Old Bailey Proceedings Online (www.oldbaileyonline.org, version 6.0, 25 October 2014), January 1816 (18160110).

Old Bailey Proceedings, 10th January 1816.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the PEACE, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND ALSO THE GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, HELD AT Justice-hall, in the Old Bailey, On WEDNESDAY, the 10th of JANUARY, 1816; and following days; BEING THE SECOND SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF The Right Honourable MATTHEW WOOD , LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY J. A. DOWLING, CLEMENT'S INN.

LONDON: PRINTED AND PUBLISHED,(BY THE AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON.) BY R. BUTTERS, NO. 22, FETTER-LANE, FLEET-STREET.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON.

Before the Right Honourable MATTHEW WOOD , Esq. Lord Mayor of the City of London; the Right Honourable Lord Chief Baron Thompson , one of the Judges of his Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Mr. Baron Richards , one of the Barons of His Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Mr. Justice Dallas , one of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; James Cox , esq. Thomas Smith , esq; Christopher Smith , esq. Aldermen of the said City; Sir John Sylvester , bart. Recorder of the said City; Sir William Domville , bart. Sir James Shaw , bart. M. P. Sir Charles Flower , bart. Aldermen of the said City, and Newman Knowlys , esq. Common Serjeant of the said City. His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of Goal Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

London Jury.

Daniel Boggis ,

Gregory Jarman ,

Robert Huxley ,

Samuel Price ,

Thomas Brown ,

William Sharp Hutchinson ,

William Boran ,

William Swift ,

Thomas Fountain ,

Daniel Deacon ,

William Wright ,

James Waylet .

First Middlesex Jury.

George Hammond ,

Matthew Masterman ,

Henry Nicholl ,

John Hammond ,

Henry Pulford ,

John Finney ,

Charles Mason ,

Thomas Buckland ,

Robert Marlyn ,

George Kemble ,

Charles Read ,

Charles Ruthwell .

Second Middlesex jury.

John Mackel ,

Richard Lyster ,

John Bentley ,

James Gadd ,

Samuel Harbone ,

Henry Coterell ,

Thomas Simms ,

Richard Huggas ,

Edward Woodger ,

John Usborne ,

James Hunt ,

John Halsey .

167. JOHN KELLY , THOMAS PRITCHARD , and JOHN SIMPSON , were indicted for stealing, on the 9th of November , three pints of rum, value 2s. the property of John Sage .

ANOTHER COUNT, stating it to be the property of the West India Dock Company .

JAMES OLLEY HUDSON. I belong to the West India Docks. I delivered fifty-two puncheons of rum out, which had been imported in the ship Knapton, Captain Christie. Amongst others, I delivered No. 9, nearly full; I delivered them all to the care of William Weston , a watchman, at about three o'clock in the afternoon, in the Ducks.

WILLIAM WESTON. I am an extra watchman of the Excise. On the 9th of November last, I was on duty, and the last witness delivered the rum into my charge; it was bunged, and there were tins over the bungs. I saw them put into a lighter, and I watched them, until I was relieved, which was at six o'clock, by John Kelly, he is an extra watchman in the service of the Excise. Up to the time that I was relieved, the rum was not touched, for I was on board the craft.

Cross-examined by Mr. Andrews. They remained about half an hour before they were put into the lighter, during which time I employed myself going to the Excise office with samples; it is an Excise office just outside the Dock gates.

WILLIAM RAWLINSON . I am a lighterman to Mr. Suge. On the 9th of November, I received twenty-two puncheons of rum from the last witness, and they were put into my barge from the crane on the Quay. I remained on board until they weremoved into the Guter Basin. I left the craft at a little after five in the evening, and Weston was taking care of it. When I returned in the morning, I found Kelly in custody.

JACOB FELTON . I am an extra watchman in the Excise. On the evening of the 9th of November, I went on duty at the Basin of the West India Docks, at six o'clock. At about ten o'clock, I observed a man walking along side of the Basin, towards whom I went, suspecting, I said, is it you Kelly; the prisoner Kelly, said yes, and I turned back with him. He told me he had a charge of coffee and complained to me very much of the constables interrupting him in having a fire. I told him I thought he might do very well without fire. When we parted, he went on board a lighter, and then I went round the basin. I saw a light on board the barge that the prisoner went to. I met Pugh, and we got two constables, and went on board the barge. When we got on board we hallooed, and John Kelly opened the hatch-way; I took the lanthorn from Pugh, and went down the hatch-way into the cabin; I found the two prisoners, Pritchard and Simpson, both laying down on the floor opposite the door. Kelly went and sat himself down at one end of the the cabin. There was a large fire, which is a thing not allowed. I bid the constable, Thomas Tatham, to search, and I saw him find a tin pot, about half full of warm grog, and by Kelly's side was a bladder, with three parts of a pint of rum in it, together with a gimblet, and a spoil. The barge in which we found Kelly, was a sugar lighter, that Simpson had the care of; Pritchard had the charge of the next barge, which was a rum lighter, and he is an extra Excise watchman. I examined the twenty-two casks of rum in Kelly's barge, and we found the side of cask No. 9, with a spoil in it, and leaking. The prisoners refused to surrender themselves to the constables, and we went to the guard-house, and got a file of men.

EDWARD PUGH . Corroborated the testimony of the last witness.

THOMAS TATHAM . Was a constable, and also corroborated the testomony of Felton.

JOHN FIELD. I am surveyor of imports at the West India Docks. I gauged the cask No. 9, and upon calculation, there are about three pints missing; I found one inch and a qaarter dry.

Cross-examined by Mr. Andrews. We can bring the gauge within half a gallon; but we can't come within a pint, or two pints; the operation is more perfectly performed when the cask is nearly full.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson

168. WILLIAM JEFFORD was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Kerslake , at about the hour of four in the night of the 22nd of December , with intent to steal .

JOHN KERSLAKE. I live at the Crown, Essex-street, in the Strand . I went to bed at about two o'clock, on the morning of the 22nd of December,leaving my house perfectly secure in all respects; more particularly that night, as I had been robbed the night previous. At about four o'clock in the morning, we were awakened by a strange noise; it was very dark; my wife got up; she is not here; the sweeps were to come at about five o'clock; she got up and let them in at that hour. In consequence of what she came and told me, I went down, and found the cellar door out side the house broken, and the grated one outside in the street also broken. I called the watchman, and found the prisoner in the back cellar.

Prisoner's Defence. On Friday fortnight, I went to Mr. Kerslake's, as usual; Mr. Kerslake desired me to go into the cellar to remove some pig's dung, and unfortunately I was led to drink some brandy at the cock, which took such an effect upon me, that I layed down on the coals, and I fell asleep. When I awakened in the morning, I found myself in the dark, and could not remember where I was, and I tried to get out, and that piece of wood came off by pulling the door. When they came in, I was not concealed by any means, I stood up. When I was searched, there was no instruments of house-breakingfound upon me, nor any thing that could shew a guilty design.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Dallas.

169. JAMES BAYNES and JAMES M'DONALD were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Frederick Davies , at about the hour of seven in the night of the 4th of January , with intent to steal, and for burglariously stealing therein, three brushes, value 4s. his property.

FREDERICK DAVIES. I live at 38, Little Poulteney-street, Golden-square . On the 4th of January, at about a quarter before seven, I was in a little back room behind my shop, and on my being called out, I found Johnson, and another, handcuffing the prisoners in my shop; it was dark.

BENJAMIN JOHNSON . I am a City officer. On the evening of the 4th, I was going through St. Giles's, in company with Woodroffe, towards a place called the Seven Dials, and I observed the two prisoners; I followed them, suspecting they were going to commit some crime. They went to Crown-street, by the prosecutor's window; they walked to and fro, beside the shop in the court. The old prisoner tried the door several times, kept trying the Jatch, and watching the window. I desired Woodroffe to go to the other end of the court, to prevent the boy from going away. The man attempted the latch several times; then he took both hands and lifted it up, and went into the shop. In about a quarter of a minute, he came out, with something under his coat; Woodroffe apprehended him, and I took the boy; we shoved them both into the shop, and searched them; under the old man's coat we found the brushes, and we handcuffed them both together.

Prosecutor. I know these brushes are mine; I saw the witness in the act of taking them from under the coat of the old man.

Benjamin Johnson . The old man and the boy were together; I followed them from a house in Seven Dials, where they all come from.

GEORGE WOODROFFE . I was in company with Johnson; in crossing the Seven Dials, we saw the prisoners; I knew Baynes; I did not know M'-Donald. The latch going rather hard, the old man was obliged to use his left hand likewise; in the space of a quarter of a minute he came out, with something under his coat, and I laid hold of him.

Baynes's Defence. I have served his Majesty twenty-three years, and ever since that I have known nothing but poverty and sickness; I know nothing of the boy, nor be of me.

BAYNES, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 53.

M'DONALD, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Richards .

170. MARY CONNOLLY was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Bannister , the elder , about the hour of eleven in the night of the 25th of December, 1815 , with intent to steal, and for burglariously stealing therein, one pair of sheets, value 5s. and two hats, value 4s. 6d. his property.

JOHN BANNISTER, THE ELDER. I live in Portland Mews , over a coach house and stable. On the night in question, I went out at about ten o'clock, I fastened the door with two bolts, and when I returned, at a little after twelve, my door was wide open, and my wife was in bed.

JOHN BANNISTER THE YOUNGER. On the night of the 25th, I came home at a little after eleven o'clock. When I came in, the under part of the door was only bolted with one bolt, and the upper part was closed to, but not fast; it was not latched; I left it the way I found it.

MARY BANNISTER . I am the wife of the first witness. There is a curtain goes across our bedroom, to keep it warm. My son had come home about half an hour, and was in bed, when I heard a sort of a scratching noise, on the green baize that was on the table. I had a candle burning in my room, and I saw the green curtain across the room move, but I had not power to get up to see what it was. I told my husband when he came in, and he went about the place, but he could not see anything. The next morning, I missed the property named in the indictment; I know they were in the premises the night before.

WILLIAM CHAPMAN. I am a patrole of the parish of St. Anns. At about four o'clock in the morning of the 26th, I was visiting the posts, and came to William Browning a watchman, at the corner of Moore-street. I stopped with him a few minutes, and then saw the prisoner coming along Compton-street, towards St. James's parish; she was coming along Compton-street. I went up to her, she looked very big and bulky, and I turned her shawl aside, and she had a little bag or pillow-case full. We stopped her, and found the articles named in the indictment on her.

JOHN BROWNING . The patrole came to know if all was well on my beat, and I was talking to him at the corner, when we saw the prisoner coming along; we stopped her, and took her to the watchhouse.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY, aged 27,

Of stealing, but not of breaking and entering .

Confined six months , and fined 1s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Thomson.

171. EDMOND PAGE , HENRY SCOTT , and RICHARD COLE , were indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of December , eighteen pairs of shoes, value 4l. the property of David M'Queen , in his dwelling house .

DAVID M'QUEEN. I am a shoe maker . On the 23rd of December last, I lived at 93, Drury-lane ; I kept a shop there, I am a house-keeper. In the evening of the 22nd, there were several people came into my shop to purchase shoes, and among others, the prisoner Page, and a lame man; I don't know who the lame man was. He tried on several pair of shoes, and none would fit him but a pair, which were unbound; Page did not want any. They said they would return in an hour and a half, when these shoeswere to be bound for them. When they were in the shop, I missed some shops; but did not take any particular notice until they were gone out; then I made a search, and missed eighteen pairs, they were tied up in three separate parcels, and when I had last seen them, I put them down towards the right hand coming into the shop. I missed some before they went out; they went past where they were. There were three men and two women in the shop besides them; this was Saturday, and a busy evening; the value was between three and four pounds.

SAMUEL LANK . I am a constable of Bow-street. On the 23rd of last month, the Saturday, I saw the three prisoners at the bar, in company with a lame man, coming out of a public-house, in New-street, Covent Garden. I suspected that there was something wrong going on, and I turned in Bedfordbury, and watched them. They had a lame man in company; the prisoners Cole and Page went on first, and the lame man and the boy, Scott, followed;they went down into Chandos-street, and thence into Maiden-lane, and through the different streets, until they came into Drury-lane; they went as direct a line as they could to this man's shop; before they stopped, they looked through the window for a minute or so, and then went about twenty yards below the shop, and had some conversation together. I placed myself on the opposite side of the way, and continued watching them. The boy, Scott, followed the lame man in; as soon as he got in, he took a bundle of shoes, and was coming out, and Page made room for him; he came out of the shop with the shoes under his arm; the prisoner, Page, was covering him while he stole the shoes in the shop. I let him go until I thought he had got out of the hearing of the other prisoners, I then took him into custody; he began hallooing, but I told him if he hallooed, I would choake him. Cole only stood and looked through the window. I left my brother officer to watch the other men. I took the shoes to the office, and locked the boy up.

WILLIAM GODFREY . I am a constable of Bow-street. I was with the former witness the whole of the time on the night in question. I saw the three prisoners come out with the lame man at the public-house; Cole was the man who went to different corners of the street, looking for the boy, not knowing that he was in custody; Page and the lame man were still in the shop at the time I returned; on their coming out, they all three joined company together. I went so near them that I could hear their conversation; I got close to their heels; I heard them in conversation in the dark, saying, they supposed the boy must have returned to the house whence they first came out of. Cole knocked the lame man down, saying, "he was going to bilk him out of his whack, he said, he would not let one out of his swagg." I took Page in custody, and took him up to the office. I could not get the other two. In about half an hour afterwards, Cole came up to the office, to know if any thing very particular happened within two hours, and I took him into custody. I searched Page, and found a bad dollar in one pocket, and a bad dollar in another pocket.

Page's Defence. This lame man owed Mr. Cole and me some money. When we met him, we asked him for it; he said, he had only got a one-pound note; but he was going to buy a pair of shoes, and if we would go with him, when he got change, he would pay us the money. We waiked with him to this shoe-maker's shop, Cole waited on the outside; the lame man could only find one pair to fit him, and that was not bound; we agreed to call again in an hour for them. We then went to have something to drink, and on coming out, the lame man said he should not know the shop again. Then Cole said he wanted to bilk him; that was an excuse not to get change. Then they fell quarrelling, and Cole made a bit at the lame man: I took the lame man's part, and was quitting the quarrel when Mr. Godfrey took me into custody.

Cole's Defence. What this young man says, is true.

PAGE, GUILTY , aged 27.

SCOTT, GUILTY , aged 12.

COLE, GUILTY , aged 32.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Richards.

172. WILLIAM COLLINS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of October , six sheep, value 12l. the property of the Rev. Robert Heale Selby Heale .

JAMES KEMPSTER . I am a shepherd to the Rev. Mr. Heale. I missed these sheep on the 8th, and had seen them safe on the 2nd; I missed six sheep that were marked with S H on their right side, and a heart on the hip. They were taken out of the flock, which consisted of two hundred and seventyfour. I have seen one at Hasefield, at Mr. Ivers's, in Middlesex, it was one of the six I am sure; the marks were remaining on it, and I knew it besides, by the nature of the sheep.

MR. IVERS. I am a farmer, at Hasefield. In the early part of October, the prisoner came to me, it was either on a Monday, or a Tuesday; I don't specify which; he brought six sheep, and he requested me to let him put them into my fields until the Thursday, when he was going to take them to market. Four were taken on the Wednesday; but I don't know by whom, one is dead, and the other is in my possession now. Mr. Heale saw the sheep that is living yesterday; he came with his steward, and my man shewed it to him. I had no sheep marked like them; mine were all marked with a single P.

ROBERT HEALE SELBY HEALE . I am a clergyman; but know nothing of the loss of my sheep, but what was told me. I saw one of my sheep at the last witness's yesterday.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought the sheep at Chesham Fair, and gave the full valuation for them.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 56.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Richards .

173. THOMAS MULLCOCK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of December , two heiffers, value 16l. the property of Charles Burrell .

PETER WARD. I am a servant to Mr. Burrell,who lives out near Waltham Abbey ; he is a farmer ;hecked some cattle at Monkton Farm , which is about four miles from my master's; he had twenty head of cattle there in November last; I was there on the 20th of November; I went to look at the beasts, and counted them; they were all right,twenty in number. I went again on Tuesday afternoon, and there were two missing; they were two red sided ones with white backs; one was rather heavier than the other; the heaviest was rather the darkest red; the horns of the lightest stood straight from her head, and the other's stood rather wider; there had been a mark of C.M. but I am not sure whether that was not worn out; we had had them the greatest part of the summer; one came in the summer, and we had had the other the greatest part of the year. I had frequent opportunities of seeing them; they were both heiffers; they were missing in the afternoon; I went directly after dinner, and got there at about two or three o'clock, as near as I can guess, and then I missed them. I have seen the hydes doubled up, but have not seen them opened. Mr. Burrell has no partner.

WILLIAM GREGORY. I am a labourer, at Chigwell; I am now in the employ of Mr. Hatton, of Barking. I know the prisoner at the bar; I can't say when I happened to meet him, on what day of the month; I can't say whether it was in the beginning or at the end of the month; but it was on a Monday; I met him at the Bald Hind public-house, at Chigwell; there was another young man with me, named John Wright . The prisoner said,he had a conple of beasts to drive to Town; he said that to me and Wright, and asked us if we could help him to drive them to Town. I and Wright told him we had nothing to do, and we would. He said,he must go and see the man, to know which two to take, and get a note from the man. It was agreed between us, that we were to meet again; we did so, both I and Wright. The prisoner said he had been, and had seen the man, and had got a note, and knew which two to take. We were to go the next morning early with him, and drive them to London; this was about five or six o'clock in the evening. We went into the field where they were,into Mr. Hawley's field, a Monkton; it was near one or two o'clock in the morning; he shewed us which two we were to take, and we took them; we took two heiffers; I don't know rightly what colour they were; there was one rather bigger than the other; they were of a brownish colour, with a white mark down the back. We selected these two, and we drove them along the road to London; we came the Lee-bridge-road. When we got to London, we took them down to the slaughter-house. The prisoner came very near to the place, which was near Smithfield; I can't say what direction he gave us, but he shewed us the street we were to go down, and he stopped until we came back; he gave us the note too; he told us we were to receive six shillings from the man; I don't know the name of the street. I and Wright went together. We got to London at about six o'clock. We delivered the note to a man in the yard; we did not receive any thing from him. The money was thrown out of the window, two three-shilling pieces. We left the brasts there. We met the prisoner in the street again, very near the place where we left him. Wright and I had the six shillings. The prisoner returned with us as far as the Spread Eagle, at Sharebrook. He was in company with me and the beasts the whole way from Lee-bridge to London; he was with us at Hackney.

Prisoner. Did you ever know me concerned in any thing of the kind before, or know any harm of me?

Witness. No.

JOHN WRIGHT . I am a labourer. I remember meeting the prisoner at the Bald Hind public-house, at Chigwell; I was in company with Gregory. The prisoner hired us to drive two beasts to Town. Gregory and I went together on the Tuesday morning. I have been in court while Gregory was giving his testimony; I have heard what he has said respecting our drivieg the beasts from Chigwell to London; Gregory's account is true. I went home after we returned.

-BACON. I am a carcas butcher; I live at Red Lion-alley, Cow Cross, Smithfield, about three hundred yards from the market Smithfield. On Tuesday morning, the 21st of November, between five and six o'clock, two heiffers were brought to me to be killed, two young men brought them to me; they brought this note, which I have in my hand; I signed my name to it to know it again.

(Note put in, and read.)

"Addressed to Mr. Bacon, Cow Cross, London.

"SIR. These are from the same party as before, and still you are to have what was promissed to you. You are to settle every thing with Mr. George Lloyd , of your place. Please to pay the bearer six shillings."

"Signed MR. JOHN KENDON ."

Mr. Bacon. I had known the prisoner before; I had seen him once; I had killed a heiffer for him before, on the 27th of September; when I paid him for the other heiffer, he promissed me a hair. I saw no marks on these two heiffers; they were red sided and white backed ones, and one was considerably heavier than the other. I can't tell about the difference of the horns. When I received that note, I chuched six shillings out of the window. I sent a a message to Mr. Lloyd. by Mr. Poole. I killed one of these heiffers on Tuesday, and not receiving any orders, I killed the other on the Wednesday; the hydes went with my own bydes to Leadenhall-market, on the Tuesday, to Mr. Warmington, who is a hyde-salesman, in Leadenhall-market. All commission beasts that I kill, I put a mark on the nose of the letters of the owner's name, and the hydes of my own beasts, I mark with three cuts. I was directed to stop the sale of the hydes, until the Friday following, which would be about the 2nd of December, and then if there was no word sent up, to sell them. I saw Mr. Barrell on Friday, the 1st of December; he came to my house, and enquired of me about two heiffers. In consequence of the conversation that passed between us, he and I went to Mr. Warmington's at Leadenhall-market; therewas a lot of hydes produced, consisting of two or three and twenty. Mr. Burrell and I turned the hydes over one at a time, and I asked him if he could tell his hydes if he saw them, and he said, he could. In the course of the turning over, he selected one, and Mr. Warmington's foreman picked the other out. On Friday, the 24th of November, I saw the prisoner at the bar; it was the very next day after I received the heiffers; I saw him at my own house; he came to know about the heiffers; he asked how I got on with them? I told him very badly. I said there hangs one, and the other is at market, not sold; the one I pointed out to him, was one of those brought by the young men to whom I threw six shillings out of the window. He said there was a considerable deal of fat; I told him, I did not think so. Then I asked him if he had seen George Lloyd ? he said, no; I want to see him. I said, if you will go up to the Greyhound, in Smithfield, you are sure of finding him there. He left me then, and I did not see him again until he was in custody.

GEORGE LLOYD . I am a beast-salesman, and live at 10, Chappel-place, Pentonville. I attend Smithfield-market. I know the prisoner at the bar very well, and have known him many years. I saw the prisoner in November last, about the 24th; I saw him about some beasts. He said to me, where have you been. I have not seen you; I said your beef is not sold; he said, I know that; I have seen one in the slaughter-house; but you can let me have a little money on them, though they are not sold. I told him I had got another person to be answerable; where was that person I had received a note on the Thursday night or Friday morning; I won't be certain which. I told him I would not give him the money until got an order from the person. He said, I can't get an order, for the man is gone into Yorkshire. He said you will let me have a pound note. I told him that Charles Bacon had got the beef, and I did not mind letting him have a pound on Charles Bacon's account I was to receive the money for the beasts, for the same party as before. The prisoner can't write himself, and the former note is different. Bacon was to slaughter the beasts, and I was to sell them. I had transactions with the prisoner before, one bullock. Bacon slaughtered the bullock, and accounted to me for the produce of it, and I settled with the prisoner for the amount of that bullock. The conversation I had with the prisoner at the bar when he asked for a pound note, was relating to the two heiffers at Bacon'.

CHARLES BURRELL . I am a farmer, living at Chigwell. I had twenty head of cattle at Monkton. On Tuesday afternoon, I was informed that some were missing, by Peter Ward . I offered a reward for the apprehension of the thief, and I described them to the best of my knowledge. One of them, the biggest, was the darkest colour; her horns stood rather up, and wide. The smallest of the two was lighter, and her horns stood rather straight from her head. I had had the large one the greater part of the summer, and the other near two years; they were heiffers, and I was well acquainted with the marks of both. I went to Mr. Bacon's on the 1st of December; I described to Mr. Bacon the heiffers I had lost; it was the same description I have now given. In consequence of that description, he and I went to Leadenhall-market, to Warmington's; there was a lot of hydes produced there, in which these two skins were. I selected one. Mr. Bacon turned the skins over, one by one, and he made a stop at some of the skins which appeared something like, saying, is that yours; I told him to keep on, and when I saw it, I would tell him the skin. He turned over one or two more, and then I said pull out that, I can swear to that; the one I fixed upon was pulled out, and I knew it belonged to the smallest of the two heiffers of which I have been speaking. One of the horns of that had been broken, and I knew it by that circumstance. When I came to the largest, I did not exactly know it at the first moment, it was very dirty, and I was not positive at the moment; I have since known it to the hyde of the biggest beast; I knew it from the colour, and part of the old pitch mark, C.M. and from the horn which stood in; the pitch mark was quite visible The two heiffers had the mark of C.M. on the off side; it was rather worn out on the larger heiffer, but quite plain on the first. From all these marks, I had not the least doubt of their being my hydes, and the hydes of the two heiffers which I lost.

JAMES ALLINGTON . I am servant to Mr. Warmington, who is a hyde salesman, in Leadenhall-market. In the latter end of November last, I received a parcel of hydes from Mr. Bacon; it was on a Tuesday, I took away a dozen; I took them to Leadenhall-market. After I had taken them, I received directions from Mr. Bacon to stop the sale of the two hydes in question, until Mr. Burrel saw them. These are them.

(Hydes produced,)

James Burrell . Those are my hydes; I know them by the marks I have described.

Prisoner's Defence. I met Mr. Kendon, and he asked me to go with him to take two heiffers to drive to Town. I went with him to the field where they were, and he tied his horse to the gate, and he went in with me, and told me to drive up two, which he pointed out; but they were so wild, I could not. He asked me if I would know them again; I told him I should, and he asked me if I would drive them to Cow Cross, Smithfield; he told me to get somebody to help me, and I got the two young men. I have lived with Admiral Harvey as land bailiff, and my prosecutor has known me upwards of twenty years.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 45.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Dallas.

174. GEORGE CLARKE was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Josiah Parker , at about the hour of seven in the night of the 15th of December , with intent to steal,and for burglariously stealing therein, one counterpane, value 1l. and four yards of muslin, value 5s. his property.

JOSIAH PARKER . I keep a ready-made linen warehouse , No. 14, St. John-street, Clerkenwell ; I am a shop-keeper there; my shop is part of my house; it is in the parish of St. James's Clerkenwell. On the 15th of December, in the evening, between six and seven o'clock.

Q. Was it quite dark - A. It was a full moon.

Q. Except the moon, was it otherwise dark - A. Yes, quite dark.

Q. Did you hear any noise - A. Yes, by the breaking of the window; I was behind the counter, just by it, when I heard the window break; it was the shop window; I was within a yard and a half of the place; I heard the noise, and then turned round to see what it was, and I discovered the prisoner attempting to take out two counterpanes; they were within the shop, on the inside of the window that was broken; he could not get at them without breaking the window; he had hold of them when I saw him; I had something on the counter, and ran round, and at the time I came round, he thought he had secured the two counterpanes, and he was pulling the other articles off the lines; I laid hold of these articles that he was forcing out of the shop; there was a piece of corded muslin; his strength was superior to mine, and he forced me against the broken glass; I called stop thief two or three times through the broken hole; he had these articles which he got from the lines; he forced them out of my hands, and he then ran away; he had-tied the door; but I opened it, so that I forced my way through, and pursued him; I cried stop thief! and I think he got the distance of about one hundred and fifty yards, when a person came up, and laid hold of him; this person came up, and attempted to stop him, and he dropped the goods, and then ran off, and I picked up the articles.

Q. From the time you saw him in struggling with you, until he was stopped, was he out of your sight - A. There is just going out of the house a bin, and I did not see him for that; but I got sight of him before he was stopped. I picked up the things; the things I picked up, where the things I lost out of my shop.

(Property produced.)

Prosecutor. This is the kind of muslin that I lost, and I believe this is it; it was muddy when I picked it up; I can swear to it from the manner it was cut out. There is nothing in the counterpane that I could swear to; but a counterpane was missing, and he took away a counterpane.

FRANCIS PRINCE . I stopped the prisoner; he was running, with the property; I first made an attempt to stop him, and he dropped it, and then I followed him, until I secured him, by the assistance of one of the patroles, in Spa-fields; he was detained, and we took him to the watchhouse.

-WINTESTON. I am a patrole. I heard the alarm of stop thief; I saw the prisoner coming across the fields, and I made across the fields, and I made towards him, until he crossed the ditch, with the last witness after him; he came up towards me when he crossed the ditch; I took him in charge, and took him to the watchhouse.

WILLIAM READ . I am an officer of Hatton Garden. The prisoner and the property were delivered into my charge; I have had the property ever since.

Prosecutor. The value of the muslin is about five or six shillings; I can't speak correctly, for I don't know the number of yards; but it is between four and five shillings.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming up St. John-street, and I crossed over to Corporation-row, and picked up these goods on the ground; I saw them laying down. I am a stranger in London; I heard the cry of stop thief; I was frightened, and ran away; when I ran into Spa-fields, they took me into custody. I have got no friends at all in London.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 24.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Dallas.

175. JOHN SEYMOUR was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of December , two pieces of toilenet, value 5l. the property of George Hunter Hodgson , in the dwelling of John Buckley .

GEORGE HUNTER HODGSON . I am a manchester warehouse-man ; I live at 23, Lawrance-lane ; it is in the dwelling-house of John Buckley . On the 28th, between five and half past, I caught the prisoner at the bar, with two pieces of toilenet, my property, in his hands; he was just putting them into a sack, with another person. On the morning of the 26th, I missed some particular goods, and I suspected that they must have been taken out of the warehouse while they were shutting it up, for one part of our warehouse goes into the Blossom-innyard, and on this evening, I said, I would wait, and the prisoner came in at the street door, into the warehouse door, which was a little open, and there was another person holding a sack for him to put these pieces of toilenet into. I could not see him in the warehouse, because it was so dark; but I saw him in the passage leading to the warehouse.

JOHN HUGHES. I am warehouse-man; I live next door to Mr. Hodgson. On the evening of the 28th, at about a quarter or half past five, I was sitting in my counting-house, when I heard an alarm of stop thief! I rushed out as quickley as I could; I found Mr. Hedgson with the prisoner at the bar by the collar, and he was coming out after some other man, then out of sight, and the two pieces of toilenet were laying on the threshold of the door, in the passage of Mr. Berkley, leading to Mr. Hodgson's warehouse.

THOMAS-. I am an officer. I know nothing more than producing the property.

George Hunter Hodgson . That is my toilenet, it is my property. There is but one common entrance into Mr. Buckley's house, and my warehouse. The lowest value is five pounds.

Prisoner's Defence. I fell in with a shipmate that night; he was going into Cheapside, and he said, he had got to go into a gentleman's house, and he went up and brought these things out, and asked meto put them into the bag for him, while he held it open, and then that gentleman seized me.

Prosecutor, I could not see him come out of the ware-house, because it was so dark, but I saw him in the passage with the goods, and I saw the other person who is not here, come from the other side of the way, and open the bag for him to put them in; and I took him in the altitude of putting them in.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 20.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

176. JOHN DAVIS was indicted for assaulting Robert Shute , in the King's highway. on the 5th of January , for putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, two reams of paper, value 40s. the property of Edward Harrison .

ROBERT SHUTE . I am a paper-ruler ; I am servant to Mr. Gadnay, who is a paper-ruler; he lives at No. 2, Maiden-head-court, Moore-lane, Fore-street, Cripplegate. On Friday evening, at about six o'clock, I was in Cloth Fair; I had a parcel, I was bringing it from Mr. Harrison's, at Smithfield Bars; I was going to cross to Mr. Gadnay's, a man came behind me, and put his hand on my mouth, and threw me down, and took my parcel from me; I gave the alarm of stop thief, and he ran away with it, and he found it was too heavy, and he dropped it. I am sure it was the prisoner. I ran after him; I saw him with the bundle, as he ran away, and as I was running after him. I saw him drop it; he was stopped very soon. I had lost sight of him just before he was stopped; he was taken directly. I am sure he is the man who took the parcel from me; there was a light that I could see him; throwing of me down, I could see his face.

Prisoner. What had I on?

Witness. He had a light coat, and I did not take any notice much of any thing else.

JAMES CUNNINGHAM. I am a milk-man. On Friday evening, I went into Cloth Fair, with intent of buying a milk-walk. I was sitting down for some time, and I heard the cry of stop thief; I got up, and went to the door, and saw the prisoner at the bar run; I pursued him; he turned round a corner, and I caught him there; I lost sight of him just whilst he got round the corner; I caught him immediately; not two hundred yards from where I was sitting down; I brought him back to the house I came out of; he had no hat when I caught him; he had a light coloured coat on. I ordered a light to be brought to the door, that the boy might be sure; the light was brought, and I asked the boy if that was the man, and he said he was. I asked the prisoner where he lived; he said in Whitechapel. I asked him, had he come from Whitechapel without a hat, but he made no reply. He said, he had been seeing a friend of his named Long, home. He stood behind a shutter when I caught him.

(Property produced.)

EDWARD. HARRISON. This is my property; it is the bundle I gave to the boy; it contains two re ins of foolscap paper.

Robert Shute . That is the same bundle.

Prisoner's Defence. I stopped, and then he said he would bring me back to the boy, for I was the man.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 25.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

177. JOHN THOMPSON and JOHN HAINES were indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of January , five pieces of cotton webb, containing one hundred and fifty yards, value 30l. and one piece of canvass, value 1s. 6d. the property of John Nicholson , in his dwelling-house .

JOHN NICHOLSON . I am a wholesale hosier ;I live at 60, Watling-street. I lost these things on last Tuesday morning, the 2nd of January; a bale containing five pieces was delivered at my warehouse; my warehouse-man received it from Pickford.

FRANCIS HILL. I am warehouse-man to the last witness. A truss containing these goods was delivered to us on Tuesday week; I received it at about half past twelve at noon.

JOSEPH CORDINGLY . I am a Manchester warehouseman. At about half past twelve o'clock, on Tuesday, the 2nd of January, I was standing at our warehouse door, in Size-lane, talking with a person of the warehouse, and the two prisoners at the bar passed by; I looked at them, and saw that they were the same I had seen in Lawrence-lane the day before. I followed them down Size-lane, into Budgerow, along Watling-street, and I met with an officer in Red Lion-court, and pointed them out to him. I turned down Bread-street, and went into Little Friday-street, where I saw the prisoner Thompson with a truss on his shoulder; I walked on gently after him, on the contrary side of the way, and Haines, who was behind, observed me noticing Thompson, and called out "old one" I passed, and stopped him with the truss; I asked him where he got it from; he said, if I would go with him, he would shew me; Haines also stopped. I gave the truss in charge of Shipton, the ticket-porter, who took it into a house, with me, and the two prisoners. I sent for the officer, Jackson, and had them immediately conveyed before the sitting Alderman. I never lost sight of this man with the parcel.

(Truss produced.)

WILLIAM BUNTING . I am a porter, and delivered that truss at Mr. Nicholson's, on the 2nd of January.

Francis Hill. That is the truss I received into Mr. Nicholson's warehouse. I left it in the passage and four others, open to the street. The passage is part of the dwelling-house.

Joseph Cordingley . That is the truss stopped Thompson with.

JOHN JOHNSON . I am an officer, and was sent for to take the prisoners into custody. Haines said,he knew nothing of Thompson at all. I searched them, but found nothing on him.

John Nicholson . My servants live in this house. The truss and its contents are worth thirty pounds; it was taken out of the passage, which is part ofthe dwelling-house.

Thompson's Defence. I am a brush-maker, and I was imployed to carry it to the foot of Blackfriars-bridge, and I was to have a three-shilling piece for my trouble.

THOMPSON, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 23.

HAINES, NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

178. JOHN BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of December , one piece of printed cotton, containing twenty-four yards, value 2l. 15s. the property of John M'George , Thomas M'George , and George Walker March .

JOSEPH BELL . I live at Messrs. M'George, and Co's; they live at 43, Watling-street. I lost this piece of cotton on Monday, the 8th, about two o'clock, I was standing at about the center of the warehouse, and a man came in under a pretence of selling apples; I immediately ran forward to the door, and perceived the prisoner in the act of taking away the printed cotton, behind the man who had the apples in his hand, and he ran off with it; I pursued him, and he dropped it at the door, in the passage. I followed him into the street about a hundred yards, and caught him; I brought him back into the warehouse; a constable was sent for. The apple-man ran off, while I was following the prisoner. He was taken to the Compter.

(Property produced, and sworn to.)

BOSWELL BETON. I was a constable, and was sent for at Messrs. M'George's, and took the prisoner into custody; I took him to Giltspur-street Compter.

Prisoner's Defence. The man went into the warehouse, and chucked the piece of print out to me.

GUILTY , aged 14.

Confined one year , and fined 1s.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

179. GEORGE BOX was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of December , eleven yards of printed cotton, value 11s. one head-cloth of a bedstead, value 2s. and three cases of a beadstead, value 2s. the property of Nicholas Phene , the elder , Nicholas Phene , the younger , and Reuben Williamson .

NICHOLAS PHENE . I am an upholsterer ; I live in New Broad-street. I lost these things. In consequence of missing some Brussels carpetting, we had a search among the porters's lodgings. When I, and Brown, the officer, went to the lodgings of George Box , we discovered some of our property.

JOHN BROWN. I am an officer. On the 6th of December, I was sent for to Mr. Phene's, and on account of the loss of a roll of corpetting, he wished me to search Box's lodgings; in a bottom drawer in his lodging, in Old-street, I found part of a coachtop bed furniture; on searching further, I found some duplicates; one for a piece of print, for nine shillings; we went to the pawnbroker's to look at it, and it was eleven yards of new cotton. Under the bed, I found some mats, such as upholsterer's pack their goods in. I then locked the prisoner up in the Compter. I asked him how he became possessed of this property, and he said, that a woman who was lately dead, gave it to him. I then asked his wife, and she had no knowledge of it.

JAMES ROSS . I am a pawnbroker, and produce eleven yards of printed cotton; I took it in pawn from a woman who called herself Ann Box .

(Property produced, and sworn to.)

GUILTY , aged 35.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

180. GEORGE HAWKINS and GEORGE FERGUSON were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of December , one coat, value 5s. one pair of breeches, value 3s. two waistcoats, value 5s. one pair of stockings, value 6d. one handkerchief, value 6d. the property of Jesse Smith ; four pairs of stockings, value 2s. four half handkerchiefs, value 2s. the property of John Carter ; one shirt, value 1s. the property of Neil Molloy ; one pair of trowsers, value 2s. one half handkerchief, value 1s. the property of Edward Robinson ; six shillings in monies numbered, the property of Thomas Smith ; and three shillings and sixpence in monies numbered , the property of John Wertendropt .

JAMES GILLMORE . I am an officer, belonging to Queen-square. On Monday, the 11th, the prisoner Ferguson was delivered into my custody. I asked him then where he was to meet Hawkins; Hawkins had at that time absconded; he said, he was to meet him at the Swan with Two Necks, in Tothill-street,at ten that morning; but was prevented from fulfilling his engagement, by being detained in the workhouse. In consequence of that. I went to the Swan with Two Necks, and gave the landlord some directions. I was afterwards sent for by the landlord; I took these articles from the prisoner Hawkins; he was laying asleep, with his head on this bundle,(producing a bundle,) round his neck he had this handkerchief, (producing it,) which appears to be torn by getting of the Chevaux de frise. I asked him where the remainder of the things was? he admitted he had committed the robbery, but said, he got drunk, and lost the things.

"A confession of the prisoner Ferguson was here put in and read, stating, that after the rest of the paupers had retired to bed, the two prisoners broke into a certain room, termed the oakham room, where was a number of the paupers boxes, which they plundered of the various articles named in the indictment; that this spoil was to be equally divided between the prisoners. That Hawkins was discharged the next morning, and that the deponent (Ferguson,) threw the wearing apparel over the gate to him, and part caught on the chevaux-de-frise, which they could not ge off, and which led to a discovery, and to deponent (Ferguson's) detection."

(Part of the property produced, and sworn to, by the several owners.)

FERGUSON, GUILTY , aged 20.

HAWKINS, GUILTY , aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

181. ELIZABETH JACKSON was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of December , two sheets, value 6s. one candlestick, value 6d. the property of John Clarke , in a lodging-room .

ANN CLARK . I am the wife of John Clark . I let to the prisoner, a one pair back room, ready furnished, at five shillings a week; she had entered the lodging a month, when she went away; she said she lost the key; she only paid one week in the month. When she went away on the 20th, I broke open the door, and found the sheets and candlestick, which were part of the furniture let to her, gone.

WILLIAM ROBERTS . I am a pawnbroker, I produce a sheet, two towels, and a candlestick, pledged with me by the prisoner.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Confined fourteen days , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

182. JAMES WEYMAN was indicted for feloniously receiving on the 1st of April, 1812 , one timepiece, value 6l. one telescope, value 1l. and five yards of muslin, value 10s. being part, and parcel, of certain goods, the property of Joseph Covington , of which James Westbrook , and Elizabeth Phipps were, at September sessions in the same year, convicted of stealing, he well knowing them to be stolen .

No witnesses appearing, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson .

183. JOHN SHERLOCK and RICHARD WILTSHIRE were indicted for stealing, on the 17th of December , two yards of woolen cloth, value 12s. the property of Caleb Trewick , privately in his shop .

CALEB TREWICK . I live in Church-row, St. Martin's in the fields . On the morning of the 17th of December, which was a Sunday, I was up one pair of stairs, when my brother, who is about ten years old called me down stairs, telling me I was wanted; but on coming down, I found the persons who pretended to want me were gone.

WILLIAM TREWICK . I live with my brother, I am going on ten years old. My brother is a taylor , and I assist in making and mending the clothes. The two prisoners at the bar came and knocked at the door, on Sunday morning, when I was cleaning my shoes. When I opened the door, I stood in the way; they shoved me back and came in; they had not asked to come in, nor anything before that. They then took up a book which was on a board, and began to read; then Wiltshire put his hand behind him, at the same time he shewed me a coat, and said was it to sell; he put the cloth in question under the coat, and said, there my boy, here is the coat. The cloth was about two yards, and was lying on the counter behind him, and I saw him put it under the coat. Then he wrapped the coat up in a bundle, and said they could not stop any longer. They then went out together; and I called my brother; I saw them go to the next door, my brother went after them. I never saw the cloth again.

Caleb Trewick . There were two yards of mixed narrow cloth on the counter; I went to the next door in consequence of what my brother had told me, and got some information there. The next shop, is of the same description as mine. When I came to the top of Church-row, I saw a young man running, and I followed him into a wine vaults, to which there were two doors, and he went out at the other as I came in. In consequence of informatio I received I went to Bedford Bury; my brother had described Sherlock, as blind of an eye; I knew them both before by sight. Coming from Vine-street, I met both the prisoners together, I seized them both by the neck-handkerchiefs; Sherlock said I hurt his neck I brought them to the constable's door, but he was not at home. They said if I would let them loose, they would stay until the constable came; I did so, and then Wiltshire ran off immediately, and Sherlock struck me several times; I called for assistance, and a gentleman came who and helped me to take him to St. Martin's watch-house. On the following day the constable apprehended Wiltshire.

JOHN WATSON . I am a constable. On being sent for on Sunday morning, I found Sherlock at the watch-house; I secured him, and went with the prosecutor after Wiltshire, and after securing Wiltshire, I searched them both; I found nothing on either of them except three pocket handkerchiefs on Wiltshire.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson .

184. DAVID WILLIS was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of January , sixteen pounds weight of cheese, value 12s. the property of William Lockwood , privately in his shop .

WILLIAM LOCKWOOD . I am a cheese-monger , I live at No. 18, Park-street, Grosvenor-square , at about eight o'clock in the evening of the 2nd of January, I was in a back room behind the shop; and I thought I heard a noise in the shop; I went to see what it was, but I could see nobody; the shop door was wide open, and I missed some cheese from the window; I missed sixteen pounds. I followed the first that went from me, and it happened to be the prisoner, and he happened to have the cheese under his arm; I came up with him, and he threw the cheese down with both arms; he endeavoured to run away, but I ran after him, and he was tripped up; I secured him. He begged of me to forgive him, but having lost several things before, I thought proper to prosecute him.

GUILTY , aged 15.

Confined six months , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Dallas.

185. WILLIAM JOHNSON was indicted for making an assault, upon Elizabeth Deney , spinster, on the 4th of January , in the King's Highway, for putting her in fear, and taking from her person and against her will, a silk shawl, value 10s. her property.

ELIZABETH DENNY. I live in Cotton Factorycourt, Rose-lane. On the 4th of this month, I was standing with my sister, in a pork shop, in Bethnell Green , and I felt my shawl pulled from me, I cried stop thief, and this boy was afterwards caught.

JAMES BOYNE . I am a weaver. I heard the cry of stop thief, and on going down stairs, at the top ofClub-row, I stepped upon the shawl; I took it to the office.

BARNARD GLEED . I am an officer. I know nothing more than taking the prisoner into custody.The mob had got the boy, and delivered him over to me.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlnsex jury, before Mr. Baron Richards .

186. WILLIAM JOHNSON was indicted for making an assault, in the King's Highway, on the 3rd of January , on Sarah, the wife of John Bond , for putting her in fear, and taking from her person and against her will, one silk shawl, value 2l. the property of the said John Bond .

SARAH BOND. I am the wife of John Bond . I was coming along on the evening of the 3rd of January, as the bell told eight, I saw three boys in Shoreditch ; they seemed to be watching in different shops When I got to the corner of Church-street , my shawl was torn from my shoulders, it was pinned, and was torn off.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson .

187. THOMAS BATTS , ROBERT RAWLEY ,alias CONNOLY , and JOHN FARTHING , were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house. of James Poole , at about the hour of six in the night time of the 15th of December , with intent to steal and burglariously stealing therein, four yards and a half of woolen cloth value 5l. his property.

JAMES POOLE. My business is a taylor . I have a front shop, which is part of my dwelling-house. I was ordered out at five o'clock upon business, to wait upon a gentleman; it was not then quite dark. The front door opens into a passage, and I secured it upon the latch when I went out. I came back at about twenty minutes past six; I had left different pieces of cloth on the counter, and those pieces which I have lost, were on a shelf by the door. When I came back, I missed three pieces of cloth. I have never seen any of the three pieces, but the one I saw at Bow-street. I met the prisoner Rawley; he passed close on the flags, and I called out stop thief,and took him in Great Guilford-street. When I came back to my shop, I found three pieces of cloth missing.

GEORGE VAUGHAN. I belong to Bow-street. I was on duty on the 15th of December, I saw the prisoners on the 14th, at about five o'clock in the evening. I was in company with Barrett, and saw Batts and Rawlay in Gray's-inn-lane. I saw them on the 15th; I watched them until they came to Mr. Poole's house; I saw the three prisoners in company with a forth person; I was in a house opposite the prosecutor's house; I was in that house on suspicion, because we had reason for it; my attention was awakened the night before; Barrett was with me. I went to the house of Mr. Poole,and communicated something to him. I observed the three prisoners, in company with a fourth person, come up the street; they passed by Mr. Poole's door. The one that is not here, remained about five doors from Mr. Poole's; the other three came down again towards Poole's house. Farthing went to the railing, and looked over, as it he were looking into Poole's shop; as soon as he had done that; he went towards the other two prisoners, and then Batts. went into the passage of Mr. Poole's house; then he came out. Rawley then immediately went into Mr. Poole's passage, as Batts had done just before.Batts then went in twice after that. Rawley first came out. and joined in company with Farthing at the door; then they went away from the door. Then Farthing took his situation, as before, and continued to do so as if he was looking into the shop. Then Batts went in a third time. I then moved myself from the situation in which I was, and saw him lay hold of the handle of the door, which door he opened; he came out, and spoke to Rawley, who was standing at the step of the door. Batts spoke to Rawley; Rawley went into the passage; I saw him go into the shop of Mr. Poole. In about three minutes he came out, with some cloth undes his arm. He turned towards the left, towards Brutfswick-square, in company with Farthing and Batts. I saw Rawley thrown down the cloth, which I picked up. When I came across the way, I found the prosecutor had got hold of Rawley; I am sure he dropped the cloth, for he was never out of my sight. I had seen somebody running, but I did not know it was Mr. Poole. Farthing was just by Rawley at the time he was stopped. Batts and Rawley had crossed to that side of the way.

(Property sworn to.)

WILLIAM BARRETT . Corroborated the statement of the last witness, in every respect.

BATTS, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 24.

RAWLEY, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 24.

FARTHING, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 24.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Richards .

188. GEORGE WALKER was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Eliza Lebeau , at about the hour of seven in the night of the 25th of December , with intent to steal .

THOMAS TIBBOT . On the 25th of December last, I was a lodger in the dwelling-house of Mrs.Lebeau, who is a widow , and lives in the New Hackney-road ; there are other lodgers in the house. I was at home on the evening of the 25th of December, between six and seven o'clock, I heard the fall of a shutter; in consequence of this, I went down, and took a light; I went towards the window of Mrs. Sumson's room, and saw there was one of the pieces of glass broken out; it was a back window on a ground floor; the shutter was quite down upon the ground. I told my brother-in-law to give me the candle, and I undid the window, and I jumped in; when I was in the apartment, I looked round, and on the right hand, I saw something looking very dark by the bed side; I made a blow at it with a stick I had in my hand; up jumped the prisoner at the bar, to beg I would not murder him; I held him until I got assistance. He told me that Mary Lebean had brought him in at the front door; that is the daughter of the landlady. Mary Lebean came, and she said, George, did I let you in, and he said, yes, and said, did you not leadme through the passage, and shew me down stairs; she immediately ran down stairs, and denied every thing he said. I left him in charge of two or three of my friends whilst I went to get an officer.

ELIZABETH SUMSHON . I am a lodger in the house of Mrs. Lebeau; the room which was broken into was rented by me. I went out between eleven and twelve, on the 25th; before I went out, I left the shutter of my room, and every thing, safe and close. I did not come home for the night.

JOHN CRESSWELL . I am an officer. I was sent for on the 25th of December, at about eight o'clock; the prisoner at the bar was then in custody; a pane of glass had been taken out of the leaden casement, and by that means, the window had been opened. The prisoner told me that he had been told that the old lady had a goose, and having gone to dine out, he went for the purpose of getting the goose.

Prisoner's Defence. Mrs. Lebeau's daughter came to my house, and asked me to go with her. I went out, and then she asked me to come home with her. When I went home with her, she said, "there is a goose in the kitchen, will you get it for us." Then she got a light, and unbuttoned the shutter, and I got in. I was in when they found me there.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Dallas.

189. JOHN WOOD was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of December , two pieces of carpetting, value 10s. the property of John Smith .

THOMAS LANE . I am a servant employed by Mr. Smith. At about five o'clock in the evening of the 20th of December, I heard a noise at the door; I went to the door, and saw a piece of carpeting by the door; I ran out, and about twenty yards off I took the prisoner, with the property on him.

JOHN WALL. I live with Mr. Smith. I can't swear to this carpeting; that pattern is to be found in every factory in London, and whats more, I have searched over the stock, and there is not a single yard of carpeting missing.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Richards .

190. BENJAMIN FORD was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of January , one bag of cotton, value 5s. the property of John Plummer .

JOHN PLUMMER . I am a candle-wick spinner ; I live at 63, Tower-street. I sent a truck containing about eight bags of cotton to the West end of the Town. The porter had not left the house ten minutes when he returned with a constable and the prisoner.

JOHN DEERING . I am a porter to Mr. Plummer. I was going up Philpot-lane , on Tuesday evening, with this bag of cotton among others on my truck; in going up Philpot-lane, I placed my hand on the particular bag in question to prevent its falling off; I then turned round for a moment, and when I looked again, the bag was gone; it was rather dark, but I turned back, and saw the prisoner with the bag under his arm; that was in Philpot-lane; I made towards where I saw him, and he ran across the street, and then he dropped it; I picked it up, and he ran away. I ran after him, and cried stop thief; then he was stopped in East Cheap. I am sure he is the man; I never lost sight of him. I got a constable, and took him to my master's.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

191. JOHN EARL was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of December , two three-shilling pieces,and three shillings in monies numbered, the property of Joseph Cole , from the person of Margaret, his wife .

MARGARET COLE . My husband is a shoe-maker . I lost my money on the 23rd of September, between eleven and ten at night; I went into a pawnbroker's shop, in London Wall , to redeem an article that was in pledge; I had nine shillings in a little box in my pocket. Whilst I was counting a shillings worth of penny pieces, and I found the prisoner with his hand in my pocket; then to be satisfied before; I put my hand in my pocket, and had not a farthing. The young man searched the boy, but the money was not found on him, because there were three boys behind him, who ran away.

DANIEL JONES . I am a constable of the night. The prisoner was brought in to me. I searched him as soon as he came in; but found nothing on him.

Prisoner's Defence. I went in to get a coat and a hat out, and a pair of breeches. I was standing by this woman, and she accused me of picking her pocket; I was searched in the shop by the master, and nothing was found on me; then I was taken to the Compter.

GUILTY , aged 13.

Confined three months , and whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

192. THOMAS BALL was indicted for stealing. on the 4th of January , three pounds four ounces of tea, value 3s. 9d. the property of Merchants of England, trading to the East Indies .

WILLIAM BARBER . I am an elder in the warehouses of the East India Company; the prisoner was a supernumery labourer ; between the hours of twelve and one, on the 4th of January last, Mr. Stockwell, the warehouse-keeper, came round the warehouses; I was with him, and Mr. Hemmet; when we came to the second floor, we discovered the prisoner standing in an alley, in a separate room from where he ought to have been at work. I asked him what he did there? his answer was, that he had been spreading some teas. Mr. Stockwell desired me to bring him out of the alley, and search him; I did so, and found twenty ounces of tea on him. In his left hand coat pocket, was a bag containing twelve ounces, and in each breeches pocket were four ounces; the bag has a string and two rings; so that it may hang down in the small-cloths, and not be perceived.

(Tea produced.)

William Barber . It is green twankay tea, andworth about three shillings and ninepence; that is without the duty; the duty is ninety-five per cent.

GUILTY , aged 33.

Confined six months , and fined 1s.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

193. JOHN JACOBS was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of January , a watch, value 3l. and a 5l. bank note , the property of William Dickson .

WILLIAM DICKSON. I am master of a ship . My watch was taken from me by fraud, upon the 2nd of this month. I was going up Tower-hill, close by the Trinity House, and there was a person in the habit of a sailor, in company with another man, who was a Jew; it was between eleven and twelve, on Tower-hill that I met the prisoner, there was another person with him, like a Jew. The prisoner was dressed in a blue jacket, and canvass trowsers,and was dressed like a sailor. The sailor appeared as if he was selling a watch to the Jew; he tapped me on the shoulder, and asked me if I wanted to buy a good watch; I told him I had a very good one, and by no means wanted his. I told him I had no money to purchase his watch. He told me he was forced to sell her for want of money, and he said, sooner than he would let the b-y Jew have the watch, he would let me have a bargain of it. I told him I wanted no bargain of him, nor did I wish to have any thing to do with the watch; but I told him if he was in want of money to stop a little;accordingly I went away, and did my own business. When I came back, I found the sailor in the same place; the Jew said, if I would buy the watch, he would give me ten or eleven guineas for it; that was while I was away. When I came back the prisoner still wanted to sell me the watch. Then we went into a public-house. I told him I had no means of buying it, nor was I a judge. He told me he was forced to sell her, as he had no money, and she cost him fourteen guineas; he said he bought her in Liverpool, or some other sea port. I told him I would not buy the watch; but if he was so much in want of money, I should give him my watch, and a little money for his watch; I gave him five pounds and my watch, and he was to return it in three days after, and I was to have his watch the while. I parted with the money merely to help him, as he made believe to be distressed. When I went out of the public-house, the Jew asked me if I had bought the watch; I told him no; but I had relieved the sailor. I never saw the man afterwards until the day after, nor did I ever see my watch again, or money.

Cross-examined by Mr. Adolphus. I told the prisoner to come to Mr. Lacey's, at the end of three days, and he was committed and put into prison before the three days had expired; so that he could not return at the end of three days. I went to Mr. Morris, in the Minories, and he told me it was a comple take in.

ISAAC LE PLASTRIERE. I am a watch-maker. I look at the watch given by the prisoner to the prosecutor; it is a very common watch; it is capped with a mock jewel, and may be worth thirty-eight or forty shillings.

JOHN DICKSON SMITH . At a quarter before two, last Tuesday week, I saw a crowd at the foot of the watchhouse, and I saw a sailor had hold of the prisoner, who was charged with robbing him of his watch, in Oxford-street. I found these two watches on him.

Isaac Le Plastriere . These watches are of the same manufacture, and of the same value.

Prisoner's Defence. I never saw the prosecutor at all in my life; it is quite a mistake.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

194. WILLIAM WHITE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of December , two pieces of printed cotton, containing forty yards, value 40s. the property of Stephen Eaten Eland , and John Baker Eland .

HENRY KEMER . I am shopman to the prosecutors. On the 9th of December, between the hours of twelve and one, I was in the window, and I heard somebody at the door say, there is a man ran away with two pieces of cloth; I ran out at the door, and found that he had turned up the adjoining court to our door, with the two pieces. I followed him with the two pieces, and collared him, and brought him back to the shop. He remarked at the time that he was only going to shew them to a woman. These two pieces had been standing at the door.

(Property produced, and sworn to.)

GUILTY , aged 30.

Confined six months , and fined 1s.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

195. JOHN BUTTERS was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of January , three dollars, and a three-shilling piece, and a shilling , the property of Lewis Thompson .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded .

GUILTY.

Confined six months , and fined 1s.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

196. BENJAMIN ROGERS was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of December , one shoe,value 5s. the property of James Golding , from his person .

JAMES GOLDING . I am a porter . At about half past twelve at night, I was coming home from the shoe-maker's, with both these shoes in my hand; the prisoner tried to get both these shoes from me, and snatched one, and ran away with it; I called out watch, and took him. They came out of Fieldlane, about four or five of them, and surrounded me.

DARBY CONNOR. I am a watchman of St. Andrew's parish, and assisted in taking the prisoner.

The prisoner called the following witness.

HENRY JEFFERIES. I am a bricklayer, and saw this business. The prosecutor knocked this Ben Rogers down, and the shoes were never out ofhis hand; I will swear that I never go to the Hare.

Prosecutor. I never saw that young man before. The prisoner took the shoe out of my hand, and I am quite sure he is the man. I never knocked him down; I called stop thief!

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

197. JOHN EDWARDS was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of December , a writing-desk,value 29s. the property of George Adams , and James Adams .

GEORGE ADAMS . I am an upholsterer , and live in Fore-street . Between three and four o'clock in the afternoon of the 20th of December, I was in a shop of ours, which is opposite to the one from which the desk in question was stolen. I observed the prisoner, in company with another man, and rather suspected them. The prisoner opened the shop door, and went in, and brought out this desk.I immediately crossed over, and stopped him with it.

Prisoner's Defence. I shewed the gentleman the person that sent me in for the desk; it was the man that was in company with me.

(Property produced, and sworn to.)

GUILTY , aged 17.

Confined six months , and fined 1s.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

198. MARY SULLIVAN was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of December , two pillows, value 6s. one counterpane, value 5s. a pillow-case, value 1s. and one sheet, value 5s. the property of William Tunstile , in a lodging-room .

WILLIAM TUNSTILE. I live at the George, Beech-street, Barbican . I let the prisoner one room at the top of the house, ready furnished; she said, her husband worked in the Docks; a man lived with her, who appeared to be her husband.

Prisoner. He is my lawful husband.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

199. THOMAS BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of December , nine pounds weight of soap, value 6s. 6d. and one sheet, value 1s. 6d. the property of the Trustees of a certain Society, called the Refuge for the Destitute .

JOSEPH HOSKINS . I am the master of the Refuge. In consequence of some suspicion. I searched the house of the prisoner, and found a quantity of soap, and a sheet; how he came possessed of them, I don't know; he was not a servant in the house.

SARAH TURNER. I am a laundry-maid, to the Refuge. I don't know the soap, but I know the sheet; it has exactly my mark upon it.

ANTHONY CAVALIER . I apprehended the prisoner.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

200. JOHN GROVES was indicted for stealing on the 23rd of December , six flannel waistcoats, value 24s. five pairs of gaiters, value 1s. and fifteen jackets, value 5l. the property of William Berry .

WILLIAM BERRY . I am an inn keeper ; I keep the Bell Inn , Warwick-lane. My flannel waistcoats were lost in going in a truss by my cart, driven by Gibson, in Jerrand Hall, Basing-lane, on Saturday the 23rd of December.

SAMUEL GIBSON . I lost this truss out of my cart; I believe in Christian-street, Spital fields .

SAMUEL DAWSON . My wife and I were going up Dorset-street, Spital Fields; as I turned round, I saw a young fellow run by me in velveteen breeches and jacket; and I saw the prisoner run down with the truss under his arm. I lost sight of him in the corner. I crossed, and the prisoner threw the truss down, and ran as fast as his legs could carry him. I was informed he was taken, and brought back. The prisoner is the man I saw with the truss.

THOMAS JEFFERIES. I was in Red Lion-street. I saw the bundle in the kennel, and took the prisones after running after him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY , aged 38.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

201. THOMAS BUTT and JOSEPH CASSIMERE were indicted for stealing, on the 19th of December , one pound fourteen ounces of silk, value 3l. 14s. the property of Mary Lewis , widow , privately in her shop .

MARY LEWES . I am a widow, I live at No. 48, Cheyney Walk, Chelsea , I have a shop there. The silk in question was on the counter at four o'clock, and we missed it at half past eight in the evening; it was sewing silk. Sarah Jones assists in my shop, she is not here.

WILLIAM BARRETT. I am acting as a Bow-street officer. On the 19th of last month, I was in company with Johnson, and Woodroffe, in the Strand; I saw the two prisoners at the opposite side of the way. knowing their characters, I took notice of them. I saw something underneath Butt's coat; we watched their motions for about an hundred yards; seeing them speak to each other; this was a little after six. I caught hold of Butts, and Johnson caught hold of Cassimere. I asked Butts what he had got, and he said nothing. I unbuttoned his coat, and took that bundle of silk, (producing it.) I asked him where he got it, and where he meant to take it to. He hesitated some time, and could not satisfy us, only that he had picked it up in Scotland yard. When I took it from him, this handkerchief was over it;he said he picked it up; I told him that could not be, for it was a very dirty night, and the bundle was quite clean. We then took them to Bow-street. By the letters C. H. we guessed it belonged either to somebody at Charing Cross, Cheapside, or Chelsea; at last we found it belonged to the prosecutrix.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

BENJAMIN JOHNSON. Corroborated the account of the last witness.

BUTT, GUILTY, aged 15,

CASSIMERE, GUILTY, aged 16,

Of stealing, but not privately .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

202. ELIZABETH HAZELTON was indicted for that she on the 14th of December , feloniously, knowingly, and willingly, had in her custody and possession, three counterfeit bank-notes, made with intent to resemble the bank-notes issued by the Governour and company of the Bank of England , she well knowing the same to be counterfeit .

JOHN FOY . I am an officer of the public office,Marlborough-street. On the 14th of December last, I was in company with Mr. Glover, who is an inspector of the Bank. In consequence of information which I received, I went to Ward's-row, Bethnell Green. I had watched the prisoner there a day or two before; I saw her coming from No. 9, Ward's-row. Upon seeing her, I took her into custody, I told her she was in custody, and I must search her; she said very well. I found on her a purse, in which was upwards of thirty pounds in good notes, some gold, and a key of a box; we were at this time at a public-house. I told her to sit down, whilst I examined the notes; she did so, and on finding the notes were good, I asked her if she had any other notes good or bad in her possession? she said not any. I proceeded to search her I was about to unbutton her pelisse, when she drew a small paper parcel from her bosom, and gave it to me saying, there sir, here they are, take them. Before I opened the parcel, I asked her what it contained? and she said forged notes, I have not had them in my possession above three minutes. I asked her if she had got any more, and she said not any. I told her I must proceed in searching her, and I did so. Underneath the underpart of her stays I found another small parcel, which contained twelve one-pound notes; they were all bad notes. I then sent her to the office, and I went to No. 9, Ward's-row, and saw Mr. Nightingale; I asked him where the prisoner's room was, describing her to him; he pointed out the room, and unlocked the door, he did in point of fact open the door. In that room I found a box, which I unlocked with the key I found on the prisoner; and in it I found two hundred and fifty four one-pound bad notes; and ninety nine two pound notes all bad. I took them and the box and Mr. Nightingale to the office in Marlborough-street. On Nightingales going into the room where she was, he taxed her with having brought him into trouble, by placing forged notes in his house. She said you have nothing to do with it, the room, the box, and the notes are mine, and I will take all consequences on myself. She requested I would let him out of custody; she said she had hired the room of him, under a pretence of putting contraband goods there. I marked the notes I took from her person. (Notes put into the hand of witness.) These are the ten one-pound notes I took from her bosom, I marked them, and delivered them to Mr. Glover. (Other notes put into the hand of the witness.) These are the twelve, I took from under her stays; they are also marked. (Other notes put into the hands of the witness.) These are the notes I found in her room, in her box; they are also marked. I asked her where she procured them, and she said that she would never tell.

THOMAS GLOVER. I am inspector of the Banknotes, of the Bank of England. I accompained the last witness Foy; I saw the notes taken from her person, but did not see those found that were in the box.(Three notes taken from the parcel found in the prisoner's bosom, and put into the hands of the witness.) These are all forged; the remaining seven of this parcel are also forged; also the twelve in the other parcel are forged. All the notes are of the same kind of filling up. All the signatures are the same hand writing; all the two-pound notes are from the same plate, and all filled up alike; they are all forged.

JOHN NIGHTINGALE . I lived at No. 9, Ward's-row, Bethnell Green; I keep a chandler's shop there. The prisoner at the bar came to take a room about three weeks before she was taken; she had a three pair back room in my house. In two or three days she brought a box. She told me she was a widow woman, and dealt in shawls and handkerchiefs, as a pedlar, and was very seldom in London.

Prisoner's Defence. I am entirely innocent of the charge; I found the parcel, and when I discovered it contained Bank-notes, I thought I had found a fortune. I advertized them, and when nobody answered, I kept them as my own. When I went out in the day in question, I put the two parcels in my bosom, which Mr. Foy found,

GUILTY , aged 34.

Transported for fourteen Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Dallas.

203. JAMES TREE was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of December , a pelisse, value 25s. the property of John Elliott , paivately in his shop .

ELIZABETH ELLIOTT . My husband's name is John. At the time this affair happened, we lived in Mary-le-bone-lane; we sold clothes of all descriptions. On the 20th of December, the prisoner at the bar came into my shop, and asked the price of a watch; I told him it was twenty five shillings. He looked at the watch, and went away without bidding any money for it. In a minute or two afterwards,he came in, and offered twenty three shillings for the watch; I told him, I could not take it. He turned his back to go out of the shop, and I went into the parlour. The pelisse in question was hanging inside the door, inside the door-way leading to the street; the door is open all day; there were two articles hung at the door before it; it was within the prisoner's reach at the door. A man came and told me that a man had ran away with the pelisse. I asked him to run after him, and he went together with another young man, named John Brooks . He might not have been in the shop when he took the pelisse; the pelisse was at the door when I saw him going out. They brought the prisoner back, and my pelisse.

(Pelisse produced.)

Prosecutor. The lowest value is twenty-five shillings: I know it by two or three marks on the collar.

MOSES GREEN . I remember what passed; I live in a shoe-maker's stall close by. I saw thePrisoner come from Mr. Elliott's door, with the coat under his arm. I went and told Mr. Elliott; I went a little further, until I came to Mr. Brooks's shop, and the gentleman and I went after the prisoner together; we went about three hundred yards,and Mr. Brooks pursued him, and took him in Spanish-place.

JOHN BROOKS. I have only this to say, that Moses Green came and told me that a man had stole a coat or a pelisse; I ran along with him; he ran one way, and I ran another; he ran up into the square, and I ran up Charles-street, and up Spanish-place; I saw the prisoner, and thinking I should meet Moses Green to come the other way; I pointed,and he nodded his head, and I secured the prisoner, and brought him to Mr. Elliott's shop, with the pelisse.

EDWARD WHITTINGTON . I am a constable, and took the prisoner into custody.

Prisoner's Defence. I went down to Blackwall to try to get a ship, and as I was going home, I saw this watch hanging in the window; I asked the price of it, and offered twenty-three shillings; the lady would not take it, and I came away; as I was going along, a Jew shewed me this pelisse, and asked me twelve shillings for it; I offered him nine shillings, and when I was going away, he said he would take it, and just as I got to the corner of Charles-street, this gentleman collared me, and I said I would walk quietly with him, which I did. The good woman did not wish to swear I stole it.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Confined two years , and fined 1s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Richards

204. THOMAS GREEN was indicted for the wilful murder of Elizabeth Mantin .

WILLIAM FLINT . I am headborough of the Liberty of Norton Falgate. I know no more than the apprehending of the prisoner, on Saturday, the 23rd of December, in the evening, at about eleven o'clock; I apprehended him at a public-house called the New Crown, in Wheeler-street, Bethnall-green, Hospital-fields. I heard the woman was dead, and therefore I apprehended him.

SARAH HEWIN . I live at 22, Moore's-alley, in Norton Falgate . This is the same house in which the prisoner and the deceased lived; he himself lodged in the gatrret, and she lodged in the same room; she was the woman he cohabit with. This was on the Saturday night, and Christmas Day was on the Monday following; I don't know what time I went out; but when I was returning, it was nearer eight then seven; when I came up to the house, I saw a great mob round the door; when I went up to see what it was, I saw the deceised laying on the steps of the door. When I went up to her, she could hardly speak. It is impossible for me to know whether she was in danger of death, nor do I know that she was sensible, as she was in a dying way; I don't think she had her perfect senses about her; she was carried to the watchhouse, and I went with her to the watchhouse; there she was in a sensible state. Afterwards she went to the Hospital; but I don't know whether she died going to the Hospital, or at the Hospital. I saw the prisoner that evening at the King and Queen, in Norton Falgate; I asked him how the woman came out of the window? He swore, and said how did he know. I told him he ought to know, because the woman had lodged with him upwards of two months? He said he had set by his own fire side, while she broke the windows with her kunckles; he did not say what window. I said, as he had lodged with the woman, he ought to have come down stairs, and seen what was the matter with her. He said if she had a mind to break her neck out of the window, that was nothing to him, and he swore again. I don't know whether they-had been quarrelling that day; I had not seen her or him either; I very seldom saw them.

ELIZABETH WILLIAMS . I live in the next house, on the adjoining floor of the prisoner; I live up three pair of stairs, and the prisoner lived three pair of stairs in the next house; there is nothing but a lath and plaster division between. They were always quarrelling and wrangling; I knew the prisoner's voice, and I could distinguish the deceased's from it. At about eight o'clock in the evening of the 23rd, I heard the prisoner and the deceased wrangling; I heard him get up in a very great passion, and she came against the partition. He pushed her down two or three steps, by reason of which, she fell against my wainscott. I could see nothing; I could hear him go into the room again, and her follow him: I heard him get up and force her towards the door again; she said "you won't" three times. I understood that he was endeavouring to push her down stairs, and she said "you won't."Then I heard her fall down the whole pair of stairs. She said, "don't murder me," three times. The prisoner said, he did not want to murder her; but he would have his money. He shut his door, and went towards the fire, as I could hear. The woman was then down one pair of stairs; then I heard her groan very low. Then I heard the stair case window break; I heard it break four or five times; in about six or seven minutes, I heard her fall out; that was the two pair of stairs stair case. The prisoner at that time was in his room. Hearing this, I ran down stairs; she was laying just at the foot of the steps, on the flagstone, just under the window. I never saw either of them to my knowledge before. The neighbours came round, and I went to my own house.

ELIZABETH MANNING . I live at No. 6, Moore's-alley; that is almost facing the house the prisoner lived in; I knew the prisoner; but not the deceased. I heard the prisoner and her making a great noise, wrangling and quarrelling; I could not tell what it was about. I heard the deceased cry "murder," several times, and I heard her say, "for God's sake some good Christian come and help me" I heard the window break several times, It was ten minutes after this that I heard the window break; I could not tell what window; I did not see it at the time. I heard nothing else. Afterwards I went down after she fell out, and saw her laying on her back on the stones; she looked sensible in her eyes; she did notspeak. She was taken out of the alley to the watchhouse, and I saw no more of her.

ANN KELSEY. I live in this alley; my house is on the opposite side of the way to the prisoner's; it was up one pair of stairs. Between seven and eight, I heard the woman cry out "murder," I knew her voice; I went and opened my window,but saw nothing of her. I never held any conversation with the woman. I thought I could see a head hang out of the window, between seven and eight o'clock. I asked her what was the matter? and she said, she wanted to get out, and she said, if she could not get out, she would throw herself out of the window; I said, don't do that, until some body comes to you. I directly shut up the window, and came to my own fire place. My husband came down, and sat by the fire. I heard some thing fall out ef the window, very heavy; that was in a very few minutes after she said "she would throw herself out of window." Upon hearing this fall, I ran down with a candle, and went to the woman; she was laying with her foot in the kinnel; I went to her, and said, poor woman, have you hurt yourself, and she opened her eyes, and could not speak.

JOHN BATTEN . I am a watchman of Norton Falgate. I saw the deceased at the watchhouse; I brought her there; she was very bad indeed, hardly sensible. I believe she died going along; she was examined by Dr. Rowington.

MR. WILLIAM ROWINGTON . I attended at the London Hospital. I remember the evening of Saturday, the 23rd; the deceased was brought to the Hospital soon after eight o'clock; she was dead. On my examining her, there was a bruize at the hinder part of her head; on removing the bone of the head, there was a quantity of fused blood between the duramater and the brain; the pressure of the fused blood was the cause of her death; there was neither fracture nor depression. She died of concussion. This exhavasated blood would occasion stupefection, and death, and might be produced from the blow we understand she received. I have no doubt that a fall would occasion it.

Prisoner's Defence. The crime with which I am charged, if I was the wickedest person in the World would be impossible for me to commit; it would be impossible for me to take a strong middled aged woman and so force her out of a window four feet from the ground.

Several witnesses gave the prisoner a good character for humanity.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson .

205. WILLIAM HORSELEY was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of December , a looking glass, value 7s. the property of John Mower , privately in his shop .

JOHN MOWER . I am a cabinet-maker , and have a shop in Shoreditch . I lost a looking-glass out of my shop, on the 16th of December; I was in bed; it was about eight o'clock in the morning; my work people called me up, and then the prisoner was in my shop, with the glass. The person that took the prisoner brought him back, and the glass too. The selling price is nine shillings, and it is worth seven shillings.

ALEXANDER JOHNSON . I live in Nevin-yard, opposite Mr. Mower's. On the 16th of December last, I observed the prisoner and another looking in at the window of Mower's shop; I kept behind my door, knowing Mower had been robbed; they went to the door, one made an attempt, and went in about two yards, and returned again; they then went away. They then returned again, and then the prisoner went in, and brought the glass out in his apron; then they went away. When they had got from the door a few yards, I went from behind my door, and followed them. The prisoners then seeing me following them, ran, and I cried stop thief; they separated, and ran different ways. I continued following the prisoner, who had the glass in his possession; he threw down the glass, in turning to make his escape, and the glass was broken. I got up to the prisoner when he was stopped in the Curtain-road; I brought him back to Mr. Mower's shop.

GUILTY , aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Dallas.

206. GEORGE CARTER was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Cole , at about the hour of six in the night of the 3rd of January , with intent to steal, and for burglariously stealing therein, three jacket, value 6s. five stockings, value 2s. one pillow-case, value 1s. one shift, value 1s. one petticoat, value 1s. two bags, value 2s. twenty pounds weight of flour, value 5s. and twelve 1l. bank notes , his property.

WILLIAM COLE . I live at Limehouse . I was at home on Wednesday, the 2nd of January; I came home at noon to dinner; I came home in a perspiration, and my shirt, my waistcoat, and the lining of my jacket were wet. I took those articles off, and put on a dry shirt; I took my pocket-book containing the notes out of the pocket of the jacket that I took off, and put it into the jacket I put on; there were twelve single notes in my pocket-book. I staid at home an hour and a half, which is longer than I ought to have done, and finding that the jacket I had taken off was dry, I put it on again; in my hurry, I forgot to take my pocket-book out. I then went to work, and returned between four and five o'clock; I cannot tell whether the jacket was there then. I did not miss it until the Thursday morning, when I got up: I should not have missed it then, only that my daughter told me something; I missed all the things between eight and nine. The next time I saw the jacket was on the prisoner's back, at Shadwell, between twelve and one, on Monday last; it was very promiscuously that I happened to hear of it, because he had had two hearings. I then went to look at the prisoner and the jacket, and knew it to be mine.

JANE COLE . I am the wife of the last witness. On Thursday the 4th of January, I was at home;there had been some washing done in the house, my daughter assisted me. The things were hung up to dry, all over the kitchen. I went to bed at about eleven o'clock, but I can't say exactly; my daughter went to bed at the same time, and my husband; the doors of the house were all fast; the door and the windows fast. There was wood work at the side of the windows, bars of wood. The window was fastened slightly on the inside by a small slight nail. This was on the Wednesday evening. I got up between seven and eight on the Thursday morning; my daughter was up first in the house; I sent her down. The things were not there that were put there the preceeding evening: I had seen my husband's jacket the night before; I had seen it an hour before I went to bed. When I went down on the Thursday morning, all was gone, and all was open; the bars were lifted slightly off, and put on again; the nails were forced out, and the window was right open. I saw this property at Shadwell office on the Monday.

SARAH COLE . I am daughter of the last witness. I assisted in this washing on the Wednesday evening. I went to bed at about eleven o'clock, when my father and mother went to bed; I had seen the window and the door secure the night before; I had seen the clothes hung on the lines to dry in the kitchen. I got up between seven and eight on the Thursday morning, and saw nothing but the lines; the clothes which had been on them were gone. I observed the bars and the window it was all open, and the bars broken. The windows were all open in the morning, and the things were all gone. I came down about a qearter after seven, it was between dark and light.

HENRY ANDREWS . I am a patrole of Ratchiffe. I know the prisoner at the bar. I stopped him at half past five on Thursday morning; I mean the Thursday morning on which these things were missed. I had suspicion he had something in his bag, I stopped him with the bag, and took him to the watchhouse. This was about half a mile from the prosecutor's house; he had on this jacket. (producing it.) I took him to the watchhouse, and made him open the bag there. At first when I met him in the street, he said he had only a little flour. After he said that I opened the bag to look in it. The first thing he pulled out, was two white stockings wet. I told him to put them into the bag, and I should convey him to the watch-house; I delivered him to the officer of the night, he is here. I then went to my duty again. I left the bag also in the custody of the officer of the night. I left it and its contents, as I found it on the prisoner.

JOHN KINDON . I am a night constable of the Hamlet of Ratcliffe. I remember the prisoner being brought to the watchhouse, it was on Thursday last, at about half past five he was brought.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. All that I have to say is, that this jacket with which he accused me of stealing, had nothing in it; and I have not had any money these five months.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 22.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Dallas.

207. WILLIAM WALKER alias RICHARDS , and CHARLES CURLE , were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Fielding , about the hour of five in the night of the 30th of December , with intent to steal, and for burglariously stealing therein, four gowns, value 2l. one dress, value 10s. two pairs of stockings, value 5s. one silk sash, value 2s. and two yards of fringe, value 6d. his property.

WILLIAM FIELDING . I live at 19, Marshall-street Carnaby Market . I have a shop there, I rent the whole house , and the shop is part of the house; I have a wife and one child I sleep in the back parlour. I occupy the middle parlour as where I live in; I let out the first and second floors. The entrance to my appartments is through my shop. My lodgers who occupy the first and second floors enter by the same door. I went out when it had turned five o'clock in the evening of the 30th, I left my wife and child in the parlour. The shop door in the passage when I went out was latched. I returned in about an hour. When I returned I went into my shop, I missed nothing that I had left there, I missed the things at a quarter after seven on the Monday morning. These gowns I had taken to do; two pairs of silk stockings, the silk sash, and the silk fringe, were all to be dyed.

BENJAMIN JOHNSON. I am a city officer. On Monday the 1st of this month, I was in Fleet-street I had occasion to follow five men, and I followed them until they came to Pie-street, Westminster. In coming into Pie-street, at about twelve o'clock, I saw the two prisoners pass the five men, and speak to them; they were not two of the five. I observed the prisoner Curle with something under his coat; and knowing them, I suspected that they had something that did not belong to them. Curle turned round and saw me, and I knew be knew me. When I approached him, he gave the parcel to the prisoner Richards; I stopped them, and asked them what they had got; that was after he had delivered the parcel to Richards; Richards hesitated some time, and then said he had been of an errand for his mother. I asked him what was in the bundle? he said silk gowns. I asked him where he was going with them? and he said he was going to his mother's. I then asked him where his mother lived? and he said in Titchfield-street. I could not get anything out of him but that he was coming from his mother's and he was going to his mother's. On the Wednesday or Thursday I discovered Mr. Fielding had been robbed. This happened on the Monday.

WILLIAM BARRETT . I am a constable. I was in company with Johnssn. When we came into Pi-street, we saw the two prisoners. The account Johnson has given is correct.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Walker's Defence, This boy I met in Pie-street, Westmister. I asked him which way he was going and he said he was going towards Barrack-street, and I was going that way, and Mr. Johnson came and collared us directly,

Curle's Defence. I have nothing to say.

WALKER, GUILTY , aged 15.

CURLE, GUILTY , aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

208. JANE SMITH was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Joseph Pulbrook , about the hour of twelve in the night time of the 4th of December , with intent to steal, and for burglariously stealing therein, twenty dozens of leather soles, value 16l. seven upper-leathers, value 7s. and two odd boots, value 2s. his property. And MARYANN CAFFRAY , for feloniously receiving on the 5th of December , two odd boots, part of the said goods, she well knowing the same to have been stolen .

JOHN PERRY. I attend in the shop of Mr. Pulbrook, he keeps a shop at 48, Goswell-street; the shop lies backwards, it is about four feet from the dwelling house. There is a court runs down by the side of the house, it is called Willow-row, which goes into a skittle-ground. There are houses on one side of the way, and the other is a rope yard. We found a ladder in the yard. I was in this house on the 4th of December; we went to bed at about ten o'clock, and the next morning we missed the property in question. I found the shelves stripped, and the window taken down in the skittle ground.

THOMAS CARTER . I am a patrole. At a little after five o'clock on the morning of the 5th of December, I saw the prisoner Smith running along George-street; she was running as fast as she could run with a large bundle, which I had some suspicion was stolen property. I directly followed after her, and heard a very loud knocking at a door. The woman was at first twenty or thirty yards before me; I saw a man and a woman standing at the door; they entered, and we followed them so quick, that they had not time to shut the door. We went up stairs, and there were five or six people drinking, and appeared as if they had been up all night. At the time we went up stairs, we heard the door shut, and then the property was gone. As we were going out, Jane Smith came in again; she was in and out several times; I knew her again, and took her with the property at a little before seven.

HENRY COOK . I saw the last witness Carter in the morning of the 5th of December, at about half past six; I went with him opposite No. 2, Church-lane; we waited there, when out came the prisoner Chaffray; she came to the end of George-street, which is a very few yards; she looked up the street, and returned, and left the door open. In about a minute, out came Jane Smith , with something in her lap. We started out, and Carter laid hold of her; we asked her what she had got, and she said leather.

MICHAEL HARRINGTON . I know one of the prisoners at the bar; I know Chaffray. I know nothing more than she lodged with me.

JOHN SKEFFINGTON. I am a shoe-maker. I know her coming to me, and offering me two boots to mend; they were odd ones; these are the boots.

SMITH, GUILTY , aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

CAFFRAY, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Richards .

209. SUSANNAH LEWIS was indicted for making an assault upon Cecilia, the wife of Godfrey De Trigomane , upon the 6th of January , with intent the money of the said Godfrey De Trigomane then being upon the person of Cecilia, his wife, feloniously, violent, and against her will, to take .

CECILIA DE TRIGOMANE . I am the wife of Godfrey De Trigomane . This happened last Friday night, or Saturday morning. The prisoner was my landlady ; she lived at No. 7, Gray's-stoke-place, Fetter-lane ; I occupied the back room on the second floor. At twelve o'clock, I went home, and went to bed; she lighted my fire, and she bid me good night; I did not lock the door, because there was no key; there was a handle went through the door, and fastened it with, which she took out, and took away with her. She took away the only thing which fastened the door; I did not go to bed directly because she came up in a few minutes again; I had lodged with her about nine weeks. She asked me where my pocket-book was; then she said, you have left it at your washerwoman's; then she told me I must come to the washerwoman's with her; the washerwoman lives in Chancery-lane. I owed Mrs. Lewis about fifteen pounds for board and lodging. My husband wrote to me, if I received the ten pounds in James's-street, Adeiphi, to give her half; I had got five pounds in the Adelphi, and I offered her the whole five pounds in the morning, and she would not take it; I told her I would not give her my money, when she said, she would have my money or my heart's blood, because she said in the evening that I should not eat any more victuals in the house. When she came in she took hold of me, and knocked me down, and struck me three times on my face; I hallooed out murder! Her husband ran up stairs very quick, and told her to open the door, or he would break it open; she opened the door, and he said, Susan, what do you mean by this conduct. I took her up on the Monday following.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

210. JOHN KENNINGTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of January , a watch, value 3l. three gold seals, value 30s. one gold ring, value 5s. one chain, value 5s. and one watch-key, value 6d. the property of Charles Tidmas , in the dwelling-house of Robert Thomas .

CHARLES TIDMAS . I am shopman to Mr. Thomas,haberdasher in Fleet-street ; the house is his dwelling-house; the prisoner worked as a carpenter in the house. I lost this watch on the 8th of January; I had left it down in the back kitchen adjoining the water closet; I saw it at about half past ten, when I left it there; I went to see if it was in the kitchen in about a quarter of an hour, and it was then gone. The prisoner was taken into custody.

JOHN BENDALL . I am shopman to Mr. Flemming. I took in a watch from the prisoner, upon which I advanced two pounds.

GUILTY .

Confined six months , and fined 1s.

London jury, before Mr.Common Serjeant.

211. ANTHONY M'KENROTT was indicted for that he, on the 22d of July last , feloniously did falsely make, forge, and counterfeit, and did cause and procure to be falsely made, forged, and counterfeited, and willingly did act and assist in the false making, forging, and counterfeiting, a certain bill of exchange , the tenor of which is as follows: that is to say,

NEVIS, the 21st day of April, 1815. For 800l.

At sixty days after sight pay this fourth of exchange, (first, second, and third not paid), to the order of JOHN DOUGAN , Esq. Eight hundred pounds.

Value received. Which place to account of

GEO. C. FORBES.

To A. MACKENROTT, Esq.

In London.

with intent to defraud Arthur Clarance .

N. B. The above Bill has the following acceptance across the face of it, made by the prisoner, "Accepted July 21st, 1815, payable at the Bank of England."

SIXTEEN OTHER COUNTS, varying the manner of laying the charge.

Mr. GURNEY, with his usual perspicuity, stated this case to the Jury; and then with his assistants, Messrs. RICHARDSON and MINCHIN, proceeded to substantiate the several facts by evidence.

Mr. ARTHUR CLARANCE , called and examined by Mr. RICHARDSON. I am a navy agent . I live at Adelphi House, Adam-street, Adelphi. I knew the prisoner in 1806, in the West Indies. I saw him at the latter end of 1812, or beginning of 1813. In the latter part of June last, I met him in the Strand; about the middle of July, he called at my office. He asked me what I was doing; I told him, and where my place of business was. This passed when I saw him in the Strand. I told him I had a good connexion, but wanted capital. He said, a friend of his had promised to assist him with a sum of money, and that if he did, he would embark 500l. in my concern for prize purchases. On the 22nd of July, he called at my office, and he produced two bills; he said that his friend Captain Halladay had sent him those two bills. Upon looking at the bills, I observed they were the prisoner's acceptances. I remarked to him, that it would appear singular that I should negociate these two bills, one for 1100l. and the other for 800l. they being his acceptances. He said, he had received them from Captain Halladay , to whom he had formerly rendered essential services in the West Indies; and that if I negociated them I might invest 1000l. in joint purchases, 500l. on his account, as his proportion, and 500l. as mine, for which I was to pay interest. I asked him, how he was to provide for these bills when they became due. He replied, that Mr. Forbes, the drawer of the bills, would ship home colonial produce to cover the amount. He gave as a reference to the validity of the bills Messrs. Manning and Anderton, of Princes-street, near the Bank, and also Messrs. Smyth, Payne, and Smyth, on whom I waited; they vouched generally for the validity of the bills; both bills were indorsed with the name of " John Dougan ." I told him the money would not be of any use in my concern, if it was to be drawn out at the expiration of the two months, to provide for these bills; his reply to that was, that Mr. Forbes would ship home colonial produce to provide for these bills. After having made inquiries respecting the bills, and having received satisfactory answers I waited on the prisoner at his lodging, at 53, Tower-street. I then asked him, what reply I should make to a question which might be proposed to me-How I came possessed of the bills? he said, I might make use of Captain Halladay 's name, with his sanction. The bills had been delivered to me at my office, and remained in my possession. On Sunday the 23rd of July, (the next day), after I had waited on the prisoner, I went to Portsmouth by the coach, taking the bills with me. I arrived there in the evening, and went to Mr. Huish's, at 28, High-street, Portsmouth; Mr. Huish is a navy agent; I had some connexions with him as such; I gave the bills to him to get them discounted; I myself indorsed them, either that evening or the next morning. I staid at Portsmouth about three days; I did not then received any discount. On my arrival in London I saw the prisoner. Before I received the proceeds of the bills, I told him what had transpired. I told him I had left the bills with Huish to get them discounted, and that I expected to hear the result every day. I saw him almost every day until I received the proceeds of the bills. I told him the purport of a letter that I had received from Huish, stating that he was surprised that Captain Halladay had not indorsed the bills. The prisoner said, he did not conceive Captain Halladay 's indorsement would add any weight to the bills, but if it was still wished, Captain Halladay was then at Liverpool, and he could procure his indorsement. I afterwards received the proceeds of the bills. On the 4th of August, I received a bill from Portsmouth for 800l. drawn by Messrs. Godwin and Co. on Messrs. Masterman, at one month, and transmitted to me by Huish, on account of the bills; and at various other times I received to the amount of 1500l. on account from Huish; we had a running account between us. At various times I received the full amount of the bills. I paid to the amount altogether of 880l. to the prisoner on account of these bills, which would become due on the 22nd of September. As the time approached for these bills coming to maturity, I saw the prisoner several times. I asked him whether the bills would be paid or not? his reply was, "that he had been disappointed in the shipment of colonial produce from Mr. Forbes, but Captain Halladay would take them up." I think about the 21st of September, the day before the bills became due, the prisoner left directions at my office that the bills should be presented at Messrs. Manning and Anderton's, and that instructions should be sent to Messrs. Masterman for that purpose. I understood that they were to be presented at Manning and Anderton's, for them to take them up on behalf of Mr. John Dougan ; I had understood that Manning and Andertons had transactions with Dougan; those instructions were given to Messrs. Masterman; I do not know of my own knowledge that the bills were presented at Messrs. Manning and Anderton, by Messrs. Mastermans. The prisoner afterwardssent me a letter upon the subject of these bills.(Letter put into the hand of witness.) That is the letter.

(Letter read, addressed to A. Clarance, Esq.)

" MY DEAR SIR, - I have the satisfaction to inform you that I am authorized by Messrs. Smyth, Payne, and Smyth to say, that 1500l. will be paid by them as soon as the bills are presented.

Signed, A. M'KINROTT."

I received this on the Monday after the 22d, when the bills were due. I saw the prisoner on the Tuesday or Wednesday afterwards. I should inform you, that I had first waited upon Messrs. Smyth, Payne, and Smyth, upon the subject of this letter. I applied to them to take up these bills; they positively refused to do it. I communicated that to the prisoner; I told him that Messrs, Smyth, Payne, and Smyth told us, that they never authorized him (the prisoner) to say, that they would take up the bills; and furthermore, that they were in doubt whether there was such a person as Mr. M'Kinrott, the acceptor; and that it appeared to me, from the tenour of their conversation, that they either doubted the existence of M'Kenrott, or that they thought the signature " John Dougan " was a forgery. We prevailed on the prisoner to go to Messrs. Smyth, Payne, and Smyth; he went out, and returned in about a quarter of an hour afterwards; he went out for that purpose. On his return, he said he had been there, and related a conversation that had passed between them. This conversation passed in Baker's coffeehouse, in Pope's-head-alley, which is not very far off Smyth, Payne, and Smyth's. Then we went together to Mr. Briggs, the solicitor, in Essex-street; we went together, Mr. Huish, the prisoner M'Kenrott, and I. Mr. Briggs then held the bills for Messrs Godwin and Co. We informed Mr. Briggs of the conversation that passed between the prisoner and Haynes; we told him what I related before, that Smyth, Payne, and Smyth, positively refused to pay the bills; we related generally what passed in company of the prisoner. Mr. Briggs said he had instructions to proceed against all parties; Mr. M'Kenrott requested time, which Mr. Briggs granted; there that conversation ended. The prisoner, a few days prior to his apprehension, which was on the 28th or 29th of November, said, if I would find the balance that was in my hand of about 600l. he would find the remainder to take the bills up. I replied, it was impossible then, as the money was vested in my business; but I would not have the smallest objection to relieve the balance when I received it. The day before the prisoner's apprehension, he called at my office in the Adelphi; at that time I had received intelligence respecting the bills; in about three minutes after that the prisoner's clerk called; I endeavoured to make an appointment with the prisoner's clerk, to meet the prisoner that evening; I however made an appointment to meet him the next morning at 10 o'clock, at the New England coffeehouse. In consequence of that I attended there the next morning at 10 o'clock, accompanied by my solicitor, Mr. Price, and Limbrick the officer. The prisoner was sitting in the coffee-room; I told Mr. Price that he was there; he and Limbrick went up and brought him down. The prisoner said, he conceived I used him excessively ill; I told him he could not accuse me of that, as placed in the situation in which I was, and hearing that the signature " John Dougan " was a forgery; I was compelled in my own defence to have him forthcoming. He replied, "If they are forgeries, I uttered them in the same state as I received them from Captain Halladay ." To which I replied, "If Captain Halladay be so material a witness in your favour inform me where he is, and I will start off this evening to bring him to you." To which proposal he made no reply. The prisoner then said, he had securities with himself to settle the bills with him, and wished to know whether it could be effected. I referred him to my solicitor, Mr. Price, and there the conversation ended. He was not taken into custody then; I was not present when he was given in charge. We walked on; I and Limbrick walked on, and the prisoner and Mr. Price followed us. We then went to Temple-bar, to the George coffee-house, where I left him in company with Limbrick, and never saw him afterwards until at Hatton-garden.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. It was in 1806 I first knew the prisoner in the West Indies; I considered him as deeply concerned in mercantile affairs; I know he was counected with Mr. Dougan; I took it for granted all was right; he give me these bills; he imposed no restraint on me in the manner I should dispose of them, either as to the manner or persons to whom. He did not hurry me to give him the money, but told me if I got the money I might invest 1000l. in my business. When I asked for a reference as to the validity of the bills, he referred me to Messrs. Manning and Anderton; Smyth, Payne, and Smyth, was the other house he referred me to; in these places they considered the bills as good and genuine. I told him that I told Huish to satisfy himself about the bills; he was aware that every possible inquiry was making, to ascertain whether the bills were valid; he wrote down the names of Manning and Anderton, and Smyth, Payne, and Smyth. I afterwards gave him 800l.; he got the whole of it in about a month after the bills were delivered to me; the bills had about two months to go. He did not go away; he continued about; he went down to Plymouth about some idle mission to Buonaparte. He was at a sea-port town, and I remitted him money whilst he was there; that was about the 5th or 6th of August, and the bills were payable on the 22d of September. Afterwards, when I discovered that the bills were dishonoured, and that Smyth, Payne, and Smyth, had some conception that the bills were not valid, I told the prisoner of it, so that I possessed him of what had passed at Smyth's. I watched his countenance, on purpose to see if he betrayed any symptoms of guilt, and he betrayed none. I told Mr. Huish of it. Even after this he went to Briggs's, and there I repeated the conversation in his presence; and at last he said, if I could accommodate the remaining 600l. he would make up the rest.

Re-examined by Mr. Richards. It was six or seven weeks before the bill became due that he went to Plymouth.

Examined by the COURT. He told me to say that I received them from Captain Halladay, and he said Captain Halladay would provide for them.

Mr. HENRY HUISH , called and examined by Mr. MINCHIN. I reside at Portsmouth. I am acquained with Mr. Clarance, the last witness; he is my London agent; I am a navy agent. I saw him at Portsmouth in July; he brought down two bills, requesting me to cash them. (Bills produced to witness.) Those are the bills; I took them to my bankers,Messrs. Godwin and Co. requesting them to cash them; I requested them to send them to London, to inquire as to the respectability of the parties; they went to London, and an answer came, and I afterwards received the amount of them.

ANDREW BURNETT , called and examined by Mr. MINCHIN. I live at Southsea. I am acquainted with Mr. Huish in the way of business; I am a clerk in the house of Godwin and Co.; I received those bills from Mr. Huish, and passed them to his credit. Mr. Thomas Andrews Minchin is a partner in that house.

Mr. THOMAS BRIGGS , called and examined by Mr. GURNEY. I am an attorney, and live in Essex-street, in the Strand. In the month of September last I received the bills of exchange in question from Messrs. Godwin and Co. at Portsmouth, to apply to the parties for payment, and if they were not paid, I was to proceed against the parties at law. In pursuance of those my instructions, I applied to the prisoner, Mr. M'Kinrctt. Before he would have received my letter, he called upon me, in company with Mr. Clarence. The prisoner then stated, that Smyth, Payne, and Smyth, would take up the bills, for the honour of the indorser John Dougan . I informed him that that was not the fact, for I had already made application to Smyth, Payne, and Smyth, for that purpose; which I had done that day at one o'clock. I was induced to go to Messrs. Smyth, Payne, and Smyth, by a letter which Mr. Huish brought to me (Letter put into the hand of witness.) That is the letter. I informed the prisoner that Smyth, Payne, and Co. were excessively indignant at their name being made use of. In that letter the prisoner stated that Smyth, Payne, and Smyth, had authorised him to say that they would pay the bills on their being presented. The prisoner said there must be some mistake, for that Smyth, Payne, and Smyth, had plenty of money in their hands of John Dougan 's, and he was sure if they were again presented, and a proper representation made, they would be paid. At his particular request I consented again to present the bills, which I did, and met with a similar answer they refused to pay them. When I next saw the prisoner, I told him of the second refusal, and told him I should arrest him for the money; I would write into the country for the necessary affidavit to hold him to bail, and I desired him to refer me to his solicitor. He promised to take up the bills, and called almost every day with excuses of some kind or other. In the course of these interviews, I inquired why he expected Mr. Dougan to take up the bills, of which he himself was the acceptor? His reply was, "that great commercial transactions had passed between him and Mr. Dougan, and the matter could easily be settled between them; he said that great transactions had passed, and that consignments of colonial produce were to have been made to take up these bills; I cannot positively say whether he stated that the consignments were to be made to Mr. Dougan or Mr. Forbes, but to the best of my recollection I think he said Mr. Dougan. He also said that Mr. Dougan and he were then jointly concerned in a schooner or sloop of war; and he said, he would bring the documents or the register of this ship, as security for these bills. He called at my office on the 4th of October, and stated that he was ready to pay the bills, but urged me not to issue the writ against him. Looking over one of the clerk's desks, he observed his own name in the writ, which was a special original. As a proof of his disposition to pay, he took out of his pocket-book a 100l. note, and begged that I would take that; after some entreaty (it being so small a portion of the amount of the bills), I consented that he should leave it; he said, that great expences had been incurred in preparing the writ, and it would go towards the costs, in all events. I told him it might affect the liability of the other indorses, and therefore I would not take it in part payment of the bills. He said, he would come the next morning with the remainder of the money, if I would not issue the writ; I consented not to issue it before eleven the next morning, but on no payment being made, I thereupon issued it; and on the 5th October he was arrested. I believe he went to prison, and then justified bail in Court; I recollect opposing that bail; notice was given to me on the 7th, and I should think, by two days' notice, he would have got out about the 9th. The last sitting in term they were under terms to plead. Just before that last sitting, on the 23d November, he called upon me, and requested me not to proceed to trial until the last sitting, and promised faithfully to take up the bills. He stated, he was sure Mr. Dougan, upon his arrival, which he expected daily, would immediately direct Smyth, Payne, and Smyth, to take up the bills. I informed him that I had heard Mr. Dougan had arrived. He said, he presumed that he would not come to London directly, but go to Teignmouth, where he had a country residence; and he said that he himself would pay the money on the following Wednesday; he pledged himself most faithfully. I had been making a great many inquiries for witnesses to prove the handwritings of the drawer and indorser, and I readily granted a postponement of the trial, seemingly as a favour. He told me that Mr. Forbes was attorney-general of Tortala.

Cross-examined by Mr. Andrews. I first went to Smith and Co. by the direction of Clarance and Huish, upon their bringing me the letter. The prisoner was with me as early as the 26th, after the bills became due; I saw him continually until the 4th or 5th of October; I told him my purpose was to arrest him, and he even came to me. Conceiving he was a gentleman, I asked him who his solicitor was? and he said he would come any day I chose. I told him, the last time he came to me, that Mr. Dougan had arrived; and he told me where Mr. Dougan lived, and gave me the means of communicating with him. I think I heard it before, about an hour but however, the prisoner told me.

JAMES WILLIAM FRESHFIELD, Esq. attorney for the prosecution. I produce the release of Mr. John Dougan from all responsibility on these bills, made by Mr. Mitchin, one of the partners in the house of Godwin and Co. for the other partners.

Mr. Alley objected to this release, as the wording of it was in the plural number, "We release," &c. and it was only signed by one partner, Mr. Minchin.

Mr. Richardson, contra, stated, that it was impossible for Mr. Mitchin's partners to enforce payment of these bills without him; and therefore it was conclusive that he could release for them.

Mr. Alley. I am aware that one partner may bind another by parcel, but one cannot bind the others by deed; and this speaks in the plural number, "We, A. B. and C. do so and so," and then it is signed only by one.

Mr. Andrews, on the same side. This gentleman does not profess to have released for his other partners, it merely purports to be the act and deed of himself.

CHIEF BARON THOMPSON . This purports to be a release proceeding from all the partners. It is,"That we have, each and every of us, released," and therefore this proceeds from each and every of them, and is signed by one: therefore, surely it is the same as if they all signed. They, and each, and every of them have released. It seems to me to be so.

Mr. JOHN DOUGAN , called and examined by Mr. Richardson. I am a navy agent. In the year 1813 I was going to the West Indies, in pursuance of that my business. I had occasion for an interpreter; I advertised for that purpose, and the prisoner applied in consequence of that advertisement. He represented himself as having been in business at Liverpool, in partnership with a person named Routart, or Rouretart; that he had failed, and that he was an Austrian or Prussian by birth. A newspaper happened to be present, and he immediately, without hesitation, translated a passage, first into German, then French, then English, and proved to me that he was well skilled in languages. He referred me for his character to a gentleman named Mr. Slade, near Finsbury-square; in consequence I engaged him with a written engagement for two years, at 300l. a year. He continued in my employ to the period of that engagement, to the August of 1805, when I left the West Indies for England. I left England in May 1806 for the West Indies again, and went to Tortola, where I found the prisoner; I staid there till May 1808, when I returned to England; the prisoner was resident at Tortola while I was there. The next I heard of him was in 1809, by letter from another person. In consequence of what I heard, I wrote to my friends there, and desired my correspondent to pay 800 dollars towards paying his expenses home, and that he would pay a bill of 100l. down. The prisoner arrived in England in December 1809; I endeavoured to settle his affairs; his creditors said they had judgment against him. The last time I saw him was in 1812, just previous to my leaving England, in a lock-up-house. I proposed that the debt he owed me should be made over to his wife and children, and that I should apply to his creditors to give him 500l. and that in return he should give up his property to his creditors. This he refused to do; and I never saw him nor heard of him afterwards until my arrival here; I arrived in England on the 16th of November last, 1815. During the three years of my absence, I have never been either in Tortola or Nevis; I have never been at either of those places since 1808. I never authorised any person to make use of my name in bills of exchange. I know Mr. George Clarke Forbes very intimately; he was attorney-general of Tortola whilst I was there; I never had any dealings whatever with Mr. Forbes about such bills as these. I have had a great deal of business to do with Mr. Forbes, being a navy agent, and he being attorney-general; I am acquainted with his handwriting; I do not believe the signature" Geo. C. Forbes ," on the bill for 800l. to be his handwriting; Mr. Forbes writes a crabbed hand, and this is a very different hand; I have many letters and receipts from Mr. Forbes. Looking at the indorsement " John Dougan ," it is not my handwriting, nor by any means my way of signing; it is an up and down writing. There is on the top of the g a little round o, a little loop, which is never in my handwriting; the g is not united at the top; it does not join, all my g's join. In the formation of the D there is an upstroke; in my signatures, and I have examined a great number of them, I can't perceive a single one that has that. I never agreed to make any consignment of colonial produce to the prisoner, to meet any such bill as that; I never saw nor heard of the existence of that bill, until I came to England in November last. I was not in November last, nor at any other time, connected with the prisoner, in the ownership of any schooner or sloop of war. Upon my arrival in England, I landed at my own house at Teignmouth. A letter which came from the prisoner, and which was intended by him to reach me there, was sent after me to London. It is the prisoner's handwriting.

By the wish of the prisoner, the whole of this letter was read. We only give our readers the concluding paragraph, as the only part bearing on the case. It is dated from 37, Gower-street, Bedford-square, is addressed to John Dougan , Esq. Teignmouth, and is signed by the prisoner.

After congratulating him on his safe arrival in England, he writes, "formerly I was honoured with your friendship, so much so as to enable me, without counter security, to lay the foundation of a fortune, which a series of misfortunes has reduced. Under these circumstances, might I without too great presumption, on considerations consisting of of mortgages and deposits, ask your assistance to the amount of 1000l. for six months. Large as this request seems, it is but small comparatively with your wealth, and would relieve me from the grinding and ruinous calamities which oppress me."

I certainly had reason to reprove the prisoner once very severely for imitating my hand writing, and I told him the danger of it: that was when he was in my service. I never saw it.

Cross-examined by Mr. Adolphus. - When I wasin the West Indies the prisoner rendered me very considerable services, for which I remunerated him beyond his salary. I employed him in matters of privacy. He continued as Interpreter to the Court of Admiralty, after I left. There was no other person who understood the languages. I know afterwards that he went into business for himself. I afterwards heard of his distress, and the effect of that distress on his understanding; it went to the extent of an attempt on his life; that was the occasion of my writing to relieve him. When he arrived in England, I was convinced that the report I had heard was true; not only from seeing his throat, but from other appearances. That was when I saw him, and endeavoured to induce him to compound with his creditors. I believe he was put in custody and was superintended; and I thought, at my own expence, of putting him under restraint. He had trusted some Frenchmen in the West Indies, which was the occasion of his ruin.

Re-examined by Mr. Richardson. My intercourse continued with him a month or two before I left this country in 1812.

Q. What was the impression of your mind during the latter part of your intercourse with him, as to his family? - A. I wish you would not put that question; I am in a particular situation.

COURT. You are sworn to speak the truth, and the whole truth. - A. I thought his reason had returned; it is merely a matter of opinion. He appeared to be in possession of his senses; yet there was a wildness about him, and inconsistencies in his conduct. His not accepting the proposal I made to him of compounding with his creditors, looks like an act of insanity.

SAMUEL HICKS, called and examined by Mr.Minchin. I know Mr. Dougan. I was in his employment in the year 1807, at Tortola. I continued with him until 1811. I went again into his service in 1814, when I went to Halifax to him. I am acquainted with his handwriting. I look at the bill for 800l.; that name of John Dougan is not his handwriting. I am acquainted with Mr. George Clarke Forbes , the supposed drawer of the bill, and with his handwriting; I look at the signature of the bill " Geo. C. Forbes ;" to the best of my knowledge it is not his writing. I look at the body of the bill; I can't say whose handwriting it is; it has a strong resemblance to the writing of the prisoner, but I can't say as to the belief. The signing" Geo. C. Forbes " is very like M'Kinrott's handwriting.

Mr. WILLIAM FRY . I am acquainted with Mr. John Dougan , and his handwriting. I look at the indorsement of his name on the back of the bill for 800l.; that is not Mr. Dougan's handwriting.

Mr. PHILLIP PERRING , called and examined by Mr. RICHARDSON. I know Mr. Dougan, and his handwriting. I look at the indorsement in his name on the back of the bill for 800l.; it is not the handwriting of Mr. Dougan, nor is the indorsement on the bill for 700l.

WILLIAM CURTIS , Esq. I know Mr. Dougan, and his handwriting. I look at the indorsement on each of the bills in question, and I believe them not to be the handwriting of Mr. Dougan. There's a

THOMAS LATHAM , Esq. I am a merchant in London, and know Mr. George Clarke Forbes ; I have very large concerns both with him and his father; I have had transactions in business with him, which have given me a knowledge of his handwriting. I look at the two bills of exchange, and can take upon myself to say, that the signatures are very little like his handwriting; I can take upon myself to say, that they are not his handwriting; he writes the George and the Clarke at full length, That is a good mercantile hand, and he writes a kind of running hand, such as lawyers write. I am very clear those are not his signatures.

JOHN LIMBRICK . I am an officer of the Police-office, Hatton-garden, and apprehended the prisoner. On his person I found a great number of papers.(Two bills put into the hand of witness.) I found those two bills on his person, and marked them whilst they were in my possession. I searched his house in Gower-street on the same day, and found many papers at his house. (A letter put into the hand of witness.) I found that letter, with the words Tortola and John Dougan on it, just in the state they are now; I also found some blank forms for bills of exchange; the papers I found in his house were on a writing-table, in a back parlour. I was at the Police-office, Hatton-garden, when all these papers were claimed by the prisoner's attorney.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. I don't mean to say that he specifically claimed any paper in particular; but he merely wished for a sight of the papers generally. There were servants living in the house in Gower-street.

SAMUEL HICK . I first look at the two bills of exchange found on the prisoner's person; the one for 1100l. the other for 1400l. bearing date at Tortola, and indorsed John Dougan ; these indorsements of the name John Dougan are not Mr. Dougan's handwriting. I now look at the letter found at the prisoner's house; I look at the words "Tortola," written several times, and "sixty," and " John Dougan ," on that letter; I believe them to be the prisoner's handwriting.

Mr. John Dougan . I look at the indorsement on the bills for 1100l. and 1400l.; they are not my handwriting, but better imitations than I had seen before. I never saw these bills until after the prisoner was apprehended.

Cross-examined by Mr. Reynolds. I now look at the letter found at the prisoner's house; the " John Dougan " on that letter is not in the least like my handwriting.

JAMES STAUNTON . I am an engraver, and have the plate in my pocket, of which these bills are impressions. The bill for 800l. is a fourth bill of exchange; the word fourth is in print. I now look at the blanks for the first, second, and third bills of exchange; I have the plates in my pocket from which they were struck; the impressions of these plates are sold by my master, in Moorfields.

Mr. SIRR. I am a clerk of the Bank of England. On the 21st of July the prisoner had no account with the Bank of England; it was ordered to be closed by the Directors; there is still a small balance of 5l. to be drawn. (Forged bill put into the handof witness.) That bill was not paid by the Bank of England. My situation in the Bank is such, that I see every person who opens an account with the Bank; they are introduced to me to sign their names.

Q. by Mr. Gurney. Were you present when the prisoner opened his account, and gave in his signature - A. Yes.

Mr. Alley. My Lord, I am aware that the forgery of a bill of exchange without a stamp, at places within the jurisdiction of the laws of England is cognizable by those laws, in the same manner as any other forgery; but here is a bill, purporting to be drawn at Nevis, which now appears was made and forged in this country. Your Lordship recollects the case of Mr. Richard Phillips ; and I apprehend that that case is similar to the present. There a bill of exchange was drawn upon an Irish stamp, and purported, on the face of it, to be drawn in Ireland; but it subsequently appeared that it was drawn in this country upon an Irish stamp, and that invalidated the bill. I humbly conceive that this bill is under similar circumstances.

CHIEF BARON THOMPSON . Not for the purpose of forgery. There is the distinction, as I take it.

Mr. Gurney. Certainly; as a person shall not plead one crime in excuse for another.

(Forged bill put in and read.)

DEFENCE. The prisoner made a defence of some length, imputing this prosecution to a foul conspiracy, because he had some charges of felony and high treason to alledge against Mr. John Dougan.

DOCTOR COOMBE. I am a physician. The prisoner called upon me soon after his arrival in this country from Tortola; I can't say at that time whether he was really mad or not, but I found in conversation with him, that kind of oddness and quickness in his manner, that if I had previously known of his having been deranged, I should have thought that that derangement still continued. Soon after this, the family that I was acquainted with in Tortola arrived in England; from them I learned that he had been twice deranged. About two years after that, or not quite so much, I was sent for to the Cambridge coffee-house in Newman-street, where I found him in a perfect state of derangement. I then called on the late Doctor Simmons ; I think the prisoner was then perfectly mad. From that time down to the present, a period of five years, I have seen him off and on. His wife lay-in about three months ago, and then I visited her, and used to see him. I really should think that his madness has continued up to the present time.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. I have no recollection whether I saw him in July last; from the different times that I saw him, I am of opinion that he was never a perfectly same man, down to the present time; I did not think it necessary to put him under any confinement; I have seen him in a lockup-house.

WILLIAM LEWIS KOCK . I am a merchant's clerk. I have known the prisoner for the last six years; indeed when I was but a boy. I saw him in 1809, after his return from Tortola. I first saw him at Plymouth, where I resided; I formed a sort of engagement with him to follow him up to London,where he intended to establish himself. I came to him, to the Cambridge coffee-house, in about ten days afterwards; I then conceived him decidedly deranged, from the incoherent questions he put to me on my arrival into the room; he would have a great number of candles lighted in his room; he talked of parties with the Austrian Ambassador and Mr. Percival; he was always talking of very great enterprises, where he had not even the means of paying the rent of the house. One day I offered him a snuff-box, on the cover of which was painted a Jew; on producing it, he accused me of having called him a Jew, and threatened to turn me out of the room. He remained there seven or eight days, and I removed him to the house of Mr. Scheffer, 178, Upper Thames-street; I continued there several months; I considered him as always labouring under mental derangement. He used to talk constantly of his being on trial, and he fancied himself under continement under some charge; under that impression he wrote a variety of letters. He used to walk about the house almost in a state of nakedness. His spirits varied considerably; to extreme dejection, but never to violence that I remember. He conceived a peculiar prejudice to Mrs. Scheffer, which he manifested by threatening her violently, and by the general crossness of his conduct towards her; she always treated him as he ought to be treated. At one time he accused me of owing him, some money, and when I made appear to him the incorrectness of what he stated, he challenged me to fight him. Four or five months he was quite calm to appearance, and we did not think it necessary to keep him locked up, and we let him out, not apprehending that he would do any mischief; but in the evening we ascertained that he had placed himself in the door-way of a shop, which he would not quit, and he was sent to the Poultry Compter; he threatened some violence to the officers. After that, he went from Mr. Scheffer's to the Horns Tavern, Doctors' Commons; I don't know how long he staid there. Thence he went to several private houses, but under arrest, I believe, from the Lords of Appeal. He after that went to Burder's, the sherifi's officer, at Grocer's-hall, in the Poultry; I believe he continued there twelve months. I had frequent opportunities of observing him whilst there; he was sometimes extremely agitated, and at other times appeared composed. My opinion with respect to his insanity always continued the same, and I have received letters from him which have strengthened that opinion. He told me in October last, that he had been agent for Buonaparte, and had superintended his general business in Europe. I knew of his going to Plymouth to subpocna Buonaparte, only by the newspapers.

Cross-examined by Mr. Richardson. He has been under no restraint on account of the state of his mind since he left Scheffer's, whom he left towards the close of 1810.

Mrs. SARAH SCHEFFER . I am the wife of Mr. John Scheffer ; we live now in Leman-street, Goodman's-fields. I know the prisoner at the bar, Mr. M'Kinrott. He came to live at our house on New-Years's day, 1809. He came from the Cambridge Coffee-house to us. Mr. Kock visited him at our house. He was not suffered to go out of the house, and was always locked up when I was at home by myself. He appeared to be very much deranged when he came to our house. I attended upon him myself. I discovered the state of his mind from the first evening. He was very indelicate in his conduct. He used to go about the house with nothing on but his shirt, and sometimes quite naked. He was constantly writing letters, and wanting me to go with them, to the Lord Mayor, and Sheriff's of London, and to the turnkey of Newgate; sometimes they were only directed. He used me very ill. He beat me very much, and got his hands round my neck to throttle me, because I desired him not to look over some private business of my husband's in the counting-house; he beat me with a book, which I got from him. I believe he used to be more so to me in particular, because I used to lock him up; unless I locked him up he would be always about the house, with two candles in his hands. He continued in this state, more or less, during the whole time that he was with us. I never changed my opinion; I always considered him deranged.

Cross-examined by Mr. Minchin. I cannot say I have seen him above twice since he left our house. Mr. Dougan took him away from our house.

JOHN BURDER . I am a sheriff's officer. The prisoner at the bar was brought to my custody about two years ago; he was in my custody about eleven months; he was brought to me by a Mr. Baker, who I believe is an officer of the Lords of the Appeal. He was not brought to me by process, out of any of the Courts at Westminster. Whilst he was with me, his conduct was very incoherent. He applied to me to lend him some money; I lent him 5l. upon bills of his own; when they became due they were not honoured, but he paid me that money afterwards. I was going to observe the conduct of the prisoner towards my servants; in one instance his throwing one of my servants on the fire. He thought himself highly offended because I refused to lend him a farther loan of 50l. In consequence of my refusing this, he came down from his room into my office, and expressed how much he disliked me above all other men that he had ever seen before. He received 3040l. before he left my house; he disposed of this money by paying the debts of the prisoners that were in my house, who were total strangers to him. I think that he was an insane man. He came to me in 1812. His paying the debts of the other prisoners was just before he left me. He sent me a letter one night, in the middle of the night, by the watchman. I don't mean to conclude that he was mad; I have handed that letter to the person who brought the prisoner to me. His breaking open the doors, and running up and down stairs with four lighted wax candles in his hands, for four or five nights running, I look upon as acts of insanity.

THOMAS BAKER. I apprehended the prisoner under an attachment of the Lords of Appeal, and handed him over to the last witness. I saw him several times whilst in custody; his conduct always appeared strange, from my first having him in custody. When I first had him in custody, I had him in a private lodging. From the observations I made of his conduct, I should really think he was not in his proper state of mind.

SARAH TRINDER . I lived servant with the prisoner in Judd-street, Somer's-town, in November 1812; he had his wife and family living with him: I continued to live with him eighteen or nineteen months. During the time I lived with him, from his conduct I think him perfectly deranged; I have seen him lie almost naked for hours together, in the room on the floor before the fire, and I have heard him say that he wished he had been a pig in the West Indies. He swore at the cat, and swore he would throw her on the fire. He used constantly to walk about in his shirt, and he would eat beef almost raw. I left him about June, 1814. After that I went to live at Hockton, a good way off.

ANN PEARCE . In the course of the last year I lived servant with the prisoner Mr. M'Kinrott. I went into his service on the 11th of September last, at 37, Gower-street, Bedford-square; I was living with him when he was apprehended on this charge. The first week I went there I was going to give notice to quit, on account of his strange behaviour, - by storming and raving, in a manner that I never saw any one do before. I was cooking for the family, and at times when I took any thing up to table, he would rave and storm, and one day he put his hand and his mouth to my ear, and holloa'd in such a way as almost to stun me; he did that more than once, and would likewise take a chair and beat the ground-dash it on the ground. He would go about the house with nothing on but his shirt and morning gown. He would come down in that state into the kitchen very often: sometimes for his tobacco. He had his regular supper at ten o'clock, and about one or two he would come down and eat rump steak almost raw; put it upon a bit of bread, and then go up stairs again. In my opinion, I don't think he was a man of sound mind at all.

Mr. JAMES ANDERSON , called and examined by Mr. Reynolds. I was formerly a West India planter at Tortola; I was acquainted with the prisoner there; I knew him in 1803, when he was clerk to Mr. Dougan. He was always a steady, active, stirring man. I came from the West Indies in 1807. I used frequently to meet him on my return loitering about Doctors' Commons. At these different times he used always to address me. His manner of addressing me always betrayed a great degree of incoherency, with a great appearance of wildness in his looks. He always appeared to have a despondency on his mind. I used to meet him after I returned to this country several years afterwards. I have always observed on these occasions, when he has stopped me, some inconsistency in his conduct. From that time I used frequently to meet him on Ludgate Hill, with books under his arm, apparently in the same mood, and I used then to avoid him. From these different opportunities I have had of observing his conduct, I am perfectly convinced ofhis derangement. I returned again from the West Indies about fifteen or sixteen months ago. I saw him two or three weeks previous to his apprehension. I had previously heard of his having obtained a subpoena for Buonaparte. Upon hearing so, I observed this poor man is in the same situation still. Seeing him on Ludgate Hill two or three weeks before his apprehension, I spoke to him from motives of curiosity. I discovered that his mind was in the same state that I had formerly believed it to be in.

Mr. Gurney. My Lord, I think I am bound to call Mr. Clarance and the other witnesses for the prosecution, who had an opportunity of observing the prisoner's conduct about this transaction.

Mr. ARTHUR CLARANCE , re-examined by Mr. Gurney. I have before given an account of the interviews I had with the prisoner; to me he appeared to have the perfect possession of his understanding. Respecting these bills, he always appeared in his right mind.

Cross-examined by Mr. Reynolds. The only part I thought rather strange in Mr. M'Kinrott's conduct, was his conversation about serving a subpoena on Buonaparte. From having belonged to the Northumberland myself, I knew that Buonaparte's evidence would be of no use to him. I know of his actually going to Plymouth for the purpose. I sent him down 50l. whilst he was there, the first time, and 200l. the next.

Re-examined by Mr. Gurney. I do not know whether his serving a subpoena on Buonaparte was a mere pretext to get him on shore.

Mr. HUISH, recalled by Mr. Richardson. I had only one accidental interview with the prisoner after the bills were dishonoured. I heard a conversation between Clarance and the prisoner, which might last for a quarter of an hour; in that conversation I did not perceive any derangement about the prisoner whatever.

Mr. BRIGGS, recalled by Mr. Minchin. I had about six interviews with the prisoner. He did not appear at all deranged to me. I have a letter (producing it) which he sent me, about his being arrested.

(Letter read, addressed to Mr. Briggs, and signed by the prisoner.)

"SIR, - Whilst I was trusting to the faith of your kind promises, your officers took me, and, refusing the common indulgence, brought me at once to the place, whence I now write. I do not doubt that they have deviated from their instructions, and under these circumstances, I flatter myself that you will not refuse my request of an interview, for the purpose of receiving my proposals.

"I am, Sir, your humble servant,

"A. M'KINROTT."

In all the various intercourse with him, he discovered a perfect possession of his mind.

Cross-examined by Mr. Reynolds. I had no other conversation with him but what related to these bills. I did not say any thing to him relating to himself.

Mr. SIRR, recalled by Mr. Richardson. The prisoner came to me to give his signature; I did not discover any derangement in his conduct.

Cross-examined by Mr. Adolphus. He produced his money, and signed his name like any other man.

THE COURT now summed up the whole of the evidence to the Jury, telling them that the first question would be whether the bill in question was a forgery, and whether the prisoner forged it, and uttered it knowing it to be so forged, and if they were satisfied that he did, then they would consider the defence that had been set up, and whether the prisoner, at the time of his forging and uttering the bill, was in such a state of mind as to be answerable for his conduct.

NOT GUILTY,

Upon the ground of Insanity .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Chief Baron Thompson .

212. JOHN WILCOX was indicted, for that he, on the 28th of December , unlawfully, &c. procured thirty-three pieces of false and counterfeit money, made to the likeness and similitude of that silver current coin of this realm termed a sixpence, with an intent unlawfully and deceitfully to utter, and cause and procure them to be uttered, to the liege subjects of our Lord the King .

OTHER COUNTS varying the manner of laying the charge.

HENRY TURNPENNY . I am a constable. On the 28th of December last, I saw the prisoner in St. Martin's-le-Grand, at about three o'clock in the afternoon; he had a basket, which he was carrying in his right hand. In consequence of information which I had received, I followed the prisoner, and caught hold of him. I took hold of the basket, and asked him where he had got that? he told me, it was given me by a woman. I asked him, who that woman was? and he said, she was a shipmate's wife. I asked him, where she was? he said, he could not tell. I took him to a public-house, and searched him; I found nothing about him but two farthings. Thomas Prestridge was with me; he and I searched the basket, and we found it to contain thirty-three bad sixpences, five shillings and nine pence three farthings in copper money, consisting of halfpence and farthings, three shillings and five pence in penny pieces, one red herring, one slice of cheese, two biscuits, a yard of ribbon, two papers of tobacco, each containing about half an ounce, and one ball of cotton. I then took him to the Compter. I asked him where he lived; he told me, at No. 3, Kent-street, on the left hand side of the Borough. I asked him, in what part of the house he lived? and he said, in the front part.

THOMAS PRESTRIDGE . I went to Kent-street in the Borough, but could not find that any such person as the prisoner lived there at all.

Mr. CALEB EDWARD POWELL . I am assistant to the Solicitor for the Mint; I am conversant with base coin; I have examined the sixpences in question; they are all counterfeit.

Defence. A woman, the wife of a shipmate, had given me the basket just before, and I knew nothing whatever of its contents. GUILTY , aged 25.

Fined 1s. and imprisoned a year , and to find sureties for two years .

213. JOSEPH MILLS , WILLIAM CHAPMAN ,and JAMES HODGES , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of January , eight prints, value 2s. the property of Charles Rivers , from his person .

The prosecutor nor witnesses appearing, the prisoners were

ACQUITTED.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

214. JAMES CLOSE was indicted for that he, on the 1st of January , unlawfully and deceitfully did utter to one Robert Cane , a certain false and counterfeit token, made to pass as and for one of certain silver tokens for the sum of three shillings, he well knowing the same to be false and counterfeit .

ROBERT CANE. I am a waiter at the Crown and Shears , which is at Sparrow Corner, Minories ; I am quite sure it is in the City of London. On the 1st of January, the prisoner came to my master's house, between nine and ten at night; he asked for a glass of gin; I served him; he tendered me a three-shilling token in payment; it was not a good one. I suspected him, and detained him, and sent for an officer, Mr. M'Combie; who came, and took him into custody. He said that he could not have the gin, for he had no money. I saw Mr. M'Combie search him, and he had three eighteen-penny pieces, which were good, on him, three good shillings, and tenpence in halfpence. The glass of gin was to have come to two-pence.

(Token produced.)

Robert Cane . That is the token the prisoner tendered to me.

DAVID M'COMBLE. I am a constable; I was sent for to the Crown and Shears. I apprehended the prisoner; I said, governor, I must search you; he said, you are welcome to search me; I have no money at all about me. He had three eighteen-penny pieces, three shillings, all good, and ten-pence in halfpence.

JAMES THURGOOD . I am one of the tellers of the Bank of England. This token is bad; it is a counterfeit; it resembles the three-shilling tokens issued by the Governor and Company of the Bank of England.

GUILTY , aged 42.

Confined six months , and bound to find sureties for his good behaviour for a year .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

215. THOMAS BURGOYNE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of December , one pair of shoes, value 4s. the property of Edward Watkins .

MARIA WATKINS. My husband is a shoe-maker , and lives in Globe-lane, Bethnall-green . About six o'clock in the evening of the 12th of December, I was in the shop when the prisoner at the bar came in, and asked for a pair of second hand shoes, that would come to about three or four shillings. I gave him one of a pair at four shillings, which he tried on, and said it fitted him exceeding well. He asked to look at the other one, and pretended he could not get it on. I told him they were fellows. I saw some more men waiting at the window for him. I turned round to call my husband down; immediately the prisoner ran across the shop to the door, to get out; but I caught him by the coat, pulled him back, and locked the door. He left his own shoes, which were very tidy ones, under the chair.

JAMES CARTER . I am a carpenter. I was just coming out at my door, which is next to Mr. Watkins's; I heard Mrs. Watkins charge the man with stealing the shoes, and I detained him until her husband came down. He had a pair of second hand shoes on.

Prisoner's Defence. I never went out of the house with the shoes.

GUILTY , aged 27.

Confined ten days , and fined 1s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

216. SARAH STURDWICK was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of December , two eighteen-penny bank tokens, one shilling, and sixpence , the property of John Kerslake .

JOHN KERSLAKE . I keep the Crown , in Essex-street, in the Strand . The prisoner was in my service; having several times missed money, I was induced to mark what I left in the till on the night of the 21st of December. At about twenty minutes after eight the next morning, I told one of my daughters to bring me up the till, and then I missed the money in question; at about eleven o'clock in the morning, I went to Bow-street, and got an officer, and stated to him the circumstances. He came down to my house, and ordered her into the dining-room. He told her to produce her money, which she did, to the amount of thirteen or fourteen shillings, and among it was the identical money I had missed from the till. She said, that a gentleman had given it to her in Figtree-court, in the Temple. The officer took her to Bow-street.

ARCHIBALD RUTHWIN. I am an officer belonging to Bow-street. The account the last witness has given is true. The prisoner told me that an old man who used the house, had told her to do it, and to give him part, for that the servant who had the place before her had done it, and she could not be found out. She had given the old man sixpence that morning, and sixpence the morning before.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Confined one month , and fined 1s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

217. SAMUEL ELLIOTT was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Pinson , at about the hour of eight in the night of the 9th of December , with intent to steal .

JOHN PINSON . I live at No. 6, Meeting-housecourt, Shoreditch . I left my house at about seven o'clock in the evening of the 9th of December, perfectly secure in all respects; the window shutters were fastened on the inside. I returned at about a quarter or twenty minutes before eight; when I unlocked the door, the windows were strongly thrown open, and a man jumped out. I found the windowopen. He ran the extent of about fifty yards; I was never three yards from him; I cried stop thief, and a young man named Hunt caught him in his arms. Hunt and myself brought him back to my house, and sent for a police officer. We searched him; but found nothing on him, nor did I miss any thing out of the house. There was some dirt on the chair, under the window. I am positive the prisoner is the man.

Cross-examined by Mr. Reynolds. I am positive I put my shutters to, and fastened them; I can't say what makes me recollect that I did that night; but I am certain I did. The officer and I have had no conversation about what the reward is upon the conviction for burglary; I have heard that there is a reward. The prisoner jumped out of the window with his face towards me.

Q. Is there no place in any part of your room where the prisoner might have been concealed before you went out, without your knowledge - A. There might be, as under the bed, or such a place.

Q. If such a person had been in your house, he might then have bolted out of the window in the manner you have stated - A. He might so, certainly.

ANN PINSON . I am the wife of the last witness. I left the house at about six o'clock in the evening, and left behind me my husband. I came back at about eight o'clock; when I went back, I could not get in. There was an alarm in the court that somebody had broken into the house. There was nothing in the house either disturbed or removed.

THOMAS HUNT . I was standing at my own door, in Long-alley, and I heard the cry of stop thief; I ran, and immediately caught the prisoner round the waist in my arms. The prosecutor was about two yards behind the prisoner. I delivered him into the custody of the officer.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Richards .

218. AUGUSTUS TRAVERS , alias MIRANDA , was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of January , in the dwelling-house of Samuel Stacey , four pounds six shillings in silver, and five 1l. bank notes , the property of Richard Bruton .

RICHARD BRUTON . I slept on the night of the 5th of this month, at the Northumberland Arms ; I had five one-pound notes in my left hand breeches pocket, and four pounds six shillings in silver in my purse, in my right hand pocket; the notes were loose; the silver was in a yellow canvass purse; the silver consisted in three-shilling pieces, eighteen-penny pieces, shillings and sixpences. I put my breeches under my pillow when I went to bed; I am sure the money was safe. When I awoke, at about seven o'clock in the morning, I found my breeches nearly on the outside of the bed; I searched for my property, but when I took up my breeches, I missed the silver directly, by the weight. I felt after the bank notes when I missed the silver, and missed them also. When I missed my property, I went and called the girl, and awakened the landlord, and alarmed the house. The landlord went and fetched the officers.

JAMES JOHN SMITH. I am an officer of Bow-street. I was sent for to the Northumberland Arms, on the 5th of this month. A brother officer named Ruthwin, went with me. I went up into the prosecutor's room first; I did not disturb any of the lodgers until I had searched his room; I found nothing in it, and then searched the room of the prisoner, which was immediately opposite; I knocked two or three times. The prisoner opened it, but had nothing on, but his shirt; he was very agreeable to my searching his room, saying he had been robbed himself. The first thing I saw on the table was a yellow canvass bag, and a shilling, and a sixpence by it. I asked him was it his; he said, yes, and that he received that one shilling and sixpence from the landlord in change the night before. I found a shilling and two sixpences in his waistcoat pocket; I then looked over his bed and about the room. The prisoner then said, as he had been robbed, he hoped the thief might be found out, and he followed me into the different rooms, and seemed desirious to find the thief. We went down stairs,and searched another room; he was not quite dressed, and I told him I did not want him to follow me about. I went up stairs again, and not being satisfied with the search I had made in his room; when I entered the room he was dressed; I missed the bag that had been laying on the table. I asked him where it was, and he denied all knowledge of it, and denied its having been there. I looked round the room, and then took off the bed clothes one by one. On the bed being pulled down from the mattrass, in the middle of the mattrass I saw four eighteen-penny pieces, a shilling, and a sixpence. I then told Ruthwin to go into the different rooms into which the prisoner had followed us, in hopes that he might find the bag, suspecting that the prisoner might have thrown it away, and I saw Ruthwin go over to the fire place in which the prosecutor slept, and pick it up from the fire place, saying, here it lies. I then ordered the prisoner to strip; he stripped to his shirt; I found nothing in his clothes. He sat down on the chair, and I unbuttoned his shirt collar; under his shirt collar there was another collar; I was about to unbutton that, when he was very busy with his hands behind this collar; I then bid him stand up, and underneath him, at his heels, where he sat, I picked up five one-pound notes. I then took him to the watch-house. I have kept one note, to which the prosecutor swears.

ARCHIBALD RUTHWIN. I produce the purse.

James John Smith . That is the purse I saw upon the table.

Archibald Ruthwin. The first thing I saw was this bag doubled up on the table just behind the door in the prisoner's room. There was one and sixpence and a gold brooch, lying by the side of it. I took up the bag, and said to Smith, here is a bag; he said, pooh, that is nothing. We then proceeded to search the other rooms; the prosecutor was not with us at first. The prisoner followed us down stairs: going down stairs, I was not satisfied about the bag, and asked the prosecutor, and he said hispurse was a yellow canvass bag. Smith told the prisoner to return to his room as he did not want him; and he returned to his room for five or six minutes before we went back. Then we went back to the prisoners room again, and on going into the room, both Smith and I asked him what had become of the bag which had been on the table? he denied seeing, or knowing anything of the kind. We then told him we were certain it had been there, and we proceeded to pull the bed clothes off the bed; the landlord's brother laid hold of the bed, and hoisted it off the mattrass, and then we saw some silver lying in the middle. The prisoner denied knowing anything of the money that was under the bed. He did not object to our searching him. Smith said to me, we must have the bag, and I opened the window of the room, to see if it had been thrown out. Smith told me to look in the prosecutor's room, and I looked towards the fire place, and saw it rolled up. I saw Smith pick up the notes from the prisoner's heels. There were no notes on the floor before, for I looked and saw the notes quivering, but whether that was from the wind, or from their having fallen just before, I can't take upon myself to say; I am certain it was impossible for any other person than the prisoner to have put the notes in the place where I saw them. Bruton was up the second time, but not the first. Upon this we took the prisoner to the watchhouse. Bruton told us that the notes he had lost smelled very strongly of musk. These notes did so, enough to knock a person down. I knew the purse to be the same, on account of the shortness of the strings. We examined the prosecutor's room at first, and I am sure it was not there then.

Richard Bruton . I was so frightened that I did not go up the first time. This bag is very like mine but as for swearing downright to it, I can't, This note I can swear to, it is one of the five I lost.

Prisoner's Defence. I was fast asleep when he knocked at the door. I jumped out of the bed and opened it. He said he wished to search the room. and I told him he was welcome. On the table there was nothing but a pair of gloves, and one shilling and sixpence. I went down stairs with them; Mr. Smith said he did not want me, and I went up stairs again and dressed myself; then they came up again, and Mr. Smith made me strip myself. I was untying my neck cloth behind, and Mr. Smith picked these notes from right under me. There were other people in the room, and I knew nothing at all of the notes. There were nothing else found. There were four pounds six shillings in silver, and it is not very likely I should throw that out of the window, He said nobody else could put the notes under the chair. and the room is only five feet long.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 22.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Richards .

219. GEORGE TREADWELL and JEMIMA TREADWELL were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Baxter about the the hour of one in the night of the 12th of December , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, two petticoats, value 10s. two shifts, value 10s. two gowns, value 1l. two silk petticoats, value 1l. two sheets, value 10s. one childs shirt, value 2s. one towel, value 1s. one pelisse, value 2s. one scarf, value 1l. one spencer, value 10s. one nightcap, value 6d. one piece of cotton, value 1s. one pair of stoekings, value 6d. one table-cloth, value 6d. two pictures, value 1s. one lace cap, value 1s. one lace, veil, 1l. two pairs of silk stockings, value 14s. five yards of sarsenett, value 2l. and eight hundred and eighty four halfpence, value 1l. 16s. 10d. the property of the said John Baxter.

JOHN BAXTER . I am a hatter , and live in the precinct of St. Catherine's . I went out on the night of the 12th of December, at seven o'clock, and I returned at about twelve. The boy let me in, and on my coming in, I shut the door to, and double locked it. I had then some conversation with the boy, and then went to bed. I was awakened between four and five o'clock in the morning, by the patrole and my apprentice who came into my room. The patrole told me he had found the door open, and he believed the house had been robbed. I got up and came down stairs, and in the front room I found the drawers had been opened, and the things had been taken out; I can't say how they had been opened, but the front of the secretary had been wrenched open. In different parts of the room, bundles of linen, books and things, had been moved out of the place where they had been left. I missed some halfpence, and in consequence of something that I heard from my apprentice I suspected the female prisoner; I desired the boy to stay in the house with his mistress, and I told the patrole to go to the end of the court where the prisoners lived, and to stop any suspicious characters that might pass by, I went to Lambeth-street office, and asked where I could find the nearest officer,and I was refered to Ebenezer Dalton . I called him, and he answered me, and I told him to come immediately for that my house had been broken open. He came with me to my house, and saw the state of place in the same manner I have described. Thence we went to the house where the prisoner lodged; I did not miss anything but halfpence at first. In the hurry we could not tell what we had missed. We knocked at the door, and we were near twenty minutes or half an hour before we could obtain admittance up stairs in the room where the prisoners lodged. The female prisoner was up and dressed; the prisoners were only lodgers. The patrole hallooed out from below, that a bundle had been thrown out at the window. The prisoner occupied a front and a back room. They are father and daughter. The patrole brought the bundle up, and two miniature pictures. I identified them immediately, they were the miniatures for myself and my wife. In the bundle there was one scarf which I could swear to. We took the two prisoners and the bundle up to Lambeth-street, and on searching them, we found nothing on them, but took the two keys of the rooms, and went back to the house. In the window of the front room, I found a viel, a lace cap, and two pairs of silk stockings, one pair white, and the other pair black; they were my property. Outside the window of the back room, we found the halfpence tied up ina shawl, and a piece of silk was under the halfpence; the halfpence had been in a tray outside the door in my house. The old man was undressed and in bed. We produced a chissel to him, and he said he said he believed it to be his; I have dogs, but they did not bark that night. All my family were gone to bed when I came home, except the boy, who let me in. I left the key on the inside of the lock, when I double locked it.

JOHN CURTIS . I remember the night of the 12th or the morning of the 13th. In the discharge of my duty I tried every door as I passed along. At about a quarter before two, the Tower clock had just gone the three quarters of an hour. I shoved my elbow against Mr. Baxter's door, and almost fell in. I knocked twice at the door with the handle of my cutlass, and said, house a boy; and a female voice answered, thank you sir; and somebody shut the door. I went past the door three times, and tried it and found it fast until about twenty minutes before five, when I found it open again. I knocked at the door, and a young man came out in his shirt, and said thank you patrole; I believe he is the apprentice. He asked me to get a light, and he said all was not right. I went to the watchman's box, and got a light, and took it to the house. As soon as he had shut the street door, he said, the back door is open, all is not right; the back door was about half open. We proceeded up stairs, and called his master; at that time we passed through the dining room, and saw the things all in confusion. Mr. Baxter got up, and he told me to go to the court where the prisoner lived, and not to suffer any body to pass either in or out, and I went and watched. He afterwards went away. I waited until Mr. Dalton, and he came back. We all went to the house together, we were some time before we could gain admitance. A bundle come out of the front window, I immediately took possession of it, and carried it up stairs, and gave it to Mr. Dalton.

I sleep in my master's shop. On the 12th of December, I went to bed at about half past eleven o'clock. At about a quarter before one, Mr. Baxter come home; I had double locked the door, and my master double locked it again when he came in. With that he went up stairs, and I went to bed again, and fell asleep. In about an hour afterwards, between sleep and awake, I thought I heard a female voice say, hush, the door is fast; that voice resembled Jemima Treadwells ; I got out of bed, and opened the shop door. I went to bed again, and fell asleep, and was awakened by the patrole knocking at the door; the door was open then. I went up stairs, and alarmed Mr. Baxter, he got up, and come down stairs.

EBENEZER DALTON . I remember the night of the 12th of December, or rather the morning of the 13th, I went up stairs, and found the things all in confusion, and the things tied up ready to be carried away. I saw a chissel there; I have it in my possession; it exactly corresponds with the marks on the drawers. After this, I went with Mr. Baxter to the prisoner's house; after knocking at the door twenty minutes or half an hour, we got admittance; in going up stairs, we heard the casement open; I desired the patrole to go outside the door in case any thing should be thrown out of the window. I went into the room. and found the window open, as I expected; this was the second floor front room. I had not beed in the room more than half a minute before the female prisoner came in nearly dressed; the man was in bed. I searched the room, and then the patrole brought the bundle of clothes up to me, and afterwards the pictures. I searched the window, but was not very particular, because I supposed the bundle contained the whole of the stolen property. I took the prisoners to Lambeth-street office, and locked them up. We then came back again; I unlocked the front room, and there I found two pairs of silk stockings, a lace veil, and a cap. I then went into the back room, and out of the back window, into the gutter; I found one pound sixteen shillings in halfpence, and a piece sarsenet; they were tied up in a shawl. I locked the room up, and took the rest of the property to the office. I shewed the chissel to the man prisoner, I asked him if he had lost any tools, and he said, not that he knew of. I pulled the chissel out of my pocket, and said, is not this yours; he said, he had one like it. There was a lanthorn on the table, which I took in my hand; I opened it, and found in it a match; I felt to the candle, and it did not appear to have been long put out.

George Treadwell 's Defence. In the unfortunate situation in which am I placed, it is difficult for me to convince a jury of my innocence. On the night in question, at a little before ten, I retired to rest, fatigued with a hard day's labour, leaving my daughter sitting up at work. Having lived a sober life, ever marked by honesty and integrity, let my horror be imagined, when I was awakened from my sleep, charged with being an accessory with my own daughter in a burglary. Painful as the task is to me, it is my duty, when I am put upon my trial, for an offence of which I am totally innocent, though unfortunately labour under strong circumstances of suspicion, to declare my innocence, and plead my bitherto unblemished character. The articles must have been brought into my premises between the time of my going to bed, and my being awakened. I refer to the prosecutor for a character. I am at a loss to describe my feelings; yet I know my innocence. I have been ten years a house-keeper in the neighbourhood in which I lately resided. I throw my unfortunate case on the Court and Jury, and shall rest satisfied with their decision.

Jemima Treadwell 's Defence. I am guilty of the charge that is laid to me; but my father is innocent.

The prosecutor and several other respectable witnesses gave the prisoner George Treadwell , the character of being an honest, sober, industrious man.

JEMIMA, TREADWELL, GUILTY - DEATH ,

aged 23.

Of stealing to the amount of 40s. in the dwelling-house .

GEORGE TREADWELL , NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson .

219. PATRICK BURKE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of September, 1815 , one 50l. bank note, the property of the Hon. James Butler , in his dwelling-house .

JAMES BUTLER , ESQ. On the 15th or 16th of September last, the prisoner was footman to me, and had been so seven or eight years; I lived in New Burlington-street , at the time I lost this note; I am not certain whether it was in a drawer, or in my clothes; I missed it on the 15th or 16th, and had seen it on the day before. I had given notice at the Bank of England to stop the payment of it, and in consequence, I saw it on Thursday last. It was one of the six fifty-pound notes which I received on the day previous to my losing it. I charged my servants generally at the time, and they all denied it, and agreed I should examine their boxes, which I did, with the assistance of a police officer.

GEORGE ASCOTT. I belong to Sir Richard Carr Glynn and Co's Bank. I made a payment to the Hon Mr. Butler, personally of three hundred pounds, in six fifty-pound notes; the number of one of them was "938, and it was dated 21st of July, 1815".

ANDREW LUFNER, ESQ. I gave the Hon. Mr. Butler the draft, in payment of which, I understand he received the note in question, among others.

JOHN ALLWORK . I am shopman to Mr. Johnson, hosier, in Cheapside. I know the person of the prisoner at the bar; he came to my master's shop, between five and six o'clock on Wednesday evening last; he purchased articles in my master's line of business to the amount of sixteen pounds; he tendered in payment a fifty-pound Bank of England note, and gave me, as his direction, " James Bruce , 58, Tottenham-court-road." The next morning, by the desire of my master, I took the same note to the Bank of England, where I was informed that the payment of it was stopped, as it was a lost note. The prisoner did not receive the change at the time he purchased the goods; he was to come the next day for it. On the following day, a letter was brought to the shop, by a witness who will be examined, named James Sullivan ; that letter I delivered to my master, and he told me to go to Mr. Butler, which I accordingly did, and gave him some information.

BENJAMIN JOHNSON . I am a hosier, in Cheapside. The prisoner came to make a purchase as my servant has related; he tendered a fifty-pound note in payment, and I heard him give his address as" James Bruce , 58, Tottenham-court-road." The next day I sent Allwork to the Bank with that note. The prisoner was to have called the next day for the change; but he sent Sullivan with a letter to me, and then in consequence of information which I received from the Bank, I sent to Mr. Butler.

FRANCIS SULLIVAN . I am footman to Captain Burke . I had only known the prisoner at the bar four or five days; he asked me if I would take a letter to Mr. Johnson's for him; I told him I would, and I accordingly did so; the note was directed to Mr. Johnson, in Cheapside; the prisoner went with as far as the corner of St. Paul's-church-yard, where he waited. I delivered the note to Mr. Johnson, and Mr. Butler went back with me to see who the person was who had given me the note, and on perceivings it was the prisoner, he brought him back to Mr. Johnson's shop, and an officer was sent for. The prisoner told me what I was to get; he said he had been purchasing sixteen pounds worth of goods of Mr. Johnson, and the reason he did not like to go to the shop himself was because the shopman persuaded him to buy more goods than he wanted, and he did not like to trust himself in the shop again.

CHARLES CHRISTIE . I am an inspector of the Bank. I produce the note which was stopped, which was for payment of fifty-pounds; the number is "938, and the date the 21st of July, 1815."

George Ascott . That note corresponds, and I know it to be one of the notes I paid to the Hon. Mr. Butler.

GEORGE VERNON . I am an officer. I took the prisoner into custody at Mr. Johnson's shop, on Thursday last.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing about the note; I never stole a shilling of Mr. Butler's in my life.

GUILTY , aged 34.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

220. JUDAH POLLOCK , JOSEPH NEAL , and JAMES HARRIS , were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Henry Hart , at about the hour of seven in the night of the 13th of December, 1815 , with intent to steal, and for burglariously stealing therein, one looking-glass, value 2l. sixty yards of carpeting, value 5l. one bed, value 3l. three blankets, value 1l. four bolsters, value 2l. two pillows, value 10s. one quilt, value 2l. one sofa-cover, value 10s. six curtains, value 6s. one set of bed furniture, value 2l. the property of the said Henry Hart .

HENRY HART . I live at No. 10, Garden-place ; I rent the whole house, which is a private one. The furniture mentioned in the indictment was the furniture of that house. I left Town on the 13th of December, in the morning; I had fastened the shutters of my windows, and then double locked the door; I have no family; I always slept in that house when I was in Town. On the 17th, before I returned, I had information that my house had been robbed. It appeared to me, on my arrival, by marks of violence on the door, that it had been forced; when I got into the house, I perceived that all the articles named in the indictment were gone, the sixty yards of carpeting I immediately missed from the stairs; a bed, worth five pounds; a lookingglass, worth two pounds; a set of bed furniture, worth two pounds, and all the other articles. I saw these things on the morning of the 15th, in the possession of Sapwell. I came to town between the hours of ten and eleven in the morning.

THOMAS SAPWELL . I am an officer of theCity of London. I know Mr. Hart's house. On the evening of Wednesday, the 13th of December, about eight o'clock, I received information of a cart going up Bishopagate-street. I took Gildersleave and Bengough with me. When I came, the cart was coming out of Sweet Apple-court, which is about ten minutes walk from the prosecutor's house; I searched the cart, but found nothing in it. I then left Gildersleave and Bengough in the court with the cart; I then went into Pollock's room; I knew his person; he lived in that neighbourhood; I found Pollock in a room in that neighbourhood; when I opened the door, Pollock was behind the door; Neale was in the same room, standing up opposite to the door, and Harris was sitting by the fire place, and there was no fire in the grate. I then called to Gildersleave to assist me in taking them; as soon as he came in, Bengough came in, and told me that the man in the cart had made his escape. This room is in a house nearly opposite to where the cart stood. I then asked Pollock if the things on the ground were his things; (those were the things which are the subject of the present indictment;) I asked him was that his room, and he said it was, and he gave me the key of it, and he said that the man who had made his escape, had brought the goods there. I then asked Neal how he came there, and whether he knew any thing of the goods, and he said he knew nothing about them, he came to see Pollock. I asked Harris, and he told me the same. I secured them, and searched them; but found nothing at all upon them. On searching the room, I found all the things named in the indictment. I then secured the prisoners, and we took them to the watchhouse, and returned back to Pollock's room. In the room Gildersleave found four pick-lock keys, in my presence, in the dresser, and a bunch of keys besides, which were not picklock keys; keys of different sizes; but no one of them would open Hart's house. In the chimney I found an iron crow; it was not visible until I got up the chimney; there was a cupboard by the side of the chimney, and the crow was shoved through; I found part in the cupboard and part in the chimney; it could not be visible in the cupboard; I found nothing else at all. I went to Mr. Hart's house on the Friday following; there is a mark of something on the door; I found an impression on the door, which appeared to me to be matched by the end of the crow; Mr. Hart was present at the time. I tried some of the pick-lock keys. I am not able to tell you how the persons obtained entrance.

MATTHEW GILDERSLEAVE . I am a constable. On the Wednesday evening at about ten minutes before eight, I was parading up and down Bishopsgate-street. I went up Sweet Apple-court and saw the cart standing empty facing of Pollock's house. I looked about it, and could perceive no number on it. I immediately went to Mr. Sapwell, and informed him, and then he came along, and brought me and Bengough. Then the cart was coming out of the court, upon which Mr. Sapwell stopped it; and searched it, but found nothing in it. I staid below to mind it, with Bengough, and soon after Sapwell called out for me to come and assist him to secure the prisoners. I know nothing more than what Sapwell has related.

ROBERT BENGOUGH . I am a patrole. I knew nothing more than that I was taken as an assistant, and went into room where the prisoners were I know no more than what Sapwell and Gildersleve have related.

SAMUEL SHEPPARD . I am an officer of Bishop's gate. The prisoners were brought to the watchhouse te me, and lodged in my custody.

BENJAMIN MILLARD . I am a toll-man. I only know of taking two pence of that cart, that night; in Bishopagate-street; I don't know who were in the cart. One man was leading the horse, Pollock was some distance behind, and he paid me the two pence for going up that way. The cart went up Sweet Apple-court laden; that was a quarter before eight o'clock. I never heard anything of this until the Friday afterwards. My stand is at the corner of Sun-street, about three doors from Sweet Apple-court. Pollock carries goods for any one.

LOUISA COUZENS. I sell fruit at the corner of Dunnings-alley, Bishopsgate-street, which is about six or seven houses from Sweet Apple-court. I was at my barrow at about a quarter before eight, talking with Mr. Millard, the toll-man: he said there were two pence more for him; he said that to me, and went away. I just turned round and saw the end of the cart going up Sweet Apple-court. I did not see the persons who were in the cart.

WILLIAM ORR . I am a publican, and live in Angel-alley, Bishopsgate-street; my sign is the Three Jolly Weavers. I know nothing only that the three prisoners were in my house on the evening that the robbery was committed; but previous to it. They were there between four and five o'clock; they were all in the tap-room.

Harris's Defence. I left my work at four o'clock, and had got some eggs to take to a gentleman. I went down to his house, but he was not there. I heard of a Free and Easy; I was in company with this young man Neale, and asked him to come and spend the evening with me at the Free and Easy; he said he had got no money, but however, he went along with me, and going through Sweet Applecourt, and seeing a light in Pollock's room, I said we will go and see the wooden legged man, as he is at home, and have a bit of fun with him. We went in, and had not been in five minutes, when Sapwell came in. That is all I wish to say.

Neale's Defence. I don't wish to say anything further than this young man has said.

Pollock's Defence. I keep a horse and cart, and a man came to me, and asked me to lend him the horse and cart, for which he paid me four and six-pence. He brought the goods to my house, and requested me to let him leave them in my house for one week; immediately when he had put them in, Mr. Sapwell came in and asked who the place belonged to, and I told him it belonged to me, and they immediately took me into custody.

POLLOCK, GUILTY - DEATH .

NEALE, NOT GUILTY .

HARRIS, NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

221. THOMAS HARRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of January , two pellisses, value 2l. the property of James Appleby .

JOHN SPINK . I am a pewterer. I was coming from Shoreditch with a load, and rested opposite Mr. Appleby's. I saw the prisoner in company with another lad, and the other lad took the pelisses off. which was hanging outside the door; I saw the prisoner brought back, but not the property. The two lads were in company together close by the door.

MATTHEW GILDERSLEAVE , At about a quarter before three, on Saturday last, I was sent for to Mr. Appleby's house, and he gave me charge of the prisoner.

JAMES APPLEBY . I live at 37, Bishopsgate-street . I lost two pelisses on Saturday last, but did not see them taken; I saw them about an hour before I was told they were gone; a person brought the prisoner in; that person is not here.

GUILTY, aged 16.

Judgment respited .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant

222. MARY BREWSTER was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of December , one shawl, value 1s. and one apron, value 1s. the property of Mary Kindon .

MARY KINDON . I live at 18, Wine-court, Lance-street, Spitalfields . On Saturday the 16th of December, I had a shawl and apron hanging in the yard of the house where I live; I saw them between six and seven in the evening; the door is generally left open.

ROBERT HOUTON . I live in this house; I was going to my labour, and found the prisoner in the passage; she was a stranger, and I asked her where she had been, she said she had been backwards. In consequence of information which the landlady gave me, I followed her, and brought her back, and took the shawl and apron from her. I took her to Worshop-street, where she was committed.

(Property produced, and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I did not steal them, but found them in the yard; I asked the people in the house who had lost them, and the woman's mother said, my poor woman go about your business; but the man kept me.

GUILTY , aged 54.

Confined six months , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

223. CHARLOTTE CHAPMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of December , two pounds weight of bacon, value 15d. the property of Samuel Jones .

ELIAS ABRAHAM JONES . I am apprentice to the prosecutor, who keeps a cheesemonger's shop in Norton Falgate . At abovt five in the evening of the day in the indictment, the prisoner came into the shop and asked the price of a piece of bacon, it weighed about a pound and a half; I told her six-pence a pound; she offered five pence. While I went to the other end of the shop, she put the bacon in question under her cloak; it was worth about ten-pence.

WILLIAM FLINT . I am a constable. I searched the prisoner, and found only five halfpence, and a farthing on her.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY , aged 48.

Confined six weeks , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

224. EDWARD TAYLOR and ROBERT WILLIAM TAYLOR were indicted for that they, upon the back of a certain order, for the delivery of goods,(to wit,) for the delivery of seven hundred and twenty nine hides, the tenor of which was as followeth , that is to say.

"No. 14, London, 26th of July. 1814.

"To the Superintendant of the London Docks,

"PLEASE weigh, transfer, or deliver, to the order of Mr. P. Broadmead, the undermentioned goods entered by us in the ship, Hope, Capt, Lyal, from Cadiz. No. -

Mark

N

654

75

B.

C

Hides.

For Sir John Lubbock and Co.

J. Dennington."

And that they on the 16th of February, 1815, at St. Mary-le-how, feloniously did falsely make, forge, and counterfeit, and willingly did act, and assist in the false making, forging, and counterfeiting, a certain order, for the delivery of the said goods, the tenor of which is as followeth.

"Deliver the within, to Messrs. widow Robert Taylor and sons; they paying all charges.

"February 16, 1815."Signed P. Broadmead, with intention to defraud the London Dock Company ." And other counts, only varying the manner of charging them.

JOHN WILLIAM LUBBOCK ESQ . I am in partnership with John Lubbock . We had been in the habit of employing the prisoners as our brokers . On the decease of the father, we employed the widow and sons. In the month of June, 1814, we had some hides which come from Cadiz in the ship Hope; they were in the London Docks. We employed the firm of widow Robert Taylor , and Co. in which the prisoner Edward Taylor was a partner, and as our brokers for the purpose of disposing of them. A contract was sent to us in the month of June for these hides. I have seen Edward Taylor write, but not sufficiently to speak to his hand writing; I believe this contract to be the hand writing of Edward Taylor . I afterwards gave orders to the London Dock Company to deliver the hides into the hands of Edward Taylor , and Co. These hides were in the Docks. Some time afterwards, we made a demand of these goods, and found that they were gone. In consequence of that, we brought an action against the London Dock Company. We directed a letter to the person purporting to be the purchaser; I saw Mr. Broadmead in court; I had some conversation withthe prisoner Edward Taylor , in November, after this contract, with respect to the payment of the money; I gave him to the end of the year to pay for the hides, which we supposed to have been transfered to Broadmead; I had not seen Broadmead then. After I had seen Broadmead, I never communicated to the prisoner Edward Taylor , what he said. In March, 1815, we received a communication from Henry Taylor that the hides were not transfered to Broadmead; he wished that the contract might be cancelled, as the goods were safe, and undisposed of; I said I would have nothing to do with it.

Mr. Gurney, by the permission of the court, postponed the cross-examination of this gentleman, until the rest of the case on the part of the prosecution was gone through.

JAMES DOMINGTON . I look at the contract in question; I think it is the hand writing of Edward Taylor . In consequence of that contract, an order was sent to the brokers for the London Dock Company, to deliver the hides to them. (The order produced.) This is the order; it is dated the "26th of July," I signed it for Messrs. Lubbock, in the ordinary course of my business. I look at the indorsement on the back of the order; I don't know whose hand writing it is; I have not a sufficient knowledge of the hand writing of the prisoner Edward Taylor to say that is is his; it has a similarity to his hand writing; but I have not a strong belief.

COURT. I don't think this will do.

Q. After you sent that order to Messrs. Taylor, had you any conversation with them respecting the execution of the contract, and the delivery of the goods - A. The goods were not weighed until some time afterwards; we requested him to let the goods be weighed. Edward Taylor requested time, and said the goods were not wanted, and that they might remain in the Dock longer. In the interval between the purchase and the time of payment, he requested and extension of time.

Q. On whose behalf - A. It was always understood on the behalf of the buyer. The reason assigned was that the goods were not of the quality that they were expected to be when brought; I did not hear any other reason assigned. At another period the goods could not be received when applied for, because it was alledged that the duty had not been paid. It was Edward Taylor that stated this to us; it was the duty of one of our clerks to have paid it. The observation was made by Edward Taylor , because it was alledged by the Docks that the duty was not paid.

Cross-examined by Mr. Andrews. The duties were not paid until November; then I learned what Edward Taylor said was true. Duties were paid, as I think, a second time, in November; it was the business of our house to pay the duties, which might amount to about thirty pounds, or twenty-five pounds.

Re-examined by the COURT. The clerk whose duty it was to have paid the duties, always asserted that they were paid; but the London Dock Company denied that they were paid. There was no appearance of their having been paid; that clerk's name was Samuel Ki zey; I don't know where he is now. There is a clerk in Court, who will explain whether or not, or receipt papers for these duties; not attending to the Custom House business myself, I am not aware.

JAMES CULVERWELL . Some years ago, I was in the house of Messrs. Taylor. I have seen Edward Taylor's hand writing; but not the other prisoner's; as he had only then just come from school I was in the habit of doing business upon paper, on Edward Taylor 's hand writing. I look at the contract, and I should suppose it to be the hand writing of Edward Taylor .

Q. Now look at the indorsement on the back of the order in question, and say whose hand writing you believe that to be - A. This I am not positive about; it certainly has something of a resemblance to Mr. Edward Taylor 's hand writing.

Q. Whose hand writing do you believe it to be - A. It has a resemblance to Edward Taylor's hand writing.

Q. Have you no belief - A. I believe it has a resemblance.

Q. Do you believe it, or not, to be his - A. It certainly has more the resemblance of his, than any one's else.

Q. You being a clerk in his house, would you, or not, have acted upon an order in that hand writing - A. I think I should.

Q. Have you any doubt - A. It would depend upon circumstances; if it were for the delivery of goods, or money, I should not have acted upon it; if it were for a trival, (I mean a thing of small value,) I might.

Q. Once more; whose hand writing do you believe it to be? have you, or have you not, a belief - A. I have a belief; but I can't give an affirmative or a negative answer. There are some parts that have a resemblance, and others have not.

Q. Do you know any thing of the signature "P. Broadmeed," - A. I do not.

JAMES FISHER . I was clerk to Messrs. Widow Robert Taylor , and sons, for a short time; I was there in the month of October, 1814, and remained there until the March following. During the time I was there, I was in the habit of transacting business upon written orders of Mr. Edward Taylor. I was in the habit of sending goods from the London Docks to Messrs. Taylor's warehouse, upon orders written by Mr. Edward Taylor ; I did that very frequently; some times to a large amount; sometimes to a less, as it happened.

(The order in question, put into the hands of the witness.)

Q. Look at the indorsement on the back of that order. If that paper had come to your hands, should you, or should you not, have acted upon it as Edward Taylor 's hand writing - A. I think I should.

Q. From the knowledge you have of this hand writing, do you believe that to be his hand writing-

A. It has a great resemblance to it.

Q. Would you have acted upon it unless you believed it to be his handwriting? You told me just now, you would have acted upon it; I ask you whether you believe it to be his handwriting? - A. I think it is. I either took that order to the Docks myself, or delivered it to the carman, for the purpose of being taken; I can't tell which. I was directed to send the goods, to which the order refers, to our warehouse; I cannot remember at this distance of time from whom I received my direction, but I believe from Mr. Edward Taylor ; I generally received my directions from him, and I suppose I received the directions respecting these goods from him also. I do not recollect going to the London Dock with that order; to the best of my recollection I had the order from Mr. Edward Taylor . I don't recollect whether, in consequence of my going to the London Docks, that the goods to which the order refers were afterwards delivered to the premises of Mr. Taylor; I suppose that they were, but I did not see them put in. I don't recollect whether any one accompained me to the London Docks. I know William Tomlins ; he was always employed by our house as carter.

Q. I see upon this paper the words

"deliver to Tomlin's cart." Look at that, and tell me whose handwriting it is. - A. That is my own handwriting. The memorandum in red ink was made after it went to the London Docks. I look at the bottom of the order; there's P. Broadmead.

Q. Do you know that handwriting - A. I was not much in the habit of seeing Mr. Robert Taylor write; but there is a slight resemblance.

Q. I observed, before you mentioned the name of Robert Taylor , you paused. With respect to the signature, can you speak more certainly than you have done - A. Mr. Robert Taylor did very little in the counting-house, and I had not the opportunity of observing his handwriting; it is very much like what I recollect to be his handwriting, but I cannot say that I believe it to be so. I recollect the time after Sir John Lubbock brought the action against the London Dock Company, Mr. E. Taylor sent me a note. In consequence of that note I went to him. He said,

"I sent for you, Mr. Fisher, to know whether you know any thing about a parcel of hides of Sir John Lubbock 's." He said, "that he was in hopes (to the best of my recollection I am speaking) all but these hides would be settled." I think he said he got his brother Robert to indorse an order; I think he said so. He said, "either to save time or trouble;" the trouble of sending to the country.

You have said that he said he got his brother to sign it, and that his brother signed it; which did he say, "that his brother signed," or "that he got his brother to sign" - A. I can't say which. It was either to save the time, or save the trouble, of sending it to the country.

THOMAS MIDDLETON . I am a clerk in the house of Messrs. Doricn and Co; the house of Messrs. Taylor kept cash there; I had opportunities of seeing the handwriting of Mr. Edward Taylor .

Q. Will you look at the indorsement on that order, and tell me whose handwriting you believe it to be A. I cannot speak with certainty. If it is Mr. Taylor's handwriting it is counterfeited, and I can't tell.

Q. If you had received that in an order on your bank, would you have cashed it - A. The middle line "Widow Robert Taylor and Sons" bears a resemblance, but I cannot say that it is his handwriting.

Q. Had a draft been presented with these words signed to it, would you have paid it - A. I might have had a doubt at the moment, and have consulted some of the firm.

Q. But upon the whole, what is your belief - A. It appears to me as a counterfeit.

Q. Do you mean the whole, or these words - A. I mean the whole altogether.

Q. But if these words were signed - A. If these very words were to it, I should hesitate in taking it. I only think it resembles the handwriting of Mr. Edward Taylor .

PHILIP BROADMEAD . I am a tannes, and live in Somersetshire. I dealt with old Mr. Robert Taylor when he was alive, in the purchasing of hides, as his principal. Since his death, I have not given any contract to any one for the purchase of hides from Sir John Lubbock and Co. I now look at the order, and see the name P. Broadmead.

Q. Is that your signature - A. No.

Q. Did you direct any one to sign that for you - A. No; I have nothing to do with the contract whatever; I did not hear any thing of it until the 8th or 9th of March.

JAMES NORTHCOTE . I am a clerk at No. 3 warehouse, in the London Docks. We had some hides in the month of June, 1810, in the Docks, belonging to Sir John Lubbock and Co.; a part was shipped off soon after they first came in, and then there remained 729; they continued in their name at the Docks until; the 9th November, 1814, (a paper put into the hand of witness); they were then transfered to the name of P. Broadmead by virtue of this paper which I hold in my hand. They remained in his name until the 16th February, 1814, when they were delivered under an order, brought either on that day or the 17th. They were delivered under the authority of this order. I read it, "Deliver the leather to Widow Robert Taylor and Sons, they paying all charges." By virtue of this they were delivered. The clerk brought it, and I recollect receiving it from him. I then put my initials upon it, as an authority for the warehouseman to deliver them to the carter. I recollect they were delivered to Tomlin. I don't recollect that he was at the door, but I recollect he was there during the time. I kept that order until there was an application made by Sir John Lubbock .

WILLIAM TOMLINS . I am a carman. I did the Dock business for Messrs. Robert Taylor and Co. On the 16th of February, I took hides from the London Docks to their warehouses. I can't take upon myself to say that I saw the order, nor that I went with the carts myself.

WILLIAM JOHNSON. I am chief clerk to the London Dock Company. Mr. Inglis is the Treasurer, and has been so six or seven years; he keepsthe seal of the Company, and during the last six or seven years he has uniformly done such business as is required of the Treasure.

JOHN GATTY. I am an officer of the Thames Police. I was employed to apprehend Mr. Edward Taylor . I found him at his house in George-street in the Adelphi. He had just arisen. I told him the occasion that brought me there, and shewed him the warrant, and the words "on suspicion of forgery." He repeated them, and laid an emphasis on the words "on suspicion." He expressed surprise at being apprehended on a Sunday, and said that he thought it very strange and very hard. There was nothing in his conduct more than happened every day in the mercantile world, and he had not intended any fraud or injury to any one. That he had not concealed any thing, nor withheld any information that he could give to be useful. That he had attended at Westminster for that purpose, and that he had prepared a writing which he meant to publish to prove his innocence. As I waited a considerable time for him, and there was a great deal more conversation passed, I said, Did not your brother-

COURT. We can't hear what one prisoner says, either for or against another.

Witness (in continuance). I asked him whether he wrote the indorsement, and he replied, No. Afterwards he again repeated what he had before stated of his having communicated every thing he knew. He said he told the Solicitor, Mr. Teasdale, who it was that signed the name, P. Broadmead, and I said,"you must have told him it was your brother." He said, I did. I afterwards took Robert William Taylor . He asked me, if it was any thing of a very serious nature? and I told him, I feared it was; I told him it was for some goods obtained from the London Docks, upon an order purporting to be written by Broadmead, and I asked him if that order was written by Broadmead, and he said no. I said, in point of fact, is there such a person as Mr. Broadmead? he said, he believed there was, and that his name was Philip. He said, he was innocent of any evil intention; he said, he hoped that there was no harm in it. I asked him, if he wrote the name to the indorsement; he owned that he did, but said he was innocent of any evil intention.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Did he not say, "is there any harm in it? I am here; I had no evil intention" - A. Yes; Mr. Edward Taylor said he had attended on Mr. Teasdale, as Solicitor for the London Dock Company, and told him what the transaction was.

Q. What he said he thought was no harm was his signing his principal's name without his principal's knowledge - A. Yes.

Q. And he said, what he had done he did without the least intention to defraud any one - A. He did.

A long tissue of documentary evidence, from the books of the London Dock Company, and parcel evidence was gone into, and which is unimportant here to repeat, to prove that Mr. Tnglis was the treasurer of the London Dock Company, both at the time of the commission of this forgery, and also at the time of the present trial. However, the gentlemen engaged for the prosecution relied mainly on the proof of his being treasurer, upon the evidence of William Johnson , who proved, that for the last six or seven years he had in all respects executed all the requisite duties of the treasure, and had kept the Company's seal.

(The contract was here put in and read.)

London, 8th June, 1814.

Sold upon the account of Sir John Lubbock,

To Mr. P. Broadmead,

About 778 Hides, per lay for Commerce, at 11 1/2d. Per lb. Your obedient humble servants,

Widow Robert Taylor and Sons.

The order for the re-housing of these hides, in the name of the supposed purchaser, Mr. Broadmead, was now put in and read.

London, 16th November, 1814. Please to re-house the within to the name of P. Broadmead.

Case for Sir John Lubbock and Co.

The order in question was now read, being the same as we have set forllr in the indictment.

JOHN WILLIAM LUBBOCK, Esq. now called again, and cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. I have no other partner than my father, Sir John Lubbock, in our mercantile concern.

Q. I observe that this contract comprehends a much larger quantity of hides than the commerce. It is 773. The price of the first parcel of hides was a little more than 2200l. - A. Yes, it was.

Q. And Mr. Taylor paid you that 2200l. for them - A. They were paid for at the time they came due. Mr. Taylor had been long employed by our house as broker.

Q. I need not ask you, if you had great confidence in his integrity - A. He did all the business in our line.

Q. I believe, at the very time of this transaction, he had many thousand pounds worth of your goods in his possession - A. He made a sale of goods to the amount of 9000l. and they were in his warehouse. The other goods of the Commerce were delivered in October. They were kept back for the small sum of duty; but the same delivery which was had upon the order in question in February, might have been obtained six months sooner, upon payment of the duty.

Q. If these had been delivered in the month of October, have you the least doubt that they would have been paid for also - A. I think that there is every reason to suppose that they would.

Q. Then I would ask you from all this, do you think he intended to commit any fraud - A. I do not think that at the time he gave me the contract, he ever intended to defraud me of the amount, but to fulfil it by paying the amount.

Q. And but for his subsequent failure, do you mean to say he would not have done it - A. I attributed it to his failure, and I founded that opinion from the hides being in his warehouse at the time of the failure.

Q. And before the failure, he sent word to you that he wished the contract to be cancelled, and that you might have the hides again - A. Yes.

Q. And the hides were still in his warehouse - A. Yes.

Q. Do you mean to say that he had any intention to defraud - A. It is impossible to say that. I do not think he got them under any premeditated scheme to get the money for them; but if it had not been for his bankruptcy, I believe he would have paid for them.

Q. We know a broker can't buy in his own name. If he had said that these hides were for himself, you would have objected to it - A. Unquestionably.

Re-examined by Mr. Pooley. It is not usual for a broker to use the name of a fictitious person.

Mr. SERJEANT BOSANQUET. My Lord, that is the case on the part of the prosecution.

Defence. The prisoner, Edward Taylor , on being called upon for his defence, read it to the Court as he had committed it to paper. He lamented the degrading situation in which he was placed. He commented with warmth upon the various circumstances which appeared in evidence to prove that he might, by paying the trifting sum of 30l. duty, have obtained the hides in question, long before the time that he got them into his warehouses. He declared that his intention was to pay for these as he had paid for the former; and he hoped that unless the transaction appeared to be meditated, and carried into execution for the purpose of fraud, a Jury of his countrymen would not find him guilty. He hoped that the door of mercy would not be shut against him, and that his intention would be seen throughout the whole transaction. He declared that if any criminality could be attached to the transaction, his brother was most ignorant of it; and he concluded by throwing himself on the humane consideration of the Jury, and by hoping deliverance at their hands.

THE COURT did not think it necessary to call on Robert William Taylor for a defence.

William Mellish , Esq. M. P. James Louis Du Mont , Esq. John Rucker, Esq. were called, together wits several other respectable gentlemen, and they all gave the prisoner the best of characters.

THE COURT then proceeded to sum up the evidence for the consideration of the Jury, and told them, that the first question for their consideration would be,whether the prisoners, both or either, and of but one then which forged the endorsement in question, with intent to defraud.

The next question would be, did both or either of them dispose, fit, and put it away, upon the other Counts of the Indictment, with a similar intent. If they should be of opinion that they either forged or put away with a guilty knowledge of forgery, with intent to defraud, then the question would arise, whether it was with the intent stated in the indictment.

The Jury, after deliberation, found the prisoners both

NOT GUILTY .

Before Mr. Justice Dallas and the London Jury.

225. WILLIAM WOOD was indicted for stealing sixteen pounds weight of printing types, value 20s. the goods of Henry Teape .

HENRY TEAPE . I am a printer , and live on Tower-hill . I saw nothing of this theft; I can only swear to the type.

PETER DONALDSON . I am warehouseman to Mr.Teape. On the 22nd December last I met the prisoner in the passage, and I asked him what he had got under his coat. He said, he had got some type there. I immediately took him up stairs, and conveyed him and the type into the counting-house. Here is the type(producing it) wrapt up in paper, on which I have put my signature, It is a page of a book set up.

HENRY TEAPE , again called. This type is mine. It is a page of a book printed for Government, and no other of the sort is printed. I value it at 20s. as old metal; it would fetch me as much in exchange for new type.

Prisoner's Defence. I was out of employ, and I went there to look for work. As I came down stairs I found this lying on the staircase. I wanted to deposit it with somebody in the house, and took it up for that purpose, and I met this man coming down stairs. I put it under my coat, to prevent its being broken, and I gave it to him as soon as he came.

Henry Teape , examined by the Jury. This type lay up stairs two pair, in a nest of shelves. This person has been seen freqnently going up stairs.

GUILTY , aged 43.

Fined 1s. and confined six calendar months in the House of Correction .

226. JACOB COHEN was indicted for stealing, on the 16th December , one shirt, value 2s.; one waistcoat, value 6d.; one bed-gown, value 6d.; two handkerchiefs, value 6d.; one yard of printed cotton, value 6d. the goods of James Thomas .

JAMES THOMAS . I am a dyer , and live at No. 7, Baker's-row, Whitechapel . On the 16th December. I left my apartment about two o'clock in the afternoon, and about three o'clock, my wife went out and locked the door. At six I returned, and with great surprise found my door open, with the lodgers of my house in my room, and a neighbour or two beside, I rent the house. At about twenty minutes past six my wife came home. We found these articles in the prisoner's apartments.

MOSES FORTUNE . I am an officer of Whitechapel. On the 16th the robbery was committed; on the 19th I went to the prisoner's room, and found this property, which the prosecutors indentified as part of the property they lost.

JOHN GRIFFITHS. I know no more than my brother officer has proved. I searched the prisoner's room the night before, and found a number of articles. I had heard of this young man coming to our office, and on examining these articles, he identified them. The prisoner was apprehended on the 18th, and we found the property on the 10th.

Prisoner's Defence. I went to my business. This was a public-house, where I lodged. There were a great many other lodgers, and they all put goods into this room.

The same several witnesses who appeared beforeto give the prisoner a character, when he was tried for a burglary with Nathan Phillip , attended to-day again for the like purpose.

GUILTY, aged 33.

Of the stealing, but not of the burglary .

Fined 1s. and confined Six months in the House of Correction .

Before the Recorder, and First Middlesex Jury.

227. JACOB COHEN and NATHAN NATHAN, alias PHILLIPS , were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Samuel Harris , at about the hour of six in the night of the 18th December , with intent to steal; and for burglariously stealing therein a looking-glass, value 4l. two curtains, value 1l. two pair of sheets, value 30s. four gowns, value 22s. two shifts, value 8s. five shirts, value 15s. five frocks, value 15s. one pair of stays, value 5s. 1 quilt, value 4s. four waistcoats, value 8s. one other frock, value 2s. 3 jackets, value 6s. twelve pair of stockings, value 12s. 9 napkins, value 5s. five pair of pillowcases, value 5s. one waistcoat piece, value 2s. one pair of breeches, value 3s. three parasols, value 1l. one coat, value 5s. one ring, value 16s. one pair of glass salts, value 5s. one glass mug, value 5s. one lace cap, value 3s. one veil, value 2s. one ear-ring, value 7s. and one pair of blankets, value 1l. of the goods and chattels of the said Samuel Harris .

SAMUEL HARRIS . I live at 18, Green-Dragon Yard, Whitechapel . On the 18th December last, I and my wife left our house about one o'clock to go out to dinner. About five I returned home to shut the shutters, and see that the house was safe. I shut the shutters and fastened them, struck a light and went up stairs. I washed my face, put on a neckerchief, and went out; every thing was perfectly right and safe in the house. I locked the door when I went out At that time a person came by, and I asked what o'clock it was? and they said, a few minutes to five. I did not return again until past seven. My wife returned before me.

DEBORAH HARRIS. I am the wife of Samuel Harris , the last witness. I went out with my husband at about one o'clock, and I returned at about seven. I came home before my husband. When I went to open the door I found it open. I immediately made an alarm before I went into the house. When I went in I found the trunk open, and all the things taken out. I went up stairs, and found every thing taken out of the drawers. I missed the looking-glass from the wall, and all the things named in the indictment.

Cross-examined by Mr. Andrews. My husband came in a short time after me. He was sent for.

SAMUEL HARRIS recalled. I saw my property next day. I was sent for by the officers between ten and eleven.

JOHN GRIFFITHS . I am a Police officer of Lambeth-street office, Whitechapel. I remember the 18th of December. In consequence of some information given to me, I went to the prosecutor's house with two of my brother officers, Dalton and Thomas Griffiths . We went to the Prince of Wales, Spital Fields. When we went into the house, I asked the landlord whether one of the prisoners lodged in his house. He said Jacob Cohen lodged there. I went up stairs, and he was there lying on a bed with his clothes on, seemingly asleep. I called to him to wake him, and I proceeded to search the room, and in the room we found this bag and this parasol (producing them). I called to him three or four times before he answered. We found the parasol in a drawer. It was between ten and eleven at night when we made this search. We found a ring, which Mrs. Harris afterwards claimed. We found nothing else in his room. I asked him if he had any thing to say to me about any body else? He said, no; before he would say any thing about any body else he would be hanged. We took him to the watchhouse, and we then proceeded to Phillips's. It was near twelve before we could get in. The daughter was within, as I supposed. We were some time trying to break open the door. I told her I would break it in, and gave her my name. Some person came and opened it; and when we got into the passage, we saw the key on the inside in the door of the room which was locked, and we concluded somebody must be inside. We forced the door, and found the servant sitting by the fire. We found in that room two bags of wearing apparel, and a looking-glass, which I have here. I desired one of my fellow officers to go and bring the other prisoner. He brought him in about a minute. I said how is this, Mr. Nathan? and he said he knew nothing about it. We took him into custody, and locked the property up, and it was sworn to the next day by the prosecutor.

Cross-examined by Mr. Andrews. We first saw Phillips a few minutes after we got in at nearly 12 o'clock. Cohen was found at the Prince of Wales in Wentworth-street.

Examined by THE COURT. Somebody shewed me the room in which Cohen was lying on the bed. When I first went to Phillips's house, I found that there was somebody inside, from the circumstance of the key being inside and the door being locked. When Phillips came in, he said he had just come from the Royalty theatre. The robbery was in Whitechapel. Phillips's house is about 150 yards from Harris's, the prosecutor.

EBENEZER DALTON . I went with Griffiths to search. I began at between ten and eleven o'clock. We first went to Cohen's room, in the Princess of Wales public-house. I went up to the room and we found Cohen asleep on the bed, with his clothes on. We found the things which are before me. I went to look for Nathan. I found him about sixty yards from his own house, walking towards home in Wentworth-street. I told him he was the man I was looking for; and he said, "What is the matter?" and I told him. We also told him we had a deal of trouble in getting into the house; and he said, that he had desired the people not to open the door at all. The Royalty Theatre is not more than a quarter of a mile from his house. Cohen's room door was unlocked, and he was lying on the bed.

Deborah Harris. I have looked at all these things before; they are all my property.

Goben's Defence. On the 18th, I went out to labour, and I got intoxicated in the afternoon, and went up stairs, and laid myself down on my bed, and fell asleep, until I felt myself wakened. I was never out of the room, and how the things came into the room I don't know.

Phillips's Defence. I had an order, and went to the Royalty Theatre, at about ten minutes after six; I went into the boxes, and never came out until after the first act, when I came out to make water. I met Mr. Freeman, the officer, and I believe we had a glass of liquor together, and then I went in again, and never stirred until almost twelve o'clock. When I wet Mr. Dalton, I told him I knew nothing about this business. When they took me into custody, they would not let me speak to my servant. I know no more about this business than the baby in the mother's arms.

The prisoner Cohen, called several witnesses to his character.

The prisoner Phillips, called the following witnesses.

MARY SMITH . I was servant to Mr. Phillips. My master gave me orders not to open the door to open the door to any one, until the lodgers came; the lodgers all got home at about a quarter past ten. A man brought the things which were found in my master's room, at about a quarter before nine; I opened the door to him, because I thought it was one of the lodgers knocking to get in; he forced himself in, and put the things into my master's room; it was before the lodgers came in that this man came with the bundle. It was about half past ten o'clock that I heard a knocking at the door; I found it was Mr. Griffiths, who stands by me. I did not open the door; but sat in the room. They forced my master's door open. I did not tell Mr. Griffiths how the bundles came there. My master came home at about twelve o'clock; he told me he was going to the Royalty Theatre; it was a little before six o'clock that he went; he was having his tea at five o'clock; that took up some time; he dressed himself before tea; he was at home at five o'clock, his usual tea time. I was at home all day.

Cross-examined by Mr. Adolphus. I have lived with Mr. Phillips three weeks; it was a quarter before nine that the man came and put these things in; he kept the door open with his foot, and pushed them in. I said nothing to him; he said, he must leave them there, and went out directly.

FRANCIS FREEMAN . I am a police officer, and was attending the Royalty Theatre on the night in question. I know Phillips very well; I was on duty as near eight o'clock as possible, and saw him come down the steps out of the boxes; he said he had his old woman (as I supposed meaning his wife) in the boxes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Adolphus. I did not see him before eight o'clock; I don't know where he was before that. He asked me to drink with him,and I had a small glass of brandy.

JOHN HARRIS . I am a money-taker at the Royalty Theatre. I know Mr. Phillips; he was at our theatre on the night in question; he came in with an order, which he gave to me; he came in at about a quarter before six, before the performance began. He went out in the course of the evening, at about half after eight, or some where about half price.

Cross-examined by Mr. Adolphus. I had not seen him there that season before. I know it was before seven that he came, or the orders could not be admitted.

JOSEPH LEE . I am check-taker at the Royalty Theatre. The prisoner Mr. Phillips, was at our Theatre one night, just before he was taken up; that was the only night that he was there during the season.

CHARLES NORDEN . I am box-keeper of the Royalty Theatre. I can't tell what night it was that Mr. Phillips was at the Theatre; but it was the only night that he was there during the season.

John Griffiths . Re-examined for the prosecution. I found this girl sitting by the fire side. She told me her master had told her not to open the door to any one, and she said, that the man who brought the things in, brought them in at twice.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

228. GEORGE JOSLING was indicted for that he, on the 28th of December . unlawfully and deceitfully did utter to Richard Brocklesby Williamson , a certain false and counterfeit token, made with intent to pass as and for certain silver tokens for the sum of three-shillings, made, stamped, issued, and circulated by the Governor and Company of the Bank of England; and that he, at the time of his first uttering the said false and counterfeit token, had in his custody and possession, one other such counterfeit token for the sum of three-shillings, by reason of which premises, he became, and was a common utterer of such counterfeit tokens .

RICHARD BROCKLESBY WILLIAMSON. I keep the One Tun , on Holborn Hill, which is in the City of London . On the 28th of December last, about half past five in the afternoon, the prisoner came in, in company with another man; he asked for a glass of gin; I gave it to him, and he offered a three-shilling token in payment for it; I told him it was a bad one, and he said, he had no more money. He looked round for his partner; but the other man was gone. There was an officer standing on his right side, and he said, let me look at the three-shilling piece; he accordingly looked at it, and marked it; it was the one which the prisoner had given me. The officer then took him into custody, and searched him in a back parlour. The prisoner on my refusal of the three-shilling piece, pulled out two-pence, which was the price of the gin, after he had said he had no more money. The officer found in his waistband six more bad three-shilling pieces. I asked him how he came possessed of them, and he said, he had received them all in change of a one-pound note.

THOMAS BROCK . I am an officer of the City ofLondon. I observed the prisoner before he went into the prosecutor's house; I had followed him from the Ship in Newgate-street. I then went to the Tun on Holborn Hill. While I was in there, the prisoner came in, and called for a glass of gin, which the prosecutor drew and gave to him; he tendered a three-shilling piece in payment, which the prosecutor rang, and said was bad. I then got up, and went to the side of the prisoner, and caught hold of him; I looked at the three-shilling piece, and saw it was a bad one; I marked it, and gave it to the landlord. I asked the prisoner if he had any more of that kind about him, and he said, he had no money about him at all. Upon that, I took him into the back parlour, and searched all his pockets, and nothing could be found. I then put my hand inside his breeches,and between his thighs in the fore part of his shirt,I found a paper; I took it out, and laid it on the table, and opened it; there were six counterfeit three-shilling pieces, with pieces of paper between them. This is the one tendered to the landlord, and these are the others.

MR. JAMES THURGOOD . I am a teller of the Bank of England. This one tendered to Williamson is counterfeited, as are the other six; they are made in immitation of the genuine tokens of the Bank of England. They are all counterfeit, and struck from the same die.

GUILTY , aged 10.

Confined a year , and bound over to find sureties for two years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

229. JOHN FIELD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of January , twenty-one pounds weight of coffee, value 1l. 1s. the property of the East India company .

THOMAS HEMMET . I am an assistant elder in the East India Company's warehouses. The prisoner was a labourer there. On the 9th of this month; it is the course for all the persons employed to go to breakfast at a certain hour; my attention that morning was called to something which occured in the place where the prisoner was employed; I went to examine some Cassia, upon the second floor, and while I was doing that, I heard something fall like pease. After I heard this, I proceeded up stairs towards the place where I heard the noise, in the third floor, which contains only coffee; I did not discover any thing upon entering the room; but on going to the farther end, where the bags were piled so as to form alleys, I found the prisoner at the farther end of the alley; suspecting he was after no good, I had him searched, and found on him about eighteen ounces of Bourbon coffee in his pocket; there was a quantity of that sort of coffee in the warehouse: I have examined some of the bags, and I found they were cut, one bag in particular; I examined the bags that were cut to find what deficiency; I had them weighed, and this bag was nine pounds deficient; I found some coffee on the floor, near a handful, against the place where the bag was; I have had this coffee, which I found on the prisoner, ever since; it is the same description of coffee with that which was in the plundered bag. I sent for Rice, the constable, to take the prisoner into custody. I said nothing to the prisoner at the time about the coffee. He said he was very sorry for it, and hoped I would over-look it, that it was the first he had ever taken, and he would never be guilty of the like again; but I said, I could not tell at that time what I would do.

AARON CLARKE . I am a police officer. I was attending on that day at the India House; I went with the last witness to search the prisoner; he had about half a handful of coffee in his breeches pocket; it was taken out before I got up to him, and when I got up there was about half a handful more not taken out. I examined a bag which had been cut, and it contained coffee of the same description as that found at his lodgings; he acknowledged his guilt, and hoped we would have mercy on him.

Thomas Hemmet . I saw that bag full of coffee taken from the prisoner, it weighed eighteen ounces, and was worth one shilling, duty included.

EDWARD RICE . I am a constable. I was sent for to the warehouse to take the prisoner up; he said he lived at No.53, Lambeth-street. I asked him first if he had any coffee at home? he said, no. I found on enquiry, there was no No. 53, in that house; but I found he lived at 71, and I found there a quantity of mixed coffee in a bag, weighing twenty-one pounds.

The prisoner put in a written defence, in which he said the coffee found at his lodgings he had bought from a sailor, and it was his own real property.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Confined three months , and whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

230. JAMES TRING was indicted for feloniouly stealing, on the 23rd of December , a stone bottle, and a gallon of gin, value 10s. the property of James Small .

JAMES SMALL . I am a baker , and live at Holloway, near Islington. I lost a stone bottle containing a gallon of gin, and half a pound of tea, on the evening of the 23rd of December, about half past six o'clock I keep a cart, and these things were in it; I was going home with my cart, and these things were taken out opposite the Leaping Bar in St. John-street . I am quite sure the things were safe when I went into the Leaping Bar; but when I came out, they were gone; I saw the prisoner in the cart, and when I came out, he had the gin in his possession, and he was in the hands of Thompson, the constable.

WILLIAM THOMPSON . I am a patrole. I was present in St. John-street, when this occured, and saw Mr. Small there. I saw the prisoner in company with another or two that evening, lurking about St. John-street; he was dressed in a jacket, white corderoy breeches, and topped boots. I saw Small leave his cart once or twice; I watched him up to the Leaping Bar. The prisoner was following the cart, with his companions. Small stopped at the Leaping Bar, and went in, and I saw almost immediately the prisoner lay hold of the cask, anshoved it off the side where it stood; the other two were near the cart; they were dressed in long coats, and the prisoner had a long coat over his jacket. I saw him jump on the shafts of the cart;he had got a parcel; but I could not see what it was. He jumped off the shafts of the cart, and smashed the bottle with the gin in a thousand pieces. I laid hold of him, and picked up half a pound of tea from the middle of the road. The other two came up at first; but found I was too strong for them, and I took the prisoner into custody.

The prisoner put in a written defence, which stated that he had been in his Majesty's sea service twelve years; stated the several ships on board of which he had served, and amongst others, the Acasta Frigate, Captain Carr , on which he had served last, and the actions in which he had been engaged; that he only was discharged the 23rd of last month, had spent all his money, and was very much in liquor when this happened, and he did not know what he was about.

CAPTAIN ALEXANDER ROBERT CARR, of the Acasta, gave the prisoner a very good character.

GUILTY .

As Captain Carr promised to recommend him immediately to another ship, and was confident he would do his duty as a seaman, the prisoner was fined a shilling , and delivered into the care of Captain Carr .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

231. GEORGE NICHOLLS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of December , one shawl, value 6s. the property of Mary Ann Briggs spinster , from her person .

MARY ANN BRIGGS . I am a single woman. On the 24th of December last, at about nine o'clock in the evening, I was going home from Wheeler-street to 29, Montague-street, Spitalfields; I was met by the prisoner and another young lad, and when I got facing White Lion-street , one of them snatched my shawl from my shoulders, and ran off; I cried out, and the person was stopped, when he was half the length of White Lion-street from me. I don't know whether the person who was stopped was the prisoner, as I lost sight of him. They had taken the shawl from him before I came up.

WILLIAM SPITTLE. I am a watchman of the Liberty of Norton Falgate. On hearing the cry of stop thief, on this evening, I saw the prisoner running towards me in White Lion-street; he was the only person running, and I caught hold of him; in a minute the shawl was brought to me by a person, who said the prisoner dropped it. I gave the shawl and the prisoner into the custody of the night constable.

JOHN BRACKETT . I am a weaver. I was at my own door, in Wheeler-street, four doors from White Lion-street, and I heard the cry of stop thief; I immediately saw a person run from the prosecutrix,who was not above two yards from me; I immediately pursued the person, and never lost sight of him until he was taken; it was the prisoner; I saw him drop the shawl in White Lion-street; when I found he was stopped by the watchman, I went back to pick it up, but another gentleman had picked it up, and gave it to the watchman.

WILLIAM FLINT . I am the constable of the night, and the prisoner was delivered into my custody, together with the shawl.

(Property produced, and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was running down White Lion-street; I heard a person sing out, stop thief, and I ran to see what was the matter; but I was not running away.

GUILTY , aged 17.

Confined one year , and whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

232. JOHN SULLIVAN was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of January , a coat, value 10s. the property of John Ambredge .

JOHN AMBREDGE . I am a carter to Mr. Philpot,farmer at Wilsden-green. I came to market on Tuesday, the 9th of January, with my master's cart, and went into Paddington-street, and I went down a mews to seek after some dung; I left my coat on the shaft of the cart, when I went down the mews, and I was not gone a minute when I was told some body had stolen my coat. I saw the person running, and I ran after him; I lost sight of him; I saw him drop the coat while I was in sight; I did not see his face until he was stopped; but I knew he was the same man that was running, by his dress.

SAMPSON SPURETT. I am a green-grocer, in Paddington-street. I was standing on that day at the corner of Dorset-mews, and I saw the prisoner coming with his face towards the cart; I never saw him before. I saw him take the coat from the shafts of the cart, and run away; I pursued him into East-street, and saw him with the coat under his arm; I cried stop thief, and so did he; he ran out of Dorset-street into Blanchard mews, back into Earl-street; I still pursued him; it was about two o'clock in the day; one man attempted to stop him, but the prisoner struck at him with his fist; the man then turned round, and followed him, and he was stopped; and as we were taking him down to Marlborough-street; he told me he would mark me.

Prisoner's Defence. I saw a man running with a coat under his arm, and heard a cry of stop thief, and I ran to see what was the matter, a man who was in the street made a blow at me; I told him I was not the person who was running away; but he insisted I was, and took me into custody.

Sampson Spurett. There was a number of neighbours who saw this transaction. The prisoner never denied his guilt; as soon as he was stopped, he felt down on his knees, and begged for mercy.

The prisoner called the following witness.

MARGARET KEATING . I hawk fish in Marybone. The prisoner is quite a stranger to me I was passing by this place at the time, and saw a man in a black coat take a coat from the cart, and saw him ran away. I saw this young man at the bar taken: but he was not the man who took the coat.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

233. MICHAEL MALLETT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of December , four pieces of timber, value 3s. the property of John Callow .

JOHN CALLOW . I live at 13, St. Mary's Hill.Tower-street; my father is a builder; he had some timber at North Hide, in the parish of Heston . I know nothing of the timber, I only went down to prosecute the warrant.

JAMES WEBB . I know the place was Mr. Callow's. I was employed by my master, John Callow to watch the timber, and I saw the prisoner come over the premises and take four pieces of timber; they were upon the ground; as soon as I got off from the premises, I hallooed out to him to stop; but he run away about two hundred yards; I laid hold of him before I lost sight of him. The timber was two inches and a half, by four inches.

GUILTY , aged 50.

Confined fourteen days , and whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

234. PATRICK FITZMAURICE and JOHN FINLAY were indicted for stealing, on the 4th of January , one drake, value 3s. two ducks, value 6s. and three fowls, value 6s. the property of James Lynd .

JAMES LYND. I am a mariner ; I live near the Commercial Road; I lost my fowls on the 4th of January.

JOHN KING . Fitzmaurice called on me about eleven o'clock that morning; I am a green grocer and dealer in fowls; much of my business is among shipping. He followed me from my house to the Docks, and asked me if I would buy some fowls and ducks; I said you don't deal in them, you are a tradesman; no said he, but a countryman at my house brought them from the country, and has them to dispose of. I said if they were good and fresh, I would give him two shillings a piece for them all round. Fitzmaurice I have known some years as a painter and glazier; he keeps a house. He went home to find the fowls, and in the afternoon he called two or three times for the money I had agreed to give for them; I paid him all the money I agreed for, except one shilling; the countryman was standing by at the same time, and said nothing; it was eleven shillings out of twelve. I did not see Fitzmaurice give the countryman any money. I went with them to a public house, and had a pot of beer; I never saw Finlay before. I bought the fowls on Thursday, Next morning when they were to be fed, I put them in a basket at my door to be sold, and this gentleman's friend coming by saw them there.

EBENEZER DALTON. On the 6th of January, the prosecutor came to the police office for a search warrant. The magistrate told him it was not necessary, as the things were exposed to sale. I went down with him, and saw the fowls in King's shop, and he said he bought them of a man named Fitzmaurice, and I desired King to bring him to me, to East Smithfield; he did, and took him to the office. Fitzmaurice said he bought them of this man, who said he bought them of a waggoner.

(Fowls produced.)

James Lynd . These are my fowls; they were stolen from my back premisses on the 4th of January at night, but gone before seven in the morning. The parties who took them, had got over my back wall by a ladder. I could not trace any footsteps; I am quite exposed to the fields.

Fitzmanrice's Defence. This man the other prisoner, came to me in the morning, and asked me if I would buy some fowls; I said I did not deal in them, and had no money, but that I knew a person named King who dealt in the like, and I took this man with me to King. I am an industrious tradesman, and served my time in London, where I have worked this thirty years.

Finlay's Defence. I bought the fowls of a waggoner, and paid nine shillings for them; he is not here.

The prisoner Fitzmaurice called one witness, who gave him a good character.

FITZMAURICE, NOT GUILTY .

FINLAY, GUILTY

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

235. WILLIAM COTTER was indicted for stealing. on the 9th of January , one silver table-spoon, value 5s. the property of John Hatchett , the younger .

WILLIAM THOMAS. I am clerk to Mr. Hatchett, at the White Horse cellar, Piccadilly. On Tuesday,the 9th of January, the prisoner came in the passenger's room, at about half past one, and walked up to one of the tables, where the silver spoon lay. He walked away again, came back; looked at the spoon and turned it over; went away again; returned the fourth time, and was walking away with it, concealed in his hand when I stopped him with it, and took it from him. I did not know him before, but he was perfectly well known at Marlborough-street.

Prisoner's Defence. I have served my country thirty years, and was four times severely wounded. Want and old age have forced me to this; I am upwards of seventy years old; and throw myself totally on the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY , aged 70.

Confined two years , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

236. JACOB COHEN was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of December , one shirt, value 2s. one waistcoat, value 6d. one bed gown, value 6d. two handkerchiefs, value 6d. one yard of printed cotton, value 6d. the property of James Thomas .

JAMES THOMAS . I am a dyer , and live at No. 7, Baker's-row, Whitechapel . On the 16th of December, I left my apartments about two o'clock, my wife locked the door. At six o'clock I returned, and with great surprise found my room, and a neighbour or two beside; I rent the house. At about twenty minutes past six, my wife came home. We found these articles in the prisoner's apartments.

MOSES FORTUNE . I am an officer of Whitechapel. On the 16th of December, the robbery was committed; and on the 19th, I went to the prisoner's room and found this property, which the prosecutor identified, as part of the property they lost.

JOHN GRIFFITHS . I know no more than my brother officer has proved. I searched the prisoner's room the night before, and found a number of articles. I had heard of this young man coming to our office, and on examining these articles, he identified them. The prisoner was apprehended on the 18th, and we found the property on the 19th.

Prisoner's Defence. This was a public-house where I lodged; there was a great many other lodgers, and they all put goods into this room.

The same several witnesses who appeared yesterday to give the prisoner a character, when he was tried for a burglary with Nathan Phillips , attended to day again for the like purpose.

GUILTY, aged 33,

Of stealing, but not of the burglary .

Confined six months , and fined 1s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

237. ELIZABETH BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of January , a silk umbrella, value 1l. the property of George Nuttal .

GEORGE NUTTAL. I am a physician , and lodge in the house of Mr. Andrew Robinson , 33, Gerrard-street, Soho. On Tuesday, the 9th of this month, on my return home, I missed my umbrella. I know nothing further of this transaction than that the umbrella to be produced here, is mine.

ANDREW ROBINSON. On Tuesday, the 9th of this month, this paper was sent up to me by my servant, from a person at the hall door, to solicit charity. I said, I knew nothing about the person. I did not see the person. The servant brought up this paper three times, and said the woman would not go away. I went down stairs to turn her out,and it appeared she was a person who had come frequently to the house before to ask for charity, and I had given her a shilling; she became importunate and clamorous, and would not go away, and I sent for a constable to take her to the watchhouse, and he found on her this umbrella.

-.I am beadle of St. Ann's Soho. Mr. Roinson sent for me to take this woman, who he said, would not go away. I took her to the watchhouse, and from there to Marlborough-street,and on bringing her back to the watchhouse, I found this umbrella between her legs, under her clothes.

GUILTY , aged 52.

Confined six months , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

238. JAMES STEVENS was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of December , one pair of breeches,value 5s. the property of Samuel Godfrey .

SAMUEL GODFREY. I lost my breeches on the 5th of December; they were in the bed room; the prisoner slept in another bed, and I afterwards took the prisoner on Limehouse-bridge with the breeches on him; this was near a fortnight after I lost them. When I took him he said he did not know any such place as mine. I turned his coat on one side, and said to him, why, you have my breeches on. I am quite certain he was the man who lodged in the house.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought these breeches at Woolwich.

GUILTY , aged 42.

Confined six months , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

239. CHARLES JOURDAN was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of November , one box coat,value 20s. the property of Andrew Grady .

ANDREW GRADY . I drive a hackney coach at the time; I lost my coat on the 27th of November, from the watering-house; I carried it into the house from Oxford-street, and put it on the seat, while I had some refreshment, and I had sat upon it; I went out to put the straddles on my horses, and the prisoner, who was sitting in the seat, took charge of my coat; I told him it was mine, and I should be back in a few minutes, and when I came back, both the prisoner and my coat were gone.

DAVID WILLIAMS . As I was sitting there at the same time, when the coachman went out, I saw the prisoner take the coat on his arm, and walk out with it. I saw him again in a few days after, and took him up, and he acknowledged he did take the coat.

Prisoner's Defence. I acknowledge I had a coat both coming and going out of the watering-house; I took it to the Bolt-inn-tun, Fleet-street, to be left there, at the desire of an old fellow servant.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Confined six months , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

240. ELIZABETH FOSTER was indicted for privately stealing, on the 4th of December , three shirts, value 9s. and one shift, value 4s. 6d. the property of John Steel .

The prosecutor and witnesses not appearing, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

241. JOHN DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of December , ten pairs of stockings, value 10s. the property of Alexander Munro .

ALEXANDER MUNRO . I am an agent for a house at Nottingham , and having a brother in town, I retail a few at his shop; a quantity of stockings were put out on a box, close by the shop door, on the 23rd of December, and they were taken by some person.

WILLIAM MADDOCKS . I saw the prisoner at the bar in company with another person; I was there to protect the property, and the prisoner took up the stockings, and put them under his coat. I secured the prisoner, and the other made his escape, by leaving his coat in my hand. I saw the prisoner drop the stockings, and I picked them up.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going to the India House, and saw a young man looking at the stockings; it was he who had them, and dropped them from under his coat, and then ran off, and I was taken up; I am a seaman, I have been many years in the service, and served under Lord Nelson, and had not been long a shore; I have no witnesses.

GUILTY , aged 31.

Confined six months , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

242. LOUISA BOLTON was indicted for stealing, a pocket-book, value 6d. two 1l. bank notes, and a silver watch, value 4l. the property of William Coyle , from his person .

The prosecutor and witnesses not appearing, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

243. GEORGE BARNES was indicted for that he, on the 20th of December , was servant to Robert Hopcroft , and employed and entrusted by him to receive notes and money for him, and being so employed and entrusted, did receive and take into his possession, three 1l. bank notes, for and on account of his said master , and did feloniously embezzle and secrete the same .

ROBERT HOPCROFT . The prisoner was in my employ, as clerk , and to see goods sent out properly. I sent him out one day to Mr. Crookes, and others, to get money; but he did not return. I sent after him; but he did not come back at all, until I apprehended him in Brook-lane, St. Luke's.

WILLIAM CROOKES . I keep a shop in Fleet-street. There was an account between Mr. Hopcrot and me, and a ballance due to him of about three guineas. The prisoner called on me to collect this sum, and said he came from Mr. Hopcroft for three pounds, due on a regester stove. I asked him if he had a stamp receipt; he said, no; but if I had a stamp he would write a receipt, and allow me for the stamp. I paid him three one-pound bank notes, and he gave me the halfpence for the stamp.

Robert Hopcroft . He never accounted to me for the money; he never came near me afterwards.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 27.

Confined one year .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

244. MARY SWEENEY was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of December , a copper tea-kettle, value 4s. the property of Thomas Radley .

THOMAS RADLEY . I am a licensed victualler , and keep the Marques of Granby , in Drury-lane . I lost my tea-kettle on the night of the 28th of December, it was full of hot water. I did not see the prisoner take it; I only know she did from circumstances. I never saw her in my house but once in my life.

HENRY ALMOND . I am a patrole. I took the prisoner in Queen-street, at two o'clock next morning, with the tea-kettle under her cloak.

GUILTY , aged 68.

Confined one year .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

245. SAMUEL PENNEY was indicted for that he, on the 12th of February, in the 49th year of his Majesty reign, at St. Giles's in the Fields, by the name of Samuel Penney , took to wife one Hannah Andrews , spinster , and that he afterwards, to wit, on the 23rd of January, in the 54th year of his Majesty's reign , at Christ Church, in the County of Surry , by the name of Samuel Penney , feloniously took to wife one Mary Davis , spinster ; the said Hannah, his former wife, being then alive .

DOROTHY WAYMOUTH . I was at the prisoner's first marriage; he was married by banns, to Hannah Andrews , she was a single woman; I can't say the day of the month she was married, nor the year. I knew it was by banns, by their being asked in Church. I heard his first wife say it was by banns; it was in St. Giles's Charch. I was not present, I only heard them say so; she is alive, I saw her the day after Christmas day.

WILLIAM WAINWRIGHT . I can only say, I apprehended the man, and that he was by when the certificate was made out in St. Giles's.

COURT. Gentlemen of the Jury, it is necessary the first marriage must be proved; if it be by licence, and the parties be under age when they marry, it must be by the leave and consent of the parents, or guardians. Why then, before we can try this man for marrying a second wife, we must prove that the first marriage was legally solemnized. But this does not appear. For what the witness, Waymouth, says of what the alledged first wife said to her is not evidence.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

246. MARY JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of December , one watch, value 2l. one seal, value 10s. the property of Benjamin Jarmy , from his person .

BENJAMIN JARMY . I am an old officer . I was going home to my house in Sommers Town, on the night in question; the prisoner passed me in the street, laid hold of my arm, and walked some way with me. I missed my watch; she ran into a house, and I followed her, and a woman there locked the door between her and me. I called the watchman; he sprung his rattle; he said, he knew her. In a few minutes he took her, and found the watch upon her.

PATRICK O'NEIL . I am the watchman. I knew by the description given by the gentleman, who the prisoner was; I took her, and found the watch on her.

(Watch produced.)

Benjamin Jarmy. That is my watch.

Prisoner's Defence. The gentleman gave me the watch.

GUILTY , aged 22 .

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

247. ELIZABETH HARVEY was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of December , one sheet, value 3s. one gown, value 1s. and one shirt, value 1s. the property of John West .

ELEANOR WEST . I live at 77, Bunhill-row . I lost these things on the 12th of December; an apprentice of mine, who had lived with me two years and a half, was cleaning the stairs and the passage. She had gone down, and the prisoner went in at thefirst door she found open. The neighbours told me she was about the door for three hours, waiting for an opportunity to get in. The girl called out, who has been up stairs; I said no one; she replied there was, for there was the mark of a man's feet.

MARY ANN JONES . I am the apprentice. I had occasion to leave the passage a short time, and when I came back, I saw the marks of dirty feet, and I saw a person's shadow next to the two pair window. The eldest daughter of my mistress heard me speak, and followed me up stairs. The prisoner threw the things out of the window. I met her on the stairs coming down, and asked her what business she had there; and she said, she wanted a person of the name of Clarke.

JOHN WALTERS . I was at work in the two pair of stairs room; and I am sure I saw the prisoner throw the things out of the window.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been lately out of illness; I asked for a person named Clarke, who went out a nursing; and the woman desired me to go up stairs. I know nothing about these things; I was an hour and a half in the house before the constable and prosecutor's daughter went out, and came in and said they found the things on the tiles.

GUILTY , aged 43.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

248. JOHN MACLEAN was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of December , one pair of shoes, value 8s. the property of Thomas Haylett .

THOMAS HAYLETT . I am a shoe-maker , on Holborn Hill . I lost my shoes on the 23rd of December; they were inside the shop, in a glazed window. I left my little boy to watch the shop, while I went into the yard, and in the meantime, this person came in, and took the shoes. When I returned, I found the child crying; he told me the man was gone up the Hill; I followed him about three hundred yards, and took him with the shoes under his coat.

THOMAS HAYLETT , JUNIOR. I am six years old. My father left me to mind the shop while he went to the yard. I went into the parlour to play at marbles, and that man there (pointing to the prisoner,) came into the shop, and stole away the shoes.

GUILTY . aged 73.

Confined one year , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr Recorder.

249. JOSEPH HAMMOND was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22nd of December , seventeen pounds weight of beef, and four pounds weight of mutton, value 16s. the property of William Lindus , and son.

WILLIAM LINDUS JUNIOR. My father is a butcher in Whitechapel. I missed the beef on Wednesday the 27th of December. I took the keys of the stable to feed the horse; I was looking in the loft for a truss of hay, and I found the meat tied up in a cloth in the loft. We had reason to suspect the prisoner, having no other servant in the house: there was no other person trusted with the key of the stable but the prisoner; he had been in our house three or four months; he was a general servant, and was occasionally sent to take out a joint of meat, or mind the door. I saw the hay taken in, and placed in the loft. Nobody could get into the stables but me or the prisoner. My father saw the beef there.

WILLIAM LINDUS SENIOR. It was seven or eight pounds, out from the middle of the sirloin. The rats had gnawed it; the pieces matched the rest of the sirloin it was cut from.

SAMUEL COLLIER . I am a police officer. When I took the prisoner into custody, I asked him how he came to rob his master of the meat; the prisoner owned he was guilty of the crime.

GUILTY , aged 15.

Fined 1s. and discharged.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder

250. RICHARD BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of December , a handsaw , the property of John Newsham and others.

JOHN NEWSHAM . I am a carpenter , I was at work at 199, High Holborn . On the 19th of December, I lost my saw on that day. On the night of the 18th, the shop was broken open, and several tools, and other things carried away. On the 19th, I desired one of the men to get some screws to fasten down the place; and when I came there, there was a mob about the door, and they said one of the men was in the house.

THOMAS NEWSHAM. I am a carpenter. On the 19th of December, while I was at work on the scaffold, I saw the prisoner go to the farther bench, and take the saw from it. I called out, and asked him what he wanted there; and he dropped the saw. I collared him, and he asked me would I lend him a saw; I said no, we have lost saws enough last night. He endeavoured to get away; I had a wrestling with him, and got him down; and he was secured.

JOHN FURZEMAN . Produces the saw, and the first witness swore to the property.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

251. WILLIAM WILSON , JOHN KANE , and JOHN BAKER , were indicted for stealing, a pocket-book , the property of William Scarlett .

WILLIAM SCARLETT . I keep a perfumer's shop . The three prisoners came into my shop, on pretence of buying something; but one of them contrived to steal this pocket-book, (producing it,) which I found concealed in the crown of his hat.

SARAH SCARLETT . These three boys came into our house together, on the 12th of January, about eight in the evening. Baker asked for a knife, and before one was shewn him, he contrived to take a pocket-book off the glass case, and put it into his hat; I am quite sure of him. My fathet then came into the shop, and took them.

JOHN GALLOWAY . I am a patrole, and was in that street, on that night. I was called in by Mr. Scarlett, and searched these boys, but could not find the pocket-book; I told Baker, I would let him free, if he would tell me where the pocket-book was; and he shewed it me under the chair in the corner.

Baker's Defence. I went into the shop to buy a knife; I took up the book to ask the price, but I didnot mean to steal it.

Wilson's Defence. I went into the shop to buy a knife, but I knew nothing of the other two boys.

WILSON, GUILTY, aged 13.

KANE, GUILTY, aged 12.

BAKER, GUILTY, aged 12.

Judgment respited .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

252. HENRY RUSSELL and ELIZABETH HOWARD were indicted for stealing, on the 10th of November , one blanket, value 3s. and one looking-glass, value 1l. the property of Hugh Jones , in a lodgingroom .

MARY JONES . I live at 67, Cow Cross . I let the lodgings to the prisoners both together, between fifteen and sixteen months ago. They continued till last Saturday week. It was a two pair back room at four shillings and sixpence a week. I found out I had lost these things about six weeks ago, and they told me I should have them back again. I gave them time, but they did not return them. They paid their lodgings at first very well, but could not pay them lately; they owed me six weeks. The goods I lost were, one blanket, two sheets, a pillow, a patchwork, and the looking-glass.

A pawnbroker, produces the two sheet, and the patchwork, they were left in the woman's name. Some of them had been in above a twelvemonth.

JOHN BUTLER . I am a pawnbroker, I produce the pillows, and blanket, and the glass; I can't say who pawned them, it is so long back; I took the interest of the two prisoners, in the month of November last.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder

253. DAVID LEE and JAMES PARKER were indicted for stealing, on the 11th of January , two jackets. value 10s. the property of Henry Cohen .

HENRY COHEN. I am a slop seller , in Rosemary-lane. The prisoners came into my shop, on the 11th instant, and enquired if I would purchase a prize ticket from them; I said no, it was not my business, I was no agent. There was a person came by at the time, and I told them that was a navy agent, and they went with him, I missed two jackets; they came in the evening and took more. Next morning I challenged them with stealing the jackets, and they confessed they took one at night; and I found it the next day at the shop of Abraham Harris, a slop-seller in my neighbourhood.

JOHN BROWN. I am a police officer, and only took the prisoners into custody.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

254. ESTHER EDWARDS was indicted for stealing, two 3s. bank tokens, and two 18d. bank tokens, the property of William Mosty , from his person .

The prosecutor and witnesses not appearing, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

255. JOHN DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of December , a quantity of hemp flax and twine, value 40s. the property of John Christy .

JOHN CHRISTY. I am a sea-faringman ; my wife carries on the twine and line manufacture. I know nothing of this affair

JOSEPH LAKAN . I am a line-spinner, and work for Mr. Christy. I only know the goods were taken from where they were placed that night.

ROBERT HICKS . I am a patrole; at about two o'clock in the morning, going my round behind the house in Gravel-lane, near to a shed where the spinning wheels are fixed for twine, belonging to Mr. Christy, I saw laving by the shed a quantity of hemp and twelve skains of line, which gave me a suspicion there must be somebody about the premises; I examined the loft above the shed, and by the light of a small lanthorn I carry, I saw a man laying on the floor; it was the prisoner; I waited to the watch came down the lane, and we took him into custody; we asked him what he did there, and he gave us no answer; but he said, he was willing to go with us, and we took him to the watchhouse.

Joseph Lakin . I am a servant to the prosecutor. I know where this property was kept on Mr. Christy's premises, it was in the dressing shop over the shed, and I left it safe there at night, and I found the board that closed the room pulled down in the morning.

Prisoner's Defence. I was a distressed seaman, and only went in there to sleep; I could get no employment, and they won't take me any more in a Man-of-war because I am lame.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Confined six months , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

256. EDWARD ROACHE was indicted for feloniously assaulting Robert Langton , on the King's highway, putting him in fear, and forcibly taking from his person and against his will, one hat, value 4s. and one handkerchief, value 6d. his property.

ROBERT LANGTON . I am a dealer in bottles . I was driving my cart about six o'clock on the evening of that day, near the turnpike-gate, Edward Roache was on the foot-path; I had just been through the gate, and paid the toll; the cart had gone before me some distance; I ran to overtake it; I saw Roache before me, passing off the foot-path; he came up, and gave me a violent blow on my head, and knocked my head against the side of the the cart; before I could recover, he gave me another blow on the other side: as soon as I recovered myself, I struck at him with a whip I had in my hand. My hat and handkerchief he had knocked off my head, and where on the ground at the time. I called to the watchman, and as soon as he came up, Roache ran across the road, and took the hat and handkerchief in his hand, and I never saw it since.

Cross-examined by Mr. Walford. I and the prisoner are brothers-in-law; we have been on very bad terms; he has always been insulting me. I indicted him for an assault in this case, and took him up on awarrant, upon the 23rd of December; it is about sixteen or seventeen months since I indicted him on a waistcoat before. That night, when he came up to me, he said, you had better go now and get another judge's warrant against me. I went to the magistrate's, and told my story. Upon my oath, I charged him to them with the robbery at the time;but through the neglect of the police clerk, it was omitted in the indictment, and when I was before the magistrate, both he and they told me, although the theft was not in, he was to be prosecuted for the theft, as well as for the assault.

Cross-examined by the COURT. It was between six and seven in the evening. I did not pick up the hat; a boy came up, and said, he saw him knock me down, and take my hat away. Upon my oath, I told the magistrate of the robbery. I have read in several books there is a reward of forty pounds for convicting a man of a highway robbery; I have heard so; but I don't know it will stand good in this case. The magistrates only held him to bail for the assault.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

257. JOHN WINTER , JOHN POSSEY , and GEORGE COOPER , were indicted for stealing, on the 1st of November, 1815 . forty-eight reams of paper, value 8l. the property of William Winchester , and Henry Winchester ; and one jacket, value 10s. the property of William Brazier .

WILLIAM BRAZIER. I am warehouse-man to Messrs. Winchester, who are wholesale stationers ; they have a warehouse in which the property in question was previous to its having been stolen. I locked the door of that warehouse, and left it perfectly secure at five o'clock in the evening of the 31st of October. In consequence of some information, I went again, between the hours of seven and eight, and found the door locked; but on entering, I missed fifty reams of foolscap paper. I do not know how they could have entered, except by a pick-lock key.

JAMES FARNES . I am warehouse-man to Mr.Minier, who has a warehouse in Villier-street, in the Strand, situated about twenty yards from the warehouse of Messrs. Winchester. I was in my employer's warehouse at about twenty minutes before six o'clock; I observed a harkney coach, No. 333. at the door of Messrs. Winchester's warehouse, the door of which was open, and some men were putting paper into the coach I saw Cooper; he drove the coach; I followed the coach; it drove at the back of the New Church, and at the top of Hollywell-street, I lost it. Cooper was taken the next morning.

Cross-examined by Mr. Andrews. I am sure he is the man. I saw him at the bar of Bow-street, and knew him.

CATHERINE KINGSMAN. I am the proprieter of the backney coach 333; I keep it at Upper Grosvenor-mews, Bedford-qu e. On the 31st of October, the prisoner, Cooper, was in my service, and drove that coach; he was out all day and all night

e 31st; I believe he came home at about a quarter after eight on the 1st of November, after having been out all night.

MICHAEL M'NALLY. I live in the Grove, Southwark. About three o'clock in the afternoon of the 31st of October, Winter came to me, when I was at work in Mr. Thornton's yard; he asked me if I could take some goods in my cart the next morning, he said they would come down at about a quarter before six; but they did not come down until a quarter before seven; the coachman was George Cooper; John Possey was inside the coach, and Jack, the Baker, (John Turnwell, who was capitally convicted for a burglarly, at the December Sessions, 1815.) was behind. We all helped to bring the parcels out of the coach. In consequence of something that was said, I expected the cart to come at half past six the next morning. It accordingly did so. They brought about the same quantity of paper then that they brought the night before, and of the same appearance; I observed the words "first class" was written on the parcels: that paper was put into my room. I did not see either of the others until the Thursday morning; they called me out of Mr.Thornton's factory, and asked me if I could get a cart to carry this paper away to where they wanted it: in consequence of that, I hired a cart; the carman and I loaded the cart; Jack, the Baker, and Pussey, packed the paper up. I understood there were forty-eight reams. I heard Possey, and Jack, the Baker, talking about it; they told me that they would meet me at the Charlotte Arms , Charlo -street, Rathbone-place. We went there, and met them; John Possey paid the carman ten shillings. Jack Winter, and I, and the others, were to meet again in the afternoon; but I was taken into custody upon this; I was locked up near where Cooper was, and I could hear a few words drop from him to the other three, who were locked up with him. Some of them asked him what he was pulled up for, and he said these goods; and said Jack Possey, and Jack, the Baker, were concerned, and he was taken up on suspicion. Jack Winter brought a newspaper to me, and read a statement that Cooper was apprehended upon this, and he said that Messrs. Winchester had offered a large reward, and he told me to keep my tongue quit, and all would be right.

HARELETT M'NALLY. Corroborated part of the account given by her husband.

EDWARD HATHAWAY . I am a carman. M'Nally hired my cart for me to carry some goods from his house to the Charlotte Arms , Charlotte-street, Rathbone-place. The goods were packed up; there was about half a ton weight; I don't know what they were; but they looked like tea chests. Possey paid me ten shillings at the Charlotte Arms . We took the goods into the Charlotte Arms.

WINTER, GUILTY , aged 26.

COOPER, GUILTY , aged 23.

POSSEY, GUILTY , aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

258. THOMAS SMITH was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Elizabeth Spenser , widow , on the night of the 12th of December , with intent to steal, and for burglariously stealing therein, a sack, value 2s. the goods of Elizabeth Spenser; eighteen tame pigeons, value 30s. and a guinea-pig, value 1s. the property of James Spenser and Edward Hardy .

JAMES SPENSER . I am the son of Elizabeth Spenser , who is a widow, and lives in Old-street - road . The property mentioned in the indictment was in the stable; I locked the stable door, and left the things safe on the evening of the 12th; the stable and the dwelling-house are parted by a yard. I did not know that the stable had been broken open until the next morning at nine o'clock, and then I missed the property in question. I saw the sack at the prisoner's house on the Wednesday, and I saw eleven pigeons in the possession of a man of the name of Cooper; the pigeons are here, and I know them to be mine, and Edward Hardy 's joint property. I knew the prisoner many years; I had bought rabbits and guinea-pigs of him; he deals in these things.

ALEXANDER COOPER. I am a cutier. There were eleven pigeons found in my house. I first became possessed of them on the 13th of December, between six and seven in the evening, the prisoner at the bar brought them to me all alive; I bought them of him for nine shillings; I am sure he is the man.

EDWARD ALLEN . The prisoner came to me to my house No. 16, Mint-street, in the Borough, at about six o'clock in the evening of the 13th of December; I deal in pigeons: he asked me if I bought pigeons; I told him I did. I took the pigeons out one by one; but they were so common, I told him I did not care about buying them; I took out seven; there was no more in the bag. I offered him four shillings and sixpence for them, which he took.

WILLIAM WORSLEY . I am a constable, and apprehended the prisoner. I went in company with the prosecutor to the prisoner's house; he said he bought the pigions of two boys, who had left the sack with him; he told me where to find the pigeons; he deals in pigeons.

Prisoner's Defence. I deal in pigeons and rabbits, and such kind of things. Two boys came to sell these pigeons to me; I told them I would give twelve shillings for them; they asked me to shew them a doe, which they took of me, and I bought the pigeons.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

259. WILLIAM COOLING KENT was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Walter Steele , about the hour of nine in the night of the 2nd of January , with intent to steal,and burglariously stealing therein, three loaves of bread, value 2s. the property of the said Walter Steele .

WALTER STEELE . I am a baker , and live at 49, New James-street, Manchestester-square . A little after nine on the 2nd of January, I heard the spring of the door squeak; my daughter got up immediately, and went out of the parlour, and then cried stop thief; I immediately followed her, and the prisoner was then in custody of a witness, and he had thrown away the three loaves; they were picked up and brought to me.

BENJAMIN BRADSHAW . I am a shoe-maker. I heard the alarm of stop thief; I saw the prisoner come out of the shop with the loaves; I stopped him; he threw them away.

JOHN MORGAN . I am the watchman. I saw the prisoner running away, and assisted to stop him.

GUILTY , aged 32.

Confined a month , and whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant

260. THOMAS GOGAN was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Jacob Numbers , about the hour of seven in the night time of the 7th of January , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, various articless , his property.

The prosecutor and witnesses not appearing, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

261. MARY WELLS was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of December , a silk handkerchief, value 5s. the property of George Parke and Elizabeth Thornbury , privatety in his shop .

ANN PARKE . I am the wife of George Parke. I was in the shop on the 30th of December, and saw the prisoner come in about seven o'clock; the prisoner came in, and Elizabeth Thornbury served her.She asked to look at some black silk handkerchiefs; she found a good deal of fault with them. I did not like her manner, and I went and stood by the side of Thornbury; when I stood a minute or so, she dropped a key, and stooped to pick it up; she offered five shillings and eightpence for the handkerchief; on our refusing which, she was about to quit the shop, when I stopped her, I shook her clothes, and the silk handkerchief fell down from her cloak; she tried to get out at the door: but I held her; she threatened to break every window if we did not let her go; but we sent for a neighbour, and she was apprehended.

ELIZABETH THORNBURY . I did not see her take the handkerchief. She asked for a black silk handkerchief; I shewed her a box full, with which she found a great deal of fault; she was going out when Mrs. Parke stopped her, and the handkerchief fell from her.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

262. CHARLES WALTON was indicted for feloniously assaulting Simeon Thomas Bull , in the King's highway, on the 11th of January , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, a gold chain, value 2l. a gold seal, value 1l. and a gold ring, value 10s. the property of the said Simeon Thomas Bull .

MR. SIMEON THOMAS BULL. I live in Holles-street, Cavendish Square. I was robbed on Thursday last, between twelve and one at night; it happened near Blenheim Steps . I had been out to dinner at a party; I was returning from the Free Mason's Tavern; I had been drinking more than usual, but was not intoxicated. There were three of us in company, one of which, my youngest brother, was very much intoxicated. The gentleman who was with me had volunteered his services to assist me in seeing him home. Three persons were coming the coutrary way to ourselves, in a direction towards us, and passed us. We were arm in arm together; I had hold of one of my brother's arms, and Mr. Dupins, had hold of the other. The three persons returned, and said we had run against them. I said I was extremely sorry, but they saw the condition of the young man whom we where conducting. They did not pass on my side. I told them if it were so, I was sorry for it, but they stlil followed and abused us; my friend turned round to speak to them, and I looked towards them and lifted up my hand, to tell my friend he had better let them go on their own way. As I just lifted up my hand, I felt my watch drawn out of my fob; that was not the way I expected any injury to be presented to me. I brought my hand down quick, and caught the watch on the swing; it was entirely out of my pocket. I pulled, and the person who had got hold of it pulled, and the chain broke from the watch. It was a gold chain, cost me five guineas, it was worth two pounds, There was a seal, which was worth one pound, which cost me two guineas and a half. There was a gold mourning ring, which was worth ten shillings. As soon as the chain broke, I pursued the person with whom I tustled. He turned down a dark street, and was about to return down Winslow-street; I still pursued him closely; he was not out of my sight. He went about half way down the street, and was about to return. I seeing his intention, threw myself in his way, and put out my foot; and he came with such force against my leg, that he threw me down; I saw him falling when I was getting up; and a watchman came round the corner, and stopped him. He had not got out of my sight; I am sure the man who was stopped by the watchman, was the man whom I tripped up. My chain and seals were not found. At the time I put out my foot, there was nobody else running in the street, but the person who had struggled with me, and who had then my chain. I had an opportunity of seeing his face. I had not lost sight of him, and the person whom the watchman stopped must have been the man.

MR. CHARLES DUPINS. I was in company with this gentleman. I had been to the Freemason's Tavern; I considered that I was not inioxicated. The prosecutor did not appear to be intoxicated. When I was near Blenheim Steps, three men passed us, who returned immediately, and accused us of running against them; Mr. Bull apologised, and I believe I aggravated it; for I said if they did not proceed, I should call the watch. Mr. Bull then tapped me on the shoulder, and advised me to proceed I had hold of his brother, at the time by the arm. Almost at that same moment, I observed Mr. Bull n a scnffie with the man, and then I called out watch. I did not see what they or either of them were doing. My intention was intirely taken up with Mr. Bull's brother, and I did nothing further than calling out watch.

WILLIAM CAVE . I am a watchman of Mary-lebone parish; my beat is at 29 box, in Wells-street, at the Oxford-street end; I heard a cry of watch, when I was in my box, just after I had finished caling half past twelve. When I heard the watch called, I proceeded towards the cry; the first I saw was the prisoner running without his hat, as hard as he was able; I first caught sight of him within half a dozen yards of Winslow-street, which faces the Pantheon; it is a small street with a brewhouse in it. I did not stop him then; I made a catch at him, but missed my catch; he was then in Oxford-street, close to Winslow-street; Mr. Bull was within two yards of him. I laid hold of him in Winslow-street; Mr. Bull tripped him up first, and as he fell, I caught hold of him by the collar. There was nobody in company with him at the time; and nobody of his party came up. I asked Mr. Bull what was the matter, and he charged him with having robbed him of his watch. The prisoner denied it; the prisoner appeared as if he had been drinking, but he was sensible; he was capable of running, and did run.

The prisoner, in his defence, called some witnesses who gave him a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 20.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

263. JOHN BAPTIST was indicted for that he, being in the dwelling house of John M'Cormack, at about the hour of five in the night, of the 25th of December , did feloniously steal, two gallons of rum, value 30s. and fifteen shillings and ten pence in copper money; the property of the said John M'Cormack ; and afterwards, to wit, about the same time be did burgiariously break the said dwelling-house, to get out thereof .

JOHN M'CORMACK. I am a publican . The prisoner was in my house on the 23rd of December; he had not a lodging. He was in my house all night; I caught him in the house between five and six o'clock in the morning. I was the last person up, on the night of the 23rd of December; I had seen the prisoner the night before, before I went to bed. I saw that he was in the house between nine and ten o'clock, because I turned him from the fire. When I fastened up the house, I did not know he was in it. He did not call for anything to drink. When I fastened up the house, I thought he was out of the house. I saw him the next morning when I was awakened by my little daughter, before it was light; it was quite dark. I got up, my daughter was frightened with the noise. I struck a light, and went down stairs; my bar and till were secure, and locked the night before; I had taken the silver up stairs with me. I searched the room in which I lay; nobody was there, and then I went down stairs, and when I went into the tap-room, I found the prisoner behind the door; he had a cag of rum standing behind the back door; I presented a pistol at him, and told him, if he stirred, I would blow his brains out; and he surrendered himself. I had filled mycags in the bar, the night before; the cag he had was not mine; but he had poured the rum into it, in the course of the night. He was searched by Morris, the officer, soon after, and fifteen shillings and tenpence in copper money were found on him, I found the bar was broken into by the shutter being forced up. He said, he pushed the shutter up. I went into the bar; I found a canvass bag of copper on the counter; the bag was not mine. My till was not broken open; it had been unlocked, and was unlocked then; I am certain I had left it locked. At the time I laid hold of this man, the back door was wide open; I had left it locked when I went to bed; it was fastened by two bolts and a bar. Upon examining the back door, there was no appearance of force on the outside. I can say with certainty, that the door was opened by some person withinside the house. There were none of the outside doors open at that time. I had no such cag in the house as I found with the prisoner; the rum to fill this cag was got out of the bar. I examined the rum in the bar, to see if there was any deficiency, and I found there was; that rum in the bar was in casks. When I laid hold of the prisoner, I asked him how often was he in the house. I made no promise to him; I did not threaten him, that I would shoot him if he did not tell me; he said he was three times in the house. I asked him what way he got into the bar, and he told me. he said, he pushed the shutter up. I found the shutter corresponding with the account he gave; it been had pushed up. He acknowledged he was concealed; he said, he concealed himself in the house. I observed that a large quantity of halfpence was gone; but I could not tell the exact amount I sent for a constable; when he came, he overhauled him; we found half a candle on him, and a few matches, also a quantity of tobacco; I missed the tobacco from the bar; it was found upon him lose, as mine was. Among the matches I found on him, none appeared to be burnt; I did not take notice if there was a match about the house that had been lighted. He had no shoes on when I laid hold of him; we asked him where his shoes were; he told Morris that they were under the water but in the yard. Morris went out, and I saw him find them where the prisoner said he had left them.

MICHAEL MORRIS I am an officer of Shadwell. I was sent for to Mr. M'Cormack's house. I asked the prisoner if he had any thing about him, and he ststed he had not. I found nothing on him until I came to his hat, in which I found some matches, and half a candle, the wick of which was quite warm, for it had been lighted. I came to Mr. M'Cormack's house at about six o'clock; the tallow appeared to have been melted, and the tobacco stuck to it; it was put in the hat with the tobacco loose. I found this tobacco in his hat also. I asked him if a man of the name of George had been with him, and he said that George was to have met him at six o'clock. He did not tell me who the cag belonged to until afterwards, he told me it belonged to a man who was convicted of burglary.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 17.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

264. HENRY RAY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of December , three ducks value 7s. the property of John Stokes , privately in his shop .

ELIZABETH STOKES . I am the wife of John Stokes . We lost those ducks from our shop on the evening of the 14th of December. I did not miss them at all, but they were brought back at about half-past five, and the prisoner in custody of Thompson, the patrole.

THOMAS THOMPSON . I am a patrole of St. Sepulchre's . On the 13th of December, I was in Aylesbury-street, at about half-past five o'clock in the evening. I saw the prisoner in company with another about Aylesbury-street . I watched them. They went up to Mr. Stoke's shop. The one that was in company with the prisoner steps into the shop. He took a duck from the window withinside, and handed it to the prisoner; I saw him put it under his coat behind. I immediately followed them both. They walked away together. I laid hold of them both, when I got got up to them. The companion got away from me. I saw one duck drop from the prisoner's coat behind.

Prisoner's Defence. I was standing at the pump wiping my mouth after I had been drinking, when this gentleman took bold of me, and I know nothing at all about it.

GUILTY, aged 19.

Of stealing, but not privately .

Whipped and confined one year .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

265. ELIZABETH BANNISTER was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of January , three yards of cambric, value 10s. the property of Thomas Hillman ,privately in his shop .

JOHN PLATFORD . I am servant to Mr. Hillman, linen-draper , 6. Crown-street, Finsbury-square, in the parish of Shoreditch . The prisoner came into my master's shop. between one and two, on the 11th January, in company with another woman. I was in the shop, and a lad with me. The female in company with the prisoner asked for some French cambrick. The prisoner kept her distance. I shewed the woman some cambrick. While she was looking at it, the prisoner stood about two yards off, and did no ask for any thing. The other woman bought half a quarter of a yard of the cambrick, the price of which was one shilling and nine pence. She gave me a three shilling piece, and I gave her the change. They both went out together; I looked over the cambrick, and missed a piece. In consequence of that, I went about seven doors off, and found the prisoner in another linen-draper's shop. I charged her with being concerned in this transaction. She denied it, and an officer was sent for, and she was taken up stairs. I am confident it was the piece which I have missed.

GEORGE TURNER. I am an officer of Worship-street. I took charge of the prisoner at the linen-draper's shop. I asked her, if she had any thing of the kind about her, and she said, she had not. She was taken up stairs, and searched by a young woman belonging to the house, who went with me.three yards of cambric were found on her. She then said, she had bought it at the West End of the Town; but she afterwards said that the woman who had been with her, had given it to her.

ANN ALLSET . I was desired to search the prisoner. She took off her shawl, and then pulled the cambric from underneath her stays. I mean the cambric which was afterwards claimed by Platford. She first said, she had bought it, and afterwards she said; that the other woman had given it to her, and at the same time, she wished she had never seen her.

GUILTY, aged 22,

Of stealing, but not privately .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

266. ABRAHAM ISAACS was indicted for making an assault on Thomas Vesale , in the Kings highway, putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, a gold watch, value 10l. a chain, value 2l. and a seal, value 1l. his property.

THOMAS VESALE . I am a school-master, and parish-clerk . This happened on the 1st of January, at seven o'clock in the evening, in Ratcliffe Highway; at the turning at St. John's-hill , in Hatcliffe Highway, a man purposely closed in upon me, and prevented my passing along; another at my back, violently pushed me up against the man in the front; so that I was hemmed in between them both, and at that very instant my watch was drawn from me by the man in the front; the man immediately ran down John's-hill; I pursued him; but was not able to overtake him. The man from behind ran at the same time with me. I called stop thief; but the man who ran with me said nothing, from which I apprehended that he was an accomplice. He overtook me, and ran a head of me; I lost sight of them at the bottom of the hill. Three days after that, the chain and seal attached to it were brought to me by a young man. I never found my watch; I only recovered my chain and seal. I cannot swear to the person of either of those men.

WILLIAM DOUGLAS . I was at Mr. Nettleship's, the publican, on the 2nd of January, between eleven and one in the day; during the time I was there, the prisoner came in, and offered a gold chain and seal for sale; there might be from eight to a dozen persons in the tap-room, and each of them took it into their hands; some of them said they did not think it was gold. He said, he would go with any one to any jeweller's shop to enquire whether it was gold or not. I immediately said, I would go with him myself; I went with him; we went to Mr.Ballautyne's; we asked him was it gold, and he said it was. I went back with the prisoner to the place we came from, and he asked sixteen shillings for them. After speaking a few words, he said he had bought them of a sailor for twelve shillings about five or ten minutes before. He said if I had a mind to buy them, I should have them for thirteen shillings, and a glass of something to drink. I bought them, and in consequence of something I heard, I went to Mr. Vesale on Thursday morning, with them.

Cross-examined by Mr. Adolphus. He said he merely wanted to turn a shilling.

FRANCIS JACKSON . I went with Douglas to apprehend the prisoner, and did so.

(Property produced, and sworn to.)

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

267. WILLIAM CRAIG was indicted for making an assault on William Connor , in the King's highway, on the 24th of December , putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, a watch, value 3l. four 1l. bank notes, and sixteen shillings in monies numbered , the property of the said William Conner .

WILLIAM CONNOR. I am a seaman ; I live in Milford-lane, in the Strand. I was robbed on Christmas Eve, at about twelve o'clock at night, in Old Gravel-lane, close to Ratcliffe Highway . I spent the evening at Mrs. Bryan's; I had some supper there between nine and ten o'clock; I sent out Mrs. Bryan with a five-pound note to get half a gallon of beer; she brought in the beer, and four one-pound notes, and the change. When we had drank the beer, I expressed a wish to go home, as it was pretty late. She recommended that her son should see me part of the way home, to which I accepted. I am a stranger to that part of London. We went into the coach stand public-house; I wanted to treat him, and called for a pot of beer; it was at Mr. Christian's, in Ratcliffe Highway. This Bryan handed the pot to the prisoner, and two or three other men that I did not take particular notice of, and the prisoner came up to me, and asked me what ship I belonged to; I told him the St. Domingo, a seventy-four. He said he had a cousin on board that ship, of the name of William Gifton. I told him there was not a man named William; but Jack Gifton. He said, his name was not Jack, and he wished to know what sort of a man he was; I told him, and he made an account to me, that he had not heard from him a long time. I told him he was a mess-mate of mine, and that Jack fell off the yard-arm, and was lost. In consequence of that, the prisoner recommended me to an aunt of his, and said I should be well treated, and he wrote down the direction to enquire for Mrs. Browne, Iron-street, Lambeth; after this, the landlord wished the company to quit the house. Three men came out along with me, and proposed to seeing me home to my lodgings. They brought me down thrown some small courts, and into one called Starch-court, as I hear. They dragged me into the court, and held me by the head and arms, and took my watch, and what money I had. I had the silver in my waistcoat pocket, and the notes in my fob pocket, with the watch; they ran away; they took my watch, my silver, and bank notes; the prisoner, Bryan, and another man held me; but I could not swear to the other man. The officer detected the watch. I am sure ther prisoner was one of them, I was only hearty; I was not drunk, to my recollection. I went to Mrs. Bryan's in the morning; Bryan was not at home; the mother requested I should stop, and take breakfast, and I stopped with the intent of seeing him. I breakfasted and dined there. I went to my own lodgings when it was dark. In a couple of davs after, I told the publican, Mr. Christian, and asked him if he knew the men.

Cross-examined by Mr. Adolphus. I only know Mrs. Bryan; I did not know her son before; the son had been to sea, and he and I had some discourse together, and she recommended that he should see me part of the way home. It was about eleven when I went to this public-house. I did not know where the prisoner lived; but when I went to the landlord, he gave me to understand something, though he could not tell where he lived. In consequence of that, I applied to Mr. Jackson, and told him of my loss. I took pains to discover the prisoner. I gave a description of Bryan. I requested the landlord if ever they should come into the house again, to give charge of them, and I left my address with the landlord; the landlord could not tell me the prisoner's name. Nobody has told me about a reward for convicting a man of a highway robbery; Mr. Jackson, the officer, has not told me there was a reward; I have heard of it; but have not believed it. The prisoner was taken up last Thursday. I was asked if I should know my watch if I saw it. Bryan was in custody since this robbery, he was taken up on the Saturday following; I made a charge against him of this robbery, because I knew him to be one of the men. I was hearty, and had been taking a drop; but I was not intoxicated, to my recollection. I will swear that the prisoner came out with me, and I have always told the same story to the magistrate.

Re-examined by the COURT. I gave nothing to this old woman but some beer; I was sober when I left Mrs. Bryan's.

COURT. Here is what you swore before the magistrate.

"I was much in liquor, I then went to the Bunch of Grapes, and was much intoxicated. I wanted to get away, but I had not power, and I fell asleep, and the pataole found me."

GEORGE PARTRIDGE . I am a police constable of Shadwell. Last Wednesday evening, I, and two other officers, chanced to meet with Craig; knowing he was wanted for a robbery we took him to the office; as we were going up to the office, he asked me whether it was for a robbery that happened since this, and I told him no, it was for one formerly. In consequence of information that I received, I went to Battle, and asked him for the watch which he had purchased of the prisoner; I told him he must give it to me; which he instantly did I have the watch. I then informed Craig, the prisoner, that I had got the watch he sold to Battle he said, if that was what I wanted him for, he could prove he had had that watch twelve months, for that he won it at skittles. I then sent for the prosecutor; he came on Friday; I asked him the maker's name in the watch; I told him the right name. I don't know how Bryan came to be discharged. I think it was not entered into against Bryan; I think there was no deposition taken about Bryan; he is now in custody about another robbery, and we were advised not to bring him here; the other robbery is of a much more serious nature than this. I asked the prisoner how he came by the watch that he had sold to Battle, and he said he bought it of Bryan. I shewed it to no person but Bryan. I knew the prisoner to speak to him; but I did not know where to find him when I wanted him.

WILLIAM BATTLE . I look at this watch produced by the last witness; I bought it of the prisoner Craig, about a month ago. I had had it about three weeks before the last witness applied to me to give it up. The prisoner told me it was his own watch, and he took it out of pawn.

William Connor . That is my watch; but that is not my seal to it.

Prisoner's Defence. Please you my lord, I bought that watch of David Bryan , on Christmas Day morning, and I know nothing of this robbery.

The prisoner called the following witness.

JOHN CHRISTIAN . I am the son of John Christian , who keep the Bunch of Grapes, the corner of Old Gravel-lane. I remember the prosecutor was there tipsy; they were obliged to take him out; I don't know whether he was sensible; but he did not appear to be so to me. I know Bryan and the prisoner were in company with him; I was in the parlour.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 21.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

268. WILLIAM FOX and JOHN WILLIAM POND were indicted for stealing, on the 5th of December , one brass cock, value 7s. one ball-cock, value 1s. and five brass locks, value 5s. the property of John Wahlenberg .

JOHN WAHLENBERG. I am a biscuit baker , and live at Catherine-street, near the Tower. I accused these boys of robbing my premises in the Kingsland Road . They took a water cock, a ball-cock, and some locks; it was done on the 5th of December. A constable came down to me, and I only know it to be my property.

THOMAS HAYCOCK . I am a constable. On the 5th of December, at three o'clock in the afternoon, I met the prisoner Fox, with a ball-cock, and a water cock in his hand. He said his father had sent him to sell them, and he was to have sixpence of the money. I then took him on suspicion of stealing them; these are the things, (producing them;) and his father is a very honest man.

JOHN MYERS . The house is in Kingsland Road, from which these things were stolen, was an empty one at the time. I occupied the house on the 7th of October last and saw the things all safe when I quitted it. I found the back door open after this cobbery.

JOSHUA ARMSTRONG. I took young Pond, in consequence of information I received. At the house of Fox's mother, was this cock, (producing it,) whichyoung Fox said he gave to his father.

JOHN PRICE. I shall be fourteen on the 7th of February. I was going on an errand, at about half past two in the afternoon of the 5th of December, I met the prisoners near the Bull, in old Kingsland. Fox said he would send the things home by Pond, which he did, and he said he had some things to shew me, and he took me down into a brick field,and shewed me the cocks; and he went into a good many shops, and could not sell them. I did not see him any more, until after Mr. Haycock took him up. He said he had taken them from next door to the Shepherd, Robinson's Row, Kingsland.

POND, NOT GUILTY .

FOX, GUILTY, aged 10.

Judgment respited .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

269. JOHN MOODY was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of December , one coat, value 1l. and one whip, value 5s. the property of James Sneesham .

JAMES SNEESHAM . I live at Shenfield. I had drawn my carravan up into Mr. Mane's yard, and whilst I was unlosding the straw, my whip and coat were on the shafts. The prisoner at the bar followed me all the way from Whitechapel. He told me he was Mr. Mane's cousin, and said he had thirty five shillings a week for buying hay and straw for Mr. Mane. I missed my coat and whip when I was coming out of the yard; I saw the prisoner going out with them on his arm; I followed him out, but he got away from us. I heard him tell the man in the yard, to hurry me along, saying he was going to a gin shop at the corner of the Curtain Road, but he never stopped.

WILLIAM CLEAL . I am a horse keeper, to Mr. Mane. I saw the prisoner at the bar in the yard on this day. I have lived with Mr. Mane some months, and never knew the prisoner was his cousin. Sneesham came in with a load of straw; and I saw the prisoner carrying the coat and the whip out at the gate. He gave the note into my master's hand; he said he had got the whip, and the great coat, and told me to hurry the lad on, for he was going to the gin shop; the lad knew where.

JOSHUA ARMSTRONG . The prisoner brought a man to our office, for stealing a bundle out of a cart. In consequence of information which I had received before that, I detained him, and sent for Sneesham the prosecutor, who picked him out of a room in which there were seven or eight, as the person who stole his whip.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Confined one year , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

270. JOSEPH BLANCHARD was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of January, one watch, value 3l. the property of William Harris .

WILLIAM HARRIS . I am in the employ of Messrs. Hugh, Stevenson, and Co. Adam-street, Marybone . On the evening of the 4th of January, I left my watch in the drawer of the table in the factory in which I worked. I left the factory at about five in the evening; the lad at the bar staid there after me. I did not miss my watch until I was going to bed; and then I remembered I had forgotten it at the factory. I did not mean to have left it there. I saw it at Marlburongh-street afterwards. The prisoner was not taken up until I sent for an officer.

SAMUEL WILLIAM PYALL . I am an officer of the parish of Marybone. In consequence of this business, I went to the manufactory, and examined twenty persons, and found it lay between the prisoner and two others. The prisoner then attempted to make his escape. I secured him, and taxed him very closely about it, and then he confessed he had hid it in the cellar; I asked him what part of the cellar; and he took me into the cellar, and by his direction at the bottom of the wall, between the brickwork, and the earth, I found it rolled in paper.

(Property produced.)

William Harris . That is my watch. The prisoner lived in the factory about twelve months; and always was very honest.

GUILTY , aged 14.

Fined one shilling , and discharged.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

271. JOHN DURKIN was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of December , one oak poast, value 7s. the property of William Hodge , and Luke Buttress .

WILLIAM HODGE . I lost some fencing, and saw this timber on the prisoner's premises; but I can't swear it was mine, because it has no mark.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury,before Mr. Common Serjeant.

272. THOMAS GODDARD wae indicted for indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of January , one dollar , the property of James Smith .

JAMES SMITH . I lost a dollar on the 3rd of January, it was in my basket at the end of the street; and the prisoner accidently dropped some halfpence in the basket, and I found he had taken the dollar out.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

273, JOSEPH HIGH and DANIEL BRANDON were indicted for stealing, on the 11th of December , one wooden cover, value 6d. and one hundred and twelve pieces of copper coin of this realm, called halfpence, value 4s. 8d. the property of Jeremiah Mann .

SARAH MANN . I am the wife of Jeremiah Mann who lives in Hope-street, Spitalfields . The cover and halfpence in question, were on a shelf behind the counter. About seven o'clock, in consequence of an alarm, we found the two prisoners in the shop, and this cover was not on the shelf, but was removed to the floor. The prisoners were searched, but nothing found upon them.

JOHN DE GROTT . I live at No. 3, Hope-street, Spitalfields; I live in the same house. I went behind the counter on the alarm being given, and saw the cover on the floor. I found Brandon behind the counter; he said that some big boys had been pursuing him, and he had ran in to hide himself.The other ran away. It might be half an hour afterwards when he was laid hold of.

FREDERICK INWILLIAN . I am a patrole, and was going past the door between seven and eight, I heard the word, theives, ballooed out in the shop, and in consequence of that I went in and took charge of Brandon. He said that the other had been with him; and we took him up on suspicion.

NOT GUILTY ,

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

274. ARCHIBALD HOLLOWAY was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of December , two jackets, value 1l. two pairs of trowsers, value 12s. one waistcoat, 4s. one shirt, value 2s. and one hat, value 1s. the property of Martin Copeland .

MARTIN COPELAND . I lost these things out of my birth in the ship, in the West India Docks . I saw them all safe at five o'clock on the evening of the 24th, and saw them on the 26th in the morning.In the evening of the 27th, I saw my hat on the prisoner's head outside the Dock gates. I asked him what ship he belonged to, and he could not tell. While I was looking for a constable, and he ran away. The next time I saw him was on the 5th of January, and then I had him taken into custody.

Prisoner's Defence. It is my own hat, and I have had it three weeks.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

275. JANE PARTRIDGE was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of December , from the person of Philip Mayhew , two Bank-notes, for payment of twenty pounds each , his property.

PHILIP MAYHEW. On the evening of the 5th of December last, I had two twenty pounds, and five one-pound Bank of England notes; they were paid by the Commissioners at Somerset House; I had these notes some time about me; the two twenties were sowed in between the waistband and the lining of my trowsers. The prisoner spoke to me first; I saw her under the Piazzas, Covent Garden; she took me to a house in Hart-street, right opposite to Covent Garden Playhouse ; I went up stairs with her. I undressed, and went to bed. She was not in bed more than an hour, when she got up, and said it was too early to go to bed; I could not stop her; I let her go away; I did not at that time suspect any thing. I awoke as soon as it was day light in the morning; I found my trowsers under the window, with the two twenty-pound notes gone; the breeches seemed as if the lining had been bitten. I found my four one-pound notes in my waistcoat pocket; I never saw either of the twenty-pound notes since. I have heard her say that she gave them to an old jewis woman, as she thought they were two one-pound notes.

JEREMIAH MAIDMENT . In consequence of hearing of this robbery, I apprehended the prisoner; she said, she gave the two notes to a woman named Lawrence, who kept an old clothes shop, in Drury-lane. I took her to Mrs. Lawrence's; but she defied all knowledge of it.

Prisoner's Defence. He gave me two notes, and said he was going to Ratcliffe Highway.

GUILTY , aged 33.

Confined two months , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

276. GEORGE WHITE , alias ARMSTRONG , was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of January , four pairs of children's shoes, value 7s. and one bag, value 6d. the property of Samuel Durdel , from the person of Mary Durdel , spinster .

SAMUEL DURDEL . I live in Phoenix-street, St. Giles's. The little girl from whom these shoes were stolen, is eight years of age, and is my daughter; it was between five and six o'clock on the evening of the 1st of January; she was to take them to Mr. Bright in Queen-street, St. Giles's; she had carried shoes for me a great many times. A gentleman brought her to me at about half past six; the prisoner was then in custody, and I saw the shoes down at Bow-street; they were the shoes I had delivered to my daughter.

GILES HEMENS . I am an auctioneer. I heard the child crying in the street, very loud. I suspected somebody had been robbing her, and I looked to see if any one was running, and I saw the prisoner running; I immediately pursued him, and he dropped a bag containing four pairs of children's shoes; I called out stop thief, and the prisoner was stopped, and brought back to where I and the child were. When she saw the bag in my hand, she said"give me my bag, give me my bag."

CHARLES FIELD . I was at the top of Cross-lane, which leads into Long Acre, and heard the cry of stop thief; I turned round, and saw the prisoner running; he had a bag which he dropped, and I stopped him, and secured him. Mr. Hemens immediately came, and we took the prisoner back to where the little girl was, and she said he was the person who robbed her. The prisoner said to me going along, "I am all right, for the child can't swear to me." The girl appeared to be frightened, and I can't suppose she knew who the man was. The girl had fallen down, and was very dirty; she might have dropped the bag.

GUILTY,

Of stealing, but not from the person .

Confined one year , and whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

277. JOHN M'CUE was indicted for stealing on the 26th of December , a truck, value 4l. two bags, value 6s. and one hundred pounds weight of glue, value 2l. 10s. the property of Joseph Roe .

JOSEPH ROE . I sent my lad on the 26th of December, to take one hundred pounds of glue to Holborn-hill.

JOHN HUGHES. I am in the service of Mr. Roe; I was to go to the Borough to fetch a hundred weight of glue to take to Mr. Powel, oilman, on Holborn-hill. I went into the house of Mr. Lowe, in Bishopsgate-street, in my way from the Borough, I left the truck at the door, and when I came out again, it was gone. I saw the truck aboutten o'clock the next morning, it was brought from Petticoat-lane, by a young man, who was Mr. Lowe's porter. I saw the glue and the prisoner in custody at the watchhouse.

BENJAMIN COHEN. I live in Wheeler-street, Spitalfields. The prisoner came and knocked at my mother's door, and asked was Lumpy at home; I told him I did not know whom he meant; no such person lodged there. He then asked me would I buy any thing; I told him, no; I did not buy any thing; I did not even ask him what he had to sell; I am sure it was the prisoner; he had another man with him. The prisoner said to the other man let us be off, or we shall be nabbed. When I heard that, I instantly called the patrole, who took the prisoner into custody, with the property.

TITUS WELLS. I am the patrole who apprehended the prisoner, and the other man; but the other man got away. I took this bag of glue from the prisoner, which he said was bones.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner received a good character from some witnesses.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Confined six months , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.