Old Bailey Proceedings Online (www.oldbaileyonline.org, version 6.0, 01 October 2014), January 1811 (18110109).

Old Bailey Proceedings, 9th January 1811.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE OYER AND TERMINER, AND GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND ALSO THE GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, HELD AT Justice-Hall, in the Old Bailey, On WEDNESDAY the 9th of JANUARY, 1811, and following Days;

BEING THE SECOND SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF The Right Hon. JOSHUA JONATHAN SMITH , LORD-MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY JOB SIBLY, No. 4, CARTHUSIAN-STREET, ALDERSGATE-STREET.

LONDON:

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED (BY THE AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON.) By R. BUTTERS, No. 22, Fetter Lane, Fleet Street.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON.

Before the Right-honourable JOSHUA JONATHAN SMITH , Lord Mayor of the City of London; Sir Archibald Macdonald , knt. Lord Chief Baron of His Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir Simon Le Blanc , knt. one of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir Alan Chambre , knt. one of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir Watkin Lewes , knt. Harvey Christian Combe , esq. Sir James Shaw , bart. Aldermen of the said City; John Silvester , esq. Recorder of the said City; Sir Matthew Bloxam , knt. Samuel Birch , esq. Christopher Magnay , esq. Aldermen of the said City; and Newman Knowlys , esq. Common-serjeant of the said City His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of Goal Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

London Jury.

William Metcalfe ,

Thomas Buzzard ,

Joseph Lambert ,

William Mullins ,

John Weddal ,

William Bannister ,

William Lloyd ,

William Bruce ,

Archilleaus Scruce ,

Richard King ,

Joseph Turner ,

William Bolden .

First Middlesex Jury.

Ralph Coultry ,

Joseph Gilbert ,

Thomas Sowter ,

Edward Fearn ,

William Gravel ,

George T?rant ,

William Bridges ,

Liddel Thelwall ,

William Hilliker ,

William Barnard ,

Samuel Peacock ,

William Heather ,

Second Middlesex Jury.

William Rummer ,

Richard Botheroyd ,

John Baddely ,

Richard Webb ,

Joseph Bowman ,

John Palmer ,

William Lucas ,

James Matthews ,

William Waters ,

Stephen Dodson ,

William Newman ,

Samuel Briant .

101. MOSES DAVIS was indicted for feloniously receiving, on the 23d of March , one hundred and twenty yards of carpeting, value 18 l. the property of John Robins , feloniously and burglariously stolen by James Petherick , David Whittaker , and James Fielder , he well knowing to have been stolen .

Mr. Gurney, counsel for the prosecutor, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

102. CHARLES WATTY was indicted for feloniously assaulting Bryant Fielding , in the King's highway, on the 2nd of January , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, four dollars, and three shillings, his property .

BRYANT FIELDING . I am a dustman in the employ of John Shelton . On the evening of the 2nd of January, after my labour was over, I went to buy a jacket in Whitechapel, I called in at the King's Arms public-house in Wentworth-street, about nine o'clock, I staid there about an hour and a half.

Q. Had you any liquor before you went there - A. I had three glasses of gin, and some small beer in the course of the day, and one pint of porter there and no more. About a quarter after nine I pulled out a dollar, one of the men in the public-house knocked it out of my hand, and put out the light.

Q. What men - did you know them - A. I had seen them there that night; the prisoner was one of them.

Q. Did you find your dollar again - A. No; the candle was lighted again, and I made a sad noise with them about it; I made a complaint to every one there and the landlord heard me; I staid in the house till about half after ten, and then we were all turned out of the house; I was going towards home, I was knocked down; there were five of them; I cannot say who it was that knocked me down.

Q. You were in a public street then - A. Yes. After I recovered myself they followed me about an hundred yards, they then surrounded me and put me again a dead wall, stretched my arms out, one held me by my throat, and stretched my jaws open; the prisoner was at work at my pocket, his hands were in my pockets.

Q. Do you know what you had in your pocket at that time - A. Yes, three dollars and three shillings.

Q. Had you counted that money after you lost the dollar in the room - A. No, but I am certain it was safe. I took the money out of my pocket, and put the remainder in, and I had not taken it out afterwards.

Q. You have told us that the prisoner had his hands in your pocket, had any other person his hand in your pocket - A. There was another besides him, there was one hand in each pocket.

Q. Did they say any thing to you at this time - A. They said nothing, only surrounded me; the prisoner, after he had got the money from me, he said, let the b - r go; I immediately received a heavy blow on my head; the prisoner was standing at my right side, and had his hand in my pocket, where my money was; I heard the money rattle when his hand was in my pocket, and they left me with my breeches down.

Q. Did they search any of your other pockets - A. They searched all of them, they gave me a violent blow before they left me; I was quite senseless; when I came to myself I looked round, I found they were gone; I buttoned up my breeches and went home.

Q. This was on a Wednesday night - A. It was.

Q. How soon after the Wednesday night did you see the prisoner again - A. On the Thursday morning following.

Q. What sort of a night was it, dark or light - A. A lightish night.

Q. Was it star light or moon light - A. I did not take that notice.

Q. Had you light enough in the public house to distinguish the prisoner - A. Yes; before I was robbed.

Q. When he came out he followed you, and they said nothing to you - A. Not in my hearing.

Q. Then you could not know his voice so as to know him again - A. There was a lighted lamp against the dead wall where they robbed me, it was about an an hundred yards from the public-house.

Q. You have told us what quantity of liquor you had in the day, I now ask you whether you was drunk or sober - A. I was as sober as I am now; I was neither drunk or sober.

Q. Are you in that state now - A. No. I had the liquor in me, drunk I was not. I saw the prisoner in Norton Faldgate on the Thursday, and the officer took him on the next day.

Q. What made you take so much notice of the prisoner in the house - A. Why they were tossing up for liquor I suppose, and I, like another foolish young man, was looking on.

Q. Are you partly certain that the prisoner was one of the persons in the house - A. Yes.

Q. Was your money in your breeches pocket or your jacket pocket - A. It was in my fob pocket.

Q. Did they let down your breeches before you heard the money rattle or afterwards - A. They undid my breeches at the very first start; the prisoner had his hand in my fob pocket, and after they left my pocket my breeches fell down, and when they left me all my money was gone.

FRANCIS FRIEND . Q. You keep this public house in Wentworth-street - A. Yes.

Q. Were you at home on the evening of the 2nd of this month - A. Yes. I saw the prisoner at my house that evening. I did not see any thing of the prosecutor untill I heard him make a great noise, he was stripped to fight with some other man; I called the watchman and turned them all out. The prisoner made no complaint untill I called the watchman, he then told the watchman that he had dropped a dollar in the house, and somebody had picked it up, he madeno complaint of any body having used him ill.

Prisoner's Defence. I was sitting in the house in company with a drover, he and I were having a pint of beer together, the prosecutor came in, he had three crown pieces in his hand, tossing with another man. The publican came in after the tossing was over.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Chambre.

103. CHARLES FEARY was indicted for feloniously assaulting James Sturgeon , in the King's highway, on the 26th of December , putting him in fear, and feloniously taking from his person and against his will, two watch keys, value 10 s. 6 d. a seal, value 1 s. and a watch ribbon, value 1 d. his property .

JAMES STURGEON . I am a shipwright , I live in Union-street, Poplar. On the 26th of December, between four and five o'clock in the evening, I was crossing the street from the iron gates, Finsbury-square in company with Mr. Brown, I was met and knocked down in Wilson-street , and at the time I was falling I felt a grappling at my watch, my watch was in my fob; I had a ribbon, two seals, and a key to it hanging outside.

Q. What do you mean by grappling - A He made a snatch at it, he did not get my watch, but the two keys, the seal, and the ribbon. When I was down I holloaed to my friend that I had lost my watch, and before I got up to my friend he had been knocked down, and as I was getting up I saw the persons go away.

Q. In what manner did they go away - A. I cannot say; they did not run away. I believe the prisoner to be the person that knocked me down.

Q. You have not got any of your things back again - A. No.

Q. What were the keys made of - A. One gold key.

Q. When did you see the prisoner again - A. In about ten minutes afterwards; my friend was along with me. I said nothing to the prisoner because my friend to come along, he knew him.

Q. When was he apprehended upon this charge - A. The same evening, at the White Hart, Christopher-street, Mr. Brown took me there.

Mr. Walford. Was it light or dark when this took place - A. It was dusk, just getting dark, I cannot say that I was perfectly sober, I might have had two or three glasses of rum, I cannot saw how much I drank. I fetched Mr. Armstrong the officer, and Mr. Brown gave charge of the prisoner at the White Hart.

Q. Did not the prisoner wait with Brown while you went for the officer - A. Yes.

COURT. Could the prisoner have got away from the White Hart - A. He might if he chose, there was nobody there to hinder him.

ROBERT BROWN. I am a publican; I keep the Horse and Leaping Bar, Whitechapel.

Q. Do you know the first witness Sturgeon - A. Yes. He was with me on the day this happened from nine o'clock in the morning until eight in the evening, and as were going home, crossing Finsbury-square into Wilson-street, Mr. Sturgeon, my friend, and I crossed the road into the foot path, Mr. Sturgeon was knocked down.

Q. Did you see him knocked down - A. I did not. I saw him when he was knocked down.

Q. Did you see who was with him - A. I saw no more with him but the prisoner and myself, and one or two with the prisoner.

Q. What was the prisoner doing - A. The prisoner was coming across the street.

Q. You saw the prisoner before the blow was struck - A. Yes, I saw him come up the street.

Q. Where did you see the prisoner after you saw Sturgeon on the ground - A. I saw the prisoner after that, he went to make away from us and lounged me in the mud. I heard Sturgeon say he had lost his watch, when I saw him upon the ground.

Q. Did you observe the persons of the other men - A. No, otherwise than he was a tallish man, with a whitish coat, and a bundle under his arm.

Q. Was the prisoner doing any thing about the person of the prosecutor at the time when you saw the prosecutor down - A. No, he was making away from him and lounged me in the mud.

Q. Then you did not see the prisoner or any other person take from the prosecutor his watch - A. No, I did not see it done.

Q. You say he pushed you down - A. Yes, he was running across the road, he ran against me and pushed me down, he was running to make off.

Q. What passed between you and him - A. Not a word; I held by him and got the watch ribbon out of his hand; I thought at that time he had got the watch and all.

Q. What, had he the ribbon in his hand, did you take it from him - A. Yes, I did not get the seal and the keys; he held the ribbon as fast as he could, but I got it out of his hand.

Q. Did you know the prisoner before - A. Yes, I have known him four or five years before, but not by name.

Q. Did you say any thing to him - A. No, I had no discourse at all with him; when I was pushed down and had got hold of the ribbon, I got up again and went to cross the kenel, he fetched me a blow and knocked me against the fence. I saw the prisoner in about an hour and a half afterwards in the White Hart public-house, the corner of Christopher-street, Sturgeon was with me, I said, when I went in, that is the man, I pointed him out, and had him apprehended there.

Q. What kind of a night was it - A. It was between four and five, rather a darkish evening.

Q. Then you could not distinguish his features very well - A. Yes, I could, and he knew me afterwards.

Q. In what condition was Sturgeon with respect to sobriety - A. He was a little matter in liquor, and I was the same, I might have drank four glasses of spirits in the course of the day.

Mr. Walford. Who was the person that charged the prisoner with having committed the robbery - A. I went to Mr. Armstrong.

Q. Who called the beadle - A. I called no beadle, nor the prosecutor to my knowledge. I went to the public-house, and charged the prisoner with havingcommitted the robbery; I went out and fetched Mr. Armstrong and he was there when I came back, I was gone perhaps twenty minutes.

Q. Will you swear that you was not very drunk - A. Yes.

Q. Did you ever hear of such a thing as a forty pound reward - A. No, not to my knowledge, I expect no share of any such thing.

JOHN TAYLOR . I am a coachman.

Q. Where are the stables that you attend - A. No. 30, in Wilson-street.

Q. Did you hear any thing of the disturbance there was on the evening of the 26th of December - A. Yes, I was in my room, I ran out of the stable door, I saw Mr. Brown was shoved down in the road and when he was getting up he was knocked down again by the pales as he was crossing the kennel; when Mr. Brown got up he gave me a ribbon and told me to keep it untill he saw me again. This is the ribbon, I have had it ever since. I saw the prisoner, he was the person that shoved Mr. Brown down the first time and struck him afterwards; I saw that myself.

Mr. Walford. Was Mr. Brown sober, or how - A. He appeared perfectly sober and Sturgeon the same.

Q. to prosecutor. Look at that piece of ribbon, have you seen it since - A. Never till this time, the colour of the ribbon that I lost was purple, I cannot distinguish the colour by this light, mine was a purple ribbon and this appears to be one.

JOHN ARMSTRONG . Q. You are the officer that was sent upon this occasion - A. I went that night with my son, the prosecutor and Mr. Brown to take charge of the prisoner, he was taken to the office and this charge was exhibited against him before Sir William Parsons and at that time Sir William Parsons did think the prosecutor a little in liquor, and told him so; that was the same night, and I thought myself he had been taking a little more than otherwise he might have done being Christmas time; Mr. Brown appeared to have his recollection about him; the prisoner was sitting in the tap room, he very readily went with me to the office and some of the friends of Mr. Brown did think the seal and keys were in the coachman's hands, and that is the reason I did not search this man.

Prisoner's Defence. I am not guilty of any thing of the kind, I never had it in my heart.

JAMES MESSING . Q. Do you recollect being in Finsbury-square the day after Christmas day - A. About five o'clock in the evening I was coming by Wilson-street, I saw a mob assembled there, I saw the prisoner and Mr. Brown; at the time I came up Mr. Brown made use of some improper language which irratated the prisoner very much; I did not hear it. I saw the prisoner strike Mr. Brown; Mr. Brown stood in a posture that he appeared to be very much intoxicated.

Q. When the prisoner struck Mr. Brown did Mr. Brown do any thing to the prisoner - A. No, Mr. Brown called to the beadle and gave charge for an assault upon him. I saw Sturgeon there, he said not a word, the beadle walked away; I was not there when Sturgeon was knocked down. The whole of the party are entire strangers to me.

ROBERT BUXTON . I am a journeyman baker; I live at Mr. King's in Sydney-street.

Q. Do you recollect being in Wilson-street on the evening after Christmas day - A. Yes, about five o'clock in the afternoon, I saw Mr. Brown's friend strike the prisoner on the face, and then the prisoner knocked Mr. Brown's friend down, he after that knocked Mr. Brown down, Mr. Brown called him a thief and said he was robbing him daily and hourly.

Q. What did Brown do upon being knocked down by the prisoner - A. I did not see him do any thing in striking the prisoner.

Q. Did any body call the beadle - A. Yes, I believe it was Mr. Brown, he asked him to take charge of the prisoner for breeding a mob.

Court. Did you hear him say for what - A. I did not hear him say particular, he seemed very forward in liquor, and Mr. Brown's friend appeared very much in liquor indeed.

Q. Had you known any of these parties before - A. I have seen Mr. Brown before, but never spoke to him. I never saw the prisoner before to my knowledge.

The prisoner called ten witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

104. ANN NESBITT was indicted for that she, at the general sessions of our Lord the King for the County of Middlesex, holden at the sessions-house Clerkenwell for the said county, on Monday the 18th of September, in the 49th year of his present Majesty's reign, she was in due form of law tried and convicted for that she, on the the 19th of August in the 49th year of his Majesty's reign, one piece of false counterfeited money made to the likeness and similitude of good and lawful current money of this realm called a six-pence, as and for a good sixpence unlawfully did utter to Mary the wife of William Thomas , she well knowing the same to be false and counterfeit, and was thereupon ordered to be imprisoned in New Prison, Clerkenwell, one year and to find sureties for her good behaviour for two years more; that she, having been convicted as a common utterer, afterwards, on the 15th of December , one-piece of false and counterfeit money made to the likeness and similitude of good and lawful current money of this realm called a shilling, unlawfully did utter to Mary the wife of John Clarke , she well knowing the same to be false and counterfeit .

JOSHUA GILL SEWELL . Q. I believe you are clerk to the solicitor of the mint - A. I am; I produce a copy of the record of the conviction of the prisoner, I got it from the clerk of the peace's office Clerkenwell; I examined that copy with the original, it is a true copy.

[the copy of the record read.]

WILLIAM BEEBY . Q. You are a clerk to Mr. Newport, keeper of the New Prison, Clerkenwell - A. I am.

Q. Do you know the prisoner, Ann Nesbitt - A. Yes, I was present when she was tried and convicted in September session 1809, she was ordered to be imprisoned in New Prison, Clerkenwell, one year and at the expiration of that time to find sureties for her good behaviour for two years more; she staid in the prison that time and found sureties and was discharged; I am positive she is the person, I know her very well.

JOHN COBHAM. Q. You are a potatoe merchant - A. Yes, I live in David-street, Berkley-square. On Saturday the 15 of December about a quarter past five in the evening the prisoner asked me if I had any kidney potatoes, I toldher I had, she desired two pound of the best, I weighed her two pound and there were rather more, she said never mind make it three, they came to three pence, she gave me a bad shilling, this is the shilling, I returned it to her instantly, it is a crooked shilling; I stated to her it was a bad one, I expostulated to her on putting off bad money at that time of the night, because it was an hour we often take bad money at our shop; she was about a minute and a half searching her pocket, at last she produced a sixpence very much battered saying very likely you may not approve of this, I have no other silver except a dollar which I do not like to change; which dollar afterwards upon searching her I never found.

Q. You afterwards searched her and found that shilling upon her - A. Yes, about a quarter of an hour after I searched her in Mr. Clarke's shop and found this shilling in her hand, that she had offered to me with three others; I found another bad shilling and a sixpence in her pocket. I did not approve of the battered sixpence, I returned it her; she then left my shop desiring me to leave the potatoes in the scale she would return for them. I followed her at a distance, I saw her cross over to a public house and look in at the window, she did not go in there, I then followed her to Mr. Clarke's a butcher in Grovesnor-market, she took up a piece of meat smelled it and put it down again, she then went to Mr. Clarke's shop; I crossed opposite, it is very narrow there, I could see her, I heard Mr. Clarke ring a shilling upon a block, it sounded bad, I saw her come out of the shop and as she came out I went in, I asked Mr. Clarke if she had given him a bad shilling, she was not within hearing, Mr. Clarke went after her and brought her back, Mrs. Clarke returned the shilling to her, I seized her wrist instantly and took four shillings out of her hand, her hand was clenched, three of the shillings were wet; I asked her where is the shilling that you gave me, she said where; I said at the potatoe warehouse; she then begged for mercy, she said she was an unfortunate woman, she would give me any thing to let her go. I took her to the watchhouse, she got behind a chair, rather in the dark, she untied her pockets, I picked them up and examined them, I found five shillings and ten pence three farthings in copper, a penny bread cake, a penny plum bun, two tarts, two skains of thread, a box of salve, and this terner's cerat, I then took her to Marlborough-street. This is the money that was taken out of her hand, and this is the money that was found in her pocket.

RICHARD FRANKLIN . Q. You are one of the moniers of the Mint - A. I am.

Q. Look at the shilling tendered to Cobham - A. That is a counterfeit.

Q. Look at the three other shillings - A. They are the same, and the crooked one, and the sixpence is bad.

Q. The crooked one is the one uttered - A. And the one shilling and six pence out of her pocket is bad.

JOHN CLARK . I am a butcher in Grovesnor-market . On the 15th of December in the afternoon about half after five, the prisoner came to my shop, she picked out several bits of meat which came to eleven pence, she gave me a shilling, I gave her a penny, I looked at it, I thought it was not a good one, I called my wife to look at it, she said it was not a good one; I went out to the door and left her with my wife, I saw Mr. Cobham run in and speak to my wife, in consequence of what my wife said I pursued after the prisoner and brought her back again, she offered my wife a crooked shilling instead of that she had given her, Mr. Cobham catched hold of her by the hand and he said he had got three shilling more and a crooked one.

MARY CLARKE . Q. You are the wife of John Clarke A. Yes .

Q. Do you remember the prisoner coming to your house - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember your husband giving you a shilling which you found to be a bad one - A. Yes, I returned that to the prisoner and then she gave me a crooked shilling for the bad one and then went out of the shop, I put the shilling in my pocket and thought it was a good one; I had only one other shilling in my pocket which was a flat one; she went out of the shop, Mr. Cobham came in immediately after the prisoner was gone, I shewed him the same shilling that I received of the prisoner, he said it was a bad one; I am sure it is the crooked shilling that the prisoner gave to me that I shewed to Mr. Cobham, I had no other crooked shilling, I believe that to be the shilling.

Q. Did you hear her beg to Cobham for mercy - A. Yes, I did, and I begged for her upon account of her saying she had a family.

Q. Did you see this shilling taken out of her hand - A. Yes, with the other shillings. It was one of the four shillings that was taken out of her hand.

Prisoner's Defence. I leave myself to the mercy of the Judge and the Jury, I have three fatherless children, I did it to get a bit of bread for them; I hope you will shew me mercy; I shall in duty be bound ever to pray for the Judge and the Jury. I will never do such a thing any more.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 42.

First Middlesex Jury, before Lord Chief Baron.

105. GUSTAVUS LOWE was indicted for that he, on the 21st of November , feloniously did falsely make forge, and counterfeit, and willingly acted and assisted in making a certain bill of exchange for the payment of 20 l. with intention to defraud Charles Greenwood , Richard Henry Cox , and Charles Hammersly . And

SEVERAL OTHER COUNTS for like offences only varying the manner of charging them.

JAMES PARKER . I am a labourer.

Q. On the 21st of November were you in a coffee-house in the London-road, St. George's-fields - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know the name of the coffee-house - A. No, only that it is a coffee-house in the London-road, St. George's-fields.

Q. Did you there see the prisoner at the bar, look at him - Did you receive from any person there any paper A. Yes.

Q. What directions were given you with that paper - A. To go as far as Charing-cross to a banking house.

Q. Was the name Greenwood and Cox - A. I rather think that was the name.

Q. Did the person that gave you the paper tell you what you were to bring back - A. No, I was to go of an errand and take that paper to Greenwood and Cox.

Q. Did you take that paper which he so gave you - A. Yes, and I was to come back again.

Q. Were you to bring any thing back - A. He did not mention any thing of the kind, I was to come back.When I got to Greenwood and Cox I gave the paper to one of the clerks there, I do not know the gentleman.

Q. After being kept there some time did you come back to the London-road - A. Some gentleman came to me, and told me to follow him after some time.

Q. Did you go back with some gentlemen to the London-road - A. Yes, in a hackney coach part of the way.

Q. As you went along did either of them give you any thing - A. Yes, they gave me two papers, which they told me was two ten pound notes; I was to give them to the same person that sent me.

Q. When you got to the coffee-house did you see the person that sent you - A. Yes, that person was there.

Q. Did you give that person those two ten pound notes - A. To the best of my remembrance I did.

Q. Do not you know you did - A. Yes, I did.

COURT. Was that the same person that gave you the other paper, and that sent you first of the errand - A. To the best of my remembrance it was, I should not like to swear.

Mr. Gurney. Have you any doubt that the person that you gave the two ten pound notes was the same person that gave you the first paper - A. I think it was the same.

COURT. Why you would not have given it any other man, would you - A. No. I believe it to be the same.

Q. Did that man at the coffee-house give you at first one paper or two - A. There was something wrapped up in another bit of paper.

Q. He gave you something wrapped up in a bit of paper - A. Yes.

Q. Was that the paper which you took to the gentleman who afterwards came back with you in the coach - A. I took it with me where I was ordered.

Q. You carried that bit of paper wrapped up in a bit of paper - A. Yes.

JAMES HUME . Q. I believe you are clerk in the office of Greenwood and Cox - A. I am. The names of the partners are Charles Greenwood , Richard Henry Cox , and Charles Hammersley ; that is all the partners, they are army agents, their office is in Craig's court, Charing Cross.

Q. On the 21st of November last did the last witness bring to your office any bill of exchange - A. He did, it is here.

Lavender. This is it.

Q. Mr. Hume, did Parker present to you that bill of exchange - A. This bill was first put into my hands by another clerk, Mr. Downes.

Mr. Alley. Do you receive a fixed salary or share in the profits and loss with the house - A. I receive a fixed salary, whatever the profits or the loss may be.

JOHN DOWNES . I am clerk in the office. On the 21st of November Parker came to the office, when he came to my desk where I was writing the bill was laid down, I did not see who laid it down, he came to my desk where I was writing, I took up the bill, looked at it, and also looked at the endorsement, and asked him whether he brought that bill, he said he did, I then asked him from whence he brought it, he said, from a coffee-house in the London-road, but he could not tell me the name of it. I immediately detected it to be a forgery. James Ramsay is major in the Queen's regiment, and lieutenant-colonel in the army. I have been accustomed to pay money on his drafts about two years, I believe it not to be his hand-writing.

Q. Upon your detecting it not to be Mr. Ramsey's hand-writing did you shew it to Mr. Hume - A. I did; I gave it to Mr. Hume, and he took the other steps. There was no other person near the bill when I took it up.

Q. to Mr. Hume. Was that bill shewn you by Mr. Downes as he has represented - A. This bill was given me by Mr. Downes, I have been familiar with Mr. Ramsey's hand-writing about five years, I think it is not his hand-writing, it does not resemble it.

Q. After the bill was shewn you by Mr. Downes did you send to Bow-street for two officers - A. I went for them myself, and went with Parker and them to the London-road. In my way I gave Parker two ten pound notes, I desired him to give the notes to the gentleman who had delivered him the bill. When we got near there I left Parker and the officers at the Circus; I staid behind, they went before me, and I followed them.

Q. How soon after them did you enter the coffee-house - A. I should think about seven or eight minutes, at that time the prisoner was with the officers in the back room, and Parker was there also, and the bill was in the room, either in my possession or in the officers. When I went in the room one of the officers was asking him from whom he got that bill, he said immediately that he had got it yesterday, from colonel Ramsey himself at the British coffee-house, he made that assertion more than once while in that room; I asked him whether he had ever been an officer in the 2d regiment, the Queen's, of which colonel Ramsey is major, he said he had. Then he was brought away to Bow-street.

Mr. Alley. In point of fact you know that this unfortunate man has been an officer - A. Yes.

Q. At the time that you were talking to the prisoner about the bill that you hold in your hand was it shewn to the prisoner - A. I now remember that the bill was not out of my hand untill I went to Bow-street.

Q. Then at the time you were talking to the prisoner the bill was not produced - A. I cannot charge my memory with it.

STEPHEN LAVENDER . I am an officer of Bow-street. I went with Parker into the coffee-house in the London-road; we took the prisoner in custody; I asked Parker whether that was the person that sent him to Cox and Greenwood, Parker said it was; I then desired Parker to give him whatever he had, and he delivered to him the two ten pound notes which were given him by Mr. Hume in the coach; I then asked the prisoner whether he sent Parker to Cox and Greenwood with the bill of twenty pound, he admitted that he had. He was afterwards searched by Vickrey, and the two ten pound notes were taken from him.

COURT. When you told him to give him what hehad for him did he then give them to the prisoner - A. He did, and the prisoner put them in his pocket.

Q. Did he take them from Parker after you had taken him in custody - A. He did, and put them into his pocket, they were afterwards taken away by Vickrey.

JOHN VICKREY . Q. You accompanied Lavender upon this occasion - A. I did.

Q. Did you and Lavender go into the back room where the prisoner was - A. I was the first in the back room, I there saw the prisoner.

Q. When you entered the room did you tell him what you wanted - A. I did not, untill Parker saw him. When Parker came in he was taken from that room, where he was into another back room behind that. I then asked Parker if that was the gentleman who had sent him to the bankers with the bill; Parker said yes; the prisoner said nothing.

Q. Was that in the prisoner's hearing - A. We were all close together except Mr. Hume; I then asked the prisoner if he had sent Parker with the bill. I do not believe I mentioned Cox and Greenwood, he admitted that he had; I then desired Parker to give the gentleman the money, he gave the prisoner the two ten pound notes.

Q. What did the prisoner do with them - A. I do not believe he put them in his pocket; I took them out of his hand, he had either got it in his waistcoat pocket, or was going; I then told him I had a suspicion it was a forgery.

Q. You had not told him before that you suspected any thing - A. No, he seemed confused, and said he had received it of major or colonel Ramsey at a coffee-house in Cockspur-street, and he said he had been an ensign in the regiment that major or colonel Ramsey belonged to, but at that time he was in a West India regiment; these are the bank notes I took from him.

Mr. Alley to Parker. You are no great scholar we find, you cannot read - A. A little.

Q. You could not tell if you were to see that bill of exchange whether that was the one that you carried - A. No, I could not.

Q. I believe you never saw it - A. No.

Mr. Gurney. The paper that you took to Cox and Greenwood, Charing Cross, was that the paper you received at the coffee-house - A. Yes.

COURT to Vickrey. Where is this coffee-house in the London-road, St. George's fields - A. That is in the county of Surry.

(Read.)

"London, November 20, 1810.

"Please to pay R. R. M. Jones, or order, the sum of twenty pound sterling, which place to my account.

James Ramsey , 2d regiment. Jones."

Greenwood and Cox. 20.

Prisoner's Defence. The bill which I gave the porter was a genuine bill from colonel Ramsey, whether it was changed or not I cannot say.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 20.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

106. MARY WHITE was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Humphrey Varnall , about the hour of three in the afternoon, on the 7th of December , Ann, the wife of Humphrey Varnall , and others being therein, and feloniously stealing, two coats, value 5 l. two waistcoats, value 30 s. a pair of breeches, value 1 l. two pair of stockings, value 10 s. a watch, value 4 l. a gold watch chain, value 50 s. a seal, value 1 l. a watch key, value 5 s. a shift, value 1 s. a bed gown, value 2 s. and an apron, value 6 d. his property .

HUMPHREY VARNALL . I live at 33, Vere-street, Clare-market ; I keep the Lamb public-house . On the 7th of December I lost a silver jewelled watch, it cost me seven pounds, a great coat, and a suit of mourning.

Q. That was two coats, what might they be worth - A. The two coats near eight pounds, a black silk waistcoat, an under waistcoat, a pair of black breeches, a pair of black silk stockings, a pair of cotton stockings; my wife lost a shift and a bed gown; there was a gold chain to the watch, gold seal and key. I value them all at twenty pounds; I lost them out of my bed room, the back room on the first floor.

Q. When had you last seen them before - A. On the Thursday, about the middle of the day, and I missed them on the Friday, on the day before my clothes were all folded up and laid on my box from the Sunday till the time that I lost them.

Q. Was your bed room door open - A. It was locked, I locked it on the Friday morning. I went up stairs to get change of a pound note and on my missing these things I made application to Bow-street and got an officer to come to my house, his name is Bacon.

When did you see your goods again - A. On Monday I saw part of them at Mr. Hawkins's in Drury-lane, a great coat, a gold chain seal and key, I went there and saw Mary Driscoll with a part of my property.

ANN VARNELL . Q. What do you know of this matter - A. I went up to make the beds a little before four on the Friday, I put the key into the key-hole of the door, I found it was unlocked, I opened the door made the bed and dusted the room and then I found my watch was taken out of the room, the watch had laid on the table; I came down stairs and went about my own business till my husband was in the way and then I asked him if he had seen any thing of the watch, he told me no, not since the morning; I missed all these things my husband has mentioned. On the Thursday they were there, on the Friday they were gone.

WILLIAM BACON . On Monday the 10th I went to Mr. Hawkins's, in the evening Mary Driscoll was there, I took her in custody, the pawnbroker produced the things before the magistrate.

WILLIAM SMELLIE. At that time I lived with Mr. Hawkins, I took in of Mary Driscoll a great coat, a pair of breeches, a chain seal and key.

Prosecutor. These articles are mine.

Bacon. I have the watch.

Prosecutor. This is my watch, I have had it fifteen years.

JAMES GERROD . I am shopman to Mr. Edwards, Clare-street, Clare-market; I produce two pair ofstockings pledged for three shillinge and two waistcoats five shillings, the prisoner pledged the waistcoats.

- WELSH. I apprehended the prisoner at a liquor shop the corner of Hollies-street Clare-market, I asked her whether she had got any duplicates, she gave me six and said that was all she had got; I took her to the office in Bow-street, she was there searched.

Bacon. I searched the prisoner, in her left hand pocket I found this key, I took her into the Brown Bear and desired the maid servant to search her, she found this watch; this key unlocked the door that is supposed to broken open.

MARY DRISCOLL . I had been in Mr. Lamb's, Stanhope-street, Mrs. White came in and spoke to me, she pulled out a chain, Mr. Lamb would not take it in; I went along with her to Mr. Lane's in Drury-lane, the chain was taken in for twelve shillings; we then came out, she said she had got something else, we went to another pawnbrokers and pawned the seal for eight shillings and when we came out she treated me with some gin.

Q. What was the name of the pawnbroker where you pawned the seal - A. I do not know, the street goes into Bow-street. On Saturday night I bought these tickets of her, I gave her a shilling and four pence for the tickets of the chain, seal, and key, a great coat and breeches, I was to give her three or four shillings for them.

Prisoner's Defence. I never saw the witness on that day, I saw her husband, he lent me a shilling, I saw that woman on the Monday, she gave me four pence, that good woman went and pledged the seal in Bow-street; the young man that gave me the things is run away.

GUILTY , aged 31.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Lord Chief Baron.

107. JANE HOLLIDAY was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Thomas Fonsick about the hour of four on the night of the 24th of December , and burglariously stealing therein, two pellises, value 1 l. a tablecloths, value 3 s. two silver tea spoons, value 6 s. a knife, value 6 d. and a fork, value 6 d. the property of Thomas Fonsick ; a gown, value 2 s. two petticoats, value 2 s. a neck handkerchief, value 6 d. a pair of stockings value 6 d. a cap, value 6 d. a shawl, value 2 s. and a pair of shoes, value 3 d. the property of Ann Wright , Spinster , a pair of boots, value 1 l. two waistcoats, value 1 s. the property of Paul Rodriguez .

THOMAS FONSICK . I am a slop-seller ; I keep a lodging house in Princes-street, St. George's in the East . I lost property out of my house five different times.

Q. Which time are you come to prosecute now - A. The last one on Christmas eve last.

Q. Was it in the day time or night time - A. Night time; she got into the house about five o'clock in the morning, I was watching at the time, I had fastened my house up and set up to watch.

Q. What part of the house did you set up in - A. In the front parlour; I got up about two o'clock in the morning, I fell asleep upon the sopha. About five o'clock I heard some noise, a little after five I called the servant girl to give me a light, the servant told me there was no clothes to put on, I told her she must get me a light, she wrapped a quite round her went out and got a light; I then went to the back of the house and found the prisoner with one bundle upon her.

Q. You heard a noise - A. Yes, I heard a noise down in the kitchen and the kitchen door banged after her; I went with my landlord into some ruins behind my house, I found the prisoner lying down upon the top of the bundle in an alley; I took hold of her.

Q. Did you bring in the things that she lay over A. Yes, and she together; I gave the things to the officer. The prisoner had been a servant to me once, she ran away and we missed some things.

Q. When you brought her into the house did you examine the kitchen - A. Yes, she climbed over the wall.

Q. You did not see her there, and therefore you do not know that - A. No.

Q. Did you look at the doors and windows of the kitchen - A. Yes, the windows were all fast, the back door was open, she unbolted it to get out; there are two back doors to get out into a yard, and both back doors were open.

Q. You did not see her unbolt it, therefore you do not know, both the back doors were open - A. Yes.

Q. When you went out of the back doors did you find them both open - A. Yes.

Q. Had you seen these doors on the over night, were they both open or shut - A. They were both shut, the servant girl shut them, they were bolted on the inside, they could not be opened on the outside. The person must have come in at the parlour window, the blinds bolted inside of the window; we found the blinds put upon the leads on the outside, she had shut down the window, she had unbolted the blinds and put them on the outside on the leads; the window blinds were always bolted day and night.

Q. When you brought the prisoner and the things into the house what did you do next - A. I sent for the officer, James Windey , he came and took her in custody.

Q. Did you examine the things she had been lying upon - A. I did; she took two new pellises, the green one she had upon her at the time, the other pellise was in the bundle.

JAMES WINDEY . Q. You are an officer and live near the prosecutor - A. Yes.

Q. Were you called in by him on this morning - A. Yes, a little after seven, it was light when I was called in.

Q. How long had it been light - A. A very little while; it was a very little while after seven; I found the prisoner in Fonsick's house.

Q. Did you know her before - A. No. He gave her to me in charge; I found the property there which will be produced; the bundle was in the kitchen where she was; Hope had it at Fonsick's house, I was with him; I am certain that is the same bundle.

RALPH HOPE. I am an officer. About eight o'clock in the morning I went to Fonsick's house, theprisoner was then locked up; Mr. Fonsick delivered the bundle to me, I have had it ever since.

Q. Now Mr. Fonsick look at the things - A. This is a cloth pelisse of my wife's, this was in the bundle, it is worth about a pound.

Q. Where was that the evening before - A. In the back parlours where the servant sleeps.

Q. Did the maid servant sleep in that room that night - A. Yes, she did. This green pelisse she had got on, this was in the same room, this belongs to my wife, it is worth a pound; the tablecloth belongs to me, it is worth a shilling or two shillings; this was in the kitchen; the two silver spoons were found in her pockets by the servant girl; the servant girl took them out; it is the servant girls pocket, it was upon the person of the prisoner.

Q. Did you see the servant girl take them out of the prisoner's pocket - A. Yes; the prisoner had the servant girl's pocket tied on her; my servant girl took them out, they are marked M C.

ANN WRIGHT . I lived servant with Mr. Fonsick last Christmas day.

Q. What time did you go to bed on Christmas Eve - A. Between eleven and twelve.

Q. Were did you put your clothes when you went to bed - A. I folded them up and laid them by the side of my head, by the pillow; I slept in the back parlour.

Q. Were there any thing of your mistress's in the back parlour - A. Yes; these pelisses were there.

Q. Is there a window to the back parlour - A. Yes, and a blind that fastens on the inside of the window with a little bolt.

Q. Was the blind up and the window shut at the time you went to bed - A. Yes.

Q. Where does the window open - A. Out upon some leads.

Q. Did you hear any body come into your room in the course of the night - A. No, I was asleep; the first thing that I heard in the morning was master called for a light; I got up to dress myself, I could not find my clothes.

Q. Was there any shutter inside of that window - A. Yes, but it was never shut until since this happened.

Q. At the time that your master called you up was it light or dark - A. It was quite dark.

Q. It was not day light you are sure - A. No.

Q. You felt about for your clothes, you could not find them - A. No; I put the quilt round me, and then I went out in the street and got a light; I could not find the tinder box; I went out at the street door to the side of the square, it was quite dark, and then I came back again with the light; I went into the back parlour to see if I could find my things, I missed all my things; then master went up stairs to see if all the men were in bed; then I went down in the kitchen, master came along with me, and the first thing that I saw in the kitchen was this gown that is on me now; it was in my room on the over night.

Q. How did you find the kitchen doors - A. They were both open, they open backwards; I missed my shawl out of the kitchen drawers, and a goose that was in the safe on the over night; and then my master went out, I did not go with him; I was in the house when master brought in the prisoner, and these bundles, I saw her brought in.

Q. At the time that she was brought in did you observe what she had on her person - A. No, I did not; I observed nothing but an old cloak; my mistress observed when she sat down her pelisse, and then I observed it and my cap on her head.

Q. Was that cap in your room that night - A. Yes, and my mistress's pelisses were in my room; I found my pocket on her, only one pocket, it was tied on her.

Q. Are you sure that when you went to bed the blinds of the window that you speak of were shut, and the sash window shut down - A. Yes.

Q. Were there any of your things in the bundle - A. Yes.

Q. Take up what belong to you - A. That is a gown of mine, and two petticoats, a pair of stockings, an apron, a cap, a pocket, a shawl, a pair of old shoes, and a white handkerchief.

PAUL RODRIGUEZ . Q. Do you lodge in Fonsick's house - A. Yes; I lodged there on Christmas day last; there is a pair of boots in the bundle that is mine; I left the boots in the kitchen on the over night.

Q. Were you in the house - A. Yes, up stairs and in bed.

Q. You knew nothing of what happened untill after she was brought in and the alarm given - A. No.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 17.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

108. CHARLES HANDYSIDE was indicted for that he, on the 13th of May , feloniously did take to wife Jane Covell , widow , his former wife being then alive .

SARAH PEARCE. I keep a public-house in Gosport; I was witness, and signed the church books of the prisoners first marriage about the beginning of June 1796; the prisoner Charles Handyside was married to Mary Partman , widow .

Q. What was Charles Handyside - A. A taylor at Gosport.

Q. How were they married - A. By license.

Q. Are you sure the prisoner is the man - A. Yes, I will swear to him; I have known him more than twenty-nine years, and I knew Mary Partman more than thirty years.

Q. How long did they live together after they were married - A. Not above three days before he sent for a broker to sell her things, and wanted to leave her poor three orphans distressed.

Q. Did he leave her three days after they were married - A. Yes.

Q. What became of him - A. I do not know; he left Gosport, and I never saw him from that time to this.

Q. What became of her - A. She lives in Gosport now and keeps a public house; I saw her on Sunday evening last.

JOHN GEER. I am clerk of Haverstock church ; Ihave got the register of Charles Handyside , widower and Mary Partman , widow, both of this parish, were married in this church by license, 2d June, 1796, witness Sarah Pearce and Robert Newman .

Q. to Mrs. Pearce. Is that your hand-writing, look at it - A. It is.

THOMAS MOORE . I am one of the beadles of St. Bride's, I produce the register of Charles Handyside , widower, of this parish, and Jane Covell of the same, widow, were married in this church by banns, 13th of May, 1810.

JANE COVELL . Q. When were you married to this man - A. On the 13th of last May.

Q. You were married to the prisoner, were you - A. Yes, I was, not knowing that he was a married man; I keep a brokers shop and sell earthenware in St. John-street.

Q. How soon did you find out that he was married - A. I did not find it out untill seven or eight weeks.

Prisoner's Defence. My Lord, I lament much the miserable situation that I am put in, and much more so that my embarrasment will not afford me council; I shall wait for that justice from your Lordship which is the characteristic of this court; I humbly beg to state that I was married to Mary Partman and was not more than two days in the house, I left her in possession of the house and property in the same situation I found her and I have not since heard of her for fourteen years, I was informed she was dead and I considered her so or I should not have married a second wife to offend the laws of my country and blast my happiness; I protest to your Lordship and the Gentlemen of the Jury that I was allured into the marriage of Jane Covell by the prosecutrix herself, from the 17th of March she was a constant visitor at my lodgings; I made her acquainted that I was only a journeyman and was in debt five pounds, her answer was that she could better my situation provided that I could carry on my business for her support and my own; I made no false representation to her in any one instance; she purchased the ring herself, paid the expence of the marriage and also the expences of the day, I was not in possession of a penny at the time; I am now forty-five or fifty pounds in debt, I was that sum in debt on the last day in September, which debt she contracted herself, nor was I ever brought in court before. Jane Covell 's son, I see him here, he is a bedstead maker and under twenty years of age, his father at his decease left him two hundred and fifty pounds in the four per cents, in consequence of his being under age he could not become possesed of the money, and his mother wanting him to go into business I became bondsman to one Mr. Page and his mother another, for should he be dead before the money became due it devolved to his sister. I am informed that my first wife Mary Partman should be in court and had she been living I am confident she would, I entertain an anxious hope that your Lordship and the Jury will believe me on my solemn protest to God that if I have erred against the laws of my country I committed it innocently, I was informed in 1808 that my wife was dead when I returned from Egypt.

GUILTY aged 47.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

109 MARY CARNEY , and MARY BOLSTEAD were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of December , twenty-nine yards and a half of printed cotton, value 2 l. 10 s. the property of Nathan Merry , privately in his shop .

NATHAN MERRY . I am a linen draper , 21, Bishopsgate-street . On the 7th of December about ten o'clock in the morning the two women came into my shop to purchase cotton for a gown, eleven shillings and six pence was the purchase, they left six shillings and the parcel and were to call again. they returned within the hour, paid the rest of that money and took that parcel; they bought some other things and paid for them, bought another gown which they had put by paying part of the money as before. I waited on them at the upper end of the shop, a young man at the door saw them coming down the shop and were going out, Carney wore a long cloak and the wind parted it in the front as she came down the shop, the young man came to me and gave me information, I followed Carney and found two pieces of print upon her, I took one piece from under her right arm and the other piece was falling, the young man catched it before it reached the ground; I detained them both and sent for a constable.

THOMAS WILCOX . I am shopman to Mr. Merry. On the 7th of December the two prisoners came about ten in the forenoon made a purchase and went away, they returned in about an hour, made another purchase, and as Carney was turning round from the counter to go out I saw a piece of print under her left arm, I told Mr. Merry, he ran after them and stopped them at the door and when Mr. Merry was in the act of taking one parcel from under her right arm the other was sliding down, I catched it before it fell to the ground.

Carney's Defence. I took it up in a mistake and put it in my bundle.

Bolstead said nothing in her defence.

Carney called two witnesses who gave her a good character.

Bolstead called two witnesses, who gave her a good character.

CARNEY GUILTY , aged 18.

BOLSTEAD GUILTY , aged 22.

Of stealing to the value of 4 s. 11 d. only.

Confined Two Months in Newgate and fined 1 s .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

110. RICHARD COLES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of December , a pewter quart pot, value 1 s. 4 d. the property of William Payne .

JAMES GLEEK . On the 13th of December I was going up Furnivals Inn-court , I saw the prisoner take two pots off the string, one was a bar pot, he put that on the string again, he put the other pot under his apron, walked down the court and put it into his basket.

Q. Had he a basket with him - A. He had a basket where he worked, where he puts his brushes in, he is a shoe-black ; I went up the court and called the lad and asked him if the pots belonged to him, he said yes, I told him that the man had taken one off the string.

WILLIAM PAYNE . I live at Furnivals Inn cellar in Holborn; from information I took the prisoner and sent for an officer; I found this pot in his basket, it is mine.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, nor called any witnesses to his character.

GUILTY , aged 61.

Confined Six Months in Newgate and fined 1 s .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

111. WILLIAM JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of December , seventeen pound weight of hair, value 5 s. the property of Edward Joseph Mallough , junior .

EDWARD JOSEPH MALLOUGH . jun. I am a wharfinger and warehouse keeper , 18, Harp-lane, Tower-street.

JOHN OLIVER BOYES. On the evening of the 23th of December about a quarter past six I saw some person creeping under the wall of St. Botolph's wharf , there appeared to be something bulky before him, as the prisoner was turning the corner to go up Botolph gateway I made up to him and asked him what he had got, he made no answer but tried to get away from me, we then had a scuffle, I threw him and kept him down upon his breech and called out to a person on the wharf and told him to go to Fresh Wharf to tell them that I had got a person with some of their hair.

Q. There were some hair upon Fresh wharf - A. Yes, there were, and no where else on the Quays besides; it was about fifty yards from Fresh wharf where I stopped the prisoner, he was coming from Fresh wharf Mr. Mallough came and recognized the prisoner having been at Fresh wharf a night or two before. Mr. Mallough fetched an officer, I delivered the prisoner and the hair to the officer. I went and examined a bale on Fresh wharf, it was cut and a quantity of hair taken out.

JOHN LOWRY . I am a constable, I took the prisoner in custody from the last witness, and this hair.

MR. MALLOUGH. I believe it is my hair, it was laying on the wharf to be loaded; I had such hair as that and there were no other any where about; the prisoner said he found it; I am sure he is the same man I had seen him there before

Prisoner's Defence: I went to the Quay to see a shipmate of mine and turning back I got that on the Quay, I took it up in my arms and coming along a man asked me what I had got, I told him I believed it was hair, I threw it down.

GUILTY , aged 47.

Transported for Seven years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

112. SOPHIA KNOWLES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of December , a quilt, value 5 s. a blanket, value 5 s. a pair of sheets, value 5 s. and a table-cloth, value 6 d. the property of George Tyler .

SARAH TYLER . I am the wife of George Tyler , he is shopman to an ironmonger .

Q. When did you lose these things - A. On the 8th of December, between five and six in the evening, from off my bed.

WILLIAM HALL . I am an East India labourer; Mrs. Tyler lodges in my first floor. On the 8th of December, between five and six, Mrs. Tyler informed me that she was robbed and told me the articles she had lost. I found the blankets at Mr. Attenborough's; I got an officer; the prisoner came to redeem some things and then I took her in custody, we then went and searched her apartment, found the quilt, two sheets, and a tablecloth.

Mr. Knapp. When you found these things what did she say - A. We found a person in the room, we were in agitation whether we should take him in custody, the prisoner cried and said he was innocent and she was guilty.

WILLIAM ATTENBOROUGH . I am a pawnbroker, No. 1, Crown-street, Finsbury-square; these blankets I took in of the prisoner on the 8th of December, between five and six, the man came to my shop about five minutes after she was gone, the prisoner came again in the evening when she was taken in custody.

DENIEL BISHOP. I am an officer; I took the prisoner in custody, in her hand I found the duplicates of the blankets at Mr. Attenborough's, I went to her lodgings in Artillery-street and found the quilt and the pair of sheets, there was a man in the room, I asked her if he lodged there, she cried all the time and did not say.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought the things of a woman.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY , aged 27.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

113. ANN MOORE and MARY GALPONEY were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of December , a shawl, value 4 s. the property of William Payne Barnard .

WILLIAM PAYNE BARNARD. I am a linen draper , 86, Bishopsgate-street . On the 26th of December, about five in the evening, in company with another came to my shop door, they asked the price of things that hanged about the door, I missed a shawl from the door, I jump-over the counter, the prisoners saw me coming, they crossed the road, I followed them and took the prisoner, Moore, with the shawl upon her; I brought her back to the shop and sent for an officer.

MARY OTRIDGE . I was coming down Bishopsgate street on Wednesday evening about five o'clock, there were three of them stopped together, one stooped, the other unpinned the shawl, and the other took it; the gentleman came out crossed the way and took the woman with the shawl.

Moore's Defence. I picked up the shawl like another fool from off the pavement; if I had twenty pound I would not pick it up again.

Galponey's Defence. I happened to stop at the door like another fool as I was, seeing a mob.

MOORE, GUILTY .

Transported for Seven Years .

GALPONEY, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

114. JOHN WHITE was indicted for feloniously assaulting Benjamin Tonquet on the 24th of December in the King's highway putting him in fear and feloniously taking from his person and against his will a watch, value 3 l. a gold seal, value 2 l. a gold ring, value 1 s. a watch chain, value 1 s. and a watch key, value 6 d. his property .

BENJAMIN TONQUET . Q. What are you - A. I am a servant . On Christmas eve, about eleven o'clock, I was ordered to get a coach for the family, they were in Bedford-row; I went into the Turk's head public-house in Dyot-street to get a pint of beer, I asked the landlord whether I could go in and set down half an hour, I went in and sat down about half an hour and the prisoner came in; I came out at eleven o'clock to go to get a coach, I had not gone ten yards from the door before they came out and knocked me down in the street.

Q. Who knocked you down - A. I do not know who it was. When I got up I said, what do you think you are going to do, are you going to rob me; there were nine or ten around me.

Q. They did not say any thing to you, did they - A. No, they did not; It was coming away, the prisoner at the bar came forward after I had left them; he came sideways, my watch was in my pocket, he snatched my watch out.

Q. You both saw him and felt him - A. Yes, and as soon as I found my watch was drawed out of my pocket I called out stop thief. The prisoner ran into the middle of the street, I ran after him and kept close to him; he was running up to the end of Broad-street, the watchman was at the corner and caught him; we took him to the watchhouse, he was searched, we could not find the watch on him. As he was running down the street he met some of his companions, he extended his arms to one of them.

Q. If what you say is true he gave it away you know - A. Yes.

Q. Are you sure the prisoner is the man that snatched the watch from you - A. Yes.

Q. Are you sure he is the same man that was in the room with you - A. Yes.

Q. What business had you in that house - A. I had been in Charlotte-street; I was ordered to get a coach; at eleven o'clock I went in there to get a pint of beer; I did not know what the house was.

MICHAEL ADAMS . I was upon duty in Broad-street, Bloomsbury, on Christmas Eve, I heard the cry of stop thief, two or three times, I was at the corner of Dyot-street, I saw the prosecutor following the prisoner, I stopped him and took him to the watchhouse.

Q. What did the prosecutor charge the prisoner with - A. He said, watchman, stop thief, he has robbed me of my watch, the prisoner said, I am not guilty, do not take me to the watchhouse; I said I will, and took him to the watchhouse.

JOHN SMITH . I am beadle of the night. They brought the prisoner into the watchhouse, the prosecutor charged him with robbing him of his watch; the prisoner said nothing in my hearing; I searched him and found nothing on him.

JOHN BAXTER . I am watchhouse keeper; I saw the prisoner searched, he had nothing on him.

Prisoner's Defence. I am a very hard working lad; I was coming up Holborn after I had done my work, I heard the cry of stop thief, I ran to see what was the matter, the watchman dragged me to the watchhouse; I know no more of it than a child unborn; I never was in Dyot-street, I was at the top of Holborn.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 20.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

115. HENRY WILSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of December , two hundred and ninety yards of gingham, value 11 l. the property of Richard Levett Brooks , in his dwelling-house .

MARY ELIZABETH BROOKS . I live in Glasshouse-street, Piccadilly , in the parish of St. James's; I live with my father Richard Levitt Brooks , he is a linen draper , the shops are below stairs; we live up-stairs; my father keeps two shops and two houses, they both communicate together. On Friday evening, the 7th of December, I was in the shop, a man came in the shop to look at some handkerchiefs, another man then came in and took a parcel of ginghams that laid on the counter without saying any thing.

Q. Did you see him take them - A. I did.

Q. How were they wrapped up - A. They were laying in a pile on the top of the others, near the door; when he had taken them up he put them on his shoulder and walked out of the shop with them, without saying any thing.

Q. Did you observe that man to see who he was - A. I did not see his face; I judge by the size that the prisoner is the same person.

Q. How soon after that did you see any man brought back to the shop - A. I did not see him any more till the next morning. When I saw the man go out of the shop with the ginghams; I immediately gave the alarm to my father, who was in the next shop; my father immediately pursued him.

RICHARD LEVETT BROOKS. Q. You are the father of the last witness - A. Yes.

Q. You keep these two shops and occupy both the houses - A. Yes; the shops are the lower part of the houses.

Q. Do you recollect being in one of the shops, and being called to by your daughter - A. On Monday evening my daughter called father, and said a man has taken a bundle of ginghams from the other shop, and the moment it was mentioned, I went out at the door, I saw a man about fifteen paces from the door, he had the ginghams which we have here, he had shifted them from his shoulder to his front, he was going as fast as he conveniently could, with the bundle to the corner of Union-street, I caught him and clasped him as far as I could with the goods in my arms, I seized him and the bundle at the same time, I saw him drop the bundle, he gave me a twist and I fell, I got up again, and instantly pursued him, and at a door in Union-street, about thirty paces I caught him again; I did not lose sight of him all the time, it was a bright moonlight night.

Q. Are you sure that the man that you caught again at the distance of thirty paces was the man that you first laid hold of - A. Yes, I noticed his voice and person; when I first caught him he said some man has put them in my arms; I knew him to be the same man, there was no person in the street at the time, not even of the other side of the way; I got hold of him a second time, and by a twist again, or some how or other I fell in the dirt again; I lost my hold, but I never lost sight of him; he was off immediately, I was after him in a moment, I was not three paces behind him, he passed Little Union-street into Piccadilly, and rushed up against the dead wall of St. James's church, and in my attempting to lay hold of his collar I slipped down again and caught hold of the tail of his coat, a gentleman then came up, and we carried him to St. James's watchhouse, and from there to Marlborough-street office.

Q. Can you swear positively that the man that you carried to St. James's watchhouse was the man that you saw fifteen paces from your door with the ginghams - A. I took notice of his person and voice, I am most assuredly certain he is the person; I never lost sight of him, it was a very moonlight night.

Q. What became of the ginghams - A. One of my young people followed me and picked the ginghams from off the ground. I can swear to the ginghams. I pursued the man; I saw the young person take up partof the ginghams.

Q. Where she took them you do not know - A. They were taken to my house.

Q. How came she not to be here - A. I did not think her evidence to be necessary. I saw the ginghams as plain in his arms as I see your lordship.

Q. When you saw them in his arms could you take sufficient notice to know they were your ginghams - A. No, only from the alarm; I could not distinguish they were mine, or any one else's. St. James's is very well lighted, I could see they were ginghams; I could not see any mark upon them then.

Q. Was that young person before the magistrate - A. No. I believe they informed me that it was not necessary; I asked the question.

Q. When he was taken to the watchhouse did anything pass there - A. No; I was so short of breath, and hurt by the fall, I could not speak.

Q. Had you observed the place where these ginghams were before the alarm - A. Yes, they were about a yard upon the counter, all upon one pile, and when I returned a great part of the pile were gone. When I came back I found some of my ginghams in the shop all over mud, and they were part of that pile which I had been before.

- BURTON. I am an officer of Marlborough-street. The ginghams I produce were brought into the office by Mr. Brooks, and the daughter, and an officer belonging to the parish; they were put into my custody, I have had them ever since.

Q. to Miss Brooks. You say you saw nothing more of the man that took the things until the next morning you saw him at the office - A. Yes.

Q. You had not taken sufficient notice to know the man again - A. I did not see his face, by his size it was the prisoner to the best of my belief; I thought so the next morning.

Q. Did you stay in the shop after you had given the alarm, and your father went in the pursuit - A. I staid in the shop the whole of the time.

Q. While you were in the shop did you see any thing done with respect to them ginghams, or any body bring them in - A. The young person that took them up that belonged to the shop, she brought them in; she followed my father out.

Q. How long after she had gone out did she bring in any thing - A. She brought them in in about eight or nine minutes.

Q. You saw her go out after your father, did you - A. Yes.

Q. Of course you did not see her pick up any thing - A. No. She brought in a parcel of ginghams all over mud, they were the same ginghams that had been upon the pile.

Q. Are these the ginghams that lay there - A. They are; I have looked at them before, I am certain they are my father's property, there is two hundred and ninety yards and there is a mark upon them; they are of the value of eleven pounds eighteen shillings and sixpence: we put them down eleven pounds.

Q. to Mr. Brooks. Have you looked at these ginghams - A. I have looked at them, and put my seal upon them; they have my private mark, I am sure they are mine; I have put them down at a low value, at three parts of the price.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming along Glasshouse-street, at the end of Glasshouse-street I saw a mob, Mr. Brooks was in the middle of the mob; he said he is gone, and then he saw me, he said, that is him, I will swear to him.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 20.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Le Blanc.

116. JAMES EDWARD WYNE was indicted for that he, on the 20th of December , in and upon Sarah How , spinster , violently ad feloniously did make an assault, and her, the said Sarah How , did ravish and carnally know .

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

117. ANN PEARMAN was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of James Esdaile , the elder , Joseph Esdaile , James Esdaile, and James Esdaile , the younger , about the hour of ten, on the night of the 5th of January , with intent, the goods and chattels therein being, to steal and carry away .

JAMES ESDAILE , JUNIOR. Q. Are you in partners ship with other persons - A. I am, with James and Joseph Esdaile ; the firm is James Esdaile and sons. The premises where we carry on our business is in Bunhill-row ; the dwelling house is in the front, and a large yard at the back of the house, and the warehouse make up three sides of the square.

Q. How is the entrance into the yard - A. The entrance of the large yard is by a gateway from the street. There is a communication from my house into the yard; I live upon the premises, the premises are the property of the partnership; my house is in front. The warehouse is connected with the dwelling-house but there is no communication.

Q. Does your partners reside in the dwelling-house - A. Occasionally. My father resides in the country; when he comes to town he resides there as a visitor to me, I reside constantly there.

Q. You are the only one that resides there - A. Yes, constantly. On Saturday evening, the 5th instant, about the hour of ten o'clock, I was alarmed by the springing of a rattle, I went down stairs into the yard, I saw the watchman employed by us; we entered the warehouse through the window; the shutter had been broken through; upon searching the premises we discovered the prisoner, she was in one corner of the warehouse, concealed under a kind of a bench.

Q. Did you afterwards find that any thing had been stolen - A. No.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Chambre.

118. THOMAS CARTER was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Richard lord viscount Chetwynd , about the hour of twelve at night, on the 15th of December , and stealing therein, a great coat, value 3 l. his property .

STEPHEN YOELL. I am coachman to Lord Chetwyn, his stables are in Barlow Mews .

Q. Was any thing lost on the night of the 15th of December from this stable - A. A box coat I was accustomed to wear. I missed it on the morning of the 14th.

Q. When had you seen it before it was missing - A. I saw it before ten o'clock at night, when I locked the stable door. On the next morning the stable door was wide open.

JOHN WOOD . I am a patrol. On Sunday morning betwixt two and three o'clock, James Hall and me were on duty at the Old Bailey. Thomas Box , a waterman, on the stand, told me he had searched the rank of hackney coaches; he could not find any coach belonging to the prisoner; I directly took hold of him on suspicion of stealing the coat; he had been offering the coat for sale. When I had got within a few yards of the watch-house, I had hold of one cuff of the coat, the prisoner gave a twist, the coat came off in my arms, he got away. I pursued him; he was stopped by a watchman; he was not out of my sight, nor two minutes from me, until I got him again. I took him to the watchhouse.

JAMES HALE. Q. Did you apprehend this man in conjunction with Wood - A. Yes. The coat being a big one, and he a little man, he made a ruslt, and sprang out of the coat; I am sure he is the man, he was not from us above a minute and a half. We never lost sight of him.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked that coat up in Couson-street, Mayfair, about eleven o'clock at night; I had a long way to go to my lodging in Water-lane, Blackfriers, and as I was locked out I went to get into a watering-house I told them I had a coach on the stand on purpose for them to let me in, and I had not been in a minute before the waterman asked me if I would sell the coat, I told him I did not know. I am as innocent of stealing the coat as a child unborn.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

119. JOHN JONES , alias, DAVID JONES , was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of James White , about the hour of twelve on the night of the 13th of December , and stealing therein, three cheeses, value 1 l. 10 s. eight pound weight of lard, value 8 s and five pound weight of butter, value 5 s. the property of James White .

JAMES WHITE . I live in Wardour-street, St. James . I keep the house; I am a cheesemonger . On the 14th of December I was called up by the watchman of St. Ann's, about half after twelve, I got up and came down stairs.

Q. In what situation did you find your shop - A. I found two of the shop window shutters taken down, they had been barred on the outside, and by getting them above the hooks they might be taken down. A pane of glass was cut out of the shop window so as to put an arm in. I went to bed about eleven, the shutters were put up and fast, there was no pane of glass broke; I missed cheese, butter, and lard, but what quantity of cheese I could not tell at the time; there were a pile of cheese in the window, the whole pile was gone, and the pile stood right opposite of the glass that was broken.

Q. Was there any butter standing there - A. Yes; it was gone, and the lard was gone, they were all within an arms reach of that broken window. The watchman told me they had taken up a person with such articles. The next morning at ten o'clock I went to the watch-house, I saw the prisoner in custody, three cheeses, about eight or ten pound of lard, and four or five pound of butter.

JURY. How large was the pane of glass - A. Large enough to let a cheese out.

WILLIAM CHAPMAN . I am a watchman of St. Ann's. I was calling half after one o'clock on the 14th in the morning I was in Wardour-street, I saw two men at a distance coming down Wardour-street, they were walking gradually together with two bundles, one had got a large one, and the other a small one, they perceived I was coming, he with a large bundle crossed over the street to St. James's side, at that time St. James's watchman was calling the half hour at a distance behind me; I passed the man with a little bundle and took no notice; the other passed the same; I stopped to see whether the man with the large bundle would meet the St. James's watchman or not, and before he met him he crossed over of my side, I then followed after them as fast as I could; I passed the man with the small bundle, and got within eight or ten yards of the man with the large bundle, he began to run; I sprang my rattle, he threw down the goods and ran off; I then turned and seized the man with the little bundle by the collar, I said let us see what you have got, he let the handkerchief drop, it fell on the ground, it contained butter and lard; I then called to the St. James's watchman, and one of St. Ann's to come and pick it up; they did; I took the prisoner, he was the man with the small bundle; they took the cheese, butter, and lard to the watchhouse, and there the prisoner was searched; he had two bad dollars, and two duplicates in his pocket. The watchman that I called picked up the property, and I saw the other man drop it; there were three cheeses, and four lumps of butter. Mr. White's house is on the St. James's side; I did not go there. I saw Mr. White at the watchhouse the next morning.

JAMES BALL . I was constable of the night for St. Ann's. I was at the watchhouse on the morning of the 14th of December, the prisoner was brought to the watchhouse by Chapman, and the other watchman brought the goods.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, nor called any witnesses to character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Le Blanc.

120. CHARLES BELL was indicted for burglarious breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Read , about the hour of six, on the night of the 18th of December , and stealing therein, ten gold chains, value 30 l. sixteen gold seals, value 20 l. two gold necklaces, value 6 l. and thirty seals, value 4 l. his property .

WILLIAM READ . I live with my father, Thomas Read, 84, Germain-street, St. James's , he is a jeweller .

Q. Were you in the shop on the 18th of December - A Yes, between five and six in the evening I was in the back shop; it was quite dark; my two brothers were with me; William Marks , my father's apprentice, about that time had gone to the next door, St. James's hotel, to deliver some plated candlesticks, he went out between five and six; I saw him go out of the back shop, and I heard him go out of the front shop, I heard him open the door and shut it after him. In about a minute and a half afterwards I heard some one open the shop door, I had to open a middle door before I could get into the frontshop, and when I got into the front shop I saw the front door half open, I could not see any one in the front shop, one of my younger brothers came into the shop, he said one of the trays in the window was gone; I locked and found one was gone.

Q. What had been in that tray - A. Thirty pebble pyramid seals, two necklaces, ear-rings and broaches, belonging to them, and in looking further I found the other tray was stripped of ten gold chains, and sixteen gold seals.

Q. What part of the shop was it where that tray stood - A. In the front of the shop next the door, and the other tray stood by it.

Q. Have you seen any of this property since - A. Yes; about nine days afterwards, at Mr. Turner's, in Bridges-street, I saw a gold chain, and a gold seal.

Q. What might be the value of the chain and seals - A. The chain, thirty shillings, and the seal, a guinea and a half.

Q. Is this shop where these things were taken part of your father's dwelling-house - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know in what manner the windows were closed - were the shutters shut up - A. Yes, they were closed about four o'clock; there was no way of getting into the shop but by opening the door.

Mr. Bolland. Do you know whether your father or the officer searched after a man of the name of Watson - A. No.

Q. Did you know the prisoner before - A. No.

WILLIAM MARKS . I am an apprentice to Mr. Read. I went out of the shop between five and six.

Q. Do you know whether there was any light of the day to observe the countenance of any person - A. No, it was dark; I went out to next door to St. James's hotel, the door was upon the latch, I pulled it to after me, I am certain it was fast.

Q. How long did you remain away - A. I suppose about two or three minutes.

Q. Was there any thing missing when you returned - A. Yes.

WILLIAM LEVETT . I live with Mr. Turner, a pawnbroker in Bridges-street. On the 22d of December, in the morning the prisoner pledged a gold chain, I lent him one pound six shillings upon it.

Prisoner's Defence. I was at the Fountain public-house, a man that I knew asked me to drink; he said he wanted some money; he said, here is something, go and get some money; I took the chain, and went to Mr. Turner's shop, and offered it, I asked thirty shillings, he bid me twenty-six shillings; I took it and took the money; the person that gave me the chain, I have not seen him since.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Chambre.

121. EDWARD GEORGE was indicted for feloniously assaulting Robert Rankin , in the King's highway, on the 24th of December , putting him in fear, and feloniously taking from his person, and against his will, a gold seal, value 2 l. a gold ring, value 1 s. and a gold key, value 1 s. his property .

ROBERT RANKIN . I am a mariner . On the 24th of December, a little before twelve o'clock at night, I was coming home from Little Queen-street , towards Great Queen-street, I observed the prisoner with a woman hanging on his arm; I was alone, and going to give them the wall, with my hand in my pantaloons pocket. I had my seal in my right hand; when nearly opposite of the prisoner and the woman, I was in the act of pulling my hand up the prisoner came up; and my elbow touched the shop window; I immediately put my left hand to my right elbow, which it had from the touch of the bar of the window; at this time the prisoner and a woman with him were close to me, when they separated, and the woman accosted me familiarly in her discourse, and put her arm under my right arm, upon which the prisoner snatched at my seal, and feeling something give I immediately disentangled myself from the woman, and followed the prisoner, who run across the street, I got up with him, and attempted to lay hold of him with my right hand on his shoulder; in consequence of an accident, having had two fore fingers broken, I could not hold him; he ran across the street to an alley, I prevented him from getting in the alley, a scuffle ensued between the prisoner and myself, upon which I called the watch; immediately I heard the tattle spring, and the prisoner attempted to make off the second time; I again followed him, he ran towards Holborn; I came up with him at the corner of Little Queen-street, and on my endeavouring to lay hold of him, he turned a post at the corner of the street, sprung his left arm, and gave me a blow on my head and brought me to the ground, on my knee, and left hand with my face towards the prisoner; at this moment I observed the woman cross the street, and observed the prisoner and the woman in the act of giving and receiving; their hands were extended to each other; the prisoner then walked towards Holborn, and the woman towards the alley; the watchman came up and took charge of the prisoner.

Q. He got away from you twice - A. Yes; I never lost sight of him, nor was I ever above two or three yards from him. When the watchman came up I gave charge of him he was taken to the watch-house.

Mr. Andrews. Were you sober - A. Quite sober.

Q. You never found your property - A. Never.

Q. Do you mean to say you could distinguish whether it was the woman or him, that made the snatch at your watch - A. I could.

WILLIAM WEBSTER . I am a watchman in Holborn. On the 24th of December, about twelve o'clock, I heard a gentleman call watch; I came up, the gentleman had hold of the prisoner, he gave charge of him, I took him to the watchhouse.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, nor called any witnesses to character.

GUILTY , aged 46.

Of stealing, but not violently from the person.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

122. JOHN COX and CHARLES BOTWRIGHT were indicted for feloniously assaulting George Skene , in the King's highway, on the 30th of December ,putting him in fear, and feloniously taking from his person, a gold seal, value 10 s. a gold watch key, value 1 s. and a watch ribbon, value 1 d. his property .

GEORGE SKENE . On Sunday, the 30th of December, at about eleven at night, I was at the end of Castle street, in the City-road , I was going home, I saw three men meeting of me, one of them snatched my gold seal, key, and black ribbon, it was hanging to my watch, out of my fob, the ribbon broke, and the watch remained in my pocket; that was done by one of them, he instantly ran away with it, and at the same instant another of the party gave me a violent blow at the side of my head.

Q. Could you distinguish it was one of the three men that gave you the blow - A. Yes, it was one of the three men; that blow was given at the same instant the person took the seal; or perhaps a few seconds after, it was not before. After I perceived it I turned round, and then I had the blow, just as the other was running. I then discovered that they had robbed me. I immediately pursued the thief.

Q. Did you see the man that had taken the seal, key, and ribbon - A. Yes, he ran away and I pursued him.

Q. What became of the man that gave you the blow - A. I did not see him. I followed the man that took the seal and key towards Finsbury-square to Providence-row, I kept him in sight all the way, at the lower end of Providence-row, he struck against a post and fell, he immediately got up again, and ran across Wilson-street, I did not catch him. Crossing Wilson-street he fell again, and I collared him; I kept my hold of him; several watchman came up, I gave him in charge of two of them.

Q. Are you sure you kept the man in sight all the time - A. Yes.

Q. And the man that you gave in charge was the same man that had taken your seal and key - A. I am positive of it. It was a fine clear frosty night. I requested two of the watchmen that were there to look after the seal; I was certain he had not dropped it before he came there; it was a clear night, I could have seen it. It was brought to me the next day. I went to the watchhouse with the prisoner Cox.

Q. And that was the prisoner Cox that you so secured - A. Yes, he was searched at the watchhouse, the seal and key was not found upon him.

Q. Did you take notice at all of the man who snatched at you seal and key at the time that he did it - A. I took notice of him particularly; I know his person; I could not perceive his face; I kept him in sight, and took him to the watchhouse; I am certain Cox is the person.

Q. Did you take any notice of the man that gave you the blow - A. No. I observed three together, I believe Botwright to be one of the three.

Q. You had not observed him particularly - A. No.

THOMAS PATEY . I heard the alarm of stop him, past the hour of eleven o'clock, on the 30th of December; I run, I saw the prosecutor and another gentlemen with the prisoner Cox, the prosecutor gave me charge of him; I took him to the watchhouse, and afterwards I searched the place, in consequence of the prosecutor's desire, that same night, I picked up the gold seal, key, and black ribbon, I took it to the constable of the night, I found it within a few yards of where I took charge of the prisoner Cox, they were laying on the foot pavement.

FOSTER HEWITT . Q. You were the officer of the night on duty at the watchhouse - A. I was; the prisoner Cox was brought to the watchhouse a little after eleven o'clock. It was about an hour afterwards when the watchman brought the seal, key, and ribbon to the watchhouse. These are them.

Prosecutor. They are my property, and they are the same that was snatched from me that night.

RICHARD WILD . I was going my rounds past eleven o'clock, I heard the cry of, stop him, I turned round, I saw the prisoner Botwright, he was running up, Windmill-street, towards Finsbury-square, I collared him, and delivered him up at the watchhouse.

Cox's Defence. I had been up to the Green-gate in the City-road, I was rather intoxicated in liquor. I live in London Wall; I heard the cry of stop thief; I run over, I saw a man run before me, and I ran after him; the prosecutor was behind me; I fell down, the man before me run on.

Botwright was not put on his defence.

COX - GUILTY , aged 21.

Of stealing, but not violently from the person.

Transported for Seven Years .

BOTWRIGHT - NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

123. MIHEL EMANUEL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of August , in the dwelling house of Jane Wilson , widow, a promissory note, value 10 l. and a promissory note, value 1 l. the property of Alexander Ogleby , and William Law Ogleby .

WILLIAM LAW OGLEBY . I am a ship and insurance broker ; I live in Abchurch-yard, that is my dwelling-house, I have an accompting-house in Jane Wilson 's house in Sherbourne-lane , she is a widow. It is in the parish of St. Mary Abchurch.

Q. When did you lose this note of yours - A. On the 23d of August I left in a drawer on the desk in the accompting-house, a ten pound note, and a one pound note; I only had it in my hand that morning; about ten o'clock, on the next morning I looked for it they were both missing; the prisoner was my servant , he attended at the private house, and slept in the accompting-house. Some time ago I saw a watch with the prisoner, I suspected him, I sent for Mr. Harris that he bought the watch of; I traced the note, and got it.

Q. What is your partners name - A. Alexander Ogleby .

Q. How long had the prisoner lived with you - A. A year and a half.

Q. Did he sleep in the accompting house, or in a room adjoining - A. In a closet in the accompting-house.

JOHN JAMES HARRIS . I am a watchmaker, I live at 19, Nightingale-lane. On the 22nd of Decemberthe prisoner came in, and wished to look at some new watches; he approved of one, and tendered me a ten pound Irish note; I sent my apprentice out to get cash for this Irish note of Mr. Murray, and I gave the change. I am sure the prisoner is the man.

JONATHAN MURRAY . I am a pawnbroker; I live near Mr. Harris. On the 22d of December I gave him change for a ten pound Irish note; I endorsed it with my own initials; here is my initials at the back of this note.

SAMUEL LOVELESS . I am an apprentice to Mr. Harris. On the 22d of December I went to Mr. Murray to get change of a ten pound note; he gave me six pound; he was to send the rest down the next day; I took the six pound to Mr. Harris.

DANIEL LEADBETTER . On Tuesday last, in company with Cartwright, I apprehended the prisoner at Mr. Ogleby's. I took a watch out of his pocket. We took him to the Mansion House; there were two keys taken out of his pocket; I went to where he lodged. I there found two one pound bank notes, a half-crown, sixpence, and a new hat.

Q. to Mr. Harris. Look at that watch - A. This is the watch I sold to the prisoner.

Q. to Mr. Ogleby. Look at that ten pound note. Is that your note - A. It is; the woman endorsed it at the time I took it of her; I am sure it is the note; I lost it out of the drawer.

DANIEL CARTWRIGHT . I was in company with Leadbetter. On searching him I found this purse with a shilling in it, and an Irish one pound bank note. It has the same direction as the other; it is endorsed A. Storey, the same as the other.

Q. This house in Sherbourne Lane is let out in lodgings - A. Yes; Mrs. Wilson lives in the house.

Prisoner's Defence. I have been along with this master a year and a half; he lost some money last Christmas. My master saw this watch; he asked me where I got that watch. I got money before I came to London. I brought this money from Ireland. It is my money. When my master saw the watch, he said, this is the way my money goes. I slept in the accompting-house. I never saw the money at all. This watch cost me four pound ten shillings. I bought the watch at Wapping. My master said, he had lost the money, and I had bought the watch with it. I said, No, I got money before I came to London. This master gave me victuals and drink, and clothes; he gave me no money.

JURY. The notes are dated 4th of June, 1810. The prisoner said, he brought them to London he could not have done that.

GUILTY , aged 21,

Of Stealing, but not in the Dwelling-house.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

124. WILLIAM TOWNSEND was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of December , a watch, value 5 l. a gold watch chain, value 4 l. a cornelian seal set in gold, value 16 s. and a gold watch-key, value 4 s. the property of Joseph Lewis , in his dwelling-house .

JOSEPH LEWIS . I am a goldsmith , 21, Aldgate, High-street . On the 12th of December, about ten o'clock in the morning, Mr. Blacket brought a watch and chain and seal; the chain he wished to be mended, being broken. I said I would do it for him; he then left the watch on the counter, the chain and seal, at that time I was sorting some pearl; I had been parting some gold from silver at the back part of the house. I ran to the back part of the house to look after my work, forgot the watch entirely; I was absent about three minutes; on my return I forgot the watch. I went to my pearl again; I never thought of the watch till the next day. I then made inquiry; no one had seen the watch. On the next day I advertised it; that brought the chain and seal to light. Mr. Crouch had taken it in to pledge.

THOMAS BLACKET . I live at No. 9, Aldgate. On the 12th of December I left a watch and chain, seal and key, with Mr. Lewis.

JAMES HAWKINS . I am a hatter.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. Yes, after he left my master he went to sea. I saw him in London about four months ago; he said he was down in the world. I treated him, and told him to call at my house. On the 12th of December he came to the shop where I work to enquire for me. I went home about four o'clock, he was at the Red Lion public house. He asked me to pledge a chain and seal; I thought it was not his own; I asked one of my shopmates to pledge it for me; I thought it was not gold.

Q. You gave the chain and seal that you received of the prisoner to Joseph Johnson , to go and pledge it - A. Yes, the prisoner wanted three guineas on it; Mr. Crouch's man gave him twenty-five shillings on it; as soon as I found it was gold, I went into the shop, and when I came out I gave the prisoner the money. On the Tuesday following he came to me, and wanted to sell the duplicate. On the Sunday I happened to see it advertised a watch, and chain, and seal stolen from Mr. Lewis, Aldgate, High-street, and on the Tuesday when he said he wanted to sell it, I told him I thought it was stolen; he said how came I to think of that; then I let him see the paper; I told him to go to Mr. Lewis; he said he had not got the watch; he found the seal by Aldgate church, the seal in one place and the chain in another. He said he would not go with me if he thought he should get into any trouble. I told him if he came by it honestly he need not fear; he went with me; I delivered the duplicate up to Mr. Lewis Mr . Lewis asked him if he had got the watch; he said no; an officer came in; he searched him, and found the watch in his hat.

JANE HAWKINS . On the 12th of December the prisoner brought the chain and seal up into my room about three o'clock in the afternoon. I told him my husband was at work; he said he had been down to his shop, he was not there. I then said it would not be long before he was in; he said he would go to a public-house, and me to send him in; I told my husband when he came in; he said he did not want to see him; my husband went down stairs, and the prisoner came in and asked me to lend him a shilling. I said no; he shewed me this gold chain and seal; said he found it about seven o'clock as he came out of his lodgings at Wapping. He wished my husband to pledge it for him. I told him I did not think my husband would do it; I did not think he ever had been in a pawnbroker'sshop; he then asked me to take it. I said I did not like to take it; I did not think it was gold. The prisoner said he was sure it was gold by the weight and the work that was in it; he pressed me very much to go; I said I would; I knew my husband was down stairs in the parlour; the prisoner went down stairs; I called my husband up; my husband took it down stairs and asked if it was gold; then he took his shopmate with him and pledged it.

JOSEPH JOHNSON. I was at the Red Lion; Hawkins brought me the chain and asked me to pawn it. I went and got one pound five shillings upon it, and Hawkins gave the money to the prisoner.

WILLIAM MESSER. I am a servant to Mr. Grouch, 25, Providence-Row. This is the chain and seal I took in of the prisoner.

FRANCIS KINNERSLEY . I went into Mr. Lewis's shop; he said he had lost a watch, gold seal, and the chain; here is the duplicate of the chain, and I suspect this man knows something of the watch. I took the prisoner of one side, and the first thing I pulled out was this metal seal. I took off his hat; in the lining of his hat was tied this watch, and in the corner of his handkerchief was tied up this key.

Q. (to Mr. Lewis.) Have you any partners - A. No, I keep the house.

Q. How could this person come into the shop - A. I had left the front shop to go backwards; on my return I never thought of the watch; during that interval somebody must have come in and stole it.

Prisoner's Defence. On my crossing from the Minories to Houndsditch I picked the watch up; I went into this woman's house; I asked her where her husband was; she said at the shop. I told her I had a watch-chain, and asked her to pawn it; she said yes; she took the watch out and said she had given it to her husband. Two hatters came in and gave me one pound five shillings. I came up to the house; after that he shewed me the paper; I said if such a thing was lost, I would go to the house. I went to the house with him; I told him that I had found such a chain; the constable came, he gave me a black eye; if I had taken any thing wrongfully from any house, I would never go to it of my own accord.

GUILTY , aged 50,

Of Stealing to the value of 39 s. only.

Transported for Seven years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

125. CHARLES VICKS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 21st of December , a basket, value 1 s. 6 d. a cloth, value 1 s. and thirty pound weight of butter, value 1 l. 10 s the property of Joseph Hearn and Richard Pollden .

The prosecutor was called, and not appearing in court, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

126. CATHERINE WHITE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 14th of December , eleven pound weight of lead, value 2 s. 9 d. the property of Charles Manning , affixed to his dwelling-house .

MARY MANNING . My husband's name is Charles Manning . We live at No. 4, Lombard-court, Seven Dials . On the 14th of December in the forenoon, on going down into my cellar, I perceived the pipe to be gone, and looking about I perceived the prisoner going up stairs. I ran and tried to catch hold of her; she tried to get away. I held her fast till the constable came. I found the leaden pipe in her lap.

Q. Did the prisoner lodge in your house - A. No, I never saw her before; I had taken the house the Saturday before. I have lodgers, and I occupy the ground-floor.

- GALLEY. I am a constable; I was sent for to apprehend the prisoner; on her person I found a lead pipe and a ball-cock. I asked her how she came by it; she said some woman had cut it; she told her to go below, it was in a tub, she might have it.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going through Lombard-court on the 14th of December; I saw a woman at this door; she told me that if I would go down stairs there was a bit of pipe in the tub, to bring it up to her.

GUILTY , aged 36.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

127. JOHN DORAN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 11th of December , eight shirts, value 32 s. two frocks, value 10 s. two pair of trowsers, value 4 s. half a yard of canvas, value 1 s. 6 d. four waistcoats, value 5 s. and a worsted neckcloth, value 1 s. the property of George M'Carthy , in his dwelling-house .

GEORGE M'CARTHY. I am a slop-seller , at the corner of Parson's-street, Wellclose-square .

Q. Did you miss any articles out of your shop any time - A. Yes, on the morning of the 12th of December, I missed all the things from off the shelf, and from information I went to Aldgate watchhouse, and there John Forrester the officer, produced to me part of the property; I knew it to be mine.

JOHN FORRESTER . I am an officer. On the 11th of December, about seven o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner and two more loaded with property; they were carrying it across the shoulder just as if taken out of the shop. I saw them come out of Somerset-street, and from there they proceeded into Gulston-street; on the other side of the way I followed them; I had suspicion that the property was stolen. The prisoner dropped some of the property off his shoulder accidentally; one of the other men said, d - n it, do not stop to pick it up; which made my suspicion stronger, I laid hold of him; he told me to let him go; I told him I would not. The property was thrown upon the pavement; he and I had a scuffle together for a long time. I got part of the property picked up, as much as I could. A mob came round, part of the property was gone; I saved as much as I could. I got him and the property to the watchhouse. Mr. M'Carthy applied the next morning, said he had been robbed; he swore to the property before the magistrate.

Q. What became of the other men - A. They walked away with their loads; my attention was taken to the prisoner and the property. The prisoner knew me. The property is here, I have had it ever since.

Prosecutor. They are all mine; I lost a great many other things that are not come forward.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming up Somerset-street between five and six o'clock, I went into aruinous place to do my occasions; I kicked up something, I saw it was a pair of trowsers, I took the property up and put it under my arm, and was going with it to my father's house to know what I should do with it.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Of Stealing to the value of 39 s. only.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

128. EDWARD SAUNDERS and CHARLES KNAPP were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of December , fifty-eight books, value 10 s. the property of William Fox .

WILLIAM FOX. Q. Are you the proprietor of the Minor theatre in Catherine-street - A. Yes.

Q. In a part of the building, not appropriated for theatricals, had you a parcel of books deposited - A. I had.

Q. Was the prisoners employed in any part of the theatre - A. Charles Knapp was employed by the person to whom I had given up the theatre for a compensation. I kept the key.

Q. On the night of the 13th of December did you miss the key from the place where you expected it - A. Yes, at eight o'clock in the evening I took a candle and went to where my books were deposited, I saw a light and heard a rustling noise; I saw at the landing at the bottom of the stairs, near the gallery door, a man, which proved to be the prisoner Saunders, and close to him was a bag about two thirds filled with something, which I found afterwards to be books; I seized him by the collar, I called for assistance; Humphreys and another officer immediately came, one of them took Saunders, and the other went and took Knapp in the place where my books was.

CHARLES HUMPHREYS . Q. I believe upon the occasion you happened to be present - A. Yes, I was within a few yards; upon Mr. Fox calling thieves, help, we rushed out immediately; I laid hold of Saunders, and I began searching him, I found the bag close to him, I found a hat close to the bag; I then said, there must be another man in the place; Saunders had got his hat on; Rutley got hold of Knapp, I produced to him the hat, Knapp claimed it. I took the books to the office.

- RUTLEY. Q. You were with Humphreys - A. Yes. I found the prisoner Knapp trying to hide himself towards Catherine-street; I laid hold of him.

Saunder's Defence. I was with Charles Knapp to assist in the theatre, not to defraud or thieve, in any account; Mr. Fox came down the gallery stairs, and there might be a bag there, I do not know.

Knapp said nothing in his defence.

SAUNDERS, GUILTY , aged 28.

KNAPP, GUILTY , aged 18.

Confined One Month in Newgate and fined 1 s .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

129. MARGERET MOLLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 3d of January , twenty-two yards of printed cotton, value 40 s. the property of Benjamin Webb , privately in his shop .

CHARLES STRONG . I am shopman to Benjamin Webb , linen draper , in Holborn . On the 3d of January last, about two o'clock, the prisoner and another woman came into the shop, they asked for a piece of print, they looked at it, and desired me to cut off two yards of it; after I had cut off two yards for the other woman, the prisoner look at a print and asked me to cut off two yards; I did, and while I was in the act of folding up the print, I saw her rise from the ground and put her coat around her; then two other women came in, I rang the bell for the other men to come down, the prisoner paid me for the print and went out.

Q. Did her rising up in this way, and putting her coat about her raise suspicion in your mind - A. It did; I went over the counter and watched her, she had not gone above the next door to one, before she let a piece of print fall of twenty-two yards.

Q. Did it fall by design or by accident - A. I think by accident; she picked it up and went on; I pursued the prisoner, she went into a court near Middle-row, and from there she went to a gin-shop, at the corner of Middle-row. I left the witness Lambert there while I went and fetched my hat; when I came back she was just coming out of the door of the gin-shop, the wind blew her coat of one side, I distinctly saw a piece of print; I pursued her and took her at the top of Gray's-inn-lane; I asked her for the print, she let it fall on the ground, I picked it up by her feet; I took her back to Mr. Webb's, and a constable was sent for, he took charge of the prisoner and the print.

ALEXANDER LAMBERT . On the 3d of January, about two o'clock, I was coming by Mr. Wood's shop, I saw her drop a piece of print about five or six yards from the door; I saw her stoop to pick up the print, and she stumbled over it; I thought the prisoner was in liquor, that made me follow her; she got up again and run with it, and stopped at the corner of a court in Middle-row, and as I was going back I saw Strong looking back, I went into the shop and asked whether they had lost any thing, I told them I had seen a woman come out of their shop and drop a print; then Strong and I went and saw her in the same court where I had left her; she turned down Middle-row and went into a gin-shop, she staid there about three or four minutes, while Strong went and get his hat, she came out and went over to Gray's-inn-lane, Strong saw the print and went and took her. When she was taken I saw her drop the print from underneath her coat down by her feet, and Strong picked it up.

GEORGE WOOD. On Thursday, the 3d of January, about two o'clock, I was coming down Holborn, I went into Mr. Webb's shop; I saw the prisoner there, whom I knew; the prisoner and the cotton were delivered to me.

Prisoner's Defence. I went into this gentleman's shop, I bought two yards of cotton, when I came out of the shop they dropped a bit of cotton, I picked it up and followed them; I thought they were in that court; I called after them, this gentleman came after me and said it was his cotton; I said he was very welcome to it.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Of Stealing, but not privately.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s .

Second Middlesex jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

130. JOHN BOWLES was indicted for the wilful murder of Ann his wife ; and also charged on the Coroner's inquisition.

ELIZABETH BLAND. I live at 17, Little Earl-street , in the parish of St. Ann's.

Q. Did you live there on the 26th of last December . A. Yes; I lived in the garret, and Mr. Bowles lived in the two-pair back room. On the night of the 26th of December, Mr. Bowles came home between five and six o'clock; he came up stairs; I called to him, and said,

"will you come up and set in my room, I dare say your wife will be home in a few minutes?" He came up, and sat about ten minutes or a quarter of an hour. He then asked me to light him down to his own door. He pushed the door open. I gave him a light. He said he believed he should go to bed. I left him in his room, and saw no more of him till about eight o'clock; I was then in the street. I saw him bring his wife from Mrs. Baldwyn's wine-vaults, in the same street - I saw him bringing her in company with Mrs. Smith, whom Mr. Bowles had denied his wife being in company with. Mr. Bowles had frequently turned Mrs. Smith out of the room.

Q. When you first saw Bowles and his wife together, did any words pass between them. - A. Not till they came in the passage of his own house. I saw her sitting on the stairs; he was standing in the front of her. Bowles desired his wife to go up, and by her refusing he gave her a blow with his right hand on the left side of her head, I think, with his double fist He kept saying,

"will you go up? if you do not, I will break your neck. I left them upon his carrying her up, and Mr. Togwell shut the door, and I went out I saw no more of them at that time. I came home in about three quarters of an hour. When I returned, I called to my husband to let me in. I was called to go up to see the deceased. When I went into the room I found the deceased laying upon the sacking of the bedstead; there was no bed. Mrs. Togwell had pulled her strait. The prisoner Bowles was in the room, and Mrs. Togwell, and I think Mrs. Tooley. I felt the deceased, she was very hot. I said,

"Oh! Mr. Bowles, what have you killed your wife? He, with his hands, beat his head, and stamped his feet, and said,

"Oh! pray Mrs. Bland do not say so," and appeared very much agitated indeed. As she seemed so hot. I said,

"for God's sake, has nobody sent for a gentleman of the faculty?" He went out himself, without his hat, and in about ten minutes, or a quarter of an hour, he returned with Mr. Steward. Mr. Steward called for a looking-glass. Bowles was in the room; the looking-glass was wiped clean; he put it over her face, and then he put it again, and pronounced that she was dead. The doctor asked Bowles if he had any words with his wife, or if he had struck her? He said, yes, he had, but nothing in particular, and when he laid her down, he thought she might have been in a fit. He never left the house till two o'clock in the morning, when Limbrick took him. I took up his two children into my room, and by my landlady's request, Mr. Bowles went up there, and I sat up all night with my landlady.

Q. Was the prisoner sober. - A. I am sure he was not; he was better than half in liquor; he had been out all day. He is a sawyer by trade.

Q. Did he go out in anger. - A. No.

Mr. Gurney. He was displeased with her in some way, because the five shillings that he had given her to buy a mattress, she had spent in gin. - A. I do not know about the mattress - Mr. Bowles said she had pawned his tools for a shilling. It was about dusk she came home; I understood for the pliers. She had gone out at one o'clock in the day, and did not come home to the children till eight o'clock.

Q. You say he was rather forward in liquor. - A. Yes, I never saw any thing amiss of him while I knew him. I have lived in the house fifteen months.

Q. Besides working at a trade as a sawyer, when at home, he made bird cages. - A. He was an industrious man, I saw nothing amiss of him.

MARY MUSBROOK . Q. Where did you live on the 26th of December last. - A. No. 10, Monmouth-street.

Q. Do you know the prisoner. - A. I do not remember I ever saw him before I saw him at a house in Earle-street, between seven and eight o'clock - I was going for some cheese for my supper. I was going by the prisoner's door. I heard a scream of a woman. I looked in the passage. I saw a man and a woman at the foot of the stairs; he up with his fist and struck her on the side of the head; she fell down backwards at the foot of the stairs; the landlady came out; she said,

"for God's sake, Mr. Bowles, do not beat your wife so much." She said,

"for God's sake shut the door." The man looked at me - he came towards the door. I was afraid he would strike me, perhaps.

MARY TOGWELL . I keep the house No. 17, in Earle-street. The prisoner Bowles and his wife occupied the back room two pair of stairs.

Q. What time did you see the prisoner and his wife come home. - A. About eight o'clock. I had not seen Bowles all the day before that time his wife was with him. I heard a scuffling in the passage. I went to see what was the matter. He struck her in anger, but not with great violence.

Q. Did he strike her more than once. - A. Only once. He asked Mrs. Bowles to go up; she would not; she sat down on the stairs. Bowles asked her many times to go up stairs, she would not go. He struck her on the side of the head, I believe, with his fist. He took her in his arms before him, and carried her up stairs. He asked her several times what she had done with the five shillings? she made no answer. He appeared to be in anger. I lit him up stairs, and as soon as I came up stairs, he struck her and stamped upon her side or belly, I am not sure which it was, at the lower part of her body. He asked her where the money was; he seemed to be harping about the money. He was very angry with her for being with Mrs. Smith. I begged of him not to beat his wife any more. He gave me his finger, and promised me he would not. I went down stairs.

Q. Did you go again to his room. - A. I did, about a quarter of an hour or twenty minutes after. When I got into the room, Bowles was standing up by the side of the fire-place; there was no fire; the deceased was lying upon the bed. Bowles told me that his wife had a fit. I said,

"Mr. Bowles, she is dead."

Q. In what state of mind was Bowles at that time.A. I think he appeared to have been drinking. He appeared very much hurt upon my telling him that his wife was dead. Mr. Bowles would not believe that she was dead. Then I sent up stairs for Mrs. Bland. Mrs. Bland suggested for a doctor to be sent for, and Bowles himself went without his hat.

Q. Upon Bowles finding that his wife was dead, was he composed. - A. No, very much hurt. I was in the room; I saw him beat his head. The prisoner returned with the doctor; and the doctor, Mr. Steward, tried an experiment with the looking-glass. Mr. Steward, pronounced that she was dead, and said he could not say whether it was a fit or no. Mr. Steward left the house, and Mr. Bowles went and slept with Mr. Bland. He remained in the house till two o'clock until the officer came.

Mr. Adolphus. How long did he live with you. - A. Better than two years.

Q. Do not you know that this woman was subject to fits. - A. I attended her in a fit once - when she was on the floor I held her down.

Court. They were convulsion fits, were they. - A. Yes.

JANE TOOLEY . I live in the front room in the two pair, and Bowles occupied the back room in Earl-street. On the night of the 26th, about eight o'clock, I heard a voice upon the stairs. I heard a great lumb-ring, and some one cried, and that I heard a great noise as if Bowles had throwed his wife down in the next room. I sat about five or ten minutes, and heard blows; then I went to Bowles's room; the door was open. I saw the deceased on the floor. I called,

"Bowles, have done." I saw him kick her while she was on the ground, about the side of the lower part of the body. Bowles said,

"what can I do, Mrs. Tooley?" Mrs. Togwell came up; he promised her that he would not beat his wife any more. The deceased said, as she laid on the ground, you and Mrs. Togwell may go. We went away. I left the deceased on the ground. I stepped into my own room. I heard many things that passed in Bowles's room. The prisoner asked his wife what she had done with the things? she said she had pawned them herself. I believe he struck her then, for the child cried out,

"pray father do not beat her any more, beat her again tomorrow." He said to the child,

"go and ask your mother what there is for supper." He questioned the child to know what the mother had bought for the sister out of the money? the child answered, that she did not know that the mother had bought any thing. I heard nothing else until Mrs. Togwell came up.

Q. What brought Mrs. Togwell up. - A. The little child went and said her mother was in fits. Upon Mrs. Togwell's coming up, she called me, and told me Mrs. Bowles was dead. I went into Bowles's room; I found her laying upon the mattrass, with the blanket over her. Bowles was standing at the foot of the bed by the fire-place; he seemed very much hurt when Mrs. Togwell told me his wife was dead. He appeared agitated, and beat his head very much. Mrs. Bland proposed to have a doctor. Bowles was glad enough to go - he went without his hat, and when Mr. Steward came, he pronounced her dead. Bowles seemed distressed and hurt. After this Bowles remained in the house until Limbrick the officer came and took him.

Q. Can you say whether they were comfortable together, or did they quarrel much. - A. I have heard them quarrel together, and fight. I have heard the deceased say,

"pray father do not beat me."

Q. On this night was Bowles sober. - A. He was very much in liquor; he was a very industrious man. His wife would get in liquor as well as him. I did not associate with them.

Mr. Adolphus. How long have you lived in this house. - A. Two years.

Q. You were saying something about five shillings. - A. Yes, he asked her what she had done with it? he gave her five shillings to buy a mattrass for the eldest girl that was out of service.

Q. After Mrs. Togwell went down, and he had promised not to beat his wife any more, they had a conversation together. - A. Yes, for a quarter of an hour.

Q. At that time was she on the floor. - A. She was on the floor when I left her. When she was talking, I conceived she was sitting up in a chair.

Q. You only supposed that he struck her from what the child said, you heard no blows. - A. No.

Q. Did they continue to converse after that expression. - A. I heard no conversation after that.

Q. You heard no fall down. - A. No, nor did I hear any blows.

Court. Is the partition so thin between you that you must have heard the blows, if any had passed. - A. Yes, the partition is thin, I think I should have heard it if any had passed.

CHARLES BELL . I am a surgeon. I live in Leicester-street, Leicester-square. I was called in by the medical gentlemen during the dissection of the body.

Q. Who were the gentlemen. - A. Mr. Steward, surgeon; Mr. Lonsdale, a surgeon; and a medical student, a young gentleman. When I went in, the three principal cavities of the body were laid open, but nothing removed or touched; the abdomen or belly, the chest and the head. My attention was first drawn entirely to the abdomen; there was a little blush of redness upon the stomach, and within the stomach a quantity of gin; the quantity of fluid might be about ten ounces - the smell indicated a considerable quantity. I must add, that this was done the day after the decease. Nothing preternatural in the chest; on the head marks of blows, but under the integument of the skin no mark. On the bone, that is the scull, the scalp skin was taken off, and part dry by the bruises. On opening the inside of the scull-cap no appearance of bruises; no fracture. The membrane of the brain nothing implying the effects of injury there, nor upon the upper part of the brain. On the surface and cavity a watery serous effusion on all the surface of the brain. In the cavity of the brain, on rising of the brain from the lower part of the brain-case, a large coagulum of blood appeared. I took the opportunity afterwards of examining the large vessels of the lower part of the brain, and I observed in her head, on one of the four principal arteries of the brain, a transverse rent of the artery going up into the brain.

Q. From the observation that you made, what do you suppose to be the cause of this person's death. -A. The immediate fall of the quantity of blood, pressing upon the brain, that was the cause of her death, according to the best of my judgment.

Q. Was the rupture of that material artery the cause of that effusion of blood. - A. Undoubtedly.

Q. You have been in Court and heard the evidence given of the violence that had been used, do you or not conceive that that external violence was the cause of the rupture of that artery. - A. There is an external difficulty here. If I had seen no marks of external violence there, I should have said it was a common case of a sanguinous apoplexy.

Q. With the assistance of the external violence that you have described in this case, and the quantity of gin in the stomach, and this effusion which we know to be the effect of encreased action, do you conceive that the state of the woman approached to a state of apoplexy, so far that at that time a slight agitation or blow would produce an effect which would not take place; was not the person inebriated. - A. When I have opened the head of those that died from inebriation, the effusion was present, not the rupture.

Q. The effusion of serum, could that take place instead of the coasulum of blood with such blows as you have heard described. - A. From concussion; a state of concussion of the head might produce the effect, but not at that time; the coagulum of blood from the rupture of the vessel produced death, and not the effusion of the serum.

Mr. Gurney. You said, were you have opened the head of persons that died of drunkenness, you have found the serous effusion, but not the rupture. - A. I have found the serous effusion in a greater degree than here. I recollect two instances.

Q. I take it for granted you found the rupture also, were persons died of drunkenness. - A. I have opened the head of a young man that drank a great quantity of whisky, so much as he was hardly able to stagger to bed - on opening this young man's head, I found this serous effusion.

Q. Where persons die of intoxication, I take it for granted, apoplexy takes place in persons that die of drunkenness. - A. In persons that are sober, and persons that are inebriated.

Q. And I take it for granted that drunkenness will produce it. - A. Very much so; it resembles very much the natural apoplexy.

Q. Can you say whether the rupture of the artery might have arisen from blows, of which you saw the marks. - A. I cannot say, the rupture might or might not have arisen from blows, of which I saw marks, considering the state of circulation.

Q. Supposing this poor woman to have fallen down in a fit, that might have contributed to it. - A. If I had not seen the marks, or heard of the blows, I should have considered it an apoplectic fit.

Mr. Reynolds. Supposing the vessels of a person to be filled, the circulation encreases in consequence of intoxication. With such blows as you saw upon this person, would not that have a tendency to have produced the rupture that you saw. - A. Undoubtedty - but I cannot say it did.

Court. Then upon the whole, considering the intoxication, such a quantity of ardent spirits might have occasioned the bursting of the artery that you have mentioned. - A. It might.

The prisoner left his defence to his Counsel.

Mr. STEWARD. Q. You are a surgeon. A. Yes.

Q. We understand you were called in upon this woman being discovered or supposed to be dead. - A. Yes, I was.

Q. And you were brought to the spot by the prisoner himself. - A. Yes. When I arrived there, I found the deceased laying upon the bed, seemingly dead. I ascertained that she was dead. There were three women in the room at the time, Mrs. Togwell, Mrs. Bland, and Mrs. Tooley.

Q. Were any of these three women in a state to make correct observations of what passed. - A. Mrs. Bland appeared frantic, she was stamping about.

Q. You assisted Mr. Bell in the disection of the head. - A. Yes.

Q. What in your judgment was the occasion of her death. - A. The rupture of the blood-vessel.

Q. Are you able to say the rupture of the blood-vessel was occasion by the blows, which you saw the marks, or by any fall. - A. It is certainly very hard to say.

Q. With the quantity of spirits you found in her stomach, do you think in the state of intoxication that she was in, the state of anger she was in, or irritation, might account for the rupture of that blood-vessel. - A. Certainly.

Mr. Reynolds. How many blows were there on the head. - A. I think there were four.

Q. Are you able to say whether the blows were violent or not. - A. They were not so violent to effect the skull, only the integument.

Q. Supposing they were given by the fist, were they violent or not. - Q. I do not think they were.

Q. Supposing the circulation of the blood being much encreased by intoxication that this woman is stated to be found in, would not the blows then have a tendency to fill the vessels. - A. One blow would have done it, there would be no occasion of repeating it; in my opinion the patient must die instantly, the rupture of the vessel would occasion instant death.

Q. Was there any mark of any blow were the rupture was. - A. No, there could not be any; there was one upon the root of the nose, one upon the left temple, one by the right ear, and one behind her head.

Q. Was the rupture such that either these blows would effect the rupture of the vessel. - A. I do not think it could.

Q. Might it be produced by either of these blows. - A. It is very hard to say - it is my opinion it was not.

Court. What do you ascribe it. - A. To the effect of intoxication, causing a greater action of the vessels of the head, together with struggle and passion. It is my opinion it might have been produced without blows, if there had been intoxication, struggle, and passion.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

131. ANTONIO CORDOSA , SARAH BROWN alias SARAH GOTTS , and MARY ROGERS alias ELIZABETH MILLS , were indicted for the wilful murder of Thomas Davies : and ANTONIO CORDOSA , and SARAH BROWN alias GOTTS stood charged upon the Coroner's Inquisition.

The case was stated by Mr. Gurney.

JAMES DAVIES . Q. I believe you are the brother of the deceased. - A. Yes, my brother's name was Thomas Davies . I was in company with him on the 12th of December, in the evening. We were in a house in Nightingale-lane, the Newcastle Arms; we went there in search of a young fellow; not finding him there, we saw a girl we knew; we drank some gin with her; we had three half-pints of gin, and we went to dancing there.

Q. How long did you remain there. - A. About a quarter of an hour.

Q. Did you in that room see the prisoner at the bar. - A. I saw Antonio sitting on the table in the box; my brother and I went out, and bid them good night. We walked up Nightingale-lane to the top of the rents, and turning round the corner we saw three girls, Mary Rogers , Sarah Brown , and the girl that is now outside of the door.

Q. Mary Rogers and Sarah Brown , are those two women at the bar. - A. Yes, on our turning round the corner, my brother went against one of these girls.

Q. Which girl. - A. Mary Rogers . She took her patten that she had in her hand and struck him on the head, in several places. Sarah Brown struck me with the umbrella. I said to Mary Brown ,

"take no notice of him, I fancy he is a little matter in liquor; if you are a mind to have any thing to drink, I will give it you." Her answer was,

"I'll kill the b - r." And she struck him with her pattens, and Sarah Brown struck me with an umbrella. I catched hold of Sarah Brown , pulled her out in the road by her habit-shirt, and took the umbrella from her. I hove the umbrella into the green-shop. Sarah Brown said,

"Antonio, why do not you go and call Antonio." When I let her go, she ran to the Newcastle Arms, and fetched Antonio out. Antonio, with her calling, came out with three men.

Q. Then four came out. - A. Yes.

Q. You are not certain whether Brown was with them. - A. No; Antonio and one man catched hold of me, and two men seized my brother; the one that I had in my left hand, I throwed him down. Antonio struck at me twice. I caught the blow on my left arm.

Q. Had Antonio any thing in his hand. - A. I could not tell.

Q. Did you strike him. - A. No, I threw Antonio down, and got away from him. I ran into the path; he immediately ran to my brother, and struck him in the back as he was rising up.

Q. How far were you from your brother and Antonio at the time that Antonio so struck him. - A. About four feet.

Q. Had Antonio any thing in his hand. - A. I could not see.

Q. Did either of the women prisoners do or say any thing during this. - A. Sarah Brown said,

"kill the b - r, do not leave a bit of life in him.

Q. Was that before he struck you. - A. After he struck me.

Q. Was it before he struck your brother. - A. I am not sure, it was during the time that Antonio and my brother were together.

Q. Was the other prisoner, Mary Rogers present at the time. - A. She was standing by. I did not hear her say any thing.

Q. Upon Antonio's striking your brother, what did your brother do. - A. He got up and about forty yards. He said,

"Oh Lord! Oh Lord!" and directly I followed my brother, and came up to him. I spoke to my brother, he never answered me. I did not know any thing what was the matter only by the fall. I took my brother up, and took him into surgeon King, there I saw the blood running out of his trousers.

Q. What became of your brother. - A. He died in about five minutes, and they put him into a shell.

Mr. Knapp. You are the brother of the unfortunate man that lost his life - how long had you been in the house. - A. Three quarters of an hour altogether; we drank three half-pints of gin between five of us. We were a little matter in liquor.

Q. What time of the night was it you went out. - A. It wanted a quarter to nine.

Q. This was in the month of December, it was dark, was it not. - A. I cannot tell, I could see, it was night.

Q. When you got into the street, you got talking to three girls of the town. - A. No; my brother went against one of the girls, and catched hold of her wrist.

Q. Afterwards there was a scuffle about the umbrella, between you and Sally Brown. - A. Yes; I took the umbrella from her, and hove it into the green-shop.

Q. When Antonio came out, there was a scuffle between you and him, and another person. - A. Yes.

Q. How long did that scuffle take place. - A. Not long.

Q. It was not until after that, that the injury complained of took place. - A. No.

Q. Was it upon that taking place that he ran, and it took place the injury. - A. Yes.

Q. Then there was not time for him to cool, he ran after your brother, and did the injury to him. - A. Yes.

Q. Were there many Portuguese. - A. I saw four come out of the house.

Q. And all the opportunity that you had of observing of it, was in the night. - A. Yes.

Q. Nightingale-lane is rather a dark lane. - A. Yes, there are very few lamps there.

Q. Now you say you were about four feet when this took place, from Antonio and your brother. - A. Yes.

Q. If the night was so dark, and the lane so badly lighted, might not another Portuguese sailor have done it as well as Antonio.

Court. Do you hear the question. - A. I saw Antonio strike at my brother, I did not see any of the rest.

Mr. Knapp. Do you mean to swear positively that it was Antonio and nobody else. - A. Yes.

Q. I will ask you again, whether you will venture to swear that it was done by him, or that it might not by done by any other. - A. By him.

Mr. Bolland. You told that gentleman you saw Antonio strike your brother. - A. Yes.

Q. Although the lane is badly lighted, were not there other lights. - A. Yes, there was a butcher's shop lighted up, this was right before it; there was alight at the green-shop; it shewed a light in the street.

MARIA PICKFORD. A. I believe you are a servant at the Dundee Arms public-house. - A. Yes.

Q. On the night of the 12th of December, had you been out to deliver beer. - A. Yes.

Q. At about what hour were you returning from the delivery of beer. - A. About nine o'clock.

Q. Did you come by the end of Maudlin's rents. - A. I saw three girls there, the two prisoners and another girl.

Q. Did you see the last witness, and the brother of the deceased. - A. Yes, he shoved up against Sarah Brown , out of a joke like; the girls said very indecent words for his showing up against her. Sarah Brown struck one of them with the umbrella; the young man who was struck, took the umbrella from her, and swung her about till they both fell down in the kennel, she was undermost.

Q. Did that scene take place upon either this man or the other taking the umbrella. - A. I cannot say which; I saw it took.

Q. After that, did you hear Sarah Brown say any thing. - A. Yes; a little after nine o'clock, as soon as the umbrella was taken, she said to the other girls,

"fetch Antonio." She was got up, but she would not loose the young man. Sarah Brown stood by the two brothers. Mary Rogers went to fetch Antonio. Antonio came, and there were three or four more with him.

Q. Had you known Antonio before. - A. Yes, I had, he came to the public-house where I lived. I knew him well. When he came out, Sarah Brown said,

"that is the man that served me this, kill the English b - r, and leave no life in him."

Court. At that time did she point to any one. - A. Yes, she pointed to the deceased; the two brothers stood by the green-stall, close together.

Mr. Gurney. Upon her saying this, what did Antonio do. - A. He gave the deceased a blow some where by his back part, and struck him down on the middle of the road.

Q. Was that the first thing that you saw done by Antonio. - A. Yes, that was the first thing that he did after he came out of the public-house.

Q. How near were you standing to the deceased. - A. I don't think I was two yards; there was a light in the green-stall, and there was a butcher's next door to the green-stall, that was lighted, and it was a moonlight night, there was light enough altogether for me to see what passed.

Q. Have you any doubt that it was Antonio that struck the deceased. - A. It was Antonio.

Q. At the time that Antonio struck him, could you see whether he had any thing in his hand - A. He shook something out that glistened after he had struck him once, and then he struck him again.

Q. You say he struck the deceased down. After Antonio shook something out of his hand, what did he do. - A. Antonio was at the top of him, he fell on the top of him for the purpose.

Q. Did he fall on him before or after he shook something out. - A. He was on the top of him when he shook it out; he gave him a podge.

Q. What do you mean by a podge. - A. Like a stab; he did that somewhere upon his back. Antonio kept laying on him about five minutes, as night as I can recollect. After he got up, Sarah Brown said, that all English b - rs ought to be served the same. The deceased got up and ran. I thought he had escaped the blow, yet I saw something that glistened.

Q. You hoped, not withstanding what you had seen, he was not stabbed. - A. Yes; but when I heard he was dead, I knew it was no one else; in about ten minutes afterwards I heard he was a dead man, I went to the doctor's shop, I saw him lying upon the floor.

Q. At the time you saw this take place, was John I'ons there, - A. Yes, that is my master; he went into the house to get some men to come to his assistance. I stopped there, and when he returned, I pointed out to my master that it was Antonio.

Mr. Knapp. So Antonio, upon the other prisoner making use of the expression, immediately came out of the public-house and went to the deceased. - A. Yes, I am certain of that, and three or four men came out with him. I did not know none of them. I did not see any of them meddle with him, but Antonio.

Q. Was there any scuffle with any of the other men. A. No, not as I saw.

Q. And you must have seen it if it had taken place. - A. Yes, I must.

Q. Therefore, if any one, Thomas Davis , the poor fellow that is gone or the brother had any scuffle with any of the other men, you must have seen it. - A. Yes, I must, I did not.

Q. Your expression was, that he fell upon him: might not Antonio be tripped up, and have fell on him - A. He fell purposely on him.

Q. Upon your solemn oath, might not Antonio, by scuffling with the man, tumble down. Take your time, remember this man's life is at stake. - A. I saw no scuffle, all the scuffling was on the other side of the street, people running backwards and forwards.

Q. Did you see the brother of the deceased there that night when this took place - A. Yes. When Antonio was called out of the public-house, the brother and the deceased stood together

Q. Did Antonio say or do any thing to the brother, or any of the men that came out with him, scuffle at all with the brother. - A. No, somebody gave the brother a blow, but who it was I cannot tell - it was not Antonio.

Q. Was that blow given to the brother that is here, before Antonio struck the deceased. - A. Yes, Antonia laid hold of the deceased and threw him down; this brother was not thrown down; the brother struck the man again, and the man ran away somewhere; he did not fall.

Q. That was before Antonio went up to the deceased. - A. Antonio went up to the deceased the same time.

JOHN I'ONS. Q. I believe your mother keeps the Dundee Arms. - A. She does; it is in the parish of St. Botolph, without Aldgate, in Middlesex. On the 12th of December I was in my mother's house; in consequence of an alarm, I went out in the street. I saw some men and women scuffling together, who they were I cannot say. The girls were apparently fighting with the men, and the men were endeavouring to keep them off. I now recollect the person of Brown,she was one. I was giving directions to the other servant, not the one that is here, to put up the shutters. While I was doing that, a girl was pushed into the kennel; she got up again, and ran after the man, that is Brown; she began fighting with the man, when she got to him - I am pretty confident it was the deceased. The deceased laid hold of her (this was while she was clawing him), and said,

"if you do not leave me alone, I must push you into the kennel again." She twisted her hands from him, and began clawing him again. He immediately pushed her down into the kennel, and came himself down also. The girl immediately cried out,

"Antonio," while on the ground. - One of the girls that stood on the pavement, ran to the door of the Newcastle Arms, and called out Antonio. Three or four men came from the Newcastle Arms. I cannot say whether Antonio came or no; to the girl had got up, and got on the pavement again. In the mean time the men from the Newcastle Arms, made to the girl, and the man, which I firmly believe to be the deceased. I heard a voice say this is him. The men that came from the Newcastle Arms immediately seized the deceased, and dragged him from the pavement into the middle of the street - they knocked him down, or pulled him down, I cannot say which. I immediately ran into my own house to get assistance, for the man that was down, when I returned, I heard that the man had been stabbed, and was gone to the doctor's.

Q. Did you see your servant Pickford there. - A. I did not. I ran after the man to the surgeons.

Q. Did you hear or see Brown do or say any thing. - A. I did not.

Q. What sort of a night was it. - Q. A moon-light night. There was a butcher's shop next door to my house, lighted, I believe, by a lamp; and the next to that is a greenshop, and I believe there is one candle generally used in the window.

Q. How many persons came out of the Newcastle Arms. - A. Three or four persons.

Q. Were there many persons in the street. - A. When I first went from my mother's, I suppose there were six or seven, one was Mr. Staples, the others were strangers to me.

Q. How far was the place where the girl was thrown down, and the man fell down, how far is that from the Newcastle Arms. - A. Not above ten yards.

Q. Was the noise or the scuffle at that place, so that they could hear it the Newcastle Arms. - A. I should suppose so.

Q. You say they had been fighting and scuffling with the girls. - A. Yes, about one minute before the girl was pushed into the kennel.

Q. Did you see the brother of the deceased engaged in the scuffle. - A. I did not see him at all.

SARAH ROWELL. I live with my mother at No. 5, Greenwood-court, Nightingale-lane.

Q. Were you, on the evening of the 12th of December, in Nightingale-lane. - A. Yes, I was going past. I heard a noise where the fire was. I saw four or five Portuguese.

Q. Did you know any of them. - A. Yes, Antonio. I had known Antonio about two years. Antonio had hold of the young fellow; there were four or five had the young fellow down. I never saw the young fellow before, that was down; he was down in the middle of the road. He went to get up, and they knocked him down again.

Q. Which of them was it that knocked him down again. - A. Antonio; I was about two yards from them, on the other side of the way; I then got to the opposite side of the way. I got nearer to them. I saw the weapon in his hand. Antonio made a stab at his back, and to the best of my knowledge he struck him with what he had in his hand. The young fellow got up, and ran some yards, and cried,

"Oh Lord, brother, I am killed!" and fell

Q. Are you certain sure that Antonio is the man that struck him with the weapon that you have described. - A. Yes.

Q. Was the other men near Antonio. - A. Yes; I am perfectly sure that Antonio was the man that did it.

Q. Did you see any girls there at the time. - A. Yes, two. I know one Sarah Brown , the prisoner. I heard her say,

"kill the English b - r, leave no life in him." The man was upon the deceased at the time that she said that.

HENRY STAPLES . Q. I believe your father lives in Nightingale-lane. - A. Yes, directly opposite where this happened; my father's shop is an open shop, and lighted with two glass lamps, and a candle that goes up the middle of them. I was at my father's door, the shutters were up all but one.

Q. Did your shop throw any light upon the street. - A. I do not think it did.

Q. What sort of a night was it. - A. A moon-light night, and a sky over the moon, when this happened. I observed a mob. I saw a man stabbed upon his shoulder. I do not know who that man was.

Q. Was the prisoner Antonio there. - A. Yes, he was: it was about nine o'clock in the evening.

Q. Were you standing there the whole of the time. - A. No.

Q. What did you first see. - A. A mob; the prisoners were there; they were quarrelling with the deceased and his brother; there were three girls there, they were quarrelling with the deceased. I heard one of them say,

"kill the Englished b - r, do not leave any life in his body." That was when Antonio had collar'd him - I saw him collar him.

Q. What became of the deceased. - A. He ran directly, and said,

"I am stabbed." Then I ran in doors to tell my father. I afterwards saw the deceased in the doctor's shop: he was dead when I saw him.

Mr. Knapp. The light that we have heard so much talk of were two candles, and the shutters all up but one, what happened previous between these persons, except the scuffling, you do not know. - A. No.

Court. You say you saw Antonio there, and you say that he collar'd the deceased - A. Yes, he did, that was the first thing I saw done after they came out.

Q. Did either of them fall. - A. That I did not see, I was standing at the door.

Q. Where were they when you saw the man stabbed. - A. They were in the road then, that was a very little while after I saw them on the pavement.

Q. Did you see any of them go into the middle of the road. - A. They pulled the deceased into the road, the Portuguese did; Antonio was one of them.

Q. Did any body fall on the ground in the middle of the road. - A. Not as I saw.

Q. Then you say you saw somebody stabbed. - A. Yes.

Q. Was the prisoner standing up at the time. - A. That I do not know, the deceased was lying down I believe.

Q. Just now you said he was standing up. - A. He was lying down, I did not see him fall down; the man that stabbed him was standing up.

Q. Did you see him standing up. - A. He was standing behind him, leaning over to stab him in the back. I saw him stab him. I did not see where he took any thing from; I saw some sort of an instrument in his hand.

Q. Did you see the instrument. - A. I did not.

Q. Did you see that he had any thing in his hand, or did you only see his hand move. - A. I judged that he stabbed him in the back.

Q. Did you see any instrument. - A. I could not describe what instrument it was, I only saw his hand at his back.

Q. Did you not see whether he had any thing in his hand or not. - A. No.

Q. You so far noticed Antonio come up to the pavement and collared him, and gave a blow, could you see whether it was him that gave him the stab. - A. I cannot say whether it was the same man that collar'd him or not.

JOHN THOMAS . I am an assistant to Mr. King, Burr-street. Mr. King was confined at the time, he could not see the patient himself.

Q. Was the deceased brought to your house. - A. Yes. I took papers out of his pocket. I now knew who he was. I examined him; I found a wound on his back; he had a great loss of blood. The wound was between the shoulder-blade and the spine. I have not the least doubt that his death was from the wound. He died in about two minutes; I examined the body afterwards by opening it. I found the instrument which had penetrated to touch between the ribs into the left lobe of the lungs, the wound was six inches long, and the width of half an inch; it had been done with a flat instrument, probably a knife. Bleeding internally was the cause of his death.

Q. Was the primary cause of his death the wound. - A. Yes.

EMANUEL MERCURY. I am a Thames police-officer. In consequence of information, I apprehended Cardosa and Sarah Brown , about a quarter after nine on the 12th of December, at No. 17. Cable Place, St: George's. Cardoza was in his shirt at his lodgings. Sarah Brown had undressed herself, the clothes that she had on were all mangled with mud, and on the right shoulder of Cardosa's jacket there was some mud rather clammy. When I took him he said I never carry a knife.

Cardosa's defence. I am not guilty, all the witnesses have sworn false against me.

Brown's defence. This young woman and me, and another that is out of doors, asked me to go to the public-house; we stopped there, and had something to drink, along with a young man. When I went out I missed Mary, I had stopped to speak to a young man. I called her several times. I went in again, I asked if Mary Rogers was come in there, the answer was no. I ran up the street and saw Mary Rogers having a bustle with this young man and his brother; he catched hold of her breast. I said do no strike her, strike me; I put the umbrella to him; and did not strike him; they rolled me down in the mud and kicked me, and took the umbrella out of my hand. When I got up, I said if there was an officer I would give charge of them, they then knocked me in the mud again.

Rogers was not put on her defence.

Cardosa called three witnesses who gave him a good character.

CARDOSA, GUILTY , DEATH , aged 46.

BROWN, GUILTY of MANSLAUGHTER .

Confined one year in Newgate .

ROGERS, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

132. JOHN MAXWELL was indicted for feloniously assaulting Francis Mayell in the King's highway, on the 11th of December , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, a dollar, a shilling, and four halfpence, his property .

FRANCIS MAYELL. I am a musical instrument-maker . I live at the Apple-tree, Cursitor-street, Chancery-lane . On Tuesday morning, about half past one, on the 11th of December, on my returning home, I was about four doors in Cursitor-street. About seven or eight men together laid hold of me, and threw me down. I felt one of their hands in my right breeches-pocket. I had a dollar, four shillings, and about five pence in my pocket. I had been drinking. I was very little the worse for liquor. I was quite alone when these persons met me, they said nothing while I was on the ground. They tried to stop my mouth with mud. One of them said something before they attacked me. I believe it to be the prisoner, said who do you want? I am not sure it was the prisoner. While I was on the ground I cried out lustily, watch. I seized hold of the prisoner with my left hand, while they were rifling my pocket, I still kept hold of the prisoner. The watchman came up to my assistance. The rest all ran away. I had still hold of the prisoner with both hands when the watchman came up.

Q. At the time that you were on the ground did you feel any money go from you. - A. I perceived the hand in my pocket, and the taking of all the contents of the pocket out. The watchman took charge of the prisoner. While I was down, one of the parties kicked me. When I had got to the watch-house in Carey-street, I examined my pocket. I had lost a dollar, a shilling, and a few half-pence. I had three shillings and three pence half-penny left in my left pocket.

SAMUEL MACDONALD. I am a watchman in Chancery-lane. About half-past one o'clock in the morning, I heard a man cry out watch, in Cursitor-street. - I ran to the spot, and sprang my rattle. I found the prosecutor had hold of the prisoner, he was crying out Oh you thief you have robbed me. The prisoner wished him to let him go for me to take him. I could see that the prosecutor had been drinking a glass or two, but he was perfectly sensible of what he was about. I took the prisoner to the watch-house.

JAMES MELLISH . I am a constable.

Q. Do you recollect the prosecutor, the last witness,and the prisoner coming to the watch-house. - A. Perfectly well.

Q. What charge did the prosecutor give of the prisoner. A. That he was one of the party of seven or eight that knocked him down and robbed him. He lost a dollar, a shilling, and a few half-pence. The prisoner said he had been in Oxford-road, to see his sister. I asked him the name of the street his sister lived in; he said he did not know, he was a stranger to that part of the town, and having missed his way some where, he got into Fleet street. He came down Chancery-lane into Holborn, and passing by the end of Cursitor-street, hearing a noise, and a person calling watch, he went to see what was the matter, and when he came near the prosecutor several men ran away. He asked the prosecutor what was the matter, the prosecutor then seized him, and charged him with being one of the parties. The prisoner denied having any hand in the robbery, and proposed to be searched. I searched him, and found no property relating to this charge.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

133. CATHERINE DOWSE , alias MUNING , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of December , four window curtains, value 5 s. a soffa cover, value 2 l. five sheets, value 50 s. six yards of silk, value 12 s. three yards of muslin, value 6 s. five silver spoons, value 13 s. four gowns, value 1 l. two petticoats, value 6 s. two work boxes, value 5 s three coats, value 40 s. a waistcoat, value 3 s. a pelisse, value 1 l. a waistcoat, value 3 s. two pair of breeches, value 2 l. 5 s. a remnant of kerseymere, value 18 s. four waistcoat pieces, value 12 s. two remnants of cotton, value 2 s. two handkerchiefs, value 2 s. a bed tick, value 2 s. 4 d. a table-cloth, value 1 l. a time piece, value 2 l. a habit shirt, value 7 s. a remnant of stuff, value 7 s. a pair of silver tongs, value 10 s. an umbrella, value 9 s. a remnant of gingham, value 1 l. a sheet, value 6 s. an umbrella, value 6 s. and five spoons, value 10 s. the property of Moses Crawcour in his dwelling-house .

MOSES CRAWCOUR . I am a dentist .

Q. In the course of last year had you occasion to leave town - A I had. In some part of May I went in pursuit of my business professionally. I took my wife with me. I left my house, No. 9. Commercial-road , in the care of the prisoner.

Q. How long have you known her. - A. Near three years. I had great confidence in her, or else I would not have placed her there. I and my wife returned to town on the 7th of December. On my arrival in town, about twelve at noon, the door of my house was opened by a person of the name of Lewis. I did not find the prisoner in the house which I expected. I immediately went up stairs, and on my opening my drawers I found the things were nearly stripped from them. The wardrobe in the passage I broke open. I found that was stripped. I found all the clothes that I had left nearly gone. Several boxes, which I had sent up from Scotland, were also nearly empty; all these things stated in the indictment were gone. I applied to Mr. Griffith's, the officer. The prisoner was taken into custody; she delivered up the duplicates to the officer. I said to her,

"Kitty, what have you done with my things; are my things sold, or what is become of them?" She told me they were not sold, but they were in pledge. She cried and said,

"how could she look me in the face after what she had done."

Q. Did you go with the different duplicates to the different pawnbrokers. - A. I did.

Q. Look at these two letters, and tell me whether they are her hand-writing. - A. They are, I received them by post since she was in custody. - (The letters read.)

"Honoured Sir, I hope you will pardon me for the first offence; I served you three years, which I lived with you always truly and honestly. I can safely say before God and man, that I never wronged you in my life. I own I have committed a great fault; it was distress that drove me to it; give me time, whatever I have done wrong I will gratefully return. I hope you will have a feeling to a fellow-creature. I long to see you both; my heart is almost broke; pray, for God's sake, have a little mercy. I am your's, faithfully,

CATHERINE DOWSE."

Directed to Mr. Crawcour, King's-place, Commercial-road. No date - Post-mark, December 7.

Another Letter, dated 15, Clerkenwell prison, directed the same.

"SIR - I once more solicit your pardon; if you have one grain of feeling, and recollect there is a good God that over-rules us all. The punishment you have inflicted on me at present is quite enough for a fellow-creature to suffer; what I would not wish you nor yours to suffer one hour. If you have no feeling for me, I hope you will consider an aged parent's sufferings for her child's misconduct, that never had her name called in question before I unfortunately came into your house. If you would take it into consideration, and think that you might have a child of your own, that may want forgiveness, as I do. If you do not forgive, how can you expect to be forgiven? the day may come when we all want forgiveness; then how shall we prosper if we do not forgive? I have found you to be the greatest enemy that ever I had in my life. Only have feeling for one moment.

I am your's, respectfully, CATHERINE DOWSE ."

THOMAS GRIFFITHS . I am an officer of Lambeth Street Office. In consequence of being applied to by the prosecutor, I apprehended this woman.

THOMAS COLEBURN . I am a servant to Mr. Sewerby, pawnbroker, Cannon-street Road.

Q. Did you take in pawn any articles that you have brought here to-day. - A. I did not receive them from her. The window-curtains were pawned on the 14th of June, in the name of Irvine, for five pounds; 7th of September, four pieces of kerseymere, two remnants of cotton, two handkerchiefs, and a bed-tick, pawned for one pound ten shillings; 5th of June, a remnant of stuff, seven shillings, pawned in the name of Lewis; the pelisse and two sheets for one pound ten shillings, 5th of Nov. in the name of Mary Smith .

Prisoner's Defence. I have lived with the prosecutor three years; he never found fault with any thing I did before.

The prisoner called six witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY , aged 36.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

134. JOSEPH BLAIR and THOMAS DALE were indicted for that they, on the 15th of November , feloniously did falsely make, and caused and procured to be forged, counterfeited, and willingly acted and assisted in forging a certain order for the payment of 600 l. with intention to defraud Patrick Crawford Bruce , George Simpson , and Thomas Free .

SECOND COUNT for disposing off and putting away a like forged order for payment of money with the same intention. And

SEVERAL OTHER COUNTS for like offences, only varying in the manner of charging them.

HENRY GRAY . Q. You are a clerk of Messrs. Bruce, Simpson, and Co. - A. Yes, they are bankers in Bartholomew-lane .

Q. What are the names of the partners - A. Patrick Crawford Bruce, George Simpson , and Thomas Free .

Q. Were Messrs. Gregg and Corfield customers at your house - A. They were.

Q. Do you remember any draft being presented at your house on the 15th of November - A. Yes, a draft for six hundred pound was presented to myself; it was paid by me in a five hundred pound note, and a one hundred pound.

Q. Do you recollect from your memory the number of these notes - A. I have got it put down in a book of my own entery the five hundred pound is 8789, and the one hundred pound 9985.

Q. How long have you lived at Messrs. Bruce and Co - A. About a year and a half.

Q. Do you know the prisoner Blair - A. I do, when I see him, that is him at the bar, he was clerk to Messrs. Gregg and Corfield.

Q. Has he been in the habit, during the time you have been in the banking-house, of coming to the banking-house from Messrs. Gregg's and Corfield's to the house of Bruce and Co. - A. He has.

Q. You have seen him come for that purpose, tell us whether you know who it was that presented that draft - A. I do not recollect.

Q. Do you recollect on that day having seen Blair in the house - A. I do not.

Q. Should you know the order for the payment of the draft if wou were to see it - A. Yes, I should. This is the draft I paid for six hundred pound, I cancelled it, I recollect the signature.

GEORGE CORFIELD. Q. You are a partner with Mr. Gregg - A. I am a partner in the house.

Q. Do you know the prisoner Blair - A. He has been a clerk of ours two years, he was book keeper and collecting clerk, he collected all our debts.

Q. Had he any thing to do with your banking-book - A. It was his peculiar duty every Monday morning to check the bankers book.

Q. We are told that Bruce and Co. are your bankers - A. They are. Besides keeping the ledger, it was his particular duty, every Monday morning to check the bankers book, so that every Monday morning he called at the bankers for our book, brought it home with the checks that had been drawn, and having checked the amount, he gave both to Mr. Gregg and myself the balance.

Court. You mean an account of the balance - A. Yes, the statement of the balance. It was his business to point out any error that was in that book.

Mr. Serjeant Vaughan. Was he acquainted with your manner of drawing blank checks with the house - A. Perfectly. I am in the habit of drawing nineteen checks out of twenty, and I therefore use the printed checks, Mr. Gregg uses plain paper.

Q. Do you authorize any body to draw for you - A. Nobody.

Q. Were this printed forms accessable to the prisoner Blair - A. Yes, they were.

Q. Have you given to him checks that you have drawn upon the house - A. Frequently.

Q. He is acquainted with your signature - A. Yes.

Q. He had been in you service two years - A. He had.

Q. Do you know from him where he had been living before - A. He had been living with the bankers between two and three years of Bruce and Co. before he came to live with me.

Q. I beg you to look at that check; I believe you have it in your hand, tell me whether that is your signature, whether the words Gregg and Corfield is your signature - A. It is not.

Q. Is it the signature of Mr. Gregg - A. Certainly not, it is meant to resemble my hand, it resembles my hand, I am perfectly sure it is not my hand; I always fill up the body of the check myself, except in some cases, a young man who is standing here fills them up for me.

Court. It is a particular clerk that fills up the body of the check - A. It is.

Mr. Serjeant Vaughan. Is the body of that check in his hand writing - A. It is not.

Q. Is the body of the check in your hand writing - A. It is not.

Q. Can you tell me in whose hand writing the check is - A. I can form a judgment, I believe the date of the check, 15th November, and the name of the payee to be in the hand writing of the prisoner Blair, it is not his natural hand to be sure, it is disguised; I believe I hold in my hand the check by which it was made.

Q. What is the name of the payee - A. It was J. C. but they have added, lark, it is in the same ink it appears to be added. I always drew the full name of the payee, except when I drew a check payable to myself, then I drew the initials only, J. C.

Q. Tell me whether there appears J. C. - A. There does, and the letters, lark, appear to me to be added.

(The check read.)

No. Bartholomew-lane, 15th November, 1810.

Messrs. Bruce and Simpson, pay J. Clark, or bearer, six hundred pounds.

Gregg and Corfield,

600.

Q. When you drew money from the house of Bruce and Co. for your own private accounts, you used the initials J. C. - A. I was in the habit of using J. C. on my private accompt, they were my private bankers, and when I placed money there on my private account, then I used J. C. The information was given late on the Saturday evening. On theMonday morning the prisoner Blair was at my office before the clock struck nine, the officer was there and he was apprehended.

LUKE HALL . You are a clerk also in the bank of Bruce and Co. - A. I am; I have been there about nine years and a half.

Q. Then you were there at the time the prisoner Blair was there - A. Yes.

Q. In what situation was he in Bruce and Co.'s house - A. As a clerk in various departments.

Q. At that time was Gregg and Corfield customers at your house - A. I think not.

Q. You know Blair - A. Yes, extremely well.

Q. Do you remember him going from your house to Messrs. Gregg's and Corfield's - A. He did not leave our house to go there. He did go to Gregg's and Corfield's, and afterwards I saw him coming frequently to our house upon their business; sometimes he came to receive money, sometimes to pay, and sometimes for the book.

Q. Do you remember seeing Blair on Thursday, the 15th of November - A. I do, at the banking-house, I think between three and four in the afternoon.

Q. Is that hour, between three and four, a particular busy hour with you - A. It is; it is very busy, except there are holidays at the Bank.

Q. Was the 15th of November a holiday - A. I do not think it was; the stock brokers are very busy at that hour; it is the clearing hour.

Q. And therefore you are more busy at that hour, than you are at any hour in the day - A. Generally.

Q. That hour was the hour you saw the prisoner - A. Yes.

Q. For what purpose did he come there - A. He asked me to give him change for a pound note.

Q. Had you been made acquainted or seen any note that had been shewed to you previous to that - A. It was shewed me about that time, I do not know it was previous; it was shewn me by Henry Gray .

Q. Now look at that check, and tell me whether you believe that to be the check that was shewn to you by that witness - A. I believe it is, it is six hundred pound, purporting to be Gregg and Corfields, payable to J. Clark.

Q. Upon his application to you for the change of twenty shillings, tell me what passed - A. I told him change was very scarce, I hardly could spare it; he pressed me very hard for it, I therefore gave it him principally in sixpences.

Q. Will you give us any correct notion how long it was either previous or subsequent to it that note was presented - A. I cannot; I believe it was between three and four in the day.

Q. Did you see Blair at any other hour - A. Yes, at nearly five.

Q. At that time that you have been speaking of between three and four was the time that Mr. Gray shewed the check - A. Yes.

Mr. Gleed. You do not mean to speak with any degree of certainty whether it was between three and four or five - A. The first time was between three and four.

JOSEPH GOSTICK . Q. You are a clerk of Messrs. Gregg's and Corfield's. - A. I am.

Q. Was it your department in that office to fill up the body of the checks - A. On certain occasions.

Q. Now look at that check and tell me whether it appears to be your filling up the body of it or not - A. No, certainly not.

Q. Do you know Mr. Gregg's and Mr. Corfield's hand writing - A. Yes, I know both.

Q. Is it the signature of either Mr. Gregg or Corfield's - A. Certainly not, neither of them.

Q. You know Blair - A. Of course, certainly.

Q. Have you had any conversation with him relative to Newgate - A. I have heard it mentioned, certainly, many circumstances respecting Newgate and persons therein; respecting Roberts, Hitchen, and other persons whose names I now forget, prisoners in Newgate; he has offered to take certain persons in the office, to Newgate, to see Roberts, I believe it was mere curiosity; he offered to take me to see Roberts, if I would stand a bottle of wine to treat them.

MARK CHAMBERS. I am a taylor, I live at No. 3, Young-buildings, Old-street.

Q. Do you know the prisoner Blair - A. Yes, and the prisoner Dale; I knew Blair about a fortnight before the 14th of November, and I knew Dale about half a year before that.

Q. Were you in the habit of meeting Blair that fortnight before the 14th of November - A. At Newgate.

Q. How often might you meet him in Newgate before the 15th of November last - A. Not above two or three times in all. I met him on the 14th in company of Hitchen and Roberts; Hitchen sent for me to go to Newgate, I went on the 14th, Hitchen told me Blair was present, he wanted me to go to get a check changed, Blair told me I must come again the next day, Thursday the 15th, at twelve o'clock; I went the next day at twelve o'clock, I found Roberts and Hitchen, a little after that Blair came in, they then were all in conversation together, Roberts, Hitchen and Blair; I was walking up and down the ward; I was ordered by either Hitchen or Blair to go out with Blair; Blair took me to the Prerogative office in Doctors Commons; Blair told me I was to get a porter to give the check to in Doctors Commons on the Wednesday, he told me I was to get a porter at the Prerogative office to get the check changed.

Q. Then on the Thursday he took you to the Prerogative office, he told you to get a porter - A. Yes, on the Thursday, he told me I must not come in the hat, which I had on, which was a straw hat; he told me then to meet him a little past Doctors Commons, and St. Pauls church-yard; we went both into a public-house, he called for two slices of bread and cheese, and a pot of beer; he told me to meet him exactly at three o'clock, at the Tobit's Dog in St. Paul's church-yard; I parted with him then at twelve o'clock, he left me eating the bread and cheese. Dale came in soon after Blair went out, Blair did not see him as I know of.

Q. I ask you how Dale came to meet you at thetime - A. I had appointed him on the morning of the Thursday; I went to Westminster before I went to Newgate; I set off from Westminster about eleven o'clock along with Dale, Robinson, Hooker, and myself, all came from Westminster together, and coming home I told Dale I had got to go to Newgate to get a check changed; I understood for Mr. Hitchen, and I was to get a porter. He said he would be porter, I said you may if you like; with that, upon the top of Fleet-market, me and Dale left Hooker and Robinson, and came to Newgate just before twelve o'clock.

Q. You have said it was for Hitchen, were Robinson and Hooker present - A. I told Dale to himself as we were coming along. In consequence of what I told Dale, Dale came in after Blair went out, I was eating the bread and cheese; I told him I was to get a porter, he said he would be porter.

Q. Now I ask you whether you met Blair at three o'clock - A. I think about two or three minutes before the clock struck; I went in, and met Blair exactly at three o'clock.

Q. When Blair came in the Tobit's Dog was any body else there - A. There were two or three servant girls. Blair set down on my left side, he put the check into my hands folded up, I never opened it. He told me to send a porter to Bartholomew-lane.

Q. Do you know whether that is the paper he put into your hand - A. I observed these small figures, he told me that was of no consequence. I never opened the check, the figures were exactly like unto these. He never put any other check into my hand, and I never put any other check than this into Dale's hand; I never had it out of this hand until I delivered it to Dale.

Q. When he put it into your hand did he say any more to you than the porter was to take it to Bartholomew-lane - A. He told me I must give it to the porter in Doctors Commons, and go out myself from the Prerogative office, and also put a pen into my hand; he told me to let him see me give it to the porter the check; the pen was into this hand.

Q. Was any use made of the pen - A. No; he directed me to hold the pen in my hand; I do not know what for no more than you. He told me I was to go to the top of Paternoster-row, and stand there till he came back. That was all that passed.

Q. Now having stated what became of him, and what became of you - A. He went along St. Paul's church-yard, leading to Cheapside; I turned to go to Doctors Commons to look for Dale to give this check to.

Q. Did you see Dale - A. Yes; I went to the Prerogative office according to his desire.

Q. I ask you now whether when you found Dale at the Prerogative office you delivered the check to him - A. Yes, I delivered it to him at the bottom of the street; I am quite sure that the check that I delivered to Dale was the check that I received from Blair; Blair was in the street, I saw Blair look to see whether I gave the check to Dale, he saw me do it.

Q. Having given the check to Dale what became of you - what became of Dale and Blair - A Directly I gave the check to Dale he set off to Bartholomew-lane. I looked and saw the other set off.

Q. Was the prisoner Blair walking in a direction to Bartholomew-lane - A. They both went there, they walked separate; I soon lost sight of them.

Q. What time might elapse before you saw either and which of them again - A. About twenty minutes or half an hour elapsed before I saw either of them again. I saw Blair first at the top of Paternoster-row, that was the place he appointed to meet me; Blair came all of a sweat, I then thought it was all wrong, and a bad piece of business; I was frightened; he said to me, I saw the money paid, and the check filed.

Q. Had you asked him any questions upon the subject - A. Not a word; he spoke to me first, he then walked fast off, I followed. After walking about fifty yards he said, have you got the money? I said no, I thought you were going for it yourself; he said, go and look after the porter. We parted. I went to Doctors Commons, I saw Dale, he was walking very fast on one side of Doctors Commons, I went to get up to him, he held his hand up, and said,

"be off, be off, I am followed;" I tried to get up to him to catch him, I could not, he got away, I lost sight of him, I gave up the pursuit, and went to look after Blair, I found Blair between the top of St. Paul's church-yard, and the end of the Old Bailey, I told him the man was run away, I could not find him; he seemed to say nothing at all to it; I continued a little with him, I told him, I thought he thought I had the money; I did not tell him so then, I desired to go with him to Hitchen and Roberts, to let them see I had not the money, that the man had run away with it, if he had got it; he went and I went with him to Newgate, I saw Hitchen and Roberts in his presence, they were altogether in conversation, they seemed to make a laugh at me; I told them if the man had got the money I knew nothing of it, he had run away; I assured them I had none at all of it; I told them altogether; Blair told me to go to the Tobit's Dog, back again immediately; I went out him and all, he said he would come to me there, I went there, but he never came.

Q. I believe you were apprehended upon this subject - A. Yes, I was taken up on the Tuesday following; I gave the description of every thing about it before I was taken up; directly I found it out I told it to Hooker.

Mr. Gurney. You live in Young's-building - I see by the Sessions Paper you were here last October to swear an alibi - A. I know nothing of an alibi.

Q. You were not here last October in favour of a man for horse-stealing - A. Yes, I was.

Q. He was convicted notwithstanding your evidence - A. Yes.

Q. You would not have been concerned in this transaction if you had known it had been a forgery - A. No.

Q. You never had any suspicion it was wrong until it was all over - A. Not at all. They told me they had got thousands of money, I supposed it was right.

Q. And you would not have sent the porter to getthe money if you had not thought it was all night - A. No, to be sure not.

Q. Did you ever tell any body that when you sent the porter to get the money for the check that you changed hats with him - A. I was desired to do so.

Q. Did you change your hats again - A. Yes, on Friday morning.

Q. Did you ever in your life before lend your man your hat to go of an errand for you - A. I do not now justly recollect.

Q. You not having the least suspicion that any thing was wrong, believing all was right, you lent the man your hat, and you wore his hat while he was gone - A. Dale desired me to do it.

Q. Did you ask the reason - A. No. Dale told me to change the hat, and I did it.

Q. You were taken up on the Tuesday after about this forged check - A. Yes, and I was kept in custody several days.

Q. And you thought it was better to be a witness than a prisoner - A. To be sure, because I was led into the business.

HARRY ADKINS. Q. You are an officer of Bow-street - A. Yes.

Q. Did you apprehend a person of the name of George Robinson - A. I did, on the 17th of November at night, in Playhouse-yard, No. 20; I searched him, I found upon him a hundred pound note, a five pound note, and two one's, this is the 100 pound note, No. 9m985. I apprehended Dale on Sunday morning, in Aldersgate-street, he was at Mr. Stevens's, a hair dresser; I asked Dale what he had done with the money he had received on the Thursday, he said that he had not received any money. I then asked him if he had not taken a check on that day to some bankers, he said that he had taken a six hundred pound check to a bankers, he had received that check from Mark Chambers by the Prerogative office in Doctors Commons, and that he was to return there, Chambers was to be waiting for him. When he got back to Doctors Commons he found Chambers was gone, he then went to a man of the name of Robinson, the same person that I have been speaking of, that I apprehended, he gave him the money, thinking it would be safer in his hand than in his own; he said, that the check did not belong to Chambers, he understood it belonged to a tall man, he should know him if he was to see him, that he was dressed in black, and had long black whiskers, and that man he was near him at the time he received the check of Chambers. I apprehended Blair on the Monday morning in his own office, at Messrs. Gregg's and Corfield's; on my taking him from there in a coach to Bow-street, I asked him if he had ever been at his late employers, meaning by that the bankers; he said he was in the habit of going there very often; I asked him when was the last time, he said, on the Thursday before he had been to the bankers; I asked him what he went for there, he said, to get a note cashed for twenty shillings worth of change, that he had been twice there on that day in the afternoon. I then asked him if he knew a man of the name of Robinson, he said he did not. I then asked him if he knew a man of the name of Chambers; he said he did, he knew him by going to see Hitchen in Newgate, he had seen him several times in the last week, he saw him on the Wednesday and on the Thursday about twelve o'clock, he met him in Newgate. He asked me what charge I had him upon; I told him upon a check of six hundred pound, that I suspected he was the person that had drawn the check, he said, that if that was the charge I had him upon he did not care about it; he thought that I meaned to arrest him for debt.

WILLIAM HOOKER . Q. Were you at the house of a person of the name of Robinson on the evening of Thursday the 15th of November - A. I was. Robinson lives at No. 20, Play house-yard, Golden-lane.

Q. While you were there with Robinson did either of the prisoners, or which of them, come to the house of Robinson - A. Thomas Dale came there between six and seven in the evening, there was some secret words between him and Robinson; Robinson desired me to go down stairs.

Q. Before you went down did you see any thing produced by Dale the prisoner - A. Some kind of paper, what it was I cannot say. Dale came down stairs to me in the course of five minutes, and said George Robinson had not behaved well to him, he had brought him six hundred pound bank of England notes, and Robinson had not given him a shilling out of it. I told him he need not ask a favour of Robinson, he might help himself with the money, if it was good money. Mr. Robinson came down at the time, Robinson said, come along, to Dale; they went into Golden-lane, and they stood about ten minutes together; I was about ten yards from them. Robinson sent Dale away and came to me; I then went with Robinson to a man of the name of Brown; I saw Robinson produce at a public-house in Worship-street two notes, one was a five hundred pound note, and the other a one hundred pound note, I did not know the amount of them, only Robinson told me six hundred pound. Afterwards, at another public-house in Whitechapel, Robinson produced the notes, a five hundred pound note. The number of the five hundred pound was 8789.

Q. Having got this number did you make any communication about this number - A. I did not, until I saw Chambers, and in consequence of having seen Chambers on the Saturday evening I communicated it to the house of Bruce and Co.

Dale. I will now ask you whether you do not justify bail - A. Yes, four times; I have once for my coal merchant, and three other times.

JOHN PARKER . Q. You are a clerk in the library of the bank - A. I am.

Q. That is the place in which cancelled notes are deposited - A. They are.

Q. Have you got a cancelled bank note for five hundred pound - A. I have; dated 13th of October, 1810, No. 8789, No. 2, Checquer-court, Bunhill-row, it was paid on the 16th of November.

Mr. Gray. Is that the note that was paid - A. I took the number of it; I have not the smallest doubt from the number that is the note.

Q. Look at the one hundred pound bank note, doyou know that - A. I took the number of this note also, I have not the smallest doubt this is the note.

Mr. Gurney. All you speak to it is the same number, that is all the knowledge you have - A. Yes, that is all.

THOMAS WRAGG . Q. I believe you are a clerk in the bank - A. I am.

Q. Can you tell me when that note was presented to the bank for payment - A. On the 16th of November.

Q. Look at the prisoners at the bar, and tell me who presented it - A. From the multiplicity of business it is impossible for me to recollect. I have seen the prisoner Dale before, I cannot recollect I saw him then. Here is the name of the party that presented it and it has been stamped out in our office, I wrote the name over again.

Q. I will now ask you whether you have more notes of the same number of five hundred pound, 3789 - A. It is probable we may have two notes of the same number, but not of the same number and date.

Q. Do you know what notes were given for the five hundred pound - A. I do: at the time that this note were exchanged I made the entery in this book, I did not give the notes myself, that is the department of another gentleman; fifty ones for the five hundred pounds, forty fives, and twenty-five ten pound notes; the fifty ones run from No. 71351, up to 71400 bearing date the 28th of August, all of them.

Q. to Adkins. You produce some notes - A. Yes, thirteen ones from a man of the name of Blundell, 71356, that is one, 71376, 71385, 71387, 71388.

Blair's Defence. I do not know any thing of the men that come against me, I never exchanged a word with them in my life; as to the fact I am charged with I have no knowledge, neither direct, or indirect.

Dale's Defence. I would wish to speak to Chambers, he has told the truth, that he himself gave me the check; he said it belonged to a gentleman, he would give me half a crown, and when I came back he was not there; I went to St. Paul's church-yard the next morning, I met him, he gave me some rum, and told me the gentleman would not like them large notes, he said he wanted thirty pounds. I was going to justify bail, I paid him fifteen shillings for bailing one of the men for sodomy. Chambers asked Hooker if he would take any small sum. Hooker bailed one Whiffen; just after the long vocation he took his brother's house, I do not know whether he did not take his brother's name; there are gentlemen here that recollects his face very well, he engaged with one Mason to swear that a gentleman owed him a bill of ninety-five pounds, Mr. Arabin and Mr. Adolphus were on the part of Mason, he received money as long as he could, then he went on the other side, though he had been sworn at Mr. Arabin's before; he went to the coffee-house and swore for Shirley, Mr. Price the attorney gave him a pound for his trouble. He had an execution in his house, I was present when the things were sold by auction; he has not been worth a shilling for this half year.

JOSEPH PIKE. Q. I believe you are a woollen-draper residing in Basinghall-street - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know that man, Chambers - A. I do.

Q. From the knowledge that you have of him would you or not believe him upon his oath - A. I would not.

COURT. How long have you known him - A. From September 1809.

Mr. Serjeant Vaughn. When did you see him - A. At my own house in Basinghall-street, he is a taylor.

Q. Is he in your debt - A. He is, about forty odd pounds. I have heard him examined upon oath, I know he is a very bad character.

BLAIR, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 27.

Of uttering it, knowing it to be forged.

DALE, NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

135. SARAH BAILEY , THOMAS MOORE , and HANNAH GREEN , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of December , in the dwelling-house of John Wilson , a promissory note, value 20 l. and three five pound bank notes, the property of David Roberts .

DAVID ROBERTS. I am a Welsh drover . On the 7th of December, about four o'clock, I was in Smithfield; I had been drinking all day, I met a man in the street, he said you are a Welshman. I am not able to say who that man was.

Q. Who was in Wilson's public-house with you - A. These two girls, and the man at the bar; we were all sitting together in the tap-room; I was very tipsey. I called for a pot of beer, I changed something to pay I do not know what.

COURT. Were you sober enough to recollect what passed at that public-house - A. I was not. I am sure I was there. I am certain I sat in company with the three prisoners, I drank some beer, it was paid for.

Q. Did you see your pocket book while you were in the public-house - A. Yes. I cannot tell whether I took it out myself, I was tipsey; I went to sleep, and when I awoke I found the pocket book empty on the table, and the prisoners had all left the house; I told the landlord I had lost every farthing.

Q. Did you see the pocket book, or know that you had the pocket book before you went to that public-house - A. I put the notes in my pocket book at Rumford. I put it in my pocket, and I had never taken it out of my pocket, until I found it on the table.

WILLIAM WILSON . I am eight years old. I am the son of John Wilson .

Q. Do you know these three people at the bar - A. Yes; I saw them in the tap room on the night Mr. Roberts was robbed, the three prisoners came into the tap-room a little after seven, Mr. Roberts came in to the house after seven, after the prisoners; they all three were round him directly; he sat down and said, what are you all doing round me; Sarah Bailey said, let us look at your pocket book; Mr. Roberts called for a pot of beer, they all set down to drink it. Mr. Roberts was called on to pay for it, he took his pocket book out of his waistcoat pocket, he opened his book and took out a one pound note, hesent Sarah Bailey with it to the bar to get change. I did not see the change brought back. Then Mr. Roberts sent an Irishman with another pound note; the Irishman went to the bar and got change, and brought it to the Welchman. Bailey returned, and said, I am not like the other man.

Q. Did she return with the change - A. No, she had been out half an hour, and returned before the Irishman brought the change to the Welchman. The Irishman gave the Welchman the change; he put it into his pocket-book; in about ten minutes afterwards it was all gone from him. He pulled out the pocketbook once more, and then Hannah Green snatched the change out and the notes, and all three ran away together.

JOHN WILSON . I keep the Earl of Moira on Saffron-hill ; it was called the Castle public-house.

Q. Of course that boy is your son - A. Yes.

Q. On the 7th of December do you remember the prosecutor coming to your house - A. I saw him in the tap-room from six to seven o'clock.

Q. Did you see your boy in the tap-room - A. I cannot tell where my boy was.

Q. Do you recollect any of the prisoners being there - A. Thomas Moore and Sarah Bailey were there; they sat next to Roberts; there were a great many about them; Roberts called for a pot of beer; an Irishman brought me a pound note; I changed it; I followed to see the Irishman give the change to the Welchman; I am sure I saw the Welchman put the change into his pocket-book, and put it into his pocket; the tap-room was full of people. I am sure Moore and Bailey were in the room; I told him I understood he had a deal of property about him; that if he staid in that company he would soon lose it. I begged him to come out along with me; he told me he would not, he could take care of himself. Presently afterwards a pint of rum was called for. I changed one of the dollars; I observed nothing more of it until four or five minutes afterwards. I saw four or five of them run out; Thomas Moore and Sarah Bailey , I saw them go by the bar; I said, I dare say they have robbed the Welchman. They did not return after that; I went into the tap-room, the Welchman met me, and told me that he was robbed.

Q. Did you see his pocket-book at that time - A. I did not; I advised him to go home and come to me in the morning; after he was gone from me Chapman came and told me the twenty pound note was safe; I afterwards saw the note.

JOHN CHAPMAN . I am an officer of the city, I keep a liquor-shop in Long Lane. On the 7th of December, about seven o'clock in the evening, the Prisoner Moore brought me a twenty pound Rumford bank-note, he asked me to give him change for it. I knew him; I asked him how he came by the note; he said he had it of Sarah Bailey who was in my tap-room. I went into the tap-room and asked Sarah Bailey ; she said she gave it to him; she told me that she had it of a country gentleman for sleeping with him. I told them I could not think of that, I must stop the note; I did not detain them; I had not an opportunity, my shop was full of people. When they found I stopped the note, they instantly left the house. I went in search of them as soon as I could get rid of my company. I did not find them; I ordered the officer to take Tom Moore on my charge, and take him to the Compter; he was taken in the morning by day-light; I saw him in the Compter on Saturday morning. I understood there had been a Welchman robbed. I went to Mr. Wilson's; he said he had been there the night before, and between the hours of nine and ten I took Sarah Bailey in Field Lane; I sent her to the Compter. I then went back to Mr. Wilson's, there I found the Welchman. I desired him to meet me at Guildhall at eleven o'clock; he did. I produce the twenty pound Rumford note, it was offered to me by the prisoner Moore.

Prosecutor. It is my note, there is some red ink inside and some figures outside. I took the note at the White Horse, Rumford market.

COURT. Can you recollect at all whether on that night you went with Sarah Bailey any where except at this public-house - A. I was never out with her.

GEORGE WOOD . I am an officer of Hatton-Garden. I searched Moore at the lock-up house at Hatton Garden Office; I felt outside; I felt something hard; he resisted me putting my hand in. I got hold of the fob and cut it out; in it I found two one pound notes, two dollars, four shillings and a sixpence.

JOHN HUTT . I took Sarah Green. Sarah Bailey told me she gave the note to Moore to change; asked her how she came by that twenty pound note which Chapman had got; she told me that the Welchman had given her it as a one pound note, to go out and get some bread and cheese and onions with it.

Bailey's Defence. I was in the tap-room when the Welchman came in; he asked me after a young woman of the name of Nelly. I told him she was gone on board a ship; he and I drank rum together. He gave me a one pound note; I thought it was. I gave it to Moore to look at it; he said it was a twenty pound note; I asked him to go and get it changed; he went to Mr. Chapman's to get it changed.

Moore's Defence. I know no further about the robbery than a child unborn. The girl gave me the note to get it changed; where she got it I do not know.

Green's Defence. I was not in the house; I never saw the prosecutor before I saw him at Hatton Garden office.

BAILEY, GUILTY , aged 20.

MOORE, GUILTY , aged 24.

Of Stealing, but not in the Dwelling-house.

Transported for Seven Years .

GREEN, NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Le Blanc.

136. GEORGE CARRINGTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of January , eighteen yards of ribbon, value 9 s. the property of Elizabeth Whiffen , privately in her shop .

ELIZABETH WHIFFEN . I am a widow ; I live at No. 10, Leather-lane, Holborn ; I keep a haberdasher's shop . On last Monday afternoon about four o'clock, two women came into the shop and asked to look at some ribbons. I took out the box, and they took up some ribbons to look at. The prisoner came in, he asked to look at some ribbons. He stood close by the women, put his hand over the box, took out a piece of satin ribbon, and was putting it into his pocket; I said you have got a piece of ribbon; he put it back again, and immediately took up a piece of broad sarsenett ribbon,and ran out of the shop immediately, and the women after him.

Q. What quantity of it was there - A. About eighteen yards, worth nine shillings, it cost me more. I ran to the door after him; my brother was coming up to the door at the time; his name is William Whiffen . I told him; he pursued the prisoner, and brought him back; the women made off. James Taylor assisted in bringing the prisoner back to the shop; James Taylor staid in the shop with the prisoner. My brother went for an officer; the prisoner was searched.

Q. Did you see any ribbon found upon him - A. No, he was seen to have dropped it in the shop, the officer picked it up.

JAMES TAYLOR. I and the prosecutrix's brother-in-law were coming from the timber yard with a deal, a piece on our shoulders, when we came to the door, Mrs. Whiffen said, brother, that man has got a piece of ribbon from me; we put down our deals, pursued the prisoner and took him; he continued to run till we overtook him, we took him back to the shop; I told the prisoner in the shop, after Whiffen was gone for the officer, if he would give up the ribbon he might go about his business; he put his right hand into his left coat pocket, took out the ribbon, put it under his blue apron, and dropped it under the leg of the table; the officer came immediately after that.

WILLIAM WHIFFEN . I accompanied the last witness in pursuing the prisoner, I was the person that took him; it is correct what he has said.

JOHN HUTT . I am an officer. When I got into the shop I saw the prisoner; I said, is it you; he said, yes, it is; I took him from the table to search him, I found this ribbon, I have had it ever since.

Prosecutrix. This is my ribbon, it has my mark upon it.

Prisoner's Defence. I had bought a new hat; I went into the shop and asked for a yard and a half of ribbon for my hat; the woman said, the ribbon was too broad for my hat; I walked out of the shop.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Of Stealing, but not privately in the shop.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Chambre.

237. MARY CASEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of November , a silver seal, value 5 s. a silk handkerchief, value 2 s. three yards of ribbon, value 3 s. a yard and a half of lace, value 3 s. a box of lip salve, value 6 d. and a watch key, value 1 s. the property of Ferdinand Buzzio .

SOPHIA BUZZIO . I am the wife of Ferdinand Buzzio ; I am a dress-maker in Charles-street, Grovesnor-square , the prisoner was my servant for twelve weeks. In consequence of information I got a constable, I searched the prisoner's person in my own house, I found a silver seal with a coat of arms in her pocket, and a box of lip salve, some ribbon, and a small gold watch key. In her box we found a silk pocket handkerchief with my initials black and purple ribbon, and a yard and a half of lace; the property that we found upon the prisoner's person, she said, she found in sweeping; she cried, and wished me not to take her in custody.

WILLIAM DEAN . I am a constable; I apprehended the prisoner and found the things on her and in her box as the prosecutrix has described; I have kept the property ever since.

Prisoner's Defence. I Mary Casey , the unfortunate prisoner now before, humbly begs pardon for thus addressing you, having never been in any trouble before. My prosecutor is a milliner by profession, with whom I lived as servant, and had a deal of property entrusted to my care; I declare I never wronged her, nor no one, to the value of a penny in my life time; the prosecutrix knows that which I am prosecuted for was swept up and throwed into a closet as useless; the seal I picked up that morning, I put it in my pocket, I meaned to return it but forgot it. I now stand before you my Lord and Gentlemen of the Jury, an innocent sufferer.

GUILTY , aged 38.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Chambre.

238. JAMES BLAY was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of George Hobey , about the hour of twelve in the night of the 3d of January , and burglariously stealing therein, a pair of boots, value 2 l. his property .

CHARLES HOLBEY . I am in the employ of Mr. Hobey, bootmaker , Piccadilly .

Q. Were you in his employment on the 3d of January last - A. Yes.

Q. Do you recollect having shut up the window shutters of that house on the 3d of January - A. I did, the shutters were shut up by me on the 3d of January, the last window but one I shut up at the Piccadilly side, within twenty minutes after eight that window was shut up.

Q. Is there any communication between that window that you shut up and the dwelling house - A. Yes, it is all within the same roof, and all make a part of the dwelling house. When I came to the shop a quarter before seven, I began to open the shop, and when I came to that window, I perceived the glass of the window broken, the window was not broken when the shop was shut up, that I am positive of.

Q. At half past eight it was not broken, was any part of the stock in the shop missing - A. I cannot say that any part of the stock was missing.

Court. Do you know what parish Mr. Hobey's shop and house is in - A. St. George 's, Hanover-square.

Q. How did you find the shutters - A. The shutters were as I left them the over night, no part of the shutters had been cut.

WILLIAM SHILSTON . Q. You also, I understand, are a person employed by Mr. Hobey, do you recollect any thing particular in the boots on the 3d of January, or the 4th of of January - A. I came at half after seven, on the morning of the 4th, when I came in the shop the first thing that I saw was Mr. Hobey, he was looking at the pane of glass which was broken above the shutters, I looked and found there were boots missing that had been there the night before.

Q. What time did you leave work - A. On the 3d I left the shop, it might be about a quarter after eight.

Q. How many boots do you think were missing - A. Three pair I am certain of, there might be more.

Q. Have you ever seen any of these three pair of boots since, that you missed, that you had seen the night before - A. I have seen one pair of the same name that we missed, I saw that pair on the 4th, in the evening; on that pair of boots that I saw, was Williams, that was a customer for whom they were bespoke; I am certain they were of Mr. Hobey's manufactory, Williams was the name of the customer for whom they were made, and to the best of my knowledge they were one of the pair of boots that I had seen in Mr. Hobey's shop the night before.

Mr. Alley. The man that rubs the boots up and makes them fit for the customer, he can speak best to them - A. The boots came into my charge.

Q. Who was the man that staid last that night - A. I did not.

Q. Mr. Hobey employs a great number of men I presume - A. He employs as many as he wants.

Q. They are all honest men, you never heard of a man taken a pair of boots home in his pocket to look at them - A. No.

Q. You have been asked whether you could speak to the boots when you saw them - A. They were made for Mr. Williams.

Q. You have got a great many customers of the name of Williams - A. Yes.

Q. And they all wear square toes - A. They were round toes, they were a fashionable toe.

Q. Was there any thing upon the face of God's earth in the shape of the toe, or the make of the boot, that you could say it was Mr. Hobey's boot before you saw it at the office - A. I know the boots were taken away.

Q. I ask you solemnly, upon your oath, if you saw these boots at York, could you say they were the boots that hung up in Mr. Hobey's shop - A. No.

Mr. Mears. Perhaps if you were to see them again this evening, you would be able to them whether they are Mr. Hobey's boots - A. Yes.

Court. Do you know whose hand writing it was upon them - A. No.

Q. Supposing this window was broken outside, if they put in their arm, could they have taken these boots - A. Yes, or for a small sized man to get in without breaking the frame.

ALEXANDER WILSON . I live at 95, Holborn-hill; I am a shoemaker.

Q. Do you recollect having ever seen the prisoner before - A. On the 4th, between six and seven o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came into my shop, and said, he had a pair of boots to sell, he produced them; I asked him who made them; he said, he made them himself; I asked him what he asked for them; he said, twenty-five shillings; I then asked his name; he said, James Brown , he lived in Monmouth-street, 31. On examining the boots I perceived the name inside had ink drawn over it, the name was scratched out, I asked him why that was done; he said he chosed to do it; I then said I suspected they were not his make, but I suspected them to be Mr. Hobey's make from the general appearance; he said, I was mistaken they were not, he then said he did not make them, but bought them of a man that had cabbaged them. I told him that I should detain the boots and him too, and send the boots up to Mr. Hobey. I detained the prisoner and sent the boots up to Mr. Hobey by James Chivers .

Mr. Alley. Where do you live - A. Upon Holborn-hill; I deal in second hand shoes, and new shoes.

Q. He brought the boots to you in the common hours of trade - A. Yes.

Jury. As a boot and shoemaker what is the value of these boots - A. The value I consider to be about thirty shillings.

JAMES CHIVERS. Q. You are in the employ of the last witness - A. Yes. I was desired to take the boots to Mr. Hobey's on the 4th of January, between six and seven.

Q. What part of the conversation did you hear - A. That part Mr. Wilson did not consider the boots to be the prisoner's make, but the make of Mr. Hobey; he said, he bought them of a man who cabbaged them; he knew they were not Mr. Hobey's make.

WILLIAM READ . I am an officer of Hatton-garden office; on the 4th of January I took charge of the prisoner at Mr. Wilson's shop; I searched him, I found nothing upon him. I went the next day to search the prisoner's house; he told me himself where he lived, he directed me to No. 8, Crispin-street, Spital-fields, he said he lived below, in the lower part of the house. These are the boots I had at Mr. Wilson's shop; I found nothing at all at the prisoner's lodgings. While I was there a letter came from New Prison; this is the letter, it says, as there will be some gentleman there put the things out of the way.

Mr. Alley. Do you not know that upon the oath you have taken, you are not bound to tell that - A. I do not know it; I was desired by the magistrate to mention it.

COURT. There is nothing in that letter - A. I received the boots from a person of the name of Mills.

- MILLS. Q. Where did you get these boots that you delivered to Read - A. I saw the boots delivered by Chivers into Mr. Hobey's son's hands; I received them again from Mr. Hobey jun. and delivered them to Read. Mr. Hobey is the maker of them boots; I am sure that I cut them to a measure of a customer of Mr. Hobey whose name is Williams.

Mr. Alley. You say that Chivers brought back that pair of boots to Mr. Hobey - A. I have swore that; I can swear to them because they have my hand-writing, it is marked over here, but upon that part it is quite plain.

Q. There are clerks who do business in the shop, can you say they were not purchased and delivered - You cannot say how many pairs were delivered out of the name of Williams - A. I cannot say.

Mr. Mears. Q. to Shilston. Look at them boots A. These boots are of the same description, and Williams was wrote in chalk on the bottom.

Mr. Alley. And because you find no chalk mark now, you swear more positively to them - A. No, they were boots of that description.

COURT. Do you know whether these boots had ever been delivered - A. No, they had never been delivered, I had seen them on the over night, and about half after seven o'clock in the morning these boots were missing.

GEORGE HOBEY. I am perfectly sensible the boots are of my own manufactory, they were made for Mr.Williams, he was out of town, they hung up in my shop until called for, or to be sent to him when he wrote for them.

Q. Had you after your men left work sent any boots out to Mr. Williams - A. Never. They cost me as near as I can calculate from three to four and forty shillings, I sell them for two pound fourteen.

Mr. Alley. The prisoner was a stranger to you - A. Yes.

Q. You keep a good many men we all know - A. Yes.

Q. These men go away at various hours of the night - A. Eight o'clock is the hour for all to go excepting one man I pay to stay to see the fires all out.

Q. Supposing you had seen these boots at any distant part of the kingdom, should you have known they were of your manufactory - A. I should.

Q. You never carry out boots yourself do you - A. Oh yes, I do, I will bring you a pair if you please.

Mr. Mears. According to the routine of business, as it is kept in your warehouse, would there have been the least possibility of any person being in possession of these boots that were made for a person that never called for them - A. Certainly not.

Prisoner's Defence. At the time I brought them boots to Mr. Wilson, I asked Mr. Wilson if they suited him he asked me what I asked for them, I told him thirty-five shillings; he looked at them a great while and then said, which way did you come by these boots, I told him I bought them, he said, where did you buy them, I said, I did not know, the boots might be cabbaged I could not tell, I gave thirty shillings for them, I could not tell whether they were cabbaged or what. The last pair of boots I sold to Mr. Wilson was for a one pound note, I bought them in Petticoat-lane. He asked me where I lived, I told him I kept a shop in Monmouth-street, I stopped in it three weeks, I was obliged to pay twelve shillings a week for the shop.

Wilson. The prisoner never sold me any boots before to my knowledge.

Mr. Alley. You say the prisoner never sold you any boots - A. Not to my knowledge.

Q. How long have you lived at the corner of that place - A. Seven years, and in the neighbourhood twenty years.

Q. Do you know Mr. Limebeer of Fleet-street - A. I do not know him.

Q. Pray has he had any suit against you at law - A. Yes, I know what you mean.

Q. I ask you were you ever in this court before - A. I have three or four months ago.

Q. As a witness - A. No, about four months ago a man came in with a pair of boots, the same as this man did, saying he manufactured them, it turned out to be a lie, I was prosecuted for receiving them.

Q. Do you make any boots yourself - A. Sometimes I do, I served my time to the trade.

Q. Do you manufacture them now - A. No, I do not.

Q. What do you mean by saying that sometimes you manufacture them - A. When I get a small order I manufacture them.

Q. Where do you get your new boots that you sell A. I get them from the country.

Q. Now upon your oath within this twelvemonth have you made any boots - A. Yes, about three months ago I made a dozen.

Q. Will you swear that you made more than twenty in the course of the year - A. No, I will not.

Q. You swore that they are not worth more than thirty shillings, we all have heard an honest tradesman say that they cost him forty-four shillings - A. They can be made for less.

THOMAS FULLER . I am a labourer; I know the prisoner; he lives at No. 8, Crispin-street, Spitalfields, he is a shoemaker. I live at No. 8, Honey Suckle-court, Grub-street, last Friday week I was at the prisoner's house.

Q. Do you know what day of the week this is - A. Saturday, yesterday week I was at his house. At the time I came in there was a man selling a pair of boots, they were turn down boots with white tops, the prisoner purchased them of him, he paid down a one pound note and ten shillings in silver.

Q. Do you know who the man was - A. No.

COURT. What are you - A. I am a labourer, I work at the Quays down by the water-side where I can get a job.

Q. How long have you been acquainted with the prisoner - A. Three or four months.

Q. What way of business is the prisoner - A. Shoemaking and shoe-mending, he has mended shoes for me at his house, No. 8, Crispin-street.

Mr. Mears. What time of the day did you see the prisoner purchase a pair of boots - A. Between eleven and twelve o'clock, I took a pair of shoes to him.

Q. What business have you had to pay attention to for the last two or three months - A. The last person I worked for was my uncle, I worked for him these last three weeks, it is not far from my uncle's to his house.

COURT. What Quay did you work for last - A. The Quay down by London Bridge.

Q. What was the name of the last Quay you worked at down at London Bridge - A. The last Quay that I worked for was close to Billingsgate-market.

Q. Were you present when the man came in - A. I found them together when I came in, I did not hear any questions asked how he came by them, I heard him ask thirty-five shillings for the boots while I was there, and the prisoner paid thirty shillings.

Q. How do you know it was Friday that you were there - A. Because I know it was yesterday week.

Q. When did you see the prisoner after this - A. I never saw him till now.

Q. Then how came you here to day - A. The prisoner's wife came for me.

Q. Was the wife by when he bought the boots - A. Yes, she was in the back-room.

Q. You have known him all the three months, did he always live in the same room all the three months you knew him - A. Yes.

Q. You never knew him carry on any business any where else - A. No, I never knew him before.

MARY WOOD . Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. Yes, he lives at No. 8, Crispin-street, Spitalfields; I live at No. 8, Little Swan-alley, Coleman-street, I sleep at nights at this man's house.

Q. Has he any young children - A. Three; I sleep in the shop, he sleeps in the back parlour.

Q. In order to go into the street to go abroad mustthe prisoner come through your room - A. He must.

Q. Did you sleep at his house yesterday week - A. I did, I went to bed about eleven o'clock, he went to bed just before I went.

Q. Could he have passed through your room without your hearing it - A. I do not think he could.

Q. Do you know the day he was taken up - A. On the Friday. On the Thursday night the child cried out and the father called to the child and desired it to go to sleep; he has three children, the oldest is six years old, that child slept with me; I spoke to it and the father spoke to it.

Q. Is it your opinion that he was out that night after eleven o'clock - A. I do not think he was.

Q. What time did he get up - A. At eight o'clock I went into the room where the bed was, and lit the fire, the two young ones slept with him and his wife. I have slept there about three weeks.

Mr. Mears. After you had spoken to him and quieted him what occasion would there be for the father to speak to him - A. I could not quiet him.

Q. Did you ever find any difficulty in making the child quiet before this night - A. I do not know that I ever did before that Thursday night.

Q. And on that Thursday night perhaps you were never awaked at all, you were sitting up watching for some person to come in, what is your reason for thinking he could not go out of the house without your hearing - A. I do not think he could,

Q. You have not the least recollection what hour of the night it was - A. No.

Mr. Alley. Q. to Mr. Hobey. Do you think it possible a burglary as desribed could have been committed in a public street before the hour of eleven - A. From the severity of the weather I think it could, not that I think it likely.

Q. to Wood. What time did you return home that night - A. About ten o'clock, he was at home at his supper, he never went out after that before he went to bed.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 41.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

239. FRANCIS RIVERS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of December , a writing-desk, value 42 s. the property of Thomas Handford .

THOMAS HANDFORD . I live at 34, in the Strand , I am a cabinet-maker . On the 20th of December, between eleven and twelve o'clock, the desk was taken away.

Q. Did you see it taken - A. No, the desk stood on the stall board, I saw the desk on the stall board about three quarters of an hour before it was taken away.

JOHN HANDFORD . I am fourteen; I live with my father. On the 20th of December I was in the shop behind the counter, a neighbour gave an alarm, I did not see the desk taken; I saw the prisoner in the street with the desk about twenty or thirty yards from our house; I pursued him, I cried out stop thief, he threw the desk on the stones, he made a slip and fell down, I took him; my mother picked up the desk.

GRACE HANDFORD . I am the wife of the prosecutor; I heard the alarm, I saw the prisoner crossing the street, he had the writing-desk in his possession, the boy cried out stop thief, he chucked the desk down, I picked it up, this is the desk, it is my husband's property.

Prisoner's Defence. My Lord and Gentlemen of the Jury, I unfortunately had been out of a situation for eighteen weeks, in the course of that time I distressed myself and wife, I had parted with every thing except what I had on and my wife too, I was turned out of my lodgings, and with difficulty I procured for her a place with a friend; I was two or three nights out in the street, after that I was in an alone garret; I was taken for a small debt and put in Tothill-fields where I was released out by a benevolent society, I came out and was with my wife in a starving garret, in an unfortunate hour I took the desk, I am conscious of the impropriety of my conduct, I am unfeignedly sorry for it.

GUILTY , aged 50.

Of stealing to the value 39 s. only.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction and fined 1 s .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

240. JANE ANDERSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of December , seven yards of printed cotton, value 10 s. the property of Richard Robson , privately in his shop .

THOMAS EADY . I am a servant to Richard Robson , Linen draper , 72, Oxford-street . On the 17th of December the prisoner came to the shop, she had a large shawl on, she asked to see some print for a a gown; I shewed her some prints, she purchased half a yard of printed cotton, it came to a shilling, she was about to leave the shop, I perceived I missed a piece of print, the prisoner was at the door, I laid hold of her shoulder; I took the piece of print from under her shawl; it is seven yards of printed cotton worth about eleven shilling. Mr. Robson was at the desk he might have seen what passed. This is the print, it is Mr. Robson's property.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing of it; he found the cotton by my feet; I had a child in my arms.

GUILTY , aged 15,

Of stealing, but not privately.

Judgement respited.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

241. HENRY GOUCHER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of December , a gelding, value 80 l. the property of Charles Baxter ; a saddle, value 10 s. two bridles, value 15 s. a Chaise harness, value 8 l. and two halters, value 1 s. the property of Phillip Dodsall , Charles Baxter , and Andrew Mackclew .

THOMAS HARROWSMITH. I am a groom to Mr. Baxter.

Q. Is Mr. Baxter one of the partners at Mr. Godsell's house - A. Yes.

Q. You charge this man with stealing a gelding - A. Yes, this gelding was the sole property of Mr. Charles Baxter . This horse was lost from the stable in New-yard, Great Queen-street , in the parish of St. Giles's; it was stolen on the 17th of Decemberlast. I left the stable at half past seven in the evening; on the 17th of December last the stable door was locked with two locks, the gelding was safe in it. I went to the stable at half after seven on the 18th in the morning I found the stable had been broken open and the gelding was gone.

Q. What was the worth of the gelding - A. Eighty pounds.

Q. Do you know whether there was any saddle, bridle or chaise harness - A. Yes, there was a saddle gone, the saddle was safe the night before; it belonged to the partnership, it might be worth eight shillings; two bridles were missing which were safe the over night, the two bridles were worth fourteen shillings, and a chaise harness was gone that was safe when I left the stable, that was worth eight pound, the bridle and the chaise harness were the property of the partnership, and there were two halters taken away that the gelding was tied up with, they were worth a shilling.

Q. Did you ever see the gelding again - A. On the 20th of December I found the gelding in a stable in Mr. Hornby's yard, in St. Martin's-lane, I knew it to be my master's.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. Yes, I knew him by being at work in the yard of my employers.

Q. These gentlemen are coachmakers in Long-acre, are they not - A. Yes. The prisoner knew where the horse was kept.

Q. What are the partner's names - A. Phillip Godsell , Charles Baxter , Andrew Mackclew .

Q. Did you find the harness with the horse - A. No.

THOMAS HORNBY . I am a livery stable keeper.

Q. Do you know the person of the prisoner - A. Yes; I let him a two stall stable, in the name of captain Smith, that he said was his master's name, he had possession of it on the 24th of November; he said he was the servant of Captain Smith.

Q. Do you know whether he brought a horse to that stable - A. No, I never saw him after the 24th of November, till that day the horse was brought into the yard by somebody, that was the 18th day of December.

Q. Did you see any horse brought into your yard on the 18th of December - A. No. On the 18th of December I saw him, I told the people of the yard if he came to let me see him; when I saw him I said, what makes you so long before you come to my yard, it is a month ago you took my stable; he said his master was taken ill at Woolwich, and he was going to him on the next day. He had the key in his possession, I did not see the horse in the stable.

RICHARD SMITH. I am coachman to Mr. Nutting, King-street, Covent Garden; I saw the prisoner come in about a quarter before six in the morning of the 18th of December into Mr. Hornby's yard, in Bedford Bury, he brought a horse with him, he led him in the gateway; I heard him unlock the stable door. I did not see him; he came out in about five minutes afterwards without the horse. I am sure the prisoner is the man.

Q. to Mr. Hornby. Was that the yard in Bedford Bury that the prisoner took the stable - A. Yes, it is detached from our yard.

Prisoner. I was ten miles out of town at the time he swears that.

Q. to Smith. At the time this man brought the horse it was not day light - A. No, it was not. I had a candle and lanthorn, he was the man, and no one else, he passed close by me twice.

GEORGE DONALDSON . I am a constable of St. Martin's in the Fields. In consequence of information I went down to Mr. Hornby's stables, on Wednesday the 19th of December, about eleven o'clock at noon, we got a ladder and looked through the window, and saw the horse that was described in the hand-bills in Mr. Hornby's yard, Bedfordbury; Mr. Hornby was by at the time. When I looked in the stable and saw the horse, Clark broke open the stable door with a chisel that Mr. Hornby lent him, we found only one horse in that stable, that horse was claimed by Mr. Baxter himself, he came down and claimed the horse as his; the horse is now in Mr. Baxter's possession.

Q. to Harrowsmith. Is the horse in Mr. Baxter's possession - A. It is.

Q. to Donaldson. Did you see the prisoner - A. Not till night. In the stable I found this saddle and bridle, I have kept them ever since.

Q. to Harrowsmith. Look at that saddle and bridle - A. They were taken from Mr. Baxter's stable, I am positive the bridle and saddle is the property of my employer, they were in the same stable out of which the horse was stolen.

Q. to Donaldson. When did you see the prisoner after this - A. About ten minutes past five on the 19th we apprehended him coming towards the stable where the horse was in; he was about six yards from the stable; we were in another stable, we let him go past, I said I got you, and took him in custody; he was troublesome; we searched him in the public-house, we were obliged to make use of great force, we found the key of the stable upon him.

Q. to Mr. Hornby. Is that the key of the stable that you let to him - A. I believe it is.

Donaldson. After we had put him in the watch-house I and Clark went up to his lodgings, Clark told me it was his lodgings, I found his wife there. In searching his lodgings, in a pail under the dresser, I found this halter with the initials of C. B. marked upon it.

Harrowsmith. I will take my oath this is the halter that I left the horse tied up with on the 17th; it is one out of the two. And the horse is a gelding.

JOAN CLARK . Q. You were with Donaldson when this man was apprehended - A. Yes; in searching him I found in his left hand pocket this key, I tried it with the lock on the stable, it both locked and unlocked it; I understood by one of Mr. Baxter's men where the prisoner's lodgings were; I found a woman there that answered to his name; I afterwards saw them together at the watchhouse where they acknowledged each other as man and wife.

Q. Did you find any thing in the room where this woman was - A. Donaldson found the halter, I saw him find it.

Q. What part of the house was this room - A. Inthe kitchen down stairs.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent of the business; I took the stable for my master; I lent the key to some person, and I had the key of him; I was going into this stable.

Q. Who is that person - A. He is gone out of town.

Q. to Harrowsmith. I understood you to say that this man worked for Mr. Godsell and Mr. Baxter - A. Yes, he has worked for them, he left on the 10th of November.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 35.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

242. THOMAS KING was indicted for feloniously assaulting Elizabeth, the wife of Griffin Jones , in the King's Highway, on the 2nd of January , putting her in fear, and taking from her person, and against her will, two gowns, value 1 l. a necklace, value 5 s. a child's coral, value 10 s. a cloak, value 10 s. a dress, value 10 s. a shift, value 2 s. two pair of stockings, value 2 s. and four handkerchiefs, value 5 s. the property of Griffin Jones .

ELIZABETH JONES. My husband's name is Griffin Jones , I live in High-street, Marybone. On the 2d of this month I was sent by Mr. Ballinger to fetch a bundle from Greenwich; I got my bundle of linen and brought it safe to London; it was about nine at night. When I got near Oxford-street I met the prisoner at the bar, I asked him the nearest way I could go into Marybone. I have lived five years in High-street, but was never much out of the place; the prisoner said he would direct me the nighest road, he went along with me; when we came to Marybone-street there was a cooks-shop, I proposed to have some soup, as I was tired, and to give him some for his civility, he went in with me; we staid there about a quarter of an hour, he took part of the soup. When I left the cooks-shop I went up Marybone-court ; I knew that part of the town very well; I wished him good night, and thanked him; he catched me by my side, pulled me to the ground, and pulled the bundle out of my hand; I resisted his taking the bundle as much as I could, he tore my gown, and took it from me, with that I cried out murder, and I was robbed; I saw him run across the street and drop the bundle.

Q. After that treatment from the man were you frightened - A. I was very much frightened indeed. I saw the prisoner again at the watchhouse in an hour or an hour and a half; I am very certain he is the man that robbed me of the property; I never saw him before.

Q. Do you know what the contents of the bundle was - A. Yes, I do, a black silk gown, a muslin dress, a cotton gown, two pair of stockings, a cloak; the cloak, silk gown, and the cotton gown, were worth a pound, the muslin dress, ten shillings, a shift, a coral and necklace, I do not know the value of these things, a lace cloak I dare say worth ten shillings, a silk shawl and a silk handkerchief that was the whole contents; I had these to return to Mr. Ballinger.

Q. Has the bundle ever been found since - A. I have never seen it.

Mr. Alley. What time of the night was it you were going through the street - A. It was near about nine o'clock, I met this man, it was dark.

Q. Have you ever said that the person that robbed you wore a soldiers coat - A. No not to my knowledge.

Q. Had the man that robbed you a soldiers great coat on or not - A. No.

Q. You say you did not make observations enough to speak to that fact - A. No.

Q. Then you could not make great observation of the man - A. Yes, I knew him when I saw him.

Q. This is a charge for a highway robbery, forty pounds would pay for the bundle - A. I do not know. I saw the bundle at the watchhouse.

Q. We heard you swear upon your oath, distinctly, that you never saw the things - A. I saw the bundle at the watchhouse.

Q. Be attentive to your answers, you are upon your oath, how long might the man be with you - A. An hour.

Q. And it might be an hour before you saw him in the watchhouse - A. I cannot say, it might be half an hour, from the place that he knocked me down and took the bundle out of my hand, before I followed him to the watchhouse, and saw him.

Q. This man at the time he was taken he had no great coat on - A. Not as I know off, from the fright I was in, I hardly knew who he was in the watchhouse for the mob.

Q. Then you would not have known him except he had been pointed out to you - A. No, he was not pointed out to me.

Q. Is the man, at whose house you had the soup, here to day - A. Yes.

Q. When you say you know the contents of the bundle, had you seen the contents - A. I had a proper knowledge of the bundle when I lost it, I had seen the contents, and tied it up myself.

JOHN BALLINGER . Q. Did you desire this woman to bring a bundle for you from Greenwich - A. I did, on the 2d of this month.

Q. Was that bundle brought by her to you - A. No, it was not.

Q. Have you seen the contents of the bundle - A. Yes, I saw it the same night, it contained the articles that I expected her to bring me.

Q. Had you known the woman at any time - A. Yes, for these two years, her husband is a lath-render.

CHARLES BIGNELL . I am the person that picked up the bundle; I was coming up Little Marybone-street, I heard the cry of murder, stop thief; I did not see the person that cried out, I made up to the top of Marybone-street, the cry came from towards Marybone-court, I saw the prisoner run from Marybone-court towards Beaumont Mews .

Q. At the time that you first saw him running, had he any thing with him - A. Not as I perceived, he was the person I saw running; I pursued him and cried, stop thief; there was nobody running after him but myself; he got down the mews and returned back, and went up alongside of the dead wall.

Q. What sort of a night was it - A. It was not a dark night, it was the second of this month, frosty weather. When he tureed back I ran up, I was within a yard or two, I asked what he had been doing to theperson that cried murder. I saw him drop the bundle, he gave me no answer; I picked up the bundle, he run off; I pursued him and kept him in sight, crying out stop thief, watchman; he was stopped between the officer and me, I saw the officer stop him. I lost sight of him turning the corner of Paradise-street, I was not above seven or eight yards from him at the time that he dropped the bundle.

Q. Who was the man that stopped him - A. Flowerdeau.

Q. What are you - A. I am a carpenter, No 4, Spring-street; when he was stopped, the constable took him to the watchhouse, I saw the constable search him, he told the constable that he lived in Green-harbour-court, in the Old Bailey, the constable asked him what he did up there, he said for a spray or for a lark.

Mr. Alley. You are a carpenter, you live in that neighbourhood, in the New-road.

Q. You were some distance from the woman when she cried out murder - A. Perhaps twenty yards.

Q. You pursued this man, this man was the only man that was running, he ran up the Mews - A. Yes.

Q. It seems rather strange to me, from the account that I heard before, did not you hear the man say that she saw him drop the bundle crossing the street - A. I do not know half what she saw, I speak the truth, the man is a stranger to me.

Q. You know there is such a thing as a forty pound reward - A. I don't know.

Q. I ask you upon your oath did you never hear it - A. I have heard that there is such a thing, I do not know what it is, for I have heard them say if a man is found guilty, there is a reward of forty pounds.

Q. Then you know the fact - A. I do not want any such thing.

Q. All that is avoiding my question you will not be believed. Answer my question, when you came into this court, did you not expect, and believe, that you should share of the reward - A. I did not expect any such thing, only that I should receive for my loss of time.

Q. You say the man dropped the bundle up by the dead wall - A. Yes.

Q. Do you mean to swear that the man dropped the bundle by the wall, or whether it was not dropped in crossing the street - A. By the wall, that is where I picked it up.

Q. When you found the bundle did you go back to where the cry was - A. No; I never saw the woman until the man was taken to the watchhouse, then she came crying out who has got the bundle.

COURT. Could any person that was in any part of Marybone-court, see a bundle drop where it did drop - A. Yes.

Mr. Alley. How was the man dressed that you pursued, that dropped the bundle, in a soldiers coat - A. I took no notice of his coat at all.

Q. How can you pretend to say, not having taken any notice of his coat, that the prisoner at the bar is the man that dropped the bundle - A. I only missed him when he turned the corner.

Q. And although you cannot swear what his coat was, you could swear to his face - A. I cannot swear to his coat.

Q. But you can swear to his face - A. Yes.

COURT. When he turned the corner of this court was there any other man running but this man - A. No.

ROBERT FLOWERDEAU. I am a beadle and a constable of the parish of Marybone, I heard a violent cry of murder, stop thief; I was going to supper, I came out of my house at the corner of Marybone-court, I saw the watchmen running, I passed them towards Paradise-street, I saw something turn the corner of Burying-ground passage, that person was running.

Q. Who was the person - A. I do not know; I turned into Grafton-court, which is seven or eight doors before you come there, thinking he might turn the corner of the court; I saw the prisoner coming quick round the corner of Conduit-court, in Burying-ground passage, about one hundred and twenty yards from Beaumont Mews , he was running round the corner, but made a stop as he came, there was none other near him not directly; it is a short court, about twenty-five yards long, we met nearly in the middle, holloa, said I, you are the man I want, I believe; the moment I said that, the last witness said, that is the man that robbed the woman, there was no one between the prisoner and the last witness, he was following after the prisoner; I went up the court the other way, I stopped him, the witness came up afterwards, he said, that is the man that dropped the bundle, the prisoner was apparently out of breath; he said, what is the matter, what do you want of me; he said he knew nothing of the bundle; I asked him where he lived, he told me in the city; I asked him for what purpose he came up there, he told me for a lark; I took him to the watchhouse, he gave me the name of Thomas Cain ; the next day morning we took him to Marlborough-street in a coach; I asked him who he worked for last, he mentioned a man in Fleet-street; I said, is that the last place, he could not recollect that, the property was delivered over to me, I have kept it ever since.

Prosecutrix. These are the things that the bundle contained.

Mr. Alley. Which is the man that kept the Eating-house - A. He is not here.

Q. You told me that he was here - A. No, I did not.

Q. to Mr. Ballinger. Are these the things that you sent the woman for - A. Yes, they are.

Prisoner's Defence. I never saw the woman before I saw her in the watchhouse; she could not give any description of me; she said she was robbed and knocked down by some man.

The prisoner-called three witnesses, who gave him a a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 40.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

143. ROBERT CHARLTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of December , five pair of silk stockings, value 30 s. twelve pair of gloves, value 8 s. and a pair of pantaloons, value 20 s. the property of William Thompson in his dwelling house .

WILLIAM THOMPSON . I am a Dyer ; I live at 22, Providence-row, Finsbury-square ; I keep the whole house, it is in the parish of St. Lukes; the prisoner had been my servant in the dye-house.

Q. Did you at any time miss any silk stockingsgloves, and pantaloons - A. Yes, sometime in the month of November, they were sent to me to be dyed.

Q. to Mr. Shelton. Is it December in the indictment - A. Yes, the 13th of December.

Prosecutor. Suspecting the prisoner I sent a man in search of him, he was brought to me, and then I mentioned that I had lost these articles.

Q. Did you then tell him it would be better to tell you how he disposed of them - A. I did.

Q. Then I must not hear what he said - A. The prisoner delivered up the duplicate of the pantaloons. I found the pantaloons at Mr. Richards, Brick-lane, Spitalfields. I knew them to be the pantaloons which had been delivered to me to be dyed. I paid the pawnbroker his money, and took them out. The pawnbroker found three pair of stockings besides.

Q. Did you find them by his duplicates - A. No, by his confession. I knew them to be the stockings that had been sent to me to be dyed.

WILLIAM HARRISON . I am servant to Mr. Richards, pawnbroker, Brick-lane, Spital-fields. The prisoner pawned with me on the 26th of November, two pair of silk stockings for ten shillings; on the 8th of December a pair of silk stockings for five shillings, in the name of William Charlton .

JOHN RICHARDS . The pantaloons were pledged in the name of Robert Charlton , for four shillings, I believe it to be the prisoner.

Prisoner. I must own to the truth I pledged one pair of pantaloons for four shillings; my master forgave me for so doing. I left my business because he had not constant work for me. The foreman called on me and told me that my master wanted to see me. He told me that he had lost five pair of stockings; they had been lost five weeks, and I had only been to work there three weeks; and twelve pair of cotton gloves, which were lost before I came there. I have been five years at sea. I hope you will have mercy on my unfortunate situation.

GUILTY , aged 16,

Of stealing, but not in the dwelling-house.

Judgment respited.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

144. WILLIAM CATTERMOLE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of December , a watch, value 3 l. a tin canister, value 5 d. a gold ring, value 5 s. a gold broach, value 2 s. one hundred and twenty-seven penny-pieces, five hundred and sixty-five half-pence, and thirty-two farthings; the property of Elizabeth Payne , widow , in her dwelling-house .

ELIZABETH PAYNE. I am a widow woman.

Q. Do you rent a house any where - A. The Red Lion, Church-street, Stoke-Newington . The prisoner was a lodger of mine. I was sitting in my bar near upon twelve o'clock at night. My house was shut up, I had a little girl with me at the time; my little girl heard something; she said it was at my bed-room door, and then she heard the prisoner's door go. I thought he was putting his candle out as he used to do. One of the lodgers went up and came down, and said my room-door was half-way open; he had taken this key out and unlocked it; the key was brought down to me. I said this is the key of my bar that I had lost. I went up into my room, opened a box, and found a gold broach taken out. I had seen it there in the morning; the gold broach might be worth two shillings.

Q. What day of the month was this - A. It was in December; I did not exactly notice the day. There were some halfpence and penny-pieces found in his pocket; they had been standing in a tray upon my drawer in my bed room. I had seen the copper in my bedroom as late as half after six in the evening.

Q. Did you miss a gold ring - A. Yes, that was in the same box with the broach.

Q. Was the watch taken away on this day - A. About six or seven weeks before this.

Q. Has the watch ever been found - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see any of this copper money taken from the prisoner - A. Yes, I saw the whole taken from him by Thomas Hill, the constable, at about half after twelve at night; he took charge of the prisoner.

Mr. Alley. You have a great many lodgers in your house - A. At that time only three.

Q. Wiscar was a lodger of yours - A. Yes, he brought me down the key.

JOHN WISCAR . Q. You lodge in Mrs. Payne's house - A. Yes; on Monday, I think, the 10th of December, or early on Tuesday morning, I was getting my supper with Mrs. Payne, in the bar, her daughter said, there your door goes; I went up, I saw a key in the door, and the door half open. I did not go in the room, I locked the door, and took the key down. I dare say the prisoner had been up in his room an hour. Mrs. Payne desired me to go for a constable. Mr. Hill came; two watchmen, the constable, I and Mrs. Payne, went up into the prisoner's room. Mr. Hill tried to awake him; he could not; he searched his pockets, and took out a pocket-book; he did not awake though all these people were in this room; the constable opened the pocket-book, there was some silver, the ring, and the broach in it; then the constable took him in custody; he had halfpence in every pocket to the best of my knowledge.

THOMAS HILL . I am a constable. I was sent for on this business. I went into Cattermole's room; I endeavoured to awake him; I could not exactly awake him. I took out of his pocket a pocket-book; on opening it I saw a broach and ring; Mrs. Payne said they were her property. I examined every other pocket. I found copper to the amount of eleven shillings and nine-pence, penny-pieces, half-pence, and farthings. When he awoke and dressed himself, he said he knew nothing about the things.

JOHN MATTHEWS . I have got the watch; I had it from Mr. Barker, in Houndsditch; the young man that took it in is gone away.

JOHN WRIGHT . I am a painter; the prisoner gave me some halfpence to take care of; in the morning there may be fourteen shillings or more.

Prosecutrix. This is my broach and ring.

Prisoner's Defence. I cannot account how these things came in my pocket at all; I knew nothing of it until I found Mr. Hill and several other people in my bed-room. I was surprised to find so many people in my bed-room.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 21,

Of stealing, but not in the dwelling-house.

Judgment respited.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

145. WILLIAM HENRY ATTLEBURY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 5th of January , five pound weight of bees-wax, value 16 s. the property of Philip Plum , privately in his shop .

PHILIP PLUM . I keep an oil-shop , 62, Leather-lane , In the parish of St. Andrew, Holborn; I sell bees-wax.

Q. Did you see the prisoner in your shop - A. Yes, the prisoner with two others, came into my shop; one of the party, not the prisoner, asked for a halfpenny pickled cucumber; I served him with it; the same man asked for a halfpenny-worth of pepper; I served him with that; I had other customers in the shop at the same time.

Q. Are you quite sure that they all three came in together as companions - A. Yes. When they had the pepper and the cucumber, they looked at the window as they were going out, the bees-wax was in the front of the shop, and seeing them look at the window gave me suspicion. I looked at the window and missed the bees-wax immediately.

Q. Were there any other persons serving in the shop at the time - A. My wife and shopman. In consequence of missing the bees-wax, I immediately ran round the counter, and went into the street; I saw no other in the street than the prisoner; he had the beeswax rolled up in his apron. I laid hold of the prisoner, and brought him in; he scuffled to get away from me. He threw the wax from him. I then delivered him over to Wood; he has had the wax ever since.

Q. What is the worth of the wax - A. Sixteen shillings; there was five pound and a half.

GEORGE WOOD . I am an officer. I produce the wax. On the 5th of this month, in the evening, I went to Mr. Plum's, I took the prisoner and the wax in charge.

Prosecutor. This is the wax that I took from the prisoner. I am sure it is mine, and it is worth sixteen shillings.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not steal the bees-wax; there was a man came out of the shop; he threw the wax down, and I picked it up.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 16.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

146. MARY JEFFRIES was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 27th of December , three pieces of ribbon, value 1 l. the property of Thomas Smyth , privately in his shop .

THOMAS SMYTH . I live at 104, Ratcliffe-Highway .

Q. Were you present when this person came in the shop - A. I was; she came in by herself. After the prisoner had been accused by my lad of having taken some pieces of ribbon. I saw her take them out of her pocket, and put them on the counter.

Q. What was the worth of that ribbon - A. Three pieces about twenty-five shillings. I am sure they were worth a pound and more.

Q. Who was serving in your shop besides yourself and your young man - A. Two or three others.

BENJAMIN WILLIAMS . Q. How old are you - A. Sixteen next March. On Thursday the 27th of December, about one o'clock in the day, the prisoner came in; she asked to look at some ribbons. I shewed her some, they did not suit her. I shewed her another drawer, she looked at them some time. I perceived her shawl come over the drawer, and I thought her hand was underneath, and she withdrew it immediately.

Q. When she withdrew her hand, did she withdraw her shawl to - A. Yes, but I did not see any alteration in the drawer of ribbons; she looked at them a little, and then asked me to look at some narrower. I put that drawer away; I shewed her the third drawer of narrow ribbons; her shawl came over the drawer again in the same way; she withdrew her hands and looked at the ribbons. Again I suspected that she had taken some. She then asked me if I had got any narrower; I put that drawer away and got another narrower still, she took up one, asked the price and told me to cut a yard off, while I was cutting it off, her hand came in the same way. I saw a piece of ribbon. I then put the drawer away, and told my master there was a thief in the shop. While I was doubling up the ribbon, I accused her of taking some, and directly I accused her, she took them out, and laid them on the counter one at a time. I went for a constable, and she was secured.

Partridge. I have got the ribbon; this is it.

Williams. I saw her produce the ribbon; it is part of my master's stock.

Prisoner's Defence. I had no ribbons in my pocket, nor in my hand. I am as innocent as a baby unborn.

GUILTY , aged 25,

Of stealing, but not privately in the shop.

Transported for Seven years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

147. SARAH BELL and ELIZABETH GOFF , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of December , three sheets, value 20 s. a shirt, value 5 s. a pair of stockings, value 2 s. four yards of cotton, value 4 s. an apron, value 1 s. and a shift, value 2 s. the property of John Moon .

JOHN MOON . I live in Tothill-street, Westminster . I am a publican .

Q. When did you lose these things - A. I cannot say; I discovered it on the 7th of December that I had lost three sheets. I picked up a pawnbroker's ticket by accident. I examined it, and found it was my property. I saw Bell's name on the duplicate.

Q. What is Bell - A. She lived servant with me, and Goff lived servant with me before Bell. I found other duplicates in a drawer in Bell's bed-room.

JOSEPH COOPER . I am an officer belonging to Queen-square. I found two duplicates on the prisoner Bell, and four duplicates in Goff's box, No. 21, Tothill-street, belonging to Mr. Moon's property.

JANUS NEIGHBOUR. I am a pawnbroker, 25, Tothill-street. I have got a shift and a white apron; I took it in pawn of Sarah Bell .

JAMES BASNELL . I am a pawnbroker, 14, Tothill-street. I have three sheets, a shirt, and a pair of silk stockings pledged by both the prisoners.

Bell's Defence. I should not have been here now, if my husband had the money to make it up.

Goff's Defence. That shift that Mr. Moon owns is my own property.

BELL - GUILTY ,

GOFF, GUILTY , aged 24.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

148. MARY SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of December , a gold broach, value 10 s. half-a-crown, a shilling and a sixpence, the property of William Brooks , from his person .

WILLIAM BROOKS . On the 22d of December on my going down Drury-lane about half past three in the morning I overtook the prisoner, seeing her in a miserable condition I looked round to see what was the matter with her, upon which she leaned against me as though to take hold of my arm, I immediately walked on; the broach was in my pocket, I had bought it the same day, a half crown, a shilling and sixpence, they were in my left waistcoat pocket; on my putting my hand into my pocket as I was going along I perceived that she had took it, I turned round accused her of taking it, she denied it, I charged the watchman with her, she was searched at the watch-house and it was found upon her.

WILLIAM BLAND . I was constable of the night; Mr. Brooks asked the prisoner for the broach, she denied having it; on my searching her I found the broach in her bosom and two shillings and sixpence in her pocket.

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutor gave me the broach, the money was my own; he gave me two black eyes.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

149. THOMAS SIMMONDS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of December , three pound weight of pork, value 3 s. the property of Thomas Cottle .

THOMAS COTTLE . I am an oil-man in Drury-lane , we sell salt pork. On Saturday evening, the 15th of last month, the shop was full of customers, my wife, son and daughter were serving as well as myself; I had just cut off a loin of pork for a customer which weighed three pound and a half, but not having that, he wished to have a piece that was larger, I cut him off one of five pound and when I turned to the scale to weigh it I heard the watchman call out stop thief, I turned round and missed this piece of pork which I had cut off before; the prisoner was stopped, taken and brought back with the pork immediately; I knew the pork.

Q. Was the pork within the shop - A. Yes, it was about two yards within the shop.

Prisoner's Defence. I did it really for want; I must leave it to the mercy of the Court.

JOHN KEY . I am a watchman, I was going my rounds at ten o'clock, the prisoner was within a yard of me, he turned into this gentleman's shop, put his right leg in and with his right hand he laid hold of this pork; I followed him and cried stop thief; he was stopped. That is the pork.

GUILTY ,

Confined One Year in the House of Correction .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

150. LAWRENCE WELCH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of December , a piece of deal, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of George Pocock .

THOMAS RICE. On the 13th of December, about half after five in the evening, I was going along the Back road Islington; I met the prisoner with a piece of timber on his back; I asked him where he was going to take it, he said, home; he said he had taken it from Mr. Pocock's premises, it was his property; I asked him if he worked for Mr. Pocock, he said he did, afterwards he said he did not; I then told him he must go back to see if Mr. Pocock had given him that wood; he did not wish to go back, I took him to the watch-house and sent to Mr. Pocock, he sent his foreman.

WILLIAM JOHN HUNT . I am foreman to Mr. Pocock in the back road Islington . This board is Mr. Pocock's property.

Prisoner's Defence. I have a wife and three young children who must go to the parish.

GUILTY , aged 35.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

151. SUSANNAH DAVIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of December , a sheet, value 10 s. the property of William Tooley .

MRS. TOOLEY. My husband's name is William Tooley . The prisoner lodged with me; she came on the 27th of December and left the lodgings on the 14th of January, she was to pay four shillings and sixpence a week for the room ready furnished, she never paid at all. On the 14th of January she was taken in custody, I went up with the prisoner into her room, I found a sheet was gone.

FRANCIS SWINDER . I am a pawnbroker, 251, in the Borough, a sheet was taken in pledge on the 28th of December in the name of Susannah Davis .

Prisoner's Defence. I pawned the sheet, I asked the gentleman to lend me five shillings on it and to keep it clean, I would come for it on the Friday.

GUILTY , aged 45.

Confined One Month in Newgate , and fined 1 s .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

152. WILLIAM LEWIS and RICHARD STEWART were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of December , two watches, value 6 l. and two gold seals, value 1 l. the property of Ralph Clay , in his dwelling-house .

RALPH CLAY . I live at No. 5, Millbank , in the parish of St. George's in the East. I am a baker .

Q. Do you know the two prisoners at the bar - A. I never saw them before they were charged on the 4th of December, about twenty minutes past three, I was in the bakehouse at work.

Q. They were charged with stealing two watches, and two gold seals, what part of the house were they in - A. They hung over the chimney piece of the parlour.

Q. Were the seals that were at the watches both gold - A. Yes. I heard an alarm by my wife, crying out,

"Clay, the watches, the watches!" I ran to her immediately and pursued, but did not find neither of the prisoners, but on returning back I met a neighbour, he told me he saw two boys running, and we might see those two boys in the dock opening. This was the 4th that the watches were stolen, on the 7th me and my wife went to the dock opening, they were gambling among the Portuguese, me and my wife saw the prisoner Lewis there, I went for an officer; before I got back from fetching the officer it got dark, they all left the dock opening.

Q. Did you ever see your watches - A. I saw one of the watches, but none of the seals; I knew it to be one of the watches that I lost on this day.

Mrs. Clay. Q. Were you at home on the 4th - A. Yes, I was in the kitchen, adjoining the parlour, on the same floor, about a quarter past three; I saw both the watches safe in the parlour, they were hanging up at the chimney-piece.

Q. How long after that was it that you heard any thing that induced you to believe they were gone - A. About twenty minutes after I was in the kitchen, I saw the prisoner Lewis making way over the counter to make away with the property. I am certain he was the lad.

Q. Did you not see whether he had any thing in his possession - A. I did not.

Q. Did you see any thing of the other prisoner - A. I did not. I thought he was about taking a quartern loaf, I went directly into the shop, I did not miss any thing from the shop; I came into the parlour and looked round me, and missed the two watches immediately; one of the watches had two seals. I went out every day to the dock opening to look for them, I did not see either of them until the Friday, I pointed out the boy Lewis to my husband. I had seen him often as a customer in the shop, he had come for three weeks and purchased small bread.

Q. He was not apprehended on the Friday - A. No. Q. Was any thing found upon him when he was taken in custody - A. No. The watch was found afterwards at the cooks-shop, that is one of the watches that was taken from my parlour.

JOHN WICKS . I keep a cooks-shop in Rosemary-lane.

Q. Do you know either of the two prisoners - A. Yes, I know the them both. On the 4th of December the two prisoners and another person came to my shop.

Q. Was it on the 4th - A. It was on a Friday.

Q. That was the 7th of December - A. They had something to eat, and after they ate it they came to pay for it; one of them offered me a bad shilling; the boy that is in court offered me a bad shilling, he was with them; I told them I could not take it, then they said I must trust them; I said I could not, they must leave something; they offered me a watch, I am not certain whether it was this boy or Lewis; they were both standing at the counter, they all three had something to eat, and were in company together; they offered the watch, and left it as security, and they would call and pay the reckoning. I delivered the watch to Mr. Gray the constable; Mr. Clay saw it and paid me the shilling that was left on it. They told me first they had got the boy, and then afterwards they said if the boy came to stop him. The same night Lewis came and said he wanted the watch; I told Lewis I had not got the watch. I said you are a pretty fellow, you have stolen the watch; he said it was no such thing. Directly Mr. Clay came in and and asked me if that was the boy, I said yes, and secured him. I am sure he was one of the party that left the watch and came for it.

JOHN KIRBY . I am a sailor.

Q. How long have you been on shore - A. Almost three months now. I know nothing of taking Mr. Clay's watch no more than what Lewis told me.

Q. How long have you known Lewis - A. About six weeks.

Q. Were you by when Lewis took it - A. No.

Q. How came you acquainted with Lewis - A. Being about the London docks.

Q. Were you in his company on the evening of the 4th of December - A. I was in his company at the Hampshire Hog, Lewis joined my company there, the boy was with me.

Q. How long have you known the other boy - A. Much about the same time.

Q. What passed then - A. Lewis told me that he had a watch; I asked him where he got it from; he said he stole it from a watch-maker, I asked him whereabouts; he did not give me a correct account so I left him for that night. I did not see him again till the 7th of December, then I went with him to the cooks-shop to have my dinner.

Q. How came you to go to the cooks-shop, you had no money to pay for your dinner - A. I took the bad shilling of the cook-shop man, he would not take it, he said he would trust me. Lewis took the watch out of his pocket and said, what will you give me for this; the cook-shop man said a pound: Lewis said he would not take it, it was worth three or four; he told him to take care of it for him until he should call for it at night.

Q. Did not he keep it for the reckoning - A. No. The two lads paid for what they had, except myself, he left the watch with Wicks to take care for him. I went along with Lewis to the London docks, I was standing there a good while, and about dusk Gray came and took me by the collar and said, I had stolen two watches; he took me to the watchhouse, from that they took me to Lambeth-street office, there I toldthem all I knew.

JAMES GRAY . I am a constable. I apprehended the three lads, and searched them all. Kirby told me that the other watch was sold to a Jew for twenty-eight shillings.

Kirby. I only know that Lewis said that he had sold the other watch to a Jew of the name of Hart in Duke-street, for twenty-eight shillings.

Mr. Gray. Wicks delivered me the watch; I had Kirby two hours before he told any thing. I found nothing on Stewart. This is the watch.

Prosecutor. This is my watch.

Mrs. Clay. I gave four pounds for that watch.

Lewis's Defence. John Kirby said this boy was in the cooks-shop, but this boy was not there. I know nothing of the watch; I went for it that night for a boy of the name Brooks that sent me for it, that had dinner at the cooks-shop instead of this boy.

Stewart said nothing in his defence.

Q. to Mrs. Clay. To go to the parlour must you go over the counter - A. He could not go into the parlour without getting over the counter.

LEWIS, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 15.

[The prisoner was recommended to His Majesty's mercy by the jury and the prosecutor on account of his youth.]

STEWART, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

153. PETER PETERS was indicted for that he, on the 16th of August , feloniously did falsely make forge and counterfeit, and willingly acted and assisted in falsely making and counterfeiting a certain deed and receipt for money, with intention to defraud Thomas Bowcott .

SECOND COUNT, for uttering and publishing as true a like forged deed with like intention. And

SEVERAL OTHER COUNTS for like offence, only varying the manner of charging them.

THOMAS BOWCOTT . I am a publican in Cannon-street, Ratcliffe Highway . On the 16th of August the prisoner brought me a house note from the India House, and asked me if I would buy his wages; he informed me that he came home in the Nottingham, East Indiaman. I saw the note and asked him if he would let me take it to the India House to see if it was for a man that had come home, he informed me that his name was Gwillam Anthony; I went and enquired, they said there was a man of that description; I then got the bill of sale for the prisoner to execute; I got two men to be witnesses; I read the bill of sale over to him twice, and asked him if it was right.

Q. What amount in money did you understand his wages to come to - A. Sixteen pound nineteen shillings and two-pence; I gave him fourteen pound and two-pence; I deducted one shilling, in the pound poundage, and fifteen shillings for the bill of sale.

Q. When are these wages paid - A. Sometimes three months after, and sometimes sooner. No further passed than I gave him the money, he signed his name Gwillam Anthony.

Q. How did he sign it - A. He made his mark.

Q. Was he sober - A. Yes; this was on the 16th of August, as nigh as I can recollect. In November I went to the India House to receive the money, it was stopped.

Q. How was this executed - A. In my parlour, before him and the witnesses.

Q. Who wrote the name, Gwillam Anthony - A. I did, and read it over to him, and asked him if it was right; he said, yes; I asked him to sign it, he made his mark here; I asked him if that was his right name, he said yes.

Q. You did this without any man to advise him what he was about; he is a foreigner - was there any attorney present - A. No.

Q. You wrote the name of Gwillam Anthony to the deed, and to the receipt - A. Yes.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

154. ELIZABETH OVERET alias WATSON , was indicted for feloniously assaulting Simon Cullom , in the King's Highway, on the 29th of September , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, a dollar, value 5 s. half a crown, and four shillings and sixpence, his property .

SIMON CULLOM. I live at Stoke Newington, I am a labouring gardener; I work or Mr. Eade in Church-street. On the 29th of September I came into town, and went into Petticoat-lane to buy some sweet meats; it was then a little after eight, after I bought the sweet meats to put in my window for my wife to sell I turned to go to Brick-lane; I turned into an alley to make water, and coming out of the alley the prisoner and another woman took hold of the basket on my arm; I asked them what they meaned by it, they said they would see what I had got in my basket, and while the other woman had hold of the basket, the prisoner let go and stripped my clothes down, and opened them; she then said to the other woman, let us go. I gave no attention to the money in my pocket; I had no suspicion that they were robbing me.

Q. They were using no violence to you - A No. After I came out of the alley I went on to Brick-lane, I bethought myself of the money; I felt in my pocket, my money was gone; I then pursued after them. I overtook the prisoner, I accused her of the robbery; I am sure she is the same woman; there was another woman with her when I overtook her, but whether that was the same woman I will not say. I am sure the prisoner is the same woman that stripped my coat open; the prisoner denied robbing me; they both gave me a blow and knocked me down; I got up again and ran after the prisoner; the prisoner was secured, the other woman ran away.

Q. What money did you miss from your pocket - A A dollar, a half crown, and four shillings and sixpence in silver. The prisoner was searched at the watchhouse, she laid down two crown pieces, and said she would pledge the ring off her finger to make up the other money. The officer searched her and found one shilling and sixpence more upon her; there was a sixpence among the money that I had taken in Petticoat-lane to the best of my belief.

WILLIAM PARTRIDGE . I was constable of the night. The prisoner was brought into the watchhouse, the prosecutor said she had robbed him of a dollar, half a crown, and four shillings and sixpence; at that time there were two dollars laying on the table, which she wished to give the prosecutor to let her go, and for the remainder part of the money she would pawnher ring to make it up; I searched her, I found on her one shilling and sixpence in silver, and one shilling and nine pence in copper.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent of the crime; I had a child laid dead at that time; I said I was very sorry it happened at the time; I offered my money to go to my home.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

155. JAMES POWELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of December , twenty pieces of wood, value 10 s. the property of Francis Cummings .

FRANCIS CUMMINGS. I am a licensed victualler , I keep the Star in Star-street. I purchase old materials of houses, to work up into buildings, the prisoner was the bricklayer , I employed him from Michaelmas day to the last month; I employed a man of the name of Taste for my carpenter; I missed more than a hundred poundsworth of building materials; the prisoner neglected his work, got drunk; I had to get another man to finish his work, On the 25th of December I got a search warrant and went to the prisoner's house. No. 27, Cow Cross, he was not at home. I found a quantity of scantlings, deal ends, and joists. concealed under the coals in the cellar; I looked at these pieces. I knew them to be mine by the private marks I ordered the carpenter to put on them when taking down. The prisoner was kept out of the way I believe: I never saw the prisoner untill Mr. Harmer introduced him at Hatton Garden office.

Mr. Alley. In what capacity did you employ the prisoner - A. As master bricklayer, to superintend and carry on the work.

Q. I take it for granted in the course of the business he has done for you, he has earned a great deal of money, how many men did he employ - A. Open to the amount of six or seven, and sometimes one or two and sometimes none.

Q. The consequence arises there must be a great deal of money due to him - A A great deal of money for a little work. He made no claim but what he got.

Q. Had not he threatened to arrest you before you had accused him that he had robbed you - A. No, never before I got another man to do his work.

Q. Did not he threaten to arrest you before you complained to the magistrate against him - A. He never threatened to arrest me until this moment.

Q. What did you mean by saying that he never threatened to arrest you until you had got another man to do his work - A. He threatened to serve me out in an open tap-room in public company, on a certain day.

Q. And before that certain day was, you applied at Hatton Garden office and accused him before the magistrate - A. No.

Q. It is a bold question to put to you - has not he accused you of altering a receipt of his from twenty pound to one hundred and twenty pounds as money paid - A He never has.

Q. Upon you oath did not Mr. Harmer in my presence before the magistrate accuse you, or complain that it was altered from twenty pound to one hundred and twenty pounds, and was it not snatched out of his hand - A. No.

Q. Was not the paper snatched out of Mr. Harmer's, hand which was presented to the magistrate - A. Mr. Harmer snatched a paper out of Mr. Fletcher's hands, and Mr. Fletcher snatched it back again.

Q. Did you receive from the prisoner a receipt for the sum of one hundred and twenty pound - A. From his wife I did. On the 31st of November I paid her a one hundred pound note, and a twenty pound note before a witness, she gave me a receipt for the one hundred and twenty pound on plain paper.

Q. I will now ask you, whether true or false, did not he serve you with a bill of one hundred and thirty seven pound - A. On that day I was in the back premises, he and another man came, and the other man had a thick stick in his hand, he presented me a bill of one hundred and thirty seven pound.

Q. This was the day before Christmas-day; was it not - A. No.

Q. Then it was on the 23d of December - A. Upon my word I cannot recollect, I cannot say whether it was the day before Christmas day or not.

Q. How many days after that was it you went to the police office - A. I cannot say.

Q. Upon the oath that you have taken did not you go to the police office the next day out one; and the reason that you did not go the next day was because it was Christmas day, the police office was not open - A. I went as soon as the information was given.

Q. You do not suppose that you will dupe me that way, nor my lord, nor the jury - A. I tell you the truth, I did not look at the bill; I put it in my pocket.

WILLIAM TAITE. I am a carpenter.

Q. Were you employed by the prosecutor after the prisoner had left - A. Yes, and I worked for Mr. Cummings when Fowler did, and was discharged with him, and upon the prisoner being discharged I applied to Mr. Cummings for the job; Mr. Cummings told me that I had robbed his premises; I told him that the person that told him so was the greatest thief; I told him then what I saw the prisoner take out; I had seen him take boards out of Mr. Cummings's house that he was building, and took them to the prisoner's house. After this Mr. Cummings had a search warrant. I went with the constables who had the search warrant. The wood was found in the prisoners coal cellar. I saw the private mark upon the wood, some red chalk marks.

Mr. Alley. The prisoner had not left the work when he made the accusation against you - A. No.

Q. When he had left the work then you accused him - A. Yes. I told of him because he had told Cummings that I had stolen them.

Q. Why did not you tell before - A. He had a right to do what he asked, I had nothing to do with it.

Q. Was there a single board found that you or any body else could speak to - A. There was no board I could speak to.

JOHN TOWEER. I assisted in loading the cart with timber, I put a cross made with red chalk on the pieces of wood for one load, they were to go to Cow Cross.

JAMES HANCOCK . I am an officer. In consequence of a search warrant I went to Cow Cross on the 27th of December, the prisoner was not at home; we went into the cellar, we found boards that the prosecutordescribed to be his property, it was marked with a red cross.

JURY. The marks in these pieces of wood are not all alike.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

156. MARK KILLROY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of December , ten pound weight of lead, value 2 s. the property of the London Dock Company .

JOHN DALBY . I am a watchman in the London Docks . The prisoner was a bricklayer employed in the London Docks. On the 13th of December, about five o'clock in the afternoon, we searched the prisoner, I found upon him ten pound weight of lead concealed between his shirt and waistcoat. He told the constable afterwards that he took it from the building, at the office, he said he found it. It is sheet lead; ten pound; it is worth two shillings.

ARCHIBALD MACDONNELL . I am the constable to whom the prisoner was delivered; I asked the prisoner how he came to take it; he said it was mere distress, he picked it up on the premises.

Prisoner's Defence. We cannot work without bobs to plumb the work up. I happened to pick that up among the rubbish to make bobs to do the work with.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and Whipped in Jail .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

157. DENNIS COUNTEY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 6th of January , a piece of wood, value 2 s. the property of the London Dock Company .

JOHN STROPTAN. I am an apprentice to William Cook and William Scarlet, they are carpenters and builders, and have a contract for putting piles in some part of the London Dock . On Sunday the 6th of January, about four in the afternoon, I observed the prisoner on John's Hill, selling the piece of wood in question at Cohen's house for one shilling; when he had sold the wood I asked him whether Mr. Scarlet had given him leave to sell it; he said he did not know who I meaned, and went about his business. On the Monday morning I informed Mr. Scarlet of it, and the prisoner was apprehended.

WILLIAM SCARLET . Q. You are the acting partner with Mr. Cook, a carpenter - A. I am.

Q. We understand you contracted at the time with the London Dock company for putting down the piles - A. Yes. When the timber is brought into the dock it is mine; when it is put down a clerk of the company measures it, it then becomes the dock company's property. I went with the lad and found the man at work in the trench that was cutting out for the piles, and the officer took him to Cohen's house; Cohen immediately brought forward the wood, the prisoner said it was the first piece of wood that ever he took from the premises. This is the piece of wood, it is the top of the pile, and here is the mark of the engine.

- COHEN. I bought the wood last Sunday was a week; there were two men, each of them had logs. That gentleman came in the early part of the morning, he asked me if I had bought a piece of wood, I told him, yes, and shewed him the piece of wood; he came afterwards with the constable and took it away.

Prisoner's Defence. In the morning when I came to work I had no victuals to eat. I have three young children, they were distressed; I took this bit of wood and sold it to get my children a bit of bread. I leave myself to your mercy.

GUILTY , aged 33.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

158. JAMES BRADLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 3rd of January , a pound weight of wool, value 2 s. the property of the London Dock Company .

JAMES SLATER . I am a constable in the London Docks . The prisoner was a watchman employed in the docks. On the 3d of January, between seven and eight in the morning. I received information, Clark and me stopped the prisoner in the watchhouse in the docks; I told him I wanted to search him, I had some reason he had some property about him; I found some wool concealed in his hat, some in this pockets, some in his boots, and some in his breeches. He said he was very sorry, and hoped we should take no further notice of it. I produce the wool; I have had it ever since; it is worth two shillings. In taking him to the police office he told me he had taken it out of different bales.

Prisoner's Defence. I am very sorry for it; I never did such a thing before in my life.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 59.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

159. WILLIAM GOODWIN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 22nd of December , a shawl, value 4 s. a pair of gloves, value 1 s. 6 d. and a remnant of cambric, value 5 s. the property of William Cook , and James Martin .

WILLIAM COOK . I am a linen-draper , James Martin is my partner, we live at No. 7, Warner-street, Clerkenwell ; the prisoner was our porter . On the 21st of December last I was informed by my wife that our porter had been robbing us; I came home in the evening between eleven and twelve o'clock, I went down stairs where the prisoner had a box, I looked in the box and there I saw a pair of gloves of ours.

GEORGE SAVILLE STAPLES. I am an apprentice to Messrs. Cook and Martin. On the evening of the 21st I was going through the room where the porters box was, the lid of the box was not locked; I looked in it; I turned over a few of the things, I saw a shawl, I knew it to be the pattern of some that we had in our shop; I informed Mrs. Cook of it.

JAMES HANCOCK . On the 22d I apprehended the prisoner at Mr. Cook's, he was in the shop crying; when I went in I tied his hands and went down and searched the privy, I found two pieces of a shawl; I searched the prisoner's pocket, I found a quarter of a yard of cambric, which is marked with his master's mark.

Prisoner's Defence. The cambric I took from somewaste paper that I went to light the fire with.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 18.

Fined 1 s. and discharged .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

160. MICHAEL FLYNN and PETER TARRES were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of December , a hat, value 5 s. the property of Robert Reynolds ; and a handkerchief, value 6 d. the property of John Reynolds .

MILLICENT REYNOLDS . On the 18th of December, the two prisoners knocked at the door about half past six in the evening. I sell cakes, barley sugar, and candy; they asked for half an ounce of barley sugar; I weighed it, and gave it to Peter Tarres , he gave me a penny and asked for his farthing; I had to turn myself round to get a farthing; in the mean time I turned myself round, Flynn took the hat off the table and ran away; I said to Peter Tarres , your partner has taken the hat off the table; he said, hat, twice over, and seemed to make a stoppage, and would not let me go by. I pushed him of one side, and went to the street door, and could not see any body. I detained Tarres until I sent for an officer.

JOHN SPENCE . I am and officer of Clerkenwell. I was sent for; I asked Tarres if he knew Flynn; he said, no, but if I would go with him to a court in Whitecross-street he would call him down; we went to a court in Whitecross-street, he knocked at the door, and the boy came out; I asked him if that was his companion; he said, yes. I took hold of him and asked him where was the hat; he said,

"hat, what hat." I said the hat that you took just now; in the room that he came out of this hat was lying upon the drawers, and this handkerchief I took out of his bosom; I took the hat off the drawers.

Flynn's Defence. I know nothing of the hat; the handkerchief was mine, I had it nearly a week.

Tarres's Defence. I know nothing at all of the hat; I went into the shop with this boy, and whether he took the hat I do not know.

FLYNN, GUILTY , aged 14.

TARRES, GUILTY , aged 14.

Judgment respited.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

161. THOMAS DORSETTER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of December , three loaves of bread, value 3 s. the property of Thomas Marle Sanderson .

CHARLES SPILLER . I am journeyman to Mr. Sanderson, he is a baker . On Saturday the 29th of December, I was serving my customers; I left my basket in Bond-street ; I saw the prisoner about my basket, when I returned I watched him, I walked by my basket and took no notice of it; he was at the corner of Conduit-street then; I saw him go up to the basket; I then followed him, he stooped and took three loaves of bread out; I asked him what he meaned by taking my bread; he begged my pardon; and said he thought it was another man's basket; I made him put the bread in my basket. I took him to my to my master's shop. The prisoner is a journeyman baker .

Prisoner's Defence. I met a baker whom I knew, he was arguing with another man about the quality of the bread; the stranger said he left his basket in Bond-street; he said his bread was the best. In Bond-street I saw a basket, supposing it was the same basket I took up the bread and looked at it. I did not mean to go away with the bread. I put the bread in the basket before the prosecutor came up.

GUILTY , aged 32.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

162. MARY SULLIVAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of December , a watch, value 10 l. a gold watch chain, value 2 l. two seals, value 3 l. and two watch keys, value 1 l. the property of Elijah Thomas Stoney , from his person .

ELIJAH THOMAS STONEY . I am a taylor , I live at No. 1, Denmark-court, in the Strand. On the 19th of December, between five and six in the evening, I met with the prisoner by Whitehall, she asked me to give her something to drink; I went into Mr. Morris's wine vaults and gave her a glass of liquor; I went on further to a public-house down a passage, called the Shades . We there stood in the passage, she was familiar with me, and pulled my watch out, and on my turning round in a hurry, being in liquor, I fell down; the prisoner ran away, and I went home.

Q. Did you ever find your watch again - A. Yes.

Prisoner's Defence. He told the magistrate that he was so much in liquor that he did not know whether he gave it me, or lost it, and there are hand-bills that give the same account.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

163. WILLIAM CARTER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of December , a silver table spoon, value 10 s. and a silver tea spoon, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of John Leech and Thomas Dallimore .

GEORGE MATTHEWS. I am a waiter at the London coffee-house .

Q. You lost a table-spoon and a tea-spoon at your coffee-house - A. Yes.

Q. Did you ever see the prisoner there - A. Yes, about a month ago.

- LANE. I am a waiter at the Russell's coffee-house, Covent Garden. I saw the prisoner filing some spoons; I went and told my mistress of it; the prisoner was taken to Bow-street. My master's name is Salter.

PETER HOMER. I am a patrol of Bow-street. On Friday the 28th, the prisoner was brought to me by Salter, and the two spoons were given up to me; I searched him, and found the file. Both the spoons have been filed. The prisoner told me that a waiter of the name of Jackson gave him the spoons, and there was London upon them.

THOMAS DALLIMORE. My partner's name is John Leech , we keep the London Tavern . The spoons are our property.

Prisoner's Defence. Between the corner of Fleet market and the coffee-house I saw a paper tied up with a string; I found in it the contents all but the file. I filed them in order to pawn them.

GUILTY , aged 66.

Confined Two Years in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

164. CHARLES LAWRENCE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of January , a paper box, value 2 d. a canvas bag, value 2 d. sixty-four yards and a half of silk trimming, value 42 s. 6 d. eleven gross and a half of buttons, value 24 s. one hundred and ninety-two yards of silk cord, value 13 s. the property of Robert Boone .

ROBERT BOONE. I am a silk trimming manufacturer . I live at the back of Camden's Gardens, Bethnal Green On the 1st of January I was coming from Fulham by the Fulham coach; the coach stopped at the Black Horse, at the corner of Coventry-street ; I was cold and wet-footed; I went into the house along with the coachman to have part of sixpennyworth of gin and water. I was in the house about five or six minutes, and as I was coming out of the house I heard the flap of the boot fall; the articles were in the boot. I then made the best of my way out of the house and looked in the boot, I saw the articles were gone. I left the coach and looked round and saw the prisoner in the road; I followed him until he got in the footway, and by the light of a silversmiths shop I saw the box under his arm in the bag; the bag and box were mine; I seized hold of the prisoner by the collar, and told him the property under his arm was mine; he dropped it, and told me he had not got any thing of mine. I picked up the box and took the prisoner to Bow-street. This is the box and the bag, the contents are mine.

Prisoner's Defence. As I crossed the road I picked up the box with three yards of the curb stone.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

165. STEPHEN PEACHMAN , and MARY his Wife, were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of December , six ounces of silver, value 32 s. fourteen wine glasses, value 4 s. two cups, value 6 d. two saucers, value 6 d. and six plates, value 1 s. the property of Harry Phillips .

JANE PHILLIPS . I am the sister of Mr. Phillips, auctioneer , Bond-street. Mary Peachman used to char for us.

THOMAS DALE. I am a silversmith, 133, Oxford-road. On the 29th of December Stephen Peachman came to me, he offered me some knives and forks, handles that had been broken up; I saw a crest on them, I questioned him; he said they belonged to a servant; the silver was wrapped up in a letter addressed from Mr. Phillips in Bond-street, to Mr. Lawrence. I detained the silver. The man called again in about two hours, saying, that the silver had come from Mr. Phillips, that it was found by a charwoman in a place where they considered it was of no value, and they made a perquisite of it. I told him to call on me at seven or eight o'clock in the evening; he came, and the constable took him in custody, and took the silver from me.

Q. Did you see the woman - A. Not till I saw her at the office, there the prisoner said the charwoman was his wife.

SAMUEL PLANK . Q. You took this man in custody at the silver smiths shop - A. Yes. I asked him how he came by it, he said his wife found it where she was at work at Mr. Phillips's.

Q. Was the wife present at that time - A. No; she was charing at Mr. Phillips's. I then thought it right to take the prisoner and the silver to Mr. Phillips's to see if they knew the property; they claimed the property. I laid the property on the table, I asked her how she came by it; she said she found them in a dust hole, wrapped up in paper, and begged to be forgiven. I searched their lodgings; the husband and wife both told me where they lodged; I went in company with the witness Phillips, and there found the glasses and china. The woman said they were given her by a servant of Mr. Phillips's; I never could see that servant, she only came occasionally.

Miss Phillips I believe it to be my brother's property. I can speak to this socket of a candlestick that we used. The silver socket is worth half a crown.

Mary Peachman 's Defence. I was cleaning the gentleman's house, I found them in the dirt. My husband was out of work five weeks.

Stephen Peachman 's Defence. My wife brought them home, she did not think any consequence would come of it; I went to sell it.

The prisoners called one witness, who gave them a good character.

STEPHEN PEACHMAN , NOT GUILTY .

MARY PEACHMAN , GUILTY , aged 28.

Fined 1 s. and discharged .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

166. JOHN BROW was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of November , a portmanteau trunk, value 5 s. eight waistcoats, value 20 s. two girths, value 6 s. ten pair of stockings, value 10 s. three pair of gaiters, value 1 s, two razors, value 1 s. 6 d. a coat, value 1 l. five shirts, value 1 l. four caps, value 3 s. and five handkerchiefs, value 2 s. 6 d. the property of Thomas Field and Henry Field .

JOHN KEMP . I am the waggoner of the Bedford waggon. On the 12th of November, about six o'clock in the morning, I came to town with the waggon, and all the packages safe; I loaded the waggon myself; there was a package in the waggon belonging to Mr. Travers. I brought some poultry with me for Newgate Market; when I got to town the first thing was to unload the Poultry, meat, and other things opposite the White Hart in St. John-street . The market goods are always put behind; the other goods were all safe, with a sheet over them. We took the market goods to market.

Q. Was there any person in the care of the waggon - A. I do not think there was. I returned a little after seven.

Q. When you came back did you miss any thing - A. Yes; we could see the space where it was taken from, in the front of the waggon. It was a portmanteau that was gone, belonging to Mr. Travers.

Q. Have you ever seen it since - A. Yes, I saw it on the same day at the Swan in St. John's-lane.

Q. Is that the way bill that you brought with the waggon into town - A. Yes.

RICHARD BOTFIELD I am a table keeper in Peter-street; I take in between to Smithfield market. On the 12th of November between six and seven o'clock I saw the waggon in St. John-street. I saw the prisoner standing on the shafts of the waggon with both his hands up, as if he was undoing some lines, or else endeavouring to get the portmanteau off; I knew the prisoner for several years, I turned round and looked at him; he saw me take notice of him; I have known him to work occasionally in the market as a drover; seeing me take notice of him he set himself on the shafts, folded his arms, and held his head down, as if I should not see who he was. I had a drove of beasts which I took in the market, and returned as soon as I could. I returned in about a quarter of an hour. I had information that the portmanteau was gone; I saw Kemp (the waggoner), and the beadle of the parish; they requested me to go along with them to the prisoner's lodging, we did not find the prisoner nor the property there. I did not see the prisoner for a great many weeks afterwards, until he was taken up to Hatton Garden office. I am certain he was the person that I saw on the shafts.

JOHN RICHARDS . I was at the corner of St. John's Lane, on the day the waggon was robbed.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. I cannot swear to him.

Q. I did not ask you what he did - do you know him - A. I have seen him four or five times, but as to speak to him I never did; he goes by the name of Skippey. It might be between five and six in the morning; when I saw him it was not day light. I was coming from my master's house, No. 20, St. John's Lane, to go with the sheep.

Q. What did you see - A. I saw a man with a portmanteau, or a parcel, what it was I cannot say. He might be about half a dozen yards from the waggon when I saw him.

Q. What sized man was be - A. About the same height as the prisoner.

Q. Though you have seen the prisoner a great many times, you have heard his name was Skippey, you will not swear it is him - A. No.

JOHN WETCH. I drive a horse and cart for Mr. Taylor, a bricklayer, in St. John's-lane. On the day this robbery was committed I was in Eagle-court, I found this trunk there, at the back of my master's shed; I told our bricklayer of it, he took it to Mr. Taylor's house, the White Swan; I went with him. It was the same portmanteau I afterwards saw at the magistrates.

JAMES HANCOCK. I am an officer of Hatton Garden office. I produce a portmanteau I received at the White-Swan on the 12th of November. I received an information from Mr. Taylor that there had been a robbery. I went in search of the prisoner, I did not find him; he was absent from the 12th of November till the 11th of December, I was obliged to serve Richards with a summons to bring him forward.

Q. to Kemp. Is that the portmanteau that you had with the waggon - A. Yes.

JOHN GOFF. I apprehended the prisoner on the 11th of December in the borough of Southwark; I told him I took him for a robbery in Smithfield; he said, I am innocent of it; it is of no use, I know I shall be done for it, he would go quietly with me; he did.

Q. to Batfield When you left St. John-street to take care of the cattle did you leave the prisoner upon the shafts of the waggon - A. Yes, he was sitting on the shafts of the waggon when I left him.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing about it. I am as innocent as a child.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

167. JOHN PETERS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of November , a shirt, value 6 s. the property of William Burton .

WILLIAM BURTON . I am a soldier in the 2nd regiment of Tower hamlets. On the 14th of November last I went on guard, and returned on the 15th; I left two shirts and a pair of stockings in my knapsack, on the 16th; in the morning I went to my knapsack, and one of my shirts was gone. I went down and told the landlord of it; the landlord told me the prisoner had absconded, and taken away a great deal of property belonging to the men he slept with.

THOMAS KERSHAW . I live in Parsons-street, Ratcliffe Highway. The prisoner lodged at my house five days.

Q. Does the prisoner speak English - A. Very little. I can speak Russia to him. The prisoner met me about the India House, he asked me if I knew any Russian officers; I said, no; he said he had lost his master. I shewed him where I lived on Monday; I told him to call on me, I might get him a situation. On Tuesday he brought the bundle to my house, and left it in the room, where three young men slept; I thought of getting him a ship; he was taken up, and taken to the Compter. I went to the Compter and asked him what he had done, he said he had bought a soldiers shirt, and gave three shillings for it. This is the shirt. I brought this bundle down when the officer came, and the soldier claimed the shirt.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Judgment respited.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

168. HANNAH PRESMALL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of December , a watch, value 30 s. a seal, value 6 d. and a key, value 1 d. the property of James Mott .

JAMES MOTT . I am a silk dyer ; I live at No. 7, Spicer-street, Bethnal Green . On the 14th of December the prisoner came to wind quils , and between seven and eight o'clock, my wife came and asked me if I had got my watch; I said, no; she then said it was gone. The next morning I found the watch at Mr. Phillips's, the pawnbroker.

JOSEPH PHILLIPS. I live at 35, Bishopgate-street. I am a pawnbroker. On the 14th of December the prisoner pledged this watch with me, I lent her a pound note.

Prosecutor. That looks like my watch; I cannot take upon me positively to swear it is mine; I believe it is.

Prisoner's Defence. I had that watch given me by a young man that went to sea.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave her a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr Recorder.

169. JOHN TURNER , alias, JOHN WILLIAM TURNER , was indicted for feloniously marrying Mary Ann Pittels , his former wife being then alive

CHARLES HAGLEY. I am cousen to Maria Turner's first husband. I was present when she was married to Turner, about three years ago. She was married to Kensington Church; her name is Maria Hagley .

Q. How long did they live together - A. About a year.

Q. Is that the man - A. Yes; he was married by the name of John Turner . I was present at the wedding.

Q. She was a widow of a relation of yours, was she - A. For what she knew; she had not heard from him for seven or eight years.

MARY ANN PITTELLS . Q. Where were you married - A. At St. John's, Hampstead , on the 3d of September last, to John William Turner . The prisoner is the man; he did not live with me above a fortnight.

ANN PITTELLS . I am the mother. I was present at the marriage.

Q. What is the prisoner - A. He was an usher to a school at Highgate.

Q. Did you give him any money - A. No, we had no money to give him; my husband is a coachman. The prisoner pretended he was a gentleman.

Prisoner's Defence. In July 1807 my marriage took place with Maria Hagley ; she opened a box which contained mourning, she told me she had it for her former husband. Charles Hagley , now present, informed me that her first husband was living in the 21st regiment of Light Dragoons. I called at the War Office, they told me they had not time to look over the book. I told my wife I had called at the War Office; knowing herself guilty she went away. The said Charles Highley sent to me, he said he wanted to speak to me on particular business; I went and found my wife had taken herself from me. I considered she was not my wife. I got a certificate from the War Office that he was alive on the 24th of June, 1810. I then took another wife, thinking my first marriage was not legal. As to the last wife, her father and mother did not make any enquiries about me; they thought I was a man of property. Finding I was not they are seeking their resentment on me. And the last wife said that she has known a gentleman in the army, a lieutenant, and that if I did not support her as well as the lieutenant she would go and live with him, Since our separation she has been living with the said lieutenant.

Q. to Charles Hagley . Do you know whether this relation of yours is alive - A. I know no more than the account the prisoner has given now. He belonged to the 21st regiment of Light Dragoons; he went to the Cape of Good Hope.

Q. Did your relation leave him, or he her - A. She left him.

JOHN AMRAGE. I got that certificate for the prisoner, at the Muster office; the certificate is that he was alive in 1810.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

170. WILLIAM SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 27th of December , forty yards of flannel, value 30 s. the property of John Rogers .

JOHN ROGERS . I am a hosier , 78, Chiswell-street . On the 27th of December, between twelve and one, I was in the parlour adjoining the shop, and on my coming out I saw the prisoner going out with the roll of flannel under his arm; I followed him, brought him back, and took the flannel from him. This is it, I am sure it is my property.

Prisoner's Defence. As I was going along Chiswell-street, near Whitbread's brewhouse, a gentleman asked me to carry it for him as far as Smithfield; I had not carried it half a minute before the gentleman took me.

Prosecutor. I saw him go out of the shop with the flannel under his arm.

GUILTY , aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

171. JOHN WHITTLE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of December , a pair of shoes, value 8 s. the property of Joseph Fisher .

JOSEPH FISHER . I am a shoe-maker , No. 4, Saffron Hill . On the 26th of December, the prisoner came into my shop, he said he wanted a pair of shoes, I shewed him a pair; he said they were too little; I shewed him three pair more, he said they would do; I told him they were nine shillings, he bid me eight; I told him I could not take it; he said he would not give any more. I saw him secrete a pair of shoes. He turned to go out of the shop; I knew he had got a pair of shoes under his coat. I clapped both hands to his collar; I said, d - n you, I will not be robbed. Neale the patrol was coming along the same time he took him into custody.

MICHAEL NEALE . I am a patrol. I was passing by, I went in, hearing what the prosecutor said; I took the prisoner in custody; he had a pair of shoes, he dropped them from under his coat, as he sat upon the chair.

Prisoner's Defence. I put the shoes under my arm. I was going to pay him the nine shillings. I did not take the shoes out of the shop.

GUILTY , aged 31.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

172 RICHARD WILKES , and ELIZABETH his Wife , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of December , one hundred and sixty-eight pounds weight of beef, value 3 l. and one hundred and twelve pounds weight ofpork, value 3 l. the property of James William Jefferies .

JAMES WILLIAM JEFFERIES . I am a butcher living in Union-street, Bishopsgate. I have a slaughter-house in White's-row, Spitalfields . On the night of the 5th of December, between eight and nine o'clock, I went with the boy, to see him feed the horse, and shut the place up at the slaughter house; there were then three carcases of beef hanging, and a large hog, and a cloth over the hog; I saw the boy lock up the place; he came away with me; about a quarter before nine in the morning Henry Mackgear , the boy, gave me information. I went to the slaughter house, the beef was cut to a mere skeleton; the hog and the cloth were gone, the cloth was marked in full length. On the 8th of December, in the morning, Mr. Sapwell came to me; I went with him to the Poultry Compter, there I saw Catherine Parker in custody; from there I went in a coach to Shoreditch Church. The prisoner Wilkes was brought to me, and a quantity of meat, it was not cut like a butcher, and by comparing it to the other part of the carcase, I found it tallied.

Q. Was any cloth produced to you - A. Yes. The cloth was brought into the coach, it had my name on it. The prisoner Wilkes said he bought it; I said, did you buy the cloth; he said, no, he believed that was left with it.

HENRY MACKGEAR. I am a servant to Mr. Jefferies.

Q. Were you at the slaughter house the over night - A. Yes.

Q. Was the beef and pork in the state that Mr. Jefferies represented it - A. Yes; I left the slaughter house all safe and secure at that time. I returned to the slaughter-house the next morning, between four and five o'clock, I found the staple had been drawn, and when I went in I found three carcases of beef cut, and the hog gone, likewise the cloth round it. I went back and informed my master. I have seen the cloth since, master's name is on it.

THOMAS SAPWELL . I am a constable.

Q. In consequence of information that you received did you go in a coach with the prosecutor - A. Yes, to a house in White Bear Gardens, near Shoreditch Church; the prisoner was at work; he is a turner; Armstrong spoke to him, because I went up stairs.

Q. Was there any butcher's shop - A. No, by no means; there was a turner's shop. I went up stairs, there I found a quantity of beef and pork, in different parts of the room, some on the bed; there were two or three hundred weight; I found some cloths. In a drawer in the lower room I found an iron crow, he said he used it in his business; I saw some meat hanging backwards, and I ran up stairs, the room was literally covered with meat.

JOSHUA ARMSTRONG. I am an officer: I was with Sapwell; the wife opened the door, then I saw the prisoner Wilkes, he was at work in a back shed; I told him we wanted to speak to him; he came out of the place he was working in. Sapwell went up stairs; he came down and told us to secure the prisoner, we did. After all the meat was brought down I asked the prisoner how he came by that meat, he gave me no answer. The meat was then put into the cloths and put into the coach, and he was taken to the office.

Q. to Sapwell I ask you now about Parker - A. On the 8th of December, about half past eleven in the morning, I was going down Wheeler street. I met Ann Parker , I knew her before, I asked her what she had got, she said, silk she was going to her warehouse. I was not satisfied with that, I looked, and found it was meat under her arm, it was upwards of twenty pounds weight of flank beef, wrapped up in a cloth. I asked her where she got it from, and in consequence of the information she gave me I went to Wilkes.

CATHERINE PARKER . Q. Do you know the prisoner Wilkes - A. No, not long; there is some resemblance of him. Mr. Sapwell stopped me with some meat, I misunderstood him. I bought the meat of the prisoner. I gave the account where Wilkes lived.

Mr. Arabin. You misunderstood Sapwell - how came you to say you had got silk - A. I said I was going for silk. I was in a flurry.

Q. I have been told that you have been flurried before, and have been taken before a magistrate - A. That was a good many years ago.

COURT. What family have you got - A. One child, and my husband. I live in Three Colt-court, Angel-alley.

Q. Where did you buy this meat - A. In White Bear Gardens I gave him seven shillings; I was to pay him the remainder when I carried my work home. I was to pay him sixpence a pound, he weighed it by the hand.

Q. to prosecutor. Were you shewn that piece of meat that was taken from Catherine Parker - A. Yes; I fitted it to the carcase, it fitted as nigh as could be. This is the cloth that was taken from Wilkes's house, it has my name on it.

Sapwell. That cloth I found in Wilkes's room, with a pile of meat upon it.

Prisoner's Defence. This meat I bought of a man that formerly served me by the name of Shaw, he lived at the back of Bishopsgate-street, he brought me some muton and pork, he told me if I would buy it it would be sixpence halfpenny per pound; he told me he had some beef at home, if I would take it all I should have it at sixpence a pound; having a large family five children, and a wife; I thought it would be a saving to buy it all; he brought it in a cloth, and when he came to enquire if I wanted any more he would take the cloth back again; he told me there was twenty-six stone and six pound of it; I paid him for such, it came to five pounds five shillings and sixpence. As to selling the meat to Ann Parker , I never did; I do not know her; I declare to Almighty God I never saw her. She said at the magistrate's that she bought the meat of me at sixpence a pound, and paid seven shilling for the whole.

Q. to Sapwell. Was there any mutton in the house - A. There was about twelve pound, more or less.

Q. to prosecutor. You lost no mutton did you - A. No.

Q. to Sapwell. Did he mention the name of Shaw to you, or the name of any one that he bought it of - A. No, he did not.

RICHARD WILKES , GUILTY , aged 30

Transported for Seven Years .

ELIZABETH WILKES , NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

173. WILLIAM SCOURFIELD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of December , eighteen ounces weight of tea, value 3 s the property of the United Company of Merchants, trading to the East Indies .

SAMUEL WATKINS . I am deputy assistant elder to the East India company's warehouse, Haydon-square ; the prisoner was a labourer there; I observed tea spilt from a chest; I set Waisley to watch that chest; I had seen the prisoner go in five or six mornings, but not this day. On the morning of the 8th of December I did not see Waisley go in, I said, Waisley, are you there? he said, yes, all is right, I went down in the yard, I heard my name called; I went in the office and saw the prisoner standing without his hat; the king's officer was there, and a quantity of tea in a bag. I saw the tea in a bag, it is the same sort of tea that we have in the warehouse.

RICHARD WAISLEY . I am a labourer at Haydon-square warehouse. I was ordered to watch a chest of tea; on the 8th of December, about ten minutes before ten o'clock, I saw the prisoner come down the alley, between the row of chests. When the prisoner came down he put his hand, and felt about it, I could not see who it was; he had a military coat; he turned the chest on its edge; he took a bag out of his pocket, and began to fill the bag; I let him go, he filled the bag, and shook it, he turned round and faced me, and put it in his hat, and then put his hat on his head; I called out what are you doing there? I jumped down and seized him; he said, what is the matter? I said, you know what is the matter, you have plundered a chest of tea; he said, pray forgive me, I have a little tea in my hat. I told him I knew he had, I could not forgive him; I took him down into the elder's accompting-house, he then laid down his hat.

Q. What quantity of tea was there - A. Eighteen ounces, the officer told me, I did not see it weighted.

- WARBURTON. I am an officer. The prisoner was brought into the office, he pulled off his hat. This is the bag of tea that was taken out of his hat

Prisoner's Defence. I beg for mercy, if you please, it is the first time.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and Whipped One Hundred Yards near the India warehouse, Haydon-yard .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

174. MARY ANN WELCH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of December , five yards of cloth, value 18 s. the property of Daniel Lawrence .

DANIEL LAWRENCE . I am a publican ; I keep the Golden Lion, Lemon street, Goodman's-fields . The prisoner was my servant , she came to me on the 19th of November, and left me on the 29th; I gave her warning. In three days after the prisoner left me I found out that she had stole my cloth. It is table linen, there is above ten yards of it in the whole.

WILLIAM MORRISON . I am journeyman to Mr. Murray, pawnbroker, 199, East Smithfield. On the 5th of December, the prisoner pawned with me a tablecloth, containing three yards and a quarter. I advanced ten shillings upon it.

THOMAS HORN . I am an apprentice to Mr. Matthews, pawnbroker, in the Minories. On the 8th of December the prisoner pawned with me a table cloth containing three yards and a quarter; I advanced four shillings upon it.

FRANCIS FREEMAN. I am an officer of Lambeth-street. I took the woman in custody; I had occasion to call at the Flying Horse to get the keys of the office; I searched her, and found nothing upon her; about two days afterwards the landlord of the house picked up a hussiff where she stood, I opened it, and saw a number of duplicates; I went to Mr. Lawrence, told him I was in possession of the tickets. He described the cloths that he had lost, he said he had a private mark on one of them.

Prisoner's Defence. I have two small children without a father. I leave myself to the mercy of the court.

GUILTY , aged 29.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr Common Serjeant.

175. JOHN RAYSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of December , two pigs, value 8 l. the property of Matthew Ashton .

MATTHEW ASHTON . I am a cow-keeper , Bagnigge Wells .

Q. Had you any pigs in your field on the 8th of December - A. Yes, in the Spa-field, facing the chapel; there were three of them; one of them came home rather sooner than the others did. I missed two of the sows. On that evening we made every enquiry we could, and heard nothing of them. On Monday an officer of Worship-street called at our house and gave some information; my man went to the Basing House. One was a fine sow-pig, ten weeks in the pig, the other was a young one; I saw the carcases in Worship-street, I am very certain they were my pigs. One was a black and white sow, and after they had been scalded the black marks still remained.

- ADAMS. I am a servant to Mr. Ashton.

Q. Did you know these pigs were your master's - A. I had every reason to believe they were them. I knew them by the head, and by the feet; thefore-feet were not scalded, they were white feet, and a black mark down the back, it was just the same after they were scalded. I knew the breeding and the rearing of them. I missed them on the 8th of December. I had seen them on that day, between ten and eleven o'clock. These were three pigs in the field, one of them came home about twelve o'clock and seemed terrified.

Q. Did you go to the Basing-house to Mr. Kelly's. - A. Yes, and there I saw the pigs that my master had lost. I have no doubt at all about it.

CALEB JACKSON . I am an Ostler at the Basing-house, Kingsland Road.

Q. Do you know Kelley. - A. Yes, he has a slaughter-house in the Basing Yard, he rents it of my master, he is a carcase and retail butcher.

Q. Do you remember being in the Basing-house on Saturday the 18th of December. - A. Yes, between two and three o'clock in the afternoon I saw two pigs driven into our Yard by the prisoner, I knew him. I had seen him two or three times before along with Kelly.

Q. What sort of pigs were they. - A. A small white sow, it might weigh ten or eleven stone, the other was a black sow with a white mark across it's shoulder, they were drove into Mr. Kelly's stable by the prisoner, I went into the stable by my master's desire in the afternoon, when I saw David Kelly and Dexton the butcher killing them. They had killed the little sow when I went, and were scalding of it. I went and told my master, he told me to go down again. I saw Dexton and Mr. Kelly killing the black sow with the white mark. Kelly knocked it down. On Sunday afternoon Mr. Armstrong sent for me to come to his house. On Monday Mr. Bishop and I went to Mr. Ashton's house, to enquire if he had lost any pigs. He described what pigs he had lost, and the description answered to what I saw. The Butcher Dexton was taken to Worship Street Office, and the pigs likewise. Mr. Ashton and his man came and spoke to his property.

Q. You saw the pigs after they were taken to the office. - A. I did.

Q. Was the black and white mark visible then. - A. Yes, there was the white mark on the shoulder, and black all over. It was the same.

Q. Has Kelly left your yard. - A. I do not know, I never saw him after that day.

JOHN DEXTER . I am a butcher, I live in Edward's Place, Kingsland Road.

Q. That is not far from the Basing-house, you know Mr. Kelly. - A. Yes, he has not been there since the Monday.

Q. Do you know the prisoner. - A. Yes, I saw him on the 8th of December, I was along with old Mr. Kelly. They sent for me to kill two pigs.

Q. About what time on the 8th of December did you see the prisoner. - A. About four o'clock in the afternoon I was going home, Mr. Kelly's wife came after me to go into the shop; there I saw young Kelly and the prisoner. When I got into the shop the prisoner asked me to kill a couple of pigs for him that night, he would pay me any thing. I told him I would charge him five shillings and something to drink I saw the prisoner go down the yard and drive them into the slaughter-house. Kelly knocked them down, and I stuck them. They were killed and drest, one was a large black and white sow, the other was a white sow. I took their heads off, and cleaved them down. I left the heads and every thing else in the slaughter-house.

Q. After these pigs were scalded, did the black and white marks remain. - A. It did upon that sows back. I will be upon my oath it was the same sow.

DANIEL BISHOP . I am an officer, I brought the pigs from the slaughter-house in company with Kelly's man.

JOHN ARMSTRONG . I am an officer, I apprehended the prisoner on Tuesday the 11th of December, on Saffron Hill. I told him what I apprehended him for, he said he knew nothing about it.

Q. What is become of Mr. Kelly. - A. He has not been seen in that neighbourhood, or else I should have taken him.

Q. to Dexter. What were the value of these pigs. - A. They were worth more than 6 l. dead, they were worth more alive.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, nor called any witnesses to character.

GUILTY , aged 25,

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

176. WILLIAM HUTTON was indicted for, that he, on the 13th of September was clerk to Isaac Clementson , and was employed and entrusted by him to receive money for him, and being such servant so employed and entrusted by him, did receive and take into his possession the sum of 170 l. 19 s. for his said master, that he afterwards did embezzle, secret, and steal 39 l. 17 s. 6 d. part of the said sum .

ISAAC CLEMENTSON . I am a Navy Agent , No. 14 Clements Inn . The prisoner was a clerk in my employ.

Q. Did you use to entrust him to receive money for you. - A. His situation was to be book-keeper, and never to go out of the office. I never entrusted him to receive money for me.

Q. Did you ever get the 39 l. 17 s. 6 d. from him. - A. No.

Q. Has he in former employment received money for you with your authority. - A. I never authorized him to collect money for me, but my principal clerk authorized him when I was out of the way. I never authorized him, nor expected it from him.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

177. ANTHONY HAYWARD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of January , a wooden rail, value 3 s. the property of Ann Newby .

JOSEPH BERRYFORD . On Monday evening, the 7th of January, at half past seven, these rails were on the fence that parts the field from the high-road, it was mortised in the post, and that post fixed in the ground; I was watching, and I had not been there above an hour, I thought I heard a saw, I looked over the fence, I saw the prisoner sawing the post, as soon as he had sawed it off, he carried it away.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

178. SAMUEL GALLING was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of December , a silk handkerchief, value 5 s. the property of Stafford Moore Cooper , from his person .

STAFFORD MOORE COOPER . I live at No. 1 Gerrard Street, I am a linen draper . On the 12th of December, I was passing up Catherine Street about eight in the evening, I was going towards Gerrard Street, Mr. Cass was with me, we were arm in arm, we heard some people behind us close as we passed the end of Exeter Street, Mr. Cass pulled me to let some person pass, the prisoner passed me, I felt my pocket move, I put my hand to my pocket, and missed my handkerchief, the prisoner passed me, I suspected he took my handkerchief, I stepped on very quick, touched the prisoner on the shoulder, and said,

"you have got my handkerchief in your hand," he said

"no it is not your handkerchief," I said it was, I put my hand upon it, he said some other person gave it him.

Q. Was there any person near enough to have handed to him - A. Not as I know of, I said

"very well, we will settle that presently," I had only my hand on his shoulder, he slipped from me, and ran across the street and down a court, I believe White Horse Court, and as I went to cross the street, I fell over some rubbish, I heard some person say the court was no thoroughfare, Mr. Cass cried out,

"stop thief," I ran down the court, and saw the prisoner in the middle of the court, I could not take him then, there were three or four people buzzing about him, he avoided me, and ran into Mr. Cass's hands. When I came to the top of the court I catched hold of his collar, we took him to the Brown Bear , Bow Street. I had taken the handkerchief out of his hand before he ran away. This is the handkerchief, it is exactly the same pattern I had in my pocket in the morning, it is worth four or five shillings. In going down Bow Street, he looked round. and two or three young men kept buzzing about, we put him in an Hackney coach, he begged that I would not appear against him. He said he was a very good young man, it was his first offence I told him, if he told me where he lived, and he had a good character, I would not take him to Bow Street.

MR. CASS. I am a linen draper, I was with Mr. Cooper on this evening, we were walking arm in arm together, I observed two or three young men behind they appeared to be in company together, I turned round two or three times to let them pass, the prisoner was the only one that passed us, and after the prisoner passed us I observed the handkerchief in his hand; Mr. Cooper laid hold of his arm with one hand, and took the handkerchief with the other, he told the prisoner it was his handkerchief, I think he denied it, when Mr. Cooper took the handkerchief, he ran across the street, Mr. Cooper fell down, (I saw two or three young men running across the road, they appeared to be pursuing as well as us) I cried out stop thief, he ran into a court, I catched him as he returned back.

Prisoner's Defence. In the afternoon of that day, I had been to see a relation, in my way home I met an old school-fellow whom I had not seen some years, and on our coming up Catherine Street in the Strand, my school-fellow put a handkerchief in my hand, and before I had time to ask him the reason of so extraordinary a circumstance, the prosecutor came up and asked me for the handkerchief, upon which I was alarmed, and had no doubt he had stolen it from the prosecutor; upon the prosecutor's attempting to take me, I ran away; I do solemnly declare my running away was not from a consciousness of guilt, but for my unfortunately happening to be with one who had so departed from moral honesty, and what adds to my affliction is the shame it has brought on my family; I hope your Lordship will extend mercy to me, which will be the study of my life to shew my gratitude.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

179. MARY MAHONEY was indicted for that she, on the 28th of December , one piece of false and counterfeited money made to the likeness and similitude of good and lawful current money of this realm, called a shilling, as and for a good shilling, unlawfully did utter to Sarah Parry , spinster , she well knowing the same to be false and counterfeited .

The case was stated by Mr. Reynolds.

SARAH PARRY . I live with my uncle in Newgate Street , he is a tobacconist; on Friday week the prisoner came into our shop for an ounce of shag tobacco, I served her, it came to three-pence, she offered me a shilling, I took it into my uncle, he said it was a bad one, he came into the shop, he gave it her back, and said it was a bad one, she said is it, I am very sorry, I will give you another then, she gave him another, that was a bad one, she gave him a third, that was bad, he then said he would send for a constable, she put the shillings in her mouth before the constable came, and then she was taken in custody.

Court. She never went out of the shop. - A. No.

Q. Are you sure she is the same woman that offered you the shilling. - A. Yes.

Q. What time of the day was it. - A. About six o'clock.

JOHN PARRY. I keep a tobacconist's shop in Newgate-street; the little girl brought me a shilling that she took from the prisoner, I told her it was a bad one, she offered me another that was as bad as the first, then she offered me a third shilling, and I saw she had five or six others, all of the same cast, I kept this third shilling, and sent for a constable, the constable came, I gave him the third shilling, he searched her.

Q. Was any other shilling found upon her. - A. I believe not, except one, I saw five or six more shillings in her apron, her apron was on the counter, I am sure the two first that she offered, were as bad as the third.

WOODMAN. I am a constable, I was sent for to search the woman at Mr. Parry's, I found nothing at all but three-pence halfpenny in her apron, she had some split pease in her apron, I stripped all her clothes off, I found no bad shilling about her, if I had had any item of anything being in her mouth, I should have searched her mouth, I received this shilling of Mr. Parry.

MR. PARRY. The third shilling I received of the woman, I gave to Woodman.

MR. PARKER. I have been a silversmith; I attend prosecutions of the Mint; it is a bad shilling.

Prisoner's Defence. I asked for two ounces of shag tobacco, the little girl asked me whether she should take it in to her uncle, I said yes; I dropped the shilling in the shop, or else Mr Parry must have it when they said I swallowed the shilling; I told them to lock me up, I leave it to God, I did not know it was a bad one.

GUILTY , aged 54.

Confined in Newgate six months , and at the expiration of the time, to find sureties for One Year .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

183. JOHN AYRES and SAMUEL EDY , were indicted for a misdemeanour .

The case was stated by Mr. Abbot.

THOMAS FALDING . I am a Manchester warehouse-man , I live in Clements Court, Milk Street; I know the two defendants, Ayres was clerk to a wholesale warehouse, Mr. Bailey in Watling-street. Edy was a draper at St. Ives, Huntingdonshire; my dealing with Edy commenced in July, 1809; I was dissatisfied with him in March, last year. I met Mr. Ayres and Edy in the street, we stopped in Gough Square, Mr Ayres took me of one side, and stated, Mr. Falding you need not be afraid of trusting Mr. Edy now, his uncle is dead, and left him six thousand pounds, Edy was dressed in mourning with a black crape, I made an appointment to meet that day at three or four o'clock, we did not meet on that day, the next day Mr. Edy called at my warehouse, I made my transaction in confidence of the report of Mr. Ayres, I sold my goods to him.

Q. What goods were looked out. - A. A variety of Manchester goods to the amount, I think, from five to six hundred pounds. It was agreed upon that he should give bills of different dates, these bills were given

Mr. Gurney. Are these bills here. - A It is impossible for me to have the bills that are paid, the bills that are not paid are not here.

Q. Had you any conversation with Mr. Edy afterwards . A. In last August I told Mr. Edy that he had made false representations, I said, Mr. Edy was it you or Mr. Ayres that imposed upon me, is answer was, that he had nothing to do with it, it was a contrivance of Mr Ayres , that he was perfectly ignorant at the moment, I added, you are a very apt scholar, you told me you were going to a professional gentleman, for the purpose to prevent an elder brother, in case of your death within a twelvemonth, to secure the property for your wife and family; he said, as Mr Ayres stated it, he confirmed it; I reproached him for deceiving me, he said, well such a thing will take place I have an expectance.

ROBERT MANN . Q. Were you in the accompting-house or warehouse of Mr. Falding , on the 5th of March. - A. Yes, Mr. Edy came in the month of March to purchase goods, he looked out goods to the amount of about 140 l. and they were sent to him. He came in April, I was the man that sold them to him, there was a delay in delivering them; I met Mr. Ayres by Bow Church Yard, he said you may trust him in a thousand pound, I repeated it to Mr. Falding as soon as I went home, the goods were delivered afterwards.

CHARLES FREDERICK SHIVERAL . I am clerk to the prosecutor, I was in the accompting-house making up the books in the month of March, I recollect Mr. Edy coming into the shop; I was not present when the goods were purchased, I made out the bills, I know the amount; I was there in the month of August, when Mr. Edy came; Mr. Falding said to Mr. Edy, how could you suffer such an imposition upon me, Mr. Ayres introduced you to me, saying your uncle was dead, and left you six thousand pounds, when you knew at the same time from your irregularity in paying your bills in former times, I had made up my mind not to trust you any more, and had it not been for Mr. Ayres assertion, I would not have trusted you a farthing; Mr. Falding said, Mr. Edy was it a contrivance of your own or Mr. Ayres ; Mr. Edy replied, upon my word Mr. Falding, I know no more about it than Tom the madman; Mr. Falding said, you are an apt scholar, when I met you I asked you what relation left you the property, you said you had come up to town to make use of some law process in case you should die within the twelvemonth, that the property might be secured to your wife and family, so that your brother could not touch it; Mr . Edy replied, I have an expectance, I have a rich relation , who when he dies, will leave me all his property. The goods were all delivered before this, I kept the books at that time

Q. Was it mentioned during this conversation, that the bills were not paid. - A. It certainly was to the best of my recollection.

Q. Do you know the amount. - A. The first amount was 500 l. 3 s. 4 d. on the 5th of March, the second is 166 l. 6 s. 3 d.

JOHN EDLAND Q . Are you acquainted with Mr. Edy. - A. Yes, I have known him two years or more, Mr . Ayres introduced Mr. Edy to me as a friend of his, that he was in the habit of doing business with, I knew he was a tradesman, his bankruptcy took place last September, our house is a creditor to Mr. Edy, he had some goods of us, it might be a month before the bankruptcy.

MR FALDING . These two bills were delivered in exchange for the goods sold in March, 180 l . three months after date , the 27th of April, 166 l. 3 s. these unfortunate transactions took place in my warehouse.

Mr. Gurney. You live in some court in Milk Street. - A. I do, and my warehouse is there.

Q. There were some attempts to prove the debt under the commission. - A. I understood so from some of the parties.

Q. There was some little objection, some of the goods were prohibited. - A. I sold him some silk goods in in March last.

Q. Were they prohibited. - A. I will be governed by his Lordship.

Mr. Gurney addressed the jury in behalf of the defendants.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.