Old Bailey Proceedings Online (www.oldbaileyonline.org, version 6.0, 29 July 2014), May 1806 (18060521).

Old Bailey Proceedings, 21st May 1806.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE OYER AND TERMINER, AND GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND ALSO THE GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, HELD AT Justice-Hall, in the Old Bailey, On WEDNESDAY, the 21st of MAY, 1806, and following Days,

BEING THE FIFTH SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF The Right Honourable JAMES SHAW , LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT HAND BY JOB SIBLY, FOR R. BUTTERS.

LONDON:

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED By Authority of the CORPORATION of the CITY of LONDON, By R. BUTTERS, 22, Fetter-lane, Fleet-street.

1806.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON.

BEFORE the Right Honourable JAMES SHAW , LORD-MAYOR of the City of LONDON; Sir NASH GROSE, Knt. One of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir ROBERT GRAHAM , Knt. One of the Barons of His Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir Richard Carr Glynn, Bart. Sir Charles Price , Bart. Thomas Rowcroft , Esq. Aldermen of the said City; John Sylvester , Esq. Recorder of the said City; Stephen Hunter , Esq. John Peter Hankey, Esq. and William Domville , Esq. Aldermen of the said City; and Newman Knowlys, Esq. Common-Serjeant of the said City; his Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of Goal Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

LONDON JURY.

Joseph Bagnell ,

James Smith ,

John Howes ,

William Prior ,

Benjamin Lane ,

Thomas Woodall ,

Harry Hammond Hale ,

Henry Dobson ,

William Lefevre ,

Andrew Anderson ,

James Bethel ,

William Parkinson .

FIRST MIDDLESEX JURY.

George Parker ,

Thomas Paine ,

Alexander Barron ,

Charles Diamond ,

William Buddle ,

John Linney ,

George Crane ,

Henry Taylor ,

Jonathan Gale ,

John Elsdon ,

John King ,

Alexander Handy .

SECOND MIDDLESEX JURY.

George Moor ,

William Godbolt ,

Charles Tray ,

William Reeves ,

Thomas Prudence ,

John Gibson ,

James Hall ,

Charles Bier ,

Richard Jackson ,

John Carr ,

George Seward ,

Thomas Jackson .

312. EDWARD BASSET was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 2d of March , three blankets, value 14 s. and a sheet, value 1 s. the property of Joseph Ibbett , in a lodging room .

ELIZABETH IBBETT sworn. I am the wife of Joseph Ibbett , I live at No. 8, Church Row, Chelsea ; I let the prisoner a bed, he had lodged with me about six or eight months. On Sunday afternoon, the 2d of March, my husband and I went out to a funeral, the prisoner at that time was the only person left in the room; we missed three blankets and a sheet from off his bed and there was a little girl saw him come down stairs with a bag on his back.

Q. Have you ever found your things. - A. Never; he returned to his lodgings the same night, he did not ask after the blankets; when he came the next night from work he was taken up.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp.

Q. He had lodged with you six or eight months, had he paid regularly for his lodgings. - A. Yes, he paid one shilling and sixpence a week.

Q. How many beds were there in the room in which the prisoner slept. - A. Four beds, and seven people slept in the room; at that time he mostly had a bed to himself.

Q. You said that he never asked you for the blankets, do you know whether he asked for the blankets of any other person that slept in the room. - A. He complained in the middle of the night that he was cold.

ELIZABETH CASTLETINE sworn. I saw the man come down stairs with a bundle.

Q. What day. - A. It was on a Sunday, between four and five in the afternoon.

Q. Where was Mrs. Ibbett. - A. She was gone to a funeral.

Q. Who was the man that came down with the bundle. - A. That man. (witness pointing to the prisoner at the bar.)

Q. Did you know him. - A. Yes, I had seen him a good many times before; I lived opposite of Mrs. Ibbetts.

Q. Did you see what was in the bundle. - A. I saw something like a blanket, there were holes in the bag.

Q. How large might the bundle be. - A. It was this size. (witness extending her arms about a yard in length and about half a yard in width.)

PATRICK MACKCALLER sworn. I lodge in the same room with the prisoner; I left Edward Bassett in the room, between five and six o'clock in the afternoon, he came into the room of a bustle and went to the cupboard, after that he went to his box, and took something out, what it was I do not know.

Prisoner's Defence. A little after three o'clock my landlady was in a hurry to go out to a funeral, she said I must make haste, I went up stairs and left two persons in the room; I said to Solafont this is not an agreeable lodging. we cannot get a fire when we want it; I went down stairs and went to a neighbour's house and drank tea with them, I saw nobody in the court when I went down it.

JAMES MURRAY sworn. I am an out-pensioner of Chelsea Hospital; I know the prisoner, my wife washes for him.

Q. Do you remember his drinking tea with you on the 2d of March. - A. Yes, he came about three o'clock in the afternoon, and about five o'clock he went to fetch his tea things, he was gone about ten minutes or a quarter of an hour, he returned and went to tea with us, and staid till ten o'clock at night, he brought his tea things in his pocket.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

313. ELIZABETH GRIFFITHS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 29th of April , a silver desert spoon, value 5 s. a silver tea spoon, value 2 s. a table cloth, value 3 s. and a towel, value 1 s. the property of Joseph Fitzwilliam Vandercombe ; a gold broach, value 5 s. and a pocket book, value 1 s. the property of Richard Holt .

JOSEPH FITZWILLIAM VANDERCOMBE sworn. I live in Bush-lane, Cannon-street , the prisoner at the bar was cook in my service a twelvemonth ago; while she was in my service we lost several things, and amongst the rest the property laid in the indictment; she was dismissed from my service in April, 1805, I heard no more of her till about a week or ten days ago; about the 14th of April, 1805; I am not sure to the day; in consequence of information I went to the police office, in Worship-street, there I saw some of my property, the silver desert spoon, the silver teaspoon, the tablecloth, and the towel, they are marked.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley.

Q. Your house is in the city. - A. Yes.

Q. You do not know where the things were found. - A. I do not; when I saw the property there they were in the county of Middlesex.

- PURWELL sworn. I was present when the prisoner's box was opened at Mr. Wood's house, in Finsbury-square, on the 29th of April.

Q. Was the prisoner a servant in that house. - A. She was living with Mr. Wood, I saw the silver spoons, and the tablecloth taken out of her box.

JOHN RAY sworn. I am an officer belonging to Worship-street; I was sent for to take the prisoner into custody, I had these things delivered to me at Mr. Wood's, Finsbury Square; I produce them; I saw the tea spoon found in her box.

Purwell. I saw these things found in her box.

Q. Was the prisoner present at the time. - A. Yes, she said that she bought them in Whitecross-street, at a pawnbroker's shop; this pocket book was likewise found in her pocket with this gold broach, she said that she found them in sweeping the floor about three years ago, but she could not tell where it was that she found the broach and the pocket book; the tablecloth was found in her box, and this napkin.

Ray. On the 29th of April, about half after nine inthe morning, her box had been opened before I came, and some spoons had been found in the box, which were delivered to me, the linen I found myself in the box; I searched her pocket and took out this pocket book and the broach; I asked her where she got it, she said that she found the pocket book and the broach when she was sweeping a room, between two and three years ago; I then asked her where she got the spoons, she told me that she bought them at a pawnbroker's in Red cross-street, and gave five shillings or five shillings and three pence for them; I asked her where she got the linen from, she said she had them left her by an aunt of hers; the letters has been picked out, but there is very plain the remainder of the V, on the tablecloth; on the towel there is the remains of the V, and the number 18, on it.

Q.(to prosecutor) Are these things your property. - A. With respect to the linen I cannot venture to swear to, but as to the spoons I have no doubt at all.

Q. Is there on the linen any mark. - A. Yes, the towel has a V and the figure 18.

Q. Your surname does begin with a V. - A. Yes.

Q. I want to know whether your linen was so marked. - A. I believe it was.

Q. Were you in the habit of having your linen marked with the initials of your name, and numbered. - A. I was.

Q. From the circumstance of being marked with a V and numbered, do you believe they are yours. A. I verily believe they are, I cannot take upon me to say positively, but I have no doubt in my own mind that the table-cloth and the napkin are mine; with respect to the table cloth we have some of the same identical pattern that I remember in use, but I own that it is not decisive; the spoons I venture to swear positively are mine, they are particularly marked, and I think I know their faces from the frequent use of them; the desert spoon is marked with the crest of a mermaid, the tea spoon has a Roman V under the Hall mark, at the back of the spoon, they were missed at the time the prisoner was in my service, and great search was made for them; it is our practise to have the plate put into a particular place every night.

RICHARD HOLT sworn. I am clerk to Mr. Vandercombe and reside in his house; the broach which was produced I am perfectly confident is my property; the pocket book I believe to be mine, the broach was enclosed inside of the pocket book when I lost it, the pocket book has been very much worn since and defaced, I lost it shortly after it was given to me, I put it in my drawers in my bed room in Mr. Vandercombe's house: I do not know that my drawers were always locked.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked up the pocket book when I was sweeping up the room after the carpenters had done working in the room, the young gentleman moved out of his room into another room, I did not consider the pocket book of any value, I thought it was to be thrown away; that gold pin I never noticed was in the pocket book; as for the spoons I gave five shillings and ninepence for them, they have been in my possession near five years, I bought them at a pawnbroker's in Red-cross-street, the table linen has been mine fifteen years, before I ever saw Mr. Vandercombe.

Q.(to prosecutor) Whether this is possible to be true that she should have the plate and the linen in the way she states. - A. The linen she says she has had fifteen years; I cannot say any more than I have, it may possibly be the case, but with respect to the spoons they have been in my house before April 1805.

Q. How long was she in your service. - A. Only two months.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

314. CORNELIUS DONNOHEW and WILLIAM CONNER , were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 29th of April , a water cask, value 2 s. the property of Elizabeth Weldy .

JAMES WENDY sworn. I am an officer of Shadwell. On the 29th of April I was in company with Hewitt, my brother officer, between one and two in the morning; we met the two prisoners in St. George's New Road, they were both together; I saw something on the prisoners, I suspected they had stolen it, being so late an hour of the night, I immediately laid hold of Conner, Donnohew tried to make his escape, he was overtaken by Hewitt; I found a water cask upon Conner, a check apron, a cap, and a piece of blue ribbon; I produce the water cask, the prisoner had it in his hands before him.

ELIZABETH WELDY sworn. I live in Denmark street, Ratcliff Highway ; that water cask stood in my yard, it is an open yard, I lost it on the 29th of April, I had seen it the night before, it is my property.

Q. What is the worth of the cask. - A. Two shillings.

- HEWITT sworn. I am a police officer.

Q. Do you remember seeing the prisoner between one and two in the morning on the 29th of April. - A. Yes, I was with my brother officer at the time, I questioned the prisoners how these things came in their possession; Donnohew immediately ran away, he threw the tea tray away, I ran after him and took him, we secured them both.

The prisoners said nothing in their defence, nor called any witnesses to character.

DONNOHEW - GUILTY , aged 40.

CONNER - GUILTY , aged 32.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

315. ELIZABETH KENNEDY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 28th of April , a shirt, value 6 d. and three handkerchiefs, value 4 s. the property of William Boffy .

WILLIAM BOFFY sworn. I lodge at the Fox, in Wardour-street, Soho .

Q. Did the prisoner live near you. - A. Yes, in the same house in the three pair of stairs room, and I lived in the two pair of stairs. On the 19th of April I went down to Margate, and I returned on the 26th; I missed my property on the 28th, I took a clean striped cotton shirt to a pawnbroker's, and asked him if he had got any striped cotton shirts orhandkerchiefs pawned at his house in the course of the week, he told me had one, it had been fetched out half an hour before I came there, I went to another pawnbroker's, he told me that two of the handkerchiefs that I had described were fetched out that morning, and he had one left, I asked him to stop the person that pawned them and send to me, which he did, and the prisoner was taken to the office in Marlborough-street; after that she owned to the three handkerchiefs and the two shirts that she had taken out of my box.

- ROBERTS sworn. I live at No. 25, Great Windmill-street, I keep a sale shop.

Q. Look at the prisoner at the bar, did you ever see her before. - A. I think so, she came to me on the 28th of April with an old check shirt, said her husband had gone to sea and left her, I told her it was not good enough; she asked me if I bought silk handkerchiefs, she had the ticket of three in her hand, she said she would bring them, instead of bringing three she brought but two, a cotton handkerchief and a silk one; I produce them; I am sure I had them of the prisoner. (The property identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was in distress when I took them, I had not a bit of bread to eat for my child nor myself.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Privately Whipped and discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

316. JOHN RUGGLES was indicted for that he on the 16th day of February , being servant to William Benton , was employed and entrusted by him to receive money for him, that he being such servant, did receive and take into his possession; 27 l. 10 s. for an on account of his said master, and that he afterwards fraudulently did embezzle, and secrete, and steal the same .

The case was stated by Mr. Knapp.

WILLIM BENTON sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am an officer to the sheriff of Surry , the prisoner was my servant, I gave him 14 s. a week, besides other monies he got under me. On the 16th of February I gave the prisoner a bill of exchange (accepted by Mr. Davis), to go to Mr. Davis, John-street, Edgware Road, to receive the money; I did not see him after that time for three or four days, he was then in custody in Whitechaple watchhouse.

Q. Had you any conversation with the prisoner. - A. Yes, I asked him what he had done with my money, he told me that he got drunk and went into a coach with a w - e, and he was robbed of some of it by her; I asked him what became of the other part, he said he had lost that amongst them; he desired me not to prosecute him, I told him I should do it.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney.

Q. Mr. Benton, what are you. - A. I am a sheriff's officer.

Q. The prisoner had been some time employed by you as your assistant as sheriff's officer. - A. He had.

Q. You mean what is commonly termed a bailiff's follower. - A. Yes, to go with me to make arrests.

Q. You gave him fourteen shillings a week, and he had a fee to every caption, half a crown was it not. - A. Yes.

Q. When did you give the bill to the prisoner. - A. On the 16th of February.

Q. When was the day you found him in the watch-house. - A. About the 19th.

Q. Do you mean to speak that the 16th was the first time that you gave him the note. - A. No, I gave it him some days after it was due.

Q. It must be due on the 28th of January last. - A. After it became due I gave it to him to get the money; I had endorsed it before it came due.

Q. Who presented the bill. - A. I believe I went down and delivered it myself.

Q. Do not you know whether you went or not; do you know whether you are awake now or not. - A. Yes, I did, I was not paid then; I endorsed it for the purpose of paying it away to my son, he is an attorney, I told him he might get it.

Q. And yet he did not present it but you. - A. Yes.

Q. Upon his telling you that he had lost the money, you threatened to prosecute him, - A. To be sure I did; he sent me a letter on the over-night.

Q. That drew you to the cage; he sent a letter to you, informing you that he had been robbed of some part of it by a woman in a coach, and the other part by some w - s where he got drunk. - A. Yes.

JOHN DAVIS sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp. I live in John-street; Edgware Road.

Q. Did the prisoner at the bar come to you on Sunday the 16th of February. - A. Yes, he presented to me a bill, drawn upon my brother, payable at my house, I took him into my accompting house, and gave him two ten pound notes and two five pound notes; the bill with the interest is twenty-seven pounds ten shillings, he told me that he had not the change, if I would trust him with the five pound note he would get me change, he went out and returned with the change; I am sure he is the person, he said that he came from Mr. Benton for it; I produce the receipt he gave me.

Q.(to prosecutor) Is that the bill that you gave the prisoner, with directions to go and get the money. - A. It is.

Q. Did he ever pay that money to you. - A. Never.

WILLIAM PRENTICE sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. What are you. - A. I keep the Yorkshire Grey public house, Whitechapel. The prisoner came to my house between eleven and twelve o'clock at night (I cannot recollect the night) in a coach, accompanied by a woman, which I afterwards found to be of bad character; he asked for a glass of brandy, which he drank, he appeared to be the worse for liquor; he then asked me leave to sit in the bar, and to boil three or four eggs for him, he said he had been drinking, it would do him good; he staid in my house about an hour and a half.

Q. Did he drink any thing more in your house. - A. Part of a shillingsworth of brandy and water, I drank some and the woman drank some; after the eggs were eat and the brandy and water drank, he fell asleep, I was busy serving, the woman went out privately while I was serving my customers, and shenever returned; I awoke him after she was gone, and asked him whether he knew this woman, he said no, he put his hand in his pocket and said he had been robbed, and he had lost near all his money.

Q.Had you any opportunity of seeing before that he had any property about him. - A. I saw some notes when he first came into the bar.

Q. Did you recommend him to an officer of the name of Langhurst. - A. Yes, they went and searched for the woman and found her in Carter-street, Tooley-street; the next morning, about half after five o'clock, she was searched and nothing was found but a silver pencil case belonging to the prisoner.

Q. The result was the woman was taken and examined at the office and was discharged. - A. Yes, the woman said he made her a present of it.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

317. JOHN FLYNN was indicted for feloniously making an assault in the king's highway upon George Bedford , on the 26th of April, putting him in fear, and feloniously taking from his person, a hat, value 2 s. the property of George Bedford .

GEORGE BEDFORD sworn. As I was going home late on Saturday night, the 26th of April, I was hustled by three or four persons and knocked down in Field-lane, Saffron Hill , and after that they robbed me of my hat.

Q. Was the prisoner one of them. - A. I noticed him, I supposed him to be one of them, I saw him afterwards, he had dark blue clothes on.

Q. Did you see any body take your hat. - A. They knocked me down and my hat tumbled off, and they run away with it.

Q. Who ran away with it. - A. I cannot swear to the man that ran away with it; they left me a hat with the crown hanging only by a little bit.

Q. Who run away with it, you did not see. - A. I cannot swear to the man that ran away with it.

Q. This was on Saturday night. - A. Yes, on Sunday morning I went down the same street, I saw the prisoner with my hat on his head.

Q. Did you know him by his face or by the hat. - A. I knew him by the hat, and I had a little suspicion of him by his dress, he was dressed in blue and there was nobody dressed in blue but himself.

Q. What time of the night was it. - A. It was half after eleven.

Q. It was dark, could you tell whether his coat was blue or brown. - A. I could tell it was a dark jacket and trowsers; when I saw him the next morning I went up to him, and said, my friend do you know whose hat you have got on your head, he gave me a saucy answer, and offered to strike me.

Q. What is your hat worth. - A. Two shillings; when I attacked him with my hat the officers stepped up and took him.

Q. Was you drunk or sober that night. - A. I had drank some beer, but I was very sober.

Q. What are you. - A. I am a painter and glazier .

Q. Had you any money in your pocket. - A. Yes, I had the change of a pound note, I had been and bought a pair of stockings, I had sixteen or seventeen shillings in my pocket I lost none of my money.

JONATHAN TROTT sworn. On Sunday the 27th of April myself in company with Stanton and Wood, two brother officers were going down Saffron Hill, I saw a number of Irish people collected together, I then informed my brother officers there was a noise amongst the Irish people and that we would go down and quell them; when I got there I heard the last witness tell the prisoner that he had been knocked down and robbed of his hat, and that he had got his hat on his head, the prisoner tried to strike the prosecutor, and would if he could have got at him; I heard first of all the word, police officers, by some of the Irish people who were standing around; we were all three around him at that time, he attempted to run away, I ran through the mob, and got hold of him by the collar; I then took off the hat and told Wood to hide it, and not to let the prosecutor see what marks there were about it, Stanton took hold of the other side of him, we then led him away; going along, the prosecutor said it was his hat, there had been some paint dropped on the top of it which had been scraped off, the hat was so marked as he has described; I handcuffed him, and thought he was secure, then he made his escape and ran away, we caught him again with the handcuffs on; I took this hat from the prosecutor, this is the hat the prisoner left behind; the prisoner said this was his own hat that he had left behind, and that he had picked up the prosecutor's hat by accident. (This is the prosecutor's hat, and here is the place as he has described.)

Prosecutor. This is my hat.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going down Field-lane on Saturday night, I saw a row before me, when I came up I was knocked down, and my hat fell off, and I picked up the first hat I could, I do not know whether that is the hat or no, I was drunk, I did not know what I was doing of, I was going home.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

318. WILLIAM HAMERTON was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of John Langford , about the hour of ten at night, on the 29th of April , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, thirteen cheeses , the property of Henry Walduck .

HENRY WALDUCK sworn. I only know the property is mine.

Q. Where was these cheeses. - A. The thirteen cheeses were at Mr. Langford's house, No. 9, High-street, St. Giles's , the last time I saw them there was on Saturday the 26th of April, I lost them on the 29th; I only rented the bottom part of the house.

Q. Did you sleep in it. - A. Not at that time; I rented it at thirty-five pounds a year.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp.

Q. I understand you to say that you had slept there for some time though you did not sleep there at that time. - A. I occupied the shop, parlour, cellar, and two back rooms on the first floor.

MARY GREEN sworn. I live servant with Mr. Walduck; on the 29th of April I locked the shop door; I saw the cheeses in the shop before I lockedthe shop door; after I had locked the door, I gave the key to Mr. Jones, - a cheesemonger, on Snow Hill.

Q. What time did you give him the key. - A. About half past twelve in the day.

Q. Were the windows of the shop fastened. - A. Yes, I did not return any more that day.

MARY LANGFORD sworn, I am the wife of John Langford . On Monday the creditors came and took an inventory of his goods; on the Tuesday or the Monday night there was a noise in the shop, between nine and ten o'clock at night, I thought it was somebody from Mr. Walduck who had come to take some more of the goods away, it being a moon shiny night; I looked through the dining room window, I saw nobody, I went down stairs with a light in my hand, I thought I saw the moon shine in through the crevice; I got the watchman to stop with me till Mr. Langford came home.

Q. Was the door forced. - A. I do not think it was, it was such a bad lock I do not think they could lock it; when my husband came home he and the watchman went in, they did not know what was missing.

Q. Of course, they not knowing what was there, missed nothing. - A. No.

JOHN TOWNSHEND sworn. I am one of the patroles belonging to Bow-street; I apprehended the prisoner at his lodgings in Crown-street, Soho; I know no more than finding the cheeses at his lodgings, on Tuesday the 29th of April, between the hours of eleven and twelve, I secured the cheese and him; I produce the cheese.

Q. Did the prisoner give any account how he came by this cheese. - A. I asked the prisoner if he had turned cheesemonger, he replied no, I then asked him if he owned the cheese; he said you have got it, it is of no use for you and I to have any words about it. (The cheese identified by the prosecutor and Mary Green.)

Mr. Knapp. Q.(to prosecutor) We have heard something about creditors, when was the day of your assignment. - A. The cheeses were lost on the evening of the 29th, and the assignment was not till the Thursday following.

Court. What is the value of these cheeses. - A. More than four pounds.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel, and called no witnesses to character.

GUILTY, aged 38.

Of stealing, but not of breaking and entering the dwelling house .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

319. SARAH BLAKE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 12th of May , three window curtains, value 9 s. a shirt, value 2 s. four pieces of white lace, value 3 s. one yard of brown Holland cloth, value 1 s. one silk handkerchief, value 6 d. and a one pound bank note , the property of James Brown .

JAMES BROWN sworn. I live at Mill Bank, Shadwell ; I am a black ash maker (pot ash); the prisoner at the bar was my servant .

MARGARET BROWN sworn. I am the wife of the last witness.

Q. Do you remember the prisoner at the bar leaving your service on the 12th of May. - A.Yes; on the Saturday prior I found her very much inebriated, I detected a bottle of rum in my own kitchen secreted, she confessed it was mine; on the 12th I searched her things, I found a pair of Morocco boots, and some trifling things, and a one pound bank note I found in a tin box in her pocket.

Q. How came you to know it was your bank note. - A. I know the number, I had lost it, the number is 29613; when I detected it she said ma'am it is your's.

Q. The things were taken to Mrs. Nelson's. - A. Yes.

MATILDA NELSON sworn. I live adjoining to Mr. Brown's factory.

Q. Do you remember the prisoner at the bar bringing any thing to your house. - A. Yes, on the 12th of May, about half after seven in the morning, she brought a bag tied up with packthread, as part of her own wearing apparel, she asked the favour of me to let her leave it at my house, I gave her leave; she said she was going away that day or the day after, and she had more luggage than she could take with her at one time.

Q. Did you shew Mrs. Brown the parcel the prisoner left with you. - A. Yes.

ROBERT BROWN sworn. I am an officer of Shadwell, I produce the property; Mr. and Mrs. Brown brought them to the office, there is a silk handkerchief that I took off the woman's neck in the office myself, and there is the note. (The property identified by the prosecutrix.)

Prisoner's Defence. When I went into Mrs. Brown's place, I only took a bundle with me to see how I liked the place, as soon as I came acquainted what kind of a lady I was with I gave her warning; the lady said if I would go she would have me taken up, and she never would pay me the two seven shilling pieces I had lent her; she kicked and called me violent names, and said I walked like a rotten hedge w - e; she told me she would cut my throat from ear to ear; she said that I had very little coming to me, she had lost several things and she should lay that to my charge; I never was in Matilda Nelson 's house; the boy, James Kirby , came into the kitchen with a new one pound note in his hand, he said he was going to pay it to the lighterman, I asked him to change it with me for an old one that I had.

JAMES KIRBY sworn. Q. Is that true. - A. No, I did not, I never paid any money for my master.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

320. MARY BAILEY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 27th of March , a sheet, value 2 s. a waistcoat, value 2 s. and a cotton bedgown, value 2 s. the property of William Bell .

ANN BELL sworn. My husband's name is William Bell , I live in Benbow's Rents, St. Luke's.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar. - A. The prisoner at the bar came into my dwelling house on the 27th of March, and went up stairs and took outof a portmanteau the articles in the indictment, as she was going out of the door I saw a piece of my daughter's gown hanging out of her apron, I went immediately after her and took her, and brought her back into the house.

Q. Did she come willingly with you. - A. Very willingly, but she said she had got nothing with her but her own property; the neighbours came about the door; I sent for a constable, she was searched, I found upon her a sheet, a gown, and a waistcoat, they were all in her apron.

JOSEPH PRINCE sworn. I am a constable; on the 27th of March I was sent for, about three o'clock in the afternoon, to the prosecutor's house; Mrs. Bell took the things from her before I came, she delivered them to me and the prisoner; I produce the property. (The property identified by the prosecutrix.)

GUILTY , aged 38.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

321. JOHN CRADDOCK was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 20th of April , fourteen pound weight of lead, value 5 s, the property of Charles Alliston and James Somers , affixed to a certain building called a slaughtering house .

Second Count. Stating it to be affixed to a building generally.

CHARLES ALLISTON sworn. I live at No. 52, Marshall-street, Carnaby Market, I am a butcher .

Q. Who is your partner. - A. James Somers ; there was a piece of lead missing from the slaughterhouse, which the prisoner was detected of having.

Q. Who detected the prisoner. - A. The watchman on the night of the 20th of April; I saw it put to the place, it fitted exactly.

Q. How long before had you seen it there. - A. I cannot say.

Q. It was affixed to the slaughtering house. - A. It was put under another piece of lead; it was so affixed as not to be moved without some force.

RICHARD PRING sworn. I repaired the slaughterhouse last August, there was a long gutter, the end was cut of, we were obliged to put a piece of lead about two foot long, to convey the water to the gutter, we put it under and beat it down.

Q. Then it would not have come away without any body had moved it. - A. No, I fitted the lead to the place, it fitted exactly; I believe it is the same piece of lead that I put on.

JAMES SLADE sworn. I was ordered to go with the lead to see it fitted on, the last witness and the prosecutor fitted it on, it appeared to fit the place.

JOHN KIRVEN sworn. On Sunday, the 20th of April, as I was crying the hour of twelve o'clock, I saw the prisoner sitting down, I asked him what he was about, he said he was easing himself; I put up my lanthorn, and missed the spout, and I saw a lamp lighter's ladder up against the slaughter house, I desired him to get up, I saw the spout under him, he had no shoes on; there was no other person near, I took him to the watchhouse without his shoes, I returned for the ladder, and found the shoes under the steps of the ladder.

Q.(to prosecutor) You have no doubt of that lead being yours. - A. I have not the least doubt in the world.

Prisoner's Defence. I was along with a few relations, it was late before I came home, I went up stairs and pulled my shoes off; I was taken so bad with a pain in my bowels, I came down to ease myself, I saw a man run away; before I could get my breeches unbuttoned the watchman came and took me to the watchhouse.

GUILTY , aged 16.

Confined Twelve Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

322. JAMES MARSHALL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of May , two night caps, value 2 s. a napkin, value 6 d. a waistcoat, value 5 s. three pieces of dimity, value 3 s. and one gaiter, value 6 d. the property of the Marquis of Abercorn .

THOMAS WOODHOUSE sworn. Q. You live at the Marquis of Abercorn's. - A. Yes.

Q. What was lost from his premises. - A. Two night caps, a waistcoat, and some cotton bed furniture, on Thursday the 15th of May.

Q. Where does the Marquis of Abercorn live. - A. In Harlow , in the county of Middlesex.

Q. What is the prisoner. - A. He came from Dyot-street, I came up after he was taken, I saw him in custody, I heard his confession.

THOMAS STONWELL sworn. I work for the Marquis of Abercorn, as a labourer; on Thursday the 15th of May, as I was going to my brother, I met the prisoner with a large quantity of clothes under his arm, there was a boy coming from his poultry yard, I sent him back to enquire if they had lost any clothes from the laundry, I keep him till he was put into the constable's hands, I delivered the clothes to the constable.

Q.(to Woodhouse) Had you any conversation with the prisoner. - A. Yes, I really think he is not right in his intellects.

Q. You speak from the impression of your mind. - A. Yes, he did not appear to be in his senses.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

333. JOHN O'BRIAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of February , six yards and a half of velvet, value 3 l. 18 s. the property of James Harrison .

The case was stated by Mr. Gurney.

JAMES HARRISON sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You are a haberdasher in Fleet-street . - A. I am.

Q. The prisoner was in your service. - A. He was for about a twelve months down to the 6th day of February.

Q. Do you remember his taking any velvet out of your house, stating that he was going to take it to a customer of your's. - A. I recollect it very well, there was two or three lengths he took cut, he told me that he received an order from Clift and Cockhill.

Q. How much. - A. He did not say how much, he took it out of my shop, under the idea of takingit to them.

Q. What time of the day was it when he went out of the shop. - A. I cannot say particularly, he generally went out between nine and ten o'clock.

Q. Produce the entry made by himself on his return. - A. There is an entry there of his own writing (witness producing a book); Clift, six and a half yards of velvet, twelve shillings a yard.

Q. That would be three pound eighteen shillings. - A. Yes.

Q. That was the manner in which he accounted to you for part of the velvet he had taken out that morning. - A. It was.

Q. You supposing this to be true, you sent in your account to Messrs. Clift and Cockhill. - A. I did.

Q. When was it you took him up. - A. On the 24th of February last.

Q. I do not know whether you made a discovery before you took him up. - A. After I took him up.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley.

Q. He lived some time with you as a servant. - A. He did.

Q. He made a pretence and said that he had an order for Clift and Co. that turned out to be a false pretence. - A. So it appears.

Q. In consequence of which you permitted him to take the goods. - A. Yes.

Q. You gave him leave to take them away in consequence of that false pretence. - A. Yes.

Mr. Gurney. It was his business to take out goods to customers. - A. Yes.

Q. At other times he took out goods to customers, stating what he had ordered. - A. Yes.

ESTHER COCKHILL sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am in partnership with Miss Clift, we carry on business in Titchfield-street.

Q. Had you dealt with Mr. Harrison in Fleet-street. - A. Yes.

Q. Has the prisoner at the bar called on you with articles of sale. - A. Yes.

Q. Had he before the 6th of February, received from you any order for six yards and a half of velvet. - A. He had not.

Q. Did he on that day bring you six yards and a half of velvet. - A. No.

Q. When was the first notice that you received from Mr. Harrison of his supposing that you had that velvet. - A. About the beginning of March.

Q. You then discovered it to be incorrect. - A. Yes.

- CLIFT sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You are in partnership with the last witness. - A. Yes, we are milleners and dress makers.

Q. Had you given any order to the prisoner, prior to the 5th of February, for six yards and a half of velvet. - A. No, I never saw him after the 11th of January.

Q. Then I need not ask you whether he brought you any velvet on the 6th of February. - A. He did not.

Prisoner's Defence. I have been in the habit of receiving orders for Mr. Harrison, whatever order I received from Miss Clift, or any other person's order, I entered down in my book; during the time I was at Mr. Thresher's, Mr. Harrison came after me, he wished to get me away, he knew I had a good connection, and during the time I was in his house he never went round to one customer, I have even given him the money in public company, he has been the person that has introduced me into company, (for singing) which has been my ruin.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

324. ELIZABETH PENNINGTON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 12th of May , seven yards of printed cotton, value 12 s. 3 d. the property of William Tray , privately in his shop .

EDWARD PHILLIPS sworn. I am assistant to William Tray , Sun-street , a linen draper . On the 12th of May, between the hours of five and six in the evening, the prisoner at the bar came with Mary Joyce into our shop, I shewed her some cottons, she objected to them, being too light, and on turning round to reach some more, and turning back again, I missed one of the pieces, which I had previously shewn her; I shewed her more pieces, she objected to their being too light; my master was down at tea, when he came up I told him I had missed a piece of cotton; I searched her, I found in her apron the seven yards of printed cotton which I had missed; the prisoner said it was the first time she had committed any offence, and she hoped I would forgive her; when I turned round and missed it there was no person in the shop. Mary Joyce , who recommended her to me, was gone out of the shop.

MARY JOYCE sworn. I am a shoe binder, I live at No. 16, Peter-street, Bishopsgate-street, Without. On the 12th of May the prisoner came to me and asked me if I would go with her and buy a gown, and to pay so much a week, I told her I bought things of Mr. Tray, I took her to his shop, and after the gentleman had taken down two pieces of cotton I saw my young master coming, I followed my master, he went to my room, and I went after him, I forgot to go back to the person I had left in the shop: I had been home ten minutes or a quarter of an hour before I found that she had taken this bit of cotton.

Q.(to Phillips) You had not agreed to let her have a gown to pay so much a week. - A. I had not.

THOMAS SAPWELL sworn. I produce the piece of cotton; on searching the prisoner this pocket was found underneath her apron. (The property identified by Phillips.)

The prisoner said nothing in her defence, nor called any witnesses to character.

GUILTY, aged 23.

Of stealing, but not privately .

Confined Three Months in Newgate , and fined One Shilling .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

325. THOMAS FROST and ELIZABETH FROST were indicted for that at the delivery of the King's goal of Newgate, holden for the Country of Middlesex, on the 16th of April last, Robert Brown and James Pink , were tried and convicted, for feloniously stealing three pieces of jennet, value9 l. the property of John Joblin , that they afterwards on the 3d of March feloniously did receive one piece of jennet, value 3 l. being part and parcel of the aforementioned goods, they knowing them to have been stolen .

Mr. Knapp, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, under the direction of the court, they were

BOTH - ACQUITTED .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

326. WILLIAM BLAKE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 6th of May , one tanned hide, value 40 s. the property of John Osborne .

JOHN OSBORNE sworn. It is my property; I know nothing of its being stolen, I am acquainted with its being missing; the next witness can speak to the property.

Q. What are you. - A. I am a warehouseman at Leadenhall market. One Mr. Gibbons bought thirty-seven hides, I was in the habits of carting them home to him, and when they were delivered to Mr. Gibbons there were only thirty-six.

- FREEMAN sworn. I am a leather factor in Leadenhall market; I sold Mr. Gibbons thirty-seven hides the 6th of May.

SAMUEL GIBBONS sworn. I am a leather cutter, Church row, Whitechapel.

Q. You bought thirty-seven hides of Mr. Freeman. - A. Yes, when they came home I found only thirty six.

Q. Into whose care did you deliver them to. - A. To Mr. John Osborne , he was to convey them to my house.

Q.(to Osborne) You received of Mr. Gibbons some hides. - A. Yes, by his putting them down in what we call the loading book; as is usual I carted them in a cart to his house; I set my man to load them that was in the habit of doing them, the cart began to load about five o'clock, and before the cart was loaded with Mr. Gibbons's things and other people's, it might be about seven o'clock; the cart went out of the market to go its rounds, and came to Mr. Gibbons's the last of all.

WILLIAM SAPWELL sworn. I am a porter.

Q. Did you go with the cart. - A. Yes, I went to Mr. Gibbons's with thirty seven hides, as I thought; when I took them from the cart I counted only thirty six.

ELIZABETH BULLEN sworn. I saw the prisoner Blake come through my yard, called Bullen Alley, with a piece of leather, I think it was on Thursday fortnight about four o'clock; I live in a court between Skinner street and Angel alley, Bishopsgate street.

SARAH BILLINGHAM sworn. I live at No. 60, Skinner street, Bishopsgate street. On Tuesday fortnight I sat at my back window that looked into Acorn alley, it joins Bullen alley; I saw the prisoner Blake with the leather on his back, I saw him go into Bullen yard with it, and pitch it into the house of one Richardson.

Blake. I admit that I had the leather; I look upon it impossible from where she represents she lives, for her to see me go into Bullen alley, as it is for any gentleman in this court to see St. Paul's.

THOMAS HARLOW sworn. I am a ribbon weaver by trade, I live in New court, Angel alley. On the 6th of May I saw the prisoner come through Bullen yard with the leather on his head, about four o'clock, I saw him pitch it at the door and take it into Richardson's door; I saw the prisoner come out of the door afterwards with a knot in his hand.

THOMAS SAPWELL sworn. I am a constable; on the 6th of May, between five and six in the afternoon, I went with another constable with me to the house of Mr. Richardson in Angel alley; Dodson looks after the house while Richardson is bad in the hospital; I found Dodson sitting in the passage playing with a child, I knew him before for years, I then pointed to Shephard to go to the back part of the house. I saw him go to the back part of the house and pull out from the boards a bullock's hide, which I produce; I then turned round to Dodson, and outside of the door I saw Blake, I brought him in; I then asked Dodson how the leather came there, he told me that Blake had brought it there; Blake denied it, and he said he knew nothing at all about it, I then handcuffed them, and brought them and the property away.

Q. What is Dodson. - A. He was once a respectable man in our parish and kept a public house; he sells braces now about the street.

Q. Does he live in the house. - A. No, he only lives in the house while this poor man is in the hospital.

Q. Where was this concealed. - A. In a kind of a sand bin.

SAMUEL SHEPHARD sworn. I am an officer. On the 6th of May I received information that a hide of leather was carried into this alley by the prisoner Blake, into the house where the prisoner Dodson was, I applied to Mr. Sapwell, we went to the house of Dodson the prisoner, Dodson was then sitting at the door with the child in his arms; in going to the back part of the shop I found the hide covered over with two shutters and a basket, I took the hide up; Sapwell instantly secured the prisoner Dodson; at the instant of securing him, Blake made his appearance outside of the door, Sapwell also secured him, we brought the hide and the prisoners away. (The hide identified by the prosecutor.)

Blake's Defence. On the 6th of May last, coming from Bilingsgate (I am a porter, and get my bread at various markets, and sometimes at Bilingsgate, I have a wife and three small children), I had left my basket at Bilingsgate; a man at the corner says, porter, do you want a job, I says yes, he agreed to give me a couple of shillings to take it to the Blue-Coat Boy, he said he was not in a hurry, I might take it at my leisure; I goes home to leave what supply I had, my wife was not at home. That man is totally innocent, you may depend upon it; I asked him to let me leave it there till I found my children; I went to the prisoner's house to buy some potatoes after I had found my children.

Q. Now where is the man that gave you this to carry. - A. I never saw the man from that time to this; frequently as I go along the street I carry things of this sort.

Dodson's Defence. I can say no more; he came in and asked me liberty to put it there while he lookedfor his children, it remained there during half an hour; during that time Mr. Sapwell came in, I told him Mr. Blake brought it.

Blake. The officer seems to tell you as how the hide was secreted and covered over; I pitched it in the shop, I assure you.

Q. How came you to tell the officer you knew nothing at all about it. - A. If I did, my lord, at the time, it was from the agitation of my mind.

Blake called no witnesses to character.

Dodson called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

BLAKE - GUILTY , aged 37.

Confined One Month in Newgate , and Whipped in Gaol .

DODSON - NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

327. WILLIAM JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 21st of May , a hat, value 3 s. three shirts, value 5 s. three waistcoats, value 8 s. two pair of shoes, value 3 s. three neck handkerchiefs, value 2 s. 6 d. and an apron, value 1 s. the property of John Tuff , and a pair of trowsers, value 3 s. the property of William Whitehead .

JOHN TUFF sworn. I am a painter , I live in Harp lane, Tower street. Last night, about nine o'clock, I arrived from Gravesend; the first part of my passage I was in the aft part of the vessel, I left the aft cabin and came upon deck, and I left my bundle in the care of William Whitehead , we had some friends in the boat, I went into the fore hold, and William Whitehead came to me; I told him to go and get the bundle, he went, and then he replied it was gone; I went on shore, and the watchman who is here, told me he saw a man go by with a bundle and a hat in his hand; I overtook the prisoner at Aldgate pump, I asked him how he came to take these things from the Billingsgate boat, he replied, he had a bundle in the boat, he took them in mistake.

Prisoner's Defence. I walked from Chatham to the Gravesend boat, then I came up to London in the boat, I was half tipsey when I went on board, and in the room of taking my own bundle I took this gentleman's; I lost my own at the same time.

Prosecutor. The captain said there was no bundle left in the vessel; he appeared to be rather in liquor when I took him.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

328. JOHN NIX was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 16th of May , one pound seven ounces weight of coffee, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of the united merchants trading to the East Indies .

Second Count. For stealing like goods, the property of certain persons to the jurors unknown.

The case was stated by Mr. Knapp.

ELY SOUL sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a commodore in the East India Company's warehouse, Crutched Friars , the prisoner at the bar was a labourer in the gang that I had the command of in that warehouse.

Q. Had you observed any Mocoa coffee in that warehouse. - A. Yes, and there was one bale cut, and there seemed to be three or four pounds gone; as he was going out of the door I said I was going to rub our gang down, he appeared confused in my rubbing him down, in two small pockets hanging quite behind, I felt something like coffee, I told him he must go with me to the elder's office, he immediately answered, pray Mr. Soul do not take me there, for God's sake, do not; on being taken there an officer was sent for; in his pocket was found one pound seven ounces of coffee.

- BURGESS sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are the King's locker. - A. Yes, I found the coffee in the possession of the prisoner, it weighs one pound seven ounces, it is Mocoa coffee.

Prisoner's Defence. In the morning I hung up my coat about eight o'clock, I never was nigh it till after three o'clock, I know not how the coffee was put in my pocket, there was nothing in my pocket when I hung it up; I said for God's sake do not say this coffee is in my pocket, it is unknown to me.

GUILTY , aged 35.

Confined One Month in Newgate , and Whipped. in Goal .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

329. DAVID PAYNE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 9th of May , a shirt, value 7 s. and two razors, value 1 s. the property of Joseph Guest .

JOSEPH GUEST sworn. I am a hair dresser , I live at No. 16, Bear-street, Liecester-square ; the prisoner was my journeyman . On Friday, the 9th of May, I pulled my shirt off in the afternoon, and I missed it the same afternoon; I did not accuse him till the Tuesday, and on Friday, the 16th, I went and took a search warrant, and went to the Duke of Clarence, St. James's, where he lodged; the constable searched the drawers, and the first thing that he found was two razors, the next thing he found was a pocket book with the duplicate of the shirt.

EDWARD TREADWAY sworn. I am an officer; on the 16th of May I went with a search warrant to the prisoner's lodging, and there I found these two razors and the duplicate of the shirt; I produce the razors.

THOMAS CHAPMAN sworn. I am a pawnbroker, I produce the shirt, the shirt was pawned by the prisoner for five shillings. (The property identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's Defence. I took this shirt with intent to bring it back when I received my wages.

GUILTY , aged 46.

Confined Fourteen Days in Newgate , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

330. JOHN HURST was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of May , twelve pound weight of flour, value 2 s. the property of John Shephard Killock .

JOHN SHEPHARD KILLOCK sworn. I live at Hackney mills, Lea Bridge.

Q. What is the prisoner. - A. A flour dresser . On Sunday morning the constable of Hackney came to me, and told me that a patrole had taken a man into custody with some flour belonging to me; the prisonertold me he took it from the mill.

Q. How long has the man lived with you. - A. Between two and three years.

JOHN IVES sworn. I am a patrole of Hackney. I stopped this man about twenty-five minutes before five in the morning, on the 18th of May, I stopped him at the bottom of Brooksby's Walk, about a mile and a quarter from the mill, I produce the property he had with him; I says to him, what have you got here my friend, he says a little dust, I says you must go along with me, he says God Almighty bless you, I will give you five shillings to let me go, I says I cannot do no such thing; I took him to the watch-house.

JAMES WRIGHT sworn. I belong to the trustees of the River Lea; I saw the prisoner go over Mr. Killock's premises on Sunday morning, the 18th of May, about half after three, he came back in about ten minutes, and went of the side of the mill called the mill tail.

JAMES GRIFFITHS sworn. I am a constable of Hackney. I took the prisoner into custody, he said he took it out of the mill for the use of his family, and he had been working all night; I produce the flour.

Prosecutor. I have no doubt but that is my flour, it is like it, I cannot swear to it.

GUILTY , aged 34.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

331. ELEANOR RUSSEL was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 22d of April , a silver watch, value 2 l. the property of Thomas Pocock , in the dwelling house of Robert Moreton .

THOMAS POCOCK sworn. I lodge at Robert Moreton 's house, One Tun-court, St. Martin's. On Tuesday, April the 22nd, I arose from my bed, I went to my box, and opened and looked at my watch to see what o'clock it was, it was then half past seven, I then put the watch in my box again, and went to work; I returned about half past two to dinner, and to clean myself; I went up stairs and opened my box, I found my watch was gone; I then went down stairs, and enquired of the servant maid, Eleanor Russel , if she had seen any thing of the watch, she said no, she said you may depend upon it George Singleton has got it, it is gone like the young man's shirts; I then went up and examined my box again, and found no watch there.

Q. Did you find your watch. - A. Yes, at Christopher Brown's, No. 2, Panton-street, in the Hay Market.

THOMAS COPE sworn. I live at No. 2, Panton-street, in the Hay Market, I am servant to Mr. Brown. On the 22nd of April, the prisoner pledged a silver watch with me, she described it as her husbands, I lent her twenty-seven shillings on it. (The watch identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's Defence. I live servant in this house, and the lodger asked me to pawn it for him, the man being sick, I pawned it for him, his name is George Singleton ; he told me if the pawnbroker asked any questions to say it was my husband's; he now denies he ever gave it me.

The prisoner called two witnesses who gave her a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

332. ANN SLOCOMB was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of May , twenty-five yards of printed cotton, value 21 s. the property of Charles Price .

WILLIAM PRICE sworn. I live in Oxford-street, I am shopman to Charles Price . On Saturday the 17th of this month, I saw the prisoner standing close to our window.

Q. I suppose you have linen drapery goods hanging about your window. - A. We have; she went suddenly from the window, I went after her on suspicion, I found a piece of printed cotton under her arm under her cloak, I brought her back to the shop, and Mr. Charles Price sent for an officer.

Q. You took the printed cotton from her. - A. I did, I knew it to be my master's, we measured it over, it measured twenty-five yards.

Cross-examined by Mr. Reynolds.

Q. You say that she suddenly went off, you do not mean to say that she ran off. - A. No.

Q. When you came up to her I believe that she told you that she had it given to her. - A. She did.

Q. You charged her with the property, she without being confused admitted that she had it. - A. I did not say she was confused.

Q. How long before had you seen this property at the window. - A. I cannot tell, I had not seen it that day.

Q. Although you were attending to her you did not see her take it. - A. No.

Q. You say you venture to swear to this property, if you had gone into any place whatever, and you had seen this cotton produced, could you have ventured to have sworn to it. - A. If it had my employer's mark on it, if I had known that he had not sold it.

Q. Therefore you cannot be confident of what is sold but by yourself, other persons sell in the shop as well as yourself. - A. Yes.

Q. You can only swear that you did not sell it, but you cannot swear that any other person might not have sold it. - A. I cannot.

Q. The other shopmen are not here. - A. They did not see any thing of the transaction.

Q. That you do not know, nor whether they had sold it you do not know. - A. No.

JOHN WARREN sworn. I took the girl in custody on Saturday the 17th of May; the cotton was delivered to me by William Price ; I produce it. (The property identified by William Price .)

The prisoner left her defence to her counsel; called two witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY , aged 16.

[The prisoner was recommended to mercy by the jury and the prosecutor, on account of her youth.]

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

334. JOHN CLEMENTS was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of John Christian Buckhart , about the hour of tenat night on the 16th of March , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing a pair of breeches, value 40 s. the property of John Christian Buckhart .

JOHN CHRISTIAN BUCKHART sworn. I live at No. 14, Northumberland-street, in the Strand , I am a jeweller . On the 16th of March last I went into the country; before I went out, I gave the servant leave to go out, I left the house in the charge of my servant; I came back at seven o'clock in the evening, but I did not go home then, I was sent for at half after ten o'clock to come home, that my house was robbed: I returned home and went to my bed room, because I keep my best silver there, I there found the mahogany wardrobe broke open, and my drawers were broke open and they were empty; when I went out in the morning they were full.

Q. Your indictment is about a pair of breeches, I see in the commitment there is a charge of silver. - A. Yes, but the small clothes is the only article found upon the prisoner, and among the articles that I lost was a pair of patent cord small clothes, they cost me between forty and fifty shillings; I gave notice to different offices, but I have not been able to learn any thing who was the thief or what has became of my property; I was lead to Bow-street, where three people were brought up as housebreakers, and the prisoner at the bar wore a pair of small clothes which attracted my notice when he was before the magistrate; in consequence of that I had them examined, they were lined with white calico, and so was mine, they were too large for him, and the buttons to which the gallowses were fastened were white metal, and there was a little spot on the right knee, which I got on them the first time I wore them.

Q. Did they appear to be yours. - A. They did.

WILLIAM BLACKMAN sworn. I produce the breeches, I took them from the prisoner at the Brown Bear at Bow-street, last Monday.

Q.(to prosecutor) Was this part of the property that you lost. - A. They are.

Cross-examined by Mr. Reynolds.

Q. You went out early in the morning. - A. I went out about twelve o'clock in the day.

Q. You have spoken of their value, may I ask you what you paid for them. - A. Upwards of forty shillings.

Q. You had worn them twice and injured the value of them to a purchaser. - A. I might.

Q. These breeches are a common colour, you stated that you knew them by a white calico lining, a little spot, and a white metal button, did you ever see any breeches lined with any other calico than white, there is nothing peculiar in their having white calico lining. - A. I do not know; the last time I wore them I rode to Windsor and back again, the lining doubled under my seat, I found the inconvenience of it, in consequence of which I wore them higher, and the front button was torn out, and it is torn out now.

Court. These are very common sort of breeches. - A. I should not have taken notice of them except from the circumstances I have mentioned.

SARAH RUSSEL sworn. Q. You lived with Mr. Buckhart at this time. - A. Yes.

Q. Tell us what you recollect happening on this Sunday. - A. I went out between the hour of one and half after one in the middle of the day, I made every door and window fast, I double locked the street door; on returning home in the evening a little after ten o'clock, I found the door on the single lock, I went in and struck a light, I perceived the back parlour door open and two cupboards.

Q. You found the house in such a state that you supposed somebody had been there. - A. Yes, when I went into the back room, I went to the door directly and called the watchman, I told him somebody had been in the house, there was some gentlemen came from over the way, they went up stairs and found the drawers of the wardrobe were broken open, they were all empty.

Q.(to prosecutor) What had been in them drawers. A. Plate and linen were in some of the drawers, and in others my clothes.

Sarah Russel. We went into the front room, them drawers were broken open likewise, and different things were missing; we came down into the kitchen, we found they had been in the kitchen and opened every drawer in the kitchen; they took out of the cupboard in the kitchen four tea spoons, and one table spoon out of the kitchen drawer; I sent for my master.

STEPHEN LAVENDER sworn. I am one of the patroles belonging to Bow-street; we apprehended the prisoner on the 11th of this month, he had the breeches on him, he is detained for something else.

Court. (to prosecutor) What was the amount of your loss. - A. It cannot be less than between two and three hundred pounds.

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutor in one place observed that there is a button which is nearly coming off, which supports the gallowses, which is in consequence of his wearing his breeches so high; when I had these breeches this button was perfectly fast, and it is lose now, in consequence of the heavy irons they put on me at Bow-street; I purchased these breeches promiscuously, in the middle of the street of a Jew, I saw them hanging across the man's arm, they attracted my attention seeing them a good pair of breeches, to the best of my knowledge I gave twenty-three shillings for them, if they are stole it is unknown to me.

Q.(to Lavender.) Had he heavy irons on before you took off the breeches. - A. Yes, he had an iron on about a week, and he wore these breeches, because we knew nothing about them breeches.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

334. SARAH BURTON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 18th of April , two silver spoons, value 1 l. a shift, value 5 s. three pair of stockings, value 5 s. three shirts, value 1 l. and two handkerchiefs, value 1 s. the property of Jane Capel Banes , in her dwelling house .

ANN HARPER sworn. I live in Little Dean's Yard , Westminster; I am housekeeper to Jane Capel Banes , she keeps a boarding-house .

Q. Did the prisoner at the bar live with your mistress's family. - A. Yes.

Q. How came you to fix any part of this upon the prisoner. - A. It was found out by the dustmanbringing a pawnbroker's ticket to me of a shirt for five shillings, with the name of Broomfield upon it; this was on the 18th of April. I went to the pawnbroker to see who it belonged to, I took the shirt out, I knew it to be one of the boy's shirts, it was marked with permanent ink Thompson; I sent the officer to search Broomfield's room; the prisoner was taken up on some information he got upon this search; the prisoner was searched in my presence, and some duplicates were found upon her.

JAMES GILLMORE sworn. I am an officer of Queen's square. On searching Broomfield's house, I found they were acquainted with the prisoner, I immediately went back to Mrs. Banes and searched the prisoner, there I found upon her the duplicate of a spoon pledged for seven shillings, a shift pledged for three shillings, two pair of stockings pledged for eighteen pence each, a shirt pledged for six shillings, and a duplicate of a shirt and handkerchief pledged for five shillings, and several other duplicates which relate to another indictment that is against her; I found in her pocket this table spoon, I found in her box two pair of stockings and a prayer book; I then apprehended the prisoner.

CHARLES SMITH sworn. I am shopman to Mr. Wright, pawnbroker, in Tothil-street, Westminster; I produce a shirt and a handkerchief pledged by the prisoner for five shillings, and a pair of stockings for eighteen pence, a spoon for seven shillings, a shift for five shillings, a shirt for six shillings, and two handkerchiefs for one shilling. (The property identified by Ann Harper .)

The prisoner said nothing in her defence, nor called any witness to character.

GUILTY, aged 39.

Of stealing to the value of thirty-nine shillings .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

335. WILLIAM TOWNSEND was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of James Purcell , about the hour of eleven at night on the 5th of February , with intent to steal and burglariously stealing therein, seventeen ox tongues, value 1 l. 14 s. thirteen pig's jaws, value 1 l. 12 s. three cheeses, value 3 l. 14 s. eleven pound weight of tea, value 3 l. 6 s. fifty-six pound weight of sugar, value 2 l. two hundred and forty penny pieces, five hundred and forty three halfpence, and four hundred and thirty five farthings , the property of James Purcell .

JAMES PURCELL sworn. I live at No. 8, Bembridge street, St. Giles's . On the night of the 5th of February my two shutters were forced out, and two squares of glass were cut across; I was disturbed by the watchman, I got up.

Q. What room was the glass broke. - A. Of the shop window; when he alarmed me I come out in my shirt just as I was, and my slippers, the watchman gave me a light, I found the things gone.

Q. What was there gone. - A. I keep a provision warehouse, I sell all manner of salt provision, butter, cheese, potatoes, it is a poor neighbourhood; when the watchman had alarmed me, he sprang his rattle, and there was one of the party taken with some of the property on him, his name was Thomas Taylor , he was here three sessions ago, he has been tried and convicted; he had some of the property found on him, one of the pigs' jaws.

Q. I what to know what circumstance you have to bring it home to the prisoner at the bar; there is no circumstance that you can prove against the prisoner at the bar from your own knowledge. - A. No.

Q. Then all the evidence that you have is by means of the accomplice. - A. I know no more than in Mr. Townsend's lodgings part of the property has been found.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp.

Q. Whether they are your property that you do not mean to say. - A. No, far be that from me.

Court. You do not know they are your property. - A. No, I have not seen one of them after they were found.

Mr. Knapp. Was there a word said about their being found in his lodging in the last trial. - A. I believe not, you will not hear a wrong word of me.

WILLIAM BLACKMAN sworn. I am an officer of Bow-street. On the 6th of February I received information from Christopher Jones and Michael Layha ; I went with them into John's court, and there we found three cheeses (Mr. Purcell had the cheeses for fear they should be spoiled, they were produced here when Taylor was tried), they were hid under the dung in the stable; we went there by information that we received from Daniel Murphy , he is admitted an evidence to the crown.

Court. None of this brings home anything to the prisoner at the bar. - A. No, I went to the prisoners lodgings with Michael Layha , No. 4, Compton street, up in a two pair of stairs back room.

Q. How do you know they were his lodgings. - A. By information from the woman of the house, she said that he lodged there; there was a young woman that he lives with, or was his wife, that was there.

Q. Is the woman of the house here. - A. No.

Q. You have no evidence of this being the prisoner's lodging, but the accomplice. - A. Here is part of the property that we found there.

Q. I want to know how you can bring it home to the prisoner, is there any body here that can say it was the prisoner's lodgings. - A. I do not believe there is; I received information that it was the prisoner's lodgings, there was the young woman there that he lived with as his wife, she was standing under the door of the cock lost, and there was a chair stood by her. which as I turned up stairs I heard her get off, I got up into the chair, suspecting to find Townsend in the roof of the house, I looked about the roof, he was not there; between the rafters at the top of the plaister and laths, I found this stocking, with all these halfpence and farthings, they were tied up in this stocking; I put them down to Christopher Jones and Michael Layha , I have kept them ever since, they correspond with the quantity that was found on Taylor.

Q.(to prosecutor) Do you know that stocking. - A. No, I rather fancy the halfpence are mine, I am certain that farthing is mine, I can swear to them two farthings that they had been taken out of my house.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp.

Q. These are two bad farthings. - A. Yes, they are not the value of two farthings.

Q. Are both of them of the value of one farthing. - A. I do not know, I think they are bad farthings, they have been amongst the money, that is what I swear; they were among the money that was stolen from me.

Court. There is no mark on them of yours. - A. No, there is a mark on the crooked farthing that I know of, they had been returned me by the baker, I just marked them by the thinness of them, I made an observation on them.

CHRISTOPHER JONES sworn. I am an officer. I went with Blackman when he went to the top of the house, when he found the halfpence.

Q. Do you know it was the prisoner's lodgings. - A. I only know from information of others.

Q. Did you ever see him there. - A. No.

DANIEL MURPHY sworn. Q. What do you know respecting this charge of the prisoner. - A. He was one of the party.

Q. Who did the party consist of. - A. Thomas Taylor , Bill Scarer , Jerry Ragan , James Britten , Bill Townsend , and Daniel Murphy myself; when we came to Mr. Purcell's house, James Britten took the shutter down, it was then about eleven o'clock, we had come from Short's gardens; Taylor then cut the window with his knife, he took the cheese out of the window and gave them to the others; I was standing watching on the opposite side of the way; we took four cheeses out and some tea and sugar, and put it into a stable.

Q. Whereabouts was the prisoner standing. - A. At the window.

Q. Did he receive any thing. - A. He did, I see him receive some tea.

Q. You know nothing of any halfpence or any money. - A. I did not see any money about the place at all.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

336. JOHN RYAN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 16th of May , a pair of shoes, value 5 s. the property of William Gardner .

WILLIAM GARDNER sworn. I live at No. 23, Wellclose-street, Wellclose-square , I am a tinplate worker . Last Thursday night the shoes mentioned in the indictment were hanging in my back parlour, I saw them there at eleven o'clock when I went to bed; about a few minutes after seven George Wheeler came up and received a key of me of the parlour, a few minutes after this Ann Spencer came up with a pair of shoes, and asked me if they were mine, I immediately recognised the shoes as my own; I brought them down stairs, where I saw the prisoner at the bar; I gave the shoes to George Wheeler , and desired him to detain the prisoner; I fetched a constable, and delivered the shoes and the prisoner to the constable.

ANN SPENCER sworn. The shoes were given to me by George Wheeler , I carried them up stairs to Mr. Gardner.

GEORGE WHEELER sworn. On Friday morning I went to the shop before my master was up, not finding the shop open I went up to Mr. Gardner's bed room door, the entry door was open, and Ann Spencer was up.

Q. What time of the morning was it. - A. Between seven and eight; Mr. Gardner gave me the key of the parlour, I admitted myself into the parlour, which is the back entrance to the shop, and after I had taken down some of the shutters, I found the parlour door open which I had shut, I went to the parlour door, and the prisoner was standing with his face to the parlour door in the passage, I questioned him what business he had in the house, and whether he had taken any thing out of the parlour, which he denied; the witness Thompson came in, and took a pair of shoes from under his coat, he gave them to me, I called Ann Spencer , she went up stairs with the shoes to Mr. Gardner. The prisoner said he only wanted a drink of water. (The shoes produced and identified by the prosecutor.)

GEORGE THOMPSON sworn. I took the shoes from the prisoner in Mr. Gardner's passage.

Prisoner's Defence. He swears to the shoes; I I bought them honestly, I bought them in Rosemary lane, I gave all the money I had for them, which was three shillings and nine pence.

GUILTY , aged 84.

Confined Two Years in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

337. JOHN RANGER and REBECCA GAMBLE , were indicted for feloniously making an assault upon Richard Cole on the 19th of April , putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, a bank note, value 2 l. the property of the said Richard Cole .

RICHARD COLE sworn. I went into the prisoner John Ranger 's house on the 18th of April, I went to his house with a young woman, a girl of the town; Ranger came up stairs after I had been two or three minutes in the house; the woman that I picked up began a quarrel with me, she thought the money that I offered was too little, she called Ranger up and told him that I intended to bilk her, he went down stairs, then she put her back against the door and kept me in the room for near three hours; after I had been in the room three hours, I was admitted to come down stairs into the passage, when Rebecca Gamble came down as the mistress of the house; she swore that I should not go out of the house with as much about me as the bigness of my hand; the woman that I picked up came down stairs with me, she was in the passage too; Rebecca Gamble said what I had about me she would shake it out of me; at the same time I took a two pound note out of my pocket and put it into my hand, she put my hand into her mouth and bit it, which was the occasion of my letting the note drop. I resisted against her by striking her with my hand, at the same time Ranger come out of the parlour, and struck me with a stick.

Q. I want to know whether he could observe that you had this bank note in your hand. - A. I believe not; I believe Rebecca Gamble saw it, I asked them whether they intended to murder me, I took a hair broom, and said if they did not let me out, Iwould break the windows.

Q. Did the woman that you picked up assist. - A. No.

Q. How came you not to make such an effort as that while you were in the room three hours. - A. I did, I called the watchman, when I was up stairs the watchman knocked at the door; when I said I would break the windows if they would not let me out, Ranger took me by the shoulders, opened the door, and pushed me out.

Q. Did you ask for the two pound note. - A. No, at the time that I was put into the court, I called the watchman again.

Q. What court was it. - A. Marygold court, in the Strand; the watchman came to my assistance, he knocked at the door and was refused admittance; he advised me to go to St. Martin's watchhouse, and relate the story to the constable of the night, which I did, the constable came from the watchhouse with me to the house, he knocked and was refused admittance; I told him the situation I was in, and all the circumstance, he saw how my shirt was torn and my hand was bleeding; when he knocked they said Mr. Ranger was gone out and they had lost the key, they could not open the door; we heard Ranger talking to some of the women.

Q. What time was this. - A. That was after two o'clock in the morning.

Q. What o'clock was it when you first went. - A. About a quarter before eleven; the constable went away and desired me and the watchman to remain at the door till he should return, he returned to the watchman and me, we waited at the door till half after six, at last a man came out of the house, we then gained admittance; we went up stairs and found the woman prisoner in bed with her clothes on, the constable took her into custody, and returned down stairs and knocked at Ranger's door, he refused opening it, a girl came from the back parlour and told him if he went through her room there was a little door with a bolt, he might go into it, which he did and found Ranger in bed; after we had got him in custody, he asked leave to go into the yard, the constable gave him leave (he had not quite dressed himself), instead of going in the yard he went up stairs and made off out of the back of the house, and was missing for about a week.

Q. Did you ever find your note again. - A. No, I did not see it after it dropped on the ground.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp.

Q. You picked up up this girl and went into Marygold court. - A. She picked me up.

Q. I suppose you had been in the room some time before she and you had a dispute. - A. I had not been there above five or ten minutes before the dispute began, I offered her a compliment, but she did not think that was enough; there was some words between us, but there was no disturbance.

Q. Mr. Ranger came up upon being called, and after he had been there a little while he returned down again. - A. He did.

Q. Then this woman put herself against the door, and vowed you should not go till you had paid her what she demanded. - A. Yes.

Q. You got down stairs after being there about three hours. - A. Yes, when I got down stairs Mr. Ranger locked the door, Mrs. Gamble came down stairs as the mistress of the house, she vowed I should not go any farther without paying immediately; she saw the note in my hand, she put my hand into her mouth and bit it.

Q. Will you venture to swear that Mrs. Gamble at that time knew that you had a two pound note in your hand. - A. I certainly could not swear to that, I believe she knew it by her attempting to bite me, I resisted by striking her.

Q. Whether with the pain that you received from the bite the note did not drop on the floor. - A. I cannot say.

Q. Do you know how the note went. - A. I should naturally suppose that she took it out of my hand, I can only venture to swear I lost it there.

Q. Upon your oath, will you venture to swear that Mr. Ranger knew any thing at all of your having a two pound note. - A. No.

Ranger called four witnesses who gave him a good character.

BOTH - NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

338. STEPHEN RALLEY was indicted for that he on the 22d of April , being servant to James Waugh , and employed and entrusted to receive money for him, and that he being so employed and entrusted as aforesaid, did receive and take into his possession, the sum of 1 l. 19 s. 9 d. 1/2 on account of his said master, and that he afterwards feloniously did embezzle, secrete, and steal the same .

Second Count for like offence, only stating that he received the money of John Mountain.

The case was stated by Mr. Knapp.

JOHN MOUNTAIN sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp. I live at the Elephant and Castle, St. Pancras.

Q. Did you deal with Mr. Waugh, Goodge-street, Tottenham Court Road. - A. I have dealt with him three different times.

Q. Do you remember paying the prisoner any sum of money, and what. - A. The last that I paid him was on the 22d of April, for which I have got his receipt.

Q. What did the prisoner say at the time he demanded the money. - A. He did not demand it, he brought the bill with the goods, and delivered it, I paid him one pound nineteen shillings and ninepence halfpenny; on the Monday after that the master same to me with the bill for the money, I told him I owed him none, I shewed him the bill and receipt the prisoner gave me.

JOHN WAUGH sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are a cheesemonger, living in Goodge-street, Tottenham Court Road, the prisoner was your servant. - A. Yes, he has been with me better than three quarters of a year, I entertained a very good opinion of him, I always gave him more than I agreed for.

Q. Did you make up your books at any time. - A. Yes, before the 22d of April, I thought I was deficient, I said to Stephen take an account of the stock, just count the hams, cheese, and the butter, he did so, and I took the amount of them; I told him I was almost two hundred pounds out of pocket, I very much suspected he was robbing of me; I went to Mr. Mountain's, I took the bill and demanded the money,he told me he paid the money the day the cheese was brought.

Q. Did you ever tax the prisoner with it. - A. I never taxed the prisoner with it.

Q. Did the prisoner ever account to you for the amount of this bill. - A. Never.

Court. You are pretty clear that you had this conversation with the prisoner before the 22nd of April. - A. Yes.

Q. How long afterwards was it that you went down to Mountain's. - A. About a week: I think I had the prisoner taken up the same day I went to Mr. Mountain's, I applied to Marlborough-street office, two officers came and apprehended him at my house.

Q. Did the prisoner say any thing at the time he was taken up. - A. He said what is the matter; I told him, Stephen you have been a robbing of me; he says have not I worked very hard in your service, I says you have very hard and I have rewarded you, have I ever given you less than two pints of porter a-day; he said he had spent all his own money and mine too.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley.

Q. I think you said the prisoner was with you for three quarters of a year. - A. Yes.

Q. He was your book-keeper. - A. He occasionally wrote in my books.

Q. Did not you keep an open account with the prisoner, and he was to settle with you at the quarter of a year. - A. Never, he always gave me the money, or should do.

Q. Did you know a man of the name of Haydon. A. Yes.

Q. Have you never said to him that the prisoner and you always settle your accounts once a quarter. A. I never did.

Q. In the conversation that you had with him after you discovered your loss, you stated your general loss to him, you did not ask him whether he had received any money from Mr. Mountain. - A. Says I, Stephen you have robbed me of the money of Mr. Mountain's cheese; the answer that he gave me was, that he had not received it.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

329. MARGARET OBRIEN was indicted for feloniously stealing in the dwelling house of Thomas Evans , on the 7th of May , a canvas bag, value 1 d. three guineas, seven half guineas, four seven-shilling pieces, fifty-one shillings, sixteen sixpences, ten halfpence, a bank note, value 10 l. three other bank notes, value 2 l. each, and five other bank notes, value 1 l. each , the property of Kidgell Seabrook.

KIDGELL SEABROOK sworn. Q. Do you know Thomas Evans . - A. Yes, he keeps the Spread Eagle public house, St. Giles's ; the prisoner and and I went into this house to drink together; I being up all night coming to town, I dropped asleep, some girls that were in the house said they saw her pick my pocket of something.

Q. Had you any thing in your pocket. - A. Yes, forty-six pounds; the landlady awaked me, and told me it was time to go, I asked them whether I could have a bed there, they said no.

Q. What time of the night was this. - A. About eleven o'clock, I believe; I went over to the King's head, they lodged me there; when I awoke in the morning I felt for my watch and my purse of money, my money and watch was gone; the publican searched after her, and found her with this money and my purse.

Q. Where does the prisoner belong to. - A. I do not know, I met with her in the street, and we agreed to go and have a drop of beer together.

Q. Were you sober. - A. I was a little in liquor.

THOMAS EVANS sworn. Q. Do you keep the Spread Eagle. - A. Yes. On the 7th of May the prosecutor and the prisoner came into my house from the Brown Bear or some place in Diot-street; they set drinking some beer, I was not at home when they came in; when I came in there were some gipsies, some Scotch people, from whom I understood he had his pocket picked of something.

Q. Was he in the room at the time you understood his pocket was picked. - A. Yes; he was quite tipsy asleep; I awoke him, I thought to speak to him, I saw it was of no use he was to tipsy, I went in search of this woman that I understood had robbed the man; in going to Diot-street, I met a woman who told me there was a girl with a deal of money at the Maidenhead public house; I met this girl and several others coming out of the door, I understood from some of them that she had the money, I laid hold of her and searched her, and found thirty two pounds, three shillings and eleven pence upon her.

Q. Did you find a purse or any thing of that sort upon her. - A. Yes, I produce it and the money.

Q. Did you ask her how she came by it. - A. Yes, she was drunk, she would not make any answer if she could; I gave her in charge to Blackman the officer.

Prosecutor. That is my purse; there was forty-six pounds in it when I lost it; there was one ten pound note in it, I cannot swear to the money.

WILLIAM BLACKMAN sworn. I was going up Diot street; there was a woman ran out of the Maidenhead; Mr. Evans said I am glad you are come, take hold of that woman, he had searched her in the house and counted the money, she tried to abscond from him, I happened to meet her at the door, I took her into custody, I asked her how she got the money, she said she was drunk, she admitted that she took it as I was taking her down to the watchhouse.

Q. Was she drunk. - A. She was very much in liquor.

GUILTY, aged 24.

Of stealing, but not in the dwelling house .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose:

339. MARGARET RAGAN and THOMAS CAMPBELL were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 18th of May , a hat, value 5 s. the property of Joseph Tomkins .

Second Count for stealing a like hat, laying it to be the property of John Tomkins .

JAMES EDWARDS sworn. I am a watch finisher, I live at No. 19, Gee street. On Sunday evening about half past eight o'clock, a neighbour's child came running into my house, and told me that a nephew of mine had been beat, and his hat taken from him.

A. Who is your nephew. - A. John Tomkins ; I went out and met the young woman at the bar; I says to the boy, John where is your hat, he says this woman has punched me in the face, and took my hat and gave it to a boy, he has ran away with it, I then says to the woman, I will take care of you, she said I did not mean to keep it, do not charge a constable with me and I will get the hat again; as soon as I could get her into Cripplegate parish I charged an officer with her, and from there she was taken to the compter.

JOHN TOMKINS. Q. How old are you. - A. I am twelve the second of June; I am an errand boy to Mr. Dancer, Great Sutton street, I live with my uncle Mr. Edwards.

Q. Have you ever been to school. - A. Yes.

Q. Then you have learned your catechism. - A. Yes.

Q. Is it a good thing or a bad thing to tell a lie. - A. It is a bad thing to tell a lie.

Q. You are going to be sworn, by that means you call God to witness that what you say shall be the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth; therefore if you tell a lie you will be punished in this world and likewise in the other world (sworn); what do you know about this business, when was it. - A. Last Sunday evening about eight or half after eight, there was me and these two boys along with me, and they looked into a little house.

Q. Where was you then. - A. In Goswell street fields ; these two boys were looking into a little house, and they said there was a ghost, they wanted me to look in to see it; then this girl and boy (the prisoners at the bar), and a great many more, came up to me, and the boy (the prisoner) snatched John Sheen 's hat off, and put it on his head, that hat did not fit him, the girl came up to me and said he shall not have your hat, she touched me on the back, took my hat from my head, throwed it to the boy, and he ran away with it as hard as he could; I did not see the boy afterwards till the constable had got him at the watchhouse in Redcross street, there they asked me whether it was my hat.

Q. Are you sure that is the boy. - A. Yes, I am sure Thomas Campbell is the boy and Margaret Ragan is the girl.

Q. Are you sure that is your hat that you saw at the watchhouse. - A. Yes, the officer asked me where I bought the hat, I told him, the officer took my hat to the place, they knew the make of it.

HENRY BULLOCK sworn. I am an officer of Cripplegate Without. On Sunday morning I was sent for to take the prisoner Margaret Ragan into custody; I took her from the public house in Princes street, Bridgwater square, to the compter; I afterwards apprehended the boy, he confessed that he received the hat from Margaret Ragan .

Q. Did you say anything to induce the boy to confess. - A. The officer questioned him, he said that she had offered him several hats, and he took that.

WILLIAM WOOD sworn. I am a constable, I produce the hat; the prisoner Campbell came into the watchhouse with this hat on his head, it was taken off his head, and given to me just at the time the little boy and his uncle came into the watchhouse, he described the mark on the hat, and where he bought it; I went to the hatters, and he said there was his private mark on it.

JOHN EDWARDS . Q. How old are you. - A. I am twelve next Christmas.

Q. Do you know whether it is a good thing or a bad thing to tell a lie. - A. It is a bad thing.

Q. Do you know that if you tell a lie after you are sworn, you will be punished in this world and the next too. - A. Yes. (witness sworn.)

Q. Now my boy you have called God to witness to all that you shall say respecting these two people, that it shall be the whole truth and nothing but the truth, tell me what you know about this business. - A. The girl took John Sheen 's hat, it being too little she returned it, then she went to John Tomkins , and said he shall not take yours, he was going to run away, she laid hold of his hat, and took it off his head, and gave it to the other boy, and he ran away with it; I was going to run after the girl, and she said if you make any alarm I will stick a knife into you.

Q. Are you sure that is the girl. - A. Yes.

Q. Is that the boy. - A. Yes, we kept slyly behind the girl, and sent Sheen home to my father; as we followed her, she said if you keep after me I will murder you.

JOHN SHEEN . Q. How old are you. - A. I am eleven years old to-day.

Q. You have been to school. - A. Yes.

Q. What is your father. - A. He is a watch engraver.

Q. It is a good thing or a bad thing to tell a lie. - A. It is a bad thing to tell a lie (witness sworn.)

Q. Were you in company with Edwards and Tomkins. - A. Yes.

Q. What passed. - A. We were playing at follow my leader; this girl came up and took my hat from off my head, it was too little for Campbell, she gave it me again; she says to John Tomkins , my dear, he shall not take your hat, and she took his hat off directly.

Q. Did you lose sight of her before she was taken into custody. - A. No.

Q. Are you sure that is the woman. - A. Yes, I am sure that is the boy.

Ragan's Defence. I never pulled his hat off.

Campbell's Defence. I did not take the hat.

RAGAN - GUILTY , aged 15.

CAMPBELL - GUILTY , aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

331. ANDREW CLARKE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 17th of April , thirty-six yards of muslin, value 6 l. the property of John Garcias and Thomas Lewis .

The case was stated by Mr. Knapp.

- COGGERILL sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp Q. You are in the employ of Messrs. Garcias and Lewis, what are their names. - A. John Garcias and Thomas Lewis , they are Spanish merchants , their warehouse is No. 87, London Wall .

Q. Was their warehouse broken open at any time and when. - A. On Thursday morning the 17th of April I went to the warehouse; I found the padlock was off, the staple and the door had been forced open, I saw a quantity of cambric muslins laying on the ground.

Q. Did you upon looking at the muslins and cambrics miss any. - A. I did not touch them, it is not my department, I did not touch them till I made Mr. Lewis acquainted with it; when Mr. Lewis arrived, I went in, I found a padlock that did not belong to the warehouse, which was left there, and another padlock which belonged to the warehouse, and an iron crow.

WILLIAM MACALPINE sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are employed in the warehouse of Messrs. Garcias and Lewis. - A. I had the management of the sale of these goods for Messrs. Garcias and Lewis.

Q. Did you miss any of these articles. - A. Immediately upon hearing of the circumstance of the robbery, I went with a relation of Mr. Garcias, and took an account of the things that were missing; there were fourteen pieces of muslin missing altogether.

THOMAS LEWIS sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Your name is Thomas Lewis , what is your partner's name. - A. John Garcias .

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney.

Q. Have you any private partner. - A. None; there is no person connected in our trade but me and Mr. Garcias.

JOHN WALDEN sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a watchman of Cripplegate Within.

Q. Were you upon your beat on the 17th day of April last. - A. I was; on that morning, at the hour of half past four, I went by this warehouse, and took particular notice (I had a great charge upon me of taking care of this warehouse); I found every thing safe, and the padlock was on the door.

Court. Did you try the padlock. - A. Yes, it was safe as far as I know; I went to the watchhouse and resigned my coat and lanthorn, and about five o'clock I went round again; on my going on to cry the hour of five o'clock, I observed a hackney coach draw up to the warehouse door, I took particular notice of the number, 146, it was a yellow bodied coach, I directly walked down to see what they were about, I had great suspicions that it was a robbery, I saw the property put into the coach, by the coachman and another person who is not here.

Court. Do you know the coachman. - A. Yes, I took particular observation of the person of the coachman, the prisoner is the man.

Q. Where was the prisoner and the other person bringing the property from. - A. From the warehouse of Messrs. Garcias and Lewis; I attempted to follow the coach, to see where these goods were deposited, I could see nobody in the street, the watchmen were all off their beats; I followed the coach as far as Jewin-street, and then he drove at such a last rate that I lost sight of him.

Q. Could not you get up behind it. - A. Yes, but I was afraid he would give me a cut or two.

Q. When did you see the coachman again. - A. On the Friday following I saw the prisoner at Bow-street.

Q. Is the prisoner, whom you saw at Bow-street, the person that you saw drive the coach on that morning. - A. I have no doubt of it.

Mr. Knapp. What quantity had been put in the coach, do you know. - A. I could not tell, I suppose I saw eight or ten large parcels put into the coach.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley.

Q. You are a watchman, you say you saw the coach at the prosecutor's warehouse, how many persons did you see at the warehouse. - A. I only saw one besides the coachman.

Q. What time do the watchman go off their beat. - A. At five o'clock, at that time there is no watchman to be seen.

Q. But there were some people going to work. - A. Not at that part.

Q. Can you read. - A. Yes.

Q. You say the number of the coach was 246. - A. No. 146.

Q. You had never seen the coachman before. - A. Not to my knowledge.

Q. How far were you from the place when you saw the things put in the coach. - A. I suppose about an hundred yards, I walked nearer the coach when I saw the number, I was opposite the coach when it drove in the street.

Q. You did not make any alarm. - A. No, I could not see any body, I made an alarm, so far, I went and told the constable of the night.

Q. You saw the coach drive up to the door, why did not you go to the watchhouse and get assistance. - I was afraid the coach would get off.

SAMUEL TAUNTON sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am an officer of Bow-street.

Q. From information that you received, did you apprehended the prisoner. - A. I did, in company with Townshend, on the 17th of April last, at No. 20, William's Mews, Devonshire-street, Portland Place, between nine and ten o'clock at night; when the prisoner opened the door I informed him that we were two officers, that I suspected he had some property that did not belong to him, he replied that he had nothing but what he worked hard for, and paid for, and that we were welcome to search any part of his premises that we liked; we went up one pair of stairs and searched two rooms and a hay lost, and found nothing, I then came down stairs and and searched the stable, and inside of the coach.

Q. What was the number of the coach. - A.146, a yellow bodied coach; I then renewed my search up stairs, and opened a window of a back room (his bed room), there was a kind of blind which went up two foot from the lower part of the window, sloping in this way (witness describing); I pushed up the window, and there I found two pieces in paper, and two pieces out of paper, there was four pieces altogether; I then told the prisoner that was what I was looking for, I asked him where he got it, he told me that he found them in his coach when he came home at five o'clock; in the afternoon on the Friday following he was examined at Bow-street, and this property was identified by Mr. Macalpine. The prisoner is the owner of the coach, he told me he had only one pairof plates, he drove them himself.

Mr. Knapp. (to Macalpine) Look at that muslin, is that one of the four pieces that were missing on that day - A. I believe it to be, I have no doubt of it.

Prisoner's Defence. I was called by a person in Cheapside, at two o'clock in the morning, he ordered me to Finsbury-square, he stopped me at Moorgate, there a person came to the coach, he said something, what I do not know, to the man in the coach; I was desired to go up Chiswell-street, I waited there two hours, when a parcel was brought to the coach; I went away according to his directions, he ordered me to 61, Smithfield, when I got there he stopped the coach again, he ordered me to go to Back Hill, when I got there he pointed to the place opposite of the hill, that leads to Clerkenwell Green, there he went out with the things, he told me he should be back again to pay me my fare; I waited there a considerable time, and during the time I waited I got into the coach, and on my sitting down in the straw I put my arm on the parcel; I waited, no person coming to me, I went home, I informed my wife that I had had a job and had not got my fare; I described the person, saying, that if he called by that description, there was his property; it was on my drawers, I went out with the coach the same day.

Court. Where was you at five o'clock in the morning. - A. I was not home till half after five.

Q. Where was you at five. - A. I was in Fore-street then.

The prisoner called six witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 32.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

332. THOMAS HAYWOOD was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 12th of May , a basket, value 1 s. and forty pound weight of butter, value 2 l. 10 s. the property of William Thomas .

WILLIAM THOMAS . I live in Trump-street, Honey-lane Market , I am a butterman and cheesemonger ; on Monday week the 12th instant, about twenty minutes before nine o'clock in the evening, I was in Milk-street, Cheapside, I had not been gone ten minutes before I was sent after, and was informed that I had lost a quantity of butter; when I returned, the prisoner at the bar was in my shop, and the flat of butter; I could swear to the butter, by the note that was in it.

JOHN CARTER sworn. I am servant to Mr. Hubbard, poulterer, a neighbour opposite to Mr. Thomas: I was at my own shop, I saw this here prisoner take the flat of butter up.

Q. What time of the day was it. - A. About twenty minutes before nine o'clock at night; he walked gently down the left hand side of Trump-street with it, I walked after him, hearing his shoes, another behind whistled, as soon as he heard the whistle he dropped the flat of butter, I hallooed out Stop thief; soon after he was taken.

Q. Did you lose sight of him. - A. No, he was brought back and the butter too, there was no soul in the street but him and another man.

Prisoner. I think he is swearing very false.

WILLIAM M'DONALD sworn. I am a constable; on Monday, the 12th instant, I was sent for by Mr. Thomas to come to his shop, the prisoner and the butter was in Mr. Thomas's shop; I produce the flat and the cloth. (The property identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's Defence. I have just come from Ireland, I have been out of the kingdom twelve years, I have been in Egypt and every where, as I was going down this street, when the word Stop thief was cried out, I ran as well as the rest; this boy swore that he never lost sight of me, he said to the alderman that he lost sight of me for ten minutes, and that I had a white coat on; there were two hundred people in the street besides me.

Court. Q. It is a short street, there could not be two hundred people at that time of the night. - A. This boy will swear any thing.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

333. JOSEPH PENNYFEATHER was indicted for that he on the 11th of March , was servant to George Wood , was employed and entrusted by him to receive money for him, and being such servant, so employed and entrusted, did receive and take into his possession, 8 s. a promissory note for the payment of 10 l. another promissory note for the payment of 5 l. and two bank notes for the payment of 1 l. each, for and on account of his said master, that he afterwards fraudulently and feloniously did embezzle, secrete, and steal, the same .

The case was stated by Mr. Alley.

GEORGE WOOD sworn. Examined by Mr. Alley.

Q. You are a cheesemonger . - A. I am, in Bishopsgate street, the prisoner was my servant and warehouseman; he was sent by me on Tuesday the 11th of March, to the west end of the town to recieve orders.

Q. He was entrusted to receive money for you. - A. He was.

Q. On the 12th of March did he bring any money to you from Mr. Lee's. - A. He did not.

Q. Mr. Lee was a customer of yours. - A. He is, he was indebted to me seventeen pounds eight shillings; he is a cheesemonger, in Hungerford-street.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gleed.

Q. That man has lived with you for some years. - A. He has been with me about eight years, and five years he has lived in the house.

Q. The man at the bar was employed for the purpose of receiving orders and taking money. - A. Yes.

Q. Mr. Lee was a customer of yours. - A He was.

Q. Your servant returned after receiving orders, and then there is an entry made in some book. - A. Yes.

Q. That book is not here. - A. It is not; when he comes home he brings an account of what he has received, that is his memorandum (producing a paper) of his own writing, one side is the orders, and on the reverse side is the money that he has received, but no mention is made of receiving any from Mr.Lee.

JAMES LEE sworn. I am a cheesemonger, I live at No. 10, Hungerford-street.

Q. On the 12th of March, did you pay the prisoner any sum of money on account of his master. - A. Yes, I paid him seventeen pounds eight shillings, on account of his master, George Wood , I paid him a ten pound Henly bank note, a five pound Henly bank note, and two bank of England notes of one pound each, and eight shillings in cash.

SAMUEL GOLD sworn. Examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You are one of the clerks of the prosecutor. - A. Yes.

Q. Did the prisoner account to you for this sum of money. - A. He never did.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gleed.

Q. How many clerks are there in your house. - A. Only Mr. Everest and myself.

HENRY EVERETT sworn. Examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You are also a clerk, did he ever account to you for this money. - A. Never.

Court. (to prosecutor) When was he taken up. - A. On the 17th of April.

Q. Was seventeen pounds eight shillings due to you from Mr. Lee. - A. Yes; the way I discovered it was paid was by one of my clerks calling on the Monday for the money, then it appeared that he had paid it.

Q.(to Lee) Before the 17th of March you were indebted to Mr. Wood, seventeen pounds eight shillings. - A. Yes.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel, and called seven witnesses who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 32.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

334. ELIZABETH SULLIVAN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 23d of April , two sheets, value 12 s. the property of James Lemoine .

ELIZABETH LEMOINE sworn. Q. Are you a married woman. - A. Yes, my husband's name is James Lemoine , we live at No. 5, Tash-street, Gray's Inn-lane . The prisoner came to my house on Friday the 18th of April, and took a ready furnished room of me at five shillings a week, she came in immediately, she said she was married, her husband was a goldsmith she said at first, but she varied from that, afterwards she told me that he was ill in the country, she expected him home on the Monday; she continued in her lodgings till Monday afternoon, she slept out on Monday night and Tuesday night, and returned on the Wednesday; I being surprised at her staying out, I looked among my linen, and I found I missed a foul sheet; I was much alarmed at that, and with a witness I broke open her door, and found the sheets were both off the bed.

Q. That was three. - A. Yes, I saw no more of her till the Thursday week following; I was in a shop in Holborn, I saw her pass the shop, I went out to her and took her, she came into the shop with me, and gave me a direction to her aunt's, and promised she would be with me the next day and return me she things if I would let her go; I went to her aunt's. twho is a poulterer, 284, Oxford-street, her aunt said she was sorry I let her go; she came the next day and prevailed upon me to go again up to her aunt, we did, her aunt was not at home, she came home with me and I kept her all night; the next morning as soon as she came down stairs she ran away, I went into Gray's Inn-lane and found her coming out of a court, I prevailed upon her to come back with me, she wanted me to go to her aunt again, but a person persuaded me to send to Hatton Garden office.

Q. Did you ever find your sheets. - A. I found two of the sheets, she would not own to the third.

- sworn. I am a pawnbroker, I live at No. 34, High Holborn, I produce a sheet pledged with me on the 21st of April for five shillings; I never saw the prisoner to my knowledge.

JAMES LABROW sworn. I am a pawnbroker, No. 93, High-street, Holborn, I produce a sheet pledged on the 21st of April, for five shilings, by whom I do not know.

WILLIAM CHAPMAN sworn. On the 3d of May I took the prisoner into custody, I searched her and found no duplicates belonging to the property, when I was taking her to prison, she acknowledged to me where the sheets were pledged.

Prisoner's Defence. My husband is on the debtor's side of Newgate, he wanted half a guinea, I pledged the sheet, my husband said he should have some money on the Friday, it never come, I wrote to Mrs. Lemoine to inform her; Mrs. Lemoine let me sleep with her one night, and the next morning when I was going to my uncle's, she came after me and brought me back.

GUILTY , aged 22.

[The prisoner was recommended to mercy by the jury.]

Confined One Week in Newgate , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

335. JAMES FOLEY and RICHARD ARIS were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 25th of April , a time piece and pedestal, value 10 s. the property of Thomas Hartwell .

MARY MOLLOY sworn. Mr. Warren came into my shop to buy a pair of shoes.

Q. Do you live near Mr. Hartwell. - A. Yes, the next door; Mr. Warren called Mr. Blackman into my shop as he was going by, Mr. Blackman said there are two thieves going by, with that I looked out of the door, I saw two lads going by with a dial under their arms.

Q. Who had the dial under his arm. - A. I cannot say, it was under the arm of one of them, I was so terrified I cannot say, I hallooed out, and these two gentlemen went out and they were taken.

WILLIAM BLACKMAN sworn. I was coming by with a prisoner at the same time Mr. Warren was in at Mrs. Molloy's, Warren called to me, I stepped into Molloy's shop to speak to Warren, mean while Foley and Aris came by, I knew them, I drew back and secreted myself in Mrs. Molloy's shop, I said Mrs. Molloy, there are two thieves, they are going to rob you, step out, you will see what they are about; they went into the next door, and took the time piece out of the shop; Mrs. Molloy says, come out, they have got it. Warren and I followed them down theHampshire Hog yard, and I believe it was Aris, the smallest prisoner, that flung away the pedestal; I picked it up, Warren pursued and overtook Foley, and apprehended him.

Q. Who had the clock. - A. I cannot say; when Warren laid hold of Foley it was in a narrow passage, I could not get by them; Aris ran away and got off; they were both in company together.

JOHN WARREN sworn. Q. You are an officer. A. I am; on the 25th of April I went to Mrs. Molloy's house to buy a pair of shoes, and whilst I was fitting them on I saw Mr. Blackman over the way, I called to him, he came into Mrs. Molloy's, he had not been in the house two minutes before he saw the two prisoners at the bar looking in Mrs. Molloy's window, Blackman says there is two thieves, take care Mrs. Molloy else you will be robbed, she immediately went out of doors and looked about, she had not been out half a minute before she cried out they had got it; I immediately ran out of the house and followed both of the prisoners into the Hampshire Hog yard, I think it was Aris that threw away the pedestal, I did not stop to pick it up, I pursued them and took Foley in the little court.

Q. Did you see any thing in his hands. - A. No.

Q. What became of the time piece nobody knows. A. No.

THOMAS HARTWELL sworn. I only know that this is my property; this is the pedestal of the time piece, I lost the time piece and the pedestal altogether.

Q. Did you ever find the time piece. - A. No.

Q. When did you see it. - A. On the morning of the 25th of April, before I went to work.

Q. Do you know that to be a part of the time piece you left in your shop when you went out. - A. Yes.

Q. What is that worth. - A. The pedestal is not worth any thing; I suppose the time piece and that altogether was worth about ten or twelve shillings; I am sure the pedestal is mine.

MICHAEL LEAYE sworn. I am an officer; I apprehended Aris after he made his escape from these officers.

Foley's Defence. I know nothing at all about it; this lad asked me if I would take a walk with him to his uncle's, I told him I would, I went with him to his uncle's, and then he and I parted; just as I got into the coach yard Mr. Warren apprehended me.

Aris's Defence. I know nothing of the things, I was up at my uncle's at the same time this was done.

Q.(to Blackman) When you first see these boys were they walking together. - A. Yes, and they looked into Mrs. Molloy's shop window; I am positive of them.

Q.(to Mrs. Molloy) What had they under their arms. - A. They had that all whole, it was the time piece that I took notice of.

FOLEY - GUILTY , aged 18.

ARIS - GUILTY , aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

336. JOHN NOBLE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 3d of May , a bridle, value 5 s. the property of John Baring , esq.

JOHN JOHNSON sworn. I am groom to Mr. Baring; his stables are in George yard, Piccadilly .

Q. Did you lose a bridle of your master's. - A. Yes, on the 2d of May; I saw it in the stable about nine o'clock on Friday morning; I did not miss it till Saturday about the middle of the day.

Q. Now look at the prisoner at the bar, do you know him. - A. I saw him on Friday afternoon in a stable close to mine.

WILLIAM JEWELL EDWARDS sworn. I am a pawnbroker. On Saturday the 3d of May the prisoner offered this bridle to pledge, he said it was his own property, it was given him by sir James Perryman, with whom he lived lately; I told him I believed it was very unusual for gentlemen to give their bridles away, particularly when it was such a good one; he said he had no further use for it, as lord Foley had bought his horses; I suspected the story, and had him taken into custody.

WILLIAM CHAPMAN sworn. I am an officer of Hatton Garden; I took the prisoner in custody with the bridle; I saw the sadler's name on the bridle, I went to North Audley-street, and the moment they saw the bridle they told me who it belonged to.

(The bridle produced and identified by Johnson.)

Prisoner's Defence. On the 2nd of May as I came along the street I picked it up.

GUILTY , aged 37.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

337. NELLY CARTY , alias NELLY BARRETT , was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 2nd of May , six fowls, value 14 s. the property of Theophilus Clive .

THOMAS STUCHFIELD sworn I have the care of Mr. Clive's farm at Hendon . On the 1st of May about half past eight in the evening, I saw the fowls were all safe in their roost; on the 2nd of May at nine o'clock in the morning I missed seven of them. I saw the fowls at Hatton Garden office, I know they are my master's property, one fowl had the thigh broken; the prisoner last year worked for Mr. Clive at haymaking.

JONATHAN TROTT . I am an officer belonging to the police office, Hatton Garden. On Friday the 2nd of May two watchmen brought this woman in custody from Hampstead with four hen fowls and two Guinea fowls alive, there is two of them dead since; there are some alive now, I produce them. I asked the prisoner how she came by them, she said that a man gave her them that she formerly lived with, that he had not money to support her, he gave her these fowls to make money of, she said he was a clerk, and had taken them from his master's house, about four mile in the Hampstead road, near the sign of the Swan; I went down there, and after several enquiries I found the fowls belonged to Mr. Clive; I asked the last witness, he said they had lost fowls, he claimed them; I then found that she had lived with the last witness's brother, I traced him at about two miles distance from that place, I took him in custody; upon her examination again, when he was there, she was asked that question by the magistrate; she said no person was concerned withher, she took them herself; I told her she was a very bad woman to involve an innocent man, she said she was very sorry for it, she was afraid she should be hung; she would not tell where she lived, she said it was of no use of my going to search her box.

- FRENCH sworn. I am one of the watchmen of the town of Hampstead. On Friday morning the 2d of May at half past three, I observed this prisoner coming about an hundred yards before me, she shunned me as she went across the road, she had a pack at her back, I stopped her and found it contained a little hamper, with a saucepan at the top, I took the lid off the top, and found it contained a dead fowl inside of it, I took the basket from her, and there I observed the Guinea hens, I asked her a few questions, I could get nothing from her, I put her in the watchhouse that night, in the morning I brought her down to Hatton Garden.

Stuchfield. I know this Guinea-hen by a bit of string round the leg, it had this bit of string round the leg when it was stolen; they are all my master's property.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence, nor called any witnesses to character.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

338. JOHN TURNER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 16th of May , three hens, value 3 s. and three ducks, value 3 s. the property of William Eling .

SAMUEL ELING sworn. I live at Teddington in Middlesex.

Q. Who is William Eling . - A. He is my father, he is a farmer , they are his property. On the 16th of this month about three o'clock in the morning, as I came from Twickenham fair, I saw the man at the bar come out of my father's poultry house, I catched hold of him by the collar in my father's farm yard; I said what business have you here, he instantly chucked this bag with three hens and three ducks over the gate; I asked him what he had got there, he said he did not know, I took him back and called the servant up, while I went and got this bag; I went directly, and found this parcel over the gate.

Q. What did that parcel contain. - A. Three hens and three ducks, they were all tied up, I put him in the washhouse, I produce one hen; I know this was the hen that brought up some young ducks, I heard the young ducks hallooe, which gave me the alarm, I knew them all, they were all warm.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been to this fair with gingerbread and nuts, I got a little drop of beer, I went into the farm yard about eleven o'clock, and about two o'clock, to the best of my knowledge, I was going to come home; a man hallooed out what have you got there, I said I only came to lay down and no harm to you; when I was coming just about five or six yards from the gates he laid hold of me by the collar, and says what did you do there over that gate, I said nothing, he took me to the house and called the men up and his father; now says he I will go and fetch a constable; the constable came about three o'clock and put me in the cage; I am innocent of that charge.

Prosecutor. I saw him with the bag in his hand before he threw it over, I saw him throw it over, and I saw him come out of the poultry house, he had no time to go from me.

GUILTY , aged 62.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

339. MARY TILLER was indicted for feloniously receiving on the 24th of February , six pair of leather shoes, value 20 s. the property of Richard Carey , John Kelly , and James Carey , being part and parcel of the goods whereof William Lake last session was convicted of feloniously stealing .

JAMES CAREY sworn. I am a shoemaker .

Q. Do you remember having a servant of the name of Lake. - A. Yes, William Lake had been a servant to me for a number of years. I knew the shoes when I saw them at the police office, Hatton Garden, and Mary Tiller said that she had them of William Lake to sell for him.

Q. When was this. - A. On the 24th of February last I swore to the shoes being my property.

Q. Upon her telling this story of her having the goods from William Lake he was taken up. - A. Yes, he was tried for stealing them.

Q. He was tried, convicted, and sentenced to be transported. - A. Yes, that good woman was not well at the time.

Q. What was found in possession of the prisoner. A. Six pair of shoes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp.

Q. I understand that she upon their being found, said that she had them to sell for Lake. - A. She did say so.

Q. She said at the police office that Lake was a servant of yours, and that he lodged in the same house with the prisoner. - A. Yes, and as you press me so close I must say that she knew they were stolen.

Q. That is your conclusion; this poor woman was taken up, the magistrate admitted her to bail. - A. Yes.

Q. The reason that she did not appear last session was, because she was far advanced in pregnancy, she was brought a-bed lately, and this session she comes here voluntarily. - A. Yes.

JONATHAN TROTT sworn. On the 24th of February I was fetched by Mr. Page the pawnbroker, saying he supposed there was a woman in his shop with some stolen shoes, he could discern the marks on the toes of the shoes had been scratched off; in our way to his shop we saw the woman coming with the shoes wrapped up in her apron; we watched her to Mr. Armstrong's in Baldwin's Gardens, she went in at the shop door and we went in at the private door; I went round the shop and stood a little behind her, while Mr. Armstrong and she were discoursing about the shoes; Mr. Armstrong asked her who made the shoes, she said her husband, I then told her I should take her in custody and the shoes likewise, I suspected they were stolen; going along I asked her where she lived, she hummed and sung to herself, and seemed quite saucy; she says you know, why do you ask me this question; after I got her to the office she did then say that she lived in a court on Saffron Hill; I went there and was informed there was one Lake a shoemaker lived in the house, and one Tiller a hackney coachman lived inthe same house.

Q. You discovered a person of the name of William Lake, that was tried last sessions, and the prisoner lived in the same house. - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp.

Q. Did not you understand from Lake, the person that was convicted last sessions, that he had given these shoes to this woman to sell. - A. Yes, after some hesitation.

Q. Never mind the hesitation, he did say it. - A. Yes.

Q. To sell for him. - A. Yes.

Q. In going to the house did you find Lake there. - A. Yes, and I found some more shoes in Lake's apartment in a box, I was obliged to break it open.

Q. Did you find where the prisoner's apartment was. - A. On the next floor in the same house, I found some new leather there, in a drawer, the prosecutor would not swear that they were his; I produce the shoes.

WILLIAM PAGE sworn. I am a pawnbroker, I live in Liquorpond-street. On the 24th of February, the prisoner brought a parcel of shoes to sell, I looked at them, and observed some marks had been scratched out of the toes, I told her they were not a kind of a shoe that I wanted; I took no farther notice, but went out of the shop to fetch an officer; I saw Trott on our return, I saw her coming from my shop, I pointed her out to Trott, we followed her to the shop of Mr. Armstrong, Trott there took her in custody; she brought all these shoes to my house to sell, I refused buying them; I had bought shoes of her before, and used to suppose that her husband made them, which I thought was Lake, he used to come to my shop.

- ARMSTRONG sworn. Q. Do you remember the prisoner at the bar coming at any time to offer some shoes to sell. - A. Yes, on the 24th of February.

Q. Had she the shoes with her. - A. Yes.

Q. Do these appear to be the same shoes. - A. Yes, she offered to sell them in consequence of Mr. Trott following her; I asked her who made the shoes, she said her husband (I had bought shoes of her frequently); Mr. Trott immediately said, I suspect you have stolen them, and took her into custody.

(The shoes identified by the prosecutor's workmen.)

Prisoner's Defence. This young man (Lake) and his apprentice lodged in my house, they used to board with me, he had a deal of work on his own account; he used to cut out in my room, I used to go out of his errands, and carry home his work, he gave me these shoes, and asked me to sell them, which I did; Lake told the officer that I was the person he had sent with them; I should have appeared last sessions but I have laid in, I have five small children.

The prisoner called five witnesses who gave her a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

340. MARY DRAKE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 12th of May , a handkerchief, value 2 s. and twenty-two guineas, the property of James William Macdonald , esq. in the dwelling house of James Taylor .

The case was stated by Mr. Knapp.

JAMES WILLIAM MACDONALD , ESQ. sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp. Did you lodge at No. 13, Half Moon-street, Piccadilly . - A. I did, at Mr. James Taylor 's house.

Q. Was the prisoner a servant in that house. - A.She was.

Q. Did Mr. James Taylor live in the house. - A. Yes.

Q. You had a desk in which you kept your money, was that in your room. - A. It was in my sitting room; I had fifty-two guineas in gold in a purse in this desk.

Q. How long before you missed this property had you seen these fifty-two guineas. - A. I cannot precisely say, within a month I had looked at them.

Q. On the day this woman was taken up did you miss any property out of this desk. - A. On examining the desk I found the guineas reduced to thirty.

Q. You had locked your desk, and when you opened the desk, you found there was only thirty. - A. Yes.

Court. You had not taken any out for your own use. - A. No.

Mr. Knapp. Did you miss at any time a silk handkerchief. - A. I did.

Q. That silk handkerchief, I believe, you have afterwards seen. - A. I have.

Jury. Was the desk kept in a continual state of being locked up. - A. I always locked it, I am positive of it; the fifty-two guineas were in the purse altogether.

Mr. Knapp. Q. The purse remained in the desk although the twenty-two guineas were gone. - A. It did.

Q. I presume you did not go with the officer to make a search. - A. No.

RICHARD LOVETT sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am an officer of Marlborough-street; I went to the lodgings of Mr. Macdonald, and searched a box of the prisoner, on the 12th of this month.

Q. How do you know it was the prisoner's box. A It had been out of the house, and was brought back again.

Q. Then you searched a box; in that box, let it belong to whom it will, did you find any thing, and what. - A. I found this silk handkerchief, the box was remarkably full of clothes and trinkets, the handkerchief and the trinkets I have here; one of the constables of Hanover-square had apprehended the prisoner, I fetched her out of the watchhouse, I asked her how she came by so many fine things, she said some of the trinkets she bought with some money she had from her brother, and the rest were bought with the money that she took from Mr. Macdonald's purse; she said she had spent it all; in her box I found a seven shilling piece and a crown, that was all the money that she had; I produce the handkerchief.

Prosecutor. It is my handkerchief, it is marked J. M. No. 6, in the border, all my handkerchiefs are marked in the same way.

WILLIAM MEDLAM sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You know the prisoner at the bar. - A.Yes, I am groom to Mr. Macdonald.

Q. You remember Mary Drake living servant in the house where Mr. Macdonald lodged. - Yes; I lodged at the King's Arms, in Shepherd's Market.

Q. Did she ask your permission to leave her box at your lodging. - A. She did, on the 10th of May, I gave her leave.

Q. Was it locked up. - A. Yes, she brought it to my lodgings, on the 12th it was taken to Mr. Macdonald's again, I was in the room when Mr. Macdonald's valet fetched it out.

Q. Was the box that Mr. Macdonald's valet took out the one that the prisoner brought to your lodging. - A. Yes, I saw it opened, and I saw the handkerchief that is now produced taken out of it, and the trinkets.

NICHOLAS BENCARY sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You were the valet of Mr. Macdonald at this time. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember going to Shepherd's Market to the groom's for the box. - A. I did. I brought it back to my master's lodgings; I saw it opened and the handkerchief taken out, I know it is my master's handkerchief (witness looking at it); I know the mark

Q.(to Lovett) Produce the trinkets. - A. There is a gold ring, a broach, a stone ring, and two earrings, they are broken.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence, nor called any witnesses to character.

GUILTY, aged 19.

Of stealing to the value of thirty-nine shillings .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

341. WILLIAM TURTLE , alias SMITH , was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 29th of April , a saw, value 5 s. the property of James Torry .

JAMES TORRY sworn. I live at No 19, Featherstone-street. On the 29th of April I lost a tenon saw out of Mr. Price's building, Crown-street , I am a carpenter , I had been at work there; on the same evening I went to Mr. Salmon, a pawnbroker, in Whitecross-street, I found the saw pledged there, I am sure it is mine.

THOMAS NELSON sworn. I live at No. 104, Whitecross-street, at Mr. Salmon's. On the 29th of April, the prisoner at the bar came to our shop, I believe about the middle of the day, to pledge a saw and three planes, I advanced him ten shillings on them.

JOSEPH PRINCE sworn. I am a constable, I produce the saw, I received it from Mr. Salmon.

Nelson. That is the saw I received from the prisoner.

Prosecutor. I am certain it is my saw, it is worth six or seven shillings, I was using the saw about an hour before I missed it.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing at all about that saw; last Monday I went to pledge two saws of my own, and the first place I carried them to, a pawnbroker's in Chiswell-street, I told him I wanted seven shillings, he said that was too much, he would lend me six shillings, he said are they your own saws, I said yes, he said there is a young man has lost a saw, and it has been found in Whitecross-street; as this gentleman would not let me have seven shillings, I went to this gentleman's in Whitecross-street, I laid the two saws down on the counter, I told him I wanted seven shillings, he asked me my name, and I not telling him my own name, I happened to think of the name that that saw was pledged in; the pawnbroker says, have not you any tools here before, I said I have not, he said are you sure of that, he brings me this saw down, and asked me if I knew it, I said I did not, he detained me and sent for the prosecutor, that was the instigation of my being brought here.

Nelson. In consequence of his bringing the two saws which he just mentioned, I sent for Torry, and his giving the same name, as he had done on the 29th of April, he was taken into custody.

Q. Are you sure that the prisoner brought that saw. A. I am certain that he is the identical man; he said it was his own property.

GUILTY , aged 44.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

342. CATHERINE WELCH was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 28th of April , two silver tea spoons, value 3 s. the property of Stephen Kemshead .

STEPHEN KEMSHEAD sworn. I live at the Golden Cross, Charing Cross ; I am a tavern and inn keeper .

ELIZABETH - sworn. I am servant to Mr. Kemshead. On the 28th of April as I sat at my dinner, about two o'clock, in the kitchen, I saw the prisoner shut the door three times.

Q. Did the prisoner work in your house. - A. No, she came for the washing, she was in a room below in the house; seeing her shut the door three times, I went up the last time to see what she shut herself in for, the door had wooden panes and one pane was out, I looked through, I saw her take one silver spoon out of a glass that had wine and water in, it had just come out of the coffee room, she put it in her bosom, I ran and told the head waiter, the waiter told master, and master sent for her back.

Q. When she put the spoon in her bosom she went away out of the house did she. - A. Yes.

Q.(to prosecutor) You remember when the waiter told you that the spoon was lost. - A. I do, in consequence of that my waiter brought her back from the Swan, at Charing Cross, I immediately ordered a constable to be fetched, he came, and took up the prisoner.

- CLEMENTS sworn. I am a constable. On the 28th of April, about three o'clock in the afternoon, I was ordered at Mr. Kempshead's, to take the prisoner into custody; I searched her, and found these two spoons I now produce, they were twisted up in the corner of her apron which she held in her hand.

Prosecutor. One of the spoons is marked with a cross and a K, I am certain that is my spoon, with regard to the other, I will not swear to it.

Prisoner's Defence. My mistress told me to make haste with the basket of clothes, and as I came back to bring one of the children with me, I brought two with me, I asked the cook for a little bit of bread andmeat, I just shut the door after me while I eat some of it, then there was a parcel of dirty coarse kitchen cloths, which I put in my apron, as we never put them with the clean linen; the waiter came after me, he says you are wanted back, I went back with him, Mr. Kempshead told me to sit down, he locked the door, I says what is the matter, he says I do not know, but if it is true you may be transported; these cloths I laid down on the table, and when the constable came I took the cloths up in this hand, the constable searched me, and when he had done that, he takes these greasy cloths, and the two spoons fell out.

Q.(to Clements) When you took the spoons from the prisoner at the bar, had she any thing in her hand but her apron rolled up. - A. There was no towel about her, there were only the two spoons in the corner of her apron; she was very loth to let me open her hand.

GUILTY, aged 33.

Of stealing one spoon .

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

343. ANN RAYMOND was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 15th of May , a lace cloak, value 40 s. the property of George Brown , in his dwelling house .

GEORGE BROWN sworn. I live at No. 8, Shoreditch , I am a silk mercer . On the 15th of May I came forward to send one of my servants of an errand, at the same time he accused her of taking something from the counter; I immediately said to her if she had not taken nothing she should not be blamed wrong, at the same time I insisted upon seeing whether she had or not; I looked over the counter on the floor, fearing she had dropped something there, I found nothing, I went round the counter and examined her minutely, and I saw the cloak laying at her feet.

Q. What cloak was this. - A. A lace cloak; she had got her gown wrapped about her very much.

Q. Did you see her take it. - A. I did not, there is a person here that did see her take it.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp.

Q. You say this cloak was laying at her feet on the floor where the prisoner stood. - A. It was.

Q. Were there many cloaks laying on the counter at that time. - A. I cannot say myself, my servant says there were three.

Q. Then whether it was thrown down by accident, or how, you cannot say, how long had the cloak been in the shop, was it an an old one or a new one. - A. It had been in my house about four or five months.

Q. You have laid it in the indictment at forty shillings, you have given the prime cost, I presume. - A. I have no doubt but it cost me fifty shillings.

Q. After being in your shop about five months, must not your having kept it so long have lessened its value, you know that forty shillings would affect her life. - A. I have learned it since.

JOHN URWIN sworn. Q. Do you live at Mr. Brown's. - A. Yes; the prisoner came to our house on the 15th of May, along with another woman to buy some lace, Mr. Brown's brother shewed them some, they could not agree for the price, they went out, they came back to me, as Mr. Brown's brother was not at hand, and said they would give a penny more a yard for the lace, I told them we could not take it; they stood talking to me while I was behind the counter folding the things up, but what they said to me I did not take any notice of; that woman turned her back towards me, I saw her take something off the counter.

Q. What, the prisoner. - A. Yes, I asked her what she had got, she persisted that she had taken nothing; I had folded three lace cloaks up a few minutes before, I looked to see if they were all there, I found one of them was gone; they laid close to the prisoner's elbow on the counter, I saw her take something off the counter, but I could not see what it was she did it so quick, she drew it under her cloak into her gown; when I accused her of taking something, and she said that she had nothing, Mr. Brown came forward, he gave me a parcel to go out of an errand, and when I was going out of the door, the cloak was found laying close by her feet.

Q. Whether it is not possible that she might have pulled the cloak down by accident. - A. No, it was not near the edge of the counter, it was about an inch from the edge of the counter, she had her right arm upon the counter, she did not move that to take the cloak, she took it with the left, she had her back towards me, and put her right on the counter; I believe she put her left hand so.

Q. Then you did not see her. - A. No; I believe it.

Q. Do you know any thing about the worth of this said cloak. - A. No, I had not been two hours in business.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp.

Q. Very likely you had been asleep at that time. - A. No.

Q. You do not mean to say you saw her take it up, what it was you do not know. - A. Not till it was found.

Q. I should think you might, if you had not been asleep, told us what it was. - A. I cannot.

Q. She denied it. - A. Yes.

Q. And just at her feet, after you had been folding them, when you came round, there was one laying at her feet. - A. Mr. Brown found one at her feet.

Court. It might be swept off the counter.

Prosecutor. I looked over the counter when she was first accused; there was no such thing laying there.

SAMUEL BISHOP sworn. On the 15th of this month Mr. Brown came down to the office in Worship-street, and I went with Mr. Brown to his shop, the cloak was then laying on the ground, and the prisoner was sitting on a chair; I took her to the office in Worship-street and searched her; I found nothing but a penny and a thimble about her.

Prisoner's Defence. I am very innocent of it, it must have been there before I came into the shop.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

344. SOLOMON JOSEPH was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 23d of April , seven pound in monies, numbered , the property of John Spybey .

JOHN SPYBEY sworn. I live at No. 4, Broad-street, Bloomsbury, I am a hatter .

Q. On the 23d of April did you send your apprentice boy for any money. - A. Yes, I sent George Newman into Queen-street in the city; he brought me seven pounds in his pocket handkerchief, I saw the money in the handkerchief, it was all gold and silver.

Q. You did not count it. - A. No, he brought me a message from the city which induced me to wish to send it back again, they had a large bill to pay that day; I said it will be of no use to me, I gave him a piece of brown paper to put it in, and told him to take it back again, I saw him put it in the paper.

GEORGE NEWMAN sworn. Q. Do you remember going to the city for some money for your master. - A. Yes, I brought the money in a handkerchief.

Q. Do you remember your master telling you to carry it back. - A. Yes, I put it into a piece of brown paper, I folded it up and laid it on the counter, and I went to breakfast.

Q. When did you see the prisoner in the shop. - A. When I came from breakfast.

Q. How long might you be at breakfast. - A. Half an hour.

Q. Then you returned into the shop. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see the money laying on the counter then. - A. I did not notice it, I did not know but my master had taken it up, I left my master in the shop when I went to breakfast.

Q. Did you see the prisoner in the shop at all. - A. When I come from breakfast I did.

Q. Did you look after the money. - A. No, I had no thought about the money.

Q. Had not your master told you to carry it back to the city. - A. Yes, but I told my master I had not had my breakfast, he told me to go and get it, and when I came from breakfast he told me to clean the windows.

Q. You know nothing about what became of the money. - A. No.

GEORGE SPYBEY sworn. Q. You are brother to John Spybey are you. - A. Yes, I am a stocking-maker by trade.

Q. You remember going to your brother on the 23d of April last. - A. Yes, in the forenoon I went into the shop, I saw a brown paper parcel laying on the counter, I asked the boy in the shop what it was ( John Andrew Paas ), he said he supposed it was hat buckles, and I immediately laid it down, I felt it was heavy; John Andrew Paas took it up and opened it, he said it was money, I did not see the contents of the parcel; the prisoner at the bar was in the shop, I know him perfectly well, I have seen him frequently at that shop.

Q. Do you know what trade the prisoner is. - A. No more than buying old clothes; he is a Jew as I suppose.

Q. When Paas opened this parcel where was Solomon Joseph standing. - A. Paas and me were standing near the parlour, and Solomon Joseph was near the door; I heard him say when the boy asked whose it was, he said it was his, I heard Paas say it was money, and I think in reply to that Solomon said it was his.

JOHN ANDREW PAAS sworn. Q. You are apprentice to John Spybey . - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember the day the boy brought the money from the city. - A. It was on the 23d, I remember seeing it in the shop on the counter in brown paper.

Q. Do you remember George Spybey coming in. A. Yes, I remember his taking up the brown paper parcel, he asked me what it was, I immediately told him that I supposed it was hat buckles, he put it down on the counter again, I opened it, I saw it was gold and silver, I said it was money; Solomon Joseph said it was his, then I shoved it towards him, I saw Solomon Joseph put his hand upon the paper and draw it towards him, I took no more notice, I went to the other side of the shop, and he said in the shop about a quarter of an hour afterwards, then he went away.

Q. When he went away did you perceive that parcel on the counter. - A. No, it was not on the counter, because I took and rubbed the counter down as soon as he was gone, because it was all over dust, and I was going to get my breakfast.

Q. When did your master first come to know it was missing. - A. About half after three he came and enquired about the money.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney.

Q. You did not see Joseph put it in his pocket and take it away. - A. I did not.

Q. You never saw him take it off the counter. - A. I did not.

Q. It was about half past three before there was any enquiry about it. - A. Yes.

Q. By that time there was a great many customers in your shop. - A. I have no doubt but there was.

Q. Did you leave him in the shop. - A. When I went down stairs he came down after me, and when I came up he came up, and we left master down stairs; I had to tie up a couple of hats that he had bought of my master, and then he went away directly.

Q. And this was after all had passed up stairs about the money. - A. Yes.

Court. Q.(to prosecutor) When did you first know that this money was missing. - A. After I had dined a customer came in to pay me a bill, he wanted change for a five pound note, I felt in my pocket, and I found that I I had not got any change, directly it struck me that this boy had not been to Mr. Pedders with this seven pounds.

Q. What time of the day was this. - A. I think it must be before three, because we were down at Whitechapel before four; when the boy came from breakfast I ordered him to wipe the windows, it struck me that I should have to go into the city, I thought no more of the seven pounds after that till I wanted to give this gentleman change; I says boy, give me that seven pounds, says he, I have not got it sir, I laid it on the counter, John Andrew Paas says the Jew took that money.

Court. That was his idea of the matter, whether the Jew took it will be for the consideration of the gentlemen of the jury.

Mr. Gurney. You went that same afternoon to Solomon's. - A. Yes.

Q. You have always found him honest and correct in his dealings. - A. Yes, I always had a good opinion of him.

Q. On his being searched you found nothing on him but a few shillings. - A. Nothing else.

Prisoner's Defence. I never wronged any body of a farthing, I have dealt with this gentleman four or five years, for new hats; for him to say that I had his money, I never saw it; when that gentleman came to see me I was very glad to see him, I asked him where he came from, he said he came to see me, I owed him seven pounds, I said seven pounds for what, he said do not you recollect that you owe me seven pounds, I said again for what, for if I want money, I can have it lent me in the neighbourhood, he says come along with me, when I came out of doors there was his brother and two other gentlemen; when we came to Lambeth-street he told me that I had robbed him; I never in my life did hurt a worm, nor was I ever dishonest to any body of a farthing, I was fit to faint, they shoved me into a public house and tore my clothes to pieces.

Prosecutor. The first word that I said to him was you are determined to make me come to see you, you have repeatedly asked me, but I am much surprised at your conduct and the cause of it, how could you think of taking my seven pounds this morning, says he what seven pounds, I says seven pounds you took from out of my shop, says he how could you think of me taking seven pounds, I said I could not help thinking of your taking it when I have so clear evidence against you; there is no doubt you took it out of a joke, and I would wish to pass it off as such, says he I have not got your seven pounds, I says I shall take you to the police office immediatly, I called in Mr. Pedder and another friend; I did not stop a moment hardly.

The prisoner called five witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

345. GEORGE RUSSEL was indicted for that he on the 17th of March was servant to Henry Samuel Kettle (the surviving partner of Samuel Kettle , lately deceased), and was employed and entrusted by him to receive money for him, did receive and take into his possession, three bank notes, value 1 l. each, and one other bank note, value 2 l. for and on account of his said master, and that he afterwards feloniously did embezzle, secrete, and steal, the same .

Second Count for like offence, only varying the manner of charging.

Mr. Alley, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, under the direction of the court, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

346. HENRY OLIVE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of May , a great coat, value 4 s. the property of William Richardson .

WILLIAM RICHARDSON sworn. I am a publican , I live at the Rose and Crown London-house Yard . This day week the prisoner at the bar, and three other men, came into my house, and had something to drink, and after they were gone I missed a great coat, I went to my door, and my neighbour told me that he saw a boy go out with a great coat under his arm, I knew the boy belonged to the prisoner at the bar, I found he lived in a court in Golden-lane; the boy went out first and the men went out afterwards.

Q. What is the prisoner. - A. A waterman to hackney coachmen; I went to the prisoner's room, and the constable found the duplicate of the coat in his room in a cup.

JAMES GEARY sworn. I am an officer; on Monday night, the 16th of May, I went to the prisoner's lodgings, Bell-alley, Golden-lane, with the prosecutor, I found the duplicate of the coat; I took the prisoner in custody.

JOHN BARRET sworn. I am a pawnbroker; I produce a coat pledged by a woman of the name of Mary Olive , on the 16th of May, for three shillings.

Prosecutor. That is my coat.

Q. Do you know who took it out of your house. - A. No more than a gentleman that lived opposite told me he saw the boy take it out of my house, the boy was his own son; the boy said his father gave it him.

Prisoner's Defence. I never had the coat so help me god.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

347. JANE BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 9th of May , a frock, value 3 s, and a petticoat, value 1 s. the property of Thomas Coleman .

JAMES COLEMAN sworn. This child was at a visit at my house at the time it was stole; I live at No. 17, Field-lane, Holborn , it is my brother's child. On the 9th of May, about half past seven in the evening, we missed her, she had got into Holborn, playing with the bird cages, when this woman took the child and walked away with her.

Q. How old is the child. - A. Two years and four months.

ROBERT ARMSTRONG sworn. I am a pawbroker, I live in Baldwyn's Gardens, Leather-lane. On the 9th of May, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, the prisoner at the bar left in pledge with me a frock and petticoat for two shillings, in the name of Ann Brown .

Q. You know the woman. - A. Yes, I am certain she is the person.

MARIA DUTTON sworn. I live at the workhouse, this person brought the baby in between nine and ten o'clock, I took it in; she came to the matron, and told her she would call in the morning and see if the mother did not come; she said that she picked the child up in the pipe fields; I put the child to bed, in about three quarters of an hour Coleman and another person that is here fetched it.

Q. You are sure that is the woman who brought the child. - A Yes, that is the person that brought the child.

JAMES CUNNINGHAM sworn. On Friday the 9th of May, as I was coming through Baldwyn's Gardens, the prisoner at the bar said to me, I should like to split your scull, I said why, she said because you are like my husband, I said I should be very sorry ifI was, because I should not like to have such a drunken wife, she reeled very much, and was sometimes off the pavement into the road, I paid very little at tention to the conversation, she said she had been into the fields to keep herself sober, and there she found a child in the morning, the child had nothing on, she said, but a flannel bed gown and a pair of earrings; she said the child turned to her and called to her, and called her aunty, she asked the child where she lived, the child said Mutton Hill; she had, she said, been all the day and could not find the parents of the child, she had left it at Clerkenwell workhouse; I thought it was a strange story, when we went almost to the bottom of Holborn she asked me if I would drink, I told her by no means, she says I would wish you to drink with me; I thought I might have an opportunity of getting the whole of the transaction out of her; I went into the wine vaults, I looked at the woman, her right eye was black, she had a glass of gin, and when she came out of the wine vaults a woman that sold gingerbread accosted her, and says what have you done with the child you took down Holborn; I went back, asked her what she said about the child, she said this woman led a child away, she said it was Coleman's child in Field-lane; I went to Coleman and found he was out with the beadle having the child cried.

Q. I believe, if I am right, you afterwards found the child in Clerkenwell workhouse. - A. We both went there and found the baby, we brought her back; I told Coleman if he would go with me up to this wine vaults, probably they might know something of this woman; I said I am positive I should know her; we went into several houses about Saffron Hill, we could see nothing of her, when I was with her she said she was going to meet her husband at the Cow, in Cow-lane; we went there and the first object that I saw when we were at the door was this woman, we took her up, she was searched, and a great many duplicates were found upon her.

JAMES CLARK sworn. I am a watchman of St. Sepulchre's parish. When I was calling the hour of three o'clock in the morning, I picked up this duplicate off the pavement; the next day at Guildhall, it occurred to me when the name of Brown was mentioned, that I had a duplicate I picked up in that name; I went up to sir Watkin, and informed him that I had something that would bring the matter to light, here is the duplicate. (The frock and petticoat identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was in Cold Bath Fields, I met this poor baby, about the hour of half past eight, or near nine o'clock, I could not hear who it belonged to one way or other; I went up and down Mutton Hill for half an hour, I could not hear any thing; there was a poor woman that persuaded me to take her to the workhouse, I took the child to Clerkenwell workhouse, there I left word my name was Brown, and my father lived in Shoe-lane; I told this good man that I was going to meet my husband at the Cow, in Cow-lane, is it likely that I should have told that if I had robbed the child; I have had seven children of my own, I never touched the child's clothes, I have too much feeling for a baby.

GUILTY , aged 35.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

348. WILLIAM WEBB was indicted for that he on the 12th of April , was servant to John Kershaw , and divers other persons, and was entrusted to receive money for them, and being such servant, and so employed and entrusted, did receive and take into his possession the sum of ten shillings, that he afterwards feloniously did embezzle, secrete, and steal, the same .

Mr. Gurney, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

349. CHRISTOPHER DEMPSEY and WILLIAM BROWNER were indicted for that they on the 5th of June , feloniously did falsely make, forge, and counterfeit, and willingly acted in forging and counterfeiting a certain deed, to wit, a writ of attorney, with intention to defraud Anthony Robinson .

Second Count for a like deed, with like intention, knowing it to be forged.

(The indictment was read by Mr. Gleed, and the case was stated by Mr. Knapp.)

WILLIAM STEWARD sworn. Examined by Mr. Gleed. You are clerk to the paymaster of the East India company. - A. Yes.

Q. Who is paymaster of the East India company. - A. Robert Champion .

Q. Do you know the person of the prisoner at the bar, Dempsey. - A. I do. On the the 5th of January, 1804, he made application to me at the pay office in the India house, to receive one Robinson's absent money (that is one month's pay in fix); he produced a power.

Q. Was that the power he produced to you at the time. - A. It was paid upon this, (witness looking at the paper,) I paid him three pounds ten shillings to the prisoner, Christopher Dempsey , upon the back of that power there is my indorsement.

Court. Do you mean Anthony Robertson, 5th of June, three pounds ten shillings, is that your writing. - A. Yes, that was the money that was due at the time; I have his receipt (producing it).

Mr. Knapp. You paid him and that is the receipt. - A. Yes.

ANTHONY ROBINSON sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp. Are you acquainted with with Dempsey, the prisoner. - A. Yes, I have known him little better than three years, I lodged at his house, I believe it was from the 10th of March to the 26th of April, about three years ago; I am not a scholar, I can neither read nor write, I am an American.

Q. Did you ever see the prisoner, Browner. - A. I never saw him in my life till I saw him at the police office, to the best of my knowledge.

Q. Did Dempsey procure you a birth on board the Europe. - A. He sent for me on Sunday evening, I was not in health at the time; I went to his house, he told me he thought he had a good birth for me on board the Europe, providing I would go on board, I told him as I was not in health, I did not thinkI was fit to go, he said there was a very good doctor on board, it was better to go there than to be on shore, he got me a birth on board the Europe.

Q. What was due on account of board or any thing else from you to Dempsey, before you went on board the Europe. - A. There was nothing due at that time for board; I told him the night I agreed to go, between ten and eleven o'clock, I must go to the washerwoman's, and when the washerwoman brought my clothes, I told him to pay the bill, he said he would, the washing bill amounted to seven shillings, I gave him the seven shillings on board the ship; after we had settled that, he asked me if I would leave an absent bond for a woman that I lived with, I told him I would not, Coleman was present and said you are very right, do not leave none to no person; I then gave him one guinea and two seven shilling pieces to pay one Macdonald, there was nothing else due then after that was settled.

Q. Before you went from Dempsey's house to go to Gravesend, had Dempsey made any application to you for any power. - A. No.

Q. Did you upon your oath execute any power of attorney at Dempsey's house in St. George's in the East. - A. No, nor no where else.

Q. Did you on board the ship at Gravesend, or before you failed, execute any power of attorney. - A. I did not indeed.

Q. Am I to understand you that you never saw Browner before you failed. - A. I never had seen him.

Q. Then you failed for India I suppose. - A. Yes.

Q. How long was it before you returned to England. - A. I came home this winter in the Lord Hawkesbury; after I failed in the Indiaman, I was on board a man of war, the Russel, and I was invalided; I returned in the Hawkesbury a little while after Christmas.

Q. How long was it before you made application to the magistrate at the Thames police office. - A. Nearly six weeks, I went after the man to get the money from him.

Q. When did you apply to the India house. - A. The second day after I arrived at London, I applied to Mr. Steward at the India house to get my money, they refused payment.

Q. Did you apply for your wages or any thing else. - A. For my wages of the Europe, the ship that I went out in; they told me that Dempsey had got the money. The next day after I was at the India house, I went to Dempsey, I found him in Newgate; I asked him how he came to get my money at the India house; he told me then he did not know he had got it rightly, but says he, it was either upon an absent bond or a power of attorney, I do not know which; I told him, you know I never empowered you to get any money, he told me to make myself easy, he expected to be out of Newgate in a few days, but in fact, says he, I do not know whether I have got your money or not, but if I have, when I come out I will make a settlement with you; about a week or two I think I waited upon Dempsey at his house in Dock-street, St. George's in the East; there he said he did not know but I was indebted to him; I never could get him to do any thing with me.

Q. Did you see any power of attorney produced to you on your return to his house. - A. No, never; afterwards there was one brought to the Thames police office by Dempsey.

Q. Do you remember that power of attorney. - A. No, (a paper handed to him). I think that is the one I saw at the Thames police office which Dempsey produced to Mr. Harriot the magistrate; it was afterwards shewn to me.

Q. Upon this being shewn to you you were quite satisfied that you never executed it. - A. I was, I never gave a power, I never saw Browner till he came a witness against me at the Thames police office; Dempsey called him, Dempsey had two or three examinations before this Browner could be found; since that time Dempsey and Browner were committed.

Q. Since that time have you received from the India house your wages. - A. Yes, every farthing that is due to me.

Court. Then you claim no wages at all from any one. - A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney.

Q. From what ship had you come from at the time you lodged at the house of Dempsey. - A. From the Three Sisters of Philadelphia.

Q. I think that you stated at the police office that you had received your wages from the captain of the Three Sisters in the presence of Mr. Hull of Virginia street, Wapping. - A. Yes.

Q. But Mr. Hull was not present. - A. He saw the money as soon as I saw it, Mr. Hull went down to the coffee house where the captain was; when I came into the office to be paid Mr. Hull was there waiting for me till I came out, and when I came out I shewed it him.

Q. I ask you whether you did not state that your wages were paid you by the captain in the presence of Mr. Hull. - A. I am not certain whether he did or not.

Q. According to your account you was on shore only about six weeks, you boarded at Dempsey's house all that time. - A. Yes.

Q. You chuse to state now that at the time you quitted Dempsey's house you paid him every thing. - A. He had my money in his hands, I gave him my money, and I could never get my money out of his hands, I brought a great many Spanish dollars.

Q. We must take your word for that, he cannot be examined as a witness; when you came back this last winter you went to him, he told you you were indebted to him. - A. Yes.

Q. And when he had looked among the papers he did not at all deny that he had received three pound ten shillings, but still said there was money due to him. - A. Yes.

Q. You went to the police office for an order for the magistrate to make him pay the money. - A. Yes.

Q. In consequence of your application he came there and produced the paper to which you have been speaking. - A. Yes.

Q. The magistrate asked him if he had any thing of that sort to shew, he said he had, he would bring it, and upon that he went home, and did bring itthe next day of meeting. - A. Yes.

Q. The enquiry was then made whether they could or could not find Browner, who was a witness to it. - A. Yes.

Q. Dempsey said he would endeavour to find him, upon which he was allowed to go home again. - A. Yes.

Q. And after some days he brought him to the office. - A. Yes.

Q. When Browner came there he stated to your face that he had witnessed that bond. - A. Yes, and he told me that he saw me sign it.

Q. Upon that the magistrate committed him as well as Dempsey. - A. Yes.

Q. You have since got all the money from the East India house. - A. Yes.

Q. Do not you know except that you sware that you had not executed that absent bond, that you could never get that money. - A. I did not know it.

Q. Do not you know this, that provided you had signed that paper, that Dempsey was well warranted to receive that money at the India house. - A. If I had left him one; I knew perfectly well that I had not left him no absent bond; I said to him I will try by the laws of your country; I thought to have got the money from him.

JOHN DUDLEY sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a hair dresser, I live at No. 7, Denmark-street, St. George's in the East.

Q. Do you know Mr. Dempsey. - A. I know him as a neighbour, he keeps a house for sailors.

Q. You remember being called upon by Mr. Dempsey to come to his house to witness any paper. A. Yes, about three years ago I went there, he came to my house for me.

Q. Did you see Dempsey there. - A. Yes, and there was a person there that they called Browner, it was rather duskish in the evenig, I cannot swear whether that is the person, he was sitting at a table with a good many papers before him at the time.

Q. Were you required by Dempsey to witness any thing. - A. Dempsey asked me to put my name to a paper.

Q. Was that paper upon the table at which a person of the name of Browner sat. - A. It was on that table at which Browner sat; there was Browner's name on the paper, Dempsey told me to put my name near to that, Dempsey shewed me where by his finger, then I wrote my name.

Q. Did you see any writing on the paper besides Browner's name. - A. None, it was blank paper all that I saw, except the name of Browner; it was folded up in a manner I saw nothing, but that I wrote my name over it; that is the name I wrote. (Witness describing the manner the paper was folded up.)

Q.You say there were several sailors in the room. A. Yes.

Mr. Knapp. Now Robinson stand up.

Q.(to Dudley) Look round and tell me whether that man that stands by you was there or not. - A. There were six or seven, and whether he was or was not it is not in my power to say.

Q.(to Robinson) Were you present at the time he witnessed any power for you. - A. No.

Q.(to Dudley) Did you see any person execute any instrument whatever at the time you described you signed it. - A. No one at all.

Q. Were you ever informed by Dempsey or by Browner, or by any body else, for what purpose you were to sign that instrument. - A. I was not.

Cross-examined by Mr. Barry.

Q. At the time you called it was darkish. - A. You did not take particular notice of any of the faces that were in the room. - A. I did not.

Q. Did you make observation sufficient so as to ascertain that there were any black men there. - A. There were black men in the room, they seemed to be all very agreeable together; I put my name and went away, I did not stop a minute.

Court. Do you do these things, put your name as a subscribing witness without knowing what it was. A. I never signed such a paper before.

Q. How came you to sign an instrument to which you saw nothing done. - A. I went there just the same as any neighbour might have sent for me.

Q. Are you so neighbourly to any person that asks you to go and sign your name without knowing what it is for. - A. I had no idea but all was right, they seemed to be all happy and comfortable, I put my name and went away immediately, and thought no more of it.

DAVID COLEMAN sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Do you know Robinson. - A. Yes, I was with him at Gravesend in the Europe; I heard Dempsey ask him for an absent bond for a girl that he called the man's wife, Robinson told him no, he would not give him any one at all, he asked him why, Robinson said because I will not give any one at all; after this communication Dempsey and I left the ship, we left Robinson there on board, it is about three years ago, that was the last day they took any crew on board, I came back with Dempsey, and saw no more of Robinson.

Q. You lived and boarded at Dempsey's house. - Yes.

Q. Did you ever see Robinson execute any power to Dempsey before he left England. - A. I did not.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney.

Q. Now Mr. Coleman you and Dempsey have had some difference since that. - A. Yes.

Q. You made a demand on him last October for some clothes, which you say he had, and would not give up to you. - A. Yes.

Q. That is the demand you made of him. - A. I cannot read.

Q. That is your mark (handing him a paper). - A. Yes.

Q. The demand you made was a blue coat, three shirts, a pair of drawers, a hammock, a bed, three blankets, a rug, and a waistcoat. - A. Yes.

Q. What are they worth. - A. I cannot say.

Q. Are they worth five pounds. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you think they are worth ten pounds. - A. I cannot say they are worth ten pounds.

Q. Upon your oath did not you go and swear they were worth forty pounds, and you tell me now you cannot swear they are worth ten pounds. - A. Yes.

Mr. Knapp. That was drawn by your attorney Mr. Chew. - A. It was.

Mr. Gurney. Was it not read over to you at the time you swore it. - A. Yes.

MR. TQULMIN sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp.

Q. You are the chief clerk at the Thames police office. - A. I am.

Q. Did you take the minutes of the examination of the prisoners. - A. Some of them, not all.

(The examinations of Dempsey and Browner read in court, and the affidavit of David Coleman ).

Dempsey left his defence to his counsel.

Browner's Defence. What I have to say will be but a few words: - my lord and gentlemen, I am severely used; I know the prosecutor to have signed a paper in my presence; and after he and the three other persons signed it, I witnessed it; this I solemnly declare to God and this honourable court.

BOTH - NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

350. CHRISTOPHER DEMPSEY was again indicted for the like offence with like intention .

Mr. Knapp, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, he was

ACQUITTED .

London Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

351. DAVID ROBERTSON was indicted for an unnatural crime .

GUILTY - DEATH .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

351. JOHN WEST was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 8th of May , three iron eye bolts, value 6 s. and steel screw tap, value 3 s the property of Alexander Brodie .

JOHN MASSEY sworn. I am in the employ of Mr. Brodie, his manufactory is in Carey-street, Chancery-lane. On the 8th of May I saw two iron eye-bolts lay on an iron stall in Covent Garden market, I thought I knew them to be Mr. Brodie's, I asked the price of them, they asked a shilling, I bought them of Martha Oakes , and I acquainted the foreman of the factory.

JOHN MUTCH sworn. I am foreman to Mr. Brodie; on the 8th of May, from an information of John Massey , I went with him and the time-keeper to Covent Garden, and bought this eye-bolt for nine pence of William Ray ; from information, I went home and detained the prisoner.

MARTHA OAKS sworn. I keep an iron stall in Covent Garden; about a month or five weeks ago, I bought two eye bolts of a woman, I sold them to Massey.

Q. Do you know any thing of John West . - A. No.

WILLIAM RAY sworn. I keep an iron stall in Covent Garden; the eye bolt I sold to John Mutch , I purchased of the prisoner at the bar, I gave him six pence for it.

JOHN DUDMAN sworn. I received the prisoner in charge, and the property, I produce them.

Mitch. I believe them to be Mr. Brodie's property.

Prisoner's Defence. I leave it entirely to the mercy of your lordship, and the lenity of the prosecutor.

GUILTY , aged 41.

Transported for Seven Years

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

353. JAMES COX was indicted for feloniosly stealing on the 26th of April , a copper, value 30 s. the property of Alexander Aberdour .

ALEXANDER ABERDOUR sworn. I am a brazier and tin man , I live in Red Lion-street Holborn; I only know it is my property.

SAMUEL CLARK sworn. I am a fish monger's servant, I live with Mr. Bayley, Newgate-street; I had been in Portland-street, Oxford Road; coming back I saw the prisoner at the bar and another after picking a gentleman's pocket, then they went down Red Lion-street ; I watched them down there, and a lad that was with the prisoner took up the copper, the prisoner then was behind him; the prisoner went and took the copper away from the boy, and went on with it, I went and informed Mr. Aberdour.

Q. Are you sure that the prisoner is the person. - A. Yes.

Prisoner. Where was I when I took the copper from the boy. - A. In Red Lion-street.

Prisoner. I have a witness to the contrary; it was in Eagle-street, the boy asked me to carry it for him into Holborn.

Prosecutor. In consequence of information, I followed them into Eagle-street; the prisoner at the bar was carrying it on his head; they were walking very fast, they turned into Dean-street, and when they had got a little way down Dean-street, I came up to them. I immediately collared the prisoner at the bar with the copper on his head; the other person ran off, I asked him how he dared steal the copper from the door, he said he was employed by the person that was with him; in the scuffle he got from me and the copper fell off his head, with assistance I took him again; he never was out of my sight.

Prisoner. I shewed him the boy who hired me to carry it, and begged of him to take him.

Court. You know him I suppose. - A. I never saw the boy before.

(The copper produced and identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner. I have a witness that saw the boy call me to carry it, that was coming by at the time he hired me.

ELIZABETH ROSE sworn. I live in Charlotte's-buildings, Gray's Inn-lane, I work for Mr. Wake a scavenger in Gray's Inn-lane, I sift cinders.

Q. How long have you known Cox. - A. I do not know him at all.

Q. O, Yes you do. - A. No, I do not know him, I never saw him before the boy stopped him in Eagle-street and asked him to carry the copper for him into Holborn, and he would satisfy him for it.

Q. What size boy. - A. He was about fifteen years old, the boy had the copper before him when he asked Cox to carry it.

Q. A stout lad. - A. Yes, with a brown coat.

Q. Did it not strike you very odd, that that boy should not be able to carry that copper himself. - A. It was nothing to do with me.

Q. You will explain to me and the jury how he found you out. - A. I will tell you how I was found out, two or three days afterwards, I was in Gray's Inn-lane, a woman was crying she said her brother was charged with the copper, I said I saw such a man stopped in Eagle-street with the copper, I thought it was my duty to go and tell the truth

Q. What is the woman's name. - A.ElizabethCox.

Q.(to Clark) Where was it you first saw the prisoner. - A. In St. Giles's I followed him to Red Lion-street.

Q. What was the boy in that was in company with him. - A. I think it was a brown coat.

GUILTY , aged 34.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

350. RICHARD WILSON was indicted for that he on the 17th of April was employed by John Dunkin , for the purpose of receiving monies and notes, to wit, bank notes, and being such servant as aforesaid, did receive and take into his possession for and on account of his said master and employer, four bank notes, value 1 l. each, and that he feloniously did embezzle, secrete, and steal the same .

The case was stated by Mr. Knapp.

JOHN DUNKIN sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q.You are a tallow chandler , living in Aldersgate-street. - A. Yes.

Q. Was the prisoner at the bar a servant of yours. - A. I employed him occasionally. On the 17th of April I sent him with goods, with orders to receive the money of Mr. Richard Bass , a publican, I gave him a bill and receipt, he was to receive three pounds five, I gave him change for four guineas.

Q. Did he ever return to you. - A. No, on the Monday following I saw him, he said he had lost part of the money and spent the rest; I sent him to the Compter directly.

RICHARD BASS sworn. I live at the Manchester Arms, Adam-street, Baker-street, Portman-square. On the 17th of April, the prisoner at the bar brought me some candles.

Q. Did you pay him any money for these goods. - A. I paid him three pounds five shillings; I paid him in four one pound notes, he brought the change.

Q. On whose account did you pay him that sum of money. - A. Upon Mr. Dunkin's account.

Court. Mr. Dunkin, is the prisoner at the bar your servant, and did you send him with the goods that morning. - A. I sent him with the goods that morning, he was an occasional porter when I wanted him, perhaps I might have him once a week; he is a poor man in the workhouse.

Q. Here is a poor man hired out of the workhouse brought here, did not he tell you he lost part of the money. - A. Yes, I have not the least doubt but that he lost part of the money.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

347. JANE NUNN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 26th of April , a petticoat, value 5 s. the property of William Gates .

MARY GATES sworn. My husband's name is William Gates , we live at Battle Bridge . On Saturday the 29th of April, I hung my petticoat out to dry in my own garden, and I had pinned it to a gown which I have now got on.

Q. There was an alarm of somebody having taken the petticoat. - A. Yes, I ran and fetched the prisoner back.

Q. Was the petticoat ever found. - A. No, she threw the petticoat away, and the man that was with her picked it up and ran away.

MARTHA WOODMAN sworn. On the 26th of April as I was going to get something for dinner, I was coming down the road, I saw this woman go into Hamlington court, and take a petticoat from Mrs. Gates's paling; I asked the woman at the bar if it was hers, she said it was; she had on a long red cloak, I saw her put it under her cloak and run over the road; when I saw her run I called out who belongs to these pales, Mrs. Gates came out, said she did; I told her the prisoner had taken a petticoat and had ran up Britannia row; they brought her back and found nothing on her, I saw her brought back, she is the very same woman.

MARY JAGO sworn. Q. Do you know Mrs. Gates. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see her petticoat hanging on the paling. - A. I did; when I came down the court, the prisoner passed me in Britannia street with a bundle under her cloak, what it was I cannot tell, the petticoat was gone when I went up the court; I made an alarm to Mrs. Gates.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going to gather some dandelion, and coming along this road, where I serve with asparagus, some women called after me, you have got something that does not belong to you under your cloak, I turned back to go to the woman that said I had got the property, and before I got over the second channel, a man came out and said he would take good care I should not go; I stopped an hour before the officer took me, the officer took me into a public house and searched me, I had not any thing in the world but one halfpenny; he asked me where I lodged, I said it is nothing where I lodge, I get my money very hard; I am really innocent of the fact, you may depend upon it, as innocent as God is just and true in heaven.

GUILTY , aged 34.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

348. JOHN HIGGINS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 29th of April , three pewter pint pots, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of Ishmael Birch .

The case was stated by Mr. Alley.

ISHMAEL BIRCH sworn. Examined by Mr. Alley. - Q. You are a publican . - A. Yes, I live at the Black Boy and Horshoe, Nicholas-lane, Lombard-street .

Q. Have you lost any pots lately. - A. About nine dozen.

JOHN REEVES sworn. Examined by Mr. Alley. - Q. I live along with my father, he keeps the Mail Coach public house, Abchurch lane. On the 29th of April, between seven and eight in the morning, I saw the prisoner at the bar in possession of three pewter pots; I asked him where he lived, he said he lived with Mr. Birch, who keeps the Black Boy and Horshoe, Nicholas lane; I went home immediately to my father and told him, he told me to go and ask Mr. Birch, I did, Mr. Birch said there was no such a person lived with him; the next morning Mr. Birch's waiter found him in Abchurch-lane.

Q. When you saw the pots in the prisoner's possession did you see whose they were. - A. Yes, I saw J. Birch, Blackboy and Horshoe, Nicholas-lane, Lombard-street, upon them.

Court. You are sure you saw him with the pots. -A. Yes, and he said that he lived with Mr. Birch.

Prisoner. Which way was I going. - A. When I saw you with the pots you was going towards Mr. Birch's.

ANN CLARKE sworn. Examined by Mr. Alley. I am servant with alderman Curtis, at the banking house, Lombard-street.

Q. On the 29th of April did you see the prisoner at the bar. - A. Yes, he called at our house for the pots, he said that he came from Mr. Birch's, it was just before eight in the morning.

Q. You considered him as the regular servant. - A. He went into the servant's hall and took the pots away.

Prisoner. I was not in the house at all at that time.

Q.(to prosecutor) Was the prisoner a servant of yours. - A. He was not.

Q. Where are the pots. - A. We never had them, I had lost pots on that day.

Q. Do you serve sir William Curtis in Lombard-street. - A. Yes.

Prisoner's Defence. I never was in that place at all, nor never received any pots, nor nothing of the kind.

GUILTY , aged 46.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

356. WILLIAM SPILLMAN AYRES was indicted for a fraud .

The case was stated by Mr. Gurney.

WALTER HEMMIT sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. I believe you are partner with Mr. Alexander Sinclair Stratton . - A. Yes, we are oilmen , we live at No. 34, Fish-street hill.

Q. In the month of October last did the prisoner call upon you. - A. He did, he is an oil-broker; he stated that he understood that we had a pipe of olive oil to dispose of, and requested a sample, he had a sample, he made an observation when the sample was given him that it looked rather dingy, he asked the price, I made answer seventy pound per ton; a day or two afterwards he called again and requested a fresh sample, he said it looked dingy, and requested the man to put the searching iron in to ascertain what grease or dirt might be in the body of the oil: the man did it and brought it to Mr. Ayres' inspection; he went away and returned again in about three days, and requested to know if I would take sixty-five pound per ton for it, I said as I had only that one cask, I would dispose of it at that price; he said he had sold it to Mr. Payne, a spermaceti refiner, Berwick street, Soho, he said he had sold it for sixty-five pound, he then gave me a note in my presence (the note read in court); he then said he had two or three little packages to take to Mr. Payne, he must have a cart for them, and if it made no difference to me, he would thank me if I would let him take the olive oil with him, as it would save the cart hire, he requested to have the oil got up for him by eleven o'clock, it was got up for him, and he called a little after eleven o'clock and took the cask of olive oil with him, and said he would make the allowance for the dirt and grease in the oil shortly.

Q. What was the quantity and value of the olive oil in that cask. - A. I think about ninety-three gallons, and it was worth about twenty-four or twenty-five pounds.

Q. This was on the 25th of October he took the cask of olive oil with him. - A. Yes; in about three weeks afterwards I met him in Leadenhall-street, I told him we had not his return, he made answer we should shortly have it, he never called on us; in about a month or five weeks afterwards I met him again, I then asked him the reason that he had not brought the allowance for grease and dirt down to our accounting-house, he said it was owing to the severe cold weather, it was impossible to ascertain the allowance, but now being placed in a warm situation, he would shortly take it and bring it down to us.

Q. Did he give you any idea that the oil had not gone to Mr. Payne. - A. None at all; after that one morning I called at his dwelling house George-yard, Lombard-street; he then said he would bring the allowance down for the cask, he never came near us, I called again, he then stated that he had lost the paper that had the allowance on it; I then sent to Mr. Payne: I saw Mr. Ayres after that, I told him that Mr. Payne knew nothing of the transaction, he had never ordered him to buy the oil of us, he answered me he would call down and settle it, I saw him again, he promised to call; at last I told him I should take out a warrant against him.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gleed.

Q. When did you apply to Mr. Ayres to pay the money. - A. I never applied to him about the business of the money.

Q. Who was you to receive the money from. - A. From Mr. Payne, we looked to Mr. Payne for the money, it was sold to him.

Q. From the time you sold it, how long elapsed before you made application to Mr. Payne. - A. Near four months.

Q. And he not being able to pay did not give you such security as you approved of. - A. Ayes offered security, but I told him I did not approve of it.

Court. He offered security and you refused it. - A. Yes.

- PAYNE sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Did you receive a pipe of oil from Messrs. Stratton and Hemmit on the 25th of October last. - A. I did not, I permitted him to make use of my name, but it never came.

Mr. Gleed addressed the jury on behalf of the prisoner.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.