Old Bailey Proceedings Online (www.oldbaileyonline.org, version 6.0, 21 October 2014), May 1805 (18050529).

Old Bailey Proceedings, 29th May 1805.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the Peace, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND ALSO, THE GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, HELD AT Justice-Hall, in the Old-Bailey, On WEDNESDAY, the 29th of MAY, 1805, and following Days,

BEING THE FIFTH SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF The Right Honourable PETER PERCHARD , LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY RAMSEY AND BLANCHARD.

LONDON:

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED. By Authority of the CORPORATION of the CITY of LONDON, By W. WILSON, St. Peter's-Hill, Little Knight-Rider-Street, Doctors' Commons.

1805.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the Peace, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, &c.

BEFORE the Right Honourable PETER PERCHARD , LORD-MAYOR of the City of LONDON; the Right Hon. Sir NASH GROSE, Knt. One of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir ROBERT GRAHAM , Knt. One of the Barons of His Majesty's Court of Exchequer; JOHN PERRING , Esq. Sir BROOK WATSON, Bart. and Sir WILLIAM STAINES , Knt. Alderman of the said City; JOHN SILVESTER , Esq. Recorder of the said City; Sir WILLIAM LEIGHTON , Knt. THOMAS ROWCROFT , Esq. CLAUDIUS STEPHEN HUNTER, Esq. and JOSIAH BOYDELL , Esq. Aldermen of the said City; and NEWMAN KNOWLYS, Esq. Common-Serjeant of the said City; His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of LONDON, and Justices of Goal Delivery of NEWGATE, holden for the said City, and County of MIDDLESEX.

London Jury.

John Ward ,

John Pitman ,

John Peris ,

James Elisha ,

Thomas Judkins ,

John Barlow ,

Michael Whitlock ,

John Griffin ,

William Ward ,

Matthew Bacon ,

Richard Clark ,

Henry Dismoor .

First Middlesex Jury.

John Fuller ,

John Spalton ,

Richard Wilmot ,

Joseph Clements ,

James Wilmot ,

George Hardesty ,

George Dobins ,

Thomas Bristow ,

Joseph Brown ,

Henry Thompson ,

Daniel Lock ,

Thomas Sambrook .

Second Middlesex Jury.

Charles Crump ,

Robert Hare ,

John Olendale ,

Jacob Rook ,

John Burrell ,

Robert Winkworth ,

Samuel Smith ,

Jasper King ,

Henry Saxton ,

John Frost ,

Samuel Newman ,

William Sweetman .

361. EDWARD EVANS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of April , a ham, value 4 s. the property of Edward Frisby Howis , Edward Howis , and Stephen Howis .

JAMES COOK sworn. - I am a servant to Mr. Reynolds, a printer, who lives opposite to Mr. Howis; I saw the prisoner take a ham from Mr. Howis's shop on the 27th of April, between two and three o'clock in the afternoon, and put it into the cart, and wrapped it up in some matting; the ham was close by the side of the door; I saw him go back into the shop, and speak to the young man, and then he returned to the cart and took the ham from the cart, and wrapped it up in the matting and put it under his arm, and went away with it; I informed Mr. Howis of it; he went in search of him, but could not find him; when he returned back, Mr. Howis sent for me.

EDWARD FRISBY HOWIS sworn. - I am an oilman , I live in Piccadilly ; I am in partnership with Edward Howis , and Stephen Howis my father.

Q. Did you ever find your ham again? - A. No, the prisoner was a servant to the carman we usually employ to cart our goods; when he came back I challenged him with it, and he strongly denied having any thing at all to do with it.

Prisoner's defence. About half past twelve o'clock I was standing with the cart at Charing-cross; my master came down to me, and ordered me to go to Mr. Frisby Howis to load the cart; I stood with the cart before the shop a quarter of an hour; the gentleman came to the door, and I asked him how long it would be before he could get the goods to load; he said a quarter of an hour; I asked leave to go and get a pint of beer and a bit of bread and cheese; instead of going for that I went up to the whip-maker and fetched my whip.

Q. What do you say about the ham? - A. I never touched any thing of the kind, nor had the least thought about it.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

362. MARGARET BUCKNELL , alias BROWN , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of May , twenty-five yards of black silk lace, value 25 s. the property of Archibald Macaulay .

BETTY BEAUMONT sworn. - I am shopwoman to Mr. Macaulay.

Q. Do you remember the prisoner coming into your master's shop on the 6th of May? - A. Perfectly well, it was between three and four o'clock, and another lady with her; the prisoner enquired of the boy to look at some British lace; he was the only one in the shop; I was in the adjoining room; the door being open, I heard every thing, and by the glass I saw every thing, that passed; he shewed her a draw of British lace; they did not approve of that; she asked to look at some real lace; the boy shewed her a draw of real lace; she did not make choice of what he shewed her; he went to the window to fetch a card from there; she did not approve of that, but she made choice of one in the drawer, and agreed with him for seventeen yards, which he cut off for her; she had not money to pay for the whole of the lace; she desired it might be put by and she would call the next day; she gave the boy one shilling and sixpence towards the payment.

Q. Did you miss any lace? - A. We did not miss any at all.

Q. Was there a quantity of lace lying about the counter? - A. None, but what was in the drawer, she and the other woman sat upon two stools by the side of the counter, and the drawer was between the two women; the prisoner was the person that cheapened the lace.

Q. Did the other woman offer to buy any? - A. I believe the lace that was to be bought was for the other; I believe it was the prisoner that gave the one shilling and sixpence.

Q. Was she intoxicated at all? - A. It appeared to me so; she had a very odd behaviour with her, and had a great deal of action with her hands; they were very genteel people, and very well dressed; the other woman had on a white dress and long sleeves, and a feather in each of their hats.

STEPHEN MACAULY sworn. - Q. How many cards of lace might you shew the prisoner? - A. Several.

Q. Were any cards of lace on the counter, or were they all in the drawer? - A. I took some of them out to shew them.

Q. Did you miss any? - A. I did not.

Q. Which of them appeared to be most dealing for the lace? - A. The prisoner was the person that cheapened.

- KINCADE sworn. - I live in Fort-street, in the old Artillery-ground; I am a silk manufacturer; on the 6th of May, about half past five, Iassed the prisoner at the bar in White-Lion-street; she was apparently very well dressed; she being very much intoxicated, abused the passengers as they went along; it attracted my attention, seeing a woman so well dressed, and so very abusive, that I crossed the way, to see who or what she might be; knowing where the beadle of the district lived, I went and knocked at his door, and he came down; I sent for an officer by him, and immediately gave him charge of this woman on suspicion that she was a shop-lifter.

Q. What reason had you? - A. This lace, with this ticket, which appeared to be a shop-mark, was hanging somewhere under her clothes, with the ticket to it; I ordered her to be taken to Worship-street, I gave particular charge that she should not drop the lace; I went with her to the office, and it was taken from her there; there was another card of lace which the officer took from her at the Office.

CHARLES COWLING sworn. - I am one of the headboroughs of Norton-Falgate; I was fetched from my house, about half past five o'clock, on the sixth of May, to take the prisoner in charge, on suspicion of her being a shop-lifter, by Mr. Kincade; I asked her if she had any lace about her; she said, yes, it was her own, and if I, or any body took it away from her, she would swear a robbery against them; I took her to the next place to the Office, the Office being shut up, and there she dropped the two cards of lace; I picked up one, and Mr. Kincade picked up the other.

DANIEL BISHOP sworn. - I am an officer of Worship-street, when the prisoner was brought there, I was going to search her; she dropped the cards of lace, which were picked up by the witnesses; I was present at the time that she said it was her own; I searched her, and in her pocket I found a half guinea, a key, and a duplicate. (The property produced and identified by Mrs. Beaumont.

GUILTY, aged 34.

Of stealing only .

Confined one year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

363. JOSEPH WILLIAM ALDRICH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of April , four silver dishes, value 16 l. thirty-three silver forks, value 12 l. eight plated dishes, value 3 l. four silver candlesticks, value 4 l. two silver salvers, value 4 l. three silver gravy-spoons, value 5 l. two silver table-spoons, value 2 l. four silver desert-spoons, value 2 l. four silver tea-spoons, value 20 s. two silver salts, value 2 l. a silver fish-trowel, value 2 l. two silver ladles, value 30 s. two plated branches, value 10 s. a silver bread-basket, value 4 l. and one box, value 2 s. the property of Charles Dennis , Esq. in his dwelling-house .

CHARLES DENNIS sworn. - I live in Bentinck-street, Cavendish-square ; the prisoner at the bar lived with me as footman .

Q. When did he quit your service? - A. On the night he committed the robbery, on the Thursday in Passion-week, I do not recollect the day of the month; I believe he left my house about half after nine in the evening; at nine o'clock I rang the bell, and the prisoner answered me; at half an hour after nine I rang again, and upon no person answering, I was surprized and went down, and I found there was no person below stairs; I then went up stairs and called; I found no servant above stairs neither; in a short time afterwards, there was a ring at the bell; I went down and opened the door; it was the house-maid; I reprimanded her and she said the prisoner had induced her to go; I found the prisoner was absent; he did not return that night.

Q. Did you miss any thing upon his being gone? - A. In consequence of what the servant-maid told me, I missed all the plate, chest and all.

Q. Had you that plate in use in the course of that day? - A. The chest of plate was in my room the whole course of that day.

Q. Had you looked at the contents of the chest that day? - A. I had not.

Q. I suppose you had several articles of plate in use that day? - A. No, none that were in the chest.

Q. When had you last seen them in the chest? - A. I believe about three weeks before I put them in the chest myself; I keep those in my own bedroom that are not in common use; I lost both these that were in common use and in the chest, except a few.

Q. Upon this did you make any enquiry after the prisoner? - A. I did; on Sunday I found he had been with Soley, a milkman, on Lisson-green; I traced him by that means.

JOHN SOLEY sworn. - Q. Where do you live? - A. On Lisson-green.

Q. You know the prisoner? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember his coming to you? - A. Yes, on Thursday evening, about ten minutes past ten o'clock; he came and called my wife and me; we were all in bed; I opened the door; I was in my shirt; he came inside of the house; he said to my wife, Mrs. Soley, I am now come to take my leave of you; he said he was going into the country; - he told my wife he had made her a present of an old coat or two, and some things, that he should not take away; he said where he had left them.

Q. Had he any thing with him? - A. No, not when he came to my house; he asked my wife if she would consent for me to go as far as Bishopsgate-street; he said, if you will dress yourself, and come over the other side of Lisson-green, I have got a hackney coach; I dressed myself, and went;there was nobody with the coach but the coachman and him; he went into the coach, and asked me to ride a little way with him; I got into the coach with him, and I saw two boxes in the coach; he drove on down Oxford-road; the coachman, when he came into Oxford-road, said he must feed his horses, and he would advise him to take another coach, as the horses could not go so far as Bishopsgate-street; he told the coachman to get him a post-chaise; the coachman got him one, and the post-chaise was put alongside, and the boxes were put out of the coach into the post-chaise; the helper that came with the post-chaise shifted the boxes.

Q. Did you touch them? - A. No; then I shook hands with him, and told him I would rather go home, as he had got a post-chaise; he pressed very much for me to go along with him, and I agreed to go to Islington turnpike; when I came there I shook hands with him, and parted, and wished him a pleasant journey.

Q. Did you hear him tell the postillion where to drive to? - A. Yes, to Waltham-cross.

Q. Did he say he was to go farther? - A. He told the post-boy he was going on to Cambridge; with that we went on Friday morning to the place where he told us for the clothes; we went to two or three places, we did not understand the right shop, and we never got the clothes.

HANNAH PATMORE sworn. - Q. Where do you live? - A. At Puckeridge, twenty-seven miles from Shoreditch.

Q. Do you come through Waltham-cross to it? - A. Yes.

Q. Look at the prisoner at the bar? - A. That is the gentleman.

Q. Do you keep a public-house? - A. Yes, the Crown and Coffin, at Puckeridge; he came to my house on the Friday before Easter, before dinner, in a post-chaise, alone.

Q. What did he bring with him? - A. I was not present at the moment he alighted; I believe the post lad had brought the boxes into my house.

Mr. Knapp. Q. You were not present; you did not see the boxes taken out of the chaise? - A. No; I saw the boxes in my parlour.

Court. Q. How many boxes? - A. Three.

Q. Had you any conversation with the prisoner about the boxes? - A. No, nothing particular; I went to the parlour-door, and made my obedience to him, and he asked for a pot of ale; the servant fetched the ale; then he asked for something to eat; I told him I had nothing cooked, there was bread and butter, and bread and cheese.

Q. Did he give you any directions about these boxes? - A. He said he would take a bit of dinner, and after dinner he went and took a walk, and came back to tea; after he drank tea he went out of doors, and going out of doors he heard there was a post-chaise to let; he went and hired the post-chaise, and the post-chaise was brought up to the door; he took the white deal box with him.

Q. That was one of the three boxes? - A. Yes; he said he was going to Cambridge, and he said, would I have the goodness to take care of the other two boxes till he returned again; he said he believed he should come back on the Sunday morning, but he did not return till the Sunday evening; then the deal box was brought back, and he said he was going to London on the Monday morning, and he wanted something out of the other two boxes, and the middle box of the three was brought down stairs for the gentleman to take out whatever he wanted.

Q. Why do you call it the middle box? - A. Because there was one smaller, and the white deal box was larger.

Q. He took something out, did he? - A. Yes, I went into the parlour to light him, and I saw him open the large deal box, and in shifting his box I saw some silver candlesticks and two silver branches; I saw them in the room, I suppose they were taken out of the box.

Q. You did not see him take any thing out of the box? - A. I did not particularly see that; however I saw them in the room on the table.

Q. You saw him open the deal box, but you do not recollect seeing him take any thing out? - A. Yes, I saw them in the box afterwards; there were some silver candlesticks, and two silver branches.

Q. Were they silver? - A. Apparently silver, I thought they were silver; they were such as I never saw before, and there were some silver spoons; I never remarked any thing else; he said he was going to take a neckcloth for his own use; he took the middle box, and the other box, and locked them up; he asked me to be so kind as to take care of them till he came back.

Q. Did he lock up both the boxes? - A. The little box was locked; he locked the other box, and one box he took into his bed-room, and the other two, the lad, who was in my house, took them up into my bed-room; he staid on the Sunday night, and went off in the morning before I was up.

Q. I understood you to say that he desired you to keep these boxes till he returned? - A. Yes, I have told you so.

Q. What did he do with the large box? - A. They were both put into my bed-room, and one he took to London with him; that was the middle box.

Q. The other two were kept in your bed-room? - A. Yes.

Q. How long were they kept in your bed-room? - A. The Monday happened to be a fair-day; I locked up my room door, and put the key in my pocket, and in the evening he returned again from London about tea-time; I changed but very few words with him, being busy; I asked him how he did after his journey; he told me he was going his journey for Cambridge.

Q. He still left his boxes with you? - A. Yes, they were still in the same place where he left them, in my bed-room.

Q. I suppose you are quite sure they are the same boxes that he left? - A. O yes, that I am very sure of; I bid him good afternoon, and went about my business; in the course of the evening, Mr. Rivett and Mr. Dennis came into my house; I stood at the bar-door; they asked me if the landlord of the house was at home; I told them, yes; they asked me if they could speak to him; I said, yes; Mr. Dennis said to me, are you the landlady; I said, yes; he then said, I shall be glad to speak to you in a private room.

Q. You told him that a man had left two boxes? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you show him the boxes? - A. I told him they were in my bed-room; I went up stairs with both the gentlemen by myself, and unlocked the bed-room door, and shewed them the boxes; Mr. Dennis looked at the deal box, and put his hand upon it, and said that was his box, and he could swear to it; it rather confused me, and I said, if it is your's, I should like to have somebody as a witness to see you take these things from me, for fear I should be brought into trouble.

Q. You delivered the box to Mr. Rivett and Mr. Dennis? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you ever see the prisoner afterwards? - A. I heard his voice when Mr. Dennis and Mr. Rivett returned with him; he never came into my house after he was taken.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. I understood you to say, when the person came in the chaise the first time, you were not then at the door? - A. I was not present, to my knowledge.

Q. The first time you saw the boxes was in your parlour, and that gentleman was in the same room with the boxes? - A. Yes.

Q. You were not present at the time to see that any boxes were taken out of the chaise? - A. I do not recollect seeing them taken out of the chaise; he is the gentleman that gave them into my hands.

Q. Any body else might have brought them there for what you know? -

WILLIAM WATTS sworn. - I keep the Bull, at Royston.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - A. Yes.

Q. When did he come to your house? - A. On Good Friday night, he came in a post-chaise from Puckeridge; he changed the chaise at my house to go to Cambridge.

Q. It is only one stage from Royston to Cambridge? - A. It is thirteen miles; my chaise took him to Cambridge; he had this deal box that is here.

Q. Do you know the box? (the box produced) - A. This is the box that he took with him to Cambridge.

Q. When did he return to your house? - A. On Saturday night, he brought the box with him; he had a chaise of me on Sunday morning to go down to Cambridge again; he returned from Cambridge in my chaise on Sunday evening, with the box, again; he took a fresh pair of horses to go to Puckeridge; he told me he was short of money, and requested that I would lend him some; he told me that he was going to London, and he should there receive money, and he would pay me for the chaise; I told him I did not like to do any thing in that way; he said he had plenty of property, and he would leave me more than double the amount of it; he unlocked that box, and gave me out a silver bread-basket, which I gave to Mr. Dennis when he came down.

Q. When did Mr. Dennis come into your house? - A. On Monday night; the prisoner came in about three hours before Mr. Dennis and Mr. Rivett came.

Q. Where was the prisoner when Mr. Dennis came? - A. In bed; the prisoner paid me for what he owed me, and I offered him the bread-basket; he told me to keep it till morning.

Q. On him giving you the bread-basket, did you lend him any money? - A. A one-pound note; he paid me the one-pound note, and for the chaise as well; then he went to-bed; when Mr. Dennis and Mr. Rivett came, they brought the box to my house; he had taken the box to Puckeridge; Mr. Dennis asked the prisoner whether he had any plate at my house; he said, no; I said I had a bread-basket before the prisoner; I produced the bread-basket, and Mr. Dennis said it was his; they took the prisoner with them, and I gave the bread-basket to Mr. Dennis.

JOHN RIVETT sworn. - I belong to the Public-office, in Bow-street: On Monday, the 15th of April, I went with Mr. Dennis to Puckeridge; I found these boxes in Mrs. Patmore's bed-room; Mr. Dennis identified this box to be the box that he lost; he wished very much to see the contents of it; he recognised it immediately he came into the room; we asked Mrs. Patmore if she had the key; she said she had, and immediately she gave it up, and it was unlocked; she had only this one key.

Q.(To Mrs. Patmore.) Did the prisoner give you the key of that box? - A. Yes; the reason of his giving me the key was, he said it had been lostin the course of his travelling; he came back with it, and when he was going away, he said, I wish you to have the goodness to take care of this key; I put it in my right-hand pocket, and directly Mr. Dennis came to me, I said, Mr. Aldrich gave me the key.

Q.(To Rivett.) You opened the box? - A. Yes, and there were several articles of plate, which Mr. Dennis identified to be his property.

Q. Are they there now? - A. Yes; we went after the prisoner, and took the box with the plate with us; the others were left at Mrs. Patmore's; I have had the care of this box ever since; I have kept the box under lock and key; I have had the key likewise.

Q. Having found the box, you and Mr. Dennis took a chaise, and went on to Royston? - A. Yes; I apprehended the prisoner in bed; Mr. Dennis asked him what he had done with all his plate, as there was a great deal missing out of this large box; the prisoner replied he had pledged some; I asked him where the duplicates were; the prisoner replied they were locked up in a box at Puckeridge; we had taken his keys from him, and when we came to Puckeridge, he found the key that opened the smaller box; he pointed out where the box and the duplicates were.

Q. He shewed you the box himself? - A. He did; the box was brought to him at the chaise-door.

Q. You found the duplicates where he shewed you? - A. Yes.

Q. You took the prisoner into custody at Royston? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember any thing about the bread-basket? - A. Yes; Mr. Dennis asked if there was any plate there, and the landlord immediately answered he had a silver bread-basket; he gave it to Mr. Dennis; I have had it in my possession ever since Mr. Dennis gave it to me.

Q.(To the prosecutor.) Is that the bread-basket that was produced to you at Royston? - A. Yes.

Q. Whereabouts is the value of that? - A. I do not know; I believe the weight is upon it; I think it weighs thirty-two ounces.

Q. Look at it, and tell us whether it is worth about forty shillings? - A. No doubt of that, and here are two silver candlesticks.

Q. You have no doubt but the greatest part of them were deposited in the trunk? - A. They were deposited by me; there was a great deal more that was deposited, which are at the pawnbroker's.

Court. The pawnbroker must deliver it up.

JOEL EDWARDS sworn. - I produce these dishes; the prisoner is the person that pledged them with me.

Q.(To the prosecutor.) Are those your's? - A. They are.

Q. You had a good character with the prisoner? - A. I had.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Have you taken any pains to find out who this young man is? - A. I have.

Q. Whether you did not find him to be of a very respectable family? - A. Yes.

Q. Whether you do not believe that he had been set upon by other persons to commit this depredation? - A. I had a good opinion of him till that day, he had lived with me about two months.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , Death , aged 23.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

364. JAMES FAGAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of April , one iron brand-mark, value 6 d. a shovel, value 6 d. two locks, value 1 s. one steel ruler, value 2 s. and a box, value 3 s. the property of Francis Hicks .

(The case stated by Mr. Gurney.)

FRANCIS HICKS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am a calico printer , I live at Old Ford, the prisoner had been in my service for six or seven years: On Sunday morning, the 28th of April, I saw some of the articles in the indictment in our watchman's box; I proceeded from thence to the house of the prisoner, and there I saw the box.

EDWARD EWERS sworn. - I am clerk to Mr. Hicks: On Sunday, the 28th of April, I went to Fagan's house; the locks we found in his bed chamber; the brand-mark, the shovel, and the box, we found in the wash-house.

JAMES OLIVER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Did you receive these things from the last witness? - A. I did; I brought the things in a bag as I received it from him.

Q.(To Prosecutor.) Did you see that box on the day the other things were found? - A. I did; in going to the prisoner's house I met several articles in a wheelbarrow that I thought was my property; when I saw him, he went down upon his knees; he said he was extremely sorry, he wished me to forgive him on account of his family, he said he had three children; I told him he should have considered that before; I know this box has been about the factory some years, I know they are my locks, it is all my property.

Prisoner's defence. I am innocent of the charge that is alledged against me.

The prisoner called three witnesses who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 35.

Confined one year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

365. CATHARINE KELLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of May , one jacket, value 2 s. 6 d. two waistcoats, value 10 s. three shirts, value 5 s. three sheets, value 30 s. three table-cloths, value 20 s. two napkins, value 2 s. 6 d.a towel, value 6 d. two pillow-cases, value 2 s. 6 d. four pair of stockings, value 6 s. four neck handkerchiefs, value 1 s. a flat iron, value 2 d. two gowns, value 7 s. seven yards of nankeen, value 7 s. one gold ring, value 10 s. 6 d. four yards of sheeting, value 6 s. one yard of satin, value 2 s. 6 d. two bed gowns, value 2 s. two pair of pockets, value 6 d. and one shift, value 1 s. the property of James Robinson .

JAMES ROBINSON sworn. - I live at No. 17, St. Mary Axe , I keep an eating-house : On the 6th of May I had a search-warrant, and searched Mrs. Young's house in Castle-place, Whitechapel, where I found the prisoner Kelley, who had been in my service as cook ; on searching her we found forty-two duplicates in her pocket, some of them were for property belonging to me; we found some of my property in Mrs. Young's trunk, and others between the sacking and the bed where the prisoner slept; we also found a gold ring upon the prisoner, in consequence of which I gave charge of her to the officer.

Q. Was the gold ring your property? - A. Yes.

THOMAS GRIFFITHS sworn. - I am an officer: On Monday, the 6th of May, I went in company with Mr. Robinson to No. 21, Castle-place, to Mrs. Young's house.

Q. What is Mrs. Young's husband? - A. He is a City porter, she takes in washing; in searching about the house, we found several things which I produce; I then insisted upon searching the prisoner's pockets, which she resisted, and said I should not; in struggling, I was obliged to pull them off before I could search them; I found in the pockets a gold ring and forty-two duplicates, part of which is Mr. Robinson's property; we then searched Mrs. Young's trunks, and there we found some of Mr. Robinson's property; the prisoner said she had put them there herself; I then took her to Lambeth-street Office, where she confessed that she had pledged those things at Mr. Spinkes's, in Gracechurch-street, and that they were her master's property; I then told her that her master had lost some rings, which were very valuable; she said, she knew nothing more than what she told me.

- sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Spinkes, No. 2, Gracechurch-street; I produce a waistcoat, a napkin, and a handkerchief, pledged for six shillings, pledged on the 25th of March. On the 1st of May, three table-cloths, two napkins, two pillow-cases, one pair of stockings, and three handkerchiefs; these pledges I took in myself from the prisoner at the bar, the young man that took in the other things is gone away.

(The property identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. No person has any thing to say to those tickets but myself, excepting what belongs to my master; I had no wages for six months that I lived with him.

Prosecutor. I would have given her the money, but she run away.

GUILTY , aged 39.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

366. GEORGE DUCKHAM was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Susannah Turner , between the hours of two and three, in the night of the 1st of May , and burglariously stealing therein twenty-nine bonnets, value 20 l. two silver tea-spoons, value 3 s. one pair of silver tea-tongs, value 5 s. and five shillings in halfpence , the property of Susannah Turner.

(The case was stated by Mr. Gleed.)

SUSANNAH TURNER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gleed. Q. What are you? - A. I live at No. 5, Long-lane , I keep the house, I am a single woman .

Q. What time did you go to bed? - A. Between ten and eleven; I was the last up in the house, I bolted and chained the door that night.

Court. Q. What day of the month was it? - A. The 1st of May; I got up the next morning between six and seven, I did not observe any thing then; between seven and eight I went into my shop, I observed all my bonnets were gone, and the till was broke open, and five shillings in halfpence were taken out.

Q. What shop do you keep? - A. A straw bonnet shop; I missed two silver tea-spoons and a pair of silver tea-tongs.

ELIZABETH TURNER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gleed. Q. What time did you get up on the 1st of May? - A. Between six and seven; I went to open the street door, and it was neither bolted nor chained, it hung upon the single lock.

Court. Q. Have you any lodgers? - A. Yes, in the first and second floor.

Q. Perhaps some of them were gone out? - A. I do not know.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Of course your lodgers go out and in when they like in your house? - A. Yes.

JAMES GEARY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gleed. I am an officer belonging to St. Luke's: On the 1st of May, in the morning, about half past two, I observed the prisoner at the bar coming through Cowheel-alley with this bag, there were two other men with him; I stopped him, and the other two men ran away; I asked him what he had got in his bag; he said, it was nothing else but a bit of hay for his horse; I took the prisoner to the watch-house, and searched him, and found the property in the bag; he dropped two keys under his feet, I have two other keys that were found on him.

JOHN WATKINS sworn. - I am an officer: I was with the last witness when the prisoner was apprehended; we heard some persons coming out of Cowheel-alley, we overtook the prisoner, and securedhim; he dropped this skeleton-key under his feet, I tried the key to the prosecutrix's lock, and it threw back the bolt of the lock.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Would it let a man get in after the door was bolted? - A. No.

Q. I dare say you know there is a forty pound reward for a burglary? - A. I do.

Mr. Gleed. Q. You have spoken the truth? - A. Yes.

(The property produced, and identified by the prosecutrix.)

GUILTY, aged 39,

Of stealing only .

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

367. ANN MAGRATH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of May , eighteen yards of chamberry muslin, value 3 l. the property of John Hamilton , privately in his shop .

THOMAS- CHRISTIAN CORKER sworn. - I am shopman to Mr. Hamilton, a linen-draper , in Newgate-street : On the 14th of May, between five and six in the afternoon, I saw the prisoner just come in the shop, I was standing at the other end of the shop, she was gone in about five minutes, some person passing by cried out; I went to the door, and missed a piece of chamberry muslin; it was in the shop hung on the side of a chair; I pursued her, knowing her again, and found this chamberry muslin upon her; I brought her back to the shop.

Q. Did you ever know her before? - A. No.

DANIEL LEADBETTER sworn. - I produce the chamberry muslin.

Q.(To Corker.) How do you know it to be the property of Mr. Hamilton? - A. I know it from the colour, and by being on the chair about ten minutes before; I believe it to be our's.

Prisoner's defence. I have not much to say, I had been to Somerset-house to receive a small remittance of money; on my return, I met an acquaintance or two in the street, I drank with them too freely, I do not know how I came into the shop, I do not recollect any thing at all till I was in the Compter.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

368. JOHN GENTRY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of May , four fowls, value 10 s. seven chickens, value 14 s. and one basket, value 1 s. the property of Barnabas Allen .

BARNABAS ALLEN sworn. - I am a carrier , I drive a waggon from a place called Stebbing , in the county of Essex; I was coming to Leadenhall-market, I had four hens and seven chickens in a basket, they were taken from the waggon from the hind ladder.

Q. Did you see him take them? - A. No; I missed them before I came to Romford .

Q. Why did you accuse the prisoner of taking them? - A. I had suspicion of him being the man, there was no other man passed me till after daylight; I found them in Leadenhall-market, in Mr. Rutter's possession.

Q. What is the prisoner? - A. He comes with a one-horse cart from Palley, in Essex.

JOSEPH RUTTER sworn. - I am a poulterer at Hackney: On the 3d of May I was at Leadenhall-market, about six o'clock in the morning, buying some pigeons of a man; the prisoner at the bar asked me if I would buy seven chickens; I bought them, basket and all, of the prisoner.

Q.(To Allen.) Is that your basket? - A. Yes, I know it by being tied up here with some strings.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. That basket was not your own, you only know it by the string? - A. No, but I will swear to the basket by the shape and the make.

- SAMPSON sworn. - I am a poulterer in the market, I saw Mr. Rutter pay two shillings and four-pence a-piece for seven chickens.

Q. To whom? - A. I do not know the man.

JOHN RAY sworn. - On the 3d of May, the prosecutor came to the Office in Worship-street, saying, he had been robbed of some fowls, and that they were at a poulterer's shop in Hackney; I went in company with the prosecutor, and there I found the fowls. On the Monday following, by information, I found the prisoner was coming to town; I went with the prosecutor, and as soon as he saw the prosecutor, he ran away; I immediately pursued him, and took him; he began to cry very much, said he hoped he would forgive him, he would pay for the fowls if he would take the money.

The prisoner left his defence to his Counsel, and called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

369. GEORGE BRIGGS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of May , four pounds eight ounces weight of pewter, value 3 s. the property of Peter Le Keux .

PETER LE KEUX sworn. - I live at No. 11, Sun-street, I am a pewterer : On the 13th of May, between eight and nine o'clock in the morning, my apprentice came and gave me some information, the prisoner at the bar went out to go home to breakfast; I desired the boy to call him back, to tell him that I wanted to send him of an errand before he went to breakfast; I had sent for an officer, and the officer came in; I said to the officer, I had suspicion that this man had some of my property; he searched his pockets, and found pot handles and bottoms that weighed four pounds eight ounces.

Q. How long has he lived with you? - A. About four or five weeks.

THOMAS SAPWELL sworn. - I am an officer, I was sent for to search this man; I searched him, his breeches were partly full of this kind of metal, and his coat pockets; they are pot handles and bottoms.

Prisoner's defence. I am very sorry, I did not know that I had got so much, it was only to amuse my children, I took it to make dumps and cocks for my children to shy at; I have got a wife and three children.

The prisoner called a gentleman of the Jury to his character, who gave him a good one.

GUILTY , aged 34.

Confined six weeks in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

370. HENRY WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of April , seven pounds weight of flour, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of Richard Richardson .

JOHN NASH sworn. - I am a servant to Richard Richardson, a corn-factor , in Goulston-square : On the 30th of April I saw the prisoner take a bag out of his pocket, after my master was gone out, and take part of the flour that was concealed in another bag under the straw in the stable; he unbuttoned his waistcoat, and put about seven pounds of flour in this bag he had took out of his pocket, and put the bag between his waistcoat and his shirt, and then walked out of the yard, I immediately followed him, and stopped him, and took him to the Police-Office, where he was searched, and the flour found upon him.

Q. Whose flour was it? - A. Mr. Richardson's; it was in a stable belonging to him, the prisoner was carman; there might be seventeen or eighteen pounds in the stable, he took part of it, which is in the bag here.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Have you had it in your custody ever since? - A. Yes, locked up.

Q. Where were you when you saw all this? - A. In the adjoining building; I was looking through the crevice of a slight partition.

Q. Do you pretend to say that flour is your master's property? - A. I saw him take it from under the straw.

Q. That was not the place where your master keeps flour? - A. Certainly it was not.

Q. Neither can you swear to the colour of the flour? - A. I cannot swear to the colour of the flour.

Court. Q. What quantity was there? - A. The whole that was under the straw was seventeen or eighteen pounds, out of which I saw him take just so much flour as is in this bag.

Q. Do you know whether your master missed any flour? - A. We could not tell that; I saw the place where it was taken from, there was some spilt upon the ground.

The prisoner left his defence to his Counsel.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

371. GEORGE BEALS and ESTHER MERRYMAN were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of April , twenty-four yards of printed cotton, value 30 s. the property of John Greenwell and William Pitt , privately in their shop .

JOHN GREENWELL sworn. - I am a liner-draper , in Bishopsgate-street , I am in partnership with William Pitt ; on Monday, the 29th of April, between five and six o'clock, the two prisoners at the bar came in for a piece of print for a gown; I was up stairs at the time Mr. Pitt was shewing them the print; I came and stood on the stairs, and they both looked at me in a way which I thought very suspicious; when I came into the shop, she pretended she could not find her pocket; the man stepped in between the woman and me, and she turned round and dropped the print from under her petticoat; I saw it drop from her; when I took it up it was warm.

THOMAS SAPWELL sworn. - I produce the print: I searched them both, and only found three shillings in money between them both. (The property identified by the prosecutor.)

Beal's defence. You did not see me offer to lay my hand on any thing; I am a hard-working man; I have a wife and a small family of children.

Merryman's defence. I had been to the warehouse, and I met my brother accidentally; I told him I wanted to buy a gown against Whitsuntide; I asked him to go into this shop with me, and I there looked at some prints; I asked him if he would take so much off for the gown; he said, how much was I going to pay; he could not take less than half a crown a yard; I bid him two shillings and four-pence; he said how many yards did I want; I said, six and a half; in measuring the piece, he shoved that piece from the counter; I directly picked it up, and this gentleman here came up from behind me, and said, I had dropped it; (that is the very truth about it) he said he had lost about twenty or thirty pounds that week; and he would make me pay for all.

Beals called one witness who gave him a good character.

Beals, NOT GUILTY .

Merryman, GUILTY, aged 21,

Of stealing only .

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

372. JAMES PLUMPTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of May , a check-brace, value 2 s. the property of Thomas Oliver , Esq.

JAMES LEE sworn. - I am groom to Mr. Oliver: I was inside of the chaise about twenty minutes past ten at night, the prisoner got up behind the chaise the corner of Hart-street : he unbuckled the check brace, and took it off; I put down the other blind; I was upon the watch for him, and he began to take the other off; I jumped out and caught hold of him; he dropped the brace, and I took it up; I produce it; I am sure the brace is my master's property.

Prisoner's defence. My business is in the china painting line; we always work by day and burn our china in the evening; my master ordered me at nine o'clock to get my supper, and to return at ten; being rather late I got up behind this carriage; as soon as I got up behind the carriage, the man jumped out, at the corner of Great Russel-square, and said I had taken the brace from behind the carriage; I endeavoured to vindicate myself; he said that he was certain that I had; and he had lost one or two more, and I should pay for the rest.

Lee. There was nobody behind the carriage that night till I took this man.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

373. GEORGE CROOKSHANKS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of May , a silk gown, value 20 s. and a bag, value 3 d. the property of John Baker .

MARY BAKER sworn. - Q. Do you know the prisoner? - A. Yes, he lodged at my house; my daughter went up stairs and found him in the dining-room he was taken to the watch-house, and my daughter went and gave charge of him.

JOHN WYGATE sworn. - I was constable of the night when the prisoner was brought into the watch-house, I searched him, and took the bag out of his pocket; and gave Ann Baker charge of the prisoner for being concealed in her father's room; Ann Baker 's daughter sent for the gown; she said he had taken it out of the drawer, and when she saw him in the room, he had his hands lying upon it. I produce the gown and the bag.

Prosecutor. It is my gown, and the bag is mine; they were both in the dining-room.

Prisoner's defence. On Thursday, the 9th of May, I had been drinking very much the whole day; about eleven o'clock at night I went home to my own lodgings; I went up stairs, and instead of going into my own bed-room I went into the servant-maid's; I sat down by the hearth; on the table was a gown belonging to the prosecutor's wife; the daughter came into the room, and not knowing it was me, alarmed the people in the house, supposing I was a stranger; the prosecutor's wife and daughter said I was there with intent to steal something; I was in the dark; I did not know that there was such a thing as a gown on the table; while I lodged in the prosecutor's house, I always paid him justly; there were several articles missing which were laid to my charge, in consequence of my being in the room; there were several other lodgers in the house; I think they had as good right to suspect them as me, as the door was always open.

Q.What do you say about the bag? - A. It is my own; it is my first wife's bag.

Prosecutrix. I will swear positively that bag is mine, it is pieced at the top, it was made by my mother.

GUILTY, aged 32,

Of stealing the bag only .

Confined one month in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

374. MARGARET LEONARD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of May , a frock, value 1 s. a shift, value 3 s. two petticoats, value 2 s. a pair of shoes, value 6 d. and one bonnet, value 3 d. the property of Henry Thompson .

ANN THOMPSON sworn. - I am the wife of Henry Thompson : I live at No. 35, Monmouth-street, St. Giles's ; on the 14th of May, about ten o'clock in the morning, I was going out of my door, and I perceived the prisoner at the bar sitting at the door; I asked her what she wanted; she said she wanted to go to Covent-Garden market; I directed her, and she went quite the reverse way to what I told her; then I left my child setting at the steps of my door, and then I went to market.

Q. How old is your child? A. Three years old.

Q. Can she talk? - A. Yes, a little, as I returned home Ann Hughes informed me that the prisoner was going to take away the child.

Q. Your child is in court? - A. Yes, I have got the things here that she had on at the time. I produce them.

ANN HUGHES sworn. - I keep a shoe-cellar in Monmouth-street: I saw the prisoner speak to the child as she was sitting on the steps; she said, my dear, will you go along with me to Covent-Garden market, I have got something nice in my pocket to give you; I just turned my head, and said, that woman is going to steal Mrs. Thompson's child; the child said, yes; the prisoner had a long red cloak on; she put the cloak she had on over the child, and took her by the hand.

Q. How far did she go with the child? - A. About three yards, and the child walked with her; I then went up to her, and said, you hussey, you, how came you to steal that child away from the door; she said she was only going to take the child to shew her the way to Covent-Garden market.

Q. What became of the woman? - A. She attempted to run away, but the people having increasedthey took her to the watch-house, and I took care of the child.

Q. Was she lame as she is now? - A. Yes, she had a stick and a little black dog; she was very black, and in a dirty state.

Prisoner's defence. I was a stranger to that end of the town; I came through Monmouth-street, to a door where there fat a child on the threshold of the door, and another girl walking in the street directed me the nearest way to Covent-Garden market; she said, what is that you are saying to the child, and up with her foot and gave me a blow on the small of my back.

Q.(To Hughes.) Did you give her a blow with your foot? - A. No, I only took the child from her; neither was there any other girl at the door or in the street at the time.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Confined one year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

375. JANE HETHERALL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of May , a tablecloth, value 6 s. a counterpane, value 6 s. and a coat, value 5 s. the property of Leman Oakley ; one cloak, value 2 s. a shirt, value 4 s. and two gowns, value 12 s. the property of Martha Turner , widow .

LEMAN OAKLEY sworn. - On the 19th of May, between nine and ten, my mother went up stairs and missed all the articles in the indictment; I went up stairs after she came down; and I missed them; they were taken from the drawers; I took a pattern of my mother's gowns and found them at the pawnbroker's; the prisoner was a lodger of mine.

Q. Had the room-door been locked that morning? - A. Yes, it was double-locked; when the prisoner came home I charged an officer with her; he searched her, and found the duplicates of all the articles.

Q. Did she give any account how she came by the articles? - A. She said she found them scattered upon the stairs.

JAMES GILMORE sworn. - I was sent for, on the 21st of May, by Mr. Oakley, to apprehend the prisoner; I took the duplicates from her pocket I found the duplicates of all the property lost, except the coat.

BENJAMIN CHARLTON sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Murray: On the 21st of May the prisoner pledged a counterpane and a silk cloak, for two shillings each.

- HARRIS sworn. - I am a pawnbroker: I produce two gowns and a shirt, pledged by the prisoner on the 2 of this month. (The property identified by the prosecutor, and Mrs. Turner.

Prisoner's defence. On Tuesday morning I was coming out of my own passage and saw these things trailed on the stairs, and being in distress made me do it; I hope, my Lord, you and the prosecutor will have mercy upon me, for God Almighty's sake.

GUILTY , aged 49.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

376. JAMES HALL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of May , a hat, value 5 s. a great coat, value 20 s. two waistcoats, value 5 s. three pair of breeches, value 10 s. a pair of cotton stockings, value 1 s. a pair of worsted stockings, value 1 s. three neck handkerchiefs, value 1 s. a pair of braces, value 6 d. two shirts, value 5 s. a seven-shilling piece, and two shillings, the property of James Martin , in the dwelling-house of James Plaistow .

JAMES MARTIN sworn. - I lodge at Mr. Plaistow's, the Barlow Mow, Turnham-green ; the prisoner lodged in the same room with me: On Saturday night, the 4th of May, when I was going to-bed, the prisoner asked me where my watch was; he said he could not hear it tick; I told him I had left it behind me; I went to-bed; in the morning I awoke about half past six, I looked by the side of the bed, and I found my stockings and shoes were gone from the side of the bed, and my small clothes were gone from under my pillow; I asked the landlord for a hammer to open my box to put some more things on, that I might go after him; I found all my things were gone out of my box, except this handkerchief that I have got on: I had seen them all on the Saturday night. A fellow-workman in the house lent me some clothes to put on to go after him; I and my brother overtook him on the other side of Uxbridge, on Sunday, about twelve o'clock; he had got every thing of mine on; I produce the clothes.

Q. You are sure they were in your room when you went to-bed? - A. Yes.

- MARTIN sworn. - I am brother to the other person; I went with my brother, and overtook him; I took him by the collar, and told him he was my prisoner; he never spoke.

GUILTY , aged 17.

Confined one year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

377. JOSEPH PERKINS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of April , three pewter pots, value 3 s. and one pint pot, value 6 d. the property of Robert Horn .

JOHN SMITH sworn. - I am a coach-master, at Chelsea: On the 30th of April, I saw the prisoner preparing to leave work, he is a coach-maker , he worked for a man that I employ in my work-shop;I asked him what he had got on his back; he said, nothing, (it was a bag;) I said you have got something; he said it was nothing belonging to me, and threw it under a coach that was in the shop; I picked it up, and saw it was the property of Mr. Horn.

THOMAS WHITE sworn. - I am a constable; I apprehended the prisoner on the 30th of April; I produce the pots, I have had them in my custody ever since.

Q. When you apprehended the prisoner, did he say any thing? - A. He said he did not put them in the bag. (The pots identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. I was going to Mr. Horn's with the pots; Mr. Smith met me in the shop; he sent for Mr. Horn to make a charge against me.

Q.(To Mr. Smith.) Were the pots in the same bruised situation then as they are now? - A. They were, some of them were bent quite flat.

GUILTY , aged 45.

Confined one year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

378. MARY FOWLER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of May , ten pieces of sole-leather, value 12 s. the property of Murray Eldred and Richard Banks , privately in their shop .

MURRAY ELDRED sworn. - On Tuesday, the 21st of May, the prisoner came into our shop to buy some leather; she has been in the habit of coming into our shop for these twelve months past, every day, and from information when she went out, I had her brought back and searched; there were found on her ten pieces of sole-leather; I can swear to them, they are marked. (The leather produced.)

ANN SMITH sworn. - I live opposite to the last witness: On the 21st of May, I saw the prisoner in the shop; the leather was in a place made on purpose like a box; I saw her stoop down, and take a piece of leather; I sent over to tell Mr. Eldred; then I saw her take another piece of leather; she then went out of the shop, and I went over myself; Mr. Eldridge followed her, and brought her back; I saw ten pieces of leather taken out from her petticoats; she had something made on purpose round the bottom of her petticoats.

Prisoner's defence. My Lord, I leave it to the mercy of you, and the Gentlemen of the Jury.

GUILTY, aged 53,

Of stealing, but not privately .

Confined one year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

379. ANN PERCY , alias CURETON , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of April , a set of bed-furniture, value 5 l. and a pair of sheets, value 20 s. the property of Penelope Drummond , widow , in her dwelling-house .

PENELOPE DRUMMOND sworn. - I live in Old Chapel-street, St. George's in the East .

Q. Do you let lodgings? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know the prisoner? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember the prisoner at the bar coming to you on the 13th of April last? - A. I do; she came for a furnished apartment; she asked what apartments I had to let; she looked over every room in my house; she fixed upon the front parlour, and the bed-chamber over it; she was to pay me twenty shillings per week for these rooms; she told me that she came from Sunderland, and that she and her husband were going to settle in the West-Indies, and she would take these rooms for three months certain; I asked her to give me a reference for their character; she told me she was a stranger in London, and could give no reference, and that she would go back to her husband, who was on board a ship, and probably he had some acquaintance in London. She gave me three shillings, and desired that I would order in some coals for her use; she took my address, and went away; she came back in the course of two hours, and then told me she could give me a very respectable reference to a Mr. Pilkington, in Cornhill; she told me her name was Wilson, and Mr. Pilkington would give me any satisfaction that I would require; she asked me if she might go into the bed-room, and refresh herself; I went with her, and put up my bed-furniture while she was in the room; I left her in the chamber; she then came out of the room, and said, might she lay herself down for an hour, for she was very much fatigued; I made no answer; she went in immediately, and shut the bed-room door; I left a friend of mine in the charge of the house sitting in the parlour; I went to Cornhill to look for Mr. Pilkington.

Q. How far might that be from your house? - A. About a mile and a half; I could not find any person of that name in Cornhill; I returned, and I asked for her, and my friend that I left in the house told me that she went out, and said that she would return in an hour; I then went into the bed-chamber, in which I left her, and found that the bed was completely stripped of all the furniture; the whole of the curtains and trimmings, and the sheets, were gone. Upon this I went to a friend, and they advised me to give information at Bow-street Office; I saw no more of her till I saw her at the Public-office, in Bow-street, which was about eight days afterwards.

Q. You saw no part of your property there then? - A. Not then.

Q. When did you see any part of your property?- A. I had a letter from an officer in Bow-street, informing me where some of my property was pledged; I went to Bow-street, and the officer came with me to the Minories, to a pawnbroker's there, where my property was found; this was about three weeks afterwards; I saw my bed-furniture there; another pawnbroker had the sheets.

Q.Are both these pawnbrokers here? A. One is here that had the sheets.

Q. You knew the bed-furniture and trimmings to be your own? - A. Yes, I did.

JOHN DORRINGTON sworn. - In consequence of information from our Office, Mr. Collins, I think, on the 18th of April, sent to me, and said that there was a woman in his shop answered to the description of what we wanted; I went up to his house, and he asked me if I thought I should know the woman.

Q. Did you know the woman? - A. No; I had taken the description of her down so many times, I was sure I should know her; I went to the shop, and went into one of the private boxes; I there saw the prisoner at the bar; I said to her, how do you do, Mrs. Wilson; she said her name was not Wilson, I must be mistaken; I said I was quite sure that she was the person that had been so frequently described to me; I said, let me look at your hand, and by her nails and every other description I was positive; she denied it. I said, I must search you, I am sure you are the woman; I searched her, and found only one duplicate, as I can recollect, upon her; the duplicate was to Collins's, the same shop, for a gown or petticoat; I gave it back to her; I asked her before I went to the Office where she lived; she said she did not live any where, she had no lodgings.

Q. How came you to know where any part of the things were pledged? - A. Mr. Collins intimated the circumstance to me, and said that there was a man, who was a carpenter, who had been at work in his shop, which induced me to think it was the husband of the prisoner; it appeared that he had been afraid to come out, and said that his wife was lost; I went to the house, and there I saw Mr. Cureton. After being committed several times for re-examination, she told me the bed-furniture was pledged at Matthews's, in the Minories, and Mr. Collins likewise told me of a Jew, who had bought some duplicates, and had fetched some things out; I went to Solomons, the Jew; he said he had six or seven duplicates, which he gave me to look at; one of the duplicates were for the sheets, I took the direction of it.

Q. Solomons would not part with the duplicate? - A. No; the sheets were pawned for fifteen shillings; I left them a summons to produce them the next day.

Q. Did you go to the place where these duplicates pointed out? - A. Yes, to Mr. Collins's.

ROBERT SIMMONS sworn. - I live with Mr. Collins, in Long-acre.

Q. Now look at the prisoner at the bar, do you know the prisoner? - A. I know her well; she pawned the sheets on the 15th of April; these are the sheets, they have been in my custody ever since.

Q.(To the prosecutrix.) Look at these sheets? - A. They are my property.

Q. Are they the sheets that you put on the bed on the 13th of April, when the prisoner at the bar came to take a ready-furnished lodging? - A. The same.

Q. Tell me what is the value of these sheets? - A. About one pound.

Q. You told us that you went to a pawnbroker's in the Minories, where you saw your bed-furniture? - A. Yes, at Matthews's, in the Minories.

Q. And that bed-furniture, consisting of the curtains and the trimmings, you know to be your own? - A. I am perfectly clear they are my own.

Q. And that you put them on the bed that very day? - A. I did.

Q. What do you think might be the value of that bed furniture? - A. About four pounds.

Q. I wish you to speak within compass? - A. I do, it cost me a deal more.

Q. You are a widow? - A. Yes.

GUILTY , Death , aged 38.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

380. JOHN APLYN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of May , a silver watch, value 20 s. a gold seal, value 10 s. and a tin box, value 2 d. the property of William Williams .

OWEN WILLIAMS sworn. - The prisoner was at my master's, William Williams , apartment, on the 14th of this month; I left my master and him about a quarter past eight o'clock in the evening, the watch laid on the window shelf, in the bedroom; I returned the next morning about half past nine o'clock, and when I entered his bedroom I missed the watch; I asked him what had become of his watch, and he with a great surprize asked me if the watch was not there; I replied, it is not here now, it was here last night when I left you and the prisoner in the room; he requested me to go in pursuit of the prisoner along with the other person that brought him in; I asked the prisoner if he had seen any thing of the watch, (he is a foreigner) he said, me no see the watch; I received information that the watch was at Mr. Turner's, a pawnbroker.

JOHN HARRIS sworn. - I am a servant to Mr. Turner, he is a pawnbroker: On the 21st of May the prisoner at the bar pledged a watch; I lent him sixteen shillings on it, I produce it.

JOSEPH BAKER sworn. - On the 21st day of this month I was walking in Brewer-street, and I heard the cry of stop thief; I immediately pursued the prisoner, he was running; I overtook him and brought him back to Mr. Turner's, the pawnbroker, in Brewer-street; on searching the prisoner, I found in his left-hand pocket a duplicate of a watch pledged for sixteen shillings on the 21st of May; I produce the duplicate. (The watch produced and identified by Owen Williams .)

The prisoner did not say any thing in his defence, but called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 36.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

381. MARY BRYANT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of May , two sheets, value 4 s. the property of Thomas Moxley , in a lodging-room .

THOMAS MOXLEY sworn. - I live in Brick-lane, Old-street ; the prisoner left her lodging on the 6th of May; we missed the things about eleven o'clock at night; she had taken the key of another lodger's door with her; he came home, and could not get into his room; I went up and broke open his door, and there I missed a pair of sheets; I suspected that it was the prisoner that had robbed it, and from thence I went to the prisoner's room, and there I missed several articles which are in another indictment; I went in search of her for three or four days; my wife found her on the Sunday following; I got a constable, and he took charge of her; she delivered up both the keys at my house, and one duplicate for one pair of sheets from that same man's room; I went with the constable to the pawnbroker's; the prisoner had told me and the officer that the whole of my property was at Mrs. Fothergill's, a pawnbroker, in Aldersgate-street.

JAMES MORRITT sworn. - The prisoner pledged two sheets on the 6th of May; I am quite certain to her person, I produce the whole of the property.

(The property identified by Mrs. Moxley.)

Prisoner's defence. I hope the Court will be favourable.

GUILTY , aged 29.

Confined six calendar months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

382. MARY JASPER , alias BAILEY , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of May , a gown, value 18 s. a shawl, value 2 s. a pair of stays, value 10 s. two aprons, value 4 s. and a shift, value 4 s. the property of Frances Chipperfield , widow .

FRANCES CHIPPERFIELD sworn. - I live at No. 43, George's-court, Red Lion-street, Clerkenwell : On the 1st of May I lost the articles mentioned in the indictment; the prisoner went up three pair of stairs, and took the property; a man in the house brought her back, then I saw all my things in her apron, she begged for mercy.

MARY CHIPPERFIELD sworn. - I saw the prisoner walk up the court where I live, she had a bundle, I did not see her in the house; a man came and told my mother, and I followed her; I saw the things in her apron.

Q. Are you sure this is the woman that you saw with the things in her apron? - A. Yes, we brought her back, and she begged for mercy.

JOHN LAMSEY sworn. - I rent a shop of Mrs. Chipperfield; I saw the prisoner go into the front door of the house, she passed by my room door; I went into the yard, I saw no person there; I put my door open, she came so gently down stairs I did not hear her till she was in the passage, and then she had a lap full of things when she went out, she had nothing in her lap when she came in; I followed her, and took her, and brought her back; she said, she was guilty, and begged for mercy; I took the things from her.

LEONARD LAMMAS sworn. - I am a constable, I was sent for to take charge of this woman; I produce the property, the prisoner was very much in liquor. (The property identified by the prosecutrix.)

Prisoner's defence. I am sorry to say it, I was in liquor when I took them.

GUILTY , aged 37.

Confined one month in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

383. CHARLOTTE METCALF was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of May , two sheets, value 10 s. a counterpane, value 4 s. a brass candlestick, value 1 s. a pillow, value 2 s. a pillow-case, value 1 s. and a glass, value 1 s. the goods of Joseph Matthews , in a lodging-room .

SUSANNAH MATTHEWS sworn. - My husband's name is Joseph Matthews , we live at No. 39, Albion-street, Commercial-road : On the 11th of May I let the prisoner a back one pair of stairs room, furnished, at four shillings a week. Last Saturday she came in, and said she had been nursing a person; I made an excuse, I told her I wanted one of the sheets I had given her, I must have it, and I would give her another for it, she had not got into the room at this time; she said, she had left the key of the room where she had been nursing, she must have all the way to go back for it; I put my bonnet on, I said it would make no odds to her, I would go back with her; she told me to stop a minute, she would be soon back; I went out with her, she kept me walking about for an hour, she pulled out an handkerchief, and the key fell out; I said to her, when I picked up the key, this is the key of your room; when we came home, she went into one of my lodger's rooms, and said she hadmade free, and pledged the sheet; when I went into the room, I missed the articles in the indictment; I sent for an officer, and gave charge of her; she said that she meant to redeem them in the course of a week.

Q. Do you know how this woman got her living? - A. She said she got one shilling and sixpence a day at working at her needle, I never saw her doing of it.

ELIZABETH GIBSON sworn. - I am a pawnbroker, No. 8, Upper East-Smithfield; I produce a sheet pledged by the prisoner on the 11th of May for five shillings, and a looking-glass pledged on the 24th for one shilling.

ROBERT IVEY sworn. - I am apprentice to Mr. Dexter, Whitechapel-road; I produce a sheet, the prisoner pledged it on the 14th of May, I gave her five shillings on it, and here is a candlestick pledged on the 20th by the same person.

EDWARD SMITH sworn. - I am an officer of Lambeth-street Office: On Saturday last, I was sent for by Mrs. Matthews to take this woman into custody; on searching her I found two duplicates, one led to the discovery of the glass, and the other the candlestick.

Q.(To Prosecutrix.) Have you ever been able to find the duplicates of these sheets? - A. No, never.

Prisoner's defence. When I took the room of the prosecutrix, I was in view of paying my rent; I went for my monthly money, they told me they would not pay me the money, as they had got an account that some of the men were dead; I was very bad, I have got two children, I was very much distressed. If my prosecutrix had given me a little time, I would have replaced them, I had got good work coming in.

Prosecutrix. The Monday before the Saturday she was apprehended, she said she had received two pounds ten shillings, she paid me one four shillings.

GUILTY , aged 37.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

384. STEPHEN WADLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of May , 130 lb weight of lead, the property of Edward Smedley , fixed to a certain out house fixed to the dwelling-house .

Second Count. For like offence, fixed to a certain building.

JOHN MONK sworn. - I am a watchman in Tothill-street: On the 21st of May, about half past three in the morning, I met the prisoner and another man, they had a load a-piece, they were turning out of the Broad Sanctuary into Princes-street; I got Tumbrell and his partner, they are patrols, in King-street, to assist me; I called to them to stop them; they both threw off their loads, and began to run; we caught the prisoner, and his companion made his escape; we secured the loads, they being lead.

Q. Do you know where this lead came off? - A. No, I saw it fitted exactly one side of Mr. Smedley's premises.

- TUMBRELL sworn. - I am a patrol: On the 21st of this month, about half past three in the morning, I met the prisoner at the bar and another man; I saw Monk follow them, Monk called out stop him; they threw down the loads, and we pursued them directly.

Q. Did you ever lose sight of them? - A. No.

Q. Were they dressed in regimentals? - A. In working jackets; the prisoner belongs to the Coldstream regiment, the lead was taken to Mr. Smedley's premises, and it exactly fitted the privy.

Q. Had the prisoner any knife about him? - A. Yes. this knife he had in his possession; here are notches at the back as though it had been beaten by something hard.

ELIZABETH MURRELL sworn. - I am cook to the Rev. Mr. Edward Smedley .

Q. Do you recollect the constable bringing some lead to Mr. Smedley's premises? - A. Yes.

Q. Had you observed the state of the lead on the privy the day before the constable came there? - A. I am certain it was on the day before.

Q. Was it entirely covered with lead the day before? - A. Yes, and the apron that was round the lead is my apron, it hung on the railing of the area.

Prisoner's defence. I was going out of Mr. Lee's house, where I lodge, and coming down York-street and Tothill-street, I overtook this man that was with me going to work at Mr. West's, Narrow-wall, and as we came to the bottom of Tothill-street, by the stone-mason's, there lay this apron with some lead under the wall, and the other lead was in a bag against the wall; we picked it up, and we were going to carry it down where we worked; I have been eight years in the regiment, and never had a blemish in my character in my life.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

385. GODFREY OSBORN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of May , a chair, value 7 s. the property of John Ingram .

JOHN INGRAM sworn. - I live in the City-road, St. Luke's, I am a chair-maker , I was not at home when the chair was taken; I went to the Office, and saw it there on the evening of the 10th of May.

Q. Is your's an open shop? - A. Yes, the chair was standing in the passage when it was taken away; when I received the information, I missed the chair from the passage.

MARY MITCHELL sworn. - I live in Church-street,Shoreditch: On Friday, the 10th of May, about six o'clock in the evening, a man brought a chair to sell.

Q. Is that the man at the bar? - A. Yes, I think he looks like the man; he was dressed different.

Q. Do you believe him to be the man? - A. Yes; I keep a broker's shop, he brought a chair, and asked my man whether he would buy it of him; my man called me out, and he offered the chair to me; I told him I did not buy chairs in the shop without I knew the people; he told me I need not fear buying it, it was his own, his father had left him two chairs a year and a half ago, he would wish to keep one, and the other he had no use for, he wished to sell that; I asked him where he lived; he said he lived at No. 6, Brick-lane; I told him one of my men should go to Brick-lane, and if he lived there I would buy it of him; he asked five shillings for the chair, and said the man might go with him; and going out of the door, he said, it was not his chair, it was his brother's, and he lived in Drury-lane, his brother lived in Brick-lane; I said I would have nothing to do with it; I told him it would be doing him justice to send for an officer; I sent for an officer, and Vickery came and took charge of him.

- VICKERY sworn. - I am an officer of Worship-street; I was coming past at the time they called me in; I asked him where he lived, and he told me, in Hartshorn-court, Golden-lane; I asked him where he got this chair from, and he told me that his father left him two chairs, and his father formerly lived in Drury-lane; I then took him to the Office, and found he was a soldier in the East-London Militia; the next day the chair was seen by the prosecutor, and he identified it.

Prisoner's defence. On the day this affair happened, I was on duty on the morning; I went home to dinner, and coming along Brick-lane I met a man with a chair on his head; he asked me to buy the chair; he said he had been moving, and he had half-a-crown given him, and that chair being an odd one, he said I should have it for three shillings; I bid him half-a-crown and a glass of gin; he took it; I offered it for sale to get my money back; I asked her five shillings for it, I told her I bought it of a person in Brick-lane, I told her my father was dead, and my brother had a chair like it, and I lived in Hartshorn-court.

(The chair produced and identified by the prosecutor.)

GUILTY , aged 28.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

386. THOMAS COLE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of May , twelve sacks of coals, value 2 l. the property of Sampson Hanbury , John-Truman Villebois , and Henry Villebois .

Second Count, The property of John Briant , Isaac Briant , and James Beck .

Third Count, The property of persons unknown.

(The indictment was read by Mr. Alley, and the case stated by Mr. Knapp.)

There being no evidence against the prisoner he was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

387. EDWARD FLEET was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of April , twelve sacks of coals, value 2 l. the property of Sampson Hanbury , John-Truman Villebois , and Henry Villebois .

Second Count, The property of John Briant , Isaac Briant , and James Beck .

Third Count, The property of persons unknown.

(The indictment was read by Mr. Alley, and the case was stated by Mr. Knapp.)

ISAAC BRIANT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You are one of the partners in the house of Messrs. Briant and Beck? - A. I am.

Q. On the 30th of April had you delivered any coals to Messrs. Hanbury? - A. I cannot say as to the delivering them; we were sending them there from our wharf.

Q. Do you know whether the prisoner was employed as a carter on that day? - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You do not know of your own knowledge of any coals being sent - you have two partners, and Mr. Beck superintends the wharf? - A. I know it is in the day-book.

Q. Do not tell me of your book; do you know it of your own knowledge? - A. No.

ARTHUR WHITING sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are clerk to Messrs. Briant and Co.? - A. I am.

Q. Do you know of any coals being sent from Briants' wharf on the 30th of April? - A. Not on that particular day.

Q. Do you know of any being sent in April? - A. I do, to Messrs. Villebois and Hanbury.

Q. Was the prisoner a person employed to drive a waggon for them? - A. He was.

Q. Do you know Mr. Dickens, a pipe-maker, in Rose-lane, Spitalfields? - A. We have no such customer, I do not know him.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Can you say that the prisoner was employed on the 30th of April last? - A. I cannot say that.

JOHN TODD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - A. Yes, I have known him some years; on the 30th of April last I saw him unloading some coals in Rose-lane, at a pipe-maker's shop, out of Messrs. Briants' waggon; Jerry Crew was assisting him.

JEREMIAH CREW sworn. - Examined by Mr.Alley. Q. You are fellow-servant with the prisoner? - A. Yes.

Q.Do you remember going with any coals from Briants' wharf to Rose-lane, Spitalfields? - A. Yes, on April the 25th or 26th.

Q. Tell me particularly, where did you get the coals from? - A. From Messrs. Briants' wharf.

Mr. Gurney. Q. Will your Lordship go on with this particular transaction on another day.

Court. Q. Do you recollect the day? - A. I believe it was either the 25th or 26th, I will not be sure of the day of the month, we took thirty sacks to a pipe-maker's in Rose-lane, Spitalfields; we had a ticket to go to Messrs. Hanbury.

THOMAS-BUTTS AVELIN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Did the prisoner say any thing to you at any time respecting this business? - A. After his examination at Worship-street he acknowledged his guilt, and begged that I would pardon him, in consequence of its being his first offence, and that it was real distress that caused him to do it.

The prisoner left his defence to his Counsel, and called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 35.

The Jury recommended him to mercy, on account of his good character.

Confined one year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

388. WILLIAM WITHERS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of May , two shirts, value 10 s. two pair of shoes, value 2 s. and two pair of stockings, value 2 s. the property of Samuel Gimber .

SAMUEL GIMBER sworn. - I live at Little Harrow, in Middlesex ; I am a servant to Mr. Selby, a farmer; the prisoner was a servant: On the 2d of May I lost my shirts, shoes, and stockings; I had seen them on the over-night, they were in the room where we sleep, in a box, but not locked up; the prisoner slept in the same room, he was gone when I awoke.

Q. Did he ever come to work again? - A. No, he was in hold when I saw him; I have seen one shirt, and one pair of shoes, which I know to be mine, he had only lived three days in the service.

JAMES ROSE sworn. - I work for Mr. Selby: I found the prisoner between South Green and Norwick, two days after he left his service; he had Gimber's shirt on, and his shoes in his pocket.

WILLIAM MARTIN sworn. - I am a constable; I took charge of this lad; I produce the shirt and shoes.

(The shirt and shoes identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. I have a mother and brother; I was a long way from home, I had no work, so I came from home to get my living; I asked for work, the bargain was made, I took no earnings; I took these things because I had but one shirt, and it began to get filthy; I have not a friend in the world; I was born at Shelton, near Burford.

GUILTY , aged 15.

To be sent to sea .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

389. ELIZABETH WILSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of May , a pair of stockings, value 2 s. a neck-handkerchief, value 2 s. two muslin caps, value 2 s. two handkerchiefs, value 1 s. and a flannel petticoat, value 3 s. the property of George Fountain .

MARY- ANN FOUNTAIN sworn. - I am the wife of George Fountain ; he is a nightman ; he lives in Well-court, Queen-street, Cheapside ; the prisoner lived with my sister, my sister's husband was in a little trouble; we fetched my sister home, and the prisoner asked me to be so kind as to let her sleep in the room where my children slept; I gave her leave; she came on the 6th of May.

Q. When did you miss these things? - A. On Wednesday morning, the 8th of May, she left my house, on that day, about half past nine, to the best of knowledge.

Q. After she was gone out of the house, you missed all these things in the indictment? - A. I did; I saw her again on the same day, at Bow-street, about half past one; my sister took her up; my under petticoat was on her sides.

MARY DAVIS sworn. - Q. Did the prisoner go with you to your sister's house, in Queen-street, Cheapside? - A. Yes, on Monday morning, the 6th of May; she left my sister's house on the Wednesday morning.

Q. In consequence of any suspicion that your sister entertained, did you go after her? - A. I did, I found her at Mr. Lane's, a pawnbroker, in Drury-lane.

Q. Did you find any of these things that are the subject of the present charge? - A. The officer found them upon her; I saw them at the Justice's, and knew them to be my sister's; she went with me to Bow-street, and I called the officer out.

Q. What was she doing at Lane's, while she was there? - A. Taking a handkerchief out for a shilling.

Q. Had she then these things in a bundle? - A. Yes, tied up in a pocket-handkerchief.

JOHN SMITH sworn. - I am an officer of Bow-street; I took this woman in charge on Wednesday, the 8th of May.

Q. What had she with her? - A. Two caps and a flannel petticoat; the flannel petticoat was on her person; I produce them.

Q. What did the prisoner say to the charge? - A. She did not deny having any of the property.

Prisoner's defence. The things that are not ironed,Mrs. Fountain brought to her sister to be ironed, as Mr. Davis was going to remove on Monday morning; I pledged them to get some breakfast; her husband was transported last sessions; on Wednesday my own flannel petticoat was very dirty, I put on her's till I washed my own, and Mrs. Davis asked me to get the handkerchief out of pawn; her husband gave her the ticket in Newgate, and when they were gone out I put on these stockings on my own feet, to go and get the handkerchief; being gone a good while Mrs. Davis came to the pawnbroker's after me; I told her I was very willing to go to Bow-street.

Q.(To Prosecutrix.) Are you very sure that the the things which form the subject of the present indictment were at your house on the day that she left your house - A. Every stitch was, upon my oath; she had left me to fold them; she has taken twenty-five pounds worth of things of mine; I am quite sure they are all mine, every one.

Q. Had you ever authorized this woman to pledge any of these things to accommodate your sisster? - A. My sister never wanted: I always allowed her so much a week.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr Common Serjeant.

390. EDWARD TAYLOR was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the first of May seven yards of carpeting, value 21 s. the property of William Grant .

The prosecutor not appearing in Court, his recognizance was ordered to be estreated, and the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

391. MARIA BROWN and ELIZABETH ROBINSON were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of May , a pair of gold ear-rings, value 5 s. the property of Barnabas Merrick .

BARNABAS MERRICK sworn. - I live at No. 162, Brick-lane, Spitalfields; I am a shuttle-maker ; I lost a pair of ear-rings about a fortnight or three weeks ago; they were in Martha Merrick 's ears, my daughter, who is between six and seven years old.

Q. When did you see the child with those earrings in her ears? - A. The day before.

- COTTERELL sworn. - I am a weaver; I live in New-court, Holywell-lane, Shoreditch: Maria Brown nursed my child for three days and a half; on this day fortnight she went out in the afternoon, and in about half an hour afterwards Elizabeth Robinson brought my child home; she went away and returned in about half an hour, and brought me a pair of ear-rings; she asked me if I would keep them for about half an hour; I told her I would not; she said they were her's, she could not keep them in her ears; she put them on my child's frock and went away; she came the next morning for the ear-rings; I asked her what she wanted with them; she said she wanted to pawn them; I told her I dare say they were not her's, and she should not have them. My husband fetched Harper, the officer, and gave charge of her. She is about fifteen, I believe.

SAMUEL HARPER sworn. - I took charge of Brown first; on the 16th, Mr. Merrick gave me charge of her in Shoreditch, for stealing his child's ear-rings from her ears; the next morning the last witness's husband came to my house, and I went and took charge of Robinson; Robinson said she did not take the child's ear-rings out of her ears; the other did it, and gave them to her; I produce them.

Q.(To Prosecutor.) Can you speak with certainty to these ear-rings? - A. I am much in doubt about it, there being other ear-rings like them.

Both, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

392. ROBERT FARR was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of May , a pair of silver sugar-tongs, value 5 s. a silver tea-spoon, value 1 s. 6 d. and a silver salt-spoon, value 1 s. the property of John Moule .

JOHN MOULE sworn. - I keep the Rainbow coffee-house, Covent-Garden : I was out when the theft was committed; when I came home I found the prisoner was in custody.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - A. I have seen him some years since.

JOHN HUMPHREYS sworn. - I am a waiter at the Rainbow coffee-house: On the 1st of May the prisoner came in and ordered tea; I brought him the tea immediately, at about half-past seven in the evening; I then had occasion to go into the cellar to get some brandy; I put his muffin by the fire, and when I came again I found he was gone.

Q. How long had you been absent? - A. Not more than five minutes.

Q. Were you the only waiter serving there? - A. There was another servant there; I do not know whether he was present at the time; I put the muffin on the tea-board; I did not miss the things, I did not know of it till the next morning.

Q. Did you take away the tea-board? - A. No, I went home.

WILLIAM AKESS sworn. - I belong to Bow-street: I took the prisoner at the bar on the first of May, between nine and ten o'clock in the evening, at the New Hummums coffee-house, Covent-Garden; the waiter told me he suspected him having something about him that was not his own; I searched him, and found a pair of tea-tongs, a silver salt-spoon, and a silver tea-spoon; they were claimed by Mr. Moule; there is the name at full length on them all three; information was sent tothe Rainbow; he said he hoped I would not take him into custody, if I did it would be the ruin of him; I found a number of other things upon him. (The property produced, and identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. My Lord and gentlemen of the Jury, my defence will be short; I shall not detain the Court long; I had been out the day this offence was committed, and had drank very freely; I was in a state of intoxication, and I had an appointment to meet a gentleman at the Rainbow coffee-house upon some business; I went there in order to meet the person; the person that I was to meet called upon me, after I had ordered the tea, and said that he had made a mistake in the house that I was to meet him at; it was another house, which was the Hummums; the things mentioned in the indictment were found on me I will admit of; but how they came on me, or in my pockets I know not; I was in such a state of intoxication that I was not able or capable of knowing what I was about; and in the morning, when the officer came to me in the watch-house, I did not even know the charge that was against me; I never was charged with a criminal matter in my life before; this is the first time that ever I was brought into a Court, therefore I shall humbly beg leave to throw myself on the mercy of the Court.

Q.(To Humphreys.) Had he the appearance of a man intoxicated? - A. No, I thought him mean and shabby.

Q.(To Akess.) At the time you were called upon to take the prisoner into custody, did he appear intoxicated? - A. Not at that time; in taking him to the watch-house he wished to make himself appear so.

Q. Was it real intoxication or pretended? - A. It appeared to me pretended, I do not think he was drunk at all.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 39.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

393. ROBERT FARR was again indicted for feloniously stealing, on the first of May , a silver pepper-castor, value 20 s. the property of William Brown .

WILLIAM COLEMAN sworn. - On the first of May, (I was waiter to Mr. Brown) the prisoner came into the coffee-room, between the hours of nine and ten.

Q. What did he ask for? - A. He asked for nothing at all; he walked down the coffee-room and returned to the fire-place, and from the fire-place to the bar; then he stood with his back to the fire.

Q. Did you know where the pepper-box stood that you charge him with? - A. It was only my suspicion at first; the pepper-box, in the course of the afternoon, had been used; I had removed it to the side-board; we usually put it, there after the business is over.

Q. Is the side board within the reach of the persons in the coffee-room? - A. Yes; I saw him look wildly round the coffee-room; I was standing in a dark part of the coffee-room and I saw the prisoner go out; there is a communication from the coffee-room to the passage leading to the hotel, where he had passed this side board, where there was a vast deal of plate extended; on his going out I thought I perceived that he put his hand over; whether he took any thing I could not just then inform myself; I am positive that he put his hand over; I arose from my seat immediately, and followed him as gently as I could, and in the middle of the passage, I being tall overlooked his shoulder, and saw this pepper-castor in his hand; I immediately laid hold of him; he still held this pepper-castor in his hand for about two minutes; then he threw it from him; I took him into custody, and searched him in the hall of the hotel in the side of his pocket I saw a muttineer; I put my hand into his pocket, and there I found the spoons; then I sent for an officer.

Q. Was that pepper-box which he threw away your master's? - A. Yes, I resigned it up to my master; I am positive this is the pepper-box; here is a mark underneath, which was marked by Mr. Akess.

WILLIAM BROWN sworn. - Q. Look at that pepper-box? - A. It is a silver pepper-box.

Q. Is it your's? - A. Yes.

Prisoner's defence. I can only say in my defence as I did before, that I was in a real state of intoxication, and did not know that I was in the house, nor for what I was put into the watch-house, till the officer came to me in the morning; I beg leave to ask Coleman, the waiter, (I recollect so much as that), whether he remembers, at the time the officer was sent for, that he made use of this expression, that when I went out a thieving I ought to go out sober.

Coleman. Upon my word I did not; you had then a wild look with the eye, as you have at this time; he was drest at that time as he is now, exclusive of his having his great coat on and buttoned high up.

Court. Q. Was he intoxicated? - A. I cannot say; to the best of my judgement he was not. On the following day he was more intoxicated than on the over night: on the over night he walked as steady as myself into the coffee-room; I went immediately to Mr. Moule; the bar-maid said she had lost these things.

CATHERINE SHANNON sworn. - I met Mr. Farr on the first of May; he wanted to see me home; he was so intoxicated I would not suffer him; this was between seven and eight o'clock, to the best of my knowledge, I do not carry a watch;I live at No. 11, Crescent-place, Lambeth; I have known him these twenty years; I have known him constantly, for these eleven years, every day.

Q. What way of life was he in latterly? - A. I understood that he followed the profession of the law.

Q. Had he dined with your father that day? - A. No; the night before he had seen me home, and he promised to call upon me the next day at two o'clock, on particular business; I never saw him till I saw him in Covent-Garden, when he was in such a state of intoxication.

Q. Did he know you? - A. Yes, he knew me.

GUILTY .

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

394. JOHN TROY was indicted for that he, on the 27th of February , feloniously did utter, dispose of, and put away, a forged and counterfeited Bank note, for the payment of 5 l. with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England .

Second Count, For like offence, with like intention.

Third Count, For feloniously disposing of and putting away a forged promissory note, for the payment of 5 l. with like intention.

And Four other Counts, For like offence, with intention to defraud William-John Rhodes .

(The indictment was opened by Mr. Bosanquet; and the case was stated by Mr. Garrow.)

WILLIAM- JOHN RHODES sworn. - Examined by Mr. Fielding. Q. You are a hosier and glover , in Oxford-street ? - A. I was at that time, on the twenty-seventh of February.

Q. Look at the prisoner at the bar - On the twenty-seventh of February did you see him? - A. I did, I saw him at my shop, it is dated on the back of the note.

Q. What time of the day was it? - A.About twenty minutes past four o'clock.

Q. It was light? - A. Yes, I was returning from my office, and the prisoner at the bar was at my shop, bargaining with my partner; he purchased two silk handkerchiefs; I went behind the counter, to give my partner assistance, and the prisoner at the bar gave me the note in question.

Q. What price was the two handkerchiefs? - A. It was either 12 s. or 12 s. 6 d, I will not be positive; the prisoner gave the note into my hand and I held it up to the light it was a note of five pounds apparently, and I conceived it to be a bad one, as I thought; I was not certain myself, I went up stairs to my wife who was ill in bed.

Q. You looked at the note and you thought it was a bad one - did you do any thing by way of knowing whether it was bad or not? - A. Yes, I went out leaving him in the shop and took the opinion of a neighbour.

Q. You went out, and your belief was confirmed? - A. Yes, my friend confirmed me in my opinion; I went to a banker's, in Barner-street, and they proved it to be a forged one.

Q. Did you go to any Police-office? - A. I did; there was no constable there at that time.

Q. Did any constable come to you? - A. Yes.

Q. Having spoken for a constable did you return home? - A. I did.

Q. Did you find the prisoner there? - A. I did.

Q. Be so good as to look at this note? - A. That is the note.

Q. When you found him there, what passed between you and him? - A. I shut the door upon the prisoner; I told the prisoner I suspected it to be a forged note; he said he was very sorry for it, and if I would go with him to Tottenham-court-road he had plenty of friends there, who would give me a good one, in lieu of the one in question; I told him it was out of my power; he then took the watch out of his pocket, and said he would leave it, and return the next day and satisfy me; I told him I had nothing more to do with it, it rested then with the Magistrate, I should have nothing further to do with it, the law must take its course.

Q. That is the note, and that note had not been out of your custody till you delivered it to the man who took the prisoner in custody? - A. No, I put his hat on his head (the constable never came to my house, I was going from my house, when I met the constable); I took hold of him by the arm, and took him myself till we came to Blenheim-steps, where the constable met us, and I delivered him to the constable, who, with myself, conveyed him to Marlborough-street; he made no resistance after he got out of the shop at all.

Court. Q. Did he make any resistance before he got out of the shop? - A. Not forcible resistance; he begged and prayed that I would let him go; we took him to the Office, and he was examined.

Prisoner. Q.What time were you gone from your shop, from your first going out? - A. I might be gone a quarter of an hour.

Q. Is it natural to suppose this man to be gone for a quarter of an hour with this note, that if I knew it to be a forged note that I should not have gone.

Court. You are not to talk and argue upon it; at present you must confine yourself to ask questions.

Prisoner. As to making any resistance, you cannot say I ever did.

Court. He said you made no forcible resistance,you only begged and prayed in the shop, and no resistance at all out of the shop.

Q.(To Prosecutor). Did you give him a general reason for your going out of the shop? - A. I told the prisoner I had not sufficient change in the house, I would go out and get it.

JOHN WARREN sworn - Examined by Mr Knapp. Q. You are one of the officers of Marlborough-street? - A. I am.

Q. You were applied to by the last witness to take up the prisoner? - A. I secured the prisoner just by Blenheim-steps, in Oxford-street.

Q. At the time you secured the prisoner did you see any five pound note? - A. No.

Q. When did you see any five pound note? - A. When Mr. Rhodes produced it at the Office.

Q. Did you put your initials upon that note? - A. Yes; J. W. February 27.

Q. Tell us whether these are the marks that you put upon it? - A. Yes; J. W. February 27.

Prisoner. Q. You searched me? A. Yes, I searched you, and found the dollar, a six-pence, an eye-glass, and a watch.

Prisoner. I had nothing else about me.

THOMAS THOMPSON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Garrow. Q. Where do you live? - A. At No. 29, New-street, Covent-garden; I am a linen-draper and hosier.

Q. Do you remember seeing the prisoner at the bar at any time in your shop? - A. Yes.

Q. When was it? - A. Either on Saturday, the 23d, or Monday, the 25th. I rather incline to the Monday.

Q. For what purpose did he come there? - A To buy a small article, either a pair of hose or a handkerchief, which I cannot recollect, to the amount of half a crown, not more.

Q. In what manner did he pay for it? - A. He offered a five pound note, which I believed to be a five pound note at the time.

Q. You look at that, sir? - A. This is the one, I wrote upon it.

Q. What reason have you to know that that is the one you received from the prisoner? - A. By my writing upon it.

Q. Did you ask him any questions? - A. I asked him his name, he gave me the name of John May , Blackbird, Low-Layton.

Q. Did you write that upon the face of the note which he gave you? - A. Yes, in his presence.

Q. You gave him the article he had purchased and the difference, and he went away? - A. Yes, I believe I saw him again in about six weeks.

Q. Are you quite certain this is the same person? - A. I have no doubt of it; I paid it away; I gave him four pounds seventeen shillings and sixpence: I believe that was the change.

ANN PUDEPHAT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Garrow. Q. I believe you keep a milliner's shop, in Tichbourne-street? - A. A straw hat manufactory.

Q. Do you know a young woman by the name of Thompson? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know her by the name of Mary Young ? - A. Yes, and I know her by the name Mary Thompson .

Q. Did Mary Young ever offer to purchase any article at your shop? - A. On Saturday, the 23d of February, she came to my shop, and agreed to purchase a small bonnet of the value of a guinea.

Q. Did she take it away or did she say she would send for it? - A. She desired me to put the name of Young on it, and she would send for it.

Q. Did any person come afterwards for that bonnet that was so marked? - A. Yes, the prisoner; I am positive of it; on Monday, the 25th of February.

Q. What did he say when he came? - A. He asked for the bonnet that had been ordered; I knew him, because he had been once before for a bonnet for the same person, whom I then knew by the name of Thompson; he asked for the bonnet, and I gave it him.

Q. In what manner did he pay you for it? - A. A five pound note.

Q. Look at that? - A. Here is my own handwriting; I wrote Thompson, February; I put it 24 by mistake, it was on the 25th; I perfectly recollect it was Saturday she came, and it was fetched on Monday; I then gave him four pounds in change, and he gave me a shilling.

Prisoner. Q. I think I heard you say you endorsed the note? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you endorse that note in my presence? - A. I did; I put the name.

Q. Do you intend to swear that? - A. Yes.

Q. You do? - A. Yes.

MARY YOUNG sworn. - Examined by Mr. Garrow. Q. You know Mrs. Pudephat? - A. Yes.

Q. Have you ever dealt with her for any article? - A. Yes, I have; for more than a twelvemonth.

Q. By what name did she know you by? - A. By the name of Mrs Thompson.

Q. Did you deal with her in the month of February, for any straw bonnet? - A. I did.

Q. What day in February was it when you bespoke it? - A. It was on Saturday evening.

Q. What price did you pay for it? - A. A guinea the lady asked; I wished to have it for a pound; I would have bought it then, if she would have taken the old bonnet I had on.

Q. In the end, it was put by for you for a guinea? - A. Yes.

Q. Were you to send for it? - A. Yes.

Q. It was to be put by for you to send for when it would suit you? - A. Yes, I sent for it on the Monday.

Q. By whom? - A. By the prisoner.

Q. How long have you been acquainted with the prisoner? - A. Ever since the beginning of last June.

Q. How was the prisoner to pay for the bonnet? - A. I gave him the money in cash.

Q. You mean in gold and silver? - A. Yes.

Q. Did he bring back the bonnet to you? - A. Yes, he did; he could not get it for a pound.

Q. You had given him commission to try and get it for a pound? - A. Yes, he came back and said he could not get the lady to take off the shilling.

Q. You know the prisoner intimately, Mrs. Thompson? - A. I never knew any harm of him.

Q. Had you any reason to know that he was in possession of a 5 l. note at the time? - A. No, I had a bad dollar at the time, and I begged him to get it off for me; his answer was, did I want him to be hanged.

Q. What name did you know the prisoner by, during all your acquaintance with him? - A. John Troy .

ELIZABETH SHEPHARD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Fielding. Q I believe you keep the Black-bird, at Low-Layton? - A. Yes.

Q. Look at the prisoner at the bar? - A. I do not know him; I never saw him before I came here.

Q. He never lived at your house? - A. No, he might have been in the house, but I do not know him.

Q. If he had been in your house, and lived in it, you must have known him? - A. Yes.

THOMAS BLISS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are an inspector of Bank notes - I am going to shew you the Bank note in question - take that in your hand and tell us whether it is a forgery; first, the one that was given to Mr. Rhodes? - A. The whole of this is a forgery.

Court. Q. Be so good as to tell the Jury what you mean by the whole of its being a forgery? - A. I mean the paper is not the Bank of England paper, nor is it the engraving of the Bank of England; neither has it the water-mark, nor is it the signature of our cashiers, nor of any of the clerks.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Whom does that appear to be the signature of upon the face of that note? - A. It does not appear to be the signature of the Bank, we have no cashier that signs any 5 l. notes in that name at all.

Q. I am now going to put into your hand that uttered to Mr. Thompson? - A. This note is of the same texture, and of the very same description, as the other note.

Q. By that you mean it is the same sort of paper, and the same writing? - A. It is a strip of the same paper and the same writing, and it is a facsimile of the other first note; they are both from one plate.

Q. I am now going to give you the other 5 l. note uttered to Mrs. Pudephat? - A. This note is of the same kind of paper, from the same plate, but a different signature to the others, we have no cashiers in that name; they are all from the same plate; it is a forged note.

GARNET TERRY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. I believe you are the engraver to the Bank of England? - A. I am.

Q. Will you take these three notes in your hand - Look at that note uttered to Mr. Rhodes? - A. It is altogether a forgery; this is a forgery also of the same kind, and in every respect; it is from the same plate.

Q. That is the note uttered to Mr. Thompson - Look at that which was uttered to Mrs. Pudephat? - A. This is a forgery, in every respect the same as the others.

Q. Are every one from the same plate? - A. From the same plate, the same paper, and the same ink. (The notes read in Court.)

Prisoner's defence. I must acknowledge I uttered these notes; I sent to the Bank, and Mr. Winter attended me in Newgate; I candidly told him the manner in which I got these notes; I passed three before that one to Mr. Rhodes; I knew it not to be forged. Can it be supposed that I, knowing these 5 l. notes to be forged, would have continued in the shop, when he was away from the shop a full quarter of an hour; I left on the other side of the counter, and the door open. I acknowledge I had the notes; I found the pocket-book, and I uttered the notes, but I knew them not to be forged.

Q. Have you any witness to call in your behalf? - A. I have not; with respect to the notes I found them; they did not belong to me, but through my partner's distressing me to the last shilling, I passed them; I must acknowledge my dishonesty that I did not advertise the book in which they were found; to say that I knew they were forged, I did not.

GUILTY , Death , aged 28.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

395. ISABELLA BARNES, alias RANCALIER , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of April , a frock, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of Sarah Stevens .

SARAH STEVENS sworn. - I get my bread by selling things in the street.

Q. Are you a single woman ? - A. Yes, I am not married: On the 2d of April I sent my two children on an errand, at six o'clock at night; the oldest is six years old, and the other is three; the young child had a dark cotton frock on, when she left me; they had been gone twenty minutes when the woman, who sits at the corner of Leg-alley, Shoreditch, said that my little girl had been taken from my boy by a woman.

MARTHA NASH sworn. - I had been on an errand; I heard that a woman had ran away with the child; I ran down Bishopsgate-street after it, and could see nothing of the woman; coming home, I met the child in another woman's arms; directly the child saw me she cried to come to me, I brought the child home, and went down Bishopsgate-street with a piece of the child's frock, to see if I could find it at the pawnbroker's; I went to Mr. Clarke's, and Mr. Parsly said he had just taken it in, and if I had come five minutes sooner, I should have seen the woman. I found the frock at Mr. Clarke's.

- PARSLY sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Clarke, a pawnbroker; the prisoner at the bar, on the 2d of April, brought me a frock, which I now produce, between six and seven o'clock in the evening, a very few minutes before Nash came; I lent her one shilling on it; I am certain she is the person.

THOMAS HART sworn. - I am a constable; I had the woman in custody; she acknowledged to me in the watch-house, that she pawned a frock at Mr. Clarke's.

Q. Did she say when? - A. No, I asked her how she came by it; she told me she could not tell; she was stopped in the street by Mr. Matthews, he being present.

JOHN MATTHEWS sworn. - I am a pawnbroker; I was headborough at the time this happened: I took this woman into custody; I had her at Worship-street-Office when I was informed of this; I went and saw this frock at Mr. Clarke's; I have known her these three or four years, she has been in the habit of using my shop; I had taken her up on another charge. (The frock produced and identified by the prosecutrix.)

Q.(To Parsly.) Had she pawned any other frocks at your house? - A. Yes, about three weeks before this.

Prisoner's defence. I really believe I did pawn the frock I cannot disown it, how or which way I came by them I know not.

GUILTY , aged 33.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

396. MARY SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of May , a looking-glass, value 6 s. the property of John Rentoul .

MARY RENTOUL sworn. - My husband's name is John Rentoul ; we keep a broker's shop , in Leather-lane, Holborn ; we lost this glass on the 18th of May, about ten minutes before six in the evening; I was below stairs at the time she took it; I perceived her go out of the shop, and I run after her immediately; she had just turned the corner of Hatton-wall, and had got the looking-glass under her cloak.

JONATHAN TROTT sworn. - On the 18th of this month a gentleman came running to me (a stranger) to the end of Saffron-hill, begging that I would go along with him a few doors, for he thought a woman would get murdered there, by a parcel of boys and girls; I went after her, and they had let her go when I found her; I said, I know you very well; I went to Mrs. Rentoul, and took the looking-glass and the prisoner to the Office; I produce the glass. (The glass identified by the prosecutrix.

Prisoner's defence. I was a little intoxicated; she took hold of me, and after that they forgave me; they told me to go about my business, and do so no more.

GUILTY , aged 50.

Confined one year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

397. JOHN CALVERT , ROBERT COLSTON , and JAMES JOHNSON , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of April , five pounds weight of almonds, value 12 s. the property of the London Dock Company .

And Seven other Counts, For like offence, only varying the manner of charging.

(The indictment was read by Mr. Bosanquet, and the case was stated by Mr. Knapp.)

EDWARD SEALEY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Pooley. Q. I believe you are a foreman employed by the London Dock Company? - A. Yes, in the warehouse No. 1.

Q. On the 27th of April last did you see the prisoners there, while you were on your duty? - A. Yes; Johnson had to superintend some brandies in the front warehouse No. 1; he is an Excise officer; about five o'clock in the afternoon I saw the three prisoner's there, in the back room of No. 1, up two pair of stairs.

Q. What articles were there in the back room? - A.Barrels of raisins and almonds.

Q. Had Johnson, as an Excise officer, any occasion to be in the back room? - A. No, none at all; the other two men were strangers to me; I I saw the three prisoners standing by a barrel of almonds; Colston and Calvert were taking them out of the barrel and putting them into their pockets, and Johnson was either leaning at the barrel, or holding it on one side, that they might get at it the more readily: I considered it my duty to report it; I went to Mr. Marshall and gave him the information; he directed me to go to the constable at the gate, and direct him to come, which I did; when I came back with the constable, we found them down in the Dock, opposite No. 1; we apprehended them, and took them to the superintendant's office; they were then ordered to turn out what they had got in their pockets; Calvert turned out two or three pounds of almonds and a few figs,and Colston turned out two or three pounds; they were then taken to the Thames Police-Office.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. When Johnson was searched, do you not know that there was not so much as a fig or an almond found upon him? - A. He was not taken directly.

Q. Did you see any thing taken from him, either a single almond or a fig? - A. I did not.

THOMAS MARSHALL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Bosanquet. I am warehouse-keeper to No. 1; I have the whole stack of buildings in my charge; the whole of the goods in this warehouse was under my care; there were sixteen casks of almonds in this back room; they were landed out of the ship by Messrs. Reeve and Bell.

Q. Had Johnson any business in that part of the building? - A. There was a sample of brandy in the front room; he was placed there as a locker or Excise officer; he had the charge of that.

Q. Were there any exciseable articles in the back warehouse? - A. No, there were not.

WILLIAM CLARKE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are a constable? - A. Yes, I was on the quay; I took Colston and Calvert into custody; I searched Calvert; in his pocket I found two pounds of almonds mixed with figs; he was very ready to be searched, and very sorry for his misconduct.

JAMES SLATER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Pooley. Q. You are one of the constables of the London-Dock? - A. I am; Colston took from his pocket three pounds of almonds and some figs by my order.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. He was very sorry for what he had done he said; he had taken some to eat? - A. Yes.

Calvert's defence. I only took a few, with intent to eat them, not to have done any thing else with them.

Colston's defence. I only took a few to eat, I had no idea of the quantity.

Johnson's defence. A part of this warehouse was occupied to deposit goods, subject to the duties of the Excise, and under my care; the remaining part of the warehouse on the same floor, was appropriated for housing of fruit of various kinds; this fruit was exposed to view, and thirty or forty people, in the course of the day, came in to examine, and participate as they thought proper; the servants of the warehouse were in the warehouse from the moment it was unlocked to the time it was locked up, and I never heard them take the least exception; that not being any concern of mine, I did not think it necessary while there were people there who had the care of them; nor did I interfere in any respect whatever any farther than my own duty compelled me, and I am sure that my superiors will say, that in every thing where I have acted under them, I have ever given a faithful account of the trust they have been pleased to repose in me; with respect to the business that is now depending before the Court, I had no knowledge whatever when it took place, nor was I in the least apprized of it till six o'clock in the evening; I had locked up the warehouse, and was going to the Excise-office in Thames-street to finish my business of the day, which I was obliged to do, when I was informed at the gate of the London Dock what had occurred, and that I must be detained, in consequence of being in the warehouse at the time; I walked about the Dock, and enquired of some of the gentlemen in the most exalted stations, thinking they could inform me for what cause I was in detention, and none of them could inform me. If they had suspected any unwarrantable power of that kind, they knew where I was; instead of which, an hour and a half elapsed before I knew any thing of it; and then I was about to leave the premises. They did not think it was necessary to search me, nor was I searched, till I was conveyed to the Police office, when the Magistrate desired me to do it. There was nothing found on me belonging to these warehouses but the book and the key of the warehouse, and what I could call my own; if there had, they no doubt would have mentioned it. I am now brought into this Court, charged with being accessary to what I know not, was not, nor never did I, on my own account, dare to take a liberty of the kind, either within the walls of the London Dock, or any other part, with the property that was committed to my care. My Lord, and gentlemen of the Jury, I have that consolation that there is no misconduct whatever can be attached on my part; at least, I trust so; as such I humbly leave my case to the consideration of the Judge and the Jury.

Johnson called four witnesses, Colston four, and Calvert one, who gave them a good character.

All Three, NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

398. WILLIAM JAKEMAN was indicted for the wilful murder of Elizabeth, the wife of William Smith .

WILLIAM SMITH sworn. - I was married to the deceased on Oct. 16, 1787, and she went from me on the King's birth-day last to cohabit with the prisoner; on last Tuesday morning, between three and four o'clock, she came to my watch-box (I am a watchman,) she asked me if I had seen the prisoner; she said she would go home, signifying to the prisoner's house, and I saw no more of her that morning.

Q. When did you see her afterwards? - A. On the same day she was with me in Little Chesterfield-street , where I live; she said she wanted tospeak to me; I went with her to the Globe public-house in the New-road, the corner of Baker-street, and the prisoner was there; there were a great many words of anger occurred between the prisoner and the deceased; the prisoner called her a b - y w - e, a b - y sow, a b - y cow, and he would cut her head off, and he said he would break her b - y neck.

Q. Was he sober, or how? - A. He was not sober, nor much advanced in liquor; he said he would serve me the same, or any body that seemed to take her part.

Q. What hour was this? - A. I believe it was past twelve; then the deceased came out of the tap-room with me, and said she was very hungry, she said she would get something to eat; then we went from the Globe to the Nottingham Arms; I believe it was near three o'clock when we went away from there; we had some eggs and two pints of beer there, and at the Globe we had a pint of ale between three of us; we went home from the Nottingham Arms about three o'clock; I saw what temper the prisoner was in; I advised her to stay with me till his passion was over; I persuaded her to lay down, I being a watchman, and having been up all night.

Q. She was perfectly sober, was not she? - A. Yes, she was sober; we went to-bed at near four o'clock in the afternoon; I went to sleep directly, I was tired, I had had no rest from the Saturday till the Tuesday; about half past six, or near seven o'clock, I awoke by a violent shriek, and when I looked up I saw the prisoner.

Q. When you went to-bed did you fasten your door? - A. I locked it, and by the request of the deceased I put the key on the table, in case the prisoner came, that he should not come in; when I awoke by the shriek, I observed the prisoner standing by my bed-side, on the side my wife laid; I observed the prisoner standing in this attitude (in a boxing posture) over the deceased; I immediately jumped up, and seized him; we had a great scuffle, and we fell down two or three times together in the fire-place, and once across the foot of the bedstead.

Q. Was your wife in bed at the time? - A. Yes.

Q. Did either of you fall, so as to fall upon her? - A. We both fell down on the floor together; I saw the complexion of the deceased change, and her lips turn black; the moment I got up I called for the people to come in, and to get medical assistance (the door being open,) and for a constable.

Q. At the time you called where was the prisoner? - A. Seated in a chair, he never attempted to escape; in about a quarter of an hour, or twenty minutes, the surgeon came; he ordered a pail of boiling water, and what he thought necessary; the prisoner asked the surgeon if she was dead, and he said, yes; I bathed her feet with hot water.

Q. Did the surgeon inquire whether any body had struck the deceased? - A. I do not recollect, I was in such trouble then; after this the peace-officer came, and secured us both.

Q. During all this time do you recollect whether any blow was given to the deceased? - A. Not in my presence.

Q. Did the deceased, after you awoke, explain to you, or in the hearing of the prisoner, what was the occasion of her shriek? - A. She neither so much as sighed or breathed after I awoke.

- MOTT sworn. - I am a surgeon: On Tuesday, the 28th of May, about seven o'clock in the evening, I was called by two women, who are witnesses in Court, to go to the deceased, understanding from them the deceased had received some injury. When I came into the room, I saw the deceased lying on the outside of the bed; on examining the body, I found little or no signs of life; I bled the deceased in the neck; I attempted to bleed her in the arm and on the temple, but without success; I directed her legs to be bathed in warm water, but without effect, the deceased being too far gone to be recovered by the means that I made use of; I then inquired what had been done, by the people standing at the door, or how the deceased came by her death. The prisoner was sitting in the chair near the window; I asked the husband, in the hearing of the prisoner, whether the woman had been struck; the husband said he had done it, pointing to the prisoner, who was sitting in the chair; I then asked the prisoner whether he had struck her; he said, O yes, I have done it, striking his forehead with his hand; I asked him where he had struck her; he said, Oh! I know nothing about it, waving his hands; I then said, you must secure this man, and send for a constable; he said, Oh, certainly I will be secured, and several expressions of the same effect; I then left the house, he made no attempt to escape. In about three quarters of an hour I was sent for again by one of the officers of Bow-street, they imagined she was alive; I examined her, but found no symptoms of life. On Wednesday, by the direction of Mr. Lee, the Magistrate, I opened the body, although I found no marks of violence on the exterior of the body, but on opening the cavity of the chest I found abundant marks of bruises or concussion; there was extraversated blood in the minute vessels of the parts in the cavity of the chest; I found no other marks of violence within the body but that, and from that I suspected there had been some injury done to some more vital part; I then proceeded to examine the head; I opened the head, and found a great deal of blood again, extraversated over the surface of the brain, which I do imagine to be the immediate cause ofher death - I do believe that the blood found on the surface of the brain was owing to the violence done to her chest - I do believe a blow may be so given as to cause death, although no external marks should appear: the parts being covered by blankets and a sheet, the injury might have been sufficient to destroy the woman's life, without these appearances on the brain.

Q. Where did the blow appear to have been given? - A. On the right side of her breast; I found no outward marks, I found evident marks of injury within; the blow given on the side, occasioned a violent spasm of the heart, or more important organs of life, that would be sufficient to force the blood so upon the vessels of the brain, as to produce the appearances that were seen.

Q. You are of opinion that the blow on the breast caused that extraversated blood on the brain, and that blow was the cause of her death? - A Certainly so.

Q. Whether it is not possible that a person awoke from her sleep by the breaking in of the door, and finding a man standing by the bed-side, might not that surprize occasion the appearances in the head as you found in that head? - A. Certainly.

Q. Then, if they might, what should you have said was the cause of her death? - A. I then should have said that the appearances on the brain was the cause of her death from sudden fright, or sudden surprize; I should have considered these symptoms sufficient to produce death, but then I cannot account for the symptoms which appear on the side; stating it in the light in which your Lordship has stated it, I should have considered those symptoms sufficient, had I not found those which I had seen in the brain.

Q. Yet you say, the symptoms in her head were the immediate cause of her death? - A. They were the immediate cause of her death.

Q. Have you not heard of a case of two persons fighting, and one dying in the fight, yet it appearing most probable, and to a degree of certainty, that that death was not occasioned by a blow, but through an apoplectic fit? - A. I have heard of such a case; I do not believe the deceased to be subject to that disease, she being of a thin habit of body.

Q. Do no persons of a thin habit of body die of an apoplexy? - A. We are taught to believe that a person of a full habit of body is more apt, and persons of a thin habit of body seldom if ever die of an apoplexy, except they labour under some disease, as in most inveterate cases of scurvy they may die of an apoplexy, but not in a healthy state.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Whether or no she might not have so laid on the bed, that trending upon her, or falling upon her, might not have the same effect as a blow? - A. Certainly.

MARY WEST sworn. - Q. You live in the same house with the husband of the deceased? - A. Yes; I had just come home from work, I had sent my little girl down for a light; the prisoner at the bar put his head into my room, and asked me which was Smith's room; I pointed to Smith's room-door, upon which the prisoner knocked very loud at it; I did not hear any answer returned; he cried out, Smith, Smith, get up and come out, if not, I will come in, I will break the door open; he pushed the door open with both his hands; the first thing that I heard was a very heavy fall, that shook all the things in my room; I looked into Smith's room, and Smith and he were fighting; he was under the prisoner. I called my landlady; she asked the prisoner what had brought him there, he had broke all her crockery; I never saw the woman till I saw her dead; the prisoner said if she was dying, he would die with her; he went to the bed, and kissed her; he was not sober when he went into the room, but he was sober when he knew the woman was dead.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Your room is just opposite to their's? - A. There is nothing between the two rooms but the wainscoting.

Q. Therefore you could hear any noise in that room? - A. I could indeed.

Q. And the first noise you heard was like something falling down? - A. It was; I heard the crockery break, then I went and saw them fighting.

- DUDLEY sworn. - Q. You are the owner of this house, in which the deceased's husband lived in? - A. Yes, when I went up I saw the two men scuffling, the table was overturned, and the crockery was all broken; they were both from the bed when I saw them; I saw a woman lying on the bed; Smith said it was his wife; he went to the bed side, and said, he has killed her.

Prisoner's defence. The moment I went into the door I enquired of the woman that lived on the same floor, whether they were at home or not; the little girl came by with a candle a-light at the present time; I took the candle and perceived them lying together on the bed, through the hole of the door; I knocked and called for them to open the door, and they neither of them spoke; immediately I pushed the door open; the deceased saw me coming into the room, and she made a bit of an alarm to her husband; he jumped up immediately on the bed, and immediately struck at me; as soon as he got off the bed we got into a skirmish, and in our scuffling we both fell athwart the woman; we had several ups and downs in the room; no further I have to say.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

399. LOUIS LOUIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of May , a bill of exchange, value 10 l. 2 s. the property of Charles Lewis .

Second Count, For the like offence, the property of James Brothers .

(The case was stated by Mr. Fielding.)

JAMES BROTHERS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Albott. I live at Kensington.

Q. Did you write that letter on the day of this date? - A. Yes, and directed it to Mr. Lewis, grocer, Titchfield-street, Oxford-market. (The letter shewn to him.)

Q. Was there any thing more writ on the top of that letter which has been cut off? - A. I think there was Kensington, there was a line at the bottom expressing some sugar not being weight that is cut off.

Q. Do you know that writing (a paper handed to him.)? - A. That is my writing; I enclosed that bill in the letter, I wafered it and put post paid on the outside.

Q. The bill was your's? - A. Yes, at that time.

FRANCIS BROTHERS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Abbott. I received that letter from my son, I saw him write it and wafer it, and I saw him put a bill in it, on Saturday, the 11th of May.

WILLIAM PEARCE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Miles. Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - A. Yes; on the 11th of May I delivered a letter to him, post paid 3 d, which I received from the office in Gerrard-street.

Q. Did you deliver any letter to Mr. Charles Lewis in the same street? - A. Not on that day? on Monday morning, about eleven o'clock, at the office, in Gerrard-street, I found out the mistake and went to the prisoner and told him I had delivered the letter to him by mistake, and that there was a ten pound two shilling bill in it; I told him I was the postman, and that Mr. Charles Lewis was the owner of it, I asked him if he would give it up, he said he was not bound to speak, and refused to give up the letter.

CHARLES LEWIS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Miles. Q. Did you ever receive that letter by the post that you have in your hand, or the bill enclosed in it? - A. I did not; on Tuesday evening I went with the postman; he asked the prisoner where the letter was that he had delivered on Saturday; the prisoner said he was not bound to speak; I asked him to deliver up the letter, it belonged to me; he said he was not bound to speak.

JOHN WRIGHT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Miles. Q. In whose service were you living on the 11th of May last? - A. Mr. Wannah's; he lives in Edward-street, Cavendish-square.

Q. Did the prisoner come to your master's house on that day? - A. He did, and presented the bill for payment; he asked me if my master was at home; I told him, no; this was between-three and four o'clock; he came again about six o'clock; my master was not then at home; I told him to call on Monday at eleven o'clock; he called again at ten o'clock the same Saturday; it rained very hard, my master was not at home.

JAMES WANNAH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Fielding. I live at No. 21, Portland-place, Cavendish-square.

Q. Do you remember the prisoner at the bar? - A. He looks rather like the man, but I cannot swear to him.

Q. Did any body call on Monday morning to present you a bill? - A. Yes, at five minutes before eight o'clock.

Q. Is that the bill that was presented? - A. Yes, (looking at it) I gave him a check on Hammersley's bank, dated the same day, for ten pounds four shillings, I received two shillings back from him.

MARMADUKE PYBUS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Abbott. I am a clerk in the house of Messrs. Hammersley; I received a check drawn by Mr. Wannah, for ten pounds four shillings, I gave a ten pound bank-note and four shillings; the number of the ten pound bank-note was 9961, dated the 4th of May.

Q. To Mr. Wannah. (A bill handed to him.) Are you able to say, whether that is the check that you gave to the person that brought Mr. Brother's bill? - A. It is.

THOMAS WADE sworn. - Q. You are a grocer, in Skinner-street, Snow-hill - Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - A. Yes, On the 14th of May last, he purchased seven pounds of Jordan Almonds; I gave him change for a ten pound banknote. I produce the note, the number is 9961, dated 4th of May, 1805; I gave him eight single one pound notes.

JOHN PEARKES sworn. - I am an officer of Bow-street: I apprehended the prisoner on the 15th of May; in the back-room of his apartments, I found a letter in a coat pocket which hung up, and ten one pound notes; these are the ten one pound notes; I marked them, and this is the letter.

Q.(To Mr. Wade.) Look at these notes, and see whether they have been in your possession? - A. Here are seven which have been in my possession. (The letter and the bill of exchange read in Court.)

Prisoner's defence. My Lord and gentlemen, upon this subject I did not know how to regulate myself; I took the advice of a friend of mine how to regulate myself on this occasion; now I hope my friends will come forward.

RICHARD ROASCH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Do you know the prisoner? - A. I do.

Q. Did the prisoner communicate to you his having a letter on the 13th or 14th of May? - A.To the best of my knowledge he did; he acquainted me that he had received a letter from a man of the name - He said he did not recollect the name, he said it must be some person that knew him; he told me he had called for payment, he did not get it at first, but on the next day he called and received the money; I advised him as he had received the letter by the post, to be very particular to know the proper owner of it; I suggested to him to be very particular to whom he delivered the produce.

THOMAS SIMS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am a carpenter and builder, I live in Well-street, Oxford-street; I have known the prisoner four years: On the 13th or 14th of May I met him accidentally, he told me he had received a bill by the post.

Q. Did he ask your advice on the occasion? - A. He did; I told him not to part with the letter, nor the contents, till such time as he was satisfied to whom it belonged; I further told him, if he made use of the contents, to keep money in his pocket to pay the contents whenever it was called for; he only told me it was directed to him, letter for letter, Louis Louis ; I did not see it.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

400. THOMAS BAKER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of May , a pair of boots, value 10 s. the property of Richard Matton .

RICHARD MATTON sworn. - I lost a pair of boots about six or seven weeks ago; I had left them in Mr. Smith's stable, at Chelsea ; the prisoner was a fellow servant of mine; I left them in the stable in the morning and missed them at night; I found them three weeks to-morrow at Mr. Brown's, who bought them of the prisoner.

HENRY BROWN sworn. - I bought those boots of the prisoner seven weeks or two months ago; I keep a sale-shop at Chelsea; I gave the prisoner 4 s. for them and half a pint of gin.

Q.(To Prosecutor.) Are they your boots? - A They are.

Prisoner's defence. The boots laid in the stable, and I took them away; I asked him 5 s. for them; he gave me 4 s. and half a pint of gin for them.

GUILTY , aged 32.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

401. JOHN ROSE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of May , a brass weight, value 10 s. the property of David-John Keen .

HENRY CHAPMAN sworn. - On the 23d of this month I served the prisoner with a candle; directly after he was gone out of the shop I missed the weight; I pursued after him and overtook him, and took the weight from him. I produce the weight, it is my master's property.

Prisoner's defence. A man in a black coat asked me if I would do him a job, and he would give me sixpence, as I was having a halfpenny worth of saloop; he said he would give me sixpence, and took me up to this place to steal this weight, and I went and stole it.

GUILTY, aged 13.

Of stealing to the value of 1 s.

Confined one week in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

402. THOMAS CONNER was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas White , between the hours of nine and ten at night, on the 25th of April , and feloniously stealing therein forty pounds weight of salt, value 10 s. the property of Thomas White and Samuel Jones .

Second Count, For the like offence, in the dwelling-house of Thomas White and Samuel Jones.

(The case was stated by Mr. Knapp)

JOHN FORRESTER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a constable and patrol of Portsoken ward: On the 25th of April, ten minutes before ten o'clock, I stopped the prisoner in Somerset-street with a bag containing salt; he told me he was going to take it home to salt meat. He said he carried meat about the country.

Q. What quantity did it turn out to be? - A. Fifty-two pounds weight of salt; he told me he bought it at Mr. Hawkins's, in Bishopsgate-street, and a young man in the shop served him; I asked him if he should know the young man again; he said he should; I lodged the prisoner in the watch-house, and went to Mr. Hawkins's, and brought the young man with me; I asked the prisoner if that was the young man who served him with the salt; he said, yes; the young man said he did not serve him with it.

THOMAS WHITE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are in partnership with Mr. Samuel Jones ? - A. Yes, we are oilmen living in Aldgate High-street : On the 25th of April, about ten o'clock at night, from information, I went to the watch-house, and saw the prisoner and the bag of salt; I saw a great deal of salt hanging about the prisoner's clothes; on the sleeves of his frock, and on the knees of his trowsers; I asked him how he came by the salt; he said he bought it at Mr. Hawkins's; I went back to my premises to see whether it was the same salt that we keep in bags, and from the inspection I found it to be the same salt that we have from Mr. Steward, of Portsmouth, which I believe no other person in London has, there were the finger-marks in two of the bags.

Court. Q. ive it from a large salt manufactory?- A. Yes, I believe they do not serve any other people.

Q. You do not know that, you have a large stock? - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gleed. Q. Can you speak to the loss of fifty-two pounds of salt that night? - A. No.

- MANN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a servant to Messrs. White and Jones; I saw the salt and the prisoner at the watch-house.

Q. Did you see the salt on his knees, and on his sleeves? - A. Yes.

Q. Did it appear to be of the same quality as that in the bag? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you find any thing in the warehouse? - A. Yes, two bags of salt that were brought there and filled with salt.

Mr. Gleed. Q. I take it for granted if there were any holes in the sack, the salt would fall on the man's trowsers, and different parts of him, he carrying of it: are you sure that that on his knees was of the same quality as that which was inside of the bag? - A. The quantity was so little I could not be certain.

THOMAS FORSTER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am porter to Mr. White; about two days afterwards, I found this key just inside of the warehouse, by the door in a window; it was tried to the door and it unlocked it.

- MAGRATH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are employed by Mr. White - Did you fasten the door on the night this happened? - A. Yes, about a quarter before eight o'clock.

Forrester. I produce the salt.

Prosecutor. I believe it is of the same quality exactly as that which we have in our bin.

JOSEPH TRAVERS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I live with Mr. Hawkins, oil and colour-man, Bishopsgate-street: I am quite certain I did not sell that salt to the prisoner; I never saw the man before I saw him in the watch-house.

Prisoner's defence. On the day I was taken I had been a portering for a man of the name of John Brown, who lived at the upper end of Brick-lane; he had a sack that he used to keep salt in; he told me to sew the sack about the bacon; the sack was nearly full of salt, it clung to my trowsers; I carried it on my shoulders till I went to Billingsgate with it; and after I came back, I bought a quartern of salt at Hawkins's; I gave the bag to that boy; he had a sack of salt, some of it was sewed up with this bacon, and the remaining part was put in my bag; I was coming home with this sack of salt when this gentleman took me in Somerset-street.

The prisoner called three witnesses who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

403. WILLIAM MELTON was indicted for that he, on the 26th of May , being employed as a servant to John Lewis , and being in that capacity, did receive and take into his possession, for and on account of his said master, a piece of silver coin, value 5 s. and one other piece of silver coin, called a sixpence, and that he afterwards did fraudulently embezzle, secrete, and steal the same .

(The case was stated by Mr. Knapp.)

JOHN LEWIS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You keep the New American coffee-house, in Sweeting's alley, Cornhill ? - A. Yes; the prisoner was a servant and a waiter; I hired him as a servant, to do every thing that I told him to do; if I ordered him to brush me a pair of shoes, and he refused to do it, I would have discharged him.

Q. How long had he been a servant and a waiter? - A. I believe a twelvemonth last March.

Q. In consequence of any information did you call to your assistance Mr. Holdsworth? - A. I did.

Q. Did you, in consequence of that and Mr. Holdsworth, mark any money? - A. One seven-shilling piece, one dollar, a half-crown, five shillings, and a sixpence; I marked them on Saturday, the 25th of May, and went in the evening to the Mansion-house and gave it to Mr. Holdsworth: On Sunday I left my house at one o'clock, and my sister went with me; I returned about five minutes before nine o'clock.

Q. The money that was received, where was it put? - A. In a little bowl that I had.

Q. Was there any other waiter but the prisoner? - A. A porter: On Sundays he takes money when the other is at dinner; when I returned home I turned out all the money that was in that bowl into a half-pint bason; before I went out in the morning I counted out five guineas in small change; I took the half-pint bason with the money up stairs; I counted the money over twice; my first object was to know what was taken; I counted out the five guineas that was left: On the second time of going up stairs I missed the dollar and the sixpence.

Q. Have you ever seen that marked dollar and the sixpence? - A. Yes, I knew it to be the same that I had marked; I took the prisoner up stairs with the Marshal into my room; he said he was honest, and he was very much surprized that he was charged with a theft; he suffered himself to be searched; he said the sixpence was given to him, and he had given the dollar to his sister that evening; she wanted one, and he had put in five shillings for it; I said to him, I shall soon convince you of that; there is no more than one shilling in the bowl that I had marked and put in the bowl in the morning; I went with the officer to his sister, and she gave the dollar to the officer in mypresence; I knew it to be the same that I had marked.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. The prisoner was your waiter and your servant; if he had refused to have brushed your shoes you would have discharged him? - A. Certainly.

Q. You pay taxes for your servants - Do you pay for him as a waiter or servant? - A. A waiter.

Q. You would rather pay one guinea instead of two; now we find what sort of a servant he was - Did he pay you or you him? - A. He.

Q. How much a year did he pay you for being your waiter? - A. He pays me 120 l. a year.

Q. And finds himself in every thing - A. Yes, he finds himself in clothes.

Q. And he pays you for the honour of blacking your shoes 120 l. a year - You marked a dollar and some money of your own, and gave it to Mr. Holdsworth? - A I did.

Q. And when you came home at night, you did did not look into the bowl and count it; you put it into a half-pint bason and went up stairs? - A. I did.

Q. You were anxious to know whether you had been robbed, and like a candid and respectable man you called and said to the prisoner, give me an account? - A. He could not recollect.

Q. Do you take that to be an answer to my question, or do you think I am so silly as to take it - Did you when you came home, and before you charged him with any theft whatever, did you ask him what money he received in the course of that day, and put it down? - A. I did not.

Q. Did you ask him any question whatever, as to the money he had received that day, till you had put him into Mr. Holdsworth's custody? - A. I did not.

Court. Q. This man was entrusted to receive money and give change, was he not, from this bowl? - A. Certainly.

Q. What money he received from a customer, if he wanted change he would resort to the bowl for change? - A. Undoubtedly.

Mr. Gurney. Q. Did you say, I have lost five shillings to day; what money have you received, what money have you given in change - A. I left out five shillings in the morning, and I put in half a guinea; this was about eleven o'clock at noon I made up this money; I did not come down stairs till one and I found the five shillings safe.

Q. This was one o'clock - How many people came into your house from one o'clock till nine o'clock you cannot tell - Was there any gold there? - A. He had changed a one pound note.

Q. In addition to the five guineas? - A. He had changed a one pound note from the bason.

Court. Q. When you went out, how much money did you leave? - A. Five guineas, in half guineas, seven shilling pieces, dollars, half-crowns, and shillings and sixpences, in the bason.

Q. When you came home how much money was there in the whole? - A. When I came home I counted one pound seven shillings, and five shillings of this money was taken before I left the house, and one pound I apprehend was spent by Mr. Holdsworth's party.

Q. You cannot know what money was paid; you found an addition to your money of one pound seven shillings, and what was given in change for that one pound seven shillings you do not know? - A. There were two 1 l. notes he had given change for; one was changed while I was there.

Mr. HOLDSWORTH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are the City Marshal? - A. I am.

Q. Did Mr. Lewis deliver any marked money to you? - A. He did, on Saturday evening, a 7-shilling piece, a dollar, a sixpence, a half-crown, and 5 s. I directed Tipper and Stanton to to be there; I gave Tipper a seven-shilling piece and 3 s. and Stanton had the dollar and the sixpence; when Mr. Lewis was up stairs, and the prisoner with him, I told the prisoner that he had received a dollar; he admitted it; he said he had put five shillings in the bowl in lieu of it; he had given the dollar to his sister; I desired him to empty his pocket, in doing which he threw out three sixpences; one of the three was one I had received from Mr. Lewis, and another of the sixpences was a sixpence I gave to him to take three pence out; he said that the sixpence that was given to him marked, was the sixpence that I gave to him to take three pence out, that was not so.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. When the prisoner was asked about the dollar, he said it is very true, his sister wanted the dollar of him, and he put five shillings in the bowl for it, the value of more than twenty shillings was in the bowl? - A. The identical money was all in the bowl but the dollar and the sixpence.

Q. A waiter will find it more convenient to have small change in his bowl than large - He had put five shillings in the bowl, in lieu of the dollar? - A. I think it is more handy.

JAMES STANTON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are one of the city constables? - A. Yes; I went to the American coffee-house by the direction of Mr. Holdsworth, on Sunday; he gave me a dollar and two shillings and sixpence; I paid the whole of the money I received from Mr. Holdsworth to the prisoner at the bar.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. What had you? - A. A bottle of wine four shillings and sixpence, and afterwards a pint of wine two shillings and three pence; I gave the prisoner three pence.

DANIEL CARTWRIGHT sworn. - I produce the dollar; I got it from a house in Pall-mall, on Sunday evening, about eleven o'clock.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You would not have known where to go for the dollar, unless the prisoner had told you; you had no inspiration to know that fact? - A. I was told by him. (The dollar identified by the prosecutor.)

Jury. Q.(To Prosecutor.) When you charged the prisoner with the dollar, did he not say he had given you five shillings in lieu of it? - A. Yes; in looking over my money there was only one shilling that had my mark on it.

Q. Is it not probable, in consequence of much money being taken, that these identical shillings might have been given to customers in change? - A. They might.

Court. You have hit the bird in the eye; he might have given three or four of the shillings when they came for change.

The prisoner left his defence to his Counsel, and called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

404. EDWARD KIRBY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of May , a silver watch, value 1 l. 5 s. the property of John Bucknell .

JOHN BUCKNELL sworn. - I live at No. 18, Grub-street : I keep a broker's shop and sell earthenware . On the 15th of May, about half after nine o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came into my shop with another man, who represented himself as drum-major to the East London Militia; the prisoner said he wanted to speak to me in private; I told him I had no secrets in my place, and what he had got to say to speak out; he and the other man talked about some lead that had been stolen; I saw a man looking through my window; I turned my head, and the prisoner at the bar went into my room.

Q. When did you miss the watch? - A. In two minutes after he went out of my house; I made application to Captain Walker, and the Captain sent him down to my house.

Q. When was it that you took him up? - A. On Friday.

Q. Did you ever find your watch again? - A. The pawnbroker has the watch. I saw the watch hanging in my room at half after nine o'clock, before twenty minutes to ten I missed it; I went up to the Guard-house, in Bunhill-row; I have seen the man several times in the Artillery-ground.

Q. You knew him personally; had he ever been at your shop before? - A. Once before; I never had any dealings with him in my life.

Prisoner. He has known me for these five or six years, and I have bought and sold to him.

Court. Q. Had you any dealings with him at all? - A. No, never in my life.

Prisoner. He has bought property of me at different times.

Court. He says not.

JOHN BUCK sworn. - I belong to the band in the East London Militia.

Q. Do you know the prisoner? - A. I know him since he has belonged to our regiment.

Q. What do you know about this watch? - A. He came to where I live, and told me that he had got a watch to sell, on the 15th of this month; he asked me twenty-eight shillings for it; I bid him twenty-five shillings, and I gave him twenty-five shillings; I wanted money to pay my lodgings, and I went and pawned it on Snow-hill, on Friday.

JOHN MERRIT sworn. - I am shopman to Mr. Cordy, pawnbroker, Snow-hill; I produce a watch, pledged on the 17th of May; I took it of a man of the name of James Nicholas .

Q.(To Buck.) I thought you said you pawned it? - A. I sent a friend of mine to pawn it; I did not know how to pawn it; his name is Katson; this is the same watch, I know it by the case.

JOHN RAY sworn. - On Saturday, the 18th of this month, this gentleman brought the prisoner to our office, and delivered this ticket to me; I went to the pawnbroker's, and he produced the watch; the prisoner said he should not have done it, if he had not been drunk. (The watch identified by the prosecutor.)

GUILTY , aged 19.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

405. LEAH LEVI was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of May , a pair of shoes, value 5 s. the property of Richard Bickerton .

RICHARD BICKERTON sworn. - I am a shoemaker , I live at No. 19, Bishopsgate-street within ; the prisoner came into my shop on Wednesday afternoon, between the hours of five and six, to buy a pair of shoes; I was serving two ladies; my daughter came forward and asked her what she wanted; she said, a pair of shoes; my daughter went to the glass case to get a pair of shoes; she had tried them on, and had taken them off; she said she did not very well like them, but told my daughter to leave them and shew her another pair; my daughter went to the glass case for another pair; I saw the prisoner busy at her pocket; I did not then know that she had put any thing in her pocket belonging to me; she got up in a moment and said I cannot stop now, I shall call another time; I went to the door immediately after her; I said, what have you got in your pockets; she said nothing you blackguard; I said then if you have nothing you need not be afraid to come in; I brought her into the shop, and she screamed violently; Mrs. Bickerton, who was up stairs, came down; I got hold of her by the side and felt the shoes in her pocket; she put her hand to her pocket,or whatever she had them concealed in, and dropped them on the floor, and the shoes having wooden heels they made a noise; I then sent for a constable, he came and searched her; in her pockets he found a dollar, a piece of sugar, and some soap.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. What was the price of the pair of shoes? - A. Five shillings.

Q. Did not she give 5 s. into the man's hand? - A. Yes, and he gave it to me.

Q. For shoes? - A. No, I did not keep it for the shoes.

Q. You have had it in your custody till yesterday, and after you had preferred the bill of indictment, you thought it best to return the five shillings, that you might convict? - A. I did not take it for the shoes.

MARY BICKERTON sworn. - I came down, hearing the noise; the woman was brought in doors, and was sitting in a chair; I put my hand in her pocket and felt the shoes; she struggled, I had not strength to hold her, she dropped first one shoe, and then the other.

PATRICK MULLIN sworn. - I am an officer; I produce the shoes. (The shoes identified by Mr. Bickerton.

Prisoner's defence. I went into this shop; he gave me a pair of shoes into my hand, and he tried them on himself; then he charged the officer with me, and had me taken up innocently.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Recommended to mercy by the Jury on account of her good character.

Confined one week in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

406. JOHN SAUNDERS , alias BUTTERS , was indicted feloniously stealing, on the 25th of May , a silver watch, value 5 l. the property of Charles Goodall , in his dwelling-house .

Second Count. For the like offence, only charging it to be the property of John Dorrington .

It appearing in evidence that the prisoner obtained the watch by a false pretence, and the Court being of opinion it was a fraud, and not a felony, he was

ACQUITTED .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

407. MARY ROBINSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of May , an umbrella, value 4 s. the property of William Pike .

There being no evidence against the prisoner, she was

ACQUITTED .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

408. MARY-ANN WATTS , ELIZABETH BURRAS , and SARAH HARRIS were indicted, the first for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of May , a gown, value 4 s. four petticoats, value 8 s. one dress, value 5 s. two habit shirts, value 2 s. a tucker, value 1 s. four pair of stockings, value 4 s. two shifts, value 7 s. a pair of stays, value 6 d. two pair of pockets, value 1 s. a spencer, value 2 s. two pair of stays, value 2 s. a skirt, value 6 d. a pair of shoes, value 2 s. and a muslin body, value 6 d. the property of Arabella Bowyer Snape Berridge , and the two others for feloniously receiving the same goods knowing them to have been stolen .

MARY- ANN WALBOIS sworn. - I live at No. 20, Upper Mary-le-bone-street , the prisoner was a servant ; she came to me on the 8th of May, on the 10th Arabella Bowyer Snape Berridge packed up her things to go into the country, in my presence; the bundle was taken into the kitchen, and put on the table; it was to go to Isleworth; on Sunday morning, the 12th, between the hours of twelve and one she let my brother in; I run immediately to her to lay the cloth; she was gone and left the street door open; I saw no more of her till she was brought back to our house, on Thursday evening, the 16th of May.

THOMAS WALBOIS sworn. - In consequence of her running away, I had a warrant on Monday, and on Thursday, I took her in Church-lane, St. Giles's, and brought her home; she had the young woman's cloaths on.

HENRY BETTS sworn. - On the 16th of this month, the prisoner was brought to our watch-house by the last witness; finding upon her all these clothes which I now produce; in the morning the prisoner Watts informed me where the rest were; I went to No. 5, Church-lane, St. Giles's, to a room belonging to the prisoner Burras; and just where the prisoner informed me, there I found a muslin spencer, and a handkerchief, on the top of two trunks by the bedside; they were delivered to me by the prisoner Burras.

- KENNEDY sworn. - I produce a shift, that I made the prisoner strip and take off; I produce it; and a duplicate of a gown which Mrs. Burras gave me. (The property identified by the prosecutrix.)

The prisoners did not say any thing in their defence, nor called any witnesses to character.

Watts, GUILTY .

Privately whipped and discharged.

Burras, NOT GUILTY .

Harris, NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

409. CHARLES BRIDGESTOCK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of May, three handkerchiefs, value 8 d. and one pair of stockings, value 3 s. the property of Alexander Duncan , a pair of breeches, value 1 s. 6 d. a shirt, value 6 s.two handkerchiefs, value 8 d. two petticoats, value 18 d. an apron, value 1 d. two pair of stockings, value 6 d. and two old rags, value 1 d. the property of Samuel Milne .

ALEXANDER DUNCAN sworn. - The prisoner at the bar came to me on the 2d of May, to get him a situation to go to sea; on the 5th of May he took the property out of the one pair of stairs back room. I live in Cinnamon-street ; he lodged in my house.

- BOWYER sworn. - I found part of the property on the prisoner, on the 5th of May, close to the back of Mr. Duncan's house; I was at my supper at nine o'clock, and heard a report that there was a man on the tiles of Mr. Duncan's house; I ran out of my own house, down an alley, and heard him drop; I ran about ten yards further, and caught him with the property about him. I saw him drop a wet shirt from under his arm. - (The property produced, and identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. This gentleman had me and four more concealed in a room; he was going to get us a ship; we were never to go out of the house for fear he should lose us; his brother and him are both crimps, they let me know of it, and so I was making my escape; I have been eighteen years in the King's service.

GUILTY , aged 37.

Confined one month in Newgate , and whipped in the jail .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

410. JULIET SHAW , JOHANNA BUKK , MARY HOWELL , and MARY JONES , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of May , twenty-five yards of check, value 30 s. and seven yards of British cambric, value 14 s. the property of Charles-Fisher Bell and Joseph Crawley .

Second Count, For stealing the said goods, the property of Charles-Fisher Bell.

CHARLES-FISHER BELL sworn. - I am a linendraper ; I live at No. 39, Oxford-street : On the 14th of May I missed the articles in question, they were stolen from the door, I had placed them there in the morning.

EDWARD CROCKER sworn. - I am an officer of Bow-street, I was going through Bedford-square, into Tottenham-court-road, on Tuesday, the 14th of May, about six o'clock in the evening, and saw the four prisoners coming from Percy-street, into Tottenham-court-road, towards Bedford-square; knowing the prisoners Howell and Jones, induced me to stop the prisoner Shaw, and in her apron I found this piece of printed cambric; on my stopping her, the prisoner Burk ran away; I knew their persons; and as the prisoner Burk ran, she threw down this piece from her, and I picked it up: Howell and Jones stopped, and I took them all four to a public-house and searched them; on the prisoner Howell I found this pair of scissars; I took them to Bow-street-office and they were committed; I was ordered to find the owner which I did. I produce the property. (The property identified by the prosecutor.)

Howell's defence. Me and Jones met Burk and Shaw, and I knowing them, stopped to speak to them, and that gentleman told us to stop, and we stopped.

Jones's defence. The same.

Burk's defence. I met these two girls coming along Rathbone-place, and I spoke to them.

Shaw's defence. We met these two girls, and we had not walked above forty yards when he stopped me with a piece of print.

Shaw, GUILTY .

Burk, GUILTY .

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Howell, NOT GUILTY .

Jones, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

411. CHARLES PALMER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of May , a coat, value 2 s. 6 d. a pair of pincers, value 6 d. and three shoemakers tools, value 6 d. the property of Clement Osborne .

CLEMENT OSBORNE sworn. - I am a shoemaker I had been out on a little business, and when I returned my property was gone from my shop; I went after the prisoner, and found him in Redlon-street, Whitechapel; I found my coat on him and my working-tools. I took these tools out of his pocket, and this coat, I know them to be mine.

Prisoner's defence. The great coat he lent me, and the tools.

Prosecutor. I did not.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

412. THOMAS GARLAND and JOHN DAVIS were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Sarah Curtis , widow , John Lloyd and Elizabeth his wife being in the said house, about the hour of seven in the afternoon, on the 28th of April , and feloniously stealing therein one silk purse, value 1 d. sixteen dollars, value 4 l. ten guineas, twenty-six half-guineas, twelve seven-shilling pieces, 160 shillings, 40 sixpences, 960 penny-pieces, 480 halfpence, and two Bank notes, value 1 l. each , the property of Sarah Curtis , widow.

SARAH CURTIS sworn. - I live at No. 5, Long-alley, in the parish of Shoreditch ; I am a widow; I keep a pawnbroker's shop : On Sunday, the 28thof April, I went out a little after one o'clock, and I returned a little after eight in the evening.

Q. When you returned home, in what situation did you find your house? - A. I found my door open and my drawers had been broke open, and all my money taken.

Q. Did you perceive the lock of your door had been picked that goes into the alley? - A. Not the outer door that goes into the alley; that door was open, and so was my parlour door.

Q. Had you left that door locked when you went out next the alley? - A. No, I left that door open, on account of my lodgers going up and down stairs.

Q. When you went out did you leave any of your lodgers in the house? - A. Yes, Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd; they were in the house the whole of the day.

Q. Were they there when you returned? - A. Yes.

Q. You found the outer door open - What was the next observation that you made? - A. The passage door was open and my parlour door was open.

Q. Did you leave your parlour door open? - A. I double locked it, the lock had been picked, the door had not been damaged at all.

Q. On going into the room did you miss any thing? - A. I lost all the money I had in the world.

Q. Where had you put that money? - A. I had locked it up in a drawer belonging to a chest of drawers in the parlour.

Q. Are there many drawers belonging to it? - A. It has three large drawers, and two little ones.

Q. In which of these drawers was your money? - A. In one of the upper little drawers; they went into the shop, and took a basket of copper.

Q. Tell us what sort of money it was that you missed from this drawer? - A. I missed the guineas, the half-guineas, seven-shilling pieces, a dollar, shillings, and sixpences.

Q. What might the gold and silver amount to that was taken? - A. I had counted ten guineas in guineas, and twenty half-guineas, and I counted eight pounds in silver; I cannot say justly how many in shillings; I counted it on Saturday night; I had so many seven-shilling pieces, I cannot say how many, and five pounds of copper in the shop.

Q.Where was it contained in the shop? - A. It was put into a half-sieve basket.

Q. Did the parlour open into the shop? - A. Yes; on coming home I missed all that money which I counted on the Saturday before.

Q. Were there any Bank-notes? - A. Two Bank-notes of one pound each; they were in the drawer with the silver in a decanter stand; the gold part of it was in a green silk purse.

Q. What do you say to the prisoners - look at either of them? - A. I know neither of them.

Q. You do not know that you saw either of them before? - A. No, but my daughter came home, and found one of the young men in the shop.

Q. Did you see your daughter come home? - A. No; she came home before me.

Prisoner Garland. Q. Did you not say on the last examination that you took part of the sieve out of the fire that was burnt? - A. I went up in the one pair of stairs with Mr. Ray, and there I saw on the fire the appearance of a basket that had been burnt there, and it struck me that that was the basket that my copper and my money was in; I only thought so, I could not swear to ashes you know; that I mentioned at the Office, but not here.

SARAH CURTIS , jun. sworn. - Q. How old are you? - A. Fourteen.

Q. You know the nature of an oath, do you? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know that you shall be punished if you swear falsely? - A. Yes.

Q. You remember coming home on Sunday, and finding your mother's house had been robbed, do you? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know what Sunday that was? - A. I do not know the day of the month, it was in the last month.

Q. In April was it? - A. Yes.

Q. You are the daughter of the last witness? - A. Yes.

Q. What time on Sunday did you come house? - A. Between seven and eight.

Q. Did you come home before your mother? - A. Yes, they sent me home by the stage.

Q. Where did you come from? - A.Clapton.

Q. And when you got home, what did you see? - A. I went in; the door was just ajar.

Q. What the parlour door? - A. Yes.

Q. When you went in, what did you see? - A. I went in, and found my mother's shop-door open, and the shop-door leads into the parlour; I shut the door, and came out into the passage; I stood there a little while, and then I saw this young lad come out with the light coat.

Q. Did you see them both? - A. Only one with the light coat, Garland.

Q. Where did he come out of? - A. Out of my mother's parlour door.

Q. When you first went in, was he in the parlour? - A. I did not see him when I first went in.

Q. Was it dark? - A. No, not very dark.

Q. From where did he appear to you to come from? - A. Out of my mother's parlour.

Q. You went into the parlour then, did you? - A. Yes.

Q. You did not see him then? - A.No; I got out, and stood in the passage; then I saw him come out.

Q. You did not see him before? - A. No.

Q. How do you know that it is the same man? - A. I am sure it is the same man.

Q. Where did he go? - A. Then he came out amongst the people.

Q. Did you see him for any time, or did he run away? - A. No, he did not run away.

Q. Did you see him for any time? - A. No.

Q. How long was he remaining in the alley or the street near the door? - A. I do not know how long.

Q. How long did you see him when he came out of the parlour? - A. He stood a bit, you know, but he did not stay long.

Q. How long did he stay then, that you might know him again? - A. Not long; he had a light coat on and the same buttons then as he has now, and his hat was off when he came out of the room; I did not see any more of him when he went away.

Q. Did he go out of the passage into the alley? - A. Yes; he went out of the long passage into the alley; I saw no more of him.

Q. Did not you see somebody collar the prisoner? - A. Yes, Mr. Kendrick; I went out of the passage into the alley, and then I holloaed out.

Q. Upon your screaming out, did you see any body come? - A. Yes, Mrs. Williams came.

Q. What next did you see? - A. Then Mr. Kendrick came, and then he collared that young man, Garland; it was a very little time after he came from the parlour door that I screamed.

Q. Are you quite sure that the man that Mr. Kendrick collared was the man that you saw come out of your mother's parlour? - A. Yes.

Q. Are you now sure that it was the man that you now see, the prisoner at the bar, Garland? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see any thing of the other prisoner? - A. No, sir, I never saw him.

Q. How long was it afterwards when your mother came home? - A. Not long.

Q. I suppose you told her how you found the things? - A. I told her what had happened.

Prisoner Garland. Q. Did you not say when you first came up to Worship-street Office, that I was not the person? - A. I said, no, at first.

Court. Q. Did you say that? - A. I said, no, at first; I knew it was the man, but I did not like to say so.

Q. Why did not you like to say so? - A. Because, sir, I did not, I was ashamed.

Q. Who was the first person to whom you said it was the man? - A. To my mother.

Q. When was it that you told your mother that it was the man? - A. When I came home.

Q. Did you tell your mother the reason why you did not say it? - A. I told her I was ashamed, and did not like.

Q. You said first, when you went before the Magistrate, that it was not the prisoner - did you afterwards tell the Magistrate that it was? - A. No, I only told my mother.

ANN WILLIAMS sworn. - On Sunday, the 28th of April, between seven and eight o'clock, Mrs. Curtis's daughter was come home; she said, Mrs. Williams, is my mother come home, have you seen my mother; no, my dear, said I, not to-day; she said, my mother's door is open; I went with her, and the door was open; I took the door in my hand, and looked in; I said, my dear, there is nobody there; I came out, and shut it.

Q. Where did you leave the child? - A. She came out with me; I had not been out five minutes before I ran to see what the matter was, and the gentleman was coming out of the room.

Q. What gentleman? - A. That young man, Garland.

Q. Where was it you first saw him? - A. Coming out of the parlour-door into the passage.

Q. Did he come into the passage? - A. He came into the passage, and pulled his hat off, and said, come and look if I look like a thief.

Q. When he said, come and look if I look like a thief, had any body said any thing to him? - A. Yes; he was collared by a gentleman coming out of the parlour-door in the passage, close to the parlour-door; I saw him collared by Mr. Kendrick.

Q. Where was this that you saw him collared? - A. At Mrs. Curtis's door; Mr. Kendrick lives in that yard; hearing the child cry, he ran and collared him.

Q. Where was the child then? - A. She was standing by me; she was so frightened then that she almost fainted away.

Q. Now look at the prisoner and see whether Garland is that man? - A. I am positive that is the man.

Q. You had been at home all day? - A. I never go out on a Sunday, I work hard all the week.

Q. Did you see the other prisoner there - did you see him there in the course of that day? - A. No, I did not; I had nothing to do with any body but him.

Q. You say the child was very much frightened? - A. Yes, she got hold of me, and said, oh, Mrs. Williams, and Mr. Kendrick collared him.

Prisoner Garland. Q. Do you remember speaking on Tuesday before the Magistrate - you said it was twenty minutes before eight? - A. I said, between seven and eight o'clock; it might be twenty minutes, it was rather more under than over.

- BELL sworn. - I live at No. 18, Primrose-street, Bishopsgate-street.

Q. Do you remember Sunday, the 28th of April, on that day seeing any thing? - A. Yes.

Q. What did you see? - A. I saw Mr. Garland come out of Mrs. Curtis's door, the prisoner with the light coat.

Q. Did you see him come out? - A. Yes.

Q. What passed? - A. He mentioned the name of Faulkner to inquire his character there.

Q. How came he to do that, to mention the name of Faulkner? - A. I do not know, it was to inquire his character; I did not hear him say any more, I was passing by.

Q. Did you see him collared? - A. No.

Q. Was he accused of any thing? - A. I was coming past at the same time; I heard him mention the name of Mr. Faulkner.

Q. What did they say to him that drew that answer? - A. I did not hear what they said to him who drew that answer.

ESTHER KELLOW sworn. - Q. Your husband is Richard Kellow ; he lives in Primrose-street? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know any day back, the 28th of April, of Mrs. Curtis's house being robbed? - A. On the 28th of April, about eight o'clock at night, as near as I can recollect, I was standing at my door; I heard a violent screaming; I then ran to see what it was; I saw a mob of people; they said Mrs. Curtis had been robbed; I saw a very genteel young man with a light coat on, and his hat in his hand, bowing to the people, and said he had not been in that house, nor he had not robbed them; he seemed very much agitated, but did not offer to go away.

Q. Now look at the prisoner at the bar, and see whether that is the person? - A. I think it was that young man in the light coat, (pointing to Garland), I do not know his name.

Prisoner Garland. Q. Recollect what time that was? - A. I think it was about eight o'clock in the evening, I was then going to put my children to-bed.

THOMAS KENDRICK sworn. - Q. You are a chair-maker? - A. Yes, I live in Long-alley, Moorfields, but I work in Oxford-street.

Q. Do you remember on Sunday, the 28th of April, any thing at or near Mrs. Curtis's door? - A. I was at home on the Sunday evening, and Mrs. Curtis's little girl came and called to me.

Q. What time? - A. I cannot justly say, it might be about eight o'clock; Mrs. Curtis's little girl asked me whether her mother was come home; I told the little girl I did not know that she was out; she said her mother had been out to dine, and she had come home and found all the doors open; I told the little girl to get a light.

Q. It was dark, was it? - A. It was near dark, and Mrs. Williams came into the garden to get some stockings and things she had been hanging out there in the garden.

Q. Whose garden? - A. Mrs. Curtis's garden; and the little girl asked Mrs. Williams to go with her to the door to see whether they could see any body in the house, or about it; I was informed that they looked in at the door, but saw no person; I went up to my own room again; in or about five minutes afterwards, Mrs. Curtis's little girl cried out very loudly; I ran down, and seized a person in the passage close by the door.

Q. Who is that person? - A. The prisoner, Garland, in the light coat.

Q. Where was it exactly that you seized him in the passage, how near to Mrs. Curtis's door? - A. About two yards in the short passage that leads into the long passage which goes up stairs.

Q. You saw him two yards, you say, from the door? - A. Not more than two yards from the door; he said, I do not look like a thief, come to the light.

Q. You had done something, or said something, before that? - A. I had seized him by the collar; then he said, I do not look like a thief, come to the light; he said that I should know him again; he pulled off his hat, and stood in this manner (witness holding his head up,) quite upright, facing me so; I did not see him have any bundle, or any thing of that sort; he referred me to Mr. Faulkner for his character; he said he was well known in the neighbourhood of Chiswell-street.

Q. Did you see any man with him? - A. I did not.

Q. You say he had no bundle with him? - A. No bundle at all to appearance.

Q. Did any body search him? - A. No.

Q. How came you not to search him? - A. I cannot tell you; but the reason why I suffered him to go away was, by seeing he was a genteel young fellow, and his saying he was no thief, and the like of that.

Q. How long was it before you let him go away? - A. About ten minutes.

Q. You kept him about ten minutes, and then let him go? - A. Yes, in the presence of several people in the alley.

Q. Do you know how he came afterwards to be apprehended? - A. No.

THOMAS NELSON sworn. - Q. What are you? - A. I am a labourer; I am one of Mrs. Curtis's tenants.

Q. Do you remember last Sunday month, when this bustle was? - A. Yes, I came from the barber's shop something after two in the afternoon.

Q. Is that in the neighbourhood? - A. Yes.

Q. You are sure about the time? - A. Yes.

Q. Where did you go when you came from the barber's? - A. I am one of her lodgers in her house, and when I came from the barber's I found the passage door fastened; I wanted to go up stairs to my own apartment.

Q. Did you knock at the door? - A. Yes, I did, and a tall young fellow opened the door.

Q. Look at the prisoners? - A. That is the young fellow in the black coat (Davis); he opened the door, and then I went up stairs to my own apartment.

Q. Did you see Mrs. Curtis's door? - A. I did not take any notice of that.

Q. You are sure the prisoner Davis opened the passage door to you? - A. Yes.

Q. Had you ever seen him before? - A. I have seen him several times up stairs.

Q. Did he lodge there? - A. I believe not.

Q. Do you know what he ever came up stairs for? - A. To a person that lives up one pair of stairs; he used to come to and fro some times.

Q. Do you know whether he had been then up stairs upon that day? - A. I do not know indeed.

Q. What became of him then? - A. He went out of the passage and I went up to my own apartment.

Q. You do not know where he went? - A. I do not, I saw him go out of the passage door.

Cross-examined by Mr. Watson. Q. You were returning home from the barber's at half after two o'clock, and you met the prisoner Davis at the passage door - You say you had seen him before going to visit some people in the house? - A. Yes.

Q. He walked away and you went up to your own apartment? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. You said he opened the door, was it fastened? - A. Yes, it was bolted.

Q. Is it usually bolted at that time of night? - A. No, never before ten o'clock at night.

Q. You found the door bolted, and the prisoner opened it? - A. Yes.

Q. When you came down again was the door open or shut? - A. It was open when I came down again.

JOHN ARMSTRONG sworn. - On Wednesday, the 15th of May, in company with Ray, Vickery, and Bishop; about nine o'clock at night I went into a room in Forster's buildings, in Whitecross-street, and there I found the prisoners. These two men were there, and three women who were all taken into custody; after these men were secured I searched a cupboard in that same room, and on the shelf I found these four picklock keys; the prisoners were secured, and the next day brought to the Office; some of the witnesses did attend, and at other times other witnesses attended, but no part of the property was found; I found no money upon any of the persons that were in the room; the women said the room belonged to them, and the men had just come up.

Q. You found none of the property? - A. None.

Cross-examined by Mr. Watson. Q. The women who were there said this room was theirs? - A. Yes.

Q. They lodged there? - A. Yes.

Q. You searched these lodgings of the women in which were found these picklock-keys? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. Did you look at all to Mrs. Curtis's door, to see if these keys would open it? - A. I tried these keys to Mrs. Curtis's door, and found these keys were all too large; I could not open her door with any of them.

JOHN RAY sworn. - I searched the prisoner Garland on the 15th of May and found this black bag in his pocket.

JOHN VICKERY sworn. - I went with Armstrong and the other officers to the apartments where these two men were found; the men were searched; there was nothing found on their persons; I found a door-key on Davis, that I believe belonged to his own apartment.

Q. Do you know where he lived? - A. No, I do not; he said it was his door-key. In the window of the same room, next to where Garland was sitting was this key; it was covered with soap; and something black in all the wards and on the sides of it; it was a great deal too big for Mrs. Curtis's door. This key is prepared on purpose to to take the wards of locks.

WILLIAM FAULKNER sworn. - I am a pork butcher in Chiswell-street.

Q. We understand from the evidence that has been given, that Garland, one of the prisoners at the bar, referred some people to you for a character - Do you know him? - A. No, I never saw him before Friday last, to my knowledge.

Q. Then that is a mistake to refer any body to you for a character? - A. Quite so.

Garland. Q. Do you recollect what description you received of the person they said was me, as they said referred to you? - A. The description was a tall young man rather thin light hair, the person that came to me gave that description.

Prosecutrix. I believe it was Mr. Sapwell.

DANIEL BISHOP sworn. - I only went in company with Armstrong and the other officers; I saw Armstrong find the keys in the cupboard.

Q.(To Prosecutrix.) Look at that bag - Is that any part of the property that you lost? - A. I do not know any thing of it.

Q. Was that any part of the property that you lost? - A. No.

Garland. My Lord, on the evening as the people have stated that they saw me in Long-alley, I was drinking in a public-house, in White-cross-street. On my first and second examination, they swore positively it was twenty minutes, or half after eight; I have Mr. Hanson here to prove that I was along with him.

Q. You mean on Sunday, the 28th of April? - A. Yes; it is a long way from Shoreditch church to Whitecross-street.

WILLIAM HANSON sworn. - I am one of the turnkeys of Newgate; On the 28th of April, lastSunday month, I was going up Whitecross-street to a friend's house, where I go to dine sometimes.

Q. What time of the day was it? - A. It must be half after eight, because at eight o'clock we lock up the jail. The prisoner ran out after me, and took me into that same public-house he came out of; I think the publican's name is Harrison; we had some rum or brandy and water together at this public-house; I told him I was going to see a friend of mine.

Q. Whether you can be sure, from what you can recollect, that on the 28th of April, you were with him at half after eight, or any other time? - A. It must be between that and a quarter before nine o'clock; he was with me from that time till half after nine o'clock, and we had two shillings-worth of brandy and water together, and smoked our pipes together.

Prosecutrix. I do not live up at Shoreditch church; I live in Long-alley, near Primrose-street.

Q.(To Hanson.) How far is that from Whitecross-street? - A. Primrose-street is a little way from Whitecross-street, just through Finsbury-square.

Q. You know Long-alley - How far is Long-alley from where you were with him that evening? - A. It is not above a quarter of a mile; I do not think it is a quarter of a mile to it, it is not above.

Prisoner. Q. Do you remember what clothes I had on? - A. A brown coat, the under coat I believe.

Prisoner. This drab coat was in pledge at the time, at Mr. Lucock's, in Whitecross-street.

Court. Q. You may call any body to prove it? - A. I have not got any body to prove that at all.

SARAH HILL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Watson. I live in Davis's buildings, No. 1, Whitecross-street.

Q. Do you know the prisoner Davis - A. I do. On last Sunday month I saw the prisoner Davis at his mother's, in Beech-street, No. 9.

Q. What time of the day did you see him there? - A. I saw him there from about one o'clock, till about half after six or seven at night.

Q. Are you sure that it was Sunday month? - A. I am quite sure, I work for Mrs. Davis.

Q. Was there any body else there at the same time? - A. There were his two brothers, his mother, and me.

Q. Any body else there? - A. Nobody else there, I think.

Q. What had you for dinner? - A. I dined off of a shoulder of mutton there.

Q. You are quite sure that he was not out of the house from one o'clock till the time you have mentioned? - A. No, he was not.

Q. Did he dine there? - A. Yes, he did.

Q. There was his mother, his brother, and him, and you, dined there? - A. Yes, I am confident he was there all the time.

Court. Q. What is his mother? - A. She is in the straw business.

Q. What time did you go there? - A. I went there to finish a bonnet in the morning.

Q. What to work? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you always work on Sundays? - A. No, it was a thing that was in a hurry, or else I should not have gone.

Q. What time of the night did you go away? - A. I went away about eight o'clock in the evening.

Q. Was he gone then? - A. Yes, he went away first, he went away about seven o'clock, or half after six, I cannot be sure which.

Q. Have you ever been examined by the attorney? - A. I went up to the place where he was before, and they would not permit any body to speak.

Q. What had you for dinner that day? - A. A shoulder of mutton.

Q. What else? - A. Potatoes and greens, and a pudding.

Q. Who sat down at the table? - A. Mr. John Davis , Mrs. Davis, and me, and Thomas Davis .

Q. Who is Thomas Davis ? - A. His brother; and George Davis , his younger brother. That is all I can recollect.

Q. Who waited upon you? - A. John Davis , the prisoner, waited upon us.

Q. Had you any thing to drink? - A. Yes, we had a pot of beer.

Q. Any thing else? - A. No, nothing else that I can recollect.

Q. Did you drink tea in the afternoon? - A. No, we had none.

Q. Then all you had to drink was a pot of beer? - A. Nothing else.

GEORGE DAVIS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Watson. Q. How old are you? - A. I am sixteen.

Q. You are brother to the prisoner? - A. Yes.

Q. Where does your mother live? - A. In Beech-street, No. 9.

Q. Do you know the last witness, the straw bonnet maker? - A. Yes.

Q. You remember seeing your brother last Sunday month? - A. Yes, I was with my brother at my mother's I dined with him.

Q. Who else were there? - A. My other brother and that young woman, and my brother's wife was there.

Q. At what time did you dine? - A. We dined at one o'clock, at that time.

Q. How long did you see your brother there? - A. I was with my brother from that time till twenty-five minutes past nine in the evening; after tea we went and took a walk together.

Q.What time did you go and take a walk? - A. About half after six o'clock, I believe.

Q.Was that young woman there all that time that you were together, till you went and took a walk? - A. I went to my master's home.

Q. Then you parted with your brother, and went home to your master? - A. I did.

Q. You are sure that he was there till half after six o'clock, till you went and took a walk with him? - A. Yes, I was walking with him till twenty-five minutes after nine in the evening.

Court. Q. Where do you live? - A. I live with my master, No. 31, Bridges-street, Covent-garden; he is a boot-maker.

Q. What is your mother? - A. A straw bonnet maker.

Q. What time did you go to your mother? - A. About eleven o'clock.

Q. What was your mother about? - A. She was cleaning the child.

Q. What was she occupied about during the day? - A. She was cooking the dinner.

Q. What had you for dinner? - A. A shoulder of mutton.

Q. What had you to drink? - A. Porter, a couple of pots of porter.

Q. Any thing else? - A. No, that was all that we had.

Q. What was the last witness doing of during all this time; Sarah Hill, what was she there for? - A. She came to dinner with my mother.

Q. What time did she come to your mother? - A. About one o'clock.

Q. Are you sure that she came so early as one? - A. She was at home at my mother's when I went to my mother's.

Q. What did you see her doing when you were there? - A. I do not know.

Q. Was she working, reading, or writing, or what? - A. She was reading I believe.

Q. Do you know what she was reading? - A. I do not know.

Q. A large book or a small one? - A. A little book.

Q. What sort of a cover had this little book? - A. I do not know. It was eleven o'clock when I first saw her; I had then to take a pair of shoes home for my master.

Q. Did not you stay and dine with them? - A. I returned and dined with them, and then staid all the time; when I went home she was reading, she did nothing afterwards.

Q. After she had done reading, she did nothing afterwards? - A. No.

Q. How late did you stay in the evening? - A. I staid with him till twenty-five minutes after nine.

Q. You went out of the house at half after six; had you any tea that afternoon? - A. No.

Q. Pray what is your brother? - A. A leather-seller; he lives at No. 7, Featherstone-court, Featherstone-street.

Q. Has he any family? - A. He has no family, but he is married.

Q. Are any of your brothers married? - A. No, nobody else married but him.

The prisoners left their defence to their Counsel.

Davis called one witness, who gave him a good character.

Garland, GUILTY , Death , aged 19.

Davis, GUILTY , Death , aged 24.

The Jury recommended Davis to mercy, on account of the slight evidence against him.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

413. PATRICK MARTIN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of May , nine shirts, value 15 s. a shawl, value 10 s. a handkerchief, value 5 s. a shift, value 8 s. and a gown, value 20 s. the property of William Brown , in his dwelling-house .

- BROWN sworn. - Q. Are you a married woman? - A. Yes, my husband's name is William Brown ; he is a cabinet-maker , and lives in Spitalfields : On the 10th of May I went up to my bedroom, at half after eleven o'clock, to get some aprons, and I missed a great many of my things; I found nine shirts gone from my drawer, a gown out of another, a shift, a silk handkerchief, and a silk shawl, were all out of the different drawers.

Q. Why do you accuse this man of taking them? - A. He was a lodger, therefore I suspected him; I sent to the different pawnbrokers, and found four shirts at Mr. Perkins's and two at Mr. Prentice's.

Q. What is he? - A. He is a soldier in the East London militia.

Prisoner. I told Mrs. Brown, at the time she mentioned it to me, where the things were, and who I got them from.

Prosecutrix. He told me where a gown and two shirts were; I told him, if I could get my property, I would make it as easy as I could; that is all he told me.

CHARLES FRENCH sworn. - I am a pawnbroker; I live at No. 14, White's row, Spitalfields: On Wednesday, the first of May, the prisoner brought me two shirts, which I lent eight shillings on, and two more on the 9th of May; I am not positive, whether or not it was him who pledged them, I was in such a hurry to go out. I produce them.

CHARLES LESTANG sworn. - I am a servant to Mr. Perkins, a pawnbroker, in Bishopsgate-street: I produce a gown and a shirt pledged for sixteen shillings on the 10th of May. I did not take them in. (The property identified by the prosecutrix.)

Prisoner's defence. I received them of a person who lodged at Mrs. Brown's, that she knows verywell; I gave him 1 l. 5 s. for the lot; he said he had been at Rosemary-lane, and bought a bargain of a Jew; I did not know what I was took up for till I was at Hicks's Hall; I told her where those things were, I did not know any thing at all about them before.

Court. There is something you did not tell of.

GUILTY , aged 39.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

414. JOHN RHODES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of May , in the dwelling-house of Stephen Heath , a silver breast-buckle, value 2 s. a pair of steel buckles, value 1 s. a guinea, and five Bank notes, value 5 l. the property of Thomas Corby .

THOMAS CORBY sworn. - I live at Sunbury, in the parish of Harrow ; I lodge at Stephen Heath 's, the Black Horse: I found my box broke open on the 12th of May, the box was in the room where I slept, I had a guinea and five one pound notes taken out of it, and a silver shirt hasp; I had seen them on the 7th of May, the prisoner slept in the same bed with me.

Q. What is he? - A. A day labouring man , and so am I.

Q. Have you found any of your things? - A. Only my shirt hasp on the prisoner; I asked him how he came by it; he said he bought it at Brentford fair. (The shirt buckle produced by the officer and identified by the prosecutor.)

Q. You never found any of the notes, nor traced them any where? - A. No.

Q. Then all you know is that that is your property? - A. Yes, that is my property.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Will you venture to swear to this? - A. I do.

Q. The day your box was broke open the prisoner went out with you; and when you went out the box was safe, and when you came home you found your box broke open? - A. Yes.

Q. And you charge him with stealing five pounds? - A. Yes.

Q. What wages have you? - A. Fourteen shillings a week.

Q. How long was it before he was committed that you borrowed a seven shilling-piece of him? - A. No, not a seven shilling-piece, it was half a crown.

Q. Did you make use of this expression, that you would thank him to lend you this money, that you were quite broke down - How long was it before this? - A. I cannot say.

Q. Had not you and the prisoner a quarrel about a week or ten days ago? - A. Rather longer.

Q. You had been beating an old man of the name of Langdon? - A. Yes.

Q. And he quarrelled with you about your beating an old man? and this breast buckle which you have sworn to, he told you he bought it at Brentford fair; he wore it publickly, and while he was sleeping in the same bed with you; and you have lost these notes you say, and you had only fourteen shillings a week? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember his going along with you to Marlborough-street, with another man, and they taking their oaths, that they were not the men that robbed you? - A. Yes.

Q. After that you saw this breast-buckle in his breast, which he told you he bought at Brentford-fair, and then you had him apprehended - Is that so? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. How long had you missed it before he quarrelled with you? - A. I had not missed it before he and I quarrelled.

FREDERICK KNOWLE sworn. - On the 20th of May the prosecutor came to me to take the prisoner into custody; he believed he was the man who stole the property, by seeing the breast-buckle in his possession; I went to the Black Horse and asked him for the breast-buckle, which he at first refused, saying, he had bought it at Brentford-fair. I produce 4 l. 10 s. which he had in his possession, one Bank note, of 1 l. three guineas, and a seven-shilling piece.

Q.(To the prosecutor.) Look at that Bank note - Can you read? - A. No, I cannot tell whether it is mine.

Q. How came you to borrow half a crown of this man while you had this money? - A. My brother was a baker; he and I had a horse, which we sold for 8 l. then I had 4 l. I had one of my own, an old mare, which I sold for four guineas; and then I had a little poney which I sold for 2 l. then I had 8 l.

Q. What became of the other two pounds? - A. There were ten shillings more of this money.

Q. When was it you borrowed the half-crown? - A. I do not exactly know.

Q. How long before you went to the office? - A. A good bit.

JAMES KENNEDY sworn. - I know no more than that the Magistrate desired me to take care of the breast-buckle; and see the prosecution carried on.

Prisoner's defence. What money they took away from me I worked hard for; I sold a ewe and a lamb for 3 l. I cleaned out a privy for Lord Northwick; it came to a guinea; I put the money by; I had been a long time saving this money; my box was broke open, it was very well known; I had lost the key; I offered to lend Mr. Corby some money before he had lost this money; I had lent him money two or three different times; it is verywell known; I am sure I am not deserving of this now.

Q.(To the Prosecutor.) When was the box broken open? - A. I do not know exactly what day.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

415. JOHN HOLT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of May , two yards of black cloth, value 2 l. 2 s. and half a yard of printed cotton, value 10 d. the property of William Law , in his dwelling-house .

WILLIAM LAW sworn. - I am a tailor , No. 34, Hatton-garden , the prisoner was my journeyman : About a fortnight or three weeks back, I missed articles out of my cutting-room, and having suspicion of the prisoner, I went to Hatton-garden Office, and took out a search-warrant.

Q. When was that? - A. This day fortnight; I took the officer with me, and searched the prisoner's lodgings; we found a coat and a pair of pantaloons of French black cloth; I took a piece with me that I had at home, and by the colour, and by the thread, and in every respect, it appears to be the same, in consequence of that we brought it away; at the same time I found a piece of printed cotton, which I knew to be the facing of a jacket that had been made the week prior to it; it is all here.

GEORGE WOOD sworn. - I am an officer; I produce the property, a coat, a pair of pantaloons, and a piece of printed cotton.

Prosecutor. The cotton I can swear positively to.

Prisoner's defence. I am innocent of stealing the cloth from any person, it was a present to me from the country; my friends have been waiting here for my trial; my father is gone back into the country.

Q. If your father was up from the country, it is strange he should go back again? - A. I have not seen my father since Friday.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY

Of stealing to the value of 10 d.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

416. CHARLOTTE SEARLE was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Blundle , about the hour of eleven at night, on the 21st of May , and burglariously stealing therein, two shirts, value 5 s. four half-handkerchiefs, value 3 s. a cloak, value 7 s. two skirts, value 7 s. one apron, value 1 d. and a towel, value 1 d. the property of William Blundle .

ANN BLUNDLE sworn. - Q. Are you the wife of William Blundle? - A. No; I have been called by that name for fifteen years, I am not married to him, he is a shoemaker ; we rent the two pair of stairs front room, No. 1, Red Lion-yard, Red Lion-street : On the 21st of May I washed a few things and folded them for ironing, and I put them in the bottom drawer; I went out a little after nine, and when I returned I found the door broken open.

Q. How was the door when you went out? - A. I left the key in the door, I cannot say the door was locked when I went out; when I went in I found the things taken out of the drawer; in the morning Mr. Trott came down and said, Blundle, your things are at Hatton-garden.

Q. Did the prisoner lodge in your house? - A. No; I had seen her several times for three weeks before this happened.

WILLIAM DAVIS sworn. - I am a watchman; I apprehended the woman at the cry of eleven o'clock at night; she just stopped on the paved stones, and something dropped from her apron, it seemed to be wet linen; I said, my good woman, what have you got there; I put my hand on the things, they were quite wet, and said, put them in your apron; I took her to the watch-house; she wanted to run away.

Q. Was she sober? - A. I do not think she was.

FRANCIS ROGERS sworn. - I am constable of the night, I produce the bundle.

JAMES DEAN sworn. - I am superintendant of the watch-house; I was standing at the watch-house door at a quarter past eleven o'clock; I saw Davis come along with a light, and I went to meet him; I said, what is the matter.

Q. Who had the bundle? - A. The prisoner, the other woman ran away; the prisoner made some resistance; I pulled her into the watch-house; I said, what have you got here; she said, I have got some linen, I had it at No. 31, Clerkenwell-green; I asked her the people's name; she did not know, she said; I said, let us see what it is: she refused; I asked her again where she got it from, and she said, from Gerrard-street, Soho.

Prisoner's defence. That man tells false; I said, I served my time at Clerkenwell-green, No. 3, at the watch business; I never refused to give the bundle up. I am a widow with three children, and work hard for two, which I have to support.

GUILTY, aged 42.

Of stealing only .

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

417. MARGARET STANFORD was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of James Read , about the hour of two in the afternoon, on the 28th of May , and feloniously stealing therein, a pair of shoe-buckles,value 2 s. 4 d. two guineas, three seven-shilling pieces, and sixteen shillings , the goods and monies of the said James Read .

There being no evidence against the prisoner she was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

418. THOMAS TURNER , alias TOWERSON , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of May , a leather housing, value 10 s. the property of John Rodburn and Joseph Bramley .

The witness not being able to describe the Christian name of Mr. Rodburn, nor did he know whether Mr. Rodburn had any partner, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

419. MARTHA MIDGELY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of May , two sheets, value 18 s. the property of John Griffin .

MARY PELTRAN sworn. - I live with Mr. John Griffin , as a particular friend; the prisoner was house-maid : In consequence of a duplicate being found on the prisoner, it led to a discovery of the property; the sheets were marked J. G. I knew them to be Mr. Griffin's property when they were produced.

Cross examined by Mr. Gleed. Q. I understand that she is in her 20th year; you had a good character with her? - A. I had her character from a particular friend of mine - a very good character, and during the time she lived with us she conducted herself very modestly and very civilly.

Q. In point of fact no sheets had been missed? - A. No, not till after the sheets were produced, and then I looked them over and missed them.

JOHN RAY sworn. - On the 22d of May I received charge upon suspicion of the prisoner at the bar of robbing Mr. Griffin; I searched her, and on her I found a duplicate, I produce it; she said she picked it up on her master's steps at the door.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gleed. Q. She pointed out the time when she picked it up? - A. Yes.

WILLIAM MATTHEWS sworn. - I am a pawnbroker's servant; I produce a pair of sheets pledged for twelve shillings, I did not take them in.

Q.(To Mrs. Peltran.) Are these Mr. Griffin's sheets? - A. There is part of the marking picked out, there is the J, and the G is picked out; there is the mark of the thread that the G was marked with; there is the print of No. 1, that is picked out.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gleed. Q. It is a common mark J. G. it may be J. Griffin, or J. Green? - A. I cannot swear to linen, only J. G. and the number.

Q. In point of fact the G and the number is picked out - you only speak from probability? - A. From the appearance I should suppose they are Mr. Griffin's; it is not impossible others may mark with the same letters; if they were not marked I certainly would not swear to them.

ELIAS FLETCHER sworn. - I am a servant to Mr. Griffin; I was present when the duplicate was taken from the prisoner; it was in consequence of something else that she was taken up.

The prisoner left her defence to her Counsel, and called two witnesses, who gave her a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

420. JOHN EDBERY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of May , two quartern loaves of bread, value 2 s. 4 d. the property of Henry Hutchins .

HENRY HUTCHINS sworn. - On the 20th of May I turned up my basket on the pavement, with my bread in it; I was going to serve a customer with a loaf; in the mean time I saw the prisoner take two loaves out of the basket, and run as fast as he could; I pursued him and took him.

Q. Do you know what he is? - A. He told me that he was a baker out of place; I understand since that he has been a baker, and had a shop over Blackfriars-road.

Prisoner's defence. Please you, my Lord, I acknowledge doing this; I hope in God you will have mercy upon me for the sake of my wife and family, I have six children; they were in want of bread.

Prosecutor. There was a woman called at my house; she said she was his wife, and she had five or six children.

GUILTY , aged 41.

Privately whipped and discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

421. WILLIAM COSTER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of May , sixty pounds weight of lead, value 15 s. the property of John Stenson , fixed to his dwelling-house .

JOHN STENSON sworn. - I live at No. 1, Old Round-court, in the Strand .

Q. Did you lose any lead from your house? - A. Yes, this day week, I was not at home when it was taken away; one of the witnesses saw it cut, it was taken from the roof; there were fourteen feet taken down, and here is six feet; I imagine there might be eight feet gone; I found this six feet of lead secured away on the tiles when I came at night; I found from one of my lodgers that it was gone, and the next morning I had him taken up.

CHARLOTTE MOOR sworn. - I live at No. 5, Old Round-court, in the Strand, opposite to Mr. Stenson.

Q. Do you know any thing of this charge of stealing the lead from his house? - A. I saw theprisoner walking about on the leads for some time; about seven o'clock in the evening he had a chisel in his hand, and was marking the lead out; sometime afterwards I saw him folding the lead up; but I did not see him take it away.

Q. At the time you first saw him, did you see whether the lead was all fixed to the dwelling-house? - A. I saw that the lead was all there when he was marking it out.

Q. When did you tell Mr. Stenson of it? - A. On Tuesday; the reason I did not inform Mr. Stenson at the time, I knew he was a lodger; I did not know but he might be repairing the place, not knowing his business.

Prisoner. I could not take it down four pair of stairs without being observed.

Prosecutor. The lead might be let down in the court-yard it is only a wall there.

EDWARD BEALE sworn. - I am a cook, I lodge in Mr. Stenson's house, I live in the front garret: On the day the lead was taken I was in my room; I went on the leads to see what was the matter, hearing a noise; when I got there, I saw the prisoner there; he met me, and asked me how I did; I saw the lead was missing, and spoke of it to the prisoner; he seemed surprized that it was gone; he said Mr. Stenson ought to be told of it; then we talked of other things, and while we were talking and walking about, I saw this quantity of lead on the top of the house, behind the gutter; I mentioned it to the prisoner, and he put his foot against it, and said, yes, it is so; it is lead.

Prisoner. I had been there to empty dirty water, I and every one in the house had free access there; he saw the pail, and the water that I had been emptying, and as for the noise that he heard, it was occasioned by the bed-post I had been cleaning on the top of the roof.

Beale. I did see the pail, and the water had been slopped down.

Q.(To Prosecutor.) What is the value of that lead which is taken away? - A. Above a guinea.

Q. Do you know any thing of the prisoner? - A. Only that he lodged in my house.

Q. What way of life is he in? - A. I do not know; I should like to know; his wife said he was a porter to an oil-shop; he lodged with me from the 28th of last November.

Q. When was he taken? - A. He was taken on Tuesday afternoon; he slept in the house that night; I went up on the top of the house that night; after the lead was taken off; there were several people of the house up there; there was a fire at Mr. Griffin's house, a neighbour; I went up to see fire, and the prisoner was up there then.

Prisoner's defence. I was on the top of the house when Mr. Beale first mentioned about the lead being cut off; here is this woman swears, that she saw me marking off the lead, when there is a parapet wall runs above the roof; let alone this, her room is only three stories high, and our garret is four stories, and where this lead is torn away is under the parapet; it is impossible that she could see the lead taken from it.

GUILTY , aged 34.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeants.

422. SARAH BRIANT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of May , a Bank note, value 5 l. a 2 l. Bank note, and a 1 l. Bank note , the property of John King .

JOHN KING sworn. - I am a seaman ; I was coming through East Smithfield , between the hours of eleven and twelve at night, when this girl stopped me in the street, and asked me to have a drop of gin; I told her to let me go, I would not go in with her; she took hold of me, and I went in; she put her hands round me, and took the notes out of my pocket; she ran out of the door, and there was another girl that was with her; I took hold of the other girl and gave charge of her, and we were both put into the watch-house together; the next morning she said to the Magistrate, if she was let go, she would tell where the girl lived who robbed me. The prisoner is the girl who took the money from me.

Q. Were you sober? - A. I had been drinking, but I was as well in my senses as I am now.

Q. Are you sure that is the woman who took the notes? - A. Yes, there was nobody nigh me but her at the time.

- NOWLAND sworn. - On the 4th of May, the next morning, I went to the room of Bet Smithers, and there I saw the prisoner; I took her and Smithers into custody; Smithers and she were very much intoxicated; they asked for some liquor, Smithers pulled out a 1 l. note; she dropped the first 1 l. note; there were four 1 l. notes besides, which I picked up; I asked her where she got them, I have 5 l. in notes now, which I produce, which I received from Smithers; I asked her who she had the notes from; she said, from the prisoner; I asked the prisoner who she had them from; she said, from the sailor; I asked her what she had done with the rest of the notes; she said she had taken a gown out of pawn with one, and she and the other woman had spent the rest.

ELIZABETH SUMMERS sworn. - I am a charwoman: The prisoner came to me about five or six o'clock in the morning, and asked me to wash some things for her; she pulled out a five-pound note and a one-pound note, and laid them on the bed; she said they were given her by a friend to put her into the hospital; she and I went out together, and going together the sailor stopped her, and said she was the woman who had got his money.

Nowland. Mrs. Summers told me that the prisoner gave her a five pound note.

Summers. I did not tell the officer at all, that I know of.

- GRIFFITHS sworn. - I heard her say so; when Mr. Nowland took the five pound notes from this woman, I took her by the arm and led her to the office; she said there was a five pound note, which she had changed, she had it from the prisoner, and there was a pound note, and the prisoner confessed that she had given her a five-pound note and a one pound note, which she had taken from the prisoner.

Prisoner's defence. I said that I had the money given me by a friend, and I laid it on the foot of the bed, and desired her to take care of it, and she put it in her purse; there had been another woman locked up in custody all night.

MARY SAMROW sworn. - I was with this woman when the prisoner came in; I saw her give her a five pound note, she sat on the woman's bed after I let her in; this was at No. 8, Sun yard; she asked Mrs. Summers to lend her sixpence; she said that a friend gave the five pound note to her, to put her in the hospital.

Q. What is the prisoner? - A. An unfortunate girl of the town.

Q. You know she ought to be in a hospital? - A. Yes.

JAMES FAGE sworn. - I am a watchman, and this man that lays this charge to this woman, gave me another charge of another woman, between eleven and twelve in the morning before. I took charge of the woman, according to his order; he said to me I do not know positively that this is the woman, but I dare say they are connected together; the next morning I was ordered to go up with the officers to the watch-house; I went up, the woman was called, and after that there was another woman; we had come up the second time, he said that was the woman that had his money.

Q. You know them both? - A. Yes, very well.

Q. They are old acquaintances of yours? - A. Yes.

Q. A great pity you should be a watchman much longer? - A. I never had any complaint of the kind, I have been there two years.

GUILTY , aged 17.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

423. JOHN KEENE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of May , a counterpane, value 7 s. two pillow-cases, value 2 s. a sheet, value 3 s. a flat iron, value 6 d. the property of John Underwood, in a lodging-room .

MARY UNDERWOOD sworn. - I live in St. John-street ; the prisoner came to me for a lodging on the 17th, on the 20th he came, and on the Monday following, a little before eight in the morning, he went away and took the key with him, the next day I broke the door open; he took two pillow-cases, one sheet a counterpane, and a flat iron. The constable found the things again.

Q. What did he pretend to be? - A. He belonged to the militia.

JOHN JOHNSON sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Bridges, St. John-street; I produce a counterpane pledged for three shillings, and a sheet for one shilling and sixpence, pawned one on the 22d and the other on the 24th of May; I took them in of the prisoner, I am certain he is the man.

JOHN WHITE sworn. - I am an officer of Hatton-garden; I went to the Artillery-ground and took him into custody on the 29th of May, and found the duplicate of the things in his possession, and the flat iron tied to his bundle. (The property identified by the prosecutrix.)

GUILTY , aged 48.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

424. THEOPHILUS BARKER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of May , a footman, value 3 s. a saw, value 2 s. a candlestick tinder-box, value 2 s. a tin tea-pot, value 2 s. and a pen-knife, value 6 d. the property of Miles Maskow and Roger Moser .

Second Count, The same as the former, only varying the manner of charging.

ROGER MOSER sworn. - I am an ironmonger , No. 23, Dean-street, Soho .

Q. What is your partner's name? - A. There is no partner, the property belonged to my uncle, John Moser ; the business is carried on for the benefit of the estate; he left the business to the executors Miles Maskow , and I am one of the executors; the prisoner was clerk and shopman ; I got a warrant and searched his lodgings, and found the articles mentioned in the indictment and a great many more.

RICHARD LOVETT sworn. - I am an officer belonging to Marlborough-street: On the 25th of May I went to the prisoner's lodgings, in Compton-street, and found these articles; I produce them; here is a tin tea-pot, a candlestick-tinder-box, a screw-driver, a footman, a hand-saw, and a pen-knife. (The property identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. My Lord and Gentlemen of the Jury, I did not know but these articles, that are now produced against me, was booked to me; the first thing that I had of my prosecutor was a wire guard; I asked him for that; and told him I thought it would suit me, to prevent the child from the fire; I agreed to give 5 s. for it; that wasprevious to my having these articles; two or three days elapsed; I had then a pantheon stove, it was a second hand one, I thought it would answer my purpose, and I got the foreman of the yard to put that stove in a little order to be sent home; he did so; after I had it sent home, in looking over the book, which is my employment, I found that I was debted with that stove, the moment I saw that, I debted myself with the wire guard; after that I had a tin sauce-pan, which came to three shillings and threepence, which I believe one of the shopmen debted me with; after that I had a slop-pail, which I was debted with; then there were other things that I was debted with, and there was this footman; I had that on the Monday; my dinner hour being two o'clock, I brought it down in the front shop, and said to Mr. Selby, there are two or three articles, I will thank you to book these with them, and I will pay you for them altogether; two or three days elapsed, and I had the candlestick and tea-pot, and I brought them down in the shop in the same manner; I did not know but what I was debted with them, except the pen-knife, which is my own; he has sworn it is his; I cannot help myself.

Prosecutor. None of our people knew that he had took any of these things.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

425. JANE TOTHILL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of May , a shirt, value 3 s. the property of Elizabeth Stewart .

ELIZABETH STEWART sworn. - I live at No. 4, Edward's court, Oxendon-street : The prisoner came to our house on Friday week, the 24th of May, between two and three; I take in a little washing ; she sat down at the end of the table where the gentleman's linen was folded up; the property was there when she sat down, and after she was gone I missed it.

Q. Had any body else been in? - A. Yes, a smith came in; I wanted a key for the box; he never sat down.

Q. Did you ever find the shirt? - A. Yes, I went to Bow-street and got an officer, and took her into custody the next morning.

WILLIAM PURNEY sworn. - I am a pawnbroker's apprentice; I live with Mr. Lamb, No. 48, Stanhope-street, Clare-market: I produce a shirt, the prisoner pledged it on the 24th of May in the evening; I lent her 1 s. 6 d. on it. (The shirt identified by the prosecutrix.)

Prisoner's defence. I went into the prosecutrix's house for some money which she owed me for a year and a half; I have been from time to time after it, and could not get it; I could not get the money from her, and I was drove to it, through necessity of taking the shirt.

Prosecutrix. It is about five weeks ago she called at my house with a pair of corsets; I was to give her 7 s. for them, and I gave her 5 s. of the money: that is not a year and a half ago.

GUILTY , aged 56.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

426. CHARLES PORTER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of May , four pigs, value 7 l. the property of William Harris , the elder, and William Harris , the younger.

WILLIAM HARRIS , sen. sworn. - I live at No. 32, Gee-street, Goswell-street; I work at the West-India docks ; William Harris is my son, he is about nineteen, I am in partnership with him with the pigs: On the 19th of May, Sunday night, between eight and nine o'clock, I locked the place up where I kept the pigs with a padlock; Monday morning I returned about a quarter before six, and I found the padlock unlocked, and locked upon the staple with the hasp off; I missed these four pigs.

Q. What size pigs are they? - A. I considered the two biggest to be about twelve stone a piece, my others were smaller store pigs.

WILLIAM HARRIS , jun. sworn. - The prisoner came to me on Monday morning, May the 20th, a quarter before nine, he asked me whether I had lost four pigs: he said he knew where they were, he said, if you will go with me I will take you to the place where they are; he took me to one Harrison's, in Bowling-green lane, Clerkenwell; I asked Harrison if he had four pigs, that he took in this morning; he said, yes; I told him where I lived, and described the pigs to him; he said he would make enquiry, and if I came at six o'clock at night, I should have the pigs; I went at six o'clock at night, and asked Harrison to let me have the pigs; he would not, nor would he let me see them; we went up to Hatton-garden to get a search warrant, and while we were there they brought the prisoner to the office.

Prisoner. I had these pigs in my charge in the morning; I gave information all over the parish, and I applied to a drover in Smithfield, to know whose pigs they were; I was in Smithfield, serving my milk, when I met Mr. Harris, jun. I told him, and he said he was very glad I had told him; I took him to my house, and told him I lived there, in case I should be wanted at any future time; I said I would meet him at six o'clock at Harrison's; I went there two minutes before six, and they took me into custody.

ROBERT HARRISON sworn. - I am a carmanand milkman, I live at No. 18, Bowling-green-lane, Clerkenwell: On the 20th of May, about half past four o'clock in the morning, I saw four pigs in Bowling-green-lane, and my being in the neighbourhood, I thought they were no persons property in the neighbourhood; I went out to see if there was any body with them, and I saw the prisoner at the bar looking about him, he was with them; I saw him drive them to his own sister's door in Wood's-close; after that I saw Steele, the watchman, and I told him I suspected these pigs to be stolen; Mr. Steele asked him whether he was waiting for any body; he said he was waiting for somebody to come and take the pigs from him; Steele said to me, what do you think of the business, I think they are stolen, and if you have not much to do this morning I would have you watch him; accordingly I did; he then went down Corporation-row, across St. John-street, into Wilderness-row, with the pigs; he lodged them there a full hour; I saw him go from there to King-street, Goswell-street, with them; there was another person joined in with him.

Q. How did they find the way to your house? - A. They were brought there; I suspected he was going to Kentish-town with them; accordingly I immediately ordered them in there, when they were in Wood's-close.

Q. You took possession of the pigs, and took them into your house? - A. Yes, into my yard.

- FIDO sworn. - I live in Turnmill-street: On Monday, the 20th of May, Mr. Harrison was coming down the Green; he told me that he had been watching two men that had some pigs that he suspected were stolen; he asked me to watch them, as they had seen him; I followed them.

Q. Who was driving these pigs? - A. The prisoner at the bar and another man; the other man absconded soon after; I saw him driving them from Wood's-close to Spa-fields turnpike; I assisted Harrison in driving them in at his gate, and saw him shut them in.

JOSEPH FISHER sworn. - I am a publican: On the 20th of May, Mr. Harrison came into my house, between five and six o'clock in the morning, and informed me that there were two men with some pigs; I went with him to the back of my house, and saw two men with four pigs.

Q. Was the prisoner one of them? - A. Yes; then I returned into my house; a little time after that I went back again, with an excuse of fastening my shutters; I saw the prisoner and the other man at some distance, and in about a quarter of an hour I saw the prisoner driving them out of Steward-street; I am sure the prisoner is one of them.

Q. Who the other man was, you do not know? - A. I do not.

JOHN STEELE sworn. - I am a watchman: On the 20th of May, in the morning, I was going home, I met with Harrison.

Q. Did you see who was driving the pigs? - A. Yes, the prisoner at the bar; I went up to him, he stood quite still, and by and by he left the pigs; I followed him, and drove the pigs before me; I then saw Porter standing at the bottom of the lane; I asked him if he waited for somebody; he said, yes, he expected to meet a person in Bowling-green-lane.

Q. Why did not you take him into custody? - A. I did not know that he had stole the pigs; I did suspect it as well as Harrison; I was going off my beat.

JOHN RAYMOND sworn. - On Monday evening, this day fortnight, I took the prisoner into custody; I had a strong suspicion that the pigs had been stolen. (The pigs identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. I met a man in Bowling-green-lane with these pigs about a quarter before five; I asked him if he was going to Smithfield with them; his reply was, if you will stop them a little, I will thank you; he never came back again to me after I had stopped with them; I made every inquiry whether any man had lost those pigs; Harrison took them from me about a quarter before seven in the morning, I left them in an open place, and I went into Old-street to inquire if any body had lost any pigs; I have found out a man who saw me a quarter before six.

Court. You had been a long while with these pigs.

FRANCIS BIRD sworn. - I work for Mr. Davis, a distiller, in Old-street: About ten minutes before six o'clock the prisoner came to me, and asked me whether I knew any body who had lost some pigs; he asked me what I thought he could do with them; I said I could not tell.

Q.(To Harrison.) How long had they been lodged in your house? - A. About half after six o'clock.

HENRY BOUCHER sworn. - I work for Mr. Davis, in Old-street; I was standing in Old-street; this man addressed himself to me, and said a countryman had left him in charge with four pigs; he had waited for him a considerable time, he came down Old-street, and went down Whitecross-street; he returned back to me again, and asked me what he had best to do with them; I recommended him to take them to the Green-yard.

Court. Q. They were not strayed pigs? - A. He asked me and Bird to help him drive them there; we told him we could not, because we expected to be let into the distillery to our work.

WILLIAM SPICER sworn. - I am headborough of the parish of St. Luke's: On Monday, the 20th of May, the prisoner at the bar, and William Harris the younger, called on me at nine o'clock in the morning; I went with them to where theprisoner said the four pigs were; Mr. Harris described the pigs to Mr. Harrison, and he said, you shall neither see the pigs, nor have them, for he had taken a great deal of trouble, and he had been even to the expence of having them cryed.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 38.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

427. MARY DUFF was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of May , eight handkerchiefs, value 30 s. the property of John Brookes .

WILLIAM RUTTER sworn. - I am shopman to Mr. Brookes, a linen-draper , Great Russell-street ; I know nothing of the fact; a man detected her and brought her into the shop.

- sworn. - I am an officer of Marlborough-street: About five o'clock in the afternoon, I was going up Great Russell-street, and saw the prisoner at the bar take these handkerchiefs from the hook at the door, she was in company with another woman; I pursued them, and took the prisoner, the other made off; I produce them.

(The handkerchiefs identified by Rutter.)

Prisoner's defence. I picked them up at the door; they laid in a small bundle; I did not know what it was.

GUILTY , aged 17.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

428. WILLIAM CARTER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of May , two pair of boot-legs, value 7 s. the property of William Hawkes .

WILLIAM HAWKES sworn. - I am a bootmaker by trade, but now keep a public-house ; I have been a long time in the habit of losing my property; the prisoner was a ready furnished lodger in my house; the boot-legs were in a room where I slept, and where I cut out boots; I searched the room with a constable, and I found the bootlegs in a drawer in his room.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. When did you search his room? - A. On the 16th of May last, I found these boot-legs in his room, which I knew to be mine; the prisoner is a boot and shoemaker; I bought these boot-legs two years ago; I can swear to the legs in every respect, I know them to be mine.

RICHARD POUNDS sworn. - I know very well selling these legs to Mr. Hawkes; there is my hand-writing on the legs.

Prisoner's defence. I bought eight pair of legs about fifteen months ago of Mr. Bradshaw, of Woolwich; I worked up six pair, and they are the other two; he is at Portsmouth now, he has been in various circumstances since he left Woolwich.

GUILTY , aged 32.

Confined one year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

429. DAVID GRIFFITHS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of April , twenty yards of printed cloth, value 30 s. the property of Edward Haslewood .

THOMAS THOMAS sworn. - I am shopman to Mr. Haslewood, linen-draper , Holborn ; from information I received from a next door neighbour, I pursued the prisoner, and took him; I saw the print under his coat; I brought him into the shop.

Q. It was hanging outside of the shop? - A. Part outside, and part inside.

JOSEPH HART sworn. - I saw him take it about half past seven in the evening, on the 30th of April; he wrapped it up, and put it under his coat; I informed Mr. Thomas of it.

DAVID SPRIG sworn. - I am beadle and watch-house keeper to the parish of St. Andrew: On the 30th of April, about half past seven in the evening, I was walking up Holborn, and saw a crowd at Mr. Haslewood's; I went to see what was the matter; the prisoner was in the shop; he had stole this piece of linen, which I produce; I took him into custody.

Prisoner's defence. I had been out of work a long time; I have done it form distress.

GUILTY , aged 43.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

430. DAVID COTTERILL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of May , thirty-nine pounds weight of lead pipe, with a ballcock, value 15 s. the property of John Stork , fixed to his dwelling-house .

JOHN STORK sworn. - I live at No. 30, Collenade, Great Russell-square , I am a housekeeper : On Saturday morning, the 18th of May last, about nine o'clock, the pipe was missing from the wall fixed to the dwelling-house, it is called the feeding-pipe, it goes from the main to the water-butt; the prisoner is a lodger in my house; I was fetched to go to him at St. Giles's watch-house to speak to him about some particular business; I did not know what at that time, it was about eight o'clock in the morning; he told me that he was brought there in the evening, on suspicion of stealing some lead pipe; I went down to Bow-street at eleven o'clock; then I saw this pipe; I compared the ball-cock with the piece that is on the pipe, and it perfectly matched.

Q. Is that part of your pipe? - A. It is, this isabout fifteen feet altogether; I have matched it to the part that went up against the wall.

WILLIAM BLACKMAN sworn. - I am an officer of Bow-street: On Friday, the 17th of May, between nine and ten o'clock at night, I and Christopher Jones saw the prisoner at the bar going along Drury-lane with this pipe towards Broad-street, he had the pipe under his coat; we had suspicion that he had got stolen property.

Q. What is he? - A. He is a bricklayer's labourer; we followed him from Drury-lane to the bottom of Short's-gardens; he turned in there, and under the gateway I saw him look round at us; I suspected him knowing us, and that he would leave the lead and run away; I ran up to him, and Christopher Jones and I laid hold of him, and took the pipe from under his coat; I asked him what he had got there; he said what was that to me; I said we are officers; he said it was his own; we took him into custody on suspicion; he sent for his landlord, and it proved to be his property.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You do not live in the house; I do not now, I did at the time; when I came down in the morning I found the kitchen full of water; I slept there on the 17th.

Prisoner's defence. He had not slept there for three nights before this.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 33.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

431. WILLIAM HITCHIN was indicted for feloniously forging and counterfeiting an acceptance of a bill of exchange, for the payment of one thousand pounds, with intention to defraud the Duke of Leinster, of Ireland , deceased .

Second Count. For like offence, and with like intention, he knowing it to be forged.

Third and Fourth Counts, For like offence, only varying the manner of charging.

Fifth Count. For uttering and publishing as true a like acceptance of a bill of a thousand pounds, on the 19th of April, instead of the 19th of September, with intention to defraud Henry Fitzgerald , Esquire , John Joseph Henley , Esquire , and Joseph Sargeant .

Sixth Count, For like offence, only charging it to defraud Joseph Sargeant .

(The indictment was read by Mr. Gleed, and the case was stated by Mr. Raine.)

JOSEPH SARGEANT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. I believe you are a watch maker , residing in Jermyn-street, St. James's - A. I am; the prisoner at the bar called at my house prior to the 19th of April, and shewed me a bill drawn on the Duke of Leinster, for a thousand pounds.

Q. Did he leave the bill with you then? - A. No, he did not; I told him that was not the bill that he shewed me before; he had shewed me one before for a thousand pounds, when I let him out of jail, I had it in my hand.

Q. When he came on the 19th of April he shewed you another, what was that first bill? - A. It was nearly the same sort of a bill; it was three days over due, when he shewed it me in January, and that he shewed me in April was due in July to come; he told me that the bill he shewed me in January was paid; I told him I would endeavour to get the bill discounted, on condition that he would take some goods; he said he had no objection.

Q. That was the bill coming due next July? - A. Yes, he told me that he had lent the Duke of Leinster four thousand pounds in cash, and he had four of these bills; he asked me when he should call again; I told him he might call in two or three days; he called at that time and I told him my friend was not in town, he must call again in two or three days more; he called in two or three days more; I told him that I had asked my friend concerning it, and it was such a heavy bill he would not discount it; he then said he had seen a person of the name of West in great distress, and had given him half a guinea, he had formerly told me that that man had nearly ruined him by drawing bills on each other. On the 19th of April he tendered me the bill; prior to that I had sent him word, that if the bill was a just bill, I would try and get it discounted.

Q. Was any agreement made between you, upon what terms the bill should be discounted? - A. Two hundred pounds worth of goods, and five hundred pounds money; I told him I was afraid I should not be able to procure so much money; he said four hundred pounds money and two hundred pounds goods and the remaining four hundred pounds should be settled by two or three bills, payable at three or four month's date.

Q. Did you desire to have the bill for any purpose? - A. I said, sir, I am going to take this bill of a thousand pounds; I should like to let a friend of mine have it, to know if the signature was right: I asked him to go with me to a friend of mine, who knew the hand-writing; he said, no, he would go and get a pint of ale, while I went to enquire about the signature of the bill.

Q. He left the bill with you for that purpose? - A. He did; I went to Mr. Ogleby, and, in consequence of what Mr. Ogleby said, I went to Lord Henry Fitzgerald , and there I saw the Duke's daughter; I believe she is about eighteen years old; she said that was never her father's writing; after that I went to the Police office and saw Mr. Conant; in about ten minutes I saw the prisonerbrought into the office; I remained there till he came; I produce the bill, it has been in my keeping ever since.

Q. In the month of January did you know him to be in confinement? - A. Yes, I was a creditor to a bill of thirty pounds, he paid me.

Q. Was he set at liberty on paying you your whole demand? - A. Partly; I took ten pounds, and the custody was about four pounds.

Q. You had entered an action upon him? - A. A detainer was lodged, while he was in the Fleet.

Cross-examined by Mr. Const. Q. Was that a debt of his own, payable by him, or any body else? - A. A bill of his acceptance.

Q. In January he was let out of the Fleet; this bill was presented to you after that; you knew his situation? - A. Yes.

Q. Then when the bill was presented, you went into a negociation, after you knew that? - A. I did.

Q. And it terminated that your friend declined, therefore you gave it up? - A. I did.

Q. You say you afterwards sent to him, not he to you? - A. I did, I believe it might be two or three weeks afterwards; I sent to him that I thought I had a friend; I had a channel that I could get it discounted; I was going to take part gold and part money of the refiners; I am in the habit of doing it, when people will take goods out of the shop, and sometimes I deal with a Jew broker for the money; there are different channels to persons who do not keep a banker; I had the mode of doing it, and sent for him for that purpose, allowing the bill to be just; I had another reason, as well as the reason assigned; I am parish constable, and I spoke of the transaction to Mr. Conant, the Magistrate; Mr. Conant told me there was something of forged paper belonging to the Duke of Leinster, and he wished me to get it, to send to the relations of the Duke.

Q. Whether having been informed that particularly from him, whether that was not the reason, and the only reason, that you sent to him to get the bill? - A. No, it was not; my reasons were more than one; and if the bill was just the man should have the money, he should have the bill discounted; if not, as I was a parish constable, the man might be apprehended.

Q. Have you been under any embarrassments yourself? - A. I have been here, as many an innocent honest man before, about thirteen years ago; a poor man came to me one morning, a tailor, who made my clothes, and said he had taken an old gold watch of a foreigner; I was a journeyman then, and he wished to make money of part of it; I told him the best mode would be to sell the case, and have a metal case for himself.

Q. The man from whom you had the watch was indicted-were you? - A. I went voluntarily.

Q. Were not you sent to prison? - A. I certainly was sent to prison.

Q. And certainly indicted, and certainly tried at the bar? -

- CLEATHEROW sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gleed. Q. You live with the last witness? - A. I do, as a shopman and workman.

Q. Do you know the person of the prisoner at the bar? - A. I do.

Q. On the 19th of April, do you recollect his coming to Mr. Sargeant's house? - A. I do, about ten o'clock, and there was some conversation about a bill; the prisoner brought the bill, for Mr. Sargeant to discount it for him; the prisoner produced the bill; Mr. Sargeant said he would wish to go to Mr. Ogleby, to see whether the bill was right or not; Mr. Sargeant said he would go to a friend and asked the prisoner if he chose to go with him: he refused it, and said he had walked a good way that morning. that he had come from Hampstead or Highgate, and was very dry; Mr. Sargeant told him, if he did not chuse to go with him, he would find a house in the street that sold good ale; Mr. Sargeant went, and the prisoner said he could drink a pint of ale, he would go and have it while Mr. Sargeant was out; he went out. The prisoner returned first, and Mr. Sargeant returned afterwards; Mr. Sargeant said he was not fully satisfied, he would go to another friend; Mr. Sargeant left the house a second time.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. How long did the prisoner stay after Mr. Sargeant went out the second time? - A. Till the officer fetched him; about a quarter of an hour.

Q. He had an opportunity, if he chose, to have gone away; there was nobody to hold him? - A.Exactly so.

JOHN NORRIS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You are an upholsterer, residing in Mortimer-street - Do you remember seeing the prisoner at your house, on or about the 12th of April? - A. Yes, as near as I can recollect, it was about the 14th; he came to purchase some fine timber that I had to dispose of.

Q. When did you first see him? - A. On the 4th of April; he did not call on me, I saw him at Garraway's.

Q. At that time how did he propose to pay you? - A. By two bills, drawn on the Duke of Leinster, of a thousand pounds each; I saw him at Garraway's; I only saw the bills there; I did not wish to take any responsibility upon myself; I referred to Mr. Major for the bill.

Q. Did he ever tell you how he came by that bill? - A. He did; I was afraid it came from a money broker; he said it was for goods sold to the Duke of Leinster, that they were delivered to Patrick Fitzgerald , Duke-street, Dublin; I think he said this on the 6th of April; when he shewed methe bills, he said that there were four bills drawn originally, and that two of them were paid; each of them was to the amount of a thousand pounds.

CHARLES TREBECK sworn. - Examined by Mr. Raine. Q. I believe you are solicitor to the executors of the late Duke of Leinster? - A. I am.

Q. Is this the probate? - A. This is the probate which I saw in Ireland, by which it appears that Lord Henry Fitzgerald and Lord Robert Fitzgerald are executors to his late Grace.

Q. Who are those executors in point of fact? - A. Lord Robert Fitzgerald , Lord Henry Fitzgerald , and John Joseph Henley .

Q. Lord Robert does not act? - A. My Lord Robert is at Lisbon, and has never proved the will.

Q. Who has proved to the will? - A. Lord Henry and John- Joseph Henley .

Court. Q. He is in charge for Lord Henry? - A. Yes.

Q. Mr. Trebeck, I believe you returned from Ireland in the beginning of February? - A. I returned from Ireland about the beginning of February.

Q. Do you remember making an appointment for the prisoner at the bar to come to your house? - A. I wrote twice to the prisoner, I think it was to his house, to appoint a meeting for him to produce the bills, in order to substantiate the bills, at my house.

Q. Do you remember in point of fact the prisoner at the bar, and his attorney, Mr. Hurd, attending at your house, on the 23d of February? - A. Yes; a bill was produced by Mr. Hitchin, stating to become due on the 16th of February; it was over due then; I compared it with a letter to Lord Henry Fitzgerald ; I produced the letter then, and compared it in Hitchin's presence; the copy of the bill in the letter corresponded with the bill; I have got that letter about me; I asked him about that bill particularly; he having spoken to Mr. Hurd, he rather declined entering into the particulars of the other bills, which were not become due, (the bill read in Court.) I told him, before I could consider it a proper claim, it was necessary that he should give me the particulars of the consideration given for the bill; - he stated that he was entirely ignorant as to the purpose for which the money was borrowed; he said that 2000 l. were paid to the Duke on the day of the date of the bills, at the York coffee-house, in St. James's-street, in the presence of Davenport Sedley, and others, in bank-notes of two thousand pounds; he did not say who the other persons were, and he declined saying any thing about the bills but that over due; this was on February, the others were not due.

Court. Q. In point of fact you declined paying the first bill? - A. Yes.

Q.Did you give any hopes of paying the other bills? - A. None; I then gave positive answer at that time, and refused paying that bill till further satisfactory proof was given.

Mr. Raine. Q In point of fact have any one of these bills been paid by the executors? - A.Not to my knowledge.

Q. You must have known it? - A. I think I should.

Court. Q. You transact business for them? - A. I do.

GENERAL OGLEBY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gleed. Q. Give me leave, sir, to ask you where you live? - A. At Grosvenor-place in town, and at Wimbledon in the country.

Mr. Const. Q. I do not know, sir, whether you are interested in the personal estate? - A. Not in the personal estate; in the real estate, by my wife's jointure, to the amount of three thousand a year.

Q. Whether you are interested contingently? - A. It is precisely so, upon the charge of the land; no other way.

Mr. Gleed. Q. You married the Dutchess Dowager of Leinster, whose jointure is paid out of this estate; you were of course acquainted with the late Duke of Leinster? - A. Yes, intimately; he was at my house the day before he left London.

Q. Are you acquainted with his hand-writing? - A. Yes.

Q. Will you be so obliging as to look at that bill (witness looking at the bill) Do you believe the signature, Leinster, to be the signature of the late Duke of Leinster? - A. I really think it is not the Duke's hand-writing.

Mr. Const Q. Are you acquainted with the Dukes's hand-writing, so as to say you have no doubt of it? - A. I cannot say that I have; yet, I could not say that it is impossible that the Duke of Leinster wrote that, because a man may not write like himself at all times - In my own opinion it has not been written by him, I have reasons for thinking so.

Mr. Const. Q. Look at that, that is the Duke's writing? - A. Certainly (a letter shewn the witness.)

Q. That is prior to this? - A. If I were to go into the difference, I could point them out, if you desire it; if you press me I will; the Duke of Leinster, whenever he wrote a letter, he never drew a line under that signature; when he wrote a a frank, he did; I have every reason to believe that this is not his hand-writing; the two last letters of his name were generally written in a looser character, and rather sloping, and never finished.

GENERAL ORMSBY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Raine. Q. Do you remember, in consequence of an application being made to you, going to Tindal-place? - A. I went to Tindal-place, Islington.

Q.What sort of appearance did that house exhibit? - A. The house is in a crescent, a short row;I think it is No. 16; when Mr. Hitchin's letter was sent to me by Lord Henry Fitzgerald , I thought it as well to go to the house of the prisoner, as well as to do any thing else; and having Mr. Hitchin's letter to Lord Henry Fitzgerald , and knowing the number of the house, I dismounted and knocked at the door; there came out a woman; I asked if that was Mr. Hitchen's dwelling.

Q. Be so good as to look at that letter, and see whether that is the letter by which you went to the house? - A. This is the letter which instructed me where to go. I thought it was 16, it is 13.

Q. What sort of appearance had the house? - A. The woman opened the door, and I asked her if she belonged to him; she said, I am his wife, will you walk in; I said by all means; she shewed me into a little room at the right hand, there I saw four girls, working at the needle; when I got into the room, I asked the woman for Mr. Hitchin; she said he was not at home; from the general appearance of the house it did not appear to be inhabited by any body of wealth; it was a little house; I have had the pleasure of being intimate with the Duke of Leinster from the year 1774; I was very intimate with him till the time he left Dublin; he was a particular friend of mine indeed; I left Ireland the beginning of last November; I had many conversations with him after he returned to Ireland: he died in October. He told me in Ireland that he rated his living; he confined himself to six thousand a year, and of late years his habits of living were much more moderate than they had been.

Q. Are you so familiarly acquainted with his hand-writing? - A. I do know as much about his hand-writing as I do about my own; I cannot know my own better than I do his; I was in the habit of corresponding with him; I have seen him write very often.

Q. Look at Leinster on that bill - Having looked at it carefully, is it your opinion that it is the Dukes's hand-writing; I do verily believe that it is not the hand-writing of the Duke; I cannot swear that it is not, but I verily believe, upon my oath, that it is not the hand-writing of the Duke; the prisoner at the bar shewed me another bill.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. The letter which you looked at referred you to the house at Islington? - A. Yes, it was nearly the centre house of the Crescent.

Q. Did you write him any note? - A. I was going to relate - I asked her when she thought he would be at home; I said, madam, give me a pen and ink; I wrote a note, and, in consequence of that note, the prisoner called on me the next day; I then said to him, sir, will you let me look at the bill; he took his pocket-book out and shewed me a bill, and when I saw it, I said, sir, this comes in a questionable shape; my thought was about the signature.

Court Q. Did you say they were forged? - A. No, I said they were in a questionable shape. Upon that General Ross came in, and mixed with the party; this was at St. James's hotel; I believe this was in January last, when General Ross came in, I said, General Ross, this is the gentleman who says he has a demand upon the Duke of Leinster; I had a long conversation with the prisoner before General Ross came in; I said to him, I do think it right to communicate to you the conversation that I have had with this gentleman previous to your coming in; I then repeated the conversation, as my memory served me; then the prisoner began to talk to Sir Charles Ross , and in his conversation he appeared to be rather confused; in a little time after the prisoner left the room; before he left the room he said, sir, I will call upon you to-morrow, about this hour; he did call upon me the next morning, and he began charging me with severe language; he charged me with saying it was a fraud; why, said I, Mr. Hitchin, I cannot conceive that I said the word fraud; sir, said he, you did, you told me that it came in a questionable shape, and that it was a fraud; I said, upon my word, Mr. Hitchin, as well as my memory serves me, I do not think that I made use of that word; he said, sir, you did, and you embarrassed me that I did not know what I said; he still urged, and fixed it on me in so peremptory a manner, that I said, if you will have it so, put the cap on your own head, in the name of God; let it remain so. I said, how came you acquainted with the Duke; why, said he, sir, I never saw him but once, until I lent him the money; I was walking in the street, with a gentleman of the name of Sedley, and said he, he spoke to Sedley; I said, who is that; Sedley said, that is the Duke of Leinster whom I want you to lend four thousand pounds; I said, where did you lend him this money; we met at the York coffee-house, in St. James's-street; there Sedley and I went, and there I lent him the money. I said, it is a most extraordinary thing that could be advanced; not a third person mentioned in the bill to pay to the drawer a thousand pounds; if there was a third person, it would be a greater proof of its being a substantial bill; I said, it is a thing that astonishes me; I think he said he had drawn many bills of the same kind for large sums of money, and that it was the best way.

Q. Did he at any time state what he had given to the Duke, by way of consideration for these bills? - A. I do not know any further than he paid him the money at the coffee-house all at one time.

CHARLES CARR sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You are clerk to Messrs. Hammersley's house, in Pall-Mall? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you know the Duke of Leinster? - A. I did.

Q. Was Messrs. Hammersley's his house for business? - A. It was his banking-house.

Q. Have you ever seen his Grace write? - A. I have.

Q. Have you been in the habit of paying his checks? - A. I have, constantly.

Q. Have the goodness to look at that bill - at the word, Leinster - Do you or do you not believe that to be his hand writing? - A. It is a different character; I should hesitate in taking of it, if it did not come through respectable hands; I cannot say whether it is his hand writing or not; it is different from what I have known; I should have doubted it very much; if a draft had been presented to me so signed, I certainly should have very much doubted it.

Court. Q. If a draft had been presented to you, so signed, should you have paid it? - A. I certainly should not.

Q. How long have you lived with Messrs. Hammersley's? - A. Ten years; from that time I have paid his drafts very frequently; all the money he expended in London was drawn from our house, whenever he came to town.

Q. In all the drafts which he drew, did he ever put a dash under the name? - A. Never under drafts.

WILLIAM- ERASMUS HARDY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gleed. Q. What are you? - A. I am clerk to Mr. Newman, the keeper of Newgate.

Q. What book is that that you have? - A. It is the debtor's book.

Q. Do you know the person of the prisoner? - A. I do.

Q. Have you any account in that book, when he came into prison? - A. Yes, from this book it appears, that he came into Newgate on the 23d of July, 1804, and on the 25th of Sept. following he was removed by Habeas Corpus to the Fleet; there were several debts against him to the amount of six hundred and odd pounds. (The bill read in Court.)

London, July 13th, 1804.

1000.

Twelve months after date, pay to order of the drawer, one thousand pounds, for value received. W. Hitchin to the Duke of Leinster. Thomas's hotel, Berkley-square.

Accepted, Leinster.

Prisoner's defence. In 1797, I commenced the corn and cheese trade, near Namptwich, in Cheshire. I imported a great quantity of corn from America and Holland, and various other places. I was very fortunate for a considerable time, and was at last worth seven thousand pounds, when all of a sudden it happened I had the loss of a vessel from Boston, laden with goods, shipped by Wainwright and Co. by which I lost three thousand pounds; I got account of the loss of the ship Sally, before I got an account of her lading, to get her insured by the underwriters; a short time after I heard of the loss of another vessel from London; she took fire at Ramsgate; by her I lost one thousand pounds; then I had the Friendship, bound to - , which was taken by the French, by her I lost two thousand six hundred pounds. In January, 1801, this made it necessary for me to stop, and I was made a bankrupt; in May, 1801, I delivered up in money and goods, to my assignees, sixteeen shillings in the pound; the assignees and creditors that were then present signed my certificate, and told me, if the remainder of the creditors living abroad did sign my certificate, they assured me then there was no doubt but that the other creditors would all sign, I then should not be molested, or put about by any thing that might come against me; I went down to Liverpool, a distance of thirty-six miles from my assignees, in the July following, immediately after finishing my last examination, and with reliance on their saying they would not hurt me, I commenced the corn and cheese trade again; I then dealt very largely, and shipped goods to Ireland, and reshipped corn to Liverpool; I was then successful and very well respected, and could have had credit to a great amount; at last I had a malicious person, who told my new creditors that I was a bankrupt, and that my former assignees would make me pay twenty shillings in the pound, and that the new creditors would not have a shilling in the pound; in consequence of that my new creditors fell upon me at once; most of my property was in Ireland; some at Waterford and some in Dublin; this was in the year 1802; at that time I owed five thousand one hundred and eighty-six pounds; some of my creditors, who did not know that I had been a bankrupt before, struck a new commission out against me; I was going to Ireland, in order to settle my debts for my new creditors, as I called them. On my returning from Ireland, immediately on finding myself a bankrupt, I came up to London, in the year 1802, and employed Mr. Hurd. When the second commission was superseded I applied to my creditors for a letter of licence, in order to satisfy my new creditors; after some time my creditors granted me a letter of licence for six months, in order that I might get this property; at the expiration of the six months I collected four thousand three hundred and sixty pounds fifteen shillings; during the time I was collecting this property my assignees were doing all in their power to get this property. In March, 1805, I got my certificate signed by a sufficient number of creditors, and during the time I was endeavouring to get my certificate signed, I did not wish to be squandering the four thousand three hundred and fifty pounds. I wished to keep it, in order to satisfy my new creditors when I got my certificate.

Court. Q. If I understand you right, you wanted to employ this money so as to have something to live on? - A. Yes, if I could do it without the knowledge of the assignees, I living in London; in consequence of that, at the time of the great loss of the West-India fleet, which you all must know was in April 1804, I thought it very possible to get five or six hundred pounds by purchasing a ship for that trade; I went down to Hull in May 1804, and ordered Messrs. Callendart to look out a ship, and let me know the price; they did look out one, which was the Thomas and Sally, the property of one Gledow (I have got the letter in Court,) I ordered him to buy her for four thousand three hundred and fifty pounds, the price that was agreed on. The price of vessels taking a rapid advance, made them run off from the bargain; they were to new sheath her, which they declining to do, made about five hundred pounds difference; the bargain broke off intirely. On my coming up to London in the beginning of June, I met with a gentleman of the name of Sedley, who had been introduced to me about half a year before by a gentleman in a coffee-house, whom I am now sorry to hear is a man of a very dishonest character. This Sedley is a gentleman who forces his conversation upon people, and he is in all appearance a gentleman-like man; he has a great deal to say for himself, and very seducing ways with him; we entered into conversation together, and our conversation led to the subject of the purchasing of the ship that I had been making at Hull; he said that he thought I might make more of the money, if I would be led by him, and more secret for myself; he invited me to his house, which made a respectable appearance indeed; he had two daughters elegantly dressed, and several gentlemen in the room. During the conversation he expressed himself to be acquainted with almost every great person in the kingdom - that he was acquainted with the Duke of Wexford, and the Duke of Leinster; he also shewed me letters from a number of them; he told me that the Duke of Wexford had applied to him for the loan of five thousand pounds; I told him if he was a good personal security, I should have no objection; I went with Sedley, according to appointment, to the hotel, the right hand going up St. James's-street; his Grace was then engaged in business we were informed, by whom he was sure to get supplied. When we came out of the hotel, Sedley and I stood at the door a few minutes, and a gentleman passed by, whom Sedley immediately saluted; he said to me, that is the Duke of Leinster, and if he is now wanting of money, we cannot possibly have a better security under heaven; he said, shall I ask him; I replied I had no objection, and he followed him immediately. The Duke, I, and Sedley, appointed to meet on the Monday following, on the 9th of July, at the York coffee-house in that street; on Monday, the 9th of July, previous to our meeting the Duke at the York coffee-house, Sedley called upon me at my lodgings in Mansell-street, Goodman's-fields; he said he came to know if I had made any inquiry respecting the Duke, and whether I would advance the money to the Duke; I told him I had made my inquiries, and that I would advance the Duke two or three thousand pounds. Soon after we arrived at the York coffee-house, at two o'clock, the Duke made his appearance at the York coffee-house, and after some conversation I agreed to lend the Duke four thousand pounds at six, eight, ten, and twelve months date; I desired Sedley to walk out of the room, in order that I might know what I was to have for the loan of four thousand pounds; the Duke agreed to give me five thousand pounds for the loan of it; I drew the four bills in question, and the Duke accepted them in the presence of this Sedley. Sedley having returned to me, I drew the four bills in the presence of this Sedley, and paid two thousand pounds, and the Duke directed me to call at Mrs. Howard's on the 13th; I was not prepared; I wrote a note, desiring his Grace to meet me at my house in two or three days, in order that he might receive the balance; his Grace was punctual to that appointment, and received the remainder, one thousand five hundred pounds, at my lodgings in Goodman's-field. Previous to my lending the Duke the four thousand pounds, Sedley assured me, that if I wanted money, he would get a gentleman or two, or a thousand, that would discount a bill at any time; he never did; in consequence of which we quarrelled very frequently, for I not only parted with all the money I had to the Duke, but troubled my friends to get the money discounted at what we call common interest. By Sedley disappointing me, I got arrested, and in a very short space there were eight hundred pounds against me; there were two writs against me besides, which you have heard in Court, that the officer took my word for, besides all the other actions. I had got these bills, and no person would discount them for me, and my friends whom I have here would not bail me; I owed better than five thousand pounds; all this while I had never satisfied my new creditors; my friends said it was no use to bail me, my other creditors might do the same, and I might be in prison all my life-time for my new debts; at the same time I had no doubt; I rested fully assured it was the Duke of Leinster who had accepted these bills, and I was convinced in my own mind that these bills would be paid when they became due; thus I buoyed myself up in the best manner I could. In this distressed situation I was cast into Newgate; I remainedthere till the 11th of January, when Sedley called upon me very frequently, and promised that he would get these bills discounted for me, which, on the contrary, he never did. When I was in the Fleet, finding by the London papers that his Grace was dead, and that he died in Ireland on the 20th of October, I wrote to Mr. Berrisford, the banker, in Dublin, and informed him that I had four bills of exchange, for which I had accommodated the late Duke of Leinster with money for them; they replied to my letter, as I was a stranger to them, they would thank me for a reference. On the 16th of January, I presented the bill at Thomas's hotel, where it was payable; the book-keeper informed me that they had no orders whatever; they informed me that Lord Henry Fitzgerald was in town, and the young Duke, but that Mr. Ogleby was the most likely person to inform me who were the executors; I went to Mr. Ogleby, and he was not at home; there I left a copy of the bill and my address, and desired Mr. Ogleby to drop me a line who were the executors. I then called on Mr. Sargeant, in Jermyn-street; I shewed him the bill, and asked him if he knew of a notary who lived in that neighbourhood; he did tell me of one, but I did not go; Mr. Sargeant informed me that he worked for some of the family. On the next morning I received a letter from Mr. Ogleby's servant, saying that Lord Henry was either executor or guardian to the young Duke; I called several times on Lord Henry Fitzgerald at Miller's hotel, Jermyn-street, before I could have an interview with his Lordship. At length I saw him; I gave his Lordship the bill, and told him my business; he desired me to give him the particulars of the bill, as his solicitor was in Ireland on the business; I went home, and wrote a copy of the four bills and the transaction, and left them with the landlord of Miller's hotel. In a few days afterwards I wrote again to his Lordship, and then Lieutenant-general Ormsby called at my house, where I have lived ever since I came up to London, for better than three years.

Q. I understood you to say you lived in Goodman's-fields? - A. Yes, in winter-time, it is too far to go to Islington, and then I live in the City. General Ormsby left a note. I waited on him the next morning, in consequence of his saying it came in a questionable shape, and I being an innocent person, not supposing but it was a regular transaction with me and the Duke, it preyed on my feelings. I called the next morning to know what he meant by that expression, and if he did not say it was a fraud, it was the same thing as a fraud, as I had given a consideration for the bills. I called on my solicitor, Mr. Hurd, and desired him to write to Lord Henry Fitzgerald for the demand, which he did. I wrote to Lord Henry, desiring to know who was the solicitor employed in Ireland; I received a letter, and I waited on Mr. Trebeck, and my solicitor went along with me, as Mr. Trebeck did not wish to ask me any questions alone; he was not at home; the next morning, as I was going, I met Mr. Trebeck, and he informed me that the executors could not pay me till they were better informed; I met Mr. Trebeck in March, I think it was in Oxford-street. I desired my solicitor, on the very day I met Mr. Trebeck, to take out a writ to recover this money, and told him that I had a very able body of people to contend with, as I was informed by General Ormsby that he meant to file a bill against me to prove the hand-writing; I had entered my action in the Court of Common Pleas, on the 13th of March; I desired Mr. Hurd to retain three Counsel - one in the Common Pleas, one in the Chancery, and one in the Exchequer, being confident that I should have to prove the value given for the bills, and the hand-writing. I left the bill along with a friend of mine at Liverpool; I was offered several times eight hundred and nine hundred pounds for it; I would not take the money, not doubting the validity of the bill; I came up to London, and offered it to Mr. Sargeant; if I could have disposed of it by a trifling loss, I would; he said he should see his friend, and if I would call again, he would inform me. I did call again; he gave me an answer that he had seen his friend, and that his friend could not discount the bill, for cash was very scarce, even for bankers' bills; he went to Sedley after that, to know where I lived; Mr. Sedley wrote a letter to me by Mr. Sargeant's desire, saying that Mr. Sargeant would give eight hundred pounds, and two hundred pounds in goods for the bill. I thought if I could dispose of the bill to keep quiet a few fractious creditors, I would; I went to Mr. Sargeant, and I gave him the bill, I knew he was acquainted with the family; I went to a public-house to get a pint of ale, I had walked a long way that morning; he returned, and took me into a little room; he gave me a glass of liquor of some kind; he said, you had better tell me what is the lowest money you will take; I said I wanted to dispose of this bill to quiet a small number of my refractory creditors; he then said he would give me nine hundred and twenty pounds for the bill, and a five guinea watch for my wife; I was to pay the common interest for the nine hundred and twenty pounds; I waited in the shop till he sent the officer to take me.

DAVENPORT SEDLEY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Const. Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - A. Yes, I have been acquainted with him eighteen months.

Q. You, I believe, transact the business of lending money; you have been in that business? - A. I have.

Q. Do you remember having any intercourse with the prisoner respecting money? - A. I do.

Q. When was it? - A. The earlier part of July; in the earlier part of April, prior to then, I was applied to by the Duke of Leinster to enquire amongst my connection if I could borrow the sum of four thousand pounds; I had not an opportunity of finding out a person who had such a sum of money to lend. A similar application was made to me by the Duke of - . In consequence of that application I went along with him to the hotel, in St. James-street, to propose or offer a sum of money to a nobleman who had applied, that lived in the hotel; on our going together to the hotel, we received word from Lord - that the nobleman had been supplied with what he wanted; in consequence we left the house, and in getting out into the street we stopped some little time together to know which way each party was going; I was going over Westminster bridge, and while we were in conversation the Duke of Leinster happened to go by.

Q. What day was this? - A. On the 5th of July; he rather nodded and waved his hand to me, upon which I took my hat off and made a salute; I immediately observed to Mr. Hitchin that as the other nobleman, who wanted on a former occasion, had been supplied, probably the Duke would be glad to have the money; Mr. Hitchin desired me to offer it to him. I went after the Duke and mentioned the matter to him; I immediately returned with him, and in the presence of Mr. Hitchin, I mentioned the matter to the Duke. The Duke observed that he wanted money, and it would be particularly convenient to him to borrow at that time, upon which Mr. Hitchin requested a few days to consider of it, and they fixed upon a meeting four days afterwards, which was to have been at a coffee-house, almost opposite where we stood at that time, the York coffee-house in St. James's-street; we then parted, and at two o'clock, or near that hour, on the ninth of the same month, we again all met, and nobody else with us, as I can recollect, when a conversation ensued between Mr. Hitchin and the Duke; Mr. Hitchin said he had enquired about the Duke's solvency, or words to that effect, and that, as far as four thousand pounds went, he should have no objection to take his Grace's security, in bills of exchange, for he expected to convert them to that use, and that would answer his purpose equal to money, but that then he could not pay the whole amount, but should pay him down two thousand pounds, and in three or four days after he should settle the business with his Grace, in case a negociation should take place; at which moment Mr. Hitchin requested of me to retire for a few moments; I went into another part of the coffee-room while the Duke and Mr. Hitchin were in conversation, and remained till I was called to come forward, at which time Mr. Hitchin pulled out from his pocket-book four different bill-stamps, and began to draw one bill, and as soon as he had written the one thousand with an L before it, the Duke observed to him, as I am to have the balance of this money on the 13th, date your bills on that day, and come to me, I believe, to the best of my recollection, it was No. 7, Portland-road, or Portland-place; it was there he appointed Mr. Hitchin to come, and prior to my quitting the coffee-house, four bills of exchange of one thousand pounds each were drawn by Mr. Hitchin, upon the Duke of Leinster, payable at Thomas's hotel, in Berkley-square, which were dated on the thirteenth of July, to the best of my recollection, at six, eight, ten, and twelve months after date, payable to Hitchin or order, to which four bills I saw the Duke write Leinster, and he handed them over to Mr. Hitchin, upon which he took up some Bank notes that were lying by him: he counted them and turned them over, and said very well, or words to that effect; upon which Mr. Hitchin and I left the room, and went away. That is the whole sequel that I know.

Cross-examined by Mr. Raine.. Q. You have first of all said, you have been in the habit of lending money; your business was in money transactions? - A I used to do so certainly, when I had an opportunity.

Q. How long is it ago since you had the last transaction? - A. I have not for these last seven or nine months.

Q. Probably not, you have been in custody for the greater part of that time; I believe you have been in confinement for about seven months of that time? - A. I have, within that time for debt: I was brought first to Newgate, and from thence to the Fleet.

Q. The prisoner and you were both together in the Fleet? - A. We certainly were; the last money transaction that I had was with a Mr. Haines, about a month or six weeks before I got arrested.

Q. During your money transactions, had you ever occasion to advertise? - A. Never.

Q. Never is actually wrong? - A. Not for these twenty-five years.

Q. Then twenty-five years ago you did? - A. Yes.

Q. What name did you go by? - A. No other name but my own.

Q. You are an Irishman, are not you? - A. I am.

Q. When you were last brought from Ireland you were brought in custody? - A. I was; it was on a fallacious charge; a charge that did not exist.

Q. Pray what may be the means of your subsistence? - A. From a great many sources indeed - One general source is, that I have had an intercoursebetween people who had money to lend, and people of fortune who wanted to borrow money; I have been engaged in mining down in Wales, near Pontipool; that I left off last February was a twelvemonth; I got some money by speculation in Wales; perhaps I got ten or fifteen pounds in a day; sometimes buying a load of coals, and sending them down the canal.

Q. You never knew who the particular man was who advanced the money? - A. I never did; I saw a parcel of Bank notes; some of two hundred pounds, which I understood to be so put into the hands of the Duke by Hitchin, and I saw the Duke of Leinster put into the hands of Hitchin bills to the amount of four thousand pounds; that he did in my presence.

Q. Nobody was by to see this transaction but yourself? - A. No, only us three.

Q. Then if any body had said there were other persons there, that is not true? - A. Certainly not, there were no more at the table; only us three.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex