Old Bailey Proceedings Online (www.oldbaileyonline.org, version 6.0, 22 September 2014), May 1814 (18140525).

Old Bailey Proceedings, 25th May 1814.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY, FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND ALSO THE GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, HELD AT Justice-Hall, in the Old Bailey, On WEDNESDAY the 25th of MAY, 1814, and following Days;

BEING THE FIFTH SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF The Right Honourable WILLIAM DOMVILLE , LORD-MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY JOB SIBLY, No. 4, CARTHUSIAN-STREET, ALDERSGATE-STREET.

LONDON:

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED (BY THE AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON,) By R. Butters, No. 22, Fetter-lane, Fleet-street.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON.

Before the Right Honorable WILLIAM DOMVILLE , Lord Mayor of the City of London; Sir Simon Le Blanc , knt. one of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir George Wood , knt. one of the Barons of His Majesty's Court of Exchequer; George Scholey , esq. Harvey Christian Combe , esq. Sir James Shaw , bart. Aldermen of the said City; John Silvester , esq. Recorder of the said City; Thomas Smith , esq. Samuel Birch , esq. Samuel Goodbehere , esq. Aldermen of the said City; and Newman Knowlys , esq. Common Serjeant of the said City; His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of Goal Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City, and County of Middlesex.

London Jury.

William Rose ,

George Heen ,

Ralph Jackson ,

John Austin ,

John Vivey ,

George M'Quire ,

Thomas Moxon ,

Robert Wain ,

Edward Cross ,

Joseph Milner ,

Benjamin Badman ,

Christopher Cockerton .

First Middlesex Jury.

James Butler ,

Edward Stollworthy ,

Thomas Stevens ,

Benjamin Fox ,

Thomas Chame ,

Thomas Cradock ,

John Davis ,

Thomas Wheeler ,

John Powell ,

John Richard Wilkins ,

Nicholas Byron ,

George Harlow .

Second Middlesex Jury.

Moses Brent ,

Samuel Rackstraw ,

William Pearce ,

John Simpson ,

James Fontaine ,

Samuel Bannister ,

William James ,

William Chapple ,

William Harpthorp ,

Joseph Charles Riley ,

Robert Adams ,

William Starke .

460. CHARLES FREDERICK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of February , one pewter quart pot, value 1 s. and three pewter pint pots, value 3 s. the property of George Gruby .

GEORGE GRUBY . I keep the Angel and Trumpet public-house, at Stepney . On the 21st of February, the prisoner came into my house, and asked for half a pint of porter; he sat, and drank his porter, warmed himself, and went out with the pots now in question. I followed him, overtook him, and found three pint pots and a quart pewter pot in his pockets. I have only one of them now; the others I have lost since. This is one of the pots I found upon him; it is mine.

Prisoner's Defence. Last sessions I was discharged here by proclamation; I hope you will think I have undergone punishment sufficient for this offence. I have served his Majesty on board a man-of-war. As I was passing along Whitechapel, an officer accosted me, and took me in custody, for the same charge for which I had been discharged last sessions.

Prosecutor. I was too late last sessions to find the bill; I was told, I must file the bill this sessions. I am sure he is the man.

GUILTY , aged 35.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

461. REBECCA EVELEIGH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of April , seven hundred and twenty pounds weight of candles, value 40 l. and fifty-six pounds weight of soap, value 3 l. the property of Randell Clark .

RANDELL CLARK . I am a tallow-chandler ; I live in Bishopsgate-street without.

Q. Did you lose any candles at any time - A. I did, a large quantity, on Sunday evening, the 27th of March, or early on Monday, the 28th. I lost them from my warehouse in Catherine Wheel yard ; that is near my house. I also lost a quantity of soap.

Q. When did you last see them - A. My lad saw them on the Sunday morning; he went to feed the dog which I kept there as a guard to the warehouse. I missed them about a quarter after seven on Monday morning; I then found three locks broken, and my dog was in a state of stupefaction; he could hardly stand upon his legs. I gave notice at the office.

Q. Do you know any thing of Eveleigh, or his wife - A. I do not. A man that keeps a horse and cart in the yard where my warehouse is, gave me information, his name is Westey; he came and told me my doors were open. I missed my property on Monday morning, the 28th of February. I saw my candles again on the 7th of April. The prisoner's husband keeps a chandler's shop.

JOHN ARMSTRONG . I am an officer. I went with a search warrant, and searched the prisoner's premises, on Thursday, the 7th of April, in company with Mr. Clark, and my son, who is an officer, and another person. I went to a house in Long-alley, in the parish of St. Leonard, Shoreditch; I found the woman prisoner in the shop, with a child or two. I told her, I had a search warrant, and asked her who lived there; she said she and her husband. I pulled out a drawer; Mr. Clark saw some candles he knew. I begged of her if she had any more to shew them to them to Mr. Clark and me. I knew her husband by name and person. Me and my son searched the parlour; we found in a drawer in the cupboard a great number of house-breaking implements; this is one of the crows, a dark lanthorn, and a pistol, loaded with ball. We have used every endeavour to find the man; he has absconded. I have every reason to believe she is the man's lawful wife. I knew the man well, and so does my son. My son knows no more than me.

Q. to Prosecutor. Look at the candles - A. I have not the least doubt of their being my candles; I knew them by the cotton, and the bottoms in particular.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

462. MARY DUNN and MARY LEONARD were indicted for that they, on the 21st of April , traiterously did counterfeit and coin, two base and false pieces of coin, resembling the current silver coin of this realm, called sixpences, against the duty of their allegiance .

ELIZABETH FEWHEY . Q. Do you know the two prisoners - A. I do; they are mother and daughter. I have known them about two years. I met the mother about nine weeks ago, in Barbican; I had a little conversation with her. She invited me to her place, No. 4, Broad Arrow-court, Grub-street . I went there, and then nothing particularly passed. I did not see her daughter then. I did not see her until the day she was taken up.

Q. When you first saw her, did she tell you the mode of her life - A. She said, she was going to make some base coin, that her daughter was going to Ireland with. She said no more at that time. This was the first time. This conversation was in the first floor front room; she took me to that room as her own room.

Q. Do you recollect the day you went again - A. No, I cannot. On the day she was taken up I went there again, between twelve and one in the day, and I went there in the evening; I saw a little girl belonging to the second floor; she asked me who I wanted. I got up to Mrs. Dunn's door; I knocked at the door. The little girl asked me again who I wanted; I said I did not want her. After my knocking at the door, Mrs. Dunn aid to her daughter, Mrs. Leonard open the door, I do not mind her.

Q. Did Mrs. Dunn know your voice - A. Yes. I spoke loud enough for any one in the room to hear me. The door was opened immediately. I heard the door unbolted. I went into the room; I found both the prisoners there, Mrs. Dunn and her daughter, Mrs. Leonard, when I went in. In the first instance, I saw two files and some scouring-paper on the floor; Mrs. Dunn took them up, and took them in the second floor herself. I sat down upon the bed, and had some conversation with Mrs. Leonard. While I was sitting down, Mrs. Leonard took several blanks from under the coverlid.

Q. What do you mean by blanks - A. I mean pieces of metal in the form of sixpences.

Q. You stated, they were taken from under the bed-quilt - A. Yes. Some of them were round, and some crooked; they were not all of one size; they were all in the shape of sixpences.

Q. Had you and Leonard any conversation about them - A. Yes; I asked her to let me look at them; she gave me two or three to look at. Upon my looking at them, I observed some of them had been coloured before; I told her so. She said, they had, but they had been spoiled, and Leonard said, she meaned to colour them again; she intended to make some to go to Ireland. She said, she intended to go there, and intended to make a sufficient quantity to go there.

Q. Did you see her do any thing with these blanks - A. I saw her crook them with her teeth. Dunn was in the second floor all this time.

Q. Dunn was not in the room at this time - A. No. I observed they were small; Mrs. Leonard said, she could pass them better small than large.

Q. How long did you remain there - A. An hour and a half. Mrs. Dunn came down just as I was going away. Mrs. Dunn said are you going away; will not you stay to tea, or return to tea. I said, I did not know; perhaps I might. I went away. I went to Hatton Garden office, and passing along Clerkenwell, I met Read, junior, the officer; I communicated to him what had passed. He appointed me to meet him at six o'clock at Hatton Garden office. I met Read at the office at six o'clock in the evening; I then was taken before the magistrate, and gave information. I was to meet Read, senior, junior, and Limbrick, at the Black Horse, in Barbican, at seven o'clock in the evening. I went to the Black Horse; I met the Reads and Limbrick. I then went to Mrs. Dunn's; I found both the prisoners in their own room.

Q. Were both of the prisoners there - A. Yes. I staid there about an hour, and returned to the officers; I gave the officers information of what I had seen. The officers went immediately to the prisoners house. I accompanied them to the door, and then I left them. I don't know any thing further.

Mr. Alley. How long have you been acquainted with these two women - A. About two years.

Q. Where is your poor husband - A. He is in prison, for an eighteen-penny token. I have likewise been in prison for an eighteen-penny token. I have never been a witness upon any occasion before.

Q. You know they are indicted for high treason, and that there is a reward, do you not - A. I don't know it.

Q. What are you - A. I am a straw bonnet maker; I work for Mr. Medley, a straw bonnet maker, in Sloane-street, No. 145. I never heard of a reward.

WILLIAM READ , JUNIOR. I am an officer.

Q. Did the woman that has just stood down, give you any information against the prisoners - A. She did. She afterwards took me to the house, and there I found the prisoners at the bar, on the 21st of April, near eight o'clock; I found the prisoners door shut. I expected to find it open. A woman looked out of the window. I said, I wanted to come in; she said, she would let me in directly. I heard persons running up and down stairs. I threw up the parlour sash, and got in at the window; I broke the parlour door open, it being locked on the outside. I instantly let the other officers in. I heard a great noise of running up and down stairs, and I heard something fall, as if out of the window upon the tiles, I heard it jingle as money would; I heard something fall that I supposed to be money. After I had opened the street door, and let my father in and Limbrick, Limbrick and I went up stairs into the first floor; there we saw the two prisoners; the door was open. Mrs. Leonard had her cap and handkerchief off, and seemed much torn about, and much agitated; the other seemed very much frightened. I told them I had a search warrant, to search on suspicion of coining; they said, they did not know any thing about it; they did not do it there; they did not know what we meaned. We then searched about different parts of the room. I found eight shillings and sixpence in good money upon Mrs. Leonard; no bad. Limbrick searched Dunn, and found a quantity of halfpence. Between the bed and the quilt, I found eight blanks; in the tinder-box on the shelf over the mantle-piece, I found a coloured sixpence, and some cuttings of metal. Under the bedstead I found several more blanks, and some more cuttings, and more pieces of metal, apparently as though they had been sixpences before; they were blank sixpences, not coloured; they were in the chamber-pot; I emptied the pot. Here is one sixpence coloured, the same as what I found on the shelf over the the fire place. I found this whitening and cream of tartar together. In different parts of the room I found sand-paper, it is all over brass, and here is some yellow soap. In the second floor, I found a file; it is all over brass. Mrs. Dunn went and sat down by the fire place; I observed her hand go. I went to the fire immediately, and took a piece of saltpetre out of the fire. In searching the cupboard, I found this hammer and iron plate; at that time the iron plate was all over brass, and the hammer appeared to have been used recently. I then went up into the second floor; I found in searching on the shelf twenty-four bad shillings and bad sixpences coloured, and on the shelf I found cream of tartar, three bottles; and these clothes; they appear to have been stained with something wet. The prisoners said, they were innocent of what they were charged with. That is all I produce. Then I tookthe prisoners into custody. The two prisoners owned that they lodged together. I asked them whether they occupied that room; they said, they did; they lived together.

JOHN LIMBRICK . I accompanied Read to this house.

Q. We understand the younger Read got in, and opened the door - A. He did. I went in with the other Read. There was a window on the staircase open; it looked into the back yard; it is a small yard; there is a shed underneath the window; it adjoins the house. In that back yard, I looked out there by hearing a noise of something jingling; I was satisfied there was something thrown out there. In looking out of this window, I found this apron laying on the tides of the shed; I went and took it; it contained three files, a parcel of cuttings, and blanks.

Q. What are the blanks - A. They are metal blanks for sixpences. I also found six sixpences finished; they wore on the tiles; thrown out in paper as they are now, in separate papers. I proceeded to look into the privy.

Q. In the place where you found this apron, could that be thrown quite easy out of this window - A. Yes, quite easy; the shed is underneath. I then went to the privy; there I saw some cuttings on the seat, and these three files; on the teeth of them they were full of brass filings; they are the same filings as would come off pieces of this metal. In the privy I saw some blanks; Read will speak to that; he took it. Then I went into the house. There is a cupboard underneath the stairs, in the passage, I found this cup and this rag over it.

Q. Do you know what is in the cup - A. It is stuff for rubbing over the blanks to produce the colour of silver; there is aquafortis in it. I then went up stairs; Mrs. Dunn was in the room. She said; where did you get that from; I know nothing of it.

Q. Had you asked her any question about that cup - A. I had not. It was just as I came into the room; having it in my hand, and nothing being said to her, she made that observation in the room. I found these scissars; they have brass upon them, and this flat iron, with the appearance of brass on it now. I found this cloth, it is stained with aquafortis, with wiping off. These pieces of metal were in the room, and some sand paper. I perceived Dunn throw something towards the fire when I went into the room; I raked it out. I took out a sixpence, some cuttings, and some sand paper; that is all I found. Afterwards I saw Macdonald and Conner in the room; they were both taken up, and afterwards discharged. This table me and Read found in their room; it looked apparently as if they had been working upon it; there was the white stuff that I have described, some of the stuff out of the cup. It appeared to me as if they had been working on the table. The younger prisoner asked me how we came by out information; I told her that was not a fair question. She said, she supposed it was that b - y But Fewhey; for there had nobody else been in the room but her.

WILLIAM READ , JUNIOR. I was in company with Limbrick and my son. I saw Limbrick find these things upon the tiles. I produce two blanks; I took them off the tiles; they were scattered on the tiles, and one coloured, and wrapped up in paper, in that way. I found this cup in a tub, in the one pair of stairs room, nearly close to the table; it is the same sort of stuff as you had in the other cup. I searched Dunn. I found between seven and eight shillings upon Dunn, and a vast quantity of halfpence in the room. Both the prisoners told me the room belonged to them. In the coach, going along, they said, they knew who had given the information:

CALEB EDWARD POWELL . I am an assistant to the Solicitor of the Mint. I have carried on these prosecutions many years. I am perfectly well acquainted with the materials now produced; they are necessary for coining; the scouring paper, files, scissars, cloth, and aquafortis, and all other articles produced, are complete for the purpose of coining; they are complete for finishing a sixpence from the beginning to the end.

Q. Look at the sixpences now produced; these are two found in the prisoners room; tell me whether they are genuine or counterfeits - A. They are counterfeits; they are finished fit for circulation. The slight manner in which they are coloured, require them to be kept in paper; this way, their being exposed to the air, the colour would go off. They are completely finished for their purpose.

JOHN NICOLLS . I am one of the moniers of his Majesty's Mint.

Q. Look at these two sixpences found in the prisoners room - A. They are both counterfeits.

Dunn's Defence. I know nothing about it.

Leonard's Defence. The same.

DUNN, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 70.

LEONARD, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 38.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood .

463. BARBARA NICOLLS was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Mary Matthews , about the hour of ten in the night of the 5th of July , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, two sheets, value 10 s. a petticoat, value 5 s. three shirts, value 4 s. three guineas, four seven-shilling pieces, and 8 l. in monies numbered, her property .

MARY MATTHEWS. In July last, I lived at No. 5, Castle-yard, Broadway, in the parish of St. Margaret's, Westminster . On the 5th of July I left the house after nine at night; I came home before twelve. I found my door open, and the padlock put on the table, and no one in the house. I left my door padlocked on the outside, and locked the other lock besides. I am now talking of my room-door. I first went to my trunk, and missed my money. I cannot say whether my trunk was locked or not. I missed all my money, and two aprons and a petticoat out of the room; a habit shift, three guineas in gold, four seven-shilling pieces, and some silver, but I do not know how much. I had all my money in my hand that morning. This is the receipt, I paid my landlord that morning. The prisoner had lodged in my house two Christmas's, I believe. She lodged in myhouse last July until the 3d of May. In November I was robbed again. On the 3d of May, I saw something on her head that I was robbed of on the 5th of July. The edging of one of my habit shirts was on her head before that. I saw the edging in her room on the top of her drawers. That was on the Friday before the 3d of May. On the 3d of May I took the prisoner up.

Q. How came you to go in her room on the Friday before the 3d of May - A. A young woman was at work in the room; I went in. The prisoner was not at home. Seeing that, I was thoroughly convinced who had robbed me on the 6th of July. On the 3d of May I went to Mr. Gillmore and got a warrant, and had her room searched, and had her taken up. She then had the edging on her head upon her cap; the edging I knew was mine. Mr. Gillmore found the duplicate of two of my husband's shirts.

JAMES GILLMORE . I am an officer. On the 3d of May the prosecutrix applied to me. I went to the prosecutrix's house; I found the prisoner at home in her own apartment. I told her I had a warrant to search for some stolen goods that I suspected she had got. Mrs. Matthews was with me. The prisoner begged Mrs. Matthews not to hurt her. I desired Mrs. Matthews to give her no answer, but to let me proceed in the search. I found in the prisoner's box in her room several duplicates. (the prisoner produced me the key), among which is the duplicate of two shirts pledged at Mr. Graham's, in Stratton-ground. I then desired Mrs. Matthews to bring to me her padlock of her door. She did. The key which the prisoner gave me to open her box, locks and unlocks the prosecutrix's padlock; and the key of the prisoner's room door, unlocks and locks the prosecutrix's door. I asked the prisoner if she had not heard that Mrs. Matthews had been robbed; she said, yes, she had. She before had said that she found them on the stairs. I then said, if you had, why had not you told Mrs. Matthews so before. The pawnbroker attends here with the things. I have the duplicate; this is it.

WILLIAM GRAHAM . I am a pawnbroker in Westminster.

Q. Take the duplicate into your hand produced by Gillmore - A. These are the two shirts that were pledged at my house; my daughter took them in. She dropped down dead suddenly. I don't know who she took them of. They were in our house pledged for four shillings, one on the 14th of July, and the other on the 13th of October.

Prosecutrix. They are my property; they were my husband's shirts; his name is marked on them. This petticoat Mr. Gillmore found in the prisoner's room; it is mine.

Q. Did you give Gillmore your padlock and lock off your room door - A. I did, and I am sure I locked it when I went out at past nine at night. I left a light in my room when I went out.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence; called four witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY , aged 32.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only, but not of breaking and entering the dwelling-house in the night time.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

464. THOMAS WELSH and JOHN GRIFFITHS were indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Robert Swiney , no person being therein, between the hours of three and four in the afternoon on the 30th of April , and stealing therein, a gold toothpick, value 7 s. a gold cross, value 3 s. a cloak, value 10 s. a broach, value 21 s. five handkerchiefs, value 5 s. three petticoats, value 1 l. five handkerchiefs, value 1 s. 6 d. a cloak, value 10 s. five shillings and sixpence in monies numbered, and four 1 l. bank notes, his property .

EDWARD SWINEY . Q. Where did you live upon the 30th of April - A. I lived at 37, in Horn's-alley, Liquorpond-street , close to Meux's brewhouse, in the parish of St. Andrew's, Holborn. On the 30th of April, Thomas Welsh and John Griffiths , about one o'clock, they both came together to my door just as I was going out. I was eating my dinner in my own room; Welsh asked me if I could help him to a job of plaistering. Welch is a plaisterer , and an Irishman. He told me to go with him to the next public-house. I refused to go with him; they insisted I should go. I went into the public-house; he called for a pot of beer; he drank first, and handed the pot to me; he told me to sit down. I sat down. He then put down an hammer and an iron crow on the table. Welsh's wife came to the window, and called him out. He went out in about ten minutes, and took the hammer and crow. He came back afterwards; he did not bring back the hammer or the iron crow. I said I could not stop any longer; he said I was welcome to drink the share of two or three pots of beer if I would stop. I stopped with him about half an hour, and then I went away to my work. I told him when I saw him again I would reward him for it I told him that my wife was not at home; that she would not be at home before six o'clock. My wife happened to come home before I did.

Q. When you went out of your house did you fasten up your door - A. Yes; I locked my room door and the street door. The lodgers in my house were all out at work. I have two lodgers in the house. When I locked the house I did not leave any one in the house. My wife came home first, and when I came home I found three locks broken open; the lock of the street door, my room door, and the lock of my box was broken open, and my things gone.

Welsh. Where did I meet with you - A. At my own door; you followed me into my room.

COURT. I thought you said you were eating your dinner - A. Yes. They came plump into my room; then they went out to the door, and stopped while I was locking my door.

MARGARET SWINEY . On the 30th of April, I left my house at eight o'clock in the morning; when I returned, I found the street door and my own room door broken open. The box stood just behind the door. I locked the box at half past eight o'clock, when I went out; I opened the box just about five minutes before I went out. I lost four gowns. Every thing that I left in the box was gone. I saw everything in it before I went out; a gold tooth-pick was gone, a broach, four gowns, a cloak, five handkerchiefs, a shawl, and four pound eleven shillings; there were several notes of the Bank of England. I made an alarm, and then I went to my husband, where he was at work. I have found no part of my property.

HANNAH KEITH . I live at No. 1, Horn's-alley. On the 30th of April, between three and four in the afternoon, I saw Thomas Welsh and John Griffiths in Swiney's passage of his house; Griffiths came out, and stood against the house as if he was making water. Welsh staid in the house. John Griffiths was standing by the house pretending to make water. Griffiths had an hammer in his hand, and Welsh had an iron crow. That is all I know. It was on a Saturday when I saw them in the house, and between twelve and one o'clock. I saw Thomas Welsh with a pipe in his mouth, and Mr. Swiney going with him to a public-house. I did not see Griffiths then. Welsh went into the public-house with Swiney.

Q. Have you been examined before the magistrate - A. Yes, I have.

Q. You did not say a word about this before the magistrate - A. Yes, I told the same as I do now, I am sure of it.

Q. You are quite sure you did see them in Swiney's passage - A. I did; I told the magistrate so.

JAMES KEITH . The last witness is my sister. I live at No. 1, Horn's-alley. I saw Welsh go down the court with a bricklayer's hammer in his hand about half after eleven, when I was eating my dinner. He went into Mr. Swiney's yard; he stopped there about two minutes. His wife was with him. After that I did not see Welsh until between three and four o'clock; I then saw him go into Swiney's yard again. Griffiths was with him, but I never saw Griffiths go in. Griffiths stood at the bottom of the court, leaning over a post at that time; I never saw him go in. I did not see any body with him. A little while afterwards, I saw Welsh come out with a bundle under his arm. That might be in about twenty times. He came out with a sailor's sack, a little narrow bag. He had nothing when he went in; he had this bag coming out. The bag appeared to be full; I cannot say what was in it. Welsh came down the court; Griffiths took the hammer, and Welsh's wife came up the court.

Q. When you saw him between three and four o'clock did you see the hammer then - A. I did not. When he came down I saw the hammer in his hand. Welsh passed down the court with the bundle; his wife went up the court. That is all I have to say.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood .

465. CHARLES EDWARD COX was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of February , a watch, value 25 l. the property of Peter Delany , in his dwelling-house .

JOHN FORTY . I am shopman to Peter Delaney , he keeps a goldsmith and jeweller's shop , 68, New Bond-street , in the parish of St. George, Hanover-square. On the 16th of February last, about half past seven in the evening, I was in the shop alone; the prisoner came in.

Q. Look at him; are you certain he is the man - A. I am certain. He asked to look at a watch which was suspended in the window. I took it down; he examined it; I gave it into his hand. He then requested to look at some others, which I accordingly took down. He then desired me to recommend him one which I thought was a good one, that would do him service. I did; I recommended him the best watch in the shop. He asked me whether I could warrant it to perform well. I told him I would warrant it to perform remarkably well. After a little conversation he desired me to reach him one suspended at the left of the window. While I was turning myself to reach that watch, the prisoner ran out of the shop. I saw him have the watch in his hand, and when I turned round again he and the watch was gone. I could not pursue him; I was alone.

Q. What was the value of the watch - A. Twenty-five pounds. It was a gold watch; it was worth more than that. We could not purchase one of that quality for ten pounds more. It was the property of Peter Delaney . Last week I was informed the prisoner was in custody in the city; I went there, and recognised him.

Q. How long was he bargaining and talking about this watch - A. I should imagine he was in the shop about four minutes; it was dark; we had a lighted candle in the shop, and a lamp.

Prisoner's Defence. Situated as I am, not having time to send to my friends, trusting entirely to a jury of my country, which is the greatest gratification to a prisoner, the trial by jury. Gentlemen, the man who knows his innocence can put his hand to his heart, and has nothing to fear. I declare, most solemnly, gentlemen, that I am as innocent as any of you. I am situated without a counsel, having been committed on Saturday. Gentlemen, I have been at large after having undergone three examinations. I was acquitted of the whole charge, but I fell within the domain of Bow-street. I now appear before you. Gentlemen, now the prevarication of the witness I will ask you. The witness now swears positively to me. It is now three months ago; whether from that period to four months, which positively did not exceed a minute and a half, how he can prevaricate before a jury. I should be sorry to say that he is the individual that did the act himself. I can thus much declare, no property has been found. It is something extremely singular, at the office he felt a degree of agitation in swearing to me, now he can swear to me. If I had shrunk from the court I must have been a guilty man, though conscious I am that whatever your verdict may be I shall be satisfied. To my God and my country I leave it. I have not been allowed time to call my friends, or else I could have confirmed my innocence.

GUILTY , aged 26,

Of stealing, but not in the dwelling-house.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

466. CHARLES EDWARD COX was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of January , awatch, value 30 l. the property of James Dunkin , in his dwelling-house .

JAMES DUNKIN . I live in St. James's-street ; I keep a watch-maker's shop . I know the watch was missing from my shop on the 17th of January. I saw the watch in the shop in the fore part of the day. After the theft was committed, I was sent for, by Joseph Shadwell my shopman.

JOSEPH SHADWELL . I am shopman to Mr. Dunkin.

Q. Do you recollect in January last, any watch being missed from his shop - A. I do; to the best of my recollection, it was on Monday, the 17th of January, about a quarter past seven in the evening, I was alone in the shop; the prisoner came into the shop; I am certain it was the prisoner. He came into the shop, and asked me if we had a silver chronometer; I told him we had, and handed him one from the drawer of the iron chest, under the counter. He looked at the silver chronometer, and asked my opinion of it. He wished to know the difference between a gold and silver chronometer; I asked him if he wanted a watch for nautical purposes. I then showed him a gold watch. A second person came into the shop, and asked me if I had a silver watch at two pound five shillings, or two two pound ten shillings; I told him I had. He said he was in an hurry. I went to reach a silver watch, and the prisoner darted out of the shop, with the gold watch in his hand. I rushed from behind the counter, but was somewhat impeded by the second man; that man hindered me. I run on the pavement; I was not able to pursue the prisoner, on account of leaving a stranger in the shop. I might have overtaken him, but I must have left the shop to the stranger. The prisoner was in the shop six or seven minutes; we had two lamps and two candles. I had a very good light. I have no doubt of his person. It is now some time ago, since the 17th of January. The moment I saw him again, I had no doubt of his person.

Prisoner's Defence. My lord and gentlemen of the jury, it is an extreme hard case having no solicitor to defend me in this awful predicament; I shall regret it as long as I live. To be tried by a jury of my own country is a gratifying thing. Now, gentlemen, an individual has sworn to me, and another persists in swearing to me on former occasions; they said, they did think it was me. The worthy alderman told them they must not give belief, it was a cruel thing to deprive an individual of a character. Now, gentlemen of the jury; standing as I do, it may be construed that I feel hardened; believe me, I have no such a disposition. I am innocent. I am compelled by my God and my country to say, that the stranger who came into the shop might have done the act, and I myself, am to be made the sacrifice. I shall depend upon whatever your verdict may be; I shall never complain. I have myself, sat in your capacity. But whenever a doubt arose, I always leaned to the side of mercy.

GUILTY , aged 26,

Of stealing, out not in the dwelling-house.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

467. JOHN FIELD, alias JONATHAN WILD , MICHAEL BERRY , SARAH COLLARD , and WILLIAM ROBINSON , were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Philip Phillips , about the hour of twelve in the night of the 9th of April , and burglariously stealing therein, two silver waiters, value 25 l. a tea-pot, value 12 l. five ladles, value 9 l. 10 s. a cheese-scoop, value 1 l. a butter-knife, value 1 l. a pair of snuffers and stand, value 6 l. 12 s. a table-bell with ivory handle, value 3 l. nine frocks, value 1 l. 10 s. a pelisse, value 1 l. 10 s. a pair of spurs, value 1 l. four silver candlesticks, value 12 l. two pinafores, value 4 s. two petticoats, value 10 s. a cloak, value 1 l. 16 s. two pair of stockings, value 16 s. two work-boxes, value 3 l. one hundred and forty-four knives, value 12 l. two hundred and forty-four pair of scissars, value 12 l. one hundred and forty-four razors, value 7 l. twenty gilt purses, value 18 s. seven hundred and fifty-four pocket-combs, value 22 l. an hair trunk, value 60 s. sixty pair of scissars, value 3 l. forty-six broaches, value 18 s. twenty-eight purses, value 6 l. 18 s. ten thousand needles, value 3 l. a 2 l. bank note, and nine 1 l. bank notes, the property of Philip Phillips , in his dwelling-house .

PHILIP PHILLIPS . I am a merchant ; I live in King-street, Bartholomew-close ; I keep the house. On Saturday, the 9th of April, I went to bed about twelve o'clock; I examined the fastenings before I went to bed; they were all secure. I was particularly attentive to the fastenings. The house had been attempted two or three nights before. I gave particular charge to all the watchmen in the neighbourhood. The cellar door was fastened. That cellar leads to the warehouse. There is a stair case from there to the warehouse; the dwelling-house is above the warehouse; it is all under one roof. I went to bed about twelve o'clock; the nursery-maid and Mrs. Phillips were up last. On the next morning, I was awoke by the nursery-maid; she told me there was a number of things laying about the warehouse in confusion. I got up. I went into the drawing-room; I found the glass buffet broken open; the lock had been forced, and all the articles of plate, with the exception of a wine-strainer, had been taken out. I had seen the buffet the night before, all was safe. Some of the articles that I missed, I saw afterwards. I missed a large silver waiter, a smaller ditto, a silver tankard and cover, four silver candlesticks, a silver soup-ladle, a gravy-ladle, a sauce-ladle, a cheese-scoop, and a silver table-bell with ivory handle; that was taken out of one of the cupboards.

Q. Did you look at the table-drawer in that room - A. I did. I have a secretary and a book-case also in that room. The drawer was nearly emptied, and open. I went into the kitchen; I missed six silver table-spoons from the kitchen; I had seen them there the evening before. I then went to the warehouse; there is a glass case door; that was broken open; the glass broken and the lock broken. I missed a great number of articles from there; I missed an hair trunk, and the whole of the articles in that trunk.

Q. Among the rest of the articles, was there anyscouring paper - A. There was a great deal of scouring-paper in some part of the warehouse, several reams; some of that was taken. There is a desk in that warehouse; I saw it closed on the over night. In the morning, the flaps were up, all the drawers were out, and laying on the floor. I did not then go to the cellar. After I returned from Hatton Garden office, I went to the cellar.

Q. Had you some time before, some steel purses - A. I had; I lost some that night. I have seen one of them since, that I lost that night. When I returned, we entered into the cellar; we found where the entry had been made. The entry into the coal-cellar was very narrow; we found the walls were wiped clean, and the coals had been disturbed. We then found the entry had been made in the cellar; the officers were of the same opinion.

Q. Did you know either of the prisoners at the bar - A. I know Field; he was my servant. That is the name he used to go by; he lived in my service near three years; he had left me about two months I think; he had been my porter. On the Sunday night, I saw some part of the cutlery and combs, and the next morning I saw part of a silver candlestick. The first thing that I saw was in Checquer-place, Checquer-alley. The other things were brought to me by the officers.

ANN READ . I am nursery-maid to Mr. Phillips. On Sunday morning, the 10th of April, I came down about half past seven; I came into the shop. The first thing I observed was a knife laying at the bottom of the stairs, and a quantity of Whitechapel-needles laying on the floor; the street door was open. I fastened the street door the night before; there was no appearance of force to that street door; it must have been opened on the inside. I went and told my master and mistress of it. That is all I know about it.

MRS. PHILLIPS. I was the last person up in the house.

CHARLES BROWN . I am an officer. Mr. Phillips made application at Hatton Garden office. On Sunday, the 10th of April, I went with the prosecutor to No. 2. Checquer-place, Checquer-alley, Whitecross-street; I went to look after Field; I could not find him in the morning. In the evening I went in company with Cook and two City officers to the same place; I found Field and Berry in the custody of Cook and the other officers. I handcuffed them, and took them to the watchhouse, and from there to the office. On the next morning we agreed we would take Collard: she lived in the same house where we took Field and Berry from; we took her in custody. I searched her at the office. I found in her pocket these three knives and two thimbles; they were afterwards identified by the prosecutor as his property. Mrs. Collard said the knives were given to her by Field, to keep for him.

Q. Did Mrs. Collard keep the house - A. I believe she did.

CHARLES COOK . I am an officer of Hatton Garden office. On Sunday evening, the 10th of April, I went to No. 2, Checquer-place, Checquer-alley, to Mrs. Collard's house; I saw the prisoner Collard, two other females there, and the prisoner Berry there. I knew Berry before. He was sitting by the fire; he appeared to be in liquor. I endeavoured to awake him. I searched him. I found four combs, and three knives upon him. I produce them. I shewed them to the prosecutor afterwards. According to the description of the things, I was satisfied this was part of the prosecutor's property. I handcuffed them, and told Berry he should go with me. I searched a closet close to where Berry was sitting; I found a dark-lanthorn, a phosphorus bottle, with matches, complete, and this hat; on the side of that, this small chisel.

Q. Did you afterwards go to Phillip's house - A. I did, and saw the buffet; there were marks of violence upon it, exactly corresponding with this screw-driver.

Q. Did you see any thing of Mrs. Collard - A. I did. I asked her who that hat belonged to; she said, she did not know; she believed it belonged to her son. I asked her who she had got up stairs; she said, no one. I went up stairs, and in the garret I found Field in bed; he had part of his clothes off, and part on. I endeavoured to awake him; he seemed very much stupified. His face being black with coals; and by the description I had in the morning, I was almost certain he was the person that was seen. I had great trouble to awake him; he was very much in liquor. Before I brought him down stairs, Moore searched him; in his waistcoat pocket he found a pair of scissars; he gave them to me. I then brought him down stairs; Mr. Phillips identified him as the person he was in search of.

Q. Did you take any notice of his coat - A. There is another person that can speak to that. I went to the premises of Mr. Phillips; I examined them. In my judgment, the persons got into the house at the flap of the coal-cellar, and by the appearance of the place, they did get in that way. On Monday, I was present at the taking of Mrs. Collard, and on the 15th, I went to the house of the prisoner Robinson, in Henley-place, Checquer-alley; there I found in a box, a steel purse. I found the prisoner in bed. I had received information that part of the property laid there. I took Robinson to the office. The prosecutor saw this purse; and said, he had every reason to believe it was his property. At the office, Robinson was admitted to bail, and to day he surrendered. The box in his room was not locked. I never heard any thing against his character.

JAMES SCOTT . I am an headborough of St. Luke's. I went with the other persons to Checquer-place, I found Field in the garret; he was intoxicated. His face was quite black, his coat was dirty, and torn in one part. Mr. Phillips identified him. I found this coat hanging up in his room; I found the scissars in his coat pocket. We got him up twice; he got into bed again, with his shoes off, and his breeches on. We found no other coat in the room. We took him to the watchhouse. We shewed Mr. Phillips that coat; he has got the coat on, I believe.

Prosecutor. I know the coat he has got on; Igave it him. I am sure the coat that he had on, was the one that I gave him. The coat was black with coals, as if he had rubbed against the side of the coals in the cellar. Field wanted to be admitted an evidence before the magistrate.

WILLIAM LEE . I am a constable of St. Andrew's. I went to the house of Sarah Collard , on Monday, the 11th; I found this coat. Sarah Collard said, it was a coat that was given to her for her husband. In this coat pocket, I found the top of a silver candlestick; the prosecutor saw it, and identified it.

JOSEPH PRINCE . On the 10th of April, I saw Michael Berry in White-cross-street, about half past five in the morning; he had got an hair trunk on his head. I had seen him before as I came home from work in bad company one or twice.

Q. to Prosecutor. Look at the top of the candlestick - A. It is part of my silver candlestick.

Q. Look at the other articles, and see if you know them - A. Here are combs, knives, scissars, and a purse; these came out of the buffet up stairs. This nozle of a candlestick was in the buffet in the drawing-room. My loss upon this occasion was between three and four hundred pounds; there were a number of things taken. I cannot tell the extent of it.

Q. to Lee. Whose coat is that - A. Mrs. Collard owned it; she said, it was her son's coat. She said it was one that was given to her by a friend, that lived at the other end of the town; it was for her husband. We could not find him.

Barrett. I spoke to Mrs. Collard about this coat; I said, I thought it was Jonathan Wild 's; Mrs. Collard said it was not John's; it was given her for her husband.

Prosecutor. I lost an hair trunk, about two feet and a half long, with a round top; that hair trunk contained pattern cards. This knife was in a card in that hair trunk, that the boy, Prince, has described he saw Berry with. Field said, before the magistrate, they had burned the hair trunk. In that trunk was a variety of articles.

Field said nothing in his defence.

Berry's Defence. When Cook, the officer, found the two knives upon me, I told him I bought four; I gave nine shillings for them.

Collard's Defence. When the officers asked me if I knew any thing about the business, I said, I did not.

Robinson's Defence. I am entirely innocent of the charge against me.

FIELD, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 21.

BERRY, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 21.

COLLARD, NOT GUILTY .

ROBINSON, NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

468. JAMES WILSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of April , forty-two yards of carpetting, value 4 l. 11 s. the property of Robert Freebairn .

JOHN FITZPATRICK . I am an apprentice to Robert Freebairn ; he is a warehouseman , 65, Watling-street . The last time I saw this carpet was on the 28th, between seven and eight in the evening; I did not see it after that, until the next day; I saw it at Guildhall.

JOHN HODGSON . I am a City officer. On Friday, the 29th, a little after eleven o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner with a roll of carpetting on his shoulder, in Watling-street; I saw him turn into the warehouse No. 12, in Watling-street; he did not go inside; he stood between the two doors; that house is under repair. I saw the prisoner brushing the straw off the carpet. I asked him where he was going to take it, and whether he had any bill of parcel; he said he had no bill of parcel. He would neither tell me where he brought it from, nor where he was going to take it. I took him into custody. This is the carpet; I have had it ever since. Mr. Fitzpatrick came and identified the carpet. When I first saw the prisoner, he was about two hundred yards from Mr. Freebairn's.

Prisoner's Defence. I am a poor distressed man; I did not take the carpet; I was to have a shilling for carrying it.

GUILTY , aged 64.

Confined 6 months in Newgate , publicly whipped .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

469. THOMAS JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of May , from the person of George Greaves , a pocket-book, value 2 s. a 5 l. bank note, and four 1 l. bank notes, his property .

GEORGE GREAVES . I am a seaman . I lost my pocket-book on last Saturday; I was in Watling-street , between two and three o'clock; I was going down to join my ship. I felt somebody at my pocket; I instantly missed my pocket-book. I turned round, and saw the prisoner behind me; I took hold of him. He dropped the pocket-book, and a gentleman standing by, picked it up; he took him in custody.

JOHN SPRY . As I was passing along Watling-street, I saw the prosecutor run up to the prisoner, and take hold of him. I saw the pocket-book fall from the prisoner; I collared the prisoner. Whether I picked up the pocket-book or another, I cannot say. I got the pocket-book, and wrote my name upon it, to identify the pocket-book. There was not a third man there until I got hold of the prisoner. I would not let him go. I can swear I saw the pocket-book fall from the prisoner. This is the pocket-book.

Prosecutor. It is my pocket-book; it contained a five-pound note, and four one's.

Prisoner's Defence. I am as innocent as the child unborn.

GUILTY , aged 42.

Transported for Life .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

470. JAMES BAMBRIDGE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of May , from the person of Penfold Greeves , a pocket-book, value 20 s. a 5 l. bank note, and a 1 l. bank note, his property .

PENFOLD GREEVES. I am a cotton manufacturer . I had my pocket picked on Monday last, about a quarter before five, in Fleet-street , opposite St. Dunstan's church. I was walking along; I felt a person touch me behind; I immediately looked round, and saw the prisoner withdraw his hand from my pocket, with the pocket-book in it. I seized him by the coat with one hand, and followed his hand with the other, and supposing he would put it into his own pocket from the appearance and the direction he took, I accused him of picking my pocket. He denied it, and asked me to search him. I did not search him, but held him, and sent for a constable. I first prevailed upon a gentleman at a bookseller's shop to admit him in, while a constable was sent for. He searched him, but no pocket-book was found upon him. A gentleman who was crossing the street; (he is here; the prisoner heard what he said); he said he saw the prisoner take the pocket-book, and put it behind him, and give it to another person who was in company with him at the time. I absolutely saw his hand with the pocket-book in it.

EDWARD M'GOWER. In crossing at the corner of St. Dunstan's church, I observed the prisoner take out of the prosecutor's pocket his pocket-book; he put his hand behind him, and transmitted it to his accomplice's hand. I kept my eye particularly on the prisoner. The person that received the book went away. I was some distance from the person. I came up to the prosecutor, and stated what I had seen.

Prisoner's Defence. The constable found twenty-nine shillings and my handkerchief about me; he returned me my handkerchief, and kept my silver.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Transported for Life .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

471. WILLIAM MARSHALL , alias JOHN MASHETER , was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Pardy , about the hour of one on the 12th of May , and burglariously stealing therein, a watch, value 3 l. a watch-chain, value 1 d. and a watch-key, value 1 d. the property of Joseph Judge .

JOSEPH JUDGE . I am a mariner . I was robbed at the Spread Eagle inn, Gracechurch-street . I arrived from Dover that evening, on Thursday the 12th of May. I went to bed about eleven o'clock in company with an acquaintance that came up from Dover. He had been a prisoner ten years in France. Before I went to bed I put my watch on the frame of the window. About one o'clock I was awoke by my partner, who said there was a man in the room who had awoke him by clapping his hand on his face in the dark. We both of us got out of bed immediately, and asked the prisoner what he was doing in our room.

Q. You found the prisoner in your room, did you - A. Yes; he made some kind of excuse, as if he had mistaken the room, and by the noise that we made the watchman was alarmed; he came to the room door, and met the prisoner going out. The watchman followed him into his own room, and came back with his lanthorn to light our candle, and desired us to see that we had not been robbed. I immediately went to the window, and found my watch missing. I followed the watchman into the prisoner's room; he was searched; no watch was found upon him. I then uncovered the bed clothes, and in so doing I heard the ticking of a watch. I listened, and found the noise proceeded from the tester of the bed. I climbed up the bed post, and found my watch in two parts; the case of the watch in one part, and the body of the watch in another part. I got it down, and gave it the watchman, who asked me if it was my property; I said it was.

Q. When you went to bed did you shut the door - A. I think I did; I would not wish to swear I did; I have every reason to suppose I did. I did not lock the door; I rather think I shut it with the latch.

WILLIAM SENIOR. I am a servant with William Pardy .

Q. Do you know this room that Judge was in - A. Yes; it is No. 10. The prisoner's bed room was No. 12, in the gallery. I went round the gallery, as I do generally about one, to see that the doors were shut, and the candles all out, the prisoner rung the bell; I came down to the gate; I had been round to see all was safe. I put my hand against every door when I went round; I can say the door of No. 10 was shut.

Q. You are sure Mr. Judge's door was shut, are you - A. It was shut. I do not come till ten o'clock on my duty. I went to the ring of the bell; the prisoner asked me if he could have a bed; I told him he must go up to the chambermaid, if there was one he might have one. She shewed him a bed at No. 12; that was the only bed that was left. He paid for the bed, and the chambermaid told me to see to the light. I watched while his light was burning, a quarter of an hour. I was up stairs. I heard the prosecutor say to the prisoner, what are you about here? and just as I came up to No. 10 the prisoner came out. I asked him what business he had in that gentleman's room. I went into the room, and asked them to look if they had lost anything. A gentleman came out of No. 11. We could not find the watch about the prisoner. I took the prisoner down to the watchman in the street, and just as I came back the prosecutor said he heard the watch upon the tester of the bed, and there it was found. I took the watch, and gave charge of the watch and the prisoner to the constable.

SAMUEL SHEPHARD . I was constable of the night. I received the prisoner, and had the custody of the watch.

Prosecutor. That is my watch.

Prisoner's Defence. On the night stated by the prosecutor, I went to the Spread Eagle to sleep; I asked for a bed to sleep. I went up one pair of stairs for the purpose of going to bed; a short time after, I felt myself unwell; and although I urge that I was intoxicated, I know that will not be taken in my favour. I went out for the purpose of going to a water-closet; on my return I missed my own room, and put my hand against this door, which certainly was open, and not shut. I went into the room most certainly; one of the gentlemen asked me what I wanted.I declared I had mistaken the room, and I believe I stated the reason I had so done. I went to my room, and was not met coming out of Mr. Judge's room. From that I went into my own room, when the last witness insisted I should put on my clothes, and go out of the house; some time afterwards, he said I should not go out of the house until he had enquired whether any gentleman had lost his property. Then I was taken to the Compter. While I was down stairs in the chambermaid's room, below, there was a cry in the gallery that a watch was found. I declare that I did not move any watch out of that room. As Mr. Judge had been in bed two hours before I went to bed, it is probable that some other person opened that gentleman's room, and not me. It is possible, and probable. At the same time, I hope the jury will take it into consideration that some other person had opened the room door. and had removed the watch. After I was out, they found it.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 31.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

472. THOMAS ALEXANDER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of April , a ham, value 15 s. the property of Thomas William Hodgson , privately in his shop .

JAMES PARSONS . On the 28th of April last, a quarter before eight in the evening, I was passing by the corner of Great Queen-street, Drury-lane ; the prisoner went into Mr. Hodgson's, the cheesemonger 's shop: there was nobody in the shop. I was at the shop window. I saw through the window the prisoner take a ham. I catched him when he came outside of the door. I saw him go in the shop first; he had nothing with him then; he came out with the ham. I catched him by the collar, and asked him what he was going to do with the ham. He said nothing at all. I pushed him into the shop, and told him to put it back again.

Q. At the time you pushed him into the shop was there any body in the shop - A. Nobody at all. I called Mr. Hodgson. I live near Mr. Hodgson. Mr. Hodgson came into the shop from a parlour behind. When Mr. Hodgson came I told him this man had taken a ham. The man dropped the ham down; I picked it up. Mr. Hodgson sent for an officer; he was taken to the watchhouse. Mr. Hodgson had the ham. That is all I know. There was a lamp in the shop. I saw the prisoner take the ham from the left hand side of the shop.

THOMAS WILLIAM HODGSON. I am a cheese-monger, the corner of Great Queen-street.

Q. Do you recollect this night when the witness called you out - A. Yes; I was in the back parlour; I was called out with a loud voice. When I came in the shop, I found the prisoner and Mr. Parsons; they were both standing in the shop. The prisoner must have come into the shop to get at the hams; they were on the stall board, or shelf, in the window near Drury-lane. I had seen the hams there a short time before. There were three hams in the window, and two were missing.

Prisoner's Defence. I was very much intoxicated; whether I knocked the ham down with my elbow, I cannot say.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 33.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

473. JOHN HICKEY was indicted for that he, on the 2nd of May , feloniously and without lawful excuse, had in his custody and possession, a forged bank note, for the payment of 5 l .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded GUILTY , aged 17.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

474. JOHN HICKEY was indicted for feloniously forging, disposing of, and putting away, a forged bank note for the payment of 5 l. he knowing it to be forged, with intention to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England, and also to defraud Abraham Lee .

Mr. Knapp, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

475. AMELIA HATFIELD was indicted for that she, on the 4th of May , feloniously had in her custody and possession, a certain forged bank note for the payment of 1 l .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded GUILTY .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

476. AMELIA HATFIELD was indicted for feloniously disposing of an putting away a forged bank note for the payment of 1 l. with intention to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England, and also another person .

Mr. Knapp, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

477. JOANNAH LEWRY was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Gilliver , about the hour of eight in the night of the 6th of April , and stealing therein, two blankets, value 8 s. a sheet, value 8 s. a bolster, value 8 s. a counterpane, value 6 s. and a bed-gown, value 3 s the property of John Gilliver .

MARY ANN GILLIVER . I am the wife of John Gilliver ; I live in East Smithfield , in the parish of St. Botolph, Aldgate; my husband has a house there; there is one other lodger in the house; I rent the room of Mrs. Hearne; her husband is dead. She does not live in the house. Mrs. Hearne lets the house out in lodgings. The door of the house is open day and night. When I go out I always lock my room door. On the 6th of April last, I went out of my house. I locked my door, and took the key with me. I went out about eight o'clock in the evening. It was dark when I went out. I returned in half an hour. When I returned, my room door was open, and the staple was off the door. Ifound two blankets gone, a bolster, a sheet, a counterpane, and a bed gown gone. I am sure I left them in my room when I went out, and when I returned they were gone. I found some part of them at Mr. Ellis's, the pawnbroker's, and the rest at Mrs. Driscoll's.

MARY DRISCOLL . I live in White Hart-court, in Whitechapel. On the 5th of April, about a quarter before nine at night, the prisoner came to my house; I was in bed; I heard her offer a little girl two pence to pawn some things for her, and the prisoner came to me and said she wanted to leave some things with me until the next morning. About five minutes before nine, the prisoner opened my door; she desired me to let her leave a blanket and a bolster there. I refused her. She took them down into the cellar of my house. The cellar belongs to the landlord of the house. The cellar door was open. I have nothing to do with the cellar. The prisoner told me she took the things to the cellar. I told her I would have nothing left in my place. My bed is right before the cellar door. I saw her take the things into the cellar, and the next morning I saw the things in the cellar. The next morning the prisoner came to my room at seven o'clock; she said she had a sheet, a blanket, and a counterpane at the pawnbrokers, which cost her thirty shillings before she was married, and that she had pawned them at Mr. Ellis's for seven shillings, and he had always lent her a guinea upon them. She asked me if I would take the ticket to Mr. Ellis, the pawnbroker; I denied it. She wanted Mr. Ellis to make it two shillings more than what she had on it. She said if her husband met her with it he would use her ill. I took the ticket to Mr. Ellis's shop; the man would not lend any more on it. I brought her back the ticket; she went away, and left the ticket on the table. I did not see her any more until she was taken. About eleven o'clock, the constable came to my room, and asked if any thing had been left in my house. I went in the cellar, and fetched up a blanket, a bolster, and a bed gown. I delivered them to him.

JOHN TURNBRIDGE . I am a constable. On the morning of the 7th of April, I went to the apartment of Mary Driscoll ; I enquired whether any goods had been left there; Mrs. Driscoll fetched a bolster, a blanket, and a bed gown out of the cellar, and delivered them to me. I apprehended the prisoner six weeks after that I produce the bolster, blanket, and bed gown.

SAMUEL PARSONS . I am a brother-in-law to a pawnbroker. The prisoner has pawned things several times with me. On the 6th of April, about a quarter before nine, she pawned with me a counterpane, a blanket, and a sheet, for seven shillings. These are them.

JOHN BROWN. I went to the prosecutrix's house; I found the room had been broken into, and on the 6th of May I found the prisoner concealed under her bed. I went with the officer to apprehend her. She said she was in no fear of being prosecuted, except the prosecutor came forward.

Q. to Prosecutrix. Look at the articles produced - A. They are all mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I met a man who had these things in his possession; he asked me to pawn them; he said he would give me a shilling for my trouble. I leave it to God's mercy, and you gentlemen.

GUILTY , aged 20,

Of stealing, but not of the burglary.

Confined 1 year in the house of correction , fined 1 s .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood .

478. JAMES BATHER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3 d of May , fourteen drinking. glasses, value 8 s. the property of Cephus Shirley and Benjamin Shirley .

BENJAMIN SHIRLEY . I am a china-man , No. 17, Worship-street ; my partner's name is Cephus Shirley. I was present when the prisoner was searched; my brother took out of his pockets twelve wineglasses. The prisoner said it was his first offence; he hoped we would forgive him; he had no more. The officer searched him after that, and found two more glasses in his hat.

JOHN SHIRLEY. The prisoner came to my brother's warehouse on the 3 d of May, between seven and eight in the morning. In consequence of former suspicion, I strictly looked at him; I was convinced he had nothing in his pockets at that time. When he was ready to leave the warehouse, I stopped him on the premises, and told him I had suspected him of stealing some time, and told him I should search him. He, in the first instance, refused me doing so; he afterwards said, I will be searched by you. He had got a dozen of them. I then sent for an officer, and before the officer came I took out of his pockets this dozen of glasses. He said it was the first time he had ever done any thing of the sort, and hoped we should forgive him. The officer came in, and took him to the public-house adjoining the office in Worship-street. The officer took his hat off; out of his hat he took these two glasses, in addition to the twelve I took from him. These are the glasses; they are the property of Cephus and Benjamin Shirley . He had six in each pocket, with paper between them.

Prisoner's Defence. I am a poor man, with three children. I throw myself on the mercy of the court.

GUILTY , aged 37,

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , whipped in Jail .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

479. WILLIAM KERRICK , MARY MORRIS , and MARY BARRETT , were indicted for feloniously making an assault upon William Reardan , on the 3rd of May , putting him in fear and taking from his person, and against his will, a watch, value 5 l. and a 1 l. bank note, his property .

WILLIAM REARDAN . Q. Did you at any time lose a watch and any other property - A. I lost my watch and a one-pound note on the 3rd of May last, between eleven and twelve o'clock at night; I went into the wine-vaults, the corner of Lisle-street , and Princes-street , I called for a glass of ale; the three prisoners were in the front of the bar; the same as I was. The man jumped up, and said, he would drink with me; he asked me to treat him; I said no; he was a perfect stranger. He then said, he would drink with me; I told him I had no more than fivepennyworth of halfpence and a one-pound note in my pocket; I did not mind spending the halfpence on him. He catched hold of me by the breast, and shoved me back upon a form that was there. I had not been a minute sitting there, before I felt a hand come out of my right hand breeches pocket; I made a grasp at the hand. I catched hold of the hand as it was going behind me.

Q. Did you see whose hand it was - A. Yes; Mary Morris's hand. I never saw her before. I jumped up, and told the bar-maid that I was done, that I had lost my watch and note. I turned my pocket inside out, to shew the people that I had lost my money. They asked me to describe the note; I said, the first figures were a 3 and a 1.

Q. What had you in your pocket when you went into that wine-vaults - A. I had five pennyworth of halfpence, a farthing, and a one-pound bank note.

Q. Were the halfpence gone as well as the note and the watch - A. No, they did not take the halfpence. I paid for the ale with the halfpence, and it was not three minutes before she took the note, I had my hand in the same pocket.

Q. What became of the women after the hand was taken out of your pocket - A. They stopped, and Kerrick stopped. The bar-maid told her brother; he came, and bolted the doors. The man at the bar stopped, and the women too.

Q. At the time that you asked for the ale, were there any other person at the bar than the bar-maid - A. There was another woman. The landlord was not in the bar then; the landlord was called in when I missed my property.

Q. Where were you going to or coming from at that time of the night, when you called in this wine-vaults - A. I came from Paddington; I was going home to my lodging, No. 19, Whitcomb-street. I was not sober; I was sensible of losing my property.

ELIZA SEYMOUR . I was in the wine-vaults at the corner of Lisle-street and Princes-street, at the time the prosecutor came in, on the 3rd of this month; it was about a quarter after eleven when I went in; I was outside of the bar before the three prisoners came there. The two women came in with another man. Kerrick was in before they came in. As soon as they came into the house they joined company with Kerrick; they were all four together. They were talking together; what passed between them I do not know. The prosecutor came in, he asked for a glass of ale; the bar-maid served him the ale. I saw the four surround him, and I saw Mary Morris take the watch from his fob; they were rustling up against him. I believe he sat down, and two of the women were setting also on the form. They pushed the prosecutor down on the form, and I saw Mary Morris take the watch out of his pocket.

Q. Did he pass by Gower while he was fastening the door - A. No. There are two doors to the house; he went out of one while Mr. Gower was fastening the other. Mr. Gower went up to the watchhouse, and fetched the night constable, and another man. The constable searched the prisoners, the man, and the two women; neither of them went out of the house before they were searched. The note was found on Mary Morris .

Q. Did you take notice whether Reardan was in liquor - A. He was; a stranger could see that.

Q. How soon after he was hustled down upon the bench, was the watch taken from him - A.He was standing up when the watch was taken from him. It was after he was hustled on the bench; he got up again, and the watch was taken when he was standing no. They were doing nothing to him, except taking his watch from him.

Q. That watch was not taken with any violence or force was it - A. I do not know. I saw them take it. That is all I know.

JANE KILSON . I am sister-in-law to Mr. Gower. I was inside of the counter; I was there when Eliza Seymour came in. I saw Kerrick and the two women at the bar come in; I did not take notice how they came in. I only know they were there. I served Reardan with a glass of ale. I took no notice of what passed. Reardan came up to me, and said he was done out of his watch and a one-pound note; I called the landlord, and Seymour said, she saw the watch taken from his person.

JOHN GOWER . I keep the wine-vaults. I was called in by the bar-maid; she is my sister-in-law; when I came in the bar, I found the three prisoners, the prosecutor, and another person; I went and fastened one door, and while I was fastening the other, the fourth person opened the door and went out. I had said, they all should be searched. I observed Mary Morris kept her hand closed; on my opening one of her hands, she shifted something from one hand to the other very quick. On my opening the other hand, it was a one-pound bank note.

Q. You did not find any watch upon either of them, did you - A. No. I detained them all until I got a constable from the watchhouse. I kept the note until the next day; I then gave it to the constable, as I could not attend Marlborough-street office myself.

Q. Did you observe whether Rearden was sober or not - A. He certainly was not sober; he was competent to judge what he was doing, and what was done to him. I was sober.

Morris. I wish to ask you whether I did not give your wife a pound note; I gave his wife a pound note to change for a quarten of liquor.

COURT, to Jane Kilson . Did either of the prisoners give to you or Mrs. Gower a one-pound note to change - A. I was in the bar during the whole of the time the women were there; they had nothing to drink; they gave no one-pound note. Mary Morris never gave Mrs. Gower, my sister, a one-pound note; my sister never was near her the whole of the evening.

RICHARD HOWELL . I am a constable. Mr. Gower came to the watchhouse; he fetched me to his house, and there I took the prisoners into custody; they were searched before I got there. Mr. Gower gave me the pound note the next day. This is the note; I have had it ever since.

Mr. Gower. This is the note; the number is 31,313. This is the note I took from Mary Morris 's hand.

Q. to Prosecutor. Do you know the note you had - A. I only took notice of the two first figures; they were a 3 and a 1.

Kerrick's Defence. The prosecutor was very much in liquor. When Mary Morris offered her pound note, he said it was his note.

Morris's Defence. On this evening a gentleman gave me a pound note; I went into Mr. Gower's; I called for a quartern of liquor; I gave the pound note into Mrs. Gower's own hand; the prosecutor snatched the note out of Mrs. Gower's hand; she said, do you know the number; I said, no; it was a new note, and folded up in four. That is all I know.

Barrett's Defence. I am innocent.

KERRICK, NOT GUILTY .

BARRETT, NOT GUILTY .

MORRIS, GUILTY , aged 30,

Of stealing from the person, but not with violence.

Confined 1 year in the house of correction , fined 1 s .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

480. JOHN SAUNDERS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of May , a livery-coat, value 2 l. the property of Sir Charles Price , bart. a coat, value 1 l. and a waistcoat, value 10 s. the property of Thomas Price , esq. in the dwelling-house of Sir Charles Price , bart .

ROBERT BRADY . I am a servant to Sir Charles Price: his house is 28, Bedford-square , in the parish of St. Giles's in the Fields.

Q. On the 24th of this month did you see the prisoner - A. I did. On Tuesday morning, I went into the water-closet leading to the front area; I had left the servants hall. The coachman's coat was in the servant's hall; in the same room Mr. Thomas Price 's black coat and waistcoat were hanging on the clothes horse. I had not been in the water-closet a minute, before I heard a footstep come down the area steps, which I believe to be John Saunders , the prisoner; I had not seen him at that time. I might be in the water-closet two minutes. I met the prisoner with the clothes under his arm; he was in the area about three yards from the door that leads to the dwelling-house. I asked the prisoner what he was going to do with the clothes; he told me he took them from a man, and was going to deliver them to me, the moment he saw me. I took the prisoner by the collar, and took him into the servants hall. I took the clothes from him, and laid them on a chair. The case was made known to Sir Charles Price ; he ordered a constable to be sent for, to take him into custody; a constable was sent for. I had seen the clothes in the servants hall before I left the hall.

Q. Had there any other person been in the servants hall - A. I should suppose not. From my absence from the servants hall to the water-closet, was only two minutes. I heard no other footstep but the prisoner; he came very softly.

Q. Could any body have gone in without your hearing them that length of time - A. I should hardly think any body could have been there. He said, a man had knocked him down, and he had taken them from him. If that had been the case, I must have heard some kind of wrestling.

Q. Did he say where the man knocked him down - A. In the area. If any thing of that sort had happened, I must have heard it. I was not the distance of ten yards from there all the time; every thing was quiet at the time.

Q. Had you known this man before - A. I never saw him as I know of. This is the coachman's coat, it belongs to Sir Charles Price ; the price of the coachman's coat was about three pounds. This is Mr. Thomas Price 's black coat and waistcoat, they have been worn a long-time; the coat and waistcoat may be worth eight or ten shillings. The prisoner was searched in the kitchen by the constable; nothing else was found upon him. I took the clothes from him.

JOHN DALSBEVEY . I am Sir Charles Price 's coachman. I was in the stable at the time the coat was taken; it is a new coat; it has not been worn above two or three times; the value of it is between three or four pounds.

Prisoner's Defence. I declare to Almighty God, distress and poverty made me do it. I had not tasted victuals for three or four days. I humbly crave for mercy.

GUILTY , aged 62,

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only.

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , fined 1 s .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood .

481. WILLIAM PRITCHARD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of May , two ounces and half an ounce weight of gold, value 10 l. 10 s. the property of Henry Jackson and William Jackson , in their dwelling-house .

JOHN WILLIS . I am in the employ of William and Henry Jackson . The prisoner worked for my masters. On the 11th of May, both my masters put me in the loft; the loft is over the shop. I could see every thing that passed in the shop, when I was in the loft, by means of holes, which I had. I saw the prisoner come in, in the morning. I was put in the loft before seven in the morning. The prisoner came to work between eight and nine in the morning. About one o'clock, there was no one in the shop but him, (that was before he went to dinner, ) I saw him take a bit of brass wire from a drawer under his work-board; with that, he forced out a piece of gold wire from a hiding place, placed under this board.

Q. Where did the hiding place appear to you to be - A. It appeared to be in the skirting boards.

Q. How long was the piece of gold wire - A. About five inches. He cut it in several pieces, and put it into the fire loose, blowed with a pair of hand bellows; then he took it out of the fire; he wrapped it in a piece of paper, and tied it round with a piece of iron wire. He went to the forge, and drove a nail about a yard up the forge chimney, and hung it upon the nail, which he had put in the forge chimney.

Q. You could not see up the chimney of course - A. No. I saw the parcel go up in his hand, and his hand came down without it. Having done that, he went away to dinner, and while he was at dinner, I communicated to my master what I had seen; mymaster went into the shop. I remained in the loft all the time; I never left it. I continued there by my master's direction. The prisoner came into the shop in about an hour after he had gone to dinner; when he came into the shop one man was there then; the man remained in the shop about five minutes, and went away. The prisoner then was alone. Then the prisoner went to several of the men's drawers, and came back with several pieces of gold wire in his hand to the forge.

Q. Are you able to say you saw him take it from the men's drawers - A. No. I saw him go the men's drawers in the shop, but I cannot say that he took wire from them; but he returned with several pieces of wire in his hand to his own boards.

COURT. Did you see what he had in his hand - A. I did; they were pieces of gold wire.

Mr. Arabin. Is the ceiling of the shop a high one or a low one - A. A high one. Having weighed them; he took them to the fire, and did the same as before. He raked it out of fire; one of his shop-mates came up at the time. He took it from the forge, and put under a flat iron without a handle, he put a lump of lead on this flat iron; he put his elbow on the lead, and turned round in conversation with his shopmate; the shopmate talked with him a few minutes, and afterwards went to his own board, and they both continued at work. While the shopmate was at work, the prisoner wrapped it up in a piece of paper, and put it into his own drawer.

Q. These boards that the men work at have very high backs - A. Yes. Marsh, the shopmate, could not see what the prisoner was about, by any manner of means. When the other workman went away, the prisoner was then alone in the shop. He took the gold out of his drawer, tied the gold round with a piece of iron wire, and went to the forge chimney again; he appeared to hang it in the chimney, the same as he did the last. After that, he went to his work; another man came up. He was left alone again about seven o'clock; the other man was gone. He got upon the forge; he was partly up the chimney; he took these two parcels of gold down; he stood a long time in great agitation with them in his hand. I saw them in his hand. He took a chisel of one of his shopmates, and forced up a brick from under the forge in the chaircoal-hole, he tried to dig a hole; he found it too hard; he put the brick in the same place, and covered it over with charcoal dust, as before. He stood upon a stool, and tried to force the ceiling with the chisel; finding he could not do that, he got down, and stood several minutes with it in his hand; he then went down stairs with it; he was in his working dress then. I saw him come up stairs without any thing in his hand; he had been washing himself in the yard in his working dress, a waistcoat with sleeves.

Q. Does the way down to wash lead to the charcoal cellar - A. It does. After he went into the yard, he put on his coat, handkerchief, and hat, and then he looked over the bannister of the stairs several times to see if his master was in the way, then he went away. I saw him do no more. Then I gave the signal to my master.

Q. You say these parcels were put up the chimney; did you see him do any thing to them - A. I saw him go up the chimney with a hare's foot in his hand to black the parcels.

Mr. Knapp. How long have you lived with your master - A. Four months.

Q. There was one man in the shop when Pritchard was in the shop, his name is Marsh, was not there a man of the name of Gosling too - A. Yes; he was there about five minutes after Pritchard came from dinner.

Q. Were you to be paid for your trouble in watching - A. Master said, I should not lose any thing. I lost by being up there.

Q. Was there no sum promised you - A. Master promised me a guinea if the property was found on the prisoner.

HENRY JACKSON . I am a watch-case-maker ; I am in partnership with my brother, William Jackson .

Q. Does the shop adjoin the dwelling-house - A. It is just at the gable end of it; there is no communication between the dwelling-house and the shop. It is the dwelling-house of me and my brother. There is iron railing in the front of the house.

Q. How is the roof of the house - A. The roof of the house is considerably above the shop; it is only one story high.

Q. You and your brother placed the boy in the loft - A. Yes. In the loft you can see every thing that passes in the shop. I placed him there at seven o'clock in the morning; I removed the ladder, so that it was impossible the boy could get down. About two o'clock, I and my brother went into the shop, when no one was in the shop; I saw a piece of gold on the forge, by the fire; it appeared to have been raked out of the fire. That is all I saw at that time. I gave the boy directions to give me a signal when the gold was taken away.

Q. At any time in the evening, did you lock yourself in the accompting-house - A. I did, about seven o'clock, near dark, I heard a person come down stairs. and go out of the shop door.

Q. If a man wanted to wash himself, he could wash himself in the washhouse without going out of the door - A. Yes; the washhouse is direct opposite the accompting-house door.

Q. Did that man go into the washhouse door, whoever he was - A. No.

Q. In going out of the shop door does it lead to the charcoal-cellar - A. It does.

COURT. That is the charcoal-cellar - A. It is out at the door, level with the washhouse.

Mr. Arabin. What time elapsed before any man returned - A. A minute, or a minute and a half.

Q. Could he in a minute and a half have gone to the charcoal-cellar - A. Yes; it is not more than four or five steps. Upon my hearing a person return, I looked through the key hole; I saw it was the prisoner, and saw him go into the washhouse passage; he was in his work dress. After that, I heard him go up, as I supposed; I did not look then; I was fearful he should see me. I soon afterwards heard him come down; I saw him passthe accompting-house window. The signal was given; nothing was found upon him.

COURT. What day was this - A.Wednesday, the 11th of May. On Sunday, the maid and I was upon searching; she was moving a German stove in the charcoal-cellar, that we put by for the summer season. She said, there it is; I took it in my hand; I said this is it by the weight of it. These are the two parcels.

Q. Let the boy look at them -

Willis. I believe them to be the parcels; I saw the manner he packed them up.

Mr. Henry Jackson . This is the parcel the boy described he saw him weigh.

Mr. Arabin. Is it gold - A. It is gold wire, melted in the fire would it look like that; the value of the gold in both the parcels is about eleven pounds. I cannot answer for the quantity there is in each, one perhaps, as much again as the other.

Mr. Knapp. The gold by melting has quite a different appearance to what it had before - A. Yes, in point of form.

Q. When the person came down stairs, be he who would, you did not see him - A. No, I did not.

Q. Be that person, whoever it was, whether he went to the charcoal-place or washhouse, you do not know; you did not see them - A. As far as I can guess, he did not go into the washhouse.

Q. That person had the opportunity of going to the charcoal-place or any where else, just as he pleased - A. Yes.

Q. And when you did see him, you looked through the key-hole - A. Yes.

Q. You saw it was the prisoner that was coming in again - A. Yes; that person went up stairs.

Q. Whether that person went up stairs, you do not know, you did not see him - A. I heard him go up; it must be him; there was no other person came in during the time.

Q. Now, attend to me. You said the maid pointed out to you the parcels you now produce - A. Yes; she saw them first.

Q. Was this the Sunday after the Wednesday - A. Yes.

Q. Is the charcoal-cellar, a place to which each of your men might go to between the Wednesday and the Sunday - A. Certainly.

Q. Had you gone to the charcoal-place - A. I had searched; I did not think of looking there.

Q. Any other person might put it there as well as the prisoner - A. I should think it possible.

Q. What is Mr. Gibbons - A. A watch-maker.

Q. Mr. Gibbons lives in the house, and has a great part of it - A. Yes.

Mr. Arabin. You are confident it must be the prisoner, you had no other workman in the house, had you - A. No; at that time they were all gone.

WILLIAM JACKSON . Q. Your house is in the parish of St. James's, Clerkenwell - A. It is.

Q. Tell us who this Mr. Gibbons is - A. Mr. Gibbons, myself, and Mr. Simpson, were partners; last August we dissolved partnership. When we had dissolved partnership. Mr. Gibbons continued to occupy the same part of the house that he had before. No rent has been paid but for the shops since. One hundred and five pounds a year is the rent of the house and shops; that includes Mr. Gibbon's shop and mine; there is a distinct rent upon the shops; the rent. I pay for my shop is thirty-four pounds three shillings and fourpence a year.

Q. Is there a distinct rent for the shops, and a distinct rent for the house to be paid by Mr. Simpson - A. There is, by agreement. The rent of my shop is thirty-four pounds three shillings and fourpence.

Q. How much for your part of the house - A. Twenty-six pounds, as long; as we continue, and Mr. Gibbons has his part of the house the same.

Q. Does that include his shop - A. No; there is a distinct rent for the shop. Mr. Gibbons's rent of the shop is seventeen pounds six shillings and eight-pence; When we separated partnership, the rent of the shops was to be paid by three persons. The whole of the premises belongs to Mr. Simpson.

Q. Did you place this boy in the loft with your brother - A. I did.

Q. What is the length of the shop - A. About twenty-one feet in length, about nineteen or twenty in width, and the height of the ceiling is between seven and eight; The holes were sufficiently larger enough for any one to see the whole that was done in the shop. One night I watched myself and on. Tuesday my brother; we were tired of the job. We placed this young man there for the purpose of detecting whoever might roll us. Between two or three o'clock, I left him in the loft; he could have no communication with any body else; it was impossible. About two o'clock, I went into the shop with my brother; I saw a piece of gold lay on the forge, close by the fire. I looked up the chimney, and saw a parcel tied round with a piece of binding-wire, hung upon a nail; I distinctly saw it fastened to the nail by a wire; I saw the parcel now produced; I have not the least doubt it is the same parcel; it was blacked in the same way; the paper was discoloured black. I saw the impression of a hand in the chimney, as if a person had got up. Then I went away. The lad said, he could not see a part of the shop so clearly; we made him a fresh hole at the time we went up. When the boy told me what had passed; my brother said, he would give him a guinea. I said, he had done wrong; however I said he should have it if it was found upon him. After the prisoner was taken, I went up again; we looked up the chimney to see whether the parcel was there; it was gone. I have weighed the parcels to together; the weight is two ounces ten pennyweights; the value is upwards of eleven pounds.

Q. Have you missed any gold wire - A. Yes; we have missed wire repeatedly. Gold wire is an article we use in the watch-case making; we never melt gold wire in large pieces; we never melt gold wire except small ends.

ELIZABETH ELLIS . I am a servant-maid. I was present when Mr. Jackson searched the charcoal-cellar; I found the piece of gold on the ground,under some fire stove; they were but the parcels When I found them, Mr. Jackson took possession of them.

JOHN MARSH . I work for Mr. Jackson. The prisoner him worked about two years for him, as near as I can recollect. On Wednesday, the 11th of May, I left the prisoner in the shop at six o'clock in the evening, I am desire it was not late than half after six. I left no other person at work; the prisoner was at work while I was there, and no one else to my knowledge whatever.

THOMAS GOSLING . I work for Messrs. Jacksons. On the 11th of May, I went to work about ten o'clock in the morning, I found the prisoner there. I went away about half past one. I will not be certain whether I left him there at the dinner hour nor who went first.

THOMAS ROWLINS . I am a constable. I searched the prisoner's lodgings. I found this crucible. I searched him on Wednesday evening, and his lodgings on the same day; I searched his body. I knew they were his lodgings. He told me he lived at No. 9, Swan-street, Bethnal-green.

Mr. Jackson. This crucible appears to have gold in it.

Prisoner's Defence. After Mr. Gosling came, I went and asked Mr. Jackson if he could give me any thing to do; he gave me a couple of dials to make; I went about my business. The occasion of my stopping late at the dinner hour was on account of a job I had to do.

The prisoner called seven witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 26.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

482. DENNIS MAHONY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of May , seventy pounds weight of lead, value 5 s. the property of William Piper .

WILLIAM PIPER . I am a plumber ; I live at No. 8, Little Eastcheap I merely know of the lead being delivered to my foreman.

JOHN BROWN . I am an officer of the City. On Friday, the 6th of May, in the evening, about six o'clock, going down Leadenhall-street, I observed the prisoner coming from the skin-market, with a quantity of lead on his shoulder; I followed him down St. Mary Axe, to a little plumber's shop. I waited until he came out. I saw him put his hand into his pocket, and count some money. I went into the shop, and asked the man if he had brought the lead; the lead was laying in the shop on the floor. He told me, no; it had been left there by the party at the bar. I run up St. Mary Axe, and took the prisoner into custody, and asked him where he got the lead; he said, he knew nothing about any lead. I asked him if he knew Mr. Watts, where he had left it; he said, no. I then took him back to the shop, and asked Mr. Watts if he was the man that left it; he said he was. I got a person to take the lead to the Compter, and I immediately took the prisoner there. On Saturday morning. I went round to several plumbers, and found that the lead was Mr. Piper's, and that their labourer was missing, of the name of Dennis Mahony, Mr. Piper and Mr. Piercy attended before the Lord Mayor, and the prisoner was committed. I am sure the prisoner is the man who had the lead on his shoulders. I produce the lead.

GEORGE PIERCY . I am a poulterer in Leadenhall-market . My sink was being repaired by Mr. Piper. This piece of lead is one of the pieces of lead that I gave to Mr. Piper's foreman. I can swear to this piece. Mr. Piper's foreman gave it to the prisoner to carry it to his master. Mr. Piper was to account to me for it. The place I last saw the lead was in the kitchen. There was more lead besides this. The other went to Mr. Piper, this did not.

Mr. Piper. I had the order to repair the sink. My foreman cut up the sink, came home, and went out to look after another job. The prisoner was my servant. Instead of bringing this lead to me he took it elsewhere.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence.

GUILTY , aged 35.

Confined 3 months in Newgate , whipped in jail .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

483. GEORGE DAVENPORT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22nd of April , two reams of paper, value 2 l. 10 s. the property of John Nichols , John Bowyer Nichols , and Samuel Bentley .

JOHN BOWYER NICHOLS . I am a printer ; I live in Red Lion-passage, Fleet-street . The prisoner is my apprentice . My partners names are John Nichols and Samuel Bentley . In consequence of suspicion. I got an officer and searched the prisoner's lodgings; were the property was found; two reams of foolscap paper.

JOHN MATTHEWS . I am an officer. I searched the prisoner's lodgings, and found these two reams of paper.

Prosecutor. It is my paper; it is part of fifty reams that came in the day before. After the paper was found we missed it.

Prisoner's Defence. I am not guilty; I throw myself on the mercy of the court.

The prisoner called five witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Fined 1 s. and discharged .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

484. CHARLES MARNS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of May , two lamps, value 10 s. the property of Edward Collinson .

EDWARD COLLINSON . I am a lamp contractor and oil merchant . On Saturday last, when I went to the Exchange, at four o'clock, I left a quantity of illumination lamps in a basket, in my own warehouse, in Coocked-lane . I have employed the prisoner; sometimes he behaved well, and sometimes ill.

SAMUEL MATTHEWS . I am a lamp-lighter, in Mr. Collinson's employ. The prisoner came into the yard to ask for a job, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, on the 21st of May, he went into the warehouse; he stood on the side of the warehouse where there was a prickle of illumination lampsHe put his hand into the basket; he took out one; he turned away. After he turned away, he returned to the basket, and took another, and put it into his bosom; I saw him take them both. We then told him to go into the accompting-house up stairs, to get his name put down for employ, that we might take him.

ROBERT RECKALL . I am in Mr. Collinson's employ. I saw the prisoner take the lamps when he went up in the accompting-house; I went after him, and told him he had master's property about him; he denied it. I felt in his bosom, and took out two lamps. The officer has them.

EDWARD LEWIS . I am an officer. I produce the lamps; they was given into my charge at Mr. Collinson's. After the prisoner had his hearing before the Lord Mayor, he said he should have eighty-four months for it.

Prisoner's Defence. My lord, and gentlemen of the Jury, last Saturday I went to ask Mr. Collinson for employ; I put two basket lamps into my bosom. He had employed me before, and had always found me just and honest. I have a wife and four children. I hope your lordship will shew me mercy. I submit to your lordship's superior opinion, and an impartial jury.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

485. WILLIAM ATKINSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of May , three pounds weight of leather, value 6 s. the property of John Maberly .

GEORGE EDWARDS. I am clerk to Mr. Maberly. The prisoner was a cutter of leather in Mr. Maberly's employ. From information of Mrs. Finch, the wife of a keeper of an eating-house, I went to her house; there I was shewn a basket belonging to the prisoner, containing some leather, which I have no doubt is Mr. Maberly's leather. When the prisoner left his employment in the evening, I gave him into the custody of the constable. He was taken to where the leather was. I asked him how he came by the leather; he denied knowing any thing about it; at last he said he had taken it by permission of his foreman. This leather is the property of John Maberly .

ANN FINCH . My husband keeps an eating-house, 216, Upper Thames-street. On the 7th of May, about six o'clock in the morning, the prisoner brought the basket to my house; he left it in the shop; at nine o'clock he took it up into the dining-room, and between four and five in the afternoon I saw it with leather in it concealed under the table in the dining-room. I informed Mr. Edwards of it. In the afternoon, Mr. Edwards came and brought the prisoner to my house. The prisoner acknowledged taking the leather from Mr. Maberly's warehouse; he afterwards said it was given him by the foreman.

JAMES JAMESON . I am Mr. Maberly's foreman in the leather department. I know this leather is Mr. Maberly's; it corresponds with the marks I put on the hides. I am in the cutting, and putting these marks on the hides. These he has out in his own shape for the conveniency of taking them away. I am confident it is my mark.

George Edwards . The prisoner cut this leather in two. If he did cut it he had no right to cut it.

HENRY KERRIDGE . I took the prisoner into custody; I took him to Mrs. Finch's. The leather was produced before him. He first denied any knowledge of the leather; he afterwards acknowledged it was Mr. Maberley's property. He then said Mr. Jameson, the foreman, had given him leave to take it away. As I was taking him to the counter, he said he was sorry for accusing Mr. Jameson; he knew nothing of it. I went to his lodging in Shadwell-high-street; there I found a quantity of leather. It being out of the city, I have not produced it. I took the leather away.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence; called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 37.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

486. HENRY HART was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of May , a watch, value 20 s. a watch-key, value 4 d. a seal, value 18 d. and a ribbon, value 1 d. the property of Edmund Taylor , from his person .

EDMUND TAYLOR . I am a livery stable-keeper , Northumberland-alley, Fenchurch-street. On the 4th of May, between eight and nine in the evening, I was coming towards home by Aldgate , just of the side of Jewry-street, by Aldgate, I was on the outside of the pavement; the prisoner came before me, and snatched the watch out of my pocket. I catched him by the left arm. He held his arm out, as if for some person to take it away; I saw him put his hand back. I catched him by the left arm; I said, my lad, you have robbed me of my watch; I will take care of you; I was taking him across the way to the watchhouse. I delivered him into the hands of Kinnersley at the watchhouse. I told Kinnersley I had been robbed of my watch of a highway or street robbery.

Q. Did you find your watch - A. Not then. I told the prisoner, I would take care of him; the watch would speak for itself, there was the initials of my name on the back of the watch case.

Q. Did you look after your watch - A. No. I have seen my watch since. The next day, the prisoner was brought to the Mansion House; he was remanded until Saturday. On the Thursday evening after, between eight and nine at night, the prisoner's mother came to the yard.

Q. You must not tell what the mother said - A. I never went after the watch. I stuck by the prisoner.

RICHARD MEARS . I happened to be passing just after the act took place; the prosecutor had seized the prisoner, and charged him with robbing him of his watch. The prisoner told me the watch was there, meaning over the way, under some scaffolding boards; I did not go to look after it; I did not expect to find it there.

MR. KINNERSLEY. I am an officer. Mr. Taylor brought the lad to me. I sent a man over the way to look under the scaffolding boards; the watch was not found there. I took the prisoner to the Poultry Compter. He told me the names of the two boys that was with him were Isaacs and Solomon, and if I went to his mother she would shew me where they lived. The day afterwards; the boys where had up before the Lord Mayor. From their information, I found the watch at Nathan Isaacs ', in Wentworth-street. This is the watch. That is all I know.

Prosecutor. This is my watch; I have had it twenty-three years.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Transported for Life .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

487. THOMAS WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of May , from the person of Richard Conyears , a bank note, value 1 l. a 10 l. promissory note, a 5 l. promissory note, and a 1 l. promissory note, his property .

RICHARD CONYEARS . I am master of a barge belonging to Yarmouth. I was in the Poultry Compter when I was robbed. On the evening before, I was in Bishopsgate-street, I was very forward in liquor; the constable took me up, and put me in the Compter. I slept there that night. In the morning I missed my pocket-book in the prison. I mentioned it to the prisoner; he said, he knew nothing of it: As I was walking about, I saw some papers which were in my pocket-book laying on the ground, which belonged to me; in these two single papers were a one-pound bank note and a one-pound promissory note. The papers I found close to Thomas Williams's feet. I told him I had a suspicion that he had the note; he denied it. There was a ten-pound note and a five-pound country note; the notes were found upon the prisoner; they belonged to me.

THOMAS PINNER . I am a constable. I searched the prisoner. In the sleeve of his coat, was a hole, in that hole, I found a ten-pound note, in one corner of it.

THOMAS MILLER . I searched the prisoner. I found a five-pound note in the sleeve of his coat.

Prosecutor. They are my notes; I know I had them about me.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Transported for Life .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

488. JOHN NEWMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of May , a wine-glass, value 2 s. eleven glass goblets, value 16 s. and two glass decanters, value 10 s. the property of Apsley Pellatt and John Green . And FRANCIS BRADY , for receiving the said goods, he knowing them to be stolen .

Mr. Gurney, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoners were

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

489. JOHN NEWMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of May , twelve egg-glasses, value 8 s. twelve wine-glasses, value 12 s. twelve glass-goblets, value 18 s. and two glass-decanters, value 10 s. the property of Apsley Pellatt and John Green . And FRANCIS BRADY , for receiving them, he knowing them to be stolen .

Mr. Gurney, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoners were

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

490. JOHN NEWMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of May , eleven ale-glasses, value 11 s. the property of Apsley Pellatt and John Green .

Mr. Gurney, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

491. JOHN WILLIAMS and WILLIAM WELLS were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of April , a silk handkerchief, value 5 s. the property of John Ruport Griffen , from his person .

JOHN RUPORT GRIFFEN . I am an attorney . On the evening of the 28th of April, a little before nine o'clock, I was in Queen-street, Holborn ; on my going up towards St. Giles's, I observed the prisoners pass and repass me several times, which created a suspicion in my mind that they were after no good. I immediately felt about my pockets, and missed a silk handkerchief. Williams, the prisoner, was close to me at the time. I immediately charged him with having picked my pocket; he asked me what I meaned, and said, he had not. I then said, your accomplice has; meaning the prisoner Wells. I had seen them together before, when they passed and repassed me. I searched Williams first. While I was searching Williams, the patrol came up. When I said to Williams, if it is not you it is your accomplice; the patrol laid hold of Wells. As Wells turned, I observed a handkerchief hanging out of his pocket; I could not observe whether it was mine or not; it was a silk pocket handkerchief. At that time three or four persons came up, and somebody picked up a handkerchief, and said, is this your handkerchief; I took it in my hand, and said, it is.

Q. Did you see him pick it up - A. No, I did not. We took him to the watchhouse. I cannot say the handkerchief that was picked up was the handkerchief that I saw hang out of Wells pocket. The handkerchief that was recovered was mine.

ROBERT CLARK . I am one of the patrols of St. Giles's. On the 28th, I was coming up Holborn; the prosecutor was charging the prisoner Williams with picking his pocket; he denied it. The prosecutor searched him, and he said the prisoner Wells was with him, and if it was not him, it was one of the two; by which means I laid hold of both of them. I perceived Wells throw something away; a bye stander picked up a handkerchief, and said sir, is this yours; the prosecutor said it was his handkerchief. I took them both to the watchhouse. The prosecutor delivered the handkerchief to me; I gaveit to the constable. I saw Wells throw something away, it appeared to me to be a handkerchief.

SAMUEL ROBERTS . I was constable of the night. I searched the prisoners in the watchhouse; neither of the prisoners had any handkerchiefs in their pockets. Williams had two handkerchiefs in his hat. This is the handkerchief that was given to me by the patrol.

Prosecutor. It is my handkerchief.

Williams's Defence. I was not in company with any body.

Wells said nothing in his defence.

WILLIAMS, NOT GUILTY .

WELLS, GUILTY , aged 20.

Confined 1 year in the house of correction , fined 1 s .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

492. ANDREW GEORGE was indicted for feloniously making an assault in the King's highway, on the 23rd of May , upon Samuel Gothey , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, a watch, value 2 l. his property .

SAMUEL GOTHEY . Q. How old are you - A. I shall be thirteen next September.

Q. Had you a watch at any time - A. I had. That watch was taken from me last Monday evening, it had just struck nine; I was coming from Islington on foot; I was with my mother and my younger brother. I was in Goswell-street when I lost the watch, at the corner of Rawsterne-street. I was walking along; the prisoner was meeting of me; he came very violently, he was walking. My little brother was inside of the wall, I outside, and my mother in the middle. He came violently, and pushed against my mother, so violent, it knocked my my little brother down upon the step. I felt the watch go out of my pocket.

Q. You did not perceive how it went, did you - A. No, I did not. He partly pushed against me; he came between me and my mother. He pushed his left hand against the pit of my mother's stomach. I felt my watch go. I have every reason to believe he took it out. I only felt the watch go; I said that he had stolen my watch. My mother told me not to be alarmed; she said, she knew the man, it was young Andrew George . He then turned the corner of Rawsterne-street, and ran down Rawsterne-street. I hallooed out stop thief directly; he was stopped in Rawsterne-street; my watch had a dark blue ribbon and a key attacked to it. A person came up, and told me to shew him the man who stole my watch. I stepped in among the crowd, and said, that is the man who stole my watch. I saw my watch again that evening, and I saw it afterwards at Bow-street office. I am sure the prisoner is the person; it was a light evening.

SARAH GOTHEY . I am mother of the last witness.

Q. We understand you were coming home with him and his little brother from Islington - A. Yes; we were in Goswell-street-road; I had one son on each arm. About six or eight yards of me, I saw the prisoner coming towards Islington, as we were on the road; he was not coming very quick. Just as we got to the corner, he stepped quicker: he was walking in the middle of the pavement; he came in that way, that I was not able to make way for him; with his left hand, he threw the little one down on the inside. He pushed me violently on the stomach with his left hand; he then threw his shoulder on to mine, and turned himself round, and with his right hand he drew out my son's watch; I saw that. Knowing of the man before, and the character of him, I kept my eye on him, and saw the method he took it; he bent his finger as a hook; he caught the watch in the hollow of his hand, and kept it so. I am sure the prisoner is the person; I knew him before. He ran some distance before he was stopped; we called stop thief. Prior to that, I saw him throw his arm out, and then he cried stop thief louder than we did; he was stopped. I did not lose sight of him. I am sure of his person. The watch was found by two gentlemen that followed us to Bow-street office; the gentleman is in court that picked the watch up.

SAMUEL COWLAND . I was in St. John-street-road, about nine o'clock, last Monday evening, that is near Goswell-street-road. I perceived a man running very hard; a little boy was after him, crying stop thief; the little boy tumbled down. He begged me to stop him. I ran after him, and catched at him; he held his hand up, as if to knock me down, and then he said what do you stop me for, and then I ran away. A gentleman that was with me walked by the side of him, and kept the prisoner in conversation until the mob came up, and then they said the prisoner is the man that ran away, and he is the man that went to strike me. I went into the public-house with the people, and then I returned to look for the watch. I tumbled on the watch in Rawsterne-street, in an open place. I found the watch in about ten minutes after he was taken, not more. I found the watch in that part of Rawsterne-street where the prisoner had been running. I saw him coming out of Rawsterne-street, and it was in that street where I saw the prisoner coming out, that I found the watch. I found the watch without the case; the case has been found; I did not find the case. I delivered the watch to Edwards, the officer, at Bow-street.

- EDWARDS. I am an officer. On account of illness, I gave my place up. I live in St. John-street. There was no officer to be found, and knowing me in the neighbourhood, I was sent for. The prisoner was taken in St. John-street-road. I searched him in the public-house; I found nothing on him but a box. The mother and the lad were in the public-house with me. I proceeded to Bow-street with the prisoner. When I came there no magistrate was sitting. I took him to the watchhouse. The watch was delivered into my hands by Mr. Cowland. It had no case. I never had the case. The man that found the case, left it with the lad's mother. He did not give any address. This is the watch.

Prosecutor. I know the watch to be mine; it is a metal watch. It has the same ribbon to it now as when I lost it. It had an outside case when lost.

Mrs. Gothey. I know the watch; the maker's name is Bent, London. I paid fifty shillings for it to aparticular friend of his father; he let me have it cheap.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, nor called any witnesses to his character.

GUILTY , aged 22,

Of stealing from the person, but not with violence.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

493. ROBERT JOHNSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of April , a shawl, value 30 s. the property of Richard Coates and Thomas Coates , privately in their shop .

WILLIAM SPENCER was called, and not appearing in court, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood .

494. FRANCIS TURNER and JOHN ROBINSON were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of May , thirty-four yards of ribbon, value 13 l. the property of Thomas Rowley , in his dwelling-house .

MARY ROWLEY . I am the wife of Thomas Rowley . I live at 74, St. James's-street , in the parish of St. James. My husband keeps a shop there, in St. James's-street, a haberdasher's and hosier's shop. The shop is part of the dwelling-house.

Q. Did you lose any ribbons out of your house - A. Yes, on the 13th of this month, about thirty-four yards, value between thirteen and fourteen pounds. I had laid it on the window. John Robinson , the little prisoner, came in first. It was about half past eight in the evening when they came in. I was in the shop when John Robinson came in; he came in for half a yard of narrow white ribbon. The young woman, Martha Morse , was in the shop; she took down the box to serve him. Immediately after, Francis Turner came in; he wanted a small quantity of black ribbon. I took the box down, and served him; before I had done serving him, Robinson went out; the small one went out of the shop before I had served the tall one. After I had served the tall one he went out of the shop. I served him twopennyworth of ribbon. In about three minutes after, the person that left the ribbon with me came for the ribbon. It was gone. A gentleman left the ribbon. It was not my property; it was left with me by a gentleman. It is the order ribbon; it is the property of the Duke of Clarence; it is the ribbon for the sashes the Royal Dukes wear. There was about thirty-four yards of the ribbon. I missed the ribbon in about three minutes after the prisoners were gone out. I laid it on the window before they came in. From the time that I laid it in the window to the time we missed it did not exceed a quarter of an hour. The door had not been opened only by the prisoners. Nobody had been in the shop but the prisoners. The ribbon was the property of the Duke of Clarence. The ribbon was rolled up in paper; I put it in the window. A Mr. Jemmet had left it for me to make an order ribbon.

Q. Has the ribbon been found - A. No, it has not, Nobody had been in the shop but the prisoners; the prisoners passed the window to go out of the door; it was inside the shop, by the window; it lay on the raised part of the window; they were quite near enough to take it away; they might if they had been so disposed.

MARTHA MORSE . I was in the shop on the 13th of this month; Robinson came for a pennyworth of white ribbon to make a bow for a child's cap. I took the box down; I found there was none that would do. I said I had not any. He said he would call again, and went out. The other came in before he went out. He wanted a yard of black ribbon. He had a yard of two-penny black ribbon, and went away. We did not miss the ribbon until three minutes after they were gone. The gentleman came in for it that had left it, and then we missed it.

Q. Where had it been put - A. On the shew-board, in the window. Mrs. Rowley put it there. I saw it there before the prisoners came in.

Q. Had any other person come in the shop - A. The door had not been opened, nor had any person been there until the prisoners came in. No one else had been in the shop except us two. There are two counters in the shop. The door opened by the window where the ribbons lay. There were two candles on the counter where they were served; there were none on the other. The prisoners were within half a yard of it when they went out.

Prisoner Turner. When I was in the shop there were two other women in the shop.

Miss Morse. There was a friend sitting by the side of me, by the counter, and another young person sitting upon a chair, talking; she was not a customer. That person is a woman we frequently employ; the other was a friend. They staid there until the ribbon was lost; they never moved from their seats. After the ribbon was put in the window they never arose from their chairs until the ribbon was lost. They could not have taken it, because it laid on the other window, the other side of the shop. One of them was sitting behind the counter, and the other was sitting on a chair by the side of me, where I was serving.

CHARLES HUMPHREYS . I was informed of the robbery; I went to the house. Mrs. Rowley gave me the description of the prisoners. The next morning I took Miss Morse to the Park; I expected to meet the prisoners there; there a number of thieves attend on the parade every morning. On Sunday morning, I took the two prisoners in the Park; they were both together. The robbery was done on Friday evening. She pointed out the prisoners, both of them. I took Robinson; he was going to run away as soon as he saw the lady; I ran after him, and catched him. He denied being in the shop when I told him what I took him for. The other did not attempt to run away. They both said they lived in Drury-lane; there was no number to the house. In the evening, at the watchhouse, Robinson told me they both lodged together in Parker's-lane. I went there on Monday morning; I found they both lodged there. I could not find the ribbon. When I searched them I found five shillings and sixpence upon the person of each of them, in their pocket. Joseph Payntington took Turner; he knows no more than me.

Turner's Defence. I am innocent of the crime as the child newly born; and the money I had in my pocket, I received of my master on the Wednesday night.

Robinson's Defence. I am innocent. I know nothing at all of it.

TURNER, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 18.

ROBINSON, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 16.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood .

495. SAMUEL CHAPMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of April , six jelly-glasses, value 3 s. seven patty-glasses, value 3 s. the property of Benjamin Shirley and Cephas Shirley .

BENJAMIN SHIRLEY . My partner's name is Cephas Shirley; we are china-men in Worship-street . The prisoner was our warehouseman . On the 26th of April last, I was in the warehouse where the glasses are kept. I saw these glasses taken from the respective places, and set of one side; suspecting they were put there by the prisoner to be taken away at dinner time, I marked each one particular. I had applied to Mr. Armstrong to attend. On the prisoner going to dinner, I sent a servant up to see if they were gone; I discovered the glasses were gone. I went with the officer, and saw the prisoner taken in custody. He had got about fifty or sixty yards from our shop. He was then taken to the public-house next to the office. These glasses were taken out of his pocket; he confessed he had stolen them; they were the first; he hoped we would forgive him on account of his poor wife. The glasses were found in his pocket. He had a basket, carrying crockery-ware. He had bought articles of me before. I never suffered him to take anything without first bringing them into the shop, and having them booked to him. These glasses were up stairs, in the warehouse.

JOSHUA ARMSTRONG . I took the prisoner into custody, and searched him at the public-house, and found these glasses in his pocket. I asked him how he came by them; he said it was his first offence; he hoped Mr. Shirley would forgive him. He was very much alarmed. Afterwards, he said he told Thomas to book them.

THOMAS SHARP . I am bookkeeper to the prosecutors. The prisoner never desired me to book these articles to him. On this day he brought goods to me in this basket to book, but not these glasses. I booked the goods in his basket. I am certain these glasses were not among the things he brought to be booked.

Benjamin Shirley . These are the glasses; they are the same that I marked.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in the habit of buying articles of Mr. Shirley. I looked my goods out before I went to dinner; some earthen ware, and them glasses. I got them together; they were basons, jugs, and them glasses. I went to fetch the jugs and glasses down; I put the glasses in my pocket. I kept one glass in my hand to shew the clerk. As he was booking them a load of crates of earthen ware came to the door; he immediately told me to make haste home, that I should help him in with the crates. When I came back I took the glasses and went away. I believe I left a memorandum of the glasses; they would have been put down when I came back.

Sharp. There was a cart come with crates. I was certain the prisoner had the property about him. I would not suffer him to stop. He had not a glass in his hand. He put the earthenware on the counter to be booked, but not the glasses.

GUILTY , aged 57.

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , fined 1 s .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc

496. JOHN JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of May , twenty-two yards of printed cotton, value 1 l. 13 s. the property of Francis Workman .

THOMAS THOMSON . I am a patrol of the parish of St. Sepulchre. On the 4th of May, in the evening, I was on duty; I saw the prisoner in company with another, walking before Mr. Workman's shop. He was in company with a bigger boy than himself. It was about a quarter before eight. There was a chair outside of the door, with linen-drapery for sale. The prisoner and the other boy went up to the chair; the prisoner took a bit of printed cotton off the chair. As soon as I laid hold of him he dropped it. I put him into the watchhouse, and went back for the print. I took the print back to Mr. Workman's shop. It is a linen-draper's shop. The shopman said it was Mr. Workman's property. He said it had his mark. This is the piece of print. I have kept it ever since.

Q. Where is this shop situated where they put things out on a chair in the street - A. No. 66, St. John-street , a public street.

JAMES - . I am shopman to Francis Workman . I was out of the shop when this print was taken. We had a chair with linen-draper y outside of the door, within sight of the door. Thompson brought this piece of print; I examined it; it had my own private mark upon it. I am sure it is Mr. Workman's property.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence; called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 13.

Fined 1 s. and discharged .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood .

497. NAMON KEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22nd of May , six fowls, value 12 s. the property of Francis James Panckurst .

FRANCIS JAMES PANCKURST . On Sunday morning last, I discovered that my fowls were gone; I live in Vineyard-gardens . The fowls were lost out of a shed from thence. I had seen them all safe on Saturday night. I had eight fowls in all in the shed near the house; two were left. On Sunday morning, I missed them, about seven o'clock. I was informed by a neighbour that the fowls were gone. I found six were gone, and two remaining alive. The heads of three of them that were gone were lying on the ground.

Q. Was the door kept locked - A. No, it was not. I traced the blood of the fowls to a neighbour of mine; not the neighbour that alarmed me. I went to that neighbour's house; his name is Santy; I toldthe neighbour that I thought his son had robbed me; he assured me that his son was in bed.

Q. What magistrate did you go before - A. Mr. Sellon.

Q. Did you find your fowls afterwards - A. Yes, at the constable of St. Luke's. I found some of my fowls there. The constable shewed them me. Three of them were without heads, and three with, and their feathers. I knew my fowls again. I took the heads of the fowls with me, and applied the heads; it appeared that they were the heads of the fowls that were without the head. Matthews, the officer, took me to the watchhouse; there I saw the prisoner the same evening. The prisoner said, he himself, in company with young Santy, had robbed me, and he said so at the office. I am sure they are my fowls. The value of the six fowls are twenty shillings.

MARY PANCKURST . I am the wife of the last witness. I saw the fowls alive on the Saturday evening; they were all safe in the shed in the garden. I always feed them before they go to roost. Four of them that were lost we bred. I saw them the next day at the constable's. I am sure they are mine.

JAMES FORDHAM. I am an officer of St. Luke's. About half past two o'clock on Sunday morning, I was coming up Golden-lane; I saw the prisoner, and another lad standing behind the turnpike house; I got almost close to them. They came away. I saw the prisoner had something underneath his coat; I caught hold of him, and asked him what he had got there; he replied, fowls; immediately the other ran away. I called out stop thief. The prisoner had three on him, and the other had three. I kept hold of the prisoner. The watchman went after the other person; he was not taken. I examined the prisoner. He had three fowls under his coat; two of them the heads were off; the other with the head on. I asked him where he got them; he said a man gave them him in Old-street to carry for him, and the other lad had three. After I secured the prisoner I went to see if the watchman had taken the other lad. He had thrown the fowls away; they were taken to my house. I produced the fowls to the prosecutor; they were the same fowls that I produced before the magistrate when Mr. and Mrs. Panckurst were there; they identified them. They were afterwards given to them. The prisoner said the name of the other lad was James Santy .

COURT, Q. to Prosecutrix. How near does a man of the name of Santy live to you - A. Two doors from me. I have often seen the prisoner with young Santy. The prisoner lived in Goswell-street.

Prisoner's Defence. I had the fowls of a young man of the name of Santy.

GUILTY , aged 18.

Confined 1 year in the house of correction , fined 1 s .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

498. WILLIAM MARKES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of April , thirteen medallions, value 13 s. 6 d. two rings, value 1 l. a brooch, value 10 s. and a smelling-bottle, value 1 l. the property of Thomas Read .

SAMUEL COOPER was called, and not appearing in court, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood .

499. ELIZABETH PARKER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of April , two odd shoes, value 5 s. the property of William Scale .

WILLIAM SCALE . I am a shoemaker ; my shop is 52, St. John-street, Clerkenwell . On the 29th of April, the prisoner came to my shop; she tried a pair of shoes on, and agreed for the price.

Q. Did she buy them - A. No. When she came in I was up stairs at dinner, and hearing some customer in the shop, I went down and pushed the door open; I saw the prisoner in the shop; she was putting something under her left arm. The prisoner, when I came into the shop, wished the boy to try a pair of shoes on, as she could not try them on herself. The boy tried them on. She then wished the boy to get a pair of bows tacked on, and she would call in a few minutes for them. She got up, and went towards the door; the boy said, stop, mistress, you have got a pair of shoes that does not belong to you, and took them from her. She then accused the boy of robbing her. The boy pushed the shoes over to me. The prisoner said, they are not your shoes; a man at Islington made them for me. I said, how can you say so; they are my shoes; go and fetch the man that made them, and you shall have them. With that, she took up the shoes, and went off with them. I said I would not be robbed with my eyes open. I ordered my man to fetch her back; he did. I then sent the boy for an officer; the officer came, and took her in custody. These are the shoes; they are two odd shoes; I had them in my hand that day, before the prisoner came into the shop. I know they are my property. When I said, fetch the man at Islington that she said made them, I did not expect she would take them.

WILLIAM SIMPSON . I am journeyman to Mr. Scales. I saw the boy take the shoes from the prisoner; I know they are my master's property.

Prisoner's Defence. I had no thought of taking the shoes until he told me to take them.

Simpson. Master never told her to take them, but to fetch the man from Islington that she said made them.

GUILTY , aged 27.

Confined 1 year in the house of correction , fined 1 s .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

500. JOSEPH RIVERS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of May , a puncheon, value 15 s. the property of Francis Pethoniere .

WILLIAM HOOD . I am an apprentice to Francis Pethoniere , 168, Old-street , a distiller . On the 7th of May, between ten and eleven in the morning, a man came into our house, and said a man had taken a puncheon away; I pursued after the puncheon. I saw the prisoner and the puncheon in James-street, about an hundred yards from our house; I passed him several times to observe whether it was our puncheon; I was satisfied it was our puncheon. I then accosted a person I met in the street, and askedhim whether he would assist me in taking the man; I asked a second person, who proved to be an officer, he took him in custody. I gave charge of the prisoner for stealing the puncheon. The puncheon is Mr. Pethoniere's property.

WILLIAM WARREN . I saw the prisoner rolling this puncheon down Tabernacle-row; Hood asked me to assist him. Church, the officer just came up at the time, and took the prisoner into custody. At the office the prisoner said he had bought the puncheon of a man.

ROBERT CHURCH . I am an headborough. I saw the prisoner roll this puncheon across Tabernacle-walk. The prisoner said he did not take the puncheon; I told him, he might clear himself at the office. At the office he said he bought it of another man.

Prisoner's Defence. I was passing along Old-street, a person asked me if I would roll a puncheon as far as the Curtain-road, he would pay me. A person followed me, and said he believed it was his puncheon; I said, I believe not; the person that belongs to it is behind me, and when I looked round, the man was gone.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Confined 1 month in Newgate , whipped in jail .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood .

501. JOHN ELLIOTT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23rd of April , three pounds weight of bacon, value 3 s. the property of Thomas Gammage .

SAMUEL GAMMAGE . My father's name is Thomas Gammage ; he is a cheesemonger , King-street, Seven Dials . On Saturday, the 23rd of April, the prisoner came into my father's shop, he took a piece of bacon, put it in his pocket, and went out into the street with it; he did not speak to any body. I followed him, and laid hold of him. I asked him for the bacon that he had got in his pocket; he said he had not got any. I put my hand in his pocket, and pulled it out. I called my father. A gentleman and I took him into my father's shop. The bacon was taken to the watchhouse with the prisoner.

THOMAS GAMMAGE . I keep this shop. I was in the shop at the time it happened; I did not see the prisoner take the bacon. I saw him in my shop. My son called me; I saw my son take the bacon out of his pocket. I had seen the bacon before in my shop; they were two pieces of bacon.

SAMUEL ROBERTS . I took charge of the prisoner and the bacon. I produce the bacon.

Prosecutor. These are my two pieces of bacon; they cost me three shillings.

Prisoner's Defence. I went into the shop to buy a piece of bacon; he asked me thirteen-pence a pound for it; he weighed it. I told him I had but eight-pence in my pocket. I offered to pay the money; the prosecutor refused. I never thought to wrong him, nor no man of his money. I told him my wife was coming to me with the change of a dollar.

Prosecutor. He never asked the price of any thing, nor was any thing weighed for him.

GUILTY , aged 63.

Confined 1 month in Newgate , fined 1 s .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

502. HENRY TURBETT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of May , from the person of William Hutchinson , a silk handkerchief, value 2 s. his property .

WILLIAM HUTCHINSON . On the 1st of May, me and my wife were coming home; I was in St. John-street . As I was walking along, with my wife holding my left arm, I felt something behind me, and my pocket moving: I instantly let go my wife's arm, and turned round quick; I perceived the prisoner behind my wife and me. On my turning round, he attempted to pass my wife; I laid hold of the prisoner by the collar; at that time my wife was alarmed. The prisoner said it was not him, it was that man. I had not spoke to the prisoner; there was no man near. My wife did not know what was the matter; I said he has picked my pocket, and there lies the handkerchief. I told my wife to pick my handkerchief up; she did, and gave it into my hands. I took the prisoner to the watch-house.

Q. Did you feel your handkerchief go out of your pocket - A. I did; I did not see it in the prisoner's hand. There was no one near me at the time but the prisoner.

BARNARD COHEN . I am an officer. I took the prisoner in custody. The prosecutor gave me the handkerchief; I produce it.

Prosecutor. This is the handkerchief, that was taken out of my pocket.

Prisoner's Defence. I never saw the handkerchief, nor touched it.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 17.

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , fined 1 s .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood .

503. FLORA MACKLIN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of April , five yards of ribbon, value 5 d. ten ribbon wreaths, value 20 s. and fifteen rosets, value 5 s. the property of Mary Long , widow .

MARY LONG . I am a widow; I live at No. 2, Green-street, Lamb's-conduit-street . I make articles of millinery, and supply shops . The prisoner has been in my employ for several months. On the 27th of April, I found two remnants of ribbon in her pocket. I never suspected her before that day, although I had lost a great many things. She went out in the yard; I followed her. I asked her what she put the ribbon in her pocket for; she said, it was only a small piece of ribbon; the loss of it could not hurt me. She endeavoured to put it down the privy. I took from her two pieces; they measured five yards; I value them at five-pence. I saw a great number of goods that I had lost in Dean-street. I lost a ribbon wreath that day, and fifteen rosets; Mrs. Macklin sold them at a shop in Dean-street. The value of the rosets are fifteen shillings a dozen.

JAMES COOK . I am an officer. I produce fifteenresets and ten ribbon wreaths; I found in Mrs. Bullen's shop, 14, Dean-street, Red Lion-square.

ANN BULLEN . I keep a clothes shop, in Dean-street, Red Lion-square. I bought the articles produced of the prisoner, at different times; she put down in my book where she lived, Macklin, No. 6, Boswell-court, Queen-square. I bought two white rosets of her last Easter Monday; I gave her four-pence for some, sixpence, and seven-pence for others.

Prosecutrix. I know the articles all to be mine. These she sold for seven-pence, I sell for eighteen-pence; nobody makes the wreaths but me and my work people. These articles were stolen out of my place.

Prisoner's Defence. I get my bread by needle work; these things are my own needle work.

GUILTY , aged 51.

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , fined 1 s .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood .

504. ROBERT CROMIE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of April , a pound weight of tea, value 2 s. 6 d. the property of the United Company of merchants, trading to the East Indies .

SECOND COUNT, for like offence, only stating it to be the property of persons to the jurors unknown.

JOHN FAIRCLOTH . I am an assistant elder in the East India Company's warehouse, Fenchurch-street . The prisoner was employed in that warehouse . On the 26th of April, in consequence of suspicion, the prisoner was stopped; I asked him what he had got; he said something. I took him into the accompting-house; there I searched him. I found two stockings or sandals of tea under his waistcoat. I weighed the tea; it was better than one pound.

Q. Had you observed the prisoner any where in the warehouse - A. No. He was reported to me as a suspected person. This is the tea. and these are the stockings. It was such tea as was in the Company's warehouse; it corresponds with the tea in the warehouse. The prisoner had access to the tea.

JOHN EVERETT . I am deputy assistant elder to the warehouse in Fenchurch-street.

Q. Had you entertained suspicion of the prisoner - A. Yes, very great suspicion. I intimated this suspicion to the last witness, and directed him to be stopped. I examined the tea that was found about him with some chests that had been plundered before; it corresponded with the tea in these chests.

SAMUEL OLIVER . I am an officer of the Customs. I searched the prisoner. I found these two small bags of tea in his breeches pocket. These sandals or stockings were taken from him prior to my coming down. These two bags contained four ounces.

Prisoner's Defence. On the 26th, I went to my employ as usual; I was so bad, I went to lay down; I went along the tea chests; I laid myself down five minutes. The two sandals and two bags filled with tea laid there; I said to myself, I might as well have them. Faircloth asked me if I had any more; I said, no. That gentleman came, and took the two bags out of my pocket.

GUILTY , aged 47.

Confined 1 month in Newgate , whipped in jail .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

505. ELEANOR BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of May , a bank dollar, value 5 s. 6 d. eight three-shilling bank tokens, twenty-four shillings, and a key, value 1 d. the property of William Cate , from his person .

WILLIAM CATE . I am a milkman ; I live at 13, Hungerford-street, Commercial-road. In the afternoon of the 15th of May, I had a brother-in-law came out of the country; he stopped with me at my house. When my brother-in-law said he was going home, (he lived in Swallow-street,) I went with him part of the way home. I parted with him in Middle-row, Holborn. As I was returning along Newgate-street, my hands were cold; I put them into my breeches pockets; I met the prisoner at the end of Foster-lane , she laid hold of my arm, and wished me to go home with her; I refused to go with her. I felt the prisoner's hand at my pocket; she ran away. I then suspected she had got something from me; I felt in my pocket, and perceived all my money gone in my pocket; I had a five-shilling and sixpenny dollar. I missed all the money I have put in the indictment, and the key of my chest. As soon as the prisoner went from me, I stepped sharp after her, and catched her; I said, you huzzy, you have robbed me of my silver, and likewise my key; she threw down the key, and said pick it up; there is your key. I then said, if you do not give me up my silver, I'll charge the watch with you; she said with an oath, she would not. The watchman came up, and said, you huzzy, you will not leave off your old tricks. I told him what I had lost, and gave charge of her.

Q. Did you see her searched - A. When we came to the watch, I went back to the spot, and found my key in the spot where I supposed she had thrown it down. When I went back to the watchhouse, they told me they had searched her; they produced ten shillings to me; among the shillings was one shilling that I knew; it had two dots in it. I lost more than ten shillings. They searched her again, and found three three-shilling pieces in her stays. I desired them to search her again; they said she behaved so rough they could not search her. Before she was searched I said I could be positive to one shilling.

HENRY HURRY . I am street-keeper of Newgate-street. Near upon twelve o'clock, the prisoner was brought into the watchhouse, charged by William Cate of robbing him of forty shillings. Cate appeared a little fresh; he was perfectly collected, and had his senses about him. I knew the prisoner as soon as she came in. I said I must search you. She pulled nine shillings out of her pocket, and a purse with duplicates in it. The prosecutor said he should know one of the shillings; he picked out one of them; before I searched her again, she snatched the shilling off the table that the prosecutor knew; I took it from her; and upon searching her further, I found three three-shilling pieces in the lining of her stays. Shewas so abusive, I did not search her further. There was nothing further found. This is the shilling the prosecutor picked out.

Prosecutor. I can say with certainty this is one of the shillings that was taken out of my pocket.

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutor gave me that shilling to look for the key.

Prosecutor. This is the key; it was in my breeches pocket.

THOMAS GILL . I am a constable. At the watch-house the prisoner said the prosecutor gave her that shilling to have connection with her.

GUILTY , aged 35.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

506. ROBERT TUCKER was indicted for feloously stealing, on the 14th of May , twenty-eight yards of calico wrapper, value 20 s. and a wrapping sheet, value 3 s. the property of Richard Lawson and Edward Williams .

THOMAS PRICE . I am a porter to Richard Lawson and Edward Williams ; they are Manchester warehousemen in St. Paul's church-yard . On the 14th of May, the calico and sheet were in the forepart of the warehouse, near the door that leads into the passage. About eight o'clock in the evening, I was standing in the warehouse; I thought I heard some one in the passage; I saw one of the bales move with the calico and sheet, containing straw. I saw it move off before I saw the prisoner. On my turning to the door the prisoner threw the calico down. I asked him what he wanted with that; he said he only wanted it for an apron; I replied, if he wanted an apron, why not come in and ask for it; he said he thought we should deny him. I sent for an officer; the officer said he knew him; he was a bad character.

Q. What was the worth of the calico wrapper - A. Twenty shillings, and the sheet five shillings; it is valued at three shillings in the indictment. When I opened the door I saw the bale on his shoulder; I saw it move by something or other. After I opened the door I saw it on his shoulder.

EDWARD CHARLES MATTHEWS . I am a constable. I was sent for to take charge of the prisoner. This is the wrapper; I have kept it ever since.

Price. It is the same wrapper that the prisoner took.

Prisoner's Defence. I never had my hand upon the calico until the witness came to the glass door, and if he was to speak the truth he would say the same.

GUILTY , aged 54.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

507. JOHN FULWELL was indicted for that he, on the 2nd of May , being in the dwelling-house of John Wreford , feloniously did steal, a bag, value 1 s. and forty-eight pounds weight of thread, value 9 l. his property; and that he, about the hour of ten in the night of the same day, burglariously did break to get out of the same .

THOMAS WHITE . I am an inspector of the watch for the parish of Cripplegate. On Monday the 2nd of May, a little before ten at night, I was going past the prosecutor's house, No. 69. Aldermanbury: I observed the prisoner looking out of the door, first one way and then the other. I thought there was something that was not right. I stepped up Dyers-court to watch; in my situation in Dyer's-court, I could see every thing that was done. While I was standing there, I observed the prisoner look out of the door the second time; he put the door as it were to; he opened it the third time, and looked out; he then opened the door wide, and threw something across his shoulder, which was this bag. He came out of the house, and went towards Love-lane. I followed him, and overtook him. I took hold of the bag. He had got about twenty yards before I came up to him. I said what have you got here; he said, thread. I asked him where he was going with it; he did not tell me. I then told him I must insist upon taking him into custody; he said he would send for his master; I said I would be perfectly satisfied with that, but I must take him to the watch-house. In my taking him to the watchhouse, he threw down the bag, and made his escape. I took the property home to my own house, locked it up, and went and communicated it to Mr. Wreford. I then went to Mr. Wreford's stable; the door was shut, with the key inside. I knocked at the door, and called the prisoner by name; he did not answer. I broke open the door. The prisoner was sitting on the corn bin I took him in custody. I told him as he had made his escape, I must secure him; he said he would surrender, he was sorry for what he had done; it was for want of money. I took the bag home to my own apartment; I have kept it ever since. The contents of the bag is the same as the prisoner threw down. I am certain the prisoner is the man. He was never out of my sight from the time he came out of the door, until he escaped. I had seen the prisoner before.

JOHN WREFORD . I am a wholesale haberdasher , No. 66, Aldermanbury , in the parish of St. Mary, Aldermanbury. The prisoner was my porter . On the night the last witness came to my house, I went with him to my stable; we found the door locked, with the key inside. We called him repeatedly; he made no answer. We forced the door open; and in my presence he was sitting upon the corn chest. When he was brought out, he said he was sorry for it; he hoped I would not punish him. There is nothing in the bag I can swear to. I had such articles as are contained in that bag. I had very large quantities of these articles; the prisoner had constant access to them. The value of the thread in the bag is rather more than nine pounds; the bag is worth about a shilling.

GUILTY , aged 24,

Of stealing, but not in the dwelling-house, nor of breaking it.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

508. JOHN NEWMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of May , eleven glasses, value11 s. the property of Apsley Pellatt , James Green , and William Leader

CHARLES BROWN . I am an officer. In consequence of information I went to the house of Messrs. Pellatt and Green. On Thursday the 5th of this month, about two in the afternoon, I asked Mr. Pellatt for the prisoner Newman. Mr. Newman sent for him to the accompting-house; I secured his hands, and took him to Hatton Garden office. I searched him at the office; I found in his coat pocket, three ale glasses; in his other coat pocket three ale glasses in a cloth; in one waistcoat pocket two ale glasses; in the other, one ale glass; and in each breeches pocket one ale glass.

APSLEY PELLATT, JUNIOR. I am the son of Apsley Pellatt; James Green and William Leader are his partners.

WILLIAM LEADER . I assist in conducting the business. In our stock it is impossible to miss them glasses; they are exactly a similar pattern of glasses we had. From the pattern, I believe them to be ours. I have no doubt of their being our property, from their similarity.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence; called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

509. JOHN NICHOLAS BROWN was indicted for that he, on the 26th of April , was servant to Thomas Groves , and was employed and entrusted by him to receive money for him, and that being such servant, so employed and entrusted, did receive and take into his possession the sum of 33 l. 9 s. 9 d. and that he afterwards did secrete and steal 15 l. 9 s. 9 d. part of the said sum .

SECOND COUNT, for secreting the said sum, stating that he received it of Ann Goodall , widow.

THOMAS GROVES . I am a fishmonger at Charing-cross . Brown is a servant of mine; he has lived with me about two years. I entrusted him to receive money for me, by giving him the receipts before the money was paid. I charge him with embezzling money of customers.

Q. Who is the customer - A. Philip Metcalfe , esq. 32, Berkley-square; he was indebted to me thirty-three pounds nine shillings and nine pence; the prisoner accompted eighteen pounds of that; there remained fifteen pounds nine shillings and nine pence.

ANN GOODALL . I am housekeeper to Philip Metcalfe , esq. I always paid my bills once a fortnight, by my master's desire. I paid him thirty-three pounds nine shillings and nine pence, except three shillings and ten pence which I have paid to Mr. Groves since. I am sure I paid the prisoner that money; he gave me these receipts, and that is the money I really paid him.

Prisoner's Defence. I fell into this error through fear of being arrested, and my wife was near her lying-in. I wish I had been taken for debt, instead of being brought here as a culprit. At Bow-street, Mr. Groves said I paid him eighteen pounds eight shillings and four pence; at all events, there is nine shilling to deduct that I paid to Mrs. Goodall for poundage

GUILTY , aged 38.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

510. ANN WILKINSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of April , a watch, value 25 s. the property of Joseph Schultz , from his person .

JOSEPH SCHULTZ . I lost my watch on the 23d of April, in the morning, about half past one, I had been to a public-house in Aldgate , I do not know the sign; I came out of the house to go home. I stepped against a wall for a certain occasion of necessity; the prisoner came up against me, and said, how do you do, my dear; I said, what is it to you. She kept close by my side, and took my watch. I did not feel my watch go from me. When I felt for my chain, I missed it. She went away, and said, I am York over you. She is a Yorkshire woman. When I missed my watch, I then understood what she meaned. I pursued her; it was quite dark. The watchman took me to Blue Anchor-yard; there we found the prisoner; we took her to the watch-house. No property was found on her. The watchman took the prisoner out of the watchhouse to search her apartment. In about a quarter of an hour, the watchman returned with my watch, and gave it to the constable. I described my watch to the constable; he said, he was satisfied. The watch was then produced; it was my watch.

JOSEPH MAY . I am a watchman, in the parish of St. John's, Wapping. On Saturday, the 23rd of April, the prosecutor came and told me he had been robbed. I took him to Blue Anchor yard; there we found the prisoner. We took her to the watchhouse. She was searched; no property was found on her. She took me to her lodgings, and acknowledged taking the watch. She took me up two pair of stairs; there were two children in bed. She said to the children, give me that article. One of the children put her hand under the bed, took out the watch, and gave it to the prisoner. This is the watch I took from the prisoner.

Prosecutor. It is my watch.

Prisoner's Defence. Distress drove me to be in the line of life I am in.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , fined 1 s .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

511. FREDERICK ROLFE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of May , two pair of shoes, value 10 s. the property of John Frazer , privately in his shop .

JOHN FRAZER . I am a shoemaker , No. 17, Ratcliffe-highway , in the parish of St. George's. On the 20th of May, about nine in the morning. I was at breakfast in the parlour; my servant girl called out, sir, there is a man gone out of the shop, and I am sure he has taken something with him. I pursued him, and when I came up to him I perceived he had something under his great coat. I took one of the pair of shoes from him; he took out the otherpair, and threw them down in the street. He ran away. I ran after him, took him, and brought him back to my shop, and sent for an officer. I delivered the shoes and the prisoner into the hands of the officer.

FRANCIS JACKSON . I am an officer. These are the shoes that Mr. Frazer delivered to me.

Prosecutor. They are my shoes; they are the shoes that the prisoner took out of my shop; they are of the value of ten shillings.

GUILTY , aged 48,

Of stealing, but not privately.

Confined 1 month in Newgate , fined 1 s .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood .

512. JOHN STEVENS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of March , a pair of gold watch cases, value 3 l. the property of Henry Berthond .

EDWARD HAYWARD . I am a refiner, servant to John Hayward and John Turner .

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. I cannot swear to him.

Q. Did you at any time buy any gold of any person - A. Yes. On the 14th of April last, I bought eleven pennyweights and six grains of gold. It was very much disfigured, a small long piece. I gave forty-five shillings an ounce, value one pound five shillings and three pence. I took the name of the persons that sold it, Stevens, 19, Seward-street, Goswell-street. It was a lad about the size of the prisoner, but to swear to his features, I cannot.

WILLIAM MASTERS . I am son-in-law to Mr. Woolman, a refiner in Little Sutton-street, Clerkenwell. On the 25th of April, I bought a small piece of battered gold of a boy now in court, not the prisoner. It weighed six pennyweights. I gave one pound one shilling for it, at seventy shillings per ounce.

RICHARD POWIS . I am a watch manufacturer in Rosamond-street, Clerkenwell. The prisoner was my errand boy . On Monday the 2nd of May, I had suspicion of his having become improperly possessed of some gold. I interrogated him how he came possessed of it; he made various improbable excuses that he had found the gold. At that time there was some gold stopped on him at a refiner's, and sent to me. I searched him, and found more gold. I distinctly found that the gold in his possession was a mutilated watch case. He told me he found it in Mr. Berthond's passage. I told him the improbability of finding a case of the value of eighteen or nineteen pounds. He then said he had been tempted to take it while he was in the passage of Mr. Berthond's house. Mr. Berthond is not here.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

513. CHARLES CAGELL and SAMUEL DAVIS were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of May , seven fur borders, value 1 l. a hair sack, value 7 s. seven fur tippets, value 7 s. and a branco fur border, value 5 s. the property of Simon Levy .

SECOND COUNT, charging Cagell with the felony only .

THIRD COUNT, charging Davis for receiving the goods charged to be stolen by Cagell only, he knowing them to be stolen .

AND THREE OTHER COUNTS for like offences, stating the goods to be the property of Simon Levy and John Wilcox .

GEORGE WOOD . I am an officer. On the evening of the 4th of May, I was sent for to a room in York-street, Saffron-hill, on account of a riot. I went to a room kept by a Mrs. Lee. I saw these borders laying in the room: I saw a hair bag laying in the room. I asked her how she came by the bag. In consequence of her information I went to Levy, the prosecutor, and brought him to the public-house where I had taken these things. I asked Cagell how he had come by these things. I said I had been to Lee's lodgings; he said he had them of Davis, he lived in the City. Cagell and Davis were both present. I had sent for them both. I asked Davis whether he gave it to Cagell, or not. He said he had; he had given him a hair bag for a covering or sacking of bed. This is a tippet we found in the cellar where there was a man dying skins. Mr. Levy picked these things out. I saw them selected out of a large quantity in a bag in the work shop. This seal skin and these borders he also picked out. I afterwards took the things to the office.

THOMAS BEVAN. I live in Water-lane, Fleet-street; Davis lodged with me. I went into the lodging of Davis; I saw part of the things found there by the officers.

PHILIP LEVY . On the 12th of March last, I came to live with my brother in Red Lion-street, Clerkenwell ; he is a furrier . I came there on the Saturday; I saw Davis there on the Monday following, in the middle of the day. When he came he asked for my brother; I told him he was not at home. He went through the yard, into the dye-house. Cagell was in the dye-house. I went into the yard, and perceived them in close conversation. Afterwards, I saw Davis going out of the back door of the dye-house with a bundle in his hand. There were some furs hanging out of the bundle. They were fur tippets, called stone martin tippets. By the size of the bundle, I suppose it contained about a dozen tippets.

Q. Where was Cagell at the time - A. He was in the dye-house. I did not say any thing to either of them. I did not know anything then of my brother's concerns. I told my brother the same evening when he came home.

SIMON LEVY I live at 43, Red Lion-street, Clerkenwell. The prisoner, Cagell, was in my employ at the time he was apprehended; he was my foreman in the dying business. Davis, the other prisoner, was in my employ; he was bound apprentice to me four years ago; he ran away from me three years ago. Since that time he has set up business for himself.

Q. Now look at these tippets; had you any such tippets as these on your premises - A. Yes, I had, in the month of March, in the dye-house; I had near sixty. On the 14th of March, I missed a dozen of these tippets. I was out on the 14th of March; when I came home at night my brother told me Davishad been there. The tippets now produced are my own manufacturing; they are my own property. This seal skin is mine; this tippet, there is my own writing on it; I missed it in March; and this hair sack found in Cagell's apartment, I missed that in March.

Mr. Knapp. What is your name - A. Simon Levy ; that has been always my name.

Q. Perhaps you will recollect if I remind you; have you gone by the name of Simon Woolfe - A. No, at no time.

Q. This Davis was an apprentice of yours. Did you never go by the name of Simon Woolfe - A. I will explain it; my name is Levy.

Q. Did you come from your country by the name of Levy or Woolfe - A. Woolfe.

Q. Now you go by the name of Simon Levy - A. I came here by the name of Simon Woolfe Levy.

Q. Did you sign the indenture of Davis, by the name of Simon Woolfe Levy - A. I cannot recollect.

Cagell's Defence. I am innocent. When I wanted to go away from him, he said, stop with me; I will give you fifty shillings a week; we made an agrement for five years. A gentleman offered me four pounds a week; I did not like to go away. He is a villain; as I have learned him his business, he would do any thing to me.

Davis's Defence. All the time I have been in business for myself, the prosecutor tries to injure me; it is but two years ago he swore an assault against me; all through my doing well in business, he tries to injure me, and when I get clear of this, he has said, I shall never be at rest in this country.

ELIZABETH ATWOOD . I live at No. 3, Shoe-lane.

Q. Do you know the prosecutor - A. I do; he lodged with me when I lived in Water-lane; he went by the name of Levy then. He was asked for by the name of Fox, Simons, and Levy; he would answer to any name he was asked for. I have heard him say if ever Davis came into his room, he would murder him if possible. He always vowed vengeance against Davis.

The prisoners called six witnesses, who gave them a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood .

514. JOHN BYRNE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of May , two pair of boot-legs, value 13 s. the property of Samuel Jackson .

ALEXANDER WHITE . I am a currier, in the employment of Samuel Jackson . The prisoner was also in his employ. On the 16th of this month, I was set to watch the prisoner; there are three shops in Mr. Jackson's house; the prisoner was at work in one of the shops; different work is carried on in different shops. I watched him through a hole in the wall, that I made for that purpose. I saw him take two pair of boot-legs, and secrete them under his trowsers. I informed Mr. Jackson's clerk of it; he went and told Mr. Jackson of it. The clerk went into the shop where the prisoner was. He let the prisoner go out into the street, and then called him back; told him Mr. Jackson wanted to speak to him; the prisoner went out in the street about two yards from the door; when he came into the shop he attempted to run up stairs. He told him to go into the accompting-house. The clerk ran after him, and laid hold of him, and said Byrne, you have got legs about you; he said, yes, I have, and begged for mercy. He was taken into a room adjoining. He then took out two pair of legs from his trowsers, where he had put them before. Mr. Broadhurst, the clerk, took possession of them. The legs would sell for half-a-guinea a pair; they were in a finished state, ready for sale.

JAMES BROADHURST . I am clerk to Samuel Jackson ; he has no partner. On the day mentioned in the indictment, I saw him come through the shop. and go into the street; I called him back, and told him Mr. Jackson wished to speak to him. I desired the prisoner to go into the accompting-house; I thought he was following me. He ran up stairs; I ran up stairs, and collared him. I told him he had legs about him, and desired him to pull them out; the prisoner immediately begged for mercy. He pulled the legs out himself in the sale shop, from his trowsers. These are the legs; I have had them ever since.

WILLIAM GARNON . I am in the employ of Mr. Jackson. I marked these legs with my own hands; they are Mr. Samuel Jackson 's property. After they are scowered and shaved, I mark them, and deliver them to the prisoner to dress.

Prisoner's Defence I confess my guilt, being in great distress, having an helpless wife and four children; this being my first offence, I implore for mercy.

GUILTY , aged 55.

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , fined 1 s .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

515. WILLIAM BINGHAM , alias ABEL WILLIAM BINGHAM , was indicted for feloniously marrying Sarah Biscoe , his former wife being then alive .

FRANCES HEATH . Q. In the year 1802, did you attend the marriage of the prisoner and Frances Badham - A. Yes; on the 10th of August, 1802, at St. George's church, Hanover-square; I was bride's maid. She is still living, and now in court.

WILLIAM SMITH . I produce a copy of the register of that marriage; I compared it with the book; it is a true copy.

"St. George's, Hanover-square, August 10th, 1802, William Bingham and Frances Badham , were married by me, J. Clements, curate; this marriage was solemnized between us, William Bingham , X the mark of Frances Badham ." I produce the register book of marriages of the parish of Tottenham.

" William Bingham of this parish, and Sarah Biscoe , were married in this church, by banns, this 13th of September, 1813 ; the marriage was solemnized between us William Bingham and Sarah Biscoe ."

SARAH BISCOE . Q. Were you married to the prisoner at Tottenham in the month of September last - A. I was. I was acquainted with him four months; he addressed himself to me as a widower. He told me his wife was dead and buried.

Q. You are now far advanced in pregnancy - A. I am.

Prisoner's Defence. Eight years have elapsed since my former wife Frances, eloped from me with a married man, of the name of Richard Wood , who at that time had a wife and family; I was uneasy; I went into the Navy, and after I was discharged, I heard my wife was dead. If I had not heard that, I never should have attempted to marry again.

GUILTY , aged 43.

Confined 1 year in Newgate , fined 1 s .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood .

516. JAMES HALL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3rd of May , a handkerchief, value 2 s. the property of Richard Bontin , from his person .

The prosecutor not appearing in court, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

517. JAMES SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of April , a leg of pork, value 5 s. the property of Thomas Cole .

THOMAS COLE . On the 18th of April, I was standing in the shop; I saw James Smith come and take a leg of pork from off the door post. I was standing in William Whitbread 's shop. I take care of the shop, and I am answerable for all the meat.

Q. What business is Mr. Whitbread - A. A cheese-monger . I mind the business for him. I live at 94, High-street, Wapping . The prisoner could not take the leg of pork without coming upon the step. I saw him take it; I went after him, and brought him back, and took the leg of pork from him. I am sure it is my leg of pork. I sent for an officer; he was taken in custody.

Prisoner's Defence. It tumbled off the nail, I took it up; the young man came and took me.

GUILTY , aged 56.

Whipped in jail, and discharged .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood .

518. MARY SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of May , a pewter quart pot, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of Henry Hale .

HENRY HALE . I keep the Cooper's Arms public-house, Millbank-street , St. George's in the East. On Sunday, the 8th of May, the prisoner came into my house; I knew her before: I am sure she is the person; she lived within two doors of my house. She frequently had half a pint of beer, and took it into the tap-room to warm. My servant had washed the pots, and put them by the fire to dry them; the servant left the tap-room to bring some pots into the bar. When she returned, there was a pot gone, and the prisoner only in the tap-room. I went into the tap-room, and asked the prisoner if she knew any thing of the pot: she said, no. I told her there was one missing; suspicion fell so strong upon her, as not to allow her to leave the house until she was searched; she said, she would not be searched by any body in the house. I sent for an officer; before the officer came, my wife asked the prisoner to stand up, to see if the pot was under her; she got up, and moved round so quick, which shewed the bulk of her pocket. I caught hold of the pot through her clothes, and held it until the officer came in and took it out. This is the pot; it is mine. I saw it taken from her pocket. After the officer had taken the pot out of the prisoner's pocket, we went and searched the prisoner's room. We found a frying-pan with pewter all over it.

GUILTY , aged 35.

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , fined 1 s .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

519. MARIA PAYCE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of April , two vices, value 50 s. and twenty pounds weight of iron, value 10 s. the property of William Beecher .

WILLIAM BEECHER . I live in French-alley, Shoreditch .

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. Perfectly well, and her husband. I let them a smith's shop and a room; the prisoner and her husband were both together when they took it. They were in the shop on the 18th of April, and on the 19th I found the shop empty; the vices and the iron were gone.

Prisoner's Defence. My husband took the money for them; I have not seen him since. The man pawned them.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood .

520. MARY LACEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3rd of May , a three-shilling bank token, the property of George Richards , from his person .

GEORGE RICHARDS . I am a servant . On the 3rd of May, near half past ten at night, I was coming home in an hackney coach; I was bringing things to my master. I got out of the coach at the corner of Park-street, Oxford-street , and was going to discharge the coachman: I took two three-shilling pieces out of my pocket, an eighteen-penny piece, and a sixpence; I had them in my hand. The prisoner came by with more women; she took hold of my hand, took a three-shilling piece, knocked the rest on the ground, and then run away. She stopped when she espied me pursuing her; I asked her for the three-shilling piece that she had taken; she replied, you may go and get it; I'll go and spend it. She went to a public-house, about an hundred yards further; I pursued her, and called the watch; the watch came up. She went into a public-house, and had something to drink. When she was drinking, she said, I am spending your three-shilling piece. I retired from the door; she followed me out. The watchman took her into custody. She was taken to the watchhouse, and searched. I saw a three-shilling piece found upon her, a shilling, and a quantity of halfpence.

Q. You did not know your three-shilling piece, did you - A. No; there was no mark upon it. It appeared to be a good one. I should not have taken such a three-shilling piece as that found upon the her; my master would have flung it at my head. I am in the habit of taking a little money.

JOHN RAVENCROFT . I am a watchman. Thelast witness called me in Oxford-street, about half past ten at night. I saw the prisoner run away from him; she went down Oxford-road, and went into Portman-street, to a public-house. I waited about two minutes, until she came out. The prosecutor gave me charge of her. I took her to the watch-house, and searched her. When I took her in custody, she said, here, you old b - r, here is the three-shilling piece, go and spend it; I said, no, I will not take it; I am an officer of the night. I searched her at the watchhouse; I found a three-shilling piece, a bad one, a shilling, and nine-pennyworth of halfpence.

Prosecutor. My three-shilling piece was a good one; to the best of my knowledge that is not my three-shilling piece.

Ravencroft. It is the same three-shilling piece I found upon the prisoner; I marked it when I took it from her.

Prisoner's Defence. I am a poor and unfortunate young woman. I met the prosecutor in the street; we spoke together. He said, that he had no less change than a three-shilling piece; I went to get that changed at a public-house; I was informed it was a bad one. I returned the prosecutor the bad one; he said, it was not the three-shilling piece he gave to me; I had no other to change it.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , fined 1 s .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

521. JOHN DONNAHOUGH was indicted for that he, on the 1st of May , upon Elizabeth Harriet Cooper , violently and feloniously did make an assault, and her the said Elizabeth, did ravish, and carnally know .

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

522. THOMAS JONES , alias CROSS , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of April , two promissory notes for the payment of 10 l. each, seven promissory notes for the payment of 5 l. the property of Thomas Wellington .

SECOND COUNT, the property of Thomas Dorial , the elder , and younger , and John Malone .

THIRD COUNT, charged with stealing nine stamps, value 6 d. the property of Samuel Tuffney Harding and Company.

And OTHER COUNTS, the property of other persons.

SIXTH COUNT, charged with stealing nine pieces of stamped paper, value 6 d. the property of Thomas Doriel and Company.

SEVENTH COUNT, a box, value 1 s. the property of Samuel Tuffney Harding and Company.

HENRY BATEFALL. I am a clerk in the banking-house of Doriel and Company; the names of the partners are Thomas Doriel, senior , Magenis Doriel Bacon , Thomas Doriel, junior , and John Malone , they are bankers , 22, Finch-lane, Cornhill.

Q. On the 19th of April, last year did you make up a parcel - A. I did; for the purpose of sending to Harding and Company, at Tamworth. The banking-house in Finch-lane, they are town agents of that bank.

Q. What was the amount of the notes you made up - A. 2,946 l. I made the entry from the notes themselves.

Q. Was there one for 10 l. No 9000 - A. Yes.

Mr. Gurney. Is it your own entry - A. Yes.

Mr. Alley. Turn to your entry, and tell me the two 10 l. notes, 535, and 629, what bank were these notes - A. That I cannot tell. They must be either the Barton or the Tamworth bank; I do not know which.

Q. Now, look for the 5 l. notes, I shall confine myself to seven of them; 5,938 - A. That is here; 5,938, 5,698, 5,678, 5,765, 4,593, 5,787, and 5,766, these were all 5 l. notes, that were put in the parcel to go to Tamworth; the parcel was made up in cartridge paper, and put into a small wooden box covered with shavings, to make it sit tight. The box was directed to Messrs. Peal's Harding, and Company, printers, Tamworth. When I had made up the parcel, and put it into the box; I put the box into the back accompting-house.

Q. Whose business was it afterwards to take it to the coach office - A. The junior clerk, William Ariel , or Robert Lock. the porter. They were to take it to the coach-office, I believe. I took it out of the accompting-house, and gave it to one of them; I do not know which. It went out of the house. When I parted with it for them to take it to the coach it was quite safe, and the same as when I made it up. This is the box that I put the parcel in; they took it away to the coach. It went out of the house secure; not broken as it is now.

ROBERT LOCK . I am a porter at the house of Doriel and Company. The box that was directed to Peal, Harding, and Company, printers, Tamworth, I took it to go by the Chester mail. Ariel went with me. We took the box to the coach-office, Golden Cross, Charing-cross. I delivered it, I believe, to one Mr. Thompson; I paid two pence for the booking, and I got a receipt for it. Thompson gave it to another man; the other man took it to the back of the office. It was perfectly secure; it was tied. The string was not tied as it is now, nor was the top of the box broken.

FREDERICK JOHN THOMPSON . I am a bookkeeper at the Golden Cross, Charing-cross. I was so on the 19th of April.

Q. Do you remember a box being brought to your house that you were to book to be sent to Messrs. Peale's and Harding, at Tamworth - A. I do; I gave a receipt for it. I have no doubt it is the box; it bears the number 16, which corresponds with the entry in my book; that is how I know it to be the same; to the best of my recollection, I received it about six o'clock, it was to go with the coach at seven o'clock.

To whom did you deliver the box for that purpose to be carried to the coach - A. We have two men, who are here.

JOHN WADSWELL. I am a porter to the bookkeeper at the Golden Cross, Charing Cross; I was so in April, in last year. It was my duty to put the parcels in a regular place that are to go by theChester mail; they are to be put in the coach by Day. The bookkeeper takes them, and books them. I put them into a certain place; Day takes them out of that place, and puts them into the coach. The 19th of April was Easter Monday.

RICHARD DAY . I am the porter that takes the parcels out, and help to load the coach. I was so employed every day last year; if I had taken a box in that state I should have brought it back to the office. It was not in that broken state when I put it in the coach.

MR. STONE. I am the coachman of the Chester mail; I was so on the 19th of April, 1813. I remember that box being in my coach. I drove the coach to Redbourne. Redbourne is twenty-five miles from London. I did not observe the box broken at all; I had not time to examine it; I got up in an hurry. I took up a person at the Royal Exchange; he said he was in the habit of going by the Glasgow mail, and as they were gone could I accommodate him to Hadley-high-Stoke, and then he could walk the remainder of the way to his own house. There was no one in the coach when he got it, not till I came to the Peacock, Islington; that is a house we all stop at; and at the Peacock I took up Mr. Wilson. I put the person that came in the coach at the Royal Exchange, down at Hadley-high-Stoke. Mr. Wilson had to go forty or fifty miles.

Q. Did anything pass at his going away - A. No; he turned down the Hatfield-road. Mr. Wilson I knew before; he is a respectable gentleman.

Q. Look round, and tell me whether you know the prisoner - A. I do not. It was nearly his size as possible, but his features I cannot recollect. He was dressed in dark clothes, or black.

Q. Which way did you come from the Exchange to Islington - A. By Moorgate, and up the City-road. I delivered the coach to Hope.

Q. Have you got your way bill - A. I have not.

Q. Did you put down all the passengers, and the one to Hadley-high-Stoke - A. I did not; the other I put down.

Q. That is shoulderage - A. Yes.

SAMUEL WILSON . I am a brewer; I live in Wellingborough. On the night of the 19th of April, I got into the Holyhead coach, at the Peacock, Islington. There was one man in the coach; he accompanied me to Hadley Heath . I had a little conversation with him; he told me he rode up in the morning with his horse and gig; he could not get through his business that day; and finding that he was not able to get through his business that day, he had sent his horse and gig back into the country. I considered him to be an innocent man.

EDWARD HOPE . I am the coachman that took the Chester mail at Redbourne; I drove to Ladbury. I was succeeded by Foster. There was one inside of the coach, and only one, a Mr. Wilson; he quitted it at the Swan, Newport. There was nobody else. I took up neither in or out.

THOMAS FOSTER . I took charge of the coach of the last witness at Ladbury; I drove to Northampton. I had one inside passenger; he was a sailor. I found him inside; he was alone fifteen miles. He was not a shoulder.

RICHARD TOOTH . I took the coach of the last witness. I drove the coach from Northampton to Litchfield.

Q. Did you find there was a box to be delivered to Peal's and Harding's - A. Yes, at Tamworth. I took it out of the coach, an delivered it to the innkeeper at Tamworth, Mrs. Lucombe; she is the mistress from Northampton to Tamworth. I took a lady up her name is Mrs. George.

HARRIET LUCOMBE . I assist my brother, and keep the inn at Tamworth. I recollect on the morning of the 20th of April, the last witness bringing a box to me; it was directed to Messrs. Peal, Harding, and Company. He brought it from the coach to me. It appeared to me that it had been broken. When I received it, it felt very light. I gave it to a person of the name of Hollier, who was to carry it to the place it was intended for.

- HOLLIER. I am an apprentice of Messrs. Peal and Company. I received a box of Mrs. Lucombe. I delivered it in the same state I received it to the servant in Mr. Eveleigh's presence.

RICHARD EVELEIGH. I am clerk to Peal, Harding, and Company, I received a box of Hollier.

Q. Did you take it to the Tamworth banking-house - A. I did not. I delivered it to Mr. Oxworth, in the same state that I received it. It was very badly tied, and appeared to have been opened by breaking. I told Oxworth so.

JOSEPH OXWORTH . I am clerk to Messrs. Harding and Company, at the Tamworth bank. Their names are Samuel Tuffney Harding, Charles Oakes , and Charles Wellington ; they are the partners. I received of Mr. Eveleigh the box in question. I observed it was very badly tied; it appeared as if it had been opened. The lead was cracked as it appears now. I opened it; it contained nothing but shavings. There is a branch of this bank at Burton.

Q. Do you ever officiate as clerk at the Burton bank - A. Sometimes. We have got the Burton book here; it is the hand-writing of John Lawson .

WILLIAM LAWSON . I am clerk of the Burton bank.

Q. Is that book your hand writing - A. No; it is John Lawson 's hand-writing.

Q. Produce your own book, and tell me whether you find a 10 l. note, No. 10,535 - A. No, I have no such 10 l. note.

Q.6029 - A. No.

Q. A 5 l. note have you, 5398 - A. No.

Q.5928, 5787, 5766 - A. No, no such numbers have been issued from our bank. I have been clerk there a year and a half. The entries of the notes are made in another book. This is copied from the day book. I have not that book here.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

523. THOMAS TYLER , JAMES KNIGHT , SAMUEL KNIGHT , and JANE STAMFIELD , were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of George Collins , about the hour of two in the night of the 9th of April , and burglariously stealing therein, five bear skins, value 5 l.six hare skins, value 6 s. a fox skin, value 2 s. and a rabbit skin, value 6 d. the property of George Collins .

GEORGE COLLINS . I am a fur skin dresser ; I live in Allen-street, in the parish of St. James, Clerkenwell . On the night of the 9th of April, I fastened up my premises; I was the last person up. At half past four I was called up, with an alarm of my premises being broken open. I got up, and found my premises had been broken into and robbed. They had entered on the side next to Compton-passage, apparently by crows; there were impressions of crows in five different places. After they had entered the door, from thence they got into the window of the shop, went up stairs into another shop, and there they took furs and skins to the value of one hundred and fifty pounds. This shop that was so broken is part of the dwelling-house. There is a communication from the house to the shop by a small yard, all within one enclosure.

JOSEPH SOLOMON . I am a furrier. On the 2nd of May, I was in Bishopsgate-street. My dress, on that day shewed that I worked in furs.

Q. Were you accosted by any person - A. I was, and I was desired to go and look at some furs. I was taken up to Hoxton, to the place I took the officers to, just by the Ivy House . It was a kind of stable. I was there shewn some furs, a swan skin, and a fox skin. I only saw one fox skin. I saw several Russia white hair skins and bear skins. I was shewn a large quantity of these skins; they were offered me for sale. I did not buy them; I came away.

JOHN WOOLFE. I am a baker.

Q. Have you any shed or stable in Ivy-lane, Hoxton - A. I have.

Q. In the month of April last did you let that place to any one - A. Yes, I did, to Mr. Tyler, on a Friday morning, the latter end of April, I let it him.

Q. Did you see the place while it was occupied by Tyler - A. Yes, I saw it two or three times. I never saw Tyler after I let it him. I know Tyler very well; he lives in Tryson-street, Spitalfields. I saw an old dirty ragged great coat hanging up in the stable while Tyler had the occupation. The officer shewed me a coat; I do not know that it is the same.

CHARLES COOK . I produce the coat.

Q. to Woolfe. Tell me whether you believe that to be the coat that hung up in the stable - A. I have no recollection of the coat; it was something of that colour, and a good deal like it; whether it is the same I cannot pretend to say.

Mr. Adolphus. You let this stable to somebody else, do not you - A. Mr. Malin, in Hoxton; him and me took it together. I let part to Tyler, and the standing of a cart. I had part, and Mr. Malin had a part. The key of the stable for our common accommodation hung up over the gate.

Q. This stable is next to a skittle ground - A. I never was in the ground. I sometimes saw fifty or sixty persons there.

Q. The officers had the cruelty to suspect you guilty of this robbery, had not they - A. Yes.

Q. And I believe, on a prior occasion, you had the misfortune to shew your face here, had not you - A. Yes.

COURT. What did you take this stable for - A. For the purpose of having the garden.

Q. The prisoner kept a horse and cart; did you ever see the horse and cart there - A. Yes, certainly, I have seen the horse and cart there. I was forced to go through the stable to get at the garden

Q. What is Tyler - A. He gets his living by moving of goods .

FRANCIS FREEMAN . I am a constable.

Q. Did you make a search in this stable at the Ivy House - A. I did. Behind the shed there is a dunghill; I examined it, and found a skin. I saw Mr. Collins dig a handkerchief out, and these pick-lock keys. This was on Monday the 9th of May. The dunghill is in Woolfe's garden, I understand.

Cook. I found the coat hanging up in the stable on Wednesday the 4th of May. Mr. Collins was outside. I jumped over the place. I found an appearance of fur in the stable. There is some on the coat now.

Q. to Freeman. Do you know when Tyler was taken in custody - A. Not for some days after the coat was in the possession of Cook.

Q. to Prosecutor. You went there on the 4th of May, with Cook - A. Yes. I examined the coat; on it there were marks of three distinct kind of furs, of swan down, white Russia hare, and some hear hair. I had lost all these kind of hair, and I had lost a fox skin.

Q. Look at that skin found on the dunghill - A. I have looked at it before; it is a rabbit skin; it is one of the skins that I lost.

RICHARD STEVENS . I am porter to Mr. Sharp, of Aldermanbury.

Q. Did you receive from a person of the name of Wittam any skins to dispose of - A. Yes, I received three skins; I took them to Mr. Meyer, a furrier, and shewed them to him.

Q. After you had seen Mr. Meyer, was any appointment made to meet any other person, by Wittam - A. I was appointed to meet a Russian captain of a Russian vessel laying off Deptford.

Q. Before you kept your appointment you were taken by the officers - A. I was. I got another appointment with Wittam; I went to meet the parties; they were not come. I went into a public-house, and enquired for a person of the name of Knight. I had apprised the officers, and they were watching. I went to the Angel and Crown public-house, that goes out of Wood-street into Maiden-lane. I went and enquired for Mr. James Knight ; the prisoner, James Knight , answered to the name. I told him I was recommended to him by the porter over the way (that is Wittam) concerning some skins. This I believe was Tuesday the 10th of May. He said the skins did not belong to him; he would take me to the person where I should see the whole of them. He took me to the Three Bucks public-house, the corner of the Old Jewry; and at the Three Bucks after some time he went out and came back again; then in came a person; he said, you see the person,that is Samuel Knight . They retired into a back room. He came out again. I got up, and spoke to him; he told me that was the person that had got the skins. He did not say what he was. Samuel said they were not there; they were a good distance off; he would go with me. Samuel and I proceeded as far as the Marquis Cornwallis public-house in the Curtain-road, Shoreditch; it is opposite of William-street; he said if I would go in there and get a pint of porter, he would go and find the person; he should not be ten minutes. The officers were there. He came back in about ten minutes; he said he could not find the person. He asked me how many his brother, James Knight , had shewn me. That is the first time I knew they were brothers. I told him three. That is the three I had of Wittam. He said he had got eighteen or twenty, and if I had seen them, the others would be as good. We drank up our beer, and parted. I informed the officers what had past immediately, and before he went out of the street the officers took him. Upon this I returned to the Three Bucks, where I had left James Knight ; I told him his brother could not find the man to shew me the skins, and that he had got a quantity of them, and that I was given to understand should be as good. He gave me an order to go and look at them. This is the order: -

"Let this man see the skins. James Knight , 109, Snows-fields, Borough." - When he had given me that written order, I and the officers went over to Snows-fields. I went into the house alone, and delivered the order to Mrs. Knight; she ordered the girl to go up stairs, and shew me the skins. I went up and saw them; then I came down again to the door, to the officers; then I and one of the officers went back and took James Knight . He was still at the Three Bucks.

JOHN WITTAM . I am a porter to Mr. Webb, a hosier, in Maiden-lane.

Q. Did you deliver any skins to Stevens - A. I did; I received them of James Knight on the morning of the 7th of May.

Q. Where did Knight give them to you - A. At his own house in Snows-fields, in the Borough. On the day before he asked me if I could get any body to buy them, that would give the full value for them. I understood they belonged to a Russia ship; he afterwards told me the ship was gone into dock.

Q. Did you shew them to Mr. Emannel - A. I did.

MORRIS EMANUEL . Q. On the 7th of May did the last witness shew you any skins - A. He did; I saw one of the skins.

Q. Did any person come afterwards as the owner - A. Yes; James Knight came with Wittam; he came as a Russia captain; he told me he was just arrived from Russia, and these skins I had seen in the morning, he had sent them as a sample. There was a black cub bear skin, a swan skin, and a Russia white hare. He said his vessel was in the river. I asked to see all that he had; he said he would bring the remainder. I never saw him afterwards until he was in custody.

JOHN LIMBRICK . I met Stevens by appointment on the 10th of May; we went to the Angel and Crown. I was dressed as a countryman. When I got there with Stevens, I saw James Knight , and another strange man. The conversation was concerning some skins; Knight said the bulk should come to Wittam's warehouse. Knight and Stevens went out together; I followed them to the Three Colts, the corner of Old Jewry-street; I did not go into the house; I waited until Stevens came out. In consequence of what he told me I went into a neighbouring public-house; Stevens in the course of time came to me at that public-house, and told me to follow him. I followed him into the Curtain-road after him and Samuel Knight . I saw Stevens walk down the road a little way; they separated; Stevens said something to him. I followed Samuel Knight , and took him into custody. After that, I went to the London Apprentice. I sent Freeman to the Three Colts, in the Old Jewry, where Knight had been. I remained there with Samuel Knight ; Stevens came back again and brought me a note; the note that has been produced before you. I proceeded to Snows-fields, taking Samuel Knight with us. I got out of the coach, and went with Stevens. Samuel Knight was in the coach, and Hutt, the officer, with him. Stevens went into the house first, came out again, and made a sign to me; I then went into the house. These are the skins; I brought them away with me, and Mrs. Knight. I came back, and apprehended James Knight at the Three Colts. On Wednesday I went into the City; I went to Mr. Brunswick; I found the woman prisoner there; she was taken in custody there. Before she was taken in custody, I found these three skins at Mr. Brunswick's. The skins had been offered there. The skins were in Mr. Brunswick's possession. The woman prisoner said she met a Jew on London-bridge, he gave her these skins for a sample. I asked her if she knew him; she said she did not by name, nor where he lived, nor did he know where she lived. She was to meet him at the sign of the Cock and Bottle, in the City. That is all that passed. Then she was detained.

Mr. Alley. You searched her house, did not you - A. Yes.

Q. You did not find any picklock keys, nor at Knight's neither - A. No.

JOHN POOK . I am one of the partners in the house of Brunswicks. On Wednesday the 11th of May, the woman prisoner came to my house, No. 2, Mansion-house-street; she came to sell a bear skin, a swan skin, and a Russia white hare, and a black cub bear. She said she had two dozen more; I wished to see them altogether before I told her the value of them. I could not prevail upon her to bring the goods. I knew of the robbery; I wanted to collect the goods. I asked her how she had attained them; she said that her husband, or some person, had brought them from abroad. She left the skins, and was to come back within the hour. She made it a little better than an hour. I first sent for Mr. Collins, who had lost the goods, to know whether they were his property. When she returned, the constable was in the shop with Mr. Collins. I then told her I was very sorry for the situation she stood in. I suspected the skins were stolen; in consequence of that I had sent for the proprietor; he had got aconstable, and there was the owner of them. I advised her to give up the person she had them of, as they were stolen; she said she did not know they were stolen, she had them of a Jew on London-bridge, she neither knew his name or his residence; she was to meet him at the public-house in Cannon-street; then she was taken away. The officer remembers the sign.

THOMAS WADMAN . I am a constable. Jane Stamfield, at Mr. Brunswick's, said she was to meet the Jew at the Cock and Bottle, in Cannon-street. I went there about seven o'clock in the evening; when I went it was a shut-up house; the house had lost its license.

Q. to Prosecutor. Look at the three skins produced from the house of Brunswick, a white hare, a swan, and a black can bear - A. I know they are mine; they are part of what I lost from my house that night; and those found in Snows-fields are my property; it is a small part of what I lost. It was the 29th of April that they were lost.

Q. Was it light when you were called up at half past four - A. It was perfectly light. I should suppose in a quarter of an hour they might have done all they did on the premises.

Tyler's Defence. I am innocent of the charge that is against me.

James Knight 's Defence. I had the skins sent to my house on the 6th of May, and on the same day I met my brother; he said I have sent some skins to your house in order to know the value; he had sent the others into the Borough to know the value of them. He told me he received them of a Russia captain. I supposed it was all right; I took them to Wittam, and told him to take them to a house in Cheapside; instead of that, he took them elsewhere. I had the skins of my brother.

Samuel Knight's Defence. On the 6th of May, I was at the White Horse, Moor-lane; a man was there; he said he knew a Russian merchant that had a lot of goods to sell; he said if I would sell them he would let me have a good commission. On Friday the 6th of May, he sent the skins to the White Horse. I asked my brother if he knew any hatters in the Borough, send them to them, and do the best you can. When I saw him again, he told me he had offered several of the skins to them, and they said they were damaged goods. He said he was to see a man at the Three Bucks. I went to the Three Bucks, and saw Mr. Stevens there. I took him to the Curtain-road; the man I had them to sell for was not come. I went back to the public-house, and told him the man was not come, and I told Mr. Stevens to go up to my brother to see the sample. I went to a public-house just by there. The officer took me. I told them to wait half an hour; the man that left the skins would be there. The officer would not stop. They took me away directly.

Jane Stamfield 's Defence. I was coming over London-bridge; I met a man; he spoke to me; I did not recollect him at first; he said he had known me a long time by attending a sale-room; what he did now was by commission only. He then said, can you do any thing with any for skins; I said I would try. He took me into one of the arches on the bridge. I saw one white skin; he said they were two swan skins, and one Russia bear. I said I thought the swan skins were very ordinary. He said there were two dozen, I said I should shew them. I said I should like to know how many there were, because every person before they made a purchase wished to know the quantity. He said he would let me know the next day. He said, what part of the town do you intend to shew them. I said, Cheapside. He said he would meet me at the Cock and Bottle in Cannon-street; he said, do you know it. I said I could find it. He said he would meet me there tomorrow, by two o'clock. I came there two or three minutes after the time; I saw it was a shut-up house. I went to Mr. Brunswick's house, and told them I had a sample of skins to dispose of, He looked at them, and asked the price; he said first, how many have you. I said, I have no more than these, but I am told there are two dozen bear skins. He called a gentleman to look at them, and told me to call in an hour's time. I went, and was taken in custody.

REBECCA FISHER . I live with Mr. James Knight. I have lived with him ever since I came from the country, which is eleven months. James Knight lives in Snows-fields. He has always slept at home ever since I have been in his house. I have slept in the same room with him ever since the fire happened in Snows-fields; there were sixteen houses burned near us; and when I did not sleep in the same room with him and my mistress I slept close by.

Q. How old are you - A. Sixteen.

Q. How long had you left off sleeping in the same room before he was taken up - A. About a fortnight. I did not go to bed until after master and mistress.

Q. When you go to sleep you sleep sound - A. I awake about two or three times of a night, about two o'clock, and between five and six; when I awake, I generally set up in bed, and see who is there.

Q. Do you burn a light in the room - A. No; there is a lamp outside; by which throws a light upon his bed; by which means I can see whether he is in bed or whether I am alone, and I am sure he had not gone out. I locked the door; I had the key in my window. There is only one key to the street door; that key I always keep.

SAMUEL SHALER . I am a gardener. I have known Samuel Knight five years. I live in Little Chelsea.

Q. Do you remember his being taken up on this charge - A. Yes; I heard of it the Tuesday week afterwards. On Friday, the 29th of April, he was with me in my ground on that day. I saw him in the morning at eleven o'clock, In the afternoon, I saw him; from two to six he was in my garden ground, and when I left him my uncle was with him.

Q. What is Knight - A. He sells cloth to tailors by commission .

COURT. What do you call him - A. I do not know. He lodges at the Somerset Arms, Little Chelsea. He was at my house in the Grove, in Little Chelsea, from two to six. We afterwards went to the Somerset Arms, and spent the evening.

Q. Where is his shop - A. I never knew him have a shop or warehouse. I have seen him in the possession of cloth, nor had I ever any dealings with him. I remember that he was with me in my garden ground on the 29th of April; my uncle was with me also, and a great many more.

Q. Can you tell how he gets his bread - A. By selling cloth; he is a west countryman.

HENRY SHALER . I am a nurseryman, at Little Chelsea. I am uncle to the last witness. I have known Samuel Knight five years and a half. On Friday, the 29th of April, I was with him at the Somerset Arms, Little Chelsea; he lodges there, and he came into my nursery-ground. The last time I met with Knight was eleven o'clock at night, and after I had done my work in the garden; I was with him from seven o'clock until eleven at night, and then I left him at the Somerset Arms. On the next morning, I saw him again, about half after nine o'clock, he came down rubbing his eyes, as if just out of bed; I gave him part of a cold pint of porter.

Q. How does he get his living - A. God knows; by industry, I believe; I understand he is a clothier.

Q. Where is his manufactory - A. God Almighty knows; I do not know; nor where his warehouse is.

EDWARD DAIN . I keep the Somerset Arms public-house, Little Chelsea. The prisoner, Samuel Knight , lodged with me; he has a wife and two children.

Q. Do you know the two Shalers - A. Yes; they are gardeners. I remember seeing them at my house on the 29th of April, perfectly well.

Q. What time did Mr. Shaler go away - A. Between ten and eleven o'clock, as nigh as I can recollect; he had been in the company of Samuel Knight from seven o'clock in the evening. I am quite sure of that. Knight left my room to go to bed as near twelve as possible. I gave him a light, and saw him go up two pair of stairs. He sleeps on the second story. I heard him go into his room. I shut up the house after he went to bed. I saw him the next morning, about nine o'clock. I have no doubt he was there all night.

Stamfield called six witnesses, who gave her a good character.

TYLER, NOT GUILTY .

JAMES KNIGHT , GUILTY - DEATH , aged 46.

SAMUEL KNIGHT , GUILTY - DEATH aged 49.

JANE STAMFIELD , GUILTY - DEATH , aged 40.

Of stealing in the dwelling-house to the value of above 40 s. but not of the burglary.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

524. HENRY LYE was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Henry Peter Simmons , about the hour of eight in the night of the 17th of March , and burglariously stealing therein, two watches, value 40 l. a trinket-box, value 1 l. two pearl bracelets, value 5 l. six rows of pearl, value 40 l. twenty-six ear-rings, value 60 l. sixteen brooches, value 200 l. a diamond locket, value 20 l. a diamond cross, value 20 l. six rings, value 2 l. two silver waiters, value 20 l. two silver coffee-pots, value 20 l. four silver salt-spoons, value 1 l. a silver mustard-pot, value 1 l. a muffineer, value 1 l. a fish-slice, value 1 l. three pair of candlesticks, value 15 l. two pair of snuffers, value 2 l. two teapots, value 20 l. a sugar-bason, value 5 l. forty-eight spoons, value 40 l. forty-seven silver forks, value 40 l. twelve shifts, value 6 l. twelve handkerchiefs, value 6 l. six pair of stockings, value 3 l. six habit-shirts, value 2 l. a piece of cambric, value 1 l. a piece of linen, value 10 s. and a pocket-almanack, value 1 s. the property of Henry Peter Simmons .

SARAH LONGMAN . I live at 22, Tottenham-place, Tottenham-court-road.

Q. Have you been occasionally employed in Mrs. Simmons's, the prosecutrix's house - A. Yes.

Q. You remember St. Patrick's day last - A. Yes.

Q. On that evening your mistress was gone to the Theatre - A. Yes; she went about five o'clock, or five minutes past. There was an elderly woman left in the house, a Mrs. Blundell, with me, and nobody else. About seven o'clock, a ring came from the bell; I went into the area, and asked who it was; a woman replied, it was a friend of Betty. (That was a person who had lived there formerly, and had gone away.) I told her Betty had left; she was gone away. She said, she had come to tell her of a place. That woman went away; I then fastened the door.

Q. Where does Mr. Simmons live - A. No. 30, Upper Baker-street , in the parish of Mary-le-bone. Shortly after that woman went away, a double knock came to the door; the old lady was going to answer the door; I run and opened the street door, the hall door; I had a candle in my hand, and the old lady came up with a candle in her hand. When I opened the door, a tall man came up to the door; he asked if Captain Prescott was at home: he was rather tall, with large features, and light eyes; he turned round, and beckoned with his finger; in came two more men directly. The man that first came up, pushed me forward into the parlour. I had shut the windows in the front of the house, but I had not the back. He went and pulled down the back parlour window blinds, so as to prevent me from seeing him. I had two candles in the parlour. I said, my good gentlemen, spare my life; he said, do not speak a word, I will blow your brains out; he pretended to take something from his side. He told me to go with him; I told him, I would do any thing if he would spare my life. He took hold of me, took me into the water-closet, and the old lady he pushed in afterwards. He beckoned with his finger for one of the men to go in with us; which he did. That man took care of us, while the other went down stairs.

Q. Who was the man that remained in the closet with you - A. That man, the prisoner at the bar. They took the candle with them, and left me in the dark. They went down into the pantry, and made a rustling with the plate. They came up stairs, and went out of the door. They went out for a shorttime, and returned, and came in again, and then they went up stairs. After a considerable time, they went out, and returned.

Q. Did they go into the garret - A. I do not recollect their going into the garret that time; I believe they went into the garret the next time. I could hear their raftling about the plate; the plate chest was just drawed out to the landing. I said to the an that stood over me, I could not sit any longer. I said, my good gentlemen, spare my life, for the sake of my children; he told me to keep still, and I should not he hurt. In about a quarter of an hour after that, I heard somebody go to the back door; it is a door that leads to the back of the house, into the store room. They went and locked that door, and took the key; it would prevent giving any alarm.

Q. Do you know where the two men were at the time the back door was locked - A. No; one came and locked the door where we were in. It must be done by somebody in our place.

Q. Your mistress had a footman who was turned away some time ago - A. Yes. When that was done, they went into the hall; they waited there a few minutes. The man that was along with me, opened the door, put out his head, and said, Jack, look sharp, be quick; I believe he heard the watch at that time go past eight o'clock. In a few minutes after that, the man in the hall said, come along. When I came into the parlour, the chairs were taken out of the parlour, and put into the hall, so as to make it difficult my getting to the hall door. I got out to the back of the house; I gave the alarm to the coachman; he alarmed the watchman.

Q. You said, the candles were lighted when the men came in - A. Yes. It was quite dusk at that time.

Q. Did you observe the man that stood over you when he put out his head, and said, Jack, look sharp - A. Yes; I took notice that he had a particular way of shewing his teeth when he spoke, and that he was of a fair complexion. I believe the prisoner to be the man.

Prisoner. Q. In which way can you swear I am the person -

Witness. I noticed this man when he opened the door; I noticed he had a particular way of shewing his teeth when he spoke, and the height of the man. I staid by him a full hour.

Prisoner. Gentlemen of the jury, and my lord; I hope you will watch the evidence; there is three hundred pounds reward for the depredation I am charged with. She would swear my life away, and five or six more, for it.

Witness. I saw him at Bow-street; he spoke very abruptly, he said, he could bring witnesses to prove I was a base woman. At Bow-street, I thought he was the man, and I think so now. The first time the prisoner saw me, he trembled; he could not hold one joint still about him.

MARGARET CAREY . I am the wife of James Carey. In the month of March last, me and my husband lived in Sand-yard, Liquorpond-street.

Q. Do you know a person of the name of Wilson - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know Byrne - A. Yes, and Johanna Fewhey , and the prisoner, Henry Lye .

Q. Do you remember the evening of the 17th of March, St. Patrick's day - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know who went out with your husband that evening - A. I saw Lye in company with him about half past seven; my husband was sent for. He went out with Byrne in the evening, about half past five or six.

Q. Do you know with whom he went out with - A. No, I have never known. My husband went out in consequence of a message from a pot-boy. Byrne returned first; I believe he came in about eight o'clock. My husband came in next; he brought nothing in with him. Lye came after my husband; he brought a bundle in something of a tablecloth, or a sheet, I do not know which; it was a bundle containing plate, candlesticks, and several other articles, I do not know what. Wilson came in next. Lye left the room, and went away with my husband, and never opened the bundle. I saw the bundle opened the same evening; it was put into a box.

Q. Did you leave any of these things with your sister, Sarah King - A. Yes, I did; a pocket-book, an almanack, a brooch, and two pair of ear-rings. The things that were put in the box that evening, were carried to Byrne's.

Q. Did you afterwards go with Lye to any person with these things - A. Yes, to a person near Temple-bar, a Mrs. Housley, she goes by the name of Smith; Lye was with me; he waited in the passage while I was there. I did not sell them to Mrs. Housley. They were afterwards taken to Byrne's house. They were articles of jewellery; I cannot say what they were.

Prisoner. Q. Where was it you saw me that night, the 17th of March - A. At my own room.

COURT. Q. How long have you known him - A. About three months before that. I am quite sure he was at my room.

JOHN CARTER . I am pot-boy at Mr. Cloney's, a public-house, in Union-street. On the evening of the 17th of March, three men came to my master's house; they sent me about seven o'clock with a pot of beer to Carey's house. The men sent me the second time to see whether Carey was at home; I went, and saw Mrs. Carey; I told her.

ANN HOUSLEY . I live in Pollard's-court, Fleet-street.

Q. Do you remember Mrs. Carey coming to your house with any person - A. Yes, there were three or four with her; the prisoner, I believe, was one of them. Mrs. Carey came to ask me if I would buy some property. She shewed me some beads, and bracelets; there were a great many things; there were a watch or two; one was a yellow watch. I did not buy them; they went away. I cannot say how many articles there were altogether. I think the prisoner was at the door; he waited at the door until, they all want away.

Q. As they were going away did they leave an ear-ring behind them - A. I picked it up and offered it them; they throwed it on the fire-place; they said they would not turn back. I gave it to Mr. Beckitt.I am sure that Mrs. Carey came, and the prisoner was at the door.

HANNAH KING . I am sister to Mrs. Carey. I live servant with Mr. Appleby on Ludgate-hill.

Q. Did you some weeks ago receive from your sister a pocket-book and a brooch - A. I did; I delivered it up to Mr. Adkins. After that, my sister left a bundle at my house.

HARRY ADKINS . Q. Did you receive of the last witness, a book and a handkerchief - A. I did; four shifts, a handkerchief or two, and other articles; and I have the brooch in the pocket-book. I apprehended the prisoner on the 6th of April; he was then in custody at Marlborough-street.

JOSEPH BECKITT . I belong to the house of correction.

Q. Did you receive from Mrs. Housley an ear-ring - A. Yes, this is it.

MRS. SIMMONS. I am a married woman. My husband's name is Henry Peter Simmons . On the 17th of March, I went to the play; on my return home I found I had been robbed; I lost all the articles stated in the indictment of the value of between three and four thousand pounds.

Q. Look at that ear-ring; was that one of the articles that you lost - A. Yes, it was, and the brooch and the pocket; these were two of the articles that I lost. I have looked at the articles; the body linen, they are nine; these ear-rings are mine that Mr. Adkins got of Mrs. King. My house is in the parish of St. Mary-le-bone.

Prisoner's Defence. I am not guilty of the crime that is alleged against me. I have two witnesses to prove that I was at work at the time that burglary was committed. I was at work at eight o'clock in the evening where I had been at work the week before.

ROBERT LAWRENCE . I am a dairyman, No. 1, Cambridge-place, Fitzroy-square. Henry Lye left my house on the 17th of March, about a quarter before eight.

Q. What is he - A. He is a plaisterer by trade; he lives in John-street, Tottenham-court-road.

Q. You do not know the number - A. No. He went home to his meals. He was repairing my house.

Q. What day of the week was the 17th - A. I cannot say. When he went away, I thought by his name he was an Irishman; I said to him and to my wife, I thought he was going to fuddle. He had been fixing a furnace to a copper for me.

Q. You are not an Irishman - A. No. I thought Lye was an Irish name. On the next day he came and took hold of the copper.

Q. When did you hear that he was taken a prisoner - A. About the 19th of the said month, on the 19th of March; I then went to Cold-bath-fields prison, and several places, and could not learn; at last they told me it was for breaking into a house in Baker-street. I saw him at Marlborough-street get out of a coach. I cannot say when that was; it might be a week after.

COURT. On the 19th of March, you said he was apprehended - A. No, sir. I did not mean that; it was several days after; I cannot recollect how many. It was on the 17th of March, he was at work at my house, and he went away about a quarter before eight. I will stick to that.

SARAH WILSON . I am a single woman. I am housekeeper to the prisoner. I live with him in John-street, Tottenham-court-road. This man was at home and in bed on the 17th of March, by half past eight o'clock. He had been at work at No. 1, Cambridge-place, at Mr. Lawrence's. It was St. Patrick's day; and at half past eight he was in bed and asleep.

Q. How do you know that - A. Because the watchman came round and called the hour.

Q. Is not your brother indicted in this indictment - A. I have heard so; I have not seen the indictment. I have not heard of my brother lately.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 24.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

525. JOHN HILLYER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of May , two quartern loaves of wheaten bread, value 1 s. 10 d. the property of Richard Clark .

RICHARD CLARK . I am a baker at Old Brentford .

Q. Do you know anything of this loss of two loaves - A. Yes; it happened on the 12th of May, about twelve o'clock, these loaves were in a barrow, nearly opposite of the six mile stone, in the London road. I was going to serve my customers a little distance off. The prisoner followed me all the way from his own home. I did not see him take the loaves. I saw them in his possession after he took them; he was about two hundred yards off my barrow. As soon as I saw him he went into a ditch. He seems to be an ideot.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

526. JAMES HOW was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of May , two coach-glasses, value 3 l. the property of Owen Ellis .

BENJAMIN JOHNSON . I am a city constable. On the 17th of May, about half past ten at night, I was in Covent Garden, near the Theatre ; I saw the prisoner there; he was in the company of hackney coachmen. From suspicion, I watched the prisoner. I saw him go between the carriages, open a coach door of a gentleman's coach, and take the glass out; he run towards the hackney coachman again; I went to follow him, and received a blow on the head with the butt end of a whip. I went round to the other side of the carriages. I saw him go towards Covent Garden market, where the people sit. I saw him cross the market, and go into the market-house. I laid wait outside; I suspected he was going to conceal the glass. I waited, and saw him come out without it. I then followed him into St. James's-street; there he went between the carriages, and took another glass out of a gentleman's coach. He opened the door in the same way, and cut the strings of that, and took another out there; and directly he took the second glass to where he had taken the first, I stepped to the place where I thought he had concealed the other in the market-house; I went then with alight; I found four coach-glasses concealed behind a box, trimmings and all. This is the loop that he cut to take them out; he could not well take them out without cutting the loop. I put the glasses in a way of security of my own. I waited for his coming there again, suspecting that he might bring another there. He returned, and brought another glass with him. I laid hold of him, and told him what I took him for. He said he only came to ease himself. I only saw him take two glasses out; I found four. They were both yellow-bodied carriages. This is the knife I found on the prisoner.

WILLIAM HEARNE . I am coachman to Mr. Owen Ellis . On the 17th of March, my master's coach was near Covent Garden market. I stopped in James-street a little after ten; I had set my master down. I did not miss the glasses until a coachman said, William, you have lost your glasses; I dare say your coach doors are open. I got down to look: I found they were gone. I did not see my glasses until I saw them at Marlborough-street office. The glasses were shewn me by Johnson. These are the glasses; I know them to be Mr. Ellis's property. The glasses and the lace would cost five pounds.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been into the Playhouse to see Hamlet acted. I went into the Garden; two officers came and laid hold of me, and took me to the watchhouse.

GUILTY , aged 13.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

527. ROBERT HILL was indicted for that at the General session holden for the county of Surry, on the 24th of March, John Purvis was tried and convicted of feloniously stealing three asses, value 6 l. the property of the right-honourable Edward Lord Ellenborough ; that Robert Hill, on the 11th of March , feloniously did receive and have the said asses, he knowing them to have been feloniously stolen .

JOSEPH SNOW . I am one of the constables of the county of Surry. I produce a copy of the record of the conviction of John Purvis . I had it at the office of the clerk of the county of Surry.

(The copy of the record of the conviction read.)

Snow. I went on the 19th of April with a person of the name of Oades, to Hill's house, in Union-court, Chick-lane. I took Hill in custody. I asked him whether he had bought any asses; he said, no, he had not. I told him they were two young asses, and an old crop mare ass; he said he did not recollect buying any. I then asked him where he lived; he said, in Union-court, Chick-lane; he would go shew me. In going along, I asked him whether he had not got some asses at home; he said he had got one young one. I asked him how he came by that; he said he bought it of a young man; he should know him again. We then went to his house, and saw this ass which has since been sworn to be the property of Lord Ellenborough. In the room I found one young ass, locked up in the room, as if it was a stable for asses. That ass has been since claimed as Lord Ellenborough's property. Thornton was with me. Thornton is Lord Ellenborough's servant. When the young ass was claimed, the prisoner Hill then changed his story, and said he had bought of Ben Harl , that lived next door to him. He said he bought that and another young ass of Ben Harl . He denied buying the old ass, or ever seeing it. I took him in custody, and took him to Union-hall. Since that, I have been looking after Ben Harl , who has absconded. I have never found him.

Mr. Alley. This man told you where he lived - A. Yes. Oades was at a little distance when I first laid hold of him; he said, that is the man that we sold the asses to. I kept Oades out of sight.

JAMES THORNTON . I am gardener to the right-honourable Edward Lord Ellenborough . I was present at the time that Purvis was convicted, and I went with the last witness to the prisoner Hill's house; I found the young ass. We asked him if he had not bought any young asses; he said, no. When I got to his house, I said, this is his lordship's ass; he said he bought it; Harl bought the other. That is what he told me. This ass was in the room that was converted into a stable. It was Lord Ellenborough's ass; I knew it by its countenance as soon as I went into the room. We have never found the other asses.

Mr. Alley. Was Oades with you - A. Yes; he pointed out Hill to us.

CHARLES OADES . I am a brick-maker; I live at Egham, in Surry. On the 10th of March, Purvis and I went to Rochampton; we went to Lord Ellenborough's ground; we took three asses out of the yard; two young stone asses, and an old crop mare ass. We drove them up to Smithfield. It was on the 10th of March that we took them; I do not recollect the day of the week.

Mr. Knapp. It is Thursday, and Friday is Smithfield market, is it not - A. Yes. We took them at twelve o'clock at night on Thursday, and drove them up to Smithfield. At Smithfield, Purvis went away from me; he said he would come back to me. I then was left in possession of the asses. He returned in about a quarter of an hour. We drove the asses down to Union-court, Chick-lane. We went to Hill's house.

Q. Is the prisoner the man - A. Yes.

COURT. He did not come to market to buy them - A. No. When we got to the door a man of the name of Harl bought one young stone ass; the crop mare, they gave five shillings for that. One young ass we drove into Hill's stable; the other two we drove to a gin shop, where the landlord wrote out a bit of paper for the purchase of the asses, two pound five shillings. Harl paid the money before the landlord.

Q. What is the landlord's name - A. I do not know. The money was paid by Harl to Purvis. Hill was by at the time. We had some gin together. When we came out of the door, Purvis paid it all back except twenty-five shillings at that time. Hill and Harl were in conversation together; I could not hear what they said.

Q. What became of the young ass and the cropped mare - A. They drove them away. I parted with them at the door.

Q. What was your share of the booty - A. Afterthe gin was paid for there was only one pound two shillings. I got seven shillings for my share.

Q. Did you go afterwards to Hill's house with Thornton and Snow - A. I did not go to the house. I saw Hill in Cow-cross; I said, here is the person that this bargain took place between Purvis and Harl.

Mr. Alley. You seem a nice clever, careless, fellow; have you been tried yourself - A. No.

Q. I think you ought to be. Do not you come here to give evidence, and not to be tried - A. I came here to give evidence.

Q. How soon after you stole the asses did you tell Lord Ellenborough's servant - A. I was taken in custody, and then I told the truth.

Q. You broke out of prison, did not you - A. I walked out of the watchhouse. I was taken a second time.

Q. Take that paper in your hand, and look at that - A. I cannot exactly swear that this is the paper.

Q. Do not you know that forty-five shillings was paid for the asses, and did not you tell the poor man at the bar that you came by them honestly - A. No. Forty-five shillings was given down before the landlord; and when we came out of the public-house Purvis gave the money back, except one pound five shillings. That was done to make it look more like the value.

Prisoner's Defence. On Friday the 11th of March, a person calling himself John Williams , came to me with two asses; he said he lived at Croydon. I told him I would not purchase them of a stranger, except he gave me a receipt. I took him into Mr. Tarrent's; I paid him forty-five shillings for them. If I had known they had been stolen I should not have kept them in my premises. I never received any of the money back.

GEORGE TARRENT . I keep the King's Arms public-house, St. John-street. I have seen the prisoner before; he is a costermonger. I wrote this memorandum.

"March 8, 1814, John Williams this day has sold two asses for two pound five shillings to Robert Hill." I had not the least reason to suppose there was anything wrong in the transaction.

Mr. Knapp. Did you see the asses - A. No. I did as the seller desired me. He was a man in a smock frock; he appeared to me like a gipsey. I knew Hill and Harl by sight, not by name.

COURT. Could you believe that this was written for any other purpose, namely, than that John Williams had sold to Robert Hill two asses - A.If I have erred, it is the last time. I believe they had half a pint of gin at my house; that came to nine pence.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

528. JOHN CHARLES TAYLOR was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of January , thirteen pieces of stone, value 13 s. the property of Hannah Lion , spinster .

MICHAEL MURPHY . I am an apprentice to the prisoner. I was at work at Mrs. Lion's house. I cannot say when it was, it is so long ago. It is about a year and a half ago.

Q. Do you remember some copeing stones being taken off and put in the garret - A. No.

Q. Do you remember some rubbish being carted away - A. All the rubbish that was there we carted away.

Q. Did you see any stone coping taken out of the rubbish cart at your master's premises - A. No. When I went home there was some rubbish in the shed, and some coping; whether it came in the rubbish or not I cannot say. They took me in custody last Tuesday night.

Q. Did you at any time see in Mr. Taylor's possession any old stone coping that you had seen in Mrs. Lion's house in Shire-lane - A. There was some rubbish in the shed; I picked it out of the rubbish. I asked master if it was of any use; he said, no.

Q. Before the rubbish came from Mr. Lion's house had you seen any stones in your master's house - A. No. There was some coping stones there before I came to master's; I cannot tell where they came from.

ELIZABETH MOSS . My husband is a stone-mason. I saw some stone coping brought into our yard. Mr. Taylor has a shed there. The stone coping was brought there by Lander, Mr. Taylor's carman.

RICHARD LANDER . I am a carter to Mr. Taylor. I carted several loads of rubbish from Shire-lane. Mr. Taylor did not see what I took away.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

529. JAMES WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of February , a yard and three quarters of a yard of woollen cloth, value 80 s. the property of Thomas Edwards , in his dwelling-house .

JAMES ABBEY . Q. How old are you - A. Seventeen. I am an apprentice to Mr. Edwards; he is a tailor in Hatton Garden . I have been with him six years. The prisoner was his journeyman .

Q. Did he at any time make any application to you - A. Yes, he stated to me the pleasure he received when he was an apprentice, and the clothes he got, and the way he used to get them; he said he got cloth from his master, a Mr. Downes, in Fleet-street, and that the foreman used to sell it for him, and used to buy him clothes, and give him money to spend. He then asked me if I did not want a few things; I told him I wanted a great many things that I could not get. He said he would put me in a way to get them; he said if I would get a bit of cloth or kerseymere from my master down stairs he would sell it for me and buy me things. With great persuasion I let him have some kerseymere. I told him I did not like to do it; I did not think it was right; he said, very well. One day, I was going to Islington on my master's business; he met me; he said he was in debt, and wanted to make a suit of clothes for his brother-in-law. That was in last February. He said, if I could get him that I should never want for anything. After great persuasions, I got him what he wanted. I got him the cloth thenext morning. He came before six o'clock; there was only me and him in the room. He lifted down the broad cloth, and cut a yard and three quarters off. I saw it measured. That is the quantity for a coat. He took it away at dinner time. He told me he sold it. I never told my master of it; he discovered it.

JOHN BARNLEY . I am a constable. I produce the cloth.

Prosecutor. It is such kind of cloth as I use; I cannot swear to it.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

530. SOPHIA GILES and ANN COOK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of May , a silk cloak, value 12 s. the property of Thomas Hill .

THOMAS HILL. I am a pawnbroker , 42, Turnmill-street, Clerkenwell . I lost the cloak on Monday the 9th of May, between eight and nine in the evening; the two prisoners came into my shop; I suspected them, having lost something the day before. When they came in, the prisoner Giles looked at a gown that was hanging up in the shop; I took her by the shoulder, and desired her not to move the things that were hanging up. The prisoner, Cook, offered a pair of shoes and stockings, both new, which I supposed not to be her own. I desired her to take them away; they would not do. I then turned away from the counter, with my back towards them. I was informed by a witness that something was pulled down; I said to the prisoner Cook, what have you got there. She went towards the door. I perceived her throw something out of the door. I got over the counter. She had then a great coat on. I said, what have you got; she said, I have got nothing about me. I desired them to go about their business. In a few minutes afterwards, a boy, a witness, came with a cloak. The cloak is mine. That is all I know.

SARAH BRANWELL . I was at Mr. Hill's shop a little after eight o'clock; I saw Sophia Giles and Ann Cook there. I saw Ann Cook pull the cloak down by force. She tried to unpin it; she could not. I told Mr. Hill I thought there was something dropped. She walked to the door, and threw something out; I did not see what it was. She stooped down, and tried to put something under her petticoats. Mr. Hill got over the counter, and brought her in. She opened her coat. Sophia Giles offered a pair of shoes and stockings. I did not see her do any thing else.

CHARLES DAVIS . On Monday night, the 9th of May, I was passing Mr. Hill's door; I saw a cloak on the ground, by the door; I took it home to my master; my master seeing a ticket upon it, ordered me to take it back to Mr. Hill. I took it back. This is the cloak.

Prosecutor. It is my cloak.

Giles's Defence. Ann Cook asked me to pledge a pair of shoes and stockings. I went to Mr. Hill's shop; I said, will you advance four shillings; he said, no more than half-a-crown; I said, make it three shillings; he said it would not do.

Cook's Defence. I sent this woman with the shoes and stockings to make my mother's money up, I told her to get four shillings. Mr. Hill would give no more than half-a-crown. Mr. Hill searched me; he found nothing. He told us to go out of his shop, and never let him see our faces there any more.

GILES, GUILTY , aged 57.

COOK, GUILTY , aged 45.

Confined 2 years in the house of correction , fined 1 s .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

531. JOHN FULWELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of April , ten pounds weight of thread, value 2 l. two dozen pieces of tape, value 3 s. the property of John Wreford ; and WILLIAM POWELL , for receiving the same goods, he knowing them to be stolen .

THOMAS WHITE . I am inspector of the watch of the parish of Cripplegate. On the night of the 2nd of May, I took Fulwell into custody, about ten minutes before ten at night. I placed myself up Dyer's-court, and watched. I saw Fulwell open his master's door, in Aldermanbury , look one way, and then the other, and shut the door close again.

Q. When he came out, did you see him bring any thing with him - A. He did. In consequence of that, I took him into custody; I asked him what he had got in the bag he had with him across his shoulder; and taking him towards the watchhouse, he threw the bag down, and ran from me. I picked the bag up, and took care of the bag and the property. He made his escape. I afterwards took him in his master's stable; I broke open the door. That was on the 2nd of May, the same night, about an hour and a half after. I conveyed him to the Counter. Coming along, he told me it was not his fault. I told him, if anybody was implicated with him, he had better tell me, it might be of service to him. In consequence of his information, the next morning I apprehended the prisoner Powell. I went to Powell's masters house, Messrs. Smith and White, linen-draper's, in a court in Bow-lane; he is their porter. I took him in custody; and when he came to the Compter, he wished to retire. I then immediately searched him; in his pocket I found this book, and some other papers. Powell then requested that he might send somebody to his wife. I told him I should go up to his house, and I would tell her the situation he was in.

Q. Did you search any apartment of Powell's - A. I did; I went into the room, and said, does Powell live here; she said, yes, he does, I am his wife. I then began to search. She was very much alarmed. In Powell's apartment, I found underneath the bed in the back room, this basket, which contained ten pounds weight of thread, half a pound of raven-grey silk, and two dozen pieces of tape. I examined the thread; it corresponded with the thread that Fulwell described. On the Monday night he said he had caried that thread to Powell; and he told me that he had carried thread three times the week before to Powell. I brought it away in the basket. I took the basket to the Compter; Powell owned the basket; he said the goods were brought to him under the idea of their being bought at a sale.

JOHN WELFORD . I live at 60, Aldermanbury; I am a wholesale haberdasher . My stock is so large I believe if I was to lose ten times the quantity that is found I should not be able to miss them, without taking stock. Fulwell was my porter . I was present when White took the memorandum-book out of Powell's pocket in the Poultry Compter.

Q. Are there any entries in that book - A. There are; they have a reference to the articles in this basket, as far as it goes; it does not go to the full extent.

Q. Read them - A. On one side is

"received, two pounds of black, two pounds of whity-brown, two pounds of drab, one pound of white, and one pound of mixed colours:" on the other side is,

"S L D, two pounds of black, one pound of drab, one pound of whity-brown, one pound of coloured, and one pound mixed." They are each of them the description of articles that I deal in.

Q. What is the value of the thread found in Powell's possession - A. About two pounds, and the silk twenty shillings. Before the Alderman, Powell said the person who had left them at his house was an entire stranger to him.

Fulwell said nothing in his defence.

Powell's Defence. After the property was brought to my house, I understood it was bought at a sale. Fulwell brought them to me, and asked me if I would let him leave a parcel a day or two, until he called for it.

Powell called five witnesses, who gave him a good character.

FULWELL, GUILTY , aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

POWELL, GUILTY , aged 39.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

532. THOMAS WATERS , alias SMITHERMAN , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2nd of May , a seal, value 18 d. and a watch-key, value 2 d. the property of William Martin , from his person .

WILLIAM MARTIN. I am a footman . On the 2nd of May, I had my pocket picked at Brook-green fair . I stood in the fair, outside of a shew; the prisoner came and cut my seal and key from my ribbon. The moment he did it I called a constable.

GEORGE HARRICK. I am a constable. I was at the fair; I saw Martin and the prisoner. I asked Martin what was the matter; he said this fellow has cut my watch-ribbon; he has got my seal and key. I searched the prisoner, and after I had searched him Martin had got the seal and key in his hand.

Martin. The prisoner had dropped it out of his hand.

Prisoner's Defence. I never had it in my hand, nor never saw it.

Harrick. He told me if I would take him to the magistrate, he would tell something that would be of advantage to the public. I took him. He told of the prisoners that are now coming forward, and where the gold seals were pawned.

GUILTY , aged 18.

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , fined 1 s .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

533. JOSEPH DENHAM and WILLIAM DENHAM were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3rd of May , a gold seal, value 2 l. the property of Richard Hastings , from his person .

RICHARD HASTINGS. I am a lamplighter . I was at the fair , standing in the crowd; my watch-ribbon was cut; I lost my seal.

- BOOSEY . I am a pawnbroker. I live with Mr. Nicolls, in the City-road. I produce a seal pledged in the name of John James .

CHARLES MATTHEWS . I am an officer. From the information of the last prisoner, I apprehended the prisoners in Spitalfields. Joseph Denham took me to a pawnbrokers, stating, that they had pawned some seals that were stolen by John James .

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

534. JOSEPH DENHAM and WILLIAM DENHAM were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of May , two gold seals, value 4 l. the property of Thomas Bodden .

No evidence being adduced, the prisoners were

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

535. ANN RILEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2nd of May , a hat, value 7 s. a handkerchief, value 1 s. the property of Joel Wright , from the person of Esther Wright .

JOEL WRIGHT . On the 2nd of May, the prisoner came to my house, the Three Compasses, Cow-cross , about eight o'clock in the morning; she continued there till near twelve. She had two half pints of beer, a pipe of tobacco, and a quartern and a half of gin altogether. During the time she was there she took my little child up, kissed it, and asked the child if she should buy her a cake. After she took the child (I lost the child), she took the hat and handkerchief off the child. My child was found in Sharp's-alley, in about two hours after. She afterwards acknowledged that she had pawned the handkerchief and hat.

THOMAS HUNT . I am a constable. I took the prisoner in custody on the 12th of May; she owned that she had pledged the hat and handkerchief for five shillings at Mr. Nicolls's. I went there, and found the property had been taken out. The prisoner had sold the ticket. I traced the property. I recovered the hat and handkerchief. This is the hat and handkerchief.

THOMAS DRURY . I am a pawnbroker. The prisoner is the person that pawned the hat in the name of Ann Riley .

Prisoner's Defence. I was never guilty of any misconduct before; if I had not been intoxicated I should not have done it.

GUILTY , aged 36.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

536. SAMUEL COHEN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of April , a silk handkerchief, value 4 s. the property of John Lutwyche , from his person .

JOHN LUTWYCHE. I am a leather-seller , No. 4, Skinner-street. On the 29th of April, between seven and eight o'clock, I lost my handkerchief; I was passing up Doughty-street ; I was walking very fast. I heard somebody behind me, and some person seemed as though he was pulling my coat; I instantly turned round, and caught the prisoner; he had almost pulled my handkerchief out; it was not quite out. I felt a pull at the handkerchief; I turned round; the prisoner dropped down. There was another man; he ran away.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

537. RICHARD CLEMENTS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of April , three bushel of coals, value 5 s. the property of Thomas Osborne , George Osborne , and Thomas Caldwell .

ROBERT PEARCE . I am clerk to Thomas Osborne , George Osborne , and Thomas Caldwell ; they are coal-merchants at Brentford. On the 30th of April, in consequence of suspicion, I was ordered to watch the prisoner; he was to carry thirty-two sacks of coals to Lady Parker, of Enfield. The regular way for him to go would have been through Hounslow; instead of that, he went through Osterly-park. I watched him through Brentford, into Hounslow-road; he turned to the left, and went into Sion-lane, from thence into Osterly-park. I went into the lodge, and watched him nearly through the park. I then followed him out of the park, into Norwood-lane. I got close up to the church. I waited until the waggon came through the gate, into Norwood Green. I hid myself behind some paling on Norwood Green, where I had the waggon in my eye all the way. The waggon arrived in Norwood-lane, where Mrs. Hope lives. When I got up to the gate, I saw the prisoner at the tail of the waggon. It appeared as if a sack had been taken out of the waggon.

Q. You did not see it taken out of the waggon - A. No. After the waggon went on, I went up to Mrs. Hope; I had some conversation with her. The prisoner never saw me from first to last. There were thirty-two sacks in the waggon by the delivery note. I did not see them put in. I counted the sacks at Lady Parker's, but whether the waggon left the yard with more than that quantity I cannot say.

MARY HOPE . I live at the corner of North Hyde-lane. On the 30th of April, the prisoner left me a sack of coals; I was to give him three shillings for them. I told him I had no change; he told me he would call for the money when he came back. Just after that I saw Mr. Pearce.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

538. RICHARD CLEMENTS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of March , three bushels of coals, value 7 s. the property of Thomas Osborne , George Osborne , and Thomas Caldwell .

JOHN BRADLEY . I am foreman to Messrs. Osborne and Caldwell. On the 26th of March, the prisoner had an order to carry out a chaldron of coals to Captain Wiatt , of Ealing, half a chaldron to Mrs. Hawkinson, and a chaldron to Mr. Collett, of Acton. There were thirty sacks altogether. I saw them loaded in his waggon. He had the opportunity of putting another sack in the waggon if he was so disposed without my knowledge.

MR. COLLETT. I live at Acton. The house of Osborne and Caldwell serve me with coals. On the 26th of March, the prisoner came to my house with a chaldron of coals. As soon as he came to my door he said, sir, I have got a sack of coals I brought for a poor woman at Ealing; she was frightened at the price, it was so large. I said, I suppose you gave nine shillings for them; he said, yes, he did give nine shillings. He asked me if I could take them in; I said, yes, a sack of coals was no object to me. I gave him nine shillings for them again in three three-shilling pieces, which was one shilling more than I paid Mr. Osborne when I came to pay for them.

JOHN BLACKHALL . I have the delivery out of coals that is sold by retail at Messrs. Osborne and Caldwell's wharf. I never sold the prisoner only one bushel of coals, that was when he first came there; he paid master for them. I never at any time sold him any more.

Mr. Bradley. I never sold the prisoner any coals.

GUILTY , aged 29.

Confined 1 year in the house of correction , whipped in jail .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

539. THOMAS FIELDING was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of May , a basket, value 3 s. two hammers, value 1 s. a pair of nippers, value 1 s. a pair of compasses, value 2 d. an oil-stone, value 2 s. a rule, value 2 s. a pair of sleeves, value 1 s. and a grease pot, value 2 d. the property of Robert Blunt .

ROBERT BLUNT . I am a journeyman carpenter . On the 19th of May, I was employed at Newington , in Mr. Clark's house. When I had done work, at night, I left the basket and tools in the shop; some of my tools were in the basket, and some on the bench. When I came in the morning, my basket and tools were gone. On the 18th, I left my tools in the shop. On the 19th, I saw my basket and tools at Worship-street office. The prisoner was there.

JOHN ISLES . I am a patrol of Hackney. On the morning of the 19th, about four in the morning. I stopped the prisoner; it was light the time; he had a basket at his back. I asked him what he had got; he said his master's tools. I took him to the watchhouse, and from thence to Worship-street office.

Prosecutor. That is the same basket I left in the shop, and my tools.

Prisoner's Defence. I met a man in the road; he asked me to carry them; he would, he said, satisfy me for my trouble. I was taken, and the other man made his escape.

Isles. The prisoner was alone.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , whipped in Jail .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

540. JANE GROVER was indicted for feloniously stealing, from the person of Charles Hales , a pocket-book, value 1 s. a 2 l. bank note, and a 1 l. bank note, his property .

CHARLES HALES . I am a seafaring-man . I lost my pocket-book, a two-pound note, and a one-pound note, on the 20th of this month.

Q. Was this woman an acquaintance of yours - A. No further than she was on board the ship, and I was with her all night on the 19th, and on the 20th of this month, I went with her to a public-house in New Gravel-lane ; I had my pocket-book in that house. I was in liquor. She left me asleep. When I awoke, I was told my pocket-book was gone; I felt in my pocket; my pocket-book was gone. I went into the street, and fetched the prisoner in again. My pocket-book was brought back to my house by a little boy, with thirteen pounds in it. There was sixteen pounds in it altogether when I went into the house; there was a two pound note and a one pound note missing. I have never seen them again. I know I had sixteen pounds in notes in my book.

HENRY LOW . My son-in-law keeps the Town of Newcastle public-house, New Gravel-lane. The prosecutor and the prisoner came in with another woman and a man, who said he had come out of a French prison. They were altogether. After that, the prisoner walked out of the tap-room, and came to me in the house with a pocket-book; she said, here is a two-pound note and a one-pound note, which I perfectly saw in the middle sold of the pocket-book; she said, I shall be in in a few minutes. At the time, I thought the man had given her it to take care of. In about a quarter of an hour, I went into the tap-room; he said he had been robbed. I said, my friend, the girl that was with you has got it; she shewed me a pocket-book with a two pound and a one pound note in it. In a little time, a lad came in; he said, here is a pocket-book I have found. I delivered it to the prosecutor; I asked him if he knew what was in it; he said, yes. I told the prosecutor he was very lucky to have it. He afterwards charged her with taking the two pound note and the one pound note. When the pocket-book was brought back there was a ten pound note in it, and three one-pound notes. I believe the prisoner was so intoxicated she did not know what she did.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

541. WILLIAM KELLY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of April , twenty-eight yards of printed cotton, value 1 l. 8 s. the property of Hugh Jones and Henry Fearon .

HENRY FEARON . I am a linen-draper , in Wilmot-street, Brunswick-square ; Hugh Jones is my partner. On the 27th of April, I was informed that a piece of print was taken from the door. These goods were exposed outside of the shop on a chair.

JOHN CARTER. I am shopman to Messrs. Fearon and Jones.

Q. Did you see the goods taken - A. No. I saw the prisoner brought back. The chair where the goods were placed upon was inside of a rail next door.

CORNELLUS POWER. I took charge of the prisoner and the goods. This is the printed cotton.

Prosecutor. It belongs to me and my partner.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming through the street. a man came up and asked me to carry this parcel to Somers Town. I took the parcel to deliver it, as I was a poor lad.

GUILTY , aged 17.

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , fined 1 s .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

542. ISAAC SAUNDERS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of April , two seals, value 30 s. and a gold ring, value 4 s. the property of John Jones , from his person .

JOHN JONES . I am a footman in the service of the Countess Dowager of Pembroke. On Tuesday the 26th of April, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I was coming up St. James's-street ; there was a crowd collected seeing some children dancing opposite of White's hotel. I turned off the pavement to pass them. I turned round to look at the children. There was no crowd about me. I had not been in that place two minutes when I heard a pair of scissars snap. My seal and ring were fastened to the watch by a ribbon I instantly perceived my watch-ribbon was cut. I catched hold of the prisoner; he dropped the ribbon and scissars between his two feet. There was nobody near enough to do the act but himself. A gentleman assisted me in taking him to the watchhouse.

JOHN FORBES . I live with Mr. Willis, a fishmonger, in the Strand. I was coming by St. James's-street, I stopped to see the children dancing; I saw the prisoner by the side of the prosecutor. I saw him drop the scissars, ribbon, and seal. I did not see what he did with the scissars. There were no other boys near him nor the gentleman.

JOHN KNIGHT. I am a constable. I took charge of the prisoner. I produce the ribbon, seal, and ring.

Prosecutor. It is my seal, ring, and ribbon.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent of the crime.

GUILTY , aged 14.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

543. MARY THOMAS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of April , a pair of breeches, value 8 s. the property of Jeremiah Sinderby .

ELIZABETH SINDERBY . My husband's name is Jeremiah Sinderby ; he is a smith : we live at No. 6, Brooks'-market . He lost his breeches on the 21st of April. The prisoner was my servant . The breeches were lost from the side of the bed; they were hanging up on a nail. They were taken on the Friday, and the day before I had seen them in the bedroom. I did not miss the breeches, but on the prisonerwanting to go away, she made up a bundle; in that bundle I detected some bits of muslin which she had no right to take away; they belonged to me. I had the prisoner taken up on suspicion. The officer found the duplicate of the breeches upon her.

THOMAS DRURY . I am a pawnbroker, 46, Gray's-inn-lane. On the 21st of April, I took in a pair of breeches of a person of the name of Ann Thomas . I cannot swear to the prisoner. These are the breeches. They were claimed by Mrs. Sinderby. I advanced four shillings upon them.

JEREMIAH BAILEY . I am the constable that took charge of her; I searched her, and found this duplicate upon her.

Prosecutrix. These are my husband's breeches.

Prisoner's Defence. I throw myself on the mercy of the court.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Privately whipped and discharged .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

544. PATRICK GOODWIN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of May , one hundred and fifty pounds weight of iron, value 7 s. 6 d. an axe, value 1 s. a chisel, value 6 d. and an awl, value 2 d. the property of George Meadows, the elder .

JOHN M'NAMARA . I am a watchman. On the morning of the 24th of May, about half after one, I was opposite of Mr. Meadows's house; I was attracted by a noise; I put my lanthorn under my coat, and stood by; in a little time I saw a light; I heard some iron move. I waited, and saw the prisoner come out. I seized the prisoner by the collar; he had the iron on his back; he threw the iron away, and got out of my hands. I knocked him down and secured him until the watchman and patrol came up. I produce the iron, and these tools. The prisoner gave me the key of his master's premises.

GEORGE MEADOWS . THE ELDER. The prisoner was one of my workmen. I was alarmed by the last witness; I went to the watchhouse, and saw the prisoner there; I asked the prisoner how he could do so; he said he had never done so before, nor never would again. The key the prisoner gave the watchman is my key, and the iron produced by the watchman is my iron; it is similar to what I had in the cellar.

WILLIAM GODFREY . I searched the prisoner's premises, and found these articles. I went by the directions of the prisoner to his lodgings in Hampshire-hog-yard.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Confined 1 year in the house of correction , whipped in jail .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

545. JOHN WITTAM was indicted for feloniously stealing, on 23d of April , four tippets, value 8 s. and two cravats, value 1 s. the property of William Webb .

RICHARD STEVENS . I am a porter to William Granville Sharpe ; he keeps a Manchester warehouse. I know the prisoner, John Wittam . About six weeks ago, I saw the prisoner at his master's door. His master is a hosier . The prisoner asked me if I could buy any hosiery goods. I went in; he shewed me some children's tippets; I bid him six shillings for half a dozen, if his master liked that price, and would take it; he might send them up to my house, and when I went home there were some tippets left.

Q. You do not know that they were left at your house by his order - A. I do not.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

546. JOHN WITTAM and SARAH WITTAM were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of May , five pair of gloves, value 5 s. three tippets, value 6 s. one pound weight of cotton, value 6 d. and a wrapper, value 6 d. the property of William Webb .

JOHN HUTT . I am an officer. On the 10th of May, I and Limbrick searched the prisoner's lodgings; they went with us there to No. 5, New-rents, St. Martin's-le-grand. The prisoners knew what we went there for. They were then in custody for some fur skins on account of another robbery. We took Wittam to his house. I searched the lower part of the house; by the side of the mangle was a deal box, in the box were these goods, three tippets, seven pair of braces, and a pound weight of sewing cotton. While I was searching, I observed Mrs. Wittam go towards the fire-place; she was shuffling something in her pocket, and from her pocket I took these five pair of gloves out. I searched her all over. I asked Wittam how he came by this cotton; he said he bought it for his wife's use; the braces and tippets he had of his master. These other balls of cotton I found in the cupboard. I said his wife could not use so many balls of cotton. When Mrs. Wittam was at the bar of our office, as I passed by, she put a pound note in my hand, observing, do not say anything about the gloves. I produce the property.

WILLIAM WEBB . I am a hosier, in Maiden-lane. The property produced by the officer are all mine.

Q. Did the prisoner's wife assist him in the warehouse - A. No.

JOHN WITTAM , GUILTY , aged 38.

Transported for Seven Years .

SARAH WITTAM, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

547. JOHN BRADFIELD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of May , twenty-eight pounds weight of sugar, value 15 s. one pound weight of tea, value 6 s. one pound weight of coffee, value 3 s. two pounds weight of plumbs, value 3 s. two pounds weight of soap, value 2 s. and three shillings and three halfpence in monies numbered , the property of John Eaton .

SARAH ANN WING . I keep the shop at Hendon for my father and mother.

Q. You keep a shop in the county of Middlesex - A. Yes, it is my father-in-law's shop. It is a shop in the general line. I am the daughter of Mrs. Wing. We have lost a variety of articles for some time.

Q. Did you in consequence of having lost these articles, mark any copper coin for the purpose ofdetecting the person - A. I did, on the 11th of April. The prisoner is an inmate in the house; he dwells in the back apartments. I occupy the shop and two parlours. On the 11th of May, I marked ten shillingsworth of halfpence; I put them in the drawer on the Wednesday night. In the morning I only found six shillings and ten-pence halfpenny. When the halfpence were taken out of Mr. Bradfield's pocket, they corresponded with the marks that I had made upon them. Bradfield was not taken up until the 13th. I saw Mrs. Bradfield take from her pocket one shilling and nine-pence halfpenny; all of which were marked as these were in the drawer. In Bradfield's cupboard was found sugar, coffee, tea, tobacco, and butter, we found in his pantry; we both had the use of the pantry. Mr. Bradfield kept the key of the cupboard; it was under his look; in the cupboard we found soap. I manage the business of the shop at Hendon, and I live at Hendon. My father and mother live in London.

JAMES EDWARD WING . I am brother to Miss Wing, and son-in-law to the proprietor of the house and shop.

Q. Did you and Miss Wing consult together to detect any person that might come into the shop - A. Yes. I came down to Hendon on Thursday, the 12th. I laid myself down behind the counter; about five o'clock on Thursday morning, I awoke with the noise of the till being drawed out; I did not hear the person come in; I was asleep. When I heard the till being drawed out, I rushed up; I saw the prisoner's hand over the till, and when I arose up, I saw him let the halfpence fall out of his hand into the till. I saw his hand shut above the till, and I heard the halfpence drop. I then collared him, and told him I was waiting for him. He then said, is that you, James; I said, it is. I hoped he would make no resistance, if he did I would knock him down; I had a stick, and he must consider himself my prisoner. I then ordered him not to go out of the shop; I continued holding of him. When I got into the parlour, I saw a key in the shop door, and I went to take it out; the prisoner then snatched the key out of the door. I demanded the key; he gave me a broken key. I took the lock off before Mr. Chambers, the high constable; I then found part of the key was broken in it. I then accused the prisoner of making a practice of robbing my shop; he said, he had only been there once before; he only took a shillingsworth of halfpence and a few hob nails. I took the prisoner to town, to my father; he sent for Mr. Chambers, the high constable; the prisoner was then taken to Bow-street. He had not time that morning to put any halfpence into his pocket, or nails. I heard the halfpence fall out of his hand into the till.

JOHN EATON . Q. You are the proprietor of the shop in question - A. I am. I deal in a variety of articles , as all country shop-keepers do. James Wing brought the prisoner to me; he said, he had catched the prisoner's hand in the till. I said, you are a pretty fellow, this is not the first time you have been there: he said, I have not been there for three months. I sent for Mr. Chambers, and gave him into custody.

MR. CHAMBERS. I am high constable. The prisoner was given into my care, on Friday, the 13th of May; I took the prisoner to the watch-house. I searched him, I afterwards went down to Hendon, and searched his premises. In consequence of Wing saying this was the key he saw in the door, I saw the lock taken off I found the little bit of the key inside of the lock; it matched the key exactly.

Prisoner's Defence. I made no resistance; I knew myself no way to be injured.

The prisoner called six witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant

548. STEPHEN FOX was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of April , a sack, value 3 s. and four bushels of oats, value 13 s. the property of Adam Mantz and Gotliff Smith .

ANOTHER COUNT, for like offence, stating it to be the property of William George Cook .

WILLIAM GEORGE COOK. I am a stable-keeper , in High-street, Shadwell .

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. I do, well; he keeps a horse and cart . On the 19th of April, I employed him to bring a quantity of oats from Mantz and Smith at Wapping-wall; he was to bring the oats to my stables in King David-lane; that is behind my dwelling-house, in Shadwell High-street. I saw him bring the last load. I gave him directions to take one quarter to Mr. Fox, and another to Mr. Barford; they were to be delivered out of the last load. One quarter is two sacks.

Q. What was the last load that he brought - A. Six sacks. By sending him to these men, I expected he would be back in a quarter of an hour. I was standing at the top of a court, waiting for him; I saw him coming down the open road; he must have gone three quarters of a mile out of the way to where he delivered the oats I went up to him, and asked him if he had brought the empty sacks back; he replied, he had. I stopped some time while he saddled a horse for an opposite neighbour, and as soon as the horse was taken out of the cart, I took my four empty sacks out. I then found a sack of oats lay down in the cart length ways, near the front board, and the empty sacks had been put over it to conceal it. I said, Stephen, you have a sack of oats here; he answered, yes, I bought them of Mr. Kent. I am confident there were only four sacks in the cart when he set off. I trusted him to deliver the oats, without any observation.

ADAM MANTZ . My partner's name is Gotliff Smith; we are general merchants ; I live 77, Wapping-wall.

Q. Do you remember the prisoner coming to your premises to carry some corn to Mr. Cook - A. Yes; the first and second load I was not present at the delivery. He came for the third load; there was a wrangle between the meter and the porters, theywanted to put fourteen sacks in his cart; there were thirteen sacks in his cart.

Q. Did he say how many sacks there were in his cart - A. Yes; the prisoner said, the first load I had fourteen, the second load twelve, and now I have thirteen. I was very particular about it. When he fetched the fourth, I was in the ship; he said, Mr. Mantz, I had only twelve sacks in the third load; I answered, you certainly had thirteen. I was busy. I said, I do not think Mr. Cook would cheat me of a sack of oats. He pressed me so much about it, I gave it up. The fourth load should consist only of eleven sacks; I allowed him twelve, because he said, he was one short before. I counted the fourth load, when there only should have been eleven. I saw a sack at the office, that was one of the forty sacks that he had loaded that day.

GOTLIFF SMITH. I am partner with Adam Mantz . I counted the third load; there were thirteen sacks, no more nor no less; there were twelve sacks right up, and one across.

JAMES HIGH . I am ostler to Mr. Cook. I was at home at the time the prisoner brought the third load; there were twelve sacks; he said, he ought to have thirteen; there were only twelve. I did not see him bring the next load.

MARGARET NORMAN , AND MARY NORMAN , were called, and not appearing in Court, their recognizances were ordered to be estreated.

RALPH HOPE . I produce a sample of the corn I took from the prisoner's stable, and a sample from a sack in Mr. Cook's possession.

Mr. Cook. This is the sack I found in the prisoner's cart.

Hope. This sack was found in the prisoner's corn place.

MR. KENT. I am a corn-dealer, in Ratcliffe Highway. I never sold the prisoner a sack of corn; I have sold him half a peck, or a bushel.

Q.to Mr. Mantz. Look at that sack found in the prisoner's stable - A. It is our sack; we marked it in the morning, when it went out in the morning, it being quite new and unmarked. I am sure that is one of the sacks that constituted the loads that the prisoner carried out.

GUILTY , aged 27.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

549. JOHN BREEZE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of April , a box, value 2 s. the property of John Eames .

JAMES WILSON . I am bookkeeper at the White Horse inn, Fetter-lane.

Q. On Saturday the 9th of April last, did you receive a box, and book it - A. I did; it was directed to Captain Pollack , of the Royal Navy, to be left at the Crown inn, Portsmouth. I delivered that box to William Kilham . The prisoner was with him. I gave him a particular charge with it. It was his duty to take it to the Angel inn, to go by Mr. Eames's coach to Portsmouth.

WILLIAM KILHAM . On the 9th of April, I was driving Mr. John Eames 's cart; I came out of the Angel inn yard; I saw the prisoner at the gateway of the Angel inn. I knew him well before by living in the yard as porter-boy, a twelvemonth ago. As I was coming out with the cart at the Angel inn, he asked me if master was at home; I said, no. Then he asked me if I was going to the White Horse; I told him, yes. He said he wanted to see my master; he was to meet him; he had promised him a situation. He said he would ride with me to the White Horse, to see if master was there. I let him ride in the cart. I went from the Angel, and delivered the parcel that I had to go to the White Horse, and I was to bring back the parcels from the White Horse that were to go to the Angel. I received of James Wilson , a deal box directed to Captain Pollack , and put it in the cart; I put it at the back of the cart. I had a bill of it. He gave me a particular charge that it must be there as quick as it could, to be forwarded by the Portsmouth coach that goes from the Angel inn. On my coming to the White Horse, Fetter-lane, I got out of the cart; and the prisoner went with me to the book-keeper's office. Mr. Wilson gave me the box. After I got the parcel, he came with me into the cart again, and as soon as I got to Temple-bar , he asked me if I would give him something to drink; I said; yes. I immediately pulled up of oneside of a liquor-shop, the sign of the Punch Bowl, on the right hand side, between the fishmonger's and the church; I got out of the cart to get the liquor. I was not gone no more than two minutes. When I came back to the cart, the prisoner and the box were gone. When I got out of the cart, I left the prisoner in the cart; he told me he would take care of the box, and when I returned, he was gone, and the box too. I immediately drove home to the Angel, and told the book-keeper of it. This was the 9th of April, Easter eve, and on the Saturday after that, he was taken in custody. On the Saturday following, I saw him at Bow-street; I am sure he is the same person. The box has never been found.

JOHN MANN . I am employed in the Angel inn. On the Saturday following Easter eve, I was in Chick-lane; the prisoner came up to me; he asked me how I did; he said he was very poor. I asked him if he would have anything to eat and drink; he said, yes, and thank me too. He said he would go with me into a house in Field-lane. I refused. I told him I would go with him to the Bell in Holborn. In going there, he asked me if I had heard of any robbery at the Angel inn; I told him, no. I went with him into the Old Bell; I called for one pint of porter, and then another. I went out, and went to the Angel, and told my master. Mr. Eames went to the Old Bell, and took him into custody.

GUILTY , aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

550. JOHN PAYNE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of May , a saddle, value 2 l. the property of Robert Lake and David Tucker .

JOHN HALL . I am an apprentice to Robert Lake and David Tucker . On the 16th of May, the saddle was outside of the door.

Q. Did you see the prisoner that day - A. Yes.A young woman came into the shop, and beckoned me to her. In consequence of what she told me I went after the prisoner. I perceived a saddle missing from the door. I came up to the prisoner, and asked him what he had taken the saddle away for; he made no reply. I took the saddle from him. This is the saddle; it is my master's property; it is worth two pounds.

GUILTY , aged 42.

Whipped in jail and discharged .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

551 MARY JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of May , a pair of stockings, value 18 d. the property of William Howard .

JOSEPH VICKERS . I am a servant to William Howard; he is a medical gentleman . Mrs. Howard carries on the hosiery and haberdashery business. The stockings were pinned to an iron bar outside of the shop. I missed the stockings. I saw the prisoner putting them into her pocket. I laid hold of her, brought her into the shop, and took the stockings out of her pocket. I am sure they are William Howard 's property. These are them.

Prisoner's Defence I picked them up on the pavement; I did not know who they belonged to.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Fined 1 s. and discharged .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

552. FRANCIS HUTT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of May , a sheet, value 2 s. and a pillow, value 2 s. the property of Joseph Woolting , in a lodging-room .

JOSEPH WOOLTING . My house is No. 10, Essex-street, Whitechapel . I let out lodgings. On the 25th of May, the prisoner took a lodging of me for one night only; he paid sixpence. On the next morning, he went away between eight and nine; he appeared bulky about his body. I ran up stairs, and missed a sheet. I ran after the prisoner; I overtook him, and searched him. I found the pillow before him, and the sheet behind him under his coat. This is the sheet and pillow; they are mine.

GUILTY , aged 53.

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , fined 1 s .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

453. MATTHEW BUTLER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of May , a silk handkerchief, value 5 s. the property of Thomas Munyard , from his person .

THOMAS MUNYARD . On the 3d of May, about four in the afternoon, I was proceeding along Coventry-street, in the Haymarket ; I felt something at my pocket; on my looking round, I saw the prisoner drawing my handkerchief out of my pocket, and when I collared him he was in the act of putting it into his pocket. I demanded it; after some hesitation he gave me my pocket handkerchief. There were two or three apparently his accomplices; they followed me. I took the prisoner to the watchhouse. This is the handkerchief; it is mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming along Coventry-street, a boy laid the handkerchief down by me; I pointed the boy out. He took me.

GUILTY, aged 12.

Judgment respited .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

554. PHILIP PHILLIPS was indicted for a misdemeanor .

THOMAS EDMONDS . I am a paper-hanger; I live at No. 8, Beech-street, Barbican. On the 28th of April , I met the prisoner at the Ship public-house, Stoney-lane, about seven o'clock in the evening. I went with him from thence to the Black Horse, Petticoat-lane ; he there told me that what I had had in counterfeit money of Israel had all come through his hands, and what I had I was charged too much for; that he had some that were silver edged, and that would even bear robbing one against the other; that he generally sold them at a guinea a dozen; he would sell them to me for a pound, as I had been taken in. I bought a dozen of three-shilling tokens of him for a pound bank note. I put them in my pocket, and I kept them separate by themselves. I marked them before I parted with them. I delivered them to Mr. Westwood. These are the tokens; I am confident of it.

Q. When did you see the prisoner again - A. On the 30th, in the evening, I met him again at the Black Horse (the same house) by appointment. He asked me whether I wanted any more tokens; I said I did, I wanted another dozen. He said he would go and fetch them. He then left the public-house, and returned with them with one dozen. I gave him a pound note for them. Before I parted with them I marked them also. This was on Saturday evening. On Monday morning, nine o'clock, I waited on Mr. Westwood; I marked them, and delivered them into his possession.

Q.Now look at these, and tell me whether these are the second parcel that you marked - A. These are the same.

SAMUEL DICKONS I am an officer.

Q.Do you know Edmonds, the last witness - A. I do. On the 30th of April, I saw him in company of the prisoner; he was with him and three more. I brought the prisoner out of Petticoat-lane. I apprehended him in Whitechapel. The prisoner asked me if my name was not Dickons; I told him it was. I saw the prisoner and Edmonds twice together that day. I had been sitting there three hours, seeing them together, and I saw them together at eleven o'clock at night. I have no doubt of the person of the prisoner. I am sure he was in the company of Edmonds. He said, Dickons, you knew me when I was in Clerkenwell. I said, I knew you well. I left him in the watchhouse. I searched him, and only found on him a few good shillings.

EDWARD HOMERSHAM . I am one of the tellers at the Bank.

Q. Look at the parcel produced first, bought on the 28th - A. The whole of the first parcel e counterfeits; they have not been in circulation; they are merely washed; they have not silver edges,and the second parcel, are all of them counterfeits; they are all of them of one manufactory.

THOMAS BEVERLEY WESTWOOD . I assist the Solicitor of the Bank in these prosecutions. These two parcels were delivered to me by Edmonds, and now produced here by me. They are in the same state as when produced to me. They have been in my possession ever since.

Prisoner's Defence. I never saw Edmonds in my life; I do not know him.

GUILTY , aged 29.

Confined 1 year in Newgate , and to find sureties for good behaviour for two years to come .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

555. GADALIAH PHILLIPS was indicted for a misdemeanour .

THOMAS MORGAN LUCAS . I am a carver and gilder; I reside in Eagle-street, Red Lion-square. I was employed by the Solicitor of the Bank for the purpose of detecting the prisoner.

Q. When did you see the prisoner the first time - A. On the 4th of February; I saw him standing at the door of the Grapes public-house, the corner of Catherine Wheel-alley; I had nothing to say to him on that day. On the 8th of February , I went to his house in Catherine Wheel-alley ; he was not at home. I sat down in his parlour about two hours; he came home. I told him, I wanted to buy tokens of him; he brought me a dozen. I gave him a pound for a dozen three-shilling tokens; I did not look at them; I put them into my pocket. I immediately went, and joined Read and Matthews, two officers, that were waiting at a near public-house for me. I marked them, and delivered them to Mr. Westwood. When I marked them, I saw they were three-shilling tokens.

Q. Now, look at them, and see whether they are the three-shilling tokens that you marked, and delivered to Mr. Westwood - A. They are the same. I saw the prisoner again on the 10th of February, between eleven and twelve in the forenoon; I told him I did not like the tokens very well; I wished he could furnish me with some better. He took me into the back yard; he produced one; he jinked it up. I told him, I thought it jinked pretty well; that I would purchase another dozen. He shewed me that one as a sample. I thought it jinked better than the others had done. I bought a dozen, and gave him the same price. When I came out of the yard back again, the son beckoned him of one-side; his father went out; they spoke to each other, and then the son brought me the twelve tokens. I paid the father for them. They were delivered to me in the presence of the father. I having received them of the son, and bargained with the father, I went and joined the officers, who were waiting at the public-house, the same as before; I told them that I had made a purchase. Then I went to the Solicitor of the Bank's office, and delivered the twelve tokens to Mr. Westwood, after I had marked them. These are the twelve tokens that I marked on the 10th.

WILLIAM MATTHEWS . I am an officer. I watched Lucas to the prisoner's house; Lee was with me. I apprehended the prisoner on the 24th of February; Lucas went into the Three Pigeons public-house, and pointed the prisoner out to me. I searched the prisoner. I found nothing on him.

MR. WESTWOOD. Q. Did you receive these tokens of Lucas - A. I did. I received the three different parcels, at three different times; all on the same day he purchased them. The prisoner was asked by the magistrate, whether he had ever seen Lucas before; he denied all knowledge of Lucas, and stated, that he had never seen him before.

EDMUND HOMERSHAM . I am a teller at the Bank.

Q. These are the first twelve; tell me whether they are genuine or counterfeit tokens of the Bank of England - A. They are counterfeits; they are merely washed over; just as the others were. The next twelve are counterfeits likewise; and the six are the same; they are all of one manufactory.

Mr. Alley addressed the jury in behalf of the defendant.

GUILTY , aged 51.

Confined 1 year in Newgate , and to find sureties for good behaviour for two years to come .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

556. HYAM PHILLIPS was indicted for a misdemeanour .

THOMAS MORGAN LUCAS . I consequence of information, I went to the prisoner on the 4th of February , I saw him at the Grapes public-house the corner of Catherine Wheel-alley , I agreed to buy four dozen eighteen-penny tokens of him. He gave me the four dozen of eighteen-penny tokens at the Grapes. The officers were waiting for me upon that occasion. I joined company with them, and then I went to Mr. Westwood. I marked them, and delivered them to Mr. Westwood.

Q. Look at these, and tell me whether these are the same eighteen-penny tokens that you marked upon that occasion - A. These are the same; they were wrapped up in paper, and paper laid between them, to keep them from rubbing. I saw the prisoner the next day; the officers were waiting there then. I bargained with the prisoner for two dozen; he said, he had no more than fourteen, I should have the remainder the next day or the day after. I received them as if for the whole two dozen. The officers were waiting for me. I went to Mr. Westwood; I marked them before I delivered them to Mr. Westwood.

Q. Now, look at these fourteen - A. These are the same I bought on the 5th of February; he never delivered me the remainder. He was taken up on the 24th, at night. I saw the prisoner on the 10th in his father's parlour. I received a dozen three-shilling tokens of him, for which I had paid the father; I marked them, and delivered them to Mr. Westwood. These are the same.

MR. WESTWOOD. Q. Did you receive of the witness these different parcels that you have produced - A. I did; at three different times. I have had them in my custody ever since. They are the same.

EDMUND HOMERSHAM. I am one of the tellers at the Bank.

Q. Look at the first parcel - A. They are counterfeits; the second parcel are counterfeits, and the other parcel on the 10th, I have seen before; they are all counterfeits.

Mr. Alley addressed the jury in behalf of the defendant.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Confined 1 year in Newgate , and to find sureties for good behaviour for two years to come .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

557. WILLIAM GREGORY and JOHN COLEMAN were indicted for a misdemeanour .

RICHARD JEFFRIES , and CHARLES COOK , were called, and not appearing in court, the defendants were

ACQUITTED .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

558. JAMES MARLEY , GEORGE BERKHAUSSEN , RICHARD HENSHAW CROPPER , and GEORGE MALONE , were indicted for a misdemeanour .

SOLOMON DAVIS , GEORGE HAYES , and THOMAS BOREMAN , were called, and not appearing in court, the defendants were

ACQUITTED .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

559. ISRAEL ISRAEL was indicted for a misdemeanour .

THOMAS EDMONDS . I am a paper-hanger; I live at No. 8, Beech-street, Barbican. I know the prisoner Israel; he frequented my shop. I went to his house near Stoney-lane, Petticoat-lane ; I met him first at his house on Good Friday, the 8th of April last. I had conversation with Israel on the subject of tokens; he said, he could introduce me to a better thing, to country notes. I said, I believed no such people existed there; that dropped. I and Israel met the following day, at the Ship public-house, in Stoney-lane; we met there by agreement. We talked upon the subject of counterfeit tokens. I then agreed to buy some. Israel told me, he did not care about serving me, unless I took a large quantity. As soon as I had the idea of the business, I informed the Bank. They directed me to buy them of him; I did, on the 15th of April . He said, I could not have less than five pounds worth. I met him at six o'clock, on the same day, at the same house in Stoney-lane. Andrews was there, and Israel. I there purchased five pounds worth of Israel; Andrews was by at the time. Andrews took one in his hand; he said, they were well executed, he could see no fault in them. Israel desired me to put them in my pocket, for fear they should be seen. I was about counting them; I was to have five dozen for five pounds. He told me to put them in my pocket; which I did, supposing I had sixty. I put them into my pocket. We drank together. I went home.

Q. What did you pay for them - A. Five pounds for the sixty.

Q. Before you parted with them did you mark them - A. Yes; before I parted with the tokens I marked them in the presence of Dickens and Mr. Westwood, in Mr. Westwood's office; I parted with them to Mr. Westwood. I am sure these are the fifty that the prisoner gave me for sixty, and they are the fifty that I gave to Mr. Westwood; they are all marked with my initials under the head. I saw the prisoner again the next morning at his own house in Stoney-lane. He asked me what I had done with them. I told him they were gone into the country. He had told me to part with them as soon as possible. I told him according to his directions, they had gone into the country. He then told me that he ought to have a share in the profit of them.

Q. Had you counted them - A. I counted them, and was surprized there were only fifty. We appointed to meet on the next day, that was on a Sunday: Andrews and Israel were to come to my house, on Sunday morning, by nine o'clock. I took care to have the officer in my house. Andrews came to my shop, he asked me if I had done any thing; I told him, yes, I was going on well. I walked up Sun-street with him; the officer was behind me. I told the officer to keep back. I went into a public-house, and drank with him. He appointed to meet me the next day. The next day I purchased three pounds worth more of Israel; I was to have thirty-six. I counted them; there was only thirty-three. I marked them, and delivered them to Mr. Westwood, as I had done before.

SAMUEL DICKENS . I am an officer. I apprehended Israel on the 1st of May, at his own house. I found nothing but good money upon Israel.

Q. Had you seen Israel, Andrews, and Edmonds, in the public-house together - A. I had; they were talking together for the space of ten minutes.

EDMUND HOMERSHAM . I am one of the tellers of the Bank.

Q. Look at this coin, the fifty - A. They are all counterfeits; they have not been in circulation, and the thirty-three are all counterfeits likewise, and of the same manufactory. None of them are genuine bank tokens.

GUILTY , aged 43.

Confined 1 year in Newgate , and to find sureties for good behaviour for 2 years to come .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

560. WILLIAM WHITTINGSTALL was indicted for that he, being an evil disposed person, wickedly, and designedly, did set fire to certain bed-clothes, whereby the dwelling-house was in danger of being burned, with intent to defraud Jenkin Jones .

And OTHER COUNTS, for like offence, with intent to defraud other persons.

ELIZABETH KING . I am the wife of John King ; I live at 33, Half Moon-alley. On the 20th of February, I lived at No. 9, Peter-street, that goes out of Sun-street; it is in the City of London .

Q. To whom did that house belong - A. William Whittingstall was the tenent of the whole house. I had the front parlour; he had the back parlour; William Shephard the first floor, front room; William Witton the first floor, back room; an old woman was in the garret, that got her bread by washing;she is a very old woman, with her a grand daughter, and with her was a servant out of place. These were the only persons in the house. The old woman's name is Margaret Adams . I have lived there eight or ten weeks; I cannot say exactly.

Q. Did you ever see a person there of the name of Jane Sidebottom - A. Yes; she was Whittingstall's house-keeper.

Q. In consequence of what she said to you, did you expect any thing - A. Yes; I expected the house to be set on fire. I had great suspicion of that.

Q. Do you recollect hearing any conversation between the prisoner and this woman - A. Yes.

Q.What separated your room from his - A. My room is separated from his by a wall or partition; but there is a closet, when that is open we can hear what is said in each other's room. A week previous to the fire, I heard a discourse which alarmed me very much I heard it twice, fourteen days before the fire, and a week before the fire, on Sunday night. I heard it on two separate Sunday nights. Jane Sidebottom usually slept at home on Saturday night. She came home on the Sunday night; he asked her why she came home that night. She said, Whittingstall, my husband said I might; why do you object to it; he said, I should be a rich man to-morrow, if you did not come home to me to night. I heard that two Sundays; in consequence of this, it excited my suspicion I packed up a large box of my most valuable articles; I hired a man to take them away to a friend's house.

Q.Now, on Saturday night, what time did you go to bed - A. I did not go to bed. I, my husband, my daughter, and a friend, George Tiburd , sat up on the Saturday night; I was apprehensive that he would set fire to the house that night, as the young woman was not there. Nothing happened that night at all.

Q. On Sunday night, who sat up that night - A. We all sat up that night again; I, my husband, George Tiburd , my eldest daughter, Jane Shephard , and Sarah Witton, they sat up in my apartment; they met in my apartment between ten and eleven o'clock. The prisoner came home that night about half past ten; Jane Shephard let him in.

Q. In the course of the night, did you hear any thing in the prisoner's room - A. Yes; but being up the night before and that night, I cannot say any thing with respect to time.

Q. Only tell me what you heard and saw - A. I heard the sound of a box-lid falling down; the next thing appeared to me, like the latch of his door. I cannot tell what time that was. The next thing, I heard something like a flat iron fall, it had not the tingling sound of a poker, it was more heavy; the next thing, I smelled a sulpherous smell, like woollen burning; my room was full of smoke. I said, I think the house is on fire; I was unwilling to make a false alarm. I said, my God, the deed is done; I ran up stairs, and called the old woman and her grand daughter; I said, Mrs. Adams come down, the house is on fire. Whittingstall then called, Mrs. King, for God's sake, help me, I am burning. I said, you wicked rogue, I know you are burning; I have been sitting up two nights to catch you in that burning. He said he did not know what I meaned.

Q. Had he any appearance of being burned at all - A. None at all. He had his shirt on, and waistcoat. He had no appearance of fire about him at all. Mr. Shephard came down stairs to me; he saw the prisoner; he seized the prisoner immediately, and brought him into my apartment, and gave him to George Tiburd.

Q. Had there any water been prepared for your use - A.Every pail and every vessel was filled that would hold water, they were in the yard, close to the back door.

Q. Did you see any of the bed clothes the next morning - A. Yes. The middle of the blankets appeared to be quite burnt to a cinder, with a flat iron apparently, and the neck part and the sleeves of a night-gown were burnt, and a counterpane was destroyed, the middle and top had been burned, and a black waistcoat had been burnt to a skeleton.

Q. Do you know what furniture the prisoner had in his room - A. His room was very slightly furnished with three wooden bottom chairs, and a small toilet table. Last July, he sold the best of his furniture.

Mr. Alley. What the man had in his drawers you cannot say. I believe you mean any thing but kindness to him. How long have you lived in the house - A. Eight or nine weeks.

JOHN KING . Q.We understand you lodged in the house of the prisoner - A. Yes; the house is in Peter-street. Peter-street leads from Sun-street into Bishopsgate-street, in the city of London. I and my wife and my two children live in the front parlour of this house.

Q. How long have you lived there - A. I went in there the week before Christmas. We all four lodged in that parlour. On the 20th of February, in consequence of what I heard, it excited my suspicion; I filled the pails with water. On the very day the accident happened I filled twelve pails and earthen pans full of water. The prisoner's room was the back parlour.

Q Who was in you room - A. Mrs. Witton, a young man an acquaintance of mine, myself, and wife, and one child. We were all there upon the watch. The prisoner came home about half past ten. I went out in the yard a few minutes before eleven for the purpose of looking into the prisoner's room. In his room there was a fire in the grate, and a candle burning. The prisoner followed me out in the yard, with a tea-kettle in his hand. I told him he could not get any water, the cock was frozen. I said, you are going to get ready for breakfast; no, he said, he was going to have a wash, he should get up soon in the morning; he went back into his room, and I into my room. I stripped part of my clothes off, and laid down on the bed. I did not give credit to what was said. The first thing I heard was a kind of a noise, as if something had dropped from the grate. That was between one and two, or a little after; thereabouts. The next thing I heard them that watched say, there was a light. Ithen saw a great smoke, and a stench as if wool was burning; that was about three o'clock, or a little after. Then the alarm was given; that smoke was coming into my room by Tilburd. I went out for water; I did not see the prisoner laid hold of at first.

Q. Did you observe whether he had any appearance of being burnt - A. Not at all. I am quite sure that no part of his clothes were burnt, or singed at all. I got some water into his room, and supplied Shephard in throwing water. I saw the state of the things upon his bed. They are here. Both the over and under clothes were burnt.

Q. Could the prisoner have been in bed without being burnt - A. No, nor no other human being. He was not burnt.

SARAH WITTON . I live in the house. I heard something fall in the fire-place; I thought it was the poker, or something that hit against the grate; I was in Mrs. King's room. Mrs. Shephard and the girl went out of Mrs. King's room into the passage, and returned into the room again. I think that was between one and two. Soon after they came into the room again, I heard something, like as if the lifting up of the latch of the prisoner's door. I smelled fire just after three; the alarm was then given. When we smelled fire, I went into my own apartment with Mrs. Shephard and Susannah King to see if the fire proceeded from my own room; we ascertained it did not; my fire was out then. On my returning down stairs, I perceived a light over the prisoner's door; I called Mr. Shephard up. He slipped on his clothes, and was coming down. I wished him to go into the prisoner's room, and just as he got upon the stairs, the prisoner opened the door, and cried, for God's sake, help, he was all over burning, or words to that effect. I could see that the prisoner had a waistcoat on. Mrs. Shephard and King went out into the yard to look into the prisoner's window; the light went out then.

Q. Was there any body living in his room that night but himself - A. Nobody but himself.

SUSANNAH KING . I am the daughter of Mrs. King, that has been examined in court. I sat up with my father and mother this night.

Q. Do you remember going out any time on this night into the passage - A. I opened the room door; I did not go into the passage; I think it was between one and two. I could see the prisoner's door; at the time that I opened the door I saw there was a light. I returned into the room, and immediately I heard as though a latch was opened. There was nobody in the passage when I looked out.

Q. You saw the prisoner after he came out of the room - A. Yes. He had no appearance of being burned upon him; he had only a waistcoat on.

GEORGE TIBURD . I am a chair-carver. I am an acquaintaince of Mrs. King. On the 20th of February, I staid in the house that night. The alarm was given by Mrs. King's daughter first; she and Mrs. Witton went up stairs to see if Mrs. Shephard's fire and her fire were out. Upon our opening the door, the smoke was as much in Mrs. King's room as in the passage. When Mr. Shephard was alarmed, he was coming down stairs, and the prisoner hearing the noise, he came running out of his door, exclaiming, I am on fire, Mrs. King, help me for God's sake. I saw him come out of the room; he was not on fire, nor was any thing upon him; he was dressed in his shirt, night-cap, and waistcoat; his shirt was hanging loose. There was no appearance of fire about him. I entered the prisoner's room with Mr. Shephard; the prisoner ran back into his own room. Mr. Shephard and I after him. We both immediately entered together. He then began scraping the fire about the bed-clothes, with his hands; his bed was on fire; the flames was raising up; as we entered the door, he said, help me to put it out. Mr. Shephard laid hold of him, and gave him to me; I took him into Mr. King's room. The prisoner's bed-clothes were all burnt. If any body had been in the bed, their flesh must have been injured, and the shirt burnt, to lay in that bed as I saw it.

WILLIAM SHEPHARD . I am a brass-founder. I had the front room up one pair of stairs, in the prisoner's house. On Sunday night, the 20th of February, I went to bed; I was awoke in the morning between three and four; they called fire; I came down as fast as I could. It smoked so, I could hardly fetch my breath. I went towards Whitting-stall's room; I heard him screaming out, help me, or I shall be burnt. He then ran into his room. Indeed, as a brass-founder, I am used to all kinds of smoke; I could not stand in the room as he did.

Q. Did you see much flame - A. I saw the bed all on fire; no other place was on fire than the bed. The prisoner was upon his hands and knees, pretending to put it out; he was clawing it out with his nails, which accumulated it; it made it worse. From the manner in which he acted, it did not seem to me that he was putting it out. I ran and caught him by the neck; I said, you rogue and villian, come out; I pulled him out, and gave him to Mr. Tiburd, who stood in the door-way. They brought me water; I threw a dozen pales of water upon it, that it should be perfectly out. I put the fire out. The fire was in a good blaze; it would soon have taken the house down if I had not done that way. The prisoner was not burnt, neither his shirt, nor any thing.

COURT. Q. From what you then saw, could he have been in bed - A. I never think he could be, from the state of the bed; the bed was on fire in the middle. At the time that I seized the prisoner, and called him a rogue and a villain, he said, let me put my clothes on. I said, no; you shall go to prison. He then said, Oh, dear. That is all. He did not assign any reason how the fire happened.

JANE SHEPHARD . I am the wife of the last witness. I let the prisoner in; he came in near half past ten. I went with him into his room, and gave him a light.

Q. Had he any fire then - A. No. I took particular notice of a gown hanging up, of Mrs. Sidebottom's; the woman he cohabited with. It was hanging upon a line, right over the bed. I knew the gown well; she had washed it on the Friday, and ironed it on the Saturday night. Mrs. Sidebottom was not at home. I had not seen her since the forenoon. I am quite sure she was not at home when I let in the prisoner. There was nobody in the room but the prisoner.

Q. Do you remember the constable coming after the fire was extinguished - A. Yes.

Q. Did he go into the prisoner's room - A. I believe the prisoner was in his room then; I cannot exactly state that. I heard the prisoner ask the watchman's liberty to have his great coat. I saw the watchman had hold of him. He said to the watchman, give me liberty to put on my great coat; the watchman said, yes, by all means. The watchman let go his collar. He went to a corner close by the door; he took up his great coat, which was rolled up in a small compass close to the door, and put it on his back; and the gown that I saw hanging on the line over the bed on Sunday night, in the morning it was taken down, and an old ragged gown of no value whatever was hanging in its place. I saw the other gown the next morning when the gentlemen came from the office to examine the room. The gown that I first saw hanging up was rolled up in Mrs. Sidebottom's box.

Q. Who used to wash the prisoner's linen - A. Jane Sidebottom .

JAMES RICKELL . I am a constable of Bishopsgate. These premises are in the city of London. I was sent for on the night of the 20th of February. I took the prisoner into custody in his own room. I returned on the Monday morning. I possessed myself of the articles of his bed. I also took a flat iron I found in his room. I produce a counterpane, blanket, sheet, and an old dressing-gown. These were all taken from the bed; and here is an old coat, and a waistcoat. The blanket has every appearance of being burnt by a hot iron, as if the iron had been red hot, and the other things are burnt also, and the sheet is burnt in two places.

Q. to Mr. Shephard. Did you observe when the fire was put out any preparation for washing, or any tub with water in it - A. No, nor anything that had been washed that night.

THOMAS JONES . I am a broker. I live at No. 8, Broker-row, Moorfields. On the 3rd of July last, I bought sixteen poundsworth of furniture of the prisoner. At that time I bought the most valuable part of his furniture.

WILLIAM SINGER . I am clerk to Mr. Winstanley, the auctioneer. On Monday the 21st of February, I went to the prisoner's room to ascertain the value of his furniture. The value of the property that was shewn me upon a liberal estimate is twenty-nine pounds eighteen shillings.

JOHN DAVID KELLY . I am clerk to Mr. Harmer, solicitor for the prosecution. I served a notice on the prisoner to produce the policy of insurance.

(The notice read.)

JOHN WESTON . I am a clerk in the Phoenix office. The prisoner insured at our office in April, 1806, in the sum of one hundred and fifty pounds, on household goods and wearing apparel. It expired on the 8th of April. Mr. Jenkin Jones is the secretary.

GUILTY , aged 56.

Confined 1 year in Newgate , and to be placed twice in and upon the Pillory in Bishopsgate-street, near Sun-street, within the first 6 months, for the space of one hour each time .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.