Old Bailey Proceedings Online (www.oldbaileyonline.org, version 6.0, 27 November 2014), May 1807 (18070513).

Old Bailey Proceedings, 13th May 1807.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE OYER AND TERMINER, AND GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND ALSO THE GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, HELD AT Justice-Hall, in the Old Bailey, On WEDNESDAY, the 13th of MAY, 1807, and following Days,

BEING THE FIFTH SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF The Right Honourable Sir WILLIAM LEIGHTON , LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT HAND BY JOB SIBLY , FOR R. BUTTERS.

LONDON:

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED By Authority of the CORPORATION of the CITY LONDON, By R. BUTTERS, 22, Fetter-lane, Fleet-street.

1807.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON.

BEFORE the Right Honourable Sir WILLIAM LEIGHTON , Knt. LORD-MAYOR of the City of LONDON; Sir NASH GROSE , One of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir ROBERT GRAHAM , Knt, One of the Barons of His Majesty's Court of Exchequer; James Shaw , Esq. Sir Brook Watson , Bart. Sir William Staines , Knt. John Ainsley , Esq. Aldermen of the said City; John Sylvester , Esq. Recorder of the said City; Joshua Jonathan Smith , Esq. John Princep , Esq. William Domville , Esq. Aldermen of the said City; and Newman Knowlys , Esq. Common-Serjeant of the said City; his Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of Goal Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

LONDON JURY.

John Lewes ,

John Bolcot ,

Samuel Gifford ,

William Marshall ,

Richard Edgar ,

William Wood ,

William Bridger ,

James Hopwood ,

Richard Bartholomew ,

Francis Smith ,

Joseph Heaton ,

William Leeks .

FIRST MIDDLESEX JURY.

Thomas Lonsdale ,

Thomas King ,

Thomas Hulston ,

John Howell ,

William Mangham ,

James Hullam ,

John Goldicutt ,

John Baker ,

George Dickenson ,

William Keene ,

Francis Day ,

William Pinney.

SECOND MIDDLESEX JURY.

John Young ,

James Silver ,

David Fontaine ,

John Bowley ,

George Long ,

Thomas Kingham ,

James Sutton ,

Francis Hall ,

John Strachn ,

Thomas Cowey ,

Robert Downes ,

Joseph Winder .

356. ELEANOR ALLISON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 20th of August , two gowns, value 20 s. a petticoat, value 5 s. two caps, value 6 s. two pair of stockings, value 4 s. a pair of shoes, value 2 s. two caps, value 2 s. a silk handkerchief, value 3 s. and a hat, value 6 s. the property of Sarah Collins .

SARAH COLLINS . Q. You are a single woman are you. - A. Yes; I live at No. 1, Cross-lane, Holborn . I am a lace-maker .

Q What is the prisoner. - A. She is a married woman ; I took her in out of good nature on the Sunday morning, she was destitute standing at the door; I asked her what was the matter, she told me that the person in the next room had turned her out, she was then standing in the passage by the street door; I told her to come up and have some breakfast, and she was with me till the Tuesday.

Q. Had you known her before. - A. I knew that she lodged in the house with this person. On Tuesday she got up between five and six o'clock in the morning and went out; I was in bed, I saw her go out of the door; she took all my clothes, she left me in bed with nothing but my shift on; I had nothing left to put on, neither shoes nor stockings; I got up and endeavoured to pursue her; she got away, being an early hour, there was no body about to stop her; I sent a person to Mr. Harrison, a pawnbroker, to know if any of the things were there; they said they were not; they were afterwards found there. Last Friday I heard the prisoner was at the election at Covent Garden; I asked her what she had done with my things; she said some she had pawned at Mr. Harrison's, some she had sold, and the others she had wore out. I lost my things on the 20th of August, and I never saw the prisoner from that time till last Friday.

JEREMIAH CORDING . I live servant with Mr. Harrison, No. 3, High-street, St. Giles's. On the 20th of August, I took a gown and a pair of shoes in pledge; of whom I cannot say.

(The property produced and identified.)

The prisoner said nothing in her defence, nor called any witnesses to character.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

356. PETER GILL was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 31st of March , two epaulets, value 2 l. a handkerchief, value 10 d. and a pair of leather breeches, value 20 s. the property of James Delaney , in the dwelling house of Charles Warwick .

JAMES DELANEY . Q. What have you to say respecting this accusation of the prisoner. - A. I have part of a room with some other officers belonging to the East London regiment for the purpose of putting on our regimentals on parade days, at the Swan public house, Bunhill-row, St. Luke's .

Q. Who keeps the house. - A. Charles Warwick . On Saturday the 28th of March there was a parade, and I changed my clothes and gave them in possession of the servant who is here; I have a trunk in this room for the purpose of keeping these regimentals in. I had no occasion to go to this house till the following Friday, April the 3d, when the servant informed me the epaulets were not in the trunk, nor my leather small clothes; he told me the lock had been forced.

RICHARD JAMES . Q. Were you servant in March last to Mr. Delaney. - A. Yes, on Saturday the 28th of March we were at the Swan in Bunhil-row, St. Luke's.

Q. Do you remember your master having a trunk at that house. - A. Yes, on the 28th I received some regimentals, and locked them up in the trunk that was kept in the Swan public-house.

Q. Do you recollect whether there was any epaulets on the coat. - A. There was one epaulet on the coat, and one wrapped up in a silk handkerchief; I locked them up in the trunk as usual. The captain keeps one key and I the other. I went to the trunk again on Friday the 3d of April, the epaulets, handkerchief, and leather small-clothes were gone. I found the lock of the trunk had been forced; the lock had been fastened on again by two small nails and locked.

Q. Have you seen any of these things since. - A. I have seen the small clothes, but not the epaulets.

Q. Do you know the prisoner. - A. Yes, he is a soldier in the same regiment as I am, the East London.

SAMUEL PAYNE . I am a pawnbroker in Bow-street, Bloomsbury. On the 31st of March they were pledged at our house; I cannot tell whether they were brought by the prisoner or not.

JOHN RAY . I am an officer of Worship-street office. I went in company of Peter Mason , captain Delaney, and Mr. Warwick, to the prisoner's apartment up two pair of stairs, No. 10, King-street, Drury-lane; on searching the room I found a great many duplicates; I then asked the prisoner if there were any more duplicates in the room; he said there was not. I moved a jar on the mantle piece; under that I found a duplicate of a pair of leather breeches, pledged for thirteen shillings at Mr. Payne's. The moment I found that ticket, the prisoner was very much alarmed, he begged the captain would forgive him. I asked him what he had done with the epaulets; he told me that he had sold them to a Jew for eighteen shillings.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. I am quite innocent of the charge; I cannot tell how the ticket came into my room. There is many men in the regiment come into my room and I tie them; it was found in a hole sticking in the wall.

GUILTY, aged 26.

Of stealing to the value of thirty-nine shillings, but not in the dwelling-house .

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

357. CATHERINE PEELEN was indicted for she, about the hour of two on the night of the 27th of April , being in the dwelling-house of Charles Hall , feloniously did steal, eight petticoats, value 2 l. five frocks, value 3 l. eleven gowns, value 3 l. five habit shirts, value 1 l. three shifts, value 15 s. two towels, value 1 s. two pieces of cloths, value 1 s. seven caps, value 1 l. two neck handkerchiefs, value 2 s. a piece of lace, value 5 s. a pair of pockets, value 1 s. an apron, value 1 s. a pocket handkerchief, value 1 s. and two pair of stays, value 2 s. the property of Charles Hall , and that she about the aforesaid hour, burglariously did break out of the said house .

ELIZABETH HALL . I live at No. 66, Chiswell-street, St. Luke's , my husband's name is Charles Hall . On the 27th of last month she came into the house to wash; at one o'clock in the morning my servant let her in; I delivered the things to my servant.

MARTHA HARRISON . Q. You are servant to Mrs. Hall, are you. - A. Yes; my mistress delivered the things to me; the prisoner came to wash about one o'clock in the morning.

Q. On what day of the month. - A. I cannot say. When the prisoner came we had some tea; after that the washerwoman persuaded me to go to sleep; I laid down upon the dresser in the kitchen and went asleep. I woke about six o'clock, I found the prisoner was gone. I went up stairs to inform my mistress, I found the street door open; I had fastened it when I let the prisoner in.

Q. Did you look to see if there were any clothes missing. - A. No, my mistress came down and missed them.

Q. (to prosecutrix) Do you recollect what things you gave to the girl to wash. - A. All the articles mentioned in the indictment, and when I came down stairs into the kitchen I missed them; my husband went to Mr. Ray the officer.

JOHN RAY . I am an officer of Worship-street office. On the 28th of April, about eight o'clock in the morning, Mr. Hall came to me; I went to a number of pawnbrokers, and in the evening she was stopped with the property at Mr. Fothergill's; she had them in a bundle.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. I am very sorry for what I did; I have had no advantage from them.

GUILTY, aged 57.

Of stealing to the value of thirty-nine shillings, but not of breaking out of the house .

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

359. MARY BENNARY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 6th of May , one cotton shawl, value 2 s. 6 d. a cotton bed gown, value 2 s. a gown, value 10 s. and a silk handkerchief, value 6 d. the property of Ann Rupert , widow .

ANN RUPERT . I am a widow , I live at 18, John street, Holywell Mount .

Q. Do you know the prisoner. - A. No. On the 5th of May last I had seen the articles at four o'clock in the afternoon; I lost them between four and five.

DANIEL BISHOP . I am an officer of Worship-street office. On the 6th of January I took the prisoner in custody; I searched her, and found a duplicate of a bed gown and a shawl.

WILLIAM POPE . I am a pawnbroker. On the 6th of May the prisoner pawned this shawl with me.

MR. COTTON. I am a pawnbroker. The prisoner on the 6th of May pledged a bed gown with me; I lent her eighteen pence upon it.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. I bought the shawl of a man in a soldier's coat, and the bed gown of a woman in the Change, Petticoat-lane. I pledged them to buy a gown with; Mr. Cotton's man came to me and said they were stole. The prosecutor took that gentleman to shew him the foot-marks of a man that went in the room, and she said there was a man seen to go out of her house with blue pantaloons.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

360. JAMES HOWARD was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Henry Williams , about the hour of twelve on the night of the 28th of April , with intent to steal and burglariously stealing therein, three sets of cart harness, value 2 l. three cart ropes, value 5 s. one coat, value 5 s. and two sacks, value 5 s. the property of Thomas Woodbridge .

JAMES GRAINGER . Q. Do you know Mr. Woodbridge. - A. Yes, he was my master, his name is Thomas Woodbridge , he lives at Greenford Green, in the parish of Willsdon . On the 28th of April I saw the prisoner in the stable about twelve o'clock at night; I had been out to my benefit club. I had bought a bit of bacon the over night, and I put it in the stable when I did my horses up, and when I came home from my benefit club I went into the stable to take the bacon out; I saw a man in the stable up against the lost window, and the dunghill window was open.

Q. Was that left shut. - A. Yes, I left it shut between six and seven o'clock; there were three pair of trace chains for cart horses, they were put in a sack, it stood against the dung hole window; the mouth of the sack was tied, and three ropes he had put loose on the dunghill, with his hat full of horse hair.

Q. Where had these things been. - A. We always hang the harness up in the stable; he had cut the back band straps and took the chains out of them, and he had got the dung fork in his hand to try to wrench the bin open; when I went up to the dung hole window I found him in the stable. I called my follow servant back; then he got up into the loft.

Q. Had the man been about the parish. - A. Yes; he at a time had worked for Mr. Boram; he got out of the loft into the barn; we took him in the barn.

Q. What did he say for himself. - A. He said he did it in distress.

Q. Is this stable or loft part of the house. - A. No, the stable is one side and the house is of the other; they all join. He got in at the loft.

WILLIAM MORGAN . Q. Were you with Grainger at the time the prisoner was taken. - A. Yes; I live in the house and I have the care of the farm; I was in bed at the time, James Grainger called me up; I got up and loaded my piece; I went into the barn, I said, my friends, whether you be one or two, if I see you I will shoot you; the prisoner at the bar said here I be, set a ladder and I will come down; he was without a coat and hat, I took him in the stable, I asked him how he could think of breaking the place open and cutting the leather to pieces; I asked him why he did not go to work, he said he had got no work to do; I told him he had better go a begging, he said if he went a begging he should be put in prison; I told him he lived in a Christian country, if he told his case any body would relieve him; I said you have got a good pair of trowsers on, why did not you sell them; he said would you like to strip yourself naked. I left him in the stable till three o'clock; at four I went over to the public house; as soon as it was open, I gave him some beer and a glass of gin; I took a dog's collar from him, he asked me to give it him, I would not; he threatened me if ever he should be at liberty, he would make me remember the dog's collar. I would not give it him; the collar I thought might lead to some discovery.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. I am not guilty of the charge; I was just come up from Colchester; I went out of the road to get a place to lay down; the stable window was open; I went in to lie down; there was a man came in, he made an alarm; as soon as the alarm was given, another man came in, he said d - n him, shoot him; it frightened me, I went up into the loft.

GUILTY, aged 38.

Of stealing, but not of breaking and entering the dwelling-house .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

361. WILLIAM RUTTIFORD was indicted for feloniously making an assault upon Joseph Firth , about the hour of twelve at night an the 6th of May , putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, a silver watch his property .

JOSEPH FIRTH . I am a journeyman baker , I live in South-molton-street. On the 26th of May, between eleven and twelve o'clock at night, I was in James-court, Hanover-square ; the prisoner came up, he took hold of my watch chain, and snatched the watch out of my pocket; with his snatching the watch out of my pocket the case flew off, he picked up the case; there were two men and a woman standing at about twenty yards distance, he ran towards them with the watch and the case, he gave it to one of the three, which I do not know; when I caught him he had neither the watch nor the case; I called the watchman several times before he came and took him to the watchhouse.

Q. What did the other people do. - A. They ran away. The prisoner was searched, and nothing was found upon him.

Q. Young man, this is a serious case, I wish you to be clear in your recollection - are you sure the prisoner at the bar is the person who snatched the watch out of your pocket. - A Yes, it was a silver watch.

Q. Were there any other people by in the court. - A. There were other people in the court, but nobody nigh.

Q. Do you know who went with you to the watch-house. - A. Only the watchman. In the mean time I was holding him, there was a person that wanted to rescue him; he went to the watchhouse; I held up my arm; and when the watchman came he ran away.

Q. You never recovered your watch. - A. No.

Q. How came you to be in this court at eleven o'clock at night. - A. I was coming home from Mr. Simpson's, a public house that I use.

Q. Is the watchman here. - A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Was not you kept in the watchhouse that night. - A. I was.

Q. You were taken in custody to Marlborough-street. - A. Yes, the person that came to rescue the prisoner, he gave charge of me.

Court. I understood you to say when you held up your arm to him he ran away. - A. Yes; he came up to the watchhouse, and said I insulted him; then he gave charge of me.

Mr. Alley. What sort of a court is this, are there any improper houses there. - A. Perhaps there might.

Q. Did you see or meet with any girls in that court. A. There was a girl standing with two men.

Q. Was there no girl standing with you. - A. No.

Q. Am I to understand that you had no conversation with any girl in that court. - A. I did speak to a woman, I asked her how she did.

Q. Was not you intoxicated. - A. No.

Q. Now let me ask you, did not you speak to this woman on purpose to accompany her home. - A. No, I did not.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going home about my business; this man said I had robbed him of his watch; he had been talking with two bad girls; he had no hat on, and his breeches were unbuttoned.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY, aged 16.

Of stealing only .

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

362 JOHN BREWSTER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 17th of April , thirty-eight pound weight of lead, value 5 s. the property of John Roberts , affixed to a building of his called a house .

Second count for like offence, only stating it to be a building generally.

JOHN ROBERTS . I live in Oxford-street, St. Mary-le-bone. On the 17th of April I received information there was a man in custody for taking some lead of mine in Montague-square , affixed to a house inhabited by colonel St. Ledger; I went with the plumber to see it compared to the place where it was taken from; it appeared to me to be cut from that place.

CHARLES WILD . I am a watchman of Mary-le-bone parish. On the 17th of April I was crying the hour of two o'clock; I saw a man come down from a dunghill where this lead was cut off; I went to the corner of Gloucester-place to my partner, and told him to be ready, there was something going on that was not right; in going back to the mews again I saw the prisoner at the bar dropping down from the top of the roof of the kitchen upon the top of the wall, and then he came down from the wall into the mews; I ran to lay hold of him, I missed my hold, and he ran down George-street, Portman-square; I hallooed to my partner, stop thief, he stopped him; I searched him, and out of his hat dropped a great knife (producing it); my partner picked it up. I said what have you done with the knife, he said he had given it him back again; the prisoner said he had not got a knife about him, I insisted upon having it; the lamplighter was lighting the lamps, I called him over to bring his burner; I found the knife fixed in between the rails and the wall, I am sure it is the same knife. I took him to the watchhouse and secured him; then I went to the mews where the dunghill was, and there I found the lead hid in the dunghill (the lead produced); it weighed thirty-eight pound. I fitted it to the place, it fitted exactly.

Q. Where was the lead cut from. - A. From the kitchen flat at the top.

Prisoner. When you took me in custody did you see me with any lead, or in company with any body nigh me. - A. I saw you at the top of the kitchen, and your partner was receiving it from you.

Prisoner. That was no reason though I was upon the top of the wall that I should take the lead.

ROBERT JONES . I am a watchman; I was the partner of the last witness. When my partner called to me I went to his assistance, I stopped John Brewster , my partner came up, he took his hat off, and the knife fell on the pavement; I picked it up and returned it to him, being a young watchman; he asked him about the knife, he told him he had not a knife; in a short time we found it between the rails and the wall.

Prisoner's Defence. Please you, my lord, when he saw me come from the wall, as he says, he took me immediately to the gentleman's house, he rang the bell, the gentleman came down, he asked the gentleman whether he had lost any property; the gentleman looked about, and said he had lost nothing; he took me to the watchhouse, and while I was in the watchhouse a watchman came to me, and said why did not you take the lead away; then I said I had no lead; they found the lead on the dunghill after my being in the watch-house all night.

GUILTY , aged 47.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justise Grose.

363. HENRY BULL was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 21st of April , a yard and a half of white serge, value 6 d. a yard and a half of other white serge, value 4 d. half a yard of cloth, value 3 d. three quarters of a yard of blue cloth, value 1 s. a yard and a quarter of blue cloth, value 6 d. three quarters of a yard of blue cloth, value 4 d. and half a yard of brown cloth, value 4 d. the property of Joseph Thrupp .

JAMES MAIZE . I am a patrol. On the 21st of April, about half after eight o'clock, I saw the prisoner in the King's private road, St. Luke's, Chelsea; the prisoner had passed me as I was talking to another man in the road; I perceived that he had something of a bulk under his coat, I followed him, and when I came up with him I asked him what he had got under his coat; he pulled out these pieces of cloth that I have got in my hand; I asked him if he had got any flannel, he said yes, he had bought it at a shop in Oxford-street; I said I believe you live in Chelsea, he said he did, I had seen the man before; I said I should have paid a penny a-yard more than I should have walked to Oxford-street to buy flannel; he replied I work in George-street, Oxford-street, he said he was a labourer to Mr. Thrupp. In consequence of that I took him to a public house; I untied the bundle, I found these pieces of serge and broad cloth and several pieces of cuttings; I asked him whether Mr. Thrupp gave him these, he said he had not, o none of the men had; I then said, of course you must have stole it from your master; he replied he had. I said, this is the first time, I suppose, he said it was; I told him to be cautious of telling an untruth, for I should search his house, I put him in the watch-house, and went to his lodgings, and there I found the remainder of the cloth.

Q. That was taken at another time, we must not hear that, only what was taken at one time.

(The property produced and identified.)

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, nor called any witnesses to character.

GUILTY , aged 43.

Confined Two Years in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

364. BARBARA BARLOW was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 18th of March , two sheets, value 3 s. two shirts, value 4 s. an handkerchief, value 1 s. a cloak, value 4 s. a flat iron, value 7 d. and a shift, value 2 s. the property of Patrick Linch

SARAH LINCH . I am the wife of Patrick Linch , I live at No. 10, Cohen's Rents, New-Inn-yard, Whitechapel .

Q. On the 18th of March last did you lose any thing. A. Yes, I lost all the articles mentioned in the indictment from my house; the prisoner was my servant ; she staid out one night, and I missed these things in the morning; I found out where she was, I asked her about the things. she confessed that she had pawned them; she gave me the tickets.

JOHN HOCKLEY . On the latter end of February, or the beginning of March, the prisoner pawned the articles with me.

(The property produced and identified.)

GUILTY , aged 30.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

365. ANN BANNISTER was indicted for stealing on the 30th of May , two pewter pint pots, value 1 s. the property of William Lea .

ANN LEA . My husband keeps the White Hart in Foster-lane, in the liberty of St. Martin Le Grand . I did not see the prisoner take the pots; I saw them taken from her; they have our name upon them.

- I keep the Blue Anchor public house, George-street, Foster-lane. I was standing at my own door, I saw the woman take the two pots off the strap; she crossed the street, I met her, and took the pots away.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. I am very sorry.

GUILTY , aged 53.

Confined Two Years in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

366. MORRIS CAVEY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 10th of May , a great coat, value 4 l. the property of James duke of Montrose .

MR. DENNIS. On Saturday the 10th of May I was standing at my door, the corner of the mews where the duke keeps his carriage; the prisoner at the bar came past with a bundle under his arm; I had a glimpse of the crest on the button of the great coat; he was going as fast as he could; I suffered him to go forty or fifty yards, and then I pursued him; I caught him by the right hand and seized the coat with the left; I asked him where he had got this coat, he said he did not know; my reply was, that I thought I could take him to a place where I thought he brought the coat from; I conducted him to the duke's stable, knocked at the door, some of the domestics opened the door; I enquired in there was a great coat lost. The coachman came, he owned the coat.

JAMES BULLOCK . Q. You are the duke's coachman. - A. Yes. I left the coat on the box in the coach house.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. I picked the coat up by the coach house door.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

367. JOHN STOKES was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 15th of April twenty-five yards of floor cloth, value 3 l. the property of Joseph Barnes

The case was stated by Mr. Knapp.

JOSEPH BARNES . Q. I believe you are a floor cloth manufacturer living in the City Road . - A. I am; the prisoner was employed by me as a printer for about nine or ten years.

Q. Had you for a long time before suspected that you had lost a great deal of property. - A. I missed more than a thousand pound in one year; in consequence of that I employed five or six to watch, and my apprentice in particular.

Q. In consequence of what he informed you, did you get to the fact that the prisoner had robbed you. - A. I did.

Q. Was the property afterwards produced to you. - A. Most assuredly it was.

WILLIAM HOW Q. You are an apprentice to the prosecutor. - A. Yes. On the 15th of April, about ten minutes past seven in the morning, I was at the corner of Hill-street, Finsbury-square; I saw the prisoner come out of the manufactory with a piece of floor cloth upon his shoulder; I followed him, I see him go into Mr. Benson's, a chandler's shop in Gee-street, with the floor cloth. I waited till he came out again.

Q. Did he come out with any thing. - A. No. I went immediately to my master, and gave information of what I had seen.

Cross-examined by Mr. Walford. How do you know that what you saw the prisoner carry was floor cloth. - A. I had seen it before in the factory.

MRS. BENSON. - Mr. Knapp. Do you know the prisoner. - A. I do; he came to me, I believe it was the 14th or 15th of April, about eight o'clock in the morning, he came to me with a floor cloth; I purchased it of Stokes, I paid him thirty shillings for it.

Q. Was that the piece of floor cloth that was taken by the officer. - A. I believe it is; it was sold to Mrs. Fletcher.

Cross-examined by Mr. Walford. You bargained with the prisoner's wife for the floor cloth. - A. I did.

Q. How came you to purchase it of him. - A. The first time I knew the prisoner, I wanted a carpet painted; Mrs Fisher recommended him to me.

JANE LOCK . - Mr. Knapp. How old are you. - A. Eleven.

Q. Have you learned your catechism. - A. Yes.

Q. Is it a good thing or a bad thing to tell a lie. - A. A bad thing.

Q. Where do people go to that tell a lie. - A. To Hell.

Q. Do you remember purchasing any floor cloth of Mrs. Benton. - A. Yes, and the officer took it away.

Cross-examined by Mr. Walford. How came it about, you are so very little a girl, how came you to buy some floor cloth, do you know how it happened. - A. No.

Q. Was your mother by at the time. - A. Yes.

Q. And you bought it by her directions did not you. A. Yes.

Court. Did you buy it or your mother. - A. Me sir.

Q. Who paid for it. - A. It was not paid for, it was left for my mother to look at.

Q. Who agreed with Mrs. Benson. - A. My mother.

Q. Were you present. - A. No.

Q. Was the piece of floor cloth that was left by Benson, the same piece of floor cloth that was taken away by Vickrey. - A. Yes.

JOHN VICKREY . - Mr. Knapp. You are an officer of Worship-street. - A. I am. On the 15th of April I apprehended the prisoner; I asked him what he had done with the floor cloth, he said he knew nothing about it; I told him he should go to Mr. Benson's in Gee-street with me, and there he should find it; he then said he was very sorry, but he had sold it to her for forty shillings. We went to Benson's house with a search warrant; Benson went over with us to the little girl's mother; the little girl was in the room; I took the piece of floor cloth up. It has been in the office ever since, in the custody of Armstrong.

(The property produced and identified.)

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel, called five witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

368. MARY SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 18th of April , a silver table spoon, value 3 s. 6 d. the property of Samuel Brinklett .

ELIZABETH BRINKLETT . I am the daughter of Mr. Brinklett. On the 18th of April, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner came for a glass of gin at the bar; my father kept the King's Head public house at Fulham . William Phillips had borrowed of me a silver table spoon, he returned it me, he laid it on the bar door; a gentleman came in and ordered sixpennyworth of brandy and water; I put some brandy in the glass, and took it in the front room to my father to mix, and when I was coming out of the room I met her running out of the house; the spoon was gone; I ran after her, I overtook her six doors from her house; I took the spoon out of her left hand, both her hands were under her apron; I took the spoon to my father, he sent for a constable.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. I had drank a glass or two of liquor more than did me good, and parting with my friends I went to get some more; she was a long while serving me; I said Betsy if you do not serve me I will take this spoon. I took it up and thought no more about it.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY , aged 39.

Confined Two Months in Newgate , and privately Whipped .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

369. ELEANOR THORN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 4th of May , three silver tea spoons, value 6 s. the property of James Frost .

JAMES FROST . Q. Do you know the prisoner. A. Yes, she was my servant . On Saturday morning last I missed three silver tea spoons, I challenged her with stealing them; she hesitated some time, and then she acknowledged it, and gave me a duplicate of one; I fetched it out from the pawnbroker's, and while I was gone she went out of the house; I sent the boy after her, and she gave him the two other duplicates.

Q. Do you know when they were taken. - A. They were pawned one on the 7th, one on the 8th, and the other on the 4th.

JOHN NEAVES . I am a pawnbroker. On the 4th of May the prisoner pledged a table cloth and a tea spoon; I produce the tea spoon.

Prosecutor. I can swear to the spoon.

Prisoner's Defence. I took them and pledged them with an intention of replacing them on the Saturday.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

370. JOSEPH LOVETT was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 2nd of April , thirty-eight yards of woolen cloth, value 36 l. seventy yards of linen cloth, value 3 l. thirty yards of green baize, value 3 l. 10 s. the property of Henry Darby and John Hilton .

JOHN HILTON . My partner's name is Henry Darby , we keep a woolen warehouse ; I only know the robbery from information The warehouse is in Cullum-street . I found the warehouse had been opened; the padlock had been stolen.

Q. Did you afterwards see any of your goods. - A. There has none been found.

WILLIAM BARTON . I am porter to Messrs. Davison and Newman in Fenchurch-street. On Thursday morning the 2nd of April about six o'clock, I was passing Cullum-street, I saw three men come out of the warehouse of Messrs. Darby and Hilton, and the last man that came out was the prisoner; each man had a canvas bag with goods in. The two first men passed me with very little notice; I noticed that they had bags with goods in it. When I came up to the prisoner he spoke to me and says, how are you master. I believe I have known him for five years. I made some reply similar to that; he followed the other two; I was a little struck; I turned round, I saw him go to the other two, I went to the end of the street, I saw the three men go up Lime-street for Leadenhall-street; I then concluded that they might be men employed by Messrs. Darby and Hilton. I went to my employ and took no further notice. On the next day I was passing by I saw a smith working at the door.

Q. You learned the next morning that they had been robbed. - A. Yes; I informed the prosecutors in the course of the day; I described who the prisoner was.

DANIEL CARTWRIGHT . I apprehended the prisoner in company with Mr. Holdsworth; on Friday afternoon he was brought to us by Mr. Haswell; we took him into his house in Hartshorn-court, leading into Fenchurch street; there I searched him, and found five one pound notes, a two pound note, and two canvass bags; the last witness described the bags to be the same as these.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. There is no charge against the man for stealing bank notes. - A. No.

Q. You searched the man's house, you found nothing in it that would open a door. - A. No.

JAMES HASWELL . Q. You are foreman to the prosecutor are you. - A. Yes, I apprehended the prisoner on the Friday the 3d of April in the afternoon, between two and three o'clock, I found him at his own house, I delivered him into the hands of Mr. Holdsworth and the constable directly. On Tuesday morning I went to the warehouse about seven o'clock in the morning, the lock was on but the padlock was off; I found the door upon the spring lock; there did not appear any marks of violence on the door.

Q. Upon going into the warehouse did you perceive any thing, could you perceive that any thing had been taken away. - A. It was a snowy morning, I observed some footsteps of men in the warehouse, and part of the way up stairs, there was some flakes of snow on the floor; on seeing them footsteps I had some idea the depredators were up stairs, I went up stairs in hopes of taking them, I found no one there; we missed the goods in question; the woollen cloth was taken from the top of the warehouse, and the linen from the two pair of stairs. I had seen the goods a short time before.

Q. What was the value of these goods. - A. About forty pound altogether.

Q. (to Barton) Look at these bags, are they the same sort of bags. - A. They are, I believe them to be the same.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. There are many hundreds have bags the same as that. - A. Yes.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent of the affair.

SAMUEL BAGLEY . - Mr. Alley. Where do you live. - A. No. 53, in Church-street, Bethnal Green. I am a shoemaker.

Q. How long have you known the man at the bar. - A. I have worked for him this three or four years; I make shoes for him.

Q. Do you remember meeting him any morning before he was taken up. - A. I did, in Lime-street, I think it was on the 8th or 7th of April, I cannot say which, it was on a Tuesday or a Wednesday.

Q. That will make all the difference. - A. It was Wednesday, the 8th day of the month of April, I met him in Lime-street, rather nearer six than seven, about a quarter after six as near as I can guess; I saw the prisoner have a load upon his knot, he took it off and put it in a Hackney coach, and a gentleman in a light coat and a pair of boots gave him a shilling, and asked him whether that would satisfy him; the prisoner said to me he wanted a word with me, I stopped, he said, now I want a pair of good strong shoes; we went to the nearest public house, we had a glass of liquor, I measured him for a pair of shoes, and that we parted.

Q. You are sure that all you say is very correct, when did you hear that he was taken up. - A. I never heard that he was taken up till last Sunday was a week, when I carried the shoes home.

Q. How came you to recollect that it was the 8th of April. - A. Because it was my birth-day.

Court. Are you sure it was the 8th of April. - A. Yes, sir, I be.

Q. Did you see any body give him a shilling. - A. Yes, a gentleman in a light coloured great coat, a dark coloured waistcoat, and a pair of boots; he asked him if he was satisfied; he had an umbrella in his hand, being a coarse morning; there was another person by his side, he looked like a labouring man.

Q. Did he appear to be in the gentleman's company. - A. They were both by the coach, I cannot tell whether they were in company or no.

Q. When were you applied to to give an account of this. - A. Not before this morning.

Q. How came you to know this was the 8th day of April. - A. Because it was my birth-day.

Q. I want to know how you came to know, it was material for you to prove, that the day on which you saw him was the 8th of April - are you quite sure he was not in prison on the 8th of April. - A. I am positive he was not, except it was late at night.

Cartwright. The prisoner was apprehended on Friday the 3d of April; the trial was put off last session; Wednesday the 8th of April was the first day of the session. On the Saturday before the session he was committed to the Compter, and he was there on the Wednesday following.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel, called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 33.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

371. SAMUEL BURRIS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 28th of April , fourteen pound weight of lead, value 2 s. the property of John Edward Holmes , and William Hall , affixed to a building of theirs .

Second count for like offence, only stating it to be affixed to a building of John Edward Holmes .

The case was stated by Mr. Knapp.

JOHN FLETCHER . Q. On the 28th of April last you were in the employ of Messrs. Holmes and Hall. - A. Yes, they occupy Porter's quay . The prisoner was sent up to work with me; I missed him several times; I found him in the further back garret, at the gib-head; he was taking the lead off. communicated it to Stapp.

RICHARD STAPP . I am servant to Mr. Henry Hall ; from the information of Fletcher I went into the back warehouse; I saw the prisoner beating the lad with an iron pin; I immediately went down and informed Mr. Henry Hall; he returned with me; the prisoner then was in the act of hammering the lead-closer; Mr. Hall took him with the lead in his left hand; he dropped an iron pin from his right hand. The prisoner begged for mercy.

HENRY HALL . - Mr. Knapp. What is your father's name. - A. William Hall; his partner 's name John Edward Holmes , they occupy Porter's quay. I went up with Stapp and saw the prisoner beating the lead up with an iron pin; I took about fourteen pound of lead from his left hand; he let fall the iron pin from his right; I saw the place from whence the lead was taken; it appeared to be newly cut.

JOHN WYE . I am a constable, I took the prisoner in custody. I produce the lead; I measured the place with a string, the lead exactly corresponded.

Prisoner's Defence, I was in great distress, and want, having a sick wife and two small children.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Publickly Whipped on Porter's Quay , and confined in Newgate One Month .

London jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

372. MICHAEL NOWLAND was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 11th of May , thirty four pound weight of ash metal, value 25 s. the property of Roger Devey , Roger Chamberlain Devey , and William Devey .

ROGER DEVEY . I am a brass founder in Shoe-lane .

Q. Who are your partners. - A. Robert Chamberlain Devey and William Devey ; the prisoner worked for us. On Monday evening last, about eight o'clock, as I was returning home, the prisoner at the bar was coming out; I thought he seemed to move aukwardly; I made way for him to pass me, I said to him, Mich what have you got, I perceived him to be very heavy on the outside; he said he had nothing; he was outside of the door; I told him to come in, he came in, I put my hand to his left side, I felt the metal, it was between his coat and his waistcoat. I called for some of the men, and John Edwards came and took the metal from under his coat; it was an ingot of ash metal; it weights thirty four pounds, and it is worth twenty five shillings.

JOHN EDWARDS . Q. Did you take this ingot from the prisoner. - A. Yes. I heard Mr. Devey call for some of the men; I went and unbuttoned his coat, and took the metal from him.

(The property produced and identified.)

GUILTY , aged 40.

Confined in Newgate One Month , and publicly Whipped .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

373. SARAH SHARP and HANNAH JONES were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 23d of April , twenty eight yards of printed calico, value 1 l. 19 s. the property of James Gray and Thomas Elsworth , privately in their shop .

JAMES GRAY . I am in partnership with Thomas Elsworth ; we are linen draper s in Bishopsgate-street .

Q. Did you on Thursday the 23d of April lose any thing from your shop. - A. Yes, a piece of print; the goods were laying on the counter.

Q. What was the length of the piece. - A. Twenty eight yards; there were eleven pieces of goods that lay on the side counter, they had been in the house about a quarter of an hour. About four o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner Hannah Jones came into the shop with another woman who is not now at the bar, and a child. I did not serve them, Armstrong served them.

Q. Had the persons left your shop before you missed this. - A. They had, I believe about two minutes. I never saw the other prisoner Sharp till such times she was in custody of the officer. The prisoner Sharp was taken in consequence of Barnard Gleed ; he was in Mr. Wood's shop, Mr. Wood sent over one of his men to inform me; I immediately left the three ladies that I was serving; I run up Rose-alley, when I got to the end of the alley, on the left hand, I saw the prisoner Sharp in possession of the officer; I saw the prisoner Sharp with the print in her apron, he was taking the print from her; Jones at that time made her escape; I did not see Jones till the following morning.

Q. Are you quite certain that the was one of the persons that was in your shop. - A. I cannot say, the young man speaks to her; I believe her to be one of them.

Q. How long did the prisoner Jones stay in your shop. - A. From ten minutes to a quarter of an hour.

Q. Have you more than one counter to your shop. - A. Yes, we have a small side counter, these goods were laving on the side counter, I was at the other.

Q. Was she at that counter. - A. No, during the time they were in the shop, the young man who was serving them he left them, he had occasion to go to the further end of the shop; one of them went close to where the goods were, I cannot say whether it was Jones or the other woman.

Q. When the callico was produced by the officer, did you know it to be yours. - A. Yes, I knew it to be mine when I saw it at the end of the alley; I am confident of it; there was nobody serving in the shop but me and Armstrong.

Q. There were three ladies in the shop. - A. Yes, they were not near the pieces.

Q. What is the value of this print. - A. We valued it at thirty-nine shillings, it cost rather more

- ARMSTRONG. Q. You are servant to these gentlemen. - A. I am.

Q. Do you know the persons of either of the prisoners. - A. I do, I saw Jones on Thursday the 23rd of April, between four and five in the afternoon; she came into the shop, she had a child in her arms; when they came in I was behind the counter doing of nothing.

Q. Were there any ladies in the shop. - A. There were several, my master was serving them. The prisoner Jones asked me to look at a piece of dimity. I shewed them several, none of which pleased them; they asked to look at another piece, I went to the further end of the shop, I shewed them another piece, they bought it immediately; it was a yard, I took sixteen pence of them.

Q. Who paid for it. - A. Jones; when they bought it they went out immediately. In about ten minutes or a quarter of an hour after, from information, my master went out and pursued them; I saw Sharp brought back by the officer; Jones was taken in custody the same afternoon.

Q. Had you seen this callico in the shop at the time these women came in. - A. Yes, they were all laying on the side counter, about three yards from the main counter.

BARNARD GLEED . I am an officer of Worship-street. On Thursday the 23rd of April, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I was in Mr. Wood's shop, opposite Mr. Gray's; in consequence of what passed I went out immediately, and saw Jones and another woman in Mr. Gray's shop, and a little child was playing by the door; I saw Sharp by a sadler's shop, about thirty yards off near Devonshire-street; there was a fourth woman, she was standing at the corner of New-street, a few doors from Mr. Gray's; I went behind the carts in the street, and presently I saw Jones come out and the other woman. Jones had a long duffell cloak on; directly these women came out of the shop, Sharp and the woman at New-street followed them; they all four went together up Rose-alley, which is a narrow alley and thoroughfare into New-street, and into Petticoat-lane; when they were in Rose-alley Jones stooped down, and said to Sharp, I want to tie up my stocking, Jones and Sharp turned into the passage of a house, I turned my face as they could not see me; I saw something pass from Jones to Sharp; after that they all four joined together again, and went up the alley together; I was behind them, I could see distinctly a piece of something under Sharp's apron, but what it was I did not then know; after that she rolled it up in her apron and carried it loose; I took hold of Sharp, Jones and one of the other woman turned to the right and the other woman went to the left; I asked Sharp what she had got; I took the print from her; she said she found it in Rose-alley. As I was bringing it back and the woman to the shop, I met Mr. Gray in Rose-alley, he was pursuing the woman. I have had the callico ever since.

Q. What became of Jones. - A. I took Sharp to the Compter, she gave me information; Shepherd and I went and took Jones about an hour afterwards in Rose-lane; I told her what I took her for; I took her to Mr. Gray's shop, and the shopman said that was one of the women that were in the shop, and had seen her in the shop before.

(The property produced and identified.)

Jones Defence. I am a woman that sells fruit in the street . I had but eighteen pence, I had been to Orange-lane, to buy some oranges; as I was coming along Whitechapel I met my sister, we went into the Coach and Horses, and had a pint of porter; I had fifteen pence halfpenny then; going down the corner of Rose-lane there was some people a quarreling, they began to fight, they were both parted; I said what an odious thing it was for women to quarrel in the street; the officers came, one took the woman I was talking with, and the other took me; they let the other woman go; he says you have been stealing a piece of print; I never was in that gentleman's shop.

Sharp's Defence. As I went up Rose-alley I saw the print lay, I saw no one near it, neither man not woman; when I got to the top of Rose-alley, that gentleman tapped me on the shoulder, and asked me what I had got, I shewed it him, he said he would take me where it belonged to; he took me into the gentleman's shop, they gave charge of me; as for this woman I never saw her before I saw her in the Poultry compter.

Sharp called two witnesses, who gave her a good character.

SHARP, GUILTY , aged 18.

JONES, GUILTY , aged 47.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

374. JOHN JACKSON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 1st of May , a gown, value 5 s. the property of Luke Mauclark .

LUKE MAUCLARK . I am a labouring man , I live in Great Coram-street . From information I went to the prisoner and took the property from him.

MR. BISHOP. I am a bricklayer, I live at 42, Great Coram-street. On the 1st of May, between the hours of twelve and one at noon, I saw the prisoner go into the prosecutor's house; I could not swear whether it was No. 36 or 37, I am sure it was one; I saw him come out with something under his coat; I took hold of the prisoner, and took him home to my house; I told my wife to go and ask this person whether they had lost any thing, the woman came over and said they had lost a gown.

(The property produced and identified).

Prisoner's Defence. I was walking down Coram-street, I was not on the side of the way of that house at all, I was going to Islington; I was in want of a house for a gentleman, he had applied to me to get him one; there were several houses had paper in their windows, that the houses were to be sold; I went into a house, I found this gown, I tied it up in a handkerchief and brought it away; when I was in that house he came in, he said do you live in that house, I said I do not; I came to look at it for a gentleman; he then said, you had not that bundle when you came in, I said I had not; he took me to his own house, he sent for the woman, and she swore to the gown.

GUILTY , aged 35.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

375. MARY COY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 11th of April , a silver watch, value 80 s. and a gold seal, value 5 s. the property of Thomas Watkinson .

ALEXANDER DOUGLAS . I am a constable. The prosecutor's wife applied to me; she said that she had lost the watch. I took the prisoner on the 14th; she confessed that she had taken the watch, it was in pawn in Jermyn-street.

CHARLES SMITH . I am servant to Mr. Rochford, Jermyn-street. On the 11th of April Mary Coy pawned the watch with me.

THOMAS WATKINSON . I live at No. 14, Bedford-court, Covent Garden. On the 11th of April the prisoner brought a dish back that my wife had given her some victuals in. I missed the watch two hours after she was gone.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. My mother took it out of pledge and took it to the prosecutor. I was very much in distress at the time.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

376. WILLIAM HALSGROVE was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Henry Williams , about the hour of nine on the night of the 28th of April , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, a leaden stink trap, value 10 s. eight pound weight of lead pipe, value 4 s. and a copper affixed to the dwelling house, the property of Henry Williams .

Second count for that he being in the said dwelling house did steal the same things, and that he afterwards burglariously did break to get out of the same.

HENRY WILLIAMS . I live at No. 32, Frith-street, Soho . On Tuesday the 28th of April, between eight and nine o'clock, my house was entered and robbed of a copper, lead pipe, and a leaden stink trap. I saw them in the course of the afternoon; the pipe had been fixed that day by the plumber's man.

Q. This house was under repair at the time. - A. Yes. I had one of my servants to sleep in the house, and a considerable quantity of my furniture was there.

Q. Was it dark - A. Yes.

THOMAS MEDLAM . I am a servant to Mr. Williams. I am in the habit of going to the house in Frith street every night after the workmen had done their work.

Q. Where did you go from. - A. From No. 21, Church-street, to No. 32, Frith-street. I went on the 28th of April; I had fastened the doors before the robbery, and the windows; the house was all fastened. I left the house at half past seven o'clock.

Q. Was it dark. - A. It was not dark when I left it, between eight and nine o'clock. There was an alarm at 21, Church-street that a man had broke into the house in Frith-street. When I went the door was not locked, there was a lead pipe, a stink trap, and a copper was taken down from the kitchen. I had seen them before.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Do you live with the prosecutor as a servant. - A. Yes.

Q. When you found the place open the lamps were lighted. - A. Yes.

Q. When you fastened the house the lamps were not lit. - A. No.

Q. Were you examined before the magistrate. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you recollect when you was before the magistrate saying you were not positive that you fastened all the doors of the house. - A. I was always quite positive. I fastened the doors, and I found them open.

JANE WILKINS . I live in Frith-street. On Tuesday the 28th of April, a little after eight o'clock in the evening.

Q. Was it dark or light. - A. It was rather dark.

Q. Was it light enough to see the face of a man. - A. I could not see the face of a man. Being at my window I saw a man knock at Mr. Williams' door; after the man had knocked he crossed over opposite of my window; I could not swear to the man, he was about the height of the prisoner. About ten minutes afterwards I come down and stood at my door; I then saw two men at Mr. Williams' door, one with his face towards the lock, as if he was doing something to it with his hands, and the other with his back towards the door, with a view of watching any thing that might occur. When the man with his back towards the door saw me, he touched the other man, meaning as I suppose that he saw me. I then went into the shop and told Mr. Wilkins, my husband; on our return they were gone. I kept watching, and about a quarter of an hour more, seeing the door open from within side, and I saw a light through the crevice of the door, and a man coming out with something on his back; being dark I could not discern what it was. I immediately gave the alarm to Mrs. Williams the lady of the house at No. 21, Church-street.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. When you saw the person crossing the street you say you could not distinctly see his features. - A. No, I was at my dining room window.

Q. Had you met a man in the street you could have seen his features distinctly. - A. To be sure I could.

- MOODY. I live opposite Mr. Williams' house in Frith-street. On the 28th of April, between eight and nine o'clock, I came to the street door, there was an alarm of thieves at No. 32, I saw a man climb-over from the inside of the railing at Mr. Williams' door, I immediately made my way for him, but was too late to pursue him; he went off. On looking down the area I distinctly saw another man. I took him as he was scaling the iron railings.

Q. Who is he. - A. The prisoner now in question. I secured him fast, my master was in the house at the time; I called out to him, and Mr. Williams came down to my assistance.

Q. You do not mean that the prisoner was attempting to get away. - A. Yes, I do; he, the prisoner, was pulling me from one side of the street to the other, struggling to get away; we brought him to No. 32, and from thence took him to the watchhouse.

THOMAS WILKINS . Q. You are the husband of the lady that has been examined. - A. Yes. At the time the prisoner was detected, I was at the upper part of the house with the witness Medlam, Mrs. Wilkins, and Mrs. Williams the prosecutor's wife; we searched the upper part of the house on suspicion of some persons being there, when I heard the cry of thieves in the street, and my own name being called by Moody, I ran to his assistance; I saw the prisoner endeavouring to get away from him, I assisted in securing him. I saw no violence on the door; they must have got in by false keys, or picking the lock.

THOMAS SHARP . I had been working in the house, I left it at a quarter after six. I know the copper was there then. The next morning when I came to my work I missed the pipe and the copper.

- CRAYDEN On Tuesday the 28th of April the prisoner was in custody. When I went into the house my brother officer searched him in my presence, we found upon him a common latch key; after we had put him in the watchhouse, we returned to No. 32, Frith-street. In the area I found this iron crow.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing of the transaction whatever. I was walking along with my hands in my pockets, I was never near the house no more than passing it.

GUILTY, aged 30.

Of stealing only, but not of breaking and entering the house in the night time .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

377. JOHN BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 4th of May , a gold watch, value 20 l. and a silver watch, value 2 l. 8 s. the property of James Duncan , in his dwelling house .

JAMES DUNCAN . I am a watchmaker , I live in the liberty of the Rolls .

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar. - A. Yes, he was my journeyman .

Q. What countryman is he. - A. He says that he was born in London, but that he has spent most of his time in Ireland. On the 4th of May last he was at work at my shop; about three o'clock a friend called upon me, he agreed to stop to dine with me; in the interim before dinner I was shewing him several watches, and among the rest was the gold repeater; that was the last I shewed him.

Q. You replaced it I suppose. - A. Yes.

Q. Was it a valuable watch. - A. Yes, it stands me in upwards of twenty pounds. A short time after I had gone in to dinner with my friend in a back room. I had left the prisoner in the shop; in about twenty minutes or half an hour after that, my servant called me and told me that the prisoner at the bar had run away; I could not believe it at first till they told me he had taken his hat.

Q. Did you go out to your shop immediately. - A. Yes, and I immediately missed this gold repeater, and a common silver watch.

Q. When did you see the silver watch before. - A. In the course of an hour before.

Q. You are quite sure of that. - A. Perfectly so. After consulting a little with my friend we agreed to go to Bow-street. We got there at a time when there was no business done; there we determined to go to several pawnbrokers, and leave the names and the numbers of the watches; one of the pawnbrokers that I went to was Mr. Lee at the corner of Dean-street in Holborn; when I enquired of him whether any of these watches had been offered to him, yes, he said, the silver watch.

GEORGE LEE . I am a pawnbroker at the corner of Dean-street in Holborn. On the 4th of May, about four or five o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner came and pledged a silver watch with me (I am quite certain of his person) for one pound fifteen. A short time after I had taken it in Mr. Duncan called, I shewed him the watch, he said it was his immediately. On the 8th of May, a person of the name of Southgate came to redeem the watch; I asked him how he came in possession of the ticket, as Mr. Duncan had ordered me to stop any person; he told me the person that gave him the ticket was at his house in Tabernacle-square; I took Southgate to Hatton Garden office, from there I went with Southgate and Stanton the officer, and we took the prisoner.

WILLIAM SOUTHGATE . Q. Do you know the prisonor at the bar. - A. By sight, I never saw him in my life before last Friday, between twelve and one o'clock on the 8th of May, he came into my house, he said he was very aukward, not having a watch in his pocket, he said he had one in Holborn, and if he could get any body to go for it, he would satisfy them for it.

Q. He asked you to go for it did he. - A. Yes, he was then at my house; he gave me the ticket, a one pound note, half a guinea, and a seven shilling piece to redeem it; I went to the gentleman, I laid the ticket on the desk, I asked for the watch

Q. You told Mr. Lee the man from whom you had the watch of. - A. Yes, and according to what I said they found it true.

THOMAS WALKER . I am a pawnbroker, I live in Tabernacle row, City Road. On Thursday evening the 7th of May, about eight o'clock in the evening, a woman of the name of Southgate brought a watch to my shop.

Q. What sort of a watch. - A. A gold repeater.

Q. Do you happen to know whether that is the wife of the last witness. - A. I never saw the man before this business; the woman was in the habit of coming to my shop. I interrogated her concerning the property; she told me it belonged to a captain of a ship, that he was a respectable inhabitant of this parish, meaning the parish in which I live; that he was a friend and regular visitor of one of the ladies in her house. I put the question more than once, whether he was a stranger, or a person she had seen more than once; to which she answered that she knew him well; she added that if she was not sure that all was perfectly right she would not have brought the watch. In consequence of that I gave her eight pounds.

Q. Of course you gave her a ticket. - A. Yes. On the following afternoon about four o'clock, Stanton the officer, and Mr. Duncan entered the shop; they produced the ticket; and on my shewing the watch, he claimed it as his property. Before I shewed the watch to Mr. Duncan he told me the name and the number; I looked and found it was so.

MRS. SOUTHGATE. Q. You are the wife of William Southgate are you. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar. - A. Yes; I saw him last Wednesday was a week in the evening, he came into my house with a young woman that lodged in the house.

Q. I do not want to enquire into particulars about your house, do you remember his bringing the watch to your house. - A. Yes; last Thursday evening was a week he gave me a gold watch to pledge. I carried it to Mr. Walker.

Q. You pawned it for eight pounds. - A. Yes.

Q. And you told Mr. Walker a great falsity that he was a captain of a ship. - A. He told me so.

Q. You got a ticket for the watch. - A. Yes, and I gave it to the prisoner at the bar.

ROBERT STANTON . I am an officer belonging to Hatton Garden.

Q. You remember apprehending the prisoner. - A. Yes, on Friday the 8th. I searched him, I found a pocket book containing four one pound notes and three tickets; one ticket of a gold watch pledged for eight pounds at Mr. Walker's Tabernacle-walk. In consequence of that I went to Mr. Duncan's.

Q. And you went with Mr. Duncan to Mr. Walker's, and there you saw the watch. - A. Yes.

Q. Mr. Duncan gave the name and the number of the watch before he saw it, and when he saw it he claimed it. - A. Yes.

Q. Mr. Duncan, look first at the gold watch and then at the silver watch, they are both your property. A. They are.

Prisoner's Defence. My lord, I am guilty; I have nothing to say any more than I must leave my case to you and the gentlemen of the jury.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 23.

[ The jury and the prosecutor recommended the prisoner to his Majesty's mercy on account of his youth .]

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

378. MARGARET BRAND and JANE HOBBS were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Henry Barber , about the hour of eleven in the forenoon of the 8th of April , no person being therein, and feloniously stealing two gowns, value 20 s. a silk cloak, value 20 s. a bonnet, value 2 s. a petticoat, value 2 s. a shift, value 1 s. 6 d. three sheets, value 12 s. a bolster, value 3 s. two pillows, value 2 s. and and a quilt, value 8 s. the property of Hannah Wilkins .

HENRY BARBER . I live at No. 2, Clark's-court, Vine-street, in the parish of St. Andrew , I am a cabinet maker . I went out in the morning about half past five on the 11th of April.

Q. Did you leave any body in your house. - A. Yes, my wife; when I came home from my work at night I was informed by my wife that Mrs. Hannah Wilkins 's room had been robbed; she is a lodger of mine. I told my wife to go and inform Mrs. Wilkins of it; she was out a nursing; I found her door broken down, and part of the pannels of the door broke.

MRS. BARBER. Q. What do you know about this charge of the prisoner at the bar. - A. I saw the door broken down of Mrs. Wilkins's room, who broke it I cannot say.

Q. You mean to say you saw it after it was broken down. - A. Yes, it was broken off the hinges, and I found Mrs. Wilkins's drawer also broke open; I missed the bed clothes from the bed.

Q. At what time of the day did you find it broke open. - A. About six o'clock in the evening on the 11th of April; it was supposed to be done before that. I went out on Monday the 6th of April at eight in the morning.

Q. When was the room broken open. - A. I do not know rightly.

Q. Then whether any body was in the house when the room was broke open, that you do not know. - A. No.

HANNAH WILKINS . Q. You lodge in this house. A. Yes. On Easter Monday I was out before six o'clock in the morning, I was sent for to a place to nurse a person; I did not return any more till the Sunday following. I found my room very safe; on the 11th I was informed my room was broken open by my landlady. I went to it, I found it broken open, my door was broken down. I missed all the articles in the indictment.

Q. Do you know whether the articles were taken at one time. - A. No.

Q. Did you ever see any of them again. - A. Yes, I saw one of the gowns, it is worth about seven shillings, and a silk handkerchief.

MRS. DUNKLEY. I keep a broker's shop. On the 8th of April, the prisoner Brand offered two pillows, three sheets, and a gown, for sale; the other prisoner was with her. I told her I did not buy any thing in my shop.

RICHARD WHITE . About half after eight o'clock on the 8th of April, I saw the prisoners come out of Mrs. Barber's house with their lap full of things, but what they were I could not see; after that they went to the gin shop. Mrs. Brand said she was going to make money; I said that is the the thing I want to do; after that I saw them go to the pawnbroker's; and some time after that I met them in King's Road in the street; they had got the pillows, and were looking at them. Mrs. Brand took them up, and said here is White.

MR. UNDERHILL. I am a pawnbroker. Brand pledged a gown and a handkerchief with me for seven shillings on the 9th of April in the name of Margaret Smith .

(The property produced and identified.)

SARAH BURN . On the 11th of April I went to call on my sister Mrs. Wilkins. I found the door broke open.

MARY BURTON . Mrs. Brand is my sister. I bought two pillows of her, I believe it was about the 7th of April; they are made into a bolster now.

JONATHAN TROTT . I am an officer of Hatton Garden office. On Sunday morning the 12th of April I was going across Hatton Wall. Mr. Barber told me the place had been broken open. From his information I found Mrs. Brand in company with another woman, walking very fast; I took Brand in custody. From information from her son, I believe it is, it was a little boy, I traced out Hobbs near Queen-square, she was servant to a gentleman. I searched her box; not finding any thing that led to the charge I went away; I returned back and took Broomfield to the same place; I directed her to stand at the door till she saw Mrs. Hobbs open the door; she challenged her to be one of the women that came to her along with the other prisoner. I took her in custody; Hobbs told me where the gown was pledged. I and my brother officer searched Brand's room, which was underneath the room that was broken open in the same house. I found this bed-winch; I thought by the marks upon the door post it had been used to force the door open. I fitted it to it, and it fitted exactly. There were two instruments used; Chapman holds another that fits the other mark.

WILLIAM CHAPMAN . I produce a chopper. This was found in Brand's drawer. As I was taking Hobbs to prison she told me that the gown was pledged, and she thought a great deal more property, in Wardour-street. In consequence I took the prosecutrix to the pawnbroker's; there was nothing more found than what is produced.

Brand left her defence to her counsel; called six witnesses, who gave her a good character.

Hobbs's Defence. I never was nigh the place at the time I was accused of it. The prisoner at the bar can clear me if she likes.

BRAND, GUILTY, aged 50.

Of stealing only .

Confined Two Year in the House of Correction and fined One Shilling .

HOBBS, NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

379. WILLIAM HORATIO BROWN was indicted for feloniously intermarrying with Rebecca Willmot , spinster , his former wife being then alive .

The case was stated by Mr. Knapp.

JOSEPH ASHMORE . Q. I believe you are the clerk of the parish of St. Margaret, Westminster. - A. I am. I produce the register book of marriages.

Q. Read the entry of the 23d of August, 1806. - A. William Horatio Brown of this parish, bachelor, and Maria Parkinson of this parish, spinster, was married in this church by banns; this 23d day of August 1806. - By me,

WILLIAM GROVE , Curate.

Q. Who were the subscribing witnesses. - A. Elizabeth Parkinson and Joseph Ashmore . I gave the young woman in marriage.

Q. Do you know the person of the prisoner. - A. No. I have a faint recollection of him, but not certain; to the best of my belief it was so.

ELIZABETH PARKINSON . Q. Are you the mother of Maria Parkinson that was. - A. I am.

Q. Were you present at any time when she was married. - A. Yes, I saw her married to William Horatio Brown .

Q. Look at the prisoner, is that the person. - A. Yes.

Q. Was Ashmore, the other witness, present at the time. - A. Yes.

Q. Have you seen your daughter lately. - A. Yes, I saw her yesterday before she set off in the country; she would not be present here.

Q. How long did you know the prisoner before he married your daughter. - A. He paid his addresses to her for a long time, I believe more than a year. I kept my girl from him seven months, I believe, because she was so young.

Court. What age was she when she married him. A. Eighteen.

Mr. Knapp. Did the prisoner state what line of life he was in. - A. He has been after many things. The money he has had of me is to the amount of two hundred pounds.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. I think you said he paid his addresses to your daughter for a twelvemonth; that was time enough for you to enquire his character. - A. It was not done by my consent.

Q. Do not you know that he has behaved well to your daughter. - A. He has not behaved well, but very ill.

Prisoner. The daughter that she said was in the country, is in the prison now.

Q. (to witness) Does your daughter live with him. A. She has been backwards and forwards to him.

THOMAS HARMER LAYCOMB . Q. Are you the parish clerk of St. George's, Middlesex . - A. I am. I produce the register book of all the marriages. - William Horatio Brown , of the parish of St. Margaret, Westminster, in the country of Middlesex, bachelor, and Rebecca Wilmot , spinster, of this parish, a minor, was married in this church by licence, by and with the consent of Thomas Wilmot , the natural and lawful father of the said minor - this 20th day of October 1806 . By me,

ROBERT FARRINGTON , Rector.

Signed - William Horatio Brown , Rebecca Wilmot . In the presence of Thomas Wilmot the father, and Elizabeth Lane .

Q. Have you any recollection of the person of the prisoner. - A. No.

Q. Do you believe he was the person that was married. - A. I believe he was; it was a person of the same size and genteel appearance. I believe he is the same man.

ELIZABETH LANE . Q. I perceive by the register book that you are the subscribing witness to the marriage of Miss Willmot on the 20th of October at St. George's. - Q. Yes.

Q. Was it the prisoner that was married to Miss Wilmot. - A. The very same.

Mr. Alley. I find Rebecca Willmot is not here. - A. No.

Prisoner's Defence. Mrs. Parkinson has known my family for twenty years. In the year 1804, I became acquainted with her daughter, at which time I was a mathematical instrument maker . I have not been capable of following it, owing to a complaint in my head. After she had put her husband in a private mad house, where he remained thirteen months, she permitted her daughter to sleep with me; in one of my mad fits I slept with her daughter; she was to give me seven hundred pounds to buy a commission in the horse-guards; she promised me two hundred pounds; thirty-three pounds I returned her back; nine pound I paid for a gin score.

Court. Do you assert that ever you have been deranged in your mind. - A. Yes, from a nervous complaint in my head. At this time twelvemonth I had a letter from Mrs. Parkinson; she there speaks highly of my character; and adds, that she would protect me for the honour I had done to her daughter in marrying her.

Court. I called on you for your defence.

Prisoner. Mrs. Parkinson by a drunken habit swore her life against me.

Court. It is unbecoming you to throw any implication on Mrs. Parkinson's character. I want you to say something in your own defence.

Prisoner. The infamy of the mother has forced me to do what I have done; she has been infamous enough to take the duplicate of a watch from me; she swore her life against her daughter, and detained her in Tothill-fields. As for the two hundred pounds she said I had, every farthing was laid out in the repair of her mother's house, except forty pounds.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

380. WILLIAM BERRINGER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 26th of April , fifty pound weight of lead, value 10 s. the property of Edward Russel How , esq . sir James Sibbald Russel , bart. Charles William Bigg , esq . affixed to a certain building called a warehouse .

And several other counts for like offence, laying it to be the property of other persons.

The case was stated by Mr. Knapp.

HARGREAVE HANSON . I believe your father's name is John Hanson , he is the lessee of Spital Fields market . - A. Yes.

Q. Who are Mr. Russel How , sir James Sibbald Russel , and Charles Williams , esq. - A. They are the proprietor s. William Hudson is the tenant.

JOHN ARMSTRONG . Q. You are one of the officers of Worship-street. - A. I am. On Saturday the 25th of April I was out with Vickery and Mason. About two o'clock in the morning I was at the corner of a place that goes into Wheeler-street, Spital Fields; I heard the footsteps of some people; I stooped down and had my eye to the corner of Wheeler-street; in a minute or two I catched hold of the prisoner by the lower part of his body; at that time this piece of lead fell from him between him and me. I kept by the lead, and kept hold of the prisoner; he was very much alarmed at my catching hold of him. As soon as he came to speak, I said what did you drop the lead for; he said he had it not. I instantly, when the other officers came up, turned him round to let them see the dirt marks that were on his clothes; the prisoner was secured, and the lead was advertised, and on Tuesday the 5th of May this piece of lead was produced at the office by Mr. Walker, a plumber; I then produced this piece of lead, and it tallied with the other.

GEORGE WALKER . Q. Are you a plumber. - A. I am an apprentice to a plumber.

Q. In consequence of some information that some lead was missing did you go to the place. - A. Yes, last Tuesday fortnight; I found the lead was gone. I took a piece of lead that remained on the building, and took it to the office, and matched it to the other piece; it fitted exactly.

Q. What is the value of that - A. About ten shillings.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, called five witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

381. WILLIAM LEWIN, alias BAILEY , was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 4th of May , a brown mare, value 8 l. the property of Thomas Strange and William Strange .

THOMAS STRANGE . I live at Staines.

Q. In May last you had a brown mare had not you. - A. Yes. It belongs to me and my son.

Q. When did you first miss her. - A. I turned her out on the 4th of April on Staines moor , my son did, I saw him; I missed her off Staines moor about a week afterwards, and about a week after that Trott the officer told me he had found the mare, and the man that had got her.

WILLIAM ALLEN . I am a green grocer, I live in Essex-street, Kingsland Road. On the 8th of April I went to Barnet fair, I saw the prisoner with a mare, I asked him if it was to sell, he said yes; he asked eight pounds for it; I told him I would give him five pounds for it if he would give me five shillings back; I bought it for that money; he said the mare did not belong to him, he said his master was in the cow fair who it belonged to, and he had got two black cows and a poled white cow; he mentioned his name, out I cannot recollect it; I could not find his master in the cow fair. After I had paid the prisoner at a public house, at the door of that public house I put my little boy upon it; there were some people who knew the mare, they told me I had better get my money again, otherwise I should get into a hobble; I went into the public house, I told him I had a suspicion that it was a stolen horse, I told him he had better have the mare again, and to give me the money; he accordingly did give me all the money back again but two shillings and three pence, which he said he had spent in the public house. The prisoner was taken into custody.

WILLIAM BUCKLE . I live at Barnet. I was close to the public house door, I heard some of the horse dealers tell Allen to find out the man that he bought the mare of; Allen went into the house, I went in with him; he asked me to go with him and shew him the person that gave him the horse to sell; with that we went half a mile through the cow fair, and could not find out the person; Allen then says, you had better return me my money, and take your mare again; he returned him all the money within two shillings and three pence; with that I collared him and took him before the magistrate. I came up to town with him, I was handcuffed to him for safety; the constable did that.

Q. You were only put as a sort of clog to him. - A. Just so. Allen charged the prisoner before the magistrate with selling him a stolen horse; the prisoner said he did not steal it. He did not disown but that it was stolen.

MICHAEL WELCH . I am a constable at Barnet. Allen, Buckle, and another man, brought the prisoner to my house on the 8th of April; I asked the prisoner where he lived, he told me at Cowling near Uxbridge; I asked him whether it was his own property or not; he said it was not, he was employed by a man of the name of James Benson to sell the mare, who lived in the same neighbourhood. After he had been before the magistrate, he told me he did not live at Cowling, but he came from Englefield green. I have kept the mare in my custody ever since. I brought the mare up to Hatton Garden, the prosecutors saw it, and they recognised it immediately.

Q. (to prosecutor) You saw the mare at Hatton Garden, did you. - A. Yes, I was shewed her by Welsh; I swore to her; and here is the stamp that I stamped her in the hoof.

Q. You have no doubt but it was the same mare that was turned on the moor on the 4th of April. - A. I have no doubt at all.

JONATHAN TROTT . The prisoner was delivered into my custody on the 13th; he came to our office for examination. Before I took him to prison I asked him how he came in possession of the mare; he said a man of the name of Benson that lived near Uxbridge had employed him, he was to meet him on the morning of Barnet fair, against the hand post at the end of the road leading to Harrow; he did meet him there; he had three cows, two black ones and a white one, and a brown poney; Benson kept on the poney, and he helped to drive the cows till they came to Barnet common, near a barn; there they met with one of the Oxford blues that came from Windsor; he did not know his name. The Oxford blue then said they must all change their names, and if we have the luck to sell the cows, as well as the mare, we will all meet at the top of Holborn, and buy new clothes; I'll desert, and we will go down into Yorkshire and steal horses, and sell them at fairs; he said he had met this Benson and the Oxford blue at Windsor, and there this appointment was made. I put him in prison, and went to Windsor; I could find no Benson; I heard of a person of the the name of James Bennet , his right name is Lambert. We could not find the Oxford blue at all; I came to London. The next day I went to Barnet and found out the Oxford blue's name, and after seeing the prisoner again, I told him I had found out the blue's name; he said he was pitted with the small pox very much, but he did not know his name. After he had been examined by the magistrate, he said James Bennet was the man he had called James Benson , and he and the Oxford blue were the men who sent him to sell the mare. I went to Windsor again and took them. It was satisfactorily proved by several respectable witnesses, that Bennet was at Windsor; he and the blue were discharged.

Q. When was Barnet fair. - A. On the 8th.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

382. SARAH YOUNG was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 3d of May , a silver watch, value 1 l. and a gold ring, value 1 s. the property of Edward Archer .

EDWARD ARCHER . The prisoner at the bar came to me last Sunday week about seven o'clock, as I was going to bed very ill; there was she and another girl came in with an excuse for me to mend a pair of shoes against the next morning, for her to go to Billingsgate. I told her she should have them done. My watch and ring laid upon the table; they took them both; I will not be sure which took the ring, whether it was the prisoner or the other person, but I am sure the prisoner took the watch; they took them out of my room and fastened my door; I padlock my door when I go out; I sell shoes; they put the hasp on the staple and fastened me in the room; it was about a quarter of an hour before I could get out, I called to my neighbours some time, at last they heard me and took the hasp off and let me out.

Q. What part of the house do you lodge in. - A. A bottom room.

Q. You knew this woman before. - A. Yes, as a neighbour, I never had any thing to say to her; she brought me a pair of pumps to mend once before, she lived next door to me. After I got out of my house I went to her house to seek her, she was not at home. On Tuesday morning I found her in bed about four o'clock, I went with an officer; she said she knew nothing about the watch. I am sure she took it.

Prisoner. Did not you give me this watch on these terms, for to lay with you. - A. Me want a wife! I am seventy-five, bless my soul, no.

Q. Did not you come in my place and offer me two gowns of your wife's. - A. I did not, there never was such a word spoke.

Court. Well, do not be angry. - A. No, sir, I am not angry, but a man of seventy-five years of age, it makes me shudder.

Q. Have you seen your watch since. - A. Yes, it is here.

MRS. CHANDLER. This young girl brought a watch to me on Sunday night the 3d of May, she asked me to put it by for her for a few minutes. When she came to my house she said it was her mother's.

Q. How far do you live off Mr. Archer's. - A. I cannot tell, I keep the Star and Garter, Whitechapel road. In ten or fifteen minutes she came for it again; it was a silver watch. When she brought it to me I said it was an old antique thing, and I put it in the drawer.

BENJAMIN CHARLTON . I am a pawnbroker, The watch was brought to me on the 4th of May, by a woman much resembling the prisoner, in company with another; I believe the prisoner to be the person to the best of my knowledge; she told me her name was Mary Archer . On the back of the watch is the letter A; that gave me reason to suppose it was her husband's; she pawned it with me for fifteen shillings.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. He went to my friends and asked them to make it up, he would scorn to hurt a hair of my head; if they would give him the duplicate he would take any thing in part of payment; my friend gave him a crown piece.

JOHN MITTY . Please you my lord, the prosecutor was with me three times last week; he said to me provided I could get him his watch he would not trouble his head any further about it; with that I went down to the prisoner at the bar, the duplicate was brought to me; I told him it was out of the girl's power to get the watch out; now I said to him, I will give you part in payment now, and on Saturday I will give you the remainder; I gave him a crown piece; he said I am very happy to think it is all settled.

Prosecutor. It is all a false thing.

GUILTY . aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justise Grose.

383. MARY M'CARTNEY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 20th of April , twenty-four yards of printed calico, value 2 l. the property of Daniel Allenby , privately in his shop .

DANIEL ALLENBY . Q. Where is your shop. - A. In Fleet-street , I am a linen draper . On the 20th of April, between four and six o'clock in the afternoon, I lost the articles out of the shop; I was in the shop at the time.

Q. Did you see the prisoner come into the shop. - A. Yes, I am sure of her person, there was a young man in the shop at the time, he is not here; the prisoner asked for a small pattern to make patch work. I shewed her several, and she at last fixed on one.

Q. What was the price of that. - A. Twenty pence a yard, she asked for half a yard, and half a yard she had for nine pence; two others came in at the time, and they asked for the same articles; she stopped there; I do not know whether they were in company together, I suspected them all three; and I did every thing in my power to prevent their stealing.

Q. Did they speak to each other as if they were known to each other. - A. There was nothing past. I cannot tell whether she knew them or not, they all went out of the shop together; the other woman bought a yard of another pattern; I did not miss any thing till the prisoner was brought back. From information I went out, I saw Ealand had hold of the woman, he lifted up her apron, and asked me if that was mine, I told him it was; it was a piece of printed calico that was under her apron; I knew it to be mine.

Q. Had she bargained for any thing of the sort. - A. No, I had not shewn it her.

Q. How many yards did this piece contain. - A. Twenty-four yards.

Q. How long before you saw this under her apron, had you seen this piece of calico in your shop. - A. It was upon the counter when she came into the shop.

Q. I suppose you did not see her take it or else you would have stopped her. - A. I did not see her take it.

Q. The other person who was in the shop is not here. - A. No, he was quite in a detached part of the shop, not where she was.

Q. How was this piece of calico in her apron. - A. She had a bundle in a silk handkerchief; with the pressure of her hands she kept it under her apron; when she was brought back into the shop, she immediately dropped the bundle in the silk handkerchief; somebody observed to her, you have dropped your bundle, she said it was not hers; she said the callico that I claimed she had received it of a young woman.

WILLIAM EALAND . I am a baker. On the 20th of April, about five in the evening, I was coming up Fleet-street, near Mr. Allenby's shop, I saw this woman and two more come out of the shop; I saw a large piece of cotton hanging down below her apron, the greatest part was in her apron, but some part was below it; a gentleman was standing by me at the time I saw her come out of the shop, and turn up Bride's-passage, and she looked behind her; the other woman went towards Bridge-street; Mr. Allenby's shop is the corner of Bride's passage; she turned up there and went strait on; the young man and I said she had stole that piece; I suspected her and went up the passage after her; and I saw the cotton as I walked along at her side; I told her that cotton did not belong to her; she said no, it did not belong to her, it belonged to a little girl that gave it to her at the bottom of the court.

Q. Did you actually see her come out of the shop. - A. I did, there was no little girl with her or near her; Mr. Hindel went to Mr. Allenby's, I held her till Mr. Allenby came, then I pulled her apron up, I said, does that cotton belong to you, he said he believed it did, he knew the pattern; Mr. Allenby and me brought her into his shop; the calico was given to the constable, and she was given in custody.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. I had occasion to go into Fleet-street, I wanted to buy a piece of cotton, I met a woman, she told me she was coming away from her husband and he was pursuing her; she gave me this callico at the corner of the wine vault door, she told me to follow her to Black Friar's bridge, she would meet me there, I was making a bit of patch work; I went into the shop to purchase half a yard, it was in my apron when the gentleman made a prisoner of me; I thought he was her husband, as I never saw the man in my life.

Q. Is that woman here. - A. No, I do not know where she lives, nor does she know where I am; I am a poor woman with three children, without a father.

GUILTY, aged 44.

Of stealing, but not privately .

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

384. THOMAS RIX was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 14th of April , one tea kettle, value 5 s. three sauce pans, value 3 s. two flat irons, value 1 s. 6 d. a pot, value 5 s. 6 d. two candlesticks, value 1 s. and one gridiron, value 2 s. the property of John Scholing , James Lawrence , James Scholing , and Alfred Miles Galindo .

JAMES SCOLING . I am in partnership with James Lawrence and Alfred Miles Galindo , we are iron monger s in Bishopsgate-street ; the prisoner at the bar was our porter . On Tuesday the 14th of April I caught him coming out of the house with a tea kettle in his hand, at his usual time of leaving work; I asked him what he had got in his hand, he said nothing; he immediately put his hand behind him, trying to hide it. I immediately collared him, I took him into the warehouse, and sent for an officer. I gave charge of him.

Q. How do you know the kettle to be yours. - A. I have every reason to think it is; I cannot swear to it The prisoner went down upon his knees and begged my pardon, and said it was the first time he had ever done so. I saw the things the officer brought from his lodgings; I can swear to the pottidge pot; that has our private mark upon it.

Cross examined by Mr. Knapp. You do not take your private mark off when they go out of your custody. - A. No.

Q. Therefore if you had sold this pottidge pot it would have the private mark of your shop upon it. - A. It would.

THOMAS NICHOLLS . I am shopman to these gentlemen.

Q. Did you see the kettle which your master took from him. - A. Yes. There is no mark on the kettle. I went with the constable to the prisoner's lodgings; we found three sauce pans, a pottidge pot, two flat irons, and a gridiron; I can swear to the pottidge pot by the mark. The prisoner owned taking the tea kettle.

- WILLIAMSON. I am a servant to Mr. Scholing. I can only speak to the tea kettle; it was one made by my father, he made one dozen last February.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. I suppose you could not tell one from the other. - A. I cannot speak to that.

Prisoner's Defence. I worked for Mr. Scholing as porter; I was in the habit of putting things up and taking them down; I was going to hang the tea kettle up; as for the other things I did not know they were in the house.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY, aged 55.

[ The prisoner was recommended to mercy by the jury and the prosecutor on account of his family .]

Fined One Shilling and discharged.

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

385. MARY BARKER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 28th of April , a tin box, value 4 d. a guinea, a bank note, value 2 l. and four bank notes, value 1 l. each, the property of John Owen , in his dwelling house .

JOHN OWEN . I live at No. 17, Lombard-street, Fleet-street, Whitefriar's Precinct ; I occupy the whole of the house; the prisoner was servant to my wife while she lay in, and she attended her as a nurse. On Tuesday the 28th of April, when I came home about half past two in the afternoon.

Q. Where did you use to keep your money. - A. In the bottom drawer of a chest of drawers.

Q. When you went out on the Tuesday, did you know what money you had left in the bottom drawer. A. Yes.

Q. Was it kept locked. - A. Yes, I always kept it locked.

Q. Had you seen your money in the course of that day before you went out. - A. I had not seen it for a week before, my wife had; when I last saw it there was one two pound note, four one pound notes, and one guinea; I kept them in a tin box.

Q. Upon coming home Tuesday afternoon did you go to your bottom drawer. - A. I had no occasion to go to it; I looked at it and saw the drawer open; I always kept the keys in my pocket.

Q. Was this woman in the house that day. - A. She was, she was hired that day to look after the children; my wife was gone to church. I looked into the drawer, I was alarmed that the tin case and the contents were gone; the indenture and the money together were gone.

Q. Was the woman in the house when you returned. A. No, she was gone; I was alarmed that she should leave the house so clandestinely; I did not expect her to leave the house till my wife came home.

Q. When did you expect your wife to return. - A. I did not know when my wife would return; when I came home the prisoner was gone, and left the house in the care of the children.

Q. Did the prisoner come back at all. - A. No. I I found her on the Saturday afterwards in Shoreditch in the street, I saw her in company of my brother-in-law, he had found her out.

Q. What age is your children. - A. The eldest is ten, the other is eight; I found the indenture by the prisoner's direction in the neighbourhood of Whitechapel, where she told me she had slept.

Q. Did you get any of your money or your notes again. - A. No, she told me where she had changed the two pound note, that was at a pawnbroker's at Islington; the pawnbroker told me the woman had changed a note; he told me he did not know whether it was a two pound note or a one.

Q. Before she told you that, did not you tell her it would be better for her. - A. No, she made no hesitation of telling me. The tin box contained the whole of the property. She changed the guinea at a gin-shop in Fleet-street; she told me she forced the drawer open and she took them; I found the drawer was forced open; the lock was standing up when I found it.

Q. In consequence of her living in the house did she know that you and your wife kept the money there. - A. I do not know; she further told me that she went with Mrs. Butcher, and this Mrs. Butcher had robbed her of one of the one pound notes. The prisoner told me she had purchased a gown and cap at the pawnbroker's at Islington; he said that she had bought a gown and cap there, but he did not know whether it was a one pound note or a two.

Prisoner. The drawer was open when I went to the drawer.

Court. You thought the drawer was locked. - A. Yes, I always kept it locked.

ELIZABETH SARAH OWEN . Q. You are the wife of the last witness are you. - A. Yes.

Q. What time did you leave the house to go to church to return thanks for you recovery. - A. About half past eleven o'clock.

Q. Did you leave this prisoner at the bar in care of your children. - A. I did.

Q. Had your husband left the house when you went out. - A. Yes, I left her and the children only at home.

Q. Then you expected to find her in the care of them when you returned. - A. I did.

Q. What time did you return home in the afternoon. - A. It might be four o'clock, my husband then was gone out to seek for me.

Q. When you left the house was that drawer safe that you kept the money in. - A. Yes, I looked at the money before I went out; I opened the tin case and I counted it; I opened the drawer by taking another drawer out, and then I could get at the money; I have frequently done that before the prisoner's face; there was one two pound note, four pound notes, and a guinea.

Q. Did you see the prisoner after she was in custody. - A. I saw her at the Falcon public house; I asked her what she had done with the things. I told her I would not forgive her for leaving my five children, they might have been scalded to death; she told me if I would forgive her, she would pay me by installments; I said how can you get the money, she said she might pay me in a week; I said what rob another poor family, and distress them as you have me; she said she took it out of the drawer, and she knew it was there, for I shewed it her when I went out; I searched her, I found none of the money; she said she was robbed of a part of it.

- HINKS. You are the brother-in-law to the last witness. - A. Yes. I went in pursuit of this woman, I found her on Saturday the 2nd of May, about a quarter before one, in the street in Shoreditch, facing the Swan public house. I asked her how Mrs. Owen did, she told me she did not know, she had not seen her since Tuesday; I then taxed her with the robbery, and she strongly denied it; I asked her if she would have the kindness to accompany me to Mrs. Green, an acquaintance of hers in Spitalfields, she said she had no objection to go; when we came to Mrs. Green's, Mrs. Green burst out a crying; I had prior to that told Mrs. Green what had past; the prisoner sat down, Mrs. Green told her she had ruined herself, and broke her heart. Mary Barker then told me she would tell me where the indenture was; she told me they were in a lodging house, in a street in Whitechapel.

Q. Did you get them there. - A. Yes, I went with the prisoner back to the Swan public house, and there met my brother-in-law; we three went to where she had slept, and there we found the indentures, according to her directions. She then told me she changed a guinea at a wine vaults in Fleet-street; we then all three went to Islington; where she had purchased a gown and a cap, the pawnbroker said she was in his house believed on the Tuesday afternoon, in company with Mrs. Butcher, and bought a gown and a cap, but he could not be positive whether it was a one pound note or a two, that she had changed; then she told me that Mrs. Butcher and her went to Highgate to see a child of hers that she had out at nurse; and that she bought the child a doll that cost her eighteen pence, and a small tea pot that cost her four pence; and coming back from Highgate in company with Mrs. Butcher and the hackney coachman, they called at the Britannia to have tea; they went in the coach again, this woman told her the coachman had done her, meaning that he had taken part of the money away; she went to Mrs. Butcher the next morning, and asked her for the money that she had missed, when she was sober; Mrs. Butcher told her she knew nothing of it, and threw a gown after her, and shoved her out of the door. After that she pawned the gown that she had bought of the pawnbroker for four shillings, and laid it out in gin and spirits; and after that money was spent, she pawned her shift, and had no one on when I took her, according to her own account.

Prisoner. When he first met me in Shoreditch, he told me it I would bring my master's indentures to him, my master nor mistress would not hurt me.

Witness. I did not.

Prisoner's Defence. In the morning when I went my mistress gave me some thing to drink; we drank freely together both she and I; my mistress took out the second drawer, which is next the bottom drawer, she shewed the woman and me these notes; she told me that she had taken one or two out, and he had never missed them Being a little in liquor that day before she went, she ordered me to bring the notes to this place, where she was gone; I did not take them with a view to rob her of them. I being in liquor I changed the guinea in Fleet-street; then I went on, I had something more to drink, and I forgot I had any thing to bring to my mistress; I did not know that I had got any thing of the kind, till I got to Mrs. Butcher's.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 47.

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

386. WILLIAM CLARK was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 8th of May , a pewter half pint pot, value 6 d. the property of Joseph Christopher .

JOSEPH CHRISTOPHER . I keep the Black-horse, Petticoat-lane .

Q. Did you lose a half pint pewter pot. - A. I did, on the 8th of May.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar. - A. I do.

Q. Was he in the house at the time you lost it. - A. Yes, I served him at the bar with half a pint of beer; he took the beer into the tap room.

Q. Did he pay for his beer. - A. Yes, and in about a minute or two he left the taproom, my mother-in law was in the tap room at the time; she came and asked me what was gone with the half pint pot. In consequence of that I went into the tap room to see if it was there; not finding it there, me and an acquaintace of mine went in pursuit of the prisoner, and took him three yards from the door.

Q. Had he the half pint pot with him. - A. It was in his jacket pocket. I know it to be mine; it was marked with the name of the person that lived in the house before me; I delivered the pot and the prisoner into the charge of the constable.

(The property produced and identified).

Prisoner's Defence. On the morning specified in the indictment, it might be nine o'clock that I went into the house, I called for half a pint of beer, whether I had drank the half pint of beer I cannot say; I tossed up with two or three people in the tap room; we then played with a thing at the ceiling, like the hand of a clock, like that ventilator (pointing to the ventilator); I turned out of the house to make water, I got a little distance from the door, I was returning to go into the house, a man came up to me and said what have you done with the half pint pot; I put my hand to my pocket, there the pot was half sticking out; if I had meant to conceal it, I should not have carried it away in that manner; my pocket is so shallow I am sure it must have been put in by somebody out of spite and malice.

Jury. (to prosecutor) Were there any other persons apparently drinking in his company at the time. - A. There was no other person, and he paid for the beer on delivery.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 50.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

387. JOHN LAWRENCE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 17th of May , a child's dress, value 14 s , the property of James Plummer .

JAMES PLUMMER . I live in Newgate-street , I am a tailor and draper . On the 17th of May I lost the child's dress from the shop door, it was pinned to a string inside of the door. About eight in the evening I saw the goods upon which it was placed in a moving state, I went to the door, I saw the prisoner walk away, I followed him, he crossed the way, I saw him change something from his left hand to his right, I could not see what it was; he then crossed the way and went into Grey Friars; he then began to run, I called out stop thief, he threw the dress from him. I picked it up; he was going to the Blue coat gate, it was locked up, he was obliged to return; I had never lost sight of him. A gentleman struck him over the mouth and broke his stick with the blow. I secured him, and gave the dress and him to the constable.

(The property produced and identified.)

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel, called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 27.

Confined Two Months in Newgate , and fined One Shilling .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

388. ELEANOR FITZGERALD was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 2nd of May , a silver watch, value 39 s. the property of John Collyer .

JOHN COLLYER . I am a soldier in the guards . On the 2nd of May I was at the Marquis of Granby in the Almonry, Westminster I sat in the tap room; I fell asleep; when I awoke my watch was gone; the prisoner was in the tap room with two other women, but they were not in my company.

JAMES GILMORE . I am a constable of Queen's-square. On the 4th of May I apprehended the prisoner in company with two other women at the Marquis of Granby. As I was locking them up, Sarah Coleman said in the presence of the prisoner, that the prisoner was the person that took the watch, and that morning a man whom the prisoner lodged with had the watch; the prosecutor found the watch in the man's knapsack, as I understood. I asked the prisoner if that was the case; she said it was; and while I was taking them to prison the prosecutor apprehended the man. He being a soldier the magistrate thought fit to have him tried by a court martial.

Q. (to prosecutor) Where did you get that watch. - A. Of one of the guards, his name is Manning; I found it in his knapsack. It is my watch.

Q. When you fell asleep was Manning in the room. A. No, there was none but these three women.

Prisoner. Did not you go backwards into the yard. A. I did.

Q. I found the watch in the necessary. - A. I had the watch when I came in from the yard.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

389. HENRY LONG was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 27th of April , a pair of coach wheels value 6 l. the property of Henry Turner .

HENRY TURNER . I am a coach painter , I live in Little Wild-street . I lost the wheels on the 27th of April, they were taken from a place adjoining the stairs in the yard. The prisoner had worked for me about a fortnight.

JAMES WEST . I am a watchman. On the 27th or 28th of April I saw a man come out of the yard with a pair of wheels; there was a stick run in between the wheels, and with his running them along the stick broke. He tried to tie the stick up again; he went a very few yards before the stick gave way; he went into the yard and got another stick, and wheeled them off.

Prisoner. Look me in my face, can you say I was the person. - A. I know you very well, I was in your company twenty minutes; you went up towards Drury-lane with the wheels. I did not suspect him then.

Q. Did not you swear before the magistrate that it was Tuesday morning, a quarter after four. - A. It was either Monday or Tuesday, I am sure as to the hour, it was twenty minutes after four o'clock.

ANN GARNIS . I am a milliner and mantua-maker, I live at No. 17, Wilstead-street, Somers Town; my child was very ill on Monday night; on Tuesday morning at three o'clock I told my servant to knock at that young man's door for a match; I heard Mr. Long cough from three o'clock till six o'clock; he never went out of the house that day, he was unwell.

Q. What day of the month was it. - A. I believe it was the 26th or 27th of April.

JANE - . I live with Mrs. Garnis. On Tuesday the 26th or 27th of April I heard this young man a coughing at three o'clock in the morning; he did not go out all that day. he was unwell.

Q. How many days was it before the 1st of May. A. Ten or eleven; I am sure it was as long as that.

Prosecutor. He missed coming to work on the twenty-eighth.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

390. JOHN DIGNAM was indicted for the willful murder of Albion Copeland .

The case was stated by Mr. Knapp.

SOPHIA COPELAND . Q. I believe you are the wife of the deceased. - A. Yes.

Q. On the 15th of April your husband received an injury, were you at home on that day. - A. Yes, I was in the washhouse at the time; the prisoner was an articled servant to my husband for three years.

Q. How near is the washhouse to the place where the injury was given. - A. The shop is at the bottom of the yard, I cannot say how many yards it is from the wash-house, it is not quite so much as the length of this court. I heard a few angry words between my husband and John Dignam, but the words were not so high as I had heard them before; immediately the words were over, John Dignam came up the yard from the shop, and ran out of the door immediately; in about two minutes afterwards my husband came up from the yard in a most shocking state, with his head all bloody; I immediately ran for the surgeon; the surgeon came and dressed his head, and got him in bed; he never spoke to me till three o'clock in the afternoon; then I asked him how it happened, he told me that John Dignam had spoiled him a gun; he asked him the reason he had done it in that manner; he told him if he had spoiled it, he must alter it, what else had he to do; my husband asked him what he said, he repeated the same words over again; my husband said, he up with his foot and kicked his bottom; he immediately turned to his work, or his vice, I cannot say which; he said he felt a blow upon his head, and he fell down immediately.

Court. Can you tell me whether at the time he received the blow, he was sitting or standing. - A. He was standing, his work is standing; after he fell down, not being able to recover himself, he laid two minutes and then got up, and he came out of the yard.

Mr. Knapp. How long did your husband live after the 15th. - A. To the 18th, which was Saturday, I told him that John Dignam had given it out that the deceased had struck him with the stock of a gun; upon which he answered that if he never was to enter into the kingdom of heaven, he never lifted his hands against him, but he said he up with his foot and pushed him from him; that was all he said, till within a few hours before he died; all he said then was that he was barbariously murdered, and that he hoped justice would be done by his wife and child.

Q. How long was that before he died. - A. That was about eleven or twelve o'clock in the morning, and he died twenty minutes before two.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. At the time he made use of that expression, the prisoner was in custody. - A. No, he was not apprehended till the day before the sessions came on.

Q. I believe you had no apprehension of the danger till the next morning. - A. No, not till the next morning about three o'clock; it was about eleven or twelve when it happened, and at three o'clock the danger was perceived. He went to the police office immediately it was done; he was never out of the bed afterwards.

Q. There was nobody in the work shop but your husband and the prisoner. - A. Nobody heard any thing but me.

SOPHIA BARTON . - Mr. Knapp. Did you know the deceased - A. Yes, he was my son-in-law.

Q. Did you see him on the morning this unfortunate affair happened. - A. Yes, when he went for an officer I saw him in the street, a little before twelve; he had a cloth over his head, he was going home; the blood was running over his head and face at the time he desired me to go to the police office to see if there was an officer; I went, but there was never a one; I returned again immediately and stood by him, and during the time the surgeon was gone for; I asked him how it happened; he told me his lad had spoiled him a gun, he said he asked him what he meant by so doing, he told me it was so spoiled he did not think he could alter it; the lad told him he must alter it himself, he had nothing else to do; he asked him what he said, he repeated the same words, he told him if he must hear it again, that if he had spoiled it, he had nothing else to do; he returned to his bench and received a blow; he said he fell down like an ox, immediately; and when he had said this, he fainted away.

Q. Did he say what he received the blow with. - A. No, he said the blow was on his head; I saw him on the evening, I told him that I had heard the lad said, he had beat him violently on his loins with the stock of a gun; he said, if he never entered the kingdom of heaven, he never lifted his hands against him; but gave him a push with his foot. Frequently after that he said he was murdered, and cried out for justice; his voice was so low he could only say, murder, justice.

Q. When was the operation performed by the surgeon. - A. On Thursday, the next day.

Q. Was it after that he could only say, murder, jusstice. - A. Before that he said murder, justice; he was in great pain.

Court. Do you mean to say that the time that he said murder, justice, was before the operation. - A. He said so many times, both before and after.

Q. Were you in the habit of seeing the prisoner and the deceased very often. - A. Very often.

Q. Were they in the habit of quarrelling, or disagreeing. - A. They did not agree very well at any time, because the boy was very saucy to him.

WILLIAM OSBORNE . - Mr. Knapp. What are you. - A. I am office-keeper of Lambeth-street office. On the 15th of April, I saw the deceased come from his own house, it is directly opposite of the office; with his head all bloody, and a thick cloth to it; he asked for an officer, but there was none there; he immediately went out. In about ten minutes afterwards the prisoner and his father came into the office, and asked for a warrant against his master for beating him; he said that he had struck him with a gun stock across his back; I asked him what he had done to his master, to make his head so bloody; he said when he struck him with the gun stock, he struck him with the saw he had in his hand; he was refused a warrant and went away.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Was not the master refused a warrant. - A. No, he did not ask for one, he came for an officer.

WILLIAM BURGIS AUKRIDGE . - Mr. Knapp. What are you, sir - A. I am a surgeon. On Wednesday the 15th of April, between eleven and twelve, I was called into the deceased; I found him sitting in a chair, supported by a female; upon examination, I found a wound on the right side of the head, about an inch and a half in length.

Q. From the appearance of the wound, did it appear to be done with a sharp or a blunt instrument. - A. It is impossible to say; the wound corresponded with the extremity of the saw, with which it is said to be inflicted; (the saw produced); on examining the saw, after I had dressed the deceased, I found on the end of it a drop of blood; at that time there was no certain appearance of danger; I saw him repeatedly afterwards, till he died, he got worse and worse; I saw him in the evening when he was perfectly sensible; I asked him several questions respecting his head, and respecting some medicine I had given him; all which he answered rationally; this was the last visit. On the 15th, the day of the accident, the next morning I was sent for, before my usual time of going out; upon enquiry I found a sickness of stomach had come on about three o'clock in the morning; this convinced me there was some injury of the brain. I pointed out the necessity of an operation, and recommended to them to have a consulting surgeon, Mr. Luxmore was called in, 27, at St. Mary Axe.

Q. Did you find upon examining him, the brain was injured. - A. Yes, we found a detached piece of bone, which had been forced through the membranes into the brain; he appeared very little better for the operation, and continued gradually to get worse till he died.

Q. What was the cause of his death. - A. The wound in the head, the fracture in the scull; I have no doubt about it.

MR. LUXMORE. - Mr. Knapp. Do you, sir, agree with that statement. - A. Perfectly so.

Prisoner's Defence. May it please you, my lord, the blow which I received on my back overcome me; upon which I slung my hand back with the instrument I had got in my hand; I got out of the shop as well as I could and as soon as I could, and when I came to the yard door it was fast; I was terrified for fear my master should come after me. I looked for something to open the latch with; in the mean time my mistress opened the door. I went home and shewed the blow which I had received to my father; my father advised me to go to the office to get a warrant.

Court. What did you receive the blow with. - A. With the but-end of a gun; when I came to the office the clerk of the office would not grant me a warrant. From that time till Monday last I have been with my friends. I surrendered myself to the office.

MILES DIGNAM . - Mr. Alley. The lad at the bar is your son. - A. Yes. I am a dealer in clothes; my son was a servant to the deceased, he eat and drank at my house. On the Wednesday this unfortunate accident happened he came home to my house.

Q. In consequence of any complaint that he made did you examine his back. - A. I did; it was very much bruised, it was black and blue, and there was a lump; he was so affected he could hardly tell me what was the matter; his back continued so about a fortnight.

ELEANOR DIGNAM . Q. When your son came home did you see his back. - A. I was not then at home; I saw it in the evening; he was sadly bruised on the flesh of his back; on the back bone there was a lump like a pigeon's egg; the skin was grazed upon the lump, and it was violently red.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Whether the injury had been received by a kick, or any thing else, it would be impossible for you to say. - A. Certainly; I know nothing but from the boy's account.

HANNAH ELWIN . - Mr. Alley. After this injury had been received did you see the boy's back. - A. Yes, about a week afterwards; it then appeared to me he had a very bad blow, it was bruised very much in the middle of his back, and turning all yellow.

SARAH HARRISON . Q. Did you see the boy's back on the same day the last witness saw it. - A. Yes.

Q. Has she truly described the appearance. - A. Yes. Every word that she has stated is perfectly true.

GUILTY.

Of Manslaughter .

Confined One Year in Newgate , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

400. JOHN BAPTISTA was indicted for that he on the 16th of February , upon Patrick Brown , a subject of our Lord the King, feloniously, willfully, maliciously, and unlawfully did make an assault, and with a certain sharp instrument which he then and there held in his hand, did strike, cut, penetrate, and wound the said Patrick Brown in and upon his left thigh, with intent in so doing feloniously to kill and murder him .

Second count with intent in so doing to do him some harm. And

MATTHEW BONNAS for that he on the same day, feloniously, wilfully, and unlawfully, did aid and assist and abet the said John Baptista the said felony to do and commit, and that he knew and was privy to the same offence .

The case was stated by Mr. Gleed.

MARY KASHAW . Q. You are the wife of Thomas Kashaw . - A. Yes.

Q. You are the sister of the prosecutor of this indictment. - A. Yes.

Q. You keep a slop shop and a house for the reception of seamen . - A. Yes, sometimes. The prisoner Baptista lodged in our house for about a week before this business happened; he got up earlier than is usual to get up in the house, he came down stairs, I spoke to him out of my room, I said who is coming down stairs; he went down and I followed him, I found the door open and he was gone; I saw him going away with a bundle in his hand. In about eight or nine days afterwards I saw him in Ratcliffe Highway, I asked him to return me the property he had stolen from me, and I would not prosecute him; he replied I was a girl of the town; he drew a mob round me and ran away; this was on the Saturday. Sunday I saw him again much in the same place, he ran away again. In consequence of information, I got an officer, his name is Mercury; I found the prisoner Baptista on the Sunday night; he was taken in custody and taken to the watchhouse. As we were coming out of the watchhouse Bonnas came up, he said if he could he would have me in a worse place before it was long. On the next day at six o'clock we went before the magistrate, the magistrate wished us to make it up. Not finding any thing upon Baptista, we all went over to the lock-up house for that purpose.

Q. Was any money to be paid. - A. There was one pound to be paid.

Court. Did the magistrate order the one pound to be paid. - A. My money was fifty shillings that I demanded of my loss, and Bonnas made answer that he would pay a one pound note, whether I would take it or not, on account of his shipping the man.

Mr. Gleed. What is Bonnas. - A. He keeps a lodging-house, and ships men . He sent for the money, and his wife sent a guinea, it was paid into the officer's hands; we returned him a shilling; Bonnas said it was the last pound I ever should handle if he could help it. I sat down in the place, I did not like the parties; they went away before me.

Q. That is, Bonnas and Baptista went away, and his wife also, leaving you and your brother behind. A. Yes, to the best of my knowledge, they went away about a quarter of an hour before us. On our return, as I walked along between New Gravel-lane and the church, I saw Bonnas and Baptista standing together, the same side as we were; we crossed over to the other side of the way until I came to the coach stand; I found myself very weak, I wished for a coach, and as I put my foot on the pavement, Mr. Bonnas knocked me down; he made directly a bustle about his pocket, and he handed an instrument to Baptista, I saw the instrument, I cannot tell whether it was scissars or a knife; he handed the instrument to Baptista, he said, twig her, twig her; I saw Baptista take the scissars or knife, I received a blow on my head, he cut my clothes here (pointing to her waist); I shrinked back and fell under the window of a baker's shop, when he cut my clothes; I have got my clothes here (clothes produced); that is the gown and petticoat I wore.

Q. That is cut just about your waste. - A. Yes. And this is the gown, they were both cut. Upon that my brother came up and seized Baptista by the collar; Baptista then struck my brother, and they jostled one with another a short time. I saw Baptista fall twice during the time they were scuffling together, and the third time he ran towards him and struck him with an instrument.

Q. Did you say strike him or stick him. - A. Stick him with the instrument; my brother screamed out, oh, sister, I am murdered, I am stabbed; Bonnas sprung forward and asked Baptista, he said did you do it; Baptista said yes. Bonnas stamped his foot, and told Baptista to run away. Baptista immediately ran away.

Q. Upon Baptista's running away what did Bonnas do. - A. He knocked my brother down upon his knees; then Bonnas turned his back, took his wife by the arm and went away.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. What time of the evening was it. - A. Between eight and nine o'clock.

Q. It was dark then. - A. Yes, but there were lights in the shop, and the lamps were lighted.

Q. Your husband is a crimp. - A. No, I do not think he is, he is a sadler by trade; it is my business if I can get a couple of guineas, I take it. I provide slops for the seamen that lodge in the house.

Q. After your brother came over as you described, they were jostling together, did that continue very long. - A. About three minutes.

Q. Will you swear there were no blows that passed between them. - A. I will not venture to swear that.

Q. Baptista was throwed down twice before there was any injury done to your brother. - A. Yes.

Q. You made a complaint at the office, and they dismissed that complaint, and told you to settle it. - A. Yes.

Mr. Alley. You have said when you come to put your foot on the pavement, that moment Bonnas came up and knocked you down without any words. A. Yes.

Q. And a very violent blow he gave you. - A. No, he did not hurt me very much, the place was very slippery.

Q. I take it for granted you was a little alarmed at such an unexpected salute. - A. No, it was what I expected.

Q. Why did not you get out of the way. - A. I went out of the way as well as I could.

Q. Your brother came across the way after you had seen the knife, why did not you call out that the man had a knife. - A. I did not know that it was a knife.

Q. You thought it was an offensive weapon. - A. Of course I did. I cried out to him to take care of himself; in the flurry he did not hear. I said we will have him another day.

Q. That was because you saw the cut upon your gown - you were examined at the police office two or three times. - A. I have been several times there.

Q. I ask you upon the oath you have taken, did you upon any one of the examinations that took place at the police office, say that you cried out to your brother to caution him of the danger he was in. - A. I never did.

Q. I know all your dress on that occasion - did not you wear a great coat, a pelisse, or any thing of that sort. - A. I had not, I had nothing outside but my shawl I had on me now.

Q. Be cautious, I shall call witnesses. - A. You may call as many witnesses as you like, I had nothing but a shawl over my shoulders.

Q. You had no ill will towards Bonnas till this day. - A. No.

Q. You had a great regard for him. - A. No, I had no regard for him; I only knew him by eyesight.

Q. Of course you never quarrelled together. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you ever travel to Gravesend. - A. Yes, I recollect being at Gravesend, and Mr. Bonnas seemed to be a great man, and he seemed to ridicule poor women.

Q. What did you do to him. - A. I gave him a slap on the face.

Q. Now I ask you, have you not said that if ever you could find an opportunity you would hang him. A. No. I said if ever he insulted me again, I would try the laws of my country against him.

Q. Will you persist in swearing that Bonnas was by at the time your brother was wounded. - A. He was close by when my brother was wounded, but he did not join in the scuffle.

Q. After the transaction on that night, did you say any thing to Mercury - namely, that Bonnas was the person that handed the instrument to Baptista. - A. I screamed out, oh you villain Bonnas, you handed the instrument to Baptista, you are the cause of this; I said to Mercury are not you a bad man for not taking the man up after stabbing my brother. I believe I said this in Bonnas's house.

PATRICK BROWN . - Mr. Gleed. You are the brother to the last witness, I believe. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you recollect being at the public office with your sister. - A. Yes, on the 16th of February.

Q. After that you went over to the lock-up house. A. Yes.

Q. During the time that you were in the lock-up house, were the two prisoners at the bar there. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you recollect any expressions that were said by Bonnas. - A. I cannot recollect the words, but they were words of anger.

Q. Do you recollect Bonnas and Baptista going away. - A. Yes, and I asked my sister to go, she said she would not till they were got out of the way; to the best of my recollection it might be near half an hour before we left the lock up house; we went the regular way home. Soon after we got out, we saw the prisoners on the pavement before us; my sister told me to cross over the way, we both crossed; my sister said she wanted a coach; I told her it was not worth while to take a coach; she went across the way before me, I heard her shout; I ran up to the place where I heard the noise; I saw Baptista striking her, and Bonnas was close by; when I came up Baptista struck her on the head; I seized hold of him by the collar; I asked him what he meant by striking a woman, he turned round and struck me on the face, I struck him again with one hand, and I held his collar with the other; then he stabbed me on the thigh; very soon I felt the blow upon my right thigh, upon the groin; after I felt the stab, and felt the blood running, I cried out murder, I was killed; I did not fall by the wound. After I cried out murder, I received a blow upon the back part of my head, which knocked me upon my right knee; I looked round and I saw Bonnas.

Q. Are you perfectly certain that the blow that you received upon the groin, was a blow that you received from Baptista. - A. I am positive sure.

Q. You have been from that time in the hospital. - A. Yes.

MATTHEW ARNOLD . - Mr. Gleed. Where do you live. - A. At 69, Ratcliff Highway. Some little time after this transaction took place, I went into Bonnas's house, hearing the officers was there, and knowing how his house was situated; I thought if a man had been guilty of stabbing a man, he might go out the back way. In consequence of that I went round the back way. I found Baptista by the wall of the gardens; he was there close to the wall, there is a little ditch there besides; I said, halloo, what are you about there; I was getting near him, he attempted to spring the wall; I took hold of his collar, I said, I suppose you are the person that has been cutting the man in the street; come sir, I says, you must go with me; he said he was no thief, no robber (in bad English), only cut the man; I kept hold of him by the collar, till I got him into the house; I delivered him to Oliver; we found a very little blood on his hands; I fetched a lanthorn and searched the place, and found no knife at all.

SAMUEL RUTHERFORD . - Mr. Gleed. You are under Mr. - , of the London hospital. - A. I am; Mr. Eddington was the surgeon of the house at that time; he examined him; the wound was in the upper part of the left thigh, just below the groin; the wound was about two inches in depth, and about half an inch wide; the wound was done by a sharp pointed instrument.

Q. Was the wound in such a situation so that death might be occasioned thereby. - A. Yes, it was very near a principal artery in the thigh.

Court. It might have been fatal. - A. Yes.

Mr. Gleed. You considered it as a wound of a dangerous nature. - A. Yes.

Q. He has been under the care of the gentlemen of the hospital, and is now under your care. - A. He is.

Baptista's Defence. One morning six o'clock, go to this house, they took me and put me in prison; six o'clock Monday at night, go to the magistrate, charge me with losing two handkerchiefs, broke the lock of the door, charge me with two guineas for that.

Bonnas' Defence. My lord, I am an innocent man; I had been down to Gravesend, and while I was at Gravesend my wife received him; when I come from Gravesend I found this man, Baptista, in my house; I had five men in the house besides him. I asked my wife what that man did in the house, she said a captain wanted six men at night; the sailors told me that Baptista was taken for a robbery; I went to the watchhouse, one of the gentlemen told me he was locked up for a robbery. On Monday six o'clock I went to the magistrate, the magistrate said it was a quarrel about the crimpage; he told them to go away and settle it among themselves; we went to the public house with the officer Mercury; Mrs. Kashaw said she would have two pound ten shillings, I said, I cannot give that money, Baptista owes me four pound already; Mrs. Kashaw then would take one pound; I said that will be all out of my own pocket; I sent to my wife for a guinea, she came to me, after that was paid, Baptista walked out of the house first, then Mercury, my wife and me. After I came out of the house I missed Baptista; I never saw Baptista no more till the gentleman brought him into my house. Mercury came and told me that Baptista had stabbed the man; the parish officers came and said they must look over my house for him; I said with all my heart; when the gentleman brought Baptista in the house, they handcuffed me, and took me with him; the magistrate let me go home, and told me to come again tomorrow morning at two o'clock; the next day we had a hearing, the sister swore against me the most vilest she could; and then I was committed to New Prison.

EMANUEL MERCURY . - Mr. Alley What are you. - A. I am a parish officer.

Q. Do you remember the day this unfortunate accident happened. - A. I do.

Q. On that day do you recollect previous to the misfortune taking place, being at the public house, at which Mrs. Kashaw and this man was there. - A. I do

Q. Do you recollect when the parties separated, who went away from the public house first. - A. Baptista the sailor got up and went out; this was a little after eight o'clock, Mr. Bonnas, Mrs. Bonnas, and me went next; I was going home, a woman came to Bonnas and said, sir, a captain.

Q. In consequence of what she said to him, did he go away. - A. He took his wife on his arm, and walked away immediately. I heard the alarm, I went to Bonnas' house and took him in custody. Mrs. Kashaw came in Bonnas' house with some of the Shadwell officers.

Q. Had she a pellisse on. - A. She had a bottle green pellisse on. I walked all the way home with Bonnas and his wife but ten or a dozen doors; I went into Mr. Elliot's a tobacco shop, I might stay there about ten minutes, and then I heard there was a man stabbed; I then went to Bonnas' house, took him in custody, and brought him to the public house opposite the office.

Court. In consequence of the representation you had given the magistrate, was the prisoner Bonnas set at liberty, upon promise of coming again. - A. He was, and he kept his word; he returned the next day.

Mr. Alley. Did you at any time hear Mrs. Kashaw say any thing and when, that Bonnas had a knife. - A. I did not hear her say any thing of a knife, till the second examination.

Q. Have you ever had any conversation with this woman about this business. - A. Mrs. Kashaw has often desired me to call at her house, and have a cup of tea with her; she has often said that she would be revenged against Bonnas, if possible, because he was a bad man. About a month or five weeks after this happened, I met her in the Highway; I asked her how her brother was; she said she was going to see him, he was very bad; will you take a walk with me. She said if it was to cost her ten or twenty pound she would not mind it, to be revenged of that fellow Bonnas.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gleed. Is it true that two pound ten was what the woman required. - A. Yes.

Q. And you reconciled the matter for twenty shillings. - A. Yes.

Q. How much of that did you have for your share. - A. Ten shillings and sixpence.

ANN CALLENDER . - Mr. Walford. You lived servant with Bonnas at the time of this transaction - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember the evening this accident happened. - A. Yes, it was Monday evening.

Q. Do you recollect a captain calling that wanted your master. - A. Yes; and I went to meet him; as I went by the coach stand, I saw two men and a woman struggling.

Q. Where did you find your master. - A. Close by the end of New Gravel-lane, almost by the tobacconist's shop; Mr. Bonnas and his wife were together; there was a man bidding them good night. I went home with my master and his wife.

Q. Did you see any thing on your way home. - A. I saw the scuffle as I was coming towards them, to meet them; we all came strait home to his house.

Q. Was he engaged with any quarrel during the time you met him. - A. No, he was not indeed.

Court. What did you see when you were coming to meet your master. - A. I saw two men and one woman struggling almost by the coach stand, just by the baker's; I was in a hurry, I did not stop; when I had got about six yards off, I heard a woman cry out murder; she said a man had murdered her brother. The place was quite clear when I came back.

JANE DAVIS . - Mr. Knapp. Where do you live. - A. I live at Rotherhithe.

Q. Did you happen to be in Ratcliffe Highway on the night this accident happened. - A. Yes, I was returning from Blackwall, a little after eight o'clock. In Ratcliffe Highway I saw a quarrel between a woman with a pelisse, or a long top coat on, done with fur, and a tippet; and two men, one a sailor in a jacket and trowsers, and the other a tallish thin man; I think the prisoners are the men; they were having high words about a guinea. The sailor in the jacket gave the woman a shove, and called her a b - r, and said he would have the guinea out of her; and after that the man catched hold of him by the collar, and several blows were given, and she struck him by the side of his head, and took hold of his hair; after several blows had taken place, by the woman and by the men, the sailor fell down and when the sailor got up he gave him one blow, and left him reeling; he ran away; the man reeled till he came by the side of the door; I called out to Mrs. Lawrence, that the man would go through the window; when the man fell, she gave the alarm that her brother was murdered.

MARY LAWRENCE . - Mr. Alley. You are a widow, you keep a baker's shop somewhere in Ratcliffe Highway. - A. Yes. On the day this accident happened I was in my parlour at work; I came to the window and looked through the window to see what was the matter in the street; I saw two men and one woman; there were two women after the alarm of murder was given; I just got to the door as I heard the cry of murder, and then I saw the man run away.

Bonnas called ten witnesses, who gave him a good character.

BOTH, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

401. THOMAS STEVENS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 14th of April , a pocket book, value 2 s. the property of James Storme .

- . On Tuesday the 14th of April, about twelve o'clock at noon; crossing from St. Paul's into Cheapside , I saw the prisoner at the bar in company with two others; I saw him following a gentleman, I supposed him to be a captain; he was a foreigner, he had the appearance of a sea faring gentleman; I followed him between Friday-street, and the Old Change; he put his right hand into the gentleman's outside left hand coat pocket; he opened it with his hand to look in, but took nothing. I followed him to the Old Change, the prisoner put his hand in the same pocket again; he took out this pocket book, and put it under his left arm, under his coat. I collared him, he dropped the book from under his coat, and I stooping to pick it up, he got from me; his hat flew off. Returning back to pick up his hat, he was secured by the witness Martin. I took him to Guildhall.

Q. Who is the gentleman. - A. Captain James Storme , his name is in the book.

JOSEPH MARTIN . I am an extra constable. On the 14th of April, about twelve o'clock, as I got into Cheapside, I saw the prisoner and the last witness of this side of the Old Change; the prisoner was endeavouring to get away from him, they separated, the prisoner stopped to pick up his hat; I secured him.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

402. CHARLES WHITLOCK was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 5th of May , two coats, value 6 l. a gold epaulet, value 12 s. a pair of breeches, value 10 s. a hat, value 13 s. and a gold band, value 10 s. the property of Richard baron Sunderland , in his dwelling house .

THOMAS HALL . I live in Swallow-street. The prisoner was a servant of mine, I sent him to lord Sunderland, he drove my horses; he absconded from his service without his knowledge, and went away with his clothes.

Q. How long did he live with lord Sunderland. - A. Not quite two months; he lived with me about three weeks before that; I hired him and paid him his wages; his lordship boarded him in the house; he quitted his service last Tuesday was a week in the morning; he confessed he sold them to a jew in Oxford-street.

LORD SUNDERLAND . Q. Your lordship's title is Richard baron Sunderland. - A. Yes. The prisoner was coachman to me about two months.

Q. The hackneyman of the job paid him his wages, but you gave him board and lodging. - A. Yes.

Q. What clothes did you give him. - A. A livery, a box coat, a livery coat, a waistcoat, a hat, a hatband, and two gold epaulets.

Q. When did he leave you. - A. About ten days ago.

Q. You have ever seen these things since. - A. No. The clothes were perfectly new. I was shortly going over to Ireland, and then these clothes were to be given up.

Prisoner's Defence. I have nothing to say for myself.

GUILTY. aged 21.

Of stealing to the value of thirty-nine shillings, but not in the dwelling house .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

403. MARY ANN FRAME and HANNAH FLYNN , were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 20th of April , one shawl, value 20 s. the property of Thomas Harvey , privately in his shop .

HENRY THOMAS . I am shopman to Mr. Thomas Harvey , a linen draper in the Minories . On Monday the 20th of April, between one and three o'clock, I was serving a customer in the shop; the two prisoners came in. After I served them I missed a shawl from off the counter. The next morning I found it pledged at Mr. Matthews' in the Minories.

CHARLES - . I am a pawnbroker, I live at Mr. Matthews' in the Minories. On the 20th of April, between the hours of one and three, I received in pledge of Mary Ann Frame a shawl; I delivered it to Mr. Harvey on the 22nd in the morning; in the evening of the 22nd a person came with the duplicate to redeem it. I sent for Mr. Harvey, he brought an officer with him, and we found the prisoners. I identified the person of Mary Frame .

EDWARD DAVIS . I am an officer. I was sent for to the house of Mr. Mathews; there I found a girl that described herself to be a servant to Mrs. Lyon, she keeps an old iron shop; she told me that she received the duplicate from her mistress; she said the person was at her house that gave her the ticket. I went to her house, I asked Mrs. Lyon whether the woman that was there gave her the ticket; she said yes, and pointed to the prisoner Frame, who was sitting by her side. Frame told me she had got the duplicate of a woman who was waiting at a public house till she returned; I went with her to a public house in Ratcliffe Highway, and there I found the other prisoner Flynn; she brought Flynn out of the public house, and said she had given her the duplicate of the shawl; Flynn replied, lord, how could you say I gave you that duplicate.

THOMAS HARVEY . Q. You are a linen draper in the Minories. - A. Yes. I was not at home at the time the shawl was stole; I received that shawl from Mr. Mathews on Wednesday the 22nd of April in the forenoon.

Q. Was there any mark upon it. - A. I put a mark upon it after I received it from Mr. Matthews.

Q. The question is whether that is the same shawl that you had in the shop. - A. I have no doubt it is mine, but I will not venture to swear it.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

404. WILLIAM MOORE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 11th of April , a coat, value 3 l. 3 s. the property of Joseph Burnell .

JAMES CORDEROY . I am coachman to Mr. Burnell, he lives at No. 7, Fitzroy-square; I lost my coat from the coachmaker's, Blackfriar's road , from off the coach box.

WILLIAM PARR . I keep a clothes shop, No. 1, Golden-lane, Barbican. On the 11th of April, about ten o'clock in the morning, the prisoner at the bar came into my shop with a box coat on his arm, he asked me if I would buy a coat; I told him to let me look at it; I threw the coat on the counter, he asked thirty shillings for it; I asked him where he got it from, he said he got it from his brother over the water; I then said to the prisoner I suppose you will take eighteen shillings for it; he said no, I will take a guinea. I told him I had every reason to believe he had stolen it. I sent for an officer.

(The property produced and identified).

GUILTY , aged 55.

Confined One Month in Newgate , and publicly Whipped .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

405. THOMAS SAUNDERS was indicted for stealing on the 13th of May , a salmon, value 12 s. the property of James Ebenezer Saunders and Nathaniel Saunders .

There being no evidence adduced against the prisoner, he was

ACQUITTED .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

406. CHARLES O'SHAUGHNESSY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 3d of April , fifty-six pound weight of lead, value 20 s. affixed to a certain building called a house, and a fixture, called a copper, value 30 s. the property of John Mackay .

BARNABAS BLAKE . I am an hotel keeper in Jermyn street . On the 3d of April. Mr. Trimming, my opposite neighbour, informed me that there were some persons robbing an unoccupied house next door to me, that his wife on the succeeding night had seen three persons attempting to unlock the door, and that he suspected they would be there the following evening; he saw some of the persons had come up the steps. I looked at the door and saw a marble stone, I put it between the door; I went at eight o'clock, the same stone was there; I went out about nine, and gave the watchman charge, I saw the stone was down. I went to my opposite neighbour at the back of the house, I got him to look out of his window; I suppose his candle disturbed them. I heard the door unfasten, and this little man came very leisurely out of the door; I did not attempt to take hold of him on the step; he made a run across the street, I cried stop thief, he ran in a direction for Bury-street. Some person coming there he rebounded into the street again; he was laid hold of, I never lost sight of him; the whole was not above twenty-five yards. I was not the first who took hold of him.

Q. You have no doubt of his being the person. - A. No. I took hold of him by the collar and gave charge of him. There were two more persons who run away.

JOSEPH GREGORY . The next morning I went to this house in Jermyn-street; we found the lead was entirely gone off from the house of every description; the lead, and the lead pump and the copper were gone; this lead pipe I now produce was spread upon the kitchen floor, it was separated from the house, and found in the very form it is now. This crow I received at the watchhouse.

MR. BLAKE. After I took the prisoner, this crow dropped between the watchman, the prisoner, and me. I cannot swear that the prisoner dropped it.

Prisoner's Defence. I was never in the house.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

407. MARGARET SULLIVAN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 26th of April , a silver watch, value 25 s. the property of James William Brown .

MARY CLEAVE . Q. What are you. - A. I carry on the turnery business; the prosecutor Brown boards and lodges with me, he carries on the turnery business for me. I know no more than this about the watch; when he went up to bed at twelve o'clock Saturday the 25th of April, he had the watch with him. I live in Feathers-court, Gray's Inn-lane .

WILLIAM MEAR . I live in the house with the prosecutor, in the back parlour. On Sunday morning at seven o'clock I saw the prisoner at the step of the lower stairs.

Q. What is the prisoner. - A. I do not know what she is. When I heard the door open, I said who is there; she said me. I said she is not up yet, meaning the landlady.

Q. What business had she there. - A. She had no business to come there. I am sure it was the prisoner, I knew her before.

GEORGE WOOD . I am an officer. On the 7th of May I apprehended the prisoner; she told me the watch was pledged at Mr. Crouch's, Ray-street. This is the watch.

JAMES LAWSON . I am servant to Mr. Crouch, pawnbroker in Ray-street.

Q. Look at the watch produced by Wood. - A. This is the watch that I took in pledge on the 29th of April, of a person of the name of James Green.

JAMES WILLIAM BROWN . I am a turner. I was awoke between six and seven o'clock by the prisoner falling on the bed. I was asleep when I lost my watch My watch and my clothes were all on the bed; I did not miss it till she was gone. It is my watch.

Prisoner's Defence. I am an unfortunate woman; and this man has been with me frequently. I leave myself to the mercy of the court.

GUILTY , aged 27.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

408. JAMES HERBERT was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 8th of March , forty-five skins of leather, value 3 l. two doe skins, value 18 s. and thirty sheep skins, value 20 s. the property of Frederic Briant , in his dwelling house .

The case was stated by Mr. Alley.

FREDERIC BRIANT . Q. Where do you reside. - A. I live at No. 203, High Holborn , I am a leather dresser and seller .

Q. In the month of November and December, did you lose any of your property. - A. I lost a considerable quantity from the latter end of November till the middle of December, all kinds of skins; the goods in question were taken from 228, High Holborn. I slept there at that time.

Q. In consequence of any information did you cause the prisoner to be apprehended. - A. Yes, his apartments were searched in Peter-street, Saffron Hill, I assisted at the search; we found a quantity of shammy skins. I believe thirty.

Q. Are those the skins now before you. - A. I think they are; my servant is here that can testify what I say, his name is Roberts. I found them on the 29th of December.

Court Do you know whether they were all taken at once. - A. I cannot say. I missed an immense quantity at the time; I cannot say when they were taken, nor how they were taken: the prisoner and Andrews were employed under Roberts's father; he had access to the house.

WILLIAM ROBERTS . - Mr. Alley. Are you a servant of the prosecutor. - A. Yes.

Q. Be so good as to look at those found in his house. A. I cannot swear to these; them underneath I can swear to.

Mr. Knapp. There is no distinct mark to them. - A. No.

WILLIAM BRIANT . - Mr. Alley. Be so good as to look at them skins. - A. I should not know them skins.

Q. You live upon Ludgate Hill. - A. I do.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar. - A. He wanted to purchase some skins of me once.

Q. Did you give him any receipt. - A. I gave him a receipt.

Hancock. I can swear to finding them in his house.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

409. EDWARD HOBBS and EDWARD GUPPY , were indicted for that they on the 14th of April , fifty pound weight of lead, value 8 s. the property of William Foxall , and affixed to his dwelling house, feloniously did rip with intent to steal .

JOHN HENWRIGHT . I am a watchman of Marybone parish. On the 14th of April, when the serjeant of the night came to me in the division I belong to, he told me to beware of the thieves that night, they were out. I was ordered by the serjeant of the night to leave my lanthorn in the box; I went my rounds as regular as if I were to call the hours. At the hour of one o'clock I was talking to No. 49 watchman, that stands in New Cavendish-street; I left him and turned into Harley-street, Cavendish-square; I come down a good bit of Harley-street, and took Queen-Ann-street, West; hearing the noise of the people coming from Cavendish-street up Harley-street I stopped; I saw three men come across Queen-Ann-street, West; I kneeled down quite close to the railing, the night being dark; and took notice of three persons standing in the street; they stopped on the foot way on the same side with me; I saw them plainly, two of them turned into the door way, and one stood with his back to the house on the pavement, the tall man stood on the pavement, he said to the other men, d - n your eyes, you will not have such success to night as you had last night; they had gained a great quantity of lead from the off side of the street the night before. I took of my shoes and went up on my knees and hands, close to the ground where they stood, as close as I could without their seeing of me; I turned into New Cavendish-street, out of Harley-street, and then I stood upright.

Q. Then the men were in Harley-street were they. - A. I went to No. 49, watchman, and told him that the lead merchants were in Harley-street , and I told him to come to my assistance; he came with me, and we both looked round the corner of New Cavendish-street, into Harley-street: then there was one man standing up at No. 19, on the railing turning into the door way; the other was standing at No. 21, on the top of the railing; Guppy was one, and the man that made his escape was the other; he stood at No. 21; Hobbs, the tall man, he was standing on the foot way, between the doors of No. 19 and 21. Accordingly Hobbs seeing us, he gave a double small cough, which was a signal to the two men; the two men threw themselves down off the railing at the time Hobbs coughed; they crossed Harley-street; and went on the darkest side; they went into Great Mary-bone-street; they all three walked very gently till they came to the end of Great Mary-bone-street, my fellow watchman darted after them; I catched hold of Hobbs, he ran a few yards before I laid a hand upon him; the two other darted up Great Mary-bone-street; No. 49, watchman followed them, and sprang his rattle; I secured Hobbs, he was getting very resolute to get out of my hands; I sprang my rattle for assistance, the serjeant of the night came to my assistance; and then he came quietly to the watchhouse. My partner took the other man.

Q. From the first time of your seeing them till the time you took them, how long was it. - A. About five or six minutes.

MORRIS M'KILLOCK . You are the watchman, No. 49. - A. Yes.

Q. On the 14th of April last, do you remember the alarm being given of thieves being about. - A. Yes, James Hart , the serjeant of the night, came round; he says, I have seen the captain in High-street.

Q. You were put upon the alarm by the serjeant of the night. - A. Yes, he told us the thieves were out; my partner came to me in New Cavendish-street, and told me they were at work in Harley-street.

Q. What time of the night was it. - A. Between one and two o'clock, it was very dark; in consequence of that, I went with him directly.

Q. Did you take your lanthorn with you. - A. No, I went into Harley-street, and both of us stooped down; I saw one upon No. 19, he was lifting the lead off, and the other upon No. 21; the third man stood with his back towards the door of No. 20.

Q. Do you know which man that was. - A. That was Hobbs, he was the tallest of the three; the other two were standing on the rails, taking the lead off the pediment of the door. One of the three men saw us, he made a cough, who it was I cannot tell. Upon this coughing, they immediately jumped off the railing, they crossed Harley-street, and went down towards Mary-bone-street; I and the other watchman walked after them; Henwright took hold of Hobbs; I saw him seize the tall man.

Q. Are you sure that he is one of the three men that you saw together. - A. Yes.

Q. How long did you lose sight of them when they turned the corner. - A. We were as close to them as six or seven yards; we did not lose sight of them at all.

Q. When Henwright seized Hobbs, what became of the other two. - A. The two started, I followed them both, and sprang my rattle; one took to the right and the other to the left; I followed to the left, down Welbeck-street, into Mary-bone-lane; there I seized Guppy; I brought him to the watchhouse; going along I saw Hobbs in custody of the other watchman, and the serjeant of the night.

Hobbs (to witness). Did you see me stand on the pavement. - A. Yes, it is a fact.

Court. When you saw him in custody of Henwright, did you or did you not know him to be the man that stood on the pavement. - A. Certainly, he never went out of my sight till Henwright seized him.

Q. I understand you to swear that you followed Hobbs, Guppy, and the other man, till they turned into Mary-bone-street, and you hardly lost sight of them for a moment. - A. Yes.

Q. (to Henwright) Are you perfectly clear that the prisoner Hobbs, is the same man that you saw standing with his back to No. 20. - A. The very same man; I never lost sight of him from the time I saw him, till I laid my hand upon him; he was beginning to start when we came upon him.

JOHN HART . I am serjeant of the night. On the 14th of April, at eleven o'clock at night, I saw the man they call captain, that is Hobbs, in High-street, Mary-bone, I knew him very well; he was coming out of a public house. I went round my division, and acquainted them that the captain was out.

Q. You did not see any body with him at that time. - A. No; the night before we lost upwards of fifty pounds worth of lead, out of Harley-street. I came to Henwright's assistance; when he sprang the rattle, he had hold of Hobbs.

Q. Did Hobbs appear to make any resistance. - A. He did; and I told him that if he did make any resistance and was not peaceable, I would blow his brains out with the blunderbuss. Then Henwright took him to the watchhouse.

Q. I suppose in your way you met M'Killock with the other man. - A. Yes; after we had secured the prisoners we went back to look at the houses, to see if there was any lead lost; I looked at No. 21 and 19, the lead was torn off, and ripped from the boarding of the pediment over the door, ready to take away; a few minutes more they would have took it completely away; both the places were in the same situation.

Hobbs. I never was on the premises, I made no resistance.

Hart. He did make resistance, he would have got away from Henwright if I had not come up. When we took him to the watchhouse, the constable of the night knew him; he asked him how long had he been out of prison, he said on Friday last.

MR. SPARKS. Q You live at No. 21, Harley-street. - A. I do.

Q. Do you know who lives at No. 19. - A. Mr. Edward Foxall ; he has lived there five or six years.

Hobb's Defence. I am a seaman; I have been eleven or twelve years in his Majesty's service. I was discharged the last peace; I work at rigging. I had been to the West India dock. As I was going home down Marybone-street I met this watchman, they took me in charge and took me to the watchhouse. I never made any resistance.

Guppy's Defence. I was coming home from my sister; it was about half past one o'clock when I came from Holborn to Marybone; I was not nigh no man. The watchman sat the dog upon me, and by the dog following of me I ran to make haste home to my lodgings; the man took hold of me in Mary-bone-lane, he said I want you, you must come to the watchhouse. The other watchman, when we came up to him, said I was along with this man; I said I was not, no more I was not.

HOBBS, GUILTY , aged 28.

GUPPY, GUILTY , aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

410. ELIZABETH WHITMORE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 25th of April , five shirts, value 3 l. 10 s. five handkerchiefs, value 20 s. and a waistcoat, value 3 s. the property of Horatio Lewis , in the dwelling house of Benjamin Carter .

HORATIO LEWIS . I lodge in Arundel-street in the Strand .

Q. What parish is it in. - A. St. Clements, Danes, I believe, I am not sure. The prisoner was servant in the house, she had lived there about two months; I missed several things before I took out the warrant; and on Sunday the 26th I looked over the inventory of my linen; I found there were eight shirts and cravats, waistcoats, and a great number of things missing. I went immediately to Bow-street for a warrant; on Monday they granted a search warrant, and the officer took up the prisoner as she was cleaning the windows on the first floor; I told the prisoner that several things had been taken from me, that I suspected her; the officer then searched her, and found two duplicates upon her; one was in her pocket, and one against her breast. She confessed the robbery, and said she had done it in order to purchase drink. I could not replace the things for twenty or thirty pounds.

Q. You did not understand her to confess that she took any one article at one time worth forty shillings. - A. Oh, no. I then went with the officer, Anthony, to look at the articles pledged, and there I saw one of my shirts, it is marked in full length with permanent ink.

JOHN LEDGER . Q. How came you by that property. - A. The sheet I did not take in; the handkerchief I took in of the prisoner at the bar; she pledged it for three shillings in the name of Field. The shirt was taken in by a person in the shop.

(The property produced and identified)

GUILTY, aged 22.

Of stealing to the value of thirty-nine shillings .

Transported for Seven Years

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

411. SARAH AUSTIN was indicted for feloniously making an assault in the King's highway upon George Silver on the 3d of May , putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, a seven shilling piece, a sixpence, and four half pence, his property .

GEORGE SILVER . Q. What age are you. - A. Twenty. On Sunday morning the 3d of May, I was in Blue Cross street , between four and five in the morning; I am a shoemaker ; I sit all the week; I generally get up of a Sunday morning to take a walk if it is fine. As I was going along the street, the prisoner and three other women were on the pavement; this woman walked from the rest and stopped me as I was passing by her, and she would walk along with me; in the course of two or three minutes she forced her hand into my pocket, I wanted to get away, she would not let me; I did not know that she had got any thing till she was gone.

Q. When she put her hand into your pocket, did you make any resistance. - A. I asked her what she was about, she said nothing; she had not been gone five yards from me when I found I had lost a seven shilling piece, a sixpence, and a few half pence; I had felt it in my pocket not three minutes before she came up to me. Upon finding I had missed the seven shilling piece and the other money, I followed her and gave charge of her to the watchman; she then said she had got nothing. At the watchhouse the prisoner was searched; out of her bosom there fell a sixpence and four halfpence. One of the halfpence I can swear to.

PHILIP PILGRIM . On the 3rd of May last I was the constable of the night; the watchman and Silver brought in a girl to the watchhouse, it was about twenty minutes to five in the morning. I searched the prisoner; I found in her bosom, when she was unloosing her clothes, a sixpence and four halfpence, they dropped from her; I asked her what they did there, and why she had not put it with the six shillings and sixpence that she had in her pocket; she said that she had them given her in change out of a quartern of gin that she had. I could not find the seven shilling piece upon her; I shewed the prosecutor the money. He said he only knew this one halfpenny.

Prosecutor. I can swear to this one halfpenny; I had it three or four months, I never saw one of the kind before; it has four heads on it, and I know it by the brightness.

Jury. It is a George the Second's halfpenny, it is like every other halfpenny of the same die.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going along Whitcomb-street, that young man followed me, he asked me if I was going home; I told him yes. He asked to go with me, I told him he could not; he put his hand into his pocket and gave me four halfpence. He said he wanted to go with me, and because I would not let him, then he charged me with a robbery.

Prosecutor. I never gave her a halfpenny, nor ever wanted to go with her.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

412. CATHERINE BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 13th of May , three pieces of galloon, value 13 s. the property of Robert Kenyon , privately in his shop .

ROBERT KENYON . I am a haberdasher and hosier , I live in Rupert-street . Last Wednesday evening the prisoner came into my shop to purchase some ferrit; she purchased some and paid for it; I was in conversation with a gentleman; I observed her to be in a flurry, she seemed to be agitated, she had a pocket handkerchief in her hand; as she walked out of the shop I started after her, and I expressed a wish to see the pocket handkerchief that was in her hand. She gave it to me; I found in it these pieces of silk galloon, they are worth thirteen shillings; I had seen them in the course of the day.

MR. KERNEY. I was in the shop transacting some business with Mr. Kenyon. I saw the woman come in and purchase some ferrit; I saw Mr. Kenyon call her back, and take the handkerchief from her. He shook it, and the goods fell out.

Prisoner's Defence. When I was examined, he was asked if they were his; he said he could not tell; he put his private mark on since.

(The property produced and identified.)

GUILTY, aged 38.

Of stealing only .

Confined One Year in the House of Correction and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

413. ELIZABETH TYE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 14th of April , a gown, value 4 s. a shift, value 1 s. two aprons, value 2 s. a pair of stockings, value 6 d. two caps, value 6 d. two handkerchiefs, value 1 s. and a pair of pockets, value 6 d. the property of William Mills .

ESTHER MILLS . I live servant with Mr. Haynes. On the 6th of April I went to bed very ill; I left the key in the door for my fellow servant to come up to bed; when she came up to bed she awaked me, and said she found all my things gone; I missed my gown that I pulled off when I went to bed, two caps, two handkerchiefs, a shift, a pair of stockings, and a pair of pockets.

Q. Are you a married woman. - A. Yes, my husband's name is William Mills .

SAMUEL HAYNES Q. The last witness lived servant with you. - A. Yes. On the night of the 6th of April I found the servant had lost a great many articles of wearing apparel; on the next morning I endeavoured to find the prisoner. From the situation of the chamber I was certain that none but those who knew the house could have gone into the room and taken the things away.

Q. How came the prisoner at the bar to have known the way of your house so well. - A. She has lived servant with me at two different times; the last time she lived with me only a fortnight, and the time before not three months; I found her not adequate to my business; I had no other objection to her. The things were missing on the Monday evening; it was Thursday before I found her and then I took her before Mr. Alderman Hankey; I found nothing on her person nor in her lodgings; the officers and I searched her box and found nothing. I told her I would forgive her if she would let the girl have her things.

Q. That is very wrong, now, I cannot hear any more what she said. - A. I applied to the person that she had lived with, and through the means of that person she was taken into custody at the next door to Worship-street office. where she had gone to live servant. This was a week or ten days afterwards; the officers searched her box, and found the things laid in the indictment in my presence.

JAMES GEARY . I am a constable of St. Luke's. I went to the public house next door to Worship-street office, with Winder and Prince, on Tuesday the 14th of April; the prisoner was a servant there, she had been there about three days. I searched her box; she gave me the key and went up stairs with me. I found these things.

Q. (to prosecutrix). On the night you lost your things did you see the prisoner at the house. - A. No. I went to bed between seven and eight o'clock.

Q. (to Haynes). Had you seen the prisoner that night, or at any time previous in the day at your house. - A. No.

Q. Where do you live. - A. In Shire-lane. I keep an eating-house.

Q. Of course your house is open all day. - A. Yes, till ten o'clock. I went out a little after ten; one of the lodgers very imprudently left the door open then.

(The property produced and identified.)

The prisoner said nothing in her defence, nor called any witnesses to character.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

414. ANN SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 2nd of May , a handkerchief, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of Mary Forest .

MARY FOREST . Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar. - A. Yes. On the 2nd of May she came into my house about nine o'clock in the morning; I went with a pint of beer to the top of the court where I live, I was not gone above five minutes, and as I was coming home my daughter informed me she had seen her go to the pawnbroker's; my little girl had watched her into the pawnbroker's. When I went in I missed a handkerchief I had bought for my little boy that is gone to Teneriffe. I keep a public house ; I had throwed it into the drawer where the pipes were. I went to the pawnbroker's, I I found the handkerchief there.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. I went into her house, I asked her for the money she had of mine; she said you will make away with that half guinea as you did last night; I told her I wanted to buy a gown; she gave me the handkerchief as part of payment out of the half guinea. I pawned the handkerchief for a shilling; I told her I had pawned it for a shilling; I told her if she would return me the remainder of the change, I would take it out of pawn.

GUILTY , aged 33.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

415. ALEXANDER FOSTER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 1st of April , one four post bed furniture, value 3 l. twenty-eight yards of cotton, value 3 l. the property of Nicholas Phene and Edward Ricketts .

The case was stated by Mr. Alley.

JOHN - . Q. You live with Messrs. Phene and Ricketts - do you remember being sent up in the warehouse to look for some furniture. - A. Yes, on Tuesday the 7th of April. It was striped cotton.

Q. Could you find it in your master's warehouse. - A. No. I went round to the pawnbrokers. I found it at Mr. Burton's in Whitechapel, in the county of Middlesex.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. This house is in the city of London. - A. Yes.

Q. The prisoner was no servant of yours. - A. No.

Q. Yours is an open shop, you sell to persons walking along. - A. Yes.

Q. These things that you have described have been kept up stairs. - A. Yes.

Q. Do customers that come in the shop ever go up stairs without some of you accompanying them. A. No, they are sometimes left there.

Q. This man was not a customer of your's. - A. No, I never saw him there.

BENJAMIN MATTHEW . I am servant to Mr. Burton, pawnbroker, Whitechapel. The four post furniture the prisoner pledged with me on the 1st day of April.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. I am a tailor by trade; I buy old furniture, and among other things I bought this furniture; I am in the habit of buying old clothes in Petticoat-lane and parts adjacent. I carried it to pledge with intent to take it out again.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

416. GEORGE COLLIER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 13th of May , thirty-two pound weight of lead, value 8 s. the property of Charles Gilliard , affixed to a certain building of his called a house .

Second count for the like offence, only stating it to be affixed to a building only.

JAMES MAY . On the 13th of May I called at a house that I am repairing for Mr. Charles Gilliard , at the corner of Quebec-street ; it being the men's beer time, I went from thence to the King's head in the Edgware road; I had not been there long, before Dowell, my labourer, came to me and said that he would not stop at the job any longer; I told him to go to his job and I would follow him, and as soon as I got into the house I saw Collier in Mr. Gilliard's parlour; Mr. Edington accompanied me, being a constable; Dowell telling me he saw the prisoner take up something, I ordered Mr. Edington to take him in custody. I asked the prisoner what he had done with the leaden pipe that was missing from Mr. Gilliard's house; I told him it would be better for him if he would confess.

Q. You did very wrong, do you know that there was this leaden pipe missing. - A. Yes. We found the lead where he said he had sold it, to a plumber.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Had you ever seen that lead affixed. - A. I do not know that I did.

Q. Did you afterwards look at the place where it was taken from. - A. Yes; it was taken from the front of the area wall; I matched it with the place, I could not make it fit; I cannot swear it is part of that lead.

LAMBERT STEVENS . I am a plumber. The lead in question was brought to my house on the 13th of May, I bought the lead for thirty-two pound weight, I gave seven shillings and seven pence for it; I went with Mr. May to the place; we could not make it answer to the place; there was as much as twenty feet deficient in the whole; he sold me twelve feet.

Q. If I understand you right, it may be part of of the same lead, some part belonging to it might have been disposed of. - A. It was the same bore and the same sort.

- DOWELL. At four o'clock on the 13th of May we went to beer, me and the prisoner and the plasterer; I and the plasterer came to the house in half an hour's time.

Q. Did you see him about the lead. - A. Yes, between five and six o'clock; he was bending a leaden pipe; I did not see him cut it, nor take it out of the premises; I only saw him bend it.

Q. Was this at Mr. Gilliard's house where you saw this. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you observe any of the leaden pipe was missing that day. - A. Yes (the lead produced).

Q. Did it appear to you to be the same sort of pipe as was in the house. - A. I cannot swear to it.

Q. (to Mr. Stevens) Did you compare that pipe with any part that was left in the house. - A. Yes. To the best of my knowledge it was the same bore, a three-quarter bore.

Q. That is a three-quarter bore that remains in the house. - A. Yes. To the best of my knowledge the prisoner brought the lead to me between four and five in the afternoon.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

417. ANN DEAN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 14th of May , fifty yards of printed cotton, value 50 s. the property of Simeon Brown .

THOMAS WATKINS . On the 14th of May I was in Stanhope-street , when the prisoner at the bar and another person with her, took from the prosecutor's door two pieces of printed cotton; I saw them take it. I informed the shopman; he came out, and we pursued the woman. When we came up to the prisoner, she was near an hundred yards off; upon our speaking to her she dropped the two pieces of cotton, she had them in her apron; I picked them up and gave them to Mr. Pinches. I am certain the prisoner at the bar is the woman who took it.

JAMES PINCHES . I was in the shop; this gentleman gave the alarm; I ran out immediately; when I got to the door I found two pieces of print were gone, I did not see her drop them, but I knew she dropped them; I took them from Mr. Watkins immediately he picked them up; I have had them in my custody ever since. These are the two pieces. I know them to be the property of Mr. Simeon Brown .

Prisoner's Defence. I was very much in liquor. When I awoke, I found I was in St. Clement's watchhouse.

GUILTY , aged 32.

Confined One Years in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

418. MARY LEEK was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 16th of March , a metal watch, value 4 l. the property of George Purvis .

GEORGE PURVIS . Q. How old are you. - A. Fourteen, I live with Mr. Grove, sail maker, Horslydown. I am upon liking .

Q. Had you a metal watch at any time. - A. Yes, I put it in a drawer up stairs, in the room where I slept at my fathers.

Q. When did you see it last. - A. I saw it about an hour before it was missed. The drawer was not locked that I put it in.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar. - A. Yes, I lost the watch before I went to my masters.

Q. Where does your father live. - A. At the Brewers' Arms, Gun and Shot Wharf, Southwark .

Q. How long ago is it that you lost your watch. - A. I cannot say when I lost it; I asked the servant if she had seen it. I saw it at the police office about five or six weeks ago. I knew it to be mine.

THOMAS PURVIS . Q. You are the father of George Purvis . - A. Yes; my son lived in the house at the time the watch was lost; it was in the month of March, sometime about noon; I saw the watch again on the 12th of April, at the police office, Whitechapel. The prisoner's daughter was servant at our house, the prisoner came frequently to see her daughter.

Q. Was your son's bed room door kept locked. - A. No, the same day my son missed the watch, the prisoner was in the house before he complained he had lost it. When I saw the watch at the police office, I knew it to be my son's watch.

JOHN GRIFFITH . I am an officer of Lambeth-street office. On the 16th of March I was sent for to Mr. Windsor's, a pawnbroker in Whitechapel; they said they had stopped a woman for offering to pledge a metal watch for a gold watch; they suspected she had stole it; they delivered the watch and the prisoner to me. I asked the prisoner whose watch it was, she said it was her husband's, she was going to pledge it, to make money to pay a quarter's rent; she said her husband worked for Mr. Liptrap, I found he had worked there five years ago; she then said her husband lived over the water, and worked at a brewhouse there. She was sent to prison, and was brought up for examination; and in consequence of what the husband had said, she said then that her father gave it her before he died; she had had it for twenty years; she once pledged it in Oxford-street, that her husband knew nothing of it. She was discharged because no owner could be found. I kept the watch. When the prosecutor called on the 12th of April, I shewed the father the watch, he claimed the watch as his son's watch; the son saw it on the next day before the magistrate, and claimed it. I went over the water the same day, and took her in custody.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. I went to my daughter's, I picked the watch up in the privy. I did not know who was the owner of it.

GUILTY , aged 18.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

419. LUKE SPURGIN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 9th of April , four bags, value 4 s. and four bags of lime, value 3 s. the property of Andrew Patten .

The case was stated by Mr. Gleed.

JOHN HINDS . - Mr. Gleed. You live with Mr. Jeremiah Oshier . - A. Yes.

Q. Does your master do business with Mr. Patten. - A. Yes. On the 9th of April the prisoner came with his master's cart as usual, and bags belonging to his master; he said he wanted thirty bags of lime; I filled the bags with lime, and the prisoner went out of the yard.

WILLIAM CAMPIER . - Mr. Gleed. You are a publican in King's-lane, St. George's. On the 9th of April, do you recollect seeing the prisoner. - A. Yes, on the 9th of April, between nine and ten o'clock in the morning; he drove the cart close to the bar window; he took six bags of lime out of the cart, and put them against the wall of my house; they stood there the whole day; at night I put them in my yard, till the morning of the 10th, they were taken before the magistrate. Edwards came to me the next day for the lime; I took his directions. Mr. Patten's initials are on three of the sacks.

EDWARD EDWARDS . I live in New-street, the corner of Phillip-street, Cornwallis-fields. I directed the prisoner to bring me six bags of lime from Mr. Oshier's, they were stopped at Mr. Campier's; I was to pay the prisoner for the lime.

Q. Who was to pay Mr. Oshier. - A. The prisoner, as he has done before.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. The sacks were to be returned. - A. They were.

ANDREW PATTEN . - Mr. Gleed. You are a soap manufacturer, living in Old Gravel-lane - A. Yes. The prisoner was to bring the twenty-six bags of lime, for the operation in the morning; we could not go on without them.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. If he went and said that he wanted thirty sacks instead of twenty-six, that was a false pretence, it was a lye. - A. Certainly it was.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel, called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 27.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

420. ELIZABETH QUIN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 14th of April , three guineas, half a guinea, a seven shilling piece, a six pence, and a halfpenny, the property of Benjamin Abraham , privily from his person .

BENJAMIN ABRAHAM . I am an attorney . On the 14th of April, between three and four in the morning, I was accosted by the prisoner near Strand-lane ; I told her I did not want her caresses; it would not do, she should go about her business. Notwithstanding she was very loving, and she would clench about me, I could not extricate myself immediately; but all of a sudden I found her to run, which caused me to have a suspicion; I put my hand upon my right hand pocket; I missed my money.

Q. How much was gone. - A. Three guineas and a half, a seven shilling piece, a sixpence, and a halfpenny. When I got up to her, I said you hussey, you have robbed me; I took her of his side of Strand-lane; I seized her first, and the watchman came up and took her; she was searched, and all my money was found upon her.

Q. Were you quite sober at this time. - A. I had been drinking, but I was very competent.

Prisoner's Defence. When I saw him he was very tipsey; he says it is a very cold night for you to be walking; he says will you have something to drink, poor girl; I says, I am benighted; he put his hand in his pocket; here, my girl, says he, I have a family of my own; what he put in my hand I did not know. When I was searched they found what he said in my pocket; that is the way I had it; he gave it me.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

421. HANNAH SIMPSON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 26th of March , a great coat, value 5 s. and a pair of breeches, value 5 s. the property of James Phillips .

JAMES PHILIPS . I live in the Mulberry Gardens. I am a watchman in the London Docks .

Q. When was it you lost this coat and breeches. - A. On the 26th of March.

JOHN GILL . I am a Thames police officer. I apprehended the prisoner on the 11th of May, in Butcher-row, East Smithfield; I told her I apprehended her for taking this property from Phillips; she acknowledged to me that she did take them; she said she pledged them at Mr. Levi's in East Smithfield. I found them there.

JOHN GARROW . I am a pawnbroker, I live with Mr. Levi, 109, East Smithfield. On the 26th of last March I took in a coat and a pair of breeches of the prisoner. I am sure she is the person, I knew her some time before.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. I leave myself to the mercy of the court.

GUILTY , aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

422. ELIZABETH SLY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 11th of April , a pewter quart pot, value 1 s. 6 d and a pewter pint pot, value 1 s. 4 d. the property of Catherine Agar .

RICHARD MAY . I am waiter to Mrs. Agar, she is a publican , at the Whittington and Cat, Whitechapel . The prisoner came into the house and called for half a pint of beer, that she had, and after drinking it she came past the bar, and took a pint pot from the bar. I was drawing some beer, I called her back, she did not return; I went after her, and asked her what business she had to take the pint pot she had under her cloak; she did not say any thing. I took her back to the house; she took the pint pot and a quart pot also out. These are the pots, I know them.

Prisoner's Defence. I have nothing to say.

GUILTY , aged 53.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

423. MARY WHITE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 12th of April , a sheet, value 4 s. the property of Thomas Gosling , in a lodging room .

THOMAS GOSLING . I live at No. 76, Old Gravel-lane, Ratcliffe Highway . The prisoner had one room ready furnished of me, she was to pay five shillings a-week; I examined the bed, I found one sheet missing. The officer searched her, and found the duplicate.

- PERRY. I am servant to Mr. Mitchell, pawnbroker, 41, Ratcliffe Highway. On the 13th of April last I took in the sheet of the prisoner.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. It was my intention to bring it back again.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

424. ANN PARIS was indicted for wilful and corrupt perjury .

Mr. Alley, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

425. GEORGE DUNN was indicted for that he on the 13th of April , one piece of false and counterfeit money, made to the likeness of a good seven shilling piece, as and for a good shilling piece, unlawfully and deceitfully did utter to John Chapman .

The case was stated by Mr. Knapp.

MARTHA CHAPMAN . I am the wife of John Chapman , we keep the Barley Mow, Long-lane, Smithfield . On the 20th of April the prisoner came into our house about eight o'clock in the evening, he called for two pennyworth of brandy, he gave a crooked seven shilling piece to pay for it; it proved to be a good one; he asked me to give it him again, he could pay for it with halfpence. I gave it him, he fumbled in his waistcoat pocket a little while; he then said I must give him change. He offered me another seven shilling piece, it was bent, but paler than the other; that I weighed, and found to be a very bad one. My husband sent for an officer.

JOHN CHAPMAN . I produce the seven shilling piece, I have had it ever since; there was found upon him a counterfeit guinea.

MR. PARKER. Q. I believe you are employed by the mint on these occasions. - A. I am.

Q. Look at that seven shilling piece. - A. It is a counterfeit one. The guinea is like a pocket piece; it resembles a guinea.

Prisoner's Defence (read in court). My lord. - Having a conviction of the excellent philanthropy you possess, more particularly for those whose awful situation has brought them before this tribunal, and not being able to deliver my defence, owing to a severe in disposition and long confinement, being now under medical aid; having it not in my power to procure counsel, I must throw myself on your lordship's candour, together with an English jury, denying the charge of ever uttering base coin of this realm, knowing it to be such.

GUILTY .

Confined Six Months in Newgate , and find Sureties for good Behaviour at the Expiration of that Time .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

426. MARGARET FLINN was indicted for that she on the 16th of April , one piece of false and counterfeit money, made to the likeness of a good shilling, as and for a good shilling, unlawfully and deceitfully did utter to Charles Wilson , she knowing the same to be counterfeited, and that she at the time she so uttered that piece of false and counterfeit piece of money, had about her in her custody and possession, another piece of counterfeited money made to the likeness of a good shilling, she knowing it to be counterfeited .

The case was stated by Mr. Knapp.

CHARLES WILLSON . The prisoner came to our house on the 16th of April, between the hours of eight and nine o'clock, she came for a skain of silk; that came to three halfpence; she gave me a bad shilling, I had some suspicion; I gave the shilling to Mr. Dark. I told her it was a bad one; it was returned to her. Mr. Dark sent for an officer, and there were five others found upon her.

JOHN DARK . Q. You belong to the house of Jones and Co. - A. I do. I remember the prisoner coming to the shop and tendering a bad shilling; I cut it and found it to be a bad one. On searching her the officer found five others equally bad, and a good sixpence, and three pence in halfpence.

PRICE HUGHES . I am a constable; I searched the prisoner; I found six shillings in her pocket, a sixpence, and a few half pence; the other officer has them.

- TURNER. I am an officer. I produce the money found on the prisoner; I have had it ever since. There is six bad shillings, a good sixpence, and three penny worth of good halfpence.

MR. PARKER. Q. Look at these six shillings, and tell me whether they are good or bad. - A. They are every one counterfeited.

Prisoner's Defence. My husband is on board the Culloden; I went to Somerset-house; I met with a man, he bought me a shawl, he gave me the change; I did not know whether it was good or bad.

GUILTY .

Confined Twelve Months in Newgate , and to find Sureties for Two Years more at the Expiration of that Time .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.