Old Bailey Proceedings Online (www.oldbaileyonline.org, version 6.0, 21 December 2014), July 1806 (18060702).

Old Bailey Proceedings, 2nd July 1806.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE OYER AND TERMINER, AND GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND ALSO THE GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, HELD AT Justice-Hall, in the Old Bailey, On WEDNESDAY, the 2nd of JULY, 1806, and following Days,

BEING THE SIXTH SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF The Right Honourable JAMES SHAW, LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT HAND BY JOB SIBLY, FOR R. BUTTERS.

LONDON:

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED By Authority of the CORPORATION of the CITY of LONDON, By R. BUTTERS, 22, Fetter-lane, Fleet-street.

1806

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON.

BEFORE the Right Honourable JAMES SHAW, Lord-Mayor of the City of LONDON; Sir SIMON LE BLANC, Knt. One of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir ALAN CHAMBRE , Knt. One of His Majesty's Justices of the Court of Common Pleas; Sir Watkin Lewis , Knt. Sir William Curtis , Bart. Sir Harvey Christian Combe, Bart. Aldermen of the said City; John Sylvester , Esq. Recorder of the said City; John Perring , Esq. Joshua Jonathan Smith, Esq. and John Princep , Esq. Aldermen of the said City; and Newman Knowlys, Esq. Common-Serjeant of the said City; his Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of Goal Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

LONDON JURY.

Thomas Pearson ,

John Boggis ,

Nathaniel Gast ,

James Darling ,

George Brede ,

William Hunter ,

Jonathan Dolphin ,

William Puckeridge ,

William Pikes ,

Thomas Davey ,

John Bush ,

Evan Lloyd .

FIRST MIDDLESEX JURY.

John Manson ,

John Blease

Charles Clifford ,

William Earle ,

William North,

John Fyson ,

William Senior ,

John Lacomb ,

James Fosbury ,

Thomas Allen ,

John Buckmaste ,

George Ansley .

SECOND MIDDLESEX JURY.

James Henderson ,

William Bridges ,

Thomas Chaoman ,

George Chapman

William Francis ,

John Anthony Hulme,

John Bignell ,

Thomas Hunter ,

Samuel ton ,

William Sadford ,

John Ayre ,

William Ashnell .

357. MARY WALKER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 30th of May , a tea caddy, value 20 s. a writing desk, value 9 s. two seals, value 1 s. a penknife, value 6 d. three ink glasses, value 6 d. half a pound of lump sugar, value 6 d. and a quarter of a pound of tea, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of Samuel Williams .

FRANCIS MACKENNA sworn. I am servant to Mr. Williams, No. 13, Finsbury Square . Through information of the clerk I went up stairs, and missed these things; I went in pursuit of her and took her about forty yards from Mr. Williams' house, with the property on her; when I saw the things, I knew them to be Mr. Williams'; I brought her back and left her in the house, and went for an officer.

ANTHONY AUGUSTUS FRY sworn. I attend at Mr. Williams' as one of his clerks; I was going into Mr. Williams' back gate, I met a woman coming out, I perceived she had something bulky under her cloak; Mr. Young, another clerk, came up, we asked her what she had got there, she said nothing, she had been speaking to the lady; I said there was no lady, she then said the young woman; we let the prisoner go, and asked the servants if they had seen such a person; they said no; they went to see if any thing was missing, and as soon as they found any thing was missing, four of us went in pursuit of her different ways, I went the wrong way.

Q. When she was brought back did you know whose property the caddy and the desk were. - A. No.

Q. Was the woman at the bar the person whom you saw the desk taken from. - A. Yes.

ROBERT SNELL YOUNG sworn. Q. Do you live with Mr. Williams. - A. I do; I saw the prisoner pass by the door as I was sitting in the counting-house, and as she was going out I went and asked her what she wanted, she said nothing, she had been speaking with the lady; I asked her what lady, she said the young woman, and from something that I saw projecting under her cloak I had some suspicions; I went and enquired of the servants if they had seen such a person, they said no; the first witness then went into the room to see if there was any thing missing; he immediately missed the tea caddy; we then went in pursuit of her, she was brought back to the house, I saw the tea caddy and the writing desk in her possession, and I went with her to the officer.

JOHN ARMSTRONG sworn. I am an officer. On the 30th of May I was sent for; Bishop and I went to Mr. William's house, I found the prisoner in the yard, and received charge of her and took her to the office; I received the tea chest and the desk at the office from Mr. Mackenna, they were tied up in this apron, which the prisoner said was hers.

Q.(to Mackenna) Did you know them before you saw them in the possession of the woman. - A. Yes, I can swear that they belong to Mr. Williams, they were taken from the back parlour; I missed the tea caddy immediately the alarm was given, I had seen them she morning before, one of the seals in the desk was marked with a W, the other is a wafer stamp; I have no doubt but the whole is Mr. Williams' property.

Prisoner's Defence. I leave myself entirely to the mercy of the court; I have four small children, my husband left me quite in distress.

GUILTY , aged 40.

[The prisoner was recommended to mercy by the jury.]

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

358. JAMES HEWSON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 26th of April , five pound eight ounces weight of flax, value 5 s. the property of Stephen Atkinson , James Yates , and James Atkinson ; and HENRY BASTIN for feloniously receiving the same goods, he knowing them to be stolen .

The case was stated by Mr. Gurney.

JAMES YATES sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. What are you. - A. I am a Russia merchant , I am in partnership with James Atkinson and Stephen Atkinson ; the prisoner Hewson was in the service of Thomas Atkinson as a labouring man , he was no servant of the firm.

Q. By means of being his servant had he access to your flax. - A. He had whenever he pleased; Thomas Atkinson is my partner's son, my flax was on his wharf at Brown's Key, Hermitage . On the 26th of April I received information from Mr. Elliot; in consequence of which I caused the prisoner Hewson to be apprehended.

MARGARET WILLIAMS sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney. I live in Pennington street, Old Gravel lane; on the morning of the 26th of April, between eight and nine o'clock, I went to the prisoner Bastin's shop to sell some rags that came to three farthings; there was an elderly man came in while I was there, in a brown jacket, which is the prisoner Hewson, he wanted to go backward; upon his wanting to go backward, Bastin said to him, she be d - d, never mind her, put it in; Hewson then pulled the flax out of a brown jacket pocket, and put it in the scale; Bastin weighed the flax and gave him a shilling and some halfpence, and Hewson went away; I put my rags in the scale, and before I went Hewson came back and said it was a bad shilling; Bastin gave him another, and Hewson went away again.

Q. Did you immediately after this go to Mr. Elliot's. - A. Yes, and I stopped at Mr. Elliot's while he went to Bastin's, and when he came back he shewed me some flax which I had seen at Bastin's shop.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gleed.

Q. How do you get your livelihood, you live in Pennington street, Old Gravel lane. - A. Yes.

Q. You was not to be found last session. - A. I was in the hospital.

Q. Do you know any thing at all about flax. - A. I cannot say that I do.

THOMAS ELLIOT sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. I believe you are a flax dresser, living in Crown court, Wapping. - A. Yes.

Q. On the 26th of April last in the morning, in consequence of any thing that Margaret Williams said to you, did you go to the shop of Bastin. - A. I did; she came to me that morning, I believe, about nine o'clock; when I went to his shop Bastin was not at home, I searched his shop, and I found five heads of Dutch flax behind the counter, placed in a corner; Bastin came into the shop; as soon as I had found the flax I said to him, Mr. Bastin I am looking for some property that does not belong to you, and here is something here that does not belong to you; he replied I have been to the barber's shop to be shaved, and since I have been gone somebody has thrown this into the shop, I know nothing about it, if it is your property take it away; no, says I, I cannot take it away, I will tell my son of it; I went and told my son of it, leaving the flax with Bastin in his shop: my son and his partner went.

Q. You say that these heads of flax were placed in a corner behind the counter, could they have been in that situation from any person throwing them. - A. No, they must have been placed there.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gleed.

Q. Your son and his partner went to Hewson's shop. - A. They went directly I came back.

Q. This flax was not your property. - A. No.

Q. I suppose this rag shop is like all other rag shops, an open rag shop in the street. - A. Yes.

Q. You went in consequence of information that you received from the woman. - A. Yes.

Q. You did not take the flax away with you. - A. No, I did not.

Q. Therefore whatever suspicions you had of the flax you left it in his custody. - A. Yes.

Q. How long was it before you returned and sent your son. - A. About three or four minutes.

Q. Then there was time enough for the flax to be removed and taken away - A. I suppose there might.

Q. How long distance do you live from where Bastin lives. - A. About one hundred and thirty yards.

Q. You made no particular mark on the flax. - A. No.

JOHN THOMAS STANLEY sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney. On the morning of the 26th of April, in consequence of what Mr. Elliot said to you, did you and your partner John Elliot go to Mr. Bastin's shop. - A. Yes, I went immediately, I found Bastin in the shop, and five heads of flax on the counter, I asked him how he came by this flax, I suspected it to be some of ours, he said somebody had thrown it in the shop, he did not know how it came there, he says if it is your property take it; I took it home to my shop, and on examining it closely I found it did not match with what I had got.

Q. In consequence of that did you give information to Mr. Yates. - A. Yes, I took it to Mr. Yates.

Q. You afterwards took it to the police office. - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gleed.

Q. You are a dealer in flax. - A. Yes, very largely.

Q. You so far thought it was your own flax that you took it away from the shop. - A. Yes, I kept it in my own possession till I delivered it to Mr. Yates, it was never out of my possession till I delivered it to Mr. Yates and the officer.

JOHN FOX sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You are a Thames police officer. - A. I am.

Q. On the 26th of April last did you take the prisoner Hewson into custody. - A. I did, about eleven o'clock in the day; I took him first in Mr. Elliot's shop, Mr. Yates was by at the time, he had been brought from Mr. Yates' to Mr. Elliot's; I took him to the police office, I produce the flax.

Prosecutor. I believe these three heads are my property and my partners. it is Dutch flax, I have compared them with the other flax I have on Mr. Atkinson's wharf, and they agree exactly.

The prisoners said nothing in their defence.

Hewson called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

HEWSON - GUILTY , aged 67.

Confined Twelve Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

BASTIN - GUILTY , aged 30.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

359. MARY ANN RYAN was indicted, and the indictment stated that she at the general quarter sessions of the peace holden for the county of Middlesex, on the 23d of April, in the forty-fifth year of his Majesty's reign, was tried and convicted of being a common utterer of false and counterfeited money, and was sentenced to one year's imprisonment, and to find sureties for two years more; that she on the 26th of May last unlawfully did utter to Isabella Brown a piece of false and counterfeited money made in the likeness of a sixpence, and as and for a good sixpence .

The case was stated by Mr. Knapp.

CALEB EDWARD POWELL sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are clerk to the solicitor of the mint. - A. Yes.

Q. You produce the copy of the record of the conviction of the prisoner. - A. I do, I got it from the office of the county of Middlesex, I examined it with the original record. (The copy of the record of the conviction of the prisoner read in court.)

WILLIAM JACKSON sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are an officer belonging to Marlborough street. - A. Yes.

Q. Were you present when the prisoner was convicted. - A. Yes, I was at Clerkenwell in April 1805, at the sessions there

Q. Are you sure of her person. - A. I am sure of her person, I have known her many years.

Court. You heard the trial. - A. I did.

Q. Did you hear what it was for. - A. I did; I had some halfpence to produce which she had about her at the time she uttered the bad sixpence.

ISABELLA BROWN sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. I believe your husband keeps a public house. - A. He does, at No. 23, Poland street, Oxford street.

Q. Do you know the prisoner. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember her coming to you. - A. Yes.

Q. On what day was it. - A. On Monday the 26th of May.

Q. At what time did she come to your house. - A. A quarter before twelve at noon; she asked for half a-pint of porter, it came to a penny farthing, she tendered me a sixpence, I looked at it, I did not discover it was a bad one at that time, I put it in my pocket.

Q. What had you in your pocket that you put the sixpence into. - A. I had a seven shilling piece and a half guinea only.

Court. Are you sure you had no silver. - A. I had not.

Mr. Knapp. How soon after you had put the sixpence into your pocket did you see the witness Foy. - A. It was within a moment, I was going to go up the stairs, but had not got up the stairs.

Q. When Foy came in did you shew Foy the sixpence that you had received from the prisoner. - A. Yes.

Court. Had you any suspicion of it before you shewed it to him. - A. No, he asked me what the lady gave for the porter, I told him.

Mr. Knapp. He asked you to shew him the sixpence. - A. Yes, I produced the sixpence to him in a moment.

Q. And then you found it to be a counterfeit one. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you keep the sixpence. - A. Yes, I kept it till three o'clock in the afternoon, by itself wrapped up in paper.

Q. Foy went out of the house to apprehend the prisoner. - A. Yes.

Q. At three o'clock in the afternoon what did you do with the sixpence then. - A. I gave it to Foy at Marlborough-street.

Q. Then the prisoner in the mean time had been apprehended, and you attended at Marlborough-street. - A. Yes.

Q. You are quite sure that the same sixpence that you received from the prisoner was the same sixpence that you gave to Foy at Marlborough-street. - A. I am quite sure of that.

Q. Did you know the prisoner before. - A. No.

Q. Have you any doubt of her being the person. - A. No, I was with her half an hour in Marlborough-street, I am sure she is the same person.

JOHN FOY sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am an officer of Marlborough-street.

Q. How long have you known the prisoner. - A. About four years.

Q. Did you on this day that we have been speaking of, see the prisoner any where. - A. In Portland-street, St. James's, Westminster, about twelve o'clock in the day; I suspected her, and followed her into Poland-street, she stopped at the corner of Poland-street, in Oxford-street, and put something in her pocket and took something out.

Court. She was putting her hands in her pocket. - A. Yes, for about half a minute, and then walked on again, she turned into the sign of the King's Arms, in Poland-street, at Mr. Brown's, I staid out till she came out, and then I went in and enquired what she had changed there. Mrs. Brown produced this sixpence, she said this sixpence was the sixpence that she had paid her. I produce the sixpence. I rubbed the sixpence on the stairs with my foot, to ascertain whether it was a bad one, and marked it, and desired her to keep it by itself; I then followed the prisoner, and took her in custody, in Marlborough-street, close by the office; she immediately put her hand and took out this brown paper, I suspected she was going to throw it away, I immediately seized both her hands, and took her into the office, where after some time struggling, we got the paper out of her hand, I found it contained two more sixpences, which I now produce, I have had them ever since; I searched her, and found a red pocket book, a new tooth brush, and about thirteen pennyworth of new halfpence, here is six pennyworth of them, and Jackson has got the rest, they were all good copper; we had some discourse who gave charge of her, she said if I liked she need not be prosecuted, I told her it did not rest with me, it was with the gentlemen who conducted the mint, I should take her before the magistrate; at the office I received that sixpence of Mrs. Brown, I have had it ever since; I was in court at Clerkenwell when sentence was passed upon her.

JOHN NICHOLL sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are one of the moniers of his Majesty's mint, - A. I am.

Q. I will trouble you to look at this sixpence, tell me whether that is good or counterfeited. - A. It is counterfeited, the other two sixpence are also counterfeited, they are mixed with metal, and the brass is to be seen on one of them, they are none of them silver.

Prisoner's Defence. I beg for mercy.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 36.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

360. JOHN JARRARD , JOSEPH ALTHORPE , and WILLIAM BAXTER , were indicted for making an assault upon Barnabas Carolan , on the 12th of June , putting him in fear, and feloniously taking from his person, and against his will, a pair of trowsers, value 2 s. a purse, value 1 d. three shillings in silver, and eighteen penny pieces, his property .

BARNABAS CAROLAN sworn. On the morning of the 12th of June, between one and two o'clock, as near as I can guess, I was at Holloway , laying by the side of a hay stack, when four men came to me, and one of them held my hands; I had been working at the hay stack the day before, and not being able to get a lodging, I laid there; the hay stack was in an enclosed yard, there was paling round it; when the men came I was between asleep and awake, one of them came and asked me if I had a woman there, I said no, he said you are a woman yourself; it was a bright morning, he field me and put his knees on my breast, and my trowsers was taken from under my head, there were three shillings in silver in the trowsers, in a canvas purse, and eighteen pence, in penny pieces and halfpence, loose in my trowsers pocket.

Q. And these trowsers you put under your head. A.Yes, I had them under my head when they came on me; these three prisoners were along with the man that held me; the prisoner that stands outside took the trowsers away from me.

Q. What were the others doing there. - A. The young one, when they talked of one another's name, desired no name to be expressed.

Q. When they got the trowsers what did they do next. - A. They went away from where I said and left them, after they had been there a good piece of time.

Q. They took the money and the purse, and left the trowsers, how long had they been doing this. - A. They were about fifteen minutes as near as I can guess.

Q. Were you talking to them. - A. No, the man that held me was hurting me, I struggled to get from him.

Q. Was he a quarter of an hour kneeling upon you. - A. He was near a quarter of an hour, he used very odious expressions.

Q. Was it star light or moon light. - A. It was not moon light, it was very bright.

Q. Could you see their faces. - A. Yes, and the man who held me had a smock frock on, the others were dressed much as they are now, only one of them had not a white jacket on.

Q. Had you ever seen either of them before. - A. I might have seen them.

Q. Do you know whether you had or not. - A. I cannot say, because I was in that place a year before.

Q. Which way did they go when they left you. - A. They went out of the yard over into another yard of the other side.

Q. What did you do. - A. I was gathering up the things I had laying in the hay, they came into the back yard again and went over the meadows, they did not speak a word to me the second time, nor I to them.

Q. Did you follow them. - A. No.

Q. When did you give any alarm. - A. As soon as the public house was open in the morning, I told the waiter how I had been used.

Q. When did you see any of the men again. - A. That very morning, at six o'clock, I saw the man that held me.

Q. I am asking of them three men at the bar. - A. I saw them in the back yard the next day, and one of them struck me, that big man; I saw them all four together in the hay yard of the public house where I had been sleeping.

Q. Were they drinking in the house. - A. I saw them there, it was in the yard where they abused me, they came to me and asked me if they had robbed me, I said to the man that held me, these three men robbed me while you held me.

Q. Were they taken into custody at that time. - A. No, they went away to work, they wrought at Mr. Small's that lives just by the side of this place, I went to their master that they wrought with, and they abused me again, that was in the afternoon; I had not a farthing to go to any justice's on the day they robbed me, which was Thursday, but on Monday I went to Bow-street, and got an officer to take them up; one was taken in the same public house, one in his master's-yard, in the same place, and the other between the public house and his master's yard.

Q. Did you ever find your money again. - A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gleed.

Q. I presume that you (from your dialect) are an Irish labourer, and when you cannot get work at one place you go to another. - A. Yes.

Q. You understand that these men are tried for their lives. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you understand there is a reward. - A. I do not know.

Q. Upon your oath, was not you told that. - A. I was told that I would get for my loss of time.

Q. Is this hay yard a place where Irish labourers sleep. - A. I do not know.

Q. Who slept there besides yourself. - A. There was another man that slept in the hay that saw every thing they did to me.

Q. Did you ask him to assist you in taking up these persons that had robbed you. - A. I did not.

Q. These men were on the spot from the Thursday to the Monday at work there. - A. Yes.

Q. Did they take any thing from the other man. - A. No, they spoke to him, he told him there were women enough if they would go to the other yard.

- COX sworn. I am one of the conductors of the patrole at Bow-street. I apprehended Baxter in the tap room, I apprehended Jarrard in Mr. Small's yard, and Althorpe I apprehended in a foot path opposite Mr Small's gate; the prosecutor pointed them out to me.

The prisoners said nothing in their defence.

Jarrard called one witness, who gave him a good character.

Althorpe called one witness, who gave him a good character.

Baxter called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

361. JOHN HARRIS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 17th of June , a pewter quart pot, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of John Stewart .

ANN STEWART sworn. My husband's name is John Stewart , he is a publican , he keeps the sign of the Four Queen's Heads, in Bishopsgate-street . On the 17th of June, about nine o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came in for half a pint of beer, when he was going out I received some information, in consequence of which I ran after him and stopped him, I told him I wished he would return with me, I had something to lay to his charge, he rather hesitated, but he went back with me, I felt in his pocket, I found a pot there, he took the pot out of his pocket and did not say a single word, I sent for an officer.

JOHN TURNER sworn. I am an officer, I happened to go in just at the time, she gave me charge of him, he had a basket containing six more pots belonging to different publicans; I produce the pot that was taken out of his pocket, I saw it taken out, I produce the basket and the six pots that were in it, they were coverered over with hay, and this handkerchief.

Prosecutrix. That is my husband's pot.

Prisoner's Defence. A man gave me the basket to take care of while he was going the other side of the way; I went into Mrs. Stewart's house, and had half a pint of beer, I was very dry.

GUILTY , aged 33.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

362. WILLIAM FRENCH and MARY FRENCH , were indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling house of Thomas Bedford , at the hour of five in the afternoon on the 29th of May , and stealing therein a silver watch, value 2 l. a silver tea spoon, value 2 s. a silver table spoon, value 8 s. two shirts, value 6 s. a waistcoat, value 3 s. three pair of stockings, value 6 s. a cotton gown, value 8 s. a shift, value 3 s. a towel, value 1 s. and a window curtain, value 6 d. the property of Thomas Bedford .

SUSANNAH BEDFORD sworn. I am the wife of Thomas Bedford , I live in Wrighthorpe's court, Old Gravel lane, St. George's in the East; the prisoners lived in my one pair of stairs room as lodgers.

Q. What does your own family consist of. - A. Myself and child, and my husband; my husband was then away; it is a little house with only three rooms, I had the lower room and the top room; on the 29th of May, about four in the afternoon, I went with my little boy to Bow.

Q. Were the two prisoners in the house at the time. - A. Yes, both of them.

Q. How long were you absent. - A. Till near eleven at night; I locked both my room doors and my box.

Q. When you returned did you return alone. - A. I returned with my little boy and my sister, a young girl; I found the street door open, which Mrs. French the prisoner told me when she came out she would meet me, and would shut my street door; I found, however, the street door wide open.

Q. Any person in the house. - A No, no person, I unlocked my lower room door, I found it locked as I left it, I went in to get some refreshment; after sitting in my lower room about ten minutes, I shut up the street door and went up stairs to put my little boy to bed; when I came up I found the door wide open, I ran down to the street door, and said to my neighbours, come in, somebody is in my top room, and three or four of my neighbours came up directly.

Q. When you got into the room did you perceive any alteration. - A. Ann Webb and another gentlewoman ran up with me; I perceived my box wide open, and every thing entirely out of it, without it was a few pieces of paper.

Q. What did you leave in the box when you went out. - A. I left my husband's watch, a silk mode cloak, a pink cotton gown, two cotton shirts, a waistcoat, a silver tea spoon, half a window curtain, a napkin, and three pair of men's stockings. When I went out about three o'clock I went up and changed a gown, I saw all the articles in the box; when I went up stairs to put my gown on Mary French was on the dark part of the stairs with her head against my door, her husband was with her; I said Mrs. French are you courting, she said my Bill has lost his ship, I said Mrs. French I am going out to the fair, if you are going out will you have the goodness to lock the door, she says to be sure I will not leave it open; after I came home at night I sat up till near twelve o'clock; her daughter came in first, I said is your mother coming, she said yes, and when they came I said Mrs. French I am robbed of every thing out of my box, particularly my dirty shift; she said what the Hell have you lost, you have not lost every thing, your green gown is hanging up, which it was, over the cupboard door, she abused me very much and told to go the next day and get an officer, and see what they would find upon her; I went the next day to Mr. Brown the officer, and I informed him of it; she told me she would not go out, she would stay in the next day till I got an officer; she came down about half after five in the morning, she went out several times to the liquor shop; about a quarter before six o'clock Mrs. French went up and dressed herself in a dress that I never saw her in before, she came down (her pockets appeared very bulky), and went to the top of Old Gravel lane, I followed her, and I went to see if the officer was up, she turned round at the top of the lane and threatened to strike me if I followed her; I returned home and fainted away.

Q. Have you found any of the property since. - A. Nothing but my shift in a dirty pan of water in her room the next morning; an Irish woman came with the prisoner's daughter and took a large bundle away, I heard the daughter mention the shift.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley.

Q. Had not a Dutchman been in the house that night. - A. We had two Danes that lodged in the house.

Q. You had not left one of them in the house when you went out. - A. No, one was gone on board a-ship, and the other was gone for a week, I had not seen him for two or three nights before.

ROBERT BROWN sworn. I am a constable belonging to the police office, Shadwell. On Friday the 30th of May Mrs. Bedford applied to me between the hours of eight and nine in the morning, she told me her place had been broken open and she had been robbed; I went to her house with her, I met the woman prisoner in the alley, she was very much in liquor; I told her I was come after her, she said she was very glad of it, I told her to go up stairs and shew me her room; Mrs. Bedford, me, and the woman prisoner went up stairs together; in searching the room, at the foot of the bedstead I perceived some dirty linen, under which was this hammer, there was a large jar stood in the room with a small top to it; in that jar I perceived there was a pair of drawers and some other foul linen; it smelled in such a manner we could not take it out, I kept the hammer in my hand, I told the woman prisoner and Mrs. Bedford to go up stairs before me, that I might see in what manner the room was broken open; I then found the box was broken open with the claws of a hammer; and with the hammer that I have got in my hand; I fitted the claws to the marks on the box, it corresponded exactly in two different places, I then examined the door post, and there was the print of the claws of the hammer there; I brought the box and the woman down stairs: Mrs. Bedford followed us. A gentleman of the name of Palmer came over, he said that is my hammer, he said the woman prisoner borrowed the hammer of him about five o'clock; I told him that hammer had broken open this box. (The box, hammer, and shift, produced.)

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley.

Q. Was this conversation in the presence of the prisoner. - A. It was, Mrs. Bedford said she had a shift in such a state she could not well make awaywith; the next morning I went down to the premises again at her desire, and I searched the premises, and in this jar where the soul linen was, I found this shift in the right thigh of a pair of flannel drawers; Mrs. Webb took the shift out, and Mr. Rogers took out his knife and cut it across the bosom, and gave it to Mrs. Webb in the presence of me and Mrs. Bedford, and after it was clean she returned it to Mr. Rogers again.

Q. Then if I understand you right, the shift was in the thigh of the prisoner's trowsers; where did you find the pitcher when you saw it a second time. - A. I saw it in the same place where I had seen it the day before.

Q. You knew the day before there was a shift lost. - A. Yes, but it was in a very awkward situation for me to search for it; there was an Irish woman there, she put her hands in, it smelt so I turned my head round and went to the other part of the room.

ANN WEBB sworn. I live right opposite of Mrs. Bedford; when Mrs. Bedford came home I heard her cry out she had lost every thing; I heard Mrs. French abuse her, and I heard her say she had not lost every thing, the green gown was in the room; I was with her the next day when she found the shift, I took the shift out and washed it, and returned it to Mrs. Bedford, Mrs. Bedford gave it to Mr. Rogers.

EDWARD ROGERS sworn. I am an officer. On the evening of the 30th the prosecutrix came up to the office and enquired for Mr. Brown, I told her he was not in the way, and whatever was necessary I would do for her; I went to the pawnbroker's, where I found a big Irish woman with the key of her room, I examined the bundle she had got, they appeared to belong to the prisoner; I went with the prosecutrix to the prisoner's room, I opened the prisoner's room door with the key I received of the Irishwoman who had gone to pawn the things, I searched the room and looked into this pan as described by the other evidence, I saw something that looked like drawers, it smelt so bad I went away; the next morning Brown and I went down with a search warrant, Brown went-up stairs, and the prosecutrix and the last witness; the prosecutrix shewed me a dirty shift they had brought down stairs, it was in a very wet disagreeable state (I produce the shift), I took a knife and cut this mark in it, I told the prosecutrix to mark it; she stitched some yellow thread in the breast of it, I told them to put it in a clean state and return it to me, which they did in about half an hour; I have had them in my custody ever since.

Q. Does that mark you find there correspond with the mark you made. - A. Exactly, and here is also the yellow thread.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley.

Q. The Irishwoman was stopped in the pawnbroker's shop. - A. Yes.

Q. The shift when you found it you cut a mark in it, and the prosecutrix made a mark on it, I take it for granted there was no mark before. - A. It was for my satisfaction that she put a mark on it.

WILLIAM PALMER sworn. I live at No. 43, Old Gravel lane, St. George's in the East. On the 30th of May I came to the prosecutrix' door about nine o'clock in the morning, and claimed the hammer; the woman prisoner borrowed the hammer of me about five o'clock in the afternoon, she told me she was going to put up a bedstead with it.

Q. Was her husband with her. - A. No.

ANN WATSON sworn. I was at the end of the court when Mrs. French and her husband went out, it was about eight o'clock on the night the robbery was committed, I was in the court afterwards till such time as it was proper to put the child to bed, and after I put the child to bed I was in the court again, I saw no one go into the place till Mrs. Bedford came home.

Q. Did you observe whether the outer door was open or shut. - A. It was open.

(The shift identified by the prosecutrix.)

Mary French 's Defence. When I came in there was a great alarm, Mrs. Bedford said she had been robbed and I well knew it, she had lost every thing; I said we had been out ever since seven or eight o'clock, it is now twelve o'clock; she had a pint of gin on the table, and there were four or five people sitting with her; she said they left her nothing, what says I, have they left you nothing, why the green gown that you pulled off is there hanging up; yes, says she, they have left me that to change. On the morning that Mr. Brown came I had borrowed a washing tub, and Mr. Brown took the things out, and the girl that stood there put them in one by one, the tub belonged to her; as to the things that were put in this jar I know nothing of, nor do I know of Mrs. Bedford's room being broken open; there were two foreigners that slept in that room.

William French 's Defence. The hammer that is produced here was borrowed to mend the hinge of the bedstead, she stood present at the time.

William French called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

BOTH - NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

363. MARY BLAKE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 26th of May , four gold watch keys, value 25 s. the property of James Tegg , privately in his shop .

JAMES TEGG sworn. I am a jeweller , I live in Oxford street, in the parish of Marylebone . On Monday the 26th of May about ten in the morning, I saw a mob passing by; I received information from my wife that the prisoner was in my shop about half an hour ago; I went to Marlborough street, and I saw the prisoner there.

Q. Did you see any of your property there. - A. I saw four gold keys; the officer had them.

JOHN LITTLEWOOD sworn. I was sent for to Mr. Johnson's shop, an umbrella maker in Oxford street; I saw the prisoner in the shop; he desired me to take her back wards and search her, I searched her and found these four gold keys and one seal; there was one that she bought of Mr. Tegg in a paper, which induced me to send to his shop; I produce the articles.

(The property identified by the prosecutor.)

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

364. MARY BLAKE was again indicted for feloniously stealing on the 26th of May , a parasol,value 6 s. the property of William Johnson , privately in his shop .

WILLIAM JOHNSON sworn. I keep an umbrella shop in Oxford street . On the 26th of May about ten in the morning, the prisoner at the bar came into my shop to look at some parasols; I opened one to shew her, I went away, and left my wife to shew her the remainder.

Q. Did she purchase the one you shewed her. - A. She did not; when I was down stairs I heard a noise, I came up stairs, my lad was gone after her, my wife accused her of taking away something that did not belong to her; when she was brought back I sent for Mr. Littlewood, she was searched, and these gold keys were found upon her; my wife had taken the parasol from her before.

Q. Is your wife here. - A. No.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

365. ANN SIMPSON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 14th of June , a yard of flannel, value 8 d. a napkin, value 3 d. a purse, value 1 d. three guineas, three bank notes, value 1 l. each, and a bank note, value 10 l. the property of John Hat , in his dwelling house .

JOHN HATT sworn. I live in Union street, St. Marylebone .

Q. Do you know any thing of the prisoner. - A. Yes, I knew her a good while, she had lodged with me, but not of late; I missed the property last Sunday was a week, I missed a ten pound bank note, three one pound notes, three guineas in gold, these two pieces of flannel, and the napkin; the purse was wrapped up in the flannel, the purse had the three guineas at one end, and the bank notes at the other end, it was in a deal box under my bed on Thursday before the twelfth of June, I had it in my hand and told it.

Q. Who lives in your family besides yourself. - A. Nobody; I heard something which made me suspect her, I went to her room and examined her, she said she knew nothing at all about it, I insisted upon breaking open her box except she would give me the key; with great persuasion she gave me the key, and the first thing that I saw was these two pieces of flannel.

Q. Was there any body with you when you found it. - A. Yes, the man of the house, she said it had been there for a month; I asked her what was become of the money that was in it, she said that I had not a farthing of money in my box; then I insisted upon searching her pocket, she said she would not be searched without I had a search warrant; I can swear to the flannel, I wore it about my legs.

Prisoner's Defence. I have been living with this man four years as his wife, these flannels were hanging on the line in the passage, he got up in a passion, and told me he would kick me down stairs: I tore my clothes from off the line and these flannels; they have been in my trunk ever since last May; he was mad and jealous because I was going to marry a Frenchman.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave her a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

366. THOMAS BRITTEN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 16th of June , a silver watch, value 40 s. the property of Francis Grain .

FRANCIS GRAIN sworn. On the 16th of June I laid myself down to rest between the hours of five and six o'clock in the evening, on the left side of a path going from Brom lane, Old Brentford , to Ealing .

Q. Do you know whether you had your watch in your pocket before that time. - A. I had seen it about five minutes before I laid down.

Q. Were you quite sober. - A. I had drank three pints of beer in the course of the day; the prisoner at the bar came and laid down by me, I felt him draw the watch out of my pocket; he then got up and walked away, I got up and followed him, he had not gone ten yards from me before I catched him by the collar; I think I said, You rascal you have robbed me of my watch, he replied he had not seen the watch, and while I had got him by the collar, he dropped it with his left hand on the ground, and with his right hand he gave me a violent blow on the eye and knocked me down and ran away; I picked up the watch and pursued him to the Red Lion at Brentford; there I delivered him into the hands of the constable.

Q. What was the prisoner. - A. He worked in the garden, I had known him about three months; I produce the watch, I have had it in my possession ever since.

SAMUEL HUGHES sworn. I am a constable; I took the prisoner into custody, he was very drunk; I have known him two years.

Q. How was the prosecutor. - A. Quite sober.

Prisoner's Defence. My lord, I hope you will take my case into consideration, as I am poor and friendless; this man will swear my life away; I declare I never saw him, nor do I know any thing about him.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

367. ROBERT CROSS was indicted for that he not having the fear of God before his eyes, being moved by the instigation of the Devil, on the 5th of May in and upon one Elizabeth Keef , spinster , violently and feloniously did make an assault, and her the said Elizabeth Keef violently and against her will did ravish and carnally know .

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

368. MARY MULLINS and ELIZABETH RASBERRY , were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 26th of May , a watch, value 30 s. a watch chain, value 6 d. a watch key, value 1 d. and a seal, value 6 d. the property of Edward Clark .

EDWARD CLARK sworn. I am a hair dresser , I live at No. 2, Butcherhall lane, Newgate street. On the 26th of May at half past one in the morning (I was returning from Hammersmith), as I crossed Fleet market to Ludgate hill, I saw Rasberry and Mullins walking together; as soon as Rasberry came near me, she either put her arms round me or forced my hands back, which I cannot say; I lost my watch just at the instant, I directly said youhave got my watch; Mullins ran away down Fleet market; Rasberry says, Polly, I'll be d - d if I will be served so; I called the watchman, he came over, and another came up directly, and asked who it was that run away, Rasberry called out Pretty Polly, the watchman knew who Pretty Polly was, he ran after her down Fleet market.

Q. Are you sure that Mary Mullins was the person that run away. - A. I could not swear to Mary Mullins , but Rasberry I laid hold of; she said the other had taken the watch; I said I be d - d if I care, you stopped me for the purpose, I will keep hold of you.

Q. While your arms was so pinioned by Rasberry, did the other run away with the watch. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you ever find the watch. - A. No.

Rasberry's Defence. As I was coming along with this young woman, we met this gentleman; I catched hold of him and she catched hold of him, she ran away, and his property I never saw.

Mullins' Defence. I never saw the gentleman.

RASBERRY - GUILTY , aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

MULLINS - NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

369. JOHN RAWLINS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 3 d of June , nine ounces weight of tea, value 2 s. the property of the United Company trading to the East Indies .

Second Count for like offence, the property of persons unknown.

The case was stated by Mr. Knapp.

THOMAS NORDERBY sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am an assistant-elder in the East India company's warehouse, Jewry-street, Aldgate ; the prisoner at the bar was a labourer employed in their service for about seven or eight years; on the 3 d of June about ten minutes past two o'clock, they all come down to be discharged, I rubbed the prisoner down to see if he had got any thing about him, I felt something in his pocket, I said what have you got here, he said nothing, taking his handkerchief out of his pocket and shaking it; I put my hand into his right hand coat pocket, I took out a handful of Hyson tea; I took him to the officer, Lawrence searched him, and took out some more Hyson tea from his right hand coat pocket, and some out of his right hand breeches pocket.

JOHN LAWRENCE sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a custom-house officer. On the 3d of June I searched the prisoner, and in his right hand coat pocket and breeches I found a quantity of tea.

Q. What tea is it. - A. Hyson tea, just the same as was in that warehouse; the prisoner before the lord mayor acknowledged that he had taken the tea out of a chest at a window on the first floor in that warehouse.

Prisoner's Defence. I acknowledge my fault; I maintained my character for seven years in the company's employ; I throw myself on the mercy of the court.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Confined one Month in Newgate , and fined One Shilling .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

370. ELIZABETH MACDONALD was indicted for stealing on the 31st of May , two pewter pint pots, value 2 s. the property of Richard Clitter .

RICHARD CLITTER sworn. I am a publican , I keep the Golden Lion, Dean street, Soho. On the 31st of May I lost two pots; I served the house with beer where the prisoner worked.

DANIEL POWEL sworn. I am a watchman in Queenhithe ward. On Saturday the 31st of May, a little before twelve o'clock, Mrs. Wright gave me charge of the prisoner for using her ill with her tongue in indecent hours; when I took charge of the prisoner she had a basket in her left hand, containing two pint pots belonging to the Golden Lion, Dean street, Soho; when I took charge of her she struggled, I could not take care of her and the basket; she dropped the basket; Mrs. Wright brought it to the watchhouse.

Prisoner's Q. If I struggled with you as you say, and I dropped the basket, would not you have picked up the basket and brought it, and not to let it be brought in ten minutes afterwards. - A. I speak as a man, it was not two minutes before it was brought into the watchhouse.

FRANCIS WRIGHT sworn. I live at No. 6, Labour in Vain court; I take in washing; the prisoner lodged with me; on the last day of May she came home at twelve o'clock at night, and abused me at the door; when I asked her how she could come home so late, she said she had done for my husband, and she would do for me; the watchman came up and heard her abuse me, and I gave charge of her.

Q. Had she any thing with her. - A. She had a basket in her hand when I gave charge of her, I knew it was her basket, I looked upon it to be her work basket, she used to come home with it every day.

Prisoner. I had not the basket, I never saw the basket in my life.

GEORGE BOURNE sworn. I am constable of Queenhithe ward. On the 31st of May, about the hour of twelve o'clock, this woman was brought into the watchhouse; I produce the basket and the two pots that were in it; I produce an iron pot found in the fire place in the prisoner's room, with solder at the bottom, by which we believe her to be in the habit of melting pots down.

Q.(to Wright) Is that the basket she had in her hand. - A. Yes; the iron pot is mine; the prisoner rented a ready furnished room of me, I cleaned that pot out when she came into my room.

Q. Had it the appearance of metal at the bottom of it. - A. No.

Q. It has the appearance of metal in it now. - A. It has.

(The pots identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's Defence. All that I can say, I am a hard working woman; I have known Mrs. Wright twenty-four years, we were always good friends together, I know nothing at all about the basket and the pewter pots, nor the iron pot, I do not indeed; my husband is on board a man of war.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Confined One Month in Newgate , and fined One Shilling .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

371. JOHN WILLIAMS , alias WILLIAM BAYLIS , was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 24th of May , a silver table spoon, value 6 s. the property of James Young .

JAMES YOUNG sworn. I live at Lamb farm in the parish of Hackney ; I am a surveyor .

Q. Whereabouts is Lamb farm. - A. Between Kingsland and Hackney. On the 24th of May the prisoner was sent to town on an errand; on the evening of the same day the officer came and told me they had got him in custody. On Monday the 26th I went to Worship street; there was the remains of a spoon shewed me.

Q. Had you a character with him. - A. I had a good character with him.

Cross-examined by Mr. Bolland.

Q. You say you had a good character with him, during the time he was with you had you any reason to suspect him being a dishonest boy. - A. I had not.

ALEXANDER SCULTHORPE sworn. I am a pawnbroker, I live at No. 15. Church street, Bethnal Green. On Saturday the 24th of May, about four o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner at the bar brought a table spoon broken in three parts to sell, I asked him how he came by it, he said he found it in the road in Shoreditch, I asked him where he lived and his employer's name; he said his master lived in Hackney, his name was Brown; I told him I would go with him to his master's, he said very well, and we went down the street together; going along he said his master lived some distance farther. I told him if he would go with me to Worship street, I had a friend there who knew most of the gentlemen there; he went with me very quietly to the Northumberland Arms in Worship street; there I gave him and the spoon to Mr. Armstrong.

JOHN ARMSTRONG sworn. On Saturday the 24th of May I was at the Northumberland Arms, next door to the office: I received charge of the prisoner with Vickery, and this broken spoon I heard the lad say that he found it in the street.

- VICKERY sworn. After the prisoner was committed, he said he wished he had told the magistrate the truth, he wished me to let him have pen, ink, and paper, and he would write it; I said you had better tell me, because if you write it, I must see it before it goes; then he said his master's name was Young, he lived at Lamb farm, and this spoon was in the hog tub; he took it away and was going to buy his master a new one.

Prosecutor. There is not any mark on the spoon, I cannot swear to it.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

372. ANN TYLER was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling house of William Fetton and his wife, and Ann Thacker , being therein on the 24th of May , about the hour of eleven in the forenoon, and stealing therein, five silver handled knives, value 5 s. seven silver handled forks, value 7 s. a pair of cruets, value 5 s. and one window curtain, value 10 s. the property of Francis Joseph Robert Tellear , two gowns, value 2 l. three shawls, value 30 s. two pair of stays, value 7 s. a petticoat, value 7 s. a cloak, value 7 s. two pieces of linen, value 6 d. a pair of stockings, value 1 s. and two pocket handkerchiefs, value 1 s. the property of Mary Dufour .

MARY DUFOUR sworn. I live at No. 6, Short's Gardens, Drury-lane , I lodge with William Fetton , he keeps the house, I rent the first floor. On the 24th of May, at about twenty minutes to eleven o'clock in the forenoon, I went to market, I returned again about a quarter before twelve; when I went out, I particularly went to the middle of the stairs, and returned again, and double locked my door.

Q Did you leave any body in your room. - A. Nobody at all, there was Ann Thacker , an aged mother of mine, up two pair of stairs, my landlady was below serving behind the counter; as I was going up stairs, I heard a noise at the latch of my front room door, I heard somebody push against it, I put the key in, I found it was unlocked, I pushed against the door and got in; I saw the prisoner at the bar in the room, with all my property in her apron, I pulled the door to keep her in, I stamped and screamed, and Mrs. Fetton came-up, I said bring somebody to my assistance, I am robbed.

Q. What did you first take notice of that the woman had in her apron. - A. The first thing that saw was a petticoat and a red shawl in her apron, she was standing behind the door to keep me out; I kept the prisoner in the room till I got assistance, Mr. Harris, the publican, came up and she was taken to the watchhouse.

ANN FETTON sworn. You are a married woman. - A. Yes, my husband's name is William Fetton , he keeps the house, the last witness is my sister, she lodges in the first floor. On being alarmed by my sister, I went up stairs, I found my sister outside holding the door, and the prisoner was within the room, the neighbours were alarmed, they came in, and she was taken in custody.

Q. Had you observed any body go up stairs - A. I had seen somebody going out of my house with an apron full of things before my sister came home.

Q. Did you see any body come in again afterwards. - A. No.

- HARRIS sworn. I am a publican, on hearing the alarm I went up stairs, I saw Mrs. Dufour standing at the door of the room up stairs, she was holding the door; when I went into the room I saw the prisoner standing very near the door.

Q. Did you observe whether she had any thing with her. - A. She had nothing with her when I went into the room, there was a bundle of things laying close by the prisoner's feet, and not being able to procure a constable, I took her to the watchhouse, I saw her searched at the watchhouse, and five silver handled knives and seven silver handled forks, one silver stud, a leather purse, two cruets, a thimble, and seven keys were found in her pocket.

- MORGAN sworn. I am watchhouse keeper, theprisoner was brought to me by Mr. Harris, I searched her, I produce the things I found upon her, I tried these two keys to Mrs. Dufour's door and both these two keys opened that front room door; I produce the property found in the room; when I went into the room Mrs. Dufour said that is the property the woman had got, I found them on a chair.

MARY ANN OFFICER sworn. On hearing an alarm, I went up into Mrs. Dufour's room, I saw the prisoner at the bar in the room, and the clothes were laying on the floor, by her feet; I took the clothes up, and put them on a chair, Mr. Harris took her to the watchhouse, I went with him, I saw her searched, and I saw the articles taken out of her pocket that he has mentioned.

Q.(to prosecutrix) Who does the knives and forks belong to. - A. They belong to Francis Robert Tellear, a French gentleman, that lodges with me, they were in a knife box in the front room, the two cruets, tobacco box, and sleeve button, belong also to him; the other things are mine except the curtain, he gave ten shillings and sixpence for that.

Q. What are the three shawls worth. - A. They are worth thirty shillings, this petticoat, seven shillings, the two muslin gowns, two guineas, and the other things they are all my property; they were all in the front room. I saw them in her apron.

FRANCIS JOSEPH ROBERT TELLEAR sworn. Q. Look at the knives and forks. - A. They are mine, at the same time I recommend her to mercy.

Prisoner's Defence. I can say no more than I make soldier's coats and waistcoats, I was told by Mr. Matthews, that I work for, to go to this house in Short's Gardens, to enquire for Mrs. Pritchard, as I was coming from these people's stairs I saw an old white handkerchief, and on it lay these white handled knives and forks, I saw a woman whom I supposed had dropped them, that good woman in black came in apparently with some steakes, and before she had been to her room door she called me a blackguard b - h, and said I had robbed her. She was very much in liquor the Saturday night I was committed.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 48.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

373. JOHN WILMOT was indicted for that he not having the fear of God before his eyes, being moved by the instigation of the Devil, on the 3d. of June in and upon Mary, the wife of Charles Littlejohn , violently and feloniously did make an assault, and her the said Mary and against her will, feloniously and carnally did ravish and know .

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

374. JAMES BRYANT was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 24th of May , four coats, value 6 l. a pair of pantaloons, value 1 s. a hat, value 12 s. the property of John White , in his dwelling house .

JOHN WHITE sworn. I am a publican , I keep the King's Arms, Coal-yard, Drury-lane , I was only keeping the house open for the brewer, I paid no rent, nor taxes. On the afternoon prior to the robbery the prisoner, about one or two o'clock, applied to me for a lodging, I let him one, he said he should want to go out at four o'clock in the morning, I shewed him the way to unfasten the door, at a little before ten when he came home, then I let him to bed; the next morning, a little before four o'clock, I heard him go out, I had no other person in the house but himself; I had that afternoon taken the clothes out of the box to brush them, and I had left some of them in the parlour, my wife came down first in the morning and missed the coats, she came and told me, and when I came down I found they were gone.

Q. How many coats did you miss. - A. Three under coats, a great coat, a hat, and a pair of pantaloons, all my own.

Q. Did the man come back again to pay for his lodging. - A. No, he was taken at the Yorkshire Grey, in Eagle-street, and I saw him in prison on the fourth of June, he had then got my pantaloons on, he told me in prison where he had pawned my clothes, the officer heard him.

WILLIAM READ sworn. I am an officer I apprehended the prisoner, at the Yorkshire Grey, in Eagle-street, on the 3d of June, he had the prosecutor's pantaloons on; (I produce the property,) I went to the different pawnbrokers; the prisoner at the bar told the prosecutor in my presence where they were pledged.

HENRY FLEMING sworn. Q. Is that your ticket. - A. Yes, this coat was pawned with me by the prisoner at the bar, I have a perfect recollection of his person, it was pawned on the 31st of May; on the 29th of May another coat was pawned in his name, I do not exactly recollect the pledging of this, I suppose he pledged it.

- sworn. I am a shopman to Mr. Davidson, pawnbroker, Skinner-street; to the best of my knowledge the prisoner at the bar pawned a great coat and a hat at our shop, I remember his bringing the hat, the hat he brought on the 30th, and the coat on the 29th of May.

ANN WHITE sworn. I am the wife of John White ; when I came down in the morning I missed four coats and a pair of pantaloons; I heard the prisoner go out before five o'clock in the morning, I had seen the things on the overnight.

(The property produced and identified by the prosecutor)

Prisoner's Defence. I resign it up to the court altogether.

GUILTY, aged 47.

Of stealing only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

375. LEWELLIN DAVIS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 27th of May two saws, value 14. a plain, value 6 d. four chisels, value 2 s. two locks and keys, value 1 s. 6 d. an iron ladle bowl, value 6 d. four brass handles, value 6 d. a gimblet, value 1 d. two files, value 2 d. and a hundred nails, value 2 d. the property of Charles Davies .

The case was stated by Mr. Reynolds.

CHARLES DAVIES sworn. Examined by Mr. Reynolds. Q. You are a carpenter , and live in St. John-street, Clerkenwell. - A. Yes, the prisoner at the barwas my journeyman .

Q. Did you on the 27th of May miss any tools. - A. Yes, I obtained a search warrant, and went to his lodgings in St. John-street, Clerkenwell, and there I found the articles in the indictment, he said before the magistrate he was induced to take the things for the one pound note I refused to let him have.

JOHN HANCOCK sworn. Examined by Mr. Reynolds. I am an officer; I searched the premises of the prisoner; I found the property mentioned in the indictment, except a saw pledged at Mr. Page's for five shillings.

Court. (to prosecutor) He applied to you for the loan of a one pound note, and you refused it. - A. Yes.

(The property produced and identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's Defence. I worked with this gentleman above a twelvemonth with my own tools; his tools and my tools I carried all in one in my apron sometimes to my apartment, and as we wanted them we fetched them. we used each other's tools, his tools were nothing to me, I did not want to sell them; he called me from the shop, and this gentleman took me; he said, he had found some tools in my room; he knew at the same time some must be in my apartment; I have done very imprudent, owing to his not lending me the one pound note.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

376. THOMAS HOPKINS and JAMES ENGLISH was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 18th of June , eight loaves of bread, value 8 s. and a basket, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of James Lindoras .

JAMES LINDORAS sworn. Q. Did you loose any bread at any time. - A. Yes, on the 18th of June from the corner of Oxford street ; they were in a basket, I was absent from the basket about a quarter of an hour, I went to take a loaf and to receive a bill; when I returned I found the basket was gone.

Q. What time of the day was this. - A. About eleven o'clock.

Q. Did you find your bread or your basket again. A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gleed.

Q. You suffered your bread to remain exposed in the street, you being absent about a quarter of an hour. - A. Yes.

RICHARD MARKHAM sworn. Were you in Oxford street when Lindoras lost his bread. - A. Yes; I did not see him set the basket down; when I was in Swallow-street I saw the two prisoners pass by me, I knew them before.

Q. Where did they come from. - A. I cannot tell, I am a baker, I was enquiring for work; when I was at the end of Hollis street, I saw them again. Thomas Hopkins was carrying a basket of bread, and English was in company close by him; I saw them first come out of Oxford street into Hollis street, they passed me, I did not speak to them, I went round Cavendish square and I saw Mr. Lindoras, I told him what I had seen, the prisoners are both journeymen bakers.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gleed.

Q. In point of fact you know Hopkins to be a journeyman baker, Hopkins you saw in Hollis street with a basket on his shoulder. - A. Yes, he came close by me.

Q. Could you see what was in the basket. - A. Yes.

Q. How far was the other prisoner from him at this time. - A. He might be perhaps half a dozen yards.

Q. There were more persons in the street besides him. - A. Yes.

- LINDSEY sworn. On the 18th of June I was in Cavendish square with the last witness; I first saw the prisoners at the corner of Mortimer street; Thomas Hopkins had a basket on his shoulder. I saw two quartern bricks in the basket.

Q. How near were they together. - A. One was several yards behind the other.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

377. MARY HALL was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 24th of June , a shift, value 2 s. the property of William Curling .

WILLIAM CURLING sworn. I live at Shadwell , I am a salesman . On the 24th of June about one o'clock in the day, the prisoner at the bar came into my shop and enquired if I had any yellow handkerchiefs, I shewed her some; after she had looked at them some time, she said she did not want any of them, she would call again; as she was going out of the street door I saw something hang below her clothes, I asked her what she had there, she answered do you think that I have robbed you; I pulled it from under her petticoats, and I saw it was mine. I produce the shift, there is my private mark on it, it had been hanging at the door for sale, I had seen it five minutes before it was taken down.

Prisoner's Defence. I was very much in liquor, I did not know any thing about it.

GUILTY , aged 42.

Privately Whipped and discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

378. JUDITH LOW was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 16th of June , a gown, value 10 s. the property of Nathaniel Kelly .

NATHANIEL KELLY sworn. I keep a slop and sale shop . On the 16th of June the prisoner and her husband, her nephew and his wife, came to my shop all together; the prisoner's husband asked me for a pair of boots, and while I was attending him with the boots, the prisoner moved from the side she first stood and went to the other side where this gown hung; a short interval of time after this she went into the passage, I noticed her staying in the passage; then she went out of the street door; I saw no more of her, her husband bought the boots and paid me for them, and went away; immediately they were gone I missed the gown; after they were gone a pug dog returned into the shop, I had observed that dog in the shop when the man was trying the boots on, I looked at the collar of the dog, andfound out where the nephew and neice lived.

Q. Did you ever find your property. - A. Yes, I went to this woman's house, I accused her of taking the gown, she after denying it a long time. she opened her drawers and produced the gown; I took possession of the gown and gave her in charge of an officer; I produce the gown, it is mine, there is my private mark on it.

Prisoner's Defence. I had drank more than did me good, I did not know that I had the gown, as I sat down I must have taken it up in my petticoats; I told Mr. Kelly as soon as I found it I meant to bring it to him.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

379. ELEANOR PEACH was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 10th of June , a sheet, value 3 s. a gridiron, value 6 d. six locks, value 1 s. 6 d. a petticoat, value 1 s. 6 d. and two oval mill board patterns, value 2 d. the property of John Davis .

ELIZABETH DAVIS sworn. I live in Bear street , I am a band box maker, the prisoner worked for me; I missed all the articles in the indictment during the time the prisoner worked for me.

Prisoner. Them things were never hers in the world.

WILLIAM BLACKMAN sworn. I am an officer; I searched the prisoner's lodging on the 10th of June, No. 23, Grafton street, the prisoner was there at the time; on her person I found a flannel petticoat, which Mrs. Davis identified to be her property, and in the apartment I found, I think it is, seven locks and a gridiron; I found a duplicate of a sheet pledged for half a crown at Mr. Lucas's; there is three pasteboard patterns, I produce them.

(The property identified by the prosecutrix.)

SAMUEL WOOLCH sworn. I live at No. 4, Rider's court, I am apprentice to Mr. Lucas; I produce a sheet pledged by the prisoner at the bar for half a crown.

Prisoner's Defence. The sheet I have had these four years, I bought a pair of them in Cranbourn alley; there is one lock I have had twenty-two years, that gridiron I bought at a sale; there is nothing that belongs to them but the two old pasteboard patterns.

Prosecutrix. I made the sheet myself.

GUILTY , aged 55.

Confined Twelve Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

380. GEORGE COOK was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 3d of June , a seven shilling piece, three shillings, two sixpences, and fifteen halfpence , the property of Joseph Lever .

JOSEPH LEVER sworn. I live at Homerton, in the parish of Hackney, I am a labouring man .

Q. What is the prisoner. - A. He is a labouring man. On Tuesday the 4th of June, after I had my dinner at the Woolpack, Homerton , I dropped asleep; at that time I lost out of my pocket, a seven shilling piece, three shillings, two sixpences, and fifteen halfpence.

ANN PERCIVAL sworn. I was at the Woolpack on the 4th of June between two and three o'clock, I saw the prisoner pick the prosecutor's right hand pocket.

Q. Was the prosecutor asleep. - A. Yes, they were both sitting in the tap room, I was standing in the passage, I saw him take the money out, and he dropped two shillings on the floor; when he took his hand out of his pocket I told him then that the young man was picking his pocket.

Q. Do you know the prisoner. - A. No, I never saw him before.

Q.(to prosecutor) Do you know the prisoner. - A. No, when he took the money out of my pocket, he pulled my pocket inside out.

WILLIAM CARR sworn. I am a constable of Hackney. The prisoner and the prosecutor were sitting together on the bench in the tap room, I saw the prisoner take a seven shilling piece out of his pocket and lay it on the bench, he took it up again and put it in his mouth; I had charged him with picking the man's pocket, and the people in the tap room threatened him, he took it out of his mouth; then Tom Stevenson took the money and gave it to me, some of the money was on the ground; as we were coming to town the next day, he said he did not think of doing what he had done five minutes before; he said that as he was going to have his hearing.

THOMAS STEVENSON sworn. I am a hair-dresser by trade, I live with my mother at Hackney; I was down in the cellar, I heard somebody say there was a man picking another man's pocket; I came up and found a seven shilling piece lay on the bench, there was some silver and halfpence on the floor, I sent for a constable, and I delivered it to Mr. Carr. (The money produced).

Prosecutor. I cannot swear to money.

Q. What money had you about you. - A. I had a seven shilling piece, three shillings, two sixpences, and fifteen halfpence, that is exactly the sum I lost.

Prisoner's Q.(to Stevenson) Was not the man in liquor. - A.No, he had only two pints of beer.

Court. Did you see him drop any money on the floor. - A. No.

Prisoner's Defence. I am not guilty of the charge that is alledged against me; instead of the prosecutor putting the money in his pocket, he kept it in his hands and dropped asleep, then it dropped out of his hands, I picked it up and put the seven shilling piece in my mouth while I put the other money in his pocket.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

381. WILLIAM HORSENAIL was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 29th of May , a bundle of of small hand paper, value 14 s. the property of William Jackson .

WILLIAM JACKSON sworn. I live at the corner of Orchard street, Oxford street. On the 29th of May my shopman had been to Portman square, he returned into the shop before five o'clock in the afternoon, he returned in the shop with the prisoner and the bundle of paper in question; my man said that he had met him in the street, asked me if I hadsold it, said he suspected that he had stole it; I asked the prisoner how he came by it, he said that he took it from the side of the door towards Orchard street.

WILLIAM MASON sworn. I am in the employment of Mr. Jackson; on the 29th of May, returning home I met the prisoner in Orchard-street with a bundle of small hand paper in his hand, from the manner of his appearance I suspected that he had stole it, but not being positive, I followed him, he saw that I watched him; at the top of Quebec-street I asked him where he got the paper, he immediately threw it down and said he took it from the corner of the street, I asked him what street, he said he did not know, I brought him back to Mr. Jackson's; he acknowledged taking it from that side of the place which is next Orchard-street.

(The paper produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. I leave myself entirely to the mercy of the court.

GUILTY , aged 59.

Confined one Week in Newgate , and during that time to be publicly Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

382. LION LEVY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 29 of May , one thousand four hundred pound weight of copper, value 70 l. the property of Francis Morgan , James Morgan , and George Ward .

The case was stated by Mr. Knapp.

DAVID SWAIN sworn. Examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Who do you live with. - A. I live servant with Francis Morgan , James Morgan , and George Ward , they are copper smiths ; the shop is in Whitechapel, they have a wharehouse in Colchester-street .

Q. On the 28th of May did you see any copper weighed. - A. Yes, they were weighed in my presence, one hundred and eighteen cakes of copper, they weighed six ton eleven hundred and odd weight.

Q. They were weighed in Colchester-street on the 28th. - A. Yes, and Thomas Wilkins put a mark on them, I saw him do it; the next morning we found the yard gate open, we found fourteen pigs or cakes of copper missing, there were twelve of them that were weighed in one draft; they weighed ten hundred one quarter and twenty five pound; we found upon further examination there were two others missing from another draft.

Q. You have seen some copper produced by the officer. - A. Yes, I have no doubt but they are my master's property.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney.

Q. What are the names of the parners. - A. There are no other partners than James Morgan , Francis Morgan , and George Ward .

THOMAS WILKINS sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are in the employ of Messrs Morgan and co. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember a quantity of copper being in the yard of Messrs. Morgan in Colchester-street. - A. Yes, I weighed and marked them on the 28th of May last, they were put into different drafts as we weighed them, and there was one hundred and eighteen pigs in the whole; on the next morning I missed them twelve, which was one separate draft.

Q. Have you seen any cakes produced to you by the officer. - A. Yes.

Q. Are those cakes that you saw afterwards a part of the cakes that you had marked. - A. I can swear to two positively, and the others I can safely swear to.

JOHN MARKS sworn. Examined by Mr. Alley. I am a porter, I was employed by the prisoner at the bar to carry some copper on Monday.

Q. What Monday. - A. I cannot rightly tell the day of the month, I believe I was taken in custody on the 4th of June, it was the Monday before that I was applied to by the prisoner Mr. Levy to carry a piece of copper to Mr. Oakes and Brown's house, Houndsditch.

Q. Where is Mr. Levy's house. - A. In Goodman's yard, Minories. On Wednesday morning the 4th of June I carried two pieces, and in the afternoon I carried another piece, that made four pieces; when I went with the fourth, one of the copper smiths laid hold of me and said I was his prisoner.

Q. From what part of the prisoner's house did you get the copper. - A. From his cellar he gave it me himself.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gleed.

Q. Was it the cellar or kitchen. - A. The cellar.

Q. Then on the 2d of June you took one piece to Oakes and Brown's house. - A. Yes.

Q. You know a person of the name of Alexander do not you. - A. I know him, but I have no dealings with him.

Q. Was not you employed to carry that copper by Alexander. - A. No.

WILLIAM OAKES sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp.

Q. What business are you. - A. I am a coppersmith in Hounsditch.

Q. Do you remember the last witness, Marks, coming to your house, and with what. - A. I do not, I was not at home at any one of the four times he came with the copper.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney.

Q. The name of the person that you agreed with for the copper was Alexander. - A. I do not know his name.

Mr. Knapp. Did you give any information respecting any copper that you had brought to you to Messrs. Morgan. - A. Yes.

JOHN GRIFFITHS sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. I am an officer of Lambeth-street. On Wednesday, the 4th of June, I went to the prisoner's house, Goodman's-yard, Whitechapel; when I went in the prisoner was not at home, I looked over the house and in the cellar I found two copper cakes or pigs; I waited a short time to see if Mr. Levy came home, he did, I then took him in custody, and the cakes of copper, and told him he must go along with me; the next day I took him before the magistrate, the witnesses who are present came and swore to the cakes being Messrs. Morgans property.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gleed.

Q. You examined the pieces of copper, I suppose. - A. I did not notice any marks on them, till I saw them at the office.

Q. Did not the marks on the dresser and the marks on the copper correspond. - A. There were marks on the dresser, but I did not notice them at the time.

Mr. Alley. (to Wilkins) You say you marked some of them pieces of copper that morning. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see these two pieces of copper produced by Griffiths at the office. - A. Yes, they are the marks that I put on them, I am sure of that.

Court. They are both your marks. - A. Yes.

Q. Have you the least doubt that these are the two pigs that were in your yard, and were the property of your masters. - A. I have not the least doubt in the world.

(The copper produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent of the charge that is alledged against me.

SOLOMON JACOB sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. What are you. - A. I am clerk to a merchant in Fenchurch street; I have been twenty-five years clerk to his father and him. On the 4th of June I assisted the prisoner in taking the weight of copper, I occasionally assisted him; the pieces of copper looked to me like lead, he said they were copper, I took the weight and marked it on the copper, and likewise marked it on the dresser with chalk.

Q. Look at one of these pieces and see whether there is any mark which you yourself had made. - A. This one I can take upon myself to say is my mark.

GUILTY - aged 40.

Transported for Seven Years

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

383. JOHN SHAW was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 4th of May , a copper tea kettle, value 4 s. the property of James Page .

JAMES PAGE sworn. I live at No. 8, Goswell-street , I am a tin plate worker . On the 24th of May about eleven or twelve o'clock at noon I just came from next door from having a glass of porter, I came into my shop, I went into the far end of my shop, I saw the prisoner come up towards the door, I goes towards the door, he was gone, I looked at my door to see if the goods were safe, I saw the copper tea kettle was gone, I looked and saw the prisoner with the tea kettle in his hands, I pursued him and got hold of him by the collar, he refused to be laid hold of by me but dropped the tea kettle by me.

Q. Did you secure him. - A. Yes, and I took care of my tea kettle.

Q. Was he drunk. - A. I cannot say, he might.

- COMPTON sworn. I am an officer. On Saturday the 24th of May I was sent for to take charge of somebody, I live about seven doors from the prosecutor; about midway to the prosecutor's house I saw a quantity of people, and the prisoner was standing with this tea kettle I now produce in his possession; the prosecutor gave me charge of him for stealing it.

Q. Was the man rather drunk. - A. He was rather in liquor, he was acute, not very drunk.

Prisoner's Defence. I came from on board aship the same morning, I was very groggy the next morning, I did not know nothing of it nor where I was till one of the keepers told me I was in prison; I have been sixteen years in his majesty's service, I came to look after some prize money.

(The property identified by the prosecutor.)

GUILTY , aged 37.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

384. JOSEPH WOODHOUSE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 28th of June , a box, value 2 s. 6 d. one thousand and two yards of ribbon, value 17 l. 5 s. 6 d. one hundred and ninety-two yards of ferrit, value l. 5 s. 6 d. forty yards of velvet, value 1 l. 11 s. fifty-four buttons, value 16 s. eleven pound weight of thread, value 2 l. 18 s. 6 d. four ounces weight of silk, value 11 s. three pound weight of cotton, value 1 l. 15 s. four fans, value 6 s. seventy two yards of lacing, value 13 s. two pound weight of wire, value 5 s. twelve sheets of court plaster, value 1 s. 9 d. twenty-four pound weight of pins, value 1 l. 13 s. two pair of stockings, value 7 s. 10 d. twelve yards of crape, value 3 l. twelve yards of persian, value 1 l. 6 s. twenty-four yards of canvas, value 1 l. 19 s. six silk handkerchiefs, value 1 l. 4 s. two hundred and sixty-four yards of tape, value 4 s. 3 d. and one thousand and fifty yards of bobbin, value 9 s. the property of James Hoglin .

JAMES HOGLIN sworn. I live at the Darkhouse in the parish of St. Mary on the Hill , I keep the house.

Q. Were these things your property, or were they only lodged in your house. - A. They came to my house by a porter, to be sent down by the boat to Gravesend, they were in a white deal box, I took it in myself, and put it in a place right opposite to the bar, where we put all the parcels when they come in.

Q. Is that under lock and key. - A. No.

Q. Your house is a public house is it. - A. Yes.

Q. What day and what time of the day was it when it was left at your house. - A. It was on Friday the 27th of June, between two and three o'clock in the afternoon, I am not sure.

Q. How long was it after that before the box was gone. - A. At twelve o'clock at night I saw it safe, I went to lay down, I got up rather before two o'clock in the morning, I returned into the bar, and I looked for the box and missed it, it was gone.

Q. Do you know any thing of the prisoner at the bar. - A. No, he was not in the house at the time I went to lay down.

Q. Upon your missing it what did you do. - A. I came into the bar, I said to the boy that I had left in the bar, where is that white deal box, he said that there were five men came in and had a pot of beer, they took the box.

Q. Did you ever see the box again. - A. The first time that I see the box again was before the lord mayor; in the course of three quarters of an hour after I had missed it, the watchman came down to enquire if we had got a box going to Gravesend, I told him we had, the box was directed for Mr. Bevan, Gravesend.

Q. Was it booked with you. - A. It was booked with me, I received two pence for the booking and two pence for the porter.

MILES ABERNOIR sworn. Q. Did you bring this box to Mr. Hoglin. - A. I did, a quarter before eight in the evening last Friday, it was directed toMr. John Bevan , Gravesend; I booked it there and left it in the house, to be conveyed to Gravesend by the boat.

Q. Do you know the contents of the box. - A. Yes, I packed it.

Q. What was the name of the gentleman that sent this property. - A. Mr. Joiner. (The box produced and opened, and the articles identified,

Q. When did you see the box again. - A. Yesterday.

Q. That was the same box that you delivered to Mr. Hoglin. - A. It was.

DANIEL SCHOFIELD sworn. I live at the Dark House, I am brother-in-law to Mr. Hoglin.

Q. Were you up after Mr. Hoglin retired to rest on the Friday night. - A. Yes, the prisoner came into the house soon after my brother went to bed.

Q. Are you sure the prisoner is the same man - A. I did not see his face, he had a wooden leg.

Q.(to Mr. Hardy) Has the prisoner a wooden leg. - A. Yes.

Q.(to Schofield) Then a man with a wooden leg came into the house, which you take to be the prisoner; did you see him come in with any body. - A. I do not know, I saw him go up to the fire with four more.

Q. Did you see where this deal box was. - A.It was in a box opposite the bar, under the seat.

Q. Did you see whether the prisoner went to that box or not. - A. No, I did not take particular notice, I saw him go up to the fire.

Q. How far was that box from the fire. - A.There were three more than that before you get to the fire.

Q. You had seen the deal box before. - A. Yes.

Q. How long did this man with the wooden leg stay. - A. He did not stay above half an hour, there were some more people there, they had a pot of beer and half a pint of gin.

Q. Did he drink any thing with them. - A. I did not take that notice.

Q. You did not then observe the prisoner call for any thing, or drink with any other person. - A. No.

Q. Yours is a house of call for passengers and parcels to go by the Gravesend boats. - A. Yes.

Q. Were there any other persons belonging to the Darkhouse with you after your brother retired to rest. - A. No.

Q. Are you quite sure that you saw the box safe in the tap room after Hoglin retired to rest. - A. I am quite sure it was there when he went to rest.

Q. When Hoglin retired to rest; did you continue in the room all the time. - A. I went up stairs twice, and once in the cellar to draw a pint of ale.

Q. How long were you absent these times. - A. I was not absent above a minute each time.

Q. When did you miss the box. - A. I did not miss the box till my brother got up, he missed it first.

Q. When your brother made the enquiry was the prisoner gone then. - A. Yes, he had been gone about a quarter of an hour when my brother came down.

Q. When did you see the box again. - A. On Monday.

Q. Did you know the box again when you saw it. - A. Yes, I had observed the shape of the box and the direction.

JOHN JOINER sworn. This is my property, I sent it to go by the Gravesend boat.

JAMES WARREN sworn. I am patrole of Lime-street ward.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar. - A. I know him well, I saw him last Saturday morning the 28th of June, about two o'clock in the morning, as I was on duty; the prisoner and another man came up, the watchman saw him first, I was about twenty or thirty yards from the watchman. I was facing the pea market in Leadenhall-market.

Q. Had they any thing with them. - A. The other man who is not here had got the box on his shoulder, I clapped my hand on the box, and said what have you got here, he pitched it down on the stones and said, that man is the proprietor of it, he said it several times over to me in the street; I told him he must go to the watchhouse, the watchman took care of the box, while I took care of the two men till they came to the watchhouse door, then the man that I attacked with the box first ran away; we did not think it judgment to pursue him, we took care of the prisoner and the box; I did not keep hold of the prisoner, he went in voluntary in the watchhouse; he persisted the box was his, and what was in it was his property; I took him to the Counter, there he gave the name of Williams; his name is Wood-house.

WILLIAM SANDFORD sworn. I am a watchman of Lime-street ward, my stand is in Leadenhall-street.

Q. Did you see the prisoner on this Saturday morning. - A. Yes, about a quarter past two I saw two of them come along, the wooden legged man, the prisoner, was behind with his coat off, following the other man with the box; I followed them down to my partner, and I called out stop them; immediately we took them to the watchhouse, the prisoner said he was the owner of the box; in the watch-house he said his name was Williams, at the watch-house he again claimed the box to be his; the other man run away; I looked at the direction of the box after he said his name was Williams; I went down to Darkhouse-lane, and that is the way we found where the box came from.

Q. Do know this man. - A. I have seen him several times before.

JOSEPH HARVY sworn. I am a constable, I was attending in the watchhouse in Lime-street ward.

Q. When the box was brought in did the prisoner claim the box as his. - A. Yes; I asked him what the box contained, he only said it was his box and I might open it.

Q. What name did he give at that time. - A. Joseph Williams was the name that he gave at the watch-house, No. 22, Essex street, Whitechapel; in consequence of the direction on the box not agreeing, I told him I must take him to the Counter unless he could give a better account of himself; he said he could not help it; I went down immediately to the Darkhouse and found where it had been taken from about three quarters of an hour before; I have had the box in my possession ever since; I and the officer went to his house and found the prisoner lived, there but not by that name.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in liquor.

The prisoner called no witnesses to character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 27.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

385. GEORGE HALL was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 10th of June , a silver table spoon, value 7 s. and a bank note, value 2 l. the property of Mary Kerslake , in her dwelling house .

(The indictment was read by Mr. Gleed, and the case was stated by Mr. Alley.)

MARY KERSLAKE sworn. Examined by Mr. Gleed. I am a single woman , I live in my own house, I occupy it, I am a vender of medicine . On the 10th of June last, returning from Kentish town, I had occasion to purchase some goods at Messrs. Fishers and Wells' in Fleet street; I paid for these articles in a five pound note, I received a two pound note in exchange.

Q. Was there any thing remarkable in the two pound note. - A. There was a shilling difference between the shopwoman and me, I cast it up outside of the note; when I returned home I put the note in a bag, which I generally put the money that I take of Mr. Hall, I placed the bag in a closet in the ware room, I locked the closet door, and put the key on the corner of a shelf (there was other money in the bag which I had received of him); I then went to market; this was about eleven or twelve o'clock.

Court. Had he access to that closet. - A. Yes, he sold medicine when I was out of the way, he was my clerk, in short he was every thing to me.

Mr. Gleed. How long were you absent. - A. I suppose not more than half an hour; in about half an hour after my return I went to my closet, I went to my bag, I observed the notes that I had put in very tight together were shook loose; I then said to Mr. Hall who has been here, have you sold any thing, he said nobody has been here; I then was very warm on losing my two pound note out of the bag.

Q. Are you perfectly sure that the two pound note you received at Fisher and Wells' you put in that bag. - A. Yes.

Q. Was that the two pound note that was missing. A. It was.

Q. I do not know whether any thing material passed between you and the prisoner. - A. I do not know any thing particular than I saw he was frightened, Mr. Swinton being there at the time I mentioned it to him; I went to the Mansion house about half past one, I had a coach and I went there very fast.

Q. How soon was the prisoner taken up. - A. Not on that day, it was the next day.

Q. When you returned from the Mansion house to your own house was the prisoner there. - A. He was, not knowing where I had been; on the next day I applied to Weatherfield, I sent him to my house, I told him that was his prisoner, Weatherfield, with Kimber, another officer, searched him.

Q. Did you see any thing found upon the prisoner. - A. I saw the note directly it was found.

Court. You did not actually see them find the note. - A. No.

Q. Where did the prisoner Hall live. - A.I do not exactly know the number, in the Borough; I attended the search of his house in company with the same two officers, and in a chest of drawers on the first floor I found a silver spoon which belonged to me.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney.

Q. You are a dealer in medicines are you. - A. Yes.

Q. What sort of medicines. - A. Dr. Brodum's nervous cordial.

Q. And all Mr Swinton's medicines. - A. I did not come here about that.

Q. I must question you about that although you do not like it, you succeeded Mr. Swinton in business. A. Yes.

Q. You sell Dr. Brodum's cordial, and all Mr. Mr. Swinton's medicines. - A. Yes.

Q. He had the misfortune to become a bankrupt lately. - A. Yes, the commission took place after Christmas.

Q. How long have you lived in the house before that. - A. Last March was a twelvemonth.

Q. Then you lived there nine or ten months before you commenced business. - A. Yes.

Q. A partner in the business. - A. No.

Q. Never a partner, were you housekeeper to him. A. No, nothing to him.

Q. Only in the same house - A. No, in the adjoining house, he lived at 45 and 1 at 46; I lived three years before that with Mr. Swinton, I was his housekeeper six months.

Q. When you missed this two pound note you were very angry. - A. Yes.

Q. You told him you had lost a two pound note, and we were told while you were out of court that he absconded, whoever said that told a falsity. - A. Yes.

Q. No fault of yours; you went to the lord-mayor that day. - A. Yes, I did not see the lord-mayor, here was nobody at the mansion house nor at Guildhall, the next day I got an officer.

Q. When the officer came in the room where was the hat laying. - A. It was laying very close to where he was, I cannot say that I saw it there, it was not found till some minutes after the officers came.

Q. Was not Mr. Swinton there. - A. He was there when the officer was there.

Q. Do not you happen to know that Mr. Hall is a principal witness in support of Mr. Swinton's commission of bankruptcy. - A. I do not know that.

Q. Is that as true as all that you have told us. - A. Certainly.

Q. Is there no communication from a door between the two houses. - A. No.

Q. Is there a communication between the two yards. - A. There was not at the time Mr. Swinton lived there, but since December last there has been a communication; I have the use of the yard since Mr. Swinton left it.

Q. Does not Mr. Swinton live in one of the houses now. - A. No.

Q. Have not you kept out of the way to avoid appearing before the commissioners of bankrupts respecting Mr. Swinton's debts. - A. I have not.

Q. Do you know that the young man has given information to the assignees of Mr. Swinton's concealinghis effects, and of your assisting him. - A. I know nothing of the kind.

Q. Do you mean to say that you never heard that he gave information of that. - A. I have heard it about a week or a fortnight back, I believe it came from his own mouth.

Q. No, it came from better mouths than either his or yours; this young man was your clerk at Christmas, and from then you would have us believe that Mr. Swinton had nothing to do with the business; upon your oath did not Mr. Swinton settle the accounts with him from Christmas last. - A. No, never, except it might be a week or two I was out of town, and then Mr. Swinton gave it to me.

Q. You have given a large sum of money for this situation, what situation have you been in before this. - A. I have been a housekeeper to Mr. Swinton, not because I was obliged to do it.

Q. Who do you pay the rent to. - A. To Mr. Emden of Furnival's inn.

Q. The prisoner went away from his business on the Tuesday and came again on the Wednesday. - A. Yes.

Q. At which time the officer took him, was Mr. Swinton there when the note was found. - A. Not exactly, he was as near as me.

Q. He had been in the room with the officer. - A. Yes.

Q. What time of the day was it. - A. I suppose about half past nine in the morning.

Court. Had Mr. Swinton been in the room before the note was found in the hat. - A. No, I was the first person that went into the room when the officer came, Mr. Swinton was in the house at that time.

Mr. Gurney. Hall had left your house on the Tuesday night, at his usual time he came again the next day and brought the note which you charge him with taking in his hat. - A. Yes.

JOHN WEATHERFIELD sworn. Examined by Mr. Alley. I am a sheriff's officer. On the 10th of June Mr. Swinton desired me to assist Kimber in taking the prisoner into custody; we apprehended him in Mr. Swinton's house in Salisbury square.

Court. You say at Mr. Swinton's house. - A. That is where they fell the Daffy's elixir.

Mr. Alley. What part of the house was he in when you took him in custody. - A. He was in the front parlour.

Q. Who was in the front parlour besides you and Kimber and the prisoner. - A. Mr. Swinton and Mrs. Kerslake.

Q. Did you see him searched. - A. I did, there was a two pound bank note found in his hat, the hat was upon a box about two yards from where the prisoner sat, Mr. Swinton called me out of the room and told me to search him closer, for he was sure he had not time enough to make away with it, he had not time enough to pass the note away.

Q. You have got a paper in your hand, is that the note you found in the hat. - A. It is.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney.

Q. Who was it that fetched you on Tuesday evening. - A. Mr. Swinton came on the Tuesday, I was out, he came again on the Wednesday morning.

Q. You and Kimber proceeded to search the prisoner. - A. Yes, we found him in the parlour and Mr. Swinton, we searched him.

Q. I dare say when Kimber and you were searching him, you were very attentive to what you were about. - A. We were.

Q. And being attentive to what you were about, you did not keep your eye upon the hat. - A. We did.

Q. You went out of the room before you found the note in the hat; while you and Kimber were searching who was attending the hat. - A. I did.

Q. You did not stand watching the hat as I stand watching my bag. - A. No.

Q. After he was searched Mr. Swinton took you out of the room, and said, I know he has not had time to pass it away. - A. Yes, and he said he suspected it was about the hat.

Q. And then he came with you, who was it that suggested first upon looking into the hat. - A. It was me, the hat was laying with the open part upwards, I searched the hat first of all between the hat and the lining, then I saw the leather which is over the lining, I put my finger there and the note came out.

Q. It would not take long putting in there you know. - A. I cannot say nothing about that.

Q. It was put snug there, so that it could not be perceived by the wearer. - A. It could not he perceived by any body.

WILLIAM KIMBER sworn. Examined by Mr. Gleed. Q. What are you. - A. I am constable of the city of London.

Q. On the 10th of June were you called upon to attend at Mrs. Kerslake's house in Salisbury-square. A. I do not know whose house it was, I went to No. 46, at the shop where Daffy's elixir is sold, I searched the prisoner and found nothing on him.

Q. At the time that you began searching the prisoner what persons were in the room. - A.Mr. Swinton, Mrs. Kerslake, Weatherfield, myself, and the servant maid; I was present when the hat was searched, I saw the note pulled out by Weatherfield; the same persons were present when the hat was searched; I took the prisoner to the Counter, I then went to the prisoner's house 250, Bermondsey-street, Mr. Swinton, Mrs. Kerslake, and Weatherfield went with me, we searched his house, and in a room up stairs in a chest of drawers we found a silver table spoon, I presented the spoon to the lady, and afterwards I gave it to Weatherfield.

Q.(to Weatherfield) Did you receive the spoon from the last witness. - A. I did, I produce it.

Prosecutrix. It is my spoon, we had a careless servant, she used my spoons in the kitchen in the common way, she notched the edge of it; and this is the note I received at Messrs. Fishers's and Wells, I observe here is some casting up at the back of it.

Mr. Gurney. There is no mark on the spoon, there is no cyphers nor crest, you cannot swear to the spoon, because your cook stirred the pot with it you are not the only person that has had a careless servant that used a spoon in that way, how long had you missed this spoon. - A. About three months.

Jury. We do not find any notch on the spoon.

Mr. Gurney. (to Kimber) When you searched the prisoner you found a pocket book, have you got thepocket book. - A. I never had the pocket book in my possession.

Q.Upon your oath did not you give it to Mr. Swinton or to Mrs. Kerslake. - A. I cannot say.

Weatherfield. He gave it to me, I gave it back to the prisoner.

Q. Did not you take out all the memorandums, and give them to Mr. Swinton. - A. I gave two memorandums to Mr. Swinton, he said it was his weekly accounts; Mr. Swinton took them.

ANTHONY DAFFY SWINTON sworn. Examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Were you present at the time the prisoner at the bar was searched at Salisbury-square. - A. Part of the time I was, I partly saw him searched.

Q. During the time that you was there was any thing produced by either of the officers as being found upon him elsewhere. - A. There was a paper containing a copy of weekly accounts in red ink of Mrs. Kerslake's, I gave it to Mrs. Kerslake.

Court. (to Mrs. Kerslake) Have you got it here. - A. No, I believe I have destroyed it; it was only figures in red ink.

Mr. Swinton. He has been in the habit of keeping the same account with me.

Mr. Alley. Did you desire the constable to take up the hat. - A. I did not to my recollection, nor any body else in my hearing.

Q. Was there a note produced. - A. There was a note produced in the parlour; I do not recollect seeing it found; it was shewn to me after it was found.

Q. Upon your oath had you ever seen that note before it was produced to you by the constable. - A. I never had.

Mr. Gurney. When did this happen. - A. I am not quite perfect as to the day, it was on the 11th I believe.

Q. You had been in the house on the 10th. - A. I believe I had.

Q. Do you not know that you had. - A. I am not certain, I must have been there.

Q. I know you must have been there. - A. I had been there because I went over the water with Mrs. Kerslake to the Borough.

Q. What time were you there. - A. I was there in the morning, at noon, and in the evening.

Q. And by accident you was there the next morning. - A. I was there expressly for the purpose the next morning.

Q. Then it was not by accident you were there the next morning. - A. No.

Q. I suppose you told the officer to search, and you, and Mrs. Kerslake retired to another room. - A. I called them out and told them to be particular in searching, for one grand reason, because I knew him to be a very artful man.

Q. When was it Mr. Swinton that you had the misfortune to become a bankrupt. - A. It was sometime in March that the commission was issued.

Q. You were anxious to get the commission superseded. - A. I do not know whether I am obliged to give you an answer, if his lordship orders it I shall.

Court. Do you not know that Hall had given an unfavourable account of you on the 10th of June. - A. I knew it on the 11th when his house was searched.

Mr. Gurney. Perhaps you do not know that Mr. Hall had given any information of your concealing your property. - A. I did not at that time; I knew it on the 11th, I traced it by a letter to Mr. Hindman, and also a letter to the solicitor of the stamp office, wherein Mr. Hall had given information of Mrs. Kerslake selling medicines without stamps, whereas he had concealed these stamps.

Q. How long has this been Mrs. Kerslake's house. - A. I think she took it of Mrs. Steele, who was a tenant of mine.

Q. You have visited this young man in Newgate. - A. No.

Q. In the Counter then I suppose - A. I did, twice.

Q. Now, Mr. Swinton, I ask you this question, attend to the question, and give a deliberate answer, did you upon either of the occasions upon your visiting him in the Counter, tell him that you would forbear prosecuting him, provided he would sign a paper tendered by you to him, respecting all that he had sworn, denying what he had sworn before the commissioners. - A. I never said any thing to him, he put the question to me, he asked me to forfeit my recognizance, I said how can you expect that of me when you have acted so unjustifiable; I never did tender a paper to him, I sent my son with a paper for him to sign, but without any conditions annexed to it, my counsel has the paper at this moment, my son brought it back unsigned. (A paper handed to the witness.) That is the paper. (The paper read, in court, and two letters sent by the prisoner to the witness.)

Q. Then you wanted this man to sign a paper that he had been guilty of perjury, without holding out any promise whatever. - A. I did.

Q. You told me that Mrs. Kerslake took this house last May twelvemonth, of Mrs. Steele, who was a tenant of your's, who paid the rent of that house. - A. The two last half years she has paid the rent to Mr. Emden of Furnival's-inn.

Q. Do you mean to tell me, upon your oath, that Mrs. Kerslake has ever paid you any rent for that house, to you bona fide payment, aye or no; I am asking about the rent of that house she took of Mrs. Steel, whom you say was your tenant, while Mrs. Steel was your tenant she was to pay it to you; has Mrs. Kerslake paid you any rent. - A. No, she has paid it to Mr. Emden, who purchased the house of me, I did not wish it to he known, I disposed of it to Mr. Emden, about two years ago.

Q. Did not you direct Weatherfield to search the hat. - A. I desired him to search his hat, his neckcloth, and every where else.

ANTHONY DAFFY SWINTON , JUNIOR, sworn. Examined by Mr. Gleed. Q. You are the son of Mr. Swinton, do you know the hand writing of Mr. Hall. - A. I have frequently wrote at the same table with him.

Q. Did you accompany your father to the Counter. - A. I did.

Q. Was the prisoner Hall there. - A. He was.

Q. Was any thing said by your father to induce Hall to make the communication, whatever it might be, that was made. - A. No.

Q. Was that communication, whatever it might be, afterwards reduced to writing. - A. It was, I heard the communication made by Hall, and what was reduced to writing was the communication made by Hall in my presence, as near as possible, word for word.

Q Is this the paper. - A. It is, I took it to Mr. Hall, I asked him whether he would swear to the contents of this paper; he read it over and said he had no objection, except at the beginning something about Mrs. Kerslake, he said my father ought to come himself, and then he would have done it.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney.

Q. Without any sort of promise made by your father, he opened his mouth and said all this. - A. No, he began crying when my father went in, and said how good a master he had been to him.

Q. You did not ask him to sign it. - A. No, I only asked him to swear to it, I wanted him to write it down, I did not want him to copy that, but to write it out of his own head.

Q. He said he would swear to it if your father came. - A. Yes.

Q. You did not tell your father that he had refused to sign it. - A. No, I told my father if he would go he would do it, I never asked him to sign it, but to swear it when he had writ it over.

Prisoner's Defence. My observation to that is, that it is all false. When I was in the Poultry Counter I wrote to Mr. Swinton to come there, that was only to know from him what he had put me there for; at that time I never knew what it was for. On Tuesday morning Mrs. Kerslake had been out twice, once she went out to market, she put some money in a canvas bag, which Mr. Swinton bought for the purpose during the whole time I settled the books with him, and she was put out of the way that she should not be subpoena'd; I said to Mrs. Kerslake I do not think you have lost the two pound note, Mr. Swinton said, no d - n her, she has not lost the two pound note no more than you have; about half an hour after that he said, will you go up and look for Dr. Brodum's day book, he said you had better take off your coat you will dirty it; I thought he was making fun of me, it was an old coat, I would not, I was going up, he said stop till my son Anthony comes in; then he sent me down to fill some bottles with Dr. Brodum's medicines, when Mr. Swinton said I might go home early that evening if I liked, as he had some gen-men coming there, consequently I went home about six o'clock that evening; the next morning I went in at the back gates (there is a communication made backwards to convey the goods from one house to the other, neither is the business at this time Mrs. Kerslake's no more than it is mine; Mrs. Kerslake keeps false books to shew the commissioners, which she has shewed me), when I went in that morning I laid my hat down, he (Swinton) said, Mr. Hall you had better go down and fill some nervous; before I had done that, he said to me, have you written out these false accounts to give the assignees, I said I have not, he said will you be so good as to write them out now, I made half a dozen pens out of some quills, I said to Mrs. Kerslake will you have the goodness now to let me have the writings to copy, she said I should have them presently, she walked out again, I sat down for about twenty minutes or half an hour, she came to the door herself with two constables, she says there is your prisoner, I give you charge of him; they searched me, and while I took off my coat Mr. Swinton tapped the officer on the shoulder, took him out in the passage and came back again, he says where is your pocket book, I gave them the pocket book, they took out a paper containing an account of what I I had received and paid, after that he tapped the man on the shoulder again, and took him out, and when he came in he said where is your hat, I said that is my hat, with that he took hold of my hat, takes out a paper, he says this is it, and took and gave it to her, he then asked Mrs. Kerslake what the note was.

ROBERT CROSS sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Were you in the Counter at the time this young man was there. - A. Yes.

Q. What are you. - A. I am a gentleman's servant, I have the care of Mr. William Wells , an insane proctor of Doctors' commons.

Q. You say you was in the Counter at the same time that Mr. Hall was there, do you remember Mr. Anthony Daffy Swinton coming there. - A. I do, on the 12th of June I heard him say if he would sign a paper on his bankruptcy, he would not come against him, he then treated the prisoners with two gallons of porter, I was one among the rest; he gave the turnkey seven shillings, and what remained out of that he gave the prisoner at the bar; I saw Mr. Swinton there more than four times.

Q. Were you tried here yesterday. - A. I was for a rape, and I was acquitted.

The prisoner called five witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

386. THOMAS MOORE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 24th of June , one yard and three quarters of a yard of woolen cloth, the property of William Trayner , in his dwelling house .

WILLIAM TRAYNER sworn. I am a tailor , I live at No. 71. Jermyn street .

Q. Have you the whole house. - A. I have the shop and back room, and garret for a workshop; the owner of the house lives in the house himself, his name is Robert Holton , there is a shop door and a private door, there is a communication from the passage into the shop and a shop door besides. On Tuesday the 24th of June, I believe about a quarter before twelve in the day, I took a piece of cloth and some nankeen and set it on the counter, the cloth might be a yard and three quarters in length, I was going to make use of it; that moment I was sent for to measure a gentleman about three hundred yards off, I did not stop above twenty minutes, when I came back I missed the piece of cloth and the nankeen; I had measured the prisoner the day before for his livery.

MARY LANGSTON sworn. I am servant to William Trayner . A little before twelve o'clock the prisoner came in, a young man was sitting in the shop at the time of the name of Daniel, they shookhands together and asked each other kindly how they did, he went out, and in a few minutes he came back again, and asked me if Mr. Trayner was in the shop, I told him no, he would be in in a few minutes, I asked him if he would wait a few minutes, he said no, he would return again, I went over the road to the green-grocer's to prepare something for dinner, I stood on the step while the woman served me.

Q. Could you see your own door when you stood there. - A. Yes, all the time; the prisoner returned and went into the shop while I was over there, and before I crossed the road he came out of the door, tucking something under his coat, and he was buttoning it; I knew he had robbed the shop, I ran round the corner of St. James'-street after him, but seeing I could not overtake him, and my having left the shop, I returned back again.

Q. He was not taken then. - A. No, a very few minutes after that Mr. Trayner came in, I told him the shop had been robbed, he looked about to see what he had lost, he missed the cloth and the nankeen; after that, in the afternoon the prisoner came again, I wished very much to accuse him of the robbery, Mr. Trayner prevented me, he said he wished to speak to the gentleman about it, sir Hugh Owen . I am sure he is the same man.

Q. When you went over the way you left the shop, are you sure that nobody went into the shop besides the prisoner. - A. Nobody went in but him.

Q. Were the things ever found. - A. No.

Prisoner's Defence. This woman now says that it laid on the counter; at Bow-street she said it laid on a board in the window; after sir Hugh Owen had got my character I was with the prosecutor in the afternoon, he never accused me with a piece of theft till he and the constable came to the stable, the constable went to my lodging, he found nothing there but my property; it was not half past eleven when I saw this young woman.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

387. JOHN HIND was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 5th of June , twelve pound weight of types, value 1 l. 4 s. the property of Andrew Strahan and William Preston ; and ELIZABETH TAYLOR for receiving the same goods on the same day, she knowing them to be stolen .

Another Count for like offence, the property of persons to the jurors unknown.

The case was stated by Mr. Gurney.

GEORGE MOORE sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. I believe you are warehouseman to Mr. Strahan and Mr. Preston, what are their names. - A. Andrew Strahan and William Preston .

Q. On the 5th of June last and some time before, had the prisoner Hind been their servant as an apprentice . - A. He had.

Q. In consequence of any thing that had passed, did you pay any attention to Hind on the 5th of June last. - A. I did, I met him on the stairs about two o'clock on that day, leading into the printing office, I saw his coat pockets were very full of something, I passed him without taking any notice whatever, I told a lad of the name of Charles Taylor to follow him, he did, and returned again in a few minutes.

Q. In consequence of what he said to you did you and Mr. Preston go immediately to Hatton Garden police office. - A. Yes, we procured a warrant, and went immediately to the house of Mrs. Taylor in Field lane.

Q. How near is that to the office. - A. About a quarter of a mile.

Q. What time do you think had elapsed from your seeing Hind on the stairs, to your arriving at Mrs. Taylor's. - A. Near an hour, the officer Trott accompanied us.

Q. Did you find any thing at her house. - A.We found some types melting in a ladle on the fire, the woman's son was melting them.

Q. Was she in the house when you found them. - A. She was in the front shop, the types were melting in a back place up a few steps.

CHARLES TAYLOR sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am a servant of Mr. Strahan and Mr. Preston. On the 5th of June, by the desire of Mr. Moore I followed John Hind to an iron shop in Field lane (Mrs. Taylor's), I saw him go into the shop, then I went home and told Mr. Moore.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp.

Q. I understood you first of all to say the house of Mrs. Taylor, you know that she is a married woman, and that Mr. Taylor her husband keeps the shop. - A. Yes

JONATHAN TROTT sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You are an officer. - A. Yes; on the 5th of June I went to the house of Mrs. Taylor, in company with Mr. Preston and Mr. Moore.

Q. It is stated that her husband keeps the shop. - A. I believe it to be so, I found her in the front shop.

Court. Was her husband at home. - A. He was not, I asked first of all Mrs. Taylor whether Mr. Taylor lived there, her answer was yes, I then asked her if she had purchased any types of a boy, she said no, I then asked her if her husband had purchased any, she said no, that he could not, for he had been out a great while (some hours); I then told her I had a search warrant and I must search the place; there was three gentlemen went with me and a brother officer, I told them to let nobody go out of the house; I then went backwards into a place where I knew there was a forge, a boy was making up the fire, I believe it to be Mrs. Taylor's son, and these letters were laying on the side of the fire.

Q. First of all what is that that is in the ladle. - A. Types partly melted, and some fresh, these were on the top of the ladle, this piece of iron was to keep them down in the bowl; Mrs. Taylor came into the shop where the forge was while I was there, I asked her how she could tell me that falsity that she had not purchased any types of a lad; she then told me she had purchased them of a lad, and she was afraid of saying any thing before; I asked her how much she gave for them, she said there was twelve pounds, and she gave three halfpence a-pound; I then directed my brother officer to take care of her, I went into the front shop again, and at the end of the scale I picked up these few more types, I took her to the office; I went to Hind's mother, I could not findhim there, I traced him as far at Rochester, Chapman apprehended him.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp.

Q. I understand that you know this woman is a married woman. - A. I believe her to be married, I knew her husband, he lives there.

WILLIAM CHAPMAN sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You are a police officer. - A. Yes, I apprehended the prisoner Hind, near his mother's house in Bowling-green-lane, Clerkenwell; when I brought him from the House of Correction, before he was fully committed, he informed me that he had been to Mrs. Taylor's four times, and at the time he sold these types she was to give him one shilling and sixpence, I understood there was only nine pound, and she was to give him two pence a pound.

Prisoner. I told him that I had only been there three times.

(The property produced and identified.)

The prisoners left their defence to their counsel.

Hind called one witness, who gave him a good character.

Taylor called eight witnesses, who gave her a good character.

HIND - GUILTY , aged 15.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

TAYLOR - GUILTY , aged 44.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

388. MARTHA DOYLE was indicted for that she at the general quarter sessions of the peace holden for the county of Middlesex by adjournment at the sessions house, Clerkenwell Green, on Tuesday, the 23d of April, 1805, was in due form of law tried and convicted on a certain indictment against her, for that she on the 27th of February, in the year aforesaid, one piece of false and counterfeited money, made and counterfeited to the likeness of a shilling, as and for a good shilling, unlawfully, unjustly, and deceitfully, did utter to Ann the wife of Albert Wagner , she the said Martha Doyle , at the time when she so uttered the same, had about her in her custody and possession, one piece of false and counterfeited coin, made and counterfeited to the likeness of a good shilling, she well knowing the last mentioned shilling to be false and counterfeit; and thereupon the said Martha Doyle was ordered to be imprisoned in New Prison, at Clerkenwell, in the said county, for one year, and that she should find sureties for her good behaviour for two years more; and that she having been so convicted as a common utterer of false money, afterwards, on the 3d of June , one piece of false and counterfeit money, made and counterfeited to the likeness of a shilling, as and for a good one, unlawfully, unjustly, deceitfully, and feloniously did utter to one John Sweeting , she the said Martha Doyle at the time when she so uttered the said last mentioned piece of false and counterfeit money then well knowing the same to be false and counterfeited .

The case was stated by Mr. Knapp.

CALEB EDWARD POWELL sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You conduct for Mr. Bernard, the solicitor of the Mint, all these prosecutions. - A. I do, I produce a copy of the record of the conviction of Martha Doyle . I examined it with the original record. (The copy of the record and conviction read in Court.)

WILLIAM BEEBY sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are clerk to Mr. Newport the keeper of the New Prison, Clerkenwell. - A. I am.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar. - A. Perfectly well.

Q. Were you in court in April Sessions, 1805, holden for the county of Middlesex. - A. I was.

Q. Were you present when she was convicted. - A. Yes, and when she received her sentence; she was tried for uttering bad money, and convicted to be imprisoned for one year, I am thoroughly convinced of her person.

JOHN SWEETING sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp

Q. You serve in the shop of Mr Benjamin Markham . - A. I do, he lives at No. 133, Ratcliff-highway. In June last the prisoner at the bar came to buy a piece of print for a gown, I cut her off six yards at eighteen pence a yard, for which she gave me nine shillings in silver, which I found fault with, I thought it was not good, I told her so, I told her to wait two or three minutes and I would look at it; I got over the counter and looked at it immediately and I shewed it to Mr. Markhan, he said it was not good in her presence, it all appeared to be of the same coin; Mr. Markham said he would detain the money, and likewise her, she burst out into tears, and an officer was sent for.

Q. You parted with the money to Mr. Markham. - A. I did, I gave him the same nine shillings I received of the prisoner.

BENJAMIN MARKHAM sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp. We understand you live in Ratcliff highway. - A. I do, I am a linen draper.

Q. You remember seeing the prisoner in your shop in the month of June last. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember receiving the money of the last witness, Sweeting. - A. Yes, I looked at them, I thought they were all bad, I detained her, kept the money, and sent for an officer, I delivered the money and the prisoner into his custody.

Q. Did you observe any thing particular about the money. - A. There were some letters and some wax in lumps over all the money; I kept the money in my hand till I gave it to Hewitt the officer.

WILLIAM HEWITT sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are one of the officers of Shadwell police office. - A. I am.

Q. You were sent for, we understand, by Mr. Markham. - A. I was, I had nine shillings given me by Mr. Markham; I searched the prisoner, and found upon her a base shilling, a good sixpence, several halfpence, a new pewter spoon, and a child's little earthen pot; I produce them, I asked her where she bought the spoon, she said that she bought them for the purpose of taking them to a relation of her's who was in the hospital; I asked her how she came by the money, she said she had taken it of a strange person last night, I told her I must take her in custody, which I did; I have kept the one base shilling separate from the nine shillings.

Q. Did there appear any thing on the surface of the shillings at the time that you took them from Markham. - A. A kind of wax was all over them inlittle lumps, it was put on them for the purpose of taking the brightness off.

MR. NICOLL sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are a monier of the mint, look at these nine shillings, and tell me whether they are good or bad. - A. They are all bad and counterfeit, by rubbing them the brass is perceptible to any one: they appear very much alike.

Court. Do you know what the wax is upon them for. - A. To take the glare off, to deaden the white.

Mr. Knapp. I now put into your hand the shilling that was found in her pocket. - A. This is also a bad one, it is very much like the others.

Q.(to Mr. Powel) You have been examined upon these cases a great number of years. - A. I have.

Q. Are you acquainted with the effect of this wax, or whatever it is, that is put upon the surface of them. - A. It takes off the bright appearance from the silver, and makes it appear to be in a state of circulation; I particularly noticed it on them when they were first examined, and there is some on them now.

Prisoner's Defence. (read in court) My lord, I humbly beg your lordship will take these few lines into your kind consideration, of the hardships of an unfortunate orphan, for so I may call myself, having no mother, and my father having left me to God and the wide world, for when I went to him thinking to find a home, he cruelly told to go on the town and to get my living as I could; unfortunately for me, when I was turned from his door I met with a gentleman who gave me twelve shillings, which to my misfortune were bad; having no gown but one I had borrowed, I thought I would buy one with the money he had given me; I bought the gown of the shopman, the master was not there, after I gave him the money he took it to some gentlemen that were in the back parlour, and after that he took it to the others that were at the door; I hopeyour lordship will take pity on my tender age, and my being entirely inexperienced in the world, and my great distress, being entirely without friends; upon my bended knees I humbly beg you will shew me mercy, and save me from utter ruin.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 17.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

389. RICHARD HOLLAND was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 24th of May , a promissory note, value 10 l. a promissory note, value 5 l. a yard of canvas, value 1 s, and twenty yards of woolen cloth, value 10 l. the property of John Burr ; and

Several other Counts for like offence, only stating the property to belong to different other persons.

The case was stated by Mr. Knapp.

WILLIAM BAKER sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp.

Q. You are servant to Mr. John Willan, he keeps the Bull and Mouth inn . - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember receiving the parcel in question in a cart on the day laid in the indictment. - A. Yes, on the 24th of May I received a truss of cloth, directed to Mr. John Lawson , No. 10, Red Lion-street, I put it into the cart with other goods.

Q. When you got to the White Hart, Holborn, you had occasion there to stop and deliver other parcels. - A. Yes.

Q. Then you left the cart with Royce; when you came back did you hear that your cart had been robbed. - A. Yes.

Q. How long had you been gone to the White Hart. - A. I should suppose it to be about three minutes, or something better.

Q. When you returned how soon did you discover that the cart had been robbed - A. I should suppose it to be near ten minutes.

Q. Upon your being told that your cart had been robbed did you miss that parcel. - A. Yes, momentary, a gentleman of the name of Spearing took the prisoner to the watchhouse in my absence, Royce came and told me.

Court. Did you go to the watchhouse. - A. Yes, I saw the prisoner and the parcel there.

Q. Was that the parcel that you had put in at the Bull and Mouth, directed to Mr. Lawson. - A. Yes.

JOHN ROYCE sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Had you the care of the cart with Baker on the 24th of May. - A. Yes, I was driving.

Q. You remember Baker going into the White Hart. - A. Yes, I stopped just as I was going into Red Lion-street to see who the truss was for, I saw it was for Mr. Lawson, I drove along to Mr. Lawson to deliver it, and when I turned round it was gone; I was in the cart, I saw the truss in the middle of the street laying down, I run directly and I picked it up.

Court. Did you see any body with the truss. - A. I only saw a truss, I took the truss to the watchhouse, I saw Mr. Speering have hold of the prisoner at the bar, opposite his house No. 4, Red Lion-street.

Q. How far was he from the truss when you saw him. - A. The truss lay in the middle of the road, and Mr. Speering had hold of the man on the pavement exactly opposite the truss.

HOLLY SPEERING sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp.

I live at No. 4, Red Lion-street, Holborn, I am a cooper; on the 24th of May as I was in my shop, I noticed a cart going past, about eleven in the morning, as the cart was going along I saw a person behind it removing a package, he was on foot, reaching over into the cart, I saw him take the parcel out.

Q. What sort of a parcel was it. - A. It appeared like a roll of cloth, I went out and laid hold of the prisoner, the cloth was then in his possession, I believe it was resting on the ground with his hand upon it; when I laid hold of him he did not resist, he said he was very much in distress, his wife had lain in lately, he never did any thing of that sort before; I took him to the watchhouse, I beleive the boy took the package to the watchhouse, I sent for a constable.

Court. The same man that you saw take the cloth out of the cart you gave into the hands of the constable. - A. Yes.

(The property produced and identified by Baker.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, nor called any witness to character.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

390. DAVID JONES was indicted for feloniouslystealing on the 28th of May , six pound weight of wool, value 8 s. the property of John Willan and company.

Two other counts the same as the former, only varying the manner of charging.

WILLIAM HOLTON sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are the guard to the Leeds waggon. A. Yes.

Q. On the 27th of May last did you go with the waggon on its passage from Leeds to London. - A. From the Bull and Mouth, London, to Hertford, is my stage.

Q. Who went with you besides. - A. William Low the waggoner.

Q. What was your waggon loaded with. - A. There was some packs of wool on the outside; as we were going on a little further than the Cock at Houndsfield, just before we came to the Two Brewers, I saw the prisoner at the bar wiping his boots as he walked along; when I went up to the Two Brewers he asked me if I would have something to drink, I told him no, we were going to stop at the White Hart to water our horses; when we got to the White Hart at Ponder's End he was there, he gave me a glass of ale and the waggoner another, I told the waggoner that man was going to Hodsdon, he had told me so, the waggoner said do not let him ride; we went into the public house, then he gave us part of another pint of ale, the waggoner then was a tankard because he was two pints, he asked him whether he might have a mouthful of meat with us for his supper, he had some; then it was my turn to ride a little way.

Court. You had been on foot before. - A. Yes.

Q. Before he came out of the public house had he told you what he was going to Hodsdon for. - A. Yes, he enquired of Mrs. Littlechild to lend him a bag, she lent him one, he gave her sixpence for it, he said he wanted the bag to put a couple of game cocks in that he was going to fetch at Hodsdon; then I got up and rid, the waggoner told me not to go to sleep, I came from the hind part of the waggon into the hay bag at the front of tht waggon, the waggoner said he would mind the near side if I would look out on the off side; in rather better than a quarter of a mile from the Red Hart he was on the off side filling his bag with wool, I saw him do it, he was pulling out the wool from the side of the pack as the waggon went on, I told my partner to go round and he would catch him at it; he went round and catched hold of him and called me, and I went to him and catched hold of the other side of him, we took him back to Mrs. Littlechild's, the White Hart; I stopped by him there till they sent for a constable.

Q. When you went back to the waggon did you see the place from whence he took the wool. - A. I searched it directly I caught him, I put my arm ever so far, there had been a great deal of wool gone by the vacancy.

Q. How was the prisoner dressed at this time. - A. He was dressed in black, and a pair of boots on.

Q. Had you observed before you came out whether your packs were safe, whether there was any hole in them before. - A. No, there was not.

Cross-examined by Mr. Walford.

Q. How far were you got from London before the prisoner overtook you. - A. I saw him this side of the Cock first, I suppose about seven mile, it was not dark nor light then, with the dust and every thing I could not rightly see him. I only knew he was a man dressed in black.

Q. Upon your oath had not he the appearance of being in liquor when you first saw him. - A. Not as I know of.

Q. Was not you drunk yourself. - A. No.

WILLIAM LOW sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You were the waggoner of the Leeds waggon on the 28th of May. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember seeing the prisoner at the bar. - A. Yes.

Q. You were called to by the last witness when he was in the hay bag, to go round the waggon to the prisoner, and you would catch him. - A. Yes.

Q. What time of the night was that. - A. About twelve minutes past twelve, we started about twelve o'clock from Ponder's End, this was about a quarter of a mile further, when I went round the waggon and came up to him, he had a bag under his arm, I took hold of his shoulder, I asked him whether he knew what he had been doing of, he said he had not been doing any thing as he knew of, I said I will tell you what you have been doing of, you have been robbing the waggon; he begged and prayed for me to let him go, I took him to the White Hart, Ponder's End, and the bag too, I delivered him into the bar and the bag too to Mrs. Littlechild, and Holton my guard was with him, I went back to my team immediately, I left the bag in Holton's care, I went back to the pack, and I saw it was cut and a great quantity of wool was gone.

Q. Did the prisoner appear to you to be drunk. - A. No.

Q. Do you remember the prisoner applying to Mrs. Littlechild for the bag. - A. Yes, I heard him ask for the bag to put the fighting cocks in.

Court. Did you see her give the bag. - A. Yes.

Q. Was there any thing in it or was it quite empty. - A. Quite empty.

Cross-examined by Mr. Walford.

Q. What sort of a night was this. - A. It was moon light.

Q. What part of the waggon was this hay bag. A. At the fore part.

Q. Was it not in a place that he must have known that he must be seen by the guard if he had attempted to have robbed the waggon. - A. I cannot say.

Court. Could he see the guard in the hay bag. - A. Perhaps he did not know that he was there.

- LITTLECHILD sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You keep the White Hart at Ponder's End. - A. Yes.

Q. That is in the county of Middlesex. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember the Leeds waggon coming to your house with Holton the guard and the last witness Low. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember seeing the prisoner at your house. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you know the prisoner before. - A.No, he asked me if I had a bag of any description, he was going to Hodsdon for a couple of fighting cocks, I told him that I did not know that I had oneof that description, he pressed me very much, he said he had brought one from home and he had left it at Newington, I told him there was a bag with a hole in it, I supposed it would hold the fighting cocks, he might give me sixpence for it, and if he returned it I would give him the sixpence again.

Q. You did not let him have any wool in it. - A. There was not any thing in it.

Q. What time was it that waggon left your house. A. It might be past twelve, they returned back in about a quarter of an hour, when Low brought him back, he said this is what the rascal wanted the bag for, I said I am very sorry I lent him the bag; Mr. Low sent Crossingham the constable; the bag and the prisoner were left in my bar, and the same bag was delivered to Crossingham; the bag had two handfuls of wool in it, and two handfuls were taken out of his pocket during the time he sat in the bar.

Cross-examined by Mr. Walford.

Q. Did you see these persons come in. - A. Yes; when they first came up to the door the prisoner came in by himself, and asked for a pint of ale to take out to the waggoner.

Q. Had he the appearance of being in liquor. - A. No, they had two pints, and one pot of ale together.

STEPHEN CROSSINGHAM sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp. What are you. - A. I am a constable; I was sent for to the White Hart, I found the prisoner there and there I searched him, this is the wool I found on him (producing it), part of it was underneath his waistcoat and some part of it in the hind part of his breeches and in the crown of his hat; I had a bag delivered to me in the bar, with some wool in it; the prisoner said he was going down to Hodsdon for a couple of game cocks to a person of the name of Cunningham; he had taken that wool to put the cocks in, and he thought it no hurt.

MR. CHARLES HUMPHRIES sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. From your knowledge of Mr. Willan and his firm, what are his partners names. - A.John Willan, James Nelthorp , Thomas Farrington , Sarah Barker , Robert Sauls , John Brandon , Joseph Bowen , William Tomlinson , Joseph Jackson , Thomas Jackson , and John Hick .

Q.(to Low) What is the value of this wool. - A. One shilling a-pound, I think there is about two pound.

Prisoner's Defence. I am extremely sorry to tell you that at the time this misfortune took place I was in a state of inebriety, more to my shame; I can only add that hitherto, and up to this time, I have had a character with reputation; I leave myself to the mercy of the court.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

391. SYLVESTER WICKHAM was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 22d of June , two pound eight ounces weight of verdigrease, value 2 l. 2 s. the property of Richard Grace and Thomas Yellop .

The case was stated by Mr. Gurney.

THOMAS MUSTON sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am clerk to Richard Grace and Thomas Yellop , they are colour manufacturers in Old-street , the prisoner has been six years in their service as a labourer .

Q. On the 22d of June had the prisoner been there as watchman. - A. Yes, I had let him in on Saturday evening, and I had locked him in there.

Q. Did you attend early in the morning of Sunday close to the gates with two officers. - A. Yes, I did not see him come out of the gate exactly, we stopped him, and desired him to come back when he was just out of the gate, he returned readily; when we all came together to Mr. Yellop's dwelling house the carman, whose business it was to let him out, was standing at the door; he was taken into the house, I told him he was suspected of being dishonest, Garret the constable immediately searched him, in each coat pocket he found a parcel of yellow colour, called king's yellow, the two parcels together weighed two pounds and a half, and within his waistcoat and breeches were laid flat and round his body. fourteen pounds weight of verdigrease, it was tied up in a long paper bag.

Q. You are the clerk, was there such a commodity as yellow colour and verdigrease there. - A. There positively was.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp.

Q. I understand you to say he came back very readily. - A. He did.

Q. I suppose from the nature of your trade it was impossible to prove any loss. - A. No, he might have taken twenty pounds, we could not miss any, the quantity is too large.

WILLIAM HUBBARD sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am a servant to Messrs Grace and Yellop.

Q. On the morning of the 22d of June did you let the prisoner out of the manufactory. - A. I did, I heard Mr. Muston call to him while I stood at the door.

THOMAS GARRET sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You are a constable. - A. I am, I searched the prisoner, I produce what was found upon him, these are the two parcels of yellow colour that I took from his pocket and this is the verdigrease, it was taken from under the waistband of his breeches and his waistcoat.

(The property identified by the prosecutor.)

Thd prisoner said nothing in his defence, called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

392. ELIZABETH CRULDROCK was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 28th of May , a petticoat, value 5 s. two shawls, value 10 s. two pair of gloves, value 4 s. a pair of gaiters, value 1 s. and an apron, value 2 s. the property of Joseph Follett .

JOSEPH FOLLETT sworn. I live at No. 21, Paddington-street , the prisoner at the bar was servant to Elizabeth Gibbs , I rented the second floor of Mrs. Gibbs; in my room I had a chest of drawers, and at the corner of one of the drawers I had a box wheremy wife kept her trinkets, and I had bank notes to the amount of twenty pounds. On the 4th of May, when my wife was put to bed I missed nine pounds out of the box; previous to the 28th I moved the remainder of my money to a writing desk in order to secure it; on the 28th, when I was at breakfast, my wife communicated to me that she had lost a great deal of wearing apparel, both of my own and hers, I immediately went to my writing desk to see if any of my bank notes were gone, I perceived there was eight or ten; I went to Marlborough-street, and took a search warrant out, Slade the officer executed the search warrant, he, myself, and the prisoner, went down stairs to search a box in the kitchen, the prisoner told us it was her box, and she gave us the key; in this box Slade the officer found two or three shawls, a petticoat, and there were some gloves and gaiters found among her clothes; there were three false keys found in her pocket, the officer tried these keys to my drawers, writing desk, and my cupboard, these three keys corresponded with those three locks; in consequence of her being found out in the theft she took a quantity of laudanum, which she said was six shillingsworth, and she said she had destroyed herself; in consequence of that I took the bottle to Mr. Lomax, he said it was laudanum, he brought another gentleman, and they gave her every assistance, he brought three drafts, she had not taken any, I told her if she would take a draft I would do every thing to save her from justice I could; they took her to Mary-le-bone infirmary, and the next day she was taken before a magistrate.

JAMES SLADE sworn. I am an officer, I produce the property; some of the articles I found in her box, these three keys I found in her pocket; with one of these keys the lady opened her drawers in my presence, and the cupboard with another key, and the smallest key opened the writing desk.

AGNES FOLLETT sworn. Q. Were you present when the prisoner's box was searched. - A. I was, I saw all the articles found, the articles are like mine, there are no marks on them, to the best of my knowledge they are mine.

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutor promised to forgive me, they had three or four different nurses, and one of them slept with me.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY , aged 17.

[The prisoner was recommended to mercy by the jury and the prosecutor on account of her youth.]

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

393. THOMAS BRACE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 12th of June forty pound weight of iron, value 5 s. and one nailing tool, value 6 d. the property of Edward Leggett .

EDWARD LEGGETT sworn. I live in New Gravel-lane . On the 12th of June I lost a parcel of old iron and a nailing tool out of my workshop, I had locked the door to the best of my knowledge, and carried the key to my wife, in case she should want it; the next morning, between three and four o'clock, I was alarmed by two watchmen, I went to my shop and found the shop door unlocked, the lock was hanging on the staple, the lock had been picked.

THOMAS LANCASTER sworn. I am a waterman. On the 12th of June about three o'clock in the morning, I was going home after I had been watching the craft, and coming across the Dock Road that leads to New Gravel lane, I saw this man come from the back of the premises with a white bag on his shoulder, he went about forty yards from Leggett's shop, I told the watchman that I had suspicion that it was linen; the watchman called to Jones, another watchman, the first watchman and me went and overhauled the bag, and we found it was iron, we brought him back to Mr. Leggett's place, the prisoner said he found the door open and he went in; we took him to the watchhouse, the officer had the charge of the prisoner and the iron.

JOSEPH WOODHOUSE sworn. I was sent for to take the prisoner in custody; I produce the property, it was delivered to me by the watchman.

JOHN INGOR sworn. I am a watchman, I took up the prisoner, he had a white bag at his back, the waterman came up and took the bag from him, we found it contained iron, we took him back to Leggett's shop and called him up, and then took him to the watchhouse; we found the shop door broken open, the prisoner said he found the lock hanging on the door.

Prisoner. I told him I found the bag as I was walking along, they never a one of them saw me in the place, nor can they say they saw me steal it.

(The property identified by the prosecutor.)

GUILTY , aged 58.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

394. JEMIMA JENKINS , ELIZABETH JENKINS , and LUCY COOPER , were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 27th of May , a quilt, value 2 s. two pillows, value 3 s. a bolster, value 3 s. 6 d. three blankets, value 9 s. a candlestick, value 6 d. and a flat iron, value 6 d. the property of William Howard , in a lodging room .

ANN HOWARD sworn. I am the wife of William Howard , I live at No. 17, Union-street, Westminster . The prisoners at the bar, Jemima and Elizabeth Jenkins , came to me about nine weeks ago, they said they wanted the room for themselves and for a young woman that lived with them; I agreed with Betsy, I believe, they were to have the room furnished for four shilling a-week.

Q. Were you to be paid by Betsy. - A. Yes.

Q.Then Lucy Cooper had nothing to do with the bargain. - A. Nothing at all.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

395. JEMIMA JENKINS , ELIZABETH JENKINS , and LUCY COOPER , were again indicted for feloniously stealing on the 27th of May , a sheet, value 4 s. the property of Edward Kennedy , in a lodging room .

CHARLOTTE KENNEDY sworn. I live at No. 12,King-street, Westminster , my husband's name is Edward Kennedy ; the prisoner's came to lodge at my house on the 26th of May; I made the bargain with Jemima only, I had no conversation with Elizabeth at all.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

396. JAMES TAYLOR was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 3 d of June , a featherbed, value 5 l. and one sheet, value 2 s. the property of Susannah Lloyd , widow , in a lodging room .

Second Count for stealing on the same day two silver tea spoons, value 6 s. the property of the said Susannah Lloyd , widow.

SUSANNAH LLOYD sworn. I live in the Land of Promise, Hoxton .

Q. Did the prisoner lodge in your house. - A. Yes; I cannot tell the day he came to lodge, he lodged with me about four or five weeks, he was to pay eighteen pence a-week for the room, there was a bed in the room and bedding, he lodged with me till the Monday after Whitsun week; at night he went to bed, I locked the door, and in the morning I missed the property.

Q. Was he gone in the morning before you got up. - A. Yes, the first thing that I missed was my two tea spoons from the one pair of stairs room.

Q. They were not in his room. - A. No; on the morning before I made the prisoner a bason of tea, and the tea spoons were there safe then; I went up stairs and missed my bed in his room; about three weeks afterwards I saw him at the Royal Oak public house door; when he saw me he got up and walked round the corner of the house, and then he ran, I ran after him and cried out Stop thief; when he had got half way down the street he returned back to me and asked me what I had lost, he told me to hold my tongue and go with him into the public house and he would give me any thing for my loss; he asked me what I had lost, I told him he knew.

Q. Did he give you any thing for your loss. - A. No, he went into the public house and called for a pot of porter and asked me to drink, but I did not drink with him; I sent for an officer and gave him in charge; I have seen the spoons since, but not the bed; I am sure that is the man.

ANN MAY sworn. I have lodged at the prosecutrix' house five years.

Q. Do you remember the prisoner at the bar lodging at the same house. - A. I do, I lodged there at the same time, I recollect the things being missing.

- CLARK sworn. I am a watchmaker; the prisoner brought me two spoons to sell about three or four weeks before he was taken up, I bought them of him, I produce them.

Prosecutrix. I can swear to these being my spoons, I have had them years, they are family spoons.

- ELLIS sworn. The prisoner sold me a bed about the beginning of June; about four months before that I bought all his furniture; on the beginning of June he knocked me up about five or six o'clock in the morning, I did not get up till breakfast time, he said he had got a bed at the public house, I asked him if it was his own, he said he bought it of his shopmate, I bought the bed, it was tied up with something like a table cloth or a sheet; I sold it, but to whom I do not know.

Prisoner's Defence. I should not have carried that bed to Mr. Ellis's if my wife had come home; may it please your lordship, I bought that bed in Spital Fields, with a view of going to housekeeping again; I went to my wife and asked her if she liked to come and live with me again; she told me she would go to service, for if we came together again we should not agree; I sold the bed to Mr. Ellis for one pound seventeen shillings; as for any of her things, I never touched them, nor did I go away with any thing.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

395. JAMES FORREST was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 3 d of June , two yards of linen, value 4 s. and seven yards of nankeen, value 7 s. the property of John Williams and James Armour .

JAMES ARMOUR sworn. I live in Conduit-street , I am partner to Mr. John Williams , we are tailors ; the prisoner at the bar about three months ago made application to Mr. Williams, and likewise to myself, to get him a situation as a porter or clerk to a woolen draper, he generally used to call every other day to see if we had got a situation for him among our tradespeople; during the time he called we missed a great many things, it continued on till the 3d of June, I saw him in the custody of an officer when I came home, and the property was in the possession of the officer, that property belonged to me and my partner; it was sent to us to make up, and we had to pay for it if lost.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp.

Q. You have known this man for many years. - A. I cannot say that I know him, I have seen him about twelve years ago at Brighton.

Q. Do you not know that this man was out of his mind. - A. Never.

HENRY COOK sworn. I am clerk to Mr. Armour and Williams.

Q. Do you remember the prisoner coming to your cutting-room frequently. - A. Yes, he applied for a situation; he has been in the habit of coming two or three months. On the 3d of June he was in the cutting-room, as I thought, with a piece of nankeen under his coat. I was talking to a gentleman that came in on business; as the gentleman was going out I turned round, and I saw him take up a small end of linen. I asked him what he was going to do with that? he replied, he wanted a little piece to face a waistcoat. I told him I was surprised at his doing such a thing in that house, for if he had asked for such a thing, I was sure he would have it given him. I then asked him what he had got under his coat, for I saw it below the lappel; he told me that was a piece of nankeen he had bought coming along, upon which I took it from him, and I looked at it. I saw it was the property of a gentleman who had sent it to be made up. I told him I could swear to the property. He then told me he was very sorry hehad taken it, and begged me to let him go in consideration of his family. I told him I should acquaint Mr. Williams of it; he offered to come by me; I stopped him, and locked him in the room. I took the nankeen in my hand, and went up to Mr. Williams and shewed it him; an officer was then sent for.

ARTHUR GOAD sworn. I am foreman to Messrs. Armour and Williams; I can only speak to the property.

THOMAS CLARK sworn. Q. Do you live with Messrs. Armour and Williams, - A. I do.

Q. Were you present when the prisoner was apprehended. - A. On the 3d of June, between ten and eleven o'clock I let the prisoner in at the street door; about an hour afterwards hearing a noise in the cutting-room I went in there, I saw the witness Cook coming out of the cutting-room with a piece of nankeen in his hand, I entered the cutting-room, and I perceived a pound of thread sticking up in the prisoner's coat pocket.

Q. Was it visible to the eye before you searched him. - A. Yes, it was about two inches out of his pocket; suspecting that he had something else about him I watched him narrowly, he turned his back to the table and took out the pound of thread and a gross of buttons and laid them on the table; I was sent to Marlborough street for an officer.

(The property produced and identified by the prosecutor.)

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel.

GUILTY , aged 38.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

396. GEORGE HALL was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 11th of June , twenty-two two shilling stamps, value 2 l. 4 s. sixteen one shilling stamps, value 16 s. one table cloth, value 5 s. one case, containing two instruments, value 10 s. 6 d. one lamp, value 1 l. two locks, value 10 s. one mustard pot, value 6 d. twelve yards of paper, value 6 s. and three seals, value 30 s. the property of Anthony Daffy Swinton .

Second Count for like offence, only stating the property to belong to different other persons.

The case was stated by Mr. Alley.

ANTHONY DAFFY SWINTON sworn. Examined by Mr. Gleed.

Court. What are you. - A. I was a vendor of patent medicines , and a proprietor of some.

Q. At the time you where so, where did you live. A. At No. 45, Salisbury square .

Mr. Gleed. You are not in that situation now. - A. No.

Q. Who succeeded you in that situation. - A. Mrs. Kerslake.

Q. On the 11th of June last, in consequence of something, did you proceed to the prisoner's house. - A. I did, accompanied with Mrs. Kerslake and two officers.

Q. Mrs. Kerslake succeeded you in the business. - A. Yes.

Court. How do you mean succeeded you, I do not understand you. - A. She lived in the adjoining house, I ceased selling medicines myself at No. 45, and at No. 46, the door adjoining, she sold them.

Mr. Gleed. What was the prisoner at the bar. - A. He was clerk first to me and afterwards to Mrs. Kerslake.

Q. During the time that you carried on your business did you make use of stamps. - A. I did.

Q. Had you many of those articles at that time in your possession. - A. Yes, we are always obliged to purchase fifty-four pounds worth of them.

Q. Had you at any time missed any of these stamps. A. I had missed them.

Q. On the 11th of June you searched the house of the prisoner. - A. I did, on account of the note that Mrs. Kerslake lost; Mrs. Kerslake, Kimber, and Weatherfield, accompanied me to his house.

Q. Who requested Weatherfield to attend. - A. I asked him on the night the note was lost to come to me in the morning; in consequence of that he and Kimber the officer came to my house in the morning, and we all proceeded to the prisoner's house in Bermondsey street; we got there about ten o'clock in the morning; the officer desired me to wait in the shop while Mrs. Kerslake and the officers proceeded to search; first of all they went into the back kitchen.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney.

Q. Your name sir is Anthony Daffy Swinton . - A. Yes.

Mr. Gleed. Had you lost stamps before Mrs. Kerslake succeeded you. - A. I believe not.

Court. Were they stamps for the medicines. - A. Yes, I am obliged to have the stamps from the stamp office with my own name on them.

Q. For your quack medicines; when you parted with the medicines, did not you give up likewise the stamp business. - A. No, I never parted with the patent at all, nor the order at the stamp office.

Q. You mean to say this, that she was to sell Dr. Brodum's medicine, and that she was to come to you for every stamp of the nervous cordial and the botanical syrup. - A. She was to have six of each.

Q. Could not you trust her with more than six. - A. If there was an order for more she asked me for them.

Q. A very odd way of parting with business. - A. I never parted with the patent right.

Q. If you parted with the sale of these goods, you surely put her in the best way you could, but the fun of this business of yours was to give her the medicine and to keep the stamps. - A. She never had them, not to this moment.

Q. It seems to me to be a nominal succession, supposing a thousand are ordered and she has only got six stamps, how was she to sell them, she must sell them without stamps. - A. She has had no more than six at a time since she has sold the medicine.

WILLIAM KIMBER sworn. Examined by Mr. Gleed. Q. What are you. - A. I am a constable, I live at No. 25, Holiday yard, Ludgate street; I went to the prisoner's house, Bermondsey street, Mrs. Hall let us in; when we went into the parlour I saw Mrs. Hall take some paper from out of the buffet, and she endeavoured to conceal it.

Q. How many persons were there in this room. - A. Only the lady and me and Mrs. Hall; she hadgot them in her hand, and she endeavoured to conceal them under her clothes, I immediately says, Ma'am that will not do, I insist upon seeing what you have got there, I took from her hands this parcel of stamps, which I now produce; we went up into her bed room.

Q. Who went with you. - A. The lady, and Mr. Kerslake, and Weatherfield.

Q. You mean Mrs. Kerslake, Mr. Swinton, and Weatherfield. - A. Yes, when I went into the bedroom I found in one drawer sixteen one-shilling stamps, and a spoon that we had here last night, a mustard pot, and three seals, and a case of instruments and a lamp, these were all found in my presence.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney.

Q. Did you come away in one coach or two. - A. Two.

Q. You brought away two coach loads. - A. Yes.

Q. And these are all the things that you put in the indictment. - A. Yes.

Q. There were four full boxes taken away by Mr. Swinton in a separate coach. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see the contents of them. - A. No, they were taken away tied up and all packed.

Q. What, did Mr. Swinton claim these four boxes as his property. - A. Yes.

Q. Were they taken before the sitting alderman. - A. They were not, he told me they contained Dr. Brodum's medicine.

Court. Did you happen to see whether that was true or not. - A. No.

Q. Then you did not seize them as stolen goods. - A. I did not.

Mr. Gurney. They were worth a great deal more than the things charged in the indictment. - A. I cannot say they-were in boxes, they were carried to Mr. Swinton's house.

Court. They may be brick bats for what you know. - A. I did not see them.

Mr. Gurney. You rather think they were brick bats. - A. No.

Court. Do you suffer a man to go with you to search for stolen goods, to take away boxes without your searching and examining them, you as an officer have a right to take every thing that is stolen. - A. They did not say they were stolen.

Q. What size boxes were they. - A. They were about nine inches in depth and fifteen inches in length; the boxes are now in Salisbury court, Mrs. Hall desired they might be left because they were going in a ship; I know not who took them there.

Q. But what is in them you do not know. - A. No.

Mr. Gurney. The assignees shall know, and what is in them, when did you see them last. - A. This morning.

Court. When you search a man's house for stolen property and they are claimed, why did not you take them with you, there would be no harm in that. - A. I should have thought it improper after leaving him in the Counter.

Q. Where was he apprehended. - A. In Salisbury court.

Mr. Gleed. There was never any pretence that these four boxes were stolen. - A. No, they were claimed by the prosecutor's wife.

JOHN WEATHERFIELD sworn. Examined by Mr. Alley. I am a serjeant at mace.

Q. Did you with Kimber the constable proceed to search the prisoner's house. - A. Yes, I fetched him on the 11th of June, I went with Kimber, Mrs. Kerslake, and Mr. Swinton, to the prisoner's house.

Q. Who opened the door to you. - A. The prisoner's wife; we went into the parlour, I saw the prisoner's wife at the buffet, she was very much alarmed and frightened, she took some papers from under a bason, she held them in her left hand, Kimber observed there was something, he catched hold of her right hand, I stood behind, he says what have you got here, I thought she would have fainted she was so much affected, he then laid hold of her left hand and found the stamps, I believe them to be the same stamps; I went up stairs, Mrs. Hall accompanied us, we went into the one pair of stairs bedroom, where the drawers were, I pulled out the drawers and Kimber searched them, we found in the drawers some stamps.

Q. Look at them stamps and tell me whether they are the stamps. - A. I believe them to be the same; we found a mustard pot and some paper, and there was a lamp found below in the shop.

Court. What did you find in the one pair of stairs room. - A. Some stamps, some paper, and some memorandum books, they were, I believe Dr. Brodum's books.

Q. What do you mean by Dr. Brodum's books. - A. They were printed pamphlets; then we went down stairs again and found this tobacco box, this lamp we found in the shop, Mr. Swinton said it was his, and in the drawer we found these three seals and these patent locks, the mustard pot and this case of instruments.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney.

Q. Now, good Mr. Weatherfield, although you are not a constable, you are a very useful servant called a serjeant at mace, you and Mr. Swinton are friends. - A. Yes, as neighbours.

Q. You have known him a long while, where does he live. - A. At No. 46, in Salisbury square.

Q. If I had enquired of you where Mr. Swinton lived, you would have told me No. 46, Salisbury square. - A. Yes.

Q. Are you a constable. - A. I was a city constable for a number of years, and I was beadle to the parish of St. Bride, but I found myself ill treated.

Q. That ill treating was, some wicked people charged you with stealing coals. - A. No.

Q. Upon your oath was not you discharged upon that charge of stealing three sacks of coals. - A. No, I deny it; the parish had an information from a spiteful man, to whom I would not pay a bill of twenty-eight pounds, I had paid it once, and because he could not have his ends of me, he told the parish officers that I wanted to embezzle coals, which I never did, and I will prove it.

Q. Then in point of fact you was charged with embezzling coals. - A. I was.

Q. You voluntarily resigned. - A. No.

Q. Then you did not voluntarily resign, you went out without voluntarily resigning. - A. I might have had that situation then and might now, I was very illtreated, and I would not serve it.

Court. If they did not turn you out and you did not resign, how did you get out, you puzzle me. - A. The reason was because I would not solicit among my friends, I told them I had paid the twenty-eight pounds, I shewed all my account, and because I would not pay the money again, they brought forward that which turned me out.

Q. They turned you out then. - A. No, they chused another man.

Mr. Gurney. Then they did not turn you out, they chused another man; on the night of the 10th of June Mr. Swinton came to you and desired you to get an officer the next morning. - A. He asked me to come and take the prisoner, I told him that I was a sheriff's officer, I was no constable, but I would get him an able man that would find out the thief, I fetched Kimber, and he said he would do his endeavour to find out the thief.

Q. You mean to say that Mr. Swinton came to you, as being a cunning man, to find out the thief. A. No, not as a cunning man, but because the parish officers did not know how to go about it.

Q. You, Mr. Swinton, and Mrs. Kerslake took Kimber, what was the room that you went into first. A. To the best of my remembrance we went along the passage into the back room.

Q. Did you all stay in that room or go out of it. A.We were all in that room.

Q. Was that the room in which the stamps were found. - A. Yes.

Q. You went into the room in which the stamps were found and Mr. Swinton. - A. He was there or in the house.

Q. I dare say he was in the house, I am asking of you whether he was in that room or not; (witness pausing) I will take the answer that you do not know whether he was or not. - A. He was in the room.

Q. Therefore if any body said he was not in the room that is incorrect. - A. Yes.

Q. You were in the room. - Q. I was in the room, we next went into the one pair of stairs, a bed room, then we went below.

Q. Did Mr. Swinton go with you into every room at the same time that you went in. - A. I believe not at the same time, because there was one kept below for fear any thing should be carried out.

Q. My question is, did he accompany you into every room at the time that you went. - A. I do not think he did, he was in and out.

Q. Your attention was not so much directed to him, as it was for looking after the things, you have been an officer a great many years, do you remember some boxes being found there. - A. I saw Kimber find some boxes, he brought them out from under a dark place under the stairs, they were brought into the shop, and there was some boxes found in the passage.

Q. Were they taken to the sitting alderman. - A. Not all, that was only one coach load that Mr. Swinton said was stolen.

Q. This was one coach load, and the other went to Salisbury square. - A. I believe they did, I did not go with them.

Q. They did not go to the alderman. - A. I believe not.

Q. You know whether they did or did not. - A. Upon my honour I tell you the truth.

Q. Do not tell me of your honour, you are upon your oath, did those boxes that were put in the other coach go to the sitting alderman. - A. Upon my oath I cannot say whether they did or not, I know these did.

Q. I do not ask you about these, upon your oath do not you know that they did not go. - A. I cannot say, I only had them in my custody, I was not with the coach.

Q. Did both the coaches go to Guildhall. - A. I believe they followed one after the other.

Q. Did you see both the coaches at Guildhall. - A. I do not charge my memory that I saw them both at Guildhall, I verily believe that the other coach went Mr. Swinton's or elsewhere.

Q. You found some boxes that were corded, and they were taken to Mr. Swinton's. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see the contents of them. - A. No, they were not opened, there was five or six of them.

Mr. Alley. You have been asked whether you was not charged with stealing coals, upon your oath did you ever commit that offence. - A. I never did.

Court. Whether you was not accused. - A. I was overseer and beadle; there was a poor woman with a large family, I gave her three sacks of coals.

Q. How came you not to examine thoroughly below stairs, before you went up stairs. - A. When the things were found Mr. Swinton put himself in a very great passion, we hardly knew what to do with him.

Q. Then you went up stairs and left him below. - A. I believe we did.

Q. Then when you returned you found all these things; now let me give you one piece of advice, when you go to examine a place let the persons be with you, now it appears either negligence of you or great wickedness in somebody else; the first thing that you found in the parlour were these papers, you then went up stairs, and when you came down again all the other things were found. - A. Yes.

MARY KERSLAKE sworn. Examined by Mr. Gleed. I am a single woman, I live at No. 46, Salisbury square, I am a vendor of medicines.

Q. Whom did you succeed in that business. - A. I succeeded Mr. Swinton the first of January, the beginning of this year, the prisoner at the bar was my servant, (my clerk) he was in the same situation with Mr. Swinton.

Q. On the 10th or 11th of June had you any reason to suspect his honesty. - A. I had; in consequence of that the prisoner Hall was taken into custody by Weatherfield and Kimber at my house.

Q. Did you afterwards go to the house of the prisoner, with Weatherfield, Kimber, and Mr. Swinton. - A. Yes, Mrs. Hall let us in; the first room that we searched was the first floor, Weatherfield and Kimber went up with me, Mr. Swinton staid below, he came up afterwards; the first drawer we opened I saw some stamps with Dr. Brodum's name on them, I put my hand on them and said they are our stamps, the officer took them immediately; we found a table cloth, we then proceeded to search below stairs, and in the kitchen drawer there were found three seals and some bottles of embrocation, alamp, and a mustard pot; I should have told you the wife took some stamps when we first went in from under a bason in the cupboard, which she held in her hand: the officer took them from her when she got up stairs. We went into the cellar, and under the stairs I saw some medicine boxes, they were all marked 1, 2, 3, 4, and in the passage there were four boxes belonging to myself, they were an order, I sent them there for conveniency, being by the water side, I was to let the gentleman have medicine, and he was to send me a pipe of wine; Mr. Hall took these boxes to his house, as being more convenient, the boxes were not quite packed; I took them home to my house; the other four boxes found in the cellar, Kimber I believe had them, they were taken to Guildhall.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney.

Q. You commenced business the beginning of this year, and succeeded Mr. Swinton, when did you go into the house. - A. I have been in the house a twelve month last March, I took it of a tenant of Mr. Swinton's, not knowing it was not Mr. Swinton's.

Q. Did not Mr. Swinton occupy both houses formerly. - A. I do not know.

Q. You were his housekeeper. - A. I was, about three years ago.

Q. You succeeded him in the business about the beginning of this year, and he became a bankrupt shortly after you succeeded him, you had all the stock and the right of making the medicines, had you all the stock transferred to you. - A. I had not all the stock, I had as much as I thought proper.

Q. How much did you pay for what he did transfer to you. - A. I do not know.

(The property identified by Mr. Swinton.)

Mr. Gurney. (to prosecutor) I ask you whether you have always gone by the name of Swinton. - A. No, I have gone by the name of Moore and of Hall.

Q. How many times have you gone to prison. - A. Three or four times to see Hall.

Mr. Gurney. Upon your oath, did not you swear last night you had been only twice; I will now produce the key to these two locks found at the prisoner's house, which the prisoner sent to me since he has been in confinement.

Court. It struck me very odd that a man should steal two locks, and leave the keys behind.

Prisoner's Defence. These articles were sent to my house to keep them from the assignees; the four boxes that they have made the excuse of sending them to my house was that they were to be sent by water; he never put any direction on the boxes, they were for a gentleman in Wood street, that order was countermanded; after he found a messenger was to be sent into his house, he ordered me to go to the inn in Fleet market to get some porters, which porters were to be none that I knew, nor should they be followed to see where the articles went; there were some small articles besides, he desired them to be taken to my house for fear the assignees should have them; since which time he has been carrying on the business, he receives the profits of the business, I settled the books with him every Saturday; once or twice he brought in Mrs. Kerslake, that I might swear that I settled the account with Mrs. Kerslake; he has sworn to a tobacco dish that I had three years before I knew him; last night Mrs. Kerslake swore to a table spoon that was my own; there is Mr. Chapman that drawed the beer, he is in court, he came into the charge room with me, he knows that when he offered me the change of the seven shilling piece I first of all pushed it from me; the next day he came to me and said, if I would sign the commission of bankruptcy he would not appear against me.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

397. GEORGE HALL was again indicted for feloniously stealing on the 1st of December , twenty-six bottles, containing embrocation, value 2 l. 12 s. the property of Anthony Daffy Swinton , in his dwelling-house .

Mr. Alley, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

398. SUSANNAH BROUGHTON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 28th of May , a purse, value 6 d. thirteen guineas and four half guineas, a bank note, value 10 l. and three other bank notes of the value of 5 l. each, the property of John Coltson Doyle , privately from his person .

JOHN COLTSON DOYLE sworn. On the 27th of May I had been in the city, and in the morning of the 28th about three o'clock, as I was returning home, the prisoner accosted me in Holborn , nearly opposite Hatton Garden, she laid hold of my arms two or three times, I pushed her away each time; she continued repeating it till we came to King's head court on the left side of Holborn, she dragged me into this court, and there I lost this money; I did not perceive it, it was done in an instant.

Q. Did you go with her willingly. - A. No, she took me up there, long enough to accomplish that purpose, I did not perceive the loss till I had come out again; in a few minutes, and before I had got twenty or thirty paces, I perceived that I had lost my money.

Q. What did you lose. - A. A brown silk purse, thirteen guineas in gold, and four half guineas; a ten pound bank of England note, and three five pound bank of England notes; there were two other promissory notes that had been taken out, and kept at home as memorandums; I had gone a few paces towards Lincoln's Inn fields, I returned, and fortunately looked down Fetter lane, where I saw the prisoner in conversation with two watchmen; she was making her escape, and I fancied they had stopped her, I desired them to hold her and to take her to the watchhouse, I said she had robbed me of near fifty pound; she denied it till she was taken to the watchhouse and searched; the inspector of the night searched her, and found the money about her, it was inside of her clothes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp.

Q. You were late in the city, or rather early this morning, you had been drinking. - A. I was a little tipsey, I had been to a dinner party.

Q. We all of us in our turn are agreeable withour friends, and when a man has been drinking plentifully and comes out in the air, sometimes he is so tipsy he does not know what he is about; when a man has had a little wine he is more gallant than usual. - A. I was shocked at her.

Q. When she dragged you into the court were you in the attitude of falling. - A. I was struggling to get away.

Q. With your struggling might not the purse fall out. - A. I will not be so severe against her as to say it might not happen, the purse was in my breeches pocket.

Court. You were tipsy a little. - A. I was a little tipsy, but I recollect every circumstance that happened.

Q. You was not perfectly sober. - A. In fact I was not.

Q. You had no suspicions of it, you were not alive to it at that moment. - A. I was not.

WILLIAM ASBURY sworn. I am a watchman in Bartlett's buildings, Holborn; when I called the time of half past three in the morning this gentleman appeared to me to be just at the watering house, and the woman at the bar came immediately after him and catched him by the breast, he pushed her off, he went strait on again, and she followed him again and laid hold of him by the left arm and his breast, and dragged him into the court immediately; no watchman being at King's head court, I ran up Bartlett's buildings, there is a door that leads into Fetter lane, a watchman was sitting there, I says to him, Cary come out of your box, there's a gentleman been robbed by an old whore in Holborn; I had seen her in the street before at different times; I had told the watchman to come after me, I said, I dare say she has robbed him, and just opposite us we saw the gentleman pass Fetter lane in Holborn, I says there he goes, I suppose she is gone, we will go no farther, with that she appeared at the top of the lane in Holborn, she came down to us, I said you have made a fine job this morning, she said what job, I told her I supposed she had robbed him; she replied, the scaly b - r had only gave her a shilling; we took her into the gate at Bartlett's buildings, the gentleman appeared at the top of Fetter lane, I said here he is, she attempted to go away, we stopped her, and when he came close to us, he says, watchman I give you charge of that woman, she has robbed me of fifty pounds; she said search me, no, says we, we shall take you to the watchhouse, we did, and the inspector searched her, and found the property on her.

JOHN TOWERS sworn. Q. You are inspector of the watchhouse. - A. I am, I searched this woman, I found this purse, which contained thirteen guineas, four half guineas, one ten pound note, and three five pound notes; she strongly denied having it; while I was searching the right side of her I heard the gold chink; as soon as I got hold of the purse, she put her mouth to my ear and said smash it, he cannot swear that I have got it; I took the purse and I asked the gentleman what it contained, I found every thing right that he said was in the purse; here are two promissory notes in the purse now of his own hand writing.

Q.(to prosecutor) Is that your purse. - A. Yes, and these were the memorandums that were in it.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going home as an unfortunate woman, I live at a distance from there, I met that gentleman, he solicited me to go with him as well as I solicited him; as for robbing the gentleman of any thing I never did, he pulled me about undoubtedly, and I found it on the ground.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

399. HANNAH LEEFEVER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 27th of June , a yard of white lace, value 5 s. half a yard of lace, value 5 s. and three bank notes, value 1 l. each, the property of Amelia Campbell , in her dwelling house .

The case was stated by Mr. Bolland.

AMELIA CAMPBELL sworn. Examined by Mr. Bolland. Q. You are a widow . - A. Yes; the prisoner was my servant , she had lived with me about three months.

Q. In consequence of some suspicion that you had you marked some notes. - A. I did, I deposited them in a scrutoire in the drawing room, I had marked some of them, but I afterwards was told that the number and dates were sufficient; I took the number of 38101, 9th May, 1806, entered John Lucy , one pound, and there was a cross to the last figure 1, I observed it when I took the number; the other number is 37291, 29th April 1806. 1 l. I marked that with a cross at the corner of it; the third number is 37300, 29th April 1806, 1 l.

Court. When had you last seen all these notes. - A. I missed 37291 on the 26th of May, 37300 I missed on the 28th of May, 38101 I missed on the 27th of June.

Q. At what time on the 27th of June had you last seen that. - A. I believe it was about a quarter past four o'clock in the morning, it was then in that cabinet.

Mr. Bolland. When did your ladyship miss it. - A. About half after six the same morning; upon missing the notes I went up stairs into my maid's room to see if they were all asleep, my suspicion rested upon three, the servant maid who undressed me, and the servant who let me in, and the servant who came home with me; I called up my housekeeper and requested her to come to me immediately, which she did. The men servants room were searched first, nothing was found; I then with my housekeeper went up into the prisoner's room, I found her in bed, I told her I had missed two notes since I came home that morning, and that they must be in the house, she told me I was welcome to search her pockets, there were nothing in them but her own property; my housekeeper lifted up her bed, found her pockets and searched them, we found nothing there; on lifting up the mattress my housekeeper found another pocket, which she gave to me, the prisoner then said it was her pocket, there was nothing in it but what was her own and nobody should see it; she attempted to snatch it, I took the pocket down stairs, and desired her to follow as soon as she had got her clothes on; I did not open it till the prisoner came down stairs; it was opened first in her presence, and various articles of mine were found in it, and among them the two notes I hadlost, one of which is 38101.

Q. What did the prisoner say or do upon your finding the notes. - A. She said she had taken them.

Q. Who was present at the time the pocket was searched. - A. Mr. and Mrs. Markham, my housekeeper, and colonel - .

Q. Are you sure that this is one of the notes that you saw at one o'clock. - A. I am sure it is.

Q. I believe the prisoner and you had agreed to part. - A. We had, she was to have gone away that very morning.

Q. Where did you discover these other notes. - A. They were in her breast, she took ten notes from her breast herself and held them in her hand, they were taken out of her hand, and the other two notes in the indictment were among that number; there was the 37291 that is marked with a cross, I made it myself, and 37300, I have no hesitation to say that they are my notes.

Q. Had you observed any thing during the time that she lived with you that appeared that she was deranged. - A. No, she was sometimes confused and melancholy, but I had no notion that she was deranged, I recommended her to a lady, I only took it to be a stupidity.

MARTHA JONES sworn. Examined by Mr. Bolland. I am housekeeper to lady Campbell; I went up stairs to the prisoner's room with her ladyship, the prisoner was in bed, we found a pocket under the matress, which I gave to lady Campbell.

Q. What was the conduct of the prisoner at the time you found the pocket. - A. She said there was nothing in the pocket but what was her own.

Q. Did you see it after it was opened. - A. I did, there was some cloth, some pieces of lace, and three one pound notes taken out of it.

Q. The other notes were taken out of her bosom. A. They were.

The prisoner left her defence to her counsel.

HANNAH FREEMAN sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Do you know the prisoner. - A. Yes, about twenty-five years, I have seen her very frequent during that time.

Q. During that time in your judgment, has her mind been found all that time. - A. By no means in my opinion, from her incoherent manner of asking of questions, and before you could answer she would go into some other subject, she would jump up and go out, and after wandering up and down, she would return home.

Court. What are you. - A. My husband is a turner in Mount street.

Mr. Knapp. Has she ever been prevented from committing any violence to her own person.

(Prisoner. That has nothing to do with my crime now.)

- A. She took laudanum to the amount of three ounces.

Court. Did you see her take the laudanum. - A. No, I was told so, but before she took it I had reason to believe she was bad in her head; that is seventeen years ago.

Q. Have you known any one act within these five years of this woman's derangement. - A. Not within these five years.

CAROLINE JACKSON sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am a dress maker; I have known the prisoner fifteen years, I thought her deranged at most times.

Q. Down to what time has she so conducted herself that you thought her deranged. - A. Within these six or seven months she lodged with me, she frequently shaved her head, she said it relieved her, and she would cut her head, she said the more she cut it the more service it was to her; I was so alarmed at it once that I called out, and I took the razor and hid it; she got it after that and used it frequently.

Court. Who did she live with before she went to lady Campbell, - A. With Mrs. Campbell of Devonshire street, she lived there about eleven or twelve years.

Q. And able to her business. - A. Yes.

JOHN FREEMAN sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You are the husband of Mrs. Freeman. - A. Yes, I have known the prisoner twenty-four years; about fifteen or sixteen years ago she lodged in Jermyn street, and during the time I went to her she was as insane as could be, she would have died on the bed at one time if it had not been for me; an apothecary was called in, we hauled her about the bed all night to prevent her going to sleep; and during the time she was out of place she used to become so wild and unpleasant, she said she certainly must make away with herself if she could not get a place.

Court. Did you see her after she went to lady Campbell's. - A. Yes.

Q. What did you observe of her then. - A. Nothing more than her coming in and winding her hands, and talking from one thing to another.

Q. Did you ever tell lady Campbell of her deranged state of mind. - A. No.

ROBERT WILLIAM sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Have you ever lived fellow servant with the prisoner. - A. Yes, at Mr. Gervaise's, Greek street, Soho; I lived with her about six months.

Q. During the time that she lived with you did she appear to be of a found mind. - A. Quite the reverse; one day we were going to have company she gave me two letters to deliver, and she cried when she gave me them.

Q. Did she ever do any thing to herself. - A. Yes, one day I found her in a stupid state on the bed, I called in two medical gentlemen, they gave her medicine, and with great difficulty they brought her to herself, this was in the year 1793.

Court. Did it appear that she had taken poison. - A. Yes, there was the remains of the laudanum in the bottle.

Court. Did the apothecaries send her to St. Luke's or any where else. - A. No.

Q. This was in the year 1793, she was discharged in consequence of this. - A. She was discharged from not being competent for her situation.

Court. What was she discharged for. - A. For a reason I do not know.

ANN BUCKLE sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp. I have known the prisoner sixteen or seventeen years.

Q. Have you known her down to this time. - A. Not for the last twelve years; from what I saw of her conduct I did not think her right in her head, when she was speaking to you of one thing, she wouldleave it and ramble to another.

Mr. Bolland. Is she the only woman that you know to ramble from one subject to another. - A. I cannot say.

Court. (to Mary Jones ) You lived fellow servant with her three months, had she any appearance of any derangement. - A. I never saw any.

Q.(to Lady Campbell) I understand this woman came to you from Mrs. Campbell, had you a character with her. - A. Yes, I had a good character with her, she lived with her eleven years.

Q. Did Mrs. Campbell give you any hint of any derangement in her mind. - A. No

Q. Did you ever observe any derangement in her mind when she lived with you. - A. No.

GUILTY, aged 39.

Of stealing to the value of twenty shillings .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

400. JOHN RUSHTON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 16th of June , a diamond, value 7 s. three opera glasses, value 10 s. 6 d. a telescope, value 9 s. a pair of milling tools, value 4 s. a brass check, value 1 s. two opera glass frames, value 1 s. and an optic glass, value 6 s. the property of George Norton .

GEORGE NORTON sworn. I live at No. 20, Rolls Buildings, I am an optician , the prisoner at the bar was in my employ nine months; I can only speak to the property.

JAMES OWEN sworn. I am a journeyman to George Norton .

Q. Did you go with the officer to the prisoner's lodgings. - A. I did, last Friday fortnight, I took out the articles from his room, at Mrs. Cooper's, Baldwyn's Gardens, what I thought was my master's.

Q. Do you know whether the prisoner lived in these lodgings at that time, or whether he had quitted them. - A. I do not know, I have seen him go in and out there.

Cross-examined by Mr. Reynolds.

Q. You do not know whether he lived in that particular room. - A. I do not.

Q. Therefore whether this was his room or another person's you do not know. - A. No.

ROBERT STANTON sworn. I am an a police officer of Hatton Garden. On the 16th of June I went to the house of Mrs. Cooper in Baldwyn's Gardens, Owen shewed me the house, he pointed out the things from his box as the property of his master.

Q. You do not of your own knowledge know it was his box. - A. No otherwise than by Owen and by the landlady; I found two duplicates, one of a telescope and one of a diamond in his box, the telescope is pledged in the name of Rushton, and the diamond is pledged in the name of Owen. (The property produced, and identified by the prosecutor.)

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel, and called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

401. EDWARD PATRICK was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 2d of June four files, value 1 s. a square, value 6 d. and sixty pound weight of iron, value 5 s. the property of Robert Walker .

ROBERT WALKER sworn. I am a smith , the prisoner was in my employ five months as a labourer ; I sent the prisoner of a message, he was apprehended by a constable, who took some property from him; I found him about ten minutes after he was out of my shop in the watchhouse, in the custody of the constable, he was searched in my presence, and some cuttings of iron were found in his pocket, and then his lodgings were searched.

- GREGORY sworn. I am a constable.

Q. Had you occasion to pass Mr. Walker's manufactory. - A. Yes, about five o'clock in the afternoon on the 2d of June, I saw the prisoner coming from Mr. Walker's manufactory, his pockets appeared bulky, and his coat seemed to hang heavy, I walked softly after him and hit his pocket with the back of my hands, I found it was something very heavy, I says where are you going my friend, he said he was going to the founder's he worked for Mr. Walker, he was not a yard or two from it; I laid hold of his pockets (he trembled very much), I told him he must go with me to the watchhouse; I took him there and sent for Mr. Walker, I searched him, and Mr. Walker claimed the property; he told me where he lodged, I searched his lodgings and found this basket of iron. (The property produced and identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's Defence. It is the first offence that ever I have been guilty of of this sort; I have always endeavoured to maintain my family in an honest way before; I have served my king and county both by sea and land.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 44.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

402. WILLIAM GAMMON was indicted for that he on the 22d of February was clerk to Sarah Rainsdon , and being such servant, he was employed and entrusted by her to receive money and valuable securities, that he being such servant and so entrusted, did receive and take into his possession a certain order for payment of 23 l. 7 s. on account of his said mistress, and that he afterwards fraudulently did embezzle, secrete, and steal the same .

The case was stated by Mr. Gurney.

DANIEL FORD sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am clerk to Mr. George Longman , a stationer.

Q. In the month of January last did Mr. Longman owe any bill to Mrs. Rainsdon for cartage. - A. Yes.

Mr. Knapp. Do you know that of your own knowledge. - A. Yes.

Mr. Gurney. Were you present when any money was paid to the prisoner on account of Mrs. Rainsdon. - A. I paid it myself to the prisoner, I gave him a check of twenty-three pounds seven shillings on Mr. Longman's banker, Mr. Down.

Q. Was that the ballance of the account due to Mrs. Rainsdon. - A. Yes, (the bill produced) Mr. Longman drew the check, and I gave it to the prisoner.

EDMUND PELL SHARP sworn. Examined by Mr.Gurney. Q. I believe you are clerk to Mrs. Rainsdon. - A. Yes.

Q. Is that a bill made out by you to Mr. Longman. - A. It is.

Q. On the 22d of February did the prisoner account to you for twenty-three pounds seven shillings paid to him by Mr. Longman. - A. He did not.

Q (to Ford) On what day did you pay that check. A. On the 22d of February.

Q. Had you given this bill to the prisoner for the balance of Mr. Longman's account. - A. I had.

Q.(to Sharp) Did he account to you for the twenty-three pounds seven shillings in the name of Longman. - A. Not in the name of Mr. Longman.

Q. Did he ever give you that check of Mr. Longman's. - A. No.

Q. You have the account books here. - A. Yes.

Q. Had the prisoner been employed to receive money for Mrs. Rainsdon. - A. He had, near six or seven years.

Q. Did he ever after the 22nd of February absent himself from her service. - A. He was away for a fortnight, which was the cause of that discovery.

Q. When was it he absented himself. - A. In April, and by order of Mrs. Rainsdon I called upon him, I told him I came from Mrs. Rainsdon to insist upon all the books and bills that he had to be given up, that some one or other might be sent to collect the money in; he said he was not prepared to give the whole of them in immediately, as he had not the last months account made up, he would endeavour to make them up in a few days and deliver them in.

Q. Did you see him again after that. - A. I saw him when he was in prison for debt, I told him I had been round for Mrs. Rainsdon, I discovered a great many bills that he had received without any account for them; I then proceeded to read the accounts over to him.

Q. Did you mention the name of Mr. Longman to him. - A. I did not.

Q. Did he ever in point of fact bring this to account. - A. Never.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp.

Q. I understood that the prisoner said to you that he would endeavour to make up his accounts as soon as he could. - A. Yes, he would return his accounts as soon as he could.

Q. No charge or thought of any charge being made against the prisoner at the bar until he was in Newgate, not for any criminal charge, but unfortunately for debt. - A. O yes, we discovered it before that.

Q. Was there any charge of a criminal nature laid against him until he was in Newgate for debt. - A. No.

Q. Then when you found him in Newgate for debt you made this charge against him. - A. Yes.

Q. That was after you made application to him to pay or give security for it. - A. I never made any application to him to settle it, I had no authority for that, I called upon him for nothing more than for him to relate to me what number of bills he had settled, supposing he would give me the account, entirely for saving the trouble of going about to receive it; I told him a number of names.

Q. You never told him of Longman's. - A. No.

Q. He said he would endeavour to settle his accounts. - A. Not at that time, that was when I took the books away he said he would settle the accounts.

Q. When was the first time that you said anything to him about the books being incorrect. - Q. The first time I went to him, I said Mrs. Rainsdon insisted upon his giving the books up; he then said he would make them up.

Q. How long was it after that when you saw him in Newgate. - A. A fortnight.

Q. How soon after you saw him in Newgate did you institute this prosecution. - A. About a week, I am not prepared to say the day.

Q. Had he any right to receive checks for your mistress. - A. Yes, and he used to get the money from the bankers, or pay the checks in, which he thought proper.

SARAH RAINSDON sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney. The prisoner was my outdoor clerk, to collect my money.

Q. Did he ever account to you for this check of twenty-three pounds, seven shillings. - A. No.

RICHARD HUMPHRIES sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am clerk to Messrs. Down and Co. I produce a check drawn by Mr. Longman and Dickenson upon Messrs. Down and Co. the check I paid, I cannot say to whom (the check read in court), I placed it to Mr. Longman's account I suppose.

Prisoner's Defence. If I understand Mr. Sharp right, he says I left Mrs. Rainsdon's service without making up my accounts; I made up my accounts to the last day of April, sometimes I made up my account in one month, sometimes two, and sometimes it was three months; I made up my account last April to the amount of sixty-three pound odd.

Court. That you made up the account there is no doubt, but the question is whether you brought to account the sum received of Mr. Longman.

Mr. Sharp. He delivered in an account with the names of the people he had received from, but not with the name of Longman, I had no return of the money he had received from Longman.

Prisoner. When Mr. Sharp and Mrs. Rainsdon came to Newgate, I said I would rectify the mistake.

Mr. Sharp. Mr. Gammon did ask me for the books and the account again, I had no authority from Mrs. Rainsdon to give them back nor to answer him; on Saturday night the 26th of April, when I went to him by Mrs. Rainsdon's orders, I went to him at his own house, I told him I came by Mrs. Rainsdon's order for him to give up all his books or bills, he then said his accounts were not made up, but they would in two or three days; he then delivered me a book and part of a book that he had and some bills, and he said in two or three days he would give a final account; on the Wednesday after he gave in the account and what monies he had paid me, which was eight shillings in cash; I then supposed the accounts would balance, until I went to collect the money.

Q. Did you see him afterwards, - A. Never till I saw him in prison.

Q. When you saw him in prison did he then say he wished to have an opportunity to correct them. - A. No, the answer made me was, that if he was outof prison he could go to sea-port towns and earn a great deal of money; I had no more talk with him.

Q. How much was the deficiency in his accounts. - A. I discovered a deficiency of one hundred and seventy odd pounds.

Q. Was the prisoner in the habit of receiving to a large amount. - A. To the amount of an hundred pounds at different times.

Mr. Knapp. I should think a mistake in a hundred pounds, as it is in various sums, might easily happen in the best books that ever were kept. - A. I am happy to say I never had such a mistake.

Q. To a man not so correct as you it might happen. - A. It might be possible.

The prisoner called thirteen witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 47.

[The prisoner was recommended to mercy by the jury.]

Confined Six Months in Newgate , and fined One Shilling .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

403. ELIZABETH CURRY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 12th of May , three pewter pots, value 3 s. the property of Peter Emans.

PETER EMANS sworn. I live at the corner of Burlington street, Swallow street; on Monday the 12th of May, about ten o'clock in the morning, from information I found the woman in custody, and some of the pots were found upon her.

WILLIAM DANIEL sworn I am pot boy to Mr. Emans; on the 12th of May, about ten o'clock in the morning, as I had a strap of pots, I saw the prisoner standing at No. 3, New Burlington street, I went home and took the pots off from the strap, I went out again to get in more on the left hand side of the way, I went down the area of No. 14, to get my pots, I heard a noise with the pots, I ran up immediately, and found the woman was gone off with three quart pots under her clothes, I then hallooed to her twice, and the second time I hallooed to her she dropped the pots from under her clothes and ran away, I followed her to Berwick street, I and another person brought her back; I am sure she is the same woman.

Q. What became of the pots. - A.(prosecutor) I picked them up.

(The pots identified by the prosecutor.)

The prisoner said nothing in her defence, nor called any witnesses to character.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

404. EDWARD SWINNEY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 25th of May , twenty pound weight of lead, value 5 s. the property of Philip Dauncy , Esq.

Second Count for like offence, only stating it to be the property of different persons.

The case was stated by Mr. Knapp.

JOHN OWEN sworn. Q. You are a porter belonging to Gray's Inn coffee-house. - A. I am; on Sunday the 25th of May I saw the prisoner upon the top of the building in Holborn court , I saw him walk backwards and forwards, I gave information to one of the waiters; I am sure the prisoner is the person, he was there by himself.

GEORGE GRAHAM sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. What are you. - A. I am one of the porters to Gray's Inn; in consequence of information I went to Mr. Dauncy's chambers, I met the prisoner on the third pair of stairs, I asked him what he had got under his coat, he said a little bit of lead, he put it down and I took it up; I produce it; I went with the plumber's man to match the lead with the place, it fitted exactly.

- GUNDY sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am one of the porter's of Gray's Inn, I went up stairs and met the prisoner at the bar coming down, I perceived he had got something under his coat, the edge appeared like lead, he put it down, I knew him before by being a workman on the place belonging to Mr. Mansfield.

MATTHEW LAWRENCE sworn. I am a servant to Mr. Covey, a plumber, I fitted the lead to the place and it exactly tallied.

Q. How much is there taken. - A. Ten pounds all but two ounces, there was a considerable quantity beside this that had been taken off; it was first entered with a knife, and then tore off.

Court. What was he. - A. A bricklayer's labourer.

THOMAS QUIN sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You I believe are the steward of Gray's Inn. - A. I am; at No. 2, Holborn court, Mr. Dauncy is the proprietor of the chambers.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going to a country job to Dover barrack buildings, I went up for my tools, I found this lead, and I was going to bring it home for safety to my master.

Q.(to Mr. Quin) Was the roof repairing at that time. - A. It has been repaired some little time past, I do not think it was under repair at the time the lead was stole.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and during that time to be publicly Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

405. MARY STEVENS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 22d of June , a silver watch, value 2 l. two half guineas, a seven shilling piece, and four shillings, the property of James Bliss , in the dwelling house of James Purcell .

JAMES BLISS sworn. I am a bricklayer , I live in Queen street, Oxford street; I was passing through St. Giles's; the prisoner accosted me and asked me to give her something to drink, which I did, I then went with her to her room, No. 8, Bembridge street, St. Giles's , we had some conversation, I laid on the bed and went to sleep.

Q. What time of the day was this. - A. Between seven and eight in the afternoon; when I awoke I found myself in the hands of James Purcell the landlord, and the watchman, they pulled me off the bed and threatened to send me to the watchhouse, but in consequence of my good behaviour they did not, I told them I was robbed and I should know the womanagain if I saw her.

Q.Were you sober. - A. I cannot say I was, I knew what I had been doing, and I remember what I had; my watch was found three or four days afterwards in the bed, but the money was never found.

MICHAEL LEAYE sworn. I apprehended the prisoner at the bar on the 26th; on going to Bow street she acknowledged she robbed the man and she had spent the money, and she had took the watch, it was hid in the house somewhere; I searched her room, I shaked the bed, I heard the chain of the watch jingle in the bed where the man said he was with her, I took the watch from out of the tick of the bed, it was amongst the feathers.

(The watch produced and identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's Defence. He told me he would give me the watch for an ilicit purpose, he having no money, he did not come with any money to me for three nights after he gave it me, and without he gave me some money I did not mean to give it him back again.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

406. ROSE KITE and CATHARINE GOGAN were indicted for feloniously making an assault in the King's highway, upon Philip Finch , putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will a key, value 4 d, a thimble, value 1 d. and a shilling, his property .

PHILIP FINCH sworn. I am a tailor , I live in Stacy street; on Sunday morning the 29th of June, I met two young men, they asked me to have a drop of beer together with them, I staid with them about an hour, I parted with them and went up Diot street (I was going to take a little walk in the country); the two prisoners shoved me down in the open street, and took these articles from me.

Q. They found you in liquor and pushed you down. - A. Yes, I had been drinking porter, we had three pots between us three.

WILLIAM BLACKMAN sworn. I am an officer; on Sunday the 29th of June about half past eleven o'clock I was going down Diot street, I was informed there was a man that had been used ill, I searched the prisoners in the watchhouse; under the arm pit of Kite I found this key and thimble, and under the arm pit of Gogan I found this shilling and three halfpence, I suppose they had no pockets, it is their plant, as they call it; I went to the prosecutor's house, and the key fitted his drawers.

Q. And the thimble fitted his finger. - A. Yes.

- BELL sworn. I was passing the end of Bembridge street on Sunday the 29th of June; I saw a great number of people ghting, which is no uncommon thing there, I went up to make peace if it was in my power; the prosecutor was certainly ill used, he was bleeding, the prosecutor gave me charge of these two prisoners for robbing him; there were a a great many of them fighting, the prosecutor had knocked them down and they were bleeding; I took them to the watchhouse, Blackman came in and searched them; I saw the property found on them exactly as he has described.

Q.(to prosecutor) You had rather a bit of a bustle there had not you, they struck you and you struck them again, or was some of them taking your part now was it, there was some of the women beat. - A. I cannot tell whether some of them took my part or not.

Kite's Defence. When I came to the end of Diot street I saw a great many people, I saw him fall over the girls he was with, and some of the people lifted him up, the girl got up and ran up the street, I stood against the side of the Maidenhead, I saw the key and thimble lay on the ground, I picked them up; he said that us two girls had robbed him of fourteen shillings.

Q.(to Mr. Bell) Did he charge the prisoners with having robbed him of fourteen shillings. - A. He did mention having lost fourteen shillings; there was only this one shilling found.

Gogan's Defence. I was in Diot street, and as I was standing there this man was quarrelling with several girls, he said they had robbed him of fourteen shillings, he said I was one of the girls; Mr. Blackman found a shilling in my bosom, which was my own, he then said he had lost fourteen shillings, and when he was at Bow street he said he lost only one shilling.

BOTH - NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

407. WILLIAM MARSHALL was indicted for that he on the 10th of April was servant to William Richards , and employed by him to receive money, and being such servant, did receive and take into his possession the sum of 5 l. 9 s. 9 d. and afterwards feloniously did embezzle, secrete, and steal the same .

WILLIAM RICHARDS sworn. I am a broker , I live at No. 3, Broker row, Long Acre, the prisoner was a common porter that was in the market; on the 10th of April I sent him out with goods to deliver to Mr. George Harvey , I gave him a receipt to give when the money was paid to him, he received the money and never returned with it; I never saw him from that time to the 26th of May; I was going down Drury lane, I saw him come out of his own lodgings, I immediately took hold of him and took him to my house to give me an account of what he had done with the money, he told me he had lost it, I took him to Bow street, he told the magistrate he had a hole in his breeches pocket, and he had lost it out of that pocket.

GEORGE HARVEY sworn. I am a schoolmaster, I live in Tuston street, Westminster; on the 10th of April I bought some goods of Mr. Richards, the prisoner brought them and a bill and receipt, I paid him five pounds, nine shillings, and nine pence.

(The bill and receipt produced in court.)

Prisoner's Defence. (read in court) May it please you, my lord, the defendant was employed by Mr. Richards to deliver for him as porter, certain goods and articles, and on the delivering of the same to give a bill and receipt for the same, for five pounds nine shillings and ninepence, which he the said defendant did receive in cash of Mr. Harvey, and the said defendant returned home in order to return the cash to Mr. Richards, when to his great astonishment he could not find the money he had received, but by some accident found he had lost the same, which misfortune prevented him from returning, but the plaintiff immediately procured a warrant and had the defendanttaken into custody, the said defendant on account of his confinement was unable to support his family or of paying the said money, and wishing to make some compensation to the defendant for the loss he had sussained, wrote the plaintiff a letter, desiring him to grant him his liberation, and he would repay him by instalments, but instead of that the plaintist has proceded to the utmost rigour of the law; the defendant therefore humbly prays that his innocence will appear in not making away or disposing of the said money, but having lost it by accident, and not with intent of any fraud, or to wrong him of it by any means whatsoever.

Q.(to prosecutor) What was his character before this happened. - A. I had only been six weeks in business, I saw many people employ him, I had employed him and entrusted him with money before, but not to that amount; he says he lost the money, they said at his lodgings he had not done a stroke of work since.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

408. JANE WILSON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 7th of June , a gown, value 12 s. the property of John Horwood .

SARAH HORWOOD sworn. I am the wife of John Horwood , I lost my gown on the 7th of June, it was taken off a pole from a two pair of stairs window, I did not see her take it, I only know by a person who saw her take it, I had not left it on the pole ten minutes before it was taken, and at the time it was taken I was in my own place.

JOHN TOWNSHEND sworn. I am a pawnbroker, No. 66, Long Acre, I produce the gown, I did not take it in of the prisoner, it was pledged by her daughter on the 9th of June.

JOHN SMITH sworn. I am an officer, I went to the prisoner's lodgings, Short's Gardens, I searched and found the ticket of a gown pledged for eight shillings, I found the sleeve belonging to the gown, I took her in custody; I produce the duplicate, I found it under her arm pit.

(The property identified by the prosecutrix.)

Prisoner's Defence. I take in washing, I took that gown of Mary Mays , I have washed for her two years; I told the prosecutrix if she would go with me I would go after the woman and find her; she was at my house, I told her my husband was coming home to breakfast, she stopped all the time my husband was there, and she sent out for something to drink, she said she would not hurt me; when my husband was gone she locked the door, and would not give me liberty to go, I asked her over and over, and she would not then let me go; I have three small children, I am an innocent woman.

Q. How came you by the duplicate. - A. This woman was in my place on Saturday, and asked me to let my daughter pledge it for her.

GUILTY , aged 27.

Confined One Week in Newgate , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

409. CATHERINE KITE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 19th of June , a waistcoat value 5 s. the property of William Key .

The prosecutor not appearing in court, his recognizance was ordered to be estreated, the prisoner, was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

410. JOHN JONES alias LAZARUS EDWARDS, alias WILLIAM LYONS , alias WILLIAM PRESTON , was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 18th of May , three silver table spoons, value 30 s. two silver desert spoons, value 10 s. one silver gravy spoon, value 20 s. seven silver tea spoons, value 7 s. two silver salt spoons, value 2 s. two silver sauce ladles, value 15 s. a silver pepper castor, value 5 s. one pair of silver sugar tongs, value 5 s. one silver caddy ladle, value 1 s. the property of Ann Thornburgh , widow , ten gowns, value 10 l. one velvet spencer trimmed with lace, value 2 l. two laced cloaks, value 10 l. three yards of laced trimmings for a gown, value 10 l. one lace frill, value 2 s. one chip hat with a lace veil, value 1 l. one silk handkerchief, value 1 s. one pair of shoes, value 5 s. and three petticoats, value 15 s. the property of Clarissa Thornbugh , spinster , in the dwelling house of Ann Thornburgh .

ANN THORBURGH sworn. Q. You are a widow. - A. Yes, I live in Devonshire-street, Queen's-square .

Q. Do you keep the whole house. - A. Yes.

Q. When was it you lost these things. - A. On the 18th of May, I did not sleep at home that night the things were stolen, my daughter was at home, and my servant.

Q. What parish is it in. - A.St. George the Martyr's.

CLARISSA THORNBURGH sworn. Q. You live with your mother, do you. - A. Yes, all that I know is that when the servant got up in the morning she found the house door open.

Q. What time did you get up in the morning. - A. About seven o'clock, the servant asked me if I had taken the plate from the side board.

Q. Have you ever found any of your property. - A.None.

Q. What have you lost. - A. All the articles which is mentioned in the indictment.

Q. Were all these things in the parlour. - A. The plate was in the back-parlour, which is our sitting room, and my wearing apparel were in a third room.

Q. Was any body in your house besides you and the maid servant. - A. There were other lodgers in the house, a lady and gentleman, and another gentleman of respectability.

ELIZABETH M'BRIDE sworn. Q. You are servant to Mrs. Thornburgh - A. I am, I know nothing further than when I came down in the morning I found the street door open.

Q. How had it been opened, had it been forced or how. - A. It was not forced; I went into the back parlour, I found the silver was all gone from the side board.

Q. Why do you accuse this man of taking it. - A. Because he left the house ever since.

Clarissa Thornburg . He was a lodger in the houseand he absconded at the time.

Q. How long had he lodged in your house. - A. Near three weeks.

Q. What name did he lodge by in your house. - A. Preston.

Q. What did he pretend to be. - A. An American ship owner.

Q. When was it he left your house. - A. On the 18th of May in the morning before the servant was up, the servant went into his room finding the street door open, she found that he had left his room.

Q. Had you seen him in the house the night before. - A. Yes, he had sat with me some hours.

Q. What time did you go to bed. - A. I believe we went to bed about half after eleven o'clock.

Q. Who shut the door. - A. I in general see to the fastenings of the door, I saw it fastened myself that night, I left the key in the inside, and he went to bed.

Cross-examined by Mr. Reynolds.

Q. I think you said the prisoner was sitting with you some part of the time the night before, in what room. - A. The back parlour.

Q. When did you look over all these things. - A. The day before, very likely.

Q. You cannot say with certainty when you saw these things. - A. I cannot, only my cloak I saw the night before, that I can say from a particular circumstance.

Q. Any of your lodgers might let themselves out. A. Yes.

Q. But suspicion fell on him, and you had three lodgers in the house; how many servants were there in the house. - A. Two.

Q. There was a servant of the lodgers as well as your own. - A. Yes.

Q. What time these servants got up you do not know, what acquaintance they have you do not know. - A. Our own servant we have got a good opinion of.

Q. No doubt, we have a good opinion of many till we find them out, you never found any thing. - A. Not an article.

Q. Every person in the house had equal means of getting to this property as well as the prisoner. - A. Yes.

Court. What room had this man. - A. A back room on the second floor, and the liberty of breakfasting in our parlour.

Q. Did you board him. - A. No.

Q. How came you to accuse him by the name of Jones. - A. He was taken up by that name, he was not taken up by us; on the 18th of May he absconded from us, we never saw him for six weeks afterwards, I then saw him at the prison in Horsemonger lane; that was six weeks afterwards.

Q. How long had he been there. - A. I think the goalor told us three weeks or a fortnight.

Q. You do not know of any other lodger having gone out that morning. - A. No, they were all in bed.

Q.(to prosecutrix) How came you to take this man without a character. - A. I had no character with him, he said he was a ship owner, he was a stranger, he would give me a reference in two or three days when he had cleared the ship; it was the first time I suffered a person to come into my house without a character; he did give me a reference to a banker's, but I did not go.

Q.(to Macbride) Now young woman you got up at seven o'clock in the morning, you found the door open, you looked in the parlour and found the things were gone. - A. Yes, when I went down I found the adjoining room open, I went down into the kitchen, and the kitchen window was open, I went up stairs and alarmed the house.

Q. Who did you find at home. - A.All the family, the lady and gentlemen were in bed, and Mr. Reynolds the other gentleman, he was in bed, the servant came down at the same time with me.

Q. Did she lay in the same room with you. - A. No, in the next room to me, I heard her get up and come down.

Q. Did you go into this man's room. - A. I did, I found nobody there.

Q. Had he been in bed. - A. Yes, he had.

Q. Did you find whether it was warm or no. - A. No.

Q. He had no property in the house. - A. He left his nightcap, that was all.

Q. He had no box. - A. No.

Q. Had he no property with him, no linen to change. - A.He left nothing behind, not so much as an handkerchief.

Q. Did he not bring any thing with him. - A. Nothing at all.

Cross-examined by Mr. Reynolds.

Q. You saw the kitchen window open. - A. I did.

Q. Somebody might have come in at that window. - A. They might.

Q. Are you sure that the kitchen window was fastened that night. - A. I am sure it was fastened.

Q. Supposing any person in the house to have taken this property, and to have gone out of the door, it would have been unnecessary to have opened the kitchen window. - A. Yes.

Court. Was there any appearance of the window being broke. - A. No.

Q. Was the sash up. - A. I did not take particular notice.

Mr. Reynolds. Then for what you know it may have been up. - A. It may.

Q. On any persons coming in at that window they might have shut the sash after them though they did not put the shutters up, I suppose you are a hard working girl, you generally sleep the night through. - A. Yes.

Q. Therefore any body coming up the stairs, they might have gone down again without your knowing it. - A. They might.

One of the jury. Were the shutters on the outside or within. - A. The shutters were on the inside fastened with a bar.

Q. Then a person on the outside could not have opened these shutters. - A. No.

Court. Was there any appearance of any body coming in at the window. - A. No, the window shutter was open enough to give light.

Q. Did any body examine the window. - A. I do not think they did.

Prisoner's Defence. May it please your lordship, in the first place my taking the name of Preston, wasnot in any way to commit any fraud, but merely from embarrassed circumstances; I solemnly declare that when I went out I pulled to the street door after me, I went out of town not with any view of defrauding the prosecutrix, neither did I know any thing of it at the time; I knew not of the robbery till such times I was accused by the prosecutrix, I had no other intent than to pay the lady for the lodgings.

Q.(to prosecutrix) Did not he pay for the lodging. - A. No, I received half a crown earnest when he took the lodging, the lodging was eleven shillings a week.

Prisoner. The lady said I might pay it monthly, I was expecting remittances, I actually did send her a letter, saying I was obliged to go out of town, and that I meant to send her the money

One of the jury. What led you to discover him in prison. - A. In consequence of information I received he was in prison for an offence he had committed two years ago.

Prisoner. I hope the honourable court will not suffer this to prejudice my case, I was in there for debt; there was a gentleman called there that morning; when I came down stairs I found the door had been unbolted, and that somebody had been out.

CLARISSA THORNBURGH . Mr. Reynolds, the gentleman that I said before was our lodger, intended that morning to go by the Bath coach at three o'clock; this man undertook to call him, which he did, he came down stairs to speak to his friend, he told me that he only bolted the door, he was too ill to go to Bath, he returned to bed again; he is a man of fortune and of great respectability.

Prisoner's Q.(to the servant.) Whether I have not called you up several times to go to your sweetheart. - A. He has called me when I wanted to get up at six o'clock.

Prosecutrix. She is a married woman, therefore it is not likely.

Prisoner. From my embarrassed circumstances it has not been in my power to have brought forward witnesses to my character; my reason for stopping away was I was every moment expecting to be arrested, I went to Gravesend, I was ashamed to send to any body to let them know the situation I was in; during all the time I was in that house, the house was totally free and open for me; if so be I had a bad intent, why go out in that manner, I might have gone when they had been out to the play, as the house was totally open.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 30.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

411. ELEANOR BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 17th of June , a silver watch, value 3 l. two pair of stockings, value 6 s. and two handkerchiefs, value 3 s. the property of William Simpson , in the dwelling house of John Pritchard .

MARIA SIMPSON sworn. I am the wife of William Simpson , my husband is a coachman , I live at No. 32, Marylebone lane , at John Pritchard 's house, I have the first floor front room.

Q. What is the prisoner. - A. She lives in the back room; I lost the articles on the 17th of June, I left them in my room, I returned in about three minutes and they were gone, I pursued after her, but could get no tidings of her; the man that kept her took her at Fleet market and brought her to Marlborough street; he fetched us. I have never found any of my property.

Prisoner's Defence. The house is full of lodgers.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

412. MARY BLOOMFIELD was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 25th of June , four yards of printed cotton, value 6 s. the property of Charles Parry .

The prosecutor not appearing in court, his recognizances were ordered to be estreated; and the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

413. ELIZABETH PIKE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 2nd of July , a quart pewter pot, value 2 s. the property of John Alcock .

JOHN ALCOCK sworn. I keep the Gun public house, Union street ; on Wednesday the 2nd of July this woman came into my house for half a pint of beer, which she drank and paid for, she then went into the yard; as she came along the passage to come out, she took a quart pot from the shelf and went out, I followed her and stopped her, and found it under her long cloak, she asked me to forgive her, I told her I would if she would tell me where she was going to take it to; I saw her take the pot as I was standing in my bar; I produce the pot, it is my pot.

Prisoner's Defence. I only beg for mercy, I would not hurt any person living.

GUILTY , aged 68.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

414. VALENTINE AUSTIN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 18th of June , a hair broach, value 3 s. the property of Joseph Swain .

JOSEPH SWAIN sworn. I am a jeweller , I live in Anderson's Building's, City Road , I keep a jeweler's shop. On Wednesday the 18th of June last, about one o'clock in the day, an alarm was made that my shop was being robbed, I run out immediately and saw the prisoner at the bar running away, I followed him and brought him back to my own house; on my return I found a square of the window had been cut; I cannot exactly ascertain the articles taken, nor the amount, but they are chiefly gold articles; the article found upon him is in court.

Q. Did you find it upon him. - A. No, he threw it down upon the spot where I took hold of him.

Q. How far did he run from your shop. - A. About two or three hundred yards; I asked him how he came by the broach, he said the other Jew boys gave it him.

MARY ANN HOLDEN sworn. I am going on fifteen, I work at tambour and satin stitch; I was going up the City Road with two pair of shoes for my mother, I saw three boys standing together at the corner of a little alley next to Mr. Swain's shop, I went up to the Jew boy and asked him how he sold his lemons, he said a penny a-piece, I heard the Jew boy say he helped the woman up with the curtain(that is the sun shade), I have watched the window but I cannot be positive whether he said hay or straw you have got in your hat, and that will do.

Q. Had he haw or straw in his hat. - A. Yes, one had; I walked about a yard further, and all the three boys went to the window, and the Jew boy stood in the middle, and the other boy and the prisoner on each side of him, the Jew boy took something out of his pocket, and cut the window, and pushed the glass through with his finger, and the prisoner took out a little stick with a hook at the end of it, and took the things out, I called to Mr. Swain, and the boys all three run away. Mr. Swain ran after them.

Q.Is that the same boy that you saw pull the things out with a stick. - A. It is.

(The broach produced and identified by the prosecutor.)

The prisoner said nothing in his defence; called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 12.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

415. MOSES CLARK was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 31st of May , ten pound weight of tobacco, value 20 s. the property of Richard Cook and George Lloyd Jackson ; and

Other counts for like offence, the property of persons to the jurors unknown.

GEORGE LLOYD JACKSON sworn. I am a ship owner and broker , I live in Water lane, Tower street.

Q. Where did you lose these things from. - A. From on board the ship Speedwell in the river Thames; I was on board the ship a month ago, I went for the officer, and when the prisoner was going along with him he acknowledged his taking it.

JOHN GOTTY sworn. I am a police officer; I know no more than the owner told me there was a man on board the ship that stole some tobacco, he pointed out the prisoner to me, and said he is your prisoner; I said to the prisoner how came you to be so foolish to do such a thing, I have known you a great while; he said that he saw the bale open, he took a little for himself and partner; the prisoner was a revenue officer on board that ship; this is an article of foreign tobacco, which is shipped for exportation.

Cross-examined by Mr. Arabin.

Q. Did you find any thing on him. - A. I did not, the mate is gone to sea who saw the transaction.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

416. JOHN MADELL was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 11th of June , a loaf of sugar, value 7 s. the property of Alexander Glennie , John Capper , William Henlock , and John Richter .

JOHN BELL sworn. I am clerk in the sugar house Gulston square , formerly belonging to John Fry , but now to the assignees who are laid in the indictment; I found this loaf of sugar concealed in a mat in the mill room, I got Henry Cordey to watch who took it away.

HENRY CORDEY sworn. I am a sugar baker; on Sunday morning the 8th of June I was desired to watch who came and took it away.

Q. Did you see who took it away. - A. No, it was gone on Wednesday morning, who took it I cannot tell.

JOHN CHRISTIAN sworn. I am a sugar baker; on the 11th of June about ten at night, Henry Cordey came and knocked at my gate, and told me he heard somebody going out of the gate, I went out, and about a hundred yards from the gate I met the prisoner, he had a loaf of sugar under his arm; he was standing still when I came up to him; he went back very willingly, I put the loaf of sugar in the men's room, I cannot say this is the same sugar, I did not put any mark on it.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

417. ANN DOYLE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 1st of July , six yards of cotton, value 4 s. the property of John Gardner .

There being no evidence against the prisoner, she was

ACQUITTED .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

418. ELIZABETH BARNET was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 11th of June , a purse, value 5 s. forty guineas and a half, and a diamond ring, value 36 l. 15 s. the property of John Docke Romney Rouvellet .

JOHN DOCKE ROMNEY ROUVELLET sworn. Q. What are you. - A. A gentleman.

Q. Are you no profession. - A. None at all.

Q. What do you accuse this young woman of. - A. Of robbing me in my room in the Fleet prison in the top gallery; I was there for debt.

Q. How long had you been there. - A. A month or five weeks before the 11th of June, I surrendered the 2nd of May, 1805.

Q. For what sum. - A. There were several sums, about eleven hundred pounds; I continued there until the 19th of May the following year, I then obtained the Rules, then I was removed by habeas to Somersetshire upon a charge of forgery.

Q. When was it your property was lost. - A. On the 11th of June 1805, it was taken out of a red morocco purse that property was.

Q. What property. - A. Forty guineas and a half and the ring, she took the purse and all, she lived there in the room with me.

Q. How long has she lived with you. - A. From the month of August or September 1804; while I was alone in the room I had occasion to go to the purse, and take out half a guinea to give to Joseph Smith , a messenger, I then turned the purse and its contents and my pocket inside out; after Elizabeth Barnett was gone I immediately perceived that somebody had been to the coat.

Q. Where was the coat. - A. Hanging up in the room, it had been pulled down and the nail with it, and there was no one in the room but Elizabeth Barnett ; she went away, as I supposed, to Dorant's hotel; I remained in the room after she was gone about fifteen or twenty minutes; being alone in the room I took the coat myself to put on, when I perceived by the lightness of the coat that the purse and the money were gone, I immediately felt for it and found none; having perceived that, and there beingnobody in the room but Elizabeth Barnet and myself, I did not suppose she took it to keep, but would return it; I expected her return the next day, as she had been accustomed to visit me daily in the Fleet; finding she did not return on the third day, I directed a letter to her, where I supposed she was, in Albermarle-street, to which I received no answer; I then became very alarmed for the safety of my purse and the effects deposited in it; from that time to this I could hear nothing of her till she was arrested (which I think was in July last) in an action of trover, joined in with this Dorant, to which bail was given; I did not hear any more of her until there was a public rumour of an action against her for an assault, that I think was in the latter end of November, 1805; that matter was bailed, I could not discover where she was, Mr. Sewell was my solicitor, he was a prisoner, he had a day rule.

Q. When you had a day rule did you apply any where. - A. I did at Guildhall, and obtained a warrant, which warrant was backed by Mr. Kinnard, she then could not be found, I was removed to Bath; after I arrived at Bath, and was fully committed to take my trial, a writ was issued for the twenty thousand pound, but the affidavit was made in the month of November before; I swore to a debt of twenty thousand pound, in deeds, mortgages, bonds, and bills.

Q. Have you recovered any of your things; has your action ever been tried. - A. Not yet, I have proceeded in it as far as I could; this writ was sent down to Bath by my solicitor, as well as this warrant.

Q. Then you was determined to have her both ways; was she with you at Bath. - A. She was with Dorant at Bath.

Q. Is this diamond ring found or your purse found. - A. I never could find any part of it.

Q. Of course you mentioned it to Mr. Eyles the warden of the Fleet. A. No.

Q. Do you know Mr. Nixon; I suppose you mentioned it to him, what misfortune you had. - A. I do not know that I ever mentioned it to Mr. Nixon; I mentioned it to Mr. Sewell and several fellow prisoners, but I did not mention it to the warden, because I was told he would order me to apply to a magistrate.

Q. Certainly he would. - A. I did make the application to Mr. Nixon, he told me he could not get the alderman down.

Q. When you got the rules of the Fleet why did not you prefer your bill here, you did not ask leave of the warden to come here and prefer the bill of indictment. - A. No, I thought if I mentioned it to him he would have advised me to have a habeas corpus.

Court. He would not, he might have brought you in the rules, it would have been no escape.

Cross-examined by Mr. Cummins.

Q. When did you come to England. - A. In the year 1802 or 1803, I came from the West Indies, I arrived from St. Christopher's, before that I was in St. Lucie, Antigua, St. Bartholomew, and St. Martin's.

Q. And at all these places you followed the business of a gentleman. - A. I hope so.

Where did you reside at St. Martin's. - A. With my uncle, Mr. John Rouvellet , he is a planter there.

Q. Did you live with any body at St. Martin's, as a clerk in the house. - A. No, nor any where else.

Q. Where was you born. - A. I suppose at St. Christopher; and I was brought up in Holland.

Q. What was your father's name. - A. I believe the name that I bear, I never knew my father.

Q. He was dead perhaps before you were old enough to know him. - A. I was told so.

Q. Then I am to understand you, you never lived as clerk with any body in the West Indies; and never was in any business. - A. No business but what was connected with my own; during part of last war I was an officer in the British army, in the eighty seventh regment.

Q. Then you know a colonel Joseph Romiley of the eighty fifth. - A. No.

Court. How long was you in the army. - A. I think four years and a half.

Mr. Cummins. Do you know a person of the name of Romiley. - A. I am told a relation of mine had that name.

Q. Do you know Mr. Hope, of Harly-street, Cavendish square. - A. Yes.

Q. By what name did you introduce yourself to him. - A. As myself, as a gentleman, as Mr. Rovellet, of St. Martin's; I was sent when a child to Mr. Hope's house, at Amsterdam, he managed part of the family concerns for a number of years.

Q. Have you any property in this kingdom. - A.No.

Q. No acquired property in this kingdom. - A. None, I have my remittances from the West Indies; in the year 1803 and 1804, I resided principally in Lancashire and Liverpool, in 1805 I came into London.

Q. You was quite a gentleman, having your remittances from the West Indies. - A. Yes, they were remitted to me in Liverpool by Mr. John Bolton and Mr. Stevens.

Q. Where were they remitted to you in London. - A. They were to be remitted to Mr. Hope but they have not, my family have suppressed them since last January.

Q. Then you have never been in business here. - A. No.

Q. How many places had you remittances from. - A. From St. Christopher, and St. Lucia.

Q. What may your annual expences in this country be. - A. They used to be about a thousand pounds a year; my remittances were in sugar or bills of credit, and sometimes in cotton to that amount.

Q. Who were they sold by. - A. By Mr. Thomas Stevens , a merchant in Liverpool, and sometimes I had bills upon my house, or upon the credit of it by Mr. Stevens, or Mr. Bolton, or upon those; I had credit to draw a thousand pound.

Q. Had you any one permission to draw upon any merchant in London. - A. I had permission to draw upon Mr. Hope in the month of February or March 1805; I drew several bills upon him for three or four hundred pound, they were drawn upon Mr. Hope's house, Amsterdam, payable in London.

Q. Did you send them to Amsterdam - A. No, theywere to be paid in Harley-street.

Q. I think you told me just now that you drawed upon Mr. Hope two or three hundred pounds at a time, how much did you draw upon him in the whole. - A. I think altogether six or seven hundred pounds.

Q. Upon what house. - A. Upon the house of Arnold and Co. in the Old Jewry.

Q. In January, 1805, you introduced yourself to Mr. Hope, as Mr. Romney Rouvellet, and that you expected large consigns of sugar. - A. At the time that I visited Mr. Hope, he asked me whether I had any expectations, I told him I had on or before August.

Q. You do not know any men of business in the city. - A. I do not.

Q. How were you introduced to Mr. Arnold. - A. As Mr. Hope's correspondent.

Q. You, expecting of having sugar to the amount of fifty thousand pound, you got Mr. Arnold to get an insurance to that amount, what was the insurance paid for that cargo. - A. I believe the instructions were given by Mr. Hope; I expected eighty or ninety hogsheads to arrive on or before the month of August.

Court. What value might you put upon them. - A. That is uncertain, I cannot say, because the value fluctuates according to the current price.

Q. That is not an answer to my question. - A. I cannot say exactly what sum we insured for, nor how many hogsheads we insured.

Q. The sugar never arrived. - A. No, not one hogshead.

Mr. Cummins. On your coming from Liverpool, you went into the first hotel, you being a gentleman. - A. I went to the first hotel, I was driven to the York hotel.

Q. You introduced yourself as Mr. Rouvellet and lady. - A. I introduced myself at the hotel by paying the bills.

Court. Did you go to the hotel and pass her as your wife. - A. I cannot say that I said to any body so, she certainly did pass for that.

Q. What name did you address her by. - A. Perhaps by the name of Betsy.

Q. Did you introduce her there as your wife. - A. I believe I did; I kept no company at the hotel, I was only there for my own convenience, I never saw the master of the hotel.

Q. Perhaps you like to see the servants better, did not you both live there and pass as man and wife. - A. We did.

Q. Did not you call her your wife repeatedly. - A. Perhaps I might.

Mr. Cummins. How long did you live there. - A. From the beginning of January to the middle of March.

Q. By what name did you mostly pass at the hotel. - A. Mostly by Romney Rouvellet .

Court. Did you ever go by the name of Romney Rouvellet , upon your oath. - A. I did.

Mr. Cummins. Did you ever pass by the name of colonel Romiley of the 85th. - A. Perhaps I did.

Q. What is your real rank in the army. - A. I was first ensign, and afterwards captain, when I passed into a colonial volunteer corps; I do not think that ever I called my self colonel Romney, I might have called myself captain Romiley.

Q. Do you know Mr. Adwell, a merchant. - A. Not a merchant, he is a bankrupt.

Q. Had you any account with him. - A. I believe it was a debt account concern.

Q. Do you know Mr. Owen in Purple lane. - A. I believe they are agents.

Q. Will you just condescend to look at that (a paper handed to the witness), is that your hand writing. - A. I do not believe it is.

Q. Perhaps it is a forgery imposed upon you (another paper shewn to the witness, a third paper shewn him). - A. I think that you shewed me last is my hand writing. (The paper read in court.)

Q. I believe you lived together at Liverpool. - A. We did.

Q. When you were in the Fleet you had a chum there, perhaps you do not know the meaning of a chum. - A. I do.

Court. How long did the young woman live with you in the whole. - A. From June 1804, to the 11th of June 1805.

Mr. Cummins. Can you tell me who was your worthy chum. - A. I had no chum, because an apartment was hired for me, I had a man with me of the name of William Cummings , he was with me but a few weeks.

Q. I believe he quitted your room on the 14th of June. - A. I believe he did.

Q. Till the 11th of June that young woman came backwards and forwards. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you tell your chum Cummings that she was your wife, what name did you call her. - A. Mrs. Rouvelet.

Q. On June the 11th 1805, you were in a room on the top gallery in the Fleet prison; I think you have described you went to your purse, took out half a guinea, carried it to the man at the door, then you put your purse in your great coat pocket again. - A. I did.

Q. Is that the great coat that you have got on. - A. It is not; I did not say a great coat, a loose coat pocket.

Q. What sort of a purse was this. - A. It was a purse of two compartments, one side was the forty guineas and a half, and the other side the diamond ring.

Q. Do you often wear a diamond ring. - A. I never wore it in the Fleet.

Q. I believe you have not had any correspondence with Mr. Hope since the consignment of the sugar failed. - A. I have not had any correspondence with him since the failure of the consignment of the sugar was known.

Q. You missed the purse about twenty minutes after that young woman went out. - A. I did,

Q. Mr. Cummings was with you till the 14th or 15th of June. - A. I think on the Friday following he went out.

Q. What day was this the purse and diamond ring was lost. - A. I cannot say what day in the week.

Q. Did you mention it to Mr. Cummings. - A. I did not.

Q. There was a separation between you. - A. She did abscond, I never saw her afterwards till she wasarrested.

Q. Did not you say to Mr. Cummings, that you would not hesitate to do any thing to be revenged on her, meaning the unfortunate young woman at the bar, and lamented that you could not make a charge of felony against her. -

Court. Upon your oath did you or did you not. - A. I cannot charge my memory with it.

Q. Did you ever say any thing like it. - A. I think not.

Q. Did you ever find your purse or the contents again. - A. I did not.

Mr. Cummins. I ask you upon your oath whether Mr. Cummings did not on the 12th of June find your purse and money, and that under your bed. A. He did not; I recollect some days previous to that he did.

Court. The question is whether after the 11th of June a person of the name of Cummings did not find a purse with the contents under your bed. - A. I do not recollect it; I was going to say that some day after I got up out of bed, Mr. Cummings making up the bed, took out the purse and gave it to me; I think that was before the 11th.

Mr. Cummins. Did you not then say, Cummings this is what I have deliberated. - A. I do not recollect it.

Q. On the 14th or 15th of June Cummings, your chum, left the prison. - A. I think it was the latter end of the same week.

Q. Did you give him that order (a paper handed to the witness). - A. I gave him a letter, I believe, to Mrs. Rouvellet.

Q. With an order for two or three guineas. - A. Very probably I did.

Q. Did you give him any authority. - A. That I cannot say.

Q. This is your hand writing (shewing him a paper). A. I recollect something of the kind.

I will just read a part of it to you. - I hereby empower and authorize Mr. William Dorant and Elizabeth Rouvellet , my wife, jointly or separately, to sell by public auction or private contract, any of my effects now or hereafter.

Court. He said that she lived as such and passed as such, and here you have it under his hand writing as such.

Q. This is the man that you brought the action of trover against. - A. Yes, for perjury.

Q. When does that trial come on. - A. On Monday.

Q. Is the prisoner a witness on Monday. - A. I know she is no witness on my side.

Mr. Cummins. I ask you upon your oath whether that young woman was ever in your room in the Fleet after the 6th day of June. - A. I think she was, two or three times.

Q. Was she there between the 6th and the 11th. - A. I dare say she was.

Q. Were you here last sessions in May. - A. I do not believe I was, but the session before I was here, and came too late for the grand jury to prefer the bill.

Court. That was in April when you was here, you say the grand jury was discharged. - A. Yes, I came too late, I came in company with the tipstaff, I think that was in April.

Q. You was here then either in April or May. - A. I was.

Q. How came you positively to swear you could not come here because you was a prisoner in the Fleet, you told me you never was here, what you then swore was false.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

410. AMBROSE CRAFTON and MARGARET CRAFTON were indicted for a misdemeanor .

The case was stated by Mr. Gleed.

EDWARD HUGHES sworn. Examined by Mr. Gleed. I live at the Cross Keys, Gracechurch-street. On Tuesday the 6th of May, about a quarter before two, the man prisoner came and asked me for a glass of gin, I received a shilling of him, I suspected him, and put the shilling in a particular place, I gave him tenpence change, he went away; shortly after the other prisoner came and asked me if the Maidstone coach went from my house, I said yes, she asked me what time of the day and what was the fare, I told her I could not tell; she said, I shall thank you for a glass of gin, she gave me a shilling, exactly like the other, I told her it was a bad one (I have kept them separate), she said she would go out and get it changed; I asked a Mr. Barnard to see whether she did not join couple with some man in the street; I went out too, and in a passage I saw them both standing together conversing, I said this is the man and this is the woman, if you will take care of the woman I will take care of the man; the woman stopped but the man rushed from me and ran towards Cornhill; I cried out Stop thief, and he was overtaken and brought back.

Q. Were you present at the time he was searched. - A. I was, there was some halfpence and some silver found upon him; I produce the shillings, I have kept them separate, one I marked Man and the other Woman.

THOMAS BARNARD sworn. Examined by Mr. Gleed. You were at Mr. Hughes'. - A. I was in the bar when the woman came in for a glass of gin.

Q. You pursued the prisoner. - A. Yes, I found them in a court; Mr. Hughes said, here they are, take care of the woman and I will take care of the man; I brought the woman up to Mr. Hughes's house.

HENRY BAKER sworn. Examined by Mr. Gleed. On the 6th of May I was in Gracechurch-street; I heard the cry of Stop thief, I saw the prisoner running; the moment he passed me he dropped a yellow purse with some silver, and a brown canvas bag with sixpence and some halfpence, I picked it up and carried it into Mr. Coltson's shop.

- sworn. Examined by Mr. Gleed. I live at Mr. Coltson's, Gracechurch-street, a shoemaker. On the 6th of May the last witness brought in the two bags and laid them on the ground, he said he could not stop, I gave it to Mr. Barnard.

Q.(to Barnard) Were you at Mr. Coltson's shop. - A. Yes, I was there, and took the two bags that the prisoner dropped, I took them into the room where the prisoner was searched, and delivered them to the constable.

- BAYLEY sworn. Examined by Mr. Gleed. On the 6th of May did the last witness deliver to you two bags. - A. Yes, one bag contains ten bad shillings and one good sixpence, the other contains six-sixpences and some halfpence; I searched the man, and found two good sixpences and fivepence halfpenny in good halfpence, which we returned to him; the woman was searched by two women, and nothing found upon her.

WILLIAM PARKER sworn. Examined by Mr. Gleed. Youattend from the Mint for the purpose of ascertaining whether it is good or bad coin. - A. This shilling taken from the man is a counterfeit one, it has been newly coloured, it has not been in circulation; the one taken from the woman is exactly the same, and of the same manufactory, they have neither of them been in circulation since they have been coloured, and the ten shillings are all counterfeit; some of the sixpences are of the same manufactory, and some are also good.

Ambrose Crafton's Defence. I went into this gentleman's house and had a glass of gin, I paid him, and he gave me change, I gave my wife another shilling, I did not know of them being bad at the time; my wife knew nothing of my concerns; the gentleman did not approve of the shilling that I gave her, she came out to me to get the shilling changed.

BOTH - GUILTY .

Confined One Year in Newgate , and at the expiration of that Time to find Security for their good Behaviour for Two Years more .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

420. ANDREW DEALE , alias DOWLING , was indicted for a misdemeanor .

The case was stated by Mr. Gleed.

CHARLES DIMES sworn. Examined by Mr. Gleed. I live in the Minories, I am a haberdasher. On the 26th of May last, about nine o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came to my shop and asked me for half a dozen of buttons, she looked at them and said they were good ones, she would have a dozen of them; she tendered me a shilling, I told her I knew it was a bad one, I asked her how many more of these shillings she had, she said she did not know what I meant; that moment I heard something fall, I went round and picked up a paper with a bad shilling and sixpence in it.

FRANCIS KINNERSLEY sworn. Examined by Mr. Gleed. I am a constable; on the 26th of May I took the prisoner in custody, I searched her and found ninepence three farthings upon her; Mr. Dimes gave me this plain shilling, and one shilling and sixpence.

Q.(to Dimes) What did the buttons cost. - A. Sixpence.

WILLIAM PARKER sworn. Examined by Mr. Gleed. Will you have the goodness sir to look at that money. - A. This is a counterfeit one, it is newly coloured and has the grease upon it to make it look as if it had been in circulation, the other shilling is also bad, and the sixpence is bad, they are of the same kind.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not drop the shilling and sixpence in the shop, but I offered him the shilling.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY , aged 18.

Confined One Year in Newgate , and at the expiration of that Time to find Security for her good Behaviour for Two Years more .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

421. JOHN MOORE was indicted for that he on the 26th of May , unlawfully knowingly, and designedly, did, under a false pretence, obtain three books, value 3 l. 4 s. the property of Henry Delahay Symonds .

WILLIAM SHERWOOD sworn. I am clerk to Mr. Symonds, Pater-noster Row. On the 26th of May the prisoner at the bar brought a note-addressed to H. D. Symonds, I wrote a note to Mr. Dutton to-let him know the price of-it, and that he must send the money because I thought it was a a fraud; Mr. Symonds came down at the time, I told him I had wrote a note that he could not have them without the money; he made a pause and said, perhaps Mr. Dutton wanted them, I said I believed it was not Mr. Dutton's hand writing, and the man said he came from Mr. Dutton, he was in a hurry; I asked him his name, he said John Moore , I delivered them to him.

Q. It is very odd how you came to send them when you suspected the man. - A.Because Mr. Symonds came down stairs.

Q.What was it. - A.Curtit's Botanical Lectures, 3 vols.

HENRY DELAHAY SYMONDS sworn. The man sent a note up stairs, I sent word down I would leave it to him to do as he pleased; he not knowing the man wrote a note, I happened to go down stairs, and ordered him to let the books go, as Mr. Dutton might want the books in a hurry.

Q. You thought he was sent by Mr. Dutton. - A. Yes.

THOMAS DUTTON sworn. Q. Look at that paper. - A. I am a bookseller in Gracechurch-street; that is not my hand writing.

- sworn. I am shopman to a pawnbroker. On the 26th of May the prisoner brought these three volumes for me to purchase, I gave him a guinea and a half for them; I am sure he is the same man.

Prisoner's Defence. When I first came to this bar I pleaded guilty, for this reason, I would not wish to trouble your your lordship, nor offend my prosecutor with a tedious defence.

GUILTY , aged 45.

[The jury recommended the prisoner to mercy.]

Confined One Month in Newgate .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

422. THOMAS DEAN was indicted for a misdemeanor .

DAVID ELLIS sworn. On Sunday evening the 8th of June, about half past nine o'clock, I felt something at my left coat pocket, I immediately put my hand round and caught hold of the prisoner.

Q. Where was his hand. - A. In my coat pocket; I took him to Bow-street, he had not taken any thing out, my handkerchief was only half out.

GUILTY , aged 12.

Whipped in Gaol , and discharged.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

423. WILLIAM BASTIN and ROBERT PRESCOTT , were indicted for a misdemeanor .

The case was stated by Mr. Attorney General.

DAVID CARDEW sworn. Examined by Mr. Fielding. Q. On the 2nd of December 1804, were you an officer of the excise. - A. Yes, I was stationed at East Buddley, in Devon.

Q. Now look at the two prisoners at the bar, do you know them. - A. Yes, I have a perfect knowledge of their persons.

Q. Had you a perfect knowledge of their persons before the 2d of December last. - A. Yes, they had been pointed out to me. On the night of December 1804, I was going from East Buddley to a place called the Lime Kilns, there was no moon, but it was a light night, I could see at some distance.

Q. How far had you gone towards the sea-coast. - A. I got into Grainary field, which is about two mile from the sea coast, and there I saw a chister of something lying down by the hedge, which I saw was kegs, I counted nineteen, they were about five gallon kegs, they were all slung, except three, and they were marked with white paint P, and some with B, and others with EG and GT, I tasted what was in one of the kegs, it was brandy.

Q. What hour was it when you discovered the kegs. - A. Between twelve and one o'clock on the morning of the 3d of December.

Q. How soon after this was it that you saw any body come to the spot. - A. I staid a little while by the kegs, then I went to a house where I saw a light, about a hundred yards distance; going towards that house I saw a man, he said halloa.

Q. That man was not one of the prisoners. - A.No.

Q. Did you see any body afterwards. - A. Yes, Robert Prescott was the next that I saw, I saw him by the gate of Grainary field, where the kegs were, I knew him, I said, serjeant Prescot you must assist me in the King's name in securing the seizure, he made me no answer, I was not then more than two or three feet from him; I told him if he would not assist me I would go to lord Rolle in the morning (Prescot was a serjeant in lord Rolle's regiment), he made no answer, but went away with the other man I had met and brought with me; I went to the light that I had before seen, I opened the door, and found nobody in the house; I left the house and came back to the seizure; I heard a horse coming down the lane, I took the horse by the bridle, and kept the boy.

Q. Did you see the father of Robert Prescott so on afterwards.- A. I did, he came on horseback into Grainary Field, we had some conversation.

Q.What became of Prescott, the father, and the boy. - A. They left me and went out of the field; about a quarter of an hour after they left me, about one o'clock in the morning, I was standing by the kegs, a person came up to me, I told him to stand back, he looked in my face and ran away very fast; about half an hour after that three men came up to me, they were dressed in smock-frocks, and handkerchiefs over the lower part of their faces, they had old round flopped hats on, two of them were very stout men, the other man was a shorter man, I told them to stand back, I was knocked down immediately as I uttered the words, with a stick or a bludgeon; I cannot say who the man was that knocked me down, I received two or three blows at once, they all continued beating of me, I was struck all over my head, and my shoulder, and my left side, and on my legs; the blows came from all three of them.

Q. Had they all sticks. - A. They had, they were very large sticks.

Q. How long did they continue beating you. - A. I do not know, I laid on my right side while they were beating me, just under a hedge.

Q. Had you during this time an opportunity when you looked at them of seeing any person that you knew. - A. William Bastin was the first person that I observed.

Q.Are you sure that William Bastin was one of the men among the three that beat you in the way that you have described. - A. I am, I called to him by his name at the time, I said do not kill me, Mr. Bastin.

Q. Did he make you any answer. - A. He did not, I had some blows after that, then I said I would give it up, meaning the seizure, they cried, ho! and then they desisted from beating me, then I saw William Bastin , he turned round from the other two; I got up as well as I could upon my legs, I was very weak, I received several other blows, I cannot say from which of them, I staggered to the gate of the field.

Q. During this time had you an opportunity of seeing Prescott, was he there. - A. Yes, he was one of the three men that struck me.

Q. Have you any knowledge of the third person. - A. No.

Q. How long did they continue about you after you had said you had given it up, and you had received some other blows, before you were able to get towards Buddley. - A. Two followed me a mile and a half towards Buddley.

Q. Which of the two men followed you. - A. Prescott and the man unknown, they forced me on and threw stones at me, Bastin did not come with the other two men after me.

Court. How did they force you on. - A. By threats and d - g me, they were two or three yards behind me, they swore and beat the ground with their sticks, and threw stones at me, they followed me to Roder's Cross; when I came to a village called Kersbrook, I turned to them, I was in great pain from the cut on my head, I said, gentlemen let me take one of my handkerchiefs off my neck and tie round my head (I had lost my hat), they swore, and said go home you scoundrel; when we got further on I heard Prescott say to the other man that he would as soon die as live; they did not beat me nor strike me after this; they left me about half a mile from Mr. Dennis's house, I crept along to Mrs. Dennis's house, and got assistance, about half an hour after that I got to my own own house, it was day light, I had medical assistance from Dr. Clark, he attended me till my wounds were well.

Q. When you got home, give us some idea what state you were in. - A. My head was cut, and my left arm had been beaten from my fingers to my shoulder, and all round my body, and a piece of flesh was cut out of my left shoulder, I had guarded off the blows from my head with my left arm; I could not help myself, I was confined to my bed three or four days, I wrote to my supervisor to send an officer to do my duty.

Q. How long were you unable of performing your duty. - A. Near six weeks.

Q. When you were laying in this state at your lodging, how soon was it after the morning this affair happened that you saw Prescott and Bastin. - A. About two or three days.

Q. Had you said to any body that Prescott and Bastin were the men that struck you. - A.I had, I said it to Mrs. Dennis, and to several people.

Q. Did you ever accuse any body else than these two men. - A. Never.

Q. What happened when Prescott came to you. - A. He knocked at the door, the woman that attended me was gone out, I was in bed by myself, I told him to come up, he came up to my bedside, he told me that he had heard that I accused him of being one of the men that beat him, he swore to his d - ation that he was not the man, I told him he was the man, he said farmer Leach would prove that he was in bed with his wife; he staid with me about a quarter of an hour, I shewed him my wounds on my shoulder and arm; he told me that he and his father were about having a vessel built, and it would be all over with them if I swore to him; he asked me whether the nineteen kegs would be of any use, I told him no; he said the nineteen kegs were no object, he did not mind their loss.

Q. How long was it before you saw the other prisoner, Bastin. - A. I think that was within five or six days, he came to my house with his brother, he said he understood I said he was one of the men that beat me, I told him he was, he said that it was only he and his brother that carried on the smuggling there; he said that he had never beat an officer in his life, and he had been taken a great many times; he asked me whether it was him or his brother, I told him I was positive it was him.

Court. He denied that it was him that struck you. - A. Yes.

Mr. Fielding. Now look at the men, upon your oath, to the best of your knowledge and recollection, are you able to say that they are the men that used you so. - A. Yes, I have no doubt.

Q. You called upon Bastin by name. - A. Yes.

Q. You had an opportunity of seeing him and of seeing the serjeant at the time the blows were given. - A. I had better opportunity of seeing Bastin when I was looking over my arm.

Q. Had you the opportunity of seeing the serjeant so as to be able to swear to him. - A. Yes.

Q. You did receive from some hand or other an hundred pounds. - A. Yes, the hundred pound was received and paidback.

Q. At any one time did you ever accuse any other person in the world, but the third person that you did not know, besides these two men. - A. No.

Q. How long was it after your complaint was made before you had an opportunity of apprehending these men. - A. I cannot say whether it was in January or February, we endeavoured to apprehend them, it was on a Sunday.

Q. Who was in company with you on the Sunday, when you had an opportunity of apprehending them. - A. John Daw and John Bugle . On that Sunday morning we waited at the house of Richard Swain , to apprehend them as they came from church, we saw them both coming together, I went up to them and and the other two officers followed, I put my hand to lay hold of them, they ran off in two directions, I ran after Prescott, but could not overtake him.

Cross-examined by Mr. Const.

Q. You had been in that neighbourhood from the 29th of September to December. - A. Yes.

Q. You say you had an opportunity of knowing these persons personally. - A. Yes.

Q. You were, I presume, perfectly sober that night. - A. I was.

Q. When you saw the kegs first you saw the marks very plain. - A. Yes, very plain.

Q. It was a tolerable light night, of course. - A. I could see farther than from where I stand to the bench.

Q. During the time that these men were using you so ill you called him by his name. - A. I only called Bastin by his name once, I did not call Prescott by his name at all, I received a blow from Bastin upon my head, I took all the blows I could upon my arm.

Q. How came it that you did not call the other by name as well as Bastin. - A. I thought I should be killed, I directed my discourse to Bastin; I had got a pistol in my pocket, I thought I would shoot one as I was likely to die.

Q. You had only one cut on your head. - A. No.

Q. You said this kept you six weeks from your duty, how long did the surgeon attend you. - A. Till I was past danger,I suppose about a week.

Q. Is the surgeon a witness here. - A. He is a witness here for the prisoners, I understand.

Q. You said that they had handkerchiefs about their faces, but you could see their countenances for all that. - A. I could see it was Bastin, his handkerchief came down.

Q. What is the reason that you knew the other, did his handkerchief come down. - A. No, I knew him from his voice; his handkerchief was on the lower part of his face, about as high as his mouth.

Q. When Prescot called upon you he swore with some violent oath that he was not the man, and that he knew nothing of you. - A. Yes.

Q. And then asked you (you are correct about that of course) whether the nineteen kegs would be of any use to you, as he did not mind nineteen kegs, he said that. - A. Yes.

Q. When you gave in your account to the excise officer, did you give it in with that circumstance. - A. I did not, I forgot.

Q. Then you have recollected that since. - A. Yes.

JOHN DAW sworn. Examined by Mr. Rowe. You are an officer of the excise. - A. Yes.

Q. You assisted him during his indisposition. - A. Yes.

Q. Were you with them on the Sunday when they attempted to take the prisoner. - A. Yes, and Bugle.

Q. That was about three or four months after his happened. A. Yes, we went to East Budley, we saw the defendants; I spoke to Bastin, I told him he was a prisoner of mine, he scuffled and got off, I followed and catched hold of him by his coat.

Q. Did he escape again. - A. He did, we had a scuffle before he made his escape, he wrested a pistol out of Dowgood's hands, I struck his heels, upon which he fell upon his back; I called upon Cookstone to assist me, he would not.

Q. Why did not you secure Bastin. - A. We could not, owing to the people throwing stones and dirt.

(Mr. Const addressed the jury on behalf of the prisoner; and Mr. Attorney General replied.)

- CLARKE sworn. Examined by Mr. Const. Where do you reside. - A. At East Budley in Devon.

Q. What character have the defendants deserved as men of humanity. - A. A very good one, I have known them twenty-five years.

Q. You are a surgeon there. - A. I am.

Q. Were you the person that attended the officer afterwards. - A. Yes, I attended him about two days, I believe he had a cut on his head, I found there was no danger.

Q.You was called in the same morning. - A. Yes, about ten o'clock.

Q. In the course of your profession was you out the evening before. - A. I was out most of the night, it was one of the darkest nights that ever I was out in, I could not distinguish my next door neighbour from a stranger.

Cross-examined by Mr. Attorney General.

Q. You live about two miles from the sea coast. - A. Yes.

Q. What night was this. - A. It was either the 3d or 4th of December 1804, it was either Sunday evening or Monday morning.

Q. You were particular attentive to the state of this night. - A. I was particular, and made a memorandum of it.

Q. Are you always attentive to the state of the weather at night. - A. This was a remarkable dark night.

Q. How was the night before. - A. I do not know.

Q. How was the night after. - A. I was in bed.

Q. And the night after that. - A. I cannot pretend to say, I only know of this one night, I should not have made the memorandum only I did not know but I might be called upon; the exciseman told me he had been beat, I told him it was a very dark night.

Q. You say you only attended him two days, do you happen to have your bill here. - A. I have not, my whole charge is but thirteen shillings.

Q. Did not you call to see him after the second day. - A. I never visited him as a patient after the two days.

Q. What sort of a wound was this upon the head. - A. He had a large cut on his head, no, it was a small cut.

Q. Which am I to understand you. - A. It was not a very large one, it was well in two or three days.

Q. You know the prisoners. - A. Yes, I know them well enough.

Q. When did they desire you to go to Cardew. - A. They neither of them did, to the best of my recollection, I never saw either of them for a month afterwards.

Q. Did you go to Mr. Cardew. - A. I certainly did.

Q. Did you offer Cardew any money. - A. I offered him no money any farther than this, I said to him it was a common assault, Cardew said to me it is hard I should be beat for nothing, I replied I will rather give you twenty pounds out of my own pocket than you should go to law, I would rather you would make it up; I was not authorised by these people at all.

BOTH - GUILTY .

Confined Two Years in the House of Correction , each to find Security for Three Hundred Pounds themselves, and Two Sureties for One Hundred Pounds each, for their future good Behaviour .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.