Old Bailey Proceedings Online (www.oldbaileyonline.org, version 6.0, 19 April 2014), January 1814 (18140112).

Old Bailey Proceedings, 12th January 1814.

WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY, FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND ALSO THE GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, HELD AT Justice-Hall, in the Old Bailey, On WEDNESDAY the 12th of JANUARY, 1814, and following Days;

BEING THE SECOND SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF The Right Honourable WILLIAM DOMVILLE , LORD-MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY JOB SIBLY, No. 4, CARTHUSIAN-STREET, ALDERSGATE-STREET.

LONDON:

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED (BY THE AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON,) By R. Butters, No. 22, Fetter-lane, Fleet-street.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON.

Before the Right Honorable WILLIAM DOMVILLE , Lord Mayor of the City of London; Sir Vicary Gibbs , knt. Lord Chief Baron of His Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir John Bailey , knt. one of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir Robert Dallas , knt. one of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir Watkin Lewes , knt. Sir John Eamer , knt. Sir William Leighton , knt. Aldermen of the said City; John Silvester , esq. Recorder of the said City; Joshua Jonathan Smith , esq. Matthew Wood , esq. George Brydges , esq. Aldermen of the said City; and Newman Knowlys , esq. Common Serjeant of the said City; His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City, and County of Middlesex.

London Jury.

William Giles ,

Jacob Ray ,

John Swinn ,

Daniel Inwood ,

Adam Stewart ,

John Scott ,

Robert Belton ,

Joseph Dempsey ,

John Thomas Skeron ,

Joseph Chater ,

Samuel Walker ,

William Norman .

First Middlesex Jury.

Edward Kent ,

Lewis Leplasterer ,

William Butterfield ,

Thomas Gerrard ,

Thomas Marshal ,

Thomas Barker ,

William Marshal ,

Benjamin Hughes ,

John Simmonds ,

James Matthews ,

James Gray ,

John Allsop .

Second Middlesex Jury.

Daniel Dupree ,

George Cadogan ,

James George Greenwood ,

Thomas Howse ,

John Long ,

George Simpson ,

David Smith ,

Joseph Coulden ,

James Lee ,

John Turtle ,

Henry Davis ,

James Turverveel .

72. JOHN MOORE , alias LOAKES , and ROBERT MOORE , alias LOAKES , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of November , two geldings, value 70 l. the property of Edward Wilkinson .

EDWARD WILKINSON . I am an hackneyman .

Q. In the month of November last, had you any horses grazing at Mr. Froggett's, near Hendon - A. Yes, I had twelve.

Q. On Wednesday, the 10th of November, did you see them all safe - A. It was on the Friday preceding the Wednesday, they were all safe then. I sent for them home on the 17th, only ten were brought home; two bay geldings were missing.

Q. What were the value of them - A. Seventy pounds both. On the 17th I learned two were missing; on the Tuesday following, I received some information from Cambridge of the two bay horses; on the Wednesday, I went to Cambridge; I found my horses; they were brought and delivered back to me.

Q. Were these two geldings that were delivered to you at Cambridge the two geldings you missed - A. They were.

CHARLES ELLIS . I am a servant to Mr. Froggett. I had the care of Mr. Wilkinson's horses in my master's field. On Tuesday I was in the field.

Q. Were the horses all safe then - A. I did not tell them then. I told them on Monday; they were safe then.

Q. On Tuesday did any thing strike you as wrong - A. No. The gate was shut, a lashing stick was drawed through the staple, and nailed each side of the stick, the gate was fast; on Tuesday morning the horses appeared to be there; I did not count them. On Wednesday, first of all, I looked round the field to see whether the horses were there or not; the horses were all gone, and the gate was open.

Q. How did it appear to you that the gate had been opened - A. The gate could not have been opened without the stick had been broken out; the stick had been fastened with a nail each side. I went all round the field; I could not trace how they got out any where, but at the gateway; it being wet and dirty, there were the marks of their feet at the gateway. I found ten horses in the Edgware-road, in a field about half a mile off; the two geldings I could not find; they were two of the twelve.

WILLIAM NUNN. I am a horse-dealer; I reside at Cambridge.

Q. Were you at Cambridge fair on Saturday the 20th of November last - A. I was not at the fair, it was Cambridge market day; on the market day I saw John Moore , he came to me and asked me if I had a horse to exchange with him for a bay gelding; he went down to my stables, and looked at a horse that I had there; in the mean time before we went to my stable, he tied up that gelding with my horses; he went and saw my horse. I exchanged a horse of mine for the bay gelding, and I gave a one-pound note, and a shilling to boot; my man took the gelding home.

Q. Did he afterwards propose to you to buy another horse - A. I told him I could not buy it; I had got another, I would exchange with him for it. We exchanged for that, and I gave him five golden guineas, and another horse in exchange for it.

Q. Did you examine these two bay geldings more particularly after you had exchanged - A. I did, after they were cleaned I found them much better horses than those I had exchanged them for; upon that I went in search of the prisoner; I found him at the White Horse, and the younger prisoner at the Bell.

Q. Which of them did you find first - A. The eldest. I found out the youngest at the Bell in Northampton-street; something a friend of mine said to me induced me to think there was another. When I saw the young one, I asked him whether he was waiting for a young man of the name of Loakes; he said he was. I then told him, I had exchanged some horses with him, and I thought they were stolen. The young one went with me to the White Horse, there we found the elder; I told the elder that I had strong suspicion the horses were stolen horses. He gave me the name of John Loakes ; he made his mark to that name in the receipt of the horses; he told me he lived at Tillbrook, in Bedfordshire. He told me they were Lord St. John's horses; the other horse had a broken leg, and he was to be sold. Then I went with them both to the Mayor; they were both examined separately; they were detained, and the horses were detained.

Q. In consequence of what you learned, did you make any communication to Mr. Wilkinson - A. I did; he came down and swore to the horses; they were delivered to him as his property.

JAMES RICHARDS. Q. In the month of September last, were you a servant to either of the prisoners - A. I was, to John Moore , the elder; he lived in Mount-row, Islington.

Q. By what name did you know him - A. John Moore; his stables were in Sherborn-lane, in the Back-road, Islington; he was in the horse dealing way.

Q. Do you remember any bay geldings being brought to his stables on the afternoon of Tuesday the 16th of November - A. I do.

Q. Who brought them there - A. They both came together.

Q. By both, whom do you mean - A. Both the prisoners at the bar; they did not come in together directly, but afterwards one brought one, and the other the other; the young one brought the other, his name is I Robert Moore; they are brothers to the best of my knowledge. At about six o'clock in the afternoon they brought in the two geldings; I took one of them to be shod at Mr. Balam's, Cross-street,Islington; they were both shod on Wednesday morning, one by Balam, and the other by another person. The horses were taken away on Thursday afternoon, what time I cannot say; I was not at home. I did not see either of them after the Thursday.

Q. Have you since seen these two bay geldings - A. Yes, it was in the second week after they were taken away; I saw them in the custody of Mr. Wilkinson.

Mr. Wilkinson. The two geldings I shewed to the last witness were the two that Mr. Nunn bought of the prisoner.

Mr. Knapp. Q. to Richards. You only took one to be shod - A. No.

Q. When you saw him on the over night in the stable it was dark - A. Yes.

Q. Therefore you had little opportunity of seeing him - A. Yes, I mean to swear to him by the cut of the tail; I assisted in cleaning them.

WILLIAM BALAM . I am a farrier at Islington.

Q. On the morning of Wednesday, the 17th of November, was a bay gelding brought to you by the last witness to be shod - A. There were several shod at that time.

Q. Was a bay gelding brought to you by the last witness, Richards - A. There was. I have since seen that bay gelding again, Mr. Wilkinson brought it to my shop; it is the one to the best of my knowledge; he had rather particular feet; I believe it to be the same horse, I cannot swear it to be the same. The horse was brought to me to be shod about the middle of November; Mr. Wilkinson brought it about a fortnight afterwards; I think it is the same horse; it is the same colour, and appeared to be the same horse.

Q. to Nunn. What name did the younger prisoner tell you - A. He told me his name was Robert Loakes .

John Moore 's Defence. My brother is innocent. Mr. Nunn is wrong to say that I said I came from Tillbrook in Bedfordshire; I told him the horses I had to sell was the property of my uncle, one horse was the property of Lord St. John.

Mr. Nunn. This is the receipt the prisoner signed with his mark.

Robert Moore said nothing in his defence.

The prisoners called four witnesses, who gave them a good character.

JOHN MOORE , GUILTY - DEATH aged 24.

ROBERT MOORE, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 17.

First Middlesex jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

73. FREDERICK NEWSON was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Elizabeth Matthews , widow , about the hour of seven on the night of the 8th of December , and stealing therein, twelve pounds weight of mutton, value 9 s. her property.

ELIZABETH MATTHEWS. I am a widow; I live in Vine-street, in the parish of St. Giles's in the Fields ; I rent the lower apartment of Mr. Godwin, he lives in the first floor of the same house.

Q. On Wednesday, the 8th of December, was any thing taken from your shop - A. Yes, a hind quarter of mutton; I had seen it safe in the shop about an hour and a half before it was missing. I was not at home at the time it was taken.

Q. Who was there that saw it taken - A. Mary Andrews .

MARY ANDREWS . Q. Were you in Mrs. Matthews's shop on the 8th of December - A. Yes, I was in the parlour; I heard the shop door open; I said to the little boy, Charles, what is that; we went into shop, and saw the shop door open; we looked up for the hind quarter of mutton, it hung at the further part of the shop; we missed the hind quarter of mutton. I went to the door; I saw the prisoner just going off the step of the door, with the hind quarter of mutton under his arm; I took it from him. I said, what a shame to rob a poor widow woman with four children. I delivered him to Oram, the patrol. I can swear to the mutton being Mrs. Matthews's property. I had seen the mutton hanging up in the shop not ten minutes before, the fellow to it was hanging up; I matched it afterwards, the other hind quarter fitted it exactly.

GEORGE MATTHEWS . I was in the shop with Mrs. Andrews; I serve in the shop when my mother is out. I saw the prisoner just going off the step of the door; Mary Andrews took the hind quarter of mutton from the prisoner. I saw the meat fitted afterwards.

JOHN ORAM . I am an officer. The prisoner was given into my charge by Mary Andrews ; he had got his coat off in the street; the mutton had been wrapped up in it; the boy had got the mutton then. He asked me to let him put his coat on, and not to use him ill. I took him to the watchhouse.

Q. to Mary Andrews . You saw the mutton - A. Yes, the prisoner had his coat off, the meat was wrapped up in it, under his arm.

Prisoner's Defence. I came up from Deptford that evening, we went to a public-house, and agreed to have a leg of mutton for supper, they gave me the money to buy it; I bought a quarter of mutton in Clare-market; after paying for the mutton in Clare-market, coming along Vine-street I saw a butcher's shop, I said, I will go and buy a sheep's head, and have it for supper with the loin; as I came to the step of the door a man came to me, he said, halloo, what do you do with this quarter of mutton; I said I bought it in Clare-market. He called out two or three times at Mrs. Matthews's shop before any body answered; he asked if they had lost any mutton; this woman came to the step of the door, she said, she would look. She looked all round the place, and said, you had better take him in custody until Mrs. Matthews came home. I paid thirteen shillings for the quarter of mutton in Clare-market.

Q. to Mrs. Andrews. Had any body got hold of him when you went out - A. I do not know; there was a crowd collected. He then did not say he had bought it in Clare-market.

Q. to Oram. Did the prisoner say he had bought it in Clare-market - A. No. He appeared to be an ideot.

GUILTY, aged 33.

Of stealing, but not of breaking and entering the dwelling-house .

Confined 1 year in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

74. ANN CAVANAUGH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of December , a watch, value 50 s. the property of Margaret Crosten , widow , in her dwelling-house .

MARGARET CROSTEN . I am a widow; I live in Bird's-buildings, East Smithfield . The prisoner lived with me until the last day of December, and then she left me. On the 31st of December, I missed my watch; I saw it on the 29th. The prisoner was not in my apartment after I missed the watch. It is my dwelling-house; I let it out to separate people; I live in the house.

Q. What watch was this - A. A silver watch. I called the prisoner down stairs; her mother said, Nancy, your mistress wants you; I went up to her. I asked her to be so good as to tell me where my watch was, it was my husband's watch; I told her my buffett was broken open. I could get no redress at all; I came down stairs, and sat content until the watchman came; the watchman went in, took her, and out her in the watchhouse. The next morning I went upto the pawnbrokers and saw my watch.

JAMES - . I live with Mr. Watts, pawnbroker, East Smithfield. On the 30th of December, in the evening, the prisoner pawned this watch with me for twenty-eight shillings.

Prosecutrix. That is my watch; I missed it out of my buffett.

Prisoner. Q. Did not you tell me to pawn the watch to get some money to pay the two carpenters that came into the room to mend your buffett -

Prosecutrix. No.

Prisoner's Defence. She gave me the watch to pawn, and had three quarterns of rum for the two carpenters. I pawned the watch by her order.

GUILTY, aged 28.

Of stealing to the value 39 s. only .

Confined 1 year in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Dallas.

75. CATHERINE CLARKE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of December , in the dwelling-house of Thomas Whalen , five one-pound notes , his property.

THOMAS WHALEN . I live in Shakespeare's-walk, in the parish of St. Pauls Shadwell .

Q. Had you any property in your house in December last - A. Yes, I had five one-pound notes in my chest; I had put them by to pay my rent. I saw them in my chest about a fortnight before I missed them. I locked them up in my chest, and kept the key in my pocket. I missed them on the 8th of December. I saw my chest was broken open. I asked my wife if she had broken it open; she denied it. The prisoner came in and said, your wife did not break it open. I asked the prisoner if she broke it open for her. My wife said, I left nobody else but you here on Friday when I went out. I then said to the prisoner, I will make you suffer for it. The prisoner called me up into her room, and acknowledged that she had changed one of the pound notes; in about an hour after she acknowledged that she had changed two of them. On the next morning I had her taken up to the magistrate. She acknowledged that she exchanged two one-pound notes. This is a chisel that I lent to the prisoner's husband; I never saw it after until I saw it in my chest. The prisoner borrowed it of my wife for her husband's use.

Prisoner's Defence. I changed a one-pound note for his wife to get some things out of pawn for her.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

76. SARAH GOODCHILD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of December , in the dwelling-house of Ann Greaves , three shillings in monies numbered, a 5 l. bank note, three 2 l. bank notes, and two 1 l. bank notes , the property of William Charlwood .

WILLIAM CHARLWOOD . I live at Tottenham ; I am a servant to Mrs. Ann Greaves , she occupies the whole house herself. The prisoner was one of the servants in the house.

Q. Did you lose any money - A. Yes, thirteen pounds; my money was in my box in the room I slept in; I kept the box locked, and I kept the key. I missed my money on the 5th of December, the hasp of the box was wrenched off. I had seen my money about two weeks before.

Q. What reason have you to charge the prisoner with taking it - A. On the 4th of December the prisoner went to the linen-drapers and changed a five-pound note, as the linen-draper told me, and on the same night she brought home a new pelisse from the tailor's at Tottenham; she told me that she brought it from town, she paid for it with a two-pound and a one-pound note; she said, it was not paid for, and on the 4th I saw her pay a two-pound note away; I cannot say it was mine, I rather think so; and she went to the linen-drapers on Sunday morning, and paid for some cloth. I have not found any of my money.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

77. FRANCES JOHNSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of December , four pair of stockings, value 10 s. the property of George Minton , privately in his shop .

GEORGE MINTON . I am an hosier ; I live in Ratcliffe Highway . On the 9th of December last, I missed four pair of stockings out of my shop, one pair of black silk and three pair of cotton; they were my own property for sale. The prisoner was in my shop about six o'clock in the day, there were no other customers in the shop but the prisoner; she applied for some Guernsey frocks and some flannel shirts, and bought nothing; these stockings were at the lower part of the shop, I had just taken them out of the window a few minutes before, and the moment the prisoner went out of the shop I missed the stockings; I went directly after the prisoner, and could not find her. My boy went down the gateway two doors beyond my house, he there saw the prisoner;he brought her into the shop. The prisoner stood with her back to the counter, near to where the stockings had been taken and before the officer came I saw the prisoner place one pair of stockings upon the counter; I immediately put my hand upon them, they were quite warm. I opened them; they were dirty as if they had fallen in the street; that was a pair of cotton stockings. The officer came, and searched the prisoner; he found nothing more upon her.

Q. What was the value of all the stockings that you lost - A. Ten shillings; the pair of stockings that the prisoner put on the counter was eighteen pence.

WILLIAM MULLEN . I am a servant to Mr. Minton. On the 9th of December, I came into the shop before the prisoner went out, and directly she went out I ran after her; I found her up the gateway with a pair of stockings in her hand. I asked her where the stockings was; she seemed flurried, and did not answer; at last she said the other girl had got them. I brought her back to my master's shop; I went for an officer.

GUILTY, aged 21,

Of stealing to the value of 18 d. only .

Confined 1 year in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Dallas.

78. THOMAS GENTRY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of December , twenty-eight pounds weight of butter, value 30 s. and a tub, value 1 s. the property of John Tapperell , privately in his shop .

RACHEL ROBSON . I am an assistant to John Tapperell , he lives in East Smithfield, in the parish of Aldgate ; he is a grocer, and deals in butter and cheese .

Q. On the 16th of December, do you remember being in his house - A. Yes, I was in the parlour with Mr. Tapperell's daughters; Miss Tapperell saw the prisoner go out of the shop; I looked and saw the prisoner go off the steps of the door; I went to the door, and saw the man go up the street; Mr. Bennett pursued the man, and brought him back.

Q. Now, look at the prisoner, is that the man - A. It is; he had a tub of butter with him when he was brought back, a half firkin, the value of it is thirty shillings; it is the property of Mr. John Tapperell .

JOHN BENNETT . I am a cabinet-maker; I live at 50, Lower East Smithfield. Miss Robson called to me, she said, Mr. Bennett, there is a man has taken a tub of butter out of the shop; I pursued him as far as Red Cross-street, he threw the tub of butter down, that impeded my progress of laying hold of him; I took him, and brought him back.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming along with a jack ass load of wood to sell, a man asked me to carry this tub of butter for him down the street, and when the gentleman came up he ran away; I was not nigh the house where the butter came from.

GUILTY, aged 32.

Of stealing, but not privately .

Confined 1 year in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before the Lord Chief Baron

79. GEORGE THACKER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of December , nine yards of ribbon, value 4 s. 6 d. the property of James Grafton .

MR. WOOD. I live opposite of Mr. Grafton, he is a hosier and haberdasher .

Q. Do you remember seeing any boys near his shop - A. Yes, on the 17th of December, about six o'clock, I saw two boys, they were in the act of drawing ribbon out through the screw holes of his shop window; I could not see which of them did it. I opened my door and run after them; I took one of them, that was the prisoner; he was never out of my sight. I found nothing upon him.

Q. You have not got the ribbon - A. No, nor any thing else.

Q. Could you, while you were in the shop, see them in the habit of drawing the ribbon out - A. Yes, one of the boys went up the street, and the other down the street; they run about an hundred yards together.

JAMES GRAFTON . I an haberdasher at Hoxton.

Q. You had an alarm on the 17th of December, had not you - A Yes, by the witness Lettsom; I missed nine yards of figured orange ribbon from the inner side of the window, close to the screw hole of the window; I had cut some off that piece within half an hour before; it was robbed up upon a block, I value it at four shillings and sixpence.

CHARLES LETTSOM . I gave Mr. Grafton an alarm about six o'clock in the evening, I had occasion to call upon Mr. Wood; about twenty yards before I got to Mr. Wood's door, I saw the prisoner standing at Mr. Grafton's window; I stopped and looked; the two boys turned round and looked at me. I went into Mr. Wood's and communicated my suspicion to him; we shut the door, and looked through the glass window, we observed the boys drawing something through the bolt hole in the window; the boys ran away immediately before I opened Mr. Wood's door. Mr. Wood pursued them; I went over to Mr. Grafton.

Q. Did you make observation enough of the boys to say the prisoner was one of them - A. No. I cannot swear to either of them.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been out of work about a month, I went round that way to look for work.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

80. JOSEPH SHADE and MARY HAGERTY were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of December , nine pounds weight of sugar, value 12 s. the property of John Tyler .

80. JAMES SIMMONS . I am a patrol of Aldgate parish . On the 29th of December, I saw the prisoner Shade in company with the woman; she had something under her arm; she was going to a shop in King-street, Tower-hill. I stopped her; the man made off. I took the loaf of sugar from the woman.I asked her how she came by it; she said she bought it at Mr. Vincent's, which was the house she was going into. I asked her what she gave a pound for it; she said, fifteen pence. I gave the loaf of sugar into Mr. Turnbridge's hands, he is the officer of the parish, and the next evening we went in pursuit of the man. We found him behind the Back-lane, in Thomas-street. Mr. Turnbridge went to the door, and asked if such a man lived there; they said he did, he was not within, and then I saw the prisoner coming along within four houses of his own door. I asked him if he lived at that door where the light was; he denied it. I took him to the door where the light was; the woman of the house said here is Mr. Shade. He took his key from his pocket, and unlocked his room door, which is the lower room. The officer searched the room, and found nothing. He made his escape while we were searching the room. I pursued him and brought him back; we then took him to the watchhouse.

JOHN TURNBRIDGE . I am a constable. Shade was brought to me, and a loaf of sugar with the woman prisoner, and where the woman said she had bought it I enquired; there they said they had not sold a loaf of sugar that day.

GEORGE PARKER . I am in the employ of Mr. Tyler, sugar refiner, in Ratcliffe Highway.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. Yes, he worked for Mr. Tyler between six and seven weeks, until the week before Christmas.

JOHN SMITH . I work at Mr. Tyler's; it is part of my duty to mark the loaves of sugar.

Q. Look at the loaf of sugar - A. The mark on the sugar is my marking; it is Mr. Tyler's property.

Shade's Defence. I know nothing of the sugar. I do not know how she came by it.

Hagerty's Defence. I bought the sugar of a man in the street.

SHADE, GUILTY , aged 43.

HAGERTY, GUILTY , aged 26.

Confined 1 year in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Dallas.

81. HANNAH ROGERSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of November , two sheets, value 4 s. one blanket, value 4 s. and a bolster, value 3 s. the property of Thomas Balance , in a lodging-room .

THOMAS BALANCE . I live in Long-alley, Moorfields . The prisoner lodged in my house; she is a married woman ; she and her husband lived together in my house.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

82. WILLIAM ROCHESTER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of January , two stockings, value 18 d. the property of Henry Dickenson ; one iron pot, value 5 s. and a feather bed, value 4 s. the property of John Powell .

HENRY DICKENSON . I live in Palmer's-green, in the parish of Edmonton . In the month of August last, my drying ground was robbed of sundry articles that were left there after a wash.

Q. Among other things did you lose any stockings - A. I did, two stockings. I have seen them since in the possession of the patrol.

Q. Had you seen them yourself in the drying ground - A. No, the servant who had the charge of them at that time is out of my service. I cannot tell when last I had them in my possession, nor how they went out of my possession.

JOHN POWELL . I lost an iron pot and a feather bed the latter end of July last. I lost them from a shed in my yard. I saw them the day before I missed them, and I saw them again last Saturday night in the possession of Smith the patrol.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. Yes, he lived near me. I can speak to the iron pot being my property. The prisoner took the pot, and left the lid at home. I know the pot by the lid fitting it. This bed I know by the stripe of the tick; it is large blue stripes.

WILLIAM SMITH . I am a patrol. I got this iron pot and feather bed out of Rochester's house on Saturday evening last. I found the feather bed enclosed in a blanket to make a pillow of; it was on the bed on which Rochester slept. I found the pot in the same house, but not in the same room; it was in Rochester's part of the house. I asked the prisoner where he got the feather bed; he said it was a bed that his wife's father gave him seven years ago. He said he found the pot in a ditch.

Prisoner's Defence. I found the pot. My wife's father gave her the bed when he went in the workhouse. He has lost the use of his limbs; he cannot get across the place without being carried.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

83. THOMAS PINK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of December , three yards of sheeting, value 9 s. the property of William Wilkinson , Richard Baker , and John Fisher .

THOMAS ROBINSON . I am in the employ of Wilkinson, Richard Baker , and John Fisher ; they are calenderers . On the 13th of December I was informed that there was this sheeting concealed on the stairs at two o'clock; when the man shewed it me I desired him to replace it where he took it from. In the course of half an hour after he replaced it the workmen were going to their tea; I heard a step up this landing; I was in the cellar. I came from there, and saw the prisoner walking from the passage into the yard. I saw he had something in his apron; I asked him what he had; he said, some linen. I saw the linen; it is the property of Messrs. Wilkinson, Baker, and Fisher. I know the linen by the mark; it is a remnant of Irish sheeting. I always thought the prisoner to be a good boy.

Prisoner's Defence. As I was going up the stairs I saw a piece of linen on the stairs. I took it up, and was going to the accompting-house with it.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Dallas.

84. GEORGE LENTZ was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of November , a watch, value 4 l. a watch chain, value 2 l. and three seals, value 5 l. the property of Thomas Vincent .

THOMAS VINCENT . I am a silversmith , 145. High Holborn . On the 8th of November last, the prisoner came into my shop; he asked to look at a watch, stating that he had seen it in the front sash. I took it out; he said he must have a chain with it. It was a silver hunting watch, a gold chain, and he chosed three seals. I put them all together, set the watch right; we could not agree about the key; I gave him a gilt key to wind the watch until I got the gold key made. He said he had not the money for it in his pocket; he said if you will send it to No. 4, Southampton-row, I will send the money by the bearer.

Q. Did he give you any name - A. He did not. He was dressed in a middling way. I called my young man. The prisoner went out of the house. I said to my young man, John, follow the gentleman immediately, and remember you do not leave the goods without the money.

Q. Did you afterwards receive from your boy any note - A. I went to the house myself to No. 4, Southampton-row; I found a check upon the banker, I think Hammersley and Co. Pall Mall.

Q. Did you go with that check to the bankers - A. I did not. I sent a friend just to enquire a day or two after; he is not here.

JOHN COX . I am an apprentice to Mr. Vincent. I went with the watch, chain, and seals, to 4, Southampton-row. I there saw the prisoner in the parlour; I produced the watch, chain, and seals; he tendered me a check; I laid them on the table. The prisoner wrote that check while I waited. This is the check. I refused the check. I put the watch, chain, and seals, in my pocket. After I had gone out he called me back, and requested I would let let him shew the watch to his father. I came back.

Q. When you came back where was he - A. In the passage then. He said, give me back the watch, chain, and seals, to let my father see it; we both then went into the parlour. I waited about ten minutes, and rung the parlour bell; I found he was gone out of the house. I never took the check; I left it on the table, and was going home with the watch. I thought I would go home; I sent for my master; he came.

SAMUEL TAUNTON . I am a Bow-street officer. I apprehended the prisoner on the 1st of December. I found several duplicates upon him, and among others I found the duplicate of a gold chain pledged with Mr. Kimber on the 19th of November. This is it.

THOMAS ASHTON . I am a taylor and draper, in the Strand.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. On the 19th of November he came to me, and had articles to the amount of fifteen pounds; he came and had the articles; he gave my young man a check; my young man took the check. Two days after that I met him in the Park; I told him the manner he had treated my young man, the check was not paid; it is drawn upon Drummond. The prisoner gave me the watch, chain, seals, and key, and begged I would take no further notice of it, he would come the next day, and bring me the money. That was the 21st of November. This is the watch, chain, seals, and key.

Prosecutor. This is the watch that the prisoner had, and two of the seals. The chain is not mine.

Prisoner's Defence. The young man said he would not take the check; the young man went out of the door; I called him back again; I asked him if he would allow me to take the watch to a friend, to shew him the purchase, to know whether the agreed with the terms. My intention was to have paid him, but I was not able to pay at that time.

GUILTY , aged 17.

First Middlesex jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

85. GEORGE LENTZ was indicted for feloniously forging, disposing of, and putting away a certain forged order for payment of the sum of 137 l. 13 s. with intention to defraud Elizabeth Elvey , widow .

SECOND and THIRD COUNT, for like offence, with intention to defraud Peter Esdaile , James Esdaile , and Thomas Scott .

ELIZABETH ELVEY . I am a widow; I live at No. 9, New Bond-street; I keep a shop; I sell writing desks, pocket-books, and dressing cases. He said his name was Douglas, that his brother had purchased a number of articles of me, and that he now wanted a dressing-case.

Q. In fact, had a gentleman of that name some time ago dealt with you - A. Yes. He looked out a dressing case, a handsome one, price one hundred and ten pounds. After he looked that out he said he wanted a handsome present for a lady. He looked out a pocket-book, a silver ink stand, two gold pencil-cases, and several other articles to the amount of one hundred and thirty-seven pounds thirteen shillings. He directed me to send them to 14, Charles-street, Grosvenor-square; he said he would go and get the money ready if I would take them there.

COURT. He desired you to take them there, did he - A. Yes; I myself went with them. When I got to the house he met me at the door; he took me into the parlour; I shewed him the box and the other things; he said they were all right, and there was the money. He gave me a check upon Sir James Esdaile 's house. It was ready written. This is the check.

Q. Did you give him any receipt - A. He did not ask me for any. I left the things with him. I sent the check to Esdaile's house. I sent it on the 27th, Saturday morning, the same day.

Mr. Gurney. The transaction was on the 26th - A. Yes, it is dated on the 27th. Before I presented the check I went to the house in Charles-street; I found he was gone.

Q. Did you ever find him afterwards until he was taken up - A. No. I have found some of my things at the pawnbrokers.

COURT. Did you observe the check was dated the day after - A. No, I did not.

Q. Should you have left the things if you had not received that check - A. No.

Q. Where did Mr. Douglas live that he named to you - A. In Bolton-street. He did not mention where he lived, only that he was his brother.

Q. Not mentioning what Mr. Douglas he meaned - A. No.

Q. But there was a Mr. Douglas in Bolton-street, who had been with you before - A. Yes.

Q. By whom did you send the check - A. By my man, William Lawrence .

WILLIAM LAWRENCE . Q. Did you on the 27th of November present that check at Sir James Esdaile 's - A. Yes, it was not paid. I took it back to Mrs. Elvey's. I gave it into the hands of the clerk, I believe; he took it into a back room. This is the check that I presented.

Q. to Prosecutrix. Mrs. Elvey, I believe, your initials are upon that check - A. Yes; I wrote that after it went to the bankers.

Q. There is a blot upon the figures - A. Yes; I observed that blot upon the figures before I sent Lawrence with it.

Q. How did that blot happen - A. Afterwards he took a pen and writ, it fell on it; he said that would be no detriment to it.

Prisoner, Q. to Lawrence. When you presented that check what did the clerk say to you - A. I presented the check; the clerk answered, there was no such person as George Henry Douglas that kept cash there.

JOHN HALARD. I am clerk in the house of Sir James Esdaile and Company.

Q. Has the prisoner, either by the name of George Henry Douglas , or by any other name, kept cash at your house - A. No, sir; no person of the name of George Henry Douglas ever kept cash at the house. It was to me that check was presented. I took it into the country office, supposing it might be drawn from the country bank. I never parted with it.

WILLIAM HARDING . I am a musician; I live in New-street, Broad-street.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar - A. I have known him six or seven years; I knew his father and family; his name is Lentz; that is his father's name.

Q. How many years have you known his father - A About the same time; I have played the same time with him in the same profession; he is in the musical department as well as a player.

SAMUEL TAUNTON . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner on the 1st of December last; I found him at the Swan livery stables, Knightsbridge. I took him to his lodgings, No. 2, Blacklin's-lane, Chelsea. I found upon him two duplicates of two gold pencil-cases, dated the 27th of November. I found them on his person, and the key of the dressing-case that was tied to a bunch of keys in his pocket. I found the dressing-case at his lodgings, No. 2, Blacklin's-lane; he told me he lodged in Southampton-row; I told him he lodged in Blacklin's-lane, where I was going to take him to. This key was in his pocket; it opens the dressing-case.

JOHN WOODYEAR . I am a pawnbroker. On the 27th of November the prisoner pawned two pencil-cases with me.

FRIEND LAWRENCE. I am a servant to Mr. Turner, pawnbroker. The prisoner pawned a pocketbook with me on the 29th of November.

Q. to Prosecutrix. Look at the pocket-book last produced - A. It is the pocket-book the prisoner had of me; there is my shop mark upon all the articles; it is made by a person in my employ; I know it to be the pocket-book. The pencil-cases produced by Woodyear there is my mark upon them.

Mr. Gurney, Q. to Woodyear. You have an inkstand also - A. Yes, a silver ink-stand. I lent one pound on the ink-stand.

Prosecutrix. That is my ink-stand. The dressing-case is mine. There are a great many things wanting.

(The draft read.)

"Sir James Esdaile and Company, bankers, London. 27th of November, 1813. Please to pay Mrs. Elvey, or bearer, the sum of 137 l. 13 s. which place to my account.

GEORGE HENRY DOUGLAS ."

Prisoner's Defence. The draft that was given to Mrs. Elvey was not written by me, it was written by one of the name of Knight, who had been with me. On the 24th of November, I, George Lentz , in company with Philip Henry Knight went to the shop of Mrs. Elvey, No. 9, New Bond-street, Oxford-street, with intention of asking any one that might be in the shop where one Mr. Easton, a tailor lived. Mrs. Elvey informed me the place of his abode. When in the shop, Mr. Knight enquired the price of a dressing case, and asked me if I was not in want of such an article, which question caused me to look at one. We looked at one; the price was one hundred and ten pounds. We answered we would call, and give an answer in the morning, having just returned from Brighton. Knight observed to me that we should lose no time. We fixed upon an apartment to have it sent home. Knight advised me to take the name of George Henry Douglas . This was on the 27th, in the morning; the lady of the house not being able to inform us the terms, we deferred taking it till the next morning. We returned to Mrs. Elvey, and informed her that we should have the dressing-case at one hundred and ten pounds, and to look out the pocket-book and other articles, which made it one hundred and thirty-seven pounds thirteen shillings. We then desired her to send it to No. 14, Charles-street; I told her to make out the bill for George Henry Douglas . We returned to Charles street; the lady could give no answer. He observed to the lady that we had some articles coming then for us. We gave in the name of Spencer Pemberton and George Henry Douglas . He immediately returned to the door; a knock came at the same time, the door was opened; Mrs. Elvey came up to us; Knight gave the check into my hands, and without previous excuse left me. Mrs. Elvey and her man went into the parlour; she produced the dressing-case, the bill, and other articles, which amounted to more than she had told us. I gave her the draft; she went away. I ordered the man of the house to take the box to the first coach stand; he did. I put the case on my shoulder; I had not proceeded far in Brompton-row, when Knight asked me for some of the things. I told him, after using me as he had he should have none. We proceeded then to the public-house and opened the case.

Prosecutrix. The direction the prisoner wrote in my presence. G. H. Douglas, 14, Charles-street, Grosvenor-square. He gave it me as his name and address.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 17.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

83. ANN HALEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of December , a gown, value 6 s.a petticoat, value 4 s. a boy's coat, value 7 s. and a napkin, value 1 s. the property of William Herbert .

WILLIAM HERBERT. I am a weaver ; I live in White-row, Spitalfields .

Q. Did you lose any property on the 8th of December last - A. Yes, a black silk gown, a petticoat, a boy's jacket, and a napkin; I lost them from a drawer in the first floor; I had seen them safe six or seven days before. In consequence of what Margaret Leary told me, I went to Perkins's, the pawnbroker, in Widegate-street; I described the things that I had missed; Mr. Whittaker produced the things, and asked if they were mine; I said they were. He said, there was the person that had brought them; he pointed to the prisoner; the prisoner begged me to forgive her.

MARGARET LEARY. I live in the same house as Mr. Herbert does. On the 8th of December, I saw the prisoner in Mr. Herbert's chamber, she asked me for an old lady in the garret that wound the engine; I said, there was an old lady that wound the engine. She went up two or three stairs, and came down again; I told Mr. Herbert directly.

STEPHEN WHITTAKER . I am shopman to Mr. Perkins, pawnbroker, Widegate-street. On the 8th of December, the prisoner came to our shop, she offered the articles to pledge; Mr. Herbert came, and asked if we had taken such articles; I said, look at these, and see if they are yours, I have had them just offered to me by this woman in the box, there is the woman, do as you like with the things, and Sapwell, the officer was sent for.

THOMAS SAPWELL . These things were delivered to me.

Q. Did you go to Herbert's room in order to examine the room - A. I did; I have not a doubt but this chisel forced the door open; there were marks on the door and the post that just fitted this chisel. This is the chisel I found in the prisoner's pocket; the prisoner and me had a struggle before I could get the chisel from her.

Q. to prosecutor. Look at the articles - A. They are all mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming through Widegate-street, a gentlewoman asked me to take them in, and she would give me some halfpence, and when I went in my prosecutor came in, and took me.

GUILTY , aged 16.

Confined 1 year in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

87. JOHN EVANS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of December , three yards and a half of stair carpetting, value 10 s. the property of John Broom , Herbert Broom , and John Harris .

CORNELIUS WILLS HARRIS . Q. Do you know the prosecutors - A. Yes, they are carpet manufacturers ; their names are John Broom , Herbert Broom , and John Harris ; I am the son of Mr. Harris. The prisoner was porter to Messrs. Broom and Harris; the carpetting was not missed from the warehouse until after it was found on the prisoner. I saw the carpetting at Bow-street office; I know the carpetting to be the prosecutors property. I had occasion to cut off six yards from the pi and the three yards that was left.

JOHN GRIFFITHS. I am foreman in the Strand. On Saturday, the 18th of December, the prisoner stopped at the door, which attracted my attention; asked I would purchase a calf skin, which the habit of doing; he took it out of a piece of brown holland, and then I saw it was a piece of carpetting by his hesitation I was induced to think it was purloined. I taxed him with it; he said, he had purloined it; he told me freely. I said, I am sure you never came by this honestly, where did you get this; he said, that was nothing to me. I then said to him, I conjecture you are an upholsters porter, that he had been laying it down at some house and this was a remnant; he said, it was. I said, who is your master; he said, that was nothing to me. I insisted upon knowing, or he should not have the property. He said, he was an upholsterer in the City. He had a small bit of paper in his hand which led me to the knowledge of Messrs. Broom and Harris. On Sunday morning I went to Mr. Schofield; I asked him where he purchased the rug; he told me of Messrs. Broom and Harris; I went to Messrs. Broom and Harris; I saw their foreman; I asked him if they had such a man; he said, they had. I asked him if they had missed any thing; he said, I could not tell. This is the capetting the prisoner offered me for sale, and the carpet he admitted he had stolen.

Cornelius Harris . This is the three yards and a half that was left when I cut off the six yards; it is the property of Messrs. Broom and Harris.

The prisoner called five witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 36,

Confined 2 years in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Dallas.

88. GEORGE LEVI PERRY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of December a watch, value 30 s. the property of Joseph York Hatton .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY , aged 18.

Fined 1 s. and discharged.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

89. JOHN JONES , alias GRIFFITHS , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of December , a wrapper, value 1 s. four shirts, value 2 l. four cravets, value 6 s. two handkerchiefs, value 6 s. three towels, value 3 s. and a pair of sheets, value 1 l. the property of John M'Beth .

JOHN M'BETH. I am a carrier . I carried these goods for Mrs. Bean, of Lower Layton. On the 9th of December, I lost these things in Gracechurch-street; I left the cart on seeing my lad coming to go into Leadenhall-market; my lad was coming up to the cart; he was about a dozen yards off the cart when I went up to Leadenhall-market.

JOHN MOORE . I am the lad that belongs to Mr. M'Beth's cart. I took up a bundle to White Hart-court, I ran after the cart; I saw my master making from the cart, and when I got to the cart the prisonerwas in the cart; I asked him what he wanted; he said, his parcel. I told him he did not want any parcel; he said, he did. He got out of the cart with a bundle under his arm; I followed him, and catched hold of him by the collar; we scuffled a bit. He threw the bundle into the cart; I still kept hold of him. He asked me to let him go as he had nothing; I told him he should not go until master came. I held him until master came, and then I told him of it. I saw him getting down out of the cart when I came to it.

MR. NALDER. I was coming by, I took the prisoner in custody; I did not see the bundle, it never was in my possession; knowing the prisoner I secured him.

Moore. This is the bundle; I am sure it is the bundle that I had in the cart, Mrs. Bean delivered it to me in the morning.

ELIZABETH BEAN . My bundle contained four shirts, four cravets, three towels, and a pair of sheets; I had them to wash.

Prisoner's Defence. I was rather forward in liquor, I fell up against the cart; as for any bundle, I never had; I never was in the cart.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

90. ELIZABETH FIELD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of January , four yards of cloth, value 3 s. and one gore of a tent, value 1 s. the property of John Maberley .

MARY LANGLEY . I am in the employ of Mr. Maberley; I am forewoman. The prisoner is in the employ of Mr. Maberley, a piece woman under me in work. On last Tuesday week, at the dinner hour, a person informed me that she had the property about her; I stopped all the wemon, every one. I found upon the prisoner four yards of what we call walling of a tent, and one gore of a tent.

MARY ALDERSON . I saw the prisoner while sitting at work put four yards of walling into her pocket, and one gore, and I saw Mary Langley take it from her.

HENRY KERRIDGE . I am a constable. I produce the cloth.

WILLIAM CARTER . It is Mr. Maberley's property.

Prisoner's Defence. I put the work in my pocket to work at my dinner hour; I was behind hand in my work.

Mrs. Langley. They are not suffered to take the work out to do upon any occasion.

GUILTY , aged 65.

Confined 3 months in Newgate , and whipped in jail .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

91. GRACE MAPLES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of December , a coat, value 18 s. a waistcoat, value 5 s. and a pair of breeches, value 9 s. the property of Richard Roberts .

RICHARD ROBERTS . I am a gold and silver refiner ; I work for Mrs. Cowie, Falcon-square; I live in Half Moon-passage, Aldersgate-street.

WINNIFIELD ROBERTS. I am the wife of Richard Roberts . The prisoner was out of place; I had her to look after my place while I went to the doctors, and when I came back I missed the clothes off the line, and she was gone. The constable took her; she said, she pawned the clothes for a pound. The clothes are here.

HENRY SMITH . I am a pawnbroker. I produce a coat, waistcoat, and breeches, pawned on the 13th of December. I have no recollection of the person.

WILLIAM TAYLOR . I am a constable. On the 27th of December, I took the prisoner in custody. The prisoner acknowledged that she had pledged the clothes for a pound at Mr. Smith's, in Wood-street.

Prosecutor. The coat, waistcoat, and breeches, are mine.

GUILTY, aged 18.

Judgment respited .

London jury before Mr. Recorder

92. CATHERINE RUBY , MARY FITZGERALD , and MARY ANN BURRIDGE were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of December , eighty yards of ribbon, value 5 l. the property of Charles Bluck .

CHARLES BLUCK . I am an haberdasher , Bishopsgate within . On the 7th of December, between two and three in the day, the three prisoners came in together, and asked to look at some ribbon, and while I was serving them I thought I saw Catherine Ruby take some ribbon. I afterwards saw Fitzgerald take a piece of ribbon; I laid hold of Fitzgerald, and asked her what she had done with it, and turning round I saw Burridge was going out of the shop; I laid hold of her pocket, and found it full. I took them all three back, and searched them, and Burridge dropped the whole of the property out of her pocket, which the officer has. We sent for Sapwell, the officer, who came, and took charge of them. Burridge never took any thing from me; Catherine Ruby was the person I suspected first, the next was Fitzgerald.

THOMAS SAPWELL . I am an officer. I took the prisoners in custody. I searched them; I found nothing upon them. I produce seven pieces of ribbon, I received them of Mr. Bluck.

Burridge's Defence. I went into this gentleman's shop, I was asking for needles and cotton; he caught hold of Ruby; he shook her pocket, and said what are you dropping. He then told the boy to send for an officer; we were searched all over; he found nothing upon either of us. I know nothing of the other two prisoners.

Fitzgerald's Defence. On the 7th of December, I went into the gentleman's shop to buy a pair of stockings; I was waiting for change, as for the other young women I never saw them before.

Ruby's Defence. I went in, and bought a yard and a half of ribbon; I was waiting for my change. The gentleman came round, and asked the young woman what she had got in her stockings; she said, nothing. He got hold of me, and asked me what I had got in my pocket. I never saw these two young women before.

Prosecutor. I saw Fitzgerald take it out of the drawer; I expected to find it in the stockings, but instead of that she had given it to Ruby.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

93. SAMUEL SAUNDERS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of December , fourteen yards of printed cotton, value 20 s. the property of William Gregory .

WILLIAM GREGORY . I am a linen-draper 28, Sun-street. On the 6th of December last, about half past two o'clock, I saw the prisoner in company with another, at the outside of my shop, and suspecting him I watched him, and saw him steal a piece of print from off the horse outside of the door; I pursued him, and brought him into the shop, and took the print from him. I sent for an officer, Mr. Shephard. This is the print; it is mine; it has my mark upon it.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming home by this shop; I saw some part on the ground about four yards from the door; I picked it up, and was going to carry it in the shop.

GUILTY, aged 23.

Judgment respited .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

94. JAMES SIMS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of December , fourteen pounds weight of brass, value 14 s. the property of John Thurkle .

JOHN THURKLE . I am a sword-cutler , in New-street-square, near Fetter-lane . The prisoner was my journeyman . On the 7th of December, I lost a quantity of metal; I had previously marked it; on the 7th of December, I discovered an ingot of brass was taken from the bin or box, where it was kept; I determined on searching the men when they came down to go out to dinner. I stopped a number, and desired them to walk into the parlour; I robbed down one of the men, and afterwards the prisoner, and in his breeches pocket I found the two ingots of brass. These are the pieces of brass; they are my property; I had marked them a month before I found them on the prisoner.

JOHN CALLEB. I am a brass-founder. I saw master rub the prisoner down; he told him to take the brass out of his pocket; the prisoner took out two pieces of brass, one from each breeches pocket.

Prisoner's Defence. I went to Mr. Thurkle's foreman; I asked him for six sets of heutenants furniture; he gave mo the keys to go and fetch them; I took the brass out of the shop; the men were coming down stairs, I was obliged to get out of the way to let the men pass, master was ordering the men into the parlour. I put the things in my pocket; I did not mean to take them out of the shop.

The prisoner called five witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 53.

Confined 6 months in Newgate , fined 1 s.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

95. JOHN JOHNSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3rd of December , two pounds weight of butter, value 3 s. the property of William Wykes .

WILLIAM WYKES . I am book-keeper to Collins and Keppel, Northampton carriers .

JACOB JOLLY . I am a boot-maker, I live at No. 24, Duke-street, West Smithfield. On Friday the 3rd of December, a waggon stopped opposite my shop window, and in the waggon the prisoner was sitting; the man that was driving it went into a public-house facing of our house, and while the waggoner was gone into the public-house the prisoner employed himself in untying a flat of butter, and out of that flat he took a lump of butter and placed the lump of butter in an empty one that was standing endways upwards; he then tied the flat that he had taken the lump of butter out, and threw it in a careless manner to the other side of the waggon, as though he was about his business. By this time the waggoner that went into the public-house came out, and brought half a pint of purl or beer to the prisoner; he drank it, and gave the waggoner the money to pay for it, and while the waggoner was gone to the public-house the second time, the prisoner took his handkerchief out of his pocket, as if to wipe his nose, instead of that he took up the lump of butter he had throwed into the empty flat, tied it up, and put it into his pocket; the waggoner then moved the waggon; they went on towards Smithfield. I saw two officer; I told them to follow me.

JOSEPH HORTON . I am an officer. I was in Smithfield upon duty; Mr. Jolly came, he said come along with me. He told me the man in the waggon had stolen a lump of butter out of a flat; I jumped in the waggon by Smithfield bars. On searching the prisoner I found two pounds of butter in his pocket.

Mr. Wykes. I am book-keeper of the waggon, and I keep the Inn. The prisoner was one of the porters; the waggon had been to Newgate market; the prisoner was appointed to take care that nobody should rob the waggon.

Prisoner's Defence. I have been porter at the inn many years, and never was in any mistake before.

GUILTY , aged 61.

Whipped in jail and discharged.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

96. JOHN KINGSWOOD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2nd of December , two pewter pint pots, value 2 s. the property of Hannah Redfearn .

HANNAH REDFERN . I keep the sign of the Green Dragon in Bishopsgate-street . I lost my pots on the 17th; these are the pots; they were brought to me by an officer. I know them to be my pots.

STEPHEN ADAMS . I am an officer. About six o'clock on the 17th of December, I was at the watch-house, a man came to me, and said there was a man at the Blue Boar public-house Rosemary-lane, with a pot in his pocket that belonged to the Green Dragon Bishopsgate-street. I went to the prisoner; I asked him how he came by the pot; he said he knewnothing about it. I got him as far as the watch-house; he was very much in liquor. I left him in charge of another while I went and informed Mrs. Redfearn. I only found one pot, that was in his hat.

WILLIAM KINNERSLEY . The prisoner was left in the watchhouse with me; he said, he had something to communicate to me; he said if you will be my friend look behind the chair; you will find something; I pulled the chair out, and the pot fell down. Mrs. Redfearn came to the watchhouse; I told her the circumstance. The first pot was found in his hat, the second behind the chair in the watchhouse, when only he and I were together.

Prisoner's Defence. I was very much intoxicated; I went into the Blue Boar to have something to drink. I do not know how I came by the pots; I did not know that I had any thing about me.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder

97. SARAH COPE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of January , thirty yards of ribbon, value 10 s. and four remnants of lace, value 15 s. the property of Isabella Smith .

ISABELLA SMITH. I am a milliner ; I live in St. Paul's church-yard .

Q. Do you keep a shop - A. No, I live in a private house. The prisoner was my servant ; she had lived with me near five years.

Q. When was it you lost these things - A. I suppose them to be taken on the 4th of January. During the time the prisoner has lived with me, I have lost articles of different kinds, and on that morning I missed four shillings; I had the prisoner's box searched, and there this property was found, thirty yards of ribbon; I know them to be mine by their matching with the remainder pieces.

JURY. Who found these things in the prisoner's box - A. I found them, in the presence of my sister, and four other persons.

PARNELL SMITH . I saw my sister search the box; all these things were found in the prisoner's box.

Prisoner's Defence. By sweeping the work room up at different times, I picked them up.

GUILTY , aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

98. HANNAH HOUSDEN and SARAH HOUSDEN were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of January , six pair of women's boots, value 4 l. 4 s. and a pair of women's shoes, value 6 s. the property of John Luke ; eleven pair of sandals, value 11 s. 8 d. the property of Thomas Smith , in the dwelling-house of John Luke .

JOHN LUKE . I am a shoe-maker, I live at 142, Cheapside. I lost these things on the 1st of January. Mr. Jones that keeps a public-house sent for me; he shewed me a basket in the bar, he asked me if I knew any thing of that basket; I said no, I do not know the basket. He asked me again, and then he said I am sure you will know something of the basket if you look in it; on my feeling about the basket I felt there were shoes inside of the basket. I asked Mr. Jones how the basket came there; he told me my servant had brought the basket into his house as soon as he was up; that was Hannah Housden , that she brought the basket there, and said she was going away at eleven o'clock, she would call for it again. I opened the top of the basket, I saw there lady's boots and shoes; I saw they were my property. I made up my mind that I would obtain a constable and get him to be at the public-house at the time the girl said she would call for the basket; I got Mr. Shephard, the constable to go to the public-house. About eleven o'clock the prisoner Hannah Housden left my house to go with her sister by the coach; they went out together.

THOMAS SMITH . I am a wholesale hosier and warehouseman. In the basket left at Mr. Jones's I found eleven pair of sandals belonging to me.

MR. SHEPHARD. I am a constable. On the 1st of January, Mr. Luke came to me to go to Mr. Jones's public-house in Gutter-lane, and there I was shewed the basket I now produce. I waited until the servant came for it; in about half an hour Hannah Housden came and asked for the basket at the bar; the landlord gave it her. I followed her into Cheapside; I then asked her where she was going with it; she said she was was going to her sister with it. I told her she must go with me to Mr. Luke; she said, there was nothing there of Mr. Luke's; it was her sister's basket. I asked her where her sister was; she turned on the left hand and showed me her sister about three or four doors off. I then took them both into custody. I produce the property; this is the contents of the basket, six pair of boots, a pair of shoes, and eleven pair of sandals.

Mr. Luke. The six pair of lady's boots and the pair of women's shoes are my property.

Mr. Smith. The eleven pair of sandals are my property.

Q. to Mr. Luke. Then Sarah had not lived with you, had she - A. She had been with us about a week; she came up to assist her sister.

Hannah Houden 's Defence. My sister knows nothing of it; I leave myself to the mercy of the court.

HANNAH HOUSDEN, GUILTY , aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

SARAH HOUSDEN, NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

99. HANNAH HOUSDEN and SARAH HOUSDEN were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of January , a pair of shoes, value 5 s. 9 d. two dozen pair of boot-laces, value 6 s. 6 d. and four pair of tassels, value 2 s. the property of John Luke ; and fourteen yards of bombazett, value 21 s. the property of Thomas Smith .

JOHN LUKE . This box was found on Sarah Housden when she was stopped in Cheapside; she had been with me a week; she came to take the place after her sister, but she was unwell also, and so she was going home; she took the box out of the house about eleven o'clock; there was a pair of shoes in itbelonged to me, two dozen boot-laces, and some tassels.

MR. SMITH. In the box there were fourteen yards and a half of bombazett my property. I hold a warehouse in Mr. Luke's house; I missed a piece of bombazett of the quality found in Sarah Housden 's box.

Sarah Housden . I wish to know by what mark Mr. Smith can speak to the bombazett -

Mr. Smith. There is no mark; here is the other half piece, it is exactly similar to it; I have no doubt it is mine.

Mr. Luke. I know the shoes to be my property.

Sarah Housden 's Defence. The stuff I bought when I was in the country; the shoes I received of my sister, not knowing but that they were hers.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

100. JOSEPH MARTIN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of January , a great coat, value 5 s. the property of William Littler .

WILLIAM LITTLER . I am a calico-printer , I live at Waltham Abbey, Essex. I lost my great coat on the 1st of January, about five o'clock; the night being dark my coat was in a single horse cart; I was leading the horse; my boy was behind on foot; it was a jockey cart. My boy saw the prisoner take the coat out of the cart; he told me and pointed to the man; I followed him; he dropped the coat before I got to him. There were three of them together; the prisoner was in the middle. I saw the man in middle drop the coat; I continued following him until I overtook him.

Q. You are sure he is one of the three that you followed, and dropped the coat - A. Yes; after the boy pointed him out to me I never lost sight of him.

JAMES MILES . I was following my master's cart: master was leading the horse. I saw the prisoner take the coat out of the cart; I told my master immediately; he run after him. He had not gone far when I poined him out; there was nobody close to him when he took it. I saw master lay hold of him. I am sure it was the same man. I am sure the man I pointed out and the man he took is the prisoner.

Prosecutor. This is my great coat.

Prisoner's Defence. I deal in oranges and lemons in the wholesale way; I had been about to the shops. On Saturday afternoon coming home from Islington; I heard the cry of stop thief; I saw two men running; I ran after them to stop them, that gentleman came after me.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

101. WILLIAM FREEMAN was indicted for that he, on the 14th of December , upon Ann Simpson feloniously did make an assault, and with a certain pewter pot which he held in his right hand, in and upon her head with malice aforethought, did strike and beat, thereby giving to her one mortal wound of the length of one inch and of the depth of a quarter of an inch, of which she languished until the 30th of the said month, December, and then died, and so the jurors say, that he, the said Ann Simpson , feloniously, wilfully, and with malice aforethought, did kill and murder . He also stood charged upon the Coroners inquisition of the like murder.

HANNAH CRAWLEY . I was at Mr. Bailey's, the Golden Chain, in the Tower, at the time when this transaction took place.

Q. Do you know the prisoner Freeman - A. Yes, he was there, and Ann Simpson was there; she was sitting in the same box with me, but Freeman was not.

Q. Who was in the house first - A. She was; he afterwards came in.

Q. Was any body with him - A. Not as I saw, he had a pint to himself.

Q. Was any other woman there besides Ann Simpson - A. There was a girl of the name of Maria; the prisoner drank to Maria; Ann Simpson was angry; she snatched the pot out of his hand.

Q. Did Ann Simpson use to be with him before - A. Yes, she mostly used to be with him. The prisoner took the pot out of her hand, and struck her on the head with it; he was provoked with having the liquor thrown over him. She was a passionate girl.

Q. And did she act passionately upon this occasion - A. Yes, she did; she abused him first, and used very aggravating language.

Q. Did you observe whether he struck her more than once - A. He struck her twice.

Q. What effect did these blows produce upon her - A. She started out with blood upon her head directly; then she was sent to the Hospital.

Q. Did he strike her with great violence - A. It was very violent.

Q. From the manner in which he struck her, did it appear to you that he meaned to do her a serious injury, or only to chastise her for her insolence - A. I know he did not mean to hurt her, only to chastise her for her insolence; he was in a passion. It did not look to me as though he intended to do her a serious injury.

Q. Do you know what became of her after this - A. She was taken to the Hospital, Charlotte Foster went with her.

Q. Did Ann Simpson cohabit with him - A. Yes.

MATILDA STANTON and CHARLOTTE FOSTER were called upon their recognizances.

THOMAS WILLIAM BARNWELL . I am a pupil at the London Hospital. I saw Ann Simpson when she was brought to the Hospital; she had a small wound upon the head bleeding; I think she was brought there on the 14th of December.

Q. Did it appear to you that that wound was dangerous at first - A. Not in the least; it afterwards assumed an alarming appearance by assuming another disease, an erysipelas produced inflammation of the brain, and the inflammation death.

Q. Was the erysipelas produced by the wound - A. I cannot say that; she was attended skilfully by other surgeons of more skill than me.

Q. Was the erysipelas in the wound - A. Yes, and it affected her arms. It spread from the wound to other parts of the body.

Q. Do you think it would have been at other parts of the body, but from its origin in the wound - A. I think not.

Q. Was there any erysipelas there before the wound - A. I rather think not. I think the wound was the acting cause of the erysipelas.

Q. When you saw the erysipelas in the wound, and saw it spreading over other parts of the body, did you, as a rational man, think it proceeded from the wound - A. Yes, I rather think it produced from the wound, but there are causes which it might produce besides wounds.

Prisoner's Defence. She and I had been together a month or six weeks, or better. We had been drinking together several times; she was passionate and abusive; she abused me much that morning. The drink rather took effect of me. When she spilled my beer I went from her and touched another pint pot. I am very sorry I happened to do such a thing. I never intended to do any such thing.

GUILTY, aged 41,

Of Manslaughter only .

Confined 6 months in Newgate , fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

102. THOMAS SMITH was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Charles Smith , about the hour of five in the night of the 3d of December , with intent to steal, and stealing therein a piece of cheese, value 3 d. his property.

CHARLES SMITH . I live at Hampton Wick .

Q. Who was up last on the 3rd of December - A. I was up last; about eleven I went to bed. I examined the house to see whether the doors and windows were fast; they were all fast.

Q. Who came down first in the morning - A. The prisoner; he lodged with me at that time; he went down to go to his master's work.

Q. Then he was in your house that night - A. Yes; he went to bed and came down first in the morning. On the 13th of November twelvemonth, his master came to me and engaged to rent a stable of me; he introduced four horses to his stable, and once or twice he changed his carter; at last the prisoner was his carter.

Q. He lodged in your house on the night in question - A. Yes.

Q. The doors and windows were all fastened - A. Yes. When he came down he knocked at my bedroom door, and asked me for the key of the stair-case door; I gave it him. In consequence of my having suspicion, and I had been frequently robbed since he had been in the house; I followed him down; when I came to the stair case door, the key that I had given to him to open the stair-case door he had kept to let himself into the larder, which larder is part of my dwelling-house, all under the same roof. I found in the larder he had helped himself to a slice of cheese, which he had cut off and laid on his smock frock, on the ground. The cheese weighed about eleven pounds, or better. He was in the act of turning to help himself to another piece; or something else. This was about five o'clock in the morning, three hours before day light nearly, within a few minutes. I then tried to lock him in the larder by way of security. I found the key in the door, and with my turning I could not make the key set upon the lock. I told him to go and do his horses, or what be pleased, he should not go out. I secured him in the yard.

Q. You found him in the larder, and you secured him at five o'clock in the morning - A. Yes.

Q. What is the value of the cheese - A. I valued it at three pence.

Q. Was your larder locked the over night - A. I am positive of that myself, my wife locked it. At eight o'clock the prisoner made his escape out of the yard by getting over a coal shed. We then traced him to Putney Heath; we found him at a public-house.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, nor called any witnesses to his character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 51.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Dallas.

103. JAMES HALL was indicted for that he, on the 7th of December , one black sheep, value 1 l. the property of Benjamin Hopkinson and Benjamin Mansfield , feloniously did kill with intent feloniously to steal part of the carcase of the said sheep, that is to say, the two hind quarters of the said sheep .

BENJAMIN HOPKINSON . Q. You have fields near Highgate - A. Yes.

Q. Did you join with Mr. Mansfield in purchasing some sheep - A. Yes, these sheep were placed by me in a field near Highgate. I had only one black sheep.

Q. On the night between the 6th and 7th of December, did you lose that sheep - A. Yes.

Q. When you went to the field, and had information of the sheep that was lost, did you see any part of it - A. In a few minutes after I went down two men brought the fore part of the sheep; they said they had detected the man, and had taken him to the watchhouse. I then knew the parts of the sheep to be mine, because it is a remarkable sheep.

COURT. You said the sheep was yours and Mansfield's - A. Yes.

Q. How many were there in the whole - A. There were nineteen. I knew the sheep by the marks, and by the head. The patrol took that part of the sheep down to where the other part was; that part was compared with the other part, it appeared to be the same sheep; the parts corresponded; the hind quarters corresponded with the fore quarters left on the skin. He had cut the sheep in two, and skinned the hind quarters, and left the fore quarters on the skin. They were all joined so as to constitute the entire whole sheep.

SAMUEL AUSTIN . I am a watchman belonging to Islington. On the morning of the 7th of December, I saw the prisoner; I walked with him about an hundred yards; I left him about a minute to inform another watchman. I afterwards run up the path, and catched hold of him. It was between five and six in the morning when I stopped him; it was quitedark when I stopped him with this bundle in his possession. The parcel contained the hind quarters of a sheep.

Q. What did you say to him - A. I said, you have got something that does not belong to you; he said he had got some mutton that his brother had given him; he had killed a sheep. I felt the mutton; it was quite warm. I then secured him, and took him to the watchhouse. I and the constable of the night searched him; we found a knife upon him; his pockets were filled with horse hair and cow hair

Q. Was that knife an instrument fit to kill sheep - A. Yes, I believe it had killed the sheep; there was some blood upon it. At Worship-street the parts of the sheep were joined together; they matched.

COURT. You say you found a parcel upon him with a hind part of a sheep in it - A. Yes; it was all tied up in one bundle. The pluck was of oneside, the knife and the bill hook were all in one bundle, and there was a piece of black wool on the mutton.

WILLIAM MAGEN . I am patrol of Islington. I saw the prisoner in the watchhouse, and the hind parts of a sheep laying on the table. I saw the horse hair taken from him. I went with my brother patrol to about Highbury-barn; I knew the prisoner must have come that way by the way where he was taken. When we got to Mr. Hopkinson's farm we met a person belonging to it, the bailiff; we asked him whether there was any sheep on or about that part. We made search there; we found the sheep wild there, in two meadows; there was one sheep running about; we went to one part of the field; we found a dissected skin and entrails put into the ditch, covered over with roots of grass. We took it with us to Mr. Hopkinson. When we found the skin we did not find the fore part of the mutton. This was the dissected skin, belonging to the hind part. We returned again to the field; in the centre of that field there had been a pond, under a knapsack laid the head, and a little distance from the head laid the bladder and gall, and a little distance was some blood, as if the sheep had been killed there. We went to another part of the field; we found the fore part of the sheep with the skin on. We then went to Mr. Hopkinson, and took the whole together. I put the parts together. I am a butcher. I had not a shadow of a doubt when they were compared together but what they belonged to the carcase of a sheep.

EPHRAIM SMALL . Q. You went with the last witness to Hopkinson's field - A. Yes, I did; I saw the limbs of the sheep, as described by the last witness. I accompanied him all the time; I was present and saw the limbs of the sheep put together, and compared. I think it was all one sheep.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence; called six witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 44.

[ The prisoner was recommend to mercy by the jury, on account of his good character .]

Second Middlesex jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

104. WILLIAM JONES was indicted for that he, on the 9th of January , one sheep, value 35 s. the property of William Weedon , feloniously did kill, with intent to steal part of the carcase of the said sheep, that is to say, two legs, two shoulders, and part of two loins .

FRANCIS WEEDON . My father is the prosecutor; he lives at Hillingdon. On Saturday the 8th of January, the sheep were all right, at four o'clock; they were all safe in the field; there were forty-two altogether. It was a field belonging to Mr. Boddy, in Hillingdon parish . On Sunday morning we discovered this sheep was missing. We found the head and skin and neck and breast also; We found them near a brook which runs through that field, where the sheep had been skinned; it laid apparently where the sheep had been killed; the entrails and blood laid there.

Q. Did you go to the prisoner's house on Sunday morning - A. There was snow upon the ground; there was a track of a shoe upon it; I thought I knew it by having the shoes to mend at the shop before. I concluded it was the marks of William Jones 's shoes; they led upwards of fifty yards in the field, and up to his house.

COURT. In your tracing these footstep, was it in the public-road - A. Yes, in the public-road.

Mr. Alley. You thought you knew the foot from the appearance of nails in the shoe - A. Yes, and shoes. I had mended the prisoner's shoes.

Q. Did you put the nails in the heels - A. No; I mended the shoes; I thought it was the marks of the prisoner's shoes. I went to Read, the officer; he and I went again to the footsteps, and afterwards we went to the prisoner's house. We came to the prisoner's house about two o'clock on the Sunday. When I came there I saw the prisoner; we said we came to search for some mutton that was there; he said he had no mutton in the house. We were going to search in the cellar; the wife said they had got no mutton but what they got from Dorley. Dorley, that is the name of a farm at some distance. We searched the cupboard, and found some mutton. The cupboard was in the back room, over the fire place. We searched the cupboard; we found part of a loin cut up into steaks. From that we searched in the cellar; we found two legs, two shoulders, and a loin. They were in separate pieces, suspended with a string to a beam. The necks and breasts were left on the skin.

COURT. Both breasts were remaining on the skin, were they - A. Yes.

COURT. Had the mutton the appearance as if cut up by a butcher - A. No, it is haggled; it had the appearance of having been cut up by some person not used to it.

Q. How many sheep had you in the field - A. Forty-two on Saturday night, and the next morning forty-one; we lost one sheep. The skin was found in the same field where the sheep were in. The prisoner lived about a mile from me, from Uxbridge.

Mr. Barry. There is a market there on Saturday - A. No, on Thursday.

Q. What is the prisoner - A. The prisoner is a labourer.

Q. Were all the sheep in the field your father's - A. No, only four of them; they were all under thecare of Mr. Fowler, the shepherd. I can swear that the sheep that was lost was my father's sheep, because there was a mark of a W upon the skin.

JAMES FOWLER . I am a shepherd.

Q. Do you remember seeing the sheep in the field on Saturday - A. Yes, on Saturday the 8th, at four o'clock, I saw them; I had forty-two sheep under my care, four of them belonged to the prosecutor, he bought them of me.

Q. After you found the head and skin were you able to say the sheep that was killed was Mr. Weedon's sheep - A. Yes, it was; I found the skin and the remainder part of the mutton. I was present when the mutton was found in the prisoner's house, we compared it to the other parts in the skin. We compared the shoulders; they seemed to fit very well according to the cutting them off; they were cut off very bad indeed, irregularly.

Q. Did you apply the parts so as to compare them, and they fitted, did they - A. I have no doubt but the parts found at the prisoner's house were cut off that sheep. I am sure that sheep was the one I sold to the prosecutor.

Mr. Alley. You compared the fore quarters with the parts on the skin - A. Yes, and they fitted; we could not compare the hind quarters, they were cut from the loin; we could not compare the loin, they were cut in steaks, all in pieces.

Q. Did you know the prisoner - A. Yes. I sold the sheep in September to the prosecutor. The field is Mr. Boddy's field.

Q. Had you seen the sheep the night before - A. Yes, on Saturday, at four o'clock.

WILLIAM READ . I am a constable. About ten o'clock the prosecutor applied to me, I accompanied him into the field where the sheep had been slaughtered; I saw the blood on the snow where the sheep had been stuck. I afterwards accompanied the prosecutor's son to the prisoner's house; on my going into the house I told Jones I had suspicion there was mutton there; he told me there was none, I was welcome to search the house. I then asked him what place that was; he said it was the cellar. I said we will look in the cellar first; we opened the door to go down, Jones's wife hallooed out Jones, we have no mutton but what you got from Dorley; that is about three miles from the prisoner's house, a farm-house belonging to Mr. Hammond. I said, where was the mutton; he said, up stairs; that was after his wife said he had no mutton but what came from Dorley. I went up stairs, there were on two plates the fat caul and kidney fat of a sheep, and in another plate was part of a loin or loins, and two kidneys of a sheep.

Q. To the parts of the sheep in the field were both kidneys gone - A. Yes. I said, is this the mutton. I thought the prisoner was upon the move, then I secured the prisoner. In searching the further part of the cupboard I found the middle of the loin of mutton covered over with a cloth in the same cupboard. I went into the cellar, it was dark; I got a candle; I found two legs and two shoulders suspended with pitchnettle string. On searching the prisoner I found some Pitchnettle string, pitchnettle is what they tie sacks with. The mutton was very badly butchered indeed, nor was the sheep skinned as a butcher would skin it; it was very badly skinned indeed.

COURT. Was the meat fresh - A. It was very fresh.

Q. Could you judge how long it had been killed - A. I should have thought recently by the appearance of the mutton. I went then and saw the skin of the beast, and the young lamb that was cut out of the sheep, with Fowler, the shepherd; I put my hand to the dug of the yew the dug was full of milk, as it was so near lambing. I compared the parts with what we brought from the field about the middle of the loin where it comes off the neck, it exactly tallied in thickness. In my own opinion they were the same parts of the same sheep, only seperated with the knife. The fat on the skin matched with the part in the leg; in the corresponding part of the leg I found a deficiency in fat, they fitted. There was part of the udder of the yew left in the skin; the udders were taken from both legs.

Q. Do butchers commonly sell cauls - A. Not usually at one time, as we found; both kidneys had been taken from the sheep, and we found two kidneys.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 24.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

105. WILLIAM PRICE was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Algernon , about the hour of one on the night of the 9th of January , and stealing therein thirteen pair of shoes, value 16 s. 6 d. two pair of boots, value 6 s. and two bottles of blacking, value 2 s. the property of Peter Lerouche .

HENRY LECK . On the 9th of January, about one in the morning, I was coming home. I was passing the prosecutor's shop; the door was on a jarr.

Q. What is the prosecutor's name - A. Lerouche; he is a shoe-maker . On my seeing the door a jarr I pushed it open; I asked who was there; the prisoner answered, me. I asked him to come out, and let me look at him. When he came out I gave him into the hands of a watchman until I called my brother-in-law up.

Q. Did you go into the shop - A. No, not till I gave him into the hands of the watchman and came back; then we pulled down the shutters and went in; we found the things packed up ready for going away.

Q What, these things in a basket - A. Yes, on the floor.

Q. Was there any body in the shop at this time sleeping there - A. Nobody at all.

Q. Does the prosecutor usually sleep there - A. No, he never did in his life; he keeps the shop only, and sleeps in a room up stairs, in the same house.

Q. Is the shop part of the house in which he lives - A. Yes.

Q. Was any thing found in the shop besides these things in the basket - A. Outside of the shop was the padlock drawn, and a staple, and the door without any lock.

PETER LEROUCHE . I live at No. 29, Little Earl-street, Seven Dials.

Q. Is your shop the bottom of the house in which you live - A. Yes, and part of the house.

Q. On the night of the 9th of January, had you fastened the door of your shop - A. Yes; I came down about five o'clock and found the door fast. Between ten and eleven I went to bed, and about one o'clock I was disturbed by my brother-in-law calling me; I went to the window and asked what was the matter; he said Mr. Rouche come down immediately, the shop is broken open. I came down, and found the shop was broken open, and the prisoner in the watchman and patrol's custody.

Q. Have you seen the goods that were found in the basket - A. Yes; I took them to the watchhouse just as they are. The basket is mine; there was some old bits of leather in it. The basket was emptied out, and he had packed up these old boots and shoes from various places in the shop where they were hanging; some were hanging very high. He had packed up thirteen pair of shoes, two pair of boots, and two bottles of blacking.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going home; I found this place open as I came by; I could not get in my lodgings, so I went in there.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 19.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Dallas.

106. WILLIAM JOHNSON , alias STONE , was indicted for feloniously making an assault upon Joseph Spencer , in the King's highway, on the 28th of December , putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, a watch, value 1 l. his property.

JOSEPH SPENCER . I live at 29, Chapel-street, St. George's in the East.

Q. Where did this happen - A. In Back-lane , on the 28th of December, about seven o'clock at night.

Q. Was any body with you - A. No one. I saw the prisoner and another man; at first of their meeting me they asked me if I was homeward bound; I told them I was. They passed on before me, and took no further notice. They came to a small turning, I passed them there; they followed me back again. They went on my left, and crossed me on the right; they went before me again. I passed them the second time; the prisoner crossed and passed between me and the wall, and took my watch from me; they turned down a street, I saw them turn down, I cried out stop thief. Then in a short time the prisoner was brought forward; I knew him to be the person that took my watch; he was taken to the watchhouse.

Q. The watch was not found upon him, was it - A. No. I value the watch at one-pound.

MR. WHEATLEY. I am constable of St. George's in the East. The prosecutor came to me at the watchhouse, and desired me to take the prisoner. On the evening stated in the indictment, I heard the cry of stop thief; the prisoner was taken immediately. Upon the prosecutor seeing the prisoner, the prosecutor said the prisoner was the man that robbed him. The prosecutor was a little fresh; he seemed positive he was the man, and there is no doubt but he was the man; I had my doubt in consequence of the fog. I searched the prisoner; I did not find the watch. The watch was produced to me the next morning; I received the watch of Mrs. Jackson. This is the watch.

Prosecutor. This is my watch.

SARAH JACKSON . I am the wife of Francis Jackson . beadle of the watchhouse.

Q. Do you remember when the prisoner was confined there - A. Yes, it was a Tuesday evening. The next morning the prosecutor and I was at the watch-house at the time the prisoner was locked up.

Q. Was it in the presence of the prisoner - A. Yes.

Q. State what passed - A. Mr. Spencer asked the prisoner if he would return the property; the prisoner said he would return him the property if Mr. Spencer would not prosecute. I asked the prisoner if he had any body to go of his errand; I called Elizabeth Wilkins ; she came; she spoke to the prisoner, and went. I cannot say what passed between them. Then she returned again, and said the watch was detained for five shillings; he gave her some silver; she went out, and returned with the watch; she then delivered the watch to the prisoner. The prisoner delivered the watch to me; I kept the watch, sent for Mr. Wheatley; when Mr. Wheatley came I asked Mr. Spencer if that was his watch; he said yes. I delivered the watch to Mr. Wheatley.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent of taking that man's watch as a child unborn

GUILTY , aged 17.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

107. SARAH CONWAY and SUSANNAH HILL were indicted for feloniously making an assault upon John Page , on the 1st of December , putting him in fear and taking from his person and against his will, six 5 l. bank notes, a 2 l. bank note, eight 1 l. bank notes, and eleven shillings in monies numbered , his property.

JOHN PAGE . I am a boot and shoe-maker ; I live at Deptford. On the 1st of December, I came to town with intention to go to Leadenhall-market to buy some leather, I met with some companions; I did not do my business that afternoon. I had a glass or two of liquor, which detained me late. I met the prisoners; I asked them to put me in the way to London bridge.

Q. What time of the night was it - A. I cannot tell, it was late. They told me they would put me in the way to London bridge; after they walked some way together, they asked me for something to drink for their trouble; they went into a house, and called for a drop of gin; I paid for the gin, and we came out of the house. We then came on perhaps ten yards, or not so much before I was knocked down, or pushed down.

Q. Do you know by whom - A. No, I do not. As soon as I arose they went to lift me up; I said let me alone, and as soon as I came up I found my coat unbuttoned; I put my hand in my pocket, I found I was robbed; he women were present. I cried, out Iam robbed; the officer came up immediately, he said who has robbed you; I said I had my money when these women came with me; I have not it now. The women began to start; the officer catched them. They took my pocket-book from me.

Q. Do you know where it was when you first met these two women - A. No, I am quite a stranger in town.

ROBERT HILL . I am a serjeant of the watch for St. George's the Martyr. On the 1st of December, I was stationed in Gray's-inn-lane; at one o'clock I was in Fox's-court, and while I was there I heard a woman say, Charley, come here, here are two girls robbing a countryman. I followed to the spot; I found them in George's-court, Gray's-inn-lane. When I entered the court I met the two prisoners, but not knowing that these were the two women I did not stop them at that moment, because I did not know that they were the two. I went a little further down the court where I saw the man laying down, he was trying to get up, saying that he had been robbed. The girl that first of all spoke to me was standing by the prosecutor; she told me the two girls that I first met where the two girls that robbed the gentleman. I immediately went in search of the two prisoners, I overtook them in Brook-street; I knew both of them perfectly well. I stopped the prisoners; Cager and Belsover, my brother officers were with me.

Q. Are you sure that the two persons that you saw coming out of George-court, are the same persons you overtook in Brook-street - A. Yes; I knew them both perfectly well. Upon Conway we found a pocket-book; upon Hill we found a receipt. We took them to the watchhouse, and near the watch-house Conway began to struggle; I told Belsover to take care of her; I knew she wanted to make away with the property; I saw she was wishing to make away with the property. I at last picked up some bank notes; I picked up four one-pound notes; I did not see them drop from her. I picked them up exactly at the spot where she was.

SAMUEL CAGER . I am a patrol. I was with Hill in George's-court; I met the women in Fox-court coming from George-court; I knew the prisoners well. I am sure the persons we overtook in Brook-street, are the persons we saw coming out of Fox-court. I helped to search them; I found a pocketbook on the prisoner Conway; this is it. I found a receipt for a quarters rent, that is paid up to Lady Day for six pounds six shillings; upon the prisoner Hill I found that. Hill confessed to Read, the officer, and me, that Conway robbed the gentleman.

WILLIAM BALSOVER . I can state no more than the other witnesses, except I felt the notes in Conway's left breast as I was conveying her to the watch-house; I was struggling to get them from her; she dropped them. When she moved from the ground Mr. Hill picked them up.

Q. to Prosecutor. Look at that pocket-book - A. I can swear it is mine; there is William Pittman 's hand-writing in it; he told me what public-house to call upon him.

Q. What did the pocket-book contain - A. It contained from fourteen to sixteen notes. I paid away a little money, and received some. I am not clear how much the pocket-book contained at that time. The receipt is mine: it was for a quarter's rent I had paid up to Lady Day. This receipt was in my pocketbook at the time. None of the five pound notes have been found, nor yet the two pound note. I received it the same day.

Q. You cannot tell who knocked you down - A. I believe it was their bully; I do not think they are strong enough.

Q. How long after you were knocked down did you find your pocket-book was gone - A. In one minute, or less.

Conway's Defence. I went home with my work at almost twelve o'clock as far as King-street, Seven Dials. This woman was with me; she kicked something with her foot; she picked it up, and gave it me. I put the pocket-book in my pocket; two men came up and demanded the notes and the pocketbook. As to the prosecutor, I never saw him until I saw him at Hatton Garden office.

CONWAY, GUILTY , aged 28.

HILL, GUILTY , aged 20.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

108. JOHN SWEET , alias MANNING , was indicted for feloniously making an assault in the King's highway, upon John Saunders , putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, a watch, value 2 l. a seal, value 6 d. a watch-key, value 1 d. and a watch ribbon, value 1 d. his property.

JOHN SAUNDERS . I am a corporal in the 3d regiment of foot guards . On the 7th of December last I was at the Prince's Head public-house, in Princes-street.

Q. Was any body with you there - A. Yes, a corporal belonging to the same regiment. I went into the public-house at near eight at night. I left it at nine at night. I drank gin hot during the time I was there. I was perfectly as sober as I am now. There were several other persons in the house; there were two or three girls of the town in the house dancing with the prisoner.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. Yes, he was there at that time; he continued there until half past ten. I went out at nine. I went home and returned again.

Q. Was he there when you left the house - A. Yes, and when I returned.

Q. Did you know him before - A. No, I never saw him before to my knowledge. li might be near ten o'clock when I returned.

Q. Were you in the house when the prisoner left it - A. Yes.

Q. How long did he leave you in the house - A. It might be a quarter of an hour or twenty minutes, as near as I can guess. When I left it I proceeded home the second time. It was about a quarter before eleven. In my way home I proceeded through Tothill-street, Westminster . By that time it was near eleven. As I was going up the street, the prisoner crossed over the road to me; he came up and said something, but the words I cannot express that hemade use; at the same time he pulled my watch from my fob. It was a silver watch, a seal, key, and a ribbon to it.

Q. Was this taken from you by force against your will - A. Yes.

Q. What became of the person who took your watch afterwards - A. He ran away from me immediately; I hallooed out immediately that I had lost my watch; corporal Lee came to me; he picked up my watch-case; the prisoner returned to me, and said, God d - n your eyes, do you mean to say that I have robbed you. I said, yes. He struck at me immediately, and on my turning round to save the blow he ran away. I saw no more of him that night.

Q. Do you know when he was apprehended - A. One day last week, by Pace, the officer.

Q. Now, how can you be sure that the person that took your watch was the prisoner - A. I can swear to it. I saw him in the house the evening before. I might be in the house an hour and a half, or better. While he was dancing I observed his countenance, his figure; I knew him again when I returned to the public-house, and I knew him to be the same person when I saw him in the street.

Q. Have you any doubt the prisoner is the man that took your watch in the way that you have told us - A. I can swear he is the man, without doubt.

WILLIAM LEE . I am a corporal in the 3d regiment of foot guards. I was with the last witness on the night of this robbery, at the public-house.

Q. Did you see the prisoner there - A. Yes, I am sure I saw him. I never knew him before to the best of my knowledge.

Q. Did you leave the public-house with the last witness - A. No; I went with him when he returned, and came with him when he came away the second time.

Q. Did you see his watch taken from him - A. No, I cannot say I did. I heard him call out that he had been robbed. I was about three paces in front of the witness when I found the outside case of a watch.

Q. After this did you see any person come up - A. I saw the prisoner come up; he said, d - n your eyes, do you mean to say that I robbed you. The prosecutor said, yes, I do. The prisoner struck at him; I ran in between to save the blow. The prisoner returned, and ran away. I saw no more of him that night. I am positive the prisoner is the man.

Q. to Prosecutor. Look at the outside case - A. That is the outside case of my watch; I am sure of it.

Prisoner's Defence. I went into this public-house to have pint of beer after I had done work; on my returning home I saw the prosecutor coming up the street; he had some girls of the town with him; he said he had lost his watch. He challenged me with the robbery; he said I had robbed him of his watch. I asked him if he meaned to say that I had robbed him of his watch; he said, yes. I offered to strip my clothes off for him to search them; he would not. About a month after, he got a constable to take me up. I am innocent of the robbery.

Q. to Prosecutor. I think you said he took the watch by force - A. Yes; he came up against me, and made use of some words that I cannot express. I thought it was to rob me. He pushed me against a shutter, and took the watch from me.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 21.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Dallas.

109. MARTHA BRAMWELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22nd of December , four gowns, value 2 l. a petticoat, value 5 s. two pockets, value 2 s. and one yard and a half of printed cotton, value 3 s. the property of William Carrol , in the dwelling-house of William Wade .

MARY CARROL . I live at No. 20, Compton-street, St. Giles's .

Q. Do you recollect going out on the 22nd of December - A. Yes; I locked my door and came home again. I met the prisoner as I came home on the stairs; the prisoner had my property in her apron; I could not tell what it was when I met her. I went up to my room door; it was unlocked, but shut to. Finding that, I pursued the prisoner; I over-took her; I saw her where she ran in; I followed in after her; I catched hold of her arms; I said she had been robbing me; she said, me robbing you; I said, yes. I saw in her apron four gowns, one petticoat, a yard and a half of gown new print, and two pockets; she had taken them out of a box in the room, but the box was not locked. These are the articles; they are mine. The four gowns are worth twenty-seven shillings.

ELIZABETH CARR. I saw the prisoner and the prosecutrix in Compton-street; I saw a bunch of keys drop from the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing of it. I was going up Compton-street when some man stopped me.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

110. MARTHA BRAMWELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22nd of December , a coat, value 2 l. a waistcoat, value 5 s. a pair of breeches, value 1 l. a book, value 3 s. and a tablecloth, value 1 s. the property of Charles Cadman , in his dwelling-house .

CHARLES CADMAN . I live at 48, New Compton-street, St. Giles's .

Q. Do you rent the whole house - A. No. On the 22nd of December, I lost a coat, a waistcoat, a pair of breeches, a book, and a tablecloth. I was not at home at the time they were taken. I left my house at half past two o'clock; the door was locked to the best of my knowledge; I returned at half past three; I found the door shut to, but unlocked. I found my property afterwards at the pawnbrokers.

WILLIAM SIMPSON . I produce the property. I live with Mr. Turner, of Brewer-street. I took these articles in pledge on the 22nd of December, in the evening, about dusk, of a woman. I cannot say the prisoner is the woman. There is another witness; he is not here; he is taken up for a deserter.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

111. ANN BERRIDGE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of December , a watch, value 3 l. the property of William Hill , in the dwelling-house of William Kirby .

WILLIAM HILL . I live at Kensington , in William Kirby 's house; I lodge in the house; Mr. Kirby's wife lives in the house; he is out at service himself. On the 11th of December I lost my watch out of my apartment. I know the prisoner; she and I had lived fellow-servants together.

WILLIAM BARRETT . I am a servant to Mr. Norton. a pawnbroker. On the 11th of December, the prisoner pawned this watch with me; I lent her one pound five shillings upon it.

Prosecutor. This is my watch; I will swear to it.

GUILTY, aged 18,

Of stealing to the value of 39 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Dallas.

112. ANN BERRIDGE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of November , a watch, value 10 l. the property of Robert Hare , in his dwelling-house .

ROBERT HARE . I live in Little Chelsea ; I occupy the house in which I live. The house is in Kensington parish .

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. Yes; she was in my house about three or four hours to assist the servant; never more than that. That was on the 18th of November. I did not miss the watch until the officer informed me of it. The officer came to me, and said he had found upon the prisoner the duplicate of a gold watch, which she had pawned for four guineas. I went to Bow-street; there I saw the watch; I swore to it. I am sure it is my watch; it was deposited in a drawer in my bed room. I suppose I had not seen it for a month before. I am sure it is my watch; I have had it about thirty years. It is a gold watch.

JOHN GOODYEAR . The watch was pledged with me on the 19th of November, by the prisoner. She at first pledged it for two pounds; on the 6th of December she had two pounds four shillings more upon it. I produce the watch.

Prosecutor. This is my watch; I am sure of it.

WILLIAM BACON . I searched the prisoner; I found the duplicate of a watch upon her, pawned for four guineas. This is the duplicate.

Goodyear. That duplicate is mine; I delivered it to the prisoner for the gold; watch she had pawned.

COURT, to prosecutor. What is the value of that watch - A. It cost me about fourteen guineas; if it was worth that thirty years ago it may be worth more now.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence, nor called any witnesses to her character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 18.

Second Middlesex jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

113. WILLIAM JAMES HEWITT , alias JOHN EASTON , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of November , a pair of child's leather shoes, value 4 s. the property of John Negus .

JOHN NEGUS, SENIOR. I am a carpenter; I reside at Stepney.

Q. In the course of last summer your son went to Mr. Haydon's boarding school, Stepney, did the prisoner officiate as usher there - A. He was there about three months.

Q. Was it in the early part of November, that he said any thing to you about keeping a school - A. It is about ten weeks back; he said he was going to keep a school himself, and my son should be his scholar; he would take him cheaper. They were going to raise the schooling, and I could not afford to pay any more than what I had paid. I agreed that he should go to his school.

Q. Did the prisoner say he wished your son to go with him to a friend of his - A. Yes; this was about the latter end of November. I agreed to this. My son had a suit of clothes that he had on, and took a great coat, two pair of shoes, and shirts.

Q. Did you see them put up - A. No, I did not: I was out upon my business. After my son was gone with him, in consequence of hearing something respecting the prisoner, I became alarmed; I tried to find out the prisoner. I heard of the prisoner in Cloth-fair. My son was taken in the street, and was brought to a house in Cloth-fair to me, and a person took the prisoner and brought him to the house in Cloth-fair also. I took the prisoner by the collar, and asked where my son was; he said he was very well, and very well off, not to make myself unhappy about him. Somebody brought my child to me.

Q. Did you see the prisoner searched - A. I did. This is the duplicate of my child's shoes that was found on the prisoner. I never permitted or authorised him to pawn my child's shoes.

JOHN NEGUS , JUNIOR. Q. Did you know the prisoner at the time he was usher at Mr. Hayden's - A. Yes; that is how I first became acquainted with him. In November he came to my father's; he said he would take me in the country to a respectable friend of his for a week's holidays.

Q. This was at your father's house - A. Yes. I took a suit of clothes I had on, a great coat, and a pair of shoes, besides them I had on, and a shirt besides that I had on; I cannot tell how many stockings hardly.

Q. Did you set off for the country - A. No; instead of that we went into a house in Compton-street, Drury-lane. The prisoner took the bundle and left it there; he then went about with me to different houses.

Q. Where did you go from that place - A. He took me to a public-house in Mile-end-road, there he left me; he said he was going to my father and my master, Mr. Hayden; he was away half an hour or more. He then went to a house in Rosemary-lane, where we slept that night; then I walked about with him the best part of the next day, and slept at the same house the next night; I cannot tell where I went the next day. We slept the third night at the house in Rosemary-lane; the fourth day we went into a house in Rosemary-lane, and had some bread and cheese and porter. Then he said he would take me to a place where I never had slept before; he said it was a place where they set off to Gravesend. The next morning we set off to Croydon; we slept atCroydon on the Sunday night. The next day he came to town; we went to a public-house in Moorfields, and the next day he said he got a place to sleep for half-a-crown, at the Goat in Cloth-fair; we slept at the Goat in Cloth-fair on Tuesday night, Wednesday, and Thursday, and on Friday my father found me. I never authorised him to pawn my clothes, or knew that he had pawned them until afterwards.

WILLIAM GATTIN CHATLEY . I am a publican. I apprehended the prisoner at the Goat public-house. When I was bringing him out, the father said he had made away with the boy's clothes; I said to him, give me the duplicates; he said he would not. I replied, then I must compel you. He took from his pocket-book this duplicate of the boy's shoes.

GEORGE CLEVE . I live with Mr. Sadler, of Aldersgate-street, pawnbroker. I produce a pair of boy's shoes, pawned by the prisoner. The duplicate produced by Chatley, the constable, is the duplicate I made out and gave to the prisoner when he pawned the boy's shoes.

Negus, junior. I believe them to be my shoes.

Prisoner's Defence. I was not able to open school so soon as I expected; I was distressed for money. I mentioned several times to the child that I would take him home again; he begged me not. I was with his father on Saturday evening; he said nothing to me about the child.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

114. JAMES HAWKINS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of December , sixteen yards of printed cotton, value 30 s. the property of Richard Munns , privately in his shop .

GEORGE VAUGHN . On Tuesday the 28th of December, I saw the prisoner commit the robbery. I saw the prisoner and two more in Holborn; they passed Red Lion-street. There was one person rather taller than the other two, that person was placed at the window of the prosecutor, while the prisoner went to the door; the other went near the curb of the pavement. I saw the prisoner have a pull at a piece of print; a signal came from the one placed at the window, and they separated; they then came back, and took the same stations which they had formerly bad. When the prisoner stepped on the door and where the print was hanging, he gave two pulls, the linen then came down; he then ran across the road, folding it up. I caught him in my arms, and took him to Hatton Garden office. This is the print.

Prosecutor. This print was taken out of my shop on the 28th of December; it is my property; the value is thirty shillings.

Prisoner. Please you my lord, I will ask that gentleman whether he saw me in the shop, or nigh the door.

COURT. He said he saw you at the step of the door.

GUILTY, aged 14,

Of stealing, but not privately .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Dallas.

115. THOMAS JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of January , five yards and a half of printed cotton, value 11 s. the property of Joseph Craig , privately in his shop .

JAMES STOCK . I am shopman to Mr. Craig, linen-draper , 360, Holborn . On Tuesday afternoon, the 4th of January, I saw this piece of cotton hang up between five and six o'clock; soon after, I missed it.

Q. Between five and six o'clock in the evening - A. Yes.

Q. Did you miss it after you perceived the boy hanging about - A. Yes. I did not see the prisoner take the property from the shop. In consequence of information, I gave a strict look nut. Soon after, the officer brought the piece of cotton which we had lost.

Q. How long was it after you had seen him before you missed the cotton - A. I suppose ten minutes. The boy was absent when I found the cotton was gone.

Q. The question I asked is this: how long before you missed the cotton had you seen the boy - A. About ten minutes.

Q. You said you saw him hang about the shop - A. Yes.

Q. By which, I understand, you had seen him for some time; how long a time had you seen him about the shop door - A. He was about the shop door five times.

Q. What space of time had elapsed from the last time you saw him and the time that you missed the cotton - A. About ten minutes.

WILLIAM GODFREY . I am an officer of Bow-street. I saw the prisoner at the door about half past six; I saw him at the shop door, and the shop window; he was loitering about the door about five minutes; he proceeded from there towards the City. I pursued him; I saw him through Middle-row, Holborn; I got in the street opposite Middle-row; I saw him come out of Middle-row, Holborn; he went behind the stone pillar; he took something off the heap of rubbish; he shook it. I said to my brother officer that he had got something that he had taken from behind the stone pillar. We asked him what he had got; he said, nothing, at first. We unbuttoned his coat; these was the cotton. He then said it was a piece of stuff he had found.

Q. How far is this stone pillar from the house of the prosecutor - A. One hundred and fifty or two hundred yards. I never lost sight of him at all.

Q. At the time that you saw him he had not taken the linen - A. No; he must have taken it before, and there have hid it. He went out of the foot way.

Q. to Stock. How long after you saw the prisoner was it that he was brought back - A. About a quarter of an hour.

Q. You never saw the prisoner at your house after you missed the cotton, did you - A. Yes; I saw him loitering about the door after I missed the cotton.

Q. Had you any suspicion of him - A. Yes.

Q. Why did not you seize him - A. I was not certain that he had taken any thing.

Q. Then after you had missed the cotton you saw the prisoner loitering about the door, and you had seen the prisoner loitering about the door before you had missed the cotton - A. Yes.

Q. And you saw him again after you missed the cotton - A. Yes.

Q. Was there any time during which it appeared he was absent from the door - A. No.

Q. How long before you missed the cotton had you seen him; you told me just now five or ten minutes - A. Yes, I saw him about ten minutes before I missed it. I was gone upon some other business; I had turned my back.

Q. He might have been at the window when you missed it; did you see him there at that time - A. No.

Q. What part of Holborn is your house in - A. Between Chancery-lane and Southampton-buildings.

Q. to Godfrey. He went up towards the city, you said - A. Yes.

Q. He went behind the stone pillar and pulled out something from some rubbish - A. Yes.

Q. What account did he give you of it - A. He said he had found it, and he would take us to the place where he found it. The place he took us to was the place where I saw him take it from. I took him into custody.

Q. You afterwards carried him to the door - A. Yes, and my brother officer produced the linen there. Before it was produced, they said they had lost a gown piece. The linen is here.

THOMAS MENTZ . This is the linen that I found under the prisoner's great coat.

Q. to Godfrey. Is that the linen that was found on the boy - A. Yes, it is.

Q. to Stock. Is that the linen that you lost - A. Yes, I am certain of it.

Q. to Godfrey. Do you know any thing more of the matter - A. No, more than what I have stated.

Mentz. I know no more than what Godfrey has stated; what he has stated, passed. I did not see the boy go behind the stone pillar. I was going through Middle-row; Godfrey called me, and told me he took something from behind the stone pillar.

Prisoner's Defence. As I was coming down Holborn, I picked it up; that gentleman saw me pick it up. I threw the snow off it, and put it under my coat. I thought of giving it to my mother.

Q. to Stock. What is the value of that linen - A. Eleven shillings; that is what we gave for it; it is worth more now.

Q. Can you say with certainty that it is worth more than five shillings - A. Yes; I would give more than five shillings for it to sell again.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 13.

First Middlesex jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

116. WILLIAM PETHERICK , HUGH DONALDSON , and JOSEPH MILLBANK was indicted for feloniously making an assault, on the 16th of December , upon John Nadin , putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, a watch, value 3 l. and two seals, value 2 l. his property .

JOHN NADIN . On Thursday the 16th of December, the prisoner's came to the door; it was locked; I went only to let them in. I keep a public-house, the Butchers Arms , Carnaby-market .

Q. What time was it - A. Past twelve o'clock. They said they only wanted a glass at the bar. I opened the door myself.

Q. And how many came in - A. Three.

Q. Should you know them again - A. I do, all of them, perfectly well. I never saw them in the house before to the best of my knowledge. I have not been long in the house, only since the 10th of October.

Q. When they came in how long did they stay - A. They staid, I think, until half past four o'clock. I could not get them out of the house.

Q. What had they while they were there - A. I cannot exactly tell; my daughter-in-law served them, and her mother.

Q. Had they any thing to eat - A. Donaldson had some supper: he returned thanks for his accommodation. I was the only person that was left up in the house with them. My daughter-in-law went to bed; they persuaded her to go to bed, and called her their dear, and wished her to go to bed.

Q. Did they at last attempt to go - A. I told them I insisted upon their going, and not having any more liquor. William Petherick said he would stay, and the other two said they would not hurt me, but they insulted me very much, and when they were going away they all three huddled me together. I had the door half open. They were all upon me at once. I thought they would have lamed me. I desired them not to kill me. Petherick wrested himself out of the house first. I clapped my hand to my watch; I felt the watch was gone. My watch was taken, I am sure, when the three huddled me together. They were all on me at one time, but which of the three took it I cannot tell. I had shewn my watch to Mill-bank; he said he would open it, and did; he said it wanted cleaning. I pursued them into Broad-street.

Q. Have you got your watch again - A. I have seen it. James Alexander has it.

JAMES ALEXANDER . I produce the watch.

Prosecutor. I can swear to the watch by the inside, and likewise by the seals. I can speak to the watch by the paper inside; the paper was cut by a foreigner that lived with Lord Sligo, and here are two gold seals I can swear to. I do not know the number of the watch.

Q. How long have you had that watch - A. About eighteen months; the seals I have not had so long. I have only had the seals since my son's return from Malta with Lord Sligo; the small seal not so long. I am certain they are my seals. I pursued them into Broad-street, all three together. I seized Mill-bank and Donaldson by the collar myself; Petherick walked off. I took them in custody myself; they said I might search them, they had not got the watch. I called the watch; they sprang the rattle, and two of them were taken to the watchhouse. The watch was not found upon either of them two.

WILLIAM SERJEANT . On the morning they were taken in custody a watchman knocked at my door;he said a person of the name of Millbank wanted to see me at the watchhouse. I went to the watch-house; I saw Donaldson and Millbank. Millbank I knew. I asked him how he came there; they both appeared to be in liquor. They could not tell how they came there. In consequence of what the watchhouse keeper told me I went to Mr. Nadin.

Q. What past between you and Nadin is not material - A. I have known Millbank many years, I never knew any one to impeach his character.

Q. You do not know who took the watch, do you - A. No. After I had been to Nadia I went to Petherick's lodgings; I saw Petherick. I told him the consequence of what would happen, and that the publican told me if he could see the watch again he would not mind; Petherick said he thought it might be found.

Q. Did you afterwards get the watch - A. Yes, I did; a young man of the name of Burton brought it me. I know nothing more.

Q. Is Burton here - A. I do not know. Burton brought it me; I said I would return it to the owner.

James Alexander . I am a constable. I took Serjeant and the watch into custody.

Q. What made you take Serjeant into custody - A. Nadin gave Serjeant into custody to know how he came by the watch.

Q. He did not charge Serjeant with stealing it, did he - A. No.

The prisoners left their defence to their counsel.

Petherick called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Donaldson called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Millbank called one witness, who gave him a good character.

PETHERICK, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 30.

DONALDSON, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 39.

MILLBANK, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 48.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

117. JOHN CHAPMAN and MARY SHAFTOE were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of James Miller , about the hour of seven on the night of the 25th of December , and stealing therein a pocket-book, value 6 d. three three-shilling bank tokens, and thirty-five shillings in monies numbered , the property of James Miller .

JANE MILLER . I am the wife of James Miller , he is a tobacco-pipe-maker , No. 4, Gloucester-court, White Cross-street, in the parish of St. Luke's . My husband rents the whole house, and he lets out one room out of three.

Q. Who do you let that room to - A. Mary Shaftoe; she occupied that apartment.

Q. On the 25th of December did you go out - A. Yes, about half past seven in the evening I went out; I locked my two rooms up; the money was in my pocket-book in the chest of drawers; the drawers were shut, but not locked.

Q. What money was it - A. Thirty shillings in penny-pieces and new halfpence, a pocket-book with four receipts in it, fourteen shillings in silver, three three-shilling bank tokens. I had seen this money before I went out.

Q. When you went out was Mary Shaftoe in the house - A. Yes in her own apartment; Chapman was not there. I told Mary Shaftoe I was going out, and asked her whether she would mind the children while I was gone out; she said she would. I went out, and returned about eight o'clock; I found my door broken open, and my money was gone. I charged Mary Shaftoe with the robbery; she denied it. This was Friday night. On the Saturday night she paid me ten shillings in copper, and a halfpenny was among the copper that I had taken particular notice of, it had a hole in it; I had it myself on the Friday night before I was robbed; I shewed the halfpenny to the man I employ, he brought me that halfpenny; he knew it again; his name is Edward Morrell , and the pocket-book was afterwards found by the watchman, with the receipts in it.

EDWARD MORRELL . I am a labourer. I went with some pipes for Mr. Miller; I received halfpence for them; I paid Mrs. Miller them halfpence.

Q. Did you observe a halfpenny with a hole in it - A. Yes, I took it the day before Christmas Day with other money for pipes at the public-houses.

RICHARD HUTCHINS . I am an officer. I searched the apartment of Mary Shaftoe ; I found this chisel. I took the chisel to the door that had been broken open; it fitted exactly the marks on the door. Chapman was not at home. I took him an hour afterwards in White Cross-street. He said he knew nothing of the robbery, he was not at home at the time. I took him to the watchhouse.

ROBERT BOOTH . I am a watchman of St. Luke's. On Christmas Day, at twelve at night, I was crying the hour of twelve o'clock at the back of Mr. Miller's premises, I picked up this pocket-book, and in it there were four receipts.

Q. to Prosecutrix. Look at the halfpenny with the hole in it - A. I am sure that halfpenny was in my chest of drawers, and the next night it was paid to me by the prisoner Mary Shaftoe . The prisoners lived together as man and wife; I did not know them but what they were man and wife.

Chapman's Defence. I was not there; I knew nothing about it.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Dallas.

118. ROBERT BYE was indicted for that he, on the 17th of December , was a servant to the United Company of Merchants trading to the East Indies , and being such servant, so employed and entrusted, did receive and take into his possession for and on their account, a banker's draft for the sum of 13 l. 4 s. 4 d. and that he afterwards feloniously did embezzle, secrete, and steal the same .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY , aged 60.

MR. STOCKWELL. I am receiver of these monies.

Q. What is the deficiency of the prisoner's accounts - A. Twenty-eight hundred pounds.

Mr. Gurney. He bore an excellent character - A. I know nothing against him only in this respect.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

119. HENRY CRESWELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of January , five shillings in monies numbered, the property of John Pearam from his person .

JOHN PEARAM . Q. When did you lose your money. - A. On the 1st of January, in Eagle and Child court, Shoe-lane . I had been into the barber's shop at the corner of Stonecutter-street, and on my coming out to go home, I said I wished I knew my own door. Creswell, the prisoner, came up, he would shew me Rose and Crown court, Shoe-lane, where I lived. I told him I would thank him if he would. He laid hold of my arm, and took me to Eagle and Child court, Shoe-lane. He there thrust his right hand into my left waistcoat pocket. I made a grasp at him, and some of the money fell to the ground, He ran away. I followed him immediately. He ran down Shoe-lane as far as the Red Lion. I called the watchman, and we then took him to the watch-house. At the watch-house he was searched; no money was found upon him.

Q. Were you perfectly sober - A. I had been drinking a little.

Prisoner. Were not you so intoxicated that the patrols would not take the charge - A. They would not take the charge, you offered me money to make it up, and I believe I should have taken it, because they said they would take me to the Compter until Martin and Lee came in; they knew where I worked, they took the charge.

MARTIN ROBINSON. I am a watchman of St. Andrew's. I heard the call out of stop thief. I saw the prisoner run by quite fast, and the Prosecutor after him; the Prosecutor laid hold of him. I came up and took him to the watch-house. He went to the watch-house quietly.

WILLIAM LEE . I am constable of St. Andrew's. I saw the prisoner searched in the watch-house; nothing was found on him but a few halfpence. I went to where the prosecutor said he heard the money drop, but nothing was found. The night constable threatened to send the Prosecutor to the Compter.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming up Shoe-lane. The Prosecutor got hold of my collar, he called out watch. I never saw him till he got hold of my collar, nor was I up so far as Stonecutter-street at the time.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury before Mr. Recorder.

120. WILLIAM WELLS was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of James Edwards , about the hour of ten, on the night of the 30th of May, in the 51st year of his Majesty's reign , and stealing therein a case, value 30 s. a gold locket, value 30 s. three pair of gold bracelets, value 6 l. a gold seal, value 60 s. twelve rings, value 5 l. two pair of snaps, value 5 l. and twelve broaches, value 12 l. his property.

JAMES EDWARDS . I am a jeweller . I live at 251, High Holborn. At the time of this transaction, I lived at the Commercial Hall, Skinner-street . I had No. 61 on both floors. On the 30th of May, 1811, I went out about a quarter after eight at night; I think I locked the door after me; I returned about eleven o'clock; when I returned, the box of the lock was wrenched off. I went in the room, and found the case gone containing the articles in the indictment.

Q. Why do you accuse the prisoner of it - A. I suspected him; he worked for me. He left me on the Saturday, said he should come to work on the Tuesday. I never saw any thing of him from that time until he was taken on another charge. I heard nothing of my things I had lost until the 30th of March following, as I was going up Holborn, I saw five of the broaches and the locket exposed to sale in Mr. Lane's shop window. He is a silversmith and pawnbroker. I went to Mr. Lane's with Stenton the officer. Stenton told me to take the things out of the window until he should be able to find the prisoner. We tried to find the prisoner, we could not.

JAMES BLAND . I am a jeweller. Near two years ago Wells brought some duplicates to me; at that time I lived with Mr. Lane. I sent for the articles, and we agreed for the price. I know nothing further. I have brought three broaches from Mr. Lane's; I do not live with Mr. Lane now.

Q. Is Mr. Lane here - A. No. I cannot say these are the articles; Mr. Lane is not in business, he has now a young man to manage the business; that young man knows nothing of the circumstance.

Q. All you know is, the prisoner brought you some duplicates of broaches, and what else - A. There was a seal or two, how many broaches I do not recollect.

Q. Now what do you produce to-day - A. Three broaches, that is all; whether they are the produce of what the prisoner brought I cannot say. The prisoner then was a working jeweller.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury before Mr. Recorder.

121. JAMES COBBETT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of December , a watch, value 30 s. a seal, value 4 s. a key, value 6 d. and a ribbon, value 1 d. the property of Thomas Cornelius Cole , from his person .

THOMAS CORNELIUS COLE . I am a shoemaker ; I live at Banefield in Berkshire. I lost my watch on Monday night, the 27th of December, about nine o'clock at night, at the top of Bull and Mouth street, going into Little Britain . It was a foggy night. The prisoner ran against me; I missed the watch out of my pocket; I immediately seized the prisoner, and told him he had robbed me of my watch. I took him into the Red Lion public-house just by there, charged him with a constable, and got him searched; no watch was found on him. On going to the Compter, I told him if he would give the watch up I would not prosecute him. The watch has been sent to Mr. Bruce, No. 78, Little Britain.

Q. Was any body else near you at the time that you lost the watch - A. Yes, an old man was nigh me. I cannot say who robbed me. I lost the watch against the posts that night.

MR. HUSSEY. I am a constable. I searched the prisoner at the Red Lion. The prisoner said it wasnot him that took the watch, it was a woman, and the watch would be sent back.

WILLIAM BRUCE . I am a baker, No. 78, Little Britain. At eleven o'clock on Tuesday, the night after the robbery, a packet was delivered to me; it was addressed to myself. I opened it and saw the watch. I knew that Mr. Cole had lost the watch, and when he came in I gave him the watch.

MARY BROWN . I live at the White Horse, Little Britain. A great tall man brought the watch to me at eleven o'clock at night; he gave me twopence to take it to Mr. Bruce.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent of the charge laid against me. I never saw or touched the watch.

GUILTY, aged 23.

Judgment respited .

London Jury before Mr. Recorder.

122. BRIDGET BURN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of December , a deal table, value 1 l. the property of Thomas Crafer .

THOMAS CRAFER. I am a butcher ; I live in Clare-market . I missed my table on Saturday morning, the 14th of December. When I came to open the shop door, the table laid on a board outside of the shop.

PATRICK CADMADEY . I am a watchman in Great Wild-street. Between eleven and twelve o'clock this woman came along my beat; she had a deal table on her head. She told me she brought it from Clare-market, and seeing some blood upon it, I put her in the watch-house.

JOHN RYAN . I am a watchman. I was along with my partner between eleven and twelve. I saw the woman with the table on her head. He asked her where she got the table; she said from Clare-market: this is the table.

Prosecutor. That is my table.

Prisoner's Defence. I got the table in the street; a man put it on my head; I was to take it to Saffron Hill for him.

GUILTY, aged 36.

Judgment respited .

First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Recorder.

123. MARY RUSHTON was indicted for feloniously forging, on the 10th of December , a Bank note for 1 l. with intention to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England . SECOND COUNT, for disposing of and putting away a like forged note with the same intention; and other COUNTS for the like offence, only stating the intention to be to defraud other persons.

JOHN GREENHAM . I keep a grocer's shop in Drury-lane. On the 10th of December the prisoner came to my shop; she asked for an ounce of tea and a pound of lump sugar; it came to 2 s. 8 d. she offered a pound note to pay for it. I looked at the note and asked her name; she said her name was Stevens or Stevenson; she resided No. 10, Charles-street, Long-Acre. I looked at the note again; I said I believed it was a bad one. She repeated over and over again, if you do not like it give it me back again; that gave me suspicion. I called to my niece to give me my hat to go along with her to Charles-street; she then said, I do not live there. We both went out of the shop together; she made a sudden stop, and said she did not live there herself. I offered to go there with her; she then said she was an unfortunate girl, a gentleman gave it her in a coach. We went back to my shop; I asked her where she did live; she said she did not live any where. I then sent for an officer. I marked the note.

RICHARD WESTBROOK. I am one of the patrols of Bow-street office. On the 10th of November I took the prisoner in custody at Mr. Greenham's shop. I saw a 1 l. note lie on the counter. I searched the prisoner; I found nothing upon her, except a farthing in her pockets and a small key. She told me a gentleman gave her the note in a coach; she was an unfortunate girl; the gentleman picked her up in the Strand. She told me she lived no where, she was a country girl. I took her before the magistrate. I found that her mother lived at No. 4, Phoenix-alley, Covent-Garden.

MARK WALKLAND . I keep the house in Phoenix-alley; the prisoner's mother and father lodge in my house. She was in the habit of coming backwards and forwards to her father and mother; she went by the name of Mary Rushton .

MR. DANIEL. I am a cheesemonger in Drury-lane. On the 2d of December the prisoner came into my shop; she asked me for half a pound of fresh butter and a quarter of a pound of salt butter, and half a pound of cheese. She offered me a one pound bank note. I looked at the note; I told her I did not like it. She said she knew where she took it, she would go back and change it; she desired me to put the things by, she would call for them presently; she never returned.

SAMUEL DAVIS . Q. You are one of the turnkeys of Newgate - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know the person of the prisoner at the bar - A. I have seen her.

Q. Was she in the jail last year - A. She frequented Newgate last year. She visited a young man of the name of Robinson, alias Myers. She called frequently, three or four times a day; that was in the last Summer.

JOHN LEES . I am an inspector of bank notes.

Q. Is that note a forgery or not - A. This note altogether is a forgery; it is not from a Bank plate, it is not Bank paper, it has not the Bank water mark; the name of the signing clerk is not the hand writing of the signing clerk; altogether it is a forgery.

The note read.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury before the Lord Chief Baron.

124. MARY RUSHTON was indicted, for that she, on the 10th of December , knowingly, and without lawful excuse, had in her custody and possession like forged Bank notes, she knowing them to be forged .

No evidence was adduced, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

125. THOMAS SMITH was indicted, for that he, on the 22d of December , feloniously did forgeand counterfeit a certain Bank note for the payment of 1 l. with intention to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England .

SECOND COUNTS, for disposing of and putting away a like forged Bank note with the same intention. And other Counts, stating the forged instrument to be a promissory note instead of a Bank note; and other Counts for like offence, only varying the manner of changing them.

ABIGAIL BARNET . Q. You are the wife of Morris Barnet - A. Yes, my husband keeps a slop-seller's shop, High-street, Shadwell.

Q. Do you remember the prisoner coming to your shop on the 22d of December last - A. Yes.

COURT. Where do you live, ma'am - A. Next door to the Police office, Shadwell. He asked the price of a shirt that hung in the window; that shirt did not suit him. I shewed him another, the price was seven shillings; he bid me six shillings; he said he had not sufficient change in silver, he begged me to change a 1 l. note. I called the servant to get change, the servant was not in the way, I gave the note to my sister Priscilla Jacobs , the same note I received of him I delivered to my sister.

Q. Did he make any objection to your sending out for change - A. No.

Q. Did you look at it before you sent it out - A. I did. I had no suspicion of its being a bad one.

PRISCILLA JACOBS . I am sister to the last witness. I received a note of my sister to get change. At the time the prisoner was in the shop I went to Mr. Andrews the haberdasher; he would have given me change if I would promise to stand to the goodness of the note.

Q. While you were at Mr. Andrews's, did you observe any thing particular on the note - A. That black mark at the side of the note, it was not out of my sight during the time I was there. I did not get change; I returned home with it. I said Mr. Andrews disputed its being a good one. I said that in the presence of the prisoner. My sister desired me to go to Mr. Gedney, and ask him if it was a good one. I took it to Mr. Gedney; Mr. Gedney said it was not a good one. Mr. Gedney gave the note to Hewitt the officer in my presence.

Q. Had it been out of your sight before it was delivered to Hewitt - A. No. I marked it after it was delivered to Hewitt the officer. Hewitt came home with me, he and I together.

Q. Just look at that note, and see whether that is the note - A, That is the note that I marked, my mark is upon the back, which I made when Hewitt came back with it, and the black mark is in the margin. I have not the least doubt that is the note.

Court. To Prosecutrix. Did the prisoner make any objection to remaining while your sister was gone to Mr. Gedney's - A. No, he did not.

Q. Do you remember what he said when you told your sister to go and ask Mr. Gedney whether it was a good one or not - A. He said he had not change sufficient, he would call the next day.

Q. Was there any thing to prevent the prisoner from going away while your sister was gone to Gedney's if he had wished it - A. No, there was nobody else in the shop but me and the prisoner.

JEREMIAH GEDNEY . Q. We understand you received a note of Priscilla Jacobs - A. I did, I delivered it to Hewitt the officer. The note that I delivered to Hewitt the officer was the same I received of her.

WILLIAM HEWITT . I am an officer of Shadwell office. I received a note of Mr. Gedney on the 22d of December. I saw Priscilla Jacobs mark that note. and I marked it myself.

Q. Look at the note - A. This is the same note I received of Mr. Gedney; I put my initials on it. I do not know Priscilla Jacobs ' mark, she put it in Hebrew. When I went to Mr. Barnet's, I saw the prisoner there; I took him in custody; I brought him over to the Le Beck's Head. I then asked him his name; he said his name was Thomas Smith . He said he could not tell me where he got the note, he had it about ten days. I then asked him where he lived; he said No. 10, Lion-street, Islington. I asked him whether he meant White-Lion or Red-Lion-street. He answered no, Lion-street. I then accompanied one of the inspectors of the Bank to Islington. I could not find any such street there. I left him in charge of Willan when I went.

Prisoner. I mentioned White-Lion street.

HEWITT. No, he did not. I put the question to him the second time; he said the second time Lion-street, in the presence of my brother officer.

COURT. Is there such a street as White-Lion street - A. I believe there is; we enquired at No. 10, White-Lion street, there was no such person there.

ROBERT WILLAN. I am an officer of Shadwell office. I received the prisoner in charge of Hewitt. I searched him; I found upon him four three-shilling tokens good money, and three shillings in silver and some halfpence.

Prisoner. Did I not tell you that the twelve shillings was not my own money.

Willan. He said it belonged to another person.

ANN CARR. I am the wife of Paul Carr ; he is a tobacconist, living in Little Fitzroy-street.

Q. Do you remember, on Friday the 30th of July, seeing the prisoner at the bar - A. Yes, at three o'clock in the afternoon; he said he wanted two ounces of segars; I served him. I told him they were half a crown an ounce. I gave him four pence too much. He paid me in a 1 l. note. I asked him to put his name to the note; he said he could not, but I might put it on. He told me his name was Smith, that he came from Uxbridge. I wrote Smith upon the note. I gave the prisoner 15 s. 4 d. I took the note; he went away.

Q. Look at that note that I present to you, and tell me whether that is the note in question - A. Yes, there is Smith upon it; it is my hand writing; I have no doubt that is the note. I gave the note to my husband to look at as soon as he came home, he said it was a bad one as soon as he saw it; he took it to the Bank the next morning; it was stopped at the Bank.

Q. Has your husband any situation at the Bank - A. Yes.

Prisoners Q. I wish to ask the lady if she did not pick me out by a scar on my hand - A. When I asked the prisoner to sign his name, he said he couldnot, he had had an accident on his hand; he put his hand out on the counter, and shewed me a scar on his hand.

Q. Have you any doubt of the prisoner being the man - A. I have not, there is the scar on his hand now.

WALTER HENRY CHAMBERS . I am a shoemaker, 39, Goudge-street, Tottenham Court Road. On the 3d of August last the prisoner came into my shop about four o'clock in the afternoon. He said he wanted a pair of shoes; he tried on a pair; I thought they were rather too small; he said they would do. I put them up in paper. He asked me the price; I told him nine shillings. He said he would give me eight shillings. He gave me a 1 l. Bank note; he took it from a black pocket-book.

Q. Did you look at it - A. I did not take any more notice of it than any other. I observed the name of Bewen upon it in small writing at the other part of the note written crossways. I gave him twelve shillings in change, and I kept the note. I put my own initials upon it, W. C.

Q. Look at the note, tell me whether the name of Bewen be upon it in the same writing, and your initials - A. This is the same note, I have no doubt at all.

Prisoner. Q. I think you made a remark that I took it out of a pocket-book - A. Yes.

Q. Are you sure I did - A. Yes.

Q. I am sure I did not; I have not had a pocketbook for two years.

A. I am certain you took it out of a black pocketbook.

Mr. Knapp. Are you certain he is the man - A. I am certain he is the man.

COURT. Had you known him before or not - A. I never knew him before; I am certain he is the man.

Prisoner. Do not you think there may be two people alike - A. There may be two people alike; I cannot be deceived in you. I do not rest entirely upon myself, I had a friend in the parlour.

COURT. Confining yourself to your own recollection, have you any doubt the prisoner is the person - A. I have no doubt at all.

WILLIAM WILLS . I am a shoemaker; I live at No. 3, Artillery-passage, Spitalfields.

Q. Do you recollect seeing the prisoner about the latter end of October - A. Yes, about two o'clock in the middle of the day he came in and fitted on a pair of shoes himself; he pleased himself; the price was eight shillings; he paid me in a 1 l. note as I thought I sent my boy to a neighbour with the note.

Q. Did you before you sent it by the boy make any remark on the note, so as to be sure the note be brought back was the note you had taken of the prisoner - A. Yes, I saw the note had been torn, and there had been a piece of paper pasted upon it.

Q. From the circumstance of that piece of paper being pasted upon it, have you any doubt that was the same note that the boy brought back - A. None in the least.

Q. When the boy returned with the note the prisoner was with you, was not he - A. Yes, I sent the boy in the prisoner's hearing to ask if it was a good one, and when the boy brought back the note I gave him twelve shillings and the shoes. I then asked him his name and address; he gave me his name, Mr. Smith, No. 10, London Wall. I wrote upon the note from his dictation, Mr. Smith, London Wall.

Q. Is that the note - A. It is, I have no doubt of it in the least, this is the note I received of the prisoner.

COURT. Mr. Wills, have you any doubt of the prisoner being the person - A. No doubt at all.

Q. Did you remark his hand at the time - A. No, it is from his general appearance, and my general recollection; I never knew him before.

HARRY BARRY . I am a jeweller; I live at No. 10, London Wall.

Q. Did you keep that house in October last - A. I did.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. I do not, he never lived at my house, No. 10, London Wall, in October last.

COURT. There are not two No. 10 in London Wall, are there - A. I am not quite sure, I rather think there are.

JOSEPH HENRY HARPER . Q. You are engraver at the Bank. - A. I am.

Q. You on grave Bank notes - A. I do.

Q. Is that a Bank note - A. No, it is not, it is not engraved at all; it is done with a pen and ink, and the other parts with a camel's hair pencil. It appears to be wholly written; if there is any thing done with the camel's hair pencil, it is the full strokes, but I rather think it is all done with the pen.

Q. Look at the other note, is that genuine or a forgery - A. It is a forgery, it is made exactly in the same way, it is the same manufactory, they appear to be made in the same way; I have no doubt they are done by the same hand, I should think they are copied by the same hand, the signatures of every one is the same, and the dates are the same: there is a distinction in the numbers; the first is 62492, the next 69492, the next 62492, the same as the first, and the last 69492, the same as the second.

JOHN LEES. Q. You are one of the inspectors of the Bank - A. I am, Sir.

Q. Look at that first note, Is that genuine or a forgery - A. It is a forgery in all respects, the signature and all.

Q. Look at the others - A. They are equally bad, and of the same description; they appear to be made by the same hand; I have no doubt of it, they are copied from the same note, the same characters run through all.

The note read.

Prisoner's Defence. It is now a year and a half ago that I was bound for a person, which person absconded out of the way for the present; in consequence of that I have been obliged to keep out of the way of sheriff's officers. I have been obliged to sell my clothes and furniture to support myself in selling them is the way I got these notes, one after the other; for the list note particularly I sold all the clothes I had except these on my back; I sold them to a Jew his name I did not ask him; Ishould know him if I was to see him. I have done business in the City of London; I have sold out three or four hundred pounds in the Bank, and never was accused at any time. If I had known these things to be what they are I never should have gone so nigh the office door to have changed one, that is a clear case; no man would put his head in the fire. And as to what the woman has said at the other end of the town, is it likely that I should shew her my hand as it has a particular mark, it is not likely. I have lodged in London-wall, and I have lodged in every place I have spoken of; I might be wrong in the number, it might have been at the next door; I have been in Uxbridge also. I throw myself on your lordship's mercy. As for knowing any thing of these bank notes being bad I did not; I know no more than any of these gentlemen here. I dare say there is not one person here but what has had bad notes in his hand; unfortunately for me there are four come through my hands at different times. I did not choose to plead guilty, because I knew myself not guilty.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 60.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

126. JOHN REYNOLDS and JOHN SHIRLEY were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Samuel Stacey , about the hour of six at night, on the 9th of December , and stealing therein a coat, value 3 l. his property.

SAMUEL STACEY . I keep a tailor's shop , 112, Great Portland-street ; I rent the whole house. On the 17th of December, in the evening, about half past six, I was in my back parlour, I heard the shop door open by the ring of the bell; the door I fastened by a common lock-latch.

Q. Is it a door that any one might open by turning the latch outside - A. Just so. I heard the bell ring, I came out of the parlour; I saw the prisoners, and the door was open; one of them asked for a yard of fustian. I went towards the door; I thought some one had run away. When I returned I fastened both the prisoners in the shop. I called for assistance from the back premises. My man came. I asked what laid in the window, nearest the door; my foreman said, he had laid a great coat; there was no great coat there. I charged the watch with them for taking the coat, and they were taken to the watch-house.

GEORGE SENIOR. Q. Did you work for Mr. Stacey - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember the night when the prisoners were taken - A. Yes; on that morning I put a great coat in the window. I saw the coat in the window half an hour before the prisoners came in; in the evening I was called from the back premises, and when I came in the shop the coat was gone; no one had been in the shop that evening. No person could open the shop door without the bell ringing.

WILLIAM FROST . Q. On the 17th of December did you see the prisoners, or either of them, in your neighbourhood - A. I saw them about two minutes before Mr. Stacey took them in custody.

Q. How many did you see - A. I saw three. I saw them two prisoners at Mr. Stacey's; they were loitering about two doors from Mr. Stacey. I heard one of them say, move; that attracted my attention, therefore I suspected them; I proceeded a little further, and returned back, and then Mr. Stacey had got two of them in custody.

Prisoner Reynolds. Do you know me to be one of them three persons - A. It was too dark to distinguish your features, by your dress I think you were.

Reynolds's Defence. My lord and gentlemen of the jury, suspicion only has brought me here; I had given a coat to a tailor near my prosecutor to turn. I was directed there to purchase fustian for the pockets; the door was open a small space. On my entrance a bell rang; I asked for what I wanted; a man ran to the door; he returned, and said he would give us pepper; he said he lost a black coat and waistcoat, these however were found, and whether he has since found the great coat he best knows. I never attempted to run away.

Shirley's Defence. I knew nothing of the property I am charged with; I went into the prosecutor's after a man that owed my brother for soaling and repairing a pair of boots, which he had obtained without paying for them; when the light came I found he was not the man.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury before the Lord Chief Baron.

127. BENJAMIN BENJAMIN and LEWIS BENJAMIN were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of November , two hundred and fifty-three promissory notes, value 10 l. each, and fifty five-guinea notes , the property of Joseph Cripps and Edward Cripps .

MR. WESTWOOD. Q. You are a clerk in the house of Mastermans and Company - A. I am. The prosecutors, Messrs. Cripps, keeps an account at our house, and we are in the habit of paying their ten-pound and five-guinea notes at our house, and the notes that come up from the country I enter; I have the book here.

Q. Look at the 2nd of November, have you a note of ten-pound No. 8557 - A. I have.

Q. Now, another, 8335, for ten-pound - A. I have that in my book.

Q. 8933 - A. That is in the book also, a ten pound-note.

Q. Another ten-pound, 8543 - A. That entry I have in the book; it is entry was made in the book on the 2nd of November, and entered as paid on the 2nd of November.

Q. When was this parcel made up to send to these gentlemen - A. On the 4th.

Q. Is it the course of your business when you send paid notes into the country to send all that have been paid up - A Yes.

Q. On the 4th of course you would send all the paid notes paid up to the 3rd - A. Yes.

COURT. And was such parcel made up on the 4th - A. I did not make it up; of my own knowledge I do not know that any such parcel was made up, but if the parcel was made up that is the course.

Mr. Gurney. You have produced a book in whichyou have made certain entries on the 3rd of November - A. I have.

Q. Were these entries made from personal inspection of the notes or from another clerk calling the numbers of the notes themselves - A. From another clerk calling the number of the notes.

Q. Then they were in the house on the 3rd of November, and further you cannot say - A. Certainly, sir. The entries are in my own hand writing.

Q. Whether the general course of your office was observed in that instance or not you do not know - A. Certainly not.

JOSEPH GWYER . I am a porter in Masterman and Company's house.

Q. Did you deliver to Jones, the guard of the Stroud coach, a parcel of notes to be sent down to the prosecutors - A. I saw it in Jones's possession; I packed up the parcel. I knew the parcel contained notes, and I saw it in Jones's possession; it was delivered by me or in my presence by some of the clerks of Masterman and company.

Q. At what time did you see it made up - A. It was made up at one o'clock; after the parcel was made up it was brought into the country department to be directed by the clerk in the country department and delivered to the guard. I saw the parcel made up, and I saw it delivered to the guard at near one o'clock.

COURT. Do you know what notes this parcel contained - A. It contained Joseph and Edward Cripps 's notes; I did not remark what they were. I did not notice whether they were ten-pound notes or five-guinea notes.

Q. to Mr. Westwood. Have these gentlemen any other notes paid at your house than ten-pound and five-guinea notes - A. No.

Q. to Gwyer. As you made up the parcel did it contain a considerable number of notes - A. It did; it was a large parcel to the best of my recollection. I cannot say how many the parcel contained.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

128. FRANCES WILSON and ELIZABETH THOMPSON were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of December , from the person of John Rampling , three three-shilling bank tokens, one eighteen-penny bank token, one shilling, and one 1 l. bank note , his property.

JOHN RAMPLING . On the 29th of December, about eleven o'clock in the evening, I was in Newgate-street, my brother dropped his stick; the two prisoners came up, and asked him what he was looking for; my brother said, his stick. Thompson picked up his stick, and Wilson took hold of me; she wanted me to go with her.

Q. Did you go with her - A. No, only in the street in my way home. The other was with my brother, he gave her two-pence after she picked the stick up; she kept hold of his arm. She wanted me to give her something to get her a glass of gin. I felt Wilson's hand in my breeches pocket after my brother's stick was picked up.

Q. Was it in your pocket in which your notes were - A. Yes.

Q. How many notes had you in it - A. A single one-pound note in my purse, three three-shilling bank tokens, one eighteen-penny token, and one shilling.

Q. Were you sober at this time - A. Yes, quite sober.

Q. How long was it before you perceived her hand in your pocket had you perceived your note safe in your pocket - A. Not two minutes: I kept my hand to it; I had suspicion what she was after; I could feel the paper in my pocket. I called to my brother after I found my pocket had been picked. I laid hold of Wilson; Thompson had come back to me, and left my brother. I told Wilson that she had picked my pocket; she said she had not, and directly I called my brother, Thompson walked a little way from me.

Q. Now, at the time you perceived Wilson's hand coming out of your pocket was Thompson with your brother - A. No, Thompson had left my brother, and was close by me. When Wilson was picking my pocket she was saying something to me, I do not know what; she was on the other side of me to what Wilson was.

Q. Did you ever find your note again - A. Yes; my brother came, and stopped Thompson; we took them both to the watchhouse. The patrol said he thought it was the best to go back and look, he said possibly they might have dropped it; I went to the spot where she drawed her hand out of my pocket. I found the purse in the kennel, with the note and silver in it; that was close to the spot where I first missed it.

RICHARD RAMPLING. I was going home with my brother. In Newgate-street I dropped my stick; the girls came up; they asked me what I was looking for; I told them I had dropped my stick. Elizabeth Thompson directly stooped and picked up my stick; I gave her two-pence for picking it up; she was not content with two-pence, she said that would not get her and her sister a glass of gin; I gave her three halfpence more. Wilson was pulling my brother along the street, asking him to go with her. As soon as I gave Thompson the three halfpence I endeavoured to get rid of her; I went to my brother, Elizabeth Thompson said let the countryman alone, and shoved me away. I asked my brother if he had given her anything; he said, no. I told him to give her two-pence and let her go about her business. I had not walked but a few yards before my brother called out that she had picked his pocket; I instantly went to my brother, and Thompson was walking away; I thought she had the property as she was walking away.

Q. You never saw Thompson in possession of the purse, did you - A. No. I took them both to the watchhouse, and the purse was afterwards found in the kennel, near the spot where my brother was.

DAVID TOWERS . I am a patrol of Farringdon Ward. I was coming from the watchhouse as the charge was going in; the prosecutor said he hadlost his purse; I told him it was likely they had dropped it, I took the lanthorn, and found the purse a quarter of a yard off the pavement. The money was in the purse that the prosecutor described he had lost. I produce the purse.

Prosecutor. This is the purse that I lost.

Wilson's Defence. As I was walking down Newgate-street one of the young men catched hold of me; he wished to behave in an indelicate manner indeed; I refused. What money he had in his possession I know not. He might have dropped the purse.

Thompson's Defence. Wilson never saw me before that night. I picked up the young man's stick; he said he would give me sixpence; he gave me twopence; I walked away.

Thompson called one witness, who gave her a good character.

WILSON, GUILTY , aged 32.

Transported for Life .

THOMPSON, NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

129. SUSANNAH RICHARDSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of January , twelve yards of lawn, value 18 s. the property of John Stiles .

JAMES FARTHING . I am shopman to John Stiles , linen-draper , Bishopsgate Without . Yesterday morning, between the hours of twelve and one, I saw the prisoner come in the shop; she had a child in her arms then; she asked for a small piece of sprigged muslin. I had one other customer in the shop. I saw her set the child on the counter. She took the child off the counter again, and took it in her arms. She was anxious to be served before the other customer left. I made a reply that I would serve her directly. The other customer went out of the shop. I perceived the prisoner with the child in her arms had got something under her shawl. She bought a quarter of a yard of plain book muslin; she paid nine pence for it. I espied three pieces of lawn on the counter; I was certain my employer had left four pieces on the counter; I missed one. I had observed four pieces on the counter twenty minutes before this. I let her go out of the shop. I followed her, and asked her whether she had got any thing that was not her own; she said, no, I pulled her shawl aside, and took the piece of lawn out of her hand. She had got the child in one hand, and the piece of lawn in the other. The lawn was twelve yards.

THOMAS SAPWELL . The prisoner was delivered into my custody. This is the lawn she was charged with stealing.

JOHN STILES. I only know that is my property. I left home about eleven o'clock; I left that lawn on the counter; it has my shop mark; it is worth eighteen shillings; that is the price cost of it.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent. I get my living honestly. I went to purchase muslin; I sat the child on the counter. When I came out of the door I heard the child say, dolly. I said, what have you got there. The shopman came up and said, my property. I did not know the child had got it. I was taken in custody immediately.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Confied 6 months in Newgate , fined 1 s.

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

130. JOHN PUCKERIDGE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 31st of December , ten pounds weight of cheese, value 8 s. the property of William James .

WILLIAM JAMES . I keep a chandler's shop in Albion-street, Hoxton . I was out at the time. Mr. Haines saw the fact.

ROBERT HAINES. I live nearly opposite of Mr. James. On the 31st of December, about a quarter before six in the evening, I was crossing the road towards Mr. James's shop; I saw the prisoner come out of the door with a cheese in his hand; he put it under his arm; it was a whole Gloster cheese. The prisoner set off running, which made me suspect he had stolen it. I ran after him, and called out stop thief: he directly chucked the cheese down; he ran three hundred yards; a man told him if he did not stop he would knock him down. A boy picked up the cheese, and it was taken to Mr. James's. I am sure I saw the prisoner come out of Mr. James's shop with the cheese.

RICHARD BEAL. I live at No. 27, in the same street that Mr. James's shop is in. I saw the prisoner on the day he was taken; I heard the cry of stop thief; I saw Mr. Haines running after the prisoner; I picked up the cheese in Scott's-lane.

Prisoner's Defence. I was never charged with any thing of the kind; I was going to my master at Hoxton; I heard the cry of stop thief; I run after the man a quarter of a mile; I lost sight of him; the gentleman stopped me, and charged me with taking the cheese.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Whipped in Jail and discharged.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

131. SARAH EUSTACE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of December , four silk handkerchiefs, value 6 s. the property of John Matthews .

JOHN MATTHEWS . I am a pawnbroker , Wheeler-street, Spitalfields . On the 23th of December, I missed one silk handkerchief, and on the next morning I missed four; they were taken by shoving the inside sash of one side; they were taken all at one time. I had just stepped backwards; when I returned my young man asked me if I had sold the silk handkerchiefs. This was just before seven in the evening.

Q. Do you know that when he left your shop that these four silk handkerchiefs were safe in it - A. Yes, they were in the window, enclosed by a sliding sash.

Q. How long were you absent from the shop - A. Two or three minutes. When I returned my servant asked me if I had sold a handkerchief. I only missed one that time; the next morning I examined the window; I missed the others. Two or three of them are remarkable ones. The next day, Wednesday, about three in the afternoon, I went to the prisoner's apartment in Webb-square, Shoreditch; I took Kennedy,the officer, with me. The prisoner was at home; she keeps a clothes-shop.

Q. Would not she be as likely to have purchased them as to take them - A. Probably so. She was asked for a bundle of handkerchiefs that had been left there last night; she said, there was a bundle left there by two boys, but they had away in the morning; we were welcome to search if we choosed. On looking about, I opened a drawer: the first that presented itself was a particular handkerchief that I had described to the officer going along. I only found two; I missed four or five. She said, these two handkerchiefs were chucked out of the bundle by the two boys; she did not purchase them. I gave them to the officer. The two handkerchiefs are worth about six shillings.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

132. THOMAS AYRES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 31st of December , in the dwelling-house of Jonathan Wellington , five 1 l. bank notes , the property of James Griffiths .

JAMES GRIFFITHS . I live at Chiswick . On the 31st of December, I missed five one-pound bank notes. The last time I saw them before was on the 24th.

Q. Where were they taken from - A. They were in a box, locked up.

Q. On the 31st, when you missed them, was there any thing the matter with the box - A. When I went to unlock it I could not get the key into the lock of my box; I employed a man to pick the lock to get the box open.

Q. Have you seen any of your property since - A. Yes, I saw one of the notes on the 1st of January, in the possession of a man of the name of Hughes. I had the number and dates of the notes before I lost them. When the prisoner was taken in custody, Clements (the constable) searched him; in his breeches pocket (the breeches were in his box) was found a one-pound note. The prisoner lodged at Wellington's; he did not abscond.

GEORGE CLEMENTS . I took up the prisoner; I searched his box; Griffiths was present when I searched him; I found a one-pound note in his breeches pocket. This box was locked; I got the key of the prisoner. This is the note I found in the prisoner's breeches pocket in his box. At the time I was searching him I asked him whether he did not change a note at the Red Lion on Wednesday the 28th. Mr. Hughes endorsed that note with the name of Rusty Rusty is a nick-name the prisoner goes by.

Q. to Prosecutor. Can you tell what was the number and dates of your notes - A. I can; the number of one of them is 33,790, August 25, 1813; the next 20,132, August 5, 1813.

Q. Now look at that; is that one of them - A. Yes, that is 20,132, August 5, 1813. I wrote the name of the person that I took it of before I lost it, and that name is on the note now in my own handwriting. I am sure I received that note on the 23rd.

Q. You cannot tell whether the five notes were taken at one time or not - A. They were all wrapped up in one piece of paper, and they were all gone at one time.

Prisoner's Defence. On Sunday night, the 26th of December, I was going to bed; the prosecutor was in bed; I having a candle in my hand I picked up a bit of paper; I opened it, and looked at it; I saw these notes; I said, Mr. Griffiths, are these your notes; whether he was asleep or awake, I don't know; he said, they are not my notes, I have no notes to loose, let me go to sleep. I put these notes in my pocket. On Tuesday, I changed one of them. He never said any thing to me about the notes until the Sunday following. I have lodged in the house seven months; I never robbed a person of a farthing nor ever was in any place of confinement.

Q. to Prosecutor. Do you remember the prisoner bringing the paper to you, and asking you if the notes were yours - A. No, he never spoke to me concerning any such thing.

Prisoner. Did you ever speak to me of your loss until you gave me in charge.

Prosecutor. I had never spoken to him; I told the landlord and his wife of my loss.

GUILTY, aged 23.

Of stealing one 1 l. note only .

Confined 2 years in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

133. ELLEN, alias ELEANOR MUNROE , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of December , twenty-four yards of linen cloth, value 30 s. the property of Robert Mann , George Mann and Thomas William Philpot .

WILLIAM WRIGHTON . I am porter to Robert Mann , George Mann, and Thomas William Philpot ; they are linen-drapers , Parliament-street, Westminister .

Q. On the 23d of December were you in the shop - A. Yes, I was; I saw the prisoner in the back shop; she was being served, and when she was served by Mr. Philpot, the gentleman who is here, he stopped and talked to another lady in the back shop. I was going to open the door for her; as she was coming to the door she stared me very hard in the face. I saw under her shawl a piece which is now here; I suspected she stole it. I let her out, and shut the door; I went back, and asked Mr. Philpot if he had sold her the cloth; he answered he had not. I had let her go out of the shop; I went after her, and caught her about fifty yards from the shop; I laid held of her arm, and under her arm was a piece of Irish linen; I asked her what she had got, to go back with me. She said she had got nothing at all. I took her back to the door; she held the cloth to Mr. Philpot; she said, this is not yours. Mr. Philpot took the cloth from her, and then he charged a constable with her; she escaped from the constable. I went over to her lodgings at Lambeth with the officer, and there we found her bonnet and shawl that she had on when she committed the theft.

Q. Now, what was this Irish linen that she had under her arm - A. Twenty-five yards, value one pound eighteen shillings.

Q. Had you seen it that day before - A. Yes, not ten minutes before I took notice of it laying on thecounter. I knew the piece of cloth myself, by taking that and another piece myself to Union-place, Lambeth; I left it with, the lady all night: I marked the prices, and left both pieces, and the young man fetched it back in the morning, and left it on the counter.

Q. You had seen it on the counter ten minutes before the prisoner came in the shop, had you - A. Yes; it was the same piece that was found on her.

Mr. Alley. This is charged privately stealing; you saw it under her arm as you shut the door - A. Yes.

Q. There was somebody else in the shop serving, who is not here to-day - A. Yes.

COURT. Was there any alarm given by any other person in the shop that saw her take it. Did any body see her take it - A. No.

JOHN THOMAS WATSON . I am a constable. I received charge of the prisoner of Mr. Mann; I was going to take her to prison, and I met Darvill, the constable: the woman said she wanted to go to her lodgings in Stratton-ground, Westminster. I told Darvill the circumstance; he said he would search her; he searched her, and took a ten pound note and a five pound note from her. She wanted to go into the yard; I let her go into the yard: she escaped. She was taken in about three quarters of an hour afterwards. That is all I know, except the linen I marked it when it was given to me.

Prosecutor. That is my property; I value it at thirty-eight shillings; it is worth more than that.

Q. to Wrighton. Is that the linen - A. Yes, it is.

The prisoner left her defence to her counsel; called two witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 28.

[ The prisoner was recommended to mercy by the jury, on account of her good character .]

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Dallas.

134. JOHN JOHNSON was indicted for feloniously making an assault, in the King's highway, upon Mary Murray , on the 13th of December , putting her in fear, and taking from her person and against her will, a lace veil, value 2 l. and a hat, value 1 l. her property.

MARY MURRAY . I live in Cato-street, Edgware-road. On the 13th of December, I was coming home between ten and eleven at night; I was coming from the Borough, through Oxford-street ; John Johnson accosted me; he asked me to take his arm, which I objected to. I walked on briskly to escape him, and immediately he seized my hat and veil. I alarmed the watchman with the cries of murder; he ran about fifty yards; I pursued, and took my hat from him. He had the hat, but not the veil.

Q. Was he afterwards searched; was the veil found upon him - A. No; he chucked the veil away.

Q. What part of Oxford-street was this - A. On the Hanover-square side.

Q. Had you known the prisoner before - A. No.

Q. Whereabouts did you overtake the prisoner - A. In Oxford-street, near Hanover-square. It is a bye place, no houses; there are a parcel of stables there.

Q. You had nobody in company with you, had you - A. No, I had just come out of a coach when he followed me. I came in a coach to Oxford-street. A lady was with me in the coach, but we had separated.

Q. He had offered no violence before he took your hat and veil - A. Not before, but when I took hold of the skirt of his coat, and took my hat from him. He held up his fist; he then said he would knock me down.

JAMES REDFORD . I was constable of the night. On the 13th of December, the patrol and watchman brought the prisoner to the watchhouse; the lady charged the prisoner with robbing her of her hat and veil; the prisoner said she was a false woman to say he took her hat and veil. This is the hat.

Prosecutrix. That is the hat; it is mine: the value of it is two guineas. The veil cost me three guineas.

Prisoner's Defence. On the 13th of December, a little after nine in the evening, I met with this young woman in King-street, Covent Garden; she asked me if I would give her any thing to drink. I went with her to the watering-house in Bedford-street; we had sixpennyworth of gin and water, and after that I called for sixpennyworth of rum and water: we drank that; she turned sick, and vomited in the coal-box in the tap-room. She wished me to go home with her; I refused, she being in such a state of intoxication. In the street she vomited again; then I left her. I went into Oxford-street; I met her again. I never had her veil in my hand.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

135. WILLIAM ATKINSON and MARY ATKINSON were indicted for feloniously forging, on the 31st of October , a promissory note, value 1 l. with intention to defraud Sarah Crickett , George Round , and Alexander Crickett .

JOHN EMBLIN. Q. What are you - A. A watchmaker; I live in Ship-yard, Temple-bar.

Q. Are you acquainted with Vickrey, the officer - A. Yes.

Q. At the latter end of October, did he furnish you with any bank notes - A. Yes, on Sunday the 31st of October; I took these bank notes to the White Hart, Hooper-square, Goodman's-fields. He gave me eight one-pound notes and a two-pound note, ten pounds in value.

Q. What public-house - A. The White Hart, Hooper-square, Goodman's-fields; it was in the evening. I went there about half past seven.

Q. When you got there whom did you meet - A. The male prisoner at the bar; I told him I was informed that he had got some screens to dispose of.

Q. What do you understand by screens - A. Bank notes. The prisoner said he had got some screens to dispose of, but he had got but seventeen, what could I stand for them; I said, what are they, bank; he said no, country, Colchester bank; they were prigg'd screens. I understood by that that theywere stolen notes; prigg'd screens is the cant term for stolen notes. I told him as for that I did not care about that, I was going out of town, and if any body could work them I could.

Q. What did you mean by working them - A. Get rid of them. He then said, are you going to Wales; no, Yarmouth; I thought of trying them along the coast. The prisoner said, oh, the coast will do well, and seemed pleased at the idea. He next said, well, what will you stand for them; I replied, I am not prepared to take a great number, as I have but ten pounds about me; I said, when were they got, have they been got long; he replied, no, only the night before last. I said it was necessary I should know whether he would wish them to be started immediately, or whether he would wish them to sleep, that is to lay by until they were forgot; he replied, oh, sleep, by all means; I would not have one of them started for three months; I told him very well, it should be so, the money was no object. He said now to business. I said what do you ask for them; he said, he did not know; what did I give; I said, that depends upon circumstances. He then said, what did you give for the last; I said, twelve; meaning twelve shillings a piece. The prisoner replied that will be about fourteen for ten pounds; I said, no, as it is our first dealing, and I have to lay out my money, I must have fifteen. The prisoner said, I have got a partner, I don't know whether he will agree to it; I said, tell him it must be so, I will have fifteen. The prisoner replied, I do not know, I will go and get them. I said, dear me, I understood you had them about you here; he said, no, but I shall not be long in fetching them. How long will you be gone; he said, I will not be above twenty minutes. He went, and in about twenty minutes he returned to me again, told me he had got the fifteen. He came into a private room. and very carefully drawed the curtains around him; he took out the fifteen notes. He gave me the fifteen notes, and desired me to count them; I being somewhat agitated, I counted only fourteen. The prisoner said, give me leave, you have made a mistake.

Q. What money did you pay him with - A. The ten pounds I received of Vickrey, the eight one-pound notes and the two-pound note. After we completed the bargan we parted. I immediately went to Vickery at the White Swan, in Mansell-street. I have measured the ground since, it is about four hundred paces.

Mr. Adolphus. You said you were called out; who was the person that called you out - A. It was a person acquainted with Vickrey.

Q. Who was that person that called you out - A. It was an entire stranger to me; he called me out of the public-house where I was waiting for the express purpose of seeing the prisoner.

COURT. Do you know the man's name - A. I do; I believe his name is Abraham Samuel ; I knew him by the name of Abey.

Mr. Adolphus. Is Abraham Samuel here - A. No, not to my knowledge; I have not seen him this morning.

Q. When did you see him last - A. I saw him come into a public-house in the Old Bailey last sessions; that is the last time I saw him, and then I did not speak to him.

Q. Had you any previous acquaintance with Abraham Samuel - A. I had seen him once or twice before, he was a stranger to me.

Q. He called you out of the room - A. He did.

Q. That was part of the plan between you and Vickrey - A. Yes.

Q. Before that time you had no knowledge of the prisoner, had you - A. None at all before that, I had no knowledge of the prisoner whatever. Samuel walked away directly he came out of the house; Samuel said, this is my friend; whether he spoke to me or the prisoner I cannot say. He immediately walked away from the house.

Q. Then the conversation between you and William Atkinson was entirely separate - A. Entirely separate no other person was there whatever.

Q. Does not this man go by another name than Samuel or Abey, did you ever hear him called Romanis - A. Never.

Q. William Atkinson told you they were prigg'd screens, which you know very well is stolen notes - A. Yes.

Q. You asked him upon that whether you should issue them immediately or keep them some time - A. Yes. I knew they were not stolen.

Q. With respect to forged notes, the advice of keeping them some time would not be applicable - A. I do not know; it was a good advice.

Q. Now, I ask you whether to your knowledge forged bank notes may not be issued one time as well as another - A. I do not feel myself competent to answer that question.

Q. He told you that he had got a partner - A. Yes.

Q. Did not he tell you that the person who had employed him to distribute these bank notes, was the very man Abey, who had introduced you to him - A. He did not.

Q. How long might this transaction take place altogether - A. Ten minutes or a quarter of an hour.

Q. How long have you lived in Ship-yard, Templebar; are you an Englishman - A. Yes, I believe so; I have lived in England all my life.

Q. You have visited this place before - A. I beg the protection of the court; this gentleman is going to touch a spring that will do him no good, and no harm to me. I never bought them things but upon the part of the Crown.

JOHN VICKREY . Q. In the latter end of October last, did you employ the last witness, Emblin, to endeavour to detect the prisoner - A. I did, under the direction of the magistrate. On Sunday the 31st of October, I furnished Emblin with eight one-pound notes and one two-pound note for the purpose of dealing with him; I took the numbers and dates of the notes on a piece of paper, and marked some of them in the back; some were already marked on the back, of which I took the particulars.

Q. At the time that Emblin went to the public-house that he has spoken of, did you, Lavendar, Westbrook, and Bacon, go any where - A. We did;we went to the Swan in Mansell-street. When I gave Emblin the notes, I followed him to within fifty yards of the house I had sent him to; it was not the White Hart that I had sent him.

Q. How soon afterwards did you see him again - A. I waited in the street for him; I saw him within a quarter of an hour. I saw him running on the other side of the way; I met him in the street. He gave me fifteen one-pound, Colchester notes; I marked them all, and the next day I delivered them to Mr. France. I marked them before I parted with them. These are all the right notes.

Q. Now, look at the last, the last note is the note upon which this indictment is framed. After you had received these of Emblin, did you and the other officers proceed to the habitation of the prisoner - A. We did.

Q. How near was that to the spot where you saw Emblin come back - A. From where I left Emblin to make the purchase I suppose it is about a quarter of a mile.

Q. After you had received these notes of Emblin you went, and the other officers to the house where you could find the prisoner - A. Yes, we fell in with him in Chamber-street, St. George's in the East. It was in the street that I found him and the woman at the bar together.

COURT. You found him about a quarter of a mile from the Swan public-house - A. Yes, I knew that was in the way to his lodging. I found him and the woman walking together; I walked behind them about an hundred yards; at the turnpike-gate I stopped them; I knew there was a house there that I could search by the light. They were arm in arm walking together, as if in company. I called them by name, took hold of them both, and took them into the turnpike-house. The prisoners were searched in my presence; there were a quantity of notes found upon them of that description; they are in Lavendar's custody. I heard Lavendar say he found two one-pound genuine notes upon the prisoner William Atkinson .

Q. Had you given Emblin a one-pound note, No. 14,358 - A. I had, dated July 5, 1813, marked on the back by me, William Rolfe .

Q. Had you another, 73,913, one-pound note - A. Yes, dated 7th of August, marked on the back James Edwards .

Q. Then these two genuine notes that were found upon the prisoner, were two of the notes that you had to Emblin - A. They were.

Mr. Adolphus. Where was Abey to meet you - A. I knew nothing about that. I planned the thing.

Q. Where is Abey's house - A. I think No. 90, White Lion-street, Spitalfields. I should have been glad to have catched Abey as well as him, I can assure you. I saw this man and woman go into Abey's house before I took them that night; I watched them out. They went into Abey's house after the purchase.

Q. When did you see Abey last - A. I met him to day, as I was coming here, close to my own house; about three miles from here.

Q. to Emblin. You gave the prisoner all the notes that you had of Vickrey - A. Yes.

Q. You told him you had been used to give twelve shillings, he said he would give fourteen for ten pounds; did it not occur to you that nine pounds would make the purchase - A. I was employed to make the purchase; I did not mind the price.

STEPHEN LAVENDAR . Q. You are a Bow-street officer also - A. I am.

Q. You, and Vickrey, and the other officers, apprehended the prisoners at the turnpike-gate - A. I did.

Q. Did you find upon him these two bank notes which are now produced - A. I did; I likewise found three one-pound notes, purporting to be Colchester notes of one-pound each; they have not been out of my possession ever since: and I found a large copper plate upon him.

Q. Is that the plate - A. It certainly is. I found four bits of copper upon him

Q. Are these the bits of copper - A. Yes. The large copper plate I found upon him leaves the place blank where bank should be; the bits of copper fill up the blanks in the large plate; so as to make up such notes as were found upon him, excepting the one pound and the signature.

Q. Have you seen these two impressions made from the large plate - A. Yes, and the one pound in the centre I put in myself, in the presence of a witness. I likewise found two glass stamps, one the impression of a crown upon it, and the other the word four-pence upon it, and a circle. These are the stamps.

Q. Do they appear to be in imitation of the stamp imprest upon promissory notes - A. Certainly.

Q. Have you examined these notes found upon him, so as to say whether they are imprest with this stamp - A. Certainly; I have some of them. I believe them to be imprest with this stamp.

Mr. Adolphus. These things that you found about the man, where were they - A. Some in his coat pocket and some in his waistcoat pocket.

WILLIAM BACON . At the time the prisoners were apprehended, and taken into the turnpike-house, I searched the woman while Lavendar was in the act of searching him. I found one hundred and sixty-four one-pound notes, purporting to be of the Bank of Colchester; they were in her right hand pocket, and they have been in my possession ever since. There is one note at the bottom with the word bank upon it.

LUCY HOLROYD . I keep a chandler's shop, 21, Hans-street, St. George's in the East.

Q. Look at the prisoners at the bar, do you know them - A. Yes, they lodged in my house on the 21st of October last.

Q. Did they bring any thing with them - A. Yes, a trunk. They had a furnished lodging. I have not got the trunk; they occupied a front room over the shop; they remained at our house from the 21st until the 31st, until the officers searched the room.

Q. Did you see the officers search the box - A. I did. That was the box that they brought there.

RICHARD WESTBROOK. I am a Bow-street officer. I was present when the prisoners were apprehendedby Lavendar and Vickrey. I immediately after that went to search the prisoners lodgings, 21, Hans-street, St. George's in the East. We saw a small hair trunk there. These are the things we found in it, a marking instrument with

"one pound" on it, a cushion, and in this handkerchief seventeen one-pound notes. They are of the same description as the others. Here is some printing ink and some dubbers to charge the letters.

Mr. Adolphus. When did you search - A. On Sunday evening, as soon as they were apprehended.

Mr. Gurney, to Lavendar. You stated that you saw the impression taken from the plates; did you supply the one-pound and the stamps - A. I did.

Q. And then they were the same as the notes you found upon the prisoners - A. They were, except the filling up.

EDWARD BARTELL . I am an engraver; I live in Booth-street, Spitalfields.

Q. Did you engrave that plate - A. I did, for Mr. Justins, about the middle of last August.

MR. JUSTINS. I live at 20, Brick-lane, Spitalfields.

Q. Did you, in the month of August last, employ the last witness to engrave that plate - A. I did, for the man prisoner.

Q. After Bartell had engraved that plate, did you deliver it to the prisoner - A. I did, a plate of that description.

Mr. Adolphus. Did not any other person give you instructions about this plate but the prisoner - A. No other person.

CHARLES EDWARD STEWARD. I am clerk to Messrs. Crickett, Round, and Company. The names of the partners in that firm are Sarah Crickett , George Round , and Robert Alexander Crickett.

Q. Are you acquainted with Mr. Round's handwriting - A. Yes; that is not his hand-writing.

Q. Is the signature of James Stewart your own - A. No, it is not; I have seen all the others; none of them are Mr. Round's hand-writing; they are all forged.

Q. Look at these three found in the man prisoner's pocket - A. They all three are forged.

THOMAS FRANCE . Q. You are assistant to Mr. Hanson, solicitor to the Stamp office - A. Yes.

Q. Have you examined all the notes produced - A. Yes, they all appear to me to be impressed from this large copper plate with the aid of the small plates. The glass stamps are in imitation of the stamp used at the Stamp office.

(The note read.)

William Atkinson 's Defence. I beg leave to observe the things that Westbrook produced were brought to my lodgings, by Samuel, saying, he wished to leave them at my lodging until he returned; he never did return. Samuel was the man that drew the draft of the plate on paper, and took me to this man's door to give the order for the plate. When I went for the plate then he took me again to the door, and gave me a pound note to pay for it; and the very Sunday evening of this transaction Samuel gave me a roll of paper with a bit of thread round it, and told me there was a particular friend of his waiting at the public-house for it. He did not observe what the roll was to me. When he gave it me he said, there is the man, go in and have some conversation with him; the man has been transported, but that is nought to you. As to the conversation that Emblin has said I had with him is all false; there was, nothing of the kind. The only conversation that I had with Emblin, was to know whether he was the man that wanted the roll of paper, and when I gave him the roll of paper he presented me with ten pound, saying it was for Samuel. Samuel sent me to him in that house, saying, he had got to go to Wellclose-square, and that he had no time. When I came out of the house Samuel came to me, and said, has he given you any money for me; he then said, he promised to lend me two pounds; he lent me two pounds out of that ten pounds. I presume that is the two pounds the officers found upon me, and then when we came out of the Brown Bear my wife and me were talking together upon different subjects. I had occasion to go under a gateway; Samuel gave me these things, saying, he would call for them in the morning; there was going to be an execution in his house. I left him under the gateway, and when I returned he was giving my wife a parcel, I presume the parcel that was found upon her; he said to her here, mistress, put this in your pocket, and when you come to tea to-morrow bring it with you. I am sure she did not know what it contained. Emblin told me he knew Samuel a long time. I did not ask him what the transaction was. As for the conversation that he has related never passed; it is entirely false. Mr. Vickrey has said, he should like to have got hold of Samuel. It is well known that Vickrey knows what kind of a man Samuel is better than I do. I could enter into many things about Samuel. It is well known it is not in my power to bring such a thing as this to perfection. Samuel was the man that found the money to get this plate made, under pretence of its going into the country, and when we went to Mr. Justins' door he told me to go in and pay for it. I am very sorry Samuel is not at this bar to-day; it would be of service to this country if he had, for the the numerous things that he has been guilty of; he is the sole cause of my misfortune. It is well known it never was in my power to do such a thing as this. The rascal wanted me to rob the house I lodge in of two feather beds, and the landlady's chest at the foot of the bedstead; he wanted to unscrew the lock to see what was in it. I am confident my wife is innocent of any offence.

WILLIAM ATKINSON , GUILTY - DEATH , aged 34.

MARY ATKINSON , NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury before the Lord Chief Baron

136. WILLIAM ATKINSON and MARY ATKINSON were indicted for feloniously forging and counterfeiting, on the 31st of October , the resemblance in paper of a certain stamp made to be used on promissory notes .

Mr. Gurney, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoners, of this charge were

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

137. STEPHEN JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of December, two great coats, value 2 l. the property of Samuel Cornett ; and an umbrella, value 1 l the property of Robert Rogers , in the dwelling-house of Samuel Cornett .

SAMUEL CORNETT . I am a housekeeper, 21, New North-street, Red Lion-square .

Q. What parish is that in - A. I do not recollect.

Q. Did you at any time lose two great coats and an umbrella - A. Yes, on the 13th of December. I was at home. The great coats had been hanging in the passage, and the umbrella. The coats were mine; the umbrella was my friend's, Robert Rogers . I knew nothing of it until I was called out to the watchhouse; I went there and saw the coats and the umbrella; I knew the coats to be mine, and the umbrella to be my friend's.

MARY M'CORMACK. Q. Did you ever see the prisoner at your master's house - A. Never to my knowledge. Near eight o'clock I was going out for some tea and sugar, a ring came to the door; a man came in and asked for one of the gentleman's hats; he said he came from the hatters in Cheapside. I called up the house-maid to answer the man; the house-maid came up: I went out. I did not like to go far from the house, for fear my mistress should find me absent, as I was going without her leave. I was absent about three minutes, and when I returned to the door the man was coming out with a parcel under his arm. I asked him, was he a thief, because I saw he had got the great coats and the umbrella I am sure the bundle was not a hat. He knocked me down with an umbrella he took out of the house. When I got up I ran after him; he got out of my sight. There was a great crowd; they got the prisoner; he was taken to the watchhouse. I saw the prisoner at the watchhouse.

Q. When you saw him at the watchhouse, did you believe him to be the man that was in the passage - A. I believe he was not the man, only his face was paleish like the man that was in the passage; his face resembled the man.

Q. That is a reason to believe he is the man - A. I believe he is not the man; his features resembles the man that knocked me down. I cannot say he is the man.

ELIZABETH HOWELL . I am house-maid at 21, New North-street. My fellow-servant called me up stairs; I saw the man on the stairs; I asked the man in the passage what gentleman's name was whose hat he wanted; he said he did not know. I went up stairs, and asked what gentleman's hat was wanted, and when I returned the man was gone.

Q. Did you see enough of him to form any belief whether the prisoner was that man - A. I did not.

WILLIAM WHITEHEAD. I am a watchman; my beat goes from the corner of New North-street. On the 25th of December, about eight o'clock at night, I heard the cry of stop thief; I saw a great mob coming from Theobald's-road; I ran to them. The prisoner tumbled down; the mob said he was the thief. I laid hold of him, and took him to the watch-house.

WILLIAM ASHLEY. I was constable of the night. I was in the watchhouse when the prisoner was brought in; he was charged on suspicion of stealing two great coats and an umbrella. I asked the prisoner what he had to say; he said he was running with the mob, he knew nothing of the charge. The property was produced by Burdon, another watchman. The prosecutor said the coats were his; the umbrella was his friend's; he did not know that the prisoner took them.

GEORGE BURDON . I am a watchman in East Harper-street, in Red Lion-street. I heard the rattle spring as I was going to my beat. Our watchhouse is in Eagle-street. At Devonshire-street there was a mob of people; I was endeavouring to disperse them; a woman came and threw these coats in my arms; she said, take care, there is thieves in the house.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

138. JAMES AYLWARD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of December , two watches without cases, value 2 l. the property of James Beale , in the dwelling-house of James Harper .

JAMES BEALE . I am a watch-maker . On the morning of the 27th I had occasion to go down stairs; I left no one in my room. I left two watches without cases in my drawer. I did not go out of the house at all. There are eight single men lodgers in the house. The prisoner was a lodger in the house; he was in the house at that time, but not up. He lodged in the back room, on the same floor with me.

Q. Whether he was dressed or not he could pop out of one room into the other - A. Exactly so. When I came up I had occasion to go to the drawer. I missed one of the watches, and afterwards the second. I wrote the description of the two watches on the back of some cards of my address; I went round to the pawnbrokers. I saw both the watches at Marlborough-street office. I took the prisoner in custody; he acknowledged to the fact. When I took the prisoner, I said, you have stolen two watches from me; he said, he had, without any promise of favour or threat whatever. On the prisoner being taken to the office he was searched; the two duplicates were found upon him by the officer.

THOMAS STANTON. I am shopman to Mr. Lowther, pawnbroker. The two watches were pawned with me at one time, I believe by the prisoner; I advanced one pound two shillings upon them. I produce them.

Prosecutor. They are the watches that I lost.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury before Mr. Common Serjeant.

139. MARY FERCLEY , MARY SMITH , and WILLIAM PERRY , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 31st of December , eighteen yards of ribbon, value 8 s. the property of Thomas Lee , privately in his shop .

SARAH LEE. On the 31st of December, between two and three in the afternoon, Mary Smith came in first and enquired the price of some ribbons in thewindow, she then went to the door and called Mary Fercley in, they wished to see some other ribbons; I took out a drawer, and laid it on the counter for them to choose. Mary Fercley took her bonnet off, and laid it on the top of the drawer of the ribbons; I suspected them, the difficulty of her choosing them, and the motion of her arms that she was stealing some property; I tried gently to remove the bonnet off the drawer, she held the bonnet very tight in her hand. I then gave it a sudden pull, and discovered half a piece of ribbon in her bonnet; I threw her bonnet off the counter, and withdrew the drawer of ribbons, and desired my servant to call the constable; she asked me what I was calling a constable for, and desired me to some of the ribbon that hung in the window for her; I replied, I would do no such thing; I would call a constable for her; she dared me to do any such thing, and ran out of the shop; immediately Mary Smith followed her. Johnson, the officer, was waiting outside of the door, he came in and asked if they had stolen any thing; I replied, that I had found the ribbon in her bonnet.

BENJAMIN JOHNSON . I am a City officer. On the 31st of December, I saw the three prisoners in Holborn, between one and two o'clock, knowing them I suspected them; I went into one or two shops after they came out, they never purchased any thing. They all three went into Mr. Saxton's shop. From there the two women went into Mr. Lee's shop; the man was standing outside, waiting for them at the corner of a court. After waiting there a short time Fercley ran out of the shop briskly, leaving the other prisoner in the shop. Perry, who is her brother, concealed himself in the passage of Mr. Bett's shop, the baker; about half a minute afterwards Smith ran out of the shop; Perry gave them a signal; they all three came together. I immediately went into Mrs. Lee's shop, I asked whether they had bought or stolen any thing; Mrs. Lee said they had concealed a piece of ribbon, she took it from them by snatching the bonnet. This is the ribbon that was in the bonnet

Q. You do not know that - A It is the ribbon that was given to me. I searched them, and found nothing on them but some silver.

Prosecutrix. The ribbon is mine; it is what I found in Mary Fercley 's bonnet.

Q. Might not it get into the bonnet by accident - A. I conceive that impossible; the back part of her bonnet was on the drawer. These two young women had been in the shop two or three days before; I lost some ribbons then.

Fercley's Defence. I went into this lady's shop on Christmas Eve, I bought several yards of ribbon; this young woman was with me. I did not go into her shop again for a week. I then asked the price of ribbons, I pulled off my bonnet to match the colour, and that young man was not in the shop at all. If the ribbon was in my bonnet it might have catched it by the wire of my bonnet when the lady took it up.

Smith's Defence. I did not take the ribbon.

Perry's Defence. I was coming up Holborn; I met these two young women; that young woman is my sister; I was going home at the same time, we were going to have something to drink; they said they were going to buy some ribbon, and when they came out the two gentlemen took us into the wine-vaults and searched us.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

140. ROBERT JOHNSON and JOSEPH FINCH were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of January , twenty-three yards of velveteen, value 3 l. 9 s. the property of John Wiggins , privately in his shop .

JOHN BEST . I am shopman to James Wiggins , woollen-draper , High Holborn On the 1st of January, in the morning, I saw the prisoner Johnson walk past the door several times, he looked in the shop; I asked him if he wanted any thing particular; he did not make any answer, but crossed the way. I did not see any more of him until half past two in the afternoon. The velveteen was placed partly inside of the shop, and partly outside of the shop. The officer brought Johnson and the velveteen back to the shop.

BENJAMIN JOHNSON . On the 1st of January, I was going up Holborn, I saw the two prisoners in company with one another; the prisoner Finch was standing at a door before you come to Mr. Wiggins's shop; Johnson was walking backwards and forwards before the door; I passed them, and went as far as Kingsgate-street. The prisoner Johnson ran after me, he came right in the front of me, and stared me in the face; I recollected I had seen him before; I thought it strange of his turning round and looking me in the face. He immediately went and made water. I immediately crossed the road and went on the other side of the way; Johnson returned back to his companion. I went to a potatoe shop as if to conceal myself for a few minutes; I then saw Johnson and the other prisoner walking backwards and forwards by the door of the prosecutor: a coach passed; I then saw Johnson with this piece of velveteen under his arm; I kept on the same side of the way. Johnson came over to me; I catched hold of him with the velveteen under his arm. The prisoner Finch was crossing over to where I was, but seeing I had got hold of Johnson he made his escape.

Best. This velveteen is my master's property, James Wiggins.

Johnson said nothing in his defence.

Finch's Defence. I know nothing at all of the transaction.

JOHNSON, GUILTY, aged 15,

Of stealing, but not privately .

Transported for Seven Years .

FINCH, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

141. MATTHEW JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of December , a barrel, value 12 s. and two kilderkins, value 18 s. the property of Thomas Morton and Edward Abbott . And HUGH TODD and JEREMIAH CREW for feloniously receiving the same goods, they knowing them to have been stolen .

THOMAS WARD . I am drayman to Messrs. Morton and Abbott. On the 3d of December I was out collecting their casks.

Q. Did you put any casks outside of the London Dock gate - A. Yes; I put five kilderkins and one barrel, about eleven o'clock in the forenoon, and between two and three in the afternoon I was in Nightingale-lane; I was going to the City; I saw Matthew Jones and John Todd ; Jones spoke to me: I answered him, and about a quarter before four I went to the Dock-gate, and then three kilderkins and one barrel were missing. On the same evening the officer took me to Todd's house in Sun-yard, Nightingale-lane.

Q. Did you see there either of the casks that you had lost - A. I saw a kilderkin; it is here. The officer brought it out of Todd's house; this chalk marking on it is my writing, William and Mary. This cask had been delivered to the William and Mary.

ALEXANDER DURHAM . I am a constable. On the 3rd of December, I was stationed at the London Dock-gate at a quarter past eight that morning I turned Jones back from the Dock-gate, and I saw him at various times outside of the gate doing nothing. I saw the casks that the drayman put there between three and four o'clock; I saw Jones roll one of them away behind a waggon, and in about five minutes afterwards the drayman came, and missed his casks.

JOHN SMITH . I am a constable. On the evening of the same day, I went to the house of the prisoner; Todd he keeps a green stall, and a horse and cart; sometimes Jones drives the cart and sometimes Todd. It was about seven o'clock in the evening, the shop was shut up; I opened the door; I found the three prisoners sitting round the fire. I told Todd I wanted to speak with him; I took him backwards, and asked him if he had received any casks that afternoon; he told me, no. On my looking round I saw this kilderkin with William and Mary chalked upon it; it was in the yard behind his house. I asked him how that cask came there; he told me Jones had brought it, and asked him to let it stay there. I went into the shop to lay hold of Jones, and he had ran away; Gillmore, my brother officer, pursued him, and brought him back again in the space of five minutes. I then asked Jones where he found the cask; he told me he saw it just outside of the kennel, he thought it belonged to somebody, and so he rolled it in there. At that time I found no other casks. I asked Todd if there were any other casks there; he told me there was not. On the next night I went again to Todd's premises; Todd and Jones were then in custody. I went and looked over the wall of the yard; there were four or five barrels there in the yard. I then came round to the front of Todd's house, and found there was somebody in Todd's house; I knocked at the door; Crew opened the door, and when I went into the shop I saw the fire was composed of staves a burning. I asked Crew where he got these staves; he told me in the stable. I had searched the stable the night before, there were no casks there; among the casks I found two were defaced; the barrels belonging to Messrs. Moreton are here. There were other barrels there belonging to different people, they are not here. I took Crew in custody.

Wardon. This kilderkin is my master's property, and the barrel belongs to the ship the William and Mary.

EDWARD ABBOTT . The names of the firm are Thomas Moreton and Edward Abbott . The kilderkins we value at nine shillings each, and the barrels at twelve shillings each.

JOHN GILLMAN . While Smith was in the yard with Todd, Jones made his escape; I followed him about an hundred yards and brought him back.

Jones's Defence. I implore your lordship's attention, that however the crime may appear against me, I declare, in the presence of my God, as I returned from the Quay I found the cask in the street; I took it to the shop until I was able to learn to whom it belonged; soon after, I was made a prisoner.

Todd's Defence. About a quarter after four o'clock in the evening this good man brought the cask to my door; he said, shall I leave this cask, and he would take it away to-morrow, as he believed it belonged to his master at Bethnal-green.

Crew's Defence. These men were taken up, I went to the office to them. Todd told me to go and mind the house. In the night three or four casks were chucked over the yard, and one broken one.

JONES, GUILTY , aged 60.

TODD, GUILTY , aged 64.

Confined 1 year in the house of correction , whipped in Jail .

CREW, NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

142. JAMES HARRISON and JAMES CHILVERS were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of November , four planks of mahogany, value 5 l. and eleven mahogany bed pillars, value 10 l. the property of William Dawes .

JAMES COURT . I am a journeyman cabinet maker, in the employ of Mr. Dawes, Long cottage, City-road . On the 23d of November, there was missing from Mr. Dawe's premises, three planks of mahogany, and ten or eleven mahogany bed-posts of fourteen feet long. I saw them in Mr. Dawes possession at five o'clock the night before, and I have since seen them at Hatton Garden office.

CHARLES COOK . I am an officer. On the 1st of December, I went to search Harrison's premises, No. 1, Back-hill, Hatton Garden; I found Harrison and his family there at breakfast; it was between eight and nine o'clock in the morning; afterwards I saw Chilvers coming down stairs. Mr. Harrison came out; I told him Mr. Dawes had lost some mahogany, he had some suspicion it was on his premises; he said I was wellcome to look. Mr. Dawes went first up stairs, as soon as he got to the top, he said here is my property. I then told Harrison he must go with me to the office; I took him in custody.

Q. What was the property that you found that Dawes owned - A. Three large mahogany and two bed-pillars unturned; the two bed-pihere; the planks are too large to be brought in here. At half after eleven o'clock at night I took Chilvers; he was in bed with his clothes on, except his shoes.

Q. Did you search any other place - A. Yes, I had a search warrant and searched No. 47, Seward-street, Brick-lane, Chilvers and Harrison's premises; we found nothing there belonging to Mr. Dawes.

Q. Now, bring in one of the pillars - A. This bed-pillar was fourteen feet long; it has been cut in two.

CHARLES TIPPEL . I live at 47, Seward-street, Brick-lane, St. Luke's.

Q. Do you know the prisoners - A. I do, my father delivered them up the key of the bottom shop of the the house, No. 47, Seward-street; I took the rent of Chilvers. My father told me he had let the shop to Harrison and Chilvers, on the 24th of October they took possession; they took it at three shillings a week; they carried on the business of carpenters.

Q. Did you see any property there - A. I did, I saw pannel doors, mahogany planks, and bed posts there. I do not recollect the quantity; they were unturned; I saw them in the shop. Chilvers paid some rent in advance; they both took it, and they were joint tenants there. I saw them at work there once; they kept the shop until they were apprehended.

THOMAS WHITE . I am a mahogany-turner. On the 24th of November, Harrison sent me ten or eleven pair of bed-pillars to turn; he told me to sell them for him if I could at twenty-four shillings a pair. I applied to Mr. Blackhall; he refused buying them, he said they were worm-eaten. He then told me to turn them, and he would sell them. On the 1st of December, Cook and Mr. Dawes came, Mr. Dawes claimed them; he said they were stolen.

WILLIAM SMITH . I am a coffee-roaster, I work for Mr. Tippel.

Q. Did you ever see Harrison and Chilvers at work at any bed posts - A. Yes, I saw one of them sawing them in two, and the other holding it, and I saw the mahogany planks there in the shop they rented of Mr. Tippel.

THOMAS HACKER . I am a timber-merchant. I saw the mahogany planks at Hatton Garden; it is a part of the log I sold to Mr. Dawes.

WILLIAM MAXWELL . I am a cabinet-maker. I have seen the planks at the police office; they came off the log at Mr. Dawes premises.

Harrison's Defence. This property was brought to me for sale; I did not know it was stolen.

Chilvers's Defence. I cannot say any thing in respect to this charge, except this property was brought there; Mr. Harrison told me to take care of whatever property that was brought to him.

Harrison called six witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Chilvers called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

HARRISON, GUILTY , aged 45.

CHILVERS, GUILTY , aged 33.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

143. WILLIAM COOK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22nd of December , two pair of men's shoes, value 8 s. the property of James Stewart .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY, aged 16.

Fined 1 s. and discharged.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

144. JAMES ADAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of December , sixty-six yards of dowlas, value 2 l. the property of Joseph Graham .

JOSEPH GRAHAM . On the 22nd of December, the dowlas was at the door. I accidentally went to the door; I saw the prisoner going along with a bundle on his shoulder; I asked the prisoner where he was going with that on his shoulder; he said, a person gave it him, if it was mine I might have it. I said, I must take you too. I took him; he let the dowlas fall on my arm; a gentleman took the dowlas who is present.

Prosecutor. That is my dowlas; it has my mark at the end.

Prisoner's Defence. A person asked me to carry it for a pint of beer, I being out of employ accepted the offer; this gentleman came and said it was his property; I said if it was there it was for him.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , whipped in jail .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

145. JAMES HAYNES was indicted for that he, on the 26th of November , was servant to John Wall , and was employed and entrusted by him to receive money for an upon his account, and that he being such servant, so employed, and entrusted, did receive and take into his possession for his said master, the sum of 2 l. 2 s. and that he afterwards did embezzle, secrete, and steal the same .

JOHN WALL . I am a potatoe salesman , in Spitalfields market. The prisoner was a servant of mine; the prisoner received two guineas of Michael Wall, he never told me he had received it; when I sent a person to Michael Wall; he said he had paid it.

MICHAEL WALL . I live at No. 70, Fleet market. I ordered three sacks of potatoes on the Monday, and the same on Friday the 26th of November of Mr. Wall's man. I paid the sum of two pounds two shillings for them.

Q. Did you take a receipt - A. No, I never had any receipt; I paid the prisoner for his master two pounds two shillings, another man delivered them to me; I paid the prisoner the money. I have been in the habit of paying him money before.

Prosecutor. I never received the money.

Prisoner's Defence. I have a wife and three small children; I leave it to the mercy of the court.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Confined 1 year in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

146. MICHAEL WELCH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of January , a piece of timber, value 10 s. the property of William Mitchel .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY , aged 28.

Whipped in jail and discharged.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

147. EDWARD FOOTMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3rd of December , four coach-glasses, value 2 l. the property of the Honorable Alexander Maitland , esq.

CHARLES GOODMAN . I am groom to Mr. Green. I was coachman to General Maitland at the time the glasses were taken away. On the 2nd of December, I left the premises safe, and locked up; on the 3rd of December, in the morning, when I went I found the coach-house door open, and the four glasses taken away.

JOHN GWYER . I am a gentleman's servant. On the 3rd of December, the prisoner brought to me the four glasses, he asked me if I knew any body that bought coach-glasses; I asked how he came by them; he said, he found them. I took the glasses to Mr. Gladman, a frame-maker, in Drury-lane; I asked him fifty shillings for them; he bid me two pounds four shillings; I agreed to let him have them, and while he got the change he sent me over to a public-house, in the mean time he got two officers, and had me taken up to Bow-street office. The prisoner was waiting for me at the Queen's Head in Holly-street.

Q. What is the prisoner - A. A labouring man. I did not suspect they were stolen; he said, he found them.

Q. Coach glasses do not easily get out of a coach without hands - A. No.

JOSEPH GLADMAN . The glasses were brought to me for sale, on Friday, the 3rd of December; I stopped them, and sent for the officers. The man asked me thirty-six shillings for them; I gave thirty-four shillings for them, and got an officer and had the man taken in custody. These are the glasses.

CHRISTOPHER JONES . On the 3rd of December, Mr. Gladman came to the office, he said there was a man came with the glasses, he asked but little for them. I went to the man and asked him where he got them; he said that he had them of a man of the name of Footman, he was at the Queen's Head in Holly-street; I went to Footman; he said he found them in Paddington fields.

Q. to Goodman. Is the lace on the frames like General Maitland's lace - A. It is like it; I cannot swear to it.

JURY. The lace on the frames correspond with the lace brought from General Maitland's house.

Prisoner's Defence. I found the glasses in a ditch in a field where the grand navigable Canal is cut in the Prince Regents park; there was a boy in the field feeding cows; I do not know him; I cannot call him.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

148. JANE DENHAM was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of September , a watch, value 5 l. the property of John Edwards , in his dwelling house .

MRS. EDWARDS. I lost my husband's watch on the 14th of September; it was on a drawer in my room. The prisoner took the watch out of the bed and put it on the drawers in the other room: I asked her where the watch was; she said on the drawers. I then asked her to look what o'clock it was; she replied, it was exactly twelve; some time after that she was walking about the room; I then had occasion to go down stairs, I gave her my young baby to nurse while I was gone; I took the other child with me of two years and a half old. On my returning back to the room, I saw the door open; the prisoner met me at the door with the infant in her arms asleep, she said the child was asleep, shall I lay it on the bed; I said, no, I will take her out of your arms in one minute; she said, as quick as you can. I want to go down stairs. I took the child, and she left the room immediately. About half an hour after she was gone I thought it very odd of her not returning, I looked on the drawers, and missed my watch. There was no one in the room after she left it.

Q. Did you ever find your watch again - A. Yes.

Q. Was the prisoner a servant out of place - A. Yes.

JOHN BURGESS . The prisoner I believe pawned the watch with me for thirty shillings, I am not positive; it was a woman; I cannot exactly swear to the prisoner; it was a woman something like her. This is the watch; it is a common silver watch.

Prosecutrix. It is my husband's watch, his name is upon it.

Prisoner's Defence. I certainly took the watch; I did not pawn it.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

149. MARY ANDERSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of December , a watch, value 2 l. and a piece of ribbon, value 1 d. the property of Patrick M'Ivers .

PATRICK M'IVERS. I am an invalid belonging to Chelsea. I lost my watch on the 25th of December; we got our pay; I received a one-pound note I went into a public-house to get change; the landlord said he had not change. I went out to see about my billet; the prisoner followed me out into the street; she said, there is a bad woman in company here, if you come back you will be ruined. She came forward, pulled my watch out, and ran away with it; I ran after her; I could not overtake her. I had my knapsack, and I am lame, I could not overtake her; I am sure she is the woman.

EDWARD CLARK . I am an officer. I searched the prisoner; I did not find any watch or duplicate upon her.

Prisoner's Defence. I never saw his watch.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

150. JAMES BOND was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3rd of December , two pewter pets, value 2 s. the property of William Tent .

JOHN WALLER . I am a constable. I was sent for by Pilgrim; he informed me that Margaret Vaughn had been robbed; in searching the prisoner's promises for Mrs. Vaughn's property I found these pots in the cupboard; the prisoner said, he had the pots in his possession a twelvemonth, they were given to him by a gentleman to take home. These are the pots.

Prosecutor. They are my pots.

Prisoner's Defence. I was moving some goods for a gentleman in St. James's-street, these pots were in his house. I cannot read. The gentleman told me to take them home.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

151. JAMES BOND was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3rd of December , a handkerchief, value 3 d. two shifts, value 2 s. a pair of shoes, value 2 s. a night-cap, value 3 d. an apron, value 2 d. and ten shillings in copper monies , the property of Margaret Vaughn , widow .

MARGARET VAUGHN. On the 3rd of December, I came out of the workhouse; I asked the prisoner, (he was a watchman,) if he could help me to a lodging. I went into his box; he went away, and when he came to the box, I asked him what he wanted; he said, nothing. When he was gone I looked to see if my bundle was there, it was gone; my bundle contained all the things in the indictment. The ten shil- shillings in halfpence the gentlemen gave me.

Q. Was any body in the box but this man - A. He locked me up from eleven at night until five in the morning. I wanted to go to Shrewsbury; the ten shillings in halfpence I did not intend to spend until I got to Highgate, and met a coach to take me to Shrewsbury.

JOHN WALLER . I searched the prisoner's lodgings; I found this shift. I asked the prisoner if he had seen this poor old woman; he said, no, nor her bundle.

Prosecutrix. I am sure that is my shift, the matron of the workhouse gave it me; I cut out the name of the workhouse on the body because nobody should know that I had been in the workhouse at Shrewsbury.

WILLIAM GODFREY . I searched the prisoner's room the second time.

Prosecutrix. I know them; I had untied them and tied them up again, it is one of the papers of halfpence I had of the gentlemen.

Prisoner's Defence. When the old lady came to me I saw no bundle that she had; the halfpence I received of Mr. Swift at his lottery office, and the shift is my wife's shift.

GUILTY , aged 60.

Confined 1 year in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

152. MARY WHITE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 31st of December , from the person of John Hern , four two-pound bank notes , his property,

JOHN HERN . I am a pensioner at the board of Ordnance . I came to get my pension; I picked up the prisoner in St. Martin's-lane, she took me to a house in Vine-street, and when I came into the room I paid her for what I agreed. My notes were all safe in my pocket when I entered the room. I felt her hand at my pocked twice, I shoved her away. I felt in my pocket, and my notes were gone; I challenged her with robbing me of eight pounds. She took two pins out of her breast and said, I might search her. I took her to the watchhouse; the constable searched her, and found nothing.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

153. DANIEL BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of December , four shirts, value 3 l. a handkerchief, value 6 d. a waistcoat, value 6 d. six pieces of cuttings of cloth, value 6 d. a quarter of a yard of canvas, value 1 s. the property of George Exton .

MARGARET EXTON . My husband is a tailor ; his name is George Exton . Four men lodged with me, they were shipmates of the prisoner; these clothes were left in my husband's possession.

Q. Why do you accuse this man of stealing these things - A. After a fit of sickness, and every thing was gone out of my chest except an old handkerchief, I missed all the things in the indictment among a number of other things.

JOHN BROWN. I am an officer. On the 11th of December, I went to the house of a woman in New Gravel-lane; I took the prisoner in custody; I searched him, and found four duplicates upon him, two of which belong to this property. I afterwards went to Mr. Exton's house and searched the prisoner's chest. In his chest I found a knife with the name of King upon it, and a waistcoat that belonged to a man that left his things there, and the bit of canvas and the cuttings of cloth were found in the prisoner's chest, and the other things at the pawnbroker's.

THOMAS BROAD . The duplicates produced by Brown are my duplicates. I took in a white shirt, a check shirt, and a red shirt, of the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. A seaman gave me the things; I pledged them.

GUILTY , aged 39.

Confined 1 year in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

154. CHARLES BLINMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of December , two seals, value 1 l. a watch-key, value 1 d. and part of a watch-chain, value 1 d. the property of William Sharke , from his person .

WILLIAM SHARKE . On the 29th of December, about seven o'clock in the evening, I was in Crown-street, Finsbury-square ; I saw a small crowd on the opposite side of the way; I crossed the way to see what was the matter, when the prisoner rushed against me and caught hold of my seal. I instantly catched hold of him; he fell down. I still kepthold, and with assistance took him to Worship-street office.

JACOB LEWIS. I am a carpenter; I live in Crown-street. I saw a mob; a woman had lost her shoe. I heard a person say he has stolen my watch. I saw the prisoner; the prosecutor had caught hold of him. The prisoner said he had not got his property. I called for a light; I dragged the prisoner two feet with intention of taking him into the Flying Horse public-house. I was looking to see if the property was on the ground; I heard something fall. I saw the two seals in question taken up and delivered to the prosecutor. I am sure the prisoner is the same man.

Prosecutor. These are the seals; the chain broke; the watch remained in my pocket. The prisoner never got away from me.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent of the charge that is against me.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

155. JAMES BURRIDGE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of December , a chaldron and three quarters of a chaldron of bones, value 4 l. 10 s. the property of William Stapleton and George Stapleton .

JOSEPH CHARLES NASH . My father lives at Battle-bridge; he is a bone merchant; the Messrs. Stapleton's are carriers , and they are frequently employed by us. Their wharf is Whitefriars-dock, at the bottom of Water-lane.

Q. Did they carry any bones for you on the 29th of December - A. They did, their carts received fourteen loads, but we heard they only received thirteen loads. Their carts were employed to carry bones to their dock at Whitefriars, and the road they should take is through Gray's-inn-lane, Fetter-lane, and Water-lane; that is the direct road from Battle-bridge to their dock; Fleet-market would be out of the way. The prisoner was a carter; he was employed, and took several loads that day, and particular the last. About seven o'clock the prisoner had a load of bones at our house, Battle-bridge; he had two horses to his cart; the horse between the shafts was a grey horse; the prisoner was the driver of that cart. The prisoner said at the magistrate's that he did not drive that load. I am quite certain that he did; I saw him go with it. It would take half an hour to go from our house at Battle-bridge to Whitefriars dock. I am certain he drove the last load of bones; the load of that cart was worth four pounds ten shillings.

WILLIAM STAPLETON . My partner's name is George Stapleton . The prisoner was our carter. On the 29th of December, to the last cart he had a white horse in the shafts.

Q. Were you at home about half past seven o'clock - A. I was not.

JOHN BROWN. I am horsekeeper to Messrs. Stapleton's. The prisoner drove for them; he went out with the horses in the morning.

Q. Did you see the last term that the prisoner had - A. Yes, about eight o'clock I was going down Fleet-market; I saw the prisoner's cart and horses; a grey horse was in the shafts. The prisoner was not with his cart; the man that was with it was driving the horses as fast as he could drive them. The cart appeared to me to be empty, by the rattle of it. It was dark; I could not tell who the man was that was driving of it.

JOHN KITCHENER . I am clerk to Mr. Stapleton. I was in the counting-house when the cart came home. The man said Burridge was drunk; he took the cart, and drove it for him from the top of Gray's-inn-lane. These bones never came to my knowledge.

Prisoner's Defence. I drove three loads of bones to Mr. Stapleton's; I sent another man home with the cart and horses; he went and asked where he should shoot the cart out.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

156. RICHARD HUCKLE and THOMAS HICKEY were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of December , twenty-eight yards of printed cotton, value 28 s. the property of William Todd , privately in his shop .

GEORGE VAUGHAN . On Saturday the 18th of December, I saw the two prisoners in Great Russel-street, Bloomsbury , walking backwards and forwards at the shop of William Todd , a linen-draper . I was on the right hand side of the way, and Mr. Todd's shop is on the left. I saw one of the prisoners by the door of Mr. Todd's shop: the other was looking in at the window; they soon separated. I walked down towards Bloomsbury-square, and one of the prisoners came as if from Mr. Todd's shop; he gave the prisoner that is rather lame, a something which he put in his apron, (it was a foggy night), and after he had done so he walked by the shop again; he then made a return, and gave a whistle; the other prisoner cried, here I am. The prisoner was running at the time that is rather lame; he stopped, and the other prisoner came up with him, and when they got opposite Bedford chapel in Charles-street, the prisoners saw me coming, as I supposed; they were going to run, I caught them in my arms, and on the lame prisoner I found this piece of print. I then took them back to Mr. Todd's shop; I saw a lad in the shop; I asked him if he knew this piece of print; he said, yes, it was hanging within his shop within a quarter of an hour before.

WILLIAM GILLMAN . I am an apprentice to Mr. Todd, he is a linen-draper in Russel-street. When Mr. Vaughan took the prisoners he brought them in the shop; he asked me if I knew this piece of print. I told him I did it was Mr. Todd's property; Mr. Vaughan brought it back with the prisoners.

HUCKLE, GUILTY , aged 16.

HICKEY, GUILTY , aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

157. PETER NOAKES was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 11th of January , twenty-three yards of printed cotton, value 25 s. the property of William Williams .

WILLIAM WILLIAMS . I am a linen-draper . On the 11th of January, I lost twenty-three yards of printed cotton. I know I put it there at my door, and I saw it there twenty minutes before I lost it. It was secured to an iron rail.

Q. Was any part of it in the shop - A. None. My boy at the time was taking in the goods at the door. We did not miss the goods until Mr. Vaughan came in and gave information. I went to Hatton Garden office, and there I saw the prisoner and the goods in Vaughan's possession. I only know that the piece of print is mine.

GEORGE VAUGHAN . I am a broker; I live at No. 65, Gray's-inn-lane. On the 11th of January, between four and five, I saw the prisoner at Mr. Williams's shop door; I saw him untwist this piece of print from the rail; he folded it up in his hands, and he ran off with it. I pursued him, and laid hold of him near King-street, Holborn, and took him to Hatton Garden office, and I went and gave Mr. Williams information. This is the print; I have had it ever since.

Prosecutor. This is the print that I had hung up against my shop about twenty minutes before.

Prisoner's Defence. I wish to go to sea if you would let me.

GUILTY , aged 15.

Judgment respited, to go for a Sailor or Soldier .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

158. THOMAS HARVEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of December , two trusses of clover hay, value 5 s. the property of John Harpur .

JOHN HARPUR . I live in Edgware-road . The prisoner was my servant . On the 29th of December I was returning home about four o'clock in the morning; I heard a waggon going out of my yard. It was not to go out so early as that; I had ordered it out between five and six. I suspected something was wrong; I went out, and waited outside of the gate. The prisoner and Francis Pearce , who has absconded, were to drive the waggon. I desired them to stop in George-street; there were two trusses of clover hay upon the top of the waggon, besides a truss of meadow hay for their horses. They did not know I was there until I told them to stop. I got upon the wheel; I observed the two trusses of clover hay, besides that a truss of meadow hay for their horses, and a nose-bag full of corn for their horses. When we send out horses we send meadow hay with them. When Pearce saw me upon the wheel he desired the prisoner to hold the whip; he absconded immediately. They were both equally entrusted with the waggon. The prisoner staid with the waggon until I called my clerk up.

Q. How long had this man lived with you - A. A month or five weeks. The prisoner said he knew nothing of it.

Q. Was this clover hay in the same place or near it, in the waggon - A. No, the meadow hay was on the shafts, and the clover hay was upon the top of the waggon on the dung. I directly called my clerk up, and sent the prisoner to the watchhouse. When I returned, after calling the clerk up, I observed one of the trusses of clover hay off the waggon; my clerk found it throwed into a neighbour's yard. I left the prisoner with the waggon while I went and called my clerk up.

Prisoner's Defence. I don't know any thing about it.

GUILTY, aged 21.

Judgment respited .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

159. GEORGE FORD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of December , a silk handkerchief, value 7 s. the property of William Saunders , from his person .

WILLIAM SAUNDERS. I am clerk to Mr. Guy. On the 5th of December I lost my handkerchief; the handkerchief I know was safe in my pocket a quarter of an hour before I missed it. It was intimated to me by a lad standing by me that my handkerchief was taken away. I was waiting while the militia were going to chapel at Whitehall, that occasioned me to stop. I took hold of the prisoner; I charged him with stealing my handkerchief; he said he had a handkerchief; that he had picked it off the ground. He gave it me. This is the handkerchief. My handkerchief was a similar pattern to this. I cannot swear to it being my property.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury before Mr. Common Serjeant.

160. ANN WRIGHT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of January , from the person of John Ross , a pocket-book, value 1 s. and two 2 l. bank notes , his property.

JOHN PROCTER . I am a patrol of Shadwell. John Ross is gone to sea; he told me the prisoner was the woman that had stolen his pocket-book. I only know what he told me.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

161. JOHN SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22nd of December , a coat, value 14 s. the property of James Asher .

WILLIAM RIVETT . I am coachman to Mr. James Asher , Bloomsbury-square. On the 20th of December, I left my box coat, the property of my master, in the stable, at ten o'clock at night. The stables are in Turk's Head yard, East-street . I returned to the stables in the morning between seven and eight; the coat was gone. I value the coat at fourteen shillings.

SAMUEL MILLER. I apprehended the prisoner at a house in Golden-lane. Lion Solomon swore before the magistrate that he bought this coat of the prisoner.

LION SOLOMON. Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. Yes. I bought the coat of the prisoner; I agreed to give him ten shillings for the coat, and I gave him ten shillings for it afterwards. I am sure he is the person.

Rivett. I am sure it is the coat I lost; it is my master's property.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

162. MARGARET MOLLOY and BIDDY ABRAHAMS were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of January, twenty-five yards of Irish cloth, value 24 l. the property of Jeremiah Beech , privately in his shop .

JEREMIAH BEECH . I live in Grafton-street ; I am a linen-draper . I lost the twenty-five yards of Irish cloth on the 4th of January. About two weeks ago Molloy had a gown put by until she could afford to pay for the whole. She came to pay 6 d. on the Friday; my young man took the 6 d. and gave it to me. Abrahams then wished to look at some print. They came in together. I shewed her a considerable quantity. After a long time she purchased a yard and a half; she gave 3 s. 6 d. for it. I was serving a customer at the top of the shop; my young man brought me the money. I had scarcely got the money in my hand, when a young man looked in the shop after the prisoners had gone out, and said, here is a woman has gone out that I believe has got something that does not belong to her. I and my young man followed the two prisoners, and when we came to Molloy, she had got a piece of Irish linen under her petticoats; she had got hold of the linen, one hand at one end and the other hand at the other end, underneath her petticoats. We took her back to the shop, and as soon as she came into the shop she dropped it. I sent for an officer, and had her taken into custody. She must have done it under cover of the other, or else we must have seen her take it out.

JAMES PANEL . I am shopman to Mr. Beech; the two prisoners came into the shop; Molloy paid off 6 d. for a gown which she had put by. Abrahams asked me to shew her some prints; I shewed her a great number; she purchased a yard and a half, it came to 3 s. 6 d. I gave the money to my master; they went out of the shop. George Bigby came in the shop, and said one of the prisoners, he believed, had got a piece of cloth. I immediately pursued the prisoners; I catched Molloy about thirty yards from the house. I brought her back, and as soon as she got into the shop she dropped the cloth.

GEORGE BIGBY . On Friday last, about three o'clock, I was going past Mr. Beech's shop. I saw the prisoner Molloy just as she came out of Mr. Beech's shop; she dropped the linen from underneath her petticoats. I suspected that she did not come honestly by it. I went into the shop, and informed Mr. Beech and his shopman of it. Mr. Beech and his shopman jumped over the counter, pursued the prisoners, and overtook them about thirty yards from the house. They were brought back into the shop, and in the shop Molloy dropped the cloth from underneath her petticoats. Mr. Beach then sent for a constable, and had them taken into custody.

Molloy's Defence. I was going to Covent Garden market to get something for my throat. I met Biddy Abrahams; she said she was going to get a frock for her child. I never saw any thing of the linen until the man followed me and brought me back; then the piece of linen was lying down in the shop.

Abraham's Defence. I met this woman; she told me she was going to pay something off her gown. I went then with her. I bought a frock. That is all I saw of the woman.

MOLLOY GUILTY , aged 58,

Confined six months in the House of Correction .

ABRAHAMS, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Recorder.

163. THOMAS BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of December , two saws, value 6 s. two planes, value 8 s. a coat, value 3 s. an oil stone, value 3 s. and a basket, value 2 s. the property of John Elliot .

JOHN ELLIOT. I am a carpenter . On the 16th of December I went to dinner an half after twelve o'clock; I returned at half after one, and my basket and tools were gone. The next day I found the prisoner with my coat at the Jane Shore public-house, Shoreditch.

FRANCIS COTTON . I took in pledge of the prisoner two saws and two planes; I advanced 5 s. upon them; I produce them.

Prosecutor. They are my saws and planes; the other things have not been found.

Prisoner's Defence. The coat I bought, I gave half a crown for it; the man sent me to pawn the saws.

GUILTY, aged 30.

Judgment respited .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

164. SAMUEL HIGGINS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of December , a looking-glass frame, value 18 s. the property of Samuel Campion .

SAMUEL CAMPION . I am a cabinet-maker ; I live at 118, Curtain road.

Q. When did you lose your looking-glass frame - A. On the 31st of December, about ten or eleven o'clock. I had just closed up my shop. I went backwards; my man came and informed me he saw it taken out of the door.

RICHARD HARVEY . I am a servant to Mr. Campion. I was working. I saw the prisoner go out of the door with the glass under his arm. I went and informed my master.

Q. Where was this frame - A. It stood on the chest of drawers in the shop.

Prisoner's Defence. I am in partnership with Samuel Campion ; he is in articles of agreement with me, which I never got stamped. I believe Mr. Campion has destroyed it. Campion asked me if I had any money; I told him no. He has had six accommodation bills of me. Campion said he had no money. The day before Harvey, the man that gave evidence against me, Campion lent him his coat to pawn for eight shillings. I went and took a table out; he afterwards pledged it for ten shillings.

Q. to Harvey. Did you let him have that glass frame - A. He asked me what that glass frame would fetch, I told him to take it and see.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Recorder.

165. JAMES KING and EDWARD HARRIS were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of January , a counterpane, value 5 s. two handkerchiefs, value 2 s. two night-caps, value 6 d. three small pieces of cotton, value 2 s. a glove, value 2 d. a remnant of velvet, value 1 s. and two pieces of carpet, value 2 s. the property of Peter James Richardson .

PETER JAMES RICHARDSON. I keep the Horse and Groom public-house , Dogget's-court, Moorfields . On Tuesday, the 4th of January, the prisoners came to my house between ten and eleven o'clock; they had two glasses of rum; one only of them partook of it, the other gave his share away; they afterwards had six-pennyworth of gin and water. I told them then to go. They wanted more liquor; I would not draw them any more. We missed King out of the tap-room; the other prisoner went and stood with his back against the tap-room door. I requested my sister-in-law to fasten the door, and let no more in. She went with intent to fasten it. Harris stood with his back to the door, and said the other man was coming in. I said, let her have none of your nonsense, let her go and fasten the door. He still refused. I pulled him away. While I was pulling him away, I happened to cast my eye on a window that gives light to the stairs in that passage; by the reflection of the lamp I saw King coming down stairs. I went into the passage; Harris followed me. One of them whispered to the other; after the whispering, King got the street door open. I saw King's pockets stick out very much. I asked him what he had got there. Harris got in between me and King, and prevented me from holding him. King held up his hand, made a blow at me, and ran away as fast as he could. I pursued him as far as the Brown Bear in Moorfields. When King found I was close at his heels, he swore he would serve me out. I said, you damned rascal, I will serve you out. His feet slipped; I catched hold of him, and brought him up to my own house. Harris came behind him, and took some linen out of King's pocket. Harris then went and dropped some things under the window. My sister picked them up; one of them was a little boy's shirt and a half handkerchief. I do not recollect the other things in my confusion; they are here, and they are my property. I am quite sure as to the persons of the two prisoners.

MARY PHILLIPS . I an sister-in-law to the Prosecutor. On the 4th of January I was at the Prosecutor's house, when the two prisoners were there in the tap-room. The Prosecutor desired the house should be cleared. I remember missing King. The Prosecutor desired me to go and fasten the door. I was prevented by Harris standing with his back to the door. My brother pulled Harris from the door. I afterwards saw King in my brother's custody.

Q. When you were at the door do you know where King came from - A. I saw him coming down stairs. I saw Harris take some things from King's pocket; he put them down by the wall by the window. I picked up a shirt, a pair of stockings, and a piece of fringe; I gave them to my brother; he gave them to Moreton the officer.

SARAH WEST . I am a servant to the prosecutor, the counterpane now produced is my master's property, and this boy's shirt and all the things produced are my master's property, except the pieces of velvet, they are mine.

King's Defence. I was coming by this house at a late hour in the evening. I heard a great noise of singing and dancing up stairs. I went up stairs. I was asked to sing a song; I got very tipsey. As to the robbery, I know nothing of it.

Harris's Defence. I went to the club at the Horse and Groom. I got intoxicated there.

KING, GUILTY , aged 22.

HARRIS, GUILTY , aged 26.

Transported for Seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

166. MARY BAILEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of December , four shirts, value 1 l. a jacket, value 3 s, two pair of stockings, value 3 s. and five handkerchiefs, value 5 s. the property of Eleanor Herbert , widow .

ELEANOR HERBERT. I am a widow. I am a laundress . I live in Lee's Mews, the top of North Audley-street, Grosvenor-square. I lost these things. On the 28th of December I was out. I went into a public-house. I fell in with the prisoner and another woman. One of the ladies gave me a glass of rum; then I called for a quartern, and we left the house. One of the ladies wished me to give her the bundle; I refused, and the prisoner took it from me.

Q. What did your bundle contain - A. Four shirts, a jacket, two pair of stockings, and some handkerchiefs I had to wash. Mrs. Bailey took them, and took them into Mrs. Barclay's room. We all three went together to Mrs. Barclay's room, and when I came the next day to Mrs. Barclay, the bundle was gone.

Prisoner's Defence. I went to the wine vaults, the corner of Compton-street. I there saw the prosecutrix; the prosecutrix, I and Mrs. Bailey, drank together. The prosecutrix called for a quartern of rum; we went to another public-house; we all got intoxicated. I took the bundle to Mrs. Barclay's, and there I left it with her. I was intoxicated almost as much as the prosecutrix.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Recorder.

167. SUSANNAH YARNELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of December , a counterpane, value 7 s. a pair of sheets, value 18 s. three blankets, value 1 l. two looking-glasses, value 27 s. four curtains, value 24 s. a pound weight of feathers, value 2 s. and a flat iron, value 6 d. the property of Thomas Twinam , in a lodging-room .

THOMAS TWINAM . I am in the medical line ; I live at No. 50, Kingsland road, Shoreditch. The prisoner was a lodger of mine; she had the one pair of stairs room; she came on the Saturday, and went away on the Wednesday following. She had almost emptied the bed before she took the things away, and when I asked her what she had done with my things, she said she had pawned some and sold the rest.

The Prisoner said nothing in her defence.

Confined one year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

168. WILLIAM PAGETT was indicted, for that he, on the 13th of October , was servant to Henry Wyatt , and was employed and entrusted by him to receive money for him; and that he being such servant, so employed and entrusted, did receive and take into his possession for and on account of his said master the sum of 29 l. 8 s. 6 d. and that he afterwards feloniously did embezzle, secrete and steal the same .

HENRY CHARRINGTON . I am the landlord of the Cock public-house, Snow-hill. I am a customer to Mr. Wyatt. On the 13th of October I paid the prisoner 29 l. 8 s. 6 d. on account of Mr. Wyatt his employer.

HENRY WYATT . I am a brewer in Shoe-lane. The prisoner was clerk to me; he was employed to receive money on my account; when he came home at night, he was to give me an account of the monies he had received in the day.

Q. Did the prisoner give to you any account, on the 13th of October, of the 29 l. 8 s. 6 d. received of Mr. Charrington - A. Not to me.

THOMAS SPENCER . I am a clerk of the prosecutor; it is my duty to make entry of the money brought home by the prisoner.

Q. On the 13th of October did you receive the sum of 29 l. and a fraction of the prisoner - A. I never received any money at all, nor do I see any such entry in the book.

Mr. Wyatt, junior. Q. Did the prisoner account to you of this sum of 29 l. 8 s. 6 d - A. He did not.

The Prisoner left his defence to his counsel, called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 37.

Transported for Seven years .

First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Recorder.

169. WILLIAM SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of February , 170 yards of lustring, value 70 l. and 100 yards of serge, value 30 l. the property of Thomas Hayward .

GEORGE HAYWARD . I am superintendant to Thomas Hayward , weaver , in Coleman-street. I sent a parcel of goods directed to Elizabeth Baldwyn , Church-street, Liverpool. I directed it myself. I delivered it at the Swan and Two Necks in the office myself.

Q. What were the contents of that parcel - A. Upwards of 100 yards of lustring; the lustring was worth 70 l. and the serge was worth 30 l. After I delivered it at the office, I heard the coach had been robbed. I have seen some of the goods that were in that parcel, the lustring, at Mr. Wilson's shop, Crown-street, Finsbury-square; he is an umbrella maker; it was umbrella silk.

Q. What day of the month was it when you packed up this parcel - A. On the 8th of September, and some time in November I saw some part of the lustring at Mr. Wilson's shop.

THOMAS CROSSBY. I live in Seward-street, Old Artillery-ground. About ten months ago the prisoner brought me two pieces of lustring to dispose of for him.

Q. Are you sure it was before September last - A. I am sure I cannot say; it might be in October. I sold the lustring for 5 s. a yard to Mr. William Wilson ; the prisoner told me he dealt at auctions, and by that means he could get things cheaper than the value.

Q. How long after you had sold the silk to Wilson was the prisoner taken up - A. About five or six months afterwards.

WILLIAM WILSON . I am an umbrella maker, in Crown-street, Finsbury-square. On the 17th of September last Mr. Crossby brought to me 77 yards of 24 inch green lustring. There was another piece of 57 yards; it had been cut; the whole amounted to 36 l. 18 s. 6 d. ready money; that is what I paid. In November they were claimed by Mr. Hayward; this is some of the lustring.

PETER CARON , I made this lustring for Mr. Hayward; I know it is my work by the reed.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

170. JOSEPH DENHAM was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of January , a man's hat, value 2 s. the property of Joseph Gardner .

RICHARD HOLMAN . I am a hatter; I work for Mr. Gardner in Chiswell-street . On Tuesday, the 4th of January, the prisoner came to our shop between six and seven o'clock. I saw the prisoner kneel down; he put his arm round the door post and took a hat; he ran away with it. I pursued him, and caught him about ten yards from the shop. He dropped the hat when I laid hold of him; this is the hat; it is Mr. Gardner's property. I took him to Worship-street office. His mother came forward, and said she had seventeen of them.

GUILTY, aged 11.

Judgment respited .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

171. MARY MARTIN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of December , a watch, value 1 l. and a seal, value 4 s. the property of John Stapley , from his person .

JOHN STAPLEY . I am in the fancy business ; I live in Banner-street, St. Luke's. I lost my watch on the 28th of December in the evening, past eleven o'clock. I had been drinking porter; I was a little intoxicated. I am quite sure I had my watch with me. When I left the public-house in White Cross street Charles Thompson was with me. Mr. Thompson and I were going up White Cross street together. We met a woman and two men. A woman ran up against my arm, and instantly I felt my watch go out of my pocket. I called out, I have lost my watch. I felt it go. Mr. Thompson took the woman, but the two men ran away.

Q. Is the prisoner the woman - A. Yes.

Q. Was she at all out of your sight - A. No.

Q. Was your watch a silver watch - A. No, a metal watch; it was worth 1 l. and the seal was worth five or six shillings. The watch has not been found; the prisoner snatched it away, and the twomen ran away. The watch was not found about the woman, that is all I know.

CHARLES THOMPSON. I live with my father; he is independent; he lodges at Mr. Stapley's. I was coming home from my brother's; he keeps the Rum Puncheon.

Q. Were you intoxicated - A. No, not in the least. In White Cross street two men and a woman met us; the woman ran up against Mr. Stapley; he instantly said he had lost his watch, and instantly the two men ran away. The woman never offered to run. I catched hold of the prisoner, and took her to the watch-house. She was searched, nothing was found upon her.

Prisoner's Defence. I saw the prosecutor; he was intoxicated. He cried out he had lost his watch. I never offered to run away.

GUILTY , aged 29.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

172. MARY NEWMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of December , four yards and a half of calico, value 3 s. 6 d. the property of Mary King , widow .

MARY KING . I am a widow woman; I live in Castle-lane, Westminster ; I work for my landlady, she takes in ironing; I live at the top of the house, the ironing room is in the middle of the house. On the 4th of December the prisoner came into the house. She is an entire stranger, and had no business in the house. She went up stairs, and took the calico from off the drawers in my room. I saw her coming down stairs; I took the calico from her apron. This is the calico, it is mine.

Mrs. DEANE. The prosecutrix irons for me. I was called up into my own laundry; the prisoner was sitting in the laundry; she was an entire stranger, and had no business in the house. I saw the calico taken from her; I am sure it is Mrs. King's property.

Prisoner's Defence. I have lately left Ireland. I came to get work at boot closing. I am innocent, to the best of my knowledge, as any of you, gentlemen. I am an entire stranger in London.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

173. THOMAS RAVEN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of January , a pig, value 1 l. the property of William David Gough .

WILLIAM DAVID GOUGH . I live at 67, Hoxton . I lost my pig on the 3d of January. I kept the pig in a sty in a place next the kitchen. I missed my pig between eight and nine o'clock in the morning. It was safe in the sty on the over night. I saw my pig again at the office about ten o'clock the same day, and the prisoner. I have the pig here; I am sure it is my pig; it is worth twenty shillings. The back door had been forced open; the pig-sty was in the house; I had no yard to my house.

CHRISTOPHER JOSLING. I am a watchman at Hoxton. On the 3d of January, about two o'clock in the morning, the prisoner passed me. I heard him say, be quiet. I thought he had somebody with him. He said, watchman, I have got a pig. I said, let me look at it; it is a pretty pig, how much did it cost. He said he had it given to him at Kingsland, and he had stopped until late. I told him I must take him and the pig to the watch-house: At the watch-house he told another story to the constable. The pig is here.

Prosecutor. I am sure it is my pig; I have had it three months.

Prisoner's Defence. I told the watchman I was going to take the pig to the watch-house. I picked the pig up in Kingsland road.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Transported for Seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

174. CATHERINE DAVIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of December , from the person of Matthew Myers , a guinea, two three-shilling Bank tokens, one shilling, sixteen 1 l. Bank notes, and a 2 l. Bank note , his property.

MATTHEW MYERS. I am a navigator ; I live at No. 16, Mandlin's Rents, Lower East Smithfield. I lost my money and the notes on the night after Christmas night. I met with the prisoner in Ratcliffe Highway. I went home with her to her room in Blue Coat Fields . I am sure I had my money in my jacket pocket when I was in the room with her; it was in my pocket-book. I undressed myself and went to bed with her, and when I awoke at five in the morning the prisoner was out of the room. I called for a light, and said I was robbed. The prisoner then came into the room, and the landlady brought a light. I was not sober; I felt my money when I was going to bed. The prisoner laughed at me, and said she knew nothing of my money; there was another girl in the house; it was a bawdy-house. The prisoner was searched, none of my money or notes were found upon her. When she came in the room at five o'clock, she was not dressed; she said she had slept in another bed. The landlord of the house has absconded.

WILLIAM JACKSON. I am an officer. At half after six o'clock I took the prisoner into custody. I searched her, I found nothing on her. The landlord escaped. I took the landlady in custody. Dayley nor any of the notes have not been found since.

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutor would make no agreement with me. I told him to go out of the house. I never saw any of the money. I would not go to bed with him; he would not go out of the house. In the morning when he called out he was robbed, I went into the room.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

175. JAMES MILLER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of December , four great coats, value 4 l. and a hat, value 10 s. the property of Ann Laber , in her dwelling-house .

ANN RUSH . I am a servant to Mrs. Laber, Adam-street, Adelphi . On the the 4th of December, in the evening, the prisoner knocked at the door; I opened the door to him. He said, he came from Mr. Hares, a hatter, in the Strand, for a hat to be made larger; I asked him who the person was; he said, a young gentleman, a slim young man. We had a young gentleman in the house of that description lodged and boarded in the house. I told him he could not see the gentleman, he was at dinner; he had better call in a quarter of an hour. The prisoner then particularly desired to take the hat back with him; in consequence of that I asked the prisoner to come in, and said I would inform the gentleman of it; I went into the back parlour, and when I returned the street door was a little way open; I asked him if any body had gone out; he said, no, the door opened of itself. I shut the door, left him in the passage, and went down stairs. When I came up the prisoner was gone, and likewise four great coats and a hat were gone; the four great coats were in the passage when the prisoner was there. I went in the parlour and informed the gentleman of it; the gentleman went in pursuit of him, and could not find him. The coats and the hat have never been found.

Q. When did you see the prisoner again - A. On Sunday morning following. The 4th of December was on Saturday. Oddy, a Bow-street officer, asked me to go to the Park with him, and the first person I saw was the prisoner, I knew him by his dress, and features; no person pointed him out to me; there was a number of other people looking at the soldiers. I am quite sure the man I picked out in the park is the man. I asked the prisoner if he knew me; he said, no. I told him I knew him; I saw him at No. 19, Adam-street, Adelphi, and that he then said, he came from Mr. Hare in the Strand, for a hat to be made larger; he said it could not be him. I laid hold of him, and Oddy came and secured him.

ABIGAIL MILLER. I live at No. 2, Michael-grove, Brompton. The prisoner is my son; he lives with me; he is a carpenter. On Saturday he had been at work at Vauxhall-bridge; he was discharged from there that evening, and brought his tools home about twenty minutes past five o'clock; he drank his tea with me; a person here came in the shop, and saw him drink his tea with me; her name is Frances Swallow . When he had drank his tea I sent him over the way to Mr. Wardour to borrow a basket for me to carry two parcels into town to his brother.

Q. What time did he leave you to go for the basket - A. About ten minutes before six; he immediately returned with the basket. He set out again about five minutes before six o'clock; when he set out with the basket of things to his brother my watch hung up; I noticed the time; and when he returned home it was about half past nine. I am sure this was on Saturday the 4th of December. On Monday I heard my son was taken up.

FRANCES SWALLOW . I am in service with Mrs. Montgomery, at Brompton. On the Saturday before the young man was taken up I went into his mother's shop for a ball of worsted; that was Saturday, about a quarter before six in the evening; I saw the prisoner in the parlour drinking tea, and on the Wednesday I heard he was taken up.

ROBERT WARDOUR . I am a fruiterer, at Brompton. On Saturday, the 4th of December, I lent the prisoner a basket about ten minutes before six; he returned it me on Saturday evening about half past nine.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

176. SARAH BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of December , a gown, value 6 s. two aprons, value 6 d. four towels, value 6 d. two shifts, value 6 s. six pair of stockings, value 6 d. and four handkerchiefs, value 4 d. the property of Peter Strong .

AMELIA STRONG . I am the daughter of Peter Strong . On the 19th of December I received all the articles in the indictment of Mrs. Glessing to mangle them, for my father, he keeps a mangle . On the same day the prisoner came for them; I delivered all the articles to her, two aprons, four towels, two shifts, six pair of stockings, and four handkerchiefs; she said her mistress wanted them. I knew she had lived a servant with Mrs. Glessing. I delivered them to her. I have since seen the things at the office. The 11th of December was Saturday; on Sunday I went to Mrs. Glessing; she said the things were lost. The prisoner had left her a fortnight.

SUSANNAH GLESSING . The prisoner left me a fortnight before the 11th of December. I never sent her for my mangling after she left my service. I have seen my things at the office; I knew they were mine.

JOHN RICKARDS . I am a pawnbroker, 49, Brick-lane, Spitalfields. The prisoner pawned with me a tablecloth, a shift, and a bed gown. On the 11th of December the prisoner pawned with me a gown and a tablecloth.

JOHN EILLINGWORTH . I am a pawnbroker. On the 17th of December the prisoner pledged a shift with me.

FRANCIS FREEMAN. I am apprehended the prisoner; I found on her the duplicates of some of the property, and the remainder part of the property I found in her room; Mrs. Glessing was present, and claimed them all. I produce them.

Prosecutrix. The property produced by the pawnbrokers and the officer are all mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I leave myself to the mercy of the court.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

177. JOHN SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22nd of December , two coats, value 5 l. the property of John Stevenson .

JOHN STEVENSON . I live at 60, Harper-street,Red Lion-square, I am a coachman to Mr. Jones. These coats were lost on the 20th of December, from the stables; I had seen them there at half after nine at night, they were safe then. I came to the stable at half after seven in the morning, they were gone. I have seen the coats since; they are worth forty shillings.

SAMUEL MILLER . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner in Golden-lane on the 23rd of December; on the day before I had received information of stolen property being at a house in Fireball-court, Houndsditch; I went there. I saw these two coats in a room of the sister to one of the witnesses; she said her brother sent the things there. When I apprehended the prisoner I told him I apprehended him for stealing coach-glasses and coats; he said, he knew nothing of it. I found a two-pound note upon him with the name of Lion Solomon upon it, the witness who had bought the coats.

LION SOLOMON. I keep a clothes shop, 19, Playhouse-yard. On the 21st in the morning, about nine o'clock, I was sent for, to go to Golden-lane: I went the house in Golden-lane, and when I got to that to house I saw two men and a woman; I did not see the prisoner when I bought the clothes. They asked me three-pounds for these coats; I gave six pounds for the lot; two have been claimed by Stevenson. I had to go home to pay the money; I appointed to come to the Black Horse, Barbican, to pay the money and there I found three men; the prisoner was one of the men. I paid the money in that house; I put the money on the table, a woman took the money up. I left the house.

Q. Did the prisoner say any thing about the coats - A. Not a word.

Q. Was your name upon the back of the notes - A. Not to my knowledge.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

178. MARY WILSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22nd of December , from the person of Charles Henry Steward a 10 l. bank note, a 5 l. bank note, and nine 1 l. bank notes , his property.

CHARLES HENRY STEWARD . I am a clerk to a distiller . I lost these notes on the evening of the 22nd of December, at a house in Bell-yard, Holborn . I had been spending an evening with some friends, I got intoxicated. I picked up the prisoner, and she took me to the house in Bell-yard; I felt my money when I went in this house, and when I came down stairs I missed them.

MARY BURT . I keep this house. The prosecutor came in the house with Mary Wilson about half after eleven o'clock; I am sure he came in with the prisoner, she has been with me before; I cannot say that she robbed him. He changed a one-pound note with me.

SUSANNAH GRAY. I keep in public-house in Duke-street, Smithfield. On the 22nd of December, in the evening, I paid Mr. Steward twenty-five pounds in notes, a ten-pound note, the rest small notes.

WILLIAM READ . I am an officer. From infor- formation of Mr. Steward, I, in company with Limbrick, apprehended the prisoner at No. 10, Church-lane, St. Giles's. I searched her; I found a one-pound note upon her. I asked her what she had done with the remainder of the money; she told me it was behind the washing-tub, all but a ten-pound note, which she gave to Thomas Irwin to get it changed. I found the five-pound behind the washing tub. I went to Irwin, he gave me the ten-pound note. This is the ten-pound note, the five-pound note, and the one-pound note.

Prisoner's Defence. I am an unfortunate girl; I leave myself to the mercy of the court.

GUILTY, aged 22.

Judgment respited .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

179. JOHN ELLIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of December , twenty-nine hats, value 7 l. and seventy-four felt-hoods, value 9 l. the property of James Scholes ; John Scholes , and Henry Scholes .

JAMES SCHOLES . My partners names are John Scholes and Henry Scholes . On the 15th of December, they were in a hogshead placed at the door of our premises; I saw the hats and the hoods in the hogshead at five o'clock, and at half after five they were gone.

EBENEZER DALTON. I am an officer. On the 15th of December, I was coming down Rosemary-lane, I met the prisoner with a green bag in his hand, he paused about three minutes, and run away: I ran after him; he dropped the bag, it contained twenty nine hats.

James Scholes. The hats are our property.

GUILTY , aged 63.

Confined 1 year in the house of correction , and whipped in jail .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

180. MARIA MANSFIELD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of December , a watch, value 2 l. the property of William Cragnell .

WILLIAM CRAGNELL . On the 4th of December. I saw the prisoner in Dean-street, she asked me to treat her with some gin; I walked down Dean-street into St. Ann's-court ; she run away from me; I felt my watch go from me. I said to the other woman that my watch was gone; I catched the prisoner. I was persuaded to put her in the watchhouse. I went home with the other woman to her lodgings in Smart's-buildings.

Q. How long were you with the prisoner - A. About a quarter of an hour. I felt my watch in my fob when I was with the prisoner; when she run away I missed it.

JOHN GRIFFITHS. I am a watchman. Cragnell desired me to take the prisoner into custody; I took her to the watchhouse. I saw the prisoner take the watch out of her pocket, and put it on the ground.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

181. RICHARD SEARS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of December , one hat, value 4 s. one pair of boots, value 6 s. a shirt, value 3 s.and a pair of stockings, value 18 d. the property of Michael Raftery .

MICHAEL RAFTERY. I work at dry skins ; I live in Ropemaker-street . The prisoner lodged in the same house, but in another room. I missed my things on the 10th of December. My landlady went into my room on the 9th, and they were gone. I have seen my hat since at Lion Solomon's shop, No. 19, Play-house-yard. On Saturday evening I asked the prisoner what he had done with them; he told me that he had sold the boots and the hat to Lyon Solomon, and when I went to No. 19, Play-house-yard, a woman shewed me the hat. The boots were not produced. This is the hat; it is mine; it is worth a shilling.

Prisoner's Defence. I leave it to the mercy of the court.

GUILTY, aged 24.

Judgment respited .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

182. ANN VICTOR was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of December , a carpet, value 10 s. and a tin kettle, value 2 s. the property of Ephraim Sumption .

ELIZABETH SUMPTION . I am the wife of Ephraim Sumption . On Thursday the 30th of December, I took my carpet off my parlour, and put it in the kitchen in the morning, and in the afternoon I missed it. On Monday I saw it at Mr. Barnet's, the broker's door.

WILLIAM BARNET. I am a broker, 102, Saffron-hill. The carpet and tea-kettle I bought of the prisoner; I gave him five shillings for them. I am sure the prisoner is the person I bought them of. This is the carpet and the tea-kettle.

Prosecutrix. The carpet is mine, I made it myself two lengths one way and two lengths the other; it is worth ten shillings, and the kettle two shillings.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought the kettle of Mr. Leister, and the carpet is mine.

GUILTY , aged 36.

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

183. CAROLINE GREEN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of December, one watch, value 5 l. the property of John Burke .

JOHN BURKE . I belong to the Pay office . I live at No. 4, Coleman-street, Bunhill-row. On the 9th of December, between nine and ten o'clock at night, I met with the prisoner in the City-road. I accepted her invitation, and went to her lodging.

Q. Were you sober at the time - A. I was not. I had my watch with me when I went into her lodging, and I left it there. I have seen my watch again in the hands of Bishop, the officer of Worship-street office. I do not charge her with stealing my watch; I believe if I had called the next morning for it she would have given it me. The watch never had been pawned or parted with; it was found in her possession.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

184. ALICE BOWKER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of November , two shirts, value 1 l. the property of Elizabeth Thomas , widow .

ELIZABETH THOMAS. I take in washing . The prisoner worked for me. On the 26th of November I delivered two parcels of linen to the prisoner to wash. I missed a shirt from each parcel in two different weeks. In a fortnight afterwards I found them at the pawnbreker's. The prisoner had worked for me four days.

THOMAS MILLER . I am an apprentice to Mr. Walker, 19, Tabernacle-walk. I produce a shirt pawned by the prisoner; I advanced nine shillings on it.

Prosecutor. This is my shirt; the other shirt the person took out; they were both in my care to wash.

Prisoner's Defence. I leave it to the mercy of the court.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Confined 1 week in prison , fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

185. MARY ADAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of December , three pounds weight of bacon, value 3 s. the property of James Durbin and George Southcombe .

JAMES DURBIN. On Sunday morning, the 19th of December, the prisoner came into the shop about ten o'clock; she said she wanted a quartern of butter; I saw her go to where the bacon was; I had suspicion of her. I took up her apron, and took the bacon from her from underneath her apron; she was searched; she had not money enough about her to pay for the bacon; she said she had never done the like before, and she hoped we would forgive her.

EDWARD TRING. On the 19th I was sent for to take charge of the prisoner. I searched her; she had only four-pence or five-pence in her pockets.

Prisoner's Defence. I have no friends at all.

GUILTY, aged 13.

Judgment respited .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

186. JANE SHARP was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of January , four silver tablespoons, value 4 l. one silver soup-ladle, value 1 l. the property of Woolf Jesepheson Gollin .

WOOLF JESEPHESON GOLLIN. I lost four silver table-spoons and a soup-ladle, on Monday the 3d of January. I left my house about eight in the morning; I came home between eight and nine in the evening; I was then informed I was robbed.

Q. Did you ever see these spoons and soup-ladle again - A. Yes, on the 4th, the next day, at the office in Worship-street. The prisoner was a stranger to me.

ELIZABETH GRIFFITHS. I was charwoman on the 3d of January, at Mr. Gollin's. I saw the prisoner in his parlour; she was a stranger to me; I asked her what she wanted; (this was about two o'clock); she said she wanted to sell a frying pan. Mr. Gollin's house is a private house. The back-door was left open for the lodgers. It is generally left upon the latch. My master's sister catched the prisoner before she went out of the house; the prisoner dropped the spoons and the soup-ladle.

SARAH WOOLF. I am sister to the prosecutor. I was on a visit to my sister. I saw the prisoner in the back parlour; she left the parlour and was goingaway. I stopped her, and took her in the parlour again; she dropped directly the spoons and the soup-ladle. The spoons were kept in the back parlour; I had seen them on the table just before the prisoner came in.

JOHR HAWES. I produce the four spoons and the ladle.

Prosecutor. These four spoons and the ladle are mine; they are worth about three pounds; they would sell for that in weight.

Prisoner's Defence. I am quite friendless.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 39.

[ The prisoner was recommended to mercy by the jury and prosecutor, on account of her being in distress .]

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Scipio Robinson and Charles Harding , Confined 2 months in Newgate , fined 1 s.

James Golding and Daniel Smith Seaton , Transported for Seven Years .

Prisoners convicted last sessions, whose judgments were respited -

Scipio Robinson and Charles Harding , Confined 2 months in Newgate , fined 1 s.

James Golding and Daniel Smith Seaton , Transported for Seven Years .