Old Bailey Proceedings Online (www.oldbaileyonline.org, version 6.0, 18 April 2014), December 1810 (18101205).

Old Bailey Proceedings, 5th December 1810.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE OYER AND TERMINER, AND GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND ALSO THE GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, HELD AT Justice-Hall, in the Old Bailey, On WEDNESDAY the 5th of DECEMBER, 1810, and following Days;

BEING THE FIRST SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF The Right Hon. JOSHUA JONATHAN SMITH , LORD-MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY JOB SIBLY , No. 4, CARTHUSIAN-STREET, ALDERSGATE-STREET.

LONDON:

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED (BY THE AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON.) By R. BUTTERS, No. 22, Fetter Lane, Fleet Street.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON.

Before the Right-honourable JOSHUA JONATHAN SMITH , Lord Mayor of the City of London; Sir Nash Grose , knt. one of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir Robert Graham , knt. one of the Barons of His Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Thomas Smith , esq. Sir Richard Carr Glynn , bart.; Sir Charles Flower , bart.; Aldermen of the said City; John Silvester , esq. Recorder of the said City; William Domville , esq.; John Atkins , esq.; Aldermen of the said City; and Newman Knowlys , esq. Common-serjeant of the said City of London; His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of Goal Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

London Jury.

William Mayhew ,

Charles Abbott ,

Henry Stobart ,

William Matthews ,

Samuel Bellingham ,

John Rawlins ,

Justice Hudson ,

Thomas Garlick ,

Thomas Jolly ,

John Oliver ,

Robert Butler ,

Charles Clarke .

First Middlesex Jury.

James Giles ,

Joshua Robins ,

John Smith ,

Ranium Steward ,

Edmund Harper ,

William Thomas ,

William Pais ,

Thomas Boorer ,

Edward Bradley ,

George Watnor ,

Robert Wiseman ,

William Everard .

Second Middlesex Jury.

Richard Ford ,

William Haines ,

James Hay ,

George Shelly ,

James Lowe ,

Browning Gumsey ,

Martin Waller ,

James Capon ,

William Smith ,

John Robinson ,

John Grindley ,

Anthony Battin .

1. THOMAS WHITE , and JOHN NEWBALL HEPBURN , were indicted for an unnatural crime .

WHITE, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 16.

HEPBURN, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 42.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

2. HENRY VOWYER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of October , a watch, value 40 s. a silver tea-spoon, value 2 s. the property of Mary Woodgear , widow , in her dwelling-house .

MARY WOODGEAR . I am a widow, I live at 31, Silver-street, Golden-square . On the 9th of October three men came to my house, one of the young men had lodged in the house in my husband's time, a twelvemonth before, and the prisoner was another of them; one of them sat down, and said they must have something to drink, but they did not send for any thing; they staid in my house about ten minutes or a quarter of an hour; I was standing with my back towards them at the washing tub. I knew the other two men for two years past; the prisoner I had seen but three times before, one of these men was a sailor, and the other had been a footman.

Q. Before these men came to your shop had you any watch there - A. Yes; I had a watch hanging at the mantle shelf while they were in the room.

Q. Was your back towards the mantle-piece, or your face - A. My back. There was nobody in the room but the three men.

Q. Had you any silver tea-spoon about the room - A. I had a tea-spoon in the cups and saucers, on the mantle-piece. When the man had been gone out five minutes I missed my watch and spoon, there was a silver sixpence on the blue ribbon of the watch.

Q. What was the value of the watch - A. I cannot say. When I missed my silver watch and spoon I immediately went out, I saw neither of them in the street. From information I went to the Yorkshire Grey public-house and took one of them. About eleven o'clock at night; I gave him in charge of the watchman; the other two I could not find that night. The prisoner was taken up upon another charge. I went to the prisoner and saw him, I just saw one eye and his side face, I could not swear to him then; he was in a sailor's dress when he came to my house, and when I saw him in prison he was differently dressed.

Q. Look at him now and tell me whether you can safely say he the man - A. I can take my sacrament oath that he is the man.

Q. Have you got your watch again - A. No, I have not.

JOSEPH MAITLAND . Q. Do you remember being near this woman's house in October last - A. Yes; I cannot recollect the day of the month, it is about two months ago; I was spinning a top on the pavement about a quarter past two.

Q. Did you see any body go into Mrs. Woodgear's room - A. Yes, I saw three men, one in a sailor's dress, another in a groom's dress, and the other in a blue coat and a pair of corderoy breeches; they staid in the house about a quarter of an hour; I saw one come out first, the other two came out in about five minutes, and Mrs. Woodgear came out five minutes afterwards.

Q. Did you find any thing in the hands of the man that came out first - A. The man in the corderoy breeches came out first, and then the sailor and the groom came out; the groom had the watch in his hand, he gave it to the sailor, and they all ran off together; the prisoner was one of these men, he was in a sailor's dress.

Prisoner's Defence. I was never in the prosecutrix's house in my life, I never saw her before.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

3. WILLIAM BERRY , CHARLES GLOVER , and MARY TOOLEY , were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Frances Clarke , widow , about the hour of eleven in the forenoon, on the 16th of November , Mary Ann Herbert , and others of the family then and there being, and feloniously stealing, a pair of silk stockings, value 14 s. the property of Frances Clarke .

FRANCES CLARKE . I live in Great Russell-street, Bloomsbury ; I keep a haberdasher and milliners shop ; I am a widow. On the 16th of November , near ten in the morning, I observed a pair of black silk stockings hanging at my shop window rather improperly; I was going to Mary-le-bone; I then left Mary Ann Herbert in my house, my mother, and Sarah Dunlop ; I returned between eleven and twelve; I went into my work-room, and while I was in the act of pulling off my things a man came into the shop and asked if I had lost any thing out of the window; I went to the outside of the shop window, I perceived one of the shop window squares broke off the Charles-street side, and I observed that those stockings which I before had seen hanging improperly in the window, were gone. The man told me he saw it done, and he would fetch them. In an hour he brought me the stockings, the stockings he brought me were like the stockings I had missed, but I could not swear to them; the mark had been taken off, and the thread that stitched them together; they were separated.

MARY ANN HERBERT . I am shop woman to Mrs. Clarke.

Q. Do you remember the morning she went to Mary-le-bone - A. Yes. I was left in the parlour her mother was in the house, and Sarah Dunlop . I know nothing more than I was there at the time.

ANN HOLT . I am servant to Mrs. Clarke. I went twice to open the door, I saw the two boys, prisoners at the bar, standing at the shop window in Russell-street, Berry I can be most positive to, but I am not so sure of him as I am of Berry.

HENRY GERRARD . I am a journeyman coach-maker,I work for Mr. Mitchell in Tottenham-place. On the 16th of November I was going from Bedford-square to St. Giles's, I was coming down Charlotte-street, I observed the two prisoners at the bar standing against the shop window of Mrs. Clarke in Great Russel street, the boys were in Russel street, against the window I observed that as I came down Charlotte-street; I am sure the prisoners are the boys, I knew Berry before. On my crossing the street, from Charlotte-street to Great Russell-street, I observed Glover making a hole in a pane of glass, I saw an instrument in his hand, I imagined it to be a knife, but was not nigh enough to see what it was, I found this knife on him afterwards; at the time that Glover made a hole in the window, Berry with a piece of wire, drew out this pair of black silk stockings that I have in my hand, Glover took them and put them in his bosom, they walked away together. I was crossing the street at the time this was done, it was done in an instant.

Q. What time of the day might this be - A. Between eleven and twelve at noon.

Q. What sort of a morning might it be - A. To the best of my knowledge a dullish morning.

Q. Were there many people walking along the street - A. Yes. When they walked away I went and told Mrs. Clarke of the loss, and that I would get an officer to take them as soon as I could; I followed them into George-street.

Q. During the time that you went to tell Mrs. Clarke did you lose sight of them - A. They crossed the street and went towards St. Giles's, they went down the lower part of Charlotte-street, and then they went into Dyot-street, it is now called George-street. I kept them in sight the whole time; in going there they met with Mary Tooley , at the corner of Church-street, or Church-lane.

Q. How far do you think that might be from Mrs. Clarke's shop - A. About one hundred and fifty or two hundred yards.

Q. Could a person standing at the corner of Church lane see Mrs. Clarke's house - A. No, they could not. Where the woman stood she could not see Mrs. Clarke's house. The prisoner Glover gave the stockings to the woman, she went into Mr. Hinckesman, the pawnbroker in St. Giles's; the two boys stood by the pump in Broad-street, St. Giles's; I followed the woman into the pawnbroker's, I told the pawnbroker the case the same as I have told now; the prisoner, Mary Tooley, was at the further end of the shop with the stockings in her hand, as if offering to pledge them; there was a wainscot partition between me and Tooley, she could not see me; I went and took the stockings out of her hand, the shop was full, she could not get served, she was waiting to be served by another shopman, not the man I told the story to; I took the stockings out of her hand, I thought Mr. Hinckesmen would have kept Tooley, while I went out to apprehended Berry and Glover; I catched hold of Glover and brought him back to Mr. Hinckesman, in the mean time the woman was gone. I took Glover from there to the Brown Bear in Bow-street; directly I took hold of Glover Berry ran away; I gave Glover up to Blackman, he and I went to look after Berry; I saw Berry in Church-lane. I ran after him and catched him and gave him up to Blackman.

Q. When did you find Tooley - A. We thought she might visit the prisoner's at the Brown Bear, Blackman and me went to the Brown Bear between six and seven o'clock; we there saw Tooley with a child in her arm with the prisoners, I told Blackman that was the woman Blackman, the woman and me walked down to the pawnbrokers, the pawnbroker identified that she was the woman that offered the stockings to pawn; Blackman took her in custody, I have had the stockings in my custody ever since; they are the same stockings I took from Tooley, and which I saw Glover give to her.

WILLIAM BLACKMAN . I am an officer of Bow street.

Q. Do you remember the last witness Gerrard coming to you - A. Yes, I was standing at the office door, I saw Gerrard coming with Glover, he beckoned.

Q. What time was this - A. Between eleven and twelve at noon I went to him, he related the case of Mrs. Clarke's shop being robbed of a pair of stockings; I took Glover to the Brown Bear and searched him, I found this knife in his pocket, I locked him up, and went in search of Berry, and coming down George-street we saw Berry, he was turning into Church-street, he was walking we pursued him, I thought he then mended his pace in walking, Gerrard ran before him and stopped him, I laid hold of him, I searched him, and found nothing about him. We went in search of Tooley, I could not find her I thought she might come to the strong room where Glover and Berry were, and there found her sitting in the strong room with the two prisoners; she told me her name, and Gerrard told me she was the person; to be perfectly satisfied, I took her up to Mr. Hinckesman, he told me I had the right person.

Berry's Defence. That young man wants to swear our three lives away, I never saw this young man or woman before in my life.

Glover's Defence. That man while I was at St. Giles's pump came and collered me, he took me into Mr. Hinckesman, the pawnbroker, where this young woman was standing behind the counter with a pair of silk stockings in her hand, he took the silk stockings away from her, and took me to Bow-street, and called Mr. Blackman, I was then searched, they took a bread and cheese knife away from me, and two small boxes, and locked me up.

Tooley's Defence. On this morning, between ten and eleven o'clock, I was going out to get two pounds of potatoes, I live in a cellar in Buckeridge-street, and just as I came out of this cellar, met a young man, he asked me to pawn these silk stockings, he said he would give me a shilling, I was to pawn them for six shillings, I opened the stockings, I said they would not lend six shillings, he said they would, this gentleman rushed by me and almost knocked me down, I said holloo, cannot you look before you, I took the stockings open in my hand to Mr. Hinckesman, and held my hands on the counter, there were four people in the shop, no one came to serve me; one, this young man came in with this young lad, he had hold of him by the collar, he pulled the stockings out of my hand, and said to Glover, where did you get these stockings? I said, the young man that I had the stockings of is out of door, it is not him; Mr. Hickesman said, take them all together, I followed them up Bow-street, I met Mr. Blackman, they passed me, this young man's sister saw me at Bow-street, she said I had a right to be there to clear him if I could, he said she was his sister. Mr. Blakeman came there and took me to thepawnbrokers, I said I was the person that had the stockings from a young man in a blue coat and check pantaloons, and while Mr. Blackman went for the mother of the child I had in my arms, this young man took me into Mr. Britten's and gave me a glass of liquor, he said, if you will tell me who gave you the stockings, he would be a good friend to you, with that they took me off to Bow-street.

BERRY, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 13.

GLOVER, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 14.

TOOLEY, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 16.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

4. JOHN HAILEY was indicted for feloniously assaulting Robert Wild in the King's highway, on the 25th of November , putting him in fear, and feloniously taking from his person, a watch, value 2 l. a gold seal, value 1 l. and a gold key, value 6 d. his property .

ROBERT WILD . On the 25th of November I was going up Golden-lane on my way home, between eleven and twelve at night, three men came out of a street leading into Golden-lane, they took my watch; the prisoner was one of the men.

Q. Do you know which of the men did it - A. No, they were so close; I only felt something go, I cannot say who took it; I clapped my hand to my fob, and found it was gone. I had my wife with me, I said to my wife, my watch is gone.

Q. Did they say any thing before they took it from you - A. No, and the moment I said I had lost my watch one of them threw it at me, I do not know which of them it was.

Q. There were no struggle between you and the person that took it - A. No. They took it, and I immediately said I had lost it. The watchman was close at hand, he came up, I saw the prisoner, he was quite close to me, I gave him in charge.

Q. Did you hear the watch fall - A. Yes, it fell near the place where the prisoner stood; I picked it up it appeared to me to fall from the prisoner, I could not be certain.

Q. He did not stop you and ask you for your watch - A. No, it was all done in an instant. This is the watch that was taken out of my pocket.

JOHN CROOME . I am a watchman. I was but a short distance from the prosecutor, I heard him say he had lost his watch, I heard something fall, and directly I went up he gave the prisoner in charge; I took him to the watchhouse. I saw the gentleman pick up the watch.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent; I had nothing to do with him or the watch; I came out of the public-house and was going home to my lodgings.

GUILTY, aged 31, of stealing only .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Grose.

5. ROBERT WILLY was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of George Raggett , about the hour of one, on the afternoon of the 11th of November , Ann, the wife of George Raggett being therein, and stealing a great coat, value 20 s. the property of George Raggett , jun.

GEORGE RAGGETT , JUN. I live at the Union club-house, St. James's square , it is my father's house. On Sunday the 11th of November, at twelve o'clock, I was coming home from Church, I saw Samuel M'Ewen at the top of the area steps of my father's house, he had hold of the prisoner by the collar, the prisoner had dropped the coat on the area-steps.

Q. Where was the great coat taken from - A. The housekeeper's room, in the under office.

SAMUEL M'EWEN . On Sunday the 11th of November I came down stairs, and going to the housekeeper's room I saw the prisoner come out of the housekeeper's room, with an umbrella, and a great coat in his hand, I asked him three times what he wanted, and finding he wanted to make out as quick as possible; I pursued him; at the bottom of the area steps he dropped a coat and umbrella, he ran too fast for me; in Pall Mall I holloaed out stop thief, he was stopped by a gentleman's servant; I immediately collared him; and brought him back to the top of the area steps, and then the umbrella and great coat were there, which he had dropped; I begged of a person to bring the umbrella and great coat up to me, which I took to the watchhouse with the prisoner, I gave charge of him; I told him I was sorry a young man like him, so able to work to come to thieving, he answered, pray forgive me.

Q. Do you know how he got into the house - A. He came down the area steps and opened the passage door, which always falls to with a spring after every person to keep the cold out.

Q. Might not the door be open - A. It shuts with a latch, I always found it shut.

Q. Do you know that the latch was fast - A. I cannot speak to that; I know the door always falls to.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming by at the same time, I ran the same as other people.

GUILTY, aged 20, of stealing only .

Transported for Seven Years.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Grose.

6. MARY BELDON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22nd of November , a silver tea pot, value 9 l. a silver snuffer tray, value 1 l. and a silver extinguisher, value ten shillings, the property of Martha Mears , widow ; a pelisse, value 7 s. the property of Ann Wood ; and a pelisse, value 7 s. the property of Elizabeth Bust , in the dwelling-house of Martha Mears .

MARTHA MEARS . I live at 43, Upper Titchfield-street, Mary-le-bone .

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. I do not. On the 22nd of November last I saw a man and a woman come in and go out.

Q. They went into the kitchen I suppose - A. Yes; I saw them go out about four o'clock in the afternoon.

Q. Did you miss any thing that day - A. Yes, one of the servants told me they had been robbed; I went down stairs and looked in the cupboard as soon as the smith had opened it, I missed a silver tea-pot, a silver snuffer tray, and a silver extinguisher.

ANN WOOD . Q. Do you live with Mrs. Mears, this last month - A. Yes.

Q. Look at the prisoner at the bar, do you knowher - A. Yes. On the 22nd of November the prisoner came to my mistress's house with a man, his name is James Batt .

Q. Do you know who she came to visit - A. My fellow-servant, Elizabeth Bust . They came near two o'clock, they had two pots of ale, and some bread and cheese, they staid till about four o'clock.

Q. Do you know the cupboard where your mistress kept her plate in the back kitchen, who usually kept the key of that cupboard - A. It was never locked. I put the plate away that morning myself; I put away a pair of candlesticks, a silver tea-pot, a silver snuffer tray, and an extinguisher; I put them away after breakfast, when I had cleaned them; I saw them after that.

Q. When the prisoner at the bar and this man Batt were in the kitchen, did you observe either of them go into the back kitchen - A. As I came down stairs to fetch the pump water I met the prisoner just by the back kitchen door, she was coming out of the back kitchen, against the front kitchen door.

Q. Do you recollect at that time that you were coming down the stairs, who else were in besides the prisoner and this man, Batt - A. There was no one else.

Q. You did not particularly observe her to speak to her - A. No. They went away; I went down as usual to get the candlestick for my young master, dinner was getting ready, it was almost immediately after they went I found the cupboard door locked, it was never locked before since I have been with my mistress, I immediately went up to my mistress and asked for the key of the cupboard, she told me she had not locked the door, and she immediately sent for a smith, the smith came and opened the door, on opening the door, I found the silver tea-pot was gone, a snuffer stand, and extinguisher.

ELIZABETH BUST . Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar - A. No, I do not. I know it is the same person that called on me on the 22nd of November; I only saw her on the Tuesday before that.

Q. And before that time you had not known her, had you - A. No.

Q. You received her in the kitchen - A. Yes; she had some refreshment with Batt; they staid there about two hours.

Q. During the time of the two hours did you ever leave them below by themselves - A. Yes; I went to my master in the parlour.

Q. Was it at the time that Ann Wood was absent too - A. Yes.

Q. How long did you leave them together below - A. Half an hour.

Q. We understand you missed several things - A. Yes, at night, and I missed my cloth pelisse; and Ann Wood likewise missed her pelisse.

LOUISA SAWYER . Last Saturday week the 24th the prisoner came to my bar, we keep a wine vaults at the top of the Old Bailey, the Star by Skinner-street, I think she came to me about eleven o'clock at noon, she asked me if I wanted such a thing as that, she laid down a duplicate, I told her I did not want such a thing; it was a silver tea-pot; I immediately went and fetched my own tea-pot to shew her I was not in want; I had one for nineteen years; she stood with tears in her eyes, and observed that she was greatly distressed; I asked her who she was, she said she was sister to the unfortunate Roberts, and that she wished to make up three guineas by three or four o'clock, to forward a brief for him, or something of that, by four o'clock; I told her I never bought any thing of that sort, that I did not see, and that I never bought any thing without Mr. Sawyer being present; she pressed me very much, I told her when Mr. Sawyer came in I would talk to him about it. She left the duplicate upon the counter, and in half an hour she was to come back to know if I would have it; she did not come, I sent my servant maid for it, as she told me it was a great bargain, she wished me to do so to see what a great bargain it was; I sent a servant with the duplicate, and three pound that it was pawned for, and a shilling to pay the interest.

Q. You gave the ticket with three pound to Maria Harrison - A. Yes.

Q. In point of fact you did not get the tea-pot - A. No. The pawnbroker and the prosecutrix came to my house.

Q. You cannot be mistaken about the prisoner at the bar - A. No, I had seen her two days before, but never held conversation with her before that morning, I am certain of the person of the prisoner, she came back at four o'clock, after four hours waiting, I had then the prosecutrix's servant, and the constable waiting for her; when she came up to the bar Mr Sawyer was serving, she said she wanted to see Mrs. Sawyer; I went to her, she said, I come to you ma'am to know about the tea-pot; I told her I had got it out, and if she would walk in I had got a friend that would give her the value of the pot; she walked up stairs into the dining room, and was delivered into the hands of the constable.

JAMES BATT . Q. Look at the prisoner, do you know her - A. Yes; I went with her on the 22nd of November last to Mrs. Mears.

Q. Had you known her some time before - A. No, I never saw her before.

Q. How came you to go with her to Mrs. Mears - A. I was passing along Drury-lane, I said to her it was a wet day; I met her for the first time in my life in Drury-lane, I told her I was going into Covent Garden; we went in to have something to drink, and then I went out with the woman; she said she was going to Titchfield-street.

Q. Do you at all mean to give us to understand that you had been at all familiar with her - A. Not at all, we had something to drink there, from that place we went to Titchfield-street, I was going that way, I went with her to shew her the way, she said she did not know where Titchfield-street was; I said it laid near Oxford marked; she knocked at the door and went in; I said I will stay here till you come up to me, it may not be agreeable for me to come down; she said, come down; I went down; we left the house in about two hours afterwards.

Q. What do you know about taking this plate - A. I know nothing at all.

Q. You and she were left some time below were not you - A. No, the servants were in the kitchen.

Q. Do you mean to say both the servants were in the kitchen the whole time you were there - A. Yes; both of the servants.

Q. You left the house you say in about two hours afterwards - A. I believe it might be two hours; we came out, and going across Portland-place I said I shall not go any further; she says, she is coming to meet me, and then she said, she has lit of a very bad accident; she has put a silver tea pot on the fire and melted it; I am going to get it soldered; I then said, in the name of God, where are you going to; she said she is coming to meet me; I said, who? she replied, my acquaintance she is, you had better take the umbrella, and go back, and I will return to tea: I went back; she told me she was going to get the tea pot mended. I met the young woman at the door, she said, O God, we are robbed.

Q. In short she went from you - A. Yes, and I went back, as the prisoner said she was coming to tea

THOMAS THOMAS . I am a pawnbroker at Mr. Fleming's in Fleet-market.

Q. Look at the prisoner, do you know her - A. I do not; I cannot swear that she pledged the tea-pot, the tea-pot was all that was pledged with me; I have the duplicate in my possession, I took it from Mr. Sawyer's servant, and have had it ever since I received it from her.

MARIA HARRISON . I am a servant to Mrs. Sawyer. On the 24th of November last she gave me a duplicate.

Q. Who did you give that duplicate to - A. To Mr. Fleming's young man; that is the young man, I gave it to him that same evening, I offered him three pound and eleven-pence, he took the three pound and eleven-pence, but he did not give me back the tea-pot.

CHARLES GRIFFIN . I am a constable. This is the tea-pot that was delivered in my hands by Mrs. Mears; I have had it in my custody ever since.

Prosecutrix. I got the tea-pot at Mr. Fleming's, I cannot say from which of the young men.

Q. to Thomas. Is that the pot that was pledged with you for that duplicate - A. It is. The value of it is about seven pound.

Prosecutrix. It is my tea-pot, I am positive; I know it by the top, it is rather loose, and there is a mark at the bottom, I have had it upwards of seven years.

Prisoner's Defence. I have nothing to say in my defence; Mrs. Sawyer has entirely put it out of my power; I should be exceeding sorry to prejudice you and the jury against them who wish to prejudice me. I leave it to your lordship.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 41.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

7. WILLIAM WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of November , a leg of mutton, value 10 s. the property of Jonathan Lambert .

JOHN DINGLEY . I was out with Jonathan Lambert 's cart on the 17th of November, he is a butcher in Tower-street; I was in Fleet-street, I went into the Cheshire Cheese public-house with a load of meat. From information I ran after the prisoner and catched him, he had got the leg of mutton in his apron; he said he found it in Water-lane, the leg of mutton was my master's.

JOSEPH LADD . Q. Where was this cart standing - A. At the corner of Wine Office-court. I saw the prisoner take the leg of mutton out of the cart, and the leg of mutton that was found upon him was the same that was taken out of the cart.

ABRAHAM CRESWELL . I am a constable of St. Bride's. I asked the prisoner if he took this leg of mutton; he said, no, he found it in Water-lane, he saw a man drop it, and then he picked it up.

JONATHAN LAMBERT . It is my mutton.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming down Water-lane, a man dropped it, I picked it up.

GUILTY , aged 34.

Confined Two Months in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

8. JOSEPH GATER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of November , twenty copper rivets, value 30 s. the property of William Pontifex .

EDMUND PONTIFEX . I am son to William Pontifex , he is a copper smith in Shoe-lane . The prisoner was journeyman to my father.

Q. When did you lose these rivets - A. On Monday the 5th of November they were taken out of the factory by the prisoner, he had the rivets about him when I saw him; from information I came to the prisoner, I found him laying on his face upon the ground, the constable was sent for, and before the constable arrived the prisoner dropped some rivets from his bosom. When the constable came the prisoner took some more from his bosom, and put them on the ground. The constable took him to his house, and before he came back with the constable he dropped a false key that unlocked our warehouse door.

JONAS FRANCIS . I am an apprentice to Mr. Pontifex, Shoe-lane. From information I watched Joseph Gater, he was in the passage, I saw one of the rivets stick out of his bosom, I said, Joe, what have you been at; I told my fellow apprentice to call master; he said, oh God, pray do not; master came to him; and sent for the constable; the constable came; Joseph Gater throwed the rivets out of his bosom, the constable weighed them. The rivets belonged to our factory.

SAMUEL GORDON . I am the last witness's fellow apprentice. On the 5th of November last at five o'clock, the prisoner was in our shop, I heard something drop from him, I said Joe, what is that, he said it was a little boy throwed something up the hill.

Q. What little boy - A. The foreman's boy; I said, Jem, to the boy, did you throw any thing up the hill; he answered, no, I told my fellow apprentice to look after him; I thought he had got something.

WILLIAM BLINCO . I am an officer, I live in Fetter-lane. On the 5th of November, about five o'clock, I was sent for to Mr. Pontifex's, I saw the prisoner at the bar, he was in the act of taking out of his bosom the rivets, and throwing them on the ground; I weighed the rivets, they weighed thirty four-pound, the prisoner said he was a rogue, that was all he said; I believehe was in liquor.

Prisoner's Defence. I was very much intoxicated in liquor.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr Recorder.

9. RICHARD ROBINSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of November , two sacks, value 4 s. the property of James Lynn .

JAMES LYNN . I am a fishmonger in Fleet-street ; on the 28th of November, about a quarter after three in the afternoon; the prisoner went up a private court, at the side of my house; having suspicion I went to the front of the shop and stood at the door a short time; he came out of the court with two sacks under his arm; he had taken them off the pallisado's. I called to my servant, he overtook him in Fleet-street; we brought him back to the shop with the sacks under his arm. I sent for a constable. These are the sacks, they are mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I am guilty.

GUILTY , aged 39.

Confined Fourteen Days in Newgate , and whipped in Jail .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

10. JOHN ANDREWS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 3d of November , twenty-five pound weight of brass, value 1 l. the property of Kezia Botten and Robert Gillman .

JAMES FEARON . I live at 29, Turnmill-street; I deal in old iron and marine stores. On Saturday, the 23d of November, between one and two, the prisoner came to my house, he offered me twenty-six pound of brass; I made an objection, I thought it was cock metal; he said, it was good brass. I paid him eightpence a pound for it; as soon as I bought it, I put what I had to it, and went to Messrs. Botten and Gillman, in Shoe-lane, to sell it altogether.

Q. Did you take to them the some metal that you had bought of the prisoner - A. Every bit of it, and some more that I had laying by me some time before.

Q. Did you see Francis Lee at Messrs. Botten and Gillman - A. Yes.

Q. After that were you stationed to observe the men when they came to work - A. Yes; the prisoner was the fifth or sixth man that passed; I went into the work shop, and told him I understood he did not come honestly by the brass, that he sold to me half an hour ago; he asked me who said so. I am sure the prisoner at the bar is the man.

FRANCIS LEE . Q. Are you shopman to Botten and Gillman - A. Yes. On Saturday, the 3d of November, Fearon brought me some brass to see; I shewed the brass to Mr. Gillman in the presence of Fearon.

ROBERT GILLMAN . My partner's name is Kezia Botten , we are founder s in Shoe-lane . The prisoner had been in our employ about ten weeks. On the 3d of November, when Fearon brought the brass, I was called into the shop, I saw the brass; I had no doubt of it all being my property.

Prisoner's Defence. I keep a house, one Cox lodged with me for three years, he was in the brass foundery line; he was obligated to go to Birmingham and he enlisted for a soldier; he left the brass in my house; I had witnesses to prove that I had it in my house three or four months but they are not come forward.

The prisoner called one witness who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 33.

Confined Three Months in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

11. JAMES GREENLEES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of November , thirty-four yards of Irish linen, value 1 l. 15 s. fifty-two yards of cotton, value 2 l. 12 s. six handkerchiefs, value 4 s. twenty yards of cambrick, value 20 s. one yard of dimity, value 1 s. and two yards of hessian, value 1 s. the property of William Snow .

WILLIAM SNOW . I live at 23, Broker's-row, Moorfields . I am a callico glazier and calenderer . On the 22d of November. I received information that the prisoner robbed me; the prisoner was brought to my house by Armstrong a piece of black cambric was found upon his person; I could not swear to the piece of black cambric, but I had lost brown and white Irish. We went and searched his premises, and found the article that I had lost, concealed in a box.

JOHN ARMSTRONG . On Thursday, the 22d of November, I, in company with Bishop, met the prisoner with a man named Bennett, near the barquin Broker-row, Moorfields: he had the piece of black cambric in a handkerchief under his arm; he said, the cambric was his own, and if we would go to Mr. Snow, his master, he would satisfy us. We all went to Mr. Snow, and shewed him this piece of black cambric. We went with the prisoner to his apartment, No. 2, Rope-maker-street; I found a woman there, with three children, she knew Mr. Snow; I found in a drawer, in the room, four remnants of brown Irish, and several pieces of black cambric, all remnants.

DANIEL BISHOP . I am an officer, I was in company with Armstrong. Searching the prisoner's apartments I found in this box Irish linen, brown and white, cottons, and pocket handkerchiefs; I shewed them to the prisoner, and told him we had found them in his apartment; he said; he knew nothing about them.

WILLIAM KEMP . I work for Mr. Snow. The prisoner sent me to look over some blacks, I looked over his shoulder and saw him take some brown Irish he put it in his waistcoat; I saw him take it from under the bench; I did not inform my master until three weeks afterwards.

Q. Did you see him take it out of the house - A. No, he went into the coal cellar, I saw him coming out buttoning up his waistcoat.

JOHN FIELD . I work for Mr. Snow; I saw the prisoner take a piece of Irish from under the counter, which he was at work upon, and put, it in his coat pocket; this was about three weeks before he was taken up.

Q. What did he do with it afterwards - A. I do not now.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence; called three witnesses who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 27.

Confined Three Months in Newgate , and whipped in Jail .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

12. FRANCISCO JOSE DEMELLO was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 9th of November , a watch value 2 l. the property of Edward Vale , from his person .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

13. WILLIAM WRIGHT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of November 10 lb. weight of mixed metal, value 7 s. and 5 lb. weight of but leather value 7 s. the property of George Dodson .

GEORGE DODSON . I am a pump and engine-manufacturer . I live at 51, Shadwell . The prisoner was my labourer . All I know I lost some leather and metal on the 10th of November; the leather was marked.

ROBERT BROWN . I am an officer of Shadwell; on the 10th of November I searched the prisoner's apartment; he was not at home; we found ten pound of metal, and a quantity of leather. In half an hour afterwards I apprehended the prisoner going home; knowing of me he wanted to know what I wanted with him. When we got near the office-door, I told him about some leather; he then put his hand in his side-pocket, and pulled out this piece of leather and throwed it away; I picked up the leather; I searched him at the office, and found another piece of leather; he acknowledged that it was his master's leather, and said he was sorry for it.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 45.

Confined Six Months in the house of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

14. SAMUEL HARRIS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 13th of October , a coat, value 28 s. a pair of breeches, value 10 s. a pair of trowsers, value 2 s. 3 d. three pair of stockings, value 8 s. and two neck handkerchiefs, value 2 s. the property of Lawrence Norris , in the dwelling-house of Mary Paul .

LAWRENCE NORRIS . I live in Little Ormond-yard, in the parish of St. George the Martyr . On the 13th of October on my return home, my landlady informed me I was robbed; I missed all the articles mentioned in the indictment. In about six weeks afterwards, I saw the prisoner; he had my coat on his back; the prisoner had slept with me one night; the rest of my things I have never found.

JAMES HANCOCK . I am an officer of Hatton Garden; the prisoner was brought to the office. I took this coat from the prisoner's back.

Prosecutor. It is my coat; I value it at one pound.

Prisoner's Defence. I would not wish to give this honourable court any further trouble. I am guilty of taking the coat and nothing else.

GUILTY, aged 60,

Of stealing to the value of Ten Shillings only .

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

15. JOHN BOOTE was indicted, for that he on the 2d of November feloniously forged and counterfeited and falsely procured and caused to be made a certain order for payment of the 5 l. with intention to defraud Thomas Coleman .

SECOND COUNT, for uttering and publishing as true, a like forged order for payment of money, with the same intention. And

FOUR OTHER COUNTS, for like offence, only varying the manner of charging them.

ALEXANDER WILSON . Q. What is the name of your firm - A. John Alexander Anderson , and Co. I am a partner in the house.

Q. Look at the prisoner; do you know him - A. Yes, some years ago he kept cash at our house in the name of John Boote ; I think he left a balance of five-pence due to him.

Q. Did you see a draft of five pound that was presented at your house on the 2d of November - A. Yes.

THOMAS COLEMAN was called, and not appearing in Court, his recognizance was ordered to be estreated .

NOT GUILTY.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

16. JAMES COCKSHEAD and WILLIAM HOUSE were indicted, for that they on the 27th of November , about the hour of eleven at night, being in the dwelling-house of Thomas Ashby , a sack value 1 s. and a bushel of flour value 17 s. feloniously did steal and carry away, and afterwards about the hour of twelve at night burglariously did break to get out of the same .

THOMAS ASHBY . I live at Fulham ; I am a baker . The prisoner Cockshead was my servant . On the 27th of November I was awoke about twelve o'clock in the night; Mr. Watts my neighbour, called me; I got up and went down stairs directly and opened the door. Mr. Watts had the prisoner House in custody; he had got part of a sack of flour by the side of him; he brought the prisoner in my house. I went for a constable; the constable came directly. We found Cockshead pretending to be asleep in the bakehouse. I told Cockshead he must know something of this flour being taken out of the bakehouse. In both the prisoners presence Mr. Watts told me he took the prisoner House with the flour on his back. House had been my servant; he left me about five months ago. Cockshead was my servant then; Cockshead denied any knowledge of the transaction. Mr. Watts and Mr. South said they were both concerned, and insisted upon both being taken to the watchhouse.

Q. Had either of them broke into the house - A. The doors were looked and the keys carried up stairs. When he went to bed I suppose the other let him in. I did not find the doors broken open; nothing was broken at all.

Q. Then the probability is the person inside opened the door and let the other person in - A. That appeared to be the case to me.

Q. Where was the flour taken from - A. Out of my warehouse; it is all my dwelling-house.

JOHN WATTS . I live near Mr. Ashby. On the 27th of November Mr. South and myself had been to London, and was returning home. About twelveo'clock we were going by the prosecutor's house to our own houses. I discovered the door of Mr. Ashby's warehouse open. I looked through the key hole of Mr. Ashby's warehouse door. I saw the prisoner Cockshead fill this bag; he tied it up; I did not see House then; I went to Mr. South, told him what I had seen; we agreed to watch. I returned to Mr. Ashby's premises and found the warehouse in darkness; I returned to Mr. South, we separated one above the house and one below the house; I was compelled to take a small circuit to get to the upper part of the house, as soon as I had done that I saw the prisoner, House, cross from Mr. Ashby's house with the bag upon his shoulder; I immediately seized him and called Mr. South, he begged me to let him go, to consider his family and called me by name, I asked him what he had got there, he said, some flour that Mr. Ashby's servant had given him; he still begged me to have mercy on him, to consider his family; I told him he had no consideration for Mr. Ashby's family, neither should I for him. Mr. South and I took him to Mr. Ashby's door with the flour, called Mr. Ashby up, who admitted us, we then sent Mr. Ashby for a constable, Mr. South and I and both the prisoners were in the bakehouse; Cockshead pretended to be asleep. We have since weighed the flour, I am in the business, it is worth twenty three shillings and nine pence.

JAMES SOUTH . I was with the last witness; I can confirm him in every respect.

Cockshead's Defence. I was asleep on the board at the time this happened; I know nothing of it.

House's Defence. As I was coming from London I was coming round opposite the King's head, and just as I got by Mr. Ashby's that quantity of flour laid by the path and another sack with it, I took it up and went about twenty yards from Mr. Ashby's when Mr. Watts stopped me.

Cockshead called one witness, who gave him a good character.

House called one witness, who gave him a good character.

COCKSHEAD, GUILTY, aged 20.

HOUSE, GUILTY, aged 48.

Of stealing only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

17. JOHN HOPKINS , JOSEPH JONES , and RICHARD PRESCOTT , were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of David Phillips about the hour of two on the night of the 21st of November , and stealing therein eight pair of breeches, 1 l. 5 s. 6 d. two pair of trowsers, value 3 s. and one jacket, value 1 s. his property .

DAVID PHILLIPS . I live in Princes-street, Soho ; I am a salesman ; I was alarmed about half past three o'clock on the morning of the 22d of November; I think it was, the patrol and lamp lighter told me to come down stairs, I went down, I saw my shutters of the shop window shoved aside, just aslant, and a pane of the glass of the window broken so that a hand might be put in.

Q. Had you seen the shop window and the shop shutters on the over night - A. To the best of my knowledge I had, I generally shut up the shop window shutters myself.

Q. How many in family have you - A. My wife and a female servant and nine small children, the oldest not thirteen.

Q. What time did you go to bed - A. About half past eleven or twelve.

Q. Were you in the shop before you went to bed - A. I do not believe I was.

Q. Then you are not sure that your shutters were shut before you went to bed - A. I cannot take upon me to say.

Q. Your usual practice is to shut up your shutters before you went to bed - A. I always try them before I go to bed, but sometimes I may not. When I went down I missed some goods immediately.

Q. Can you recollect what goods - A. Two pair of leather breeches, I missed what I saw afterwards, four pair of kerseymere breeches, one pair of nankeen, two pair of striped trowsers, and one red jacket. I said to the patrol, where is the goods, the beadle of St. Ann's said he had somebody in the watch-house, they said they could not tell where my goods were; I went to the watch-house.

Q. When had you last seen these several things that you described as missing - A. I saw them on the same day, I am quite sure of that; I cannot take upon me to say any particular part of the evening.

Q. Did you miss any part of these things in the day A. I did not.

Q. If these things had been gone, would not the place that they occupied, have left a vacuity, and must not you have seen it - A. I must have seen it, they filled up a part of the window.

Q. You went to St. Ann's watch-house, did you - A. Yes, I saw Prescott, he was in custody; I found none of my things, the same morning I went to St. James's watch-house, I saw these goods that I have described. My house is in St. James's.

Q. Who shewed you these goods - A. The constable of the night, he had Jones and Hopkins in custody, I saw them, I left the things in the care of the constable.

Q. In the course of the day, or in the evening, did you observe that any pane of glass was broken or disordered - A. There were one or two that were rather cracked.

Mr. Alley. With respect to your shutters, I believe they are old window shutters, they are not sound and they do slide of one side - A. Yes.

JOHN MURPHY . I am a patrol. On the morning of the 22d of November I was standing facing St. Ann's burying ground, six men came up to where I stood, they appeared to be very much intoxicated in liquor; I took particular notice of the men. In two minutes afterwards I could see the men were not in liquor as they pretended to be; I looked after them with Owen Duncan , from the hour of two till nearly three we were watching the party, they came across us several times, and we came across them in the street, we alarmed the watchmen about, we gave them information, we did not spring the rattle, we saw them pass by Phillips's house several times, not the whole six, three at a time; we saw them go two and two together and the last we saw of them they separated and they went three together, Hopkins, Jones, and Prescott, the three prisoners at the bar, they are the men, they went across the street, St. James's-street to St. Ann's side, they went to 21, Gerrard-street, 21, that shop wasbroken open that morning. They went from towards Phillip's house, to 21, Gerrard-street, and there we apprehended Jones, the other men got off. We took Jones to St. James's watchhouse, before the constable of the night; Jones was charged and put into confinement; he was searched, a seal and six shillings was found upon him. We went on our duty again, we found that Mr. Phillips's was broken open. We looked at Mr. Phillips's house at two o'clock, Phillips's house was all safe then, the shutters were safe and the bar across outside.

Q. When you returned, in what condition did you find Phillips's house then - A. We found the shutter was wrenched from the other adjoining shutter, and the glass was broken, to appearance not cut; we found several pieces of broken glass both inside and outside, we could perceive, by the broken pane of glass that there was something gone out of it. We alarmed Mr. Phillips, he came to us; one of the St. Ann's men came up, and said, he had one of the party, that was Prescott; Phillips was by at the time, Phillips and I went with that man, we saw Prescott.

Q. You say at two o'clock all was safe at Phillips's - A. Before the clock struck two, and after I returned from apprehending Jones, I found it was broken open.

Q. Between that and the time of your going to apprehend Jones, at 21, Gerrard-street, can you say how it was then - A. No. We saw Phillips's house before the clock struck two, and not afterwards till after three.

Q. Between the time of your leaving Phillip's house, before two and the time of taking Jones, you did not see Phillips's house at all - A. No. When I returned from St. Ann's watchhouse, one of the St. James's men told me there was a man taken with some clothes upon him, his name is James Ford .

OWEN DUNCAN . I was a patrole along with Murphy; we were both together, I was with him the whole of the time that he has been describing.

Q. You have heard this account - A. Yes; it is quite true.

JAMES M'CARTY . Q. Were you a watchman this night - A. Yes; at half past three I was on duty, and James Ford , the prisoner Hopkins passed James Ford .

Q. Did you see that - A. No, I saw Ford take the prisoner opposite of my box, I went up to him; we both laid hold of him together; Hopkins dropped the property as soon as we laid hold of him, I took it up and took it to St. James's watchhouse, and left it with the constable of the night, Mr. Scott, and we left Hopkins in his custody.

JOHN FORD. I was a watchman; Hopkin's passed me in Hopkin's-street, I thought he had something under his arm; I came up to him facing of my partner's box, at the corner of Berwick-street; I took hold of him, and he dropped the things down in the street; M'Carthy took the things up.

Q. How far is Hopkin's-street from Phillip's house - A. About three hundred yards.

Q. to M'Carthy. How far is the place where you stopped Hopkins from Phillips's house - A. More than five hundred yards.

Q. to Ford. You took Hopkins in custody - A. Yes; and my partner took the things. We delivered them both in custody at the watchhouse.

JAMES MANYOUGH . I was a watchman in King-street, St. Ann's. The patroles came and gave me notice, after two o'clock, that there were thieves about; I went down Princess-street, after I had made a report at the watchhouse. Where Phillips lives, not quite opposite to his house, I watched a jeweller's shop in the street, I saw it was secure; these three men came across me.

Q. Look at the three men, are you sure they are the three men - A. Yes, I am quite sure of Jones, I knew him to be a bad character, I had seen him in a public-house in Frith-street; I can take upon me to say, that I saw all these three young men, they seemed to be intoxicated in liquor, they were locked armed. Watchman, said they, will you give us something to drink; no, said I, I have got nothing to give you to drink, nor do I know where there is any. They said, if you will come along with us to the watering house, we will give you something to drink; I want none, said I, I have a person to call up that is going in the country, I cannot go with you. I went to the corner of Dean-street, where my stand is.

Q. Can you see from your stand up Princes-street - A. I could if it was moonlight, it was a moonlight night; so Prescott came up to me alone, he said, watchman, what o'clock is it; I said, almost three; I got up and went towards Upper King-street, he went away down Gerrard-street; I saw him go into another street, and went down George-yard, there are carts there, and a great many premises backwards; out of George-yard he went into Princess-street, where Phillips lives.

Q. Then you followed Prescott down into Princes-street - A. Yes; he crossed over the way to Phillips's shop.

Q. You represent Prescott to be alone - A. Yes.

Q. When he came into Princes-street did you see him join any one - A. No, I saw him go up to Phillips's door, and there he appeared to be talking to some people; I could hear them talk, but not distinguish what they said; I heard a wrench of a shutter or a door.

Q. Could you at the time tell who they were - A. I could not, I did not go nigh them expecting them to be bad people.

Q. You said you could hear them wrenching of something - A. Yes, Prescot said, coming across the street, all is well.

Q. Did you see him cross the street - A. Yes, I was in the yard at the time that he crossed the street, and said this. When he came out and crossed the Dean-street, I followed him and sprang my rattle, and my partner, his name is Daniel, he and I took him and brought him to St. Ann's watchhouse, and there he had no name, nor would he tell where he lived.

Q. When you heard the talking of people, can you take upon you to say how many people there might be - A. No, I cannot tell.

Mr. Alley. You began to say that you knewJones, he was a bad character, do you know there is a reward for a burglary - A. No, not to my knowledge, I never heard it.

Q. How long have you been in London - A. Twenty-six or twenty-seven years, but part of that time I have been abroad, not all that time in London.

Q. You have said that Prescott accosted you, asked you what the hour was, after you had observed what he and the other men were about. You say you retired after you had seen the men to the place where you were accustomed to stand - A. Yes.

Q. Afterwards you would have us understand, Prescott accosted you, and asked what the hour was - Yes, about six or seven minutes afterwards.

Q. You say you heard a wrenching, you and another watchman were watching, was not there some watchmen in that neighbourhood near you - A. There was one.

Q. You say that you communicated to the officer of the night, that there were some thieves about - A. Yes, I did.

Q. And you supposed that these people were about something mischievous and bad - A. I had no suspicion at the time, until after he had passed me.

Q. When you were behind a cart did not you then suspect that something was going wrong - A. I did not suspect particularly then.

Q. There were a great many people going along Princes-street - A. I could hear the noise of more than one or two, the street was very quiet except these people.

Q. The prisoner Prescott you had never seen before that night - A. No.

Q. You have said it was a dark night - A. It was not a very dark night, nor very moon light.

Q. It might be moonlight, was it moonlight or not - A. It might be moonlight, and it might be a dark cloudy night.

Q. Did you not assign it as a reason that you could not see down the street - A. I could see best part of the street down.

Q. Your answer to my Lord was, that if it was a moonlight night you could see down the street - A. I was not in the street, I was in the mews.

Q. Prescott that night was a stranger to you - A. Yes.

Q. And you would have us believe that you saw him near Phillips's house - A. I saw him different times.

Q. If you thought these men were doing something that was wrong why did you not take them - A. In the first place they were six in number, we did not like to attack them.

Q. Do you mean to swear that Prescott was one of the men that went to Phillips's house - A. I did not say that.

WILLIAM SCOTT . I was constable of the night of the 21st, Hopkins and Jones they were brought before me, they were searched, a seal was found upon Jones, that I returned to him; Ford and M'Carty came together, bringing in Hopkins; they produced a bundle, I have taken care of it ever since.

Mr. Alley. No implements of any sort were found upon them - A. No one at all.

Prosecutor. The property is mine some are marked and some are not.

Hopkins' Defence. I was passing from my lodging in Compton-street to go to the Jews Harp, I dle, I saw this bundle, I picked it up; I was stopped by the watchman, he asked me if I had got my master's things; I said it is of no consequence to you; he said, I should go the watchhouse; I said if I am to go to the watchhouse you shall carry the things.

Jones's Defence. I was taken to the watchhouse before the circumstance happened; the watchman looked at Mr. Phillips's house before he took me, if you observed that.

Murphy. I apprehended Jones near upon three o'clock.

Prescott's Defence. The night I was taken I had been to the play at Astley's in Wych-street, I happened to stop with some girls, and the time I got home it was half past twelve, I knocked, I could not get in: coming up Macclesfield-street I stopped to make water, he sprang the rattle; I went over to him, he said, keep off; I went over again.

Scott. My attention was taken to Hopkins's right hand which was bloody, as if it had been cut with glass. There were two gentlemen who followed him into the watchhouse, who directed my attention to his hand, I did not observe it myself.

Hopkins. I shewed my hand before the magistrate, there was no cut, only a scratch of a pin on my finger, and no mark of any cut at all.

Q. to Scott. What part of his hand was cut - A. At the two extremities, there were more than that.

Prescott called six witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Jones called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Hopkins called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Q. to prosecutor. Some of the property you had seen in the house the day before the burglary was committed, had not you - A. Some of it.

HOPKINS, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 22.

JONES, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 22.

PRESCOTT, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 17.

[ The prisoners were recommended to his Majesty's mercy by the jury, on account of their youth and good character .]

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

18. CATHERINE HIGGINS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of November , a bonnet, value 5 s. 6 d. the property of Daniel Peddar , privately in his shop .

DANIEL PEDDAR . I live at No. 1, Beech-street, Middlesex . On the 26th of November, about half past seven in the evening, the prisoner came in my shop, and said she wanted a bonnet, I shewed her one; she said, she wanted a different sort, I told my daughter to shew her one, and I went down stairs.

SUSANNAH PEDDAR . I am daughter to the last witness. On the 26th of November I shewed the prisoner a bonnet, she said it was not good enough; I shewed her another, she did not like it. I went into the other shop to get her one, and when I came back she said they were too dear, she would call again, and as she went out of the door I looked upon the board, the bonnet was gone; I ran after herthere was a coach going by at the time, I called out stop thief, I saw her throw the bonnet down, I picked up the bonnet and looked up the street, I saw her run through the courts; about an hour and a half after that she came down the same street, I went after her, I told her somebody wanted to speak to her; she said nobody wanted to speak to her, she pulled off her pattens and was going to run, I laid hold of her, and brought her down the court; she ran up; a lady going by at the time she helped me to bring her home; when I got her back she said they had no business to keep her, as they had the property back. This is the bonnet, I am sure it is the bonnet that I shew- the prisoner, and that she took and dropped: it is worth five shillings and sixpence.

DANIEL GARDNER . I am a constable. I took the prisoner to the watchhouse, and the next morning I took her before the magistrate; going to Worship-street I asked her how she came to be guilty of such a thing; she said she was very sorry for it; she knew nothing of the bonnet until the girl stopped her with it, she thought it must have hanged to her side; she should not have done it but she was intoxicated; if the prosecutor would hush it up she would pay him the expence, if there was any damage, if he did not approve of that she would pay him for it, if he would go to her lodgings in Golden-lane.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not know that ever I was in the shop untill the next morning they told me of it.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY, aged 22,

Of stealing to the value of 2 s. 6 d. only .

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Grose.

19. ANN ROWLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 6th of November , in the dwelling-house of Benjamin Watkins , a forty pound bank note, his property .

BENJAMIN WATKINS . I live at Battle Bridge, in the parish of St. Pancras ; I am a victualler .

Q. Had you any considerable sum of money in your house before the 6th of November - A. I had received an hundred pound on the over night of Mr. Buckley one fifty pound, a forty pound, and a ten; I put them in my pocket to the best of my knowledge, and went out that evening to meet a person, I staid till about half past ten o'clock; after I came home I went to bed, and they remained in my pocket till the next morning as usual, since I have been in business; I took the money out of my pocket, and put them in a drawer without looking at them.

Q. You did not look to see whether the forty pound was there - A. No. On the 25th, in consequence of something that I heard, I went to my drawer, I refered to my cash account, I could not find I had paid away a forty pound note to my creditors; then I looked at my drawer, I could not find the forty pound note that I had received on the 5th; I had not taken the number of the forty pound note, nor any particular mark. They were all clean notes.

Mr. Mears. You had received exactly as hundred pound - A. Yes.

Q. And I think you told us that you went out on that evening - A. Yes.

Q. Therefore as you supposed that you took all this money out you might have dropped the forty pound note for what you know - A. It might be so.

Q. Do you happen to recollect whether you had more forty pound notes than one - A. I do not recollect that I had.

Q. You do not mean to swear positively that you had no other forty pound note - A. No.

Q. And you kept no number nor any particulars of the note - A. No.

JOHN SANNON . I am a servant to Mr. Watkins, the prisoner was servant also. One afternoon the prisoner came into the kitchen, pulled out a nutmeg grater, she took out a forty pound note, she asked me what it was; I read it, and told her it was a forty pound note, I asked her how she came by it, she said her father had given it her to pay his club.

MRS. WATKINS. Q. You are the wife of William Watkins - A. I am. The prisoner told me that she picked up a forty pound note in Edward-street.

JOHN BUCKLEY . Q. On the 5th of November did you pay an hundred pound to Mr. Watkins - A. I did; I had not taken an account of the numbers, there was a stain of ink on the forty pound note to the best of my knowledge.

ROBERT STANTON . I am an officer. I produce the note.

Buckley. There is the mark of ink at the corner, the same as there was to the note. I gave it to Mr. Watkins.

Mr. Mears. You do not mean to swear positively to the note - A. I do not.

Q. You have heard the last witness say that the notes you gave him were very clean - A. I did. I do not mean to swear to that night.

CHARLES ROWLEY . Q. You are the father of the prisoner - A. Yes.

Q. Did you receive any note from your daughter about a week after she went to Mr. Watkin's service - A. She brought home a note almost a month before I was taken up. I returned it to her, and told her to put it where she found it; she said, Father, then I must put it in the street. I told her to take it to her master and make what enquiry she could about it, and if it was a good note, I said we shall soon hear of an advertisement. I thought it was not a good one; the child kept it, and afterwards gave it to her mother; I was at work at the time.

Q. You received it afterwards of your wife - A. I did; It was very clean, no mark or blemish was upon it. There was not an ink mark upon it; here is the man in court that put the ink mark on it. I suspected it to be bad, because there was no writing on the back. It was perfectly clean. Mr. Bond had it of me; I saw no more of it afterwards.

Q. Was it a forty pound note - A. Yes.

JAMES BOND . I live in Somer's Town, and the last witness lives at Battle Bridge. I received a forty pound note from Rowley; I wrote Rowley's name upon it at the time I received it. I took it to Tottenham to Mr. Matthews, a baker. I went with Matthews to Mr. Smith, of Spitalfields market; Mr. Smith changed it.

Mr. Mears. Q. Of course you do not know that the forty pound note that you marked Rowley, was ever in the possession of the prisoner - A. No.

SAMUEL SMITH . I am a salesman in Spitalfields. Matthews and the last witness came to me on the 20thof November. I changed a forty pound note; that note I gave to Stanton the officer.

Q. Is that the note that is produced - A. Yes, it is, I know it by Rowley's name, and Mr. Scott, and my cross; I gave to Stanton the same note I received from Matthews.

Mr. MATTHEWS. Q. Were you with Bond at the time that note was changed - A. Yes, I had the note of Mr. Bond, I changed it with Mr. Smith on the 20th.

ROBERT STANTON . I apprehended Rowley, the father of the prisoner, on the 23d of last month.

Q. Did he deliver to you any part of the produce of this forty pound - A. Fifteen pound; it was in a box hid in a bank of a field.

Q. (to Bond.) Did you give Rowley part of the produce of the forty pound that you got changed - A. I gave him nineteen pound.

(The bank-note read.)

Mr. MEARS. Q. (to Charles Rowley .) Part of this money which is supposed to be in your possession, but was not found on your person - A. I had this short jacket on; I was over my shoes in water. I was close by the bank. When I was at work I put the box out of my pocket for fear I should drop it. When the officer took me I just came out of the water in my half-boots; he asked for the money; I had left, I told him, fifteen pound; he said, deliver up what you have got, there shall be no more of it.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

20. GEORGE HARVEY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 16th of November , 3 lb. weight of mustard, value 5 s. the property of Mary White , privately in her shop .

MARY WHITE . I live in the parish of St. Luke's, Chelsea , I keep a chandler's shop . The prisoner came into my shop to buy some bread and cheese; he did not take any thing the first time. He came into the shop a second time to buy a twopenny loaf. I did not see him take the mustard at all.

Q. Where was the mustard - A. It stood on the end of my counter where the tradesman laid it down that brought it in, and in two hours afterwards a person brought the mustard to me.

Q. Did you see the mustard directly after he was gone - A. No, I did not. A person sent to me to ask if I had lost any mustard; if I had I was to come up to Mr. Salmon's public-house. I went there, I saw the prisoner sitting in the parlour in custody; the officer took the mustard out of the bundle and shewed it me. I knew my own name and the hand-writing that was on it. This is the mustard, it was in this paper in my shop, and my name on it as it is now. I am sure it was on my counter when he was there, and I knew it the moment I saw it. I saw it on my counter at twelve o'clock when the prisoner first came there, and after he was gone; it was not a quarter of an hour before he came in again and asked for another twopenny loaf; this paper of mustard cost me five shillings.

SAMUEL BUTTERWORTH . I am an officer, I apprehended the prisoner on a charge for another offence. I found the property on him.

Prisoner's Defence. I am a poor man, I was out of work at the time, and my wife had hardly lain in a month, I had the doctor to pay, I was short of money.

GUILTY, aged 30,

Of stealing, to the value of 4 s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

21. ANN WALTER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 8th of June , seven yards of cambric, value 5 l. the property of Joseph Jolly , privately in his shop .

JOSEPH JOLLY . I am a linen-draper in Holborn . I was not at home at the time the property was stolen. From information within fifty minutes after it was taken from my house, I went to Mr. Wegulin, pawn-broker, in Chandos-street; there I found my cambric. It appeared to me to be a whole piece; it had been in my house from the 2d of May, and worth about four pound. It was on the 8th of June that this happened, and I had seen it in my shop on the over night. I have no doubt of its being my property. When I saw it at the pawnbroker's the mark had been rubbed out, but there was a sufficiency left for me to identify it to be mine.

Q. From whom did you receive information of your loss - A. From my shopman, Isaac Johns , and on my receiving information from the shopman, I immediately went to the pawnbroker's, taking a neighbour with me, William Philpot .

ISSAC JOHNS. I am a shopman to Mr. Jolly. On the 8th of June, between the hours of two and four, the prisoner came into the shop and asked to look at some French cambrics. I shewed her the lowest price we had first; it was not fine enough; I continued shewing her cambrics until I think I shewed her the finest. She desired me to cut her one-eighth of a yard, upon which I opened the cambric so to do, and in stooping to pick up the measure I saw and likewise heard a rustling; I immediately rose up, and the prisoner rose up, and she was in the act of taking money out of her purse; I suspected at the time that the prisoner had taken a piece, but could not challenge her. I had suspicion of her from her first coming in the shop, but on account of her appearance and dress I did not challenge her. The prisoner then asked to look at some print; I sold her some print; when the prisoner paid for the half quarter of cambric and the print she went out, the boy was at the door; when she went out I told the boy to follow her and see where she went; in the mean time I examined the cambrics and missed the piece. The boy came back and told me that she went into Mr. Philpot's the corner of Turnstile. I immediately told him to follow her, and not to lose sight of her.

Q. How lately had you seen that piece of cambric yourself that you missed - A. I had shewed it her at the time I was shewing her the cambric. I am perfectly clear that I had that piece of cambric. The boy went after her, and I have seen the cambric since at the pawnbroker's. I knew it to be my master's; this was on the 8th of June; my master was in the city at the time. When he returned I informed him of it. I am sure as to the person of the prisoner.

GEORGE WEGULIN . I live in Chandos-street. I have some cambric.

Q. Do you remember the last witness Johns coming to your house - A. I do, it was on the 8th of June, and afterwards on the same day Mr. Jolly came. I shewedthem that piece of cambric; they laid claim to it; when I say they, I mean to be correct; the young man did not lay claim to it, but Mr. Jolly did. I cannot speak to the person of the prisoner; it was a genteel person that pawned it.

Q. I would wish to know how that mark in the cambric came to be obliterated - A. I do not know. I should hardly take it to be a mark.

Johns. I swear positively I did claim it when I first went to the pawnbrokers.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave her a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

22. THOMAS MORSE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of August , a piece of drab kerseymere, value 20 l. and one other piece of drab kerseymere, value 25 l. the property of Charles Goodwin .

SECOND COUNT for like offence, the property of Thomas Becket .

CHARLES GOODWIN . I am a warehouseman living in Wood-street .

Q. Have you a correspondent at Leeds of the name of Becket - A. Yes, he employs me to sell cloth for him, for which I have a commission, they are sold at the risque of Mr. Becket.

Q. Did the prisoner Morse in August last live in your service - A. Yes, as warehouseman and clerk , his duty was to go round the town to get orders, or to sell any goods in the warehouse that customers came in to buy.

Q. Had any quantity of cloth, whether improperly sold or not been substracted from your shop - A. Not that I was aware of, unless such as are entered in the books.

Q. What is the credit of your trade - A. Six months credit, and a bill of two months.

Q. If an entry was made in your books on the 2nd of August could you at all entertain an opinion whether it was a good one until the goods became due - A. No. I suspected the prisoner, a bill not being paid, I requested to know the cause.

Q. Whose bill was that - A. Joseph Philpot .

Q. Was your attention at all called to John Anderson White Horse-yard, August the 2nd - turn to the entry - A. Here is the entry in Morse's hand-writing, the entry is John Anderson , 557 kerseymere drab forty-five and a half yards, at ten shillings and six-pence; 1018 ditto forty-nine and a quarter ditto, the amount is forty-nine I enquired of Morse where Mr. Anderson lived, he said, White Horse-yard.

Q. Did you make any enquiries of Mr. Anderson - A. Yes, and Morse gave me a list of all the goods he had pawned, and upwards of a hundred duplicates.

Q. Did he give you any duplicates that he had entered to Anderson's debit - A. Yes, these are the two. I went to Mr. Morris pawnbroker in the Minories, and saw the drab kerseymeres, they are the property of myself and Mr. Becket; Mr. Becket has been with me, and seen the goods.

JOHN KILLINGWORTH . I am servant to Mr. Morris, pawnbroker, in the Minories.

Q. Look at these duplicates - A. These duplicates are my making out, these are the two pieces of kerseymere they apply to, they were pawned with me on the 1st of September; I never saw the prisoner before I saw him at the Mansion House, I gave the person that pawned it these duplicates.

JOHN ANDERSON . I am a woollen draper, I live in White Horse yard, Drury-lane, I know the prisoner Morse.

Q. Did you on the 2nd of August purchase of Mr. Goodwin two pieces of kerseymere - A. I never purchased any; I never was a customer to him, I never gave the prisoner any orders since he was with Mr. Goodwin; I did not give the prisoner orders on the 2nd of August, I never saw the goods till now.

Prisoner's Defence. My lord, and gentleman of the jury, the whole that I can say upon this subject is, that I was employed by Mr. Goodwin, as agent, to act according to the best of my skill and judgement; it was not done with any intention to defraud in the least; Mr. Goodwin in the first place might have prevented that; I was involved in difficulties when I first went there, and a person of the name of Philpot first involved me in it. The goods were in the first place bought, they were then pledged; he led me on from one thing to another, but not of the least advantage to me whatever. I have only further to observe I was never engaged to Mr. Becket, my agreement was with Mr. Goodwin to be agent and traveller to him.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 29.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

23. THOMAS MORSE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 2d of June , a piece of drab kerseymere, value 25 l. one other piece of drab kerseymere, value 25 l. and a piece of blue cloth, value 32 l. the property of Charles Goodwin .

SECOND COUNT, the property of Thomas Becket .

CHARLES GOODWIN . Q. We have heard that you live in Wood-street - A. Yes.

Q. The prisoner Morse lived with you - refer to the entry in your book of the transaction stated to be with John Hall - A. Here it is, and these are the duplicates.

JOHN KILLINGWORTH . These are my duplicates, and this is the cloth.

Q. to Mr. Goodwin. The duplicates of all these cloths were produced, and given you by the prisoner at the bar - A. Yes. They are our goods.

GUILTY , aged 29.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

24. JOHN TOW was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of November , sixteen yards and a half of linen check, value 1 l. 10. the property of James Gray .

SECOND COUNT, sixteen and a half yards of cloth made of cotton and linen, value 1 l. 10 s. his property.

TURNER DAVIS . I am an upholsterer in Sun-street . On the 3d of November I was in my upper rooms, facing the front of the street, I saw the prisoner take a piece of check from Mr. Gray's door; I went down and overtook the prisoner with the check under his arm; I challenged him with the theft; he denied it, said he had bought it; with assistance Iconveyed him to Mr. Gray's shop.

WILIAM WOOD . I am shopman to Mr. Gray, linen draper , Sun-street; from information, I pursued the prisoner and took this check out of his hand, It is my employer's property.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, called two witnesses who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Confined Three Months in Newgate , and whipped .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

25. WILLIAM KNIGHT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of November , two saddles, value 2 l. and four bridles, value 1 l. the property of Benjamin Goode .

JOSEPH GOODE . My father is a horse dealer and stable keeper , in White-street, Little Moorfields , the prisoner was ostler , we missed saddles and bridles; I went to Worship-street on the 24th of November and got a search warrant; I found at Thomas Cook 's shop, Old-street, two saddles and four bridles; I knew they were fathers.

THOMAS COOK . I live at 73, Old-street; I am a sadler, I purchased of the prisoner two saddles and five bridles; there was a sale at Mr. Goode's, I saw the prisoner there, I purchased a saddle there, then he brought me these things.

Q. How much did you give him for these that are here now - A. For one of these I gave fifteen shillings, and the other ten.

JOHN HODNEY . I am journeyman to Mr. Cook, I saw the prisoner selling them to Mr. Cook.

PETER MASON . I am an officer, I went with the search warrant and found the goods at Mr. Cooks.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Transported Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

26. PETER COE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of November , a copper glue pot, value 10 s. the property of Henry Burnell .

THOMAS BLADES . I am a journeyman carpenter, the prisoner is a carpenter , I believe. On the 16th of November, the prisoner came to Mr. Burnell's shop, No. 25, Fetter-lane , he asked for the foreman, the foreman was not within; as soon as he came down stairs he took the glue pot from off a tool chest, I saw him, I was in the privy at the time, he did not see me; he went out of the yard and set up a running; I pursued and took him in Rolls-buildings; I brought him back into the yard with the glue pot upon him.

Prisoner's Defence. Here is my book to identify my character, that I do not lead an idle life.

GUILTY , aged 44.

Confined One Month in Newgate , and whipped .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

27. FRANCIS ABBAGE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of November , one pound four ounces weight of salmon, value 2 s. the property of John Daniel Bailey .

GEORGE CHAPMAN , I am servant to Mr. Nevill, Newgate-market. On last Friday, about half past two in the middle of the day, I was walking behind the prisoner in Newgate-street , the salmon was on a board at the fishmonger's door, I saw the prisoner take it, and put it under his coat, I directly went in the shop, and told the shopman, he pursued the prisoner, and when he laid hold of the prisoner he let it fall.

WILLIAM SWINNERTON . I am a servant to John Daniel Bailey, his shop is at the corner of Rose-street in Newgate-street, I had information from Chapman, I pursued the prisoner, and took hold of him, he dropped the salmon, it weighed a pound and four ounces; I am sure it was my master's property.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in liquor when I came past the shop, I do not recollect taking it.

Swinnerton. I rather think he was in liquor; this was a small tail, there was a larger one, he took the small one.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

28. WILLIAM LEE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of October , a counterpane, value 14 s. two remnants of ticking, value 3 s. two yards of cotton, value 2 s. and four yards of velveteen, value 10 s. the property of John Strachan , and John Thomas Thompson .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded.

GUILTY .

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

29. MARY WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of October , a sheet, value 5 s. and a bolster, value 2 s. 6 d. the property of James Rorke , in a lodging room .

MARY RORKE . My husband's name is James Rorke , we live at No. 8, Marybone-court ; I let a garret to the prisoner; she came in the lodging's on the 4th of October, and on or about the 11th she was missing, and on my searching the room I missed the whole of the bedding, she paid me no rent.

Q. What day did you search the room - A. On the Thursday; I found one pair of sheets missing, three blankets, a bolster, a counterpane, a window curtain, and a brass candlestick.

Q. That is not in the indictment - did you find them afterwards - A. Yes; after she was apprehended she told me where the sheets were pawned, and where the other things were sold.

RICHARD RANDELL . I am a broker, I live in High-street, Marybone; I bought a bolster, of whom I cannot say, a woman brought it to me in the middle of the day, I gave her half a crown for it.

CHARLES WILLIAM AUBERT . I am a pawnbroker at the corner of London-street, Fitzroy-square; a female pawned a sheet with me on the 5th of October; I cannot swear the prisoner is the person.

Prisoner's Defence. I did it through distress, my husband went and left me.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Confined Fourteen Days in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

30. ANN WALTER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 12th of November , six yards of cambric, value 3 l. the property of Richard Robson , privately in his shop .

RICHARD ROBSON . I live at 72 Oxford Street . I am a linen draper .

Q. Look at the prisoner, do you know her. A. Yes, on the 12th of November, the prisoner came into my shop and asked to look at some French cambrics, my young man shewed her some, his name is William Bates ; after having shewn her a few cambrics, I was standing close by, serving another customer, she expressed a wish to look at some others, as what she had seen not suiting; upon that I was casting my eye round, the young man was pulling open the drawer underneath, to look out some more cambrics.

Q. He was probably stooping. A. Yes, I observed the prisoner tuck to her mantle in an hasty manner, which created a suspicion in my mind that she had got some of my property, or something that she wished to conceal, I stepped up to her, and opened her mantle and discovered this piece of French cambric, it had my mark on it then, and it has now, it has been in my custody ever since. When I took it from her she expressed sorrow and begged forgiveness, she told me she was a person of respectability, and assured me, it was her first offence. This is the piece of cambric, it stands me in about 4 l.

GUILTY, aged 25, of stealing but not privately .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

31. THOMAS ROBINSON was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of William Wilkins, about the hour of twelve on the night of the 7th of November , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein three feather-beds, value 24 l. eight blankets, value 4 l. two counterpanes, value 30 s. a quilt, value 5 s. a carpet, value 1 l. six window-curtains, value 6 l. a bed-curtain, value 2 l. the property of William Wilkins . And LYDIA FIELD , for feloniously receiving on the 8th of November , a bed, value 8 l. five blankets, value 50 s. a quilt, value 5 s. and a carpet, value 1 l. being part of the goods burglariously stolen .

WILLIAM WILKINS . I am a broker , living in Edward Street, Marybone.

Q. Where was the house in question. A. 37 Upper Berkley Street, Marybone . I or my man sleep there at nights, to take care of the house; two nights before, I slept there myself. At the time the house was robbed it was empty. On the evening of the 7th, at six o'clock, I was in the house. I secured it.

Q. Were there any furniture in the house belonging to you. A. I rent the house furnished of Major Blundell.

Q. Do you sleep there yourself. A. Sometimes myself, and sometimes my servant, at this time it was empty.

Q. Either you, or some part of your family, were generally sleeping in the house. A. Yes, and I meaned to continue, and have continued it ever since.

Q. On the evening of the 7th, at six o'clock, was it dark. A. No, it was not, it was just upon the eve of dark.

Q. How soon the next morning did you discover that house being robbed. A. Not till ten o'clock the next morning. I repaired to the house, I observed the scutcheon was wrenched off the key-hole of the street door, by which means the lock was picked. There were missing, three feather-beds, eight blankets, two counterpanes, a quilt, three curtains of a four-posts bed, and a Brussells carpet. The drawing room curtain were cut off with a knife, as high as a man could reach, and they were gone. I have seen some of the property since at the watchhouse.

Court. Q. Did any body sleep in your house two nights before. A. No, not for two nights. I was the last person that slept there. I slept there about two nights before, and I intended to sleep there again.

JAMES DAVIES . I am a watchman, my beat is at the Seven-dials. On the morning of the 8th of November, between six and seven o'clock, it was not quite daylight, I met with a man crossing the dials with a bed, he was walking in a great hurry, I stopped him, took him and the bed to the watchhouse.

Q. In short, did the man escape from you afterwards. A. He did.

JOHN BAXTER . I was the watch-house keeper.

Q. On the morning of the 8th did the last witness bring a bed tied up with a blanket. A. Yes, he brought the bed and the man too, the man gave a description of the neighbourhood where he was going to take it to. I sent two watchmen with him to the place where he said the bed was going to, and from them he escaped. The bed and blanket was afterwards shewn to Mr. Wilkins.

Q. Did you go to a house, No. 10 Shorts Gardens. A. I did, between seven and eight o'clock in the morning. I went there accompanied by Furseman and Roberts. I searched the house from the top to the bottom. In the prisoner Field's apartment, Field the prisoner was there, the door was locked, I found a bed, five blankets, a quilt, and a carpet, under the bed, she was sitting by the side of it.

HANNAH DELANEY . I live at No. 26 Short's Gardens.

Q. On the morning of the 8th of November last did you see the prisoner. A. I met him in Short's Gardens, between six and seven o'clock, it was rather dark, he had a large bundle, he got into No. 10 with it, he passed close by me, what was in the bundle I could not tell, I knew him by sight before, he is the man, I saw him go into No. 10. I was going for a kettle of water.

Q. Do you know who lives in the house. A. Mrs. Field and her husband lives in the shop. When I came back with the water he was standing at the door, he had not the bundle then, he was talking with a woman at the door. I mentioned this to my husband.

CORNELIUS DELANEY . Q. Are you the husband of the last witness. - A. Yes.

Q. In consequence of information that you received from your wife, did you apprehend the prisoner Robinson. - A. Yes, in two nights after I did, in Drury Lane, I told him I apprehended him concerning the bundle he brought into No. 10 Short's Gardens. I took him to St. Giles's watch-house. At Marlborough Street office, the prisoner owned to every thing.

Q. to Wilkins. Have you examined all the articles carefully. - A. Yes, they are all mine, every thing that is here, they are worth 70 l. altogether.

Q. What are these articles worth. - A. The blankets and two beds are worth at least 10 l. I could not replace them for that. I am certain they are my property.

Robinson's Defence. I was brought innocently into it, I did not know what was in the bundle. I was having a pint of beer in the night at a public house, a young man came in and said my brother wants to see you, I said, what does he want, he said he did not know, go and see. I went up with him, he said he would make a fire, you sit and bear me company a bit, will you fetch me a pot of beer and two pipes of tobacco. I fetched it, up came his brother between 12 and 1 o'clock, we stopped there till half after four, and then we went out. I said, what are you going upon, he said, no matter to you. I thought if it was no harm I would go. We then went into the Edgware Road, and from there we went into Oxford Street, to a public house. They gave me a pint of purl, in came a man, he gave me the bundle, he did not tell me where to take it to.

Field's Defence. On the morning of the 8th of November, I was in bed with my husband, I heard some person call my husband, he spoke to him, and when he came in, he asked him to let him leave a bed for a few hours, he said he was seized upon by his landlord. I did not approve of it, my husband and me had a few words, I was angry with him. He went out to find the man that brought the bed, and the watchman came in and found the things.

ROBINSON GUILTY DEATH , aged 30.

FIELD GUILTY , aged 40.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

32. HANNAH HAMSDEN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 12th of November , eleven pair of stockings, value 22 s. three waistcoats, value 7 s. eighteen handkerchiefs, value 28 s. a petticoat, value 2 s. three napkins, value 6 s. two pinafores, value 2 s. and a shirt, value 5 s. the property of Jame Devine , in the dwelling-house of Joseph Iredale .

MARY DEVINE . I am a laundress, the prisoner worked for me near two years. The prisoner was taken up on another charge, she sent for me to give her a character, there had been some tickets found upon her, they were mentioned, and I had lost things repeatedly. I went to the pawnbroker's, and the things are here, they are all things that I had to wash.

WILLIAM JEPSON . I am a pawnbroker. In May I took in a waistcoat and handkerchief, 11th of July, three handkerchiefs, two handkerchiefs in March, and a handkerchief in October, two pair of stockings in September, and another handkerchief in November, the prisoner pawned them.

WILLIAM KING . I am shopman to Mr. Tale, pawnbroker, I know the prisoner, she pawned several articles from January up to the 10th of November, I value them at two guineas.

ROBERT LEADER . I am a constable, I apprehended the prisoner for stealing a coat and a silver snuffbox. I took her to the watch-house, she delivered to me a number of duplicates, upwards of fifty. I went to the pawnbroker's with the duplicates, and Mrs. Devine owned the property.

Prisoner's Defence. It was mere distress.

GUILTY, aged 33. of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Confined two years in the House of Correction .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

33. MARY CAVILLON was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Dean , about the hour of three in the afternoon, on the 5th of December , Mary the wife of William Dean , and others of his family being therein, and feloniously stealing, two shirts, value 10 s. the property of William Dean , and two shirts, value 5 s. a neck handkerchief, value 1 s. a hat, value 3 s. a great coat, value 10 s. and a pair of half boots, value 2 s. the property of Joseph Dean .

MARY DEAN . My husband's name is William Dean , I live in St. Giles's . A person went up to the one pair of stairs door, and opened the door with a false key.

Q. Did you see the person go up stairs. - A. No, I saw her come down.

Q. What day was this. - A. On Wednesday last, between two and three o'clock in the afternoon.

Q. Did you see the prisoner come down stairs. - A. Yes, she wanted to rush through the passage, to get away from my son, and I called to an old man that lived in the two pair, to come and detain her while my son went for a constable, the old man came down, and then she ran into my parlour.

Q. What the prisoner. - A. Yes, I saw her put her right hand into her pocket, she pulled out three keys, and chucked them under the parlour grate. The officer tried one of these keys, it unlocked the room where the prisoner came from, she exclaimed when I took up the keys from under the grate, that she was guilty, and said,

"pray do not hurt me."

Q. You had not promised to forgive her, or any thing of that sort. - A. No, I told her I saw her take the keys out of her pocket. The officer brought down the clothes which she had put into the bag. They are here. There was a pair of sheets worth 10 s. three shirts, worth 5 s. three neck handkerchiefs, worth 1 s. a hat 3 s. a pair of boots, half a crown, and a great coat, 10 s.

Q. Do you know how she got in your house. - A. She came in at the street door, it stands open in day-light. The door up stairs was locked and I had the key.

Q. What did you find upon her. - A. Nothing, upon her, I found all these things put up in a canvas bag.

Q. The things in the canvas bag would not amount to forty shillings. - A. No, when the prisoner was taken to the watch-house, I found ten false keys upon the chair on which she had been sitting, and one of them keys opens the front garret door, out of which I was robbed about ten weeks ago.

Q. We must not hear that. You say your street door was open. - My street door was open, the one pair door was locked and the key in my parlour. She stripped the bed, and took some dirty things which were laying about the room.

Q. Was the room locked in which the goods were. A. Yes.

Mr. Arabin. You say the outer door was open. A. Yes.

Q. To whom did this room belong to, where the bag of goods where found. - A. The goods were foundin my son's room, and a young man's room. I keep the house.

Court. Do not you and your husband live there. - A. Yes, and my son sleeps in that room.

Court. What time of the day was this. - A. Between two and three o'clock in the afternoon. She came running down stairs. I went to the street door, I endeavoured to stop her.

Q. How near the street door did you see her. - A. About a yard from the stairs.

Q. This was a one pair of stairs room, and these goods in the bag were still in the room. - A. Yes.

Q. And when she came down she had no bag. - A. She was in the room with the bag. My son saw her in the room.

JOSEPH DEAN . You occupy this room in this house. - A. Yes.

Q. It was your father's house, and your father's room. - A. Yes.

Q. Now tell us whether any of the property taken was your's. - A. Yes, two of the shirts were mine that were taken.

Q. They were not carried away. - A. No, they were packed up in the bag.

Q. They were taken from the place where they had been left. - A. Yes, and the great coat was mine, it was worth 10 s. and the hat was mine. They were all removed from the place where they was left. I left the hat on the table by the foot of the bed, the sheets were taken off the bed. I went up stairs between 2 and 3 o'clock after dinner, to get my hat off the table to go out. I took the key off the nail in the parlour where it usually hangs. I went up stairs, put the key in the door, unlocked it. I could not get in, this woman resisted inside, and pushed inside. I saw her came out of my room, she ran part of the way up the second pair of stairs, she came down again directly, rushed into the passage, and appeared confused. She took nothing away.

Q. Then these different articles in your room were removed for some purpose or other. - A. Yes, into the bag. She wanted to go out of the passage away from my mother and me. We stopped her, she never got out of the house. I called the old man out of the two pair to help to secure her while I went for an officer. fetched the officer.

Mr. Arabin. What time of the day was it. - A. Between two and three o'clock last Wednesday.

Q. This room is occupied by you and another person. - A. Yes.

Q. The key of that room was kept hung up in the parlour. - A. Yes, and I took it when I went up to the room. I was up there about half an hour before I found the prisoner in that room.

Court. If I understand you right, this key you hang up in your mother's parlour. - A. Yes, the prisoner could not have opened the door with this key, but with a false key.

WILLIAM SALMON . I am an officer - I was sent for to the prosecutor's house on Wednesday the 5th of this month. I saw the prisoner in the parlour. The prosecutrix said, that was the person who had robbed her. I searched the prisoner, and found on her a pipe-key; after that, the prosecutrix gave me these three keys, the keys that the prisoner threw away. I took Mrs. Dean's son up with me. I tried this key is the son's room. I found this key exactly fitted the lock; it locked and unlocked it. I went in the room. I observed this bag, with the property stated in the indictment. In Joseph Dean 's room, by the side of the bag, I found these pattens very dirty. I took the bag and the pattens, and went down in the parlour where the prisoner was. When I went in the parlour, the prisoner said, these are my pattens, give them to me. I took her to the watch-house: the small keys I found in her lodgings.

The prisoner left her defence to her counsel; called two witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY DEATH , aged 35.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

34. WILLIAM BRITTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of November , a trunk, value 10 s. a rasor, value 5 s. a dressing case, value 5 s. a smelling-bottle, value 1 s. and four guineas, the property of Charles Maitland ; thirty-five guineas, and four pieces of foreign gold coin, value 4 l. the property of Andrew M'Intyne , in the dwelling-house of Henry Hudson .

CHARLES MAITLAND . Q. I believe you are an officer of the navy , are not you - A. Yes.

Q. You were in town on the 17th of November last. - A. Yes; I lodged at the Cannon Coffee-house, Charing-cross . I came there that morning; that was the first day I came there.

Q. What did you bring with you. - A. I brought my trunk, it was locked. I had the key in my pocket. I put my trunk in a bed-room, where I was shewed to, up two pair of stairs. I left it in that room. I had my dinner; and after I had my dinner, I was going to the theatre. A gentleman was with me, his name is Andrew M'Intyne. I went up stairs. I had some money in my pocket.

Q. You had some money, and he had likewise. - A. Yes; I told him it would not be necessary to take it all out, we had better put it away. We went up stairs, both together.

Q. What time in the evening was this. - A. About six o'clock. He counted out thirty-five guineas in gold, or more, and four foreign pieces: they are worth a guinea a piece. I had four guineas in gold. I put them into a secret drawer of a small dressing case; the thirty-five guineas and four moidores were put in a piece of brown paper, and put in the dressing-case, in another drawer. I locked the dressing-case and put it in the trunk, and locked the trunk likewise; then we went both to the theatre, and we returned the next morning about nine o'clock.

Q. Did Mr. M'Intyne come with you. - A. No; I went to the coffee-house, and Mr. M'Intyne was there at the time I went up the two pair of stairs bed-room. I found that my trunk was broken open. I spoke to nobody of the house. Before I went up, the man of the house came up and told me, that my trunk had been broken open, and the man was taken, and that they had got all the money safe. I did not look into my trunk then.

Q. In point of fact, besides the money that you put in, you had a great variety of articles of wearing apparel. - A. Yes, all my clothes and linen, no property of Mr. M'Intyne, except the guineas and money. ANDREW M'INTYNE . Q. You have heard the account that young man has given. - A. I have.

Q. The account of your having deposited this money in this trunk is correct and true, is it. - A. Perfectly, I lodge in the same house, he a room higher than me.

HENRY HUDSON . Q. You keep the Cannon Coffee House, do you. - A. Yes.

Q. You remember these two gentlemen coming to lodge in your house. - A. I do, it was on the 17th of November, the prisoner came to my house and ordered a dinner.

Q. Look at the prisoner, are you sure he is the man. - A. Yes, I am, he was then dressed like a gentleman, not as he is now, he had his dinner, he observed to the waiter after he had his dinner he was going to the play, and would be very glad of a bed on his return, he observed also to the waiter, had we any naval officers in the house, he was a naval officer himself. The waiter told him he could have a bed, the waiter said there were two or three naval officers in the house, but they were not within. He asked leave to go and wash his hands prior to his going to the theatre, he was shewn into the same room in which he slept, I think it was then six o'clock, it was before the gentleman were gone.

Q. You say he was shewn into a room, was that near Mr. Maitland's room. - A. The adjoining room to Mr. Maitland's room, the same side of the passage; when he went up stairs he staid up a very little time, he came down and said he was going to the play, he should be home when the play was over, and he went out; he returned about half past nine, observing to the waiter that he did not stay to see the after-piece, it was not worth seeing, or some such expression. He ordered a supper, and after taking the supper he retired to bed, I think about half past ten, the chamber-maid shewed him up to his room, I saw her go up with him; some time after that, the chamber-maid came down and said she thought he had taken Mr. Maitland's trunk out of his room, in consequence of that I went up stairs, I found that Mr. Maitland's trunk was taken out of the room, I heard the prisoner in his room making a great noise.

Q. Was it such a noise as could be heard down stairs. - A. Oh no, it seemed like the knocking of a hammer, but not very loud.

Q. In what manner had you gone up stairs. - A. I went gently up stairs, I listened at the door, I then asked him whether he was in bed, he said no, I asked him whether he was in the dark, he said yes, I asked him to open the door, I thought there was some of the luggage belonging to another gentleman in that room, he unlocked the door, I went in with one of the waiters, he was then lying in bed with his clothes on, he got up and opened the door, and went and laid himself in bed before I went in the room.

Q. At the time you got in, he was lying in bed with his clothes on. - A. Yes, I saw some things scattered about the room, I thought it was adviseable to have an officer, I took the key from the inside of the door and locked him in until the officer came, I sent for the officer, he came about ten minutes after this happened, I took the officer up stairs, and gave him in charge, he was then lying in bed as before.

Q. Did he exhibit to you the appearance of a man in liquor at all. - A. Not the smallest, then on searching the room we found a great many guineas in a drawer, I found the trunk broken open and put under the bed, the lock was forced; we opened a drawer in a chest of drawer in the room, we found some guineas and some linen also, I think there were eighteen. There were two foreign pieces of gold coin under the mattrass, and there were two guineas in a piece of brown paper, and a chissel, nothing else, I took the trunk into the gentleman's room.

Q. Did you lock it. - A. No I could not lock it, I put the things in the trunk, and put them in the gentleman's room. The officer took the eighteen guineas and the two pieces of foreign gold coin.

Q. Upon the apprehending of the prisoner, did he say any think. - A. He denied every thing.

Prisoner. I would wish to ask him whether my coat and waistcoat were on when I was in bed. - A. The coat was not on, I believe he had his waistcoat and pantaloons on, and his braces.

MARY OWEN . Q. You were chamber-maid at the Cannon Coffee House on the 17th of November last. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar. - A. I do, I remember shewing him up to a room, the first time that I shewed him up to the room was about six o'clock, to wash his hands, and about half past ten when I shewed him to bed, and then I came out and left him, I went into a gentleman's room exactly underneath his, I heard a great noise over my head, I heard a kind of a lumbering, I went up to prepare the room for Mr. Maitland, and missed the trunk, I came down and told my master and mistress, they sent for a constable.

WILLIAM PIKE . I am a constable, I was sent for to apprehend the prisoner.

Q. When you went there you went with Mr. Hudson into that room did not you. - A. Yes.

Q. We need not hear the particulars of your conversation with him, you found the money in the drawer, and the trunk under the bed, as Mr. Hudson has described. - A. Just the very same, I pulled the trunk out myself, It was seventeen guineas in the drawer, it is a mistake of eighteen, and a smelling bottle was found then I looked about the room, I saw the room all littered with different articles about the floor, I desired the prisoner to get up, I looked about the bed clothes.

Q. He laid between the sheets as described, did not he. - A. Yes.

Q. The prisoner did not appear to you to be drunk at all. - A. Not in the least; when he got up, I searched the bed, I found a shirt behind where he laid, a pair of breeches and a waistcoat; in searching further under the mattrass, I found a guinea, two half guineas, and this chissel, I examined the trunk, I found it had been broken open by this chissel, and the dressing case in the trunk appeared to be forced open by this chissel. This was on the Saturday night, on the Sunday I called to have an understanding, what was missed out of the trunk I could not hear; on Monday morning at ten o'clock, I attended to take the prisoner before the magistrate, the seventeen guineas, the guinea, and the two half guineas I have kept ever since, I found two gold moidores, they were along with the seventeen guineas.

EDWARD GREEN . I am an officer, on Monday, the 19th, the prisoner was brought to our office, several ofthe officers searched him, afterwards I searched him, and found in one of his boots seventeen guineas, two gold moidores, and two half guineas.

Q. To Pike. Produce the money that was first found. - A. Pilgrim has got the two gold moidores I found, here are the guineas.

Q. To Green. Shew those two you found.

Mr. M'Intyne. They are of the same description that I had, I cannot speak to any one of the guineas, there were half guineas in my money, and seven shilling pieces.

Pike. This is the smelling bottle.

Mr. Maitland. I had a smelling bottle like that, I had such a one in my dressing case.

Prisoner's defence. I have nothing to say, I never occupied the room before

GUILTY , DEATH , aged 22.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

35. FRANCISCO PERARA and PEDRO ANTONIO were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of November , a jacket, value 18 s. the property of John Rose , privately in his shop .

JOHN ROSE . I am a slop seller in Manor-row, Tower-hill .

THOMAS ROSE . I am the son of the last witness. On the 17th of November, between four and five o'clock, Perara, accompanied by another man, came into my father's shop; he asked to see a long jacket; the jacket in question was on the counter. At the time, while I was shewing him a long jacket, the person accompanying Perara left the shop. Perara had looked at the long jacket; and, after bidding me much less than the price I asked, left the shop. On my doubling up the jackets that were on the counter, I missed the jacket in the indictment. I know the prisoner did not take the jacket, but the person accompanying him took the jacket.

Q. Who is that person. - A. That I cannot say. When I missed the jacket, I went to several pawnbrokers, and desired them to stop it. On my return, the prisoner Perara was in the shop with a jacket of the same description that I lost. My father asked me, if that was not the jacket that was stole? I said, I believed it was, but I would fetch the person that made it. I went for the person that made it, and when I returned, Perara had left the shop and took the jacket with him.

JAMES GODDARD . I am a pawnbroker. I live at 59, Lower East Smithfield. I produce a jacket; I received it from Pedro Antonio on the 17th of November, about half past ten at night. He asked six shillings on it. I took the jacket up to Mr. Rose. I never saw Perara at all. I have kept the jacket ever since.

Prosecutor. This is my jacket; it was taken away when Perara first came in, and Perara came in with this jacket between eight or nine at night. He asked to look at some black silk handkerchiefs, and asked me the price of them. He bid me little more than half, and when he was gone away, he took the jacket up under his arm.

Q. That was the jacket that you missed before. - A. Yes I asked him where he bought the jacket? he said, at Blackwall; he gave sixteen shillings for it. I replied, you have not given any thing for this jacket, it was taken out of my shop this afternoon. He said, you make a thief of me, take care of what you say.

Q. Could he speak English. - A. Perfectly well; and while I was talking to him, my son came in. He said; he thought it was my jacket; and, to put it beyond all doubt, I sent for the woman that made it. I was behind the counter when my son was gone out. Perara snatched it up, and went away. The jacket is worth eighteen shillings. I swear to the jacket.

Perara's Defence. I met a black man; I gave him sixteen shillings for it. I gave it to the other man to pledge.

Antonio's Defence. I know no more than the other man gave it me to pledge.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

36. ROBERT QUADLING was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of November , five hundred and seventy-four halfpence , the property of Henry Wyatt .

Second Count - the property of Matthew Paul ,

MATHEW PAUL . I am in the service of Henry Wyatt . He is a brewer . On the 6th of November, I was out with one of his drays. I received money where I leave beer. I received a good deal of money in halfpence on that day. I received between three and four pound in halfpence. I put it in a box, nailed to the left side of the dray. The box was locked, and I had the key About half after five, I put in the box a five-shilling paper. I locked the box; then I went into a house to take the money for a cask of beer, and when I was in the house doing that, William Hutchinsen called to me. I went out and looked to the box; the lock was broke, and laid down by the side of it, on the ground, and twenty-three shillings were gone. I examined the box, and four five-shilling papers were missing, and one three-shilling and sixpence paper. In about three or four minutes Willing Harding brought the prisoner to me. The prisoner gave me eighteen shillings and sixpence into my hand, upon his coming up, and wanted me to let him go: there were three five-shilling papers, and a three-shilling and sixpence paper, all in halfpence: one five-shilling paper was missing.

WILLIAM HUTCHINSON . I am a drayman to Mr. Wyatt. On the 6th of November we had taken a cask of beer into a chandler's shop, in Saffron-hill ; Paul and I together. We carried the cask in, and as soon as I went out, I saw the prisoner at the box; he was alone. I was going to put the slings on the dray, as he was stooping down at the box. I struck at him with the slings, and he ran away out of sight. I went round, and found the box broken open, and the lock on the ground. I called to my partner; in about five minutes the man was brought back again by Mr. Hardy.

WILLIAM HARDY . I am a serjeant in the West London Militia. On the 6th of November last, about half after five in the evening, I was in the act of locking up the premises where I had been at work, in Castle-street; it comes into Saffron-hill. The prisoner came running down Castle-street, ran against me, and asked me to let him in; that he had broken a window upon Saffron-hill, and they were after him. I took hold of him by the collar. A boy, at the time, said, that is him. I led him along to see what the depredation was to the place, where the dray was.The two brewer's servants were looking about for him. The prisoner put his two hands into his pockets, and turned out eighteen shillings and sixpence. He said to them, I will give you all, let me go. I took the prisoner to the office, and delivered him to Cook, the officer.

JAMES COOK . I am one of the officers of Hatton-garden Office. The prisoner, and the money, were given to me.

Q. to Paul. Open the three-shilling and sixpence paper. - A. There is the mark of three shillings and sixpence upon the paper. All this money I received on Mr. Wyatt's account.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, nor called any witness to character.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and whipped in jail .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

37. WILLIAM MUNROE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of November , a pair of women's shoes, value 3 s. 6 d. the property of William Bows Shrubsall .

WILLIAM BOWS SHRUBSALL . I am a shoemaker , 31, White Lion-street, Norton-falgate . On the 7th of last month I was reading a paper in my shop. I heard a noise. I went to the door. I supposed I had lost a pair of shoes; the nail was bent where the shoes had been on. I missed one pair of shoes. I looked out, and saw a boy going very quick. In about ten minutes a boy came again; he made a stop at the door, and I walked to him - then he walked off. Mr. Hobson, a neighbour facing, calls out, lay hold of that boy. I saw him take a pair of shoes. I went and secured the boy, and the other boy that was with him ran away.

Q. Did you get the shoes again. - A. No; I never got the shoes. I am sure I lost one pair from the door.

JOHN JUDE HOBSON . On the 7th of November, about three or four o'clock, I saw the prisoner snatch a pair of shoes from off the nail, at Mr. Shrubsall's door; another boy was with him; they both ran off. I was minding my mother's shop at the time, standing at the window. In about ten minutes the prisoner returned and looked about the shop, and walked off, I then informed Mr. Shrubsall that was the boy that stole the shoes.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been looking after a place. I was going up White Lion-street, to my house. The gentleman came and took me. He charged me with stealing a pair of shoes. I told him I had no shoes, and I was willing to go with him wherever he pleased.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

38. RICHARD RICH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of October , twenty-six pound weight of olibanum, value 6 s. the property of John Edward Holmes , William Hall , Thomas Chapman , and John William Chapman .

WILLIAM AUBERN . I am servant to John Edward Holmes , William Hall , Thomas Chapman , and John William Chapman , they have a warehouse at Botolph's Quay, in Thames-street .

Q. Were there any gum olibanum there. - A. There were under the king's locker. The prisoner was the custom-house locker . No person could have access to it without his knowledge.

Q. On the 18th of October, did you, in company with Gillespy, watch the prisoner's motions. - A. I did. I saw him come through the warehouse with a handkerchief containing something. I bid Gillespy watch him coming out of the warehouse, and then I came up to him. I asked him what he had got? he said, a little gum to do a bed-tick. I looked at it, told him I knew where he got it, and told him to go and put it back to where he took it. He took it back: there was about five or six pound in his handkerchief.

WILLIAM GILLESPY . I am warehouse-keeper to Messrs. Holmes and Hall.

Q. On the 18th of October, were there any gum deposited in their warehouse. - A. There were. I was waiting below for the prisoner coming out. I met him; he asked me if I had seen his partner? he did not wish to see him. he had got a little gum, he said, to do a bed-tick. My fellow-servant then met him, and desired him to put it where he took it from: there were between five and six pound weight.

HENRY HALL . Q. Do you know this gum in question. - A. Yes, It is olibanum; the cask belongs to James Graham . It was in the custody of Holmes and Company, in their warehouse. I re-weighed the cask. I found the cask deficient three quarters and twenty-three pound, it was in the charge of Rich.

Prisoner's Defence. I have been seventeen years in the service. I was never called up for any misdemeanour, or for any neglect of duty.

GUILTY , aged 69.

Confined fourteen days in Newgate , and fined one shilling .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

39. EDWARD SADLER was indicted, for that, on the 23d of September , a certain person, whose name to the jurors is unknown, in and upon James Bray , a subject of our lord the King, unlawfully did make an assault, and with a certain sharp instrument did stab and cut the said James Bray , in an upon, and across his fingers, with intent in so doing to kill and murder him; and that he, the said Edward Sadler , on the same day, at the time of committing the said felony aforesaid, unlawfully did aid and abet the said person, the said felony to do and commit, and was privy to the said offence , and four other counts for like offence, only varying the manner of charging.

The indictment was read by Mr. Reynolds, and the case was stated by Mr. Watson.

MARY JACKSON . Q. On Sunday the 23d of September last, where did you live. - A. No 7, Harp-court, Fleet-street. On that day, about half past six in the evening, I was in Bartholomew Hospital square. On my passing through the square, I saw the prisoner Trueman, who was tried last sessions. I perceived he was following of me. I saw two more with him. When I got to the steps of the hospital, with intention to go in, he put his hand to my face. I put up my hand to prevent him from striking me. He struck me in the bosom, and took the watch from my side. He ran away, and I called for assistance. James Bray was coming across the square; he passed me as I wasrunning. I did not lose sight of Trueman untill he was taken. James Bray pursued the man, Trueman was taken, and was afterwards tried.

Q. Did you prosecute a person for this offence last sessions. - A. Yes, he was tried in this court last sessions, his name was Trueman.

Q. Do you know a person of the name of William Lloyd . - A. Yes, he was the first persons that caught hold of Trueman.

WILLIAM LLOYD . Q. On the 23d of September last, were you in Bartholomew Hospital Square. - A. Yes, about half after six, I was going through Bartholomew Hospital, I heard the cry of stop thief. I had just passed the gateway, I saw a man strike Mrs. Jackson. I immediately pursued him, and I was never more than four or five yards behind him, from first to last, I might be more, I cannot say exactly. He attempted to run down Hosier Lane. He saw one or two people coming up Hosier Lane. He threw a something from his hand at the time, and he turned again and ran towards the George Inn, and, opposite of the George, he stopped as though he had been shot. I ran up against him. I collared him immediately, and said, he was the person that robbed the lady. He denied it. In the course of a few minutes, Mrs. Jackson came up, she said,

"you are the man that robbed me." I took him into the George public-house, and in a few minutes, the lady came in and said,

"you are the man that robbed me." A gentleman came in in a few minutes, and said,

"coming up Hosier Lane he picked up the watch," and directly the gentleman came in and gave up the watch, the prisoner and two or three more came up to me and said

"d - n your bloody eyes let the prisoner go." I am positive to the man, he said,

"the lady has got her watch, and what does she want more. I told him I would not let him go untill I put the prisoner Trueman into a prison, and the person that had got the watch, said, he would not deliver the watch up untill he delivered it to a magistrate, or to an officer. I then sent for a constable, and for the lady's friend Griffin. The constable came in. About three quarters of an hour after that, Trueman said he would go quietly with Griffin and me. The prisoner was present, and very abusive, because I would not let Trueman go. When we came to the corner of Hosier Lane, I had old of Trueman's right arm in my left, and I had hold of his coat and waistcoat with my right. Trueman said,

"what do you hold me by the coat and waistcoat for." I said,

"to make sure of you." I had no sooner spoke the words, than my heels were kicked up, and Trueman fell upon me and Griffin, the constable fell upon Trueman. I was dragged some yards in a few minutes. I kept holding Trueman's legs. I got up and saw several people that came to my assistance. I saw one Huggins. I was no sooner up, but I was knocked down again. They dragged me through the pens, beat me with sticks, and likewise kicked me, and there were a great many knives drawn at the time. After they dragged me through the pens, I got Trueman to Mr. Gent's public-house, Mr. Gent said, he would not let any thief come in there, and shut the door. We were dragged into the pens, and I was knocked down again. While I was standing at Mr. Gent's door, they cut Trueman's coat all round except what I had got hold of, so that he might slip out of his coat. They said,

"d - n his bloody eyes cut his bloody arm off." I immediately stooped down, let go and got old of his thighs. They dragged me into the pens, and beat me a second time. There were many knives and sticks flying about, and when I got up I saw Trueman wrestling with Griffin to get his staff from him. Trueman and a number of others at the time said,

"d - n their bloody eyes, hamstring them. I was then got very near the George with Trueman. I was so overpowered at that time, I said if they would let me go, I would let Trueman go, they said,

"d - n your bloody eyes let him go, we'll let you go." I immediately heard a voice behind say,

"throw him backwards." I turned round and saw a person at a small folding doors to a large gateway. I then threw Trueman's heels up, threw him in that door, and fell in with him. I took Trueman into the back part of the George public-house. The prisoner at the bar came in at the same time, and Bray, Griffin, and Huggins.

Q. Had you seen the prisoner during the whole of this time. - A. I saw the prisoner when he insisted upon me letting Trueman go in the public-house, before I had not seen him from that time to this. Griffin then got a cord and tied Trueman's hands behind him. I had hold of Trueman, the prisoner came and stood opposite of me. The prisoner called for a pint of ale, he gave Trueman the first glass of ale out of his pint, he said,

"here my lad, drink." After Trueman drank he said,

"he wished somebody would go and let his friends know where he was." The landlord of the house said if you will give me proper directions, I will go and let your friends know. The prisoner said,

"you have no occasion to give yourself that trouble. Trueman is a stranger to me, I will let them know." After the prisoner had called for a pint of beer and a pipe, I said,

"as you pretend to be a friend to this man, why do not you go and let his friends know." He said he would stop and see the coach off first. The landlord of the house then shook his head, and seemed to think he was one of the gang. A coach came.

Q. Who got into the coach. - A. I, Trueman, Griffin, and Bray, I cannot tell exactly how many there might be. And the prisoner followed us out of the house, and after the coach. As soon as we got out of the door they gave a shout. When we got into the middle of Smithfield, the coach door was broken open on the left hand side. I then received four or five blows on my left thigh with a stick. I then looked at the coach door, I saw the prisoner at the coach door with a stick. I then asked some one to lend me their stick to defend myself, but they wanted it back again in a moment, and I delivered it to them. I then put my hand out to hold the door by the tassel, and received a blow on my arm. I got the coach door to, and held it by the tassel and the pocket. We proceeded, the coach was stopped several times before we got to Newgate Street. There were a number of voices at the time cry our,

"d - n your eyes you bloody b - s, we'll rescue him." I cannot say the prisoner was one, there were so many crying.

Mr. Knapp. I did not understand you that the prisoner struck you. - A. Yes, the prisoner struck me with a stick. We had not got far up Newgate Street, before the traces, and the reins, and the harness werecut. The coachman was obliged to get off his box, to get one of the horses, the reins were cut. He had not gone many yards before the body of the coach fell down between the wheels, the main braces were cut. With that, one or two people in the coach left me, Griffin, and the prisoner in the coach. Bray who had jumped out of the coach, returned in a few minutes and said,

"Oh Griffin my arm is broke." Griffin immediately jumped out of the coach, left me and Trueman together in the coach. Trueman began to cry at that time, and said,

"he was a lost man," he was very sorry for what had happened. Just at that moment the prisoner came up to the coach door, he said something, I could not rightly understand what. He had not been at the door above a minute or two before Stanton the officer came up. I heard Stanton say,

"the first man that came near the coach, he would blow his brains out." He had got a pair of pistols. I then said,

"blow that man's brains out," which is the prisoner at the bar, or drive him away. With that he put a pistol to his breast, and told him,

"if he did not go away he would blow his brains out." I told him he was the man that wanted to rescue Trueman. He immediately went away. We got Trueman into a fresh coach, and returned to Giltspur Street Compter. We could not go forward to the Poultry Compter. It might be near ten o'clock when we got to Giltspur Street Compter, and then there was a great shout gave. After we had lodged Trueman in Giltspur Street, I never saw any thing more of the prisoner untill the trial of Trueman came on.

Q. Are you certain he is the same man. - A. I am positive he is the same man.

Mr. Knapp. Q. You are sure he is the same man. - A. Yes.

Q. In Newgate Street Bray's expression was, that he had his arm broke. - A. I am sure it was.

Mr. Watson. You did not see the state in which Bray was. - A. He was cut across his fingers. When he appeared at Guild-hall on Monday morning, he shewed it to the court. His fingers were cut across on his left hand, and his hand was in a sling.

JAMES BRAY . Q. You belong to the hospital, do you not. - A. Yes, I am box carrier to St. Bartholomew's Hospital, I attend the surgeons when they go round.

Q. Did you go to the George public-house. - A. I did.

Q. Did you see the prisoner at the bar in the course of that evening. - A. At the George, I saw him drinking ale with Trueman. I did not see the prisoner any more, not to my knowledge, untill he was taken out of the gallery.

Q. What happened to you. - A. At the George, a coach was sent for, I went with them along to the Compter. Trueman was resolute the first time, but the second time he was very quiet, because his hands were tied behind him. The reins were cut, and the traces and the harness of the horses, in Smithfield. The coachman got on one of his horses and rode as postillion, untill we got into Newgate Street . They found they could not get the prisoner out of the coach. They cut the braces of the spring, and let the body of the coach down. I jumped out of the coach immediately, and Pike the officer. As we jumped out of the coach, there was a most desperate gang, some with knives, and some with sticks. One of them hit me on my head by the side of my ear, and knocked me down with a large stick. I was fighting at that time for about ten minutes. The other officer ran away and left me at the coach door. I dare say I was knocked down a dozen times.

Q. How many were there assembled together. - A. I dare say near twenty; some beating me over my legs, and some over my thighs; they were armed with sticks and knives; they said, d - n your b - y eyes, let him go. One of them cut me on the fingers, on this hand, with a knife; another came up and hit me on my arm with a large driver's stick. I called out,

"Griffin, my arm is cut, and I believe broken," immediately Stanton, the officer, came up with a brace of pistols. Somebody spoke to Stanton, in the coach, and pointed out some man at the coach door; he said, he was trying to rescue Freeman. Stanton put a pistol to his breast, told him, if he did not go away, he would blow his brains out.

Q. Do you know who that man was. - A. No; my arm was in so much pain, I could not swear to any one.

Q. Had you seen the man before to your knowledge. - A. I saw him in the George, drinking, all with the prisoner Trueman. I cannot positively say it was the same man, it was dark out in the road.

Q. What part of Newgate-street was this. - A. Just by Christ's Hospital gate. I am quite sure I was cut across my hand with a knife.

Mr. Knapp. You never saw the prisoner after you saw him in the George, until you saw him in the Court. - A. Not to my knowledge.

CHARLES GRIFFIN . I am a constable.

Q. Were you sent for on the 23d of September. - A. Yes, to the George, in Smithfield.

Q. Look at the prisoner at the bar. Did you see him there. - A. I saw him after we had taken Trueman back again to the George. I asked Lloyd if he liked to have something to drink? Bray poured two glasses out of two pots. The prisoner said, let Trueman have a glass - that is the first time. I did not see him again until we got into Newgate-street, when the coach was cut, and then I saw him there. The street was lined with people when the coach was cut down. The prisoner came to the coach door. Lloyd was in the coach.

Q. When the prisoner came to the coach, did he say any thing. - A. He said nothing. I did not see him do any thing in the least, at that time. Lloyd said, to a gentleman that came up, that man attempted to rescue Trueman out. When Stanton came up, the prisoner was standing at the coach door: I saw him there.

Q. Did any thing happen to Bray. - A. Bray got out of the coach after it was cut down. The prisoner came up to the coach door, and Bray came up to the coach door. He said,

"Griffin, I have got my arm broken, and my fingers cut.

Q. It was after Bray came out of the coach that the prisoner came to the coach door. - A. Yes; and it was after Bray came out of the coach that Bray got his fingers cut. Lloyd said to Stanton,

"Shoot that fellow, he has been at the coach door before." Stanton said,

"Go away, or I will shoot you." I never see him after that time.

Q. How long was it before or after Bray's hand was cut. - A. It was about ten minutes after Bray said his hand was cut. When Stanton came up with the pistols, that was the second time.

Q. The first time he came up to the coach door, how near was that to Bray's coming up and saying he was cut. - A. A few minutes.

Mr. KNAPP. I do not understand you, to say at that time when Bray came up and said he was cut, and his arm broke. You did not see the prisoner then. - A. No, I did not see him at the coach door.

Q. At that time that Bray informed you, did you see him at the coach door, or any where else at that time. - A. I did not. I saw him about ten minutes after that, the second time.

JOHN HIGGINGS . Q. Were you sent for to the George inn, Smithfield. - A. Yes, I was. I knew Miss Jackson. When I came there, I saw the prisoner. He called for a pint of ale: he was along with Trueman.

Q. Do you remember the time the coach went away. - A. I do. I followed Sadler with the coach, when the coach went away. Sadler followed the coach from the George, and about an hundred yards from the George, in Smithfield, I saw the prisoner stop the horses. After having stopped the horses, he went of the near side of the coach, and tried to open the coach door; he could not get it open; then the coachman drove on very hard. He directly ran before the horses again. Just as the coach got opposite of the hospital gates, he stopped the horses the second time. After that, the coachman found the reins were cut. He directly hollowed out,

"his reins were cut." After that, the coachman got into Newgate-street. I heard the prisoner say, to four or five of them,

"Now, my boys, stick true to me, and we will have them away from the b - rs."

Q. How many persons were there following of him. - A. Near upon thirty of them from what I could see in the gang: a great many had sticks and knives.

Q. I think you say you saw the prisoner twice at the horses heads. - A. I did, and likewise in Newgate-street. After he made that expression to four or five of them, he went to the off side of the coach, and directly the coach fell down - it was instantly cut down. After he came up to the coach door, I heard Stanton say,

"if you do not go away I will blow your brains out." After that I lost sight of him. I heard Bray say he had his arm broke. I did not see him struck. I am quite sure Sadler is the person.

WILLIAM STANTON . I am an officer.

Q. On the 23d of September, were you in Newgate-street. - A. I had an information at the Compter. I went to Newgate-street. When I got halfway down Newgate-street, I saw a mob. I quickened my pace, and got up to it: it was a great mob, indeed. I tried to go through the mob. Some cried out,

"do not let him go through." I pulled a pair of pistols out of my pocket, and swore the first person that offered to stop me, I would blow his brains out. They pushed me backwards and forwards. They would not let me go through. When I got to the horses heads, I was tried to be stopped by a man. I did not exactly notice that man. I got to the coach door; there were some trying to open the coach door. I pushed them of one side, and looked in the coach window. I saw Griffin. I said,

"what is the matter?" he said,

"for God's sake assist us." I said I would. Lloyd said,

"Stanton, blow that man's brains out, if he does not go away from the coach." He said, " that man has been following of us all the while." The prisoner is the man, to the best that I can recollect; I have no doubt about it. That is the man that tried to shove me under the coach, when I was endeavouring to get at the coach door. The pistols were locked. I unlocked one, and presented the pistol to him, and told him, if he did not go away, I would blow his brains out. I never saw any more of him, he went away.

Q. Are you sure that is the man that attempted to push you under the coach. - A. Yes; I have no doubt at all of it.

Q. And the man that was pointed out to you. - A. I have no doubt of it. It was very dark. I saw him by the light of the lamps. I got another coach and put Trueman in, and then I saw Bray's hand was cut by something sharp.

DANIEL LEADBETTER . I am one of the Marshalmen, I apprehended the prisoner in the gallery in this Court, between nine and ten at night, on Friday the 2d of November. I was desired to lock the gallery doors, and to take Lloyd and Bray into the gallery. They pointed out this man, and took him in custody.

The prisoner left his defence to his Counsel. Called eighteen witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

40 WILLIAM TOPPING was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of November , four copper pans, value 10 l. the property of John Batts .

WILLIAM STRUDDICE . Q. You are the sole manager for Mr. Butt's, at his powder-mills. - A. Yes; he carries on a gunpowder manufactory at Twickenham .

Q. Are you in the habit of using copper pans for the purpose of refining salt-petre. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you, on the 8th of November last, miss any pans. - A. I did. I caused hand-bills to be printed, and afterwards saw the pans at Mr. Barnard's, at Richmond, and from information I took the prisoner up; he lived about three miles from Mr. Butt's, at Feltham; he is a gardener . I knew the pans to be Mr. Butt's property.

Q. I believe the prisoner had a son that worked at your manufactory. - A. Yes, he has absconded since this man has been in custody.

MR. BARNARD. I am a brazier. I live at Richmond. On the 9th of November, between twelve and one o'clock the prisoner brought four copper-pans, in an open cart; he said, he bought them from a friend of his, a broker in the country. I purchased them.

The property produced, and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I was never nigh Mr. Barnard's shop, to my knowledge.

The prisoner called five witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

41. WILLIAM OXLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of November , a sack, value 3 s. four bushels harley. value 20 s. the property of Richard Galley .

SECOND COUNT - for stealing the said goods, only varying the manner of charging it.

JOSEPH MITCHENER. I am a servant to Mr. Galley, barge-master and malster ; he resides at Kingston.

Q. Do you know the prisoner. - A. Yes, he lives at Hampton Wick, he sells potatoes and fish .

Q. Were you employed by Mr. Galley, on the 3d of November, to carry any barley from London to Kingston. - A. On the 3d of November I arrived with the barge of barley, at Kingston ; the barge contained one hundred and fifty odd quarters; it was in sacks. The sacks, some of them, were marked Grives, in full length, and some were not. On Sunday morning, at four o'clock, I went on board and missed a sack of barley; that sack was marked with three letters. I cannot say what the letters were, I informed Mr. Galley - he obtained a search warrant. We went to the prisoner's house. Mr. Galley and Brown went into the prisoner's house. I staid outside. Mr. Galley brought out the sack with the same mark I had seen the night before; the sack that I missed was taken from the top of the pile.

JAMES THORP . I brought some barley from Horsleydown, on the first of November, to Kingston. We arrived at Kingston of the 3d of November. I hired three hundred sacks of Mr. Groves, at Horsley-down, for Mr. Galley. The three hundred sacks of barley were put on board the barge. I attended the barge all the way to Kingston. They were all marked, some with single letters, and some with the name in full length. On Sunday morning I missed the hind sack, on the top of the bulk, I think it was marked with single letters. I had seen the barge at five o'clock the night before. There was a skiff tied to her quarter. The skiff was missing from the barge. The next morning the skiff was found on the Hampston Wick side of the river. In consequence of suspicion the prisoner's house was searched.

Mr. Alley. It is in Mr. Groves trade to let sacks out to other people, as well as you. - A. Yes.

RICAARD GALLEY . - I am a barge-master and maltster, at Kingston.

Q. Had your men, on the 3d of November, brought down any barley. - A. Yes, the barge load was very near four hundred and a quarter. I saw the barge when it arrived, the corn was in sacks; some of the sacks were my own, and some Mr. Groves's. On the Sunday morning Mitchener came and told that there was a sack missing. I got a warrant, and searched the prisoner's house. I found a sack marked W. J. G. William and John Groves , and L. for London. I told the prisoner I had found the sack, and I wished he would shew me the barley. He said he had no barley in the house, but in a jar. He pulled the jar off the shelf and shewed it me. I told him I must search farther. I went in his out house, and went up stairs, there I saw two sacks of barley. One sack appeared never to have been tied; a new sack, no mark, and that answered to my bulk of barley. I found four bushels in the sack, the sack was full; the other sack was tied up, that barley was nothing like mine. I took a sample of that which I supposed to be mine. In consequence of that, he was taken up. This is the sample of the bulk, and this is the sample of the sack. I have no doubt it is part of my barley.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought the barley at Brentford. That same sack might be left in my house to put potatoes in.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

42. HENRY CARPENTER , WILLIAM NOYS , and CHARLES COOPER , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of June , a diamond ring, value 5 l. 5 s. a pearl ring, value 1 l. 10 s. a pair of gold bracelets, with amethyst snaps, value 5 l. an opaz snap set with brilliants, value 2 l. 2 s. a pair of gold bracelets, with ruby snaps, value 2 l. 2 s. a gold chain, value 10 l. twelve yards of poplin, value 2 l. three shifts, value 12 s. a miniature picture, value 3 l. 3 s. twelve pair of gloves, value 12 s. the property of Thomas Bruce , Earl of Aylesbury; two silver spoons, value 5 s. and a pair of silver sugar-tongs, value 5 s. the property of Sarah Knap , in the dwelling-house of Thomas Bruce , Earl of Aylesbury .

The case was stated by Mr. Alley.

SARAH KNAPP . Q. You are waiting-woman to Lady Aylesbury . - A. I am. Lord Aylesbury's house is in Seymore-place, in the parish of St. Giles's .

Q. In the month of June last, did you go in the country with lady Aylesbury's family. - A. Yes, on the 14th, I believe.

Q. Had you the care of her trinkets. - A. Yes, I had.

Q. When you left London, did you leave in the drawers a diamond ring, a pearl ring, a pair of gold bracelets, an Opaz snap, set with brilliants, a bracelet with a sapphire snap, a bracelet with a ruby snap, a gold chain, and a miniature picture, and twelve yards of poplin. - A Yes; but the miniature picture I never saw before I saw it in Bow-street. Three shifts, and a number of gloves I left in the house. Two silver tea-spoons and a sugar-tongs belong to myself, they were left in the drawers; the drawers were locked, and I left the keys locked up in town. I returned to town on the 14th of October, and on the next day I went to the drawers with the key, I could not open it. A smith was sent for, he opened the drawers, and then we missed all the articles that you have been speaking of.

JOHN TOWNSHEND . Q. You are an officer of Bow-street. - A. I am; on the 29th of October I searched Carpenter's apartment, in North-street, Manchester-square. The prisoners were all brought to Lord Aylesbury's house, by Mr. Lisle. I went to Carpenter's house, in company with Mrs. Knapp and Mr. Lisle; his wife was out. She came in in a few minutes, and then we began to make our search. We found two of her Ladyship's shifts, with a quantity of gloves and other articles, which are here.

Q. Did you find any pawnbroker's duplicates. - A. A great number in a bag, and a piece of poplin. I went round with Mrs. Knapp to the different pawnbrokers. The things that were found by the duplicates, are in the possession of the pawnbrokers, who are here.

FRANCIS LISLE . I am an Upholsterer in New Bond Street.

Q. Had you any occasion during Lord Aylesbury's absence from town, to send any men to his house to work. - A. Yes, the prisoner, Carpenter, was my journeyman,and the two lads are my apprentices. I sent them to the house to do work in June, they worked there three weeks or more. After Lord Aylesbury came to town, I was applied to on the subject of this robbery. I brought the three prisoners to his house.

Q. In consequence of any thing you said to either or both the boys, were you directed to an apartment next to which they sleep. - A. I was directed by Noys to my house, 158, Bond Street, to a room leading to Noy's bed-chamber Noys went with me and pointed out a drawer, which contained some ladies gloves, and a pinchback locket, of small value. They were given to Mrs. Knapp.

Mr. Knapp. These persons at the bar were sent by you to Lord Aylesbury's house - A. Yes.

Q. They were there you said, about three weeks. If they had been so disposed, could not they have taken them at different times. - A. I beg your pardon, Cooper was not with me at that time, Carpenter was there three weeks; and, during that time, these articles might be taken at different times. Carpenter was there at work a day and a half when the boys was not there. I mean this young lad, Noys, he has been with me two years, he deserves a very good character. I was very much astonished that he should have known of it, and not acquainted me of the misconduct of the other.

ROBERT SPARROW . I am a journeyman to James Brookes , Pawnbroker, Paddington. I took in pledge a pearl ring of Carpenter, for ten shillings, it is worth twenty-five or thirty shillings.

WILLIAM MOXON . I am a servant to Mr. Dry, South Street, Manchester Square. I have a pair of sugar tongs, pledged on the 13th of August, by a woman of the name of Maria Carpenter, North Street. I lent seven shillings on them.

JAMES ROSS . I am a Pawnbroker. I produce a piece of poplin. I took it in of a woman of the name of Ann Carpenter . I lent twelve shillings on it, and to the same woman, I lent four shillings on two silver tea-spoons.

SARAH KNAPP . I cannot speak to the gloves, I never missed them. Lady Aylesbury had a ring like this ring. These tea-tongs I cannot say is mine, they were my sister's. I put them in a box, I did not look at them. I lost two tea-spoons. Lady Aylesbury lost some poplin like that, I would not swear to it. The only thing that I can speak to, are the three shifts. Lord Aylesbury's name is Thomas Bruce , his title is, Earl of Aylesbury.

Carpenter said nothing in his defence, called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Noys and Cooper were not put on their defence.

CARPENTER GUILTY, aged 22, of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

NOYS NOT GUILTY .

COOPER NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

43. JOHN WOOD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of November , a tarpaulin, value 10 s. the property of the London Dock Company .

SECOND COUNT - the property of persons to the jurors unknown.

LUKE HIGGENS . Q. I believe you are a foreman employed by the London Dock Company. - A. I am. On the 3d of November last, between two and three o'clock, I saw the prisoner come in the London Dock. He was driving Joseph William Clifton 's waggon. He came directly past No. 4, Warehouse. He came close to the tarpaulin In about three or four minutes, he was obliged to drive off to make room for another team. I observed the tarpaulin lay there, close to a pile of hides over which it had been thrown over. I saw the prisoner view it and handle it more than once, he stooped down and turned it over.

Q. Had he an opportunity of observing the mark upon it. - A. Probably he might, it was carelessly thrown off the hides, I directed the men to watch at the different windows, I placed myself also in another window. I received information a short time afterwards, I went down. I saw the prisoner going away with the tarpaulin in the waggon.

Court. Whose tarpaulin was it. - A. The London Dock Company's. He was folding it up smooth to lay it down in the bed of the waggon. I went and took the number of the waggon, and gave information to the gate-keeper. After he had folded it up smooth, he laid it in the head of the waggon, he covered it with some straw and a Russia mat. This is the tarpaulin, it belongs to the London Dock Company.

THOMAS CHAPMAN . I am a labourer in the London Dock.

Q. Were you directed by any person to watch the prisoner, on Friday the 30th of November. - A. I was Between the hours of two and three, I saw a carman.

Q. Was that carman the prisoner - A. I cannot pretend to say, because I looked through the glass.

Q. Was it the same person that Higgens saw. - A. Yes, the carman was looking about him. He came forward to the tarpaulin, he turned it part over, then he left it, he came back again and looked about him, took it on his shoulder and walked in the direction the waggon had gone.

SAMUEL CLEMENTS . I am a constable. I was stationed at the North west gate that afternoon. I stopped the prisoner coming out of the docks with a waggon, in that waggon I found this tarpaulin. I asked him whether he had got any thing in the waggon, he said, no. I went up to the waggon, removed an old mat, and discovered this tarpaulin. I asked the prisoner whose tarpaulin it was, he said our's. The prisoner got up in the waggon and opened it. I said, it is not your's, it is our's.

JOHN WAKELIN . I am carman, I work for Mr. Clifton.

Q. Do you know whether there was any tarpaulin of your master's left in the Dock Company's yard. - A. I left one the day before he was taken up. I told the prisoner when he went in to bring it out. On the next day, the prisoner was going in with my master's waggon.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

44. JAMES PIER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of November , a watch, value 12 s. the property of James Denham .

JAMES DENHAM . I am a butcher , I live at South Mins . On the 15th of November I hung up my watch in the slaughter-house, the prisoner came by as I was at work and asked to help me, he did help me some time, and then he told me, somebody wanted me, and when I came back the watch was gone.

Q. Did you ever find your watch again. - A. Yes, at Mr. Cordy's, a pawnbroker. On Sunday evening I found the prisoner at a public-house. His wife came in, and said, he was a rogue, he had taken my watch and pawned it. I sent for a constable.

JAMES CORDY . I am a pawnbroker, I took this watch in pawn of a man, I cannot say it was the prisoner, he was not in my presence two minutes.

JAMES HANCOCK . The prisoner acknowledged to have taken the watch, I found it at Mr. Cordy's.

The property produced and identified.

GUILTY , aged 46.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

45. CHARLES HENRY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of November , a watch, value 3 l. a gold chain, value 2 l. two seals, value 2 l. and two gold keys, value 10 s. the property of John Robinson , from his person .

JOHN ROBINSON . I have been a sailor thirty years, I am a Fishmonger in Billingsgate market. On the 2d of November, I was near Princes Street, a man asked me to treat him, I went in the public-house and treated him.

Q. Did you know him. - A. I did not.

Q. Were you sober. - A. I was in a good sailing trim, fit for any thing but work. I had not been in the public-house half an hour, before this man went out and brought two more in, I treated them all. I paid the reckoning and was coming out, one of these three men snatched the watch out of my pocket.

Q. Was the prisoner there at all. - A. I do not recollect.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

46. THOMAS DAVIES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of November , two saws, value 4 s. five planes, value 8 s. two plow irons, value 2 s. a pair of pincers, value 6 d. two hammers, value 1 s. a bevel, value 6 d. a screw driver, value 2 d. a chissel, value 6 d. two files, value 6 d. a pair of compasses, value 6 d. a gouge, value 6 d. a turkey slip, value 2 d. a punch, value 2 d. two gimblets, value 2 d. a brad-awl, value 2 d. and a basket, value 6 d. the property of Richard Pugh .

RICHARD PUGH . I am a carpenter , I was at work at Alfred Cottage Marybone . On the 14th of November I left my tools upon the bench, at twelve o'clock. I went to dinner, and when I came back, I found the prisoner in the room where I was at work. He was stooping down, tying up the basket of tools. He arose up immediately I came into the room, and said,

"you have made alterations." He ran out, and I followed him, and cried out,

"stop thief, and Roberts, my partner, catched him. This was the basket, they are my tools. I am sure he is the man.

Prisoner's Defence. I am guilty.

GUILTY , aged 34.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

47. ALICE DICKSON, alias JOHNSON , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of December , a carpet, value 5 s. and two remnants of carpets, value 2 s. the property of John William Bentley .

JOHN WILLIAM BENTLEY . I am a clerk to an auctioneer . On the 1st of December, on my returning home from my employ, about eight o'clock in the evening, I missed the carpets out of my room.

JAMES GILLMORE . On the 1st of December the prosecutor applied to me, and from the information of Mr. Wright, I found out the duplicate.

JAMES COURTNEY . I am a pawnbroker. I took the carpets in of the prisoner, on the 1st of December, about seven o'clock in the evening.

The property produced and identified,

Prisoner's Defence. I found them in the street, they lay by the side of the door.

GUILTY , aged 42.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

48. ANTHONY JOSEPH was indicted, for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of November , a great coat, value 20 s. two handkerchiefs, and a pair of braces, value 1 s. the property of Thomas Lee .

MARY LEE . I am the wife of Thomas Lee , slop seller , No. 4, Upper East Smithfield . On the 9th of November, I was sitting in the parlour, a man came in the shop, took a great coat, value 20 s. two handkerchiefs, value 2 s. and a pair of braces, value 1 s. They were pinned to the coat. I immediately called out,

"stop thief". A gentleman who was sitting in the parlour ran out and caught him.

JAMES BEDFORD . You were sitting in the parlour with Mrs. Lee. - A. I was. On the alarm, I ran out and called,

"stop thief." A man kicked the prisoner's heels up. I immediately got up to him, and picked him up in one hand, and the coat in the other. I have the coat across his shoulder, and took him back to where he took it from.

WILLIAM CANNON . I was coming out of the door of my house at the time. I heard the cry of

"stop thief. I catched the prisoner by the collar, and kicked up his heels, he had got the great coat over his arm at the time.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I was never in the shop untill I was dragged into it. I was directed into the street, to a house to get a lodging. Coming down the street, a man ran against me, and hove, as I thought, a rug or a blanket on my shoulder. I was looking round to see what the man did it for, that is the way the coat was found upon me. I pulled it off, and whether the coat got under my leg, or the man that stopped me, threw me down, I cannot say, I fell down.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and whipped in jail .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

49. EDWARD JONES was indicted for the wilful murder of Peter Langstrom , and also stood charged upon the coroner's inquisition.

JOHN JOHNSON . I am a seaman on board the ship New Caesar . On the 6th of November she lay at Black-wall; the deceased, Peter Langstrom , was a mariner on board that ship; the prisoner, Jones, was a Custom house officer on board.

Q. On the night of the 26th did Jones apply to any of you for some meat for supper - A. Yes, between ten and eleven.

Q. Was Jones sober at that time - A. No, a little tipsy.

Q. Was the meat given to Jones - A. Yes, and he began eating it.

Q. How did he cut it - A. He had the meat in his left hand and a knife in his right to cut his meat, he asked for some salt; Langstrom was at that time laying in his hammock with his wife.

Q. Did the deceased say any thing to the prisoner upon his asking for salt - A. He begged he would make no noise, said he was tired and wanted to go to sleep. The prisoner then took him by the hair of his head and shook him in his hammock.

Q. At that time had the prisoner his meat and his knife in his hands - A. He had the meat; I did not see the knife.

Q. You had not seen him lay it down, I suppose - A. No, upon the prisoner seizing him by the hair of his head, the deceased jumped out of his hammock and struck Jones by the side of his face; the prisoner made a blow at his body at the same time; I did not see the knife, that was directly after the deceased struck him.

Q. What did the deceased say - A. That moment the blow was given him, he said, Lord have mercy upon me, I am a dead man.

Q. Did you see the blood flow from the wound directly - A. Yes.

Q. Did the prisoner say why he had done it or how he came to do it - A. The prisoner said he had done it in a passion.

Q. What sort of a knife was it - A. I do not know what became of the knife, it was a sailor's knife, a clasp knife. The deceased was taken to the hospital, he lived about two days afterwards, I belive.

MR. BUTLER. Q. You are the house pupil of the London Hospital - A. I am, this man was brought to the Hospital from on board the ship, the wound was in his belly, with the bowels protruding through the wound in the side of the belly; he lived forty-eight hours after he had received the wound; he died of that wound.

WILLIAM PRESS . Q. Were you on board the New Caesar - A. I was, I am a Custom-house officer, I was on duty with the prisoner; I was on board that ship a month; I never saw him have a word before.

Q. You have heard that the prisoner had been drinking a little, had Langstrom, that died, been drinking a little - A. He had.

Q. What was the character of the prisoner with respect to humanity - A. I never could see that he was quarrelsome untill that evening, I saw the deceased a minute after it was done, I was not there at the time.

SOLOMON JEWEL . I am a beadle of the London Hospital; I was with the deceased previous to his death, he died a quarter after one on Thursday morning, a little after midnight; I was certain he was dying when I left him. He said he was in his hammock with his wife endeavouring to go to sleep, the prisoner was making a noise near his bed, he begged him to be quiet, he jumped out of his hammoc and struck the prisoner, he said there had not been a word before that time.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, called six witnesses who gave him a good character.

GUILTY, aged 36.

Of Manslaughter only .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

50. JACOB JOHAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of November , an umbrella, value 9 s. the property of William James Siggens .

WILLIAM JAMES SIGGENS . I am an hat and umbrella manufacturer , 41, in the Poultry . On Thursday the 22d of November, about half past four o'clock, the prisoner came into my shop with two other men dressed like sailors, and while they were asking about umbrellas with swords in them, I observed the prisoner go out of the door, and missing an umbrella which was there before they came in, I left the two men in the shop and followed after the prisoner, I found the umbrella in his hand, I took him directly to the Poultry Compter and delivered him to the officer; this is the umbrella, it is mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought the umbrella of another seaman, I gave five shillings for it.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Confined Three Months in Newgate , and publickly whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

51. JAMES HOLT was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Charles Griffin , about the hour of seven at night, on the 24th of November , and stealing therein five knives, value 2 l. 10 s. his property .

CHARLES GRIFFIN . I live at 48, Skinner-street, Snow-hill , I am a perfumer and deal in jewellery . On Saturday evening, the 24th of November, about seven o'clock, I went out of one shop into the other to snuff the candles, I snuffed the candles on the compter, I went to the glass case in the window and snuffed three more, I perceived some cotton waving up that the silver knives lay on; I perceived some knives were gone out of the tray. I came into the back shop, I put on my coat and hat and took a large stick and went out of my shop on the Snow-hill side and round the corner into Skinner-street, I saw the prisoner with another at my shop window in Skinner-street, I came up between them both, I saw the prisoner's right hand in the pane of glass what he had broken, with a knife in his hand, he drew the knife out, it was such a knife as this; I catched hold of him by the collar and the other person too, I saw the other person receive the knife of the prisoner, I said, you have robbed me long enough, and when I collared him he struck me on my side and kicked me two or three times and plunged and said d - n you, sir, I am not the man, what do you want of me; in so doing he got out of my hand and ran across Fleet-market. I brought the prisoner in and searched him, I found none of my property, I found a clasp knife about him like others I have seen before to cut windows. I lost five knives, this is one I brought to shew you what sort of knives I lost; I am sure I saw him take one and the other received it; beforeI took him to the compter; he said he would have a pint of beer, Stanton asked him how he came to rob me, d - n him, said he, he would rob me as soon as any other man.

WILLIAM CARTER . I am fourteen, I am an apprentice to Mr. Sellers, silversmith, Cross-street, Hatton Garden. On Saturday evening, the 24th of November, about seven o'clock, I was coming down Skinner-street, I saw two men at Mr. Griffins window, I stopped to see what they were doing of; I saw the prisoner pull out a knife from Mr. Griffin's window with his right hand, and the other man that was with him received it with his left hand; when they saw me looking at them they went to go away, and then Mr. Griffin came right in between them both, and caught hold of both of them, one kicked him and got away, Mr. Griffin took the prisoner into his house and called me in, he searched him and found a knife broken at the point.

Q. Then you did not see them when they came first up to the window - A. No.

WILLIAM LEE . I am a constable. The prisoner was delivered into my charge, and this knife; the point of the knife corresponded to the hole that was made between the glass and the frame.

Prisoner's Defence. On the Saturday stated I went to carry a box for a young woman to the Swan and Two Necks, Lad-lane. On my return, going down Skinner-street, I saw two young men stand at the window, I unfortunately stopped, that gentleman laid hold of me and another, the other was a stronger man than me, he got away.

GUILTY, aged 25,

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

52. JOHN FARLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of November , a piece of cloth, value 3 l. the property of Thomas Canning , a gown, value 5 s. five aprons, value 8 s. a petticoat, value 3 s. a pinafore, value 2 d. the property of John Ballad .

THOMAS BROWN . I am a driver to a stage waggon from London to Hertford. On the 22nd of November the prisoner, his wife, and child, I took up as passengers, and an empty box in Bishopgate-street, near the church to go to Hoddesdon, when I came to the Stones End I took up another passenger, Sarah Ballad ; when I came to Ponders End the passenger Ballad said she had lost some clothes out of her bag; she gave me the bag at the Vine inn in my care; I loaded it in that part of the waggon where the prisoner was, upon some trusses of cloth at Ponders End , Mrs. Ballad found something loose of hers in the waggon, which had been tied up in the bag. I insisted on them all getting out of the waggon and going into a house where we stop and feed the horses; I sent for a constable and had them searched; William Gregory , the constable came and searched the prisoner's box, and found a quantity of new cloth, and wearing apparel belonging to Mrs. Ballad, she claimed it; then I returned to the waggon with a light, this was about ten o'clock at night, and finding two trusses were cut, and part of one of them was taken out, which we found in the prisoner's box, that was not the property of Mrs. Ballad; I asked the prisoner how it came there, he made no reply.

SARAH BALLAD . Q. Did you hear the last witness give his evidence - A. Yes.

Q. On the day that he has mentioned tell us whether you were a passenger in his waggon - A. Yes.

Q. Was the prisoner in the waggon - A. I cannot positively say, because it was dark when I got in, and this man got out of the waggon to fetch a pot of porter.

Q. During the course of your journey did you miss any thing - A. When I got to Ponders End I found a habit shirt loose in the waggon, I then knew my bag had been opened; the waggoner ordered us to get out of the waggon, we did so; the prisoners box was opened, they told me to take my things out, I took out a gown, a petticoat, a pinafore, and five aprons.

Q. What is your husband's name - A. John Ballad .

Q. All these things were in your bag, and were taken out of your bag in the waggon, and they were found in the prisoner's box - A. Yes.

WILLIAM GREGORY . Q. Did you see the magistrate sign that - A. Yes; that is the magistrate's hand-writing. (Read.) The prisoner on being charged with the above robbery, sayeth, my name is John Farley , I am a carpenter , I live in Union-street, Bishopsgate-street; I confess to taking the linen described, and also the clothes from the bag of the passenger Ballad.

X The mark of John Farley .

Prisoner's Defence. May it please your lordship, I am a journeyman carpenter, and was going on that day to see my relations with my wife and child, there were several other persons in the waggon all the way from town, and the waggoner's brother rode in the waggon part of the way; my box was only carried. I was so much agitated by the magistrates telling me he would send my wife to prison, and from the terror of that I should have confessed any thing whatever; the magistrate promised to liberate my wife. I am totally innocent, I had no knowledge of the articles being in the box, and have no doubt they were removed by some of the passengers out of mere frolic.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Grose.

53. JOHN FARLEY and ELIZA FARLEY were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of November , a great coat, value 40 s. a waistcoat, value 7 s. a shirt, value 5 s. two half handkerchiefs, value 1 s. the property of James Williams ; a gown, value 5 s. a frock, value 2 s. a bonnet, value 5 s. three quarters of a yard of muslin, value 2 s. a handkerchief, value 1 s. and two waistcoats, value 3 s. the property of John Adamson , in the dwelling house of James Williams .

MARY ADAMSON . Q. Do you know the prisoners at the bar - A. Yes; both the prisoner's came and took a lodging in my son's house on the 23d of October. My sons name is James Williams . They stopped a week and three days.

Q. What parish is your house in - A. St. Leonard Shoreditch . On the third day after the week they absconded, and we missed all these things out of aroom.

Q. And were these things found upon them - A. Yes, they were found in Paternoster-row, Spitalfields, No. 14.

Q. Did an officer go with you - A. Yes. I went from my own house to their lodgings with an officer, they were not at home then; we waited till she came home and put the key in the door, and then the officer took her; he asked her what she paid for the room a week, she said, three shillings. Before she came home the officer and I searched the room; I found all the things, the bed curtains cut up; these are the blankets; what we found of them she took there.

Q. The owner of the house is your son James Williams - A. Yes. They were all my things, they were taken from different parts of the house, and were found in her apartment in Paternoster-row, they were taken to the apartment that she lodged in.

Q. What is the value of all these goods - A. I cannot exactly say the real value of them altogether, I have lost twenty pound I suppose.

Q. Speak of the value of those things there, do they amount to the value of forty shillings - A. Yes, and upwards; the blankets are worth seven shillings a piece, there are two here, and four were taken; the mattrass we found in her apartment, it is worth about a pound, a bolster and pillow, the bolster is worth half a crown, the two arm chairs they are worth a guinea. All these things are mine, and they were found in the apartment of the prisoner.

Q. There is another indictment they are to be tried upon - A. That is my son's clothes; there was a great coat taken when they came into the house, it has not been found, it cost my son four pound ten; there was a waistcoat found, my sons, it was worth ten shillings.

Q. What can you swear to be the value of the property taken from your house - A. I can swear they are worth twenty pound to me.

Q. You are sure they are worth forty shillings - A. I will say ten pound; then they are worth twenty pound to me. These are the things that were found at her lodgings, they are worth three pound.

Prisoner. How do you know I took the coat; I never saw the coat in my life, nor many other things. The coat was never found.

Prosecutrix. You took them; the officer found the duplicate, and these things in your lodging.

Prisoner. I did not.

- I am a pawnbroker.

Q. Did you receive any thing from the prisoners at the bar - A. I do not recollect the prisoners; I received a waistcoat, from whom I cannot say.

DANIEL BISHOP . I produce a duplicate of a waistcoat pledged for five shillings, I found it in the apartment where I found the woman prisoner.

Prosecutrix. It is my son's waistcoat.

JOHN RICHARDS . I am a pawnbroker.

Q. Do you know of any thing pledged by the prisoners - A. I have every reason to believe it was neither of the prisoners that pledged the sheets.

Bishop. I have a duplicate corresponding to this pair of sheets, pledged for ten shillings, that was found in the prisoners apartment.

Prosecutor. These are my sheets, they are worth fifteen shillings.

JONATHAN BAKER . I am a pawnbroker.

Q. Do you know any thing of the prisoners pawning any thing with you - A. I cannot exactly say; I really believe it was the man, he pawned with me a waistcoat, a frock, and a shirt.

Prosecutrix. They are mine; this is my sons shirt, it is worth about two shillings, a waistcoat of my sons worth one shilling, and my daughter's frock one shilling and sixpence.

Bishop. That duplicate was sound in the prisoners apartment.

JOSEPH DUNN . I am a pawnbroker; I produce a pillow case; I cannot speak to the prisoner.

Bishop. I have the corresponding duplicate.

Dunn. The duplicates tally, it is worth a shilling.

Prosecutrix. The great coat and two pillows are not found.

John Farley 's Defence. That waistcoat and shirt I have had five years. My wife knows nothing at all of the matter, and she is my lawful wife.

Eliza Farley 's Defence. I am entirely innocent of any thing of the kind.

JOHN FARLEY , GUILTY - DEATH , aged 24.

ELIZA FARLEY , NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Grose.

54. JOHN FARLEY and ELIZA FARLEY were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of November , a feather bed, value 4 l. a mattrass, value 1 l. and divers other articles, the property of James Williams , in a lodging room .

The Court declining to offer any evidence, the prisoners of this charge were both

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Grose.

55. JAMES GILL , GEORGE COGDALE , and RICHARD NORRIS , were indicted for feloniously assaulting William Weston , in the king's highway, on the 29th of November , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, sixteen dollars, value 4 l. a crown piece, four half crowns, twenty-five shillings, and a one pound bank note, the property of George Pegg .

WILLIAM WESTON . I am carman to George Pegg , he lives at Hyde, in the parish of Hendon.

Q. On the 29th of November last were you coming home with a load of dung - A. Yes, from London. I was on the Edgware-road , near the five mile stone; it was about eight o'clock at night, the night had been very dark, it was getting lighter then; when I got near the five mile stone, I was riding on the forepart of the cart, three men came across the road, out of the foot-path, two men went before the horse's head, and one behind the cart, the man of the name of Gill had got a short smock on, and a pair of trowsers.

Q. You did not know him at that time - A. No; he went by that name at Bow-street, he was one of those before the horses.

Q. How were the other dressed - A. He had a short smock on, or a jacket, I cannot say which, theman behind the cart had on a large darge dark coat, it appeared to me.

Q. When they came up to you what did they do - Gill came up to me and put something to my breast, which appeared to me to be a pistol.

Q. The man you think was Gill - A. Yes, he said, see this, see this, your money or your life; the man in the dark coat, who was behind, took the money out of my pocket, a letter, and a knife.

Q. How much money did he take from you - A. Seven pounds.

Q. How was the seven pounds made up - A. In the first place there were sixteen dollars, four half crowns, an old crown piece with some letters on the head of it, twenty-five shillings in silver, and a one pound bank note.

Q. How did you receive this money - A. As payment for a load of hay; I received it that same evening, about four o'clock, in London for a load of hay. When they took my money out of my pocket they took me behind the team about two hundred yards, as near as I can tell, back upon the road, the team was going on slowly, they let me go then, and I did not see any more of them, they walked towards town.

Q. While they were robbing you and taking you two hundred yards back on the road, did you take any notice of their persons - A. I looked at Gill, he was the man that was facing of me.

Q. Did you look at him enough to be able to recollect his countenance afterwards - A. Yes.

Q. Did you observe the other men - A. No, I did not; one stood behind me, and the other on the side of me, I did not observe them.

Q. When did you see these men, or either of them afterwards - A. I saw them the next day at Bow-street.

Q. That is you saw three men - A. Yes.

Q. Now these three men that you saw there, did you recollect any one of them - A. Yes, Gill, the right hand man; I told the officer before I went in I could swear to him, and when I went in I recollected Gill, I said that is the man that presented the pistol to my breast, in his presence, he was by, he could not hear me speak.

Q. Look at the prisoner, can you say that man put what you took to be a pistol to your breast - A. Yes, I can safely swear that.

Q. Now when these men left you what did you do - A. I went into a public house and told the people that I had been robbed, that was before I got up to my team, I went on then after my team; at the public house there were two or three people said they would go after them, I did not see them go.

Q. You went after your team - A. Yes; I went up to the stable's with the horses; master's house is not where the stables are, I did not go to my master's house that night.

Q. What time did you arrive at the stables - A. About half after eight, as near as I could tell.

Q. How far are the stables from your master's house - A. Above a mile as near as I can tell. I live in the parish of Hendon, about a mile from my master's house.

Q. Are you a single or a married man - A. A married man.

Q. How came you not to go directly that night - A. I do not know; I did not go there till the next morning, I never go there of a night only once of twice a week to know what I am to do. My master came to me the next morning to the stable about nine o'clock, I told him I had been robbed on the over night.

Q. How came you not to go and tell your master before nine o'clock, you were up before that time, what time did you get up that morning - A. About six.

Q. Had your master heard of the robbery before he came to you - A. Yes; I told him I had been robbed, and while I told him there was a man came up and told me these men were taken.

Q. Then in consequence of that I suppose you went up to London did not you - A. Yes.

Q. You were shewn the three young men at the bar were not you - A. Yes.

Q. Now you have told us one of them you know, which was Gill, and respecting the other men did you take any notice of the height or size of them - A. No, I do not.

Q. How old are you yourself - A. I am about twenty-seven.

Q. You say you are married, how many children have you - A. One child.

Gill. I would wish to ask him who told him I was the man that put the pistol to his breast - A. No man told me so.

Q. I was told that you were in the public-house conversing with some of Mr. Franklin's men, and you were told to say I was the man - A. I never had any conversation with Mr. Franklin's men.

COURT. Did either Mr. Franklin's men, or any men whatever tell you to swear to Gill - A. No, no man whatever.

Gill. I never had a pair of trowsers on, these are the clothes that I had on when the officer took me; I shewed him my things, they searched my room; I had no trowsers whatever.

JOSEPH WRIGHT . I am a horse patrol on the Edgware-road. On the 29th of September, about half past seven o'clock in the evening, I was riding between the three and four mile stone, the London way, I met two men first going down the road from London, and I met one a little way after, I bid them good night, they gave me the return of good night; I rode a little way farther, and met another man.

Q. That is the fourth - A. Yes. I rode a little past him, and had suspicion there was something the matter.

Q. Did you hear any thing that excited that suspicion - A. By hearing of a whistle; I still remained quiet until I heard a whistle twice more, I then turned round and proceeded to the whistle, there I fell in with a man of the name of James Fordham , I apprehended him and examined him, and got his address from him, where he lived, and what house he used, he told me at the sign of the Bell, Church End, Wilsdon, and during my examining of him I got alarmed of the robbery, a person came up the road from the public-house, saying that Mr. Pegg's man, the farmer,had been robbed of seven pound. I there proceeded after these men and gave charge of Fordham, and went after the men that had just passed me; I went from thence to Wilsdon Green to the Bell, it is two or three miles out of the Edgware-road; I went by my own judgment, these men having been drinking at the Bell; when I came to the Bell I enquired if such a person as James Fordham had been at the house in the course of the afternoon, they told me yes; I then went in pursuit of James Gill ; I heard of the names of the other people that had been drinking there; I found James Gill at his lodging in Church-End, Wilsdon, he was in bed, I took him on suspicion of the robbery, I then went to Richard Norris 's lodging, I found him in bed and took him also.

Q. What time might this be - A. When I took Norris it was about eleven o'clock, and about ten o'clock when I took Gill; then I proceeded to George Cogdale 's lodging; they all live in the parish of Wilsdon. I took him; that was exactly at twelve o'clock.

Q. Your meeting of two, and then another man, and the fourth man, what time was that - A. That was about half after seven.

Q. How came you to be so late taking Gill - A. My detaining Fordham, that took up the time. When I took the three prisoners I took them to the Crown, about the three mile stone, where I had left Fordham, the Crowns is in the Edgware-road. My partner came up when I had taken the third man.

Q. Another man assisted you likewise - A. Yes, and he came with me to the Crown.

Q. You and your partner went with them I suppose - A. Yes; I rode before, my partner behind, and a lodger or two walked along side of them.

Q. They made no attempt to get away, did they - A. No.

Q. When you apprehended them did any conversation pass - A. No further. I searched them and found nothing but knives upon them, I searched them all, I found no money upon either of them at first; I kept them at the Crown untill my inspector came down, he told him if he would go with him he would shew him where the money lay; Richard Norris said to the inspector when he came, if he would go along with him, or send the officer, he would take him to where the money lay, he said he saw George Cogdale hide it in a bank of the garden of his lodging.

Q. Was Cogdale by - A. No. In the bank of the garden of Norris's lodging, the inspector and me proceeded along with Norris, he took us into his garden, from thence he searched with his hands in the bank, and scratched the money out there and gave the money to me, I have kept it ever since, this is it.

Q. Now tell me what it is - A. A one pound note, sixteen dollars, an old crown piece, twenty-five shillings, and four half crowns, these are the knives, I found upon them, and a letter.

Q. to prosecutor. Do you remember having any thing of a letter - A. Yes, this is my letter, I will swear to it, it is a letter to my sister, I had it in my pocket at that time.

Wright. After this I took him to Bow-street, the next morning with the three prisoners, I sent a man off for Weston in the morning, he came to me at the office, he was shewn the three prisoners at the bar in my presence, he pointed out Gill, he said he pointed something like a pistol to him, but he could not tell whether it was a pistol or a knife; Gill made no answer to that, but said as to Norris telling of the money he had been the ringleader of the whole, Norris said they had been the ringleaders, and had brought him into all this trouble.

Q. You did not hear Cogdale say any thing - A. No, only what Gill said was perfectly right.

Mr. Barry. You were upon that road at half past seven o'clock, you found Norris in his bed, you did not see him on the road - A. I cannot say I did to my knowledge.

Q. How far is the place where the robbery was supposed to be committed to where Norris lodged - A. About three miles.

Q. What was the hour of the robbery - A. About eight o'clock in the evening.

Q. I believe you know that if these men are convicted there is a reward - A. Yes; I have had the the premium before, there is forty pound reward for each man.

Q. Now when this man told you where this money was, was any inducement held out to him - A. Not any; I never spoke to him, he wished to speak to the inspector, he said he saw it hid, he was sorry for it; he acknowledged that he was led into the error by the young men.

Q. He told you he saw another man conceal it - A. Yes.

Q. He did not tell you that he was guilty of the robbery - A. No; I found him in bed by eleven o'clock, his door was locked, and he was gone to bed.

WILLIAM LANCE . Q. What are you - A. I am inspector of the horse patrol; I was at the Crown at nine o'clock.

Q. When were the prisoners brought in there - A. Near two o'clock in the morning. When the prisoners were there, I went into another room to where the prisoners were, I had not been in more than ten minutes before Norris came in, he expressed a wish to speak to me, I asked him what he had to say, he told me he could tell me where the money was, and that the other prisoners were the men that robbed him.

COURT. We will not go into that, the other prisoners were not by - A. No, they were not; I saw the other prisoners before Norris came to me.

Q. And after that you had no conversation with the other prisoners, had you - A. No. I went with Norris and Wright the patrol, he took me to his own garden, he began making a search for the money in the bank of the garden, he did not find it for some time, I said you have not brought me for nothing; he said, no, and assured me it was there; there was a cottage to the garden, I sent Wright for a light, and when a light was brought he found it directly; it was wrapped up together and given to Wright.

Q. Before Norris had made this proffer of shewing you where this money was, you had not held out any promise had you - A. No, not to any one of them. I brought the prisoner back to the Crown. When he came there I went into the room where the two otherprisoners were, and I believe there were some little murmur with the others, what it was I do not know; then I left them, when I saw them with the two patrols, with directions to bring them up the next morning. Wright and Vickers, the other patrol, staid with the prisoners.

Mr. Barry. Norris told you where the money was put - A. He told me Cogdale hid the money, and he told me that there was the money.

JOHN VICKERS . I am one of the horse patrols.

Q. You were with Wright that night were you - A. Yes.

Q. Were you present when these men were taken - A. When I came to the Crown I was with Mr. Lance, he ordered me to go to Church End; I went accordingly there, I found Wright, he had got Norris and Gill, then I went with him to take up Cogdale; I and Wright and another man brought them all three to the Crown.

Q. Tell me what past in your presence at the Crown - A. Norris asked me if I would untie his hands and let him go out of doors, and when he was out of doors he asked me if I thought Mr. Lance would speak to him. I told him I would take him in doors and tell Mr. Lance that he wanted to speak to him; I took him in doors and shewed him into Mr. Lance's room, and told Mr. Lance and in consequence of what he told Mr. Lance and Wright went to his house. I kept guard of the other prisoners at the Crown, Norris was brought back near three o'clock.

JOSEPH SENIOR . I keep a public house at Wilsdon, the Bells.

Q. Look at three young men at the bar do you know them - A. Yes. On the 29th of November last they were all three at my house, I was not at home when they came in, it was about nine or ten o'clock in the morning, it rained in the morning, and they left my house about five o'clock in the afternoon, as near as I can tell they all went out together.

Q. Do you know a person of the name of Fordham - A. Yes, he was there at the time, he was with them, they all four went out together, saying, they would go to Gill's house.

Q. How far is your public house at Wilsdon from the Edgware-road - A. About three miles; Wilsdon lies between the Harrow-road, and the Edgware-road.

Q. How far is your house from London - A. Five miles.

Mr. Knapp. They came into your house being a public-house between nine and ten o'clock in the morning - A. Yes, and went out about five.

Q. At the time they went towards Gill's house they might have gone any where else, or they might have separated - A. They might so.

Gill's Defence. I am innocent of the crime that is laid to my charge, I was in company with these men at Mr. Senior's, when we came out I bid them good night

Cogdale's Defence. I am innocent; I never saw the robbery, I never saw the money, I was not nigh the place, I had no connection with it.

Norris left his defence to his counsel.

Gill called one witness, who gave him a good character.

Cogdale called eight witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Norris called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GILL, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 22.

COGDALE, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 18.

NORRIS, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 21.

[ The prisoners were recommended to His Majesty's mercy, on account of their former good character, and using no violence at the time .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

56. ZOORTESTOODO SANTO and FRANCISCO PERARA were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of November , a watch, value 2 l. 2 s. the property of George Morris , privately in his shop .

GEORGE BLANEY . I am shopman to George Morris , silversmith and watchmaker , 120, Minories . On the 17th of November, about a quarter after five in the afternoon, the prisoners came to our shop, Perara spoke, he said, this man wants to buy one watch, they could speak English very well when they came to our house; I asked them what price, the reply was four pounds or four guineas; I took them one out of the window at four guineas, and Santo looked at it, then I introduced two on the counter, which made three watches at four guineas; after looking at it some time he said he could not hear how it went, I told him he had better go to the bottom of the shop, which he did and while I was there Perara asked the lad standing in the shop to shew him another watch out of the window, I made a motion to the lad with my hand not to do it. When Santo and myself came to the window again Perara asked me if I would shew him one at two pound ten shillings; I shewed him one at two guineas and a half; after some time looking at it he offered me two guineas for it; I told him that was too little; he then endeavoured to secrete it down the sleeve of his coat; I took the watch from him and told him that was not the way to use the watch; I then laid it on the counter, he then offered two pound three shillings for it, and took it up in his hand; I told him that was too little, he then put the watch down on the counter, in about two minutes; he slid out of the shop, I instantly missed one of the four guinea watches, I told William Godfrey that was standing by to jump over the counter and look for the short man, Perara, I had missed one of the four guinea watches. Directly he was gone Santo pointed to one of the bills of the four guinea watches, and said you want for this watch five guineas, I said no, but four; the lad then returned and said he could not see any thing of Perara, the lad coming in at the door prevented Santo from going out, I then jumped over the counter myself, and laid hold of him by the jacket, but before I could speak he said, me no got the watch. I was induced by him to go three or four doors down the street, because I understood the man was gone in the stocking shop; when I came there I found he was not there, I then told him he must go back with me, when I requested him so to do he pushed me off the pavement, I had still got hold of his jacket; I pushed him on the pavement again, but finding I had no one to assist, he pushed me into the road, and there knockedme down, by the fall I tore his jacket from the top to the bottom, and knocked his her off, and by so doing I lost my hold of him, he then ran away; I instantly got up and called out stop thief, he ran down Goodman's-yard, and ran up a very intricate place; he ran up a corner, I then thought I had got the man again, I went to lay hold of him, he knocked me down again and made a spring from me some few yards, but two persons coming up he was secured and brought back to the shop; I then sent for an officer to search him, he was searched, and there was found upon him five shillings and an halfpenny, and two clasp knives. He was then taken to the watch-house. The watch has been found.

WILLIAM GODFREY . I am a servant to Mr. Morris in the Minories. On the 17th of November, a quarter past five, Santo and Perara came into my master's shop, Perara introduced Santo as being a man that wanted to buy a watch, Mr. Blaney asked him the price, he replied four pounds, or four guineas; I saw Mr. Blaney take one from the window first, and then took two more at four guineas each, they were produced on the counter. I saw Santo go down the shop to observe the motion of the watch, then he returned to the counter again; after he returned to the counter he leaned down and obscured the light of the lamp in the window, then he laid down the watch on the counter again. Perara asked Mr. Blaney if he had a watch he could sell him for two pound ten shillings; he shewed him one at two guineas and a half, Perara then bid him two pound, and advanced three shillings; Mr. Blaney told him he could not take that; he observed him using the watch very roughly endeavouring to conceal it up the cuff of his jacket, he laid it down and slid to the door. After he was gone about two minutes or rather better the watch was missed, Mr. Blaney desired me to jump over the counter to go in search of Perara; I jumped over the counter and went to the centre of the window, I could not see Perara; I returned and told Mr. Blaney I could not see any thing of him. When Santo found Perara was gone I saw him take up the four guinea bill of the watch that laid on the counter, he then said that watch was five guineas that was by the side of the bill; Mr. Blaney told him four guineas; he was then walking to the door, making motions that it would not do, my being at the door when Santo attempted to go away, obstructed him in endeavouring to make his escape; Mr. Blaney saw him endeavouring to make his escape, jumped over the counter, and laid hold of Santo's jacket, and before he could say any thing Santo said, me no got the watch; he then said he would shew us where Perara was; I saw them go a door or two distant, and by the motion of Mr. Blaney I saw he wanted to bring him back; I saw Santo push Mr. Blaney off the curb, and in about one minute he made his escape into the middle of the road, I am sure both the prisoners at the bar are the men, I can swear to both of them.

FRANCIS KINNERSLY . I am an officer. I was sent for to Mr. Morris's in the Minories on Saturday the 17th between five and six o'clock, Santo was in the shop, I searched his pockets, and found one dollar, I enquired of him what he had done with the watch, going to the watchhouse he told me Perara desired him to go with him and purchase a watch. Perara was taken on Saturday night for stealing a Flushing jacket.

WILLIAM BEEBY . On Monday the 12th of November last Perara was brought to the office in Lambeth-street, and another man for stealing a Flushing jacket from a shop, the headborough that brought him up told me that he understood he had a watch about him; I searched Perara, underneath his trowsers knee I found a watch, I went to Mr. Morris's, they claimed the watch.

Blaney. This is the watch, here is my own hand-writing on the watch paper.

Perara's Defence. I never was in the shop, I bought the watch of another seaman.

Santo's Defence. Perara desired me to go along with him to buy a watch, I did not know that he had stolen a watch nor what his intention was.

SANTO, GUILTY, aged 33.

PERARA, GUILTY, aged 20.

Of stealing, but not privately .

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

57. JOSEPH SEXTON was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of James Clarke , about the hour of six o'clock at night, on the 21st of November , and stealing therein, six pieces of camblets, value 12 l. 10 s. the property of Robert Lee , and George Brassey .

JAMES CLARKE. I am a warehouseman in Hart-street, Crutched Friers, in the parish of St. Olave, Hart-street .

Q. Is your warehouse part of your dwelling-house - Yes; they communicate together; I occupy the house myself; I let part of the dwelling-house out in accompting-houses.

Q. What day was it - A. I think on the 21st of November, about noon time in the day, I saw the prisoner at the bar with another soldier , who had been frequently in the habit of working in my warehouse in Mark-lane, I knew the other soldier to be a notorious thief, because I had detected him in my warehouse, and seeing this prisoner with him I suspected him, and repeatedly saw him till about dusk in the evening, till it was about time to shut up my warehouse.

Q. At what o'clock did you shut up your warehouse - A. Usually at dusk in the evening, about five o'clock, or earlier that that, we hardly ever do any thing by candle light, I shut up my warehouse in the usual way, and examined all the locks of different floors in the warehouse, which I found secure. On the following morning, between nine and ten, I found the lock of the two pair of stairs floor which is occupied by Messrs. Lee and Brassey, they rent it of me; I found the padlock taken off, and the screw staple was broken, and the lock laid upon one of the steps of the warehouse stairs, the door was closed to, though the padlock was taken off; I pushed it open; I suspected that the warehouseman of Messrs. Lee and Brassey was in the warehouse. It was after I came out I should have told your lordship that I observed the screw staple was broken off; I called about in the warehouse, I found nobody there. On the evening I secured the outward door with an additional fastening. On the following morning I went to Messrs. Lee and Brassey's accompting house, then followed the information that the warehouse had been broken open, and a bale had been cut open.

Mr. Alley. This dwelling house is part of your warehouse, do you mean to say so, it is divided into separatetenements - A. It is.

Q. Messrs. Lee and Brassey are yearly tenants - A. Yes.

Q. They hold it now of you until the end of the current year, is it so - A. Yes.

Q. As to your dwelling house you live at Hackney - A. Yes.

Q. I believe there are bills upon your house in town to let it - A. Yes; accompting houses to let, not my dwelling-house. I have another dwelling-house attached under the same roof.

Q. Do you mean to say you sleep in No. 2, 3, 4, and 5 - A. I cannot mean to say that; I cannot divide myself into four or five parts; I have somebody in my dwelling-house until I can return and fill them up myself. They are all under one roof.

COURT. This warehouse of Lee and Brassey is it under the same roof under which you live - A. It is; it communicates to my dwelling-house, and has done for twenty-four years.

Mr. Alley. The passage to this warehouse is in the street - A. It is not. It is through my house, a communication under the same roof, they do not go into the street, the communication is from my dwelling-house.

JOHN AMOS . I am clerk to William Robert Lee , and George Brassey . I know that Messrs. Lee and Brassey had a bale containing camblets and other stuffs. On the evening of the 27th of last month I was informed.

Q. You are wrong as to your dates - A. I was not informed until a week afterwards.

Q. Had Mr. Lee and Brassey a bale of Norwich camblets - A. Yes.

Q. When had they it prior to the robbery - A. This bale of camblets they had in their possession two years. On the 27th I was informed that the warehouse in which the bale was deposited had been broken open, that bale had been cut open, and part of the contents stolen out. On the following morning a person brought to Messrs. Lee and Brassey's accompting house a newspaper, in which were inserted an advertisement, stating that several pieces of Norwich camblets had been stopped upon a person, and were to be seen at the Mansion house; I went to the Mansion house, and upon the five pieces of Norwich camblets shewn to me; I immediately recognized the numbers to be the handwriting of some person in the manufactory at Norwich, from whence Messrs. Lee and Brassey were in the habit of having goods.

Q. Was your own mark upon them - A. No, I never saw the pieces untill I went to the Mansion house; I afterwards proceeded to the warehouse and examined the remainder of the bale that had been cut open, and upon comparing them with the pattern book I found six pieces missing, the numbers and colours of the five pieces which were shewn to me at the Mansion house, they corresponded with the number and colour of the five and six pieces that were missing. This is the pattern book.

Q. Then all you know is, that these camblets they are of the same number, and the same colour and marks - A. Yes, and six pieces were missing out of the bale.

Q. Have not other persons the same patterns and the same numbers - A. I have no doubt they have the same colour, the numbers I cannot speak to that.

JAMES BROWN . I am an officer of the city. On Wednesday the 21st of November, about twenty minutes after six in the evening, in company with Branscomb and Eldridge in Leadenhall-street, I observed the prisoner at the bar with a bag on his back just turning the come of St. Mary Axe, when he turned the corner I observed him to make a kind of a run, I immediately went after him and laid hold of his collar, I asked him what he had got, he told me he did not know; I asked him where he had brought it from, he told me he had picked it up, it had dropped from the tail of a cart, he did not say where; my brother officers then came up, Branscomb took the property in question. In taking him to the compter, nearly opposite of the India house; I observed his left hand down by his side, I desired him to keep his hand up, at that instant he threw something into the middle of the road, I called to Eldridge to pick it up, he did, which proved to be a large rasp with the end broken off; I immediately searched him, by a shop window, found in one pocket two knives and gimblet; we then took him to be the compter. We advertised the goods on the 28th Messrs. Lee and Brassey's people came to the Mansion house and owned them, saying they had been robbed. I went and examined the warehouse, I found a screw staple had been broken open, I examined the bale, and found it was cut, and the marks in the door corresponded with this rasp in two places.

THOMAS BRANSCOMB . These are the pieces I took from the prisoner in company with Brown; they are all marked on the outside with numbers, four of them green and one blue.

JOSEPH BLACK . I am porter to Lee and Brassey. All I know that I locked the door myself three days previous to this robbery.

WILLIAM ELDRIDGE . This is the rasp which the prisoner put his hand into his left pocket and took it out and threw it into the road, I went to the warehouse with Brown; I examined the flat part of the rasp to the door it exactly corresponded.

Q. to Amas. Now point out the patterns in the book - A. One piece is marked 74, and this piece is marked 74, the colour is green.

JURY. The patterns are not cut from the pieces - A. These large patterns were sent by the manufacturer at Norwich. I never saw these pieces till after the robbery.

COURT. How long has this entry been made - A. I suppose two years; this bale was intended for exportation it could not be exported in consequence of the interruption with the communication to the Continent; the value of the pieces are ten pounds.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel, and called no witnesses to his character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 24.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

58. WILLIAM CLARK , and JESSE SMEED , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of November , eighty pounds weight of lead, value 12 s. the property of our Lord the King . And

FOUR OTHER COUNTS, stating the property to belong to different persons.

EDWARD ARNOLD . Q. You are the office keeper of these barracks - A. I am, 21, New-street, Spring Gardens . The two prisoners were plumber s, they were employed in repairing the premises. On the 28th of November, in the morning, they rang the bell, they were let in; it was quite day light; they called for a candle, I hadsuspicion, I put my clothes on and sent for a constable; there was some lead under my care, I saw Smeed turn the engine in the back area, the engine was near the place where the lead was deposited; I heard Clarke pulling out the lead; I went up stairs and waited for their coming out; the lead was in the back area. I looked out of doors and saw Sir John Onslow 's servant coming out of his master's house, I called him and asked him to assist me; we waited in the hall till Clarke came up stairs, I asked him what he had been doing of, he said, he had been repairing the engine; I told him I understood that was done before; I caught hold of him by the collar and pulled a screw wrench out of his hand, I asked him where the lead was, he said, down stairs, then Smeed came up and begged for mercy before I spoke to him, he said, pray forgive me this time, I will never do so again; I told them they should stop there till the constable came, and if they offered to stir I would knock them down with the screw wrench. Before the constable came they dropped the lead from each of them; I saw the lead drop, I believe one weighed fifty-two pound and the other twenty-nine pound.

WILLIAM SMITH . I am constable, these are the two pieces of lead I took up where they dropped it in the hall.

WILLIAM HALL . I am a plumber; the lead is worth about fifteen shillings.

The prisoners said nothing in their defence.

Clarke called five witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Smeed called five witnesses, who gave him a good character.

CLARKE, GUILTY aged 41.

SMEED, GUILTY aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

50. MARY SHADWELL , and MARY the wife of RICHARD SHADWELL were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of October , a promissory note for the payment of 20 l. eleven other promissory notes for the payment of 10 l. each, and three other promissory notes for the payment of 5 l. each , the property of Griffith Griffiths , William Griffiths , and Robert Roberts .

SECOND COUNT, the property of William Williams .

WILLIAM WILLIAMS . I am a Welsh drover; my employers are Griffith Griffiths , William Griffiths , and Robert Roberts ; they live in Carnavonshire in North Wales. On the 20th of October I was returning from Maidstone in Kent, I saw Mary Shadwell the younger at a small distance from the Swan at Crayford; she said, Welchman, will you let me ride? I was riding one horse and leading another; I told her I did not care if she did, she did not ride. I went on to the Swan in Crayford , she kept near me; when I came there I put up the horses and went into a box in the tap-room and in a few minutes Mary Shadwell the younger came in, I had some bread and cheese and a pint of beer; she said, Welchman, will you let me drink with you; she sat in the box very near the side of me and called for a pipe of tobacco, after that she called for another and shifted and sat on the right side of the box. After I had drank the pint of beer I had a glass of rum and been very much fatigued three days before, I put my head on the box and slept for half an hour to the best of my recollection, the landlord informed me something; when I awoke the prisoner was gone, I afterwards made an application to a constable there, he refused to give me assistance, he is a baker at Crayford; this was on the Saturday, I came to London on the Monday morning, I gave some information at Bow-street.

Q. When you went into that public house at Crayford describe what you lost - A. I had three hundred and twelve pound in my breeches pocket, they consisted of Bank notes, Canterbury and Dartford notes, they were in brown paper - I had four twentys, more than five or six tens, and a good many fives, and from seven to ten ones; I have seen some of the notes since in the possession of Gillmore the officer. The money was all taken out of my pocket when I was asleep, and when I awoke the girl was gone.

EDWARD JONES . I keep the Checquer public house, in Tothill-street, Westminster. On the 22d of October the elder Shadwell came to my house about eight o'clock in the morning, the younger one came in about half past eleven, before she came in the elder woman offered me a country note for ten pound, I told the old woman I did not change country notes; she offered after another country note of ten pound. When the young Shadwell came in my servant called me into the bar, I looked at a tray in the cupboard, I saw many notes, my servant said they were Mrs. Shadwell's; she sells apples in the street, my servant said I was to give them directions where to get them changed. I took them in the parlour and sorted them, there were fifty pound in country notes on Masterman and co. on Williams and Griffiths two five pound notes, five ten pound notes of Dartford, and six one pound Bank of England notes, in all, country notes one hundred and ten pound and six one pound Bank of England. I then asked Mary Shadwell , the elder, if she knew how many notes she had given me, she answered no; I gave her all these notes, she put the six one pound notes in her bosom, I told her they did not want any changing any where; I told the elder Shadwell there were proper directions at the back of each bundle were to get them changed. I suspected it was a robbery, I went to Queen-square office.

JOHN GILLMORE . I am an officer of Queen square. On Monday the 22d of October I and Thomas Renny pursued the prisoners into the city by the direction of Mr. Jones expecting to see them at the banker's; when I came into St. Paul's Church-yard I met an hackney coach with the two prisoners in it and four other persons, it was about one o'clock, they went to Ludgate-hill and were coming towards Westminster; I ordered the coachman to stop and immediately jumped into the coach and said which of you ladies have got any thing for me, they said they did not know what I meant; I ordered the coachman to drive to Queen-square; going along I said which of you ladies have got bank notes, I asked them frequenly, at last one of them cried and pointed to the old woman said that is the woman that has got what you want; I said no one should put their hands into their pockets untill I had searched them; going along the Strand the elder prisoner said, now shall I speak? I told her she might do as she liked about that; she put her hand in her pocket and gave me a parcel.

Q. What relations are the prisoners - A. The elder one is mother-in-law; she conveyed to me fifty new onepound Bank notes, the elder one cried and said, Oh! Mary if you have any more give them to Mr. Gillmore, addressing herself to the younger prisoner I wish you had broke your neck before you had brought your father and me into this trouble. Mary pulled a handkerchief out of her pocket which contained some silver; I afterwards found two guineas, she gave me that and said that was all she had got of the money left, adding, you know, mother, I gave it all to you. When we came to the office the elder Shadwell gave me some more notes at the public house where we searched them, which made up in total one hundred and fifteen pound, I asked the old woman how she came by the fifty new notes; the young one was present, she said she had just received them at the banker's in change of five ten pound notes; I then asked the young one how she came possessed of all this money she told me that coming from Maidstone Fair she met with a Welchman who gave her the notes to take care of; I then called the mother of one side and told her that I heard that she had something more at home, I would wish to search her lodgings; I left the other prisoner in the care of my brother officer and went and searched the elder prisoner's lodgings at St. Hermit's-hill, I there found a quantity of new linen drapery goods, I asked her where she purchased them, she told me at Mr. Barrett's in the Broad-way, that she had left a twenty pound and a five pound for Mr. Barrett to change, that she had received no other change for the twenty-five pound than the goods that lay there, these are the new goods which I have here, and the notes, a twenty pound and a five pound they are both Rochester and Chatham Bank; I then traced a ten pound note in the hands of Mr. Cadmore a publican, making about one hundred and sixty pound; the elder prisoner told me there was fifty-five pound more in the hands of Mr. Battin a publican in Westminster, he denies all knowledge of it. When we went to Crayford I found a bundle which the younger prisoner claims, that is in court; she says she left it behind her at the Swan; I went there to fetch the landlord up, he has left the house.

WILLIAM BARRETT . I am the son of William Barrett , linen draper, Chapel-street, Broad-way, Westminster. On the 22d of October, the two prisoners came to our shop, between seven and eight in the morning, they bought some goods and tendered a twenty pound note to me; that is my hand-writing on the back of the note, the five pound note was tendered in the house by these women; they are both Rochester and Chatham notes.

MARGERET WILLIAMS. On the 22d of October, the elder Shadwell came to my house, about eleven o'clock in the forenoon, she said her daughter-in-law had come out of the country and had made her a present of a ten pound Dartford note, she left it with me to get it changed; I sent my little girl with the ten pound note to Mr. Chadmore.

GEORGE CADMORE . I am a publican, Broad-way, Westminster; the daughter of the last witness brought this ten pound note to me.

Gillmore. That is the note I received from Mr. Cadmore, he heard of the robbery and sent the note.

Prosecutor. The number of the notes I have here that agree with the notes that I was robbed of by this girl.

Shadwell the elder. I know nothing of the robbery.

Shadwell the younger. I met the drover about a quarter of a mile before we came to the Swan in Crayford, he asked me if I would let him go with me. I told him yes, when I came to the public house he asked me what I would have to drink, he gave me beer and part of the rum, he called for bread and cheese, the reckoning came to four shillings and eight pence, he asked me if I would go down to his own country and live with him, I said I should look very foolish if he had a wife and family, he took out the money and gave it me in a bit of paper, he laid down his head on the table and I came out of doors.

Williams. What she says is entirely false.

SHADWELL the Elder, NOT GUILTY .

SHADWELL the Younger, GUILTY , aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

60. RICHARD CRANSTON and RICHARD CLARE was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Thomas Dadd , about the hour of nine, on the night of the 4th of November , and stealing therein two blankets, value 6 s. two tablecloths, value 4 s. two pillow cases, value 2 s. and a shirt, value 2 s. his property .

ANN DADD . I live on Howard's-green, in the parish of St. Luke's . On the 4th of November, about a quarter before five in the afternoon, I went out of my house, I fastened my window by a gimblet and double locked my door, there was a pane of glass broken in the window.

Q. You say there was a pane of glass broken, do you think a person putting their hand in might pull out that gimblet - A. Yes, I think I could have done it very well myself. As I was going out of the house I saw Mr. Green, a neighbour, he was talking to the prisoner, Cranston; I smiled and told Mr. Green I was going to take a pleasant walk, the afternoon being fine, meaning the contrary; I told him I was going to Bayswater, he said not back to night, I said yes, I had done it frequently after this time, I then walked on to Bayswater, I met my husband there about half past six o'clock, we both returned home about a quarter before ten.

Q. What is your husband - A. A shoe-maker.

Q. You did not know Cranston before, did you - A. Yes, he lives very near to us. When we came to the top of the Green there is the City Arms where we have our beer, I gave my husband the key, he went home and I followed with my son and the pot of porter in my hand; when I came to my own door my husband met me and said, we are robbed; I went in and found the kitchen window open, that window I had fastened with the gimblet; I missed three candlesticks off the mantle-shelf, a shirt from the chair back; we then went up stairs I missed a bolster, two pillows with their cases, a pair of sheets, a gown, a one pound Bank note, fifteen shillings in silver, and two table-cloths.

Q. When did you see these things again - A. I have seen some of the things again but I cannot say whether they are my own.

Q. Let me caution you, you must speak the truth - A. On the second week there were some things brought up to the office.

THOMAS DADD . Q. We are told you are a shoemaker - A. Yes.

Q. You were coming home from Bayswater - A. Yes, a quarter before ten; I was the first person that came home, I was the proper person to be the prosecutor, not my wife. I unlocked my door, I saw the window open,there had been a pane broken out some time, I thought my wife very careful to fasten all the doors and leave the window open, I gave her a good lecture when she came home, I went to get a candlestick to light a candle, I missed the candlestick. About six weeks ago I saw a person look over my pales in my yard at one o'clock in the morning, I really believe it was Cranston, I spoke to him, I said, what are you looking after here, my friend? he said, he was taking a view of the rooms to see whether they were bigger than the rooms in his house; I asked him who he was, he said, a neighbour over the way, the hair-dresser. Cranston used to shave me.

Q. Now after this conversation with him, that he was your neighbour, the hair-dresser, had you any doubt about his being your neighbour - A. No, not the least doubt in the world.

Q. Did you direct Cranston to be taken up - A. My wife applied at the office.

Q. Did you see your things brought before the magistrate - A. Yes; they were not a bit like mine; I could not speak to any of them.

HENRY BLY . I am a hair-dresser, 22, Brick-lane, Old-street. On Sunday evening the 4th of November, about six o'clock, the prisoner Cranston came to my house with a bundle under his arm and went up stairs to his brother-in-law, the prisoner Clare, Cranston stopped a few minutes, they both came down together and went out, they stopped about half an hour out and came back again and brought in a luggage; they appeared to me to be assisting one another with the luggage; they stopped that evening till ten up stairs, Cranston did and some other company; Clare went away the next day.

JOHN MATTHEWS . I am an officer; I apprehended Cranston on the 5th of November, the sister of Cranston applied to Mrs. Dadd, the sister and Mrs. Dadd came to my house together and offered five pound, a gentleman of the name of Holder offered ten pound to Mrs. Dadd, they asked me what I could do in it, I told them I could not do any thing untill I apprehended the other prisoners. There is another besides these, I apprehended Clare on the 21st of November, it was through a letter being sent to our magistrate; I went on board the Dorset East Indiaman laying off Gravesend; before I apprehended Clare Cranson offered to me if I would admit him to be an evidence he would tell where the property was.

Q. When had you this conversation with Cranston - A. On the 29th he told me proviso I would admit him to be an evidence he would tell me where the things were; he had pledged the things on the 5th at Mr. Crouch's, Paul-street, Finsbury-square, they were all pledged in his own name and they had burned the duplicates; I went to the pawnbrokers and found it to be true. Clare said to me, coming up from Gravesend, he wished he had never seen the family, it was well known Cranston was a thief and had been sent away before for stealing spoons; he was innocent of the charge. Cranston told me he was the first person that entered the house, Clare followed him, and Clare's brother, a butcher, stood outside; he has been out of the way ever since.

MR. GREEN. I was standing near to Mrs. Dadd's door, Mrs. Dadd came out and told me that she was going to Bayswater; Cranston was standing near me, he asked me how far it was to Bayswater, I said about five or six miles, he said it must be late before they get home I said it must be nine or ten o'clock before they came home if they made haste.

CHARLES STREET . On the 4th of November, about half past seven, or between that and eight, I went out to see if the beer was coming. As I went up to Elbow Place near the prosecutor's house, it joins Howard's Green, I saw a man stand in Elbow Place in a blue jacket. I turned my head to look at him in the face; he then turned his head round to hide his face. As I was returning on Howard's Green, I saw the prisoner Cranston coming along with a large bag. I have been to his shop to be shaved, they make bags. I am confident it was the prisoner Cranston, and the man that I saw in Elbow Place was not Clare, it was a stouter man.

WILLIAM VIPOND . I am servant to Mr. Crouch, pawnbroker. I received part of that property from the prisoner Cranston; two pillows pledged on the 5th of November; two blankets, and a table-cloth I received from Cranston's wife.

Q. to Prosecutrix. Look at these things, and see if you know them. - A. I have neither private marks nor public marks. I lost two blankets, they are nearly like them.

Cranston's Defence. On Sunday evening, after I left Mr. Green, I went to my brother-in-law to tea. I asked if my wife was there, they said no. I went home and bought ten bags, and then I went and fetched my wife: at ten o'clock I went home.

Clare's Defence. Cranston came to me on the Sunday evening, he bought the bags and left them in the passage all night, and took them away in the morning.

CRANSTON GUILTY, aged 22,

Of Stealing only .

Transported for Seven Years .

CLARE, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham,

61. GIUSEPPE VALENTINE, alias JOSEPH VALENTINE , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of November , a sheet, value 5 s. and a pillowcase, value 1 s. the property of Joseph Dean .

JOHN DEAN . I am a mariner , my wife keeps a house for sailors, the prisoner is an Italian seafaring man . On the 2d of of November there was a sheet lost and a pillow-case; I suspected the prisoner and stopped him when he came down stairs; he had the sheet inside of his shirt and the pillow case I found in his hat.

ELIZABETH DEAN . That is my sheet and pillow case.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence.

GUILTY , aged 35.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

62. MARY WARING was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Seaman , about the hour of six in the night of the 17th of November , and stealing therein three coats, value 81 s. a waistcoat, value 2 s. a pair of overalls, value 6 d. and a pair of stockings, value 6 d. his property .

SECOND COUNT, for feloniously breaking and entering the said house in the day time, and stealing the above mentioned goods.

JOHN SEAMAN . I live in Brewer's Rents, Whitechapel . On the 17th of November I went to a neighbouringpublic-house, my son came for me, saying, I was robbed, and when I went home I found the prisoner in custody.

JAMES SEAMAN . I am the son of the last witness. On the 17th of November I went from my father's house a little after five in the evening, I left the window shut down.

Q. Was it dark - A. No. I returned home about six, it was then dark; I unlocked the door, I found the woman in the apartment.

Q. Was the prisoner in the house - A. Yes; the moment I unlocked the door; she bolted out, I ran after her and caught her, I left her in charge of a neighbour. I went into the house and found all the things in the indictment moved from off a chair behind the door to the window. I shut the window down when I went out, and it was open when I came back; the window was not fastened, any person might get in at the window from the street.

Prosecutor. I only know the clothes being mine.

Prisoner's Defence. It rained, I went and stood there until it gave over raining; as the young man opened, the door I said, halloa. I was in no house you may depend upon it.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY, aged 20, Of stealing only .

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Grose.

63. CHARLES REEVE was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Samuel Stacey , about the hour of two, in the night of the 3d of November , with intent the goods and chattels then and there being to steal and carry away .

SAMUEL STACEY . I live at 112, Great Portland-street . On the 8th of November I was informed by the watchman that my shop in Wimpole-street was broken open.

Q. What trade do you carry on - A. A taylor ; I carry on business at both shops.

Q. Do you sleep in the house in Wimpole-street - A. No, no person had slept there for six or eight months.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

64. JOHN DAVIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of July , two shirts, value 5 s. two coats, value 25 s. two waistcoats, value 6 s. and two pair of breeches, value 6 s. the property of Thomas Gardener , in his dwelling-house .

Mr. Knapp, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

65. JOHN LADRANE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of November , six yards of woollen cloth, value 2 l. 18 s. the property of John Francis , in his dwelling-house .

JARVIS STIRLING . I live at 88, Ratcliffe-highway.

Q. Do you remember seeing the prisoner any time on the 1st of November - A. I saw him lurking about Mr. Francis's window; he put his fingers to the window and fetched out a piece of woollen cloth, I went and told Mr. Francis of it. I pursued the prisoner and overtook him in Ratcliffe-highway; I took him back to Mr. Francis's shop; I then sent for an officer, who took him in custody.

JOHN FRANCIS . I live at No. 105, Ratcliffe-highway .

Q. Do you remember the circumstance the last witness has mentioned - A. I was from home; I was sent for I never saw the goods untill the officer shewed me them.

RALPH HOPE . Between the hours of seven and eight on Thursday evening I was sent for to Mr. Francis's shop, the prisoner was given in charge to me with this piece of cloth.

Q. to Stirling. Was the prisoner given in charge with that piece of cloth - A. Yes.

Prosecutor. I have not the least doubt that it is my property.

Prisoner's Defence. They put me in a place for a fortnight without any thing to eat or drink, there was a coachman saw me pick it up.

Q. to prosecutor. What is the value of it - A. Forty eight shillings, it cost me a great deal more.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 17.

[ The prisoner was recommended to his Majesty's mercy by the jury and the prosecutor on account of his youth .]

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

66. RICHARD MORRIS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 6th of November , three quarts of brandy, value 6 s. the property of the London dock company .

SECOND COUNT - the property of certain persons to the jurors unknown.

WILLIAM CLARK . I am a constable employed by the London dock company. The prisoner was a forman of the London dock company, he had thirty shillings a week, his business was to superintend the warehouse for delivering out and receiving in brandy and wines. On the 6th of November, about half past three, I went into the warehouse, No. 2, situated by Brewer's-lane, St. John's, Wapping . In going into the warehouse I saw the prisoner in the act of delivering something out of his hand between two casks, as my appearing he catched his hand away very sharp. I went immediately to the place, I put my hand in there, found a bladder containing three pints of foreign brandy; I asked him what he thought of himself, and what he knew of it, he looked confused and made no answer; I took off his hat, there I found another bladder, containing three pints more of brandy, he begged I would forgive him. I took him in custody. These four bottles contain all the brandy I found in the two bladders.

The prisoner called five witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 35.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

67. CHARLOTTE TAYLOR and ANN STEVENS were indicted for feloniously assaulting John Adams , in the king's highway, on the 20th of November , putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, an umbrella, value 2 s. his property .

JOHN ADAMS . I live at No. 7 Skinner Street, Bishopgate Street. On Tuesday, the 20th of November, between eleven and twelve at night, I saw the two prisoner's first in Bishopgate Street, near Skinner Street . They were in company together, walking along.

Q. Were you sober. - A. Yes, when I first saw them, they catched hold of me by the arm, one by one arm, and the other the other, they asked me where I was going to, I told them home. I went a little way down Skinner Street, each of them holding my arm. I did not wish to walk with them, they went with me, they asked me to go with them. They asked me if I meant to give them any thing, I asked them what they wanted, they wanted two shillings of me.

Q. You thought they asked for two shillings, for the purpose as the women of the town do. - A. Yes, they proposed that I should go to their house, they said it was in Skinner Street, but not where justly.

Q. Had you an umbrella with you at this time. - A. Yes, in my hand. They then asked for something to drink, I told them I would not, and they struck me on the head with the patten. Ann Stevens struck me first, they both struck me.

Q. What induced them to strike you with the patten. - A. Because I would not give them any thing to drink. I said nothing to provoke them, they beat my hat off, and struck me three or four times after my hat was off. They cut my head in three or four places.

Q. Are you quite sure that you said nothing to provoke them. - A. No I did not.

Q. Did you call them bad women, or any thing of that sort. - A. No, I made away from them, and got to the public-house door, put my hand with my hat in there. I held the umbrella with the other hand.

Q. Was the public-house door open. - A. It was put to, but I pushed it open with my hand. I put my hand inside of the door.

Q. Had either of them attempted to take away your hat. - A. Yes, they attempted to take my hat away, after they struck it off.

Q. Therefore you put it inside of the public-house door to secure it. - A. Yes.

Q. After you had put the hat within side of the door, and you were holding the umbrella in the other hand, what did they do then. - A. They beat me with the pattens, and laid on so, I was obliged to let go the umbrella. I was not able to hold the umbrella any longer. They had hold of the umbrella all the time, trying to pull it from me. They got it from me by main force.

Q. How long do you think you were able to resist before they got it from you by main force. - A. I suppose five minutes or more.

Q. What was it that disabled you from keeping hold of the umbrella. - A. The blows disabled me from keeping my hold, and they got it out of my hands.

Q. What was the worth of your umbrella. - A. I valued it at two shillings. When they got the umbrella, they made the best of their way off. They run away.

Q. Did any body come out of the public-house to your assistance. - A. Yes, Charles Wright.

Q. Did you call out while they were beating of you. - A. Yes, but nobody came then. After that, me and the witness, Wright, went to the surgeon's to get something to put to my head. I bled so much, I was not able to stand. I went with Wright with his assistance. I was stunned with the blow.

Q. How far off did the surgeon live, that you went to. - A. In Bishopgate Street. I went to Mr. Fox, the surgeon, he was not at home. When I was coming back, I saw Ann Stevens near the public-house door, where they struck me. I told Wright to take care of her while I went to get the watchman. While I was gone, she escaped from him.

Q. Was this near the watchbox where this happened. - A. No, I saw the other the next night after. I sent for Mr. Sheppard, the officer, and described her to him. He went and took her the next night.

Q. You were not with him when he took her. - A. No, he took them both.

Q. When was it you saw them after Sheppard took them. - A. I saw one the next night, and the other I saw on the Monday following. I saw Taylor on the next night, and Stevens I saw on the Monday.

Q. Are you quite sure there are the two women who had beat you in this way, and ran away with the umbrella. - A. Yes, I have no doubt of either of them.

Q. Have you ever seen your umbrella again. - A. Yes, Mr. Sheppard shewed it me, I know it to be mine.

Q. What sort of a night was it. - A. It was not very dark. I saw them by the light of a lamp, and by the light of the window.

Q. How long were you in their company before they began to use you in this way. - A. Not so much as five minutes before they began to use me ill.

CHARLES WRIGHT . Q. On the Tuesday night that this happened, where were you. - A. In the public-house, the Robin Hood, in Skinner-street. I am a wine-porter. I work for Mr. Keep, Halfmoon-street, Bishopsgate. I was there about half past eleven.

Q. Did you here any alarm. - A. I did. I heard a voice in the door-way, as of a person in distress. On my coming out, I saw John Adams , he was down on one knee, in the door-way.

Q. Had he any appearance of having been hurt. - A. Yes, the blood run copiously down the crown of his head, each side.

Q. Was he much cut? did you examine it. - A. Yes, I took him in the house, got a candle, and looked at his head. I saw the wounds were dangerous. I took him to Mr. Fox, a surgeon. I opened the door; they said Mr. Fox was out. I went to another docter, at the corner of Spital-square. I could get no assistance. I brought him to the door from whence I had taken him, to the public-house. We bathed the wound with brandy, endeavouring to stop the blood. The blood was stopped, in a measure, by that means. Previous to our taking him into the house, the prisoner Stevens, was passing the door, Adams said,

"Wright, that is one of them." I turned round to him, and requested him to get a watchman. He said,

"he would,"The watchman's stand is about twenty yards off. I proceeded to take hold of her, but she instantly withdrew.

Q. Did you lay hold of her person. - A. No, she withdrew instantly. I followed her; she ran, and escaped.

Q. How long do you think you had her in sight. - A. Two minutes.

Q. When did you see Stevens again, after that. - A. At the Poultry Compter, on the Monday morning following.

Q. From the little observation that you had as you saw her, about two minutes, are you sure the person you saw about two minutes, and she escaped from you, is the person that you saw again in the Poultry Compter. - A. I am positive. I knew her by sight. I had seen her in the neighbourhood.

Q. When John Adams said, that is one of them, did he say it loud enough for her to hear. - A. Yes; there were words passed; he said,

"Wright, that is one, take hold of her." She said, she was going home to get her supper; she knew nothing at all about it, and then she ran away, while I turned round to him, and told him to get a watchman.

STEVENS. A young girl, in the Poultry Compter, told me the young gentleman came and swore to her.

Jury. Q. to Wright. Were you sent for to the Poultry Compter, to be witness to any person. - A. No.

Court Q. Did you, upon any occasion, say you had a doubt. - A. There were three in custody at the time the officer Sheppard said,

"do you think you shall know the girl?

"I said,

"Yes." I went with Sheppard to the Poultry Compter.

Q. Did you, at any time then, rather express any doubt as to the person of Stevens. - A. No, not to any body.

Q. Were you as sure then as you are now. - A. Yes.

Jury. Did you make any observation with respect to Adams, on that night, between eleven and twelve, whether he was perfectly sober. - A. He did not appear as if he had been drinking. I have known him some time. I never knew him in the least addicted to drinking or intoxication; he was perfectly sober.

Q. What sort of night was it. - A. A very dark night.

Q. Was there any light in the public-house window. - A. Yes, and a lamp near the public-house door.

SAMUEL SHEPPARD . I am a constable. On Wednesday the 21st of November, Mr. Aams applied to me. He told me had been robbed of an umbrella, and very ill-treated.

Q. Had he the appearance of any violence about his person. - A. Very much so then: about the head he had three wounds, and about the breast, upon the back of the head, and the arm. He described the persons, as women who attacked him in this way; he described their appearance and persons. In consequence of his information I apprehended the prisoner Taylor, on Wednesday night, at her lodgings in Angel-alley, Bishopsgate-street. I told her I took her for robbing a man of an umbrella, and ill-treating of him. She said, she knew nothing about it. I took her on the ground floor of the house, she was in bed at the time; it was about twelve o'clock at night when I searching her lodgings. I found this umbrella under the further side of the bed.

Q. Was any woman with her. - A. No, I asked her how she came by that umbrella? She said, she found it. I then secured her, and took the prosecutor to look at her, to see if he knew her, the same evening. When the prosecutor saw her, he said, that was one of the women, in her hearing. She said she was not. I secured her, and then she was taken to the Poultry Compter. And on the Thursday night I apprehended another woman on suspicion. I took her in Bishopsgate-street. I applied to the prosecutor; he was so ill for three days he could not attend the Magistrate. On the Sunday I went to the prosecutor. I shewed him the woman that I had taken up. Him, and Wright, they said, that was not the woman. She was discharged on the Monday. I apprehended Stevens on the Sunday night, from a further description of Adams and Wright. I found her at her lodgings in Petticoat-lane. I took her in bed: there was another woman in bed. It being dark I enquired. The other woman said, she was not at home: she denied her several times. I enquired for her by the name of Bonner; that is her right name. The woman said that Nance was not at home. She goes by the name of Nance. I found the prisoner Stevens at the bottom of the bed, after I went down and got a light.

Q. Do you know whether she was acquainted with your person and voice. - A. I do not know that she knew my voice: she knowed my person very well. I have spoken to her many times.

Q. When you had taken her from the bed-clothes, did you tell her what you had against her. - A. Yes, she said she knew nothing of him. I charged her with robbing a man, and beating him with the pattens. I asked for the pattens. I could not find any; she said she never wore any.

Q. This was Sunday night; how long was it after that the prosecutor saw her. - A. On the Monday morning. I took both Wright and him up to the Compter. I took them in one at a time.

Q. How many women were there in the room. - A. They only came to the gate, and looked through. I suppose there were about five in the whole, that I took notice of. I think it was Wright. I took first Wright; pointed out Stevens. I called the prosecutrix to look; he pointed out Stevens also, without any thing being said to him.

Q. To Prosecutor. Look at that umbrella. - A. This is the umbrella that was taken from me that evening; there is the name on it of the person that I had it of. I had it of Mrs. Monday. It was torn in taking it from me. It is worth two shillings.

Taylor's Defence That umbrella I found when I was coming home on Tuesday night going down Skinner-street. I stumbled over something. I stooped and picked it up; it was an umbrella, all over mud and dirt. The prosecutor I never saw in my life, until I was taken on the Wednesday night to the watch-house.

Stevens Defence. I knew nothing of this young lady before I was taken in custody, nor of the gentleman. I was taken out of my bed, and I did not know what for.

TAYLOR, GUILTY DEATH , aged 23.

STEVENS, GUILTY DEATH , aged 19.

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

68. JOHN WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of November , two pound weight of linen rags, value 1 s. the property of John Edward Holmes , William Hall , Thomas Chapman , and John William Chapman .

HENRY BACON HALL . I am a servant to John Edward Holmes , William Hall , Thomas Chapman , and John William Chapman ; they are wharfinger s, Bear-quay, Lower Thames-street . On the 21st of November, I saw Williams on Bear-quay, in the act of taking some rags that had been just landed from a vessel. The rags were in a bag when landed on their quay. They are responsible to the owners for it.

Q. Had you seen him there in the course of the day before. - A. I did not.

Q. Is he a person employed on the quays. - A. It is very rarely that we can get him to work; he is generally idle. I ran immediately when I saw him take it from the bag. On seeing me, he immediately ran away. It was the top bag of the pile, the package was cut. It contained rags. At Wiggins's quay, I saw the prisoner getting under a waggon. I searched him, and found a large bag upon him, it would hold thirty pound, it was a large bag that he had round his neck. I compared the rags in the bag that I found with him, it was the same quality as the rags were in the bag that had been cut across, and there was a vacancy in the bag, and the rags found on him would make up the deficiency. He confessed having taken the rags, and said if I would let him go, I never should see him on the quay any more. These are the rags, they are worth a shilling.

Prisoner's defence. I was coming along the quays. I picked them up. I was never nigh the bag within three or four yards.

GUILTY , aged 62.

Confined one month in Newgate , and publicly whipped one hundred yards near Bear-quay .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

69. JOHN OXLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of November , a great coat, value 10 s. a coat, value 15 s. a waistcoat, value 5 s. a portmanteau, value 10 s. the property of Daniel Kay and John Tanner Kay .

DANIEL KAY . John Tanner Kay is my partner. We keep the Castle and Falcon Hotel The property taken was the property of a gentleman, who, when he is in town, resides at my house; he was gone out of town, and the property was left in the care of my chamberlain.

THOMAS CROFT I am the chamberlain of the Castle and Falcon Hotel.

Q. Had you a portmanteau left in your care, the property of your master. - A. Mr. Johnson left a portmanteau in my care until he returned. I received a letter from Mr. Johnson a week preceding the 5th of November, desiring me to send him down a black coat and waistcoat, a curricle coat, and a portmanteau, desiring that I would enclose the coat and waistcoat within the portmanteau. That I did, with intent to send them down to Mr. Johnson. The portmanteau I enclosed within the box-coat, and then enclosed that within brown paper. I gave it to our porter; it was to be taken to the George and Blue Boar, Holborn. Robert, our porter, left the house with it on the 5th of of November. The portmanteau was worth ten shillings, the great coat ten shillings, the black coat about ten shillings, and the waistcoat two shillings and sixpence.

ROBERT OSBORNE . Q. Are you a porter at the hotel in Aldersgate-street. - A. Yes, I received a parcel from Thomas Croft , to take to the Stamford coach, at the George and Blue Boar, Holborn. When the parcel was given to me, we were a porter short. I hired the prisoner Oxley. I delivered to him the parcel that Crofts delivered to me, at five o'clock in the afternoon. I told him to take it to the George and Blue Boar, Holborn, to go by the Stamford coach. I gave him this book, and sixpence to pay for the booking. He was to return to me the next morning, deliver me the book, and I would satisfy him. In consequence of his not coming, I had suspicion I waited till ten o'clock the next morning. I went to the George and Blue Boar, made enquiry, they told me the parcel had not been delivered. I looked after the prisoner. I found him at the Ship, in Lime-street. I took him to the George and Blue Boar. I asked the bookkeeper whether the said parcel had been delivered there for the Stanford coach, in the name of Johnson? He said, no such parcel had been delivered. The prisoner had delivered to me the book, there was no entery of the parcel. He said he had delivered the parcel to another man to carry. The prisoner took me to different houses, at different parts of the town, under pretence of finding this man; no such man was to be found as he described. In consequence of that, I went for a constable.

Q Have you ever found any of the contents of this portmanteau. - A. Yes, one black coat we found at the Ship public-house, Lime-street.

WILLIAM WOOD . I am an officer. I took the prisoner in custody. I went in search of the property by the porter's directions, and by the information of Benjamin Davis . I went to Garbut, who bought the coat of the prisoner, he gave me the coat.

JOHN GARBUT . I am a taylor. I live at No. 4, Crutched-friars. On the 5th of November, about a quarter before eight o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner at the Ship, in Lime-street, he was in the tap room. The prisoner held up a black coat, and said,

"who will give a crown for it?" I gave him the crown for it, and he handed it over to me. I delivered it over to Wood, the officer.

BENJAMIN DAVIS . I was with Garbut at the Ship public-house. He bought a coat of the prisoner.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's defence. If that is my coat, which I sold, I think you will find the button holes of the left side are broken open. I sold it for distress. The publican would not let me go without paying him. I had been drinking there three hours. I sold it to that gentleman for fifteen shillings, and paid the reckoning, and went away.

GUILTY , aged 27.

Confined one month in Newgate , and publicly whipped .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

70. MARY SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 3d of September , sixty yards of ribbon, value 1 l. 5 s. the property of Matthew Bruton .

WILLIAM HALL . I am shopman to Matthew Bruton . His shop is 64, Bishopsgate-street . Onthe 3d of December, between four and five in the afternoon, the prisoner came into the shop. From information, when she went out of the shop, I followed her, and overtook her about forty yards from the shop; I laid hold of her, and brought her back. She delivered up the piece of ribbon to me, and wished me to let her go. I took her back to the shop. Mr. Sapwell, the officer, searched her. He found four pieces of ribbon in her boson, three were ours. I knew them to be my master's. I measured the four pieces of ribbon, they contained sixty-six yards and a half. They were worth 1 l. 5 s.

JAMES NICHOLSON . Q. Did you see this young woman in the shop. - A. Yes, I served her, she asked for three quarters of a yard of ribbon. I took out a drawer of ribbons, and produced them to her, she bought three quarters of a yard, it came to three pence. I did not know any thing untill Hall brought her back. The account that Hall has given, is correct and true.

THOMAS SAPWELL . I am a constable, I searched the prisoner. I found four rolls of ribbon down her bosom, there were three of them claimed by Mr. Bruton. When these were found, she fell on her knees and begged for mercy. I have got five pieces, I did not find an owner for one piece.

NICHOLSON. Four of them pieces are my master's.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked the bundle up as I came out of the shop, in paper. The paper was wet and dirty, I took the ribbon out, and put it into my bosom. The gentleman tapped me on the shoulder, told me I must come back. I went back, I was very much frightened. I am innocent.

GUILTY , aged 18.

Confined Six Months in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

71. JOHN LEONARD was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 6th of December , a bed furniture, value 4 l. 4 s. the property of Paul Mullet , and James Mullet .

PAUL MULLET . I am an Upholsterer , my brother James is my partner, I live in Moorfields . On Friday last, I was desired to go to the Mansion-house, in consequence of the prisoner, who was my porter , being stopped with a set of bed-furniture. I went there, I saw there, the whole furniture of a bed produced. I knew the furniture to be part of my stock. After I had seen it, I went to my warehouse, and found that part of my stock was missing. The value of it is about four guineas.

JOHN FORRESTER . I am an officer belonging to the city. On Thursday the 6th of November, about seven o'clock in the evening, I met the prisoner with the property in his possession, near Tower-hill. He was alone. Being dark, I stopped him. I asked him what he had got there? he told me, bed-furniture. It turned out to be correct. I asked him where he was going to take it to? he told me, to sell it. He could not rightly tell the place. I put him into Aldgate watch-house. I told him then, I suspected it was stolen. He told me he had brought it from home, it was his own furniture. I asked him where he lived? he directed me to 13, Dagger-court, Moorfields; his father-in-law kept the house, and they all lived in one family. I search him; I found two large keys upon him. He said they belonged to the doors of his rooms. I told him I thought they were stable keys. He then said he found them. I then put him in an hackney-coach, and took him to the Compter. I asked him if he had any master? he said no, he jobbed about any where. In going to the Compter, he said, he did not live where he told me, he lived in North-street. He told me a lie. After I had put him in the Compter, I went to Dagger-court, to his first directions; they there informed me that he worked for Mr. Mullett. I gave the information, and Mr. Mullett came to the Mansion-house. I searched his lodgings, in North-street, he lived there. I found the keys belonging to his master's stables, in Moor-lane. I understand he had the looking after the horses.

Prosecutor. This is my bed-furniture; it was taken out of my warehouse without my knowledge. I am positive I had not sold the furniture to any body: the prisoner had been my servant for two years.

Prisoner's defence. I found these curtains in my master's stables. The man was very ill that used to take care of the horses. I went up to the stable one week, and found it. I know no more than I found these things. My master trusted me with all that he had almost. There was a man that lived there before, that robbed him, and the porters all would hang me now, if they could.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Transported for seven years .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

72. DAVID WHITTAKER and JAMES FIELDER ; were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Robins , about the hour of twelve, on the night of the 23d of March , and stealing one hundred and twenty yards of carpetting, value 18 l. his property , and JOHN ROBINS , for feloniously receiving the same goods, he knowing them to have been stolen .

Mr. Pooley, Counsel for the prisoner, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoner were

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

73. DAVID JONES and THOMAS COOPER , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of November , a cask, value 10 s. and eight gallons of ale, value 16 s. the property of William Cox and Peter Cox .

THOMAS JACKSON . I am a watchman in Shoreditch. On the 25th of November, about five minutes before two, I saw the two prisoners in Kingsland-road, one of them had a bulk upon his shoulder. I got out of my box, followed them, and passed them. I turned back and stopped both of them. Jones had a cask upon his shoulder. I asked them what they had got? they said,

"nothing." I told them I should take them to the watch-house. Cooper said,

"do not, here is two shillings for you." I said,

"that would not do, I would not take a farthing." Then Jones said, I should carry the cask. He threw it down, and the bung flew out, and the beer ran about the street. I tasted it, it was ale. I called for assistance; my partner came and took Jones, and I took Cooper. We took them to the watch-house, and they said they did not know each other.

JOHN PASSAU . Q. You were called to by the last witness. - A. Yes, I saw both Cooper and Jones, and the cask, the bung was out and the liquor running about the street. I took Jones, and my partner took Cooper, and as Jones was going to the watch-house, he said he did not know any thing about stealing the cask. This is the cask.

WILLIAM COX . My father's name is Peter Cox , the cask is our property. Cooper was a servant of our's, he had lived with us two months.

JONES GUILTY , aged 32.

COOPER GUILTY , aged 24.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

74. CHARLES JOHNSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 31st of October , six shovels, value 15 s. the property of Francis Vandepool .

FRANCIS VANDEPOOL . I can only speak to the property.

EDWARD SMITH . On Wednesday, the 31st of October, about twelve at noon, I saw the prisoner and two others standing near the door of Mr. Vandepool, in East Smithfield . I saw the prisoner take six shovels that were standing at Mr. Vandepool's door, exposed to sale. I saw the prisoner again on the 5th of November, and took him in custody. I am sure he is the man.

JOHN MACKEY . I am an apprentice to the prosecutor, he is a tin plate worker . Edward Smith gave an alarm that six shovels were stolen. I immediately went in pursuit of the prisoner, he dropped the shovels in Swan Street. I picked up the shovels and took them home.

Q. The shovels that you picked up, were like those of your master's. - A. Yes.

FRANCIS VANDEPOOL . These are the shovels that my apprentice brought home. I think they are mine.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

75. MARY CARNEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of October , a pair of sheets, value 10 s. a bolster, value 4 s. a looking-glass, value 6 d. the property of Mary Hammond , widow , in a lodging room .

MARY HAMMOND . I am a widow, I live at No. 8 in Chesterfield Street . I let a two pair back room, furnished to the prisoner, she was to pay five shillings a week. She came into my lodgings on the 29th of October, and continued there till the 17th of November. She passed as a widow woman, she had a little boy of four years old. That is the child she has now got in her arms.

Q. What way did she get her livelyhood. - A. Washing and ironing. The prisoner did not pay me according to the agreement. I sent for an officer and examined the apartment. I missed a pair of sheets, a bolster, pillow, blankets, and a looking glass, and some feathers were taken from the bed.

ROBERT FLOWERDEAU . I am an officer. On the 17th I went to the prosecutor's, I found the duplicates in the prisoner's room. She said real distress had drove her to it, she had nothing to cover herself.

JOHN HALL . I am a pawnbroker. A pair of sheets, a bolster, pillow, and looking-glass were pledged with me by the prisoner.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. Distress made me do it.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Fined 1 s. and discharged.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

76. CAROLINE MARSHALL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of November , a shirt, value 5 s. a pair of stockings, value 2 s. a jacket, value 10 s. and two handkerchiefs, value 4 s. the property of Roger Layton .

ROGER LAYTON . I am a post-boy to John Newman , Windmill-street . On the 1st of November, I did up my horses, I was obligated to be on my master's premises, ready to be called for. After doing them up, I laid by the side of one of them. I heard two women whisper something at the door, I did not understand what they said, and momently Caroline Marshall ran and blowed my candle out. It was alight in my stable, she said to the other as she blowed the candle out, take it. I arose from my horses, and catched hold of Caroline Marshall .

Q. Where were these things then. - A. They were in the manger, in the first stall in the stable, I lay in the next stable, they could not see me, After doing up my horses, I put my fork and broom in the first empty stall, and when I caught hold of Marshall, the fork and broom fell towards me, and the other woman darkened the door. I called our ostler instantly, he was in the office. I never found my property, the other woman got off, the other woman must have taken my bundle. I never found the other woman, or any bundle again.

Prisoner's Defence. My husband is in the stable, the same as that young man is, I missed him that evening, I went to the stable and called Ned, there was a woman there, he charged me with taking the bundle.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

77. MARY NUTTING was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of October , a shirt, value 12 s. a frock, value 2 s. a napkin, value 1 s. two shawls, value 10 s. two handkerchiefs, value 1 s. and two pair of stockings, value 5 s. the property of Thomas Wood .

THOMAS WOOD . I am a victualler . I keep the Black Bull, Kingsland Road , the prisoner was my chair-woman . On the 23d of November, having reason to suspect the prisoner, I applied to different pawnbrokers in the neighbourhood, and at Mr. Stephenson's. I found the articles in the indictment, in the prisoner's name.

JOHN STEPHENSON . I am a pawnbroker, these things were pledged by the prisoner, they are all here.

The property produced, and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. The silk handkerchief, and the pocket handkerchief is mine, I know nothing about the other things. He lost some things before, they are all laid to me. I found this watch in the vault, I gave it to him.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

78. JOHN WHITE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of November , a pair of shoes, value 5 s. the property of Robert Bawden .

ROBERT BAWDEN . I am a shoemaker , 142 Swallow Street .

- JOHNSON. I am a shoemaker. On the 7th of November, the prisoner stood at the step of my door, attempting to reach a pair of boots, he saw me come into the shop, he ran away, I pursued him. He went to the prosecutor's shop. I saw him take something out, and put it into the left hand pocket. I laid hold of him by the collar, and asked him what he had taken out of that shop. I took him back to the shop, he took out the shoes, and said he intended to pay for them.

Prosecutor. These are the shoes, they are mine.

Prisoner's Defence. The shoes were lying by the side of the door.

GUILTY , aged 53.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

79. WILLIAM WHEAT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of December , a carpet, value 20 s. the property of Joseph Sapwell .

JOSEPH SAPWELL . I am a tinman , I live at No. 11 Luke Street, Finsbury Square . On Saturday evening, the 1st of December, about ten o'clock in the evening, I missed the carpet out of my parlour, I then called down my lodgers, and told them of my loss. The prisoner lodged with me, he offered to go to the pawnbroker's with me, to find out the property. He and I went to a great number of Pawnbroker's, the last we went to, we found the carpet. The prisoner enquired for the carpet, the pawnbroker said, there was a carpet brought on the Saturday night, and he was the man that brought it. This was on Monday when we found the carpet.

JOHN NEADS . I am a pawnbroker, in Brick Lane, Spitalfields. On the 1st of December, between six and seven in the evening, the prisoner pawned this carpet with me. I am positive of the man.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing at all about it. I am innocent.

GUILTY , aged 27.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

80. WILLIAM HATCHMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of November , nine pound weight of cheese, value 6 s. the property of William Faulkener .

WILLIAM FAULKENER . I keep a chandler's shop , No. 40, Great Saffron Hill .

JOHN HUTT . I am an officer. On the 5th of November, I was in Chick Lane. About a quarter before seven, I saw the prisoner and another lad together. I crossed over and met the prisoner, I said

"Bill, what have you got here," he said

"it is not mine, I have found it," I said,

"I will find an owner to it." I took him in custody. I examined the handkerchief in his hand, it contained this cheese.

WILLIAM FAULKENER . I am nine years old, my father is a carpenter, he keeps a chandler's shop in Saffron Hill. The prisoner came in for a two-penny loaf, he made a bother about it, he pointed out which he would have, I gave him that which he pointed to. When I went in doors, my mother came out, she asked me where the cheese was gone, there was nobody in the shop but the prisoner. I did not see him take the cheese. The cheese was there when he came in, and when he was gone, the cheese was gone. I am sure he is the person.

Prosecutor. I am sure it is my cheese.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming from my own house about half after six o'clock at night, I was going to my uncle's. I was going out of Harps Alley I saw the cheese against the side of a court, I picked it up, and went to Black Boy Alley. Mr. Hutt stopped me, he asked me what I had got, I told him it was mine, I picked it up.

GUILTY , aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

81. RICHARD LAWSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of December , twenty-six yards of linen cloth, value 4 l. and five yards of muslin, value 15 s. the property of John Savage , and Robert Evans , in their dwelling-house .

SECOND COUNT - for like offence, only stating it to be in the dwelling-house of Robert Evans .

ROBERT EVANS . I am a Linen Draper , my partner's name is John Savage , I live in Oxford Street, in the parish of St. Mary le Bone , the prisoner was my porter on the 6th of December he had not left our service. The prisoner was to have left my service on the Saturday or the Monday.

Q. What day was the 6th. - A. Last Thursday, he was to go and live with Lord Burleigh, as groom, I gave him a character last Sunday week.

Q. Had you a good character with him. - A. Yes, very good. He took his box away early on Wednesday morning last, before I was up, when he returned I asked him where he had been, he said, he had been taking his box away. I had given him orders the night before to go to the carpenter, I told him, it was very improper going upon his own business: it past off till the next morning. On the Thursday morning, one of my shopmen informed me, that, he had lost shirts and neckcloths out of his bed-room, dirty linnen. I called up the prisoner some time after, and asked him about it, I told him I must have it cleared up before he went. I had given him a good character, and I wished to know the rights of it. I desired him to go with the shopman, to shew him the box that he had taken away. They went out, and in a short time, they both returned. The box was to be in the coachman's apartment, he was to live in the coachman's apartment, over the stables, when he returned he said, the coachman and his wife were out of town. I requested one of the shopmen to go to his Lordship's taylor, where the prisoner's clothes were making, to enquire if the family were out of town, the prisoner said he would go withhim I had some suspicion that he would get away from him. I immediately desired another shopman to follow him, and in a short time after they both brought him back again. He attempted to make his escape from them. I sent for a constable; he took him to Marybone watch-house. From there he was taken to Marlborough-street Office. I went there, and swore to the property, a piece of Irish of twenty-six yards, and about five yards of plain British muslin.

Q. Had you missed out of your shop any thing of that sort. - A. No, it is impossible from our large concern to do it.

Q. How long had he been your porter. - A. About five months.

SOLOMON WINTER . Q. You are shopman to Mr. Evans and Savage, are not you. - A. I am. On Tuesday evening last I missed part of my linen. I suspected the prisoner from his being the only man that had access to my room, except the other young men. I mentioned it to Mr. Evans. I went to Lord Burleigh's stables, where he took me to a wrong door. He knocked at the wrong door, and could receive no answer. He said, the coachman had left town on Tuesday morning. This was on the Thursday morning the prisoner and me returned to Mr. Evans. I went to enquire at the taylor's. Before I got there, the prisoner and another young man was out, and I met them at the taylor's in Maddox street. The prisoner went from there into Bond-street, on business for himself. The prisoner then said he would give us a chance: he ran down Grosvenor-street. We ran after him, caught him, and took him into a public-house. After some time he promised to walk quietly home, if we would let him go. The moment he got out of the door he ran from home. We could not catch him. In Berkley-square he was catched by a man.

Q. Did you call out after him. - A. I did, and he was taken by a man in Berkley-square; the man let him go on our coming up. We told the man we suspected him of having stolen goods. The same man followed him again, and found him concealed in a stable. I was present at the time. I followed the man in, and found the prisoner secreted under the manger in the stable. The man took him out of where he was, and gave him into our custody. We took him to Mr. Evans's house. We went for a constable, who took him to the watch-house. We took the constable up to Lord Burleigh's stable. Me, Bevan, and Pearson, the constable, went to the apartment occupied by the coachman, and found the box of the prisoner, which he had taken away. I knew the box, I had seen it on the morning before on the counter in the shop. I asked him if it was his box? he answered,

"Yes." We brought the box to the watch-house where the prisoner was. It was opened in the prisoner's presence. He gave the constable the key. We found a piece of Irish linen and a quantity of British muslin, and two half handkerchiefs belonging to Henry Bevan .

Q. The piece of Irish linen and British muslin, were delivered to Pearson. - A. They were.

HENRY BEVAN . Q. You were in company with the last witness, when you went after the prisoner. - A. I was; I went with the prisoner the second time, when he was pursued up Grosvenor-street; he was pursued and taken. The stranger ran after him again.

Q. And you followed after the stranger. - A. I did. The prisoner took to a stable. The prisoner was taken and brought to our house. What Winter has stated is correct and true I went with Winter for the box. I knew it was the prisoner's box. I had seen it a few days before. I saw the box opened. The prisoner gave Pearson the key. The prisoner said, some time before in our shop, that he had lost the key Upon this occasion he produced it, and the things were taken out by Mr. Pearson, a piece of Irish linen and a piece of British muslin.

- PEARSON. I am a constable of Marybone.

Q. You was sent for to take up the prisoner, was not you. - A. Yes; I apprehended him on Thursday last, the 6th. I found the box in the apartment near the stable. I brought the box to the watch-house where the prisoner was. I asked the prisoner for the key, he gave it me. I opened the box with the key. I found in it this Irish linen, and the British muslin. opened it before the prisoner's face.

Q. Was Mr. Evans by. - A. No, only me, the two shopmen, and the prisoner. I have had the things ever since.

Q. to Winter. Have you seen the Irish linen, and the British muslin, in Mr. Evans's shop. - A. I certainly have - they have his private mark. I cannot state what particular time.

Prosecutor. This Irish linen, it is my property, and marked in my own hand writing. It is the joint property of me and Mr. Savage. The British muslin has my own mark, likewise the Irish linen. I have valued at 4 l. it is a fine one. I think it is a low value, indeed - the value of the British muslin is fifteen shillings.

Mr. Arabin. You say you know these are your goods because they are marked with your writing. - A. They are the goods of myself and partner.

Q. Do you rub that mark out when you sell them. - A No.

Q. It is possible that you may have sold it. - A. It is possible. This was taken out of the prisoner's box. We cannot take out that mark.

Q. Where does Mr. Savage live. - A. He resides in Holley-street. Me and my family sleep at where my business is carried on, in Oxford-street.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel, called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY DEATH , aged 17.

The prisoner was recommended to his Majesty's mercy by the jury, on account of his youth and good character .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

82 JOHN MOLLOY and JOHN WILLIAMS were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of November , a cooper, value 3 l. the property of John Roberts ; and MARY ETHERINGTON for feloniously receiving, on the same day, the same goods, she knowing it to be stolen .

WILLIAM CHAPMAN . I am a servant to Mr. Roberts, ironmonger , in Oxford-street . On the 8th of November I know we had the copper on the area railing. It was taken away between the hours of two and five.

JOHN HUTT . On the 8th of November I was in Chick-lane, watching some receiving houses there. Iobserved three or four men coming down the lane; they stopped at Mrs. Etherington's door.

Q. What is Mrs. Etherington. - A. She keeps a chandler's shop - it is a lodging house. I observed the prisoner Williams, and two others, forcing that copper into the street-door. It is a large copper. It was too wide. When they got the copper in, I ran over the way directly. I got into the house, and seized Williams standing by the copper, and Molloy standing by him. Mrs. Etherington was standing with the candle in her hand, by the side of the counter. They seemed alarmed at my coming in so sudden upon them. Mrs. Etherington turned herself round, and went into the parlour. I secured the two prisoners. I told Mr. Barnley, a constable, to go in the passage. It is a double house. They are two houses joined together; and as they got the copper in, the two men went in the passage into the other house - they made their escape. I secured these two men. Williams face was all over black. I took them to the office, and left Mrs. Etherington in the care of Barnley. I came back from the office, and then took Mrs. Etherington in custody. When I got her to the door, she put a dollar in my hand. She said,

"let me go, and be as easy as you can." I told her I could not do any such thing, and returned the money back.

Mr. Knapp. The moment you saw these persons go into the house, you directly went into the house, how many were they. - A. There were three, Sir. I went in directly after the copper.

Q. There were no bargain for money that you saw. - A. I did not.

JOHN BARNLEY . I am a constable. On the 8th of November, Mr. Hutt called and asked me to point out Etherington's house to him. We went and looked in the window, then crossed the way and stopped there. We saw either three or four men come with something along. I saw them put it down at Mrs. Etherington's door, and they tried to get it in one way; they could not; they turned it, at last they got it in; the door goes with a pulley; it went to. Hutt ran over. I said,

"stop, let them buy it first." Hutt was in a hurry, he ran over. When I got in, Hutt had got hold of these men. He said,

"Go on, there is some more gone up the passage." Mrs. Etherington was there, and I think, with the keys of the warehouse in her hand, but that I do not swear to. Her houses are No. 10 and 11. I questioned Molloy and Williams, where they got the copper from? they gave no satisfactory account at all.

JOHN DAVIS . I live at No. 1, Field-lane. I saw Molloy walk before the man that carried the copper. I knew Molloy before. I cannot say that he was in company with him.

THOMAS FOWLER . I am servant to Mr. Roberts. On the 8th of November we had a copper on the area railing, exposed to sale. That is the copper. I saw the copper about two in the afternoon, and between four and five it was gone.

Molloy's defence. I was bad two or three weeks with my arm in a sling. That day I was so bad I could not get up before six o'clock in the afternoon. I lodged in Etherington's house. If you will please to call Mary Ann Fountain, she will testify the truth of that.

MARY ANN FOUNTAIN . I have known Mrs. Etherington some years. I know Molloy, he lodged at Mrs. Etherington's.

Q. How long have you known him. - A. Not a great time.

Q. Do you know Barnley. - A. No.

Barnley. Q. Did you ever see me turning you out of the street. - A. No.

Court. Q. What o'clock did he get up that day. - A. Between five and six o'clock in the evening.

Q. Where was he between the hours of two and five. - A. I do not know, I did not see him before that.

Barnley. When I asked Mrs. Etherington if Molloy lodged there, she said, No.

Q. to Davis. What time was it when you saw him. - A. It was in the evening, my lamp was lit.

Williams defence. I went to that house to get a lodging. Mr. Hutt nor Mr. Barnley cannot say I had the copper. The people that brought the copper made their escape the back way.

Hutt. I saw Williams come to the door, he was helping to put it in. He was not the man that carried the copper, they were two brothers; they made their escape. I have not been able to take them.

MOLLOY GUILTY , aged 35.

WILLIAMS GUILTY , aged 18.

Transported for seven Years .

ETHERINGTON NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

83. PETER SAWYER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 22d of November , seven pound weight of sugar, value 7 s. and three candles, value 3 d. the property of George Wackerbarth and John Henry Wackerbarth .

JOHN HENRY WACKERBARTH . My father is my partner. We are sugar-baker s in Wellclose-square . The prisoner was in my service on the 22d of November. I received an anonymous letter. In consequence of that I caused the prisoner to be searched. We found half a double loaf of sugar in his breeches, and the head of a loaf in each coat pocket, and two or three candles in his waistcoat.

Prisoner's Defence. I have a wife and family. I took it for my own use.

GUILTY , aged 33

Confined six months in the House of Correction .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

84. HENRY MARTIN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of November , twenty-two pound weight of Hemp, value 16 s. the property of William Lenthall .

WILLIAM LENTHALL . I am clerk to Meux and Reid, brewers, Liquorpond-street. The prisoner was employed by a clerk under me, to make up hemp into twine, for a shop in Holborn , of which I am the executor of Joseph Cooper .

JOHN LIMBRICK . I am an officer of Bow-street. On the 17th of November I stopped the prisoner in Sadler's Wells Fields, between six and seven o'clock. He had a bag of hemp upon his back. I asked him where he going? he said,

"home." I asked him how he came by this hemp? he told me he bought it of one Holland, that lived in Elm-street, Gray's Inn Lane. He bought it of him in the street, just by the Maidenheadpublic-house, Battle-bridge. I enquired for this Holland. I could not find any such person lived there. I went to Mrs. Cooper's grounds, they opened the warehouse, and missed a quantity of hemp.

THOMAS EMERY . I gave the prisoner two dozen of hemp made up in the same manner. It is impossible to swear to hemp.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought the hemp.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Confined six months in the House of Correction .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

85. MARGERET DUNCAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of November , three shillings and sixpence , the property of Thomas Clarke .

THOMAS CLARKE . I am a mathematical instrument maker , Warden's-place, Holborn. On the 18th of November I came out of a public-house. I was looking to see what silver I had. This woman coming past at the time, snatched it out of my hand. I never changed a word with her.

Q. Were you quite alone. - A. Yes, I laid hold of her. I asked her to give me the money back; she denied having taken it out of my hand. I called the watchman; he took her to the watch-house. The constable searched her, and found it in her pocket.

Prisoner's Defence. The prisoner asked me to let him go home with me. I told him no. He took me up Fox-court. He took liberty with me, and put the money in my hand; and when I would not stay with him any longer, he said he would have the money back again. I told him he should not. He gave me the money himself.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

86. SAMUEL MILLS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of December , two pound weight of butter, value 3 s. the property of Mageret Swan .

MARGERET SWAN. I keep a cheesemonger's shop in Castle-street, City road . Last Monday was a week, my neighbour informed me that a boy had his hand in my window. On the night after he came again and my neighbour brought him in the shop. On the next morning I missed a lump of butter, and two pound of cheese.

ROSE DUNN . I live in Castle-street. Last Monday week I saw the prisoner go past, two or three times. I saw him take his hand out of the window, and when I went out in the street, he ran away. I did not see what he took out. He came back again on the Tuesday night, my husband took him into Mrs. Swan's house. A constable was sent for, and he was taken to the watch-house.

SAMUEL GARDNER . I am an headborough. The prisoner said he was pursued. He threw the butter in the street.

GUILTY, aged 16.

Judgment respited .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

87. JAMES O'DONALD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of November , an umbrella, value 4 s. the property of George Flower .

GEORGE FLOWER . I am a servant . On Sunday, the 11th of November, I was at the King's Head public-house , with a friend. I laid the umbrella across the table. The prisoner came in. He had not been but a few minutes in before he took the umbrella, and went off with it. The landlord of the house pursued him, and brought him back.

THOMAS POOL . Q. You are the landlord of this house. - A. Yes. The prisoner came into my house with three more Irishmen. In the course of two or three minutes from the information of my boy, I went out and overtook the prisoner, with the umbrella in his hand, and brought him back with the umbrella in his hand: the other three men, that were with him, remained in the house.

Prisoner's defence. I was intoxicated. I did not know what I did.

Prosecutor. He was not drunk; he appeared to be as sober as he is at this present time. I am sure it is my umbrella.

GUILTY , aged 32.

Confined six months in the House of Correction

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

88. MARY POTTER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of November , a pair of steps, value 5 s. the property of John Hatton .

ANN HATTON . My husband's name is John Hatton.

Q. When did you loose these steps of yours. - A. On the 8th of November. They stood just inside of the passage. I lost the steps a little before four o'clock.

SOLOMON GOLDSMITH . I am a slop-seller. On the 8th of November, a little after four, the prisoner came and offered the steps for sale. Mr. Hatton had offered me the steps for six and sixpence. I knowing the steps detained her, and sent for Mr. Hatton.

GUILTY , aged 29.

Confined fourteen days in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

98. STEPHEN REGAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of November , fifty-six pound weight of Hemp, value 20 s. the property of Henry Williams Hobbs , and William Henry Hobbs .

WILLIAM HENRY HOBBS. The prisoner was my watchman on board my craft.

WILLIAM THOMAS . I am an officer of the Thames Police. On the 26th of last month, at seven in the morning, I apprehended the prisoner in Rotherhithe, close by Church-stairs. He had a bag carrying into a tallow-chandlers shop. I asked him where he got the hemp? he told me he picked it up. I took him in custody, and conveyed him to the office. Frognell was close by him at the time.

THOMAS GLAZIER . I am a lighterman in the employ of Mr. Hobbs. On the 25th in the morning, I placed John Frognell and the prisoner on board a lighter, called the Mary, to be conducted to Whiting's Wharf. I gave directions to the prisoner to watch the lighter that ensuing night. The lighter contained hemp.

JOHN FROGNELL . The prisoner and I were ordered to fetch this lighter up from Whiting's Wharf, and in coming up, he said,

"John, I know a man that will buy four or five heads of hemp, that lives at Church-stairs. We took this bag of hemp from under the stern-sheet of the lighter, and rowed it up in a skiff to Church-stairs, and at day-light we took it to this house; and then the officer took him in custody. I told my master the same evening.

Mr. Walford. If you had not told your master of the prisoner, do you not believe you should have been tried yourself. - A. We were both in the mess together.

Prisoner's Defence. This man took me to a public-house, we were drinking ale. He made me very much in liquor.

Prosecutor. We had a whole cargo of hemp, it was exactly like that.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Fined one shilling and discharged.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

90. HENRY VOWYER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of November , a hearth rug, value 1 l. the property of Samuel Snook .

SARAH SNOOK . I am the wife of Samuel Snook , I live in Homer Street, New Road , Paddington. On the 13th of November, about half after nine in the morning, I saw the prisoner come half way in the shop, he snatched a rug off a chair, and ran out with it. I ran after him, and called,

"stop thief," a man stopped him.

Prisoner's Defence. On the morning the robbery was committed, I heard a cry of

"stop thief," I saw a man come with something under his arm, and immediately a man came and took me in custody.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder

91. THOMAS COHEN and MARY BRYANT were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of November , a silk handkerchief, value 3 s. the property of James Wilson .

JAMES WILSON. I am a linnen draper , I live in St. John Street . On the 15th of November, the two prisoners came into my shop to look at some silk handkerchiefs, I shewed them a number, they did not approve of any. I took them away, and brought a drawer full, the handkerchiefs were covered over, I set it on the counter before them, and left it covered over, then stepped about ten yards to a door, to call my young man, a number of other customers coming in just at that time. When I came back, the man prisoner had taken the paper off the the drawer, and was looking at them, the woman stood by him, and appeared to be putting something into her pocket. I still opened the handkerchiefs for them to look at, to endeavour to sell them one, and while I was doing this, Mary Day leaned over the counter, and said, she saw the man take a handkerchief out of the drawer, and give it to the woman. They bought nothing, turned to go out, I prevented them, and pushed them into the back room. I told them they had got a handkerchief of mine; after a great deal of altercation, the woman prisoner threw the handkerchief down, and said,

"there it is.

ANN DAY . I went into the shop to buy a skain of thread, they were all very busy, I was looking about to see who was at leisure to serve me, I saw Mr. Wilson shewing these people handkerchiefs. I saw Thomas Cohen take the paper off, and take the handkerchief out of the drawer. He looked about him, and gave it to the woman that stood at his left hand, and she put it under her coat. I told Mr. Wilson of it.

Cohen's Defence. I had been to the India House, I was going over to Islington. I wanted a black handkerchief, I went into this shop, I had not taken any notice of this woman before in my life. This gentleman shewed me coloured handkerchiefs; I told him, I did not want them.

Bryant's Defence. I went in to buy a piece of flannel, I never took any notice of the man.

COHEN GUILTY , aged 28.

BRYANT GUILTY , aged 31.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

92. JOHN LODGE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of November , a deal board, value 14 s. the property of Joseph Forsdick .

JAMES JOHN SMITH . I am one of the patrol belonging to Bow Street. On the 30th of November, about eight o'clock in the evening, I saw a person in Charles Street, on the opposite side of the way to me, with something on his shoulder; it was a dark night. On crossing over to him, I saw it was a deal. He threw the deal off his shoulder, it fell upon my leg, which caused me to fall upon my hands; I called out

"stop thief," and Edwards, the patrol took him in custody.

WILLIAM JOHN EDWARDS . On the 30th of November, about eight o'clock, my partner was before me, I heard him cry out,

"stop thief." I stopped the prisoner after he had passed me about ten yards. He owned that he had done wrong.

JAMES FORSDICK . I am a carpenter , I live at 29 Goswell Street Road . I lost the deal. That is my deal.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Fined 1 s. and discharged.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

93. SARAH LAMB was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of December , two shawls, value 4 s. the property of Edward Pike .

WILLIAM COLE . I am a servant to Mr. Pike, linen draper , Ratcliffe Highway . On the 1st of December, the prisoner came into the shop; she asked to look at some shawls, I shewed her several, she had six of them cut off, they were two shillings a piece, and when I had put them up in paper, she had not money to pay for them. She had a man with her. She asked me to go home with her. I went with her into a public-house in New Gravel Lane. She said she had not got the money, the man was to pay for them. The man went out, and then she went out to look after him. She came in again, she said, she could not find him. She took two shawls out with her to go and look after the man; I did not see her take them out, I missed them after she was gone. I waited some time in the public-house, to see if she came back, and then went home. I returned to the public-house again, and found her in the tap-room; she then said, she did not know any thing at all about it.

Q. Did you know any thing of this woman before. A. No further than she has been a customer at the shop.

MARY COLLINS . I live at 28 New Gravel Lane, I keep a chandler's shop. On Saturday evening, theprisoner came to my shop, she had two shawls in her hand, she asked me to take care of them, as the person where she lived was getting tipsy, and was turning them out of doors.

Q. What is she. - A. An impudent person, that resorts about that neighbourhood. In the course of half an hour, she came in and asked for the handkerchiefs. I gave them to her.

JOHN WILDER . I am shopman to Mr. Pike. On December the 1st. I was witness of the prisoner purchasing six shawls at two shillings each; she said if the lad brought eight shillings, she would give him a pound note. The lad returned to me, and said,

"they were a complete set of swindlers, they had got two handkerchiefs. I went with the lad to the public-house, and there I saw the prisoner and the sailor that came with her. She swore that she knew nothing of the shawls. the sailor appeared to be drunk. I sent the boy to Shadwell office. The officer came and took her in custody; she said then,

"let me go, I will find the shawls," she went into Mrs. Collins's, and got the two shawls. These are the shawls, they have our private mark, they are my master's property.

Prisoner's Defence I was at the public house with this sailor, he said he would give four or five girls two handkerchiefs a piece. He went with me to this shop and desired the man to come to the public-house, he did, the sailor told me to take one.

GUILTY , aged 36.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

94. MATTHEW SULLIVAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of December , a shawl, value 4 s. the property of Thomas Stroud .

REECE REECE . I am shopman to Thomas Stroud , linen-draper , 268, High Holborn . On the 6th of December the prisoner came in and asked to look at some shawls. I shewed him several. He objected to them, and said he would call again. He went out in a hurry. I suspected him, and called after him several times. He dropped the shawl. I picked it up. Mr. Stroud and I pursued him. We brought him back till within ten yards of the door, and then he broke from us. Mr. Stroud pursued him again, and brought him back.

Prisoner's defence. They came after me an hundred yards from the shop. They asked me if I had dropped any thing? I came back part of the way with them; then I thought they would bring me in trouble if I got in the shop - I made across the street.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Publicly whipped and discharged.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

95. WILLIAM JENNINGS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of October , four shirts, value 10 s. a waistcoat, value 4 s. the property of Mary Such , widow .

MARY SUCH . I am a widow. I take in washing .

Q. Were these things delivered to you to wash. - A. Yes. I was answerable for the property. I lost the articles on the 18th of October. I hanged the clothes out to dry in the garden. The things were there at five o'clock in the afternoon. Between six and seven I went to take them in; they were gone. My garden joins a cotton manufactory, and is separated by a wall. I suppose seven or eight feet high. I knew the things when I saw them.

MARY WELLS . I keep a green-shop in long-alley. On the 18th of October, about seven o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came to my house; he asked me if Mrs. Steven's was at home? he had a bundle containing linen. He asked me to let him leave the bundle there till the next morning? I did not see any more of him until I saw him at Hatton Garden Office.

Q. You looked into the bundle, did not you. - A. Yes, I carried the bundle up to Worship-street Office.

RICHARD ATTENBOROUGH . On the 19th of October I advanced three shillings on a waistcoat to the prisoner. I am certain he is the man.

Prisoner's Defence. On the 17th or 18th of October, I went to the house of the green-grocer. George Boulton came by, told me he was going to his club in Bishopsgate-street. He asked me if I would take the bundle, which I agree. He also took off his waistcoat, and asked me to pawn it, which I did. On that evening I was taken up for assaulting a man, for which I was confined in prison sixteen days, and when I came out I was accused of robbing a laundress. The laundress desired my mother to go to Long-alley, and bring the articles. My mother went and found that the green-grocer had delivered the articles to the officer in Worship-street.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

96. WILLIAM STILES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of November , a yard of linen, value 2 s. the property of Hannah Annlx , widow .

The prosecutrix was called, and not appearing in Court, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

97. THOMAS BAINBRIDGE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of November , a watch, value 20 s. the property of Henry Spencer .

The prosecutor was called, and not appearing, his recognizance was ordered to be estreated .

NOT GUILTY.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

98. ELIZABETH BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 6th of December , a watch, value 5 l. a silk handkerchief, value 1 s. a jacket, value 2 s. a waistcoat, value 1 s. a pair of breeches, value 1 s. a pair of pliers, value 1 s. and a cork-screw, value 1 s. the property of William Hants , from his person .

WILLIAM HANTS . I am a wine-cooper . I live in Chapel-court, White chapel. I met the prisoner at the bottom of Osborn-street . She took hold of my arm, and asked me to walk home with her; and when we went in the room together, I had my watch in my pocket, and my bundle of dirty clothes under my arm. I was then clean, and when the prisoner went out of the room, I missed my bundle and my watch. The corkscrew the officer found in her pocket.

ROBERT COOMBES . I called at the watch-house. That poor lad was standing in the watch-house, lamenting his loss. I catched the other girl. The prisoner ran off. The other girl stood her ground. Theboy stated to me that it was a red-haired girl. The prisoner is a red-haired girl. I found the cork-screw in her pocket - this is the cork-screw.

Prosecutor. It is my cork-screw.

Prisoner's Defence. I had the cork-screw given to me. I know nothing of the watch or bundle.

GUILTY , aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

99. THOMAS DAVIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of November , thirty-eight pint bottles, value 2 s. and three garden chair-wheels, value 5 s. the property of Thomas Murdock .

THOMAS STEVENS . On the 29th of November, as I was in the servants hall of my master's house, I saw the prisoner pass the window with a basket of bottles on his head. I went out, and asked him where e was going with them? He said, to a man in Gee-court: he did not know the man, but if I would go with him, he would shew me the man. He took me to the corner of the Mews. There was no man there. He had taken the bottles from the vault under the area.

GUILTY, aged 17.

Judgement respited .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

100. ROBERT HOWLET , GUY WARWICK , WILLIAM CLIFTON , JOHN SCOTT , HENRY BYRNE , and JOHN GEE , were indicted for a conspiracy .

JOHN WALTERS , jun . Q. You, together with your father, are proprietors of the Times newspaper . - Yes.

Q. Were you so in May last. - A. Yes.

Q. Were the defendants all in your service in May last. - A. They were all.

Q. Did they all of them make an application to you for the advance of wages. - A. They made the application to me through Street. After the application, they all left my service - I think about the 28th of May.

Q. In consequence of their leaving your service, what did you do to supply their service. - A. I was put to a considerable difficulty.

Benjamin Beveridge was called, and not appearing, the defendants were

ACQUITED .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

ROBERT HOWLETT and JOHN GEE , convicted of a misdemeanor, confined Two Years in Newgate .

WILLIAM CLIFTON , STEPHEN BECKETT , and GEORGE WESTRAY , confined eighteen months in Newgate .

STEPHEN HURLEY , HENRY BYRNE , and THOMAS WOOLLEY , confined One Year in Newgate .

RODERICK PASKIN , EDWARD KIDD , CORBET LATHAM , WILLIAM COY , JAMES MACARTHY , JOHN MACKINTOSH , NATHANIEL COLLINS , MALCOLM CRAIG , JOHN CHAPMAN , and JOHN SIMPSON , confined Nine Months in Newgate .