Old Bailey Proceedings Online (www.oldbaileyonline.org, version 6.0, 28 July 2014), July 1808 (18080713).

Old Bailey Proceedings, 13th July 1808.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE OYER AND TERMINER, AND GOAL DELIVERY, FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND ALSO THE GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, HELD AT Justice-Hall, in the Old Bailey, On WEDNESDAY the 13th of JULY, 1808, and following Days,

BEING THE SIXTH SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF The Right Honourable JOHN ANSLEY , LORD-MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY JOB SIBLY, FOR R. BUTTERS, No. 117, ALDERSGATE-STREET.

LONDON:

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED (BY THE AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON) By R. BUTTERS, No. 22, Fetter Lane, Fleet Street.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON.

Before the Right-honourable JOHN ANSLEY , Lord Mayor of the City of London; Sir Simon Le Blanc , knt. One of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir Alan Chambre , knt. One of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir Watkin Lewes , knt. Sir Richard Carr Glyn , knt. John Perring , esq. Aldermen of the said City; John Silvester , esq. Recorder of the said City; Claudius Stephen Hunter , esq; William Domville , esq. John Atkins , esq. Aldermen of the said City; and Newman Knowlys , esq. Common Serjeant of the said City; His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of Goal Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

LONDON JURY.

Whitfield Blower ,

Robert Parkinson ,

John Dowler ,

George Cole ,

John King ,

Richard Mills ,

Robert Simeper ,

Christopher Gerron ,

John Key ,

George Francis Turner ,

William Archer ,

Thomas White .

FIRST MIDDLESEX JURY.

William Warburton ,

Edward Lockington ,

James Day ,

Samuel George Lewis ,

Edward Knight ,

Joshua Talford ,

John Wilson ,

John Allen ,

Thomas Wiltshire ,

John Moses ,

William Gill ,

William Bell .

SECOND MIDDLESEX JURY.

John Thomas ,

Henry Watson ,

John Henry ,

Richard Richards ,

James Janeway ,

Paul Howse ,

Thomas Close ,

Griffith Morris ,

William Moore ,

Francis Hornsby ,

William Carey ,

Joseph Armstrong .

475. JAMES DAVEY was indicted for that he on the 21st of January, 1793, did marry and take to wife Rebecca Stapleton , and that he afterwards on the 16th of March, 1806 , feloniously did marry and take to wife Eleanor Owen , his former wife being then living .

The case was stated by Mr. Barry.

THOMAS BIRD . I am parish clerk of St. Mary-le-bone; I produce the register book of that parish;

" James Davey of this parish, batchelor, and Rebecca Stapleton of the same parish, spinster, were married at this church by banns, this 21st day of January, in the year 1793, by me Benjamin Lawrence , curate; this marriage was solemnized between us, James Davey and Rebecca Stapleton , in the presence of Thomas Stapleton and Mary Cristie ."

SARAH BARRETT . Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar - A. Yes; I was at the marriage of his first wife; I had been with them some time. His first wife is my sister.

Q. Is his first wife, your sister, living - A. I do not know, I have not not seen her this five years.

THOMAS STAPLETON . Q. I believe you are father to Rebecca Stapleton - A. Yes; I was not present at the marriage; James Davey and Rebecca Stapleton after they were married lived in my house some time as man and wife; she lived with me before she was married; I have nothing to say of the first marriage, I believe there were faults of both sides.

JANE TEY . Q. Do you know the prisoner's first wife - A. Yes; I saw her last March, then she was alive: I saw her in Bermondsey street, Horsleydown; she was a first cousin of mine.

WINNIFRED TEY . I am the last witnesses' mother; I saw the prisoner's first wife within this fortnight in the Kent road, as I was crossing from the Bricklayers Arms, she was sitting on the roof of the coach.

JOHN TAYLOR . I produce the parish register of St. Martin's in the Fields .

" James Davey , widower, and Eleanor Owen , widow , both of this parish, were married in this church by licence, this 16th day of March 1806, by me Raymond Rogers , curate; this marriage was solemnized between us James Davey and Eleanor Owen , in the presence of two witnesses and myself."

Q. Do you remember the parties - A. No.

ELEANOR OWEN . Q. You know the prisoner at the bar - A. Yes; I was married to him on the 16th of March, 1806, in the parish church of St. Martin's in the Fields.

Prisoner's Defence. The first person that was examined told a falsity; she says she is Rebecca Stapleton 's sister, she is a bastard by another woman.

Sarah Barrett . Still she is a sister in law.

GUILTY , aged 36.

Confined Six Months Newgate , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Le Blanc.

476. ISAAC DEWBERRY was indicted for that he on the 12th of April upon Margaret West , spinster , violently and feloniously did make an assault, and her the said Margaret West, violently and feloniously did ravish and carnally know .

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Chambre.

477. WILLIAM HAIZLE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 7th of July , two pecks of chaff and beans, value 3 s. the property of William Read .

WILLIAM READ . I am a milkman and cow keeper ; I live at Hoxton ; the prisoner rents a stable in the same yard with me.

Q. You keep horses as well as cows - A. Yes, I keep four horses. Having been robbed continually I set up six nights myself. On the 7th of July I was in my stables, and just as the watchman called three o'clock, I went to the door, I found my stable door locked; a man before I went in the stable told me that if I went in at the door I never should find the man out; I got in through the tiles; about a quarter after three I saw the prisoner come to the door, he put in a key and unlocked my padlock; he then came in and laid the padlock on a lidge of some brick work, then he bolted himself in and came up to the corn and chaff; at that time I was standing at the side of one of my horses, and as near as I could guess he went to the chaff, he had a sack under his arm; he took out four baskets of chaff, two out of each tub; he then removed the sack to the bean tub and then took out from three to four sauce pans full of beans; he put them into the sack with the chaff; the things that he first took off the beans he laid them on again in the same manner as he found them; then he twisted the sack and lifted it on the bean tub; when I saw him turn his back I walked past him with my soldier's piece and fixed bayonet; I called to my son William, I said pray is that a man; I said to the prisoner if you do not put that off your shoulder I'll shoot you dead; he threw the sack down, he saw a water pipe lay; he thought it was a pole, I suppose, he went to take it up to defend himself; I then declared with an oath, I believe, that if he touched any thing I would shoot him dead; then he saw I had a gun; he jumped into an empty tub and prayed for God's sake that I would not shoot him; my son was hard by, I told him to call the watchman; the watchman came and took him in my shed.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. You have been a little acquainted with the prisoner - A. Yes, he keeps horses and carts.

Q. Formerly you were good neighbours together - have you not been in the habits of lending to each other - A. If he asked me to lend him a thing I lent it to him.

Q. And he did the same to you - you have not been upon good terms lately - A. Not this last twelvemonth; I had suspicion that I had been continually robbed by him.

WILLIAM READ , JUNR. I was in the stable at the same time; the prisoner opened the door and laid the lock on the wall; he went to the chaff tubs, took some and then he went to the bean tub; he was going to walk away with it; my father told me to fetch the watchman.

EDMUND ALEXANDER. I am a watchman. On the 7th of July, after three o'clock, I heard a rattle spring; I met a lad, he told me to follow him; I went to the shed and took the man in custody.

JOSHUA SMITH . I produce the sack, chaff and beans.

Prosecutor. This the sack he brought into the stable with him. I saw him put the chaff and beans in it.

Prisoner's Defence. This gentleman and I were good neighbours together four years; he owes me a little bit of spite; we always used to borrow of one another.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 46.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

478. MARY CHAPMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 11th of May , six yards of lace, value 20 s. the property of Mary Ann Combe .

MARY ANN COMBE . I reside with my father in Sampson's gardens, Wapping ; I am a single woman ; the prisoner was my father's servant .

Q. Your father is an attorney, you keep his house - A. Yes, I do. On the 13th of May, about five o'clock in the afternoon, I had occasion to go to my sideboard drawer in the dining room up stairs where I keep my laces: I took up my card of lace, I found it had been cut - three yards of this broad lace, two of this narrow lace, and one yard from a third card.

Q. Was this drawer kept locked - A. Yes, and the key in my pocket.

Q. Do you know what number of yards was on each card - A. On the Sunday before I had seven yards of one piece of lace, seven yards of the other, and nine yards of another.

Q. Upon which did you find the greater number of yards taken away - A. From the broad lace - that was nine yards; it was all Valenciennes lace. I am sure I never left the key in my drawer, and I am quite sure I saw them there on the Sunday; I had measured it shortly before the Sunday.

Q. Are you quite sure that on the Friday there were three yards deficient of the broad lace - A. I am.

Q. On your thinking they were something deficient on the Friday, did you take the trouble to measure them and see how much they were deficient - A. I did; and I found that quantity I have mentioned deficient: I came down and said, Mary I have been robbed of my lace and by you; she was very insolent and offered a great deal of abuse; she asked me if I meant to make her a thief; I said she undoubtedly was the thief, there was nobody in the house to go to it but her. After denying it repeatedly, she said Miss Combe I have stole the lace, if you will not tell your father I will bring it every bit back again, it is at my aunt Murray's, it is safe. I had never seen her aunt Murray then. I said run Mary and fetch me back my lace, and I will not tell my father.

Q. Nobody else was by but yourself and her - A. No; she went out as if to go to her aunt's to fetch me back my lace; of course I exported it; she returned with her aunt, they both came in together, and said they had sold it to two strange men.

Q. What passed before that - something must have been said - A. The prisoner said this is my aunt Muray, she has something to say to you. I said, May have you brought back my lace that you promised me, she said no, I have not; then I says, if you have not I must go and tell my father, and immediately I went and made him acquainted how I had been robbed; my father said, Mary if you have pawned the lace give me the duplicates, and there is the door for you, and he would have paid her her wages; she said, and her aunt also, that they had not the duplicates, they had sold the lace to two strange men; they did not know how much for; at last they said they had burnt the lace; she told two or three stories at that time; she first of all said, that she had sold the lace to two strange men; then she said that Mary brought it to her on Wednesday morning; that she said in the hearing of the prisoner, and told her to take care of it till she called for it; that she never saw the prisoner afterwards till the Friday; on that day the prisoner came to her and said aunt I want the lace, for Miss Combe has missed it. and for fear you should be in trouble and the lace should be produced against me, here goes, and crammed it in the fire, and her aunt saw her burn it. My father not believing it, sent for an officer to take charge of her; Mr. Perry came, he took charge of her. I asked the prisoner how she came to rob me; she said she took the key slily out of my my pocket, cut the lace, and put the key slily in my pocket again. I never missed the key out of my pocket. I believe she said that in the presence of the officer.

Q. Did you used to leave your bed room door open - A. She used to call me of a morning; she might have had an opportunity of taking the key out of my pocket; she did not say how she took them out, only that she took them out unbeknown to me.

Q. How much did you give a yard for this lace - A. Thirty shillings a yard for the broad lace, and eight shillings a yard for the other lace.

Q. Have you any person here that knows what lace you had - A. No; the lace has not been found; if she had returned the duplicates I should not have come here. I missed the lace about five o'clock; the prisoner was taken up the same evening about five o'clock; she had her hearing the next day. I always looked upon her as a very honest girl before this, and I hope mercy will be extended to her; I took her from the recommendation of a friend who knew her.

Mr. Knapp. How long has this girl lived in your family - A. About six weeks.

Q. How long have you had the lace - A. I suppose these four years; I bought eleven yards and a half of the broad lace; I have used two yards and a half of the broad lace.

Q. Mrs. Murray is not here - A. No.

COURT. When did you cut the two yards and a half from the broad lace - A. About four years ago.

Mr. Knapp. After your supposed loss - did you ascertain by measure whether any was taken off - A. Yes, it has been taken.

Q. Now you cannot misunderstand the question, I will repeat it again lest you should - you say you saw the lace on the Sunday before the Friday, then it contained nine yards - we are correct about that - A. You are.

Q. And shortly before that Sunday you had measured it, it contained nine yards then - A. Yes.

Q. Did you on the Friday, when you found it deficientmeasure it again - A. I did; in my father's presence; I did not measure it in the prisoner's presence. I said how many yards I had been robbed of before the magistrate.

Q. How came you not to tell her how many yards you had lost - A. Because I did not know till I had measured it.

Q. How came you to measure the lace behind the girl's back - A. My father charged her in custody immediately and I measured the laces the next day.

COURT. Did it neither occur to you nor your father to measure the lace before you took the prisoner in custody - A. No. I told the constable it was about two or three yards of the Valenciennes lace; and that I missed lace to the value of five pound; I did not say how many yards, nor did he ask me.

- PERRY. I am an officer of the Thame police. The prisoner was given into my charge; Miss Combe charged her with stealing four or five yards of lace, of different sorts; the prisoner and her aunt were present, they seemed to be very much alarmed. No lace has been found. Mrs. Murray was bound over; she is not here.

Mr. Knapp. She told you there were four or five yards missing; that was all she said - A. Yes; she did not say of the value of four or five pounds.

The prisoner left her defence to her counsel, called one witness, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Fined One Shilling and discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

479. STEPHEN AKED was indicted for feloniously making an assault, in the King's Highway, on the 5th of July , upon Joseph Robinson , putting him in fear, and violently and feloniously taking from his person and against his will, a silver watch, value 2 l. his property .

JOSEPH ROBINSON . Q. Did you at any time lose your watch - A. Yes; last Tuesday week, about ten minutes after eleven o'clock at night; I was at work at Mr. Moorman's, a saw maker, till one o'clock; about five o'clock I went into the City Arms, City road , into a skittle ground at the back part of the house.

Q. How came you not to go to work in the afternoon - A. I had a little liquor in the forenoon; in the afternoon I took a walk in the fields.

Q. Did you drink any thing - A. Not till nine o'clock at night; I then went into the house; I saw a young woman that I knew; she asked me to drink; I did. I continued with her an hour and a half.

Q. Was the prisoner or any other man in company - A. Yes, there were two or three, but I knew none of them; I only knew the girl; I drank out of one pot and paid for another; that was all that I had; I came away and said that it was eleven o'clock; I did not know it was so late or else I would have gone sooner; somebody said come back and have another pot; I said I would rather not; I went out of the house; Stephen Aked followed me, I never saw him before that day, and the two young women followed me out; I went out first and the women and the two men followed me; after that they separated themselves from the girls.

Q. Was the prisoner one of them - A. He was; the two young women walked on before; the young men asked me which way I was going; I told them into Old street; they said they would bear me company and would see me home, they lived there. We walked on till we came between two gardens; there was pales on the left hand side and a bank on the other; the man on my left side was a soldier, and the prisoner was on my right; the prisoner gave me a bit of a jostle and pushed me against the other; the prisoner snatched at my watch; he hit his hand against my hat; he snatched the watch out with such force the chain broke, and the watch fell on the ground; I said that is mine; I went to stoop for it; he picked it up and ran away; the soldier ran towards Brick lane and the prisoner towards the City road; I ran after the prisoner; I lost sight of him; he was taken. When I came up to the place then I saw that the watchman had hold of him. The watch was picked up by a gentleman; Mr. Chard shewed it me the next day.

Q. Were you at that time sober or in liquor - A. I had a little drop in the morning, and in the evening. I was sensible of every thing that passed.

PETER MONTGOMERY . I was watchman this night on the City road; about ten minutes after eleven o'clock I heard the cry of stop thief; I saw the prisoner runing, he was the first man that came up; I laid hold of him; when Robinson came up, he charged him with having robbed him of his watch; the prisoner denied it; said there were more in company than him; I took him to the watchhouse.

- TURTEL. I am a watchman in Goswell place; I was calling the hour of eleven; I heard the cry of stop thief; I ran and I saw the prisoner running; I endeavoured to stop him but he passed me; I sprang my rattle; he was stopped by Montgomery; I went up to him and Robinson came up almost immediately; he said he had robbed him of his watch; the watch was picked up and given to me; the watch had no chain to it and the outside case was open; I took it to the watchhouse and Robinson owned it.

RICHARD CHARD . I was officer of the night; the prisoner was brought to the watchhouse, and the last witness gave me the watch with the case open; I have had it ever since. The prosecutor described the name and the number of the watch before he saw it.

Q. At that time how was Robinson, was he in liquor - A. He had been drinking, but he knew perfectly well what he was about.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I was at the City Arms that night playing at skittles; the prosecutor came in; he took hold of the pot and asked if he might drink; he tossed up with a young woman that was with me for some gin; when we went in the house, he followed us; he kept company with the young woman before I did; we all went out together; the young woman had hold of my arm not two minutes before the rattle sprung; I never saw the young man before; but what I have heard he is jealous with me of the young woman.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY, aged 28.

Of stealing only .

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

480. WILLIAM BUMSTEAD was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 29th of May , in the dwelling house of Charles Timothy Peter Artis , a bracelet, value 1 d. a bit of cloth, one halfpenny, two hundred guineas, ten seven shillings pieces, a crown piece, three dollars, a bank note, value 10 l. and two bank notes, value 5 l. each, his property .

CHARLES TIMOTHY PETER ARTIS . I live in Kingsland in the parish of St. John, Hackney . On Sunday the 29th of May, I left the prisoner, he is my apprentice , at home in my house; after I had my dinner I came to to London and spent the evening.

Q. What property did you leave in the house that was afterwards missing - A. I left in my chests, two hundred and fifteen guineas and a half in gold, three dollars, and one crown piece, two five pounds bank notes, a ten pound bank note; I cannot tell the numbers.

Q. In what place of security did you leave them - A. In the tea chest, one chest was in the other; this is the lock of the chest.

Q. You left no body in the house but the prisoner - A. No; I returned about ten o'clock in the evening. I left my house between two and three in the afternoon.

Q. When you came back did you find the boy at home - A. He was not at home; there were two more boys that were apprenticed to me. they were standing at the door; when I came home Charles Bate Birket gave me the information of the chest; when I went up to the chest I found the lid of the chest was shut down, but not locked; I found the tea chest and the money was gone; this is the tea chest that the money was in; this chest and money was gone, and the tea chest was carried into the kitchen; both the chests were locked when I went out; there was a pair of silver buckles, a ten pound note, and this piece of cloth in the chest; they were not taken away.

Q. When did you make any discovery of the property stolen - A. I have not made any recovery of the property stolen, the officers has got that; a man the next morning shewed me where the boy was in the watchouse; I saw the prisoner the next morning; when they brought him out of the watch-house he was taken before the magistrate.

Q. What did your family consist of at that time - A. There were three apprentices and my son, he was out with me in London.

Q. Are you a married man - A. No.

Jury. What are you - A. I am a chimney sweeper.

JONATHAN COCKMAN . Q. You are a watchman - A. Yes, of St. Leonard, Shoreditch. In Holywell Street the prisoner at the bar came to me as I was going the hour ten o'clock on the 29th of May; he ask me where my box was, I ask him what he wanted with my box, he said he should like to sit down and eat his supper in the box, he had some victuals in his hand; I asked him the reason he did not go home, he said his master and he had some words, his master had discharged him, he said that his relations lived at a distance from town, he would not wish to go till it was light; I told him it was very seldom I went in the box and sat this hot weather, he might sit in the box and eat his supper; when he went in the box he asked me what I would drink, I told him I had had my usual allowance I wanted no more; he said he had a crown piece, and somebody told him they would not give more than four shillings and three-pence for it; I looked at it, it was a very good one; I told him if he wanted a pint of beer to go to the public house, the landlord would take it; he went in the public house, and brought a pint of ale and a glass; I blamed him for spending so much of his money. After he had ate his supper, he asked me if I could find a bottle; a bottle was procur'd, he went and bought three half quarterns of peppermint, when he had ate his supper, he said he should sit at the bottom of the box and have a sleep. I left him in the bottom of the box apparently asleep, when I was going the hour of eleven he followed me, he said he could not sleep contentedly, he would rather walk by the side of me; in walking along he said he had got a very good find, he had got some yellow boys, he could not tell how many, he had not counted them; he put them out of the nutmeg grater and counted over fourteen guineas, he said he had no pockets. I told him it was not safe to carry them about without a pocket. I begged him to put it into my hands, I would take care of it till the morning for him; he said he had some pieces of paper, he could not tell the value of them, or whether they were good for any thing or not. When I came to the box I was short of candle, I asked him to get me a candle and a halfpennyworth of snuff; when he returned he shewed me the notes; I found them to be two five pound notes he said he had another, it was put up in two squares, but by some means or other he had lost it; he and I went in pursuit of this note; we could not find it.

Q. Where did he suppose he had lost it - A. He could not tell where.

Q. Had he any more money about him - A. Two dollars and a shilling he shewed me; he told me he found them in one of Mr. Rhodes's fields, the notes the money, and the knife that he ate his supper with, he found them altogether in a rag; this is all the money he produced to me, he went to the public house to get some more liquor; the landlord came and asked me whether I sent him I said No, I desired the landlord to detain him while I went for the officer of the night. I delivered up the boy to the officer of the night.

RICHARD RICE . I live in Orchard Street. William Bumstead came into our house, he asked me whether I had an old glass bottle to sell, it was on Sunday; I gave him this glass bottle, he gave me two pence and a bracelet; the prosecutor has the bracelet. I live with my father, he his a milkman.

Q. Had you any acquaintance with the prisoner before - A. No, I knew him when he lived with Mr. Artis.

JOHN THOMAS GOODWIN . Q. Look at the prisoner at the bar, do you know him - A. Yes, I met him on the Sunday afternoon, I don't know the day of the month; I was going up Robinson's Row, Hackney; he said Jack will you have this, I said no you are making a fool of me; he said he was not; he said Jack if you will have it you may, it is five shillings, he said he had been these two years earning it, he saved it up; he asked me to go a little way with him, he had some oranges, he gave part of theoranges; he pulled off his shoes, I saw a seven shilling piece and three half guineas in one of his shoes; he put on his shoe again. I staid with him about three quarters of an hour. I never saw him afterwards.

WILLIAM LOCKLEY . I was the officer of the night on the 29th of May. I took him into the watchhouse, I found nothing about him. I received from Lockley fourteen guineas, two five pound bank notes, two dollars, one shilling and a knife; I have had them in custody ever since; he told me he found the property in the brick fields; I told him I must detain him, in the morning he must go before a magistrate.

JOHN ARMSTRONG . I am an officer. On Monday the 30th of May the boy was put into my custody; I and Bishop went into the brick fields to see if we could find any money that he had throwed there; there appeared under an archway a dent as if something had been thrown there, but whether it was a brick, stone, or the money, we could not tell - we found nothing.

Prosecutor. This bracelet is my own, it was locked up in the chest; that knife is my own.

Q. Can you distinguish the notes - A. No farther than one of the notes is tore in the middle, and one is ragged at each corner; this nutmeg grater is mine.

Q. Where did you receive these notes - A. From farmers who deal with me for soot.

Prisoner's Defence. The reason that I opened the chest was, because I had no dinner that Sunday, and the victuals was locked up in that great chest. I broke it open with a crow.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 13.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Chambre.

481. ROBERT WHITTINGHAM and LEVY LYONS was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling house of George Hatton about the hour of twelve at night on the 1st of June , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein seven shirts, value 3 l. 3 s. a coat, value 2 s. 6 d. and a handkerchief, value 1 s. the property of George Hatton: -

ELIZABETH FRINDALL for feloniously receiving on the 2nd of June two shirts, value 18 s. and a coat, value 2 s. 6 d. being part and parcel of the aforesaid goods, she knowing them to have been stolen .

ELEANOR HATTON . My husband's name is George Hatton, we live in Bethnal green , and keep the whole house.

Q. Do you remember at any time losing any linen from that house - A. Yes, on the 1st of June; I and my husband went to bed between ten and eleven o'clock; there was nobody else in the house; my husband fastened the door.

Q. Did you see him do it - A. No. I awoke on the 2nd of June in the morning in a kind of fright.

Q. Did you hear a noise - A. No, nothing particular. The first thing I observed was the street door wide open: ours is a little habitation, two rooms on the ground floor; the bed room door stood a little open; I could see the street door was open.

Q. Your bed room door was left partly open when you went to bed - A. Yes, we always leave it ajar; it was between three and four o'clock when I awoke, it was quite light; I jumped out of bed and went into the front room; I said to my husband, oh, my God! we have been robbed. I missed my things immediately; the street door was standing wide open.

Q. What things did you miss from that room - A. Seven shirts; they were laying on the top of the table wringing wet in that room, I had washed them the day before; the shirts I had to wash and the shift; I missed my husband's coat, a pocket handkerchief, and a black linen apron; I had seen all these things in the room when I went to bed.

Q. How was the windows of that room - A. One was shut and the other half open; the window case was close.

GEORGE HATTON . Q. You are the husband of the last witness - A. Yes; I am a cork cutter .

Q. Do you recollect her acquainting you with the door being open - A. Yes.

Q. Had you fastened the door the night before - A. I had; it goes with a spring lock; I forced it to, and pulled it to see if it was quite fast; it was quite fast; in the morning, when my wife told me, I found it wide open.

Q. Had you seen the things safe the night before - A. I saw them lying, and my coat I pulled off the evening before, and my apron; they laid in the chair. I wore them the day before.

Q. Did you ever find any of these things again - A. I found three shirts at Mr. Sadler's, pawnbroker, in Bishopsgate street.

BENJAMIN LEVITT . Q. Do you know the house where the last witness Hatton lived - A. Yes, I live about three doors off. I went out to work the morning they were robbed at three o'clock, it was day light then; I saw two men run across the fields from Mr. Hatton's house, I believe they might be five yards off when I saw them first, but I did not see them come from the premises; I never saw them before; I could take no further notice than of their clothing: one was dressed in a dark coat, whether blue or brown I can not say; and the other in a light coloured drab. When I went home to my breakfast I was told of the robbery. On the Saturday following I saw the two men at the Mansion house, they were dressed the same as I described to the officer.

SARAH STEELE . Q. What business do you follow - A. A child's shoemaker; I live with my father now; at that time I lived in the same room with the prisoner Frindall.

Q. Where did she lodge - A. In Reeves court near Bishopsgate street.

Q. Do you recollect at any time any person coming to her room and bringing a bundle - A. Yes, Whittingham on Saturday morning the 2nd of June; I cannot say what o'clock it was in the morning, because I was very heavy asleep; he knocked at the door, and the young woman awoke me; he brought up some things, what they were I cannot say; Frindall opened the door and took them; it might be between three and four o'clock; I cannot say what he had; I did not take any notice; he just come inside of the door.

Q. Did you see enough to know that it was that man Writtingham - A. I am sure it was that man; she did not say any thing to me.

Q. You must be awake when you saw him lay the things down - A. Yes, I was just awake then, but I did not hear him say any thing.

Q. Did she go to bed again - A. I cannot say whether she came to bed again or not; I fell asleep.

Q. Was the parcel in a black apron - A. I did nottake any notice; about eleven o'clock the young woman asked me to go along with her to pawn a shirt; I went with her.

Q. Did you see where she took the shirt from - A No; I saw she had a shirt in her apron, she gave it me out of her apron.

Q. In what state was the shirt - A. It was dry, I believe, I did not open it.

Q. Was it ironed - A. Not as I know of.

Q. You must know whether it was a shirt that was ironed or not - A. It was not ironed when the pawnbroker looked at it.

Q. She went with you to the pawnbrokers - A. Yes; in Bishopgate street, I do not know his name.

Q. Did she pawn it or you - A. I laid it down; I do not think that either of us asked any thing; the gentleman looked at it, he stopped us directly.

Q. You say she asked you to go with her to the pawnbrokers - am I to understand you that there was nothing said before, only asking you to go with her to pawn a shirt - A. No.

Q. And you had never seen the person that brought the shirts before - A. No.

Q. Did you know the other person Levy before - A. No, I never saw him before.

Q. Had you ever seen Whittingham before - A. I do not know.

Q. You must know whether you did or no - A. I cannot say positively whether I did or no; I cannot say that I ever saw him before.

Q. Now you are to understand you are upon your oath, if you had seen him before, say so - A. I have seen him before but not to speak to him; I saw him in Bishopgate street walking along the street, no further.

Q. What business does he follow - A. I do not know I am sure.

SEPTIMUS SADLER . I am a pawnbroker, 134, Bishopsgate street. On the 2nd of June, about ten o'clock I received information that a house was broken open on Bethnal green, and shirts, with other things, had been stolen; I recollected having taken in two shirts previous to the information having been given, from the prisoner Lyon; I advanced him five shillings on them. I had another shirt brought me by the female prisoner and another woman, between eleven and twelve o'clock.

Q. What did they say when they came in - A. I do not know that they said any thing; as soon as they came in I looked at the shirts to see that it was one of the same as were stolen; immediately I detained them, and sent for an officer. I have kept them shirts ever since.

SAMUEL SHEPHERD . I am a constable; I was sent for by Mr. Sadler to take charge of the two women; I searched the apartment where they lived, in Reeves court, Angel alley, Bishopsgate street; I understood this was Frindall's apartment, knowing she had lived in the alley some time. I found one shirt in the room, one coat, and a pocket handkerchief, they laid on the bed; I then went to an empty house just by, there was no person living there. On the stair case I found two shirts and a pillow case; I asked the prisoner Frindall how she came in possession of them, she told me that she received them from the prisoners, that they brought them in about three o'clock in the morning, and told her to dry them. This black apron I took from the prisoner Whittingham, before the magistrate on Thursday.

JEREMIAH SHRUBSAIL . After I received information of the robbery I went to George street, Wentworth street; I saw the two prisoners, I knew them well; that was on the 2nd of June about six o'clock in the afternoon; knowing the place to be a dangerous situation I went for another officer, and placed him at one end of the street, I went to the other, I saw the two prisoners, I took one in my hand; Lyons made resistance, but Whittingham did not; being surrounded by a parcel of girls, one had a large knife in her hand, Lyon got away before the other officer came to my assistance; I took Lyon the same evening in Essex street. I received information from the brewer's servant of the description of the prisoners. I found the lock to be a spring lock, it goes with a catch and a stiff hasp; there is a bit of wood nailed against it, it is im- impossible when shut to force it open; I saw the mark of a chisel I tried a knife and it opened it.

Q. to Mrs. Hatton. Look at these shirts, there are three of them produced by the pawnbroker - A. They are all mine, they were all in my house, I know them by the mark, the make, and the cloth, and those found in the empty house are part of them which were taken away. The coat, pocket handkerchief and apron, are my husband's; the shirts are worth seven shillings each, the coat half a crown, the new holland shift, fourteen shillings; this pillow case is mine.

Lyon's Defence. I get my living buying and selling old clothes. On the 2nd of June a young man asked me if I would buy two shirts; I gave him six shillings and sixpence for them; I went and pledged them for five shillings. I do not think it is my place if any body brings things to me to ask them whether they stole them or not.

Whittingham's Defence. That apron is my own, I bought it; on Wednesday the 1st of June, I got up from my lodgings in Wentworth street; I went to this woman, I told her I was going to my diseased mother at Deptford; I had a bundle, I took it away with me, which was a waistcoat in a handkerchief.

Frindall's Defence. I am an unfortunate girl; a man came to me on that morning and left me the things; this room is not my own; I went to that room that one night.

WHITTINGHAM, GUILTY , DEATH , aged 20.

LYON, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 25.

Of stealing in the dwelling house to the value of forty shillings and upwards.

FRINDALL - NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Le Blanc.

482. GEORGE BOOTH was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 27th of June , fourteen pieces of gingham, value 10 l. the property of Joseph Levy in his dwelling house .

JOSEPH LEVY . I live at No. 29, in the Minories , I am a linen draper . On the 27th of June between eleven and twelve o'clock, I lost fourteen pieces of gingham; it was placed on a chest, the chest was part inside of the shop, and part outside of the door; the whole quantity was gone; I had seen them laying on the chest about ten minutes before they were taken away.

Q. What might be the value of them - A. I think they are worth ten pounds.

FRANCIS WHITE . I live in the Minories, I am a grocer. On the 27th of June I was at my next door neighbour's house, which is opposite of Mr. Levy's; I think it was about eleven o'clock, I was talking to the lady of the shop. I saw the prisoner at Mr. Levy's shop, by the edge of the curb, he was looking up and down the street as if he was looking for somebody; I turned my head to speak to the lady, and when I looked at the door again I saw the prisoner with a bundle of ginghams under his arm; I thought he was going to carry them somewhere.

Q. Did you hear of the robbery soon after - A. I went to Chester key, and when I returned my brother informed me Mr. Levi had been robbed. I immediately went over to Mr. Levy's.

Q. Did you make any particular observation of the person you saw with the ginghams - A. Yes, he had on a waistcoat the same as he has now, and a painted hat; I believe it was the prisoner, but I cannot swear to his person.

THOMAS RENSHAW . I live at No. 1, Ship alley, Wellclose square, I am a silversmith. On the 27th of June I saw the prisoner between twelve and one o'clock, he was opposite of my door with these ginghams on his shoulder; he appeared very much intoxicated; he threw them off his shoulder near my door, and he laid his head upon them: Mr. Wild, whom I knew, said he had brought them from the Minories, he was going to take them to Ratcliffe Highway, but had lost the directions; a minute or two after Mr. Wild brought him to my door, and asked me to let him leave the parcel; I consented, and he throwed them into the shop; the prisoner came to the door with him; Mr. Wild gave me the goods; the prisoner and Mr. Wild went away. In about half an hour Mr. Levi enquired for the goods. I have kept the goods ever since.

Mr. White. They were the same kind of goods as these.

RICHARD WILD . I am a shoemaker, I live in Angel court, Whitechapel; I have known the prisoner seven years, he is a barber. On the 27th of last month, between twelve and one, the prisoner came to my shop where I work, he asked me to let him leave them in my shop till he called for them again; I refused; they were loosely tied up in a white apron; he threw them down by my door, there were fourteen pieces, I tied them up tighter and told him to go; then he said would I lend him eighteen pence to pay his reckoning where he had been drinking; I refused that; he had been drinking at the Four Awls in Lemon street; I enquired there and found he had been there with the bundle; I asked him where he brought the bundle from and where he was going; he said he brought it from the Minories and was going to take it to Ratcliffe Highway, facing Old Gravel lane; he was very much intoxicated, he said he came from the Four Awls; I told him I would go along with him and see that they were taken care of till he came to the shop. When he came to Mr. Renshaw's door he throwed them off his shoulder and laid his head upon them. I knew Mr. Renshaw, I asked him if he would be kind enough to take care of them till he brought a proper order where to take them to.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I must declare the truth before Almighty God and this honourable court. I have a wife and four children to support; I am a barber and take in porter's work; I have been seven years in his Majesty's service, I have a fracture in my head, and go by the name of the mad barber; at the time I was called to carry this parcel by a man, I had been drinking the whole of the day, I did not know the man that called me; I was near the prosecutor's house waiting for a man that was gone in the Tower; I took the goods to carry for the man, he said he would follow me, I did not know but he was behind me; I turned round and missed the man; I went with it to the Four Awls, I saw an acquaintance, and after we had the beer we called for I asked the man to carry the parcel, for I could not carry it any further; I fell down and went to sleep, I was awoke by the passengers, who told me I should lose the parcel; I then took it to an acquaintance of mine in Lemon street, I asked him to let me leave it at his stall, he refused, he said he did not think all was right, he would go to the office and acquaint them with it; I said go, and I will wait for you.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY, aged 47.

Of stealing only .

Privately Whipped and discharged.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Chambre.

483. RICHARD NORRIS and THOMAS HAINES were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 6th of June a piece of calico, value 4 d. three pair of stockings, value 6 s. four gowns, value 1 l. 12 s. four petticoats, value 10 s. a handkerchief, value 6 d. four napkins, value 4 s. and five shifts, value 1 l. 5 s. the property of Mary Luxmore ; and a canvas bag, value 2 d. the property of William Mumford .

And two other counts for like offence, only varying the manner of charging.

The case was stated by Mr. Gurney.

WILLIAM TUCKER . Q. I believe you are servant to Mr. Barnard at Harefield - A. Yes.

Q. On the 3d of June was Miss Luxmore at your house on a visit - A. Yes.

Q. On the 3d of June you carried a parcel to the Uxbridge cart - A. Yes, the same parcel that I received from Miss Luxmore.

- SHEPHERD. Q. I believe you are the Uxbridge carrier - on Friday the 3d of June did you receive a parcel from the last witness - A. I did, it was directed to Charlotte Alford , St. Andrew's court, Holborn; I put it safe in the cart and brought it safe into the Bell inn Warwick lane ; I had it in my hand after the cart was locked in there. I arrived there between nine and ten in the evening.

Q. Did you bring any other parcel - A. I did, and I brought Mrs. Tyson's niece; I saw the two prisoners at the bar there that evening; Thomas Peart and Mrs. Tyson, I brought parcels for them. After the cart was locked up in the yard I observed Norris go out more than once, and Haines went once out of the room.

Q. After Norris went out the last time, did you observe any thing in particular on him, or did any body say any thing in his hearing - A. Mrs. Tyson said they were all going to Tottenham; she said to Norris what in the name of goodness have you got, you are of such an immense size.

Q. Did he make any answer to that - A. I do noknow that he did. On the next morning Gibson unloaded the cart; there was a letter picked up in the yard, I did not see it picked up; the stockings that were picked up I have here; they were given me by Mr. Bedford.

SAMUEL GIBSON . - Mr. Gurney. I believe you are porter to the Bell inn - A. I am. On the next morning after the cart came in I unloaded it.

Q. Did you find any bundle belonging to Charlotte Alford - A. I did not.

- HAWKINS. I am ostler to the Bell inn, Warwick lane.

Q. On the morning of the 7th of June, did you find any stockings or a letter - A. Yes, I gave them to Mr. Bedford.

MR. BEDFORD. Q. Do you remember this cart being at your yard, the Bell in Warwick lane - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember Norris going out - A. Yes, I observed him being out of the coffee room several times; after he had been out the last time, I observed him being very full all round his person; he appeared bigger than he had been before, Mrs. Tyson said to him, Richard, you are considerably bigger round your belly, what have you got in your shirt. I did not observe that he made any answer; I touched him about his side, there appeared to be something soft, I said you have got very large; as he was going away I observed something stuffed in his breeches apparently.

Q. Did you observe Haines go out in the course of the evening when Norris went out - A. I did, once or more.

Cross-examined by Mr. Barry. You say Haines had been out of the coffee room, you did not see any difference in his appearance - A. No.

THOMAS PEART . Q. You live at Tottenham - A. Yes. On the night of the 3d of June I was at the Bell to receive something from the carrier; me, Norris, and Haines, and Mrs. Tyson, walked to Tottenham; Norris and Haines lodged with me; when we all got to my home, Haines walked on with Mrs. Tyson; Norris before we had got to my door, said he had got something which he thought was linen; I asked him what he had got, he said he had no more than Shephard had given him; I said if you have got any thing more than what belongs to you, do not bring it into my house to bring me into trouble; he said he would take care that nothing should hurt me; when we got to my door my wife was a bed, she gave me the key out of the window. Norris went in and put down the sides that he had brought from the cart; he went out saying he would meet Haines.

Court. Had he any bundle - A. Not as I know of.

Q. You said there was a bundle that Shephard gave him - A. I do not know where that was.

Q. Did you see Haines that night afterwards - A. I heard Haines' tongue that night afterwards; I cannot say that I heard Norris's tongue afterwards. On the Saturday night following, I, Norris, and Haines, were taken up; on Sunday evening I asked Norris if he knew any thing about the things that I was accused of, he said there was something in Mr. Mumford's pig stye, I informed Mr. Williams of it.

MR. WILLIAMS. Q. In consequence of something that the last witness told you did you tell Mr. Brown Mr . Williams' pig stye - A. Yes, I was near. I saw this bag and the contents found on the Monday.

WILLIAM BROWN . You are Mr. Mumford's gardener - A. I am; I found that bag and its contents on the Monday.

Q. Were there any pigs in that stye - A. No. On Saturday morning the 4th of June, I saw Norris about a quarter before four laying by the hay rick; I awoke him, he said he said he had been in town the over night, his partner had left him, he got tipsey.

(The property produced and identified.)

Norris said nothing in his defence.

Haines was not put on his defence.

NORRIS, GUILTY , aged 22.

Confined One Years in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

HAINES, NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

484. WILLIAM FAZAKERLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 26th of May , a metal watch, value 40 s. the property of Peter Patmore ; a gold chain, value 40 s. two gold seals, value 20 s. and a gold neck chain, value 20 s. the property of Thomas Obie , in the dwelling house of Thomas Eddis .

Second count for like offence, only varying the manner of charging it.

The case was stated by Mr. Barry.

BENJAMIN SMITH . - Mr. Barry. What are you, sir - A. I am clerk to Mr. Eddis, auctioneer in the Strand .

Q. On the 26th of May was there a sale in Mr. Eddis's rooms - A. Yes.

Q. Among the articles was there a watch with a chain and seal - A. There was, in a place that was partitioned off.

Q. Were they afterwards produced - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar - A. I do, he was in that quarter of the room where these articles were; I missed them on the day of the sale, about three quarters of an hour after I saw the prisoner in the room. About ten days after the loss of these goods, I went to Newgate street to pay an account; on my way to Newgate street I called in at Mr. Abbott's who were selling off their China; immediately on my entering the room, I saw the prisoner Fazakerly, I accosted him with how do you do; on my going into the room he was coming out, so that we soon met each other, I the moment I entered the room, saw the seals, I kept my eye on the two seals that I saw suspended to a watch chain; on my going near him to identify these seals; I observed him put them under his waistcoat. I immediately made a snatch at them, observing that he had some pretty seals there; upon my seizing the seals the prisoner said something, but however what was said by him was unintelligible; he made his way to the door quickly, I following of him; when he got into Fleet street (this house is the corner of Bride's passage); he attempted to make the best of his way, he was just upon the point of running, I seized him by the collar, he asked me if I meaned to tear his shirt, I told him no, but he must go along with me; he said he only meaned to go the back way; I entwined my arms around him, and he walked peaceable with me to the Strand, towards where the property was taken from, to Mr. Eddis's; Mr. Eddis being out I sent for him, uponon Mr. Eddis's return he came into the parlour where the prisoner and I were; I then delivered to Mr. Eddis the two seals and part of the chain that I snatched from the prisoner; when I snatched at them they came off the chain being very slight. Mr. Eddis then said where is the watch sir; he pulled it out of his pocket, together with the remainder of the chain; Mr. Eddis then said where is the gold neck chain besides; the prisoner pulled out a pocket book and produced the duplicate of a chain. He was then taken into custody.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. I observe, Mr. Smith, at the time you saw the prisoner, after you saw him at your rooms, ten days had elapsed - A. I believe so.

Q. So his possession of this property was after he had been ten days in your room - A. Yes.

Q. Your's is a public room and of course open to any body - A. Yes.

Q. Was there many persons there that day - A. No; very few; there was none of the plate dealers there that day.

Q. My purpose is answered if there were other persons there; how many persons were there - A. I will say to the amount of eight persons where this watch was deposited.

Q. How long before you missed the articles had you taken an account of the things in the sale room - They were all there about an hour and half before the plate sale; the plate sale does not commence immediately.

Q. Then for what you know there may have been twenty people passing and repassing in that room; it any person had been so disposed as to take them they might; it was an open room for any body - A. I should not have let a chimney sweeper or a dustman in there: we admit none in that room but persons of genteel appearance, Mr. Fazakerly is a of a very respectable appearance.

Q. How lately before had you taken stock - A. I believe that does not apply to sales every morning; an hour and a half before the sale commences we call over the sale; this was a metal watch, lot one; we had it two clear days in our possession; I know of the watch coming to us; I know it was in our sale room.

Q. How long has Mr. Eddis had this sale room in the Strand - A. About two years. I am a clerk to him.

Q. You are not partner to him - A. I am not.

THOMAS EDDIS . - Mr. Barry. You are an auctioneer - A. I am.

Q. Do you recollect the sale on the 26th of last June at your rooms - A. I do.

Q. Relate to his lordship and the jury what brought you to your house - A. I was sent for; I was introduced into the parlour; I asked the prisoner what he had done with the watch; he produced it me.

Q. Was that watch sent to you for sale - A. It was, by Mr. Patmore on Ludgate hill; I then enquired what he had done with the gold neck chain; he told me he pawned it at Mr. Milton's, Westminster road; he produced me the duplicate and supplicated for mercy.

Q. The watch having been lost I believe you paid for it - A. I paid two pound seven shillings; the duplicate of the gold neck chain I have in my pocket book.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Do you know whether it is an unredeemed pledge - A. I should presum not.

Q. Unredeemed pledges, I believe, when the time is out. then they are to be sold - A. They are compelled to sell them.

Q. These pledges when they get into your hands they are to fetch what they can, and according to the sale and the quantity of bidders they are sold. - A. Certainly.

Q. Therefore this article when it came to the hammer it might not have fetched more than thirty eight shillings - A. I will save you a great deal of trouble; it was not to be sold under two pound ten shillings; I as agent am to take my commission out of it.

RICHARD CRIPPS . - Mr. Barry. I believe you are servant to Mr. Patmore, Ludgate Hill - A. I am his shopman.

Q. Do you know that watch - A. I do.

Q. Did you take that watch from Mr. Patmore's to Mr. Eddis's for the purpose of sale - A. It was sent from our house; I know the watch from certain marks in the inside; I delivered it to the porter for the purpose of taking it.

Mr. Knapp. Is that porter here - A. He is not.

JOHN HULME . - Mr. Barry. You are servant to Mr. Olive - A. Yes, I sent to Mr. Eddis's sale a gold chain and two gold seals; I sent them myself by the porter.

Q. Look at them and see if you know them again. - A. I think them to be the seals; I would not swear it.

JOSEPH TURNER . I am servant to Mr. Milton, pawnbroker, Westminster Bridge road. I produce a gold neck chain pawned for eighteen shillings; to the best of my recollection the prisoner pawned it; I do not mean to swear positive.

Q. to prosecutor. Whose dwelling house is that auction room - A. A part of my own; I and my family live in the other part of the house.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel, called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH aged 46.

[ The jury and the prosecutor recommended the prisoner to his Majesty's mercy on account of his good character .]

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Chambre.

485. THOMAS DAVENPORT was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 12th of July , a silk handkerchief, value 5 s. 8 d. the property of Robert Potter , privately in his shop .

ROBERT POTTER . I am a linen draper , No. 106, Leadenhall street ; I know nothing of the transaction; I live at another part of the town.

HENRY WATTS . I am a servant to Mr. Robert Potter . On the 12th of July, between the hours of eight and nine in the evening the prisoner came in the shop.

Q. Were there other persons serving in the shop - A. Yes. The prisoner asked to look at some silk handkerchiefs; the young man who was serving him gave me some information that the prisoner did not hear; that brought me towards him; the prisoner had got nearly out of the door; I sent him after the prisoner, he brought the prisoner back and said he missed this silk handkerchief; the prisoner denied having it; theprisoner wished me to search him; I would not; I sent for a constable; Pinner came; he was searched in my presence; this handkerchief was found under his arm. between his shirt and his flesh, then he emplored for mercy; he endeavoured to snatch the paper denoting the price off; but I prevented him; I did not search him at all before the constable came; he turned out his pocket.

Q. Was he intoxicated at that time - A. He appeared to; after the constable searched him he appeared to have got rid of his drunkenness.

BENJAMIN JONES . Q. Did this man come in the shop on the 12th of July - A. Yes; I served him; he asked for a silk handkerchief; he was about ten minutes in the shop.

Q. When he first came in, did he appear to you to be sober - A. No, he appeared to be intoxicated; I shewed him several patterns; he took up one handkerchief and laid it down on the counter and put his hat upon it, and when he took the hat up again the handkerchief was not there; he asked me to shew him more patterns; I told him I could not; he took his hat in his hand and went out of the shop; I communicated to Mr. Watts what I had observed; he told me to go and bring him back immediately; I did so; he had got two yards from the door; I brought him back, I asked him for the handkerchief; he said he had not it; I spoke to Mr. Watts that the prisoner was to be searched; he went in a great rage and passion; he said he would scorn such a thing; he turned one of his coat pockets out to convince me that he had nothing about him; the constable arrived and searched him; the handkerchief was found under his arm, between the shirt and the body; when he was charged with the constable he did not seem to be intoxicated.

Q. Judging from the whole of his behaviour, do you think his intoxication was real or pretended - A. Pretended.

THOMAS PINNER . I am a constable; I was sent for to take charge of this man, July 12th, between eight and nine o'clock; when I came to the shop; we took him backwards into a little room; I unbuttoned his waistcoat and put my hand into the bosom of his shirt; I found the handkerchief concealed under his arm between the shirt and the flesh; I searched his pocket book; I found a five pound note, which I have got in my possession; it is a bad one.

Q. Had the handkerchief any mark on it - A. Yes; it has now.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. He pulled the shirt over my shoulders; can he look at me as an honest man and say that he took the handkerchief from me; when he found the five pound note in my pocket, I said it is a bad one. I said I was ordered to keep it in my pocket book till. I found the owner that gave it me.

Pinner. I took it from under your arm. I am sure he was not intoxicated; after I had got charge of him I took hold of his right arm; going along, about twenty yards from the prosecutor's house, he hit me on the face and knocked me down; at the same time I twisted my leg and entangled it in his; he was secured; I used him directly.

GUILTY, aged 32.

Of stealing, but not privately .

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

486. MARY DANIELS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 5th of May , a man's shirt, value 14 s. and a table cloth, value 7 s. the property of Thomas Playsted .

THOMAS PLAYSTED . I live in Cloak lane, at Cutler's hall ; the prisoner has chared for me some years. I can speak to the property when it is produced.

THOMAS TROUGHTON . I am servant to Mr. Watson, 42 Watling-street. On the 5th of May the prisoner pawned a hilt with me in her own name; I am sure of her person, I had seen her several times.

Q. Did she pawn a table cloth at any time - A. Yes, on the 5th of December preceding I advanced her four shillings on it.

The property produced and identified.

MR. CARTER. I was sent for by Mr. Foster to a house in Cloak lane where she was washing; I took her upon another charge of the 31st of May; the ward beadle was there and took the duplicates from her in my presence.

Q. Did you find the duplicates which led to Mr. Weston's house - A. I did.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence, nor called any witnesses to character.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Confined One Year in Newgate , and fined One Shilling .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

487. WILLIAM GOODWIN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 8th of June , a jacket, value 5 s. and a pair of trowsers, value 5 s. 3 d. the property of Edward Smith .

EDWARD SMITH . I keep a clothes shop in Houndsditch ; I was at home when the property was stolen; I can only swear to the property.

DANIEL ROGERS . I am a boot and shoemaker, I live in Peter's court, Rosemary lane. On the 8th of June, about eleven o'clock, I was going along Houndsditch, I saw the prisoner about ten yards from Mr. Smith's shop, he was going from the shop with a child's jacket and trowsers; I saw him take the dress from the door, it was outside the door; he perceived me; I followed him; then he run, I overtook him in Cutler street; I brought him back to the shop, then he was charged with a constable.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I am a poor man, I have been afflicted along while.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character - saying that he was afflicted with a paralitic stroke, and at times was in a state of insanity.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Fined One Shilling and discharged.

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

488. ANN CARTER, alias FARMER , was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 14th of June, a shawl, value 8 s. the property of John Harvey and James Lamming .

ROBERT ASHFORD . I am shopman to John Harvey and James Lamming , linen drapers , No. 30, Ludgate hill . On the 14th of June, about four o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner came into the shop; she asked to look at some calicoes or flannels, I do not know which.

Q. While she was in the shop did you see her do any thing - A. I saw her in the act of taking the shawl, the shawl was on the counter.

Q. Did you actually see her attempting to take it - A. I only saw her handling it.

Q. You told me you saw her in the act of stealing it - A. I saw her drop it at the left hand counter just at the side.

Q. Had she left the counter at the time these things dropped - A. No, a person detected her and told me; I went to her; directly she saw me she turned round and dropped the shawl; then the constable was sent for.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Yours is a very crowded shop and what you call a cheap shop, where people crowd to buy what you call bargains - A. Yes.

Q. How many people were there in the shop at the time - A. There might be five or six at the counter where she stood; I do not know how many there were at the other part of the shop.

Q. How many men had you serving in the shop - A. About sixteen or seventeen of us; the young man that was serving her is not here.

Q. Might not the shawl drop accidentally from her - A. No.

Q. You said Mr. Harvey and Lamming are the proprietors of this shop - A. They are; I never heard of any other partners.

MARY GRAY . Q. What are you - A. I have been employed in the shop about four months.

Q. Did you see the prisoner come in - A. Yes, she asked for some calico; the young man shewed her some and the person with her; the young man is not here; she did not like the calico, she asked to see some shawls; he shewed her some. I saw her take the shawl and put it under her gown; I went and told Mr. Ashford; he came to her and took hold of her arm; at that instant she dropped the shawl.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Did Mr. Harvey and and Lamming ever accuse you of taking things from them - A. They have once.

Q. Have you not been in prison for robbing them since this woman was under accusation - A. Yes, about a week a ago.

Q. So, then when this prosecution was going on, you were let out - how long were you in custody - A. Two days.

Q. Upon your oath, have not you said that you would not have charged the prisoner with stealing this shawl but so save yourself - A. I have.

COURT. What did they charge you with having taken from them - A. A bit of muslin. I was twice before the alderman; the alderman discharged me the second time; my master did not come to maintain the charge against me.

Q. Did you say to any body that you would not have charged the girl unless they had promised to forgive you - A. Yes, I said it to the young woman myself when I was in prison; she called me all manner of names and frightened me; I said so to her because she frightened me.

Q. Did Mr. Harvey or Mr. Lamming ever promise to forgive you if you appeared against the prisoner - - A. No.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I am not guilty at all; I asked to look at some black calimanco; they said stop a bit; I saw the shawl lie on the ground; they took another woman, but they let her go about her business.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave her a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

489. JOSEPH COPE was indicted for that he on the 12th of April , forty pieces of milled money and coin, each of them made and counterfeited to the likeness and similitude of a good sixpence, the same not being cut in pieces, unlawfully did put off to Eleanor Bryan at a lower rate and value than they did by their denomination import and were counterfeited for, that is to say, for ten shillings .

Second count for putting off the like milled and counterfeited money at a lower rate than they were denominated for, that is to say, a seven shilling piece and three shillings.

The case was stated by Mr. Knapp.

ELEANOR BRYAN . Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. Yes; on the 8th of April I saw him when Mr. Rogers sent me after him.

Q. Do you remember going to the St. Andrew's public house - A. Yes, on the 12th of April; Cornelius Richardson was with me. I was between two and three o'clock when I went there.

Q. How long did you stay in the public house before the prisoner came in - A. We sat about a quarter of an hour; he promised to meet us at the Punch Bowl, he did; then he took us up to the St. Andrew, Holborn ; he said sit down, he had the goods which I wanted in another place; we sat down there and called for a pint of beer; he went out and came back, he said the woman was not at home that belonged to them, he desired us to sit a bit longer; he went out again and returned shortly and brought them. When he came in he winked at me to go out; he took me opposite of the tap room window; the window was a little open, it was contrived for the purpose that Richardson might be looking at him; he gave me forty sixpences, they were in a bit of paper; I took them in my fist: I said now step in doors, I have not the money about me; he said nobody must see him deliver this money; I said to Richardson, pay this man ten shillings, I have got what I wanted; he gave him a seven shilling piece and three shillings for this money.

Q. Who settled the price of ten shillings - A. The prisoner did; ten shillings was the price that he asked for them; I brought the forty sixpences home in the paper and gave them to Mr. Rogers in the paper; I keep them by themselves; I counted them when he went to the bar and got a quartern of gin and treated us.

Prisoner. Did you see me receive any money for them - A. Yes, I saw Richardson put it into your fist.

CORNELIUS RICHARDSON . Q. Were you at the St. Andrew public house with the last witness - A. I was, when the prisoner came there with Eleanor Bryant ; he told us to go and get something to drink, and he would go and see whether they were ready; he came in soon again and said they were not ready.

Q. Did you know what it was - A. I thought what it was; the woman told me while he was gone; I gave him a shilling to get us some victuals. While we were eating the victuals he came up the steps and gave a beckon; she went out directly; I looked out of the window, I saw him give a paper to her with something in it; at that time I did not know what it contained;she said you must come in doors and I will settle with you, they both came in, he sat in the same box with her and me; she said Richardson you must give this man ten shillings for the property that I have in my hand, I gave him a seven shilling piece and three shillings. That is the person I gave it to (witness pointing to the prisoner;) I had seen him several times before; then he called for half a pint of gin and treated us; he went away; then I looked over the money, we counted forty sixpences; we rolled it up in the paper again and took it to Mr. Rogers.

EDWARD ROGERS . Q. You are an officer belonging to Shadwell office - A. Yes.

Q. Did you know the prisoner before this time - A. I have seen him.

Q. Had you desired this woman Bryan to go to this public house - A. Yes, they went by my directions; they brought this that I have in my hand on the evening of the 12th of April; I have kept ever it since; here is forty sixpences.

Q. Now this having been found upon the prisoner, did you make diligent search after him - A. I did; I was not able to find him till the 6th of July, then Mr. Brown and I apprehended the prisoner; before we searched the prisoner he dropt money, I found sixty or seventy sixpences at his foot. I did not see them drop; we searched him afterwards; there was good money found upon him; he had dropt all the bad.

Jury. Did you see him drop them - A. No, I saw them dancing on the ground; Mrs. Bryan pointed him out to us; he said he did not care, we had not found any bad money upon him.

ROBERT BROWN . Q. You are also an officer of Shadwell office - A. Yes; I went in along with Bryan to the Punch Bowl; Mrs. Brown spoke to him and went out, and while Mrs. Bryant was going out he took a paper of money out of his pocket and put it down on the seat, and several of them fell down; I said to Mr. Rogers you look down, there is a plant. Mr. Rogers took up the money; we secured the man; the woman said that was the man; he said there is no money found on me; you have done your duty officers. We told him we took him in custody for selling this woman bad money.

Q. Did he put this money away before you told him what you took him for - A. He did.

MR. PARKER. Q. You are a silversmith, and you have been acquainted prosecutions for the mint - A. Yes, I am acquainted with silver; these forty sixpences are all counterfeited, they have never been in circulation; the other parcel are also counterfeits; there is fifty or sixty of them.

COURT. Are they worth a farthing a piece - A. I will break one of the forty and try it. I do not suppose they are worth three pence an ounce.

Prisoner's Defence. I never received any money for them, and if I suffer for it I cannot help it.

GUILTY , aged, 49.

Imprisoned One Year in Newgate and fined One Shilling .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

490. CHARLES CLINE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 30th of June , six shirts, value 40 s. and a tippet, value 6 d. the property of Mary Lowry .

MARY LOWRY . I am widow , I live at No. 3, Old Palace yard ; I keep a small shop for straw bonnets .

Q. When did you lose these things - A. I do not know the day of the month; the prisoner lodged with me near three months; I lost a child's tippet and six shirts.

Q. Why do you accuse him of taking it - A. The box stood under the bed where he slept; the prisoner came and took his bag away in a cart; I never suspected him till a person called to me in the street and said he had been robbed by Charles Cline to the amount of twenty six pounds, I told him I had been robbed.

Q. Then after having this conversation with somebody you found your property - A. No; only this tippet was found on John Edward's daughter; he took it off and gave it to me.

Q. All you know is that your things were taken away and only the prisoner had access to that room - A. Yes.

PETER MASON . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner, he was taken before the magistrate, he was asked how he came by that tippet, he said he bought it of a jew in Grub Street, and four shirts; the prisoner said afterwards to me, now I remember, I picked it up in my room, I said what room, was it in the room you lodged in of Mrs. Lowry's; he said yes.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence I accosted Mrs. Lowry what men's shoes they were in my room, and a hat; they were in my room in the morning. I know myself innocent; I went to lodge with Mrs. Lowry in September last when I left her lodging I told her where I was going to at Walthamstow; the very first time I came to town I went to her house. On the 28th of June she accosted me, I said do what you please; I went up to the magistrate; Mr. Moser saw it was a slight case he would not trouble a jury with it. Afterwards I was taken up; the tippet I found in my box at Walthamstow; I gave it to the girl, not with any intention to rob Mrs. Lowry. The prosecutrix swore to the shirt I had got on; I delivered the key of my box, and persuaded them to bring my box up to the office.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

491. REUBEN MAIN and SARAH SMITH were indicted for the wilful murder of Reuben Main the younger .

The indictment was read by Mr. Walford, and the case stated by Mr. Knapp.

ANN WILSON . Q. Your husband keeps the sign of the White Hart at Kingsland - A. Yes.

Q. Are you acquainted with the two prisoners at the bar - A. They had used my house about a fortnight. The man is an off bearer , he takes the bricks from the moulder I believe the woman is an upstricker ; they were both at my house and the child with them; I believe him to be about ten years of age. When I came home at nine o'clock I found them there, they staid till about a quarter to eleven. When they were going away the man prisoner asked me for a match; I gave him one; they went away with the match.

Court. Nothing struck you particular in their asking you for a match at that time of the year - A. No.

MARY PERON . Q. You work in the brick fields of Messrs. Rhodes - A. Yes; I know the two prisoners, they worked in the same field, and they and deceased slept in the sand house in the brick field; the boy was about ten years old.

Q. Were you at the White Hart public house onthe Thursday - A. Yes; I saw the two prisoners and the boy set there.

Q. Did you hear Main say any thing about the houses - A. He said d - n my b - y eyes, I will set the b - y sand houses houses on fire; I was leaning over the settle; he said so to the other prisoner; that is all I heard.

COURT. There must have been some other conversation - A. I did not hear any other conversation; I went to bed about eleven that night; between twelve and one I saw all the sand houses on fire; about eight o'clock the next morning I saw the prisoners standing by the child outside of the house; the child then was dead, with his little entrails out.

Prisoner Main. I never mentioned them words in the house.

ROBERT TIE . - Mr. Walford. What are you - A. I am a temperer in Mr. Rhodes' employ.

Q. Do you remember the prisoner going to the up-striker, Elizabeth Dean , on the 2d of June - A. Yes; he had some words with her, I work at the next stool; about two o'clock on that day, he threw some earth at her; she returned it again; he seemed to be angry, he said he would do no more work that day; he went away; after I had done work I went to the White Hart, I saw Reuben Main , Sarah Smith , and the child, who is about ten years of age; they were all sitting together.

COURT. Do you know what name they called the child - A. He was called after the father's name.

Mr. Knapp In what state of mind was Main at that time - A. He seemed to be grieved about the dispute that he had with the woman Dean; I continued with him three hours at the White Hart; after I left the White Hart I went down to the sand house, where I had slept all the summer.

Q. What sort of a building are these sand houses - A. They are about twelve feet one way and nineteen the other; they are built with brick, sticks laid on the top of them and covered with straw; there were six sand houses in a row; I slept in the third and the prisoner slept in the second.

Q. How long after you reached home did the prisoner come home - A. In about twenty minutes or a quarter of an hour.

Q. Did the child come home with them - A. I do not know. Main said, Bob are you here; I said, yes; he said I thought you had not come away; I said, yes, I said I have come from the house this quarter of an hour; he said if he had known when I came away he would have come with me.

Q. Had he any light with him - A. No light as I thought. I went to bed and went to sleep; within the course of two hours I was alarmed by my shirt sleeve being on fire; I pulled off my shirt and came out naked; Hollingsworth lent me a blanket to put round me; I went to the prisoners at the bar, they were standing about twenty yards from me; I said how, in the name of God, could these sand houses be set on fire. The man was dressed and the woman had a gown and petticoat on; whether she had a cap or bonnet on I cannot say; I said, Reuben, sure you was not so foolish as to bring a lighted pipe in; he said no, by God, I had no light at all; I then went and alarmed the three other people that were in the sand houses; then I heard him crying out the child, saying my child is burnt.

Q. Did you hear the child crying at all - A. No.

Q. Was it possible for him to have got the child out - A. The child might have been got out when I got out; but whether it was dead then I cannot say; we could not have gone in the sand house, but we had hoes and rakes that we could have reached him and dragged him out; the next morning I went in the sand house, the child was in a lump of straw laying within a yard of the sand house door; I took a hoe and found out the child; the straw blazed up; there was a jug of water brought and throwed on the straw and on the child; I carried the body out.

WILLIAM HOLDSWORTH . - Mr. Knapp. You are another temperer employed by Messrs. Rhodes; the prisoners were employed by Messrs. Rhodes I understand - A. They were. I slept in the upper sand house, nearest the turnpike road; the prisoner slept in the lower sand house but one; I went to bed about a quarter past ten; I awoke a little after twelve; I got up, I came out of the sand house; I saw the prisoner Main and the woman; I did not say any thing to them, they were walking backwards and forwards; I saw them for the best part of twenty minutes or hardly so much; I observed the sand houses were all on fire at the back part; I got my utensils out of my sand house; after I got them out Robert Tie came out quite naked; I said, Lord have mercy this is a bad job; I lent him my blanket to wrap round him; when the sand house was going in Sarah Smith said Lord have mercy upon me, the child is in the flames; the man said he was an undone man. He wished to step in to save the she child; I said my friend it is impossible for you to save the child at the present time the roof is going it.

Q. Was there any time previous to this that the child might be saved - A. Yes; if I had known it when I first came out of my sand house the child might have been saved; at that time the prisoners were standing a little way from the sand house, and if I had known I could have gone in and taken the child out myself without either hoe or rake; the back part of the prisoner's sand house was on fire. I was then about eight yards off.

WILLIAM TYRELL . - Mr. Walford. You are clerk to Messrs. Rhodes - A. I am.

Q. Just be so good as to describe these sand houses to his lordship and the jury - A. There are six sand houses under one roof; they are built with bricks, they are thatched with rafters, poles or planks and then hurdles and straw over them.

Q. We have heard they were all burned down - A. Yes.

Q. Do you call them sand houses because you put sand in them - A. Yes; the sand is spread on the ground to dry, and whenever an opportunity offers they put it in to keep it from being wet. I asked Main what cause he had to ask Mrs. Wilson for a match; his answer was to light his pipe when he went by the kiln that was then burning; he signified also that instead of lighting his pipe as he first intended, when he came to the kiln, he altered his mind and carried the pipe in the sand house.

DANIEL BISHOP . I am an officer belonging to Worship street office; I apprehended the prisoner on the Friday, at the Cock in Kingsland road; comingalong I asked the prisoner what occasion he had for a match; he said to light his pipe, he said he did not get a light; he threw the pipe away as he was going from the public house to the sand house.

Q. to Mrs. Wilson. When Main left the house had be a pipe as well as a match - A. I did not see him with any pipe.

JOSEPH SAVAGE . I am a surgeon, living at Kingsland On the 3rd of July I saw the body of the child after the fire happened; I saw a great spectacle indeed.

Q. What was the occasion of its death - A. I have no doubt in my own mind, that it was occasioned by the burning.

Main's Defence. When I went to the White Hart public house, after I had some words with this woman, she said she would not work if I did; she smacked some of the earth at me, and I resented it; it was an obstinacy between us; and afterwards she picked some hard out of the bank and throwed at me; when her brother saw it, he said Reuben come out never mind it; then she begun to pelt Sarah Smith ; I said if I cannot work quiet I will work no more; I went to the White Hart; in about two hours I and my companion were after coming away; I borrowed a match of Mrs. Wilson; I wanted that match to light my pipe at the kiln in the morning; when I go to work I always do smoke the first thing in the morning; when I came home I saw Robert Tie was at home; I said Robert, when did you come home; he says I have been in about a quarter of an hour; I told him if I had known when he came away I would have come away with him; he wished me a good night; I went to bed; when I had been asleep about an hour and a half the child called father, father, and awakened us two; we did not know by the stiffle of the smoke whether he was in or out; I enquired of that man whether he had seen the boy; he said no; I would have run in to save my child; he pulled me back and would not let me go in; our things were burned, I lost my shoes; I did not use to undress myself; she lost two petticoats, shoes, stockings, and coat; and if I had known the child had been in at the time, I would have saved him or lost my own life if I had a thousand.

The prisoners called three witnesses, who gave them a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

492. MARY BERRY and JOHN HAMBRIDGE were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 5th of June , a silver watch, value 40 s. a handkerchief, value 6 d. and two shillings, the property of Dennis Leonard , in the dwelling house of Nicholas Denning .

DENNIS LEONARD . I live at Woolwich, I am a labourer in one of his Majesty's yards. On the 4th of June I came up to London; on the 5th of June I was robbed at two o'clock; I was in Dyot street looking for a lodging; this woman came athwart of me, she said she could help me to a good lodging; I left Woolwich when I had done my work, so it was late when I came to London.

Q. Did you apply to the prisoner first, or she to you - A. I enquired for a lodging, she offered to be my companion; and I being a single man had no objection. We went to the house and she called to this man to light us into the room; he brought the light, unlocked the door and let me in the room, he padlocked it after I was in; then I thought I was safe; I pulled my clothes off and went to bed and she along with me; I fell asleep; when I awoke I missed her.

Q. How long was that after you went to bed - A. About half an hour; I put my hand out for my clothes, they were gone; I rushed to the door and the door was locked; in about ten minutes this man brought me a light and let me out of the room; I then found my clothes at the foot of the bed, they were removed from the upper part end of the bed to the foot; my silver watch was taken away, two shillings and my pocket handkerchief; I dressed myself, went out, and got a constable and took the young woman to the watch-house.

Q. Did you find the young woman before you went out of the house - A. Yes, she was stopped in the gallery of the house.

Q. Have you seen the watch since - A. No, nor none of my property.

Q. Then all that you know of the man is that he unlocked the door to let you in - and locked you in - and when you gave the alarm he unlocked it - A. Yes.

Q. Were you in liquor. - A. No, I had only a pint of beer and a pennyworth of bread and cheese.

SAMUEL ROBARTS . I am a patrol. On the morning of the 5th of June, as I was going on my duty in Dyot street; this man came up to me and told me he had been robbed; I went up stairs and took the woman in custody; this man endeavoured to make his escape by running down stairs; I ordered the watchman to let nobody go down till we had made a bit of a search; I took the woman to the watchhouse; I went back to take the man, he was gone; I waited for an hour and a half, he came back with a bottle of gin; then I took him in custody; nothing was found on either of them.

Berry's Defence. I am certain he had not a watch, nor any thing of the kind, only a half crown; he gave sixpence for the room, and two shillings to me; he had not a watch nor a handkerchief.

Hambridge said nothing in his defence.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Chambre.

493. SARAH DOLLING was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 30th of June , privily from the person of Sophia Eccles , a pair of gold ear rings, value 3 s. a half guinea, and a bank note, value 5 l. the property of Robert Eccles .

SOPHIA ECCLES . Q. Do you remember losing a pocket book and some things out of your pocket - A. Yes; the the last day of June.

Q. Had you known the prisoner before - A. She had been a shopmate of mine; I met her in Brick lane, Spitalfields; about twelve o'clock; I asked her to drink; we went into a public house in Brick lane ; we drank one glass of gin each; I dropped two caps from my pocket in the public house; she picked them up and put them in my pocket.

Q. How came you to let her put them in your pocket - A. I had my child with me; she very soon bid me good bye after then.

Q. How near do you live to this house in Brick lane where you had the liquor - A. I live at No. 4, Spicer street, Brick lane; about ten minutes walk from the public house. When I got home about an hour afterwards, I felt in my pockets; my caps were in mypocket and my pocket book was missing; I felt my pocket book was in my pocket when I was in the public house.

Q. When had you seen it open - A. The same day. before I went out; there was in it a five pound note, half a guinea and a pair of earrings.

Q. You are a married woman are you - A. Yes, my husband's name is Robert Eccles .

Q. Have you seen any of the property ever since - A. Yes, the pocket book I have seen since.

ELIZABETH BRANAN . I live in Angel alley, Bishopsgate street; I have known the prisoner some time. On the last day of June, at half after nine o'clock at night, I was putting up my shutters, she came to me, she had a piece of print under her arm for a gown; she asked me if I would take it in for her, I told her I could not take it in without asking my husband's leave; he gave her leave to leave it; she came in and sat down; she pulled four pound notes out of her bosom, she also took out a pocket book from her bosom, containing a pair of earrings and a seven shilling piece, she said her husband had sent for her to come down and see him; she had a husband at sea; she fell asleep and sat in the chair all night.

Q. Was she sober - A. I do not think that she was much in liquor; she was fast asleep, we could not awake her. The next morning she asked me if I would go with her to buy a few things to wear with this gown. I went with her; she came back to my house, and the officer came with this woman and took her. My husband delivered up all the things to the officer. The woman said to the officer this was the woman that had robbed her.

- SHEPHARD. Q. You went to the last witnesses house to enquire for Dolling - A. Yes, I went in and found the prisoner sitting in a chair behind the door; the prosecutrix came in and charged her with the robbery, she denied knowing any thing of it; I then proceeded to search her; I found nothing on her person. Down by the side of the chair where she sat, I picked up a one pound note. The last witness's husband delivered me this pocket book, he fetched it down stairs, he said the prisoner had given it him to take care of for her. I shewed the pocket book to the prosecutrix, she said it was her property. In a chair, on the left hand side where the prisoner sat, I took this linen, a piece for a gown, a petticoat, and a pair of stockings; the next day, before the magistrate, the last witness delivered me a pair of gold ear rings.

RICHARD BRANAN . Q. Do you recollect the prisoner coming to your house and asking leave to leave a gown there - A. Yes, and I saw a pocket book containing a pair of gold earrings, four one pound notes, a seven shilling piece, and two shillings; the pocket book she had in her hand that night. The next day she gave me the pocket book to take care of for her.

Q. Do you remember the constable coming to your house - A. Yes. He said this woman had lost a pocket book, mentioning the things that were in it; I said the woman in my house has such things.

Q. Are you sure that the pocket book you gave to Shephard was the same that you received from the prisoner - A. Yes; the earrings she had put in the box where the rest of the things had been; the next day I gave them to the constable.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I met this body by Crispin street, she asked me to go with her to buy a bundle of calico; I went with her; from there she asked me to go with her to take a gown to a mantua makers; I said Sophia I have got no money to treat you; I took her to a house where I was known in Fashion street, there we had two pints of beer and a quartern of gin; from there we went into another public house, she wanted to vomit, she went backwards, she was gone some time; I was standing talking to a person in the public house; she not coming back I went to her; going along the yard I picked up the pocket book in the yard; I took no notice of it; she was vomiting down the privy, I held her head; I perceived three caps fall down the privy, I took them up and doubled them up as well as I could; she told me to put them in her pocket; as I came along with her she asked me to see her to her mother's, she being in liquor. I had not power to lead her along and carry the child. I saw her safe to her mother's; what was in the pocket book I did not know. I had two glasses more of liquor. I met a person, I said I had a find; I saw this person shutting up her shutters; being in liquor I stopped there as they said all night; I found it, not knowing it was hers; I do not think it is her's, any more than it is any other person's here.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY, aged 24.

Of stealing only .

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Le Blanc.

494. THOMAS MONDAY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 24th of June , in the dwelling house of Thomas Scott , a bank note, value 50 l. the property of Benjamin Parkhurst .

BENJAMIN PARKHURST . Q. You are purser of a man of war - A. I am.

Q. In the month of June you had some notes, the produce of a draft - A. Yes, of two hundred and fifty pounds; it was drawn by John Page , on the house of Messrs. Williams and co. Birchin lane, in favour of myself or bearer; I took it for payment on Monday preceding the 24th or 25th of June.

Q. In what manner did you receive the payment - A. A note of one hundred pounds, a fifty pound note, and five of twenty pounds each.

Q. Did you take the whole home with you - A. I did; I lived at that at Mr. Scott's Bethnal green ; and undressing myself at night I left them in my breeches; they were put into my portmanteau, as I changed my dress the next morning. I did not examine the notes the next morning.

Q. What became of the portmanteau - A. It remained in the room; it was not locked.

Q. Then you did not miss any of your notes till the Bow street officer came - A. No, I did not.

Q. That was four or five days afterwards - A. Yes, it was on the 25th that I missed the notes, and it was on the Monday preceding the 24th I got them from the banker's.

Q. You had not made use of any of the notes had you - A. No.

Q. Were you present when the breeches were put in the portmanteau - A. Yes; I put them in myself;the prisoner was a servant of mine; he was in my service at the time.

Q. Had he been in the room that night - A. No. he had not; he had generally the key of my trunks and portmanteau.

Q. Had you any other fifty pound note besides that - A. No.

Q. Should you know the note if you were to see it - A. I should not.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. I understood you to say that you brought the notes home and put them in the portmanteau, which portmanteau was open to every body that chosed to go into the room - A. Yes.

Q. The boy was a servant of yours; I believe he can neither read nor write - A. He cannot.

STEPHEN LAVENDER . Q. Have you a fifty pound note - A. I have; I produce it; No. 4144, dated 4th of June 1808. I received it from Mr. Thomas Roberts on the 24th of June last. In consequence of information that I received of a boy going into Covent Garden theatre, I went there and told the money taker that there was a boy I wished to apprehend; the boy was stopped by Mr. Roberts, and the note was delivered to me by Mr. Roberts; I took the boy in custody.

THOMAS ROBERTS . Q. You are one of the money takers of Covent Garden theatre - A. I am; I received this note from the prisoner at the bar on the 24th of June at the office; the boy did not offer me the note in payment; it was in consequence of some conversation between me and Mr. Lavender; I asked the boy if he had not been in Cheapside and offered it in a sadler's shop; he said yes, he had been there; I then asked for the note; he said there was the note that he had offered at the sadler's shop; I wrote my own name upon the note; I am sure it is the same note that I received from him.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. To every question you asked he very readily answered - A. Yes; he said he was very sorry, he hoped he should not lose his situation in doing what he had done, in taking it without his master's knowledge, nor did he know the value of it; he said he should return it that night if he went home.

WILLIAM DRAPER . Q. You are a clerk in the house of Messrs. Williams and co. bankers - A I am.

Q. Do you remember paying a draft of Mr. Page, for two hundred and fifty pound - A. I do; it was paid on the 20th day of June.

Q. Have you any other memory when it was paid except from reference to your books - A. No, I have not.

Q. Have you your books here - A. No; I copied it out from the book.

Q. That will not do. Do you know in what manner it was paid - A. One fifty, one one-hundred, and five twenties.

Q. Can you from memory recollect that they were the notes that you paid - A. I cannot; it is impossible, from the number of notes that we pay away in a day.

Court. Can you swear upon inspection of the book this morning, there was an entry of a fifty pound bank note, and that part of the money was so paid - A. I think I can swear that a fifty pound was paid on that day for that check.

Mr. Knapp to prosecutor. You have had the boy some time, how has he behaved himself - A. He had behaved himself remarkably well; I can give him a good character; I compute it partly to my own carelessness; I am sure he would have returned it when he came home on the evening when I gave him a ticket to go to the theatre.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 13.

[ The jury and prosecutor recommended the prisoner to his Majesty's mercy, on account of his youth and good character .]

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Chambre.

495. EDWARD ROUSE, alias GEORGE ROUSE , was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Richard Skillman , about the hour of twelve at night, on the 23d of June , and burglariously stealing therein, seventeen pieces of Irish linen, value 50 l. his property .

The case was stated by Mr. Knapp.

RICHARD SKILLMAN . Q. You are a linen draper - A. I am in Kentin street, Brunswick square . I have only been in business a month.

Q. On the night of the 22nd of June, what time did you go to bed - A. At eleven o'clock. I secured the shop the last thing before I went to bed; I saw the bolts of the door fast, top and bottom, and the screws of the windows were all fast.

COURT. Is your shop the lower part of your house - A. Yes; I occupy the whole house; I got up a little after seven in the morning, and I went down to the shop a quarter before eight o'clock. I went to the shutters; in taking down the second shutter I perceived it drop into my hands; the screw of that shutter which was fastened in the shop remained in; it was cut in the wood; after I took down the shutters, I saw a pane of glass broke quite out; I then returned into the shop to see what I had lost; I discovered seventeen pieces of Irish linen gone; there were a great many pieces of prints taken down and very much disfigured by some person's feet; there were the print of feet upon the prints as if there had been more persons than one.

Q. Whereabouts is the value of these seventeen pieces of Irish linen - the whole amount - A. The cost price is about fifty pound. I found the shop door was left open; upon discovering my loss I went to the Foundling watchhouse.

Q. There you got some information that led you up to St. Giles's watchhouse - A. Yes.

Q. What part of your property did you see - A. I saw six pieces of Irish linen; I looked at them; I knew them to be mine; they have my wife's marks upon them; the prisoner was there in custody; the goods were kept and produced before the magistrate by them.

Cross-examined by Mr. Reynolds. I think you said you had been about a month in that business - A. I had.

Q. That is a very short time, you had not an opportunity of being acquainted with one thing any more than another, how do you know it was Irish linen - A. I know it by the invoice.

COURT. Do you know Irish linen when you see it - A. Yes.

Mr. Knapp. From the appearance of the things thatwere thrown about, must it not take up a great deal of time - A. Yes, and to take out the glass in the manner it was done.

COURT. What parish is your house in - A. In St. George, Bloomsbury.

- COOK. Q. You are a patrol - A. Yes.

Q. Where is your beat - A. Down Russel square. On this night, just before three o'clock, I was going my round from Southampton row, I was going to Woburn place, about two hundred yards off; I saw the prisoner and another man, he had the bag on his shoulder; I stood up against the pillar of Bolton house, where I could have command of them and they could not see me. When they came abreast of me; I sprang out and seized the other man, I said what have you got here; the prisoner faced round and struck me upon the head as hard as he could; the blows rather stagnated me for a bit; the other threw the bundle upon my toes, and took towards Bedford place; I alarmed the constable; the rattles sprung in all directions; the prisoner got within two yards of Bedford place, by that time I had sufficiently recovered myself to pursue him; the prisoner at the bar seeing a watchman coming out of the box, run from him; I then thought to cross him; he being of lighter heels got away; the watchman in Guildford street stopped him; I am sure it was the prisoner at the bar, and he was the same person that struck me with a knotted stick, it was like a black thorn stick. When I saw the watchman in Guildford street stop him, I went towards the property which lay at Bolton house door, captain Blackhall's door; I heard him say when he was locked up in Marlborough street, D - n my eyes, we have made a crack, but we are spoiled; he was going on further in the discourse, but he saw me; then he stopped.

Cross-examined by Mr. Reynolds. You saw him very distinctly - A. Yes.

Q. You are quite sure that you saw him - A. Yes.

Q. This was the 22nd of June - A. It was the 23d of June in the morning; it was break of day. When I stopped the other man, the property was tied up in two separate parcels, it was in a bag.

Q. And it was not the prisoner that had the bag - A. No.

COURT. It was just before three o'clock when you stopped him - A. Yes.

Q. When did day break - A. It became light about a quarter after two o'clock, it was a dark rainy morning; you might pick up any thing down on the pavement that one saw, about ten minutes or a quarter past two.

WILLIAM WELLS . Q. You are a watchman belonging to the Foundling district - A. I am.

Q. Do you remember the spring of the rattle on the morning of the 23d of June - A. Yes, just as the clock was striking three. When I got into Guildford street I saw the prisoner running down the street as hard as he could from Russel square; I ran towards him as hard as I could run, I stopped him, I asked him where he was going, he told me he was going home, he lived in Gray's inn lane; I then asked him what was the occasion of the springing of the rattles; he told me he did not know, but he believed there had been some people fighting: I then secured him and took him back to two of the Bloomsbury watchmen; I am sure that is the man.

THOMAS HATLEY . I am a watchman of St. Giles's. The prisoner was delivered me from Wells at the top of Guildford street; me and another watchman conducted him to St. Giles's watchhouse. When I got hold of him, he said do not take me, I am very innocent, it was only a sham fight; I am very ready to go with you. When I took him to the watchhouse, Cook the patrol had the linen there; Cook said what have you done with the knotted stick that you hit me over the head with; he said he had not.

JAMES PERRY . Q. What are you - A. I am the watchhouse keeper of St. Giles's; I produce the bag and the linen.

Q. to Mrs. Skillman. I believe you are the wife of the prosecutor - A. I am, the linen is my own marking; there is a piece of Irish linen, No. 41, it cost sixteen pence a yard; there was twenty six yards, but there has been eight yards sold; this piece is twenty five yards, it cost me two shillings and nine pence a-yard; and this is twenty six yards, it cost two shillings and three pence a yard.

COURT. It is all Irish - A. Yes; they have every one our private mark.

Mr. Reynolds. Are you sure that they were in your house on the night of the 22nd - A. I am quite sure.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 17.

Of stealing in the dwelling house to the value of forty shillings and upwards.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

496. WILLIAM BOWEN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 12th of January a silver watch, value 2 l. and twenty five pounds in monies, numbered, the property of Robert Shuttleworth , in his dwelling house .

ROBERT SHUTTLEWORTH . Q. Where is your residence in town - A. In Norton street .

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar - A. Perfectly as well as I know myself; he was my servant , he slept in the house at that time.

Q. When did you miss your property - A. On Tuesday the 12th of January, when I came home about nine o'clock in the morning, I found my bureau was unlocked; the bureau was in the parlour next the street; upon finding it open I naturally looked at the drawer where I keep cash. I missed about twenty five pounds in gold and silver.

Q. Are you sure it was above twenty pounds - A. Yes; - about two days after I missed my watch, a double casee silver watch.

Q. Was that kept in the same drawer where the money was - A. Yes; it was a thing that I did not make use of; I did not miss it when I missed the money.

Q. When had you last seen the money and the watch in the bureau - A. The day before, I had seen the money.

Q. You do not know how long before you had seen the watch - A. No, I suppose about a fortnight.

Q. This was in January - how long was it afterwards that you got any intelligence of the money or the watch - A. I heard nothing of it till the last day of June; I rode out in the morning; when I returned my servant told me he had taken William. I got a constable, and when the constable came I went in to him, I said how could you be such a cursed fool for coming here you knew you would be taken in custody and I wouldrather you had been any where else; I did not want the trouble of prosecuting of him; he said he had a good birth on board a ship, his conscience troubled him, he came to ask my pardon; I told him I could not compound felony, I could not compromise the matter any how; he said the watch was at a pawnbrokers in Whitecross street; before the magistrate he named the pawnbroker; I went to the pawnbrokers with one of the officers to identify the watch; we took the prisoner with us in a coach, to point out the pawnbrokers; he willingly gave every information he could, he did not wish to deny any thing.

Q. When you got to Mr. Salmons did you find any watch there - A. Yes, I saw the watch.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. How did he behave while in your service - A. He was very attentive to his business, never went out of a night; and I was very much surprized when my man told me he had done it. In the hackney coach, going to Whitecross street, he said he had got in liquor and the money was all stole from him.

CHARLES EDWARD SALMON . I am a pawnbroker in Whitecross street; the watch was pledged with me by a woman.

Q. Do you know who the woman was - A. I have some knowledge of her: she pledged it in the name of Mary Baxter ; I shewed the prosecutor the watch; this is the watch, I have had it ever since.

Prosecutor. That is my watch.

Prisoner's Defence. My lord, and gentlemen of the jury, at the time this offence was stated to be committed I was in a deranged state of mind, on account of my master suddenly discharging of me from my service, and at the same time declaring he would not give me a character; I always bore a good character; on account of my youth, and having nobody to give me a character, I humbly hope your lordship will let me serve his Majesty in any way you may think proper.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 21.

[ The jury and the prosecutor recommended the prisoner to his Majesty's mercy, on account of his youth, and the contrition he had shewn .]

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Chambre.

497. HENRY VOYER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 16th of June , four waistcoats, value 35 s. the property of Robert Tuck , privately in his shop .

ANN TUCK . My husband is a taylor and breeches maker , No. 20, Spring street, Portman square . On the 16th of June, about half past one, the prisoner came into my shop for a pair of breeches; my husband was not at home, I sent the boy for him; I went in the parlour to get a shawl to throw over my shoulders, I was ill at the time, and momentary he took these four waistcoats off the counter.

Q. Who was in the shop at the time - A. Nobody but himself; he ran away immediately; my husband came home and went to the boy's mother; the prisoner said his mother sent him; his mother lived in St. James' street, Oxford road.

Q. Are you sure that when you went out of the shop he ran away with the waistcoats - A. Yes, I saw him run away with the waistcoats.

ROBERT TUCK . When I came home I went to the prisoner's mother, and I asked her if he was at home with her; I thought he was at sea; she said he was not at home, the mother said it was likely to be him. The next morning the mother told me he was at home.

Q. Did you ever find your things - A. No; when the boy was taken, he told me he had sold the things.

JOHN COBHAM . I am a constable; I took the prisoner in custody on the 17th of June; I asked him how he came to steal the waistcoats; he said because his mother refused to give him clothing; he said he had sold the waistcoats in Rosemary lane.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent of taking the things.

GUILTY, aged 17.

Of stealing the goods, but not privately in the shop .

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

498. JOSEPH BARNABY and NATHANIEL WILSON were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 21st of June , a saw, value 7 s. the property of Thomas Bushell ; and a saw, value 10 s. the property of William Roswell .

THOMAS BUSHELL . I am a carpenter ; I was working at No. 18, Harford place, near Tottenham court road , I was finishing the inside of a house. On Monday the 20th of June, at seven o'clock in the evening or a quarter after, I left my tools in the house; the next morning, about a quarter past six, I went and found the place was broken open; the kitchen sash had been broken open; it was nailed up; when I looked in the place I found the saws gone, and Barnaby was in custody.

WILLIAM ROSWELL . Q. You are a carpenter, you were at the same building - A. Yes; I left the place about seven o'clock; at six the next morning I returned, I found the place broken open, and both saws gone.

GEORGE CLARK . I am a watchman in Steward street, Tottenham Court road; after calling the hour of past four in the morning, I heard the alarm given; I saw two lads running; Barnaby was one, and another lad in company with him; I sprang my rattle and followed them; in about forty yards the saws dropped from between them; I picked up the saws, I sprang my rattle again, gave a fresh alarm; the prisoners were chased into Tottenham Court road towards Fitzroy square; Barnaby was stopped and delivered into the charge a watchman; I did not see Wilson till he was brought before the magistrate at eleven o'clock; I am sure Barnaby is one; I cannot swear to Wilson because his apparel was changed.

JOHN CLARK . I am a patrol. On the morning of the 21st of June, it was past four o'clock, I saw the two prisoners at the bar passing down Thornaugh street, I pursued them; I asked a young man that was a soldier to pursue them; he catched Barnaby; I am sure of Barnaby; I never lost sight of him but in the Mews; the other I am not so positive of.

JAMES STEVENS . I am a watchman to Messrs. Combes and co; I was standing with the watchman, when he was shutting up his box at past four o'clock in the morning; we run down to the corner of Alfred place, from where the two prisoners come; they run towards Russel square; I saw the two saws drop from between them; I am sure the two prisoners dropped the saws; I saw the patrol bring Barnaby back.

Q. Are you sure Barnaby was one of them that run by - A. Yes; I am not certain of the other.

(The property produced and identified.)

Barnaby's Defence. I was going to look after work at four o'clock in the morning. I picked them up at the corner of the street.

Wilson's Defence. I am innocent.

BARNABY - GUILTY , aged 18.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

WILSON - NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

498. CHARLES FRANCIS TRUFORT was indicted for that he on the 49th of April was servant to Richard Hooper , and was employed, and entrusted by him to receive money for him, and that he being such servant and so employed, and entrusted, did receive and take into his possession, the sum of five pounds thirteen shillings and sixpence for and on account of his master, that he afterwards fraudulently and feloniously did secrete and steal the same .

RICHARD HOOPER . I am a wholesale wine and brandy seller , in St. John street ; the prisoner was in my employ; I engaged him at the commencement of the present year, as a managing clerk .

Q. Was he to receive money for you - A. Yes; and to pay money for me, either in doors or out of doors; I had doubts of his honesty. Some time before this fact came out on the 29th of April , last, a gentleman sent for two gallons of brandy, rum, and gin; the prisoner received the order and entered it in the day book; I enquired if the goods were gone in due time; he denied that the gentleman's servant had been for them; I asked him again the next day; he also then denied it as such; seeing he had entered it the book, not called for, I declined asking him any more questions about it; in a little time afterwards seeing some of the gentleman's friends, I mentioned my surprize. About a month after the 29th. of April, the bill and receipt which my servant wrote out was handed to me for the goods, which he had marked not called for.

Mr. Gurney. Have you any partner - A. None.

WILLIAM BARWOOD . I am servant to Mr. Lucas, at Tooting, on the 29th of April my master gave me some money and an order for Mr. Hooper in St. John Street, for two gallons of gin, two gallons of rum, two gallons of brandy; I gave to the prisoner, at Hooper's, the order; the prisoner ordered the other servant to put the goods up; which he did; I told the prisoner if he would make a bill I would pay for it; he gave me the bill and receipt; I paid him five pounds thirteen shillings and sixpence.

(The bill and receipt read)

Prisoner's Defence. I was seriously distressed, I did it in an unguarded moment, I meaned to return it. I never was in any disgrace in my life.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 33.

Fined One Shilling and discharged.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

499. ROSE KITE and CHARLOTTE WOOD , were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 20th of June , six cotton handkerchiefs, value 9 s. the property of William Waugh .

MAURICE DOWLING . I am an apprentice to William Waugh , linen draper No. 3, Goodge street . On the 20th of June last, between eleven and twelve o'clock, the prisoner Charlotte Wood came into my master's shop, and enquired the price of some check that was outside of the door; Mr. Waugh told them the price of the check; as soon as she knew the price of the check, she left the shop; immediately after which a noise was heard, which we supposed to be tearing the handkerchiefs outside of the window; I then went to the door. George Kettel , a witness, gave me some information; by his direction I went in pursuit of the prisoner; I saw John Alder , a shoemaker, standing at his stall, I requested him to assist me in securing the prisoner; he did so.

Q. Where were the prisoners - A. In Charlotte street, walking together very deliberately; the prisoner Rose Kite, went through Mr. Rolfe's shop, he keeps a potatoe warehouse; I secured Wood, and when Kite came out I secured her; we took them to my master's shop, and from there to the watchhouse; I took the the handkerchiefs from Kite; these are the six handkerchiefs; I know them to be my master's property; there is no mark on them; here are some handkerchiefs that match with them, that were left behind.

GEORGE KETTELL . As I was coming by the shop door I saw Kite tear them off and go round the corner into Tottenham Court Road; I stopped a bit, I saw Rose Kite and Wood running away as hard as they could; I told the people of the shop, and Mr. Waugh's apprentice went in pursuit of them; he met Alder in his way; he asked him to assist in taking the prisoners; he did so; the goods were found upon Rose Kite.

JOHN ALDER . By the desire of the first witness I went in pursuit of the prisoners; in a few seconds, I caught Rose Kite with the property upon her.

(The property produced and identified)

Wood's Defence. As I came down Goodge street, I asked the price of the check; I walked some distance from the shop; me and this young woman as we were looking at the check, a man asked us if we would have any thing to drink; he followed us and asked us to hold the handkerchiefs.

Kite's Defence. What she says is the truth.

KITE, - GUILTY , aged 20.

WOOD, - GUILTY , aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

500. JOSEPH GASKIN and MARY KILBRIAN were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 28th of June , five pounds and three quarter weight of feathers, value 1 l. 16 s , the property of Francis Search .

- FIGGET. I am footman to Mr. Search; John Gray brought a bag down stairs; I asked him what he had got there; he told me he had some waste; there were some holes in the bag. I saw the feathers were not waste I put my fingers in the hole, and pulled some of the feathers out; I took the bag from him and put it behind the counter; I removed it into the accompting house, and begged them to call Mr. Search; I asked Mr. Search whether he sold them feathers at two pence a pound, or no; he said, no. I went for an officer; I secured the woman, she wished me to let her go.

JOHN GRAY . I work for Mr. Search, Clerkenwellgreen ; that morning this affair happened I was at my lodging at breakfast; she asked me if I would shew her the way to Mr. Search's warehouse; she told me that Gaskin was to give her some feathers that morning.

Q. What is she - A. A milk carrier ; I went and shewed her the man and the door; I went back to my breakfast and then returned to shop. As I went up stairs I saw Gaskin with some feathers in his apron, and the bag of feathers stood in the scale, he was weighing them; he told me to carry the bag down to the shop for the woman; I did bring it down; the woman and Gaskin followed me. Mr. Figget asked me what it was, I told him waste feathers, he took out a handful of feathers, he said they were rum waste, and that they were the best feathers in the house.

ELIZABETH BARTLETT . I went up stairs to sew a bag; I said to Gaskin how could you be such a fool; he said he did it either to oblige a friend or a shopmate, I cannot say which he said.

ROBERT STANTON . I am an officer belonging to Hatton Garden office. On the morning of the 25th of June Mr. Figgett came to me; I went with him to the shop, he had detained the woman; she said they were given to her by Gaskin. I took up Gaskin; he said he was very sorry, he was afraid he should be transported. This is the bag delivered to me by Mr. Figgett.

FRANCIS SEARCH . I live on Clerkenwell Green. Gaskin lived with me as warehouseman . In the manufacturing of feathers there is a large quantity of waste; Gaskin was employed by me in selling the waste. We cut open the bag and found five pounds and three quarters of the best feathers. After the discovery of the robbery Gaskin said they were some loose feathers that were laying loose about the floor; I observed to him that he knew better, as well as I, that there were none loose, that they were all in bags. I examined the bags and found some gone.

Figgett. That is the same bag that I stopped; there were five pounds and three quarters of the best feathers at the bottom of the bag. The waste was on the top.

Gaskin's Defence. I have worked in Mr. Search's family sixteen years and nine months; I have been in the habit of taking money. On the 24th of June Michael Tie spoke to me for twenty eight pound of waste for an acquaintance of his, he said she was coming on Saturday morning about eight o'clock. About nine o'clock Grey came in with the woman, he told me there was the woman that came after the feathers; I weighed them. Knowing that she wanted waste, I took a bag which had at the bottom some swan, with some sweepings of the house; I saw they were swan feathers under when I put the waste in; I could not then unmix them when I had shot them down in the bag; the bag was to be brought back on Saturday night.

Kilbrian's Defence. I know nothing of the feathers at all; I stood still till he weighed the feathers; I never had the feathers in my custody.

Gaskin called one witness, who gave him a good character.

Kilbrian called one witness, who gave her a good character.

GASKIN, GUILTY , aged 42.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

KILBRIAN, NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

501. DANIEL RICHARDSON and JAMES KEEFE were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 18th of June , two deal planks, value 16 s. the property of Thomas Lewis .

THOMAS JOHNSON . I am a carpenter in Little Guildford street, Russel square . On Saturday the 18th of June we observed Richardson walking about the premises before twelve o'clock; we watched him. About six o'clock at night we observed the prisoner Keefe walking round the premises; in about five minutes he returned with Richardson; Richardson went into the coach house and took the deals, Keefe walking on to Torrington street; Richards took the deals on his shoulder, carrying them towards Torrington street; I and another man took him in Torrington street, and we stopped Keefe at the same time.

GEORGE RILEY . I work for Mr. Riley, Russel square.

Q. Do you know any more than Johnson does - A. No; what he has said is true.

The property produced and identified.

Richardson's Defence. A man met me in Bedford square, he asked me to carry a load for him to the saw pit.

Keefe's Defence. I know nothing of the business at all, I was not in his company by fifty yards when he was taken.

RICHARD STEERS . I saw all that passed that night, the same as Johnson. These two men confessed before the magistrate that they took the deals.

Richardson called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Keefe called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

RICHARDSON, GUILTY , aged 34.

KEEFE, GUILTY , aged 32.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

502. JOHN WHITE was indicted for the wilful murder of Peter Smith .

There being no evidence adduced against the prisoner, he was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Le Blanc.

503. JOSEPH WEST was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of John Hanson , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein on the 31st of May , about the hour of two at night, a ham, value 10 s. three table cloths, value 1 l. 10 s. four silver table spoons, value 2 l. and five other spoons, value 10 s. the property of John Hanson ; - one pair of sugar tongs, value 10 s. three pair of stockings, value 1 s. one silver table spoon, value 10 s. and an apron, value 6 d. the property of Charles Clapham ; - and

WILLIAM ROBINSON for feloniously receiving three table cloths, value 1 l. 10 s. a ham, value 10 s. and an apron, value 6 d. being part and parcel of the said goods, he knowing them to be stolen

The case was stated by Mr. Knapp.

CHARLES CLAPHAM . Q. You are the husband of Elizabeth Clapham , cook of Mr. Hanson. - A. Yes.

Q. What time did you go to bed that night - A. About ten o'clock; I sleep in the house, in the three pair back room.

Q. Was the window of the kitchen and the house secured when you went to bed - A. The window was fastened by a bar, but not so secure as it might have been; the feather had not gone through.

Q. Was the sash put down - A. I cannot swear that; there were no weights to the sash.

Q. Do you mean to say it was quite open, or shut down - A. I cannot say one way or the other.

Q. What time did you come down in the morning - A. I came down twenty minutes past five.

COURT. Was the shutters down - A. The shutters were shut in.

Mr. Knapp. What was the state of the area window when you went out - A. I did not notice it; the back area door was half open.

Q. How was that when you went to bed - A. I believe it was secured; I cannot say it was fast.

Q. Did you go to bed first or your wife - A. We both went to bed together.

Q. You went out about half after five - did you observe the area gate - A. The front area door was half open; I went out at the street door.

ELIZABETH CLAPHAM . Q. Are you the wife of the last witness - A. Yes.

Q. Did you and your husband go to bed at the same time - A. We did.

Q. About what time did you go to bed - A. About as nigh ten o'clock as could be; whether it had gone ten or no I am not sure.

Q. Did you leave the house secure - A. I believe I did; it was as secure as it always was.

Q. How was the kitchen window when you came down in the morning - A. The window was fastened the same way when we came down as when we went to bed. I saw a great deal of dirt in the window, and I saw the print of a man's foot upon the dresser under the window. I went up stairs about my business. The porter said I heard the door go a second time after your husband went out; I was alarmed; that was about an hour afterwards. I ran down stairs and said, sir, the thieves have been. There were four table spoons of Mr. Hanson's gone, four tea spoons, a salt spoon, three table cloths, and a ham, all Mr. Hanson's. Then I went to look at my own; there was a pair of tea tongs, a table spoon, tea spoon, and an apron, gone of mine.

Q. Where were these things, the table cloth and the spoons, the night before when you went to bed - A. The spoons were in the closet, the table cloth in the drawer, the ham in the passage over the back area, my spoons in the dark closet, going the into back area.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You are dressed like a quaker, have you been sworn - A. Yes.

Q. Other people in the house had been up and out before you - A. Only my husband; there was a piece of coat found the same morning; I saw it as soon as I came down stairs, between the window and the cill.

Mr. Knapp. Between the window and the cill there was a piece of a coat found - the window had no pulley - A. No.

Q. Therefore if any body threw up the sash and attempted to come in it would fall down upon them - A. Yes; I left the piece of coat there.

HARGRAVE HANSON . Q. You are the son of the prosecutor, Mr. Hanson - A. Yes, his name is John Hanson , he is in partnership with Mr. John Birch ; it is my father's house, he lives there and the property is his.

Q. Does Mr. Birch live in the house - A. He acts as partner , he has an office there, and he has a house at another place.

Q. This house is situated in the Liberty of the Rolls, it is in the county of Middlesex - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know West - A. I do; he was a servant of my father's for a year, it is now a year ago that he lived with my father.

Q. Did you discover by the information that you received from the servant in the morning that the house had been robbed - A. Yes. The servant on seeing this piece of cloth came up to me; in consequence of the information I came down, the servant had not taken away the piece of cloth; the first thing they mentioned to me was the window; there was all dirt there, it had the appearance of a person's foot; it rained very hard in the night, it was impossible any body could come in without making it dirty: the cloth laid inside of the window, and the buttons on the outside; in consequence of that I was perfectly convinced that somebody had broke in; I found upon enquiry that several things had been missing, that have been described; we had a suspicion who the person was certainly; a week or ten days elapsed; I was going across Lincoln's inn I observed West, he was coming across Lincoln's inn; having no reason to ask him any question, I walked along; at the time I came to Carey street, I heard somebody running, it was this man; he said, I beg your pardon, Mr. Hanson, I was the man that robbed your house on such a night.

Mr. Alley. Did you make him any promise - A. None at all. I replied, did you, I will not stop here and talk about it, come home and have an explanation about it; he and I went home and he explained it, he said that between twelve and one o'clock that night, he broke into the house by this means, he got over the area gate and got into the area, he stopped, there a short time till the watchman had gone bye, he turned the pin of the window about a good deal, it was fastened by a feather, he turned the pin about a good deal; after which the feather fell down in consequence of which he immediately took out this pin; then the shutter was immediately loose; he opened the shutter and entered the window, and got over the dresser; in getting through the window, in consequence of there being no pulley to it, it cut his coat getting through and tore part of it off; he then fastened the shutter again, as it was the former part of the night, indeed faster, for if they had been properly done nobody could do it; he then remained in thekitchen and collected all these things together, as before stated, the ham, and table cloth, &c. and waited in the kitchen, in the back area, and in the coal hole, till Mr. Clapham went out in the morning, through at the street door, as he always does every morning; the prisoner about five minutes after followed him, that was all he said; in consequence of that information I sent for Mr. Blundell the constable, and de livered him over to him.

Mr. Knapp. Did you afterwards go to Robinson's apartment - A. I did; I went to the watchhouse with Mr. Blundell; at the watchhouse Mr. Blundell asked where these things were; he replied that they were in Fisher street, No. 22, at Mr. Robinson's. In consequence of that information Mr. Blundell and I went there to see if it was true, leaving the prisoner in the watchhouse; I saw Mr. Robinson at No. 22, Fisher street; he appeared to me to be in lodgings; Mr. Blundell asked him if he knew a person of the name of West, and if he knew Mr. Hanson's servant, if he knew any thing of him, or had seen him; he said I do not know any thing of him, nor have I seen any thing of him; Mr. Blundell said are you sure of that; I think the words were quite, or no; after that Mr. Blundell asked him if he had any bundle containing the table cloths or the ham; he replied no; immediately Robinson turned to his wife and asked her if she knew any thing of them, or had seen any thing of him or these things; she said no; Mr. Blundell said he was sure the things were there, and he would have a search warrant; the prisoner after pausing a little turned round to his wife, and said well, I believe, we may as well confess it as not; Robinson immediately crawled under the bed and got the bundle containing the table cloth and the ham; then Mr. Blundell said you must come along with me and the bundle; we all came together to the watchhouse, he carried the bundle; he was secured in the watchhouse. The things were delivered to Mr. Blundell; they are my father's property, but I do not know so much about them as the cook.

MR. BLUNDELL. Q. You are a constable of the Liberty of the Rolls - A. Yes. On the 16th of June, between the hours of eight and nine o'clock in the evening, I apprehended the prisoner.

Q. In consequence of the information that you received from the prisoner West, did you afterwards go to Robinson's house - A. I did.

Q. Did you hear the account that was given by Mr. Hanson - A. Yes, it is true; Robinson took the bundle from under the bed.

Q. Did you take Robinson and the bundle to the watchhouse - A. Yes; I did not take him in custody then, he willingly went with me; when I came to the watchhouse I said he was in custody; I have had the bundle ever since; I produce it, and a piece of coat; on the 1st of June, at night, that piece of coat was delivered by Mr. Hanson to the watchman.

Mr. Hanson. I delivered that piece of coat to Robert Brookes .

Q. to Mrs. Clapham. Look at that bundle - A. These three table cloths are Mr. Hanson's, they were in the drawer on the over night; the stockings are mine and the coloured apron; we had lost a ham, it was like it.

ROBERT BROOKES . Q. You received that piece of coat from Mr. Hanson - A. I did; I delivered it to the constable.

Q. to Blundell. Did you observe the coat of the prisoner - A. I did; at that time he had cut it, but there is a particular red selvage in the coat, and in the piece there is that particular selvage, which answers to the coat.

GEORGE WOOD . I produce a coat that I took off the prisoner's back.

Q. Have you looked at that piece of cloth and the coat - A. Yes; one part of it corresponds.

COURT. Does it particularly, so as you are able to swear that is a piece of that coat - A. Yes.

ROBERT BARKER . Q. You are a pawnbroker A. I am, 135 High Holborn; I have got a pair of sugar tongs, I took them in on the 1st of June.

Q. Do you know of whom - A. I do not; I lent seven shillings on them; the real value of them is ten shillings.

Mrs. Clapham. These sugar tongs are mine, I believe.

Q. Have you any doubt - A. None at all.

Q. to Blundell. Did the prisoner in the account he gave you tell you to what pawnbrokers to go - A. He did.

WILLIAM FOSTER . Q. You are shopman to Messrs. Payne, Bloomsbury - A Yes; I received this table spoon on the 1st of June of the prisoner West, in his own name, Fisher street, he pledged it for ten shillings.

Mr. Clapham. I believe it is mine.

Q. Have you any doubt - A. None at all.

West said nothing in his defence.

Robinson's Defence. West left the articles with my wife; I did not know any thing of the affair till Sunday the 5th of June, then my wife told me that Joseph West had left a bundle with her; as it was left so it was taken away. I am very sorry for denying it to the officer, when he came, but I did not know he was an officer, nor did I understand what he said at first; as soon as I properly understood the affair and when he told me what West had been about, I took them from the place where my wife had left them; I asked West why he brought me in such trouble; he said he was sorry, I was an innocent man.

COURT to Brookes. Was you at the watchhouse when West was brought there, and when Robinson was there - A. Yes, I was with them all night, and till they went to the justice's the next day; I heard West say to Robinson that he was sorry he had left any thing with him to bring him into any trouble.

West called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Robinson called one witness, who gave him a good character.

WEST, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 31.

ROBINSON, NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury before, Mr. justice Le Blanc.

504. SAMUEL FEARCY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 24th of June , a silver watch value 20 s. the property of Thomas Hooper .

THOMAS HOOPER . Q. Do you know the Dolphin public house, Long alley, Moorfields - A. Yes,there on the 24th of June; the prisoner and I were at the Dolphin in Long alley. About three o'clock in the afternoon I had occasion to go to the privy; I put my watch on the seat, I came away and forgot it; about one hour after that I missed it. I returned to the privy, the prisoner was in the privy; I asked the prisoner if he had seen a watch on the seat, he said no; I called the workmen together; by that time the prisoner came out; they all denied it together; the prisoner denied it a second time. About six o'clock in the evening the prisoner left work. I believe the man was intoxicated, or else he would not have done it. I have seen the watch since.

JAMES MILLER . Q. You are a pawnbroker - A. Yes, I live at No. 6, Aldersgate street. On the 24th of June, between five and six o'clock, the prisoner pledged this watch with me for fifteen shillings

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was at work at the building for the prosecutor's father; we drank freely; I had occasion to go to the privy, he came and accused me of the watch; I denied that I had it. On my getting up, stupid as I was, I took and pawned it for fifteen shillings. I came back and left the duplicate and a seven shilling piece for the prosecutor; I confessed that I had pawned the watch; he received the ticket of the watch on the following morning and the seven shilling piece; it was all agreed on in part of payment, and that the remainder part of the money should be paid by me in a fortnight, but the constable would not permit it.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged, 36.

Privately Whipped and discharged.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Chambre.

505. CATHERINE PERRY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 6th of June , a cover of a tent bed, value 10 s. a counterpane, value 10 s. three pair of sheets, value 2 l. three pillow cases, value 3 s. seven towels, value 3 s. 6 d. a child's shift, value 1 s. and two child's coats, value 4 s. the property of William Gage , in his dwelling house .

WILLIAM GAGE . Q. Where do you reside - A. My house is in the parish of St. Ann, Soho, Westminter ; the prisoner lived with me seven months, she was cook. On the 6th of June Mrs. Gage came to me and said that she saw something out of the corner of the maid's box, that looked like a table cloth; I went up into the garret and pulled out the table cloth; the box was in the maid's room; there was no other servant in the house at that time; the table cloth had my mark. I then went down to her, and told her I wished to see the inside of her box, as I had found a table cloth, I suspected she had other things; she said she would not permit me to look in the box without a search warrant. Immediately I went up to Marlborough street, it being Saturday evening the magistrate would not grant a search warrant; I came home, I ordered the porter to take the box out of the room and place them in the adjoining room; he did so. I got two padlocks and staples, and put them on this door to prevent any body going in. On Saturday evening I asked her to let me see the inside of her box; on Sunday morning I asked her the same.

Q. You did not let her go to the box - A. No. On Sunday evening I requested the same, she said no; - on Monday morning she said she would permit me to see the box. One of my young men and the prisoner went with me; she unlocked the large box. On the top there laid a pair of fine sheets, they are mine. I found there were more things in the box. I ordered him to put the locks on the door again; James Stone the constable, came about nine o'clock; the prisoner took herself off in the mean time. I and the constable searched her boxes, she left them open; we found all the articles mentioned in the indictment. This linen was left in the drawers for the use of the family. The constable found her in Tothil fields.

JAMES STONE . Q. You were present with Mr. Gage when you examined the two boxes - A. Yes; some was in one box and some in another; they were the prisoner's boxes, I took them from amongst her things.

Q. They were all things which Mr. Gage claimed to be his property - A. Yes. The prisoner was not there.

The property produced and identified.

Mr. Pooley to Gage. You keep a linen draper's shop in Lincoln's inn fields - have you any partner - A. None.

COURT. What is the value of one pair of sheets - A. Thirty shillings.

The prisoner left her defence to her counsel - called no witness to her character.

GUILTY, aged 22.

Of stealing to the value of thirty nine shillings .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Le Blanc.

506. JOSEPH BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 26th of May , a silver watch, value 5 l. a ribbon, value 2 d. and a key, value 2 d. the property of John Harden , in his dwelling house .

JOHN HARDEN . I live in Perkin's rents. St. John, Westminster , I am a publican .

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. Yes, he lodged in my house better than two months before this happened.

Q. Where did you keep your watch - A. In the bed room where we sleep; the watch was not locked up, but the money was.

Q. What is the situation of the window - A. I suppose ten or eleven feet from the ground; there is only one window in that room; the roof of the washhouse runs up sloping about two foot and a half from the window, and there are two beds in the room; the room is too small for two bedsteads; the children's bed is on the floor under the window.

Q. Then any person getting in that window, must they pass over the bed - A. Yes. My watch was in one of the drawers.

Q. When did you miss your watch - A. On the 30th of May. Before I missed the watch I had him taken; the watch was missed at the time I went up to Queen square with him; I had missed a good many halfpence and penny pieces out of the drawer. On the 30th of May I saw the mark of a man's shoe on the bed quilt, I thought it appeared to be his size. Finding all the copper gone, I went down stairs and took him by the collar and took his shoe off; I compared it with the mark on the bed quilt, I found it corresponded with the mark on the quilt.

Q. This washhouse or shed, where was that - A. That was in the back yard belonging to the premises.

Q. Was there any difficulty in getting up that shed to the window - A. No.

Q. Any body belonging to the house might get into the yard - A. Yes.

Q. Did the prisoner sleep at home - A. Generally, for the first month or six weeks he did, and after that he seldom slept at home. I have seen the watch since.

MRS. HARDEN. Q. You are the wife of the last witness - A. Yes.

Q. The prisoner lodged, we understand, with your husband and you - A. Yes.

Q. Were you at any time in May at any part of the house with him alone - A. Yes, about a week before he was taken up I was in the tap room with him; he went out, I did not see which way he went; I heard a noise in the bed room almost immediately after he went; I thought I heard somebody walking in the room; I went up stairs; finding the door locked and my husband had got the key, I went into the yard, I could see nobody. In a few minutes afterwards the young man came in from the yard.

Q. Did you take any notice of the bed room that day - A. No.

Q. When did you see the marks on the bed - A. On the 30th of May I saw three of the drawers open; I looked round, I saw somebody had been in at the window; a great many halfpence and penny pieces were taken out of the drawer. I saw the foot mark on the bed. I immediately called my husband up; the window was a little way open.

WILLIAM GORDON . I am a pawnbroker, No. 92, St. Martin's lane.

Q. Do you know the person of the prisoner - A. I cannot say I know him, I have some small recollection of him. On Thursday the 26th of May, between three and four o'clock, this watch I took in pledge for two guineas; I believe it was the prisoner, I am not certain; he was dressed in a light coloured drab coat, with a whip in his hand; he had got on a drab coat when I saw him afterwards, of the same kind, it was pawned in the name of Thomas Owen . Brompton row.

JOHN PREIST . Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar - A. Yes.

Q. Did you lend him any money and when - A. I lent him a seven shilling piece; I do not know the day or the month, I am no scholar, I believe it was between twelve and one o'clock of the day; we went together in a cart to his uncle's at Bow; he paid me six shillings of it at six o'clock at night, he only wanted to borrow a shilling; the landlord was present at the time I lent it him; the prisoner was not out of my sight from the time I lent it him to the time he paid me the six shillings.

Q. Had he a stick or whip in his hand - A. No.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. The day I was apprehended I was playing at bumble puppy in this gentleman's yard, there were a great many strangers there, as well as people that used the house. About four o'clock in the afternoon I was putting a clean shirt on; I heard a cry out that the prosecutor had lost some halfpence; I came down, the gentleman pulled my shoe off, he put it to the quilt; he came out for an officer; he told me to go out of the way; I told him I should not go out of the way. The prosecutor has got a sparing club and free and easy club; all in the same room. I am innocent of what I am accused of.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Chambre.

507. THOMAS CRIPPS was indicted for feloniously making an assault upon Rebecca Fisher , widow , putting her in fear, and taking from her person and against her will, one shirt, value 8 s. and one handkerchief, value 1 s. the property of Thomas Tucker ; - and one petticoat, value 10 s. two pair of stockings, value 6 s. a pair of shoes, value 3 s. a handkerchief, value 1 s. and a dollar, value 5 s. the property of Rebecca Fisher , widow .

Second count for like offence, only laying the goods to be the property of Rebecca Fisher , widow.

REBECCA FISHER . I am a widow woman. On Friday, five weeks ago. I was on the Hampstead road, I was walking from London to Hampstead; I had a bundle in my hand.

Q. Where did you see the prisoner - A. I saw him in Camden town , at a public house; I stopped there to get me half a pint of beer to drink.

Q. Was the prisoner at that public house - A. Yes, he was sitting on the table in the tap room; he asked me whether I was going to Hampstead; I told him I was going; and immediately he followed me after I went out of the door.

Q. What time in the evening was it - A. Half past nine o'clock; he asked me whether he should carry the bundle for me, I told him no; he pushed me by the arm off the curb into the horse road, and took the bundle from me, he snatched it out of my hand.

Q. You say he pushed you - did you resist him - A. I resisted his taking the bundle.

Q. In the first place, he asked you if he should carry the bundle - A. Yes.

Q. Then he pushed you - did not you push him away - A. No.

Q. Did not you say so before the magistrate - A. No; he pushed me and snatched the bundle out of my hand and ran away; I did not make any noise, because he had a large hammer with him.

Q. Where was this - A. It was between Camden town and Hampstead.

Q. You said nothing in going on to Hampstead - A. No; I met nobody but one gentleman, he was going in a single horse chaise, he took me home to Hampstead; every thing in the bundle belonged to me but the shirt and the handkerchief, and the shirt and the handkerchief were in my care.

Q. When did you see the man again - A. Five weeks afterwards I saw him in Hampstead town.

Q. Did you know him before - A. I never saw him before.

Q. Was it a light night or a dark night - A. It was a darkish night.

Q. Are you quite sure it was that man, the prisoner at the bar - A. Yes.

Q. Did you upon seeing him cause him to be taken up - A. I saw him on the Saturday at the Coach and Horses, Hampstead, drinking a pint of beer; on Thursday I gave information; I saw him on the Monday again; he was taken up on the Monday morning about ten o'clock.

Q. Did you ever see any of your things again - A. Only a neck handkerchief; my brother took it off his neck.

Q. What business do you follow - A. I live with my brother, and take in a little work.

THOMAS TUCKER . She told me of the man robbing her, and whose team he drove. I informed Mr. Read he had got my handkerchief on, when Mr. Read took him.

- READ. Q. You apprehended the prisoner on the Monday - A. Yes.

Q. Did you take a handkerchief off his neck - A. Yes Tucker said it was his handkerchief. I told the prisoner; I took him up for robbing Mrs, Fisher, he denied it very strongly; when I told him it was Tucker's handkerchief, he said he hoped his master would pay the money for him, he hoped they would let him go for a soldier.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought this handkerchief in Field Lane and that handkerchief of a sailor, he was broken down; this is hemmed with white thread.

GUILTY, aged, 28.

Of stealing, but not violently from the person .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

508. DONALD ROBINSON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 2nd of July , privily from the person of John Brockinshaw , a purse, value 1 d. a half guinea, seven bank notes, value 1 l. each, and a bank note value 2 l his property .

JOHN BROCKINSHAW . Q. What are you - A. I am a pensioner ; I have been home from the West Indies a month; I was going to Newcastle.

Q. Had you any occasion to get change for a ten pound note - A. Yes, I got it changed at Mrs. Rolls at the Coach and Horses, Chelsea, on the first day of this month about eleven o'clock she gave me seven one pound notes, a two pound note, half a guinea, a seven shilling piece and half a crown. The landlord and his wife were present at the time, Robinson was in the tap room, I received it in the kitchen. Robinson saw the notes when I was wrapping them up; he came with me to Charing Cross to carry my pack, and see me on the coach at the Anchor and Vine.

Q. Did the coach go from that house - A. No, he offered to carry it, and I was thankful, I was weak and poorly, I was not able myself; after I received my money he offered to carry it for me. We got to the Anchor and Vine a little before twelve o'clock, I called for a pot of beer and a slice of bread and cheese, I was not able to make use of it myself, I was very bad; I took a seven shilling piece out of my pocket and paid for the beer and bread and cheese. I wrapped up the notes and the money and put it in my left hand pocket; I fastened my pocket.

Q. Where was the prisoner at that time - A. He was on one side of the box and I of the other, there was nobody in the box besides us; I ask'd him about the coach; he said he would get one presently; I clapped my hand to my head, I fell in a bit of a dose, I had no rest for three nights; he came and sat of the left hand side of me where the money was; when I awoke I found the flap of my coat pocket turned down and the money all gone.

Q. How long do you think you might be in that dozing situation - A. Not long, because I have a bad complaint in my inside.

Q. Did you feel any body at your pocket - A. Yes; I felt something, but I did not think any thing of that kind; I kept my doze on for a small time afterwards, and then I found the prisoner was gone and nine pound in notes and half a guinea in gold was gone; I returned back to Chelsea; he was not there; he was missing from his quarters all night; I waited there till Sunday morning; he came home about nine or ten 'o'clock in the morning; I took hold of him; I enquired for my money; he said he knew nothing about it; the serjeant major put him under confinement; he confessed afterwards that he stole three pounds from me; I heard him say it, and he confessed before the magistrate, the next day, that he had three pound from me.

Q. You got none of the money back again - A. No; I am upon sufferance now; I have only what the landlord supplies me with.

- Q. What age are you - A. Fifteen; I am servant at the Anchor and Vine, Charing Cross.

Q. Have you ever seen the person that was examined just now - A. I only saw him once when he was along with the prisoner; the prisoner and prosecutor came together; I know the prisoner very well; when they came in the prosecutor called for a pot of beer, which I brought in; they both sat down in one box opposite of one another; then the prosecutor called for a slice of bread and cheese; the prisoner said bring two; then the prosecutor fell asleep; after the pot of beer was out the prisoner called for a pint, and when Robinson found the prosecutor had fell asleep, he went and sat on his left hand side.

Q. Before the prisoner had changed sides had any change been given to the prosecutor - A. Yes; he changed a seven shilling piece; as soon as he came in the prosecutor dropped half a guinea; when he took out the seven shilling piece I picked it up and gave it him, he put it into something like a bit of a rag, and put into his left hand breeches pocket.

Q. Did the prisoner see all this - A. Yes; the prisoner continued to sit of the opposite side of Brockinshaw till he saw he was asleep, then he went to the left hand side of his pocket.

Q. Did you see him do any thing with Brockinshaw's pocket - A. No; I only saw him move and sit by it; he sat there about a quarter of an hour and then he moved again.

Q. When he moved to his own side was Brockinshaw awake - A. No; the prisoner sat about ten minutes and then he said to me, you see this man on the coach; I said to him you are the fittest person, as you brought him in; the prisoner and a woman went out together; the prosecutor when he awoke went below and said to the servant maid that rascal has stolen my money.

Prisoner's Defence. That woman that I went out with sat with the man before I did.

Witness. No, she did not come in till you was just going out.

JAMES RAVENSCROFT . About three o'clock this day fortnight I went into the Cock; the prisoner was there, he knew me, he asked me to have a glass of liquor; I did, I sat in the house, he paid several pots of ale; he said he had a uncle that died in the Indies, he had lefthim a large fortune; I saw two one pound notes and about fourteen or sixteen shillings in his possession; he said when that was done he knew were to get more, he had got an order to draw upon a gentleman in London whenever he wanted; I asked him to lend me half a crown, he did.

MR. ROLLS. I keep the Coach and Horses, Chelsea; the prisoner and the prosecutor lodged in my house, they both slept in one bed, the prisoner was quartered on me. On the 1st of this month Brockinshaw took his pension, he brought it to my wife and laid it in her hands; on Saturday he said he would go away; he had nothing more to take at Chelsea; he got change for the ten pound note, seven one pound notes, a two pound note, half a guinea, a seven shilling piece and half a crown; he got the change, he put it in a ragged purse; the prisoner was not present when he did that; I saw him go out of the kitchen into the tap room; the prisoner and he went out of the house together, the prisoner carried his pack; about two hours and a half afterwards he came back, and said the prisoner had robbed him; the prisoner never came to his quarters that night; on the Sunday when he came in Brockinshaw accused him of robbing him; the prisoner was going to strike him; we sent to the serjeant major of York hospital, and he was confined.

Prisoner's Defence. I never had any of his money; this woman that was in the house robbed him, she gave me part of the money; I went from there to Westminster with the woman; the money that she gave me I spent; they searched me, I had no money about me; after that the serjeant major confined me; he asked me whether I had any of his money; I said I had none of his money, but that money I had given to me; he throwed his money about in the public house, the boy picked it up. I have fought for my King and country abroad; I was taken prisoner; I have gone through a great deal of harships, although I am a young man.

GUILTY, aged 24.

Of stealing, but not privily from the person .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Chambre.

509. WILLIAM TAYLOR was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 1st of July , a gold ring, value 2 l. the property of Thomas Saunders , privately in his shop .

THOMAS SAUNDERS . I keep a watch maker's and jewellers shop , 258, Whitechapel, in the parish of St. Mary, Whitechapel .

Q. You deal in rings - A. Yes. On the 1st of July, about eleven o'clock in the morning, the prisoner came to my shop, he asked me if my name was Saunders; he said he was going to the East Indies and wanted to take a quantity of watches out with him; he asked for a piece of paper, pen and ink, and he would write down the order; I shewed him watches of various patterns; after which he wrote down the order; then he wished to look at some gold chains and gold seals; while looking at the gold chain and seal, he took notice of the hair broaches; he asked if they could be taken out and any hair put in; I told him yes; he asked me if I knew a gentleman, he mentioned his name; and while I was looking over the book he secreted a gold ring.

Q. That you could not know - did you see him - A. No.

Q. Do not you tell us what he did, that you did not see - he asked the name of a gentleman and you looked at your book to find the name - A. Yes; I looked some time, I could not find the name; he said it did not signify; then he said he wanted a watch for his own wear, he choosed a gold chain, gold key, and a gold seal; he offered me a bill; I told him I did not like to take bills; while I was putting the chain on the watch for his own wear, I missed a gold ring out of the box; the box was on the counter with a number of watches by the side of it; I had seen it that morning in the box; I had not seen it when I shewed him the box; I turned to my apprentice and said have you taken a ring from the box, in the hearing of the prisoner; he answered no it was in the box.

Q. Was it in fact in the box at that time - A. It was not. I asked the prisoner who recommended him; he said a Mr. Cotton; I said I did not know any person of that name; he said the last time he had his goods of Mr. Leplaster, Ratcliffe highway, but he did not use him well, so he came to me. He did not take the watch, he went out; he said he lived at No. 3, Clark's terrace, New road, that his name was John Jameson; I told my apprentice to go after the prisoner to see if he lived at the house he said he did, as I suspected that he had got the ring; I looked for the ring after the prisoner was gone among the watches, I did not find it; I saw no more of him till I took him in custody; the next morning I went into a street in the New road to a pawnbrokers to stop it if in case it should be brought there; when I came to the shop, turning by the corner of Chapman street, I met the prisoner turning the corner; I immediately collared him, and asked him how he came to rob me; he said if I would come home to his mother's he would tell me all about it; I told him he must go with me to the office; a soldier coming up I desired him to assist me in taking him to the office; he did; going along he said if I would go into a public house, he would send for his father, and would satisfy me; I told him it was too late, it was not in my power to settle it; I took him to the office.

Q. You did not see the ring again - A. I never saw it again; it was a broad gold ring, with a hair plat, and with a gold cypher, A T set round with pearl.

Q. What was the value of it - A. Two pounds.

Q. Was it in your shop for sale - A. No, a lady had it of me some months before; and the cypher had come loose; I had to tighten the cypher; it was an article that I had sold, it was brought back to be altered.

Q. Who was in your shop at the time - A. My apprentice, nobody else.

Cross examined by Mr. Alley. I dare say you had many valuable things in that case - A. Yes, there were a great many more valuable things than that.

Q. So that a person who had an opportunity might take a thing more valuable than that - A. Yes.

Q. You lost nothing else that you know of - A. No.

Q. The next morning you met him in the street, you asked him how he could have robbed you - A. Yes.

Q. He said if you would go home with him to his house his mother would satisfy you - A. Yes.

JAMES HODGES . I am an apprentice to the last witness.

Q. You were in the shop at the time the prisoner came in - A. Yes.

Q. Did you hear him bargaining with your masterand giving orders for watches - A. Yes, I was not above two yards from him.

Q. Had you seen that ring which was in the said glass - A. Yes, I put it in the night before; I put it in the gold box, the gold box was in the window; it was taken out to shew the prisoner.

Q. Did you observe whether the ring was in the box when it was taken out to shew the prisoner. A. I did not; the box had not been out to any body else but the prisoner, since the night before; I had been in the shop the whole time.

Q. I suppose you had other customers in the shop between the evening before and this time - A. There might have been, but not above one or two.

Q. Did you observe this box lay between the prisoner and your master - A. It laid on the counter before the prisoner, open.

Q. You did not see him take any thing out I suppose - A. No.

Q. Do you remember your master speaking to you about the ring - A. My master asked me where the ring was; I said in the gold box on the counter.

Q. You did not see it there at that time - A. No.

Q. Did not you look - A. No, the prisoner turned it off, he asked for something else. When the prisoner went out of the shop my master ordered me to follow him; he turned to the right towards Mile End.

Q. Was that towards the place where he said he lived - A. Yes; when he had got some way I saw him look at something in his right hand; he turned the corner of the new road, and my being the other side of the way I saw there was a boy waiting for him; the boy was standing still, they walked down the New road together, the prisoner turned back, he saw me as I suppose; he went on to the second turning of the New road, and then the boy and he parted; the prisoner went on till he came to the place, then I pursued him, he got up by Cannon street turnpike, he turned the corner; it was not above a minute before I was up there; I lost him, I went home and dined; my master told me to go out to the pawnbrokers; the first place I came to was Mr. Sowerby's, a pawnbroker's in the New road, while I was giving Mr. Sowerby a description, the prisoner was in one of the private boxes.

Q. Did you see him - A. No, the servant said there was a man came and offered a ring to pledge, he was in one of the private boxes; I ran out and the servant with me, we saw the prisoner in the back streets; the prisoner looked back, saw us, and we saw no more of him.

HENRY VICARS . I am servant to Mr. Sowerby, pawnbroker.

Q. Do you remember that last young man coming and giving you a description of a ring, and ordering it to be stopped if it should be brought to pawn - A. I do.

Q. While that young man was there did any body come to your shop to pledge any thing - A. Yes, the prisoner, he came in one of the private boxes, he put a hair ring down on the counter.

Q. What sort of a ring was it - A. A ring with hair plat and two cyphers; I saw the ring, he said he wanted seven shillings on it. I did not take up the ring, I was serving another customer; he as I suppose heard Hodges giving the description, took up the ring and ran away; I went out with Hodges, I saw the prisoner in a street about forty yards from our shop, he was walking along very fast; when I got within twenty yards of him he turned round saw me, he walked as fast as he could to the corner of the street and ran away; then I lost sight of him; on the next day as I was coming down Cannon street road, I saw Mr. Sanders had got hold of the prisoner; I went up to him and said that is the young man that offered the ring to pledge at our shop, and then ran away. I have known his face these four or five years.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel, called five witnesses who gave him a good character.

GUILTY, aged 16.

of stealing, but not privately in the shop .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

510. JAMES HENLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 17th of June , one thousand yards of ribbon, value 50 l. the property of John Smith .

The case was stated by Mr. Alley.

JOHN MACKRAY . I am servant to Mr. Smith, his warehouse is at No. 44 Gutter lane; I manufacture the goods for Mr. Smith in Coventry; the manufactory at Coventry is Mr. Smith's.

Q. Did you on the 16th of June, send a parcel in a box to Mr. Smith, in the Balloon coach - A. Yes, the bill of parcels was in the box; I packed it myself.

Q. What were the goods - A. Fifty three pieces of ribbons.

Q. Of course you know the ribbons when you see them. - A. Yes.

Mr. Gurney. Did you yourself see it delivered - A. I did not; I sent a servant with it.

RICHARD DALTON . Q. You are guard to the Balloon coach - A. I am.

Q. When you arrive at London you are bound to deliver them - A. Yes.

Q. Had you a box directed to Mr. Smith, No. 44, Gutter lane - A. I had; it was safely delivered into the coach office, Lad lane; I am guard of the Coventry coach from Coventry to the Swan with Two Necks, Lad lane ; the way bill is here, it is in the way bill.

JOHN DREW LARKMAN . Q. You are clerk to the Swan and Two Necks, Lad lane - A. Yes.

Q. Did you receive a parcel from the Coventry coach on the 17th of June - A. It was called over to me by the guard; I did not see it; it was marked in the way bill by me, and delivered to the porter in the usual way.

Q. What time did the Balloon coach come in on; Friday the 17th of June - A. About half past ten.

SAMUEL CROUCH . Q. You are porter, and carry out parcels at the Swan and Two Necks, Lad lane - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember the day we are speaking of, that a servant of the prosecutor's applied for the box - A. Yes, the servant called about a quarter past twelve o'clock; I could not find the box.

WILLIAM HEWIT . Q. You are a ribbon dresser in Wood street - A. Yes.

Q. On the 17th of June do you remember the prisoner coming to your house - A. He came between one and four o'clock; I did not take them in; I looked out of the window and saw him; my brother brought up word that the prisoner had brought these ribbons,and they must be dressed by ten o'clock the next morning.

Q. Did you afterwards see the prisoner - A. Yes, the prisoner came to my house again on Saturday morning, about half past ten o'clock, for these ribbons, the six pieces that he had left the day before.

Q. Did you give him the six pieces - A. No, he left four more: he wanted them to be dressed by half after twelve o'clock.

Q. You had received some information of the robbery - A I had. At half after one he came for the ribbons; a constable was there to take him, and two or three people in the shop.

Q. Did you give him the ribbons - A. No. I asked him if he was the manufacturer, he said he was not; he said he bought the goods. I asked him who he bought them of, he said it was of no consequence to me, he would pay me for them if I had done them; I told him he must go along with me, the constable stood there waiting for him; he said that he bought them of a man that came from Coventry the day before. As we were going to the Mansion house he mentioned that he gave eighteen pounds for them.

Q. Did you afterwards enquire whether he knew a ribbon dresser of the name of Dean - A. Yes, he said he did not. I asked him if he knew Bell square, he said no; after denying it two or three times, he confessed he did.

Q. Was there any thing in particular as to these ribbons, as to their marks - A. There were no marks upon them.

COURT. Is it usual for the manufacturer's mark to be on them - A. Yes, but these were cut off at the end.

Q. Have you got them in your possession - A. Here they are.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. You are a ribbon dresser in Wood street - A. Yes.

Q. And Gutter lane is close to Wood street - you live in Wood street and the prosecutor lives in Gutter lane - the prisoner came to you on Friday, and he came the next day, as he appointed - A. Yes.

Q. In the course of conversation did not he mention to you that he had a larger quantity at home of the same purchase - A. He did. I and the officer went to his house.

Q. And there he pointed out the remainder which he had purchased - A. Yes.

ELIZABETH DEAN . Q. Your husband, I believe, is a ribbon dresser - A. Yes; we live in Bell square in the city. On the 18th of June, between ten and eleven o'clock, the prisoner came with three pieces of ribbon to get them dressed, he asked me to get them dressed in the course of an hour; I told him it was impossible, the fires were not alight, in consequence they could not be dressed: he opened the goods, I knew them to be four pieces of Mr. Smith's in Gutter lane; I told him with his leave I would take the goods and ask my husband; he gave them me; I took them up stairs and asked him if they were not Mr. Smith's goods.

Q. In consequence of what passed between you and your husband the goods were kept - A. Exactly so. When I came down stairs I said they would be done in an hour and a half; he said that would do, and went away; he promised to return in an hour and an half. After he was gone my husband took the goods to Mr. Smith.

JOSEPH DEAN . Q. You are the husband of the last witness - A. I am.

Q. Have you got three pieces of ribbon which your wife brought up to you to dress. - A. I have.

Q. Are the ends on them, as usual when they come to be dressed - A. No, they are cut off; they are in the same state now as when my wife brought them to me.

COURT. The ends where they had the mark is cut off - A. It is.

DANIEL LEADBETTER . Q. You are one of the officers of the city - A. I am.

Q. Do you recollect the day the prisoner was examined before the lord mayor - A. Yes. On the 18th of June I accompanied the prisoner to his house, he said he had a quantity more ribbons that he bought at the same time with those produced before the lord mayor by the dressers, but what number of pieces he could not tell, nor of whom he bought them. We had this conversation in his house. Going along he said he bought them of a man that came into his shop, but he did not know where he lived nor his name.

Q. Did he say that he had received them in a parcel from the country - A. He did not When we came to his house he went to a drawer on the left hand side of the shop, he produced thirty one pieces first; this single half piece of white was found afterwards in a drawer on the right hand side of the shop; he said he bought that of Mr. Abbot or Mr. Evans; Mr. Smith claimed it as his pattern, and he believed it came with the others. Mrs. Smith asked him if he had a bill of parcels with it, he said he dare say he had; his wife went to a file to see if she could find it; she could not; he said he gave eighteen pounds for them - two pieces of Irish linen in part, and the rest in money.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. He told you he himself did not understand ribbons in an undressed state - A. He did.

Q. His wife keeps a haberdasher's shop in Whitecross street - I believe you know he is by business a cupper in Bagnio court - A. I have heard that he lived in Bagnio court before he came to Whitecross street.

Q. Upon your asking him where they were, he shewed you where they were - A. Yes; he asked his wife where they were, and brought them forward to us before we made any search.

EVAN EVANS . Q. I believe you are a warehouse-man - A. I am a silkman, I live in Goldsmith street.

Q. Did the prisoner purchase any piece of white ribbon of you - A. He did not.

Mr. Gurney. He dealt with you - A. Yes, he has a regular account with us in the silk business; he bought particularly sewing silk.

JOHN SMITH . Q. You carry on this business on your own account - A. Yes, I have no partner; I have a manufactory in Coventry, and my warehouse is in Gutter lane.

Q. Do you recollect on the 17th of June whether you sent for a box of ribbons, and whether it was brought to your house - A. I did, and I did not receive it.

Q. Do you recollect in consequence of some information going to Mr. Hewitt's house the next day - A. Yes, where we found the prisoner; I went with him to the Lord Mayor at the Mansion house.

Q. What was said at the Mansion house was it takenin writing - A. Yes.

MR. HOMLER. Q. Was it taken in writing - A. Yes. (read) John Smith said he had a box of ribbons; it came from Coventry yesterday; this morning a person came to my dresser; the man had left ribbons; they were to be done in hurry; William Hewitt said he brought six pieces of ribbon; he came this morning with four pieces more; the prisoner said he had the remainder of the goods at home; he bought them of a man that came into the shop; he took two pieces of Irish linen, and the rest in money; he did not know how many pieces; they were continually hawked about.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I have stated the truth to my attorney, the case is what you have already heard; before the Lord Mayor I stated the same; I bought them of a man that I have bought braces, stiffeners, and ribbons of before; he came in the morning, he told me they came out of Coventry; I looked at these things; I said they were old things; no, he said, they wanted dressing; he said he would deal with me if he could, he would take half goods, and half money; he took two pieces of Irish, and the rest in money.

The prisoner called eight witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 45.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

511. WILLIAM JENNINGS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 17th. of November , in the dwelling house of Samuel Breeze , a pair of breeches, value 13 s. a silk handkerchief, value 7 s. a pocket book, value 1 s. one pound ten shillings in monies, numbered, a promissory note of 60 l. a promissory note of 10 l. an order for the payment of 40 l. an order for the payment 4 l. 16 s. a bill of exchange, value 184 l. 16 s, and a bank note, value 2 l. the property of David Davies .

DAVID DAVIES . I am a maltster , I live at Thames, Ditton; I was robbed on the 17th, of November, at Mr. Breeze, West Smithfield , by a person the name of Jennings.

Q. Is that the prisoner - A. The prisoner slept with me; he was gone when I got up in the morning about nine or ten o'clock; I went to bed about eleven o'clock; when I looked for my breeches they were gone, and all my property was gone; the pocket book with the notes were in my breeches pocket; I told him in the night to get me a lodging, I would pay him well.

Q. You went to sleep at a lodging house - A. Yes; three people in the house besides the landlord.

Q. Then the only thing that you accuse the prisoner of is, that he procured you a lodging, and his going off the next morning - A. I heard that he passed the notes; the officer is here that knows him well.

SAMUEL BREEZE . I keep a chandler's shop, No. 24, West Street; I let lodgings for single men.

Q. How many lodged in this room - A. Three, besides the prisoner and the prosecutor; the prisoner had been four nights before at my house; he came that night between ten and eleven o'clock, he asked for a bed for him and his friend; the next morning he went off before any body; Davies lost all he had.

THOMAS EKELSOE . Q. Do you know any thing of the transaction - A. No.

Q. Was any of the property found - A. None of it.

GEORGE WOOD . I know no more than receiving the information from Mr. Davies; them three men remained in the house some time the prisoner absconded directly afterwards; I produce him from the Boroughgoal.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

512. ANN FINLAND was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 26th of June , a bag value 1 d. 5 l. 9 s. a bank note, value 5 l. and four bank notes, value 1 l. each the property of George Nankerwell .

GEORGE NANKERWELL . I am a fellowship porter . On the 26th of June, between twelve and one at night, I was collecting money in Fleet market; coming home I met the prisoner in Snow hill ; what she said to me I cannot say; I was going up a gateway, she said go up there.

Q. You were quite sober - A. No, I was not; I was as solid as I would wish to be; I was not half drunk; I had been drinking a glass or so; I was not perfectly sober.

Q. She told you to go up there - what did you do - A. I took liberties with her, and she with me; after that I missed the money out of my pocket; she said the watchman is coming.

Q. What was in the bag - A. I cannot particularly say.

Q. How are the jury to say, are you sure you lost any money - A, Yes; to the amount of fifteen pounds, and odd silver.

Q. Was any of the money found afterwards - A. Three guineas, and a half, she dropped going up Snow hill.

Q. She was drunk too - A. I cannot say that, when the watchman was taking her along, by brother picked it up; they searched her at the watchhouse, they found four one pound notes, and a five pound note; all the money that she had belonged to me, she took bag and all.

MR. COPE. I am a constable; I was at the watch-house when the prisoner was brought in; she sat down by me, I looked at a bit of paper in her hand, it was a one pound note; I told her if she had got any more she had better give them up; she gave me three one pound notes; she pulled out of her bosom a five pound note. The prosecutor's brother picked up three guineas and half in gold; the prosecutor begged that she might be searched; we searched her, and found one pound fifteen and sixpence in her pockets and a broach, she was willing to give up the other money; the one pound fifteen shillings, and sixpence and the broach was hers; I gave the money to Mr. Fox. the other constable.

MR. FOX. Q. You were constable of the night - A. I was.

Q. The money was given up to you, did you examine her - A. I did. I took her in the back place; I searched her there. Mr. Cope and I found upon her one pound fifteen shillings; she said it was her own.

Q. Did she claim the notes - A. She did not.

JAMES EVANS . I am a watchman. On Sunday morning the 26th of June I heard watch called, I went and the prosecutor asked me if such a person had gone by. I said the prisoner asked me for a piece of candle, I gave it her; the prosecutor and his brother followed her down Chick lane; they called watch a second time, I went directly to them; the prosecutor said this is the woman that robbed me; I took her in custody.Going up Saffron hill my partner, Robert Uwins , said her right hand was in her pocket; she threw some money down; the prosecutor's brother picked it up, he said George, here is three guineas and a half of your money; the prisoner said to me and my partner loose me and I will give you the money; I thought he was a countryman, I did not know he was a poor man, if I had I would not have taken it.

THOMAS MEAD . On the 25th of June, I gave the prosecutor ten pounds, three shillings; a five pound note, and the rest in small change; I traced the five pound note, it is No. 9400.

WILLIAM NANKERWELL . On the 26th my brother came up to me, and said Bill, I am robbed of all my money; I took him up Chick lane; I found her; I called the watchman; he took charge of her; as we were going up Snowhill another watchman came with us, he said mind, her hand is at work; I picked up three guineas and a half which dropped from her.

Q. to prosecutor. Do you believe that money to be yours - A. Yes.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming towards Smith field at half after twelve o'clock, I met this man; we went up Sharp's alley, he took liberties with me; he agreed to give me two shillings; the watchman came, he run past him with his small clothes down; he gave me no money, I kicked against a small bundle; I picked it up, it was a woman's glove with notes and a gold broach in it; I was taken to the watchhouse; there he said he had lost twenty five pounds, I was searched in a very indecent manner.

GUILTY , aged 34.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

513. ANN M'CARTEY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 5th of June , ten pound weight of lead, value 2 s. and a brass cock, value 6 d. the property of James Haywood , affixed to his dwelling house .

And several other counts for like offence, only varying the manner of charging.

JAMES HAYWOOD . I am a house keeper, Vine place, Spitalfields .

Q. Had you lead taken from house and when - A. On the 5th of June, about half past five in the afternoon. I saw it safe in the morning about seven o'clock; in the afternoon I was looking out of the chamber window, I saw the prisoner coming out of the door with a large bulk in the tail of her gown, of the left side; I went down as quick as possible; I had a large salt fish in the washhouse; I perceived the fish was gone; I followed the prisoner, she was about twenty yards off, turning an alley, she was shifting the property from the left arm to the right; I called out to the prisoner, good woman come back, you have got that which does not belong to you; in shuffling to get away from me she dropped the property at the corner of Wheeler street; I caught her, I brought the prisoner back; I applied the lead she had dropped to the washhouse; it fitted exactly the place, and the part it was missing from.

Q. Did you find your fish - A. Yes; I brought her and the property all back; I delivered her to Mr. Hart the watchhouse keeper; this is the lead and the cock I took from her, it was fastened to the wall, she had twisted it off.

Prisoner's Defence. I was very much in liquor, I did not know any thing about it till I was in the watchhouse; I beg his pardon.

GUILTY , aged 50.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

514. CHARLES JAMES was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 11th of July , a sow, value 2 l. and seven pigs, value 4 l. the property of John Wheatley .

JOHN WHEATLEY . I live at Bayswater , I keep the whole house, I am a butcher .

Q. Did you lose a sow and pigs at any time - A. Yes, on the 11th of July, I was called up in the morning about thee o'clock by Sarah Haines .

Q. Had you seen your sow and pigs on the over night - A. I saw them about ten o'clock, they were safe then in the stye in the yard.

Q. Was it easy for any person to come into the yard - A. Yes, it was easy for any person to come in at the gate.

Q. Had you more than one sow and seven pigs - A. Not at that time; I had three pigs stole from me a fortnight before; the sow had ten pigs; I had no more than a sow and seven pigs that morning; I found them all gone, and the back of the stye broke down; I went down the road about two hundred yards towards London; I saw the sow and pigs, Sarah Haines ' husband was in possession of the pigs.

Q. Did you see the prisoner - A. Yes, he was with Haines; Haines told me in his hearing that he had got the sow and pigs from him; I said to him how could you think of robbing a poor man like me; he told me he would take the teeth out of my head, he said he never saw them; I put the sow and pigs in the stye: I stopped till I thought the office was open, then I got an officer. There were people left with him.

Q. Where did this man live - A. Just opposite, about five yards from my stye, he is a shoemaker .

Q. Was he sober at this time - A. I cannot say whether he was or no; he had not been sober for a great while before; I used to go out to work and my wife too; he has fed the sow and pigs for me.

Q. Then he must know they were yours - A. He knew the sow and pigs as well as I did myself; I have kept the sow and pigs ever since.

Cross-examined by Mr. Walford. Who did you buy the sow of - A. I bought it of John King , who was tried here for sheep stealing.

Q. Then this man was coming with Haines, who was driving the pigs to your house, when you saw Haines coming with him was he forcing him - A. Yes.

Q. Had he hold of him - A. No.

Q. Then how could he be forcing him - A. He would not leave him.

Q. Your pig stye was broken open at three o'clock - what time did you go to the office - A. At eight o'clock.

Q. Then there was five hours that this man might have ran away if he liked - A. No, there were neighbours with him in the public house.

Q. What do you mean by telling me that he never saw the pigs when, he was driving them home - A. He told me that he never saw these pigs till he saw the man with him.

Q. What man was that - A. The man that run away.

Q. You say he was not sober for a good while before - A. After I lost the three other pigs he had not been sober a day.

JAMES HAINES . I am a labouring man; my house is about an hundred yards from Wheatley's. On Monday morning me and my wife had staid late at a friend's; I was walking up Oxford street towards Bayswater with my wife, and just before I came to Park lane, I saw a sow and seven pigs, and the prisoner and another man driving them; they turned them down Park lane.

Q. They were driving them in a contrary direction to Bayswater - A. Yes. I asked the prisoner how he came by them pigs; he said he was going to Smithfield the back way; that gave me suspicion the pigs were stolen; I told the prisoner they were Wheatley's pigs; he answered they was not; he said there were eight or nine in the drove, and Wheatley had but seven; I told him I was not satisfied.

Q. How far was the other man from him at the time this conversation past - A. Fifty yards or better; he was going on with the pigs; I ran after the other man; he followed me; when I came up I saw they were Wheatley's sow and pigs, I knew the sow and pigs; I said to the man where did you get the sow and pigs from; he lifted up his whip with both his hands and said what is that to you; the prisoner was by at the time; I drew back, else he would have struck me; I said it was nothing to me; I then went to the head of the pigs and walked before them; I thought if I could get him as far as the watch box the watchman and I would be able to take him; then the man ran away; I followed him and halloaed out watch.

Q. That man made his escape - A. Yes. When I came back I found the prisoner along with the sow and pigs, standing in Park-lane; I asked him how he came to be so bad as to take the poor man's sow and pigs; he said he did not know the sow and pigs; he came to look for his onions, some men had stole his onions. He came on very quietly to Bayswater; we could have took the other man if he would have assisted, instead of which he run in between my wife and the other man. The prisoner said when he came back to Bayswater, to Wheatley, that he would never have found his pigs again if it had not been for him; for me and my wife had them.

Cross examined by Mr. Walford. The prisoner was walking with the other man, did not you ask the prisoner who the pigs belonged to - A. I did.

Q. Did not he say they belonged to the other man - A. No; he did not.

Q. This man had no whip or stick. How long had they been walking together - A. That I cannot say. The other man had a whip, the prisoner had none.

Q. That moment you came up you saw them talking together - A. Yes.

Q. Was the prisoner near enough to see this man lift up the whip against you - A. I think he was.

Q. When you asked him how he could take this poor man's sow and pigs, the first word he said was that he was come after a man that had stole his onions - A. He did not say that till we got back to Bayswater. Me and my wife drove the sow and pigs to Bayswater; he followed us quietly.

COURT. Did the prisoner run up to your assistance when he saw the man aim at you - A. He did not.

MRS. HAINES. Q. How far is the prosecutor's house from the turnpike - A. About half mile.

Q. Had you and your husband been in London on the 10th of July - A. Yes; we had been to see some friends in Camel's buildings, Orchard street. On returning home we saw the pigs opposite of Park lane.

Q. Did you know the sow and pigs - A. I told my husband they were Wheatley's sow and pigs.

Q. What direction were they then in when you first saw them - A. They were coming up Oxford street; they turned down Park lane when we first saw them; they were going into London. My husband went up to the prisoner and said Charles, how comes this; he said the man was going to drive the pigs to Smithfield the back way; my husband said they were Wheatley's sow and pigs; he said, no, because Wheatley had seven, and here was eight or nine in that drove; my husband was not satisfied; he ran after the pigs, as the man had drove them on; he got up to the man, tapped him on the arm, and said my friend where did you get these pigs from.

Q. How far were you and the prisoner from them - A. The prisoner was close by me; I could see him lift up the handle part of the whip; my husband went on rather before, thinking to meet with a watchman; when he came to the watch box facing of Wood's Mews, Park lane, this man made off; Charles James ran between me and him; I said to my husband this man is run away; he told me to call watch.

Q. Did the prisoner give you any assistance to stop him - A. No. I run down Green street into Norfolk street after the man, till I could run no farther; when I came back into Park lane the prisoner stood in the same spot where I had left him; the sow had got out of the road; she was laying down near the road suckling her pigs; the prisoner abused me; he said it was d - nation odd that me and my husband should know the pigs without being concerned in it, and so he continued till I got very nigh home, and then I went and fetched Mr. Wheatley.

Q. Did he at all account how he was out at that time of the night - A. Not till we got home; then he went into his own place; he brought out a handful of onions and said he had followed the man that had stolen his onions.

Q. Did he say who the man was - A. He did not.

Q. When the pigs were discovered and after this man had run away, did he go after the man that stole the onions - A. No; he never said any thing about it till he got to his own premises. The sow and pigs were delivered over to Wheatley; we have got a witness here that saw him gather the onions.

Q. to prosecutor. What was the value of this sow and pigs - A. Six pound altogether.

HARRY HOLMES . I am a coachmaker's sawyer when I can get it to do. Upon this alarm I went out in the road; I heard the prisoner abuse this man and woman with language that is not fit to be used; he went into the garden and pulled up the onions himself by handfulls; he brought them out and trembled like an aspen leaf; he said that this man wanted to take the onions.

Prisoner's Defence. I never saw this witness in the morning part of that day; he will swear any thing; he says he is a coachmaker's sawyer; he is a pig bigler.MR. WIGGETT. Q. Were you coming to London on the night these pigs were stole - A. No, I was going home; I met the prisoner alone, just through Bayswater turnpike, it was about half past two o'clock in the morning; I saw no pigs at all. I said to him is that you, he made me no answer; I am a lamp lighter.

WILLIAM LUCY . I am a watchman on the Edgeware road.

Q. Did you see the prisoner on the Edgeware road - A. There was a man came down the road, I do not think it was the prisoner; I saw but one man; I challenged the man, I asked him where he brought the pigs from; I called the turnpike man out, he gave me a rough answer; so I did not stop talking with him; the turnpike man said there was another man on the other side. It was a small white sow, with five or six pigs; they were coming towards London.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 46.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

515. JAMES WALLIS, alias JAMES HARRIS , was indicted for feloniously forging and counterfeiting on the 10th of June , a certain order for the payment of 85 l. with intent to defraud Robert Middleton Biddulph , Thomas Somers Cox , and George Ridge .

Second count for uttering a like forged order with the same intention,

And two other counts with intention to defraud Henry Mountfort .

The indictment was read by Mr. Knapp, and the case was stated by Mr. Const.

HENRY MOUNTFORT . - Mr. Const. The draft that forms the subject of this indictment, does it bear the form of your draft - A. It does.

Q. That of course stands against you in the bankers book - A. Yes.

Q. We have no other evidence to prove that it is not Mr. Mountfort's hand writing, it is so well done.

COURT. (to prosecutor.) There is no witness but you that can speak to the draft - A. No, not positively.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

516. ISAAC LEACH was indicted for feloniously making an assault upon Neal Pardon , on the 15th of June , and putting him in fear and taking from his person and against his will, a seven shilling piece, two shillings, a dollar, and a French half crown, value 2 s. his property .

NEAL PARDON . I am a sea faring man ; I lodge in Nightingale lane. On the 15th of June, between ten and eleven at night; I was in the Angel, Whitechapel ; I was very much in liquor at the time; I had been drinking in several houses before I came to the Angel.

Q. Do you know what money you had about you - A. I am not certain whether it was a seven shilling piece or a half guinea; I knew I had a dollar and more silver.

Q. When you got into this Angel public house, did any body ill use you - A Yes, my breeches pocket was cut with a knife; and my money, whatever it was, was taken from there; I perceived it at the time, and said what are you about; I was too much in liquor to stop him.

Q. There was no force made use of; it did you no mischief - A. None at all.

Q. Whoever did it, meaned to do it slightly without alarming you at all - A. I suppose so.

Q. Do you know who the person was that was sitting near you, and had this knife, and cut your pocket - A. The prisoner, to the best of my knowledge.

Q. Were there any more than one person sitting with you at the same time your pocket was cut, and your money was taken from you - A. I believe there might be one more in a smock frock; to the best of my judgment it was this man that did it; I went outside of the door and called out immediately; the patrol was going past, he came to my assistance, I called out in the house, the landlord was not at home, nobody came to my assistance.

Q. You say that this man was one that sat by you, did the man in the smock frock get away - A I cannot say; I was so far gone.

Q. Can you be certain, had you your senses enough about you to know that you had the money about you in your breeches pocket when you came into the Angel - A. I can; I took it out of my pocket to pay the reckoning at the Angel; and then I am quite sure I had the dollar and some silver, as to gold I cannot say; the officer has the money; I saw the dollar before the magistrate, and half a crown and two shillings; I had no mark on the dollar, or any of the money.

VINCENT WING . I am a patrol. On the night of the 15th of June, I was about twenty yards from the Angel; I heard this man complaining; I went up to him, he seemed very much intoxicated in liquor, he told me he had been robbed, and shewed me the place where the pocket had been cut out; I saw his breeches had been cut: I asked him if he could give a description of the person; some person answered the man is gone up here in a smock frock; I went up Angel alley, I met the prisoner and another person coming down the alley; Angel alley was stopped up at that time with boards, they were building there; when it is open it leads into Wentworth street.

Q. How were these two men dressed - A. One a light coloured coat, and the prisoner in a smock frock.

Q. (to prosecutor.) How was the man dressed who cut your breeches - A. He had a smock frock on.

Q. I thought you said the other man had a smock frock on - A. No.

Jury. He did say so.

Patrol. I took him in custody, I had only hold of the man in the smock frock, he called the other man Bob; I told the prisoner I had a suspicion of his robbing Pardon, he denied it; I took him into the watchhouse, then I fetched in the other man into the watchhouse, they were both searched by the officer of the night; I saw the dollar, half crown, andtwo shillings, found upon the prisoner, and the bottom part of the pocket, he had a large knife in his pocket: the other man had a small knife; the other man was discharged, there was nothing found against him.

Q. From any thing that the prisoner said, or from any enquiry you made, you do not know that ever the prisoner was in the Angel - A. No.

JOHN SMITH . I am a headborough; I searched the prisoner and the other man in the watchhouse; upon the prisoner I found a dollar, a French half crown, two shillings in silver, two knives, and the bottom part of a pocket. I found upon the other man, five penny worth of halfpence, no knife at all. The prosecutor could not tell what house he had been in; I found it out afterwards; the prosecutor said he had lost a seven shilling piece, a dollar, and some silver; the bottom of the pocket matches exactly the place where it was cut from.

Prisoner's Defence. Please you my lord, I know no more of the person than as if I had never seen him.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

517. HENRIETTA WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 12th of July , privily from the person of Thomas Neptune , three one pound bank notes his property .

THOMAS NEPTUNE . I am a millwright , I live in Chelsea.

Q. When did you lose your money - A. On Tuesday morning last, about three o'clock in the morning, I was going to work at Messrs. Stonard and Unwin's brewhouse, near Carnaby market. I was going through Covent Garden, this woman accosted me, she pleaded a great deal of distress, and asked me to give her a glass of gin; I took her over to a public house and gave her a glass of gin; I drank nothing at all. We returned from there; she said she had something particular to say to me; we went down Southampton street in Maiden lane ; we stopped there a few minutes, then she went towards Charing Cross; I saw my pocket open, I put in my hand and found my three one pound notes were gone; I laid hold of both her hands and charged her with robbing me of the three one pound notes; I pressed her to give them me; she denied having any property about her, and would not give them up; I called the watchman, we took her to the watch house, then she desired to be searched; she pulled out a pocket handkerchief, and down dropped two one pound notes from the handkerchief; we could not find the other note.

Q. Do you know the notes to be yours - A. I cannot swear to the numbers; from the appearance of them they are my notes; the notes I had were chiefly new.

Q. How came you in Covent garden - A. I was at a relation in Gray's inn lane.

HENRY BAINBRIDGE . About three o'clock the prosecutor brought this woman to me and said she had robbed him of three one pound notes. I told the woman to empty her pockets; she produced a silk handkerchief on the table; these two one pound notes dropped from the pocket; she said that the prosecutor had given her the two notes in lieu of a half guinea he promised her; the prosecutor insisted upon it he had three, but he gave her none; I searched her; nothing was found.

Prisoner's Defence. On the night this happened I met with a gentleman I had known before; he gave me two one pound note and a seven shilling piece; I met with a young woman, I asked her to have something to drink, I was rather intoxicated; I went home with intention to leave the notes, I forgot it; - does it stand to reason if I had taken the money from that man that I would insist upon being searched.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

518. SARAH SMITH, alias YATES , was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 8th of July , privily from the person of Edward Kemp , eight bank notes, value 5 l. each his property .

EDWARD KEMP . I belong to the navy office, I live at Pentonville. On the 8th of July instant, in Bell court, No. 3, Gray's inn lane ; I went up stairs with a woman, but not the prisoner; when I was coming down stairs, between eleven and twelve o'clock at night, at the bottom of the stair case I saw the prisoner, and a person who is in court, they were standing at the door with the door open; I had part of a pint of porter in my hand, I gave it to the prisoner and the person that was standing with her; they drank it. I went into the room on the ground floor, Ann Stewart 's room; I asked them if they would have a little rum and water. I sent for a quartern and a half; when it was brought I took some in some water, they took the remainder; while Ann Stewart was gone for the rum the prisoner put her arms round my neck and went out, saying she was sick. She did not return; I missed my notes directly.

Q. Is the prisoner mistress of the house - A. I do not know.

Q. You had been up stairs with another woman, how long had you been with her - A. Two or three hours; she was unwell, she was fast asleep.

Q. She was not asleep all the time - A. She was asleep part of the time, because she was unwell.

Q. Was you sober - A. I was as sober as I am now.

Q. Why could not the woman up stairs take it - A. I had not reason to suspect it; I cannot perfectly swear that she had it not.

Q. Did you ever find your notes - A. Never.

Q. What was the amount of them - A. Forty pounds, they were five pound notes. The watchman came, he broke open Ann Stewart 's door, she was gone out after the prisoner.

Q. When the watchman came was the prisoner in the house - A. No.

Q. Where was she taken up - A. I do no know.

Cross-examined by Mr. Arabin. This is a rum story of yours all this you have been telling us - you belong to the Navy office - A. Yes.

Q. You live in Pentonville, does your family live there - A. Yes.

Q. This was your way home to your family - A. Yes, I believe it was.

Q. It was in the morning when you lost the notes, and it was in the morning when you went into the house - A. Yes.

Q. Little Bell court is a very genteel court - A. So I am told.

Q. Is it not a house of ill fame - A. I believe you are right.

Q. I take it for granted when you laugh at these things, you have been in these houses before - now I ask you is it not one of the worst of houses - A. I believe you are right.

Q. You went into this house to see an old friend whom you had never seen before - A. Yes.

Q. You went into this house in the morning with another woman that you had never seen before, and you did not come out till between eleven and twelve o'clock at night - A. Yes.

Q. And you call that two or three hours - you went there in the morning, you know it was twelve hours - had not you something to eat and drink while you was there - A. I had a little rum and porter in the evening.

Q. How many ladies were there - A. Only two.

Q. Were they both asleep all the time you was there - A. No, one went asleep.

Q. Perhaps you went asleep, as you think the hours went so fast - A. No.

Q. How came you to go there - A. I do not know, it was in my way to the office; I cannot say how I went in.

Q. It was out of your way, as you were going to your office - you left your family and went through Bell court - A. I did.

Q. Did you eat any thing - A. No, only drank.

Q. You were coming down stairs between eleven and twelve o'clock, you saw the prisoner at the bottom of the stair case - you went freely into Ann Stewart 's room, you were not dragged in - A. No.

Q. And you were kind enough to bring half a tankard of porter, and then you asked them to have some rum and water - A. Yes.

Q. You wanted a little spirits yourself - A. I hardly tasted it.

Q. Where was your watch - A. I put it upon the table for a moment, to be convinced that I had the watch.

COURT. What time did you go there - A. Between ten and eleven o'clock.

Q. And you staid there till twelve o'clock at night - A. Yes.

Q. Without any thing to eat - A. Yes.

Q. It is an odd way of spending a day - you called there, she was in bed, what did you do all the time - were you talking and drinking - A. I did not know the woman from man that was up stairs.

Q. Had the woman any thing to eat - A. Not as I saw.

Q. Are you sure that you had this forty pounds about you - A. I am positive; I received it from Smith's banking house the week before; it was not out of my pocket for the whole week.

Q. It seems to me to be odd enough to carry it about you - A. I think it is best for a man to take care of his own property.

Q. I think not; if you had given it to your wife she would have taken care of it - where did you meet with this woman - A. She was coming down the court, she asked me to go with her; what induced me to go with her I cannot say.

ANN STEWART . Q. Do you live in this house - A. Yes, on the ground floor; a young woman of the name of Hamilton lives up stairs; there are but two rooms in the house. This gentleman came in about eleven o'clock and went up stairs to Mrs. Hamilton.

Q. How long did he stay there - A. I saw him again in the afternoon, he was enquiring for somebody; the young woman came down and he went up again; I hardly knew him; I saw the woman while he was there, coming down backwards and forwards of her errands.

Q. Then she was not laying in bed - A I do not know, I was not in the room, I mind my own affairs, I do not mind what any body does in the house or in the court. When Mr. Kemp came down he asked us to drink three times before the porter was finished, then he asked us to have a drop of rum; he gave me a shilling, he told me to get it good, because what he had been drinking all day was shocking stuff.

Q. Was he sober - A. I do not know. When I came in with the rum, the prisoner said this gentleman has got only sixpence in his pocket; she said she was sick, and went out; the gentleman as he was going out, said what am I to do, if I give you something, I must change a note; I said, sir, I can get you change; he put his hand in his pocket and said I am robbed; I said put your watch in your pocket and your hat on; I locked my door and ran after her; I said this gentleman says he has been robbed; she ran down the steps and I after her, she said you heard me say he had got but sixpence; she said she had no money, she would not come back for any body; a person came up to me and said you must go home, your door is broke open. I then returned home.

- FOX. I am a constable. I was told that a gentleman was robbed of forty pounds at a house in Bell court; I went there, I found Mr. Kemp standing at the door, he said, I was robbed in that room; he begged me to break the door open; I examined the room, I found nothing; Bet Hamilton stood on the foot of the stairs; when I moved her she went out. I took Ann Stewart to the watchhouse.

- MATTHEWS. I am an officer of Hatton Garden; I knew the prisoner perfectly well; Wood and me went to her lodgings in Union court, leading into Holborn; we could not find her. We apprehended her at the White Hart public house, White Hart yard; we found only a guinea about her person.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex, jury before Mr. Recorder.

519. MARGARET GRIFFITHS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 11th of June , a gown, value 12 s. a time piece, value 40 s. and a shawl, value 4 s. the property of William Joseph .

WILLIAM JOSEPH . I am a milkman , I live in Foster lane, Cheapside , the prisoner was my servant ; on the 1st of June she commenced servant, she was to fetch the milk from the barn, and mind the house while we were out serving it; after she had done my business onthat morning, she took a time piece, a shawl, and a gown.

Q. What time of the day did you go out - A. About a quarter before seven in the morning; we returned before nine o'clock, she was gone; I found her on the 11th of June, my friend took her in York street, Westminster.

REES RICE . Q. I suppose you are the friend of the last witness - A. Yes. On the 11th of June I found the prisoner at her lodgings in York street, Westminster; when she opened the door to me she had the gown in her hand; I asked her what she was going to do with that gown, she said she was going to wash it; I took her and the gown to the public house and sent for the constable. Going to the office she delivered me up two duplicates, one for a shawl and the other for a time piece; I gave them to the constable.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I am wholly innocent of the crime. I am an artless young woman; my family are decent, prudent, hard working people in Wales; I have hardly any acquaintance in town, nor a friend near me that I can call to my character. I promise your lordship immediately to return to Wales if I should be discharged.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

520. THOMAS SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 3d of July , a pair of boots, value 10 s. 6 d. the property of John Macdonald .

JOHN MACDONALD . I am a groom , I work at Reeves' mews, South Audley street. On the 3d of July I went to work at five o'clock in the morning, I left the prisoner in bed, he slept with me, my boots were in the bed room, standing on the earth stone when I went out; I returned to my lodgings in the evening, and found the prisoner had taken all this things away, and my boots.

Q. Did you ever find your boots again - A. Yes, at Mr. Baker's.

JOHN BAKER . I live in Mount street, Grosvenor square. The prisoner left the boots with me to sell them for seven shillings. When the prosecutor came I shewed him the boots.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I met with the prosecutor, he said he was out of place, he asked me if I could inform him of a situation; he said he had no money; I told him he might lodge with me. In consequence of his lodging with me the landlady advanced my rent from two shillings to six shillings a week, and as I had been at some expences for him, I told the landlord to sell them for seven shillings. I did not take them for my own use, only to serve the prosecutor.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and Whipped in Goal .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

521. JOHN THARBY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 9th of July , four bushels of oats, value 20 s. the property of Jeremiah Rosher , junior.

The case was stated by Mr. Pooley.

RICHARD LIGHTFOOT . I am a lighterman in the employ of Jeremiah Rosher , junior; he is a lime merchant . On the 9th of July, between one and two o'clock in the morning, as I was going to my barge, I heard somebody in the corn loft; I called my fellow servant, he came and stood with me; we stood by the loft stairs; we saw a man come out of the loft, he took the sack on his back, he came down towards us and pushed the door open; I took hold of him, I said Tharby is it you, it is too bad; he then said he was going to take it in his stable for his horses; I left him and went into the loft; I saw another sack full standing by the loft door. Peechey came with a light, he told me the prisoner had put that sack in the privy close by; Peechey went and brought the sack up and laid it alongside of the other.

Q. Did you look into the sack at that time - A We did not; they were tied at the top. Peachey locked the loft door and gave me the bunch of keys; at eight o'clock I delivered them up to Mr. Champion.

WILLIAM PEACHEY . Q. On this night were you along with Lightfoot - A. Yes; I observed a man come out of the loft, he came down the stairs with a sack on his back to where Lightfoot and I were standing. I heard the conversation that passed between him and Lightfoot. I knew the prisoner seven or eight years; I am sure he is the man; I told the prisoner to put it down; he put it into a little house where the men put their things in; I saw no more of him that night. I got a light, took it to Lightfoot; then I carried the sack of corn into the loft.

CHARLES CHAMPION . I manage the business for Mr. Rosher, he is a lime merchant. In this corn was thirty quarters of oats; they had been landed that evening; I saw the corn in the sack after it was opened at the office, they were oats and of the same sample. The carmen are never suffered to go into the loft under any pretence whatever; it is delivered to the carmen by me.

Q. He came back the next day - A. He did, in the morning early; as soon as I heard it I had him apprehended. When I returned from the magistrate, after hearing him say he wanted it for his horses, I looked, and there was near a bushel and a half in the bin.

GEORGE CHILDS . Q. Are you in the service of Mr. Rosher - A. I am a labourer. On the next morning, when the prisoner came to work, he said he saw me lay the keys in the little house; I had been landing corn that day; I locked the door and put the keys there.

Prisoner's Defence. I got up about half past one, I did not know it was so early; I put the key of the stable on the ledge of the little house, where the key of the loft was; I put up that corn one day before the time; I was going to the stable with it. I have worked for my master eight years; I had three pounds fourteen shillings of my master's in my pocket; if I had been a rogue I should have taken that.

GUILTY , aged 49.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and whipped in Goal .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

522. JOHN CONOLLY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 8th of June , a table cloth, value 5 s. the property of Thomas Wilcox .

THOMAS WILCOX . I am a victualler , I live at No. 69, Wardour street, Soho . On the 8th of June, I hadoccasion to go to the stable yard to get some straw, to pack up some goods for a friend at the West Indies; on coming into my house I saw the prisoner in the parlour standing by the side of a small dresser, where we put things in; I asked him what he wanted, or if he had any business there; I could get no answer from him; he passed me and went out into the street, I followed him; in about five yards from my house I took him by the coat; I perceived a table cloth between his coat and waistcoat, I perceived mine and my wife's name upon it; I took him into my house; when he came in he begged my pardon, and said it was distress that had occasioned him to take it; I asked him what he was, and his name; he would not tell me; I asked him to have the goodness to turn out his pockets; he did; there was a pocket handkerchief, a pair of gloves, half a horse shoe, and a small note; I looked at the note, the directions were torn off; he snatched the note out of my hand, he said he would be d - d if I should expose his note, or any man else; he threw the note into the fire and burnt it; he told me he had not a sixpenny piece; when the officer searched him, he found eleven shillings upon him.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. On the evening this happened I was intoxicated, I did not know what I was doing of; I had the misfortune some time back to have my skull fractured.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

523. MARGARET COOK was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 9th of March , a gold broach, value 3 s. four pair of stockings, value 4 s. two handkerchiefs, value 3 s. a silk handkerchief, value 3 s. a half handkerchief, value 6 d. and a petticoat, value 2 s. the property of Harriett Welbank - and a petticoat, value 2 s. the property of Sarah Welbank .

HARRIETT WELBANK . Q. What are you - A. I work at my needle ; I live at No. 13, Clement's passage Clare market ; the prisoner lodged with my mother.

Q. What is the prisoner - A. She did taylor's work I lost all my things out of the parlour, at different times; I did not know which way they went; the things were found at the pawnbrokers, and the duplicates in her pocket.

WILLIAM TAPP . I am a pawnbroker, No. 18, Portugal street, Lincoln's inn Fields; here is a gold broach, four pair of stockings, a half handkerchief, and a petticoat, I took these things in at different times of the prisoner.

The property produced and identified.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence, called one witness, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY , aged 34.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

524. SARAH DELANY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 12th of March , two silver table spoons, value 20 s. the property of John Millard .

JOHN MILLARD . I live at No. 6, Grosvenor row, St. George's, Hanover square . In the month of March, the prisoner came to see my servant; we missed the spoons and found them at the pawnbrokers.

Q. Why did you suspect her of taking them - A. Owing to her bad character.

WILLIAM AUSTIN . I am a pawnbroker's servant, Lower John street, Grosvenor square; the prisoner on the 3rd of March pledged a silver table spoon for ten shillings, in the name of Mary Jones ; afterwards she pledged another spoon for ten shillings.

(The property produced and identified.)

The prisoner said nothing in her defence, called two witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY, aged 16.

Judgment respited .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

525. MARY JENNINGS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 10th of July , two guineas, fourteen half guineas, and a bank note, value 1 l. the property of John Higgins .

JOHN HIGGINS . I am a labouring man , I live at Woolwich; I came up last Saturday week, in the morning from Woolwich; I brought a bundle to a friend of mine, and this money, nine guineas in gold and a bank note.

Q. Where did you meet with the prisoner - A. In Field lane ; two other men and me went into the White Bear to have a pot of beer; the prisoner was there; so we stopped there while we were taking five or six pots of beer, these men and I.

Q. How many were there of you that drank this five or six pots of beer - A. Four of us. After nine o'clock I was for coming out; she saw me take the money out in the public house, because I was sitting by the side of her, on the table, she was sitting on a stool; when I came out she followed me, took hold of my arm and took me to another public house; I do not know where it was; we went into the public house to take a pot of beer together; I was a little fatigued coming off the road, I went to sleep, because I had been up the night before; I laid my head on the table and felt her take the purse out of my pocket.

Q. You were asleep - A. No; I felt her take the money out of my pocket; then she made off, and I followed her; I did not see her till Monday morning, when she was taken.

Q. You was not very sober - A. I was not, but I knew what she was doing; I was not drunk; I am sure I felt her take the purse out of my pocket.

Q. Why did not you lay hold of her - A. That was more than I could do.

TIMOTHY SULLIVAN . The prosecutor was in the public house from four o'clock till nine o'clock; he had the money out of his pocket; the publican told him to put it into his pocket; this woman came up to him and led him away; I knew the man to have the money when he went out of the public house, and she led him away.

JOHN CONNOR . He came up with my bundle, what he did with my money I cannot say. On Monday he told me he had a woman in company with him; I do not know any thing of her; she said they got the things out of pawn with it.

Prisoner's Defence. I went into the public house, and there was my prosecutor; there was thirty Irish people fighting in George alley, fighting one against the other.I took a glass of gin of him: he took a glass of gin and bitters; he went to George alley. So help me God I know no more about it than you do.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

526. WILLIAM FINN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 11th of July , forty pound weight of lead, value 10 s. the property of Thomas Jennings esq affixed to a building of his called a house .

Second count stating it to be affixed to a building generally.

THOMAS JONES . I live in Newcastle street, I am a bricklayer.

Q. Had you the repair of any house of Thomas Jennings - A. I had, No. 9, Carey street .

Q. While the house was under your care repairing, was any lead taken from it - A. On the 11th of July, I went to see the men at work; in going up the two pair of stairs. I met the prisoner, he was coming down stairs; I asked him what he had, he said Pearey's tools, the bag on his shoulder was bulky; I took it down and found the contents of it was lead; I asked him where he was going with it; he said to Pearey's lodgings in Drury lane. I told him I could not put up with such a daring felony; I took him before the magistrate directly at Bow street.

Q. After you had taken him to Bow street did you examine to see whether lead had been taken away from any part of the house - A. I did, it was taken from a small gutter behind the chimney; I measured the place, I found the lead corresponded exactly.

Q. What was the prisoner. - A. He was one of my labourers.

GEORGE PEARCY . Q. Were you employed in this building - A. I was; I am a bricklayer.

Q. Had you employed this man to bring you any lead - A No. I live at No. 3, little Essex street Strand, the bag in which the lead was put is my property; I went to work at the house at nine o'clock that morning; I found my tools in the bag as I had left them on Saturday night; I took out the tools that I wanted and left the others in the bag. Mr. Jones brought the man into the garret between eleven and twelve o'clock, with with the lead in my bag; Mr. Jones enquired of me what I knew of the lead in that bag; I said that I did not know that there was any lead in the bag, my tools were in the bag a few minutes before, the prisoner said that I told him to take my tools out and put the lead in and take it to where I lived; I told him I lived with Mr. King, carpenter, No. 3, little Essex street, Strand. I never gave him any direction to carry the lead, nor had any suspicion of it being taken away; that I am willing to testify was it at the peril of my soul.

Prisoner's Defence. My master ordered me to go to Carey street, to help the rest of the men to get down the rubbish; some man in the next room called out to take that lead and put it in the next room till he went home; I picked it out of the rubbish, my master asked me what it was; I told him some of the workmen told me to put it in the next room till they went home.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

527. ANN CRINES was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 4th of July , two pewter pots, value 2 s. the property of Edward Hartley .

EDWARD HARTLEY . I am a publican , I keep the Three Colts, Grove street, Hackney .

Q. Did you lose any pots on the 4th of July - A. I had been in town about business; and when I came home the woman was in custody.

JOHN GIBSON . I live with my father, he is a surveyor. On the 4th of July, between twelve and one o'clock, I saw a woman sitting down in a path in the field: she took something from under her petticoat and put in her apron, whether it was plate or pewter I could not then see, it was in the shape of mugs; I went out of my father's accounting house and called our servant, his name is Reader; I told him my suspicion and to stop the woman if he judged she had any thing with her; I saw the pots when he stopped her, the name being upon the two pots; he took her to the Three Colts; she said she picked them up.

JOHN READER . Q. You are servant to the last witness - A. Yes, my master desired me to go to this woman; I came up to her about three hundred yards off; I saw the form of a quart pot; I said have not you got some pots of Mr. Hartley's, she said she had got two pots in her apron, she had picked them up; I took the pots out of her apron; I saw Mr. Hartley's name upon them; I took her to Mr. Hartley's, she was taken in custody; I have kept the pots ever since.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I had occasion to make water, stooping I saw these pots; I took them up; if they had not belonged to Mr. Hartley, I should have carried them down to the Salmon and Ball; I never stole a pot in my life; that gentleman saw me stoop and pick them up.

GUILTY , aged 50.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

528. ELIZABETH WATERS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 28th of May , a pair of sheets, value 4 s. the property of John Goudge , in a lodging room .

MRS. GOUDGE. Q. You are the wife of John Goudge - A. Yes, I live in Mile End New town .

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar - A. Yes, on Saturday six weeks ago the came about eleven o'clock in the morning; I told her the people was gone and she should have the room, she had spoke before for the room; she had been four times before about these lodgings; she said she took in ladies linen to wash, and her husband was a gentleman's servant at Hackney.

Q. What part of the house did you agree to let her have - A. The lower back parlour on the ground floor furnished; about five o'clock in the afternoon, I agreed with her to have the room; she brought two small bundles with her, and asked my leave to put them into the drawers.

Q. How long did she stay in the house - A. Not above an hour or three quarter's in the whole.

Q. After having made the bargain at five occlock, are you sure there was any bed linen - A. Yes, she took the dirty sheets off the bed, and I brought her down clean linen.

Q. Did she come to sleep there that night - A. No, I gave her the key of the street door, and shewed her how to come in, in case I might be out of the way.

Q. Did you see her again the next day - A. No, last Saturday week was the next time I saw her after that I examined the room finding she did not come home, and missed the sheets.

Q. Did you ever find the sheets again - A. Never, I saw her in Spitalfields watchhouse, she was not taken up on my charge. The two bundles she brought in was hay in one bundle and grass in the other; she emptied the contents of the handkerchiefs in the room, and took the handkerchiefs with her, and the key of the street door.

Q. What is the value of the sheets - A. Four shillings.

Prisoner's Defence. I gave her the dirty sheets, I had no clean sheets at all; the bed was very dirty, and there was no lock to the door.

Prosecutrix. I am very sure I put down a pair of clean sheets, she said she liked the room very well, and I am sure there were neither hay or grass in the room before she came in.

GUILTY , aged 62.

Confined Two Years in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

529. JAMES alias JOSEPH WARBOYS , and GEORGE SETON , were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 9th of June , a trunk, value 4 s. ten yards of black lace, value 5 l. a lace cloak, value 3 l. a gown, value 6 s. a petticoat, value 4 s. a shirt, value 10 s. two neck handkerchiefs, value 4 s. three books, value 6 s. a work box, value 6 d. four brushes, value 2 s. and a thread case, value 1 s. the property of John Frazer .

JOHN FRAZER . I am an agent . No. 8, Fenchurch buildings.

Q. Did you lose a trunk and the articles in the indictment - A. I did, on the 7th of December last; I removed from Prospect place, St. George's in the East ; the trunk was packed up; Mrs. Frazer can speak to that; I delivered the trunk to the carman myself, his name is Seton .

Q. Did you miss this trunk on the cart arriving at Fenchurch buildings - A. No; on the next day about twelve o'clock I found the trunk had not arrived.

Q. Have you ever seen the trunk since - A. In June I saw it at the office; the initials on the trunk are L. B.

COURT. Had Seton any companion assisting him in taking care of the goods as he went into the house - A. I saw none. I helped both to load and unload.

MARIA FRAZER . Q. Are you the wife of Mr. Fazer - A. Yes.

Q. Did you assist in packing up that trunk when you moved from St, George's in the East to Fenchurch buildings - A. I did; I packed up all the articles mentioned in the indictment myself; about twelve o'clock the next day I perceived this trunk was missing.

Q. Do you know what time the cart left your house at St. George's in the East - A. At twelve o'clock; it was four o'clock, or after, when it came to Fenchurch buildings; the cart arrived before the coach that Mr. Frazer and I were in; but the cart was not unpacked; the carman was at the door.

Q. Had he any companion with him - A. Not as I saw.

Q. Do you recollect ever seeing the other prisoner - A. I never saw him but at Hatton Garden office; when Mr. Frazer went after the man he was come; the next day he was absent from his work; the day after he came and said he was as perfectly innocent as a child unborn; I know all my clothes.

Q. You know nothing of the prisoners taking them - A. No.

Mr. Arabin. Did not the prisoner Seton do all he could in taking the things up stairs - A. He did.

COURT. Do you know whether any servant of yours was stationed at the cart to take care of the goods while the prisoner was taking the things up stairs - A. None to my knowledge.

JONATHAN TROTT . Q. Is Ann Williams present - A. I believe not; she is very unwell; she knows the prisoner Worboys brought a trunk in but she cannot swear to the trunk. On the 4th of June last I received information that Worboys was a deserter ; in consequence of that I told my brother officer, he apprehended him, I was in the country; when I returned I was informed there was a trunk stole in December last; I went to Worboy's house, I saw his wife there at a house in a court Chicksend street, Mile End New town; this trunk I found laying edgeways between the bedstead and the wainscoat, in the one pair of stairs; I found these things in the room - a book, 48 Mark lane, and the copy of a will, in all three books, about ten yards of black lace, part of a laced cloak, a gown, and habit shirt upon the wife's neck; a man's shirt, a neck handkerchief, a petticoat, two fans, a work box, four brushes, and a thread case; I followed Worboys to Deptford, he had been marched two hours before from the Savoy. The officer gave him up; I told him what I had found at his lodgings; he admitted the trunk might be found there, because he found the trunk in Aldersgate street before Christmas, he said it was open, he hardly knew what was in it; I said you have had it repaired since, have not you; he said no; I found the old hasp in one of the drawers; here is another hasp had been put on; he said he had not broke it open, it was open before. I took Seton on the 13th of June; I found him at a public house door in Nightingale lane. I told him the occasion of my taking him; he said he was quite innocent, he knew nothing of it. I have known him for some time; I believe he has something coming in.

Q. You did not find this man with Worboys - A. No.

The property produced and identified.

Worboy's Defence. I picked up the box, coming home from work, in Aldersgate street; Mrs. Williams, my landlady, saw me bring it into the house.

Seton was not put on his defence.

BOTH, NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

530. SOPHIA TAVERNER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 7th of July , three caps, value 3 s. and five pair of stockings, value 5 s. the property of Elizabeth Miller , widow .

ELIZABETH MILLER . I am a widow, I live in Roberts place, Mile End ; I keep the house.

Q. Did you lose three caps and five pair of stockings at any time - A. Yes, I lost them from my sleepingroom; they were in a little box unlocked; I saw them on the morning of the 7th; in the morning on the 8th I missed them; the prisoner lodged with me in a little back room over my head, she had been there ten days. She quitted my room without giving me any notice.

Q. When you missed your stockings and your caps, did you search after her - A. When I got up in the morning I saw a light on the stairs, she had gone in the night and left her door open; I saw her again that day, but I did not know that she had got the things. I took her up on the Friday; I found every thing gone from the bed.

Q. Did you complain of that to the magistrate - A. Yes. When she was brought back to my house she had one of my caps on her head; this is the cap, I made it myself.

Q. Have you found the other two caps and the stockings - A. No; she had a shawl on, but she went backwards and made an end of that. When she was going to the office she said she should suffer for all.

Q. What was the value of your stockings and caps - A. Five shillings the stockings, and three shillings the caps.

MARY BUSH . I live next door to the prosecutrix; I found the prisoner at her mother's, I brought her back to Mrs. Miller; Mrs. Miller claimed the cap.

Prisoner's Defence. I am very innocent of taking the things. When I went out I always used to hang up the key in my landlady's room.

GUILTY , aged 32.

Confined One Month in Newgate , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

531. HUGH PURCELL was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 10th of June , a screw wrench, value 2 s. and a whip, value 4 s. the property of Henry Smith and James Holton .

HENRY SMITH . I live at No. 9, Charles street, Middlesex hospital , I am a coachmaker , James Holton is my partner. On the 10th of May we missed the screw wrench and several other articles. On the 10th of June I was in the front shop, about the hour of two o'clock in the day; I left the front shop to go down stairs, I was called up stairs by a person that worked in the back shop, saying a strange person had taken a whip from the chaise, he had gone up Suffolk street; the prisoner was taken by Ansley; the whip he had got with him; I took him to the office.

Prisoner. Mr. Smith, when I was taken to your shop, you told me you would transport me if it cost you one hundred pounds, and when I came to the office you told me you would let me off if I would go on board a ship.

Prosecutor. I did make an offer if you would go to sea I would forgive you - you said you would have a throw if you lost the stick.

JAMES ANSLEY . I work for Messrs Smith and Holton. I took the prisoner in Queen Ann street, he was walking along with the whip; he told me he was going with the whip to a gentleman in the Strand or Fleet street; the prisoner came very quietly to the shop. I know the whip to be my master's it was not finished. I remember the workman making it.

- BUDGELL. I am an officer, I searched the prisoner; I found the ticket of a rule and a screw wrench upon him; he said he found all the tickets.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I told Mr. Ansley that I was coming from Bond street and was going to Drury lane I had the whip of Mr. Swan in Bond street.

GUILTY , aged, 17.

Publicly Whipped and discharged.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

532. ANN RYAN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 13th of June , a China figure, value 5 s. the property of Thomas Atkinson .

The prosecutor being called upon, and not appearing in court, his recognizances were ordered to be estreated .

NOT GUILTY.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

533. JOHN COX was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Thomas Bennet and William Foot Mount , about the hour of twelve at night on the 20th of May , with intent to steal and burglariously stealing therein fifty pounds in monies numbered, two bank notes, value 5 l. each, and four notes, value 2 l. each, and eight other notes, value 1 l. each, the property of Thomas Bennet and William Foot Mount .

Second count for like offence, only stating it to be the dwelling house of Thomas Bennet.

The case was stated by Mr. Gurney

THOMAS BENNET . Q. Are you in partner ship with Mr. William Foot Mount - A. I am; at the Globe brewhouse, Compton street, St. James's street, Clerkenwell . The prisoner came into our service on the 19th of March.

Q. On the 20th of May at night what time did you leave the accompting house - A I left it at eight o'clock.

Q. At that time what money was there in the desk - A. Twenty six pounds in bank notes, and about thirty three pounds in cash; seven shilling pieces, half guineas, two guineas, and eight pounds in silver.

Q. In the iron chest was there any quantity of copper - A. Yes; they were tied up in five shillings and half crown papers, halfpence and penny pieces; they were in blue and brown paper. I shut the outer accounting house door at ten o'clock, which is for the accommodation of the officers. I left the inner accounting house secured. The accounting house and dwelling house is all under one roof, it is a continuation of my house. The clerk sleeps over the accounting house; it is inclosed within my gates.

Q. At what hour the next morning were you alarmed - A. A little before five o'clock. When I came down I found the second door of the inner accounting house forced open; the first accounting house door they had not touched; a man can come to the second door without going to the first, there is a passage to it; the second accounting house door had been forced open, the staple broke, and the lock wrenched; it had the appearance as if done with an iron crow. I found the door that goes to the desk forced open, my desk and my partners throwed back and broken open. The money and the bank notes that I have spoken of, were gone.

Q. Was the iron chest broken open - A. I cannot say; the copper was kept in the iron chest; the iron chest has been opened, and the money was gone; the key was in my desk; the papers were throwed aboutand by the side of the iron chest was a dark lanthorn. The lock of the wicket gate was forced; it must have been a violent wrench to break it open. The prisoner came to work that day a little after six o'clock; he took no notice of the accounting house being broke open; I said nothing to him; he went to his work, I did not cause him to be apprehended till the Monday following, then I went to his lodgings; I found penny pieces and half crowns, with some blue paper along with the money.

Q. Did you ask him by what means he became possessed of that money - A. I did; he said it was what he and his wife had saved from their hard earnings.

Q. How much a week did this man have settled wages - A. Eighteen shillings a week.

Court. Persons employed in a brewer's service if they had a mind to save copper, would save it in that manner - A. Yes. He told me he had no more money than that which he had taken from him; he was released on the Saturday following. On the Thursday following he was apprehended again.

Mr. Gurney. How much money had he about him then - A. I think between seven and eight pounds in gold, seven shilling pieces, half guineas, two or three half crowns, and two shillings; I cannot speak positively to the sum.

Q. Did you then find at his lodging any new articles that you did not find at the first time - A. Several, there were sheeting, tablecloth, a new coat and waistcoat, and small clothes, to the value of between four and five pounds.

JOHN ROAT . Q. You are a horse keeper to Mr. Bennet - A. Yes. On the afternoon before the robbery was committed, the prisoner returned home with the dray between five and six o'clock; he said to me I am wearied and tired, I will go home and get a good night's rest; he left the yard by six o'clock and went home; I left my business a quarter before nine o'clock at night; I saw him again, he was coming out of Goswell street, he said horse keeper I have left my gimlet at the brewhouse; I have returned back to get it; he went to the gates and rung the bell; I turned away, I saw no more of him till the next morning.

- ROLFE. Q. I believe you are tunman - A. Yes. I was in the brewhouse the night before the robbery cleansing; about nine o'clock the prisoner came in, he asked for his gimlet; he and I went in the yard, the gimlet was found; I let him out and he went away; I staid that evening cleansing till about twelve o'clock; I locked the wicket gate and took the key with me.

THOMAS BLUNT . Q. You are stoker I believe - A. Yes. On the morning of the 21st of May, I went to the brewhouse about a quarter before five; I found the wicket gate open; it had been day light some time before; I did not perceive it was broken open then; I went into the brewhouse; in less than five minutes I came back again; I found the lock wrenched and a piece of wood broken off outside of the wicket, I went into the accounting house, I found all the doors open, the papers and some loose halfpence were about the accompting house; I informed my master.

JONATHAN TROTT . Q. You are a police officer of Hatton garden office - A. Yes. I apprehended the prisoner on the 21st of May, about the middle of the day. I searched his lodgings on the Monday; I found there seventy six penny pieces, thirty two halfpence, a dollar, ten half crowns, and seventeen shillings; this was the first search; one half guinea, and four seven shilling piecet, and some blue paper, it had been apparently cut as if to put halfpence in. He was set at liberty on the Saturday following, and he was apprehended on the 3d. of June; I then secured him; I asked him what he had got about him; he said a little silver he believed in this purse; I found it in his left hand breeches pocket, three half crowns, and two shillings, he seemed very restless; I said let us see what you have got in your watch pocket; I found these five half guineas, and ten seven shilling pieces; I secured him, and the prosecutor and I went to the prisoner's lodgings again; on searching I found three small pieces of linen for shirting, a tablecloth, a new pocket handkerchief, three pair of cotton stockings, and a new coat, waistcoat, and breeches, which was not there on the first search.

Q. What in your opinion must have been the cost of all these articles, including the clothes - A. From four to five pounds.

Q. Did you find the money that you found before - A. No, the box was empty. On the following day I asked the prisoner what he had done with the money that he had returned to him; he said the money was laid out for these things.

Q. Did you ask him how he came by this money you found on the second search - A. He said he had saved it by his hard work.

COURT, to prosecutor. Q. Did it appear to you that in the way it had been done that the person, whoever it was that did it, must have known the premises - A. Yes. There were two other desks belonging to the clerks which were not touched.

Prisoner's Defence. I am as innocent of it as a child unborn.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

534. JOHN SMITH , and CHARLES MEYRICK , were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Thomas Davis , about the hour of 12 at night on the 30th of June , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein a dial, value 10 l. - two fowling pieces, value 20 s. a musket, value 10 s. a blunderbuss, value 5 s. and six bottles of wine, value 30 s. his property .

The case was stated by Mr. Gurney.

JOHN CLARK . Q. I believe you are nephew to Mr. Thomas Davis - A. Yes.

Q. Is he proprietor of Bagnigge wells - A. Yes.

Q. What parish is that in - A. St. Pancras.

Q. On the night of the 30th of June last, did you secure the long room - A. No, the cellar of the long room I secured between ten and eleven o'clock.

Q. On the night of the 30th of June, you locked up the cellar, you have a long room, have you not - A. Yes.

COURT. Did any person sleep on any part of the premises - A. Yes; I slept there and Mr. Davis and family.

Q. Were there any fowling pieces and muskets - A. There were in the Nell Gwynn room, and there were some wine in the cellar.

Q. At what time on the 1st of July did you discover the place had been robbed - A. About six o'clock; the door had been forced open by an iron crow.

Q. Was any wine gone - A. I found two pints down in the garden; there were some scattered about in the cellar; there were some bottles with the necks broken off, and the lock of the cellar was broken off.

COURT. You are quite sure that wine had been disturbed - A. Yes.

Q. Did you find any fire arms missing from the Nell Gwyn room - A. Yes.

Q. Were there any left behind - A. Only a bayonet.

Q. Was the dial gone from the long room - A. Yes; there was left behind a sack and a stick.

Q. The long room and the Nell Gwyn room are within the fence - A. Yes, and surround the house.

WILLIAM HOUSDEN . Q. I believe you are servant to Mr. Davis. A. I am; I sleep in the house.

Q. Were you awoke by the last witness, did he alarm you of the robbery - A. Yes, early in the morning; about a quarter past six on the 1st of July.

Q. Did you go and look in the Nell Gwyn room - A. I did; I found missing a musquet, two fowling pieces, and a blunderbuss; the pistols I cannot be sure of; I had seen them a day or two before, they were safe then.

Q. Was the room in use at that time - A. No.

Q. Was there any bayonet - A Yes, there was one that was left behind.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. This Nell Gwyn room is in the garden - was there any persons in the gardens at that time - A Not as I know of.

Q. You say you had not seen these things for a day or two before - how many persons had there been in that room a day or two before - A. I do not believe one.

Q. You will not swear that there was not - A. I will not; it was the lumber room.

COURT. Did it continue to be open as a tea drinking garden up to the time - A. Yes.

Mr. Knapp. You are pretty full of a night of company of all sorts - any person might have got in if they chose - A. Yes.

Q. Then any body else might have got in as well as these persons - A. Yes.

Q. Who has the controul of the cellar - A. John Clerk locks up the cellar of a night at ten o'clock, and puts the key in the bar till.

JOHN PARKER . Q. I believe you are watchman of Clerkenwell church yard - A. I am.

Q. On the night of the 30th of June, or in the morning of the 1st of July, did you observe any thing in your beat - A. As I went round a little after two o'clock I saw some muskets and a blunderbuss hid behind a board.

COURT. How many fire arms were there then - A. A musket, a gun and a blunderbuss, they were concealed behind this board; I took up this blunderbuss and laid it down again where I found it. I went round the other way, to watch the other entrance of School house yard, there I met the superintendant, I shewed him them; he wanted to take them away, but I said no; he ordered me to lock up my box and go carelessly away.

Q. How soon afterwards did you see any body come - A. Going on towards three o'clock, it was not day light when I first saw the muskets, it was twilight, I saw three men coming down Aylesbury street, making towards where them things stood, then it was light; when they got down Aylesbury street they turned down St. James' walk, as though they were going towards the prison; when they came to the corner of School house yard they stopped there; that was where the fire arms were; I was about fifty yards from them; the other watchman was in the rear. My companion sprang out and went after them; two of them ran through School house yard, and one of them went down Aylesbury street; he that came towards Aylesbury street escaped entirely; Smith and I assisted in securing him in the passage leading to St. John's square. Simpson was the first man that laid hold of Smith, I came up and assisted; he went down to the watchhouse very quietly, he made very little resistance; when I returned from the watchhouse I saw Meyrick in my two partners hands, he tried to kick and throw them up if he could. I helped in bringing him to the watchhouse.

Q Did you then go back to where the fire arms was - A. Yes, they had been moved; then I found that bottle, about twenty yards off from where the things had been concealed in School house yard, it was lying down.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. When you first saw the muskets it was twilight - A. Yes.

Q. It was so light you could see muskets - A. Yes; it was not very light, the day was breaking.

Q. When you got these persons you had got your cutlass - A. I had not; the superintendant had it drawn.

Q. You say that Smith, when he was taken, he went very quietly with you to the watchhouse, but Meyrick he was very resolute - A. Yes.

Q. Did not he desire you to tell him what he was taken for - A. He did say he had done nothing; he asked why he was taken, I said for running away; we did not know at that time where the robbery had been committed.

JAMES SIMPSON . Q. I believe you are superintendant of the watch - A. I am, of St. James's, Clerkenwell. In consequence of Parker's information I went to the spot and looked at the arms; the blunderbuss was laid behind a post, and the musket was laid behind the board of a rail.

Q. What time was this that you saw the watchman - A. I think it might be ten minutes past two o'clock, it was twilight, the day had not completely broke.

Q. I believe after this you and the watchman concealed yourselves to watch for the persons that came after these things - A. Yes.

Q. How soon did any person come - A. The chimes had just gone a quarter before three; there were three men came, they came off Clerkenwell green.

Q. That is the way from Aylesbury street - A. Yes. The two prisoners were two of the men, I could plainly see them; when they came to the spot they made a dead halt and looked round them, as if to see if any person was watching them; after they had looked round, the prisoner Smith stooped and picked up the blunderbuss, he had it in his hand.

Q. Did either of the others do any thing - A. Two of them were stooping behind the post; Meyrick was further in School house yard, just by the musket. When he stooped down I sprang out; the other watchman followed the two prisoners down School house yard, and the other turned round; Meyrick let fall a bottle, it broke, I have got the neck of the bottle with the corkin; the liquor was spilled; I tasted it, it was wine.

Q. What became of the blunderbuss that Smith picked up - A. He threw down the blunderbuss before he run down School house yard; I pursued Smith and overtook him at Jerusalem passage; I apprehended him. Parker came up in a minute afterwards; we brought him to the watchhouse, with the assistance of a third man.

Q. Did he say any thing - A. I put the point of the hanger to his breast and told him if he resisted I would run him through. After I had taken Smith to the watchhouse I immediately ran back, and just by the church rails Meyrick was in the custody of Burns and others; he was tearing about in a dreadful way; I told him if he did not submit I would cut his head off; he was quieter after that.

Q. When you took him into Smith, did you ask Smith and him any questions - A. They were put in separate places; we took Smith out; the fire arms were upon the table; we asked him if he knew any thing of these fire arms, he said he never saw them in his life.

Q. Are you quite sure that you saw him throw the blunderbuss down - A. I am positive; I searched him, he had nothing upon him but a snuff box with some snuff in it; I asked Smith what his name was, he would not tell; we entered it in the charge book name unknown. Meyrick had given me another name at another time, that of Foster.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. That other occasion that you wrote Foster, he had left his cart, he gave his name Thomas Foster , the same as was upon his cart-A. Yes.

Q. At the time you saw these firm arms it was twilight, just about day break - A. It was.

Q. Was it light enough for you to see if you had been so near them as you are now - A. Not so light as that; in the morning at two o'clock I could see the person of a man certainly; I could not distinguish the features.

Q. Then at the time when you first saw them, there was not light enough to see their features - A. Not when I first saw them; at three o'clock there was.

Mr. Gurney. Who did you give these pieces to - A. I laid them on the table before the police magistrate - the musket and bayonet were fresh with oil; they fitted exactly.

JOHN HUNT . Q. In the morning after the robbery did you and Trott go together to the prosecutor's - A. Yes.

Q. Did you find the cellar door had been opened by something - A. Yes, by an iron crow.

Q. How did the long room door seem to have been opened - A. That seemed to have been opened by a similar instrument; the Nell Gwyn had no marks of violence. In the Nell Gwyn we found this bayonet; I think it belongs to the musket, it fits exactly; they were both all over oil, the musket and bayonet appear to have been recently oiled.

JONATHAN TROTT . Q. You went with Hunt to search the premises - A. I did; I searched Smith's lodgings; since then I found it to be his lodgings; his wife and Meyrick's wife came in while I was there; Hunt took three skeleton keys from Smith's wife's pocket.

Q. You saw the musket and the bayonet compared - A. Yes. I have no doubt but what they belong together.

Q. You have drawn the cork of that bottle, is it wine - A. It is.

Q. Was there any other person in that house - A. One man that occupied the house, that they lodged with.

Q. Did you find any clothes that belonged to Smith - A. There was a man's wearing apparel, but whose it was I do not know.

Mr. Knapp. Mr. Trott, you know very well if these persons are convicted, there are two forty pounds reward - A. Certainly I do.

THOMAS DAVIS . Q. You were the proprietor of Bagnigge wells at that time - A. I was.

Q. Were you a resident in the house - A. I was; - the long room adjoins the house, and the cellar is under it.

Q. The Nell Gwyn room is a detached room in your garden - A. It is.

Q. Can you tell us upon looking at your cellar before the robbery, and looking at it the next morning, whether you had lost any wine - A. A few days afterwards there did appear to be missing about a dozen bottles of wine. The contents of that bottle is Madeira wine.

Q. Had you such a musket as that - A. I had such a musket and blunderbuss, they were nearly similar. I have no doubt but they were taken from my premises.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. I understood you from the appearance of them you have no doubt but they are yours - A. I have not.

Q. But with respect to swearing them, you would not - A. With respect to the musket, that belongs to the Bloomsbury association; it is one I borrowed of the committee while my own was making for myself.

Q. Have you never experienced that a bayonet would fit three or four muskets - A. I have no doubt but it would.

Q. The Nell Gwyn room in the garden is completely detached from the house - A. It is.

Q. With respect to the wine, you say you are now moved - had you moved a good deal of wine - A. I had not moved any; I had packed up some.

Q. How many waiters come to your cellar - A. A. bout half a dozen; only one person goes into the cellar, John Clark ; the others do not go in only in my presence.

COURT. Had you observed this musket of yours previous to the robbery - A. A day or two before I had; from the knowledge that I have of them I should not entertain any doubt that they belong to each other.

Q. to Clark. Look at that musket and blunderbuss - do you believe they belong to your uncle - A. I have some opinion they do.

Q. At the time the officer compared the musket and the bayonet, did they appear that they belonged together - A. They did.

Q. Could you judge from the appearance of the wine in the cellar, whether any wine had been removed from the cellar - A. Yes; I cannot exactly say how much.

Housden. I believe the musket and bayonet belong together; I saw them at the office in the state in which I oiled them; the blunderbuss has been broke since it was taken out of our premises.

Jury. Are you positive that they are your master's - A. I should be loth to swear it; I do not doubt it; Ifirmly believe they are the same that were in the Nell Gwynn room; the dial has never been found; it was appraised at six guineas and a half.

COURT, to prosecutor. What are the two fowling pieces worth - A. Twenty shillings; and the musket ten shillings; the fowling pieces were not found.

Q. What would be the purchasing price of Madeira wine to you - A. It cost me about fifty two shillings a dozen.

Smith's Defence. In the morning I passed by the place; I was coming from No. 63, Brick lane, Old street; I was going to the Black Horse, Rathbone place, to borrow a horse for a friend of mine to go to Fairlop fair; as I was going by this place, that man sprang upon me like a tyger, he swore he would cut my leg or arm off; I ran, not with any fear fear for what I had done, I thought the man would run the sword in me; him and the watchman took me to the watchhouse, there they locked me up in a little hole, they called me out to know if I would own to either of these pieces; I told them I never saw either of these pieces in my life; I knew nothing at all about them; in the morning they took me to Hatton garden, from there down to the House of Correction; Mr. Trott and Mr. Hunt went to my place of residence, they secured my wife and young child sucking at the breast, and left two children to the mercy of the street for five days, without bread and meat, or any body to give them any thing; they took the landlord of the house away and shut him up in prison the same length of time.

Meyrick's Defence. Since the landlord of the house wife has been dead, I have lodged in the same house with Smith in the one pair of stairs. On that morning I got up, I believe about three o'clock, to go to a friend of mine, his name was Sims, he had promised me various times he would indulge me with the use of a horse to go to Fairlop fair; when I had got there I had got to go to Whitechapel, to my harness and chaise cart; when I came to this place they sprung upon Smith. I am a younger man than he; I ran swifter; I had no arms in my hand; I certainly did resist a little when I was taken. I acknowledged to being present to where this property was, but I never stooped to it.

Meyrick's Q. (to Simpson.) You say that I threw a bottle out of my hand, in what place might I be when I chucked the bottle out of my hand - A. You were running across the road.

Q. What distance were you from me - A. About seven yards.

Meyrick. I never had any bottle in my hand.

COURT, Q. to Simpson. How far distant was he from you when you saw him throw the bottle away - A. About five or six or seven yards; he was in a light coloured coat.

Q. Do you think that you are able to say that he was the person that threw away that bottle - A. Most assuredly.

Meyrick. I had a handkerchief on, they pulled it tight had I not made resistance I must have been choaked.

SMITH, GUILTY , DEATH , aged 50.

MEYRICK, GUILTY , DEATH , aged 26.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

535. EDWARD CHURCHILL, alias ROACH , and JOHN SMITH, alias JOHN PAUL SMITH , were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 10th of June , two thousand nine hundred pound weight of tallow, value 84 l. the property of Christian Splidt .

The case was stated by Mr. Alley.

CHRISTIAN BRUGES . Q. You are a servant to Mr. Stroder, sugar baker - A. Yes, in a field behind Cable street, St. George's in the east . The prosecutor's warehouse is in the same field close by Mr. Stroder's; in the room where I sleep at Mr. Stroder's, I had an opportunity of observing the prosecutor's premises. On the 10th of June, I got up in the morning between two and three o'clock; I looked out of the window, I saw the prosecutor's door half open; I saw a man in the warehouse with a light; I then awoke Mark Powell ; in consequence of what I observed I went towards the prosecutor's warehouse; there I saw three men.

Q. Did you see either of the two prisoners - A. No I saw a cart and horse close by the warehouse.

Q. Did you see any body driving the cart - A. Yes but who it was I do not know.

MARK POWELL . Q. Do you remember the morning we are speaking of - A. Yes; between one and two I looked out of the window; I saw a light in the prosecutor's warehouse, the man with the light went backwards and forwards; I saw him hold a light to the others; I saw them carrying something to the cart, the cart stood by Mr. Splidt's garden, about fifty yards from the warehouse door; we went down all of us, and the persons all run away, and then four came back; two men came to the carts and two stood a little behind the cart; there were two small carts, one stood at each cart, one drove away with his cart; at the other cart the man had a whip in his hand, that is Churchill; I knew him before, he had a whip in his hand; I spoke to him, I said what have you got there, he said what is that to you; I laid hold of him; he was never out of custody from that time till this.

Q. Was there any thing in the cart - A. The cart was loaded with the same parcels that is here to day.

SAMUEL BONTON . Q. Your father is foreman to Mr. Smith - A. Yes. I locked the door on the night of this robbery.

THOMAS BONTON . Q. You are a servant to Mr. Smith - A. Yes.

Q. Were you entrusted in the custody of this warehouse where this tallow was kept - A. I was. On the night this happened there were goskins; I left them safe in the warehouse; on the morning I went to the warehouse I found seventeen skins had been taken out; I laid them in thirteen times six.

Q. Were you afterwards shewn the tallow that was in the cart that was produced here to day - A. Yes, that was my master's tallow; that was packed up the night before.

COURT. What is the general weight of a skin of that tallow - A. One hundred three quarters weight; that is worth five or six pound.

The property produced and identified.

Churchill's Defence. I had been to Bow fair; coming home down Whitechapel with some friends, I was going to the Blue coat fields; I went to look at what was the matter; I had not a whip in my hand; they asked me what I wanted; I said the same as you to look on.

Smith said nothing in his defence.

CHURCHILL, GUILTY , aged 36.

Transported for Seven Years .

SMITH, NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

536. HENRY PAINE and THOMAS DRAKE were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 13th of June , three logwood knives, value 30 s. the property of David Davis .

DAVID DAVIS . I am a logwood cutter , I live in Great Pearl street, Spital fields . On the 9th of June I lost my knives from the warehouse in my yard: on the Monday following a witness told me the knives were at his house.

EDWARD DAVIS . I am a logwood cutter. On Monday the 13th of June Thomas Drake came and told me he had three logwood knives, would I buy them; I asked to see them; he said I should. About half past four in the afternoon he brought them; he came along with Paine; Paine had the three logwood knives; I thought I knew them. I sent for the owner; Paine was stopped.

Q. When Paine came with the knives, you did not see Drake yourself - A. Not at that time. Drake is a smith, he bears an honest character.

JOHN JONES . I am a logwood cutter. I saw the knives in a bag at a public house we used; I saw Paine and Drake by the door; I asked Drake if he knew Paine, as he had walked away; he said he did did not know him. David Morgan went for David Davis. When he came the knives were there, but both the prisoners were gone. When I came out of the public house Paine wanted to know whether I would buy the knives; we laid hold of him and brought him to the knives; we did not suspect Drake, we know him.

(The property produced and identified.)

Drake's Defence. My lord, and gentlemen of the jury - I went with Paine to Edward Davies ' with the knives; I did not know the knives were stolen, nor did I know Paine till he was introduced to me by one of my shopmates; he asked me if I knew any body that would buy logwood knives, he would bring forward the man and the knives; he did so, and I took him to Edward Davies ; I married my wife from the house of Edward Davies . If I had known the knives had been stolen, it cannot be supposed that I would have gone to a person that knew me.

Paine's Defence. We had them from the man that works in his master's shop; he has absconded. I am innocent of the robbery; he knows me, I have drank tea with Drake.

Drake called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Paine called one witnesses, who gave him a good character.

PAINE, GUILTY , aged 44.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

DRAKE, NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

537. RICHARD PERRY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 5th of June , two pair of trowsers, value 10 s. a shirt, value 1 s. and a jacket, value 1 s. the property of Francis Boigue .

FRANCIS BOIGUE . I am a sailor , I live in Nightingale lane, Wapping; I lost these things on the 5th of June, I put them in a cart, Catharine Lester drove the cart, she was very much in liquor. I asked the prisoner to take care of them for me. When I came back my bundle was gone.

CATHARINE LESTER . Q. You were driving the cart, you were drunk - A. Yes. This man threw a bundle into my cart, I was in liquor; I took as much care of it as I could; I saw the prisoner take it, I demanded it of him.

Prosecutor. I desired the prisoner to take care of the bundle, as the woman was so drunk, till I came back from Blackwall.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex, jury before Mr. Recorder.

538. ELIZABETH DAVIES was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 11th of July , eighty yards of silk braid, value 10 s. the property of John Mackgee .

MARY MACKGEE . I am a braid maker, No. 1, King street, Soho; the prisoner worked with me.

Q. Did she live in your house - A. No On Monday evening the 11th of July, about half past eight o'clock, I entrusted her to go to Old street road with eighteen pounds to pay a bill for me; instead of going there she went to St. Martin's lane , and left there some braid that she had stolen from me.

Q. What became of the eighteen pounds - A. She said she lost that.

ANN ARNOLD . I live at No. 6, St. Martin's lane. The prisoner called on Monday evening about nine o'clock and asked for my daughter; I told her she was up stairs; she went up stairs. Mr. Williams came the next day and took the braid away.

Q. Then she had left the braid with your daughter - A. Yes. I know nothing more of the prisoner than she went to school with my daughter.

MARY ARNOLD . The prisoner called on Monday evening; she asked me to let her leave the silk braid till the next morning, then she would call for it, it being late, she said she did tot like to take it home that night. On the next day in the evening the officer called for it, and my mother gave it him.

MR. WILLIAMS. I am an officer. I was called upon to take the prisoner in custody; she told me she went to a lobster shop, there she bought a lobster; somebody saw the parcel in her hand; she lost the parcel between Mrs. Mackgee's house and the lobster shop; she said she left the braiding at Mrs. Arnold's house.

Q. to prosecutrix. Are you a married woman - A. Yes, my husband's name is James; the prisoner lived in Princess street when she came to me; I took her in and kept her some time; she said that her father and mother had turned her out.

Mr. Walford. This poor girl came to you between twelve and one o'clock at night, you took her in - A. Yes.

Q. You have been in the habit of taking her out to visits and dances - A. No, not but once; she could earn half a guinea a week by her labour.

The property produced and identified.

The prisoner left her defence to her counsel; called one witness, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY, aged 15.

Judgment respited .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

539. WILLIAM GEORGE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 17th of June , a waistcoat, value 4 s. the property of Thomas Jennings .

MRS. JENNINGS. My husband's name is Thomas Jennings , I live at No. 109, East Smithfield .

Q. When did you lose your waistcoat - A. About five weeks ago; it was taken from the door by the prisoner.

Q. Did you see him - A. I did not; the prisoner was brought into the shop; he took it out of his bosom.

ANN DENNING . I live with Mrs. Jennings; I was standing in the kitchen, I heard a noise at the door; a gentleman asked me if I missed any thing; I said I missed a waistcoat; the gentleman told me that the man was gone down Nightingale lane. I ran after him and brought him into the shop; he took the waistcoat out of his bosom.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I am a poor unfortunate fellow with a paralytic stroke; I did it out of want.

GUILTY , aged 32.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

540. ELEANOR FITZGERALD was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 3d of July , a silver watch, value 2 l. a handkerchief, value 1 s. half a guinea, three shillings, and a dollar, value 5 s. the property of William Natch .

WILLIAM NATCH . I was returning through Westminster on the 3d of July, at twelve o'clock at night; I met the prisoner, she asked me to give her something to drink, which I did; I gave her three shillings to sleep with her. When I awoke in the morning the prisoner was gone, and my money and watch was gone; I am sure she is the woman; I found her afterwards at the corner of Strutton street the same morning, about seven o'clock; I told her that she had robbed me of my watch and money; she denied it. I had her apprehended.

ANN COUCH . I live on the same floor. Coming down stairs I met Mr. Bly; he took a key, from a comrade of the prisoner's; looking round the room I saw a handkerchief; Mr. Bly took the handkerchief; he never said to me what was in it.

MR. BLY. On Sunday morning the 3d of July, about ten o'clock, the prosecutor came to me and said the prisoner had robbed him of his watch. I went to search the room. Between the tiling I found a handkerchief; in the handkerchief this watch was hid; I brought it to the prosecutor, he said it was his watch.

Q. Did you ever find the money - A. No.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I got up in the morning and went into the public house; this gentleman came and took me up. I asked him five shillings to sleep with me; he said he had no more than three shillings. I saw no watch; if I had known where the watch was, from eight o'clock till ten, I should have known where to have made away with it.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

541. ELIZABETH MARY HEWIT was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 14th of July , three pair of stockings, value 10 s. the property of Thomas Alsford .

CATHERINE ALSFORD . I am the daughter of Thomas Alsford , he is a haberdasher and hosier in the City road .

Q. When did you lose these stockings - A. On Wednesday last the prisoner came into my father's shop, she said she came from Mr. Mainwaring's for some stockings; I gave her three pair; she went away with them.

MR. BANKS. I am a pawnbroker, No. 104, Whitecross street; the prisoner pledged two pair of stockings with me; from information I stopped her when she came to pledge the third pair.

MR. MAINWARING. The prisoner lived servant with me two months ago; I never sent her.

Q. How did she behave - A. Very bad.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I leave myself, my lord, to your mercy and a British jury; - as for my prosecutor I forgive him - I wish they all may have the same mercy at the bar of God as they give me here.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.