Old Bailey Proceedings Online (www.oldbaileyonline.org, version 6.0, 02 August 2014), February 1814 (18140216).

Old Bailey Proceedings, 16th February 1814.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY, FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND ALSO THE GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, HELD AT Justice-Hall, in the Old Bailey, On WEDNESDAY the 16th of FEBRUARY, 1814, and following Days;

BEING THE THIRD SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF The Right Honourable WILLIAM DOMVILLE , LORD-MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY JOB SIBLY, No. 4, CARTHUSIAN-STREET, ALDERSGATE-STREET.

LONDON:

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED (BY THE AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON,) By R. Butters, No. 22, Fetter-lane, Fleet-street.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON.

Before the Right Honorable WILLIAM DOMVILLE , Lord Mayor of the City of London; John Heath , esq. one of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir George Wood , knt. one of the Barons of His Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir Henry Dampier , knt. one of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir William Curtis , bart. Sir Charles Price , bart. John Ansley , esq. Aldermen of the said City; John Silvester , esq. Recorder of the said City; Sir Claudius Stephen Hunter, bart. Christopher Smith , esq. William Heygate , esq. Aldermen of the said City; and Newman Knowlys, esq. Common Serjeant of the said City; His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City, and County of Middlesex.

London Jury.

Robert Hennel ,

Robert Hinckesman ,

Robert Harley ,

John William Sims ,

John Watson ,

James Hubbard ,

Samuel Sanxton ,

Richard Booth ,

Robert Riddle ,

James Davis ,

John Ross ,

Richard Thorn .

First Middlesex Jury.

John Bark ,

Matthew Jackson ,

John Barry ,

John Bartlett ,

Robert Sizeland ,

James Harris ,

Benjamin Deshon ,

Richard Matthews ,

James Daws ,

Robert Griffiths ,

John Maberley ,

John Robertson .

Second Middlesex Jury.

Edward Foxall ,

James Loveland ,

Richard Blakemore ,

Henry Mason ,

William Farron ,

William Palmer ,

Gordon Houghton ,

William Rayner ,

Joseph Nailer ,

Thomas Cannon ,

Stephen Grange ,

Thomas Owen .

187. STEPHEN CURRAN was indicted for that he, on the 10th of December , in and upon John Fawcett , a subject of our Lord the King, feloniously did make an assault, and that he did cut the said John Fawcett in and upon his nose and lip, with intent to disfigure him .

SECOND COUNT, to disable him.

And THIRD COUNT, to do him some grievous bodily harm.

JOHN FAWCETT . I am the master of Shadwell workhouse . On the 7th of December last, the prisoner was brought to our workhouse from Shadwell police office; he remained with us until the night of the 10th, and on the night of the 10th he was locked up in a room adjoining the oakum room. On that night, between eleven and twelve o'clock, after I was gone to bed, I heard a noise; it continued louder and louder. I was alarmed. I got up, fearing for the safety of the people in the house. I called up Burn; Burn and me went to the door of the oakum room. I then found the prisoner in the oakum room, and the door was fastened on the inside. When I went to bed it was fastened on the outside. We called to the prisoner; he never spoke. We broke the door open; I saw the prisoner; he was standing forward, with an axe lifted up. Burn attempted to lay hold of the prisoner by the collar; in the mean time I rushed forward to catch the axe. He shifted the axe; he struck me a blow with the back of the axe; it stunned me completely. I was so stunned I do not know how I got the other blow.

Q. When you recovered yourself in what state did you find your face - A. I had a deep cut at the side of my nose; my nostril was cut quite round, and my lip was cut at the bottom; I believe it was done with the front of the axe. One of my teeth was knocked out, and there is another tooth coming out now.

Q. How long had you known this man - A. About a fortnight before that he was brought to us from the police office; he was with us three or four days.

Q. From the whole of your observations upon him do you believe him to be a man in his senses, or not - A. I now believe him to be an insane man.

WILLIAM DRUMMOND . I am the office-keeper of Shadwell office. I was the person that took the prisoner to the workhouse. From the observation I made upon him I believe him to be an insane man. The magistrates considered him so.

NOT GUILTY ,

on account of insanity.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

188. STEPHEN CURRAN was indicted for that he, on the 10th of December , in and upon James Burn , a subject of our Lord the King, did make an assault, and that he did cut the said James Burn in and upon his head and arm, with intent to kill and murder him .

SECOND COUNT, for like offence, stating the intent to be to disable him.

THIRD COUNT, to do him some grievous bodily harm.

No evidence being adduced, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED ,

on account of insanity.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

189. GEORGE SMITH was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Alexander Jardine , about the hour of three on the night of the 11th of January, and stealing therein a pair of shoes, value 10 s. the property of Alexander Jardine . And ELIZABETH WAYTE for receiving, on the same day, the same goods, she knowing them to be stolen .

ALEXANDER JARDINE . I live at 63, Sun-street, Bishopsgate Without, Middlesex; I am a shoemaker .

SAMUEL SHEPHARD . Q. Do you know the parish this man's house is in - A. I do, it is in the parish of St. Botolph, Bishopsgate, in the City of London.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Dampier.

190. SAMUEL FOWLER and HENRY WOOLFE were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Joel Barns Berkham Stotter , about the hour of seven on the night of the 31st of January , and stealing therein, a knife, value 3 d. his property.

JOEL BARNS BERKHAM STOTTER. Q. Where is your dwelling-house - A. In Holywell-street, Shoreditch, in the parish of St. Leonard, Shoreditch . I knew nothing of the transaction until I came home.

Q. You knew nothing of your house being broken open - A. Not till I returned home. I returned home about half past seven in the evening. It was daylight when I went out, I and my wife only live in the house. I rent the house myself. When I went from home at four o'clock in the afternoon I left my wife at home, and when I came home the two officers shewed me the knife taken from out of my window; it had the appearance of being mine. I do not know what number of knives I had in my window, and they shewed me another knife that they had broke the window with.

Q. Had the window been broken - A. Yes; the pane of glass had been broken at the bottom by a knife.

Q. Do you know whether it had been broken before you went out - A. It had been cut on the Friday; I mended it, and it was broken again on the Monday.

Q. Was it broke before you went out - A. No, it was perfectly sound before I went out, and perfectly safe. I had seen it about half an hour before I went out. I know nothing of the breaking of it; it was done in my absence.

ELIZABETH STOTTER . I am the wife of the last witness.

Q. Were you in the shop on the 31st of January - A. I was. I was in the back room at the back of the shop; as I was sitting in the shop I heard the glass break. I went into the shop, took the candle out of the window; snuffed it, and put it in the window again.

Q. There was a candle in the window, was there - A. Yes, but I did not observe any glass broken then. In the course of a few minutes after, two officers came in with the boys.

Q. What time was that - A. About half past six, or near seven. They asked me if I had lost anything out of the window, or whether it was broken. I looked then.

Q. Did you miss any thing - A. I did not know then what had been exactly in the window; there were knives in the window such as the officers shewed me. They shewed me one knife; then I had every reason to suppose the knife was ours; it was exactly like those in the window. I could not swear to it.

Q. What was the names of the officers - A.Armstrong and Gleed.

Q. Had you seen the boys about your window - A. No, not until they were brought in.

SAMUEL ANDRADE . I live at 74, Holywell-street, Shoreditch. I live next door to Mr. Stotter's. I had been out, and on my return I saw a confusion at Mr. Stotter's door; a gentleman of the name of Knighton picked up the knife by Mr. Stotter's door; the boys were in doors with the officers. I took the knife from Mr. Knighton, and took it into the shop; I said I thought it was their property. I delivered it to Armstrong, the officer.

MR. KNIGHTON. I picked up a knife by Mr. Stotter's door; I gave it to Mr. Andrade.

JOSHUA ARMSTRONG . I am an officer. On the night of the 31st of January last, I was on duty, in company with Gleed, another officer. In going down Shoreditch we observed three boys standing at Mr. Stotter's window. We heard something crack, and the three boys ran away. This was about half after six; it was dark; the snow was on the ground. We observed a lady come from another room into the shop, and take the light out of the shop window, and put it in again; she then went back into the back room again. We waited about three minutes, and the boys returned. Fowler put his fingers into the inside of the window, and laid hold of something; I do not know exactly what it was; he dropped what he had in his fingers as soon as we laid hold of him; he dropped something by the window that he had got in his hand. Woolfe was then standing close to him as possible. We took the two prisoners into Mr. Stotter's shop; the other boy ran away. Mr. Andrade brought me this knife, saying, it was given to him by a gentleman at the next door, at his house, by Mr. Knighton. On searching the prisoner Fowler we found another knife; we compared this knife to the frame of the window where the glass had been broken; it fitted the marks in the frame where the glass had been broken, and the mark in the putty. The glass was broken in four or five pieces.

Q. Could he get his hand in - A. I do not think the hole in the glass was big enough to admit his hand; his fingers were in. I produce some of the pieces of glass, with the putty sticking to it. I asked Mrs. Stotter if she had lost any thing; she said she could not tell, but such knives as that were in the window.

BARNARD GLEED . I am an officer. I was with Armstrong. I saw Fowler with his fingers in the window. I catched hold of Fowler, and then something dropped. I did not see what it was, Armstrong catched hold of the other. We took them into Mr. Stotter's shop. They were both close together. We asked Mrs. Stotter if she had lost any thing. She said she did not know exactly what was in the window. After that, Mr. Andrade came in with this knife. This is the knife that was in Fowler's possession; it fitted the marks in the putty and in the wood. Mrs. Stotter saw us fit the knife to the place. We took the two prisoners into Mr. Stotter's shop. I catched hold of Fowler, and something dropped; I could not see what it was Armstrong catched hold of the other. We asked Mrs. Stotter if she had lost any thing; she said she did not exactly know what was in the window. After that, Mr. Andrade came in with this knife, and this is the knife that was in Fowler's pocket; it fitted the place between the putty and the wood. Mr. Stotter saw us fit the knife to it. The little boy ran away. The two prisoners were standing as close together as possibly they could.

Q. to Prosecutor. Look at that knife - A. I cannot swear to it. I had a number of knives like this laying at the bottom of the window close to the glass where it was broken.

Q.How many knives had you there - A. I do not know, a great number. I don't know the number. I have every reason to believe this knife belongs to me.

Q. to Prosecutrix. Look at that knife - A. I cannot swear to it. We had knives of this sort in the window; they were laying close to the glass where it was broken. I believe this knife to be our property.

The prisoners said nothing in their defence.

FOWLER, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 12.

WOOLFE, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 12.

[The prisoners were recommended to mercy an account of their youth.]

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood .

191. JAMES INGRAM was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of James Bibbs , about the hour of seven in the night of the 6th of February , and burglariously stealing therein, five gowns, value 2 l. two petticoats, value 8 s. a sheet, value 10 s. a quilt, value 8 s. three shifts, value 15 s. and two handkerchiefs, value 1 s. the property of James Bibbs .

HARRIET BIBBS . I am the wife of James Bibbs ; we live in Elbow-place, in the parish of St. Luke's . My husband is a carpenter . We occupy the whole of the house. On Sunday, the day in the indictment, we left the house at three o'clock, my husband went with me. We left nobody in the house. We went out about three o'clock in the afternoon; it was day-light then.

Q. You left every part of the house secure, did you - A. Yes.

Q. Was the sash that you afterwards saw broken was that fastened - A. Yes, it was fastened down.

Q. Did you afterwards find it broken - A. Yes, and lifted up. The shutters were not shut, but the sash was fastened down. The door was double locked; I locked it myself. I took the key in my pocket; I went to a friend's house, and from there to a chapel.

Q. Did you and your husband return together - A. Yes; we went together, and returned together. We returned at half past eight; it was dark then. I put the key in the door; it opened immediately upon turning it once; when I went in I observed the sash lifted up as high as it could be, and the shutters put to.

Q. Was there any glass gone - A. The pane of glass was not all gone, but it was nearly all out, and the glass scattered about the room, and two of the drawers were out, and the things scattered about the room. The things mentioned in the indictment were taken out of my drawers, the drawers that were not locked. The things were taken out of there, and the drawers that was locked nothing was taken out. I missed five gowns; some of them were very good; many of them had never been used.

Q. Whereabouts is the value of all that were taken - A. About four or five pounds value. I value the three best of the gowns at twelve shillings each, the two others about five shillings each; I lost two petticoats, I value them at five shillings each; the sheet at ten shillings; a quilt, eight shillings; three shifts, value five shillings each; two handkerchiefs, value one shilling. I had seen them the same morning.

JANE JORDAN . I live in Elbow-place, Howard's-green, next door to the prosecutor's house. I came by about half past five, every thing appeared to me to be safe then; it was dusk then.

Q. Could you distinguish the features of a man's countenance - A. Yes, if I knew him, but not a stranger. I had candles burning in my own house then.

WILLIAM WAINWRIGHT . I am a Bow-street patrol. I stopped the prisoner at the corner of Aylesbury-street, Clerkenwell, about a quarter past eight on Sunday evening the 6th of this month.

Q. How far is Elbow-place from Aylesbury-street - A. About half a mile; he had the appearance as if coming from some place at a distance; he was walking quickly.

THOMAS MAYHEW. I am a conductor of patrols. I was present when the prisoner was stopped; it being dark I took him into a public-house. Before I opened the bundle the prisoner had, I said, what does this bundle consist of; he said, my own wearing apparel; it consisted of shirts, stockings, and handkerchiefs. I asked him where he lodged; he said just by. It was a remarkable cold night; he was all in perspiration. I produce the property.

Q. to Prosecutrix. Look at these things - A. The whole of the articles are mine; I know them; I made them all myself.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming from Hoxton on Sunday evening. In Goswell-street I picked this bundle up.

GUILTY, aged 20,

Of stealing, but not of breaking and entering the dwelling-house .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

192. HARTLEY SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of August , four watches; value 4 l. 10 s. the property of Robert Winter , in his dwelling-house .

ROBERT WINTER . I am a watchmaker ; my dwelling-house is in Cannon-street, St. George's in the East .

Q. Do you know the prisoner, Hartley Smith - A. Yes, he lived in our house four days. I took him in, and gave him some employment. He came to live with me on the 14th of August; he left me on the 19th.

Q. Did you lose any watches from your shop - A. I went out of town on the 17th of August; I returned in about a week; the prisoner was gone then. I had a letter sent me that he absconded on the 19th with four watches, and when I returned I missed four watches that I had left in my shop when I went away. They were silver watches, worth about three guineas each.

Q. What did your family consist of - A. A housekeeper I left behind me and a son; he is gone to sea now; he was at home then. The housekeeper is here. The watches were pledged, and the tickets sent home in a letter on the 19th. The officer has the watches; he happened to be in the shop at the time the letter came in. The officer has got the property. I took the prisoner in out of charity. I did not expect he would have robbed me. I had no suspicion of the man. I had seen him twice before I employed him.

SARAH UNDERHILL. I am housekeeper to Mr. Winter. On the 14th of August, the prisoner came to our shop to work; he continued to work there until the 19th. Between the hours of seven and eight he came to work on the 19th. I gave the prisoner the watches to hang up. I had the care of the watches, and took them down and hung them up, but being busy I gave them to the prisoner on the 19th to hang them up, about eight o'clock in the morning. There were a great many more watches. Them four were taken down of a night and put into a glass case. I took them into my bed-room of a night. I gave them to him about eight o'clock in the morning; I saw him hang them up. I was in a room adjoining. After he had hung the watches up he went out to breakfast; about ten o'clock he came back; he said he had heard of a situation for Robert Winter , my master's son, to go to sea; the prisoner wrote a direction for him to go and see the gentleman at Tom's coffee-house facing the Royal Exchange. He stopped at work until one o'clock, and then he went out to dinner. He never returned. On the Saturday week I saw him at the police office. About two o'clock Mr. Winter's son came home; I said to him, William is not come back yet. The prisoner had hung up watch-cases in the places where the watches had been. I did not miss the watches until Robert came home; he missed the watches, andthen I missed them. He said he had robbed him; I went to see, and I saw the watches were gone.

Q. How many watches were gone - A. Four. The prisoner never returned.

JOHN BUTLER. I am an officer of Shadwell office. The prisoner was given into my charge on the 5th of this month, at New Prison. He was first taken to Hatton Garden office. On the 19th of August I was at Mr. Winter's house when a letter came with these four duplitates enclosed. The letter was directed to Mr. Winter.

Q. How came you to go to Mr. Winter's house - A. I was sent for, and when I was at the house a letter came with the four duplicates of the four watches. The letter bears Sarah Johnson 's name; I went to the pawnbrokers, and desired them to stop the watches. The pawnbrokers produced the watches before the magistrate; they are all here; these are the four watches.

JOHN GOTTEN . I am a pawnbroker. A watch was pawned with me on the 19th of August for one pound eleven shillings and sixpence. The watch, I suppose is worth three guineas. I believe this to be the watch. It was pledged in the name of John Johnson . I cannot say it is the watch I received in pawn; the magistrate detained the watch from me; it was such a watch as that.

JOHN WELHAM . I am a pawnbroker. On the 19th of August, a watch was pledged with me. This is the watch I believe; I cannot swear to it. I took account of the number of the watch; the watch is the same number, but the watch having been out of my possession I cannot swear to it. It was pledged in the name of John Johnson . I believe the watch to be worth three pounds ten shillings.

THOMAS JONES . I am an apprentice to Robert Barker , pawnbroker. I believe this to be the watch that was pawned at Mr. Barker's shop, but I have not had it in my custody ever since I delivered it to the magistrate. The watch was pawned in the name of John Johnson .

JOHN DAVIS . I am a pawnbroker. I received a watch in pledge on the 19th of August. I believe this to be the watch; it has been out of my possession ten days. I cannot possibly swear to it. It is remarkable in the dial plate. I believe it to be the same watch; it has the same name as is upon the ticket. It was pledged for thirty shillings; the value of the watch is about three guineas. I believe the prisoner pledged it. He had the appearance of a gentleman; he was dressed very different to what he is now.

Q. to prosecutor. Look at these four watches - A. They are all my property; three of them I made myself. I left them in my shop when I left town. My son took an inventory of all that was in my shop in my presence. I was close by him at the time; the prisoner was close by also.

Q. to Sarah Underhill . Do you know the watches - A. Yes, two of them; they are Mr. Winter's property. I saw the watches when I gave them the prisoner to hang up in the morning; they were missed about half past two in the afternoon.

Prisoner's Defence. In the absence of Mr. Winter, my master, before I left him I heard of a situation at Uxbridge that would suit me a great deal better than his, accordingly, as I had a few shillings in my pocket I went, and when I went I had come too soon by a fortnight, and as I had left my master without any warning I did not return. I went to my father. I came up to town about a fortnight since, when I was taken into custody. I never pawned any of these watches.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 25.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood .

193. WILLIAM MAGGS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of February , a wooden till, value 18 d. two hundred and forty penny-pieces, and eight hundred and forty halfpence , the property of Thomas Shands .

THOMAS SHANDS . I am a baker in Providence-row, Finsbury-square . On the 10th of February, me and my wife were at tea in the parlour behind the shop. I had shut the front door before I sat down. I happened to turn my head over my shoulder; I perceived my shop door open, and the candles flaring. I proceeded to the parlour door; I saw a man laying down upon his hands and knees. I did not hurry; I thought it was one of my own men getting bread for his tea. The person run out, and I after him. I caught him. When I brought the prisoner in I looked how the till was. When I went in the parlour I left the till close shut. I had just served a customer before I sat down to tea. I caught the prisoner about two doors off.

Q. When you first saw him was he near the till - A. He was laying on his hands and knees; he was taking the till. I heard the till rattle when he went out. When I came in the till was hanging by the two bind quarters. My man was at the door; he heard me run out of the shop; he came up out of the kitchen, and stood at the door.

Q. Was there any thing in the till - A. Yes, two pounds fifteen shillings in penny pieces and halfpence, and a good many farthings. They are here. I have had the custody of them ever since. When I went to the office I could not say what precise sum was in the till. My wife had taken some halfpence out and put some more in. That is the precise sum when I came back. When I took the prisoner he asked me what I wanted of him; I said, if you come in the shop I will tell you. He said, you are mistaken, I am not the man. I am sure I am not mistaken; I never lost sight of him. He tried to get away; I tore his shirt and waistcoat; I took him to Worship-street office.

Prisoner. He told me that I had stolen a loaf at first.

Prosecutor. There was a loaf on the counter; I do not know whether he meaned to take it or no. I had not left a loaf in that place on the counter; there were loaves in the window.

STEPHEN HART . I live within four or five doors of the prosecutor. The prosecutor sent his man to me to know where to get a constable. I went to see what was the matter. When I got there he had just got the prisoner into the shop. I asked the prisoner what was the matter; he said, Mr. Shands had dragged him into the shop; he did not know for why. Iasked him, what he was, and who he was. He said, he was a calenderer. he worked for Mr. Fisher, in Hill-street. I told him I knew Mr. Fisher, and if he was an honest man Mr. Fisher would come and give that character. Before I went out, one of Mr. Fisher's young men came in; he said, he does not work at our house, nor had not for two years past. He said nothing to that, but declared his innocence, and that he never was taken before a magistrate, and when he was taken to the office the officers knew him very well.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming from Hill-street, and passing by the prosecutor's shop I saw a young man outside of the door; he looked like a butcher. The prosecutor told a gentleman he saw a young man run out of the shop and go across the road; I said if I knew where the young man was I would find him. I did not know where he was.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Dampier.

194. ANDREW ROKE and GEORGE THATCHER were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of January , forty-eight yards of printed cotton, value 4 l. 16 s. the property of John Hughes , in his dwelling-house .

JOHN EVANS . I am an assistant to John Hughes , linen-draper in Holborn . I live at 280, Tottenham-court-road, in the parish of St. George's in the Fields. On Saturday the 29th of January, about three in the afternoon, I perceived these two pieces of print taken down from where I put them in the morning. I perceived the two prisoners walking up and down before the house, and I saw these two pieces of print taken off the line where they were put in the morning by themselves.

Q. Where was the linen - A. Inside of the shop. They were hanging up inside of the shop. I cannot say who took them down. When I perceived them taken down I went into one corner of the shop and watched, having suspicion. I watched the prisoners walking up and down at one corner of the shop; after the prints were taken down I watched there for a quarter of an hour, and when they had an opportunity the prisoner Roke came in and put one of them on the top of the other.

Q. Roke entered the shop, did he - A. Yes, and put one of the prints on the other; he clapped his apron over them.

Q. He had an apron on then - A. Yes, he was in the act of taking them away; somebody came past at the time.

Q. Had he moved them from where they were - A. Yes; he had taken them down from where I put them. Somebody coming past at the time, Thatcher gave him a signal to be off. Thatcher was waiting outside at the door at the time; somebody came by; he gave him a signal to run off. I pursued him; both run off contrary ways. I pursued, and took the prisoner Roke; Christopher Truman took Thatcher.

CHRISTOPHER TRUMAN . I was in the shop; as soon as I was disengaged the other witness came up, and told me that the prints were not in the same state as he put them in the morning; that he had seen the prisoners walk by the shop several times. I then went and watched as well as him. I observed the prisoners walk by the shop twice; the third time the prisoner Roke stepped into the shop; he took one piece of print up from a box; he put it on the other; he put his apron over it, and as he was going to take it away the other prisoner gave him a signal that somebody was coming.

Q.What was the signal - A. He touched him, which I understood to be a signal; then he dropped the print out of his apron, and run away. One of the pieces of print cost Mr. Hughes two shillings and four pence a yard, and the other one shilling and ten pence. They are forty-eight yards; twenty-four yards each. That was the prime cost.

Roke's Defence. I know nothing of the transaction.

Thatcher's Defence. I was twenty yards off when one of these gentlemen took me.

Roke called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

ROKE, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 19.

THATCHER, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 19.

[The prisoners were recommended to mercy by the jury, on account of their good character.]

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

195. HENRY FRENCH was indicted for that he, on the 4th of February , feloniously was at large within this kingdom before the expiration of the term for which he was ordered to be transported .

SAMUEL TAUNTON . I am an officer of Bow-street office. I produce the certificate of the conviction of the prisoner; I received it of the clerk of the home assizes; I saw the clerk sign it. This is it.

(The certificate read.)

RICHARD LIMBRICK . I am an officer of Bow-street office. I was present at the Lent assizes, Kingston, Surry, when the prisoner was tried, convicted, and received sentence. I am certain he is the same person. I was one of the witnesses against him; I have no doubt in the least he is the same person.

Taunton. I apprehended the prisoner on the 4th of February last, at the Three Jolly Butchers, Clare-market, in the parish of St. Clement's Danes. Nothing particular passed. I went in with a few other officers; I told him the charge against him, and took him to the office in Bow-street. He did not deny it, or his name; he declined saying any thing, even at the office.

Mr. Gurney, to Limbrick. If this be the same man it is fifteen years since this trial - A. Yes, it is.

Q. Do you say for fifteen years you recollect his person - A. Certainly. I have no doubt of his being the person; I knew him a long while before he was tried for that offence.

COURT. Do you know how he has been employed before you took him - A. I believe he is something in the tallow chandlery way.

Prisoner's Defence. I have nothing to say.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 37.

[The prisoner was recommended to mercy by the Jury on account of the length of the time.]

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood .

196. AMELIA SIMMONDS was indicted for feloniously stealing stealing, on the 8th of February , a shaving-box, value 1 l. the property of William Batley , privately in his shop .

WILLIAM BATLEY . I live in High Holborn ; I am a pocket-book maker, and work-box maker . On the 8th of February, in consequence of information, I followed the prisoner; I overtook her about thirty yards from my shop with a Russian shaving-box upon her. This is the shaving-box; I can say it is mine. I overtook her as she was wrapping it up in a building round the corner of the street. I had seen the shaving-box in my shop not five minutes before.

ANN MARTIN . My shop is next door to Mr. Batley's shop; there is a glass door to each shop; one looks into the other. On the 8th of February, I saw the prisoner open the door and go into Mr. Batley's shop. There is a small bell to the door; she opened the door cautiously; it did not ring the bell. I saw her lift her arm across the counter, and take the outside box. There were two boxes.

Q. Did you see what she took - A. Yes, the shaving box; she then went out with it under her arm uncovered; I gave notice to Mr. Batley; he went after her directly.

Prisoner's Defence. I throw myself on the mercy of the court.

GUILTY, aged 43,

Of stealing, but not privately .

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Dampier.

197. ELIZABETH BANNISTER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of January , fifteen yards of ribbon, value 6 s. the property of Samuel Forsaith , privately in his shop .

ELIZABETH FORSAITH . I am the wife of Samuel Forsaith ; he is an haberdasher , 52, Norton Falgate . The prisoner came into our shop on the 21st of January, between five and six in the evening; she asked for a ball of cotton and a halfpenny worth of needles; she paid for them. She then asked to look at some blue ribbon. I took out the ribbon drawer, and shewed it her; she fixed upon one; I measured it for her; she said that was not enough, and when I shewed her another she objected to its colour; she asked me if I would change it if it was not the right colour. I said I could not change it after I had cut it off the piece. She then asked me to give her a pattern, which I did, and then she went out.

Q. Did you miss any thing when she was gone - A. No, I had not missed them until they were brought in. The ribbon was brought in by the officers. It was about eight o'clock when they were brought in.

SAMUEL PRENTIS . I am a constable. The prisoner came to my shop to buy a piece of meat. I suspected her of having something in her apron; I examined her; I found three or four bits of ribbon and a bit of meat. These are the bits of ribbon.

Prosecutrix. When the ribbon was brought in, I took out the drawer; it is a large drawer; I could not miss any number. I cannot say how many were in it. This ribbon I can swear to; it is about three yards. I cannot exactly say when I had seen it before the prisoner came in the shop.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent of the charge that is brought forward; as to the property being found on my person, I am at a loss how it came into my possession.

Q. to Prentis. Was she in liquor - A. Yes.

Prosecutrix. The prisoner was in liquor when she came in my shop.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY, aged 22,

Of stealing to the value of 10 d. only .

Confined 1 month in Newgate , fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

198. SARAH HAYWARD and WILLIAM FLATT were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of February , one watch, value 3 l. a chain, value 1 l. and two seals, value 1 l. the property of John Heath , in his dwelling-house .

JOHN HEATH . I keep a public-house in Shepherd's Market, in the parish of St. George, Hanover-square . On the 8th of February, I left my watch in the water-closet about eleven o'clock. The water-closet is in the yard.

Q. It is a separate building by itself, is it not - A. Yes, and in the yard. I have seen the watch since.

MARGARET HEATH . I live with Mr. Heath. In February last, I saw the woman prisoner; she came into the house with another man; the prisoner is not the man that was then with her; she went through the house to go to the yard; she returned into the house and went out; I saw no more of her. She left the man behind her. I did not see the man prisoner there that day at all.

ALEXANDER BALL . On Saturday I took the two prisoners into custody, in company with Mr. Heath, in Red Lion-yard, Red Lion-street, Clerkenwell. They lodged together. I found this duplicate of the watch on the female prisoner; she gave it me out of her pocket when I was searching her.

THOMAS BELTON . I am a pawnbroker, Brydges-street, Covent Garden. On the 8th of February, the woman prisoner pledged this watch with me for two pounds five shillings in the name of Mary Wilson . This is the watch.

HENRY DEMPSTER . I am a pawnbroker. On the 9th of February, William Flatt pawned this watch-chain with me in the name of John Wheatley .

Prosecutor This is my watch that I left in the water-closet.

Hayward's Defence. On last Tuesday I went to the West end of the town; in Harford-street I met Mr. Wiatt, he took me into that gentleman's house; there I went into this water-closet. I unfortunately saw this watch lay down; I took the watch into my hand; I said to Mr. Wiatt, I have got a watch, what am I to do with it; he said, put the watch in pawn, if it is advertised I will take it out. I pawned the watch for two pounds five shillings in Covent Garden.

Hayward called one witness, who gave her a good character.

HAYWARD, GUILTY, aged 30,

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Confined 1 month in Newgate , fined 1 s.

FLATT, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood .

199. MARY WRIGHT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 31st of January , twenty yards of flannel, value 2 l. the property of Joseph Riches and Henry Foreman , privately in their shop .

JOSEPH DENHAM. I am shopman to Joseph Riches and Henry Foreman ; their shop is 161, High Holborn, in the parish of St. Andrew's . On Monday the 31st of January, about two o'clock, I saw the prisoner in the shop; she had been standing in the shop some time. I believe she had been asking the price of a shawl; I came and told her the price of the shawl was four shillings; she bid me two shillings.

Q. Did you then hear any thing - A. There was then an alarm given of the flannel being stolen. I then went into the street; I saw the flannel under the prisoner's petticoats, sticking out. I brought the prisoner back to the shop; she dropped the flannel as soon as I took hold of her. I picked the flannel up, and took the flannel and the prisoner back to the shop. I had seen the flannel in the shop before the prisoner came in. This is the flannel; there is about twenty yards of it; it is worth two shillings and sixpence a yard. The flannel has Mr. Riches own private mark upon it. I can swear to its being Mr. Riches and Foreman's property.

ANN HUNT . On the 31st of January, I was standing opposite of Mr. Riches and Foreman's door, I saw the prisoner take the flannel up in the shop; she brought it out. I gave the alarm; the shopman came out and took her.

Prisoner's Defence. About two yards from the door I picked the flannel up; this woman said, will you give me the flannel. I said, no; she said I will soon let you know it is mine. She ran immediately to the gentleman; he came and took me into the back parlour; he beat me with a rope.

GUILTY, aged 36.

Of stealing, but not privately in the shop .

Confined 1 year in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Dampier.

200. MARY BLACK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of January , a watch, value 2 l. and two watch-keys, value 6 d. the property of Joseph Rendell , in the dwelling-house of Catherine Talbot ; widow .

SARAH RENDELL . I am the wife of Joseph Rendell ; he is a porter . On the 17th of January, I lost my husband's watch out of my two pair of stairs room out of a case.

Q. When had you seen it the last time before it was stolen - A. On Sunday night, at eleven o'clock. It was kept in a case on the table. I missed it on Monday morning, about nine o'clock.

Q. Is the watch in court - A. It is. I lost two keys with it. I only know it is my husband's property.

Q. Did you suspect the prisoner - A. Yes. I took her in custody myself at the pawnbroker's. I gave her into the custody of an officer; he searched her in my presence; she had no duplicate. The pawnbroker produced the watch; he said the prisoner pawned it; she denied it.

JOHN HALL . I am a pawnbroker. On Monday morning, the 31st of January, the prisoner pawned this watch with me for one pound, in the name of Ann Bailey . This is the watch.

Prosecutrix. That is my husband's watch.

prisoner's Defence. I was going down Shoreditch, I met a gentlewoman; she asked me to go into the pawnbroker's, and pawn the watch; I did. When I came out I gave her the money and the duplicate; she gave me sixpence.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave her a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

201. JOHN GORDON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of February , forty-three pounds weight of soap, value 3 l. 2 s. the property of Percival North , Thomas Simpson , Christopher Graham , and George Graham .

MATTHEW HOLMES. I am in the employ of Messrs. North and Simpson. In consequence of what had passed on the 12th of February, I watched the prisoner; he left the warehouse at ten o'clock; that was sooner than usual of a Saturday night; I followed him; he turned up Little Bridge-street; it is a bye way, very private. I observed him to stoop near a dunghill; he took something out of his pockets, and put there: he returned to the warehouse; in less than half an hour he left the premises again, at eleven o'clock. I then followed him again; I saw him stoop at the same place where he had stooped before. He then appeared to take up something, and put it into his pockets: he went on towards his home, as I presume; I followed him, and stopped him on Ludgate-hill; I felt in his pocket, and found some soap there. I told him he must return again to his masters. He went with me. I found his pockets to contain three pounds weight of soap. Upon the soap being produced, the prisoner said, in the presence of Mr. Graham, it was the first time he had taken any thing, went down on his knees, and hoped he would forgive him. The other soap is here. This soap I found in the prisoners pockets is both yellow and mottled; it is worth three shillings; it is three pounds in the whole. I cannot swear to soap.

GEORGE GRAHAM . Q.You are a partner in the firm of this house - A. The names of the partners are Percival North, Thomas Simpson , Christopher Graham , and George Graham , myself; these are the names of all the partners. When Holmes brought back the prisoner to our warehouse, I told the prisoner we had suspected him of robbing us a considerable time. He said, it was the first time, fell on his knees, and begged we would forgive him of that offence. We sent for Harper, the constable.

Holmes. I went with Harper to search the prisoner's lodgings; we found about forty or fifty pounds weight of soap, cut up in pieces.

- HARPER. I produce the soap found on the prisoner's premises.

Mr. Graham. We dealt in this kind of soap; we had such kind of soap in our warehouse. One of the pieces of soap has the appearance of having laid on a dunghill.

Prisoner's Defence. I have a counsel to speak for me; I do not know what to say.

GUILTY , aged 42.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

202. DENNIS BRIANT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of January , three pounds weight of blue verditer, value 10 s. the property of Thomas Brandram , Samuel Colvill Brandram , and Henry Long .

THOMAS BRANDRAM. I am a colour merchant , I live in Size-lane; the names of the firm are Thomas Brandram , Samuel Colvill Brandram, and Henry Long . The prisoner was our porter . On the 29th of January, about seven o'clock in the morning, I told the prisoner I suspected he had robbed me; I insisted upon searching him. I found three pounds of blue verditer in his hat.

WILLIAM MOSS . I am warehouseman to Messrs. Brandram and Company. In a morning, I generally go over the warehouse to look at it. I had smoothed the cask of verditer; I observed the print of a man's fingers in it. I could see that some man's hand had been in it, and seeing the prisoner's coat all over with it I informed Mr. Brandram of it.

WILLIAM WALLER . I produce the verditer.

Moss. That is like our verditer; it is worth half-a-guinea; there is three pounds of it.

Prisoner's Defence. I took it to paint my room.

GUILTY , aged 43.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

203. THOMAS BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of February , an apron, value 3 d. and nine pounds eight ounces weight of tripe, value 5 s. 6 d. the property of Solomon Bennett .

SOLOMON BENNETT . I am a tripe-dresser , 130, Bishopsgate without .

JAMES LITTLE . I am horse-keeper to Mr. Bennett. On the 10th of February, about a quarter before four in the afternoon, I went into the privy; I had not been there above two minutes before this man came in, he went into the factory; he looked in, and went out again; he looked in the yard, and went into the tripe-shop. I heard the water rattle in the water tub, where the goods lay; he came out of the tripe-house. He went across the yards, he saw a blue apron hanging on a brick wall, drying, he took it, and tied it round him. I stepped out of the privy, and said, halloo, my friend, what are you going to do with that; he looked over his left shoulder, saw me, he flung the apron down, and directly he ran out of the yard, and I after him; I collared him, and took him to Mr. Bennett. He had got the tripe wrapped up in his jacket.

Q. Do you know any thing of the prisoner - A. I saw him once before, he came to see one of the men that worked there; he said he was an Irishman. The tripe that he had in his jacket was nine pounds and a half; he took it out of the backs.

Prisoner's Defence. I took it, and he took it from me again; I am a poor cracked brain fellow. I did not know what I was about; the devil was tempting me to take it. I have been in his Majesty's service ever since the day I was born, and now next May I am going to serve my king and country until I die in glory.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Confined 2 months in Newgate , and whipped in jail .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

204. JOHN SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of January , twelve gross of shirt buttons, value 22 s. and eight ounces weight of thread, value 4 s. the property of James Byrn and Charles Trist .

WILLIAM HOSKINS . I am clerk to James Byrn and Charles Trist , they are haberdashers and warehousemen , Dyer's-court, Aldermanbury . The prisoner was a porter , but not belonging to the house. He came to our house on the 24th of January, with a load of goods from Messrs. Evans and Company, it happened at that time that I was in the accompting-house; upon stepping out shortly afterwards seeing there were people in the warehouse, I returned into the accompting-house; I did not remain long there. I went into the warehouse again, and saw that he had dragged his load of goods to a counter adjoining, and emptied the bag on the floor, and was then in the act of placing them on the counter, his apparently bag was laying near; I laid my hand upon it, and asked him what he had got there; he said, it was something that he intended to take to some other house. I wished to see what it was; he was very unwilling, and drew the bag towards him. I emptied the bag, and found the two parcels, one of thread and the other of shirt buttons, the property of my employers. The prisoner said, he had knocked down these things, and they had tumbled into his bag. I sent for a constable. The parcels could not have fallen into his bag; they were placed on a shelf two yards off.

JOHN BIRCHENALL . I was present when the prisoner brought the goods in the warehouse; my fellow servant told him to put the goods down near to where we were both standing. Our warehouse is large. The prisoner appeared something intoxicated. He said, no, he would bring them to the back counter; I said, it is no material difference. He went to the back counter; I then could not see him where he stood; he continued taking the goods out. The witness came and said to me, I have found these goods in this man's bag. These are the goods that he produced at the time; they are my employers property.

Prisoner's Defence. These persons cannot swear that they saw me put any thing in the bag. I never knew there were any thing in the bag.

GUILTY , aged 45.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

205. CATHERINE SWIFT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of February , seven shawls, value 10 s. 6 d. the property of William Gregory , privately in his shop .

WILLIAM GREGORY. I am a linen-draper , 28, Sun-street, Bishopsgate without . On the 1st of this month, the prisoner came into my shop, between eight and nine o'clock in the morning, and bought a small article to the amount of one shilling of me; she left the shop. After that, my lad stated to me that he missed these shawls off the counter; it struck me that it must be the prisoner that had taken them. My lad went out, and brought the prisoner back with the shawls. I sent for an officer, and she was taken in custody.

Q. Did you know her before - A. She had been in my shop repeatedly before.

Q. You did not observe her take the piece of shawls, did you - A. No. I had not the least suspicion she was a thief. These shawls were laying on the counter just by her elbow.

EDWARD TYLER . I am a servant to Mr. Gregory. I missed the shawls after the prisoner went out of the shop; I had placed them on the counter just before she came in. I told Mr. Gregory; he sent me after her. I went, and found her at the corner of Long-alley, just going into a gin shop with the shawls; I brought her back and the shawls into my master's shop. These are the shawls; I can swear to their being my master's property. The value of them is half-a-guinea. I brought back the prisoner with the shawls upon her.

Prisoner's Defence. There was another woman in the shop, she was as likely to take them as me. I am quite innocent of it.

GUILTY, aged 48.

Of stealing to the value of 4 s. 11 d.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

206. DANIEL WALKER , GEORGE KEPPLE , and WILLIAM BARNS , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of February , eighty-four pounds weight of sealing-wax, value 21 l. forty dozen of pencils, value 4 l. and a box, value 1 s. the property of William Spear . And ISRAEL DAVIS for feloniously receiving on the same day, the said goods, he well knowing them to be stolen .

WILLIAM SPEAR . I am a stationer , in Upper Thames-street. I only know that I lost the property out of my cart.

GEORGE HOLINGSBY . I am carman to Mr. Spear. On the 9th of February, between two and three o'clock, I lost the box of wax and pencils out of my cart; I went to Cox's Quay, in Lower Thames-street, with three bales of paper, and a box. When I got to Cox's Quay, I could not go down, there were two waggons to go down before me; I stopped behind them, between Fresh-wharf and Cox's Quay, in Lower Thames-street ; I stopped there until I could go down. I left the cart and went down the wharf, and when I returned to the cart the box was gone. All I know, I lost the box out of my cart.

SAMUEL MILLER . I am an officer. On the 9th of February, I received information that there was a heavy load going into a house in Wentworth-street, and three men with it; I took Freeman and Griffiths with me, suspecting the load was stolen. We searched the house and the house adjoining; in the house adjoining we found this empty box. We then went to the prisoner Davis's house in Petticoat-lane; I left Griffiths below stairs while I went up stairs. In the one pair of stairs room I found a bag containing the contents of this box; I put them in the box since. I them came down stairs with the property; I asked Davis where this property came from; he said, he hoped I would not hurt him, and he would tell me; he said, the three prisoners had just brought it in, that he had given two pounds for it. I asked him how he paid them; he said, a one-pound note, nineteen shillings in silver, and a shilling in copper, which he had paid to Walker. We took them in custody; then Freeman searched the prisoners.

FRANCIS FREEMAN . I was in company with Miller, the last witness. I searched Walker; on him I found six three-shilling bank tokens and a shilling in silver and a shillingsworth of copper, and at the office I found a one pound note in his waistcoat pocket.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

207. ABRAHAM LEVY and CHARLES HARDING were indicted for feloniously making an assault upon William Woodhouse , on the 26th of December , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, a watch, value 1 l. a seal, value 1 s. a key, value 1 d. and a 5 l. bank note , his property.

WILLIAM WOODHOUSE . I am a cooper , I live in Snow's fields, Bernrundsey. On the 26th of November, I went into Newgate , and when I got into the second yard, there I was met by the two prisoners, Levy pressed up hard against me; I perceived something come from my breeches; I found he drawed away my watch. I saw him pull my watch from me; he had got hold of the ribbon; the watch he had not got hold of. I tried to catch hold of it; I could not. I saw it in his hand. I called out to my brother that was with me, to assist me; he could not; there were so many about me. When he got hold of me they took Levy from me. I was surrounded by twenty I dare say of them. After I found my watch was gone, about a minute, I found another hand come out of my breeches pocket, which hand took my note out.

Q. Whose hand was that - A. The prisoner Harding's hand that was in my breeches pocket. As soon as I had lost the note I went and informed the inward keeper; he asked me what reward I would give; I told him I would give a pound for my watch.

Q. Who said what reward would you give - A. One of the turnkeys; I said, I would give a one-pound note reward. I came again on the next day, Sunday, the 27th, to see whether my watch was come forward; the turnkey said, he could restore the watch to me, but he must have a pound first; I gave a pound in silver into his hands, and I received my watch.

Q. Are you clear that Levy was the man that took your watch - A.Yes, I am positive to that, and I am sure that Harding took the note. After I found the situation I was in, I remarked the people that I catched in the fact.

Q.Who gave you the watch - A. The inner locksmans, I believe they call him; he unlocked the gate.

- EVERETT. I am a shoemaker; I am brother-in-law to Woodhouse; I married his sister. On the 26th of December, I went to see a friend of mine that is confined in Newgate for a small misdemeanour, and just as we entered into the middle yard my mother called out he had lost his watch. I was about a yard and a half behind. I saw the watch in Levy's hands. I catched hold of Levy, and was trying to get the watch; the others came round, and put me away. I could not see what became of the watch at all.

Q. Did you see any more - A. No; the others all rushed up stairs; my brother came to me, and said he had lost the five-pound note out of his pocket.

Q. to Woodhouse. Did you ever recover your watch - A. Yes, here it is; my five-pound note I never recovered. I offered fifty shillings reward for it. I understood the five-pound note was taken from the prisoner by the wardsman.

Q. What kind of a push was it when your watch was taken from you - A. It was a squeezing up against me; there were a dozen or twenty round me; no violence; I think they call it a hustling; it was only pressing against me. I had a good deal of showing about; no blows was struck, it was done in so short a time, and when they had got their prey, there was a signal, a whistle; they then all flew up stairs directly.

Levy's Defence. I was in the yard; I saw a row in the yard. He did not see the watch in my hand; I know nothing at all about it.

Harding's Defence. He was two or three times in the yard; he never said any thing about me till last Wednesday. He told Mr. Davis, the turnkey, it was a man in a velveteen jacket. I never wore a velveteen jacket.

LEVY, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 18.

HARDING, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 18.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

208. MOSES SOLOMON , JOSEPH BURRELL and JOHN MORRIS , were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Richard Atkinson , about the hour of seven, on the night of the 7th of February , and burglariously; stealing therein, a pair of shoes, value 8 s. the property of Richard Atkinson .

RICHARD ATKINSON . I am a boot and shoemaker . On the 7th of February, I came home about eight o'clock at night. I found my window had been broken, and a pair of shoes taken out of the window. I keep the house; I live there.

GEORGE VAUGHAN . I belong to Bow-street. On Monday the 7th of February, I saw the three prisoners in Holborn, at the shop window of Mr. Grosvenor, and while they were there, the prisoner Burrell put his hand into his right hand pocket and pulled out a knife from that pocket; at Mr. Grosvenor's window he opened the knife and put it to the putty of the window, and as soon as he put it to the putty of the window I saw the glass fly across. Mr. Grosvenor came up to the door, and spoke to the lads, and they ran away. I followed them, and Mr. Grosvenor followed me to inform me that the window was broken. I then followed the boys down Holborn, until they came to Fleet-market, to a linen-draper's shop on the right hand side of the market. I followed them down Watling-street, where they cracked another window, and after they had done so a person disturbed them; they crept into an orange shop and stole some oranges and nuts. I pursued them to Mr. Atkinson's shop in Lombard-street. At this time it was about seven o'clock. Burrell placed himself at Mr. Atkinson's shop window; Solomon and Morris were at the door watching the motions of the persons in the shop. Burrell pulled out a knife and put it to the putty of the window; it gave a crack, and a piece of glass came out. I heard the crack. At the moment the knife was applied to the putty a piece of glass came out; then he left the window, and joined Morris and Solomon. Burrell left the window again, and Solomon and Morris left the door and went to the door adjoining the shop, in Lombard-street. Burrell put his hand into the window, and pulled out a shoe, which shoe he gave to Solomon, and Solomon gave it to Morris. Burrell then returned, and took the second shoe; he gave it to Solomon, and Solomon gave it to Morris as he had done before. He was then returning to the window again, and at that time a person was coming out with the shutters to shut up the shop. I then laid hold of Solomon and Morris, and on Morris I found these shoes; I asked a person to lay hold of Burrell, and I took all three into Mr. Atkinson's shop. I searched Burrell; on Burrell I found a penknife, and the point of the knife appears to have been used.

Prosecutor. These are my shoes.

Morris's Defence. The square of glass was broken at the time.

COURT, Q. to Prosecutor. Was this pane of glass broken - A. Not to my knowledge; another pane of glass was broken, and it remains broken now.

SOLOMON, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 9.

BURRELL, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 9.

MORRIS, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 8.

[The prisoners were recommended to mercy on account of their youth.]

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

209. JOHN BRINDELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of January , twelve ounces weight of tobacco, value 3 s. the property of John Lloyd .

JOHN ROBERTS. I am foreman to John Lloyd; he is a tobacconist , 77, Snow-hill . The prisoner is a servant to Mr. Lloyd; he attended the engine for the manufactory of tobacco. On the 28th of January, we were informed that John Brindell , the prisoner, robbed us; I secreted myself in a part of the warehouse that day. I saw him put into his hat a quantity of tobacco, which he took from a cask; whenhe had put it in his hat he went out with it. I sent John Evans after him to call him back. Instead of his coming back he turned into a court which is next door but one to us, and when he came in I challenged him with having the tobacco in his hat; he said, it was no such thing. I then told him he had emptied it in the court; he said he had done no such thing; I sent Evans back to the court, and there he found it.

JOHN EVANS. I am a servant to Mr. Lloyd. After the prisoner went out of the shop I followed him, and told him to come back; instead of following me back to the shop he turned into the court. I saw him come out of the court; he came to the shop afterwards. I was sent back to the court afterwards for the tobacco, which I found, and brought to the shop. It was covered over with paper, and the lining of his hat was on it.

WILLIAM WORRALL. I produce the tobacco. This tobacco was delivered to me by Mr. Roberts; after that, I searched the prisoner's lodgings; his wife delivered this tobacco to me; she said it was what he had brought in in the morning.

Prisoner's Defence. That tobacco never was in my hat. The back window of our manufactory comes in this court, and the lower panes of glass are out of the window; it is easy for any body to throw tobacco out into this court.

GUILTY , aged 39.

Whipped in Jail and discharged.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

210. WILLIAM WRIGHT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of February , twelve ounces weight of butter, value 9 d. the property of George Wood .

ALEXANDER SHIRER . I am a servant to George Wood, cheesemonger , in Bishopsgate-street, 187 . On Thursday the 10th of February, about eight o'clock in the morning, I had occasion to go into the cellar; I saw a piece of butter in the tub in the cellar. The prisoner was Mr. Wood's porter. When I saw the butter I was going to breakfast, and as I hardly got out of the door the prisoner was brought back by the officer. I went down into the cellar; I found the butter had been cut. The officer that brought back the prisoner, produced the butter in the shop; it appeared to be cut from the same piece in the cellar, which I had before seen. There was about twelve ounces of butter, worth nine-pence.

SAMUEL SHEPHARD. I am an officer. In consequence of information that Mr. Wood's porter was robbing him, I watched for the prisoner. On Thursday I met the prisoner and let him pass me some way, and seeing him walk rather awkward I followed him and stopped him; I asked him what he had about him; he said, nothing but broken victuals which the cook had given him by the order of Mr. Wood. I searched him; in his breeches I found three quarters of a pound of butter. I took him back to Mr. Wood; he then said he had the butter given to him in the street.

Prisoner's Defence. I have been trusted with various sums of money, I never made any mistake with the money; and on last Saturday night Mr. Wood's cook gave me some soup, and when I turned it into a dish I saw a silver spoon; I took it back on Monday morning. I throw myself on your lordship's mercy, and beg Mr. Wood's pardon.

GUILTY , aged 54.

Whipped in jail and discharged.

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

211. JAMES BLANCH and JOHN BRENNAN were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of January , ten yards of Russia duck, value 30 s. the property of our Lord the King .

SECOND COUNT, for like offence, stating it to be the property of George Hall .

And TWO OTHER COUNTS, stating it to be the property of other persons.

GEORGE HALL . I am master of the ship the Lord Harlington, from St. Petersburgh to London. I brought a general cargo, among other things Russia linen. My vessel laid in the London Docks for being unladen. The two prisoners were Custom-house officers stationed on board my ship.

Q. About what time was your cargo delivered - A. She was cleared the 9th of this month, and in the course of delivering the goods I was two pieces of Russia duck deficient. The bale was opened for the purpose of getting it out of the place; it was stationed in my state-room; it was too large to get it out whole, therefore they took it out by pieces, and on my finding that I was two pieces of Russia linen deficient I mentioned it to Blanch.

JOSEPH BECKWITH . I am an apprentice on board the Lord Harlington.

Q. Were you in the docks in that ship in the month of January - A. Yes. On Tuesday the 18th, Luke Rochford was clearing the forecastle, I saw the two pieces of Russia duck in the shot locker; this bag was underneath the two pieces of Russia linen in the shot locker. About eleven o'clock in the forenoon I saw it again in the same place in the shot locker.

Q. What time was it you saw it first - A. A little after breakfast, and I saw it again between three and four in the afternoon in the same place. I saw part of it in the same place; part was gone; about half a piece apparently was gone.

Q.When was it you saw a half piece - A. On the 19th, the next day. I perceived a piece and a half was left, and that half a piece was gone. On Wednesday I saw the other half piece underneath the bed cabin. It was about one o'clock I saw it underneath the bed cabin. I first saw a piece and a half, the next day I saw the half piece.

Q.About what o'clock did you see the half piece - A. About one o'clock I saw the half piece underneath the bed cabin in the forecastle; that was a few yards from the shot locker. On Wednesday I mentioned it to Blanch; the other prisoner was on shore. I told him on Tuesday I saw the two pieces underneath the shot locker, that it had been removed. Blanch said Brennan was on shore; we should tell him of it; he added that it would be better to tell the captain, and we should not be blamed, and then they would make a seizure of it. He said there were two boys who had run away, it might be imputed to them, and they would be transported for it. Wewaited till Brennan came on board; Brennan came about twelve o'clock; then Brennan sent a man to call me in the cabin; I went into the cabin; I found the two prisoners in the cabin. Brennan said they would take the two pieces of Russia linen; they would give me a few shillings out of it, and they would do the best they could with it.

Q. How soon afterwards did you miss the Russia duck out of the place where you saw it - A. Directly after this conversation I went to the place where I had seen it, and found it was missing.

GEORGE NORTH . I am mate of the Lord Harlington. I was informed where the Russia duck was; I was directed by the Captain to watch who should take it away from that place; for the purpose of seeing that, I placed myself close to the bulk head, forward; I then commanded a view of the sleeping place of the two prisoners; they were in bed at the time I was stationed there. I saw Brennan get out bed. I saw one of the prisoners take the Russia duck from under the bed cabin; he placed it in the clew of his hammock. The other was by at the time. Then Brennan got on his back; he was partly dressed. I cannot say which of them laid it on his back; they were both together. Blanch tied his breeches with rope yarn; the waistband would not meet.

Q. Then the Russia duck was in the waistband of his breeches - A. Yes. I then went on deck, and sent for a police officer; the officer came, and found the duck on his person.

Mr. Alley. Smuggling is done as secret as possible - A. Yes.

MR. CLARK. I am a Thames police constable. The captain came for me. I took this piece of Russia duck from Brannan's back; it was fastened round his waistband with rope yarn. This is the half piece I took from his back; the other has not been found. When I found it upon Brennan he said it was the first thing he had done ever since he had been in the employ.

Q. to Captain Hall. Was that the Russia duck that was on board your vessel - A. Yes; it is ten yards.

Blanch's Defence. This piece of Russia linen the two boys that run away from the ship, they said they bought it in Russia; they asked us to buy it; we gave them twelve shillings for it.

Brennan said nothing in his defence.

Brennan called five witnesses, who gave him a good character.

BLANCH, GUILTY , aged 29.

BRENNAN, GUILTY , aged 32.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

212. WILLIAM COOK , JOHN SANDIFORD , JAMES THOMPSON , JOHN YOUNG , and RICHARD THOMPSON , were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Robey , about the hour of nine in the night of the 10th of January , with intent to steal, and stealing therein, fifteen pounds weight of cheese, value 14 s. and six loaves of bread, value 5 s. his property.

JANE ROBEY . I keep a chandler's shop; my husband, William Robey , is a gentleman's servant ; I live at No. 1, Artillery-place, in the parish of St. John, Westminster . On the 10th of January, between eight and nine o'clock in the evening, some person first opened the door; the bell rang; the door was not fastened. I went out; I could see no person. I came in, shut the door, and fastened it. Some time after that I heard a noise as I was sitting. I did not go out at the very minute. I went out in a few minutes after; I saw the shop window which had a fastening; there is a brass catch to the window; I saw the window lifted up.

Q. Was it fastened - A. I cannot swear to that; it was shut close; it generally fastens when it is shut close. When I went into the shop I found the window open; I then missed a Cheshire cheese and some bread. The Cheshire cheese was standing in the window; the window goes into the street.

Q. You did not see any body there the second time, did you - A. I did not see any person

ANDREW COLTON . Q. What are you - A. I am nothing at present. On the evening of the 10th of January, about half past eight in the evening, I was near Mr. Robey's house; I saw the prisoners by Mr. Robey's shop; they were at the corner of it. I saw William Cook , Jack Young , and Richard Thompson ; I did not see them do anything. About nine o'clock I heard Mr. Robey had lost his cheese and bread, The next morning I told Mr. Gillmore. That is all I know.

JAMES GILLMORE . I am an officer belonging to Queen-square office. In consequence of information on the morning of the 11th I went down Pie-street, I saw Sandiford and Richard Thompson together in Pie-street. The water being in the kennel I could not easily cross. Richard Thompson went away on seeing me crossing; he started directly; he knew me. I got hold of Sandiford, and sent Pople after Thompson. Pople, instead of taking Thompson, brought Young. I tied them two together with a pocket handkerchief; I said I suppose you know what this is for; they said, no. I then said, what have you done with the cheese; they both said they had not got it, Fourteen penny Jack had got it; that is Cook. Then they went with me to where they supposed they should find Cook. Cook was not there to be found. They said in going along they both assisted in taking the cheese, and that Cook was to give them a shilling a piece. When they shared the cheese they also said, why did not I take Thompson, he was as much in it as they were. I secured them, and went to Thompson's lodgings, there I found James Thompson , and a piece of the cheese which I have in my pocket. The Thompson's are both brothers; they live together. I took the cheese and James Thompson to Tothill-fields Bridewell. I said to James Thompson , is this the cheese; he said, it is; Sandiford and Young said, it is. James Thompson said, why did I not take Jack Ready as well as him, he was as much concerned in it as they were. Jack Ready is Anderson. He told me where to find Anderson; he is here now, a witness. I went and took Anderson and Richard Thompson on the same day. I took Cook on the 24th of January, at Sandy-hill.

WILLIAM ANDERSON . Q. Do you know any of the lads at the bar - A. I know them all, and theirnames. On Monday night, the 10th of January, I was in company with them in Artillery-place, at Mr. Robey's house, between eight and nine o'clock. James Thompson tried the door first; the bell rung; we all ran away. We all came back in less than half an hour. James Young said to Sandiford, stand round the corner, and I'll hand the things to you that I take out.

Q. Who opened the window - A.Young, Cook, and Richard Thompson , lifted up the window. Young took out the cheese first; he took out four two-penny and three three-penny loaves. He said, I can take no more small. He put his hand in and broke a quartern loaf in two. Cook said, give it me and I will carry it, and when they got round the corner they all run away.

THOMAS PACE . I am an officer. The next morning I fetched Cook from prison; coming along I asked him what he had done with Mr. Robey's cheese; he said they had shared it amongst them. He said he was in company with them when the cheese was taken; he stood at a distance off, and received the cheese of My hearty; that is Young.

Q. to Prosecutrix. You said you lost some bread; what loaves were they - A. Some half-quarterns and some two-penny and three-penny loaves. There were two whole loaves left in the window.

Cook's Defence. I had no hand in it.

Sandiford's Defence. I know nothing about it.

Richard Thompson 's Defence. The same.

James Thompson 's Defence. The same.

Young's Defence. The same.

COOK, GUILTY, aged 15.

SANDIFORD, GUILTY, aged 12.

RICHARD THOMPSON , GUILTY, aged 16.

JAMES THOMPSON , GUILTY, aged 12.

YOUNG, GUILTY, aged 13.

Of stealing, but not of breaking and entering the dwelling-house .

Whipped in jail and discharged.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

213. ANN TURNER, alias AKERS , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of January , a watch, value 30 s. three silver table-spoons, value 30 s. five dessert-spoons, value 25 s. two gowns, value 10 s. and a shift, value 5 s. the property of Sarah Louch , spinster , in her dwelling-house .

SARAH LOUCH . I live in White Lion-street, Pentonville, in the parish of St. James, Clerkenwell . I am unmarried. The prisoner lived servant with me. I keep a dwelling-house. The prisoner came to me on the 15th of November; she staid with me until the 9th of January; she then left me without any notice. In the evening, at half past four, I left her in the house; at half past seven she was gone. I cannot say between them hours what hour she might go. After she was gone I missed five dessert-spoons, three table-spoons, and a watch; that was all that I missed at that time. I discovered that evening at eight there was a gown of mine gone, and two days after I missed two gowns. The gowns were at the top of the house, in a room that we leave the linen that is to be washed.

Q.When had you seen the spoons - A. I saw the dessert-spoons before I went out.

Q. Have you seen any of these things since - A. Only the two gowns and the watch I have seen since.

WILLIAM THISSELTON . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner on the 20th of January, in Holywell-lane, Shoreditch. She lodged with another woman. I told her I came from Mrs. Louch, of Pentonville; she seemed very much embarassed. I asked her what she had done with her mistress's watch; she said she had pawned it at Brentford. She gave me this ticket for two gowns and a shift; the two gowns in the duplicate belong to another case; the shift to this case. I went to Brentford and stopped the watch. Mrs. Louch has claimed the shift at the office. I asked her what she had done with the three table-spoons and the five dessert-spoons; she said she had pawned them at different pawnbrokers, and she sold two of the small spoons to a Jew in Whitechapel for four shillings.

WILLIAM MITCHELL . I am a pawnbroker at Brentford. I produce a watch pawned with me for one pound in the name of Aker. I have seen the prisoner before; I do not recollect her.

ANN HILLIER . I lodge and board with Mrs. Louch. I know the spoons were there on Sunday morning, the 9th of January, and the watch; they were gone before night.

Q. to Prosecutor. Look at the watch - A. This is my watch; it is the watch I lost out of my house. I have never got my spoons again.

Q. to Thisselton. Produce the shift and two gowns - A. These two gowns I found in the prisoner's bundle in the room when I apprehended her. She said she had cut the bodies off to make petticoats of them, and this shift was sent to me by Mr. Nicolls, pawnbroker, of Brentford; he is at Union-hall today. He gave the shift to Mr. Mitchell, who gave it to me to-day.

Prosecutrix. The gowns and the shift are mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I am very sorry.

GUILTY, aged 18.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood .

214. WILLIAM SCANES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of February , thirteen three-shilling bank tokens, seven shillings, and two sixpences, the monies of Stephen Puddicomb , in his dwelling-house .

STEPHEN PUDDICOMB . I keep the King's Arms public-house, Holborn-hill, in the parish of St. Andrew's, Holborn . The prisoner was my pot boy ; he lived with me on the 3d of February, and on Sunday the 3d of February I went to bed the last in the house. I looked in the till; I did not count the money; the next morning I came down about nine o'clock; I examined the till then. I considered to the best of my opinion there was about a pound less in it. I sent for an officer, and the prisoner was taken in custody.

WILLIAM THISSELTON . I am an officer. I took the prisoner into custody on the 4th of February; he told me he had taken some money out of the till that morning, he believed about eighteen shillings, and hehad hid it in the cellar. I took him into his master's house, and in the coal cellar he took up a coal, and there I found these thirteen three-shilling bank tokens and eight shillings.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing of it.

GUILTY, aged 17,

Of stealing to the amount of 18 s.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Dampier.

215. JOSEPH MARASCA was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of October , a watch, value 7 l. the property of William Benham , in his dwelling-house .

ELEANOR BENHAM. I am the wife of the prosecutor, William Benham; we live in Christopher-street, Shoreditch . The prisoner came to our house in October last; it was in the absence of my husband; he requested to see Mr. Benham. On his being informed he was not at home he went into the back parlour; he staid there about ten minutes or a quarter of an hour, and then said he could stay no longer. He told me he had made an appointment with Mr. Benham. After he had sat there some time he went out. In about half an hour after he was gone I missed my husband's gold watch. I have no doubt the prisoner is the person.

ANN HASLING . I am a servant to the prosecutor.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. Yes, I remember seeing him at my master's house on Tuesday the 5th of October; he came there; he asked me if my master was at home; I said, no, he was not at home, but he would be at home at five o'clock; he said, that was strange, he had promised to meet him there at half past two. He said no more to me, but walked down the passage into the back parlour. I am sure he is the man. The next time I saw him again was a fortnight ago last Saturday.

Q. How long were you talking with him - A. About two minutes.

JAMES ROBERT KETTERN . I am a pawnbroker. On the 5th of October, the prisoner came to me and offered a gold watch to sell; I asked him what he wanted for it; he told me eight guineas. I offered him six; he said he had been offered six in pledge. He agreed to take six pounds fifteen shillings for the watch; I gave him that money.

Q. Had you ever seen him before - A. No, never; he is the same man. When I gave him the six pounds fifteen shillings for the watch, he took out of his pocket three gold seals and a key. I gave him fifteen shillings for them. I asked him where he got the watch; he said he bought it of the maker, Mr. Watford, in Ryder-street, St. James's. He said he was going to Gibralter the next week, it was of no use his pledging it, he might not be back in time to redeem it, but if I had it when he came back he would purchase it again of me. I asked him his name, and where he lived; he said his name was John Simeon , he lived at 54, in East Smithfield. On the Monday following, a hand bill came from Bow-street office, describing such a watch to have been stolen. I set out immediately to go to Bow-street; in my way there I learned that Mr. Essex of the Strand had been making enquiry about the watch. I went to Mr. Essex; he said it was his daughter's watch. I delivered the watch to Mr. Essex; he desired me to stop the man if ever I saw him. On the 22nd of January the same man came -

Q. That is the prisoner - A. Yes; and offered me another watch to pledge. I looked steadfastly at him; he said, I sold you a gold watch a few months ago, have you parted with that. I told him I had, and I immediately sent for an officer; the officer came; I gave him into custody.

ANTHONY ESSEX. I received the watch; I gave my daughter the watch.

Q. to Prosecutrix. Can you swear to the watch - A.No.

Prosecutor. I can swear to the watch.

Mr. Essex. I gave the watch to my daughter; I can swear to it; the number of it was entered in my book, and this watch answers to that number. I know the watch from the general appearance of it; the maker's name on it is W. Watford, Ryder-street, St. James's. I gave it to my daughter a long time ago; it is near three years ago.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence; called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 24.

[The prisoner was recommend to mercy by the jury and the prosecutor on account of his being a young man of good character.]

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

216. SARAH STOKES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of February , two pair of stockings, value 18 d. a mug, value 4 d. and a chamber-pot, value 4 d. the property of Matthias Austerman . And WILLIAM BUNNEY for receiving the said goods, he knowing them to be stolen .

MATTHIAS AUSTERMAN. I am a leather-dresser , I live in Long-alley, Moorfields . On the 4th of February, I lost two pair of stockings, an apron, a mug, and a chamber-pot; I lost them out of my yard at the back of my house; I had seen them about a quarter of an hour before I missed them. I know Bunney. I saw my things the next morning at Bunney's house, the mug and chamber-pot were standing on a table outside of the house, exposed for sale.

Q. What is Bunney - A. He is a broker, and keeps an old iron shop. I went into the house; I saw the stockings; Bunney was not at home. I saw a woman and a little girl. I claimed the stockings, the mug, and a chamber-pot. I did not see the apron. I afterwards saw Bunney, I told him the things were mine; he said, he gave fifteen pence for the stockings, and sixpence for the crockeryware. I have never seen the stockings since; the crockery I have got. It was Friday when I lost the things. On Monday afterwards, about six o'clock in the evening, I passed the woman prisoner in the passage, I asked her what she wanted, it was dark; she said, she wanted to go into the privy. I said, I think you are the woman that robbed me last week; I had her taken into custody. My wife told me she had confessed taking the things, and selling them to Bunney.

WILLIAM ARMSTRONG. I am an officer. I apprehended Stokes on the 7th of February. She told me she took the things, distress drove her to do it.

Stokes's Defence. As I was going through the passage I stepped upon the stockings, I unfortunately picked them up.

Bunney's Defence. To the best of my knowledge I bought the goods of the woman Stokes; she said they were her own, she sold them for distress; the crockeryware I put out publicly for sale.

Bunney called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

STOKES, GUILTY , aged 50.

Confined 1 month in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

BUNNEY, NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood .

217. TIMOTHY BRYANT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2nd of February , a hamper, value 1 s. and thirty-six glass bottles, value 6 s. the property of William Bellingham .

WILLIAM BEDLINGHAM. I am an inn-keeper , I live at the Blue Boar Inn, Aldgate , in the City of London. On the 2nd of February, two officers came from Worship-street office to our yard, and asked if we had lost a hamper; I saw the hamper and the bottles. I searched about, and then I missed it. I know such a hamper had been in our yard within half an hour before that time.

JOSHUA ARMSTRONG . I am an officer. On the 2nd of February, about six at night, being out on duty in company with Barnard Gleed and other officers in Wentworth-street, in the County of Middlesex, I saw the prisoner carrying a hamper, in company with three others behind him; I stopped him, and asked him what he was carrying; he said, he did not know what it was, he was going to carry it somewhere in Petticoat-lane, he did not know where. I asked him how he came by it; he said, a gentleman gave it him to carry in Somerset-street, Whitechapel; he did not know the man nor where he was to carry it to. As soon as we laid hold of him the others ran away. This is the hamper; I took the prisoner to the office.

Prosecutor. This is the hamper that was in my care.

Prisoner's Defence. I was out of work; in Somerset-street this gentleman asked me to carry it; I said, I would if he would pay me; he carried my hat. He was walking by me when I was taken in custody.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Dampier.

218. JOHN DIBBS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3rd of January , six brushes, value 6 s. 8 d. the property of William Kent .

WILLIAM KENT . I am a brush manufacturer , in Great Marlborough-street. I am in a considerable way of business. In my taking stock I discovered I had suffered a loss to a considerable amount; I obtained a search warrant, and searched the prisoner's lodgings; he was not at home, his wife was. In searching I found six brushes; I know them to be mine.

RICHARD BURTON . I was with Mr. Kent when the brushes were found in the prisoner's apartment. These are them.

Prosecutor. Some of the brushes have my mark, others are of my manufacturing; I know them to be mine, all of them.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

219. JOHN FAULKENER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3rd of January , twelve brush-boards, value 18 d. and two pounds weight of bristles, value 8 s. the property of William Kent .

RICHARD COVEY. I am an apprentice to Mr. Kent.

Q. Do you remember the circumstance of the prisoner being taken to the office to be examined by the magistrate - A. Yes, he gave me the keys at Marlborough-street office; he told me to take these keys to the Black Dog to a man of the name of Joseph Handy , and tell Handy to go to his wife and tell her to take the things out of his desk, and one of the keys would open his desk. I believe there were three keys; I gave the keys to my master.

MR. KENT. I gave the same keys to my clerk, Baldry.

JOHN BALDRY . I am clerk to Mr. Kent. On Monday, the 3rd of January, Mr. Kent gave me the keys with directions to go to Faulkener's lodgings; I went, and took a man with me. I told Faulkener's wife that her husband was in custody; I asked her for the things in the desk; I found nothing in the desk, nor in that room. At last I got a box open, I found the things now produced; there are twelve brush-boards, two of them are brushes completely.

Prosecutor. I know these brush-boards to be my property; I never sell them in that state. At the office the prisoner confessed of having taken them.

Prisoner's Defence. I am a young hand with Mr. Kent. When I saw a board lay waste I picked it up. Some of the boards are worn out by paper-stainers; brush-boards have been worn out by the paper-stainers.

The prisoner called five witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Confined 1 year in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood .

220. WILLIAM HILL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of December , thirty pounds weight of bristles, value 5 l. the property of William Kent .

JOHN BOQUET . I live at Paddington. I know the prisoner Hill; he has often told me that he had bristles to sell cheap. On the 28th of December, I met the prisoner as I was crossing Blenherm-mews, he had some bristles tied up in an handkerchief, he asked me if I would buy them; I said, I would; I gave him ten shillings for them. I could not tell what the bristles were worth; they were not weighed. On the 10th of January Mr. Kent came, and found the bristles at my house.

RICHARD BURTON . I am an officer. I produce the bristles found in Boquet's house.

Prosecutor. I know this bundle of bristles are my property by the marks; they are marked the size; all manufacturers mark them alike.

Prisoner's Defence. Boquet has falsely sworn; I never did deliver any bristles to him. He has taken bristles himself out of my master's premises. I never robbed my employer the four years I have worked for him.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Dampier.

221. WILLIAM HILL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of October , fifty pounds weight of bristles, value 10 l. the property of William Kent .

THOMAS PHILLIPS . I am a workman in Mr. Kent's employ. I worked with the prisoner Hill between three and four years. About the latter end of October, he sold me about thirty pounds of bristles; he told me the person that had them to sell had told him to ask three pounds ten shillings for them. I gave him three pounds for them; I fetched them from his lodgings in a hamper. I had them in my lodgings at the time the prisoner was taken up; I went and told Mr. Kent that I had bought bristles of the prisoner. The bristles are here now; I gave them up to Craig, the officer.

WILLIAM CRAIG . I am an officer. I produce the hairs I found at the last witness's lodgings.

Prosecutor. I cannot swear to the bristles; the hairs are worth ten guineas.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

222. JAMES SAVAGE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on on the 15th of January , a tea-chest, value 10 s. three pounds in monies numbered, a 2 l. bank note, and seven 1 l. bank notes , the property of George Williams .

ELIZABETH WILLIAMS . On the 15th of January, the footman fetched a coach to convey my mother's boxes from Nelson-square . I was in the same house with my mother in Nelson-square. I accompanied my mother in the coach from Nelson-square. I am positive the prisoner is the coachman . My mother's two boxes, two bundles, and tea-caddy, were put in the coach; we were driven to the end of Tudor-street, to Crown-court; my mother alighted from the coach at the end of Crown-court, Tudor-street ; my mother came out of the coach first. I stood by the side of the coach while the coachman took the things out. I saw the goods put in the coach, and I saw two boxes and two bundles taken out. These two boxes, two bundles, and a tea-chest, were put in the coach; I saw two boxes and two bundles taken out. I asked the coachman if all were taken out; he said, yes, every thing was out.

Q. Did you see these two boxes and two bundles put in the coach - A. Yes, and I saw a tea-chest put in also, and I saw the tea-chest on the front seat at the end of one of the boxes.

Q. Are you positive sure that upon your arriving in Tudor-street that this tea-chest was never taken out by the prisoner - A. Yes, I am. The coachman was paid his fare, two shillings, and then he drove away. The coachman got on the steps of the coach, felt about, and then he said, every thing was out. In about three minutes after the coach went away, my mother missed her tea-chest; my mother went after the coach, she could not find it. I took no notice of the number at that time; I have since learned the number of the coach was 955. I observed the countenance of the prisoner at Tudor-street when I was talking to him.

COURT. You have never recovered any of the property - A. No.

Q. How soon after your mother lost the tea-chest was it you saw the prisoner again - A. On last Thursday; I saw him at the public-house by the office; I knew him again as soon as I saw him.

SARAH WILLIAMS . Q. Do you remember on the 15th of January last, a coach being brought for you at Nelson-square - A. Yes, I was only there five days. I was with the Rev. Mr. Jenkins five days. I put two boxes in the coach, two bundles, and a tea-chest, which I carried myself.

Q. What did that tea-chest contain - A. A two-pound note, seven one-pound notes, and three pounds in silver money; the tea-chest was locked. I was taken in this coach to Tudor-street; I did not take the number of the coach. I took particular notice of the lining of the coach, there were three stars on each side of the door of the coach, and a ragged hammercloth. On my arriving at Tudor-street I got out of the coach; I went to my friend in Crown-court, and asked to leave my boxes there, and then I observed the coachman's face; I paid him his fare, two shillings, close to the candles. On my missing my tea-chest I went after the prisoner; I went to the first stand in Bridge-street, I could not find the man or the coach. James Savage , the prisoner, is the man that drove the coach. On Thursday morning I first saw the coach again in Savage's yard; they brought out to me two or three young men, and asked me if they were the men that I wanted; I said, no. I first saw the prisoner again on the Thursday morning; I saw him alone; I was then certain of his person; he was apprehended, and taken to Bow-street.

THOMAS SMITH . I am a hackney coachman. I went out with my coach on the 15th of January; I went and put my coach in the rank by Rowland Hill's chapel by eight o'clock in the morning, I put in the rank behind James Savage 's coach; his No. is 955. I knew the prisoner perfectly well a long time; his coach was before mine. On the 15th I was talking to him, a man called coach; he said, where; the man said, to go and take up in Nelson-square. The prisoner said, where is it going; the man said, only to take a servant from her place. The prisoner grumbled; I said, if you do not like to go I will. The prisoner said, he would go; he went off in that direction to take up there, as I supposed. I am positive that he drove No. 955. I saw no more of the coach at that time. I accompanied Mrs. Williams and Ruthwin, the officer, to Savage's house. Isaw Sarah Williams the very night after it happened; I was not then acquainted with the prisoner's name; I know the number of his coach was 955.

GEORGE RUTHWIN . I am an officer. I went with the prosecutrix to apprehend the prisoner.

Q. Upon your going to his father's house on the Sunday morning was the prisoner produced - A. He was not. William Savage was; she said, William Savage was not the man. After some time the coach was produced; she said, she thought it was the coach, but the lining was cleaner, and the glass that was broke was mended. On Thursday she saw the prisoner; she said, he was the man that drove her.

Prisoner's Defence. I was not out with the coach; I am innocent of the crime I am here for.

WILLIAM SAVAGE . I am brother to the prisoner. On the 15th of January, I drove the coach No. 955. I was out for my father all day and night. On the evening of that day I drove it from seven until eleven when I got into the yard.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

223. MARY ENGLAND was indicted for that she, on the 22nd of September, without lawful excuse had in her custody and possession two forged 1 l. bank notes, she knowing them to be forged ; and

ANOTHER COUNT, that she had one other 1 l. bank note, she knowing it to be forged.

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

224. MARY ENGLAND was indicted for feloniously disposing of and putting away a forged 1 l. bank note, with intention to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England , and also to defraud another person.

Mr. Knapp, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

225. MATTHEW YOUNG was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of January , a box coat, value 1 l. the property of Matthew Wood , esq.

JOHN HAMFTON . I lost my box coat on the 15th of January, near four o'clock in the afternoon. My stables are in Dean's-yard . I pulled off my coat and hat, and hung my coat up on a peg. I went over my stable, and when I came down I saw this man in the stable. I thought it was the young man in the stable that assisted me; I said, you have soon got home. Directly the prisoner throwed the coat off his arm. I had hung it up about three stalls from the horse. The prisoner asked for work; I told him I did not know any person in the neighbourhood that wanted a helper. I walked towards the door; then I asked him what parcel that was. I did not know it was my coat. I thought it had been his own; he said it was a coat. Then it struck me that it was my coat. I looked towards the place where my coat should have hung; I found it was off the peg. I took the coat up, and saw it was my coat. I collared him immediately. This is the coat; it is the property of Matthew Wood , esq When I collared him he begged my pardon, and said, it was the first time he had done such a thing. I am sure it is my coat.

Prisoner's Defence. I never touched the coat; it might have fell off the peg where he had hung it.

GUILTY, aged 24.

Judgment respited .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

226. JAMES KING and WILLIAM MANSFIELD EVANS were indicted for that they, on the 30th of December , in and upon John Vickrey , a subject of our Lord the King, feloniously did make an assault, and with a certain sharp instrument did strike and cut the said John Vickrey in and upon his head, with intent to kill and murder him .

SECOND COUNT, to disable him.

THIRD COUNT, with intent to do him some grevious bodily harm.

Mr. Gurney, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoners were

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood .

227. SACK MAHOMET and MANDANE were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of January , two boots, value 34 s. the property of Francis Brown , privately in his shop .

CHARLES INMAN . I am foreman to Mr. Francis Brown , he is a boot and shoe-maker , 72, Ratcliffe Highway, in the parish of St. George's ; he has a shop there. On the 17th of January, we missed two boots that had been stolen from the shop door; about half after five I missed the two boots; the boots were hung upon the glass door of the shop, and the shop door was fastened back; the two boots hung with others within the shop,

Q. How long before you missed them did you see them there - A. A few minutes before five. I knew they were there then; they were Mr. Brown's boots. I saw them the next day at the watchhouse.

WILLIAM BARNARD . I am a patrol. On Saturday, the 17th of January, about half past six o'clock, the two prisoners came into Rosemary-lane, and offered two boots for sale; I suspected them, because the boots were odd ones, and seeing the name of Brown inside the boots I took them in custody. Sack Mahomet had the boots, and Mandane offered them to sell. I took them to the watchhouse. Turnbridge; the constable, was in the watchhouse, he has the custody of the boots. I went to Mr. Brown; he informed me he had lost two boots.

JOHN TURNBRIDGE . I am a constable. I received two boots of William Barnard at the watch-house in East Smithfield. I produce them.

Laman. They are the same two boots that we missed; they are Mr. Brown's property; they are worth thirty-four shillings.

Mahomet's Defence. I was going along Rosemary-lane, a white man gave me them boots to sell; he said he would give me something if I wouldsell them. I do not know the man; nor where he lived.

Mandane's Defence. The other prisoner asked me to sell the boots; a jew looked at them in his shop by the candle; he said they were two odd boots; I then was taken in custody.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Dampier.

228. PATRICK GALLAGHER and MICHAEL RAGAN were indicted for the wilful murder of Edward White ; and also stood indicted upon the Coroners inquisition.

ELEANOR HARRINGTON . Q. Did you know the deceased Edward White - A. I did.

Q. Were you in his company the day he met by his death - A. I was; ten minutes before he met with his accident. It was on Sunday, the 30th of January, between nine and ten o'clock at night.

Q. Do you know the prisoners - A. Yes, I know them both. I saw Edward White at the Hare and Hounds, in Puckeridge-street, St. Giles's, he parted company with me there.

Q. Where did you see him again - A. Opposite the Ship public-house in Bembridge-street; he offered me part of a pot of beer. I said I would not drink out of the pot unless it was a full pot. He told me to follow him into the Crown, and I should have part of a full pot. He was going to the Ship. On my hearing a great noise and enquiry for Ned White I went towards the Ship. The great noise was in Bembridge-street. I was running towards the door.

Q. How many persons were there assembled there - A. I cannot tell; I was astonished at seeing so many there. There were a great party, one running after the other.

Q. Do you mean there were two parties of men, or all of one party - A. I cannot say which; they were running from the Ship towards the Brewhouse.

Q. At this time did you see Ned White - A. No, I did not. The men running had several weapons and bludgeons; I don't know how many had them.

Q. What sort of weapons were they - A. I saw one man with a shovel, and many of the men had iron bars.

Q. When the mob was going to the brewhouse did you see Ned White - A. Yes, I saw Ned White within two or three yards of the Ship door; he was making his escape to get away.

Q. Do you mean that he was coming out of the Ship public-house - A. I cannot say. It was about three yards from where he fell. I was standing in the street about three yards from the Ship public-house.

Q. Where did Ned White go to - A. Patrick Gallagher hit him a back handed blow with a bar of iron about two feet in length.

Q. Did Ned White see Gallagher coming towards him - A. I do not suppose he did. He came behind him sideways, and struck him.

Q. Was White in a situation to see Gallagher coming - A. I cannot say.

Q. Had White any stick in his hand - A. Nothing at all.

Q. What was the consequence of this blow White received - A. I think it knocked him down; the blow seemed to knock his senses away; his hat fell off immediately.

Q. Did Gallagher remain by Ned White after the blow was struck - A. I cannot say; I screamed out murder. One of the men ran after me; I moved away from the spot where I stood. I did not see Gallagher do any thing more to Ned White . I saw Ragan, the other prisoner, striking White with a gibbet of wood when White was upon the ground.

Q. Did you see anything else done to White - A. There were a great many people gathered round him. I knew Patrick Gallagher and Michael Ragan . I saw Dennis Collins pick White up in the street, and he was carried to the Hare and Hounds in Puckeridge-street, and from there to the hospital. I saw Ned White at the Hare and Hounds, and I saw him at the hospital. I saw no more of him until he was dead.

Q. Was Ned White sober or in liquor - A. He was quite sober ten minutes before the accident happened.

MARGARET DONNOVAN . I live in Bembridge-street. On the night of 30th of January, I saw several persons assembled about the Ship public-house, some with swords, bludgeons, and sticks.

Q. Did it appear to you that these men were preparing for a fight - A. Yes, they were preparing for a fight between eight or nine o'clock.

Q. Do you remember seeing Edward White in Bembridge-street - A. Yes. I saw him at the Hare and Hounds before that; he was drinking a pot of beer with my husband; he was sober; he had no weapons with him.

Q. When did you see him next - A. I heard a great alarm; I went as far as Church-street, then I went to Bembridge-street. I heard a great row at the Ship.

Q. That was the assembly that you first mentioned - A. Yes.

Q. How long was that after you had seen White at the Hare and Hounds - A. Not above ten minutes.

Q. When you got near the Ship did you see White - A. Yes; I saw him knocked down, but to tell you who knocked him down I cannot. I saw Michael Ragan strike him after he was down with an old sword with the point knocked off. I saw Galligher there in the crowd with a stick, but not to strike any body.

Q. Did you see Gallagher do any thing to White - A. No, I did not; Ragan did strike him; I could almost swear I saw him strike him a blow across the nose.

Q. Did you see White picked up - A. I waited a good bit, and then I went away for fear I should be served the same.

Q. How far was White from the Ship when he was knocked down - A. Not two yards. He was on the pavement. I went and leaned over White; I asked him to come home; he was not able to make me any answer. The crowd returned. Ragan said he was not dead. The deceased said in Irish, do not strike, and then they struck him with scaffolding poles. A man took him away.

PATRICK M'CARTY. Q. Were you in Bembridge-street on the night that White came by his death - A. Yes, I came out of the Hand and Crown in Church-street on hearing a noise. I went up towards Bembridge-street. It was about eight o'clock. On my passing by I saw White in the kennel. There were a good many people beating him as he was down. Michael Ragan was there; he said he had not enough. Ragan struck him with a sword. I did not see Gallagher there; I cannot say how many men there were about White; they were all beating him with sticks, or what they had in their hands. I saw Ragan strike him with an unlawful stick, and I saw Quinland striking White while he was down; the party went down Puckeridge-street; they all said they were for Ragan. I went along with Ned White to the hospital. I saw him after he was dead.

ELIZABETH CARRINGTON. On the night that Edward White met with his death I was in Puckeridge-street; somebody came in and told me there was a mischief in the street. I went up to the Ship and saw these people with sticks and large pieces of wood in their hands. I saw one of these men strike Edward White at the time that he laid for dead on the ground.

Q. What did he strike him with - A. A large piece of wood. At the time he was striking him a man cried out not to hit him, he had a plenty; and somebody called out to know where the rest of the party were, and they would serve them in the same way.

Q. What party was it that they were speaking of - A. That came from the county of Limerick, where White came from. I had been speaking with Ned White before this happened.

Q. Look at the prisoners; did you see them at any time that evening - A. No, I did not.

Q. How many men might there be about White when he was laying down upon the ground - A. Eight or nine. Some of them had weapons.

THOMAS AUGUSTIN FINNEGHAN . I am a schoolmaster. Upon hearing this row I went into Bembridge-street.

Q. Did you there find a person whom you know to be Edward White - A. Yes, I did.

Q. Did you see either of the prisoners at the spot - A. Not exactly at the spot where the row was. The prisoner Gallagher was about five yards distance; he was standing upon the step of the Ship public-house door without a hat. I applied to him to assist me in preventing a party beating the deceased. Gallagher immediately assisted me to prevent the party from beating the deceased. When I applied to Gallagher, some of the mob were crying out in Irish to beat him; Gallagher cried out in Irish not to beat him, and immediately Gallagher and I shoved ourselves between the party that were beating the deceased, and after our interference the deceased did not receive any blow except from some person who kicked him on his legs. I know nothing more of White. I spoke to the party of the impropriety of their assembling in this way.

WILLIAM SALMON . I am an officer. On the 30th of January, at twelve o'clock at night, I apprehended Gallagher at the Ship public-house.

WILLIAM PRETTY . At the time of this accident I was house-surgeon at Middlesex hospital.

Q. On the night of the 30th of January, was the deceased, White, brought to the hospital - A. He was.

Q. In what state was he - A. He was almost insensible. He lived until Tuesday morning, half past nine o'clock.

Q. Did you examine his body so as to ascertain what was the cause of his death - A. I did. It was an injury upon the brain from external violence; the upper part of the left side of the skull was fractured. It appeared to have been done by blows most undoubtedly.

The prisoners left their defence to their counsel.

ELIZABETH RAGAN . I live in Gray's-inn-lane.

Q. Are you any relation to the men at the bar - A. No. I never saw them until I saw them at Bow-street.

Q. Do you know the Norwoods - A. Yes.

Q. White lived in Saffron-hill - A. Yes. On this day I saw Edward White in St. Giles's, at the corner of the Hare and Hounds public-house door; there were three or four persons with him; they were county of Cork people that I saw with him at the Hare and Hounds. They went off to Mr. Griffiths's, the Hand and Crown. I asked White to come home with me, and not to go with these rebellious characters. Some of these men had sticks in their hands. White then had a stick. They were going to meet an opposite party to fight; the Limericks, as they call them in Ireland.

MARY REDDIN . I am an Englishwoman. I was in Puckeridge-street; I saw a great mob of men with sticks in their hands; they spoke in Irish; they said, are you all there; the other said, harroo for Old Dayley and the Ship. They went to the Ship door, and struck at the Ship door. I saw a man come out of the Ship public-house; he was knocked down. Gallagher came out; they struck at him; he begged them to go home, he did not want to fight. Gallagher had neither a stick nor a hat on.

DAVID AYRES . I live opposite of the Ship public-house. I was at my window when the people were coming from the Hare and Hounds public-house. I saw the Norwoods at the Ship public-house door. White had a black thorn stick in his hand. They harrangued their men at the Ship door at the time that every thing was quiet. One of them broke the bar window; then the word was, the first man that comes out of the Ship let him he knocked down. Gallagher came to the door; he told them to be peaceable and quiet, and to go home without fighting. They struck at him; he put up both his hands to save himself, and got through them as well as he could.

Q. Do you know Ragan - A. Yes; he was not there at that time at all.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

229. WILLIAM STURMAN was indicted for that he, on the 11th of January, in the 54th year of his Majesty's reign , at the parish of St. George, Hanover-square, feloniously did set fire to and burn a certainhouse in his occupation, of which house Sir Richard Sutton , bart. was possessed in fee, with intent to injure Sir Richard Sutton, bart .

SECOND COUNT, stating the house to belong to him, not stating in fee.

THIRD COUNT, for like offence, with intent to injure Charles Reeves .

FOURTH COUNT, for like offence, with intent to injure George Kempster .

FIFTH COUNT, to injure other persons.

SEVENTH COUNT, to injure Sir Richard Carr Glyn , bart. and Walter Russell , esq. treasurers of the Globe Insurance Company .

And OTHER COUNTS, for setting fire to the house, not stating that he burned it.

MARY WRIGHT . Q. I believe you lived servant with the prisoner - A. I did, at No. 9, Half-moon-street, Piccadilly . I was the only servant in the house.

Q. What did his family consist of - A. He had a wife and one child, and me and him. The wife and child and me were all the persons in the house.

Q. How long had you lived with him previous to the 11th of January - A. I lived there eight days.

Q. Look at this model, is the house like this - A. Yes.

Q. Suppose this to be the street door, is this the passage - A. Yes.

Q. As you go on you come to a small hall - A. Yes.

Q. In that hall there is a stair-case, one that goes up stairs, and one that goes down stairs - A. Yes.

Q. What is the partition between that front parlour and the small hall - A. A partition of wood, and behind the back parlour there is the pantry.

Q. On the 11th of January do you remember any thing being said to you about going out - A. At nine o'clock on the 11th of January, in the morning, my mistress said, Mary, your master and me are going out to dinner, and after you have shut up the house you may go out for a few hours.

Q. Had you applied for leave to go out - A. No, sir.

Q. What time did Mr. Sturman go out - A. He went out about half past twelve o'clock. The prisoner told me to go and fetch some seed to feed the canary bird. I went and fetched the bird seed. Mr. Sturman fed the bird himself. The bird was in a bird-cage; it hung up by the side of the room, between the window and the fire-place, in the front parlour.

Q. What sized cage was it - A. It was a large breeding-cage; it might be the size of that model.

Q. After you had fetched the bird-seed what did your master say to you - A. He gave me a key, and asked me if I knew how to unlock the door; I said, no. I had never seen such a key before. I tried to unlock the door; he shewed me, and then I could do it after he shewed me, not before he shewed me. He told me to leave the house perfectly secure, to be at home at half after eight o'clock, and not later, and to get the fire and lamps ready by nine o'clock. I went out about four o'clock. He told me to be sure to be at home at half after eight o'clock, and before I went out to leave a lamp alight, that nobody might distinguish whether there were any persons in the house or not. I left the lamp burning on the board in the hall, and the tinder-box, for fear it should go out. I went into the front parlour before I went out. I raked the fire almost out; I barred the shutters up, but I did not draw the curtains. I left every thing perfectly safe, to the best of my knowledge, up stairs. I fastened the doors and the windows; I left the windows shut and the shutters open.

Q. How high was that room - A. Three pair of stairs. All the fastenings were very secure when I went out.

Q. What time was it when you went out - A. About four o'clock.

Q. And what time did you return - A. I returned about twenty minutes before eight. I unlocked the street door.

Q. How happened you to return before the time your master gave you leave - A. I was at a friend's house; I did not exactly know the hour; I mistook the hour. I let myself in with the key my master gave me. When I came in the passage I saw the house was in flames. The back dining room door post I saw in flames.

Q. On which side of the door post - A. The inside of the door post.

Q. What was there against the door post - A. On the inside there were paper, wood, and boards.

Q. How many boards - A. I believe there were one or two; they were thin boards, usually kept by Mr. Sturman that he had in the wine cellar; the boards laid against the door post.

Q. Between them and the door post what was there - A. A wooden partition.

Q. Was any thing put between the boards and the door post - A. No, sir.

Q. What was there of the other side - A. Bundles of fire wood with the strings cut, and paper, and on the outside of the front parlour was steps, wood, and hand boxes brought out of Mrs. Sturman's room, filled full of combustlbles, and a bunch of matches also.

Q. What were the combustibles - A. A band box, wood, and paper, and on the inside of the front parlour there was more wood and paper also on the floor.

Q. Were these on each side of the partition - A. There were steps on the outside, and wood and paper within. They were as close to the partition as possibly they could be laid to the partition of the front parlour. The clothes-horses used to be kept down stairs in the washhouse. Stocking and rags were scattered about the stairs.

Q. What stockings - A. Some silk and some cotton.

Q. Whose stockings were they - A. Mr. Sturman's. The stocking were kept in the front parlour, in the bottom drawer. The pinafores I washed myself; they were in the front parlour; they were usually kept in a drawer in the front parlour.

Q. How many pinafores - A. I cannot say how many, not less than six or seven. They were in the back parlour hanging on the back of a chair when I went out.

Q. Where were they when you came home -- A. When I found them they were upon the stairs.

Q. Were there any rags about - A. Yes, there were rags which I had dusted the tables with on the stairs; the rags smelled very strong of turpentine indeed, some of them, and some of the stockings I believe smelled very strong of turpentine. There were some matches laying on the clothes-horse, and on the steps, and I had left some on the side-board; when I came home there was a considerable fire in the front parlour, and two pokers red hot.

Q. What had become of the lamp - A. The lamp was removed from the place I left; it was carried into the back-pantry. The lamp I left in the passage burning was carried into the back-pantry.

Q. How was the curtains of the front parlour - A. When I went out I left the curtains undrawed; when I returned they were drawed.

Q. How was the windows of the prisoner's bedroom - A. I left the windows shut, and the shutters open; when I came home the windows were throwed open, and the shutters open.

Q. That would make a draft down the stair-case - A. Yes. My window was open at the same time; it was shut when I went out.

Q. Was the snow upon the house at this time - A. Yes, a great deal. My room was at the top of the house, next to Mr. Sturman's room. The snow was upon the the top of the house, very deep indeed.

Q. On your seeing things in this state what did you do - A. As soon as I went in the house and saw it in flames I immediately called out for assistance; Mr. Levoigne was the first that came to my assistance. Captain Kempster 's servant, who lived at the next door of one side, and Dr. Lockley on the other side. The Captain's servant came, and Mrs. Lockley's also came, and we extinguished the flames as soon as possible.

Q. How where the drawers in the front parlour - A. The book-case and the drawers in the front parlour were all apparently shut when I went out; when I returned I found them all open, and stripped.

Q. Do you recollect whether the key was in the book-case when you went out - A. No, I cannot recollect.

Q. When you came home was the bird-cage there - A. No, it was not.

Q. At what time did your master come home - A. At half after nine o'clock; I was in the front parlour when I saw my master first. My mistress spoke to me, said, Mary, what is the matter; I said ma'm, the house is stripped and robbed. He immediately cried out his desk was lost, and that he was a ruined man. Master asked me what time I went out; I said, four o'clock. He asked me how long I had been home; I said, ever since twenty minutes before eight.

Q. Do you recollect the day after, Mr. Denham coming to your master - A. Yes, very well; they had some conversation together. Master told me then to fetch some turpentine bottles; I asked Mr. Sturman where they were, whether they were in the cupboard up stairs or down stairs; the prisoner told me in the cupboard in the back pantry. I knew nothing where they were; I never had seen any turpentine bottles there before hand; I used to go to that cupboard very frequently.

Q. Must you have seen them if they had been there - A. Yes, I think I must have seen them if they had been there before, but I never had seen them before.

Q. They were stone bottles I suppose - A. Yes; they hold about half a gallon. (The two stone bottles produced.) One of them is common oil, the other is turpentine. I brought them both up.

Q. Did you see how much there were in each - A. No, I did not look particularly; I smelled them, one appeared to have the same smell as the rags, and the stockings also.

Q. Did your master use more than one sitting-room - A. No, only one when I was with him, that was the front parlour.

Q. Was there any fire in the kitchen, or any where - A. No, none all the time I was in the house. No fire except in the front parlour; I had my meals there; I dined after them in the same room.

Q. Did people frequently come to ask for payment - A. Very often indeed, for payment of money during the eight days I was there.

Q. Did they ever get it - A. No, sir.

Mr. Alley. You had been there only eight days - A. No.

Q. You had no great opportunity of examining the house - A. No.

Q. Therefore the jars might be there for what you know - A. They might; they were not in that cupboard, nor any where else that I saw.

Q. One of them contained oil that might be used in paint, and the other oil that might be burned in a lamp - A. I do not know that.

Q. Your master kept a lodging-house - A. Yes, he did.

Q. Mary Sweet lived there before you did - A No, I believe not; Martha Pope lived there before me.

Q. On the day in question you were directed to get your work done, that you might go out of the house - A. No. They said, when I shut up the house I might go out, to return at half after eight.

Q. The other rooms were usually kept for lodgers, so not used in common - A. Yes.

Q. You have spoken of some boards brought out of the wine cellar, you do not mean they were brought out that day - A. Yes, they must; I had never seen them before. Mr. Sturman used always to go to the cellar himself.

Q. Was not the key in the door - A. Not in common, it was not; Mr. Sturman took the key with him; the door was generally kept locked. The first night I was there Mrs. Sturman sent me down to get a bottle of beer; I went and got it.

Q. Did you see any wine there - A. I did not look.

JURY. When you returned were you alarmed - A. Yes, I was quite alarmed.

Q. Did your recollection leave you. If you were alarmed it is somewhat astonishing that you should be correct to give a detail in this kind of way, and not under any embarrassment - A. I found myself confused to see the house in that state.

Q. You were only eight days in the house; how could you be acquainted with the house - A. Because I went into every room in the house, and cleaned every room.

Q. You were alarmed and confused, and yet can be correct in stating all this - A. Why I saw the things there every day; they remained there several days afterwards.

Prisoner. Where did you get the light - A. Out of the front parlour.

Mr. Gurney. Did you see any woman in the front parlour when you went in for the light - A. I saw no woman there until Mrs. Sturman came home.

JOHN LEVOIGNE . I am a bookseller in Portman-street. On the night of the 11th of January, I was in Half-moon-street; I heard a cry of fire; the cry proceed from some woman, I think, at No. 9. That young woman, the last witness, was at the door of her master's house. I went to the door directly. Upon entering the house I observed a light in the back parlour, and also on the stairs. I was the first person that went into the house. I immediately went into the back parlour, and extinguished the flame by the assistance of a board. I believe after two or three minutes, two other persons came in, and assisted. In about four or five minutes the fire was extinguished.

Q. What part did you find to have been on fire - A. Upon examining it afterwards the door post and part of the flooring, sir, and the stairs. Against the back parlour door post there were two pieces of boards piled up; these pieces of boards would serve as conductors to the fire. On the outside I found rags, and up the stairs them rags appeared to have been sleeped in some preparation that smelled like turpentine. The smell principally appeared like it.

Q. Underneath the stairs, against the other door, did you find the clothes-horse - A. I did, and paper, and other things; they were placed against the door post, only more erect.

Q. On the inside of that parlour did you find other paper - A. I did.

Q. Underneath the side board there - A. Yes.

Q. Did they appear to be placed so as most effectually to burn the house - A. Mary Wright went to the stair-case and saw the wooden steps.

Q. Mr. Levoigne, I believe after putting out the fire you went away; you had a friend to conduct home you went away and came back again - A. I did. I came back sooner than half past eight, and then I made more particular examination of the combustibles.

Q. Did it appear to you that these combustibles were placed at these different places to set the house on fire - A. At first it did not; afterwards they did. I was in the house when the prisoner and his wife returned. I did not see him when he first came in; in about a minute after I did. He was in the passage when I first saw him. Some person told him, after a few minutes, that his writing-desk was broken open.

Q. Writing-desk or book case was it - A. I am not certain which; he appeared very much distressed. and said he was a ruined man.

Q. When you went there the first time did you observe whether there was a fire in the front parlour grate - A. I do not recollect. I do not think the door was open.

Mr. Adolphus. Tell us as near as you can the precise time when you called at this house - A. It might be between twenty and twenty-five minutes to eight.

Q. Therefore past the half hour - A. It was.

Q. By your extingishing it so easy, the flames must have been recent - A. Not long.

Q. Was it you that told Mr. Sturman that his writing-desk was broken open - A. It was not. He gave the child to his wife, and went as far as the door; then he returned into the back parlour, threw himself upon two chairs, exclaiming he was a ruined man.

Q. Had you any doubt that his distress was real - A. I did not attempt to form an opinion.

JOHN RICHARDSON . I am servant to Captain Kempster , who lives next door to the house No. 9.

Q. On Tuesday the 11th of January, do you remember the alarm being given - A. I do. I went into the house about twenty minutes before eight. When I first went in I saw a great light in the back parlour; it proceeded from the back parlour. I saw the fire burning very fierce. I called out to the maid servant to get me a light, which she did in the front parlour, and got a lighted candle. From thence we proceeded into the back kitchen. I got a pail, and some water; I throwed a pail of water upon the back parlour; and nearly extinguished it. I went down again, got another pail of water, and throwed after that. Mr. Levoigne was treading out the fire on the stairs on the outside of the parlour, that which had been on fire he had not extinguished. I saw the rags laying about. I saw the clothes-horse, the steps, and wood resting against the inside of the partition. I did not go into the front parlour until after the fire was extinguished. I found a very large fire there, and one poker in the fire red hot; the other poker standing up by the fire, I do not recollect whether that was hot or not. A quantity of fire wood untied was laid along from the door to the side-board close to the wainscot in the parlour.

SAMUEL HALLETT . I am an assistant to Mr. Lockley, a surgeon and apothecary. I was alarmed by the fire; I went in; the fire was out when I got there.

Q. Did you observe a book-case - A. I did, one of the doors were open; I will not be certain whether the other was. There was a key in the book-case.

CHARLES REEVES . I believe you are the landlord of the house - A. I am. Captain Kempster lives at No. 10; No. 9 is the house in question.

Q. What is Mr. Kempster's christian name - A. I do not know. George Frederick Lockley lives at No. 8; I live opposite. I am a collector of Parliamentary taxes.

Q. How long had the prisoner been your tenant - A. He took possession of the house at Michaelmas, 1811.

Q. Have you threatened to distrain him - A. I have, at times, threatened to distrain him. The last payment due up to Christmas I distrained him. Onthe alarm of fire I was called by Captain Kempter ; I went into the house.

Q. The prisoner has paid you rent - A. He has. I am the leaseholder.

CHARLES NOBLE. Q. Did you see the lease executed - A. I did.

(The lease read.)

Q. Mr. Noble, what parish is the house in - A. In the parish of St. George, Hanover-square.

WILLIAM BACON . I am a police office of Bow-street office.

Q. On the night of the 11th of January, were you sent for to this house on the alarm of fire - A. I was. I got there about half past eight; I examined all over the house.

Q. Did you find any fastenings of the house broken - A. None at all. I examined every part; I could find no where whatever that any person had got into the house excepting with a key. When the prisoner and his wife returned I was up stairs; I came down; the prisoner was in the back parlour; he threw himself upon two chairs, exclaiming, he was a ruined man. While he was in this apparent distress, I took the candle and looked in his face; there did not appear any real distress; no tears at all. It struck me so forcibly that there was no real distress I told Mr. Reeves that if he would give the charge I would take him into custody. I saw the key in the door of the book-case; I took the candle, and looked at the locks of the doors; I could see no force at all. I cannot say I examined them very strictly, because I saw the keys.

Q. Have you got any part of the combustibles - A. Yes. I picked this up at the first step of the stairs, and partly on the floor; it was then as wet as if it had been dipped in a turpentine tub; it smells now strong of it, nothing like so strong as then. It is now quite dry. There were a vast many more tags on the stairs; that being the wettest I did not trouble myself with the others.

Q. The fireman were left in possession of the house after that - A. Yes, they were.

Mr. Alley. Did you take the lock off and examine it - A. No, I did not.

Q. You cannot say whether it was picked or not - A. They said it was a patent lock. Mr. Bremmer I believe has offered an hundred guineas for any person that will pick any of his locks.

MR. DENHAM. I am secretary of the Globe Insurance office. About three o'clock, the day after the fire, I went to this house. When I got there the firemen pointed out the different parts of the house that had been on fire. I asked the prisoner if he could account in any way for the accident of the fire being in his house, and whether he thought anybody had been wicked enough to do him a spite. He said, no, not any. I then asked him what time he went out on the preceding day; he said, about one o'clock and when he returned he found fire had taken place in his house; he could not explain that, nor give any other account. The next day I went into further particulars. I asked him whether he knew how the paper and hand-boxes came there. After some difficulty he said they came from his wife's bed room.

Q. Did he say where the steps and the clothes-horse came from - A. He said they were usually kept below stairs.

Q. Did he say any thing about the keys of the door - A. He said he supposed the thieves must have entered by false keys. I asked him what keys he had; he said he had originally three; one he had lost in the month of August last by the servant or one of his lodgers, and that he had given his own servant a key to let herself in. I then said I supposed he kept the third himself. He did not give a positive answer. He said he did not know where it was. I then asked him whether there was any turpentine mixture in the house. He said, after some recollection, he believed there was some in the house. I asked him whether there were any remaining; he said he thought there might; I begged to see it; he said he had it to paint the house. He rang the bell; Mary Wright came up. He desired her to bring the stone bottle or bottles. She brought one in each hand.

Q. Did she know where to go for it - A. No. He had some difficulty in making her understand where she was to go for the stone bottles; he said out of the cupboard. She then asked, what cupboard; the cupboard down stairs? he said, no, in the pantry; and was going to shew her himself. She then appeared to understand, and went and brought a bottle in each hand. Upon her bringing the bottles he took the cork out, smelled it, and gave it me to smell, which smelled the same as the clothes were wetted with. He then examined the nose of the bottle, and said he did not think it had been recently opened, and asked me if I thought it had been recently opened; he thought not. I assented to it. I then asked him about his bank notes; he said he had lost about six hundred pounds, which he always kept in the book case. I said, you keep the key of the book case. He said, yes. I asked him if it was a key separate from the bunch of keys; he said, yes; the bunch of keys were kept by his wife, the key of the book case was kept by him. He shewed me a bundle of clothes that lay in the chair; he said he supposed they were intended to be taken also; they were two or three coats and a waistcoat.

Q. Was there any children's clothes - A. Not on the chair. He said nothing more that day, I believe. On the Friday I went again and repeated my question with respect to the bank notes in particular. I asked him if he could give any account of the notes. He said, no, none; there was an account of them, but it was kept in the book with them. I asked him what the notes consisted of. He said they were of various amounts, in particular two or three of an hundred pounds each. I then said you can account, and say where you had all these notes. He said he had one or two or three of his lodgers; that he had them by him, some of them for two years. On my saying how extraordinary the robbery was he seemed much agitated.

Q. Who are the treasurers of the Globe Insurance - A. Sir Richard Carr Glynn, bart and Walter Russell , esq.

Mr. Adolphus. What day in the week was it when you first saw this person in Half Moon-street - A. Wednesday.

Q. No application had been made at the office in his behalf - A. None.

Q.Had you at that time seen his hand-bill - A. No, not for several days afterwards.

Q. To the questions you put to him was his answers readily made - A. He answered with difficulty, and answered generally with hesitation.

Q.You had not received any information from any body else - A. No; I wished to have the information from him.

Q. And he told you. You agreed with the prisoner that the bottle of turpentine had not been lately opened - A. I did. The linen smelled of turpentine very strong.

Q. The office does not pay for bank notes - A. No, sir.

Q. Did not he tell you he was endeavouring to purchase another house - A. He said, he had been looking out for another house to set up a hotel, and he said this money he reserved for that purpose.

Q. You did not take him into custody until Saturday - A. On Saturday he was apprehended.

Q. At this time you had three conversations with him - A. I had.

Q. And you found him at home - A. Yes, certainly

JOHN COVINGTON . I am a fireman of the Globe Insurance office.

Q. Did you make any enquiry of the prisoner about the boards that were placed up against the wainscot - A. I did; he told me they came from the wine-cellar. I was at the house until the prisoner was apprehended.

Q. Was the different combustibles suffered to remain in the house until after his apprehension - A. Yes. The officer took possession of the things, his name is Nicolls. I had one key of the street-door given to me when the prisoner was taken up.

Q. Did you see another key - A. Yes, on the mantle-piece in the front parlour; the front parlour is the room he lived in particularly.

Mr. Alley. Did not he tell you that the boards had been removed a fortnight before, for the purpose of enlarging the partition - A. No, sir.

WILLIAM NICOLLS . I am a police officer. I came to the house. I found this key.

CHARLES HUMPHREYS. I am a Bow-street officer. I produce the rags and stockings; the boards are not here.

MARY MARTIN . Q. I believe you are the sister of the prisoner's wife - A. Yes, I am.

Q. On Tuesday, the 11th of January, did your sister come to your house - A. Yes, about one o'clock or two; she staid with me the whole day, never went out of the room; she brought her child with her.

Q. At what time did the prisoner come to your house that evening - A. Between the hours of seven and eight, and left my house about half past eight, or a little while after that; I cannot say with certainty.

Q. Do you believe he was in your house more than half an hour - A. Yes; I cannot tell how much more.

Q. Recollect yourself; was that the time he went away - A.Nearer eight, I believe.

Q. Do you believe it was quite eight when he came to your house - A. I believe it was not quite eight when he came, to my knowledge.

Q. Do you believe it wanted five minutes - A. It must.

Q.Where is your house - A. No, 14, Broad-court, Long Acre.

Q. That is about three quarters of a mile and half a quarter to Half Moon-street - A. I think it is.

Q. At the time that he came, did he appear warm or cold - A. I really do not know.

Q. Mrs. Martin, did not you observe upon your oath, whether he was cool or warm - A. Upon my oath I did not observe whether he was warm or cool; I made no observation upon it, that I swear. He staid about half an hour, and then he and his wife went out to go home; I suppose so.

JURY. Q. You had not seen the prisoner before he came into your house - A. No.

Q. Do you think it wanted more than five minutes to eight - A. I cannot say; I am sure it was not eight.

Q. Did you know the prisoners affairs - A. Nothing at all.

Q. You know he kept a lodging-house in Half Moon-street - A. Yes.

Mr. Gurney. Had he any other means of getting his livelihood than his lodgings - A. Not that I know of.

JURY. Was the prisoner ever distressed to borrow money to pay his rent or any other demand - A. Not that I know of.

JAMES RILEY. I am in the employ of Butler and Watson; they are carpet manufacturers, in Bond-street. The prisoner came in the early part of October, and purchased some carpetting; he purchased some for a drawing-room; they were sold for a ready money price. He came on the 15th, he ought to have paid ready money for them. The balance remaining was thirty-seven pounds twelve shillings and five-pence.

JURY. What was the amount of the bill - A. Sixty-seven pounds twelve shillings and five-pence. On the 2nd of November, 1812, I received a bill for the balance for two months credit; that bill was not paid when due; it was put into the hands of an attorney.

WILLIAM PHILP . I am a Sheriff's officer. I arrested the prisoner on the 8th of March, at the suit of Butler and Watson.

Q. How soon was the money paid - A. I cannot say, the Sheriff was ruled.

EDWARD M'DOWELL. I am clerk to Mr. John Phipps , he is a barrister; he was employed to sue the prisoner Sturman for this debt; we pursued for a declaration; the declaration was not filed. The money was paid on the 6th of May, 1813; the debt and costs were paid by Mr. Sturman; the declaration was not filed. The prisoner had left his house in Park-street; we could not find him to serve him with notice.

MARTHA POPE . Q. Had you lived with the prisoner Sturman - A. Yes; I left his service on the 6th of November last.

Q. How long had you lived servant with him - A. Five months and a fortnight.

Q. During the time that you had lived with him was there any other servant - A.No. 7 Master, mistress, and me, lived in the front-parlour, and sometimes in the pantry behind.

Q. You lived in that room when there were lodgers in the house - A. Yes. We had only one fire, and that fire in the parlour.

Q. Now, during the five months and the fortnight that you were in the house, do you remember any applications of creditors to your master for money - A. Yes, a great many.

Q. Did they get their money when they came for it - A. No, sir. He was sometimes denied when he was at home, and sometimes by me, by my mistress's order.

Q. From all appearances you saw, seeing how they lived, and hearing these applications for money, did he appear to you to be a man possessed of money or a very distressed man - A. A very distressed man, sir.

Q. Do you remember the cupboard in the pantry - A. I do.

Q. Were there two stone bottles in the cupboard in the pantry - A. No. I had never seen them in the house.

Q. Who kept the key of the wine cellar - A. Master used to have the key himself; sometimes it was left in the door.

Q. Did your mother act as charwoman there - A. Yes.

Q. Had they any servant immediately after you left - A. Not as I know of.

Mr. Adolphus. When you talk of a wine cellar, it is a nick name for it, you kept wood there - A. Yes, and there were two barrels there, one of elder wine, and a barrel of beer.

Q. Do you know whether these lodgers paid every Saturday or Monday - A. On Monday; I think Mr. Cole made his bills out on a Monday. I cannot he certain.

Q. When these tradesmen came, was not the answer, I will give you money when the lodgers pay me - A. Sometimes I paid the bills, milk bills and publicans bills.

ELIZABETH POPE . Q. You are the mother of the last witness; I believe you charred in the prisoner's house - A. I did, more or less during the time my daughter lived there.

Q. Was the linen good linen or bad linen - A. It had been good linen, but much worn; it had the appearance of distress. They lived in the front parlour, maid and all. There is no fire in the kitchen very rarely, only when lodgers were there.

ALEXANDER RANER. I am an assistant to Mr. Harman, the auctineer.

Q. You must be well acquainted with the value of furniture in general - A.Yes; I was directed to go the prisoner's house, and make a valuation of the furniture. I took an inventory of the valuation; the total amount was seven hundred and thirty-two pounds eighteen shillings. I was directed to make a very liberal valuation; I have done so. If these articles had been lost, I have no doubt they might be replaced for less money.

Q. Did you find bills in the house of most part of the furniture - A. I did not. On Thursday last they were sent me; I compared my own valuation with the cost of the things.

Q. Is your valuation higher or lower than the actual cost of the things - A. The actual cost of these things as far as I could trace them, my valuation is above fifty-five pounds more than the valuation by Mr. Sturman's bills.

Q. to Nicolls. Did you find the papers in Sturman's house - A. Yes, I did.

Q. to Mrs. Martin. Do you believe that to be the prisoner's hand writing - A. It may be, but I do not know.

Q. How often have you seen him writing - A. I have seen him writing at a distance.

Q. I ask you whether you do or do not believe it to be his hand writing - A. I do not know his hand writing well enough to know, it may be or not; I really do not know.

Mr. Gurney, to Mr. Raner. You say you have over valued, you are quite satisfied - A. Yes, I am quite satisfied, I valued them on the 21st of January; I valued every thing that I found there, nothing but furniture.

Q. Was china and glass in your valuation - A. There is not. I saw no china or glass in the house. I valued the things that I understood to be insured. Covington, the fireman, was in the house.

Q. to Covington. Did you remain in the house until Mr. Raner valued the furniture - A. Yes. Nothing was removed out; I was there at the fire, and I was there then.

HENRY JONES . I am a clerk in the Globe Insurance office.

Q. Do you recollect the prisoner coming any time directing an insurance - A. Yes, I took the directions of him for the insurance.

Q. See whether that entry is yours - A. Yes, it is mine.

Q. What were the instructions that you received of him respecting the insurance - A. He stated himself to live at 31, Chapel-street, South Audley-street, to insure on the building No. 9, Half Moon-street, Piccadilly, fifteen hundred pounds, and on his interest in the lease five hundred pounds, and on household furniture only fifteen hundred pounds; making a total of three thousand five hundred pounds. A policy was made out according to these instructions. It is the course of our office to send the policy to the person insured.

Mr. Raner. I delivered a notice, of which this is a copy; I delivered it to the prisoner on the 10th of this month.

Q. to Mr. Jones. Is that a copy of the original policy - A. I believe it is. David Hunter , William Gillman , and John Neale , they are the three directers of the Globe Insurance. It is my entry in this book that I have been speaking from.

Q. Read the words just as they are in the book - A. Dwelling-house No. 9, Half Moon-street, Piccadilly; brick built, on interest of the lease five hundred pounds, on the house fifteen hundred pounds, on the household furniture only fifteen hundred pounds. The house being in the occupation of another I asked him if his linen and wearing apparel were there; hesaid, no, and then I took the general rule for houses let in lodgings.

Q. When was this policy effected - A. On the 14th of April, 1813.

Prisoner. I leave my defence to my counsel.

MARY SWEET . Q. You lived formerly as servant to the prisoner - A. Yes, I lived with him at his house in Half Moon-street; I left his service this time twelvemonth; I lived with him between four and five months.

Q.The house was let out in lodgings - A. Yes, he let the lodgings for nine or ten guineas a-week.

Q.Was the house occupied with lodgers all the time you were there - A. No.

Q.How many lodgers were there in the house when you were there - A. Only one, they had the whole of the house except what master, mistress, and I occupied, for that money; it was let in January, and how long afterwards I cannot rightly say.

Q. When you were there had you permission given you to go out - A. Yes; sometimes I asked to go, and sometimes I have been out with them; we have been all out of the house at the same time.

Q. You, your master, and mistress, have been all out together.

Q. So that the house has been left without any of the family - A. Yes.

Q. There has been two stone jars produced, did you ever see them when you were there - A. Yes, and have used turpentine out of one of them.

Q. What is the other - A.Oil has been in the other. I used the turpentine to rub the furniture, and the oil for the lamps.

Q. There was a cellar called the wine cellar, what was that used for - A. Master kept the key.

Q. Do you know of any boards that were in the house - A. No. The stone bottles were kept in the cupboard going down the kitchen stairs.

Mr. Gurney. You were there four or five months - A. Yes.

Q. Was the house let above a month of that time - A. Yes, I dare say six weeks,

Q. When you speak of nine or ten guineas for the house, you speak of the winter price - A. It was the winter time; I am speaking of the winter price.

Q. Did you know any thing of this being the price except from your master or mistress telling you - A. I heard it by the servants.

Q. Your master used to keep the key of the wine cellar himself, and you never saw any boards in the house - A. No.

Mr. Alley. When you were speaking of the stone bottles being kept under the stairs that is a twelvemonth ago - A. Yes.

RICHARD PARSONS. I am a coal merchant.

Q. Did the prisoner at any time enter into treaty with you to purchase a house - A. He did; I think about a twelvemonth ago. At the time of Dr. Daval's death he gave me twenty pounds deposit for it, he was to be the purchaser at five hundred pounds; the house is in Moon-street, No. 120, or 121. The treaty broke off because there was not a good title to the lease.

Mr. Gurney. Did you see the prisoner in possession of any other bank notes than the twenty pounds - A. I have; I recollect his asking me once or twice to change him an hundred pound bank note.

Q. Was not he always in your debt - A. He owes me now eight or nine pounds for coals; I never sent in the bill.

JURY. You say twenty pounds he deposited - A. Yes, he gave it me; I gave it back to him.

PHOEGE WILKINS. I am a servant; I live with Mr. Durge, at Hackney. The prisoner was a relation to Mrs. Durge; he came to master's house on the 11th of January last, about four o'clock, he came to see my mistress, she was not at home; he left me at Hackney a little better than half past four o'clock.

GEORGE SCOTT . I am a waiter at the Talgrave's chop-house, Gracechurch-street.

Q. Were you so on the 11th of January last - A. Yes.

Q. Look at the prisoner, and tell me whether ever you have seen him before - A. I think I have, I cannot say where; it might be that time I saw him.

Q. Can you recollect any circumstance by which you remember seeing him - A. No, I cannot.

Q. On the 11th of January you were waiter at this chop-house - A. Yes.

Q. Did the prisoner dine there on that day - A. He might; there were a number of people dined there that day.

Q. When did you see him after the 11th of January - A. I saw him at Bow-street, and I thought I had seen him before then.

HENRY BAINES . I know the prisoner; he is my brother-in-law.

Q. Were you employed by him to make any communication after this fire at the office in Bow-street - A. I went with him to Bow-street on purpose to give information of the property he had lost. First of all I went to Marlborough-street; on Friday we went to Bow-street.

Q. Look at that bill, was there a number of bills printed of that kind, shewing that he had lost property - A. Yes; that was done under the direction of Marlborough-street office.

Mr. Gurney. At the very time that the hand-bills were printed was not the prisoner in custody. Upon your oath did not you go yourself to get them bills printed, saying, your brother was in custody - A. No, I deny it.

Q. Upon your oath, did not you take them away from the printer, saying, you wanted them, your brother was under examination at Bow-street - A. No, I swear I never did.

Q. That is the hand-bill - A. It is.

Q. When did you receive them for the prisoner - A. On Saturday, a little after two o'clock, from there I went to the printer; the printer told me I should have them at eight o'clock in the evening.

Q. Was not your brother in custody on Saturday - A. I did not know that he was in custody until I took the hundred and fifty bills from his house in Half Moon-street.

Q. I give you notice, now I have a person here who was at the printing-office; on Friday morning wasthe first time that you or he went to the printing-office about it - A. Yes; I had one hundred and fifty bills at eight o'clock.

Q. There is no evidence about the bird-cage being lost in the hand-bill - A. No; I did not know that was lost.

JOHN BURROWS . I am a shoe-maker, I live in Grosvenor-street. I have known the prisoner ten years; he was a servant to Lady Bath when I first knew him. He was a servant afterwards to the present Lord Aspin, as footman, and he lived with Lord Elliott afterwards. I always considered him a sober, honest, discreet, young man.

The prisoner called three other witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 30.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

230. ELIZABETH FREEMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of February , a shawl, value 11 s. and one yard and a half of linen cloth, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of Griffiths Foulkes , privately in his shop .

THOMAS RICHARDSON . I am shopman to Mr. Griffiths Foulkes. On the 14th of February, the prisoner and another woman came in to look at some shawls; they bought as much as came to seven shillings and four-pence.

Q. What did they buy - A. Shawls. I suspected as she was going out of the shop that she had got something else about her, she looked so bulky. After she had got about a yard from the shop I laid hold of her, asked her what she had got; I put my hand under her shawl, and found this shawl and a yard and half of linen-cloth. She said that she picked it up coming in I took her up stairs, and sent for an officer. He searched her; I did not find no more upon her than the shawl and the yard and a half of linen-cloth.

Q. Where was that - A. Just upon her breast; it is my master's shawl; it has the shop mark. It was on the counter; the prisoner was near it; the value of the shawl is eleven shillings and sixpence, and one shilling and sixpence the linen, prime cost.

Prisoner's Defence. I went into this shop to buy some neck handkerchiefs, coming out of the shop I trod on this parcel, who it belonged to I did not know. The young man came after me, he asked me what I had got; I went back into the shop. He said the shawl and piece of cloth belonged to his master; who it belonged to I did not know when I picked it up in the shop.

GUILTY, aged 47,

Of stealing, but not privately .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

231. JOHN CORBYN was indicted for that he, on the 22nd of January , was servant to William Hind , and was employed and intrusted by him to receive money for him, and that he being such servant, so employed and entrusted, did receive and take into his possession the sum of 11 s. 9 d. for and on account of his said master, and that he afterwards did embezzle, secrete, and steal 9 s. 9 d. part of the said sum of 11 s. 9 d.

WILLIAM HIND . The prisoner was my foreman ; he lived with me a year and a half. I entrusted him to sell goods for me, and to receive the money for my use. On Saturday, the 22nd of February, I sent him out with fancy trimmings; he was to bring me back the money for what he sold.

Q. Had you before been to the customers to desire them to take notice of what he sold them - A. Yes; I suspected him. When he returned on the Saturday he gave me an account in writing of what he sold; he told me he received two shillings of Mrs. Hartley, and that was all he paid me; instead of that, Mrs. Hartley paid eleven shillings and nine-pence. He told me he received only two shillings of her, and that is all he put down in this paper; it is his own hand writing. I had information that he had received more. On the Monday morning I taxed him with it; then he told me to make out my bill of what he had robbed me, and he would pay me.

JEMIMA HARTLEY. I am a widow; a haberdasher and milliner, in High-street, Shadwell.

Q. Do you know Mr. Hind - A. Yes; I have dealt with him some time. I knew the prisoner was servant to Mr. Hind; he has frequently sold me goods. I paid him for them on Saturday, the 22nd of January; I bought a card of buttons, they came to two shillings. I paid him nine shillings and nine-pence besides the two shillings. The nine shillings and nine-pence was for some articles sold to me before.

Prisoner's Defence. It was through distress I did it; I thought of making the money up, and paying my master on Thursday.

GUILTY , aged 56.

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury before Mr. Baron Wood .

232. GEORGE DAVIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of November , a bill of exchange, value 10 l. 1 s. 6 d. the property of Robert Hawkins .

ROBERT GIRTON . I live with Robert Hawkins ; he is a horse-dealer .

Q. On the 5th of November, 1812, did you receive any paper of him - A. Yes; a bill of exchange for ten pounds one shilling and sixpence.

Q. Was the bill due - A. Yes, I went to George Davis 's house; I saw a woman there; she was at the kitchen-window.

Q. Was any body else in the kitchen - A. I saw a man there; I do not know who it was.

Q. What did the woman do - A. I shewed her the bill; she took it out of my hand.

Q. Did you give it her - A. No; I shewed it her. I said, here is the bill; she put her arm out of the window, and took it out of my hand. She told me to go round to the door, and she would give me the bill. I went round to the door; I saw Davis; I asked him for the bill; he said, pugh, pugh, nonsense, and told me to go home. I did not see Davis there when the woman took it.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Dampier.

233. JOSEPH EMERSON was indicted for feloniouslystealing, on the 8th of February , a wooden-till, value 1 s. a three-shilling bank token, an eighteen-penny bank token, a shilling, two penny-pieces, and fifteen halfpence , the property of Daniel Gosling .

HANNAH GOSLING . I am the wife of Daniel Gosling ; I keep a chandlers shop. On the 8th of February, I was in the back parlour, I saw a person come into my shop, which I believe to be the prisoner; he creeped behind the counter, and when he returned to the door he made a start; I went out of doors, and made an alarm that I had missed my till. I had seen my till about a quarter of an hour before I missed it.

Q. What did it contain - A. A three-shilling token, and an eighteen-penny token. After I had made an alarm the prisoner was stopped. The prisoner was out of my sight before he was stopped.

JOHN ROBINS . I stopped the prisoner. I heard the cry of stop thief by some female; I took hold of him, and said my man, what are you going to do with this; he seized me by the collar, and said, I was the man that took the till.

Q. to Prosecutrix. The witness was not the man that stole your till, was he - A. No.

Prisoner's Defence. I never had the till.

GUILTY , aged 15.

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

234. THOMAS SIMKIN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2nd of February , two iron books, value 2 d. and forty-seven pounds weight of mutton, value 20 s. the property of William Allison .

WILLIAM ALLISON . I am a butcher . On the 2nd of February, I locked my shop up at half after ten o'clock at night; I was called up on the morning of the 3rd of February, at four o'clock, by the patrol. I went to my shop; I saw the tiles had been taken off; there was a hole big enough for a man to get in, and four shutters were taken down.

Q. What was taken out of your shop - A. A haunch of mutton, two shoulders, one quarter, and seven smaller pieces; they were hung up in the shop upon hooks, and two iron hooks were gone.

Q. Was there any money in the shop - A. There were six or seven pennyworth of halfpence; they were gone; they were in the drawer. On the 3rd I saw my mutton again at Shadwell office; I knew it to be my mutton.

Q. What was the value of the mutton - A. About thirty shillings.

JOHN SWINLAND . I am a patrol. On the night of the 2nd of February, I met the prisoner; he asked me the way to Bishopsgate-street, he had a bag with him. I asked him what was in the bag; he said, beef; he said a woman employed him to carry it. I took him across the way to a watch-box where there was a light; I told the watchman; he said, he must go to the watchhouse. He threw down the bag and the meat; I pursued him, and took him to the watchhouse. The watchman brought the bag and the meat to the watchhouse. When I brought the prisoner to the watchhouse I saw the bag contained mutton; there was a hind quarter, a haunch, two shoulders, and several small bits, and two hooks also.

Prosecutor. I am sure the mutton was mine; there is no doubt of the books being mine, I cannot swear to them.

Prisoner's Defence. I have been nineteen years serving his Majesty; I get my living by portering, or any thing of this kind. I was employed to carry the meat to the Green Dragon, Bishopsgate-street.

GUILTY , aged 53.

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood .

235. ANN GRIFFITHS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 31st of January , thirteen shillings in monies numbered, the property of Richard Peer , from his person .

RICHARD PEER . I am a cattle-dealer , I live at Crickley, in Wilts. On the evening of the 31st of January, I was passing along by the Gun tavern, Pimlico , the prisoner asked me to give her a glass of gin; I gave her a glass of gin, and while I was drinking a glass of gin she took thirteen shillings out of my pocket; they were three-shillings bank tokens, and two eighteen-penny bank tokens.

COURT. The indictment is thirteen shillings in monies numbered; the pieces of money ought to have been stated.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Dampier.

236. JOHN HOLMES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of February , five shirts, value 15 s. ten handkerchiefs, value 10 s. and two pair of stockings, value 5 s. the property of Henry Wrottesley , esq. and a shawl, value 6 d. the property of Mary Weed , from her person .

MARY WEED . I am a laundress ; I wash for Mr. Wrottesley, of New-inn. On Monday, the 7th of this month, I was going up to Mr. Wrottesley's chambers with this linen, some man was behind me; I felt a pull at the bundle; I turned round, and my bundle was taken away.

Q. Was any of your property taken with it - A. My handkerchief, that contained Mr. Wrottesley's things, three shirts, seven handkerchiefs, two pocket handkerchiefs, and two pair of stockings. These are the things. I saw the property in about a quarter of an hour afterwards; it was brought into the chambers.

HOWARD FRISH . I met with the prisoner in Portugal-street, I took him, because I heard the cry of stop thief. I went with him to Mary Weed , and I gave the bundle the prisoner had to Mary Weed . This is it.

Mary Weed . I can swear to the property; there is Mr. Wrottesley's mark to it all.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going by, at the same time I heard the cry of stop thief called out, some gentleman threw me down; I was going to the master I work for.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Whipped in Jail and discharged.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

237. WILLIAM HAMBLETON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of February , a watch, value 4 l. the property of John Egleton , from his person .

JOHN EGLETON . I live at No. 10, Adam and Eve-court, in the parish of St. Luke's. I was in the public-house in the court a little before one o'clock in the morning, a row ensured in the public-house passage between two girls of the town. I was in the bar at the time, and in consequence of the girls fighting one of them laid in the passage for dead. There were several more people there in the passage. It was a passage leading into the street. The door was shut, and no one assisted the girl that was laying on the floor. I went to assist her up. After I lifted her up the prisoner was on the left hand side of me; he was the only man that was on that side of the passage. I felt my watch go from me; I found it was gone. I looked, and I saw it in the prisoner's hand. I told him to give me the watch, or I would charge the watchman with him. He gave the watch to a female that came up to the door to him; the watchman came in; I gave him charge of the prisoner; the watchman found the watch behind the door where the female put it. The constable has the watch.

ROBERT BOOTH . I am a watchman. I went into this public-house; I found the watch on the steps behind the door. I delivered it to Cleveland the constable. The prosecutor said he had been robbed of his watch by the prisoner; he pointed him out to me. I took him to the watchhouse.

PETER CLEVELAND . This is the same watch I received of Robert Booth .

Prosecutor. It is my watch. It is the watch that was taken out of my fob; I am sure of it.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent of the charge. There were thirty or forty people in the house.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood .

238. WILLIAM STEPHEN BURTON was in- indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of January , seven yards of linen, value 7 s. and fifteen shirts, value 3 l. 15 s. the property of John Deyhin and Ambrose Deyhin ; and WILLIAM LUCAS for receiving the same goods, he knowing them to be stolen .

JOHN DEYHIN . I am an army clothier ; my brother Ambrose is my partner. The prisoner, Burton, has lived with me about seven years. We missed a large quantity of shirts on the 3d. of January. I spoke to Burton on the subject of our less; he said he knew nothing of our loss. On the Saturday before the 19th; I had our porter taken up, and when I had the porter apprehended then Burton acknowledged he had taken them. He said he was very sorry; he had stolen about fourteen dozen; that Lucas brought him into it.

Q. What were these shirts worth a piece - A.Seven shillings a piece.

Q. Was Lucas present when he said this - A. Yes. He said Lucas had given him three pounds for them. Lucas said he had given nine pounds for them. Amsden then took the prisoners into custody. He was there when this was said.

THOMAS AMSDEN . I am an officer. I was present when this conversation took place I have heard what Mr. Deyhin has said; it is true; it all passed.

Burton's Defence. With sorrow and contrition I plead guilty of this charge, and throw myself on the mercy of the court, praying they will take my tender age into consideration. The artful seduction of my fellow prisoner led me into this.

Lucas said nothing in his defence.

BURTON, GUILTY , aged 16.

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

LUCAS, GUILTY , aged 45.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Dampier.

239. THOMAS SMITH and JOHN BEREHAM were indicted for that they, on the 6th of January , unlawfully had in their custody and possession, a certain forged 1 l. bank note, they knowing it to be forged .

To this indictment the prisoners pleaded

GUILTY .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

240. THOMAS SMITH and JOHN BEREHAM were indicted for feloniously forging, on the 6th of January , a bank note for the payment of 1 l. with intention to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England .

Mr. Knapp, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoners were

ACQUITTED .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

241. WILLIAM LEROYD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of January , a promissory note for the payment of 10 l. the property of William Rickford .

And OTHER COUNTS, stating the note to be the property of Messrs. Praed and Co.

THOMAS FELL . I am clerk to William Rickford , the banker , at Aylesbury; his Christian name is William; he trades under the firm of William Rickford and son. He has no son that is a partner. There is no other person in the firm but himself.

Q. On the 8th of January did you make up a parcel to be conveyed to town to Messrs. Praed's - A. I did, of various country bank notes; some small notes of the Bank of England.

Q. Did you make a memorandum of the different notes you put in the parcel - A. Yes. This is the book in which I made the memorandum. It was taken at the time from the bills themselves. I copied the dates and numbers of the notes myself, from the notes.

Q. What was the amount of all that you sent - A.The amount was eight thousand pounds on bills of exchange, notes, and checks.

Q.Look for a note, 7645, of the Chichester bank, ten pound - A.7645, a ten-pound note of the Chichester bank, 4th of April, 1812; payable to bearer at Messrs. Esdaile's and Co.

Q. After you had written the memorandum what did you do with the notes - A. I made them up into a parcel; that note was put into that parcel; the parcel when made up I put into the bank safe in the presence of Henry Thomas , for the purpose of being kept till the next morning, to be sent by the coach to Messrs. Praed's and Co. in Fleet-street, London; the parcel was directed.

Q. Do you know or not whether Mr. Thomas did take that parcel from the safe - A. I know no more I directed it to Messrs. Praed's, in Fleet-street. The direction was my own hand-writing.

Q. Did Mr. Thomas know what was to be done with it the next morning - A. Yes, he had directions what to do with it; he saw it deposited; he was present when I put it in the safe. I wrote the name upon the note of the person from whose servant I took it, so that I shall be able to know the note. I wrote Tuckwell upon the note the day I received it.

HENRY THOMAS . Q. Are you employed in the Aylesbury bank - A. I am.

Q. Did you see Mr. Fell put a parcel in the safe on the 8th of January - A. I did. On the following morning, Sunday morning, I went to the safe and took the same parcel out. I took it about nine o'clock on Sunday morning, or five minutes earlier. I took it out of the safe, and took it to the coach. It is called the Union coach, or Buckingham coach; it inns at the King's Arms, Snow-hill. I took it myself to the coach; I delivered it personally to the coachman. I saw the coachman deposit it in the locker of the seat, and lock it. The coachman's name is Parker.

Q. When you took the parcel out of the safe to take it to the coach was it the same parcel that was sealed up the night before - A. It was the same parcel; it was placed in the safe for the purpose of being taken out in the morning. Parker was the coachman I delivered it to. There is a small locker underneath where the coachman sits; I saw the coachman put the parcel in, and lock it, and then he strapped the cushion on the lid.

JOHN PARKER . I am the coachman of the Buckingham stage. The last witness brought me a parcel on Sunday morning; I put it in the locker underneath my own seat; I put it secure, and locked the box, and kept the key under my seat. I came to London with it.

Q. Did you come to London safe with all the property - A. Yes.

Q. As you supposed - A. I did. I did not unlock the box until I returned to London. I came to the Green Man and Still. I had occasion to take out a parcel there. I unlocked the locker there, and took out a parcel for Ransom and Morley; the parcel was safe then; I had it in my hand; the Aylesbury parcel was safe then; I only pushed it on one side to take Ransom and Morley's. I locked the locker, and left it safe in. Then I came to the King's Arms inn.

Q. When you came to the King's Arms inn, did you find any thing had been done to your locker - A. Not immediately I did not. About ten minutes after I went to the locker to get the parcel; the staple of the locker was wrenched off, and the parcel was gone.

Q. What time did you get to the King's Arms - A. About half past five in the afternoon. It was dark then.

JOHN HAZARD. Q. I believe you are a clerk at the banking-house of Esdaile - A. I was at that time.

Q. On Monday the 10th of January, do you remember any Chichester bank note being produced for payment - A. Yes, about the middle of the day.

Q. Look at the prisoner; is he the man that presented it - A. I have no doubt it was the prisoner that presented it; I am almost sure of it. There were only two or three persons in the shop. I asked the prisoner whether he had given value for it; he said he had, to a person in Smithfield, to either a salesman or a grazier. I took the prisoner into the inner accompting-house, and related the circumstance to Mr. Scott, a partner in the house. The note had been stopped in the morning at nine o'clock. I left the prisoner with Mr. Scott.

MR. THOMAS SCOTT . I am junior partner in the house of Esdaile and Company.

Q. Do you remember the prisoner being brought into the inner accompting-house on the Monday morning - A. I think it was between two and three o'clock in the middle of the day.

Q. Had you received any particular notice not to pay any Chichester bank notes on that day - A. Yes, in the morning. We told the prisoner that note had been stopped; it had been stolen out of a parcel that came from Aylesbury; that it was stopped by Messrs. Praed and Company. We asked the prisoner if he had any objection to go to Mr. Praed's. He said he had none, but he wished to go first to the person from whom he had received it, in Smithfield. Then I sent for James Steers , a ticket porter, whom we employ daily. I delivered the note into James Steers 's hands. I told James Steers to go with the prisoner to Praed's and Company.

COURT. Was not he to go to Smithfield first - A. Not by my desire. I did not tell the ticket porter anything about Smithfield. They went away together, I desiring the prisoner to relate all he knew to Praed and Company, upon the subject.

Q. Look upon the prisoner, and tell me whether you have any doubt that he was the person - A. I strictly think he is; I have no doubt at all of it. I asked him to write his name; I gave him a pen and ink for that purpose; he wrote his name before me, John Simpson , St. John-street, Islington.

Q. Is that the paper - A. Yes, I think it is.

Q. Did he give any other account to you - A. No, not in my presence. There was a gentleman of the name of Jeffries in the office, to whom he had conversation. Mr. Jeffries is here.

MR. JOHN JEFFRIES . Q. You were in the accompting-house at this time - A. I was, when the prisoner was brought into the inner room. I had someconversation with the prisoner when he gave the bill to Mr. Scott. I observed to the prisoner that it was very unpleasant upon a circumstance of that kind to be detained. He said it was so, it could not be helped, or words to that effect. I told him it might be inconvenient to him to spare the time to go up to Mr. Praed's; he said it would be so very much. Nothing more passed between us.

COURT. Did you see him write his name - A. I did; I did not look at it, and he said his name was Simpson.

Q. Had you an opportunity to observe his person - A. Very much so. I have no doubt at all that he is that person.

JAMES STEERS . I am a porter.

Q. On the 10th of January, were you desired at Esdaile's house to accompany the prisoner to some place - A. Yes, I was desired to accompany him to Mr. Praed's in Fleet-street. I left the house to go there. The prisoner said he would go to the person from whom he had received the note, and take the person with him to Mr. Praed's. I went with him towards Smithfield. He first stepped into two public-houses in Long-lane; he went in, but did not make any stay. He turned round into Smithfield, and went into a public-house in Smithfield, the sign of the Lock and Key, or the Key. It is the second public-house on the left hand in Smithfield from Long-lane. He sat down there, and called for a glass of rum and water.

Q. Did he name any person that he was in search of - A. Yes; that was before. I asked him if he knew of whom he received the note; he said he did, his name was Jenkins, a salesman. I asked him if he knew what bankers he used, that he might readily find him. He said he did not. After we went into the public-house he called for a glass of rum and water; he told them to make it good. He pulled out a shilling before the rum and water came. He laid this umbrella on the table. When the rum and water came he paid for it; he drank, and handed it to me; he pulled off his hat, and wiped his face. The next thing, he said I will just step over to Sharp's, the banker, and see if he is there; he is not here; he will be here before the market is over, if he is not there. When he had spoken these words he left his umbrella on the table, and went out. He had not been gone long before I suspected all was not right.

Q. Did you see him again that day - A. No. I waited till between five and six, then I went over to Sharp's with the umbrella in my hand. I did not see him there. I went back to see, that I might not miss him if he did come back. He never did come back that day. This was on the 10th I was sent on the 13th with the officers to a small street in the City-road, to his house I believe. I knew him directly I saw him. I went to apprehend him. The officer was with me.

Q. Did the prisoner say anything to you when you came to his house - A. I told him what had past at Smithfield; he said he knew nothing of it. I told him that he had left the umbrella and the rum and water, and had not come back. He denied ever being with me.

Q. to Mr. Fell. Have you got the note - A. Yes. This is the note.

Mr. Gurney, to Steers. Had you the note - A. Yes. I had it of Mr. Esdaile or of Mr. Scott. I delivered the note at Praed's. I was directed by Mr. Scott not to deliver it up. I took it to Praed's, and brought it back to Esdaile's. At Praed's they sent me for the prisoner's writing. Mr. Nelson was the gentleman in Mr. Praed's office. I put my initials on the note before I parted with it to Mr. Nelson.

Mr. Adolphus, to Mr. Scott. Did you deliver the note which you stopped from the prisoner, to the porter - A. I am not confident whether I did or not; either I or Mr. Esdaile did. It was delivered in my presence.

WILLIAM NELSON . I am a clerk at Messrs. Praed's.

Q. Did you receive a Chichester ten-pound note of the porter - A. I saw it brought there by Steers; I saw it laid on the counter.

Q. to Steers. Look at that note, and see if your initials are upon it - A. Yes. That is the note I received at Esdaile's house and carried to Praed's. I wrote my name upon it at Praed's before I delivered it out of my hands the first time.

Q. to Mr. Fell. Is there any writing of yours upon it - A. Yes, there is Tuckwell.

STEPHEN LAVENDER . I am an officer of Bow-street office.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. I do; I have known him by two names, Wootten and Leroyd. I never knew him by the name of Simpson. I searched the prisoner's house; I found no notes whatever, nor on his person.

Q. to Mr. Fell. How many notes were there in number - A. Near two thousand. - There were some hundreds.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent of the charge which is alledged against me. On Sunday the 9th of January, I was at home all the afternoon. I was very bad with a cold, and was not out of the house.

ELIZABETH CUTLER . My husband's name is John Cutler , he is a stable-keeper in the City-road. On Sunday the 9th of January, the prisoner, Leroyd, came to our house about one o'clock, in the middle of the day.

Q. How far is your house from his - A. About three quarters of a mile. He came about one o'clock, we were just going to dinner. We had a goose that was sent me from Birmingham. I asked him if he would dine off that goose; he said, no, he was going home to dinner; he was very poorly. I asked him how his wife did; he said she was very poorly; she was just put to bed, would I come and see her. I said I would. He went home by himself, and between three and four I went to his house. The nurse let me into his house; she asked me to walk up stairs. He was up stairs with his wife; she on one side of the fire and he on the other. I stopped to tea; as they asked me. We had tea about five o'clock. I stopped there until he went to bed; he went to bed between seven and eight o'clock; he said he could sit up no longer. He appeared to have a cold, and was very hoarse. I am sure from four o'clock until eight he was in the house.

Q. This was Sunday - A. Yes. In three or four days afterwards I heard he was taken up. His wife sent for me; she asked me whether I recollected Mr. Laroyd was at home the Sunday I was there.

(The Chichester ten-pound note read.)

GUILTY , aged 34.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

242. ISRAEL DAVIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of February , a compass, value 5 l. 5 s. the property of Thomas Burley .

THOMAS BURLEY . Q. Did you at any time lose a compass - A. Yes, I did. It was lost from my warehouse.

Q. When was the last time you had seen the compass in your warehouse - A. On the Wednesday, I think; on Thursday I learned it was gone.

SAMUEL MILLER . I am an officer. I searched the prisoner's house in Petticoat-lane, on Wednesday the 9th of February, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon.

Q. Did you see him - A. Yes, and there were three other persons that have been tried; they were charged with stealing sealing wax and pencils. I desired my fellow officer to secure the prisoners while I ran up stairs. I went up stairs; I found this compass up two pair of stairs. I took the prisoner up with me; I asked him how he came by it; he said he bought it the night before of a man for one pound. This is the compass.

Prosecutor. I am sure it is my compass; it was brought to my warehouse on Monday night; I saw it in my warehouse about twelve at noon on Tuesday. I removed the compass myself, and set it on a medicine chest in the middle of the warehouse. Mine is a wholesale warehouse; I sell nothing retail. This compass was for a ship of my own.

Prisoner's Defence. On Tuesday week a sailor came in; he asked me for a lodging; he had a box under his arm; he slept at my house that night; he paid me sixpence for his lodging. On Wednesday morning he asked me to let him leave this box, and on Wednesday the officer came and took me in custody.

MOSES DAVIS . I am the son of the prisoner; I live at No. 5, Meeting-house-yard, Gravel-lane, Houndsditch. My father keeps a clothes-shop, and lives in Petticoat-lane. He lets out lodgings for seafaring men.

Q. Were you at his house when this article was brought in - A. I was; it was brought in by a sailor last Tuesday night week, between seven and eight o'clock. The sailor asked for a lodging; he was accommodated with a lodging; he paid sixpence for a bed. He lodged in the front two pair of stairs room, in a four-bedded room. I slept in the same room the sailor did. I laid hold of one handle of the compass box, and the sailor the other, I helped him up stairs with it. In the room he uncovered it, and shewed me the compass.

Q. Was the compass taken away by him - A. No, I saw it there the next morning; he asked my father to let him leave it there, and he would fetch it away on Thursday.

COURT. What day was your father taken up - A. Wednesday afternoon.

Q. Was there no talk of buying the compass - A. No, not a word.

GUILTY , aged 60.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

243. WILLIAM HARVEY and STEPHEN FRIP were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of January , four sacks, value 11 s. the property of Thomas Hills .

THOMAS HILLS . I am a miller at Bromley in Middlesex .

Q. In your business you have a large quantity of hempen sacks - A. Yes. I lost a great many.

Q. Do you know the prisoner Frip - A. I do; he is a journeyman carpenter ; he has worked at my mill as a carpenter for the last twelvemonth; he had access to the place where the sacks were kept; if he was so disposed he had the means of taking them.

Q. Do you know the prisoner Harvey - A. No. He lodged with Frip, at Stratford, perhaps a mile from my mill.

SAMUEL MILLER . I am an officer. On the evening of the 21st of January last, Freeman and I were in company together in Bromley between seven and eight o'clock; I saw the two prisoners; they were walking towards Poplar from Bromley in company together; each of them had a bundle. I asked them what they had got there. At first they seemed surprized at my stopping them, but upon my pressing them again they said they had some sacks. I asked Harvey where he got them; he said he bought them at a marine store shop in the Borough, he gave four shillings and sixpence a piece for them, he said, four months ago. I asked Frip where he got his; he said the other prisoner was to give him a glass for carrying them. We took them to Bow watchhouse.

Q. Did you there examine them - A. Yes; I found eleven; there are only four here; the others are not marked; only these four were marked I called at Mr. Hills's; he said he had lost a great many sacks. When I stopped the prisoners they were about an hundred yards from the mills, going towards Poplar. These are the sacks.

Prosecutor. There are three of the sacks marked with an S; this sack is marked with a V; I can swear to that positively. I hold in my hand the stamp by which the mark is impressed. I have lost a great many sacks of that mark.

Q. What is the value of these sacks - A. Two shillings and nine-pence each. They are new. I gave five shillings for them.

The prisoners said nothing in their defence.

Frip called five witnesses, who gave him a good character.

HARVEY, GUILTY, aged 34.

Of stealing one sack .

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

FRIP, NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

244. JOHN TAWELL was indicted for that he, on the 28th of January , feloniously, and without lawfulexcuse had in his custody and possession a forged bank note, for the payment of 10 l. he knowing it to be forged .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

245. JOHN TAWELL was indicted for feloniously forging, on the 28th of January , a bank note for the payment of 10 l. with intention to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England .

Mr. Knapp, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

246. WILLIAM SLATFORD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of December , a gelding, value 2 l. and a cart, value 1 l. the property of James Ellis .

JAMES ELLIS . I live at No. 10, Swinton-street, Gray's-inn-lane-road.

Q. Had you a horse and cart on the 25th of December - A. Yes; a dun gelding; I had it ever since the 16th of November. I bought it of the broker in execution of a distress for rent; I paid John Ing , who put the man in possession. John Ing is the landlord of the premises where the horse and cart was seized.

Q. They were seized for rent - A. Yes.

Q. Who was the tenant - A. William Slatford was the tenent; it was his goods that were seized for distress of rent. I paid Mr. Ing three pounds two shillings and sixpence, and then I gave the prisoner twelve shillings and sixpence.

Q. Did the prisoner dispute this - A. Not to me. I settled with Mr. Ing in his presence; the prisoner made no objection. I agreed to let the prisoner have the horse and cart again for the same money; provided he would refund me the money, I would let him have it back again at any time. The horse and cart was delivered to my servant. I told the prisoner he might work for me at three shillings per day, until he could raise the money for the horse and cart. He continued to work for me until the 25th of December, in carting of bricks. He took the horse and cart away an the 25th of December, and sold it. I had overpaid him for his labour according to my books; I desired my man not to advance him no more money for his labour, and then he took the horse and cart away on Christmas day morning. I sent for the prisoner to come to me at the King's Head public-house; he came. I asked him the reason he took the horse and cart away; he said, Mr. Collins would not advance him any more money. I told him to bring the horse and cart back, and if there was any money due to him I would pay him; he said, he would see me b - r first.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood .

247. DANIEL GRIFFITHS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3rd of February , a box, value 1 s. and twenty pounds weight of raisins, value 1 l. the property of Robert Broadhead .

SAMUEL MILLER . I am an officer. On the 3rd of February, between seven and eight o'clock, I stopped the prisoner in Wentworth-street, Whitechapel; he had this box covered up with a great coat; there are raisins in the box. I asked him where he got it; he said, he did not know, he got it of two men in Cheapside; they gave it him to carry into Osborne-street; he said there the two men goes.

RICHARD GARRIN . I am shopman to Robert Broadhead ; he is a grocer , No. 43, Newington Causeway. I was sent on the 3rd of February to Messrs. Warners, in Great East cheap, to get a box of raisins; I got the box of raisins at Messrs. Warners. I put the box into a cart by the Monument, the carter gave me leave; he was going down to Newington. I put it in the cart, and I went over the bridge, and when I come to the cart again it was gone. I have seen the box since; the officer brought it.

Prisoner's Defence. When this gentleman took me with the box the two men that hired me to carry it both ran away; I knew nothing of the robbery myself. He saw them run away.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood .

248. MARY GRAY , alias CARNEY , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 31st of January , eighteen yards of ribbon, value 7 s. 6 d. the property of Thomas Brinson , privately in his shop .

CATHERINE BRINSON . I am the wife of the prosecutor, Thomas Brinson , he is a haberdasher , he lives in the City-road .

Q. Do you remember the prisoner coming into your shop - A. Yes, on the 31st of January, she wanted she said, some ribbon; I asked her what sort of ribbon, was it shoe ribbon; she said, yes. I shewed her the shoe ribbon; she said, that was not what she wanted; she wanted something wider; she bought two yards and a half at eight pence a yard. I suspected her when she bought the ribbon. I said, I missed a piece. She paid me for the ribbon she bought, and then insisted on my returning her the money. She said, she would not have what she bought as I suspected her guilty of a theft. I told her I was certain she had it; she then produced it, and put it on the counter.

Q. What is the value of the ribbon - A. Seven shillings and sixpence, prime cost.

Prisoner's Defence. I knew nothing of the ribbon.

Prosecutrix. She took it from under her mantle, and put it on the counter.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 18.

[The prisoner was recommended to mercy by the jury, on account of her youth.]

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

249. JOHN WOOLFE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of January , four hundred and two numbers of Brown's bible, value 10 l. four numbers of Barclay's dictionary, value 2 s. and sixteen, numbers of Watts's World to Come, value 5 s. the property of Thomas Wright .

THOMAS WRIGHT . I live at Tottenham Hale, in the parish of Tottenham.

Q. Did you give any order for any books - A. Yes, of Mr. Kinnersley, No. 3, Kingsland-place, Hackney-road; they were booked to me at eleven pounds two shillings and a penny. I ordered John Abrahams, Mr. Pratt's waggoner, to call for them on the 14th of January. The books never came to hand. John Abrahams came to me in the evening, and told me he had lost them; somebody had stolen them out of the waggon.

JOHN ABRAHAMS . I am waggoner to Mr. Pratt. On the 14th of January I called at Mr. Kinnersley's for the parcel of books for Mr. Wright. The parcel was delivered to me by Walker, Mr. Kinnersley's man. I received them at half after five o'clock; I saw them safe in the waggon. They were in the waggon better than a quarter of an hour before I missed them. They could not have dropped out of the waggon.

HENRY HANCOCK . I am foreman to Mr. Kinnersley. I packed up the numbers for Mr. Wright; the whole of them was five hundred and sixty-three in the gross, of different numbers, Brown's bible, Barclay's dictionary, and Watt's World to Come.

Q. What was the value of them - A. Eleven pound two shillings and a penny. I then directed them for Thomas Wright , Tottenham Hale.

ANDREW WALKER . I am clerk to Mr. Kinnersley. I delivered Mr. Wright's parcel to John Abraham 's, for Mr. Wright.

SAMUEL MILLER . I am an officer. I searched Samuel Jonas 's house in Gravel-lane, Houndsditch; I found these numbers; I asked him where he got them.

SAMUEL JONES . Q. Where did you get these books that Miller took from your house - A. I bought them of Mr. Dukeworth, a master baker, in Somers Town. They were sold to me as waste paper.

THOMAS DUKEWORTH . I am a baker, 67, in Wilson-street, Somers Town. I bought the numbers of Woolfe, the prisoner, as waste paper, on the 16th of January; I sold it to Jonas on the Tuesday following as waste paper.

Miller. I searched Jonas's premises on the 26th. The prisoner is a baker; he lives in Charlotte-street, Hoxton.

Q. to Abrahams. How far from Hoxton was it when you lost this parcel - A. About a mile and a half.

Q. to Dukeworth. On the 14th of January had you a supper with the prisoner - A. I had, with a few friends, at the White Hart, in the Coal-yard, Drury-lane. The prisoner was one of the party. When the prisoner has not work enough to do he goes out to work. He is a baker. I have paid him eleven shillings for jobbing for me. I know of my own knowledge that he was at work for Mr. Gregory on the 14th, 15th, 16th, and 17th of January. The prisoner came to the White Hart, and staid there until half after ten o'clock, and on the 14th of January I saw him about three o'clock working in Mr. Gregory's bakehouse. I went there to invite him to the supper.

Q. to Hancock. Look at the books and see whether they are the same that you packed up - A. Yes, these are the same.

Prisoner's Defence. On the 14th of January, a woman came into my shop, she said she was very poor; her husband was in trouble for debt. She said she had been taking in these numbers of the bible; she could not afford to keep them by her, if I could purchase them of her it would be of great service to her. I offered her four pounds for them. She said she kept a chandler's shop, she would take part in bread. I gave her three pounds fifteen shillings in money, and five quartern loaves. I have some knowledge of the woman, although I cannot say who she is.

JOSEPH GREGORY . I am a baker, in Golden-lane.

Q. Had you a man of the name of Dorsetter that worked for you - A. Yes, he is here; he worked with me. In January last I had an inflammation in my eyes; I applied to Woolfe to assist me; he came and assisted me four days; he came on the 13th of January, 14th and 15th, and on Sunday the 16th, he came and set a batch. On the 14th he came between eleven and twelve o'clock; he dined and drank tea with me; he staid until near a quarter after seven. I was invited to go to a supper at the White Hart in the Coal-yard, Drury-lane; I declined going, my eyes being so bad. The prisoner went about a quarter after seven.

Q. Can you state that the prisoner, Woolfe, was at your house on the 14th of January - A. I have taken my oath he was; he left me a quarter after seven.

JOHN DORSETTER . In January, I was a journeyman with Mr. Gregory, and on the 14th of January John Woolfe came between eleven and twelve, and staid until between seven and eight.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood .

250. GEORGE HODGES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of February , two coats, value 1 l. a pair of pantaloons, value 5 s. two waistcoats, value 7 s. a snuff-box, value 5 s. two tickets, value 3 s. a neck handkerchief, value 3 s. a silk handkerchief, value 7 s. a 1 l. bank note, and seven shillings in monies numbered, the property of John Tennant , in the dwelling-house of Jane Colborn , widow.

JOHN TENNANT . I am an hair dresser ; I live in widow Jane Colborn 's house, Woburn-place, in the parish of St. George's, Bloomsbury .

Q. On the 7th of February, what time in the evening did you go out - A. About half past eleven o'clock. I left the street door on the latch; there was one of the lodgers wanted to come in; that was my order; and my own room door was upon the latch.

Q. On the 8th did you miss any thing out of your room - A. I did, two coats, value one pound; two waistcoats, value five shillings; a hat, value seven shillings; a neck handkerchief, value three shillings; and a silk handkerchief, value seven shillings. There was a one pound note in the pantaloons pocket. A pair of pantaloons, value four shillings, and seven shillings in silver, I saw the note in the pantaloons pocket on the Sunday evening. I saw my things when I went to bed last. They were the things I had on the Monday. I saw my things again on the Tuesday at Mr. Brooks's, the pawnbroker's.

JOHN BROOKS . I live in High-street. On the morning of the 8th, about nine o'clock, the prisoner pledged a hat, two coats, and two waistcoats, for eight shillings. The prosecutor came in an hour after, and claimed them. The prisoner came the next morning, and offered me a handkerchief to pledge. I sent for a constable, and had him taken in custody. The snuff-box was found on the prisoner, and two duplicates in the snuff-box.

Prisoner's Defence. On the day stated in the indictment, as I was going up Oxford-street I was accosted by a man that appeared as a man that dealt in clothes; he shewed me the things in the indictment. I gave him twelve shillings for them, and being in want of money I pledged them for eight shillings, and the next morning going to the same place to pledge a handkerchief I was apprehended. Is it likely that I knew the things had been stolen? No. if I had I should not have gone there again in the course of a few hours. I am innocent of the charge.

GUILTY, aged 24.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Transported for Seven Years

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Dampier.

251. SAMUEL LYONS , CHARLES MATTHEWS , and JOHN NIGHTINGALE , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of January , a handkerchief, value 5 s. the property of Robert Hurley Goodhall , from his person .

ROBERT HURLEY GOODHALL . I am a broker ; I live in St. Swithin's-lane. I lost a handkerchief on the 21st of January on London-bridge .

Q. Had you been to Cheapside - A. I had; I was returning towards London-bridge; at the time my handkerchief was taken away I felt something shuffle behind me; I turned round, and felt in my pocket; I found my handkerchief gone. I turned round before I got out of the crowd; I observed the prisoner Lyons by me. That is all I know of this business except speaking to the handkerchief.

BENJAMIN JOHNSON . I am a city constable.

Q. Do you know the persons of the three prisoners - A. I do; I know them well. On the 21st I assisted in apprehending them. On the 21st I saw them first in Cheapside about an hour before this matter happened. There is a picture shop at the corner of Honey-lane-market; I saw the three prisoners there. I followed them from there to London-bridge; on London-bridge they came near Mr. Goodhall; he was looking through the ballustrades. I kept out of their sight as much as I could. I saw Matthews and Lyons go close up to the prosecutor. Nightingale stood and leaned on the shoulders of Matthews and Lyons.

Q. In the situation he stood he covered the other prisoners - A. Yes, so as we should not see their hands; it is what we call cloaking them. I saw Matthews and Lyons draw from the gentleman's pocket a handkerchief, which appeared to me to be a yellow one. I then requested Mr. Hawkins and Matthews to come over with me; I told them they had got it. We immediately went over. I saw the gentleman feel in his pocket after I said they had got it. Matthews took hold of one, Hawkins took hold of another, and I took the third. We seized one each of us.

Q. Did you find the handkerchief - A. We did; the prisoner Lyons dropped it. I saw the handkerchief in Lyons's hand, and Hawkins seized it when he dropped it. Upon our seizing them I told them I had been watching them some time, and they must come with us.

Q. Did you take them before magistrate - A. We did; it was just before two o'clock in the day time; we took them before the Lord Mayor. I called to the prosecutor; he went with us to the Mansion House. Hawkins has kept the handkerchief ever since.

JOHN LACEY HAWKINS . Q. On the 21st of January what did you observe - A. I first saw the three prisoners on London-bridge.

Q. Did you know the prisoners before - A. Not at that time, only two of them.

Q. When did you see Mr. Goodhall first - A. Not till he extricated himself out of the crowd. I saw Nightingale between the other two prisoners as Johnson has described, leaning upon their shoulders, covering them. Lyons was in the act of going away. Lyons singled himself from the persons that were there. Lyons got out of the crowd the moment Mr. Goodhall put his hand to his pocket. I saw Lyons confused; I catched hold of him from that circumstance. I looked round on my right side; I saw Lyons throw the handkerchief from his right side. I saw him move his arm from his pocket, and I saw him throw the handkerchief on the ground; I picked it up.

Q. Did he ever escape from you - A. No. I am as clear as possibly I can be that the handkerchief fell from Lyons. He singled himself out from the other people that were there. They were taken to the Mansion House, and committed. I have kept the handkerchief ever since. This is the handkerchief.

Mr. Adolphus. Which of the men did you know - A. Matthews and Nightingale.

CHARLES MATTHEWS . I am a City officer. I saw two of the prisoners first in Gracechurch-street; I cannot say I saw the third until Hawkins laid hold of him. The third passed me on Fish-street-hill. I saw Mr. Goodhall after the handkerchief had been taken from him. I apprehended Nightingale. I saw Hawkins pick up the handkerchief. He picked up the handkerchief close to the right side of the man whom he had seized.

Q. to Prosecutor. Is that the handkerchief that was taken from your pocket on the 21st - A. It is. I have had it a twelvemonth.

Lyons' Defence. I am innocent of it. I was going over the bridge.

Nightingale's Defence. I was not near the other prisoners at the time.

Matthews's Defence. I never knew of the transaction until I saw the handkerchief produced by one of the constables.

Lyons called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Lyons, GUILTY , aged 24.

MATTHEWS, GUILTY , aged 50.

NIGHTINGALE, GUILTY , aged 30.

Transported for Life .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

252. GEORGE SMITH was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Alexander Jardine, about the hour of nine in the night of the 9th, February , and stealing therein, a pair of shoes, value 10 s. the property of Alexander Jardine ; and ELIZABETH WAYTE , for feloniously receiving on the same day the same goods, she knowing them to be stolen .

ALEXANDER JARDINE . I am a shoemaker ; I live at 63, Sun-street, Bishopsgate-street . I rent the whole house.

Q. Did you lose a pair of shoes any time - A. Yes, on the 9th of February, about nine in the evening; at that time I was in the act of serving a customer; I heard the window make a great crash. I went to the door, and saw the people had gathered round the window that had been broken.

Q. Are you sure the window was whole before that - A. There was a bit broken out at the bottom; it would admit a finger. The window was whole otherwise than that.

Q. Was the hole large enough to draw a pair of shoes through - A. No, it was not.

Q. How lately before had you observed it - A. I was before it almost all the evening. We examined the shoes immediately, and found some shoes were gone from the window.

Q. Before you heard this crush was there any shoes near enough that by breaking that pane of glass any person might draw them out - A. Oh, yes. There was one pair taken away, and the second pair I found on the pavement opposite of where the glass was broken.

Q. Then one pair had been carried away, and the other pair had dropped on the pavement - A. Yes, close under the window.

Q. Did you see any person near when you came out - A. I did not see them that did it.

Q. Did you recover your shoes again - A. Yes, the next morning, between nine and ten o'clock. Elizabeth Wayte brought them to my shop. The boy was in custody then. I went to Elizabeth Wayte 's house the same morning. I saw her. It is a house where they buy old iron and rags. I asked her if she knew any thing of a pair of shoes she bought last night. She seemed confused, and desired me to come in. She acknowledged she had done wrong, and begged me to excuse her. I told her I did not know it was in my power to do so; the boy was in custody. In about half an hour after that she brought me the shoes.

Q. Your house is in Sun-street, in the city of London - A. Yes. Elizabeth Wayte 's house is in Holywell-street, Shoreditch; that is in the county of Middlesex.

JOHN SALMON . I am a servant to Mr. Jardine. I went to look after those that had done the depredation; I met the prisoner, George Smith , in Half-moon-street, about a quarter of a mile from our house. I asked him whether he had got the shoes; I told him he had better tell me who had got them. He took me to Mrs. Wayte's shop; I told Mrs. Wayte the boy said he sold the shoes there for two shillings; she denied it. The boy said to her, you did, and I brought you a loin of pork to sell, you would not give me my price for it. I went away. She said she had not bought the shoes; the boy said she had.

SMITH, GUILTY, aged 11.

Of stealing, but not of breaking and entering the dwelling-house.

Judgment respited .

WAYTE, NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

253. SAMUEL GREENWOOD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of February , ten yards of printed calico, value 1 l. the property of James Ayre and William Ayre .

JAMES AYRE . I am a linen-draper and warehouse-man . William Ayre is my partner. Our shop is 37, Cannon-street .

HUGH MAUD. I am a servant to Messrs. Ayres. On last Wednesday evening, between six and seven o'clock, I was in the shop secreted behind a pile of carpets. The door was put to, but not fastened. I was watching, expecting something would be done amiss. The prisoner came in and took a piece of print from the window, close to the door. He turned round, and was in the act of decamping with it; I rushed upon him, and laid hold of him by the collar. He said he tumbled into the shop. A constable was sent for; he was secured. This is the printed calico; there is ten yards of it; it cost two shillings a yard; it is Messrs. Ayres property.

Prisoner's Defence. I slipped down against the door; he put this piece of goods into my hand as I came up against the door; he put a pistol to my head and swore he would blow my brains out.

GUILTY, aged 17.

Judgment respited .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

254. ABRAHAM ABRAHAMS was indicted for that he, on the 16th of January , unlawfully did utter to William Scarlett , a counterfeit token for the payment of three shillings, he knowing it to be false and counterfeited .

SECOND COUNT, for like offence, stating that the token was made to resemble in form a good token issued by the Governor and Company of the Bank of England.

WILLIAM SCARLETT . I am a seaman ; I lodge in Whitechapel at present. On Sunday the 16th of January, I went to my agents, and my agent gave me only a shirt, a pair of trowsers, and a pair of stockings, and as I was going along Leadenhall-street with the clothes in my hand. I saw the prisoner; he is a Jew; he asked me if I would sell them; we agreed for the price; he said he would give me nine shillings for them. He asked me if I could change a one-pound note. I said, no. He took me up a court in Leadenhall-street, as if to get the money. He returned, and gave me three three-shilling pieces. I put them into my pocket. In about half an hour after I went to Mr. Williams's public-house in Maid-lane in the Borough; I called for a pint of beer; Mr.Williams said all the three three-shilling tokens were bad. He gave me in charge of an officer. I told the officer how I came by them, and described the person of the man that gave them me, and where he was to be found in Leadenhall-street. I found the prisoner again. The prisoner had a basket selling oranges when he was taken in custody. It was the same basket I had seen him with before. I am sure he is the man.

JOHN WILLIAMS . I keep the Dyer's Arms public-house, Maid-lane, in the Borough. On Sunday the 16th of January, in the afternoon, the last witness came to my house; he called for a pint of porter; he gave me a three-shilling bit. I looked at it. I said, it is a bad one; he offered me a second, that was as bad as the first, and then the third, that was bad also. These are two of the three that he offered me; I marked them to know them again; the third three-shilling piece a young man cut it in two with a hatchet. He said he had them of a Jew selling oranges in Leadenhall-street.

JOHN GOFF . I am an officer. On Sunday the 16th of January, I was sent for to apprehend Scarlett. I searched him; he had no money whatever. He told me he took the three three-shilling tokens of a Jew near the India house selling oranges; he said he should know the Jew was he to see him. I and Scarlett went to Leadenhall-street, and at the place he described we did not find him. We went nearer Aldgate. I told him when he saw the man to give me a signal; he gave me a signal, and I took the prisoner into custody. We took the prisoner into the Mitre public-house, Aldgate. The basket the prisoner then had answered the description Scarlett had before given me; it was an oval basket. I searched him and found on him silver that was all good. I then took him towards the Compter; in Leadenhall-street he struggled, and tried to get away from me.

MR. HOMERSHAM. These three-shilling tokens are counterfeit and bad; they all came from the same die; they do not appear to have been in circulation. They are made to resemble the genuine three-shilling bank tokens.

Mr. Adolphus addressed the jury in behalf of the prisoner.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

255. CHARLES BLACKWELL and TIMOTHY TIMMS were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of January , half a bushel of oats, value 18 d. the property of James Hart .

WILLIAM HOLLAND . I am a servant to Mr. Hart, he is a proprietor of coaches at High Wickham. The property charged to be stolen in the indictment was stolen at Uxbridge . Blackwell was the keeper of master's horses ; Timms was not a servant to master; he lived at Hillingdon. On the day stated in the indictment I saw Timms and Blackwell go to the stable; Blackwell opened the door. Timms had a large stick in his hand; he laid it against the door. Timms then took up a basket, and Blackwell filled it out of master's corn bin. Timms laid a large handkerchief on the top of the basket, and put corn into the handkerchief, and tied the corn up. The handkerchief was inclosed in the basket between the handles. He came out of the stable after he had got the corn, the oats. He put the stick through the handles, and put the basket and handkerchief on his shoulder. I came up to them; I asked them what they had got there; they said they had got anything what they could catch. I said, that is my master's property, you had better take it back again. I took a sample of it; they were black and white oats. I said, no wonder my master's horses die on the road, and that they deserved hanging.

JAMES HART. I am a proprietor of coaches; I live at High Wickham; I have stables at Uxbridge. In consequence of Rolland's information I had the two prisoners taken before the magistrate. The prisoner, Timms, said Mimford gave him the corn.

- MIMFORD. I am a corn and coal porter; I live about a mile from Uxbridge. I never gave Timms any corn in all my life. I never had any to give him.

BLACKWELL, GUILTY , aged 60.

Confined 1 year in the house of correction , whipped in jail .

TIMMS, GUILTY , aged 60.

Whipped in Jail and discharged.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

256. THOMAS WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of January , eighteen books, value 10 l. the property of Thomas Walker .

SECOND COUNT, the property of John William .

THIRD COUNT, the property of Richard Rees .

And FOURTH COUNT, the property of William Curtis .

RICHARD REES . I am a bookseller ; I live in Cranbourn-alley.

Q. Had you an order from Mr. Curtis, of Plymouth - A. I had.

Q. On the 27th of January, did you pack up any books to go to Mr. Curtis - A. There was a parcel packed up by my man to send to Mr. Curtis; they were examined prior to their being packed up, and by me. I saw the parcel after they were packed up. They were to go to the Cannon coffee-house, Charing Cross, to be forwarded by the Exeter coach. They were directed to Mr. William Curtis , Plymouth. I shall know the books when produced.

WILLIAM DAVIS . I am a porter at the Cannon coffee-house, Charing-cross. On the 27th of January, I received a parcel directed for Mr. William Curtis , Plymouth. I gave it to the guard of the Exeter coach; I saw him put it in the hind boot. That is all I had to do with it.

THOMAS WALKER . I am guard to the Exeter coach. I received the parcel of the last witness on the 27th of January, at six o'clock in the evening. It was directed to Mr. William Curtis , bookseller, Plymouth. I put it into the hind boot. It went with the coach from town to Kensington. At Kensington I had occasion to speak to the coachman about some tolls, I got on the roof of the coach; I was alarmed by some boys. I got down; I saw a parcel and a box was gone. They throwed the box into a ditch; I recovered the box, but not the parcel.

Q. Do you know the persons you pursued - A. No.

Q. You lost from your boot a box and a parcel - A. I did; the box I recovered again. I saw but one man.

RICHARD WESTBROOK . I am a Bow-street patrol. I was on duty this evening at Kensington; I met the prisoner and two more men about two hundred yards this side of Kensington turnpike; the three men passed me. I thought I knew the prisoner; I said to my brother officer that was with me, there are three thieves going along the road; and before we crossed the road we saw a small cart walking by the side of a waggon. We followed the waggon. We saw the guard of the waggon; he said he had some suspicion they were going to rob the waggon. Just before they got into Kensington the cart stopped, and the waggon went on. I directly saw two of the men cross out of the foot-path; they went towards the cart; they had some little conversation. I said to Mills, there is something coming. I heard something coming through Kensington. He said he did; and as soon as ever the coach came by (it turned out to be the Exeter coach) the prisoner and the other man jumped from the cart when the coach past. The prisoner and the other man followed the coach as fast as they could run. They had not run far before one of the three men was up on the coach, in the boot; the other men were following. I heard something fall from the coach, where the men in the bottle-green coat was. I said to Miles, stop; he did. We board the parcel drop close to the wheel.

Q. What time of night was it - A. About ten minutes before seven o'clock. It was a wet night, dark, and not many people on the road. Directly I saw the prisoner pick up the parcel I jumped from the footpath and took him into custody. I said to him, I know you, none of your tricks, if you do I will cut your ear off. I directly drawed my cutlass. I took the prisoner into the Adam and Eve public-house; I searched him; he had a knife, one shilling, and a watch upon him. I left the prisoner in Miles's custody.

Q. What cart was it - A. A light jockey cart, with a very good horse indeed to it. I think we had some moon at the time.

Q. How long before you saw somebody following the coach had you seen these three men together - A. Not ten minutes.

Q. Did they get into the cart - A. No, they went and talked to the men in the cart. This is the parcel I took from the prisoner's shoulder.

Q. to Mr. Rees. Look at the parcel - A. This is the parcel I sent to Mr. Curtis, of Plymouth; they are my property.

Prisoner's Defence. I was returning from Brentford; that gentleman took me into custody. I was not in the coach, nor in the middle of the road, nor had I the parcel on my shoulder.

GUILTY , aged 32.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

257. WILLIAM HOWARD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of January , a pair of breeches, value 15 s. and a waistcoat, value 5 s. the property of John Hawkins .

JOHN HAWKINS . I am a porter ; I lodge at the Sun public-house, Mayfair , and the prisoner lodged there. I saw my things on the Saturday morning; I missed them on Monday morning, the 29th of January.

Q. What makes you charge the prisoner with taking the property - A. I lost my things from my room. I have a room to myself. The prisoner was back with his rent; the landlady asked him for the rent; he said he would pay her at night. I found my things at the pawnbrokers.

JAMES GILLMORE . On the 31st of January, I and Pace executed a search warrant on the prisoner. The prisoner opened his box, and took something out privately; I took it from him; it was a duplicate of the property.

WILLIAM GOUGH . I am a servant to Mr. Mulcaster, a pawnbroker. I produce the property. The ticket that Gillman produced, a waistcoat and breeches, the prisoner pawned them.

Prosecutor. They are my property, I am sure of it.

Prisoner's Defence. It is my first offence. I should be glad to go to sea.

GUILTY, aged 27.

Judgment respited .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

258. FRANCIS STECKTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of February , a gouge, value 7 s. and two squares, value 4 s. the property of John Morris .

JOHN MORRIS . I am a carpenter . On the 3d of February I left work at night, and left my tools in the building. I was at work in Maid-lane, in Paddington parish . In the morning, when I went to work, I lost my tools. I saw them again on the Saturday.

MR. HALL. On the 5th of February the prisoner came and offered me a gouge and two squares to pledge; I stopped the prisoner.

Prosecutor. This is my gouge and my two squares. I gave seven shillings for the gouge, and four shillings for the two squares.

Prisoner's Defence. On Thursday the 3d of February, I bought the tools in Orchard-street of a man who had a basket of tools to sell; I gave three shillings for them.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Confined 1 year in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

259. AUGUSTUS TRAVERSO was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of February , a silver fork, value 7 s. the property of John Pagliano .

JOHN PAGLIANO . I keep an hotel in Leicester-square . I lost a silver fork three weeks ago yesterday.

CHARLES TAYLOR . I live with Mr. Steward, pawnbroker, Chiswell-street. The prisoner came to me this day three weeks with a silver fork to sell; there was an engraving on it. I suspected he had not come honestly by it. The prisoner was told tocome again. He came again on the next day, and he came on another day, and then I took him in custody.

EDWARD TRING . I took the prisoner into custody. The prisoner told me he had this fork of a surgeon that came from on board a ship.

Prosecutor. It is like all the rest I have got; it is my property. The fork is marked Mandarin, Leicester-square; that is the name of the person that kept the house before I did.

Prisoner's Defence. I got this fork of Signior Viandi in Leadenhall-street; he said he came from the West Indies. I thought of getting Signior Viandi to come with me to the pawnbrokers, in order that he might be detained. I am a Spaniard.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

260. ESTHER WHEELER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of January , a watch, value 4 l. the property of Jacob Hetherall , from his person .

JACOB HETHERALL . I am book-keeper at the Castle and Falcon inn, Aldersgate-street. On the 27th of January, in the evening, I went into the Eagle and Child public-house, St. Martin's-le-grand; I called for a glass of rum. I sat down at a table where the prisoner and others were sitting; I asked the prisoner to partake of the rum and water, as she sat next to me, and when I drank a drop I paid for it, and went out, and she followed after me. We got into conversation together until we came to Dean's-court, and at Dean's-court two men were going backwards and forwards. I asked her if she knew who the men were. They passed arm in arm together before us. When we came to Dean's-court we stood and talked together; my watch fell on my shoes; whether she took it out of my fob I cannot say.

Q. Perhaps your breeches were loose at the time - A. No, they were not. I picked it up, and put it in my coat pocket; she took it out of my coat pocket, and ran away with it.

JURY. Did not you run after her - A. No, I did not. She was gone out of my sight in a minute. I cannot say which way she took.

Q. Could not you overtake her - A. No, I missed her. I went back to the house, and asked if they knew her; they said, yes. I gave the officer orders to take her up. He found her on the Saturday night afterwards.

COURT. Are you sure that she put her hand into your pocket - A. Yes, I am quite sure of it. There was nobody nigh but she and me.

JOSEPH BARNES . I am a constable. On Saturday evening I took the prisoner into custody. Mr. Hetherall said, that is the woman, and nobody else. The prisoner said, I did not do it, I know the two young men, I may get the ticket for him.

COURT, to Prosecutor. Were the two young men near you when she took it - A. No, there was nobody but she and me together at the time.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

261. JOSEPH BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of February , a great coat, value 10 s. the property of James Hampton .

JAMES HAMPTON . I am a carman . I lost my coat on Wednesday morning. I was in the New-road, St. George's . I had four horses in the waggon; I throwed my great coat on one of the horses while I unloaded my potatoes in the New-road, and when I was rising a sack of potatoes a young man came and said, had not you a coat on one of the horses; I said, yes; he said, a man has taken it, and ran down the street with it. I pursued the prisoner, and I saw my great coat under his arm.

CHARLES GILLING . I am a butcher. On Wednesday morning I was standing in my shop, I saw the prisoner run away with the great coat from off one of the horses. I went and told the waggoner of it. The waggoner and I pursued him. I called out, stop thief. The prisoner dropped the coat. The prosecutor stopped the prisoner. I am sure the prisoner is the man.

GEORGE THORNTON . I am a potatoe-dealer. The prosecutor came to my door with some potatoes; he put his coat on one of the horses while he was unloading the waggon. I saw the prisoner looking into the warehouse with an empty bag under his arm. The butcher came over, and said he had taken his coat off one of the horses. We all pursued. I did not see the prisoner until he was taken. I am sure the prisoner is the same man that was at my warehouse.

FRANCIS JACKSON . On Wednesday morning, the prisoner was given into my custody. This is the coat.

Prosecutor. That is the coat that I lost from off the horse.

GUILTY , aged 50.

Confined 1 year in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

262. JAMES BUTLER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 5th of February , two boots, value 30 s. the property of George Wright .

GEORGE WRIGHT . I am a boot and shoemaker ; I live at No. 10, May's-buildings, St. Martin's-lane . I lost my boot on Saturday the 5th of February. I was not at home at the time they were taken. I know they are my boots; they are two odd boots.

GEORGE FOBS. I saw the prisoner take the boots; they were hanging up outside of the window. I was in a shop opposite; I saw him take them from the window. I pursued him, and overtook him in the next buildings. He told me he had not got the boots. He begged me to let him go. I told him I would take him back to Mr. Wright's house; he said, as I thought proper. A boy picked up the boots, and brought them. I saw the prisoner take them; I did not see him drop them.

JOHN DAVIS . I am the beadle of Lambeth parish. On the 31st of January the prisoner was brought to our workhouse by an order; he was brought there as an insane person; he was put under the care of a person that always takes care of the insane persons. He got over the wall. He was afterwards sent to Mr. Warburton's madhouse, Bethnal-green.

JOHN RHODES . I belong to Mr. Warburton's, Bethnal-green. I know the prisoner was sent to our house as a lunatic on the 2nd of February; he remained there until the 5th; he then got over the wall by the help of another patient. He was considered as an insane person.

GEORGE LANE . I am clerk to Mr. Folkard, an attorney. The prisoner was with Mr. Folkard; he conducted himself as an honest sober man. He left us in September twelvemonth. When he went, I understood he entered as a soldier in the name of Wilson, and he obtained his discharge in the name of Wilson on account of insanity.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

263. MARY COOMBE and HANNAH BROWN were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of January , twenty-two yards of ribbon, value 16 s. the property of Charles Robinson .

CHARLES ROBINSON . I live at 48, Red-lion-street . I am a haberdasher, hosier, and glover . On the 11th of January, about eleven o'clock in the day, Hannah Brown , a stranger, and Mary Coombe came to my shop; they asked to look at some ribbons; I shewed them some. The woman that came with Hannah Brown and Mary Coombe covered the ribbons over in the ribbon drawer with a bonnet; seeing that, I suspected they were going to take ribbon; one of their hands was under her bonnet, and with the other hand drawing the ribbon over the bonnet, seeing how the ribbon would look upon the bonnet, and in about a quarter of an hour they fixed on a ribbon. I cut the ribbon off, and gave it her, and they offered me a dollar; I refused the dollar, not thinking it good.

Q. What was the ribbon to come to - A. About ten-pence halfpenny. Then Hannah Brown went out of the shop, and said she would get change. She returned, and gave me a shilling. I took for the ribbon, and they went out of the shop; and after folding up the ribbon and placing the drawer, then appeared two vacancies in the drawer, as if two pieces of ribbon had been taken out. It struck me that they had taken them. The two prisoners came about one o'clock again, and asked to look at some ribbons again. I asked them, what sort; they said, it is not material. I shewed them a different drawer to what they had out the first time. They covered the second drawer with the bonnet, the same as they did the first. I cut them off the quantity they wished; they paid for it, and left the shop. I told Elizabeth Dimes if they came the third time to keep a sharp look out, and if she saw them take any ribbon to give me a nod, and say, yes, as I had suspected them twice; then between four and five o'clock, just at dusk, the two prisoners came again; then after they had been looking at the ribbons a quarter of an hour, Elizabeth Dimes nodded, and said, yes. I then went across the shop, and asked Hannah Brown to give me the ribbon that belonged to me that she had taken. She said she had not taken any. I moved her a little further, and picked up on the shop floor one piece of ribbon, and suspecting they had more about them I sent the boy to Hatton Garden office for an officer. Wood came; he searched them, and, I believe, did not find any thing on them. I gave him the ribbon, and he took them into custody.

ELIZABETH DIMES . I am shopwoman to Mr. Robinson. The two prisoners came in between four and five, and asked to look at some ribbons; I shewed them some. Mary Coombe took her bonnet off, and put it on the ribbon drawer. I saw her put two pieces of ribbon into the crown of her bonnet; one piece she gave to Hannah Brown , and when she took her bonnet off the other piece fell to the ground. I saw her give one piece to Hannah Brown , and I saw it in Hannah Brown 's hand afterwards. Hannah Brown seemed confused afterwards, and let it fall to the ground. Then they had a yard and a half of ribbon cut off, which came to eleven pence farthing; they gave me a shilling; I gave them the change. Brown dropped the halfpence; she went to pick them up; I said, yes, yes. Mr. Robinson understood me; he came and picked up one piece of ribbon.

Q. You are sure that you saw Mary Coombe put two pieces into her bonnet - A. Yes, and give one of them to Brown.

GEORGE WOOD . I am an officer. I was sent for to take the prisoner into custody. The ribbon was delivered to me; I produce it.

Prosecutor. I am certain it is my ribbon; it has my mark to it.

Coombe's Defence. I bought a yard a half of ribbon; I gave the lady eighteen pence. She picked the ribbon off the floor; the gentleman accused me of taking it.

Brown's Defence. I never saw the other prisoner before.

COOMBE, GUILTY , aged 18.

BROWN, GUILTY , aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

264. JOSEPH FARLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of January , four three-shilling bank tokens , the property of Thomas Fisher .

THOMAS FISHER . I keep an eating-house , 137, Long-alley, Moorfields . The prisoner was a lodger of mine. I have lost money out of my till several times. After having missed three three-shilling tokens I marked five three-shilling bank tokens, and put them in the till. That was on a Tuesday afternoon; and on Saturday the 29th of January I missed one of the marked three-shilling pieces out of the till. I then sent for an officer. I charged the prisoner with having taken it. The prisoner then took the three-shilling piece out of his breeches, and gave it me; he then said he had never taken any other. This is the three-shilling piece; it has a F marked on it; that is my mark.

SAMUEL COX. I was present at the time; I saw the prisoner take the three-shilling token out of his breeches and gave it to Mr. Fisher.

Prisoner's Defence. I saw the three-shilling piece on the edge of the counter; I gave the three-shilling; piece to the prosecutor. He said he would not prosecute me if I would give him a pound note.

GUILTY , aged 58.

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

265. RICHARD MILLS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of February , a watch, value 2 l. the property of Robert Gibbs .

ROBERT GIBBS. I am a ship-carpenter ; I follow my time at sea. I lost my watch on Thursday the 3d of February, I lost it from my own apartment, No. 1, Black-raven-court, Leadenhall-street . The prisoner was a seaman with me twenty-six months in my last voyage. The prisoner came that day to see me. I asked him to stop and have some dinner with me. I had occasion to go out for some tobacco; I pulled out my watch; it wanted twenty minutes to six o'clock. I laid the watch on the table, and was looking for my other watch, and during the time I was looking for the other watch the prisoner went out. I then missed the watch I had laid on the table. I listened, and heard him below stairs, in the taproom. I went down, and catched hold of him; I asked him where my watch was; he gave it me. I then gave him in charge of a constable, and the watch to the constable.

JOHN TURNBRIDGE. This is the watch.

Prosecutor. It is my watch what I took out of the prisoner's hand.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in liquor at the time.

GUILTY , aged 17.

Judgment respited, to go to Sea .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

266. JOHN THOMAS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of January , a mahogany dining-table, value 2 l. the property of John Stidson .

JOHN STIDSON . I am a broker , No. 9, Artillery-ground. On the 26th of January, I was alarmed; I pursued the prisoner, and stopped him with the table; he said, if I have done wrong I will take it back again. He said he was carrying it for another man. I saw him carrying the table some distance from my house. The table stood out in the street near five yards from the door.

Prisoner's Defence. I was carrying the table for a man into the City-road; he was to give me eighteen pence for carrying it.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

267. BENJAMIN THOMPSON and THOMAS THOMPSON were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of January , three quarters of a pound weight of sugar, value 1 s. six candles, value 6 d. a pint of rum, value 18 d. three stone bottles, value 15 d. and a tobacco-stopper, value 3 d. the property of Edward Weller .

EDWARD WELLER . I keep a public-house , the sign of the Bacchus and Grapes. I lost these things on the 23rd of January; they were found upon the prisoner, Thomas Thompson . Benjamin Thompson lived with me as servant . On this night, Thomas Thompson came in; he called for a pint of porter. The candles, sugar, and rum were found upon him, and the tobacco stopper.

SARAH HEWITT . I live servant with Mr. Weller. I was in the tap-room by the fire. I saw Benjamin put some sugar in a pint pot. I went and told master something was going on wrong. Master went into the tap-room, and found some rum and water mixed. The candles were found in Thomas Thompson's pocket, with a lump of sugar, and some rum, and a tobacco stopper.

JOHN TURNBRIDGE . I am a constable. I searched Thomas Thompson; I found upon him six candles, three quarters of a pound of lump sugar, and near a pint of rum in a bladder, and a tobacco stopper. I produce them.

Prosecutor. The tobacco stopper is mine; the three quarters of a pound of sugar matches with the loaf of sugar it was broken from. I cannot say any thing about the rum.

Benjamin Thompson 's Defence. I have nothing to say for myself.

Thomas Thompson's Defence. As I was going to my brother with a pair of stockings I kicked my foot against these things. I am innocent of the charge.

THOMAS THOMPSON , GUILTY , aged 28.

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

BENJAMIN THOMPSON , NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

268. WILLIAM REYNOLDS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of February , a bag, value 5 d. twelve pair of upper-leathers, value 12 s. twelve pair of soles, value 12 s. and one skin, value 4 s. the property of John Rice .

JOHN RICE . I am a journeyman shoemaker ; I live at No. 16, Colchester-street, Whitechapel. On Thursday morning, the 17th of February, about eleven o'clock, I went into Houndsditch, to Mr. Davis; I got twelve pair of stuff for twelve pair of shoes; going home with them (it was a cold morning) I went into a public-house, and called for half a pint of beer, and while I was taking my half pint of beer and warming myself, the prisoner came and took the bag and the leather off the table. I did not take any notice of the man when he came in, only I saw him brush off with it. I pursued him, and took him at the end of Colchester-street, by Church-lane. I took hold of the man and the property. I brought him back to the house. He was very unwilling to give it up. I got it from him, and gave him in charge of an officer.

SAMUEL WILSON . I took the prisoner in custody. This is the bag and the leather.

Prosecutor. It is my bag, and the leather I had of Mr. Davis to make twelve pair of shoes.

Prisoner's Defence. I was very much intoxicated. I am in the habit of carrying a bag. I thought it was my own bag.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Confined 14 days in Newgate , fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

269. EDWARD FOSTER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of February , a fender, value 10 s. and a window-blind, value 1 s. the property of John Howard , Samuel Cook , and John Jenkins .

JOHN HOWARD . I am a cabinet-maker, and upholsterer ; my partners names are Samuel Cook and John Jenkins. On the 10th of February, the fender was taken out of the warehouse by the prisoner, about half past seven in the evening; I did not see him take it out. Before eight o'clock I detected him bringing it back again; when I accused him of taking it, he brought it back again; after that we gave him in charge of the officer. The prisoner was our porter. We had told him we would furnish him with many things, and told him to take them. On Sunday, the day before he was accused, he was married, and on the Sunday evening he came to our house, he said, he had not a bed for his wife to lay on; we told him to take on.

EBENEZER DALTON . I took the prisoner into custody; he shewed me where the fender was. I went to his lodgings, and found the blind.

Prosecutor. He has lived with me four years; I always found him honest.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

270. WILLIAM BUTCHER was indicted for feloniously stealing, in the dwelling-house of William Fincham , on the 12th of February , two 10 l. bank notes, twenty-two 2 l. bank notes, a 5 l. bank note, and ten 1 l. bank notes , his property.

WILLIAM FICHAM . I keep the Plough tavern, Blackwall, in the hamlet of Poplar, in the parish of St. Dunstan's Stepney . The prisoner was chief mate's servant of the ship Bengal, East Indiaman; his master lodged at my house, and the whole of the ship's crew messed there; his master's name is Mr. Charit, of Brunswick-square. On the 12th of February, about three o'clock in the afternoon, I had occasion to trouble Mrs. Fincham to get me change of a ten-pound note; she brought me ten one-pound notes for it. In the evening a quarter before seven, I had occasion to ask her for change of a ten-pound check; she went up stairs and to her great surprise she found her drawers opened, and all her money was gone, to the amount of seventy-five pounds I am sure of. I went immediately up stairs; I could not find any of the money, not till the officer found some. I lost seventy-five or eighty pounds.

FRANCES FINCHAM . Q. You have the care of the cash I find - A. Yes, I have. I kept it in my own bed-room, in a drawer, which I always kept locked. On Saturday, the 12th of this month, Mr. Fincham requested me to give change of a ten-pound note; I immediately went up stairs for the change, and took the ten-pound note up with me, which I placed in the drawer with the other money; there were twenty-two two-pound bank notes, two ten-pound notes, and fifteen one's, making in the whole seventy-five pounds; they were all safe. I then locked my drawer before I came down to dinner; at which time the prisoner acknowledged to his master in the presence of the officer, he took the money.

Q.You were not present to hear him - A. No; there is a witness that did hear it. About seven o'clock in the evening, I went up stairs for change of a ten-pound check, to my great surprize, I found my drawer unlocked, and the money gone. I immediately came down, and told Mr. Fincham. I was certain it could be no other person than the prisoner, nobody else had been up stairs during that time.

Q. You could not tell that - A. I could. The bed-room stairs adjoins the bar; nobody could go up stairs, except a little girl that had the care of my child, and the prisoner. The prisoner was not seen after, not till Sunday morning.

Q. What day was this - A. Saturday evening, about ten o'clock. I went to the prisoner's master's house, in Great Coram-street, Brunswick-square. I told him the circumstance, and how my house was situated; he said, he thought I had great grounds of suspicion. His master requested that we should be there on Monday morning with an officer, and take him in custody; which was done.

JOHN BROWN. I am an officer. On Sunday, the 13th, Mr. Fincham applied to me to apprehend the prisoner; I went in company with Mr. Fincham to his master's house on Monday morning; I saw the prisoner; I charged him with the robbery; he at first strongly denied it. I searched the prisoner; I found thirty-six shillings in silver upon him. I bid him to lock up his room; I took him to his master. When he was there he acknowledged in the presence of Mr. Fincham, he said, he did do it, he was six days in breaking open the drawer, and getting the money. He said, he had left twenty-five pounds in a young woman's hands in Harford-street, Fitzroy-square. I went with him to the house No. 2, Harford-street, Fitzroy-square; when we went into the house, he said to the young woman, my dear, where is that money; she took this pocket-book which I produce now, out of her ridicule; she gave this book into my hand. He said, take this Mr. Brown, it is part of Mr. Fincham's money. I examined the book, and found ten two-pound notes, and nine one's in it. The five-pound note he said belonged to the young woman; the young woman is in court. He had a great many clothes that he had taken out of pawn, and new ones, which he said, he had bought with the part of the money; ten pounds he said he had paid for taking them out. I brought the pocket-book away with me. I found in a tea-caddy five pounds one shilling in silver; part of that he said belonged to the young woman; he said, the other part was to buy some linen for him. That is all I know. There was a new hat, a brooch, and a ring, that he said were bought with the money.

Prisoner. Q. Did I acknowledge in the presence of my master that I had committed the fact - A. Yes; I heard you acknowledge that you had committed the fact to your master. You said ten pounds you gave to a girl, three pounds you paid to a man in Newgate, you paid six pounds for a pocket-compass, five pounds six shillings you gave for a chain, seal, and a ring, and two pounds you gave to a young woman in Hart-street, Covent Garden. That is all I can recollect. There was some more things that amounted to sixty-four pounds in the whole.

Q. When I gave you that money, did I say that was part of Mr. Fincham's money - A. Yes, you did.

MARTHA POOLE . Q. Where do you live - A.AtNo. 2, Harford-street, Fitzroy-square. Mr. Butcher always represented himself as a gentleman to me, and he always behaved as such to me. He came to me last Saturday night, between seven and eight o'clock, and stopped with me until Monday morning. He asked me on Sunday evening to purchase him some linen; he told me he would leave his pocketbook with me, and the things I bought for him I was to have made for him, and to have the bills in his own name, and he should call on Monday night. The officer came with Mr. Butcher on Monday morning.

Q. You delivered to the officer a pocket-book - A. Yes; that was Mr. Butcher's pocket-book; Mr. Butcher delivered it me; it was the same as he left with me.

Q. Had you any thing of his besides - A. There was some of his wearing apparel, which the officer took away; the wearing apparel belonged to him. The officer took likewise a five-pound note of mine, and two one's.

Q. to Prosecutor. Can you speak to any of the notes - A. I cannot identify the notes. I lost upwards of sixty pounds out of the drawer.

Prisoner's Defence. On Tuesday previous to my being apprehended, I was in and out of the Union, West Indiaman, which lay off Mr. Fincham's house; when I was on board a young man gave me five-and-twenty pounds to purchase six dozen of wine, which I was to send down to Bristol to his father, and part of that money was his money; the notes now in possession of the officer are part of them notes. The time has been so short since I have been in prison, I have not had time to collect my friends to speak in my behalf.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 23.

[The prisoner was recommended to mercy by the jury, on account of his youth.]

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

271. EDWARD SADLER was indicted for a felony .

Mr. Gurney, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

172. MARY AMANET was indicted for that she, on the 22nd of January , five pieces of false milled counterfeit coin, each of them made to the likeness and similitude of a good shilling, and two pieces of false milled counterfeit coin, each of them made to the likeness and similitude of a good sixpence, the same not being cut in pieces, unlawfully did put off to Peter Gobey at a lower rate and value than they by their denomination did import to be counterfeited for, that is to say for three shillings .

PETER GOBEY . I live at No. 18, Gibralter-row, Bethnal-green. I have known the prisoner from the beginning of last summer; she lived at No. 11, Thomas's-place, Crabtree-row.

Q. Had you any dealings with her on the 20th of January - A. I had, on the evening of the 20th of January, I received of the prisoner three counterfeit shillings. I gave information to Armstrong on the morning of the 21st.

Q. In consequence of what Armstrong told you, did you go to the prisoner - A. I did, and paid for them, and had the promise of half a dozen more the next day; she promised me six counterfeit shillings on the 22nd for three shillings. I communicated this to Armstrong, and before I went to her house Armstrong gave me three marked good shillings; I had no other money about me of any kind; the officers searched me. When I went to the prisoner's house I told her I had come for the six counterfeit shillings that she had promised; she put her hand to the table drawer, took out a bag, and out of that bag she gave me five counterfeit shillings, and two counterfeit sixpences; I gave her for them the three indentical shillings that Armstrong had furnished me with, and as soon as this transaction happened I took the counterfeit money out in my hand, and Bishop, the officer, took it out of my hand.

Mr. Alley. Have not you had the misfortune to have two of your daughters convicted - A. One I have.

Q. Do not you know where she got the bad money from - A. Yes.

Q. She is now under sentence - A. Yes.

Q. Upon the oath you have taken, do not you expect that she is to be pardoned if you convict this woman - A. I expect some little mercy; I am not promised such a thing; I do not depend upon any thing of the kind.

Q. Did you or not leave a parcel there of twenty bad shillings before - A. No.

JOHN ARMSTRONG . I am an officer.

Q. Do you know the last witness, Peter Gobey - A. I do.

Q. Did you furnish him with any money - A. I did. On Saturday, the 22nd of January, between the hour of twelve and one, I took him into a back room of a public-house before Daniel Bishop and Joshua Armstrong both officers; I searched him; he had three penny-pieces and a farthing; I took it from him. I searched him all over; he had no money but three good shillings I had given him. I marked the three good shillings in a way that I should know them again, with an A very small; I gave them to Gobey in the presence of Bishop, and my son. I and the other two officers accompanied Gobey to the prisoner's house, No. 11, Thomas's-place. In my going along I bethought myself that I had not searched Gobey's mouth, I put my fingers in his mouth; he had no money in his mouth. We went to the house No. 11, Thomas's-place, Crabtree-row, Bethnal-green; I saw him go into the door, and waited until he came out.

Q. Had he an opportunity to receive any money during the time he was going from the public-house to there - A. No, never. He had no counterfeit money about him when he went into the prisoner's house, and the instant he came out of the house he was seized by Bishop. We took Gobey then into the house with us. When I came into the kitchen the prisoner was sitting by the fireside; she turned her eyes when I went in. I heard something chink upon the hearth like a shilling; my son stooped, and picked up a shilling; he said, it is a good shilling.He catched hold of her right hand. I heard him say here is the other two. When I came to see the three shillings I saw they were the three shillings that I had given to Gobey. Bishop searched the prisoner. I found this counterfeit money in this bag, as it is now, which is forty-three shillings and thirty-six sixpences in a cupboard; they are all counterfeits; some are fit for circulation, and some are not. I then asked her who lived there; she said, herself; her husband was at sea. She said, the goods were hers; she said, that Gobey had given her three good shillings for a debt that he had owed her some time.

DANIEL BISHOP . Q You were with Armstrong - A. I was; I was present also when Gobey was searched. I am quite certain he had no money whatever when he went away from the public-house, except the three good shillings given him by Armstrong. When Gobey came out of the prisoner's house I immediately took hold of his right hand, and took from his hand five shillings and two sixpences. These are them; they have been in my possession ever since. The moment Gobey came out of the house to the door I seized him, and pushed him into the room. I searched the prisoner; in her pocket I found twelve counterfeit shillings wrapped up in this dirty rag; they are fit for circulation.

Q. Did you find any implements there for the purpose of making money - A. None. I found a box and a bag containing upwards of two pounds in silver. I asked Gobey in the presence of the prisoner, where he got the five bad shillings and the two bad sixpences; he said he bought them of the prisoner, he gave her three shillings for them. The prisoner made no reply to that.

Mr. Alley. Did you hear her say these things were left at her house by Gobey some time time before - A. I did not.

JOSHUA ARMSTRONG . I am an officer. I concur with the other witnesses in all they have said.

CALEB EDWARD POWELL . I am an assistant to the Solicitor of the Mint.

Q. Look at the five shillings - A. They are counterfeit, and all manufactured in the same way; they are merely coloured; and the sixpences are washed in the same way.

Q. Look at the forty-three shillings and thirty-six sixpences found in that bag in the cupboard - A. These are all counterfeit; some of them want colouring; some have been coloured, and are fit for circulation.

Prisoner's Defence. I sold him no bad money; he owed me twelve shillings; he paid me three shillings off.

The prisoner called five witnesses, who gave her a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

273. ALEXANDER MURDOCK and ELIZABETH SCOTT were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22nd of January , sixty-eight pair of stays, value 20 l. the property of William Marsden.

WILLIAM MARSDEN . I am a stay-maker , 25, Holywell-street, in the Strand. On account of information from Mr. Mills I examined the stays on the 24th; they were brought to me by Briant, Mr. Mills's foreman; I discovered they were my own.

Q. Do you know either of the prisoners - A. They were both in my employ. Murdock was in my employ until he was apprehended. Scott was in my employ thirteen months ago.

JOHN MILLS . I am a stay-maker in St. Clement's church-yard. On the 20th of January, Mr. Gibbons offered me some stays. After I had got them home my foreman informed me they were Mr. Marsden's property. I sent to Mr. Marsden; he owned the whole of the property. I bought sixty-eight pair of stays of Mr. Gibbons; I gave him five shillings a pair for them. Mr. Gibbons is an actioneer. I saw the goods before I bought them.

MR. GIBBONS. I am an auctioneer. I bought some stays of the female prisoner, and some I redeemed. She told me she manufactured them. She told me to go to Mr. Grover, the pawnbroker, for the stays. I enquired her character of Mr. Grover; he told me she was a good character. I gave my porter the money to redeem the stays.

Q. All that you know, certain stays were brought to you by your porter, you gave him the money to redeem them - A. Yes, and I sent a sample of them stays to Mr. Mills. Mr. Mills gave me five shillings a pair for them. I went to the prisoner's apartment; they were then working at a late hour in the night. I told them there was a charge against them that these stays had been improperly obtained; that it was necessary they should accompany me to Mr. Marsden. I told them Mr. Marsden said they were his patterns. The prisoners said they had the same patterns in paper as Mr. Marsden, and the same scoreing-boards. The female said, I have bought stays of Mr. Marsden for the purpose of taking the patterns off. I did not deliver the stays to Mr. Mills in the first instance; they were left at a private-house in Windmill-street.

Q. You do not know of your own knowledge these stays ever reached Mr. Mills - A. No.

Q. Who did you send them by to Windmill-street - A. A porter; he is not here.

GEORGE GROVER . I am a pawnbroker, No. 10, Greek-street, Soho. Both the prisoners have pledged stays with me.

Q. To whom did you deliver the stays - A. Mr. Gibbons came and saw them; a porter and a female fetched them away.

Mr. Gibbons. There were two pair marked G for my daughter to fit them on; here is one pair marked G; I cannot find the other pair. I received them of my porter.

Q. This one pair you sent to Windmill-street - A. Yes.

Q. to Mr. Mills. Do you recollect these stays marked G being in your possession - A. No, I did not see any mark on either of them.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

274. JAMES ELLIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of February , five gowns, value 2 l. two petticoats, value 10 s. a cloak, value 1 l. four pair of stockings, value 9 s. nine shirts, value 9 s. twoshifts, value 8 s. a shawl, value 3 s. six books, value 3 s. two brooches, value 4 s. and a box, value 4 s. the property of Eleanor Scott , spinster .

ELEANOR SCOTT . I am a servant . Q. When did you lose your box - A. On the 14th of February, I was coming out of place; I took another woman to assist me in carrying my box. We went into the Three Crowns to get some refreshment. We came out of the Three Crowns, and came to a place called North-street, Whitechapel-road. I sat down the box to rest myself upon; the prisoner came up, and said he would carry it for me. I sent the woman home; I told him I was a stranger in London, and knew nobody. I gave him the box.

Q. What time of day was it - A. Between five and six. I gave him the box to carry to Edward's-place, Kensington-road; I followed him; he ran off with the box. I not knowing the place, I returned home, and gave up my box for lost. Not knowing any where about there, I did not know how to turn.

Q. Were was your home - A.Edward's-place, Kensington-road.

Q. Are you sure he is the man - A. Yes.

Q. When did you see him afterwards - A. The next day, at the office in Whitechapel.

Q. did you ever see your box again - A. I did.

THOMAS GARROD . I am a bricklayer and plaister; I live in Gossip's-buildings, Whitechapel-road. My son came in; he said, father, there are two men fighting at the bottom of the court; I went out, and said, what is the matter; why, said one of the men, this man has robbed the woman of her box, I want him to go with me, he will not go. I said, he must go. The other man had got hold of the prisoner by the collar; he asked me to take the box; I did. We took the prisoner to the Three Crowns, to enquire if he had been drinking with a girl. We found he had been there with a girl. We could not find the girl. The man that had hold of the prisoner by his collar went away; a constable came, and took the prisoner to the office, and I took the box. This is the box that laid down by the prisoner.

WILLIAM BROAD . I am a constable. I took the prisoner to the office, and I saw Garrod take the box.

Prosecutrix. That is my box, and all the things now are in it; they are all mine. That is the box I gave the prisoner to carry.

Prisoner's Defence. I was drinking at the Three Crowns with the prosecutrix and the other woman; the prosecutrix said if I would carry her box for her she would pay me, and I might sleep with her all night. I liked the other woman best. We all got so intoxicated that we missed one another.

Prosecutrix. I made no bargain with the prisoner; what he has said is an untruth.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

275. LUCY WIGS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of February , an umbrella, value 2 s. and a sheet, value 5 s. the property of Edward Hale Peech .

EDWARD HALE PEECH . I am a tripeman ; I live at No. 3, Brick-lane, Spitalfields. I lost the umbrella about three months ago. The prisoner was taken up by another person, and the duplicate of the umbrella was found upon her. She used to char for me, and she washed for the gentleman that took her up.

JOHN BAKER . I am a pawnbroker. On the 24th of January the prisoner pawned with me this umbrella for a shilling; on the 12th of February she pledged with me a sheet for three shillings. The prisoner is the person that pawned them.

Prosecutor. I lost the umbrella out of my house. This umbrella is my property. The prisoner accused another person of taking the umbrella. I cannot say when she took the sheet, but the prisoner had access to the drawers. I know it is my sheet by the sides being turned into the middle.

Prisoner's Defence. I did it through distress and want.

GUILTY , aged 43.

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

276. RICHARD GOODCHILD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of February , five pewter pint pots, value 4 s. and one pewter quart pot, value 1 s. the property of John Poundfoot .

JOHN POUNDFOOT . I keep the sign of the Berkley Arms, Berkley-square . On the 1st of February, the prisoner and another man came in and had something to drink; he was observed by the boy to go into the yard, and afterwards the boy went into the yard, and missed the pots. There were five pint pots and one quart found upon the prisoner.

THOMAS CLEW . I am the pot-boy. I was in the tap-room; the other man asked the way into the yard. The prisoner went out into the yard. I went in the yard, and missed the pots. The prisoner, after he had taken the pots, he went up to the bar to pay for what he had had. I ran and knocked my elbow against him; I felt the pots.

THOMAS HOPKINS . I was sitting in Mr. Poundfoot's tap-room on the 1st. The prisoner and another man came in together, and they went out together. Mr. Poundfoot hallooed out, stop thief. I went out, and brought the prisoner back again; he had one pot in his pocket, three in his breeches, and one in his jacket pocket. These are the pots.

Prosecutor. They are all mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I went into this public-house with a man, and had part of a pint of porter with him. He persuaded me to go down the yard and take some pewter pots, which I denied. He took five pint pots and one quart pot; he told me to put them in my pockets; he gave me eighteen pence, and when the boy missed the pots he ran away. I humbly beg your lordship to shew as much mercy as you think proper.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

277. JOHN BROWN , THOMAS SMITH , and JOSEPH WILLIAMS were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of February , a handkerchief,value 4 s. the property of Charles Garthwaite , from his person .

CHARLES GARTHWAITE . I am a broker .

Q. Where were you when your pocket was picked - A. I cannot say where I was. I was going from the Haymarket to Covent Garden theatre . It was near seven o'clock on Thursday night, the 3d of February. I had got as far as the corner of Long Acre; the officer asked me if I had lost my handkerchief; I told him I had. He then told me to accompany him; I did so. We came into St. Martin's-court; the officer said they were there. The officer and I followed them up New-street, Covent Garden; they stopped under the piazzas in Covent Garden; the officer seized Williams and Smith, and I seized Brown.

BENJAMIN JOHNSON . I am an officer of the City. On the 3d of February last, about seven in the evening, I saw the three prisoners going through Cranbourne-alley into St. Martin's-court; knowing them, I followed them. I saw Smith and Williams following Mr. Garthwaite. I followed them through the court, until they came to the end of Newport-market. The prisoner, Williams, walked sharply up to the gentleman, laid hold of the bottom of his coat, and drawed the handkerchief out of his pocket. The prisoners not being close together, I let them cross over towards Long Acre, and directly they crossed over towards Long Acre the prisoner, Williams, gave the handkerchief to Smith. I saw which way they were going, and suspecting they were going into Cranbourne-alley again, I ran and apprised the prosecutor that he had lost his handkerchief; he came back with me. I told him that I knew the lads that had taken his handkerchief; if he would come back with me I would pick them out. We met with the prisoners again in St. Martin's-court; they were about two or three yards from each other. The prisoner, Williams, was following another gentleman. I told the prosecutor they had just passed us; I would let them go further on before I took them. I followed them into New-street. I saw Williams and Smith follow a gentleman close there. Brown was some distance behind. I let them go into the piazzas, and there I took Smith and Williams, and Mr. Garthwaite took John Brown. I searched the prisoners; on the prisoner, Smith, I found this handkerchief; this handkerchief belongs to the prosecutor; it was in Smith's hat. I saw Williams take the handkerchief out of the prosecutor's pocket, and give it to Smith, and on Smith I found it.

Q. to Prosecutor. Look at your handkerchief - A.It is my handkerchief; it has my initials on it.

Brown's Defence. I am innocent of the charge alleged against me.

Smith's Defence. I met the prisoner, Williams, in Covent Garden; he told me he had a handkerchief he would sell me for half-a-crown. How he came possessed of it I know not. I said I would get the money for it of my mother.

Williams's Defence. The gentleman took me under the piazzas, Covent Garden.

BROWN, GUILTY , aged 23.

SMITH, GUILTY , aged 19.

WILLIAMS, GUILTY , aged 21.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

278. ROBERT OAKLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of January , a coat, value 10 s. four silver tea-spoons, value 6 s. a silver dessertspoon, value 10 s. and a handkerchief, value 1 s. the property of John Thomas Oxenham .

JOHN THOMAS OXENHAM . I am a patent mangle-maker , 354, Oxford-street . I lost my coat about the 10th of January, and the handkerchief out of my bed-room. On the 27th of January, the prisoner was detected in a petty theft. He was my errand-boy. He was detected of taking something out of the cupboard in the kitchen, which was found upon him. It was about eight o'clock in the morning, and when the meat and butter was found in his possession I was called down. I accused him of taking these things; he acknowledged it. I went to Marlborough-street office; I then went with the officer to his mother's apartment; we there found the spoons, the coat, and a silk handkerchief.

Q. What age is he - A. Eighteen or nineteen. He has been with me six years. Until we discovered this robbery he behaved with the greatest propriety; he was a very industrious, civil, quiet, lad. I would not have prosecuted him if I had not been bound over. I would take him again now; I know he would not be guilty of the like offence.

JOHN JEFFERIES . I am an officer. This is the coat and handkerchief; I found them at the prisoner's mothers.

Prosecutor. They are mine.

GUILTY , aged 18.

Fined 1 s. and to be delivered his master.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

279. BARNEY SHORT and JAMES WHITTAKER were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of February , a great coat, value 1 l. and a pelisse, value 15 s. the property of Thomas Sharp .

WILLIAM SHARP . I am shopman to Thomas Sharp ; he is a clothier . The property belongs to him. On last Wednesday night, between six and seven o'clock, Short came in; he asked for the jacket he had ordered the night before. I went round to show Short the jacket. Whittaker came near the counter, and took some things off. I ran after him; he lot the things fall at the door. I picked them up and brought them in the shop. It was a coat and a pelisse. I saw an officer pass the door; I called him in to take Short into custody. The officer, Brown, brought Whittaker back to the shop.

JOHN BROWN. I am an officer. On Wednesday the 16th of February, in the evening, I was passing down Whitechapel with Branscomb, my brother officer. I went into Mr. Sharp's shop; I found the prisoner, Short, there; I searched him, and found eleven shillings and eight pence on him in halfpence. I went out after Whittaker; I found him at the bottom of Church-lane; I brought him back. I asked the prosecutor if that was the man; he said, yes. The coat and pelisse were on the counter when I came in. These are them.

William Sharp. The coat and pelisse are my brother Thomas Sharp 's property.

Short's Defence. I went to the shop to buy a jacket. He asked me twenty shillings for it; I bid him fifteen shillings. Going out of the shop the gentleman came after me; I do not know what for.

Whitaker's Defence. As I was coming home this gentleman took me; I do not know what for.

SHORT, GUILTY , aged 17.

WHITTAKER, GUILTY , aged 17.

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , whipped in Jail .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

280. JAMES AYRE was indicted for that he, on the 11th of June, in the 48th year of his Majesty's reign, at St. Andrew's, Dublin, in Ireland, did marry one Margaret Osborne , spinster ; and that he afterwards, in June, in the 53d year of his Majesty's reign, feloniously did marry one Mary Smith , widow , his former wife being then alive .

GEORGE OSBORNE . Q. Have you a daughter named Margaret - A. Yes, I saw her on the 18th of last month; she was living in London.

Q. Look at the man at the bar - A. I know him; his name is James Ayre ; I was present when he married my daughter, at St. Andrew's chapel, Dublin; that was in the month of June, in 1808. My daughter was a Catholic, and he said he was a Catholic.

Q. Your daughter is alive - A. Yes.

MARY SMITH . Q. When was it you had the misfortune to be married to that man at the bar - A. In June, last year. I know he is the man. We were married at St. James's church, Westminster. He has had two hundred and fifty pounds of my money.

Prisoner's Defence. This happened in November what they want to criminate me on. I have been arrested by means of Mrs. Ayre, the last witness, and now to criminate me they have brought a person from Ireland.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

281. JOHN EDWARDS , SAMUEL CLARK and THOMAS GILES , were indicted for a conspiracy .

JAMES NABAN . I am a coachman.

Q. On the 26th of November did you go to Smithfield for the purpose of purchasing a horse - A. Yes. When I came to Smithfield I was unacquainted with the ways of Smithfield, or else I should have had the horse booked. I saw the horse at the top of Hosier-lane. It was a bay gelding; it was tied to the rails in the market. I looked at the horse, and Clark run it down the lane immediately. I spoke to Edwards.

Q. Did you see Giles - A. No, not then. I asked Edwards whether the horse was free from all vice; he said, yes. I then went down Hosier-lane, to the Fox and Knot public-house. I agreed with Edwards for the sum of eight pounds. If the horse was not approved of the money was to be returned, and I was to return the horse in two or three days. When I paid for the horse Giles was not in the room.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

282. JOHN DOWDING was indicted for a fraud .

No evidence being offered, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

283. JOHN KINGHORN was indicted for a misdemeanour .

DANIEL KENNEDY. I am clerk to Mr. Hartley, solicitor for the commission. This is the commission, dated the 1st of November; John Kinghorn, No. 6, Haymarket, corn-factor. These are the proceedings under the commission, 2nd of November, at Guild-hall. I was present, and saw the assignees sign it. I witnessed it on the 2nd of November. John Kinghorn was declared a bankrupt in court. On the 16th of November there was a meeting to prove debts. On the 30th of November the assignees were chosen.

JOHN THOMAS GREGORY . I am a clerk, at present, to Mr. Henson, the attorney.

Q. In the month of November, what were you then - A. I was then out of employ. On the 15th of November, I was at the Ship public-house, Little Bridge-street, in company with Roberts, the man who is indicted and is not here. I afterwards communicated to Kinghorn what had passed between Thomas Roberts and me. Nobody was in the room but Thomas Roberts and me. Roberts asked me if I would prove a bill under Kinghorn's commission. In half an hour afterwards I went with Roberts to Kinghorn in the Fleet prison. I found Kinghorn, Roberts, and Forest, together, and several more. I cannot say whether Kinghorn was in the coffee-room or the tap, in the Fleet. Roberts said I would prove a bill under his commission. Kinghorn pulled out several bills from his pocket; he asked me if I would prove a bill of two hundred pounds; I said, no. He agreed that the last bill for sixty-seven pounds four shillings. He himself took that bill out of his pocket; he agreed that should be the bill I was to prove.

Q. Is this the bill - A. Yes, this is the bill; it was endorsed by Forest at that time, and I have since put my initials upon it to know it again; here is I T G upon the back of it, drawn by James Ferrest. I have seen Forrest write; it is his hand-writing. This bill was given to me by Kinghorn. Roberts requested me to attend the next day at Guildhall to prove the bill. Kinghorn and Roberts promised me one pound for the job. I attended the next day at Guildhall, and something that Swancot said induced the commissioners to adjourn the meeting. The meeting was adjourned to the 30th of November; between that time and the 30th of November I saw Kinghorn two or three times in the Fleet.

Q. Did you receive of Kinghorn any part of the one pound - A. He sent me down ten shillings by Mr. Sanderson on the 11th of January. In the Fleet, Kinghorn stated to me that I had received ten shillings,part of the one pound, he sent it by Sanderson. I afterwards disclosed the whole of the transaction to Mr. Davis.

KENNEDY SWANCOT. I formerly was a housekeeper in Foster-lane; I now live in Duke-street, Lambeth; I carry on business in the jobbing way I am now a prisoner in the Fleet Prison.

Q. Did you see the prisoner in the Fleet Prison - A. I did, on the 15th of November, I saw him in the Fleet. I was in the Ship public-house, Little Bridge-street; there were Gregory, Thomas Roberts , Sanderson, Wheatley, and two or three more, whose names I do not know; Roberts called me out, and said something about Kinghorn; I said, I would see Mr. Kinghorn, he owed me some money. I went to Kinghorn; he was then in the Fleet. I told Kinghorn, Roberts had desired me to prove a small bill for him. Kinghorn begged very hard for me to do it. I said, I would prove no bill. I said, Mr. Kinghorn do away your friendly commission, and let your creditors have the just property that is left; he said, it is gone too far, how can I recall it back. He asked me if I had seen Edwards; I said, yes, I had seen him that morning. He asked me if he would come forward and prove two bills of two hundred pounds as he had promised; he left the two bills at my house. I took the bills to Edwards; Edwards said he would prove one, and his friend was to prove the other. Kinghorn said, if Edwards proved them it would be ten pounds in his way. The majority would be in his favour for the choice of assigness. I went to Guildhall the next morning; I called in at the Castle, going; Gregory was there. I told him if he had come to prove a fictitious bill I would stop him. I stopped them from choosing assignees; I told the commissioners what I knew. In consequence of that they adjourned the meeting. I saw Mr. Kinghorn after that, be gave me five pounds; he said he was very sorry for what was past, you will hold your tongue for the future; I hope you will say no more, and I will pay you the the other five in a few days; he was really my debtor. I attended the choice of assignees, and then I was arrested by a friend of Mr. Kinghorn's for an unlawful debt.

Q. Who was the plantiff in that arrest - A. John Richard Pim , of Marsh-gate, Lambeth; I owed him nothing, not an halfpenny.

Q. Did you see Kinghorn after that - A. I saw him on Monday after Christmas day; I told him I had been arrested for a false debt; he said, he was sorry, he had nothing to do with the arrest; he hoped I would not impute it to him. He wanted to see Mr. Davis, who was his principal creditor; he wanted to arrange matters, as he had been misled by the other party.

MR. DAVIS. I am a corn-chandler, I live in Warren-street, Fitzroy-square. I am a creditor of the prisoner's under the commission; I was a creditor to about seven hundred pounds; I have proved under the commission one hundred and fifty pounds; I had parted with the books to my brother. I could only prove one hundred and fifty pounds.

Q. Was any disclosure made to you by Swancot and Gregory - A. There was.

Q. On the 16th of November do you remember by something that Swancot stated to the commissioners, the commissioners postponed the meeting - A. I do; the meeting was adjourned. On the 27th of December, Swancot brought the prisoner to me in Mark-lane. Swancot brought Kinghorn to me at my house in Warren-street on the next night; Kinghorn then told me he had something to say to me; I said, what have you to say; I have nothing to say to you. He said, he wished to make some arrangement to prevent me from going to Guildhall. I asked him what he had got me; he told me he had his country-house, that was made over to his friend, it was worth an hundred and fifty pounds; I should have that, and also some money that he had got, and some money that a friend had, which I should have in preference to any other creditor. I told him I would have nothing to do with the lease of his house, to put away the swindlers he had about him. If he had any money to let the just creditors have the property; he replied, I might well say that, for he had got a set of great villians about him; he had expended five hundred pounds within a few months. I told him that I had got the false bill in the hands of my attorney for sixty-seven pounds; he admitted I had, and he was sorry for it. I told him I should prosecute him; he said, he was sorry for it. He wished to make an arrangement with me, he did not mind any other creditor as he did me. I am the greatest loser by him. Kinghorn admitted to me he had given the bill of sixty-seven pounds to Gregery.

Q. What is the amount of debts proved under the commission including all these bills - A. Foar thousand three hundred pounds. Only eleven pounds have been realized, and only seventy pounds the amount of the whole of the real debts.

Mr. Adolphus addressed the jury in behalf of the defendant.

GUILTY .

Confined 1 year in Newgate , and to be twice placed in and upon the Pillory in the open place at the front of Guildhall, in the City, one hour each time, between the hours of twelve and one in day time, on two several Saturdays within the four first Calendar months of the year's imprisonment .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

284. THOMAS M'LAGHAN was indicted for wilful and corrupt perjury .

ANN BRAITHWAITE . I am the widow of the late Brook Braithwaite. He used to sign bills of Middlesex. I have the care of the affidavit; I have had this affidavit ever since my husband's death; I took it out of his desk with some other papers.

Q. Where was that bill - A. At Middlesex office.

Q. Where was your husband's late office - A. In Clifford's-inn, in the parish of St. Dunstan's.

Q. Is the signature of B. Braithwaite to that affidavit the hand writing of your late husband - A. That is the hand writing of my late husband.

Q. He was signer of the bills of Middlesex - A. Yes, for upwards of thirty years. All these papers were handed to me immediately after my husband'sdeath, and all the affidavits on the file were handed to Mr. Braithwaite's successor.

Q. You were not present when this affidavit was sworn - A. No.

Q. Were you present when it was taken off the file - A. No. I knew that Mr. Braithwaite attended here twice with it.

JOHN KELLY . Q. Do you know the hand-writing of M'Laghan - A. I do.

Q. Look at that, and tell me whether that is his hand-writing - A. I think it is similar to notes I have.

(The affidavit read.)

"Thomas M'Laghan maketh oath, that John Kelly is indebted to him in the sum of twenty-seven pounds, for money that the said John Kelly had and received for the use of the deponent, and this deponent maketh oath that it has not yet been paid to him.

MR. COOK. Q. What public-house did M'Laghan keep at the time of the appraisement - A. The Black Horse in Barbican.

Q. Were you employed on his part to survey the furniture - A. I was employed by Mr. Nicolls, the comer-in.

Q. Who was employed by Mr. Laghan - A. Mr. Kelly.

Q. Have you an inventory of the goods - A. I have, and the receipt of the sum total. The sum total was fifty-six pounds ten shillings. This valuation was made on the 27th of December, 1810. The account was settled between M'Laghan and Kelly.

Q. At the time of the settlement did any person attend - A. Yes, the brewer's clerk and the distiller's clerk. The brewer was the landlord; he received the rent.

Q. Was any money paid by Kelly to him - A. Yes, by M'Laghan's request. Mr. Kelly asked M'Laghan if he should pay the creditors: M'Laghan said, yes. The money was paid to the creditors. There was some money left: I saw that handed over to M'Laghan. I cannot speak to the actual sum. The money paid over to the defendant he received as all that was coming to him without any objection, and he seemed very well satisfied.

Q. What was the total charge of Mr. Kelly for his trouble on that occasion - A. Six guineas; that is a fair sum for the trouble he had with it, and whatever was the remaining sum was paid over to M'Laghan.

Q. to Mr. John Kelly . Were you employed by M'Laghan at the Black Horse in Barbican - A. Yes. One hundred and ninety-six pound was the appraisement. This appraisement was made in the book at the time; one hundred and thirty-six pound five shillings and five-pence was the balance after deducting the taxes and rent from one hundred and ninety-six pound five shillings and five-pence. One hundred and thirty-six pound five shillings and five pence was the sum the defendant had to receive. My clerk made this accompt in my presence; that money was in my possession. On the 26th, me and Cook settled the business. It is usual to have all the tradesmen who have demands on the public-house; they were present. There was Mr. Dellafere for a book debt; the landford for a years rent had forty-five pound; the book debt, I think, was fifty-three pound two shillings and five pence; Mr. Maxwell, the cooper, for guaging, one pound six shillings and six pence. Mr. Windus, the distiller's account, was fifteen pound fifteen shillings and eight pence; then there is six guineas added to it, my charge, that was deducted that made one hundred and twenty-seven ten shillings and seven pence, leaving in my hands a balance of sixty-eight pounds fourteen shillings and ten pence. I paid him the balance before all the gentlemen present. My clerk put all the notes down. I paid him either with my own hands or by my clerk, and he was very well satisfied. This was on the 27th of December.

Q. From that 27th of December until May, 1812, was there any money transaction between him and you - A. None, whatever. When the agreement was first entered into he received the deposit himself.

Q. Were you afterward arrested at his suit - A. Yes, on or somewhere about the 5th of November, 1812, in Castle-street, Leicester-square. I advertised his house; that money was to be paid me again. I had two pounds of him for advertising the house. I think that was the sum itself.

Q. How long were you in custody - A. Not long. The gentlemen of the office took my word to find bail. I was not in custody a great while.

Mr. Challenor addressed the jury in behalf of the defendant, and Mr. Adolphus replied.

GUILTY .

Confined 1 year in Newgate , fined 1 s.

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

285. LEAH ABRAHAMS , REBECCA LEVY , MARY SOLOMONS , MARY ANN ADOLPHUS , ANN NATHAN , and SOLOMON AARONS , were indicted for a misdemeanor .

JACOB NOTTO . I produce the copy of the record; I got it from Mrs. Cohen.

Q. Do you know what you examined it with - A. No.

Mr. Knapp. I cannot prove the record.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.