Old Bailey Proceedings Online (www.oldbaileyonline.org, version 6.0, 24 April 2014), May 1815 (18150510).

Old Bailey Proceedings, 10th May 1815.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's ommission of the PEACE, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND ALSO THE GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, HELD AT Justice-Hall, in the Old Bailey, On WEDNESDAY, the 10th of MAY, 1815, and following days,

BEING THE FIFTH SESSIONS IN THE MAYORALTY OF The Right Honourable SAMUEL BIRCH , LORD-MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY JOB SIBLY, No. 4, CARTHUSIAN-STREET, ALDERSGATE-STREET.

LONDON,

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED (BY THE AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON By R. Butters, No. 22, Fetter-lane, Fleet-street.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON.

Before the Right Honourable SAMUEL BIRCH , Lord Mayor of the City of London; Sir Simon Le Blanc , knt. one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir George Wood , knt. one of the Barons of his Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir Richard Carr Glyn , bart. Sir John Perring , bart. Sir Charles Flower , bart. Aldermen of the said City; Sir John Silvester , bart. Recorder of the said City; George Scholey , esq. John Atkins , esq. William Heygate , esq. Aldermen of the said City; and Newman Knowles , esq. Common Serjeant of the said City, His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of Goal Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

London Jury.

Robert Mather ,

Samuel Froggett ,

John Wells ,

Vincent Phillips ,

George Steke ,

John Moon ,

William Fry ,

Joseph Bailey ,

Edward Geering Waddle ,

Joseph Grove ,

William Grove ,

Nathaniel Wainhouse .

First Middlesex Jury.

George Wilson ,

Thomas Clerk ,

Thomas Heath ,

Thomas Burne ,

Richard Hebert ,

Daniel Sharp ,

John Seirs ,

George Hema ,

John Bunce ,

Robert Trap ,

Thomas Osborne ,

Thomas Williams .

Second Middlesex Jury.

Henry Jobbings ,

John Collier ,

Leanard Bennett ,

Joseph Ball ,

Thomas Brown ,

John Street ,

James Barlow ,

Edward Griffiths ,

James Francis ,

Benjamin Pippin ,

John Side ,

Joseph Hayward .

591. JOHN, alias DAVID ROBERTS , was indicted for feloniously making an assault in the King's highway, on the 9th of November last, on John Barnes , and taking from his person, twenty-six yards of Irish linen, value 3 l. ten yards of Irish linen, value 26 s. twenty-six yards of sheeting, value 50 s. twenty-eight yards of printed furniture cotton, value 2 l. 9 s. sixty-four yards of muslin, value 15 s. and a wrapper, value 3 s. the property of Johnson Lamprell , Matthew Halling , and John Pearce .

SECOND COUNT. For a like robbery, stating the goods to be the property of John Barnes .

WILLIAM NASH . I am a shopman to Johnson Lamprell, Matthew Halling , and John Pearce, they are linen-drapers , in Barbican. I packed up the articles mentioned in the indictment in a calico wrapper; they were to be sent to Mrs. Maddocks, No. 31, City-road; I delivered the bundle to John Barnes , on Wednesday, the 9th of November, between four and five in the afternoon, Barnes set off to go with the goods. He returned without the bundle afterwards, the same afternoon, after we had light the lamps in the shop; Barnes told me that he had been robbed of the bundle, and said he should know the person that took it from him. I went some time afterwards to Hatton Garden office, where I saw the prisoner, he was at Hatton Garden before me. The boy, John Barnes, at Hatton Garden, swore to the prisoner as the person that took the property from him.

Q. What were the value of these things you packed up - A. Ten pounds six shillings.

JOHN BARNES . I am shop-boy to Messrs. Lamprell's and Co. I received a bundle from the last witness, on the 9th of November last, I set off between four and five to go to the City-road with it; I went as far as the City-road, I thought it was No. 13, I was going to, I asked there whether any body had ordered goods from Mr. Lamprell's; they said, I had to go up higher a considerable way on. I went on as far as Old street, then crossing the road, this gentleman tapped me on the shoulder.

Q. Somebody tapped you on the shoulder - A. Yes. He said, my man, you must go along with me to your master, for he had got something to tell me; my master is going out, and he wants the things directly; I said, very well, sir. He said, you may as well give me the bundle to carry, we shall then go on the quicker; I said, no, sir. I am much obliged to you; I can carry it very well myself. He said, you must give it me, I want to go directly back to my master, for he wants to go out of town; you can deliver the message. He then put his legs between mine, knocked me down, and forced the bundle out of my hand; there was a gentleman, officer, near, that saw the transaction. The prisoner ran away with the bundle. A gentleman that saw the transaction, came over, and picked me up; I did not see which way the man that knocked me down went.

Q. Do you know who that gentleman is - A. I have seen him since at Hatton Garden.

Prisoner. That person is my witness; I wish him to be here; he speaks in favour of me; I wish to put my trial off to get him here.

Q. To Barnes. Who is the person that knocked you down - A. The prisoner at the bar; I am certain of it.

Q. You went home afterwards to your master's house - A. Yes.

Q. How soon afterwards did you go to the Justice - A. Mr. Lamprell sent his man, Nash, to the officer Hancock, and when I saw Hancock, I told him what had happened; Hancock took me the same night to a place, where I saw some men, it was at a public-house up a court in Whitecross-street; the first time I pointed out no person; I went several times afterwards to other houses.

Q. Where was it you first saw the man that you thought robbed you - A. At a public-house by Hatton Garden; this was about a fortnight ago; Hancock, the officer, went with me.

Q. Were there many persons in the room - A. Yes, about eight or nine; among these I saw the prisoner at the bar was one; I knew him as soon as I saw him; I singled the prisoner out from among the rest. He said, mind what you say, you are certain that I am the man; I said, I am certain. He put his hand to his head, and appeared agitated. I am sure the prisoner at the bar is the person that robbed me.

Prisoner. Q. Can you swear to me positively since the 9th of November, about five months ago - A. I am sure you are the man.

JAMES HANCOCK . I am an officer. I was applied to about the 9th or 10th of November last. In consequence of information given me by the little boy, Barnes, I went about to a number of houses then, and for a long time afterwards, in search of the prisoner.

Q. How soon after you had any information was it that you apprehended the prisoner - A. On the 9th of April, I apprehended him in Great Shire-lane; a man of the name of Day gave me an information; I went into a shop in Great Shire-lane and went up stairs; as soon as the prisoner saw me, he asked me what I wanted with him; he asked me if I wanted him about a snow; I said, no; I wanted him about something else. Whilst going along with him to the office, I told him I wanted him for a highway robbery; he said, he did not care about that, or words to that effect. I put him into a room by the office with several others; Barnes came; I cautioned Barnes to be correct. He pointed him out directly; he made no hesitation at all. The prisoner then said, look at me again, be sure that I am the man; he said, I am sure you are the man that tripped me down; the prisoner was then take before the magistrate.

Q. The place where the boy described to you the robbery to have been committed, is properly laid in the indictment - A. Yes; in the parish of St. Luke, Middlesex.

Prisoner. Q. From the time of the robbery to the 9th of April, had you never seen me - A. Not to my knowledge.

Prisoner. This gentleman of whom the lad certifies, somebody said was hear in a butcher's shop.

Hancock. There was a man there of the name of Bullock.

COURT. Q. Who was this Bullock - A. A butcher that lives in the City-road. I sent for a person of the name of Bullock up to the office when information was first given, and he came of his own accord several times; I took him about to a great number of houses; the first information was given by Bullock.

COURT. Q. To Barnes. Did I understand you right; that you was knocked down, and somebody came across the road and picked you up - A. Yes.

Prisoner. Q. To Hancok. There was a man of the name of Fisher, who lives with the butcher; the magistrate ordered you to bring Fisher? I had nothing but a second examination - A. Neither Bullock nor Fisher were sure to the prisoner.

Prisoner. - Q. When Fisher saw me, did not he put his hands together, and say, my God! this is not the man; the man was about thirty years old, pitted with the small-pox. Did Bullock say I was the man - A. Bullock said, he did not think you was the man, but he could not speak positively.

RICHARD DAY . I am a writer to a law-stationer. The prisoner was an apprentice to a law-stationer. On the 1st of April last, between four and five in the afternoon, I met him by accident, in Lincoln's-inn-fields, I had known him four or five years before. We talked about respectable trades; and his conversation led me to believe he got his living by thieving. He informed me that he was in danger of being apprehended every minute, and that he apprehended that Garnan, the Westminster police officer, had two warrants against him; I asked him what they were for; he said, one or two pieces of Irish linen, out of Barbican. I asked him how he got it, and whether by a croke! croke is a slang word for house-breaking; he said no; from a boy. I asked him what the other was for; he said; from Peter-street, Westminster. I asked him how he got that; he gave an account how he got it; this conversation was on the 1st of April. I afterwards saw Hancock, and gave him some information; in consequence of which, the prisoner was apprehended; I saw Roberts again on the Saturday following; on the Sunday following the Saturday he was apprehended; he was not apprehended until the 9th of April.

Prisoner. Q. Were you ever in custody - A. I am not come here to convict myself.

COURT. Q. To Nash. Are the things here - A. We never found the things; they were never traced afterwards.

Prisoner's Defence. I met Day about the 1st of April, he asked me what I had been about, and what I was doing now; I said, I am looking out for bread in Shire-lane. He said he had been taken up on suspicion of stealing a watch, in Pickett-street. I asked him if he had a lodging to go home to; he said, no; so I gave him a shilling to got one. I wished to put off my trial until Monday, when I hoped to have this butcher here. I therefore throw myself entirely on the mercy of the court.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 20.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

592. RICHARD STACEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on 9th of May , a tea-caddy, value 10 s. the property of William Foy , privately in his shop .

ELIZABETH FOY . My husband's name is William Foy ; he keeps a turners shop , No. 16, Little Chapel-street, Soho, in the parish of St. Anns . On Tuesday, the 9th of May, about twelve o'clock at noon, the prisoner came into my shop; he asked for a box of dominos; we told him we had none; I told him that Mr. Foy was gone out, and probably he would bring some home. He asked what time he would be at home; I said, soon. He said he would call again at seven o'clock in the evening. I saw no more of the prisoner until two o'clock in the afternoon; I was in the parlour adjoining the shop, the door was open; there were some tea caddies standing near the counter. Afterwards I saw the prisoner brought into the shop with the tea caddy in his hand; I looked at the caddy; I knew it to be mine, and had seen it in the shop about a quarter of an hour before.

BENJAMIN CUTLER . I was in a shop opposite the prosecutrix's, about two o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner was looking into Mr. Foy's shop, peeping into it; he had a bricklayers apron on; he was looking very anxious towards this caddy. I spoke to a shopmate of mine to have an eye to the place, whilst I went out to the shop door; I saw the prisoner going along with the tea caddy under his apron; I saw the tea caddy; I went out of the door. and laid hold of him by the collar, with the tea caddy under his apron; I took him back to Mr. Foy's house; a constable was sent for, and he was taken into custody.

THOMAS FOY . I am an officer; I live next door to my brother, William Foy , I found the boy in the custody of Cutler; I took possession of the prisoner and the caddy.

Mrs. Foy. The tea caddy is the property of my husband.

Prisoner's Defence. I went into the prosecutrix's shop, I asked for a box of dominos; I came out directly, as the prosecutrix said she had none; I was standing at the door afterwards, some boys were there with the caddy, and they put it into my apron; this young lad came out, and said, I took it out of the shop. I know no more about it.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH .

[ The prisoner was recommended to mercy, by the prosecutor, on account of his youth, and good character .]

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

593. THOMAS HOOPER was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Stafford , on the 23rd of April last, and feloniously stealing therein, a feather bed, value 50 s. a bolster, value 8 s. two pillow-cases, value 3 s. three blankets, value 20 s. and two sheets, value 15 s. the property of the said William Stafford .

WILLIAM STAFFORD . I live at No. 75, Tower-street, Seven Dials . I had been out to church, on Sunday evening, and when I returned home, I was informed my door had been broken open; I was not there at the time it happened.

MARY PEMBROOKE. I was attending Mrs. Stafford as nurse. On the 23rd of April, I was up stairs at the time this happened. Mr. Stafford went out a after six o'clock, he was going to church; when he went out, I went into the kitchen; I went up stairs directly after, Mr. Stafford's little daughter went up stairs with me.

Q. What person were in the house at that time - A. I many persons; there were lodgers: the lodgers had separate rooms. Mr. Stafford had at that time, a shop, parlour, and bed room; it is a shop for ready made clothes. When I went up stairs I had locked the parlour door, and kitchen; the parlour opens into a yard, and it has another door that opens into the passage inside of the house; this inner door of the parlour was broken open; the door that opens into the yard was bolted; the door was locked, and the key was in my pocket. After I had been up stairs a little while, a young son of Mr. Stafford's came in, about seven o'clock; I gave the child some tea; then I looked at the parlour door, and went up again. Some time afterwards, I heard a noise; it was a little after seven o'clock, drawing on for dark; I went up stairs a second time, and then I heard a noise from below, it seemed like the cracking of a piece of deal; it was not quite dark then; I did not go down immediately, it may be nearly a quarter of an hour before I went down, more, or less, I cannot exactly say. When I went down, I saw the door open, and I saw a man with a bed on his back entering the passage, the man went on to the step, and out of the house; I followed him immediately, with a candle and candlestick in my hand, into the street, I called stop thief, and I learned that a young man stopped him of the name of John Vout ; I could just discern the man before me, he had a bed on his back.

Q. Had you left this bed in the room when you went up stairs - A. Yes; and locked the door, and put the key in my pocket.

Q. What was taken out of the room - A. The bed and all the entire bedding belonging to it; there was the bed, the bolster, two pillows, and pillowcases, three blankets, and a pair of sheets; all these things I left when I went up stairs.

Q. What is the bed worth - A. I cannot say, it is a good bed; I could not buy such a one under five pounds, the bolster about seven shillings or eight shillings, the pillows and cases nine shillings, the blankets are worth a pound, one is a new one, the sheets fifteen shillings; the bed things were with the bed; they are here. When I went into the parlour, I saw the lock of the parlour door had been forced off; that was the noise I heard the time before; the door had been forced open by two crows, two crows and part of the lock were produced before the magistrate.

Q. Had you ever seen the prisoner before, was he a lodger in the house - A. No, he was not.

Prisoner. Q. In the first place, when I was taken to the office, the prosecutrix swore it was between seven and eight o'clock; now she says it was between six and seven - A. I saw the place secure at seven o'clock, as I had left it.

JOHN VOUT . On the 23rd of April, as near as I can guess, about twenty minutes after eight o'clock, I was going up Tower-street; I met a man running with a bed and bedding on his back; I pursued him; I saw the last witness with a candle, hallooing out stop thief; she went a very little way from the door, and again she hallooed out stop thief. I turned about, and went after the man; there was nobody in the street besides me. I overtook the prisoner, he had the bed on his back, it was tied up in a blanket. I sprang on the bed, and pulled it off his back; the man ran off; I jumped over the bed, and went after him, and catched him in Little St. Martin's-lane, I took him after a deal of difficulty, he struck at me, and said the bed did not belong to me; he got from me again; I went after him a second time, I followed him up some considerable way; he said, I had no business with him, and I took him again, and I took him up to the house where he had taken the bed from: we got him into the passage; then I saw two women, and there was a mob about the door in the street; and I gave him up to the women; the women took the bed and bedding into the house. When I got back with the prisoner, the bed was gone from the place where I left it.

- GODDARD. I was constable of the night. I took the bed into the watch-house; the prisoner was brought to the watch-house about nine o'clock. The bedding and other articles, were brought by Maloney to the watch-house; they were put into my custody to keep; they have been at my house ever since; they are here now.

RICHARD SMITH . I took the prisoner into custody, I took him to the watch-house; I assisted in taking the bed and bedding along with Maloney to the watchhouse.

DAVID MALONEY . I took the prisoner and bed to the watch-house; I took the prisoner first, and then went back for the bed and bedding.

Q. To Prosecutor. Look at that bed and bedding, is it your property - A The bed and bedding is all my property; the whole of it is worth between five and six pounds.

Q. To Pembrooke. Is that Mr. Stafford's bed and bedding - A. It is.

Prisoner's Defence. I have nothing to say, I leave it to the gentlemen of the jury, and you sir. My friends were here, but they are now gone.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 34.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood .

594. SOLOMON SIMONS and THOMAS SMITH were indicted for feloniously making an assault on the King's highway, on Joseph Eglinton , on the 23rd of April last, and feloniously taking from his person and against his will, a watch, value 1 l. 10 s. the property of Joseph Eglinton .

JOSEPH EGLINTON . I am a carpenter ; I live at No. 34, Cursitor-street, Chancery-lane. On the 23rd of April last, I was in the Strand, I met the prisoner Smith, I came up to him; it was about a quarter before ten o'clock; at that time, I was at the end of Holywell-street; I never saw him before to my knowledge; he endeavoured to get into some kind of conversation with me; I took no heed of him; I kept on, and he kept on walking with me until we nearly reached Temple Bar; when we came to Star-court, (which is by the side of Temple Bar,) he spoke about turning up Star-court; I did not know for what purpose we were to turn into the court. We walked together within a few yards of Temple Bar; the prisoner, Simons, joined us about four or five yards from Temple Bar, he came as if from the road side; he came close to my right hand. All three of us passed through the Bar together; nothing occurred until we came close to Bell-yard; I turned up Bell-yard; they walked on with me, one on my right hand, and the other on my left, until we came to Apollo-court, in Bell-yard ; and then the prisoner, Smith, being on my left hand, struck me on my right breast, as near as I can say; I fell backwards completely on my back, on the pavement. The prisoner, Simons was on my right hand, close to me, and at the instant the blow was struck, I felt my watch go from me in an instant; it was in my breeches fob, on the right side; there was a ribbon, and a gilt key, to it, and a valuable seal. The prisoners ran away, immediately I heard them running. I never saw them before to my knowledge.

Q. Did they say any thing one to the other - A. They did not say any thing together that I heard, to my knowledge not a word passed from Simons to the other; if they did say any thing after it was done, I did not hear it. I never saw my watch again; the value of the watch is two pounds ten shillings, it cost me five pounds ten shillings. I am perfectly sure I had the watch at the time I was struck, I had felt it a few minutes before, and I likewise felt it drawn out of my pocket as I fell down; I was perfectly sober, I had not been in any public-house. Somebody picked me up. I was going to my own lodgings; this was the nearest way to my lodgings. I called out stop thief as I was laying on the stones; two watchmen came up, and said, had I called out stop thief, they could have secured them; they were not stopped at that time. I went home to my lodgings; and I had a thought that they were then lurking about Temple Bar, and it struck me that I would go out, and see if I could see any thing of them; I then went from my lodgings back again to Temple Bar, with intention to go into Pickett-street, to see if I could see any thing of them lurking about; I had a friend with me at the same time; we passed through the bar, I had scarcely got though it, before the alarm was given of stop thief, by a gentleman of the name of Jones. The prisoner, Simons, had been picking his pocket; the rattles were sprung upon the alarm of stop thief being given and several people were in pursuit; I, and my friend, went among the number, with the watchman, and in turning about from St. Clements, the prisoner, Simons, fell, he was running as if he was making for Essex-street, and in turning down he fell; Simons was then secured, and taken to the watch-house; I knew his person immediately, I was positive to his person, having joined me at Temple Bar, he looks very much like a Jew, that is the one that joined Smith at Temple Bar; he took my watch. The other was not taken then, he was Tuesday evening following; I was Smith was taken, two officers took him Bow-street, the other belonging to when he was at Bow-street, I at to his person; it was on the Monday taken, at his second examination sure of both the prisoners.

Prisoner Simons. Q. Were you drunk or A. Perfectly sober.

JAMES HUTHWAITE . I am a watchman of St. Clements parish. I apprehended the prisoner, Simons, on the 23rd of April, in the evening, he was with Mr. Jones, who accused him of picking his pocket of a pocket-book: Mr. Jones gave charge of him to take him into custody. He was walking by the side of Mr. Jones when he gave him in charge, just by St. Clements pillars.

Q. Then Mr. Jones had laid hold of him before you - A. Yes; when I laid hold of the prisoner, he ran; I called stop thief, I sprang my rattle, and with the assistance of other watchman, and the prosecutor, we took Simons; Eglinton was with me at the time I took the prisoner; the prosecutor, Eglinton, said, he would swear to Simons, was one of the two that knocked him down, and stole his watch. The prisoner said, he was innocent. I asked him what made him run away; he said, what should he stand to be taken for.

MICHAEL HONEN . On the 23rd of April last, about half past ten o'clock, I heard my partner's watchmen calling out stop thief, he sprang his rattle; I immediately ran to his assistance; I saw Simons running in St. Clements, by the end of Essex-street, he had a fall, the watchman and I catched him, and secured him. Eglinton gave charge of him for robbing him of his watch. I have had him several times in custody before for picking pockets, and riots in the street.

JOHN BEAN. I am a patrole. I know the two prisoners; I saw them together on Sunday, the 23rd of April, in Pickett street, Temple Bar; the first time I saw them was about half past eight o'clock; this was the first time I saw them that night; I sawthen after that, I was watching them from Wych Street to Temple-bar; I watched them till nine o'clock at that time; I watched them up and down Pickett-street, I saw them trying every gentleman's pocket they came nigh. The prisoner Simons get sight of me, he told Smith that he saw me.

Q. Did you hear him - A. I did not.

COURT. Then you should not say that.

Bean. Afterwards I turned back, and went into a public house, the public-house is at the end of Wych street the sign of the King's Head the prisoner Smith came into the public-house; he called for a pint of half and half, he gave a three shilling piece to change while he was looking at his change, in come Simons; they drank their liquor and went out, and I saw no more of them, I did not see any thing more of them till I saw Simons at the watch-house. The next morning the prisoner Simmons was taken to Bow-street, I went with Simons on Monday morning to the magistrate. I asked Eglinton if he could swear to the man. On Monday morning at Bow-street he said positively he could; which he did swear to him; I then gave him a description of the other man who was with Simons, and asked if he should know him again, he said he positively should, and that the man I had discribed, was the man. On the Tuesday following, I informed a Bow street officer, Archibald Ruthwin, and on Tuesday evening, Ruthwin and I went in search of Smith, we found him at the Dover Castle Dover street, St. George's Fields. We apprehended him, we began by informing him that he must go with us, he said, he wanted to see one man a bit by himself; and that he was taken on Simons's business. We told him that we took him for felony.

ARCHIBALD RUTHWIN . I was with Bean at the apprehension of Smith. When I got to him, I told him he must go along with me; he said he wished to speak to a young man in the skettle ground, I told him I had no objection; he sent a person for him, when the young man came, he whispered something to him; the young man said what are you going for, the young man answered in Soley's business, meaning Simons, Simons goes by the name of Soley; I asked what he had said to the young man, he said d - m my eyes, I did not speak.

Simon's Defence. I went into a house in Holywell-street; my prosecutor and that watchman came in together, I saw my prosecutor, and asked him to have a glass; I see them drink liquor, they both went out together; I drank my porter as to any thing further I do not know, except that I was taken to the watch-house by them.

Smith's Defence. About half past eight o'clock, when I was at the King's Head the corner of Pickett street, I called for a pint of half and half; the patrole came in, I asked him to drink, whilst he was drinking Simons came in, I asked him also to drink, I bid Simons go off, and I went down Fleet-street. I am very innocent of the crime that is charged against me.

SIMONS GUILTY - DEATH , aged 20.

SMITH GUILTY - DEATH , aged 32.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood .

595. JOHN COLE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of April , a lace veil, value 2 l. 18 s. the property of William Torrett , and David Perkins , privately in their shop .

WILLIAM TORRETT . I am a lace-man , my partner 's name is David Perkins . I have no other partner. I keep a lace shop , 286, High Holborn ; we commonly hang one large black veil inside the shop near the door, one was hanging there on the morning of the 19th of April; I hung it up in the shop near the door, about nine o'clock, about ten minutes, afterwards, more or less, I walked this way I found the veil had been removed, I made enquiry among our own people, if they had removed it; they had not. I did not see the prisoner near the shop; the veil was missed on Wednesday, on the Saturday following the officer brought the veil to our house, I knew the veil to be mine by the mark, it cost me two pounds eight shillings, the officer has it.

GEORGE VAUGHAN . I am an officer of Bow Street. On Wednesday the 19th of April, about half past nine in the morning, I saw the prisoner in company with another lad, I knew both their persons, I saw them running up Queen-street as if they were coming from Long Acre towards Holborn, Cole was first, they ran into Queen-street, and they took into Holborn, up Dean-street, into Eagle-street, in turning the corner of Dean street, Cole turned about as he turned the corner he saw me, and hastened his pace, and went up a gate-way; the other lad went up the other street from the gate way, as soon as I got to the gate-way, I saw something behind Cole's coat, as I turned into the gate-way, Cole was in the act of taking this veil from under his coat, he threw it down to his feet, the other prisoner run away, I secured the veil and the prisoner.

Q. Did you find any shop mark on the veil - A. Yes, I afterwards shewed the veil to Mr. Torrett.

(The veil produced and deposed to.)

Prisoner. That officer wants to swear my life away, I went up the gate-way to make water.

GUILTY aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex, Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

596. JAMES BURTON was indicted for feloniously making an assault, on the 15th of April , on Ann, the wife of Andrew Martin , and feloniously taking from her person, a shawl, value 12 s. the property of the said Andrew Martin .

ANN MARTIN . I am a fish woman , my husband's name is Andrew Martin . On Saturday evening between nine and ten o'clock on the 16th of April, I and a young women had been in the Borough, at Shoreditch church, I thought I would treat myself with a coach, I asked a coachman what he would take me to Cambridge Heath for, he asked me three shillings and six-pence, I told him I would not give three shillings and six-pence, he said are you going through a turnpike, I said no; he said what will you give, I said a shilling, he said, will not you give two, I said no, I would not; he said well then get in; the coachman came and put me into the coach, and this young woman was with me. The coachman said, I have a little business to do down the road, you will have the goodness to let me come into thecoach, with that he came in, and called the prisoner into the coach, the prisoner got into the coach, and set at the side of me, the coachman went on the opposite side. The coach went on.

Q. Do you know who drove the coach - A. No, I do not. It was a hackney coach, No. 737, the coach went through the bar; the prisoner unbuttoned his breeches, as we were going along, and I would not yield to his deceitfulness I was obligated of turning myself down upon my knees, then he struck me, he said if I did not yield to him, he would have my life. I told him I was a married woman and mother of a family, I held myself down on my knees. He struck me on the eye; and then he said if he could not have his will of me, he would have it of the young woman.

Q. Did he then do any thing to her - A. No, he then took my shawl off, and stuffed it into his breeches. I let down the sash and cried out, a gentleman was going by, whether he opened the door, or the coachman I cannot say, the coach stopped. The woman got out, and the coachman got out, and I got out, the prisoner staid in the coach; I saw the prisoner put my shawl into his breeches by the light of the lamps; I saw his person also; that is the man there at the bar. I asked him for my shawl, he would not give it me. The prisoner jumped up in the street into the coach; as soon as I got out, of the coach, I went home immediately, and the young woman with me; I told the coachman where the prisoner had put my shawl.

Q. Did you tell the gentleman the prisoner had the shawl in his breeches - A. That gentleman protected me home.

Q. Was he by when you told the coachman that the prisoner had got it in his breeches - A. He was by.

Q. Did you ever see your shawl again - A. No I have had an offer to be paid for it; an Attorney was with me yesterday, I had never seen the prisoner before nor the coachman.

Q. How long was it after that he was taken up - A. This was on Saturday, and on Monday I went to the office, and stated the case, the same as I have done it now.

SARAH GOLD . I was with the last witness. I am a servant, and had left my place on the Wednesday before, I lodge with Mrs. Martin the last witness, I had been with her into the Borough to buy some tea and sugar; I got into the coach with Mrs Martin; she got in first, I afterwards, the coachman asked if he might get in, he got in and called this man the prisoner, and said he was his brother. We asked him who this man was, he said he was his brother, when he got up, I saw him, I am sure he is the man. He sat on the opposite side; I did not see him offer any undecency, it was dark, I could not see; I heard them I asked him what he was at, he told me I had better hold my tongue or I should share the same ate. I saw nothing, I heard a bustling about; I told the prisoner she was a married woman, and would do nothing of the kind; he said he would have his will of one or the other, with that in a little time she got up and screamed out of the window, the coach stopped, the door was opened; I first got out of the coach, then the coachman jumped out, and then Mrs. Martin got out; I heard her ask him for the shawl, before she got out; he took an oath that he had not got it, that is all he said. We searched the coach for the shawl and could not find it.

Q. Did you search the coach with a light - A. The watchman did.

Q. To Mrs. Martin. What is the shawl worth - A. Fourteen shillings, I valued it at twelve shillings in the indictment.

Prisoner's Defence. On Saturday night between nine and ten o'clock, these two young ladies came and called a coach, when we pulled the coach up, they enquired whether Big Ben was there. We asked them were they were going, they said, to Cambridge Heath; they got into the coach, and the coachman and I, after them; the coachman had connexion with that young woman, and when we came near the Durham Arms, Mrs. Martin said I had robbed her of a shawl; she said she saw me stuff the shawl into my breeches.

JOHN DOBSON. I am a hackney coachman, I drive the coach. No. 737. On the night in question, I was called to by the two young women, the prisoner was in company with them. They asked what I would take them for to Cambridge Heath, I said three shillings and sixpence, they offered me a shilling, I told them, I could not go for that, after some further settlement we all four got into the coach together; a man of the name of Blackwood drove the coach, he proceeded to the Durham Arms, where we had some gin.

Q. Had anything happened before you had the gin - A. No, nothing at all; when we had the gin, we turned about into Shoreditch.

Q. How long did the coach stop - A. No longer than while we took the gin.

Q. What was the reason of your turning about - A. The women wished to have a longer ride.

Q. How far is the turnpike from the Durham Arms - A. A very little way, not a quarter of a mile, we went back to Shoreditch church, and then to the Durham Arms again. At the Durham Arms, Mrs. Martin said she had lost her shawl, James Burton had it; James Burton stood by the seat of the coach. We all got out one after the other, and the watchman was there, Burton said, search me, the watchman had his lanthorn; the women went one way, and we went the other, we went back to Shoreditch church, I live in Worship-street.

Q. Who proposed the gin - A. One of the women, she said they had a particular nice sort of gin there.

Q. Did you see anything pass between the prisoner and Ann Martin as she has been describing - A. No I did not, we were all in liquor together.

Q. Do you happen to know James Burton - A. Yes, he is a coachman his master is here.

COURT. When you stopped at the Durham Arms did you get out of the coach to drink the gin - A. No, it was given to us at the window, by the ostler, I do not know his name; I knew it was the ostler by his smock-frock.

Q. Had he any gin - A. No, he had none.

Q. Who paid for it - A. I paid for it myself.

Q. When you got down at the Durham Arms,were any body standing by at the time - A. Yes, several people about the Durham Arms.

Q. Did any person stop the coach or cause it to he stopped at the Durham Arms - A. The women said they would not go any further, I stopped it, Wood got down from the coach door, and opened it himself.

Q. What made the women say they would not go any further - A. Mrs. Martin lives but a quarter of a mile from the Durham Arms, I never saw her before.

Q. Did any body accompany the women - A. Not to my knowledge, I saw them walk towards their own home; I saw no person with them whatever.

Q. What became of the man Blackwood - A. I left him along with a party at the Durham Arms.

Q. Was he paid any thing for this treat - A. Not a halfpenny.

WILLIAM BLACKWOOD . Q. Did you on the night of this treat, drive the coach to the Durham Arms - A. Yes, I was not present when the women first came up; three persons got into the coach, and the coachman, I drove the coach to the Hackney Road, to the Durham Arms, when we came there, we had a pint of gin, the four inside the ostler and me; I drank with the four persons, whether the ostler drank, I cannot say. I got off the box, they ordered me to turn about, and I drove back to Shoreditch; I did so, and then I went back a second time to the Durham Arms. I pulled up beside the watchman; and the woman said she had lost her shawl, the watchman came over, and the woman got out; and one of the men staid in the coach, the watchman put his lanthorn into the coach. Burton said he was willing to be searched, he had not got any such thing about him.

Q. Did the woman insist on his being searched - A. No.

Q. Was the watchman called - A. Not till after the woman got out of the coach I am sure of that; she accused Burton with having her shawl. She said he had the shawl in his breeches, after the coach was stopped, she staid a good while after that talking with the patrole and watchman. and with several other persons, I left the woman talking with them.

The prisoner called three witnesses who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

597. GEORGE BROOM was indicted for feloniously making and assault on the King's highway, on the 9th of April , on Joseph Butler , and taking from his person a metal seal, value 1 s. and a metal key, value 6 d. the goods of the said Joseph Butler .

JOSEPH BUTLER . On the 9th of April, I was going down Shoreditch, I went down Swan-yard; it is a public thoroughfare, in Swan-yard, four men came by, and the prisoner run up against me, he was one of the four, whether they run against me accidently, or by design, I cannot say; as I was going up Slaughter-street , the prisoner tapped me on the shoulder, at the corner of Wheeler-street , he held me by the shoulder, and snatched my watch. I hallooed out murder; he did not get my watch, he got the key and seal; the chain broke; immediately I was knocked down by one of the party, I do not know which; as I was laying, I hallooed out, while I lay on the ground, the prisoner was stooping as if trying to get at my watch, as I thought; when I hallooed out, somebody made an alarm, and they then made their escape.

Q. Were more persons about you besides the prisoner - A. I did not see them; while I was down, I saw nobody about.

Q. Did you ever see your key or your seal again - A. No.

Q. What was the man's dress - A. I cannot say as to his dress. I am sure the prisoner is the person that ran against me.

CHARLOTTE PELLENEE . I am a weaveress. I was walking up Swan-yard, in company with Butler, he is a tin-plate worker; he was knocked down in Swan-yard; it goes from Shoreditch into Brick-lane, it is a common thoroughfare. Whilst we were in Swan-yard, we met four men, they seemed to be walking together; a man of the size and dress of the prisoner, he ran against Joseph Butler ; he was not talking with the other three; I and Butler were walking together. I think he could not help seeing me; I apprehended he ran against him for the purpose; I saw the prisoner's hand at Joseph Butler 's watch fob; I did not see him lay hold of any thing; he seemed feeling to see whether he could find a watch there or not.

Q. You did not take notice of him to know him again - A. No, I did not.

Q. How far did you go in Swan-yard - A. We went on till we came to the corner of Wheeler-street; there the man ran against him, as if he was going to throw him with both hands; Butler says, halloo, my friend, what are you at; I did not see any thing in the man's hands. I am not certain whether it was the prisoner or not. I thought the man's determination was to rob Butler; I saw three more rush forward on Butler, with dark great coats on; I saw that by the light of the lamp. Butler immediately hallooed out murder; I ran, and made an alarm myself; I went back again to the place where I left Butler; I found Butler with his coat all over mud, standing up, and from the violent blow he had received, his nose bled very much.

Q. You did not see any other person to notice them, but that one that ran against Butler - A. No. The three others past by us first, and presently after, the same three came back again, they had dark great coats on.

ANTHONY CAROLINE . I am an officer. I was with Kennedy, my brother officer; I was at the Swan public-house, in Swan-yard, on Wednesday, the 12th of April, and there we apprehended the prisoner, he was in the tap-room; we brought him from there to Worship-street office; he was drest in the same jacket as he is now.

COURT. Q. To Butler. Have you any doubt whether the prisoner was the man that came against you, and snatched at your watch-chain - A. I amsure he is the person; I knew him before by sight; I had seen him many times about the neighbourhood.

Q. Did you ever find your seal and key again - A No.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going by at the time there was this piece of work; I crossed over the way, and I suppose the people might take me to be one of them.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

598. ANN ROOKE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of April , a shawl, value 11 s. the property of Richard Taylor , privately in his shop .

ROBERT HAWKES . I am shopman to Mr. Richard Taylor , he lives in Piccadilly ; he is a linen draper . The prisoner came into our shop on the 18th of April, about ten o'clock in the forenoon, she asked to look at some cotton shawls; she said, she lived over the way, at a bakers shop. I took her to the counter in that part of the shop where the shawls were; I shewed her several; she fixed on one, and before she purchased it, she said, she should like her mistress to see it; I then let her have it, and she went out, and I saw her go into the shop of Mr. Johnson; she staid there about five or ten minutes, she then came over, she returned to the shop with the shawl, saying, her mistress thought it was not good enough. She said, she thought, she would like one in the window; there were several in the window; she pointed one out in the window; after seeing it, she said, she wanted some scaffs; which I shewed her; she then fixed on one; she then said, that she wished her mistress (who lived over the way) might see it, before she purchased it, that she might not think her too extravagant; she then said, how can I get my mistress over; have you a housekeeper? I will say you want to pay your bread bill; she said, she might not cross directly over, for fear of her mistress seeing her; she went out, and instead of crossing over, she went up the next street; I then followed her; I overtook her two doors up, and said, she must return back to the shop with me; she hesitated a little at first, and afterwards went with me; when she was in the shop, I told her we wanted to know about the shawl; on which, she began to take a shawl out of her pocket; she said, she would pay me for it, but said, let her go; I told her she must not go before I fetched a constable; I fetched the constable; I gave her in charge to him.

Q. Had you known the prisoner before - A. No, I had not; she was not servant to Mr. Johnson, as she said, I am sure of that; she never had been her servant.

Q. Had you bread of Johnson - A. Yes, Mr. Taylor's house-keeper had. The constable has the shawl; I had seen that shawl a few minutes before I found it on her; I had shewn it to her among other shawls, the value of it is eleven shillings.

JOHN KNIGHT . I am a constable. I was sent for to take the prisoner into custody. (The shawl produced, and deposed to by Hawkes, as the shawl that was taken out of the shop, and as Mr. Taylor's property, having his private mark upon it.)

Prisoner's Defence. I have nothing to say in my defence.

JURY. Q. To Hawkes. Did you see the prisoner take this shawl away - A. No. I suspected her after she went from the shop.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 24.

[ The prosecutor recommended the prisoner to mercy, on account of its being her first offence .]

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr, Baron Wood .

599. EDWARD WEBB was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Hannel Mendes Dacosta , on the night of the 12th of April , and burglariously stealing therein, four silver spoons, value 2 l. one sheet, value 3 s. one brush, value 1 d. the property of Catherine Harley , spinster ; and two bank notes, value 2 l. the property of the said Hannel Mendes Dacosta.

HANNAH THORNTON . I lived as cook with Mrs. Dacosta; Mrs. Dacosta lived at No. 41, Great Prescott-street .

Q. Do you know what parish it is in - A. No, I do not. His house was broken into on the 12th of April. I went to bed about half past eleven; the other servants were left up, I left them up in the kitchen; before I went to bed the doors and windows of the kitchen were all fastened; I had fastened them myself. I arose next morning about twenty minutes past four, it was drawing towards day-light; the house maid and me came down to the street door; we first went into the kitchen a little after five. After we had been at the street door, we went up to our bed room again. We went down because there was a man rung at the door; the man asked if any body was sent from there with a bundle; we said, no. He said, he wanted to see the house; we said, we could not open the door at that time in the morning. A little after five, a ring of the bell came again; we went into the drawing-room; from there we went into the kitchen, when we came into the kitchen, we found the kitchen doors open; we then went out at a door that opens into the passage to come up to the parlour; I do not know whether that door was shut or not. I found all the things in other parts to where I left them the night before; we found the bread and meat which had been put into the pantry the night before, was standing on the kitchen table; we observed both the back doors of the room unbolted; one back door goes into the back yard, the other door goes in a yard, seperate from the kitchen; they were both unbolted. I bolted them myself the night before I went to bed. The sky-light was broke; there is a sky-light over the sink; the skylight was broke, some of the frame work was broke, and some glass was taken out.

Q. Was it broke so as to enable any person to get in - A. Yes; then when they went into the kitchen, they unbolted the back door, and by that means they were capable of getting into the back yard, and there is a gate in the back yard that takes them into the tenter ground.

Q. What then did you miss - A. There was some money missing out of a gentleman's writing desk, it is a small desk with a drawer; I had put some money there the night before, one pound some shillings; there were two one-pound notes in the kitchen taken; there was a small trifle of money taken out of the house besides, but where it was, I do not particularly know; there were two towels, and a pair of shoes of mistress's; I had seen these things all safe the day before.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar - A. No; I had never seen him before the robbery.

Q. You have seen some of the things since - A. I have, some.

Q. Can you speak to the notes - A. No, I could not.

CATHERINE HARLEY . I am house-maid to Mr. Hannel Mendes Dacosta.

Q. How late that night of the robbery, did you go to bed after the cook went to bed - A. I was up at twelve o'clock; I was last up.

Q. Had you opened the back doors after the cook went to bed - A. No, they were neither of them opened; they had not been opened after the cook fastened them to my knowledge.

Q. Do you know whether the sky-light was broke before you went to bed - A. I never know of it.

Q. Did you get up at any alarm at the same time the cook did - A. Yes.

Q. Afterwards in consequence of somebody giving you information, you went into the kitchen with the cook - A. Yes, I did; I found the back doors both standing open, I observed then the sky-light, over the sink, the frame was broke, and the glass was taken out; so that there was a space large enough for any body to come in.

Q. Do you know how high the sky-light is above the sink - A. No very great height.

Q. Did you endeavour to trace how a person might come in that way - A. I did get down that way.

Q. Did you observe the place, were there any footsteps or marks there - A. I did not observe that. There was no other part of the kitchen broke.

Q. Had any person gone out by the kitchen door - A. The kitchen door was wide open; there was a middle door that was fastened; the kitchen door was wide open; it was not locked. I do not know whether we shut it to or not. The middle door, which is a door in the kitchen, was fastened.

Q. Can any body come out of the outer part of the house into the kitchen, without passing through the middle door - A. No, they cannot.

Q. Did you miss any thing out of the kitchen - A. A shawl belonging to me; I lost them out of my drawer in the kitchen, a middle drawer, that is my drawer; a sheet and a frock belonging to my mistress, that I was at work on, on the over night, that was gone; and two shillings and sixpence in silver, belonging to me.

Q. What else - A. Four silver table spoons, they were under my care; I had seen them the day before, I make use of them every day.

Q. What place where they in, the kitchen - A. I cannot say whether I had laid them in the closet or not; they are Mr. Dacosta's; a pair of shoes of master's, were taken, and a clothes brush.

JOHN FORRESTER . I am an officer. On the 12th of April, between three and four o'clock in the morning, I met the prisoner; I was on duty, I was in the Minories; it was dark; it might be about two hundred or three hundred yards from Mr. Dacosta's house; he had two bundles in his hand, he was walking, coming down from that part where Mr. Dacosta's house is; I turned round on my heels, and walked along side of him, he was by himself. I asked him what he had got in the bundles; he wanted to know the reason I asked; I told him, I must do what I generally did, know what were in the bundles. He said, one was a parcel he was going to send down to his mistress at Portsmouth; he said, his mistress was Mrs. Dacosta, I asked him what that other bundle was; he said, provision, bread and meat. I asked him whether he was going to send his mistress provision; he said, no; that was for himself; he was going by the ten o'clock coach, and the parcel was going by the five o'clock coach. I asked him what capacity he was in at Mrs. Dacosta's; he said, footman to Mrs. Dacosta. I then asked him where did Mr. Dacosta live; he said, No. 41, Prescott-street, Goodman's fields; that is Mr. Dacosta's house. We walked together until we came to the watchhouse; I said, young man, you can have no objection to go over the way, I am not satisfied; I laid hold of his arm; he made no resistance; we went into the watchhouse, and I examined the bundles. When I came to look at him by the light, I knew he was not a footman; he had a dirty check apron on. I asked him if he had any objection to my going down to Dacosta; he said, no I said, what name am I to ask for if I go. He said my name is Johnson. I left him in the watchhouse, and went to Mr. Dacosta's, rung the bell, and two women servant came to the door, they would not let me in; I went again between five and six o'clock in the morning, they spoke to me at the window; I told them they had been robbed; I entered the house, found the windows of the house all safe; we went into the back yard, we found the outer shutter broken open.

Q. The shutter that was in the yard - A. Yes. We went into the kitchen; we found the frame of the sky-light split: there was an entrance there, so that they could get into the kitchen. I examined the kitchen with the servants; the servants said what they had lost. I went back to the watchhouse, I searched the prisoner's person; I found exactly the money the servants said they had lost; two one-pound bank notes, a three-shilling piece, seven single shillings, and half-a-crown; that was all the money that was lost; he had exactly the money.

JOHN RAY . I went along with Forrester into the watchhouse. I know nothing of the transaction, but, that the prisoner was brought into the watch-house with the other officer; he had the bundles with him; the bundles were examined on his being brought, and his person was afterwards searched.I went to Dacosta's house in company with Forrester.

Q. Did you find the house in the state that Forrester has represented - A. Yes, I did. The kitchen goes right along from the passage. I got a pair of steps to get into the kitchen from the yard; the top of the kitchen is tiled; I went out over it. I found some wood, which matched to the place where the sky-light had been broken away; there had also been feet marks in the gutter. On my return from Dacosta's, at the watchhouse, I took this shawl off the prisoner's neck, I took these shoes off his feet, and the pair of stockings from his legs, after he had been examined before the magistrate, the same day.

Q. In what parish is Dacosta's house - A. In the parish of St. Mary Malfellon.

Q. Do you know that Dacosta's name is Hannel Mendes Dacosta - A. Yes; I have seen him write his name; he is dead since.

COURT. Q. To Catherine Harley . Q. You was house-maid to Mr. Dacosta - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know that shawl the officer produced - A. Yes, it is mine; I have had possession of it two or three years; the sheet I can speak to, I had seen it on that night; it is Dacosta's property; the spoons were in my charge.

Q. At the time of the robbery, had Mr. Dacosta any man servant of the name of Johnson - A. He had not a man servant at all of that name; he had no man servant at the time of the robbery.

Q. Was Mrs. Dacosta out of town at the time of robbery - A. She was in town.

Q. Had you ever seen the prisoner before - A. I had never seen him before until I saw him at the office.

COURT. Q. To Hannah Thornton. Look at these stockings - A. They are mine; I cannot speak to the shoes; I know the two towels to be my mistresses; I can speak to the two one-pound notes.

Prisoner's Defence. As for the bundles, I took them up in the street, after I had just met a man. The money that is there is my own, that I had to pay my carriage to Portsmouth, three pounds ten shillings and sixpence.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 19.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

600. GEORGE BROOM was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of March , a watch, value 2 l. and a watch key, value 2 d. the goods of Christopher Mason from his person .

CHRISTOPHER MASON . I lost my watch, on the 27th of March between ten and eleven in the morning; I was in Globe Fields, Bethnal Green ; I was standing there, the prisoner came and stood at the right hand of me, and afterwards, I missed my watch, I did not observe it go.

Q. Was there a crowd there - A. No, only a parcel of people standing about the houses.

Q. Did you observe the prisoner go from you - A. No, I cannot say I did.

Q. Had you known the person of the prisoner before - A. No, but I took particular notice of him, standing by the side of me.

Q. How soon did you see the prisoner again - A. Not till he was apprehended, on Wednesday or Thursday the week following, he was apprehended by Caroline and Kennedy.

Prisoner. Can you swear it was me that took your watch - A. You was the person that stood near to me.

WILLIAM REYNOLDS. I know Christopher Mason , he is a weaver, and I am a silk weaver. On the 27th of March, Easter Monday, I was in Globe Fields, I live in that neighbourhood. I was standing near to Mason, I saw the prisoner come and stand near to Mason, the prisoner, the identical same man, he placed himself at his right hand as close as he could get; there were full thirty people standing at the same stand, there was almost a mob. I saw the prisoner take Mason's watch; the prisoner looked sharply at Mason's breeches; there was a black ribbon hanging out, the prisoner passed by him; and took a second look at Mason's breeches, I withdrew from the prisoner about a yard; he laid hold of the ribbon with his right hand, and drew the watch from his pocket, he took the watch in his left hand, and put it into his jacket pocket. He withdrew from the mob, and turned into the next street; I kept my eye upon him from first to last; I think he took notice of my watching him; he returned back into the mob, and there I lost him. Mason missed his watch, and gave the alarm of being robbed; I said nothing to him. He made an attempt at my jacket pocket first, that induced me to watch him.

ANTHONY CAROLINE . I apprehended the prisoner on the 12th of April, I could not find him before, nothing was found upon him. Kennedy was with me, he knows no more.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

601. ROBERT SHOWELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of December , a horse, value 1 l. the property of Richard Hambridge .

RICHARD HAMBRIDGE . I am a butcher , I live near Epping Forest. I lost a horse three years old, I bought it in June last, I gave four pounds for it; I turned it out on Epping Forest soon after Michaelmas; I missed it the day after Christmas day, I had not seen it for six weeks before, I took his tail off, and docked his main; it had a very long tail, and a very strong main, I cut marks to make my letters; I saw the poney again, the beginning of the month of March, between Dalton and Kingsland; I enquired who the poney belonged to, I was sent to Mrs. Mitchell, a grocer in Kingsland; she was the person that owned the horse; I brought a police officer and she said at last she bought it of the prisoner.

Q When did she say that - A. On Saturday week, at Worship-street office; I was at the office when Sarah Mitchell saw the horse, the horse was in the stable; it was my horse, it had got my marks on it, although it was so altered.

SARAH MITCHELL . I live in Vincent-street in the parish of Shoreditch. I am a married woman; I saw the poney at the stable keepers, faceing the office, not so long as a fortnight ago, I think it was last week; one of the officers shewed it me, Mr. Gleed he is here; I bought that poney of the prisoner at he bar I cannot say positively it is the same poney, it is so much altered. On the 30th of December last I saw my two sons at my door with a poney they had been to Charles-court to Robert Shadwell , who as we were informed had been at our house to offer a poney; I suspected the prisoner, I asked him if that was the poney, he said it was; I asked whether Mr. Kemp had seen it, he came to the door and looked at it, I said the horse looks very like as if it had got some disease, and asked for what reason he was going to sell it, he said he was going to Bath, I asked him how long he had had it, he said, a few weeks or days I am not certain which; I then refused to buy it; I said it looked very poor, as if it had some disease, he took it away and said I will take it to Smithfield to sell it. When he was gone, my son cried after the poney; I sent my man after him, he brought Mr. Shovell along with him; I said, Mr. Showel you may as well come back with the poney, I had told him what the boys were crying after; I asked what was the lowest he would take for it, he said thirty shillings, he came into the counting house, and I paid him thirty shillings for it. My son, and the man took it to the stable, I think I kept it about a fortnight, I sold it to a customer of the name of Richardson.

JAMES RICHARDSON . Q. Do you remember seeing a poney at Mrs. Mitchells - A. Yes, I cannot tell the day of the month. it was a small poney a stone-horse; I sent a man of the name of Hasland he bought the poney for thirty shillings, of Mrs. Mitchell, or there abouts, I saw it delivered to Harland; I saw the poney after Harland had it about fourteen days or thereabouts; afterwards I bought it of Harland myself, I was to give him two guineas for it. I had it about a month, and when it was out one day, a man, Hambridge was going by, he said to me it is my poney, this was about the end of February; he asked me where I had got it, I saw the poney after it was delivered to the officer, I saw it in the street, with Hambridge's letters upon it. I thought the poney was the same that I bought, but I was not sure of it. As I am upon my oath, when I say it is the poney, I mean, I think it is, I had no doubt it is the same poney, none at all, I have never seen the poney since.

- GLEED. I am an officer of Bow-street, I and Armstrong apprehended the prisoner at his house in a court in Charles-street Bethnal green, I apprehended him on Saturday the 29th of April, I found him at home, he is a labouring man, and goes with a jack ass. I took him to the office. On the Tuesday following the poney was brought over the way to the stable. I took Mrs. Mitchell over the way to see it.

JOHN ARMSTRONG . I apprehended the prisoner on Saturday, in company with Gleed, in consequence of a letter, I found the prisoner in bed at six o'clock I and Gleed were waiting in the court till two o'clock in the morning; he did not come home. On Friday the information was taken at the office.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going home, on Saturday after Christmas selling my goods; I met a man with a poney, he asked me to buy it; he asked me one pound for it, there was a man who see me pay the money for it.

JOHN GREEN . I am a publican, I keep the sign of the coach and horses; I remember the prisoner in the month of December buying a horse at my door; he asked me for a light, I saw the prisoner and another man; they were both strangers to me, I saw the prisoner pay the other man eighteen shillings for the poney.

Q. Did you say anything - A. I did not. After the prisoner had paid the eighteen shillings down for the poney, he asked him for his address, the man said write the address down; I wrote down this address. (An address shewn him.) I wrote it at the request of the prisoner. Denis Mead , Eastham Essex; I still keep the same public-house at Bow. I have made enquiry last week at Eastham. for a person of the name of Dennis Mead , and could not find such a person. Last Monday week a friend of the prisoners came down to my house and asked me if I recollected such a poney being sold at my house.

Q. Did you on that go to Worship-street - A. Yes, on Tuesday, and that paper of the address was produced.

Q. Should you know the man who gave that address - A. I should if I was to see him.

Mrs. Mitchell. The prisoner told me he bought the poney of a neighbour who lived at Eastham, and a publican see him pay the money for it.

The prisoner called three witnesses to his character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

602. WILLIAM HARLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of February , nine pounds weight of white pepper, value 27 s. the property of William Ryde and Thomas Vincent .

JOHN BICKHAM MOODY . I am an apprentice to Mr. William Ryde and Thomas Vincent , they are wholesale grocers in Cannon-street; the prisoner has been their porter about seven or eight months. On the 28th of March, I went to his house, between two and three o'clock in the middle of the day; I found him at home and no one else; on my going into his house; I found the prisoner sitting on a bag and under his apron, I thought I saw something white, I wished to send him on an errand; on his raising up, I asked him what he had under his apron I went to him with the intention of sending him out, I took from him what he had under his apron; it proved to be a bag containing white pepper, a canvas bag containing nine pounds; I took it from him, and sent him out of an errand, on his return back he said he had found this bag in a corner. I told him he must take it to our house; we had a cask of white pepper, we examined it, and found the cask deficient thirty pounds weight. The pepper in the bag, is precisely the same as in the cask; I havenot the least doubt that the pepper was taken out of the cask. The value is about twenty seven shillings, I gave it to the parish officer.

JAMES DOMVILLE . I received the bag of pepper from Mr. Moody; it has been in my possession ever since.

WILLIAM RYDE . Robert Vincent is my partner. The prisoner had twenty-two shillings a week.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Fined 1 s. and discharged.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

603. WILLIAM GARCIA was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of April , a gold watch-key, and seal, value 20 s. the goods of Thomas Rose .

THOMAS ROSE . I live at No. 17, Newgate-street, I am a fringe manufacturer . On the 26th of April, I lost a seal and watch-key, the corner of Bishopsgate-street and Leadenhall-street ; about ten o'clock in the evening, I was returning towards home, a minute before I had seen the seal and key safe, they were fastened to my watch by a ribbon; it was a gold seal; two men came behind me, and pushed me forwards; immediately the prisoner came in front of me, and made a snatch at my seal and key; the ribbon was torn away from the watch. I went a few paces afterwards, and I saw a watchman, I mentioned it to him.

Q. Did you pursue after him - A. I did; I saw the prisoner's face remarkably plain, by the light of the pastry cooks shop; he walked away, and I walked after him; the prisoner turned up the market.

Q. Did you ever lose sight of him - A. I did, for a quarter of an hour; afterwards I saw the prisoner with two other persons walking up Leadenhall-street again; I told the watchman of that; he followed them down Gracechurch-street; the watchman apprehended the prisoner, and the other two set off directly. The prisoner was searched; neither the seal nor the key were found on him. I am quite sure of this man, who laid hold of my watch seal, and key.

Q. What is the seal worth - A. I gave eighteen shillings for it.

Q. Have you never said, it was two or three quarters of an hour after you lost sight of him, before you saw him again - A. No.

Q. Did you make no attempt to secure the other two persons - A. I did not.

WILLIAM SANDFORD . I am a watchman; my box is the corner of Leadenhall-market. I saw a young man there, who told me he had been robbed; three men were coming up the street arm in arm together; I said, are you sure which is your man, that when they come up, I may lay hold of the right. He picked out this man from the three; I took hold of him, and the other two walked away. I took the prisoner the other way to what the other men were going; they were off in an instant; I cannot positively say whether they walked or run. I searched the prisoner; I found nothing on him.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing at all of the transaction, any more than a child unborn.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

604. JAMES CARPENTER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of April , four papers of nails, called tacks, value 2 s. 6 d. the property of Henry Downer .

HENRY DOWNER . I am an ironmonger , in Fleet-street . The prisoner was my porter , he had lived with me more than two years. On the 26th of April, at eight o'clock in the evening, he was going out on an errand, and as soon as he had got into the street, I brought him back again. I told him I suspected he had some property of mine about his person; I sent him into the house; he said, I migh-search him. These nails I found in an inside pocket of his jacket; they are four papers of small nails; they have my private marks upon them.

Q. Did the prisoner give any account how he came by them - A. No; he only begged for mercy.

Q. What is the value of these papers - A. Two shillings and sixpence.

STEPHEN SMITH . I searched the prisoner in the presence of Mr. Downer; I found four papers of nails; we counted them, they were five hundred.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 56.

Confined one year , and whipped in Jail .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

605. JAMES HEWITT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of April , a watch, value 35 s. a chain, value 2 s. a seal, value 1 s. and a key, value 6 d. the property of Thomas Salisbury .

THOMAS SALISBURY . I live at Hoxton; I am an excise watchman . On the 28th of April, at six o'clock in the evening, I was in Bishopsgate-street, between Skinner-street and Primrose-street , I lost my watch; I was going home; I had been on duty at the Custom House; I was as sober as I am at this minute. The prisoner met me, and looked me full in the face; and snatched at my watch; I missed it, turned round, and cried out, stop thief; he turned up Skinner-street; when I got to the corner of Skinner-street, the prisoner was not in my sight; he had gone through a public-house in Skinner-street; I pursued after him; I found the constable had got hold of him. I saw my watch afterwards in the hands of the constable. I am quite sure the prisoner is the man who snatched at my watch; the prisoner was a stranger to me; the watch is worth thirty shillings.

JAMES POOL . I saw the prisoner running up Skinner-street; I heard the prosecutor call out, stop thief. I saw the prisoner ran up Skinner-street, I saw him go through a public-house, and then I saw him come down a court, and came out into Bishopsgate-streetagain; I saw him chuck the watch away, and I picked it up, and then the constable had hold of him. I gave the watch I picked up to the constable. I had seen the prisoner once or twice before; I am quite certain he is the man I saw running, and who threw away the watch.

JOHN WATMAN . I am a constable. I heard the cry of stop thief; I pursued the prisoner, and stopped him. The watch was given me by Pool; Salisbury claimed the watch; I have kept it ever since.

Prisoner's Defence. I was running along Shoreditch; I went into this public-house, and came out in this passage where the constable laid hold of me, and I was charged with stealing a watch.

GUILTY , aged 18.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

606. JOHN RICHARDS and JOHN CLARK were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of April , a coat, value 5 s. five waistcoats, value 15 s. a pair of trowsers, value 30 s. a pair of breeches, value 20 s. three pair of drawers, value 2 s. twenty-four pair of stockings, value 24 s. and nineteen handkerchiefs, value 15 s. the property of Joseph Colbin Hodson ,

JOSEPH COLBIN HODSON . I live at No. 17, Baltic-street, Old Street-road. On the 24th of April, I lost this wearing apparel particularized in the indictment, at the Cross Keys, in Gracechurch-street ; I was going by the Woolwich coach; the prisoner, Richards engaged me as a servant . Richards applied to me on the 5th, of April, in consequence of an advertisement I put in the papers; he came to me, and said, he wanted to engage me for a friend of his; he mentioned no name, any more than he said it was at Woolwich. When we came to Gracechurch-street, the prisoner went into the Spread Eagle, and he came out, and said, we must go over to the Cross Keys, the coach is there. I took my box myself; I put my box down on a step at a door, and carried it into the passage of the coffee-room; he asked the waiters if the box would be safe; they said, yes. I left my box in the passage, as the waiters said it would be safe. I sat down on the opposite side to the prisoner; he talked about my character. He called for a glass of negus; he paid for it, and gave the waiter two-pence; presently after, the Woolwich coachman went up the passage, and gave notice that the coach was ready, and asked whose coach I wanted. The waiter came into the coffee-room, and said to Richards, is there a gentleman going to Woolwich; the coachman also said to him, are you going to Woolwich; no, he said; what do you ask me such a foolish question; the coachman took no notice, but left us. The prisoner said, he would go by the next coach, a quarter before eight. He then asked me, if I had any white stockings; (I had boots on,) he said, you will not want boots, as the place I was to go to was a tavern. I told him I had plenty of white stockings. He said, there is one thing yet to be mentioned, that is, have you any white aprons; I said, if I want aprons, I can soon get them. Soon after this, Clark came in with a note to Richards; Richards looked at the note, and asked the prisoner, Clark to come inside the house. By their conversation, I learned that it was a bill. Clark went out; my trunk was still before me. After Clark went out, Richards called for a sheet of paper, and wrote a note, and wished me to take the note to a Mr. Jones, in Bull and Mouth-street, and ask him for his box coat, and in the mean while, he would go into the Poultry to search more into my character. On coming out of the room, he said to the waiter, take care of these things, let nobody have them, (pointing to my trunk,) they will be very safe here, will not they waiter; the waiter said, perfectly safe. We came out of the house together, he to go into the Poultry, and I to Bull and Mouth-street; he stopped at the gateway, and told me not to be long, or else I should lose the coach. I made the best of my way, but could not find Mr. Jones; there was no such person there. I returned back immediately to the Cross Keys, and I found that my box was gone; I went into the coffee-room, and made enquiry; I could not find either of the prisoners, Richards or Clark.

Q. Did Richards describe who Clark was - A. No. I next saw my box at Bow-street, on the 26th or 27th of April, and all the contents, except a pair of shoes. I lost the things on Monday, the 24th; I gave information of my loss on Tuesday morning; I then went instantly to the Cross Keys to find Richards, I stopped there until near nine o'clock.

Q. Have you been into the tavern at Woolwich - A. No; I never heard any thing of that place since. I saw Richards two or three times between the 10th and the 24th of April, at my lodgings in Baltic-street, he came to me there; I never saw Clark there. Richards came to me there in a hackney coach.

COURT. Q. The trunk remained in the same state until you left the coffee-room - A. It did. When we left the house, the waiter took care of it, into his own custody; the waiter's name is Joseph Brooks .

JOSEPH BROOKS . I am a waiter in the coffee-room of the Cross Keys. The two prisoners were strangers to me. On the 24th of April, I was in the coffee-room when both Richards and Hodson came in; they brought in luggage; Richards desired me to take charge of the luggage, and asked me if I thought it was safe there; Hodson put it down. I saw Clark come in with a letter, he delivered it to Richards. After Richard had read the letter, he called for a sheet of paper. After this letter was wrote, Hodson and Richards went out; Richards asked me if the luggage would be safe until he returned. Hodson and Richards both went out together. I did not see Clark any more. I saw Richards again in about ten minutes, he returned into the coffee-room, and asked me if I could get a porter for him to take the luggage; I got a porter; Richards went away with it. Hodson came back in about ten minutes or a quarter of an hour,when he returned, he made enquiries for his luggage, and for Richards. Richards never returned. I never saw the trunk again until I saw it at Bow-street; I am quite sure that the trunk I saw at Bow-street, was the trunk Richards and Hodson gave me in charge.

WILLIAM BROWN . I am a bricklayer. On the 24th of April, about eight o'clock, I saw Richards and Clark in a public-house.

Q. To Hodson. About what time was it that you get back from Bull and Mouth-street - A. About twenty minutes before eight o'clock.

Q. To Brown. Where is that public-house - A. In Kirby-street, Carnaby market. They had this trunk with them; which was afterwards claimed by Hodson. I had seen Richards before. Richards asked me if I was going home; I told him, yes. He told me he would give me a ride in a coach; he put the box into the coach, he me, and Clark, all three, went into the coach. The box was left at my house; he said, he had got it of a young man, who wanted a waiters place, and he would endeavour to get him a situation. I saw the box opened by Clark and Richards; I do not know which it was that opened it; they were both present the time it was opened; it was corded up; I believe it was not locked; the articles were most of them taken out; on the 25th of April it was opened; they both lodged in my house the night before. The same day it was opened, the 25th, two Bow-street officers came to my house; they took the box and its contents, together with Richards and Clark.

Q. Did Richards lodge with you before - A. No.

Q. Where did he lodge before that night - A. I do not know.

SARAH BROWN . I am wife to the last witness. While the prisoners were in my room, Richards asked me if I could dispose of some of the articles. I never saw Clark before, nor Richards but once. They told me the things belonged to themselves; I found by their account, that they did not belong to them. I did not dispose of any of the articles. I met Dickens, the officer, in Church-street.

- DICKENS. I am a Bow-street officer. I went after some other business to Brown's house. both the Browns gave me information; in consequence of which, I apprehended the two prisoners, Richards and Clark, on a charge of taking this box. I found the prosecutor the next day. I asked Richards and Clark where they got the box; they refused to tell me. The trunk and its contents were claimed by Hodson.

- BATEMAN. When they were taken, I took a pair of shoes out of Clark's pocket; they were afterwards claimed by Hodson.

Prosecutor. The trunk, and the articles are my property.

Richards's Defence. I saw an advertisement of a situation wanted down at Woolwich; I went to this person; I have been in great distress, I am very much in debt; I intended to take it back again.

RICHARDS, GUILTY , aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

CLARK, NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

607. GEORGE REDGRAVE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of May , a silk handkerchief, value 5 s. the property of Sir Freeman Barton , from his person .

SIR FREEMAN BARTON. On the 1st of May, about ten o'clock at night, I was going along the Strand , towards Cecil-street, and at Adam-street, in the Adelphi, in the Strand, a gentleman tapped me on the shoulder, and pointing to a man, said, that man has taken your pocket handkerchief; I felt for my handkerchief, and found it was gone. I followed the man, calling out stop thief; he turned into the road; I laid hold of him, and gave him in charge to the watchman; when I gave him in charge, there was a great hustling about his person; he made away with the handkerchief at that time.

GEORGE HARRISON . I was going along the Strand, in company with William Webster . I saw seven or eight suspicious looking men, and when they passed me, one of them got between Sir Freeman Barton and myself; I very clearly saw the prisoner, Redgrave, take the handkerchief from the gentleman's pocket; I immediately tapped Sir Freeman Barton on the shoulder, and pointed to the prisoner, saying, that man has taken your handkerchief; Sir Freeman Barton took hold of the prisoner; the prisoner rushed by Sir Freeman Barton about three yards. I am sure the prisoner is the same person that took Sir Freeman Barton's handkerchief. I never lost sight of him until we got to the watch-house.

WILLIAM WEBSTER . I was along with George Harrison , by Adam-street; I heard George Harrison tell Sir Freeman Barton, that his pocket was picked by the prisoner; he pointed to the prisoner.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY, aged 21.

Judgment respited .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

608. JOHN CAMPBELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of April , two shirts, value 1 l. the property of Hugh Rose .

MARGARET ROSE . My husband's name is Hugh Rose. On Monday, the 28th of April, I lost my shirts; they were drying in the yard; my neighbour, Thomas Radcliff took the prisoner just outside at the house, and brought him back into the yard, with the shirts on him.

THOMAS RATCLIFFE . I am a carpenter; I was going up to my yard; from information, I pursued the prisoner; I saw the prisoner taking two shirts out of his hat; I seized the prisoner; he is a watchman of Mary-le-bone parish .

- CUTRY. I am an officer. The prisoner was given to me, with the shirts. I produce the shirts.

Mrs. Rose. These are the shirts that were hanging up in the yard; they are my shirts.

Prisoner's Defence. I am a watchman of Mary-le-bone parish; about six o'clock that evening, I met two boys, they asked me fifteen shillings for them shirts.

GUILTY , aged 33.

Confined six months , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

609. GEORGE BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of April , a silk spencer, value 12 s. the property of George Hopps , privately in his shop .

GEORGE HOPPS . I keep a silk mercer's shop , in Cranbourn passage, in the parish of St. Ann Soho . I lost my spencer on Monday, the 24th of April, about half past three in the afternoon, I was in my shop, sitting down with my back to the door; I heard a kind of a wrench or pull; immediately a cry was made, that a man had taken away a spencer; I heard the cry; I went immediately to the door, and missed the spencer; it was hanging on the door, in the door-way. I went out about ten yards; I overtook the prisoner, with the spencer under his arm, just before I came to him; I brought the prisoner back with my goods into the shop; I went for a constable immediately, and gave the prisoner in charge. This is the spencer.

THOMAS NORRIS . I am a constable. Mr. Hopps came after me; I went to the shop; I found the prisoner in the shop. This spencer Mr. Hopps gave me, with the prisoner; I have kept the spencer ever since.

Prosecutor. This is my spencer.

Prisoner. Q. To Hopps. Did you see me take the spencer - A. No, I did not. I had seen the spencer five minutes before I heard the wrench; when I went out at my door, the prisoner was ten yards off, with my spencer under his arm, walking off; it is worth twelve shillings.

GUILTY, aged 58.

Of stealing, but not privately in the shop .

Confined six months , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

610. WILLIAM GALLAR was indicted for feloniously making an assault on the King's highway, on William Beadle , on the 6th of May , and taking from his person and against his will, a watch, value 25 s. the property of William Beadle .

WILLIAM BEADLE . I was going home to the King of Prussia, Lower John-street, Golden-square, about five minutes before one o'clock in the morning, I met the prisoner at the bar in King-street; I had never seen him before to my knowledge; he asked me where I was going; I said, home. He said, he would see me home; I told him I could find my way home very well. I am sorry to say, I was very much intoxicated at the time; I had a bundle in my hand with two pair of small clothes, which I had fetched away from Bond-street, they were tied up in an handkerchief. He walked with me, and pulled me about in a very rude manner; he pulled me about, and shoved me against the wall as we went along. I remember being down, but whether he pushed me down, I cannot say; my bundle was dirty; I cannot say whether the prisoner was on the top of me, or I on him, or whether we both fell down together.

Q. Was the prisoner intoxicated - A. Not that I know off. The watchman came up, and lifted us up, and want away. We went on together till we came opposite London-street; I wanted to go to King-street; he said, that is the way, and he would see me home.

Q. Had you told him where you lived - A. Not to my knowledge. We went into London-street ; he took me on a little further, and stopped; he then pushed me up against a door, (whose door it was, I cannot say,) I felt him draw my watch out of my pocket; he did it coolly. Immediately I said, you have robbed me of my watch; I called watch; the watchman came up immediately, the watchman's name is Moses Martin . I told the watchman that the scoundrel had robbed me of my watch. I got the watch again; I saw him put it down an area; he put it down the area when I called watch. The watchman took him to the watchhouse, and me with him; he was detained at the watchhouse, and the watchman saw me home.

Q. How far might you go on with the prisoner from the time of your first meeting him in King-street to where he committed the robbery - A. About one hundred and fifty yards.

Prisoner. Q. Did you see me put the watch down the area - A. I did.

Q. Did you call watch or me - A. I called the watch. Did not I say, I would not part with you, unless you give me up my property.

MOSES MARTIN . I am a watchman. I first saw the prisoner and Beadle together in King-street, Golden-square; I was calling the hour of one. They were by the Red Lion public-house window. I perceived Beadle was intoxicated with liquor. I saw the prisoner handling him by his arms. Beadle said, he had a wife and family, and he wanted to go home; the prisoner said, he would see him home. Beadle had a bundle in his hand. I heard the prisoner say, you had better deliver it to me. When the prisoner saw me take notice of him, he took Beadle across the road; he had got hold of him by the arm. Beadle said, this is not my way home; the prisoner wanted to take him through a court, and put Beadle on before him, and they went on to Lucas-court, which is no thoroughfare. The prisoner said we will go in here, and make water. The prisoner said, you had better deliver it; there were some persons in the court, and I found they both returned again, and moved up King-street about twelve or fourteen yards. The prisoner said, take hold of me by the arm. The prisoner pushed Beadle, and Beadle and the prisoner fell; the prisoner was at the top; I went to their assistance; the prisoner said, help me up, watchman, in a faint manner. When I stooped down to help Beadle up, I saw the prisoner had got part of his bundle, and Beadle had got part in his hand. After I liftedthem and I asked the prisoner if I should see him home; he said, no. I kept hack behind, and watched them. I saw the prisoner having Beadle about the waist. Beadle says, what do you want of me; I want nothing of you; I want to go home. The prisoner said he would see him home. The prisoner turned to go on London-street; he had got Beadle by the arm; they went together up London-street; Beadle said, that was not his way home; he wanted to go up King-street. I followed them about three parts of the way up London-street, I saw them turn round the corner into Marlborough-street; I lost sight of them, I waited about a minute; I heard Beadle call out watch three times; immediately I turned the corner into Marlborough-street, and saw Beadle had got the prisoner down. On my coming up, I asked Beadle what was the matter; Beadle said, the rascal has robbed me of my watch. I said, I thought there was something of that kind going forward; I said so in the hearing of the prisoner. I seized the prisoner by the collar; another watchman came up, and seized him also; a third watchman came up, and took Beadle to the watch-house, and we two took the prisoner. On entering into the watchhouse, the prisoner attempted to make his escape, he tore the sleeve of his coat off. Beadle gave charge of him, and I conducted Beadle home. After I had seen Beadle home, I went round with my candle and lanthorn to the spot where we took the prisoner; in an area by the light of the candle, we saw the watch in one part, and the key in another; the glass was broke, and the face also; this was at three o'clock; we went again at five; I, and the beadle of the parish, William Smith ; I followed the beadle; he knocked the people up, and the apprentice of the house, brought up the watch to William Smith . The prisoner was not in liquor at all. Beadle, the prosecutor, was. Beadle said, as soon as he found him with drawing his watch, he collared him immediately, and as soon as he called watch, he perceived the prisoner to put the watch down the area.

Prisoner. Q. Did not you see the prosecutor knock me down - A. No.

EDWARD GRIFFITHS . I am a watchman. I heard the cry of watch, about twenty minutes after one; I went to the place. Beadle had forced the prisoner down; he said, you rascal, you have robbed me of my watch; you have put it down the area; the prisoner made no answer at that present moment. As we got the prisoner on a little way, down the street, he said, Beadle had assaulted him. We took him into the watchhouse before the constable; Beadle gave charge of him; in taking him into the watchhouse; he endeavoured to make his escape, by tearing of his coat sleeve. I went with the other watch men to look for the watch; we found the watch as he has described.

Q. Was the prisoner drunk or sober - A. He did not appear to me to be in liquor.

WILLIAM SMITH . I am the beadle of the parish. I went with the two watchmen, knocked at the door where the watch was in the area; it was delivered to me by the apprentice of the house. I produce the watch.

Beadle. That is my watch.

JAMES SIRE. I found the watch in the area; I carried it up to the beadle, and delivered it to him.

Prisoner's Defence. On Friday evening last, I left my lodgings about half past five o'clock. I had fifteen shillings and a one-pound note in my pocket, I went into a public-house in Marybone, and met with a friend, who wanted me to go home, and drink tea with him. We had some rum and water after tea; I then went to go home with my friend; we went into a house the corner of Wimpole-street, we had two glasses of rum and water; there I was till past twelve o'clock, Going up Oxford-street, at a watering-house, I saw this man; I went in, and had a glass of rum, and he had another; we both came out together; he pointed over the way; I told him, I knew my way; that I was going straight to Upper John-street, where I lodge. We walked together some way; when he gave me a blow, knocked me down; as I was rising, he rushed on me, thrust his hand into my waistcoat pocket, took out the one-pound note and some of the silver; he said, I am out of place, and therefore you must give me some money; this was in Marlborough-street; I called watch; he called watch also. When the watchmen came up, the prosecutor said, this fellow has robbed me of my watch. I was taken to the watchhouse, and from thence to Marlborough-street.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Wood .

611. GEORGE SHERRINGTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of April , two bank notes, value 1 l. each, the property of Thomas Martin , in his dwelling-house .

MARGARET MARTIN . My husband's name is Thomas Martin ; I live at No. 2, Peter-street, by. Clerkenwell . On the 14th of April, the prisoner came into my shop between one and two in the day time, I never saw him before; when he came, he asked me for some name; I cannot tell the name in that street; I told him, I did not know any such person. He said, who is that sitting in the parlour; I said, my husband; (he was sitting in a chair in the parlour.) He said, what is the matter with him; I said, he had a paralytic stroke, and he had been twelve weeks wrapped up in blankets. He said, why, did not I apply to a Society for relief, he said, I know a good many Societies; I said, I will work for him as long as I am able. The prisoner said, he was commissioned by the Prince Regent to find out afflicted people, that he might relieve them; I said, I was glad he was go generous to poor people. The prisoner said, what money have you in the house; I said, I had two one-pound notes, and two pounds about me in silver. He said, give me a sheet of paper; he pretended to write; he asked me my husband's name; I said, Thomas Martin . He said, I will get you eight pounds. I said, we want it now, for I had a quarters rent to pay, and going on to another. He said, have you no more money by you than that; I said, no. He said, look upyour silver and put it into a bag; I looked out my silver and put it into a bag, there was two pounds three shillings in the bags I fetched away the notes from the parlour, he told me to fetch them away; to the best of my knowledge I put the notes into the bag with the silver, they were on the counter this bag and the money behind me; he then said, put your bonnet and cloak on, and go along with me, and I will get you the money. I put my bonnet and cloak on in the shop, and then I took the money from behind me, and put it before me; he reached his hand towards the bag, I thought he seemed to tremble, I snatched away the bag just as it was in his hand, I looked into my bag and said where is my notes, I said give me my notes, he said there was a piece of paper in the bag; there was a paper in the bag, he immediately ran out, I ran round the counter after him; and said stop thief, I turned down Peter street calling stop thief, one of the witnesses, a butcher came out and said, I will run round the street and meet him. I followed him all the way, and just as the butcher had got hold of him by the shoulder, I came up and said, O you wretch, and pulled off his hat, and took the notes out of it, I took the notes into my hand, and the officer took them out of my hand. I know the notes, they are my notes.

Q. When you returned to the shop did you see a bit of paper in the bag - A. Yes, I gave it to the officer.

Q. What did he do with the bit of paper you gave him to write upon - A. He put it in his hat before my face.

WILLIAM BARRETT . I am an officer, I was at that part of the town, I heard the cry of stop thief, I saw the prisoner pass the window of the house I was in; he was running, three or four butchers were after him; he was stopped, Mrs. Martin came up, and said, you rogue, you villian, you have robbed me of two one pound notes she pulled off his bat, and there were the notes, I took them of Mrs. Martin and have had them ever since; I took him into a public house and secured him; the one pound notes were wrapped up in paper, I asked Mrs. Martin before I opened the paper how many notes there were, she said two.

(The notes and paper produced.)

GUILTY aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

612. ELEANOR SMITH and ANN ATKINSON were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 25th of April , twenty-five yards of lace, value 25 s. the property of John James .

JOHN JAMES . I am a haberdasher , Holborn bridge . On the 25th of April I came home about seven o'clock in the evening; in consequence of information, an officer was sent for; I gave them in charge to the officer, the prisoners were searched in my presence, and some lace was found on Smith by the officer. I knew them to be mine, the card on which they were had my shop mark, I have no partner.

ANN MARTIN . I was serving in Mr. James's shop on the 25th of April. I saw the two prisoners both come into the shop, they came in together a little after seven o'clock; I produced a box of lace Smith asked for the lace; the other was standing by the first box of lace that I shewed them; she said that was not the width. I removed that box, and shewed another, she then made choice of our card.

Q. Did Atkinson ask the price of the lace - A. No, Smith chose two yards and a half of lace at six shillings a yard. During the time I was measuring the two yards and a half, she removed two cards of lace from the box, she then returned one of the cards and that card she put on the counter; I communicated my suspicions to Mrs. James, she sent for a constable, Mrs. James came home before the constable came, a constable came; Mr. James then asked me what I had to say respecting the prisoners, I said I suspected she had a card of lace; she said they was very welcome to search her; she was searched and one card of lace was found in her pocket; I saw it taken from her; that card I saw taken from the box; she dropped another of the cards from her pocket; the lace that was found in her pocket was twenty two yards, at two shillings a yard.

WILLIAM LEE . I was sent for about ten minutes after seven by Mr. James, the servant came for me, I saw the two prisoners in the shop; during the time I was at the door, Mr. Jones came in; he desired me to stop, I stopped about ten minutes, Mr. James called me in, and gave me charge of both the prisoners. Mr. James picked up one card, he said, she had just dropped it, I searched Smith, and in her pocket, I found this card of lace, it has the shop mark on it. When I had secured the lace, she pretended to faint away, and threw herself on the ground, I shewed the lace to Mr. James, and he claimed it, I asked Atkinson whether she knew her; she said she did; she was sorry she came in with her, I have kept the lace ever since in the same state as I found it.

MR. JAMES. This lace is my property, it has my private mark upon it, both cards of lace are my property.

Smith's Defence. I called on Atkinson and asked her if she would go to Holborn with me to buy a bit of lace; we went to Mr. James's, and the person shewed me two boxes of lace, they were all very dear; a card of lace was found on my clothes, I leave it to the mercy of the court.

Atkinson's Defence. Eleanor Smith requested me to go with her to buy some lace. I refused and said, I could not leave the place, she urged me strongly, saying, she should not stop; I went out with her, I did not see her take any thing, or do any thing.

The prisoner Smith called one witness, and the prisoner Atkinson called two witnesses, who gave them excellent characters.

SMITH GUILTY aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

ATKINSON NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

613. JAMES TODD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of April thirty-six brass rods, value 30 s. and a hearth rug, value 3 s. the property of William Kent , Samuel Lack Kent , Samuel Tomkins , and Richard Williams .

SAMUEL LUCK KENT. I am an upholsterer with William Kent , Samuel Tomkins , and Richard Williams , I have no other partner. On the morning of the 4th of April, about half past eight o'clock. I went with the keys into the counting house, and always keep the keys in my posession; I saw a desk not shut, and to my surprise I found the desk had been wrenched open; the prisoner was one and slept in the house; his was at nine o'clock, I went into the house, and missed nothing until some days, I missed about two days after a hearth rug and thirty-six rods. I found them in Todd's I sent for an officer, the rods are worth thirty shillings; Todd was absent, and the officer found him and took him to Worship-street I received this letter (a letter produced.) by the post mark on the 3rd of May, after he was in, Newgate; I went to Newgate is consequence of this letter, I read the contents of this letter over to him; he said the contents of the letter was exactly the same as he meant to say; (in the letter he confessed the crime of which he was charged.)

ISAAC LIPPS . I am servant to Mr. Kent.

Q. What do you know of the loss of the rods and the hearth rug - A. I missed them on Tuesday the 4th of April, I rung the bell for the prisoner, he should have been at home, he was not; I never see him after that time until I saw him at Worship-street, I did not miss these articles myself.

JOHN ARMSTRONG . I was sent for to Mr. Kent's house and received orders to apprehend the prisoner if I could. On Friday the 21st of April, the prisoner came to me next door to the office, I took him into custody, Mr. Kent came, he said he was the man; he made a full acknowledgment before me of his taking these rods and hearth rug from his master.

GUILTY aged 46.

Fined 1 s. and discharged.

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

614. MARK READ was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of April , two ounces of gold, value 5 l. the property of James Redford in his dwelling house .

JAMES REDFORD, I live at No. 9, Dean-street Soho-square , I am a gold beater , the prisoner worked with me as a journeyman . On the 3rd of April, last I gave him two ounces of gold to beat, and on the 4th, he came in and did a little to it, and then went away, he did not come again that day, nor all the week; I was surprised at his not coming. On Sunday evening I went to his house with a peace officer, we knocked at the door, his wife said he was in bed, we went into the house, we did not find him; last Sunday morning, we went to his house, again, we went down the street, we saw him standing in the street, I said to the officer that is the man, we took him into custody, we tied his hands and took him to the watchhouse, and the next day to Marlborough-street, the prisoner said he had lost the gold, he had taken the gold to do it at home.

Q. What was the value of the gold - A. I think about eleven pounds ten shillings.

Q. Is your shop part of your dwelling-house - A. It is; I gave it him in the next room to the shop, in my house.

REDFORD BURKER. I am an apprentice to Mr. Redford I am master give the prisoner that gold to work two ounces, three penny weights, on the 3rd of April, he had been working about twelve months before that. He worked that gold out process, is master's shop where he was always accustomed to what he parted it into so many weights, I see him do that I see him heat it on the 4th of April in the morning he went away. On Sunday master sent to know why he had not been at work, I went to his house, I told him, master wanted to know the reason why he had not been at work, he said, he took some gold home, and that he had lost it; that was the reason he had not been to work.

Q. Do you know whether he had any licence to work at home, you don't know perhaps - A. I do know that none of master's men work at their own home, they all work in master's shop.

Prisoner's Defence. I took the gold out of the shop, and put it in my pocket; I went out of the place in a hurry, and I happened to meet with two persons, shopmates, we got drinking such a quantity of liquor, that I was insensible, so that the next morning I played truant, having found I had lost Mr. Redford's gold; I know no more of the gold than Mr. Redford does.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

615. MARGARET JOHNSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of April , twenty two yards of callico, value 27 s. the property of George Vipond .

THOMAS WOOD . I am shopman to George Vipond linen draper , Ludgate-hill . On the 14th of April between the hours of six and seven in the evening, the prisoner came into the shop, I saw her put the print under her cloak, I was on the counter, I went over and told the other witness that she had got a piece of print; she went out with the print, the other witness went after her, and brought her in; I saw her drop it from under her clothes, I am sure the prisoner is the woman, I never lost sight of her.

PETER LANGLEY . I am shopman to George Vipond , the prisoner came into the shop, to look at goods, the same as other customers might do, my fellow shopman told me she had got a piece of print under her clothes; she walked out, I brought her back again, and took up this peice of print, she had dropped it from under lier clothes.

JAMES SNOW . I am an officer, I produce the piece of print.

Wood. It is Mr. Vipond's property.

GUILTY aged 61.

Confined six months , and fined 1 s.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

616. SAMUEL JACOBS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3rd of April , from the person of Isaac Abrahams , a bank note for the payment of one pound , the property of Isaac Abrahams .

MARY BARNETT . The prisoner came to me onMonday the 3rd of April, and said to my mother send me home for a pound note, I said how can my mother send for a pound note, when we have not got one a the house; he said, if you have to got one in the house you must send to Barrett's for one; I sent the child to Barrett's for a pound note, and the prisoner snatched a pound note out of his hand and run away.

ANN BARNETT . I was out on this day, and when I came home in the evening, my daughter said, you have sent Sam Jacobs here for a pound note.

ISAAC ABRAHAMS , I am nine years old, the prisoner snatched the note out of my hand on the stairs.

- I am an officer, the prosecutrix gave me charge of the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I am a dealer in all kind of things to get my living in an honest way, I heard of a sale of about fifty pieces of print; I asked the man what will you take for one of them, he said five shillings; I bought two pieces, I took them to Mrs. Barrett's she bid me twenty shillings for them, she said Sam I have no money, but I will send to Barrett my relation to borrow; I said Mrs. Barrett will you let me have my handkerchief again in which the print were tied up; she said no, I will not return it, afterwards she did not like the prints, and said, Sam you had better return me the money; I said no, I had sold them, and could not do it; in two or three hours after this, she came with a Police officer and took me into custody.

GEORGE ADAMS . I am a silk weaver, about five weeks ago, I went into a cook shop, Mrs. Barrett came in, and said she had a great bargain of Sam Jacobs's, the cloth was worth three shillings a yard.

ESTHER ISAAC . I went into Barrett's house, Mrs. Barrett said, look at what I have bought of Samuel Jacobs , that is all I know.

Q. To Mary Barrett . Did the prisoner show you any print - A. The cotton was tied up in a handkerchief.

GUILTY aged 24.

Confined six months and fined 1 s.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

617. ROBERT DEAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of April , three pair of stockings, value 6 s. 9 d. the property of James Bernard Dew , and Joseph Wilson .

JAMES BERNARD DEW . I live at No. 46. Cheapside Robert Dean robbed us of three pair of stockings; he was in the shop about half past seven o'clock, he stole three pair of stockings from the door and ran away with them, I ran after him, and took them from him. (The stockings produced,) these are the stockings. My partner's name is Joseph Wilson , there are no other partners .

Prisoner's Defence. I was going by there, I went to cross the way because I wanted to go down into Thames-street; this gentleman took hold of me, and charged me with having his stockings, and a mob came round about us.

Q. To Dew. How was he carrying those stockings - A. They were under his coat, he dropped them immediately I took hold of him, I picked them up myself.

GUILTY aged 27.

Confined six months and fined 1 s.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

618. JOHN PAYNE was indicted for that he on the 1st of April , obtained a watch, under false pretences of John Puckeridge .

JOHN PUCKERIDGE. I am a watch maker in Cow-lane, Snow-hill ; the watch was brought me to repair by Mr. Marsh; a lad came in, as from Mr. Marsh for the watch; I took six shillings and six pence and delivered it to the lad; one day after, Mr. Marsh called for the watch, I said, I had delivered it to his lad; he said he never sent him; I told him he certainly had sent him; I think the lad that came for it is a less lad than the prisoner; I do not think the prisoner is the lad, I had two or three customers in the shop.

- MARSH. I took this watch to Puckeridge to be cleaned, about a fortnight after I called for it; Mr. Puckeridge said a person came for it, and paid six shillings and six pence for cleaning it. I never sent any body for the watch.

- BALLAD. Last Sunday evening, I learned where the prisoner lodged. On Tuesday morning, I put him into the custody of an Hatton Garden officer, I asked the prisoner if his name was John Payne , he said, it is; I said you must go along with me to Hatton Garden office; he said is it concerning the watch at Puckeridge's, that he had pledged it at Greenwich, and had sold the duplicate to a person at Greenwich for twelve shillings; the watch was sent over to the prosecutor; the person did not come forward at all; his name is Reeve, (the watch produced.)

Puckeridge. This is the watch, I delivered that I had to repair, for Mr. Marsh.

Marsh. I know the watch by a dent in the inside case.

Prisoner's Defence. I never saw the watch in my life, I bought the duplicate at Greenwich, and sold it again.

GUILTY aged 22.

Confined six months , and fined 1 s.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

619. RICHARD PETCH was indicted for embezzling money .

JOHN MARRAY . I am clerk in the house of Messrs. Stephenson and Co. The prisoner Petch also was a clerk in the same house, he was a collecting clerk .

Q. Is it your duty to make out a list of the bills that are to be sent out on the following day - A. On the 7th of February, I had a number of bills given to me to arrange for the clerks that are sent out; on the following day I deliver the prisoner his bills, here is the list I delivered it to him, (produces it.) There was a bill upon Greenwood and Co. for eighty pounds. After I had listed them, I counted them, on the evening, I put them into a drawer; this list contained the bill upon Greenwood and Co. for eighty pounds, I delivered him this bill among the others on the 8th of February, it was his duty to collect them. He came in on the 8th, betweenone and two o'clock; I examined his list, and found that all the payments were right; the bill of eighty pounds of Greenwood's, is scratched out; I have nothing to do with this scratch out. I was present when he discharged the of the bill he had in the morning. Mr. David Robert Remington, one of the partners, enquired of him, what he had done with that bill of eighty pounds of Greenwood's; I did not hear him say any thing; he made up his book without that bill. I charged him with receiving without that bill, the sum of three thousand seven hundred and ninety-three pounds three shillings and nine-pence, and he discharged himself by paying three thousand seven hundred and ninety-three pounds seven shillings and nine-pence to me.

Q. When he came with the money, that sum of eighty pounds was struck out as money not received by him - A. Yes.

ROBERT SHEERMAN . (The bill shown him. Q. Is that bill drawn by you - A. It is; this bill was drawn by me on the 21st; I altered it to the 25th of the same month, before it was issued.

DAVID ROBERT REMINGTON . I am a banker, in Lombard-street; the firm is, Edward Stevenson , John Stevenson, William Remington , John Smith , Rowland Stevenson, and David Robert Remington that is my name. The prisoner was an out-door clerk; his duty consisted in receiving the bill and cashing them. On the 8th of February, he came home between one and two o'clock, as near as I can recollect; I asked him where his list was, that he had been out with in the morning; he produced his book, which contains the accounts of that day so far as concerned the prisoner.

Q. Does it contain the eighty pounds of Greenwood - A. No, it does not; this is his bill list. In this list given him in the morning, the sum of eighty pounds is scratched out. When I saw this bill of Greenwood's not accounted for; I asked what he had done with it, he replied, it was due on the 10th of that month. There were two other bills that were returned; he gave no account of them. The bills speak for themselves; they were put into the box. I supposed the eighty pound bill to have been an undue bill, and to have been put into the box, in order to have been taken out again on the 10th.

Q. At that time had you any suspicion of the prisoners dishonesty - A. None at all. I took what he said, for granted, and did not go down, and look at the box.

Q. In consequence of something that occured, the prisoner left your service and house - A. He did; in consequence of which, I made enquiry at Greenwood's about the bill.

Q. Look at that bill - A. This is the bill; the signature is the prisoner's own writing.

Q. When was the prisoner apprehended - A. About a fortnight after; he called at the banking-house to speak to one of the clerks; he was detained.

GEORGE BELT . I am cashier at Messrs. Greenwood's. I recollect this bill being presented for payment, it was presented to me. I put a mark on the bill; that is my mark.

WILLIAM CRAIG . I am clerk at Messrs. Drummonds. On the 8th of February, this bill was directed to our house; the prisoner is the man to whom I paid it; he wrote the receipt on it, said I placed it; I paid him in two notes; a fifty pound note; and a thirty pound note.

Prisoner's Defence. It was my intention to have made the amount up. I never got out of the way.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

620. MARY HOWARD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of April , four shirts, value 25 s. four shifts, value 10 s. a gown, value 15 s. a tablecloth, value 3 s. a shawl, value 4 s. two aprons, value 2 s. a counterpane, value 5 s. one handkerchief, value 7 s. the property of Joseph Allcock , in the dwelling-house of Joseph Adams .

ELIZABETH ALLCOCK . I am the wife of Joseph Allcock ; I live in the house of Joseph Adams, in the parish of St. Andrew's Holborn ; Joseph Adams lives in it; I and my husband, have lodgings in it; there is another family besides. Mr. Adams is a tailor.

Q. Did you miss these articles from your room - A. On the 15th of April, the first thing I missed, was the counterpane from off my bed, it is worth about six shillings; I missed two bundles of clothes from off my box; there were four shirts, worth twenty-five shillings; five shifts, worth ten shillings; a gown, worth eight shillings; a tablecloth, worth five shillings; a shawl, worth three shillings; three aprons, worth five shillings; a silk handkerchief, worth seven shillings; I lost them all at one time; I had gone out of my room of an errand; I don't think I was gone twenty minutes. I locked the door; left the key in the door. When I came back, I found it locked. I left all the things in the room when I went out very safe. They were all gone when I came back; some were my own, and some I took in to wash to get me a bit of bread.

Q. Did you know the prisoner - A. No; I never saw her before in my life.

JOHN BURLEY . On the 15th of April, in the evening, the prisoner was sent to the watchhouse; I went up to the watchhouse, and the prisoner had been brought there. I found some duplicates about her; she had been searched before at the watchhouse, I was not present at that time. I searched her again; I found two duplicates on her; one duplicate dated the 15th, for four shirts, a gown, and an apron; the other was dated 14th, a tablecloth, shift, and an apron.

HENRY BOYS . I had searched the prisoner on the 15th of April, between eight and nine in the evening; I found three duplicates on her; I gave them to Burley.

Burley. I have got the three duplicates; they were delivered to me by Boys; one dated the 15th, and one on the 14th; the 15th, is a counterpane of Mrs. Allcock's.

EDWARD HANCOCK . I am patrole of Hatton Garden. I took the prisoner about twenty minutes before nine o'clock, on the 15th of April, for being disorderly; the prisoner was quite drunk when I took her to the watchhouse. I went to the pawnbrokers with Burley, and found out the property.

JOHN BURGIS . I am a pawnbroker, in High Holborn. On the 15th of April, a woman pledged a sheet and an apron, in the name of Smith; I gave her a duplicate; the duplicate that Burley produces, is the ticket I gave the woman.

THOMAS TOMKINS . I am a pawnbroker, 93, Holborn. I produce a counterpane pawned on the 15th of April; the prisoner pawned the counterpane with me, about three o'clock in the afternoon, for two shillings; Burley produces my duplicate.

JAMES HEDGER . I am a pawnbroker, a shopman. On the 15th of April, the prisoner pawned four shirts, a gown, and an apron, for ten shillings; I gave her a duplicate; Burley has the duplicate; she pawned them on the 15th of April, about four o'clock in the afternoon.

Mrs. Allcock. they are all my property.

Prisoner's Defence. I was very much intoxicated in liquor; I do not know how many duplicates I had in my pocket, when I was taken up.

GUILTY , aged 31.

Confined one year , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Wood .

621. JOHN CHURCH , and THOMAS BECKENHAM were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of April , twenty-four yards of woollen blankets, value 5 l. the goods of Robert Gunston , in his dwelling-house .

ROBERT GUNSTON . I am a warehouseman , in Aldgate ; I keep the house myself. The prisoners at the bar, were my servants , both of them, Church was my porter , and Beckenham was my porter and carman . Some time about Christmas last, my clerk informed me, that I was robbed; he told me, that he had picked up a duplicate in the warehouse. The clerk is here. I went to the pawnbrokers, and there I found a coverlid had been pledged. Some time afterwards, I was going into the counting-house, I observed the prisoner, Church, stooping and peeping into the accounting-house, watching the clerk, who was writing; and a little further on, I found the prisoner Beckenham, behind a bale of goods; he was evidently confused, when I spoke to him; I asked him what he stood there for; he said, he was just come in from attending my riding horse. I was convinced they were then about committing a robbery. After that time, I missed goods in a wholesale way, whole peices of goods. I got an officer to watch, and the first morning the officers came, they detected the two prisoners; I was called up by the maid-servant, and informed, that the two men were in custody. I went down, and saw the two prisoners; I asked Beckenham how he could think of robbing me, when I had been such a good friend to him; I thought he would have protected my property, and not even seen others rob me; he made no answer to that; he hung down his head, and trembled very much. The officer took them away in a coach. My warehouseman is here. The prisoners were taken before the Lord Mayor. By what I found out since, I suppose, I have been robbed of three hundred pounds.

JOHN HODGES . I am a warehouseman to the prosecutor. The prosecutor has been robbed for a considerable time past. I went out one morning, I saw something white at the tail of the cart; I said to John Church, what is that in the cart; I saw it was new blankets.

Q. What do you know of this indictment - A. They were detected by the officers, on the 7th of April.

SAMUEL FOGG . I am an officer. In consequence of information I received; on Friday, the 7th of April, in the morning, I went to Aldgate pump; there I met Atkinson; there I saw the two prisoners in conversation together; they went down the gate-way close to the prosecutor's house, and went into the warehouse, and in a few minutes after, I saw Beckenham come out with a pail in his hand, he went into the stable with it, and in a short time after, came out again; me and my partner had placed ourselves at a window, which looked into the yard, and as Beckenham came by the warehouse door, I saw him make a motion with his hand, he was up at the top of the gateway, and in a minute, out came Church, with a hamper on his shoulder, I could see by the light, that the hamper, on being put down, contained something white; he took the hamper into the stable, and in about a minute, came out with it empty, and took it again empty into the warehouse. Me and my partner came down stairs directly from the house in which we were; we turned round into the yard; I took hold of Church, took him into the stable: Atkinson took hold of Beckenham, we took them both into the stable; where we found the blankets, close under the horse, two dozen pair of blankets altogether; we took them back into the warehouse, and called Mr. Gunston up; we confined them together, whilst my partner went back into the stable, and found some more goods, of which he will tell you, under the manger, covered over with straw.

JOHN LUCAS ATKINSON . I was with Fogg, and saw every thing exactly as he has represented. These are the blankets we found; they were in the stable, under the manger, covered over with straw; I found a small pair besides, under the hamper. We were up stairs in a neighbour's house, watching them; we could see every motion they made, and see them watching about.

SAMUEL RICHARDSON . Master desired me to go up, and feed the horse, and in the stable, in a pail, I found two pair of blankets.

Mr. Gunston. The blankets are all my property; they have my mark upon them; they cost me half-a-guinea, and seven shillings and sixpence, a pair. My dwelling-house consists of the upper part of the house, over the warehouse; both are under one roof; I have a private entrance at the back; where these goods were taken out.

Church, called one witness, who gave him a good character.

CHURCH, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 29.

BECKENHAM, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 29.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

622. WILLIAM TIDMARSH and JOSEPH TIDMARSH were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of April , four trusses of hay, value 8 s. the property of Sir Edward Baynton Sandys .

JOHN WORM . I seized the hay, and the prisoner, Joseph Tidmarsh ; he told me he got it of his brother, it was four trusses of hay; he went for his brother; his brother came without an officer. William said, that he lived with a gentleman, for whom he found the hay to feed his cattle.

SIR EDWARD BAYNTUN SANDYS . My stable is in Burley Mews . The prisoner, William, was my coachman .

Q. Did he find the hay for your cattle - A. No, he did not. The coachman had lived with me a little better than two month. It is worth about two shillings a truss, or more.

- NESBITT. The prisoners were sent to the watchhouse. Joseph said, he had the hay of his brother, William, the coachman; he went off with the hay, but he meant to return it again.

The prisoners each, called two witnesses, who gave them a good character.

WILLIAM TIDMARSH , GUILTY , aged 27.

JOSEPH TIDMARSH , GUILTY , aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

623. HENRY TURBETT was indicted for feloniously making an assault, on the 12th of April , on Elizabeth Evans , and taking from her person and against her will, a cotton shawl, value 3 s. the property of Francis Evans .

ELIZABETH EVANS . My husband's name is Francis Evans . I lost my shawl on the 12th of last April, before eight o'clock, at night; I was going into a chandler's shop, in Saffron-street, a man came behind me, rather pushed me; I felt him; I turned round, the man was running, with my shawl in his hand; the shawl was thrown over my shoulders. I saw him pulling it off; I never lost sight of him, or the shawl; when he came to the corner of Saffron-street, I saw him throw it down; I picked it up; a young man stopped the prisoner; it was the prisoner at the bar, who took my shawl; I saw enough of his face to know him again. Barnley, the officer, has the shawl.

Prisoner. Q. Was not your husband in the street - A. No. Mr. Barnley took the prisoner to my house; he was not intoxicated.

JOHN BARNLEY . I was in Peter-street; I heard the cry of stop thief; I ran till I came into Saffron-street; I saw the prisoner throw something down at the corner; he fell down; I catched hold of him; the woman picked up the shawl, and handed it to me; she said, that was the shawl he had robbed her off.

Q. Did you know this lad before - A. Yes; I cannot say any thing about him.

Prosecutrix. This is the shawl, it is mine; the value of it is about five shillings.

GUILTY , aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc

624. THOMAS JONES was indicted for feloniously making an assault on Edward Boucher , on 8th of May , and feloniously taking from his person, and against his will, a watch, value 4 l. a seal, value 10 s. a gold key, value 5 s. the property of the said Edward Boucher .

EDWARD BOUCHER . On last Monday, about half past ten, I was passing over Westminster-bridge , a person rushed violently against me, on my right side; I was then walking in the carriage way, not on the pavement; I felt my watch instantaneously taken from me; I directly put my hand down to feel, and found it was gone; I took hold of the prisoner at the bar, who is the person that rushed against me; I challenged him with having my watch, he denied the fact. I persisted in the charge, and by force threw him down on the ground; I then said, give me my watch; he said, I have not got it, you had better search me; with that, a gentleman, in court, Thomas Harrowell , said, here is your watch, sir, (pointing to the ground,) I saw the watch on the ground, about a yard or two behind the prisoner; I will not be positive whether it was one yard or two; the prisoner was then on the ground. Mr. Harrowell picked up the watch, and gave it to me. I called watch; two watchmen came up; I gave him in charge. I should mention, I lost a watch, a seal, and key, suspended by a ribbon. When the watch was picked up, there was neither ribbon, seal, nor key; these have never been found.

Q. On which side of the bridge was it - A. To the best of my belief on the Middlesex side; I cannot positively swear whether I had past the centre of the bridge; the gentleman that found the watch, may be able to speak to that circumstance better than I can.

Q. Were you running at that time - A. I was not running at the time the assault was made; the gentleman that picked up my watch, was behind me.

THOMAS HARROWELL . On Monday evening last, I was passing the Surry side of Westminster-bridge, I saw Mr. Boucher about five or six yards from me. I saw him fall with a man, a little before me; Mr. Boucher was at the top; the man who was under, proved afterwards to be the prisoner. I did not know Mr. Boucher at the time. I heard him say, that the man had robbed him of his watch, or that he had lost his watch, I cannot say which. About two yards to the right from where the man and Mr. Boucher fell, I saw a watch; I said, here is your watch; I picked it up; Mr. Boucher was raising himself up, with the man in his custody; I gave the watch into Mr. Boucher's hands. Mr. Boucher then called the watch, and I walked some distance with him before the watchman came up. I saw him give the watchman charge of the prisoner; thewatchman took the charge; I then accompanied them to the watchhouse, in Westminster; after hearing the charge given in the watchhouse, I went home.

Q. What part of of the bridge was this on - A. I believe on Parliament-street side.

Q. Were there many other people about - A. I suppose there might be fourteen or fifteen, but not very near.

JAMES GILLMORE . I am an officer. This watch was delivered to me. I produce the watch. I went to the bridge, and Mr. Boucher shewed me the spot where this transaction took place; that spot must have been in Middlesex.

Prosecutor. That is my watch.

Prisoner's Defence. It is true I was coming over the bridge; in coming over, I saw the prosecutor running; he was obstructed by a coach, and in a moment, I saw ten or twelve people around, and this gentleman challenged me with robbing him.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood .

625. JOHN LOCKWOOD was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Owen , on the night of the 21st of April , and stealing therein, four boxes, value 4 s. twenty-five gallons of oil, value 5 l. a bank note, value 1 l. and a promissory note, value 1 l. the property of the said Thomas Owen .

THOMAS OWEN. I am a lamp manufacturer , in Great Russell-street ; my shop is the lower part of the house, and communicates with the house; I live in the house with my family; I am a housekeeper; I have lodgers. On the evening of the 21st, or the morning of the 22nd of April last, my shop was robbed. About half after five in the morning of the 22nd, I had occasion to go through the shop; I saw the shop in confusion; I suspected it arose from the neglect of my servants; I went to bed again. I returned into the shop a little after eight, the same morning; I was asked by my shopman, if I had moved my lamps; then I perceived that the till had been broken open, and a large glass case that stands on the counter, had all the things moved out, and taken away; an other glass case also had the things moved, and some things taken out; next to the shop is a can, containing oil, that was gone also; then I had a light, and went into the oil cellar, by a trap door from the shop; then we perceived that the iron grating that opened into the street, had been forced open, and the oil cellar in great confusion, and a great quantity of oil spilled about the cellar.

Q. Was the trap door fastened, whereby you went from the shop to the cellar - A. That trap door is never locked or bolted; the iron grating in the street must have been opened by violence; there were several pieces of timber forced, as well as the grating. The prisoner was in my service at the time, as a lamp-lighter, he was not working in my house.

Q. Did you at any time afterwards, find any articles missing from your shop that morning - A. Soon after, in about an hour and a half after, the prisoner came to my shop, for his oil that he was to use that day, the 22nd; it had been his business that night to go about, and see if any lamps were out, and re-light them. I asked him what he had been drinking so soon in the morning, he appeared overcome with liquor; his answer was, he met a friend, and he had been drinking with him; he had got some beer at a night house. Then I sent one of my men to get a constable; in the mean time, I told him that my house had been broken open, and a large quantity of oil taken, and that they had taken away all the lamp-lighters scissars; I suspected it was done by some lamp-lighters, and he was so overcome with liquor, I suspected he was one of them; he said, he knew nothing about it, he should have been a great rogue if he had committed that robbery. I asked him if I should search his lodgings; he consented to it. He sent the constable and my shopman to his lodgings; he told them where his lodgings were. Afterwards, they thought about the key of his lodgings; and returned. We all then went together, and the prisoner unlocked the door; then we went into his room; the first thing I saw was a trimming pot and bottle; the bottle ought not to have been there; we searched about his room. The first things found in his room, were some snuffboxes, taken out of the little glass case; the officer found them; I was present, one metal box, and two japan boxes; I had seen them in the glass case a few days before. The officer searched him, and found twenty-six shillings in his pocket, in silver; among the silver was one shilling which my young man had taken the evening before; I found no scissars.

Q. You are in a large way of business; it is possible a person may secret himself in your premises - A. No; I always look to the doors before I go to bed.

- REARDON. I live with Mr. Owen; I am shopman to him. On the over night I went about the shop, and saw the shutters were all safe; I did not go into the cellar; I saw the shop safe about a quarter past nine. I was up the next morning, at seven o'clock; went into the accounting-house, and found that the lamps had been moved from there into the shop; a burner had been moved from the place where it is kept. I went to the glass case, and found it was very much smoked, by a light having been held in it; I observed the till, I thought Mr. Owen had shut it, but not put the lock too; I knew there was some silver in the till, and a book on it; I put them into a tin box; Mrs. Owen put them into the till; I saw neither till nor money. After breakfast, we missed some scissars out of the glass case; the trap door was fastened as usual; I went into the cellar that morning, about nine o'clock, I found it very wet, I thought it was water; it proved to be oil; there was not a great quantity about; there was a great quantity kept there, in twenty large casks; I saw no marks of violence at all. I missed a bottle of oil from the shop, which I had seen the evening before, and I missed from the cellar, two empty bottles, and one full of oil. The prisonercame into our manufacturing shop that morning, about half after nine; we went to his lodgings; the door was locked, I came back; master, and me, and the officer, and the prisoner, went to his lodgings, at his lodgings I found one metal snuff-box, and one or two other snuff-boxes, japaned; I know them all to be my master's property, they have his private mark upon them; I had seen them in the glass case in master's shop on the evening preceeding, I am sure of that. The officer searched him, and found twenty-six shillings in silver in his pocket, there was one shilling which I had taken the evening before; I put it into the tin box that was in the till, along with the other silver.

Q. Who goes to the till - A. Mr. Owen, Mrs. Owen, the girl, and myself. I saw it in the till about three o'clock the day preceeding.

WILLIAM SALMON . I know nothing of this business, until I was fetched to Mr. Owen's house; I went to the prisoner's lodgings; I produce three boxes. I first found the metal box; I asked him where he got it; he said, he bought it of a man about a week back. I searched the prisoner; I found twenty-six shillings on him; I gave up the silver, (except the one identified,) to the prisoner, before the magistrate.

SUSANNAH OWEN. Q. Before this happened had you put any tin box into the till - A. Yes; I took a tin box out of the desk; I saw there a good deal of silver in it, and a one-pound note; I locked the till; I took no notice of them; so as to know them again.

(The metal box deposed to by Mr. Owen, as Mrs. Owen's marking, and had not been sold. The japan boxes also, one of which he had himself used, but put it back again into the glass case, in consequence of not wanting it.)

(The three boxes were also deposed to as Mr. Owen's property, by Reardon, who also deposed to the shilling, which he had taken the afternoon before in the shop, from a dent in the middle of the head, from its sound he did not like to take it, that made him looking at it more particularly.)

WILLIAM LEACH . I am porter in Mr. Gordon's lamp warehouse, in the Strand. On the night of Friday, the 21st of May, I was with the prisoner, I first met him about eleven o'clock; I was with him about an hour, we were drinking together; I went home with Lockwood, in going home with him, Lockwood desired me to take a pot of beer home with me; this was in Charles-street, Covent Garden; I staid there about a quarter of an hour; I parted with him about half past one, and went home. I saw no more of him until I saw him at the office the next day.

GUILTY, aged 22,

Of stealing the things in the indictment, but not of breaking and entering in the night .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

626. SARAH DUDDEN and MARY MERRITT were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of April , seventeen yards of ribbon, value 7 s. the property of Thomas Duddle , privately in his shop .

THOMAS DUDDLE . I live at No. 38, Leather-lane, Holborn, in the parish of St. Andrews ; I am a haberdasher . On the 12th of April last, the prisoners came to my shop, Sarah Dudden came first, between the hours of four and five in the afternoon, she asked to look at some black ribbon; I shewed her a drawer of black ribbons, there were white on one side of the drawer, and black on the other, the drawer was parted. She was bargaining for part of the black ribbons, she agreed to take three yards and a half; I measured it; she desired me to cut it off; which I did. The other woman, Mary Merritt came in while I was measuring the ribbon, she asked to look at a bonnet shapes; I sent her to Mrs. Duddle, the other end of the shop; I cut the ribbon off, and delivered it to Sarah Dudden ; Sarah Dudden felt for her money; she said, she had none; she took her ring off her finger, and gave it me, told me not to part with it to any body, until she fetched the money. The ribbon was sixpence a yard. She told me it was her wedding ring, and not to give it to any one else but to her; she went away then. Merritt was with Mrs. Duddle, and staid in the shop bargaining for a bonnet; Mrs. Duddle could not agree with her, she did not go, before I examined the ring, and found it was not a gold ring; I said, I thought I was deceived. Merritt seemed embarrassed, and confused, and soon after left the shop, without buying any thing. I desired the little boy, that was in the next room, to follow her, to see where she went; he followed her to the George public-house; after he was gone, Mrs. Duddle examined the ribbon drawer; she missed half a piece of white ribbon, seventeen yards, or seventeen yards and a half. Merritt had never been near the drawer where the ribbon was, so that she could not have taken it; they never spoke to one another in the shop at all. The boy returned, and told me that Merritt had gone to the public-house. I immediately went to Hatton Garden office, and got two officers; I went with the two officers in search of Merritt; we went to the George, in Little Saffron-hill; there we found the two prisoners, they were both sitting together; they were taken into custody; the officers searched them, and found the ribbon on Sarah Dudden ; the officer took the ribbon.

Q. What is the value of the ribbon - A. Seven shillings; that is rather under the cost price. I saw the ribbon in the drawer when I took the drawer out.

DINAH DUDDLE . I am the wife of the last witness. Both the prisoners were in the shop before I came in.

Q. Did you suspect either of them taking any thing - A. No; nor did I see either of them take any thing. After they both were gone, I discovered a piece of ribbon was missing; I had seen it before they came in.

JOHN LIMBRIC . I am an officer of Hatton Garden office. I went with Mr. Duddle to a public-house, I found both the prisoners in the tap-room, sitting close together, they were talking together, they hadnothing before them. Mr. Duddle said, they were the two women that had been in his shop, and gave charge of them. On Sarah Dudden , I found this half piece of white ribbon. My brother officer secured one; I secured Sarah Dudden , she was very unwilling to be secured. I asked both of the prisoners where they lived; they said, they both lived together in Peter-street, Saffron-hill; they said, they were sisters. I went to Peter-street, and found what they had told me was true.

(The ribbon deposed to.)

Merritt's Defence. I was not with Dudden; I do not know what she said.

The prisoners called one witness, who gave them a good character.

DUDDEN, GUILTY, aged 24,

Of stealing to the value of 4 s. only .

Confined six months and fined 1 s.

MERRITT, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Wood .

267. ROBERT GOOCH , alias PEED , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of April, thirteen ridicule springs, value 3 l. seven pair of earrings, value 4 l. three dozen watches, value 100 l. forty-eight pair of spectacles, value 3 l. three beaded necklaces, value 36 l. one other necklace, value 4 l. two silver cups, value 4 l. two silver mustard pots and spoons, value 5 l. twelve silver tea-spoons, value 3 l. the goods of John M'Dowell , in a certain ship, called the Aberdeen, lying in the Port of London ; And ANN GOOCH , alias PEED , and ELIZABETH GARLICK , were indicted for feloniously receiving the same goods, they knowing them to be stolen .

And TWO OTHER COUNTS, for like offence, only varying the manner of charging them.

ROBERT FORESIGHT. I am a ship broker to the ship Aberdeen. I did not see the watches, and the other things mentioned in the indictment, until after the ship had been robbed; the ship was stopped in consequence of this robbery.

Q. Do you know whether the prisoner, Robert Gooch , was considered as a seaman on board - A. I do not.

Q. Did you yourself, see the ship in the London Docks - A. Yes, several times; I saw her in the month of April; I appointed the master myself, his name is John Allen .

PHILIP DYER . I am a tides-man at the Custom House.

Q. Did you know the ship Aberdeen, when she was in the London Docks - A. I was on board the 4th of February; she was taking in her cargo for Quebec. I saw some cases shipped; at that time, the prisoner, Gooch was a seaman on board; he assisted in loading; there were four cases of jewellery, watches, trinkets, and shells.

Q. Did you know particularly what these four cases contained - A. Not till afterwards; I know now.

Q. Do you know any marks that were on these cases - A. They were not then marked; I put the marks down; one was marked J. R. No. 3, I took this box myself, on the 13th of April; another J. R. No. 2; and No. 4, Ph. and Co. with the letter M, under Ph. that case contained watches; No. 1, contained trinkets. These cases the prisoner, Gooch, assisted in loading; I think they were taken on board about the 4th or 5th of April; where they were placed, I cannot say.

Q. Did you go any where afterwards in company with the mate of the ship - A. I went with the mate of the ship the second time, that was on the 13th of April.

Q. Why is not the mate here to-day - A. He is on board. I went with the mate to the forecastle of the ship, that is the prisoner, Gooch's, birth; Gooch was there. The mate searched the boxes; nothing was said to the prisoner as I know of. On that search, we found a one-pound note, and six or seven shillings, in the prisoner's box; we found no goods that we suspected belonged to any body else. The mate asked him what he had taken out of the hold; how he came by the shells; the shells were found on the deck about half an hour before that; the chief mate brought up a pair of shells, and delivered them to me. The chief mate said to Gooch, that he had been robbing the ship; Gooch said, he had not robbed it. I, the carpenter, the chief mate, and my partner, went down the next day into the forecastle; the prisoner was then in the steerage; we took a stick, and found there was something lodged on the steer-bed, below; the chief mate ordered the carpenter to fetch his chissel; the carpenter cut open a hole, through that hole we took out nine witches; they were delivered to me; I delivered them the same day to the officer; I took the numbers of them, On the same day as we found the nine watches, the man prisoner, Gooch, told me, he wished he had mentioned it at first, it would have been better than throwing them down the air holes. The next day, he told me, he had got some other things at his house; he said there were three silver cups, one silver tureen, two ladles, two silver mustard pots and spoons, one dozen table-spoons, one dozen tea-spoons, twenty-eight more watches, some papers of beads, and two clasps, belonging to ladies ridicules, but whether these were gold, or no, he did not know. He asked me to speak to Captain Allen when he came down. I then examined to see if these nine watches that were found, all which were lost, and I found there were only five left. The plate box had been broken open; I examined the other cases, but what was gone out of them, I cannot say; they had all been opened, each of the four.

Q. Could you tell from their appearance, whether goods had been taken out of them, or not - A. Yes, goods had been taken out. I remained with the ship until about the 17th of April; the officer took the cases before I left the ship.

Q. Might not those cases be broken open in the London Dock, during the time they were staying there - A. They might, I cannot say.

Q. When did you first see Gooch - A. About ten days before we left the Dock. Before I had any conversation with the prisoner, I told him itwould be better for him to tell me all about it.

Q. On the 15th you had this conversation with the prisoner - A. Yes.

Q. When first a search was made for the watches, you did not speak to the prisoner at all - A. No; the conversation on the 13th, was trifling; on the 14th, the captain was gone to town; what he said on the 15th, was in consequence of my encouraging of him to tell the whole truth.

JOHN SMITH . I am a Thames Police constable. Robert Gooch was delivered into my custody; I told Gooch, I was going to take him into custody for robbing the ship, and that I was going to take him to London; this was below Gravesend.

JOHN GOTTY. I am a Thames Police officer. In consequence of some communication from the ship Aberdeen, on the 15th of April, I searched the premises of Mrs. Garlick, situated at No. 1, Taylor's-court, Shadwell, when I went to the house, I asked her, whether she had not a person lodged with her of the name of Peed; she said, she had no lodgers. I then said, I understand there is a young man on board the ship Aberdeen, that was at your house, is it not so; she said, yes. I told her I must search the room that he had occupied; she shewed me to a room up two pair of stairs. After having examined round, I desired her to bring the keys of some drawers; she did so; she unlocked the drawers herself; in one of the drawers I found a watch; in another drawer, I found two watches; they are three silver watches; I have them in my care. She then begged me for God's sake, not to hurt her; she said, her daughter put them there. I said, what, is your daughter, Peed's wife; she said, yes. I then saw a deal box standing at the feet of the bed, and asked her for the key of it; she said, she had not the key, that her daughter had the key: it was her box, and her daughter was not at home. I broke the box open; in the box I found four silver watches, two metal watches, a gold ridicule clasp, two silver cruets, a silver tureen, and ladle, twelve silver tea-spoons, two silver tablespoons, three silver desert-spoons, two silver mustard pots and spoons, five papers of beads; I opened a pocket-book, containing thirteen pawnbrokers duplicates, they all related to the subject of this indictment. I went away to the office with the things that I had found; and afterwards brought the mother and daughter; when the daughter came into the office, I asked her if that was her box, and for the key; she gave me the key, which unlocked it. I then took the duplicates out of the pocket-book, and looked them over, and such of them as were for wearing apparel, I returned to her; she then told me her husband's name was not Peed, but Gooch.

WILLIAM DENTON . I am a silversmith. I shipped fifty-six watches, on board the Aberdeen, they were packed in deal cases, lined with tin; I superintended the packing of them; the case was marked Ph. and Co. with M under it, and No. 4; the case contained nothing but watches. I shipped two other cases on the same occasion, with jewellery and trinkets; I shipped them on board the ship Aberdeen, on the 6th of April. I was afterwards shewn the cases again at the Thames Police office; first the case containing the watches, there remained but fourteen; from the other boxes also various sorts of the trinkets were missing. These watches produced by Gotty, have the same name, as these found in the box; they also all correspond to the numbers. I know none of the articles of plate; the trinkets I do.

EDWARD HOPPING . I am in the employ of Mr. Brown, silversmith, in Cheapside.

Q. Did you sell any spoons to Mr. Dorett - A. Yes, I sold him twelve table-spoons, eighteen desert-spoons, and twelve tea-spoons; I have seen them since at the Thames Police office.

JOHN GIBSON . I am in the employment of Mr. Hollier, silversmith.

Q. Did you sell any tureens to Mr. Dorett - A. Yes; I sold him four tureens with covers, all silver. I have seen them since at the Thames Police office.

WILLIAM CHAPPLE . I am clerk to Mr. Brown, Union-court, Broad-street. I recollect shipping on board the Aberdeen, some spoons; I packed twelve silver table-spoons, eighteen desert-spoons, four square tureen covers, and four ladles; all these I cannot speak to; I can speak to none but the three silver cruets; these three were packed up for Mr. Dorett, among the rest.

CHARLES WILLIAMSON . I am a pawnbroker, Church-row, St. George's in the East. I produce articles pledged with me in April, a watch, a pair of desert-spoons, and a table-spoon, Elizabeth Gooch pawned them, on the 11th of April, in the name of Elizabeth Daniels ; Elizabeth Gooch also pledged the watch; the other articles were pledged by her mother; the tea-spoons were pledged on the 14th of April; the mother pledged them, in the name of Garlick. I have known the prisoners twenty years.

JOHN WILHAM . I produced a silver watch, pledged by Mrs. Gooch, in the name of Mary Ann Johnson , for ten shillings.

JAMES CAMPBELL . I produce three table-spoons and a pair of sauce ladles, pledged by a person of the name of Gooch; I do not know the person of the elder woman.

Hopping. All these things were sold by us, except the ladles; the spoons have our own mark upon them.

THOMAS RUSSELL . I produce a silver watch, pledged on the 10th of April, by Ann Gooch , the young woman at the bar; she had five shillings on it.

GEORGE BAYNE . I produce a silver watch, pledged by the daughter, for five shillings, on the 11th of April.

JOHN GEORGE . I produce a silver watch, pledged for one-pound, on the 11th of April, by the prisoner, Garlick.

ARTHUR PRICE . I produce a silver watch, pledged by Gooch, the young woman, for four shillings.

STEPHEN WHITTAKER. I produce a watch,pledged with me on the 11th of April, by the middle prisoner, to the best of my recollection, of the name of Elizabeth Jones, Hackney.

ROBERT HIGHAM . I produce a silver watch, pledged on the 11th of April, by the middle prisoner, in the name of Elizabeth Jones , Hackney.

ROBERT WILD . I produce a silver watch, pledged on the 8th of April, by Elizabeth Gooch .

GEORGE GUY . I produce a silver watch, pledged with me on the 11th of April, by a young woman, in the name of Mary Pearcy , of Hackney; I cannot speak to any person.

(All the watches were deposed to by Denton.)

The three prisoners called thirteen witnesses, who gave them a good character.

ROBERT GOOCH , GUILTY, aged 24,

Of stealing, but not in the Port of London .

Transported for Seven Years .

ELIZABETH GOOCH , NOT GUILTY .

ELIZABETH GARLICK, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Wood .

628. JAMES BAKER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of April , four pounds weight of coffee, value 5 s. the goods of the West India Dock Company , or of a person, or persons, unknown .

JOHN GOTTY . I am a Thames Police officer. On Wednesday, the 26th of April, I went with Mitchell to the West India Docks , for the purpose of searching the prisoner; we stopped the prisoner, and searched him, and found a considerable quantity of coffee about him; Mitchell took coffee from his coat pockets, his waistcoat pockets, and breeches pockets; the coffee is here. He said, he hoped we would be as easy as we could.

- MITCHELL. I went with Gotty; I can only state the same as Gotty; his account is correct.

ROBERT GIBSON . I am the principal of a company at the Docks.

Q. Was it usual for a foreman to be searched - A. The labourers are searched every day; the foreman only now and then. The prisoner was foreman at No. 6, warehouse of the coffee department; the prisoner had a very good character; he has been at the Docks about seven or eight years. He was at work that day in the coffee warehouse. The coffee is worth about five shillings.

- SINCLAIR. I am the captain of that warehouse. All the property in it is under my care. We had such coffee as that found on the prisoner in the warehouse.

Prisoner's Defence. I am very sorry; I picked the property up.

Sinclair. The prisoner had one pound fourteen shillings a week.

GUILTY , aged 43.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

629. RICHARD PRIER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of March , a truss of hay, value 2 s. the goods of Thomas Wild .

THOMAS WILD . I am a farmer , in Middlesex. The prisoner was my servant . On the night of the 6th of March, I watched the prisoner; in the course of that night, he was to come up to London, with his team; I put two trusses of hay for his horses, I put them myself on the cart; he was not to have more hay than he wanted for his journey, eighteen miles; he was to return the same day; he had three horses, two trusses of hay was a set allowance. On the 6th of March, I saw him at half past eleven o'clock, go into my rick yard, he cut a truss of hay from my rick; he let it remain while he called my servant, Hopwood, to go to London with him; my servant, Hopwood, came, and I saw the prisoner go, and take the truss of hay, and put it on his cart; he cut and bound the hay himself.

ROBERT HOPWOOD . I live with Mr. Wild, as his servant. I came up to London with the prisoner; he sold the truss of hay to a man that had pigeons, in Hammersmith; he told me, he had a shilling for it.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent of this thing, as a child that is first born.

GUILTY, aged 30

Judgement respited .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

630. ELIZABETH SIMMS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of April , in the dwelling-house of Rebecca Ford , a five-pound bank note , the property of the said Rebecca Ford .

REBECCA FORD . I live in Golden-lane, in the parish of St. Luke's ; I have the whole house in my own occupation; I occupy two rooms in the lower part. On the 6th of April, I received a letter, containing a five-pound Bank of England note, from my brother.

Q. Did the prisoner lodge with you - A. Yes. The postman came to the door; I was ill; this woman offered her service; I have a large family. In the time I looked out the money, she took in the letter of the postman; when she delivered the letter to me, the seal was broke, she said, the note was not in the letter, and the other said, she broke it open; it had been in no other hands but her's and the postman's; I heard the note in her hand, it was a five-pound note; she said, Mrs. Ford, if you will give me your key, I will lock it up safe; I had two keys to the drawers; I gave her one of the keys directly, and I retired into a little room, to answer this letter of my brother's.

Q. Does the letter mention its containing a five-pound note - A. It does. I expected, as she had offered to mind my family, she would not go away.

Q. What time was it when the letter came - A. About eleven.

Q. You left the note in her hand - A. Yes. I see her put it into a drawer, and lock it up, before I retired to answer the letter. I left the key with her. About half after four I got up, intending to have tea; I came out of the room, into the other; Imissed the prisoner; I asked my children, where was Mrs. Simms; they said, she had given them a penny-piece to spend, she was gone out. I immediately went to my drawers, I looked them over about two hours, it was a large chest of drawers, in hopes of finding the note; I did not look into the drawers until I missed the prisoner, and then I missed the note. I had a man lodger of the name of Thomas Spencer, he went in search of box; he found her on the 13th of April, and brought her home, it was on the 6th of April, when she took the note. I asked the prisoner how she could be so cruel as to take the note; I told her, she was a most base, ungrateful, woman, to take it from me; she said, she was very sorry, she had never had an hours peace since; I should have six pounds for it, in the course of a day or two. I sent for a constable, and she was taken up.

Q. Might not she have put it into her pocket, without putting it into the drawer - A. No; I watched her carefully; I could not walk; I saw the note go out of her hand, put up.

Prisoner. Q. When the postman brought the letter to the door, Mrs. Ford, did not I call you - A. Yes, and while I was looking the money out, the letter was broke open.

Q. You said, the postman deserved a glass of gin for bringing it safe - A. She took the letter of the postman; the man was occupied in taking my money, and I occupied in paying him.

THOMAS SPENCER . I lodge with Mrs. Ford. I was sent to seek after the prisoner; I found her between twelve and one o'clock, in Fore-street, on the 13th of April, I tapped her on the shoulder, and asked her what she had done with the money she took from Mrs. Ford; she said, she had spent it, and was very sorry for it; I took her to the watch-house first; she wanted to make her escape from me; I left her in charge at the watchhouse; I went to Mrs. Ford, and brought her to the watchhouse, and then we all went together to Mrs. Ford's; she told Mrs. Ford, she was very sorry, and in the course of a few days she would give her six pounds for it. The prisoner was taken into custody the next morning.

Q. Who was the constable - A. Robert Lock .

Prisoner's Defence. I did not put the note into the drawer, I put it into my bosom. I had an execution out against me, and I broke into the money to pay it, and if Mrs. Ford would have shewn me mercy, I should have made up the whole five-pounds. The prosecutrix keeps a house of ill fame for girls.

GUILTY, aged 29,

Of stealing, but not in the dwelling-house .

Confined one year , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Wood .

631. GEORGE WHITE and WILLIAM BROOKS were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of April , a copper, value 10 s. the goods of Stephen Sandham , affixed to a certain building of his .

JOHN BILLING . On Friday morning, the 8th of April, about ten minutes past five, I saw the prisoners; I keep a coffee shop by the City-road turnpike-gate, I was there about my business; I had information that such persons were coming, with such things on their heads; White had two coppers on his head, and Brooks had one copper, full of wet linen; I saw them coming, they passed me. I followed them five hundred or six hundred yards, as far as Wilson-street, Moorfields, and with the assistance of Joseph Cook , I seized them, and asked them where they were going to; White said, he was going home to his master's. I detained them, and took them back to the watchhouse, to the constable of the night, and gave him charge of them.

JOSEPH COOK . As I was coming out of my own door, in Baldwin's-place, at five o'clock in the morning, I met the two prisoners together, they came up to my door; the prisoner, White, asked me, what was o'clock; they had nothing with them as I perceived; I told them they may know what was o'clock, for the clocks were striking five at the time; they walked off, down the road, towards the City-road. I was just coming out to go to Spitalfields market; I followed them down, with my knot and basket on my head. About half way down the road, they made a stop, and seemed to be in deep conversation together; I past them; I conceived all was not right; about twenty yards after I passed them, I stopped; I saw the prisoner, Brooks go over a pailing, and go into the fields adjoining the road, and hand over three coppers, and then returned; White was outside, receiving them of Brooks; the prisoner, White, took two big coppers, put one over the other, and put them on his head; Brooks took the small one with wet linen, on his head. I then slackened my pace, to let them pass me again, with the coppers; when I came to the turnpike, I communicated my thoughts, that all was not right; I communicated them to Billing, at the turnpike-gate; they passed us. We followed them; we afterwards stopped them as Billing has described; I spoke to the prisoner, White, I asked him where he was going with these things; he said, they belonged to his master. I said, you must go along with me, your master must come forward; I do not think you have came by them honestly. When we took White, he took this chissel (produces it,) out of his pocket, and threw it over a carpenter's wall. After we took the coppers off his head, we took the prisoners to the watchhouse; they were delivered to the constable. Mr. Sandham lives in Craven-street, City-road, the back part of the house comes into the the field that Brooks went over, and handed the coppers to White; it was all done in the course of five minutes; the coppers were close to the pales.

Q. What parish is Sandham's house in - A. In Shoreditch.

SARAH SANDHAM . Q. My husband's name is Stephen Sandham ; I live at No. 31, Craven-street, in the parish of St. Leonard Shoreditch .

Q. Had you a copper - A. Yes, in the washhouse, that adjoins the back part of the house. On Friday, the 7th of April, I used that copper to boil theclothes; the linen and the copper both belonged to me. I saw the copper safe on the 7th of April, it was affixed in the washhouse, in brick work; I saw it about ten o'clock in the evening. On Saturday morning, about six o'clock, my husband went into the washhouse, and missed the copper. About two hours after that, Mr. Baker came. I saw my copper afterwards at Worship-street, I knew it to be mine, by two small holes in the side of it; these holes had been there some time; the washhouse window was broken into, and the copper taken out of the brick work.

- BAKER. I am a constable. This copper and the prisoners were delivered into my custody at the watchhouse; I received them from Billing and Cook. The copper that Mrs. Sandham claimed, was one of the coppers brought into the watchhouse with the prisoners. I fitted that copper to Mrs. Sandham's washhouse; Sandham's house, the back of it adjoins the fields, a little way out of the road; it is in the parish of Shoreditch.

White's Defence. On Friday evening, I was at Westminster, I stopped there all night; I got up early the next morning, coming along the road, I met Brooks, soon after which, I asked that gentleman what it was o'clock; he said, five; going along a little further, we saw something in a field; the prisoner, Brooks, got over to see what it was; he saw there these coppers; Brooks asked me what was best to be done with them; I said, take them to the public-house, and in the morning, we may enquire who they belong to.

Brooks's Defence. I was along with White; I saw the coppers lying on a dust hill; we agreed to take them to the first public-house, and in the morning enquire for the owners of them.

- SMART. On this Saturday morning, I expected White to come as usual to work; he did not; he is a journeyman baker.

The prisoner White called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

WHITE, GUILTY , aged 19.

BROOKS, GUILTY , aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

232. GEORGE SHERRINGTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of February , in the dwelling-house of Eleanor Hobson , two bank notes for one-pound each , her property.

ELEANOR HOBSON . I live at No. 3, Tash-court, Gray's-inn-lane, Holborn; in the parish of St. Andrew's Holborn ; I have had this house twenty years; I let it out to lodgers, and live in the kitchen myself.

Q. Did the prisoner lodge in your house - A. I never saw him before he came to my my house on the 13th of February, the prisoner came to my house about half an hour after one o'clock, in the day, he knocked at the door; he asked me whether my name was Elizabeth Hobson ; I told him no; my name was Eleanor. He asked me whether my husband ever worked in the City when he was alive; I told him yes; I told him he helped to point down Drapers Hall, when it was repaired. He said, he had come to do a great deal of good for me, there was a great gathering made; he said Mr. Wilson, Mr. Taylor, and he, had been buying blankets, rugs, and flannel for petticoats; he said, they gave them away to distressed widows and housekeepers; and he said, they had been about again, and found in many cases that what they had given, were made away with. He said, charity was very much abused; I cried, and said, what a pity. He said, they had now made up their minds to pay poor peoples debts. He asked me for a sheet of writing paper; I gave him one; he then asked for a knife, and cut it in two; then he asked me to give him a chair and a pen and ink, and then bid me shot the door. Then he wrote six or eight lines on a piece of paper; he asked me to put my name to it; I told him I could not; I had lost the use of my hands, by the rheumatic gout; I could not get a bit of bread. He told me to take the pen, and put a cross; which I did. He asked me whether I was in debt with my landlord; I told him, yes, I owed him eight guineas. I told him, that I had learned that I was over head and ears in debt with King's taxes, I told him, I owed five pounds sixteen shillings, and eight guineas. He said, that should be paid, and if I owed any more small debts they should be paid. He asked me what I had got towards it; I told him two one-pound notes, and some silver, I could not tell how much. He asked me to let him look at the two one-pound notes; I put them on the table; he took them in his hand, and said, he would direct a paper, and Mr. Wilson, Mr. Taylor, and himself, will also be with you. I cried very much to the prisoner, and I said, how good God is, to send me an unknown friend. He put this paper in my hand, and went off.

Q. What, he went off with your notes, did he - A. Yes, he did. He said, put your silver with your notes, and I will be with you in a short time; he gave me this paper, opened the latch of the door, and went out. Instead of my notes, he left me this paper, with something wrote inside. The prisoner was taken up for tricking Mrs. Martin, of Peter-street; I went with her to Newgate, to see if he was the same man that robbed me; when I saw him in Newgate, I said, oh, you villain! you are the man that robbed me. That is the man at the bar.

Prisoner's Defence. I never saw the woman before.

GUILTY, aged 26,

Of stealing, but not in the dwelling-house .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Wood.

633. THOMAS WALKER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of April , a pair of silver tea-tongs, value 4 s. two silver cannister tops, value 24 s. a wine strainer, value 7 s. a mantle cloak, value 30 s. and an umbrella, value 2 s. the goods of John Cairns , in his dwelling-house .

CATHERINE CAIRNS . My husband's name is John Cairus; we live in Great Hermitage-street, in the parish of St. George's, in the East . The prisonercame on the 11th of April, he had a parlour and a bed-room furnished; he continued to lodge there almost four days; the last day I saw him was the 14th. I missed a pair of sugar tongs, silver, a wine funnel; they were in the frorat parlour; I lost likewise, a pair of silver cannister-tops; they were not in the parlour; a mantle-cloak, and an umbrella from the passage. I found my mantle on the next day; it was at a pawnbroker's of the name of Matthews; I found my umbrella on the same day.

Q. What became of your wine funnel and sugar tongs - A. I do not know; they were missed at the same time.

Q. Was the umbrella that stood in the passage at his service - A. No, it was not; it was my own umbrella.

CHARLES STEBBING . I live with Matthews, in the Minories. I received a mantle in pledge from the prisoner, on the 14th of April, in the morning; I advanced thirty shillings on it.

- KINNERSLEY. I am an officer. The prisoner was brought to my house on the 22nd of April; I had been looking after him for several days. I got this umbrella from a public-house, the prisoner had left it there.

ROBERT CHAPMAN . I apprehended the prisoner, on the 22nd of April; I took him to Kinnersley's, in Blue Anchor-yard.

Prosecutrix. The mantle is my property.

Prisoner's Defence. I am sunk down with shame; I am not one of those persons that live by plundering the public; I hope you will extend as much mercy towards me as you can.

GUILTY, aged 47,

Of stealing to the value of 30 s. only

Confined one month , and fined 1 s.

[JURY. We recommend him to mercy in the strongest terms.]

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

634. SAMUEL MUNDAY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of April , twenty-six yards of gingham, value 2 l. the goods of George Todd , in his dwelling-house .

GEORGE TODD . I am a linen-draper , in the Strand; in the parish of St. Martin's, in the Fields ; my shop is part of my dwelling-house. I was in the shop on the 11th of April, I was busy at the time, it was between seven and eight in the evening; I was alarmed by the witness that is here, he called out, take your things in, that are at the door; the door-way is very wide, we put boxes out there to lay goods on; it is under the roof, inside of the shop, near the door. Barrett called out, take in your goods at the door, and at the same time he brought the prisoner at the bar into the shop, and likewise a piece of goods, saying, he had stolen it from the door; that piece of goods belonged to me, it was a piece of gingham, six quarters wide, it is worth forty shillings. I looked, and missed a piece of gingham from the door; I had seen that piece of gingham a quarter of an hour before it was taken away.

WILLIAM BARRETT . I am a constable. On the 11th of April, about seven in the evening, I was at St. Giles's church; I perceived the prisoner in company with four others; in consequence of suspicion, I watched them, and followed them into the Strand. When the prisoner came to the prosecutor's house, they all walked to and fro a number of times; I was on the opposite side of the road, watching them. Two of them went up to the prosecutor's door, and the other three to the window; the one with the prisoner, who made his escape, he was a great deal younger than the prisoner; he accompanied the prisoner to the door, and took off the gingham, and the prisoner received it in his apron: the other then ran off; and the prisoner when he had delivered it into his apron; he made off also; I followed him; I crossed the street instantly, and caught hold of the prisoner's collar; he threw down the piece of gingham into the street, out of his apron; I secured him; I had a good deal of trouble before I secured him. I left the prisoner in the custody of a gentleman at a stocking shop, and went, and picked up the piece of gingham out of the street, where the prisoner threw it down. I took the prisoner and the goods to Mr. Todd, he said, it was his.

Prisoner's Defence. I never until now have been called to answer a dishonest charge.

GUILTY, aged 19,

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Confined six months , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Wood .

635. JOHN RILEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of April , a pair of corderoy breeches, value 7 s. the goods of Thomas Sowerby , privately in his shop .

EDWARD DRY . I am shopman to Mr. Sowerby, in Chiswell-street, in the parish of St. Luke's .

Q. Did you lose any thing out of your shop on the 18th of April last - A. Yes, a pair of corderoy breeches; they were hanging on the door of the shop.

Q. Did you see the prisoner Riley in your shop - A. No; a young man came in, and asked if we had lost a pair of breeches, his name is Edward Glimley ; I jumped over the counter, and saw a pair of breeches gone. Glimley said, the man could not have gone far; I went with Glimley up as far as Finsbury-square; he said, he was a man dressed like a sailor. I left Glimley, and went towards Moorfields; I went one way, and he went another. Glimley found him, and brought the prisoner and the breeches back to the shop; when I came back, these breeches were laying on the counter; they were the property of Mr. Sowerby; I know them to be the same breeches I hung up in the morning myself; they cost us seven shillings; they have been in the custody of Thomas Mann , I delivered them to him at Worship-street office.

EDWARD GLIMLEY . I am shopman to Mr. Conder, No. 8, St. Paul's-church-yard. On the 18th of April last, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I was going past Mr. Sowerby's shop; I saw the prisoner in the act of standing up inside of the shop, what he was doing, I cannot say; he was a little wayinside the shop; as soon as I advanced to the door, he came out with a pair of breeches under his arm; that made me suspicious; I saw him come out of the shop with the breeches; I did not see him take them. I went in, and informed Mr. Sowerby and the shopman; I told them, I had seen a man going out with a pair of breeches, at that time, I could not tell whether they had sold them or not; that man was the prisoner. My Sowerby sent his shopman; I accompanied him into Finsbury-square; I told the shopman, if he went one way, I would go another. I came back to Mr. Sowerby's again, about three doors off, at a wine-vaults, I found the prisoner standing near the window, with the breeches in his hand; I asked him to come along with me; I took him and the breeches into the shop; he went with me very quietly, he made not the least resistance; the prisoner said, he had taken them from the shop to a young man at the public-house, that he was going to buy them. I left him about ten minutes; I came back again, and found him in custody of the officer.

THOMAS MANN . The breeches were delivered to me; I produce them.

Prisoner's Defence. My shopmate and I were coming along the street; he was in liquor; he told me he wanted to buy a pair of small clothes; I had the same clothes in my hand at the door of these people, when I was taken; my shopmate wanted to buy them; I went to this public-house to see if he was there; he was not. When Dry came to me, I said, I came there for my shopmate, I thought he was there. Glimley took me into the pawnbroker's shop, they sent for a constable, and said, I intended to steal the breeches.

GUILTY, aged 54,

Of stealing, but not privately .

Confined three months , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Wood .

636. JOHN GARLICK was indicted for feloniously inter-marrying with Charity Lewis , his former wife being alive .

HANNAH LAWRENCE . I know the prisoner Garlick; I was present when he was married at St. Ann's, Westminster, on the 26th of January, 1808, to Charlotte Harris .

Q. Did you know his wife Harris before that time - A. Yes, I had known her about five years; she and I were in business together, in Queen-street, Soho, milliners and dress-makers.

Q. How long did they live together as man and wife - A. About six weeks; they removed; he was taken to the Fleet Prison for debt.

Q. Did they ever live together after that - A. Yes; he was there a long time, and some few months after he came out, they lived together again in London. I went into business by myself, and she lived with me. I should not suppose they lived together that time for more than two or three months; he went on so bad; she and I went away.

Q. Have you seen her lately - A. I see her this morning; she lives with me now, and has ever since, I live in Whitecross-street.

JOSEPH DEWEY . I produce the register book of St. Ann's, Westminster. (Read.)

" John Garlick and Charlotte Harris were married in this church, by licence, the 26th of January, 1808."

Lawrance. I subscribed the register.

HUGH MARTINDALE . Q. Do you know the prisoner Garlick - A. Yes; I saw him married on the 27th of January, 1812, to Charity Lewis. I knew her some years before he had her, she was a ladies maid, and house-keeper in a gentleman's family; part of her time she followed the millinery and mantua making business, and she was a laundress; after he married her, she was obliged to do any thing, because he could not maintain her; they lived together upwards of two years after he married her, they lived together up to the present time.

(The register of the marriage produced.)

GUILTY , aged 45.

Confined three months , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

637. JOHN SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 3d of May , thirty-seven knives, value 50 s. thirteen forks, value 10 s. the goods of Richard Peachey .

RICHARD PEACHEY . I live in George-street, Hanover Square . I am an ironmonger; I was not at home at the time of the transaction.

JOHN EARLE HUXLEY . Q. Are you acquainted with Mr. Peachey - A. I am.

Q. Do you remember the prisoner coming to your shop - A. I do, on the 3rd of May he came in and asked if we sold table knives and forks; I told him we did; he said he had been recommended by Roberts and May, because they had no goods to suit him; he desired two dozen table knives and forks, two dozen desert, also two pair of covers, to send them to Mr. Parsons, Hanover-street, Hanover-square, past the church; he desired a bill and receipt to be sent with them; he said, he was only a servant; he had not the money, or he would pay for them. I was not well satisfied, and I took the goods myself to Mr. Parsons, where he had ordered them; I there saw a servant; she told me there was no such thing ordered there. I desired her to ask Mrs. Parsons, and she sent back the same answer. When I was returning with the knives, I saw him waiting at the corner of George-street, Hanover-square, he was standing; I conceived he did not notice me. I returned home, and desired Samuel Hains, the boy, who is here, to take back part of them, thirty-seven knives, and thirteen forks, and go with them to the door of Parsons; Hains took them, and I followed him; I observed the prisoner meet him in George-street, he spoke to him; they walked a little way together; he spoke to the boy again, and took the goods from him; I then ran up, and secured him; I brought him home into our shop, and Mr. Peachey soon went with him to Marlborough-street office.

SAMUEL HAINS . I was employed by the last witness to carry some knives and forks to the door of Mr. Parsons Hanover-street, Hanover-square; as I was going along George-street, the prisoner came to me, and said, a pretty fellow your master is, not to send the knives before; he said, come along; I followed him a long way towards Dr. Parsons's house; then he turned about, and took the parcel from me; he said, come along, he was before me; then Mr. Huxley came up, and collared him, and took him to the shop.

Q. How far had he got from you before Huxley came up - A. Not above two or three yards.

Prisoner. Q. Did I attempt to run away with the goods - A. Not that I see.

Prisoner's Defence. I was sent to order them by a young man, who told me he lived at Mr. Parsons; he desired me likewise to bring them with me, and not leave them at his master's house, but to wait for him, and meet him at the corner of the street; I told him I would; but I could not wait no longer for him, therefore I was going home with them.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Confined one year , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Wood .

638. CAROLINE GOODWIN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of September , a silver bladed fruit knife, value 2 s. and a tea-spoon, value 1 s. the goods of Edward Clark .

MRS. CLARK I am the wife of Edward Clark . I live in Great Ormond-street . In the month of August last, the prisoner came into my service, on the 13th, as upper nurse ; she lived with me about four months, if not more; she asked me leave to go and see her husband, who had lately come from sea. She stated that the door had been left open, and she had lost her things; that it had not been left open only a quarter of an hour. She left my house without taking her things away, and did not return.

Q. Do you know any thing respecting this fruit knife, and tea-spoon - A. Yes; I had a search warrant.

ANN CAMARON . I live at No. 11, Charter-house-lane. I have known the prisoner three years; last September I called on her at Mrs. Clark's, she asked me to lend her some money; I told her I had none. She went to her box, fetched a fruit knife and a tea-spoon, and asked me to pledge them for her, she had no money to buy tea and sugar; I pledged them at Mrs. Fothergill, in Aldersgate-street, for four shillings; she had then been at Mrs. Clarke's about a fortnight as near as I can say. I took the four shillings to the prisoner; I kept the duplicate; the duplicate was in my tea chest, when the officers came, they found it there. I was taken under the search warrant, while I was at work.

JAMES WALTER . I produce the fruit knife and spoon; I am servant to Mrs. Fothergill, they were pledged on the 18th of September, 1814.

Ann Cameron. This is the same knife and spoon I received of the prisoner.

Mrs. Clark. They are both mine; I am sure of it.

Prisoner's Defence. At the time I was going out, Mrs. Clark knows I was not going to return again.

Mrs. Clarke. I expected her to return, she left her boxes behind her.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

639. JAMES LEWIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of May , a box, value 2 s. a shirt, value 3 s. and a cravat, value 2 s. the property of William Cowley .

WILLIAM COWLEY . I am a higler or carrier ; I live at Bushey, in Hertfordshire. I lost a box from my cart on the 1st of May; I took it of a woman of the name of Morton, she is the wife of Major Morton. I took the box from London, from the Green Dragon Maddox-street, to convey it to Hertfordshire; I was stopping in Maddox-street , having a pint of porter there; a man came on the near shaft of the cart; I see him taking the box out of the cart; I was in the Green Dragon; I ran out, I followed the man down Swallow-street, I took him, he had the box with him; the prisoner is the man, and this is the box. I asked him what he took the box for; he said, a man told him to take it. I secured him, and the box; when the box was opened, I saw it contained a shirt and cravat.

JOSEPH MIDHAM . I was drinking with Mr. Cowley. I observed the man take the box out of the cart; I saw Mr. Cowley take the prisoner, with the box under his arm.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Confined one month , and privately whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

640. JOHN SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of April , a shift, value 2 s. the property of James Renton ; a shift, value 2 s. the property of Sarah Key , spinster; and one napkin , the property of George Vaughan .

ELEANOR VAUGHAN . My husband's name is George Vaughan ; I live at No. 65, Gray's-inn-lane . On Wednesday, the 19th of April, a little after five in the evening, I saw this man, taking these clothes, they were in the yard; James Renton is my father; Sarah Kay lives in the house with me. I went out at the passage door; I saw a man standing at the passage door, with a bag; I was going to take hold of the prisoner, he struck me; he made a noise, and turned up the passage. I said to the prisoner, you have got my clothes; he said, I have got nothing; the man with the bag went away; I could not hold him, I had a child in my arms; my mother came, took the child; he then said, he did it for want. The prisoner then delivered up the clothes; a shift of my mother's, a shift of Sarah Kay 's, and a napkin belonging to my husband. Mr. Brown, the officer, was coming by; he came,and took him. I think I have seen the other man since, but I am not certain.

Prisoner. Q. You swore that I struck you - A. No; it was the other man with the bag.

ANN RENTON . I am mother of Mrs. Vaughan. I saw the man take the clothes; I shut the door, and secured him; I called to my husband: he came down; the prisoner afterwards threw the clothes into the passage, out of his apron; there was a shift of mine, and one of my sister's, Sarah Key; and a napkin of my daughter's; they are worth four shillings and sixpence altogether.

- BROWN. I was accidently passing by, I took charge of the prisoner, and have kept the articles ever since.

Prisoner's Defence. I am but seventeen years of age, I had laboured under a severe illness, and was reduced to the greatest distress; I am a plasterer. I pray the mercy of the court.

GUILTY, aged 17.

Judgement respited, until next Sessions .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

641. ISAAC DAVIS and ABRAHAM ALLEN were indicted for feloniously stealing, a silk handkerchief, value 2 s. the goods of John Perry , from his person .

JOHN PARRY . I live with my brother, who is a wholesale draper, No. 43, Broad-street. I was at Harlow Green Fair , it was between seven and eight in the evening; the fair was very much crouded; I was making way out of the crowd; I was told by an officer, my handkerchief was gone; I felt in my pocket, and found it was gone. The constable produced the handkerchief to me; the handkerchief was mine.

Q. What might be the value of your handkerchief - A. About eighteen-pence; it was a silk handkerchief.

WILLIAM BROOK . I am a constable. I was at Harlow Green Fair; I saw the two prisoners there, and two others; I had been there about two hours. I saw Isaac Davis take this handkerchief out of Mr. Parry's right pocket; the other was at a distance, three yards at least. I laid hold of Davis, and told Mr. Parry he had lost his handkerchief. Abraham Allen was trying peoples pockets outside; when Davis took this handkerchief, Allen was engaged in other pursuits of a similar kind, further off; I do not think he saw Davis do this act. I am sure Davis took the handkerchief out of Mr. Parry's pocket.

Davis's Defence. I went to this fair with five others, with oranges. I never until now have been in confinement; I have been honest and industrious. I hope you will take my unhappy case into your consideration.

The prisoner, Davis, called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

DAVIS, GUILTY , aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

ALLEN, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

642. DAVID DUETT and ANNE CARROLL were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of April , a counterpane, value 8 s. a pair of sheets value 4 s. and a tea-caddy, value 3 s. the goods of Daniel Weller , in a lodging-room .

DANIEL WELLER . I live at Chelsea Common, in the parish of St. Lukes Chelsea ; I rent a house. The two prisoners at the bar, took lodging of me, a ready furnished room, as man and wife. My wife let the lodgings to them.

ANN WELLER . The prisoners came on the 6th of February, and took the first floor front room, ready furnished; the man said, he was a Sarjeant Major, in the German Legion ; they were to pay me four shillings and sixpence a week for these lodgings; they lodged with me ten weeks, they never paid me any lodging rent; they left the lodging on the 11th of April, they gave no notice; I did not know they were going away that day. I asked him for some money; he said, he had no money; he should go home to Germany for forty pounds. On the 11th of April, I was gone out a washing; I was at home at seven o'clock in the morning, to breakfast; she came to me, and asked me to lend her a seal; I did not lend it her. They both went on the 11th of April, and never returned; they left the door locked. I opened the door on the next-day, and missed the things, a pair of sheets, a counterpane, and a tea-caddy; they had these things with the lodgings. I saw the counterpane at Queen-square office; the two prisoner were in custody then. The sheets and tea-caddy have never been found. The woman prisoner took the lodgings herself.

WILLIAM WELLER . I traced the prisoners; I found them on board the ship, Denmark Hill; I found them on the 14th; they were going to leave England; I had them taken into custody.

JOHN HAWKINS . I know the two prisoners, they came to my house with others, there were several soldiers going abroad. The female prisoner, asked me to purchase a counterpane, she was going on board a ship; I gave her five shillings for it, it was in a dirty state. That counterpane was afterwards claimed by Mrs. Weller; I took it to Queen-square, and left it there.

- . I took the prisoners into custody. I have kept the counterpane ever since.

Duett's Defence. A German woman came on board and brought this counterpane; the next day I wrote a letter to Mr. Weller that I would come back, and pay him honourable. I went to his house nobody took me.

Carroll's Defence. This man knows nothing about it, I did it all myself.

DUETT GUILTY , aged 36.

Judgment respited .

CARROLL GUILTY , aged 24.

Fined 1 s. and discharged.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

643. CHARLES MACKAY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23rd of April , a Bible, value 5 s. the property of William Reynolds .

WILLIAM REYNOLDS . I am a labourer in theEast India Company's service , I live at No. 10, New way, Westminster . I am the uncle in law to the prisoner, I missed the Bible on the 16th or 17th of March, I cannot say when I had seen it before; I see it again on the 23rd of April in the possession of my wife, the prisoner lived in my house.

JOHN RUSH . I am a bookseller in Bridge-street Westminster. Between the 13th and 15th of March, I purchased this book of the prisoner, he said it was his own; in a short time after this his aunt called on me to enquire if I had bought a Bible of the prisoner, I told her I had; I afterwards delivered her the Bible, in consequence of her saying it was her property, and he had taken it from her. I am sure this is the Bible, I bought of the prisoner. I gave him the full value of it, as he appeared distressed.

Prosecutor. This Bible is my property, I never gave him any reason to suppose he should have it; it was is grandmother's Bible, after his grandmother's decease it was his mother's it then became mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I should like to ask him if my mother did not give it me three years ago.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

644. CONSTANTINE MILCOW was indicted for feloniously stealing, an the 26th of April , seventeen pounds weight of bacon, value 11 s. the goods of Thomas Cole .

JOHN ANDREW WATKINSON . I am servant to Thomas Cole , a cheesemonger , No. 187, Wapping Wall , near the new crane. On the 26th of April, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I saw the prisoner take the bacon from off the bench inside the shop close to the door; one piece of bacon between sixteen and seventeen pounds. He came into the shop, asking for an ounce of tobacco, I told him we did not sell it, and pointing to a shop opposite where they sold it; he went over, I saw him cross the way; in a few minutes I saw him walk by the door, and look in, at last I had some suspicion, as I had lost some bacon on the Saturday before, I kept out of his sight concealed, he walked backwards and forwards, he had a bag under his arm; at last nobody appearing to him to be in the shop, he stole the bacon, put it into his bag, and walked off. I pursued him, in about an hundred yards I laid hold of him; I said my friend, walk back, he went back, he had the bacon under his arm covered with the cloth, he laid it down on the bench, I got a constable and he was secured; the bacon is worth ten shillings.

MICHAEL PRICE . I took the man into custody, and this piece of bacon; I have kept it ever since.

Prosecutor. It is my bacon.

Prisoner's Defence. I was a stranger in that part, a man asked me to carry the bacon as far as Hermitage bridge; he said, I will give you money for it, you seem distressed; the gentleman took me into custody, he said I stole the bacon.

GUILTY , aged 52.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

645. HENRY HAYES was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 9th of May , from the person of George Northgate , one pocket-book, value 2 s. a warrant, for the payment of 7 l. 6 s. a bank note, value 2 l. and a bank note, value 1 l. the property of the said George Northgate .

GEORGE NORTHGATE . I am a gold beater , I lost my pocket book on the 9th of May last, I was going under the gate way of Lincoln's-in-fields about one o'clock; I was returning home to dinner, there were a few people collected about some bears, I stopped to see the bears; I put down my hand to my pocket, and missed my pocket book, I had seen my pocket book less than three minutes before; as soon as I missed my book, I recollected there was a check in it, I saw the prisoner on that spot; I recollected well I saw the prisoners during the show, I am certain I saw the prisoner on that spot, I did not see him do any thing. I immediately made the best of my way to the person I received the check from, in Wild-street Lincoln's-inn-fields, it was for seven pounds sixteen shillings; I had also a bill in the pocket book due for thirty two pounds ten shillings, I have not put it in the indictment; there were in the pocket book a two pound note, and a one pound note. Mr. Harper's young man made the best of his way to Catherine-street in the Stsand; and I followed him. I afterwards saw the prisoner in custody of Mr. Harper's young man, and Mr. Hodsell, coming up Catherine-street, they were taking him to Bow-street; immediately I saw him I said, that is the man, I will swear to him; Mr. Hodsell had the check in his hand, he said here is the check; Mr. Harper's young man took the check from Hodsell, that check was part of the contents of the pocket book. He was taken to Bow-street, and committed. The check is the only thing I found.

- . In consequence of what I had learnt from Mr. Northgate, I went to Hodsell's and Stiring, the bankers, immediately; I saw the prisoner in the banking-house, he had already presented the check for payment; I spoke to the cashier to stop a check of the name of Northgate; the cashier said, this is your check; he had it in his hand; I stopped it; the prisoner said, he had just picked it up, with some other papers, he had not brought them with him; he never produced the other papers. He told the officer where he lived; he wanted Mr. Northgate to go into a house with him; Mr. Northgate would not consent. The check I have got in my possession now; I know the check; it is my master's hand writing.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

646. WILLIAM TACHERY and CHARLES WALKER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2nd of May , a handkerchief, value 18 d. the property of Thomas Munroe , from his person .

THOMAS MUNROE . I am an apprentice to Mr. Allen, a cabinet-maker . On the 2nd of May, I went to Harlow Green Fair , I went there between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, I had a handkerchiefwhen I went into the fair, in my pocket; I did not see my handkerchief go from me. The officer informed me that I had lost my handkerchief; I had used the handkerchief about ten minutes before I lost it. I did not see who took it. I am quite sure the handkerchief I saw in the officer's hands, was mine, my name is on it. The officer has kept it ever since.

WILLIAM BARRETT. On the 2nd of May, I went down to Harlow Green Fair. I saw the prisoners at the bar, in company with two others, and watched them afterwards; the other two that escaped, stopped before Munroe, and the two prisoners went behind Munroe; Tachary put his hand into Munroe's pocket; the other covered him at the same time; he hid him as much as he could from me. Tachary unbuttoned his trowsers, and put the handkerchief inside his trowsers. I told Munroe he had had his pocket picked; I was alone by myself; I caught the two prisoners. On searching Walker, I found this handkerchief on Walker; I found the prosecutor's handkerchief on Tachary, and two others. Walker said, Tachary picked pockets, and gave him the things.

TACHARY, GUILTY , aged 13.

Transported for Life .

WALKER, GUILTY , aged 13.

Judgement respited .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

647. MARY ARNOLD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of April , from the person of John Stanhope , seventeen one-pound bank notes, and one two-pound bank note , his property.

JOHN STANHOPE . I live over Westminster-bridge, at the White Horse, College-street .

Q. Did you lose any bank notes at any time - A. Yes, a two-pound bank note, and seventeen one's; they were laying on the table, in the tap-room; the landlord and landlady of the house gave them me; it was near eleven o'clock in the forenoon. The prisoner was in the tap-room in my company. I was serjeant in the 13th regiment. The prisoner's husband was a private in the same regiment. I met this woman accidently, and asked her to go and drink with me.

Q. Is she known in the regiment - A. Yes, very well. I got change while she was drinking with me, for a twenty-pound note; they were told over to me by the landlord and landlady, both; I was counting them; the landlord said, are they right; I said, they were; the prisoner said, she would count them, and she took them out of my hand.

Q. You let her take them, and count them - A. Yes. She said she would put them into my pocket; she walked away with them.

Q. Did you see her go away with them - A. She must go away with them; they never were in my pocket; she came round to my left hand pocket, and pretended to put them into my pocket; she went away from me to go home; I did not go with her. She never put them into my pocket.

Q. You were drunk, were not you - A. I had been drinking that day. I never got my money again; this was on the 28th of April. On the 29th of April, about half after nine in the morning, she came to the door, and called me, and offered me two pounds fifteen shillings in silver, and seven pounds in notes; such as they are, the constable has got them.

JOHN LONG . I am a Chelsea pensioner. I saw the prosecutor get change for a twenty-pound note of the landlord and landlady of the house. The prisoner said, let me count it, you cannot count it; she said, she would count it, and put it into his pocket; she came to his pocket, but I cannot say whether she put it in or not; she then walked away.

GEORGE DENTS . I am a constable. I took the prisoner up; I had a warrant to take the prisoner up; when I took her up, she pulled out these notes, which I now produce, torn to pieces; five one-pound notes, and a two-pound note. She said, she would sell every thing, her ring, and her clothes, if Stanhope would not prosecute her; I did not suffer it. I searched the prisoner; I found in her pocket, two pounds fifteen shillings in silver, and about two shillings and eight-pence in halfpence.

Prisoner's Defence. Stanhope gave me the money.

ROBERT GRAHAM . I belong to the 69th regiment. I have known the woman about six or seven weeks. On the 29th of April, I heard John Long say, that the serjeant offered her any money, that she liked to take to the Coach and Horses. I never heard Stanhope on that day, give any account of it.

MICHAEL CUDDY . I belong to the 8th regiment of foot. I was in the public-house on the 29th of April, I was sitting with the rest in the tap-room; I saw Stanhope there. I heard John Long say, that the serjeant threw the money on the table, and desired the woman to take as much money out of it as she chose.

Long. I never heard that. He told the woman, she might take the halfpence and welcome.

GUILTY , aged 52.

Confined six months , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

648. HARRIET ELLIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23rd of April , a shirt, value 10 s. the goods of Jane Wood , spinster .

JANE HOOD . I am a servant . I lost a shirt, the latter end of last month, out of my room, No. 3, Berwick-street, by Exeter Change ; the shirt was in my care to wash. The prisoner lived in the next room to me, her husband is an engraver; there had been no person in the room except her. I found the shirt again at No. 135, Druary-lane.

THOMAS PARKES . I live at No. 135, Drury-lane, I am a pawnbroker. I produce a shirt; I took it into pawn on the 29th of April, of the prisoner at the bar, I lent her seven shillings on it; I know the prisoner very well, by coming to the shop.

THOMAS NAINBY . I took her on Friday following the 29th; I found the duplicate on her.

Prisoner's Defence. I had got a young child that was very bad, and I took the shirt, not to keep it, but to give it her back again, and I could not make the money up.

COURT. Q. To Miss Hood. Was she distressed - A. I know nothing of the people.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Confined one year , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

649. JOHN BOOKER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of April , a silk handkerchief, value 5 s. the property of a certain person, unknown, from his person .

WILLIAM BARRETT . I am a constable of the City. On the 19th of April, between the hours of seven and eight, in Oxford-street ; I perceived there was a mob fronting a print shop, looking in at the window; the gentleman stepped two or three minutes at the picture shop, looking in; the prisoner at the bar went up to the gentleman behind, and took from the gentleman's right hand pocket, this silk handkerchief, which he rolled up, and put into his right hand pocket; I was on the opposite side of the road; I crossed over the road, seized the prisoner by the collar, and took the handkerchief from his pocket; he called out, and immediately I was surrounded by a gang of thieves; whether the gentleman was frightened hereby, or me, I cannot tell; but I could not find him. Whether they were his companions, or no, I do not know; I had great difficulty to take him to the Police office, in Marlborough-street.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming down Oxford-street, and saw the handkerchief lay, I picked it up, and that gentleman came and took hold of me.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

650. MARGARET COOK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of March , two silver teaspoons, value 3 s. a child's pelisse, value 15 d. a shift, value 1 s. a gown, value 4 s. a handkerchief, value 1 s. a napkin, value 4 d. a towel, value 4 d. a remnant of linen, value 15 d. and two pillow-cases, value 6 d. the goods of Thomas Engley .

THOMAS ENGLEY . I live at No. 63, Moffett-street, City-road . The prisoner, Margaret Cook, was in my service, she came some where about Christmas; I took her from her mother, who had nursed some of my children; she was a servant of all work . She left me on Good Friday; I am a married man; my wife is not here.

Q. Were such articles as included in this indictment missing in your house - A. I believe they were; she was taken up about six months ago.

THOMAS BOARDHAM. I am an officer of St. Luke's. Mr. Thomas Davis, a pawnbroker, sent for me, on the 29th of March; I found the prisoner in his shop, Brick-lane, Old-street; he gave charge of her he told me that he had orders to stop her. I took from her twenty-five duplicates, eighteen of them she owned were for her master's property, seven were her own.

Q. Did you, or Lawless, or her master advise her to tell all about it - A. I did not, nor did I hear them, she told me this the next morning at the watch-house.

THOMAS WALKER . I am a pawnbroker, Tabernacle-walk, pretty near Mr. Eagley's. I have seen the prisoner at my shop; I cannot swear to her person, but I can swear that the duplicates found on her person were given when the articles were pledged; her are two tea-spoons, pawned on the 7th of March, in the name of Mary Cook, for three shillings, I took them in myself, the duplicate is in my own hand writing; I have a shift, for five shillings, pledged on the 7th of March, in the name of Margaret Cook; on the 5th of February, a child's pelisse, of the name of Mary Cook.

THOMAS DAVIS . I am a pawnbroker, in Brick-lane, Old-street. I am the person who sent for the officer. On the 10th of February, the prisoner at the bar, pawned a child's napkin, for fourpence; I sent for the officer on the 29th of March; the prisoner came to pledge a petticoat for one shilling; previous to which, Mrs. Engley had come, and told me to stop her; she was then apprehended; she had pawned at our shop several times before; I recollect her person; I produce six articles, a petticoat, one shilling, on the 6th of March; a silk handkerchief, for one shilling, on the 9th of March; a child's napkin, for fourpence, on the 10th of February; a handkerchief, for sixpence, on the 3rd of February; a child's shift, for fourpence, on the 9th of February; a towel, for fourpence, on the 9th of March.

JOHN GOLDNEY. I am a pawnbroker, journeyman to Mr. Nicholls, in the City-road. I cannot swear to the prisoner. I took in a frock, on the 11th of March, for sixpence, in the name of Margaret Cook ; a white gown, on the 14th of March, in the same name.

EDWARD BLY. I am servant to Thomas Sowerby , in Chiswell-street. I do not know the person of the prisoner. I produce a remnant of linen, pawned on the 31st of February, for one shilling and threepence.

GEORGE GARRETT . I live with Timbleby, Old-street-road, Shoreditch. I took in two pillow-cases, in the name of Ann Cook . I cannot swear to the person that pawned them.

COURT. Q. To Engley. Look at the articles - A. It is not likely I should know any of the articles; I cannot positively swear to them; we missed a number of articles, and supposed that she had taken them; the spoons are marked with my initials, they have an E. on them, and I lost two spoons.

Q. I believe this girls sister has a child of yours under her care - A. Yes, she has.

Q. I believe Mr. Gifford, the magistrate, compelled you to come here - A. He did.

Prisoner's Defence. My lord and gentlemen of the Jury. To my prosecutor I beg leave to return my most sincere thanks, and to you, I acknowledge the offence with which I am charged. My father and mother are poor persons, with a large family, andsorry am I to think that I have gone out of the former part of honesty; permit me also to inform your lordship, that if you think me a person worthy of shewing mercy onto, it will ever be remembered with a grateful heart.

WILLIAM CALVERT . I live in - street, City-road; I keep a chandler's shop. I have known the prisoner six years; never heard any thing at all of her before.

Q. Have you occasion for a servant at this time - A. Yes; I have my wife out of her mind, and I am willing to employ her to take care of my place directly.

GUILTY, aged 21.

[ The Jury begged to recommend her to mercy .]

COURT. To the prisoner. I hope you are not lost, and that you have been really sorry for the very great offence you have been guilty of; there is a gentleman here that says he will employ you immediately; the Court will therefore now, Fine you 1 s. and Discharge you; remember that if you are here again, no mercy can, or ought to be shewn.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

651. THOMAS ALEXANDER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of May , a tin kettle, value 3 s. the goods of Robert Saunders .

ROBERT SAUNDERS. I live at No. 192, Brick-lane, Spitalfields ; I am a tin plate worker, and keep a shop .

JAMES SAUNDERS . I am the son of the last witness. On the 9th of May, I was standing behind my father's counter; the tin kettle was on the threshold of the door with other things. As I was standing there, I saw Alexander, the prisoner, come to the door, and with his left hand, he took this kettle off from the threshold of the door, and turned it into his right; then I thought he would come in, and ask the price; the price was on it; instead of that, in the course of a minute or two, he went off with it. I then pursued immediately after him, laid hold of him about the distance of forty yards from my father's house, and took the kettle away from him, and took him into custody; it is my father's sole property; I only work as a journeyman to my father. I delivered the prisoner to Kennedy, the officer.

- KENNEDY. I took care of the prisoner and the kettle; I searched the prisoner, and found three pennyworth of copper in his pocket.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going up Brick-lane, and there was a man hanging up these kettles about three yards from the shop, and I went up to them, and took this down with an intent to buy it.

James Saunders. It was on the threshold of the door; I put it there myself.

The prisoner called one witness to his character.

GUILTY , aged 60.

Privately Whipped .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

652. WILLIAM WHITE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of May , five pounds weight of feathers, value 5 s. the goods of John Bates .

The witnesses were called on their recognizances, and not appearing, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

653. GILES TAYLOR was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of May , three three-shilling bank tokens , the property of William Mitchell .

FRANCES MITCHELL . I am the wife of William Mitchell; I live at the Globe and Pigeons, Shadwell . I missed three three-shilling tokens from the till, on Friday last, between one and two o'clock in the afternoon; I had five, and I lost three; I had seen the till about five minutes previous to missing them. The prisoner was in the habit of coming into the bar, whenever he came; I had known him ever since I lived there, four or five months; he was no relation, a mere customer. I had occasion to leave the bar, and the till was unlocked, and the bar door not shut; he was against the tap-room door when I left the bar; I left it for a few minutes, when I returned, I did not find any body in the bar; I examined the till a few minutes after, and found three of the five tokens were gone; when I perceived the three tokens were gone, the prisoner was with me in the bar; he came in after I had returned to the bar.

Q. Did you tell him, you had missed any three-shilling tokens - A. No; I sent for an officer without acquainting him; I had done so. The prisoner went from the bar to the tap-room; he was in the tap-room when the officer came; I mentioned my suspicions to the officer. The officer called the prisoner into the parlour, behind the kitchen, and told him, I suspected he had taken three tokens; he said, he had not. I missed money before, and therefore I put a mark on this money, that I might be able to identify it; I marked this money with a cross on the head, I marked them all in that way. The officer searched him. I had given him no change that day. I was by when he was searched; the officer found three three-shilling tokens.

Q. Were they marked as you had marked your money in the till - A. Yes.

Q. Did you believe them to be your's - A. Yes I did.

Q. Was the mark fresh on them - A. I did not observe.

Q. Had you marked yours that day - A. Yes, all on that day.

Q. Had he any other money about him - A. Yes.

Q. What did he say - A. He was very much intoxicated at the time, I don't think he hardly knew what he did or said.

Mr. Alley. Is your husband here - A. No.

Q. Your husband goes to the till as well as you - A. Yes.

COURT. Was your husband serving in the bar at the time - A. No he was not.

Mr. Alley. The prisoner at the bar did not attempt to run away - A. He might have taken themmerely to alarm me, leaving my bar so carelessly.

- HOLT. I was the officer sent for to take this man into custody. In the parlour I challenged him with robbing Mrs. Mitchell of three three-shilling pieces; he was intoxicated, but he knew what he was about; he denied it, I found four three shilling peices, three of which were described by Mrs. Mitchell; I found one shilling besides.

Q. Mrs. Mitchell's shewed you two that were marked, in your judgment were these three found on the prisoner marked in the same way - A. They were.

COURT. To Mrs. Mitchell. Do you know what way of business this man is in - A. He is an Excise officer.

The prisoner called four witnesses who gave him a good character.

GUILTY, aged 30.

[ The Jury most earnestly recommended him to mercy .]

Confined three months and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

655. JOSEPH REYNOLDS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of May , twenty-seven pounds weight of honey, value 30 s. the goods of John Corbyn and Co.

ANGLE GEARING. I am in the service of Messrs. Corbyn James Messer , Abraham Bowman , and George Stacey , the property was lost on Wednesday last. The prisoner was a servant in the house, a porter .

JOHN UPTON . I belong to the Police office Bow-street. I was going up Holborn on Wednesday the 10th of May about a quarter past eight in the evening, I saw the prisoner walking before me nearly seven yards, I did not know him before. He had got this pot of honey wrapped up in his great coat, and this cloth hanging about six inches from the great coat. I saw him lift it up two or three times under his arm, apparently as if it was heavy. With that I stepped up to to the prisoner and asked him what he had got there he told me he had got something that he had brought from his sisters, No. 330, Holborn-bars, I asked him what the things were, he said, he had come honestly by them, he was going to take them to his brother; I told him I must see what it was, so he might as well tell me; when he found I was going to examine the bundle, he told me it was a pot of honey. I told him he must go along with me to his sisters, for I did not believe the story he had told me was correct. As I was crossing the road towards Turn-stile, I told him he might as well tell me the truth, he told me he brought it from Mr. Corbyn's. I then took him to the office; I searched him, but found nothing particular about him. I afterwards went to Mr. Corbyn's with the honey, and it was claimed. The apprentice was watching him the whole of the time, but being a quaker he did not swear to it.

- TEARING. This honey is the property of Mr. Corbyn, I am sure it came from the shop, twenty-seven pounds, it is worth about thirty-one or thirty-two shillings; there was such a not missing; the hand writing of young Mr. Messer is on it, it was on it when it was taken.

Prisoner's Defence. That man cannot come against me in any respect, he was bribed to come against me.

The prisoner called one witness in his character

GUILTY , age 25.

Confined six months , and privately whipped .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

656. JAMES OSBORNE , and ARTHUR ELLINGHAM , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of April , a chest, value 2 s. and sixty pounds weight of tea, value 30 l. the property of Messrs Larkin and Co.

SECOND COUNT. Stating it to be the property of George Clay .

THIRD COUNT. Stating it to be the property of Hugh Jones .

JOHN CALLOW . I am a servant to Hugh Jones , he is a ticket-porter , I do portering work for them.

Q. Do you know these two prisoners - A. I know the tall one, Osborne. On the 6th of April, I had eight chests of tea deliverd to me and my fellow servant Davis, at the India warehouse, Fenchurch-street, we were to take them in a truck; one of them to George Clay , Esq. No. 56, Russell-square, one at Portland-place, one at Mr. Carbarnes, and three at Portman-square; they are all the property of Mr. Larkin, the tea broker; Edmund Larkin and Co. are the tea brokers to the India Company . I attended the truck with Davis all the way; Mr. Clay's chest was the top chest; his name is George Clay . The first attempt to take the chest was at the bottom of Skinner-street, just by Fleet market; I said to my fellow servant, there is something the matter. These chests were secured by a rope, well tied in, as soon as ever he put the chest on the truck, I said hold fast, because he was not used to it. I then went behind and saw the rope was cut, the top chest was off the truck, it might have fallen, or it might have been taken off, I cannot say which. I put the chest up well safe again, I fastened the rope, and was obliged to keep a sharp eye on it.

Q. At this time did you distinguish any persons near the truck - A. The two prisoners were the only, two persons that I saw, I cannot swear to their faces, they seemed to be the only persons that were watching the truck; then I got a lift behind a dray which pulled me up Holborn-hill. When I got to Middle-row Holborn, I said to my fellow servant again, there is something the matter, then I perceived that the rope was nearly cut through, there were still some persons near the truck, I could not distinguish who they were it was very dark, it was eight o'clock.

Q. Did they appear to be the same two persons that were about the truck when the chest fell off at the end of Fleet-market - A. They did. We went on till we got to the end of Southampton-street, Bloomsbury-square, then I let go the dray, and turned to go up Southampton-street; I said to my fellow servant, there is something the matter now; then I went behind, and found the ropes cut again; the one who I think was Osborne, who had a white apron on, was watching me, whilst I tied the chest, leaning on a post, and his companion with him. Ifastened the rope, and went on into Russell-square, I left the truck to go and see which way the numbers went; the instant I was going away from the truck, two gentlemen came up to me, and asked me if any thing had been the matter; I was not ten yards from the truck; I said, our rope has been cut all the way; they said, we are two officers. We then went, and delivered all our tea safe and well.

Q. Then you never lost any one of the chests - A. No, I did not.

Q. Was any chest lifted from the truck, though it was not taken away - A. I rather suppose so, at Fleet-market, but I did not see it.

Q. To James Davis . Did you see either of these chests lifted off the truck at any time - A. I did not.

Q. Could you distinguish who were the two persons near the chest - A. I could not.

BENJAMIN JOHNSON . On the last day of the former sessions, I saw these two men, when I turned the corner of the Old Bailey, in Newgate-street, I observed Osborne follow the truck down Snow-hill; when they got about half way down Skinner-street, Osborne came to the truck, cut the rope, and took hold of the chest, but it being heavy, he let it fall; they after that, followed the truck up Holborn-hill, and when they got just opposite Red Lion-street, Osborne cut the ropes again, and pulled the chest nearer the back of the truck. When they got into a street near Russell-street, the men with the truck stopped, and one went away from the truck; I went to him, and asked him if he had not the ropes cut; he said, he had.

Q. How did Osborne take hold of the chest near Red Lion-street - A. He put his arms round the chest, and pulled it from the middle of the truck, near the back part, so as to make it convenient to take off. Ellingham was not near the trunk at all, but all the way along went on the pavement. This was the top chest; he might have drawn it out about a couple of feet; this chest was a common size.

Q. Was it out of the City of London - A. It was. I did not immediately lay hold of them; I followed them back. I am sure Ellingham was in company with Osborne at the time the ropes were cut. I followed them back into Holborn, and did not take them till I got into the City.

Mr. Alley. Q. You say that Osborne had cut the ropes in the City of London; you did not take them then into custody - A. I did not; I knew well that he would follow the truck again.

Q. You saw a felony committed, and yet you did not take them - A. I thought it was my duty to follow him still further.

Q. Ellingham was on the foot-path - A. He was.

Q. Where was it you saw Osborne attempt to move the chest - A. In Russell-square, he took a knife out of his jacket pocket, opened it, and cut the rope.

Q. You said, you saw Osborne take hold of the chest, and remove it to other part of the truck; why did not you stop him at that moment - A. He let it fall.

Q. I mean the last attempt - A. That was in Red Lion-street; I was close to him, not a dozen yards off; I kept my eye close upon him; he knew my brother officer, Matthews, better than me.

Q. He did not take the chest off, or carry it away - A. He did not.

Q. There has been a consultation among the Justices, whether this was a felony in London or in Middlesex - A. Yes, there has.

GEORGE MATTHEWS . I am a constable of the City, I was in company with Johnson in Newgate-street; I saw Osborne and Ellingham looking in at a picture shop, I knew Osborne very well. I crossed the way, and then the truck came down Newgate-street. I kept behind Johnson, and followed it pretty close; I saw Osborne go up to the truck in Skinner street, nearly to the bottom of the hill; Ellingham was in the foot path; I saw two men having charge of the truck at the front drawing it, Osborne was dressed like a porter, with a velvet jacket and an apron about him. I saw the chest of tea tumble from the truck, and he went away, I did not see his arms about it then. I was not so near to the truck as Johnson. Osborne knew me well to be a constable, that was my reason for keeping more aloof. Osborne then joined company with Ellingham. The men stopped, and tied the chests on again; Osborne and Ellingham stopped standing against Fleet-market, the truck went right up Holborn-hill, tied behind a dray; the prisoners went up on the left hand side of the way, and I kept on the right. Just near to Red-lion-street, I saw Osborne go up to the truck again; Ellingham was then on the pavement; I saw the sides of the truck give out directly the ropes had been cut; I saw Osborne's arms around the chest of tea, and pull it towards the back of the truck; by the weight being increased at the back of the truck I could see the handle move up a bit, the man turned around, and Osborne left the truck, she went on turned up a Court, and came into the street again, and met Ellingham again and joined his company. They stopped there a good bit, and then walked up and down the path way, and stood against the railing while the men who had the care of the truck were tying the ropes again. The truck went on, and the two prisoners at the bar followed it till, it got to Russell-square, and then I told the men to keep one behind and the other before, and we would take care of the prisoners; the prisoners went down Holborn, and we took them in Holborn; Osborne had this knife in his night hand pocket. I did not take Ellingham; I knew he had no knife about him.

Mr. Alley. Q. Ellingham did not do any thing, except walk on the pavement - A. I did not see him do any thing, than being in company with Osborne

COURT. Q. To Callow. What is the name of your master - A. Hugh Jones .

Mr. Alley. Q. To Callow. You took these chests of tea to carry to the different persons at theother end of the town; you put this chest, after you had picked it up, on the top again; did you find it as you left it - A. No, it was pulled quite behind, it was moved nearly three quarters of a yard from the place where I put it.

The prisoner, Ellingham, called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

657. SARAH LEFEVER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of April , a watch, value 2 l. 2 s. the goods of Joseph Hardy , from his person .

JOSEPH HARDY . I am a miller ; I work at Bromley, and live in Bromley. I lost my watch about six o'clock in the morning, on the 29th of April, in Black Lion-yard, Whitechapel ; it was drawn from under my head. I went to this woman, I was not there till three o'clock in the morning, I went to bed; I saw her draw the watch from under my head, and take the watch out; I asked her what she was going to do with it; she said, nothing at all.

Q. Were you sober - A Yes. I saw the watch afterwards at the pawnbroker's.

- . There was a riot in Somerset-street, and it was said that this man had been robbed of his watch; he had got the duplicate of it; it was about eleven o'clock in the day.

WILLIAM GALE . I am a servant to a pawnbroker. I took in a watch, on the 29th of April, at a quarter past seven in the morning; we open shop at seven o'clock; I took it in of the prisoner at the bar.

Hardy. That is my watch.

Q. Where did you get the duplicate - A. She put it into my pocket, when I took her in Whitechapel.

Q. Did you give her the watch to pawn - A. No, I did not; I gave her what money she asked, eighteen pence.

Prisoner's Defence. When Joseph Hardy came to my place, he had no money in his pocket, it was three o'clock in the morning; he had come many times before, but he always came at such unseasonable hours; he gave me the watch, and said, I might pledge it.

COURT. Q. To Hardy. Did you know this woman before - A. No, I never see her before.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

658. HUGH FARRELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of May , twenty-three yards of printed cotton, value 28 s. the goods of Richard Archard Jones .

SAMUEL THOMAS . I am shopman to Mr. Jones, a linen-draper , No. 6, Pickett-street, Strand . On the 1st of May, about seven o'clock in the evening, this boy stole a piece of print; I was taking the prints in from the door, it being late; I had taken about twenty pieces in, and came out for the remainder, and saw the prisoner at the bar, with a piece under his arm, about a yard from the pile; I asked him what he was doing; he said, he was only looking at the print; I told him it was a rum way of looking at it. I laid hold of him, and took him into the shop, and Mr. Jones sent for an officer. He put his hand into his pocket, and pulled something out, opened his hand, it was a pound note, which I kept. The officer searched him, and found nothing on him, except a few halfpence.

(The property produced and deposed.)

The humble petition of Hugh Farrell. Your petitioner is a boy only ten years of age, and by unfortunate associations with bad characters, has been led into the paths of vice; desirous of reclaiming his lost character, he applied to the refuge for the destitute, but he was too young to be admitted; therefore was again obliged to have recourse to his former viciory companions

GUILTY , aged 10.

Judgement respited .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

659. CATHERINE YOUNG was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of April , two sheets, value 8 s. two blankets, value 4 s. two sheets, value 4 s. a bolster, value 2 s. a candlestick, value 2 d. and a tea-kettle, value 2 s. the goods of Joseph Jury , in a lodging-room .

MARY JURY. Joseph Jury is my husband, I live at No. 24, Baldwin's-gardens . I let lodgings to the prisoner in the beginning of December last, I let them to her and her husband. She took the lodging ready furnished at five shillings a week, she took away all the articles mentioned in the indictment. She left the lodging on the 12th of April, I had a mistrust that she had stripped the room, and found all the things gone, as mentioned in the indictment; her husband was gone, and she was in the eve of going; her husband was a stone mason, I found my things at the pawnbrokers.

Q. Had the prisoner any family - A. None whatever. She said, she had taken the things out of the room, being in want of money, but I believe it was merely for drink.

WILLIAM ASHLEY . I am a neighbour to Mrs. Jury, I was constable last year, I was sent for hearing there had been a robbery committed, I went and found the prisoner sitting on the bed, and Mrs. Jury accused her of taking this property out of her room, she said, she had done it out of distress, her husband had been out of work for five weeks, and produced the duplicates. When she came to Hatton Garden office, the magistrate let her go on her own recognizance; she said, she would get the things.

Prisoner's Defence. When I went before the magistrate in Hatton Garden, I told him that I was in great distress, and that on Saturday night, I would take them out, provided Mrs. Jury would give me till then; the magistrate let me go, and come on Friday; I could not raise more than nine shillings, which I gave to Mrs. Ashley, who took some of the things out, and if I could have raised more, I would have taken them all out.

THOMAS DRURY . I am a pawnbroker. I producethe things, pawned by the prisoner.

COURT. Q. To Mrs. Jury. Is it true that you would not give her time to fetch the things out of pawn - A. She was not committed till the Tuesday following.

JURY. Q. Was she in prison on Saturday - A. She was in confinement from Friday to the next Tuesday; her husband was out, and in work. They lived on my property, and paid no rent whatever.

(The goods deposed to.)

GUILTY , aged 34.

Confined fourteen days , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

660. AGNES BEAR was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of May , a gown, value 5 s. a pair of shoes, value 2 s. the goods of John Cummings .

SARAH CUMMINGS. My husband's name is John Cummings , he is a sea-faring man , and has been away between five and six years. I lost my gown and shoes at my master's, where I lived servant, at the Black Swan, the corner of School-house-lane, Ratcliffe Cross. The prisoner, and another woman, a neighbour, came in, the last Sunday was a week, and asked for a lodging; master said, he had no lodgings. I thought she was distressed; I said to my master, I would give her part of my bed for one night. When I went up to bed, she pretended as if she was asleep, and in the morning she took my gown and my pair of shoes from the bed side; I missed them when I went up to clean myself; she was gone then. I went over to the woman that came over with her, and the woman said, she had not seen her since the morning, she did not stop there five minutes. When I found her, she had my shoes on, and I found my gown at the pawnbroker's.

JOHN PEGGS . I keep a public-house. This woman came on Sunday week, and asked for a lodging, and my servant said, she might lay along with her. When she got up in the morning, she passed me quick, and I said, she has not paid for her lodging; I saw no more of her till the officer found her.

- BRADLEY. I am a pawnbroker. I produce a gown, pledged with me by the prisoner, on the 9th of May, for four shillings.

ROBERT WILLIAMS . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner, and found the duplicate for the gown upon her; the shoes she had on.

(The gown and shoes deposed to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I never did the like before.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Confined six months , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

661. THOMAS JONES and CORNELIOUS CONNER were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2nd of May , one copper, value 6 s. the property of James Pearce , and affixed to his building .

JAMES PEARCE . I am a chandler .

Q. Where do you live - A. No. 12, Pnacras-street, Tottenham-court-road .

Q. When did you loose your copper - A. On the 2nd of May, it was fixed in the washhouse; it was taken about five in the morning.

Q. Why do you accuse the prisoner - A. A young woman who lives a few doors from me, came and called me, by knocking at my room door, and asked me if I had my copper; I told her, yes. She said, I had better get up, for there was two men gone up the passage with a copper.

Q. Is the washhouse a part of your dwelling - A. Yes. I got out of bed, and put part of my clothes on therein, and pursued them into Newstone-square, on to Tavistock-square, into Russell-square, and stept up to Conner, I caught hold of him with the copper on his head; he threw the copper of his head; I secured him.

Q. Where is the copper - A. This is the copper.

Q. He had it on his head - A. Yes, and Jones run away.

- . On the 2nd of May, a few minutes before five, as I was going to work, I saw two men, the prisoners at the bar, looking at the door; I stood three doors from Pancras-street; Conner was standing in Little Pancras-street, and then he crossed over, and presently I saw him with the copper on his head; I called Mr. Pearce, and asked him if he had the copper in his washhouse, for I was afraid it was gone.

Prisoner Jones. Q. Did you see me speak to Conner - A. I did not.

SAMUEL ROBERTS . I am a constable. The copper was brought to me.

Q. To Mr. Pearce. Is that your property - A. I am sure it is mine.

Jones's Defence. As I was walking along, that gentleman came up to me.

Conner's Defence. All I have got to say is, I know nothing of the man.

JONES, GUILTY , aged 24.

CONNER, GUILTY , aged 37.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

662. JAMES THOMAS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2nd of May , one silver watch, value 50 s. one jacket, value 2 s. one pair of shoes, value 2 s. a bank note, value 2 l. and one bank note, value 1 l. the property of Richad Harlock .

RICHARD HARLOCK . I am a lighterman and bargeman .

Q. When did you lose these things - A. On Monday, the 1st of May, they were on board the barge, laying at Johnson's wharf ; I went on board at nine o'clock at night, on Monday, and went to bed on the Monday. I called my boy to get up; he got up, and look for his shoes, but could not find them; the boy said I cannot find them master; I went up on deck; he told me there was a pair of muddy shoes; my clothes were gone, two bank notes; they were laying by the side of my bed.

Q. Why do you charge the prisoner - A. I went to Shadwell office, and there received the information.

JOHN SMITH . I am a pawnbroker; I had a watch pledged with me, on the 2nd of May, by a young woman, by the name of H. Huggins.

HANNAH HUGGINS . This young man lodged with me a fortnight; he slept out all night, and came home about four o'clock in the morning, and said, that he had been gambling, and won the clothes, a watch, and a one-pound note.

- MORRIS. I am an officer. I received information on the 2nd of May; I took the prisoner in custody; he denied having stole the things, said, he had won them a gambling, he said, he had won the clothes in the raffle and watch.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

563. MARGARET M'KENZIE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of April , seven knives, value 4 s. and four shillings and sixpence , the property of Thomas Dixon .

THOMAS DIXON . I am a publican ; I keep the Hole in the Wall . On the morning of the 12th of April, I heard a noise, as though some one opened the door.

Q. Did the prisoner at the bar lodge with you - A. She did.

Q. What did you do with your money - A. I marked it, and put it in the till; I heard some one come and open the door; I could not get up fast; I went up stairs, and missed four shillings and sixpence, out of five shillings; I got a warrant and officer, and went up stairs, and searched Margaret M'kenzie; the knives was found between the bed and tick; she said, she bought them at an auction.

Mr. Knapp. Q. How long has the prisoner lived at your house - A. Near three quarters of a year.

Q. Whether it was a man, or a woman, you do not know - A. No.

WILLIAM READ . I am an officer. I went with the prosecutor. I found seventeen shillings, and eighteen penny-pieces; she had bought tea and sugar; Mr. Dixon owns two shillings; the knives was found between the bed and tick.

THOMAS GRATHY. I am a shopman; I served the prisoner at the bar.

Q. Is that the money you received from the prisoner - A. I believe it is.

Mr. Dixon. Q. Are these the shillings you marked - A. The two are.

Prisoner's Defence. I am perfectly innocent of the charge.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

664. WILLIAM HEMERSTEAD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2nd of April , three pounds weight of bacon, value 2 s. the property of William Hoston .

MARGARET HOSTON . Q. What is your husband - A. He is a cheesemonger , 17, Baldwin's-gardens .

Q. When did you loose your bacon - A. The prisoner came in for half a pound of cheese; I served him. Then he came back, and I saw him take this piece of bacon, and put it under his frock; I ran after him, and he dropped it down.

Prisoner's Defence. I never had the bacon; she said, I had the bacon; I never see it.

GUILTY , aged 60.

Confined two months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

665. ROBERT WIGHT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22nd of April , one piece of lead pipe, value 2 s. 6 d. affixed to the dwelling-house of William Cross .

MARTHA CROSS . My husband's name is William Cross , I live at No. 12, Beauchamp-street, Brooks-market .

Q. When did you loose your pipe - A. Near eight o'clock at night.

Q. Where was it fixed - A. To the washhouse, I saw the prisoner in the passage, I opened the door, he appeared loaded; I saw in the passage a bit of pipe; I overtook him, he fell down, he got up and run away from me, through Dove-court, he threw the pipe away, I overtook him, and brought him home.

SARAH DOWN . I found one piece of pipe in Dove-court.

SARAH WHITE . I picked up this piece of pipe.

WILLIAM READ . I am an officer, I took the prisoner into custody, the pipe matches to the place.

Prisoner's Defence. I should be glad to serve his Majesty, for a soldier or sailor.

GUILTY aged 32.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

666. SARAH WARD , and ANN WEBB , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of April , ten pounds weight of beef value 5 s. the goods of John Wallis .

EDWARD DAY . I belong to John Wallis , Bloomsbury; when I came home out of the City my master asked me if I could swear to the beef.

- . I live at No. 13, Drury-lane, I saw the prisoner Sarah Ward take a piece of beef off Mr. Wallis's board, and when she got to the top of the market, she beckoned to the other; I asked her what she had got there; I took her back to the butchers; I saw her draw it and put it under her shawl.

Webb's Defence. I was not with her.

Ward's Defence. She was not with me.

WEBB NOT GUILTY .

WARD GUILTY aged 50.

Confined one Year

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

667. MARY STUDD , and JOHANNA STUDD were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of April , ten pair of spectacles, value 50 s. a table cloth, value 10 s. and two napkins, value 5 s. the property of Thomas Blunt .

THOMAS BLUNT . I am an optician in Cornhill. I lost these articles, I missed them on the 16th or 17th of April, I found them on the 18th of April; one was a servant of mine, Mary Studd , Johanna Studd is her mother .

Q. Do you know any thing of your own knowledgemore than the things were pledged - A. No.

HENRY MARGETT . I am a pawnbroker 104, Whitecross-street.

Q. What do you know about this business - A. These things was pledged with me, a ring for four shillings; two pair of spectacles for four shillings, by Johannah Sterry, a silver mounted pair, and another pair for seven shillings; two more pair, a piece of cotton, a napkin a table cloth, and other articles by Johannah Sterry; a pair of silver mounted spectacles by Ann Hooker , for seven shillings.

THOMAS BROOKS . I am a pawnbroker, 131, Whitecross-street. One tablecloth, one pair of silver mounted spectacles, pledged with me, in the name of Ann Hooker .

Q. Who pledged them - A. I cannot say; and a napkin, for two shillings.

JOHN BOOSEY . I live at Mrs. Nicolls, in the City-road; two pair of spectacles was pledged.

JOHN WALKER . One pair of spectacles, and a mariner's compass, was pledged in the name of Mary Sterry .

ANN HOOKER. Q. You pledged these articles at Mr. Brooks's - A. Yes, for Mary Studd .

WILLIAM DRINKWATER . I am an officer. We apprehended Johannah Studd; we went to her lodgings, and found these duplicates in her apartments.

THOMAS MANT . I went and found Mary Studd at her master's house; we suspected the mother, and told her we had a very unpleasent business, and asked her if she had any duplicates; she said, she had too many.

Mr. Blunt. They are all my property.

Q. Was she in your house till the time she was taken - A. She was.

Q. How long had she lived with you - A. Near four years.

Mary Studd 's Defence. All I have got to say is that my mother is perfectly innocent. Mrs. Hooker had the benefit of what she pledged.

Mrs. Hooker. She made me this for a present.

(Witness producing a frock.)

MARY STUDD , GUILTY , aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

JOHANNAH STUDD, GUILTY , aged 50.

Confined two years , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

668. EDWARD SALISBURY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of April , one watch jewel, value 4 s. the property of Thomas Davis .

THOMAS DAVIS . I am a pawnbroker ; I live in Brick-lane, Old-street . On Friday, the 28th of April, just before nine, the prisoner came to my shop to pledge a watch diamond, he pledged it for one shilling, he solicited to do it up, that it might not be lost, it being very small; he stole the stone, and wrapt up the paper; he was caught with the diamond upon him.

Prisoner's Defence. I acknowledge I took it, but to redeem the property.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Confined two months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

669. GEORGE PARKER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of April , two traces, value 2 s. and one brush, value 1 s. the property of James Taylor .

JAMES TAYLOR . I am a pasteboard-maker ; I live No. 70, Old-street . On the 16th of April, I saw the prisoner come out of my stables, with the traces; I caught him; he threw them down; I gave him in charge to a officer.

Prisoner's Defence. I saw the property lay by the stable door, and picked them up.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

670. JOHN WALLIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of April , one time piece, value 20 s. the property of William Walter .

WILLIAM WALTER . I am a carpenter ; I live at 99, Crawford-street .

Q. When did you loose your time piece - A. Between three and six o'clock, on the 8th of April, it was taken out of my window.

- . I am a apprentice to William Watton . I saw the prisoner running round the corner, near Montague-square.

Q. Did you see him take it - A. No.

THOMAS WOODHOUSE . Coming from St. James's, I saw the prisoner running; he threw the time piece away; I picked it up.

SUSANNAH WALTER . I saw the prisoner take it out of the window; I followed him; that is the man.

Prisoner's Defence. I was looking for work; I went into that house for work, and a man as I came out, charged me with stealing the time piece.

GUILTY , aged 18.

Confined two months , and privately whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

670. FRANCIS ROACH , MICHAEL DONAHOUGH , and MARY HUDSON , were indicted for for that they, on the 6th of March , rioutously and tumultiously did assemble for the purpose of breaking in pieces the premises, with forty other persons, of Mr. John Robinson .

THOMAS WIGHT . Q. What is the christian name of Mr. Robinson - A. John Frederick Robinson .

COURT. The indictment states it to be Mr. John Robinson , the witness says his name is Mr. John Frederick Robinson , you consequently must acquit the prisoners.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

672. MARY SKIFFINGTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2nd of April , one pocketbook, value 1 s. one bank note, value 5 l. and one bank-note, value 1 l. the property of William Lowe .

WILLIAM LOWE . I am a seaman .

Q. When did you loose your things - A. On Sunday morning between ten and eleven o'clock in the morning; I went with two ladies to their room, where we had some breakfast; they sit on my knee my money was gone.

Q. Are you sure this girl took your money - A. I am sure.

Q. It was the other girl took your money - A. No.

Q. You was not sober - A. Yes, I had only drank a little.

JOHN CLIFTON. I am a publican, the prosecutor came in about half past twelve, and said he had lost his pocket-book; the book was brought to me in the bar soon after; I do not know who brought it.

- ROBERTS. I am an officer. I took the prisoner in custody.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing of it.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury before Mr. Recorder.

673. CHARLES CLARK was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 21st of April , one great coat, value 12 s. the property of Jane Johnson .

WILLIAM PAGE. I am a watchman of St. Ann's Soho. On the 21st of April, I saw the prisoner with something under his great coat; I followed him I saw him run, I sprang the rattle and when he came into Church-street Soho, he threw off his great coat, and left it in the street, and turned towards Gerrad-street; I took the coat to the watchhouse; the prisoner was brought to the watchhouse,

Q. Are you sure he is the man - A. I can swear to him.

- MACKDONALD. I am a watchman in Lecester-square. I stopped the prisoner, and took from him two keys, which undid the stable doors; the constable of the night has got them.

JOHN HOUSBAND . I am a watchman. About half past three, I saw the prisoner with two glasses under his coat; he threw the glasses on the ground, and broke them; I pursued him.

Q. Are you sure he is the man - A. Yes.

JAMES STONE . I am the constable of the night. I took the keys of the watchman. I went to Mrs. Johnson; I found these keys would open the door. The glasses was gone, and the frames laying by the side.

COURT. A. To Page. Is that the great coat you picked up - A. Yes, he had got it on, as his own.

MRS. JOHNSON. Q. I believe you are a widow; is your mews in Weymouth-street - A. Yes, that is my great coat.

Prisoner's Defence. I known nothing about it, as I was walking, a watchman took me to the watch-house.

GUILTY , aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

674. JOHN ROBERTS , alias ROPE , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of March , one pair of boots, value 5 s. the property of Charles Hobman .

CHARLES HOBMAN. I am a wine-merchant . On Tuesday, the 9th of May, I went up to dinner, and left the boots in the sample room, joining to the accounting-house; I heard a noise in the passage. The servant saw a man go out with a bundle; I pursued him, and waited at the Thames Police office till he came up; I opened his bundle, and found these boots; they are my property.

CHARLES LAWRY . I saw the prisoner come out of the accompting-house, with a bundle.

GUILTY , aged 53.

Confined fourteen days , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

675. JOHN KELLY , PATRICK CONWAY , and THOMAS BAGSTER , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of April , one box, value 5 s. one pewter plate, value 1 s. and other articles , the property of James Baverstock .

JAMES BAVERSTOCK . I am a tide-waiter ; I was stationed on board a brig, in Billingsgate Dock . About half past six o'clock, I went for my things, and found them gone; they were placed at the after part of the cabin; I enquired for them, and was going to offer a reward, when I heard the were at Aldgate watchhouse.

WILLIAM BIRCH . I am a watchman. On the 27th of April, we went down to the Tower ditch; close to the side, we found the prisoners; the sailor had the box on his head.

- WOOING. I am patrole, belonging to Tower Hill. I saw the prisoners go down to the Tower ditch; we stopped them.

Kelly's Defence. These men employed me to carry the box.

KELLY, NOT GUILTY .

BAGSTER, NOT GUILTY .

CONWAY, GUILTY , aged 32.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

676. JAMES KENSEY and THOMAS KENSEY were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of April , two waistcoats, value 6 s. one silk handkerchief, value 2 s. three clasp knives, value 1 s. the property of John Charmichial .

JOHN CHARMICHIAL . I live at the White Hart, Hackney .

Q. When did you lose these things - A. On the 12th of April; they were taken out at three o'clock.

Q. Why do you accuse the prisoners - A. Because one of them had my waistcoat on; they gave me a duplicate.

- NOOLEY. I live at No. 6, Russell-street, Covent Garden. I had a silk handkerchief pledged by James Kensey , on the 13th of April.

JAMES ROLF . I am a pawnbroker, No. 151, Bishopsgate-street. I have a waistcoat, pledged by James Kensey , on the 12th of April.

ROBERT PISCOTT . I am a constable of Hackney. I was sent for on the 13th, I searched the prisoners, and found a quantity of duplicates, two clasp knives, which belongs to Mr. Charmichial; I found one on Thomas, and the other on James.

Mr. Charmichial. That is my waistcoat, knives, and handkerchief.

James Kensey 's Defence. I shall leave it to the mercy of the court.

JAMES KENSEY GUILTY , aged 22.

THOMAS KENSEY GUILTY aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

677. CHARLES NORMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of April , two coach reins, value 2 s. the property of Thomas Coxhead Marsh .

THOMAS FOBLY . I am a coachman. On the 25th of April, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I lost these reins out of the coachhouse in Capell Mews.

WILLIAM POUNDY . I was helping to get the coach ready; I came down to the coach house, and saw the prisoner; I called to the lad, we followed and overtook him.

Prisoner. Q. You never saw me in the coach-house - A. I did.

- . I am groom to Mr. Marsh, I pursued the prisoner, and took him.

GUILTY aged 61.

Confined one Year , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury before Mr. Recorder.

678. GEORGE TAYLOR was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of May , two glass bottles value 6 d. and two quarts of shrub, value 4 s. the property of James Crook , and other counts, stating it to be the property of different persons.

JAMES CROOKE . Q. When did you loose your things - A. On the 4th of May, in the Hay-market the property was taken in execution.

Q. What is pour partner's name - A. William Armstrong , I sold the stock by sample; the prisoner at the bar was a porter in my employ, and being informed he had taken these things, I gave him in custody.

EDWARD ROWLEY . I was in posession. No. 52, in the Hay-market; I saw the prisoner go into the yard to the retail shrub cask, and fill the bottles, and put them into his pocket, and go away with them.

CHARLES TINKLER . I am a servant to Mr. Darley, in the Hay-market; I saw the man take two glass bottles and fill them, and put them into his pocket.

Prisoner's Defence. The witness gave me leave to take the shrub.

Witness. I only gave him leave to take a glass.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

679. ROBERT HARRIS . and JOHN KELLY , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of April , one box, value 1 s. two books. value 1 l. and a great coat, value 5 s. the property of John Johnson .

JOHN JOHNSON , I am a carrier from the King of Denmark's head to Paddington , On the 19th of April, I received a box and put it on my cart, I saw it safe at the Green Man and Still, Oxford-road a little before nine o'clock that night.

Q, Where was it going - A. To Dublin, it was corded on my cart.

JOHN REEVES , I belong to Mr. Johnson, I was going along the road towards Paddington , the box was tied behind the cart, when I came to the Buffalo's-head , the dog came to my horses head, I got down and found the box was gone; I enquired, and found that two men was gone up the road with the box, and I found the box in the ditch.

PATRICK CONNER . I am a watchman, Robert Harris was given me in custody.

THOMAS FELSTON . I was passing in the New-road, a little before nine o'clock, I saw three men together, one of which had a box on his head; the prisoner Harris was standing by the railings, I went to him, he whistled; I told him there was something going on improper, he took him in custody, I pursued, and when they had got to some railings, the man that had the box, threw it over the railings.

JAMES DONNER . I was going along the New-road, on the 19th of April, I saw three men lifting a box up on one shoulder; Thomas Felston came up to me and presently they threw the box over the rails, and the prisoner Kelly got over on the other side the watchman came up. Kelly endeavoured to run away, but the watchman took him in custody.

Q. To John Johnson . Is that the box you put on your cart - A. Yes, it is the same.

Harris's Defence. I was not in their company.

Kelly's Defence. As I was coming down the New-road, I heard the rattles; I went to see what was the matter, the man said I was one of the three men.

HARRIS NOT GUILTY .

KELLY GUILTY aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

680. WILLIAM UNDERWOOD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of May , one handkerchief, value 1 s. the property of John Hodges .

SECOND COUNT; Stating it to be the property of another person.

BENJAMIN JOHNSON . I am an officer. On the 1st of May, I was at Blue Green Fair ; I saw the prisoner attempt to pick pockets; I followed him, I saw him take a handkerchief out of a gentleman's pocket; I took him in custody.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

681. SUSANNAH HASSAR was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of April , one table spoon, value 10 s. the property of Henry Lewis Rowland .

HENRY LEWIS ROLAND . I am a Tavern keeper , the prisoner was my servant , the spoon was traced to her.

ANN WILSON . The prisoner lodged with me she said she had lost the spoon and paid for it; I sold the bowl.

ELIZABETH MOORE . I went to Mr. Bucklers, and sold the handle, I never saw the prisoner; Ann Wilson told me that she had lodged with her.

HENRY BUCKLER . I bought the bowl of one woman, and the handle of another, I sold them with old silver the following day.

WILLIAM READ , I am an officer. I took the prisoner in custody.

Prisoner's Defence. I went to chelsea, how the spoon came into my bundle I do not know, I was up all night; I never said I lost the spoon; they took the hammer and bent the spoon, and somebody told my master; he came and took me in custody.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder .