Old Bailey Proceedings Online (www.oldbaileyonline.org, version 6.0, 01 November 2014), June 1815 (18150621).

Old Bailey Proceedings, 21st June 1815.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the PEACE, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND ALSO THE GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, HELD AT Justice-Hall, in the Old Bailey, On WEDNESDAY, the 21st of JUNE, 1815, and following days,

BEING THE SIXTH SESSIONS IN THE MAYORALTY OF The Right Honourable SAMUEL BIRCH , LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY J. A. DOWLING, CLEMENT'S INN.

LONDON,

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED (BY THE AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON By R. Butters, No. 22, Fetter-lane, Fleet-street.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON.

Before the Right Honourable SAMUEL BIRCH , Lord Mayor of the City of London; Sir Alexander Thompson , knt. one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir John Bailey , knt. one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir Robert Dallas , knt. one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir Watkin Lewis , knt. Sir John Eamer , knt. Sir William Leighton , knt. Aldermen of the said City; Sir John Silvester , bart. Recorder of the said City; Matthew Wood , esq. Christopher Magnay . esq. Christopher Smith , esq. Aldermen of the said City; and Newman Knowles , esq. Common Serjeant of the said City, His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of Goal Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

London Jury.

Thomas Davis ,

Ruben Williamson ,

John Oliver ,

Jhon Stubbs ,

George Pitt ,

Thomas Gill ,

George Randall ,

James Richardson ,

David Price ,

John Hearn ,

William Withey ,

John Porson Entevisle .

First Middlesex Jury.

James Gates ,

Joseph Hitch ,

Thomas Proscer ,

James Osborne ,

Abraham Purdy ,

William Saunders ,

William Burgess ,

John Gagan ,

George Penny ,

Martin Millet ,

James Moore ,

Joseph Whiting .

Second Middlesex Jury.

Robert Goodburne ,

Christian W. Sheffield ,

Thomas Havel ,

Charles Powel ,

Henry Palmer ,

Nicholas Rogers ,

James Clarke ,

John Todd ,

Charles Slade ,

William Walker ,

George Ball ,

James Frost .

682. JOHN SHAW was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of June ; one pair of boots , the property of Hesman Britton .

HESMAN BRITTON. I am a shoe-maker , I live at 9, in Clement's-lane . On Tuesday, the 13th of June, about half past five in the evening, my boots were taken: I did not see them taken. The witness is in Court, who saw them taken. All I know is I missed them.

JOHN HARDY . I am a shoe-maker. I saw the prisoner take the boots from the door. I was in the shop. He ran up the Court with them. I pursued him, and he threw the boots at me. I picked the boots up, and ran after him. The gentleman is in Court who stopped him.

Q. Did you lose sight of him at all - A. No, I did not; not at all. I am sure he is the man.

HENRY KING . I am a printer. I was returning home from my work, when this affair happened. I saw the prisoner running, and heard a cry of stop thief. He was pursued by the last witness. I tried to stop him; he struck at me, but did not hit me, because I stumbled back against a door-way. He passed me, and ran up Plough-court, into Carey-street; upon which, I pursued him, crying stop thief; he turned to the right, towards Chancery-lane. Two gentlemen were coming along with a lady, and he ran across the way, and put his back against the wall. I went up, and took him, and he asked for mercy, and that is all I know.

Prisoner. When you was before the magistrate, you said, you stopped me?

COURT. And so he did. You did not go any further.

THOMAS LACK . I am a constable. I received the prisoner and boots into my custody.

COURT. Q. Now, Mr. Britton. Look at these boots, are they your property - A. They are.

COURT. Q. To Hardy. Are these the same boots that you picked up - A. Yes, they are.

Prisoner. Q. To Britton. Was your shop door shut, or open - A. Shut.

Q. Did you see me - A. No, I did not see you at all.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

683. ELIZABETH GREEN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2nd of May , a flat-iron, and several other things , the property of Mary Blow .

MARY BLOW . I am the wife of William Blow , I live at 24, Golden-lane, in the parish of St Luke's . The prisoner lodged with me about five months. She paid four and six-pence a week. There was no one besides herself. She left the lodgings in April without my knowledge. I suspected that she had stolen some things, when I found the door was locked. An officer was sent for, and he broke open the door. There was a pair of sheets, a bed quilt, a looking glass, and a flat-iron missing. I saw them afterwards at the pawnbrokers, Mrs. Fothergill's and Mr. Summer's, and Gadesby's.

JAMES WALTER . I produce the sheets, I received them in the prisoner's name, but don't know her person; I live at Mrs. Fothergill's.

Mary Blow . They are my sheets, I know them by the mark, here is an M.

HENRY MARTIN . I live with Messrs. Summers, and Gadesbye's, they are pawnbrokers. I took in the quilt, but I don't know the prisoner.

Mary Blow . That quilt is mine; it is a piece of patchwork of my own working.

JOSEPH PRINCE . I am an officer of the parish of St. Luke's. I was fetched to take the prisoner in custody. She was in Rose-alley, Golden-lane, St. Luke's. I told her for what; she gave me the tickets out of her pocket. I was going to search her, when she said, if Mrs. Blow would forgive her, she would get the things back. Afterwards I was going to search her, when she gave me the tickets.

COURT. Were are the tickets - A. Here they are.

Q. To Martin. Is that the ticket you gave the prisoner for the quilt - A. It is.

Q. To Walter. Is the other, the one you gave for the sheets - A. It is.

WILLIAM BLOW . I am the husband of Mary Blow .

Q. I suppose Mr. Blow, you know nothing more than your wife has told us - A. No, nothing more.

Prisoner's Defence. The humble petition of Elizabeth Green, sheweth, that she is an unfortunate woman, and rented a room of the prosecutrix, for the weekly sum of four shillings and sixpence; that your petitioner always most punctually paid her rent, until this time, when she was driven by distress to commit the act which has brought her before this bar. She fully intended, and told the prosecutrix that she would, leave every thing as she found it. I was about to go and get these things out, when the officer took me into custody, and I surrendered up the tickets freely, and without hesitation. By receiving the mercy of the honourable judge and jury, your petitioner will for ever feel bound to pray.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Confined three months and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

684. HENRY BAILEY was capitally indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of George Hagan , and stealing therein, five bushels of flour, value 3 l. and upwards, in the night time , of the 12th of May .

HANNAH FISHER . Q. Do you live with Mr. George Hagan - A. I do.

Q. What is your master - A. He is a farmer, and miller , with his brother; they are partners.

Q. Where is the dwelling-house situated - A. At Stanwell Moor .

Q. Is there a mill against it - A. There is.

Q. Is there a communication between both - A. there is.

(A plan of the premises was here put into the hands of the witness.)

Q. Does that represent your master's premises? is it like them - A. It is.

Q. The mill is under the same roof with the dwelling-house - A. It is.

Q. Well, go on, relate what occured - A. My mistress told me to make secure the door; which I did, about half past nine in the evening of the 12th.

Q. Did you look at the window then - A. No, I did not.

Q. When did you go to bed - A. At about eleven o'clock, sir.

Q. Did you hear any alarm in the night - A. I did, at about one o'clock; I heard a noise, which induced me to look out of the window; I could see nothing, but I heard my master's voice, telling me to open the front door, which was close to the mill; I went down stairs; I then saw my master, and his man, Miles, struggling with Bailey, the prisoner at the bar; it was near the front door of the house, which was close to the mill.

Q. What did they do with Bailey - A. They had him down against the gate.

Q. Well, what then - A. They took him into the house. He called out very plain for help when he was out of doors. I went to call Brown, the carter, but they had got him in then.

Q. Were you in the same room when Brown came - A. I was.

Q. What then passed - A. My master asked him how he intended to carry away the flour, and he said, upon my back.

Q. Was any thing said about the window - A. Not to my knowledge. My master asked him, what was become of the candle, and he said, he might make himself happy where the candle was.

Q. Did you go into the mill, and perceive how the flour was - A. In the morning I went into the mill, and saw some strange bags; I mean they were not my master's; some were full, and some were empty.

Q. Had you seen the bags in the mill the night before - A. I had not.

Q. Is your master a quaker - A. He is.

Q. Is his man, Miles, also a quaker - A. He is.

Q. Henry Miles is the name - A. It is.

WILLIAM BROWN . Q. I believe you are carter to the prosecutors - A. I am, sir.

Q. Were you called up at any time, in the night of the 12th of May, by the last witness - A. I was, sir; when I went, Mr. Miles and my master had the prisoner in the house.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. I do, sir; I have seen him; he lives at Belfont, about three miles off, from where my master lives. He did not say any thing at first, but afterwards he said, that he knew he had done wrong.

Q. Are you sure there was no promise or threat nor any thing of the kind - A. Not in the least,

Q. You say, he at first said nothing; what did he afterwards say - A. He said, he knew he had done wrong, and wished my master had shot him at once out of the way.

Q. Had you been in the mill the night before - A. No, sir; I had not.

THOMAS SEXTON . Q. You are the constable who took the prisoner and the bags and flour into your custody - A. I was.

Q. Now, was there any threat or promise made use of to him - A. No.

Q. Well, then go on - A. When I took him before Mr. Henderson, the magistrate, he made a confession.

Q. Was that confession taken down in writing - A. It was. I have the bags and flour in my custody, I suppose it may be worth three pound ten shillings, or twelve.

"The confession taken before the magistrate, was here read, and stated, that the prisoner, and a man named Seabrook, and another named Collins, broke into the mill by the window, and were proceeding out of the door, when they were stopped by Mr. Hagan, and the other man and Seabrook made off."

RICHARD WALKER . Q. I believe Mr. Walker, you are solicitor for the prosecution - A. I am.

Q. In consequence of a letter from the prosecutor, what did you do - A. I and Mr. Hagan went together to see the prisoner in prison; I made no promise, nor threat, nor any thing of the kind, nor said, that it would be better for him to confess. He said, he was very sorry for his crime; he went down on his knees to Mr. Hagan; he said, he went to the house, and undid the window, by taking out a square of glass, and removing a wedge which fastened the window down; that a man named Collins, and a man named Seabrook, were with him, but Seabrook remained on the out side to watch, and he and Collins got in at the window, and came out by unfastening the door.

Q. Did he state why he came out - A. Yes; in consequence of an alarm, given by Seabrook, and he was taken in the door-way, half in and half out.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 40.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Dallas.

685. HENRY TOPPING was capitally indicted for committing a highway robbery, on Ann Palmer , on the 23rd of May , in the parish of St. Anne, Shoreditch , and taking from her person and against her will, a bundle, containing two handkerchiefs, a pair of shoes, and other articles .

ANN PALMER . I am the wife of Daniel Palmer ; I live at No. 11, Sackville-street, Bethnal Green. I was returning home from Edmonton, on the evening of the 23rd of May; Mrs. Chaplain was with me; at about a quarter before ten, we were in Kingsland-road. The reason I was so late was that I was in expectation of a friend accompaning us home. I had a bundle in my hand, which contained two pair of shoes, two handkerchiefs, and some other little things; the shoes belonged to me, and the rest of the things to Mrs. Chaplin. Nothinghappened to us until we came opposite to the Duchess of York public-house, at the same side of the way, a man came up to the side of me from the fields, by the side of the public-house, and laid hold of my bundle; he did not say a word.

Q. Did he snatch it - A. No; he took hold of it, and tried to take it away; I resisted. He threw me down; by which means, he got the bundle, and ran away with it across the fields. I screamed out, murder, and two men came out of the Duchess of York, who followed him across the fields. I know the man; he was the prisoner at the bar; I looked at him while we were struggling for the bundle.

Q. Were you frightened - A. I was.

Q. Did you notice the man sufficiently to know that it was the prisoner at the bar? don't speak if you have any doubt - A. I am sure he is the man; he had on a light great coat, with white trowsers.

Q. Had he a hat on - A. He had a hat when he first came up to me; which he lost in the scuffle, and it was picked up by Mrs. Chaplin. When he ran away, he went without his hat. The next time I saw him was on the Sunday following, at Worship-street office; I could swear to him at that time. I had been to Edmonton, to see my mother; it was close to the door of the Duchess of York public-house that I was robbed; there were no persons near.

Cross-examined. I was very much terrified; I resisted much; I was very much alarmed; but from the view I had of the person who robbed me, I am certain it was the prisoner.

MARTHA CHAPLIN . I live in Thomas-street. On the evening of the 23rd, I and Mrs. Palmer were returning from Edmonton; I was going before her; a man came up to Mrs. Palmer; he did not speak; I heard the cry of murder, and turned round, when I saw Mrs. Palmer and the man struggling together; I could not assist her in the least, because I had a young child in my arms. The man was pulling the bundle out of her hand; she resisted very much, and he threw her down, and got the bundle. By her screaming murder, two young men came out of the Duchess of York. When he got the bundle, he ran across the fields.

Q. Was it before the two young men came out of the public-house, that the man who robbed Mrs. Palmer, ran across the fields - A. He was in the fields when they came out. One of the young men is here, his name is Sullivan. I did not see the man's hat fall, but I picked it up after he ran away. I should not know the hat if I saw it.

Q. Did you observe the man so as to know him again if you should see him - A. No, I did not, I only knew his dress; he had on a light great coat, and a pair of white trowsers.

JEREMIAH SULLIVAN . I am a weaver. I live in Old Haggerston, in the parish of Shoredicth. I was in the Dutchess of York public-house, on the evening of the 23rd of May; I heard the cry of murder, I thought it came from a woman. I and another young man ran out. We saw a man running across the fields; it was a moon-light night. We ran after him, but could not overtake him; I saw he had no hat on. The other young man is not here. We lost sight of him at first, but Mr. Harris, who lives next door told us.

COURT. We can't hear what Mr. Harris told you.

JOHN MIDDLETON . I am a dustman, I saw the prisoner at the Prince of Wale's public-house, in Oliver-lane, on Thursday night; I do not know what Thursday; it was after Easter, but I don't remember whether it was before Whit Monday. The prisoner was taken into custody on the Saturday after the Thursday on which I saw him. I asked the prisoner to drink with me. We had known each other. He said, I am in work now Jack, and said, he should be a pint with me. He also said he wanted to buy a hat; I said, I will sell you mine Henry; he said, what will you take for it I said five shillings, he said, he would give it me. I asked him what he had done with his own, and he said, he had cut the rim off, when he was at work in the brick-fields. He asked me if Mr. Armstrong the officer had enquired for him, at Mr. Clarke's in Oliver-lane, because he believed there was some information, against him; I told him, I did not see Mr. Armstrong there; he said, he would take the hat of me and was to have met me on the Saturday following to give me the money, when I heard that he was taken up.

JOHN CAVILIER . I am an officer of Worship-street-office. Here is the hat which Mr. Sullivan found, I have had it in my custody ever since the Wednesday Sullivan gave it me, at the Duchess of York, together with the handkerchiefs. That is all I know.

Jeremiah Sullivan . I got the hat and handkerchiefs from the ladies. I sufficiently noticed the hat to know that this is it.

GUILTY - DEATH .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Dallas.

686. JOHN STRANGE was indicted for a highway robbery .

The prosecutor and witnesses were called, and not appearing in Court the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Dallas.

687. WILLIAM SHAY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of May , one watch, value 4 l. and one hat, value 1 l. the property of John M'Clelan from his person .

JOHN THAY . I am a carpenter, I live in Nevil's court, Fetter-lane, in the parish of St. Dunstan . On the 8th of May, I was coming through St. Giles's from my work, between the hours of eight and nine in the evening, and observing a crowd opposite the church, I stopped and enquired what was the matter. A person told me it was a woman, who was stopped on suspicion of stealing something. I remarked that if she was innocent, it was a great shame, and the prisoner answered me, and said, it was, and offered to assist me in rescuing her. After some slight interruption to the woman, she was suffered to go about her business, and I went about mine. I had not proceeded sixty yards, before the prisoner overtook me, and told me that the woman was againstopped, and asked me would I not return, and see she was not hurt. I went back with him, and he directed me up the Coal-yard , following me himself, as I thought; a light which was at the further part, was immediately extinguished, and I was knocked down, and robbed of my hat and watch. I gave information to the Bow-street officers; in consequence of which, the prisoner was taken into custody.

JOHN WILSON . I am a Bow-street officer. In consequence of some information which I received from the prosecutor, I took the prisoner into my custody, in company with my brother officer, Thomas Nautz . We did not find any watch, nor hat; we took him at his lodgings.

Several witnesses were called, who gave the prisoner a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Dallas.

688. GEORGE HAINES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of May , two 20 l. Bank of England notes and one 10 l. note, the property of Robert Duncan , from his person, in the dwelling-house of Isaac Franes .

ROBERT DUNCAN . I am master of a vessel between Aberdeen and London. On the 17th of may last I was in London at the house of one Isaac Franes , No. 4, Swan-alley, Wapping . I lost two 20 l. notes, and one 10 l. note; they were taken from my pocket whilst I was asleep. I saw them the evening previous before I went into the house. I never saw the prisoner before. There were two girls in the same room; the prisoner slept in the same room also. I missed my property about six o'clock the next morning. The prisoner had quitted the house, but the two girls were still in the room. I know the notes; I took them the day before, at No. 24, Lombard-street, that is the banking-house where I took them. I should not have known the numbers and dates of the notes, had I not gone to the banking-house to enquire, since they were stolen. I saw a ten-pound note, and a one-pound note, before the magistrate. The prisoner was in custody at that time. He said, he picked them up on the floor of the room where he slept. I applied to an officer, and the prisoner was taken about ten o'clock the same forenoon.

Prisoner. Q. Did you ever see me at all - A. Yes, I did; in bed.

Prisoner. Q. He told the magistrate that he did not see me, for the bed clothes were over my face - A. I told the magistrate that I went over to look at you the night before, and you immediately covered your face over with the bed clothes.

Prisoner. Q. How was this money concealed about you, was it loose or in a pocket-book - A. It was loose in my coat pocket.

COURT. You must go to the banker's where you received these notes, and tell them to send their clerk to identify the numbers.

JOHN SMITH . I am an officer of the Thames Police office. On the morning of the 17th of last month, Captain Duncan applied to me, and informed me of the robbery. I immediately went to Franes's house; Franes has kept it for a number of years. In consequence of some information which I received there, I apprehended the prisoner a few hours afterwards, about ten o'clock, I found him in a public-house, drinking at the bar, and I found upon him, eight one-pound Bank of England notes, three three-shilling pieces, and some halfpence. I traced him to the houses where he had changed the notes, and all the persons are here. The prisoner was very much in liquor.

Prisoner. Q. That witness has taken away a commission from me - A. I have, my lord; he has been a Custom House officer.

ELIZABETH FROST . I live in Broad-street, St. George's in the East. I changed a ten-pound note for the prisoner, which was afterwards given to the last witness, Mr. Smith.

Q. To Smith. You have the twenty-pound note, and the ten-pound note; where did you get the ten-pound note - A. I got it of Mrs. Annesley, who received it from Mrs. Frost.

Q. Where did you get the twenty-pound note - A. From Mr. Edwards, in Old Gravel-lane.

Q. To Mrs. Frost. Look at that ten-pound note, do you know it - A. I do, I indorsed it. I gave all the notes to Mrs. Call in change, endorsed.

Q. To Smith. Have you the eight one-pound bank notes which you found on the prisoner - A. I have; here they are.

Q. To Mrs. Frost. Look at these eight notes, and tell us if those are the note which you gave Mrs. Call in change - A. They are.

ANN CALL. I carried a ten-pound note to Mrs. Frost to get changed; which I got from the prisoner. I took his note to be changed, and I gave him these eight one-pound notes, some three-shilling pieces, and six pence halfpenny in copper.

HOWSON EDWARDS. I gave a twenty-pound note to Smith, the officer. I received it from Mary Slade .

MARY SLADE . I keep a public-house. The prisoner came to my house, about nine o'clock, on the morning of the 17th; he got something to drink, which came to threepence halfpenny; he asked if he could have change of a twenty-pound note; I told him he could, and gave it him. I am sure the prisoner is the man.

Mrs. Call. I got the ten-pound note from the prisoner, about eight o'clock in the morning, of the 17th.

SARAH HOLLOWAY . I am an unfortunate girl. I slept at 4, Swan-alley, on the night of the 16th of May, with the prisoner, and in the same room with the prosecutor. The prisoner went away in the morning, about five o'clock; I let him out. The prosecutor was very much in liquor.

Prisoner. Q. I should wish to ask that witness how much she got from me - A. You gave me a three-shilling piece on the over night to sleep with me, and in the morning I asked you for more, and you pulled out twopence halfpenny, and said that was all the money you had.

DANIEL DANIEL . I am clerk in the house of Chapman, Witmore, and Co. I paid to Robert Chapman , on a draft of Edward Hoane , two twenty-pound notes, and one ten-pound note, on the 16th of May, 1815. The number of one of the twenty-pound notes was 3968, and dated, April 5th; the number of the other, was 7988, dated March 8th; and the number of the ten-pound note was 17,795, and it was dated April 17th.

Robert Duncan . I received those very notes from the last witness. I received the draft from Mr. William Hoane , for my agent, Mr. James Jenkins .

GUILTY,

Of stealing, but not in the dwelling-house .

Confined two years , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

689. HENRY RIDING was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of May , one pocket-book value 6 d. and five one pound Bank of England notes, and a handkerchief, value, 1 s. the property of Daniel White , privately in the dwelling house, of George Cleveland .

DANIEL WHITE . I am late a serjeant in the 43rd regiment . On the 15th of May, I was at the house of a person named Cleveland, between the hours of eleven and twelve in the forenoon; there was a soldier of the same regiment, who had some claim upon his agent, and came up to me, and asked me to make it out for him, as he could not write himself. Knowing that it was a just claim, I went to make it out. I put my cap beside me with my pocket-book containing the notes, and a handkerchief in it. While I was writing, the prisoner sit on my left, where the cap was; I knew him before. I was going to return to my friends in Ireland by the coach that night, and the prisoner engaged to carry my trunk for me to the coach office. He said to me while I was writing, Serjeant, I am just going out, I will return in two minutes. I replied very well, and told him to make haste. I shortly afterwards missed my pocket-book, and the handkerchief in which my arm had been slung. The prisoner did not come back, so I immediately went to the Royal College, and asked the Serjeant of his ward, if he was in, he was a Chelsea pensioner. The serjeant told me he was not. In returning, I overtook him. I took him into custody immediately, I and an officer accompanied him to Sloane-square. I there insisted on his being searched, and on him were found some three shilling bank-tokens, a five and sixpenny piece, a shilling, and eleven pence in halfpence, together with the handkerchief, in which my arm was slung, and which he took out of my cap. I found neither pocket-book nor notes; he said, that he had changed one, and that the pocket-book and the remainder were stolen from him by a woman.

Q. Are you certain that the handkerchief which you found upon him, was the handkerchief which you missed - A. I am.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not say that if I would give you two pounds, you would not prosecute me - A. No, I did not.

GEORGE SPENCE . I am an officer. I saw the prisoner in company with a woman, about three o'clock, on the 13th of May. I saw the pocketbook with him then. I was afterwards applied to by the prosecutor, to take him into custody; I did, and he acknowledged to me then, that he did take the notes; that he changed one and that the woman with whom I saw him, stole the rest.

COURT. Who proves that this was the dwelling-house of Cleveland?

George Spence . It is not the house of Cleveland. The name of the landlord is George Clark .

GUILTY, aged 61,

Of stealing, but not in the dwelling-house .

Confined two years , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Dallas.

690. ANN TRAYLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of May , one black coat, value 10 s. one waistcoat, value 2 s. and various other articles of wearing apparel, the property of George Basell , in his dwelling-house .

GEORGE BASELL . I live in the parish of St. Matthew . On the 15th of May; I lost some property; I lost a black coat, a black waistcoat, a pair of kerseymere breeches, and gaiters, a pair of nankeen pantaloons, two pockets, a white dimity petticoat, a black stuff one, and various other articles. I went out between the hours of two and three in the afternoon, and when returning, I met the prisoner coming out of my house, with these different articles in her apron; she went on; I overtook her, and found the property on her.

WILLIAM HOLLOWAY . The prosecutor was in my shop, just opposite his own house; we were talking together, and saw the prisoner come out with a great bundle in her apron.

JOHN GILLISSEY . I am an officer. I produce the things; I have had them in my possession ever since the prisoner was taken into custody.

William Holloway . We found all those things upon her.

George Basell . Those are my property; altogether they are worth about forty-eight or forty-nine shillings. When I took the prisoner, I asked her how she could strip me in this kind of way, and she said, she did not mean to hurt me. The things were delivered into the hands of Mr. Gillissey, the officer. I can't tell how she got into the house.

GUILTY, aged 18,

Of stealing to the value of 39 s.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

691. JOSEPH HUNT was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of James Pincott , on the 5th of June , and stealing therein, fifty-two yards of Irish linen, value 50 s. his property.

JAMES PINCOTT . I am a linen-draper , and live at No. 187, Oxford-street, in the parish of Marybone . On the 5th of June last, about one o'clock in the morning, I heard a noise. The shop and the house had been fastened up the night previous. I was alarmed by this noise, and immediately got up;I heard some glass fall out of the glass partition; I went down stairs, and found that the shutters had been removed; the window broken, and two pieces of Irish linen, each containing twenty-six yards, were stolen. There are four persons sleep on the same floor. I immediately put on my great coat, and went out at the private door, to see what had been done outside; I there discovered that the bar had been forced up, and the shutters forced down, and this linen taken away. The watchman came immediately, and assisted me in putting up the shutters again. In consequence of some information that I received, that a man was taken to Marlborough-street on suspicion of having stolen some linen, which was found on him; I went there, and identified the property to be mine.

THOMAS PRESTON . I am a watchman. I saw the prisoner on the morning of the robbery, about twelve minutes before two, in King-street, Soho, he had a bundle under his arm; there was another person with him. I stopped him, and asked him, what he had got; he replied, nothing belonging to me. I insisted on seeing what it was, and on laying hold of it, he struck me with a stick, and ran away. I lost sight of him for about four minutes; he was stopped by another watchman, John Fish . I am positive that the prisoner was the person whom I stopped, and who struck me, and who was afterwards stopped by Fish.

Cross-examined. It was dark, but still I am enabled positively to swear to the person of the man who struck me. I belong to St. Ann's parish; the constable of the night is not here. When I came up to Fish, I did not tell him that the prisoner was the man who struck me. I gave the bundle to the constable of the night. Fish is here.

JOHN FISH . I am a watchman. I was on duty on the morning of the 6th of June. I heard a rattle spring, and a few minutes before two, I saw a man running, and stopped him; it was the prisoner.

Cross-examined. I stopped him because I heard a rattle spring. He had no stick. There was another man running down after him; he was running in a direction from Crown-street, towards Crumpton-street. I have seen the prisoner before, but I don't know him. I saw no bundle. I gave the man to the second witness.

SAMUEL PLANK . I am an officer of the public office of Marlborough-street. I received the linen to advertise; I was making out an advertisement when Mr. Pincott came in, and identified it.

JOHN PRESTON . I took the bundle to the watchhouse, and delivered it to John Barns , the constable of the night. I am sure this is the same linen.

James Pincott . This linen is my property. I know it by the marks on it; 2, and 4, and the words

" Owen Donnally Colevain ."

Cross-examined. I had only had this linen in the shop two or three days, and had not sold any of it.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 27.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Dallas.

692. JOHN FRANKLIN was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Lord Duncannon , on the 21st of May , in the parish of Marybone , and stealing therein, one hammer-cloth, value 10 l. one box coat, value 2 l. and four coach-glasses, value 2 l. his property.

THOMAS SHENNAKER . I lived with John Ponsonby , commonly called Lord Duncannon, at No. 18, Margaret-street, Cavendish-square . The coach-house whence these articles were stolen, is behind the house; there is a communication between them. The coach-house and stable are together; and some of the servants sleep over the stable. The coach-house door was broken open on the night of the 21st of May, by a false key; a hammer-cloth, a box coat, and four coach glasses, were stolen that evening. I saw them safe when I locked up the stable at seven o'clock, and the next morning at nine, they were gone. I went into the stable directly after seven, and did not quit them until we went to bed. I slept over the stables. It was impossible for any one to get into the coach-house and get these things while I was awake, without our hearing; for we were so near; we went to bed about half after ten. I missed them at nine the next morning. I saw part of them the same morning, at Marlborough-street office, they were in the possession of the St. Giles's watchhouse-keeper, I can swear to them as the property of my master.

SAMUEL ROBERTS . I produce these things.

Thomas Shennaker . I can swear to the hammer-cloth; the door was in the same situation and the same state when I examined it as when I went to bed on the night previous to the robbery.

PATRICK CRAWLEY . I am a watchman. On the 21st of May, I was in Browlow-street, Long Acre, between one and two in the morning, I was standing talking to the patrole and another watchman, and I heard a foot coming along on the other side of the way; I crossed, leaving the patrole and watchman, and saw a man coming along with a box coat, and the prisoner was behind him. I knew the prisoner before; I saw some glass under his coat, by the light from my lanthorn. I went to lay hold of him; the other man ran off, and so did he. I cried stop thief, and sprung my rattle. He let drop the glass immediately. I never lost sight of him until he was stopped by my pal, the watchman; seeing him secured, I pursued the man with the box coat, which he dropped, together with the hammer-cloth, and escaped.

MICHAEL CULLEN . I am a watchman. I was standing at the corner of Charles-street, Drury-lane, and I heard a rattle spring in Brownlow-street; I saw the prisoner running from Brownlow-street, and a man pursuing him; that man was some neighbour, but I do not know him. I saw the prisoner run up Drury lane, and up King street; I immediately pursued him; I never lost sight of him until I stopped him.

Prisoner. Q. Did you take me, or did the other person take me - A. I cried stop thief; the other man who was standing at the corner of Brownlow-street stopped you, and I took charge of you.

JOHN HOLLOWAY . I am a patrole. I was in company with Crawley, at the corner of Brownlow-street. The account Crawley has given is all true; I should give the same.

WILLIAM READING . I am a watchman. I was in company with Michael Cullen . I know no more than he has said.

Prisoner's Defence. How can they say I had glass, when I was not in Browlow-street at all. I heard the cry of stop thief, and joined in the pursuit. I heard some glass smash down at my heels just before.

GUILTY - DEATH .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

693. JOHN OATS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of June , one pocket-book, value 2 s. the property of Frederick Benseley Barnwell , from his person .

MR. FREDERICK BENSELEY BARNWELL . On the 9th of June, about mid-day, I was going along Watling-street , and just at the corner of Friday-street , between the corner, and the post, I felt myself violently hustled by two or three men, of whom the prisoner was one. A gentleman, who was behind me, sprang forward and seized the prisoner, who immediately threw my pocket-book under a cart. He was then secured, and taken into custody; the pocket-book was delivered to the officer, and the prisoner was then taken before the sitting magistrate at Guildhall.

Cross-examined. This happened in the middle of the open day; the last time I saw my pocket-book previous to its being stolen, was in Bow-lane. My coat is not swallow tailed, and the pocket-book could not have fallen out.

MR. EDWARD WILLIAMS . I was standing talking to a friend in Watling-street, on the 9th of June, about thirty yards from the corner of Friday-street; I saw the prisoner, and two other suspicious looking characters on the other side of the way. I observed to my friend, that they were after no good, and I would watch them. I had scarcely made the observation, before one of them went in front of the last witness, who was walking along, and just as he came between the post and the corner, stopped short, and the other two closed up. I then saw the prisoner at the bar, thrust his hand into his pocket, and pull out the pocket-book. I immediately sprang forward, and collared him; upon which, the other two men made their escape, and the prisoner threw the pocket-book under a cart. He was taken into custody by an officer, and immediately taken before the magistrate at Guildhall.

(The pocket-book produced.)

Mr. Benseley. That is my pocket-book.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

694. JOHN SMITH and GEORGE LOVELL were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2nd of June , one ass, the property of William Lamb , and one other ass , the property of William Altee .

WILLIAM LAMB . I am a salesman of Smithfield market , my ass was on Ealing-common ; she had just foaled. I and my son were going to market on the morning of Friday the 2nd of June, and when we had got upon the Common, we perceived the young donkey making a great noise, it was three weeks and some days old. We could not see the mother, and my son remarked that she would not have left the foal of her own accord, and he thought somebody must have taken her. When we got to Notting-gate, we enquired of the gate-keeper if such a thing had gone through the gate, and he told us that two gypsies, one a tall man, and the other a short one, had gone towards London, with two asses. We went on to Tyburn, and there we made the same enquiries, and received similar answers; I directly came home, and sent my son to market, and told young master Atlee when I got down what was become of my ass, and told him his was gone also; he immediately set out for London.

WILLIAM ATLEE . I had a female donkey, which I lost off the Common. In consequence of some information which I received from Mr. Lamb, I went up to Smithfield market; I walked about three hours, without seeing my donkey; I was at last taking the last walk round the market, when I saw my ass, and Mr. Lamb's together, and the prisoners near them. I immediately went for an officer, who took them into custody.

WILLIAM TAYLOR . I am an officer. About four o'clock in the afternoon, of Friday, the 2nd of June, the last witness came up to me as I was standing in the market, and asked me to inform him where he could get an officer. He told me two gypsies had stolen two donkies off Ealing-common. I asked him if he knew the donkies; he told me, be did; that one was his, and the other belonged to Mr. Lamb. I immediately fetched two brother officers, who went with me where the boy directed us to. I asked the gypsies if the donkies were their property; they told me they were. A scuffle ensued, and they were taken into custody.

WILLIAM GREY . I am an officer. I went with Taylor and Smith to apprehend two gypsies, who had stolen a couple of donkies. I asked them where they got them, and they told me they bought them at Edgeware.

JOHN SMITH . I was the first man who laid hold of the two prisoners; I was with Grey and Taylor. I was in my apron, and I was not suspected to be an officer. I asked the tallest man, who the donkies belonged to; he said, that they were his. I asked him if he would sell one; he replied, he would: would I buy one? With that I caught hold of him by the collar. The other gypseyman struck at Grey, but missed him, and hit another man, who fell on his face. A scuffle immediately ensued, and at length, after considerable resistance, both the prisoners were secured.

Smith's Defence. I was coming from Edgeware that morning, and I met a man with the two donkies; he asked me if I wanted to buy them, and I told him I did. I bought the donkies and I got my little couzen here to help me to get them to London. If I had known that they were stolen, I would not have bought them.

Lovell's Defence. I know nothing about these donkies, any more than that my cousin here, asked me to help him to drive them up to London, and I did.

SMITH, GUILTY , aged 24.

LOVELL, GUILTY , aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

695. ANNE TURNER , ELIZABETH COHEN , and ANNE DIXON , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of May , three three-shilling tokens, and other silver amounting to fourteen shillings, the property of Martin Sholl , from his person .

MARTIN SHOLL . I am an attorney's clerk . On the 17th of May, I was returning home, about twelve o'clock at night, and at the bottom of Stonecutter-street, on the West side of Fleet-market , I lost this money. There were four women standing at the bottom of Stonecutter-street, the three prisoners, and another. As I passed; Ann Turner put her arm round my waist, thrust her hand into my pocket, and took this money out, handing it to the fourth woman, who made off. Dixon and the other girl were not doing any thing. I seized hold of Turner immediately, and never let her go until the watchman came up, to whom I gave her in custody.

TURNER, GUILTY .

Transported for Seven Years .

COHEN, NOT GUILTY .

DIXON, NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

696. JAMES RICHARDS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of June , one handkerchief, value 4 s. the property of John Braithwaite , from his person .

JOHN BRAITHWAITE . I am an engine-maker . On the 1st of June, I was coming from St. Paul's Church-yard, in company with Mr. John Lows , and had got just at the top of Ludgate-hill , where I felt my handkerchief drawing from my pocket: there was a little crowd. I turned round immediately, and saw the prisoner trying to hide the handkerchief under his coat; I immediately seized him, and delivered him to a constable, together with the handkerchief.

JOHN LOWS. I was walking in company with Mr. Braithwaite, on the 1st of June; just at the top of Ludgate-hill, Mr. Braithwaite turned suddenly round, and I turned round almost directly afterwards. I saw the handkerchief at the feet of the prisoner; he had apparently just dropped it.

Mr. Braithwaite. He dropped it when I collared him.

JOHN DRINKWATER . I am an officer. I took the prisoner into custody by desire of the last witness.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

697. SAMUEL GILBERT was indicted for having feloniously disposed of, and putting away, twenty forged and counterfeit one-pound notes, purporting to be the notes of the Governor and Company of the Bank of England , with intent to cheat the said Governor and Company .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded

NOT GUILTY.

SECOND COUNT. Charging him with having forged notes in his possession, knowing them to be forged.

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY , aged 27.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

698. JAMES WALLIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of May , a coach glass, value 30 s. the property of Edward White .

WILLIAM CHALTERN . I am coachman to Mr. White. I lost the coach glass at the Hare and Hounds-yard, Islington . I saw it the night before it was lost, about eight or nine o'clock, I was called up the next morning about six o'clock, by the watchman, who informed me that he had stopped the prisoner with a coach glass; which turned out to belong to my coach.

THOMAS WOOD . I am a coachman of Islington At about half past four in the morning, the prisoner passed me in Barnsbury-street; I saw him come out of the yard with a coach glass under his arm, in a bag. I asked him what he had in the bag, and he told me a coach glass, and he was going to get the string mended. I told him, he had stolen it, and I took him back to the yard, where he pointed out to me the coach from which he took it; he did not say he belonged to the coach.

JOHN FRANKLIN . I produce the coach glass. The prisoner was brought to me at the watchhouse, a little before five in the morning.

MR. WHITE. I know it to be my coach glass.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

699. JOSEPH WOOD was indicted for feloniously stealing, a shirt, a shift, a petticoat, and several other articles , the property of William Michelson .

WILLIAM MICHELSON . I live in Clarendon-square, Somers Town . I know nothing of the robbery. I can only speak to my property.

JOSEPH COUNE . I live in Clarendon-square. On Thursday, the 8th of June, between one and two in the afternoon, I saw the prisoner and a lad walking together up the square. When they came to Mr. Michelson's gate, the lad went down the area, and returned in a minute, giving the prisoner a bundle; I ran on, and took the prisoner, property, and all; the lad made his escape.

JAMES WHITEHAIR. I am a beadle. I received the prisoner and these things into my custody.

William Michelson . Those things are my property.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

699. JOHN GOWEN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of May , a snuff-box value 4 s. the property of Lieutenant Colonel Milman , from his person .

COLONEL MILMAN. On the 13th of May, between three and four in the afternoon, I was in Bond-street . On a sudden, I missed my snuff-box, being alarmed by a jerk of my coat; I turned round, and saw the prisoner behind me; I let him go on, and I followed him, until he got to St. James's church, in Piccadilly; I there tapped him on the shoulder, and requested he would have the goodness to oblige me with a pinch of snuff; he told me, he had none. I replied, you must have some, for you know you have just picked up my box, in Bond-street; he then said, is it your box? I told him it was; and he asked me to describe it; I did, and he then gave it me. I called an officer, and immediately gave him in custody.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming along, and saw the snuff-box on the ground, just behind this gentleman; I picked it up, and put it in my pocket. He came after me, and said, it was his, but I did not choose to give it him, until he had described it; when he had, I immediately saw he had a right to it, and of course surrendered it up to him.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

700. CATHERINE JOSCELYN and MARY THOMPSON were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of June , a lace shawl, value 40 s. the property of Messrs. Simmons, and Jones.

WILLIAM SIMMONS . I am a linen draper , in partnership with Mr. Jones , I live at No. 10, Liecester-square . We have two shops and one dwelling house. There is a communication between the two shops. On the 20th of June, both the prisoners were in the shop, but I did not see them come in, nor did I serve them.

ROBERT PIKE . I am shopman to Messrs. Simmons and Jones, I was in the shop on the 20th, and saw the prisoners come in, I served them, they wanted to look at some lace shawls, I cannot say which spoke. I shewed some immediately to them. After turning over a considerable quantity, at last there appeared to be one which they liked, and they asked the price of it. The price was three pounds ten shillings; she did not approve of the price. I mean Thompson did not. They were going out, I stood chattering to them at the door, and at length I got them in again, I then lowered the price to two pounds fifteen shillings, and she bid me two pounds ten shillings, and which I agreed to take. I put it into a paper, and Joscelyn took out three one-pound notes and gave them to me. I went into the adjoining shop to get change, and when I returned into this shop again, I perceived Joscelyn with her right hand upon a shawl, which she was going to steal. I kept my eye upon her. She requested me to reach her a shawl, which she pointed out to try whether the one she had bought, was as long as it, she measured and was satisfied. While I was reaching, she pulled some shawls with her left hand, over her right hand, to avoid being seen, and she then took a shawl with her right hand, and put it into her pocket. She then expressed herself satisfied with the shawl she had bought. I wrapped it up in paper. She said, good afternoon, I have stolen that piece. I directly jumped over the counter, took hold of her by the arm, and I was putting her up four pair of stairs, into a passage to take her into a room to search her, she threw the shawl from her into the passage. I saw it fall from her about a yard. I called to Mr. Simmons, who came to my assistance. I did not see Thompson do any thing. She did not try to run away, if she choosed she might have escaped.

(The shawl produced.)

MR. SIMMONS. I was called into the shop by Pike, and saw the shawls on the ground. I sent for a constable, Burn was his name.

JOHN BURN . I am a constable, I was sent for by Mr. Simmons. I took the two prisoners into my custody and have had the shawls ever since. That is it.

THOMPSON NOT GUILTY .

JOSCELYN GUILTY,

Of stealing, to the value of 39 s. only .

Confined one Year , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

701. ELIZABETH CROFTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, various articles of wearing apparel, the property of Francis Herbretcher in his dwelling-house .

FRANCIS HERBRETCHER. I live in Thomas-street, Brick lane, Bethnal Green . I am not the house keeper. I rent two appartments. The landlord does not live in the house. I know the prisoner at the bar, she lived servant with me six days; she came on the 2nd of May, and left on the 7th. Nothing was missed until she was gone. My wife is here, That is all I know.

MRS. HERBRETCHER. I am wife to the last witness. The prisoner lived with me, we expected her to stay longer with us; but she left. There was no quarrel. She went away on the Saturday to see her friends, and we expected her to return on the Monday, but she never came; and that raised our suspicion. In consequence we searched, and found missing, a silk gown, value four pounds, a cotton gown, value ten shillings, two pair of stockings, value four shillings, three neckcloths, value two shillings, a dimity pocket, value one shilling, and one cotton apron, value one shilling and sixpence. I saw part of these things, on the Sunday before the prisoner came. The next time I saw the prisoner was accidently, last Sunday in Brick-lane. When we went to her lodgings, we did not find her, when we met her, we charged her with stealing the property, she told us, it was deposited at two pawnbrokers; and gave us their names, and places of abode. She told us the duplicates were destroyed. We found the silk gown, the dimity pocket, and one or two other things.

Francis Herbretcher . She told us, that the pawnbrokers were Mr. Killingsford and Mr. Sowerby, inBrick-lane. We went there, and found the silk gown the cotton gown, and the dimity pocket.

(The articles produced.)

Mrs. Herbretcher. These are my property.

JOHN KILLINGSWORTH . I am a pawnbroker, in Brick-lane, Spitalfields. The gown is not now worth forty shillings. it is not worth four pounds.

GUILTY, aged 19.

Of stealing, to the value of 39 s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Dallas.

702. ELIZABETH HATHERALL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of April , a counterpane, a shirt, a sheet, two table cloths, a silk shawl, a gown, a jacket, a waistcoat, and several other articles of wearing apparel, together with a quantity of lamb, and a quantity of butter and cheese, the property of Samuel Ireton , privately in his dwelling-house .

ELEANOR IRETON . I am the wife of Samuel Ireton. He rents a house in the parish of St. Pancras . It is our dwelling house, nobody resides in it but ourselves. The prisoner was servant to us, we received her out of the Reffuge for unfortunate females, where she had been ever since she had return from transportation. She went away without our knowing it. We went out on Saturday evening the 15th about seven o'clock, and on our return, at a quarter after twelve, the house was stripped, and she was gone; and we heard the child crying up stairs. We missed a counterpane, one shirt, one sheet, two table-cloths, one silk shawl, one child's jacket, one neckcloth, one black frock, a child's pincloth, a coat, a quantity of cheese and butter, and a quantity of lamb, for which I paid twelve shillings and sixpence. I am sure all these things were in the house, for the prisoner had been washing the principal part of them on the Saturday, and called me down to see what a good colour she had made them of. I have never seen any of the articles since.

GEORGE TANNER . I am an officer. I took the prisoner, and conveyed her to the Poultry Compter. I searched her there. I told her that it would be better for her to confess. I was searching her, when she said, I know what you are searching for.

Q. Was that after you told her it would be better for her to confess - A. It was.

COURT. Then you must not tell us any thing of what she said after that.

Q. To Mrs. Ireton. Could the prisoner have carried off all these things at once - A. No; she could not.

(The humble petition of Elizabeth Hetherell.)

Sheweth that your prisoner, was tried at this place last April three years. She was found guilty, and was sentenced to be transported to New South Wales. She was proceeding on her voyage thither, when She was taken by the French, and your petitioner and the rest of the convicts, were landed on the Island of St. Antonio. We were taken up by another British vessel, and were brought to Portsmouth. In consequence of my good behaviour on that voyage homeward, the captain and his lady, were interested in my behalf, and got me my free pardon. When I returned to London, I went to the Reffuge, and there I remained until I got the situation, in the family of the prosecutrix. The prosecutrix is a great drunkard herself, and used to make me drink gin, and other spirits. Her husband is a very sober man, and used to tell me not to encourage her in that practice. On the day stated in the indictment, I was intoxicated with the liquor which my mistress had given me, and I went out, leaving the door open. When I came to myself, I was afraid the house would have been robbed, and therefore I did not return. In consideration of my good character and behaviour, which induced the captain and his lady, to procure me a free pardon. I hope the honourable judge and the jury, will be induced to pity the case of an unfortunate culprit, for which your prisoner will for ever be in duty bound to pray.

GUILTY aged 26.

Of stealing, to the value of 39 s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

703. THOMAS WARD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of June , one sedan-chair-glass, value 6 s. 6 d. the property of John Brenon .

JOHN BRENON . I had a chair belonging to me On Tuesday evening last, I left it in Tothill-court, South Audley-street ; between the hours of eleven and twelve; the glass was safe then. The next morning, I missed one of the glasses, it was a window with two glasses in it; each cost three shillings and three pence. I saw it the next day, in the hands of a man whom I dont know.

JOHN TIMBRELL . I am a watchman belonging to the parish of St. Ann's. I took the prisoner into custody, in the morning of the 9th of April, at three o'clock, in Porto-bello-passage. I searched him, and found the glass upon him; and took him to the watchhouse, I have kept the glass ever since that time.

John Brenon . That is my glass.

GUILTY aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Dallas.

704. JOHANNAH VICKERY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of May , a silk gown, and three silver tea-spoons, the property Peter Daniel in his dwelling-house .

PETER DANIEL . I live at No. 3, Meard-street, Soho . The prisoner lived servant with me two days, I detected her in stealing some of my property, and sent for a constable, and on her were found, two silver spoons and a duplicate of a third; and the silk gown was in her pocket. I have had them ever since, and know them to be my property. I have counted the number of the spoons and find three are wanting. The spoons are marked. When we took her, she said it was not her intention to steal them. She said, she was sweeping the floor, and found them. wrapped them up in a piece of paper to keep them clean, and intended to have put them in the closet.I asked her whether she found the gown sweeping the floor; she said no; her young mistress had brought it down for her to try on, and if it did not fit her it was to be taken up again.

BENJAMIN HOYLE . I am a pawnbroker. The prisoner came to our house on the 27th of May, and pawned a silver spoon, in the name of Mary Flannagan , and this is the spoon.

PETER DANIEL . That is my spoon; here are the other two, and here is the silk gown; they are all my property.

GUILTY , aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

705. CHARLES COOPER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the night of the 3rd, or early in the morning of the 4th of June , fifteen fowls, value 30 s. and five ducks, value 10 s. the property of Abraham Wirall .

ABRAHAM WIRALL . I am a carpenter ; I live at Camden Town . I lost some fowls on the night of the 3rd, or the morning of the 4th of June; my servant locked them up in my hen-house on the night of the 3rd of June, her name is Sussannah Dyer. I am accustomed to wake at three in the morning, and at that time my cock used usually to crow; not hearing him at three, nor for a considerable time after, I rang the bell, and told the servant to go and see how the fowls were; she returned, and told me that only one of the fowls heads was left. I know no more.

EDWARD OODEN . I am a watchman. The prisoner at the bar passed me, about four o'clock in the morning, of the 4th, at the end of Oxford-street, and was making his way down Crown-street, when I stopped him; he had a bag on his shoulder, and I asked him what he had got there; he said, watercresses. I said, I was very fond of water-cresses, and I wished he would give me a few for my breakfast; he made no reply, but threw down the bag, and ran off. I sprung my rattle. I put my hand into the bag, and found the water-cresses quite warm; for they were ducks and fowls; I found there were fifteen fowls, one with its bead off, and five ducks. The prisoner was stopped by the next watchman. I delivered the fowls and ducks in at the watchhouse, and that is all I know about it.

WILLIAM SMITH . I am a watchman. I saw the last witness stop the prisoner at the bar, with a bag on his shoulder. The prisoner threw down the bag and run off; I pursued him, but did not take him. William Rice stopped him, and I assisted him to take him to the watchhouse.

WILLIAM RICE . I am a watchman. I apprehended the prisoner on my beat, on the morning of the 4th; he ran up a court where there was no thoroughfare, and as he was coming down, I took him.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been to work as far as Hendon, on Saturday, I am a plaisterer by trade. I spent my weeks wages on Saturday night at Hendon. I got very much intoxicated; I layed down about one o'clock in the morning in the fields, close to the Regent's Cannel-bridge, in the Hampstead-road; I slept a short time, but feeling it very wet, I got up about day-break, and perceived a foot-track along the dew in the field; I followed it up for a short distance, and it led me to this sack; upon lifting up which, these ducks and fowls layed all in a hole.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Confined two years , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Dallas.

706. WILLIAM GREEN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of May , twenty-seven shillings; in monies numbered, the property of William Cowls , from his person .

WILLIAM COWLS . I am a labouring man in the service of the East India Company . On the 20th of May, I was drinking in company with the prisoner, at a public-house in Bromley ; I got very tipsey, and fell out with another man, and fought, and I put out my uncle. After that, I and the prisoner went and layed down, and fell asleep in Bromley fields; I had nineteen shillings and six pence in my right hand pocket, and eight shillings and eleven-pence in my left hand pocket; there were some shillings, some sixpences, and some eighteenpenny-pieces; I don't know how many of each. I lost this money some how; but I don't know how. When I awoke it was gone.

Cross-examined. I had a strained uncle, but I was so tipsey, that I don't remember whether the prisoner assisted me or not.

HENRY TIBBALO . I am an apprentice to a calico-printer. My master's factory is close to Bromley fields. I saw the prosecutor and the prisoner come into the fields on the 20th, and layed down, and go to sleep; presently I saw the prisoner get up, go over to the prosecutor, took some money out of his right hand pocket, and then turned him over, and took the money out of his left; then counted it, and went away.

JOHN CLARIDGE. I am a constable. When I took the prisoner into custody, I found a good deal of silver on him; he said, part of it was his own, and nineteen shillings and sixpence, he said, belonged to the prosecutor, and he pulled it out in one of the prosecutor's gloves; he said, he took it out of the pockets of the prosecutor, by his desire, when he was dead drunk, in Bromley-fields.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Dallas.

707. SAMUEL BLOWER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of June , one cask, value 1 s. 6 d. and one hundred and one quarter of spanish blacklead, value 2 l. the property of William Newton .

WILLIAM NEWTON . I am a blacklead merchant, and manufacturer , residing in Redcross-street, St. Luke's . I have known the prisoner about eighteen months, he was in my service, he was a constant servant . I never missed any property, but have been informed that I was robbed. On June 16th, the prisoner came to me in the front watchhouse, andasked me to lend him the knot for Mr. Harris; I told him by all means. In about ten minutes, I went into the back warehouse, where he was to purchase some casks to go away, but he was not there. I asked the foreman, where he was and he told me that he was gone to tell the carman to fetch the cart. In about a quarter of an hour, I went again into the back warehouse, to ask if the cart was come; it was not come, and I just stopped back into Beech-street, to ask the reasons why it was the carman told me he had seen none of my men that morning. In coming home if I had the prisoner at the bar, with a knot on his shoulder. I asked him, where he had been he told me he had him carrying a parcel for Mr. Harris. I told him, I did not mind his doing a little job for a friend, but I did not like him to go at that early in the morning, when he was wanted at home; I said to him, some how I don't think any where for Mr. Harris; he told see her hand. I immediately slept to Mr. Harris; and he had neither to go well the that morning. I went back and if you will tell me the truth you have taken any thing or not out of the warehouse, that was then said I have taken a small cask; of I said, well if you have shew it will forgive you, he said, it was.

COURT. You must tell us anything that happened in consequence of telling you would forgive him if he confessed. When did you next see him - A. I did not see her I took the officer to. We found him his house; we brought to the place where the property was found I did not know where the property was till four hours after would be better The property was a cask of between one hundred and one hundred and a; it was worth between forty shillings and two guineas, and the cask did not be worth more than sixpence.

KENNEDY. I am an officer of Worship-street office; I apprehended the prisoner between one and two in the afternoon, of the 16th of June, by the desire of his master; his master came to me, to fetch me to apprehend him. The man was in a house in the City; and I am a Middlesex officer; and I did not chose to act in the City; he did not live in the house; we met him coming out; he said, there was no property in the house. The master insisted upon my searching; I did, but found nothing belonging to him. The prisoner then took me to Bunhill row, St. Luke's in company with his master, and at the door of a public-house, called the Brew-House the cask was standing; he pointed the cask out to me; he told me it was his master's property. I have had it in my possession ever since. Have it.

William Newton . I can neither swear to the cask nor to the.

WILLIAM LEE . I know nothing about this at all, except that the prisoner and Mr. Newton's foreman requested me to assist in lifting a cask of lead on the shoulder of the prisoner; which I did.

GUILTY .

Fined 1 s. and discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice Dallas

708. CHARLES GORDAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2nd of February , a gold ring, value l. the property of John Vivien

JOHN VIVIEN . I am a Major of the Royal Artillery . The prisoner is a private of the hed was in my service in the capacity of I reside in Cumberland-street. On the of February horse. The prisoner on the morning of the day, as usual, from the stables in where I then resided, but neither he nor the horse ever returned. In I was informed that my horse in a Deptford stage coach; on which I went to Deptford, and saw my horse in the stables of the owner. I told him it was a stolen horse, he said he bought it of a hooks I am sure it was my horse. I applied to the magistrate at Marlborough-street office, and my horse was restored to me in consequence. The prisoner had with

Cross-examined. I am a Mayor in the Royal Artillery. The Hog street of Greenwich not take a glance of the applications but if not of Greenwich as theMarlborough-street do they thought right. I have given no order to the prisoner to sell the horse to any general officer at Woolwich, I had not given him off. I told him if any body wanted to buy a horse, and said to me

Robert. I am dealer. I live at New cross, Deptford. I was in market on the 3rd of February, I sold a horse to a gentleman; and I went with him to the Rose-Inn to take the money for him. In coming out I saw the horse in question it asked if it was to be sold, the prisoner, who was on him, replied he was. I asked him if his master was there, he replied he was not; in it he had the retting of him. Then I asked what lie who tell for him, he asked eighteen guineas and I gave him seventeen pounds five shillings, he was an aged horse; I bid him a sixteen guineas, but bint down to seventeen pounds five shillings. We then went into the Rose-inn he gave me his master's name and place of abode. He gave me a memorandum, not a receipt, we never do take receipts in that way. The uniform was Mr. Viven Sloane-street, Chelsea, I did not asked him for receipts. I then took the horse home. I do a great steal of business, and I don't always take and give receipts, for this kind of business. I sold the horse for twenty-six pounds sixteen shillings the day following, I am not sure the prisoner at the bar is the man who sold him me, if he is, he is very much street since I bought the horse of him.

COURT. Q. Had you any doubt about this man before the magistrate - A. I believe he was the man according to the look of his face.

Q. Was this safe entered in the market-book - A. It was not.

COURT. You know all honest men do so.

Cross-examined. I have been a horse-dealer thirty years, and it is not the custom to give receipts; they are very seldom given.

Q. Is it at all extraordinary for you to buy a horse one day, and to sell him the next at a very considerable profit - A. Not at all in our business.

JOHN DADE . I am a coach owner, residing at Deptford. I bought the horse in question from James Rolfe . I gave twenty-six pounds sixteen shillings for him; I bought him on the 3rd of February, and paid Mr. Rolfe for him on the evening of the 4th. I had given Mr. Rolfe instruction to buy me some shout strong horses, he told me he had bought this for me. I trusted my friend to buy it for me. This was the same horse that was claimed by Major Vivien 's brother.

James Rolfe . I bought the horse of the prisoner between three and four in the afternoon.

John Dade . I liked this horse much. He did not do me a great deal of service; but he was a match to another horse which I had, and he pleased me.

WILLIAM CRAIG . I am an officer. I went with a warrant and apprehended.

Prisoner's Defence. The Vivien's horse was rather tough in riding, and therefore, he wished me part with him. I was to sell this horse, If I could; and as he was at Bath. I want to give the money to my mistress. After I sold him. I was going home and I called in at the, White Horse, in Fetter-lane to get a pint of beer and some bread and cheese while I was there two men came in who wanted to try the horse two days before they asked, me what I had sold him, for I told them, and when I was going out between six and seven o'clock. They came after me, knocked me down and took away the money; I was afraid to return to my master and so I deserted but gave myself up in a week afterwards.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 31.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

709. ENGLAND BLOWER and JAMES TAYLOR , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3rd of May cotton gown, value 10 s. the property of Priscritta Sharp .

PRISCRITTA SHARP. I am servant to Winton in Bedford of the Prince of O, Field-gate, Whitechapel. Blower was quartered of our house on the 3rd of May; he was in the house about nine in the evening, about eleven I missed a cotton gown. I next saw at bo and one at the watchhouse. I shall know the gown if I see it I never saw Blower take it.

ANN BACK . A witness was called upon her recoginiances.

WILLIAM PARTRIDGE . I am beadle of the parish. I went to the lodgings of Taylor, on Sunday morning, or Saturday night. I went then. I went up stairs, and he was in bed, I asked him if he had two gowns, he said, he had no gowns, I said you must have them, because Blower immediately lifted up the gowns, saying he supposed that I told him to get up and dress coat along with me, which he did really. I taken Blower before. The woman, B appear, was suspected of having stolen them, Blower told me to go to Taylor, for had the gowns, and that would clear the gift. Here is the gown.

Priscrilla Sharp. That is my gown.

Blower's Defence. I brought this girl Ann Back with me, she said she was going to see her brother; she wanted to stop all night at my quarters, but the people of the house would not suffer her. She was up stairs in the house. The woman went away when these gowns were missed. I was suspected, and I told them I was very willing that they should search every thing I had. This girl was frightened and told me she had given the things to Taylor.

Taylor's Defence. What my commonside says is very true. This girl came on to London with us, I carried her bundle for her. On this night, she came and gave me two gowns, which she told me were her's and asked, me to take care of them with the rest of the things. When I went to bed, I was so tired, that I put them under my bed, and did not put them in her buddle.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Dallas.

710. WILLIAM DALASON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of May , one carpet, value 2 l. the goods of Thomas Mace .

THOMAS MACE . I am a chairman and porter . On the 27th of May, I had some carpets to beat, and I beat them in the fields behind the houses opposite to St. James chapel, Tottenham-court-road . I had them in a truck, and left them at the door of a public house in Bernard-street, while I went in to enquire for a job, and when I came out one of the carpets were gone. I know the carpet perfectly well, for I have beaten it for the last three years. When I stopped the prisoner, who was running away with it, he told me a gentleman gave him a shilling to carry it but he could not tell me where he was carry it to.

WILLIAM ASHTON . I saw the prisoner take the carpet off the truck, and take it across the road. I live near the public-house.

Prisoner's Defence. I was employed by a gentleman to carry it to the itching block at this end of Oxford-street for a shilling; and I was going along with it when I was stopped, and the gentleman run away.

GUILTY , aged 50.

Confined one Year , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

711. ANN PERCIVAL and ANN GILLET were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22nd of May , two books, value 20 d. the property of William Hughes .

WILLIAM HUGHES . I keep an old book-stall .On the 22nd of May last, I saw the prisoner Percival standing at my stall. I had occasion to go out shortly afterwards for a particular book, and I missed it. I thought it might be in the shop. I went to look for it, but could not find it. I went out again and missed another. My suspicions were immediately raised against the prisoners whom I saw talking together close by. I searched them and found one on one, and the other on the other.

GILLETT GUILTY .

PERCIVAL GUILTY .

Confined three months , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Dallas.

712. JOHN KNAPP was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 8th of February , one sheet, value 7 s. and one towel, value 1 s. the property of Dinah Moses , in a lodging room .

DINAH MOSES . I am a widow , I live in Parson-street, Wapping , I let lodgings, I let a room to the prisoner about four months ago, it was furnished. He lived with me three or four months. He was in my debt three weeks rent. When he was going away, I missed a sheet, and a towel, I asked him where they were, and he said he had given them to the washerwoman, and they would be returned the next day; but he never came back, so I had him taken into custody.

THOMAS ANNIS PARSONS. I live with Mr. John Annis who is a pawnbroker. The prisoner pledged a sheet with me on the 8th of February, in the name of Knapp.

Prisoner's Defence. It was my intention to have returned the things as soon as I could get money to redeem them.

GUILTY aged 42.

Confined three months and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

713. THOMAS MORRIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of May , one watch, value 1 l. and one watch key, value 1 d. the property of Samuel Kirkley is his dwelling-house.

MARY KIRKLEY . I am wife to Samuel Kirkley . My husband keeps a shop at No. 43, Golden-lane . The prisoner at the bar came into the shop on the 24th of May, he asked me to look him out some halfpence with lowered edges to them. I told him I had something else to do, and I went into the parlour, he followed me; I was very much alarmed. I went out and called Mr. Kirkley, as if he was at home. I saw the prisoner take the watch off the mantle piece. He was frightened, put it down again, and ran off. My husband came home almost immediately and I told him what had happened; and he went after the prisoner.

SAMUEL KIRKLEY . I went in pursuit of the prisoner, and found him at the public-house, close by. He was attempted to be rescued by his companions, but was finally secured.

JOSEPH HAWKINS . I am a constable. I was told by some of my neighbours that Mr. Kirkley was robbed, and might be ill used; and I was requested to go to his assistance, I went, and found that the prisoner was making his escape from a crowd being rescued by his companions. I secured him, and took him to the round-house.

Prisoner's Defence. I hope for mercy, as I have aged parents depending on me for support.

GUILTY aged 18.

Confined six months and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Dallas.

714. DANIEL WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of June , eighteen yards of printed calico, value 1 l. the property of James Martin .

JAMES MARTIN . I am a linen draper . I reside in Judd-street. I lost this calico on the 17th of this month, between three and four in the afternoon; I saw the prisoner at the bar take it; it was hanging at the door; there were eighteen yards, I immediately pursued him, and never lost sight of him, until he was taken.

MR. JOHN PIGGOY . I took the prisoner. I picked up the print, and brought it with the prisoner back to the shop.

GUILTY aged 10.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

715. JAMES PORTER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 17th of June , two nutmegs, value 6 d. and a piece of cord, value 2 d. the property of Messrs. Cannon and Alljort .

DAVID CANNON . We carry on the business of a druggists , in Aldersgate-street . The prisoner has been a servant of ours. When he entered our service, I informed him, that his two predeciatars had robbed me of considerable property, and I must always have the priviledge of searching his pockets. This he agreed to. On Wednesday the 17th of this month I went into the warehouse between two and three. When I opened the door I saw him recovering himself from stumbling, and he made rapid haste up to me. I asked him what was the master. He said he was only coming up to see who was at the door; I asked him what made him stumble, he said something on the floor; I asked him what he had in his hand, he said nothing. I then laid hold of his arms, and insisted on knowing what his hand contained; I opened it, and there were two nutmegs in it. I had some nutmegs in the warehouse, I said, it was very strange, after what I had told him He said, he did not rob me for a profit; he acknowledged that the nutmegs were my property, and that he had taken them for a pain it his stomach. Conceiving that me might have more about his person, I went for a constable, and insisted on searching him; I searched him, and found in his trowsers, a hask of twine; I asked him if that was for a pair in his stomach, and he said no, it was to make a fishing net. I felt on the outside of his trowsers, and two more pieces of twine were taken out. He said they were all to make a fishing net.

MR. BAUCK CHINA. I was in the house of the prosecutors, learning their business. I had examined the warehouse in the way of business a few days previous,and there were then three quarters of a pound of nutmegs in a drawer. After we searched the prisoner, we examined the drawer, and found all the nutmegs gone.

JOHN JOHNSON . I am an officer, I produce the nutmegs.

David Cannon . I can only say, that if these are the nutmegs I gave to the officer, they are my property.

GUILTY aged 53.

Confined six months , and fined 1 s.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

716. GEDELIAH PHILLIPS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of May , four shillings in monies numbered the property of William Gaskin from his person .

WILLIAM GASKIN . I am a labourer , and live at Old Gravel-lane, Surry-road. On Saturday the 27th of May last, I saw the prisoner in Petticoat-lane . I have been introduced to him before, I know him well. I was introduced to him by a woman named Mary Dowling , she was with me. I met the prisoner by appointment, for the purpose of purchasing some counterfeit three shilling pieces. I was employed by the Bank. I had but few words with Phillips. I met him by appointment at ten o'clock; and he appointed the same hour on Sunday morning, Saturday being their sabbath. I met him accordingly at that hour, the next morning, we did not say a word. We walked up the lane, and he gave me two dozen three shilling pieces, and I gave him two one pound notes. He sold the counterfeit pieces at half price; and he gave me four shillings change. I was parting with him, when I heard somebody cry out,

"a nose" meaning an informer. Immediately Phillips turned round and knocked me down, beat me most violently and a whole mob of jews gathered round; every one of whom had a knock at me. The prisoner ransacked my pockets, and took out the four shillings, and some of the others took from me a tobacco box, a knife, and a pocket handkerchief. There was a general cry of

"a mad dog, kill him, kill him." I received a severe injury in my inside, from the various kicks and bruises which I received.

The witness on his cross-examination could give no particular account how he got his living. He had been in service; he had been before a magistrate about stealing a handkerchief and fighting. At length he so much prevaricated and contradicted himself, that Mr. Serjeant Bosanquet, who was counsel for the prosecution, was oblidged to forego any further proceeding.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

717. JAMES WOOD was indicted for feloniously secreting and embezzleing the sum of ten shillings, which he had received on account of Samuel Freeman , in the capacity of his servant ; on the 11th of May.

JOHN HARVEY . I am a porter at the White horse, Cripplegate. I received a truss, addressed to Mr. Hockley, at Dunmow in Essex; we paid ten shillings for its carriage from the country to London, in its way to Dunmow, and I took it to the Saracen's Head, Aldgate , and upon presenting the ticket there, they paid me the ten shillings, and they were to forward it to Dunmow, and receive that ten shillings there in addition to their charge, from London to Dunmow.

GEORGE BREWER . I attended the warehouse where this bundle was delivered, and I gave this man the ten shillings, and charged it to my master's account.

WILLIAM BARBER . I am a book keeper at the Saracen's Head. This truss came on the 11th of May, and was missing on the same evening. If it had not been missing, it would have been sent to Dunmow. The prisoner at the bar was in my master's employ as porter to the inn .

SAMUEL FREEMAN . I keep the Saracen's Head inn, at Aldgate . This truss was stolen a few minutes after it was delivered at our inn.

MARY TODD . I keep the books at the Talbot. This truss was delivered by the Saracen's Head porter; he gave me that ticket, and upon it I paid him ten shillings. The truss, in the event was either stolen or lost. I do not know what became of it.

EAGLE SOARE. I know the prisoner at the bar, he brought the truss to the Talbot, and put it down by the door.

ROBERT HOCKLEY . I reside at Dunmow. I am the person to whom this truss was addressed: but I never received it

William Barber . I never received the money of the prisoner which he received at the Talbot.

Prisoner's Defence. What Barber says is quite wrong for he had kept the parcel behind some boxes for four or five days, and he told me to take it to the Talbot.

GUILTY aged 25.

Confined six months , and fined 1 s.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

718. ROBERT BEEVER was indicted, and the indictment stated that he being in the employ of Samuel Guppy , and having by virtue of such employment, received and took into his possession four pounds nineteen shillings on his account, did feloniously secret and embezzle the same , on the 12th of April 1815 .

WILLIAM BEACH . I am agent for Mr. Samuel Guppy , and his office is at Dowgate-hill . He resides at Bristol, and I manage his business in town. The prisoner was a clerk , and received money to the amount of four pounds nineteen shillings and five pence. I know nothing of its being paid.

GEORGE LEONARD . I am a boat builder. I owed Mr. Guppy four pounds nineteen shillings and five pence; I paid it to Robert Beever the prisoner at the bar, on the 12th of April, and he gave me a receipt for it. He came to me on that day, and said he came from Mr. Guppy for that little account. On which, I said, if he would write me a receipt, I would pay him. He wrote me one, and I paid him.

(Receipt produced.) That is the receipt.

Prisoner's Defence. I am indicted for embezzleing this money in different notes, and that has not been proved.

COURT. Mr. Leonard. How did you pay the prisoner- A. I really can't now charge my memory with it; I believe it was five one pound notes that I gave him, and he gave me the change.

COURT. The prisoner's objections are of no consequence.

GUILTY aged 25.

Confined one Year , and fined 1 s.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

719. THOMAS WHITE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of June , six pounds seven ounces of sugar, value 6 s. the property of Henry Sims , John Cookson ; and John Tanfield .

WILLIAM SIMS . I am a wholesale grocer residing in Queen hithe. On the 19th of June, I wanted some casks coopering, and I sent to our coopers, Messrs. Church and Norris. The prisoner was sent for the purpose of doing what I wanted. One of the young men had some suspicion of him, in consequence of something he saw him do; he gave me information and went after the prisoner, and I followed him. When we came up to him, I told him to take his hat off; he did, and it was half full of sugar.

HENRY SIMS . I am partner with Messrs. Sim's and Cookson. The prisoner came into the warehouse on the 19th of June, and began to stuff sugar into his hat; he took it out of a hogshead. After he had got as much as he wanted, he went away, on pretence of getting a drill-iron. I followed him, and told him he had our property about him; Mr. Sims told him to take off his hat; and it was half full of sugar; and I saw him throw away a bag.

DAVID HANCOCK . I am constable to Queen hithe wharf. I produce the sugar. The prisoner had a good character given him.

GUILTY aged 24.

Confined three months , and fined 1 s.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

720. JOHN SILVESTER , and NATHANIEL EWER , were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 17th of June , six charts, value 9 s. 6 d. one pen machine, value 6 s. 6 d. one mill-board, value 4 d. one hundred and seventy four bound books, value 5 l. 12 s. and one hundred and twenty other books, value 6 l. 7 s. the property of Messrs. Hearn and Benton.

JOSEPH HEARN . I keep the King's Arms Inn , Snow-hill, Mr. Benton is my partner . I lost these things on Saturday the 17th; they were sent from my inn to go to Hull; they were sent to the Axe, in Aldermanbury, in order to be forwarded thither.

JOHN WESTON. On Saturday the 17th, I drove my cart from my master's, the King's Arms, in Snow-hill, to the Axe, in Aldermanbury at which place I had to deliver three articles. I found it impossible to drive my cart up the yard as it was full of waggons and carts. I accordingly took the bundle and went up the yard with it. When I returned, the prisoner Ewer was at the tail of the cart; I took the second, and went up the yard with it. When I came back, he was in the same place; on my return after delivering the third, I missed the parcel containing the articles named in the indictment; I received information that the prisoners had taken the parcel out of the cart. Immediately I saw the prisoner run out of Phillip-lane, and make his way along Addle-street. A gentleman stopped him; I went up to him, and made him, go along with me. Going back again, up Phillip-lane, I saw a great crowd; Johnson the officer was there, he had arrested the other prisoner. I am sure Ewer is the person I saw at the tail of the cart, and who was afterwards running away. I never saw the other prisoner until I saw him in the custody of Johnson.

Cross examined. Other persons might have taken this bundle out of the cart, and I might have been none the wiser. When I met the prisoner Ewer in Phillip-lane, he went with me very readily.

BENJAMIN JOHNSON . I am an officer. On Saturday afternoon I was standing talking to two gentlemen in Phillip-lane; when I saw the prisoner Silvester with a heavy parcel on his back, and Ewer close behind him with his hat off; scratching his head, and wiping it, as if in a prespiration. I immediately laid hold of Silvester, and Ewer ran away. When I laid hold of Silvester, he tried to throw the bundle on me; I turned it off and held him tight. I requested the gentleman to go after Ewer; I had plenty to do to secure Silvester; he made very great resistance. Both the prisoner's were talking when I first saw them.

WILLIAM WATTS . I am a porter to Messrs. Hill and Parkinson, in Snow-hill. I was in Aldermanbury opposite the Axe; on saturday the 17th. I saw this cart standing at the gate of the Axe, as it could not get up the yard. I saw a man take a parcel out of the tail of the cart. I don't know that it was the prisoner Ewer; I saw two men come down in possession of the officer, I don't know that one of them was the same man that I saw take the bundle.

John Weston . The man who was standing at the tail of my cart, was dressed in black.

Ewer's Defence. I am an articulator, I am employed to put skeletons together at St. Thomas and the London Hospitals. I had been to St. Thomas's Hospital; and as I was coming down Phillip-lane, I saw a great crowd, and two gentleman run after me; I never was near the tail of this man's cart. The pupils are all out of town, or I might have a good character.

Silvester's Defence. I am a sea-faring man. I acknowledge my fault in taking this bundle out of the cart; but this man is quite innocent, for I never saw him before in my life.

SILVESTER GUILTY .

EWER GUILTY .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

721. THOMAS SMITHERMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of May , two three-shilling bank tokens, the property of Edward Robins , from his person .

EDWARD ROBINS . I am a labouring man . On Saturday night, the 27th of May, I and my wife went to Whitechapel-market. Between Somerset-street, and the Minories , there was a crowd of people; and the young man, the prisoner at the bar pushed me and my wife violently into the crowd; I turnedround, and said why do you push me you villian. I turned round and looked at him; and took particular notice of him. I had not gone two yards, before I put my hand into my left hand waistcoat pocket, and missed two three shilling pieces. We went in pursuit of him but could not find him. On our returning, Just round the corner of the Minories we met him; he said he never saw me, and never robbed me. I secured him, and gave him in charge to a constable, and told the constable to search him; and if he found any three shilling pieces on him, with the figure 3 on them, they were my property.

JOHN RAY . I am a constable, I searched the prisoner, and on him among other silver I found one three-shilling piece with a figure three on it.

Edward Robins . The two three-shilling pieces I lost had each of them the figure three upon them. There was only one found upon the prisoner, I cannot swear to that. I took two three-shilling pieces in change at the Chapman's Arms, where the landlord always marks all three-shilling pieces that come into his house, with the figure three; and then if they are bad, he will take them back. I am sure the prisoner is the person who pushed me.

Prisoner's Defence. I live with my mother in Rosemary-yard, No. 1, I have been in gentleman's service; my master is gone abroad with the army. I never saw the prosecutor before he stopped me. I had thirteen shillings of my own money.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

722. WILLIAM LAWRENCE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of May , three geese, nine goslings, and one turkey hen , the property of Richard Hudson .

MARTHA TURNER . I am in the service of Mr. Hudson, he has a farm at Plaistow in Essex ; he had some geese, some goslings, and some turkeys. On the night of the 3rd of May I locked them up, they were all safe.

MISS ANN HUDSON . I remember the circumstance of these poultry being stolen, on the morning of the 4th of May. When I went to the door of the poultry-house, it was broken open, and a piece broken off, and three geese, nine goslings, and a turkey hen were stolen. Brown the watchman shewed them to me that evening.

JAMES BROWN . I am a watchman at Bromley. On the night of the 3rd or the morning of the 4th of May, I saw the prisoner and two other men with sacks on their backs. I went for assistance; I suspected they had nothing which belonged to them. As soon as I came up to them, they threw down the sacks and ran away. I am sure the prisoner was one of the men; I knew him before; I picked up the sacks, and took them home. In the sacks were three geese, and nine goslings; and that morning I was told, that a turkey hen was runing about; and I took her. I went to Stratford, and then to Westham, and there I found Mr. Hudson had lost these things. (Here the poultry were produced, and sworn to by Miss Hudson.) It was twenty minutes past three, when I saw the prisoners; it was getting light. It was light enough to see any one. It was light enough to recognise a person I had seen before. I knew the prisoner before. The prisoner was taken up three weeks afterwards. I had seen him after this affair, before he was taken up. I did not apprehend him; he did not seem at all surprised nor alarmed. I did not attempt to secure him, because I had no assistance at hand.

JOHN MOSS . I am a constable, I apprehended the prisoner at Westham. He ran away, I got a warrant for him and took him; I received a description of him from Brown, on the morning of the robbery. I searched for him for three weeks, but could not find him. At length I apprehended him on the 22nd.

GUILTY aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

723. ISAAC FOY was indicted for wilfully and maliciously murdering, on the 22nd of May last, one Uraner Urwin , a subject of our Lord the King .

JOHN PARSONS . I am a constable of the West India Docks. On the night of the 21st of May, I was on duty. There was a watchman of the name of James, who told me of a noise.

Mr. Alley. Then you go down, and send up James.

RICHARD JAMES. I am a watchman in the West India Export Docks. On Sunday night the 22nd of May, I heard a noise a little before ten; it was a noise, as if somebody was being severely beaten. I listened again and heard it repeated. At first it did not appear to be so far off as the ship William. I then went towards where I thought it came from, and there I heard it for twenty minutes of time continued; I then was almost convinced that the noise came from the ship William; but that ship not being in my division of the watch, I took no further notice of it. I communicated what I heard to Parsons, and somebody else, when they came round; there were some ships at anchor round the William, there was one at her head; another at her stern, and three or four between her and me; perhaps she might be two hundred yards from me or more.

THOMAS LATHAM . I am a constable in the West India Docks; I remember the night of Sunday the 21st of May; I was on watch between twelve and one. I stood by the side of the ship William, in consequence of hearing, as I thought, some noise proceed from her.

COURT. Where was she - A. Close to the quay. I stood by her a little time, and all was perfectly quiet. We then went our rounds, and had proceeded about between three and four hundred yards from the vessel, when we heard the noise on board the ship again, I mean the ship William. We saw the prisoner sitting on the side of the ship, as if he intended to jump on shore. His legs were hanging outside; It was high water, and the deck of the ship was considerably above the quay; from seven to ten feet higher than the quay. The prisoner was shouting out murder. When I first heard the noise, it was loud and violent. When we saw the prisoner he was using expressions that we could not understand. When we came near to him, we heard him scream murder; and he said, he was in hell and thedevils were tormenting him.

Mr. Alley. Before you heard him use these expressions could he see you - A. He might see the light; but I should explain to you that when we heard the cry of murder, there was a number of ships in a line between him and us, and at different distances; as we walked along he might have seen us through the spaces between the ships; but that would depend upon our situation.

Q. When you first heard the noise, could he see you - A. I do not know. He could not, unless he saw between the opening of two ships, because there was a corner; but when we got within thirty yards of him, he could have seen the light distinctly. We went up close to the side of the ship where he was sitting in the situation I have described. He was crying out murder! saying he was in hell, and the devils were tormenting him. We desired him to go on board the ship; he did, and we followed him. He said he had killed one of his tormentors and wounded all the rest.

Mr. Alley. What state of mind did he appear in - A. In a very disturbed state of mind. We held the light up to look at him, and saw he had no coat nor waistcoat on, and his hands and face were extremely bloody. We asked him where the people were that had been tormenting him. He said if we would go with him he would shew us. We looked all over the upper deck, the hatchways were all closed up. We looked all round the forecastle, but we could not find any person on board but the prisoner. Not finding any one, we asked the prisoner where the man was that he had murdered; when pointing to the fore peake, he said he is down there, I threw him down there - that is were they keep the coals.

Q. Where there any coals there - A. I don't know; there was a great deal of rubbish below. I desired my partner, Winnel, to go down with the light. He went down; I saw him shake his head; he said, it is so, here is the man, and he is dead enough. I told the prisoner to go down into the fore peake. He went down and I followed him. When I went down, I told my partner to see if life was extinct. We told the prisoner to lift the body up for it was jammed up in a corner. He lifted it up perfectly unconcerned. There was a great deal of blood, and I thought the throat was cut; I felt, but it was not; the body had on a worsted shirt and a pair of duck trowsers. His neck was quite cold, but his head, and other parts of his body were warm. We found a very large wound on the back part of his head, and his arm was very much bruised. He had only one arm. We saw a great quantity of pieces of wood lying about some might be four inches square; there was part of a broken handspike, there was particularly the piece, I observed with nails in it. These pieces of wood were in the fire-peake. I should have said in the forecastle where the body appeared to have been thrown from down into the peake. There was a good deal of blood, I can't say how much there was. There was some human hair sticking to a piece of wood with the nails in it. That piece of wood was covered with blood.

COURT. Can you judge whether the blood which was on it spurted on it, or whether that was the piece of wood which inflicted the wound - A. We did not examine it close enough to be able to say. We asked the prisoner, how he came to murder the man, and what he had murdered him with; he said the man would not let him go up the ladder, and he fetched him a rap with a piece of wood. He then began to relate, that he had written a letter to his wife that evening, I asked him where it was; and he said it was on the cabin table; I asked him where the key of the cabin was, he said the keys were in the deceased pockets I told him to go and fetch them, and he did. He unlocked the cabin door we went in and found the letter as he described on the table.

(The letter produced.)

That is the letter. We then took the prisoner into custody, and took him to the watchhouse, he seemed to conduct himself orderly there. I saw him at his examination before the magistrate. He there seemed much confused, and in the same state he was on board the ship. I saw him on the Tuesday following, he then seemed perfectly sober and sensible. He said he did not recollect me, he did not know me. I asked him how this unhappy affair happened. he said he did not know he did it; he had not the least animosity towards the deceased. He said he had been many a voyage with him; I told him I had that letter which he had written for his wife. I asked him if I should write a copy of it, and send it to her; he said no, he did not wish that I should; and he hoped I would give that letter to him. He gave me directions to write another letter to his wife, together with her address.

Mr. Alley. Now during the time you were on board the ship did he seem prompt and ready in his answers, or did he hesitate at all - A. I don't recollect that he hesitated at all.

Mr. Knapp. Did he appear, in the same disturbed state of mind the first time he was before the magistrate as when he was on board the ship - A. He seemed perturbed then.

Q. Was he as deranged before the magistrate as he was on board the ship - A. He said but little; but as far as we could judge he was perturbed. I was before the magistrate with him the second day but not the first. On the Thursday he appeared to be as sensible and as collected as I am now.

Q. I think you stated that murder was shouted out - A. Shouted out.

Q. Are we to understand that it came from a disturbed mind - A. Very much so. He said he was in hell, and with devils.

Q. Did he then appear disturbed - A. He appeared very much disturbed.

Q. He killed one man, and wounded all the rest; but there was no rest to kill - A. No.

Q. From the manner he delivered these expressions what was your opinion of him - A. At that moment I conceived the man not at all right.

Q. Have you ever entertained a different opinion from the opinion which what you then saw gave you - A. I have. There was one circumstance he stated on coming to himself; on the Tuesday morning, that he had not known where he was.

Mr. Alley. Did you think on the Thursdaymorning that he was seen in his mind, and do you still continue to think so - A. I do.

Q. Now you saw him in the watchhouse, was he then composed - A. Something more so than when he was on board the ship.

JOHN WINNELL . I am a constable of the West India Docks. On the 21st of May I was on duty in company with the last witness. I had heard a noise before, and when I heard it again it was about half past twelve; according to my judgment it proceeded from the William; I was about three hundred yards from her; I had a light in my hand. The prisoner was sitting on the side of the vessel about midship. When we walked up along side, he reached down to take the light; I bid him go on board again, which he did. We went up the side, had went over to the gangway, and asked him what was the matter. He said, that the devil, and captain Derby, theives, and spirits were in the ship, and that they had been tearing his heart out. That the devil had been running after him through the ship, and wanted to put him on a spit and roast him; he said he had killed one man, and wounded all the rest; we asked him where they were, and he said they were all below. I saw that all the hatchways were locked, and we were obliged to go down the forecastle. I told him to come down, which he did, and my partner after him. I looked all round the forecastle and down the hold, with a light, but could see nothing; I asked him where he had put the man he had murdered, he said, he had put him down that hole, pointing to the forepeake of the ship, where they keep the coals; that place is very small, the body was down in the hole, it was up in one corner of it, and could not have been there without somebody going down and putting it there. According to my opinion, he was murdered in the forepeake, and not in the forecastle. I did not see any blood in the forecastle, but a drop or two on the blanket. The deceased had but one arm, was small made, and by no means so stout or strong as the prisoner. He had no coat on, but a kind of canvass jacket and trowsers; I went down into the hole, the prisoner was there with me, and I said you have murdered the man; he composely said, to be sure I have. At the place where the body had first lain, before it had been removed into the corner, there was a great deal of blood on the coals and sticks. I think the man was thrown down into the hole and then murdered there; there was a great deal of blood on the wood; there was a great many pieces of wood, and it seemed that the wood had been divided by the body falling head first, and then the body was stowed away up in the corner; the body was two or three yards from where it was first thrown. The prisoner was in the hole with me, and so was my partner; I sat down, for the place would not allow me to stand up; I told the prisoner to bring the body over to me, he did; and brought the head close to me.

Mr. Alley. In the situation in which the body was would it have been seen in open day - A. You could not see into the hole at all.

COURT. Then the body was in a place in which it would have been visible in the day time - A. It was, I took notice of the hand-spike; I saw the other piece of wood with nails in it which was covered with blood; I did not take notice of the nails in it at first; but afterwards I did; according to my opinion, I should think the wound was inflicted by the sticks, and not by the fall; indeed he told me so afterward.

Mr. Alley. You say this place was very small, was there room enough to give the blows in it - A. The place was very narrow; they might have been given with a small stick. I subsequently asked the prisoner what he had killed the man with, and he said with some pieces of wood. He seemed composed, and all the question I asked him, he answered me without hesitation.

COURT. When you told him he must go along with you, what was his answer - A. He said very well, and seemed quite content; we asked him how he came to commit this horrid murder, he said he had written a letter which was on the cabin lable, and which would tell us all about it; we found the cabin door was locked; we asked him where the keys were, he said in the cooks (meaning the deceased's) pockets. He went back to the forecastle, and felt in the deceased's pocket; they were not there; he then moved the chest and took the keys from behind it; he gave us the keys, neither of us could unlock the door; he took the bunch of keys which consisted of nine, and found out the right key, and unlocked the door; we went into the cabin and there we found the letter as he had described.

Mr. Alley. Did he appear composed at this time - A. Why sometimes he did, but at other times he used very queer expressions. We read the letter, but found it contained nothing relative to the murder. We took him out of the ship, and took him to the watchhouse; as we were going along the watchman were crying two o'clock.

Mr. Alley. As you were going along, did he appear aware you were taking him in custody, and that he was under restrain - A. I think so, certainly, we took him to the watchhouse, and went away, and returned in about an hour with Mr. Gibson. The first words he said when we came back, that the devils and Captain Derbyshire were in the watch-house, and that he could have no rest there; we stopped with him, and took off his coat to show our master and the watchhouse keeper the blood on his shirt; he looked at me very earnestly in the face, and said, what the devil, have you been telling him what I have done; and seemed well aware that he had done something amiss. He was locked up that night, and I did not see him until the Thursday.

Cross-examined. The last witness was with me the whole of the time, he might have heard the expressions relating to Captain Derbyshire's ghost, he used it several times. Latham might have heard him say that the devils wanted to roast him on a spit, he used all these incoherent expressions more than once and Latham had as good an opportunity of hearing them as I had. At times the prisoner seemed very perturbed in his mind, seemed very much deranged, and looked very wild.

Q. Did these expressions seem to come from a man in his inward reason - A. Why sometimes I thought he was out of his mind, at other times he answeredme so composely; that I thought he had plenty of reason. The ship was close up to the side.

JOSEPH WILSON . I am beadle of the parish. The prisoner was delivered to my care.

Mr. Alley. During the time that he was under your care, how did he conduct himself generally? did he seem out of his mind - A. At times he conducted himself as if he was out of his mind; at other times not, Some times he appeared perfectly in his sound senses.

Q. Were you at any time enabled to judge whether he knew he was in custody - A. Certainly he did.

JOHN PARSONS. I am the witness, who in consequence of some communication which I received of a noise on board the William, went on board about half past eleven. I looked down into the forecastle, and called below; a person answered, whom I afterwards discovered was the deceased. I asked who was making the noise below; is it any one hurting the one armed man; the voice replied no; it is the one armed man you are speaking to. Immediately there was a confusion on the occipital bone, and on the left side, there was a second fracture on the parvidal bone, which had penetrated the skull, and entered the brain.

Q. Could you judge whether these wounds were inflicted by a fall; or by blows - A. One fall would not have made all the wounds. There were other wounds in the front of the face; one under the right eye, and several other small ones. The lacerations on the head were great, but the fractures small; the one on the parvidal bone as if made by a nail driven in. It might happen that a fall head foremost down this hole upon a heap of scraggy pieces of wood with nails in some of them, might occasion both wounds on the head, and even the bruise on the arm. But I don't think such a fall could have occasioned the wounds on the face at the same time.

Mr. Alley. Do you think that the wounds were inflicted by such an instrument as this, (shewing the witness the piece of wood with the nails in it) - A. I do. There were several dents on the face, which appeared to be inflicted by such an instrument as20th of May last, between eleven and twelve, he wanted to go to sleep on the bench in the bar; he said, he had been to the Swan with Five Necks, and the Crown, in Ladd-lane; I thought by the manner in which he came in, that he was not right in his mind; he said a great many things that I could not understand.

HARDY ROBINSON. I am clerk to a cheesemonger, in Newgate-street. I observed the conduct of the prisoner at the Dolphin; at first I said he was more I have than fool, his conduct was very strange; he said he had come to town by the Liverpool mail, and that he had heard some people at the Crown conspiring to take away his life, and that they had followed him to the Dolphin; he insisted on having a bed, I told him I thought he was more knave than fool; he said, do you think I am come here to deceive you. He represented himself as Captain Foy ; by his conduct I think he was out of his senses.

Mr. Alley. Do you mean to swear that he was in that state of mind, as not to know right from wrong; or that he did not know it was harm to cut a man's throat - A. I do not mean to swear to that.

JAMES CROOKSHANK. I was at the Dolphin and I observed the conduct of the prisoner, and thought he was out of his senses.

ELIZABETH WESTEEY . I live at No. 7, Mill-place, Commercial-road, Captain Derbyshire lodged with me. I never saw the prisoner until he called at my house on the 21st of May, at about half past seven, He seemed very much agitated, and was talking to himself when he was in the room, before Captain Derbyshire was up; Captain Derbyshire got up, and they breakfasted together; Captain Derbyshire went into the kitchen to be shaved, and the hair dresser left his hat in the room with the prisoner; the prisoner fastened himself in the parlour, and would let nobody come in, I went to the door, and begged him to open it, he said, he would not until Captain Derbyshire came, but afterwards he did. When we went in, he had the poker in his hand, and was muttering something to himself; I went up to him, and took hold of his hand, and asked him to compose himself; he muttered a great deal, and said, I had secreted a woman in the house. During the time I had this conversation with him, he seemed to be a deranged man, and out of his senses.

Mr. Alley. He came to breakfast with Captain Derbyshire , but there was no knives in the room. the bread and butter was taken in cut.

GEORGE LONGLAND . I am a hair dresser, I live at Limehouse, I was at Captain Derbyshire 's, for the purpose of shaving him; I went into the room where Captain Derbyshire and the prisoner were, and observed the prisoner's conduct; he was murtering something to himself; and all on a sudden; he jumped up and wanted me to sit down; Captain Derbyshire went with me into the kitchen where I shaved him; but when I was going away, and wanted to get my hat the prisoner had locked the door, and would not let me in; I was obliged to go away without my hat, and come for it in the evening. From what I saw of the prisoner. I thought he was out of his mind. When he was in the room by himself, he talked a good deal about murder.

DANIEL STUDDARD . I am an apprentice to Captain Derbyshire . I never saw the prisoner until I saw him on board my ship, which was about ten o'clock on the morning of the 21st; I and Giles Everest were in the yard when we saw Foy in the parlour, and they told me to go into the parlour to see that he did not break the glass, I went in, and moved the chair beside him; he started up immediately, and took the poker; we made to the door, for we were afraid he would strike us; he talked a great deal about a woman, and said there was a woman concealed in the house, he heard her voice. I knew Uraner Urwin; the prisoner saw Urwin in the morning when he was on board, and they were quite friendly together, and had no quarrel at all. From what I saw of the prisoner's conduct, I judge him to be out of his senses.

NOT GUILTY .

Of the murder, because insane.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

724. WILLIAM RUSSELL was indicted for willfully and maliciously murdering, on the 19th of May , one Mary Ann Daws , a subject of our Lord the King .

SUSANNAH HOWEL . I am a widow, I live in the adjoining room to where the deceased lodged; she was a married woman; I was not at home when this accident happened. On the morning of the 19th the prisoner and Mary Ann Daws came home together at about four o'clock; the deceased was very much intoxicated. I went out at nine to Catherine Wheeler 's, and soon after I heard that a woman had thrown herself out of the window; I went for a coach, and came to the house I went up stairs, I went to the door of their apartment, I saw the deceased lying on the bed with the prisoner compassionately mourning over her. She was carried to the hospital in a coach and the prisoner accompanied her thither. The prisoner seemed very much affected at what had happened.

ANN MEREDITH . I live in Catherine-wheel-court. A little girl called me to the window, and said there was a woman getting out; I saw the deceased hanging by her hands, and in a moment she fell. The deceased and the prisoner had been very noisy all the morning.

MARY WILLOUGHBY . I am a nurse in one of the wards in the London Hospital. The deceased was brought there on the 19th of May, and remained there until her death: on the 9th of June, she was perfectly sensible all the time, and thought she never would recover. During every conversation I had with her, she used to say, that the way this affair happened was, that she was fastened up in the room and the prisoner was sharpening his knife, and swore he would stab her; which threat she was afraid he would put into execution from his violent conduct on a former occasion. The prisoner constantly visited her until her death, and always seemed very much affected with her situation.

ANN LAY . I live in Essex-street, Whitechapel I saw the deceased fall out of the window between eleven and twelve in the day, and saw her in the hospital afterwards; I don't know what she was.

MR. WILLIAM TURNER . I am a pupil attending the London hospital. The deceased was brought to the hospital on the 19th of May, and expired on the 9th of June. She had a fracture on one of the bones forming the hip joint. From the first day she entered the hospital until she expired, she daily grew worse and worse.

Prisoner's Defence. At four o'clock on the morning of the 19th, I went out to look for the deceased as she had stayed out all night; she lived with me, I found her quite drunk, and brought her home; she wanted to have something to drink in the room, and I would not suffer her, and locked the door. When I was at work, being a shoemaker, I was sharpening my knife, and the deceased went over to the window and threw herself out; I had no time to save her.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Dallas.

725. DAVID MULVEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of June , one copper sugar pan brace, value 1 l. the property of John Stover .

JOHN STOVER . I am a sugar refiner . We missed a copper brace on the 9th of June, the prisoner was employed to clear away the rubbish and repair the premises . I went out at three o'clock in the afternoon, and on my return at eight, I missed the brace. Mr. Cumley came and told me that he saw a man going along with a brace on his shoulder, and I went with Mr. Cumley, and saw it in Queen-street.

JAMES CUMLEY . On Friday at about four o'clock in the afternoon, I saw a man coming from the ruins after the fire in Five-feet-lane, with a brace on his shoulder, I followed him through the church yard. into Watling-street; I marked the brace as he went along. He went into Mr. Woods the scale makers, I don't recollect the prisoner at the bar; I know it was Mr. Stover's brace; after I went for Mr. Stover, and we found a copper brace in the cotton at Mr. Woods.

JOHN DUFFELL . I am in the service of Mr. Wood, in Queen-street, two men came in about four o'clock, in the afternoon of the 9th of June, and wanted to sell a copper brace, I told them I could not give them money for it; but if they would leave it, and call again, I would tell them what my master said; I have every reason to believe the prisoner was one of the men. They left the house, and in the interim while they were away, Mr. Stover and the last witness came. In consequence of something they told me, when the prisoner at the bar came again, I took him down to Hancock's house. The officer, Hancock, was not at home, and the prisoner went back with me to my master's. Shortly after Hancock came, and took him into custody.

DAVID HANCOCK . I took the prisoner into custody, and took him to the Counter.

(The copper brace produced.)

Mr. Stover. That is my brace.

James Cumley. That is the brace I saw the prisoner carrying, and which I marked.

GUILTY aged 25.

Judgment respited .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

726. THOMAS SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of June , twenty eight yards of printed cotton, value 2 l. 5 s. the property of John Gunne .

JOHN GUNNE . I am a linen draper , residing at No. 43, Bishopgate Without . About half past eight on the evening of the 17th of June, I saw some pieces of cotton, which were standing at the door move; I told my nephew to go forward to the door, he did, and in about five minutes, he and a man returned with the prisoner in their custody. Mr. Horton brought in a piece of cotton which was my property.

JAMES GUNNE . In consequence of what my uncle told me I went out into the street, and saw a lad running across the street with something under his arm; it was the prisoner, I followed him, and never lost sight of him until he was stopped by Mr. Horton who took the print from him.

JOHN HORTON . I am a taylor, residing at Hackney. On hearing the cry of stop thief, at about half past eight in the evening mentioned, I stopped the prisoner, seeing him runing; he threw the cotton down, and somebody picked it up, and gave it me. I then took him to the shop of Mr. Gunne, who said it was his cotton.

THOMAS SAPWELL . I am a constable. I know no more of the transaction, than that the prisoner and the cotton were delivered into my custody, and the cotton I now produce is the same.

Mr. Gunne. That is my cotton, it has my shop mark upon it.

Prisoner's Defence. I am not the person at all, the prisoner ran, and was pursued.

GUILTY .

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

727. MARY HUGHES was indicted for unlawfully uttering and tendering in payment, a piece of false and counterfeit coin, made to the likeness of a shilling, on the 23rd of May , knowing the same to be false and counterfeit; and for having at the time of such uttering, divers other counterfeit pieces of coin about her person .

MARY SMALL . I keep a tripe shop in Barbican. On Tuesday the 23rd of May, the prisoner came to my shop to buy a neat's foot, I served her; she tendered me a shilling in payment, which my brother went and got changed, and the price of the neat's foot being five pence I gave the prisoner seven pence in change; just as the woman was going away, Johnson the officer came and tapped the woman on the shoulder, and took her into the shop, saying, he wanted to speak to her.

JOHN SMALL . I remember the prisoner at the bar, tendering a shilling to my sister, I went to the public house to get change of it; Mr. Johnson was there, both him and the landlady said the shilling was bad; he told me to mark it, which I did, and he marked it himself; he told the landlady to give me a shillings worth of halfpence, she did, and he gave her a good shilling. I gave the change to my sister. I never lost sight of the shilling before it was marked

BENJAMIN JOHNSON . I am an officer. I saw the prisoner on the 23rd of May, in Whitecross-street,I watched her, she went into a butcher's shop and I heard her ask the price of some meat; she was about to buy it; she threw down a shilling, which was refused. She then went to Jacob's well. I continued my watch, and followed her to Miss Smail's; she stood talking, and bought a neat's foot, and gave a shilling in payment; I followed the boy, when he went to get change, and saw him go into the public house; both he and I marked the shilling; while we were there, I went to Miss Smail's, and took the prisoner into custody; I took her into a back room and searched her, and on her I found a piece of blue paper containing three shillings, each wrapt up separately in a piece of blue paper, so that they might not scratch. They have been in my possession ever since, and here they are.

MR. POWELL. I am solicitor for the mint, I am in the habit of inspecting counterfeit money. These three shillings are counterfeits, and are of the same manufacture as the one proved to have been tendered. They are quite fresh.

Q. What is the effect of keeping them folded between the paper - A. It keeps them fresh for circulation.

Prisoner's Defence. Mr. Johnson never saw me in the butcher's shop. I found the three shillings wrapped up in a piece of paper.

GUILTY aged 37.

Confined one Year in Newgate , and to find sureties for two Years more .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

728. MARY DONOVAN alias FITZGERALD was indicted for unlawfully uttering and tendering, on the 8th of June , one piece of false and counterfeit money, made to the resemblance of a sixpence, knowing the same to be counterfeit; and on the same day uttering and tendering one other like false piece of money, knowing the same to be counterfeit .

JOHN STIMPSON . I keep the French Horn, in Beech-street, I don't know the woman at the bar. There was a woman came to my house about eight o'clock on the evening of the 8th of June, and asked for a glass of liquor, which she drank, and which came to two pence; she tendered me a sixpence, which I said was bad; she said it was good; said, very well, and gave her the change. The moment she went out, Mr. Johnson came in; he asked me what money that woman gave me, I shewed him the sixpence; he desired me to mark it, I did, and I believe he marked it also; there was no body else tendered me a sixpence before, and Mr. Johnson came in so quick, that he saw the woman go out.

- . I live at the Globe Tavern, Moorgate. The woman at the bar, is something like a woman, who on the 8th of June came in and asked for a glass of gin, she paid for it with a sixpence and I gave her the change; Mr. Johnson then came in. and asked what money the woman had given me, I gave him the sixpence, which had been lying on the desk and was not put into the till. I have got it now, and here it is. The woman at the bar is like the woman who tendered the sixpence, and no other woman had tendered a sixpence.

ELIZABETH WALKER BERKELEY . My sister keeps a stationers shop at No. 27, Great St. Helan's. I know the prisoner at the bar, she came to my sisters shop, at about half past nine, on the evening of the 8th of June, and purchased a sheet of paper in payment for which she tendered a sixpence, and received five pence change; I put the sixpence into the till; I am sure there was no other sixpence there. In about ten minutes, Mr. Johnson came in I shewed him the sixpence, he desired me to mark it, which I did, with a pair of shears, and he came for it the next morning; I have seen the woman before.

ELIZABETH HOCKLEY. I know the prisoner at the bar, I keep the George Inn, St. Mary Axe. On the night of the 8th of June, about ten o'clock the prisoner at the bar came in and called, for a glass of gin, which came to two pence farthing; and she tendered me a sixpence in payment. I, said it was bad, and told her to change it; she had, drank the gin; just then Mr. Johnson came in, and by his desire, I kept the sixpence, he desired me to mark it; he took her into custody.

BENJAMIN JOHNSON . I am an officer. I know the prisoner at the bar for some time to be a common utterer of base money, I saw her on the evening in question a little before seven; she went into the French Horn in Beech-street. As soon as she came out I went in, I got the sixpence there; the landlord marked it, and so did I; I told him to keep it safe, and I afterwards called for it, and got it. I next saw the prisoner go into the Globe at Moorgate; I went in there after she came out; I had looked through the window and saw her tender a sixpence, I went in and marked it, and the landlord marked it too; I followed her down London Wall; and when she came to St. Helens, she went into a stationers shop that was shut up; I did not go in directly, but first followed her to Mrs. Hockley's, she there tendered another sixpence, I desired the lady to keep it; I searched her at Mrs. Hockley's I found sixpence in halfpence, on her and a good sixpence; I then went to Mrs. Berkeley's, and there I got the sixpence she had tendered there, Miss Berkeley marked it with a pair of shears. I next went to the prisoners lodgings where I found a punch stuck up against the wainscoat; it has a mark on it, and is evidently the same instrument with which these sixpences were cut, as each of them has a similar mark. There was a little cream of tartar also and a hammer, also a lapstone which appeared to have had copper beaten on it, and a piece of copper plated, but not cut round. Here are the sixpences which were tendered at the houses of the different witnesses; I have had them in my possession ever since, and they are all marked.

MR. POWELL. I am solicitor for the Mint, I am in the habit of inspecting counterfeit money. These sixpences are all counterfeit, they are merely marked and are exactly of the same manufactory.

GUILTY aged 24.

Confined one Year in Newgate , and to find surities for two Years more .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

729. JOHN ADDISON , and JAMES COYLE ,were indicted for unlawfully uttering on the 10th of May , one false and counterfeit token made to resemble certain tokens levied stamps, and circulated by the Govenour and Company of the Bank of England , for the sum of three shillings, knowing the same to be counterfeit, and on the same day uttering one other like counterfeit token, for the same value, well knowing the same to be counterfeit .

SARAH MACBEATH . I live at 38, Long-lane, Smithfield. On Wednesday evening, the 10th of May, the prisoner Addison came into my shop, to buy a pig's foot, price two pence, for which he tendered a three shilling Bank token, I gave him the change; immediately Mr. Johnson came in, and looked at it, and in consequence of what he said, and told me to do, I laid it by, and Mr. Johnson called for it the next morning.

LYDIN HARDY. I keep a chandler's shop in Golden-lane. On Wednesday evening, the 19th of May, a man came in for a twopenny loaf about half past eight; he put down a three shilling piece; Mr. Johnson then came in, and said be careful, that is a bad one; Mr. Johnson told me to mark it; the man was mothe shop at the time. Mr. Johnson took him into custody I believe, I was so frightened that I don't know what mark I put upon the three shilling piece.

THOMAS WARWICK. I keep a fishmongers ship in Carthusian-street, Charterhouse-square. Addison came to my house, on the evening of the 10th of May and purchased a pennyworth of shrimps, he immediately began eating of them; he gave me a three shilling token, which I refused as it was bad; he said he had no other; and I asked him how he came to eat my property when he had nothing but a bad three shilling piece to pay for it; just then Mr. Johnson came up, and he was secured afterwards.

BENJAMIN JOHNSON . I am an officer, On Wednesday, the 10th of May in the evening. I saw both prisoners together in Giltspur-street; I observed Addison, go into a baker's shop, Coyle went right across Smithfield and waited for him. I saw Addison through the window tendering a three shilling piece and heard it ring; he then came out and joined Coyle's. He went then to the pork shop, and Coyle went down the lane, Addison came out directly and I went in; Mrs. Macbeath shewed me a three shilling token which he passed to her that is it. The force shilling piece shewn to the witness. I went out and saw them join company again, and saw Addison give Coyle something in Charterhouse-square. They then went to Warwick's shrimp shop, Addison stopped and Coyle went into Greville-street, my brother officer, Matthews, who was with me, followed him, and I watched Addison. They then went into a chandlers shop, Addison alone, and got some bread for which they tendered a three shilling piece Coyle went away and left Addison in the shop; I saw him give her a three shilling piece, which I afterwards told her to mark. I secured Addison with a good deal of difficulty, and took him over the way where I searched him; I found the pig's foot upon him and the things he had bought, but not a halfpenny in money; I saw Coyle searched.

CHARLES MATTHEWS . I have heard all Johnson has said it is perfectly true; my pursuit was after Coyle, whom I took; I searched him, and upon him found two bad three shilling pieces, a good eighteen-penny piece, and tenpence in halfpence; also a sixpence, which looked very well then, but which is bad.

MR. EDMOND HOMMERSHAM . I see the tokens, they are counterfeits, and appear to be quite fresh, they are merely washed, and wont bear rubbing.

MR. HARVEY. I make the same observations, those tokens proved to have been tender by Addison are exactly of the same manufacture and both struck with the same die.

Addison's Defence. I took this three shilling piece; thinking it was good, it I had not thought so, I would not have passed it.

Coyle's Defence. I am quite a stranger in London, I have not been here ten days, I merely went out to walk with Addison; the three shilling pieces that were found upon me, I did not know were bad, your lordship might be equally liable to take them. I have a wife and four small children, I hope the court will be merciful.

ADDISON GUILTY aged 40.

COYLE GUILTY aged 32.

Confined one Year in Newgate , and to find surities for two years more.

London jury before Mr. Common Serjeant.

730. MARY MORTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of June , thirty six yards of ribbon, value 1 l. the property of Robert Dawson .

ROBERT DAWSON . I am a haberdasher , residing in Ratcliffe Highway . In consequence of some information which I received from Mary Wynne my shopwoman, I followed the prisoner at the bar out of my shop on the 1st of June, and charged her with stealing a piece of ribbon; I brought her back, and found a piece of ribbon on her. I sent for a constable and gave her in charge.

MARY WYNNE . I am shopwoman to Robert Dawson . On the 1st of June the prisoner was twice in my master's shop under pretence of buying some trifling articles, and the second time I saw her steal this piece of ribbon out of a drawer into which she was looking.

Prisoner's Defence, I took the ribbon by mistake.

GUILTY aged 24.

Confined six months , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

731. AMELIA JARVIS , alias BLUNDELL , was indicted for feloniously uttering on the 8th of April , a forged and counterfeit will, purporting to be the last will and testament of James Campbell , well knowing the same to be forged and counterfeit, with intent to defraud Elizabeth Campbell widow and Elizabeth Campbell spinster . But it could not be proved that the signature to the will was not the hand writing of James Campbell , and the jury found the prisoner.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

732. ROBERT SMITH , and ROBERT JONES were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of June , forty yards of sarsnet, and a quantity of silkshute, value 6 l. the property of Benjamin Lowset .

BENJAMIN LOWSET . I am a silk weaver , living in Popes Head-court, Spital-fields , I went out about four o'clock in the afternoon of the 9th of June, and returned about eleven, when I discovered that the whole of my work had been cut off in my absence; there was also some shute, I don't know exactly now much. There were forty yards of sursnet, it was evident that it had been cut off by a weaver. It was worth six pounds.

ELIZABETH JACKSON . I live in Popes Head-court. On the evening of the 9th, the prisoners passed me while I was standing at my door; I thought they were robbing Mr. Lowset, and went to the door of the house, but hearing voices within I thought the family was at home, and therefore I thought all was right.

THOMAS HOUSE . I overheard the prisoners talking about getting into Lowset's house at a public house in the neighbourhood.

WILLIAM DRAPER . I also overheard the same conversation.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Dallas.

733. JOHN SAUNDERS was indicted for feloniously, wilfully, maliciously, and unlawfully presenting and leveling on the 19th of June , a certain pistol loaded with gunpowder, and a leaden bullet, at one Thomas Doiege , a subject of our lord the King, and attempting by drawing the trigger of the pistol so loaded, to discharge the same at and against the same Thomas Doiege , with intent in so doing feloniously, wickedly and with malice aforethought to kill and murder him, against the statute .

THOMAS DOIEGE . I am a watchman in the parish of Marybone about half past eleven on the 19th of June, I saw the prisoner with another man and woman making a very great noise in Edgeware road. I went to them and told them, they must go away, which they did, into Edgeware road. I saw no more of them until I had to go down John-street, when they were there again; I told them to go away quietly. The prisoner came over and told me I was a d - d old b - r, and asked me what I had to do with him? I told him I wanted him to go along quietly. He asked me did I know who he was, I told him I did not, nor did I care; he said then I shall let you know; he produced a pistol, and laid it across the back of his left hand, it was directed in a right line to me; he snapped it at the upper part of my body; if it had gone off, it could not have missed me; I attempted to secure the prisoner but he snapped the pistol a second time, it shewed fire both times. He then ran away and ran after the man and woman, he was afterwards apprehended in John-street. I am sure the man at the bar is the man who snapped the pistol.

Cross-examined. The prisoner appeared to be quite drunk, he was able to walk, but he staggered very much; he had not been creating any disturbance at the time I spoke to him, and when he first snapped the pistol; at the time he put the pistol up I went over to him to take him by the collar. I had no intention of striking him, I was going to take I him up for the violent name he had called me. saw the flint give fire, and it was not the cracking of the pistol lock.

DENNIS WARD . I am a watchman, in consequence of an alarm I went to the assistance of the last witness; I searched the prisoner, and when I was going to search him, he put his back against the area and dropped something down: I afterwards found a pistol there.

HALE READ . I was constable of the night. The last witness brought the pistol to me, I put the pen that I was writing with down the barrel, and found there was something in it; it was examined at Marlborough-street the next morning.

ISAAC LEVERE. I am a gunsmith. At the request of the magistrate at Marlborough-street, I went there to examine the pistol in question, I found it contained a ball, and a very small compliment of powder.

Cross-examined. Was there not sir, so small, a charge that it was impossible for the pistol to go off - A. There was.

Q. Would not you have freely stood before the muzzle, and suffer yourself to be fired at with i - A. I would.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Dallas.

734. PATRICK CUSHION alias KISHON was indicted for feloniously, wilfully, maliciously, and unlawfully making an assault on the 21st of June , upon one Owen Gilliss , a subject of our lord the King, and with a certain sharp instrument, did stab and cut him on his right arm, with intent in so doing. feloniously, willfully, and of malice aforethought, to kill and murder him against the statue .

SECOND COUNT. The same as the first, only stating the prisoner's intent to disable the said Owen Gilliss .

THIRD COUNT. The same, only omitting the assault, and stating the prisoner's intent to be to do the said Owen Gilliss some grevious bodily harm.

OWEN GILLISS . I am a labourer , I never saw the prisoner in my life until I saw him on the 21st of June, I was to sleep with him that night; I was very tired, and had been hay-making; it was in Queen-street. Chelsea where I was going to sleep; I can't tell what time the prisoner came. He would not come to bed, and I went to bed before him; he gave no tea on for not going to bed and fell asleep, leaving the prisoner standing with his back against the wall by the bed side. He tried three or four times if the door was fast, I wakened about half past one, and the prisoner was standing still in the same place; I told him to come to bed, for he must be tired after his march. I was laying with my right arm across my breast, and he stabbed me in the arm. The men in the room got up, and said there was murder in the room, and a general confusion ensued, when the prisoner was taken into custody.

ROBERT GORDON , I am a watchman, I was called in to take this man into custody; there are none of the men that were in the room here.

Prisoner's Defence. I am a poor old soldier, and came to get some sleep that night at this house.The men who were in the house, and who slept in the room, were teazing me the whole of the afternoon, because I was an Irishman; I requested they would not teaze me, and if they would not, I would give them anything they chose to drink; they very readily drank all the money I had, amounting to ten shillings, all that was left of my marching money. When the money was gone, they again commenced teazing, and I was very much afraid of them. When I went up into the room, I had never seen this man; the rest of the men went to bed. I assure your lordship I was afraid of my life, and did not lie down but stood against the wall all night. I thought if they should attract me I had no means to defend myself, I searched about the room and found on the table a piece of an old rusty razor, which I wrapped up in a stocking to defend myself, I had no malice against any of them; presently some of them got up to teaze me again when they found I would not get into bed; and a man was coming round behind me, and I made a blow at him; immediately there was a watchman sent for; I was taken to the watchhouse, and remained there all night; if I hurt any one, it was not with any malice, but merely in my own defence, I was afraid of my life.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

735. DAVID HAWKINS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of June , one blanket value 6 s. the property of Abraham Solomons , privately in his shop .

ABRAHAM SOLOMONS , I am a broker , residing in Rosemary-lane, I had been out all day, and I returned about ten o'clock at night, the blanket was safe then. I went up stairs to get a bit of supper, leaving the hatch door to the shop bolted, and when I came down the prisoner was taken into custody.

JAMES LOVEBY . I saw the prisoner put his hand over the hatch; go in, and take this blanket, and I stopped him as he was coming out.

Abraham Solomons. That is my blanket.

GUILTY aged 37.

Confined two Years , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Dallas.

736. WILLIAM DAVIS , and GEORGE DAVIS , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of June , sixteen deals, and thirteen battens , the property of Arthur Dowville .

JOHN THOMPSON . I am a lighterman, and was employed by Messrs. Dowville and Co. to carry a cargo of deals and battens, from Blackwall, to Brentford. On the 9th of June I was obliged to moor off Strand-lane ; I went away that night, and in the morning there were sixteen deals, value four pounds, and thirteen battens, value two pounds, gone; I saw them the next morning at Bow-street, and knew them to be taken from my cargo.

WILLIAM RUTHBEM. I am a patrole. On the morning of the 9th of June, about four o'clock, I was watching the prisoners conversing together, and I saw William Davis cross the Strand twice with a deal on his shoulder; I watched them close; George, the other prisoner followed up, and I saw them put the deals by a butchers shop; and as they were coming back, I met them both; I took hold of William, and asked them how they came by those deals; William said he found them in the River; George at that time said nothing. I took them both into custody.

(The deals produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAM DAVIS GUILTY, aged 23.

GEORGE DAVIS GUILTY, aged 23.

Of stealing to the value of 39. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

737. JOHN WILLIAMS was indicted for unlawfully uttering, and putting away on the 24th of May , one false and counterfeit token, made to resemble the tokens, issued by the Governour and Company of the Bank of England for three shillings, knowing the same to be false and counterfeit, and on the same day uttering a like false and counterfeit token, and having in his possession divers other pieces of false and counterfeit coin .

MARY POCKLINGTON . My husband keeps a butcher's shop in Distaff-lane. Between eleven and twelve o'clock, in the morning of the 24th of May, the prisoner came into our shop, and asked for half a pound of beef steak, it came to four pence halfpenny, and he gave me a three shilling piece to pay for it, which. I put into the desk, and which was the only one of the new coin I had, for the new coin the head is considerably larger than in the old. As soon as he went out at one door, Mr. Johnson came in at the other, and asked me what money I had received from the prisoner; I gave him the three shilling piece, he marked it in my presence, but I did not. Mr. Johnson called for it in about half an hour; I am positive as to the person of the prisoner.

Prisoner. I should wish to ask that witness whether there were not other persons in the shop, and whether they might not have given her a three shilling piece - A. I might have taken three shilling pieces before, but never a one of this sort; and while the prisoner was in the shop he was the only person from whom I took a three shilling piece at all.

SARAH HALE . I am the wife of William Hale who keeps the Cock and Bottle in Cannon-street. The prisoner came to our house, between ten and eleven o'clock, on the morning of the 24th of May, had a glass of porter, and paid for it with a three shilling piece; I observed, that the three shilling piece was quite a new one; I marked it, I had but one other three shilling piece, which was an old one.

BENJAMIN JOHNSON. I am an officer, I saw the prisoner on Wednesday the 24th of May about ten o'clock in the morning, in company with another man in Thomas-street; they went down Distaff-lane, and there the prisoner went into Mr. Pocklington's While the prisoner was in the shop, I slipped myself up a Court opposite, I knew that situation; I commanded a view of the shop; I saw him receive some meat, and some change; there were two doors, to the shop, and as soon as the prisoner came out at me I went in at the other. The prisoner and the other man joined company; I found they passed a bad three shilling piece there which I marked, Ithen followed him into Cannon-street. The prisoner there left his commission and went into the Cock and Bottle, the other man went up Abchurch-yard; I went in when the prisoner came out, and by enquiry of Mr. Hale, I learned what had happened; she gave me a three shilling piece, which she had marked; I left the three shilling piece until I returned, I then went in pursuit again; and in crossing Corn-hill I saw the prisoner crossing the 'Change and I think I saw the other man going down the Hill; I took the prisoner into custody; and on searching him, I found upon him two three shilling pieces wrapt up in paper, and there were eight others where I found them seperate; there was other money in the other breeches pocket, here they are. This is the one I received from Mrs. Pocklington, and this from Mr. Hale.

EDMOND HOMMERSHAM. I am a teller at the Bank, and am in the habit of inspecting base coin. All these three shilling pieces are counterfeit, and exactly of the same manufactory, they are merely washed.

GUILTY aged 28.

Confined one Year in Newgate , and to find surities for two years more .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

738. WILLIAM BROMLEY GEORGE BROOKS and SARAH PUGH were indicted for a conspiracy .

The prosecutor was called, and not appearing in Court, the prisoners were,

ACQUITTED .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

739. ROBERT MOODY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of May , nine gallon; of rum, value 40 s. the property of Joseph Hibbert , the elder , Charles Hibbert , and John Hibbert .

SECOND COUNT. The same as the first, only stating the goods to be the property of Edward Davis .

THIRD COUNT. Like the two former, only stating the goods to be the property of John Wilson .

SAMUEL PAGE . I am foreman to Mr. Davis, who is a lighterman . In consequence of orders we received from Messrs. Hibberts nine puncheons of rum were put on board a boat belonging to Mr. Flowers, which we had borrowed in the West India, homeward bound Docks.

GEORGE MARTEL . I am an apprentice to Mr. Davis the lighterman; I left the rum in the boat, between two and three o'clock, to Mr. Watson a watchman of the excise. There were no spirits in the puncheons when I left them.

THOMAS EDWARD. I am delivering officer of the rum warehouse, I delivered the casks of rum to Watson they were all full bearing the samples; they were marked with a C. in a diamond, together with the initials of the captain's name, and the letters C. K. and the word Bristow.

WILLIAM WATSON. I am an Excise watchman. On the 19th of May, I took charge of nine puncheons of rum at about eleven o'clock in the day; they were in a lugger boat, it was impossible for any one to spile them during my watch; I had not charge of them during the night; I came the next morning about half past six to relieve the prisoner. When I came near the boat. I asked him what made me liquor smell so strong, he answered that there was a leaking in one of the casks; I did not perceive anything the matter with the casks until Edward Pugh came. In consequence of something he told me, I was led to examine the casks, and I found seven of them with a spile in each. Information was given to Mr. Tanner, the superior officer, and then the rums were relanded and dipt by Mr. Field.

Cross-examined. During the time that I first took charge of them, my attention was fixed on them, that nobody could have spiled them nor could any one have done so whilst I had charge of them the second time.

PETER WILSON . I am a corporal. I was on duty on the morning of the 20th of May, in the West India Docks; I observed the prisoner about four o'clock in the morning in the boat, wiping some wet from the side of one of the casks. I said to him that stuff smells strong this morning; he was wiping the wet off with the tails of his coat; he said in answer, that he did not know, he had not tasted it; he appeared to be concealing the wet upon the casks with the tails of his coat; I observed he came out of the boat as soon as I came away; he appeared from the colour of his features to have had a little drop, but not so much as to intoxicate him.

Cross-examined. People are not very red in a morning when they have been up all night, at least soldiers are not so, unless they have had a little drop.

WILLIAM TOMLINSON . I am a private in the same company as the last witness; I was on duty very early in the morning of the 20th and saw Collins come over the iron bridge with ten or twelve five or three shilling pieces in his hand; he went to the boat where the rum was, and gave half the money to the prisoner; I saw the man in the boat wipe the side of the boat and the sides of the casks. There appeared to be wet running down the sides of the casks; I was not more than ten yards from the boat.

THOMAS FOSTER . I am an Excise watchman, in the West India Docks; I was on duty early in the morning of the 20th, between three and four; I saw a man named George Collins , who came out of the road into the Docks, go to the centinel's box, close by the bridge and then go over the bridge with a gallon can. He went to the Limehouse Basin, and dipped some water in the can, and then came over to the centinel's box; there were two or three centinels standing round the box; a pint pot was handed out, he drank and shook his head very much. I saw three charges, and one of them was without a watchman; it was the charge where the rum was; I kept my eye upon that charge until Moody came; I asked him whether he had charge of that boat? I observed him come in from the gate, I asked him where he was at three o'clock, he said on board the boat; I knew he was not, and I asked him whether he was not just then come in, he said, he had just been out to get a pint of beer; I kept my eye upon the party until I was relieved, a little after seven.

EDWARD PUGH . In consequence of a communication which I received, I went on board the boat where the nine puncheons of rum were; I examinedeach seperately, and found seven out of the nine with plugs in the sides. I gave information to Mr. Tanner.

JOHN FIELD, I went on board, about which contained nine puncheons of rum, for the purpose of examining them, in consequence of my being informed that they had been plundered. I found seven spoils in them; and the sides of the casks were discoloured; I did not smell rum. On the casks being, dipt, some of them wanted one inch, others two, others three inches; and altogether there was at least nine gallons wanting.

THOMAS TAYLOR . I am a shipping clerk to Messrs. Hibbert and Company; who are wine and spirit merchants in Jury-street; I saw the puncheons of rum filled up, and the samples were taken out afterwards; they were not spiled when they were put into the boat, if they had been I must have seen it; the side of the boat was lared, and by the spirit runing on it, it was turned quite white.

GEORGE COLLINS . I was waterman at the water-gate, in the West India Docks, the prisoner is an Excise watchman. Moody came up to me and said he was going to get a drop of rum, and I might as well have a shilling or two as not; he then walked up the basin side, and said, go you to your post, I have got a fellow here, that will get a drop in no time; he then went up the side of the Basin, towards the guard room, and in two or three minutes he returned in company with another man, whom I knew by sight not by name. The man seemed afraid of me, but Moody said, you be not afraid of him, because I know him very well. They then went and hauled the boat away from where she was, opposite the guard house, and there the other man went on board the boat, and was there about three quarters of an hour; Moody said, he was a d - d long while about it. He then handed two bladders to me while Moody was by him, I don't know whether they were full; the man brought one or two in his hand. When they came on shore, I asked them how they were going to get rid of it; one of them said they would get it over the wall: they put one of the bladders underneath the slider, and then went over the wall with the rest, I permitting them. I saw no more of them until they came back, and then Moody gave me ten or twelve shillings in three shilling pieces. We then went and sit down in a box, and there was a drop drawn off to drink; one of the constables came by at the time, and the prisoner proposed to let him drink; he sat down with us, and drank with us. Another constable came, and he drank with us also. We then seperated, and Moody proposed to get a drop more for ourselves; the same man went again, and got some more, and they gave me some in a skin.

Mr. Adolphus. Then Moody knew that you were such a thief, that he told the other man he need not be afraid of you - A. I don't know his opinion as to that.

Q. I suppose you never knew anything of this kind to be done before - A. I don't know for that.

Q. Was it you who proposed to take the rum - A. Not to my knowledge. What should I propose it for, when he had a man already.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent of the charge and have a wife and eight children.

GUILTY aged 55.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

740. ANN COLLINS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of April , two silver bottle lables, value 10 s. one napkin, value 5 s. five towels, value 3 s. one bag, value 1 s. two doylers; value 6 d. two yards of green baize, value 4 s. part of a brush, value 2 d. five knives, value 1 s. 3 d. eleven forks; value 2 s. 9 d. six plates. value 4 s. two dishes, value 5 s. one quart mug, value 6 d. two custard cups, value 1 s. three covers, value 2 s. two coffee cups, value 2 s. two wine glasses, value 1 s. two cut decanters, value 4 s. two cruets with tops, value 3 s. one tea-pot, value 2 s. one sugar shell, value 1 s. one pound weight of tea, value 8 s. two towels, value 1 s. five napkins, value 3 s. one pair of silk hose, value 3 s. one silver pencil case, value 7 s. two tea spoons, value 5 s. one table-cover, value 3 s. three pieces of green baize, value 1 l. one cleaver, value 4 s. four dishes, value 4 s. six plates, value 3 s. one cap, value 10 s. one dress, value 2 l. five bottles of rum, value 1 l. 5 s. three bottles of noyean, value 1 l. 16 s. eighteen bottles of port wine, value 5 l. twelve bottles of maderia, value 3 l. fifteen bottles of catalonia wine, value 3 l. two guineas, value 2 l. 2 s. two pieces of foreign gold coin, value 1 l. six pounds in monies numbered, five Bank notes, for the payment of five pounds each, value 25 l. fifteen other Bank notes for the payment of one pound each, value 15 l. the property of John Leake Esq. six handkerchiefs, value 30 s. and one broach, value 1 l. 10 s. the property of Isabella Ann Stackpole , privately in the dwelling house of the said John Leake Esq. And ANDREW KEENAN for feloniously receiving on the same day, the same goods, he knowing them to have been stolen .

JOHN LEAKE ESQ . I reside in Grosvenor-place , my daughter Mrs. Issabella Anne Stackpole, widow , lived with me in my house in the month of December last. The prisoner was servant to me in the capacity of a house maid . The prisoner was taken into custody on the 22nd of April; she was in my house four months, all but one day. She had not been with me more than one month, before I missed a broach with hair in it, and a five pound Bank note, they were taken out of a drawer in the two pair of stairs back room; I had missed considerable sums of money out of my drawers from time to time, but did not know whom to suspect; after she had been some time with me, I was informed she was without money, and I gave her two guineas I told her several times that I missed my property, but she always declared her innocence, and I had not the slightest suspicion of her, because I received a most excellent character of her. I was sitting one morning in my parlour, about eleven o'clock, when the other prisoner, who was accustomed to come and talk to her at the door, though I had forbidden male followers, came and asked for her. In a short time afterwards she went by the window with a white linen bag and a small pair of drawing-room bellows; from that moment I took the alarm; I am in thehabit of leaving my, money on the and of the side board, while I dress myself and have missed it several times; I went to the house of the other prisoner in company with an officer; in consequence of my having had some conversation with Mr. Fielding, the magistrate, he the prisoner and another man were weaving in the room, I saw my property. There was the white bag tied up, just as it had passed my window, and a variety of things on the mantle piece, and about the room. We asked him how he came by the different things, and he made a full confession that Ann Collins had given him the whole of the things; and that the morning when I saw the white bag go by the window, he was in the neighbourhood with a cart to take away her boxes and things. He confessed also that she had given him eleven pounds in notes; with that money he had bought a loom, and was working as a weaver. The prisoner Collins was not at that time dismissed from my service. He said she had given him the wine that was in the bottle; the officer found the broach; the silver bottle lables were taken off my bottles; he confessed that all the things that were there of my property he had received of her. We then put the things into a hackney coach, stepped in, and drove home; she opened the door, the officer came into the house, and told her she was his prisoner. The articles were produced to her seperately, and she said at first to each, she had not taken it; and then afterwards confessed she had; and one by one, she confessed the whole.

THOMAS GARDINER . I am an officer of Queen-square office. On the 22nd of April, I went with Mr. Leake, to Fluer-de-lis-court, and found a considerable quantity of property in a room in which the prisoner Keenan and another man were weaving, and which property Mr. Leake said was his. When I searched the prisoner Collins's box, I found two pounds in silver in it, and seven one pound notes; also some handkerchiefs.

MRS. STACKPOLE. This broach is mine, as well as these four silk handkerchiefs, which were all marked, but the marks have been picked out.

Mr. Leake. Altogether I lost about forty pounds in notes. The notes found in the prisoners box, I cannot swear to; all the other property is mine, I can swear to that.

Collins's Defence. The silk handkerchiefs never belonged to Mr. Leake.

Keenan's Defence. I never knew that this property was stolen, nor what the linen bag contained.

COLLINS GUILTY aged 25.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

KEENAN GUILTY aged 29.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

741. DATESSA ROBARTO was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of May , thirty yards of lace, and one shawl, value 10 l. the property of John Fiorce , in his dwelling house .

JOHN FIORCE . On the 11th of May, I lodged at No. 24, Fore-street, Hatton Garden , in the house of one Pastorelli; I entrusted this lace to be sold by a man named Viglezzi, who lodged in the same house. On the morning of the 12th of May, the prisoner at the bar, called upon me and told me Viglezzi had had a piece of lace stolen, and he told me that Viglezzi had a strong suspicion of him. In the course of the afternoon Viglezzi called on me, and communicated to me the circumstances, together with his suspicion; hearing that the prisoner had got a birth on board a ship lying at Graveshend, to go to Italy. I went to Hatton Garden office, and dispatched an officer thence for the purpose of detaining the prisoner; the officer went down to Graveshend, and brought him up; at his commitment at Hatton Garden, I heard him acknowledge that he took the things out of the room of Viglezzi, and pawned them in Piccadilly. The prisoner is a Citizen of Milan , and was supported, during his stay in England, at my expence.

FIOLO VIGLEZZI. I think this is the lace, but I am not positive as there is no mark.

John Fiorce . I can swear to it.

JOHN BURNWELL . I am a pawnbroker in Piccadilly, and took the lace into pawn from the prisoner at the bar.

Prisoner's Defence. I was told to sell the lace by Viglezzi; and being in want of money, I pawned it; I intended to have taken it out of pawn, when I got money, and to have returned it.

GUILTY aged 20.

Of stealing. but not in the dwelling house .

Transported for Seven Years .

Tried by a jury of half Englishmen; and half Foreigners, before Mr. Recorder.

742. THOMAS FALTRICK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of June , one washing tub, value 2 s. one hair broom, value 3 s. one pewter pot, value 1 s. 6 d. and one pick-axe, value 3 s. the property of Thomas George Williams .

THOMAS GEORGE WILLIAMS . I am a school master , residing in Grove-street-field, Hackney . I lost these things out of my yard, on Sunday night last. Having been frequently robbed of whatever, was left out, I procured a very furious dog, which was chained up in the yard; but he never barked all the night, and in the morning, he was loose.

JOHN EYLES . I stopped the prisoner with these things about four o'clock on Monday morning. Here they are.

GUILTY aged 38.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

743. JOHN BURDETT , and HENRY PHILLIPS , were indicted for a highway robbery .

The prosecutor was called, and not appearing in Court, the prisoners were,

ACQUITTED .

744. JOHN HERRING , and ROBERT SMITH , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of June , four pound weight of veal, value 4 s. six pounds of cheese, value 3 s. and one pound weight of butter, value 1 s. the property of William Leyman , esq.

JOHN SWENEY . I am a watchman at Kensington .I saw the prisoners walking about my boat, on the morning of the 4th of June; they were coming from Mr. Harrison's nursery with a bundle, I told the one that had not the bundle to stop; the other three something ever the hedge and ran away thief; he threw down the bundle, and put his hand into his pocket and offered me some money to let him go; I would not take the money, and he run away again; I took the one I had to the watchhouse, and gave a description of the other man who run away, to the other watchman.

TIMOTHY WESTWICK . I picked up the bundle that the other prisoner dropped, but he made his escape.

MARTHA WEABLY . I am house-keeper to Captain Layman . I lost these things out of the safe, in the area; there was a loin of veal, some beef steaks, a pound of butter, six pounds and a quarter of cheese, and a pigeon pye. I saw all the things the next day, and knew them.

JOHN EDWARD WILSON . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner Smith, on the 6th of June, at the Rose and Crown, Lumber-court, Seven Dials. I took him to Bow-street, where the watchman swore to him. It was the other prisoner that gave me his name, and told me he was the man that was with him.

John Sweeney . We afterwards found out, that what the prisoner threw over the hedge was a picklock key; it was found by one of Mr. Harrison's men.

HERRING, GUILTY , aged 20.

SMITH, GUILTY , aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

745. GEORGE PARKER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22nd of May , one pair of shoes, value 3 s. the property of Robert Branch .

ROBERT BRANCH. I am a servant to George Burchell, I put three pair of shoes into the area to be cleaned, on the 22nd of May. I went into the pantry; and after remaining there some time about my business, I heard a noise, and turning round, I saw the next witness and the prisoner in the kitchen. The witness told me that he saw the prisoner steal the shoes; and brought him back.

RALPH AGAR . I am a servant to Colonel Dalrymple. On the 22nd of May, as I was going down Dutchess-street, I saw the prisoner down the area, at No. 5, I watched him, and saw him take the shoes, and as he was coming up the ladder, I stopped him, and took him back.

GUILTY , aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

746. JAMES THACKERY , ROBERT DRUITT , alias CROSS , and JOHN WILSON , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of May , one silk handkerchief, value 3 s. the property of a person unknown, from his person .

GEORGE VAUGHAN. I am an officer, belonging to the public office at Bow-street. I was watching the prisoners about four o'clock in the afternoon, of the 16th of June. Just before they came to Temple Bar, there was a gentleman going through, and went up to him, and puffed his handkerchief a little cut of the pocket; when he got a little through the Bar, She pulled it right out, and clapped it underneath his coat. They then turned up a court, made a circuit round Chancery-lane, and that way, and returned down into Pickett-street. I then saw Wilson go into a pawnbroker's shop in Pickett-street; I went in when he came out, and found he had just pawned a handkerchief for three shillings. I had looked for the gentleman whom they had robbed, but missed him in going through the Bar, and could not find him. I met Smith, the beadle, and asked him to assist him; he did; and we went down Fleet-street, and saw them stop and talk to a young man, and sell a duplicate to him; we went up to him, and got the duplicate from him. We then followed the prisoners into Fleet-market, and there we took Thackery and Cross; we took them into a linen-draper's shop, and searched them. Smith assisted me in taking them to Bow-street; when we got there, and had them in the Brown Bear , an old man came in, and said, Wilson was all right. I left Thackery and Cross to the care of Smith, and I followed him, and got Wilson.

WILLIAM MARRIETT . I am a pawnbroker Wilson pledged this handkerchief with me on the 22nd of May.

THOMAS SMITH . I am a beadle. But know no more of this than Mr. Vaughan has related.

JAMES GODSELL . I am an apprentice to the Crown printing office. I bought the duplicate from the three prisoners at the bar, for sixpence. The prisoners were all three together. Mr. Vaughan got the duplicate from me.

Thackery's Defence. That officer has a spite against me, and he swore if he could not do any thing else with me, he would police me.

THACKERY, GUILTY , aged 21.

DRUITT, GUILTY , aged 18.

WILSON, GUILTY , aged 55.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

747. THOMAS JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23rd of May , one handkerchief, value 2 s. the property of John Jones , from his person .

JOHN JONES . I am a carpenter , and lost my handkerchief in High-street, Whitechapel , about half past twelve in the morning; the prisoner took it from about my neck; I was a little freshish. The prisoner ran away, and I cried stop thief, and the watchman stopped him.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Privately whipped , and discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

748. THOMAS LYNCH was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 10th of June , two sheets,value 8 s. and one quilt, value 2 s. the property of Thomas Fox .

MARY FOX. My husband lives at No. 2, Charles-street, Drury-lane . I let the room to a young woman, and she lost them off the bed.

JOHN FURZEMAN. I am a patrole. On the 10th of this month, I met the prisoner at the bar, about half past twelve o'clock at night; I observed he had something under his coat. I asked him what he had got; he told me that he had two sheets and a quilt, and he had taken them out of a room in Charles-street.

ELEANOR SMITH. I am an unfortunate girl. All I know is, the prisoner was not with me, and when I came back from getting a pot of porter, the sheets and quilt were gone.

(The property produced.)

Mary Fox . I know that property to be mine; the sheets have Thomas Fox , Charles-street, Drury-lane, written on them.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Confined six months , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

749. JANE ABRAHAM was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2nd of June , one pair of stockings, value 4 s. the property of John Wasey .

JOHN WASEY. I lost a pair of stockings; they were hanging on the rails, close by the door. The reason I accused the prisoner is, that when I went to the pawnbroker's in Black Lyon-yard, Mr. Christie's. I found she had pawned my stockings there.

GUILTY , aged 53.

Whipped in jail , and discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

750. MARY ANN CLARKE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2nd of June , two bags, value 4 s. twenty-one pounds weight of feathers, value 30 s. one tablecloth, value 3 s. and two fur tippets, value 30 s. the property of John Eddison , esq. in his dwelling-house . And ELIZABETH BERRY , alias SMITH , was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, she knowing them to he stolen .

CHARLES GIMBER . I am a constable, and was set to watch in Gough-square , early in the morning of the 2nd of June. Soon after four, I saw the prisoner, Mary Ann Clark , come out of Mr. Eddison's house, with a canvas bag in her possession.

Mr. Pooley. Did you stop her - A. I did. I asked her what she had there; her answer was, a few feathers. I asked her where she was going; and she told me to Pancrass. I informed her I was a constable, and she must come back with me.

Mr. Pooley. Now, before she said any thing, did you make her any threat, or any promise, or did you say any thing to her, which might induce her to confess - A. I did not. I asked her what she was going to do at Pancrass; she said, she was going to take the feathers to Mrs. Smith; in Edmund-street, near Battle-bridge. I asked her whether she had ever taken any there before; she said, she had, and she had been in the habit of doing so. I asked her whether she used to take them in the manner she was taking these; she said, she had taken some in a tablecloth, which I should find in the one pair back room, at Mrs. Smith's, likewise two tippets in a chest of drawers in the back parlour. She begged very hard for me to let her take the bag which she had when I stopped her, back to her master's, for she should be hanged.

COURT. Did you take her to Mrs. Smith's - A. I did not. I took her to the Compter, and got to Smith's at about half past nine.

Q. You mean the woman at the bar - A. Yes.

Mr. Pooley. How did you get into the house - A. Over the wall, and in at the back window, the first thing I saw in the back parlour was, the chest of drawers that Clarke told me of, and upon opening it, I found the two tippets as described by her. Smith was not in the room at the time. As soon as I went out of the parlour, I opened the door, and let in Mr. Eddison, junior; we then went into the one pair of stairs back room, and found an immense quantity of feathers. I saw no person belonging to the house at that time. I saw a pair of scales, hung by the fire side, and there were several bags, which contained feathers, which were picked; in the corner of the room there was a great quantity of feathers loose and picked.

COURT. This was the room of which Clarke told you - A. Yes.

Mr. Pooley. Did any one come in whilst you were there - A. Yes; a boy, who was called by the name of Thomas Smith , but his proper name is Gatemeads; I got some information from him.

Q. Did Smith come in - A. Yes, in about half or three quarters of an hour. I told her then that I came in consequence of some information which I received from Clarke, that some of Mr. Eddison's property was there. I asked her where she got the feathers; she told me she got them from Clarke, to make a bed with, for Mr. Eddison. I asked her whether she got the tippets to make a bed also; she said, no, one was Clarke's, and Clarke had given her the other for her own wear. I asked her where she got the tablecloth; and she said, Clarke had brought feathers in it. When I took her to Guildhall, I asked her if she had ever disposed of any feathers; she said, no; these were the only feathers that were brought to her, and they were for the purpose of making a bed. At first, I thought that I had seen her in Gough-square; and I asked her whether she had been there; but she replied, she had not.

Mr. Pooley. Have you got the feathers here.

COURT. Nobody can swear to feathers. You must prove their identity from the prisoner's own mouth.

(The several articles produced by the witness.)

Witness. These I found in the lodgings of the prisoner Smith, accordingly to the direction I received from Clarke, and they have never been out of my possession since.

JURY. We should wish to know whether there be any, and if any, what mark upon the tablecloth - A. I. Eddison at full length.

THOMAS GATEMEADS . Stood up. -

COURT. Q. To Gimber. Is that the boy that came into the room at Smith's - A. Yes.

Mr. Pooley. Q. To Gatemeads. How old are you A. Thirteen in September last.

Q. Is it a bad thing or a good thing to tell a lie A A bad thing.

Q. Where do persons go that tell lies - A. To a bad place.

Q. Are you aware that there is a God who punishes his sinners, and these who speak falsely - A. Yes.

Q. Then mind and speak the truth. Do you remember Gimber coming to your house - A. Yes, when I came home, he was in the room; I live with Mrs. Smith. I know Mrs. Clarke. Mrs. Smith had a child of her's to nurse. Mrs. Clarke used often to bring feathers to Mrs. Smith between the hours of six and seven in the morning. I have heard her say that she lived with Mr. Eddison, in the presence of Mrs. Smith. She used to bring the feathers in bags, and once she brought them in a tablecloth; I did not see the tablecloth come in; but I saw it after it was come. I used to be employed in picking feathers; and when they were picked, Mrs. Smith used to send me to sell them to a Mr. Neville, a broker, in Brewer-street, Sommers Town; the first time, I received six shillings for what I took, and another time five; I got eleven shillings altogether; I got two shillings a pound for some.

Q. When you got the money, to whom did you take it - A. To Mrs. Smith.

Q. How long before Gimber came, did you go to sell any feathers - A. About three days before.

JAMES NEVILLE . I am a broker, in Brewer-street, Somers Town. The last witness came to me on the 23rd of May, with a lot of feathers, consisting of three pounds, and I paid him two shillings a pound. He came with another lot, and he got two shillings and six-pence a pound for them.

COURT. Did you know from whom the lad came - A. I thought from his father and mother; he went as the son of two people who lived next door.

FRANCES CLAIRIS . I am landlady of the house in which Smith lived. She took the whole house of me. Somebody lived with her, and they lived together as man and wife.

BENJAMIN NEWMAR . Q. You are in the employ of Mr. Eddison - A. I am.

Q. Look at those tippets, (the tippets shown to the witness,) do you know those to be the property of Mr. Eddison - A. They are; I made them myself; they cost between eight and nine shillings; but one of them I think where made up, would cost thirty shillings; they have never been in wear.

MR. JOHN EDDISON . I am a furrier.

Q. Look at that tablecloth, is that your property - A. I have no doubt but that it is; it may be worth three shillings.

Q. Had you such feathers as these -

COURT. You know Clarke admits that these are his feathers.

Mr. Pooly. Do you deal sir in feathers. - A. No further, sir, than I sell those which are plucked from the swan skins. The prisoner Clarke was a servant of all work in my service, I know no more of her than that I have heard her name mentioned. One of the bags has upon it,

"stolen from John Eddison ."

SAMUEL BARKER. I am attorney for the prosecution. I was at the house of Smith with the officer. Smith said she came by these feathers in the manner in which Gimber has related.

Smith's Defence. It all all false.

Clarke's Defence. When I was first stopt, it was near upon five o'clock. The officer who took me just out of sight of the house, asked me where I was going, and some other questions. He then took me to his own home, and thence to Mr. Smith's in Gough Square; and Mr. Smith told me to make a friend of him, and tell him all about it. The officer then took me to Giltspur-street Compter, and I do not think the prisoner Smith knew that the feathers were stolen.

Clarke called several witnesses who gave her a good character.

CLARKE, GUILTY , aged 34.

Transported for Seven Years .

SMITH, GUILTY , aged 35.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

751. JANE DAVISON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of May , one waistcoat, value 1 s. 6 d. two pair of stockings, value 1 s. and two handkerchiefs, value 4 d. the property of William Thomas .

ELIZABETH THOMAS . My husband is a gun maker . I lost these things out of the yard on the 20th of May, and saw this woman going out of the door; I followed her, and charged her with the theft; she opened her apron, and shewed me the things, and I gave her to the charge of an officer. Here are the things, they are mine.

GUILTY aged 27.

Confined six months and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury before Mr. Recorder.

752. JANE NELSON , MARIA JOHNSON , and JOHN LEARY , were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 14th of May , one bag, value 1 s. fifteen yards of callico, value 15 s. two Bank notes, for the payment of five pounds each, value 10 l. and ten other Bank notes for the payment of one pound each, value 10 l. the property of John Hounslow .

JOHN HOUNSLOW . I live at Etonbray, near Dunstable, in Bedfordshire, I am a dealer in straw plait . I came to town on Friday the 12th of May, Richard Theed was with me. We went to bed at No. 2, Church-street St. Giles's , we paid a shilling a piece for our bed; I had two five pound notes wraped up by themselves, five ones wraped up by themselves, and five other ones wraped up by themselves: they were all Bank of England notes; they were all in my pocket book, in the bag containing fifteen yards of cloth, I know some of the notes. When I went to bed, I set these things down against the wall; after I got into bed, this woman lay with me for the value of a minute or two; they were both in the room when we got into bed; they took the liberty of lying down by the side of us; we saw them in the publichouse, before we came there; we paid them for the beds, not knowing but they belonged to the house. They got up, and went down stairs, and came up with the man at the bar; the man asked me what business I had there, I told him I was very tired, and had paid for my bed, and wished to rest myself. He then forced me to get up, and struck me in the face; my bag was gone; Theed got down stairs and fetched the watchman; he asked them what was become of my bag, and they said my friend had taken it down stairs. The watchman searched for the bag all over the house but could not find it. The next time I saw my property, it was at the watch-house.

Cross-examined. I had not been drinking a great deal, I was not drunk; we had had some gin, we might have had a pint; I received a five pound note of my money at Battle bridge, and another at Islington, at strawhat shops.

RICHARD THEED. I was with the last witness, on the 13th of May in the evening; I know both the women very well by sight; all that Hounslow said is true; I saw Leary strike Hounslow.

Cross-examined. I know the house well that Leary lives in; Leary denied to the watchman that the girls were in the house; and when we searched, we could not find them they made their escape somehow. When we came back to the house, to search it another time with a constable, they had got into bed with another young man very comfortable, in the same room in which we had been at first. We took Leary and Johnson down to the watchhouse, and they were talking Irish all the way; and they speak that so fast, that I can't understand it; I went the next day to Marlborough-street, I was rather forward but I never was fuddled but twice in my life.

TIMOTHY LANE . I am a watchman. The last witness came and called me to go to Leary's house, I went there and asked where the bag was, Johnson said, it was up stairs; and as Hounslow gave no charge, I went away then to a row at the other end of the street. I searched all over the house, when I was ordered back the second time, and then I found Johnson, and took her to the watchhouse, and the third time I took the other prisoner; when I was searching the house, Leary held a light to me; every thing he could do to assist me in searching, he did. I know the house very well, it is kept by Leary, and inhabited by respectable, industrious, hard working people.

JOHN FURZEMAN . I am keeper of the round house. In consequence of a communication I received from Patrick Heron , I went with him to search the house, and he took a bundle out of the cockloft, which Hounslow knew immediately.

PATRICK HERON. I am a labouring man, I went to the watchhouse to see Leary. In consequence of something I heard some girls talking about in the passage of the round house, I communicated it to Leary, who told me immediately to go and search the house, which I did in company with Furzeman, and pulled the bundle out of the cockloft; Leary desired me to tell the officer what I had heard. We found no notes; here is the bag, and here is the pocket-book, and here is the linen that was in it.

John Hounslow . They are all my property.

NELSON GUILTY aged 18.

JOHNSON GUILTY aged 17

LEARY GUILTY aged 23

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

753. JOHN RUSSELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of May , three pair of shoes, value 12 s. the property of Aron Sammell , John Sammell and George Sammell .

JOHN SAMMELL . The prisoner at the bar was in our employ; and up to the time that I discovered this peculation, nobody would have given him a better character than I should. In consequence of an information I received from his landlord where he last lodged, I went to his present lodgings, and there I found an immense quantity of pawnbrokers duplicates, some dated three years ago, others less; we went to the different pawnbrokers, and the last we went to, we found two pair of women's shoes pawned but a few days previous; I told Mr. Read the constable, that he was to take him into custody when I gave him the word; Read kept close in the neighbourhood; I sent the prisoner into the warehouse, telling him to look out six pair of men's shoes, quickly; he went into the warehouse, and remained after the other men were gone, full ten minutes: as he was going out, I gave the word to Read, who took him into custody and brought him back into the shop. On searching him, we found a pair of large men's shoes, one in each breeches pocket, the shoes are new; I can swear to them.

WILLIAM READ , JUN. I am an officer of Hatton Garden office. I was employed by Mr. Sammell's. and took the prisoner into custody; Mr. Sammell's warehouse is in Hatton Garden, I took the prisoner just as he got into Ely court.

Prisoner's Defence. It is impossible for Mr. Sammell's to swear to those shoes, after they have been stretched on a last the marks must be effaced.

GUILTY aged 33.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

754. SUSANNAH CROSS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of June , two coach cushions, and two horse nose bags , the property of Elizabeth Tipping .

ELIZABETH TIPPING . I am the owner of the hackney coach, No. 147 , William Welford drives it for me.

WILLIAM WELFORD . I am coachman to the last witness, I keep a coach in Lamb-yard, Lamb's Conduit-street ; I left the coach there between one and two in the morning, and the cushions and nose bags were taken out of it while I was putting my horses in the stable.

JOHN WALTER . I am a watchman in Judd-street Somers Town; I met the prisoner about two o'clock in the morning, with something in her apron. Immediately I took her into custody, and she said she was going towards Oxford-street; and I asked her would she be so good as to let me see what she had in her apron; she had the nose bags and the cushionsthere, and she said she was on her camp from Highgate she was going to make a bed of them. I took them from her, and here they are; I took her to the watchhouse, Mr. Welford owned them there.

PETER WHITEHAIR . I am only the keeper of the watchhouse; the prisoner told me she found these things in the street.

ELIZABETH SIPPING . These are my property.

Prisoner's Defence. I found them in the street.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Confined one month and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

755. THOMAS PARMITER was indicted for bigamy and pleaded.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

756. DANIEL CAIN was indicted for feloniously stealing forty-nine pounds weight of lead, value 6 s. the property of Charles Northam , affixed to his dwelling house .

SECOND COUNT. The same as the first, only stating the lead to be affixed to a certain building of the said Charles Northam.

CHARLES NORTHAM . I live at No. 6, Southampton-buildings, Chancery-lane . There was some lead stripped from my washhouse on the morning of the 6th of this month. This lead formed part of the gutter, My attention was drawn to it by the watchman calling to know if we had lost any lead. I saw the lead applied to the gutter, and it fitted exactly; there is no easy communication to my back premises. There is a court comes up close to the wall and they might have got over that.

RICHARD BRAIN . I am a watchman in Southampton-buildings. On the morning in Question, I was coming along without my light, and saw the prisoner come out of Southampton-court; that is the court, which communicates to Mr. Northam's premises. I saw something under his arm which appeared like lead, and which, on seeing me, he put down and run away. I pursued after him; as soon as he got to Chancery-lane, I took him, but I brought him back to the spot where he laid down the lead. I took him into custody, and took him to the watchhouse. I found five pieces of lead in all; one on the wall, three in the court, and a large piece in the buildings.

Lead produced and sworn to by Mr. Northam.

GUILTY , aged 38.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

757. THOMAS JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 12th of June , nineteen yards of printed cotton, value 25 s. the property of Joseph Moore .

JOSEPH MOORE . I am a linen draper , and live at No. 22, Redlion-street, Holborn . The printed cotton was hanging outside of the door. The officers brought it back to me to know if I lost it. Then, and not before, I perceived I had lost it. There were sixteen or seventeen yards, and they were worth four or five and twenty shillings.

WILLIAM WATWRIGHT . I am a patrole of Bow-street; I not she prisoner with something order his coat, near Dean-street. I followed him about fifty yards; when he saw me, he was going down Feathers-court, and I went round and took him. He said he bought it at a shop at Paddington. At that time I did not know whose property it was and I took him to Covent Garden watchhouse. I went to several linen drapers shops in Holborn, and I was told that Mr. Moore had that pattern. I took it to him and he knew it directly.

Mr. Moore. I know the cotton to be mine.

The prisoner had a good character.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Whipped, and discharged to his master .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant,

758. THOMAS DENNY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of May , a silk pocket handkerchief, value 3 s. the property of Robert Newlove Harab , privately from his person .

SECOND COUNT. The same as the first, only stating it to be stolen from some person unknown.

GEORGE VAUGHAN . I am an officer belonging to Bow-street office. On the 12th of May, about nine in the evening, I observed the prisoner at the bar going towards Charing Cross, near St. Martin's Church . I saw him following a gentleman about one hundred yards, and then he turned after a gentleman, whose name I afterwards found to be Haram. He passed him, and touched it; he then put his hand in, drew a silk handkerchief from him, wiped his mouth with it, and then put it into his side pocket. I immediately ran across the way and seized him. I tapped the gentleman on the shoulder and told him the circumstance; and he said he just wanted his handkerchief, and missed it. He said the handkerchief was his, in the presence of the prisoner. The gentleman gave me his card, which was, Captain Haram , No. 84, Bloomsbury Square; and he said he would wait at Bow-street the next morning; but he did not. On enquiring at No. 34, Bloomsbury Square, I was told he was an India Captain , and had been obliged to sail. The gentleman told me he did not intend to prosecute. I have kept the handkerchief ever since, and here it is.

GUILTY , aged 34.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

759. HANNAH GREEN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of May , one canvas bag, value 1 d. one dollar, value 5 s. 6 d. three three shilling bank tokens, value 9 s. seven eighteen bank tokens, value, 10 s. 6 d. eleven shillings and six-pence in monies numbered, and two bank notes for payment of one pound each, value 2 l. the property of John Bayley , from his person .

JOHN BAYLEY . I am a brewer's labourer , and servant to Cox and Co. I live at Mile End, Old Town. On the 13th of May, between eleven and twelve at night, I was going home and saw the prisonerat the bar and another woman the corner of George Yard, she marked me to give her some gin; I told I had no gin money and walked on; she followed me, and just as I got in the corner of Angel-alley , she laid hold of my right arm, put her hand under my apron and picked my pocket of this money. I demanded my property of her, and she would not give it to me, and I called the watch. The watchman came and took her into custody.

ABRAHAM HOLDER . I am a watchman; my beat is down High-street, Whitechapel; I took the prisoner into charge, and found the purse containing the money in her right hand, though she said she had not got it.

(Bag and money produced.)

Prosecutor. That is my bag.

GUILTY , aged 36.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

760. STEPHEN HARRISON was indicted, for feloniously stealing on the 25th of May , 2 shirts value 10 s. one shirt, value 4 s. the property of Dalton Somerset .

HANNAH SOMERSET . My husband is a white smith , and lives at No. 5, Charlton street . I lost my shirts and sheet on the 26th in the evening. They were out upon a pole from the two pair of stairs window, and all I know is, that I missed them.

SAMUEL FURZEMAN . I am an officer. On the 27th of May I saw the prisoner with a little bundle under his arm, which, on seeing me, he threw down and ran away. I told George Holloway , a brother officer who was with me, to pick it up, while I ran after the prisoner. I took him into custody; that was about half past twelve.

GEORGE HOLLOWAY . I am an officer, and was in company with Samuel Furzeman ; I picked up the bundle, and here it is.

HANNAH SOMERSET .

Those are my property.

GUILTY , aged 17.

Privately whipped and discharged.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

761. MARY ANNE WILKINS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 24th of May , twenty yards of printed cotton, value 25 s . the property of John Wilder .

CHARLES JAMES . I am a shopman to Mr. Wilder, who is a linen draper , at No. 27, Shoreditch . This cotton was hanging outside the door, on the 24th of May, about half past five o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner was brought to the shop by William Gaffill, who produced some cotton, which I knew to be my master's, and which he said in the presence of the prisoner, that he had taken it from her.

WILLIAM COEFILL. I saw the prisoner try to throw her apron over this cotton, two or three times; till at last she succeeded in getting it.

RICHARD VAUGHAN . I am an officer, and produce the cotton.

CHARLES JAMES . I know the property to be my master's.

GUILTY , aged 16.

Confined fourteen days in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

762. JOHN TREASURE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of June , one shift, value 1 s. 6 d. two pair of stockings, value 1 s. one night cap, value 6 d. one table cloth value 2 s. one bolster, value 1 s. and two tea spoons, value 4 s. the property of William Edwards .

ELIZABETH EDWARDS . My husband is a smith ; we live in Brook-street, New-road . We lost these things, on the 14th of June. We had lodgings to let, and this man engaged them. I told him not to keep late hours; but he did not come till after we were in bed. I let him in; the parlour was his bed room. I had put a sallad bowl with my clean linen in it, on the top shelf in the cupboard. He said, he would put out the candle. I went up stairs and watched, and perceived that the candle was moved, and that it was in the closet. I immediately went down stairs and the things taken out of the closet, and the spoons under the bed. I thought he was robbing the house, and my husband called the watch.

WILLIAM PAGE . I am the watchman that took the prisoner into custody.

GUILTY , aged, 50.

Confined 14 days , and whipped in goal .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

763. WILLIAM SMITH and JOHN MARSHALL were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 11th of May , two shirts, value 6 s. two pin-befores, value 1 s. the property of Charles Andrews ; and one pair of breeches, value 10 s. the property of Margaret Lacey .

ELIZABETH ANDREWS . I live at No. 67, Charlton-street. Sommers-town , and-these things were left out, after being washed, to be dried on the leads behind the house.

WILLIAM TIPPITT . I am a brickmaker; I was going to my work about a quarter past four in the morning, and saw Marshall walking up and down a court behind this house. I saw him jump up against the wall, and the other prisoner threw a bundle over the wall. I went directly to the watchman, and told him to take these two men into custody. The watchman said he would not, and I said I would. I went up to them and asked them where the bundle was; and they said, what bundle? damn your eyes, what is it to you. They both started and ran off. I cried stop thief, and pursued them; and Smith was turning back to come towards me, when I picked up a brick-bat, and swore I would knock either of them down if they came near me. I know them both very well; Marshall dropped the bundle crossing the fields; and they were taken by the patrole.

WILLIAM BOWDITCH . I stopped these two men, seeing them running, and hearing a cry of stop thief.

(Articles produced.)

Mrs. Andrews, these pin-befores and shirts are mine.

MARGARET LACEY . These breeches were entrustedtrusted to my care, I had them to wash for a gentleman.

SMITH, GUILTY , aged 21.

MARSHALL, GUILTY , aged 58.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

764. ANNE JOHNSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of June , one shawl, value 2 s. one gown, value 2 s. one child's pelisse, value 2 s. and fourteen shillings in monies numbered , the property of Mary Cordry .

MARY CORDRY . I live at 18, Brittannia-street, Battle-bridge . I lost my shawl on the 17th of June. I saw the prisoner at the bar going out of the house with these things; I let her go out into the street, and then followed her, and told her to come back; she said, she had nothing of mine, and gave me a black eye; I gave her a push, and pushed her down; and picked the clothes up. Mrs. Groves sent a young man after her, who brought her back.

GUILTY aged 51.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

765. GEORGE HURDSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3rd of June , fourteen yards of velveteen, value 34 s. the property of James Wiggin .

WILLIAM MILLS . In consequence of some information I received, that Mr. Wiggin was robbed, I followed the prisoner up Kingsgate-street, and overtook him; I said, my friend, a word with you; and he immediately threw down the cloth, and ran away. I continued my pursuit, and secured him, and brought him back.

GEORGE BEST . I saw this man take the velveteen from Mr. James Wiggin's shop.

WILLIAM MILLS . I saw four of them together lurking about.

GUILTY , aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

766. DANIEL DOWNS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of May , twenty-eight yards of printed cotton, value 28 s. the property of David Thomas and John Jones .

DAVID THOMAS . I live at No. 9, Castle-street, Liecester-square ; I keep a linen-drapers shop ; a little girl came into the shop, and told me that a man had taken a piece of cotton, and ran away. I went to the door, and saw the prisoner with the cotton under his arm. I went after him, and brought him back.

GUILTY , aged 52.

Confined six months , and privately whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

767. JOHN ROBINSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2nd of June , two petticoats, value 4 s. one handkerchief, value 1 s. one shirt, value 2 s. one waistcoat, value 2 s. seven pair of stockings, value 7 s. four caps, value 2 s. two pair of pockets, value 2 s. and one pad value 4 d. of the goods and chattels of Mary Trueman .

MARY TRUEMAN . I live at 55, Lambeth-street, Goodman's fields ; I am a laundress , and take in washing . I lost all these things on the 2nd of June, I left them in a copper which is in the yard all night.

JOHN CONNER . I am a watchman. About three in the morning of the 2nd of June, a man went by my box with a bundle, which he said, was his own property; he threw it down, and ran away, and I ran after him. I am sure the prisoner is the same man that went by my box.

JOSEPH WINTER . I am a watchman. I took the prisoner into custody, hearing a rattle spring, and seeing him running.

CHARLES JAQUES . I am constable of the night, and the clothes were given to me when the prisoner was brought to the watchhouse. They were wet, and quite warm.

Mary Trueman . The several articles produced, were entrusted to my care to be washed.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

768. DENNIS REARDON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of June , one gown, value 3 s. the property of James Morley .

ELIZABETH MORLEY . I keep a second hand clothes shop, at No. 2, Mile End Road. I lost these things on the 8th of this month. I went to ask a Mrs. White what the time of the morning was; she told me it was between nine and ten, and pointed to the prisoner, saying, that man has something of yours. I went after him, and told him to come back. He said, he would, as he wanted to buy the gown; just then, Mr. Jaques, the constable, was coming by, and I gave him in custody.

SOPHIA WHITE . I live next door to the prosecutrix. I thought the prisoner had taken something out of her shop, and told her so.

CHARLES JAQUES . I am a constable, and took the prisoner into custody, and that is the gown which I found on him.

Elizabeth Morley . That is my gown.

GUILTY , aged 41.

Confined one month .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

769. MARY ANNE BAILEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of May , one silver tea-spoon, value 10 s. and one shift, value 3 s. the property of John White .

SARAH WHITE . My husband is a silversmith , and resides at No. 9, Red Lion-street, Clerkenwell . The prisoner was servant to me. I lost my teaspoon on the 26th of May, after missing a great many things; I also lost a chemise of my daughter's.

WILLIAM READ . I am a constable, and was sent for to search the prisoner. I found on her a duplicate for a shift, and she confessed to me that she had taken both shift and spoon.

JOHN BOTELLER. I am a pawnbroker, and took in the shift and spoon from the prisoner.

(The spoon and shift produced.)

Sarah White . These are my property.

Confined fourteen days .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

770. MARY SMITH was indicted for feloniouslystealing, on the 29th of May , one great coat, value 5 s. one petticoat, value 6 d. and one apron, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of Charles Whitcombe .

MARY WHITCOMBE . My husband is a labouring man ; we keep a room in Cock-alley on the first pair of stairs; I never saw the prisoner in the house; my husband went out at six to work; and I went out at half past six. When I returned about one in the afternoon the door was locked and the key left where it was before; I asked my neighbours if they had seen any one? And I found the prisoner in Golden-lane on the Monday; I asked her what she had done with the rags she had taken, and she said she had sold the coat and got the apron in her pocket.

JAMES FOREHAM . I know nothing more than that I am the constable who took the prisoner into custody at the request of the prosecutrix, I took this apron from her

Mary Whitcombe . That is my apron.

GUILTY aged 38.

Confined one month and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

771. ELIZABETH SMITH , alias PLATFORD , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of February , two sheets, value 2 s. two flat irons, value 6 d. one candlestick, value 6 d. one bolster. value 3 s. two pillows, value 3 s. one quilt, value 2 s. and one blanket, value 1 s. the property of John Harris in his dwelling house .

JOHN HARRIS . I live in Crown-street Soho , I keep the two houses, No. 24, and 27, I live at 24. The prisoner lodged at 27.

COURT. You did not live at 27, yourself - A I did not.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

772. MARY COCKS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of June , one watch, value 2 l. the property of John Lowing from his person .

JOHN LOWING . I live at Winchmore Hill, I lost my watch on the road from Enfield , home I was somewhat the worse for what I had drank, and can't say I saw the prisoner in my way home at all. I have seen my watch since I saw it in a young man's hand.

WILLIAM FISHER . I live at Edmonton and had been drinking with the prosecutor on the 20th of June, which was last Saturday, he was drunk, but I was not, because I can stand liquor better than him. He looked at his watch as we passed Enfield church, and I went across the field home, and he took the road, I know nothing of this business.

JOHN TUFFNELL . I am a labourer and live in Baker-street Enfield; the prisoner lives in Enfield Town, she offered me a watch to sell; and I said I would give her ten shillings and sixpence on it; and it I liked it upon trial, I would give her two pounds, upon which she gave me the watch and I gave her ten shillings and sixpence.

WILLIAM CUFLEY . I am beadle of Enfield, and took the prisoner into custody. This is the watch.

John Lowing . That is my watch.

Prisoner's Defence. He made love to me, and gave me the watch in the way of courtship, and I was glad to accept of the present.

NOT GUILTY , aged 64 !!

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.