Old Bailey Proceedings Online (www.oldbaileyonline.org, version 6.0, 25 October 2014), December 1811 (18111204).

Old Bailey Proceedings, 4th December 1811.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE OYER AND TERMINER, AND GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND ALSO THE GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, HELD AT Justice-Hall, in the Old Bailey, On WEDNESDAY the 4th of DECEMBER, 1811, and following Days;

BEING THE FIRST SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF The Right Hon. CLAUDIUS STEPHEN HUNTER , LORD-MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY JOB SIBLY , No. 4, CARTHUSIAN-STREET, ALDERSGATE-STREET.

LONDON:

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED (BY THE AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON.) By R. Butters, No. 22, Fetter-lane, Fleet-street.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE. OYER AND TERMINER, AND GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON.

Before the Right-honorable CLAUDIUS STEPHEN HUNTER , Lord Mayor of the City of London; Sir Nash Grose , knt. one of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir Robert Graham , knt. one of the Barons of His Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Joshua Jonathan Smith , esq. Sir Richard Carr Glynn , bart. Sir John Perring , bart. Alderman of the said City; John Silvester , esq. Recorder of the said City: Sir Charles Flower , bart. William Domville , esq. Sir W. Plomer bart. Aldermen of the said City; and Newman Knowlys , esq. Common-serjeant of the said City; His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of Goal Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

London Jury.

Robert Davis ,

George Heath ,

John Meadows ,

Thomas Crickmore ,

Isaac Walker ,

John Brailey ,

Thomas Keys ,

William Dawson ,

Thomas Williams ,

Moses Taylor ,

Philip Chamberlain ,

Walter Cameron .

First Middlesex Jury.

John Hutchinson ,

John Beaver ,

John Walton ,

Henry Wood ,

James David Bannister ,

William Sedgwicke ,

William Young ,

Thomas Kennedy ,

Joseph Smith ,

Benjamin Montague ,

William Wansworth ,

Mathaniel Gillam .

Second Middlesex Jury.

Benjamin Taylor ,

William Till ,

Frederick Strube ,

Thomas Barrett ,

John Varley ,

William Graham ,

William Chittis ,

Philip Askew ,

John Biddell ,

Joseph Biggin ,

William Yarwood ,

Henry Frederick Cooper .

1. THOMAS LINTON ROGERS, alias JOHN LINTON ROGERS , and CHARLOTTE ATHERTON, alias ROGERS, were indicted for that they about the hour of eight at night, on the 12th of August ; being in the dwelling-house of Joseph Bird , did steal therein a watch, value 50 l. three snuff boxes, value 10 l. a silver box, value 1 l. a reading glass, value 1 l. a pair of spectacles and case, value 1 l. a silver medal, value 30 s. a bronze medal, value 5 s. a telescope, value 10 s. a glass, value 2 s. a pair of pistols, value 2 l. three silver pencil cases, value 3 s. a memorandum case, value 6 d. a sticking plaster box, value 1 s. a piece of foreign silver coin, value 6 s. six shirts, value 4 l. and two pieces of muslin handkerchiefs, value 4 l. the property of Joseph Bird, and that they did afterwards feloniously break the said house to get out of it .

And ANOTHER COUNT for stealing the said goods and breaking into the said house.

JOSEPH BIRD . I reside in St. James's place, in St. James's parish.

Q. In the course of this last summer you and your family left your house to go into the country - A. I did, about the beginning of August, I left a maid servant to keep the house; I returned to town for two or three days at the latter end of August: I went into the country again in the course of three or four days. I returned again to town about the 3d of October.

Q. Did you examine in what state your drawers were - A. I saw them open, and the articles that were in them were strewn about the room. I missed a many articles.

Q. Had you lost a watch - A. I had, and a seal.

COURT. What was the value of the watch - A. At At least fifty pound; I lost four snuff boxes, a silver box; in short all the things in the indictment of the value of above an hundred pounds.

Q. Besides these things in the indictment did you lose a quantity of silver coin - A. I did.

Q. Where had these things been deposited - A. The whole of the articles were left in a drawer in my library.

A. When had you last seen that bureau - A. In the beginning of September it was safe, it had not then been wrenched open.

Q. Did you, sir, before the last sessions, receive that part of your property - A. I did, all the things in this indictment, they were brought back one evening about nine o'clock, they were delivered to Thomas Sanders , my servant.

Q. These are the things, the watch, and all the articles - A. Yes. They are all my property.

THOMAS SANDERS . I am a servant to Mr. Bird.

Q. How did this box come into your hands - A. It came in a paper, sealed up with different seals, it was delivered to me by a short man; a person knocked at the door, and gave me the box so wrapped up in paper, and a letter with it.

Q. Who was it - A. I cannot say indeed. It was just before I went to the grand jury last sessions.

Q. A person gave it to you with a letter to give to your master - A. Yes, and went away, and I gave it to my master, with all the contents.

MARY STEVENS . Q. You were left in the care of Mr. Bird's house while the family was in the country - A. I was.

Q. Before the family went out of town had you known the female prisoner at the bar, Charlotte Atherton , otherwise Rogers - A. Yes, she came before to see the cook, and came there to see me, and she came at times to sleep with me.

COURT. How often - A. I cannot say.

Mr. Gurney. Upon any of these occasions that she visited you in the absence of the family, did he come with her as her husband - A. Yes.

Q. Did he ever sleep in the house - A. Yes, about three times.

Q. Was she with you very frequently - A. Yes.

Q. Was he there very frequently - A. Not so often as her, but he was there frequently.

Q. When did you quit the house - A. On Saturday the 28th of September, and the cook came up to take my place.

Q. At the time that you quitted the house you had no suspicion that the house had been robbed - A. Not the least.

Mr Alley. You always understood them to be man and wife - A. Yes.

ANN WILLMORE . My husband lived in St. George's Fields at that time.

Q. What business did he carry on - A. A chandler's shop.

Q. Had you, in the month of August, September, and October, been acquainted with the prisoners at the bar - A. I had known them longer than that time.

Q. In the month of September did either of them bring any articles to your house - A. Yes, the male prisoner, Linton Rogers did.

Q. Was she with him when he brought them - A. No, not the first time he brought them; I was not at home when he left three shirts, he left no articles of jewellery at that time. He came a second time the same evening, he had the things in his pocket at that time; I saw Charlotte Rogers first, she came and asked me if I had seen Rogers; I told her I had not; she asked me to go with her, for she was in great fear of his being detected in having taken things from Mr. Bird's house; I went with her up to the Haymarket.

Q. Did you find him - A. Yes; he was then standing in an oyster-shop; Charlotte went across to him, leaving me on the opposite side; after speaking to him she told me that all was right; then I went across with her to him, and I said to him that his wife had been fearful of his being detected, and he blamed her for being foolish; he had then a tortoise shell snuff box, with a miniature picture within. That is the box. He had some small silver medals in his hands. I walked with her, she went to Mr. Miller's in Westminster-road; she sold the medals to him. I did not go in with her.

Q. Did Rogers tell you where he got these things - A. Yes, at Mr. Bird's; she was bye and heard him.

Q. Did you ask her how that could be done while the servant was in the house - A. Yes, I did ask her; she said that she went to see the maid-servant, and that he got in the back way; he knew the way of the house.

Q. Did he hear this - A. Yes, he was bye and heard it.

Q. You all went together to your house - A. Yes; but before that she pledged the small lip-salve box for two shillings. Rogers had left a bundle at my house while his wife and I were out. When I went home I saw the bundle, I opened it for curiosity; there was a muslin handkerchief, and two or three shirts; he had the snuff box in his pocket at that time, and went away with it. He produced a large silver medal; this is it, my husband weighed it, and it weighed six ounces. I saw no more medals than that, and that one snuff-box.

Q. Did you see any watch - A. Yes; not that night. I saw the watch I believe on the Thursday after, the 26th of September; Mr. Rogers pulled, it out of his pocket.

Q. Does that look like the watch - A. It was a deeply engraved case. I can almost be positive to that being the watch, and tied with a purple ribbon, as this is; he said he had taken that from Mr. Bird's. Rogers, on Friday the 27th, called again at my house, he said, that he meaned to put the property back. On Sunday the 29th of September I saw him again.

Q. Was that the day that he quarrelled with you - A. Yes; he came in the morning and fetched away the snuff-box, the medal, and the watch that he had left with me. On the Sunday evening he came drunk and quarrelled with a person in the house; he did not quarrel with us; Mrs. Baines, a neighbour came in; she picked up the case of a watch, Mrs. Rogers took it away from Mrs. Baines and gave it to her husband; he took the watch out of his pocket, clapped it on the watch, and put it in his pocket.

Q. Is that the same watch that you have been speaking of - A. Yes.

Mr. Alley. I suppose as an honest woman you went and gave an account of it - A. No, I did not.

EDWARD WILLMORE . Q. In September last you lived in St. George's Fields, we understand - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember towards the close of that month the prisoner Rogers and his wife coming to your house - A. Yes. I recollect his coming to my house on the 23d.

Q. Was that the same evening that your wife went out with Mrs. Rogers in search of him - A. Yes, it was.

Q. He having called upon you, did he afterwards come back with his wife, and your wife - A. He did. He brought a bundle before he came with my wife, and when he came with his wife and my wife he shewed me a large medal.

Q. Look at that, is that it - A. Yes, it is; I weighed it, it weighed six ounces and better. He produced a snuff-box.

Q. Look at that snuff-box - A. I am not quite so positive to this as the medal; it looks like this.

Q. Is that the watch - A. E. B There was that cypher at the back. That is the watch.

Q. Were these things left with you or with your wife for some days - A. They were left with me.

COURT. You saw them, and have to doubt they are the same - A. No.

Mr. Gurney. Did he tell you from whence he got them - A. Yes, from Mr. Bird's.

Mr. Alley. These were found in your possession - A. No.

Q. Was it not brought by you to Bow-street - A. It was not. I went to Bow-street and laid the information.

Q. You went to Bow-street to get the reward - A. No; I went for pure honesty.

Q. How soon after. We shall try your honesty - A. I went on the Monday after.

Q. Did not a lodger of your house go to Union Hall - A. No; a person in my house went, and the complaint that that person made was an assault.

ANN BAINES . Q. I believe you live in St. George's Fields - A. Yes; close to where Mr. Willmore lives.

Q. On the evening of Sunday the 29th of September did you hear any disturbance in Mr. Willmore's house - A. Yes, in consequence of that I went in, I found the prisoner Rogers there, and his wife; I found in the parlour the case of a watch on the floor. He had been quarrelling before I picked it up.

Q. Was it a gold case - A. I cannot say whether it was gold or metal, it shined very much. It was engraved, I believe.

Q. Is that it - A. I believe it was something similar to that. I said, I have found the case of a watch on the floor, Mrs. Rogers said it was her husband's; I gave it her; she said it was nothing but metal; she gave it to her husband; he took his watch out; he put the case on the watch, and put it into his pocket.

MR. MILLER. I am a silversmith and salesman, No. 1, Coates-row near Westminster bridge.

Q. Did you purchase any silver medals in September last - A. Yes, I did. I suppose it was about a week before this robbery came out, I think so.

Q. Who sold them you - A. Mrs. Rogers, the woman at the bar, sold them me. It was in the evening, about seven o'clock. I cannot say exactly the hour.

Q. What number of them were they - A. Thirty three coins.

Prosecutor. I lost such coins as these, and more in number similar to them. I cannot speak particularly to them.

Thomas Linton Rogers left his defence to his counsel.

Charlotte Rogers was not put on her defence.

THOMAS LINTON ROGERS - GUILTY - DEATH , aged 22,

Of stealing in the dwelling-house, not of breaking out, nor of breaking into the dwelling-house.

CHARLOTTE ROGERS - NOT GUILTY .

[ The prisoner was recommended to mercy by the prosecutor on account that he believed the prisoner's father sent the property back .]

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. justice Grose.

2. THOMAS LINTON ROGERS, alias JOHN ROGERS , and CHARLOTTE ATHERTON, alias ROGERS , were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Joseph Bird , about the hour of nine at night, on the 25th of September , and stealing therein, two flannel shirts, value 5 s. two pair of breeches, value 20 s. and three pair of drawers, value 6 s. his property .

Mr. Gurney, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoners of this charge were

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

3. ELIZABETH RUSSELL, alias RUXTON , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of November , a frock, value 2 s. two petticoats, value 2 s. a pincloth, value 6 d. a pair of boots, value 3 s. and a shirt, value 6 d. the property of Thomas Dillone .

SECOND COUNT for like offence, the property of James Dillone .

MARY COX . I am a fruiterer in St. Martin's-lane, Cannon-street .

Q. Do you know James Dillone and his wife - A. Yes, he is a warehouseman at Mr. Ankell's, in Thames Street.

Q. Do you know little Thomas Dillone - A. Yes, and the little girl, Rebecca; they were at my house on Monday the 18th of November, in the morning about half past ten; Mrs. Dillone had bad eyes, she went to the doctor's, and left the children at my house under my care.

Q. While they were under your care did any person come into your shop - A. Yes; a lady came into my shop about half past ten, to buy two penny worth of apples.

Q. Look at the lady at the bar, is that the lady - A. I cannot tell whether it is or not. When she came in I had the little boy in my lap, and my sister had the little girl, and when the lady asked for the apples, I put the little boy down, and then the sister, the little girl got down, and then both went to the door.

Q. How old was the little girl - A. About five years old, and the boy had just turned three. I served the lady with two pennyworth of apples, and then she asked for two pennyworth more; she gave me six-pence and I gave her two-pence; she then said good morning to me, and I said good morning to her.

Q. Did she speak to the children - A. She never spoke to them in my shop. When she went out somebody came to my shop for six pound of potatoes; I served the six pound of potatoes, and somebody came in for three pound more before I missed the children. When I had served them, I said, Beckey, do not go from the door; I ran to the door, and the children was not there. I ran half way up St. Martin's-lane; I called Beckey, Beckey, they did not answer; I returned down to No. 11, to the yard, and called, Beckey. I did not find them there. I did not think of their being stolen away; I ran down to the wharf, and as I was crossing of Swan-lane, I saw the little girl returning with a penny plumb cake in her hand, and an apple; she was coming up Thames-street; I ran across to her; I said Beckey, where have you been.

Q. How were the children dressed - A. The boy had a white frock, black skirt, a blue pinafore, and black half boots; the little girl, she had a light buff-coloured frock on, a black skirt, a dark coloured pinafore, and half boots; neither of them had hats on.

Q. What sort of hair had the little boy - A. Light hair, and the hair turned up on the right side; his hair rather wanted cutting.

Q. Do you know how the lady was dressed - A. She was genteely dressed; I did not take notice any thing she had on, I little thought of what would happen, or else I should have took notice.

Q. You have not seen the little boy since - A. No. I never saw him since he went out of my lap.

Q. How long do you suppose it was between the time of your serving the lady the apples, and the time of your last serving the last customer with the potatoes - A. Not more than five minutes.

Q. How long was it between the time that you missed the little girl, and when you saw her come up Thames-street - A. About ten minutes after. This is the little girl.

MARY BAGNELL . Q. You live with Mrs. Smith, who keeps a pastry-cook's shop on Fish-street Hill - A. Yes; it is the corner of Crooked-lane.

Q. Do you remember any time in November last a lady coming to your shop with two children - A. Yes, on Monday the 18th of November. The prisoner is the person that came to our shop that day, she had two children with her.

Q. How was the lady dressed - A. In a blue cloth cloak, a white straw bonnet, with a blue flower in front, a dark coloured gown, and white apron.

Q. Did you observe how the children were dressed - A. The little boy had on a blue pinafore, a white frock, black stuff petticoat, and black leather half boots; he had no hat on.

Q. Did you observe the colour of his hair - A. Light hair; he had a good deal of hair on his head. She came and bought two penny plumb bunns, and two seed cakes; she gave one of the bunns to each of the children, and put the two seed cakes in her pocket. She then went out of the shop.

Q. Did she say any thing to the children - A. No. I saw no more of her.

Q. How soon were enquiries made - A. About five minutes afterwards.

Q. Was your recollection in consequence of enquiries called to the circumstance - A. Yes.

Mr. Gurney. Did not you before the magistrate describe the colour of the cloak to be different from what you describe now - A. I said a blue cloth cloak, trimmed with spotted fur.

Q. Was Miss Slade in the shop at the time - A. Yes, she served her with the buns.

ANN ELIZA SLADE . Q. You are the daughter of Mrs. Slade, that keeps the pastry-cook's shop on Fish-street Hill.

Q. Look at the prisoner and say whether that is the person that came to the shop - A. To the best of my knowledge I believe it is; I have had the opportunity of seeing her three times at the Mansion House, and once at Union Hall.

Q. How was she dressed - A. I did not notice her dress particularly, only that she had fur about hercloak, and a straw bonnet on, and she had two children with her.

Q. Look at that little girl and tell me whether that is the little girl - A. I am certain that is the little girl.

Q. How was the little boy dressed - A. I did not notice his dress; I recollect that he had light hair.

Q. What did this lady purchase - A. Two penny plumb cakes, and two seed cakes; she gave me four-pence for them.

Mr. Gurney. You do not mean to say positively - A. I have not sworn positively; I believe it to be the woman; I am sure of the child.

Q. When you went to the Mansion House you were told a person was there who had taken away the child - A. Yes.

Q. You went there expecting to see the lady by whom the child was taken - A. Yes.

Mr. Bolland. You are certain you saw the child - A. Yes.

ANN WAKEFIELD . Q. You live at a hatters on Fish-street Hill - A. Yes, they are hatters and furriers.

Q. Look at the prisoner at the bar, and tell me whether she is the person that came to purchase any thing - A. I cannot swear that she is the person; she had a straw bonnet on with a blue flower in it, and a blue cloth cloak, her cloak was trimmed with fur. She had a little boy with her in her arms in the shop.

Q. Do you recollect how the little boy was dressed - A. I cannot say positively how he was dressed; he had on a blue pinafore, and a light coloured frock, he had no hat on; he had light hair and very thick. She had the little boy in her arms, and placed him on the counter; she asked me for a hat at half a guinea, upon which I arose and placed a hat on the child's head; she then asked me for a feather; I got a feather and she approved of it: I asked her if I should sew it in; she said, no, she was in a great hurry; she put the feather in the child's hat, and put it on its head; she paid me eleven shillings and went out. That is all I know of it.

Q. You were afterwards before the Lord Mayor - A. Yes, and at Union Hall.

Q. Were you there when the little girl pointed out the prisoner - A. Yes, she pointed out the lady at Union Hall; the lady was mixed with other people; she was standing with other ladies at the time at Union Hall.

COURT. What did the child do - A. The child was asked the question which was the lady that took her brother away, and the child was asked likewise which was the lady that gave her bunns; she pointed to the prisoner.

Q. When did this pointing out happen - A. At the first meeting at Union Hall.

Q. On the Tuesday week following was the same question put to her at the Mansion House - A. Yes.

Q. And did she do the same there - A. Yes.

MR. SHERGOLD. I am a labourer in the service of the East India Company.

Q. You I believe, are the uncle of these little children - A. Yes.

Q. In consequence of your sisters loss did you enquire after the little boy - A. I was distributing hand bills for three days before I could hear any thing. From information I went to Trafalgar-place, No. 7; I went to the house where the prisoner lodges, I took Goff and Clark (another officer) with me.

Q. When you get there for whom did you enquire - A. For Mrs. Russell. I was informed that she was not at home; the landlady desired me to walk up two pair of stairs, she desired me to wait, and the prisoner came into the room to me; I asked her if her name was Mrs. Russell, and informed her that I had a great deal of trouble to find her out, but did not inform her the real business I was on. I entered into a light conversation with her; I asked her if she had another room; I was anxious to see her other apartment, to see if I could discover any thing before I hurt or troubled her mind; she asked me if I wanted to go to it already; I said, yes; she then shewed me the other room; I then held her in conversation a minute, the same as I did in the other room, and walked about the room to see if I could see any thing that led to a discovery. I then told her it was too early to sit down to spend the evening.

Q. What day was this - A. This was on the Tuesday, eight days after the loss. I asked her then if she would put on her cloak and take a walk with me, as it was a fine evening, which she refused; she said she would light a fire and make me a comfortable dish of tea.

Q. What was your object in asking her to take a walk with you - A. I wished to see the colour of her cloak.

COURT. All this time you had not given her any hint what you came about - A. No; she pressed me very hard to let her light a fire, but I still refused it. She then asked me who that was standing at the door; I informed her it was my servant; she said I had better go and send him away, as she supposed I was going to stop with her all night; I gave her no positive answer; I told her I would go down and speak to him; I then went down to Goff, who passed as my servant; I asked him what we had best to do in it, whether we had not best candidly tell her our business; I went back with Goff and desired she would not distress herself; I told her I had deceived her, my business was in search of a child who was my nephew; she was very much hurt, and asked me from whence I could get any information of her; I told her that I had heard a gentleman say that there was a person once took away his girl, but it was restored to him again, and that this person who took away his girl had before left a cloak there to be dyed blue, and that she was in the habit of wearing feathers in her hat or bonnet; Mrs. Russell then denied having any such clothes; she said she would shew me her clothes if I would look at them; I refused to do it. I told her if she was an innocent woman I hoped she would have no objection of seeing that servant who served a lady with two children with bunns; she answered, she was willing to see any one; I then sent for the servant, Mary Bagnell , she was near at hand; the mother of the child came up with her. The prisoner was sitting near the window; I asked Mary Bagnell to look at Mrs. Russell, which she did very stedfastly,and said that was the lady that came in the pastry cook's shop with two children, as described in the bill; at this Mrs. Russell went to her bed-room in order to shew her clothes; the mother of the child and Mary Bagnell went and saw the clothes that Mary Russell shewed them. I cautioned Mary Bagnell not to be too hasty, but to recollect herself, and be cautious before she said she was the person. After she first said she was the person I gave her this caution; she looked at her again and persisted in it.

Q. When you suggested of some person having lost a child, did you tell that gentleman's name - A. I did not. I then asked Mrs. Russell if she was an innocent woman to walk with me to Fish-street hill to the hatters there, which she consented to do; I asked her to accept of my arm, and she should be treated with every degree of politeness. and if she proved to be an innocent woman I would civilly conduct her home again. On our way to Fish-street Hill there was a deal of conversation; Mrs. Russell questioned me closer which way I got my information; I asked her to confess to me if she knew any thing of the child; I told her that I heard that she once before attempted to take a child away; she confessed to me that she was accused of the same, but that the mother of the child gave her permission to take it.

Q. Did she say who that mother was - A. No, not to my recollection. I then asked her why, if she had permission, why she beat the child, the mother informed me that she did; she said she did slap it a little, but not hurt it. I asked her if ever she had a child herself; she answered, that she had, and that it was a girl. Any more particulars I do not recollect untill I got into the hatters shop; I then asked the young lady sitting behind the counter if she knew that lady; I mentioned no name.

Q. Was that Ann Wakefield - A. Yes. She answered she did not recollect her. I then asked her if she was any way like the lady who had bought a hat there on Monday the 18th; she answered she could not tell, but she was about the same heighth. Goff, the officer, being just behind me, asked the lady at the hatters shop to ask Mrs. Russell a few questions.

Q. Did she follow Goff's advice - A. Yes, and Mrs. Russell denied ever being in the shop. Ann Wakefield then told her her voice was like the voice of the person who bought the hat, and then asked her to stand beside of her, and told her heighth corresponded with the heighth of the person who bought the hat for the boy on the 18th. She then informed her that she did believe her to be the lady who bought the hat, though so differently dressed. That ended her conversation. We then sent for those other people who saw the lady take the children away; Mrs. Cox is one. I then took her to Union Hall and gave charge of her.

Q. Was your little niece at Union Hall that day - A. Yes; and my niece was fetched that day to the hatters, I believe her mother fetched her. I was not willing to give charge of the woman until all co-operated that she was the same person.

Q. At Union Hall she was examined - A. Yes.

Q. Were you present at any time when your neice was directed to point her out - A. Yes; the officer placed the prisoner almost behind another lady, and set six or seven ladies about her; Sir John Pinhorn took the little girl on his knee and talked to her a minute or so; he then asked this little girl which of these ladies took her brother away; the child pointed and said, that lady; the child pointed right to Mrs. Russell that is at the bar; she was then asked who gave her cakes, and she likewise pointed to her.

Mr. Gurney. The child had seen the prisoner at the hatters, before she saw her at Union Hall - A. Yes.

Q. You say the mother of the child and the other person went into the prisoner's room, and the prisoner shewed them all her clothes voluntarily - A. They only looked at what she pulled out.

Q. Were you in the room - A. No.

Q. They did not see any clothes answering the description of the lady that took the child away - A. I never saw any in the apartment.

JOHN MILLS . I was a soldier in the Guards. I work in Thames-street in general.

Q. Did you any time in November last, and what day, see any lady with two children - A. On the 18th I saw the lady who is arraignod at the bar now bring two children out of Thames-street.

Q. Look at her, are you certain of her - A. Yes, I am, or else I would not say it; I saw her come out of St. Martin's lane, having two children before her; then she took the youngest up; she walked along a few paces; the young one began to wimper; she said to the oldest that she was going to buy them cakes. I walked along with them to the end of Thames-street. The prisoner went up Thames-street, which is Mrs. Russell, I suppose, and then she went up Fish-street Hill. I did not see her any more that time.

Q. Did you observe how she was dressed - A. I will not swear whether her cloak was blue or brown, it was furred all round. She had a straw bonnet on, the children had both white frocks on.

Q. Did the dress of the children correspond with the dress of the lady herself - A. The children were dressed as a working man's children might be dressed.

Q. Was she dressed as a working man's wife - A. No, she was too tawdry for that. I was at the front of Swan-lane; I walked after up Thames-street; my attention was directed to her because she rather snubbed the children.

JOHN GOFF . I am an officer.

Q. I believe you know no more than Mr. Shergold has told us - A. No.

Q. to Mills. Have you looked at that little girl - A. Yes, that was one of the children.

Mr. Gurney. Did not you say before the Lord Mayor that you were not sure - A. Yes; I was not sure then by her dress.

Q. Then you are more sure now - A. No, I am not. I saw the child return with a cake, and it is in court.

Q. How came you not to be sure before the Lord Mayor - A. I did say I was not sure, I believed it was the child, because I had not seen the child since I saw it first.

Mr. Bolland. Since you have had an opportunity of seeing it, are you sure now - A. Yes, because I tookparticular notice of the child when it returned with the cake afterwards. I am perfectly sure.

COURT. Why were not you sure then. This child was produced before the Lord Mayor, how can you now swear that this is the child, when you recently said after the transaction that you only believed it - A. I did say so, because I had not the opportunity of seeing it again; it was a long way off.

Mr. Gurney. It was not further off you than that gentleman - A. Yes, it was twenty yards further than that.

Mr. Bolland Q. to Shergold. What is your brotherin-law's name - A. James.

Q. What is the little boy's name - A. Thomas.

The prisoner left her defence to her counsel.

MARGARET BRIORY . Q. I believe you keep a house in Trafalgar-place, Locks fields - A. I do.

Q. Did the prisoner, Mrs. Russell, lodge in your house - A. She did.

Q. Do you remember Mr. Shergold coming on Tuesday the 26th of November to your house, and going away with her - A. I do.

Q. Do you remember where Mrs. Russell was on the Monday in the week before that, on Monday the 18th - A. At home.

Q. How long in the day was she at home - A. To the best of my recollection till four o'clock.

Q. Are you quite sure that she was at home till twelve o'clock - A. I am quite sure.

Q. Till one o'clock - A. I am quite sure.

Q. Do you remember any person coming to you on the afternoon of that day - A. I do, the washerwoman, a Mrs. Wright, she came in the afternoon of that day.

Q. About what time did the washerwoman come - A. A little before one, and staid till about four.

Q. Are you quite sure that after Mrs. Wright, the washerwoman came there she had not been out of the house - A. I am quite sure that she had not been out of the house at all.

Q. Pray had you any lodger of the name of Osborne in the house - A. I have now, and I had at that time, he has lodged with me between eleven and twelve years, he was very ill at that time; he was visited by a Mr. Delahaye, a Cutholic clergyman.

Q. What was the first day that Mr. Delahaye came to visit Mr. Osborne - A. On the 18th of August he first came to stay with him from half past nine in the morning, or ten, and stayed till one, and then went home to dinner, and returned again.

Q. Then you say that Monday the 18th was the first day of attendance of Mr. Delahaye to Mr. Osborne - A. I do.

Q. After the prisoner was taken from your house to Union Hall you learned that the was charged with taking away a child on the 18th - A. I did.

Q. On that, referring back to the Monday were you quite sure that she was at home - A. I am.

Q. At the Mansion House did you attend before His Lordship to give that evidence - A. I did.

Q. How long has Mrs. Russell lodged with you - A. I cannot exactly say, many months.

Q. You had therefore the opportunity of knowing what clothes she has - A. I had, sir.

Q. Has she any such thing as a blue cloak trimmed all round with fur - A. Nothing of the kind.

Q. Has she any dark cloak trimmed with fur - A. Nothing of the kind, nor any cloak trimmed with fur.

Q. Could it be possible that she had a blue or dark cloak with spotted fur upon it without your notice - A. No, it is not possible.

Q. What time of day did she get up - A. Very late on that day, she was indisposed on the Saturday and Sunday, and on that day to the best of my recollection she was not up till near eleven o'clock.

Mr. Bolland. What are you - A. I am a widow of an officer.

Q. How large is this house that you keep - A. Six rooms in it.

Q. Which room does Mrs. Russell occupy - A. The second floor.

Q. What is her husband - A. A surgeon of a cutter.

Q. Were you the person that let in Mr. Shergold - A. I did not know his name, he is the uncle, I believe. I let in the officer that took her away, and likewise the mother.

Q. Were you the person to whom Mr. Shergold addressed himself and asked for Mrs. Russell - A. I was; I said she was gone out and would be in in a few minutes.

Q. How many lodgers have you - A. On the first and second floor.

Q. Is it possible for Mrs. Russell to go out without your observation - A. I think it is almost impossible, though not quite impossible.

Q. You think she arose about eleven did you see her rise - A. No: I saw her when she came down stairs.

Q. Her room is on the second floor - A. Yes. I generally sit in the back room.

Q. Do you mean that she came down to your back room at noon - A. I do; it was about eleven o'clock.

Q. Did she remain with you after that time - A. She went up stairs again.

Q. When did you see her again that day - A. When the washerwoman came, that was one o'clock.

Q. Mrs. Briory, what makes you so capable of saying it was Monday the 18th - A. Mrs. Russell being indisposed on the Sunday, and the Catholic priest coming on the 18th I do recollect it; on this Monday she came down stairs, and was very ill, and it was the first day that this French gentleman came to visit.

Q. Was this French gentleman with Mrs. Russell - A. No. That brought it to my recollection.

Q. You say the washerwoman staid with you till four - A. Yes. Whenever she comes she always does. She is a sister-in-law of mine.

Q. Did you know what Mr. Shergold came to her for - A. No, not till she called me up stairs and told me.

Mr. Gurney. When she came down, as soon as you think she got up, how was she dressed - A. In white. I have no doubt she had not been out, she appeared to me as if she had just come out of her chamber. This was questioned with me about three days afterwards. I had only my recollection to carry back three days.

Q. The washerwoman did not come every day inthe week. - A. No, only of a Monday.

MR. DELAHAYE. Q. I believe you are a catholic clergyman. - A. Yes.

Q. You had occasion to visit a person of the name of Osborne in Mrs. Briory's house. - A. Yes, he is my friend.

Q. Do you now spend all the morning with him. - A. I make it a point to go to him every morning, I spend three or four hours of a morning, I go to dinner, and come back again to him.

Q. When did you commence to attend him in this regular way. - A. I began with him on Sunday, the 17th, after my dinner, I found him very ill, and on the Monday morning I did call upon him, I have been regular with him every day from that same Monday morning, the 18th was the first morning which I have attended him down to this time. I am sure Mrs. Briory was at home on the Monday, when I went and when I came away.

Court. What time did you go there. - A. From half past nine till half past twelve, that is the time I generally go by, then I go home to dinner.

MRS. WRIGHT. Q. Where do you live. - A. In Moor Lane, Fore Street.

Q. Do you wash for Mrs. Briory, and her lodger Mrs. Russell - A. Yes.

Q. I believe you are by marriage related to Mrs. Briory. - A. Yes.

Q. What day of the week do you take home Mrs. Russell's clothes - A. Generally on a Monday.

Q. What time did you take home Mrs. Russell's clothes on the Monday. - A. On Monday the 18th of November I took Mrs. Briory's home at the same time, and two days after, Mrs. Russell was in custody, I heard of it in consequence of the new paper.

Q. Upon that you recollected back to the time in which you took the clothes. - A. Certainly.

Q. Now are you sure that you took the clothes home on Monday the 18th of November. - A. I am confident, I went to the house some where about one.

Q. Did you find her at home - A. I did.

Q. Did she appear to have been out. - A. No.

Q. How long did you remain in the house. - A. Somewhere about four hours with Mrs. Briory.

Q. How long have you washed for Mrs. Russell. - A. From three to five months.

Q. Have you been frequently up in her room - A. I have.

Q. Had you therefore the opportunity of seeing what clothes she had. - A. Generally.

Q. Have you ever seen her have a blue or dark cloak with spotted fur about it. - A. Never in my life, I never saw a cloak with fur on her, or about her room, and she is negligent of letting her clothes lay about the room. I have seen her drawers open, and I have had the opportunity of seeing what clothes she had.

Q. And you have seen no such thing. - A. Never.

Q. What did you receive of Mrs. Russell for washing that day. - A. Four shillings.

The prisoner called eight witnesses who gave her a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

4. SARAH WALKER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of November , a bank note, value 1 l. the property of John Clark Blundle .

JOHN CLARK BLUNDLE . The prisoner was my servant . On Saturday the 2d of November I gave the prisoner a two pound bank note to get it changed, she brought me back a one pound note, and the remainder in silver and copper, she gave me the change, I put the one pound note into a little bag, and the next day, Sunday, I shifted my clothes about two o'clock. I left the little bag in my coat pocket, and the coat in the pantry, and a little after five I was sitting at my tea, I asked my wife where my coat was, she said she had brought it in, I put my hand in the pocket, and found the bag was gone, the girl absconded between two and three o'clock.

MARY ANN BLUNDLE . I am mother-in-law to the last witness. The prisoner is a pauper belonging to the liberty of the rolls, my son-in law was ill, in consequence of which we let her go to assist him, when he found the note was missing, his wife came to me, we went to a person that is called aunt to the prisoner, in Richardson's buildings, Shoe Lane, we found the one pound note had been stopped by Mr. Ford.

GEORGE WILLIAM SHUREY . I am a constable; I have the note, I found it at Mr. Ford's, the publican.

WILLIAM FORD . I keep the White Hart, the corner of Leather Lane, and Portpool Lane. On Sunday the 3d of November, about six o'clock, the prisoner came and asked me to give Mrs. Jones, that keeps a coal-shed, change of a one pound note, she said she would take ten shillings in halfpence, if I would give change, I had plenty of copper, I gave her ten shillings in copper, and ten shillings in silver, I took this note of the girl, when the girl went out I saw another woman, the other woman said, is it all right. I then thought all was not right, I took hold of the girl, and took her into Mrs. Jones's the other woman on off, I asked Mrs. Jones if she had given this child a pound note to get changed, Mrs. Jones said, nothing of the sort, I had the pound note, I took the copper and the silver from the girl, I asked her where she lived, she first said at Hatton Wall, and then in Tothill Court, every thing she told me was quite false.

Prosecutor. This is the note that was taken from me, I know it by a mark at the back; it is a one pound note.

Prisoner's Defence. The day I took the note it was in a little bag, it laid in the pantry, I picked it up, and in the afternoon I went out.

GUILTY, aged 14.

Judgment respited .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

5. SAMUEL WHITE, alias WEBB , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of May , a great coat, value 1 l. the property of Samuel Lindsey .

SAMUEL LINDSEY . I live at 16, Warner Street, Clerkenwell , I keep an hackney coach , I engaged the prisoner one night to drive my coach, on the 27th of May; he begged the favour of my box coat, I let him have it, I believe I delivered it him out of my own hands, he never returned it; the coach and horses were brought home by a strange man; about three weeks ago he was apprehended for something else, I have never seen the great coat since.

Prisoner's Defence. He delivered his box coat into myhands, I made a bad night's work, I was very poor, I did not know how to act, I sent the coach home by another person.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

6. HONOUR BROWN was indicted for the wilful murder of Stephen Brown , and also stood charged with strangling the said Stephen Brown .

The case was stated by Mr. Pooley.

ELIZABETH ANDREWS . I am a widow woman, I live at No. 50, Greenfield Street, near the Commercial Road, in the parish of Stepney.

Q. Did you know the deceased Brown. - A. Yes, he was the husband of the prisoner, they lived at No. 2, York Street, Commercial Road, in the parish of Stepney .

Q. Were you in the habit of going to the house to be employed. - A. Yes, occasionally, how and then to be employed at a day's work in washing and mending the children's clothes, there were two children.

Q. On the 5th of November did you go there. - A. Yes, about eight o'clock in the morning.

Q. Was Stephen Brown at home. - A. He was, and the prisoner.

Q. Did any thing in the morning pass between them. - A. A few words at breakfast.

Q. After they had words at breakfast, did she say any thing to him. - A. I do not know that she did, he went out.

Q. Do you know what past between the two at the time, why he went out. - A. No, I do not, I went down stairs to washing, into the kitchen.

Q. You breakfasted, I suppose, in the parlour. - A. Yes.

Q. Did Stephen Brown return again. - A. At one o'clock he came down into the kitchen to me, Rebecca a little girl about nine years old, a child of theirs, was sitting with me in the kitchen.

Q. When he came home and came down to you in the kitchen, at that time where was the prisoner. - A. In the parlour.

Q. Do you know of your own knowledge whether any body was in the parlour with her. - A. Yes, she was engaged with a gentleman; he sent Rebecca up to tell her mother he wanted his dinner, Rebecca came down and said he was to have it presently, he seemed to be in a passion, and in about a quarter of an hour he sent the child up again, he sent word that he knew Mr. Brant was in the parlour, Rebecca said, no father it is Mr. Coggan, he said he knew it was Brant, he went up stairs in a violent passion, and looked out of the one pair of stairs window, to see who went away; when Mr. Brant went away he mobbed him out of the window.

Q. Did you see Brant quit the house. - A. No, I heard him mob him, I did not see him; then Mr. Brown came down stairs into the parlour, Mrs. Brown and he had some words, I heard them at words, I did not hear what passed; Mrs. Brown said, I believe, she would not have any of her friends insulted, while he, the husband, lived upon the prostitution of her body.

Q. Did you hear what he said upon that. - A. I do not know that he said any more. I and Mrs. Brown and the child went to dinner, and Mr. Brown went out before we went to dinner.

Q. What time of day was it you dined. - A. I think it was about two o'clock.

Q. Did the prisoner dine with you. - A. She was in the room, she did not eat with us. After dinner Mrs. Brown wanted me to pledge a large looking glass, I refused to do it, she fetched Ann at Mrs. Turner's.

Q. Was she a person that lived with her formerly before. - A. Yes, she occasionally used to be at Mrs. Brown's, she sometimes jobbed at one house, and sometimes at another, she fetched her to go out with it, she took the glass to the pawnbroker's, and just as she came back, Mrs. Brown got a trunk to pack up her clothes, Mr. Brown came in again.

Court. Can you say at about what time that was. - A. No, I could not tell, there was no clock in the house, he went out about two o'clock and had been absent the best part of an hour. I believe it was about three o'clock Mrs. Brown said to him I am about to leave you to night as soon as he came in, I will take Louisa with me, as for Rebecca you shall keep. Mr. Brown said he did not care he would be d - d if Brant should come there, he was a bad man, I do not know what answer Mrs. Brown made. I believe the answer she made was rather angry. He went up stairs to the bed chamber.

Q. Is that the room over the parlour. - A. Yes, he was gone a good while, Mrs. Brown was sorting and packing up her things, we were both in the parlour together, I went down into the kitchen to go into the yard, but did not stay longer than ten minutes. I came back and found Mrs. Brown in the parlour sitting at the window.

Q. Were the things packed up. - A. Yes, some of them and some not.

Q. Now when you went down into the kitchen to go into the yard could you tell from what you saw in the parlour when you returned whether she had been employed in packing up more things or whether the things were in the same state on your return. - A. I cannot tell that. Mrs. Brown went out of the door to Mrs. Orpwood's door, but on what account I do not know. Mrs. Orpwood lives at No. 4, Mrs. Brown's house is No. 2. I heard the noise of something like the motion or lumbring of a chair, I ran out to Mrs. Brown and met her just at Mrs. Orpwood's door. I said Mrs. Brown go up stairs something is the matter.

Court. Q. You knew that Mr. Brown was up stairs. - A. Yes.

Q. How came the mere motion of a chair to raise an alarm in your mind. - A. I do not know, he was very quiet, I thought he might have fell off the bed, and as they had some words I thought there was something the matter, the noise was like the feet of a chair rubbing or scraping on the ground, I asked her to go up stairs and she would not go up stairs, she sent me, she said go up and fetch that little box of tickets out of the corner drawer.

Q. What box was it. - A. The box that some duplicates were in. I went up stairs and saw Mr. Brown hanging up at the bed-post.

Q. Was it a four-post bed. - A. Yes.

Q. What part of the bed was it that the cord was fastened upon, which he was hanging upon. - A. Up at the round nob by which the rings run.

Q. Describe how the cord was fastened round the knob. - A. That I cannot, I had a small knife in my hand. I had been ripping Mrs. Brown's stays, I had that knife in my hand, I ran up stairs with it.

Q. Was that post that Brown was hanging higher than your head. - A. Yes, it was about as high as that knob. I did not get up upon any thing to cut it. I cut it and he slipped upon the bed. His body was hanging, his feet was rather dragging on the ground, and his toes were turned underneath as much as I could recollect.

Q. And his toes turning inward under the bed. - A. Yes.

Mr. Pooley. Do you recollect the position of his knees, whether they were strait or bent. - A. No. I ran down.

Q. Was he dressed or undressed. - A. Dressed.

Court. What was the thickness of the cord. - A. It was but a small cord, I cannot tell, I took it down in my hand.

Q. Could you tell from the appearance of the bed whether he had been lying on the bed. - A. I could not tell, nor could I tell whether the bed was made or no.

Q. When you cut the rope how high did you cut the rope. - A. As high as the knob, I reached it.

Q. You told me just now that it was as high as that knob. - A. Yes, I cut it in the middle, and then it all fell down.

Mr. Pooley. Do you mean that when you cut the rope in the middle at that place at the knob, there must be some remaining. - A. That came down all at once.

Q. When you cut the cord, did you cut the cord or a loop. - A. I cut the loop I believe, I do not know, I was in such a fright I cut it so that it all came down together.

Q. Then when you cut the loop and it all came down so together, was the rope in two pieces or one piece. - A. In two pieces. I do not know whether it was put on double or single.

Court. You do not know whether the rope was tied double or single. - A. No my lord.

Mr. Pooley. When you cut the rope which way did the body fall. - A. It fell upon the bed, he hung withinside, he hung in that position that when the cord was cut part of his body was on the bed and part of his legs on the floor. As soon as I cut him down I ran down stairs and said oh, Mrs. Brown, he has hung himself, and here is the rope, and I throwed the cord behind the fire not knowing what I was doing of.

Court. You ran down stairs with the cord, how did you get the cord off the man's neck, I took the cord off his neck. I thought he was not dead, I undid his shirt collar and his handkerchief, not then I believe, but when I went up again. When I said to her oh Mrs. Brown he has hung himself, she said oh, Mrs. Andrews no; send for Rebecca.

Q. Did she see you bring the cord down in your hand. - A. I do not know, for I took and smacked it behind the fire, I thought I should find him alive when I went up again. I put it immediately behind the fire before I knew what I was about.

Q. Where was Rebecca at this time. - A. At Mrs. Woollaston's, after she said send for Rebecca, Mrs. Brown went to the door and Mrs. Woollaston was passing by, she said send Rebecca home. When Rebecca came, she went and fetched Mr. Bennett, when Rebecca came in Mrs. Brown said go up stairs your father is in a fit. Rebecca went up stairs and I went with her.

Q. Had she said any thing to you about a fit before that. - A. No. I don't recollect.

Mr. Pooley. When you came down stairs first of all did she at that time express to you what she thought was the occasion of his death. - A. No.

Q. Then the first time that you heard the word fit was when Rebecca came in. - A. Yes. I think she said he was in a fit, when Rebecca came Mrs. Brown said oh fetch Mr. Bennet, he is a surgeon, Mr. Bennet came and said he was no more. Mrs. Brown went up stairs with him and was there.

Q. Did you see Mr. Bennet examine the deceased's person. - A. No. I dont think he did at that time.

Q. Was he told what was the occasion of his decease - A. I did not, I said I found him at the bottom of the foot of the bed.

Q. Did you tell Mr. Bennet when he went there first, that you found him hanging at the foot of the bed. - A. No. I did not.

Q. Why did not you. - A. I had no reason for not telling him except my fright.

Court. Was any thing said to Mr. Bennet about his dying in a fit. - A. Yes, I told him that Mr. Brown died in a fit.

Mr. Pooley. Why did you tell him that Mr. Brown died in a fit. - A. That I can give no account, I must have been quite lost.

Q. When you told him that Mr. Brown died in a fit was Mrs. Brown present. - A. Yes. Mrs. Brown said nothing to my knowledge, Mr. Bennet told us to lay him on the bed, then he went away.

Q. When was it you unbuttoned his shirt collar. - A. The second time of my going up stairs, I think Rebecca was with me, I saw the black mark of the string about his neck, I did not say any thing about it. I was not there when Mr. Bennet came the second time, I was fetched to Aliffe Street, where I was nursing, I staid about an hour after Mr. Bennet was gone and had some tea.

Q. When you were down stairs with Mrs. Brown had you any conversation with her concerning the death of Mr. Brown. - A. No. I do not think we had any, we talked about laying him out, a neighbour came in, I said he died in a fit and Mrs. Brown said so, when Mrs. Orpwood came in and Ann the servant I was going to lay him out, and then I was fetched away, and I was fetched to the jury on the Thursday or the Friday.

Q. When was the first time that you mentioned that you found him hanging. - A. Not till the officer took me to Lambeth Street office, I believe on the following Thursday.

Q. What day were you examined by the coroner. The day that this man came by his death was on Tuesday. - A. Yes, I think I was examined by the coroner on the Friday, and I think it was the Tuesday following, that was the first time that ever I mentionedabout seeing him hanging by the neck.

Q. You were examined two or three days after by the coroner, your fright was quite subsided. - A. I told him the same that I did before, and I don't know when I did it, I had been up night and day with a lady, my head was very bad at the time.

Q. What aged man did he appear to you to be. - A. I thought he was near forty, I do not know what age he was, he was pretty hearty all but his knee, he had been in the hospital a month, he could eat and drink hearty, there was something the matter with his knee.

Q. When you went up stairs and found him hanging, did you see near him any chair. - A. There was a chair standing sideways to the bed, it was standing in the place it usually stood, I had before seen it there, the chair was close by the body, the arm-chair stood almost at the bottom of the bed.

Q. Was it such a cord as that. - A. Yes, it was a smallish cord.

Mr. Knapp. Mrs. Andrews, I understood you to say that you went into the yard for about ten minutes. - A. Yes, leaving the prisoner packing up the trunk, putting her clothes together, I left her in the parlour, and I found her in the parlour.

Q. And when you came back she was engaged in packing up the things. - A. Yes, and looking in her drawers, and putting her clothes together what she was going to take away.

Q. So that the object she had in view when you went out in the yard she was carrying on when you returned. - A. Yes.

Q. When you did return you heard the noise like the scraping of a chair. - A. Yes, a few minutes after I returned.

Q. Where was the prisoner at the time that you returned and you heard the scraping. - A. She had gone out to Mrs. Orpwood's door, she stood at Mrs. Orpwood's door, I ran to her.

Q. Afterwards, when you went up stairs into the room, the chair was in the situation of having been removed from the place in which it had been, and it was at the foot of the bed. - A. The chair was very near to the bed.

Q. Supposing a person had been disposed to hang himself, could you conceive a chair to be put more convenient for such a purpose. - A. I do not know, it always stood there.

Q. Might it not be used for that purpose. - A. I do not know but it might.

Q. You say that he was a hearty man, and that he had a weakness in his knee. - A. He appeared to be a hearty man, he had very good use of his hands, and too much of his tongue.

Q. Do you think that from the weak state of his body, that any body could have hang'd him. - A. He was very strong and very spitefull, I do not think that any body could have hang'd him.

Q. Do you think that a man would suffer himself to be hanged up by a woman, or any body else without using his hands. - A. You will know that by the witnesses.

Q. Then there was no marks of violence found upon her. - A. No.

Q. He had the means of doing it, he was strong and hearty enough, if he was so disposed, to have done it. - A. Yes, he had used violence upon her, but I believe not that day.

ANN ORPWOOD . I live at No. 4, in York Street, two doors from the prisoner.

Q. On the 5th of November was the prisoner at your house. - A. In the afternoon she came into my shop a little before four I believe.

Q. How long did she remain with you. - A. Not above five minutes.

Q. I believe after that you saw the child Rebecca. - A. Yes.

Q. In consequence of any thing between you and Rebecca, did you go to the house of Mrs. Brown - A. I went to enquire, and Mrs. Andrews answered me, Mrs. Brown was sitting in the parlour with the parlour door open.

Q. Could she hear what passed between you and Andrews. - A. Yes, I think she could, I asked what was the matter, Mrs. Andrews said Mr. Brown had died in a fit, Mr. Bennet had been sent for, and he said he was no more.

Q. What was the appearance of Mrs. Brown while she was sitting in the parlour. - A. She was full of grief, she asked me if I would assist Mrs. Andrews, and lay him out, I said I would come bye and bye.

Q. When Mrs. Andrews said that Mr. Brown had died in a fit, did Mrs. Brown say any thing to that. - A. No.

Q. You went again in the course of the afternoon to lay him out. - A. Yes, about a quarter before six, when I went the second time they were at tea in the parlour; Mrs. Andrews took a bason of water, soap, and towel, she went up stairs first, Mr. Brown was laying upon the bed as if he was asleep, he was dressed, I observed a small black mark on the front of his neck; I saw the prisoner the next morning, she seemed full of grief.

CHARLES BENNET . I am a surgeon.

Q. On the 5th of November last, I think you went twice to the house of the deceased. - A. I was. The first time I went it was five o'clock in the afternoon, Rebecca, the daughter of the deceased, came to me crying, I went to the house, I was shewn the deceased by Mrs. Andrews; Mrs. Brown followed me up stairs; Mrs. Andrews told me that he had been in a fit, this was in the hearing of the prisoner, he was lying on the bed on the right side, I immediately unbuttoned his waistcoat and felt his body, which was rather warm, but his extremities were cold, I said he was quite dead, Mrs. Brown immediately was struck with surprise and grief, and very much alarmed; Mrs. Brown said at first that she hoped he was not dead, I told her that he was quite dead, she said to Mrs. Andrews, you know what there is, let the furniture go, do the best you can for me.

Q. When Mrs. Andrews said he died in a fit, did Mrs. Brown say any thing. - A. No, she neither confirmed it, or contradicted it.

Q. Did you at that time examine his person. - A. I only put my hand in at his body, and opened his mouth, his position on the bed was so that I could not see his neck, I went away, and said I was sorry for her.

Q. From your examination of him, and from what you observed, and from what Mrs. Andrews said had you formed any other opinion than that he died in a fit - A. I had not then, knowing Mrs. Andrews before. I was sent for again, and when I went there the second time I saw Mrs. Orpwood, and the body was removed on the floor; Mrs. Brown was in the room, and I think Mrs. Andrews, but I am not sure; I examined the body then all over, I discovered the mark round his neck, that was pointed out by Mrs. Orpwood; I then said there was no doubt he had died of strangulation, by the effect of a cord round his neck. I said I would call upon Mr. Robinson the high constable; Mrs. Brown said she would leave it to me to do what I thought proper, she did not know what to do.

COURT. Is it your opinion now that Brown died of strangulation - A. It is my clear opinion; I believe hanging and strangulation are synonomous. It was by hanging as near as I could judge, and such a cord of this dimension would make such a mark as that; it was a small mark; the indent was all round, under the left side it was deeper; it came up to a point the two cords just under his ear. It appeared to me as if the whole body had been suspended by the cord.

MARY SMITH . I live at No. 1, in York-street; that is the next house to where Mrs. Brown lives.

Q. Do you remember the day that this unfortunate circumstance happened - A. Yes, on the 5th of November.

Q. At any time in the day did you and your husband hear any thing in Brown's house - A. Yes, at half past three; I was in my kitchen ironing, my plates and dishes rattled on the shelf as I was ironing; I put my ear to my dresser, hearing a great noise; I heard Mrs. Brown say blast your eyes.

Q. Do you know her voice - A. I do, so well as to be certain what I heard was her voice, and I heard another voice answer the same language to her; it was a man's voice, but who it was I really cannot say.

Q. You say you think you heard a man's voice say what - A. D - n your eyes. I went up into my parlour, and opened my window, and looked out of the window. I thought I should see something the matter; I saw nor heard nothing. I did not know that he was dead until one o'clock the next day.

COURT. Before you went up stairs into your parlour had the noise ceased - A. Yes, it ceased all at once.

Mr. Pooley. In whose house was it that you thought you heard the persons speaking, and that that moved your dishes - A. In Mrs. Brown's.

Q. Did you know Brown - A. Yes; he was a good natured man; he was a very nice sizeable man, he was between forty and fifty; he had been out of the hospital a month or five weeks. When he came out of the hospital I asked him how he did, he said, quite charmingly, except his knees failed him; he looked well.

ELIZABETH BLOGG . I live at No. 3, York-street, next door to Mrs. Brown.

Q. At any time of the day on the 5th of November did you hear any thing in his house - A. I heard them quarrelling and swearing; I went out and returned at four o'clock.

ANN MABERLEY . I work for Mrs. Brown sometimes.

Q. On the 5th of November last do you recollect her coming to you - A. Yes, to pledge a looking glass, between two and three o'clock, which I did, and then after that I went to Mrs. Turner's where I was at work, and between four and five o'clock Rebecca Brown fetched me. When I went to Mrs. Brown's house I saw Mrs. Andrews and Mrs. Brown; Mrs. Brown said, oh, Ann, stand my friend, see what you can do for me; Mrs. Andrews replied, poor Mr. Brown, he is gone, he died in a fit. Mrs. Brown was very uneasy indeed, and seemed to fret very much; Mrs. Brown said, Ann and you can lay Mr. Brown out; Mrs. Brown said she had not got a decent sheet. I went and got a pair of sheets out at the pawnbrokers; Mrs. Andrews then said, when we have had a cup of tea we will go up stairs and lay him out; Mrs. Andrews took the bason, soap and towel and went up, Mrs. Orpwood went up, Mrs. Orpwood dicovered the mark in his neck. I then went down to Mrs. Brown, I said, step up stairs, there is something for you to see. She came and said, oh, dear lad, what he has done to himself; she saw his throat and said, go directly for Mr. Bennet. I went for Mr. Bennet, he came.

Q. Did they repeat he had died in a fit after Mr. Mr. Bennet had been there the second time - A. After Mr. Bennet was gone they said he died in a fit.

GEORGE WHITE . I am the Beadle of the hamlet.

Q. Did you on the 5th of November go to this house - A. No, on the day of the jury, on the Thursday I went to the house, there were two windows in the room, there had been blinds; one had this cord and the other was gone; that was the bed room.

The prisoner left her defence to her counsel.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

7. JOSEPH FISHPOOL was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William James Hill , about the hour of ten, on the night of the 9th of November , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, a snuff box, value 5 s. a silver mounted pipe, value 30 s. and a silver segar tube, value 4 s. his property .

WILLIAM JAMES HILL . I lived in Wardour-street at that time. On the 26th of October the robbery was committed, there is a mistake in the day of the month in the indictment. I keep a tobacconist's shop, and sell boxes and pipes , my family consists of my wife and myself, and a maid-servant; the robbery was committed at ten o'clock; a piece of glass was cut out of the window. About five minutes before the articles were missing out of the window I was in the shop, no person was with me, my wife was gone out. I was in the parlour adjoining the shop, the maid was below in the kitchen.

Q. You went into the shop just before you missed the things - A. Yes.

Q. Then you say you went into the parlour - A. Yes.

Q. What time of night might that be - A. That was, I should think, about a quarter before ten o'clock.

Q. Perfectly dark, of course, was it not - A. Yes, out of doors. The shop was lit up.

Q. Before you went out of the shop you missed nothing - A. No.

Q. Perhaps you had not cast your eye to the articles - A. I had seen them, and had handled them; the pipe in particular; the pane of glass in the window that they took the things from had been cracked across the night previous; I particularly noticed that pane before I went into the parlour, it was in the same situation as it was the night before, and the same as it had been all day. After I went in the parlour my wife came in from the grocers, she said, you have had a great sale of things. I went to the window and observed that there was a hole in the pane of glass in the window that they had starred before. I found the articles missing, a silver mounted German pipe, a silver segar tube, and a silver mounted leather snuff box.

Q. How near were these articles to the window that was broken open - A. They were close against the pane that was cut, and the pipe was hung immediately over the pane, and the segar tube and the snuff box were on the shelf under the broken pane.

Q. Was the hole in the window large enough for a man or a boy's hand to be admitted - A. Yes; any person putting their hand in through that hole might have taken these articles.

Q. Did you hear any noise of breaking the window - A. No, I heard nothing.

Q. Was the door of your shop open or shut - A. Open, I believe, it might be shut; it was shut and open occasionally. If any body had come into the shop by the door I must have seen them; while I was in the parlour can take upon me to say that no person came into the shop by the door but my wife.

Q. Was the crack in the pane of glass that you observed in the night before and in the day had you any reason to think it might have fell out - A. No, there was no danger of the piece of glass falling out; I had cleaned it in the day, it did not shake at all. I searched about afterwards, there was no glass left outside, nor had it fell in the area.

Q. You know nothing of the prisoner, do you - A. When I saw him in custody I recollected having seen him about the neighbourhood; I cannot say that night. He was taken up on Sunday, (the next day) for another robbery. On Wednesday Cooper the officer brought the snuff box and shewed it me, it was the very snuff box I had lost. On Thursday I saw the prisoner at Queen-square office, and I swore to the snuff box before the magistrate. I have not found the other articles.

Prisoner. Can you swear that you lost that snuffbox, or had you sold it - A. I am positive I never sold it; I lost it that very evening.

JOSEPH COOPER , I am an officer of Queen-square. I apprehended the prisoner on Sunday the 27th of October, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I searched him, I found a broken pointed knife and this snuffbox; I asked the prisoner where he got that box; he said I had no business with it, he bought it, but he did not say where he bought it. I told him I should keep it in my custody; I left him in Bridewell. I made enquiry and found Mr. Hill had been robbed on the Saturday night previous to my apprehending him.

Q. to prosecutor. Look at that box, can you undertake to swear positively that is your box - A. This is the same box that I lost, there is my hand-writing on it.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought that box on a Thursday and gave three shillings for it to a man that stands in the street with boxes; it is to-morrow three weeks ago.

Cooper. It is six weeks ago that he was taken in custody.

GUILTY, aged 14,

Of stealing only .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

8. JOHN JOHNSON was indicted for feloniously making an assault in a certain place near the King's Highway, upon Robert Bristow , on the 13th of November , putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, a watch, value 36 l. a gold seal, value 15 s. a gold key, value 10 s. and a stone seal, value 1 s. his property .

ROBERT BRISTOW . I am a merchant , No. 4, Thavies Inn, Holborn. On the 13th of November I had been dining at a coffee-house in Cornhill, and on returning from dinner with a friend I suppose it might be about eleven o'clock at night, I was going under the gateway of Thavies Inn, Holborn ; I suppose the period that I left my friend, and the time the assault was made upon me, it was not a period of time above eight seconds. I found myself incumbered by a man running against me, and feeling round my pockets; I clapped my hand down to my fob, missed my watch, and seized the man by the neck, and immediately exclaimed, you rascal you have got my watch; I took my umbrella, which I had in my left hand, and plunged the same into his mouth, and kept repeating it untill I secured him, and at the same time calling out for watch, and for assistance. The people in the houses heard me, and immediately came out with their candles, and a man of the name of Davis, who is a watchman of the place, also came out, and the constable of the parish came from the noise, and the man was taken away from me in custody.

Q. What became of your watch - A. The watch was gone; the people brought out candles and found the outside case which the constable has got. The watch I have lately heard an account that it is pawned in Blackfriars-road.

Q. Was any other man near you - A. None at all; he was quite by himself. At the moment I found a flutter I seized him, and never gave him up untill I delivered him to the constable. There was no blow struck by the prisoner, all he did was, he came plump against me, and feeling the flutter in my pocket I seized hold of him by the neck, and put my umbrella in his mouth.

Q. Then there was no harm produced - A. No harm at all.

Prisoner. How could I take the watch from you, and what could I do with it - A. There is no doubt he had an accomplice with him; there was a man seen torun from him to Hatton Garden.

WILLIAM ROBERTS . I am a constable. On the 13th of November an alarm came to the watchhouse that a gentleman was robbed; I immediately went up Thavies Inn, I saw the prisoner collared by the prosecutor, he told me that he had been robbed of his watch. I immediately took charge of the prisoner. In the course of two or three minutes the watch case was brought to me. I took the prisoner to the watch-house, I searched him. I found upon him nothing but a bad dollar, a three shilling piece, and one good shilling.

Prisoner's Defence. When this gentleman accused me of the robbery I was going home, he turned round and took hold of me by the collar; he said you scoundrel, you have robbed me of my watch; I said, no, I have not; he struck me; I was all over a gore of blood; he left me and went about to look for the watch; I staid there, knowing myself an innocent man. I am as innocent of stealing the watch as God is true.

Roberts. This is the outside case.

Prosecutor. It is my outside case.

GUILTY. aged 34,

Of stealing, but not with violence .

Transported for Life .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

9. PETER MACKEY and MICHAEL M'KAVETT were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of November , two pounds ten ounces weight of nutmegs, value 2 l. 10 s. the property of John Edwatd Allen and William Pell .

JOHN EDWARD ALLEN . I live in Aldersgate-street ; I am a druggist , my partner's name is William Pell : the prisoners were both porter s to us.

SAMUEL CATTERNS . I am an apprentice to Messrs. Allen and Pell. On Friday the 15th of November I was watching, about half past seven in the morning. I saw Peter Mackey and Michael M'Kavett go into the accompting-house and take the nutmegs out of the drawer and put them in their pockets, and then they both came out of the accompting-house. We only found two pounds ten ounces on them. I weighed the drawer on the over night in the company of the officers, and we were one pound deficient. We went and searched the premises that evening, I found one pound on the premises.

Q. You do not know who did that - A. No.

Q. Then you mean to say that you lost three pound ten ounces - A. Yes, in all.

Q. And one pound you afterwards found concealed on the premises - A. Yes.

DANIEL LEADBETTER . I was fetched by Mr. Allen about eight o'clock in the morning, Cartwright and I were in company. The prisoner were pointed out to us; I searched Mackey, I found about three quarters of a pound of nutmegs upon him, some in each of his breeches pocket.

DANIEL CARTWRIGHT . I searched M'Kavett, and on his person I found one pound fourteen ounces in his right and left breeches pocket; I on the night before was in company with Mr. Allen, we weighed the drawer and the nutmegs altogether, this parcel made up the deficiency of one drawer exactly; in the other there was a loss of one pound that I understand was found afterwards.

Mr. Allen. We had such nutmegs as these in the house, they are worth twenty shillings a pound, the wholesale price.

The prisoners said nothing in their defence.

MACKEY - GUILTY , aged 27.

M'KAVETT - GUILTY , aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

10. JOHN KING was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of November , a hushel of oats, value 6 s. and three pecks of beans, value 5 s. the property of John Austin ; and JOSEPH TYSON for feloniously receiving on the same day the said goods, he knowing them to be stolen .

JOHN AUSTIN . I am a corn-dealer in Aldersgate-street . On the morning of the 9th of November, from suspicion, I laid wait; in about five minutes after my man, John King had opened the shop I saw him go to the bin that had oats in it and put half a bushel into a sack that had previously beans in it; he then went and put some more oats in it, not quite half a bushel from the same bin which he had previously been to; he threw them into the sack not as if he meant to measure them at all; he then moved the sack towards the door, which apparently to me had about two bushels or better of corn in; he went to the door as if sweeping the door out, and presently Joe Tyson came round to the door, King handed it out to him: Tyson twisted the sack round at the top, and immediately it was off.

Q. Who was Joe Tyson - A. He was a waterman at the rank . I came down stairs directly; I asked King who it was he had delivered corn to; he in confusion and hesitation answered Joe, he said he had delivered him a bushel of oats for Moore, I then asked him how he could do it without acquainting me of it. I immediately went after Joe, and when I came up to Black Horse yard; I met Joe coming out with two nose bags full of corn; I asked Joe if he had any corn at my house that morning; he said, no; I told him I understood he had some for Moore that morning; he said it could not be him, for he had but just come down from his lodging, and was assisting the man to get his horses out with the coach. I then came back to my man, I was determined to bring them together; I said, are you sure it was Joe that had this corn; he said, yes; I had seen my man deliver it to Joe; I told Joe so. I asked my man if he was sure Joe had it for Moore; he said he supposed so, but Joe had not said; I then went to Joe again and I brought them together, and my man asked him if he had not some corn that morning; Joe then asked my pardon, said he thought I meant yesterday morning, I know I had some corn this morning. On the eve of the day I had my man taken up; I said, John, I am determined to know the truth; I know this is not the first time you have robbed me.

Q. Did you promise him any thing - A. I told him it might induce milder measures.

COURT. Then I cannot hear it.

WILLIAM COCKMAN . I am an officer. I went to Mr. Austin's about seven o'clock, King was called inMr. Austin said, King, you have robbed me of corn and beans; I am sure you have robbed me before, tell me all and I will use milder measures.

King said nothing in his defence.

Tyson's Defence. John Moore received the articles of me; in the evening he requested me to fetch him a bushel of oats and three pecks of beans; I did not dispute going, as I knew Moore had a running account with Mr. Austin; I told the man that Moore would pay for the goods. Mr. Austin saw Moore in the course of the day, at which time John Moore paid for the articles in the indictment.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

11. JOHN MILLS was indicted for feloniously making an assault, in the King's Highway, upon John Abrahams , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, a watch, value 7 l. two gold seals, value 4 l. and a watch key, value 5 s. his property .

JOHN ABRAHAMS . My last situation was butler to my lord Oxford. On Monday the 18th of November I was coming through Jerusalem passage into Aylesbury-street, it was just turned twelve at night; my great coat was open, my seals were hanging out. The prisoner pushed his arm against mine, and took from my fob my watch.

Q. You were not under any alarm at the moment, were you - A. I was not, until I felt the watch going. I clapped my left hand down, it was gone; I caught the prisoner by the collar of his coat, he asked what I did that for; I saw some men behind him, they did not come up; I said you have robbed me of my watch: he then struck me on the eye; I then tried to secure him, he struck me in the mouth; I had hold of his collar, and then I took hold of the skirt of his coat, and the coat rent up the back to the collar; I then got the other part of the skirt, but he turned his head towards me, and slipped his arms out of the coat. When he escaped from me I halloaed stop thief, my eye and mouth were very much bruised; my mouth bled very much; I saw him run straight down Clerkenwell Green; I did not follow him.

Q. At this time did you see any thing of the two men - A. Not when the prisoner escaped it was dark. I saw no more of the prisoner until I saw him in the watchhouse.

Q. How long was that after - A. About ten minutes. because we searched for the watch; we found the case, not the watch; I was informed the prisoner was taken, I went in the watchhouse and saw him, I knew him; I said, that is the man that robbed me. The prisoner at that time had no coat or hat on.

Q. Do you know how he came to lose his hat - A. My hat was knocked off in the scuffle, also I found the case of my watch close by where I was robbed, it was picked up and given into my hand. I have never got the watch again or the seals.

Mr. Arabin. Whoever this person was you had lost the watch before the blows were given - A. Yes.

JOHN WARD . I was in Clerkenwell Green coming out of the Crown Tavern about five minutes after twelve. On my coming out I heard a faint voice from Aylesbury-street crying stop thief, it being very dark, and the place very wide I got into the centre of the green as fast as I could; I saw a person running towards me on the flag way opposite me, this person had neither hat or coat that I perceived running I ran across to stop him; I missed him. I had this cane in my hand, I threw my cane after him and lost the head; a thought came into my mind that the person who was running away without his coat and hat was running away in consequence of a fight; that was my conjecture. I got my cane, and was proceeding home; on going into Aylesbury-street I saw Mr. Abrahams without his hat; I asked him if he was robbed; he told me he was by the person that ran down the green. I immediately called to the watch for a light. When the light came I found two hats, also a coat, it lay close to my feet; the first hat I picked up; I announced it. Mr. Abrahams said, there is a particular name in my hat; that was his hat; I picked up the other hat. I accompanied the watchman who carried the coat and hat to the watchhouse, the prisoner said he was fighting in Aylesbury-street, and that was his coat, and hat, and hoped to get it; it being a cold night the constable gave it him. The prisoner was afterwards searched, there were four or five handkerchiefs found stuffed in his breeches.

JAMES PANKERS . On the night of the robbery I was returning from a friend's house in St. James's walk the watchman going past twelve. On my arrival in Aylesbury street I saw the prosecutor and the last witness; Mr. Abrahams said he had been robbed, and that the villian had ran off. I saw the watch-case picked up, the prosecutor claimed the case; I accompanied him to the watchhouse, he there charged the prisoner with the robbery, and the prisoner claimed his coat and hat.

WILLIAM BROWN . I am a carpenter. I heard the cry of stop thief just as I was at the top of Red Lion-street, I saw the prisoner coming right before me; I stood in the middle of the road and faced him; I thought of throwing him down; he gave me a slip and got upon the pavement, and then out ran me. I pursued him, calling out stop thief; he was stopped in Ray-street by Maycock the watchman.

JOHN MAYCOCK . I was watchman. On the 18th of November last I heard the cry of stop thief, I was in Ray-street, I saw the prisoner coming running towards me, he had no hat or coat on; I stopped him and took him to the watchhouse, and left him with the constable. I went out to see what he had done; I saw the prosecutor in Clerkenwell Green, he went with me to the watchhouse; as soon as he came in he said, that is the man that robbed me of my watch.

JURY. Did Mr. Abrahams appear in liquor - A. No.

CHARLES BROWN . I was constable of the night. On the 18th I heard the cry of stop thief, I opened the watchhouse door and saw the prisoner run by; I ran after him and Maycock stopped him. Mr. Abrahams gave me this watch case.

Prosecutor. That is my watch case.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel; called eight witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY, aged 18.

Of stealing from the person, but not with violence .

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

12. JOHN M'WILLIAMSON DUPLEX was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 12th of November , a gelding, value 2 l. the property of John Carter .

JOHN CARTER . I live in Hackney Road , I keep a horse and cart .

Q. You have lost a horse have not you. - A. Yes, a brown horse.

Q. Have you got him again. - A. No. He is dead.

Q. When was it you saw him last when he was living. - A. I saw him on Monday the 11th of November, I had him at work in a cart and turned him out in the field adjoining my house at seven o'clock at night. I missed him on Tuesday morning the 12th.

Q. How long was it before you found it. - A. I saw his skin on the Sunday following, he was dead. He was at one Mr. Haddon's at New Cross, he is a collar maker.

Q. Are you sure the horse you saw was yours. - A. Yes, he had been fired near the round bone on his knee, and he had a sore place on his back which I dressed on the 11th.

Q. In short from the marks you are sure it was your horse. - A. Yes. I enquired the next day a little, my neighbour lost one, I told him if I saw his I would let him know. I saw his in Whitechapel at Mr. Dawnes's.

Q. Did you see the prisoner before this happened. - A. Yes, the night before this happened.

Q. What was this horse of any great value. - A. No great value.

Q. It was a sort of a dog horse was it not. - A. Not much better, I worked him every day, I could not afford a better.

Q. Had you any conversation with the prisoner about it. - A. On the night before I lost it he came round and saw me dressing the horse's wounds, he asked me how he did.

Q. How near do you live to him. - A. As near as from here to the top of the street.

Q. What was he. - A. God Almighty knows, I never saw him but once before or twice in my life.

Mr. Gurney. You say a week after all but a day, you found a skin at Mr. Haddon's at New Cross, and that skin you believe to be your horse's skin. - A. Yes.

Q. The knee was fired. - A. Yes. The whole of the skin was there.

Q. What was the colour of your horse's legs. - A. White behind and black before.

Q. The skin that you found had no legs, you could not tell what colour the legs were, you did not see them. - A. No. I knew the skin.

Q. You only saw the skin, you did not know him by his face. - A. I knew it by the skin. I know it to be my horse.

THOMAS HADDON . Q. You had a horse brought you. - A. Yes. I live at New Cross.

Q. Did the prisoner at the bar bring you a horse at any time which is the subject of enquiry. - A. Yes, on Tuesday morning November the 12th, between nine and and ten o'clock.

Q. Did you buy it. - A. Yes.

Q. What coloured horse was it. - A. A brown coach gelding, I gave two guineas and and a half for the two, he brought that horse and another.

Q. Did you shew that horse to Mr. Carter. - A. He saw the hide at my house.

Q. He came and complained that he had lost a horse. - A. Yes.

Q. When he saw it did he own it. - A. Yes.

Q. (to Prosecutor.) Were you at Mr. Haddon's. - A. Yes.

Q. How long after you lost the horse. - A. On the Sunday.

Q. Did you see your horse there. - A. I saw the skin.

Q. I think you told me before you examined the skin and that you thought it was your horse. - A. Yes.

Q. Have you any doubt of it. - A. I am positive of it.

Mr. Gurney. Q. (to Haddon.) When was the horse killed - A. On Wednesday morning.

Q. And was that skin that was shewn to Carter the skin of that horse. - A. Yes, and I am positive I bought it of the prisoner.

Prosecutor. I have got the skin here.

Court. I do not know that we shall be the better for that.

Prisoner's Defence. Mr. Carter says I am a neighbour of his. I am not by three miles.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 25.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

13. MARY WRIGHT was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 12th of November , twenty-five yards of linen cloth, value 3 l. 15 s. the property of Joseph Craig , privately in his shop .

JOSEPH DAVIS . I am shopman to Mr. Joseph Craig , linen draper , 78, Oxford Street . On the 12th of November, about three in the afternoon the prisoner and another woman came into the shop and enquired for some Scotch cambric; I was waiting upon two ladies, some Irish linens laid upon the counter, the ladies then that I was waiting on told me to cut some callico off for them. I turned my back to reach a yard that lay on the ground, and when I got up I saw a piece of something white under the prisoners mantle, the other woman and she talked together, I had suspicion of them. The shop being much crowded with customers they were making out. I jumped over the counter and laid hold of the prisoner and secured her, she resisted very much, the other woman made her escape. I took her into the parlour, locked the door, and went to Marlborough Street and brought an officer, she was then searched, before I went for the officer I took the Irish linen from her, it was the same that I saw under her cloak. I locked it up in the parlour with the prisoner.

JOHN WARREN . I am an officer. I found the prisoner locked up in Mr. Craig's parlour, and the Irish linen, she was delivered to me and the Irish linen. I have have had it ever since.

Q. (to Davis). Look at that piece of cloth. - A. It is the property of Joseph Craig , it has my mark upon it, the cost price is three pound fifteen shillings.

Q. Had you any other shopmen in the shopabout seeing him hanging by the neck.

Q. You were examined two or three days after by the coroner, your fright was quite subsided. - A. I told him the same that I did before, and I don't know when I did it, I had been up night and day with a lady, my head was very bad at the time.

Q. What aged man did be appear to you to be. - A. I thought he was near forty, I do not know what age he was, he was pretty hearty all but his knee, he had been in the hospital a month, he could eat and drink hearty, there was something the matter with his knee.

Q. When you went up stairs and found him hanging, did you see near him any chair - A. There was a chair standing sideways to the bed, it was standing in the place it usually stood, I had before seen it there, the chair was close by the body, the arm-chair stood almost at the bottom of the bed,

Q. Was it such a cord as that. - A. Yes, it was a smallish cord.

Mr Knapp. Mrs. Andrews, I understood you to say that you went into the yard for about ten minutes. - A. Yes, leaving the prisoner packing up the trunk, putting her clothes together, I left her in the parlour, and I found her in the parlour.

Q. And when you came back she was engaged in packing up the things. - A. Yes, and looking in her drawers, and putting her clothes together what she was going to take away.

Q. So that the object she had in view when you went out in the yard she was carrying on when you returned. - A. Yes.

Q. When you did return you heard the noise like the scraping of a chair. - A. Yes, a few minutes after I returned.

Q. Where was the prisoner at the time that you returned and you heard the scraping. - A. She had gone out to Mrs. Orpwood's door, she stood at Mrs. Orpwood's door, I ran to her.

Q. Afterwards, when you went up stairs into the room, the chair was in the situation of having been removed from the place in which it had been, and it was at the foot of the bed. - A. The chair was very near to the bed.

Q. Supposing a person had been disposed to hang himself, could you conceive a chair to be put more convenient for such a purpose. - A. I do not know, it always stood there.

Q. Might it not be used for that purpose. - A. I do not know but it might.

Q. You say that he was a hearty man, and that he had a weakness in his knee. - A. He appeared to be a hearty man, he had very good use of his hands, and too much of his tongue.

Q. Do you think that from the weak state of his body, that any body could have hang'd him. - A. He was very strong and very spitefull, I do not think that any body could have hang'd him.

Q. Do you think that a man would suffer himself to be hanged up by a woman, or any body else without using his hands. - A. You will know that by the witnesses.

Q. Then there was no marks of violence found upon her. - A. No.

Q. He had the means of doing it, he was strong and hearty enough, if he was so disposed, to have done it. - A. Yes, he had used violence upon her, but I believe not that day.

ANN ORPWOOD . I live at No. 4, in York Street, two doors from the prisoner.

Q. On the 5th of November was the prisoner at your house. - A. In the afternoon she came into my shop a little before four I believe.

Q. How long did she remain with you. - A. Not above five minutes.

Q. I believe after that you saw the child Rebecca. - A. Yes.

Q. In consequence of any thing between you and Rebecca, did you go to the house of Mrs. Brown - A. I went to enquire, and Mrs. Andrews answered me, Mrs. Brown was sitting in the parlour with the parlour door open.

Q. Could she hear what passed between you and Andrews. - A. Yes, I think she could, I asked what was the matter, Mrs. Andrews said Mr. Brown had died in a fit, Mr. Bennet had been sent for, and he said he was no more.

Q. What was the appearance of Mrs. Brown while she was sitting in the parlour. - A. She was full of grief, she asked me if I would assist Mrs. Andrews, and lay him out, I said I would come bye and bye.

Q. When Mrs. Andrews said that Mr. Brown had died in a fit, did Mrs. Brown say any thing to that. - A. No.

Q. You went again in the course of the afternoon to lay him out. - A. Yes, about a quarter before six, when I went the second time they were at tea in the parlour; Mrs. Andrews took a bason of water, soap, and towel, she went up stairs first, Mr. Brown was laying upon the bed as if he was asleep, he was dressed, I observed a small black mark on the front of his neck; I saw the prisoner the next morning, she seemed full of grief.

CHARLES BENNET . I am a surgeon.

Q. On the 5th of November last, I think you went twice to the house of the deceased. - A. I was. The first time I went it was five o'clock in the afternoon, Rebecca, the daughter of the deceased, came to me crying, I went to the house, I was shewn the deceased by Mrs. Andrews; Mrs. Brown followed me up stairs; Mrs. Andrews told me that he had been in a fit, this was in the hearing of the prisoner, he was lying on the bed on the right side, I immediately unbuttoned his waistcoat and felt his body, which was rather warm, but his extremities were cold, I said he was quite dead, Mrs. Brown immediately was struck with surprise and grief, and very much alarmed; Mrs. Brown said at first that she hoped he was not dead, I told her that he was quite dead, she said to Mrs. Andrews, you know what there is, let the furniture go, do the best you can for me.

Q. When Mrs. Andrews said he died in a fit, did Mrs. Brown say any thing. - A. No, she neither confirmed it, or contradicted it.

Q. Did you at that time examine his person. - A. I only put my hand in at his body, and opened his mouth, his position on the bed was so that I could not see his neck, I went away, and said I was sorry for her.

WILLIAM TAYLOR . I am clerk to Mr. Hobson, brick maker, Kingsland Road, I employ the workmen and manage the business. The prisoner was a hammer-man in the smith's shop. I know the pieces of iron, they were taken out of the smith's shop.

Prisoner's Defence. On Saturday night when I was taken, my foreman came to my lodgings, he asked me if I was coming to town, I said,

"I think I shall," he said he had iron to carry to town, it would fetch five or six shillings, it would serve us to drink. I had just got the iron off his shoulder when I was taken.

Q. (to Armstrong.) When you met the prisoner first was there any man with him - A. Yes, there was another man with him, they were walking together, and when we stopped him and asked him what he had got, the other man said,

"tell the gentlemen, if it is iron, say it is," I asked the prisoner if he knew this man, he said he did not.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

17. TIMOTHY O'BRIEN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of November , a copper bolt, value 4 s. the property of John Swan , Robert Anderson . and George Swan .

- GALLOWAY. I am a constable of the Thames police. On the 9th of November last, about three o'clock in the morning, I saw two men coming up New Gravel Lane, Shadwell, with a bag or parcel upon each of their shoulders, it was a dark morning I stepped up to the prisoner, I asked him what he had got in the bag, he said, what was that to me, I told him I insisted upon knowing, he said I should not, and have the bag off his shoulder, I held him fast and called the watch to my assistance, and another officer came to my assistance. There was another man with him that had a bag as well as him, he made his escape. I examined the prisoner's bag, it contained three quarters and ten pound of copper bolts.

GEORGE SWAN . My partner's names are John Swan and Robert Anderson , we are copper founders . I attended at the office, the bag was turned out, the piece of copper that I have sworn to is here, this is it, it was on our premises on the forenoon of the 8th of November, I had it then in my hand, I am positive to it being our property. The value of the bolt is four shillings.

Prisoner's Defence. I was hired to carry this bag for five shillings, I have a large family.

GUILTY , aged 45,

Confined six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

18. MARY TILL and MARIA WRIGHT were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of November , from the person of James Lock , a watch, value 2 l. two dollars and seventeen shillings, and four one-pound bank notes, his property .

JAMES LOCK . I live at Mill-bank Row, Westminster. On the 11th of last month I was in the Nag's Head public-house, Tothill Street, about ten o'clock, the two prisoners came in, I was drinking gin and water, I asked them to take some to drink, which they did, I sat there some time, and when I went out, they went out along with me. It rained very hard, I said I thought I should be locked out of my lodgings, Mary Till said she had a room, if I liked to go home with her for an hour or two, I told her I would go home with her, I went to her room, I sat myself down by the side of the bed, they were striking to get a light, and I fell fast asleep when they were getting a light, and in about an hour and a half I awoke by hearing the door shut, I found my stockings and shoes off, I felt for my pocket-book it was gone, and my purse was taken from my left hand breeches pocket, and my watch was gone also. I have it here now. I found my pocketbook on my left thigh, I felt inside of my pocket book, I found my notes were gone. I asked Mary Till if she new any thing of my money.

Q. Was the other prisoner present then there. - A. No. I asked Mary Till if she new any thing of my purse, my money, and my watch, she said no. I got off the bed and opened the window, I desired the watchman to come up and give me a light, in the mean time he was coming up stairs she told me that my watch was on the mantle piece, I found it there.

Q. How came you not to look there. - A. It was dark. The watchman came up and gave me a light, I asked Mary Till where the other prisoner was, she declared that she knew nothing of her, or of any money. I desired the watchman to go with me and take her to to the watch-house, he did and delivered her up to the night officer. Some of the notes have been found, and Mr. Edward's the gentleman that I took the notes off, is here to identify them

RICHARD WESTBROOK . I am a constable. On the 11th of November about five in the morning, Mary Till was brought into the watch house by the watchman and the prosecutor, the prosecutor charged her with robbing him of four one pound notes and twenty-five or twenty-six shillings. I searched Till, I found nothing on her. On the next day I got a description of Wright. Cooper, I and the prosecutor went to the Fountain in Old Round Court, in the Strand. The prisoner Wright came in with two women, the prosecutor pointed out Wright, we took her into a private room and searched her, we found twelve shillings and sixpence on her, Cooper took her to Queen Square office; and I went to the watch house and took Till; on our way to the office Till said that she did not rob the man, but Wright did. Till said she had lodged her halves of the money in Mary Johnson's hands in the adjoining room to hers. I directly went to Mary Johnson 's lodging, I found in the table drawer this purse containing two one pound notes.

Q. (to Prosecutor.) Look at these two notes - A. I am not a scholar, the notes I took of my master, he can speak to them. I believe his name is Thomas Edwards.

THOMAS EDWARDS . Q. Are you the master of Lock. - A. He is employed by my father. The notes I can speak to, I paid Lock eight on the 9th of November, these are two of them.

Q. (to Lock.) Had you been drinking. - A. I cannot say I was perfectly sober, I was sensible.

Q. You being with two women I thought you mightbe a little intoxicated. - A. I cannot say I was intoxicated.

JOSEPH COOPER . I apprehended Maria Wright in company with Westbrook, on Monday the 11th of November, between ten and eleven in the morning. We found her in the Fountain public house, the prosecutor indentified her immediately, we searched her and found two dollars, one shilling and sixpence. I took her to the office. I went to Mary Johnson 's room and found this green purse.

Prosecutor. This is my purse.

MARY JOHNSON . Q. Do you know the prisoners at the bar. - A. Mary Till came into my room about three o'clock on the Monday morning, she said that she had something that she wished to leave with me, I said she might. I did not see what it was, I never saw it at all.

Till said nothing in her defence.

Wright's defence. I know nothing about this young woman, nor yet about the prosecutor. I never saw them that evening.

TILL, GUILTY , aged 27.

WRIGHT, GUILTY , aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

19. REES REES and ROBERT TURNER were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of November , one hundred pound weight of lead, value 8 s. the property of Peter Steward and Mary Scotland , affixed to a building of theirs .

SECOND COUNT for like offence, stating it to be affixed to a building of Peter Steward 's.

AND THIRD COUNT, affixed to a building of Mary Scotland 's.

PETER STEWARD . Q. Had you the care and superintendance of a house in St. Giles's , in November last. - A. I had. It was an empty house. I received the rent of the house while it was tenanted and paid the rent to Mary Scotland . I received it as executor for the family, and Mary Scotland as an executrix with me of her deceased husband, he received the rent in his life time, it is a leasehold house. I had suspicion of the house being robbed on the 17th of November, between eight and nine at night. I, Mr. Salmon, and other officers went to this house, we went up stairs, at the second pair of stairs Mr. Salmon called to the people to come along, they came up stairs, and immediately after I presume the prisoners came down stairs, they are differently dressed now to what they were then.

Q. You cannot swear to either of the prisoners. - A. No. They were immediately handcuffed. Mr. Salmon asked them what they had been doing there, one of them said they have been throwing my hat into the room, and I was obliged to come in after it; they were handcuffed and left with the people below. I went up to the third pair of stairs, the back gutter of the house was entirely taken out, it laid in the room at full length, it was not cut at all. The front gutter had been carried away the night before.

- SALMON. I am an officer of Bow Street, on Sunday the 17th of November I went on this search, I took Mentz and Godfrey in the house and three other Patrols of Bow Street. I went up stairs with Mr. Steward, Mentz and Godfrey, it was about a quarter past eight, it was quite dark, we took a candle, the street door was locked, and opened by the prosecutor to let us in. I entered the lower part of the house, I found the cellar flap tore up in the back yard, it appeared that they got into the house that way, we went up two pair of stairs before we discovered any body, while I was standing upon the second floor landing, I thought I heard a footstep above me. I said to Mentz here is somebody in the house, look out, go up stairs, I was going up with the candle in my hand, I met Rees coming down, I immediately laid hold of him and gave him into the custody of Mentz. I was going up stairs, I met Turner coming down, I laid hold of him and gave him into the custody of Mentz and Godfrey, they were handcuffed immediately, I found no other persons there. In the back garret I found a large piece of gutter lead, it appeared whole, that lead was stripped from one end of the gutter to the other, it was completely taken up, and by the damp and wet on the gutter it appeared to me that the lead been recently taken up. This chissell I found upon the parapet wall opposite the window.

THOMAS MENTZ . I was with Salmon, I saw this gutter and saw the lead.

Q. Could you form any observation you made, to say where the leaden gutter was taken from. - A. I should suppose it was taken from the back garret window. I found two holdfasts that night, which had held the lead to the wall, and four the next morning on the parapet wall. I searched the prisoners, on Rees I found two knives.

Mr. Arabin. Q. Did you compare the lead you found in the room to the place from where you say the lead was taken. - A. No. I supposed that was the lead by being there.

The prisoners left their defence to their counsel, and called no witnesses to character.

REES, GUILTY , aged 24.

TURNEL, GUILTY , aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

20. MARY HARCUP was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 18th of November , a watch, value 30 s. the property of Thomas Flowers ; and a sheet, value 7 s. the property of George Taylor .

THOMAS FLOWERS . Q. Do you know the prisoner. - A. Yes, she was at my house the day this happened, I did not see her there, I live in Huggin Lane , I went to work in the morning, I left my watch on the mantle-piece.

JAMES DAVIS . I am a watchman. Mr. Flowers gave me charge of the prisoner for robbing him of a watch. We went into the White Hart, Seven Dials, he pointed her out to me, we brought her out and took her towards the watch-house, she began to be restive, she dropped herself down on an area in Monmouth Street, she pulled a watch out of her pocket and a watchman with me forced it out of her hand, we got her up and there dropped a sheet out of her lap, we took her to the watch-house.

JOHN BAXTER . The prisoner was brought to the watch-house. The prisoner said the man's wife had given her the watch and sheet to pawn. I produce the watch and sheet.

Prosecutor. It is my watch.

Prisoner's Defence. I was at this man's apartment, we were all intoxicated, his wife gave me the sheet and watch to pledge, and as I came home there was not a pawnbroker's open.

MARY FLOWERS . Q. Did you give her the watch. - A. We had been drinking, I was intoxicated, I cannot say.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

21. OWEN CARTER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of November , a piece of timber, value 9 s. the property of the London Dock company .

SECOND COUNT - for like offence, the property of persons to the jurors unknown.

WILLIAM SCUDDER. I am a bricklayer employed under the London Dock company, I was employed with the prisoner in repairing a house belonging to them in Old Gravel Lane .

Q. Did you on the day laid in the indictment see the prisoner. - A. Yes, about half after six in the evening, it was dark, then he was in Old Gravel Lane with a piece of timber I have now here in his arms, I knew the piece of timber by seeing him take it up from the house that we were repairing for the London Dock company, it laid outside of the house in the street. After he had taken the timber he walked away in the middle of the road, I walked after him, and when he came to the top of Charles Court I asked him what he intended to do with the piece of wood, he said he had seen it lay about the building, it was useless, he said he was going to sell it for beer, I told him to carry it back, it was useful, he did, and laid it down at the place where he had taken it from, and then he was apprehended. The man was in liquor, he did not seem to know what he was doing of.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Confined One Month in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

22. ANN COLE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of November , a damask tablecloth, value 10 s. a napkin, value 1 s. a pair of sugar-tongs, value 5 s. a handkerchief, value 2 s. a yard of cambric, value 7 s. and a pair of stockings, value 5 s. the property of Mary Macdonald , widow.

MARY MACDONALD . I live at 46, Lime Street , the prisoner was my servant, she lived with me from the 7th of September to the 2d of November, she was house-maid .

Q. What do you accuse her of stealing. - A. A damask tablecloth and other things, she stole them and pledged them. I had given her warning to quit, and on her going away she had great objection to my looking in her trunks, I sent for a constable to examine her box by her wish, the constable searched her trunk, and found the duplicates of the things that she had pledged of mine.

JOHN SKEDGE . I am the constable, I searched Ann Cole 's box, I found three duplicates of her mistress's property.

GEORGE SEWERS . I am a pawnbroker, 134 Bishopgate Street, I produce a damask tablecloth pledged in the name of Mary Burton . The duplicate produced by the officer is my duplicate. I know not the person that pawned it, I gave them that duplicate.

MORRIS STOCK . I am a pawnbroker, 130 Whitecross Street, I produce a napkin, handkerchief, sugar-tongs, a remnant of cambric, and one pair of hose. This is my duplicate, I gave it to the prisoner when she pawned the things.

Prosecutrix. The damask tablecloth is mine, and all the other things except the hankerchief, which belongs to a gentleman who lodges with me.

Prisoner's Defence. My mistress owed me money nearly to the amount that I pledged the things for, I asked her for the money two different times, I wanted to buy shoes and stockings.

Prosecutrix. On the evening she went away I paid her her wages and the money. I owed her, I did not know of her pawning the things, she never asked me for the money. I had a good character with her.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

23. ANN STEPHENS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of November , three one-pound bank notes, the property of Thomas Webb , from his person .

THOMAS WEBB . I am a waiter in Denmark Court in the Strand. On the 9th of November, about two o'clock in the morning, in Fleet Street , the prisoner accosted me, and after standing with me about five minutes, she left me; I then missed my three pound notes, I pursued her and took the three one pound notes from her, and had her taken to the watch-house.

ABRAHAM CRESSWELL . I am constable of St. Bride's About half after two the prosecutor brought the prisoner in the watch house, he charged her with robbing him of three one-pound notes, the prisoner, said she had not robbed him, she was very much in liquor. The young man put down the notes, I took the numbers, and as I was folding the notes up the prisoner snatched them out of my hand and put them in her mouth, I saw the notes in her mouth, I went to take them out, she bit my thumb, swallowed the notes, blood and all. I never got the notes.

Prisoner's Defence. I put a bit of paper in my mouth I thought it was my commitment, I never swallowed the notes at all, I spit the paper out of my mouth. I think paper is dry eating without something to drink with it. The prosecutor has got three pound note to appear against me.

Q. (to Prosecutor.) Have you received three pound - A. No.

DANIEL CARROLL . I am a turnpike-man at Paddington, I have known the young woman for two years past, by living at Saffron Hill.

Q. What is she. - A. A straw bonnet maker . I heard she was in trouble, and that she was innocent ofrobbing the man. I immediately went to a public house in Covent Garden. I gave two pounds to the prosecutor's friend, he said he was afraid of taking it himself, but to give it to his friend and he would not appear. I have got a pound of silver now in my pocket, he said he was afraid to take it, for fear of the constable.

Prosecutor. He wanted to put the money in my hand, I would not take it, he gave two pound to a man that I know nothing of. I had seen the man before. As to the other pound I am certain I never received it, and I will take my oath I never saw the notes that that man took from him.

Q. Who is that man. - A. I do not know his name, it is a man that I saw down at Croydon fair. I dont know where he lives.

Q. Do not you expect to receive the two pound after the trial is over. - A. He promised to meet me at a house in Covent Garden.

Jury. How came your friend to meet you at that house. - A. I met him there.

Q. It is possible to meet a man twice by chance, it does not frequently occur, you told him the circumstance and went there to meet that man. - A. No. I did not go to meet him.

- CRESWELL. When I asked him were he lived, he gave me his name Thomas Williams , No. 2, Vauxhall Road, he did not appear at Guildhall the first day.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

24. SAMUEL HARRIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of November , a cloth pelisse, value 50 s. the property of Joseph James Long , in his dwelling house .

EDWARD WILLIAMS . I am shopman to Mr. Joseph James Long , in the Minories . On the 8th of November, in the evening I stood behind the counter in the shop, I saw the prisoner rush out of the shop, he had taken a pelisse that stood on the horse, two yards inside the shop. I ran to the door and called stop thief, I saw the prisoner running across the street, I pursued him towards Aldgate, he crossed Aldgate and proceeded towards Church Alley, I called stop thief and two gentlemen stopped him, the constable came and took him to the watch-house.

Q. Did you lose sight of him - A. I did. I am certain he is the same man, he dropped the pelisse about six yards from the shop.

FRANCIS KINNERSLEY . I was going down the Minories, I heard the cry of stop thief. I pursued the prisoner until two gentlemen stopped him. I took him into custody. This is the pelisse.

JOSEPH JAMES LONG . It is my pelisse, I live at No. 147, Minories. I keep the house, the pelisse is worth fifty shillings.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going along the Minories, it began to rain very hard, which compelled me to take shelter in the prosecutor's house, and when I was about thirty yards from the house, a young man passed me going towards the house calling stop thief, he then came and seized me. I know nothing of the charge. I am a taylor by trade, he cannot say that I was seen to steal, nor was any property found on me.

GUILTY, aged 17

of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

25. JOHN SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of November , twelve mats, value 12 s. the property of John Mason Sen. and John Mason Jun.

JOHN MASON JUN. I am in partnership with my father. We are seedsmen and flourists in Fleet Street, we have a warehouse in Lombard Street . On the 18th of November, about eight in the evening, I observed the prisoner coming out of the warehouse with a bundle of mats on his shoulder, I let him pass me conceiving it to be one of our men. Immediately afterwards our warehouseman came and locked the warehouse, I asked him if he had delivered any mats to any person, he said he had not. I immediately followed the prisoner and charged him with taking the mats out of our warehouse. The prisoner said he was going to take them to the Bell and Crown, Holborn. I told him he had taken them out of our warehouse, he must take them from whence he had them, he returned with them down Lombard Street towards the warehouse, and then he told me that he had got them out of Thames Street. I told him I would go with him to the place from whence he had them. We were opposite of the Anchor public house in Water Lane. He threw the mats down and ran off, he ran up a dark passage, I followed him, he dared me to approach him, I immediately called for help and jumped upon him, and brought him down to the Anchor public house, he then said if I would not hurt him or those implicated with him, he would tell me the whole particulars how he came by them. I immediately sent home and they brought a constable, and he was taken into custody.

Mr. Knapp Q. Did not you understand him to say that he had them from the warehouse-keeper. - A. No.

Q. Is he with you. - A. No, he is gone. I have not seen him since the day after the affair happened. These are the mats, I believe they are our property.

Prisoner's Defence. I was never in his warehouse in my life, nor scarce know where it is, he has stated many things that are not true. I had these mats from his servant to carry to the Bell and Crown.

The prisoner called three witnesses who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 68.

Confined Six Months in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

26. GEORGE BELLINGER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of October , a cow, value 20 l. the property of John Riley .

Mr. Alley, counsel for the prosecution declining to offer any evidence, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

27. JAMES M'COY was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Mary Butler , about the hour of one on the night of the 23dof November , with intent the goods therein to steal .

WILLIAM COMBS . Q. Do you know Mary Butler . - A. Yes, she lives at 14, Baker Street North, in the parish of Marybone .

Q. Were you at that house on the 13th of November last. - A. I was.

Q. You were at that time living at Mrs. Butler's house as a visitor. - A. I was, I had been to the Theatre, I returned about twelve o'clock, Mrs. Butler was gone up to bed and the two maid servants. I took a little refreshment, I said to my daughter, Betsy, get the the boot jack, she said father there is one in the kitchen. She went with the candle to get the jack, as she was passing the yard door which leads to the kitchen head, she saw the door latch move which leads into the back yard; she seeing the latch of the door move returned and says, father, there is somebody at our back door, I says you only imagine so, come, come, take a light and follow me, when I was at the landing of the stair head I saw the latch of the door move myself, I said there is somebody there, I'll soon see who it is. I took the alarm bells off and put them on the mat, two bells. I undid and took off the wooden bar, after that I unbolted the top and bottom bolt, and then immediately the door was forced open from the outside, a man presented himself at the door of course.

Q. Who is that man. - A. The prisoner I suppose. I have no doubt of it. I shoved the bar against him to prevent him coming in, but he forced himself in. He came in and I went of the right hand side of him, I gave him a shove over down the kitchen stairs, down he went neck and crop, I fell down after him, I do not know who was down first, he or me, we had a scuffle at the bottom of the stairs, and I hove him over and kept him down. I then said d - n you let go me, he said you b - r what are you going to do with me, I said to beat his bloody jemmy or head, I don't know which, one of the two. I punched him with my right hand in the dark, a light came at the stair head, and he and I were at the bottom, as such I beat him prettily on both sides, by that time the watchman came, and then I discovered it was the prisoner. The watchman said let him alone, we will take care of him. No said I, I will know him again to-marrow, so I kept hammering at him until they took him away, they dragged him up stairs and said they would take him to the watch-house, I followed them. A woman met him in the street and said Jemmy my dear where is your hat. I said d - n you, if you come here, I will give you a topper.

WILLIAM GLOVER . Q. Were you at this house of Mrs. Butler's. - A. I was on a visit there for the first time. An alarm was given that somebody was there. I made the best of my way to him, to assist him instantly, and as the prisoner came in I saw two more men apparently down the yard. I shoved the door to and put my back to it, and put my foot against the bannisters of the stairs, and bolted it before they could rush in.

Q. Did you find them press against the door. - A. Yes. When I got the upper bolt and the bottom bolt in, I heard the rattle spring. Then all was quiet at the door, I heard no more. The watchmen came in with their lanthorns and took him in custody.

Jury. Is the yard at the back of the house inclosed. - A. Yes, all round, they must have got over a gate and through a cow layer to get to the yard, and then to get over a brick wall to get into the yard.

- HINCHCLIFFE. I was going one o'clock, we heard a rattle spring, the young woman said make haste my father will be killed, we were not a minute before we went into the house and secured the prisoner. There was a woman at she door when we came out, she said Jemmy where is your hat. The prisoner was without his hat, a watchman picked it up in Park Street.

Q. (to Mr. Combs.) Mrs. Butler is a single woman is not she. - A. Yes.

Prisoner's Defence. I was out of my mind in liquor, I did not know what I did.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 35.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

28. THOMAS BRITTEN was indicted for that he, on the 3d of November , was servant to William Benson , and was employed and entrusted by him to receive money and valuable securities for him, and that, being such servant , and so employed and entrusted, did receive and take into his possession the sum of five shillings, and two one pound bank notes .

WILLIAM BENSON . I keep a sale shop , 61 and 62 Houndsditch. On or about the 3d of October last Mr. Potter came and gave an order for a coat, which the prisoner took measure for; Mr. Potter not coming for it at the time that he had promised, the prisoner said on the 22d,

"I will take the coat home, I can ride without any expence, and I will leave it with Mr. Potter at Walthamstow ," the prisoner said he should go down on the next Sunday, he would leave it as he passed. On the Monday morning when he came again, I asked him how Mr. Potter liked his coat, he said he had not seen him, he was gone to church, I said is it not paid for then, he said no. A few days after I went out and when I came home I was informed that Mr. Potter had been to our house, I asked the prisoner if Mr. Potter had paid him, he said no, he only went over the way with him and had a glass of liquor to drink with him, he said on the following Sunday he would go and ask Mr. Potter for it. On the Saturday night I asked the prisoner if he would go, he said no, he should not be able to go, he had appointed to dine with his mother and sister; on the Monday he came again to the shop as usual and on the Tuesday, on the Wednesday he did not come. I understood by our boy that Mr. Potter was coming by our door, I addressed Mr. Potter, he said he had paid for the coat. I never received the money for the coat. Then on the Thursday when he came to the shop I had him apprehended.

Q. What was the coat to cost. - A. Two pound five shillings.

Mr. Alley. This is what you call a felony and embezzlement in the indictment. - A. Yes.

Q. This man being a likely man you employed him to invite the customers in. - A. Yes.

Q. You gave him a tester in nine. - A. Yes, in nine shillings one sixpence, that is usual in the trade, he had lived with me a year and a half.

Q. This man at Walthamstow was a stranger to you and a friend of the prisoner's - A I knew he was a stranger to me. I found afterwards that he was a friend of the prisoner.

Q. I ask you upon your oath when your barker produces a customer to you, do not you allow that he shall enter it as a matter of credit to his own account. - A. By no means, our shop is in the ready money way. He took the coat from me to bring home the money on the Monday morning.

Q. Did not he after your enquiry for the two pound five shillings, tell you that he had unfortunately lost the money, but that you should be paid. - A. No.

Q. I believe he was going to quit your service. - A. Not as I know.

Q. Upon your oath had not he given you warning that he was going to set up in business, and after that you had him apprehended. - A. Not before I sent for an officer to take him

MR. POTTER. I live in Walthamstow in Essex, I am a mealman and corn-dealer. On my coming down Houndsditch from the corn market, I saw the prisoner at the front of the shop, upon my seeing him, he being an old acquaintance of my brothers and my friend. I thought I wanted a coat, I asked him if he could suit me for one, he answered me, walk in Sir, I will suit you with one of the best. I tried on several coats, but I did not approve of them, he persuaded me to look at a piece of cloth a remnant, which he could recommend me. I looked at it, and he as a friend persuaded me to have a coat made of the same piece, he took measure of me, and we agreed for the piece five and forty shillings, that is all that passed then. On the Sunday morning the prisoner brought the coat to my house, I gave him two one pound notes and a dollar. When I went to the next Wednesday's market I did not see the prisoner, on the Wednesday week's market. I accosted him Old Friend you owe me sixpence, he replied Oh yes Sir, I know I do, we will drink it out, we went over the way and had a glass of rum and water and a biscuit. On the next Wednesday's market I was accosted by Mr. Benson, how do you do Sir, how does your coat fit, I told him I hardly knew, I only put it on when my Old Friend brought it, he followed me to the end of the shop like a bailiff, I was afraid of a touch on the shoulder, I said I have paid for the coat, he said have you Sir, I said yes I have, he said he had heard nothing of it. I went home, on the Thursday night he came down to my house with an officer, to apprehend me, I suppose I was not at home, he left orders for me to appear before the Lord Mayor on Friday morning following, I was prevented by business, I could not attend. On the Friday night I was coming home, Mr. Benson's brother and an officer accosted me and said they had a summons for me. In the discourse between Benson's brother and the officer, I heard Benson's brother say he is a going to live with Mr. Smith that has opened a shop down our street, and we must banish that.

Mr. Alley. You would not have gone into Benson's shop for a coat except for your old friend Britten. - A. I should not have gone into the shop except for him. I thought he was one of the firm.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

29. JOHN DAVIS was indicted for feloniously making an assault in the King's highway, on the 9th of November , upon John Smith , putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, three three-shilling bank tokens, one shilling, and ten one-pound bank notes, the property of Thomas Smith .

THOMAS SMITH . I am a cotton manufacturer , I live in Grey Eagle Street, Spitalfields. On the 9th of November I sent John Smith my nephew to Sir James Esdaile 's with two five guinea Birmingham bank notes to be changed for Bank of England notes.

JOHN SMITH . Q. How old are you. - A. Fourteen next birth day. On the 9th of November between the hours of one and three o'clock, I was going to Sir James Esdaile 's to get two five-guinea Birmingham notes changed for Bank of England notes, and on my returning home, opposite of the London Tavern, the prisoner came after me and tapped me on the shoulder and said, the notes that I presented at Sir James Esdaile 's were forgeries, and I was his prisoner and must go back with him to the banker's. After we had gone twenty or thirty yards back, he said he could not go back to the banker's, he had other business to transact, he asked me where I got them, I told him my uncle gave them to me to get them changed, he said he should take me to Bridewell, and said,

"give me the money, you are not fit to be trusted," he asked me where my uncle lived, I told him in Grey Eagle Street, he asked me how far that was off, I told him about three quaters of a mile, he asked me if I could bring my uncle to Sir James Esdaile 's within an hour, I told him I thought I could, he said,

"go, make haste, be no longer than an hour," and I went. I gave him the notes when he threatened to send me to Bridewell and said, give them to me. I gave them to him as if he had a right to them.

Q. Look at him, are you sure he is the man. - A. Yes, I heard that a man of the same description was taken to the Compter, I went there to see him. I am certain he is the man.

Prisoner. Q. Did not you say at the Poultry Compter, that you believed I was the man. - A. I did, I had not a doubt in my own mind, and when I had a full view of you I said you were the man.

Prisoner's Defence. I could bring an Admiral and other officers of the British Navy to give me a character. I assure you they have taken me for the wrong person.

GUILTY, aged 26,

Of stealing from the person, but not with violence .

Transported for Life .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

30. CHARLES JOHN LEPOER MORPHEW was indicted for that he, on the 28th of May, in the 46th year of his Majesty's reign, did marry Elizabeth Armstrong , spinster. And that he afterwards, on the 14th of October , feloniously did marry and take to be his wife one Martha Baer , widow , his former wife being then alive .

Mr. Scarlet, council for the prosecution declining to offer any evidence, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

31. JOSEPH FISHPOOL was indicted for burglariously breaking entering the dwelling-house of James Hill , about the hour of ten on the night of the 26th of October , and stealing therein, a snuff box, value 5 s. a silver mounted pipe, value 30 s. a silver segar tube, value 4 s. his property .

Prisoner. I have been tried for this offence, and convicted of felony.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

32. JAMES NASH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of November , eight pound weight of bristles, value 36 s. the property of John Pigg .

EDWARD COMMANDER . I am foreman to Mr. Pigg, brush-maker ; the prisoner is an apprentice to Mr. Pigg. I received information from Mr. Brown, stating that he had seen the prisoner Nash in Blue-coat-fields with hairs, I informed Mr. Pigg of it; an officer was sent for, and the prisoner called down stairs, and charged with the theft.

Q. When was this - A. The 12th of November. The prisoner denied it. He was informed that if he would make an ingenious confession he should not be prosecuted. He then said the bristles were at one Clowes a shoemaker in Chapman-street, Commercial-road; the officer and myself went there, we found the bristles between two and three pounds, worth fifteen shillings. The prisoner Nash was with us, he pointed out the place. We then went to Field; he told us that he had sold the bristles that he had received from Nash to Mr. Brown in Ratcliffe Highway; and had given Nash the money. Nash said, if it was the employers wish to transport Field he would do all in his power to do it.

MATTHEW BROWN . I am a brush-maker in Ratcliffe Highway. On the 11th of November I met the prisoner Nash with some hairs under his coat; I said to him, you have some lilly white hairs; he said, yes. I thought he seemed confused and wished to conceal them. I had suspicion that he had stolen them; Mr. Pigg had been to me a few days before to borrow such an article. The next morning I saw the foreman, I told him my suspicion, and that I had bought hairs of the prisoner Field two or three times. I had purchased hairs of Field three times.

GEORGE PARTRIDGE . I am a constable. I apprehended Nash and Field. I asked Field what he had done with the hair that he received from Nash; he said if Nash had done wrong it was unknown to him, that he had brought hair to him, and he had sold it three different times to a Mr. Brown in Ratcliffe Highway. I have the bristles I found at Mr. Clowes.

Commander. My master had such bristles as these; it is impossible to identify them when they are loose as they are now.

The prisoner Nash left his defence to his counsel.

GUILTY , aged 16.

Fined 1 s. and discharged.

JAMES NASH . I am an apprentice to Mr. Pigg.

Q. In November last, and some time before November had you any acquaintance with the prisoner Field - A. When I was with my late master I became acquainted with Field about a twelvemonth ago; he did some business for my late master; When he was failing he had the turning of me over to Mr. Pigg of Wapping Wall.

Q. When had you any conversation with Field about any hairs - A. When I was at Mr. Hills I did the business for him when he was out of the way, and Field was put in the house to let it; he did let it, and he was to take some of the things to sell. After I was turned over to Mr. Pigg I had a small parcel of hairs to sell, about seven ounces; I applied to Field, he sold them for Mr. Hill. After I had been with Mr. Pigg about a week he applied to me for more bristles to sell; he bought them of me, and paid me; the first sum that I received was four shillings, they came to five shillings and sixpence, eighteen pence he kept for himself. The next I received was nine shillings and two brooms, he said he kept the rest for commission, I do not know what he received. The next parcel he received was one pound five shillings and eleven pence, he said he only got twenty two shillings for them; he gave me a pound, and said he kept the rest for commission.

Q. You kept all this money yourself - A. Yes; I did not bring it to account to my master.

Field's Defence. I never applied to him for any hairs in my life; Nash applied to me to sell the hairs to Mr. Brown, and I believed them to be taken from his late master, Thomas Hill, for board wages.

NOT GUILTY.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

33. JOHN COLMAN, alias VALLEISH , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of November , twenty pieces of Spanish gold coin, called doubloons, value 84 l. the property of John Pierre Gotty , from his person .

JOHN PIERRE GOTTY . I am a Dutchman.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. Yes, three days before, and I believe he took my money. My money was in my pocket-book, and my pocket book was in my waistcoat pocket, and my passport was with my money. When I went to bed I put my waistcoat under my head.

Q. What was in the pocket book - A. Twenty doubloons and my passport; a doubloon in Spain is worth sixteen Spanish dollars. In the morning I got up at six o'clock, I could not find the waistcoat, the doubloons were gone, and the passport. I found the pocket-book, there is nothing in it.

MR. SHAW. I live at No. 18, Butcher-row , I keep a lodging-house there.

Q. Do you remember Gotty the prosecutor coming to your house - A. Colman the prisoner brought him to my house to lodge; they both slept together in one bed. When Colman first brought Gotty was on the Friday evening; he then asked me whether I had room; I said, yes; he then said he had plenty of money, that is the prosecutor had, and on the next morning they both came to my house, they breakfasted and dined at my house; they went to bed at ten o'clock. In the morning Gotty told me in the presence of Colman that Colman attempted to get out of the window, and he opened it for that purpose, andthat he had lost all his money. Upon that I sent for an officer, but the officer was not up. They both went out together at six o'clock in the morning. The prisoner took the prosecutor to a bad house. This was before we had the conversation.

Q. How do you know that - A. The prosecutor told me so. About twenty minutes after eight, after they had been out, I saw the officer search the prisoner, there was found on his person two three shilling pieces, two sixpences, and a few halfpence in his pocket. Inside of his stocking was found one doubloon, towards the heel under his foot. Previous to the prisoner being searched the prisoner said he had no money.

THOMAS DARBY . I am a constable. On the 9th of November I went to Mr. Shaw's house, I searched the prisoner, I found one doubloon inside of his stocking close to the heel. He said he had no money. This is the doubloon.

Prosecutor. I had lost money the same as this; I cannot speak to it particular.

Prisoner's Defence. That doubloon belongs to me; I received it of a captain.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

34. MARY HAMILTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of July , a printed cotton curtain, value 12 s. the property of John Holmes Gibson .

JOHN HOLMES GIBSON . Q. You are a notary-public , living in Lombard-street - A. Yes, I am.

Q. The prisoner was a servant living in your house - A. She was.

Q. In the summer time you and your family sleep in the country - A. Yes, and left the prisoner in the house.

Q. On the 7th of September you discovered your house had been robbed - A. Yes. I lost a great number of things, and amongst others a printed cotton curtain. I asked the prisoner where it was the thieves had broken into the house; she said she supposed that they must have staid in the house all night, as there was no appearance of violence about the premises. I had two clerks that slept in the house, I enquired of them if they secured the door, they informed me that they had every thing safe before they went to bed. The prisoner then informed me that she found the door shut, but the fastenings taken down; that when she came down in the morning she found a bundle of clothes tied up and left in the parlour, which she supposed the thieves had left, being disturbed. I then examined the drawers in the parlour, the clothes and wearing apparel; nothing was gone, they apparently were not open. This bundle I saw, it was in the parlour, it consisted of no great value, the drapery of the beds: and these drawers contained valuable things. I then went up stairs with the prisoner into the dining-room and examined the side-board where plate was kept; she informed me that she had lost two table-spoons and two tea-spoons and they had left the same quantity. I found a number of things gone; the curtains had been taken down, she was to unpick them and wash them, and that part in question was taken away; I asked her how many curtains were taken away; she said she did not know, they were all taken away in the night. The curtain in question and two others. On the night of the 6th, about a month before the robbery, she kept the key of the bed-room in her pocket, it was a new thing for her to do. I sent for an officer, and she was taken in custody; he searched the prisoner, nothing was found upon. The officer took her down stairs. He then went up for his hat, and as he came down stairs she made her escape. I offered a reward of five guineas for apprehending her, she was not apprehended until the 15th of November in our street; she was in a state of intoxication.

CHARLES STUBBING . I am a pawnbroker in the Minories. This curtain was pawned on the 30th of July for five shillings. I believe the prisoner to be the person that pawned it. I cannot swear positively.

Prosecutor. This is my curtain, it is worth twelve shillings.

Prisoner's Defence. Not guilty at all.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Confined Six Months in Newgate . and fined 1 s.

London jury before Mr. Recorder.

35. WILLIAM CRAWLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of December , a pair of pantaloons, value 18 s. and three pair of drawers, value 10 s. 6 d. the property of Robert Romanis .

ROBERT ROMANIS . I am an hosier in Cheapside . On the 3d of the present month, between five and six o'clock, a person came into my shop and asked if I had lost any thing; I answered I was not conscious of having lost just at that time; he asked me if I should know my own goods; I answered in the affirmative. Then another man came in with a bundle, which I recognised to be my goods.

GEORGE WAUGH . I am an officer. On Tuesday coming up Wood-street, between five and six in the evening, I saw the prisoner turn out of Wood-street into Clements-court, about four yards down the court he stooped down and wrapped something up; I stepped up to him and said, my friend, what have you got here; he said, nothing but my own; he seemed to be going off in a great hurry; I said, stop, I have not done with you yet, what have you got; he said, stockings. I put my hand upon the bundle and felt buttons; I said, come along with me, or tell me where you got these things; he said, I will shew you the man; we went on a few yards; I said, where does this man live; he said he could not find him. I then said you have stole these things; he then said he had them of them little boys. I asked one of the boys, he said he did not know any thing of him. I took him into a public-house and opened the bundle; I then took him to the Compter. I went afterwards to Mr. Romanis, he claimed the property.

Prosecutor. These are my property, they were in a tray at the door.

Prisoner's Defence. I never was in confinement before in my life.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

36. ELIZABETH TIBBLES was indicted for feloniouslystealing, on the 9th of November , four yards of serge, value 4 s. and one pair of stockings, value 4 d. the property of Mary Tibbs .

MARY TIBBS . I live in Church-street, St. Giles's , I have a front-room in the second floor. The prisoner lodged in the same house three days.

Q. Is it a house where they lodge at so much a night - A. Yes, some do. About three weeks ago I went out of an erand, and when I returned home she had taken the serge and the stockings; the serge she sold to Mr. Cooper, he keeps a rag-shop, and the stockings were found upon her.

JOHN BAXTER . I am keeper of the watchhouse. The prisoner told me where she had sold the serge; I went with her to the shop it was delivered to me.

Prisoner's Defence. I am very sorry for what I have done; it is the first offence. I had been drinking.

GUILTY , aged 50.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

37. ANN POWELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of November , a pewter cyder pot, value 2 s. the property of William Berrington .

WILLIAM BERRINGTON . I am a publican , I keep the George in Monmouth-street . The prisoner came to my house on the 8th of November for a pint and a half of porter, I served her in a pewter quart cyder pot; she told me she lived at Mr. Caton's on the other side of the way. I had never seen her before, I had suspicion of her; I watched her; she went nearly to the bottom of St. Andrew-street, then I laid hold of her and took her into the Swan public-house, I left her with the landlord. I went to Mr. Caton's to enquire whether she lived there, she never had lived there.

Q. What became of the beer - A. The beer was in the pot at the time. She then told me that she was going to take it to No. 18, Litchfield-street to warm it; I went there and they informed me that she had stole a pair of sheets; Mr. Caton told me that she had robbed them of a shawl.

Q. Did you find out where this girl lived - A. No.

Prisoner's Defence. The man credited me the pint and half of beer. I told him I lived with Mr. Caton. I had lived there. I told him I should pay him for the beer the next day. When he laid hold of me I told him I was going to have some supper with a friend at Hooper's-court, Litchfield-street. I never said 18.

GUILTY .

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

38. THOMAS DOBBINS was indicted for feloniously making an assault in the King's Highway, on the 19th of November , upon William Smith , taking from his person and against his will, a watch, value 10 l. and two gold seals, value 2 l. the property of William Smith .

WILLIAM SMITH . On the evening of the 19th of November I was going with Mr. Blackwell from Warwick-court, Holborn, to Skinners-street, Somerstown. I set out of Warwick-court rather before five, it was just dusk; Mr. Blackwell took hold of my arm.

Q. What are you - A. A master bricklayer . We came arm in arm together until we crossed the New-road, Judd-place, Somerstown ; when we came there we were just upon the act of crossing, two people met us in the road, we rather leaned to give way for them to pass, and I believe the prisoner was the nearest to and the tallest of the two; they met us in contact, he struck his arm against my breast; he knocked me back a little, and he snatched my watch out instantly. I felt my watch go immediately he struck me; I said to Mr. Blackwell, one of these fellows has snatched my watch out of my pocket; Mr. Blackwell said, there they go; the other one ran away, the prisoner walked on. I went after the prisoner and catched him by the collar, he put himself in the attitude of fighting I said you have stolen my watch; he said, no, I have not got your watch; I said I do not suppose you have got it. A person came out of a door and said, is that you Mr. Smith; I said, yes. The prisoner then said I know you Mr. Smith, and you know me very well; I said, I do not know you from Adam; he told me his name was Dobbins, he lived in Chapel-path. He said he was willing to be searched; I said, I believe there is no need of searching you now, you have given your partner the watch. I let go of him. Some people said he lived in Chapel-path, I said I should find him the next day. The next morning I went to enquire if such a person did live there, I found he did reside there. I went to Hatton Garden and got two officers, and on the 21st he was apprehended.

Q. Did you ever get your watch again - A. No, nor the seals.

Mr. Alley. Were you sober - A. I was as sober as I am now.

Q. The prisoner seems to be a strong active young man, what sort of a man was the man that ran away - A. A shorter man than him.

Q. If you were sure as you have sworn to-day that the prisoner was the man who struck you on the breast and took your watch why did you let him go - A. People came forward and said he was the man that he represented himself to be, and my friend was a little terrified; he said, let him go, we shall be murdered presently, they have given up his name. That is why I gave him up. After I was struck I never lost sight of the man.

Q. On the next day did not the man at the bar go to your house and ask you why you should propagate such a report - A. He did.

Q. Did not he go to your house on the 21st in the morning to make some demand of you - A. He did; I was present.

Q. Did not you then ask him what time of the day you might find him at home, he replied you might find him at home all day - A. The prisoner came to my house again, I told him I would wait upon him athis house as I knew where he lived, because the officers were not come at that time; the officers in a few minutes after came to my house; I said the young man has just been here; we went down to his house and found him at home.

Q. Do you know that there is a reward of forty pounds - A. I have heard so. I do not know the fact.

MR. BLACKWELL. I am a master taylor.

Q. Do you remember on the 19th of November going with Mr. Smith from your house towards Somers-town - A. Perfectly well.

Q. You got to Judd-place near Somerstown, did not you - A. Yes, it was rather dark: as we began to cross the road in the sweeping path I saw these two men coming to meet us about the middle of the road, Mr. Smith rather gave way for them to pass; at the mean time that he gave way one of them struck him on the breast and snatched his watch from him. There were two of them, the tallest man was next to Mr. Smith, and it was the tallest man that gave the blow to Mr. Smith in the breast.

Q. Look at the prisoner and say whether you know him - A. It was the tallest man; I do think it was the prisoner. We never lost sight of him after he gave the blow.

Q. Were there any body else in the road except you two, and these two young men - A. Nobody else at all. Mr. Smith ran after the prisoner when he had only got about four yards off. I do not know which way the other man went.

Q. When Mr. Smith ran after the man that he supposed had struck him were there any other people in the road - A. I saw no one crossing, nor in the path, untill after we took him, there were some immediately then.

Q. Did you see Mr. Smith lay hold of the prisoner - A. Yes, I did, and the prisoner said he had not got the watch; he gave an account where he lived, and his name, and then Mr. Smith let him go. I thought we were somewhat in danger; he gave an account where he lived; some girl or woman came up and said he lived there; we then let him go. I am quite sure the prisoner is the man that Mr. Smith laid hold of and there were two men met us; I am quite sure the prisoner is one of them; I never lost sight of him.

ROBERT STANTON . I am an officer. I only know that I took the prisoner in company with Cook, my brother officer. I apprehended him at his own lodgings, No. 1, Chapel-path. Somerstown; I believe the house to be his father's, he has a room there, he was at work with another person as a shoemaker . Mr. Smith and the prisoner had a few words together, the prisoner said you have not got your watch, you can do nothing with me, I shall be acquitted. I searched his person in the apartment, I found nothing but his working tools.

Prisoner's Defence. My mother came up in the room and the officer took my watch; my mother said, what is the matter Thomas; I said, I do not know, you see what these gentlemen are doing; I said, he has taken my watch, thank God he cannot hurt me because it is my own, and I have paid for it.

Stanton. I took his watch, I have restored it to him.

The prisoner called seven witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

39. JANE LOMAX was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of May , twelve caps, value 24 s. the property of Thomas Sutty .

CATHERINE SUTTY . I am the wife of Thomas Sutty , 29, Duck-lane, Westminster ; I take in army work and give it out. The prisoner worked for me. I missed a dozen of soldier's caps; I was ill at the time, I had the prisoner in my house, I told the prisoner that I had lost the caps, she confessed that she had taken them. About a week or a fortnight after I had lost them, I missed them on a Saturday, the latter end of May, she said she and another woman had cut them in pieces, they were cloth caps, and she sent a girl to Tothill-street; she sold them for three pence a-piece, and brought the money to her. I had a warrant for her, and took her up before the justice; the magistrate knowing her mother he wished to make it up; Justice Fielding asked me how much it would be; I told him I was charged twenty-four shillings; he then said she must produce two pounds, he allowed her till the Wednesday following; I went at the time appointed, and then he said, as she was not there I might take out a bill against her.

JOSEPH COOPER . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner on the 9th of October, she confessed before me the same as she did to Mrs. Sutty.

Mr. Andrews. What account did Mrs. Sutty give of this - A. That they were goods taken from her apartment ready made up.

Prisoner's Defence. Mrs. Sutty employed me to make these caps, I had a misfortune of up-setting a lamp over these caps, and spoiled them. When Mrs. Sutty told me I had the caps I told her I was willing to pay the money, I did not take them out of the house.

MRS. KENT. Q. Did you ever hear any conversation with the prosecutrix about this supposed felony - A. I had. I am a neighbour of the prisoner's mother. Jane Lomax 's mother sent for me, I went to Mrs. Sutty, I told her that I was come from Mrs. Steel in Gardner's place, concerning the caps; this was in October. She said she was charged twenty-four shillings; I said Mrs. Steel is a poor woman, do not charge too much. I am positive that she told me that she gave them to her to make up, that she had spoiled them and sold them.

COURT, Q. to Mrs. Sutty. You say you missed your caps on a Saturday, the latter end or May - A. Yes, and the caps were completely made up at my house. I had seen them in my house a fortnight, they had no oil on them. When I first mentioned it to the prisoner, I said, you stole them out of my cupboard, she said, for God's sake Mrs. Sutty do not let my mother know it, she will go out of her mind. I shewed Mrs. Kent the cupboard from whence they had been taken.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

41. ELIZABETH BUTCHER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of November , a pewter pint pot, value 1 s. 2 d. the property of Joseph Halson .

JOSEPH HALSON . I am a publican , I keep the Mason's Arms in Oxford Market .

THOMAS JONES . On the 16th of November I was going along Charles Street, Oxford Market, a woman pointed out this woman, I searched her and found four pots on her, I took her to the prosecutor.

Prosecutor. That is my pot.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not steal them, I have had beer in them at different times.

GUILTY .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

42. JOHN SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of November , a sheet, value 6 s. the property of Thomas Heath .

THOMAS HEATH . I am a publican in Well Street, Well-close Square . On the 23d of November, between six and seven o'clock, from information, I found the prisoner coming down the second pair of stairs, I told him he had something about him he ought not to have, I took a sheet from round his body, I sent for an officer, I gave him the sheet.

JAMES STIRLING . I am an officer. I produce this sheet.

Prosecutor. It is my sheet.

Prisoner's Defence. I leave myself to the mercy of the court.

GUILTY , aged 46.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and whipped in Jail .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

43. JOHN DAVIS was indicted for feloniously making an assault upon John Brown in the king's highway, on the 11th of September , putting him in fear and feloniously taking from his person and against his will, eleven one pound bank notes, the property of William Brown .

WILLIAM BROWN . I am minister of Gibralter Chapel, St Bethnal Green. On Wednesday the 11th of September, I sent my son off to Masterman's with a one pound note to get changed, and with a ten pound to get changed, eleven in all.

JOHN BROWN. Q. How old are you. - A. Eleven years the 3d of next March. The prisoner met me in the middle of Bishopsgate Church Yard , he said I had been to Masterman's, I said yes, he said there is a mistake in the bill that you have been about, I told him I had been about no bill, I had been to change a country note of one pound, he said,

"aye my little boy it is a forgery," I told him my father knew where he got that from, and the other too; then he asked me whether I had been to any other banking house, I told him, yes, I had been to Ladbrooke's, he asked me what I had received there, I told him I had received ten one pound bank notes for a country note, he said,

"aye my little boy they are both forgeries, your father is a dealer in forged notes, go with me to Masterman's." He laid hold of my hand and took me past the Excise, then he said he would turn back with me and go to my father's, he took me up Broad Street and up Old Bethlem, he then said,

"it is in vain me spending my time, deliver me up the money or I must take you into custody," and he told me to run to my father, and tell him to be at Masterman's in the course of an hour. Then I gave him the notes up

Q. Where were the notes. - A. They were in my pocket.

Q. How came you to take out the notes. - A. He told me he would take me in custody.

Q. Was that the reason. - A. Yes.

Q. You were afraid he would take you in custody, were you. - A. Yes.

Q. Would you have given them up if he had not said that. - A. No. Then I went home to my father.

Q. What became of the prisoner. - A. He went away, I saw no more of him then.

Q. Are you sure he is the man. - A. Yes, I am certain of it. Then on the 16th of November, about four o'clock in the afternoon, my father sent me to Messrs. Barber and Co. to receive a balance due to him, in which they gave me a two hundred pound note. I came directly from Messrs Barber and Company to Messrs. Gibson and Company, where I had to pay about eighty pound within one shilling, I gave the two hundred pound note to them, but they could not give me change, but told me to go to the Bank of England and get four fifty's. I came directly from the Bank of England to Messrs. Gibson and Company. On entering the door the prisoner accosted me, saying,

"you have been to the Bank of England." I said,

"yes, I have," he said,

"after you have been in here, you meet me up by Change Alley, and go with me to the Bank, there is a mistake in the business," he said; I, knowing it to be the same man who stopped me in Bishopgate Church Yard, I said,

"I shall not go in here now at present, you are the very man who robbed me of eleven pound," I caught hold of the sleeve of his coat, he plucked himself from me and ran off, I ran after him and hollowed out,

"stop thief, that man stole eleven pound from me." He ran off, and at the entrance of the post office, there were a few coachmen standing at the end, they stopped him. I told them to take him into custody, for he had robbed me of eleven pound a little while ago.

Q. You are sure he is the same man. - A. I am sure of it.

Q. And then he was taken in custody, was he. - A. Yes, and taken before the Lord Mayor.

Q. Now my boy , when you had left the Excise office and had gone back, you say you went through Broad Street, and then into Old Bethlem - A. Yes.

Q. Now tell me exactly what he said to you, what did he do. - A. He told me to deliver up the notes, or else he would take me in custody, I delivered up the notes then.

Q. How did he take the notes from you. - A. No. in a snatching way, I gave them to him, he had hold of my hand all the while, I was afraid he would put me in prison, and my father would not know where I was gone to.

Q. He did not hurt you or do you any harm. - A. No.

Q. He did not say that he would do any harm to your person. - A. No.

Q. What did you suppose he would charge you with when he took you in custody, - with these forged notes - A. Yes, untill my father came.

Prisoner. Q. What day of the month do you say this was committed. - A. The 11th of September.

Court. What time of the day was it - A. About half past twelve o'clock, in the middle of the day.

JOHN BROWN . I am a constable. On Wednesday the 11th of September, the last witness, John Brown, gave me information of losing this money. On the 16th of November, as he was coming along with some other people with the prisoner, he called to me, and I took the prisoner into custody, I searched him, I found nothing on him but one duplicate, he would not tell his residence.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent of what I am accused of, the boy has learned what he has said like a child going to school. I am deceived by my solicitor; and as that is the case, I leave it to your Lordship and the gentleman of the jury.

GUILTY, aged 26,

Of stealing from the person, but not with violence .

Transported for Life .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

44. WILLIAM JONES alias PRICE was indicted for feloniously making an assault in the King's highway, on the 11th of May , upon Robert Cole , putting him in fear, and feloniously taking from his person and against his will, two one pound bank notes, his property .

The case was stated by Mr. Alley.

ROBERT COLE. On the 11th of May last, about half past ten or eleven in the morning. I was proceeding to the Custom-house to do my business as a ship agent , when I got a small way over the wharf of the tower I observed the prisoner and Norton standing a little way before me, they were at the water side of the wharf as I got up towards them they accosted me and said they had found me out and Jones said, that unless I would give them some money, they would charge me with an attempt to commit an unnatural crime, I told them I was surprized to see them from what had happened at the watch-house, both of them said they could not help it, but they would have money, when I, through fear of exposure in my own neighbourhood of it, I gave them two one-pound notes, one each, they seemed very much dissatisfied and said that would not do, I gave them a few shillings.

Q. To what amount. - A. I could not tell, they then went away and left me, and I proceeded on my business.

Mr. Andrews. This was on the 11th of May last. - A. Yes.

Q. Upon the tower wharf. - A. At the further end of the new buildings of the left hand side from the entrance at the iron gate.

Court. Near the iron gate side. - A. Beyond the first draw-bridge, near the gun wharf.

Mr. Andrews. That is a considerable thoroughfare. - A. It is a thoroughfare.

Q. There is a great many workmen there in the foundery, and there is a centinel between the drawbridge and gun wharf. - A. There is a centinel box on the left hand side of the wharf, but none between the bridge and this place.

Q. Is not there upon your oath between the gate of the tower next Wapping and the draw bridge two centinal boxes. - A. There is one between the gate and the draw bridge, and one between the draw bridge and gun wharf.

Q. Nothing more past between these boys than what you have stated. - A. No. I went to the Custom-house about my business.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

45. WILLIAM JONES alias PRICE was indicted for feloniously making an assault upon Robert Cole in the king's highway, on the 14th of October , putting him in fear and feloniously taking from his person and against his will, two dollars and a one pound bank note, his property .

Mr. Alley counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

46. GEORGE GROOM was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling house of John Mather , no person being therein about the hour of two in the afternoon of the 1st of December, and stealing therein a guinea and ten half guineas, the property of John Kelly .

JOHN KELLY . I live in my master's house, John Mather 's, at Paddington . On Sunday morning I left the house at seven o'clock and left nobody in it, the doors and windows were fast. I returned about three, and when I returned I found the windows and doors safe as I left them. When I went to unlock my box, I found it punched open, I missed ten half guineas and one guinea out of the box.

Q. How long before had you seen them there. - A. I saw them on the Saturday night, they were safe then.

Q. Do you know who took them. - A No. I had a strong suspicion of the prisoner, he was a journeyman carpenter to my master. I had him apprehended, the officer took a guinea and and a half out of his pocket. I lost a guinea and ten half guineas. He confessed to the officer.

Q. Did you hear him. - A. No.

JAMES STONE . I am an officer. Last Monday I apprehended the prisoner at the King's Head, Edgeware Road. I told him what I apprehended him for, he said he knew nothing about it. I searched him, in his left hand breeches pocket I found a guinea and a half, seven shillings and sixpence, he said that was his own.

Mr. Knapp. What did you say to him before he confessed. - A. His master took him of one side and he confessed to his master first.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

47. JOHN HOLLIHAM was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Samuel Bradshaw , Esq . about the hour of one on thenight of the 22d of November , and burglariously stealing there in, four silver tea spoons, value 8 s. a plated tea-pot, value 5 s. three books, value 3 s. the property of Samuel Bradshaw , Esq. a pair of breeches, value 5 s. two pair of gaiters, value 2 s. a brush, value 6 d. and a hat, value 3 s. the property of John Benning .

JOHN BENNING . Q. Did you live with General Bradshaw in November last. - A. Yes, his name is Samuel, his house is No. 5, Market Street, May Fair, in the parish of St. George, Hanover Square .

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar at all. - A. I saw him once before at Marlborough Street, I never saw him before it happened. On the 22d of November, I went to bed between ten and eleven, the housekeeper was in the house, General Bradshaw, the maid, and myself.

Q. What time did the General go to bed. - A. He in general goes to bed about eleven, he was gone to bed when I went.

Q. Before you went to bed did you take any notice of the windows and doors of the house. - A. I did not take any particular notice of them. - The maid is here.

Q. Was she gone to bed at the time. - A. No. I got up in the morning and came down between seven and eight o'clock, when I came down I found the kitchen door open.

Q. Does that door open into the area. - A. No, it is an inner door, I found it open and on my proceeding in the kitchen I saw two of the squares broke.

Q. When these two squares of glass were broke was it possible for any person to put their hand in. - A. Yes, it was possible to be done. Any person putting their hand in at these panes might unpin the window and throw the sash up and get in, there were shutters to the window, the maid is not certain whether she fastened it when she went to bed. They were open on the inside. I then thought that somebody had been in the house. I went up to the maid and told her that the house had been robbed.

Q. You were the first up were you. - A. I was the first up. She said is it possible. I opened the area door. I found a man's shoe and a hat. And the things that are missing, when I see them, I can swear to them. There was missing a tea-pot, washed or plated, I am not certain which, five silver tea spoons, one pair of breeches, two pair of gaiters, one hat, and a clothes brush.

Q. What did you do with the hat and shoe. - A. I took them into the kitchen, I shewed them to the general, and he desired me to take care of them until the officer came. Craig the officer came a night or two afterwards to my master's house, the maid delivered them to him.

Q. Did you notice the hat and shoe. - A. I did. I can swear that the same hat and shoe that I saw the maid gave to Craig, were the hat and shoe that I found in the area.

ELIZABETH NELSON . Q. You lived with the general on the 22d of November did you. - A. Yes.

Q. What time did you go to bed that night. - A. Between the hours of ten and eleven.

Q, The general had not then gone to bed had he. - A. No.

Q. Before you went to bed did you fasten the doors and the windows. - A. I fastened the doors, But the shutters of the window I will not answer for, the sashes were all down and screwed down; that I am certain off.

Q. Did you observe the the kitchen window. - A. I am sure the kitchen window was down and the pin was in.

Q. Then in the morning you were a wakened and told the house had been robbed. - A. Yes.

Q. When you went to bed was all safe in the kitchen. - A. The spoons and the pot, and all was safe when I left it.

CHARLES SLADE . I am a watchman, my beat is in Piccadilly, Albemarle Street, and Dover Street. On the 22d of November, I was going to call half past twelve along Piccadilly. I met the prisoner with a blanket rolled up under his arm, just by the New White Horse cellar, between Albemarle Street and Dover Street, he was coming as if from Hyde Park Corner, he had only one shoe on. I stopped him and asked him what he had got in the blanket, he had a hat on, he said they were a parcel of old things, he lived with Captain Warpole. I touched the blanket and a silver spoon tumbled out, and as he was stooping for the silver spoon the tea pot fell out.

Q. What sort of a tea-pot. - A. It is plated or washed, I cannot tell which; at the time I thought it silver. I saw there was a gaiter or two hanging out, by that I took him by the collar and sprang my rattle, and then he chucked the blanket and the whole of the things down. I held him by the collar till I had a partner come up, then we picked up the things and the blanket.

Q. Some of your partners came up. - A. Yes, one man came, his name is William Gentleman . We picked up the things and took them to the watch-house and the prisoner.

Q. Who carried the blanket and the things. - A. My partner, and at the watch-house my partner delivered the things to Mr. Fell, the constable of the night.

Q. Are you sure that he delivered the very same blanket that fell from the prisoner. - A Yes.

Q. Did the prisoner say any thing. - A. He said they belonged to Captain Walpole , he was going to take them to Stephens's hotel, he was going to sea with his master.

WILLIAM FELL . Q. You were the constable of the night. - A. Yes, I was.

Q. On the 22d of November do you remember Slade and Gentleman bringing you that parcel. - A. I do and the prisoner. I have had it in my possession ever since. The parcel was opened in my presence, and I then tied it up in a parcel.

JOHN RANDLE . On the 22d of November the prisoner came to my house at half after eleven o'clock and called for half a pint of beer. I am a publican. I live in Chappel Street, May Fair. I was in the act of shutting up my house, I told him to drink his beer and withdraw, he asked me whether General Bradshaw had a servant, he appeared to me to be a little in liquor, my wife told him that she did not know I then said why do you ask that question, he said he had a particular reason for asking that question, then said I, go to General Bradshaw's house and make the enquiry, Ihad no information to give him.

Q. Had he any bundle with him. - A. None.

Q. How far is your house from General Bradshaw's. - A. Next door, the house adjoins to it. I shut the door upon him, and saw no more of him that night.

Prisoner. Q. I believe I asked you a bed the same night. - A. I don't recollect that; I stood by all the time.

THOMAS FOY . Q. You are one of the police officers. - A. Yes. In consequence of the general's applying at the office, I was directed by the magistrate to go with Craig and look at the place. On the next morning the 23d we found the window broken as the servant has described it.

Q. Can you take upon yourself to say that after breaking the squares of glass a person might put their hand in and unpin the window and throw the sash up - A. Yes, they might very easy, and afterwards shut it down again. I have no doubt they got in at that window. The servant informed us there was a shoe and a hat found in the area of that house, we desired to look at it, one of the female servants there, said she was sure the hat belonged to one of the servants that did live with the general.

Q. When you looked at the hat and the shoe did you compare the shoe with the prisoner's shoe. - A. I did afterwards. The man servant said that he had taken his hat and left his own. On Friday night the robbery was committed, on Saturday he was committed, on the Monday morning we went to the prisoner and examined the shoe that he had on. He had sold the hat when in prison to a fellow prisoner, he delivered up the hat, and the prisoner did not deny it.

Q. He gave you that hat. - A. Yes, the prisoner told me who he had sold it so, and I called the man he gave me the hat in the prisoner's presence. The hat has been in my possession and Craig's ever since. I marked the hat before ever I gave it out of my possession. I can safely swear that this is the hat the prisoner said he had sold, which the servant said was his. This is the shoe I took off the prisoner's foot, the other shoe was given me by the other young woman in the kitchen and she put her mark on it. I have compared the shoes, they are fellows.

- BENNING. This is my hat. I know it by a crack on the outside, and it has been slightly cleaned once. I know the hat by having it in constant wear. It is the hat I left in the kitchen the night before.

- CRAIG. Q. You have heard Foy's account. - A. Yes, it is true, I kept this hat a little time. It is the same hat.

Prisoner's Defence. I have lived along with different gentlemen in that neighbourhood for seven years. I went to General Bradshaw and left him at my own option. I went over to Ireland and came back, I was very bad and I went into the Lock Hospital. I came out one evening and got rather in drink, stopped out late, as I turned back I went into different houses to get a lodging, I was disappointed. I went down into this area, I saw the window shutter open, I shoved the sash up. I thought to lay there for the night, down the sash came, the glass broke, I will own it.

Q. (to Benning.) Look at these things. - A. That is the general's tea-pot, the cloths brush is my own.

FELL. That cloaths brush I took out of his pocket.

BENNING. That book is my own. I can swear to the spoon, we missed five, we have only one; and I can swear to the gaiter, both pair of gaiters are mine; and the breeches are mine.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 20.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

48. MARY WEBB was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of November , fourteen yards of muslin, value 45 s. the property of Richard Taylor , privately in his shop .

RICHARD TAYLOR . I live in Piccadilly , I am a linen draper . On last Saturday, between the hours of two and three in the afternoon the prisoner came into my shop, she asked to look at some blue printed cotton, there was a piece of that description laying upon the counter, I asked her if that was the sort that she wanted, she said no, she wished for a larger pattern, there were a number of other customers in the shop at the time, I turned from her to speak to the other customers, and then turned to her again and found her coming from the other side of the shop, coming towards me again, I asked her if that pattern would do again, she said no, it would not; she then walked towards the door, I observed her hand up to her cloak as she was going out, as if to conceal something that she had got there, I followed her immediately into the Street, she then attempted to cross the way, I took hold of her by the arm, I said,

"let me see what you have got there," I pulled her cloak a little of one side and saw a piece of muslin, which I took from her and requested her to go back with me, which she did. Before I had been in the shop a minute with the prisoner a man, a stranger to me, brought in three pieces of muslin, and said, the woman has dropped these three pieces.

Q. Was that in the hearing of the woman. - A. I cannot say, it was very close to her. These are the four pieces.

Q. Now Sir, tell me whether you know these pieces are yours. - A. Yes, they are my own marking.

Q. How lately had you seen them in the shop. - A. I had seen them in the morning, they were laying on the opposite counter, the counter from which she came.

Q. What is the value of the one piece that you took from her. - A. About six shillings, the others are about two pound four shillings.

JOHN WORTHY . I am an officer. I searched the prisoner, she had got an eighteen-penny piece and a few halfpence in her pocket, she said she did not know what would become of her, it was distress that made her do it, she had an aged mother to keep.

Prisoner's Defence. I leave myself to the mercy of the court.

GUILTY, aged 24.

of stealing to the value of 4 s. 10 d.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

49. THOMAS WESTON was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Jane Newall , no person being therein, about the hour of four on the 12th of November , and stealing therein, three dollars, value 16 s. 6 d. one bank token, value 1 s. 6 d. and a shilling, her property; and two sixpences, the property of William Newell .

JANE NEWELL. I live at Twickenham . On the 12th of November I went out to work in Mr. Burton's fields between eight and nine in the morning.

Q. Did you leave any body in your house - A. No. I fastened all the doors and windows; I returned at five o'clock, it was near dark then.

Q. When you returned did you find anything the matter with the house - A. Not directly. I came home and made a fire and put on my kettle, and went up stairs to make my bed; I made one bed and went to my box; I found the hasp of my box loose and my money gone; I missed three dollars, an eighteen-penny piece, and a new shilling, and two sixpences out of my sons breeches pocket, they hung on a line from one bed-post to another. After I missed a shirt and a handkerchief.

Q. Are you a single woman yourself - A. I am a widow, the mother of nineteen children.

Q. Did you look into your house to see if it had been broken into - A. The bolt of the window had been lifted up through the hole in the shutter; they lifted up the sash and got in.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. Yes, about ten or a dozen years ago. I have not seen him lately. His parents were neighbours of mine, he was a gardener I believe.

WILLIAM NEWELL . Q. I am son of the last witness. I had two sixpences in my breeches pocket, I hung them over the bed on the Sunday night. On Tuesday night, on my coming home, I heard my mother had been robbed; I found they were gone out of my pocket.

THOMAS NEWMAN . I am a labourer; I live upon Twickenham-common, near Mrs. Newell.

Q. What do you know of her house being broken open - A. I knew nothing of it untill she acquainted me of it. On that afternoon I had seen the prisoner towards the prosecutrix's premises.

ROBERT LAWSON . I went with William Lear to apprehend the prisoner at his father's house, the constable told him he wanted him. This was on Tuesday the same night that the woman's house had been robbed; he gave us three dollars and an eighteen-penny token. We searched him in the cage and found a shilling not much worn and two sixpences.

WILLIAM LEAR . I am headborough of Twickenham. On Tuesday the 12th of November, between seven and eight at night, I apprehended the prisoner at his father's house.

Q. How far is that from Mrs. Newell's house - A. About a quarter of a mile. I asked the prisoner what money he had got in his pocket, he shewed me three dollars, an eighteen-penny piece, and three sixpences. I took the dollars and the eighteen-penny piece from him, and put him in the cage. I then went up to Widow Newell and asked her what property she had lost; she told me three dollars, an eighteen-penny bank token, two sixpences, and one shilling; I went to the cage, I told the prisoner I thought that he had some more money that I wanted; he produced three sixpences and some halfpence, and told me that was all the money he had got. I searched him, in his side pocket I found a shilling, I told him that was what I wanted. It is a shilling that has been but worn a little. This is all the money.

Q. to prosecutrix. Can you speak to the money - A. This shilling I can say is the same; I can take my oath to this shilling; and this is all the money I lost.

Q. Why do you speak to that shilling - A. It is a shilling I had given to my boy. I had it by me a twelvemonth, it wore black.

William Newell . These are my sixpences, one has got a mark, I took notice of that mark.

GUILTY, aged 31.

Of stealing, to the value of 2 s. 6 d. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

50. JOHN WOOD was indicted for feloniously stealing, from the person of Thomas Silvester , on the 25th of November , a pocket book, value 6 d. and a warrant for the payment of one hundred pounds, the property of John Phildes .

THOMAS SILVESTER . I am clerk to Mr. Phildes, of Lambs Conduit-street, he is an upholsterer .

Q. On the 25th of October had you a pocket-book - A. I had, it is a bankers book, it contained a check for an hundred pounds upon Marsh, Sibils, and company. I was going with it to their house in Berner-street, Oxford-street. a little after eleven in the middle of the day. When I got into Oxford-street there was a fire on the opposite side of the street, and the crowd were at the side where I was looking at the fire. As it was necessary for me to pass through the crowd I was very particular of securing my book and buttoning my coat pocket; when I entered the crowd I held my hand for the purpose of securing the book, I had not been in the crowd two minutes before I found myself very much hustled, then I found it necessary that I should use both my hands to get forward, and when I pressed with my hands I perceived I had lost my book, and I am very sure it was not more than a minute before I put my hands down again, I found my pocket lighter and missed the book; I turned round to see who it was pressing behind, I then saw the prisoner with his back turned towards me making from me, and at this instant at my turning round a man that was arm in arm with another man, he pushed me before for the prisoner to escape behind, because I stood they said, d - n you, what do you stand here for, and pushed me violently before them; he then caught hold of another man directly before me, and the prisoner was behind them, the third man was arm in arm between me and the prisoner. At the instant one of these fellows laid hold of the man of the left side I turned round and laid hold of Wood by his shoulder, be then let his left hand man go, and was more violent in cursing me, endeavouring to make me let Wood go. As he was so upon my seizing Wood I was more positive of Wood being the man that had my property; I then called out,

"hold him, a pick pocket, to the crowd around; I succeeded in getting through them. Ifollowed Wood through the crowd at the distance of half a dozen people; the crowd pressed very hard in consequence of my calling out, and Wood could not escape very fast. I then catched hold of him by the collar the second time over two persons heads. It was their breaking my hold the first time that strengthened me that he was the man. I dragged myself up to him, and he pressed forward dragging me after him. I then held him with both my hands, and came before him and accused him of the robbery, he very strongly denied it, and used abusive language, presented the end of his finger and said, I am a taylor , I can get my living. I told him I did not care what he was, I was very certain he had robbed me, I would not let him go. While he was amusing me with his left hand I saw the pocket book fall as if from him; I did not see it in his hand; his right hand was by the side of him; when the pocket book fell as if from him at the same time he began to struggle, and as I saw the book down I let him go in order to secure the book; he was ultimately secured. I only lost sight of him while I picked up the book, he was working away from those that held him through the crowd.

Q. Are you sure he is the same man that you followed through the crowd, and from whom you saw the pocket-book fall - A. Most certain; he was damning the people and saying d - n any man that touches me; I went forward and seized him. This is the book and the warrant. I had not received the money, I was going to receive it. The pocket book and warrant belonged to Mr. Phildes. (The warrant read.)

Mr. Alley. The prisoner was quite a stranger to you before - A. He was.

Q. Is it possible for you to be so accurate to his person - A. I never let him go out of my sight. I never saw his face untill the second time I seized him, and I saw the book come from his person.

Q. Might it not be dropped by somebody else - A. It is possible.

- PRESTON. I am a patrol of Bow-street.

Q. Do you know the prisoner Wood - A. Yes, I assisted in apprehending of him, he was trying to rescue himself from every body. I knew him in the crowd; I have been in the habit of seeing him with other characters about town. I have no doubt of his person.

Prisoner's Defence. I am as innocent of the fact as a child unborn.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

51. THOMAS LOWMAN was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Dawson and Thomas Lipsham , they being therein, about the hour of eight in the forenoon of the 9th of November , and stealing therein a great coat, value 10 s. the property of Thomas Dawson .

THOMAS DAWSON . My house is No. 7, St. James's street , I am a confectioner , Thomas Lipsham is my partner; we rent the house together, and both inhabit the house and sleep there.

Q. When was it you lost this great coat - A. On the 9th of November, about eight o'clock in the morning; I was up at that time; I knew that I had it, I was kept in the back part of the shop.

Q. Do you know how your house was upon the 9th of November, whether it was fast or not - A. I cannot speak to that.

Q. When was it you first missed the coat - A. When the prisoner was brought in with it about eight o'clock. I only know the coat is mine, it is worth ten shillings.

JOHN BERLEYSON . I am a journeyman to Messrs. Dawson and Lipsham. While I was scraping my feet I saw the prisoner come out of the shop, I did not see him go in; he was quite a stranger to me.

Q. Had he any thing with him - A. No, not that I saw. I went in the shop and saw a great coat lay upon a mat near the door.

Q. Did the prisoner see you at the shop door - A. Yes, at the time I was scraping my shoes at the door the prisoner came out; seeing the coat on the mat, and the prisoner coming out I had suspicion. I then went backwards into the workshop.

Q. How does the door close - A. With a hasp. I shut the door and went into the back workshop: going along I looked back several times expecting him to come back. I saw him come back and take the coat; I immediately told the porter, he pursued him, and I followed.

Q. Did you ever lose sight of him - A. Yes, but I am quite sure the prisoner is the man.

GEORGE ROBERTS . I am a porter to Mr. Dawson. I saw the prisoner go out of the door, I pursued him, he got half way down Gloucester-court before I saw he had got the coat; I called out stop thief, he turned round, and when he saw me he dropped the coat and proceeded on; he was stopped in Riders-street. He was never out of my sight after he dropped the coat.

JOHN LIMBRICK . I took the prisoner in custody, and I received this coat.

Prosecutor. It is my coat.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, nor called any witnesses to his character.

GUILTY, aged 28,

Of stealing only .

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and Publicly Whipped .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

52. JAMES STRANGE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of November , a mare, value 20 l. the property of Thomas Daplyn .

THOMAS DAPLYN . On Monday the 18th of November I lost the mare; the mare was in a small field near my own house; I ordered my man to put her in in the morning about eight o'clock.

Q. How far from London is it - A. At Mile End . I had every reason to suppose the mare was in the field. About eleven o'clock a man came to me and said he had seen a man riding the mare, and that he had stopped him. I went up to Whitechapel to see if it was my mare, I found that it was, it was put up at an inn.

Q. What day was this - A. Monday the 18th of November the day that I missed her; I had seen her on the Sunday, the 17th. The prisoner was taken to the police office.

Prisoner. The mare was not in a field at all.

Prosecutor. A witness here will prove that.

JAMES DUNFORCE . On the 18th of November about half past nine o'clock, I was coming up towards town with a horse and cart, I saw the prisoner leading Mr. Daplyn's mare by the foretop; I questioned him where he was going to, he said up to the turnpike; I asked him if he was going to take her to the pound, he told me he was going to take her home. I told him the mare belonged to Mr. Daplyn, 25, Saffell-place. He turned her round to take her home towards Mr. Daplyn's, I went on about my business, not thinking I should see her any more. When I returned back from Church-lane I saw him riding the mare with a new halter about a quarter before eleven, he had just entered on the stones in Whitechapel. I ran over and catched hold of the mare, I asked him where he was going to with her; he told me was going to take her home; I said, did not I tell you that it belonged to Mr. Daplyn, 25, Saffell-place, I challenged him with stealing the mare; he jumped off, ran away, and left the mare with me. I followed him and took him to Lambeth-street office.

Q. Then he did not sell her or part with her at all - A. No.

RICHARD DUNFORCE . About eight o'clock I turned the Horse into the field and put both fetters on her.

Q. Do you live with Mr. Daplyn - A. Yes.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going to take the mare home to the owner to the gentleman's house; I could not find where the gentleman's house was.

Q. to prosecutor. Had you given any orders to the prisoner to take your mare - A. I never saw him until I saw him at the police office. I went and saw the mare just by the police office, and I swore to her.

Q. to James Dunforce . You saw the mare the prisoner was upon - A. Yes, I knew her to be Mr. Daplyn's mare perfectly well.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 23.

[ The prisoner was recommended to mercy by the Jury on account of his youth .]

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Grose.

53. WILLIAM JONES, alias PRICE , was indicted for feloniously making an assault in the King's Highway, on the 8th of May , upon Robert Cole , putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, two one-pound bank notes, and a promissory note of one pound .

ROBERT COLE . I am a publican , I keep the Crooked Billet, Iron Gate, near the Tower. On the 8th of May, in the evening, I went to the sign of the Three Compasses in Shadwell market, the lease of which was to be disposed of, I wanted the house for a brother and sister of mine who lived at Ipswich. The time I went to the house was about a quarter after seven in the evening, I stopped there about an hour and a quarter, in the course of that time I drank four glasses of cold brandy and water. After that I left the house and was returning to my own house. After I got out in the air I found I was intoxicated, I proceeded up Ratcliffe Highway and got into the entrance of Parsons-street , which is a darkish street, there is a dead wall; I was proceeding along in the best manner I was able when the prisoner at the bar was standing against the dead wall, as I approached him he turned round to make water across the payement. I asked him what he did that for, and called him a d - d dirty fellow for so doing. I asked him who he was, said he, if your sister was here I would give her a swishing; I asked him how old he was to talk about such things; he answered, between fifteen and sixteen, and said he was just returned from the West Indies, where he had seen plenty of that. I asked him the way to Well-street, conceiving that when I got there I should know the way home; the prisoner said he would shew me the way He took me up a street which I have since found to be Neptune-street, when I got to the top of Neptune-street I had some faint recollection that I was in Wellclose square. He walked me part of the round of the square, and we came into North-East passage, when I said to the prisoner this cannot be my way; he said, come along, we shall soon be there. We then came to Pell-street, he there gave a whistle which greatly alarmed me, I set off running, I turned my head round and heard the feet of two or three persons, and a voice calling out stop him; I proceeded on when I was taken hold of by a man who held me until the prisoner and Norton came up, they informed the man that I wanted to commit an unnatural crime on the prisoner; I asserted my innocence to the man.

COURT. Are you a married man - A. I am, I have a wife and four children. I asserted my innocence; the man said he was an officer of the night and he was going to the watchhouse. He took me to the watchhouse. Before we got to the watch-house I requested him to send for a near neighbour there, but they took no notice of that. When we got into the watchhouse the beadle was in the watchhouse with two women, when the man who had taken me in custody told the beadle he had got a serious charge the women were ordered to withdraw. The prisoner then stated to the beadle the charge that he had against me. I asserted my innocence. The beadle said it was a most shocking thing, but he must take the charge. By this time there were four or five men collected in the watchhouse, besides the beadle, the names of the prisoner and Norton were written down by somebody, I gave them my address and name, and begged them not to take the charge of me, as I was innocent; the beadle said he must take the charge. The beadle put his two hands into my waistcoat pockets, and said he must search me.

Mr. Alley. Give us the beadle's name - A. Lancaster.

COURT. It is very fit it should be known.

Prosecutor. I told him not to search my pockets,I would shew him all that I had got; when I took out of my small clothes pocket a five pound note and three one's, I gave them into the beadles hands and told him he might do what he pleased with it; I told them they were welcome to that little money; Lancaster the beadle said, I see you are well lined; I said I was a man of some little property; he then made some little arrangement among the officers in the watchhouse, as well as with the prisoner and Norton, they were called out of the watchhouse at different times. Lancaster came into the watchhouse and told me that he had settled it with the prisoner and Norton, and they were gone. I saw no more of them in the watchhouse. Lancaster returned to me three pounds, the other five pound was kept back. I was suffered to go at last. I had not proceeded from the watchhouse above ten or a dozen yards when I was again accosted by the prisoner and Norton, who said, that as they only received one pound each out of the five pounds that I had given to Lancaster, they demanded the three pounds that I had received back from Lancaster, or that they would come down to my house and expose my character, and see further into the business, when I, through fear of such an accusation, gave them the three pounds.

Mr. Alley. What age boy was Norton - A. He might be about nineteen. They left me, and I proceeded home.

Q. They demanded three pounds of you, and you gave it them - A. I did.

Q. I ask you upon your oath what was the occasion of that -

COURT. He has said that, he has explained himself in the most distinct way; - when I, through fear of this accusation, gave them the three pounds.

Mr. Andrews. Do you mean to tell the jury that you did not know the way home - A. I did know my way, but being intoxicated, and being in the dark street, I asked my way.

Q. It was not that you did not know the way, but you were overcome with liquor, that was the reason you enquired the way - A. It was.

Q. You have given my learned friend some account of the boy's indecency you have a perfect recollection of what he said to you and you to him the very words you recollect - A. I cannot recollect every word.

Q. How came you to trust yourself with such an indecent character you had chided him for his indecency - A. I said, pray which is my way to Well-street; I do not know that. I asked him individually. I did not ask him to guide me, only the way to Well-street.

Q. Mr. Lancaster was the person who proposed to make it up - A. It was among themselves, not in my hearing.

Q. Did not the boys in the watchhouse say that they was dissatisfied and that they would not have the money - A. Never in my hearing, nothing passed of settling the business in the watchhouse; they were called out.

Q. Did not Jones say that he would not make it up but that he would prosecute - A. Never in my hearing.

Q. When they they came up to you at this distance of ten or twelve yards you were within the reach of the watchhouse why did not you go back - A. Because I was under such dread and confusion at the time I wanted to get home, and to hear no more of the business whatever.

Q. When you parted with the money you did not part with it under any personal fear upon you - A. When they came up to me I parted with the money to get rid of them.

COURT. Were you under any personal fear at the time - A. I apprehended no personal danger; I was in great dread; I was afraid of injury to my character.

GEORGE LANCASTER . Q. You had the care of the watchhouse - A. Yes. I am beadle of St. George's in the East.

Q. Is the boy at the bar the boy that made the charge at the watchhouse - A. Yes.

Mr. Andrews. What charge did Jones make against Mr. Cole - A. He complained of an attempt of an unnatural crime.

Q. In what state of sobriety was Cole - A. As sober as could be, I am quite sure of that.

Q. When the charge was made by the boy what said Mr. Cole to him - A. Mr. Cole seemed very much frightened and agitated, he begged for God's sake that we would settle matters; he said, for God's sake do not give charge of me, I am a man having a family.

COURT. He said that - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember his saying any thing about mercy - A. I do; he said have mercy on me, I am a man having a family, and do not wish to be exposed.

Q. Did he, at any time while you were in the watch-house say there was no truth in the charge that the boy made against him - A. I never heard such a word. He said he would give any money so that it might not come to be known, or something like that. Them are the words as near as possible. Figgens can give better evidence than I can, he knows more about it.

Q. Do you know of Mr. Cole saying the charge was false - A. I never heard such a word.

Q. Money was given and for what purpose was it given - A. To get rid of the job in toto.

Mr. Alley. Whoever made the proposal did not the prosecutor go away with five pound less than he brought to the watchhouse - A. Oh, yes, he certainly did.

Q. I do not ask whether you had any, the prisoner and Norton had a pound each, had not they - A. I did not give a pound a piece to them, a man gave that, we cannot learn where he is; I believe he is in Scotland.

Q. You contrived among you that the man went away with five pounds less than he came - A. He did.

COURT. Had you any part of the money - A. Yes. I am sorry to say I had.

Q. You behaved in a most shameful manner. You an officer, and several others equally bound in public duty in a vile manner compounded a charge of this sort, nothing requires more reprehension than this sort of conduct, it is the most likely to encourage proligacyof every kind. - A. My Lord I feel it every word you say.

RICHARD MITCHELL . I am a lighterman. On the 22d of October I assisted the prosecutor in apprehending the prisoner, I apprehended him in Mount's Gateway, Lower East Smithfield, we put him into a coach and took him to the office.

PETER FIGGENS , Q. Were you present when the prosecutor was brought to the watch-house in last May. - A. Yes, I am a watchman. The beadle asked the boy what charge he had against the prosecutor, the boy said, he was coming down White Lion Street, the prosecutor seemed very familiar with him, and that as he came along he used very indecent touches.

Court. And used very indecent actions. - A. So far that he pulled out his own nakedness and put it in the boy's hand untill they came to the corner of Pell Street. Mr. Cole begged for mercy and asked the beadle whether he would not mitigate the matter to settle it between him and the boy, he did not wish it to be spoken of, be went down on his knees and implored them as he had a wife and four children.

Q. Are you speaking correct. - A. Those are the very words to the best of my knowledge. Mr. Lancaster asked the boy if he wished to persevere in it, he said not, but he wished to have an acknowledgment of Mr. Cole, whether he was guilty or not. He asked the prosecutor if he would make the boy a recompence.

Q. Who asked. - A. I cannot say whether it was Lancaster the beadle, or one Tindall a carman that was there, he said it was the least that he could give the boy five pound, Mr. Cole pulled out a handfull of notes and gave one, and said he was very much obliged to Mr. Lancaster, he gave a note, what the contents of it was I cannot say. The boy Jones insisted upon his making an acknowledgement whether he was guilty or no, he said that he had done amiss, he was very sorry for it, he hoped it would be a warning to him for ever.

Mr. Alley. Attend to me first, let me know who you are. - A. I am a watchman in St. George's parish.

Q. You are an Irishman, are not you. - A. Yes, I live in Pell Street, and I work in the London Docks, I have a wife and four children.

Q. You were in the watch-house when the charge was given. - A. It was opposite of our door, I accompanied them down to the watch-house.

Q. Lancaster you say was there, who else - A. One Tindall a carman.

Q. You said the man fell down on his knees, Lancaster is not blind, is he, I suppose he must have seen it. - A. I suppose he could.

Q. Is he deaf. - A. I cannot say.

Q. How long have you known him. - A. A twelvemonth, I never knew him deaf.

Q. He can hear as well as you. - A. I don't know that.

Q. You have said the prosecutor said he had done wrong, he was sorry for it, must not Lancaster have heard that as well as you, if he was standing by. - A. I cannot say.

Q. You said the prosecutor fell down on his knees, said, Lord have mercy, he had a wife and four children begged for mercy, and acknowledged himself guilty. - A. No, he did not acknowledge himself guilty until after the boy had the money.

Q. After he had paid the money, when there was no occasion, he said he was guilty. Did not the boy go out of doors, to negotiate with Lancaster. - A. Upon my oath I do not know.

Q. What share had the boys. - A. A pound each, I cannot say whether it was Tindall or Lancaster that gave it them.

Q. I ask you upon your oath did not you partake of the five-pound note. - A. No. I will give this information, I did not think it prudent to stop in the watch-house, I stopped long enough to hear the cause, I understood after a day or two my wife went up to Mr. Mills, he gave her ten shillings.

Q. Then in point of fact you had ten shillings of the plunder. - A. No otherwise than my wife got ten shillings of Mr. Mills.

Q. Did you see the prisoner receive a one-pound note. - A. Yes, I saw the one-pound note paid in the watchhouse.

Court. Did you in the watchhouse see him paid a one-pound note. - A. I know that Tindall or Lancaster said we must give the boys a one-pound note each.

Q. Was it given in the watchhouse. - A. Positively I cannot say that. I know that I saw the boys had a one-pound note each, I know that I saw it with the boys at the watchhouse; whether it was given outside of the door, I cannot recollect well to say.

Mr. Alley. Q. I ask you upon the oath you have taken, did the prosecutor fall upon his knees in the watch-house and confess himself guilty. - A. Upon my oath he fell upon his knees, and confessed that he had done wrong, and said he was sorry for it, and he know'd that he had done wrong.

Q. Did not Lancaster put his hands into the prosecutor's waistcoat pocket. - A. No, I did not see it.

Q. (to Prosecutor.) Is the account that that man has given true or false. - A. False.

Q. Did you confess that you were guilty. - A. I did not, nor did I implore for mercy.

Q. Is it not true that Lancaster put his two hands into your waistcoat pockets. - A. It is true.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel.

NOT GUILTY

of the highway robbery.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

54. SAMUEL NEWMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of November , three yards of shag, value 24 s. the property of Joseph Winder , privately in his shop .

JOSEPH WINDER . I keep a shop in May's buildings, St. Martin's Lane .

GEORGE SHEDEL . I am shopman to Mr. Winder. On the 9th of November I was sitting in the parlour at the back of the shop, about one o'clock at noon my mistress told me to run, there was a man going out of the shop.

Q. Is your mistress here. - A. No.

Q. Did you see any body running out of the shop. - A. No. I ran out of the shop, I saw the prisoner running along the court with something under his coat,I could see a projection from his coat towards his arm; I followed him through another court.

Q. Was he constantly in your sight. - A. Yes, when he came to the corner I lost sight of him. On looking round I perceived him in a passage of a public-house.

Q. Are you sure it was the same man. - A. I am certain it was. I went to him and laid hold of his coat and told him that he had some of our goods, he said that he had no such a thing, he opened his coat for me to search him, I felt about his person, I could find nothing, but on looking round I perceived the shag lying behind the outer door in the inside of the passage, there are two doors, one which is kept back, and one which opens into the tap-room, the shag laid behind the outward door, it laid between the door and the wall, a young man coming out of the tap-room, in my presence, took it up. The landlord of the house came and laid hold of the prisoner, and the young man gave me the shag. I left the shag with the landlord.

- WADE. I am a clock and watch maker. About three minutes before one o'clock I was in the Black Prince, Chandois Street, in the tap-room. I stood at the front of the window looking into the street, I saw the prisoner run by the window about a yard before I saw the young man, as fast as he could run, he turned himself round, catched hold of the door, and threw himself into the passage of the house where I was. There is a front door, which is generally kept hook'd back, and about two yards there is another door that pulls to and opens with a pulley; and before the prisoner could open the door with the pulley the young man had hold of him and told him he had his master's property, I was about half a yard off, I stooped down and picked it up with my right hand, I asked the young man if that was his stuff, he said yes, it was, the young man took it out of my hand, I directly catched hold of the prisoner by the collar and staid with him twenty minutes in the tap-room, and then he was delivered to the officer.

Q. Do you know who the young man gave the bundle to. - A. To Mr. Sowden, the landlord, he is not here.

- NETTLETON. I am a constable, I apprehended the prisoner, the landlady gave me this property out of the bar.

Shedel. I saw it picked up.

Q. And you told me before that it was given into the hands of the landlord, how came it into the hands of the landlady. - A. Because she was in the bar. I am sure it is the same bundle that Wade picked up, I looked at it directly, it had my writing on the ticket, and it is my master's property, I had seen it in the shop about a quarter of an hour before I ran after the prisoner, it was placed in the window as I had put it in the morning.

Q. Did you look at the window as you came along the shop. - A. I did, and there was a vacancy to hold that parcel.

Prosecutor. I know the number and the private mark on that shag, it is part of the goods of my shop, there is three yards of it, it is of the value of twenty-four shillings.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, nor called any witnesses to his character.

GUILTY , aged 32.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

55. THOMAS CORNFORD was indicted for that he, on the 10th of July , was clerk to Thomas Langston and John Farn Timmins , and was employed and entrusted by them to receive money and valuable securities for and on their account, that he being such servant so employed and entrusted, did receive and take into his possession two certain orders for the payment of fifteen hundred pounds, and that he afterwards did secrete and steal one of the said orders .

The case was stated by Mr. Alley.

THOMAS LANGSTON . John Farn Timmins was my parner at that time, we were merchants and factors in Watling Street , the prisoner Thomas Cornford was in our service, he came to live with us in the month of May 1805. Cornford continued to live with me till July last, 1811.

Q. In what way was the prisoner entrusted by you and your partner. - A. It was his duty to take care of the cash, make payment of bills drawn upon the house, he had every power that a confidential clerk could have except the endorsement of bills and drawing bills for sale, he could accept a draft drawn upon the house, or draw a bill upon the banker, but he could not draw a bill upon the Bank of England. Messrs. Prescott and Co. were the bankers of the house.

Q. Had he a power over those funds. - A. He had, he had the power to act generally in my absence, according to circumstances.

Q. Had he power to borrow money. - A. Certainly if it was necessary, and he has occasionally done so in my absence, - he kept the cash-ledger, he was entrusted to receive money on the accompt of the house, and he was in possession of the bills of the house and securities, he had the fullest confidence.

Court. Was he entrusted to receive all monies, goods, monies, bills, notes, banker's drafts, cash, and every money security. - A. Goods did not come under his notice.

Mr. Bolland. What salary did you give him. - A. Three hundred guineas, and it increased to three hundred and fifty guineas before he gave me notice to quit my service. He had permission to join in partnership with his brother in the coal trade, but it was not to take any part of his time under the firm of Thomas and George Cornford .

Court. And your firm was in no ways interested in that. - A. In no shape.

Mr. Bolland. Did you assist Cornford in carrying on that coal trade by loans of money. - A. I did, I lent him money to join his brother in the coal trade, some few hundred pounds. Afterwards he stated, that Mr. Everett the banker had offered an account in his favour, but he did not know how to keep a balance there, that if I would assist him in a balance of two or three thousand pounds, Mr. Everett would discount bills that I had on hand, provided I kept up such a balance as made it worth their while, I acceded to his proposal.

Q. Was there an account of him and his brother inyour books. - A. The account was Thomas Cornford 's, I well knew they had no money of their own.

Court. This was with the property belonging to the firm. - A. Yes.

Q. At what time did that account open. - A. I believe it was in the year 1807, and it continued untill July 1810.

Mr. Bolland. At what period was Cornford in the habit of balancing that account. - A. On the 1st of April, he ought to have struck it monthly, that was my order. The book was balanced on the first of April, 1810, at that period the balance was in favour of Thomas and George Cornford .

Court. With respect to this draft of fifteen hundred pounds, was there any prohibition to his entering it into Mr. Everett's accompt. - A. I was two hundred miles off at the time, there was no prohibition of his increasing his debit, he might have debitted himself ten thousand pounds, but he had not done that.

Q. Did the accompts debitted exceed three thousand pounds. - A. They did not. As soon as I found that he had exceeded the credit that I had allowed him, he left his own house, afraid of the eye of his master, I returned from Lancashire, on the 20th of July, I found that his business had been greatly neglected, and that the cash had not been balanced. On my ordering it to be done, and persevering in it, he retired to his own house on the 24th. At this period this book was looked up, I could not ascertain the extent of the account.

Q. When did you first discover the charge that you made against Cornford this day. - A. In October, by Cornford's successor examining this book.

Q. Turn to the book where this complaint arises, is this Cornford's hand writing. - A. It is.

(The accompt read).

Q. You knew nothing of the money except what you heard when you came home. - A. I knew nothing of it except from what I saw in the books, there is fifteen hundred pound as paid to Lion and Earle, they deny ever having received it.

Q. Have you ever received this fifteen hundred pounds of Cornford since. - A. I have not, Mr. Hall that succeeded Cornford made the discovery.

Mr. Andrews. Q. When was your banking-house opened for Cornford and Co. - A. I believe in 1808.

Q. He had a power of taking bills that you held for the purpose of discounting at Everett's house, keeping a proper balance up. - A. He had the power of taking bills and securities for the purpose of discounting at Newman's and Everett's.

Q. It was convenient to you that this should be done. - A. I conceived it would be some convenience, or else I should not have done it.

Q. You have very extensive connections. - A. Certainly, mine are inland bills.

Q. This transaction happened in July 1810. - A. What transaction.

Q. Why the draft in question. - A. In July 1810, during the time I was gone.

Q. You placed great confidence in him, you left him twenty-seven thousand pounds, with power to borrow upon your correspondents. - A. Yes, he had a general power to that effect, I cannot say what balance I left, I left sufficient for the demands in the house, and so much money in the house, to the amount of twenty-seven thousand pounds, to answer all the demands upon the house during my absence, and I say as a proof of it, I found the debt of Thomas and George Cornford, increased to twenty-seven thousand pounds in my books.

Q. Can you tell me what the accompt of Thomas and George Cornford was when you left town. - A. I cannot tell to a thousand pounds, I did not know that he had exceeded the credit that I had allowed, of two or three thousand pounds.

Court. You say that you had no reason to think that the balance was increased to beyond two, or three, or four thousand pounds. - A. Certainly, I had no reason.

Q. Had he permission to use your money, so that you could not say to three or four thousand pounds, where was this license to stop, and which he was never to exceed. - A. There was a sum understood.

Q. Do not tell me what you understood, I must have a positive answer. - A. Three thousand pounds was the outside limit that ever I gave him.

Q. Was that ever mentioned in terms, Mr. Cornford you may apply three thousand pounds and no farther. - A. It was never mentioned.

Mr. Andrews. Q. I believe the house of Cornford and his brother became bankrupts. - A. In November 1810, I was petitioning. creditor, sixteen thousand pounds is the amount I proved under the estate, and some odd pounds.

Q When did Cornford leave your accompt. - A. In July 1811.

Q. This accompt was made up in 1810, who keeps the rough cash book. - A. Any person that receives money enters it.

Q. The rough cash book is on your desk. - A. Yes.

Q. And from this book is composed the clean cash book, though you had not the book which you have now before you, had not you the rough book, and the other book of which this book is composed. - A. I had, and they all agree, if I had not examined the castings.

THOMAS BORRADIL . You know the house of Messrs. Langston. - A. Well

Q. On the 10th of July last do you remember the prisoner applying to borrow any money of you. - A. Yes, I lent him three thousand pounds, to the house of Langston and Co. I lent it him in two drafts of fifteen hundred pound each, upon the house of Sikes and Co. these are the drafts, they are paid.

RICHARD LANGSTON . Q. I believe you are a brother to Thomas Langston . - A. I am. In July 1810, I was cashier in the house of Lion and Earle, on the 6th Cornford applied to me to lend him some money on his own account, I lent him fifteen hundred pound, he gave me a I O U entered in the book. On the 15th he paid me by a check of Mr. Borradil upon Sikes and Co.

Q. On the 6th of July did the house of Langston owe any thing to the house of Lion and Earle. - A. Not a farthing. On the 7th of July I lent him three thousand pounds, for which I received his I O U on the account of Thomas Langston and company; he borrowed three thousand pound on another day, and they were paidby that house, that closed the accompt of Lion and Earle.

Mr. Bolland. Q. (to prosecutor.) Had the prisoner any accompt opened with the house of Lion and Earle on his own separate accompt. - A. He had, they frequently accomodated him with loans of money.

Court. Have you the rough cash book here. - A. I have, both these drafts are entered there of Mr. Borradils to the credit of Prescott and Company, and Lion and Earle fifteen hundred pounds, and Lion and Earle said they never received it.

GEORGE HALL . Q. Were you applied to at any time to examine these accompts, and when. - A. In last September.

Q. Look over that accompt of Lion and Earle in 1810. - A. There is an accompt where they debit in five different sums, they are credited with two, five different sums making six thousand, one hundred and thirty-two pounds, two shillings, and nine pence, as it stands here.

Court. Q. What is that book that you now produce. - A. The cash ledger.

Mr. Alley. The debtor side of Lion and Earle, they are represented in five different sums, debtor to the amount of six thousand one hundred and thirty-two pounds two shillings, and nine pence. - A. It appears so.

Q. Now Sir I ask you in that casting up is there a concealment of fifteen hundred pounds, casting it up fairly, and according to the figures, would it make fifteen hundred pounds more. - A. It would, and on the credit side there are two items that appears six thousand one hundred and thirty two pounds, two shillings and nine pence, the same as the other.

Q. Any body looking at the face of that balance, it would appear to one who looks no further, that there was no difference between the parties. - A. Certainly.

Q. But looking minutely, and examining carefully, you find there is a difference of fifteen hundred pounds from the 9th of July to the 21st of July, and the last credit of the 24th of July. - A. On the 10th of July there is fifteen hundred pounds; on the 9th of July two thousand pounds; 13th fourteen hundred and ten pounds, fourteen shillings; 14th, seven hundred and nine pounds, seven shillings and nine-pence; 21st of July, two thousand and twelve pounds, one shilling.

Court. That is in July 1810. - A. Yes, these are the sums paid. Upon the other side July 7, 1810, six thousand pounds; July 24, one hundred and thirty-two pounds, two shillings and nine pence.

Mr. Andrews. Q. Did you examine that ledger with that book from which the entry was made. - A. Not the whole of it, I supposed it to by correct, it refers to the fair cash-book; I discovered this in October.

Court Q. (to Procecutor. Then for aught you know that fifteen hundred pounds is included in the proof of your debt; it cannot be a debt and felony too. - A. I have the clerk here that drew up the debt.

THOMAS BUTTERWORTH . I am clerk to Mr. Langston; the amount of Cornford's debt, on the last proof is something better than sixteen thousand pounds; some of the securities were running.

Mr. Andrews. There was so much uncertainty in your accompt, that it was nineteen thousand first, which you afterwards reduced to sixteen thousand. - A. I did.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

56. MARIA WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously making an assault in the king's highway, upon Thomas Dukeson , on the 16th of November , putting him in fear, and feloniously taking from his person, and against his will, a watch, value 2 l. a gold key, value 5 s. a metal key, value 1 d. and a seal, value 5 s. his property .

THOMAS DUKESON . I live at 13, Wimpole-street. When I lost the watch I drove a hackney coach for Mr. Gardener.

Q. On the 16th of November did you lose a watch. - A. Yes, it was near six o'clock in the evening.

Q. Where you sober. - A. I cannot say I was quite sober, but I knew what I was about. When I first saw the prisoner, she was with a man, just turning out of Fore Street, into Grub Street , she came up to me and said where are you going my dear, the man was close to her, I said I was going home, the man directly said, d - n his bloody eyes knock him down; the man knocked me down, this woman got fast hold of my throat, when I was down on the ground the man drew my watch out of my fob; finding my watch go, I called out stop thief, and as soon as I could get from the woman's hands, I ran after the man, I kept sight of him, he ran up some alley in Grub Street, where there was no thoroughfare, I seized him as he was endeavouring to get out of the alley, and by some people helping me, I got him into a public-house in Grub Street, he had not been in the house long before a young man came in and said, do not let him go, he struck me a blow on my head, and almost knocked me down, I had hold of his coat, he slipped his coat and waistcoat off, and ran away.

Q. Did you find any of your property in his coat or waistcoat. - A. No, I have never been able to recover my property again. When I had hold of the man in the alley, the prisoner had hold of me, and said you bloody thief let him go, or else I'll do you, she followed me into the public-house, and then the constable came in, and she was secured, she was searched, and nothing was found on her.

Q. How lately before you had been attacked in this way did you perceive your watch in your pocket. - A. Just before I got to Grub Street, I fastened my seal tighter, it was loose, I am quite sure that I had it, because I looked at it. It was a silver watch, it was worth two pound.

Mr. Knapp. You said you were not quite sober, how had you been spending the evening. - A. I was with a groom, we had a drop of rum and water, and half and half, between four or five of us, that was at the watering house in Oxford Road, near Bond Street.

Q. What house did you go next to drink. - A. I might go into four or five public-houses in the course of the day.

Q. Then you did not go into the Old Bailey. - A. I went there after I put my horses up, I went to the Old Bailey before I was robbed, I came through the OldBailey.

Q. Do you mean to have it understood that you did not stop at any house in the Old Bailey. - A. I stopped with the waterman, and drank nothing.

Q. Then you do not know a person of the name of Touchey, and you did not drink with any person in the Old Bailey. - A. I drank with a coachman, not with the waterman.

Court. You positively denied that you drank with any body. Did you drink any liquor in the Old Bailey. - A. We went into the wine vaults just at the corner of the Old Bailey, and had a glass of gin.

Mr Knapp. Had you any quarrel with any body at the Old Bailey. - A. Yes, I had a few words with a coachman that was there.

Q. Did not you square with somebody. - A. Yes, I did.

Q. Upon your oath, Sir, did not you say two or three days afterwards that you were sorry that you struck the man, but you were so drunk you did not know what you did. - A. No, I said I was sorry I struck him, I was not so much in liquor; he began with me first.

Q. Did not you say to Touchey you were sorry that you had struck him, you were so drunk that you did not know that you had struck him. - A. I said I was sorry, I did not know that I had struck him.

Q. Has it not occurred to you that there is a forty pound reward. - A. I have heard that there was for a highway robbery, but not in the street.

Q. What have you indicted this woman for. - A. For throtling of me, and ill-using me.

Q. Do not you know that you have indicted her for a highway robbery. - A. Of course, it was in the street, it was in the highway.

Q. You do not know it is a highway robbery; do not you expect a forty pound reward. - A. I expect nothing at all.

GEORGE HANCOCK . I am an apprentice to my father, at the corner of White Street, Little Moorfields. On the evening of the 6th of December I was in my father's shop, I heard the cry of stop thief. I went out and saw the prosecutor had hold of a man, he said he had robbed him of his watch, and I saw the shape of a watch in the man's fob, with whom the prosecutor was wrestling; the prisoner tried to get the man away from the prosecutor, she said let him go, or I'll serve you out, she tried to rescue the man away, the prosecutor conveyed the man into a public-house, I went with him, the prisoner followed, there was a scuffle in the public-house, the people were urging them on to fight, the man said he had not got the watch, the prosecutor said the man had knocked him down by Honey-suckle court, and robbed him.

Q. How came the man not to be secured. - A. There was a set of people in the public-house that seemed to take his part, they made a sort of a lane for him to pass by, he pulled off his coat and waistcoat, to make a shew of being searched, there was a cry of bolt, the man ran away, leaving his coat, waistcoat, and hat behind him.

Q. Was the woman in the tap-room all the time. - A. Yes.

JOHN SANKEY PUGH . I am a constable of Cripplegate ward, I was sent for to the public house, the woman was there, the prosecutor detained her, he said she should not go until he had his watch, she said she knew nothing of his watch, he told me that the man knocked him down, and the woman held him until he was robbed, he gave the same account then as he has now, he was very violent, he tore the woman's shawl off, he insisted upon having his watch, I went after the man, Hancock told me he had seen him go into a house in Chapel Street, Grub Street, he had been there but was run out, I could not find him, I have got the man's coat, waistcoat, and hat, it was given up to me, I have kept them ever since. They have never been claimed by any body, I searched the woman, I found nothing upon her, I asked her who the man was, she said her husband, he lived at No. 13, Rose Lane; when I went there the house was half pulled down.

JOSEPH BOLTON REEDE . I am a stationer, 218, Shoreditch. I was in Grub Street, I heard the cry of stop thief, I saw the parties, the prosecutor had hold of a man, he said, you have stole my watch, the woman had hold of the man, and the prosecutor, she was wrestling, exclaiming let go my husband, I followed them into a public-house in Grub Street, the woman there rushed in between them, the woman said, let go my husband, he is no thief; the prosecutor said, you have stole my watch, the man said, I have not got it; the prosecutor said, send for a constable, and before the constable came the man got out of the house, and when he was in the passage there was a cry of bolt, he left his coat, waistcoat, and hat behind him. When the constable came, the woman was secured; the prosecutor gave the same account then as he has now; he seemed intoxicated. I knew neither of the parties.

Prisoner's Defence. There is a just God, he knows I am innocent.

WILLIAM TOUCHEY . I am an hackney coachman. This day three weeks I drank with Dukeson the prosecutor in the Old Bailey, we had a glass of gin each, there were four of us, he was very much intoxicated, indeed he was very riotous there, he hit one man on the mouth, and made his mouth bleed; a bill sticker came by, he began sparring with him, this was about two o'clock in the afternoon, and between four or five I saw him at the coach rank in Aldersgate Street, he was so drunk that he reeled from one side of the pavement to the other, he was by himself. About three days after I met him at the watering-house at Aldersgate Street, I said to him, you are a pretty sort of a fellow any how, you was beastly drunk in the Old Bailey, when you beat the man; he said, I wish to see him, to give him something to drink, to make it up with me, I told him he used him very ill indeed, I said, if it was me I should not have put up with it as he did.

WILLIAM COXALL . I keep the Jacob's Well, in Grub Street. There were twenty or thirty people came in the house when the prosecutor and the woman and man came in, I had never seen them before.

Q. Was the prosecutor drunk. - A. As he was a stranger, I considered it was hard for me to discriminate whether it was the aggravation or the liquor, he was knocking the man about, and the man knocking him, he told the same story then as he has now, the man denied having robbed him, the prisoner declared he was an honest man, he was no thief, the womansaid her name was Wilson, and the man was her husband, she said he was an orris weaver, he worked for his father.

Court. Q. Did you see the coat, hat, and waistcoat left in the box. - A. Yes.

Q. Has the man ever called for them. - A. No, it was thought he was a soldier in some militia.

Q. What was the coat, hat, and waistcoat worth. - A. Not much.

Q. (to Pugh). What do you think might be the worth of the coat, hat, and waistcoat. - A. Altogether a pound, the coat is a very good coat, this is it.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

57. WILLIAM LEWIS, alias BENJAMIN JOHNSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of November , two sheets, value 17 s. the property of Thomas Draper , and a great coat, value 1 l. the property of William Heale .

THOMAS DRAPER . I keep a public-house in Oxford Street .

Q. Did you lose a pair of sheets any time. - A. Yes on the 11th of November, the sheets were in the kitchen airing, for use that night.

Q. Was there a man of the name of Heale in your house. - A. Yes, he was waterman to the coach-rank , his coat was in the kitchen at that time, I had seen the coat and sheets in the kitchen two hours before they were missed, Dean, the officer, stopped the prisoner in the passage, I came out and saw the sheets in his possession, the coat was on his arm, I knew the sheets to be mine, they are worth seventeen shillings.

WILLIAM HEALE . I am a waterman, I saw the coat at the time this man was charged, it is mine, it is worth a pound.

WILLIAM DEAN . I am a constable, I was standing at my door, the prisoner was leaning against the railing, I asked him what he wanted there, he said he was in great distress, he said he came from Hereford, or was going there, I cannot say which; it was about seven o'clock in the evening, I thought him to be a suspicious character, I was determined to follow him, I saw him go into Mr. Draper's house, I beckoned to a person that I supposed to be the landlady, and by the time I spoke he came out with the box coat on his arm, I asked him whose coat it was, he said it was his own, the sheets were wrapped up in the coat, they were quite warm then. I took him to the watchouse, I found half a twopenny loaf in his pocket, and four pennyworth of halfpence, in his waistcoat pocket I found three shillings and six-pence in silver. When he got to Marlborough Street office, he was known by the name of Johnson.

Prisoner's Defence. I leave it to the mercy of the gentlemen, the things were down in the passage, I was going to take them in.

GUILTY , aged 57.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and publicly whipped .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

58. ANN EAMER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of November , a bank token, value 3 s. a bank token, value 1 s. 6 d. and a shilling, the property of Douglas Thompson , from his person .

DOUGLAS THOMPSON . I am a soldier in the first regiment of guards, I lodge at the Cooper's Arms, Westminster . On the 15th of November between two and three in the afternoon I came home, I was fatigued, I laid down on the bench and fell asleep; I had eight and six-pence in my breeches pocket; a three shilling token, one shilling, and three eighteen-penny tokens. I was awoke by the prisoner's hand in my pocket.

Q. Were there any other persons in the tap-room - A. There were two other persons by the fire, they did not see her in the act. I laid hold of her instantly, when I found her hand in my breeches pocket, she stooped then down, as if she was going to do something to her shoes, I examined my pocket, I found it had been robbed of all its contents, I charged her with it, I took a three shilling piece, and one shilling out of her hand, I asked her where the rest was, she said that was all she had taken, I found one eighteen-penny token in her shoe, I got a candle, and found a eighteen-penny token under the bench, but the other I could not find, I sent for a constable, and had her apprehended, I put the money on the table, and delivered it to the constable.

Q. Had you ever seen the prisoner in the house before. - A. I have seen her in the house.

THOMAS RENNY . I apprehended the prisoner, I searched her, and found no money, she acknowledged the robbery, and said she did it out of a lark.

Prisoner's Defence. I have been many times in his company, I had no inclination of robbing him in the least.

GUILTY , aged 43.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

59. THOMAS RHODES and JAMES CROFT were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of November , thirty pound weight of lead, value 5 s. the property of Joshua Robinson .

JOSHUA ROBINSON . I am a builder in Oxford-street . The two prisoners were my servant s. I bought the lead of Mrs. Chapple.

JONATHAN SNELL . I am an hair-dresser, I live with Mrs. Chapple, she disposed of a lead cistern to Mr. Robinson, I saw the lead weighed at Mr. Robinson's, the weight was three quarters and nine pound, I went back and told Mrs. Chapman the weight, she told me to see it weighed again, it was weighed again, and it was the same weight, I told the man that weighed it, here is not all, here is a part cut away, I told Mr. Robinson that there was not the weight that it ought to be, Mr. Robinson had it measured, and there appeared a great deficiency, Mr. Robinson told me to come at two o'clock, and then the men would be come from dinner; I went at two o'clock, Rhodes and Croft were present, Mr. Robinson then asked them if three quarters and nine pound was the weight of the lead, they said that was all, Mr. Robinson said he doubted that was not all, they had taken part away, the said no they had not, Mr. Robinson said he thought they had taken it to Ferritt's a house, that buys and sells lead, they said no, Mr. Robinson said I am certain it is not all, what is become of it, they said if it was not all, they must have left the remaining part in Mrs. Chapple's cellar, Mr.Robinson said go and fetch it, Rhodes accordingly went I went after him, I believe he did not see me, and instead of going to our house he went up Orchard street, down Somerset-street, along Duke-street, into Oxford-street, then down James street, to where he lodged, at Mr. Ferritt's house; I then went back and informed Mr. Robinson where he was gone to, Mr. Robinson requested I would go back and see if he came out of Ferritt's house, I then went back and met him crossing North Audley Street, with the lead under his arm, I followed him in, I heard Mr. Robinson say something to him, he answered, that he had fetched it from a public-house, where he had left it for liquor. The weight of the lead that he brought back was thirty pound.

Mr. Robinson. My house is three doors from Orchard Street, five doors from Mrs. Chapple's house. Rhodes brought back thirty-pound of lead.

Q. Do you know who were the two persons that fetched the lead from Mrs. Chapple's. - A. The prisoners told me they had, and that three quarters and nine pound was the whole of the weight, they were the only men doing that work, I examined the lead that Rhodes brought back, it made out the entire cistern, the value of the lead is five shillings.

The prisoners said nothing in their defence, called one witness, who gave them a good character.

RHODES, GUILTY , aged 26.

CROFT, GUILTY , aged 22.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and publicly whipped .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

60. CATHARINE KELSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of November , a shirt, value 5 s. a shawl, value 12 s. and an apron, value 6 d. the property of Mary Riley .

MARY RILEY , I live in Wild Street , I keep a mangle . I lost the articles on the 13th of November. The prisoner came into my yard, I saw her go up stairs, I went to the door to speak to a person, and when I came in she was on the stairs, speaking to one of my lodgers, they immediately went out of doors together, I had not been in my room a quarter of an hour before I missed my shawl, shirt, and coloured apron, I suspected the prisoner. We found her about four o'clock in the afternoon, very much intoxicated with liquor, we took her to Bow Street.

Q. Did you find your things. - A. The shirt was pledged at Mr. Lane's but she would not give any account of the other things.

THOMAS EDGES . I am a pawnbroker, I live with Mr. Lane. I produce a shirt, it was pawned by the prisoner on the 13th of November.

Prisoner's Defence. Sarah Boddington gave me the shirt.

Prosecutrix. Sarah Boddington is my lodger, she could not have given it her, I saw the prisoner on the stairs when Sarah Boddington came in. This is the shirt, part of the mark is picked out.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

61. JANE HAMMOND was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of December , a china dish, value 8 s. the property of Henry West .

HENRY WEST . I am a publican , I keep the Cheshire Cheese at Chelsea . On the 3d of this month, between seven and eight in the evening, the prisoner came into my house, she called for a pint of beer, she sat drinking it a considerable time, I was busy in the bar, a soldier who is quartered on me saw her go into the kitchen, when she came out he asked her what business she had there, she said that she had dropped an eighteen-penny piece, and the servant had given it her, she went and sat down in the tap-room, the soldier told me that she had got something, I asked the prisoner what she had got, she said nothing, I went and looked in the kitchen, I missed a large china disk, I found the dish in a child's frock, pinned under her petticoats. This is the dish, I put the dish on the tap-room table, I asked her whose it was, she said it was hers. I swear it is my own.

Prisoner's Defence. A soldier sold me this dish for ten-pence.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY , aged 29.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

62. BRIANT HANLOW was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of December , six knives, value 3 s. and six forks, value 3 s. the property of Thomas Clark .

- I am clerk to Thomas Clark of Exeter Change , he is a hardwareman . On Monday last I saw the prisoner take six knives and forks from the shop of Thomas Clark . I ran after him and took them from him.

Q. Did you know any thing of the man before. - A. I have seen him pass about half a dozen times before he stole them.

Prisoner's Defence. I wanted to buy these knives and forks, I was going to ask the price of them, and the man came and gave me a blow on the head.

Q. (to Witness) Did he ask the price of them. - A. No, he walked backwards and forwards, I think he had his hand upon them, that gave me a suspicion, I watched him, he took them and put them by his side, and walked away with them.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

63. WILLIAM BREACH was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 16th of November , eighty pound weight of lead, the property of Henry Myers , affixed to a building of his .

BERNARD GLEED . I am a patrol. On Saturday, the 16th of November, about seven o'clock I stopped the prisoner in the Commercial Road, he was resting this lead in a bag, I asked him what he had got in the bag, he said he had got a bit of stuff, I said, what is it, he said, it is a hit of lead, I asked him where he got it from, he said he found it in a hole near the first rope ground in the Commercial Road; I asked him what he was, he said he was a journeyman carpenter. I secured him and the lead.

JOHN GRUNDEY . I am a plumber, I know thelead to be the lead that I laid on Mr. Myers's building.

Q. Where is the house that this was taken off. - A. In the parish of Limehouse , about a quarter of a mile from where this was found, this lead was affixed to Mr. Myers's rope building, I am sure it was there a few days before, I can positively swear that it was affixed to Mr. Myers's building by the peculiar manner of laying the lead. I put it on the building.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in Stepney-fields, in the foot-path, I crossed to make water against the rope-field, in a hole I saw this lead, I took it up, and was bringing it along, the officer stopped me; there was nobody with me.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

64. DAVID BUSH was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 19th of November , a silk handkerchief, value 5 s. the property of William Baker , from his person .

WILLIAM BAKER . I am a gentleman , I live in Ireland. I lost the handkerchief, on the 19th of November about twelve o'clock, in Holborn , I was walking along the street with two gentlemen, I heard a bustle behind me, some person calling out gentlemen, I turned round and saw a person, which happened to be Charles Humphreys , a Bow-street officer, he came up with the handkerchief in his hand, he had hold of the prisoner, he said, Sir, this man I saw take your handkerchief out of your pocket, I put my hand in my pocket, and found my handkerchief gone, I looked at the handkerchief, it was very much like my handkerchief, I could not swear to it. He asked me if I would prosecute, I said I certainly would, we went into a coach, to go to Bow-street, the prisoner began to cry, I desired him not to cry, to behave like a man, he desired me not to prosecute him. I said I would, it would probably save him from being hanged.

CHARLES HUMPHREYS . I am an officer. On the 19th a little past twelve, I was going up Holborn, looking out for such characters, I saw the prisoner in company with an old thief I knew, he put his hand in the gentleman's pocket, and slipped the handkerchief out, I saw him take the handkerchief out of the gentleman's pocket, I ran across, took the handkerchief out of his hand, and then I sung out to the gentleman.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming down Holborn at the time that Humphreys took the handkerchiefs out of my pocket, I had two in my pocket, Humphreys kept the best, and returned me the other, he said at Bow Street he knew me to be a reputed thief; he never saw me but once.

Humphreys. He had no other handkerchief about him, except on his neck.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

65. JOHN HEATH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of November , a coat, value 1 l. two petticoats, value 10 s. a gown, value 5 s. a pair of stockings, value 1 s. four waistcoats, value 4 s. three handkerchiefs, value 3 s. a table-cloth, value 1 s. and a shirt, value 4 s. the property of John Reeves ; a pair of stockings, value 1 s. the property of Thomas Swaine .

JOHN REEVES . I am a boatman . I lost the things on the 22d of November, out of the cabin of the boat, at Paddington .

Q. What is the prisoner. - A. I do not know. On the 22d of November, in the morning, he came and asked me if I wanted any help to unload, I told him I did not.

THOMAS SWAINE . I lost a pair of stockings out of the cabin on the 22d. The prisoner called me of one side, and said I must not own to them.

ELIZABETH REEVES . My husband is a boatman. I saw the prisoner in the morning, near the boat, in the evening I saw him again, Mr. Crib came in, he said he thought he had been robbing of us; my husband and me went down to the boat, we saw the cabin broken open, and the property gone.

ROBERT CRIB . I live at the Green Man, at Paddington. On the 22d of November the prisoner was backwards and forwards in my house several times, I had a suspicion of the prisoner, and set a watch on him, there was a quantity of things found in the gateway of my yard, and afterwards the prisoner said he had deposited a bundle in my yard, it contained a jacket, trowsers, and shirt, belonging to himself, the property mentioned in the indictment, and the prisoner's things were found altogether in the yard.

Mrs. Reeves. These are the things, they are all my husband's things except the stockings, and they are Thomas Swaine 's.

Prisoner's Defence. I am a stranger, I was seeking work, they said they could not give me work, I could not get a lodging, Mr. Crib would not let me stop all night, he took my bundle, and when I came back I asked for my bundle.

GEORGE ROBINSON was called, and not appearing in court his recognizance was ordered to be estreated.

GUILTY , aged 35.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

66. PETER PRYRA was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of November , a blanket, value 4 s. and two rugs, value 6 s. the property of George M'Carthy .

GEORGE M'CARTHY . I am a salesman and slop-seller , near Wellclose Square .

ANN MACAULEY . I am a servant to the prosecutor, from information I pursued the prisoner, and stopped him in the square, with the things upon him.

MRS. GRIFFITHS. I am the daughter of the prosecutor. I met the prisoner putting the blankets and rugs under his jacket, I went into the house, and asked the servant if she had sold them, she said she had not.

JAMES STIRLING . On the 28th of November, the prisoner and the property were delivered to me, I have had it ever since.

Macauley. I believe they are Mr. M'Carthy's property, I tied them at the door that morning.

GUILTY , aged 37.

Whipped in Jail and discharged.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

67. WILLIAM YOUNG was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of November , a plow, value 1 l. a saw, value 7 s. and two chissels, value 1 s. the property of Mark King .

MARK KING . I am a carpenter , I was at work in Burton-street, Tavistock-square . On the 11th of November the officer brought the prisoner to me, he asked me if I had lost any tools; I told him I had not. I did not know that I had then. He produced two chissels, I could swear to them, they were taken out of the new building.

SAMUEL DICKINSON . I am an officer of Bow-street. I was in a public-house on a Sunday, the prisoner offered the saw to me for seven shillings. The prisoner told me he had broken the back door open and took these tools from the bench. I then went to Mr. King, took the two chissels, he said they were his. I then took the prisoner back to the watchhouse and shewed the prosecutor the other tools; he swore to them at the office.

Prosecutor. They are my property.

Prisoner's Defence. The back door was not fastened up, I went in there to do my business.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

68. WILLIAM REYNOLDS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of November , a brass lamp chain, value 6 s. five pounds weight of brass, value 7 s. six knives and forks, value 10 s. a table lamp, value 1 s. 6 d. twenty files, value 12 s. and a pound weight of box wood, value 3 s. the property of Thomas Brant .

The prosecutor and witnesses were called, and not appearing in court, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

69. WILLIAM COCKCROFT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of November , two traces, value 30 s. a saddle, value 1 l. two ames, value 15 s. a bridle, value 8 s. a pair of reins, value 16 s. a rein-strap, value 8 s. and one cropper, value 5 s. the property of John Wootton .

JOHN WOOTON . I am a stable-keeper at the Swan-yard, Smithfield . On the 11th of November my gates were made fast about ten o'clock; on the morning of the next day, between five and six o'clock the watchman came up my yard and said the gates were loose; he told me he had stopped a man with harness on the outside. I went to the watchhouse and saw the harness; I knew the harness well, it was mine. The prisoner had been in my service five days, no more; he had left me about four or five days.

WILLIAM BATCHELOR . I am a watchman, Mr. Wootton's yard is in my beat. On the 12th of November, about half past five I was crying the hour; I tried the wicket of Mr. Wootton's gate, it was fast then; I went on to the further end of Cock-lane; I returned; before I came to Mr. Wootton's yard the prisoner passed me with the harness; it was not light then; I had suspicion that it was stolen; I did not stop him then, I went to Mr. Wootton's gate, I found the wicket open, that made my suspicion stronger; I went after the prisoner, I overtook him by the Saracen's Head in Skinner-street, I asked him where he was going with the harness, he told me to his master's house; I asked him where he had brought the harness from; he said, from the other side of Smithfield. I told him I must detain him and take him to the watchhouse; he said he would give me the harness if I would let him go. I took him to the watch-house and went to Mr. Wootton, he came and claimed the harness.

- WORRALL. I was constable of the night. I searched the prisoner, I found the long rein and the kicking strap in his pockets. I produce the harness.

Prosecutor. That is my own property. I have had them about six months.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going to work in the morning in Smithfield, I took up the harness, I did not know who it belonged to; the watchman passed me and came back after me, and when he called after me I stopped; I told him I found the harness in Smithfield, I was willing to give it to any body it belonged to.

GUILTY , aged 34.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

70. JOHN WILLIAMS , WILLIAM PARKER , and WILLIAM BROOKS were indicted for feloniously assaulting John Fox , in the King's highway, on the 26th of October , putting him in fear, and feloniously taking from his person and against his will, a watch, value 5 l. his property .

JOHN FOX . I am a gentleman's coachman , Mr. Lister is my master, No. 3, Lincoln's Inn.

Q. Did you lose your watch any time - A. Yes, on Saturday the 26th of October, it was between eleven and twelve at night.

Q. Were you sober - A. Yes. I was a little below Gray's Inn-lane , on the Grays Inn side, I was going home; I had been out of a few errands. I live in the mews over the stable. On my going home four or five men rushed upon me and knocked me down; they struck me and tripped me up and all.

Q. Before this happened had you any watch about you - A. Yes, I am certain I had my watch, and I felt them draw my watch out of my pocket. They took it away from me when I was upon the ground.

Q. Was there any light in any of the shops when you were knocked down - A. No, the shops were shut up.

Q. What sort of a night was it, dark or light - A. It was not very dark nor yet very light, there was the light of the lamps.

Q. Did you notice the face of any of the persons - A. Yes, I did notice the faces when I was laying upon my back. When they took the watch from me I noticed some of them so that I thought I should know them again. They ran off immediately they had got my watch. It was a silver watch with the name of Burton upon it.

Q. Was it in the narrow part of Holborn where the Middle-row part is, or nearer Chancery-lane - A. It was in the narrow part.

Q. When they had got your watch and was running away did you give any alarm - A. I called out watch, but no watch came. By the fall I was very much hurt; my head was very much cut behind.

Q. That was by the fall, not by any blow upon your head - A. No, by the fall.

Q. You were not struck by any weapon, were you - A. No, by the fist only.

Q. How long was it after this that any person was stopped on this charge - A. On the Monday evening. I went home, I was so badly hurt. I went and gave information the next morning at Hatton Garden, that was the Sunday. Then on the Monday evening there were three taken up. I saw the three persons.

Q. Were they the three persons that are now in custody - A. No, not that night. One of them was set at liberty; two of the prisoners were part of those three that were taken up, their names are William Parker and William Brooks , they were two of the three persons that I saw on the Monday night.

Q. Can you say whether those two persons were either of them in the party that attacked you so and took your watch - A. I believe they were both in the party that attacked me in this way and ran off with my watch.

Q. Can you go farther than belief, you know these persons lives are at stake upon your evidence - A. I cannot speak with positiveness.

Q. You say the party were five or six - A. There were four or five of them.

Q. Were they two of the party who came nearest to your person while your watch was taken away - A. I do not know that they were nearest, they all came up.

Q. What length of time was it after you was tripped up and your watch being taken away - A. I cannot say, it was a very short time, it was done in as short a time as it could be done. I described the parties to the officer when I gave the information.

Q. When did you see Williams - A. On the Wednesday evening I saw him in Brook's Market, him and a girl of the town along with him; I saw him with the officer, Cook was with me at the time; I had said to Cook I could know this man, he being taller than the others I thought I should know him if I saw him. When I saw him in Brooks Market, without any hint from Cook I said he was one of the party. I am quite sure as to him.

Q. You now upon your oath declare that he was one of the party that robbed you this evening - A. I do. I cannot say who took the watch away from me, I speak with positive certainty that he was one of the party.

Q. Has your watch ever been found again - A. Not as I know of, I have never seen it since.

CHARLES COOK . I am an officer of Hatton Garden office. On Sunday the 27th of October, in the morning part, I received information from the prosecutor that he had been robbed; he described the persons to the best of his recollection.

Q. Was he able to describe their dress at all - A. The jacket of one; he said one had a jacket on; he did not describe the colour of the jacket; he said there were two or three short ones, but one was much taller than any of the rest. In consequence of that I went up Holborn, on the Monday night, on my going up Holborn, I saw Parker and Brooks, and a chap of the name of Hindes, all in company together about eight o'clock at night.

Q. Had you known the persons of Parker and Brooks before - A. Yes. I took all three to the office, I informed them afterwards what I took them for; they said they knew nothing of it. The third man was discharged.

Q. What did the prosecutor say when he first saw these two men - A. He said he thought they were two of the party which were concerned in the robbery; those are his exact words.

Q. Did you search them - A. I did; I found nothing upon Brooks, upon Parker a little knife, but no money upon either of them. I apprehended Williams the tall man about twelve o'clock at night on the Wednesday following, I was in company with the prosecutor; we were going through Brook's Market into Holborn, we met the prisoner Williams and the girl.

Q. Did you know the prisoner Williams's person - A. When I got him in the public-house I did, not before; the prosecutor knew his person, and when I got him to the light I knew his person.

Q. On meeting him did you say anything to the prosecutor - A. No, I did not. The prosecutor said that is the man that knocked me down and took my watch away, upon which I took hold of him immediately, and the girl too.

Q. Did the prisoner hear the prosecutor say this is the man that knocked me down - A. There is no doubt but he might have heard it; the prisoner said he was wrong, for he was not in Holborn at that time.

Q. Did the prosecutor mention then what time - A. Yes.

Q. Do you recollect the night of the Saturday preceding the Wednesday - A. Yes; it was not very light. I took the prisoner Williams to the watch-house and searched him, I found two old silk handkerchiefs upon him. I have never been able to trace the watch. When I got him to the watchhouse I let the woman go upon her own word to appear again. In the morning I went to the watchhouse to take out the prisoner, and when I came there he had broken out of the watchhouse and made his escape; he broke open both the watchhouse doors. I found that by the watchhouse-keeper, and I saw the marks of violence upon the doors.

Q. When did you see him again - A. About twelve o'clock on the Thursday night in Brook's-street; I first had taken the girl that did not come according to her word; I saw him in Brook's-street with three or four girls, one of the girls said, here is that bloody trap; I went round the corner and took him immediately; I said you shall not run away again. Read, my brother officer was just by me then; I took him to the new watchhouse, and he was afterwards committed.

Williams. There was an Irishman in the watch-house, he broke out.

Cook. The Irishman was taken up for being tipseyto be there till the morning till he could sober himself, he was very much intoxicated. I did not see him, they told me he was very much intoxicated, he was put backwards in the hold.

Brooks I will ask the prosecutor whether he did not say at Hatton Garden that he could not swear to either of us two, Parker and me - COURT. He said now he is not certain.

Brooks. He said the first day he did not think we were the men, but on the Monday he said he thought we were.

Prosecutor. I said I believed they were two of the party; I said, I could not swear positively to them, but I believed them to be two of the party. I never went so far as to say they were not of the party.

WILLIAM READ . I am an officer of Hatton Garden office. I was with Cook on the Thursday night when he apprehended Williams the second time; I asked Williams how he came to break out of the watchhouse; he told me there was a man there, he persuaded him to break open the place and make his escape out.

Q. Did you see the state of the watchhouse - A. No, I did not. I questioned Williams a little further, he said he could bring people forward to prove he was elsewhere at the time the robbery was committed, that he was at a public-house; I told him he had better do it. He never did at the office.

Q. to Fox. What was the value of this watch - A. It cost me five pounds; it was a very good one; I would not have taken seven pound for it.

Williams' Defence. I was not out in Holborn at that time I was in Brook's Market at the Compasses drinking with my shopmates until one o'clock in the morning.

COURT, Q. to Fox. What time was it when you got home - A. I think it was a little before twelve o'clock when I got home.

Parker's Defence. I can take my oath I never saw the prosecutor nor yet Williams that night.

Brook's Defence. I have nothing more to say.

COURT. What do you mean by nothing more - A. No more than what I have said.

Q. You have said nothing, do you mean to say you have nothing more to say than you are innocent of the charge - A. Yes.

Williams called one witness, who gave him a good character.

WILLIAMS - GUILTY - DEATH , aged 23.

PARKER - NOT GUILTY .

BROOKS - NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

71. JOHN PHILLIPS was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Reuben Treasure , about the hour of ten on the night of the 5th of December , and stealing therein, two loaves of bread, value 2 s. 11 d. his property .

REUBEN TREASURE . I live at 22, King-street, Seven Dials , I keep a chandler's shop , I rent the whole house, it is in the parish of St. Giles's On the 5th of December, about ten o'clock at night, William Mackey halloaed out I was robbed, he had the prisoner; I came into the shop, I saw the prisoner with a quartern loaf in each hand; he said he wanted them, though he was not without money, he had three or four shillings in his pocket, he shewed it in the shop. I sent for a constable, the prisoner was taken in custody. The two loaves are worth two shillings and eleven pence.

WILLIAM MACKEY . I am a leather-dresser. On Thursday night I saw the prisoner looking in the shop window at the Seven Dials, not this shop; I saw him try to open another shop door. In consequence of that I had suspicion of him; he ran and looked in to Mr. Treasure's shop, he went into the passage, the street door was open, the shop door was in the passage; I saw him go into the shop and take the quartern loaves from the window; I looked through the window, I saw him take one first; he shook his head and laughed, as if he had done it snug without their seeing him, and then he took the other and came into the passage; I met him in the passage and collared him with the loaves in his hand, and then I called out to Mr. Treasure; I asked the prisoner if he did it for want I would let him go; he made no answer. I said, it does not appear that you did it for want, and then I halloaed out.

JOHN BAXTER . I am the watchhouse-keeper. The prisoner said he did not take it for want, he went into the shop to buy a pennyworth of bread and cheese, and there being nobody there he took the loaves.

Q. to Mr. Treasure. Did you perceive there were two loaves missing - A. Yes, they were the only two in the window.

Prisoner's Defence. I had no work for two months; I have a wife and two children; I am a shoemaker.

Mackey. When he was taken he said he was a coach-painter.

GUILTY, aged 20,

Of stealing only.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and Publicly Whipped .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

72. ROBERT ROBERTS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of December , thirty-three yards of callico, value 3 l. the property of William Morley , in his dwelling-house .

WILLIAM CHALLAS . I am a servant to William Morley , his dwelling-house is 36, Gutter-lane, Cheapside . On the 3d of December, about three o'clock in the afternoon, I was in the middle part of the warehouse, I had been putting goods away; I was looking towards the door, I saw some person with their hat upon their head going out of the warehouse; I went towards the door and the dog barked. When I came out I saw the prisoner running into Goldsmith-street, he had a piece of white goods under his left arm; I followed him; I overtook him in Wood-street with the bundle under his arm; I looked at the bundle and thought it was my master's property; I took him and asked him who gave it him, he said some man had given it him in the street.

Q. Can you say the goods was your master's - A. Yes, it was a piece of callico; I took the prisoner back and the goods, and then I went for the constable.

Q. You do not mean to say that you saw him there personally in the shop do you - A. No, I saw a person in the shop with his hat on. He told the warehouseman when I brought him back that he picked it up in the street by the door.

JOSEPH CORDEY . I am warehouseman to William Morley , I saw the prisoner when the porter brought him back and the goods.

Q. Do you know at what part the goods were deposited in Mr. Morley's warehouse - A. I do. I questioned him what he was going to do with them; he said he found them on the door; I told him it was a falsity, they had not been out that day I was sure.

WILLIAM SHEPHERD . I am a constable, I took the prisoner in custody, and these goods were delivered to me.

Cordey. I am certain they are Mr. Morley's goods, they are worth thirty-nine shillings.

Prisoner's Defence. I leave it to the mercy of the court and jury.

GUILTY, aged 36.

Judgment respited .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

73. SARAH COLEMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of December , fifty-four yards of sarcenet, value 15 l. the property of James Compigne , privately in his shop .

MATTHEW LAMPLEW . I am shopman to James Compigne , 48, Holborn Hill , he is a silk-mercer ; Mr. Compigne has no partner. On the 4th of December the prisoner came in the shop in company with another woman, I served her; she asked to look at some mazacine sarcenet; I shewed two pieces of sarcenet, she bought an eighth of a yard, it came to eight-pence, she paid me for it; there was no person in the shop but me and the woman and a carpenter that worked at the bottom of the shop, he was at work, he had no concern with the business of the shop; there was no one serving in the shop but myself that night. After she had bought the eighth of a yard the two pieces of sarcenet were left on the counter, the prisoner and her companion both asked me to let them look at some white sarcenet; I had to fetch the sarcenet four yards from them, and had to turn my back on her.

Q. Did they converse together all the while they were in the shop - A. Yes. I got the white sarcenet for the other lady, she took a quarter of a yard and paid me for it.

Q. Was there any other customer in the shop while these two women were there - A. No, there was not. After she had paid for the white sarcenet the prisoner passed the other woman and they went out together, only the prisoner went out first. I did not perceive that any thing was taken by the prisoner or that any thing was lost.

Q. What time was this - A. A quarter before five, after the candles were lit. In about ten minutes afterwards Lee the officer brought the prisoner in.

Q. I suppose you have no doubt of the person of the prisoner - A. No doubt at all. She pulled off her bonnet in the shop; I am confident to her person. When Lee came in the shop he asked me if I had lost any thing. I told him not that I knew of; he produced a piece of silk that he took from under his coat; I knew the piece of silk, it stood near half a yard from where I was serving the prisoner within her reach; it was twilled sarcenet, I had not shewn that to the prisoner.

Q. Where did the constable say that he had found that piece of silk - A. He said he had taken it from the prisoner's clothes; I believe she said, for God's sake let me go and take the piece of silk.

Q. What was the quantity of the silk - A. Fifty-four yards, worth fifteen pounds, it cost us that; I am sure that piece was on the counter, within half a yard of her when she was served by me this small quantity of silk. The other woman I have not seen since.

WILLIAM LEE . I am constable and street keeper of Holborn. On the 4th of December, about a quarter before five I saw the prisoner and another woman go into Mr. Compigne's shop.

Q. Did you know her person - A. I did, and the persons of them both. In consequence of their going into the shop I placed myself behind a coach to observe their conduct; I observed them both come out of the shop, the prisoner came out first.

Q. to Lamplew. The other shopman was not in the shop nor the master were they - A. No, the other shopman was in the accompting-house with his back to the shop; it is in a back-room adjoining the shop, he was writing at the desk.

Q. When the prisoner came in, at that part of the accompting-house could he observe the prisoner at all - A. It was not in his view at all.

Q. to Lee. You said both of them came out of the shop, and the prisoner came out first - A. Yes. As soon as they had shut the door they turned on the left up Holborn, and I observed the prisoner had got something by the aukwardness of her walk. I followed them nine doors, they turned about four yards up King's Head-court, both together. I then observed the prisoner endeavouring to take something from under her clothes; she had got a brown great coat on over her clothes; she was stooping and taking it from under her clothes; her back was towards me; I saw her pulling it out of the lower part of her dress, under her coat. As soon as she had got it under her coat she turned to the right, and I believe she then saw me.

Q. Do you know of your own knowledge that she knew you, and what you were - A. Yes, I am certain of that. She passed me quick, and ran across the road.

Q. Had you said any thing to occasion her to run - A. No. I thought of laying hold of them both; I pursued her, and as soon as she got her foot on the curb on the opposite side of the street, I caught hold of her coat, and felt the roll inside; I then said, holloa, what have you got here; she said, take it, Lee, for God's sake, and let me go; I said, you shall go back to where you had it from. I took the roll of silk from under her coat, and put it under my coat. I took her and the silk to Mr. Compigne's. The other woman ran up King's Head-court, it is a passage into Fetter-lane; I have not seen the other woman since. When I took the prisoner into Mr. Compigne's shop the last witness was at the left hand counter, and theother gentleman at the right-hand counter; I asked the last witness if he had lost any thing; he answered, not that he knew; I asked the next witness, neither of them knew anything was gone. I then took her into the accompting-house at the back of the shop and produced the silk; the silk was claimed as Mr. Compigne's. I then searched the prisoner, in her left hand pocket I found these two pieces of sarcenet rolled in that paper; I have kept the roll of sarcenet ever since, and likewise the pieces.

Q. to Lamplew. Look at that roll of sarcenet, are you quite sure that it is Mr. Compigne's - A. I am certain of it, and it was on the counter when I was serving of her.

Q. Look at that paper which Lee said he took out of her pocket - A. These are the two pieces that they bought of me when they were in the shop, I put them in that paper and the prisoner took them away. This roll of sarcenet is worth fifteen pounds.

RICHARD ANSON . Q. You serve in the shop - A. I do. I was in the accompting-house at the time.

Q. At the time that Lamplew said this woman was in the shop did you see her - A. I was in the accompting-house at the time, I did not see her, I could not.

Prisoner's Defence. I went into the gentleman's shop to purchase a bit of silk, the young woman was in the shop before I went in, and came out before me, and when I came out she said, young woman lay hold of this while I tie my stocking; she crossed the way and I crossed after her, when I was immediately taken into custody.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 15.

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

74. MATTHEW PRIOR PIGOTT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of November , a watch, value 1 l. the property of Walter Prior Pigott .

WALTER PRIOR PIGOTT . Q. Did you lose a watch - A. Yes, on Tuesday the 19th of November.

Q. Did you afterwards see your watch - A. The pawnbroker produced it.

Q. You gave no authority to anybody to pawn it, did you - A. No.

JESSE ALLEN . I am a servant to Mr. Flemming. No. 90, Newgate-street. On the 21st of November the prisoner offered this watch to pawn, he put it on the counter and desired to have fifteen shillings. In consequence of a bill I thought it had not been honestly come by; I opened the watch and perceived it had the name and number described in the bill; I questioned him as to where he got the watch; he told me that he bought it at a silversmiths in Middle-row, Holborn; I asked him if he had got the bill of what he gave for it; he told me he had not, his name was Mr. Peters, that he lived at Hampstead. I informed Mr. Flemming my suspicion, he came into the shop and spoke to him, an officer was sent for and he was secured. The watch was afterwards owned by the prosecutor.

Q. to prosecutor. Is that the watch that you missed - A. Yes, it is the same.

Prisoner's Defence. Gentlemen of the jury, I am in duty bound to state my case to you; my case is of that peculiar nature that I think myself justifiable in stating the facts to you. On the 21st of November, being a little necessiated, I went to Mr. Fleming to pawn the watch; on Thursday I was taken to Guildhall, where I was remanded till the 29th of November, and was then committed for trial. After I was committed to trial and my own father bound over to prosecute, I asked Mr. Teague, the keeper of the counter, whether I was not at liberty to see any one that I thought proper; he answered that it was even ordered that my wife should not see me; I asked him if I might write to any attorney; the question was answered by Mr. Teague, no, he had given orders that neither pen, ink, and paper should be allowed me, nor even my own wife to come to see me. I was brought to Newgate and close confined, not having the opportunity of sending to those friends who might have afforded me assistance in the present misfortune.

Gentlemen, You will excuse the impression it makes on my mind, and as men of feeling I hope you will consider my case. Gentlemen, provided I had the opportunity of seeing my wife I might have had counsel to plead in my behalf, that might have got me out of this snare, which may deprive me of living in my native country. Gentlemen, so far from stealing the watch I swear by heaven I never stole the watch. I bought the watch in question. If I had known the watch to have been stolen was it likely that I should have gone to the pawnbrokers to have offered it to pawn? When Mr. Flemming accused me of stealing the watch I never offered to run away, nor did even guilt or suspicion come in my face. But, to cut it short, provided I am found guilty though it cannot touch my life, it will send me out of the country; it will gratify the wishes of them that wish me out of the country. I actually did buy the watch, but you may naturally say, why do not you produce the man that you bought it of. When a man is denied of seeing his own wife how is he to get people to come forward. Gentlemen, look at the question exactly as it is. If I am found guilty I must be sent out of the country. If I had time I could bring the parties that I bought the watch of, but during the time I have been in Newgate I have been deprived of seeing any one, and have had no more than the allowance of bread and water. Gentlemen, look in my case and say, whether you think I stole the watch. There is no proof that I stole the watch; the only question is, whether I bought the watch knowing it to be stolen. I bought the watch, I did not know it was stolen. The way that I came to pawn the watch I had a watch in my pocket, I gave that watch to my wife. Gentlemen, if I had known the watch to have been stolen should not I have given my wife this, and not myself have gone to pledge it. I do not wish to speak to you in this way on purpose to bias your minds, but if you do not think me guilty there is no proof of my stealing the watch; the only proof is finding the watch in my possession. Gentlemen, I know no more of stealing the watch than a child unborn. If you think I did steal the watch you will find me guilty, but as men of feeling, if you feel this as I do, you will give me that verdict upon which you cantest your minds hereafter.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

75. JACOB DIFFNER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of November , sixteen pounds weight of soap, value 12 s. the property of David Montague ; and JOHN BENJAMIN for feloniously receiving the said goods, knowing them to have been stolen .

FRANCIS KINNERSLEY . I am a constable. On the 19th of November, about seven o'clock in the afternoon, I saw Benjamin with this basket of soap on his shoulder, he was in Harrow-alley, from Petticoat lane it leads into Cutler-street; I asked what he had got there, he said it was soap, he had brought it from home from the bottom of Primrose-street, Bishopsgate-street, he told me he got the soap from a man to sell for him, he would shew me where the man was. I secured the soap and Benjamin took me into an alley at the bottom of Primrose-street, up one pair of stairs; Diffner was sitting there, and a woman and child in Benjamin's house; Benjamin pointed to him. Diffner jumped off the chair and said, good God, I thought you would not do so, or betray me. I asked Diffner in Benjamin's hearing how or in what manner he came by the soap; Benjamin said he had it of him. Diffner was in such a flurry he made no reply. Diffner said he worked at a sugar bakers. I took him down stairs. Going along he told me that he was a watchman at Mr. Montague's soap manufactory in Chick-lane , and that he brought the soap from his master's manufactory. I lodged them both in the Compter. I went to Mr. Montague, he saw the soap at the Mansion House, he said he could not swear to it. It is mottled soap in pieces.

EDWARD EAMES . I am clerk to Mr. Montague. After the prisoner was apprehended I went to him, I said it was a shocking thing; he said nobody else was concerned in it, he took it himself; that the man who locks up the soap-bin had left the key on a bench in the soap-house, near to the copper, and was going to wash himself. Diffner said, I want that key to get the saw to saw some wood for the house, and that he had take about a dozen pieces of mottled soap; the soap has no mark upon it; it is not perfectly boiled mottled soap, it answers to what we were possessed of. The basket that the soap was in is mine.

Diffner's Defence. I told Mr. Eames that I found it as I went through Smithfield, I took it up, and in Long-lane John Benjamin came up to me, he had a knot; I said I found a parcel, he said come along with me and we found it was soap.

Benjamin said nothing in his defence.

DIFFNER - GUILTY , aged 52.

Publicly whipped and discharged.

BENJAMIN - NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

76. GEORGE DIXON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of November , twenty-three quires of writing paper, value 25 s. the property of Thomas Curteis , and Lepidge Smith .

FRANCIS KINNERSLEY . Forrester and I were going on the 26th of November, we stopped the prisoner in Cutler-street; I said, you have got a log of wood; he said, yes. I took him under is lamp, it turned out to be a ream of paper; I asked him who he was; he said he should not satisfy me; he said a person had given him the paper in the street. I then lodged him in the Poultry Compter, and left the paper with the ward beadle. I have the paper here. I got information that the paper belonged to the prosecutor, and the prisoner was his porter. I searched the prisoners lodgings. The prisoner confessed that he had robbed his master of several reams of paper off his master's pile, but another man had led him into it.

LEPIDGE SMITH . My partner 's name is Thomas Curteis; the prisoner was our porter . I know this paper, there is my servants writing on it. We have missed twenty reams of paper of this sort, this paper cost about, a guinea a ream. The prisoner's wages was twenty four shillings a week, and a dinner every day at my expence.

Prisoner's Defence. I have a wife and four children totally dependant on me for support, who are now by my being deprived of my daily labour obliged to apply to the parish.

GUILTY , aged 35.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

77. ROBERT SHEPHARD and WILLIAM GOODALL were indicted for feloniously receiving, on the 4th of May , one thousand bricks, value 50 s. the property of William Hobson , whereof Joseph Hill has been tried and convicted of stealing .

(The Conviction of Joseph Hill read.)

THOMAS TAYLOR . I am clerk to Mr. Hobson, brickmaker at Kingsland. I sent the bricks to Drapers-place, Burton Crescent, they were for Mr. Hart, he was having some houses built there. On the 4th of May I sent ten thousand; I had five carts in my employ that day, which were to take a thousand in each cart in the morning, and the same quantity in the evening. The bricks were delivered to the carters. Hill, the man who was convicted in July sessions, was one of the five men.

THOMAS OWEN . I am a servant to Mr. Hart, he was erecting some buildings in Draper's place.

Q. On the 4th of May last were you employed in receiving the bricks coming from the prosecutor's to Mr. Hart - A. I was. Hill, who was convicted in July sessions, he was one of the carters, he brought one load of bricks in the morning, he did not come in the afternoon; five loads came in the morning and four in the afternoon. We received nine thousand, that is all.

CHARLES BELLINGER . Q. Do you recollect the person of Hill, who was tried here in July sessions - A. Yes. On the 4th of May, about half past four in the afternoon I was coming past Goodall's buildings, I saw Mr. Smith's cart shoot the bricks against Goodall's buildings; I did not see Hill the carter; I saw Shephard the bricklayer standing at the door; I said to Shephard, I shall draw you no bricks; I was busy, and you will not want any now Mr. Taylor lor has sent you some by Mr. Smith's cart; Shephardsaid he did not know it. I never saw Goodall.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

78. GEORGE EMANUEL and PHILIP KEATON were indicted for feloniously making an assault in the King's Highway, on the 4th of November , upon Peter Rose , putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, a pocket book, value 2 s. his property .

SAMUEL WILSON . I live at No. 5, Little Hermitage-street. On the 4th of November, about half past seven in the evening I was in East Smithfield, I heard the cry of stop thief, I saw Emanuel running, and a captain and a sailor pursuing him; I caught Emanuel by the collar; the sailor said Emanuel had picked his pocket of his pocket-book. Emanuel asked me what I stopped him for; I said, because he was running. Keaton came up and struck me on the eye; he gave me a black eye. Keaton said, let us maul this bloody thief. Mr. Harvey and me took them to the watchhouse. The sailor's name was Peter Rose . The captain and Rose said that Keaton was with Emanuel when he hustled him out of his pocket-book.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

79. SAMUEL GATES was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Gray , about the hour of seven on the night of the 4th of December , and stealing therein, six yards of printed cotton, value 12 s. five bonnets, value 15 s. and two caps, value 5 s. the property of Edward Soper .

EDWARD SOPER . I live in St. Ann's-court, Soho . I keep the shop . The housekeeper is Thomas Gray , he lives in the house.

MARY SOPER . I am the wife of the last witness. I was at home on the 4th of December, between seven and eight; I missed the goods after Mary Loft left the shop. When I came in the shop the door was wide open. I was in the parlour and did not see it opened at all.

MARY ANN LOFT . I am servant to Mrs. Holmes in Tottenham-court-road. My mistress sent me to Mrs. Soper's for a bonnet, and when I came out I made the door fast. It was between seven and eight.

THOMAS MANTZ . I went into the Three Compasses on Wednesday evening about a quarter before eight o'clock, I saw the prisoner sitting in the box, and something white behind him; he was shifting about; I went and saw this property, I asked him if it belonged to him; he said no; I asked him if there was any more; he said, yes, I believe there is; he pulled up this gown. There were two others in the box, they were discharged by the magistrate.

Prosecutrix. They are all mine.

Prisoner's Defence. There were four men sitting in the box where I was; two of them went out, I went and sat in their place.

GUILTY , aged 18.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

80. DAVID EVANS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of October , a clarinet, value 21 s. the property of Samuel James Button and John Whittaker .

JOHN WHITTAKER . My partner 's name is Samuel James Button . The prisoner was our servant . We lost musical instruments in September and in November.

JOSEPH TEMPHE . I am a pawnbroker. I produce a clarinet pawned on the 17th of October by the prisoner for fifteen shillings.

Mr. Whittaker. That is my property.

HERMAN WREDE . I am the manufacturer of this clarinet. I never stamp the name of Button and Whittaker on any clarinet except such as are actually delivered to them.

Prisoner's Defence. Mr. Wrede can put that mark upon any instrument that he makes, and his men can put that mark on. The prosecutor never missed an article until a person came and told him there was an article at the pawnbroker's. I am as innocent as any of you are.

JURY, Q. to Mr. Wrede. I wish to ask you where you keep this mark - A. In the shop.

GUILTY , aged 50.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

81. THOMAS BATCHELOR was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of July , there pounds weight of nutmegs, value 2 l. 18 s. and one pound weight of cloves, value 7 s. the property of Robert Roebuck and William Palmer .

ROBERT ROEBUCK . I carry on the business of dealing in coffee and spice . The prisoner was our servant . This order in the book is his own hand-writing.

"10th July, Edward Ashton , Great Rider-street, cloves one pound, 7 s.; nutmegs three pounds, 2 l. 18 s."

EDMUND ASHTON . In July the prisoner called for some nutmegs and cloves, the day after they were delivered, he said they were for a grocer near us, similar to my name; I would not let him have them without this receipt.

GUILTY , aged 34.

Fined 1 s. and discharged.

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

82. CHARLES PITT was indicted for a misdemeanor .

[The copy of the record between Charles Pitt and Robert Smith , Trinity Term last, produced.]

MR. HENSON. Q. You are an attorney - A. Yes.

Q. In the case mentioned in that record you were attorney for the defendant - A. I was.

DAVID WALLIS . Q. Did you examine that paper with the original record in the office - A. I did.

Defendant. How did you examine it - A. In the proper way.

Q. That is not a proper answer - A. The reverse way.

MR. WHITTAKER. Q. What are you - A. I am a solicitor.

Q. Do you know the defendant, Mr. Pitt - A. Perfectly well.

Q. Have you seen him write frequently - A. I am acquainted with his hand-writing.

Q. Look at that and tell me whether you believe that to be his hand-writing - A. I have no doubt about it.

SAMUEL FREEMAN . I keep the Aldgate coffee-house, Aldgate.

Q. Did you ever receive that letter, and when - A. I did, two days after I was witness at a trial at Westminster upon which the present defendant was against Robert Smith which was tried before Lord Ellenborough; I received that letter. The letter read, the tenor of which was as follows. -

SIR,

The learned Judge in pronouncing Smith's case to be a gross libel, and then said relief might be had if I could shew you, upon your oath, a deviation from truth. That I shall be able to do so, is unquestionable; you can best explain your motive. I assure you the mode pointed out is one way of shewing. It will be painful to me as affecting you. I have my character at stake, which must prompt me to this step, perhaps at the immediate juncture of making the statement that Smith was drunk you will avail yourself of an opportunity of correcting that, if so, you will find me at Westminster this day Your oath was in direct contradiction to what you have declared to persons of great respectability. All this intimation is given you that you may take an early opportunity to retract, by correcting yourself: or in the other instance, manfully avowing that which you have sworn is correct.

I am, sir, Charles Pitt , 39, Drury-lane.

13th July, 1811.

Defendant, Q. to Mr. Freeman. By whom did you receive this letter - A. It was handed to me by some person in the house by some of my servants or children, I do not justly recollect now.

Q. When that letter was delivered to you were you informed that that letter was brought from Charles Pitt - A. The name informed me.

COURT. Did any person inform you that he delivered it by the direction of Mr. Pitt - A. No.

Defendant. Upon your oath, who is your attorney in this prosecution - A. Messrs. Noy and Pope in Mincing-lane, and Mr. Heason.

Q. They are all your solicitors. Now, sir, did you shew to Messrs. Noy and Pope the letter of which you complain to-day, and at what time did you shew it - A. It was shewed to them, it was handed to Messrs. Smith and Henson, and then afterwards to Messrs. Noy and Pope.

Q. Now, sir, I ask you the precise day on which you sent the letter to Messrs. Noy and Pope - A. I do not recollect the precise day or month.

Q. Upon the oath you have taken have not you consulted John Henson who sits there first, before ever you mentioned the subject to Noy and Pope - A. I did not, I consulted Noy, and Pope first to know what to do with you.

Q. Upon the oath you have taken did you consult Messrs. Noy and Pope, or Mr. John Henson until after you put in bail for that indictment - A. I believe is was after.

Q. I am glad I got so far at last. Now Mr. Freeman when did you put in bail for this indictment - A. I believe it was September sessions.

Q. Then you neither consulted Messrs. Noy and Pope upon the subject of indicting me until you with John Henson stood indicted for libelling me - Did not Mr. John Henson the attorney say to you give me this letter, I will fix him free of expence to you - A. That was not his word.

COURT. Do you mean to say that no such thing passed between you and Mr. Henson - A. I do not recollect.

The defendant addressed the jury in his own behalf.

GUILTY .

Imprisoned in Newgate Six Months , and to pay a fine of 1 s. to the King .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

James Bonner , tried in October sessions, Transported for Seven Years .

Michael Hagan , John Smith and Edward Heath , severally fined 1 s. and Confined Six Months in the House of Correction .

James Mansfield , Confined Two Years in the House of Correction at Maidstone in Kent, to be in Newgate until conveyed to that place .