Old Bailey Proceedings Online (www.oldbaileyonline.org, version 6.0, 15 September 2014), April 1811 (18110403).

Old Bailey Proceedings, 3rd April 1811.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE OYER AND TERMINER, AND GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND ALSO THE GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, HELD AT Justice-Hall, in the Old Bailey, On WEDNESDAY the 3d of APRIL, 1811, and following Days;

BEING THE FOURTH SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF The Right Hon. JOSHUA JONATHAN SMITH , LORD-MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY JOB SIBLY , No. 4, CARTHUSIAN-STREET, ALDERSGATE-STREET.

LONDON:

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED (BY THE AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON.) By R. Butters, No. 22, Fetter-lane, Fleet-street

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON.

Before the Right-honourable JOSHUA JONATHAN SMITH , Lord Mayor of the City of London; Edward Lord Ellenborough , Lord Chief Justice of His Majesty's Court of King's Bench: Sir Alan Chambre , knt. one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir John Bailey , knt. one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir John William Anderson , bart. Sir Charles Price , bart. John Ansley , esq. Aldermen of the said City; John Silvester , esq. Recorder of the said City; George Scholey , esq. Christopher Smith , esq. Aldermen of the said City; and Newman Knowlys , esq. Common-serjeant of the said City; His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of Goal Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

London Jury.

William Russell ,

John Rawlinson ,

John Callow ,

James Wainman ,

William Ridpath ,

Spencer Field ,

William Godfrey ,

Thomas Adams ,

James Hammond ,

Luke Willthew ,

Thomas Arnott ,

Richard Groom .

First Middlesex Jury.

Thomas Potts ,

James Casselden ,

Richard Marston ,

Thomas Thompson ,

Edward Corn ,

David Lindsey ,

John Thompson ,

Jonathan Aswin ,

John Green ,

John Barclay ,

Edward Sawyer ,

James Deltrey .

Second Middlesex Jury.

John Hall ,

William Fell ,

Richard Artis ,

John Rodwell ,

William Conder ,

Charles Hillhouse ,

Caleb Steadman ,

Charles Greerson ,

William Ladbrooke ,

Benjamin Tabbor ,

James Showbridge ,

John Buckmaster .

286. DAVENPORT SEDLEY, and CHARLES GABRIEL GUSTAVUS KIERULFF , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of January , five bills of exchange for the payment of five hundred pounds each, a bill of exchange, value 300 l. and two bills of exchange, value 200 l. each , the property of Thomas Taylor , Marquis of Headfort.

Mr. Alley, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoners were

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

287. JOHN EASTEN was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Matthew Bankes , about the hour of six, on the night of the 5th of January , and stealing therein, two pair of breeches, value 10 s. two gowns, value 20 s. two petticoats, value 1 s. a spencer, value 2 s. seventeen handkerchiefs, value 5 s. and five habit shirts, value 1 s. the property of Matthew Bankes . And ELIZABETH WHITFIELD for feloniously receiving the same goods, she well knowing them to have been stolen .

The prosecutor and witnesses were called, and not appearing in court , the prisoners were.

ACQUITTED.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

288. ELIZABETH HICKSON, alias BROWN , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of February , twelve shirts, value 4 l. twenty-one handkerchiefs, value 3 l. 12 s. two dressing gowns, value 10 s. two pair of drawers, value 5 s. and two waistcoats, value 7 s. the property of George Davidson , in his dwelling-house .

SUSANNAH DAVIDSON . I am the wife of George Davidson , we live at 82, Market-street, Cavendish-square . I lost out of my husband's house twelve fine shirts, and fourteen fine handkerchiefs, marked W J, a dressing gown, two pair of drawers, and two flannel waistcoats, on the 19th of February.

Q. Have you seen them again - A. I have, at Marlborough-street, on the Saturday following. I lost them out of the parlour, they were in a basket tied up in the way they came in to be washed. I am a washerwoman. I had them to wash for William James . I saw them in my parlour about eleven o'clock.

SAMUEL WARD . I am a Chelsea pensioner. On Tuesday the 19th of February, between twelve and one o'clock, I saw the constable take the prisoner with a basket of linen out of a house in St. Giles's; I followed the constable, he was taking her to Marlborough-street; the prisoner took a belcher handkerchief out of her pocket, and dropped it into a woman's lap that was sitting down as she passed by. I took it out of the woman's lap, and gave it to the constable. This was between twelve and one o'clock; I saw her putting her hand into her pocket again, I said, stop, constable, she has got more handkerchiefs in her pocket. I took her hand out of her pocket, and took out of her pocket five more handkerchiefs; I gave them to the constable; that made six, and the one on her neck was seven. They were all belcher handkerchiefs, but different patterns. The prisoner was very much in liquor.

JOHN KENT . I apprehended the prisoner at No. 18, Backeridge-street; I went there from information, called her out; I told her she must go up into her room, I would tell her what I wanted with her. This was between twelve and two o'clock; we went up into her own room, she asked me what I wanted with her; she said she would not open the door; she had the key in her hand; I took the key out of her hand, and opened the door myself. In the middle of the room stood a basket, I asked her how she came by it; she said a young man gave it her. I asked her who the young man was; she said she did not know, she had never seen him before, he had promised to bring her some more. I packed up the basket of linen and tied them up; I said you must go with me.

Q. She did not produce the hankerchiefs - A. No. She said, what occasion have I to go with you, you have got your own property. I took the basket of linen and her to Marlborough-street office. She dropped the handkerchiefs, as was related before. I saw the handkerchiefs taken out of her pocket, and one was on her neck; they were all marked the same as the linen in the basket. The prisoner was intoxicated. She told the magistrate that a young man brought them to her to wash, that she had lived with the young man some time. She was committed. I advertized the property. Mrs. Davidson came and claimed the property.

Q. to Prosecutrix. You said these goods were left in the parlour - A. Yes; the parlour door was open. The basket was tied down when in my parlour, she must have opened them at her own home to have taken the handkerchiefs out. I was sweeping about the door at the time they were taken away. If she had opened them in my room I should have seen her. The shirts were worth a guinea each, when new; they may all be worth about two pounds now. I am not certain. They are all the gentleman's property that sent them me to wash.

Prisoner's Defence. This basket was delivered to me by a man, it had a cloth over it; the handkerchiefs he gave me loose out of his pocket; he told me to go home and he would bring the rest of the things to me. We had something to drink together in the forenoon. I took the handkerchiefs of the man at the end of Oxford-road; I took them home. I asked the man where he came from, he said he had disagreed with his relations. I had been in his company before, we agreed to live together. The constable came and took the things away; he said he would advertise the things, he did not think I came honestly by them.

GUILTY, aged 32.

Of stealing to the value of thirty-nine shillings only .

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

289. JOHN COLE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of March , a bag, value 2 s. and sixty pound weight of flour, value 20 s. the property of William Osmond .

JAMES GILLMORE . I am an officer of Queen-square office. On the evening of the 12th of March I saw the prisoner at the top of Cockspur-street, he was coming from towards Piccadilly, he had this bag on his shoulder; I stopped him, I asked him what he had got upon his shoulder; he said, some flour, he had got it from his master, he was going to take it to a man at Charing Cross. I asked him the name of the man and his business; he said he neither knew the name or business, nor yet whereabouts at Charing Cross he lived; I asked him his master's name, he refused to tell. I told him I was sure he had not brought it far, we would go back, and I would find out his master. We walked back again, we passed his master's house forty yards, there I found him shuffle the bag, as though he wanted to get it off his shoulder. I told him it was no use. I took him into the Sun public house in Hare-street, and handcuffed him. Mr. Lawrence, a master baker was there, he saw the bag and knew the bag. The prisoner then said, he was sorry for it, he was going to give it to a man that had three children; he had never done so before. Mr. Lawrence went for his master. The next morning I weighed the bag, it weighed sixty-six pounds. I have had the bag in my possession ever since.

WILLIAM OSMOND . I live in Piccadilly , I am a cornchandler . The prisoner left my shop at his usual time. In about a quarter of an hour after he was gone I was sent for to the Sun in Hare-street, I there saw the prisoner, he was in the custody of Gillmore. The prisoner had a bag with some flour in it, the bag is marked W. O. This is the bag and the flour that I saw at the public-house; it is my bag, and I had flour of the same description on my premises. The bag is worth one shilling and sixpence. The prisoner gave no account how he obtained it.

JOSEPH COOPER . I was with Gillmore. I have heard his account, it is correct. I know nothing more.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, nor called any witnesses to his character.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Confined Two Years in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. justice Bailey.

290. JOHN KENT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of February , four deal boards, value 15 s. and two pieces of mahogany, value 5 s. the property of George Robert Holmes .

RICHARD WITTAM . I am a labourer. On the 28th of February, in the morning, I and Neale were employed to watch Mr. Holmes's premises; we placed ourselves in the little shop, about half after five in the morning a person came past in a direction from Mr. Fletcher's premises. There is a tree by a wall that a person could get over; I saw him go to the great barn, it was light enough, I knew him directly. I have known him between five and six years, and when he passed me I was sure it was him. When he got to the barn I saw a light in the barn. I heard him rattle the deals about as if he was picking them out. I saw him come from the barn with a light, and go to the mahogany house. I saw him come from the mahogany house to the barn; when he got to the barn the light was put out; he then took up his load, and when he passed by where I was waiting for him I opened the door and seized him by the collar; he throwed the deals and mahogany at me, and broke two or three squares of glass; the prisoner struggled very hard; I threw him down, and one of his shoes came off. He arose, collared me, and struck me; I told him I would take him, do whatever he would; he said he would lose his life before he would be taken, and I replied, I would lose my life before I would leave him. I dragged him about ten yards, he got from me and ran five or ten yards. I called out, if he did not stop I would fire; he did not stop, I fired the pistol at him, I hit him; he fell. He arose and came to me, and catched hold of the pistol. We had a struggle; I got it from him. He said, d - n your blood, I have got you, and tried to get at his right hand pocket; I said, Neale, mind, he is going to get a knife, he will stab you; I knocked him down with the pistol; he said, I did not think you would have served me so; I said, is not my life as sweet as yours. After that he was delivered to the constable. From the time that he passed me, to the time that he had the deals on his shoulder, he was never out of my sight. From his person and voice I knew him.

JOHN NEALE . On this morning, about half after five, I was along with the other witness in the little shop, for the purpose of watching.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. Yes, ever since he worked for Mr. Holmes, after he lived at Twickenham. I saw nothing till I saw the light in the barn. I heard the boards moving; I saw a person come along with the boards, and my partner seized him; it was the prisoner. As soon as he was seized he threw the deals down; they struggled; he got away, and my partner fired at him. He was afterwards delivered to my master.

Prosecutor. The deals and mahogany are mine.

MR. ADAMS. The prisoner was put into my custody. I found upon him a tinder box, a knife, and skeleton keys.

Prisoner's Defence. I never was on Mr. Holmes's premises till that morning. I never stole any thing from him in all my life. I am very sorry for being there then. That man shot me in the side and broke one of my ribs. I have suffered a great deal.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 52.

Confined Two Years in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

291. MARY CLARKE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of March , a watch, value 5 l. a ribbon, value 2 d. and two seals, value 2 l. the property of Goodwin Hammond , from his person .

GOODWIN HAMMOND . On the night of the 25th of March I met the prisoner in Drury-lane, we went to No. 5, Charles-street , and after I had been half an hour in the room with her I took my watch out to see the hour; she snatched it out of my hand, and ran down stairs; she said she would be up again in a minute; I stopped about twenty minutes to see if she would return, she did not.

Q. What was there besides the watch - A. Two gold seals and a gold key. The next morning, between ten and eleven o'clock, I was with Humphreys when he apprehended the prisoner; I saw her searched, the seal and key was found in her pocket. This is the seal and key; I know the seal and key to be mine. There is a notch I made upon the seal.

Q. What was the value of your watch - A. About four pounds, and this seal thirty shillings, it cost me two guineas.

CHARLES HUMPHREYS . I am an officer. On the 26th of March I went with the prosecutor to apprehend the prisoner. When I went in, I said, Poll are you here; she said, yes. I said, Poll, you know the thimble; she said she did not know what I meant.

Q. What is the cant phrase, a thimble - A. That is the ordinary name for a watch. I asked her if she had the thimble; she said, no. She turned out her pockets, and in taking the things out she was longer than she ought. I said, stand aside. I heard something fall, I said what is that, she said a little rouge. I said, what you do your face with? she said, yes. I picked it up, it was this seal and key. The prosecutor said it was his; the prisoner denied ever being with the prosecutor at all.

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutor went with me into Parker-street, he paid a shilling for the room. He told me he had but one shilling in his pocket. I went down stairs, and he lit me down himself, and half an hour afterwards he met me again. He had the gold seal and key in his hand; he said, if I would go with him he would give it me; he would return and make me a compliment; I was not to make away with it; I did not. I know nothing of the watch, no more than you do. The prosecutor said he had given six shillings to a young woman that ran away.

Prosecutor. I did not give her the seal and key. She took the watch, two seals, and a key; the prisoner had six shillings and sixpence of me; no other person took a shilling from me.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

292. WILLIAM FOWLE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of March , a cheese, value 5 l. the property of William Davis .

JOSEPH DANIEL . On the 25th of March I saw the prisoner rolling the cheese along the street; Mr. Davis seized him, and I took the cheese to Mr. Davis's shop. The prisoner said he found it.

WILLIAM DAVIS . I am a cheesemonger , No. 17, Duke-street, Lincoln's Inn-fields . On the 25th of March, about seven o'clock in the evening, I was informed by my little boy, four years old, that a man had taken away one of my cheeses, and was rolling it along the street. Upon the child telling me the second time I went out and saw the prisoner rolling it he was about twenty yards off; I pursued him, I took hold of his collar, I asked him where he was going with that cheese; he answered, I found it in the street. I requested Mr. Daniel to take charge of the cheese while I took the man back to my shop. This is the cheese, I am sure it is mine, there is my name on it. In the morning I had put out three cheeses on my area bars, and when my little boy gave me the information there were only two.

Prisoner's Defence. I was returning home from my work, I was crossing Wild-street, I saw a tall man in a blue coat carrying the cheese, he let it drop; and at the time the gentleman came up I was wiping it; I called for assistance. I suppose the gentleman heard me. Speak the truth gentleman.

Prosecutor. I did not.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

293. ABRAHAM LANGLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of February , a watch, value 15 s. a chain, value 1 d. and a glass seal, value 1 d. the property of John Emly .

ELIZABETH EMLY . I am the wife of John Emly ; I live in Hackney .

Q. Did you lose a watch on the 28th of February - A. Yes, at eleven o'clock in the morning, it was my husband's watch, it was taken from a brass hook, under the mantle, in the front dining room, on the first floor.

Q. What time in the day had you seen it before - A. About eleven o'clock in the morning. I came down for a pitcher of water, and on my return I saw the prisoner coming down stairs.

Q. Had you known him before - A. No. He was dressed in a light coloured great coat.

Q. Did you particularly remark his person so as to be able to speak to him again - A. No; it is very much like him.

Q. Do you speak to him or not - A. No.

Q. When you went in your room was your watch there or gone - A. It was gone. On my seeing the strange man come down I had suspicion. I told my husband. I went down and told the people of the house.

Q. Was the person pursued - A. No; I went out, he was gone; I did not see any body. On the week following I saw the watch at Worship-street. The watch is here, the pawnbroker has it.

Q. Have you any doubt the prisoner is the person - A. I have no doubt.

THOMAS COKE . I am a pawnbroker's shopman, 25, City-road. This watch was pawned with me on the 28th of February, about two o'clock. I believe the person that pawned it to be the prisoner, he was drest in a light coloured great coat. I lent him twelve shillings upon it.

Q. Did you issue a duplicate - A. Yes, this is the duplicate; I got the duplicate from a private in the militia; I have had the watch ever since in my possession.

Prosecutrix. It is my husband's watch, it has a silver face.

WILLIAM HOLDEN . I am a private in the Royal East London Militia. On the first Friday in March I received a duplicate of the prisoner, he asked me if I wanted to buy a watch; I told him I did; he asked me thirteen shillings for the duplicate; he said he had pawned the watch for want of money; I agreed with him for it. I advanced no money untill I had seen the watch. I took the duplicate to the pay-serjeant, and asked him to redeem it for me. This is the same duplicate that I received of the prisoner. I afterwards saw the prisoner, and told him the duplicate was stopped. He told me he would redeem it for me if I would advance him the money; he was not afraid of being stopped.

Prisoner's Defence. I found this duplicate in Featherstone-street, I could not afford to get the watch out; I asked this man to purchase the ticket of me. I belong to the Royal West London Militia; he told me the watch was stopped two or three days after he got the duplicate. I told him I would get the watch out if he would get the money for me.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Confined Two Years in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Bailey.

294. MARY LULLY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of March , a watch, value 3 l. the property of Michael M'Carty , from his person .

MICHAEL M'CARTY . I am a sailor . I went with this girl about eleven at night, on the 26th of March to her apartment in George-street, St. Giles . I asked the person that took us up stairs if she was the mistress of the house; she said, no. I said I could not give my watch to any person but the mistress of the house, and after being up stairs I took the watch out of her hand, as she was not the mistress of the house, and put the watch into my hat; the prisoner got out of bed and snatched the watch out of my hat, and ran down stairs in her smock. I ran after her and went against the wall; I fell down, and never have got my watch since.

THOMAS LINES . I am a watchman in that street. I was fetched to that house. I went in; the prisoner was sitting in the house by the fire, in her smock; she told me that the man up stairs had took all her clothes away. I went up stairs, I said, give the girl her clothes; they were done up in a bundle; he said, I charge this girl, she has got my watch.

Prisoner's Defence. I took the prisoner to my lodgings, he promised to give me five shillings, and two shillings for the bed; we both went to bed together; when we awaked this man said he had a watch to leave till the morning, he had no money; I said, send down to the landlady; the servant girl came up, he began to play with her; he gave no money, nor no watch; he said, you be answerable for the bed, if you come to Mr. Roach's in the morning I will pay you; I said, no, I cannot be answerable, I owe the landlady money. He knocked me about the room, I cried out murder; I ran down stairs and sent for the watchman. He had no watch or money.

HARRIOTT SWAN . When this man and woman came into the house I asked the man to pay for the bed; he said he had no money, he would give me the watch till the morning. I sat there a long while asking him for the watch, he said, would I have it then, or in the morning. I was tired waiting. I went down stairs. A while afterwards he was using the woman in a very bad manner. I went up stairs and asked him what was the matter; he said he would serve me the same; the prisoner ran down stairs without her clothes, and sent me for the watchman.

Q. Did you ever see the watch - A. No, I did not.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

295. WILLIAM PARKER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of February , two sheets, value 6 s. and a counterpane, value 2 s. the property of William Tappin , in a lodging-room .

MRS. TAPPIN. I am the wife of William Tappin , we live in Christ's Church parish, Middlesex . I let a lodging to the prisoner on the 25th of last February, a one pair of stairs room for one night, he paid me the nights lodging; I let to him a bed, there was a pair of sheets and a counterpane on the bed. In the morning we got up a little before seven o'clock, found the prisoners room door open, and the prisoner was gone. The counterpane was gone, and the pair of sheets; I have never seen them since.

Prisoner's Defence. I am perfectly innocent of the charge that is laid against me.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Bailey.

296. JOSEPH SANDERS and CHARLES GILL were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of March , a pair of shoes, value 4 s. the property of William March .

WILLIAM MARCH . I am a shoemaker in Shoreditch . The prisoners came to my house on the 1st of March under pretence of giving me an order for a pair of shoes; I measured Sanders; Gill was with him. On their quitting the shop Sanders said he would call the next day and give me further instructions on them. Gill gave no order.

Q. When did you miss any shoes - A. From the information of Richard Taylor , and on some little recollection I found I had missed one pair out of three pair which had been hanging at the back of the shop. My son pursued the prisoners, and brought them back; the prisoner's were both searched, and nothing found on them.

Q. How came you to find the shoes - A. By the information of Gill himself. He said the shoes were to be found in Primrose-street, Mr. Fuller uhd them.

MR. FULLER. I belong to the board of Ordnance. On the 1st of March I was in Mr. March's shop, Mr. Taylor came in and informed him that he had lost a pair of shoes; the prisoners were pursued and brought back. Gill said he had been drawn in by him; he did not say whom; it was his first offence, and the shoes were to be found in Primrose-street. I found the shoes. These are the shoes.

Q. to prosecutor. Are they your property - A.Shoes are so much like one another I cannot swear they are my property.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

297. ANN MARIA WALTER , and WILLIAM FOWLE , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of March , seven cotton handkerchiefs, value 7 s. the property of Joseph Craig .

JANE WALSH . I live in Brownlow-street, Long Acre.

Q. Did you see the two prisoners on the 25th of last month - A. I did, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I saw them a little beyond the top of Newport Market, they were in company, and talking together. Ann Jane Freworth was with me. We followed them to Mr. Craig's shop, Castle-street, Leicester Fields ; they walked together all the way, they stopped at Mr. Craig's door. Walter looked at a gown piece, and presently she pulled out some plaid handkerchiefs, and looked at them, they were hanging inside the door. They remained there about a quarter of an hour; I stood close to the prisoners; I heard Walter say to Fowle, it would not do yet. Fowle said, you know best; she said, stop a bit. Fowle frowned, and Walter said, as I was looking at them, it was one shilling and nine-pence a-yard; then my friend stepped over to me; she said, has that man bought any thing out of the shop; I said, no; she said, the man has walked off with the handkerchiefs.

Q. Then your friend was not standing with you - A. No, she was on the opposite side of the way; the man went away, and the woman stopped to see if any one went after them; I went into the shop and asked the gentleman if he had lost any thing; they looked to see what they had lost, and they missed a piece of handkerchiefs that hung at the door.

Q. Did the prisoner Walter remain while they were searching, or go away - A. She remained; she stood round the corner of the house.

Q. When they searched and found one of the pieces were gone, did any body go after them - A. Yes, Mr. Davis, the manager of the business, and I went with him; we apprehended the woman, but the man made his escape.

Q. Where did you apprehend the the woman - A. In Long Acre; she went into a gin shop; we watched her out, in hopes we should find the man. We watched her some distance from the gin-shop, she perceived we were watching her; she did not go the same way as the man; then Mr. Davis took her; she was searched, but no property was found on her. When the woman had her hearing at Bow-street this man was brought in, I knew him again, I am certain he is the man. I never lost sight of the woman from the time that I first saw her untill she was taken.

ANN JANE FREWORTH . Q. Were you with Mrs. Walsh this day - A. Yes. We first saw the prisoners at the top of Newport market; we followed them to Mr. Craig's; after being sometime at Mr. Craig's they separated, and after they separated I saw the man with the handkerchiefs; before they separated he had nothing, nor she neither; the man went towards Newport-street.

Q. And where was he when you perceived him with the handkerchiefs - A. Just beyond the linen-drapers shop: she was with him at that time, and I saw him tucking the handkerchiefs under the top part of his coat. The woman stopped to see if any of the gentlemen of the shop were looking after them; we gave the alarm. I saw Walters taken.

Q. You have heard Jane Walsh 's account - A. Yes, it is correct.

JOHN DAVIS . I manage the concern for Mr. Joseph Craig .

Q. On the 25th of March had you a piece of handkerchiefs at the door - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember Mrs. Walsh and the other witness coming in - A. Yes, and I looked where the handkerchiefs hung, I missed them immediately; they were buff plaid handkerchiefs, I had seen them about a quarter of an hour before that.

Q. You pursued and took Mrs. Walter - A. Yes.

Q. Did you ever get the handkerchiefs again - A. No. Fowle was brought to the office at seven o'clock at her examination, the same night.

Q. Did Fowle seem to know Walter - A. No, they seemed to be strange to each other. I catched Walter in Great Russell-street, Covent Garden. When I came to the door she stood by the door, and when she walked away I followed. I thought she might go into a house, and I might catch the man and her together.

Prisoner Walter. Q. I asked Mr. Davis the price of some linen, he told me it was one shilling and nine pence a-yard - A. You did, and when I asked you to walk in you withdrew, and about two minutes after you withdrew Mrs. Walsh came in and asked me if I had sold her any thing.

Prisoner Fowle, Q. to Mrs. Walsh. What time did you see me there - A. I believe, about four.

Walters' Defence. As I was returning from Oxford-road this person talked with me, as I was walking along I stopped at the house of Mr. Craig, I asked that gentleman what the print was a yard; from that I went into St. Martin's court, and returned back again. I heard a person say, that is the woman. I was taken in Russell-street, I willingly went back with him.

Fowle's Defence. The woman is quite a stranger to me. I was at home at my dinner by three o'clock; I was not in Newport-street that day.

WALTER - GUILTY , aged 25.

FOWLE - GUILTY , aged 40.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

298. GEORGE SWALLOW was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of January , a piece of carpetting, value 9 l. 9 s. the property of Josiah Widnell , Harry Widnell , and Joseph Widnell , in the dwelling-house of the said Josiah Widnell .

JOSIAH WIDNELL . I am a carpet manufacturer , No. 4, Holborn, in the City of London . My partners names are Harry Widnell , and Joseph Widnell . On Saturday the 19th of January, about six o'clock in the evening, I observed a person come into the warehouseand take out a piece of carpetting, measuring sixty-four yards. I saw him before he got out of the house, and pursued him instantly; he had got about twenty yards from the house when I collared him.

Q. Had you lost sight of him - A. I bad. It was so short a time I am sure it is the same man. When I collared him my brother was after me, we took him into the warehouse. I sent to the Police office, Hatton Garden.

Q. What became of the carpet - A. We brought the prisoner and the carpet back again to the warehouse. He had the carpet upon his right shoulder when I collared him.

WILLIAM READ . I am an officer of Hatton Garden. I took the prisoner into my custody and took the carpet. I have kept the carpet ever since. This is it.

Q. to Mr. Windell. Is that your carpet - A. Yes; I know it is my carpet. It is worth between nine and ten pounds.

Q. Who lives in the dwelling-house - A. I did then. I live in the country now. It was my dwelling-house at that time, and nobody else. My brother lives in it now. It is in the parish of St. Andrews.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming up Holborn that evening, a young man asked me if I would carry that load part of the way up Holborn. I being out of work I took it of him, and the moment I took it that gentleman and two others with him came and took me in custody. When the young man gave it me I never saw him afterwards.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 20.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

299. RICHARD HOLLIDAY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of January , three pieces of printed cotton, in length fifty yards, value 5 l. the property of William Payne Barnard .

WILLIAM PAYNE BARNARD . I am a linen-draper , I live at 86, Bishopgate-street .

JOHN CLAYTON OLDHAM . I am shopman to Mr. Barnard. On Monday the 25th of February, a quarter after five in the evening, as I was taking the goods from the door, I perceived that the prisoner walked several times past, and when I had taken a part of the goods in from the door, and was returning for the remainder, I perceived the goods moving, as if some person was at them. On my arrival at the door the prisoner had got three pieces of printed cottons under his arm, and was going off with them. I cried stop thief, and he dropped the goods in the street. I took the goods; the prisoner was pursued by the constable and brought back.

SAMUEL SHEPHARD I am an officer of the city. I was in Bishopgate-street on the 25th of February, I saw the prisoner near Mr. Barnard's shop. Shortly after I heard the cry of stop thief, I pursued and took him in custody. These are the goods.

Prosecutor. They are mine, my private mark is upon them.

Prisoner's Defence. I was very much intoxicated. I am very willing to serve his Majesty.

GUILTY, aged 28.

Judgment respited .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

300. JOHN DIXON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of March , a bag, value 9 d. and one hundred pounds weight of raisins, value 1 l. 18 s. the property of John Lawson Haddan , William Smith Bond , and William Haddan .

WILLIAM SMITH BOND . I am a grocer ; I live in Great Trinity-lane. My partner's names are John Lawton Haddan , and William Haddan .

EDWARD JENKINS . I am porter to Mr. Smith, at the Three Cups, Aldersgate-street . I saw the prisoner carrying a bag across the road, I told him it was not his own. It was about a quarter after eight in the morning, on Saturday the 16th of March.

Q. Did you see where he had taken it from - A. No. I saw him have the bag in his hands before him; I holloaed after him and told him the bag was not his own; he then dropped it. I ran across the road after he had dropped the bag, and took hold of his collar, and delivered him into the constable's care, bag and all.

WILLIAM ALLEN . I am a carman. I went with two bags and half a chest to the Three Cups in Aldersgate-street, on the day this man was taken. I took them from Messrs. Haddans and Bond, No. 17, Trinity-lane, I could not go up the Three Cups gateway, there was a waggon shot out in the yard, I was obliged to stop and carry them up. I took up one bag on my back, I was gone about a minute; as soon as I came back for the other bag I missed it out of the cart. I went to the book-keeper, I said I had lost a bag out of the cart; he said, no, we have got the bag and the man too, and when I saw the bag it appeared to be the same bag. Both the bags were directed to one gentleman.

ROBERT THOMAS . I am a servant to Messrs. Haddon and Smith. I made the directions on the two bags. This is the bag, it is my mark.

WILLIAM STEVENSON . I am a constable. I bring this bag from the Three Cups, Aldersgate-street; I received it from Mr. Smith, the master of the Inn; the prisoner was given into my charge at the same time.

ROGER MILTON . I am a smith. I saw a man take a bundle out of the cart, and cross over the street with it.

Q. Look at the prisoner, is that the man - A. His back was towards me. I saw him taken in custody afterwards, I believe that is the same man that took it out of the cart.

Q. Have you any doubt - A. I could not pretend to swear to the man. I saw a man take it out of the cart, and I saw the same man taken in custody.

Prisoner's Defence. I depend upon your lordship's mercy, and the gentlemen of the jury. I am entirely innocent of the affair.

Q. to prosecutor. What did the bag contain - A. Raisins.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

301. WILLIAM JAMES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of March , a trunk, value 1 l. 4 s. a coat, value 4 l. two pair of shoes, value 1 l. a pair of boots, value 2 l. twenty-five yards of linencloth, value 3 l. 18 s. six handkerchiefs, value 15 s. three pair of stockings, value 1 l. 19 s. twelve yards of nankeen, value 12 s. a tea caddie, value 3 l. 3 s. the property of William Fleetwood Berry .

WILLIAM GRAYSON . I am porter to Messrs. Westwood and Berry, druggist s, in Newgate-street. On the 5th of March, about two o'clock in the afternoon, I went to carry this trunk to the Queen's Head, Old Change, at the corner of Newgate-street , I met a man, he asked me if I knew of a situation as porter.

Q. Who was that man - A. I do not know. It was not the prisoner. I told him that I believed Mr. Jordan in Whitechapel wanted one. From that information, he said, will you take share of half a pint of beer. I accepted the offer, and said, I was going to the Old Change with this trunk, we would walk down there; we went there. After we came out and had drank the pint of beer, I found my trunk gone. I left my trunk within the door, rather inclining to the outside of the door of the tap.

Q. What beer did you drink - A. One pint of beer between us two. When I came out I said to the man that was with me, by the great God my trunk is gone; he said, d - n it, that is a queer thing. I went into the yard to see whether any of the porters had took it, he said he would go and see after it; I stopped at the door, and when he came back Mr. Lee said he saw a man run down the Old Change, and go into Moor's-yard. I found my trunk in Moor's-yard, in Mr. Phillips's house.

Q. All you know is, that you lost your trunk, and that you found it afterwards at Mr. Phillips's. Are you a Londoner - A. No. I have been in London five years.

Q. Then you ought to have more sense - You know nothing of the prisoner, do you - A. No.

ROBERT PEARCE . I am a foreman to Rebecca Mott , carwoman. On this day, about two o'clock, I was standing with my cart, I saw a man run across Old Fish-street Hill with a trunk on his shoulder. He took it up Moor's-yard.

Q. How near was that to the Queen's Head - A. About an hundred yards. My fellow-servant said he had suspicion he had stolen the trunk; I did not think so; the man came back again in the space of a minute, without the trunk. I knew every person in Moor's-yard. I did not think there was any body in the court that would take a stolen thing in. There was an outcry that the trunk was stolen, I and my fellow servant followed the man up Old Change, met with him, and took him into custody. I am certain the same man we took is the same man that went up Moor's-yard with the trunk. When we stopped the prisoner he asked what was the matter; we told him a person wanted to speak with him concerning the trunk; and coming along I gave him into the custody of the officer that met us.

WILLIAM STAR . I am a carman. I was in company with Pearce; I heard him say a man went up the court with a trunk, I saw him out and when I stopped him I thought him to be the same man.

ELEANOR ROGERS . I live at No. 4, Moor's-yard. I know no more than a person came to the door where I live, and asked to leave a trunk for about a quarter of an hour; he said he had a great way to go. My brother-in-law, said he might leave it and wellcome, but the man I do not know. My brother in law is here. When the man was brought back by Mr. Smith I thought it to be the same man, but now I do not know. I had no doubt at the time; I was flurried.

WILLIAM SMITH . I am a housekeeper in Moor's yard. The man asked me if he might leave the trunk; I said, yes. I never saw him. When he brought the trunk I was getting my dinner; about ten minutes after I was going to my work, I met the prisoner with a number of people coming up the court; they asked me if I had seen a man come up the court with a trunk; I said, no, I did not, but a man had left a trunk at my house.

WILLIAM SMITH . I am an officer. On the 5th of March I was going up Paul's chain, towards St. Paul's church-yard, I met the prisoner with Star and Pearce, I asked what was the matter, told them I was an officer; they said he had stolen a trunk. I took him in custody, and took him to Moor's-yard, and when I got to Moor's-yard Eleanor Rogers said, that is the man that left the trunk, I will swear to him; I asked the prisoner how he came by the trunk, he said a gentleman had employed him to take it to the Commercial-road, and was to give him half a crown for his trouble; he said he did not know the gentleman, nor the street, or the number he was to take it to. This is the trunk I found in Mr. Phillips's house in Moor's-yard.

Q. to Mr. Westwood. Look at that trunk - A. This is the trunk that belonged to William Fleetwood Berry. I am sure this is the trunk. Mr. Berry was on a visit at my house, I was to send it to him.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent of the fact you may depend on it.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

302. MARY COLEMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of March , sixteen china plates, value 2 l. the property of John Cooke .

JOHN COOKE . I am a broker in Round-court, in the Strand . I only know them to be my property.

MARGARET WORTHY . My husband is a baker in Round-court, opposite of Mr. Cooke's; I was standing in the shop, I saw two women pass two different times, about six o'clock in the afternoon. I saw one of them take up her apron and pick up something, I did not know what; they then both went into a public-house next door; I went to the door immediately and asked Mrs. Cooke if she had lost any thing; she came out of the door, and said, yes, all my china plates; I went to the public-house bar door, they were both coming out; I asked them what they had got there; the first woman had nothing, the second woman had the china in her apron; I took them from her, and delivered them to Mrs. Cooke; I had a child in my arms. They both went away. In the evening we went to a public-house in Vine-street, and found the two women about nine o'clock.

Q. Is Vine-street near you - A. Yes. We wentto the Carpenter's Arms public-house in Vine-street, it is house that such people use. I am sure the prisoner is the person that took the plates up, I had seen her often that afternoon. These are the plates that I took away from the prisoner.

Prosecutor. They are mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing of the plates, they would be of no use to me. I could buy a plate for a penny that would serve me as well.

GUILTY , aged 31.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

303. JOHN JOHNSON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 18th of March , a saw, value 7 s. a plane, value 3 s. and a rule, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of Samuel Batten .

SAMUEL BATTEN . I was working in a building in Burton-crescent , the 18th of March, I left my tools there while I went to dinner at a public-house, a friend of mine came and told me that there was a man lurking about the building she supposed to be a thief; I went out of the public-house and watched the man, and saw him go into the building; I staid at the front of the house, and a witness I have in court. Mrs. Humbleby, saw him go in; I staid at the front of the house and the witness at the back; she saw him come out with the tools, and gave me the alarm. I pursued him and took him, I saw him drop the saw and the plane as he was going through the field; I found the rule in his pocket. The prisoner said he took them to go to work with, and wished us to send him on board the Tender. The saw is worth seven shillings, the rule eighteen pence, and the plane three shillings. They are all my tools.

ELIZABETH HUMBLEBY . I was with the last witness. I saw the prisoner come out of the back door. When the prisoner threw the things down I picked them up.

Prisoner's Defence. I was lately discharged from the army; I have been wounded. I had a job, I only wanted a saw, a plane, and a rule, to go to work with.

GUILTY , aged 33.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

304. THOMAS WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of March , three gowns, value 10 s. three pin cloths, value 5 s. and one pair of stockings , value 1 s. the property of James Phipps .

SARAH PHIPPS . I am the wife of James Phipps .

Q. Did you lose any gowns and pincloths on the 5th of March - A. Yes, from 21, Duke-street, in the Borough ; I missed all the articles in the indictment; they were hanging out in my back yard to dry. I hung them out about six in the evening, on the 5th. I saw them at the watchhouse on the Saturday following - the 9th.

JOHN BAXTER . I am a watchhouse-keeper. I produce the property.

Prosecutrix. They are all mine; they are worth above a shilling.

THOMAS MERRY . I am a watchman. I apprehended the prisoner on the 6th of March, at five in the morning, in Cross-lane, St. Giles's; he had this bundle with him; he said, they belonged to him. I looked at them, and took him to the watchhouse. I delivered the things to Mr. Baxter.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been to Deptford to seek for a ship, it was late at night, and it rained very hard, I went under a gateway, this bundle laid there; I picked it up and brought it away with me.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Bailey.

305. CATHERINE M'CARTHY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of March , three two pound bank notes, the property of Samuel Harrison , from his person .

SAMUEL HARRISON . I am a twine spinner in Whitechapel-road. On the 5th of March, about half past eleven in the morning, I met the prisoner in Holborn with another young woman, whom she said was her sister. She informed me that she and her sister were natives of Ireland, that they had no friends, and were destitute, and in consequence of kindness that I had received in Ireland, when in the navy, I was induced to return my gratitude to the country that were deserving of it. I took them into a wine vaults and gave them something to drink, and took them into another public-house and got them something to eat, and remained in their company some time that afternoon. They behaved very discreet; they saw my change was right at the public-house; the prisoner was particular in observing that I was not overcharged.

Q. Did you drink any considerable quantity together - A. We were not perfectly sober. They had so many places to call at; I found myself at Portman-square at eight o'clock at night; I was tired, I took a coach, we stopped at the Dolphin, Oxford-road at eleven o'clock; I took my pocket book out to pay the coachman, the prisoner snatched the pocket book out of my hand, I conceived that she did it in a joke; she had behaved discreet all day, but she got intoxicated. I endeavoured to persuade her to return my pocket-book; she then said that I belonged to the Vere-street gang. The people in the tap-room said I ought to give charge of her; I did. I was astonished at her conduct; she behaved so different all the day.

Q. You think she was drunk by your giving her liquor - A. Yes, and had not she been in liquor I am positive that she would not have done what she did.

ROBERT WATSON . I am a constable. I took charge of the prisoner; I searched her as far as decency would permit, I found nothing on her.

Prisoner's Defence. I and my sister met this gentleman between ten and eleven in the day, he walked alongside of us, he asked us if we were not Irish; we told him we were; he talked about different parts that we knew in Ireland; he said he was once there, and was used very well; he asked us to have something to drink; we took something. We had a few little commissions, we called at several places; he treated the people; he acted very civil and good-natured,he behaved indeed foolish, he doubly paid them for every thing that we had to eat. We stopped in his company, I got a little intoxicated. I know nothing about his money.

Q. Do you recollect charging him of being of a certain gang - A. That I know nothing about.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

306. ANN POWERS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of March , a waistcoat, value 5 s. two pair of stockings, value 5 s. 6 d. and two pieces of velvet, value 6 s. the property of Mordecai Isaacs .

MARY ISAACS . I am the wife of Mordecai Isaacs , he lives in Newcastle-street, Whitechapel . On Thursday, the 28th of March, about three o'clock in the afternoon, I lost a waistcoat, two pair of stockings, and two pieces of velvet, a yard and a half each; they were hung out in my yard; I had seen them there about ten minutes before three; I saw them at the pawnbrokers, on Saturday, and one pair of stockings she had on. These are the articles, they are mine.

WILLIAM ALEXANDER . I am a pawnbroker, Bishopgate-street. The prisoner pledged with me a waistcoat and pair of silk stockings last Thursday afternoon, about four o'clock, I lent her five shillings upon them.

GEORGE YOUNG . I am foreman to Mr. Sadler Bishopgate-street. On Thursday last the prisoner pledged with me two pieces of velvet for two shillings.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence, nor called any witnesses to character.

GUILTY , aged 17.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Bailey.

307. WILLIAM SEXTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of March , a glass goblet, value 7 s. the property of John Balls .

JOHN BALLS . On the 26th of March I was alarmed by the lad in the shop, saying, that a man had stolen a large glass goblet. I found the prisoner at the door with several persons around him. The glass was picked up, with the initials on it.

MARY GIRDLER . On the 26th of March, near eight o'clock, I saw the prisoner go into Mr. Balls' shop, there were several lighed lamps in the shop, I saw him take the glass goblet, and as he was coming out accidentally he fell down upon an iron bar; I cried, stop thief, he was taken.

Prisoner's Defence. As I was coming by two men were running, one of them knocked me down.

Mrs. Girdler. There was another with him, and as soon as the prisoner fell down on the railing the other ran away.

GUILTY , aged 35.

Confined Two Years in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

308. MARY WEST was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of March , a sheet, value 2 s. 6 d. the property of James Wicks .

ALICE HEWITT . I live with James Wicks , North End, Hampstead .

Q. Did you lose a sheet on the 22nd of March - A. Yes; the sheet was hung upon the heath to dry. I hung the clothes between seven and eight, and did not leave them after eleven; I was turning a shirt then on the heath, the prisoner came and took a shirt and walked away with it.

Q. Did you see her - A. Yes. I walked to meet her, and when she saw me she threw it upon a bush and walked away. I told some butcher boys, they got a constable, and she was taken. I am sure the prisoner is the person that took the sheet. When she took the sheet she put it under her apron, as if to conceal it, and upon my going up to her she threw it down.

Q. Did she run away - A. She walked away. I was afraid of losing some more; I desired the boys to take her. This is the sheet, it is my mistress's.

Prisoner's Defence. As I was coming past the wind blew the sheet off the bush she put it on, and I put it up again.

Witness. There was not a breath of air blowing, she took it off the bush.

GUILTY , 'aged 53.

Confined Two Years in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. justice Bailey.

309. MARY WEST was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22nd of March , a counterpane, value 1 l. a tablecloth, value 12 s. the property of Thomas Philpot .

CATHERINE MARTIN . I am a servant to Mrs. Philpot, she is the wife of Thomas Philpot . On the 22d of March I put out a counterpane and tablecloth on the heath, this woman was running, some butcher boys were crying after her; I over-took her, I saw the corner of the counterpane hanging out of her apron, it had the mark of that I had hung out in the morning; she chucked the counterpane and tablecloth at me, she said, if they were my property I might take them. These are them, they are the same that I had hung out to dry.

Prisoner's Defence. The counterpane and tablecloth I found in an apron, they laid upon a bush on the heath, that any body might steal them for three hours. I folded them up, and when the prosecutrix came, I said, they are not mine, if they are yours you may take them.

GUILTY , aged 53.

Confined Two Years in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

310. CHARLES GUNNER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of March , a pair of boots, value 1 l. 11 s. 6 d. a pair of scissars, value 3 s. 6 d. a handkerchief, value 1 s. the property of Daniel Taylor ; a great coat, value 2 l. 5 s. the property of James Oram ; a coat, value 2 l. a waistcoat, value 5 s. and a pencil case, value 2 s. the property of George Taylor .

DANIEL TAYLOR . I am a taylor , the prisoner worked for me.

Q. Did you lose any property - A. Yes, a pair of boots, a pair of scissars, and a handkerchief, about seven o'clock in the morning, on the 4th of March, a coat and waistcoat and silver pencil case, the property of George Taylor , and a great coat, of James Orams .

Q. Did you miss them yourself - A. Yes. I had seen them on the Sunday, and I missed them on Monday the 4th.

Q. When did you see the property again - A. On the 16th of March he was wearing the boots and the waistcoat, the pencil case was on him. These are the boots, they are mine, and this waistcoat I made for George Taylor ; the scissars the officer found at his lodging, my name is on them, and this is my handkerchief.

Q. Do you know Oram's great coat - A. Yes.

Q. Did the prisoner ever come to work at your shop after the 4th of March - A. No. He worked for me about a fortnight.

GEORGE TAYLOR . I am brother to the last witness.

Q. Did you see the prisoner on the 4th of March - A. Yes, about half past six, he came in the shop and staid there about half an hour.

Q. Did you see him go - A. No.

Q. How soon after he was gone did you miss any thing - A. Directly. I had seen the property all that morning; there was a coat, a waistcoat, and silver pencil case of mine; these are them, and this is the prisoner's coat he left on the premises.

SAMUEL TAUNTON . I am a Bow-street officer. On the 16th of March I, in company with Nicholls apprehended the prisoner in New Pye-street, Westminster. I asked him respecting the coats he took from Mr. Taylor, he told me they were in pledge, and the duplicates were in his box at his mother's; we took him to his mother's lodging, he opened the box and gave me the duplicates of two coats pledged at Mr. Morat's, the pair of scissars produced to day were also in his box; the boots were taken off his feet, and the waistcoat from his body.

JOHN TUCKWOOD . I am a servant to Mr. Morat's, York-street, Westminster. A woman in the name of Gunner pledged two coats with me, one on the 8th, and the other on the 11th of March; the coats produced here to day are the coats that had been so pledged.

JAMES ORAM . Q. Look at that coat, do you know it - A. Yes, I took it off the box on the Sunday afternoon, and left it in the shop.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Confined Two Years in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

311. ANN CONNER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of March , a counterpane, value 5 s. the property of John Hemmings .

MARY HEMMINGS . On the 1st of March I was in my father's kitchen at work, between four and five in the afternoon, I heard somebody go up stairs, I did not go up immediately, and when I went up I saw the prisoner come down the stairs, she was going out of the street door, she had her gown up and something in it. I asked a person up stairs if any body had been there, they said no, not to them. I followed the prisoner and over-took her in Long Acre, crossing Bow-street, I asked her what she wanted; she said she had not been there; I asked her what she had in her apron, she said some things of her own. I took her apron of one side and saw this counterpane, it is my fathers, it was taken off his bed. I am sure the prisoner is the same person.

Prisoner's Defence. I leave it to to the generosity of the court.

GUILTY , aged 29.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

312. JAMES EVANS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of March , a saw, value 12 s. the property of John James ; and a coat, value 4 s. the property of John Chapman .

JOHN JAMES . I am a joiner , I live in Duke-street, Grosvenor-square .

Q. Did you lose a saw on the 4th of March - A. Yes. John Chapman worked with me, he lost a coat; I had seen my saw at eight o'clock in the morning, I left it on the bench when I went to breakfast, and when I returned they had the prisoner in custody; I was informed he had stolen my saw. This is my saw.

RICHARD WATSON . I am a constable. On the 4th of March I was sent for to take the prisoner into custody, and the property was given to me. The prisoner said he had committed the offence, and he did not know what would become of him.

JOHN CHAPMAN . I work for Mr. James.

Q. Did you lose your coat on the 4th of March - A. Yes. I saw the prisoner in custody, he was charged with stealing my coat, and the saw. This ie my coat.

Prisoner's Defence. I am a bricklayer , I had been out of work three parts of the winter; I went into the building and was coming out with these things. I beg for mercy.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Bailey.

313. JOHN MANDERS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of March , two bridles, value 7 s. the property of John Tilbury .

JOHN TILBURY . I am a coachmaker , I live at No. 7, Edgware-road .

- HARRIS. I am a servant to Mr. Tilbury. On the 19th of March, about half after six in the morning, I went to the stable, I found the prisoner in the stable, he had got the two bridles concealed under his coat. These are the bridles, they are my master's property.

Prisoner's Defence. I have nothing to say for myself.

GUILTY , aged 56.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

314. ALEANOR FEARN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of March , twenty-one yards of printed cotton, value 1 l. 11 s. the property of George Vipond and George Rimington .

WILLIAM KIRBY . I am shopman, to George Vipond and George Rimington . On the 19th of March, about five o'clock, the prisoner came into the shop and asked me to shew her some print, I shewed her some, she purchased of me to the amount of three shillings, and paid me for it, and while she was buying them she conveyed this piece of print off the counter under her cloak, she went out of the shop. I and another young man followed her and brought her into the shop, and then about two yards from the shop door, when she was brought into the shop a piece of print fell from under her clothes, I immediately sent for a constable. This is the print I am confident it is my masters property.

Prisoner's Defence. I went into the shop to purchase two yards of print, I gave three shillings for it, and when I came out of the shop the gentleman brought me back, there was a great deal of print laying on the counter, another young woman stood there, the gentleman saw the print lay at a young woman's feet, they said I dropped it there.

Jury. How near was the other young woman to the prisoner. - A. About a yard distance, the prisoner was not close to the counter, but the other young woman was, the prisoner was about two yards in the shop, and the print lay about a yard from the counter.

The prisoner called two witnesses who gave her a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

315. JOHN SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of February , a pair of wine slings value 2 s. the property of John Edward Holmes , William Hall , Thomas Chapman and Henry Bacon Hall .

JOHN DANE . I am clerk to John Edward Holmes , William Hall , Thomas Chapman and Henry Bacon Hall , they are Wharfinger s. I saw the prisoner lurking about Bear Quay , on the 25th of Febuary, in the morning I observed him take a pair of slings off the cask, about a quarter before one o'clock he put them under his coat and was walking off with them, I stopped him and asked him what he had got there, he immediately dropped them, then these are the slings, they are my masters slings.

Prisoner's Defence. I was walking about looking for work, I saw them slings in the gutter, I picked them up and put them on the cask, I some time after took them up and put them under my coat.

GUILTY , aged 37.

Confined Three Months in Newgate , and during that time to be publickly whipped near Bear Quay .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

316. JOHN SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of February , a coat, value 5 s. the property of Joseph Taylor .

JOSEPH TAYLOR . I am a post boy , I work for Mr. White, the Swan in Bishopsgate Street , I lost my coat in February last, I hung it up in the stable, I cannot tell the day of the month, and while I was gone for a light the prisoner took the coat, I ran after him and took the coat from him.

WILLIAM KEEME . I was busy washing my carriage, I saw a man, I went and asked him what he wanted; he asked for a gentleman of the name of Stone, that came from Walthamstow, I desired him to go to the Ostler, as soon as I went from the coach house to the stable, he went and took the coat. I did not see him take the coat, I saw Taylor take the coat from the prisoner. This is the coat, it is my coat.

Prisoner's Defence. I am a drover and have been for thirty-one years, I got liberty from a man in the place to lay in the straw-house, I had no money, the man picked up the coat, he said I will give you this to cover you.

GUILTY , aged 53.

Confined Fourteen Days in Newgate , and whipped in jail .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

317. MICHAEL FOX was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of February , four pound weight of sugar, value 3 s. 6 d. the property of John Hancock and Samuel Hancock .

SAMUEL HANCOCK . My partners name is John, there are no other partners in the firm, we are wholesale Grocer s, in Bread Street Hill . The prisoner has been three months in our service, until he was apprehended upon this charge, I received some information from the warehouseman Burdekin; after that he was taken into custody.

Q. Were you present when he was charged by Burdekin with having taken the sugar. - A. I was he said he only took it with intent to put it into a little beer, or something of that sort at Guildhall, he said he took it to put into tea.

GEORGE BURDEKIN . I am warehouseman to Messrs. Hancock. On the 22d of February, at half past six in the evening, I saw the prisoner behind the mill, he turned to go into the stable that is under the mill, I followed him, he turned round to me, he had this bag in his hand, he said he had some sugar to put into some beer, he put it down on the ground, I took it up it was ground lump sugar, about four pound, it was worth about 9 d. a pound. He said he would give me a guinea if I would say nothing about it, and went down upon his knees, I put the sugar down again, he took it up and shook the sugar in the dung in the stable, and then kicked the dung with his feet to trample it down. I sent for Mr. Hancock, and then a constable was fetched. This is the bag, the sugar was not recovered.

Mr. Alley. That bag does not belong to you. - A. No.

Q. And the sugar you could not swear to. - A. I looked at that in the bag, and that in the mill, it was all alike. I have no doubt of it being my masters sugar.

Prisoner's Defence. The man used to take sugar out and put it in beer, and grate nutmeg upon it, I was never told that I was not allowed to have sugar. I took this sugar to put into small beer.

GUILTY , aged 32.

Confined One Month in Newgate , and whipped in jail .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

318. MARY ANN SHELLY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of March , five yards of printed cotton, value 10 s. a shift, value 7 s. a blanket, value 4 s. three yards of callico, value 3 s. and two yards of Russia cloth, value 3 s. the property of George Mitchell .

SARAH MITCHELL . My husband George Mitchell , is an upholsterer , Crown Street, Finsbury Square . The prisoner lived with me a servant five weeks. A few days after she came into my service, I missed some new callico, cut off a piece about three yards, afterwards I missed a piece of Russia cloth, cut off a whole piece by the person that stole it, and a shift out of a drawer. I told the prisoner I had lost them things out of the place, she said she knew nothing about them, do you think I have taken them, I said nobody had been in the bed room but her, she then opened her handkerchief and said, Madam, do you think this shift is yours, I said no. I found three keys down her bosom, one key fitted a drawer which I had my money in, and another key, which was a key of mine, which fitted a sideboard drawer, which key I occasionally left when I went out. I searched her box, I found a leather purse containing three duplicates of my property, the Russia cloth, the callico, the shift and the blanket, the blanket I have not put in the indictment.

ALEXANDER BURTON . I am shopman to Mr. Attenbury, a pawnbroker, the prisoner pledged at our house, the blanket, a piece of callico, five yards of printed cotton, and the Russia cloth.

Prosecutrix. The shift, callico, Russia cloth, and five yards of printed cotton, I know them to be mine.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

319. FRANCIS KNOTT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of March , four myrtles plants, value 1 s. 6 d. and four pots, value 1 d. the property of William Francis Smith .

WILLIAM FRANCIS SMITH . I live at the Bedford Nursery, New Road, St. Pancras .

Q. Did you lose any myrtle plants on the 16th of March. - A. I lost some, they were in pors, they were found almost immediately afterwards. In consequence of information I went out, I saw the prisoner coming up the walk, I took him in custody, he had nothing with him at that time, he was my labourer.

EDWARD COPE . I was coming home to my breakfast, I saw the prisoner running from the frame with the pots, he brought them at two different times, and covered them over with some old grass.

Q. How far did he carry them. - A. It might be a couple of hundred yards, I and another man saw him, we went and gave the alarm, we went to the place in the garden where we saw the prisoner place them and saw them lay.

Q. Did Mr. Smith go with you. - A He did afterwards, we found four pots in a concealed place.

JOHN SCOTT . I was going along with Cope by the Bedford Nursery, I saw the prisoner in the nursery ground, he was running from the frame with two pots in his hand, he looked over the pales two or three times, that made me have suspicion that he was stealing the plants, he came from the frame through the ground to the ditch, he put them down there and covered them over with some old grass, he went back again, I saw him come with two more. I am sure the prisoner is the person.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not put them there to steal them, I found them in a bye place in the garden, I put them there until I came back from breakfast.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

320. GEORGE DORAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of February , two handkerchiefs, value 10 s. the property of William Price .

WILLIAM RICHARDS . I am a servant to Mr. Price. On the 28th of February, about eight o'clock in the evening I was standing at the door of the shop, I saw the prisoner, he was standing at the corner of the window outside, I saw him put his hand in and draw two handkerchiefs through a broken pane of the window, he ran off, I ran after him and caught him, I am sure he is the same person, the handkerchiefs have never been recovered, they were laying in the window near the broken pane.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going up Oxford Road, a gentleman came and tapped me on the shoulder, he said I had been at his window, he took me back and searched me, he found nothing about me.

GUILTY , aged 18.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

321. THOMAS POLLARD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of April , a barrow value 4 s. and a barrow full of mortar, value 1 s. the property of John Plowman ,

JOHN PLOWMAN . I am a carpenter and builder , I live at Kensington.

Q. Had you any work going on there. - A. I had at Wake Place Fulham , the prisoner was my labourer , he had been in my employ about a month, from information of Mr. Stanhope, I went on the premises and examined the mortar heap, I missed some mortar, and my barrow likewise. I had seen my barrow in the course of the day. I found a barrow full of mortar shot behind the Bell and Anchor Hammersmith, by Hammersmith Turnpike, about three hundred yards from the mortar heap. I went to where the prisoner lived, there I found the barrow empty, the prisoner was at home and going to bed, the barrow was wet as if mortar had been in it, the mortar could not have been out of the barrow but a few minutes, because I could take it out with my fingers.

Mr. Curwood. Suppose he had robbed you of the mortar, you did not think that he meaned to steal the barrow. - A. That I cannot say, I only knew where I found it.

MR. STANHOPE. I live at Fulham. I am a carpenter. On the evening of the 1st of April, I saw the prisoner on Mr. Plowman's premises about eight o'clock, I saw him wheel the barrow out, he stopped and looked round to see if any body was coming, he then wheeled the barrow to the back of the Bell and Anchor, to one Dalley's, it is a Cottage. I went and informed Mr. Plowman.

Q. Did you go with him to the Cottage. - A. Yes, I saw the mortar lay, it was fresh.

Prisoner's Defence. A poor man living by there asked me if I would give him some mortar to fix up his fire place, I brought a bit of mortar there in the barrow, and in the morning I meaned to take the barrow back again, it was not half a barrow of mortar.

Prosecutor. The barrow was as full as it could be wheeled, it was worth about eighteen pence, I valued it only at a shilling.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 31.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

322. CHARLES TURNER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of February , a watch value 5 l. a chain, value 30 s. a key, value 4 d. and two seals, value 2 l. the property of Lewes Cogan , in the dwelling house of Michael Coleworthy .

LEWIS COGAN . I live at Mr. Coleworthy's in Whitechapel , he is a druggist.

Q. Is his house in Whitechapel Parish - A. Yes, he occupies the house himself and lives in it, I am his apprentice .

Q. Did you loose your watch on the 19th of February. - A. I did, I left it in the privy, the privy is in the cellar, I left my watch there about half past twelve in the day time, there was a chain to it, two seals, and a key.

Q. When did you see it again. - A. About a week after, at the office in Whitechapel.

Q. Did the prisoner live with Mr. Coleworthy. - A. Yes, he was a porter .

Q. Was the prisoner at the office in Whitechapel in custody. - A. He was.

Q. Is the watch here. - A. Yes, Francis Freeman has it.

Q. Now look at that watch and tell me whether you know it, and the chain, and seals. - A. I know them all. I know the watch by a small bit being out of the face, and very thin on the back almost through, the chain corresponds with the chain on my watch, and the seals all of them.

Q. Are you a judge of what their value is. - A. Not a very accurate judge, I suppose about eight or nine pounds, the watch is gold, and seals likewise.

Mr. Knapp. You say the watch is very thin at the back of it. - A. Yes, it is an old watch and very much worn, it was given to me.

Q. It was a second hand watch when it was given to you. - A. Yes.

Q. With respect to the seals you do not know them. - A. I know them to be the same, one of them has a motto.

Q. That motto might find its way to many seals. - A. It might, I know it by the shape and make.

Q. I understood you to say at first that you knew it by the motto. - A. Yes.

Q. Now you know it by the shape, did you never see another seal of that shape. - A. No.

Q. How many gold sea's have you bought. - A. One, that was not like this.

Q. You told my Lord that these are of the value of eight and nine pounds you are not acquainted with match - A. No.

Q. Is these any person you have got here that is acquainted with articles of that nature. - A. Yes, a watch-maker. There is no makers name to the watch I believe there is a number, I do not know the number.

Court You say the privy is in the cellar, is it open to all the persons in the house. - A. Yes, not person can get into the privy but from the shop, it is not open to strangers.

FRANCIS FREEMAN . I am an officer of Whitechapel office.

Q. From whom did you get that watch. - A. From Daniel Crawker the watch-maker, I had it ever since.

DANIEL CRAWKER . Q. From whom did you take that watch. - A. From the prisoner on the 26th of February, he brought it to me to repair. I live in the Commercial Road.

Q. How near do you live to Mr. Coleworthy. - A. About a quarter of a mile.

Q. What is the value of that watch, chain, and seals, what would you give for it to sell again. - A. Six pounds.

Q. Is it worth more than forty shillings. - A. Yes, I asked the prisoner what name he left with it, he left it in the name of Turner, the watch is gold, the chain and seals.

Prisoner's Defence. I found the watch in the privy, and it lying there so long a time I took it to the watchmaker to be repaired.

Q. (To Cogan) did you make any enquiries in the house about it. - A. Yes, I asked the young man in the shop, and I asked the prisoner the day after I lost it, he said he had not seen any thing of the kind, he did not know what I meaned about it.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY DEATH , aged 15.

The prisoner was recommend to his Majesty's mercy, on account of his youth and good character .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

323. ROBERT WHITTINGHAM was indicted for returning from transportation before the expiration of the term, for which he was ordered to be transported .

JOHN BROWN . I am an officer under the Lord Mayor, I produce a certificate of the conviction of the prisoner from Mr. Shelton's office, Mr. Shelton signed it in my presence. (The certificate read.)

Q. Were you here at the time he was tried. - A. I was not.

JOHN WOODFIELD . I am chief mate of the Retribution Hulk, the prisoner was in my charge, I saw the entry made in the book, he came on the 17th of October 1808, and left on the 31st of July 1809, he was shipped to go to Botany Bay, on board the Ann.

Q. Have you any thing to know on what account he was sent to your Hulk. - A. No.

WILLIAM ELDRIDGE . I am an officer under the Lord Mayor, I apprehended the prisoner.

Q. Were you present when he was tried in 1808. - A. I was not.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

324. JEREMIAH HEALY was indicted for that he on the 1st of March , in and upon James Maxtead ,a subject of our Lord the King, feloniously did make an assault; and with a certain sharp instrument did strike and cut the said James Maxstead , in and upon his right hand with intent to kill and murder him , and two other counts for like offence, only varying the manney of charging them.

JAMES MAXSTEAD . I am an apprentice to Mr. Gerrard an engraver. On Thursday the 1st of March, I was going up Saffron Hill between four and five o'clock in the afternoon, I met two men, one of whom is the prisoner, he had endeavoured to persuade me not to give evidence against Davis the sessions before this.

Q. What was Davis tried for. - A. For picking one Johnson's pocket. The prisoner exclaimed to his companion that is the b - y b - r that gave evidence against Davis, the other told him to run over and knock me down, they immediately crossed the way, I endeavoured to get from them to a public house across the way they followed me and Jeremiah Healey cut me in the hand with a knife, he stabbed at me towards my side, I put my hand towards my side by way of protecting myself, he stabbed me in my hand here.

Q. Was it cut with considerable violence. - A. No slightly, I was running, if I had been standing still I do suppose it would have gone into my side.

Q. And as you were running from the knife it could not have done you so much harm as if you had been standing still. - A. No, I run to the public house then and they knocked me down on the steps.

Q. It was not he that knocked you down was it. - A. No, the man that was with him, I hollowed out murder, the landlady of the house came out and brought me some rag to wrap up my hand, it bled. They run off as soon as I called out murder.

Q. You knew this man before did you. - A. Yes, I first became acquainted with him at Guildhall, and he pointed me out to his companion and used them expressions. I knew him and gave information to Mr. Warrall, I described him to be a pale faced man, a large nose, and well made about the legs. I have no doubt he is the same person that cut me on Saffron Hill.

GEORGE WARRALL . I apprehended the prisoner on the 11th of March, upon another business. It struck my mind that he was one of the men that was in company with Davis that picked Mr. Johnsons pocket, or that had cut Maxstead on Saffron Hill, I sent to Maxstead and took him to Giltspur Street Compter, I told the keepers to call the two prisoners up to the gate, they did so, and directly they came up he said that Jeremiah Healey was the man that stabbed him. At the time I took Healey up he had two knives about him, one was a bread and cheese knife, the other I thought to be an unlawful knife to carry about. I brought it before the court.

Prisoner. I am a drover, I use that knife in my business to cut off the beasts hair from their tails.

JAMES VERNEY . I live on Saffron Hill, I only saw the young man down in the door way of the public house, he was cut, his fingers bled very much. I did not see the prisoner cut him.

Q. You have heard the account he has given. - A. Yes he gave the same account then, he pointed out there they go. I looked and saw two men run, who they were I do not know.

JANE HAMILTON . I keep the public house on Saffron Hill, there was a noise at the door, I went out and the boy was crying his fingers were bleeding, I gave him a bit of rag, I did not stop a moment

The prisoner left his defence to his Counsel.

JAMES WHITE . I am clerk to the steward of St. Bartholomews Hospital.

Q. Have you the book of the names of the patients of that Hospital. - A. I have.

Q. Look in the book and see whether you can find the name there of Jeremiah Healey . - A. Yes, it is here, he came in the Hospital on the 14th of February, he was discharged on the 7th of March, he was an in door patient.

ELEANOR JOHNSON . I am sister in Lazurus Ward in that Hospital, it is the Salivation Ward, the prisoner was patient in my Ward from the 14th of February till the 6th of March, he went out on the 6th, he was under my charge.

THOMAS LATHAM . Q. Were you a patient in the same Ward with the prisoner. - A. Yes, I went into the Hospital on the 1st of March, the prisoner was in the Ward when I went in, and continued in the Foul Ward till the 6th of March, and then he was discharged.

Court. Do not you know of your particular knowledge of any of the patients being out. - A. No, except one Curtis an Irishman, he had leave of the steward. This prisoner was in the Ward the whole of the day, I saw him there.

MR. GILBERT. I am steward of the Hospital.

Q. Do any patients go out without leave. - A. Often they do, but in the Venereal Ward they are less likely to have patients to go out than in others, the surgeons are particularly strict upon them patients, because it would be injurious to their health. If a patient in that Ward went out the sister or the nurse would feel it their duty to apply to me, and they would be discharged.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

325. CATHERINE ROACH. alias MURPHY was indicted for that she on the 23d of April, in the 45th year of his Majesty's Reign, was tried and convicted together with Hannah Brown and Eleanor Connor , at the Session House Clerkenwell Green, for unlawfully uttering a piece and false counterfeit money made to the likeness of a good shilling, to Elizabeth Powell, spinster, and it was thereupon considered and ordered by the said court, that she should be imprisoned in the House of Correction One Year, and to find Surities for Two Years, and that she having been so convicted as a common utterer of false money, afterwards on the 19th of March last, one piece of false and counterfeit money made to the likeness of a good sixpence unlawfully did utter to Ann the wife of Ishmael Gazzard Burch , she well knowing the same to be false and counterfeit .

The case was stated by Mr. Knapp.

JOSIAH GILL SEWELL . Q. You are clerk to the Solicitor of the Mint. - A. Yes, I produce a copy of the record of the conviction of the prisoner. I got it from the office of the clerk of the peace for the countyof Middlesex, I examined it with the original record, it is a correct copy. (The copy of the record read.)

WILLIAM BEEBY . Q. I believe you are clerk to Mr. Newport, the keeper of New Prison Clerkenwell. - A. I am.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar. - A. Perfectly well, I was present when she was tried and convicted, in April Sessions 1805, with two others for uttaring counterfeit money, she was ordered to be imprisoned in the House of Correction One Year, and at the expiration of that time to find Sureties for Two Years to come, and pursuant to her sentence she was sent to the House of Correction. I am sure of her being the person, I have known her this seven years.

Prisoner. That time I was not innocent, but this time I am innocent. I never saw the bag.

ANN BURCH . I am the wife of Ishmael Gazzard Burch , he keeps the Black Boy in Nicholas Lane, Lombard Street .

Q. Look at the prisoner and tell me whether you know her person. - A. Yes, she came to me on the 19th of March, the day before the fast day, between twelve and one, she came by herself, she had no child with her, she asked me for a glass of gin, she offered to pay me by a sixpence, the glass of gin was twopence, I gave her four pennyworth of halfpence and took the sixpence. I put the sixpence in the front of the till where there was no other, and she went out. In five minutes afterwards there came in another woman, she asked for a glass of gin, I gave her the gin myself, she gave me a sixpence to pay for it, my husband stood at the left hand of me, I asked him to look at the sixpence, I had suspicion by their being two Irish women, and by my shewing it to my husband I concluded it was a bad one, I told my waiter to call her back, she came back with the four pennyworth of halfpence in her hand, it was not the prisoner, it was the second woman that was brought back that uttered the second sixpence, she said she had no more money in her pocket, she would go and ask her friend who was in the street, I immediately went out and saw the prisoner in the street, I told the prisoner that she had offered me a bad sixpence the other woman ran away, the prisoner refused coming back with me at first, afterwards she came back with me, and took out of her bosom a bag and put some sort of money out of her pocket into that bag, tied it up and kept in her left hand. We sent for an officer, Mr. Herman came, she was taken up stairs and searched, he searched all her pockets, she had four pockets round her, two at the front and one at each side, and in them was twopence or twopence halfpenny, and a bad sixpence, I laid that bad sixpence on the table and the prisoner took it up, we could not find it afterwards.

Q. Afterwards did you before the Lord Mayor deliver the sixpence that was uttered by the prisoner. - A. Yes, to the constable, he has it and the sixpence uttered by the second woman, I now produce, this is the sixpence.

RICHARD FLETCHER . I am waiter at this Black Boy, I remember the prisoner being in the house, I was sent out after the second woman, I brought her back, my mistress went out after the prisoner, I saw her brought back, when the prisoner was gone up stairs to be searched, I found the bag underneath the seat where the prisoner sat, I immediately gave the bag to my master, I did not see the contents untill I got to the Mansion house, it contained three pieces called shillings, a sixpence, and sixteen pennyworth of halfpence. I saw my master deliver the bag that I picked up to the constable.

WILLIAM HERMAN . I am a constable. On the 19th of March I went to the Black Boy, the prisoner was sitting in the tap-room, I took her up stairs and searched her as close as I could with decency, I found she had got four pockets on, in one of the pockets I found twopence halfpenny and a sixpence, I have had it ever since. The sixpence that I took out of her pocket I put on the table to Mrs. Burch, to know whether it was a good or a bad one, and before I took it up again it was gone, Mrs. Burch delivered to me the sixpence that the prisoner uttered before the Lord Mayor, I have had it in my possession ever since. I brought the prisoner down stairs, they began to look under the seat of the chair where she was sitting, they found this bag under that chair, the waiter gave it to his master, and his master gave it to me, I have had it ever since. The sixpence that Mrs. Burch took of the prisoner is wrapped up in that bit of paper, and Mrs. Burch has put a mark upon it.

Q. (To Mrs. Burch) Is that the sixpence. - A. It is.

Q. Look at the other sixpence, is that the sixpence uttered by the other woman. - A. It is

Q. Did you see the bag that was found under the chair. - A. I saw the constable take it, it is the same that she had in her hand, it appeared to be a bag, it is part of a glove tied up.

Herman. There was three shillings and sixpence, and sixteen pennyworth of halfpence, I have had them ever since.

ISHMAEL GAZZARD BURCH . Q. You are the keeper of this Black Boy. - A. Yes.

Q. Herman has said that he received the three shillings and sixpence, and sixteen pennyworth of halfpence of you. - A. I gave him the bag and all its contents.

RICHARD FRANKLIN . Q. You are one of the moniers of his Majesty's mint. - A. I am.

Q. I now put into your hand the sixpence uttered by the prisoner, is that a good one or a counterfeit. - A. It is a counterfeit.

Q. There is the second sixpence uttered by the woman. - A. That is a counterfeit also.

Q. Just look at that three shillings and sixpence. - A. They are all counterfeit.

Prisoner's Defence. I had not a farthing in the world but two sixpences, I went into this public house and had a glass of gin, she gave it me and gave me four pennyworth of halfpence, I put it in my pocket, she followed me in and begged me to come back I did, the bag I know nothing about.

GUILTY , DEATH , aged 48.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

326. THOMAS WARD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of February , two yards and three quarters of a yard of printed callico, value 3 s. the property of Samuel Thompson .

SAMUEL THOMPSON . I live at 56 and 57, Red Cross Street , I am a callico glazer . On the 22d ofFebruary last, about eight o'clock in the evening suspecting the prisoner having part of my property on his person, I searched him, in his hat I found two pieces of printed callico, which had been taken from pieces in my possession, I sent for a constable and had him sent to prison. The prisoner is my apprentice.

Prisoner's Defence. I only cut one piece off, the other damaged pieces were in the box, I always thought the damaged pieces were allowed to the apprentice.

The prisoner called six witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Confined Fourteen Days in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

327. WILLIAM SADLER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of April , fourteen pound weight of prussian blue, value 8 l. five brushes, value 12 s. the property of William Jones and Thomas Jones .

THOMAS JONES . I am a wholesale oil and colour-man , 56, Queen Street, Cheapside , the prisoner works for Dawson and Smith, they are scale makers. The prisoner came to our house to examine our scale, on the 2d of April, about nine o'clock in the morning. We have our scales examined once a month to see that they are correct, from the information of my foreman I came down stairs and asked if that was the person that committed the robbery, they said it was, they said it was prussian blue that he had taken and it was in his pockets, an officer was sent for, prussian blue is fourteen shillings a pound. I have a brother a partner, his name is William.

WILLIAM HENRY BURTON . On the 2d of April the prisoner came to examine the scales, and from suspicion I concealed a young lad in a cask and went to breakfast, I came from breakfast the lad told me he had his pockets full of prussian blue. I sent for an officer by Mr. Jones's order.

JOSEPH EMLEY . I am a servant to Mr. Jones.

Q. You were put into this cask. - A. Yes, I saw the prisoner come and put a box on a cask on the outside of the room door, he then went into the colour room and looked round a little while, he took a scoop from underneath the counter and went towards the box that the colour was in, I heard the colour rattle as he got it out with the scoop, but I did not see it, and then he put the scoop under the counter and began to do the scales, he went to the box a second time, came out and worked at the scales, he went the third time and got some more, came out, took his box and went down stairs. I got out of the hogshead and told the foreman what he had been doing, I went and asked the prisoner why he took the prussian blue out of the box, he said he wanted to paint his house with it.

WILLIAM CHAMBERLAIN . I am an officer under the Lord Mayor. I was sent for, on my entering the warehouse I observed several persons and among them the prisoner with his coat off, two men were in the act of shaking from his coat pockets this blue into a large brown paper, I searched him further, I found concealed in his breeches these five brushes, I asked him how he came to do it, he said it was the first time and he hoped for mercy of the prosecutor.

Prisoner's Defence. I shall leave it to the mercy of the court.

The prisoner called five witnesses who gave him a good character.

GUILTY, aged 52.

Judgment respited .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

328. ANN GILL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of March , fifty yards of ribbon, value 1 l. the property of Thomas Flint .

THOMAS FLINT . I am a haberdasher , I live in Gracechurch Street . On the 9th of March, between two and three o'clock, from information of my shopman I went into the shop, I told the prisoner that I was informed that she had put some ribbons in her pocket, she denied it, I desired her to walk with me to the back warehouse, she followed me, and when I got into that warehouse she was very much agitated, I was informed by my young man that she threw the ribbond away. I sent for a constable.

BELLAH HANKINS . I serve in Mr. Flint's shop. On the 9th of March the prisoner asked me to shew her some ribbon, I did, and cut her one yard and three quarters of black ribbon; she then asked for some coloured ribbon, I believe I cut her a yard of black ribbon, and then she asked me to measure a remnant, and when I had measured it, I saw her put a piece of ribbon under her gown on the counter, I said nothing to her, but went and told Mr. Flint of it, I did not see her take any black whatever.

THOMAS TURNER . Q. You belong to Mr. Flint's shop. - A. I do, I was behind the woman when she went through the warehouse, I saw her take from her petticoat two pieces of ribbon and throw it in the corner among some rubbish, I saw the porter pick them up.

JAMES MASON . I am the porter, I heard the ribbon throwed against the wall, I picked them up.

HENRY GILL . I am a constable, I took the prisoner in custody, these are the ribbons, they were given me by Mr. Flint.

MR. FLINT. The ribbons were brought to me, they are the same I gave to the constable, they are my property.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence, nor called any witnesses to character.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Confined One Month in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

329. MARY KING and MARY HOLMES were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of January , a shawl, value 9 s. the property of James Gray .

WILLIAM WOOD . I am a linen draper , 23, Sun Street , I carry on the business for Mr. Gray. On Saturday the 12th of January, between two and three o'clock, the prisoners came into the shop and asked me to shew them some shawls, I did, and after their looking at several, I observed the prisoner King moving her gown, which gave me suspicion, I counted the shawls over, I had shewed them twelve, I could find but eleven, and as they were going out of the shop, I laid hold of King, and told them that they had some of my property about them. I told the young man to go for Mr. Sapwell, she threw the shawl upon the counter, and said she intended to pay for it, when the officercame she had no money in her pocket. This is the shawl, it is Mr. Gray's property.

The prisoners said nothing in their defence.

King called four witnesses who gave her a good character.

Holmes called one witness who gave her a good character.

KING GUILTY , aged 20.

Confined One Month in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

HOLMES NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

330. ELIZABETH FARREL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of February , eight pounds weight of beef, value 5 s. the property of John Simpson .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY .

Fined 1 s. and discharged.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

331. JAMES FALLON was indicted for the wilful murder of Ann, his wife .

The case was stated by Mr. Gurney.

SARAH LEWELLIN . Q. Do you know James Fallon the prisoner - A. Yes, I have known him about four months, I lived in the same room, the woman and me lived down in the kitchen.

Q. You mean by the woman, the woman Fallon, the wife of the prisoner. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember any night in the month of February when Fallon had some visitors. - A. I cannot tell the day of the month, it is about two months ago. Fallon passed the board on the Thursday, he came out on the Friday, it was the night after, on the Saturday, the first Saturday after his coming home.

Q. Did you drink with Fallon and his wife. - A. Yes, and two women belonging to the school, and a man who passed the board the same day with Fallon.

Q. How much liquor had you to drink among you - A. I cannot tell, two quarts of beer or more, and some gin.

Q. There were five of you altogether, the two women, Fallon and his wife, and this other man. - A. There were six of us in all.

Q. What time of night did they go away from Fallon. - A. They went away between nine and ten o'clock I think, I did not take any notice, they left Fallon, his wife, and me together.

Q. Was Fallon drunk at the time that the women went away. - A. He appeared to me to be sober, I was as sober as I am now, and Fallon's wife appeared to be sober, she had a little drop, not to any harm.

Q. As the women were gone, did Fallon ask his wife to get any more liquor. - A. Before they went he asked her to go and fetch something, the wife asked him what he wanted, Fallon said,

"go and please yourself," Ann Fallon said,

"why do not you tell me what you want," Fallon would not tell her any thing, and the women went home and the man with them. After the man and the women were gone, Fallon asked his wife why she did not go and fetch the beer, Ann Fallon said,

"why did not you tell me what you wanted at the time, and I would have fetched it," Fallon said,

"I told you to please yourself, why did not you go," the woman said,

"you know very well I have spent all the money that you gave me," she said,

"I don't care for you."

Court. Was there any peculiar in her saying the words. - A. She spoke in a very saucy manner. After these words he struck her with his fist upon her head and once against her head, and then she fell down. She laid upon the ground about four minutes, I told Fallon he had better leave her if he could not live with her, he told me he would not touch her any more. She got up of her own accord, and Fallon sat down between her and me, I told Fallon that Nance had drank a drop too much, she jumped up at me and said something, I cannot recollect what, Fallon struck her upon her side with his fist, and she fell down in the corner, I told Fallon that I did not like that he should beat his wife. She laid a bit in the corner, and then got up again he struck her again, he was standing by her, and when she arose he struck her two or three times with his fist all over her body, she fell down again. The woman cried out,

"do not my dear, do not kill me," something like that. When she got up he beat her down by the head, and when she was down he beat her about the head with his fist again, he hit her with his fist clenched very hard.

Q. Did he appear to hit her with his full strength. - A. I think so, but I cannot tell. She got up again herself, he beat her again that she fell down upon the bed, he struck her upon her head, breast, and all about, and upon her body.

Q. Did the woman cry out this time. - A. She cried out,

"do not my dear, do not.

Q. Did you try to interfere between them, - A. Yes, Fallon told me to let him alone, he fell down upon the bed at that time, and beat her while she was laying upon the bed, he struck her upon the breast and body. The woman got up upon the bed again, he beat her again, and she came down from the bed on the ground, Fallon beat her with his double fist the same as he had done before, she cried out,

"do not kill me my dear Jemmy."

Q. Did you at any time see Ann Fallon strike her husband. - A. No, Sir, never touched, never attempt. She got up again, he beat her, she came down, and Fallon beat her again, I took hold of her arm.

Mr. Andrews. Why did you take hold of his arm. - A. I took hold of his arm two or three times before that to stop him beating her. I told him not to beat his wife so hard, he was sure of killing her, he pushed me down on the chair and told me to sit down or he would serve me the same, he put his fist in my face, I looked at the door to go out, and Fallon seeing me want to go out, put himself between me and the door to prevent me going. Fallon went to the other part of the room to beat his wife again, I opened the door and ran out to call assistance, I never saw any thing more after that.

Q. After you had left the room what did you do. - A. I went up stairs and found three women standing there to hear the noise, I asked the women to come down to stop Fallon beating his wife, they did not come down, and there was a man, I asked the man, the man asked me whose wife it was, I said Fallon's wife.

Q. Did you after this, hear any noise down stairs.- A. I heard her cry,

"do not my dear," and the sound of blows.

Q. How long was it that the noise continued after you left the room. - A. I cannot tell.

Q. Did you ever go back into Fallon's room that night. - A. No.

Q. Did Fallon stay all night with his wife. - A. Yes.

Q. After every thing was easy, did you sleep in the same room with him. - A. Yes, for that night I slept upon the stairs, I sat down upon the stairs.

Q. Could you when you were upon the stairs, hear any noise in the room where Fallon and his wife was. - A. No, not a single word all the night after.

Q. Did you go into their room the next morning. - A. Yes, Mrs. Fallon was in bed, Fallon came out dressed in his drawers, I said,

"you are easy now, you are friends after the battle," Fallon said, yes. I went to light the fire, I said,

"Nance, how do you do to day," she told me she was very sore from the blows, and told me it was my fault, Fallon was in the room at that time.

Q. Did she say why it was your fault. - A. No.

Court. Had you said any thing to provoke Fallon and his wife, for her to say it was your fault. - A. No.

Q. What did she mean by saying it was your fault. - A. I cannot say.

Mr. Andrews. How soon after this was Ann Fallon taken ill. - A. She was very ill and complained much, she shewed me all the bruises, they were very bad, she was black upon her arms, face, and breast, and her body, the bruises were all black, she complained uncommonly at the time that she moved of her left side, she could not lay down in bed, and when she turned in bed I helped her, she could not turn in bed without my assistance. She died on the Sunday week after, and complained much all the week, I was with her all the time.

Q. Did you see Fallon after the Sunday morning that you have been speaking of. - A. Yes, he staid all the Sunday and Monday, and on the Tuesday he went away, or the Wednesday after he beat her, I cannot say which, he said he was going to see some friends in town, he left his clothes at home.

Q. Before he went away had he behaved kindly to his wife. - A. Yes, he told me he was very sorry to look at it, he was sorry to do it, and he was ashamed, he took her in his lap and kissed her.

Q. What day did he come back. - A. On the Thurday.

Q. Did he come back before she died. - A. Oh yes, on the Thursday I think. He came into the room, she was in bed, he kissed her and helped to dress her, he behaved kindly to her before me, he told me he was sorry for what had passed, he slept that night with his wife easy, I did not hear a word, he went away early on Friday morning, he told his wife he would come back and fetch her, he was going to take a room, he was ashamed to see her, she looked so bad, he gave her some money.

Q. Was she dead when he came back. - A. Yes, Ann Fallon died on the Sunday, and he came back about a week after that, and then he was taken up.

Prisoner. Did not I strike her with the whalebone. - A. I never saw you beat her with a whalebone, but your fist, there was a whalebone there, I am sure you struck her with your fist.

Prisoner. She said several times that it was her own provocation, or else I should not have beat her at all. - A. His wife said it was my fault, I am clear of it, I cannot tell what she meant.

Q. How much liquor had we after the man parted with us, the two women, her and me. - A. I cannot tell, we had something, I drank with them, I did not take notice of the quantity, it was gin and porter.

Court. Was it a good deal. - A. Yes.

Prisoner. Did not I sent for the doctor. - A. You told me to send for the docter, you said the docter bleeding her was very good to cure her health.

Court. You are quite sure that he beat her with his fist, and struck her in the way you have described, and not with the whalebone. - A. Yes, he struck her with his fist very hard, thenumber of times that I have mentioned.

SARAH FEVRE : Q. You lived in the house which the prisoner and the deceased lived. - A. Yes, I remember the Saturday night on which the beating took place, I live in the room over it, I heard her cry and scream out,

"my dear Jemmy do not murder me," this was before Sarah Lewellin came up stairs for some time, and after she went out I heard a great many more blows, it seemed by the appearance to me to be a stick, and last witness shewed me a bit of whalebone afterwards, it was a flat piece, about the breadth of my two fingers, very thin and long.

Q. Was it big enough to have made a person cry out. - A. Yes, it stings very much, I do not think it could have made great bruises. After Lewellin came out, I heard her say,

"my dear Jemmy do not kill me," and she screamed a great deal, about a quarter of an hour. The next morning I saw her, her face was very bad, her eyes were all black, and her face shocking to look at, on another day she shewed me some black marks on her bosom, I did not see her side.

Q. When you came down in the morning did you see the prisoner. - A. Yes, I told him I was very sorry that he should make such a riot in my house, and that he should use the poor woman in the manner that he had done, he said, he was very sorry, but it was his passion, I told him, at the time I did not know which I had best do, stay where I was or come down, he smiled at me, and said,

"it was well I staid where I was, for if I had come down he would have served me the same, this was on the Sunday. On the Monday morning I sent for the doctor by the prisoner's desire, she continued ill untill she died, but I never heard of any danger, she complained of her side. On Sunday week about three o'clock in the afternoon she died. The day before she died the Welch woman Lewellin called me, she was casting up blood, I dare say she brought a quart full of blood up.

Court. When the woman shewed you the whalebone what did she say. - A. She said that is what he was beating his wife with.

Q. Did she tell you all the particulars of the beating. - A. No, she did not.

RICHARD FEVRE . Q. You are the son of the last witness. - A. Yes. On Saturday night I was awakenedby the young woman Leweltin coming up to me and asking me to go and part them, I heard her crying out, I said I did not think the man was touching her, I was the other side of the house, she cried loud for me to hear her, I did not go down.

Court. Let me caution you to be more humane another time. - A. I am a bricklayer, I am used to these people, they will quarrel one minute, and be friends in another minute.

MR. LANSKEAR. Q. You are a surgeon, were you called in to attend the deceased on Monday the 11th of February. - A. Yes, about four o'clock in the afternoon, to No. 5, Chelsea Market , I was introduced to her, she wished me to take some blood from her, she had a pain of the side at the time, I observed bruises about her generally, I told her bleeding was quit right. Her bruises were black, they appeared to have arisen from very great violence, her face was black and swelled, I bled her, and at the time that she was bleeding the man came, he was very attentive, he waited upon me, held the bason to catch the blood, and after I had bled her he paid me. I told her as she was so very much bruised it was necessary for her to take something, he said if I thought it was necessary he would come and fetch it, he never did call for it. I called the next morning to know how she was, and to know why the medicine was not sent for.

Q. Did you see her. - A. I did not, untill the Saturday following, they sent for me, I found her exceeding ill, her pulse was very quick and exceeding weak, and she was very faint, she complained of a violent pain in her side, I examined it, and when I pressed her rib it gave her a great deal of pain, I had reason to believe that her ribs were broken, I applied a plaster to it. I was sent for on Sunday morning about seven o'clock, she was dying very fast, and by the side of her bed was a great quantitity of blood, they told me she had thrown up in the night.

MR. READ. I am a surgeon, I opened the body of the deceased on the Tuesday, I examined the body first, there were several bruises, not that I considered of any consequence towards life. On tracing the course of the ribs on the left side I thought I perceived one or more was broken, and having been told that she had complained much of the side, I was induced to open the cavity of the chest, on doing this I discovered a very large quantity of blood effused in the cavity, and on further examination I found four of the lowest that we term false ribs broken, two of them had penetrated the membrane called the pleura.

Q. The pleura lays at the cavity of the chest. - A. Yes, two of them had penetrated the membrane called the pleura, and indeed the lower and posterior part of the left lobe of the lungs.

Q. Did it appear to you that any quantity of blood had issued from the lungs. - A. No doubt of that, the blood must have issued from the wound of the lungs, occasioned by the penetration of the rib.

Q. Must a great deal of force have been used to have broken these ribs. - A. Most assuredly a considerable quantity of force must have been used to have broken these ribs.

Q. Could it have been effected with a flat piece of whalebone. - A. Most assuredly not. The fracture of these ribs occasioned her death.

Q. Upon the examination of her body could you see any other cause. - A. Certainly not, every thing appeared to be perfectly healthy.

Prisoner's Defence. - MAY IT PLEASE YOUR LORDSHIP AND GENTLEMEN OF THE JURY.

In the awful situation I now stand, poor, and destitute of the means of obtaining the assistance of counsel, I feel it incumbent on me to submit to your attentive consideration, the substance of my defence in writing.

On Friday the 8th of February, one day previous to this unhappy occurrence. I was discharged his Majesty's service by the Board at Chelsea College, on account of a liver complaint, and had that day only left the hospital, in which I was confined for the last three months. On the next day (the day stated in the indictment) two comrades visited me at my lodging, they staid and drank with me and my wife till past nine at night. We were joined at half past seven by two female servants from the Duke of York's school, who partook of porter and spirits with us until half past ten, when they took their departure. Soon after they had left us I asked my wife the reason of her bringing porter from the public-house instead of spirits, which I had ordered her to fetch with four glass tumblers. At this she instantly flew in a passion, words arose, and a violent quarrel took place. She told me she thought porter was quite sufficient for me, and upbraided me in very insulting language for presuming to send for liquor to make punch. I said to her, if any other person had requested her to bring the spirits and tumblers, there was no doubt but she would have readily brought them. She was rather intoxicated, and I myself was nearly tipsy, provoking words were used on both sides, and at length I slapped her in the face with my open hand. She sat down on the bed and cried, but quickly after got up and abused me in still more gross and irritating language, which urged me to chastise her again. I struck her several times with a small piece of whalebone which I found lying on the floor, such as women wear for a busk-bone, Mrs. Lewellin interfered, but I told her to sit down and say nothing, or probably I might serve her the same. My wife still continuing to provoke me, and my passion increasing in consequence thereof, I struck her again, when, striving to get from me she fell over a trunk that was placed on the floor. She complained of being hurt by the fall, and requested me not to beat her again, I replied I would not provided she would hold her tongue, she ceased scolding me for several minutes, and then began again calling me blackguard and other opprobious names which induced me again to have recourse to the whalebone. At this time a man on passing the door called out and said if we did not make less noise he would fetch the watchman, upon which I asked my wife if she heard what the man had just said, and if she would be quiet and say no more, she answered yes, and in a short time afterwards we retired to bed. On the next morning, (Sunday,) Mrs. Lewellin came into my room and found my wife and me in bed; she wished us both a good morning, and said she was glad to find us reconciled and in good humour.

In the course of this morning my wife complained of being unwell, I asked her if I should send for a doctor that she might be bled, and she answered yes if I thoughtproper, I immediately sent a boy for Mr. Lanskear, who attended himself in the course of an hour and bled her. I enquired of Mr. Lanskear his opinion of my wife's complaint, who told me he thought her in no danger; but if I would send to his house he would prepare some medicine for her. My wife, however, informing me she found relief from bleeding, and saying there was no occasion for any medicine, there was none got.

I continued at home with my wife upon the most affectionate terms from the Saturday, when the lamentable quarrel took place, until the Friday following, when I told her I should go and seek after some employment, and return home on the Sunday week following. She said if it were not for her black eyes, that rather disfigured her, she would very gladly accompany me. At the time I left her, eighteen shillings was all the money I had; out of which sum I gave her eleven. I did not imagine when I left home my wife was in a dangerous state; she eat and drank as usual, and appeared cheerful. I returned home on the day promised; went to my lodging, enquired for my wife and was told by Mrs. Lewellin she was gone to another lodging. Shortly after I was taken into custody, informed that my wife was dead and buried, and that I was suspected of being the cause of her death.

My Lord, and Gentlemen of the Jury.

Whether my dear unfortunate wife came by her death through my treatment or not, is now left for your impartial judgement; but this much I can most conscientiously affirm, that if blame be imputable to me, I had no intention to incur that blame at the time the melancholy quarrel took place. I had no malice in my heart: no premeditated design upon her life; on the contrary I loved her most dearly, nor have I ever ceased to mourn her premature and untimely end.

Passionate, and given to abuse she certainly was - she had hers: - I too had mine. My passion, by her grossly abusive, provoking language, was wrought to an ungovernable pitch; and in that state, with my senses heated and bewildered by liquor. I unhappily did chastise her with the busk-bone, besides striking her, probably once or twice, with my hand. Whether she received any serious hurt from the fall over the trunk is not for me to say; but sure I am she first complained immediately after she fell. I was told when taken into custody that one or two of my wife's ribs had been broken; now if that be truth, is it not likely they were broke by her falling or stumbling over the trunk.

Gentlemen of the Jury, if I had beat my wife with the degree of violence that made it reasonable for me to suppose her life was in danger, should I not have implored the assistance of the doctor when he came by my own order to bleed her. Had I been conscious of inflicting a deadly blow, should I have remained at home with her five days and five nights after the unfortunate affair happened; or if I had suspected danger should I have returned home to my lodgings at the time and in the manner I did.

Mrs. Lewellin the witness swore before the Magistrate my wife declared on her death bed she considered herself to blame, and that I would not have beat her at all had she held her tongue.

The crime of murder I always held in the utmost abhorrence; and my conscience on the present most destressing occasion is perfectly tranquil, and fully acquits me of the offence I now stand charged with at the bar of this honourable tribunal.

I have served my King and Country in the capacity of a private and as non-commissioned officer in the first batalion of the 62d Regiment for a period of ten years, with honour and credit, and if my health had permitted I should at this moment be fighting with my brave comrades the common enemy.

GENTLEMEN,

I rest confident you will weigh in your minds with the most scrupulous attention the evidence this day adduced against me; that you will look at the cause and origin of the unhappy quarrel. My motives - the provocation: - the state of intoxication we both were in at the time. My conduct and anxiety the next day when I procured medical aid; the circumstance of my returning home on the precise day and hour I had promised, and the dying words of my dear unfortunate wife when she absolved me from blame.

I entertain not the smallest doubt but that your verdict will meet the justice of the case; and with this persuasion on my mind, I shall bow with reverence, humility, and submission to your impartial decision.

Court. Q. (To Sarah Lewellin .) Attend to the questions that I am putting to you, did you hear Mrs. Fallon complain of any injury from falling over a trunk. - A. No. I never saw her fall over a trunk, nor did she ever tell me of it.

Q. Do you remember any trunk being in the room. - A. There was a little bit of a trunk.

Q. But you never heard her mention in her illness that she had fell over a trunk, that was the cause of her illness. - A. No, and I saw her every day to her death she never mentioned any thing of falling down.

Q. Are you sure that you saw him beat her with his fist. - A. Yes, there was a slight whalebone in the room, I never saw a whalebone in his hand, the woman told me that he beat her with the whalebone on her face.

Q. Did she tell you that he beat her over the ribs. - A. No, I never saw a whalebone in his hand, I saw him beat her with nothing but his fist.

Prisoner. The whalebone was belonging to herself, it laid in the room all the time.

Court. Q. (To Lewellin.) It was your whalebone was it. - A. Yes, I have a whalebone on now, (produce it,) that whalebone was not so stiff as this, you could turn it about your hand.

GUILTY DEATH .

First Middlesex jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

332. HENRY MYERS was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Joseph Baldero , about the hour of eight at night, on the 14th of March , and feloniously stealing therein, two watches, value 8 l. a chain, value 2 s. a key, value 1 d. and eighteen pounds in monies numbered, the property of Robert Sound .

The prosecutor was called and not appearing in court his recognizance was ordered to be estreated .

NOT GUILTY.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

333. ANN CLERKE was indicted for that she on the 25th of November last, was married to Francis Collier , her former husband George Clerke being then alive .

FRANCIS COLLIER . I live at No. 7, Old Artillery Street, Old Artillery Ground. I am the second husband to the prisoner.

JOHN ALLEN STONE . I am the deputy parish clerk of Christ Church Surry. I only come to prove the register, this is the register book of marriages

Q. Who appears to be witnesses of the marriage of the prisoner. - A. Elizabeth Smith Ballad , and John Ballad .

ELIZABETH SMITH BALLAD . I live in the parish of St. George's.

Q. Do you know the prisoner. - A. I do perfectly well.

Q. Were you present at any marriage of the prisoner. - A. I was at Christs Church, Blackfriers Road, she was married to George Clerke . I saw the ceremony performed. I knew both parties. I signed the enterey that was made by the parish clerk, the date of the register is February 12th 1798. When Mr. Clerke was married he was a very young gentleman , the prisoner lived servant with his father, and the marriage was very much against the consent of the father, and very soon after the marriage they separated.

Q. When had you seen George Clerke last. - A. I have not seen him for thirteen years, whether he is living or dead, that I dont know.

JOHN BALLAD . Q. Were you one of the witnesses to this wedding at Christs Church. - A. Yes, I signed the book. I knew both parties. I have not seen Mr. Clerke for thirteen years. (The register read.)

FRANCIS COLLIER . Q. Do you know any thing of George Clerke . - A. I knew nothing of him at the time I was married, I knew him to be living about five or six weeks ago, on account of a law suit that was attached to the prisoner.

Q. Do you know him now. - A. I should if I was to see him, about six weeks ago he lived in a court in Aldersgate Street, I do not exactly know the court.

Q. Is there any body here now to prove that he is living. - A. No.

Q. Or that he is the same person. - A. Not to my knowledge.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

334. SAMUEL REYNOLDS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the first of March , five shoe brushes, value 5 s. two piece of spunge, value 3 s. and two other brushes, value 2 s. the property of Timothy William Barker , and William Francis .

TIMOTHY WILLIAM BARKER . I am a brushmaker , 80, Gracechurch Street , William Francis is my partner. In consequence of some information I suspected the prisoner had robbed us, and on the 28th of February, I desidered Jame Gifford our warehouseman to mark some brushes, and some I marked myself. The prisoner came to work on the 1st of March, some of the brushes had by my desire been placed in the back warehouse by our warehouseman, and some on the counter by myself, I desired James Gifford to send the prisoner into the back warehouse, to work where the brushes were placed and to watch him, he accordingly was sent, afterwards I was informed that some of the brushes were missing, I saw the brushes that I had marked myself in custody of the officer.

JAMES GIFFORD . I am a servant to these gentlemen, on the 28th of February I received instructions to watch the prisoner, I marked certain brushes and placed them in the back warehouse under some baskets, I then returned into the front shop where the prisoner was, and requested him to take some corn fans into the back shop, and remove the baskets and put them into a proper place, which he did, and by so doing I was certain that the prisoner would see the brushes that I had placed there, he was gone long enough to accomplish what I told him, and came down into the front shop again, I immediately went into the warehouse and found all the brushes missing, I communicated it to Messrs. Francis and Barker. The prisoner was then sent out with a load, and as soon as he returned I went into the same room again and placed four other brushes that I had marked, I came down and took the prisoner with me up into the same room where I told him I wanted to look out certain articles, and that I would take part of the articles into the shop myself, and requested him to bring the remainder, he did, I went and missed three out of the four brushes of the second parcel, and those three brushes I saw on the 1st of March in possession of the officer. The prisoner I believe is a soldier in the guards.

ABRAHAM MARKS . I keep a stand with hardware in Bishopsgate Street. About the begining of February, the prisoner asked me to buy four dozen and a half of shaving brushes, I offered him three shillings and sixpence for them, he agreed to take it and I bought them. About a week or ten days afterwards he asked me if I would buy any clothes brushes, I answered no, they were too cumbersome for me, I had some suspicion that he did not come honestly by the first brushes, and as soon I saw the officer I communicated my suspicion to him, he bid me to buy them and he would speak to the master about it. On the 28th of February the prisoner brought me two brushes, and on the 1st of March two more, and in the afternoon of the same day he brought five, and two pieces of spunge.

SAMUEL SHEPHARD . I am an officer, these two brushes were delivered to me on the 28th of February, by the last witness, and these five and two pieces of spunge, on the 1st of March.

THOMAS SAPWELL . I received two brushes of Marks on the 1st of March, about two o'clock.

MR. BARKER. I marked one of these brushes myself.

GIFFORD. Here are three which I marked myself, I know them to be my masters property.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing of what I am charged with, I never saw the jew who has sworn against me in my life, I am as innocent as a child.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

( NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

335. THOMAS FOSSEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of March , a silver butter boat, value 1 l. the property of John Stotton , Samuel Hale , Edward Hale and Philip Cass .

SAMUEL HALE . I keep the London Tavern, in Bishopsgate Street . I lost the butter boat on Thursday the 28th of March, I found it about twelve o'clock atnight. I can only indentify the property, the prisoner was employed as an extra waiter .

EDWARD HALE . In consequence of losing a great many articles of plate, we were determined to watch those waiters that come forward and were going home with their pockets loaded, standing in the passage at twelve o'clock this man came forward to go home, I saw his pockets very much loaded and requested that he would walk in the parlour with me, I immediately called for Mr. Cass one of the partners, and then requested the prisoner to lay the contents of his pocket on the table, he pulled out two or three oranges, four or five apples, a few cakes, and nearly the whole of a fowl, and some nuts, in pulling out the nuts some of them dropped into something that made a noise, I told him there was something more behind and requested he would pull it out, I was determined to know what he had left behind in his pocket, he paused some time. I told him he must know what he had got behind, he then produced a butter boat and laid it on the table, this is the butter boat, I sent for an officer and took him in custody.

Prisoner's Defence. On the evening I am charged with committing this offence, I drank freely in the servants hall, I felt myself rather intoxicated and drowsy in the evening, I fell a sleep in a room adjoining the ball room, and on going down stairs to get my hat, I went to the cook to get some cold victuals for my supper, and on my going out I was asked by Mr. Cass one of the proprietors what I had sticking out in my pocket, I said an orange and an apple or two, Mr. Cass asked me to go into the room, which I did, and to my astonishment I found the butter boat in my left hand pocket, how it came there I am totaly ignorant. I strongly suspect it was put into one of my pockets by one of the waiters out of joke or with design. I am totaly innocent of the charge. I have a wife and four children, and have always maintained them by honest industry.

( GUILTY , aged 38.

Confined Three Months in Newgate , and whipped in jail .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

336. JOSEPH PONDER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of February , a sack, value 1 s. 6 d. and two bushels of beans, value 10 s. the property of Henry Cline , and WILLIAM CRAWLEY for receiving the same goods knowing them to have been stolen .

WILLIAM CHERRY . I am bailiff to Mr. Cline at Tottenham. On the 25th of February I sent Ponder for five quarters of oats and ten bushel of beans, he had ten sacks for the oats and three for the beans, Mr. Cline's name I believe was marked on all the sacks.

Q. What time in the morning did you send him out. - A. Between seven and eight o'clock, between four and five in the afternoon I met him about three miles from home, I asked him if every thing was right, he told me yes, he went on towards home, he was to bring the oats and beans from Mill Bank Row Westminster to Mr. Cline.

ROBERT LINE . Q. Are you nephew to Mr. Wright corn merchant Mill Bank. - A. Yes, on the 25th of February Ponder came to our house for ten bushels of beans and five quarters of oats, the five quarter of oats occupied ten sacks, and the ten bushel of beans three sacks, I gave him the ten bushels in three sacks.

JOHN CRAIG . I am a labourer in Mr. Cline's service, in the afternoon of the 25th of February I was there when the prisoner returned from London and brought the beans.

Q. What quantity of beans were there. - A. Two sacks of beans and no more, a sack contains four bushels, I am quite sure there were no more than two sacks.

CRAIG. The man was committed on the Friday, on Sunday an account came that there were some beans in the stable, I found the beans in the sack, I have a sample of them in my pocket, I believe them to be the same beans, the beans found were not in Mr. Cline's sack.

Court. Q. You were at home when these sacks came. - A. Yes, I saw them delivered, there were two sacks delivered and no more at that time.

Mr. Alley. Can you tell how many sacks were there. - A. No, I could tell a half sack, there was no half sack there.

Court. After the apprehending of Ponder you searched the stable. - A. Yes, and found a sack with two pecks and a half of beans, and on comparing they appeared to be the same sort of beans. I received the information from Ponder's wife.

Q. Who is Crawley. - A. He is ostler to the Jolly Butchers, about a mile from Mr. Cline's nearer London.

GEORGE WOOD . I am an officer of Hatton Garden office. On the 9th of March I went to the Jolly Butchers public house in company with Read, we apprehended Crawley upon another charge, we searched the stable, we found two sacks of Mr. Cline's, one with some beans and one empty, both the sacks were marked in length Henry Cline , I asked Crawley how he came by them, he said a gentleman left them there that was going past in a chaise, we took the beans away.

Mr. Alley. At this time Ponder was not in company. - A. He was not.

ALEXANDER WATSON . Q. You are the landlord of the Jolly Butchers public house. - A. Yes.

Q. Was the prisoner Crawley your ostler. - A. Yes.

Q. Did he or you find the hay, corn and straw for the horses. - A. He, and the profits of the stable were his.

Mr. Gurney. Q. (To Cherry.) Have you a sample of the beans here which were brought to Mr. Cline. - A. Yes,

Q. Produce a sample of the beans brought to Mr. Cline, and a sample that were found in the corner of the stable, and look at those found at the Jolly Butchers. - A. I believe they belong to each other.

MR. WRIGHT. I believe they are alike.

Ponder's Defence. I took the beans home, and just as I was going home a quantity of beans tumbled off the cart, my boy picked them up and gave them to Mr Cline's horses.

Crawley's Defence. I did not live at this place when it was done, the cart never stopped at our house nor yet the man.

PONDER GUILTY , aged 40.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction .

CRAWLEY GUILTY , aged 21.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and publickly whipped at the carts tail near the Jolly Butchers Tottenham .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

337. THOMAS RANDALL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of February , two loaves of bread, value 3 s. 8 d. the property of Robert Gillam .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY .

Confined Fourteen Days in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

338. JUAN BAPTISTA PENIZA was indicted for that he, on the 23d of February , in and upon Edward Lawrence , a subject of our Lord the King, feloniously did make an assault, and with a certain sharp instrument maliciously and unlawfully did strike and cut the said Edward Lawrence, in and upon his face and chin, with intent to kill and murder him .

SECOND COUNT for like offence, with intent to disfigure him. And

THIRD COUNT, to do him some grievous bodily harm.

[The prisoner being a foreigner was allowed an interpretor, and upon being asked whether he would be tried by a jury of half English and half Foreigners, answered, all English.]

EDWARD LAWRENCE . I am foreman to Mr. Walker, in Wapping-street. I live in Maidenhead-court, Wapping-street.

Q. On the night of the 23d of February were you in Wapping-street - A. Yes, I was returning to my home, I was perfectly sober.

Q. Did you meet any one - A. A Portuguese, as I supposed.

Q. Who was that man - A. The prisoner at the bar.

Q. Have you any doubt - A. Not any. I am quite certain it was the prisoner at the bar.

Q. Who had the wall - A. I had; we were both going one way; he apparently was first; when I came up I went between him and the wall.

Q. Was there room for you to go - A. Yes. He reeled or shoved against me sideways, and threw me against the wall.

Q. Did you do any thing to him - A. Not any thing When he reeled against me I said, holloa, shipmate, or messmate, I cannot say which, do not run a fellow down. I said nothing else to him. He talked something in his own language, but what I did not understand. I went from him then.

Q. Had any thing further occurred at this time more than you have stated - A. Not any thing.

Q. When you received this shove how far were you from your own house - A. About thirty yards when this happened. I walked up the court to my own home, and when I got to my own home I heard a footstep coming up the court very quick and very light, I did not think it was the prisoner coming after me to do any thing to me, but directly I saw his right hand draw my right shoulder of the left side of my face.

Q. Where was the blow aimed at, and where did it take place - A. On the left side of my cheek, by my chin, it cut me very deep; I could put a finger in the place.

Q. He cut you on the left cheek and chin - A. Yes, then he turned upon his heel and made his escape. He ran away, and I ran after him directly.

Q. Did you lose sight of him - A. Not any time. He ran into Wapping-street, and ran down into Gun-alley; he ran into the side door of the Gun public-house, I went into the house immediately after him, I called out, where is he, where is he who has cut me. I saw him in the house by the side of a little passage, just within a little kitchen, or washhouse, the passage door and kitchen joins together.

Q. You saw him just within the door of a little kitchen, was there any light in that room - A. Not any. There was no company where he was, he ran out again by me.

Q. You say you saw him run into the house, and you saw him within the door of the kitchen - in order to get there had he ran into the tap-room where the company was - A. He had not. I holloaed out stop him, and calling out, where is he. When I got in Mr. Watkins, a person that was in the house, he said, here he is. He ran violently out of the same door into Gun-alley again, I pursued him myself.

Q. Did you lose sight of him before he was taken - A. No, I did not, except in running into the door. When he ran out of the Gun I never lost sight of him untill he was taken.

Q. When he ran into Gun-alley again did you call stop thief - A. I did; he was taken a little way off Gun dock, in Wapping-street, I saw him stopped and detained by Wood. I was then about a dozen yards from him when Wood stopped him.

Q. Are you quite certain, upon your solemn oath that no provocation took place, except what you have stated - A. None at all, at any time whatever.

Mr. Challenor. Were there other persons passing at the time - A. I saw not any.

Q. It is a public place - A. Yes.

Q. Can you venture to swear positively to his person - A. I can; the person that cut me is the prisoner at the bar.

COURT. What time of the night was it when you saw him - A. About half after nine o'clock.

Q. Are you sure that you had not jostled him in the street - A. I am certain I did not. I was coming very seriously to my own home without touching him, or even looking at him.

WILLIAM WATKINS . Q. Were you in the Gun public-house on Saturday the 23d of February last - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see the prisoner there - A. Yes, I met him in the passage, he came in very much confused and running, he ran into the dark kitchen instead of going into the tap-room, where there was light; he turned himself against the wall in the kitchen, and got his two hands together.

Q. Did you observe any thing in his hands - A. I saw something glistening as he came in, in his right hand, he seemed to wish to conceal it, coming by me, but turning round I had a sight of it. When he was against the wall, Lawrence the prosecutorcame in, he said, where is he, where is the man who has cut my face; I said, here he is; the prisoner dubbed himself down, and ran with his head down between Lawrence and me, and went out the same way. Lawrence pursued him, I did not.

GEORGE WOOD . I live with Mr. Peasgood, a butcher in Wapping street.

Q. How far is that from the Gun public-house - A. About fifty yards. On the evening of the 23d of February I was at my master's door between nine and ten o'clock, I heard the cry of stop thief, I observed the prisoner running along the street, from the Gun public-house; upon that I instantly caught him by the collar and stopped him. I observed him put his right hand to his pocket to take out something, it shined, I immediately caught at it and took it out of his hand; I kept it in my possession untill I gave it in the charge of the officer the same evening, and I delivered him up to the officer.

MR. M'CARTHY. I am an officer of the Thames police. The prisoner was brought to our office on the 23d, about ten o'clock. I saw Lawrence, he was terribly cut, and this was delivered to me, a brass ink-stand case, with a knife.

Q. to Wood. Look at that - A. I believe it to be the same.

M'Carthy. I examined the blade of the knife, it appeared bloody.

Q. You saw the blade did you, it appeared bloody - A. I looked at it that night. When Wood gave it me it was bloody, I unscrewed the case and looked at the knife.

Q. to Wood. How was that instrument when you first took it - A. It was in the case screwed up.

Q. About how long would it take to screw and unscrew that knife - A. About half a minute.

JAMES CRANCE . Q. You are a surgeon, I believe - A. Yes.

Q. On the 23d of February, in the evening, did you examine the wound of the prosecutor - A. I did; the wound was about four inches in length, a deep wound, part of it on the inferior jaw, and part of it on the superior, it was in a semicircular direction; had the maxillare artery been cut there would have been a risk.

Q. Did it all pass over the maxillare artery - A. Yes.

Q. Was that at all cut - A. No, by no means; the maxillare artery was not cut, the wound was not so deep in the situation of the artery.

Q. It would have caused death in all probability if it had cut the maxillare artery - A. Yes, there would have been a serious operation of taking up the coracoid artery, which is a doubtful operation.

Q. With what sort of an instrument was it done - A. I cannot say. It could not be smaller than the knife I saw. I imagine that knife would have inflicted such a wound. I have no doubt it was done by a sharp instrument.

COURT. The maxillare artery was in danger - Yes, which is a branch of the coracoid artery.

Q. What do you mean by taking up the coracoid artery - A. Passing a ligature of wax thread, and tying it.

Q. That would stop the flow of blood - A. Yes.

Prisoner's Defence. That inkstand is not mine; I want to see it.

COURT. Let him see it, do not let him have it.

Prisoner. I had an inkstand similar to this, the handle of the knife was on a small bit of iron. I recollect nothing of the affray, nor cutting any body with a knife. I found myself in prison all over mud, and my bones all over beat. I lodged a week at a public house, I wrote to the landlord of the public-house to come, he has not come.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 24.

[ The jury recommended the prisoner to his Majesty's mercy, on account of his being so short a time in England .]

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Chambre.

339. JAMES DRIVER was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Obadiah Reeve , about the hour of eight on the night of the 19th of January , and stealing therein, one pound eight shillings in monies numbered, a pair of salt cellars, value 18 s. two pepper castors, value 1 l. 1 s. eight spoons, value 1 l. 10 s. a watch, value 15 s. his property .

OBADIAH REEVE . I am a publican , I live in Shire-lane , I keep a house there. On the 19th of January, about eight o'clock in the evening, my wife went up stairs to see if all the doors were fast, I heard her cry out murder. I suspected there was more than should be, I went forward and locked the foredoor, in order to see who there were in the house, and on my going up stairs I met the prisoner coming down. I knew his person perfectly well, I do not know what occupation Driver is, he used to frequent my house. When he came down stairs I followed and shoved him into the parlour, and sat down upon a chair.

Q. Did you speak to him by his name - A. Yes, and I went out to get a constable to take charge of him; the constable refused coming. I was detained sometime, and when I came back he was gone; he had made his escape through the parlour window.

Q. Did you afterwards go up stairs - A. Yes; the sleeping-room door on the first floor was broken open.

Q. How had he got into the house - A. The doors were open as usual, he had come in at the street door, and had walked up stairs.

Q. You say the sleeping-room door was broken open, what was there taken out - A. A guinea, and a seven shilling-piece that was taken out of my desk that was broken open, and a little trunk was broken open.

Q. How lately had you seen that guinea and seven shilling piece - A. I had not seen it perhaps for a week; the man got away, and was away a month or longer before he was taken up. I am confident that is the man.

Q. Did the prisoner throw any thing away when you were taking him into the parlour - A. Yes, he put his hand into his pocket and threw away this bunch of keys. I did not know what it wasthen. I saw him put his hand into his pocket.

Q What are these keys - A. They are skeleton keys.

Prisoner. I would wish to ask Mr. Reeves if he has never received any remuneration for the loss of his money, and the locks that were broken that night - A. One of his associates brought me a two pound note and begged me to take it; I said I could not take it onconsideration of stopping the prosecution. If he had brought me more I should have took it.

Q What other view had you of taking it except stopping the prosecution - A. I took it, and I believe if he had brought more I should have took it.

MARY REEVE . Q. Do you remember the night of the 19th of February going up stairs - A. I do. I found my chamber door open, I saw a glimmering light in the room on the bed, that light proceeded from a dark lanthorn; I saw my little red trunk that we put our tea spoons and tablespoons in. I saw that on the bed, towards the foot, two salts and two pepper castors, they all laid together, they were on the bed.

Q What else did you lose - A. A guinea, a seven shilling piece, and a shilling, a pap-spoon and silver strainer. The pap spoon was part of the eight spoons.

Q. What were they worth altogether - A. I should think, between three and four pounds, without the guinea and seven shilling piece.

Q. These things had been all removed, had they from their proper place - A. Yes, they had.

Q. The guinea you did not see, nor the seven shilling piece - A. No, they were in a purse; the bag was left. The eight spoons were all on the bed, and the silver things, they were taken out of a little red trunk, and that was broken open, it was taken from under the head of the bed. I saw the prisoner looking over some papers, and all the books, to see if he could find any value, I suppose: I saw the prisoner and another man looking at them, the other man was not touching any thing, he was looking at them. I shut the door, and halloaed out murder, as loud as I could holloa out, with the door in my hand; these men came to the door to get out, they could not, I held it so tight; they burst the frame of the door, and shoved the door through; the prisoner came out first, I catched him by the collar; the other brushed by and got down stairs, and I saw no more of him; my husband was coming up stairs, and I saw the prisoner at the bottom of the stairs, I catched hold of him again, he said d - n your eyes, what do you want to stop me, have not I been endeavouring to assist you.

Q. Did he mention in what way he had been endeavouring to assist you - A. No other way than that; my husband took charge of him, and another man that was in the tap-room.

Q. When had you seen the guinea, and the seven shilling piece - A. I believe about three days before to the best of my recollection.

Q. Have you any thing here that you found upon the bed - A. No, I have not.

Q. You say there were eight spoons, was there a pair of salts, and a pair of pepper castors - A. Yes, and three table-spoons, and five tea-spoons.

Q. The table-spoons are large spoons I suppose, what may they be worth - A. Between two and three pounds altogether. The three spoons I should not like to take two pounds for them.

Q. Then altogether they may be worth about two pounds - A. Yes. I cannot say particularly, they being old silver.

Prisoner. I wish to ask her whether she is certain that she was assisting Mr. Reeves in securing me - A. Yes, I held him while my husband and another man took and drove him into the parlour.

COURT. Are you sure that when you went into this room that you recollect the features of this man by the light upon the bed - A. I am, he has been at our house frequently at times.

Q. Have you known him two or three years - A. No, not so long as that, about six or seven months.

Q. You have no sort of doubt about his person, have you - A. No, none at all. I have always said it was the same person.

MARY MOORE . Q. Are you maid there - A. Yes. I saw my master put the prisoner into the parlour, and as he was going I saw him throw the keys down, I picked them up.

THOMAS MANTZ . I apprehended the prisoner on the information I received sometime afterwards.

Prisoner's Defence. It is far from my intention of delaying the court, but it is a duty incumbent on me to impress on your lordships mind, and the jury, my innocence and that it is in my power to invalidate the evidence of Mrs. and Mr. Reeve; I had not been there five minutes when I heard an alarm, I thought it was fire. After the other man was apprehended I own one of the men said I was one of them; I said, am I not assisting you? I was never searched, nor never made a prisoner. I went voluntary into the parlour. Mr. Reeve has said I threw the picklock keys away, I never had them. I was not secured on the stairs, I was never beyond the bar-door, and with respect to the woman, by the glimmering light alone she could not observe my countenance. I can prove that she had no other light than the glimmering light till after the prisoners, whoever they were, were gone, and after that it is impossible, from the agitation of her mind to know the prisoners at all. Mr. Reeve said he had no other motive of putting him into the parlour, as he says, which he never did, as I was there, than to see whether I would suffer the prisoner to escape. Call Thomas Postan and Sarah Postan .

THOMAS POSTAN . I am a breeches maker.

Prisoner. I would wish to ask the witness where was I at the time you secured the strange man.

COURT. Did you secure any strange man - A. Yes.

Q. Is Sarah Postan your wife - A. Yes, we lodged in the house.

COURT. Obadiah Reeve , you attend to this witness, and Mary Moore - Did this man lodge inyour house.

Mr. Reeve. Yes.

Postan. I entered the lodging of Mr. Reeve on the 14th of January, and on the 19th, about a quarter before eight, a friend of mine opened my door. My door joins to Mr. Reeve's apartment

Q. What is your friend's name - A. John Stiff , he is in Birmingham, he said he saw a man, and I saw a man as well as he. I saw a stout man in the passage myself, who asked me if Taylor lived in that house; I told him he did last week.

Q. Who is that stout gentleman - A I do not know. He asked me about a taylor that lived in my room, I told him he lived in Carey-street. I instantly went down and told to Mr. Reeve, and told her that I had seen a suspicious person in the passage, Mrs. Reeve went up stairs, and I went into the tap-room, and within ten minutes I heard an outcry of my wife, crying murder, and Postan, calling me by name; I instantly ran to her assistance, I found a man coming down stairs within three or four steps of the bottom.

Q. Was it the same man you had seen before - A. No, it was not. Whom I instantly collared, he tried as much strength as he had to get from me, but I held him so as I secured him, my wife was behind at the bottom of the stairs; my wife saw him drop a watch stolen out of Mrs. Reeve's room.

Q. Did you see it yourself - A. No. I dragged this man into the tap room, and a man in the tap room said, do not choak him. I instantly loosed him.

Q. Do you know who that man was that you seized by the collar - A. I should know him if I were to see his face. He went into the parlour, I made an attempt to follow him, but by Mrs. Reeve telling me that I was not to go into the parlour, that there were gentlemen there to take care of him, I did not follow him. I instantly turned to Mr. Reeve, and said, I conceived there was a party concern. I saw in the parlour five or six gentlemen drinking brandy and water and rum and water to my knowledge; the room was not so large but I could see the man escape through the window, by the moving of the curtain, as I thought he did not come out the way that he went in, he was not present. I instantly ran to Mr. Reeve, who was at the outer door in the passage, and repeated these words. He was keeping the outer door that nobody could come in or out. I said, Mr. Reeve open the door instantly, the man that was confined in the room is escaped through the window.

Q. You say you saw five or six people in the parlour - A. Yes.

Q. Then he had escaped while these five or six people were in the room - A. I positively do declare it.

Q. Do not make so much action, behave decent I hope you are perfectly sober - A. Perfectly sober. Mr. Reeve open the door instantly, for I can catch the man again; he made answer, do not make a noise, I know what I am about, and afterwards he opened the door and came into the tap-room, I asked him the reason why he would not open that door to me; he told me that he kept the prisoner in the parlour to see if Driver would let him escape.

Q. Was Driver in the parlour - A. No, not when I missed the man to my knowledge. Mr. Reeve told me he left him along with Driver to see whether he would let him escape.

Q. Did you see Driver in the parlour - A. No, I saw him in the tap-room. I spoke to Mrs. Reeve concerning her not letting me go into the parlour. When I saw the prisoner I saw him between me and the door adjoining the bar window. When I had hold of the man somebody accused the prisoner of being one of them, whom I know not, he he said, I am just come out of the parlour, father, am I not been assisting you in the best manner I can, meaning Mr. Reeve. He has been in the habit of calling him father, I have been informed by Mr. and Mrs. Reeve a twelvemonth before that.

Q. Why they have not known him above six or seven months - A. They informed me that I heard a voice say in the tap-room, by whom I do not know, that Driver did come out of the parlour.

Q. Where were you at the time that the alarm was given - A. In the tap-room, and Mr. Reeve was in the bar.

Q. Did Mr Reeve leave the bar at the same time that you did - A. I went out, and Mr. Reeve followed me.

Q. Did Mr. Reeve assist in taking the man that you had hold of - A. No, he did not.

Q. Where was Mr. Reeve at that time - A. With his back against the outer door, to prevent any one going out or coming in.

COURT. Did Mr. Reeve go up stairs - A. He did not, nobody but myself.

Prisoner. Were you between the stairs and me at the time that you secured the man - A. The stairs were between me and you, you were against the door by the bar window.

Q. When was the first instance that you remarked me - A. When somebody accused you of being one of them, you said, I am coming out of the parlour.

Q. Did you see Mr. Reeve secure me - A. I did not.

Q. Did you consider me a prisoner at the time you put the man in the parlour - A. I did not.

COURT. It does not matter what he considered you.

Prisoner. Did you ever observe me obstruct you in your duty of taking the other man - A. No, I did not.

COURT. You do not know any thing about the keys - A. I saw nothing of the keys until they were picked up.

Q. Have you lodged any time at that house - A. Only a fortnight, a week after this happened I left it.

Q. Were you acquainted with this man - A. I never saw the man in my life, only during the time I lodged there; I do not lodge there now.

Q. How soon after this business did you quitthis house - A. That day week following. I was afraid of losing my life and property by people that resorted there.

Q. How soon after this business was it that you saw the prisoner again - A. I saw him yesterday.

Q. Is that the first time that you have seen him since this transaction up to the present time - A. On Wednesday I saw the prisoner.

Q. Is that the first time since the 19th of January - A. Yes. I went to see a boy that was confined there that had burned clothes, a shopmate's son of mine.

Q. Are you a witness upon that prosecution - A. No.

Q. Did you know there was a search about this man - A. I thought it was all done away by the money being paid.

Q. You are not the person that offered the money, are you - A. No, God forbid.

SARAH POSTAN . Q. Where were you when the alarm was given - A. I was in my own room.

Q. Did you come out of the room upon the alarm - A. I did, with a light in my hand. I saw Mrs. Reeve and two gentlemen opposite of the passage door.

Q. Was Mrs. Reeve and the men in the dark - A. Yes, untill I came out with the candle in my hand.

Q. Did you go into Mrs. Reeve's room - A. I did not.

Q. Did you see their faces - A. No; one was a tall man, and had very dark hair, both of them had dark hair; Mrs. Reeve stood against the door holding the door, and likewise the two gentlemen with their faces against the door; they were pushing the door to make their escape out; I halloaed out murder, and Mrs. Reeve halloaed out murder likewise, and after we halloaed out murder the door was forced open, and they went down stairs.

Q. Now as it was dark how could you see the colour of their hair - A. I brought my lamp out of my own room into the passage with me, and the first man that went down stairs my husband collared, he was a short stout man, with dark hair, not very short, middled sized.

Q. What became of the other - A. I do not know. My husband went to the tap-room door with him, he took him into the tap-room, he went to take him into the parlour.

Q. Was he alone in the parlour - A. I believe there were more people in the parlour, I did not go in, nor into the tap-room; I did not see any body in the parlour; Mr. Reeve was with his back against the taproom door; my husband wanted to go out to go into the yard, because he said the man would escape through the parlour window; Mr. Reeves would not let him go, told him to be quiet, and as soon as Mr. Reeve had gone from the tap room door I picked up a watch.

Q. to Mrs Reeve. Had you lost a watch - A. Yes.

Mrs. Postan. I picked up a watch and an iron crow, and the handle of the tap-room door.

Q. Where was the prisoner all this time - A. The prisoner came out of the parlour, he stood between the tap-room door, and my husband, he said, father, have not I been assisting you in the best manner I can.

Q. Did you see any skeleton keys throwed down - A. I did not. I took the watch and iron crow up stairs, and the handle of the tap-room door; Mrs. Reeve and the servant came up.

Q. What did you take them up into your room for - A. Because I had left the babe crying in the cradle. Mrs. Reeve said to the servant, I have lost a guinea, a seven shilling piece, and your master's watch; I went to her, I said, you shall have the watch, I have got it; she came into my room, and I delivered her the watch.

Prisoner. Did you ever hear Mrs. Reeve make any remarks respecting of her agitation of mind - A. She said she was so very much in a fright she did not know who the man was; she said so that night.

Q. to Mary Moore . Did you see the prisoner at the bar there - A. The first that I saw of him was going into the parlour along with master; master brought him in out of the passage, he never spoke.

Q. He did not resist him carrying him in - A. No: Master took him in as one of the men that was brought down stairs. When he was going along to the parlour he put his hand into his pocket and throwed down the keys, they laid at my feet; these are the keys that he throwed away at my feet, I picked them up; I said, here are the keys the prisoner threwed away, I gave them to my master directly.

Mr. Reeve. I have had these keys in my possession ever since.

Q. Did you see him throw them away - A. I saw him put his hand into his pocket, I did not see what he throwed away. All this was done in a minute and a half, in my passage.

Q. Who is this Postan - A. I do not know much about him; he came with me on my side, yesterday I turned him of the other side, I thought he might be useful to the prisoner. There is no truth in what he says.

Q. to Mrs. Reeve. Mrs. Postan says that you were in so much fright you declared that you did not know the man, is that true - A. It is false, I never said any such thing.

Q. Are you quite sure that the prisoner at the bar, by the light that you had in the room you could see him and that you did see him - A. By the glimmering of the lamp in the dark lanthorn in the room I could see the features of his face. This is the dark lanthorn.

SAMUEL LACK . I produce the iron crow, and the dark lanthorn, I have had it ever since, and two hats that were left on the bed in the room.

RICHARD LAMBRICK . Q. Did you apprehend this man - A. I did, in company with Mantz, in Wentworth-street, Whitechapel.

Q. What is he - A. We have understood him to be a thief for a number of years.

Q. Do you know Postan - A. No, I never saw him before.

Q. You do not know any means the prisoner has of getting his livelyhood - A. No.

Q. to Mrs Reeve. Mrs. Postan has stated that one of the men was a scoutish man, with dark hair, and another taller man in dark hair - A. There were two men in the room.

Q. Are you as sure as you are of your existence that the man at the bar was one of them - A. I am.

Q. What was that story about the prisoner sayingfather, I am helping you all I can - A. I followed him down stairs, and catched him by the collar at the passage door, he said d - n your eyes, mother and father, am not I assisting you all I can.

Q. to Mr. Reeves. Is your house in the parish of St. Clements Danes - A. It is.

Q. What is the value of your watch - A. I took it to a silversmiths, he valued it at fifteen shillings.

Q. to Mrs. Reeves. Do you remember Postan coming down and telling you that he saw a stout man, a suspicious character - A. No.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 25

Of stealing in the dwelling-house to the value in the indictment, but not burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house.

First Middlesex jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

340. MARY SMITH and MARY POWELL were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of April , a watch, value 3 l. two seals, value 2 l. and a watch key, value 5 s. the property of Charles Sandford Dodd .

CHARLES SANDFORD DODD . I am not in business at present. On Tuesday morning, the 7th of April, between one and two o'clock, I was attacked by three women a few yards from Bride-lane, in Fleet-street , I requested them to let me pass; they got me against the shutters, the prisoner Smith snatched my watch out of my pocket and ran down Bride-lane; I pursued her, and never lost sight of her, and called to the watchman; I caught her at the corner of the passage that goes into Bridge-street, I heard the chain rattle going down Bride-lane, another woman passed by whom I supposed took the watch from her.

Q. Who is that other woman - A. Mary Powell , I believe.

Q. Was she one of the three women that stopped you in Fleet-street - A. I cannot positively say, I believe the watchman can. There were three of them.

Q. As to Smith, you never lost sight of her - A. No, I never lost sight of her untill I catched her at the corner of the passage. I was then as sober as I am now.

THOMAS GODFREY . I am a watchman, my box is against the large china manufactory in Fleet-street, my beat leads into Bride-lane. I went down Bride-lane calling the hour of one, and returning back I saw Mr. Dodd, and I saw three ladies, whom I knew perfectly well, Smith, Powell, and another; Mr. Dodd appeared to me to be wanting to pass along, two of them had got him up against the shutter, I ordered them to disperse.

Q. Who are the two that had got him up against the shutter - A. Powell, and the one that is not here. This was about two doors from Bride-lane. Smith was standing just at the corner of Bride-lane, against the post, and as this gentleman extricated himself from the other two she laid hold of him as he passed along; he appeared to me to wish to extricate him to pass; she is a lusty woman, and he a slight man; she was too powerful for him, she pushed him down Bride-lane, and was followed by Powell; when he got five or six paces down Bride-lane he called out watch, I have lost my watch. I kept following them down, I expected to be given charge of them; he pursued them untill he got to the corner of a passage that leads into Bridge-street, there he secured her, and I took her in custody.

Q. Who was the other woman with her - A. Powell was the only person that passed down Bride-lane, she passed them and kept running along, never stopped, but went into Bridge-street; she was taken into custody by a watchman, upon hearing the cry of stop her.

Q. Was the watch ever found - A. No, not as I know off; the watchman that took her in custody took her down to the watchhouse, he knew nothing of the robbery.

Q. You know Powell before - A. I knew her person very well, and I knew Smith perfectly well.

Mr. Knapp. You did not know the prosecutor before, did you - A. No, never.

Q. This was one o'clock in the morning - A. I dare say it was half past one at that time.

Q. Sometimes you have seen young men in the street freshish at that hour - A. I have, too many of them, it did not appear to me that he was.

Q. Do not you believe that the watch has never been found - A. I do believe that the prosecutor, nor any person here knows any thing about it.

Q. to prosecutor. Your watch had a chain and seals to it - A. Yes. I never found them again.

JOSEPH BROWN . I am a constable of St. Bride's. On the 1st of April, about half past one in the morning, the two prisoners were brought into the watch-house, I searched them separate; I knew them before; I found no watch about either of them.

Smith left her defence to her counsel.

Powell's Defence. The watchman has spoke wrong, he says he saw me run down the passage into Bridge-street.

Godfrey. The person that followed Smith was Powell; I am as positive as I am of seeing your lordship.

SMITH, GUILTY , aged 28.

POWELL, GUILTY , aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

341. ELIZA WHISTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of March , three keys, value 6 d. and a sheet, value 4 s. the property of John Davis .

JOHN DAVIS . I am employed by the stationers of the bank of England, I live at No. 7, Bride's passage . The prisoner had been my servant three months, she came with a recommendation, which happened to be a false one. On the 2nd of March, a little past one in the morning, I came home, I let myself in by a key, I observed a light in her bed-room, and thought she had gone to bed, and left the candle to the danger of the house; I knocked at the door twice, and called her by name, and received no answer. I looked over the curtain and saw a man sitting in a chair. One part of the shop is divided off, and the window looks into her bed room. I saw a man sitting in a chair, most terribly intoxicated; a a very rough and dirty looking fellow. I just touched his breast, and said, who are you, where did you come from, what do you do here; he repeated mywords, and said, what do you do here; I will let you know about that, I replied. I went to the door, shut the street door, double locked it, and left the key in, and get two watchman; I left them in the house, I returned with two watchmen; the man was taken in custody; I called the prisoner, she came up out of the cellar. I told the watchman to take her in custody, they took her to St. Bride's watchhouse. I gave charge of the man for being in my house at an unseasonable time, and as to her I could hardly tell what to say, I had lost a great deal of property, sheets, table linen, my shirts changed, others inferior placed for them. The constable searched her, there were found three keys and some duplicates. I had asked her prior to that concerning opening the drawers.

Q. Had you lost your keys - A. I had, and the three keys found upon her was mine, which she had positively denied ever seeing. I then asked her if she would give me up the accomplice I would take the linen home myself, which she refused.

Q. Among the duplicates that were found upon her was there any thing that turned out to be yours - A. One sheet, and that duplicate was found on her in my presence.

Q. Did she afterwards say any thing else on the subject - A. No, she took it with a deal of fortitude, and refused that clemency I had offered her.

Q. These keys that I had found upon her were yours - A. Yes, they are keys of a book case, and secretary, and a drawer that served as a wardrobe.

Q. Had she any business with these keys, or did you trust her with them - A. I never trusted her with them; I have never given her any key to open any place; I generally kept these keys in the buffet, or behind the book case.

JOSEPH BROWN . I am a constable. The prisoner was brought to the watchhouse; I searched her, and found six duplicates, one was a duplicate for a sheet, pledged at Mr. Flemming's, and these three keys I found upon her, before I searched her she denied having the keys, after I found them she said nothing, but seemed sorry they were found upon her.

JAMES DWELLY . I am a servant to Mr. Flemming, pawnbroker, in Fleet-market. I produce a sheet pawned by a woman on the 14th of February, I cannot identify the prisoner; I gave a duplicate to the person that pawned the sheet, and the duplicate now produced corresponds with the one on the sheet, it is my writing, and it is the counterpart. I lent half a crown upon it. The sheet is marked J. D. No. 6.

Prosecutor. The sheet is mine, it is my marking.

Q. On the 14th of February was the prisoner in your service - A. Yes, from the 13th of February, and two of the keys are certainly mine, one opens the wardrobe, and the other opens my book-case, and this key that I do not speak to opens a drawer in which I kept my iron chest.

Mr. Walford. Has not the prisoner been in the habit of buying articles for your house - A. No, I would not pay for a farthingsworth of matches; she has brought me one false bill, and a very bad account it is. I told her I would not pay any thing but milk and rolls.

Prisoner's Defence. Upon account of having no mistress Mr. Davis gave me all the keys there was, that was four. The drawers were never locked all the time I was there; the sheets were kept up in the garret, I never was there but once, when the bricklayers were there.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

342. WILLIAM DAVIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of April , a wrapper, value 2 d. and ninety yards of callico, value 6 l. the property of Ebenezer Smith , from the person of Nathaniel Smith .

EBENEZER SMITH . I am a callico glazer , I live in White Horse-alley, Cow Cross. On Monday evening, the 1st of April, I sent three pieces of nine-eights blue dies twenty four yards each, and eighteen yards of chocolate tied up in a brown wrapper, with a cord round them; I sent them by a little boy , Nathaniel Smith , he was to have carried them to No. 3, Huggin-lane, Wood-street, to Mr. Barker, a callenderer. That was at eight o'clock in the evening, a moon-light night.

NATHANIEL SMITH . Q. How old are you - A. I do not know rightly.

Q. Do you know whether it is a good thing or a bad thing to tell a lie - A. It is a bad thing to tell a lie.

Q. Where did you meet the prisoner - A. In Bull and Mouth-street , he followed me from there to Goldsmiths Hall, then he took the bundle from me and chucked it to another man, and told him to run; he asked me to go into a public house and ask for a name, Thomas Smith .

Q. Did you go in - A. No, I did not.

Q. Look round, is that the man - A. Yes, the prisoner is the man, he walked with me from Bull and Mouth-street to Goldsmiths Hall, where he took my bundle and walked on as fast as he could.

Mr. Walford. When was you taught to say it was a bad thing to tell a lie - A. I learnt it myself.

Q. What time of night was it - A. A little after eight o'clock at night, a moon light night.

Q. I suppose you was afraid they would be angry with you for losing the bundle - A. Yes.

Q. Did any man come up to you and ask you what was the matter - A. Yes; after he took the bundle he came up to me and asked me what was the matter with me.

COURT. Is that the man - A. I am certain it is.

PHOEBE GILES . About half past eight on Monday night I was sitting at home, I heard the cry of stop thief; I live in Three Crane-court, Foster-lane; my own little girl was out, I conceived it might be her; I ran down the court, I saw this little lad at the post by Goldsmiths Hall, at this end of Foster-lane, he was crying, I asked him what was the matter with him; he said a man had taken his bundle and had thrown it to another, and the other man had ran away. I asked him if he should know the man again; he said, yes, he should; the prisoner was near the gate of Goldsmith's Hall, with about ten or a dozen people round him; the boy pointed out the prisoner, I asked him if he was quite sure he was the man, he said, yes, indeed it was; the prisoner said, how can you say itwas me; the child said, you are the very man that took my bundle, and you know you are, and them you asked me what was the matter; then I put the child out out of my arms, and took the prisoner by the collar, and said I would hold him; he told me to touch him if I dare, he lived in the city, and had a respectable character; I told him I did not care what he said in that respect, because there were as many thieves in the city as out of it, I would hold him untill he was in better hands; I kept him untill the officer came, and then I gave him up; he was taken into the White Hart, I took the child in there, and then the child pointed him out.

SUSANNAH GOSBELL . I am a servant to Mr. Adams in St. Ann's-lane. I was coming down Foster-lane, I saw this man turning the corner of Maiden-lane, and the child was close behind him; the child cried out, give me my bundle; he answered, go along boy, I have got nothing; with that the child screamed out violently, and said, stop thief; Mr. Payne came out, and the man stopped; he said, he had nothing about him, any one was welcome to search him; he said he lived with his uncle in the Strand, any one was welcome to go and see where he lived; he did not offer to run away. My mistress went in and fetched the constable, Hawkins.

Q. Did you hear the boy say to the man's face that he was the man afterwards - A. Yes. The woman took the boy up in her arms, and he looked in the man's face; she asked the child if that was the man, the child said, yes, it was.

Q. He had asked before for the man to give him the bundle - A. Yes, he had; I was the first that saw him.

Mr. Walford. There was nobody about he might have ran away if he pleased - A. Yes.

Q. Instead of that he staid and never attempted to run away, and the woman held the child up to the man's face, and said, is that the man, and then he said yes - A. Yes.

THOMAS LACEY HAWKINS . I am a marshalman; I was in Mr. Adams's house at the time the last witness came in with Mr. Adams's sister, she told me there was a piece of work in the street; I went out immediately, I got into the middle of the bustle, there were twenty or thirty people there; the woman did not know me, she was loth to give up the man; the neighbours said they knew me, and then she delivered him up. The prisoner wished me to be delicate, said he would not run away, he had a deal to say for himself, he pitied the boys loss; he seemed to say that he was not such a character as to do such a thing. I told the boy not to be frightened, and told the prisoner to come a little higher up, I knew there was a public-house, and I should not loose him. I should hold him. The neighbours came with me, the woman and the boy; the child was alarmed. I set him on the taproom table, told him nobody should hurt him; he told me the same as he has told your lordship now, and as correct; the prisoner was full of talk, I searched him, in one of his pockets I found this clasp knife open I told him when I had clasp knives I generally had them shut; he said he did not know how it came open; I asked him what trade he was; he said he was learning one with his uncle, his uncle was a bag maker. He said before the Alderman that he had been to taken at party to the Liverpool coach; I asked the bookkeeper, every thing that he said was false; he said his employment lived in the City gardens.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Transported for Life .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

343. JOHN COOMBS and WILLIAM NEALE, alias NORMAN , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of March , thirteen gallons of rum, value 40 s. the property of our Lord the King ; - and

FOUR OTHER COUNTS, laying it to be the property of different persons.

WILLIAM GIPSON . Q. I believe you are in partnership with William Kimpson and Samuel Wright - A. I am; we are spirit merchants.

Q. In the beginning of March had you any quantity of rum in the bonded warehouse in the West India docks - A. We had; we employed Mr. Drinkall, our lighterman to take some rum from the West India docks, the specific quantity I do not know; they were put on board a ship in the river intended for exportation.

JOHN DRINKALL , JUNIOR. I am in partnership with my father, John Drinkall , we are lightermen.

Q. Were you employed by Messrs. Kimpson and Company to take a quantity of rum on board a ship in the river - A. We were, the name of the lighter was the Jonathan , and that lighter is the property of myself and father.

RICHARD BETTS . I am an excise guager.

Q. On the 4th of March did you deliver any rum from the bonded warehouse to a lighter - A. I did, forty five puncheons to Messrs. Kimpson's lighter.

Q. Was there an excise watchman when you put them on board - A. Yes, William Corp .

Q. Were the casks all full - A. All full, with the exception of two half pint samples taken out of each.

Q. Give me the guage of the casks - A. No. 2, when full, contained one hundred and thirteen gallons; No. 3, one hundred and twelve; No. 6, one hundred and thirteen; No. 8, one hundred and fourteen; No. 11, one hundred and fifteen; and the other one hundred and nineteen; these were the quantities that were in each cask, barring a pint. I guaged the puncheons myself, and I did not observe any spills in the puncheons.

WILLIAM CORP . I am an established watchman of the Excise.

Q. On the 4th of March had you any quantity of rum delivered to you in charge by Mr. Betts - A. I had forty-five puncheons delivered to me by him in charge between three and four in the afternoon, they were in the Jonathan craft, belonging to Mr. Drinkall; I had the care of them for the excise; Hughes and Groves got them out of the Dock into the bason; they were both there in care for the owner or lighterman, I cannot saw which; I was there from four till seven, then I resigned my charge to William Barr , an extra watchman of the Excise; he relieved me at that time, I saw him go on board. Groves and Hughes left the lighter; when they brought it into the bason; I went on duty the next morning, abouthalf past eight o'clock I found Barr on duty, I hailed him, he came to me, I have never seen him since.

JOSEPH ROBINSON . I am Inspector of the Excise watch.

Q. Do you know a man of the name of William Barr - A. I do, he was an extra watchman of the excise, on the 3d and 4th of March.

Q. Had he the charge given him of any rum - A. He had, on board the Jonathan, Mr. Drinkall's barge.

Q. Was any thing due to Barr on the 4th of March - A. There is something due to him now, he has absconded.

WILLIAM HALLETT . I am foreman to the gates and bridges at Limehouse gate. On the evening of the 4th of March I was on duty, I saw the Jonathan in the bason, she went out of the bason into the river, rather after nine o'clock; she went to the pier-head and remained there till half past ten; I saw no more of her; there was no other barge laying near the pier-head. At half past ten it was slack water, the other craft had gone with the flood tide.

GEORGE COVEY . I am a watchman in the service of the customs. On the 4th of March I went on duty in the docks at four in the afternoon I was stationed by the searchers office on the morning of the 5th a little after twelve; I came to the bridge, I saw four men upon the pier-head, they were running to and fro; afterwards I saw two of the four go into a craft, and shove the craft off, and one of the two that were left went underneath the bridge. Barber had seen part of this transaction, he was gone for assistance, and they pushed off the craft.

JOSEPH BARBER . I am an officer of the customs. On the 4th of March a few minutes before twelve, I was on duty watching the dock, I went over this bridge, I saw four persons on the pier-head, in a craft, they seemed to be busy engaged, it was a moon-light night, I met Covey at the foot of the bridge; I then went for assistance; in my course to the pier-head I met Ellis, Robinson, and Hanover; we went through a narrow passage, I saw two men on the pier-head, about twenty or thirty feet from the Thames; one of the men I saw is Coombs; I asked them what they were doing, a voice answered nothing; they came towards us, and we advanced towards them; I then asked them what they were, and what business they had there at that hour of the night; they made no reply; myself and Robinson went to the spot where they came from, there we found these eleven bladders containing thirteen gallons of rum, the black bags, four empty bladders, and pump and a claw hammer; we took Coombs, I asked him who he was; he made no reply. The other man ran away round the pier head, into a timber yard, and I lost sight of him. We took Coombs into the guard house, and I lodged him in the care of the serjeant of the guards; Coombs said in the guard-house that he was a taylor, that he came there after a bill that Rawlinson owed him. On Friday night, the 8th of March, Eddis and myself were going down on duty to the West India Docks, we met the prisoner Neale.

Q. You, I believe, did not know him - A. No, I did not; Ellis knew him, he said he was the person that made his escape from us the over night, he immediately took him by the collar, I assisted, and as we were conducting him to the guard-house on a sudden he twisted and got away from us; I ran after him, he ran about forty or fifty yards before I overtook him. We secured Neale.

Q. You told me at the time that you first saw the four men at the pier-head that there was a craft laying there - A. Yes, and when I got down to the pier-head it was gone.

CHARLES ELLIS . I am an extra excise watchman.

Q. On the night of the 4th of March did Barber come to you for assistance - A. Yes, I went with him to the pier-head, I met with these two men, one we took, Neale escaped. I am quite positive Neale was the man that escaped.

Q. You have heard the account given by Barber of finding the bladders - A. Yes, I was present all the time.

Q. On the 4th of March how near were you to Neale when you saw him - A. I was quite close, so as to see him; I was within a yard; I have known him four or five years; I am quite positive about him. I saw him again with another man near the Royal Oak, on the Thursday night, I did not stop him then. On the Friday I saw him, Barber was with me, we took him in Mr. Curling's ship yard; I laid hold of him by the collar, I said, here he is, this is the man that made his escape; Neale said, what do you want with me, I have nothing at all about me. I took him towards the dock premises, he gave a twist and ran away; Mr. Barber ran after him, and caught him, he then made resistance; we took him about six score yards before we handcuffed him.

Q. Is the pier-head enclosed - A. It is enclosed within the boundary wall.

Q. Could any person except your watchman be there at that time of night for any honest purpose - A. No, not for any good.

Q. You saw the pumps and bladders that were found - A. Yes, they are things that are made use of for the purpose of plunder.

Mr Andrews. Do I understood you that you went with Barber to the pier-head - A. No, not quite to the pier-head; we found Coombs by the machine that grinds mortar; he was within seven yards and a half where the liquor laid; I stood by Coombs, he could not get away.

JOHN HANOVER . I am one of the constables of the West India docks. On the 4th of March, at twelve o'clock at night, Ellis came and gave me some information. I went with him and Robinson through the little passage towards the pier head. When I came to the pier head I saw two men, they were about twelve yards from me, they ran towards us.

Q. Were there any other escape for them than coming by you - A. I did not know of any at that time. Barber asked them what they were doing, they said, nothing. And at the place where they came from was the place where the liquor was afterwards found.

Q. How far was the place where the liquor was found from the place where you found them - A. About five or six yards; one of the men was the prisoner Coombs, the other man took to his heels and run; I know nothing about him; I found nothing onCoombs but a common knife; Coombs was taken to the Guard house, and these things were found upon the pier of the West India Dock in their possession.

Mr. Andrews. Coombs did not attempt to run - A. He did not; we stood by him.

Q. You told my friend that you did not know there was a way for a person to escape - A. There was then, but I did not know it, it is made secure now.

Q. How could a man get away from the pier-head into the timber-yard - A. There had been a fence, and part of the fence had been broken down; I never observed it before.

THOMAS ROBINSON . I am an established Excise watchman. On the 4th of March I was applied to by Ellis to go and assist Barber; I went with him to the pier-head, I observed two men standing up by the wall, where these goods were afterwards found; upon going on the pier head they came towards us slowly; Mr. Barber asked them what they were doing, one of the men said, nothing; Coombs was taken in custody; I and Barber went to look to see if we could find any thing, I called to Hanover that we had found the goods, and upon my calling out one of the men run towards the fence, that divides Mr. Curlings premises from the dock; no person could get in there that was a stranger; I went with Coombs to the guard room, I asked him if he belonged to the revenue; he said, no, he was an extra tide waiter, he had the misfortune to lose it; he said he came down to the pier-head to get a bill of seventeen shillings and sixpence of a man of the name of Rawlinson. I know a gentleman of the name of Rawlinson, a lighterman, I cannot say whether it is the same. There is no house on the pier head.

Q. Had you the curiosity to go and see the place by which the man escaped - A. I did; he escaped round the corner of the post.

JOHN BEAL . I am a surveyor employed by the Excise board.

Q. Did you go the next day after this for the purpose of ascertaining whether there was any deficiency of the rum - A. I did. I went on the 5th, and the deficiency was eight gallons in six casks, on board the Jonathan; I found spills in the bulge of the casks, which were for the purpose of drawing the liquor out. I made allowance for the samples.

Coomb's Defence. I have lived to near sixty years of age, I dely man or mortal to say, Coombs, you have done wrong in your life. Were I upon my death bed I would take my oath of my innocence. At the watchhouse I offered to strip myself, they said there was no need of that, they had rumaged me close enough.

Neale's Defence. On Monday night, from the hour of nine to twelve at night, I was in Whitechapel, at the Yorkshire Grey, public house, attending there as waterman. When I was taken by these men I had been down to the Isle of Dogs to get a job, coming home I was stopped by them.

Coombs called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

COOMBS, GUILTY , aged 60.

Confined Two Years in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

NEALE, GUILTY , aged 27.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Chambre.

344. SARAH DELL was indicted for that she on the 30th of March , feloniously did forge and counterfeit a certain bank note for the payment one pound, with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the bank of England .

SECOND COUNT, for feloniously disposing of and putting away a like forged note, with like intention.

And OTHER COUNTS for like offence, with intent to defraud Richard Burnell .

RICHARD BURNELL . I keep a grocer's shop in the Strand . On Saturday, the 30th of March, near nine o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came into my shop, she asked for two ounces of ten shilling tea, and a pound and a half of moist sugar, which amounted to two shillings and three-pence, she offered a one pound note to pay for it; I took up the note, and as she tendered the note I perceived it to be a false note. I did not take any notice of it, but told her while I was serving the next customer to put her name and place of abode upon it, she did so.

Q. Look at this note, and see what she wrote on that occasion - A. It is the same, there is her writing and my writing on it; I wrote my name in the presence of the officer; the prisoner wrote Sarah Dell , No. 7, Northumberland-street. This is the note I received from her; I then asked her who she had taken it of; she said, of her husband, who was then gone on; she went to the door, as if to look for her husband; I then told her it was a bad note; I called my porter to tell her she must not go away; he got to the door as she got there; she returned and said she did not wish to run away, but while serving a customer, or being otherways busy, she went to the door unperceived and run away; I followed her and overtook her, my porter accompanied me.

Q. How far had she got when you overtook her - A. Five doors; I never lost sight of her. At the time that she got past the window I got out of doors; I secured her and brought her back, then I sent for Lavender the officer. (The note read)

COURT. The name put on the note by the prisoner is the same that appears now - A. The same.

STEPHEN LAVENDAR . I am an officer of Bow-street. I took the prisoner in custody on Saturday evening last, at the shop of Mr. Burnell in the Strand, near ten o'clock at night; she had no pockets, in her bosom I found two shillings, and sixpennyworth of halfpence; I then asked her if the direction she wrote on the back of the note was correct; she then said it was not, she lived at No. 12, Snow's-fields, in the Borough; I asked her how she came so far, or some such question: she said that she had been or was going to some friend in Northumberland-court, and that she thought it better to give that direction, which was so much nearer, than the one that she really lived at. I asked her if she was a married woman; she said she was not, but she lived with a person of the name of Smith, she went as his wife, but she was not married to him. On the Monday morning I went to this house in Snow's-fields, No. 12, on searching it there appeared to be in a room at the back of the shop, better than a quarter of a pound of tea, and about twopound of moist sugar. It is a kind of a chandler's shop, where they sell bread, butter, and cheese.

Q. Was there any other tea and sugar than that you have described - A. None, whatever.

Mr. Alley. When you went to Snow's fields you there saw a parcel of tea, and a poor man there, and children - A. Yes, there were three children. I received the bill of Mr. Burnell, he indorsed it in my presence.

Mr. Knapp. The tea and sugar for which the note was given was different tea and sugar to that - A. That I never saw.

JOHN LEE . I am one of the inspectors of the Bank.

Q. Take that note in your hand - look at that note - A. It is a forged note in all respects; it is not bank paper nor bank plate, nor the signature of the cashier. That is the note in question.

Q Now look at that - A. This is a forged note also, and from the same plate, it is filled up in the same hand-writing as the note in the indictment.

COURT. Are they all signed by Watts - A. No, all different; the second note is from the same plate, it is marked Mary Brown , 21, King-street, Borough. The third note is not from the same plate, the filling up is the same hand writing, it is marked in the front, Mrs. Brown; the name subscribed to it is I. Clapp, that is the same name as the second note.

Mr. Bosanquet. Now look at the fourth - A. The fourth is from the same plate as the third, and I should take the filling up to be the same as the third note. It is marked Brown, No. 6, Kent-street. They are all forged notes.

Mr. Alley. If I understand you there are two notes corresponding in signature, and two notes appearing to correspond with the plates and signatures - A. Yes.

Q. So that there are not two corresponding in signatures and plates - A. No, I think not. I cannot say now they are out of my hand.

COURT. Two of the notes may be received in evidence, the one from the same plate, and the other of the same hand-writing.

REBECCA CLARK . I am the wife of Richard Clark, he keeps a cheesemongers shop in the Borough. On the 31st of January the prisoner came to our shop, she asked for a pound of butter and afterwards a pound of cheese, it came to two shillings and four pence altogether, she offered to pay for it by a note.

Q Look at that note, and see if that is the note she offered to you - A. It is. I asked her what her name was, she told me Brown; I then wrote Mrs. Brown on it. I am sure it the note that I received from her.

Mr. Alley. Q. to Mr. Lee. Is the note of the same plate charged in the indictment - A. It is not from the same plate, it is in the same writing.

Q. When you say it is the same writing you form a comparison with the note that is produced - A. Certainly.

Q. You have no knowledge of the hand-writing - A. No.

Q. to Mrs. Clark. The hand-writing on the front of the note Mrs. Brown was written by you Mrs. Clark - A. Yes, at the time I took it I thought it was bad, but I was not certain. I wrote that before I gave her the change.

Q. Did you ever write upon any other note the name of Brown - A. No, not exactly at that time. I did not put it out of my hand until I wrote the name of Brown upon it.

Q. Attend to my question - you have wrote the name of Brown upon other notes, have not you, it is a common name - A. I do not know that I have.

Q. What did you do with this note after you had written Brown upon it - A. I put it along with other notes I had in the house to send to the bankers.

Q. I thought you said at the time you took it you thought it was bad - A. I did.

Q. So that you that come forward to prosecute a poor woman you put it along with other notes to give it to an honest tradesman - A. No.

Q. Did not I understand you to say that you put it along with other notes that you had to send to the bankers - A. We had a bill to pay the next day, it was put along with them; the bankers clerk came the next day, he had it.

Q. Did you tell the bankers clerk that it was forged - A. No.

Mr. Bosanquet. Is that your handwriting - A. It is.

CAROLINE WARNER . I keep an oil-shop and grocer's shop, 99, Borough.

Q. Do you remember the prisoner at the bar at any time coming to you shop, and when - A. I think it was the 8th of March, she asked for a pound of plumbs and a pound of currants, I had but half a pound in the house, and a pound of sugar; my daughter reckoned it up, and signed the note; the prisoner said, before I give you the trouble to weigh the plumbs can you give me change of a one pound note; I said I would see; I called my daughter, I took the note of the prisoner and looked at it, I thought it felt thicker than bank notes generally feel; the note I received from the prisoner I gave to my daughter, and in the prisoner's hearing I said I could not see the watermark plain. I was almost afraid of it. My daughter marked it in my presence. I asked the prisoner her name and address; she told me, Mary Brown , 20 or 21, King-street, Snows Fields.

Mr. Alley. Had you ever seen the prisoner before - A. No.

Q. Have you ever seen a woman like her that you could not tell one from the other - A. Oh, yes, I could.

Q. Did you or not see another woman like the prisoner, that you for a moment thought it was the prisoner - A. No, there was a vast deal of difference; I could not mistake one from the other.

Mr. Bosanquet. Where did you see her sister - A. Some man brought a person in and asked me if I knew that woman in the Lord Mayor's parlour.

CHARLOTTE MARY WARNER . I am a daughter of the last witness.

Q. Did you receive that note from your mother - A. I did, I marked it, it is my own hand-writing. I saw the prisoner give the note to my mother.

Prisoner's Defence. I am not guilty of what I am accused of. I had two shillings and sixpence in my bosom, which was to pay for my child's coral, whichis now at the shop, not fetched home. I wanted change, and that made me go and buy tea. I was going to Northumberland-court I told Mr. Lavendar.

JOHN BRIANT SMITH . I live at No. 12, Meeting-house Walk, Snows Fields. The woman at the bar lived with me as my wife, she has four small children; I keep a chandler's shop.

Q. You recollect her being taken in custody on Saturday night on this charge of forgery - A. Yes. On the Saturday night I took the baby in a blanket to her in Bow-street, because a friend came forward. I gave her the note, I took it in the shop for a loaf of bread, a bit of cheese and bacon; I gave her the note and told her to buy meat, sugar, and tea, and what we wanted, and on Monday I came forward at Bow-street and said I gave her the note. I thought if there was any danger I would take it all upon myself. I gave the officer leave to search my premises. The sugar and tea was not brought home; on the Sunday morning I had none, I said to Mr. Gunn I'had no tea and sugar; he said he had some, I was welcome to it, he furnished me with some. I lived in Northumberland-court near seven years, she had a brother a coalmerchant that lived in Northumberland-street. Northumberland-street and Northumberland-court are connected together; the prisoner was well known there as the sister of Mr. Dell.

Q. After she and you came to live together how long did you live in Northumberland-court with her - A. Near seven years.

Q. How long ago is it that you lived in Northumberland-court - A. More than two years.

Q. When you were at Bow-street were you in custody - A. I was no otherways in custody; I went forward myself, I waited to see if they had got any thing against me. I was ready, and then I was discharged.

Q. Do you know Mrs. Clark and Mrs. Warner - A. I saw that lady to-day in the room.

Q. In the Lord Mayor's parlour - A. I do not know the name of the room. I saw them under the roof of this court; I went in along with the prisoner's sister, I asked them if they knew this woman; they said they did not know much of this woman; I said it was a hard matter to swear a thing unless they were sure.

Q. Upon the solemn oath you have taken now did not you take the prisoner's sister into the Lord Mayor's parlour, where the bank witnesses were, in hopes that they would be able to say they were one like the other - A. I did not take the sister, she was against the door at the time.

Q. Was not that the object - A. It was not. Mr. Bellis was in there, and I went in to speak to him; Mr. Bellis called me of one side, he asked me to speak the truth if I knew any thing. I said I was an innocent man, I knew nothing.

Mr. Alley. Mr. Bellis is the attorney of the prisoner - A. Yes.

Q. You say he was in the Lord Mayor's parlour - did you see him there - A. He was in one of the rooms. He is the solicitor for the prisoner; he said, if I knew any thing against the prisoner to speak the truth, and nothing else.

Q. And all that did pass from you to these women was you asking them whether they knew the sister before or not - A. I said, do you know this woman.

Q. Is she pretty much about her age - A. No, she is older; I asked them if they knew this face.

Q. Why was your reason for asking them if they knew this face, is it like the prisoner's - A. No, not exactly. I did not know there was any harm of it.

THEOPHILUS BELLIS . Q. It has been said that you were in the parlour where we go to, you came to make some communication - A. Yes. After having heard the opinion of the learned gentleman, Mr. Alley, who has the charge of defending this case, I felt it my duty to acquaint Smith, he being the nearest person affected with the prisoner, I told him the learned gentleman advised her to plead guilty of the lesser offence, and in consideration of that the Bank would new her lenity, that application was refused, both by Smith and by the prisoner; the prisoner said, I cannot plead guilty to that which I know myself innocent of.

The prisoner called seven witnesses, who gave her a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

345. SARAH DELL was indicted for that she on the 30th of March , feloniously had in her custody and possession, a certain forged bank note for the payment of one pound, she knowing the said note to be false and counterfeited .

Mr. Bosanquet, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

346. WILLIAM CLARKE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of March , a trowell, value 2 s. the property of George Pepperill ; and a trowell, value 2 s. the property of James Hillman .

GEORGE PEPPERILL . I am a plaisterer . I lost my trowell on the 20th of March, at the New Buildings, High Holborn . They were there at half past twelve; there were six trowells taken, and a hammer. At Mr. Hinckesman's I saw two trowells, one was mine, and the other the man that worked with me.

JAMES HILLMAN . I lost a trowell the same time.

JOHN HINCKESMAN . I am a pawnbroker. These two trowells were pawned at my shop on the 20th of March, I did not take them in myself. On the following day the prisoner came again to take an article out of pledge, I had him taken in custody. He acknowledged to pledging the trowells the day before at the office.

RICHARD LIMBRICK . I am an officer. When the prisoner was brought before the magistrate he said he pledged them both, one was his own, and one a man gave him to pledge.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent. I was at work in St. Giles's at the time.

Q. to prosecutor. Look at this trowell - A. This is mine.

Hillman. This is my trowell.

GUILTY , aged 61.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

347. SAMUEL GOODMAN and CHARLES TUBB were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of April , three pair of shoes, value 18 s. the property of William Morgan , privately in his shop .

WILLIAM MORGAN . I live in Church Street, in the parish of St. John, Hackney . I am a shoemaker .

Q. Do you know any thing of the two prisoners. - A. I saw them at the office. On last Wednesday two persons came into my shop to try some shoes on.

Q. Who are those two persons. - A. I do not know them when I see them. They came in to try some shoes on, and the shoes I shewed them some were too big and some too little, and when they were gone, I missed three pair of shoes directly after they left me. I had seen the shoes a few minutes before they came in.

Q. Did you observe them do any thing that raised your suspicion while they were in the shop. - A. No, I did not.

Q. Was there any body in the shop besides yourself and them. - A. Nobody when they first came in, my mother came in with a light, they got up as soon as she came in and went out.

Q. How were the men dressed. - A. They had both white aprons on, apparently like carpenters, between nine and ten the same evening, the same shoes were brought to me by Barnard Gleed an officer. I knew them, they have a particular mark upon them.

BARNARD GLEED . On Wednesday evening a quarter before eight o'clock, I being on duty in company with Edward Rice , near the Nag's Head in Hackney Road, the two prisoners passed us, I thought I knew Goodman, I turned round immediately, I said Goodman, what is it you, what have you got here. Immediately Tubb ran away, Rice followed him and brought him to me immediately, I then asked Goodman what he had got in this apron, he said three pair of shoes that a man met him by Cambridge Street Turnpike, a man he did not know, he was to give him a shilling to carry these shoes to London.

Q. What is the distance from Cambridge Street Turnpike, to where you saw them. - A. Above a quarter of a mile, I then put them in the watchhouse, and Rice and me went to Hackney to find an owner for the shoes, we went into a number, at last we went to Mr. Morgan's he said he had lost three pair of shoes, I shewed him the shoes he said they were his, these are the shoes.

EDWARD RICE . I was in company with Gleed, the account that he has given is correct.

Prosecutor. These are the three pair of shoes that I lost.

GOODMAN GUILTY, aged 17.

TUBB GUILTY, aged 19.

Of stealing, but not privately in the shop .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

348. CHARLES CROWDER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of February , eight ounces of paper, value 3 d. the property of John Lowe and William Lowe .

WILLIAM ROWLAND . I am clerk to John and William Lowe , they are solicitor s in Tanfield Court Temple.

Q. What is the prisoner. - A. A bricklayer I believe, I made up the parcel of paper and directed it, and gave it to Charles Gardner the boy on the 28th of February, between six and seven in the evening, he was to take it to the Bull and Mouth, Bull and Mouth Street, the parcel was directed for Robinson and Wheeler, they are agents, it contained instructions concerning an agreement of an enclosure, the instructions that Mr. Shephard had prepared and a letter, and the letter was directed to them, that was all that was in the parcel.

THOMAS HEARN . I am a shoemaker, employed by Dickson and Co. Cheapside, going down St. Anns Lane I observed the prisoner and three young men going towards St. Martins le Grand, one past me on my left hand and two of them passed me on my right, and one was behind the one who passed me on my left hand, I observed they crossed towards Bull and Mouth Street, and I saw a boy about twelve years of age crossing towards Bull and Mouth Street, as soon as ever the person on my left hand observed the boy he called the two who were going down Aldersgate Street to the right, and as soon as he called the other two I heard the boy ask him which was Bull and Mouth Street, I saw the prisoner take a parcel from the boy and turn round, he did not take it by violence, he put it into his breast pocket, or inside of his coat and waistcoat, I ran to take him, and as soon as I got to him the other two whom he had called tried to get him out of my hand, I had but one hand at liberty, I had goods in the other, on the two men finding they could not rescue him they left me, and the prisoner struck me, I drew of one side and collared him again and held him until I got assistance.

Q. You never lost sight of him. - A. No,

Q. Did you find the goods upon him. - A. No, I had but one hand at liberty else I could have taken them, the goods were picked up by a gentleman and given to me.

CHARLES GARDNER . I had been with a parcel to the Swan and Two Necks, Lad Lane, and I was going to the Bull and Mouth with another parcel, I asked the prisoner the way to the Bull and Mouth, he asked me where the parcel was directed to, I told him, he asked me to let him look at it, I gave it into his hand, and he put the parcel into the inside of his coat, it appeared to me that it went into his pocket, and then he set off with it, I ran after him and hallowed out stop thief, Mr. Hearn stopped him, he held him while he got some more people, he took him into a house, they searched him and found nothing, the parcel was brought in by a gentleman and given to Mr. Hearn.

JOHN LACEY HAWKINS . I produce the parcel, I was coming by at the time, I took him in custody, searched him and found nothing. I weighed it, it weighed half a pound.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent of it, The shoemakers oath ought not to be taken, he has been convicted at Westminster for body snatching.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

349. CHARLES MEREDAY and THOMAS WHITE were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of February , a pocket handkerchief, value 3 s. the property of a certain person to the jurors unknown .

JOHN LACEY HAWKINS . On the 28th of February, about seven in the evening, I was passing along Holborn near Fleet Market, I observed the two prisoners very busy watching the passengers, I was satisfied they were attempting to pick pockets, I observed them after a few minutes follow one gentleman, one was behind the gentleman and the other a little of one side, I crossed towards the middle of the street keeping the boy s in my eye, and when they came opposite of Ely Place I saw them very close to the gentleman, the night was very dark, I could not observe them take the handkerchief, the two prisoners ran up Ely Place, they disappeared immediately, I enquired of the gentleman if he had lost any thing, he put his hand into his right hand pocket, and said he had lost his handkerchief, I said if you will come quietly with me I will take the two boys, in a passage that leads from Ely Place into Hatton Garden, I searched the big boy, I could not find any thin, he had not a hat, I said where is your hat, you had a hat on just now, somebody hollowed out here is his hat, the handkerchief was in the hat. The prosecutor described the pattern of the handkerchief before I shewed it him, he said he was a druggist it smelled of opium. The gentleman went with me to the compter, he was well pleased that I had got the handkerchief, he wanted the handkerchief and to give me something for my trouble, I told him I could not let him have it. He promised to meet me the next day before the Alderman, he did not give me his address. The boy denied the hat first, and then afterwards said it was his hat.

Q. You did not see him take it. - A. I did not.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

350. SAMUEL BAILEY , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of April , twenty-eight pound weight of starch, value 1 l. 4 s. the property of John Lorkin and Joseph Pearson .

JAMES OSBORNE . I am a farmer and salesman in Smithfield, I live at Shenley Hill below Barnet. On the 5th of April I was standing in Smithfield, I saw the cart stand in Smithfield Bars , the cart could not go along because of another cart going along, it was a one horse cart, I saw the prisoner and another man endeavouring to get a parcel out, and before they got the horse on the prisoner got the parcel out, and was going off with it as fast as he could go, I ran after him and catched him by the collar, held him and called the carman to me and told him he had lost a parcel, the carman said it was his parcel, I took him into the Bulls Head and gave charge of him. He was never out of my sight till I had hold of him.

- PARKER. Q. You are the carman. - A. Yes, this is the parcel that was taken out of my cart. It is the property of John Lorkin and Joseph Pearson , oil-men , in Aldersgate Street.

Prisoner's Defence. As I was going across Smithfield a man asked me to carry this parcel a little way up St. John Street.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

351. EDWARD BEAZLEY was indicted for that he on the 23d of February , in a certain public street called Fleet Street , upon Mary Ann Sutton , did make an assault and feloniously did spoil a cloth pellisse, value 2 l. her property, being part of her cloathes on her person, then in wear

MARY ANN SUTTON . I am a singlewoman , on Saturday February the 23d, about half past eight o'clock I was in Fleet Street, I found the back of my pellisse burnt, and afterwards my gloves burnt, and the boy afterwards smacked my face, I perceived my cheek burnt.

Q. Who is the boy. - A. The same boy that stands at the bar.

Q. Did you say any thing to him. - A. No, I gave him no offence whatever, nor spoke to him, I was not talking to any one but the young lady I was with, I did not know that it was the boy that threw it over my pellisse, my back was towards him, but I saw him slap my face, it was burnt with aqua fortis, he was taken up the same night, I am sure it is the same boy. He owned to the constable that he only threw it over six couple, if he would forgive him he never would do so any more.

Prisoner's Defence. I never did it, they told me they would forgive me, that made me say that.

ANN LEVI . The young woman that made oath before you lodged with me, she came home with her pellisse burnt, she said with vitriol, she said she did not know the boy, but the first she saw taken up she would swear through a nine inch board to convict him.

Q. What are you. - A. My husband is a dealer, I live in Vine Court.

Q. Do you know the boy. - A. I do not. My husband uses a public house where the boy's father uses, when she said that I said I would come voluntary into court and speak it.

Prosecutrix. I never told her so, she did live in Shire Lane.

Q. How many young women had she in the house. - A. Four.

GUILTY , aged 13.

Whipped in jail , and discharged.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

352. WILLIAM NICHOLSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of February , nine ounce weight of silver, value 1 l. 19 s. the property of Stephen Adams .

JOHN LACEY HAWKINS . Q. You are one of the Marshalmen of the City of London. - A. Yes, on the 25th of February, I was in the top shop of Mr. Adams' shop, I went there after I had my breakfast, there was nobody there but the prisoner and his son, I went about half after eight, and about eleven I had done all what I had to do, I went to look for some salt petre and charcoal that I had hid behind a door were there was three or four shelves and very dark, I put my right hand in to feel for the salt petre, and at the very extent of the shelf was this parcel that I hold in my hand with a great piece of loose mortar clapped against it close to the wall, I found it heavy, I looked at it, and to my surprise I found it was silver, it struck me whose silver cuttings it was, I thought it was Latham's I put in the corner again, and acquainted Mr. Adams what I had found, it was then half past eleven.

Q. In consequence of information that you received did you go to the prisoners lodgings. - A. I did the same night, near eleven o'clock, when I went there the prisoner was absent, and after making the best of it that was advisable not to frighten the woman, I saidshe had better send for the man, and when the man came Mr. Adams said he had come upon a disagreeable business, he wanted his own he said to the prisoner, be so good as to let me have that parcel of silver that you took from behind the door, he said you shall have it, it is here, do not hurt me, and I hope you will have mercy upon me for the sake of my family, I lit another candle and went towards the bureau, and when I was going towards it the prisoner said it is there, it is up in the corner, when it was opened Latham said it was his silver in his presence, he meant what silver he had worked upon, Latham said he was a bad man for taking his silver, if you must take it why not take your own as he might have got into trouble, he begged of me and Latham to intercede for him, I took him to the compter that night, I weighed the silver it is nine ounces, is is thirty-nine shillings in the indictment, it is worth forty-nine shillings, I said you have a key, no man can take such a quantity without having a key, because it is put through a hole, he said I have no key, I took it at several times.

Court. Q (To Mr. Adams) How did this man behave himself. - A. He neglected his work, he had three pounds on Saturday night, borrowed a pound of me on the Monday, he had goods of me that made it up five pounds, and then he took away these nine ounces of silver.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, called two witnesses who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 35.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

353. MATTHEW MURPHY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of March , a hat, value 3 s. 6 d. the property of George Franks .

GEORGE FRANKS . I am a hatter , the corner of Red Cross Street .

Q. When did you lose your hat. - A. I do not know the date.

Q. Were your hats hanging outside with the price on them. - A. Yes

BARTHOLOMEW WOOD . I am a constable, on Friday the 1st of March, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I saw the prisoner go up to Mr. Franks door, he took this hat off the pegs, looked at it, and clapped it under his arm, and away he walked up Red Cross Street, I collared him, took the hat from him, and took him to the compter, he was very much intoxicated.

Prisoner's Defence. I was very much in liquor, I do not know what I did.

GUILTY , aged 35.

Fined 1 s. and discharged.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

354. JOHN MANNING Senr. alias MADDEN , MARGERET MANNING alias GREENLOW , and JOHN MANNING Junr. alias MADDEN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of March , thirty-four shirts, value 8 l. thirteen shirts, value 3 l. thirty-seven neck handkerchiefs, value 2 l. three pair of sheets, value 1 l. 10 s. two pillow cases, value 2 s. six table cloths, value 4 l. twenty-eight towels, value 1 l. three night caps, value 1 s. sixteen handkerchiefs, value 2 l. 5 s. three waistcoats, value 1 l. three pair of drawers, value 12 s. twenty-eight pair of stockings, value 1 l. two petticoats, value 1 l. eight aprons, value 6 s. five frocks, value 2 l. a bed gown, value 2 s. a box, value 1 s. and a basket, value 4 d. the property of Thomas Macey .

MARY MACEY . I am a laundress, I live in Glocester Street Hoxton.

Q. When did you lose these things. - A. On the 20th of January, about half after six in the evening, I lost them out of the cart in Bunhill Row , I was in the cart and the man that drove it. I did not miss it. I got up in the cart facing the Artillery Gates, the tail board in the cart was safe then, when I got to the vinegar yard in Old Street Road the tail board of the cart was down, I lost a large deal box, three bundles, and a basket, they were all gone. I applied to Worship Street, we had hand bills given out, and we put it in the papers.

DANIEL CARTWRIGHT . On the 15th of March I went with Mrs. Macey and another officer, went with a search warrant to Madden's house No. 6, Brackley Street, Golden Lane, we found a little girl there, the man and woman was not at home, Mrs. Macey picked out three aprons, a sheet, a pair of drawers, a pocket handkerchief, a neck handkerchief, and this she said was the bag that the clothes were in, it is not a bag now, we went up stairs and searched in the two pair of stairs room, there we found this basket under the bed, and in a box six shirts, four neck handkerchiefs, a silk handkerchief, and a pair of drawers. And at the next door a woman had got some things to wash, the woman is here, there we found two shirts, one pocket and one neck handkerchief, which the woman said she had of Mrs. Madden to wash on the 29th. I apprehended Madden and his Wife at the two blue posts Bartholomew Close, we were looking after them from that time to then, I told them what I took them in custody for, she said what do you take the man in custody for, he has done nothing, I said I could not help it, I should take them both in custody, she said I have lived with him a number of years, and have a number of children by him, he knew nothing of it, and she was not his wife. I took them both to the compter.

Mr. Alley. With respect to the young man you do not know where he lives. - A. No further than I am told.

Court. Q. To prosecutrix. Look at these things. - A. They are all mine.

- WILSON I am a officer. In consequence of information I searched the house of Mrs. Child, No. 3, Christophers Court, Brick Lane, Old Street. I told Mrs. Child what our business was respecting some linen that she had to wash, she said she had a good deal of linen to wash, and fetched them down stairs in a basket, these are things that I now produce, this was on the 15th of March Mrs. Child told me she received them all of Mrs. Madden of Brackley Street, they are all here, here is a great quantity of them.

MARY CHILD . I live at No. 3, Christophers Court, Brick Lane, Mrs. Madden and a man brought them things to me, to wash on this day month, it was not the man at the bar, it was a man lodger of hers, she asked me to wash them saying her servant was very ill, and she had recommended me to wash for him, I know the woman now, but the man I never saw before to my knowledge, nor I never saw the woman before.

Q. You know were she lived. - A. She told me in Brackley Street.

Q. What is her husband. - A. I do not know, I never saw him.

Q. Have you a husband. - A. Yes, a carpenter, I keep a chandlers shop, now in Bridgewater Gardens.

- WILSON. Mrs. Child received thirteen shirts the week before this. - A. Yes, I did.

Court. How many shirts did you receive the week before. - A. On the Friday week before I received nineteen shirts, and nine shifts, I washed them and Mrs. Madden fetched them away.

Jury. I thought you said you never saw her before. - A. No, I saw her a week before, I never saw her before I washed for her.

Court. How many handkerchiefs. - A. Thirty-three handkerchiefs, nothing else.

Q. You forget all these things I suppose. - A. I did not, I was not asked.

Mr. Knapp. Now which the jury are to believe, whether you saw her before, whether she brought the last, or both, or either, which is the truth. - A. Mrs. Madden brought them both times to me.

JOHN SURGEON . I am the landlord of the premises John Madden the old man was my tenant, to No. 6, Brackley Street, he lived there three or four years.

Q. What does his family consist off. - A. I am not acquainted with that, I received my rent of Madden.

Q. When did they leave your house. - A. That I cannot say, the goods were moved away unknown to me.

MRS. JEFFREYS. I keep a shop in the green way, and take in a little washing, I am a widow woman. The things found in my house I had of Mrs. Madden to wash, she sent her little girl with two shirts, a pocket handkerchief and neck handkerchief, the little girl said they were for her mammy.

Q. As you lived next door what lodgers had she. - A. She had several lodgers men and women both.

Q. Where did the young man lodge. - A. He use to lodge with them, I do not know whether he has lately, I have seen him come backwards and forwards, there has been two and three men lodge there and a woman in the one pair, and Madden occupied the lower room, the house consists of three rooms.

Mr. Alley. Do not you know that the young man lodged in Union Street. - A. Not of my own knowledge.

Q. Do not you know that he has not lodged with them for some months past. - A. He has not lodged there for months past.

Court. Q. To Cartwright. How many rooms are there in the house. - A. Three, one lower room, a one pair and a two pair, and a bed in each room.

John Madden , Senrs. Defence. I have been in Bartholomews Hospital six months, if I was to have all the world I could not take them things, I know nothing about it, I never saw none of the things.

Margeret Manning's Defence. I am innocent, I know nothing at all of it.

John Madden Junr . Was not put on his defence.

JOHN MADDEN , Senr. GUILTY , aged 64.

Confined One Year in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

MARGERET MANNING , GUILTY , aged 46.

Transported for Seven Years .

JOHN MADDEN , Junr NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

355. THOMAS DAWKINS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of March, a cask, value 1 l. 5 s. the property of Frances Wallis , widow .

JOHN BROWN . I am carman to Mrs. Frances Wallis Innholder at the George in Smithfield . On the 1st of March, I saw the prisoner at the bar with a cask on his back, he took it out of the George Yard, I called to my fellow servant the other witness to go after him and bring him back, he accordingly did, he brought him back to the George Yard.

SAMUEL HAWKINS . I am a servant to Mrs. Wallis, I went after the prisoner and caught him in Bartholomews Hospital, he had the cask on his back, I brought him back, this is the cask, it is my mistresses cask.

Prisoner's Defence. This cask belonged to Mr. Meen's, in Road Lane, No. 10. Mr. Clarke's carman gave me a written order to bring a cask away belonging to Mr. Meen, I delivered the order to a gentleman dressed in black, in the left hand office, I believe it was the clerk. I saw the mark on the cask that it belonged to Mr. Meen, if I am wrong, I am innocent of it.

GUILTY, aged 37.

Judgment respited .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

356. HENRY HUNT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of March , a watch, value 16 l. a seal, value 1 l. 1 s. the property of Thomas Gooch and Joseph Harper , and two other counts for like offence, the property of different persons.

ALFRED GOOCH . I am the son of Thomas Gooch No. 12, Red Lion, Street, Clerkenwell, his partners name is Joseph Harper , they are watch maker s. On the 28th I saw a gold hunting watch, a metal hunting case, and part of a watch, and two gold seals on a black string, packed up to go to Norwich, they were directed to Mr. James Bennett , watchmaker at Norwich, they were given to Wright to take to the coach.

WILLIAM ARNOLD WRIGHT . I am a workman in the employ of Gooch and Harper, I packed up the articles to go to Mr. Bennet, a gold hunting watch, two seals, a metal case and part of the works of a watch, I took it on the 28th about seven o'clock to the Swan and Two Necks, Lad Lane . I directed the parcel myself, I delivered it into the hands of the bookkeeper, and got a receipt from him. (The receipt read.)

SAMUEL PERRY . I am clerk to the Swan and Two Necks, Lad Lane.

Q. Do you recollect the last witness bringing any parcel to you at your office. - A. I do not, I have my book here, in it there is a receipt of a parcel to Mr. Bennett at Norwich, on the 28th of February. When the coach is loaded my porter puts the parcels on the counter, the porter takes the large parcels, and the coachman takes the small, this was a small parcel by the charge, and the prisoner was the coachman of that day for the Norwich coach.

JOHN SHROPSHIRE . I am a servant to Messrs. Boulton and Co. Charing Cross, and I have been for twelve and thirteen years.

Q. Does the Norwich mail belong to Mr. Boulton. - A. Yes, I always load the boot part and large parcels, it was the duty of the coachman to load the small parcels, because the coachman knows where to take them out to deliver them. I never did load the small parcels nor never would.

JAMES BENNETT . I am a watchmaker at Norwich.

Q. Did you after the 28th of February, on the 1st or 2d of March, receive a gold watch from Messrs.Gooch and Harper - A. I had sent a watch, and to that watch there were two seals, one of them was the arms and crest of Mr. Gurney, a banker, and the other a cypher of J. G. I have not received that, nor the two seals. I had ordered a gold hunting watch, I never received it.

Wright. The metal hunting case and the seals were sent up by Mr. Bennet.

RICHARD TAYLOR . I keep the Bunch of Grapes in Bow-street. On the 6th of March the prisoner Hunt brought me a hunting watch, I was then standing in the tap-room; he said, Mr. Taylor, I have bought a watch for a silver gilt hunting watch, he said, I am not a judge of a watch, I wish you would take it and know what it is, and what is the value of it; he had bought it of a man that wanted a little money to pay for a suit of clothes, and shewed him a bill; he said he knew the man by sight by attending at different inns.

Q. Did he say when he bought it - A. No I told him I would ascertain the value of it, and I would speak to Salmon, an officer, whom he well knew; he said, very well, I wish you would shew it to any person that you like. On the next day, Thursday, I sent to the pawnbroker to know the value of the watch, be sent me word that it was a gold watch, and the value of it was ten pounds. I saw Hunt on the Friday morning, he said, let it be what it may I bought it honestly, I assure you; he expressed his doubts of the watch on the Friday; he said he knew the man when he saw him, but he had not seen him since; he said, if the watch was gold it was a watch that he did not want; he would change it for a good silver watch, and one that kept time, and a one pound note, being a mail coachman time was all that he wanted it for. On the same day I acquainted Salmon all that passed from Hunt. Salmon took the watch and went to the office to examine it. The prisoner was taken up on the Tuesday following.

Q. Did you see him again between the Friday and the Tuesday - A. Yes, on the Friday the prisoner told me he was not in an hurry about the watch, he should see me again on the Tuesday following. The prisoner called on the Sunday to know if I had done any thing with the watch, or if any enquiry had been made respecting it; for the last journey on the road he had heard that there was a parcel missing, and in that parcel was a gold watch.

Q. Did he say any thing about any seals - A. No, he was afraid that that watch might turn out to be the watch that he bought. I told him that Salmon had the watch, and had examined the books at Bow-street of stolen and lost property, and it had not at that time been advertised, he had better see Mr. Salmon, a lodger of mine; he immediately upon that went into Salmon's apartment and was with him some time. The man went out with his coach that night. I have known him nigh twenty months, he always bore a good character. I never heard any thing to the contrary.

JOHN SALMON . I am an officer.

Q. Do you know the prisoner Hunt - A. Yes, I apprehended him on the 12th of March, at the Inn-yard, Charing Cross. This is the watch, it was given me by Mr. Taylor, the last witness. On the Sunday I saw the prisoner at Mr. Taylor's house, where I live; he was sent to me. I was ill a-bed when he came; he said he came respecting the watch, there was a parcel lost, and among the rest there was a gold hunting watch lost; he said he bought it of a man of the name of long George or long Jack, he was a person that worked occasionally at Charing Cross, as a porter. I said I was very ill, I would get up; I dressed myself, and went with him; I proposed that I would wait in St. Martin's-lane, that he should go to the yard to see whether he could see him, and I would come and take him up; he seemed so much alarmed it struck me that he was some way concerned in it. When he went in at one gateway I went round the other. I was there speaking to one of the bookkeepers, and he was there telling the case to the clerk, which I did not suppose he would have done. Hunt went with the coach to the Swan and Two Necks, and I went there about this man, Long Jack, or Long George, the porter: he went in and spoke to the publican at the bar; I could not learn that he knew any thing of him; he went out with the mail that night.

THOMAS GOLDING . I live at the White Hart, Newmarket, my mother keeps it.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. Very well; he is our coachman.

Q. Have you a seal, and from whom did you get it - A. From Henry Daniels , the nephew of the lady that keeps the house, Mrs. Walter, he lodges at her house.

Q. The mail that came down February the 28th at night, when would it arrive - A. About four o'clock in the morning, he would stop till half past eleven the next night, and then return with the other mail, and arrive in London about seven o'clock in the morning. He would not be in London again until the Saturday morning.

HENRY DANIELS . I live at Newmarket; my aunt, Mrs. Walter, keeps the Bushel and Strike public-house there; the prisoner lodged at her house.

Q. Just look at that seal produced by Mr. Golding - A. Mr. Hunt gave it me about seven weeks back. He said he had bought a watch with a seal, and the seal he would make a present to me. I gave it up about a week back.

JONATHAN TILBROOK . I live at Newmarket: I know Hunt.

Q. Did Hunt shew you a gold hunting-watch - A. He shewed me a yellow watch, I cannot say whether it was a hunting watch, about six weeks back, he said two young gentlemen came down with him, they were quite intoxicated, how careful they ought to be, and they had left a watch in the coach.

Mr. Alley. Then whether that is the watch you cannot say - A. No.

JOHN MARRIOTT . Q. Do you go by the name of Long Jack - A. Yes. I work in Lad-lane, I know the prisoner Hunt.

Q. Did Hunt accuse you of having sold him agold watch - A. I do not know that he did.

Q. Look at that watch, and tell me whether you ever sold him that gold watch - A. I never sold any watch to any body. I have not seen a gold watch for this twelvemonth.

Q. to Mr. Gooch. Look at that watch, is that the watch that was made by your father and sold to Mr. Bennett - A. It was. It is a new watch, it was charged in the bill sixteen guineas.

Wright. I am certain this is the watch. I am confident it is the same seal that Mr. Bennet sent Mr. Gooch. I sent the seal back, it was put in the parcel.

Q. to Salmon. On the day that Hunt was examined at Bow-street, were you there - A. Yes, Mr. Thomas was the clerk.

MR. THOMAS. Q. You are one of the assistants of the magistrate - A. Yes.

Q. Look at the examination of the prisoner, and see whether the statement of the prisoner was taken down by you - A. Yes, it is. (Read.)

"On Monday was a week, about a quarter before eight o'clock, he was at a public-house near the Swan and Two Necks Lad-lane, when a man known by the name of Long Jack, asked the examinant to buy the watch, which he said was a silver gilt watch. Jack pressed me to do it, he offered it for three guineas and a half. Examinant gave him two pounds ten shillings, and told him to meet him the following morning at the White Hart. Examinant went there on the following morning, Jack was not there, nor has he ever seen him since."

Q. Was any man produced of the name of Coterell - A. There was a man, I think I should know him again, he was a little man; I do not recollect his name, at the desire of the prisoner he was brought forth. To the best of my recollection the man said he saw him pay two pound ten shillings to Long Jack, he understood it was for a watch; he at first said he saw the watch, upon being questioned again he said he did not see it, only the prisoner said it was for a watch.

Mr. Alley. I was there. Do you mean to state that the man said he could not state whether it was a watch or no, but it was something yellow - A. First of all he did, and again he said he saw no watch at all, and again he said it was two dollars and a bank note.

Prisoner's Defence. On the 4th of March I had finished loading my coach at the Swan and Two Necks, Lad-lane, and had a glass of porter, while drinking it I was accosted by a man that I had seen as porter, he offered me a watch, he said it was a silver gilt hunting watch, I should have it for five guineas; I said I did not want a watch of that cost. I treated him. Mrs. Walter said he should have treated me, not I him. He came to the door with me and asked me what was the most that I would give for the watch and small seal that was attached to it; I replied three guineas and a half, and I was to buy the watch; I had not money enough about me; I went to Lombard-street, he followed me; he said I should have the watch and small seal, he would take what money I had; I engaged to pay him the remainer at the White Hart on the Wednesday morning. On Wednesday I stopped at the White Hart, no one had been enquiring for me, I went to the White Hart again, and finding no man had been there it raised my suspicion that it had not been honestly obtained, which induced me to take the watch to Mr. Taylor, knowing his house was frequented with Bow-street officers. I likewise went to Salmon of my own accord to make these enquiries to and the man that I bought the watch of; I humbly request you will perceive that what I have done will shew the purity of my enquiries. Had I been guilty I should not have taken these measures that would lead to my detection.

ISABELLA WALTER . My husband keeps the Crown, adjoining the Swan and Two Necks.

Q. Do you recollect the 4th of last month the prisoner having something to drink at your house - A. I do, it was in the evening when they were going out with the coach.

Q. What past - A. Nothing that I heard; a tall person at the bar had a pint of porter and a glass of gin, and the prisoner paid for it.

Q. Was it one of the porters at the Swan and Two Necks - A. It was not one of them.

COURT. How many years have you known Long Jack - A. I know Long Jack perfectly well, it was not him.

JOHN WOODBRIDGE . Q. You attended for the prisoner at Bow-street, what are you - A. I am a journeyman copper-plate printer. I live at No. - , Gravel-lane, Southwark.

Q. You recollect the prisoner having been taken on the charge of stealing a watch - A. Yes

Q. Speak what you stated at Bow-street, all you recollect about it - A. On Monday the 4th of March, in the evening, I was passing down Lombard-street, near Change-alley I saw a tall thin man with Mr. Hunt, they were talking together, they were bargaining about a watch.

COURT. How do you know that - A. Because I saw it. I saw the watch, it was a yellow watch; Mr. Hunt paid the man two one pound notes and two dollars; I heard him say that he was to meet him on the following Wednesday morning, and to receive the remainder part of the money, at the White Hart in the Strand As for the sum he was to give for the watch I do not know; he was just going to pay for the watch as I was going by.

Q. How came you to stop - A. I was passing by, that is the way I came to stop. I said, Mr. Hunt, how do you do. They had bargained what he was to give for it before I came up.

Q. Did you or not listen to what was passing between them - A. I saw Mr. Hunt looking at the watch, that is all.

Q. The money was not paid when you came up was it. - A. The money was going to be paid.

Q. How long was it after you came up that the money was paid - A. Two or three minutes.

Q. Be cautious what you say and speak nothing but the truth, it is of importance that you should do so. In the first place you have called God towitness that you will speak nothing but the truth, in the next place the administration of justice requires it. If you speak that which is not true you are liable to be transported for perjury, therefore it is important that you should speak the truth. You say you had been there three or four minutes before it was paid, is that true - A. It is.

Q. As you were there three or four minutes before the money was paid what was the sum agreed to be paid - A. I told you before that I did not hear what the sum was to be paid. I was towards the horses heads, I did not hear every thing that was said.

Q. Where was it this bargain was made - A. In Lombard-street, just by the Change. The coach does not stop on the Post office side. It stops on the 'Change-alley side of the way.

Q. Where was the coachman at the time he was bargaining with this man - A. On the pavement, near the box; he was standing alongside of the horses.

Q. You were with him, and stopped to ask him how he did - A. Yes.

Q. You were close to him, and close by the man - A. Yes; he was a tall thin man, with a fustian jacket.

Q. Look at Marriott, is that the man - A. That is not the man, I will swear positively.

Q. Was the man tall like that man - A. He was a tall man, I did not take particular notice of his face, he was a tall man; I do not think he was that man.

Q. You have sworn positively that was not the man - A. Yes, that was not the man, it was a tall thin man.

Q. You have sworn that you were there three or four minutes before the money was paid, what were they talking about - A. I do not particularly recollect the words; Mr. Hunt looked at the watch, he opened it, all that I saw it was a yellow watch. I am pretty sure there was no glass about it.

Q. When the prisoner looked at it did he ask him what price - A. I did not hear him ask the price; I only saw him take the watch and look at it.

Q. How do you know this was Monday - A. It was Monday the 4th of March, just before eight in the evening.

Q. When were you applied to to give any account about this - A. I was going along Fleet-street or the Strand on the Tuesday that Mr. Hunt came up; I went to Bow-street. Mr. Salmon was with him. On the Tuesday week after the Monday I went to Bow-street.

Q. He happened to be laid hold of when you were by - A. No, I was not by.

Q. Upon your oath did not you say at Bow-street that you never saw a watch - A. It was a watch. I said at Bow-street it was a watch.

Q. Did you say at Bow-street that it was a watch - A. It was a watch.

Q. Attend. Recollect, if you do not give a direct answer to a direct question I shall send you to Newgate. The question I put to you is, when you were at Bow-street did you swear that you saw a watch at the time that this man was in company with the other person - A. I forget what I might say there.

Q. You were upon your oath, you are now upon your oath, did you swear it was a watch then - A. It was a watch.

Q. I tell you I will send you to Newgate if you do not give a direct answer. Upon your oath did not you at Bow-street swear that you did not see a watch, it was something yellow, and there are two witnesses here, and more that were present, and if you do not speak according to the truth I shall order you to be committed for perjury - A. It was a watch.

Q. I will have an answer. Did not you at Bow-street swear that you did not see a watch on that day - A. I do not recollect that I did not see a watch there.

Q. Upon you oath did not you swear that you could not tell whether it was a watch or no - A. I could not swear what a kind of a watch it was, it was a yellow watch.

Q. You have been grossly prevaricating. I ask you when you were upon your oath at Bow-street did not you say you could not swear whether it was a watch or no, it was something yellow - A. It was a watch.

Q. That is not the question. Did not you swear that you could not tell that there was a watch there at the time, and I tell you here is Mr. Thomas who took your examination - A. There was a yellow watch.

Mr. Bolland. He has said at Bow-street once that it was a watch.

COURT. Did you swear at Bow-street that you saw a watch in Lombard-street - A. Not the second time at Bow-street. I did not take my oath the second time at Bow-street.

Q. Was not you sworn the second time at Bow-street - A. Yes.

COURT. Then you took your oath.

Mr. Bolland. Are you the person that was in the habit of riding behind that mail - A. I have, before now, I was behind that very morning; I was going to my work. Mr. Salmon was behind himself.

Q. What business had you behind that mail, has not the guard turned you off - A. I have never been turned off, nor flogged off.

Q. How long have you known Hunt - A. About a twelvemonth.

Q. I will now ask you whether at Bow-street you did not say that Hunt paid him in part shillings - A. I said two pound ten; I will not be positive about saying shillings. It was two one pound notes and two dollars. It was not paid in shillings.

Q. Did you say at Bow-street any of the money was in shillings - A. I might.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

357. JOSHUA KING and JOZA MITONIO were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the on the 28th of February , a watch, value 5 l. the property of Joseph Wheeler and Daniel Desboys , privately in their shop .

JOSEPH WHEELER . I am a watchmaker in Gray's-inn-passage . On the 28th of February, about one o'clock, the two prisoners came into the shop under pretence of purchasing a watch; I shewed them several; they kept me constantly employed a considerable time, and at last declined purchasing. While they were going out of the shop I missed a watch, which one of the prisoners had just before in his hand; I did not suspect their honesty, kept looking about, and found it was gone. I then supposed the men were gone too far, that it was impossible for me to overtake them.

JOHN MATTHEWS . I am an officer. On the 2d of March I apprehended the prisoners, I found a phosphorus bottle on the tall one, and Cook found some rings and duplicates upon the other. The watch has never been found.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

358. BENJAMIN EDWARDS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of February , in the dwelling-house of John Towson , a basket, value 2 s. 6 d. a gallon of gin, value 1 l. six one pound bank notes, and a two pound bank note, his property .

JOHN TOWSON . I keep a wine-vaults in New-street, Hanover-square . On Saturday the 23d of February the prisoner called to hire himself as a porter ; he referred me to Mr. Mason of Houndsditch for a character; I had not time to enquire. On the Monday he came into my service. On Tuesday, when he opened the door, he said that a servant in livery had ordered a gallon of Hollands gin to be sent to Captain Lewis, No. 2, Hollis-street, Cavendish-square, with change for a note, he did not say at that time the sum. I put the gallon of Hollands gin into bottles, and sealed them, put them into a basket. I then gave him change for a two pound note and gave him the liquor to carry The gin came to twenty-eight shillings; I gave him twelve shillings in silver, he went away with it and returned in a quarter of an hour: he said, the captain desired change for a ten pound note, he was going out of town immediately. I gave him six one pound bank notes, a two pound note, and twelve shillings that he had before made up the change for a ten pound note; he went away with the change, and did not return. I communicated it to the officer, and he was apprehended. I enquired at the house and found that no such person as Captain Lewis lived there, he had three weeks before; I went to Houndsditch and enquired for Mr. Mason, I could not find any such person lived there.

JOHN CHETWORTH . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner; I told the prosecutor I knew the man. When I apprehended him I introduced the prosecutor, I said to Edwards, do you know that gentleman; he said, no, he did not. I then said, sit, is that the man that you sent as your servant; he said, yes, that is the man, and I give you charge of him. He was searched in my presence, a one-pound note was found upon him, and eight shillings in silver, and two shillings in halfpence. I apprehended him on the same day, about eight in the evening.

Prisoner's Defence. In the morning a gentleman's servant came to my master's house, he said bless my soul, how late your people lay a bed; he said he wanted a gallon of hollands gin for his master, he could not stop any longer. I was to bring a gallon of hollands gin to Mr. Lewis, No 2, Hollis-street, Cavendish-square, I went with it, my master gave me change for a two pound note; I met the man, he took it; he said he wanted change for a ten pound note. I returned to my master for the change, and the man took it of me; he told me to wait, and he would bring me the ten pound note, and the man not coming I went to the house, they said the captain had left the house a month. I was afraid of going back to my master.

GUILTY, aged 21.

Of stealing, but not in the dwelling-house

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

359. WILLIAM HENRY DAVIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of March , a pocket book, value 2 s. the property of John Burnham .

JOHN BURNHAM . I am a serjeant at Mace in the City of London . On the 7th March, about nine o'clock in the evening, I was walking down Brook-street, Holborn , I perceived two men close at my heels, I also felt the hand of the prisoner in my pocket; I immediately seized him, and took him into custody. He did not completely take my book out of my pocket, but he had it in his hand. I did not put my hand into my pocket. I felt his hand in my pocket, and the moment his hand was in my pocket I felt it lighter. I am perfectly satisfied it was in his hand.

Q. You say the moment his hand was in your pocket you felt it lighter - do you know whether it was in his hand - A. It was in his hand, or in something in his hand. I discovered his hand in my pocket, I am sure it was in his hand; he ran up against me instantly, and shoved me against the rails; I have no doubt but that he got at the bottom of my pocket; my pocket was lighter. It was either in his hand, or in something in his hand. I do not know whether I might mention it, he said, through friends, that he would give me ten pound if I would not prosecute him.

COURT. No, I must not hear that.

THOMAS EDWARDS . I am the watchman of Brooks-street. I had then just called the hour of nine; I was on the opposite side, Mr. Burnham called out watch, he said, take charge of this man, I have found his hand in my pocket.

JAMES MAXTEAD . The magistrate bound me over on account of being in danger of my life, to appear against him next sessions.

Prisoner's Defence. The indictment for which I now stand charged I am innocent of. On that evening I had occasion to pass Brook-street, Holborn, to a shoemaker to get a pair of boots; after I had passed Mr. Burnham nigh the distance of ten yards I was collared by him, and accused of picking his pocket of a pocket book; he said, you have not picked my pocket, but in point of law it is the same; I will prosecute you. He called the watchman, and then stated that I had not robbed him, but made the attempt. I was held to bail, two in forty pound each, and myself in eighty pound. I attended at Hicks' Hall, when a bill was found against me for a misdemeanor. I was informed on the Thursday that a bill was found against me for a felony. I am aware of the unfortunate situation I am placed in, and the evidence, Maxtead, was a witness against me. I am charged of stabbing him; when I was confined in my bed at Hatton Garden I said I would ring his ears, for which I was bailed. I am likewise in an unfortunate situation, not having the benefit of counsel. I hope for your candid and impartial verdict.

Jury. Q. to prosecutor. Are you sure that the prisoner had got your pocket book in his hand - A. I have no doubt of it.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

360. PHOEBE TAYLOR was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of March , a gown, value 5 s. an apron, value 6 d. and a shawl, value 6 d. the property of Richard Watkins .

ANN WATKINS . I am a shoe-binder. I sent my little girl with the things to the mangler's, she calls me mother, she knows no other mother than me. This was about two o'clock, and about three she came back.

ELIZA WATKINS . I am six years old. I was going to Mrs. Gillett's to get some things mangled for my mother, an apron, a gown, and a half shawl, I was to take to Mrs. Gillett, she lives three doors off the corner of our court; a woman called me, she gave me a penny to get a pennyworth of tobacco; she said she would give me a penny when I came back.

Q. What became of the shawl, the apron, and the gown - A. She said, I will mind the things; she took them from me, I bought the tobacco, and when I came back she was gone. I told my mother that the woman gave me a penny to go for the tobacco, and she had taken the things.

Mr. Alley. I believe the woman that took the things was a tall woman, dressed in a black gown, and pitted with the small-pox, was she not - A. Yes.

MR. WHITWORTH. On the 11th of March the prisoner pledged the shawl, the gown, and apron with me for four shillings, between three and four o'clock. About an hour after Mrs. Watkins came and gave me information, and when the prisoner came the next day I stopped her.

COURT, Q. to Eliza Watkins. My dear little girl how was the woman dressed - A. She had a black gown; it was a tall woman.

Mrs. Watkins. I believe them to be the things, I do not know them by any mark.

EDWARD TRING . I searched the woman; she said she had not got the ticket. I found the ticket upon her, then she said she pawned it for some woman.

Prisoner's Defence. A woman that was in the wine-vaults at the top of Old street, by Goswell-street, asked me to go into Whitecross-street and pledge the things for her, I did, and she waited at the door while I was served.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave her a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

361. HARRIOT WOOD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of March , one pound one shilling in monies numbered , the property of Phillis Ducroz .

PHILLIS DUCROZ . I am a feather-manufacturer ; I live in Brook-street, Holborn . The prisoner was my servant , she had lived with me five weeks; I had suspicion of her, having missed three guineas out of the purse. On the 26th of March I missed two half guineas and two sixpences, they were taken out of the upper drawer of a chest of drawers; the half guineas were marked, they were found upon the prisoner by the officer.

WILLIAM READ . I am an officer. I searched the prisoner and found two half guineas and two sixpences in her pocket; the prisoner said she had never done the like before, and she believed the Devil possessed her to do it.

Mr. Knapp. You have taken some pains to enquire the character of this young woman - A. Yes, and I found it very good.

The prisoner left her defence to her counsel, and called four witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Fined 1 s. and discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

362. JOHN GAMBLE was indicted for that he, on the 11th of March , thirty pounds weight of lead, value 5 l. the property of Matthew Montague , esq . feloniously did cut and rip, with intent to steal and car- it away .

JOHN EDWARDS . I am a patrols serjeant, I belong to Mary-le-bone. On the 11th of March I was going my round, between four and five in the morning, I met the prisoner in North Portman Mews, he was in company with another; as soon as I saw him I sprang my rattle; they were pulling down the pump. I never lost sight of him untill he was stopped in Portman-square.

BARTLETT FLANNAGAN . I came to the spring of the rattle. The prisoner was taken by another watchman when I came up.

JOHN ATKINS . I am a watchman. On the 11th of March I heard the patrol's serjeant spring the rattle, I met the prisoner in Portman-square, I asked him what the rattle sprang for; he was in a fluster, he could not answer, I stopped him, the serjeant came up and said he was the man thatpulled the pump down.

- I am a butler to Mr. Montague. I was up in the morning. I saw the pump lay down, the hold-fasts were drawn out of the wall, it had been forced down by an iron crow; there were the marks upon the wall, but it was not cut.

Q. Who does the pump belong to - A. To Mr. Montague. The pump is lead, the case is wood, it was wrenched from the wall, laying down.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going to Billingsgate between four and five o'clock the rattle-sprang, that man stopped me. I know nothing about it.

GUILTY , aged 50.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

363. SAMUEL WALKER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of March , a great coat, value 1 l. the property of James Ansill .

JAMES ANSILL . I am a coachman . I drive for Mr. Burnham, an hackneyman in Bond-street . On the 23d of March, between three and six o'clock, I saw my coat hanging behind the stable door in the yard. Peter Davis and the prisoner were about the yard; the prisoner had no money that afternoon, the publican would not trust him. I treated him with a glass of gin, and seeing them both in the yard when I lost my coat I had Peter Davis taken up, there was nothing found upon him; I then had the prisoner taken up, the officer searched him, and found the duplicate of the coat.

SAMUEL LACK . I am an officer. I searched the prisoner and found the ticket of the coat.

JOHN HOLLAND . I live with Mr. Mulcaster, Grosvenor-street.

Q. Who pawned that coat - A. I cannot recollect. It was pawned on the 23d of March, the duplicates correspond.

Prisoner's Defence. I found the duplicate, I never saw the coat.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

364. PHOEBE GODFREY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of January , a coat, value 1 l. the property of Mary Conners .

MARY CONNERS . I go out with a barrow .

Q. What is the prisoner - A. An unfortunate woman; she lodged with me in my room in Carrol-street, St. Giles's . I lost my coat, and my daughter found the affidavit in the prisoner's pocket.

MARY CONNER . I am the daughter of the prosecutrix. A fortnight after my mother lost her coat I found the affidavit in the prisoner's pocket; she said I gave it her to pawn to get some gin for me.

MR. KING. This coat was pawned with me, by whom I do not know. This affidavit is a copy of the ticket.

Prosecutrix It is my coat.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing of it. I never saw the coat in my life.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

365. SUSAN SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of March , five pieces of leather, value 13 s. the property of Henry Billeter .

WILLIAM NEWMAN . I am foreman to Henry Billeter , currier and leather cutter , No. 11, Chandler-street, Grovesnor-square . On the 5th of March the prisoner came to the shop three times in the course of the day, the last time she came I was determined to watch her; I perceived her putting one piece of leather in her pocket or false petticoat; it was two petticoats apparently fastened together, so that squatting down it would open, and nobody see any thing in it. I immediately went up to her, I said you have got a piece of leather; she said, no; I said, you have, I saw you put it in. She at last took one of these pieces of leather from her petticoat; I said you have more; she said, no, I have not. I put my hand into the hole of the petticoat, and pulled out four more; these are them, they are my master's property.

Prisoner's Defence. I do not deny that I took this leather.

GUILTY , aged 56.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

366. ELIZABETH COLEMAN was indicted for' feloniously stealing, on the 5th of March , two sheets value 5 s. the the property of Thomas Whittaker .

ANN WHITTAKER . I am a laundress; my husband's name is Thomas Whittaker . On the 5th of March I had been out, I came home about half past seven in the evening, I opened my room door, I saw the prisoner on the stairs, I asked her what she was doing, she said I have got my basket; I said, you have got my sheets. I saw my sheets laying down before her as she was going down the stairs. I am sure I left them on the line at the two pair of stairs window.

Prisoner's Defence. I am an unfortunate woman, having lost my husband. I have a large family. I throw myself on your mercy.

GUILTY , aged 36.

Fined 1 s. and discharged.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

367. THOMAS GREGORY and RICHARD BLY were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of March , four hundred pounds weight of lead, value 4 l. the property of a person or persons to the jurors unknown .

SECOND COUNT for cutting and ripping the said lead, with intent to steal the same.

JOHN PATRICK . I am a clerk. I saw the prisoners go to No. 16, Pentonville . I went and acquainted the officer.

JOHN BROWN . I live opposite the houses. I had suspicion the prisoner's intended to take the lead; I went to the officer and told him. I went with him, he gave me instructions; the officer blew the whistle; I saw the prisoners come up the railing; I shoved the railing down, and them altogether. I got into the area, the officer and the two prisoners were in the kitchen. Gregory surrendered, Bly would not: Mr. Hunt knocked Bly down. They had ripped the whole of the boarding from the lead of the cistern,and moved the cistern from the wall with intent to double it up.

JOHN HUTT . On the 15th of March I had information that the prisoners were seen to go down the area, No. 16, Pentonville. I saw Brown and the other witness, I gave them instructions to stand at the front area, while I went in at the back part of the house; I went in and saw Bly; I gave the whistle, Brown and the other witness came down to assist me. I drew my cutlass, we had a scuffle, Gregory surrendered, Bly would not; I cut him down twice; when he was all over blood he surrendered. I went into the vault that Gregory came out of, I found this chisel. I have part of the chisel that they broke in wrenching off the cistern. This is the chisel that they wrenched the wood-work from the cistern, and this part of the wood-work here are the marks where the chisel has been. This knife I found upon Gregory, and this upon Bly.

Gregory's Defence. We were both in liquor, we went in there to lay down.

Bly's Defence. I am as innocent as a child unborn of its mother. I was there it is well known.

Hutt. They were both sober.

GREGORY - GUILTY , aged 32.

BLY - GUILTY , aged 33.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

368. BRIDGET MAKEN and ELIZABETH HENNISSEY were indicted for feloniously stealing, from the person of Francis Taite , on the 22nd of March , a pocket book, value 6 d. two bank notes, value 10 l. each, and three one pound bank notes, his property .

FRANCIS TAITE . I am a seaman belonging to his Majesty, late on board the Royal William. I lost this property on the 22nd of March, at a house in Shadwell ; I went down to where I lodged eighteen or nineteen years ago, the door was shut, so I did not rap at the door. One of these women came along, she said, you cannot get in there. She called herself Betty Maken , said she could shew me a good lodging. I went with her, I saw nothing in the house but an old chair; she wanted something to drink, I gave her a shilling, there were four of them there; I gave her half a crown more, that would not satisfy them. I had not got any silver, I gave them a one pound note to get some bread and cheese for them, and to give me the change. As soon as she came back I asked for it; she would not give it me; she brought the victuals and some liquor in a pint pot, and some beer in another. I told her I would not stop there, I would go and get a lodging; I catched Elizabeth Smith , as she called herself then, she was taking three one pound notes out of my pocket, and when she took them out of my pocket she gave them to the other woman. I put my hand in my pocket, I missed my pocket book. The short one took the money out of her hand, she said I will take care of it till the morning; I said you had better give it me, I can take care of it myself. As soon as I put my feet out of the door they fastened it. I lost my money and pocket book; in the pocket book there were two ten pound notes, and three one pound notes loose in my pocket. I catched the tall one's hand in my pocket, her name is Elizabeth Smith .

Q. Are you sure these are the women - A. Yes, and I am sure the tall one put her hand in my pocket. I walked about an hour, I could not get any assistance. I went to the watchman, and in the morning I went to the runner. The tall one was seen to go out of the house with a bundle, and when we came back she was denied being in the house, till the gentleman went in to take them. Here is one of the women that was in the room that saw her take the money out.

ESTHER PURCELL . Last Friday was a fortnight Bridget Maken brought this man in with her; whether he had any bundle, or pocket-book I did not see. He gave her a shilling to fetch something to drink; he gave her two shillings and sixpence, and the third time he gave her a one pound note. Elizabeth Smith is the name she went by, but now she has changed her name. She put her hand into his left hand pocket and took out three one pound notes.

Q. Did she take the pocket book - A. That I did not see. She took the notes, Bridget Maken said she would keep them till the morning.

Q. Who keeps the house - A. Bridget Maken . I slept there two nights, and because I went in search of the man they tore the hair off my head, and my handkerchief off my neck.

JOHN POPE . I am an officer of Shadwell. On Saturday the 23d of March I was applied to by the prosecutor. I went to a house in New Gravel-lane, I found them both in two separate rooms, they were both very much intoxicated. Smith admitted that she had taken the three one pound notes, but that she had given them to Bridget Maken . No property was found on them whatever.

Hennessey's Defence. On the night this man came into the house I was there, he was very much in liquor; there was another woman came in with him; she went out and came in again; the man gave her three-pence; he stopped there a while, he sent a shilling out to get something to drink; he gave her half a crown and a one pound note; I went with her for some beer and liquor, and that good woman was left in the house with him; he took out three one pound notes, gave it me, and I gave it to the woman that owned the house to keep in her hands till the morning. In a short time the woman and the man went out, he delivered the notes in my hand, and that woman was left in the house with him when she and I went out.

Maken's Defence. This man gave me a one pound note, and after that a one pound note. As soon as I came in with the change he told me to keep it till the morning.

Prosecutor. I am sure it is the tall one that took the notes out of my pocket.

Q. You did not see your pocket book in her hand, did you - A. No, only the three one pound notes in her hand. I saw her give it to the short one, Maken.

MAKEN - GUILTY , aged 43.

HENNESSEY - GUILTY , aged 37.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

369. THOMAS RATCLIFF was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of March , a piece oftimber, value 15 s. the property of Henry Peto .

HENRY PETO . I am a builder , No. 31, Little Britain .

JOHN BULL. I was at work at this building. About eight o'clock the 11th of March, as I was going by the building, I heard a noise in the kitchen, I stepped over the garden wall, I saw the prisoner pulling a story post out of the kitchen window; I said, halloa, what are you about; he dropped it and ran off. I pursued him, and never lost sight of him untill I took him. He acknowledged that he was going to take it to a timber-yard in the Curtain-road to sell.

Prisoner's Defence. He never saw me do it. I went into the building to do my occasion.

GUILTY , aged 56.

Confined one Month in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

370. MARY SIERS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of April , a pint pewter pot, value 10 d. the property of Philip Salter .

JOHN DOYLE . On the day stated in the indictment the prisoner came to my shop in Covent Garden market to buy Earthen-ware, my servant suspected she had more property than she had bought. We went after her and searched her. She d - d my eyes, and insisted it was no more than what she had bought. I took this pint pot from her.

RICHARD WATKINS . This is my master, Phillip Salter 's pot, he lives at the corner of Russell-street, Covent Garden. I served the prisoner half a pint of porter in this pot.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in liquor, I did not know what I was doing off.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

371. JAMES MATTHEWS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of February , twenty-one feet of leaden pipe, value 17 s. and a brass valve, value 7 s. the property of Gedney Clarke .

GEDNEY CLARKE. I lived at 58, Marchmont-street, Brunswick-square , at the time the robbery was committed. I am a plumber, painter and glazier , the prisoner was my journeyman . On the evening of the 20th of February, from the information of Wareall the watchman, I went to the prisoner's lodgings and had him apprehended.

JOHN WAREALL . I am a watchman; my beat is in Bruton Crescent, near the New-road, Somers Town. On the 20th of February, about seven in the evening, I stopped the prisoner, he had four pieces of pipe on his shoulder, I found afterwards it was twenty-one feet. I asked him where he was going; he said he was a master-man, he was going home with it to No. 7, Norton-street, Fitzroy-square. I said, you must go with me to the watchhouse; he said, suppose I take you to where I am doing the job. I said, that would be as well. He took me to the Norfolk Arms in Leigh-street with this property; he went into the bar, he said, let me leave this here, the watchman has detained me; I suspected he was employed by that publican, Mr. Hill to do the job; I let him go, and as we were coming out I had suspicion that it was stolen. I went to Mr. Stiles, one of the commissioners, he took me to Mr. Clarke's, and after that I went with Mr. Clark to the prisoner's lodgings in Cleveland-street.

SAMUEL BRIM . I am a labourer to Mr. Clark; the prisoner and I were employed at Mr. Paine's houses; I left work at six o'clock, the prisoner told me to go home, as he had a friend to meet at Mr. Hill's public-house. I left some leaden pipe in the back parlour, the prisoner had the key of the room to lock the lead up. On the next morning I heard that he was taken up, I went to the house and missed the lead; I was afterwards shewn the lead that was taken from the prisoner, it was the same lead to all appearance that was left in the back parlour, about twenty-one feet.

Q. to prosecutor. What is the value of this lead - A. I pay seventeen shillings for it. That is the kind of lead I employed the prisoner to fit up this house with.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence; called six witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Confined Fourteen Days in Newgate , and Whipped in Jail .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

372. FRANCIS SHAFTSBURY, alias KIDD , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of April , four shirts, value 12 s. the property of Thomas Hall , from the person of James Hall .

ANN HALL . I am the wife Thomas Hall , we live at No. 14, Great Ormond-yard, Great Ormond-street, I am a laundress. On Friday last I was employed to iron four shirts, they belonged to Mr. Waterfield. I sent them home by two of my child ren; James Hall was one of them, he is six years old; his sister, Eliza Hall, was with him, she is eight years old. I sent them home with them about seven o'clock in the evening, they were to go to Brunswick-row, Queen-square; I heard that the shirts were lost. I saw the same shirts again the same evening at Hatton Garden, and the prisoner was in custody.

ELIZA HALL . I was sent by my mother with these shirts; my brother was with me; I was to carry them to Mr. Waterfield; the prisoner came up to me two or three doors before I came to Brunswick-row; she asked me to go to No. 13, Brunswick-square to ask for the housemaid; the footman came to the area steps, and told me that the housemaid was gone, and just as I turned round I saw the prisoner take the shirts out of my brother's hand; I ran after her and halloaed out stop thief, a gentleman ran after her, and caught her.

HENRY VARDIN . I lodge at the Surry Hotel. On the night this happened I was walking in Queen-square. I saw the prisoner running, and two children crying stop thief; I pursued her, and took her in a privy in Lamp office-court. The shirts were taken out of the privy by a woman.

- The last witness knocked at my door, I got a candle and took the shirts out from under the seat of the privy.

Mrs. Hall. These are the shirts that I sent my childrenwith.

Prisoner's Defence. My father placed me an apprentice to a flax-mill on Hounslow Heath, where I was seduced by Lewis Kidd; we cohabited in London; he has deserted me, and left me with a child, whole days I have passed without food, what I could procure. I gave to my child. I have borne an irreproachable character for honesty-till now, and I have been always willing to work if I could get any. I stand here with shame.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Fined 1 s. and discharged.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

373. LOUISA WILKINSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of March , four shillings, a sixpence, and half a guinea , the property of Margaret Boggeref .

MARGARET BOGGEREF . I live at No. 4, Acton-place, Kingsland-road ; the prisoner was my servant . I kept my children's money in a drawer in my bedroom; the drawer was not locked. On the 5th of March, about nine in the morning, I missed the money, I charged her with having taken it; she returned me four shillings and sixpence of the money.

Q. Did you tell her it would be better for her to tell - A. I did. She said it would cost me a great deal of trouble if I did prosecute her.

MARY SMITH . I live in Orchard-street. The prisoner brought me half a guinea, she said a friend had given it her.

Prisoner's Defence. The half guinea a young man gave me; the four shillings and sixpence I picked up in my mistress's bed-room; my mistress was not at home; I put it in my pocket, and the next morning, when my mistress asked me about it, I gave it her.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave her a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

374. THOMAS LAMPIN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of April , twenty-nine pounds weight, value 2 s. the property of Thomas Bullen .

THOMAS BULLEN . The house that I had the lead on was mine, No. 8, Park-place, North Baker-street .

Q. When did you see this house in a state of security, before any lead was taken from it - A. Last Monday, about ten o'clock, when I went to bed, it was all safe. I live in the house; the next morning, a little before eight, my servant came and told me that the pipe was gone from the cistern; I went and found from eight to ten feet of leaden pipe was gone, it was torn from off the front area. The watchhouse keeper brought the lead to match it with the cistern, it appeared to be torn off the cistern, it is worth two shillings.

- SEDDONS. I am a watchman. In the morning, a quarter before one, I was going up North Baker-street, I stopped the prisoner, he had got a bag upon his back; I asked him what he had got in it; he said, working tools. I laid hold of the bag, it was heavy. I told him it was no thoroughfare. I examined the bag, it contained lead; I took him and the lead to the watchhouse; he resisted when I laid hold of him, but when there were two he was quiet. I found the top of the prisoner's hat in the area, it fitted his hat.

JOHN HOWARD . The prisoner and the lead were delivered to me at the watchhouse. I tried the lead to the place, it fitted exactly. The lead weights twenty-nine pound.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked it up in the street, and when I turned the corner the watchman laid hold of me.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

375. HARRIOTT FITZGERALD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of March , a watch, value 40 s. the property of Edward Jones .

The prosecutor was called, and not appearing in court , the prisoner was

ACQUITTED.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

376. JAMES MARTIN and JOHN SILVESTER were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of March , five cheeses, value 20 s. the property of a certain person or persons to the jurors unknown .

JOHN PLUMER . On the 5th of March I was looking cut of my uncle's window in Turnmill-street , No. 30, about a quarter before six, it was rather dusk, but I could see very well. I saw the prisoner Martin go behind the cart and take one of the cheeses out; he tied it up in his silk handkerchief; he took it into the White Horse public house and left it there; Silvester came out with him, they followed the cart. I followed them as far as Coppice-row, I came back and told my brother what I had seen.

THOMAS PLUMER . After my brother told me what he had seen I went into the White Horse and called for a pint of beer; I looked all round, I could not see the cheese in the landlord's possession. When I came out the two prisoners came down from Coppice-row with five cheeses, they walked down Sharp's Alley.

Q. Where these cheeses came from you could not tell - A. No. I immediately gave information. I was present when they were laid hold of.

CHARLES COOK . I took the prisoner upon the charge of Plumer; we found no cheeses, they had disposed of them before we took them.

CHARLOTTE PLUMER . I saw a man with a white hat on go behind the cart and take a cheese out. I am not positive that was the prisoner.

Cook. Martin had a white hat on when I apprehended him.

Martin's Defence. I was coming up the Cross when they took me; they said I knew something about some cheeses; they took me into the public house, this man was brought in after me. I never knew he was behind me untill I was taken.

Silvester was not put on his defence.

MARTIN - GUILTY, aged 18.

Judgment respited .

SILVESTER - NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

377. WILLIAM SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of March , two fowls, value 8 s. the property of Richard Holly .

ANN HOLLY . I am the wife of Richard Holly , we live at No. 4, Marybone park . On the 21st of March I saw the prisoner at the corner of the field, about twenty minutes before I looked to see if my fowls were all there, I saw they were not all there. I saw one of my old hens run from the corner of the field; I next saw the cock drop from the prisoner's side; I pulled his coat open and took the hen from under his left arm; I called stop thief, and the prisoner was taken.

Q. What are the worth of your two fowls - A. Eight shillings.

Prisoner's Defence. This person charged me first with one fowl. I never took any thing of the kind.

GUILTY , aged 35.

Whipped in Jail and discharged.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

378. ELIZABETH HALL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 31st of March , two pewter pint pots, value 1 s. 8 d. the property of William White .

ESTHER SMITH . I saw the prisoner take two pint pots out of the passage of No. 48, St. John-street . She put one in her apron, and one underneath her apron. I took her into Mr. White's house.

WILLIAM WHITE . I keep the Bunch of Grapes public-house, Albemarle-street . On the 31st of March the prisoner was brought into my house with the pots upon her. I saw her take one from underneath her apron, and the other was in the persons hand that took her. The pots bear my mark. I served No. 48 with beer. These are the pots, they are mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I was very much in liquor. I have a cut in my head, when I am in liquor I am out of my mind.

GUILTY , aged 62.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

379. BENJAMIN THOMAS was indicted for that he, on the 26th of January last, feloniously did take to wife one Martha Stacey , spinster , and to her was married, his former wife , Elizabeth Thompson , being then alive .

JOHN VERRALL . I produce the register of marriages. It appears in this book Benjamin Thomas , batchelor, of this parish, and Elizabeth Thompson , spinster, were married in this church by licence 27th of April, by R. Tarrington, rector. John Fox wrote his name, but the two parties testified it by making their marks.

RALPH HOPE . Q. Were you present when the prisoner was charged with marrying Martha Stacey , Elizabeth Thompson being living - A. Yes, and the prisoner admitted it; he said they had been married. Elizabeth Thompson was standing by the side of him, she said she did not wish to have any thing more to do with him since he had another wife; she wished to give him entirely up.

MR. PRICE. I am clerk of St. Dunstan Stepney . I have the certificate of the parties.

" Benjamin Thomas of this parish, and Martha Stacey of this parish, spinster, were married in this church by licence, this 26th day of January, 1811." I recollect the face of the man and the woman very well. I am one of the witnesses to the marriage.

MARTHA STACEY . Q. Were you married to this man at the bar on the 26th of January last - A. Yes. I have known him ever since last May, he represented himself to me as a single man. I heard that he was a married man when he was abroad, I thought it was false. I get my living by needlework.

Prisoner's Defence. I kept company with that woman, and when I went on a voyage I left all my property at her house, and when I returned I found them all safe, I thought I could do no better than make her my wife, as I did. With respect to the other woman when I was at Barbadoes I was wrote word that she was dead. I have been twenty-six years in the navy in defence of my king and country. One of them is well supported and connected with a captain in the West Indies. I am willing to maintain one of them, and hope your lordship will take my case into consideration, and intercede for me, that I may have my liberty, and I shall ever be in duty bound to pray.

Q. to Martha Stacey . Did he leave his property with you when he went to sea - A. Yes.

Q. Did you take up this prosecution or your friends - A. My mother took up this prosecution, she wished me to do it.

GUILTY, aged 43.

Judgment respited .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

380. JEREMIAH HEALY and JOHN SMITH were indicted for that they, on the 11th of March , unlawfully and against the will of John Lutwych , did attempt to put their hand into a pocket of his coat, which he then had in wear upon his person, with intent a handkerchief, value 5 s. to steal and carry away .

JOHN LUTWYCH . I am a leather seller on Snow-hill. On Monday the 11th of March, between the hours of six and seven o'clock in the evening, as I was coming down Holborn , accompanied by Mrs. Lutwych, near Fleet Bridge, the thoroughfare being quick, and the passing lessened by a linen-draper having bales on the pavement, I felt a person or persons as though they had their hands in my pocket; I instantly put my hand to my pocket and found I had lost nothing. At the same time the prisoners Healy and Smith ran by me; I observed that an attempt had been made at my pocket, and determined to walk slow that we might observe them. When we reached Mr. Cato's the two prisoners were looking and appearing to make some observation on the birds in the window, which caught my particular attention; I expected a probability of being attacked again, and therefore it put me on my guard. I am confident they were the same men. When we had proceeded as far as the Swan gateway on Holborn bridge I felt again a second attempt, much more severe than the first, and a man's hand at the mouth of my pocket; I do not say it was his, it may have been his. I appliedmy hand to my pocket, held my handkerchief tight, the same moment the two prisoners ran by me a second time, I had only a few paces to go after them. I left my wife and went after them, I was determined I would take them; they went into George-court, when I came to the end of the court I surprised them, and they ran; I ran after them, and in consequence of a cart loading or unloading at the top of the yard they escaped by getting under the horses bellies, and ran down Chick-lane; I pursued them to a narrow passage that leads to the entrance of Chick-lane, but from prudent motives I thought it best to retire.

Q. Had you ever seen them before - A. I knew their faces perfectly well, we lost some goods a few days before. Their persons were very familiar to me, I have no doubt of their persons.

GEORGE WARRALL . I am a constable of St. Sepulchre's parish. On the 11th of February, about half past six in the evening, Mr. Lutwych came to my house, I went with him in search of the two prisoners. In Holborn, opposite of Field-lane, I saw two men standing close together, as if they were waiting for something; Mr. Lutwych said, here they are; I laid hold of one, and he the other. As we were conveying them to the Poultry Compter I kept looking behind me, in the middle of Cheapside I missed Mr. Lutwych, I conveyed my prisoner in, I went to see for Mr. Lutwych, he said he would deliver his prisoner up to me, he had endeavoured to make a rescue, and when he found he could not he accused him of being one of the Vere-street gang. I then conveyed Healy to the counter, and there Mr. Lutwych said, that is the man that accused me of being one of the Vere-street gang; he replied, I do not doubt but you are one; he put his hand to his backside, made use of a bad expression, and said he might kiss his backside. I searched Healy, I found two knives about him; this is a French knife, he said his father gave him that knife, he used it to cut cows tails.

MR. LUTWYCH. In consequence of our having lost the goods some days before I followed them into George-yard, and there I thought fit to retire, but thinking it was my duty to take them if I could I went to Warrell, it was getting darkish; we went down Saffron Hill, to the extremity of Field-lane, by Mr. Cato's; I saw the prisoners, I immediately seized them both; Smith I gave to Warrall, and the other I took myself; in Skinner-street he was very troublesome, he wanted me to strike him; I told him I would not. When we came as far as Newgate market he taxed me with indecent liberties, I told him if he said any more about it I would knock him down, but I did not strike him; in Cheapside he would not go on any further he said; I made him go on; bye and bye he said I belonged to the Vere-street gang. I asked one gentleman to assist me in taking this man, when the charge was given by Healy that I was one of the Vere-street gang they all shrunk; if he had had any of his accomplices about him I do not know the consequence. I said, let me be what I will, go you shall, and in the presence of Warrall, when he came, he then accused me of being one of the Vere-street gang.

HEALY - GUILTY , aged 19.

SMITH - GUILTY , aged 20.

Confined Two Years in Newgate .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.