Old Bailey Proceedings Online (www.oldbaileyonline.org, version 6.0, 27 November 2014), July 1810 (18100718).

Old Bailey Proceedings, 18th July 1810.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE OYER AND TERMINER, AND GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND ALSO THE GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, HELD AT Justice-Hall, in the Old Bailey, On WEDNESDAY the 18th of JULY, 1810, and following Days;

BEING THE SIXTH SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF The Right Honourable THOMAS SMITH , LORD-MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY JOB SIBLY, FOR R. BUTTERS, No. 117, ALDERSGATE-STREET.

LONDON:

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED (BY THE AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON By R. BUTTERS, No. 22, Fetter Lane, Fleet Street.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON.

Before the Right-honourable THOMAS SMITH , Lord Mayor of the City of London; Sir Simon Le Blanc , knt. one of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir Alan Chambre , knt. one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir Watkin Lewis , knt. Sir Richard Carr Glynn , bart. Sir John Perring , bart. Aldermen of the said City; John Silvester , esq. Recorder of the said City; Joshua Jonathan Smith , esq. William Domville esq. Samuel Goodbehere esq; Aldermen of the said City; and Newman Knowlys , esq. Common-serjeant of the said City; His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of Goal Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

London Jury.

Thomas Lewis ,

William Whaley ,

John Jarvis ,

Walter Stone ,

George Thom ,

Borradail Dickinson ,

John Benson ,

Gilbert Wilson ,

George Martin ,

John Burgess ,

William Saunders ,

James Keene .

First Middlesex Jury.

Edward Kent ,

Lewis Leplasterer ,

William Butterfield ,

Thomas Marshall ,

John Kyle ,

John Flintoffe ,

Thomas Barker ,

Richard Blake ,

Thomas Carr ,

Robert Williams ,

William Marshall ,

Edward Lawson .

Second Middlesex Jury.

Daniel Dupee ,

John Man [Text unreadable in original.] ,

Richard Atkins ,

George Cadogan ,

John Dodd ,

James George Greenwood ,

Thomas Hawes ,

John Long ,

David Smith ,

John Turtle ,

John Walker ,

Peter Freeman .

539. THOMAS RICKETS LYON was indicted for that he on the 22nd of March last did take to wife one Martha Wilson , spinster , and that he afterwards on the 30th of May , did take to wife one Charlotte Johnson , spinster, his former wife being then living .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

540. HENRY SIMPSON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 10th of July , a shirt, value 4 s. the property of Francis Lee .

FRANCIS LEE . I live at 24, Margaret-street, Horseferry-road, Westminster . On the 10th of July the shirt was taken from a line at the first floor window, it was hanging there to dry. Immediately I heard a noise in the street I went to the door and missed my shirt, and then I heard the prisoner's door go. The prisoner lived next door to me.

Q. Was this line hanging across the street - A. Yes.

Q. Could it not fall off - A. I cannot say; there were some few trifling things hanging there; it hung low, he might jump up and take it off with his hand; every thing else remain on the line.

JAMES GILLMORE . I am an officer. On the 11th of July, in the morning. Lee told me of the loss of his shirt; I went to the prisoner's lodgings, I saw him come out and go into Carpenter-street, I called to him and asked him if he had not got this man's shirt about him; he said no, he had not; I told him I thought he had, and I would take him back to his lodgings and see if I could not find it; he said. I was welcome to search. I thought his hat did not set so well as it should, I took his hat off, and I found the shirt in his hat.

Prisoner's Defence. I found the shirt in the street; I did not take it from the line.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Whipped in Jail and discharged.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

541. MARY MURPHY was indicted for feloniously assaulting Jonathan Whittaker , in the King's highway, on the 17th of June , putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, three one pound bank notes, his property .

JONATHAN WHITTAKER . On the 17th of June I was coming from Knightsbridge, about eleven o'clock at night, I met the prisoner, Mary Murphy , at some part of the Strand , I asked her my way to London bridge; she told me I was in the wrong way, shewed me a court, told me I was to go through this court and down the next street; she followed me. When I got into the court she came up to me, put her hand into my pocket, and pulled out three one pound bank notes; she dropped one of them; I attempted to pick it up, and some women who were standing in the court pushed me a way; I saw the prisoner pick it up; I called the watch, a german came up; he called watch, the watchman came and immediately the prisoner ran away; I and the german and the watchman pursued her; the prisoner ran into a house and shut the door; I and the german went to St. Martin's watchhouse and got a constable; he knocked at the door and they opened it.

Q. What was the name of the court - A. I do not know; it was a different court. They opened the door and we went up stairs; we looked into one room where there were some young women; the young women cried out, is it me; I knew it was not them. We went into another room and found her in bed; she then said she had never been out that night; no notes were found upon her.

Q. Had you taken any personal liberty with her - A. No; there were no more words passed than what I have spoke to you; she did not speak a word when she put her hand in my pocket, and she had her hand out so quick I could not stop her.

Q. Did you search the room where you found her in bed - A. Yes; the bed and the room was searched; we found no notes. I was perfectly sober. I had been to Knightsbridge barracks to see my brother-in-law's brother. I had only a share of a pot of porter that afternoon.

JOSEPH ALBERT CHALLENGER . I am a German.

Q. Were in the Strand on the 17th of June - A. No; I was going home; I came out of a public house in New-round-court, I heard the prosecutor call out watch; the prisoner ran away, went into a house, and shut the door. We went and got a constable.

JOHN HADLAND . I am a watchman in St. Martin's. On that night, at eleven o'clock, I was coming up the Strand, I heard a calling out watch; I made up to it, and the prosecutor charged the prisoner with robbing him of three one pound notes. The prisoner ran away; I followed her to the door that she ran into, where I knew her to lodge; the door was made fast.

Q. Then you knew her person before - A. I did; I am sure the prisoner is the person that ran away.

Q. Were there any other people present when he charged her with picking his pocket - A. Yes, five or six; some men, and some girls of the town, were in the court.

Q. Did you get in the house - A. The door was made fast as soon as she went in; I advised them to go to the watchhouse and to bring the constable of the night; they did; the constable came and ordered the door to be opened; it was opened; we went in the house and found the prisoner in bed.

PHILIP PILGRIM . I am the keeper of St. Martin's watchhouse. The prisoner was brought to the watch-house, and what the prosecutor has told your lordship, he told the magistrate the very same.

Prisoner's Defence. When I came out into the court I saw the prosecutor, he was intoxicated; he had two women by the side of him, and he was crying; he came to me just as I was going in doors, he said I had three one pound notes in my pocket; these women were after taking them out. I went in doors and came out again; there were six or eight women outside of the door; them I saw a piece of paper on the pavement, one of them stooped and picked it up; I went up stairand did not hear any more about it till they came up, searched me and the room, and took me to the watch-house.

GUILTY, aged 20.

Of stealing from the person, but not violently .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Chambre.

542. GEORGE FREEMAN was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of George Bruniges , about the hour of three in the morning, on the 25th of June , the said George Bruniges and others of his family being therein, and stealing therein, three pounds nine ounces weight of soap, value 3 s. 6 d and three hundred and thirty-seven halfpence, the property of George Bruniges .

GEORGE BRUNIGES . I am a publican ; I live in Wentworth-street, Whitechapel . On the 25th of June, between three and four o'clock in the morning, I was in bed in my one pair of stairs front room, I heard the watchman say, landlord, come to the window; I went to the window and opened it; the watchman told me there was something the matter with the windows, he came past at two o'clock, it was all safe then. I went down stairs directly, I found my bar door broken open, and the till containing the money was gone, the street door was open, and one of the shutters was broke and taken down. I informed Mr. Griffiths the officer.

Q. Was any thing taken away - A. The till was gone, and the house was broken open. I saw the till the last thing at night, it was full of halfpence and penny-pieces, and one bar of soap was taken away.

Q. Did you see any thing of the prisoner, or know any thing of the prisoner - A. Not till he was brought to my house about three hours after by a police officer, and the soap was also brought.

Q. You said you were in bed, what others of your family were there too - A. I had my three children in bed.

SARAH BRUNIGES . I am the daughter of the last witness.

Q. What time were you called up - A. My father was called up first. I only know that I was the person that bought the soap, it weighed three pounds nine ounces good weight; I bought it on Sunday evening and put it on the tap tub in the passage; it cost three shillings and sixpence; that was gone when I got up in the morning.

Q. Did you ever see it again - A. Yes; I suppose it was the same soap, it was cut in pieces.

SAMUEL MILLER . I am a police officer. About five o'clock on Monday morning, the 25th of June, Griffiths, my fellow officer, came to my house and called me up, and said there had been a public house broken open in Wentworth-street; we went and found the head of the shutter cut enough to take the shutter down; we then went and searched the persons of bad character; I found the prisoner in bed with a girl in a court in Wentworth-street, about a quarter past six in the morning; I then went to a closet in the room and found these halfpence; he was in bed with a girl, undressed; they were in this handkerchief, I found a pistol in the closet, a center bit, and this small chisel, and under the pillar I found these bits of soap; I then took them to the house that was broken open and tried this chisel to two places where the lead had been cut away under the shutter; there were two places that fitted it; we then took him to the office and went and weighted the soap, it weighed three pounds nine ounces. In taking him to the office I asked where he got the halfpence; he at first hesitated, and I asked him again; he then said he had them from his father on Saturday night; he said he knew nothing about the soap.

Q. Was the prisoner in the room when you found the things - A. No; not exactly then.

Mr. Alley. His father keeps a shop, does not he - A. Yes, a cork-cutters shop.

Q. The girl is an unfortunate creature that sees other men - A. She is; I have seen him with her a number of times; it is my opinion he entirely keeps her.

JOHN GRIFFITHS . I was with the other officer, Miller; I know no more than him; I was with him when he fitted the chisel with the place, and it fitted exactly.

Q. to Sarah Bruniges . You say that you had bought the soap on the Sunday night - A. Yes; that is the same sort of soap; it was in one piece, it is in seven pieces now; it is yellow soap.

Q. to Prosecutor. You do not know so much of the soap as your daughter perhaps - A. No; I only saw it when it lay in the passage. I cannot swear to any of the halfpence; there were four pounds worth of halfpence and penny pieces in my till, not two shillings more or less, and all was gone. I did not count the quantity that the officer brought back.

Q. to Miller. When you found the soap under the pillow, how many pieces were there - A. Seven. I brought them all away.

Q. The halfpence that you found in the closet, what quantity were they - A. Fourteen shillings and a halfpenny, that is the quantity that is here now.

GUILTY - DEATH . aged 19.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Le Blanc.

543. JAMES CARPENTER was indicted for that he on the 23d of March , feloniously did utter and publish as true a certain false, forged and counterfeited promissory note, with intention to defraud William Clark .

SECOND COUNT for feloniously disposing off, and putting away a certain false forged note, with the same intention.

WILLIAM CLARK . I am a publican ; I keep the Royal Oak in Red Lion-passage . On the 23d of March, about four o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner with two others came into to my house, apparently as if they had just met on the spot, they called for a glass of liquor a piece; the prisoner presented me a one pound Billericay note to pay for three glasses of liquor that came to about nine-pence. This is the note, I marked it at the back; it is a one pound Billericay note. I told him I could not give him change of a one pound note; then one of them said, you may as well have your liquor here as any where else; they had a bottle of brandy and a pint of gin; I told them I had about ten shillings of change; Carpenter presented me the same one pound note; I said, I do no not like the note; I objected to it because it was a country note; Carpenter then said, you must give me change for a five pound note; I saw it was a Southampton note; I had suspicion it was a forged note; I thought I had better give change for the one pound note.

COURT. Did not you think it would be better not togive change for either of them if it was a forgery - A. Yes, but I saw the place in town, I thought the one pound note might be a good one, he said, they were all as good as the Bank, he took them all in Smithfield that morning; he had a pocket-book full. He said he had a friend in the lock-up-house. I was not to take for the bottle he would return it.

Mr. Knapp. Did you give him change for the note - A. Yes, I gave Carpenter the change, somewhere about ten shillings. When they went away, Carpenter said, if any body should enquire for Harding, to say they should he here and spend the evening; then they went away; they did not come in the evening; and then I suspected it was a bad note; this was on Friday. On Monday morning I presented the note to No. 31, Addle-street where it specified on the note to be payable; the landlord of the house informed me, there had been a party there that came to swindle people.

JOHN TRAILE . Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. No. I live at present in Size-lane. I had a house in Addle-street, I left that house 1809, I had it in 1808, the number was 31; a man of the name of Butler took an accompting-house of me, he called himself an agent, that was in 1808, I never saw Mr. Butler there after it was taken, his clerks as he called them were there from four to five months.

Q. Do you know what business they were carrying on there - A. I understood they had to do with the Billericay bank; they left my house towards the latter end of February 1809; they came in the morning with a cart and horse to remove the desks and the fitting up of the accompting-house; I prevented that and stopped the desk. I saw Mr. Butler afterwards; he sent his broker to value the articles; and I gave him the difference.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

544. SAMUEL SMITH and FRANCIS JACOBS were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Edward Abbot , about the hour of eleven in the forenoon, on the 5th of July , no person being therein, and stealing three gowns, value 15 s a habit-shirt, value 1 s. a petticoat, value 4 s. the property of Elizabeth Abbot , spinster ; a waistcoat, value 5 s. and a pair of breeches. value 7 s. the property of Edward Abbot .

EDWARD ABBOT I live at No. 14, Worship-street, St. Leonard, Shoreditch ; I occupy two rooms on the ground floor; the house is let out in lodgings to different people; the landlord lives in Crown-street. My family consists of, besides my wife and myself, a daughter and a son.

Q. What age is your daughter - A. Twenty-three. On the 5th of this month I left the house near ten in the morning, I left none of my family in the house, I locked the door and took the key with me.

Q. What is your business - A. I collect the toll at Worship-street bar.

MARY ABBOT . I am the wife of the last witness. I left the house on the 5th of this month about nine, I left no one in the house, I locked the door and took the key with me; we have two keys, I have one, my husband has the other; I returned a little after one, I found the door open, I looked about to see if I had lost any thing; I missed my daughter's three gowns I went to my husband and asked him to come back with me, he came; I then missed a white petticoat, a waistcoat, and a pair of breeches. I did not miss the shirt untill it was taken out of the prisoner's pocket. Before I had left home that morning, I had seen all these articles safe.

Q. Were there any marks of violence about the door - A. I saw none. I had a piece of each of the gowns, I went to Mr. Cotton the pawnbroker, shewed the pieces, and desired if any body came to pledge the gowns, they would stop them and send for me. Between five and six o'clock the same day in the afternoon, I was sent for; I went there and saw the three gowns laying on the table, the woman prisoner was there; I saw her searched, a habit-shirt was found upon her; I knew it to be my daughter's.

ELIZABETH ABBOT . I am the daughter of Edward Abbot , I live with my parents in Worship street. On the 5th of July, I left the apartment between eight and nine, I left my mother behind; I returned between one and two.

Q. Had you left any wearing apparel in the apartment belonging to you - A. I left three gowns on a chair at the foot of the bed, a cambric-muslin petticoat hanging on the corner of the bedstead, the habit-shirt was in the room, I cannot say whereabouts that was.

DANIEL BISHOP . I am an officer of Worship-street. On the 5th of July, I went, in company with Mr. Armstrong, to Mr. Cotton, the pawnbroker in Shoreditch, where I found the prisoner Jacobs and these three gowns; I searched her, and in her pocket I found this habit-shirt; I told her the things were stolen, and asked her how she came by them; she said, she had bought them of a man that day in Wentworth-street. On the following day Smith was brought to the office in custody, I shewed him the gowns and told him he was charged with stealing them; he said, he bought them of a woman in Spitalfields for eight shillings, and sold them to Mrs. Jacobs for eight shillings; Mrs. Jacobs was present, she said, I bought the gowns of you, and you gave me an old shirt in the bargain. Smith acknowledged selling her the gowns but denied giving her the old shirt.

Mr. Knapp. She said that she bought them in Wentworth-street - A. She did, she said of Smith.

Q. Wentworth-street is near Petticoat-lane, it is a place, a fair where people buy these things - A. Yes, on certain days they do.

JOHN ARMSTRONG . I know nothing more than being sent for with Bishop to the pawnbroker's, she said, she bought them of a man in Wentworth-street.

GEORGE PAYNE . I live with Mr. Cotton, 42, Shoreditch. On the 5th of July about half past five, these two gowns were presented to John Hall, the apprentice, by the woman prisoner, he brought them to me in the kitchen, I knew them to be the pattern of the pieces that were left with me; I came into the shop, and asked her if she had any thing else she wished to leave; she said, why, is not there enough; I said, you have got another gown in your lap, let me look at that; I detained her when I found they all three answered to the pieces that I had left with me. I delivered the gowns up to the officer.

Q. What are the gowns worth - A. About sixteen shillings.

The property produced and identified.

Smith's Defence. I bought the property in the open street and sold them in the open street to this woman. When I have got money I buy any thing I can.

Jacobs Defence. I bought the gowns in the open street; I offered the man half a guinea, he would nottake less than twelve shillings; I had no more than eight shillings in my pocket; I asked him to go home with me; I pawned my ear-rings for four shillings; I have the duplicate in my pocket now.

- ABRAHAMS. Q. Were you in Wentworth-street any time, when you saw any thing pass between the two prisoners - A. I was, last Thursday week between three and four in the afternoon, I saw the woman prisoner buy three gowns of the man prisoner, she gave him twelve shillings, this was in Wentworth-street, he sold her the gowns and the habit-shirt, he said, he might as well give it her, as it was of no use to him. Them are the very gowns, I stood by; if the woman had not bought them I should have tried if I could have bought them.

Q. Did she sent for you when she was in prison - A. Yes, to know if I recollected the man that she bought the gowns of; I told her yes, the next day I went into the fair and saw the same person, I gave him in charge directly.

Jacobs called eight witnesses who gave her a good character.

SMITH GUILTY, aged 37.

Of stealing only .

Transported for Seven Years .

JACOBS, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Cambre.

545. MARY FLETCHER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of June , six yards and a half of stocking piece. value 1 l. 17 s. 6 d. the property of Henry Grove , privately in his shop .

HENRY GROVE . I keep a piece-broker's shop in St. Martin's-lane . On the 30th of June, about ten in the evening, the prisoner and another woman came into my shop. I was not in the shop at the time they came in, my wife was. When I came into the shop I observed two women in the shop with my wife. My wife asked me if I had any change, I said, I had not; she went out for change of a dollar. While she was gone the prisoner and the other woman and myself were in the shop. The prisoner tapped the other woman on the shoulder, and said, I had better go and tell your husband that we are waiting for change. As soon as she spoke my wife came in and gave the prisoner the change, I believe it was 3 s. 7 d. then the prisoner and the other woman went out together; the moment they were gone I missed the piece of stocking out of the window.

Q. How lately had you seen it before that - A. I had seen it between three and four in the afternoon; it stood in the window near against the prisoner and the other woman's back were they were standing. I went out of my shop; I saw the prisoner about ten yards from the door; I laid hold of her; the other woman was before, and immediately upon my laying hold of the prisoner I saw her drop the piece of stocking from under her apron; I saw it fall and unroll as she walked along; I picked it up and brought it in, together with the prisoner. It was my stocking piece, it is about six yards and a half, it had my mark upon it, and worth about thirty-seven shillings.

Prisoner's Defence. He never saw me drop it. I never had it. I was washing and ironing for a woman, it amounted to six shillings; she came in and asked for the linen; he said she could not pay me without I went with her to Mr. Grove to sell some silk ferris to get change. I waited for her till such time she went out of the shop, and when we came out she ran away. I have never seen her since.

GUILTY, aged 59.

Of stealing, but not privately in the shop .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

546. ESTHER GAMBLE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of June , twenty laced veils, value 40 l. six laced handkerchiefs, value 12 l. a pair of laced sleeves, value 2 l. and three yards of lace, value 15 s. the property of Charles Harris , privately in his shop .

CHARLES HARRIS . I am a dealer in lace , my shop is No. 4, Berkley-square, in the parish of St. George's Hanover-square . On the 11th of June the prisoner came into my shop, I was in the furthermost room, I saw the prisoner and two ladies in the shop, they were all in the shop before I saw them, I went up to the ladies, I served them with gloves.

Q. Were these two ladies in the shop a part of her company - A. Oh, no, they had a servant at the door. When the ladies went out of the shop, the prisoner asked me the price of some lace in the window.

Q. What lace was there in the window - A. A white laced veil, with a border round the bottom, and there were several veils hanging up in the window, but she pointed to that; I told the prisoner to go out of the shop, I was certain she did not want to buy any lace, according to the appearance of her, she immediately went away.

Q. How near was she to the lace when you first observed her - A. I suppose about two or three yards from the window.

Q. Was all the lace in the window - A. No, I had a box of lace on the counter, it was from there I lost the property; the moment she was gone, a carriage drove up to the door, two ladies came out and wanted some lace, I immediately went to the lace box which was upon the other counter, I took the lace box and found all the laced veils and handkerchiefs in the box were gone.

Q. Were was this lace box placed - A. At the bottom of the shop, on the counter, near the parlour door.

Q. Had you at any time seen the prisoner near that lace box - A. No

Q. Must she come past it to come into the shop - A. No, she must have gone the whole length of the shop to have gone up to it.

Q. Could you judge from any circumstance how long she had been in the shop - A. She might have been in the shop about five minutes without my observing her.

Q. Who was in the shop before you went in - A. Nobody, nor any body in the lower part of the house, I was in by myself.

Q. Was any body else in the parlour that might have observed her - A. No, nobody but myself.

Q. Had you left the shop door open - A. Always; winter and summer.

Q. Can you enumerate the particulars of what was gone from the lace box - A. A number of veils and laced handkerchiefs, and a pair of sleeves.

Q. Can you mention them in particular - A. Yes, about a dozen black laced veils.

Q. How many laced handkerchiefs - A. There might be eight or nine to a dozen, and white laced veils as well as black, a dozen of white and a dozen of black, I dare say, and a pair of laced sleeves. It was on Whit-monday they were missed.

Q. How soon did you see any of this property that was missing - A. Not till the Friday following. After I had missed them that afternoon, I went to Marlborough-streetoffice and gave information; on the Friday following, two officers and a pawnbroker brought some of them to my house.

Q. Did you know them when you saw them again - A. Yes, they shewed me a long veil which I was robbed of, I can speak to it in particular. I went with the officer to where the prisoner was at a public house in Marlborough-street; she then told us there were some of the other laced things at her lodgings, where we went immediately to.

Q. Was any found upon her - A. Yes, upon her head. She told me that she had seen me in the shop, and she had robbed me just before the two ladies came in the shop.

Q. Did you make her any promise or any threats - A. No, she fell a crying, and told us where some of the things were; she said she had sold some at Wandsworth; we went the next morning, on Saturday, and took her to Wandsworth, the officer and myself; she went out of the coach and walked to the shop where she had sold them, we found three veils there which we brought away with us; she likewise told us that she sold one in Cold Bath-fields, and some she sold to a young girl that was gone in the country, which was the reason she wanted to know the price of the lace, on account of her selling them to this young girl. We got the veil that she had sold at Cold Bath-fields, from a house just by the prison; she went with us and took us to the place.

ROBERT SPARROW . I am a pawnbrober.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar - A. I do.

Q. Did you receive from her any goods in pawn - A. On the 13th of June I received two laced veils, I lent her ten shillings on them. On the 14th she brought me another, upon which I lent her twelve shillings, and on the 15th she offered me three more; I asked her if she had brought them for herself; she said, yes; I then had suspicion; she said, that a young man had found them on the road leading to Wandsworth, and had given them her. I detained her, sent for an officer, and had her taken to Marlborough-street.

JOHN FOY . I am a police officer of Marlborough-street.

Q. Do you remember the prisoner being brought to the office - A Yes: she said she lodged in Homer-street, Marylebone. I went to her lodgings, and in a box, of which I had the key of her, I found three black laced veils, one white one, and a pair of white laced sleeves, two white laced handkerchiefs, and a remnant of lace, and the duplicate of two veils, pledged on the 13th of June for ten shillings, at Mr. Brooks, of Paddington-street, who is master of the last witness. There was another box, which I broke open, I found in it a black laced handkerchief, a white laced handkerchief, and a white laced veil.

Q. Was this in her lodgings - A. Yes. These three I found at Wandsworth; I took her there with me in a coach, she pointed out the shop; a black veil, a white laced veil, and a laced handkerchief. At a shop near the House of Correction, Clerkenwell, I found this black laced veil, the prisoner went with me and pointed out the shop. This one was stated to me at the office to be taken off her head, which she wore as a cap, I did not see it taken off her head, it was given to me, and she admitted it.

WILLIAM JACKSON . I have two pieces of lace. On Saturday morning, while Mr. Harris was gone to Wandsworth, the prisoner's sister came and gave me this lace, it appears to have been taken off the handkerchief.

MR. HARRIS. This long veil is my property, I know they are all mine, and the lace is mine.

Q. What is the value of them all - A. Forty or fifty pound, the large veil is worth fifteen or twenty pound.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 13.

The prisoner was recommended to his Majesty's mercy by the Jury and the Prosecutor, on account of her confession and her youth .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

547. JOHN KANE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of June , from the person of Thomas Phillips , a purse, value 2 d. and a bank note for the payment of one pound, his property .

THOMAS PHILLIPS . I am a bricklayer . On Saturday night, the 23d of June, I was coming home from my pay table, I saw the prisoner Kane, standing at his quarters, in the Broadway, Westminster, at the door of the King's Head public house.

Q. Had you known Kane before - A. Yes, he asked me whether I would give him any thing to drink; I went into the public house with him and treated him.

Q. What time of the night was that - A. About nine o'clock; I paid for three or four pots of beer, and a pint of gin; it was for him, his comrade, and me, we all three then went.

Q. How did you pay for it - A. I received one pound nine shillings and threepence at my pay table, there was a five shilling paper of halfpence, I paid for it out of that.

Q. Did you pull out your pocket book or purse in which your other money was - A. No, it was in my pocket, I cannot say that my money was in my purse; I had a one pound note and some silver.

Q. How long did you stay in this public house drinking - A. Till between nine and ten o'clock, then I went to another public house with the prisoner; after we had been to the second public house, he asked me to go the way by Great George-street, Westminster , and several times as I went on the road, I caught his hand in my breeches pocket.

Q. Was that the pocket your money was in - A. Yes, I asked him what business his hand had in my pocket; he left me after that, I do not recollect what he said, I was in liquor. I went home to bed at my lodgings, in Great Peter-street, I did not examine my pocket. On Sunday morning I awoke between six and seven o'clock, I felt in my pocket, I had no money left.

Q. When was the last time that you felt you had your money in your pocket - A. The very last public house. I left, I put my hand into my pocket and felt it there.

Q. What business is the prisoner - A. A dragoon .

Q. Now besides the note and the silver that you had in your pocket, had you a purse in your pocket - A. Yes, a leather purse and three duplicates in it of things that I had pawned. I saw the purse again the next morning.

Prisoner. Q. Did you give me the purse or did I take it - A. I did not give it you.

THOMAS SKINNER . In consequence of a person applying to me, not the prosecutor, I went to the King's Head, in the Broadway, Westminster. I asked the corporal and the Serjeant for the prisoner's room, they shewed me his room; I asked the serjeant where his jacket was, he told me under his head; I took it from there, I then searched his right hand jacket pocket, I took out this purse, there were nineteen shillings in silver in it, and the duplicates; the prisoner owned the jacket afterwards, and put it on; soon after he awaked I tookhim in custody, the prosecutor said it was his purse, and there were three duplicates in it, I found it as he described.

JAMES GILLMORE . I came into the room while Skinner was there; I said, I was sorry to see a young man like him, who was a soldier, to bring disgrace upon himself and his comrades; he said, he did not care a d - n for himself, or his comrades, all that he wanted was to get rid of the charge. He changed the one pound note at the Cock public house, with Mr. Scregler, he is not here.

Prisoner. He has spoken false, I never spoke to him.

Gillmore. I most positively swear that those were his words.

Prisoner's Defence. On the 23d of June, this young man came down to the house where I was quartered; he asked me to have something to drink, I told him I would, we went in there, and then went to another public house, and on his looking for money in his purse, and finding none, he threw it down, and said, he did not want it; I knowing of him, took it up to take care of it for him.

GUILTY, aged 19.

Judgment respited .

First Middlesex jury, before Justice Le Blanc.

548. RICHARD BOWERMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of May , two waistcoats, value 4 s. a pair of trowsers, value 4 s. two shirts, value 10 s. a pair of stockings, value 1 s. a table cloth, value 6 d. a clock, value 8 s. a pair of breeches, value 14 s. a bason, value 2 d. and a saucer, value 2 d. the property of Richard Codgell , in his dwelling house .

ANN CODGELL . My husband's name is Richard Codgell : we live at Church-end, in the parish of Wilsdon : we rent a little house there. On the 17th of May last, I was at home, and my husband was absent. I had a little boy between twelve and thirteen years old, a bed and a sleep. Between ten and eleven o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came to my house, I thought it was my husband; I said, Dick, is that you; he said, do not speak. He said nothing else coming in nor going out; I said nothing more to him. He took two waistcoats, and a pair of nankeen trowsers off the line in the room; there were two shirts and a pair of cotton stockings, wrapped up in an old table cloth at the end of the table; he took them to the door, whether there was any body at the door I do not know. He came back again and took down my clock, after that he took down my husband's leather breeches from a nail, and then he took a bason with a saucer at the top, that contained a bit of victuals. On the next morning I found the bason broke, and the saucer whole, in a field at the end of the house. He took all these things away with him.

Q. Did you say any thing to interrupt him - A. No, I was afraid if I spoke he would kill me. About that day fortnight he came within a little distance of the gate, he said, mother, what is it o'clock; I said, I did not know, I had not seen a clock that day; and through the window I thought I knew the man. He then asked me to tell him the way to Halsden-green; I said, I did not know; I said to myself, that is the man that robbed me; I knew the man again, and knew his voice. I followed him into the village, and made enquiries after him, I did not find him. I have never seen any of the articles since.

RICHARD CODGELL . I live at a cottage at Church-end. The prisoner was a travelling haymaker; on the 12th of June, James Gray and I found the prisoner at Cowling, he was sitting at a public house door; I went up to him, and said, Dick, how do you do; he said, I do not know you; I said, you did a job for me on the 17th of May last, that we have not settled for; he was a little restive about it. His foreman said, if it is so, perhaps you may make it up, a guinea shall be no object; the prisoner said, I did not know him, I could not hurt him; he never acknowledged that he committed the fact. I was at Wilsdon, on the 17th of May, when the robbery was done, I staid out late that night. Wilsdon is about half a mile from Church-end.

RICHARD NORRIS . I live in the parish of Wilsdon.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. I know him very well. On the 17th of May I was with Codgell, at the Six Bells, at Wilsdon. Richard Bowerman was in there for two or three minutes, he looked about him very hard, and then turned out; it was in the evening, between eight and nine o'clock, when I saw him.

JAMES GRAY . I went with Codgell, to Cowley; I took the prisoner on the 8th of June, and on our coming to town, he offered me two guineas to let him go.

MARTHA OGLE . I live at Wilsdon, at the White Hart. On the 17th of May, between three and four in the afternoon, the prisoner was in our house, drinking with John Bedding ; John Bedding went out two or three times, and the last time he went out, was between nine and ten; John Bedding went out first, and said, Dick, mind that bundle; and before John Bedding returned, this man went out, that might be a little after ten o'clock.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing at all of the property, nor the people, I never saw them before in my life, I was never at their house or premises.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

549. JOHN WILLIAMS was indicted for that he on the 8th of June last, was at large within this kingdom before the expiration of the term for which he was ordered to be transported .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded guilty .

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 31.

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

550. THOMAS CRIPPS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22nd of June , one pound weight of silk, value 2 l. 5 s. and eight ounces weight of twist, value 1 l. 4 s. the property of Robert Scarratt and Frederick William Londansack . And MICHAEL BARNABY , for feloniously receiving the same goods, he knowing it to have been stolen .

ROBERT SCARRATT . I live at No. 12, Milk-street , my partner's name is Frederick William Londansack ; we are wholesale dealers in silk , I rent the whole house, my partner only comes there for business; the prisoner Cripps was our porter . On the 22th of June, my warehouse-man gave me some information. I went into the cellar accompanied by him, I saw the paper parcel tied up, Clark had opened some part of it, I saw eight ounces of twist and a pound of silk, I knew it was my property; this was between nine and ten in the morning; we left the silk there till we saw the house clear, and then Matthews and me fetched it up stairs and examined it. After we were fully convinced it was our own property, I tied it up and left it in the same place; I knew it to be our's, I am quite sure of it. After we had replaced it we waited to see if any of the servants moved it. Clark went down into thecellar about three o'clock in the afternoon, and I went down and saw the parcel was missing. In the course of that time Cripps had been out with the cart, when he went out the parcel was in the cellar, and when he returned at two o'clock the parcel was in the cellar; and about three o'clock we missed it. The prisoner was gone out with the cart, when we took it up stairs and examined it.

Q. Had the prisoner access to this cellar - A. Yes.

Q. You found the parcel was gone at three o'clock, what steps did you take to find who had taken it - A. My partner wanted the horse in the afternoon, and the prisoner had to go to the west end of the town with some goods; we asked him for the key of the stable, he was the person that kept the key, he left the key behind him and soon after he went out with other goods. The stable is in Grub-street; Matthews and Clark went there and brought back the same silk and twist that I had seen in the cellar in the morning; Matthews tied some knots in the silk and put some pins with the heads off in the twist. I am sure it is the same silk that I had seen in the cellar. The prisoner returned about eight o'clock in the evening, he put by his knot, then I desired him to walk into the accompting-house. I shewed him the parcel, and asked him if he had seen it in the course of the day in the cellar or the stable; he said, he had not; I was provided with a constable, I desired the constable to take charge of him.

Mr. Alley. Q. Did you promise him any favour - A. I threatened him then, if he did not tell the truth, I certainly would prosecute him as far as the law would let me.

Q. Has not the other partner a share in the house - A. The rent and taxes are paid out of the trade.

Q. Have you any other place in which your family reside - A. My family chiefly reside at Camberwell. I always had a good opinion of Cripps before this time, he lived with me about a twelvemonth; I know nothing of Barnaby.

- CLARK. I am warehouseman to Mr. Scarratt. On the 22nd of June, between eight and nine o'clock in the morning, I went into the cellar to draw beer, I observed a paper parcel lying under the stairs, curiosity led me to take it up, I examined it, I found it contained silk and twist.

Q. It is of the same quality as is in your masters' warehouse - A. It is. I informed the other warehouseman, my master was not up; after breakfast I saw Mr. Scarratt, I informed him, he went down and saw the parcel, it was not weighed in my presence. About three o'clock I went into the cellar, it was gone.

Q. Who had the care of your masters' stable - A. The prisoner. I and Matthews went to the stable about six o'clock, Matthews found the same parcel of silk and twist in the stable, concealed behind a board; we took it back to Mr. Scarratt.

- MATTHEWS. I am a fellow servant to the last witness. I first saw the silk in the cellar, I afterwards saw it when it was taken up in the warehouse. I opened it and marked it, I could swear to the articles without any mark, it was packed up and put in the same place as before. I got the key of the stable of the prisoner. About six o'clock, in the stable, between the weather-board and the lining I found the parcel, I knew it to be my master's silk and twist. After the prisoner was taken in custody, I went with the Constable, Clark, and two others, to the Green Dragon public house, in Fore-street; Cripps had then the stolen property in his pocket, Cripps and the constable went in first; when I went in, Cripps and Barnaby were drinking together.

WILIAM PAUL . I am a constable. Cripps was delivered in charge to me by Mr. Scarratt; Mr. Scarratt shewed him the parcel of silk in my presence, and asked him if he had ever seen that parcel in the cellar; the prisoner said no, he had not seen it there. I took charge of him, and took him to the Green Dragon public-house, in Fore-street.

Q. Did you see the other prisoner Barnaby there - A. I did. Cripps went in with the parcel in his hand, I stood about six yards behind him; I could not hear a word they said, Cripps gave Barnaby the parcel, and he put it behind his coat on the settle; I watched, and when I saw Barnaby put it in his pocket. I took hold of him, and told him he had stolen property: I brought him up to Mr. Scarratt, and then I took it out of Barnaby's pocket; I have had it ever since.

Cripps's Defence. I know nothing about it; I through threats, took it to a public-house. I moved it from the cellar to the stable, not knowing what it was.

Barnaby was not put to his defence.

CRIPPS, GUILTY, aged 23.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

BARNABY, NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

551. CHARLES MASON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of June , a coat, value 2 l. two shirts, value 5 s. four handkerchiefs, value 7 s. ten pair of stockings, value 11 s. two waistcoats, value 3 s. two pair of pantaloons, value 15 s. a pair of breeches, value 4 s. two pair of shoes, value 7 s. a pair of boots, value 7 s. a pair of spurs, value 3 s. a clothes brush, value 1 s. 6 d. and two books, value 3 s. the property of Thomas Newberry , junior, in the dwelling house of George Lake .

THOMAS NEWBERRY , jun. I live at No. 9, Pulteney-street, Golden-square, St. James's parish , I lodge with George Lake; the prisoner lodged with me in the same house. On the 13th of May, I left my box containing my things, and a few more things laying about the room; I returned about eleven o'clock at night, and my landlady stopped me in the passage, she told me that she had some suspicion that I had been robbed; I went into my room with a candle, I saw a waistcoat laying over the key hole of my box, so as to cover the key hole, I took it off and found my box had been broken open, and every thing taken out, excepting a few letters, and a few trifling things at the bottom; I had left the box locked in the morning. I saw a bundle lay under the corner of the bed, and my boots laying by the side of them.

Q. Did the bundle contain all the things that you had lost - A. Every thing, excepting the boots, and they were laying by the side of the bundle.

Q. Were had the boots been placed before - A. In a cupboard in the room. - I went down to my landlady and got an officer, the prisoner was in bed with his clothes on.

PATIENCE LAKE . Are you the wife of Mr. Lake, the occupier of this house - A. Yes. I had the key of the room where the prosecutor and prisoner lodged, on the day the things were stolen, the room door was locked from nine o'clock in the morning till nine at night, I locked it myself. At a quarter past nine at night, the prisoner came in, I gave him the key, he went up to bedat that time. I took the prisoner without a character, I had suspicion of him, I watched the light every night, and that night he kept the light in a long while, I thought he was either robbing me, or the young man that was in that room. About a quarter after ten, the prisoner came down, and said he had a letter to write; I gave him a light, and he went up stairs.

ANN LOCKWOOD . I am a relation to Mrs. and Mr. Lake; I was present at the time, on the 13th of June, when Charles Mason came in; and a quarter before ten, in the evening, my relation told me to go into the yard to look whether his light was out, his bed room window looked into the yard. I stood there a quarter of an hour, or twenty minutes, and heard a noise of breaking open a box; I could see the shadow of him pass by the window where the box stood; I told my relation that I thought he had broken open the box, as I had heard the noise of it.

Q. Was this before the prosecutor, Thomas Newberry , came in - A. Yes, this was before Newberry came in, nobody else lodged in that room, but the prisoner and Newberry.

HENRY WOOD . I lodged in Mr. Lake's house in June. On the evening of the 13th of June, about half past ten at night, I went home to my lodgings, the landlord called me into the shop, told me that he had a suspicion that the prisoner had broken open Mr. Newberry's box; I stood in the shop some time talking to the landlord, the prisoner came down and asked for a light, said he was going to write a letter. I went up stairs, I looked through the key hole of the door, I saw a bundle lay on the bed tied up in a black apron, I went and told the landlord of it; as I returned up stairs again, I looked through the key hole again, I saw the prisoner kneeling or stooping by the bed side, pushing something under the bed. Newberry came in soon after that.

Q. What business was the prisoner - A. He said that he was a shoemaker .

JAMES PETTITS . I live in the house opposite of Mrs. Lake. About half after nine in the evening, Mrs. Lake sent for me, I then went up stairs into the room where the prisoner was, and enquired if Mr. Newberry was in or not; the prisoner said no, he did not expect him in before eleven; when he opened the door the candle went out, I went down stairs, about half an hour after the prisoner came down stairs and asked for a light, said he was going to write a letter. I waited in the house till Newberry came in; I went up after and saw the things out of the box, and a bundle under the bed, the box was broken open. The prisoner was then in bed with his clothes on. I waited in the room while Newberry went for an officer.

Prisoner's Defence. I found the box broken open when I went into the room, the boots were never found in my possession.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

552. CATHERINE PETTY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of June , a tin box, value 1 d. a dollar value 5 s. the property of Edward Jarvis , from his person .

EDWARD JARVIS . I am a watchman . On the 11th of June, it nine o'clock at night, I was going on my duty, I met the prisoner by the Black Swan, in Wentworth-street she asked me to give her a glass of gin, I refused giving her a glass, and gave her twopence.

Q. Did you know her before - A. I have seen her before, but never spoke to her; I missed her all in a minute, in Rose-lane there is a little passage there.

Q. Do you mean that you went out of Wentworth-street into a passage - A. Yes, I did not stay in that passage a minute with her. When I missed her, I put my hand into my pocket and missed my tobacco box and a dollar, they had been both in my waistcoat pocket. There were some children that saw the prisoner, they knew where she lived, they went to Mr. Gilman's, he went and took her, and my son in law sent for an officer, and had her searched in his house; I saw her searched, a tobacco box was found upon her, it was my tobacco box, no dollar was ever found upon her.

Q. Did you tell the magistrate the same account you have given now - A. To the best of my knowledge, I did.

Q. I want to know whether you told him you went to her lodgings with her - A. I did not; I did not go into her lodging, I went into a gateway with her, not into the house.

- WHEELER. I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner in Mr. Gillman's house, the prosecutor was there and gave me charge, he said, she had robbed him of a tobacco box, and a crown piece. I searched the prisoner, I found upon her a tobacco box and a few halfpence.

Prisoner's Defence. I met the prosecutor in Rose-lane, he asked me where I was going; I said, home; he said, go on, I will follow you, he came up stairs; I asked him if he was going to give me any thing; he said, he would go and get more money; he went down stairs, some children were there that knew him, they said they would go and tell his wife; and then they came and took me, and charged me with robbing him; I said, I had none of his money, I took the tobacco box out of my pocket and gave it them; his wife said that is enough, I will swear that is his box.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

553. LUCY FOLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of July , from the person of Stephen Leeson , four one pound bank notes, his property .

STEPHEN LEESON . I live at 58, East-street, Marylebone.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. Yes. On the 6th of this month I saw her in Charlotte-street, Bloomsbury.

Q. Had you any acquaintance with her before - A. I had the pleasure of seeing her before, but not knowing her so closely as this night; I met her about half after twelve at night.

Q. Were you in liquor - A. No, I was sober, I had the share of a pot of beer with my supper before I met her. When I met her she asked me to go home with her, she would get me a comfortable lodging; I went home with her to her lodging in Church-street ; I went to bed, but she did not; I undressed myself when I went to bed.

Q. What money had you about you - A. I had four one pound notes in my breeches pocket; I undressed myself when I went to bed; the four one pound notes were in a pocket book, in my breeches pocket when I was undressed.

Q. At the time that you lost the notes they were not on your person - A. No; after I got in bed I saw her put her hand into my pocket, she wanted some money to get some porter; she then locked me in and ran downstairs. I rapped at the door, some person came and said, make yourself happy and comfortable, she is only gone for a pot of porter. I laid in the bed till seven o'clock in the morning, and when I was loosened out of the room, I enquired of the mistress of the house where Mrs. Foley was, I told her I was robbed of my money: she told me she was gone to a shop in Charlotte-street, and there I should find her drinking of gin; I went, and found the prisoner coming out of a gin shop with half a pint of gin, and a handfull of halfpence; I stopped her and asked for my money. I sent for an officer, he came and searched her, he found no notes; I have never found my notes since.

MARGARET O'BRIAN . I live in Charlotte-street, Bloomsbury. The prosecutor wanted me to keep his money for him before he went out that night; I know no more than that he had four one pound notes, he offered them to me to take care off, I refused.

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutor asked me if I could tell him where to get a bed, I told him in Church-lane, where I lodged. I went and called the girl, I said, Jenny, this man wants a bed; she said it was one shilling and sixpence; he said, he had got only half-a-crown and some halfpence; he gave the girl a shilling; and after the girl went down stairs, he said he would give me eighteen pence to sleep with him; I said, I would not stop for eighteen pence; I never saw any more than the eighteen pence which he put in his pocket.

JANE TILBERY . Q. Do you live in the house where the prisoner lodged - A. Yes, on the 5th of this month I did.

Q. Do you remember the man who has been examined, being at the house on the night of the 5th or on the morning of the 6th - A. It was in the morning, he came with Lucy Foley ; he asked me if I had a bed to let, I said yes, and went up stairs with him; he asked me what the bed was, I told him eighteen pence; he said, he had no more than a crown and a halfpenny, he could give but a shilling for the bed, and eighteen-pence for the woman. The woman came down, and said she would stop no longer for the eighteen-pence; I went into the room to him and asked him if all was right, when he was sitting by the bed side, he said yes, then I locked the door and came down stairs. I always lock all the doors every night.

Q. Did not he make any complaint in the night - A. None at all, until the morning, between nine and ten, when he got up, and then he said he was robbed of four one pound notes.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave her a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

554. RICHARD PIPER and WILLIAM DAVIS were indicted, for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Robert Sibbald , about the hour of seven at night, on the 7th of November , and stealing therein, forty one handkerchiefs, value 7 l. his property .

ROBERT SIBBALD . I live at No. 4, Lower East Smithfield, in the parish of Aldgate : I am a slop-seller . On the 7th of November, about six o'clock in the evening, I returned home, and was in the act of sitting down in my parlour that adjoins my shop. I hear a crack at my shop window; I run out of the street door, I saw the window was broke; I saw two men run, I pursued them, calling out, stop thief; about ten minutes they got so far a head of me, and my being out of breath, I gave over the chace; then I came home and missed forty one handkerchiefs. On the next morning, I went to Mr. Matthews in the Minories, I found one of them pledged there for three shillings about half an hour after it was stolen; I gave information at the office, the officers told me they knew the men, and where the property was, they were playing at skittles every day, they could take them; I was afraid to go, this passed on.

Q. Have you seen any more of the handkerchiefs since, except that one that you saw at Matthews's - A. Two handkerchiefs I have seen since.

Q. Where were the handkerchiefs laying before you lost them - A. In the window, the pane of glass was cut as if with a diamond, in the shape of a half moon; the hole was large enough to reach their arm in, and take out the handkerchiefs.

Q. Had the glass fallen in the shop - A. No, outside, the glass fell on the pavement, and gave the alarm; there were two lights in the shop, but when the window was broke the wind blew one of the lights out. It was a dark night.

CHARLES STEBBING . I live with Mr. Matthews, 105, in the Minories. This silk handkerchief was pledged on the 7th of November, for three shillings, in the name of John Pritchard, I do not know either of the prisoners.

JOHN LILL . I am a lightermen, I live at No. 15, New-street, St. Catherine's.

Q. Do you know either of the prisoners - A. I know Piper. On the 7th of November, in the evening, he brought some handkerchiefs to sell; he said, they would suit my sailors, he had a quantity of handkerchiefs, I think I bought eight, he asked five shillings and sixpence for them; I said, I did not think they were worth the money; he said, he could pawn them for three shillings and sixpence; he took one to pledge, and returned with this duplicate - pawned by John Pritchard , a silk handkerchief, three shillings; this is the duplicate.

Q. Did you see any thing of the other prisoner, Davis - A. There was another man in the court where I live, it was very dark, I had every reason to believe it was Davis, but I am not sure. I am positive to the person of Piper. Here is one of the silk handkerchiefs I kept for myself.

Q. How soon did you hear that the prosecutor had been robbed - A. The next morning.

Mr. Arabin. What are you a lighterman - A. I am an officer in the impress service.

Q. You are a crimp are not you - A. I was at that time.

Q. Have you been accused wrongfully more than once, both in London and in the country - A. Not in London, in the country, but I never was tried. In June, I was going over Blackfriars-road, a carman asked me to lend him a hand with some cotton, I gave him a lift up in the cart, and they came and took me to Guildford; the thieves run away. I did not undergo a trial there was no ground for the accusation.

Prosecutor. I cannot swear to the handkerchief; it is exactly the same pattern, they cost me six shillings and threepence a piece.

Piper's Defence. I know nothing of the robbery, I never saw Mr. Lill before in my life.

Davis was not put on his defence.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

555. JOHN BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of April , a coat, value 1 l. 1 s. the property of Samuel Wasket .

SAMUEL WASKET . I am a poulterer , I live in Essex. On the 21st of April, between five and six in the morning, I was in Lime-street unloading my cart, I laid my coat on the horse because he sweated to keep him warm; I went up to Leadenhall-market, I was gone about three or four minutes, and when I came back my coat was gone off the horse; I took the horse and cart up to the King's Arms, Leadenhall-street, I told the ostler I had lost my coat; he said, a man brought a great coat to him about a quarter of an hour back; I looked at the coat and saw it was mine; I said, do not let the man have the coat, bring the man to me, so he did; I asked the prisoner where he had got the coat; he said, if you go along with me I will shew you the man that gave it me; I went some rods with him, he could not find the man. He then said, if I would let him go, he would give me a shilling and I might have the coat again. In taking him down to the Compter he ran away from me, I caught him again, and took him to the Compter. This is the coat, I know it is mine.

JOHN OFFER . I am an ostler at the King's Arms. The prisoner brought the great coat up the yard, up to the tap-room, and not finding any body up at the tap-room he brought the coat to me, I was at the stable-door; he asked me to take care of the coat till he called for it, I took the coat and he went. In about ten minutes the prosecutor came up the yard with the cart, and told me that he had lost his coat; I shewed him the coat, he said, it was his coat, he told me not to let the man have the coat. In about a quarter of an hour afterwards the prisoner came back, he asked me for the coat, I told him a man had been up the yard and owned the coat, and he must go along with me to Leadenhall-market, to the man; I asked him how he came by the coat; he told me it was his coat, he had had it a twelve-month; he went with me to Leadenhall-market to the prosecutor's; and going down Lime-street, I said, you are sure that is your coat; he said, no, I am not sure, the man down here gave me the coat to bring to the King's Arms tap; he said there is the man, he wanted to go down Fenchurch-street, and pointed to a man, I told him he should not go down there, if he saw the man he should call to the man, or send for him; I took him into the Poultry-market to Mr. Wasket.

Jury. What o'clock in the morning was it when he brought the coat - A. It wanted a quarter to six.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming up Leadenhall-market, I met a man of the name of Johnson a porter in the market, he told me to leave the coat at the King's Arms, he was going for a load, he would be after me in five or six minutes; when the man came back he asked me to go for the coat, and as soon as he heard I was taken, he went on board the Tender.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Confined Two Months in Newgate , and whipped in jail .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

556. JOHN BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of April , a basket, value 3 s. a linen cloth, value 1 s. and forty four pound weight of butter, value 2 l. the property of Christopher Lake .

JOHN OFFER . I am an ostler at the King's Arms, Leadenhall-street. On the 21st of April, I was taking the prisoner out of the yard to the man that had lost a great coat, and a flat of butter stood in the gateway; he said, that is my flat, nobody was near the flat, nor who brought it I do not know; Christopher Lake came and owned the flat. There was butter in the flat, this is the flat.

- ELDRIDGE. The prisoner was detained for the great coat, going out of the gateway stood a flat with butter; the prisoner then said, that is my flat. This is the flat, and this is the cloth that the butter was in.

CHRISTOPHER LAKE . I can swear to that flat and that cloth.

Prisoner's Defence. I never saw the flat.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

557. ALICE WAITE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of June , a shirt, value 5 s. a pair of stockings, value 2 s. and a handkerchief, value 2 s. the property of Francis Hood , widow , and a waistcoat, value 5 s. the property of John Dobbell .

FRANCIS HOOD . I am a widow, I take in washing, I live at No. 4, Bellgrave-buildings, Pimlico ; the prisoner was my washerwoman , I had missed things for many months. The prisoner being taken up, the officer asked me if I had lost any thing. I went to the magistrate to see if any of them was mine.

JOHN DOBBELL . I keep a house No. 4, Warwick-row, Pimlico . On Monday the 25th of June, the prisoner was employed as a washerwoman at my house. On Tuesday I saw her in custody and found my property.

JAMES GILLMORE . I am an officer of Queen-square. On the 26th of June I apprehended the prisoner on suspicion of a robbery. On searching her I found these three duplicates; one for a waistcoat, another for a pair of stockings, and the other for a handkerchief; Skinner, my fellow-officer searched her on the other side and found a duplicate of a shirt.

ROBERT SKINNER . I am an officer, I produce the duplicate of a shirt I found upon the prisoner.

JOHN TURTON . I am a pawnbroker 32, York-street, Westminster. I produce a waistcoat, a handkerchief, and a pair of stockings pledged by the prisoner on the 25th of June.

JAMES HARRIS . I am a pawnbroker 7, Great Chapel-street, Westminster. On the 9th of June, a shirt was pawned for 5 s. by the prisoner.

The property produced and identified.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence, nor called any witnesses to character.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Fined 1 s. and Confined Fourteen Days in Newgate .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

558. MARY MILLS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of June , two pair of cotton stockings, value 4 s. two cambric handkerchiefs, value 2 s. the property of Patrick Fagan .

SARAH FAGAN . The prisoner washed for me, the last pair of stockings she took on the 26th of June.

WILLIAM ASHWORTH . I am a pawnbroker. On the 26th of June the prisoner pawned a pair of stockings with me for 2 s.

Prisoner's Defence. I took a pair of stockings there of my own to wash. I brought them away in a mistake of my own; I intended to bring them back again.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY , aged 34.

Fined 1 s. and Confined Fourteen Days in Newgate .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder

559. WILLIAM HINE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 18th of June , one hundred and fifty yards of cloth, value 9 l. the property of John Pollard , George Pollard , senior , and George Pollard , junior .

GEORGE POLLARD , SENIOR. My partner's names are George Pollard , my son, and John Pollard , we are warehouseman and manufacturers of Yorkshire cloth , No. 12, Coleman-street . On the 18th of June, I returned from Barnet, I was informed that I had been robbed; I saw the cloth soon after.

THOMAS WADMAN . I am an officer of Coleman street ward. On Monday, the 18th of June, soon after five o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner with a load coming from the back part of Mr. Pollard's premises into Coleman-street, he crossed the street and went into Swan-alley; I followed him, he went into White's-alley. Coffee was four or five yards before me, he stopped him and took the load from him; the prisoner made no resistance; we found it to be cloth, about three quarters of a hundred weight. I asked the prisoner where he was going; he said he was carrying it to a man in Crown-court; I named the names of the men that lived in each house; he said, to Elliott. We took him to the Dolphin public house; I asked him if Mr. Pollard was up; he said, no. From his coming out of that part I supposed Mr. Pollard was his master; he did not deny it. I left the property at the Dolphin and went back to the house, and took the prisoner with me, and found the house left open; I let him go up stairs and I followed; I thought myself not safe, having no stick; I returned to the front door, I called him and he came down; when he came down his fellow servant came with him; the prisoner said, my fellow servant is innocent, I am guilty.

Q. You had not accused the fellow servant , had you - A. No. I then searched his pocket, I found a knife and the key of the stable door. I took him afterwards to the compter. I have kept the cloth ever since.

JAMES COFFEE . I am a watchman of Coleman-street ward. On the morning of the 18th of June I saw the prisoner come out of Whitehorse-yard, Coleman-street, I followed him up Swan-alley; I laid hold of him in Printing-house-yard, I caught hold of the bundle, pulled it off his shoulder, and asked him if he had any bill of parcels; he said not. Mr. Wadman came up and took charge of him. He said he was going with it to Mr. Elliot's in Crown-court. Mr. Elliott, when he heard of this business, left his house two or three days.

Prisoner's Defence. I beg my master's pardon.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY, aged 23.

Judgment respited .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

560. ANN BATSON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 20th of June , a handkerchief, value 1 s. two yards of lace, value 1 s. two yards and three quarters of a yard of ribbon, value 1 s. a shawl, value 2 s. two yards of tape, value 1 d. eleven pieces of cloth, value 2 d. a trill, value 1 s. and two pieces of callico, value 1 d. the property of Sarah Moore , spinster ; - four caps, value 4 s. and two half handkerchiefs, value 1 s. the property of Jane Mordeace , spinster .

SARAH MOORE . I live servant with Mrs. Robinson, she keeps the Angel inn, St. Martin's-le-grand ; the prisoner lived fellow servant with me about a fortnight. My things were taken out of my trunk, I never gave the prisoner any liberty to take them.

ELIZABETH FALKENER . I live in Poppin's-court, Fleet-street. I have washed for the prisoner four or five years.

Q. Were any things found in your house that the prisoner was charged with taking - A. Yes; this day month Mrs. Robinson came to my house, I delivered all the things that were claimed to the constable; they were left at my house by the prisoner. The cap I was to wash, and the handkerchief she said her fellow servant would pay me.

ABRAHAM CRESWELL . I am a constable. I went to Elizabeth Faulkener ; I have here all the things that were produced by Faulkner, and all the things claimed by Jane Mordeace , some I found at her former lodging, and some on her person.

JANE MORDEACE . I lived fellow servant with the prisoner at Mrs. Robinson's about a fortnight; she slept in the same room; I missed four caps and a neck handkerchief; they are worth five shillings.

Prisoner. She gave me them things to get them washed for her.

Jane Mordeace . I never did.

Prisoner's Defence. They gave me the caps to get washed for them, and the ribbon my mistress gave so me.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

561. ANN BATSON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 20th of June , two towels, value 1 s. six chains, value 6 d. a quarter of a yard of muslin, value 1 d. two handkerchiefs, value 5 s. an apron, value 6 l. a brush, value 1 d. a memorandum book and case, value 6 d. and a bonnet, value 6 d. the property of John Robinson .

PHOEBE ROBINSON . Q. Are you the wife of John Robinson, who keeps the Angel inn, St. Martin's-le-grand - A Yes. I lost things every day belonging to the country gentlemen; I denied my servants going out without asking my leave, that I might ascertain the thief. On the 20th of June I saw the prisoner in Newgate-street; I followed her home and questioned her where she had been; she said she had been for thread; I asked her where the thread was; she had none; she then said she had been to Mrs. Faulkener's. My daughter and the constable went to Mrs. Faulkener's; the prisoner said, I will go up first; my daughter said, no; the prisoner ran away; my daughter returned with some of things.

Q. Did the prisoner return to your house - A. No; the constable took her. This bonnet was left in my house in the waiter's care, till the person called for it, I saw it in my house; there is two silk handkerchiefs of mine; this silk handkerchiefs I swear to, it is my own, it is worth five shillings.

- CRESWELL. I found this new silk handkerchief and another under the prisoner's arm when I took her in the street.

Prisoner's Defence. I found that handkerchief in a room next line coach-office. I know they found the two towels upon me, I put them in my pocket, I meaned to return them; the bonnet is not my mistress's, nor anybody in the house. I do not know that I wronged my mistress of two pence. The handkerchiefs were wrapped up in a bit of paper, and finding it in a public place I thought I had a right to it as well as any other person.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

562. ROBERT LATHAM was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 23d of June , a tea caddie, value 5 s. the property of Sophia Mackenzie , widow .

MRS. SMITH. I am in the care of Sophia Mackenzie 's house, she is a widow, her house is at the corner of Eden-street, Pimlico . On the 23d of June I left my little girl in care of the house while I went out.

JOHN MAYHEW . I am a carpenter. On the 23d of June, a quarter before nine in the evening, I was coming home, this little girl came crying to me, and said some person had taken the tea chest off the mantle piece; I came back with the little girl, I saw the prisoner going towards the house again; I went up to him and asked him what he had done with the property, the little girl said he had got it in his bat; accordingly he pulled off his hat and gave it into my hands; I asked him how he came to do such a thing; he told me it was through distress; he begged me to let him go. I took him to Queen-square office.

MARY PARKER . I am going eleven years old. My mother went out and left me and my younger sister in the house; the prisoner knocked at the door and came in, he asked me if Mrs. Mackenzie was at home; I told him no, he said he brought a bill from Mr. Smith, the linen-draper, for Mrs. Mackenzie; then he went into the parlour and asked me if I could mind the bill; I told him I would mind it very carefully. He put the bill on the mantle piece, in the mean while he took the caddie and and put it in his hat. I am sure the prisoner is the man.

JAMES GILLMORE . The prisoner was delivered to me and this tea-caddie. On my searching the prisoner I found this pocket book, it contains a number of letters for admittance into the hospitals.

Prisoner's Defence. I belong to no parish; I could not get into any workhouse; I was born in the city of Dublin; I was drove to the greatest distress.

GUILTY , aged 70.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

563. SUSANNAH ROBINSON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 5th of July , a counterpane, value 5 s. the property of Richard Forster .

SARAH FORSTER . My husband's name is Richard Forster , I live at No. 8, York-place, Bla[Text unreadable in original.]ed-street . I let the prisoner a bed to sleep on it she was to pay two shillings a week. She is a servant our of place; she owed me a months rent.

Q. Was this counterpane part of the things that you debated - A. Yes; she pledged it at the pawnbroker's.

- I am a pawnbroker in White-cross-street. On the the of July in the evening, I received a counterpane of in the of Robinson; it is the prisoner to the best of my knowledge; I lent her three shillings upon it.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence, nor called any witnesses to character.

GUILTY , aged 17.

Confined Fourteen Days in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

564. JAMES MANOFIE was indicted for feloniously assaulting Alfred Baxter , in the King's highway, on the 14th of June , putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, three dollars, value 15 s. and one shilling, his property .

ALFRED BAXTER . Q. I believe you live with your father, who is a coach-maker in Long Acre - A. I do. On the night of the 14th of June I was returning from my friend's house by Chalk-farm, about half after eleven at night; it was a very fine night, the moon shone very bright. As I came down the Hampstead road I met the prisoner a little of the other side of the old workhouse; he came up to me on foot, presented a pistol at me, and demanded my money; he then took the pistol down by his side and cocked it, and put it to me again; he again demanded my money, and threated to blow my brains out if I did not deliver my money immediately; I gave him three dollars and one shilling; I then walked away from him, he said nothing more to me; I walked towards town; I went to the Britannia, nigh Camden-town, I gave information of the robbery; I saw three persons at the public-house whom I knew, I came on to town with them. This was on Thursday. On the Monday I saw the prisoner at Bow-street; I saw the three dollars and the shilling; the shilling was marked; I am almost confident that was the shilling that I had in my pocket before he robbed me.

Q. Do you remember what sort of a hat the prisoner had on - A. He had a hat turned up at the back part of it, and a frock coat on.

COURT. You said it was a moon light night - A. It was.

Q. Was there any thing over his face except his hat being on - A. No; I had full opportunity of seeing his face; I observed particularly his face and person at the time he robbed me, that I can speak to him again.

Q. Which way did he go after he had robbed you - A. I was coming from Hampstead, he went over the field on my left hand; that is the right hand going up to Hampstead.

JOHN SMITH . I am one of the patrol of Bow-street. On the night of the 14th of June I was coming from Hampstead, I heard of the robbery; Wright and Preston were with me; I had not walked above two hundred yards before I saw a man in the field on the left hand side of me as I was coming to town. I ordered Wright to get over to overhaul him; I called Preston; Preston and I went over, Wright had got hold of him; I told the prisoner that we were officers of Bow-street; Preston searched his pocket and found a loaded pistol. We took him into custody and took him to the Black Cap and searched him; in his right hand breeches pocket I found three dollars, a shilling, and a ing.

Q. Did any conversation pass between you - A. He gave me account of himself at all, we look him to the watchhouse. On Friday morning, the 15th he was brought to Bow-street and examined.

Q. At that time you had not found out the prosecutor, I believe - A. No, we had On the Monday following we found the prosecutor he attended at, Bow-street.

Q. There had been an advertisement in the paper thatsuch a man had been taken - A. Yes; in consequence of that Mr. Baxter came forward.

Q. What sort of a night was it - A. A very fine night.

Q. What sort of a hat had he on - A. A shabby hat, I did not remark it, no further than it was turned up behind; he had two coats on, a great coat and an under coat.

Prisoner. He found me after I had been asleep in the field.

COURT. That is the man that you took in the field - A. Yes.

Q. What hour of the night was it - A. About a quarter before twelve.

Q. Was he doing any thing when you first saw him - A. He was a walking along the field towards the foot-path.

Q. Was there a foot-path in the field - A. No; there was a footh-path in the road. He was walking upon the grass. I discovered where a person had been lying down upon the grass, about sixty yards from the road.

JOHN PRESTON . Q. You are an officer also - A. Yes. I was attending Smith on the night he has been speaking of.

Q. In consequence of any thing that he said did you get over the hedge to apprehend any body - A. Yes; I got over rather before Smith and apprehended the prisoner; I searched him and found on him this loaded pistol, it was loaded at the time with powder and bll; I was present when Smith searched him, he found three dollars and a shilling.

COURT. There was nothing said by the prisoner at the time he was there - A. No; he seemed very sulky.

Smith. I produce the money.

Prosecutor. The dollars I cannot speak to; the shilling I noticed on the Thursday; I did not particularly notice the marks; I observed there were two marks on the shilling.

COURT. The shilling in your pocket was marked, and you did not notice what the marks were - A. No; I am almost certain that is the shilling.

Prisoner's Defence. I came up from Bath to get some prize money that was due to me; finding that I could not get it I went down to Hampstead a baymaking, being tired I went into this field and went to sleep, and when I came into the road they said there was a robbery done, and that I was the person. This pistol I found on the road, I took the priming out of it and put it in my pocket.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 48.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Le Blanc.

465. GEORGE GARRATT was indicted for that he on the 20th of June , about the hour of twelve at night, being in the dwelling house of Walter Colton , burglariously did steal three ten pound notes, four one pound notes, four dollars, two half crown pieces, and seventeen shillings, the property of Samuel Sippel ; and that he afterwards about the same hour of the night. on the same day, burglariously did break to get out of the same .

ANN SIPPEL . Q. Are you the wife of Samuel Sippel - A. Yes.

Q. Where did you live at the time that this happened - A. At the Eight Bells at Kensington .

Q. Had you lodged there that night only - A. We were there three nights; we had lodged there the night before.

Q. Was there any other bed in the room where you and your husband lay. - A. Yes; there was another bed in the room where the prisoner and another man ( John Bass ) lay. We all went into the room together, and the prisoner was the first in bed of the four.

Q. When you went to bed what did you do with your pockets - A. I put them under my head under my pillow, I went to sleep; I awoke in the morning about five o'clock.

Q. Did you look at your pockets - A. Not at that moment; it was half after five when I missed the pocket. There were two pockets upon one string; the string was cut, and one of the pockets was entirely gone.

Q. Do you know what was in that pocket that was gone - A. There were thirty-six pounds; three ten-pound notes and four one-pound notes, in a red pocket book; the leather purse was in a canvas purse, in that canvas purse there were four crown pieces, two half crowns, and the rest in small change to the amount of two pounds two shillings in silver; and a good many things in the pocket that I cannot give an account of.

Q. This was at half after five that you missed it - A. Yes, exactly. I asked the old gentleman that was asleep with the prisoner if he saw the prisoner out of bed; he said he missed the prisoner out of bed at four o'clock in the morning.

Q. At that time was the prisoner in bed - A. No.

Q. How was the door of the room when you went to bed - A. There were no fastenings, only put to. I got up in my shift and went down to see whether the prisoner was gone.

Q. Did you find any body up in the house - A. Yes, the daughter belonging to the house, Elizabeth Colton. The bottom bolt of the street-door was drawed, and the prisoner was not below in the house.

Q. Your husband was in bed I suppose - A. Yes, and John Bass .

Q. Now where had you received these three ten-pound notes, and the one pound notes that you had in your pocket - A. I received them of my husband that same morning, the 20th of June; I had got a five pound note that I got the silver from. He gave me forty pound and two crown pieces.

Q. Had you been with your husband when he received this money - A. I was not present when he took it; he had left the money in the landlord's hands at the Artichoke public house; he received it in Bartholomew-lane, at the bankers. It was prize money; my husband has been to sea a great many years.

Q. Had you known the prisoner before - A. No further than on the Sunday before he slept at the Red Lion at Uxbridge, in the same room as we did.

Q. What day was this - A. The 20th of June, on the Wednesday.

Q. So you first got acquainted with the prisoner on the Sunday before, and he was quartered at the same house as you were - A. Yes. We were travelling up from Wales to receive this trifle of money.

Q. Then on the Sunday he continued travelling up with you the same road - A. No; we were not together on the road; he came the same night to the house at Kensington and asked for a lodging; it was granted.

Q. Do you know whether the prisoner saw you have this money - A. Yes. The prisoner was with us at the Artichoke at Kensington, when my husband gave me the money to take care of, and saw my husband give it me.

Q. Did you see the prisoner again after you missed your money - A. I never saw the prisoner from the morning that I missed my money until I catched him in the Borough last Friday week; I saw him at the door of the house where he was quartered at; he was standing picking his teeth; he turned into the house and shut the door after him, he jumped over the paling of the yard and went into the next house and went under the stairs; I went into the next house with a constable, and saw him coming out from under the stairs of the next house.

Q. Did he come out of the stairs of himself - A. No; the constable bid him come out, and he said he would; I asked the prisoner how he could do such a trick with me; he said why did not I take it a little quieter.

Q. Was he searched at that time - A. He was searched when he was taken into prison; I did not see it. I had never seen him before I saw him at Uxbridge; I do not know what business he is.

Prisoner. They all knew I was going away in the morning.

Prosecutrix. I did not know he was going away.

Prisoner. She is not the wife of Samuel Sippel.

Prosecutrix. I am the lawful wife of Samuel Sippel

SAMUEL SIPPEL . Q. You you have been a sailor , have you - A. I have been in the army and navy.

Q. Is the last witness, Ann Sippel , your wife - A. We have been married about a twelvemonth.

Q. Do you recollect giving your wife any money at the Artichoke at Kensington - A. Yes; it was on Wednesday morning, at the Artichoke; I gave her the forty pounds.

Q. Had you lodged it in any persons hands before you gave it her - A. Yes, with the landlady of the Artichoke, forty pounds ten shillings; I took it from the landlady and gave it to her.

Q. Where did you get that money from - A. I received a draft of Messrs. Cook and co. in the Adelphi, they are prize agents; forty-seven pounds four shillings and sixpence, I received it as prize money; the draft was drawn upon Messrs. Downes and co. Bartholomew-lane, and there I received the money. I had come up to town on purpose to receive this money.

Q. Do you recollect in what notes you received for that draft at Messrs. Downes and co. - A. Yes; three ten pound notes, two five pound notes, seven one pound notes, a half crown piece, and two shillings.

Q. Do you know of having changed any of these notes - A. None of the tens, both of the fives I had changed.

Q. Where had you first met with the prisoner - A. At Uxbridge; I had never seen him before; he came in of the Sunday night, he went off on the Monday morning before us, he left the house sometime before us; I stopped to have breakfast. He came into Kensington and spoke to me.

Q. Was he at the Artichoke at Kensington that morning when you took the money of the landlady and gave it to your wife - A. Yes; and through his persuasion, and telling me that soldiers and sailors suffered by putting their money in landlord's hands, I took it out; that is the way that I lost it, by taking it out of my friend's hands.

Q. Now at the house where you lodged that night did you all lodge in the same room - A. This man and another slept in another bed in the same room; we went up all to bed together.

Q. You did not see your wife do any thing with her pockets when she went to bed - A. No; I laid down in the bed and went to sleep. The next morning we were awake near at one time; I saw her look for her pockets, she missed them; I sat up in bed and missed the prisoner; I saw his bundle at the foot of his bed; I thought the man was not gone. He had left his bundle there for a decoy.

Q. You were not present when the prisoner was taken in the Borough - A. No; I was in pursuit after him down at Bristol. I received the number of the three ten pound bank notes at Downes and co. The three ten pound notes were to put my children out apprentice with.

JOHN BASS . Q. Are you the man that slept on this night with the prisoner - A. Yes; I slept in the same room, in another bed, where Sippel and his wife and children were. I was awake at four o'clock, the prisoner was gone when I awoke.

Q. It was quite light when you awoke at four o'clock - A. Yes, and the prisoner was gone.

Q. Do you know whether he had taken any bundle up in the room - A. There was a bundle that he brought up at night, and he left it under the bed in the morning.

Prisoner. How can he look your lordship in the face and say he was awake at four o'clock; it was half after five when I left the room.

Bass. I heard the clock go four.

Q. Then you was awake before four - A. Yes.

JOSEPH SHEPPARD . I am clerk in the house of Downes, Thornton, and co.

Q. Does Cook and co. prize-agents, keep cash at your house - A. Yes, they do.

Q. Did you pay a draft of theirs for forty-seven pound odd on the 19th of June - A. I paid a draft to a man of the name of Sippel, the same man who is here, I remember his person; I have made a memorandum of the notes; I have brought the book, it is my own hand-writing; I paid him three ten pound notes, No. 244, dated the 4th of June, 1810, No. 245, dated 4th of June, 1810, and 246, dated 4th of June, 1810. I have no doubt they are the same notes I paid away.

Q. Are you conversant enough with the bank business to know that there are never two notes of the same number on the same day - A. Yes, I am.

JOHN GOFF . I am a police officer of Union-hall. I apprehended the prisoner in the Borough on the 6th of July, a linen draper had hold of him first. I took him to Union-hall.

Q. Did you after that search his lodgings - A. I searched him first and found on him a silver watch. I went to his lodgings in Weston-street.

Q. How do you know it was his lodgings - A. I was informed that the prisoner came from that house; I went to the house and searched the prisoner's room, I found a piece of new Irish cloth, a coat nearly new, and a great many other things that appeared to be nearly new clothes, and some shawls, and then I came to Union-hall, I told him I had the trunk and the goods;he asked me if I had got the note; I asked him what note, he said, a ten pound note; he told me it was in a canvas bag over the mantle piece, in the room where I found the goods; I went to the same room that I went to before, and over the mantle piece I found a purse containing a ten pound note. This is the note and this is the purse. The next day I told him that I had found the purse and the ten pound note; he said he found the money in the road the night before the robbery was committed.

ELIZABETH COLTON . Q. Where do you live - A. At the Eight Bells at Kensington.

Q. Do you remember the prisoner and Sippel and his wife lodging at your house - A. Yes.

Q. Are you the daughter of the people that keep the house - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know how many nights the prisoner lodged there - A. Three nights.

Q. Did the prisoner lodge there the same three nights that Sippel and his wife lodged there - A. No; I believe she came there the night before.

Q. Do you remember the morning when the woman complained of having lost her pocket - A. Yes; that morning I got up at five o'clock.

Q. When you first came down in what state did you find the door of the house - A. The door was fastened with the spring lock, but unbolted; the door had been fastened the over-night with the spring lock and the bolts; I fastened it myself, I am sure it was bolted; I was the last person up, and I bolted it before I went to bed.

Q. And the next morning it was unbolted at five o'clock - A. Yes.

Q. You cannot say at what time the prisoner went away - A. No, I cannot.

Q. Was his lodging and reckoning paid - A. His lodging and reckoning were paid I believe.

Q. How soon after you got up was it that the woman came down stairs - A. Mrs. Sippel came down about half after five.

Q. Did you yourself know whether the prisoner was going away early that morning or not - A. No.

Q. Do you know whether any body had gone off before you were up, except the prisoner - A. No; all the lodgers were in the house.

Q. Who keeps the house - A. My father, Walter Colton .

Prisoner. There are two other houses in the yard, to go out they must come through the house - A. Yes, they must come through our passage, but there was nobody that morning that came through before I was up.

JOHN TENNANT . I live at 196 Tooley-street, in the Borough. The prisoner came to my house on the 29th of June, between nine and ten in the morning, he was in company with a woman, he said he wanted a piece of linen; after some time he selected one piece and some shawls, the whole came to three pounds ten shillings and sixpence, he tendered me a ten pound note, and I gave him the difference; I am sure the prisoner is the man; I recollect an endorsement at the back of the note, I observed it particular, I did not write any thing on it myself; I paid the note away in two hours afterwards, and the person that received it wrote my name on the face of the note.

Q. Did you see him write your name on it - A. No: I can swear to the note by the endorsement.

JOHN PARKER . I produce a ten pound note from the bank of England; it was brought in the bank on the 30th of June; the note came from Masterman's.

Q. to Mr. Tennant. Look at that note - A. That is the identical note that I took of the prisoner, I know it by the endorsement of Coate; I can swear to the particular hand-writing, and there is my name on the face of the note. The number is 244.

Q. to Ann Sippel . Is that your purse - A. It is not.

Prisoner's Defence. I am very sorry that my prosecutor is so hard against me. I found these notes going to the Artichoke public house. I am quite unprepared. There were two other sailors drinking with us, they are neither of them here. I never saw the inside of a gaol before. I have been twenty two years in the navy.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 49.

Of stealing in the dwelling-house, but not not of breaking out of it.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

366. JANE STINSON and SARAH JONES were indicted for that they on the 25th of June , one piece of false and counterfeited money and coin, made to the likeness and similitude of good legal current money of this realm, called a sixpence, feloniously and traiterously did counterfeit and coin .

The case was stated by Mr. Knapp.

SAMUEL HAMILTON . I am an office of Marlborough-street office. On Monday the 25th of June, between three and four in the afternoon, in company with Craig and Jackson, officers, I went to a house, No. 17, Field-lane , the street-door was open, I made my way up to the one pair of stairs, I went gently up, the others following me to the one pair back room; when I got up I bursted open the back room door; upon my breaking open the door it brought me immediately into the room, almost upon the prisoners, who were sitting facing each other around a round table, on which was a blanket, my sudden intrusion alarmed the prisoners, who screamed; they endeavoured to catch up the blanket, I to prevent it, in consequence of each scrambling at the same object, the table was in part upset, on which I observed a number of these blanks.

COURT. What do you call blanks - A. They are blank pieces of metal, apparently for sixpences, they are not coloured; they are a metal which has a colouring in it, but not compleat.

Mr. Reynolds. When your talk of blanks you mean unfinished pieces, do not you - A. Yes. The table having in part fallen many of the blanks fell about the feet of the prisoners, and about the bottom of the table, which I picked up, most of them, in number, I think, sixty, many of them are bent, and many of them bear the punch mark of the letter P; upon looking round the floor, close to where the prisoners were, I found upon the blanket, and upon the floor this fine sand paper, most of it having been used. On the floor also, close to the prisoners feet, this punch, bearing the letter P, a pair of pincers which Jackson picked up and gave to me, a small bag also upon the floor close to the table, having in it two counterfeit shillings. In some part of the room this pair of scissars, a paper of cream of tartar I found in one of the cupboards, which I gave to Hawkins, with, I think, nineteen pence halfpenny in copper, which I also gave to him; I then searched the pockets of the prisoner Stinson, and foundsix good shillings, two good sixpences, two counterfeited sixpences, and a counterfeit shilling the shilling bearing the punch-mark of the letter P, tied up in a bit of rag, the good and the bad shilling and sixpence that I have described. On the fire side, there being a fire in the grate, I found one blank of the small size, bearing the punch-mark of the P, which was red hot. On the mantle shelf of the same room this small ball of blacking. After having secured the prisoners I went again with Craig and Hawkins, and in the same room we found this pocket, which from some liquid appears to have been burnt, bearing some green stained marks, and now very tender; this a blanket also found at the same time, with the pocket, which has in many parts of it, principally in the middle, the stained marks of green. I have the table here which I brought from the same room, it has the same marks of green.

Q. When you went in first did you make any observations on the hands of the prisoners - A. I did, that ther fingers were very dirty, as if they had been at work at some metal.

Q. It was different from ordinary persons having dirty hands - A. They were discoloured as if they had been using and rubbing of metals; I made an observation to the prisoner Stinson that it was a bad job, her answer was, that they were making button tops.

Q. Was there a curtain in the room - A. There was, which was down when we went into the room, it was a dirty red check curtain; when we went into the room we put it up. The back premises were so situated, I think, that it was impossible to see into the room with the curtain quite down. I have a vial, but what it contained I do not know.

WILLIAM JACKSON . I am an officer of Marlborough-street. I went to this house with the other officers, I entered the room with Hamilton; I picked up some sixpences that dropped from Stinson, they are three blanks, they are bent and in an unfinished state; two of the sixpence are marked with the letter P. I tried the punches to one of the sixpences, it fitted exactly to the letter; I picked up the punch and gave it to Hamilton. I secured Stinson while they were searching the room, and while I had hold of her hands she said they were making button tops. The room was searched over and over again, no button tops were to be found. This is the punch.

WILLIAM CRAIG . I am an officer. I know no more than what the other officers have stated. I secured Jones, she said she was making button tops, I found no shank nor wire; I found these rags, some about the room, and others in the cupboard, they are dirty greasy rags, as if they had been used in some process and stained green; here is very near a dozen rags. I found that tin, it appears to have been very much burnt, and there is some blacking upon it.

JOHN LACEY HAWKINS . I went with a search warrant to this house.

Q. Is this house in London or in Middlesex - A. In London. I found these metal scrapings, they were done with a chisel, and here are some more that are done with another kind of tool, neither of them are filings; on the prisoner Jones I found this cake of soap and some halfpence; in the cupboard in the room I found these papers of powder, there are three papers of powder; one powder she said was sugar of lead; one paper is cream of tartar; I found a small brush, an old file, and a quantity of sand paper; here are three pieces of sand paper, they have been used considerably, and under the table, near the fire place, I found three sixpences not finished; they are blanks. Here is a small leather bag, it is black inside; I was there when the rags were found, I can see the sparling of sand paper on them, and the wiping of metal.

WILLIAM MORRIS . I am by trade a button-maker - a button-chaser.

Q. Do you know the two prisoners - A. Yes, I know them perfectly well. On the 25th of June I unfortunately went to their house, that was the first time, I went there about eleven o'clock in the morning; the first time I went there was the 3rd of June.

COURT. I thought you said the 25th of June - A. The first time was the 3rd of June, then I went to the front room, one pair of stairs, to a young woman that I was acquainted with, she lived in the front room; Stinson came into that room to me, and this young woman that I was with expressed her surprise of her coming into the company of a stranger. At that time the prisoner Stinson had a bag in her hand, and she was rubbing in this way. I am come here to speak the truth, and you may depend upon it I will.

COURT. Do not chatter so - A. Then afterwards she pulled some sixpences out of the bag.

Mr. Knapp. Had she done any thing before that - A. Yes; I saw her file some of the sixpences at the edges, then afterwards we had a little conversation; she asked me whether I wished to have any of them; I had three of her sixpences.

Q. Before she had filed the edges and put them into the bag, where did she take them from - A. I cannot tell; after she had filed them she put them into a bag and rubbed them, before she put them in the bag they appeared brassy, and afterwards, when they came out, they were quite while. I went several times afterwards to see my friend, and I saw Stinson most times, I saw them both, they were making sixpences; once I saw them cutting out the oval sixpences with scissars, she had a flat iron without a handle, she struck a punch marked with the letter P, upon the sixpences with a pair of pincers; they were such pincers as them are; then she bent both ends with a pair of pliers; that was Stinson; Jones was rubbing some of the blanks with sand paper upon the table, with a cloth upon it, that was to get the rough marks out of the blanks, then they put them in a leather bag, and rubbed them with the bag and brought them out quite white.

COURT. What was in the bag - A. Some kind of white dust.

Mr. Knapp. Do you know aquifortis - A. I saw some there at the same time, but I did not see it used.

Q. What is aquafortis to do to them - A. To prepare them. I know what it does to buttons; when we solder them it takes out the rough marks, and prepares them for silvering or gilding, it clears them.

Q. When was the last time that you were there - A. I think on the 24th of June; it was Sunday, and I had a shilling, which I took to Mr. Sewell, who is an assistant to Mr. Powell; I gave it to him, I purchased it of the prisoner, I was to give fourpence for it, I did not; I gave that shilling to Mr. Sewell; I told Mr. Powell what I had seen. The last time I went to the house Stinson told me that they should be ready in about an hour, what I went for, some shillings and sixpences, Iwas to have three or four dozen, she was going to get some blanks; Stinson went out and Jones stopped at home, and when I came back Jones told me to wait, she would not be long; I stopped, Stinson came back soon after; when she came back they both set to work at the table in another room; Jones began first to rub the blanks with sand paper, the blanks were ready cut out; at that time Stinson was striking the punch on a coblers last; she then bent them with a pair of pliers, and after they were bent I left the room and went to tell Mr. Powell what I saw.

Q. You say you saw some aquafortis in the room, where was that - A. It was standing in the lid of a window with a feather in it. Stinson told me they were very good things, she and Jones had done three or four dozen in the morning, and they had both been out, they had got a great sale for them; as many as they could do they could part with them.

Q. In consequence of what you had seen did you communicate every thing to Mr. Powell - A. I did. I have told the truth and no more.

COURT. Did you ever learn what powder it was - A. No; it was white. Before they were put in the bag the edges looked brassy, and when they came out of the bag the edges looked white.

Q. Do you know what cream of tartar is - A. Yes, I know it perfectly well; this is the cream of tartar; they use cream of tartar and tin shavings to hardware buttons; I do not know what that other paper is.

Mr. Alley. You are a button maker - A. I am a button chaser.

Q. You unlucky enough got acquainted with the prisoner on the 3d of June, I think that was your expression - A. Yes.

Q. That was owing to your going to a girl that lodged in the same house - A. Yes; I got acquainted with these two by knowing the girl in the front room, she was a very slight acquaintance.

Q. Pray where did you carry on the trade of button chasing - A. When I am at home at Birmingham; there is very little button chasing in London.

Q. I suppose you were a housekeeper at Birmingham - A. My father is.

Q. Your grandfather may - When did you carry on the button chasing at Birmingham - A. Three years ago.

Q. What have you been doing in London for three years past - A. I have worked in two places and can have a good character from them.

Q I am sure you are a man of good character because you are doing good service to the public - when was it you came to London the last time to settle here - A. It is now twelve months.

Q. About ten months I suppose you worked at button making in London - A. No, I have not; I worked at Allen's and Butler's in Nevills-court, they carry on the spectacle trade; a person that comes to London must change his hand; I worked with them five months.

Q How have you got your livehood the last five months - A. I have got very good friends; my father is very well to do, he has sent me up money, and I have received money from my friends.

Q Have you ever travelled the country much - A. Very little.

Q. Do you know Mr. justice Grose - A. I know him very well, I have seen him at the bench, but I was never before him.

Q. Do you know poor Wingrove Butler - A. I do not.

Q. Do you remember the poor man that was tried at Aylesbury - A. I do not; it is another man that you are alluding to, his name is George Morris .

Q. Do not you know the man that was tried for horse-stealing before Mr. Justice Grose - A. I do not.

Q. Then you do not know the man that was tried that bought the horse with forged notes - A. I do not.

Q. Has your journey in the country ever led you towards Woolwich - A. I was there; I know what you are alluding to; I had his Majesty's pardon.

Q. You have been on board the hulks - A. Yes; I was tried here.

Q. I ask you upon your oath whether you do or do not expect to get any thing for this prosecution - A. I do not.

Q. Are you the person that gave bail for some offence - A I am. I am on bail now for uttering a bad seven shilling piece; I was taken up about a month ago and bailed for that. If it was not for money makers I should not have been in that situation.

Q. You have charged the two prisoners with money making on the 25th of June - you were taken up about a month ago, that was some time before the 25th of June - A. Yes.

Q. I dare say you did not think it was a convenient thing by serving the mint in this prosecution and saving yourself - A. A man has always an opportunity to gain his character in this country.

Q. It is about a month ago you were taken up charged with uttering a bail seven shilling piece - this was after his Majesty offered you a free pardon - A. Yes.

Q. You have been taken up after that for uttering a bad seven shilling piece - Do not you expect to be absolved from your sin by accusing them - A. I think repentance is never too late.

JURY. Did you teach these women their business - A. No, never.

Q. Did they ask you any questions as to the process of making buttons - A. No, never; they seemed very shy of me, but this woman told them it was all right with me. I never instructed them in the art of making bad money.

Mr. Knapp Did you ever know any thing about making bad money before this - A. I never saw any person in my life making money before this time.

CALEB EDWARD POWELL . Q. I believe you have assisted the solicitor of the mint for a great many years - A. Yes.

Q You are perfectly well acquainted with the apparatus, and things necessary to be used in coming - A. Yes.

Q. Take these sixpences, look at them - these are the sixpence found by Hamilton dropping from the women, and tell me what is the appearance of these sixpences - A. They appear to be finished ready for circulation; they are now a little rough, they are a little different from what they were the day when I first saw them, they were quite fresh, new coloured, I should suppose first of all they were cut out of the plate with a pair of scissars; there is another sixpence exactly of the same appearance cut out of the plate with the scissars, and that is complete for circulation, it would deceive now, at the time when I first saw it it was new coloured. These are the blanks. Here is a file whichwould be useful in filing the edge, after it has been cut out of the plate in order to give it a smooth and circular form; here is a sand paper for rubbing the surface to prepare it for colouring; it is a particular sand paper that is applicable for this purpose particularly, so a great deal of it appears to have been used in the rubbing of metal: the blanks, after having been so prepared would be coloured with aquafortis and cream of tartar only.

Q. Would not the effect of aquafortis bring the silver there was to the surface - A Certainly; I am satisfied of that particular circumstance by taking one of the blanks which were unfinished which I coloured with aquafortis and cream of tartar only; that is the one that I coloured. The colour of silver would be produced by aquafortis, it would be then black and be put into water, and the cream of tartar would take the black off, and produce the whiteness. Here is a number of blanks, of the size of sixpences in an unfinished state.

Q. What would the act of shaking them in the bag do to them - A. The powder in the bag I believe to be nothing but chalk, which would be a quick way of drying them by shaking them in the bag instead of drying them with chalk. The blacking would be the last thing to take off the new appearance of silver, so as to deceive and make them appear as if they had been in circulation. I have looked at the rags, the blanket, and the table, produced by the officers, they appear very much stained in a way which would be the case if aquafortis had been used; I have no doubt that these stains came from aquafortis being used with metal. One of these papers that have been produced is cream of tartar, which has been spoken to. Here is a paper which I believe to be fine chalk. There is a tin pan, I have seen such kind of things frequently before, I have known them to be used in putting the blanks in to heat them over the fire; it makes them take the aquafortis sooner, it makes them take the colour better and easier, and the colour would be much better in the metal, and wear longer; it appears very black, as if it had been over the fire. I have compared the marks upon the blanks before, and I found the mark of the punch to correspond.

Q. Take these two sixpences, are they counterfeit - A. They are counterfeit. A number of people make use of punches in good money, and a number of people will not take them without it, and the bending of the edges make them appear more like an old sixpence.

Mr. Alley. I do not see that any aquafortis has been produced to day - A. No liquid aquafortis has been produced to day.

Q. Do not you think that aquafortis is necessary in making counterfeit money - A. Yes.

Q. You have heard a witness swear that he found a pen in aquafortis in the bottle, would not the aquafortis burn it up - A. Yes, it would by being constanty in the bottle.

Q. How many are there that you suppose to have been cut with a pair of scissars - A. I confine myself to two in particular.

Q. I see here are thirty or forty that appear to have been cut with a punch - A. Yes.

Q. How long have you known Morris - A. Since January.

Q. Upon your oath, from what you know of him, do you not believe he is as big a rogue as is unhanged - A I know nothing of his character but what come within my own observations; I certainly believe him to be a man of bad character.

JOHN NICOLL . Q. I believe you are one of the moniers of his Majesty's mint - A. I am.

Q. Will you have the goodness to look at the sixpences that have been put into your hand by Mr. Powell, are them two sixpences counterfeit - A. They are counterfeit.

The prisoners left their defence to their counsel; and called no witnesses to character.

STINSON, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 38.

JONES, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 45.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

367. JOHN SALMON and LEWIS ROBINSON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 4th of July , a sack, value 3 s. and one hundred and nine pound weight of flour, value 2 l. 10 s. the property of John Hill , in his dwelling-house .

JOHN HILL . I live at 62, Three Colt-street, Limehouse, in the parish of St. Ann's, Middlesex ; I carry the baking business on , Salmon was my journeyman . From information, on the 4th of July, about twenty minutes past five in the morning, I concealed myself in my neighbour's back kitchen, so that I had a view of my back premises; I saw the prisoner Robinson come into Mr. Couchman's yard and go into mine, the prisoner Salmon opened the back door and let him in. Robinson then followed Salmon into the kitchen, they were in about three minutes, and then Robinson came out with part of a sack of flour upon his back; I let him come off my premises and then I stopped him; he said it was the first time that ever he did it. I apprehended Robinson upon Mr. Couchman's premises.

Q. Did you examine to see what was in the sack at the time - A. I did, there is about ninety pounds odd. I had seen the sack in the bakehouse about an hour before Robinson came. I dare say it is worth two pounds and upwards. I apprehended Salmon in my parlor where he had no business to be.

Q. What would be the regular time for Salmon to come to work - A. At five o'clock.

Q. This sack of flour was in the bakehouse - A. Yes.

Q. And he had business there - A. Yes, to work.

THOMAS COUCHMAN . I live with my father next door to the prosecutor. On the 4th of this month, about five o'clock, when I got up, I saw Robinson walking up the alley and about Mr. Hill's door, I saw Robinson come into my father's back premises, he then passed through Mr. Hill's yard into his his washhouse; I saw Salmon go behind the privy door in the yard and look about before Robinson came in. In a few minutes I saw Robinson come out, he had part of a sack of flour on his back, the sack was tied up. I told Mr. Hill he was coming.

The property produced and identified.

Salmon's Defence. I worked for Mr. Hill six months; I usually go at five o'clock to put my roll spunge in; it is my business to go into the yard to get cold water. I went into the parlour to get buteer and other things to make gingerbread and biscuit; as I turned into the parlour I heard a noise in the yard, I found Mr. Hill bringing this man in.

Robinson's Defence. I was going to carry it for this man; Mr. Hill when he catched me, kicked me in a tender part; I have been ill ever since.

SALMON, GUILTY , aged 39.

Fined 1 s. and Confined One Year in the House of Correction .

ROBINSON, GUILTY, aged 66.

Of stealing to the value of 39. only .

Whipped in Jail .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Cambre.

568. WILLIAM QUELCH and GEORGE BROWN were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of June , one thousand eight hundred pound weight of logwood, value 25 l. the property of Margaret Thompson , widow , Philip Thompson , and Robert Cuff Thompson , in a certain barge on the navigable river Thames .

PHILIP THOMPSON . Q. I believe you are a lighterman - A. I am; my partner's names are Margaret Thomson , myself, Philip Thompson , and Robert Cuff Thomson . The prisoner Quelch was in our employ a lighter-man .

Q. On the 25th of June last, did you give any orders to take down any lighter called the Abingdon to Blackwall - A. I did, the lighter was taken from Porter's Quay near the Custom-house .

Q. At what hour of the night was he to go off - It was high water between ten and eleven o'clock.

Q. I think you told me the name of the barge was the Abingdon, was there any tarpaulin in that barge belonging to you - A. Yes, in the cabin, Quelch had the key of that cabin.

Q. At what time on the 25th did you give Quelch his directions - A. About seven or eight o'clock in the evening.

Q. Do you remember M'Bride coming to you when you were giving directions to Quelch - A. I was not at home when M'Bride came. He came to my house between eight and nine o'clock I did not see him.

Q. How soon in the morning did you learn that any of your logwood had been stopped - A. About eleven or twelve o'clock the next day. Upon that I went to the Thames Police office, and there I found M'Bride in custody.

Q. Did you find a lug-boat with any logwood there - A. I did.

Q. Was that the same description of logwood as you had on board the Abingdon - A. It was, the Abingdon had about eighteen hundred weight of logwood. On the same day I caused Quelch to be taken up, and Brown in two or three days afterwards. From the appearance of that logwood in the lug-boat and the cargo, I belive it to be my logwood.

Q. What is the value of it - A. About thirty pounds.

Mr. Andrews. I believe it was on the 25th that you gave Quelch the instructions of this cargo - A. It was.

Q. How soon did Quelch return - A. He came to me at my accompting house the next day at eleven o'clock.

Court. Where was it to be delivered - A. At Blackwall.

Mr. Andrews. Is it your practice to look over your barges before they are loaded - A. In general. I have no foreman.

Q. You speak with some certainty of there being a tarpaulin on board this barge - A. I had seen it the day before. I have seven or eight barges. I appointed this barge on the Sunday to receive ten or eleven hundred weight of logwood.

Q. How long has Quelch been with you - A. Eight or ten months.

Mr. Gurney. You attend to your business yourself - A. Always my own business. I had seen the tarpaulin in the cabin the day before.

Court. Brown was not in your employ at all - A. No, he was a lighterman.

Mr. Alley. Q. How long was it after that Brown was apprehended - A. A day or two after.

Q. Is M'Bride a lighterman - A. He is not, he is a watchman.

Mr. Gurney. Is M'Bride capbale of navigating a lug-boat through London Bridge - A. He is not.

JOHN RYE . I am a Thames Police surveyor. On Tuesday the 26th of June, at four o'clock in the morning, I was going down Limehouse-reach in a boat. I saw a lug-boat with a tarpaulin over it. I was coming up the river at the time. M'Bride was rowing the boat up, and the tide was running up. I went along-side of the boat and boarded her; I found the boat to contain logwood. I took M'Bride and the logwood into my custody, and brought M'Bride to the Thames Police. The logwood and tarpaulin were shewn to Mr. Thompson the next day. The tarpaulin is marked TS upon the corner, and Thompson across it. I weighed the logwood myself, thirty-one pieces, eighteen hundred weight.

Mr. Alley. You met M'Bride on Tuesday morning was it - A. Yes.

Q. The tide was running of the Surry side, was it not - A. At that time the Channel run of the Surry side, but he was of the Middlesex side.

Mr. Gurney. Q. to Mr. Thompson. You saw that tarpaulin at the office - A. I did, it was mine, the same that I saw in the cabin the day before; I marked it TS with paint, that was only for the Abingdon.

NATHANIEL M'BRIDE . Q. I believe you were a watchman in the employ of Mr. Thompson - A. Yes.

Q. On the evening of Monday the 25th of June did you go to your master to receive orders - A. I did. Mr. Thompson's servant told me there was no message for me I met Quelch in Seething-lane close by the house. Quelch said, I can put a pound or two in your way if you like, because I know you are poor and got very little work. I said, I would be very willing, provided it was without any danger. He told me that he had been to a man of the name of Cuff, that lived in Thames-street, Bank-side. Cuff told him he had a punt at Stoney-stairs, and we were to put the logwood into it; his boy would take it away the next morning. He told me to go to Cuff to tell him that he sent me to him, to be sure to send the punt up to him the next morning, and if Cuff would not do it I was to go to Brown the prisoner, and tell him Quelch wanted to see him.

Q. Had you known Brown before - A. I had seen him before, he lived in a court in Tooley-street. I went to Cuff's house, there was nobody at home; then I went to Brown. I saw Brown that same evening. I told Brown that Quelch wanted to see him. He asked me what it was about, I told him it was some logwood. He said he wanted a job; he came with me to Sabs-passage near the Custom-house, for the purpose of consulting with Quelch at Sabs-passage. Quelch met us the same night; it was dark; I cannot say the time. We all went into a public house and had a pot of beer. Brown said, he must gointo Upper Thames-street to get a key of a friend of his to get a lug-boat. When he got me there he left me in the street, and when he came back he told me he could not get the boat he wished to have, but he could get another boat, there was nothing wanted but a tarpaulin. I told him there was a tarpaulin in the Abingdon barge, on board which Quelch was going down. We went on board the lug-boat at Trig-wharf. We went through the bridge; then Brown said he must get a wherry to go on shore. He told me to put the boat into the Custom-house lower road, and that Quelch was waiting for me at the stern vessel of that teer. I took the lug-boat there; I found Quelch there with a barge; Brown came to us in a wherry. There were some people walking on a vessel that was moored there, we did not think proper to do business there. We went to the South side of the river, Brown in a wherry, I in the lug-boat, and Quelch in the barge; we crossed the river and there it would not do; we had fastened the lug-boat to the barge, and Quelch and I were in the barge together, and Brown in the wherry; we found the coast not clear; we did not do it there; we hauled the lug-boat to the side of the barge; we drove down the tide towards Blackwall, putting the logwood into the boat.

Q. Did Brown come on board the barge - A. No, he never was on board the barge, I and Quelch handed the logwood from the barge into the lug-boat.

Q. How near did Brown keep to you - A. He was rowing about in case any thing came to alarm us.

Q. How much logwood did you and Quelch hand out - A. We meaned to take a ton and no more.

Q. And while this took place you were floating down the river - A. Yes.

Q. How far had you got when you compleated your point - A. Very near to what they call the fifth mill, near Blackwall.

Q. Now in your going down where you sometimes on one side and sometimes of the other - A. It is necessary to go sometimes on one side and sometimes of the other to be clear of the teers; we were sometimes of the North side while we were handing out the logwood. When we had taken a ton, Quelch took the tarpaulin out, and covered the logwood over; Quelch told me to make her fast to the first teer that I could get hold of, and stay till flood tide; I made her fast to a teer by the fifth mill, on the North side of the river.

Q. At the time that you parted with Quelch where was Brown - A. Brown parted with us a little time before Quelch told me to go to Cuckold's Point, and Brown would meet me there, then I was to go where I pleased.

Q. Had Brown parted with you before the tarpaulin was put over - A. About half an hour before.

Court. Did you see him while the logwood was handing out - A. Yes, he was after us, before us, and about us, he knew what we were doing; he was about us on the North side, and on the South side.

Mr. Gurney. When you had parted and made fast to a vessel, what became of Quelch - A. He proceeded towards Blackwall; I made fast to a vessel at the teer, and when the flood tide came I floated up the river, and between four and five o'clock, I was met with by Mr. Rye, he took me, and the lug-boat, with the logwood, altogether into custody.

Mr. Alley. We are to understand from you, that Quelch proposed to you, that you might get a little money by assisting him in robbing your master - A. He did.

Q. Then you went to carry a message to Brown in Surry - A. Yes.

Q. You say that when you crossed over from the Custom-house Brown was in his wherry, and Quelch was in the barge with the lug-boat attached to it. Now, Sir, I ask you, and is not the fact so, that Brown rowed directly across the river, and went away - Did not you at any other time say, that he went away and separated from you altogether when you left the Custom-house - A. No, I said he was sometimes before and sometimes behind.

Q. You were apprehended by the Thames Police officer on the Tuesday morning, at that time you were in possession of the stolen property - A. Yes, I was.

Q. You was apprehended on the Tuesday; when was Brown apprehended. - A. I did not see Brown till I saw him at the Police office. I believe it was on the Monday following.

Q. Did you give any information about Brown until you saw your master at the prison - A. I did not. I sent to my master before, but he did not come.

Q. Was it not for the purpose of saving yourself that you accused Brown - A. I could not stand such an untruth.

Mr. Andrews. You are a watchman employed occasionally by Mr. Thompson - A. Yes, my business is to take care that nothing is lost when I am employed.

Q. When Brown got this lug-boat then, he wanted nothing but a tarpaulin; upon which you told him there were plenty on board the Abingdon - A. Yes, I knew there were two or three in her. I was at work for Mr. Thompson that day; I knew they were marked with Mr. Thompson's name.

Q. And upon being taken by Mr. Rye, you turned tail upon your companions to save yourself. - A. My own conscience was one thing, I was not happy.

Q. You intended to take a ton, what share were you to have of it. - A. I suppose I was to have the third or fourth part of it.

JOHN GOTTY . Q. You are the principal surveyor of the Thames Police office. - A. I am.

Q. On the morning that M'Bride was taken, did you go down to Blackwall. - A. I did, I found 927 pieces of logwood in the vessel, and the Abingdon was lying along-side of her. On the evening of the 26th I apprehended Quelch in the city at Mr. Thompson's house. I told him it was necessary that he should go with me to the Thames Police office to give some account of the transaction.

ANN M'BRIDE . Q. Are you the wife of Nathaniel M'Bride - A. Yes.

Q. On the morning of Tuesday the 26th of last month, did either of the prisoners call at your house - A. Quelch did soon after I was up, a little after eight o'clock. He asked me if my husband was at home. I told him he was not. I asked him if he had any message to leave; he said nothing material; he went away. Soon after nine o'clock Quelch's wife came to tell me that my husband was in custody.

Q. On the Monday morning after were you with your husband. - A. Yes.

Q. In consequence of any thing your husband said to you, did you go with the officer and Mr. Thomson to Brown's house - A. I did.

Q. Had you while your husband was in custody, gone to Brown's house before that - A. I had, twice, I went thefirst time, as soon as I heard my husband was in custody, I went to the police office, and I think it was that same day I went to Brown, I did not see him then.

Q. Then you went with Mr. Thompson and the officer on the Monday; did you go first leaving them behind - A. I did. I saw Brown on the Monday, I had never seen him before; his wife told him who I was, he asked me how my husband did; I told him he was very indifferent indeed; he told me to make myself easy, on the next day he would send me a pound or two; nothing more past, I came out, and Mr. Thompson and the officer came in.

Mr. Alley. You went over to Brown's house directly after you saw your husband in custody - A. Yes.

Q. The Monday after you went and saw him - A. Yes.

Q. So that a week had elapsed and Brown had not absconded, though he knew your husband was in custody - A. No.

Court. Did you know Brown, or Brown's wife, before this - A. I never saw them before in my life, I never saw Brown before the night he was taken, I know nothing of them.

Mr. Gurney. Q. to Mr. Thompson. What number of pieces were there in the Abingdon before she went down - A. I cannot say; there is a person here who shipped them at the time.

Q. Were there marks upon these pieces corresponding with the remainder - A. There were when the wood came from Plymouth, the wood had a ship mark corresponding with the remainder; there was a cross mark upon some of them, not upon the whole, and there was that cross mark found on some of the pieces in the lug-boat.

Gotty. There were thirty one pieces taken in the lug-boat, about half of them were marked.

Court. Q to Thompson. What were the directions that you gave to Quelch, about going down with the Abingdon to Blackwall - A. I told him to take the Abingdon barge down to Blackwall at high water; I further told him, I could not tell him exactly, whether the ship lay at the Foley-house or the Orchard; I then told him to leave her at day-light, and bring up another loaded boat from Blackwall; and if he could not find out the ship, to call upon me in the morning, I would give him further orders; he had nothing to do with unloading her. He called upon me in the morning, between ten and eleven o'clock, he told me that he had not found the ship out when he went down, but since, he had heard where the ship laid; I told him, immediately, to go and put her on board the ship where she lay, and he went away.

PEARCY LAMBERT . I am in the employ of Mr. Mallin, a wharfinger. I took the weight of the logwood, and employed the men that put them on board, there were nine hundred and seventy nine pieces put on the board.

Q. Who received it on board - A. At the forepart there was nobody in it, towards the latter part the prisoner Quelch came.

Q. Therefore, when the whole was actually put on board the lighter, Quelch was on board to receive them - A. He was.

Quelch's Defence. My master, he mentioned; in regard of the tarpaulin being in the barge, and there was no such thing; more than that, he said he makes a common practice of going over his craft, sometimes he is not on board them a week, and we have been obliged to go and take tarpaulin's from other peoples' craft, to use instead of his own.

Brown's Defence. It is false evidence; I am innocent of what I am charged.

Quelch called two witnesses who gave him a good character.

Brown called five witnesses who gave him a good character.

QUELCH, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 38.

BROWN, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

569. THOMAS HART was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Anthony Girling , about the hour at twelve at night, on the 22nd of November , and stealing therein, a sheet, value 1 s. the property of Anthony Girling ; three gowns, value 3 l. 10 s. a pellise, value 10 s. three handkerchiefs, value 4 s. a pillow case, value 1 s. and a night cap, value 6 d. the property of John Sunley .

SECOND COUNT, stating the house and the sheet to belong to Ann Girling , widow .

ANN GIRLING . I live at No. 4, Dock-street, in the parish of St. George's . At the time I lost these things I washed for Mr. Sunley. Among other things at that time, I had the articles stated in the indictment. On the 22d of November, at nine at night, I went to bed; I got up the next morning a little after six, it was quite dark; when I went into the kitchen I was frightened to see the dresser quite empty; it had been full on the over night, and my tubs, that I had left full the night before, were empty, and the pan was full of muslin caps the overnight, and they were all gone, and the tub that I had seconded the things were quite empty; I went up to my husband, and said, my God, I am robbed and ruined. I called my daughter up, she came down, and then I saw the door and window open; before I went to bed I fastened the door and window; they were both secure at that time. I gave information at the police office.

Q. When did you see any of the things produced - A. On the 27th of June I saw some of them; all the articles mentioned in the indictment of Mrs. Sunley's, has her name in full length; I had seen them on the over night, before I missed them.

Prisoner. Have you ever seen me before - A. I cannot say I did.

SARAH GIRLING . Q. You are the daughter of the last witness - A. Yes; I live with my mother. On the 22d of November last, my mother went to bed, left me up to let in Mrs. Robinson, the lodger; I let the lodger in about ten o'clock, and locked the door, and bolted it top and bottom; I went into the kitchen, saw the door bolted, and the kitchen window fastened with a gimblet.

Q. Had you observed, before you left the kitchen, the things that your mother has been speaking off - A. I saw the things on the dresser, and the tubs were full, I covered them all over because they were seconding suds; I saw the doors all fast, and when I went up to bed, I found the lodger in bed, I slept with her. I got up at seven o'clock, my mother called me, it was dark, and when I went down stairs I found every thing gone, and the window and door was wide open.

Q. Have you seen the linen since - A. Yes, I have.

Prisoner. Q. Had you ever seen me near the house, or have you ever seen me before - A. I never saw you before.

Court. When you got up you were called up by your mother, did you leave the lodger in bed - A. She was inbed with me when my mother called me, I got up as I was, the lodger got up, but staid to put her clothes on.

GEORGE PARTRIDGE . I am an officer; in consequence of information, I apprehended the prisoner on the 27th of June; I went to his house at Old Ford, near Clay-hall; I went with Hewitt and Hope; he was at his back door, we went into his house; I told him I suspected him of being a man that had robbed a house at Old Ford; we searched the house, and found part of Mrs. Sunley's goods; we took these articles away with some others, we took him to the office. I have kept the property ever since.

Prisoner's Defence. I came from Cheltenham, in Gloucestershire, last May, twelvemonth, I brought thirty pound with me, I rented a little house in Shadwell parish, and I worked in the West India Docks; I left work at three o'clock, I went to Rosemary-lane and bought clothes, these things were part that I bought in Rosemary-lane.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

570. THOMAS HART was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of James Linsey , about the hour of twelve at night, on the 19th of June , and stealing therein, a shirt, value 3 s. the property of Evan M'Cloud .

EVAN M'CLOUD . Q. You lost a shirt sometime, did not you - A. Yes, on the night of the 19th of June. I live at James Lindsey 's academy, near Bow , I was a pupil at that academy, I was in bed at the time; my shirt was lost from the second floor, not in the room where I was sleeping.

GEORGE DOUGLAS . I am a butler to Mr. James Linsey . On the night of the 19th of June I fastened the doors and the windows, I went to bed near eleven o'clock; I did not discover any thing till I got up at five o'clock in the morning, I was called up by the gardener; it was broad day light at that time. I discovered a tall ladder standing against the window, the window was left open that night; I immediately searched the house, I found four trunks forced open; the locks broke, and part of the things in the trunk taken out; two of the trunks belonged to Evan M'Cloud .

RALPH HOPE . On the 27th of June, in company with Partridge and Hewitt, I went to the prisoner's house; I searched his house, and found a shirt with Evan M'Cloud upon it in full length.

Prisoner's Defence I think it to be about the 22d of June, there was a regiment of soldiers marching through Bow, I was going to the brewhouse at Bow to tell them to bring in a barrel of beer for me; one of the soldiers said he was poor, and wished to sell a shirt, I told him I did not want it, the man followed me to the gate of the brewhouse, and with his saying he was distressed, I said I would give him 5 s. for it; I did not open the shirt to look at it untill I had gone fifteen or sixteen yards, and then I saw a mark on it blotted out with ink; I went to the brewhouse gate to look for the man, he was gone.

GUILTY, aged 25.

Of stealing, but not of breaking and entering the dwelling house .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

571. THOMAS HART was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of June , three gowns, value 30 s a petticoat, value 3 s. a shirt, value 2 s. an apron, value 6 d. and an habit-shirt, value 1 s. the property of James Sinclair , in his dwelling-house .

ISABELLA SINCLAIR. My husband's name is James Sinclair , I live in Old Gravel-lane, in the parish of St. George's .

Q. Did you lose any linen - A. Yes, on the 20th of June, 1809. I have lost a great many things since, I have not found any of the things of the last robbery in the prisoner's house, but of the first robbery I have.

Q. Then you must speak to the things that were found at his house about June twelve-month - A. About seven in the evening, I saw the linen safe in my parlour; I missed them the next morning, I heard nothing of them till last month.

Q. You had never seen the prisoner any where about the house - A. No.

GEORGE PARTRIDGE . I searched the prisoner's house on the 27th of last June. I have the articles here that I found in his house, that belongs to Mrs. Sinclair.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, nor called any witnesses to character.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

572. JOSEPH AUSTIN was indicted for that he on the 17th of June , a certain house of Ann Thompson , widow , unlawfully and feloniously did set fire to .

SECOND COUNT for like offence, stating it to be the house of Anna Thompson .

The case was stated by Mr. Coust.

ALFRED TUFTON , esq. Q. I believe you reside at Mrs. Thompson's, in Sackville-street - A. On the 17th of June I did; the prisoner was my servant , he had been my servant about thirteen months.

Q. Do you remember on the Friday, two days before the fire happened, drawing any draft on your banker's - A. Yes, a draft of an hundred pound on my banker in Pall Mall; I sent the prisoner to the banker's for the purpose of receiving cash for it; he returned with an hundred pound in bank notes, fifty two pound notes; after I had received these notes, I put six pound in my pocket, and put ninety-four pound into my writing-desk; it stood on a table upon another writing-desk.

Q. What apartment did you occupy there - A. The first door. On Saturday, the 16th of June, about half past eight in the evening, I left my apartment, I did not return home that night; I was informed of the fire the next morning, I went home immediately, I went up into my room, I saw there had been a fire between the boards and the ceiling; and the papers had been on fire near to where the couch stood, it was almost on the other side of the room. My writing-desk, the hinges had been broken open and there was not one note remaining in the desk.

ANNA THOMPSON . I am a widow.

Q. You keep this house in Sackville-street - A. I do, I lived in that house twenty years, it is in the parish of St. James's. On the night the fire happened, I went to bed about two o'clock.

Q. Did you know that the prisoner was in the house - A. I do not; I did not come in till half after eleven, I did not see him. A little before four o'clock in the morning, I awoke with smoke about my bed, which got into my throat and awoke me; the smoke came into my room, it is a two pair of stairs room, immediately over Mr. Tufton'sroom, in the first floor. I immediately touched my daughter, who was in bed with me, and told her there was a great smoke, and went into the front room, and in one corner of the room, where there was a cupboard, I perceived a great deal of smoke, and in the other there was but little; I ran immediately down stairs to the first floor, front room, and opened it, a torrent of smoke rushed out but no flame whatever. I turned round to go up stairs to get something to cover me, and to see my child was safe, I saw the prisoner behind me, he was about three or four stairs behind me when I looked round; I went up to put my clothes on, I found my daughter upon the top of the stairs coming down, my daughter passed me; I went into my room to put my petticoat on, and ran out of the house immediately.

Q. Are you able to say how he was dressed at the time you saw him on the stairs - A. I think he was in his shirt.

Q. On the day following you had some reason for searching of different places to find the notes - A. I searched the things all round the kitchen, after the prisoner was taken up, and at night, Mr. Roton, a neighbour, found a tin canaster in the chimney piece, in a nook on the left hand side, that canaster contained some notes, and the notes were counted on the kitchen table; I think there were ninety-two pound, they were all two pound notes, I saw them counted.

SARAH THOMPSON . I am the daughter of the last witness, I went to bed first, and my mother came afterwards; when I went to bed there was no smell of fire.

Q. Had you gone into the apartment of Mr. Tufton that night - A. No, my mother awoke me about four in the morning.

Q. Had you seen the prisoner before you went to bed - A. Yes, in the kitchen, sitting by the fire with the maid-servant. When my mother awoke me she told me she smelled a smoke, I got up immediately, I dressed myself and went down to Mr. Tufton's room door, I saw the prisoner there, he was in his shirt, he opened his master's bed room door, and then the drawing room door; he said, here it is; he turned round and went up stairs, he left both the doors open, I said, gracious God why do you leave them open; the smoke came so strong that nobody could come down stairs; I shut both the doors and went into the street immediately, and gave the alarm at the Dutchess of Rutland, and asked for the assistance of the porter who slept in the hall. On Sunday, after the prisoner was taken up, I found a two pound note amongst some rubbish and papers in the back kitchen.

DR. THOMAS BROWN . Q. I believe at different times you have resided at this house of Mrs. Thompson - A. Yes, for seven years; I occupy the parlour and a room in the attic story, in which I sleep. On this night I went to bed at half past twelve o'clock, I heard two o'clock strike, and three o'clock strike; about three o'clock I heard a noise on the stairs, as if somebody had been coming up stairs; the next thing I heard was Mrs. Thompson's servant, saying, Lord have mercy upon us, that was a little before four o'clock; she then called out my name and called out fire. I heard Mrs. Thompson say, the fire is in the drawing room, pray shut the door; and the first thing I saw when I got out of my door, was the prisoner coming up stairs; I returned to my room, which by that time was full of smoke, I put on my pantaloons and coat and went out as fast as I could, with a bundle that came from my washerwoman, and went through the prisoner's room, and the first thing I saw was the prisoner sitting on the leads; I went across the leads to the other house, and went down that house into the street; I saw some loose men's apparel laying on the leads.

ELIZABETH GARDNER . Q. You were a servant in this house of Mrs. Thompson's, at the time of the fire - A. Yes. On the evening before the fire, the prisoner came home earlier than usual, I cannot tell what time it was. He went into Mr. Tufton's apartment, and from there came into the kitchen; I said, you have been a good while in your master's apartment; he said, he had been reading Mrs. Clarke's book. The prisoner went to bed before me; I went to bed about half past twelve, and nigh four o'clock, my mistress alarmed me, I put on some of my things and cried fire. I ran down into the kitchen and drawed water as fast as I was able.

Q. Do you remember the morning after the fire happened, seeing the prisoner in the back kitchen - A. Yes, sitting in a chair in the back kitchen by the screen, the screen was before the fire place, that was not a place he used to sit in, he used to be in the front kitchen. I was in the kitchen when Miss Thompson picked up a two pound note, I saw it in her hand.

Mr. Alley. When you went up stairs to bed, do not you know that the prisoner was in bed - A. Yes; I had some conversation with him, I saw no light; I sleep on the same floor with him; I did not see any candle in his room.

Q. There was a picture that belonged to his master, that he prized very much, and the prisoner took it away on account of the fire - A. Yes.

Mr. Knapp. Q. to Mr. Tuston. Had you Mrs. Clarke's book in your lodging at that time - A. No, I had lent it, I am sure he had not my copy.

Mr. Gurney. You do not know whether he had not one of his own, or had borrowed one - A. No.

JAMES BRADLEY . Q. You are a fireman at the Sun fire office - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember the night you was stopped going to another place, on the morning about four o'clock, you came immediately to Mrs. Thompson's house - A. Yes, the engine stopped by the door; I ran in doors and went up the first flight of stairs and opened the drawing room door, the smoke came out very thick; expecting that the fire was in that room, I shut the door and went down stairs again; I saw Dr. Brown moving some of his things out of the front parlour, I desired him not to move any more, but to supply me with water, I could stop the fire, I thought. At that time Butler brought me up water, I opened the door and saw a fire to the right, I have three or four buckets of water upon it; Butler, one of our people, crawled upon his hands and knees forward from the door, and by that felt another fire on the floor; he told me of it, I desired him to come back, and threw three or four buckets of water on it; I then felt with my hand to the left side of the room, and felt a frame of a picture, I passed it by to the door, and I think Mrs. Thompson took it of me, she said it was a valuable picture, she was very happy to think it was saved; I put my hand as far as I could with any safety, and felt a table, I took the table by the leg, I had no opportunity of knowing whether there was any thing upon it or no; I passed, the table along; I then took the corner of the carpet and found there was something that stopped it, whether it was stuck down, I cannot say, we could not get it awayeasy; I then desired Butler again to open the window to get the smoke out of the room; he opened the two upper shutters of one of the windows, he was obliged to retreat; I went and got the lower one's open, and throwed my head out of the window to get some air, the room was full of smoke, I went to the other window and did the like; in a little time the room was cleared of the smoke, and having the light we could see, and with the axe we ripped up the floor to see the extent of the fire; we thought it safe, we got to the extent of it.

Court. Was that the part where your companion complained of heat - A. Yes, of that side.

Q. When you had the boards up, could you distinguish whether any fuel of any sort had been placed under the boards - A. No, but the fire appeared to me to have been underneath.

Mr. Const. Did you see the prisoner at this time - A. When I was in the act of ripping the boards up, the prisoner stood to my right, he had got a writing desk in his hand; he asked me whether I thought it was the effect of the fire that had damaged the desk, he opened it, and said the hinges were broke; there are two catches to the lock, I saw one of them were broke; I asked him where it stood, he said on the table; I said, it might fall when I moved the table, and might sever the hinges by falling on one corner, that is all that past between him and me. I cannot recollect I heard any thing fall when I moved the table, I did not see it before I saw it in his hand.

Q. Look at the desk, does there appear on that desk any damage occasioned by fire - A. No.

Court. Had the prisoner, or any body else, an opportunity of going into the room after you were there, and bringing any thing out of the room, between your going in and opening the drawing room door - A. There was no opportunity, before the windows were opened nobody could get into the room, they could not have lived there. I saw the prisoner in the room with the box, while I was in the act of ripping the floor up, about four or five minutes after the window had been opened.

Mr. Tuston. That is my box that I locked my bank notes in.

JOHN BUTLER . Q. You are also a fireman belonging to the Sun fire office - A. Yes, I went along with the last witness to this house, I have heard him examined, my observations were nearly the same; I never saw the prisoner there nor the desk. I was the man that crept upon my hands and knees, and said there is fire here; Bradley ordered me to come back again, there was a table I hawled a little way, I could not far, by reason of the smoke.

JOSEPH NORMAN . When first I went into this room, I saw the papers on the sopha on fire, I turned the books and papers over; I turned round and saw the prisoner; I said, do not stand there, come and help me, move these books away, that was after the windows were opened.

GEORGE HOW BROWN. Q. You went there the next morning, I believe. There is the plan, you look at it - A. This plan was made under my direction, by the surveyor of the Westminster fire office; I went in the room about ten o'clock the Sunday morning of the fire; when I went into the room the boards had been taken up, as in this plan; I saw the girders were exposed and burnt on each side of them; the boards of the floor were laying loose about the room, just as they had been taken up by the firemen; I directed the men to replace them in the same situation as they were before, which was very easily done; which being done, I was enabled to judge in what manner the fire has been put to that part of the flooring; the upper part of the flooring boards were not burnt, and in one of the boards an aperture had been made, and the under part of the boards were burnt to charcoal in some parts nearly through.

Court. How large was the aperture - A. About three inches by four; the hole had not been originally so large, but the fire having burned through had made it so large; the joints of the boards were also burnt, but no part of the upper surface, I made the men, and I examined myself under the boards, but as a great deal of charcoal had fell from the upper boards, it was impossible to see whether combustible matter had been put in or not. That part of the girder where most of the fire had been, and that was near the aperture, was almost burnt through. Finding that the carpet had been over this floor, I directed the men to spread that carpet out, and I found an aperture in the carpet, and also the carpet burnt in those parts that were over the cracks, and in no other parts except corresponding to the hole. I supposed that it was probable these girders might run into the chimney of the next house, that fire might communicate; I went into the next house and found no stack of chimneys of that side, and therefore it was impossible for the fire to communicate from that house; from all the circumstances that I have mentioned, it did then appear to me that the fire was caused by something having been put in this aperture. I then cast my eyes on the other side of the room, and saw a sopha standing up in the corner, one half of which that is the furthest from the fire, was burnt, the back of the sopha was burnt out and part of the bottom, the most distant part nearest the wall; but that part of the sopha near the fire in the floor was not burnt; the distance from the other fire, to that part of the sopha that was on fire, was twelve feet. There was a table stood between the fire in the floor and the sopha, with two candles upon it, and them candles not melted, so that no fire could have gone across the room; from all these circumstances, it appeared to have been set on fire in two parts; and recently before the men went into the room, because they found the papers on fire when they went into the room.

Mr. Gurney. As they told you - A. I am going further than I know of my own knowledge. I did observe some peculiarities of the prisoner, he seemed to attend to every thing that was said.

GEORGE SCRAF . I live in Vigo-lane. I sleep in the first floor; the leads of the second floor nearly adjoin the house that was on fire. About four o'clock in the morning that the fire happened I was awoke by a noise, it was as if the cieling would come through.

Q. Was that more than once - A. Twice. I went up to the leads afterwards, and saw two boxes lying upon the leads of the house where I live.

ESTHER MESSENGER . Q. You live in the same house as Mr. Scraff. When you got up at the time that this fire took place, were you so situated that you could see the leads of Mrs. Thompson's house - A. I saw the boxes on our leads, and I saw some ropes hanging on the rails that divide the leads.

JOHN FOY . I am an officer of Marlborough-street. On Sunday I went to Mrs. Thompson's house. Mr. Tuston had the prisoner called into his parlour. I asked him what time he came home the night before. I am not quite correct to the time; he came home, he said, a long time before the fire, and went to bed: then, I said,it seems there is no doubt but somebody belonging to the house set fire to the house; can you account for it in any way. He said no, he could not, he supposed I suspected him. I said, we suspected every body, until it was traced to its proper soure, and desired to see his box. He said he would be d - nd if he had done it. I searched his box; he ready let me look at it. One was locked up; I could not then see it. I sealed it up. The other one he opened himself; in that was this glove, containing some stone brinstone. I searched the back kitchen, and then I took him to the office. After I had taken him to the office, we had a fresh search in the back kitchen. I found nothing there. In the front kitchen I found another piece of brinstone in a drawer, that I understood was his drawer Mr. Tufton shewed me the writing desk, I thought it had been broken open by a chisel. I asked if any chisel was lying about the house. Mrs. Thompson brought me this chisel. I applied it to the impression made upon this desk; it is exactly the size of the impression; it his the appearance of two impressions on it. I found some linen of Mr. Tufton's in the prisoner's room.

Q. to Mrs. Thompson. The officer has produced a chisel, is that the chisel you gave him - A. Yes, I found it in the basket where such things usually are kept, in the back kitchen.

Mr. Gurney. Q. to Mr. Brown. You was stating the search you made to be to ascertain the cause of this fire. Had any brimstone been made use of to cause that fire - A. No, I am certain of that, there was no appearance of sulphur, brimstone always leaves a smell a long while.

MR. ROTON. I live at No. 5, Sackville-street. I happened to go into Mrs. Thompson's house on the Sunday evening. After searching about the house and finding nothing, I looked up the front kitchen chimney; on the left I saw a hole; I saw this canister: the maid put her hand up and took it down, very much terrified indeed. I immediately went up stairs with it and counted the notes, they were two-pound notes to the amount of ninety-two pounds.

Prisoner's Defence. My Lord, the first alarm that I heard was, the maid was making a noise in the room. I got up, and saw the maid dressing herself. I asked her what was the matter: she said there was a fire in the house. I ran down with my shirt and night-cap on. I went to the drawing-room and opened the door; the smoke came out so strong it nearly stifled me. I went down to the street door to see if it was open, and then I ran up into my own room, and took all my clothes and trunks and put them upon the leads. I let them down by a cord that belonged to my wife's trunk, and it stuck by the way on the railing. I put my clothes and trunks on the leads for safety. After I had done that, I ran down and assisted in extinguishing the fire. The first thing I saw was the fireman on his hands and knees. He drawed out the table and a picture of my master's. I heard the fireman call out, that there was no occasion to take the things out, he wanted water. I assisted in carrying up water as much as any body else did. I went into the room. The first thing I saw was this desk broken open. I asked the fireman if he could give any account of the desk being broken open, he could not. Mrs. Thompson was in the room at the same time that I was there. She said, why did not I take care of this desk, as the property was in it. I stationed myself in the room, to see that nobody took any thing out; I thought it was the properest place. When my master returned, he saw the desk was broken open and questioned me about it, that is all I know.

The prisoner called five witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

573. JOHN VYSE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of August , twelve watches, value 30 l. the property of James Wilson , since deceased.

ALEXANDER WILSON . I am brother and administrator to James Wilson , he resided in Lombard-street ; he died since August; I was at Gibraltar then. The prisoner told me he lived shopman to my brother, I came from Gibraltar in April last, I examined the prisoner about some watches that were missing; I received a letter from the prisoner's brother, that letter enclosed the duplicates; the prisoner admitted the letter was from his brother. I told the prisoner that I had received the duplicates, he acknowledged that they were my brother's property, I mentioned particularly the watch of Miss Raine, he said, I should find the duplicate amongst them, that he had pledged it for ten pound; according to his directions I found the duplicate, this is the duplicate.

JOSEPH DAVIDSON . I am a pawnbroker, 155, in the Borough. The duplicate produced is mine, and this is the watch, it was pledged on the 11th of October, 1809, for ten pound, it is a gold watch, it is pledged in the name of James Carlett , by the wife.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. Having not half an hour's notice that my indictment was preferred against me, I am quite unprepared; I was told when I came up to London, that I was going to have an action against me at the Court of Common Pleas. I plead ignorance entirely of the customs of this Court.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Fined 1 s. and Confined Three Months in Newgate .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

574. THOMAS KELLY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22nd of June , six bottles, value 1. 6 d. six pints of wine, value 15 s. and fifteen yards of lace, value 30 s. the property of William Burnham Shaw .

WILLIAM BURNHAM SHAW . I am in the lace and wine trade. I live at 36, St. Paul's Church-yard ; the prisoner was my porter . With regard to the lace, I do not know when I lost it. I saw him take the bottles out of the cellar on the 22nd of June. I sent him to the cellar to take six bottles of wine, to be delivered in Tavistock-street; instead of six he took twelve. Mr. Gardener was watching him.

WILLIAM BROOKS GARDENER . I live upon my fortune. I keep the house that Mr. Shaw lives in. I saw the prisoner come out of the cellar with more bottles in the basket than six; he put the basket on his shoulder, I followed him. After he had taken the wine from the cellar, he should have returned the key. He had about fifty yards to go before he turned up the Old Change. When I turned up the corner of the Old Change I missed him all at once. I was sure that he had gone into some house, or had stopped somewhere; he could not have got out of my sight without turning into some house. I then went to Mr. Shaw to see if he had been home with the key. I found that he had not. I left the house, and looked about the neighbourhood of Doctor's Commonsto see if I could find him. I returned back again, and found he had left the keys. I knew previous that he was to take six bottles of wine to Tavistock-street. I went to the house in Tavistock-street, and found that he had not been there. In a few minutes I saw the prisoner with a little boy; he was facing the house; he turned up Tavistock-court; he had two baskets with him. I saw him put one basket down containing six bottles of wine, which is the subject of this enquiry, and he seemed to give the charge of the basket to a little boy. He then went to Tavistock-street to the house that had ordered the six bottles of wine, with six bottles, and left them there. I crossed over into the court, and took the little boy with the basket of six bottles into the public-house. I told the landlord of the house to take care of the boy and the basket. I went to Bow-street and got an officer. We secured the prisoner facing of the court, took him, the wine, and the boy to Bow-street. We afterwards searched his lodgings, No. 3, Stansbury-court, Piccadilly; the lace was found there by the officer and Mr. Shaw.

THOMAS MANTZ . I am an officer of Bow-street On the 22nd of June I apprehended the prisoner in Covent Garden. I searched his lodgings; I found two pieces of lace and five duplicates. I produce the handbasket with the wine.

HENRY GILMORE . I live with Mr. Crouch, pawnbroker, Fore-street. I have a piece of lace pledged by Ann Kelly on the 17th of May for seven shillings.

WILLIAM KING . I am a servant to Mr. Tate, pawnbroker, in Cambridge-street. On the 1st of June, a piece of lace was pawned by a woman in the name of Ann Townshend for seven shillings and six pence.

JOHN CORRS . I am a servant to Mr. Cordy, 79, Snow-hill. I have got a remnant of lace pledged on the 17th of May, by Ann Kelly .

THOMAS BEALE . I am a servant to Mr. Brown, No. 2, Panton-street. On the 1st of June a piece of lace was pledged in the name of Mary Townshend for six shillings.

THOMAS STEPHENS . I am a servant to Mr. Dobree, Charing-cross. On the 25th of May a piece of lace was pledged in the name of Ann Kelly for six shillings

Q. to Prosecutor. Do you know any thing of the wine or bottles - A. I cannot swear to either; the two pieces of lace that was found in his lodging I can swear to; I believe they are all mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent of the crime; I lived with a woman that was in the habit of buying and selling lace; I never bought or sold any myself.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

575. JOSEPH AUSTIN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of June , in the dwelling-house of Anna Thompson , forty-seven two pound bank notes, the property of Alfred Tuston .

Mr. Knapp counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

576. JOSEPH HOOPER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of June , a table spoon, value 12 s. a tea spoon, value 3 s. and a fork, value 12 s. the property of William Sheldon .

MARY POOLE . I am a servant to Mrs. Sheldon, Harford-street, May-fair . On the 28th of June, I went out about eight o'clock in the morning, I fastened the area gate, I returned about twenty minutes after and left the gate not fastened, I stepped up stairs, and on my coming down I heard a footstep in the kitchen, I called out who is there; a man in a low ne of voice answered, paper. I was alarmed at a man's voice, I knew no man had any business there, I hastened down stairs and did not go to see what I had lost, but followed the man up the area steps; I caught sight of him on the area steps and holloaed out, stop thief; turning round Stanhope-street, I lost sight of him, and caught sight of him again in Stanhope-street, and when he turned into Derby-street, I lost sight again of him; he was stopped, he threw the property down. I am sure he is the same man.

ALEXANDER BALL . I am a constable. The prisoner was brought to my house, I told him I knew him, he had been a servant; he said, he had never done such a thing before in his life.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I never was guilty of any thing of the kind in my life. I knew nothing of the transaction until I was stopped.

GUILTY , - aged 45.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

577. JAMES FOGO and WILLIAM HARDING were indicted for feloniously assaulting Sarah Pickering , spinster , in the King's-highway, on the 25th of June , putting her in fear and taking from her person and against her will a one pound bank note, her property .

SARAH PICKERING . I live at No. 5, Tottenham-place.

Q. Do you know the prisoners - A. Yes, perfectly well; I lived with Harding, I seperated from him a twelvemonth ago last April, On last Monday was three weeks, between twelve and one at night, I went into Mr. Wakefield's public-house to get change of a one pound note, I had something to drink there, the two prisoners were there. When I saw them I did not ask for change, I put the note in my bosom and paid for the liquor; I came out of the house and as I went up Greek-street , Harding and Fogo both followed me untill I came to the George, public house, Harding came up and knocked me down, and as I was getting up again Fogo took hold of me by the arm and wrenched the one pound note out of my right hand, they then both went away. I directly went home to my father No. 5, Tottenham-place. I am an unfortunate girl, I did not give any alarm there were nobody in the street.

Q. This happened on the 25th of June, have not you seen Harding from that time till he was taken up - A. Yes, I saw him the week before last, I met him by Short's-gardens. We went into a house and drank together.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

578. SAMUEL CUTLING was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of July , two pair of boots, value 1 l. the property of John Shuttleworth .

The prosecutor was called and not appearing in court the prisoner was

ACQUITTED.

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

579. BENJAMIN TANNER and NICHOLAS TOMLINSON were indicted for that they on the 29th of September, in the 35th year of his Majesty's reign , feloniously did falsely make, forge, and counterfeit, and willingly acted and assisted in forging a certain acquittance and receipt for the payment of twenty nine pounds five shillings, with intent to defraud our Lord the King .

SECOND COUNT for uttering and publishing as true a like forged acquittance and receipt for the payment of twenty-nine pounds five shillings, they well knowing the same to be false and forged, with the same intention.

The case was stated by Mr. Attorney General.

NICHOLAS RANDELL Q. We understand you are a blacksmith at Dartmouth - A. Yes.

Q. Were you so in September, 1795 - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know the prisoner, Mr. Tanner - A. Yes, he was a shipwright at Dartmouth during that time.

Q. Do you know captain Tomlinson - A. I cannot say I do.

Q. Do you recollect the Pelter gun-brig, coming into Dartmouth about that time - A. Yes; I know I did the iron work of the Pelter gun-brig to a lee-board.

Q. Were you employed by Mr. Tanner to do any iron work for him to a lee-board - A. Yes, on September 17th, 1795. I have my book here.

Q. What work was that - A. It was iron work to a lee-board - new bolts.

Q. Was it a new lee-board or an old lee-board - A. That I cannot say.

Q. What was the amount of that work - A. Four pounds six shillings.

Q. Was that work done to one lee-board, or work done to two - A. I saw but one.

Q. Did you see the work that was done - A. Certainly; I worked the greatest part of it with my own hand; I dare say I did.

Q. Are you able to certify that it was work done to one lee-board, or two lee-boards - A. That I cannot say; I never saw but one.

Q. Are you able to say whether you did any of the work yourself - A. I can say I was never out of the shop, and I rather think the work must past under my hands.

Q. Must the lee-board have been in your shop - A. No; the lee-board was not in my shop; the iron work was done in my shop and took to the lee-board.

Q. Has that four pound six shillings been paid to you - A. I cannot say: in a running account among other things I rather think so.

COURT. Have you any recollection how it was paid you - A. No.

Mr. Jarvis. Have you any other charge against Mr. Tanner for work that was done at that time to a leeboard - A. No, no other charge.

Q. Had you any demand against him for work done to a lee-board, done at that time, to a larger sum than you have stated - A. No, not a farthing.

Q. Was that all the work that you did at that time for him - A. It was.

Q. Do you happen to know what vessel that work belonged to - A. I heard him say the Pelter gun-brig. I do not know that I saw the Pelter gun-brig in the harbour.

Q. What is your entry - A. Mr. Tanner, for the Pelter gun-boat, September 17th, 1795 four pounds six shillings; that was made by myself.

Q. Had you any communication with captain Tomlinson - lieutenant Tomlinson - A. No, I never knew him; I had no communication with him upon the subject.

Q. Do you know what became of the lee-board after it became repaired - A No; I know not what became of it. There was some old iron work repaired.

Q. Whom did you receive that from - A. Mr. Tanner's shipwrights, but to say which of them I do not recollect.

Q. Be so good as to look at that bill and receipt - Is that bill of your hand writing - A. No; I never put my hand to that paper.

Q. Had you any demands against Mr. Tanner for the repair of this lee-board to the amount of the articles contained in that bill - A. No, I never had no more than four pounds six shillings; that is all the demand I had.

Q. Is that the receipt of your hand writing - A. No, it is not.

Q. Is it like it - A. It is something like it; it is not my hand writing.

Q. Is the body of the receipt your hand-writing - A. No.

Q. Do you know whose it is - A. I do not.

Q. Is the signature of that receipt your hand-writing - A. No, it is not.

Q. Had you made any agreement with Mr. Tanner to commit a fraud by means of a false voucher - A. No.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Le Blanc.

580. JOHN GILBERT was indicted for that he on the 8th of May , was clerk to William Rowe senior , William Rowe , junior , William Goad , and William Reece , and was employed and entrusted by them to receive money and valuable securities for them, and that he being such servant and so employed and entrusted, did receive and take into his possession the sum of 515 l. 5 s. 6 d. and that he afterwards did embezzle, secrete, and steal the same .

SECOND COUNT for receiving into his possession a promissory note of the governor and company of the bank of England, value 300 l. another note, value 200 l. a ten pound bank note, and a five pound bank note, and that he afterwards did embezzle and steal the same.

WILLIAM REECE . I am a broker , my partners names are William Rowe , sen. William Rowe , jun. William Goad , and myself; the prisoner was our general accompting house clerk, and occasionally to collect money. On the 28th of May I gave him a draft payable to Messrs. Reeves and co. for the purpose of paying duties for goods which Reeves and co. had bought; the draft was drawn upon Messrs. Hoare and co.; this is the draft I gave the prisoner, it is for five hundred and fifteen pounds five shillings and sixpence. Messrs. Hoare and co. paid the draft.

THOMAS THORNTON . Q. I believe you are theclerk to the inspector of East India goods at the Custom house - A. I am, and I was on the 8th of May last; on that day this warrant was delivered to me for the delivery of the goods, it is a copy of a discharge warrant. The prisoner is the person that tendered it me.

Q. Do you know James Deacon , Boswell Middleton, and Robert Thomas . whole names appear there - A. Yes, I know them, and I know their writing.

Q. Is that the writing of either one of these three persons - A. No. We require five signatures to get the goods out; a person in Mr. Deacon's office is generally required, in the Comptroller's office Mr. Middleton, in the Examiner's office Mr. Thomas, and sometimes in another office; if the surveyor signs the warrant one of them is omitted.

Q. It was stopped in your office on account of what you observed - A. Yes, and I was present the same evening when he was apprehended and searched.

JAMES DEACON . Q. I believe you are the acting receiver of the grand receipts - A. I am.

Q. Look at that signature - A. It certainly is not my hand-writing; I did not receive any duties for them hides.

ROBERT THOMAS . Q. I believe you are clerk in the Examiner's office of dry goods of the customs, is that your signature - A. Certainly not; I did not sign that paper. (The paper read.)

FRANCIS NALDER . Q. You are a city marshal - A. I am. On the evening of the 8th of May, I apprehended the prisoner at the accompting house of Rowe, Goad and co; Mr. Thompson first went into the accompting-house, I followed him, he pointed out to the young man who gave him this paper. I told him I took him on a charge of forgery on the customs; I took this paper out of his pocket; two hundred hides at four shillings each, forty-pound, the total amount of two thousand and fifty-one, four hundred and twenty-one pounds two shillings and seven pence. Five hundred and fifteen pound five shillings and sixpence is the calculation of the duty.

Q. to Mr. Reece. Just look at that paper, is that the hand writing of the prisoner - A. I believe it is.

MR. NALDER. I then searched the prisoner, for the purpose of seeing what property he had about him; I found a bank note of three hundred pound, No. 7628. 17th of April, 1810.; a two hundred pound bank note, No. 1996. 27th April, 1810; a ten pound bank note, and a bank note of five pound, and some loose cash, which I did not trouble myself with.

WILLIAM HOARE . I am a quaker.

Q. You do not mean to represent yourself as one of the people called quakers, do you - A. Yes.

Q. Do you go about the world in that dress, and prosess yourself to be one of the people called quakers - A. I do.

Q. I propose to swear to you what is your objection to being sworn - A. A religious objection.

Q. You mean to state, that you in your conscience, think it unfit to take an oath to speak the truth - A. To speak the truth any where, to take an oath no where.

Q. You are not asked to take a prophane oath, you are asked whether you have any conscientious objection to take an oath in this place - A. I have; I consider a prophane oath and a judicial oath very similar, I think they are both against the tenor of the New Testament, and therefore I object to it.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. justice Chambre.

581. JOHN GILBERT was indicted for that he on the 7th of February was clerk to William Rowe , sen . William Rowe , junior , William Goad , and William Reece , and was employed and entrusted by them, to receive money and valuable securities for and on their account, and that being such servant and so employed, did receive and take into his possession, a promissory note of the Governor and company of the Bank of England, for the payment of 300 l. a bank note, value 200 l. a bank note, value 100 l. a bank note value 40 l. a bank note, value 30 l. and two bank notes, value ten pound each, and that he afterwards embezzled and stole the same .

JOSEPH HOARE BRIGHTWELL . Q. Have you any objection to take the oath - A. I have; I am a quaker.

Q. And in all respects conform to the mode by which they regulate their conduct - A. I cannot answer in all respects, I endeavour to do so.

Q. What is your objection to taking an oath - A. From the study of the New Testament, I believe we are desired by an higher authority than any in this court, not to take an oath; I do not speak with any disrespect to any one in this court; it is a religious scruple of mine, I should be sorry to do it.

Q. You will not take the oath - A. No, I will not.

Mr. Garrow. No man alive would suspect you to be a quaker, going about in that dress.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. justice Le Blanc.

582. JOHN ELLIS was indicted for the wilful murder of William Williams , also charged upon the coroner inquisition, of feloniously killing and slaying the said William Williams .

THOMAS SHEPPARD . I am a coachman; between eight and nine in the evening that this happened; about three weeks ago I was driving my coach in Goswell-street , three carts were going on at a great rate, I came up to them, one was a waggon, the waggon and the two carts were standing still then I came by them and stopped at the side of the pavement on the other side of the way; I looked round and saw a cart come on violently, I did not see the man, whether he hit the horses I cannot say; I looked back and saw the waggon and one cart stood still.

Q. You observed one going very fast, do you know who drove that cart - A. I do not; I saw a young man run very fast and lay hold of the first horse by the head, it was not the driver of the cart; I supposed the horses had ran away.

Q. At what rate might the horses be going at that time - A. I dare say after the rate of eight or nine mile an hour.

Q. Before the cart stopped had any thing happened - A. Yes, I saw the boy, the fore horse trod upon him, and I believe all the others, but to the best of my knowledge neither of the wheels went over him; the boy was beat down by the first horse, I believe all the three horses went over him.

JOHN THOMPSON . I am a cowkeeper, Helmet-row, St. Lukes. On the 15th of June, I was in Goswell-street between eight and nine in the evening, I saw the two carts and a waggon, they were driving furiously along all the three teams were, before they were stopped; I saw them stop, and I saw the prisoner, who drove the hindmost cart, he turned his horses round the back of the cart and set off again, he passed the others, and sat off at the rate of eight or nine mile an hour, the horses continued going at that rate until they were stopped by Old-street; I was behind, I observed the boy in the road.

Q. Are you sure the prisoner was the person who drove - A. I cannot say particularly it was the prisoner, I ran to pick up the boys I saw the driver, I cannot say it was the prisoner, I found the boy very much hurt.

Q. Could you distinguish any thing that happened in the course of driving, whether the driver; whoever he was, had the command of his horses - A. I really believe he had, as he turned from behind the other carts he was of the near side, in passing there was a coach drawed up on the other side, and had he not had the command of his horses, he must have smashed the coach all to pieces, but he then held his horses toward and cleared it. I never saw the boy before nor since; the driver was stopped at the corner of Old-street.

Mr. Alley. Do you know whether these were horses that belonged to a fire engine - A. I believe they were they had the harness of a fire office.

MARTHA SALMON . I live in Goswell-street. On the Friday this accident happened, I saw the carts and waggon, they stopped at my door, I went to the window to see what was the matter; before they went off again there dropped a stick out of the cart, the carman turned the horses round, went after the stick, he tied it in the cart, that was the hindmost cart; the waggoner that was before him, told him he had better keep behind, for fear he should be over some one; he took the whip struck the horses and they set off a running, and at the distance of three or four yards, the boy was knocked down and run over.

Q. Do you know who the driver was - A. No, I saw his jacket, I did not see his face; the boy was just off the curb when he fell, he fell just by the driver and was endeavouring to rise from under the horses feet.

MARMADUKE SHAW . I live in Goswell-street. On Friday evening, the 15th of June, I was standing in my shop, I heard horses coming at a furious rate; I immediately went to the door, I perceived the cart and three horses which the prisoner was driving, was then passing my door, at the rate of more than eight mile per hour, the prisoner then was even with the shaft horse; they had not gone above three or four yards, before the fore horse knocked down the boy; as soon as I saw the horses trample on the boy , I pursued the horses. At the corner of Old street a gentleman was very active in stopping the horses; I laid hold of the shaft horse and took the name, John Holyland , jun. No. 9589. I know the prisoner perfectly well.

Q. Did you observe the prisoner make any endeavour on his part to make the horses go slower - A. I did not.

MR. PRIDDEN. I am a student in St. Bartholomew's hospital. In about a quarter of an hour after the boy was brought in, I was sent for, for upon the examination at the time, a fracture of the right thigh was discovered, and there was considerable injury done to the lower part of the body, he was not sensible; he was brought in on Friday, the 15th of June, and lived till Monday afternoon.

Q. Was the body opened after his death - A. It was; the thigh was fractured, but the greatest injury was at the lower part of the body; the pelvis; the bones forming it were fractured, and the natural connection with the spine was separated, was destroyed, with a great degree of inflamation and extraversation of urine, were sufficient to account for the death of the child; I have no doubt it was the cause of his death.

Q. What age might the boy be - A. About ten I should think.

ELIZABETH WILLIAMS . Q. You are the mother of the unfortunate boy in this case - A. Yes; after the accident happened, I found my son laying in Mr. Chambers's shop, a grocer in Goswell-street, this was on Friday evening, the 15th of June.

Q. What was his name - A. William Williams . I went with him to St. Bartholomew's hospital, he died there on Monday, a quarter before three o'clock.

Prisoner's Defence. The horses took fright and run away from me, at their first starting I run for my life and caught them, I saw afterwards I had lost my cross bar; I turned them round and put them behind a waggon, they ran off again, and when I was by the shaft horse, the fore horse started and run over the boy by the pavement; they will not follow, they will run by, they saw a gentleman coming in a little cart, the fore horse started immediately, and in danger of my own life, I run after them to stop them.

JAMES BARKER . I am a carman, I work for Mr. Holyland; I remember the accident. These horses ran away by my cart; the fireman ran to catch them; he lost his cross bar out of the cart; he catched his horses and turned them round the waggon, and while he was tying his cross bar in the cart they set off again, he ran after the horses directly, he stopped the horses after the accident happened, he could not before. They are horses on purpose to run the engine.

The prisoner called three witnesses who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. justice Chambre.

583. THOMAS DOWNING was indicted for that he on the 11th of July , about the hour of two at night, being in the dwelling house of Joseph Snow , feloniously did steal a watch, value 42 s. the property of John Bellingham ; two waistcoats, value 3 s. a jacket, value 3 s. a shirt, value 5 s. two frocks, value 2 s. the property of Joseph Snow , and that he about the same hour on the same day, burglariously did break to get out of the same .

JOHN BELLINGHAM . I am a private in the Cambridge militia ; I was quartered at the Duks's head Highgate . On White-Sunday night the prisoner slept there, in the same room with me; we went up to bed both together about nine at night; I awoke about five in the morning, the prisoner was gone, and my watch was missing out of my breeches pocket.

RICHARD LIMBRICK . I am an officer. On the 13th of June, I in company with Mantz, apprehendedthe prisoner in the Strand; I asked him where the watch was, he immediately gave me this duplicate; I found the watch at the pawnbroker's by this duplicate.

THOMAS MANTZ . Q. You were at the apprehending of the prisoner - A. I was with Limbrick; I asked him where the things were that he brought from Highgate; he pulled this waistcoat out of a bag, and a shirt.

JAMES GARROW . I am a servant to Mr. Edwards, Clare-market. On the 12th of June, a silver watch was pledged with me, I believe, by the prisoner, for twenty shillings.

JOSEPH SNOW . I am the landlord of the Duke's head public house, Highgate , in the parish of Hornsey. The prisoner lodged at my house about five weeks, he went away on Monday morning, the 12th of June, and then the property was missing.

Prisoner's Defence. When I got up in the morning I went down stairs, the washhouse door was open, I had some of my things there, I took them home to my mother and told her I had took them in a mistake, and told her to take care of them until I returned back.

GUILTY, aged 21.

Of Stealing to the value of 39 s. only.

Judgment respited .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Le Blanc.

584. WILLIAM BENYON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of January , a mare, value 10 l. the pooperd of William Baker .

WILLIAM BAKER . I live at Winchmore hill, in the parish of Edmonton ; I have a little bit of land enclosed. On the 17th of January, between eight and nine o'clock, I saw my mare in my stable in my yard; the yard is fenced in with the building, with a gate, the gate has no lock, nor the stable door. On the morning of the 18th, about five o'clock, I went to my stable and perceived the mare gone; I went into my field and traced the mare's feet, and a man's feet on the ground; the snow lay on the ground, I traced it from the dung in my yard by the stable, into the field; there is an adjoining field, they put dung in the ditch and got the mare into the next field; I traced the mare's feet perfectly across the next two fields into the open road, and there I could not trace her no further for the tracks of the carts.

Q. What day did you see your mare again - A. On the 3d of February, the Saturday fortnight after; I saw her in Goswell-street, in Mr. Cumberland's cart; I knew her directly.

Q. What colour was your mare - A. A brown mare, with a star in her forehead, she was aged, I gave sixteen guineas for her; I worked her very hard and got her poor, she was worth ten pound; after I lost her they used her very ill, she never did me an hours work, they drove a nail in her foot, the foot came off, she mortified, that day month I carried her away dead.

JOHN CUMBERLAND . I live at Ealand, in Walthamstow; I am in the jobbing way, with two or three horses in a cart.

Q. Do you know the man at the bar - A. I know that he sold me the mare, I did not know him before. On the 18th of January, about twelve o'clock at noon, I saw the prisoner, he was coming along the Ealand road, where I was at work at a dung cart, he had this known mare, nobody was in company with him.

Q. Was it the same brown mare that was claimed by Baker afterwards - A. The very same. I asked him whether he would sell the horse; he kept going on, and after he had got a little way he called me to him; I went to him, he said he would sell the horse for four pound, or four pound ten shillings; it was very poor in flesh, I told him I would give him two pounds for it; we tried her in my cart with a load of dung into the field; the mare had only a halter on her, and no saddle; I asked where he had her from, he told me he lived at Walthamstow, below Mr. Juff's, the blacksmith, that is in Marsh-street; he said she had been in the country to a straw yard. After I tried her, the prisoner agreed that she was lame, I told him she was broken winded, she appeared rather lame but not in that foot he told me; I told him it was a bad time to sell horses; I dare say she was seventeen or eighteen years old. I agreed at last to give a guinea and a half for it; we were together about half an hour. I am quite certain he is the man.

Q. This happened on the 18th of January, did you ever see him between that time and the time that the mare was claimed in your cart by Baker - A. No; I was with the cart when the mare was claimed by Baker. I took the prisoner up myself, it is not three weeks ago; I went to Southgate, the prisoner lived there, I told the constable, as soon as I saw him, that was the man, and gave charge of him. I told the prisoner I took him for selling me a mare that they suspected was stolen; he said, he knew nothing about it, he was not the man; I told him he was certainly the man, and it was no other man, he continued to deny it. At the time that I bought the mare of him at Ealand, William Pepper was there. The prisoner continued to deny, to the last, that he was the man that sold the mare to me.

WILLIAM PEPPER . I live about half a mile from Ealand; I hold a little land, and go out to labour.

Q. Look at the man at the bar and tell me whether you recollect his person - A. Yes, it is the same person that sold the horse to John Cumberland , on the 18th of January, at Ealand, Walthamstow; I did not observe at that time that it was a mare, after it was in Cumberland's possession, I observed it was a mare; I saw him sell the mare to John Cumberland.

Q. Were you present when he first came up to Cumberland - A. Yes; and afterwards they went a little distance; I heard a great many words that passed between them, I cannot say I did all. I was in the hold when they drawed the dung with the mare in the field. I heard them at last agree for a guinea and a half; he gave him the guinea first in the field, and the half a guinea in the road. I am sure he is the same man, I was with him more than a quarter of an hour. It was a brown mare, with a star in her forehead.

THOMAS CANNON . I work for Edward Harman , gardener, at Ealand, Walthamstow.

Q. Were you present on the day this brown mare was disposed off to Cumberland - A. Yes, I saw the man come by with the brown mare, he was leading her; Cumberland asked him whether he would sell it, he went on a distance from Cumberland and then he called him to him; I did not hear much what they said, but from what I collected, they were bargaining, at last they agreed for a guinea and a half; I saw the mare worked by Cumberland, I am quite sure theprisoner is the man, I had him in my sight for more than a quarter of an hour; I have not seen him from that time, till about three weeks ago, when we went and swore to him.

ANDREW BOLSTER . I am an head borough of Southgate, I took the prisoner in custody; when I laid hold of him I told him he was my prisoner, by Cumberland's order. He was driving a team, I took him from his work; when he was charged with this horse, he denied having any transaction with Baker.

Prisoner's Defence. It is all false what they have said.

The prisoner called one witness who gave him a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 27.

The prisoner was recommended to his Majesty's mercy on account of his good character .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

585. STEPHEN CRESSER was indicted for that he on the 17th of March , was servant to Stephen Henry Graber , and James Cousens , and was employed and entrusted by them to receive money and valuable securities, for and on their account, and that he being such servant so employed and entrusted, did receive and take into his possession a draft for payment of 25 l. and that he afterwards feloniously embezzled, secreted, and stole the same .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded GUILTY .

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

586. JOSEPH CLARE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of June , a bottle, value 1 d. a pint of brandy, value 2 s. the property of William Bensfield ; two pair of trowsers, value 12 s. two pair of drawers, value 4 s. 6 d. three frannel waistcoats, value 10 s. and four hundred and seventy four penny pieces, and a one pound bank note, the property of Samuel Favell , William Bensfield , and John Richardly Bensfield .

The case was stated by Mr. Gurney.

WILLIAM BENSFIELD . Q. What are the names of your partners - A. Samuel Favell, and John Richardly Bensfield; we are wholesale slop seller s in St. Mary-Axe , the prisoner had been our porter about two years.

Q. In consequence of information that you received did you cause him to be taken into custody - A. We did, on the 28th of June. I was present when his boxes were searched in our house, he was an in door servant. In his boxes there were found two pair of trowsers, two pair of drawers, and three waistcoats; in a cupboard not locked by his bedside, in a hat box, were found thirty shillings in penny pieces.

Q. Does your house keep any quantity of penny pieces for the purpose of paying your work people - A. On account of the scarcity of specie, we have lately paid them in copper; we have from ten to thirty pound at all times in the house in a box, that box was locked and deposited in a warehouse, that he and the other servants had access to; that warehouse was in the lower part of our premises, where we generally take in the work; and I can verily say that the prisoner was not paid in copper.

Mr. Knapp. Was there no other servant lodged in this room in which this property was found - A. Yes, his name is Spooner.

RICHARD ABBOTT . Q. Are you the upper porter at Messrs. Favell's and Bensfield's - A. Yes.

Q. I presume you and the other servants were in the general habit of break fasting together, which of the servants were in the habit, of leaving the room first at breakfast - A. The prisoner generally left it first, about ten minutes or a quarter of an hour before the other servants, he generally went in the warehouse below, where the chest was with the penny pieces.

Q. On the 30th, the day but one after the prisoner was apprehended, did you find any thing - A. Yes, in the place where the shoes and knives were cleaned, I found this key, this is the lock of the box, it fits the lock.

Q. Who was the person by whom the knives and shoes were cleaned - A. The prisoner; the other servants had access to that place, but; no work to do there; I found that key on a shelf behind a small box.

Prosecutor. This is the real key, it had never been out of my possession.

SOLOMON PAR . I am a servant to the prosecutor, I saw the key found; I found a five shilling paper of halfpence, I took them to my master, they laid upon a shelf upon the ground, covered over with a sheet of paper; I afterwards found another parcel upon a shelf as high as my breast, that parcel was open and some of the penny pieces taken out.

JOHN GOFF . I am an officer; I, in company with Friend, took the prisoner into custody on the 28th of last month. On the next day we went to Mr. Bensfield's house and searched his boxes, we had not the keys, we broke them open, the boxes were identified by the other servants to be his boxes, and the prisoner claimed the money and notes that were in the boxes; we found two pair of trowsers, two pair of drawers, and three waistcoats, they were found in the prisoner's two boxes, the gold and notes were returned to the prisoner; I told the prisoner I found trowsers, waistcoats and other things; he said, he bought them of his master, and that the foreman had measured him for some of the articles that were found in his boxes; he pointed out a flannen waistcoat he had bought of his master.

THOMAS FRIEND . I apprehended the prisoner in company with Goff, at the corner of Raney's-gardens, in Tooley-street.

Q. Have you the penny pieces which have been spoken of - A. I received these two papers of Mr. Bensfield, they were found in the cellar. These six papers Goff and I found in the hat box, there is no difference to be distinguished in the papers. The prisoner stated that he purchased the things of his master.

DANIEL JONES . I am clerk to Messrs. Favell and Bensfield.

Q. Look at that one pound note, do you know whether that one pound note has in a little time past been in their possession - A. I received it in the month of June last, it is marked by me, W. W. denoting the christian and the surname of the person that paid, and June, 1810; the figure of the day of the month is not so clear, that I cannot say what day.Q. Have you got the book here, with the entry of whatever goods and slops the prisoner had of your master - A. Two of the entry's are of my own hand writing; there are no entry's of these articles. The entry's read.

Q. to Mr. Bensfield. What is the value of the two pair of trowsers - A. six shillings each, the drawers two shillings each, and the waistcoats, five shillings each.

Q. Has these goods been part of your stock - A. They have, they are new, and there are our marks upon them; I never sold any of them to the prisoner, and to the best of my belief, no other person has; we never sell to our servants without giving them a bill of parcels.

Prisoner's Defence. Some of the things that have been bought, there is the man that cut them out, they were not entered in the book.

GUILTY, aged 30.

Of stealing to the value of 24 s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

587. JOSEPH BETTS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of July , a handkerchief, value 5 s. the property of William Davis , from his person .

WILLIAM DAVIS . I live at No. 77, Newgate-street; I am clerk to Mr. Anderson, Clement's-lane, he is a Scotch factor. On Monday evening, between eight and nine o'clock, I was passing the corner of Shoe-lane, in Fleet-street , there was a house repairing there, I passed under the scaffolding, I fancied I perceived a hand in my pocket, I put my hand upon my coat pocket and found that my handkerchief was gone; I immediately turned round and saw the prisoner putting his hand under his waistcoat, as if putting something under his waistcoat; I immediately laid hold of him, and said, my friend, you have got my pocket handkerchief: he appeared quite astonished, and declared he had not; he attempted to get away from me, and dragged me up Shoe-lane; several persons came up, and as soon as he found he could not escape, he put his hand under his waistcoat and drew it out; I saw him throw it away. I think the handkerchief was delivered to me by Mr. Newman.

GEORGE NEWMAN . On Monday evening between eight and nine o'clock, I was going down Fleet-street. I saw the prosecutor have hold of the prisoner, he charged the prisoner with picking his pocket, I saw him pull the handkerchief out of his waistcoat and chuck it down, I immediately picked it up and gave it to the prosecutor.

MR. WORRALL. I am a beadle, the handkerchief was delivered to me, I produce it.

Prosecutor. It is my handkerchief, it is worth three shillings.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in Shoe-lane, this gentleman came up to me, and said, you have got my silk handkerchief; I said, I have no silk handkerchief of yours; up came a man, who before the alderman, said he lived at No. 2, Shoe-lane; he saw me throw it down. I heard a woman say, here is a handkerchief; I never saw the handkerchief before I saw it before the alderman. I am innocent of the charge.

GUILTY , aged 31.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

588. JOHN MACDONALD was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Isaac Biggen , about the hour of eight in the afternoon, on the 20th of June , Elizabeth, the wife of Isaac Biggen , and George Kelly being therein, and stealing six shirts, value 3 l. a pair of sheets, value 6 s. a pillowcase, value 6 d. two pair of stockings, value 1 s. nine handkerchiefs, value 5 s. four towels, value 2 s. and a cap, value 6 d. the property of George Kelly .

GEORGE KELLY . I live at No. 1, Chapter-house-court, St. Paul's Church-yard, St. Gregory's parish . Me and my brother rent the lower part of the house of Mr. Biggen: he sleeps in the house. We are bookseller s. On the 20th of June, about three o'clock, I went to clean myself in a room in the one pair of stairs. I tied up my linen for my washerwoman, and put it on a back shelf in that room. A person came into the shop for some books, and when that person went I shut the door after him; then I went into a room to get my boots, and when I came back I found the shop door open; I had left the shop door fast, it fastens with a latch; I then looked for my things, and missed them directly.

Q. When did you see the things again - A. On the Friday morning. I saw the things with the officer and the prisoner at the Mansion-house.

Q. Now tell me what that bundle contained that you left in your room when you went to serve a customer - A. All the articles mentioned in the indictment; they were put up in one bundle.

JOSEPH WOOD . I am a constable. On Wednesday, the 20th of June, about nine o'clock in the evening, I went into the King's Head public-house, in Threadneedle-street, I saw the prisoner offering a shirt for sale in the tap-room to a customer for five shillings. He had two bundles with him at that time, one was open, and the other tied up. I suspected him. I asked him how he came by that shirt; he said, his captain gave it him. I asked him who his captain was, and what ship, to which I had no answer. I looked over the two bundles, they contained all the articles claimed by Mr. Kelly, and bearing his mark. I searched the prisoner, on him I found the laundress's hooks, with all the articles set down, signed at the bottom G. Kelly. I then took him into custody; from there I went to the washerwoman.

Prisoner's Defence. I have been to sea all my life. I bought these things of a marine, in a public-house.

GUILTY, aged 60.

Of stealing only .

Transported for seven years .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

589. THOMAS MARQUISS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of June , a great coat, value 20 s. two hats, value 10 s. the property of Francis Dolman .

FRANCIS DOLMAN . I live at 33, Gower-street . I can only swear to the articles.

EDWARD GRAY . I am footman to Mr. Dolman. The two hats and the great coat were hanging up inthe hall; the prisoner came to the door, I opened the door to him; he said, there was a parcel at the George and Blue Boar, Holborn, but the name was rubbed out, he thought, it was for us. I asked him to walk in. I told him, my master was not within, I would go up stairs and let my mistress know; he walked in, and shut the door after him. I went up two pair of stairs and looked down the bannisters; I saw him take down the great coat and the two hats, and go out of the door with it. I jumped off the bannisters one pair of stairs, and ran down the other, and got sight of him just as he went out of the door. I catched him about three hundred yards from my master's door, on the other side of the way: I never lost sight of him. When I laid hold of him he had got the great coat and the hats in his hand; he dropped them after I caught him, and Mr. Meriton picked them up.

RICHARD MERITON . On the 25th of June I saw the prisoner about half after nine in the evening; the prisoner came in a direction as if from Mr. Dolman's house, he had a parcel with him running; the other witness caught hold of him, and I secured the property that he dropped, a coat and two hats.

Prisoner's Defence. I am accused of a thing that I am not guilty of. I was returning from a friend's house, and passing along the street I just kicked the things; they laid about six yards before me, when I was laid hold off.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Whipped in jail and discharged.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

590. ELEANOR SWINNEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of June , eighteen yards of printed cotton, value 3 s. 6 d. the property of Joseph Wilson , privately in his shop .

JOSEPH WILSON . I am a linen-draper , 49, Gray's Inn-lane . On the 18th of June, between three and four in the afternoon, the prisoner, in company with another woman, came into my shop; they had been twice there before. The prisoner asked to look at some printed cotton, I shewed them some, and the other woman fixed upon one, she had a part cut, and it was to be laid by, and to be paid by instalment; she left four shillings in part of payment. They then left the shop, both of them. I went to the door, I saw them at the corner of Tash-street. The prisoner looked back, I followed them, and overtook them in Hatton-garden: I then charged the prisoner with having some of my property; she said, sir, yes, I have. I led her over to the office, and the officer took the print from under the gown.

Q. What became of the other woman - A. They seperated in Tash-street; who the other woman was I know not.

CHARLES COOK . On the 18th of June, Mr. Wilson brought the prisoner to the office. I searched her, and under her gown and apron I found eighteen yards of printed cotton; she said it was Mr. Wilson's.

GUILTY, aged 21,

Of stealing only .

Fined 1 s. and confined one year in the House of Correction.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

591. BRIDGET KELLY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of June , two pieces of printed cotton, value 5 l. 10 s. the property of William Brown , privately in his shop .

JOSEPH POBJOY . I am an apprentice to William Brown , linen-draper Ratcliffe-highway . On the 9th of June, between seven and eight o'clock, the prisoner and her child, and a man, came into our shop, and wished to look at some gingham handkerchiefs. I shewed them some; I think they bought two; they were in about a quarter of an hour. On the part where I shewed these pocket handkerchiefs there was about a dozen or fourteen pieces of cotton bed furniture: I shewed them the handkerchiefs upon the cotton bed-furniture. The woman went out first, and she left the man with the child to bring out; the man stopped behind, and asked me to give him something to drink. I did not altogether like the idea of the man asking to drink, having only laid out three shillings, so I walked to the door to look after the woman, the woman was gone half a dozen yards from the door. I observed from the inside of her apron the end of a piece of furniture; I called into the shop to James Hayes ; I just lifted up her apron, I perceived there were two pieces; then James Hayes came. I think that she gave him one piece, and I took the other. He brought her into the shop; she said, it was the first time that she had done the like. I fetched an officer.

Q. What because of the man - A. I do not know. I believe the woman was making towards the liquor-shop. I think the man went in there.

JAMES HAYES . At that time I was shopman to Mr. Brown. I was called to the door by Joseph Pobjoy . I saw the two pieces of furniture under her apron. I took one piece from her.

WILLIAM HEWITT . I am an officer of Shadwell. On Saturday, the 9th of June, I took the prisoner in custody. I have had this furniture in my possession ever since.

Q. to Pobjoy. Look at these two pieces of furniture - A. They are my master's; he has no partner; they are twenty-eight yards each; they cost twenty-three pence each yard.

Q. Who was in the shop when she took these things - A. Another young man, James Hayes ; he was at the further part of the shop.

Prisoner's Defence. I went in to buy two handkerchiefs, which I paid for; and as I was coming out these two pieces stood outside of the shop door, I picked them up. This young gentleman followed me; he said, I had something that was not my property. I said, he might take them. When I was brought before the magistrate he was asked, if he could swear to them; he said, he could not, because there was something cut off them; at the same time he put a mark on them, then he said, he could swear to them.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 30.

The prisoner was recommended to his Majesty's mercy , on account of being a widow , and having three children.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

592. WILLIAM AUGUR was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of James Wortham , about the hour of twelve at night, on the 13th of July, and stealing an oil-skin hat cover, value 1 s. a pair of boots, value 10 s. and a handkerchief stiffner, value 6 d. the property of John Nash , and a bridle, value 10 s. the property of James Wortham .

JOHN NASH . I am a servant to James Wortham , he lives at Hampstead . On the 13th of July, about ten minutes before six in the morning, I found a ladder under a small sash window over the stable; the window was broke, and the string that fastened the window in the inside was cut, and two wooden bars were wrenched down; and they came through a door into the stable, and the side door was broken open that went to the coach-house, and the coach-house door was left open; whoever got in must have entered in at this window. I missed a bridle, a horse's collar, a pair of boots, an oil-skin cover for a hat, a handkerchief pad, and several other things that are not found.

Q. Why do you accuse the prisoner - A. I informed the constable, he took the prisoner with the things on him. On the evening before the property was lost, at half past-nine, I left the stable, with all the things safe in the place.

Q. Do you know any thing of the man yourself - A. I saw the man about Hampstead; he worked about there the last winter.

SAMUEL LACK . I am an officer. On Monday morning last, about nine o'clock, I saw the prisoner coming towards town, he had got a bridle under his arm; when he saw me looking at him, he was endeavouring to hide this bridle, by covering it up with these things. I thought he had not come honestly by them; I took him in custody. He told me he found the bridle. I asked him, where he got the boots; he said, they were a pair of old boots he had worn when he was at work down in the country. I searched him, and found four large knives upon him.

Prisoner's Defence. The bridle I found coming across Finchley-common, and the boots I bought three months ago in London.

GUILTY, aged 37,

Of stealing only .

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

593. RICHARD EVANS was indicted, for that he, on Wednesday, the 15th of February, in the 49th year of his Majesty's regin, was tried and convicted of felony, and was thereupon ordered and adjudged to be transported beyond the seas for the term of seven years; and that he afterwards, on the 6th of June last, feloniously and without any lawful cause, was at large in this kingdom before the expiration of the term for which he was ordered to be transported .

- MASON. Q. You are turnkey of Newgate - A. Yes; I know this lad was convicted in February, sessions, 1809, he and two more for stealing some knives; he was sentenced to be transported; he had a pardon, on condition of going into the Marine Society. We delivered him at the Marine Office on the 20th of May 1809. I did not see him from that time till last; sessions, the officer brought him down to me to identify him. I am sure it is the same boy .

(The copy of the conviction of the prisoner read.)

WILLIAM SALMON . I am an officer of Bow-street. I apprehended the prisoner, on the 6th of June, in Chandois-street, Covent-garden ; he was walking peaceably along the street; I took him to the office.

THOMAS MANTZ . I was in company with Salmon at the time of apprehending him; he was walking along the street.

Prisoner's Defence. I received the King's pardon to go into the Marine service, it did not agree with me, I ran away.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 16.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

594. WILLIAM HARRISON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of July , sixty-three yards of stair carpet, value 8 l. the property of Richard Bagster , in his dwelling-house .

SAMUEL WYAT . I am foreman to Richard Bagster , 20, Piccadilly, in the parish of St. James's , he is an upholsterer . On the 5th of June, between the hours of four and five, I was sitting in my kitchen eating my dinner, I saw a person stepping into the shop, I immediately ran up stairs, the shop boy followed me, and going towards the shop window I missed a roll of carpet out of the shop window.

Q. Where had you left it - A. In the shop window. I immediately said, there was a roll of carpet gone out of the window. I ran out of doors, went up a passage of a public-house that adjoins our shop, it is a thoroughfare that leads into Castle-street. On coming to the top of the passage I looked to my left, I saw a man with a roll of carpet on his shoulder. I ran after him, and was going to lay hold of his coat; he threw the carpet down in the middle of the street, and ran off. I called out, stop thief; several people followed him.

Q. Did you follow him - A. No, I took the property home to my master's shop. I had not been in the shop above three minutes before the prisoner was brought.

Q. Is yours an open window - A. It is not; he must come into the shop to get at it. I am certain he is the man.

JOHN ROBERTS . I am a porter. On the 6th of July, in Sherrard-street, there was a lad running after the prisoner calling, stop thief, the prisoner was calling, stop thief, likewise. I ran after them both, the lad came up to him first, and laid hold of him, and was struggling with him, and calling out, will nobody help me; yes, said I, I will help you. We secured him, and brought him back to the master's shop.

JAMES SHAW . I live with Mr. Bagster. I was down in the kitchen having my dinner, I saw a mancome in the shop, I followed Wyat up stairs. As soon as I got into the shop I missed a roll of carpet out of the window, I ran out of the shop, turned to the left. I got sight of him in Mary-le-bone-street.

Q. Had he the carpet with him then - A. No, he he had not. I did not see him throw it away.

Q. Are you sure that he is the same man that you followed - A. Yes, I brought him back.

Q. Are you sure that he is the same man that went in the shop - A. No.

Q. All you know, you followed a man and called out, stop thief - A. Yes, and when I called out, stop thief; he called out stop thief. When I came up to him, he said I am not the thief, there runs the thief; and there was no man running but him.

CHARLES LAWRENCE . My father is a baker; I was sitting with my father at his area gate; I saw the prisoner pass with the carpet on his shoulder, and all of a sudden I saw him chuck the carpet off his shoulder at my father's door into the middle of the street; I saw Mr. Bagster's foreman pick it up; the prisoner ran up the street. I am positive that is the man.

WILLIAM JACKSON . I am an officer; I produce the carpet, the prisoner and the carpet was given into my charge.

Wyatt. This is my master's carpet.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, nor called any witness to character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 31.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

595. MARY ANN BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of June , twenty-five yards of printed cotton, value 2 l. 12 s. the property of John Russell , in his dwelling house .

JOHN RUSSELL . I am a linnen draper , I live at 71, High Holborn : I have no partner. On the 30th of June, about half past eight in the evening, the prisoner was looking about the door, and in door, and throughout the shop. I was alarmed by a customer in the shop, that the prisoner came in and took a piece of print out of the shop and went away; a constable brought her back.

Q. Was this property within the shop door - A. It was within a foot of the door, off the threshold.

- HODGES. I am a constable. On the 30th of June, about half past eight in the evening. I was sitting in the public house, opposite the prosecutor's house; I saw the prisoner running from the shop across the road, with a bundle in her apron, and a person following of her calling, stop thief; I ran out of the house, she was stopped at turnstile, by the young man that was pursuing her; I came up, took the property from her and took her back to the shop.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming along Holborn, at a little distance from the prosecutor's house, a woman came by and put it into my hand, I went after her the constable and a young man stopped me.

GUILTY, aged 21.

Of Stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Fined 1 s. and confined One Year in the House of Correction .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

396. ANTHONY HINTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of July , in the dwelling house of Peter Egin , a shirt, value 3 s. and two one pound bank notes, his property .

PETER EGIN . I live at 144, Drury-lane .

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar - A. Yes, I have had the pleasure of seeing him twice, I saw him on the first of July. I live in Mr. Baxter's house, the house is all let out to lodgers; the owner of the house does not sleep in it, I have one room on the two pair of stairs. On the 1st of July, I and my wife went to my father-in-law, No. 15, Brownlow-street; the prisoner was there, in company with us, from between one and two o'clock till half past four, then we were going to see a debtor in Newgate, the prisoner came with us, and coming along I took him up into my room, to shew him a long drum that I had for sale.

Q. Did you know that you had a shirt and two bank notes - A. Yes, the notes were in a little box inside of a big box, and my shirt laid on the box, there were three pound in this little box, whoever took them dropped one.

Q. Was that little box locked - A. No, it was fastened down with iron clamps, it is my wife's saving box for a rainy day.

Q. How long did he remain in your room with you - A. Not two minutes, my wife stopped behind to lock the door; he and I came down together, my wife, and he, and me were the only three that were in my room, to my knowledge.

Q. When you went to your father-in-laws at one o'clock, your room door was not locked - A. No, it was not, when I brought the prisoner up, the door was not locked.

Q. You said the prisoner had been there before - A. No, I had seen him before where he worked.

Q. Did he know where you lodged - A. No, not before I shewed him.

Q. You say you staid there two or three minutes, had you shewn him this box, or did you open the large box - A. No, I only shewed him the large drum.

A. Are you quite sure that when you went to see your father-in-law, that the money was in the little box, and that you had it safe in the large box - A. I am not in the habit of going to the large box, my wife was.

Q. How long was it afterwards that you discovered that you had lost the property - A. As we were going on in Holborn, the prisoner made an excuse that he had a complaint in his bowels, he left me and told me he would follow me, he did not; I and my wife went to see our acquaintance and returned back.

Q. Was this person that you were going to see in Newgate an acquaintance of yours or his - A. An acquaintance of both, but more of his, the prisoner worked under him.

Q. At the time that you were walking to Holborn, could you see whether the prisoner had any thing under his coat - A. No, not as I saw.

Q. When you went out of your room to go to see your acquaintance in Newgate, did you lock the door - A. I cannot say, my wife stopped behind to lock the door.

Q. How long did you stop in Newgate to see this acquaintance of yours - A. About an hour, the prisoner never came to us; I had a couple of pots ofposter in Newgate with the debtor; I returned and my wife back to my room, and the door was a jar, I thought it had been left locked; I suspected I was robbed, I went to the box and found the money box broken open; the shirt my wife did not miss till the next day; I examined my box, three notes were gone, one was found upon the floor.

Q. Had your great box been broken open - A. No, the key was in the great box.

Q. Was the little box taken from the great box - A. No, only broken open, the iron clamps had been wrenched up.

Q. Did you know the contents of the box - A. Yes, I was by at the time it was put in, there were three separate one pound notes, I put one in myself, and my wife put in two.

Q. On examining the little box two one pound notes had been taken away, and one dropped on the floor of your room - A. Yes; this happened on the 1st of July, on the third I saw the prisoner at Bow-street, I went to the Brown Bear and shook hands with him, and told him I was sorry for him.

Q. Did he say any thing respecting the taking the bank notes - A. No, I believe he denied it.

Q. Have you ever recovered your two pound notes again - A. No; the duplicate of the shirt was found upon him when he was taken in custody, I would not take exactly upon me to swear to the shirt.

Mr. Curwood. You say you are a taylor - A. I was once.

Q. What is the prisoner - A. He is an organ builder.

Q. They tell me you are an organ driver - A. Yes, I play an organ about the street, I can get more money by it, than I can by my business.

Q. You took this man up to your room to shew him a long drum - A. Yes.

Q. You said the little box was in the great box, that great box you did not open in his presence - A. I did not.

Q. He did not know any thing of your little box - A. No.

Q. He did not know it was there - A. No.

Q. You have never found the two notes since - A. No.

Q. You are not certain that the room door was fastened when you went away - A. No, I am not.

Q. Was the lock broken when you came back - A. No, the bolt of the lock was in no other situation than as if it had not been locked; it might have happened by not having been locked, or by being opened by a key.

ELIZABETH EGIN . Q. Did you go with your husband to his father-in-law's on the first of July - A. Yes, between one and two.

Q. Do you know whether you locked your room door when you went to your father-in-law's in Brown-low-street - A. I did.

Q. You kept some money in your little box, and your little box was in your great box - A. Yes.

Q. You had no lock to your little box - A. No, it was clamped down with iron.

Q. Are you quite sure that the iron clamps were quite secure on the first of July - A. Yes; I had put two one pound bank notes in myself, and there was a one pound bank note in it.

Q. Had you seen the box on the first of July - A. I had seen it on the Thursday before, it was all safe then.

Q. What day of the week was the first of July - A. Sunday.

Q. Had you a shirt in the room - A. Yes; I do not know exactly whereabouts in the room it was.

Q. Did you usually keep the great box locked - A. The key was in it; I am not sure whether it was locked or not.

Q. Do you know whether your husband had put any bank notes in that little box - A. He put one.

Q. Then you expected that there would be three one pound notes in that little box - A. Yes.

Q. Had you any coin in the box besides the notes - No, no coin in it.

Q. Did you see the prisoner in Brownlow-street - A. Yes, he came there while we were at dinner at my father's.

Q. You agreed to go and see a man who was in Newgate for debt - A. Yes; my husband and me took him with us and we went up into our room, the prisoner had not been in our room before that day, he did not know where we lived at all.

Q. What was the occasion of your visiting the room in your going to Newgate - A. My husband had a long drum to sell, he went to shew it to the prisoner.

Q. Did you open the door - A. No; the door was open when my husband went up.

Q. I thought you said you locked the door when you went out - A. I do not know whether it was locked or not.

Q. Are you quite sure that you locked it before you went to your father's - A. I am not quite sure; I only think so.

Q. Did you look in your great box when you returned from your father's - A. No; we shewed the prisoner the great drum, we did not stay in the room many minutes.

Q. Do you think the prisoner could open your great box without your perceiving it - A. I do not think it could be done then.

Q. While the prisoner was with you, had you at all talked of the way in which you kept your money - A. While I was at my father's house I said, he was saving a little money up to buy an organ for himself.

Q. Does he hire an organ then at present - A. Yes.

Q. Then you all three went towards Newgate, to see this prisoner - A. Yes, and my mother went with us, she is not here; my mother said below while we went up to our room, and when we came down, the prisoner set off with us with an intention to go to Newgate; this man, who was in confinement for debt, was an acquaintance of both of us. The prisoner went as far as Middle-row, Holborn, with us; my husband and he walked together. I did not hear his reason for leaving us there; he left us and went across the road. I did not see him any more till the Monday.

Q. When you returned from Newgate, did you go immediately from Newgate to your own lodgings -A. Yes, my husband went before me, I met him in Queen-street, he told me the door was broken open.

Q. When you left your lodgings to go to Newgate, are you certain that you locked the door or not - A. I am quite certain of that, the prisoner bid me go back to see if I had locked it, I did go back, and it was locked. On going up into my room, I saw the cover of the little box in the chair, with this knife, and the body of the box was in the great box; the knife was my knife, it had been laying in the room.

Q. Had the knife been at all notched or bent by opening the little box - A. The knife is bent, it was not bent when I went out, the knife was laying under the chair.

Q. What did you do in consequence of this - A. My father and mother went to his lodgings the same night.

Q. Did you inform your father what you had discovered - A. Yes; he went to look after the prisoner.

Q. When did you see the prisoner again - A. On the Monday, in St. John-street, in Smithfield, in the morning, part of the day my mother and father were with me. I asked him how he came to break the door open, and come into my place after we left it, and take my money; the prisoner said, there is an officer, if you choose to take me up you may.

Q. You took him upon his word and did take him up - A. Yes, he was taken up; he was searched in the Poultry compter yard, I was by at the time, and a duplicate of a shirt was found upon him.

Q. Did you go with the duplicate to the pawnbroker - A. Me and the officer did, to a pawnbroker in St. John-street, Smithfield; we found the shirt, I knew the shirt to be my husband's, there was the initials of his name, P. E.; I knew it to be my husband's, I use to wash for him, he had it for about three months; I can speak with positiveness that it is my husband's shirt; I told the prisoner at Bow-street of the shirt, he said he did take that. He was taken to Bow-street the same day, my husband did not see the prisoner till the Tuesday.

Mr. Curwood. This first of July was on a Sunday - A. Yes.

Q. You and your husband went to your father-in-laws before you saw the prisoner - A. Yes.

Q. When you went out you locked the door as you thought - A. Yes.

Q. When you went up stairs in your way from your father's to Newgate, the door was not locked - A. No.

Q. Yet you supposed you had locked it - A. I did not go out then meaning to leave it open, I thought I had locked it.

Q. You had made one mistake that day - when the prisoner went up with you on your return from your father's, that was the first time of his going in your room - A. The first time, he did not know where we lived before then.

Q. Much less where your money was - A. I suppose he guessed at it.

Q. What sort of a lock is it to your door - A. Not a very good lock.

Q. Were there any marks of violence when you came back - A. No, I thought it was opened by a key, my husband was the first that went into the room.

- JOHNSON. I am a servant to Mr. Briggs, a pawnbroker, St. John-street. On the 2d of July, the prisoner pawned a shirt with me, I have known him some time.

Q. Was that duplicate afterwards brought the same day - A. Yes; Mrs. Egin and the officer came between eleven and twelve, they claimed the shirt; I shewed them the shirt, I have kept it ever since; he pawned it in the name of Hinton, I have known him by the name of Hinton, always. He lived in St. John-street, and that is the duplicate I gave to the prisoner.

- CADMAN. Q. You took charge of this man - A. Yes, I searched him in the presence of Mrs. Egin, I found the duplicate upon him; I afterwards went with the duplicate to the pawnbroker's, the shirt was produced to me there. It was an old man that took charge of him, he delivered him up to me; the officer that had him first, said he knew him from a child.

ANN KERR . I live in the same house with Mrs. Egin.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. Yes; on that day I saw him in the house, alone, between five and six o'clock, I saw him go up stairs, I lodge at the top of the house.

Q. Did you stay to see what place he went into - A. No, I did not, I was standing at the door, I saw him come out.

Q. How long was he in the house - A. About a quarter of an hour.

Q. You do not know what part of the house he went into - A. No, I do not; I am sure he is the man.

Q. When did you see him again - A. I saw him in custody at Bow-street, on the Tuesday after the Sunday I saw him go up stairs, I was quite sure of his person then.

Q. When you say it was between five and six, do you speak from the clock or from recollection - A. I came down to the door about five o'clock.

Q. How long after the man had gone away did you see Mrs. Egin - A. Near about seven o'clock, I saw her and her husband; when Mrs. Egin went into her room I heard the alarm, I went down, she complained that somebody had gone into the room and had robbed her: I told them I had seen a man go up stairs, I did not see into what room he went; I described his person to them, I had not seen the man before. I am quite sure of his person.

JOHN BAXTER . These people are tenants of mine, I live at the watchhouse.

Q. to Prosecutrix. What are the letters upon the shirt - A. P. A.

Q. What is your name - A. Elizabeth Agin .

Q. You pronounce it in your dialect Agin, is it not Egin - A. Yes. This shirt is not clean, it was laid out for the purpose of washing; I neither marked it, nor made it, I know it very well, it is my husband's shirt.

Prosecutor. I believe it is my shirt, but not to say punctually upon my oath, at present that it is mine.

Mr. Curwood. Did you take the little cover out of the large box - A. I was in a flurry at the time, I cannot say, and the knife was found by the woman.

Prisoner's Defence. On Sunday, the 1st of July, I was taken by Peter Egin to his house, for the purpose of shewing me a big drum. We were going to see a person in Newgate, I carried provision, and they gave me a bottle of liquor; I left him at Gray's-inn-lane, I told him the occasion; I went into the first public house, and there I met a friend, he told me the consequence of taking liquor into a prison, in consequence of that I did not go. I returned in about three quarters of an hour, to Egin'shouse, I asked if Egin was at home, they told me no, I returned down, I saw Egin no more untill I was taken into custody, he told me at his father's, that he should not stop in Newgate more than a quarter of an hour, and my stopping with my friend made me go to his room.

Q. to Prosecutor. Were you going to take any thing to this friend of yours in Newgate - A. Yes, my father in law sent it in a bottle.

The prisoner called one witness who gave him a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 30.

The prisoner was recommended to his Majesty's mercy by the jury and the prosecutor on account of his good character .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

597. GEORGE TOWERS was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Pierce Bryon , about the hour of twelve on the night of the 8th of May , and stealing therein, three gold watches, value 60 l. a gold chain, value 5 l. three gold seals, value 10 l. a diamond ring, value 300 l. three gold rings, value 5 l. three gold boxes, value 60 l. a key, value 6 d. two pieces of foreign gold coin, called doublejoes, value 3 l. 12. three five guinea pieces, value 15 l. 15 s. three ten pound bank notes, and a five pound bank note, his property . And two other counts for like offence only varying the manner of charging them.

PIERCE BRYON . Q. You live at 55, Manchester-street, Manchester-square - A. I do; in the parish of Marylebone.

Q. Do you keep the house yourself - A. I do, it is my house; I have a niece that lives with me, I am the housekeeper.

Q. On the 8th of May, was your niece gone out at night - A. She was.

Q. Had she with her your two men servants, the coachman and footman - A. She had.

Q. Was any of your female servants at home - A. There were none.

Q. Between eleven and twelve on that night were you writing in your parlour - A. I was writing, it was within a quarter of twelve at night.

Q. Be so good as to tell us what drew your attention towards the parlour door - A. I heard something as I thought, turning the latch of the door, but very low, gently the door opened, and a man presented himself; I looked at him steadily, he did not say one word to me; nor I to him. The first of his actions was saying burr, he was pointing to the fire where I was sitting, he took a second step with making the same noise, then he was pointing to the back parlour door saying burr, he directly began to lay hold of me, and drew me into the parlour; I made some opposition to it, and by the way of giving him some counter action there was a card table that stood by the fire place in the parlour, on which I had been writing, I had really forgot to put the feet up, I laid the whole weight of my body on the table, the table of course fell on me, and cut my skin a good deal. At that time I was quite clear what he had in view was the iron chest.

Q. At the time that the table fell upon you, were you in the front parlour or in the back parlour - A. I was in the back parlour, pretty near the iron chest.

Q. You were now down upon the floor - A. The table having fallen upon me, and there was a small box between my feet. It is a room full of papers and boxes. He was up, the table did not fall upon him. I had not been long in that situation when he gave me a blow on my stomach, and I fell on my back. In that situation I was, I found both his hands at once one in each pocket, in my left hand pocket, I had one hundred pound in small bank notes in my right hand, there was my pocket book, as soon as he took these out he thrust his hand into my side pocket, and took the key of the iron chest and opened the iron chest with all the ease imaginable, and he began to rifle the chest; but he only rifled the chest with one hand, he was afraid of my getting up; I was in that situation I could not get up, he held me fast, I of course endeavoured to free myself from him, which I could not do on account of the embarrassment of the card table, and the box between my feet, and there he had me; he took every thing from the iron chest, he took gold boxes, diamond rings, chains, and watches, part of them are here, I have not them all.

Q. Were all them things in the iron chest - A. No, part of them were, some were in the drawer, he took the things out of the cases they were in, and this snuff box had a case. After being on my back, I turned about, I said, I wanted to sit down, he said, burr; I said, I wanted to sit down on one of them little boxes, he resisted my attempt by making the same noise, that is the only noise he made the whole time. I endeavouring, or wanting to get out of his hands, crept about two or three yards to the parlour door, he pursued me, and there he got upon the top of me, and gave me a violent blow upon my head which gushed out blood.

Court. He gave you a violent blow with what - A. With his fist, what, said I, do you intend to murder me, these were the only words that passed between us; I suppose that blow must have stunned me, I spoke no more. When this was done, he had done every thing, he had rifled the chest, he took the candle out of the parlour that I had, he took that in his hand, I remember his going away, he went out of the door into the front parlour, turned the key of the door, and there he left me, there I was three quarters of an hour.

Mr. Adolphus. Do you mean that he locked you in the back parlour - A. Yes, I was left in the dark laying on the ground; I was not able to get up till some little time afterwards.

Q. Where did he leave this candle that you have been speaking of - A. I think he left it in the inside room, but there was a candle which is a remarkable thing, I found a candle which he had thrown in the corner, how the house escaped fire I know not; since the candle was broken in two or three pieces, the tallow had run all about the floor, and the wick went out; it was a most wonderful thing how it went out, he dashed it in the corner as he went out, the waistcoat is signed.

A. From whom had you the bank notes that you had in your pocket - A. I wanted to pay some tradesmen, I had them from Mr. Antrobus, the teaman, in the Strand, I intended to pay them away the day after I had them in; there were others that I cannot swear to.

Q. Do you know the young man at the bar - A. I do, perfectly well; he was six months in my service, he had left me about three months.

Q. Was the person that committed the violence upon you about the size and height of that man - A. I believe he was; he had a black gauze over his face, of course that made his features appear larger to me, he looked more robust then, and in the features of his face having the gauze over it, I thought I knew his voice; I really and truly did think that it must be the prisoner.

Court. You did not hear his voice did you - A. No, only burr, from the manner of the voice. I really believed it to be the prisoner.

Mr. Gurney. Do you mean that your opinion is found upon the observations that you made at the moment or from the knowledge that you have since acquired with the; information of Humphrey's - A. It is not from subsequent information at all, I think so at least.

Q. I think you told me that the face of the man through the black gauze appeared larger - A. No doubt it did.

Q. I think you stated that the person appeared larger in bulk than the prisoner - A. Certainly, I thought so, I do not think that he exceeded in height.

WILLIAM BIGGS Q. I understand you are servant to Mrs. Pearce - A. Yes, she lives next door, No. 54.

Q. On the night of the 8th of May, do you remember being alarmed - A. Yes, Mr. Bryen holloaed out he was robbed, several times, it was a little before twelve o'clock, I asked leave of my mistress to go through our own house, I took a ladder and got upon the wall, and went into the house. Mr. Dance an attorney, and a watchman got in with me, we went up stairs, and found the door between the front parlour and the back parlour fast, we opened the door and liberated Mr. Bryen, he was near the front parlour door, he seemed to be in a deplorable state all over blood; he complained of having been robbed, we took a light from the watchman's lanthorn, I did not see any other light I staid with Mr. Bryen and Mr. Dance and the watchman went up stairs; we then let the watchman in at the front door, it was shut with a spring lock, I could open it inside, no person could on the outside.

HENRY DANCE . Q. You are an attorney, and live at No. 17, Manchester-square - A. I am.

Q. Upon hearing the outcry at Mr. Bryen's house, you assisted in getting in - A. Yes, we went through Mrs. Pearce's house over the wall, and down the area of Mr. Bryen's house, we entered by the door in the middle of the area, went up stairs into the hall. I drew the latch lock of the street door, and let two other watchmen in, there was a key inside of the lock, we went through the front parlour, we found the door of the back parlour locked, I unlocked it and saw Mr. Bryen sitting with his hand on the iron chest, the two drawers in the iron chest were open and empty, Mr. Bryen's forehead was very much cut, and he was very much over blood.

WILLIAM DENT . Q. You are in the service of Mr. Bryen - A. On the 8th of May, I was; on that evening I went out with Miss Bryen with the carriage, about half past nine o'clock.

Q. Did you see the street door closed after you went out - A. To the best of my knowledge, I shut it after I went out, it shuts with a catch lock, I was the last person that went out, there was no one in but Mr. Bryen.

GEORGE HUMPHRYS . I am an officer of Bow-street In consequence of information on the 25th of June, I went to Mrs. Temple, No. 15, Little Barlow-street, Marylebone, I found the prisoner there about five o'clock in the afternoon, there are two rooms on the first floor; I rapped at the door, I went in, the prisoner was drinking tea with Mrs. Temple, and a soldier belonging to the life guards; I said Mr. Towers how do you do.

Q. Did you know him before - A. No, he arose from his chair and said, how do you do sir, I have not the pleasure of knowing you, I told him I knew him very well, and that I had called two or three days before, and left my address, he said, I have your address in my pocket; I said, how was it you did not call upon me, he replied, he only came to town last night, I told him I understood he had an inclination to go to India, he said, he had; I said, I should wish to speak to him in private, he said by all means, we went into the back room, me and the prisoner only, then I noticed the chain and seals of his watch, I said, you have got a curious seal, a very pretty one, he said, it was; I laid hold of one of the seals, and observed the lion rampart upon it; I then said, will you have the goodness to let me look at the watch in your pocket, he said, yes, I will, he took the watch out of his pocket and gave it me in my hand, I said, they were nice seals, and the watch appeared to be a French one; he said, he did not know about it being a French watch, I told him I believe I had some knowledge of the seals, and also of the watch, he said, he believed not; it was a watch that was left to him by his uncle a very rich farmer in the country that had died lately. I said, you lived with Mr. Bryen once, he said, he did; I asked him if he thought Mr. Bryen would give him a character, he said, he had been living with a gentleman in the country since he left Mr. Bryen; I told him my name was Humphreys, I am a Bow-street officer, if this is your watch which your uncle left you, you will have no objection to go with me to Mr. Bryen, he said, he would not go, then I took my staff out of my pocket that I would not deceive him, and told him he should go; then I asked him if the trunk and box in the room was his; he said, no, it was the soldiers whom he slept with, I told him he had better go quiet and easy, and say no more about it, if it was all right he would soon return again. I got him down stairs, then he wanted to speak to his landlady, I told him no, I took him by the arm and led him out of the yard into the street. We went together till we came to the corner of Manchester-street, he had occasion to stop there, we proceeded to Mr. Bryen's door, and as I put my hand to the door he attempted to make his escape, he ran some distance before I catched him, nearly a mile, I stopped him, took him into Oxford-street, before I could get a coach, I then tied his hands, and put him into a coach, I attempted to search him, he seemed very ticklish he did not like it. In what I am going to relate, I neither promised him any thing nor threatened him, I put my hand into his breeches pocket, there I found a gold snuff box, he said, you are right, it is of no use for me to deny it any longer, take care of that box for in it there is seven and thirty pounds, this is the snuff box, he then said, keep all you find about me, and I will not split, that is he would not say any thing about it, I told him I should keep all I had got a short time, but I should split; I then asked him what he had done with the remainder of the old gentleman's property that he had taken, he replied, that he had sold it to a jew, he should not know him again if he saw him, he had not pledged it, and I might depend upon it that every thing that I found upon him was the whole that was left, I took him to Bow-street, locked him up, and took another coach and went back to his lodging.

Q. to Prosecutor. Look at that snuff box and watch - A. The gold snuff box is mine, the gold watch, seals, chain, and key are mine.

Humphries. When I got to the lodging, I found a trunk and box there, in the trunk I found a gold repeating watch, a gold snuff box, part of a tortoise shell box, an ivory box set in gold, a pearl box, a large goldring, and three other gold rings; here is gold chains and other inkets, and topaz broaches.

Prosecutor. The are all my property, they were all in the strong box.

Humphrey's. There were linen in the other box, I believe, what he owned, there is two five guinea pieces and some double joes.

Prosecutor. I lost two double joes, and three five guinea pieces.

CHARLOTTE TEMPLE . Q. Did the prisoner lodge at your house - A. He did.

Q. Do you know this box and trunk that was searched - A. I was not at home when it was searched, that trunk and box belonged to the prisoner, as he told me.

GEORGE BURNHAM . I am a soldier in the second regiment of life-guards, I lodged with Mrs. Temple, and slept with the prisoner; the box and trunk in that room was Tower's; it was the box and trunk that was taken away, I was in the stable when they were taken away, when I came back they were both gone.

WILLIAM HOPE . Q. You are clerk to Antrobus and Co. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know Mr. Bryen - A. Yes, I gave him change for an hundred pound note, on the 3d of May; I gave him three tens, and ten fives, the numbers of the three tens were 5266, 5267, 5268, and one of the fives 9731; I made the entry myself.

Humphrey's. I have got the notes.

Mr. Clark. They are all right.

MR. PAUL. Do you remember the prisoner coming to you with a watch - A. It was a person about his size.

Q. Look at the prisoner again, and try whether you can remember his bringing the watch - A. I cannot take upon me to swear that it was the prisoner, it was somebody about his size.

Q. to Prosecutor. Is there any other way out of your house - A. There is a back yard which goes into George Street, that is shut every night at eight o'clock.

Prisoner's Defence. I am as innocent as a child unborn, I received the property of a person that lived formerly as a valet to Mr. Bryen; he attempted to committ a rape upon Catherine Bryen ; I received them, not knowing them to be stolen, at a public house.

The prisoner called three witnesses who gave him a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 20.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

598. MICHAEL MAGGIN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of June , a watch, value 2 l. the property of William Phillips , from his person .

WILLIAM PHILLIPS . I am an invalid , and so is the prisoner, we were both at Chelsea . On the night of the 20th of June, I had a dispute with my comrade; he said that I should not sleep with him that night; I said I would find a bed at another place; I went out into the street and met with the prisoner; he asked me if I would go along with him; we went down Chelsea, to find a house open, it was twelve at night; finding no house open we agreed to lay under the trees till morning. In the course of the night, I was disturbed by the prisoner pulling my watch out, he cut the fob of my trowsers, and while I was taking my hat up he ran away, I could not catch him; at eight o'clock in the morning I found him in his lodging.

CORNELIUS MANNERS . I bought the watch of him, on the morning, the 21st of June, a little before five, I gave for it one pound eleven shillings and sixpence.

TIMOTHY LANE . I am a watchman. On the morning of the 21st I was on duty, when the prisoner and another man came up and asked me if I wanted a watch; Manners asked my advice about it; I said, he might buy off a soldier, it was not any thing of regiment; he bought the watch for a guinea and a half.

JAMES GILLMORE . I am an officer; Manners produced the watch at the office, I was ordered to have it in my possession, this is the watch.

Prisoner's Defence. I met the prosecutor, he asked me where he could get a bed, he said he was locked out, and so was I, we agreed to sleep under the trees in Chelsea college, about two o'clock a man came past, I got up and went with him, he informed me he was going to Bristol, he had no money and could I sell the watch for him; I asked the watchman, he said he could not purchase it himself for want of money, he could recommend me to a man; I own I sold the watch; I am innocent of stealing it.

Q. to Prosecutor. Were you intoxicated that night - A. I was, and so was he.

GUILTY , aged 35.

Fined 1 s. confined six months in the House of Correction .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

599. JAMES BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of July , a quarter of a yard of ribbon, value 1 d. a seal, value 2 d. and a key, value 2 d. the property of James Britt , from his person .

JAMES BRITT . I live at 125, Golden-lane, I am a labouring man . On the 15th of July, between twelve and one at night, I and a young man came out of a public house in Long-lane , I was going to my lodging, three men came up to us, and they were taking off my country dialect, I am an Irishman, they picked a quarrel, and wanted to fight the young man that was with me; I interfered, and said there should be no fighting; the prisoner made a grasp at the ribbon of my watch, he got the watch out of my pocket, I happened to catch hold of it, he gave it two or three jerks, the pendant broke, he got the ribbon, seal, and key, from me; he then ran away towards Barbican, I ran after him, he turned round, rushed by me, and run down Long-lane, towards Smithfield; I cried out, stop thief; I never lost sight of him, until he turned the corner of Smithfield bars, he was out of my sight about two minutes, and when I got sight of him, he was in the custody of the patrol.

JOSEPH BATLEY . I am a patrol. On that Sunday night I was on duty outside of Smithfield bars; I heard a voice call, stop thief, I made up to it, I saw the prisoner walking, I stopped him; the prosecutor came up in about two minutes, he said the prisoner was the man that had robbed him of his ribbon, seal, and key, the prosecutor had the watch in his hand, the pendant was broke.

Q. When you took the prisoner did he appear to be out of breath - A. Not at all.

Prisoner's Defence. On Sunday afternoon I was at the other end of the town, I returned at night; I was going up Long-lane, I went into a public house to get a small glass of liquor, before I drank it, I heard the cry of stop thief, I saw the prosecutor running aftera man, I followed them up St. John-street; and when I was taken in custody the man was before, and when the prosecutor left off running after the man, the petrol asked him if I was the man, he said yes; I then was behind the man.

The prisoner called two witnesses who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

600. JOHN NICOLLS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of June , a hat, value 5 s. the property of Lawrence Ingram , and William Moore .

WILLIAM REEVES . I am twelve years old, I am servant to Lawrence Ingram , and William Moore , hatter s, Cheapside. On the 13th of June, between two and three in the afternoon, I was taking a hat to Mr. Scott, 182, Upper Thames-street ; as I was going to Mr. Scott's, there are two doors to his house, the prisoner was standing at one door, I had Mr. Scott's hat in a hat box; he asked me whether I had brought Mr. Scott's hat; I said, yes; he told me I might take it back again, it was ordered at one o'clock; I turned to go home, the prisoner pointed to Queen-street, said that was the nighest way home; I went up Queen-street, and the prisoner with me; he then said he was Mr. Scott, he would take the hat home, he was going home presently; he asked me to give it him, I did. I believed what he said, that he was Mr. Scott; he asked me if we had any children's black hats to dispose off in the shop; I told him yes; he told me I might take two children's black hats there at six o'clock, for a child about four years old, and a bill and receipt, and he would pay for the hats. He took me up a street out into the Old Jewry, said he wanted to go to Coleman-street, and for me to make haste home. When I got home to my master's shop I told what had happened.

Q. Did you go in the evening with the children's hats to Mr. Scott - A. Yes, I went alone, and when I came there they said they did not know any thing about the children's hats.

Q. Did you enquire whether the hat come home to Mr. Scott, by the person calling himself Mr. Scott - A. Yes, I could not learn any thing about it there.

Q. When did you see the man again that took the hat from you - A. On the Tuesday following, in Cheapside, by our door; I told my master of it, the prisoner saw me, my master went after him; the prisoner was going to run through a passage, a thoroughfare, my master stopped him.

Q. Did you ever find the hat again - A. No. I said I was sure he was the man, he denied it.

Q. What was this hat charged to the customer - A. Five shillings. It was an old hat that had been dressed.

WILLIAM SHEPPARD . I am a constable, the prisoner was delivered to me upon this charge, in Mr. Ingram's shop; I took him into custody, he was charged with stealing a hat, he said he was innocent.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent of it. I was formerly brought up to the hatting business, my father was forty five years in the hat business, a Charing-cross, and retired from there; and after his death he left me that property which I have now to live upon, and I am in the hatting business at Lambeth; I am well known.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 31.

Fined 1 s. and confined three Months in Newgate .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

601. MARY THOMAS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of July , a gown, value 12 s. I frock, value 6 d. a pair of shoes, value 4 s. two aprons, value 4 s. three handkerchiefs, value 3 s. a lubit shirt, value 2 s. two caps, value 6 d. value four pound weight of bacon, value 3 s. the property of Jabozs Beddar .

MARGARET BEDDAR . I am the wife of Jabozs Beddar , he is a silk dresser , No. 3, York-street, Bethnal-green . On the 10th of this month, when I got up in the morning, at half past five, the door of my room was wide open, and the drawers, and these things were missing, the door was open where we were a bed. I went out to the pawnbroker's to see if she had pawned. I met the prisoner and two more, the prisoner was quite drunk, she had my handkerchief on her neck, this was about eight o'clock the same morning; I sent for an officer.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. I never saw her before.

JOHN VICKERY . On Tuesday, the 10th of July, between seven and eight in the morning, a person came to my house and said they had been robbed. I immediately went to the prosecutor's apartment, and at the door the prisoner was sitting; the prosecutor told me the circumstance of the robbery, that he was asleep in his bed, and the door on the latch, and the person, whoever it was that had robbed him, opened the door and came in.

Q. Is it a ground floor - A. No, up one pair of stairs. The woman enumerated the things that she had lost, and said that she had a handkerchief of hers on her neck; I desired the prisoner to take it off her neck, which she did; on searching her the woman found a five shilling paper of halfpence, two shillings in silver, and some odd halfpence. I then went with her daughter to Mr. Cotton's, in Shoreditch; upon enquiry they produced a frock and two aprons; there were a pair of shoes on the prisoner's feet, the prosecutrix said they were her shoes, and on the stain were left an old pair of shoes and a pair of stockings. The prosecutrix took her into another room, undressed her, and took off her an old flannel petticoat that belonged to her daughter.

GEORGE PAYNE . I am a pawnbroker, I produce a frock and two aprons, pawned on the 10th of July, by a little after seven in the morning, I gave four shillings for them.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought the shoes of a woman in Shoreditch, I gave two shillings for them, and twenty one pence for the handkerchief.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Fined 1 s. confined one year in the House of Correction .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

602. GEORGE HEFFER was indicted for that heon the 5th of March last, feloniously took to wife one Sarah Morris , spinster , and to her was married; his former wife then being alive .

SAMUEL AMES . I am parish clerk of St. Matthew, Bethnal Green: I have the register of marriages of that parish. George Heffer batchelor of this parish to Hannah Sophia Colley , of the same parish, spinster, was married in this church by banns.

Q. Do you know that the prisoner was the man that was married at that time - A. No.

ANN RUSSELL . Q. What was the prisoner's first wife a maiden name - A. Colley, she is in court.

Mr. Gurney. Can you swear that the defendant is the person - A. I think I could.

Q. Did not you say before the magistrate, that you could not swear to him - A. I said, I should not like to do it, I had not seen him for many years, now I have seen him a second time, I think I do recollect him, when the marriage was over we went to my mother's at Mile End.

MRS. DRUMMOND. Q. Where did you live at the time that we have been speaking of the marriage taken place - A. At Mile End.

Q. Do you remember their returning to your house after the marriage - A. Yes, they returned to my house, and I gave them some refreshment; I am certain that is the man.

WILLIAM HAMMOND . I am the parish clerk of Paddington . I have the marriage register, the date is the 5th of March, 1810. To the best of my knowledge the prisoner is the person that was married to Sarah Morris .

MR. FLINDALL. Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. I do.

Q. Were you at the last marriage - A. I was.

Q. Who attended besides you - A. Mr. Heffer's daughter, I think she is about sixteen years old.

Q. Did you ask him why he married Sarah Morris - A. He stated that he did not think his marriage to his first wife was good for any thing, he had the act of parliament in his hand.

Q. Did not he mention some passage in scripture - A. I do not know.

Court. Did not he say father Abraham did the same - A. I do not know.

Mr. Gurney. In October last the defendant and his first wife separated - A. It might be that time he made her a separate maintainance, a pound a week. The first wife is the prosecutrix, she and the nephew went and took possession of his business the moment he was taken up.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel.

GUILTY , aged 41.

Fined 1 s. Confined six Months in the house of correction .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

603. ANDREW M'GEE and ELEANOR his wife were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Daniel Mackey , about the hour of three, in the afternoon, on the 10th of July , the said Daniel Mackey , and others being therein; and stealing a pocket book, value 6 d. the property of Mary Burgoyne , a coat, value 5 s. a pair of sheets, value 10 s. four handkerchiefs, value 2 s. two gowns, value 20 s. and a petticoat, value 2 s. the property of Daniel Mackey .

DANIEL MACKEY . I am a victualler , I live upon Saffron-hill .

Q. When did you lose this property - A. On Tuesday, the 10th instant, my wife's sister first discovered it.

MARY BURGOYNE . Q. You live with your brother - A. Yes, I went into the two pair back room a quarter before ten o'clock, I found a hole in the cieling, the hearth stone had been taken up in the back garret to let a person down, I gave the alarm to my brother. The prisoners took a bundle out with them in the afternoon.

Q. to Mr. Mackey. Upon the alarm you went up stairs - A. Yes, and in the top garret I saw the hearth stone had been taken up, and a hole made through the cieling large enough for a boy or a girl to go through, I then sent for an officer, the prisoner and his wife occupied the front garret, the back garret was not occupied at that time.

RICHARD OGDE . I was standing by Mr. Mackey's door, I picked up this instrument about ten at night, I gave it to Mr. Wood.

GEORGE WOOD . I am an officer. On the 10th of this month about eleven o'clock, Mr. Mackey sent for me; just as I got there the prisoner and his wife came in, I went up and examined the back garret. Afterwards the last witness brought in this instrument, a bodkin which tailors use, as soon as ever I saw it, I said, this is the thing that broke open the back garret door, I examined the door the mark corresponded, I asked M'Gee if he used a bodkin in his trade, he said, no, he did not, I asked what he made the holes with for the button shanks to go in, he took a pair of scissars and shewed me how he did it, his little boy said it was his father's bodkin, the prisoner afterwards acknowledged it had been in his room. The property was never found.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

604. WILLIAM CANE was indicted for feloniously assaulting William Price , in the King's highway, on the 6th of July , and putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, a watch, value 5 l. and seven shillings his property .

WILLIAM PRICE . Q. You have a situation I beat the medical board - A. Yes, I have. I am purveyor to the army medical board , No. 5, Carburton-street, Berkley-square. I lodge at No. 16, Queen-street, Golden-square.

Q. I believe you are brother to Dr. Price, physician to the York hospital - A. I am.

Q. I believe you are in the habit when your office is over doing business, of going to visit your brother - A. Frequently.

Q. Your brother as physician, has the superintendance and charge of that Hospital - A. He has.

Q. On the 6th of July did you go to visit your brother - Q. I did. I left my lodging about nine o'clock, intending to see my brother, my brother not being at home, I did not call at the house, seeing nolight in the room that he used to sit in, and the sash up, I concluded that my brother was out, and I was returning home, I was met by the prisoner in Upper Eaton-street , opposite of Lower Grovesnor-place.

Court. What time of night might this be - A. About half past ten, the prisoner appeared to be coming from the King's New road, he met me very near the pound, as if he came from the King's New-road, he seized hold of the lappels of my coat violently; he snatched from me my watch, and then the first words that he said was, give me all the money you have, I gave him all the money I had in my pocket, amounting to seven of eight shillings, I cannot say the exact sum but not less. He immediately looked at me very hard in the face, and said I have seen you somewhere before in Parliament-street, and I know you to be a b - r, if you do not promise to behave to me as a gentleman I will have you in the pillory in less than a week for sodomy. He desired that I would meet him the next morning at the same place where I then was and give him five pound, I told him I would do so, he persisted in his threats that if I did not behave to him as a gentleman he certainly would appear against me for the crime which he charged me. I told him that his accusation would not avail, as my character would bear the most minute enquiry, and I had the most respectable connections. I then told him who I was, I said, my name is Mr. Price, and that my brother was physician to the York hospital, Chelsea. He said, he did not believe me, he immediately locked my arm in his, and took me over to a public house just by, he took hold of my arm and hurried me over where he called for something to drink, he took a candle off the bar and looked me in my face. When the prisoner had taken a glass of liquor he handed a glass of brandy and water, which I tasted, we came out together, I parted and went home.

Mr. Pooley. Q. Now Mr. Pride at the time that he seized you by the lappel of your coat had you ever seen or known the prisoner before - A. Never, upon my oath.

Q. Had you ever spoken to him before - A. Never.

Q. Now after he had got your watch and your money it was after that he made this threat - A. It was after that he made this threat.

Q. After he made that accusation and threat were you under considerable alarm - A. I was under a considerable alarm.

Q. Had you prior to that been in a good of ill state of health - A. A very ill state of health.

Q. During the time that he took you over to the public house, and at the public house to your parting with him, did you continue in that state of alarm - A. I did.

Court. While you were in the public house - A. Yes.

Mr. Pooley. Q. Why did not you at that time make any alarm - A. I considered myself at the mercy of the prisoner, I did not know with whom he might be connected, and that he might have persisted in carrying into execution the horrid charge of accusing me publicly with a crime which my nature shuddered at.

Q. Did you meet him the next morning - A. I did

Q. This was Friday night, the 6th of July - A. It was.

Q. When was the next time that you saw him again - A. On Wednesday morning the 11th.

Q. How came you to see him again - A. The most renger that attends at the medical board told me that a person wanted to see me.

Q. What time of day might that be - A. I should suppose about one o'clock.

Q. In consequence of what he said did you go down stairs - A. I did, to the door.

Q. Who was the person - A. The prisoner at the bar.

Q. Now when you saw the prisoner at the public house with the candle there, are you sure that the person you saw at the door then, was the prisoner and the man that attacked you on the Friday night - A. I am sure; the first words he said was, I wish to speak to you sir; I walked out with him a few steps, he said to me, you have not performed your promise by meeting me at the place appointed and desired me to give him five pound; I told him that I had not five pound in my pocket, he desired me to meet; him the same evening at seven o'clock, and to give him five pound; I promised so to do.

Q. When you saw him at this time, and you say it was the same man were you alarmed - A. I was very much alarmed.

Q. How long do you think you were talking in the street - A. I should suppose ten minutes.

Q. Are you conscious that your countenance was at though you were under great alarm - A. I am conscious of it.

Q. He went away after some time - A. He did.

Q. At that time why did you not cause him to be apprehended - A. I did not wish to throw the department into confusion on my account, I did not wish to develop my own name on the occasion; and not having mentioned the circumstance to my friends, I did not know how much the prisoner might have the advantage of me.

Q. Did you meet him that night - A. I did; he took me to a place near the end of Berkley-street, and desired me to go with him into that passage which leads from Berkley-street, into Cousin-street. When I came there he accosted me, he said, sir, have you seen the newspapers.

Q. What time was it - A. Seven o'clock. He said, Sir, have you seen the newspapers in which there is an account of several persons having been taken up for a certain crime; those are the words he made us of; I told him I had, he said, he did not mean to take the advantage of me, and that if I would behave like a gentleman he would never mention my name upon much a subject. He asked me if I had brought him five pound, I told him I had; and I gave him the five pound. He said, sir, I have pawned your watch, but I will tell you at once what I mean to have of you. I want fifty pound, in order to enable me to procure my discharge from the Guards; I have been a serjeant in the guards, and am a deserter from the regiment of Guards . I told him that I would meet him the next morning, he desired that I might meet him the next evening, and give him fifty pound; and w

Q. Now Mr. Price, when he asked you whether you had read the newspaper, what crime did you understand - A. I understood it to be a crime too shocking to mention; I was even as much alarmed then, as I was at the first, perhaps more; we parted, and the same night I communicated it to my brother, doctor Price.

Court. How came you, during the whole of this time, not to communicate it to your brother - A. It was a subject I was loth to communicate.

Q. What to your own brother - A. It was a painful thing then.

Q. What day was this - A. On Wednesday; I waited on my brother after I had left the prisoner.

Mr. Pooley. You went there the next day accompained by two officers, Foy, and Craig - A. I did, on the Thursday.

Q. I believe you marked a two pound note - A. My brother marked his initials first, I then put mine, and the two officers put theirs.

Q. What time did you go there on the Thursday evening - A. At seven o'clock; I saw him at the end of Berkeley-street, the same place he met me before; the officer's I left a few paces behind me.

Q. When you met him what did he say to you - A. He said, Sir, you hardly know me, I suppose, I am so very smart. He had equipped himself in new clothes, to what I saw him the last time; he asked me to walk down the same passage with him, where I had been with him before. He said, Sir, I am a gentleman, and mean to behave to you as such. Pray have you heard of the story of a certain nobleman, whose name he mentioned, who has been obliged to pay a thousand pound for concealment; I told him I had not; he said, if you will give me an hundred pound, I will never trouble you again, as that sum will enable me to return into my own country, where I have an estate; I told him that was a great sum, and that I did not think it possible that I should be able to pay him all that sum; he said, then give me twenty pound to night, and bring me the remainder to morrow; I told him that I had only a two pound note with me, which I put into his hand.

Q. Was that the same note that had been marked - A. Yes.

Q. Now when you went there this night, it was purely for the purpose of apprehending him - A. It was; I was keeping my eye upon the officers, I saw them when I gave him the two pound note.

Q. When he mentioned the thousand pound that was given for the purpose of concealment, what did you understand by it - A. The same crime. When I put the two pound in his hand, the officers came up and took him in custody.

Q. When he seized you the first night, and took your watch from you, had you ever seen this man before - A. Never.

Q. And the reason that you did not give the alarm then, and at other times, except the last time, you went for the purpose of apprehending him; I will now ask whether it was not under the terror of that charge that you did not apprehend him - A. It was, and from no other cause.

Q. And your reason for not communicating it to cause but have given his Lordship, the nature of the accusation against you - A. It was.

Q. At the time that he seized you by the collar and took your watch, before he made any threat, were you under any alarm - A. A considerable alarm.

Q. Have you ever had your watch again - A. I have not, that I positively swear.

Prisoner. Q. Upon the virtue of your oath, where was the first place you met me - A. Upper Eaton-street.

Q. Where did you meet me on last Tuesday night was a week - A. I did not meet you.

Q. Upon the virtue of your oath, did not you make me a present of two pair of cotton stockings, and did not you make me a present of the watch - A. I did not.

Q. Did not you put your hand into your pocket and give me a dollar and two shillings - A. I did.

Prisoner. I never extorted a shilling from Mr. Price, as I am to dye, he gave me five-pound; we walked round Berkley-square, and came down St. James's-street. He said, meet me to morrow, I will give you money to go to the salt water, He laid hold of me by the private parts, took cut his own, did not you do that at the chapel, at the five fields; did not I tell you I never was accustomed to any such thing.

Prosecutor. I deny it.

Prisoner. Did you not go into the Wheatsheaf along with me as the clock struck ten - A. I was obliged to go in with you, you robbed me and took me in there.

Q. Did not you have a glass of cold brandy and water, and I had a glass of gin. Did not you tell me you would get me a situation under government; I gave you my hand writing - A. No, never.

WILLIAM CRAIG . I am an officer of Marlborough-street. On Thursday night, the 12th of July, I went with Mr. Price, and Foy, we were in disguise. I first saw the prisoner in Landsdowne passage, in company with Mr. Price; I was stationed at the end of the passage, in Berkeley-street; I went up to him in about five minutes, they were standing conversing together; Foy went first up the passage, I saw Foy pass him, I was some paces behind, I went up; Mr. Price, said, this is the man; I laid hold of him by the right hand; in his right hand was this note, I asked him what it was; I do not know, said he, it is something that gentleman has given me. I took it out of his hand, and at that time Foy came up on the other side of him; he turned round when he saw Foy, and said, Mr. Foy, this is a bad job, or a bad thing, or words to that effect. Foy asked him what he had done with the gentleman's watch, he did not see any chain about him; he said, he had returned it to him. last night. I answered, that Mr. Price had said to the contrary, that he had never had his watch back. On our way to the office, he said, he was awkwardly situated, that if he should dye he should be innocent. Foy asked him where he lived, he said, somewhere in St. Giles's, he had a fresh lodging every night, he could not tell the house or the street.

Q. Did you put any mark upon that note - A. I did, there is my mark, that is the same note.

THOMAS FOY . Q. You, I believe, went in company with the last witness, in order to apprehend this man, where was the first place you saw this man - A.Mr. Price went first, I followed to keep him in view, and Craig followed to keep me in view; as soon as Mr. Price came to the top of Landsdown-passage, Berkley-square, he saw the prisoner, I returned back.

Q. You saw that they went into the passage, did not you - A. Yes, at the top.

Q. Did you know the prisoner before - A. I knew him before, I knew his character very well; when I saw him in Berkley-street I did not know him untill after he was taken in custody.

Q. While Mr. Price was in the passage and conversing with the prisoner, did you walk by him - A. I did; as I passed by, Mr. Price said he had no more than two pound; I passed and gave the signal for Craig to come; the prisoner said, that was not enough, it would not do. I went on twelve paces or more, I turned round and saw Craig apprehending him; I immediately turned round and came on the other side of him.

Q. Before you went there had you marked the note - A. Yes, When I laid hold of his arm, he looked round and said, ah, Foy, this is a bad thing; I said, what have you done with the gentleman's watch; he said, I gave it him back last night. We did not search him untill we got him to the office, in his pocket we found a street-door key; I asked him where he lodged, he said, St. Giles's, he did not know the house, he had a fresh lodging every night. On further examination the magistrate asked him where he lodged; he said he lodged opposite No. 3, King's Head-court, Broad-way, Westminster. We had a search warrant, and when we came there the house was stripped, every thing was gone. At the office, he denied that ever he said he gave the watch back.

DR. JOHN PRICE . I am the acting physician of the military hospital, called the York hospital; Mr. Price, the prosecutor, is my brother, he is in the habit of visiting me frequently in the evening. On the evening stated when my brother called me, I was absent, he called on me the following night, that made me recollect I was absent on that night. On the evening of the 11th, my brother called and made this communication to me, and then my brother did not give a verbal communication, he wrote me a letter and gave it me, he said, there is a business I cannot detail to you.

Q. Was your brother at that time in a state of alarm and agitation - A. He was, I advised him immediately.

Q. Your brother had been ill before - A. Yes, I attended him with the surgeon of York hospital; he was in a state of extreme ill health.

Prisoner's Defence. Mr. Price met me when I was pumping cold water on my legs, he frequently walked with me; he brought me to the five fields chealsea and brought a young woman there, he wished me to have a connection with her; he asked me if I was large, as Irishmen were in general; I asked him where she was, he then said it was dangerous; he unbuttoned my small clothes and took my penis out in his hand; I told him it was not a thing that I was accustomed to; it is a shocking thing, he said, say nothing about it, now my life is in your hands, now I will ever be a friend to you as long as I live; he walked down with me as far as the wheatsheaf, he had a glass of brandy and water, and I had a glass of gin; he met me on the Tuesday and gave me three shillings, he told me to call on him at the office of the medical board, I did, he came and gave me a dollar and two shillings. On Tuesday evening he gave me a five pound note to pay my lodgings; he told me to go down to the salt water, and if I should go to Colchester, where he came from, he would get me the best connections that he had. In Albermarle-street, he brought me down there, he put in my hand a two pound note; I told him I did not want that, but to get me a situation, and to go down to the salt water. I own that Mr. Price gave me the money, I never extorted a shilling from him.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 56.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

605. MARY CALLAGAN and EPHRAIM WILSON were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of June , from the person of Thomas King, a watch, value 10 s. nineteen shillings, and four one pound banknotes, the property of Thomas King .

THOMAS KING . I am purser's steward of his Majesty's sloop of war the banner. On the 25th of June I fell in with the woman prisoner in St. Giles's. I went with her to her lodgings. During the time I was with her I sent for something to drink; I got intoxicated. I laid down upon the bed, and when she found I was asleep she robbed me of my watch, and four pound nineteen shillings.

Q. Are you sure that is the woman - A. Yes.

Q. Did you find your property again - A. The constable found four pound and the duplicate of the watch; the man pawned the watch.

Q. Did you see the man there - A. Yes, he was in the room and drank with us. When I awoke from my sleep I missed my watch and money, the man was gone, I asked the woman where was my watch and money. She told me that she had given it to this man, and when the man came in I asked him for the watch; he said he knew nothing about it. I asked him for the money; he held the purse up, he said, touch it if you dare. I went to Mary Skeith , desired her to get me a constable, she did.

Q. What time of the day was this - A. Between ten and eleven. As soon as the constable apprehended the man, he found three one-pound notes; I found the duplicate of the watch in the prisoner's room in Church-lane, they both lived together; the man brought up a new pair of shoes and laid them down, I took the duplicate out of one of the shoes and found it was mine.

MR. SKEITH. I live in the same house with the prisoners No. 3, Church-street, St. Giles's ; they have the back room and live together. I have the front room. I saw this young man lay on the bed, and the woman prisoner sat on the side of the bed. I saw her pick his pocket of his watch and money, she gave it to the man prisoner, he is a shoemaker.

SAMUEL ROBERTS . I am an office. On the 25th of June the prosecutor and a young woman came to me and gave me a duplicate of a watch. I went to the house the man was not there; I apprehended the woman in the room, and in bringing her to the watchhous, I saw the man, with a purse in his hand, he was giving it to a woman; I took him in custody, I took him to the watch-house; he was searched, in his pocket there was two dollars; two shillings, and two sixpences, and three one-pound notes; in the purse, a dollar and two shillings. I went to the pawnbroker's with the duplicate of the watch, it was produced.

THOMAS WILSON . I am a pawnbroker; this is the watch, I took it in of Ephraim Wilson.

Prosecutor. The watch and the purse is mine.

Wilson's Defence. The woman is not guilty oflaid to her charge, it is me that is guilty of the whole.

CALLAGHAN, GUILTY .

WILSON, GUILTY .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

606. THOMAS WILKINS and JOHN NASH were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of June, eighty-six yards of woollen cloth, value 5 l. the property of Ann Kirk and Rupert Kirk .

RUPERT KIRK . I am a dyer , my mother Ann Kirk , is my partner; we live at No. 5, Osborne-place, Whitechapel . On the 15th of June, Mr. Vickrey gave me information that Wilkins was in possession of four pieces of cloth called long ells, and that Wilkins said he had them from my man John Nash .

JOHN VICKREY . On the 15th of June, I went in company with Armstrong, and son, to the Gibralter dye-house. Wilkins was brought into the parlour, he was asked where he got the three pieces of long from; he said, he had them from Nash, who worked for Mr. Kirk. Mr. Burton's foreman was present, he said, you told me you had them from an undertaker, the other side of the water; for the purpose of getting them dyed. Wilkins said, I did say so; but that was not true. We took Wilkins in custody, and went and searched his house; up stairs, in a cupboard or a box in a bed room, we found this piece of blue, it is the same sort of stuff only dyed blue that he said he got from a publican to get it dyed blue. Armstrong took him to the office, I went to Mr. Kirks, and Nash was brought to the office in the presence of Wilkin's; Wilkins then said, he had them from Nash for the purpose of getting them dyed. Nash said, he had them from a man about four years ago at a public house; but the man he did not know, he took them to Wilkins for the purpose of getting them dyed. I and John Armstrong went and searched Nash's house, in a cupboard up stairs we found nearly a piece of the same sort of stuff.

Q. to Mr. Kirk. Can you say they are your goods - A. I cannot, only from the circumstance of Nash being my foreman . I cannot swear to them, they are all the same goods that we are in the habit of dying.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

607. JOSEPH ALDERS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of June , a coat, value 20 s of Lyon Levy .

LYON LEVY. I live at 16, York-street, Covent-garden . On the 29th of June, I lost the coat from the inside of the shop; it was one of my wearing coats, I heard a cry of stop thief; I saw a man running, the coat was picked up by a strange man.

HENRY HOWARD . I live in York-street. On the 29th of June, between ten and eleven in the morning, I saw the prisoner looking about the door; he stepped into Mr. Levy's shop and took a coat, he took to his heels and ran, I cried out, stop thief; he dropped the coat, he was stopped. I am sure the prisoner is the same man, I never lost sight of him; this is the coat It is my own coat, I pulled it off five

Prisoner's Defence. I leave it entirely to the mercy of the court.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Fined 1 s. Confined One Year in the House of Correction .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

608. OBADIAH MYATT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of June , a one pound bank-note , the property of William Wagg .

WILLIAM WAGG . I am a shoemaker , I live at No. 10, William-street, Shoreditch . The prisoner was an apprentice to William Gill , he lived in the same house. We all went out, and left the house in the care of the boy; when I went out, I left ten one pound notes; and when I returned, I missed one of them.

WILLIAM GILL . On the 21st of June, I and my wife went out, and left this boy in the care of the house, and when I came home; I asked him where he got the money; he at first, said, his brother gave it him; at last, he said, he opened the lock with my key, and took a one pound note; I tried the key and it fitted it.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, called one witness, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

609. THOMAS SPRUHAM was indicted for feloniously, stealing, on the 12th of July , thirty-six glass bottles, value 6 s. and a hamper, value 1 s. the property of John Kew , John Bellamy , senior , and John Bellamy junior .

JOHN KEW . My partner's names are John Bellamy , senior, and John Bellamy , junior, we are wine merchant s, our cellar is in Bridge-street, Westminster ; the prisoner was our porter . On Thursday, the 12th instant, about a quarter before one, I was in Cannon-row, Westminster; I saw the prisoner pass me up the steps into Bridge-court, with a hamper on his shoulder, he was going as if from our cellar. It is always our custom to leave one of our men in the cellar at dinner hour, to take orders; it was the prisoner's turn that day to stay. When the prisoner passed me, I had no suspicion that he meaned to steal it; I saw him put it down by a book stall, in the court, he then followed me, and said, he had been to take half a pint of porter; I then asked him, what he had done with the hamper; he said, he had no hamper; I then said, do you mean to tell me that I did not see you going up the steps this moment with a hamper; he said, no. I called him a scoundrel, and took him to the spot where he put the hamper down. I saw the hamper was tied with our cord, a young woman at the fruit stall, said, she saw the prisoner put it down there; I then said, come along with me, I will transport you.

Q. What did the hamper contain - A. Three dozen empty bottles, I cannot speak to the bottles, the cord is made by our order to prevent depredations of porters it the inns opening it.

Q. From that circumstance have you any doubt of the hamper and bottles being your's - A. I have not, at the same time, I will not swear to it.

Prisoner's Defence. As for the cord; there are not London, that do not makeuse of the same cord, and if they can say they have seen them bottles, I am willing to abide by the punishment.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 33.

Fined 1 s. confined six months in the house of correction .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

610. CHARLES ROBERTSON, alias MAXFIELD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of July , a watch value 4 l. a gold chain, value 3 l. a gold seal, value 3 l. five shirts, value 10 s. five pair of trowsers, value 15 s. a pair of pantaloons, value 5 s. two waistcoats, value 4 s. two jackets, value 5 s. two pair of stockings, value 2 s. a pair of drawers, value 2 s. two pair of shoes, value 5 s. a comforter, value 1 s. a hair cap, value 1 s. and a tin box, value 6 d. the property of Antonio Martins ; a great coat, value 20 s. five spoons, value 10 s. a silver sugar tongs, value 6 s. the property of George Blow ; four pair of trowers, value 12 s. two jackets, value 5 s. five shirts, value 10 s. two pair of drawers, value 2 s. a frock, value 2 s. a waistcoat, value 5 s. two pair of stockings, value 2 s. two bags, value 1 s. and a handkerchief, value 1 s. the property of Joze Perez ; a pair of pantaloons, value 5 s. a jacket, value 1 s. and a handkerchief, value 1 s. the property of Domingo Joze .

ANTONIO MARTINS . I am a Portuguese sailor, I came from Lisbon in the Charlotte Brigg, now laying at Limehouse hole.

Q. What was the prisoner - A. The prisoner came on board at Lisbon, he is a sailor , and came in the same ship with me. On the 9th of July, I missed my watch, a gold chain and seals, and all my clothes, they were in a bag; the watch was taken out of my chest, which was broken open. On the next day, I saw every thing belonging to me at the Thames Police-office.

DANIEL TOBIN . I am part owner of the Brig Charlotte : I gave the prisoner his passage home in this Brig, these portuguese sailor s came to my house on the over night, and said they had been robbed, and their suspicion attached to this man. In a few hours afterwards, I happened to meet with him on London Bridge, I gave him in charge of an officer. Mr. Blow, the master of the vessel, attended at the Police-office, and swore to his property.

JOHN THWAITES . I am a publican, St. Martins-le-grand. On the 9th of July, the prisoner called at my house, there were two men with him, they had two bags; while they were drinking they said the prisoner had been robbed of eleven pound, in a Graveshend hoy, that he was going into the country, but he was distressed; he was going to sell the watch, chain, and seals, I gave him eight pound seven shillings on them, and a memorandum, that they should have the watch, chain and seals when he advanced the money; I believe him to be the same man.

JOHN VYSE . I am an officer; I was going over London-bridge, I saw the prisoner attempting to get away from Mr. Tobin; I took him into custody and searched him, I found upon him a handkerchief and this memorandum, that Mr. Thwaites advanced eight pound odd on the watch, and with respect to the clothes, on Monday it came out, that the prisoner had taken the clothes, and booked them at the Swan with two necks, Lad-lane, to go to Liverpool.

ROBERT COUCH . I am porter at the Swan with two necks. On the 9th of this month, about six o'clock in the morning, the prisoner came with two porters, who brought the bags, and booked himself to go outside of the Liverpool mail, and gave two guineas; these bags was taken to the Police office.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, nor called any witnesses to character.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

611. JOSEPH WILLIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of July , a handkerchief, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of William Youard , from his person .

WILLIAM YOUARD . I am a carrier . On the 5th of July, between four and five in the afternoon; I was passing over Westminster-bridge , at the time of the rowing match, my handkerchief was taken out of my pocket.

JOHN LIMBRICK . On the 5th of July, I was on the bridge. I saw Willis, and Russell, they were very busy, putting their hands into people's pockets; I kept my eye upon them. One of them put their hand into my pocket, felt the staff, and then they sheered off. In a few minutes afterwards. I saw them again, and followed them and stopped them; Nicolls searched Willis, and found the handkerchief in his hat. When he took it from him he said, it was his own.

- NICOLLS. I was in company with Limbrick, I saw Willis, and Russell, come from the crowd; Russell was thrusting something into his breeches. We took them into a public house, I searched Willis, and found this handkerchief in the crown of his hat; he said, it was his own.

Prisoner's Defence. I was on the bridge. I met Russell, by that means I crossed over the way; I spoke to him, he asked me if I was going home; Limbrick came and took us both, and searched us both, he found the handkerchief on me, and the watch on Russell. I bought the handkerchief for sixpence of a man, he said, he was starving; he would sell the handkerchief off his neck to get him a bit of bread.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

612. WILLIAM RUSSELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of July , a watch, value 3 l. the property of Charles Green from his person .

CHARLES GREEN . I am a superannuated warrant officer . At the time of the rowing match, I was passing over the bridge in my way to Deptford, I lost my watch.

JOHN LIMBRICK . I was on the bridge at the time I mentioned before, I saw Russell, and Willis, very busy in looking in people's pockets. Russell picked my pocket, he put the staff in my pocket again, I saw him in the mob, and as I was coming out, I took him in custody; I searched him, and took this watch from the inside of his right breeches knee.

Prosecutor. It is my watch.

Prisoner's Defence. I went to see the rowing match. When I got to Astley's, there was a crowd of people I felt something drop on my toes, I picked it up; aman in a flannel jacket said, that is mine, I said, I would not let him have it; I put it in my pocket, there was an hole in it, it fell down the lining to my knee.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

613. WILLIAM LORING was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of July , a coat, value 10 s. the property of William Burnett .

WILLIAM BURNETT . I am a post boy . On the 11th of July, I lost my coat out of the stable in Gardners-lane, Westminster .

THOMAS WILDER . I am an ostler. Having suspicion of the prisoner, I watched him, I saw him go into the stable; he came out with something on his arm, I went and took this coat from off his arm.

Prosecutor. It is my coat.

Prisoner's Defence. It is my first offence, I hope you will be as favourable with me as you can.

GUILTY, aged 25.

Judgement respited .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

614. FRANCIS ROGERS and GEORGE BATOAT were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of July , a handkerchief, value 14 d. the property of a certain person, to the jurors unknown .

CHARLES HUMPHREY 'S. I am an officer. on the 13th of July, in the evening, there was a fire in Titchfield-street . I saw the two prisoners in the crowd, I knew them, and watched them; I observed them attempt to pick several gentlemen's pockets, I followed them close; I saw Rogers pick a gentleman's pocket of his handkerchief, and I saw Batoat receive it of him. I laid hold of Rogers, as soon as Batoat saw me lay hold of Rogers, he threw the handkerchief down and put his foot upon it; a young man by me I desired to lay hold of Rogers, he did so; and took the handkerchief up, I took them to the office.

HENRY GARRET . I was with Humphry's at the fire; I saw Roger's take from the gentleman this handkerchief, and give to Batoat; Humphreys collared Rogers. I laid hold of Batoat, he dropped the handkerchief, and put his foot upon it; I took it up.

The prisoner's said nothing in their defence, nor called any witnesses to their character.

ROGERS GUILTY , aged 17.

BATOAT GUILTY , aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

615. ELIZABETH SCOTT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of June , a quilt, value 2 s. 6 d. two sheets, value 3 s. the property of William Kenney in a lodging room .

WILLIAM KENNEY . I live in White Cross-street . In June last, I let the prisoner a furnished room for 4 s. 6 d. a week, she took the room on the Sunday, and left it on a Thursday, and took away a quilt, and a pair of sheets.

ELIZA ANDREWS . I keep a cloathes shop in Playhouse-yard. I bought the sheet of the prisoner, I gave her a shilling for it.

HANNAH COHEN . I keep a cloathes shop in Playhouse-yard. I bought this quilt of the prisoner I gave her half a crown for it on the Thursday.

Prisoner's Defence. I was very much distressed at the time I did it.

Fined 1 s. confined six months in the House of Correction .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

616. WILLIAM SCROGINS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of July , a pair of breeches, value 5 s. a handkerchief, value 1 s. the property of James Hutchins , a shirt, value 4 s. and a handkerchief, value 2 s. the property of Joseph Wright .

JAMES HUTCHINS . I am a post boy . On the 13th of July, in the evening, I lost my breeches out of the stable.

JOSEPH WRIGHT . I am a horse patrol of Bow-street. On Friday the 13th of this month, my wife informed me that she had lost a waistcoat, two shirts, and a handkerchief, out of the garden at Edgeware . I had information also of the post boy losing his property, from suspicion, I pursued the prisoner; and apprehended him on Tuesday morning at three o'clock. On searching him, I found Hutchins's breeches upon him, and one of the shirts that had been taken away from my ground he had on; On searching the place where he slept in the barn, I found the other shirt and handkerchief.

Prisoner's Defence. The property this man has been shewing to you, he found in another man's bundle, the shirt on my back, and the breeches, I was to give him six shillings for them.

GUILTY , aged 32.

Fined 1 s. confined one year in the House of Correction .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

617. ANN RICKABY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of July , two ounces weight of hair wool, value 3 s. the property of William Halliwell .

WILLIAM HALLIWELL . I am a hatter and furrier , No. 106, Bunhill-row . From information I caused the prisoner to be searched.

REBECCA HALLIWELL . I searched the prisoner, I took out of her pocket two ounces and a half of hair wool; she owned that she took it.

EDWARD RICHARDS . I work for Mr. Halliwell. I saw the prisoner take it off a board, put it in a rag, pin it up; and put it into her pocket, and then I gave my master a hint of it.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence, called one witness who gave her a good character.

GUILTY , aged 41.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

618. MICHAEL DODD and BARNET LEVY were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of July , two pair of shoes, value 10 s. the property of Joseph Green .

JOSEPH GREEN . I live at 21, Ratcliff-highway , I am a shoemaker . On the 17th of this month, I lost two pair of shoes.

WILLIAM BARRET . I am a shoemaker. On the 17th of this month, the prisoner Dodd came and asked me if I would buy two pair of shoes, I looked at the shoes, and asked him if they were his; he said, no; they belonged to a young man in Cable-street. BarnetLevy came and owned them, he said, they were his.

Dodd's Defence. A lad asked me to sell two pair of shoes for him, he would give me sixpence; I went to Mr. Barrett, he asked me who they belonged to; I said, to a young lad, and that young lad, sent this lad, to fetch away the shoes.

Levy's Defence. I met Tom Blaines , he asked me if I would go an errand for him, I told him, yes.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

619. ELIZABET ANDERSON was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling house of William Armstrong , about the hour of six in the afternoon, on the 12th of May , Elizabeth Armstrong and others, in the same dwelling house then being .

SUSANNAH DEATH . My husband's name is Francis Death ; we live at No. 4, Peter-street , in William Armstrong 's house; I rent one room, up two pair of stairs; the prisoner lived in the next room, with a soldier.

Q. Did you lose a watch on the 12th of May - A. Yes. On that morning, the prisoner came into my room to borrow a penny, the watch was hanging over the mantle shelf, I lent her a penny. About five o'clock in the afternoon, I went out, I locked the door, the watch was then safe on the mantle shelf. When I returned home, the watch was gone. I have never seen the watch again.

Q. There are other lodgers in the house - A. Yes, two, besides her and me.

ELIZABETH ARMSTRONG . Q. Your husband rents this house, No. 4, Peter-street - A. Yes, and the prosecutrix and her husband, were lodgers of ours. This woman lost the watch, on the 12th of May. I was at home part of the time that Mrs. Death was out; I did not leave the house until my husband came home; I returned a little after nine; Mrs. Death missed her watch before I returned.

Q. Do you know any thing else - A. I know the prisoner contradicted herself in her account; she said, she saw Mrs. Death take in her clothes, out of the yard, at four o'clock; she told me afterwards, that she had been out of the house, from nine o'clock in the morning, all the day afterwards, and she was glad of that.

JAMES GILLMORE . I am an officer; I apprehended the prisoner, and searched the lodgings, I found it was stripped almost of every thing. The key of the prisoners door, opened and shut the door of Mrs. Death; no other key of the house would do the same.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

620. GEORGE BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of June , a cheese, value 19 s. the property of John Hartshorn .

HENRY KNAPP . I am a smith. I saw the prisoner go up to a cart, at Wheeler's wharf , take a cheese out, and put it under his jacket; I gave the alarm; I saw him after he was stopped by Mr. Cowen; I am sure he is the same man that I saw take the cheese.

ROBERT COWEN . I saw the prisoner in a public-house, with the cheese under his arm, I collared him; I said, you villain, you have stole the cheese; he let the cheese fall, and broke from me; he ran out of the east door, I ran out of the north door, and knocked his heels up. I marked the cheese and gave it to the constable.

Prisoner's Defence. I cannot talk English.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Confined six Months in the House of Correction , and publicly whipped .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

621. RICHARD BELL was indicted, for that he on the 6th of May , was servant to James Lowrie , sen . and was employed and entrusted to receive money for him, and that he being such servant, and so employed and entrusted, did receive and take into his possession, the sum of sixteen shillings and six-pence halfpenny for and on account of his said master, and that he afterwards feloniously did embezzle and steal the same .

JAMES LOWRIE . I live at 37, Cursitor-street, Chancery-lane ; I am the son of the prosecutor; I hired the prisoner in my father's business. My father being in embarrassed circumstances, he was arrested; and when they thought they could go on with the business, they arrested me also; the prisoner was left fifteen days in the house, he was entrusted to receive money for my father's bread.

MRS. LOWRIE. I am the wife of the last witness; the prisoner was engaged in my husband's father's business, he was entrusted to receive money for the bread that was delivered.

Q. Had you a customer of the name of Thomas Thorn - A. Yes, in St. Clement's church-yard. The prisoner asked me for Mr. Thorn's bill; I gave it him on the 6th of May; the money due from Thorn, was sixteen shillings and sixpence halfpenny.

THOMAS THORN . Q. Are you a customer to Lowrie for bread - A. Yes; the prisoner delivered me this bill on the 6th of May; I paid him the money, and he gave me the receipt.

Q. to Mr. Lowrie. Did the prisoner ever pay this money to you - A. No, if he had I should have marked it out in my book.

Mr. Gurney. Let me see your book - A. I have not brought it here.

Q. Do you undertake to speak of every sum that you received from him, without reference to your book - A. I reckon I was never paid for it.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel, called four witnesses who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

622. MARY DAVIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of June , two pewter pint pots, value 2 s. 6 d. the property of John Bates .

JOHN BATES . I am a publican , at the Cross-keys, Bloomsbury . On the 12th of June, I was standing at my own door, I saw the prisoner come out of the next door, where I serve with beer, with two pint pots in her hand; I watched her, she went into Charlotte-street. I went into Mrs. Tucker, my next door neighbour, and then I pursued the prisoner, and stopped her; I asked her whether she had not got some pots of mine; she said, no I brought her backto Mrs. Tucker, where she had the pots from; Mrs. Tucker said, you came to me, and said, that Mr. Bates sent you for the pots. I took the two pots out of her apron; they are new and cost me half a crown.

Prisoner's Defence. I met with a girl, she asked me to go in and ask for the pots.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Fined 1 s. confined six months in the house of correction .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

623. THOMAS EVANS was indicted for feloniously steeling, on the 7th of July , four flower baskets, value 4 s. a blanket, value 19 s. and a bed sacking, value 3 s. the property of John Ingram .

JOHN INGRAM . I live in the City-road ; I am a chair manufacturer, and sell flower baskets . The prisoner was my carman . On the 6th of July, I wanted to go out with my horse, I sent a person to feed the horse, the corn-bin was fastened; he wrenched it open, and there he saw the bed sacking. I ordered my brother to mark it, and leave it in the same situation he found it; in the afternoon, it was taken out and left under the manger, covered with straw; my brother and the foreman watched, and in consequence of their information, I got an officer and a warrant; we searched the prisoners room, in Three Tun Court, Red Cross-street; I there found in the closet, three flower baskets, a parcel of bed cords, and a new blanket. The flower baskets I am positive are mine.

JOHN RAY . I am an officer.

Q. Did you take this man in charge - A. I did; I told him I had a warrant against him for robbing his master; he said, he had not one thing of his master's in his possession; he told me where he lived, I went to his room, I found there this blanket, these baskets, and these ropes. I told the prisoner what I had found, he said he knew nothing about them.

Prosecutor. I know these baskets to be mine.

Prisoner's Defence. The cord I have had twelve years; and these baskets, a person, in court, gave me three shillings to buy them.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 36.

Whipped in Jail .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

624. ELIZABETH HORTON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 2d of July , a coat, value 8 s. a waistcoat, value 2 s. a gown, value 7 s. a petticoat, value 2 s. a table-cloth, value 6 d. and two shawls, value 4 s. the property of Richard Hugh Peirce .

AMELIA PEIRCE . I am the wife of Richard Hugh Peirce , I live at 41, King Edward-street, Mile-end, New-town . On Monday, the 2d day of July, about nine in the morning, I left my things safe on the bed; I went into my front room to dress my two children, and when I returned to the bed-room I missed them. I went out to the pawnbrokers, and at Mr. Burton's, in Whitechapel, I saw the prisoner, she was in the act of pawning my things. The prisoner said, she was very glad I was come, she should have been very sorry for such a poor woman as me to have lost them; she was sent by her mistress, if I would come along with her, she would take me to her mistress, she lived in Dorset-street; she led me out of one street into another, she could not find any mistress. I gave her into the charge of the constable.

- THORP. I am a servant to Mr. Burton, pawnbroker.

Q. Did that young girl bring these things to your shop to pawn - A. I cannot swear to her person; at the time that the person was pawning them, Mrs. Peirce came in and claimed them; I did not take much notice of her; she said she would take Mrs. Peirce to her mistress.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence, called three witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY , aged 12.

Fined 1 s. and discharged.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

625. MARY LONGFIELD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of June , a childs frock, value 2 s. a pair of trowsers, value 2 s. and a childs shirt, value 1 s. the property of Isaac Harris .

ISAAC HARRIS . I live at No. 3, Baker's-row, Whitechapel-road; I am a traveller , I go out with earthenware and glass. On Sunday evening I lost my boy, he is four years old; the child was dressed in a frock and trowsers. I went one way to look for my child, and my wife the other. On my return home, Mr. Jacobs informed me, that he had got the woman and the clothes; I got an officer, the prisoner was taken in custody to Lambeth-street; and when I came home, I saw my child naked, he appeared to have suffered from the cold; it was towards the evening, and the air was cool.

ROSE HARRIS . I am the mother of this child. I lost my child, between six and seven o'clock, on Sunday, the 10th of June; I searched for the child above an hour and a half, I could not find it; and when I returned home, there sat a strange woman with my child in her lap, it had no clothes on, the child was quite stiff of the cold; it appeared as if the child had been exposed to the air some time.

Q. What had the child been dressed in - A. Blue frock and trowsers, which were put new on, on the 9th of June, and a shirt; and when I found my child in the arms of this woman, it was stripped of all its things; that was about eight o'clock.

HANNAH JACOBS . I live in Whitechapel-road, my husband keeps a clothes shop. About six o'clock in the evening, the prisoner produced to me a child's frock, trowsers, and a shirt, she asked me would I buy them; I asked her how she came by them, she gave no answer; she wanted to go away, my husband said she should not go away. I looked at the clothes again, and thought they were Mrs. Harris's; my husband stopped her with the clothes. There came the news that the little boy was lost; we sent the prisoner to the house where the child belonged to, because of the mob in the street. And Mrs. Harris claimed the clothes.

FRANCIS FREEMAN . I am an officer, I took charge of the prisoner at the prosecutor's house, for stealing the child's clothes.

Q. Did the prisoner say any thing how she came by them - A. She only said that she was very much in liquor. She had drank a little, but not so much as not to know what she was doing.

Prisoner's Defence. I was at the Red Lion, Whitechapel, a woman asked me to go to this shop to sell the clothes; she said, she would go with me to the door, she had quarrelled with the woman a week before; she told me to ask one shilling and sixpence for them; she came with me to the door, I went in and asked her to buy the things; she immediately took hold of me. I never saw the child nor the woman before in my life.

GUILTY , aged 35.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeants.

626. JOHN GILBERT was indicted for a misdemeanor .

WILLIAM JOHNSON . I am chief clerk in the East India Company's warehouse. On the 8th of May, there were two thousand and fifty one tanned hides in their warehouse, in Billeter-lane.

WILLIAM REECE . I and my partner's are broker's in this city, the prisoner was our clerk . On the 8th of May, I gave the prisoner a draft of five hundred and fifteen pound five shillings and sixpence, to pay the duties of two thousand and fifty one hides, in the East India Company's warehouse. The body of this warrant is the prisoner's hand writing, and also the calculation of the duties; they were underrated East India goods.

EDWARD SIMS . Q. What situation do you hold in the Customs - A. I am clerk of the duties for under-rated East India goods.

Q. Do you remember a warrant being brought, look at that signature and see whether that is your signature - A. I believe it to be my hand writing.

Q. Your signature is preliminary to the payment of the duties - A. It is, from me it is carried to Mr. Ellis.

RICHARD ELLIS . I am deputy comptroller inward of the Customs.

Q. Is it in the course of duty in your office when goods are proposed to be taken out of the East India warehouse to sign a warrant - A. Yes.

Q. Is that your signature - A. It is.

BOSWELL MIDDLETON . Q. Be so good to explain to the court what are the steps taken when it is intended to clear out of your warehouse good, that have been imported - A. The merchant's clerk first prepares a warrant describing the goods that he wishes to clear the duties for, he takes that with a short copy of the warrant in the first instance to the clerk in the East India department under the collecter, he obtains Mr. Sims's signature; he then takes it to the comptroller's office to obtain his signature; these two signatures are preliminary to his paying any duties; he then takes it to any known officer to the receiver in the long room in the Custom-house for the purpose of having the duties computed; when they are computed, the computer figures one of the bills, to which he puts his initials, the warrant with the remaining five bills, short copys of the warrant; they are taken to the receiver of the duties; the receiver having received the duties he signs the warrant.

Q. I observe William Deason 's signature the 8th of May, 1810 five hundred and fifteen pound, five shillings, and sixpence, who put that - A. The computer puts the total of the bill upon the warrant, then the warrant having the total amount upon it, is carried to Mr. Deacon; he having received it signs his name, to testify that he has received it. The warrant with Mr. Deacon's signature is delivered to the clerk of the warrants, the clerk of the warrants distributes the copies of the warrant in the comptroller's, the surveyor's and examiner's office. Having gone through these stages, the warrant is compleat, by which he may obtain the goods.

Q. Look at the signature that imports to be Mr. Deacon's - A. I do not believe that is Mr. Deacon's handwriting.

Q. The next signatures imports to be yours, is it - A. It is not, nor is the signature of Mr. Thomas his handwriting.

MR. DEACON. I am receiver of the grand receipts, an office I hold as the principal.

Q. Tell me whether, in the course of clearing goods from the East India warehouses, it is necessary that the money should be paid to you - A. To me, or somebody in my office, I always sign it.

Q. Look at that paper - A. This signature is not my writing. I never received the five hundred and fifteen pound, five shillings and six pence, nor do I believe Mr. Middleton to be his signature, nor should I suppose the signature of Mr. Thomas to be his.

ROBERT THOMAS . I am in the Examiner's office.

Q. In order to obtain the delivery after the Comptroller has signed, is it necessary that it should come to your office - A. Yes, and receive my signature. I am certain that is not my signature.

THOMAS THORNTON . I am a clerk in the office of underrated East India goods. On the 8th of May, last, this warrant was brought to me by the prisoner, for the delivery of the goods contained in it. I observed the signatures of Mr. Deacon, Middleton, and Thomas. I did not deliver him the warrant for the discharge; I stopped it; I knew their hand writing, these are nothing like it. I did not intimate that I observed it. I called him to come back, he did, and observing me look at the warrant, he questioned me whether it was correct. I paused some time, and said, very well; I having a firm conviction that these three names were forged, I gave information; it was laid before the board. I went to take this man up, he was in Mr. Rowe's accompting house alone. I believe I asked him if he had not, in the course of the day, tendered me a warrant for East India tanned hides; he said, yes. I believe Mr. Wright asked him whether he wrote the warrant; I believe he answered to that, yes, he did. Nalder came in, he was taken in custody; he was searched; this bill of calculation was found upon him. and five hundred and fifteen pounds in bank notes.

The defendant said nothing in his defence, called seven witnesses who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Fined 1 s. imprisoned Two Years in Newgate .

London jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

627. GEORGE DUVALL , ROBERT HAWKINS , and EDWARD WILSON , were indicted for a misdemeanor .

The Counsel for the plaintiff declining to offer any evidence, the defendants were

ACQUITTED .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

628. ROBERT HAWKINS was indicted for a misdemeanor .

The counsel for the plaintiff declining to offer any evidence, the defendant was

ACQUITTED .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

629. EDWARD WILSON was indicted for a misdemeanor .

THOMAS CHARLTON . I am in the Vicar General's office. I produce an oath taken before the Surrogate.

DR. PARSONS. I am Doctor of Laws and Surrogate; that oath was taken before me by somebody, I cannot speak to the defendant.

THOMAS FLETCHER . Q. Do you know the defendant Wilson - A. I do, I am in the employ of the master of the Admiralty, Doctors Commons.

Q. Did you go with the defendant to the proctor at Doctors Commons for the purpose of obtaining a licence - A. I did, he is an acquaintance of mine.

Q. Look at that signature, do you believe it to be Wilson's hand writing - A. To the best of my knowledge I do. I do not recollect that I saw him sworn; he told me that he wanted the licence to marry Amelia Gerald . (read.)

Vicar General's office, 2d of June, 1809. -

"This day appeared personally Edward Wilson, and make the oath , that he is of the parish of St. Margaret's, Westminster; that he is a widower, and intends to marry with Amelia Gerald of St. Brides ; that he knows of no lawful impediment; or any unlawful cause whatever to hinder the said marriage, and prays licence to obtain that marriage at St. Brides , and that Amelia Gerald has been in the parish of St. Bride's four weeks last past. Sworn before me, S. Parsons, D.L.L. Surrogate.

RICHARD MONDAY . I produce a copy of register of marriage from St. Mary, Lambeth, Surry . Edward Wilson , batchelor, of this parish, and Lydia Sawyer , spinster, of this parish, were married by banns this 9th of December, 1793.

REBECCA COLLINS . Q. Was Rebecca Sawyer your sister - A. Yes. I was present at her marriage at Lambeth church in 1793; she is still living; the defendant is the person that she married.

Q. to Dr. Parsons. You officiate as Surrogate - A. Yes, Sir William Scott , he appointed me. I gave bonds for the due execution of the office.

Q. to Charlton. Is this a seal of the Master of Faculties - A. No, if it came from the Master of Faculties it would have a different seal; this licence is from the Vicar General's office, and has his seal; the Master of Faculties is a different seal.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.