Old Bailey Proceedings Online (www.oldbaileyonline.org, version 6.0, 22 October 2014), February 1811 (18110220).

Old Bailey Proceedings, 20th February 1811.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE OYER AND TERMINER, AND GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND ALSO THE GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, HELD AT Justice-Hall, in the Old Bailey, On WEDNESDAY the 20th of FEBRUARY, 1811, and following Days;

BEING THE THIRD SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF The Right Hon. JOSHUA JONATHAN SMITH , LORD-MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY JOB SIBLY, No. 4, CARTHUSIAN-STREET, ALDERSGATE-STREET.

LONDON:

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED (BY THE AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON.) By R. Butters, No. 22, Fetter-lane, Fleet-street

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON.

Before the Right-honorable JOSHUA JONATHAN SMITH , Lord Mayor of the City of London; John Heath , esq. one of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir George Wood , knt. one of the Barons of his Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir John Bailey , knt. one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir William Curtis , bart. Sir John Eamer , knt. Sir William Leighton , knt. Aldermen of the said City; John Silvester , esq. Recorder of the said City; Claudius Stephen Hunter , esq. Matthew Wood , esq. William Jacob , esq; Aldermen of the said City; and Newman Knowlys, esq. Common-serjeant of the said City; His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of Goal Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

London Jury.

John Johnson ,

Edward Cowdell ,

Christopher Wilson ,

Robert Humm ,

William Gatwood ,

Arthur Tite ,

John Schofield ,

Richard Gould ,

William Howse ,

Joseph Phillips ,

John Blood ,

William Crew .

First Middlesex Jury.

Thomas Oliver ,

John Warren ,

William Gibbs Roberts,

Thomas Fisher ,

James Smith ,

Thomas Humney ,

Henry Ramsey ,

Thomas Daplin,

Michael Biggs ,

Joseph Hancock ,

Thomas Allwright ,

William Berry .

Second Middlesex Jury.

Henry Robley .

William Watts ,

Thomas Jones ,

John Barker ,

James Vallance ,

Joseph Sweetman ,

John Douglas ,

Joseph Konder ,

Thomas Parnell ,

Thomas Dormer ,

Benjamin Abbott ,

George Wright .

JOHN MORGAN was indicted for feloniously marrying Elizabeth Johnson , on the 26th of June the fiftieth year of His Majesty's reign , his former wife being then alive .

There being no evidence adduced, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

182. THOMAS HAYDEN . junior, was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of December , five bushels of wheat, value 50 s the property of James Vaughan ; - and THOMAS HAYDEN , senior, for feloniously receiving the same, he well knowing the same to have been stolen .

GEORGE FIELD . I am a servant to Mr. Vaughan of Enfield . On the 4th of December, in the morning, about seven o'clock, I saw my master's barn had been broken open; there was a large mark of iron in several places; the rest of the iron had been left on the door.

Q. Was any wheat gone - A. Yes, about five bushels, or five bushels and a half. It had been thrashed; it was lying in a range at the further end of the barn. It was not light then, but when it was light I traced a footstep, and likewise a track of chaff across Mr. Vaughan's meadow to the premiseses of Thomas Hayden the elder.

Q. Were you with the officer when they searched his premises that afternoon - A. Yes. They found two parcels of wheat, much about the same quantity that was lost. I said, before the sacks were opened, if it was Vaughan's wheat it was red wheat, mixed with white; the long chaff was gone, but the small chaff dust and seeds remained. I had no doubt of it being Mr. Vaughan's wheat.

Mr. Knapp. Red wheat is not peculiar to Mr. Vaughan, other people might have wheat like it - A. Yes.

Q. This red wheat was mixed with white, and there was dust with it, and seeds - A. Yes, but I have no doubt of its being Mr. Vaughan's property.

CHARLES COOK . I am a police officer of Hatton Garden office. On the 4th of December I went down with Mr. Vaughan to his barn door, it appeared to have been broken open by an iron instrument, by some rust being on the door. I went to Old Hayden's house, he was at home sitting by the fire; I went to search his house; I had no warrant; I asked him for the candle that was on the table, he said he would be d - d if I should have it; he said he had killed many men in his time, and he would not mind killing me.

Mr. Gurney. Hayden the elder has been a soldier.

Cook. I sent to the next door and got a candle, I then went up stairs, I found a bushel of flour; I found the wheat in the back kitchen, or washhouse, it was in sacks, and covered over with two or three trusses of straw. I asked his wife in his presence how it came there, she said she did not know, she was sure it was not there at six o'clock the night before. He said nothing to it. I told Old Haydon he must go to town with me; he said he would not go; I then went to Young Hayden's house, there I found this crow, it is an implement of husbandry, and a sack of Mr. Vaughan's. Young Hayden was not at home. I took this crow to Mr. Vaughan's barn door, it fitted the impressions where it had been broken open; I took Thomas Hayden , junior, in custody about half an hour after I searched the house.

GEORGE PRIOR . I am a servant to Mr. Whithall. I heard of the Haydens being taken up.

Q. At an early hour the same morning as they were taken up on the evening were you going to Whetstone to fetch your master - A. Yes, by the Chase side, near Windmill hill; I saw two persons, they were going the same way as I was. I was walking my horse, it was about three o'clock, it was a light morning; I asked them what o'clock it was; they gave me no answer. They had a sack each. One was a short man, he had a lighter load than the tall man. I think I have seen one of them since, I think it to be young Hayden. I saw him when he was examined about a week after, he had the same coat on then I think.

Q. You were to have been here the last Sessions - A. Yes. I have been obliged to stop away from Enfield ever since. I have been threated by the prisoner's wife, not by either of the prisoners. At the magistrate's I had no knowledge of the man, only the dress.

JAMES VAUGHAN . Q. How early in the morning of the 4th of December did you find your barn broken open - A.About seven in the morning. I judged there were five or six bushels taken from the wheat. I have no doubt the wheat found at Old Hayden's to be mine. I have a sample of my wheat here, it is impossible to be mistaken.

THOMAS COLLARD . Q. You are Mr. Vaughan's thrasher - A. Yes. I saw the born door secure on the night before. I came in the morning about half past six, I found the door a little matter open, the lock broken, and some of the wheat gone. I saw the wheat found at Old Hayden's, I believe it to be my master's property.

Hayden, junior's, Defence. I was not at home all the harvert. It was corn that my wife gleaned there are witnesses here that saw my wife glean it.

Hayden's, senior, Defence. My sons wife gleaned this corn, and brought it to me to clean it.

MARY EAGLETON. I am the sister to Young Hayden . I know that his wife was three days thrashing that corn.

MRS. ELLIS. Q. Do you know both the Haydens - A. Yes; I have known the old man twenty he is going eighty. I saw young Hayden's wife seesing wheat, in Mr. Slaters field. These was red and white wheat, and all kind.

Q. Do you at all know of your own knowledge what she gleaned - A. I should think they might glean four or five bushel in the course of the harvest.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood .

183. JOHN HAYDEN , Junior, was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of November, in the 49th year of his Majesty's reign , a mahogany table, value 2 l. the property of George Cape , since deceased.

MRS. CAPE. I am the widow of George Cape , he was living in November, 1808; we had a garden, and in it was a summer house, and a mahogany table in it; the table was stolen away in the night; we found the table last month; I know it is mine, it is in court. It was lost in 1808.

WILLIAM FRAMPTON . Q. In the month of August 1809 did you purchase a table of the prisoner - A. I did. My wife is a midwife, she attended the prisoners wife. The prisoner brought the table to me, I was to give him two pound for the table; he owed me a pair of smallclothes, and I gave him another table for it; he brought it to my house about seven or eight o'clock in the evening; it was quite light; he was seen publicly to bring it by the neighbours.

The prisoner was not put on his defence.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

184. EDWARD DEACON , ELIZABETH DEACON , and FRANCES WILLIAMS , were indicted for that they, on the 16th of January , one piece of base counterfeit coin, resembling the current silver coin of this kingdom, called a sixpence, falsely and traiterously did colour with materials, producing the colour of silver ; and

FIVE OTHER COUNTS for like offence, only varying the manner of charging them.

JOHN OWEN . In the month of October last had you a house in Orange-court, Drury-lane - A. Yes. I am a shoemaker.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar - A. Yes, very well. Mrs. Deacon was the first I saw; she came to me in the month of October, to take a two pair of stairs room I had to left; I left her the room; she told me that her husband was a shoemaker, and they would be with me the following day. She and her husband came the following day.

Q. When did you see the prisoner Williams - A. On the following day. The prisoner Williams lived there all the time to my knowledge.

Q. How soon did you observe any thing - A. Some weeks elapsed before I made any observation. From the difference of the hammering I knew it was not our business; I had a suspicion, I took the opportunity to make myself certain that it was what I expected; I made a crevise in the partition, so that I could see well into the room. I saw him rubbing as it were with his thumbs shillings or sixpences.

COURT. Some pieces - A. Yes; and I saw him use also a brush. The three prisoners were all there to my knowledge then. I saw Mrs. Deacon standing between her husband and the fire place, handing different articles from the fire to him.

Mr. Knapp. What articles - A. They seemed to be something out of a tin pot that was going backwards and forwards I cannot describe them, but they were something. This was about a fortnight before they were taken; I gave information at the office. At one time I saw Deacon give some silver to Williams; she wrapped it up in paper, and put it in her pocket. There were various people came after them, particularly a Jew.

SAMUEL LACK . I am an officer belonging to Bow-street office. In consequence of a warrant granted by Mr. Read, I went with Clark, Donaldson, and Vickrey, to the prisoners lodgings, No. 4, Change-court, Drury-lane, on Wednesday, January the 16th, between twelve and one in the day. When I got there Vickrey shoved open the door; I went in and seized Williams. Deacon and his wife were on each side of the fire; Williams was sitting under the window; I laid hold of Williams by the pocket, and held her till some conversation took place between Deacon and Vickrey. I found in her pocket two sixpences and a piece of blacking. I then searched Mrs. Deacon, I found two good shillings and a piece of blacking; I found no counterfeit money upon her. Then I proceeded to search the room; behind a box in the room I found a paper of whitening, and several pieces of leather, they appeared to be damp; they are dirty, and appeared to have been used in polishing something with whiteness. I found this brush behind the same box. The bed was on the ground. Under the head of the bed I found an old pair of women's pockets, they seemed to be stained with aquafortis. On a board in the room I found a rag, stone, and a pair of scissars. In a rack under the window I found a brush sticking up, and another pair of scissars; there was some leather nailed against the wall; the scissars and brush were put in. Under a board under the window I found a piece of leather stained very much with aquafortis, and two fingerstalls, which were quite wet, in a pocket that was quite wet, it is not dry now, stained in the same manner as the leather. I found a small mixture in this paper which I cannot describe. I took the prisoners into custody.

Mr. Alley. You met with no resistance, though you forced the door open - A. No.

Q. You found none of the parties doing wrong, and you found upon Williams two sixpences; they are not fit for circulation - A. They were fit for circulation at the time I found them; I should have taken them if I had gone for change.

JOHN CLARK. Q. You are an officer of Bow-street - A. I was at the time; I was with Vickrey and Lack; I searched the two Deacons; I found upon the man Deacon fourteen shillings, nine sixpences, and three half crowns, in his waistcoat pockets, all bad. I searched the mantle piece, I found six bad sixpences; I searched his breeches pockets, I found a bad sixpence, and a blank of the size of a shilling. I searched further, I found a bad dollar, and two blanks, one the size of a shilling, and the other a sixpence. I found some cuttings of silver in a paper, and some blacking in a tin cannister, and a little whitening.

JOHN VICKREY . I am an officer of Bow-street.

Q. You have been in the habit of apprehending persons in the same case of the prisoners before - A. Many; I was in company with Donaldson and the others; I was the first in the room, they followed me; Deacon (the man) was sitting on the right hand of the fire-place, the woman on the left, and Williams was sitting nearer the window, she was working at her needle, I told them we had a warrant to search thatroom for counterfeit money, they made no reply, nor offered any resistance. Deacon offered to get off his seat, I desired him to sit still. I saw the officers find the things, they shewed them to me on the table. The two sixpences and the blacking was the first thing that was shewed me. Blacking is a thing that is used after the money is coloured. They rub the piece with blacking when it is coloured and bright, it takes off the polish and brightness.

Q. Is it common blacking. - A. It is a mixture of wax, tallow, and lamp black. It is not a sort of blacking that we should use for our shoes. I saw the whole that Lack found. I directed him to take care of them. Aquafortis with other things found in the house, would produce the colour of silver undoubtedly. After the silver is embibed in the mettle, aquafortis would bring it on the surface. Cream of tarter is an ingredient that is used for the purpose of putting a silver on the metal. I never knew whitening to be used. Scouring paper I have always found in these houses. The finger stalls, I have seen them, I have no doubt they were used for the purpose of colouring money. I do believe the cloths have been used for the purpose of wiping the money after having aquafortis on it. A bird cage was handed to me by Donaldson; in that bird cage, I found this aquafortis bottle. This is a bag of blanks.

Q. How many blanks are there. - A. There is above an hundred. Here are shillings, sixpences, half crowns, and a dollar or two. After I had been searching some time, Mrs. Deacon got from her seat, and under her chair where she sat, I found a counterfeit sixpence, it then appeared to have directly come from the hand of the finisher. In the same bag with the blanks, I found some pieces of silver, I have no doubt they were intended for making colour to put on the blanks. Here are some counterfeit half guineas, I found nothing to colour them. Here are four sixpences in the same place, that had been scoured ready for the process of colouring, they are complete to be coloured now, there was some cream of tartar in the same cage, and some sand paper. Some of these have been used for the purpose of rubbing metal, and this has not been used. These cloths were found in an old tea chest, they were then wet. I have no doubt but they had been washed out, there was a sufficient smell of aquafortis on them.

Q. Look at that found by Clerk in the man Deacon's pocket, is that a counterfeit. - A. It is, it has been coloured. These are the two sixpences found in Williams's pocket, these are very much changed coloured now, to what they were when found; and when produced to the magistrate, they were handed to me, they were then fit for circulation.

Q. Was there any appearance of any shoemaking in the apartment. - A. There was part of a shoemaker's kit, it did not appear that there was any carried on at that time. There were a great many old shoes about, but none appearing in a state of mending at that time.

RICHARD FRANKLIN . Q. You are one of the moniers of his Majesty's mint. - A. I am.

Q. Look at that sixpence found upon the man. - A. It is a counterfeit.

Q. Look at these two found on Williams. - A. These are both like the remainder of the parcel taken out of Deacon's pocket, they are all bad; and the blanks that are not coloured are ready for the purpose of colouring for shillings, sixpences, and halfcrowns.

The prisoners left their defences to their counsel.

EDWARD DEACON GUILTY DEATH , aged 58,

ELIZABETH DEACON NOT GUILTY.

FRANCIS WILLIAMS NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

185. AARON WITHERS was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Smeed , about the hour of three on the night of the 24th of December , and stealing therein eighteen watches, value 36 l. the property of George Seabrook ; and WILLIAM FREELAND for feloniously receiving, on the 25th of December , seventeen watches, value 34 l. part of the said goods so burglariously stolen, he well knowing them to have been stolen .

GEORGE SEABROOK . I am a watchmaker , I live in the first floor of the Brazen Head public-house, Lisson Green , Thomas Smead keeps the house, it is in the parish of Mary le bone. My watches were in the front room, one pair of stairs. On the night of the 24th of December I went to bed at twelve o'clock, the window was secured by brass and steel pins of both sides. The watches were hanging in the front of the window, so as in the day-time to be seen in the street, On Christmas day the 25th, in the morning between seven and eight, I found the wind come in very strong, I sleep in the same room, I arose up in my bed, I saw the window forced up, and the watches all gone.

Q. How many watches were gone. - A. Nineteen watches and a watch case. I have since seen them at the police office.

HENRY EWER . I am shopman to Mr. Dobree, Oxford Street.

Q. On the 5th of January did the witness Quelch bring you any watch to pawn. - A. He did, I found the watch answered to the description of one of the watches in Mr. Seabrook's handbill, I stopped the watch and sent for an officer, I asked Quelch how he came by it, he said he bought it of a countryman.

JAMES QUELCH . I am a gardener, I live in the New Road, Paddington.

Q. Do you know Withers. - A. Yes, I have known him eight or ten years or more. On the day before Christmas day, he called at my house in Circuit Street, New Road, Paddington, he asked me whether I was at work, I told him it was such a wet morning I could not go to work, he said he wanted to speak to me about a little job, he was going to a public-house the corner of the street, would I have any beer. We went together to the public-house, there he said if I would come in the morning to the Brazen Head, he would meet me there about nine or ten o'clock. I went there at ten o'clock at night, he was not there, I had two pints of beer and a pipe of tobacco. I staid there till past eleven, came out, and went past his house, I saw a light, I went in, he was sitting by the fire, he said

"Quelch, you are almost drunk," I said,

"I am not much better," he asked me to sit down, I did, and fell asleep.

Q. How far is his house from the Brazen Head. -A. About two hundred yards. I sat there I do not know how long. He awoke me; then we went up the hill to the Brazen Head up Bell Street, he turned down Frost's Gardens, there is a chapel behind that, there he brought a ladder. As we made up the hill, we met a person, Withers told me it was Thorpe, Withers, said to Thorpe,

"holloa master, do not run over me," that was just before we got the ladder. I said,

"if that is Thorp, it is not his way home," he said

"he has come this way because the water is up." I knew Thorp very well, but I did not know him then. Thorp lives down Bates's Row, he could not go along the gravel pits, the water was flooded there after a fall of rain. Withers and I went behind the chapels, and he brought a ladder out.

Court. Then you did not go with him. - A. I stopped in Frost's passage, he went round the chapel and got the ladder. When we had got the ladder, we went down Bell Street the way we came up, we made a stop in Bell Street, there was a man and his wife next door to the Brazen Head quarrelling, a woman of the opposite side of the way came out with a light. After they were all gone, and all was quiet; we came up to the Brazen Head, he pointed up to the window, and said he was going to take these watches out, he laid the ladder down under a window on the opposite side of the way, we stopped there. Holmes and his wife were making a noise, when they were quiet, three men came down Bell Street, they knocked at the Brazen Head door, the door was not opened to them, they were in liquor; and stopped twenty minutes. After they were gone, Withers then took the ladder, and put it up against the window, he went up the ladder, and raised up the window at the bottom with a small pick axe, he took the watches out, which hung on a frame, he took the frame and all, and handed it down to me One of the watches fell of the frame on the ground, I took it up and put it in my pocket, that is the watch that I offered to pawn at Mr. Dobree's. Withers came off the ladder, we left it just as it was, under the window, and away we went. At Lisson Green he took the watches off the frame, and put them into his hat, I asked him what he meaned to do with them, he said, to take them to Freeland, I knew him, he is a broker, at the bottom of Quebeck Street, in York Street, I said,

"suppose Freeland will not take them," he said,

"he will take any thing, if he will not take them, you must take them to your house," I told him I would not have them in my house for any consideration, he said, he knew if he took them home. they would search his house immediately, I must take them to my house, nobody would have any suspicion of me. We both went to Freeland's house as the watch went four o'clock. We went to Freeland's back door, he went round before me; when I went round he was got in just as I got to the window, there was a light, I saw Withers and Freeland in the room, I saw where they put the watches, down on the table, Freeland was standing at the table, I went from the window, Withers came to me, he said, it was all right, I did not go into the house, Withers said, he had got a one pound note, and Freeland would settle the remainder another day, I went home then. I met him the next morning in Circuit Street, he gave me five shillings worth of half-pence, said, he should get the remainder of it the next day. On the evening of the next day, I saw him at the Royal Oak, Circuit Street. We went into Paddington Street. there he gave me four pounds four shillings more, he told me he got it off Freeland, that was my share. On the 5th of January, I pawned the watch I had at Dobree's, I was stopped, and I told this story directly, I have been in custody ever since.

Mr. Knapp. So you kept all this snug until you thought you should be prosecuted, and then you told it. You do not understand this, you are a lucky fellow. - A. I think I am very unlucky.

Q. Four pound nine shillings you received, you are lucky that you are not punished. - A. I do not know but I may be punished, I deserve to be punished.

Q. When was it you told this story first. - A. That very night, at Marlborough Street office, I told the officer of it.

Q. Have you ever been in custody before, honesty. - A. Never before for any misdemeanor for thieving.

Q. Have you never been taken up by any constable before. - A. Yes, I was before the justice at Marlborough Street, a man charged me with thieving his tools.

Q. How many times have you been at Marlborough Street. - A. Never before, or at any other office.

Q. Where were you charged about a wheelbarrow. - A. At Marlborough Street office, I bought some potatoes of a man, he lent me a barrow.

Q. Did not he charge you with stealing the barrow. - A. He did, that was nine or ten years ago, it slipped my memory.

THOMAS SMEED. Q. You are the landlord of the Brazen Head public house, are you not. - A. Yes, Mr. Seabrook informed me of the robbery in the morning.

Q. In the course of the night had you heard any knocking at the door. - A. Yes, I did not get up, I think it was about three o'clock.

JOHN THORP. Q. You live at Lisson Green. - A. I do.

Q. On the night of Christmas eve had you been out your benefit club. - A I had, I was going up Oxford Street as the watchmen were going two. When I came to Lisson Green, I should suppose it was near half after two, I went down Bell Street by the Brazen Head. Going down the hill about thirty yards from the Brazen Head, it was a dark night, one of the men spoke, or else I should have run against him, I cannot recollect the words. As soon as ever he spoke to me, I passed by and went on, I believe it to be Withers's voice, I have no other proof than the voice, I have known him ten or twelve years.

Q. And from that knowledge of him you believe it to be his voice. - A. I do, I passed on my way, and they their way.

JOHN FOY . I am an office of Marlborough Street office. On the 5th of January, my brother brought Quelch to the office.

Q. In consequence of any communication that he made, did you that night apprehend the prisoners at the bar. - A. I apprehended Freeland, and my brother apprehended Withers, they were both brought to the watch-house that night, they were examined on the Monday,the 7th. Withers was detained for a further examination Freeland was discharged upon bail to appear on a future day.

Q. After Freeland had been discharged, did he come to you. - A. He did. On Monday, the 9th, he shewed me an anonymous letter which he said he had just received. That is the letter. - The letter read; directed, W. Freeland Broker, John Street, New Road, Paddington. To be left at the Duke of York, York Street. Post mark, January 9.

"SIR - I can give you information that Mr. Quelch has told me this day, that a part of the property he stole, he has planted them in a coal vault, in the carcase of an unfinished house, Lisson Green, Paddington, that he meant to part with them one at a time. I give you this information, I do not like to see innocent men hunted for as thieves for other men's guilt.

Q. Did you and your brother go with Freeland to Lisson Green. - A. We did, we went to a carcase of an unfinished house. We found the watches in a pickle jar, the ground had been turned up, the mussle of the pickle jar was put in the ground, the sides of the jar and top were covered with bricks. This was in January, a very hard frost. The ground where the jar was buried was soft, it appeared that it had been turned up shortly before.

Q.Could it have been in that state two days. - A I should think not, every other part of the vault was quite hard, and whatever water had flooded in was ice; the other bricks were frozen by the ice, these were loose I think it could not have been there many hours, if it had, it would have been frozen, the frost had been for several days, and it was a frost then. This is the watch I received at Mr. Dobree's, and here is, I think, sixteen watches and a watch case, Freeland went with me to that vault.

THOMAS FOY . Q. Did you go with your brother and Freeland to search this carcase of a house. - A. I did, we found the watches in the pickle jar, in the state he has described.

Q. to Quelch. Did you ever see the watches after they were left at Freeland's. - A. Yes, I saw them at Marlborough Street.

Q. Did you put them in the carcase of an unfinished house on Lisson Green. - A. No, I never did; nor did I ever tell any body of it. I had a few words with Freeland about fifteen shillings he owed me, I never wished him any ill.

Wither's Defence. There is some part of Quelch's evidence that I cannot deny, and there is a great part of it false. As to his coming to my house, he did, in a drunken state indeed; he came into my house, I was in bed, he set himself down and snored till about four o'clock in the morning, my wife said,

"Withers, get up and turn that man out, he has watered the house I believe;" and, I then got up and said

"go," he said he wanted me to go along with him, I said,

"I shall not go along with you, recollect my family, I will not do any thing that I ought not to do, my misfortunes has taught me better," I had the misfortune to stand at this bar fourteen years ago, I was capitally convicted, I received his Majesty's pardon, God restored him, from that day I never eat of ill begotten bread, I have worked hard for my living, God has blessed me with health and strength to work for my family, and from whence he must rest his infernal evidence I cannot say, except from my former misfortunes. He has said, he would do for Freeland, he was sorry for me, but he could not do any thing with Freeland without me.

Freeland left his defence to his counsel.

SIMON. I am independant, I live in Mitcham Street, Paddington.

Q. Look at that letter. - A. These are the initials of my name that I put to it. Freeland brought it into a public-house, I was setting reading the paper, he read this letter by my side, he seemed much agitated.

Mr. Gurney. He asked you to put your name upon it. - A. Yes, that I should know it again

Q. You were not present when it was put in the post-office were you. - A. No.

- RICHEY. I am a taylor, 17, Newnham Street, Edgeware Road. About the beginning of November, I heard Quelch say he would be a match for Freeland.

MR. PIERCE. I am a bricklayer, York Street, New Road. I have heard Quelch say two or three times, he would do for Freeland in a very short time.

Freeland called six witnesses who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood .

186. THOMAS THORP was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of our Lord the King , about the hour of one on the night of the 13th of February , and stealing therein, 2766 halfpence , the property of Thomas Green .

THOMAS GREEN I am the tenant of the Canteen, in Portsmouth Street Barracks , I live there with my family, it is in the parish of St Mary-le-bone. On the night of the 13th of February, about a quarter before 12 o'clock at night, I went to bed, I was the last person up, the house was fast as usual, the doors and windows, I fastened them myself. About half past three o'clock in the morning, I was alarmed by the corporal and serjeant on guard I got up, there is a guard at the Canteen to protect my property. When I looked out of the window, they told me to come down. When I came down, they asked me if I had lost any thing out of my bar, I told them I could not tell, if they would lend me a light, I would examine it. I examined my bar, I found the bar-door open, it is a half hatch door, I had bolted it inside, I found it unbolted and left open. In one of the drawers that we always put copper in, I found five pound fifteen shillings had been taken away out of six pound fifteen shillings. We found ten shillings in the drawer, five shillings on the dresser, and five shillings on the floor, all the halfpence I had tied up in five shillings in paper the evening before. The serjeant of the guards told me, that he had got two pounds fifteen shillings, and the prisoner was in the custody of the corporal and the serjeant in the guardroom.

Q. How far is the guard-room from your house. - A, About thirty-five or thirty-six yards. I went to the guard-room, I saw some of my halfpence in his foraging cap on the guard-room table. The prisoner was in custody in the guard-room. The whole the we found of my property was two pounds fifteen shillings, they were part loose, and part tied up. Theywere all tied up when taken away, I knew them in particular by the tie, and they are folded particularly, they are not tied up as others are. I lost about two quarts of rum, and some return tobacco.

Q. Did you examine your house afterwards. - A. I did, the person that got in, got in by the tap-room window, we could see the footsteps by the sawdust on the window-bench and on the window-ledge.

Q. Do you, of your own knowledge, know that that tap-room window was fast when you went to bed. - A. Yes, I fastened it the last thing myself before I went to bed. There were three parts of a pint pot of gin and peppermint that was not there when I went to bed.

Mr. Knapp. Is any person concerned with you in keeping the Canteen. - A. No person whatever.

CHARLES JONES . I am a serjeant of the first regiment of foot guards.

Q. Where did you get these halfpence that you now produce. - A. I received part of them of the drum-major, James Watson , I received three papers of Watson, the other four papers the prisoner took out of his pocket in my presence and put them on the guard-room table, they have been in my possession ever since. On the morning of the 14th of February, Drum-major James Watson came to the guard-room and called me, I was on guard, he had got the prisoner at the bar in custody with one of the centinels of the guards.

Q. Had you known the prisoner before. - A. Yes, he was on guard that night with me, he had been stationed at the Canteen, he went on centry at twelve o'clock.

Q. How long was it his duty to continue. - A. Two hours.

Q. Who was centry with him. - A. No one with him at that place, he was relieved at two o'clock. Watson called me at a quarter of an hour after three o'clock.

Q. Who relieved him when he went away. - A. John Pennel . I searched the prisoner myself, I found nothing on him after he had taken the four papers of halfpence out, but some loose tobacco, which he had in his big coat pocket, it was but a little. I went and alarmed the landlord of the Canteens of it.

JAMES WATSON. I am a drum-major. On the morning of the 14th of February, I heard a noise on the landing of the room where I sleep. I sleep in the barracks, it is about sixty yards from the Canteens, I got up, and heard some one run down the stairs of the landing, into the barrack yard. I got up and put my great coat on, and went down stairs into the back yard, and there I saw the prisoner in custody of the centinel Watson Dickason , the centinel had hold of him by the great coat, I asked him what he was doing on my landing, he answered, nothing, he had a great coat on, and a foraging cap in his hand, I asked him what he had got there, he said, nothing, I took the cap out of his hand, I felt in it, I found three papers of halfpence, and some loose halfpence in the foraging cap. I immediately took him to the guard-room and made him a prisoner there. I delivered the three papers of halfpence that I took from him to Serjeant Jones, they e then taken out of the foraging cap, and put on form in the guard-room, I then went to bed.

WATSON DICKASON . I am a private in the first regiment of guards, I was on duty on the barrack guard on the morning of the 14th. About a quarter after three o'clock I heard a noise; some person came down the stairs very fast of the contrary side where I was posted centinel, he was crossing the barrack yard, and going on to the barrack stairs where I was centinel.

Q. Were the stairs from which he came near the Canteen. - A. No, I heard the drum-major talking from his window, I asked him what was the matter, he said he did not know, I soon after seized the prisoner about two minutes after I heard the noise. I kept him till Watson came up, I asked him what he had been doing, he said, nothing, but if I would not split, he would give me half of what he had got, and on his hearing the drum-major come up, he strove very hard to go to the privy. I held him fast, the drum-major came up and said,

"that is the man that came up my landing place, I saw him come down stairs," he said,

"what have you been doing up my stairs," the prisoner said,

"nothing," I made answer, that he had got something in his foraging cap, he took the cap from him with three papers of halfpence in it. He immediately took the prisoner into the guard-room and delivered him up to the serjeant of the guard.

Q. Had he any business to be on the drum-major's landing. - A. None, he ought to have been in the guard-room.

HENRY HUNT . I am a corporal in the first regiment of guards. I was on guard on the 14th, I posted the prisoner centinel at twelve o'clock, I relieved him again at two. About a quarter past three I saw him brought into the guard room by the drum-major, I saw him searched, I know no more than has been stated, except when he was before the adjutant, he acknowledged that he went through the window and entered the bar, and took the halfpence.

Q. When was it he said that. - A. On the morning of the 14th.

GEORGE DONALDSON . I am a constable of St. Martins, I took the prisoner into custody, going down Oxford Road, I asked him how he came to do it, he said he was unsettled in his mind, there was some difference between him and his wife, he did not know how he came to do it, he then asked me if it would hang him, I told him I could not say at that time whether it would or would not.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, called three witnesses who gave him a good character.

GUILTY DEATH , aged 24.

The prisoner was recommended to his Majesty's mercy by the jury, on account of the service he had done abroad for his king and country.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

187. JOHN LAWLER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of February , a seal, value 1 s. a portfolio, value 1 l. a pocket book, value 1 s. and two pair of stockings, value 2 s. a handkerchief, value 1 s. six guineas, and eight half guineas the property of the Honourable Archibald Stewart , in the dwelling of James Fesbury .

JOHN RICE . I am a servant to the prosecutor.

Q. What is Mr. Fesbury. - A. The master of the hotel in Berkley Square .

Q. Do you know any thing of your master's portfolio. - A. Yes, I know he lost the portfolio and part of his property, part of the property was in the bed room, and part in the sitting room.

Q. Did you know the prisoner at the bar before your master lost the property. - A. No, he was taken on the 1st of February, about two o'clock in the afternoon.

Q. When was the property lost. - A. About twelve o'clock, I missed it about two o'clock, or a little after two.

Q. Was your master at home at that time. - A. No, he was not. The property is here, I can only speak to the property.

JOHN SHEENE . I am a servant to the Honourable the Earl of Moira, I was at the Honourable Archibald Stewart 's, I lodge at the hotel Berkley Square, the lodgings of the prosecutor and my master are all adjoining together. All that I know, the portfolio was deposited in my charge by the prosecutor, I deposited them in the drawers.

Q. Did you loose it out of that place. - A. Yes.

Q. When was the last time that you saw it before it was stolen. - A. I received the portfolio after being stolen.

Q. You did not say that before. - A. I know no more than it being delivered to my charge.

JAMES FESBURY. Q. You are the master of the hotel. - A. Yes, I was informed of the things being stolen out of Mr. Stewart's apartments, I can swear to the man being in the house, I cannot swear that it was the time the property was taken, I can swear positively that I saw him in the house, in the entrance of the hall, he was standing with three or four other people. I was sent for to the Running Horse public-house, in David Street, that the portfolio was there, I went there and saw the portfolio, I returned home and fetched the servant to identify the portfolio. I delivered the portfolio from the landlord to Rice.

GEORGE HOLLAND. I live with Mr. Butterfield the publican, at the Running Horse, David Street, I saw the prisoner bring the portfolio into our house, the Running Horse in David Street, he called for a glass of ale, and the bar maid was going by the parlour, she said,

"what a way you have left the table," then she drew the table near to him, he took up the glass of ale, spilt it, and put it down again, then he took up the portfolio from where he was sitting, took some papers out and looked at them, and when he had looked at one of the papers, he took it out and put it under the seat where he was sitting. That is all I know about it, I am sure it is the same man.

Q. What became of the portfolio afterwards. - A. It was taken into the bar, and my mistress locked it up. I know it is the same portfolio, because it was cut open, I did not see him cut it open.

JOHN FOY . I produce the portfolio, I had it from the Earl of Moira's servant.

GEORGE HOLLAND . This is the portfolio.

MR. FESBURY. It is the same that I received at the public-house, it was cut so.

RICE. That is my master's portfolio, I can swear to it.

JOHN FOY . The prisoner was brought into the office in custody, on him I found this pocket book, I then went to Mr. Stewart at the hotel, he gave me a key. On Monday when the portfolio was produced. I opened the portfolio and found eight half guineas, and six guineas.

Q. to Rice. Do you know your master's pocket book. - A. I do, that is it.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing about the portfolio, I found the pocket book and a pair of stockings tied up in an handkerchief in Berkley Street.

GUILTY , DEATH , aged 21.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

188. MARY SWAIN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of February , two yards of lace, value 8 s. the property of Henry Kimpton .

HENRY KIMPTON . I am a haberdasher , 160 Fleet Street , I have no partner. On the 5th of February, about five o'clock in the afternoon, Mary Swain and Elizabeth Price came into the shop, they asked me to look at some laces suitable to a child's cap, I took a piece off the line in the window, I shewed it them, they told me they did not like it, they wished me to shew them some in a box, I refused to shew them, they then asked me to look at some remnants, I took one single piece off the parcel and throwed it before them. In the mean time three ladies came in, they wished to look at some out of the remnant basket, I took the remnant basket out with the remnants, and pushed it about three quarters of a yard from Swain and Price. At the time they were looking at the lace, Swain and Price were finding fault with the remnant which I had laid before them. The other three ladies took three pieces out of the basket and laid by the side of them, Swain laid her hand on two pieces of them, and got them in her hand. The ladies who made choice of the two looked round and could not find the two pieces, they said that Swain had got the two pieces, she turned her back to Price and made no answer. I did not take any notice at the time that I saw it done. Price found fault with the lace I had laid before them and asked Swain whether she liked the remnant, she made answer, that she would be a judge for herself, she knew nothing about it, and then they refused the lace and were going out, Mary Swain with the lace in her hand. I got over the counter shut the door, and desired the lad to fetch a constable, I pulled the handkerchief out of her hand, the lace tumbled out.

Mr. Reynolds. You have told us of three ladies being in your shop, had you your goods pretty much on the counter at the time. - A. No, nothing but a remnant basket full of bits of lace, only these two pieces were by the side of the prisoner. The prisoner was standing by the side of the counter, I did not see the handkerchief in her hand until she clapped her hand down with the handkerchief upon the lace. I saw it done, indeed I suspected what they were about.

Q. There was a person of the name of Price that you indicted with her. - A. I had them up as being connected together, I expected them here to night.

JOHN HUGGINS . I am a constable, Mr. Kimpton gave me the two pieces of lace, I have had them in my custody ever since I took the prisoner into custody.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence, nor called any witnesses to character.

GUILTY , aged 36.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

189. JAMES FARTHING was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of February six pound weight of thread, value 1 l. 2 s. the property of William Crauford .

WILLIAM CRAUFORD . I am a bookbinder , 16 Peerless Row, City Road. On the 28th of January I sent my boy, Richard Davies , to Mr. Suttaby's for six pounds of thread.

WILLIAM GUEST . I am a smith and bell hanger, No. 2, Gutter Lane. On the 28th of January, about half past six in the evening, I had occasion to come out of doors, I saw the prisoner at the bar plant himself at the top of Gutter Lane . As I was standing the off side of the way, a little boy came with a parcel upon his head, the prisoner snatched it from his head, and came running down the lane, the boy cried out, I ran across the street, threw the prisoner down, and tumbled on top of him. At the time that we were down, there came up a young man who appeared to lay hold of him, and while I was picking up my hat he let him go. I immediately pursued after him, and catched him again after he had ran eight or ten yards, I took him and the property to the Poultry Compter, I never lost sight of him, he was never away from me ten yards. I saw the prisoner take the thread from the boy's head.

RICHARD DAVIS . I live with Mr. Crauford, I had been for some thread at Mr. Suttaby's, Stationer's Court, Ludgate Hill. As I was going along the top of Gutter Lane, the prisoner came behind me and snatched the thread off my head, and then ran down Gutter Lane, this gentleman, William Guest , pursued him and caught him directly, he threw the parcel down, I picked it up, I gave it to Cartwright.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming along Cheapside, there was a quarrel just by Gutter Lane, I went down that lane to get out of the way of it, about twenty yards down Gutter Lane I was stopped by a man and throwed down, I got up again and went away, I was stopped again, and taken to the Poultry Compter.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 17,

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

190. ELEANOR WISE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of February , a gown, value 7 s. the property of William Brass .

MARTHA BRASS . I am wife to William Brass , he is a carpenter and builder , No. 41 Wood Street . I lost my gown on the 1st of February.

Q. Why do you accuse the prisoner. - A. She came to my house to be hired as a servant on the last day of January. On the 1st day of February I went after her character, during the time I went for her character, she came for her answer, and was asked down into my kitchen, and while my servant came up to say she had come, she stole a gown from off the basket that had just come from the mangler. On the Monday following, a young woman came to my house to ask me if I had not hired a young woman as servant of the name of Ann Evans .

Q. Was the prisoner present. - A. No, I agreed to take the prisoner, her character suited. When she came to my house my husband sent for a constable, he searched her and found twenty-nine duplicates in her pocket, one of them was for my gown, pawned at Mr. Sadlers, Aldergate Street.

GEORGE HENRY CLEAVE . I am a pawnbroker, I live with Mr. Sadler, this gown was pawned with me on the 5th of February in the name of Taylor, for three shillings, I cannot say the prisoner is the person that pledged it, the duplicate produced by Mrs. Brass is our duplicate.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence, nor called any witnesses to character.

GUILTY , aged 22,

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

191. THOMAS DAY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of February , a saw, value 7 s. the property of Peter Edgcombe Pheasant .

PETER EDGCOMBE PHEASANT . I am a carpenter , last Thursday the 14th, between the hours of one and two, I lost my saw from Mr. Gunston's buildings, by Aldgate pump, next door to the Saracen's Head. We were hanging the front-door of the building, the saw was about three feet within side of the door. We had not left the door two minutes before my partner said my saw was gone.

JAMES PORTER . I live with Mr. Fothergill, pawnbroker, 106 Aldersgate Street. On the 14th of February, between one and two o'clock, I took that saw of the prisoner, I lent 3 s. upon it.

HENRY PIPER . On the 15th, between eight and nine o'clock, I took charge of the prisoner, this duplicate was given me.

Prisoner's Defence. I went to the pawnbroker's to fetch the saw back, by Mr. Jones's persuasions, he said I had better fetch it back, and there should be nothing done. I went to the pawnbroker's to take it back, and there I was taken.

GUILTY , aged 45.

Confined One Month in Newgate .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

192. JOHN MURRAY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of February , nineteen bonnets, value 8 l. a bushel of hair, value 1 s. 6 d. a mahogany slab, value 10 s. 6 d. four doors, value 1 l. 1 s. and two pieces of boards, value 3 l. the property of Edward Simpson .

RICHARD WAIN . I am an errand boy to Mr. Simpson, in Lilly-pot Lane, Noble Street , he keeps a straw bonnet warehouse , his house is under repair. On the 5th of February, I was from seven o'clock in the morning, till near eight o'clock watching the prisoner.

Q. What is the prisoner. - A. A bricklayer's labourer , he worked on the premises, I saw him come out of the lane with a basket, there was some hair upon the top, he went to Play-house Yard, where he lived, I returned and told Mr. Hall.

MR. HALL. I work for Mr. Simpson, from the information of this boy, I went and met the prisoner, and brought him back to Mr. Simpson, I got a constable and found the property mentioned in the indictment in the prisoner's apartment.

WILLIAM COCKMAN . I am a constable, I tookthe prisoner in custody, and took him to the Poultry Compter.

THOMAS GRAY. I am an officer, I searched the prisoner's premises, No. 19 Play-house Yard, Mr. Simpson was with me, we found a parcel of hair on the floor, nineteen straw bonnets, a mahogany slab, and two pieces of skirting boards.

Prisoner's Defence. The hair I bought on Saffron Hill, the bonnets I know nothing about.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Confined Three Months in Newgate , and whipped in jail .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

193. ALEXANDER BURGERS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of January , two sacks, value 3 s. and five bushels of oats, value 20 s. the property of John Greenway .

THOMAS HAILEY . I live at Edgware, I am a taylor, I live with my mother in law, she is a widow.

Q. What do you know of this transaction. - A. On the 17th we suspected Mr. Greenway's granary being robbed, I saw one of the men go up the granary, he left the door unlocked, his name was Thomas Sanders . About eight o'clock at night on the 17th, I went into the granary it being unlocked, to see what was going forward, there was nothing in the granary but corn, and an empty sack standing upon other sacks, the sacks were all empty, I sat up all night. About half after three Thomas Sanders , one of Mr. Greenway's men came into the yard, under the window where I was, he went down to the stable door, I went to the room door to prevent my mother's sister from coming in with a light, and in the mean time, the prisoner had got into the granary. Thomas Sanders came up the yard, and I saw the prisoner go out of the granary with one sack upon his back full of corn, as he went out of the yard I came out, and he went up one side of the way, and I the other, when we got to the centre of the town we met almost together, he went up the Boot-yard, I am sure he is the man. After he had put the sack down, and came out of the yard, he spoke to me, he asked me where I had been, I said I had been walking a little way up the street, I went home, and saw the prisoner and Thomas Sanders go into the granary again. They had not been there a minute, before the prisoner brought another sack of corn out, this was between three and four o'clock in the morning.

Q. What is the prisoner. - A. He drives a team for Mr. Coles of Edgware.

JOHN GREENWAY . I rent this granary, the corn belongs to me, I live at Watford, in Hertfordshire. On the day stated in the indictment, about six o'clock, I was called up by the witness Hailey, who told me that the granary had been robbed in the morning, I got up and set off to Edgware, and brought Hailey with me in my chaise. When I came to Edgware, I enquired where this Alexander Burgers worked, I understood that he worked for a man of the name of Coles, and drove his team, his master informed me that he was gone to London with a load of hay, I then suspected where the corn was gone, and while I was getting a constable, two of my men absconded. I caught this man on the other side of Hampstead, with his load of hay, I passed him, I thought I saw a sack of corn on the load of hay, covered over with a cloth. I then came down to the middle of Hampstead town, enquired for a constable, and soon procured him. We came up to Burgers, I saw him speak to a man of the name of Giles, I asked him where the corn was that was on the hay, he said he had none, I said I was sure he had, I had seen it on the load of hay, I asked Giles if he saw the man unload a sack of corn, he said he knew nothing about it, I went into the house and Giles followed me, I said to Giles you may as well tell me where this corn is, I am determined to find it, he denied having it, I went into the yard, I could not find it, I saw a door which led to the cellar, I went down the cellar, there I found a sack of corn nearly full, and the sack that was not full was shot into a tub. I said to Giles,

"this is my corn, I could swear to it almost," Giles said,

"I am very sorry, I bought it of this man, and gave him a pound note for it," I said,

"why did not you tell me of this at first, I shall be obliged to send for another constable for you." I sent for another constable, and gave Giles in charge. I got in the load of hay, and found an empty sack, then the constables and myself set off with these men to a magistrate at Edgware, where the prisoner said, he was very sorry. I can swear to the sack so far, they are sacks that belong to the man that I hired to bring this corn for me.

Prisoner's Defence. The man came to me at my stable, and desired me to take two sacks of corn, I was to sell them for what I could get, I did not steal the corn.

GUILTY , aged 28

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

194. ELEANOR WHITE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of November , a watch, value 8 l. a gold chain, value 1 l. a gold seal, value 10 s. and a watch key, value 1 d. the property of Thomas Barnett , in his dwelling-house .

THOMAS BARNETT . I live in Queen Street, Golden Square, in the parish of St. James, Westminster . On the 21st of November, between ten and eleven o'clock in the morning, I lost two gold watches out of my bed room, I had seen them there at ten o'clock. On the 23d I saw one of them at Mr. Lane's, this is the watch, it is mine.

JAMES SWEETMAN . I live at Mr. Lane's, Drury Lane.

Q. Was the watch pawned with you. - A. Yes, between eleven and twelve at noon on the 21st of November, I lent a guinea and a half upon it, the prisoner pawned it in the name of Mary Brown . About ten weeks after she came to redeem it, I stopped her.

Prisoner's Defence. This watch was given to me between the hours of eleven and twelve, I pledged it for the gentleman, he told me to pledge it in another name, I was to meet him at the school door, where he watched me from several nights before, I never saw him since.

The prisoner called one witness who gave her a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

195. ELIZA PERRY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 9th of February , three yards of printed cotton, value 12 s. the property of John Harris and John Thwaits , privately in their shop .

JAMES TAGGERT . I am a shopman to John Harris and John Thwaits , Linen Drapers , No. 1, Pickett Street, Temple Bar ; on the 9th of February, about six o'clock in the evening the prisoner came into our shop, she inquired for a few yards of black linen, she bought nothing, and at the time the prisoner was going out of the shop, I perceived a piece of print under her cloak, she was in the act of lifting it up with her hand, endeavouring to conceal it, I caught hold of her, and pulled it from her.

Q. When had you seen this print the last time before it was stolen. - A. I had seen it in the course of the day, it was exposed at the door, inside of the shop; it cost about eighteen pence a yard.

Prisoner's Defence. My husband had been receiving some money, he said he would buy me an apron, I asked for some black linen to make an apron, I had this print in my hand, and was looking at it, I had no intention of stealing it, I only moved from the counter to call my husband at the door.

Jury Q. to Taggart. Was she out of the shop. - A. No, she was going out of the shop.

JOHN MILES . I am an assistant to John Harris , on February the 9th, I saw the prisoner come into the shop, I likewise saw James Taggert take the piece of print from under her cloak.

GUILTY, aged 25, of stealing to the value of 4 s. 10 d. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

196. ANN HUSSICK was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 22d of January , eight yards of printed cotton, value 12 s. the property of Richard German , privately in his shop .

RICHARD GERMAN . I am a Linen Draper , 24, Shoreditch , I did not miss the cotton until it was brought in by the officer. I know the prisoner, she has been several times at my shop.

DANIEL BISHOP . I am an officer of Worship Street Office; on the 22d of January I searched the prisoner's apartment, Vincent Street, Bethnal Green, I found this print, I took it to the office, shewed it the prisoner, she said it was her property, she had bought it and paid for it, Mr. German claimed it.

Prosecutor. This print was my property, it is worth eighteen pence a yard, it has my private mark, we do not take the mark off when we sell them.

The prisoner was not put on her defence.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood .

197. ANN HUSSICK was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 22d of January , a pair of stockings, value 2 s. the property of Thomas Thomas .

JOHN BONNEY . I am shopman to Mr. Thomas Thomas , Linen Draper , 25, Shoreditch .

Q. Do you recollect seeing the prisoner in your shop in January last - A. I do, she came with a child, and asked for a pair of stockings, I shewed her pairs, I saw her take one pair, and put them between her and her child, she then took another pair, asked the price, we agreed for 2 s. 2 d. she gave me a dollar, I gave her the change, I asked her for the stockings that was under her cloak, she denied having them, I said I was sure she had them, she lifted up her arm, and the stockings fell down from under her arm, Mr. Thomas saw the stockings fall from her, and sent for an officer.

THOMAS THOMAS . I was in the shop, I saw the stockings fall from under the cloak, when Bonney asked her for them.

GUILTY , aged 25,

Confined Fourteen Days in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

198. ALICE WILSON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 8th of February , a watch, value 5 l. a gold chain, value 1 l. two gold seals, value 1 l. and a watch key, value 6 d. the property of James Hadley , from his person .

JAMES HADLEY . I am a publican , I live in Hanway Street, Oxford Street; on Friday the 8th of February I had been to a dinner at the London Tavern, I left it between eight and nine o'clock, I was in liquor.

Q. Were you sober enough to know whether you met the prisoner. - A. No, I was very drunk.

SAMUEL DICKINS . I am an officer of Bow Street Office; about one o'clock I saw Mr. Hadley come out of a house in Charles Street, Drury Lane, very much intoxicated, I said to Limbrick, I think that gentleman has been robbed, about two or three minutes afterwards, Mr. Hadley turned back again and said, I have lost my watch, and I think I have lost it at that house; the prisoner and another woman stood at the door, and as we drew towards them, the prisoner ran in the house up stairs, I followed the prisoner, told her she had robbed the man, and I must see if she had got his watch, and directly took it out of her bosom, I took her to the watchhouse.

Prosecutor. It is my watch, I do not recollect any thing that passed, I was excessively drunk.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

199. JOHN LAWLER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 27th of January , eight gold seals, value 40 s the property of Harriet Ann Bonnell , in the dwelling-house of John Morris .

HARRIET ANN BONNEL . Q. Do you live in the house of John Morris - A. Yes, in lodgings, I lost eight gold seals out of a writing desk left in the sitting room, I had seen them on the 27th of January in the evening, the master of the hotel missed them while I was absent.

Q. How came you by so many gold seals. - A. They were given me.

JOHN COBHAM . I took the prisoner in custody on the 1st of February, on searching him, I found these gold seals.

GUILTY of stealing to the value of 30 .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

200. MARY HARLOWE was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Edward Billingham , about the hour of nine at night, on the 2nd of January , and stealing therein three pair of shoes, value 15 s. his property.

EDWARD BILLINGHAM . I am a shoe-maker , 65, Great Peter-street . On the 2nd of January I came down to see the shop shut up; I saw a pane of glass broken in the shop, and several pair of shoes missing.

Q. When had you seen this place last before the pane of glass was broken - A. About dusk.

WILLIAM DALLINGE . I am a pawnbroker. I produce a pair of women's shoes, they were pawned with me by a man.

JAMES SWEETMAN . I produce a pair of women's shoes pawned with me by a man.

JAMES GILLMORE. I am an officer. On the 3d of January, at night, the prisoner was in custody at Queen square office. In consequence of a pair of shoes being stopped at a pawnbrokers she had sold these shoes to a woman of the name of Greenfield; she then said that a young man whom she had never seen before had given her these shoes to sleep with her. On the 24th I had further information, I searched her apartment; I saw her hand in her pocket, she was endeavouring to give something to Greenfield. I took possession of that pocket which contained a little red pocket book; in that pocket book I found two duplicates for two pair of shoes, pawned on the 3d of January.

Q. They were for the shoes for which the pawnbrokers have been examined - A. Yes. The prisoner said some young man had given her the duplicates.

ANN GREENFIELD . The prisoner came to me and said she had a pair of shoes that would fit me; I gave her five shillings for them. These are the shoes.

Prosecutor. The shoes are of my manufactory; I cannot swear they are the shoes I lost on the 2d of January.

Prisoner's Defence. I am an unfortunate girl. A man asked me to go home with me; he said he would give me five shillings; he came home with me; he had no money, he gave me a pair of shoes.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Heath.

201. THOMAS JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of February , seventy pounds weight of bacon, value 2 l. the property of Thomas Pugh ; that he being in the dwelling house of the said Thomas Pugh about the hour of one, on the same night burglariously did break to get out of the said dwelling house .

THOMAS PUGH. I am a cheesemonger , 210, High-Holborn, in the parish of St. Giles's in the Fields . The prisoner was a lodger in my house. On the 5th of February I lost some bacon, the bacon was put on some tubs at the further end of the shop; the bacon was sixty pound weight. On the 5th of February, at eleven at night, I saw the bacon there; I fastened the shop door, and saw every thing was secure; nobody could go into the shop without breaking the pannel, which was done. I have a private entrance in the passage for the lodgers, they have no business with the shop. On the 6th, about the middle of the day, I missed the bacon, and about six in the evening the pannel in the passage, at the further end of the shop, I observed had been broken open.

Q. What time did you go into the shop in the morning - A. About seven o'clock. I was the first person that went into the shop, I did not perceive the pannel broken then, not till the candles were lighted; the boy went out in the yard in the evening, he told me that the pannel in the passage had been broken; I took the candle and examined it, and found the bacon had gone through that pannel; the marks of the bacon was upon it. The pannel had been broken open by an axe; the axe is here, the pannel had been split and then pushed in its place again, and my knocking about the tubs in the course of the day, had moved it out of its place. It had been put in its place, and that prevented me from seeing it.

Q. How do you know that it had been broken open by that instrument - A. Mr. Baxter matched this instrument with the place, it matched with it. The patrol found the axe in the bag, with the bacon in his possession in the street. I went to the watchhouse and saw it, I knew it to be my property.

Q. Was the prisoner in your house that night - A. I do not know that he was out; he told me the next night that he was out at his club.

WILLIAM BRANSCOMB . I am a patrol of St. Giles's. I stopped the prisoner with the bacon on his back in Little Queen-street, Holborn, about a quarter past two in the night of the 5th; I asked him, where he was going; he said, home, just down here; making a motion, as if down Little Queen-street. I asked him what the bag contained, he said, meat; Bott, the watchman, asked him what meat; he replied, bacon, he had it out of the country, and had been to the Angel, St. Giles's for it, and the reason he had been out so late was, he had stopped with a friend. I told him that he and the bacon must go to the watchhouse. Bott took the bacon, and the prisoner made his escape from me. We took the bag to the watchhouse.

THOMAS BOTT . I am a watchman; I was along with Branscomb. I asked the prisoner where the bacon came from; he said, Ryegate; I took the bacon and carried it to the watchhouse, I opened the bag at the watchhouse, it contained this bacon, and this hatchet. The patrol had the prisoner in Holborn, he stopped and watched, he run off, the patrol lost him.

Mr. Reynolds. Had you ever any doubt of this man - A. No, I never had.

Q. At the watchhouse the next night did you express any doubts about him - A. No; I looked at him and would not give my opinion till I was certain; I am sure he is the same man.

JOHN BAXTER . I am the watchhouse-keeper. This bacon was delivered to me on the morning of the 5th, between two and three o'clock, it was brought to the watchhouse. On that morning Mr. Pugh came and claimed it. I went to Mr. Pugh's house, examined it where the pannel had been broken open in the passage; my judgement was, that it must have been done by somebody in the house; I took the prisoner in custody that same night in Mr. Pugh's house. Bott followed me to the watchhouse with the prisoner, and when he came there I asked him if he knew theman, he made no reply; I told him to go for Branscomb; when Branscomb came he declared directly that he was the man that he stopped with the bacon.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent of the charge that is laid against me, and had I the opportunity of bringing my friends forward I could have proved it.

MARY EDWARDS . Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. Yes; I saw him on Monday the 5th, I was at his lodgings; he went to bed about one o'clock. I am a married woman, my husband came lately from the country, he had not lodgings for me, I slept in the room with the prisoner and his wife. We all went to bed together. It was about nine o'clock in the morning. When we got up the prisoner was there then.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Wood .

202. WILLIAM OLDHAM and JOHN PICKMORE were indicted for feloniously assaulting George Cooper , in the King's highway, putting him in fear, and feloniously taking from his person, and against his will, a watch, value 4 l. a gold chain, value 10 s. a gold seal, value 5 s. a watch key, value 6 d. and three one pound bank notes, his property .

GEORGE COOPER . I am an assistant with my father, he is a farmer at Old Ford, Middlesex.

Q. Were you stopped any where - A. On the 7th of January last, about six o'clock in the evening, in Old Ford-lane , I was stopped by two men, I was on horseback.

Q. Had you ever seen the men before - A. Never, to my knowledge.

Q. Was it dark - A. It was very moonlight.

Q. Were the men disguised - A. They were; they were in light smock frocks.

Q. Had they any thing over their faces - A. I perceived one had something under his hat.

Q. Had they crape over their faces - A. No, they had not. They were on foot.

Q. Had you an opportunity of observing their faces - A. I had, of one more particularly than the other.

Q. What passed when they came up to you - A. A something was uttered, but what I do not know. They took from me a silver hunting watch; they stopped me as I was passing on the road; they were going the same way that I was; they separated, and as I came up they both took hold of the bridle of the poney.

Q. Do you remember what they said - A. No, I cannot positively say what they said.

Q. Did they demand your property - A. They said a something, and immediately a pistol was presented to me by the prisoner Pickmore, if he be the man, but I am not positive.

Q. Are you sure of the other - A. I am positive that Oldham is the other.

Q. One of them presented a pistol - A. They did.

Q. And demanded your money - A. They uttered something, I do not know what. I immediately begged that they would not ill use me, and told them that they should have every thing that I had; I put my hand into my pocket, and gave them three one pound notes, and some silver; I cannot positively say how much silver it was, from ten to fifteen shillings. I will not say what, but some silver I am positive; I believe there were some shillings, a half crown, and a crown piece, but I am not positive whether there was a dollar or not.

Q. Did you give them any thing else - A. There was a bill that I had taken up at Masterman's, White Hart Court. I gave them nothing else. The prisoner Oldham drew my watch from my fob.

Q. Was the chair out or not - A. The chain was out, and the seal and key.

Q. Did they take any thing else from you - A. No, excepting a pocket handkerchief, but I am not positive, probably I might have lost it that afternoon; whether it was taken by the prisoners I cannot say; I have not seen it again since.

Q. When they had taken that did they leave you - A. They did.

Q. They did not use you ill - A. No, they did not.

Q. How long were they with you in the whole - A. I cannot positively say, but a very short time; I think not scarce a minute; a very short time indeed.

Q. Were you frightened - A. A little alarmed, not so much as I was afterwards.

Q. How soon afterwards did you see them again - A. I saw them at Bow-street office on the Saturday following, as they stopped me on the Monday.

Q. Do you know of your own knowledge whether any of your property was found upon them - A. None I believe whatever.

Q. When you saw them on the Saturday at Bow-street did you know either of them - A. Yes, I knew the prisoner Oldham the moment I saw him.

Mr. Reynolds. I think you tell us it was about seven o'clock - A. No, about six.

Q. Two men were going the same way as you - A. Yes.

Q. Their faces then were not towards you, you had therefore no opportunity, though it was moon-light, of observing their features untill you came up - A. No.

Q. When you came up to them they separated, and each seized both sides of your bridle - A. They did.

Q. Which very much surprised you - A. Not so much at first. It did surprise me. I at first thought it was some of my friends.

Q. They had their hats on - A. They had.

Q. You sitting upon your horse, I take it you were above them - A. Very little.

Q. The sight that you had of their faces must be a downward sight - A. No, I had a straight forward view, they were close when my watch was drawn.

Q. It was scarcely a minute - A. I cannot say what time.

Q. You were somewhat alarmed, though not much - A. Somewhat.

Q. One of the men had something under his hat - which was that - A. The prisoner Oldham.

Q. Whatever that was contributed to shade the face - A. Very little.

Q. Now, sir, having asked you these questions, I put this to you, can you venture to swear positively to any man that you had never seen before in yourlife can you swear positively to this man - A. I have sworn positively, my conscience will not allow me to say otherwise.

Q.When you went to Bow-street I believe you went there for the purpose of seeing some persons that were apprehended for robbing, were you not - A. It was.

Q. You went there expecting to see them - A.I went there with an idea of seeing some prisoners.

Q. That had robbed you - A. I could not tell.

Q. That was the object that you went for - A It was.

Q. You said it was quite moon-light, were there no clouds intervening at all - A There were some clouds I believe. I can venture to swear that I could see a man one hundred and fifty yards before me at least.

Q. What day of the week was this - A. Monday January the 7th.

Q. A fortnight afterwards you saw them - A. No, on Saturday.

COURT. When you saw them do you remember whether the moon was shining in their faces - A. It was; the moon was behind me; it shone into their faces.

JOHN UPTON. I am one of the Bow-street patrols. I was in company with Cross, Avery, and Lloyd, on Tuesday the 8th of January, passing by the Shepherd and Shepherdess public-house, going to the Shepherd and Shepherdess Fields, I met the prisoners Oldham and Pickmore coming before me. I saw Oldham pull his hat over his eyes. I seized Oldham, I asked him whether he had any pistols about him, he replied he had not; Cross said that Pickmore had thrown it over the sence.

Q. How far from Old Ford were they - A. This was near the City road, it might be two miles from Old Ford, I cannot exactly speak to that distance, Cross told Avery to go over, he did not find it then. We took the prisoner to the Shepherd and Shepherdess public-house, they got a light and went to look for the pistol; after they came back I saw the pistol in Cross's hands; I searched Oldham, I found a silver watch on him, a dollar, a few halfpence, and a box like a tobacco box, containing some gunpowder, and four pieces of lead, a flannel night cap, and an old silk handkerchief; I asked Oldham where he spent his afternoon, he informed me that he had been at the Angel, smoking his pipe along with Pickmore; I took them up to the Angel, I asked the waiter, I found they had. We took them to the public-office, where they were examined, and committed for further hearing.

JOHN CROSS . I am a patrol. On Tuesday the 8th of January I was with Upton and Avery, I saw the two prisoners coming towards us, Upton took hold of Oldham, and I took hold of Pickmore. As soon as I took hold of him, to the best of my belief, he put his hand into his breeches, and throwed something over the fence; I called to Avery, he went over, he did not find it then; then I said I should take them to the Shepherd and Shepherdess. Upon my searching of Pickmore I took from him a silver hunting-watch, and this pocket-book, containing some shop bills, memorandums, and duplicates.

Q. You do not know whose watch it is - A. No.

Q.Has Mr. Cooper seen it - A. I believe he has.

Mr. Cooper. That is not my watch.

Cross At the Shepherd and Shepherdess I asked the landlord to lend me a lanthorn and candle. Avery and I went, and in searching I found a pistol about six yards from where he throwed it.

Mr. Knapp You found nothing upon them belonging to Mr. Cooper - A. No.

Oldham left his defence to his counsel; called five witnesses who gave him a good character.

Pickmore was not put on his defence.

OLDHAM, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 25.

PICKMORE, NOT GUILTY .

[The prisoner Oldham was recommended to his Majesty's mercy by the Prosecutor, on account of there being no cruelty used to him.]

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Bailey.

203. ELEANOR DEVINE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of January , one hundred and twenty-six yards of ribbon, value 3 l. 3 s. the pro- property of Robert Stevens , and George Crofts .

ROBERT STEVENS . I am a haberdasher ; I am a shop keeper, the principal in partnership with George Crofts, 63, Oxford-street, in the parish of Mary-le-bone .

Q. Were you in the shop when the prisoner came into it - A. She asked to look at small quantities of ribbons; she paid about eleven shillings for several short quantities of ribbon, which she bought. The prisoner was brought to me by the young man that served her, James Robert Knight , into the back shop.

Q. Did you search her - A. Yes; we took her up stairs in the back room, she was searched.

Q. What did you find upon her - A. I cannot say that any thing was found upon her, she contrived to get into the corner of the room, and in the corner of the room was a chair; I desired the young man to call up a female servant to search her, on his return I desired her to walk into the room. While he was absent I had strong suspicion that she was endeavouring put down the goods that she had about her; as the servant came up stairs I desired her to walk into the middle of the room; I looked down underneath her chair, I there saw a pocket lay.

Q. Do you know whether that pocket was there when she first came in the room - A. I am not certain, as I did not look. When I saw the pocket lay I took it up, I said, this is sufficient proof, this pocket contains our property. I did not examine the pocket untill Burton the constable came, then I took up the pocket in my hand, and turned the ribbons out. I recognized the principal part to be our property, the contents were seven half pieces of ribbon, amounting to one hundred and twenty-six yards. She disowned the pocket as being hers.

Q. Had any of these pieces your shop mark - A. One or two my own mark, and the other the mark of the young man we employ, his name is William Banbury ; I know his hand-writing, I can swear to it.

Q. Had you seen the ribbons in your shop - A. I cannot say I saw them; I knew the marks.

Q. It was a woman's pocket, I suppose - A. Yes; she disowned it; she appeared to be working her things about. When she was ordered to walk upstairs I heard her break the strings of her pocket, before she was taken up stairs.

Q. What is the prime cost of these ribbons - A. About three pound ten shillings; we estimated them at three guineas, the lowest value.

HENRY MAGG. I was in the shop when the prisoner came in, she asked me if I sold night caps; I told her, yes; she looked at ribbons, and bought ribbons to the value of nine shillings and ten-pence; she clapped a silk handkerchief over the ribbon drawer, which was quite open, that made me suspect her; she gave me two five shilling pieces, I gave her twopence change. I was half over the counter, going to take her to Mr. Steven's; she asked me if I sold narrow ribbon, I told her, yes; she looked out as much as came to one shilling and tenpence, and I gave her the change; then I took her into the back shop. On her going up stairs she had her hand behind her, endeavouring to break the string of her pocket. Mr. Stevens told me to go for a constable, the pocket was found while I was gone.

Q. Did you find there was any ribbon missing out of the drawer - A. I thought there was.

- BURTON. I produce the property, it has been in my possession ever since.

Q. to prosecutor. Was there any woman of your family in the room before the search - A. No, only myself. There are one or two pieces not marked, these three that are marked that I swear to are worth thirty shillings.

Prisoner's Defence. He put private marks upon them ribbons when the constable was in the place.

Q. to prosecutor. Is that true - A. Yes; but these three that I swear to had marks before.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 21.

[The prisoner was recommended to his Majesty's mercy by the prosecutor, on account of her sister calling, and said she had two children, and her husband about a year ago, had been impressed into his Majesty's service.]

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Heath.

204. ELIZABETH BROWN was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Patrick Purcell , about the hour of eight in the forenoon, on the 12th of February , no person being therein, and stealing, a tablecloth, value 1 s. five shifts, value 15 s. six handkerchiefs, value 4 s. a night gown, value 1 s. a quilt, value 1 s. a neck handkerchief, value 6 d. three napkins, value 1 s. two aprons, value 1 s. three towels, value 1 s. six dusters, value 1 s. two sheets, value 12 s. and a yard of cloth, value 1 s. his property.

CATHERINE PURCELL . Q. Are you a married woman - A. Yes, my husband's name is Patrick Purcell , I live at No. 18, Fitzroy market, in the parish of St. Pancras , I lodge in the kitchen; I have only the kitchen, Thomas Emery keeps the house, he lives in the next street, and lets this house in tenements.

Q. When was your room broken open - A. On the 7th of February it was broken open; I went out of an errand.

Q. Did you leave any body in the room - A. No, nobody. I locked my door, but left the key in the entrance to my door, being dark I do not suppose that she saw it; she had forced it in, I was not absent ten minutes, when I returned I found the door open; my fright was so great I did not look to see whether it was unlocked or not. I missed this bundle of property that I had been entrusted with to wash.

Q. What time of the day was it when you went out - A Half past eight in the morning.

Q. What did you lose - A. A tablecloth, three shifts, six pocket handkerchiefs, a night gown, a flannel petticoat, a neck handkerchief, three napkins, two aprons, three towels, six dusters, a sheet, and a piece of old linen cloth.

Q. What were they all worth - A. I dare say I should be charged a couple of pounds for them

Q. Did you examine the door - A The lock was forced, and they had not unlocked it. The bolt of the lock was out, I cannot say that the lock was very firm, there were three of the screws forced out, and one of the screws I picked up off the ground. These things were left on my chair, they were tied up in a tablecloth, and put in the basket. I went up stairs to my neighbour, and told him I was robbed of what was not my property, a bundle of linen; my neighbour went out and overtook this woman with the things.

WILLIAM THOMPSON . In consequence of what the last witness said to me I went in search of the things. On the same day I found the prisoner with the property just this side of Howland-street, Tottenham court-road. I found her with the bundle, I brought her back to Fitzroy-market, she brought the bundle back in her apron, and then she and the bundle were taken to the watchhouse, the bundle was lodged in the hands of the constable. I asked the prisoner where she got the things, she said they were her own; I said they were stolen, and she must come along with me; she did.

JOHN BAKER . I am a constable. The prisoner was brought to the watchhouse with the bundle. This is the bundle, I have had it ever since.

Prosecutrix. They are the things that I had to wash.

Prisoner's Defence. It was real distress that made me do it.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 49.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood.

205. JAMES BARKER was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Nicholas Priest , about the hour of five in the afternoon, on the 5th of January , no person being therein, and stealing a sheet, value 2 s. a blanket, value 3 s. and a quilt, value 2 s, his property.

ANN PRIEST . I live at 13, Marygold-court, Strand, in the parish of St. Martin's in the Fields . My husband's name is Nicholas Priest.

Q. Have you the whole house or part - A. Lodgings. Mrs. Davis owns the house, she does not live in the house.

Q. Did you lose this sheet and blanket at any time - A. Yes, on Thursday the 5th of January, about five in the evening; I went out and left nobody in my apartment.

Q. Was there any people in the other part of the house - A. Yes; I fastened my room doors; I have the second floor, one room. I came back about half after eight, the lock was broken off, and the door wideopen. I missed a sheet, a blanket, and a quilt off the bed.

Q. Did you ever see them afterwards - A. No.

MARY ROSE . I live in the same house with Mrs. Priest, in the parlour, the prisoner came in and asked for Ann Priest ; it was past five o'clock; I said she was not at home; he said that makes no odds, he is my coachman, I owe him six shillings and sixpence; I said you must not go up stairs, he said he would go up stairs; he put his hand under his leg, and said, I am Jemmy, I am come out of Tothill-fields bridewell. He went up stairs and brought a bundle down; I saw him in the passage with the bundle, he had nothing when he went up; he said this is my coachman; it was in a large bundle, covered over with a white cover.

Q. There was a coachman with him, was there - A. Yes, a shortish men. The prisoner said d - n you, if you say any thing; you bitch, I will let you know I have as much right here as you have.

Q. Did he go away with the things - A. Yes, he and the coachman went down the court; the prisoner said they were his property, he would have them. I was very glad he was gone. I had seen him once or twice before.

THOMAS MANTZ. I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner in the Strand; he said, well, I am not taken for beans now; I said, no, do you know what you are taken for; yes, he said, I went and took a sheet, blanket, and counterpane off the bed.

Q. Did he say from whence he had taken them - A. No, he did not; he said he had a coach, he had no money to pay the coachman, he knew the people, he went and took these things to pay the coachman. I never could find out what coachman it was.

Prisoner's Defence. It is all truth what he has said.

Q. to prosecutor. What is the value of these articles A. About seven shillings.

Q. It was about five o'clock, when you went out, that is dark on the 5th of January, is it not - A.Yes; I think it is.

GUILTY, aged 35.

Of stealing, but not breaking and entering the house.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. justice Bailey.

206. DANIEL KELLY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of February , three silver servers, value 10 l. thirteen silver spoons, value 7 l. two silver desert spoons, value 1 l. and a silver marrow spoon, value 10 s. the property of Catherine Baron , widow , in her dwelling house ; and DAVID ATKINS , for feloniously receiving, on the 11th of February , the said goods, he knowing them to have been stolen .

CATHERINE BARON . I am a housekeeper ; I live in Southampton-row, No. 49, Bloomsbury . I have an independant fortune.

Q. Do you know Daniel Kelley - A. He was my butler , and had the care of my plate.

Q. Did you miss any of your plate - A. Yes.

Q.When did you last see it before it was stolen - A. On Sunday evening, at dinner, on the 3d of February, the articles were safe then. I missed it on the Tuesday following: The prisoner had not quitted my service when I missed it. Some of the plate is here.

Mr. Reynolds. You say you saw your plate on the Sunday - A. Yes, excepting the marrow spoon.

Q. Did you take particular notice of it - A. No. The silver servers were brought to table, and the spoons; I cannot exactly say whether they were all there or no.

Q. Did you take any more observation of your plate on that day than any other day - A. No.

JOHN PERRY . I have the management of Mr. Spinks shop, 22, Gracechurch-street, he is a silversmith. The prisoner came to me on the 13th of February, he asked me if we bought silver, and what we gave per ounce; I told him from five shillings and sixpence to five shillings and ninepence was the usual price given, upon which he opened the plate. I examined the silver and said as there was foreign silver among it the utmost that I could give would be five shillings and sixpence per ounce; he said that was not sufficient, he expected five shillings and tenpence; I told him it was the most I could give, he asked me to weigh it for him that he might not be deceived in any other place he took it to; there were fifty one ounces four penny weights; he asked me what it would come to at that; I told him fourteen pounds one shilling and sixpence; he said he did not suppose he could do better with it, I should have it. I paid him the money and he went away.

Mr. Reynolds. Which man are you speaking of - A. Atkins is the person that I bought it off. I gave him the full value of it, as he told me he was a country dealer I gave him more than others would have done.

JOHN BLAKE . Q. What are you - A. I am a servant.

Q. What do you know of this transaction - A. I believe you have the minutes.

Q. I must have it from you again, tell the whole of it, and tell the truth, and nothing but the truth, do not charge any person unjustly - Do you remember a fortnight ago you were in company with Mrs. Devey, on a Sunday, a fortnight ago - A. Yes, I was.

Q. Did you go with her to any place - A. I did, at her request I went with her to a public-house in Bloomsbury-place, it is at a corner of a street.

Q. Do you remember Mrs. Devey sending a boy of an errand - A. Perfectly well.

Q. What was the boy to do - A. As I understood to tell Kelly the butler to come to her; Kelly at Mr. Barons, or Mrs. Barons, I cannot say which.

Q. Look round, do you know either of the prisoners at the bar - A. Both of them. I knew Kelly before I went with Mrs. Devey, but not Atkins.

Q. Did Kelley come - A. He did come.

Q. Do you remember Kelly bringing any thing to Mrs. Devey - A. Not at that time.

Q. Do you remember any thing of a bundle - A. Yes.

Q. Who brought the bundle - A. Kelly; he delivered the bundle to me at our parting at the public-house.

Q. Did you know the contents of the bundle - A. I did not know then, I do now.

Q. What were you to do with the bundle - A.He said there were different articles, some belonged tohim, and some to his friends; I took the bundle home along with me, I was to dispose of the articles that were in it; I sold them to Atkins, on Monday, eight days after I received them.

Q. During these eight days did Kelly call upon you for any thing - A. He asked me if I had disposed of them.

Q. To whom were you to give the money to - A. To Kelly.

Q. What is Atkins - A. I do not know.

Q. How come you to sell them to Atkins - A. I was in a public-house, a man was talking of a jeweller, and some conversation ensued about watches, and they said he bought silver and gold. A man brought Atkins to me at my master's stable; I do not know the man's name.

Q. What is your master - A. A gentleman, I believe, a counsellor, Mr. John Penleaze .

Q. What was it you sold to Atkins - A. Three small silver waiters.

Q. Were they silver - A. I believe so; I sold them as silver, I did not sell them alone; to the best of my recollection thirteen (or it may be one over) spoons, table spoons, I believe.

Q. Do you know whether they were tablespoons or tea-spoons - A. Yes, but they may put them to different purposes.

Q. What besides - A. I do not think there was any thing else. By the account of Atkins and his friend that brought him to me they came to ten pounds some shillings. Atkins paid me the money.

Q. Did Atkins weigh the silver - A. Yes. I gave Kelly the ten pounds the next morning. Kelly said it should be fifteen or sixteen pounds that he ought to have had.

Q. How many ounces did it weigh - A. Forty-seven ounces, as I understood, at four shillings and threepence an ounce. I gave Kelly the money, he gave me nothing for my trouble.

Mr. Reynolds. You were taken up and charged with this were you not - A. Yes.

Q. You have come now from prison to here - A. Yes.

Q. When did you first tell this story after you were taken up and charged - A. No, I did not.

Q. When was the first time - A. Last Monday.

Q. Three days ago - A. Three days ago.

Q. That was the first time that you told this story, when were you taken before the magistrate, as thief, you know - A. On the Thursday, I believe.

Q. And you never told this story until the Monday night - A. No, I had no opportunity; I searched for advice, and I got advice of my master.

Q. Are you in service now - A. I do not know whether I am or am not.

Q. Do you know your way into Mrs. Baron's house - A. I do, if I am shewed the door.

GEORGE CLERKE. I am a watchmaker. On Monday the 11th of February the prisoner Atkins came to my house and informed me he was going to purchase some foreign silver; a friend of his, a one legged lieutenant, was to introduce him to the person that had it to sell, it was to be sold at a public-house near Berkley-square; I cautioned him not to have any thing to do with it; I told him if the people had come honestly by it, they would go to a refiners, or to a silversmiths shop, where they could get more by it than he could afford. He borrowed my scales and weights, I lent them to him having known him about two years.

Q. What is he - A. An hawker, or pedlar, during which time I have trusted him at several periods to the amount of forty or fifty pounds, he has been frequently in my shop, where valuable articles lay about, both of gold and silver; I had not the least doubt of his honesty. I also told him, after he had borrowed the scales, that he had better go to a silversmith's shop, and have it weighed, and valued, by which means he would not be wronged; he told me he could depend upon his friend the lieutenant. He returned the scales the next morning, I was not at home; I saw him in the afternoon, he told me he had made a purchase of the silver, and gave five shillings the ounce.

Mr. Gleed. Did you know where Atkins lodged - A. He told me in London-street, Fitzroy-square. I was present at the time of his apprehension, he was apprehended in my shop, he then acknowledged every thing.

Q. I want to know when he was apprehended whether he gave all the information of the person of whom he purchased the different articles - A. He did.

Q. In consequence of the information he gave was the witness Blake apprehended - A. Yes, and Kelly.

Mr. Reynolds. You did not go to the public-house where he bought the plate - A. No.

Q. You know nothing of Kelly - A. I do not.

WILLIAM SMITH . I am a patrol of Bow-street. By the information that I received at Mr. Clerke's house on the Wednesday, on Thursday I apprehended the prisoner. As soon as I told him who I was and took him in custody he told me of the person that he had bought it of; he said he did not know the name; by the information that he gave me I found out Blake; he went with us and found out Blake. When we apprehended Blake, Blake said that he had this plate given to him.

WILLIAM CABLE . I am a pot boy at Orange-street, Bloomsbury-place.

Q. Do you remember a lady of the name of Devey coming to you - A. Yes.

Q. Are you the boy that was sent with a message to Kelly - A. Yes, she sent me of an errand to 49, to Kelly, to tell him to come; Kelly came about eleven o'clock.

Q. Did you see any bundle - A I did not.

Mr. Reynolds. You saw Kelly come, and you saw no bundle - A. Yes. I saw no bundle.

Q. If the bundle had been of any fine at all you must have seen it if he had brought it - A. Yes, I must.

COURT. Did Kelly come once or twice - A. I saw him come once.

Q. to Blake. How often did Kelly come to Mrs. Devey at the public-house in Bloomsbury - A. Twice.

STEPHEN LAVENDER. I am an officer. I hadsome conversation with Atkins, he said he was cautioned about purchasing this plate, and in consequence of this caution, he buried the plate before he sold it.

Q. Then he told you that he had sold it - A Yes, to the silversmith in Gracechurch-street, he said that he buried it in consequence of some caution he had of Blake.

Q. to Perry. Did Atkins give you reference to Mr. Clerke - A. No; he was known at our shop I had known him a month or six weeks before. I knew from Atkins that he had dealt with Mr. Clerke, and there he was found.

Q. to prosecutrix. Look at the plate, is that your property - A. The silver has my crest upon it; these two, they are all my own that is produced, and more is wanting still; these are worth twelve, thirteen or fifteen pounds: I do not know exactly.

Kelly's Defence. I am free of the charge against me.

Atkins's Defence. I hope I gave a fair price for them.

Kelly called one witness, who gave him a good character

KELLY, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 48.

ATKINS, GUILTY , aged 31.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Heath.

207 JAMES POTTER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 3d of February one hundred and twenty-seven ounces of silver cuttings, value 30 l. the property of Paul Storr , Philip Rundle , John Bridge , Edmund Waller Rundle , and William Theed ; and JOSEPH AARON , for feloniously receiving on the same day the said goods knowing them to have been stolen .

THOMAS SMITH . I am a painter and glazier, I live at No. 2, Little Moorfields.

Q. On the morning of Sunday the 5th of February were you in St. Paul's Church-yard - A. I was, about seven in the morning, I was going into Cheapside, I there saw the two prisoners at the bar, they were a little separate they were talking to each other, and walking in one direction. I was in Cheapside, I saw them going towards Foster Lane, whether they came out of the Old Change or St. Paul's Church-yard I cannot say, Potter had a bundle under his arm in a cotton handkerchief, Potter stopped and looked up Foster-lane as if for a direction, Aaron went a little before making a sign to him to follow him; Potter followed him and I followed him, and I followed them both to watch them: they came to Gutter-lane, Potter made another stop as if to go down there, and immediately Aaron beckoned him on again, he followed him again to Wood-street. They went down Wood-street, Aaron taking the right-hand side, and Potter the left. The Jew went into Lad-lane, Potter stepped forward and over shot Aaron, he looked back and turned down Lad-lane after Aaron; when they both took down Lad-lane, I stopped at the corner, I heard Aaron say, there is somebody watching us, give me the bundle; Potter give him the bundle, and Aaron put it under his coat. Aaron said to Potter leave me, Potter did not leave him but kept a little behind, he separated and went on the opposite side behind, I kept close to Aaron - they took to King-street, along Cateaton-street, and then to the Old Jewry; they both then kept of the left hand side of the way, and went into the Poultry, they went through the Poultry up to Goodluck's in Cornhill, there they separated at the corner of the Bank buildings, Aaron took Cornhill and Potter the Bank-buildings, I kept close to Aaron all the way, he might have heard my steps if he was not deaf, his eyes were upon me all the way, when Aaron got to the Royal Exchange door he dropped the bundle, and I picked it up.

COURT. Was Potter in sight then - A. I saw him looking at the corner, and when I picked up the bundle he decamped. When Aaron saw that I picked up the bundle he went away quick down one of the alleys by the Exchange. I looked over my shoulder, and saw Potter at the corner of the Bank buildings, he saw me pick up the bundle, and I saw no more of him, he saw me pick it up. I found the bundle heavy, opened it and saw it was metal, which I afterwards found was silver. This is the handkerchief it contains the silver. On the next day I went to Rundle and Bridge, Ludgate-hill, and there I found the owner of the property I delivered it to Mr. Fox, their clerk. On Wednesday I went to their manufactory in Dean-street, I saw the prisoner Potter, I am sure he is the man.

Q. Did you describe the person of Potter before you saw him - A. I did, Potter was sent into a yard where there were other persons; as soon as ever he made his appearance, I said, that is the man, I am positive he is the man I saw with this bundle. Aaron was taken up on the Monday following, I was present when he was apprehended in Crown-court, Wardour-street. Aaron perceived me looking at him he held his head down, when I saw his face, I was sure he was the man I saw with Potter.

PAUL STORR . Q. You are partner in the firm of the manufactory in Dean-street - A. I am; the partners are Paul Storr , Philip Rundle , John Bridge, Edmund Waller Rundle , and William Theed ; our manufactory is in Dean-street, Soho. Potter was in our employ in that manufactory, and had been for four years.

Q. For some time before this transaction was discovered had you missed silver from your manufactory - A. Yes, we had, I had no suspicion of Potter, he was our porter.

Q. Upon this being brought to you by Mr. Smith, this that is produced here to day, were you confident it is your property - A. Yes, I am. The silver was in the possession of Mr. Smith, at Ludgate Hill; I went there and saw it, they are our patterns, we had some patterns peculiar to ourselves, the weight of it is one hundred and twenty seven ounces, the value is upwards of thirty pounds.

Q. These pieces that you have there are theycalled silver cuttings - A. Yes, they are, in the trade; they are our patterns. We never sell them in that state; we melt them down. I have no doubt of all of them being mine.

Q. When Mr. Smith came to you did he describe to you the person that he saw - A. He did, and upon that I sent Potter into the yard; Mr. Smith selected Potter immediately. Potter was taken into custody. When we walked out to his lodgings Foy the officer accompanied us; he confessed that he had stolen a few ounces of silver, which we should find at his lodgings; he denied the silver he was charged with. Afterwards, in consequence of something Potter said, I sent to Mr. Smith, and we had Aaron taken in custody.

- FOX. I am clerk to Rundle and Bridge. I received them cuttings of Mr. Smith.

Potter said nothing in his defence; called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Aaron said nothing in his defence; called eight witnesses, who gave him a good character.

POTTER, GUILTY , aged 58.

Transported for Seven Years ,

AARON, GUILTY , aged 48.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

208. RACHEL WOODTHORPE was indicted for the wilful murder of Joshua Crickett .

SPIRE HOLLOWAY. I am a silk weaver, I live at No. 7, Spital-street, Mile End.

Q. Were you in the habit of going to the deceased Joshua Crickett's house - A. Yes, I have been in the habit of going to him at the Weavers alms-houses about two years and a half, to carry him weekly payments, sometimes twelve shillings, sometimes eight shillings, and latterly four, from Mr. John Holloway of the bank. The prisoner lived with him three months longer than that time, she was his niece.

Q. On Saturday night the 9th of February last did you go to the alms houses - A. In the evening I did, with four shillings as usual. When I knocked at the door the prisoner called who is there? I answered, it is me; the door was not opened at first; after I had been there sometime she opened the door about one third; she stood behind the street door, put her hand out and asked me if it was silver; I told her it was copper, she told me I could not come in, her uncle was unwell and dozing; I walked in, I approached the table; she then went on the other side of the table and endeavoured to conceal somewhat from me, she prevented me from coming round the foot of the bed; she treated me in that manner three times, as I moved she moved, to cover somewhat as I suppose. I then said, if it is unpleasant to you for me to bring the money, Miss Woodthorpe, you must come to my house for it. She had been to my house on the Thursday before, but did not inform my family; I asked her what was the matter with her uncle on the Thursday, she said no matter now. On the next morning my wife received this letter from her, I immediately came home and received this letter; I went there on the Sunday about one o'clock, I took an officer with me; when I entered the room I said to her, you have sent me a letter; she said, here is a copy of it.

(The letter read, signed R. Woodthorpe.)

"MR. HOLLOWAY.

I am sore distressed; I gave my uncle a piece of cake and wine the last thing before I went to bed, I left the knife and piece of cake upon the night stool. In my first sleep he reached the knife, and cut his throat; it was unknown to me; I was awoke by a strong smell, and when I turned myself I found I was all in blood; it was about half past two in the morning, and I all alone. I am much distressed; my mind is hurt in doing for him, and now to have a painful end. I shall thank you come and advise me what to do.

Yours, in great trouble, R. WOODTHORPE.

Mr Holloway; Here is the identical bit of cake that was put on the night stool to cut. I told the prisoner. I believed she had cut her uncle's throat; she said to her friends,

"do you hear what Mr. Holloway says, his words were always like swords and daggers to me." After this I went to the deceased, I found he could not articulate.

Q. What aged man was the deceased - A. Eighty-three, a very infirm man; he was feeble all over his system; he could not walk about for the last two or three months, he was bed ridden. When I went to his bed side his wound had been dressed; I found he was unable to articulate; I asked him if he did this act to signify it by holding up his hand. I am sure he knew me, his eyes were open, he shook hands with me, he did not hold up his hand; I then asked him if his niece did it to signify it by holding up his hand. He did not.

Q. Did you observe the linen on the bed whether there was much blood - A. There was a deal of blood where he laid, but none where Miss Woodthorpe laid.

Q. Was she in the habit of sleeping with her uncle - A. So she informed me, on account of his infirmity. I returned the next day between four and five, before day light, then I examined the bed particularly, I found no blood on the side that Miss Woodthorpe slept; I found a small pen-knife in the bed; I then said to him, Mr. Crickett, did you do this act; he said, no. He could then articulate with sufficient clearness. I asked him if his niece did it; he said, yes: I was astonished when I heard him say so. There was no one present but the nurse that I placed there, her name is Johnson. I let him rest. It was much labour to say yes, he could say no; there was much wind issued from the wound.

Q. Did you see the throat at that time - A. I did not before I went to the magistrate; I asked him again, Mr. Crickett did you do this? he said, no. Did your niece do this? he said, yes. After that I went to the magistrate, the magistrate came there, I was present, the examination took place about two o'clock. On the evening of the same day, between eight and nine o'clock, I went there again, my daughter Boosey and her husband was present. When I entered the room I went to his bedside, I found he was more capable of articulating than I had seen him before; I then said to him, Mr. Crickett, did you cut your own throat; he said, with a peculiar emphasis, no; I then said, did your niece do it, he replied plainer than I had heard him before, yes.

Q.At any of these conversations was the niecepresent - A. When the magistrate was there she was present, but no other time.

Q Do you recollect at any period of his life whether he had been insane - A. In the middle part of his life he had been insane, I understand, and about seventeen years ago I thought I saw a little wildness in consequence of some little misfortunes, it soon went away; from that time to his decease I did not observe the least return of it. I saw the wound almost a day before he died; the windpipe was nearly cut through; some tapinda that he took came through it. I fetched Mr. Fox to dress the wound. The last conversation that I had with him was a few minutes before his death. Mr. Thomas Holloway of Hampton-court was upon a visit, he was another nephew. After he had spoken sometime in prayer, in which Mr. Cricket seemed heartily to join with him, and lifting up his hands and saying, Amen, Thomas Holloway asked him if he cut his own throat; he said, no. He spoke no more, it was his last word. He asked him if his niece did it; he appeared incapable of articulating any more. In twenty-five minutes after that he died.

SARAH PENTON . I live in the Weavers almshouses, my husband is a silk weaver; I live in the opposite corner to which they live.

Q. On the evening of Saturday night did you go to their house - A. Yes, just before Mr. Holloway went there; I knocked at the door, she opened it; she said, Mrs. Penton, you will excuse coming in, my uncle is very poorly in his bowels; I told her what I came about, then I went away. I saw the bed, he seemed to be laying very comfortable.

CATHERINE EAGLE . I am the wife of Henry Eagle , I live at No. 2, King's Head-court, Shoreditch. I washed for the prisoner.

Q. On Saturday night did you carry home any linen in the basket - A. Yes, about half after eight. She asked me why I did not send my linen home by my neighbour Eagle; I told her it was not done; she opened the door a little way and took the basket in; on other occasions when I went I always went in.

SARAH SANDERS . I live next door to the deceased. I have known Mr. Cricket four years, he had been confined to his bed about six months, he had not been able to cut his meat some time; the prisoner told me he could not help himself, she was obliged to assist him like a baby. On the Saturday night, about nine o'clock, I saw her, I believe she did not stop with me ten minutes. I saw her the next morning about eight o'clock, she came to me in great distress; she said, my uncle has cut his throat, about two o'clock in the morning, as nigh as she could guess; she was awoke with a great smell; she went round to her uncle, and said, uncle, what have you been doing; she received no answer, nor had not received any answer up to the time that she was speaking to me; I asked her why she did not call for assistance; her reply was, as her uncle was not dead she did not wish to disturb any body. I called my husband to go for assistance. He did. I went in on the Monday morning, and kneeled down by his bed side, I believe he saw me, I told him my name was Sarah Saunders; I said, Mr. Crickett, I am going to ask you a question, I hope you will resolve it; I said, Mr. Crickett, did you do this act yourself; his reply was, no, quite distinct; I asked him the second time, Mr. Crickett, are you sure that you did not do it yourself; he answered no; I then said, did your niece do it; after resting some time he replied, yes, distinctly. I asked the two persons in the room to give attention, they said the heard it; they are not here.

Mr. Alley. How long had you known the deceased - A. Four years; my husband had known him forty years.

Q. You know that the poor man was afflicted with insanity some years back - do not you know that he some years ago hanged himself - A. I have heard my husband say so.

Q. You say the prisoner came to you in great distress, there was no one to take care of this old man out her - A. No.

COURT. Did she take great care of him - A. So far as I know.

SOPHIA BOOSEY . I am the daughter of Mr. Holloway that has been examined; I live at No. 4, Spital-street. On Sunday morning, about ten o'clock, I saw the prisoner at the deceased's house, before the wound was dressed; Miss Woolthorpe was present and my husband; I uncovered the bed as soon as I went in; the wound appeared to be three inches in length across his throat.

Q. Did you see whether the windpipe was cut - A. Mr. Fox put his finger in as he was laying on his right side; that side of the bed was very bloody, the other side was not.

Q. When you saw him in the morning state what past - A. The prisoner met me at the door and said, I am glad to see you. I then went and uncovered the bed, he seemed to me to be done bleeding. I asked the prisoner how long it had been done; she said she awoke at about half past two in the morning and found herself all in blood; she said to him, uncle, what have you done; he made no reply; she got up and walked about the room till she was very cold, then she lit the fire; I said, why did not you send for assistance before now; she said, she wanted somebody to administer that advice. I asked her what he did it with; she said a table-knife; I said, let me look at it; she gave it me out of the closet; I said, you have wiped it; she said, she had on a flannel waistcoat that he had tied round his body; she had taken the waistcoat off his arms, and wiped the knife on that flannel waistcoat. She then produced me a copy of a letter that she had sent my father telling me that she writ that copy in case any thing should happen. I asked her where she found the knife, because she said her uncle did it, and she supposed he had flung it out of bed; she said she found it afterwards at the foot of the bed, by his side.

Q. How long have you known Mr. Crickett - A. I have known him from my infancy. I was present when Mr. Thomas Holloway and Mr. Lemaire put questions to him about half an hour before he died. I heard him say on the Wednesday that he did not do it. Mr. Holloway was engaged in prayer by the side of the bed, and after he had done prayer he said, Mr. Crickett, did you cut your own throat; he said, no. It was the last word he said.

RICHARD WILSON . I am an officer of Worship-street office. I searched at the deceased's house for ahandkerchief that the prisoner said was sprinkled with blood, and after wards said it was deluged in blood. I found the handkerchief in the drawer, it was pinned up in a night cap; it is sprinkled with a little blood just there.

SAMUEL LEMAIRE . I am a beadle of the weaver's company, I have known Mr. Crickett ever since I could remember, and I have known the prisoner ever since she came to live with her uncle.

Q. How lately have you been at Mr. Crickett's house - A. About three months ago, he was up stairs. I saw him about six months ago, by his fire side.

Q. Did you see him on Sunday the 10th - A. I did not; I saw him on the Monday at eleven o'clock.

Q. Who was present when you saw him - A The nurse, Sarah Johnson , he was then in a doze. At one o'clock I went to the house again; I saw him then, and conversed with him; I sat down by his bed-side. I said Mr. Crickett, I am Mr. Lemaire's son, your old acquaintance; he looked up, and put out his hand; I said, Mr. Crickett, did you do it yourself, he drawed his hands together, and said, no; he then put his hands together, his lips muttered; what he said I could not understand; he appeared to me to be in devotion, he appeared then rather saint; I suppose it was two minutes before I put another question to him, I then said, who did do it Mr. Crickett; he made no reply; I said, did your niece do it, Mr. Crickett; at that time his hands laid upon the sheet, he raised his hand and put it to his throat, but did not speak; I put the same question to him three times, every time he repeated the same motion by putting his hand to his throat, but did not speak. I know the prisoner was at Worship-street Office, I went there, and the magistrate came with me to the dying man's apartment. At seven o'clock in the evening, on the same day, I went to Mr. Crickett's house, I kneeled down by the bedside, he appeared to me to be more revived than when I had seen him in the middle of the day; I put my hand on his shoulder, he looked at me, I said my name is Lemaire. Did you do this rash act yourself, Mr. Crickett; he said, no, and that strong. Did you do it yourself, Mr. Crickett - no. At that time the air issued through the aperture of the windpipe, and he appeared saint, I gave him some wine, it issued out of his windpipe. I said as your dissolution is issuing, I hope you are prepared for where you are going; he turned his head upon the pillow and said, no; Mr. Crickett are you sure that your niece did it; he said, yes. Mr. Crickett are you sure that you did not do it yourself? no. Are you sure that your niece did it? Yes. They are the last words I heard him utter.

Mr. Alley. During the time that you have known Mr. Crickett do you know of your own knowledge of his being deranged - A. Yes; I know of his being confined in Bedlam, the first time 1777 or 78. I was then but young. I cannot say how long he was confined; he afterwards came out, he was restored to his faculties; in 1785 or 86 he was deranged again; after that I have heard that he was deranged a third time.

Q. Have you ever observed any appearance of derangement about him lately - A. No, but a great dissatisfaction about him, his salary being so small.

SAMUEL FOX. I am a surgeon, I live in Bishopgate-street. On Sunday the 10th I went to the deceased about ten o'clock in the morning, I found a wound across the throat, from two to three inches in length, and about one in depth; the windpipe was partly divided. I asked the deceased if he cut his throat himself; he said no. I asked him if his ce cut it, he made no reply to that. I afterwards dressed it; he appeared to have last a vast deal of blood. I have known him about eighteen months and frequently attended him; I have seen a mental variance in his understanding I never saw him of his bed for the time I knew him; I should suppose he was bed ridden.

Q. From the infirm state he was in, he being bed ridden, was he capable of inflicting that wound himself - A. I should think not. In insanity I should; think he might possess more energy at that time; that wound was the cause of his death.

Mr. Alley A momentary fit of insanity produces momentary strength - A. No doubt of it.

Q. And a man more advanced in life is more liable to it at that time - A. Certainly The large arteries were not cut, if they had been cut he would have bled to death; the smaller ones might stop The wound might be inflicted on the Saturday before; what time it is impossible for me to state.

JOSEPH MOSER . Q. You are a magistrate - is that the examination of the deceased - A.It is. It was taken by me in the presence of the prisoner.

" Middlesex to wit, the examination of Joshua Crickett, taken by me, Joseph Moser, in the presence of Rachel Woodthorpe. February 11th, 1811. The said examinant being asked by me in presence of the prisoner if he did this, signs being made to him to signify his giving himself the wound in the throat under which he now labours, distinctly said, no. This question was repeated by Samuel Lemaire ; he distinctly answered, no. The said Samuel Lemaire asked the said Joshua if his niece did it, he said first, no; twice (upon the question being repeated) he answered distinctly, yes.

Q. to Mr. Holloway. Did you hear her state what expectation she had - A. I did, on Saturday the 25th of January. She asked me to go to ask Mr. Holloway of the bank to let her have twenty pounds; she said she was very much embarrassed, she wished to go into the country and leave her uncle; I asked Mr. Holloway if he would let her have twenty pound; he said no; I returned the same evening and acquainted her with Mr. Holloway's decision. She said she did not know what she should do; I told her if she was distressed it was a pity but what she should go in the country, and leave her uncle at once, we would take care of him. In our conversation I proposed his going into St. Bride's workhouse. I told her as he had fifteen shillings and nine-pence coming in he would be very comfortable there; Miss Woodthorpe seemed much pleased, and said that exactly met her idea. I then said to her, remember Miss Woodthorpe you will not have the goods; your uncle told me twenty years ago that he had willed them to Mr. Holloway of Hampton-court, and Mr. Holloway of the Bank. She then said, I do not know what I am to do now, Mr. Holloway will not let me have twenty pound, and I am not to have the goods; what am I to do, I cannotgo into the country.

Prisoner's Defence. Whenever I met that gentleman he struck a terror to my heart, and my uncle said repeatedly the last week or two, never let him him, come nigh me; he had agitated him and put him in nine months ago, by talking of carrying him to St. Bride's workhouse.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr justice Heath.

209. ROBERT SALMON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of December , a warrant for the payment of 20 l. a bill of exchange, value 20 l. and a promissory note for the payment of one pound, and one other promissory note for the payment of 1 l. the property of Richard Bryant and William Bryant .

JOHN JENNINGS. I am a clerk to Richard Bryant and William Bryant , they keep a bank at Newmarket. On the 11th of December I made up this parcel that was lost, it contained country and bank notes to the amount of eleven hundred and six pounds ten shillings, in notes and bills.

Q. Was that one of the bills that you put in the parcel - A. It was; it is a check for twenty pound for Fry and Sons.

Q. Look at these three one pound notes, and tell me whether you put them up in the parcel - A. They were in the same parcel with the twenty pound check; they are three one pound notes of the Clare bank. When I made up the parcel I carried it to the coachman's house, between ten and eleven at night, I directed the parcel to Mrs. Stephenson and Company, bankers, 69, Lombard-street, London. I delivered the parcel to Ann Clark , the coachman's wife. It is a coach that comes through Newmarket, the Norwich Expedition.

ANN CLARK . My husband is coachman of the Norwich Expedition; I received the parcel the last witness has spoken off; I gave it to my husband, he took it.

SAMUEL CLARK . I drive the Norwich Expedition coach. On the 11th of December I received a parcel of my wife, I put it in the foreseat of the forebody of the coach; it is a double bodied coach; in the forebody of the coach there were four females and one man passenger, I cannot speak to any of them. I drive the coach from Newmarket to London.

Mr. Knapp. Did the same passengers come from Newmarket the whole of the way to London - A. No, a lady got out at Woodford, a gentleman got out at Clapton, and another got out before we came to London.

Q. Now I would ask you from the time that you took in the parcel till the time you came to London had you looked to see whether the parcel was safe - A. No, I did not examine the forebody until I got to London; I am not certain whether the prisoner was one of the passenger or not.

JOHN LLOYD . I am the guard to this coach.

Q. Was there any circumstance that made you notice any person - A. Only a person having a handkerchief, half over his face in the forebody; he got out at Clapton. I do not know the prisoner.

WILLIAM SALTER. I am book-keeper at the Bull Inn, Bishopsgate-street. On the 12th of December I took a parcel out of the Norwich Expedition for Mr. Stephenson. I took it to John Smith , he carried it directly to Mr. Stephenson.

JOHN SMITH . Q. Did you receive a parcel of the last witness to take to Mr. Stephenson - A.Yes, I took it there, and saw it opened, and there papers were found in it.

JOSEPH TOLAND. Q. I believe you were present when the parcel was opened at Messrs. Stephensons - A. Yes, this is the parcel, it was brought by that lad; the parce contained no notes, only that paper and the parcel was not directed, but had some seals upon it.

Q. to Salter. You say you took out a brown paper parcel, and gave it to Smith; were there any directions on that parcel - A. No.

Q. How came you to send it to Mr. Stephenson's - A. I asked the coachman if there was any parcel for Messrs. Stephenson, he said, yes, and I took that.

Q. to Clark. Did you look at the parcel that your wife gave to you to see the direction - A. No, I had no time; I only took the parcel and put in the coach.

Q. Was there any memorandum taken of it - A. None, it never was in the way-bill, it was in my custody; as he is the proprietor of the coach I should have put it in my pocket if I could conveniently. They are never booked when they come to my house; I am sure I put it in the coach.

Q. Did you stop at all in London - A. Yes, we just pulled up at the Bull in Bishopgate-street, I was by my horses, one gentleman got out there I believe. When the book-keeper took the parcel out of the coach at the Bull; it appeared to me to be the same size that was delivered me by my wife.

Q. How long did the coach stop at the Bull - A. About ten minutes; I saw Salter come out immediately almost for the parcel; I was standing by my horses with my face to the coach.

JOSEPH COX . I am a ticket porter, I ply at the Change. In December, I cannot ascertain the day of the month; I recollect a person applying to me to get a note cashed at the bankers. I verily believe the prisoner to be the person. I was on my stand at the Bank Buildings. I believe the prisoner to be the person, he put a paper in my hand, and enquired for St. Mildred's Court, I told him he had passed it; he took a twenty pound note out, and asked me to get two ten pound notes for the twenty pound. And he not asking my name, nor taking any notice of my number, I made a remark upon him. This is the check; I took the check of him; I said, I would do it; I presented it at Mr. Fry's banking-house, they gave me two ten pounds for it; I told them the circumstance that I had remarked; they took my name, and where I plyed; I returned with the two ten pound notes, and received a shilling of the prisoner, I believe; I returned the two ten pound notes to theman who sent me. The prisoner said he was waiting for his master, he should have gone by rights himself, but he was afraid of missing his master. I believe upon my oath that the prisoner was the man.

- TILMORE. I am clerk to Messrs. Fry and company, Bankers, St. Mildred's-court.

Q. Do you recollect the last witness coming to their shop - A. I do, that is the draft I paid it on the 13th of December, I paid two ten pound notes in consequence of what Cox said, at his request, I took his address.

JOHN CHAMPION. I am clerk in the house of Messrs. Newton, Birchin-lane. On Saturday the 5th of January the prisoner brought six one pound notes of the Clare bank.

Q. Look at these three, and tell me whether these are three of the six that were tended for payment - A. They are the same number, and in every other respect the same, and the same value, they have been out of my possession, the other three I paid.

Q. How came you to take the number of these three - A. On account of the notice that we had at our office, that four one pound notes were included in that parcel, and three of those produced by the prisoner to me were three of those four notes; I gave to Mr. Newton the three notes that I had of the prisoner that I suspected.

JOHN NEWTON. Q. I wish to ask you whether that witness gave you these three notes - A. He gave me six notes, I took them to Mr. Stephenson, I have no personal knowledge that they are the three notes; I took the six, and left them at Mr. Stephenson's.

Q. Was that before the lad took a memorandum - A. I apprehend it was, I gave them to Mr. Tolman.

- TOLMAN. Q. Did you receive these notes along with others - A. If I did, I should not know them. I do not know that I received them at all.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

210. THOMAS BLACKGROVE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 31st of January , one hundred and fifty pounds weight of paper, value 20 s. the property of Duke Colson , John Henry Perry , and Paul Mallin .

SECOND COUNT for like offence, only varying the manner of charging it.

WILLIAM SMITH. I am clerk to the prosecutors, Duke Colson, John Henry Perry , and Paul Mallin, the prisoner has been in their employ about nine months.

Q. Had a quantity of books prior to the year ninety been ordered to be burnt - A. From the year forty to ninety were ordered to be burnt, none of the books since were ordered to be burnt. In consequence of information, I went to the house of Needham and Co. cheesemongers in the Borough, I there saw a quantity of paper which belonged to the prosecutors.

JOHN HONEYBALL . I am shopman to Messieurs Needham and Co. cheesemongers. The prisoner first came to our shop in December, he said, do you buy waste paper. I answered yes, if it was clean, I would give him four pence a pound for it, he said he was clearing out an old warehouse, where a large quantity of waste paper lay which was consigned to be burnt, he came the next day with four or five books, which we purchased at four pence per pound at different times he sold to me from a hundred weight to an hundred weight and a quarter. I delivered up the whole that I purchased.

Smith. I have looked the books over, they are the property of Messrs. Colson and company, and those from the year 1790 to 1800 were deposited in a chest. I told the prisoner those in the chest, were not to be destroyed.

PAUL MALLIN . Q. You are one of the partners in this firm - A. I am.

Q. Upon the prisoner being apprehended did you signify for what he was taken - A. Certainly; he at first denied the fact, and then he confessed to have taken a few. They are our property. I should imagine the weight he took to be five hundred pounds and they are as late as 1806.

Prisoner's Defence. I readily acknowledge here, as I did before the Lord Mayor. I disposed of some as waste paper. I did not think it was a serious offence because my master ordered me to burn a considerable number of papers and books in the warehouse yard, I certainly should have asked my employer's leave. I throw myself upon the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY aged 49.

Confined Three Months in Newgate , and Whipped in Jail .

London Jury before Mr. Recorder.

211. SARAH BLACKNEY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 11th of February , twenty-four yards of printed cotton, value 1 l. the property of Thomas Kirkpatrick privately in his shop .

THOMAS KIRKPATRICK I am a linen draper , No. 74, Gracechurch-street . I only know the goods are mine.

JOHN FORRESTER . I am an officer. On February the 9th, in the evening between six and seven, I stood in Aldgate High-street. I saw the prisoner and her son in company together, as she passed by she looked very hard at me; I had suspicion; I followed her and she looked back two or three times, and just as I got by her; I turned round upon my heel she delivered a parcel to her son, her son ran to the other side of the way; I crossed over and stopped him; he cried out for his mother. I asked him what he had got, he said he did not steal it his mother stole it, I took hold of him and going to the watchhouse, I delivered him up to my brother officer. I pursued the mother, and found her in a wine vaults, in Petticoat lane, I told her I had taken her boy, he was crying for her, she said she had no boy except what was in the workhouse, when I took her to the watchhouse, the boy owned her as his mother, she said she knew nothing about it. The boy told me he would shew me where it was taken from; I went with the boy to Mr. Kirkpatrick's, in Gracechurch-street; the boy shewed me the pile where his mother took it from; the boy being under nine years of age was discharged. This is the piece of print.

Q. to prosecutor. Is that your property - A. It is; I had twelve pieces of the same sort only the day before; the mark is cut off; I am satisfied it is my own. I would not swear that it was.

NOT GUILTY ,

London Jury before Mr. Recorder.

212. LAWRENCE JOTTA , and JOSEF FREDERICO CARDOSA were indicted for that they, in and upon James Starling , a subject of our Lord the King, feloniously did make an assault, and with a certain sharp instrument did stab and cut the said James Starling , in and upon his back, with intent to kill and murder him .

SECOND COUNT - for like offence, with intent to disable him.

THIRD COUNT - for like offence, stating the intent to do him some grievous bodily harm.

Mr. Shelton, Q. to the prisoners. Are you desirous of being tried by a jury of half foreigners and half English, or a jury of all English. - A. Half foreigners and half English.

Names of the Jury.

Thomas Oliver ,

John Ficken ,

Thomas Fisher ,

Michael Otto ,

Paul Johnson ,

William Gibbs Roberts ,

Joseph Francisco ,

Joseph Hurdley ,

John Warren ,

John King ,

James Smith ,

John Harlowe ,

The Court allowed the prisoners an interpreter.

JAMES STARLING . I am an apprentice to Thomas Wragg , I belong to the Ship Alexander, she is in the coal trade. On Sunday evening, the 23d of December , between five and six o'clock in the afternoon, I went into the Duke of York public-house, Shadwell , it was dark, John Mathers and David Brown were in company with me, and no other person, only us three, we went in there to see some of our companions, we expected to find them there.

Q. What companions were they. - A. Servants of ships, one belonging to the Alexander, and the other the Abercorn.

Q. Were they in the coal trade. - A. Yes, when I went into the public-house, I seated myself in the North Country box, the two prisoners were sitting there, and two girls, nobody else with them.

Q. Was it a large box. - A. No, it would hold five or six people.

Q. Did you sit down in the box. - A. Yes, John Mather shoved me into the box to make room for him, I had just sat down, and he shoved me on to make room for himself, this tall man, Jotta, struck me when I was shoved over him.

Q. You were shoved against him were you. - A. Yes, my companion shoved me against him.

Q. What did Jotta do to you then. - A. He knocked me out of the box with both his hands.

Q. Did he do it violently or gently. - A. Violently, he set both his hands against my back, and shoved me out, I asked him what he did that for, he said I had no business there; the landlord of the house came and took me away to another box.

Q. Were you unwilling to go away. - A. No, the house was full, we could not get a seat any where, we went into a box called the American box.

Q. You all three went there. - A. Yes, we staid there about a quarter of an hour, and had a pot of beer, we came out then, to go on board a ship.

Q. How many of you. - A. All three, we went to the door in order to go away, we observed these two men were standing at the door with knives in their hands, Samuel Brown went out first, he passed Cardosa, and went into the street, Cardosa, the little man, made a strike at him with a knife.

Q. What did he follow him in the street. - A. Yes.

Q. You saw that, did you. - A. Yes.

Q. Did he hit Brown with the knife. - A. No, he struck at him with a knife, but missed him, Brown called for assistance of some of his shipmates, he said shipmates, I went towards him and asked him what was the matter with him, Cardosa met me as I was going to him.

Q. Then Cardosa was between you and Brown. - A. Yes.

Q. Did he turn back to meet you. - A. No, he turned round, he was going towards the public-house door, he had a knife in his left hand, he struck me in the back here.

Q. Were you much hurt. - A. No.

Q. Did you perceive the knife in his hand. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you bleed. - A. Yes, I felt the blood run down my back.

Q. Did you perceive the knife in his hand before he struck you. - A. Yes.

Q. What sort of a knife was it. - A. I cannot exactly say, I saw the knife shine by the light of the window.

Q. What provocation had you given him. - A. Nothing but going into that box.

Q. Did you strike either of them in the box. - A. No, I did not, nor my companions.

Q. Nor insult them in any way did you. - A. No.

Q. Did you speak to them while you were in the American box. - A. No.

Q. What was the time from your going into that box, and your receiving the blow. - A. It might be more than half an hour.

Jotta, Q. Did not you break my glass of beer, and throw the beer down. - A. No.

Q. You broke my pipe, and behaved indecent to the women. - A. I did not.

Q. And when the women screamed he behaved so indecent the landlord came and took him out. - A. The women did not scream.

Court. How came the landlord to take you away. - A. He came with a pot of beer.

Q. Are you sure that it was Cardosa that cut you. - A. Yes, that is the man.

JOHN KAY . I am a sailor, I belong to the Happy Return.

Q. Were you in this public house on this Sunday night. - A. Yes, I went in about four o'clock in the afternoon.

Q. While you were sitting there did you see Brown, Mather, and Starling come in. - A. I did not hear them come in, I did not hear the row begin, I did not hear any words, the two prisoners were sitting in the box all the afternoon, with two women alongside of them, when the two lads, Starling and James Brown got out of the box, they came and asked me to drink with them.

Q. What before they got into the other box. - A. Yes, I was sitting by the fire; when the beer was outthey asked me if I was going on board with them, I told them to go out, I would go out after them.

Q. Did they sit down in the American box. - A. Yes, till the beer was out. The three lads went out, and the two prisoners went out, and I after them, the little one, Cardosa, was standing in the street, the other was standing at the door, the lads were all in the street, and as I was going out of the door, the tall one, Jotta, made a strike at me with a round pointed knife twice, he missed me, the knife rubbed my arm; then Cardosa made a strike at Brown, he sung out for assistance.

Q. Did he hit him. - A. No, he missed him, James Starling asked Brown what was the matter, then Cardosa ran up to him, and cut him with a knife, or a sharp instrument, I cannot say which.

Q. In what part of his body. - A. In his back.

Q. Did it enter into his back, through his clothes. - A. Yes.

Q. You saw that did you. - A. Yes, Starling when he was struck, cried out,

"Lord have mercy upon me."

Q. Did you observe whether he bled. - A. Yes, he put his hand back, and his hand was all over blood; I saw his hand bloody.

Q. Where did the two prisoners go after that. - A. They went into the public house again, I took Starling to the doctor's, with another man; the other lads went for the officer.

Q. Did the boy, or any of them give any provocation. - A. Not that I heard, I heard no row.

Q. You did not see the boy go into the North Country box, did you - A. No.

Q. You saw no blow struck did you. - A. No, only that blow with the knife in the street.

Jotta. He says he was sitting by the fire, there was no fire in the tap room.

MARY ANN MAY. Q. Were you at this public house on this day, at the time this happened. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see the lads come in. - A. No, I did not, I was sitting in the Swedish box, next to the two prisoners.

Q. Did you see Starling come to the North Country box. - A. I did.

Q. Who was sitting in the North Country box when they came. - A. The two prisoners and two girls, Starling sat down, the tall prisoner shoved him away with his elbow, he said he should not come there, he said he had as much right to sit there as they had, then the lad went away, when he found the man wrangle, he left him and went away.

Q. Who was with Starling. - A. I saw nobody with him, he went over to the box in the corner, I believe he had some beer.

Q. Is that called the American box. - A. Yes, I saw nor heard nothing afterwards, until a quarter of an hour, word was brought in the young lad was stabbed.

Q. Did you see or hear any thing while the boy was gone to the American box. - A. No, I did not.

Q. Do you know whether either of the prisoners had a knife. - A. The tall one had a knife, and said if he did not know Portuguese fashion he should learn it of him; he unbuttoned his shirt sleeve, and shewed the knife handle, the point was up, he said if the lad took that knife from him, he had another in his pocket.

Q. You did not see the lads go out of door, did you. - A. No, I did not see him any more until he was carried to the doctor's, I did not see him stabbed.

Q. Did the prisoners go out of the house. - A. I did not know untill after they had stabbed him; they came into the house again.

Q. Then they had been out. - A. Yes.

ROBERT BROWN . Q. You are a police officer. - A. Yes, on the 23d of December last, in consequence of information I went to the Duke of York public house, I found the two prisoners sitting together in the box, there were several people round them, I suppose there might be fifty or sixty in the room, I took them in custody.

Q. Did you perceive any blood on either of them. - A. On Cardosa, this is the jacket that he had on, there are several sprinkles of blood, I took the jacket from him after we took him down to the house, where we locked them up, there are several spots of blood about in different parts, and on the right hand pocket, the lining of it, there are several spots of blood, three or four, I found no knife upon him, I searched Jotta, in my presence this knife was taken out of his pocket. I saw Starling that night, he had been to one doctor, then the other lads brought him down to the place where these men were, they brought him upon their back, and sat him down on the top of the table in the parlour, I seeing a deal of blood about him, I sent for a coach and took him to the London hospital, he was there about five weeks and two days, he came to the office only one day before the five weeks and two days.

Q. to Starling. How long were you in the hospital. - A. Five weeks and two days.

Jury Q. to Brown. Was there any fire in the taproom. - A. There was.

RICHARD DAVIS . I am a pupil in the London hospital, I saw Starling that night, he was brought to the hospital, I examined the wound, it was on his back, about the region of the right kidney.

Q. Was it a dangerous wound. - A. No, not very dangerous, it was a punctured wound, it was from two to three inches in length, it had not penetrated the kidney.

Q. Could you judge what it had been done with. - A. With a knife, or cutting instrument; he was five weeks and two days under my care.

Jury. Could Jotta speak English. - A. Yes, he said in broken English, if he did not understand Portuguese fashion, by G-d he would teach it him.

Jotta's Defence. We were sitting at the public house and another Spaniard was with us, three men and two women; there were five of them came in, they all wanted to sit down, we had no objection for two, there was not room enough for all five, the wounded man went to the women and lifted up their clothes, the women screamed, and then the landlord came and took him away, there were about five of them, this young man challenged us if we were men, to come out and fight, and when he went out, the other Spaniard that was with us, he went out and stabbed this young man in the back, and when I saw that, I ran into the public house, had I been guiltyI would have run away, instead of that I went in the house and sat down.

Cardosa's Defence. This man insulted me, ill-treated the women, and challenged us to fight, it was the other Spaniard that stabbed the young man.

JOTTA GUILTY , DEATH , aged 28.

CARDOSA GUILTY , DEATH , aged 22.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood .

213. MARY SARGIN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 16th of January , five shifts, value 7 s. four aprons, value 3 s. four sheets, value 10 s. three pillow-cases value 3 s. a pair of breeches, value 4 s. two gowns, value 8 s. a shirt, value 5 s. six cups and saucers, value 5 s. two basons, value 1 s. a milk pot, value 6 d. four petticoats, value 5 s. a carpet, value 6 d. a tablecloth, value 1 s. 6 d. a waistcoat, value 3 s. a bed-gown, value 1 s. 6 d. a necklace, value 4 d. a half shawl, value 4 d. a book, value 1 s. 6 d. three silver teaspoons, value 5 s. a gold ring, value 1 s. 6 d. a pair of shoes, value 2 s. and a thimble, value 9 d. the property of William Mayberry , in the dwelling-house of William Johnson .

WILLIAM MAYBERRY . I live in Kingsgate Street, Bloomsbury , I am a lodger, William Johnson keeps the house, and lives in it. The prisoner lived on the same floor, in another room, my daughter can speak to the things.

ELIZABETH MAYBERRY . I am the daughter of the last witness.

Q. When did you miss any of these articles. - A. In the Christmas week, I went to the drawer for a particular article, I moved my trunk, I found it was loose, I left it locked, I looked in it, and missed my mother's ring, and three tea spoons, and all the articles mentioned in the indictment, I had seen some of the articles about a fortnight before.

JAMES JOSEPH JONES . I live with Chandler and Benton, pawnbrokers, Holborn.

Q. Have you got any articles here that the prisoner pawned with you. - A. Yes, all of them, she pawned them at different times.

Q. I suppose there is no one article of the value of forty shillings. - A. No, I have fourteen tickets, the first were pawned in November, and the last on the 15th of January.

BENJAMIN HUNTS . I am a pawnbroker, 135 High Holborn, I know the prisoner, she has pawned things with me sixteen times, the first the 20th of November, and the last 28th of December.

WILLIAM BLACKMAN . Elizabeth Mayberry came to Bow Street office for a warrant, I and Limbrick went and searched the prisoner's room, in her box I found a bag of duplicates, there were nineteen duplicates at Mr. Chandler's, and sixteen of the other pawnbroker's. When I took them out of the box, she said,

"give them to me, they are not my own."

Q. to Jones. Look at these duplicates. - A. Fifteen of the duplicates correspond to the things I produce, and are the duplicates I gave to the prisoner.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. It was necessity and want.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY, aged 30, of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Confined Fourteen Days in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

214. SAMUEL EDWARDS was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Leland , about the hour of seven at night, on the 17th of January , and stealing a looking glass, value 20 s. his property .

WILLIAM LELAND . I am a labourer in the East India Company warehouse, I live at No. 13, Montague Court, in the parish of St. Botolph, Bishopgate . On Sunday the 17th of January, about half past four in the afternoon, I left my house, the looking glass was in the parlour on the ground floor, the window comes into the court.

MARIA LELAND . I am the daughter of the last witness. We were in the kitchen at tea, we heard a noise in the parlour, we went up stairs and opened the street door, we found the parlour sash throwed open, the curtains undrawn, and the glass was gone.

Q. Which way did they come into the room. - A. Through the window.

Q. Did you see the window after your husband. - A. Yes, the window was shut down, but not fastened.

WILLIAM FRICKER . I am a musician, I lodge with William Leland . I was down stairs at tea with Mrs. Leland and daughter about half past six, I heard a noise in the parlour as if some one had jumped in. I went up stairs, I found the parlour window throwed open, and the glass gone.

ELEANOR LELAND . I am the wife of William Leland , we were at tea in the kitchen. At half past six, or somewhere thereabouts, we heard a noise over head, in the parlour, we went up stairs and opened the street door, we saw the sash throwed up, and the curtain drawed of one side, and the glass was gone.

Q. Why do you accuse the prisoner of taking it. - A. It was found upon him by Mr. Sapwell.

THOMAS SAPWELL . I am an officer. On Sunday night, about half past six, I was in Bishopgate Street, I met the prisoner with this glass under his arm, I asked him what he had got, he told me a glass, he was going to get it new framed, I told him I thought it very odd to get a glass framed of a Sunday night, I took him into a house, I searched him, and found a crow and two picklock keys, and two or three matches upon him, I secured him and took him to the Compter. The prosecutor applied to me the same night, saying that he had been robbed of a glass, I never let him see the glass till he came before the Lord Mayor, there he described the glass, and claimed it as his property. Here is a nail with which the glass was fastened, I found it on the glass.

Q. How far is this court from where you stopped the prisoner. - A. About fifty yards.

Prosecutrix. I know the glass to be my husband's property, we have had it between twenty and thirty years.

Prisoner's Defence. On Sunday I was out drinking all day, on my coming home at night, I met a man whom I formerly knew, he asked me if I would take a few things home with me, which was a glass, twokeys, and a piece of iron about a foot long, he said he was going to have his things seized for rent, I consented, and was stopped by the officer and sent to the Compter. This is the first time I ever was tried, I am innocent of what I am charged with.

GUILTY , DEATH , aged 28.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

215. THOMAS STEWARD was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Newberry , about the hour of five in the afternoon of the 5th of February , and stealing therein, a piece of silk handkerchiefs, containing seven handkerchiefs, value 2 l. 15 s. his property.

JOHN JONES . I am shopman to Thomas Newberry , linen draper , in Fleet Street . On Tuesday the 5th of February, between five and six, I was standing in the shop, I observed a person go by whom I knew to be the person that had broken the window that day week, I said to a young man standing by, that I knew it to be the person that had broken the window that day week, that I had no doubt but they were then about it. On my standing in the shop, I saw a person in a white apron before the window, and I heard the window crack, and when I got nearer the window, I saw another person standing looking in at the door, whom I had also seen on the Tuesday before breaking the window, I then withdrew behind some packs of goods which were in the shop, and as soon as I saw the men go away I ran over the packs to the window, then I observed a person put a hand through a hole which had been made in the glass, and take a piece of handkerchiefs out, I cannot positively swear to the prisoner's face, it was rather dark, but his person and manner was seemingly the same, I ran out of the door, I saw the prisoner standing two yards from the window, putting something under his coat. After the window had been cut the Tuesday before, we took the precaution to put a string to the handkerchiefs, which string had gone out of the window. I saw a string hanging down under his coat, there were two others standing there with him, I believe there were two, one I am sure of, and seeing the string hang in front of his coat, I went in the front of him, I knew him to be the same man that took them out of the window, I took hold of him by the collar, he then immediately took them from under his coat and threw them on the ground, and asked me what I wanted with him, I told him that I was sure that he had taken the handkerchiefs out of the window, he immediately then pointed to the handkerchiefs on the ground, and desired a person to take them up, and in pointing to the handkerchiefs on the ground, the prisoner sprang from me, and ran away, I pursued him, I collared him again after he had ran about a dozen yards, my next door neighbour came to my help, we brought him in, the constable was then sent for, he was then committed to his custody.

Prisoner. Q. Will you swear that I did take the handkerchiefs out of the window. - A. Yes, I can from your person.

WILLIAM MARCH . I am the beadle of the ward, I was sent for after he was taken in custody, I had been watching the best part of the week, but I happened not to be there that night.

Q. Did you see this man before. - A. I cannot positively say that I saw him, there were three of them generally in company.

JAMES BENBOW. I am an apprentice to Mr. Newberry, I saw the prisoner at the bar throw the handkerchief out of his hand.

Jones. I know the handkerchiefs to be my master's property.

ROBERT NEWBERRY . I picked the handkerchief up off the ground, the first I saw was a man standing at the window where the glass was cracked, with a white apron on, like as the prisoner had on when he was taken.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming past this shop, I saw this gentleman run out, there were two men stooping, he said I had his handkerchief, I never had them, there were handkerchiefs laying on the ground.

THOMAS NEWBERRY . What parish is your house in. - A. St. Dunstans in the West, I live there with my family, I have no partner.

GUILTY , DEATH , aged 20.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

216. WILLIAM HENRY DAVIES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of January , a silk handkerchief, value 5 s. the property of Samuel Johnson , from his person .

SAMUEL JOHNSON . I am a printer's press maker . On Sunday the 20th of January, in the afternoon, I was passing down Shoe Lane , the prisoner and another man were standing talking together, the prisoner was standing off the pavement, I passed between them, and as I passed St. Andrew's church, the witness asked me if I had lost any thing, I clapped my hand to my pocket, I said I had, he said the man I passed by took it out of my pocket. We met the prisoner coming up Holborn Hill, I followed the prisoner and spoke to him, he said

"come my friend I will take hold of your arm." We went to the White Hart, towards Giltspur Street Compter, the witness fetched a constable, nothing was found on the prisoner.

JAMES PAXTON . On the 30th of January, about a quarter before three, I was standing at the back of St. Andrew's church, looking over the rails into Shoe Lane, I saw the prisoner and another man standing together, the prisoner stood with his face towards me, and the man with him with his back to the wall, I saw Mr. Johnson pass between them, they followed the prosecutor, and the prisoner took the handkerchief out of his pocket, I went round the church and told Mr. Johnson of it, I am certain he is the man. We followed the two men from the corner of Shoe Lane to Eagle and Child Alley, there they parted, the prisoner went down the alley, we followed in Fleet Market, we asked him if he had not got the handkerchief, he said he had not, he would walk with us to any house and settle it, I went with the prisoner and Mr. Johnson to a public-house, a constable searched him and found nothing, I am certain the prisoner is the person.

Prisoner's Defence. With respect to my being in Shoe Lane, I deny it entirely, I did not like a mob about me, I said I would go any where with them.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

217. THOMAS CHURTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of February , twelve ounces weight of tea, value 2 s. 6 d. the property of the united company of merchants trading to the East Indies .

JOHN LINES . I am in the employ of the East India Company, I am a commodore, the prisoner was a labourer in the same warehouse. On the 19th of February he was employed in the warehouse Jewry Street , that warehouse contained tea.

Q. In what state were the chests. - A. The lids were opened for shew. In consequence of information I watched the prisoner, towards the close of the day I observed him go into a room by himself, after the windows were shut, he staid there a minute or two, he returned towards me again, he went into the room again, the second time he staid there a short time, when he was coming towards me I perceived him rubbing his hands towards the waistband of his breeches, I then went to the Elder, and told him I had reason to believe he had tea about him, I made it known to Mr. Jones; the warehouse keeper. The bell was ringing, the prisoner was coming down stairs, I had Mr. Brooks with me, I called the prisoner of one side, he followed me into the store room, I said,

"Churton, I have reason to believe you have some tea about you," he said, he had not, I began to unbutton the waistband of his breeches, there I saw this tea in this bag, the bag was tied to his waistband as a sob, and fastened behind, I took the tea out of the bag, this is the tea, there is twelve ounces of it.

Q. Were there tea of this description in the warehouse where this man was working. - A. There was, Mr. Sannders asked the prisoner how long he had been at this work, he said no great while.

Q. How long has the prisoner been at work there. - A. About twenty years.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 56.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

218. CHARLES WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of February , a saddle, value 3 l. 3 s. the property of James Adams .

- CLAXTON. I am a servant to Mr. James Adams , 15, Berkley Square , I missed the saddle out of the stable, on the 5th of February between seven and eight in the morning.

PETER WORSLEY . I am a sadler, I live in South Audley Street, I made this saddle for Mr. Adams, and know it to be his property.

JAMES KEENE . I bought the saddle on the 5th of February of Williams the prisoner, at the Queen's Head, Dark-house Lane, between the hours of one and two o'clock in the morning, I gave him a pound note, and some liquor, I never saw him before, he said he was distressed for money, or else I should not have bought it; I belong to a west country barge, we were stopped at the top of the lane with this saddle, they put us in the compter.

EDWARD KEENE . I was there when my brother bought the saddle at the Queen's Head, Dark-house Lane the prisoner said his brother sent the saddle down by a coach to the White Horse Cellar, he did not say where it was sent from, he said he wanted money that was the reason he sold it, my brother gave him a pound note and some liquor.

GEORGE SMITH . I am a patrol of Billingsgate ward. On the 5th of February last, about half past one I was called to a house in Dark house lane, there were some drunken people in the house, I turned them our into the lane, I met James and Edward Keene , and William Healey , a servant of theirs, I saw James Keene with the saddle, I asked him how he came by it, he told me he had just bought it at the Queen's Head, of Charles Williams , Edward Keene said they had given a pound note for it, and some liquor, I took them into custody; I went to the Queen's Head, and saw Charles Williams a bed and asleep, after we had taken them to the watchhouse, I came back and asked Mrs. Clark to keep them locked up untill I came back from the compter, we took the Keenes and Healey to the compter, and returned and took the prisoner in custody; I found out the maker of the saddle, Mr. Worsley, he said it was Mr. Adams's property.

CLAXTON. That is the saddle that I lost.

Prisoner's Defence. I am not guilty of what I am brought to the bar for, the saddle was sent to me to the White Horse Cellar, whether the saddle has been changed or lost since, I do not know.

GUILTY .

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

219. SUSANNAH GROOM was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 18th of February , from the person of William Gray , a watch, value 1 l. a key, value 1 d. six guineas, two half guineas, three dollars, a shilling, a five pound bank note, two one pound bank notes, and a two pound bank note , his property.

WILLIAM GRAY . I am a coal meter for the City of London.

Q. When did you lose this property. - A. Knowing the prisoner as an acquaintance some years, I was going by, I sat down there and sent for something to drink, I was there two hours, and when I came out, I missed my property.

Q. Did you go to see the prisoner. - A. Yes, I called there that evening, she sells things about the street, and lives in Grub Street .

Q. How could you lose your watch without knowing it. - A. Because she put her arm round my neck, I did not feel it go away, the watch was taken from my fob, the notes were in a little bag in this side pocket, the money was wrapped up in a dirty rag, and a silver shilling of George the Second.

Q. Did you see her take it. - A. No, but when I was coming away I searched, and found my property was gone, the officers searched her, they have got my watch, three dollars, and that new shilling which were found upon her.

Q. Were you drunk or sober. - A. I was rather the worse for liquor, but sensible, I knew what I did.

JAMES DYER . I am a baker. As I was going by I saw this woman had the man round his neck, I was curious enough to see what she was doing off, I saw her draw the watch and put it in her bosom, I saw her take the bag out of his pocket, and shake it to the two women that were there, the windows were allbroken, I could see in, she was putting the man out, I insisted upon the man staying in until he had his property, I got a young man to stand at the door while I went and got the two officers.

MRS. CANN. I get my living in the street, I was at the prisoner's room, Mr. Gray gave me sixpence for a quartern and a half of gin, he was in liquor, she persuaded him to go up to Mr. Groom's bed, she followed him, and what she took I cannot say, she took the bag out of his pocket and shook it. Mr. Gray came down stairs and said he had lost his property, when the officers came I told them to search me and my acquaintance, she pulled the watch from under her arm, and gave it to the officer, I saw three dollars in Mr. Gray's hand when he paid for the gin, they were taken out of the prisoner's pocket.

MARY TURNER . I was in Mrs. Groom's place with with my friend, this gentleman was there, he gave sixpence for a quartern and a half of gin, Mrs. Groom asked Mr. Gray to walk up stairs to Mr. Groom's bed, he refused, she pulled him, they returned down in a few minutes, she brings a dollar, a half guinea, and a sixpence, I saw it, and I saw her put it in her pocket-apron, I knew she had not a shilling belonging to her, she borrowed a shilling of Mr. Gray, I saw the watch taken from her, I never saw any notes.

JOHN SANKEY PUGH . I am an officer, I was fetched to Mrs. Grooms, I went in and insisted upon searching Mrs. Groom, she said I will give you the watch, I have got nothing more, we stripped her, searched her everywhere, in her pocket we found three dollars and a new shilling, I took her to the compter, I saw her speaking to the officer along with me, she said here is a guinea for you, and here is another guinea for you, I said very well, and took her to the compter, what she said was a guinea, is a new shilling which Mr. Gray said he had lost, she gave John Waugh a guinea which he will produce.

JOHN WAUGH . I am an officer, the prisoner gave me a guinea, which I produce.

MR. GRAY. I swear to the watch being mine, and the new shilling of George the Second.

Prisoner's Defence. When Mr. Gray came to see me I was very solid, he wanted me to have something to drink, he stopped three or four hours, I got in liquor I do not know what I did.

GUILTY , aged 39.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

220. CHARLES CROWDER , MARY CROWDER , alias JACKSON , and ROBERT BESMIRE were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Joseph Asberry , about the hour of eight at night, on the 15th of February , and stealing therein a bed, value 3 l. a bolster, value 5 s. two pillows, value 8 s. two pillow cases, value 3 s. two sheets, value 12 s. a quilt, value 6 s. and three blankets, value 10 s. the property of Joseph Asberry .

JOSEPH ASBERBY . I live at No. 5, White's Street, Little Moorfields ; on Friday evening last, about eight o'clock, I know by circumstances, this happened.

Q. How was it broken. - A. By getting through the window, it appeared to me that the sash was down but not fastened, I was not at home at the time when the robbery happened.

MRS. ASBERRY. I am the wife of Joseph Asberry .

Q. What window was this that was opened. - A. The parlour window that looked into White Street.

Q. When had you last seen this window. - A. About five, I did not go into the room until ten, and then I found all the bedding off the bedstead, except the mattrass.

Q. Did any body go into the room between five o'clock and ten. - A. Not belonging to me.

Q. There was a bed in the room with bolsters, pillows, pillow cases, sheets, blankets, and a quilt. - A. Yes, at five o'clock, at ten o'clock I came into the room again, and then I found nothing but the mattrass on the bedstead, I missed all the articles mentioned in the indictment, I never saw these people, I only know I was robbed, and the window was thrown up.

JOHN ARMSTRONG . On Monday the 18th, Crowder was brought to the office, I then went to Arthur Street, St. Luke's, where I knew he lived, I there found the lad, Besmire, and a woman who gave me to understand her name was Crowder, I took them both to the office, kept the lad, Besmire, and the woman was let to go home that night, on Tuesday Mrs. Asberry was taken to that room in Arthur Street, she saw the bed in that room, she picked out the goods that belonged to her, I then went and fetched the two prisoners to that room, I then asked Crowder whether he lived there, the woman was at the office, then Crowder said he did live there, and they were his goods, the bed that is now here, and the goods he claimed them all as his property, I then said, Besmire, do you lodge here, yes, he said, I do, I have lived here a fortnight, and laid upon that bed, without somebody has changed it, I then told him the goods were all owned, the bed and bedding were taken to the office, and Mrs. Asberry swore to them.

DANIEL BISHOP . I am an officer, on searching the room where Crowder laid, I found the property which was claimed by the prosecutrix, Mrs. Crowder was present, I told her these things were stolen, she said she knew nothing about them, they were brought there one day last week when she was absent.

Crowder's Defence. A young man asked me to let the bed be brought there for fear his goods should be seized. I was in Goswell Street at the time it was done.

Besmire's Defence. I had been at work all day till nine o'clock at night, I went home to Crowder's house, I went into a public house to get a pint of beer before I went to bed, I saw Crowder, I said are you going home, he said yes, I went home to bed, and got up in the morning, and went to work as usual.

Mary Crowder was not put on her defence.

THOMAS CARR . I know Crowder by sight, I have not known him long, only by using my house two or three times.

Q. You are a publican are you. - A. Yes, on the 15th of February last, between five and six o'clock, Crowder came to my house, he staid until we shut up the house, till near eleven o'clock, I was in the house all the while, I waited upon the room.

Q. How long was he absent from the room. - A.He might go to the door, but he was not gone ten minutes, any one time.

Mr. Alderman Wood. How long is it since you left the Catherine Wheel public-house. - A. Between three and four years.

Court. You have left the Catherine Wheel , how long is it since. - A. I cannot justly say, it is better than three years.

Q. How came you to leave the Catherine Wheel. - A. I had a very large family, the Catherine Wheel did not maintain me, I was forced to leave it.

Q. How came you to be forced to leave it. - A. Because I could not get a living.

Q. What is the sign of the house you now live in - A. The Stapler's Hall.

Q. How long has the prisoner lived in your neighbourhood. - A. I do not know.

Q. What is he. - A. I do not know, there are a good many customers come to my house, I do not know who they are.

Q. It seems you do not know who your neighbours are, what makes you take notice of that evening - A. Because the prisoner never came since last Friday.

Q. When was he taken up. - A. I do not know that ever I heard.

Q. How came you here. - A. I was subpoened this evening.

Q. You never heard of his being in custody till you received the subpoena this evening, did you. - A. No, I never heard of it before.

Q. Then what makes you recollect it was Friday, the 15th of this month. - A. Why I saw him.

Q. You do not know what he was, nor who he was, but you recollect that he was there on Friday week. - A. Yes, and frequently before.

Q. What could induce you to take notice of a customer coming in between five and six o'clock that evening, do you recollect Mr. Armstrong coming to your house. - A. Yes; he frequently comes to my house.

Q. Not to call for beer. - A. No, he comes about his business, he is an officer.

Q. And yet he comes there so often, you cannot recollect when he comes, was the prisoner alone, or in company. - A. He was with two or three in company, and this little Besmire and several neighbours besides, they were playing at domino's, I do not know the names, nor where the they lived.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

221. JOHN GILES was indicted for feloniously receiving on the 18th of January , two sacks, value 3 s. and five bushels of oats, value 20 s. the property of John Greenway , feloniously stolen by Alexander Burgers , he knowing them to have been stolen .

THOMAS HAILEY . I am a taylor, I live at Edgeware. On the 17th of January I suspected that Mr. Greenway's granary was going to be robbed, his granary is at Edgware, he rents it of my mother.

Q. Had you been in the granary. - A. I had, on the over night there was corn and empty sacks in it. I sat up all night on seeing one of Mr. Greenway's servants leave the granary door open. About half past three o'clock Thomas Sanders, Mr. Greenway's servant, went down the yard towards the stable door, in the mean time, a young woman was coming towards the room with the light, I went to stop her from coming into the room with the light, and Alexander Burgers entered the granary, I never left the window until I saw Alexander Burgers come out with a sack of corn on his back. After he came down the granary stairs, I went down to the front door, and when he came out into the street, I walked on one side of the way, and he on the other, across the centre of the town, he went into the boot yard with a sack of corn on his shoulder, and after he came out of the boot yard, he came down and crossed the road and spoke to me, after that my mother's sister let me in, I saw Burgers take the second sack out, and take it to the same place, being a moon-light night, I could see him go up the same yard from my own house.

JOHN GREENWAY . I live at Watford. From the information of the last witness, I immediately went to Edgware, I heard from Burger's master, that he was gone to town with a load of hay. I followed the load of hay, and about a hundred yards before I came to Hampstead, I observed the end of a full sack of corn as I supposed it to be, the end was not quite covered with a cloth, the other part was. I went down Hampstead to get a constable, which I did, and then went to meet Burgers. When we got in sight of him, I saw him set his horses off from where Mr. Giles lived, he was talking to Mr. Giles, he was on the foot-path, I gave the constable charge of him, and asked him what he had done with the corn, he said he had none, I told him I was sure he had, I had seen one of the sacks when I passed him, I asked Mr. Giles if he knew any thing about it, he said he did not, I went into Mr. Giles's house, I asked him where the corn was again, he said he had not seen any, I told him I should insist upon finding it before I quitted the premises, I was sure it was there, I searched the ground floor, found nothing there, I went down stairs, and then I found the corn. I told Giles I was sure that was my corn, one sack was as it was in the cart apparently, and the other sack of corn was shot into a tub.

Q. Did you know that sack. - A. Yes, it was one that I had on my premises.

Q. Did you know the corn. - A. Yes, so far as any person can know corn, the sample from the bulk. Giles, the prisoner then told me that he bought it of Burgers, and gave him a pound note for it.

Q. How much was the corn worth. - A. About a pound, or a guinea. This is the sack, it was one entrusted in my care.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought it, and gave a fair price, it was shot in an open town, where a number of people must have passed. I had no thought of a person offering to sell a stolen thing at that time of the day.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

222. JAMES WILTSHIRE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of February , three garnets, value 3 s. and thirteen ounces six pennyweights of gold, value 46 l. she property of John Musgrove , in his dwelling-house .

The case was stated by Mr. Knapp.

JOHN MUSGROVE . I live in Swallow Street, Piccadilly, I am a jeweller , the prisoner was my foreman , he lived with me about four months.

Q. Did you deliver over to him gold for the purpose of working up. - A. I did, fifty-nine ounces odd, from the time of his coming, to the 9th of February. He quitted my house on the 7th of February at dinner, and left word that he should return on Friday at dinner, I met him on the Friday in Fleet Market, I observed to him, I was surprized at his conduct in stopping away, and leaving the men in the shop, that he knew they wanted his directions, he said it was a dispute in the family, but he would be with me on the Saturday morning. He came on Saturday morning about nine o'clock, the usual hour I went up into the shop, he was busy about a pair of ear rings, his conduct appeared singular, I said,

"Mr. Wiltshire, I should like the account settled," he went into the accompting house, and the account was settled, and the deficiency appeared to be thirteen ounces, six pennyweights, and twelve grains of gold, of the quality of four pounds per ounce. I had two officers in my house, I said

"Mr. Wiltshire, you have no objection of going with me to your lodging," he said,

"no, but you have no occasion of giving yourself that trouble, there is nothing there. On our going to his lodgings, he said,

"I do not blame you for going, you will find gold there, and a number of things that are not finished, but they are my own property. We went to his lodging, there was a board in his bed room, fixed the same as the boards we work at, on the side of that board was a small cabinet, and several drawers to it, the first drawer we opened, contained a sketch of the principal part of my drawings, which no person in the business has but myself, in the next drawer was an ingot of gold about two ounces, I said when the ingot was taken out,

"Mr. Wiltshire, could I suppose you had been so cruel a man," in the drawer we found another ingot of gold of a commoner quality, which had been reduced after being taken from my house, in the fourth drawer we found a paper containing four lumps of gold, they might weigh ten or twelve pennyweights a lump, in the same drawer we found a box containing some garnets and pearls, three of the garnets were taken from my drawer, I have the collets out of which they came. He was taken to St. Anns watch-house.

Q. What is the value of that gold per ounce. - A. Perhaps not more than three pounds, and that common ingot and the lumps about forty-five shillings.

Mr. Reynolds. How many men had you at work in your house. - A. There is nine or ten.

Q. Is there not a waste in gold during the time it is worked. - A. There is.

Q. When did the commencement of this account take place, you say fifty-nine ounces odd, were delivered to him during the time he was there. - A. The commencement of this account took place on the 23d of December.

Q. All these men that were working in your shop, had the handling of this gold, and the working it. - A. I weighed it to the foreman, and he has to give it the workmen, he does not weigh it to them, it would be impossible, we gather the filings, put them into a pot for the purpose of bringing it into one body.

Q. Now that would occasion a deficiency. - A. Perhaps ten pennyweights.

Q. I take it for granted that as it is not the foreman's business to weigh the quantity of gold given to each man under him he had not the means of ascertaining whether each man used that gold that was not weighed to him, and it was not weighed when taken from the men. - A. It would be impossible.

Q. Do not you know in the course of your trade there would be a loss. - A. Yes, we allow for that.

Q. I take it for granted you do not mean to swear to that gold. - A. I cannot swear to the form of that gold, I am confident it is mine.

Q. Among other deficiencies, there is the sweepings. - A. I allowed him two ounces and a half for that.

Court. Do you in your trade allow your foreman to carry on trade for himself. - A. No, never, a man with a salary of three guineas a week.

JOHN BURTON . These are the articles that I found in the prisoner's room. This case contains a dozen gold seals, here is several papers of gold and garnets, these are the three garnets, Mr. Musgrove said he could swear to being his property, the prisoner said it was all his property, he now and then got a light guinea, which he melted down for the purpose.

Prosecutor. I am quite sure that these three garnets came out of this collet, they are worth about three shillings, I am confident they are mine.

MR. BONNET. Q. You belong to Messrs. Cox and Merle, refiners. - A. I do. On the 8th of February I purchased an ingot of gold of the prisoner, it had been left on the 8th of February for the purpose of being essayed, in order to ascertain the quality. On the 8th the prisoner came to our accompting-house, I paid him for four ounces, sixteen pennyweights, fifteen grains, at fifty-five shillings an ounce, it amounted to thirteen pound, four shillings, and ten pence. Wiltshire, Charles Street, Long Acre, is the address he gave me.

Prisoner's Defence. Those seals have been the work of my own time nights and mornings, I sold four ounces odd for money to purchase the garnets and pearls, I purposed leaving my master on the Monday, and going into business for myself.

The prisoner called eight witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY, aged 38, of stealing three garnets, value three shillings only .

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

223. JOHN MILES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of January , three sheep, value 6 l. the property of Joseph Graham , five other sheep, value, 10 l. the property of Robert Chapman , and three other sheep, value 6 l. the property of Thomas Wier .

JOHN FLOWERS SEN . I am a salesman in partnershipwith my son. On the 7th of January last, I sent fifty-eight sheep to a field near Devalls Lane , thirty-eight of them were the property of Robert Graham, twelve the property of Robert Chapman , and eight the property of Robert Wier, they were their property, and I was to account to them. I sent them there on the 7th, I saw them there on the 8th, 9th, and 10th.

THOMAS FARRINGTON. Q. On the morning of Friday, the 11th of January, did you go to this field to see the sheep - A. I did, there were eleven missing, I informed Mr. Flowers of it.

MR. FLOWERS. Upon receiving information that there were eleven sheep missing, I went to the field, I found there were eleven missing. Three sheep of Mr. Graham's were gone, one was a ram. Mr. Graham's sheep were marked with blue upon the head, and I. G. upon the skin; five of Mr. Chapman's were gone, and three of Mr. Wier's were gone.

- HARVEY. I am a servant to Mr. Austin, skin salesman.

Q. On Friday the 11th of January were you sent by him to Miles's. - A. Yes, in Kingsland Road I received from Miles eleven skins, Miles chucked them up into the cart, I placed them by themselves in the cart so as I could distinguish them from all the rest. I took them to my master.

MR. AUSTIN. Q. You are a skin salesman we understand. - A. Yes, the last witness brought me eleven skins, they were shewn in the evening to Mr. Flowers. and Mr. Graham came the next day and saw them.

JOHN ARMSTRONG . I received a warrant from young Mr. Flowers on the 13th of January, I executed the warrant in company with Mason on the 13th. About eleven o'clock on Sunday night I knocked at the prisoner's door, him and his wife came down stairs, I read the warrant to them, the prisoner said he had bought eleven sheep on Friday morning last, about half past six o'clock, of a man named Duplex, but he did not know where he lived, and gave two pound a piece for them, he paid him for them in his own shop in Kingsland Road. The prisoner went with me to the watch-house without any hesitation.

JOHN BOWMAN . I am a butcher. On the Friday before the prisoner was apprehended I called at his house, he asked me if I had any thing to do, and to lend him a hand with killing the sheep, he told me he had been buying eleven sheep that morning at market, he did not say what market, I supposed it to be Smithfield market, he was killing a ram at the time I went to him.

Mr. Gleed. Q. I do not know whether you know a man of the name of Duplex. - A. I did not know him then, I have known him since.

Q. In consequence of directions given to you by the prisoner did you take Duplex into custody. - A. I did, Thomas Harvey was with me. Duplex was before the magistrate, he was bound by the magistrate in forty pounds to appear at the next hearing, he has not been heard of or seen since.

THOMAS HARVEY . I am a bricklayer, I lodge at 67 Kingsland Road, at Mrs. Bayliss, my lodgings is at the back of the prisoner's yard.

Q. Do you recollect the prisoner coming to your lodgings the Friday before he was apprehended. - A. When I was in bed there was a knock at the prisoner's door, I got up between six and seven, and went down to the door, I saw the prisoner and a man named Duplex standing by the side of him, there were some sheep standing in the road, he told me he had bought these sheep at market. This was on the Friday before he was apprehended. I had seen the prisoner and Duplex on the night before at the prisoner's shop, I had seen Duplex before that, I did not know who he was, nor where he lived. When the prisoner was at the office under examination, the prisoner gave me directions respecting Duplex, Duplex was brought before the magistrate, and bound over to appear.

Prisoner's Defence. Please you my Lord. I bought them of Duplex, and when I heard he came dishonestly by them, I gave orders to have him apprehended.

The prisoner called eight witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood .

224. JOSEPH OGILVIE was indicted for feloniously assaulting James Lyons in the king's highway, on the 9th of February , putting him in fear, and taking from his person a coat, value 5 s. a hat, value 2 s. two dollars, six shillings, and two hundred and forty halfpence , his property.

JAMES LYONS. I live in King Street, Seven Dials, I am a journeyman smith .

Q. Were you robbed any day this month. - A. Yes, on the morning of the 10th the Sunday before last, about two o'clock, at the end of Monmouth Street , I was going from the public-house, it is a watering house in Broad Street.

Q. Were you in liquor. - A. I had some liquor, but not to say intoxicated.

Q. What time did you go to that public-house. - A. About twenty minutes after one, I had been to the Marquis of Granby in Drury Lane, before that, between nine and ten, I drank some beer and some gin there. I had been to the Angel in Broad Street about seven o'clock, I drank beer only there.

Q. About two o'clock in the morning you were at the end of Monmouth Street. - A. Yes, the prisoner and two more met me, I was shoved into the kennel, I made a stumble, I did not go quite down, I asked what it was for, and then I was knocked down, I tried to get up, I could not, the prisoner held me down while my coat was taken off my back, my coat and money were taken from me.

Q. Who took your coat off. - A. The party, they all assisted together, they took my coat off and took my hat, my money was in my coat pocket, two five shilling papers of halfpence, two dollars, and six shillings, the dollars and the six shillings were wrapped up in paper, I received that money a little before seven o'clock on the Saturday night, I felt it in my pocket after I came out of the watering house. When they got my coat and watch, I hollowed out watch and robbery, they ran away as soon as they saw the watchman's light. I saw the prisoner, when he was brought back.

Q. Had you any opportunity of remarking the prisoner's person so as to know him again when he wasbrought back. - A. No further than he was not out of my sight until he ran into Nailes Yard, St. Andrew's Street, and when he was brought back he had my hat in his hand, and his hat on his head, my coat was not found.

RICHARD HARRIS . I am a watchman, I was on duty on the morning of the 10th of February, I heard a person sing out, watch and robbery about half past two o'clock, I went to the place, I saw Lyons down, and three men, the three men made off.

Q.How near were the three men when you first saw them. - A.One had hold of him, and the others were quite close to him. The three men ran away immediately I came with the light, I pursued the prisoner, and catched him in Nailes Yard, he had a hat in his hand, and a hat on his head, the watch-house keeper has the hat. The prosecutor had no coat on.

NATHANIEL ROBERTS . I am the watch-house keeper, the prisoner was brought to the watch-house, the watchman delivered me this hat.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel.

JAMES FINNAKIN . I am a baker, I live in Carnaby Street, I was turning up Broad Street, the prisoner and another man was standing on the pavement, the prosecutor could not pass without touching them, whether he touched them or no I cannot say, he pushed the prisoner off the curb, and directly he pushed him again there were blows passed from each man, one man hit him with the right hand and left, I said it was a shame to use the prisoner so, the man along with the prosecutor said he would serve me so, the prosecutor stripped his coat off, and came forward and struck at me, I went of one side and shunned the blow, he fell on his face, I then said to the prisoner,

"come along, have nothing to do with them." The prosecutor came up to me and wanted to fight with me, I said I would not fight with him, I went on, he came after me, took hold of my arm, and wanted me to stop, I would not, I kept walking on to St. Andrew's Street, he followed me and called for the other two men to come up, and when I came to the end of St. Andrew's Street, he gave his coat to one of the other two men to hold, he knocked me down in the mud, I got up and knocked him down much in the same place, then he called out, watch, robbery, then I went away.

Mr. Knapp. Upon your oath, did the prisoner ever attempt to take the great coat, or the contents of the great coat, or the hat from him. - A. He did not.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

225. JAMES JOHNSON and SARAH CLARKE were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of January , a time-piece, value 40 s. and two handkerchiefs, value 1 s. the property of Joseph Pike , in the dwelling house of John Wilson .

JOSEPH PIKE . I am a watch finisher . On the 8th of January, about half past six o'clock in the evening; I went into the Earl of Moira's Head public-house, at the corner of Saffron Hill , Mr. Wilson keeps the house, I put the time-piece down by the side of me while I was drinking there. It was in two handkerchiefs.

Q. Did you see the prisoners there. - A.Yes, the man sat on the right of me, and the woman next to him, I called for a shillings worth of rum and water, and during the time I was drinking it, they took my time-piece away.

Q. Did you see them take it away. - A. No, they went away, and I missed my property.

Q. How soon after they were gone did you miss your property. - A. In the course of two or three minutes.

Q.Did you ever see your property afterwards. - A.One handkerchief the officer has got that apprehended them.

MARGARET WILSON. I am the wife of the man that keeps the house.

Q. Do you remember Pike coming into your house. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember Johnson and Clarke coming into your house - A. Yes, they were sitting together in the tap room.

Q. Did you see the prisoners go away. - A.Yes, they rushed by me as I was going into the tap room with a shillings worth of rum and water. The prisoners had nothing to drink. I know the handkerchief, he offered me the time-piece, it was wrapped up in two handkerchiefs, a red one outside, and a light coloured one inside. It is the white one that is found.

JOHN HUTT. I am an officer. On the 9th of January I took the handkerchief from between the bed and the sacking in the prisoner's apartment in Newtoner's Lane, the two prisoners lodged together.

Prosecutor. This is my handkerchief, the time-piece was in it, there is the initials of my name upon it, part of the I has been picked out.

Q. What is the value of the time-piece. - A. It cost me forty-five shillings.

Johnson's and Clarke's Defence. (read) I, James Johnson and Sarah Clarke being in the house of Mr. Wilson on the 9th of January last, we called for a pint of beer, and on the next night we were apprized by an officer of having taken away a time-piece, the white handkerchief was the property of Sarah Clarke , which she had bought some time before, the bundle that I took out of the tap room was fish that I bought for supper. Mr. Wilson's house I am told is a bad house, to prove which I hope your Lordship will refer book to last sessions. I have served in his Majesty's navy ten years.

JOHNSON GUILTY , aged 28,

CLARKE GUILTY , aged 21,

of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

226. WALTER PRESTON was indicted for feloniously assaulting John Kennedy in the king's highway on the 18th of February , putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, a seal, value 1 s. 6 d. a watch key, value 6 d. and part of a steel watch chain, value 6 d. his property.

JOHN KENNEDY . Q.What age are you. - A. Fifteen.

Q.Were you in Tottenham Court Road , on the18th of this month. - A. Yes, about nine o'clock at night I was going along the street, the prisoner and eight or ten men came up to me all in a body, they met me, Walter Preston, the prisoner, knocked my hat off.

Q.Are you sure the prisoner is that man. - A. Yes. I went to pick up my hat, I put it on my head, he gave it a thump to knock it over my eyes, it did not, then he knocked me down, he took hold of my shoulders, and gave me a knock down with both his hands, I fell on the pavement among the eight or ten men; I had my hand upon my fob, he made a snatch at my watch six times.

Q. Then you put your hand upon your watch did you. - A. Yes, he pulled the watch chain six times, and broke the watch chain, when they broke the chain, then they all went away.

Q. Did he take any thing away. - A. Yes, he took a metal key and seal, and part of the chain.

Q. He did not get away your watch. - A. No, they then walked away.

Q.The prisoner did not run away. - A. No.

Q. Did you say any thing - A. No, I got up and followed them, and called out watch, then they walked on the other side of the road, I kept my eye upon them, they crossed over and came to the corner of Goudge Street, then I called out watch again, I told the prisoner that he tried to rob me of my watch, he struck me on the face then, and ran away, I ran after him, and the watchman and more people ran after him.

Q. Did you catch him - A. No, I lost sight of him, I did not see him until I saw him at the watch-house that same evening about half past nine.

Q. What became of the men that were with him. - A. I did not see them any more, they ran away at the same time that he did.

Q. Had you ever seen this man before. - A. No.

Q. Did you take sufficient notice of him so as to know him again. - A. Yes; he held his head over me at the time he was trying to pull my watch, I am sure the prisoner is the man, he was dressed in a drab coat, and a shawl handkerchief round his neck, a black handkerchief, and a pair of patent cord breeches.

Q. Has he any part of the dress now. - A. Yes, the drab coat is the same.

Q. What is the value of the chain, seal, and key. - A. The seal and key cost me two shillings.

Mr. Barry. What are you. - A. I am an apprentice to a taylor, I was going of an errand for my master.

Q. What sort of a night was it. - A. A darkish night.

Q. The shops were all shut. - A. It was facing of Tottenham Court Chapel.

Q. That is darker still; you say there were ten men walking together. - A. There were eight or ten, they all came up together, the rest held me down while he pulled my watch chain.

Q. We did not hear that before; you saw this young man at the watchhouse, and there you saw the colour of his clothes. - A. I saw his dress by the light of the lamps before.

Q.Was your watch fastened to your pocket. - A. No, I had my hand in my pocket holding the watch in my hand, the watch chain was hanging out.

Q. Did you cry out. - A. I was going to cry out, one of them put his hand over my mouth.

Q. That we did not hear before, why did not you tell that to his Lordship; you say he stopped you, knocked you down, and while you were down, you were held down by the others, at which time he pulled at your chain. - A. Yes.

Q. You say they turned into Goudge Street. - A. They walked straight on, I called watch, directly I came up to him they crossed over to the other side of the road, and came to the corner of Goudge Street, they returned again.

Q. Therefore they returned to meet you, and then you charged them with a robbery. - A. Yes, and he hit me a slap on the face, there were eight or ten with him then.

Q. When they went into Goudge Street, and he gave you a slap of the face, did they all run away together. - A. Yes the prisoner did not separate from the rest until he got to the corner of Windmill Street, the watchman hollowed out which is the man, some said this way, and some said the other, they tried to baulk the watchman, I had lost sight of him then, I did not see him afterwards, until I saw him at the watchhouse door.

Q. Is there any body here that saw you in possession of that watch. - A. My father is here, he knew I had a watch.

Q. Did your father see you that evening. - A. No.

Q. Had you been stopping at the corner of that chapel talking to two boys or two girls - A. No.

Court. Where did you come from. - A. From Mr. Pringle's in Wardour Street; I was going to Carmarthen Street, I was facing of Tottenham Court Chapel when they met me

Mr. Barry. Is the watchhouse keeper here. - A. Yes.

Q. Have you heard any body talking about a 40 l. reward. - A. No, I do not know there is a reward.

Q. You do not know if in case this man is convicted that you shall get a share of a 40 l. reward. - A No, I never heard any body say so neither in the watchhouse or elsewhere, this is the first time I have heard any thing of it.

Q. How long were you laying down on the ground while you say the person was pulling at your watch. - A. About two minutes on the ground, I was upon my back.

Q. Were there any people passing at the time. - A. I do not know that there was any one.

Q. Did you tell the same story at the watchhouse as you have here. - A. When the watchhouse people asked who gave charge, I said I give charge of him for robbing me of part of a steel chain, a seal, and a key.

- MURPHY. I am a watchman, I heard the cry of watch, it was from five to ten minutes past nine, I did not know who it was, I saw the boy in the watch-house, it was better than a quarter after nine before I carried him to the watchhouse, when they all cried out stop thief, I followed him, some of them said this is theman, and some said not, I took him to the watchhouse in consequence of the cry of stop thief, there was a great crowd about the watchhouse, Kennedy said the prisoner at the bar was the person that robbed him, the constable searched him, he found none of the things that were taken from the boy; the prisoner had the same coloured coat on then as he had now.

HENRY CROKER . Q. Did you pursue the prisoner this night. - A. I did, I heard the cry of watch, and the rattle spring, I went to the watchman's assistance, and went into the watchhouse with him, I then enquired who it was that was robbed, they told me it was a lad, there was a great crowd about the watchhouse door, and the boy came in immediately, when the boy said he had been robbed, I said, is this the man that robbed you, he said yes, he said he was sure he was the man I searched him, and found nothing upon him.

JOHN BAKER . I am the watchhouse keeper, on Monday night last, the prisoner was brought to me in charge by this lad, I interrogated the lad to know whether he was positive, he declared that he was the only man that robbed him, while the others held him down.

- KENNEDY, SEN. I am the father of the boy.

Q. Had your son a watch on the 18th of February. - A. Yes, this is the watch.

Q. Did you see it on the 18th of February. - A. Yes, in the morning there was a chain to it, seal and key, the chain I had near twenty years, this is the watch, the chain was broken.

Prisoner's Defence. I was standing at the corner of Goudge Street, when Kennedy came up to me he said, I shall give charge of you to the first watchman we come nigh; I said for why, he came to me and I pushed him away, I walked down Goudge Street and down Charlotte Street, a gentleman's coachman came up and said I was the person that was accused of robbing the boy, I told him I was not the person, but a watchman came up and took hold of me, when the boy came in the watchhouse he said if the man has a white coat on he is the man.

GUILTY , DEATH , aged 24.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood .

227. JOHN LEE was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Jackson , about the hour of seven at night, on the 12th of February , with intent the goods and chattels therein being burglariously to steal .

THOMAS JACKSON . I am a butcher , I live at No. 11, Clipstone Street, in the parish of St. Mary-le-bone . On Tuesday se'nnight I went out between six and seven to pay my landlord my rent, I returned a little before seven, I left my wife and family at home, I have a family of nine children, and my man was down stairs at work, killing, when I came near home, I saw three men at one of my shop windows, I suspected they intended to break in, they were stooping, and in the room of coming into my own door, I went round about, and came directly opposite of them, I stood against a cobler's stall, it was dark, there I saw them push up the sash of one of the shop windows, I saw one of the men get in the window, I run across the way and pulled him out, and asked him what business he had there.

Q. Was all his body in. - A. Yes, all but his legs, if I had shut the window down I should have shut it on his legs, I asked him what he wanted, he said; I want Jem, I said, there is no Jem here, you want to rob my shop, the other ran away, I secured the prisoner and pulled him out, I asked the prisoner what he did there, he said let me go, I said I shall not until somebody else has you. I said, what did you want, he said one of my daughters, I have nine children, my eldest daughter is thirteen years of age, I held him, my wife heard me, she sent my daughter down to my man, my man came, he went for a watchman, I put him in the charge of the watchman, I went to the watchhouse with him immediately.

Q. Have you a lad in the house of the name of Jem. - A. No, my man's name is John.

Q. What age is your eldest daughter. - A. She is thirteen years of age, she goes to school.

Q. Had she any acquaintance with the prisoner. - A. No, she is quite small of her age, she is quite a child.

Prisoner's Defence. I met two young fellows that worked with me at Chathan, they made me drunk, they were coming along, I made a noise they said if I was not quiet they would chuck me in the butcher's shop they opened the window, and put me in.

Prosecutor. I saw him go in, he did not appear to be drunk.

Q. Did he say they throwed him in. - A. No, he was very insolent to me.

GUILTY , DEATH , aged 19.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

228. JOHN COOK was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Joseph Wilson , about the hour of eight on the night of the 19th of February , and stealing therein six pieces of Morocco leather, value 40 s. his property.

JOSEPH WILSON . I am a leather-seller , No. 11, Little Newport Street, St. Anns .

Q. Was your house broke open lately. - A. No, the door was opened, the prisoner and two others came in, I was not in the shop at the time, I lost six pieces of Morocco leather, value forty shillings, no part of the property has been recovered.

WILLIAM YOUNG . I am eleven years old, I am brother to Mr. Wilson. The prisoner and two other men unlatched the shop door, and came in about eight o'clock in the evening, I was behind the counter, the prisoner looked me in the face, the second that came in talked to me, the third that came in took two parcels of Morocco, he run off, the prisoner and the other walked gently up the street, I ran after the prisoner and catched him, the other that was with him he told me his name was Nightingale, I held the prisoner till I had assistance.

HENRY CRESSWELL . I am the officer that took the prisoner in custody, he owned to me that he was in company with them.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming down Long Acre the same night this happened, I met with Joseph Nightingale , he asked me where I was going, I said Newport Market, he said, I want to enquire the way to where I am going, he went into the shop, I went with him, he asked the way to where he was going, thelad directed him, we came out into the street, and walked gently up the street, only Nightingale was in company with me.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

229. MARY SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of February , five handkerchiefs, value 30 s. the property of Jonathan Holt Titcomb , privately in his shop .

JONATHAN HOLT TITCOMB . I am a haberdasher , I keep a shop in Knightsbridge, in the parish of St. Abbotts, Kensington . On Tuesday last about five o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came into our shop, she was apparently very much intoxicated at the time she asked to look at some silk handkerchiefs, I shewed her some she tumbled them about a good deal, she said her husband was a market gardener, at Walham Green, she complained that the handkerchiefs were not good enough, I shewed her some others, she chose one at eight shillings, she said she should like to have another, and then a third, she desired to have them all three put in paper, that she had not money enough, and left a deposit of five shillings, saying that she should return for them, her cart was at the corner of Sloane Street, and she would return and take the handkerchiefs away. In the meantime she was going out of the door, I missed one of the handkerchiefs which I had previously shewn her, I went out of the door and stopped her, one of the handkerchiefs dropped from her as she was before the window, not the one that I missed, then there dropped a second and a third, and the one that I missed came the fourth, and then a fifth dropped on the step as we were returning in; there were two other pieces dropped one with two in it, and the other three, they are not brought forward, the others were five single handkerchiefs, they dropped from between her legs, I believe the five handkerchiefs to be mine, I shall only swear to one that is six shillings, they cost me more, we sell them at eight shillings, that one has our mark to it. The prisoner was in liquor.

Prisoner's Defence. I know no more what I am charged with, no more that the baby in my arms, I was very much intoxicated, I did not know where I was till the middle of the night, I found I was in confinement.

GUILTY, aged 45, of stealing one handkerchief, value four shillings and ten pence only .

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood .

230. JOSEPH MASON , alias MADDEN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 31st of January , five pounds weight of bees wax, value 16 s. the property of Phillip Plumb , privately in his shop .

PHILLIP PLUMB . I live in Leather Lane , I keep an oil-shop .

Q. Did the prisoner come to your shop on the 31st of January last. - A. Yes, near eight o'clock, there was another lad with him, the other lad asked for a halfpenny pickled cucumber, I served him, he paid for it, he asked the prisoner if he would have one, he said yes, I served the prisoner, I had suspicion that there was something out of the window, I heard his elbow against the boards, the prisoner stood by the window, I came round and looked, and saw the cake of wax between his thighs.

Q. Were had it been laying before he came in. - A. In the window, I had seen it there in the course of the day; when I saw that I laid hold of the prisoner, I said, here is a pretty fellow to take the wax out of the window, he said he would beg me ten thousand pardons, I took him to Hatton Garden Office immediately, the wax was left at my shop, the officer came back and fetched it, I knew the wax, it was brought here last sessions, and I marked it at Hatton Garden, there is five pound and a half, it is worth sixteen shillings, it cost me that.

Q. It was done privately, without your knowledge. - A. It was done without my knowledge, there was nobody in my shop but me, and the prisoner, and the other lad.

Mr. Gleed. Do you know that that little boy is trying for a capital offence. - A. Yes, I do.

Q. You said you heard his elbow, that excited your suspicion. - A. It did.

Q. How high was this window. - A. As high as windows generally are, I cannot say exactly.

Q. So that the bees wax falling, would make a noise. - A. It did not fall, I suppose.

Q. You heard a noise that brought you round. - A. Yes.

Q. You went round, you saw it, he was standing close to the window. - A. Yes.

Q. You say he left the bees wax in the shop, and went to Hatton Garden. - A. I left my wife in the shop, and a man.

Q. How many pieces of bees wax had you in the shop. - A. Five or six, they were all laying together.

Q. Are you sure that that which you produce is the cake which you took from the boy. - A. Yes, I am.

Court. Did the boy pretend, when you charged him with it, that it had fell by accident, and he meant to put it up again. - A. No.

Jury. Are all your cakes marked alike. - A. No, they are not, this was marked at Hatton Garden office, it was here last sessions. I should wish to recommend the prisoner to mercy.

Prisoner's Defence. The bees wax fell down by accident, I catched it between my thighs, I did not intend to steal it.

Court, Q. to Prosecutor. From what you saw could it be by accident that it fell down. - A. It was impossible.

The prisoner called three witnesses who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , DEATH , aged 15.

The prisoner was recommended to his Majesty's mercy by the jury, on account of his age, and general good character.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

231. CHRISTIAN CRANE was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Henry Marks , about the hour of eight on the night of the 2d of February , and stealing therein twenty-five silver tooth picks, value 25 s. two silver pencil cases, value 4 s. and a silver pen, value 3 s. his property.

HENRY MARKS . I am a housekeeper, I keep a sale shop , 44, High Street, St. Giles .

Q. Your house was broken open was it. - A. The window was cut on the 2d of February, about a quarter before eight in the evening, some person gave me information that my shop window was broken.

Q. The window of your shop was broken. - A. The show glass.

Q. You said it was a window just now. - A. It was a show glass that goes underneath the window, it slips in and out.

Q. Did you lose any thing. - A. Twenty-five silver tooth-picks, two silver pencil cases, and a silver pen, I had seen them about ten minutes before they were stolen, I never got my property again. About ten minutes afterwards the prisoner was brought in, and I gave charge of him.

- FISHER. On the 2d of February, about a quarter before eight, I was coming home, I saw two men standing at Mr. Marks's window, a tall man was breaking the window, the prisoner was standing in company with him, a third man came from the side of the door, he knocked me on the side of my head into the kennel, I went home and told my master of it, I saw the prisoner after they catched him, I knew him again.

SIMON WAUGH. Fisher gave me information, I went up to Marks's, I saw three men lean over the show glass, the prisoner appeared to be taking his hand off the hole that was cut in the glass, his finger and thumb were in this attitude, I followed him, he was stopped in Compton Street.

Jury. You did not see him take any thing out. - A. No.

DAVID WARREN . I am the beadle, the prisoner was brought back, I found nothing on him.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

232. SARAH CARR was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of February , in the dwelling-house of Winfield Turner, two watches, value 10 l. eight guineas, half-a-guinea, a seven shilling piece, and nine one pound notes , the property of William Tucker Dickinson .

WILLIAM TUCKER DICKINSON . I lodge at 20, Hatton Garden , Mrs. Turner keeps the house, I missed the property on Tuesday the 5th of February, about eleven o'clock at night, when I came home. I had been dining out.

SARAH TURNER . Q. Do you keep this house, No. 20, Hatton Garden. - A. Yes, my husband's name is Winfield Turner .

CHARLES WILLIAM TURNER . Q. Do you know any thing against the prisoner. - A. No, I saw a man in the kitchen that day when the things were missed, he and the prisoner were together.

WILLIAM READ . I am an officer of Hatton Garden, I know nothing of the money, only what the prisoner told me.

Q. to Prosecutor. Was the prisoner told it would be better for her to confess. - A. I told her it would be the better for her to tell who it was that was connected with her.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

233. JOHN BENNET was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of February , a coat, value 17 s. six waistcoats, value 13 s. a pair of pantaloons, value 4 s. and a handkerchief, value 1 s. the property of John Brewer .

JOHN BREWER . I am a shoemaker , I lodge at No. 4, Great Earl Street, Seven Dials . On the 2d of February, about seven o'clock, I went out and returned about eleven o'clock, I found the door forced open, and the property gone, I lost a coat, six waistcoats, and a handkerchief, I saw the property in my trunk before I went out.

GEORGE HARVEY . I am a pawnbroker, I produce a pair of pantaloons, a waistcoat, and a silk handkerchief, pledged by the prisoner on Saturday evening, about nine o'clock.

Prosecutor. They are my property, they are marked with my own name in full length.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence; called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

234. CATHERINE FOSTER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 19th of February , a cheese, value 15 s. the property of Joseph Veesey , privately in his shop .

JOHN HARRINGTON . I live at No. 18, James Street, Long Acre, in the parish of St. Martins in the Fields , with Joseph Veesey , he is a Tallow Chandler , this is a separate shop from his, this is in the cheesemongery business, and his shop is a tallow chandlers; I serve in the shop, and carry on the business, I am his servant. On the 19th of this month, about half past eight in the evening, the prisoner came in for half a quarter of a pound of butter, after she had gone out of the shop a minute or two, I looked over the counter, there were ten piles of cheese of this description, I missed this one cheese, I ran out of the door, and called to her, and when I called, she walked faster on, I ran after her and pulled her by the shoulder, I asked her what she had got, she replied nothing, I said, it is a very large nothing, feeling it, I brought her back, Mr. Veesey took the cheese from under her cloak, the prisoner wished to be discharged, she said I had got the property, and that was quite sufficient, I refused to let her go.

Q. Do you know that cheese again. - Yes, here is a mark that was put on immediately, and here is a V that was on it before.

Q. What is the value of this cheese. - A. About fifteen shillings, prime cost.

Q. You did not see her take it. - A. No.

Prisoner's Defence. I beg your pardon for doing such a thing, I will never do it again.

GUILTY , DEATH , aged 46.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

235. GEORGE FARRELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of February , two cushions, value 30 s. the property of Thomas Pendrey .

THOMAS PENDREY. I live in Marybone Lane, I am the son of the prosecutor, from information I followed the prisoner, I overtook him in Union Street, he had two cushions, he said, for God's sake do not hurt me, I took him to where the coach stood. These are the cushions, they are my father's property.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming past the coach, I found one of the cushions on the step and the other in the street.

GUILTY , aged 49.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

236. THOMAS GRANT was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 30th of November , a jacket, value 30 s. a pair of gloves, value 1 s. two handkerchiefs, value 1 s. a rule, value 3 s. a pocket book, value 2 d. and two one pound notes , the property of James Bailey .

JAMES BAILEY . I lay the pipes down at Holloway water works.

Q. Did you lose a jacket. - A. Yes, and my pocket book and all the contents, on the 30th of November.

Q. What was in your pocket book. - A. Two one pound notes, in my jacket pocket was a two-foot rule, two handkerchiefs, and a pair of gloves. I lost them from the King's Arms, in the back road, Islington , I was laying pipes for water to the houses, as soon as I came out of the house, I pulled my jacket off to work, and laid it on the window sill.

Q. You did not see it taken, did you - A. No. I saw it there at eleven o'clock, and about a quarter after, it was taken away.

PETER MASON . I searched the prisoner, I found these glove upon him, he said, he bought the duplicate of the jacket of a person that lived at Greenwich, and he sold the duplicate again, I took him to the pawnbrokers, he made a step beyond the house, he turned back, and said this is the house. At the pawnbrokers the prisoner said he pawned it, and the young man at the pawnbrokers pointed out the prisoner as the person that pawned it, I got this jacket of John Tomkins .

JOHN TOMKINS. I bought the duplicate of the jacket of the prisoner, I took the jacket out of pawn at Mr. Sadlers, in Bishopsgate Street.

GEORGE YOUNG . I live at Mr. Sadlers, Bishopsgate Street, on the 30th of November a jacket was pawned at our shop, I think the prisoner was the person, I am not positive, in the name of John Smith , I gave him a duplicate, that duplicate was brought back by the prisoner on the 19th of December, the prisoner and another man came to look at the jacket, the jacket was brought down, the other man tried it on, it did not fit, it was pledged afresh by the prisoner, for the same money as before.

Prosecutor. That is my jacket, and the gloves are mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought the ticket for eighteen pence, of a man at Greenwich, I went and took it out, paid two-pence interest, and put it in again, the gloves I found in the dust, when I worked for William Hogg , in Holloway Lane.

GUILTY , aged 47.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

237. WILLIAM HEPBURN and FREDERICK DALZIEL were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of January , a coat, value 20 s. a waistcoat value 2 s. and a pair of breeches, value 5 s. the property of John Parsons .

HANNAH BRISCOE . John Parsons is my nephew. On the 21st of January he was a servant , he left a suit of clothes in my care, a coat, waistcoat, and breeches, Hepburn came with a note on the 21st of last month.

Q. Have you got the note here. - A. No, my children has torn it, I can express the words that were in it. -

"Be so good as to send my clothes, as I am going after a situation, John Parsons , at Mr. Brooke's, Blenheim Street." In consequence of that I sent them by the bearer. In two days after I called on my nephew, he said he had not got the clothes.

JOSEPH AVERY . I am a pawnbroker. Dalziel pledged with me a coat, waistcoat, and breeches, for fifteen shillings.

JOHN PARSONS . I am a servant out of situation.

Q. Did you send a note to your aunt Briscoe. - A. No.

Q.Look at the things. - A. They are mine.

Hepburn's Defence. I lodged about a week with Dalziel at a public house, he went by the name of the little painter, he wrote a letter, and said I would take it to Little Queen Street he would give me a shilling. I took the letter, and the woman gave me the clothes, I gave Dalziel the clothes, he said he would give me the shilling the next time I saw him

Dalziel's Defence. I went for John Parsons to Mrs. Briscoe's for a pack of cards, Mrs. Briscoe asked me to come in the room, she got a chair for me to sit down, she produced these clothes to me and said,

"these are John Parsons 's clothes," and when I went home to Mr. Brooks's house where I was at place, he discharged me for being so long gone I being out of place I sent the note by Hepburn.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

238. LETITIA JOHNSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of February , four shirts, value 16 s. the property of Samuel Nathan .

EVE NATHAN . I am the wife of Samuel Nathan. This day fortnight I had occasion to take the ashes across the way, I left a child in the shop three years old, and when I returned she told me that a woman had been in the shop, and had taken something away, I had left the shirts in the window, I looked in the window, and missed them, I went out of doors, and from the information of Rebecca Soloman , I pursued the woman and found her in Checquer Alley, Whitecross Street, she had got two shirts under her shawl in her hand, I claimed them, she said she was in liquor, with assistance I brought her back to my house, I never found the other two shirts, I missed four in all.

REBECCA SOLOMON . I live in Play-house Yard. I saw the prisoner go into Nathan's, she had nothing under her shawl then, and when she came out she hadsomething under it, I told Mrs. Nathan which way the prisoner went, we found the prisoner, and under her shawl she had two shirts, she said she was going to bring them back from where she took them, Mrs. Nathan claimed the shirts, Mrs. Nathan said she lost four, the prisoner said she only saw two.

Prisoner's Defence. I went into Play-house Yard to buy a pair of shoes. I was in liquor, I went into a shop, I saw these two shirts laying at the door, I picked them up, I saw one of the women that I had been drinking with, she said,

"Mrs. Johnson, come and have something to drink," I went on with her to a publichouse, and had some gin with her, I said to her,

"I have been to Play-house Yard for a pair of shoes, I know this is not my bundle, I have left it in a mistake, I have got two shirts I picked up in Play-house Yard, I know they do not belong to me," a person came up and took them from me.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

239. ELIZABETH LITLER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of August , a cap, value 1 l. a spoon, value 10 s. two pin cloths, value 4 s. two pair of stockings, value 2 s. two handkerchiefs, value 2 s. and a napkin, value 1 s. the property of Sarah Rayner , widow .

SARAH RAYNER . I am a widow, I live at Homerton in Hackney , I am a laundress , I lost a silver spoon out of my house, two pair of cotton stockings, I lost the cap out of the wash-house, two pincloths and the handkerchiefs and napkin, the prisoner washed for me. They were taken at different times.

CHARLES COOK . I am an officer, I produce some duplicates, I found them in the prisoner's apartment, she said they were her own.

JAMES TURNER . I am a pawnbroker, I produce a pair of cotton stockings, pawned by a woman on the 14th of April, I do not know the woman, I know the prisoner, I cannot recollect her pawning these articles, they were pawned in the name of Elizabeth Litler .

Prosecutrix. The property is mine, I lost them while the prisoner was working with me.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought the tickets of Sarah Watson .

GUILTY , aged 35.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

240. JAMES MURRAY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of January , from the person of Catherine O'Neale , widow , eight guineas, three two pound bank notes, and twenty one pound bank notes , her property.

CATHERINE O'NEALE. I am a widow, I live in Broker's Row.

Q. Did you lose any property on the 20th of January. - A. Yes, between nine and ten at night, I was at the Old King's Head, Compton Street Soho , along with an acquaintance. This is a family affair, he is my nephew, there were a number of people in the room when I lost my money, I cannot swear that he took it.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

241. GEORGE PARSONS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of January , a brush, value 2 s. 6 d. nineteen screws, value 6 s. and three pieces of wood, value 1 s. the property of Charles Harland .

CHARLES HARLAND . I am a machine maker , the prisoner was one of my workmen . I met the prisoner about an hundred yards from my work-shop with a basket, I asked him to let me look in the basket, he refused, I took him back to the premises, I discovered in the basket a machine brush and nineteen screws, the prisoner said he meaned to bring them back again.

JOHN HOLMES . I was in the service of Mr. Harland, I am not now, I have seen the brush throwing about the place at different times.

Jury. It is a shame such a thing should be brought in court.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

242. JOHN PIXLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of January , fifty pound weight of iron, value 4 s. the property of John Smith .

JOHN SMITH . I live at Battle Bridge , I am a brick maker and scavenger , the prisoner was my wheeler , he had been so almost two years. An officer belonging to Bow Street brought him back with some iron on the 23d of January, between six and seven o'clock in the evening, the iron is here, I cannot swear it is my property, he fell on his knees to me and hoped that I would forgive him, it was the first time that he had done any thing of the kind.

Q. Did he say from whence he had taken it. - A. Yes, he had taken it out of my shop. We went into the wheeler's shop, he had been knocking a waggon wheel to pieces, there was one streik that seemed to belong to that, I had a high opinion of the man, he had free access to the shop, and always kept the key.

Q. Was there any iron of that form missing. - A. There was, that one piece that was brought back with him I believe it is.

JOHN LIMBRICK . I am an officer of Bow Street office, I stopped the prisoner on the 23d of last month, between six and seven in the evening, just by Bagnigge Wells, he had the large pieces of iron on his shoulder, and these short pieces tucked in his waistcoat, I asked him what he had got there, he said, old iron, he and his wife went round the country buying old iron, I took him to the light, I said,

"I think I know your face, you are a wheeler, I think you work at Battle Bridge," he denied it, I told him I would find it out, I knew all the wheelers thereabouts, and took him along to Battle Bridge, he owned that he worked for Mr. Smith, I took him to Mr. Smith, he there said he took it from Mr. Smith's shop, he went down upon his knees, and begged Mr. Smith would forgive him.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 45,

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

243. ELEANOR HANNAN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 19th of February twenty-three yards of cloth, value 20 l. the property of William Self .

WILLIAM SELF . On the 3d of December last, I went into Mrs. Simpson's for a porter, the prisoner followed me, I gave her the cloth, and a card where I live at Hackney. I asked her whether she could read, she said she could not, but she would ask, she should be sure to find it. I then walked on briskly when I got to the bottom of Wood-street, I turned round and saw her coming, I then walked on supposing she would follow me and bring the cloth. After I got home and waiting near an hour, I felt uneasy about my property, I returned back to Mrs. Simpson's in Noble-street and enquired if she knew the prisoner; she said the prisoner was recommended to her by Mr. Triggey to serve her with butter and eggs.

Q. Are you sure this is the woman - A. I believe she is so far, if she is the person that followed me out of the public house, I will swear that she is the person that had my property.

THOMAS TRIGGEY. I keep the Crown public-house, Water-street, Strand, the prisoner has been in the habit of serving my house with things for a twelvemonth past, she represented that she had a large family of children, I recommended her to Mrs. Simpson to sell her butter and eggs.

MARY SIMPSON . I live in Noble-street, Foster-lane, I only know that the woman was recommended by Mr. Triggey. Mr. Self came in for a porter, there was none there; this woman offered to carry the parcel, she went out to carry the parcel for Mr. Self The prisoner's basket and eggs were left at my house.

Mr. Walford Will you venture to swear to the prisoner - A. I will venture to swear that the woman that came from Mr. Triggey is the woman. It was pretty near three weeks before I saw her again. I do not pretend to swear to her.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

244. JOHN HOLMES was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 2d of February , twenty-four boxes, value 7 l. the property of George Nightingale .

GEORGE NIGHTINGALE . I am a carver and gilder in Leadenhall-street. On the 2d of February , I sent my servant Joseph Prior to the City-road, for twenty-four mahogany boxes. On his return in the evening, he said he was robbed in Bishopsgate church yard .

JOSEPH PRIOR . I live with Mr. Nightingale. On the 2d of September, I went to the City road for twenty-four boxes, about ten minutes after six in the evening, as I was returning in Bishopsgate churchyard, I rested my boxes on the pitching block. The prisoner Holmes, as I suppose it to be, came and asked me the way to Moorfields, I directed him, then he asked me the way to Pitman's, I told him I believed it was two or three doors round the corner by the right hand, there was another man standing at the public house door, the prisoner says to the other man this is the way, and I saw no more of that man, I looked for two or three minutes to see which way Holmes went to see if he went right. I lost sight of him, when I turned round to look for my goods they were gone. I ran after Holmes, I could see no more of him.

Q. Did you ever get your boxes again - A. They have been recovered. I cannot swear to the prisoner's face, but he had on a velveteen jacket and small-clothes. This was on Saturday, on Wednesday I saw the boxes again.

SAMUEL MILLER . I am an officer. In company with Freeman, I was in a narrow court in Houndsditch, two men came past us, one a taller man than this. This one was carrying a large bundle, I was obliged to get close to the wall to let him pass; the other had nothing, he went before; I said to my fellow officer all was not right, I followed them up the court, he rushed into a house, and I after him, I took hold of the property and him, likewise I asked him how he came by that, he said that a man at the end of the court had given them to him to bring up to the first house in the court; I took him and his companion into custody, and took him to Whitechapel office. These are the boxes.

Prior. That is the parcel that I lost.

Prisoner's Defence. On Saturday night I was coming down Houndsditch, a man met me by this court, he asked me to carry this load up to the house, and as soon as I went into the house, that gentleman attacked me. So help me God I am innocent of the robbery.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

245. ALICE WILSON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 8th of February , a watch, value 5 l. a gold chain, value 1 l. two gold seals, value 1 l. and a watch key, value 6 d. the property of James Hadley from his person .

JAMES HADLEY . I am a publican ; I live in Hanway-street, Oxford-street. On Friday the 8th of February, I had been to a dinner at the London Tavern; I left it between eight and nine o'clock, I was in liquor.

Q. Were you sober enough to know whether you met the prisoner - A. No, I was very drunk.

SAMUEL DICKINS . I am an officer of Bow-street office. About one o'clock I saw Mr. Hadley come out of a house in Charles-street, Drury-lane , very much intoxicated I said to Limbrick I think that gentleman has been robbed; about two or three minutes afterwards, Mr. Hadley turned back again, and said, I have lost my watch, and I think I have lost it at that house. The prisoner and another woman stood at the door, and as we drew towards them, the prisoner ran in the house up stairs, I followed the prisoner, told her she had robbed the man, and I must see if she had got his watch, and directly took it fell out of her bosom; I took her to the watchhouse.

Prosecutor. It is my watch, I do not recollect any thing that passed; I was excessively drunk.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

246. WILLIAM GIBBS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 2d of February , a carcase of mutton, value 1 l. 10 s. the property of William Sack .

WILLIAM SACK . I am a butcher ; I live at No. 14, High-street, Islington. The carcase of mutton was hung inside of the shop at Newgate market .

WILLIAM SACK , JUNIOR. I am son to the last witness. On Saturday the 2nd of February I saw George Hayes the porter go down Newgate-street with the sheep in his arms. I knew the sheep by the score in his side.

GEORGE HAYES . I am a porter at Newgate-market. I was standing in the market, the prisoner asked me if I wanted a job; I told him I did; I followed the prisoner, he desired me to take the sheep out of that shop; I did, and followed him; he went down Newgate-street, and took it of me, and told me I could not carry it; I thought he meaned, not to pay me; I told him I could carry two; he took me down Snow-hill, to Fox and Knot Court, there we had a quartern of gin in three outs. I followed him into Black Boy-alley, Chick-lane, he took the sheep off my shoulder. I am sensible the prisoner is the man, I knew him before.

THOMAS GILL . I am an officer. I took the witness Hayes before the alderman; he was let go; he said the prisoner employed him. On Thursday I took the prisoner in his own house in Warwick-lane; he is a butcher I believe.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing of it, I am innocent.

GUILTY , aged 32.

Confined Three Months in Newgate , and Whipped in Jail .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

247. JACOB FREDERICK BRAVO was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of January , a pair of pistols, value 16 l. the property of Gregory de Feinagle .

GREGORY DE FEINAGLE . I am a German; I believe the prisoner is a Dane. I am a professor of the art of helping the memory .

Q. When had you any pistols - A. I had them in a sack at the Custom House in Portsmouth. The prisoner came in a ship with me to Portsmouth.

WILLIAM HENRY PYBUS . When the prosecutor arrived at Portsmouth, he set off the next day, he arrived in London on the 12th or 13th of December, and met with the prisoner; he asked him if he had any knowledge of the sack; he said, no; after being interogated; he said the sack was in the birth in the ship. We found the sack in the ship, but the pistols were not in the sack. The custom-house officer told us that Bravo took the pistols away in a handkerchief; I went to Bravo's lodgings, and took an officer; the prisoner denied having the pistols.

Q. Did you ever find the pistols - A. Yes; about the 15th of January, in London Wall, at Mr. Read's.

- MENDOZA. The prisoner was brought to my house by Lumbazy; he said, here is a young man, a mate of a ship, he has a pair of pistols to sell. I said I was no judge, I would shew them to the trade.

Q. Did you receive the pistols of the prisoner - A. I did, on commission to sell them; I sold them to Levy for three pounds, and took the prisoner the money; he gave me half a crown for my trouble.

MOSES LEVY . On Thursday evening my son took the pistols that I had of Mendoza to Mr. Read.

MR. READ. I keep a broker's shop in London Wall. These are the pistols I bought, I gave three pound ten shillings for them. They are foreign made.

SOLOMON LEVY . The same pistols I received of my father I carried to Mr. Read.

Prosecutor. These are my pistols.

Prisoner's Defence. I am in a destitute and unfortunate situation. My passage to the British shore was totally unavoidable. I am a native of Sweden; owing to the conscripts made by the French government I left my home. I have no qualification for being a soldier, being subject to fits. My father proposed to send me to Philadelphia; having procured for me money he sent me to embark in an American vessel. Not being able to go in the American vessel I was recommended to take a passage on board a ship bound to England, from which it was told me that I might easily go to America. I am not only destitute of a communication to my father, but prevented from my voyage to America. Fortunately my destitute case is made known to a gentleman, this gentleman knows my father; it is from the kind munificence of this gentleman I am obliged to for my existence.

GUILTY, aged 22.

Judgment respited .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

248. SARAH MARTIN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of January , seven shawls, value 1 l. the property of David Davis .

WILLIAM MEBROSE . I am shopman to David Davis , Aldgate High-street , he is a linen-draper . On the 28th of January, about two o'clock in the afternoon, a person came in the shop and told me that the prisoner had taken some shawls that were inside of the door; I pursued the prisoner, brought her back, and took from her these seven shawls, they are my master's property.

Prisoner's Defence. A woman said to me, here old woman, take these shawls, and go along.

GUILTY , aged 60.

Confined Two Months in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

249. MARY BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of February , fourteen shawls, value 1 l. 8 s. 6 d. and a handkerchief, value 9 s. the property of Sarah Foster , spinster .

MRS. MORGAN. I live with Mrs. Foster, she keeps a linen-drapers shop in Devonshire-street , she is a quaker . Mrs. Foster is in the habit of relieving persons, and the prisoner came there sometimes to be relieved.

Q. When did you lose these handkerchiefs - A. On Thursday morning, between twelve and one o'clock, she came to enquire for Mrs. Forster; I left her in the passage, and went up to Mrs. Foster; the prisoner in the mean while went through the parlour into Mrs. Foster's shop and took these things.

Q. You do not know that she took them - A. No. When I came down stairs I saw her go out of the door. I did not know that she had got any thing then. We did not miss the things for an hour or more.

MR. SMITH. On Thursday, between the hours ofone and two, I was crossing by Bishopgate Churchyard to go to Moorfields; I saw a little girl, and underneath her tattered great coat I saw a piece of a handkerchief, and a piece of shawls. I asked the child if they were for sale; she said, no, they were her mother's, that lived in Whitechapel; I said, I want to know who your mother is. The shawls were taken from the child and handed to me. The child went off, I followed the child; passing up the middle of Bishopgate-church yard the prisoner made a stand. The child began to cry, and said she had got them things from Mrs. Forster's; I said to the prisoner, is this your child? she said

"no, I know her, I do not deny what I have done." I asked who was Mrs. Forster; the child took me to Mrs. Forster's. At Mrs. Foster's door she said, I am the mother, and this is Mrs. Foster's. I took the property; I knocked at the door, and Mrs. Foster said they were her property.

MR. SAPWELL. I took the prisoner into custody. These are the shawls.

Mrs. Morgan. I know they are Mrs. Foster's property.

Prisoner's Defence. I never was in such a place before. I know nothing about it.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

250. THOMAS WILKINSON was indicted for that he on the 29th of December , was servant to John Fraile , and was employed and entrusted to receive money for and on his account, and being such servant so employed and entrusted, did receive and take into his possession, the sum of three pounds eight shillings and ten pence, for and on account of his master, and that he afterwards fraudulently did embezzle, secrete, and steal the same .

JOHN FRAILE . I am a baker ; I live in Pemberton-row, Fleet-street. On the 21st of January, from suspicion, I took the bills and delivered them to my customers.

Q. You employed the prisoner to take money for you; what money did he receive for you - A. Three pounds eight shillings and ten-pence. I cannot particularly tell the day; it was from the 24th of December, to the 29th; he never accompted to me for the money.

ROSE PANTON . I am a butcher, I live in Fleet-market; I deal with Mr. Fraile for bread.

Q. Did you pay him any money in December - A. I cannot say in which month I paid it; I paid it, and that is all I can say; this is the bill.

"Paid, John Wilkinson ," is the prisoner's hand-writing; I saw him sign it.

Q. Now Mr. Fraile how do you prove the prisoner never paid this bill to you - A. Here is a bill I wrote out for three pounds eight shillings and ten-pence, and that bill I never was paid.

PETER MURPHY . I am the officer that took the prisoner into custody; he said he had taken some of his master's money, and spent it in the country; he was sorry for it.

Prisoner's Defence. I was threatened by a taylor that I owed a little money to; he threatened to arrest me; so I made free with my master's money.

GUILTY , aged 31.

Fined 1 s. and discharged.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

251. HERBERT HARDEN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of June , an iron cot frame, value 10 s. 6 d. the property of Thomas Morgan and Joseph Saunders .

SAMUEL GOLDWORTHY . On a Wednesday in the month of June I saw the prisoner go out of Messrs. Morgan and Saunders premises, with this cot frame; I told a man that slept in the house of it. After six months had expired the prisoner left our master.

STEPHEN LAVENDAR . I am an officer of Bow-street. I searched the prisoner's house on the 18th of January in Denzil-street, Clare-market, I there saw the cot frame, now produced; the prisoner was at home; he said, it had been accounted for and deducted out of his wages.

JOSEPH SAUNDERS. Q. You are a partner in the house of Morgan and Saunders - A. Yes; we live in Catherine-street , about the middle of January last the prisoner left us.

Q. All you know you searched this man's house, and this cot was found - A. Exactly so. I believe it is our cot; I cannot swear to it, we have so many.

Mr. Walford. At the time this man left your service were there there any wages due to him - A. I cannot say.

Q. Do not you believe there is - A. I cannot answer that.

Q. Has not he claimed money of you - A. He made a claim that is not settled.

Q. Was not that claim above an hundred pound - A. He made a claim most certainly.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

252. JOSEPH WILD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of January , in the dwelling-house of Thomas Vincent , two twenty pound bank notes, two twenty pound promissory notes, a five pound bank note, and two one pound bank notes , the property of Charles Vere , and William Rose . And

TWO OTHER COUNTS for like offence, only varying the manner of charging them.

Mr. Gleed. counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Heath.

253. THOMAS DAVIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of January , a chest of tea, value 20 l. the property of Persival North , William Hoare , William Nanson , and Thomas Simpson .

SECOND COUNT, the property of William Dobson .

WILLIAM DOBSON . I am carman to Mr. North and company. On the 30th of January I went with my waggon loaded with chests of tea to Downes's Wharf, Lower East Smithfield . I had them all safe till I got to Downes's Wharf; I was obliged to stop in the gateway; it is a narrow gateway; there was an alarm that I was robbed. I asked the wharfinger to send some men out to find the man. I staid by the waggon for fear I should lose more. Two men went out and brought the chest back.

JOHN WILLOVEY . In consequence of an alarm I found the man at the top of King Henry's-yard, Nightingale-lane, he dropped the chest.

Q. Did you see who dropped the chest - A. The prisoner, I knew him before. When he dropped the chest, he ran off.

Mr. Knapp. What time of night was this - A. Between six and seven o'clock, I saw him as plain as I see you now. We did not find him again till the next day, at the Lord Nelson, King-street rendezvous. Smith the officer was with me.

Q. You pitched upon him directly did not you - A. I pitched upon a wrong man first, by reason of the room being dark. I recollected myself, finding I was wrong, and then I pointed him out directly. I swear to him positively now.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. justice Bailey.

254. ROBERT TURNER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of February , from the person of John Crick , a bank note, value 1 l. his property.

JOHN CRICK . I am a hackney coachman . On the 5th of February I went into the Feathers public house in Oxford-road ; at the time I went in there, I fell asleep in the tap-room, having been fatigued all night.

Q. Before you went to sleep was the prisoner there - A. Yes, I saw him there the witness awoke me, I saw the prisoner then. The one pound note was in my right hand breeches pocket, the last time I saw it when I went into the house between five and six o'clock in the morning.

THOMAS HARRISON . I am a coachman; I was in the Feathers; I saw the prisoner put his hand into the prosecutor's pocket. I awoke the prosecutor, and told him of it.

HENRY JONES. I saw the prisoner take his hand away from the prosecutor's pocket. I observed a bit of paper in it, which he put into his fob pocket.

WILLIAM PETHERICK . I am a constable. I found the note in the right fob of the prisoner; the prisoner shammed stupid, and pretended to know nothing of it.

Q. to prosecutor. You cannot swear to that note - A. No, I had a note in my pocket when I went into the house.

Prisoner's Defence. I had this note in my pocket a day or two.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Heath.

255. MARY THOMPSON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 4th of February , a basket, value 1 s. and twenty-one pounds of candles, value 16 s. the property of William Smith Sen. and William Smith Jun.

WILLIAM SMITH . I am a tallow chandler , my son William Smith is my partner. We live in Red Lion-street .

THOMAS FLAG . I live with Mr. Smith. On the 4th of February, about nine at night, the prisoner came into the shop, she asked for a three halfpenny candle, I served her, I got on the steps, taking down some candles, I kept my eye upon her, she took a basket of candles and put it under her cloak, and went out of the shop, I pursued her and took her, she let the basket of candles fall on the stones, and then she said she had nothing but the three-halfpenny candle she had bought and paid for. They are my master's candles, the watchman took charge of her.

Prisoner's Defence. I hope my age and distress will have some weight with you.

GUILTY , aged 60.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Heath.

256. JOHN SYLVIA was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 10th of February , a saw, value 5 s. the property of William Berkingshaw ; and a trowel, value 1 s. the property of John Abbott .

WILLIAM BERKINGSHAW . I am a carpenter . I lost my saw from 17, Grafton-street . I had left it there at twelve o'clock on the 10th of January, I returned at one o'clock the saw was gone.

Mr. MILLEDGE. I am a carpenter; I took the prisoner with the saw on him in Grafton-street.

JOHN BAKER . I am an officer this was delivered to me with the prisoner by the last witness.

Prosecutor. It is my saw.

Prisoner's Defence. I have nothing to say, I leave it to the jury.

GUILTY , aged 36.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Heath.

257 MARY MARCH was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 4th of February , twentyseven pound weight of hemp, value 13 s. 6 d. the property of Edward Buckingham and Francis Buckingham .

EDWARD BUCKINGHAM . I am in partnership with my father Francis, I am a twine maker , Hampstead-road.

Q. Was the prisoner in your employ - A. She was not, she was sister to a person in my employ.

JAMES JOHN SMITH . I am a patrol of Bow-street office. On the 4th of this month, I stopped the prisoner at Battle-bridge, facing the White hart she was coming from Tottenham-court-road way, she had this hemp in this bag under her cloak, she stopped to rest, I asked her what she had got, she said hemp, she was going to take it to Mr. Griffiths's rope-ground, Hackney-road, and I might go with her, I should find it all right. I asked her where she brought it from, she said just above, I asked her whether it was Mrs. Cooper's which was close by, she said no, I told her I must detain her, and took her to the office.

Q. to prosecutor. Look at the hemp, and point out what you know to be yours - A. This dozen had been delivered out to her sister to spin on the Friday before, I am sure from the manner it is made up.

Prisoner's Defence. I found the bag and the hemp in Tottenham-court-road.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction, and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Bailey.

258. JAMES JENNINGS and RICHARD BAXTER were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of February , three pieces of deal, value 6 s. the property of William Robert Laxton .

JOHN PRESTON. I am a patrol of Bow-street office. On the 7th of this month, between six and seven o'clock in the evening, I stopped the prisoners just at the end of High-street, Marybone. Jennings had two pieces of deal, and Baxter had one. They said they had bought them of John, at Mr. Travis's yard; they had given twelve shillings for them.

JOHN CHAPMAN . I am foreman at Mr. Travis's. I never sold them deals to either of the prisoners.

JOHN EATON . I am in the employ of Mr. Laxton, Gower-street. The prisoners have been under my employ all the winter.

Q. Look at the deals, whose property are they - A. I do not know; we have some like them.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Heath.

259. JANE WALKER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2nd of February , a guinea, and half a guinea , the property of James Morgan .

JAMES MORGAN . I reside at Highbury-place. On the 2nd of February, about ten o'clock at night, I was returning home, and crossing the City-road , direct fronting of the Shepherd and Shepherdess, I was accosted by the prisoner, she got hold of my arm, and pressed me very much for money to drink; I told her I thought she had enough already: I told her to let me go, or else I must push her in the mud; she let me go, and cautioned me to take care of my watch, as I was going to cross the fields; and on leaving her I felt at my watch, I perceived my pocket partly turned inside out. When she had hold of me I imagine she put her hand behind me underneath my coat. I immediately went back to a lamp, knowing I had some silver in the other pocket I took it out to see whether I had mixed the gold with the silver, I found I had not; I ran up and down the City-road, I could not find the prisoner; I went into the public-house where the prisoner first accosted me; there I saw the prisoner at the bar drinking with some more people; a constable was in the house; the prisoner was searched immediately; he found a guinea and a half upon her.

MICHAEL WINDER . I am a constable. I searched the prisoner; I turned her pocket out; I found a guinea and a half in her pocket, some halfpence, and silver. The gentleman said he could swear to the half guinea.

Q. to prosecutor. Look at that half guinea, is there any thing particular about it - A. I wafered a letter with it; I put the ruler upon it, that made a dent upon it.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going towards Islington, this gentleman accosted me; he put his hand down my bosom; he gave me a sixpence. and some halfpence. The gentleman came to where I had something to drink, and said I had robbed him of a guinea and a half; I said if I had it he had given it me among the halfpence.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave her a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Heath.

260. WILLIAM CLAYTON was indicted of feloniously stealing, on the 22nd of January , a silk handkerchief, value 5 s. the property of John Davis , from his person .

The prosecutor being called, and not appearing in court, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Heath.

261. CATHERINE BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of January , two sheets, value 6 s. and a counterpane, value 2 s. the property of Ambrose Gedge .

MARY GEDGE. I am the wife of Ambrose Gedge .

Q. Did you lose any sheets and a counterpane - A. Yes; out of a garret I left to Thomas Robinson, they were part of the bed clothes.

THOMAS ROBINSON . Q. Did you take this apartment - A. Yes; I give half a crown a week ready furnished.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Heath.

262. MARY HACKETT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of February , from the person of Thomas Jenkins , a watch, value 2 l. a purse, value 1 d. a dollar, a shilling, two one pound bank notes, and a two pound bank note , his property.

THOMAS JENKINS . I lodge at the Hampshire Hog in the Strand.

Q. On the 3d of February last where were you - A. I do not know, I was much in liquor.

Q. Had you any property about you - A. Yes, a two pound note, two one pound notes, a dollar, a shilling, a purse, and a watch, I did not know that I had lost my money untill the watchman came up stairs. The watchman shook the prisoner, my purse dropped from her. I saw the prisoner take my watch out of her bosom.

TIMOTHY LANE . I am a watchman. On the 3d of February I was called into a lodging house in Church-lane, St. Giles's; I shook the prisoner; the purse dropped down, it contained a one pound note, a dollar, and a shilling. When I came from searching the bed I went to search her again; she put down the watch. This is the watch and the purse.

Q. to prosecutor. Look at the watch - A. It is my watch, and this is my purse.

Prisoner's Defence. He laid the purse in my lap; I ask him whether he did or did not.

Prosecutor. That I cannot tell; I did not know whether I had the watch with me at the time.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr justice Bailey.

263. JANE HOLLAND was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of January , a morocco stand,value 1 s 6 d. and three glass cruets, value 3 s. the property of Henry Isaacs .

HENRY ISAACS . I am a glass cutter in Great Queen-street, Lincoln's Inn Fields .

ELEAZER DAVIS. The prisoner came to Mr. Isaacs. She took a morocco stand from a place underneath the window; I pursued her and overtook her, she had the morocco stand with her; this is the morroco stand, it is my master's property, I saw her take it.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought it in the street.

GUILTY , aged 50.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Heath.

264 JOSEPH SELD was indicted for that he on the 7th of January , was servant to Richard Gypson , and was employed and entrusted to receive money for him; that being such servant, and so employed, did receive and take into his possession, the sum of 2 l. 5 s. on account for his master, and that he afterwards did feloniously steal and secrete the same .

RICHARD GYPSON . I am a stable-keeper , at Great Stanmore, Middlesex. The prisoner was my post-boy ; he was employed to receive money for me of the persons he drove. He drove the lady of Sir Sydney Smith from the Priory at Stanmore to Cleveland-row. On the 7th of January, Mr. Baker the footman paid him the money, I never saw him again until he was apprehended, then he had spent the money.

JAMES BAKER . I live with Sir Sydney Smith.

Q. You came up with Lady Smith from the priory - A. I did; my lady gave me orders to pay for the chaise; I gave 2 l. 5 s. for the horses, and 7 s. for themselves.

Prisoner's Defence. I got intoxicated, and when I came home and had done my horses up. I looked at my money, I had lost a one pound note. It was not in my power to pay it. When I went up stairs my master was in bed. I made the best of my way off.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Heath.

265 JAMES MILLS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 20th of November , a one horse chaise, value 5 l. the property of Thomas Brownutt ,

Mr. Knapp counsel for the prosecution declining to offer any evidence, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Heath.

266 STEPHEN HOWARD was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 29th of January , a pellise, value 20 s. the property of Francis Calder .

FRANCIS CALDER . I am a haberdasher , No. 7, Market-street, Oxford-road . On the 29th of January, I saw the prisoner take a pellise, which was exposed to sale inside of my door; I instantly pursued him, and took him with the pellise upon him. This is the pellise, I know it to be mine.

Prisoner's Defence It laid on the pavement by the door, I picked it up.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY, aged 16.

Judgment respited .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Bailey.

267 JOHN MYERS and ESTHER DICKSON were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 12th of January , a hat, value 7 s. the property of John Jackson and Edward Hasler .

The prosecutors were called, and not appearing in Court, the prisoners were

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

268 JAMES HUGHES was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 8th of January , a coat, value 4 s. a waistcoat, value 1 s. a pair of breeches, value 4 s. and a jacket, value 1 s. the property of Thomas Courtney .

THOMAS COURTNEY . I am a labourer ; I live in Blue Anchor-yard, Rosemary-lane . The prisoner lodged in the same house with me; on the 8th of January, between twelve and one o'clock, I put my clothes in the box, and locked it; I went out to my work, and at night I went to my box; I found the box broken open and the property gone. The prisoner did not come to bed as usual. I went in search of him, and found him in the street, he had my jacket on; and my coat, waistcoat, and breeches, he had left with Israel in Lower East Smithfield.

MARK ISRAEL . I am a salesman, Lower East Smithfield. On January the 8th, the prisoner brought this coat, waistcoat, and breeches to my shop, I lent him a crown, I said the clothes were not good enough for me, he left these clothes with me; and when he returned from his captain, he said he would lay some money out with me.

Courtney. The coat, waistcoat, and breeches are mine.

JOHN TIMBRILL . I am a constable; on the 9th of January the prisoner was brought to me, he had this jacket on; the prosecutor's wife, said they formerly had given him this jacket; but he had not behaved so well as he should and they took it from him.

Prisoner's Defence A man gave me these clothes and I left them for five shillings for the man, he was to have them back again, when he got his money from his captain, I never saw the prosecutor wear any other clothes then these he has on now. I thought they were the man's clothes that gave them me. As to the jacket, his wife lent me it.

GUILTY , aged 59.

Confined Fourteen Days in Newgate , and Whipped in Jail .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

269 MARY WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 26th of January , two pewter quart pots, value 2 s. the property of Richard Walters .

JOHN HATHAWAY . I keep the Rose public-house, in Wimpole-street. On the 26th of JanuaryMr. Edgmore brought the prisoner to my house, with a quart and a pint pot of mine, I searched her and found upon her two other quart pots, belonging to Mr. Walters. These are the pots.

RICHARD WALTERS . I am a publican ; I keep the Duke of York, Great Marybone-street ; these two quart pots are mine.

Mr. EDGMORE. I am a confectioner; I was standing at my window; I saw the prisoner take two pots up. I took her to Mr. Hathaway.

Prisoner's Defence. I met a person I use to wash for, she gave me the quart pots, and told me to bring them to her house she would give me a day's work of scowering.

GUILTY , aged 52.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

270. BENJAMIN GOODALL was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 21st of January , a bed, value 10 s. a bolster, value 3 s. and a coverlid, value 3 s. the property of Benjamin Wallis .

BENJAMIN WALLIS . I live in Charles-street, Drury-lane . The prisoner took the property out of my front parlour.

JOHN DUPONT . I am a patrol; on the 21st of January, about a quarter before seven in the morning, I met the prisoner with this parcel by Cross-lane, going into Parker-street, Drury-lane. I went to take him into custody, he dropped the parcel and ran off. I am sure he is the man.

BENJAMIN MYATT . I am a patrol; on the evening of the same day, I was going down Charles-street, Mrs. Wallis called watch, she had got this man. I took him to the watch-house.

Prosecutor, They are my property.

Prisoner's Defence. On the morning of the robbery, I did not leave my lodging until nine o'clock; I did not return till six in the evening, when my landlady said, I had robbed them, add gave charge of me, My Prosecutor gets his living by buying stolen things.

GUILTY , aged 42.

Confined Six months in the House of Correction .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

271. ANN GREEN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 25th of January , a gold ring, value 3 s. the property of John Jones .

JOHN JONES , I live at 13, Thornton-place, Quebec street ; I am a bricklayer .

Q. Do you know this young woman - A. I do to my sorrow, she and her husband lodged in my house. This ring was lost out of a glass on the side board in my parlour on the 25th of January, I saw the ring on the 24th in the glass. I had her taken up on the 26th.

ANN JONES . I had seen the ring about an hour before it was found upon Mrs. Green, the ring was in the glass. I saw Mrs. Green produce it, she said we had no occasion to make such a fuss about the ring there it was.

Prisoner's Defence. When she called me down stairs, she asked me if I had seen the ring, I said I had, I have got your ring on my finger, she said never mind, I am not in a hurry for it; this was on the Wednesday night, I delivered the ring to Mrs. Jones. On Saturday, he went for the constable, he told the constable all he wanted was to give him a night's schooling.

Q. to prosecutor. Was the ring delivered by her to you on the Wednesday. - A. No, on the Friday evening. I got a constable the next day at my dinner hour.

Q. On the Friday evening you told Mrs. Green that you would take her up, and so there she sat still in her lodging - A. She did.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury before Mr. Common Serjeant.

272. JOSEPH ADDELL was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 15th of February , two hundred weight of potatoes, value 4 s. and a sack, value 1 s. the property of William Turner .

RICHARD FITCH . On the 15th instant did you load any potatoes to go to Young's Quay - A. I did, I was ordered to put two tons of potatoes in sacks in the waggon, driven by the prisoner. I put twenty sacks in the waggon.

GEORGE DANIEL ELLISTON . Q. You superintend the business of William Turner - A. Yes, on the 15th of February, I gave the prisoner a bill for two tons of potatoes, he was to take them them to Mr. Maclean, Young's Quay, Thames-street. In consequence of information, I got Mr. Rickards and Mr. Baker to watch the prisoner.

WILLIAM LOW BAKER. I am the master of a West Indiaman; I, with Mr. Rickards, watched the prisoner along Mile-end road; we were walking towards Bow, and he was coming from Stratford, when we got opposite Thompson's Nursery. The prisoner got up in the waggon, he continued at the tail of the waggon, the tail board was then down, he put the sack at the near side of the waggon; as he got out of the waggon the horses went on; the sack fell out of the waggon, the sack bursted in falling out, and he fell out of the waggon; about the fourth part of the sack of potatoes were scattered on the ground; he asked two persons to get the sack in the waggon again, and gave to them the scattered potatoes; he put that sack on the opposite side to where it was before; he put a full sack in the spot where the other sack was before; he drove on to the Coach and Horses, Mile End-road, he drove three doors from the public-house; he looked about seven or eight minutes, when an opportunity offered he got the sack on his back, and hurried into a passage to a stable belonging to the Coach and Horses.

Q. What is the gentleman's name that keeps the Coach and Horses - A. Porter. I met the prisoner coming out; I went in and saw the potatoes in the passage, that led to the stable; I took off the name, William Tnrner upon the sack; I asked the prisoner what he was going to do with the sack of potatoes; he said he thought he had one too many, he wished to leave it there until he returned, he was going to take it back to his master. A constable was sent for, and the prisoner was taken into custody.

Q. Did you see the landlord upon that occasion - A. Yes. The landlord wished the sack to be restored again that there might be an end of the business; he called it a foolish piece of business; the man had made a mistake.

MR. RICKARDS. I observed all the last witness has stated, it is correct.

The prisoner called five witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 32.

Whipped in Jail and discharged.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

273. JAMES YOUNG was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of February , a pelisse, value 16 s. the property of Mary Ball , spinster .

MARY PICARDY . I am an assistant to Mary Ball , 18, Cranbourn-alley . On the 6th of this month, about a quarter past six in the evening, I observed the prisoner coming towards the door; I was about a yard within the shop; he snatched from the side of the window the pelisse that was hanging for sale; I saw him, and pursued him with the cry of stop thief; we caught him in a passage in Earl's-court with the pelisse upon him.

Prisoner's Defence. I was returning from my friends in Whitcomb-street, I heard the cry of stop thief; I saw the man, I followed him. As I was going through the court the man knocked me down; they came up and said it was me. They picked up the pelisse from the ground.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. justice Heath.

274. DANIEL HARTSHORN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of February , two brass cocks, value 6 s. the property of Thomas Sherman .

THOMAS SHERMAN. I live at the corner of Crown-street, Finsbury-square.

Mr. Alley Pray, sir, were not you tried here, and stood in the pillory - A. Yes, I was convicted upon supposition of writing a letter.

Q. You were convicted upon a charge of a libel, you were put in the pillory, were not you - A. Why you must find it out. I believe my character is as good as yours.

COURT. I remember not a more infamous libel than that. You live at the corner of Finsbury-square, what business are you - A. A plumber . The prisoner was in my service.

Q. Did you at any time lose any brass cocks - A. I lost a quantity; I have lost brass articles to the amount of ten pounds. On the Wednesday the prisoner came, about a fortnight ago; I missed four brass cocks on the Friday.

Q. What reason have you for charging him with stealing two brass cocks - A. I set Daniel Hartshorn to clean the windows, he emptied them; I asked him if he had seen any thing of them brass cocks; he said, no.

Q. When did you see them again - A. I never saw them that I missed on that day. On the Monday following the mistress sent her maid up to make the prisoner's bed; I was not at home.

Q. Were there any brass cocks shewed you - A There were; about two o'clock in the morning, when I came home Sarah Worrall produced two brass cocks to me; there is my private mark upon them; they are worth two shilling and sixpence.

Mr. Alley. Did not you mark them cocks upon the Monday, they were produced by the girl - A. I cannot say: I possibly might.

Q. They are marked with a point mark, when did you put that private mark - A. Ever since they have been in my possession.

Q. Did not you mark them for the purpose of having them put in the boy's pocket - A. I never suspected the boy at all.

COURT. Be cautious, that girl will be examined, from her youth, probably, she will tell us the truth - Give fair and direct answers - A. They were marked when they first came into my possession; they were marked a second time, after he had the second examination.

Mr. Alley. Have not you proposed to stop the prosecution if the boy's father would make you a comprimise - A. I told them I should not come here unless I was compelled.

Q. Were not you accused at Hatton Garden - A. I have nothing to my upon the business.

COURT. Were you before the magistrate upon a charge - A. I was.

Q. How long ago is that - A. I do not know.

Mr. Alley. How long did you stay in Clerkenwell prison - A. Three or four days.

Q. Was that before you stood in the pillory - A. After.

COURT. How long ago is it since you stood in the pillory - A. I do not know.

Q. How long is it since you were discharged from Newgate - A. A twelvemonth.

Mr. Alley. How long is it ago since you wrote a letter charging a poor man with a crime - A. I never did it.

Q. It was proved by the jury that you did it - did you put these brass cocks into the poor boy's clothes - A. Never in my life.

Q. Do not you know that the poor boy's relations are in some respectable way of life of some property and that his father is a coach owner - A. I only know he is a coachman.

SARAH WORRALL . Q. What age are you - A. I am not quite fourteen. I live servant with Mr. Sherman; I lived a fortnight with him before this happened.

Q. How long had the lad lived there before he was charged with this offence - A. Not a week; he came on the Wednesday, and these brass cocks were found on the Monday following. On the Monday morning I went up to make his bed, the prisoner was not at home; on my turning the bed I found one brass cock between the two beds, I told my mistress of it. I went up of my own accord about an hour afterwards, I looked in the boy's great coat pocket, I found another brass cock. I took it down to my mistress.

Q. How soon after was the boy questioned about it - A. About seven o'clock in the evening. My master came home about two o'clock in the afternoon. The boy said he knew nothing at all about it; Mr. Armstrong took him to the justice.

Q. Is Mr. Armstrong here - A. I believe not.

Prisoner's Defence. On Monday morning master said he was going out to do a job; I went with him, we did not come away from the house till one o'clock.We both went to dinner. After master had done dinner I sat down to dinner alongside of the girl. We went to work and came home about six o'clock. I told master that I wanted to clean the harness; master has got a horse and two or three chaises; he said, very well; I went into the stable and cleaned the harness, he told me he wanted to go out shortly; I cleaned the horse, and was cutting his tail; I went to tea, and master went out. I went to make a finish of the horses tail, Mr. Armstrong came into the stable; Mr. Armstrong knows me well; he said, my lad, your master accuses you of stealing these cocks; is this your coat; I said yes. Your master has found these two cocks in your coat, tell me the truth; I said, before I would take away any thing from my master I would cut my head off. I was taken away; my friends would have known nothing of it if it had not been for Mr. Armstrong.

The prisoner called five witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

275. GEORGE TRAVIL was indicted for that he, on the 12th of January , was servant to John Dowding , and was employed and entrusted to receive money for him, and being such servant, and so employed, did receive and take into his possession the sum of one shilling and sixpence, and that he afterwards feloniously did secrete and steal the same .

JOHN DOWDING . I live at 58, Featherstone-street. The prisoner has lived with me five years; I entrusted him to receive money for me of my customers. I lost a great deal of property, and I did not know how I lost them; I sent Mrs. Palmer to buy a plate of tin, and a sauce-pan, with a view to see whether he would bring that money to accompt. This was on the 12th of January, about the middle of the day. I staid till she came back with the articles, then I went home; the prisoner was in the shop, I saw him; he throwed down two shillings; he said he had sold a three quart saucepan, and did a job in the bargain. That is all he gave account for. This was on the Saturday, on Monday he was taken up.

ESTHER PALMER . On the 12th of January Mr. Dowding gave me one shilling and sixpence, I was to buy a three pint saucepan and a sheet of tin. I gave the prisoner a shilling and six penny pieces, and got the saucepan and the sheet of tin. I did not mean to buy them, only to try whether the man was honest. I acted by Mr. Dowding's directions.

The prisoner called five witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Whipped in Jail and discharged.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

276. JOHN LILES was indicted for feloniously marrying Ann Adams , his former wife , Ann Bates , being then alive .

WILLIAM COOPER . Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. Yes, and I knew Ann Bates before she was married to the prisoner; she was married to him about five years ago the 28th of last October, at the parish church of Maidstone in Kent. I was present at the marriage; I saw his wife last Wednesday. She was a spinster when he married her, about eighteen years of age; she was a publican's daughter, her father kept the Bull in Cranbourne parish. The prisoner was an usher to a school; when he married he came up to London, and set up a school.

ANN ADAMS . Q. Where did you become acquainted with the prisoner - A. I lived with Mr. Moreton as house-maid, at Kensington gravel-pits; he was a schoolmaster ; I became acquainted with the prisoner in the latter end of January, 1810; he was writing master at that school. I was married to John Liles on the 9th of April, 1810 , at St. George's, Hanover-square ; he told me that he was a widower, his wife had been dead two years, her name was Hannah Bates . I was in place when I was married, and continued in place till the 28th of June; he lived with me till the 1st of September.

Q. Did he acquaint you where he was going - A. Yes; he desired me to keep it a secret for fear he should be arrested for a debt to the person that lived with his wife. The day he left me I was told that his first wife was alive. I never saw him from the day he left me till he was apprehended.

Q. Had you saved up any property in service - A. He had only four pounds in money of me, not all at once, at different times; he took away my clothes, part with my consent; he said he had thirty-two pounds to receive, if I would let him have my clothes he would return them me when he took the money.

Q. Have they ever been returned to you - A. No. and I was ill; through improper conduct of his I was obliged to have medical relief of the parish.

MR. RAWLINS. I produce a copy of the register of Maidstone; I had it of the clergyman; it is a true copy of the register. (Read.)

"Register of Marriages, All Saints, Maidstone, 1805. John Liles, of this parish, batchelor, and Ann Adams , of this parish, spinster, were married at this church by banns, on the 28th of October, 1805, by me, John Shelton , assistant minister, in the presence of William Cooper , and Ann Tooley . This marriage was solemnised between us, John Liles , and Ann Bates .

Q. Did you examine this wish the register of St. George's, Hanover-square - A. I did. (Read.)

" John Liles and Ann Adams were both married in this church by banns, April 9th, 1810, by me J. Devil, minister. This marriage was solemnised between us John Lisle and Ann Adams ."

Prisoner's Defence. My first wife and I parted by mutual consent; she proposed for me to sell her at Smithfield; I did not like to do that; there were writings drawn up between friends, and we separated; she consented for me to marry. I acted upon and that involved me into this unfortunate difficulty.

GUILTY , aged 33.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

277. MARY BAKER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of December , a sheet, value 10 s. two pillow cases, value 10 s. two shirts, value 10 s. and a waistcoat, value 1 l. the property of Joseph Brown .

JOSEPH BROWN. I am a butcher , I live in Aldgate High-street . The prisoner was wife to one ofmy servants. On the 29th of December my servant maid told me that she had missed these things; I examined my drawers, I missed a waistcoat. My servant can give a better account than I can. The prisoner admitted that she had taken them, and begged forgiveness.

MARTHA HENDRICK . I live at No. 19, Green Dragon-yard, Whitechapel. The prisoner lived at No. 1, in the same yard.

Q. Did you pawn anything which afterwards turned out to be Mr. Brown's - A. I did; I pawned these things the Friday after Christmas day; she asked me to pawn a sheet and a ring; I pawned them at Mr. Price's in Wentworth-street, in the morning, and in the afternoon I pawned for her two shirts, two pillow cases, and a waistcoat. I gave the duplicates to the prisoner.

JOHN GRIFFITHS . I went to Mr. Windsor's with Martha Hendrick and Mr. Brown, and found a waistcoat and two shirts, and a pillow case.

Mrs. Hendrick. I pawned them in the name of Cole.

Griffiths. She told us that she had pawned a sheet at Price's. The prisoner said she sent her to pledge these things; she said she took them all at one time on Christmas day.

CHARLES WILLIAMS. I am a servant to Mr. Windsor. I produce a waistcoat, two shirts, and two pillow cases; I took them in on the 26th of last December, of a woman, in the name of Martha Cole .

JOHN PRICE . I am a pawnbroker; I produce a sheet pawned on the 28th of December by Martha Hendrick.

Prosecutor. I am sure this is my waistcoat.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY , aged 29.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

278. EMANUEL RICARDO was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of January , two great coats, value 35 s. the property of Joseph Solomons .

- LEVY. I saw the prisoner stand on the threshold of the door of Mr. Solomon's shop; he leaned forward, put his arm into the shop, and brought out two coats with him. These coats were afterwards claimed by Mr. Solomons.

JOSEPH SOLOMONS , JUN. In consequence of Levy's information I went out in search of the prisoner, I found him in Rosemary-lane, he was selling one of the coats at Mr. Marks's shop. I told Mr. Marks they were my father's coats; he was taken in custody.

JOSEPH MARKS. The prisoner was selling one of these coats to me when Solomons came up.

JOSEPH SOLOMONS . I keep a slop shop , No. 14, Upper East Smithfield . I saw the prisoner in custody at Lambeth-street office. These are the great coats, they are mine.

Prisoner's Defence. A Spaniard said they were his coats, he gave me them, he is gone away.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Whipped in Jail and discharged.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

279. JOSEPH BATES was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 22nd of January , two saws, value 8 s. the property of William Daws .

WILLIAM DAWS . I am a broker in Little Queen-street . On the 22nd of January I was sitting in the parlour, the saws were upon the desk in the shop; I saw the saws conveyed away; I ran out and took the prisoner at the corner of the gateway; he had the saws under his coat; these are the saws, they are mine, they are worth eight shillings.

Prisoner's Defence. I have been at sea ever since I have been five years old; I came on shore, got my wages and prize money, which amounted to one hundred and twenty pounds; I was intoxicated; I got robbed of every farthing, and after that I did this thing for which I am now before you.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 29.

Fined 1 s. and discharged.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

280. ELIZABETH OVERET was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of February , three dollars, the property of Edward Huggins , from his person .

EDWARD HUGGINS . I am a carpenter . Last Sunday week I was in Whitechapel, about half after ten, I was standing up making water, three women passed by, one woman stepped up, and forced her hand into my pocket; I had three dollars and eighteen pence in my waistcoat pocket, I perceived the money go out that very instant; as she passed the thrust her hand into my pocket. I never spoke to them, nor they to me. I pursued the prisoner, I never just sight of her; the watchman laid hold of her, she was searched, and no dollar was found upon her. No other person but these women took my money, and the prisoner was one of the three that did take it.

FRANCIS PRIDES . I am a watchman. At the end of George-yard, Whitechapel, I perceived the prosecutor lay hold of the prisoner; he said she had robbed him; he gave me change of her. The officer searched the prisoner in the watchhouse, there was nothing found.

Q. Did you see the prisoner with the two other women - A. No.

Prisoner's Defence. I was not in company with any women when the prosecutor gave charge of me I was searched, I had nothing but a few halfpence about me.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

281. THOMAS BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of February , a sheet, value 2 s. the property of Matthew Sizer , in a lodging-room .

MATTHEW SIZER . I keep the Lord Nelson public-house, Whitechapel . Thomas Brown came in and asked for a lodging for the night, on the 8th of February, I let him a bed.

Q. There were a pair of sheets to the bed, were there - A. Yes. This was on the 8th; on the following morning he came down about ten o'clock, my wife asked him for the sheets; the prisoner said he had fouled it and thrown it under the bed; theprisoner went up stairs, and I followed him; he pulled the sheet from under his apron. I took him to Lambeth-street office.

Prisoner's Defence. When Mrs. Sizer came down stairs Mr. Sizer asked me for the sheet; I went up stairs, took it from under the bed, and was washing it when he came up stairs.

GUILTY , aged 27.

Privately whipped and discharged.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

282. ALEXANDER MEDLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of February , a gown, value 10 s. a sheet, value 10 s. and a petticoat, value 3 s. the property of Thomas Sullivan .

ESTHER SULLIVAN . My husband's name is Thomas Sullivan , he is at sea; I am a servant at the King's Head, Duke-street, Lincolns Inn-Fields . On Sunday morning, the 16th of February, I missed my gown and petticoat out of my box; the box was in the two pair of stairs room; the sheet was my mistresses; I missed all my clothes out of the box; the gown, shawl, and petticoat I have recovered.

JOSEPH CLIFTON . I am shopman to David Cameron in the Strand, pawnbroker. On the 15th of February the prisoner pawned this gown for seven shillings and sixpence.

SAMUEL WRIGHT . I am shopman to Margaret Gordon , pawnbroker, in the Strand. On the 14th of February the prisoner pawned a shawl for four shillings.

THOMAS SOUTHEND . I am shopman to William Hawkins , Drury-lane. On the 16th of February the prisoner pawned with me a petticoat for two shillings.

Prosecutrix. This is my gown, shawl, and petticoat. The prisoner lodged in the house, he is a taylor.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and Publicly Whipped .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

283. WILLIAM HAMMOND , JOHN BARNES , ISAAC HENSLEY , THOMAS ROBERTS , ROBERT SUTTON , WILLIAM STEER , and JOHN CAPEL , were indicted for a libel .

Mr. Bolland, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoners were

ACQUITTED .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

284. JOHN SMITH was indicted for a misdemeanour .

JAMES CROCKER . I am a carman to William Harvey and William Napier , dealers in coals, timber, and flour. On Thursday the 14th of this month I was going out with my master's team, the waggon was loaded with fourteen sacks of flour, a chaldron of coals; and I had some business to do, and the man that was with me drove my team on for me; I overtook the team between White Friers and Bunhill-row; I was shooting the coals at Mr. Allens; the prisoner came to me and said, you are shooting your coals without a measure; I told him I really did not know whether I was or no; I had a little business to do, I was obliged to leave the waggon; I laid down the case to him, and told him the particulars what I left the waggon for; he said he would be my friend, if that was the case. It was a particular friend of his that took the number, he would speak to him for me; I thanked him, and he went away; I did not see him again myself till seven o'clock the next evening; he then said he would settle it for a dollar, and a tankard of porter. I agreed to pay the dollar, and the expences they had been at: the prisoner and another man as a witness went to my apartment; I gave the prisoner a dollar and five shillings in silver; the prisoner wrote me a receipt, and gave it me. After the prisoner gave me the receipt I asked him what authority he had to do such a thing; he said he had authority from government, or by act of parliament to do it, I cannot say which; I then had him taken in custody, and the next day he was taken before the alderman.

Prisoner. He swears to ten shillings; he took up a shilling.

Crocker. You gave me a shilling.

JOSEPH CROCKER . On the 15th of February, at seven o'clock I went to my brother's apartment, the prisoner and another man were there, they related the story that a friend of theirs had taken the number; but had told them to make it up; they said they thought my brother was a hard-working man, they would let him off as light as they could for a few shillings, and something to drink, my brother's wife was very much frightened at seeing them to and fro all the day; I advised them to go over the way to the public-house, and get a little beer till my brother came in. Soon after I went over to see if they had been there; they were at the public-house, and the man that they said had taken the number, he was there. My brother came out with a man of the name of Jackson. The man that they said had taken the number, spoke to me; he said, I will settle with you any where, but not with Jackson the coalman, he knows me. He said Smith and the other man were his men, they could settle as well. We went down to my brother, my brother paid down to the prisoner five shilling and a dollar, and they said they would pay for the liquor that they had; before my brother stopped one shilling they gave a receipt for the ten shillings. After the prisoner had got the money he sent for half a pint of gin, and after that he took the eight shillings and fourpence, put it in paper, and was going out my brother stopped him, and asked him what authority he had to come, and extort money from him; I understood he said he had authority from some Queen-square officer. When my brother charged the constable with him, he went back and flung the money on the table, said he would not have it, and ownedhimself in a fault.

WILLIAM JACKSON . I was present when the dollar and five shillings were paid, Smith said he would pay for the beer, and Crocker took one shilling out of it.

RICHARD FAIRBOURNE. I took the prisoner in custody, and as I shewed my authority he said, I will not take the money.

Prisoner's Defence. I had only eight shillings and fourpence, had I taked twenty shillings, I had that authority I am informed. I only acted for Robinson, he has been out of the way ever since.

GUILTY , aged 49.

To be placed in and upon the Pillory, Two Hours, in market time, in West Smithfield .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

285. HENRY ELLIOTT was indicted for a misdemeanour .

ROBERT WILKINSON . I live at the Cross Keys, Gracechurch-street. On the 19th of January the prisoner called at our house; he called for a glass of grog; it was near nine o'clock; he asked me if captain Armstrong or captain Selby had called there; I told him, no; he said, if they had not they would call that night, or early the next morning. He ordered two beds, two rooms, and two fires, and asked me to procure him a porter to go and fetch the luggage from Billingsgate; he then ordered some supper, and another glass of grog before he went out, that was eleven o'clock.

Q. Did he pay for his grog - A. No, nor for his supper; he ate his supper, and went out with the porter and a gentleman. He turned back in a great hurry, said, can you give me change of a ten pound note, I have no change with me, or can you lend me any; I lent him a dollar and four shillings; he did not say the amount; he said he wanted some money to pay for the luggage. He went away to Billingsgate; the porter that went with him brought him back by force.

Q. Had you known him before - A. No.

FRANCIS JOHNSON . I am a navy agent. I happened to be in the coffee-room, I saw the prisoner, he was having beef steaks for his supper, a gentleman came in and had some turtle-soup; he said, I am very fond of turtle soup, let me have some. After supper he said he thought he knew me, he had lately come from Portsmouth, have you been on board the Royal William? I said, yes; he said, I have got a great many goods coming up from Gravesend, I am concerned that I have not got them; I am servant to captain Armstrong. I told him I knew there was such a captain in the navy; he said, he should take it as a particular favour for me to go along with him to get the things, he should be uneasy if he did not get them in his own room, where he was to sleep. I told him I would, and gave him a card of my address. We went out, he called me of one side, he said, it is very hard I cannot get change of a ten pound note; he asked me to lend him five or six shillings; I lent him a dollar. He took a coach in Cornhill; the prisoner Stubbs and me went to Billingsgate; we could find no goods in Darkhouse-lane belonging to captain Armstrong. He said to me, you had better give the coachman something to drink; I did. I said you had better discharge the coachman, he will charge for staying; he said, you had better discharge the coachman yourself, he will charge me more than you. I went to the coachman, I asked him what his fare was, he said, three shillings; I told the coachman he had two glasses of brandy, I thought two shillings would do very well; I paid him. The prisoner said, I want to pay the porter. I lent him half a crowns and then left him.

THOMAS STUBBS . I am a porter; I was at the Cross Keys Inn on Saturday evening the 19th of January, I saw a shabby kind of a man come in; I said to the landlord, what does this shabby man do here; he said, hold your tongue, Stubbs, he has brought a good order here. The first thing he called for a glass of ale, he ordered mutton chops and potatoes for supper, a gentleman came in and asked for a plate of mock turtle; the prisoner order a plate of mock turtle, and a glass of grog; he said he wanted a ticket porter to bring up five or six trunks, and two hat boxes; one of the trunks were so large it could not be got into a coach; he would wish to engage three or four ticket porters. I told him there were no ticket porters, if he would be ruled by me I would call a hackney coach, and I would bring as much as was in my power, which he agreed to. He wished to have the indulgence to smoke his pipe. After twelve o'clock he said, now I am ready to go. We took a coach at Cornhill, and drove to Darkhouse-lane for the goods in question. When we came to the Queen's Head there were no such goods, there we made every enquiry about the goods while he drank the grog; he could have escaped if he had been so disposed; he came to me; he said, porter, lend me five shillings; I lent him five shillings; he went out directly after I lent him the dollar; he took the last witness into a bye room and borrowed a dollar of him. Now my man said I pay the coachman; he said, no, I will ride home; Mr. Johnson paid the coachman. We had some grog; the prisoner and I walked arm in arm to the Cross Keys. We had a glass of grog, and while we were drinking it, he said, you must go with me to a musick shop in Cornhill, I must get the musick for captain Armstrong in the morning. We went to the musick shop in Cornhill, the watchman lighted us; he said as the musick shop is shut up Mr. Stubbs, this man has been very kind, what small change have you. I gave the watchman sixpence. The prisoner led led me down to the Flower Pot . I had suspicion but not strong enough to think him a vagabond. This was about half after one; he dragged me to St. Mary Axe by force. I got him into Gracechurch-street again, and coming by the passage that leads into Leadenhall-street he said, I wish you would stop, I want to make water. That moment he sprang from me into Leadenhall-market, not knowing the way of the market he stumbled against the butchers shambles; I took him; he gave me a crown, and said, do not call the watchman. I took it and said, I thought you were a rogue, I am sure of it now. I took him home, and from there to Bishopgate-street watchhouse.

Prisoner's Defence. I am an American. Captain Armstrong was commander of the ship Achilles, a 74; he told me to come to this house to get a bed for him.I went to Billing gate the luggage had not arrived. This gentleman took me back to his house, they took my boots off, and my stockings; I had no money about me.

GUILTY , aged 39.

Confined Three Months in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

285. JOHN NONMUS was indicted for a misdemeanor .

SAMUEL WILKINSON . I am an apprentice to Mr. Ford, trunk-maker, 110, Minories. On the 5th of November the prisoner and another man he called his steward came to my master's shop and asked if my master was at home, I told them he was not. He told me he wanted a dozen nests of trunks for the West Indies; I told him I would take the order and acquaint my master when he came home. He told me he was captain of the ship Swallow, lying in the London docks, and he lodged at Mr. Downing's, slop-seller, Upper East Smithfield. He then looked round the shop, he saw a red trunk at the door; he asked me to shew it him; I did. When I opened the trunk I found one within it; he said he would take them both; he asked me the price; I told him. He gave them to the man he called his steward, and told him to take them to his lodgings. I saw no more of him. In the afternoon the man that he called his steward came running into the shop, he said he wanted a trunk for the captain. When he came on shore there was one in the shop; I said, will this do; he said, yes, book it to the captain; I did. About a fortnight before that the prisoner came to my master's shop, he bought a trunk and paid for it. I thought him to be an honest man. I knew him again. I took that trunk to where he said his lodgings, were at Mr. Downing's.

MR FORD. In consequence of the information that I received from my lad on the evening of the 5th of November I desired I might see the prisoner when he called again; the next morning he called and said he wanted to see the trunks, if they were ready. On my coming to him I asked him what his name was, he said John Nonmus , he was captain of the ship Swallow, lying in the London docks. He asked me if the nests of trunks were ready; I told him they would be ready in a day or two; he said he did not want them for ten days, get them ready, I will pay you when they are ready; I am of Miles's house in London, but I pay all these kind of things myself; he had looked out a trunk which he said he wanted to put his own clothes in, he begged me to send it down and to charge it in the bill with the rest; I told him I would. Mrs. Downing, the wife of the person that he lodged with, was with him at the time.

Q. Did he lodge with Mr. Downing - A. He did, to their sorrow. About a week after that I had a medicine chest to make up for a gentleman, I took it down with me, and when I went to Mr. Downing he had ran away. He obtained goods of me to the amount of one pound two shillings.

MR. HOOKER. The prisoner came to me, I made up goods for him in the upholstery way to the amount of seventy-nine pounds sixteen shillings and sixpence. He called himself captain Nonmus of the ship Swallow.

Prisoner's Defence. They never sent the bills in, or else I would have paid them with pleasure. This gentleman said he would hurt me if he could.

GUILTY , aged 39.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.