Old Bailey Proceedings Online (www.oldbaileyonline.org, version 6.0, 01 August 2014), January 1805 (18050109).

Old Bailey Proceedings, 9th January 1805.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the Peace, OYER AND TERMINER. AND GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND ALSO, THE GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, HELD AT Justice-Hall, in the Old-Bailey, On WEDNESDAY, the 9th of JANUARY, 1805, and following Days,

BEING THE SECOND SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF The Right Honourable PETER PERCHARD , LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY RAMSEY AND BLANCHARD.

LONDON:

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED. By Authority of the CORPORATION of the CITY of LONDON, By W. WILSON, St. Peter's-Hill, Little Knight-Rider-Street, Doctors' Commons.

1805.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the Peace, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, &c.

BEFORE the Right Honourable PETER PERCHARD , LORD-MAYOR of the City of LONDON; Sir ARCHIBALD MACDONALD , Knt. Lord Chief Baron of His Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir GILES ROOKE , Knt. One of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir SOULDEN LAWRENCE, Knt. One of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of King's Bench; PAUL LE MESURIER , Esq. Sir JOHN- WILLIAM ANDERSON , Bart. Sir JOHN EAMER , Knt. Aldermen of the said City; JOHN SILVESTER , Esq. Recorder of the said City; JOHN ANSLEY , Esq. and JOSHUA- JONATHAN SMITH , Esq. Aldermen of the said City; and NEWMAN KNOWLYS, Esq. Common-Serjeant of the said City; His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the CITY of LONDON, and Justices of Goal Delivery of NEWGATE, holden for the said City, and County of MIDDLESEX.

London Jury.

William Russell ,

Thomas Mankin ,

William Redpath ,

Robert Birch ,

Richard Savory

William Parsons ,

William Allen ,

Robert Lawson ,

Daniel Skinner

William Kinnersley ,

Thomas Russell ,

Richard Mayhew .

First Middlesex Jury.

John Dalby ,

Francis Perrigal ,

Edward Ball ,

John Fisher ,

Charles Willis ,

Charles Lambert ,

John Hurley ,

Robert Butler ,

Henry Humphreys ,

William Martin ,

Thomas Dighton ,

Samuel Slythe .

Second Middlesex Jury.

George Bernard ,

Joseph Gessner ,

William Pritchard ,

William King ,

George Cheshire ,

Edward Hundley ,

Francis Wynne ,

Thomas Ellis ,

Stephen Pollard ,

Thomas Cooper ,

James Galard ,

William Stevens .

71. MARK HODGSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of December , a Bank-note, value 30 l. another Bank-note, value 2 l. and another Bank-note, value 1 l. the property of Samuel Skinner .

Mr. Alley, Counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

72. WILLIAM HENDERSON was indicted for feloniously receiving, on the 17th of November , fifty pounds weight of lead, value 4 s. the property of John Perry , the younger, Philip Perry , John Wells , William Wells , the younger, and George Green ; and also of persons to the Jurors unknown, whereof Edward Kelly , and Andrew Caithness were, at the last Session, convicted of stealing.

It appearing in evidence that the lead was the property of a Mr. Spence, a plumber, and not of Messrs. Perry's of Blackwall, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

73. CHARLES alias CHRISTOPHER COX was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of July , three pounds fourteen ounces of jalap, value 10 s. the property of Valentine Labrow .

VALENTINE LABROW sworn. - I am a druggist , in St. John's-street: The prisoner has been in my employ as a carpenter , about two years, at my house, he was employed as a weekly man; a quantity of jalap was missing on the 18th of July, and a part of it found upon the prisoner.

JOHN THOMAS sworn. - I am shopman to Mr. Labrow: On the 18th of July last, there was a quantity of jalap in the warehouse, the bag had been opened, in which the jalap was in, in the middle of the day; the carpenter usually went away at six o'clock, I went back into the warehouse and saw him coming from the back part of the warehouse, with an intention to go home, when he saw me he went back, having first asked me if Mr. Bailey was gone out, I told him, no; he came into the shop, and I observed his pockets bulky; I told Mr. Ogilvy, and he said you had better go after him; I overtook him about an hundred and fifty yards from the door, when I came up to him, I told him he was wanted; he hesitated a few minutes and came back, when he came back, Mr. Ogilvy said, we have some suspicion you have got some jalap in your pocket; he said, no, I have not; he afterwards said he had got only a small bit for a friend; we then desired him to empty his pockets, and he pulled out three pounds fourteen ounces, it is worth ten shillings; Mr. Labrow not being at home we were at a loss what to do, he begged not to be sent to prison, we kept him till Mr. Labrow came home; he took an opportunity of going into the warehouse, he went up two pair of stairs, out at the sky-light, dropped down upon the tiles, and made his escape, we did not find him again till this day week; an officer came and informed us he had apprehended him.

- OGILVY sworn. - I was present when the last witness searched the prisoner; I know no more than he has stated.

Q.(To Mr. Labrow.) Had you any quantity of jalap in your warehouse? - A. I had.

Prisoner's defence. I picked it up after the things were taken away.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

74. MARY BEE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of December , a cap, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of Edward Lambdin .

SARAH LAMBDIN sworn. - I am the wife of Edward Lambdin , a tailor , in Skinner-street, Bishopsgate-street : On Saturday the 8th of December, I lost a cap, the prisoner was an acquaintance of mine, and if she had not been very much in liquor she would not have done it; I found my cap on the Monday evening: on the Saturday I had put it on the table, and she asked me to let her have some halfpence to get something to drink; I said, I thought she had had enough; she went away, and when I came to put on my cap in the evening it was gone; she was very much in liquor indeed.

JOHN FRYER sworn. - I am servant to a pawnbroker, (produces a cap); I took it in on the 8th of December, from the prisoner at the bar. (The cap identified by the prosecutrix.)

Prisoner's defence. I was as sober as I am now, it is all spite, I will not excuse my prosecutor; I asked her to lend me some halfpence, and she said she had none; she gave me the cap to pawn, and when I had pawned it I received a shillingsworth of halfpence for it, and she followed me and knocked me down; she knocked the halfpence out of my hand and set me a bleeding.

Q.(To Mrs. Lambdin.) Is there any truth in this story? - A. Not the least.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

75. MARY JOHNSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of November , a coat, value 2 l. four waistcoats, value 1 l. 6 s. two pair of breeches, value 1 l. 16 s. a hat, value 14 s. a pair of gloves, value 2 s. 6 d. a Bible, value 5 s. four shirts, value 1 l. 18 s. four neckcloths, value 5 s. three yards of linen, value 5 s. two pair of stockings, value 4 s. and a pair of slings, value 6 d. the property of Andrew Thorburn , in the dwelling-house of George Hagley .

ANDREW THORBURN sworn. - I lodge at No. 152, Swallow-street : On the 28th of November, I went up stairs to bed about ten o'clock.

Q. In whose house do you lodge? - A. George Hagley 's: When I went up I found the door of the room open, my trunk open, and my property gone, I had left my room in the morning about seven o'clock, locked; I put the key in a place where it is always kept with the other lodgers' keys, for the servants to make the beds.

Q. Was the trunk locked? - A. No it was not.

Q. What did it contain? - A. A coat, two pair of breeches, two waistcoats, two pair of stockings, four neck-handkerchiefs, a pocket Bible, and my hat was also taken away, there was other property taken, but that belonged to the landlord; there was nearly three yards of linen, and a pair of slings.

Q. Did you ever find any of them again? - A. Yes; in a few days there was a neck handkerchief and the slings found in the apartment of the prisoner; I was with the constable at the time they were found, at No. 9, King-street, Seven-dials.

Q. What was the value of your coat? - A. Two pounds; I had had it about three months, it cost me two pounds eighteen shillings; the two waistcoats are worth ten shillings, two pair of breeches, a guinea and a half, the stockings four shillings, the Bible five shillings, the linen-cloth five shillings, and the slings, I suppose, sixpence.

Q. What reason have you to suppose this woman stole them? - A. She was not known to the house.

THOMAS DENIGHT sworn. - I am a constable of St. James's: On the 11th of December I was sent for by a person of the name of Heales, who keeps a public-house where the prisoner had been found in the servant's room; I went and found the prisoner there, I searched her, and upon her person, wrapped up in a black pelice, I found twelve keys, which she said she had from an iron-shop; I went to her apartments, No. 9, King-street, Seven-dials.

Q. How do you know they were her apartments? - A. She told me she lived there in the name of Robson; and she likewise told me her name was Ralph, she lived in a two pair of stairs back room; I searched the room, and found this neck-handkerchief, marked A T; the prosecutor found some slings in the same room; I tried the young man's lock, and among the twelve keys I found these two that opened the door. (Produces them.)

JOSEPH GREGORY sworn. - I am a constable, I was present when the prosecutor found the slings, (produces them); I went to a pawnbroker's, and found the linen at Mr. Simmons's, in Monmouth-street.

Q. How came you to go there? - A. By the duplicates found in her room.

Denight. I found the duplicate in her apartment among ninety others, (produces it); I went with Gregory to the pawnbroker's, and found a piece of linen pawned for three shillings.

JOHN SIMMONS sworn. - I am a pawnbroker; this is my duplicate.

Q. Who pawned that linen with you? - A. It was pawned on the 29th of November in the name of Mary Ralph , but I cannot say positively that the prisoner is the woman.

Q.(To Thorburn.) Look at those articles? - A. This neck handkerchief is mine, and the braces are mine; one of the buckles was wanting, and that part was cut to go over the button of my breeches, and the linen I know to be mine; it was sent to me from Scotland by my mother, cut off the web; I know it by the quantity and the quality; I have been in the habit of wearing my mother's linen all my life.

Prisoner's defence. The linen is my own, I have a pair of sheets of the same now in pledge; the handkerchief was left in my room by a person that slept with me; I know nothing about the name of the person that left it; the duplicates are all my own, they have been advertised, and nobody has come forward to own any thing; I have three small children, and am pregnant now.

GUILTY , Death , aged 24.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

76. ANN WELDON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of December , in the dwelling-house of Sophia Edmonds , two doubloons, value 6 l. a dollar, value 4 s. and four guineas, and a Bank of England note for 1 l. the property of the said Sophia Edmonds .

Second Count. For like offence, the property of Isaac Charton .

There being no evidence against the prisoner, except that of her own confession, extorted by a promise of forgiveness, she was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

77. JOSEPH BLAIR was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of December , eight fowls, value 15 s. the property of Robert Perry .

ROBERT PERRY sworn. - I am a stone-mason , I live at No. 61, Old Gravel-lane; I lost eight fowls on Christmas day, I had seen them on Christmaseve; they roosted in the workshop, the boy locked them up.

JOHN READ sworn. - Q. Did you see your master's fowls in the yard? - A. Yes, just before dark; I locked them up on Monday evening in the workshop, the door was not broke open; I fancy the man got in by the shutter; the shutter has a piece of wood or nail to fasten it, any body can put their hand in and open it; when I went into the yard, I missed the cock, I looked for them, and they were gone; I fetched four of the fowls from Mr. Dimsey, No. 8, Albion-street, Spice-island.

NATHANIEL OLIVER sworn. - I am an officer belonging to Shadwell office; the prosecutor informed me he had lost some fowls, and he supposed the man who stole them had lost his pocket-book; he said there were a number of duplicates in it; I looked at the duplicates, and saw the name of Joseph Blair on some of them, I knew him; I found him at a public-house in Lower Chapman-street, St. George's; I told him I had found some duplicates that I thought might be of use to him; I asked him if he had lost any; he said he did not know; I took him to the lock-up house, I shewed him the pocket-book, and he owned it and the duplicates; we took him before the Magistrate, and he confessed he sold some of the fowls to one Mr. Dimsey, of Spice-island.

Q.(To Perry.) Did you find the pocket-book? - A. No, my lad found the pocket-book.

Q.(To Read.) You found the pocket-book - what did you do with it? - A. I gave it to my mistress, and she gave it to my master.

Q.(To Perry.) What did you do with the pocket-book? - A. I gave it at Shadwell office to Oliver the officer.

JOHN DIMSEY sworn. - Q. Did you buy any fowls about Christmas day? - A. I bought five of the prisoner, I paid him twenty-pence a fowl.

Q. Did he say how he came by them? - A. No; I heard the prisoner was taken into custody; I went to Shadwell office; I returned four to Mr. Perry.

Q. Had you ever seen him before? - A. About a fortnight before I bought five, but I killed one.

Q. Do you know how he got his living? - A. By dealing in fowls; I heard him say so, and that he brought them from Berwick upon Tweed.

(The fowls produced and identified by the prosecutor.)

GUILTY , aged 21.

Confined six months in the House of Correction .

First Middlesex Jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

78. ANN SPITTLE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of December , a cloak, value 2 s. 6 d. two wooden pails, value 2 s. one shift, value 1 s. two pair of stockings, value 2 s. one apron, value 1 s. 6 d. two skirts, value 6 d. a frock, value 6 d. three handkerchiefs, value 1 s. 6 d. and a cap, value 3 d. the property of John Luyar .

JOHN LUYAR sworn. - Q. Was the prisoner at the bar a servant of your's? - A. Yes, she came into my service on the 7th of December; I live at No. 11, Gibraltar-row, Bethnal-green ; about six o'clock in the evening she called up to me and my wife, and told us she was going for a couple of pails of water; she never returned; we found her on Monday last in Noble-street, St. Luke's; I gave her in charge of the officer, and took her to Worship-street; I stated to the Magistrate what I took her for, that she had taken the things I had charged her with; she had got my wife's shift and cap on, and a pair of black stockings of mine; she had the duplicate of the cloak in her pocket, which she delivered to the officer, Goldsmith.

MARY LUYAR sworn. - Q. On the prisoner leaving your service, did you search about to see if any thing was missing? - A. As soon as I came out of the shop, and entered my dwelling room, I missed my dish full of clothes that she had ready for ironing; I missed my cloak, my husband's stockings, and two handkerchiefs, that were not in the wash; there were two children's skirts, a coloured apron, and my children's stockings, and a handkerchief that was in the wash, one cap, and two pails.

- GOLDSMITH sworn. - I am a constable: I produce the property, and a duplicate of a cloak.

JOHN GANTY sworn. - I am shopman to Mr. Jehu Briggs; I produce a cloak pledged on the 10th of December; I cannot say it was the prisoner.

CHARLES GOODALL sworn. - I am a servant to David Windsor ; I produce a coloured apron, and a pair of hose, pledged for half-a-crown on the 7th of December; I took them in of the prisoner, to the best of my recollection, I am not quite sure.

SUSANNAH NEVILL sworn. - I am a pawnbroker; I produce a child's shift pledged on the 6th of December by Ann Frost , of Noble-street; I do not know her person.

THOMAS SEARLE sworn. - I am a pawnbroker, I live on Fish-street-hill; I have a frock and two children's shirts pledged on the 7th of December; I cannot swear positively to the prisoner.

(The property produced and identified by the prosecutrix.)

Prisoner's defence. I was in distress when I took them, and hope you will have mercy on me.

GUILTY , aged 33.

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

79. RICHARD HAYWARD , alias REGINALD HARWOOD , was indicted for that he, on the 20th of October , two bolsters, value 5 s. and two pillows, value 5 s. the property of Richard Crabtree , feloniously did steal, take, and carryaway, and that he, having committed the felony in manner and form aforesaid, afterwards to wit, on the said 20th of October, upon Benjamin Chantry , a subject of our Lord the King, feloniously, wilfully, and maliciously, did make an assault, and with a certain sharp instrument unlawfully did strike, cut, and stab, the said Benjamin in and upon the head, with intent in so doing, and by means thereof, to resist, obstruct, and prevent, the lawful apprehension of him, the said Richard, for the said felony, for which he was liable by law to be apprehended .

There were Three other Counts, varying the manner of charging the offence.

(The indictment was opened by Mr. Alley; and the case stated by Mr. Gurney.)

MISS JENKINS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Are you any relation to Mr. Crabtree? - A. I am cousin to Mrs. Crabtree.

Q. Had they a house in Thayer-street, Manchester-square? - A. Yes, No. 11.

Q. Do you know Mr. Crabtree's Christian name? - A. Richard.

Q. Do you know of any furniture being sent into that house for his use? - A. Yes, on the 19th of October.

Q. Do you remember going on Saturday, the 20th of October, and what furniture did you see in the parlour? - A. Some bolsters and pillows, some bed furniture, and some beds.

Q. When you left the house, you left these behind you? - A. Yes.

Q. After the prisoner had been taken up, did you go into the house? - A. I went in, and found that they had been robbed.

Q. Was it on the same day, or the next day? - A. The night of the same day, Saturday.

Q. In consequence of any suspicion that you and Mrs. Wilson had, did you sit watching in a house opposite? - A. Yes, Mr. Williamson's.

Q. Did you observe any persons go into Mr. Crabtree's house? - A. Yes, two men; I saw them go in with a key.

Q. In consequence of that, did you and Mrs. Wilson do any thing? - A. Mrs. Wilson went down; I observed her cross over, and knock at Mr. Crabtree's door; I observed the door open, but did not see any thing else.

- WILLIAMSON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. It was at your house that Mrs. Wilson and Miss Jenkins were watching the house of Mr. Crabtree? - A. Yes.

Q. When Mrs. Wilson and Miss Jenkins came out of the house to go over to Mr. Crabtree's, did you follow them? - A. I followed Mrs. Wilson; she knocked, I was at that time close to the step of the door.

Q. Did any person or persons come out of the house? - A. Two men came out of the house.

Q. One of those men, I believe, made his escape? - A. One ran to the right, and the other to the left; the man who ran to the right was the prisoner at the bar, whom I immediately fixed my eye upon.

Q. Did any thing pass when he came out of the house? - A. I saw him make a blow at Mrs. Wilson, she was standing by the door.

Q. After he had made that blow at Mrs. Wilson, which way did he take his course? - A. He ran immediately towards Hind-street, and he had not got above twenty yards before he was stopped by a gentleman, who seized him, I was then crying stop thief.

Q. Did that gentleman keep hold of him? - A. Only for a minute; he got away from him, he made a double across the street, and whether the gentleman struck him or not, I do not know, but the prisoner fell down in the middle of the street; he got up again, and kept on my side of the way back again, opposite to No. 11; he then turned a corner into William-street, which is within one door of where I live; I pursued him, crying stop thief; I never lost sight of him, I saw him stopped in Marybone-lane by several people.

Q. What time was this? - A. About seven, or half past seven, in the evening.

Q. Did he get away from those persons by whom he was then surrounded? - A. No.

Q. Then from the moment of his leaving the house till he was apprehended, you never lost sight of him? - A. No, I am very sure he is the person.

HENRY HOLFORD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. Q. What are you? - A. A merchant, in Crutched-friars: On the 20th of October last, I was passing through Thayer-street, Manchester-square.

Q. Look at the prisoner, do you remember having seen him there? - A. Yes, I saw him first coming out of the house, No. 11; I observed him make a violent blow at a lady, who was at the door; he immediately ran towards Hind-street, he passed so close by me, that I seized him.

Q. Was the purpose for which you seized him to apprehend him? - A. Yes; he struggled, and made a blow at my head, which I avoided, and he fell.

Q. What did he attempt to strike you with? - A. I saw that he had something in his hand, but could not then discern what it was; I afterwards saw that it was an iron crow.

Q. Did he escape? - A. I returned the blow, and he fell; he got up again, and turned, and escaped for a moment; I pursued him down two small streets, and kept sight of him till I saw Chantry at the door of his own house; I called out to him, stop thief, stop him; Chantry then laid hold of him immediately, I told Chantry to take care, for he had an iron in his hand; Chantry looked round, and in a few moments afterwards he lifted up his hand, and made a violent blow atChantry with the iron; he was then taken to the watch-house.

Q. Did you then see what that iron was? - A. Yes, it was a crow; it was delivered to the officer.

BENJAMIN CHANTRY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Where do you live? - A. At No. 33, Marybone-lane.

Q. On the evening of Saturday, the 20th of October, did you hear any cry of stop thief? - A. Very much indeed.

Q. What did you do upon hearing that cry? - A. I ran out, and saw this gentleman pursuing a man, and singing out stop thief.

Q. What did you do? - A. I stepped over the way to meet the man; as I came up on one side the pavement, he stepped on the other; he fell down, and I caught hold of him.

Q. For what purpose did you catch hold of him? - A. Because I heard the cry of stop thief, to apprehend him; I led him along very quietly forty or fifty yards, Mr. Holford told me there was something in his hand.

Q. Did you look to see whether he had any thing in his hand? - A. Not to my recollection; he struck me at the corner of William-street with a piece of iron, and I was taken to the Hospital. Twelve or fourteen pieces of bone have been taken out of my head, and there are more pieces coming out.

Q. Had you hold of him at the time he so struck you? - A.I still continued to have hold of him.

Q. Upon this, did any person come up to your assistance? - A. Yes, a butcher of the name of Snowden; I told him he had got something very hard, that he had struck me upon the head very hard, and two of them got it out of his hand.

Q. What did it prove to be? - A. An iron crow; me and the butcher conveyed him to the watch-house together; I was taken to the Hospital, and was there five weeks and three days.

Q. You were under the care of Mr. Parroquet, the surgeon? - A. No, Mr. Harwood.

JOHN BOYD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You are an officer belonging to the Police-Office, at Marlborough-street? - A. Yes; I had this crow delivered to me by the watch-housekeeper, Moay, at Marlborough-street, in the presence of Snowden. (Produces it.)

WILLIAM SNOWDEN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. Q. That crow was delivered by you to Moay? - A. Yes, I marked it; I took it from the prisoner the night he was apprehended.

Q.(To Boyd.) Did you try if the crow would fit any impression upon the house? - A. Yes, I examined the house all over, and found no mark that corresponded, but a mark upon the second floor front room door; it had been attempted to be opened, and the impressions exactly corresponded with the crow; it was not opened.

STEPHEN PARROQUET sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You are one of the surgeons of Middlesex Hospital? - A. Yes.

Q. Benjamin Chantry was under your care? - A. Yes.

Q. Was the injury he had received likely to be produced by an instrument like this? - A. Nothing more likely; a portion of the bone was cut away from the skull, it was cut in a strait line, about as broad as a goose's quill, three quarters of an inch long and very deep, as if it was done by such an instrument as that; it made an incision into the bone, there was a complete piece taken out, as if it had been sawed out as it were; the scalp that covers the bone was very much torn; besides the fracture, there was a wound on the side of the head, and after examining that wound, the bone was discovered with a piece of it cut out, a slit in the bone as if from a violent blow; you may form some idea of it, by cutting off a piece of a goose's quill.

Court. Q. Did it appear to be broke off, or cut out? - A. Cut out.

Prisoner's defence. I was very much intoxicated, and did not know that I had struck any person.

GUILTY , Death , aged 24.

First Middlesex Jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

80. SAMUEL MITCHELL , alias SAMUEL WILD MITCHELL , was indicted for the wilful murder of Sarah Mitchell , on the 18th of December .

WILLIAM GODBY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You married the daughter of the prisoner? - A. I did.

Q. How long have you been married to her? - A. Rather more than eight years.

Q. Where did the prisoner live? - A. In Wheeler-street, almost opposite Flower-de-luce-court, I do not rightly know the number.

Q. What part of the house did he lodge at? - A. The top room of the house.

Q. Who lived with him there? - A. His wife and the deceased, but the wife had separated from him the day before this transaction happened; there was no other person that lived with him, excepting the child Sally, the deceased; there had been a daughter-in-law, but not at this time.

Q. What was the prisoner? - A. A weaver .

Q. Was Sally employed in the branch in which the father was engaged, in quilling? - A. She was.

Q. On the 18th of December, the day of this transaction, what time of the day did you first see Mitchell? - A. About nine o'clock in the morning.

Q. What time of the day did you first see Sally? - A. About half past twelve, as near as I can recollect.

Q. That was when she was dead? - A. It was.

Q. You have said you saw Mitchell about nine, how soon after did you see him again? - A. Not till night; I heard him on the stairs, as near as I can recollect, about ten; he was coming up to my apartment, at my house in Hare-street.

Q. You did not see him in his house? - A. No, not at that time; I saw him on the stairs of my house at ten o'clock at night.

Q. How long was Mitchell with you when you saw him at your house? - A. I do not imagine that he was with me more than ten minutes, or a quarter of an hour.

Q. Did any thing pass relative to this business during the time he was with you? - A. No.

Q. How soon in the day, on the 18th of December, did you go to the lodgings of the prisoner? - A. About half past twelve.

Q. How came you to go there at half past twelve? - A. I had been to my master's warehouse with my work; on my returning, I went up to their apartment, knowing they had been separated the day before, and when I came into the place, I was so shocked, I cannot tell hardly whether the door was shut or open, I saw the deceased lying in her blood.

Q. Seeing her lie in her blood, how did it appear to you? - A. I cannot say that I saw any thing more than the child lying in her blood.

Q. Did you see any wound? - A. I did not see any wound.

Q. Were any of her clothes lying about the room? - A. They seemed to be all on as far as I observed.

Q. Now when you observed this poor girl Sally lying in the wretched state in which she then was, what did you do? - A. I went down to the next floor to a woman that lived in the two-pair of stairs room.

Q. Her name is Nicholls? - A. So I have understood since, I acquainted her with it; I had some of my master's property about me, and that I carried home.

Q. After speaking to Mrs. Nicholls, did you see the child again or Mitchell on that day? - A. I did not see Mitchell again, but I saw Sally, the child, again; I returned back to the house.

Q. When you returned back again, did you go up stairs to the prisoner's room? - A. Yes.

Q. The first time that you saw the child, did she appear to you to be dead? - A. I could observe nothing else.

Q. When you went up the second time, you saw Kennedy, the officer, there? - A. Yes, and I went with him to the Office.

Q. Did you observe the second time the state of the poor girl? - A. I did not.

Q. When did you see the prisoner again? - A. Not till night, about ten o'clock; I saw him in the room under my room at my lodgings.

Q. Tell us what passed between you and the prisoner when you saw him? - A. I did not say a word, only that he should not come into my apartment.

- NICHOLLS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Do you lodge at No. 24, Wheeler-street, Spitalfields? - A. Yes.

Q. That is the same house in which the prisoner lodged in the garret? - A. Yes.

Q. What part of the house did you occupy? - A. The two-pair of stairs room.

Q. Were you at home on the 18th of December? - A. Yes.

Q. You remember Godby coming to you, and giving you some information? - A. Yes.

Q. Before he came to you, had you seen Mitchell in the morning? - A. Yes, I heard him about half past eleven o'clock; I went out to market, and when I returned he asked me what it was o'clock.

Q. Where was he at the time he asked you what o'clock it was? - A. In his own room; I did not see him, I only heard his voice.

Q. Had you seen the girl? - A. No, I only heard her go up.

Q. What time did you hear the girl Sally go up? - A. After school-time, after twelve o'clock, she went to a charity-school, in Spitalfields; I heard her go up stairs.

Court. Q. How do you know it was the child? - A. Only by the step, as usual.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Whether you knew that on the day before the woman had separated from her husband? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see or hear her there on Tuesday? - A. Yes, she had a light of me before eleven o'clock to light her fire.

Q. You heard a step of a child, you supposed it was Sally going up the stairs? - A. Yes.

Q. After you heard Sally go up stairs to her father, when they were in the room did you hear any noise? - A. I heard the quill-wheel go, and I heard the man weaving, I heard the noise of the loom.

Q. How long was it after you heard the girl, as you supposed, at the quill-wheel, and the man weaving, that Godby came in? - A. Not above half an hour, as I supposed.

Q. When Godby came to you, he gave you some information, and you went up stairs? - A. Yes.

Q. Had you heard any body go down stairs before Godby came to you? - A. Before Godby came, I thought I heard a woman go down stairs, and I thought I heard a man's foot; I saw neither of them, I did not open the door.

Q. Did you hear any thing else before Godby came? - A. No, a man knocked at my door, I asked who was there.

Q. It turned out to be Godby? - A. Yes, he went up with me; I stood upon the top of thestairs, I was afraid to go any farther, I saw the child lying in her gore of blood.

Q. Did you observe at that time, or any future time, the wound? - A. No; I called out, murder! to Mr. Byron, my landlord, he came up, but I was afraid to go any further.

WILLIAM BYRON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are the landlord of the house, No. 24, Wheeler-street, Spitalfields ? - A. I was at that time, but I have removed since.

Q. The prisoner occupied the garret? - A. He did.

Q. I suppose you know no more of it, than you saw the state in which the deceased lay? - A. I went up stairs, and took the child by the hand; I immediately put my feet across the body and lifted her up by the waist, and her head went one way, and the gash appeared to me.

Q. Did you observe any thing else? - A. I then gave the alarm that her throat was cut, and desired some persons to go for a surgeon, and for the father, who, I supposed, was at the Elder-tree public-house, just by; I then looked round the room to see if I could observe any instrument, but I could not observe any; I then saw the quill-wheel all bloody, and a track of blood to the body; I left the child in the same situation I found her, with her head towards the door, and her feet towards the fire, her cap was lying on the ground by her, and was all over blood; and she and I were all over blood.

Q. You say you did not observe any razor at that time? - A. No, nor any other; I know no more about it.

EDWARD DELLAFOUR sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. What are you? - A. I am a journeyman broad-silk weaver.

Q. You know the prisoner? - A. Yes; eighteen years back.

Q. Did you see him on the 18th of December, between the hours of twelve and one? - A. Yes; he came to my apartment, No. 26, Skinner-street, Shoreditch.

Q. How far is that from Wheeler-street? - A. About a furlong.

Q. Tell us what passed between you, distinctly? - A. I was at work; he knocked at the door, I let him in; he asked me to come down stairs with him, he had something particular to communicate to me; I pointed out to him the inconveniency of leaving my work, and absolutely refused to go unless he would tell me his business; he rejoined, something had happened that day that had never happened before, he should go to Newgate; seeing him in that violent purturbation I reluctantly left my work, anxious to know the cause of it; he went down stairs, and I went down soon after, and found him at the street-door, we went about fifty yards from our door, and with a countenance full of grief he turned round to me, and said, Ned, I shall die; I asked him what was the matter with him, or what had happened, thinking there might be a degree of illness about him: he said, directly, I have killed my Sally; I asked him if the child was dead; he said, yes, I have cut her head half off. It was a severe cold morning, and he shivered with cold, and desired me to go into a public-house that he might warm himself, and have something to drink; I went with him into the first public-house we came to, which was the Cock and Magpie, in Worship-street; we had a pot of beer, he called for it, and a pipe of tobacco, the landlord filled him a pipe with tobacco; there were three men and a woman, strangers entirely to me, in the tap-room; he said, sit down, I have something to say to you; seeing them strangers I thought it imprudent to speak before them, desiring him, at the same time, if he had any thing to say to me not to say it there; we might be a quarter of an hour there probably, in that place.

Q. Then he did not say any thing there? - A. No; then we went out, and he resumed the discourse; I asked him what he was going to do, and what he meant to do with himself; he said he was going to Sun-Tavern-fields, Wapping, to see two friends of his, who were rope-makers, who would, when he was in prison, allow him a shilling or two; he then asked me when the Sessions would begin, I told him; he said, he should give himself up to Justice, and suffer, with this remark, - what odds will it make to me if they cut me into a thousand pieces, when I go hundreds will go at the same minute; I told him he should not have killed his child; he looked me in the face, and said, I know that, do not you retort on me now, it is done; I accompanied him as far nearly as Whitechapel church, and then shewed him the necessity of my returning to my business, I shook him by the hand, and saw him no more till I saw him at the office before the Magistrate; when the Magistrate sent for me, I gave the same account then, nearly, as I have given now.

THOMAS GRICE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are a watchman? - A. Yes; of Bethnall-green.

Q. Did you apprehend the prisoner? - A. Yes; two men came to our watch-house, and gave information that he was in our street at his daughter's; I went there and apprehended him, and brought him to Bethnal-green watch-house.

Q. Did he say any thing to you? - A. As soon as I saw the man, he said he was the man that was guilty of the murder, and resigned himself up; I delivered him up to the officer of Spitalfields.

JAMES KENNEDY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are a police-officer of Worship-street, - what do you know about this business? -A. On Tuesday the 18th of December, about one o'clock in the afternoon, I received information that the prisoner was in Hare-street, at his daughter's; I went, in company with Bishop, a brother officer, to No. 24, Wheeler-street; I went up into the garret of that house, and there I saw the body of the deceased, lying with her head towards the door, about two feet from the door, with no cap on, and her throat cut across all the arteries, and cut through the wind-pipe, she was done bleeding, the blood was warm lying on the floor; I looked round just by the fire-place, I saw the quill-wheel, and on the block of that wheel was a quantity of blood, and there was a track of blood from the wheel to where the body laid, which might be about a yard; there was a low stool close by the wheel, where a person might be sitting down to work at the wheel; a razor was lying on the ground close by the side of that wheel, and there I got this razor, covered with fresh blood; between the wheel and the body of the child I found this cap, it had fell from her head, it is stained with blood, I saw there was no prospect of restoring life; I enquired if there was any one there belonging to the child, the room was full of people; I then, with the assistance of Bishop, put them out of the room, as there was property in the room belonging to the master of the prisoner; I took Godby and Byron to the Magistrate; we were all that day, and all that night searching after him, till about twelve o'clock at night; Armstrong, Mason, Bishop, and I, were together, we received information then that he was in custody, and was in Spitalfields watch-house, we went there to satisfy ourselves; when we went into the watch-house, the prisoner was sitting by the watch-house fire, he turned his head round and saw me, he said, Kennedy, I have given you some trouble to-day; Armstrong said to him, what do you mean by that; he answered, in searching after me; Armstrong then said to him, is your name Mitchell; he said, it is.

Q. Did you know him? - A. I had seen him before; I have known him for these five or six years. Armstrong said, I have seen a razor and a cap today in the possession of Kennedy; do you know you are charged with killing your daughter, and the razor and cap was found in your room; he then answered, with that razor I have often shaved myself, and with that razor I committed the horrid deed; Mr. Armstrong gave the warrant to the officer of the night, and left him in the watch-house; there were no signs of blood about him at that time.

Mr. Knapp. (To Dellafour.) Q. I would ask you whether, at the time you saw the prisoner, you observed any thing about his person? - A. I forgot to mention that when I was at the public-house, I observed on two of his fingers on one of his hands, a small quantity of blood.

Q. How much do you think? - A. Very trifling, not more than would come from the prick of a pin.

JOSEPH MOSER , Esq. sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are one of the Magistrates for the County of Middlesex, and a Police Magistrate for Worship-street? - A. I am.

Q. The prisoner was brought before you to be examined? - A. He was, on Wednesday the 19th of December.

Q. Was the prisoner called upon, after you had examined the evidence against him, to know what he had to say? - A. He was.

Q. Did he say any thing before you? - A. He did; we took that down in writing.

Q. Before you took any thing down in writing from the prisoner giving his account of it, did you caution him with respect to what he should say? - A. I told him the consequence in every point of view, and the use it would be made of after he had signed it, I repeated it several times; and after it was read over to him, he said, it was true what he had signed.

Q. Did the prisoner sign it in your presence? - A. He did.

Q. Look at that paper, and tell me whether that is the confession that you saw him sign? - A. It is; I wrote it myself.

(The prisoner's examination read in Court.)

"Public Office, Worship-street.

"The voluntary confession of Samuel Mitchell , weaver, for the wilful murder of his child, aged nine years, taken by Joseph Moser , Esq. Dec. 19, 1804.

"I, Samuel-Wild Mitchell, weaver, late of the parish of Christchurch, Spitalfields, now standing at the bar of the Public Office, Worship-street, being fully apprised of my situation by the Magistrate, and through him made perfectly sensible of the nature of this acknowledgment, do make this free and unbiassed confession, which is taken by my own desire. - I, in consequence thereof, state, that I had a daughter, named Sally Mitchell , aged nine years last November, and my wife had a daughter, named Elizabeth - , who at one time did not live with me, but whom afterwards I took to my apartment, where I instructed her in the art of weaving, and we lived all together; this said daughter of my wife's caused some uneasiness, as I thought; and my wife, as I thought, was more indulgent to her faults, and favoured her more than she ought, which was the reason of the separation that took place on the 17th instant; my wife also took with her Sarah Mitchell , whom I loved with the most ardent affection, which vexed me a great deal; I could not bear the little girl coming to see me as paying me a visit, I resolved that neither my wife nor me should possess her; I seized the moment of the mother going away, when the child was sitting by the fire winding quills; I took therazor out of the drawer, my affection made me almost put it down, but my resolution overcame that; I turned round, and cut her throat; I was too resolute to make any faint attempt, I cut her head half off; the child was dead in a moment, she neither made noise nor resistance; she was sitting on her stool; when I had done this, the child fell, and as I was going out of the room, I saw her blood, then I ran down stairs; after I had done this act to my child, Sarah Mitchell , I went to a man, named Ball, where I left word for some person to run and secure my master's work; I went to Mr. Dellafour, and to my friends, at Wapping. This confession is true, and this acknowledgment is free, and made by my own desire. Signed Samuel-Wild Mitchell, Dec. 19, 1804, and signed Joseph Moser , Esq."

Prisoner's defence. My Lord and Gentlemen, I stand here before you a horrid spectacle of misery, of guilt, and of disgrace. I will endeavour to be as collected in my reason as possible, though unhappily for me, at certain times and seasons, I am particularly under heavy pressures of mind, which my wife well knows, and was well aware of it. That I have committed the horrid deed laid to my charge, I have no wish to deny, any more than I have to avoid the dreadful punishment that awaits my guilt, to that I am resigned, nor was it my wish from the unfortunate moment of my crime, to evade justice; but that I committed the deed maliciously against my poor child, who was the victim of my fatal passion, I solemnly deny. I loved my child, and I hope no one will think it was done in malice. I solemnly declare it was not, in the presence of God, before whom I now stand, and before whom I must shortly appear, and whom I hope will direct you and guide you in your decision upon me in the course of this day; for malice I had none, I loved her most tenderly, and love to the child, wishing her not to be from me, strange and perverse as it may seem, is owing chiefly the sad cause that brings me here this day. I am married to a second wife, by whom this was our only daughter; we had long known each other before our marriage, when I was in better days; and when she and I were the wife and husband of others, I thought I could be happy with her, but I did not know the nature and temper of her family; I found afterwards the friends and family with which she was connected, thought her marriage to me degrading. As her family disliked the union, she knew me well, why did not she avoid having me. What has occurred was done through the height of passion and despair, as disputes and controversies had taken place between us for ten years, in which unhappily both were in fault too much so. Those disputes were often carried to a pitch of fury, and what still more exasperated me was, that those she called her friends, always sided with her whether right or wrong; and, what is still worse, they would put their hands to mischief; and many of them, I am sorry to say, were strenuous professors of religious principles. May the Lord forgive them and me, and take me to himself! Our disputes at last ended in a mutual agreement to separate, and the child I so tenderly loved was to go with her mother. This my unhappy temper and feeling could not bear, and led me to the fatal resolution that neither she nor I should have the child, by committing the horrid deed of putting an end to her life, in the manner I have done. I pray God Almighty to forgive me, and to direct you in it, and may this spectacle I now stand be a warning to those who form second marriages, if they meet with double families, to have more love to their duty than giving way to intemperate disputes that may lead them, as they have done me, to acts of desperation and vengeance beyond the controul of reason and reflection! If my wife was present, she could vouch and prove that it was impossible I could ever have deliberately executed such an act; she could vouch that my disposition is not cruel, and that my resolutions have always led me to the side of virtue; but as here I stand, in the presence of God, when unfortunately under agitations of mind or provocations of temper, I am not really the same man at all times, and my weakness, under such circumstances, when I have been under the most resolute purposes for good, have very frequently led me into excesses of frenzy. I have often felt it, and I have wondered at it; in cool moments it has often astonished me how I could do so. There was a circumstance that happened to me at one time; my own business failed me, it has often failed me, and I frequently, when I could get no work at my own business, used to strike out to out-door work; but once in particular when I could get no work, forced by distress to apply for relief at my parish-workhouse, there was something that disappointed me, I had come too late in the day, and because I was disappointed, I broke as many windows as cost the parish four pounds, and yet the parish-officers did not punish me, though they might. I have no more to to say, but I hope God will of his infinite mercy forgive me; I must die a spectacle of sin, disgrace, and horror.

After the Lord Chief Baron had addressed the Jury, the prisoner requested permission to speak again, which was granted immediately by the Court.

Prisoner. There was a single point I have got to mention, which I wish my wife was here, she could attest the truth of what I am going to say; that when I have been the most resolute to good purposes, that frailty and weakness would often prevent it; she was well acquainted with my misery, I have been frequently so, as well as my mother, an old woman, that was sensible, and yet at times she would go the same way; she has oftenasked me to cut her hair, for unless her hair was kept cut in a particular close manner, her weakness was upon her so as it has been with me.

GUILTY , Death .

First Middlesex Jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

81. ELIZABETH BURROWS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of December , a shift, value 2 s. an apron, value 1 s. 6 d. and a shawl, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of Ann Wenning , spinster .

ANN WENNING sworn. - I live at No. 16, Manchester-square : On the 12th of December, I opened my trunk, I missed a shift, an apron, and a shawl, I found the trunk unlocked; I had seen the articles a few days before in the trunk, and when I saw them last I locked the trunk; the duplicates were found on her in a pocket-book; there was no other person in the house but the prisoner, my mistress, and myself; I kept my trunk outside of the door of my room.

- FULLER sworn. - I produce an apron, a shift, and an handkerchief; I wrote the ticket, but I cannot say that I took them in; I do not know to whom I gave that ticket. (The property produced, and identified by the prosecutrix.)

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

82. DANIEL SAVAGE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of December , a basket, value 5 s. three cloths, value 3 s. four turkeys, value 24 s. a goose, value 5 s. and two quarters of mutton, value 11 s. the property of Thomas Powell .

THOMAS POWELL sworn. - On the 4th of December, I called at the public-house the sign of the Conduit, the corner of Conduit-street, Swallow-street ; I had a goose, four turkeys, and a side of mutton, and three cloths in a basket; I took a goose into the tap-room to shew the landlord, the landlord and I could not agree; I put it into the basket and went back, and called for a pint of beer and left the basket with the property in the passage, and when I went into the tap this Savage was there; he came out unknown to me, and when I came out, my basket was gone, with the contents.

GEORGE SHIVEN sworn. - I am a painter, I was at work at this public-house at the time this man missed his basket, I went with two more to find him; we went from this house in Swallow-street to Berwick-street, we found his wife down in a cellar in Peter-street, we asked if that was Savage's; she said, yes; we asked for some oysters, we wanted to have them in the cellar, she refused us going down into the cellar; I fled down, and crossed to the bed-room in the cellar, and undeneath the bed, I pulled out the basket, with three turkeys and two quarters of mutton; I said to my friends, we do not want oysters, here is enough; there were only two cloths, one cloth was gone with the turkey and goose; we sent for a constable to take the woman to the Magistrate's, she was committed for re-examination; coming from the office we met Savage, and we took him there, and the Justice released the woman and put Savage in her place; the property was given to Powell, as the goods were perishable. (The basket produced, and identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. I did not take them: On Tuesday, the 4th of December, I was out cutting of wood, as I had no work to do at home; I was not in my stall at all; I am a shoe-maker, and about four o'clock I went home to shut my place, being dark, and there was a coachman in Bond-street waiting for a pair of shoes that I had to mend; I was going with them to his stable-yard, two men followed me; they took hold of me, and said, I must go along with them; they said, they had got the old b - h.

GUILTY , aged 50.

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

83. WILLIAM STAPLETON was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Francis Francis , about the hour of six at night, and burglariously stealing therein seven yards of sarsnet, value 1 l. 8 s. the property of Francis Francis .

FRANCIS FRANCIS sworn. - I live at No. 173, Fleet-street , I am a silk-mercer ; between the hours of five and six o'clock, after it was dark, on the 7th of December , I heard a voice at the door, saying, that somebody should come out and protect the windows; I went out as fast as I could, I saw the prisoner at the bar was laid hold of by Mr. March, the elder.

Q. What had he done to your house? - A. The pane of glass was broke, and one part of the silk was out of the window; and the other part was in the hole of the window; it was cut about the middle, but not quite separated.

Q. Are you sure the glass was whole before? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you hear it break? - A. I did not hear the window break, I heard the noise at the door, it was quite dark, we had a lamp in the window; I never saw the boy before to my knowledge.

WILLIAM MARCH , Jun. sworn. - Q. Do you live in this street? - A. Yes, about twenty doors from Mr. Francis, the same side of the way; I was coming towards my father's, and I saw the prisoner at the window; I went and told my father that I thought he was going to cut the window, and me and my father went out together; we passed him, he was standing at the window; then we returned back again, and passed him the secondtime; I then turned round, and saw he was pulling something out of the window; my father then went and laid hold of him; he dropped the silk, which I laid hold of, and held it there till Mr. Francis came out.

Court. Q. It was not all out? - A. No, about four yards of it was out.

Q. You did not see whether it was broke when you first went by it? - A. I did not.

WILLIAM MARCH , Sen. sworn. - I went out as my son has stated to you, and took the lad into custody, with part of this silk in his hand, which he dropped on the ground when I laid hold of him.

Q.(To Francis.) How near was this roll of silk in the window to the pane of glass that was broke? - A. About the length of this roll.

Q. Whether, by accident of falling, this roll of silk might have broken the glass? - A. It could not have been broke by its falling, and one part of the silk was inside, and the other out, when he was taken; I do not think it could have fell there without a hand being put in.

GUILTY, aged 13.

Of stealing only, but not of breaking and entering the dwelling-house .

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

84. JOHN TENNENT was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Robert Shawe , Esq. about the hour of two, in the night of the 5th of November , and burglariously stealing a miniature picture set in gold, value 3 l. a compass, value 1 l. a leather bag, value 1 d. a canvass bag, value 1 d. twenty guineas, eleven half-guineas, sixteen seven-shilling-pieces, three crowns, four half-crowns, sixty shillings, nine sixpences, a piece of foreign silver coin called a French crown, value 4 s. 6 d. a French half-crown, value 2 s. 3 d. two other pieces of foreign coin, value 1 s. a Bill of Exchange, value 3007 l. 8 s. 11 d. a Bill of Exchange, value 500 l. a Bill of Exchange, value 434 l. 14 s. a Bill of Exchange, value 500 l. a Bill of Exchange, value 100 l. a Bill of Exchange, value 25 l. a Bill of Exchange, value 360 l. three Bank of England notes, value 5 l. each, two other Bank of England notes, value 2 l. each, twenty Bank of England notes, value 20 l. the said Bills of Exchange, Bank of England notes, and monies, at the time of committing the burglary, being the property of the said Robert Shawe , Esq. and the said Bills of Exchange, and Bank of England notes, being then due and unsatisfied to him .

Second Count. For breaking and entering the said dwelling-house, and burglariously stealing therein a Bill of Exchange, value 3007 l. 8 s. 11 d. and a Bill of Exchange, value 500 l. the said Bills of Exchange being the property of John Shands , Esq. executor of the last will and testament of James Craigs , Esq. deceased.

Third Count. Stood charged for that he, being in the same dwelling-house, did feloniously steal a Bill of Exchange, value 434 l. 14 s. the property of Thomas Loosely .

Fourth Count. For feloniously stealing the said monies, Bills of Exchange, and Bank of England notes, the property of Richard and Robert Shawe , Esqrs. and that he afterwards burglariously did break out of the said dwelling-house to get out of it.

Fifth Count. For that he, being in the dwelling-house of Robert Shawe , Esq. did feloniously steal a Bill of Exchange, value 3007 l. 8 s. 11 d. and a Bill of Exchange for 500 l. the property of John Shands , Esq. and that he afterwards did burglariously break out of the same.

Sixth Count. For feloniously stealing the said goods, monies, Bank-notes, Bills of Exchange, in the said dwelling-house, laying part of them to be the property of Richard Shawe , Esq. only, and afterwards burglariously breaking out of the said house; and the other part, the property of Richard and Robert Shawe , Esqrs.

Seventh Count. For that he, being in the said dwelling-house, did feloniously steal certain Bills of Exchange, and that he afterwards did burglariously break out of the said dwelling-house, feloniously stealing the goods and chattels respectively mentioned in the third and fourth Counts.

(The indictment was stated by Mr. Watson, and the case by Mr. Gurney.)

ROBERT SHAWE , Esq. sworn. - Examined by Mr. Watson. Q. Where do you live? - A. In Bridge-street, No. 15, the corner of Tudor-street, in the precinct of Bridewell .

Q. Whose dwelling is that - is it your's exclusively? - A. I am the only person who resides in it, except my own domestic servants.

Q. On the night of the 5th of November last, did any thing happen to that house? - A. On the night of the 5th of November, I was in the office till near eleven o'clock, the clerks had quitted their office about nine o'clock; when the clerks had quitted their office, I was sitting in my office with the door open, and my groom came in, from the door in Tudor-street, to the office.

Q. Did you hear the door fastened? - A. I heard the door shut, and the groom came in, and had some conversation with Mr. Le Blanc; I heard Mr. Le Blanc go out, and shut the door.

Q. He went out at the door in Bridge-street? - A. Yes; I went to bed about half past eleven o'clock, I got up the next morning about half past seven o'clock, when I received some information; I went into my own office, and found the uppermost drawer on the right-hand side of the desk broken open, the lock had been attempted to beforced, and the mahogany that the lock was fastened to had been cut out; they had forced it open by a poker, or some such instrument, and in that part of the mahogany that had been forced away I found this screw, (producing it); I observed on my desk a number of papers that were in the drawer when I went to bed the preceding night; on my examining the drawer, I missed the several articles mentioned in the indictment, and some others.

Q. Had you seen this drawer the night before? - A. Yes, I had only occasion to pay money out of the drawer; I had left it locked the preceding night with these articles in it.

Q. Were there a miniature picture set in gold, a pocket compass, a leather bag, and a canvas bag? - A. Yes, and eleven half-guineas; there were more seven-shilling pieces than the number in the indictment, but I am not really certain how many.

Q.Were there any crown-pieces? - A. Yes, and half-crowns, and about three pounds in shillings and sixpences.

Q. Was there a French crown? - A. Yes, and French half-crowns, and there was a foreign coin that passes in the East-Indies, called a Macarony.

Q. Any Bills of Exchange? - A. One of 3007 l. 8 s. 11 d. another for 500 l. another for 434 l. 14 s. another for 100 l. another for 25 l. one for 500 l. and another for 360 l.; three Bank-notes of five pounds each, and two of two pounds each; a great number of one-pound notes, and certainly more than is in the indictment, and one note of twenty pounds.

Q. Whose property were these? - A. The whole of these bills, notes, and cash, were my exclusive property, except five shillings in silver, and a twenty-pound note; and there were two Bills of Exchange, one for 3007 l. 8 s. 11 d. and one for 500 l. were the property of Mr. John Shands , they were left to me, they are endorsed by myself,

"Pay to Robert Shawe , or Order, on account of James Craigs , deceased." They were remitted to me by Mr. Shands, who was the executor of Mr. Craigs, and payable to me; the bill for 434 l. 14 s. is drawn in my favour, and remitted to me by my late partner, in the island of Jamaica, for the purpose of paying the money to Thomas Loosely . If I had received the money, I was to pay it over to Thomas Loosely .

Court. Q. When you had received the money, you were to remit it over to Thomas Loosely ? - - A. Yes.

Mr. Watson. Q. After you had examined the desk, did you examine any other part of the house? - A. I did; I went to the outside of the house, I could not discover that any force or violence had been used to get into the house.

Court. Q. You could not discover any marks of violence on the doors or windows? - A. No.

Mr. Watson. Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - A. Yes, he lived with me as footman near twelve months; he quitted my service last July.

Q. Had he an opportunity of seeing what you kept in that desk? - A. I paid him his wages quarterly out of this drawer, and I have many times took money out of this drawer for various purposes to give him.

Q. After this robbery had been committed by somebody, did you obtain a search-warrant? - A. No; I obtained a warrant on the 17th of November, to apprehend the prisoner, Mr. Nalder, the City Marshall, and Mr. Tipper, possessed themselves of it, and another constable: we went to the house of the prisoner, the corner of Suffolk-street, Dirty-lane, in the Borough, the King's-arms public-house.

Q. When you got to that house what did you first do? - A. The constable seized the prisoner, and as soon as he was secured, I desired Mr. Tipper to accompany me; we went up one pair of stairs into the bed-room, and in that room we searched and found a trunk, it was locked, and when we had searched the different parts of the house, I went below; and desired the mother of the prisoner to come up stairs, the key was brought up by Mr. Nalder, and Mr. Tipper unlocked the trunk, I produce the trunk, and the first thing I put my hand upon was a canvas bag, I immediately said, this is mine; the next was the pocket-compass, this compass was in the canvas bag, the ribbon was hanging out of the bag, that was in my desk on the night of the 5th of November; I found this miniature picture in the bag, that was in my desk on the night of the 5th of November; the Bills of Exchange for 3007 l. 8 s. 11 d. for 500 l. for 434 l. 14 s. for 100 l. and one for 25 l. were all in the bag, and this bag I kept the silver in; I did not then examine any further; we found the prisoner's pocketbook, it was opened by Mr. Nalder before the Lord-Mayor, in my presence; and in one of the pockets was this bill for 360 l. which was due, and was in my drawer on the 5th of November.

Q. Do you know any thing of that pocket-book? - A. No, it is not my pocket-book.

Q. Did you find any thing else, besides those notes you have mentioned? - A. There were several Bank-notes that were laying in the trunk: there was one of 20 l. two for 5 l. ten of 1 l. each.

Q. I do not know whether you know any thing about these Bank-notes? - A. I do not.

Court. Q. You do not know the number of the notes that were stole? - A. No.

Mr. Gurney. I can trace the numbers of some of the notes by some of the clerks in the Bank, they are found in the book.

Q. Did you find any others? - A. Eleven one pound notes, and four two pounds, at the bottom of the trunk, and a snuff-box; there is some coin inthat box similar to what I had; I found also a tobacco-box, it contained guineas, half-guineas, and seven-shilling-pieces; and there were some crowns and half-crowns in this bag, I had just such a bag; there is a medal which I verily believe is the same, but I cannot take upon me to say, and a French crown; and there were two silver salt spoons, they not in the indictment; and there is some linen belonging to the wife of the prisoner; and here is a book of the prisoner's, containing some accounts with his brewer, and other memorandums.

Q. Had you received, on the 3d of November, a two pound note of a person of the name of Moore? - A. On the 3d of November I received a five pound note, that and the two pound notes were in the drawer on the night of the 5th.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. The house that you inhabit yourself is in Bridge-street: the front door is in Bridge-street, and the office-door is in Tudor-street? - A. it is.

Q. I suppose, that part in Tudor-street, where the business is carried on, belongs jointly to you and your partners, and is paid jointly by you? - A. Yes.

Q. You pay for your own house out of your own private pocket? - A. The whole is considered as premises for the business.

Q. Then I understand you, that both the house and the offices are paid out of the business? - A. Yes.

Q. Your brother resides in the house? - A. He has not for some years, he did about five or six years ago, we never both jointly lived there; he built a new house, and when that house was finished, he gave up this to me.

Q. You said, in the office were these bills were kept, each of your servants had an opportunity of seeing what you had there? - A. Yes.

Q. How many servants are there in the house? - A. I had in the house a footman, a groom, and two house-maids.

Q. You paid him his wages in the office? - A. Yes; and all of them in the office.

Q. Then each of them had an opportunity of learning where the money was deposited? - A. Exactly so.

Q. I believe fourteen or fifteen days elapsed before you went to the house of the prisoner? - A. About twelve days.

Q.I suppose that you communicated it to your servants that the offence was committed? - A. One of my servants communicated it to me.

Q. What became of your cook? - A. On the 1st of December she cut her throat.

Q. And you, previous to that, had charged her with that robbery? - A. I had not.

Court. Q. Your business is an attorney? - A. Yes.

Q. Are you in the habit of having letters and papers addressed to you in the name of Robert Shawe , Esq.? - A. Frequently.

Q. That is a description by which you are known? - A. Yes.

WILLIAM HARRIS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. On the 5th of November last, you were groom to Mr. Shawe? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you fasten the door leading into Tudor-street that night? - A. Yes; it might be within a few minutes of nine o'clock.

Q. In what manner did you fasten it? - A. With a spring bolt, a chain, and a lock, there is no keyhole through the door; this outer door comes into a passage, beyond that is a glass-door, which is between the outer door and the clerk's office; I fastened the glass-door with a bolt, and the entrance into the clerk's office is by iron folding doors.

Q. Did you fasten this door too? - A. No; they were left for the footman to fasten.

Q. That is all that you fastened at that time. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you live in Mr. Shawe's service at the time the prisoner did? - A. The prisoner lived with him before me.

Court. Q. The question is, whether you lived there at the same time as the prisoner lived there? - A. Yes.

Mr. Gurney. Q. Had you continued your acquaintance with him since he left Mr. Shaws's service? - A. I have been in his company two or three times.

Q. Where does he live? - A. At the King's-arms, in Suffolk-street, at the back of the King's-Bench, the corner of Dirty-lane.

Q. On Sunday the 11th of November, did you go with Mr. Shawe's cook to his house? - A. I did.

Q. Was he at home? - A. He was.

Q. Did he and you, afterwards, come together to Mr. Shawe's house, leaving the cook at his house? - A. We did.

Q. In the course of the time you were in Mr. Shawe's house, did he, with you, or any other person, go into Mr. Shawe's office? - A. Yes.

Q. Did he go in at the door in Tudor-street? - A. Yes, and I went in at the front; and as soon as we had done tea we went to look at the office.

Q. Did he look at the drawer? - A. Yes; and he said, what a d - d rascally villain he must be, to use a man in that way, to break open his drawer.

Q. Did he say any more? - A. I do not believe he did.

Q. In your way home, had you any conversation with him? - A. Yes, about Ann Steers , who was with-child by him; he told me that in case I could persuade her not to swear the child, I was to be paid before the time he had promised me.

Q. Did he say why he should be able to pay you the money so much sooner? - A. No.

Q. You returned with him to his house? - A. Yes.

Q. Did any conversation take place there in respect to Mr. Shawe's robbery? - A. He was saying that it was said in his newspaper that a pocket iron crow was left in Mr. Shawe's office; he got the paper to shew me, and seemed very much agitated; he said, Bill, d - n it, what will you have to drink? I asked what a pocket crow was, and he could not make me understand what a crow was; when I was at his house there was a man in the room that drew the figure of a crow.

Court. Q. How did that conversation begin? - A. I asked him how the pocket crow was made.

Q. Who did you ask, the prisoner? - A. No, a man in company at his house when the prisoner was present, after the paper was read over to me by the prisoner.

Q. Did he read any thing about the pocket crow from that paper? - A. Yes; I asked what it was, and a man in company drew the figure of a crow in chalk upon the table.

Q. Did you observe the prisoner, at the time he was doing this? - A. Yes; he seemed very much agitated; the cook and I came home then.

Q. What do you mean by his being agitated? - A. He seemed to be very much alarmed; in reading the paper his hand shook; he made an alarm there was a rogue in his house.

Q. Was that after he had read the paper? - A. It was.

Q. Upon that alarm what did you all do? - A. He ran up stairs, and his wife after him.

Q. Was any rogue found? - A. Not that I heard of.

Q. Nothing more passed till you came away? - A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gleed. Q. You have been talking about agitation, was he more agitated than you are to-day? - A. I do not think myself agitated at all.

Q. This was in his house; he thought there was a rogue in it, and with that he ran up stairs? - A. Yes.

Q. How long have you lived with Mr. Shawe? - A. About two years.

Q. That is the whole of your service? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you live with him now? - A. No.

Q. How soon after the robbery was committed did you leave Mr. Shawe's service? - A. Soon after; I cannot rightly say.

Q. Had you any thoughts of quitting Mr. Shawe's service, before the robbery was committed? - A. No.

Q. Then it was part of your duty to fasten the door leading into Tudor-street? - A. It was not my place to do it; but that night I did do it, and a few nights before.

Q. And perhaps a few nights after - How many nights did you fasten up that door? - A. The night before the robbery.

Q. Then the night before, and the night the robbery was committed, you locked up that particular door? - A. I did.

Q. What makes you think the door was locked up about five minutes before nine? - A. Because I did it myself.

Q. Is nine o'clock the usual hour for locking up the office? - A. Half past eight is the usual hour.

Q. At that time you are completely certain that the door was locked up at nine? - A. I am.

Q. Have you kept up any connection with the prisoner since he quitted your master's service? - A. No more than as I went by I have called in and drank a glass of wine; I have rode by two or three times a week, but it is very seldom I was in the house.

Q. Do not mistake me; I am not asking you of your either being in or out of the house; have you seen him seldom or frequently? - A. Very seldom, I take it.

Court. Q. Only going by two or three times a week, and taking a glass of wine? - A. Sometimes I rode by two or three times a week.

Q. Recollect you are upon your oath, and do not give your evidence in this slovenly way. What did you mean by saying you had been riding by there two or three times a week, and every time you rid by you took a glass? - A. I rode by there two or three times a week, but not drank there every time I rode by,

Q. Why did you swear it just now; you should mind what you say? - A. I know what I say very well.

Mr. Gleed. Q. Were you and the cook very intimate? - A. Not in the least intimate.

Q. You and the cook went over on the 11th? - A. Yes.

Q. I am speaking of that unfortunate woman who laid violent hands upon herself; that is the same person? - A. Yes.

Q. Pray how often did you go to the prisoner's house between the 5th and 11th? - A. Not once.

Q. Then the 11th was the first time that you were at his house? - A. Yes.

Q. You were not riding by on the 11th? - A. No, it was on Sunday.

Q. You went over to get a note of hand for money which she had lent him? - A. Yes; for money that was lent in July by the cook; she asked me to go over with her, and it being a wet Sunday, I went with her.

Q. You would not have gone at all but upon her solicitation? - A. No.

Q. Had the cook, or you, any opportunity of going there on other Sundays? - A. No.

Court. Q. The question is, whether you and the cook had any opportunity between July andthe 11th of November to go over to Tennent's house? - A. We could not go over when we pleased.

Mr. Gleed. Q. The money was borrowed in July, and this particular Sunday was selected for the purpose of going to Tennent's house to get it; was it so? - A. The cook had a note of hand from my master; I do not say particularly from my master, but from one of the clerks; she asked me, if I would go over with her, and with that I said I would.

Q. Did you take a stamp with you? - A. Yes.

Q. Was it a blank stamp? - A. I cannot say.

Q. Whether it was written upon, blank or plain paper? - A. It was written upon, all but his signing it; I did not take it, the cook took it.

Q. You say you fastened the unfortunate door that leads into the office? - A. I fastened the outer door; the iron door I left for the footman to fasten.

WILLIAM HYDE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Watson. Q. On the 5th of November last did you live in the service of Mr. Shawe? - A. Yes, as footman.

Q. On the night of the 5th of November did you fasten up any part of the house? - A. Yes.

Q. What part - the office door? - A. All of them but one, and the outer door in Tudor-street; the street-door in Bridge-street it is very likely I fastened, that was found fastened in the morning; I believe I fastened that, but I am not sure whether it was me or my fellow servant.

Q. Which were the office-doors that you fastened? - A. The outer doors, all but two.

Q. What time of the night did you fasten them? - A. About a quarter past ten o'clock at night.

Q. Were all safe when you retired to rest? - A. All were safe then; I got up about a quarter past seven o'clock in the morning.

Q. Did you observe any thing then? - A. It was my duty to pass through this door to open a window in Tudor-street; I found all these doors open; the first is an iron door, the next is a glass door, and the outer door; they were all standing open, and the key of the door that leads from the kitchen stairs to the long office was changed to the contrary side of where I left it at night.

Q. You gave an alarm? - A. No, the housemaid made the first discovery that the drawer was broken open.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You were footman at the time? - A. Yes.

Q. Are you in the service of Mr. Shawe at this time? - A. Unfortunately I am not; we were discharged in consequence of this affair.

Q. How long have you been acquainted with the prisoner? - A. For five months, since I have been in Mr. Shawe's service.

Q. Have you been in the habit of visiting the house of the prisoner? - A. I have been in the house once; I have never been near the house since the robbery was committed.

Q. Were you at Mr. Shawe's house on Sunday, the 11th, after the robbery? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know the last witness, William Harris ? - A. Perfectly well.

Q. Do you remember the unfortunate woman that put an end to her existence? - A. Perfectly well.

Q. Did they stay at home or go out on the 11th of November? - A. I cannot say, I dined at home.

Q. How many servants remained at home on that day? - A. We in general went out on Sundays, my master never dined at home on Sundays.

Mr. Watson. Q. When you fastened that door on the night of the 5th of November, did you observe whether the door was fastened in Tudor-street; the outer door? - A. As it was my custom to fasten that door, I went to see, and I saw it was fastened before I went to bed.

Q. You were talking about a door in which the key was changed to the contrary side; which door was the key left in? - A. The long office door.

Q. On which side of the door had the key been left when you went to bed? - A. That side next the kitchen stairs.

Q. Was that door locked? - A. I cannot positively say whether it was locked or not.

Court. Q. Was it locked when you went to bed? - A. Yes, it was locked then; I had locked it then, and left the key next the kitchen stairs.

Mr. Watson. Q. When you got up in the morning the key was on the other side, that next to the office? - A. Yes.

Q. Was that door open? - A. No, it was shut to.

Q. The three doors that were left open were the iron door, the glass door next the passage, and the outer door? - A. Yes.

MARTHA STEVENS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Watson. Q. Were you in Mr. Shawe's service on the 5th of November last? - A. Yes, I was housemaid.

Q. On the morning of the 6th, what time did you get up? - A. A few minutes past seven o'clock.

Q. When you came down what did you observe? - A. I went into Mr. Shawe's office and made the fire; I was going to clean the fire-irons; I found the poker and tongs lying on the floor about the middle of the room; I went on with my work, and was dusting, and then I observed the drawer of Mr. Shawe's desk was broke open.

Q. How far were the poker and tongs lying from that desk? - A. A short distance; then I gave the alarm.

JOHN JARRARD sworn. - Examined by Mr.Gurney. Q. What are you? - A. I am a serjeant of the 10th regiment of foot.

Q. On the 5th of November last did you lodge at the house of the prisoner at the bar? - A. I did; at the King's Arms, in Suffolk-street, the corner of Dirty-lane.

Q. Do you remember the night of the 5th of November? - A. I do.

Q. On the evening of that day was the prisoner in or out? - A. He was at home till between 12 and one.

Q. Did he at that time go out? - A. He did.

Q. Did any thing occur to keep you awake during the night? - were you disturbed by any thing in the middle of the night? - A. I was.

Q. At what time did the prisoner come home? - A. Between four and five in the morning.

Q. In the course of the morning had you any conversation with the prisoner about your being kept awake in the night? - A. I had; I told him that his wife and mother had been making a noise in the night time about his being out; I asked him where he had been to; I told him that they had an apprehension of his being taken or grabbed.

Q. Was that the term that the wife and mother made use of? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. Did they use the word grabbed? - A. Yes, he said his wife and mother were apt to make a noise about nothing at all; he told me he met a young man, an acquaintance, and they had been over the water to a dance together.

Q. Did he say any thing more? - A. No.

Q. You continued to lodge in his house till he was taken up? - A. I did.

Q. About a week after this was his wife absent from the house at any time? - A. About eight days afterwards I think she was absent near two days; I cannot rightly recollect the day.

Q. Did you make any inquiry of him where she was? - A. I did; he told me she was gone to Wandsworth to see some relations of her's.

Q. After an absence of near two days, did she return? - A. She did in the morning.

Q. Had you any conversation with her in his presence as to where she had been? - A. I had not.

Q. Did she appear to be fatigued, as if she had been gone a little or a long way, when she came home? - A. She appeared to be greatly fatigued, as if she had been out all night, she was quite wet.

Q. In which bed-room did the prisoner sleep? - A. In the room next to the dining-room, on the first floor.

Q. Were there more than two bed-rooms on the first floor? - A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gleed. Q. The prisoner's wife at that time was pregnant, and very near her time? - A. She was pregnant.

Q. What time might you go to bed that night? - A. About one.

Q. You were a soldier quartered in the house? - A. I was not quartered in the house; I was rendezvousing or recruiting in the house.

Q. Was the prisoner in the house at the time you went to bed? - A. He was not.

Q. How far might your bed-room be from the prisoner's bed-room? - A. The next story.

Q. Is it right over it? - A. No, rather on one side, my bed-room is not exactly over his room.

Q. Did you lay awake the whole of the night? - A. Nearly.

Q. The noise was so great it prevented you from sleeping? - A. It was, I was going to get up two or three times, but I did not.

Q. What time did the noise cease? - A. About four or five in the morning; I slept after that.

Q. From the time you went to bed till the time you got up in the morning did you leave your bedroom? - A. I did not.

Court. Q. What was the noise? - A. Crying between the wife and the mother, and talking between them; they were supposing something had happened.

Q. From the talking you heard between them, you were collecting that he was not returned home? - A. Yes.

FRANCIS NALDER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Watson. Q. You are one of the City Marshals? - A. I am; I had a warrant on the 17th of November; I went over to the sign of the King's Arms, the corner of Suffolk-street, in company with Richard Tipper, Samuel Russell , a constable, and Mr. Shawe.

Q. Did you find the prisoner there? - A.I did? I sent Russell in first; we found him, his mother and wife; we secured the prisoner by first handcuffing his hands behind him in the little room behind the bar; I remained with him the major part of the time, and Russell remained with me; Mr. Shawe and Tipper went up stairs.

Q. After Mr. Shawe and Tipper went away from you had you any conversation with the prisoner? - A. Very little; Mr. Shawe called out to me for the keys of some box that was in the bedroom; I asked the wife of the prisoner for the key, or what keys she had about her, and she delivered them to me; I took them up stairs myself, leaving Russell in possession of the prisoner; I went to Mr. Shawe up one pair of stairs, into their bed-room; Tipper unlocked the box, and took out a bag of these articles, which were the things we found, as related by Mr. Shawe.

Q. Have you in your possession any papers? - A. I have two letters in my possession; one was delivered to me by a person of the name of Samuel, and the other was delivered to me by a person of the name of Furnival, who is turnkey to Mr. Kirby;I received them between the first and second examination.

Court. Q. What is Samuel? - A. I do not know what he is, he is in Court.

Q. That paper you received from Furnival; had you any opportunity of seeing it before? - A. I had an opportunity of seeing it when he was in custody, it contains a list of debts that were due to him.

SAMUEL HADLEY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. What are you? - A. I am a bookseller and silversmith; I live at Farnham, in Surry, thirty-eight miles from Hyde-Park-corner

Q. Look at that note for 360 l. and tell me whether you have ever seen it before? - A. I have, on the 13th of November.

Q. Was it offered to you by a man or a woman? - A. It was offered me by a woman.

Q. Have you seen the woman since? - Q. I believe I have, since I have been in town, she was pointed out to me by Mr. Nalder.

Q.(To Mr. Nalder.) Who was that person you pointed out to Mr. Hadley? - A. The wife of the prisoner at the bar.

Q.(To Hadley.) Was this offered to you at your shop at Farnham? - A. It was.

Q. I believe you did not take it? - A. I did not.

Q. Did you sell to that woman any sort of spoons? - A. I did.

Q. Look at these spoons, (they are banded to the witness); and see whether they are the same? - A. They are, I know them by a private mark; they are marked underneath.

RICHARD TIPPER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Watson. Q. You went on the 17th with Mr. Nalder, and assisted in the search and apprehension of the prisoner, at his house the corner of Suffolk-street? - A. I did.

Q. You have been in Court while these things have been produced in evidence? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you find any thing else? - A. A piece of japan muslin. (Produces it.)

Court. (To Jarrard.) Q. What room did the prisoner's mother sleep in? - A. The dining-room.

Q. Were they talking from one room to the other when they disturbed you? - A. They were in the dining-room.

Q. Were they in bed? - A. I do not know.

Q. They were not talking from one room to the other? - A. No, they were both in one room.

DAVID THOMAS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You are shopman to Mr. Faden, linen-draper, in the Borough? - A. I am.

Q. On the evening of the 6th of November, did you take, of any woman, a twenty pound Banknote? - A. I did.

Q. Did you sell that woman any article of linen drapery? - A. I did; several articles.

Q.Look at these articles, and see whether you sold any of them to that woman? - A. I sold this piece of japan muslin; I believe I sold her some calicoes, and I believe these are them, but I am sure of the japan muslin.

Q. That was on the evening of the 6th - Did you at any time after see that woman? - A. Yes; and by Mr. Shawe's desire I went to her house, at the King's-arms, Dirty-lane; I do not know the day, I went about a fortnight or three weeks back.

Q. Did she appear as mistress of the house? - A. She did not act as mistress; there were people in possession of the house at that time; but in that house I saw her then.

Q. How long did you keep the twenty pound note? - A. Not five minutes; I took it to Mr. Armstrong's on purpose to get it changed.

Court. Q. Did you hear the woman called by any name? - A. No.

Q. You have seen her since? - A. I have seen her since.

JOHN ARMSTRONG sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Where do you live? - A. At No. 226, in the Borough, next door but one to Mr. Faden's.

Q. On the 6th of November, did you receive a twenty pound note of Mr. Thomas? - A. I did.

Q. How long did you keep that note? - A. Till the next morning; there was endorsed Coutts and Co. on the back of it; I paid it to Mr. Thomas Mills the next morning.

THOMAS MILLS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. On the 7th of November, did you receive a twenty pound note of Mr. Armstrong? - A. It was either the 7th or 8th; I had it not in my possession above a quarter of an hour, I gave it to Sarah Earle , to pay to the house of Messrs. Were, Bruce, and Co.

SARAH EARLE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. On the 7th or 8th of November, did you receive of Mr. Mills, a Bank-note of twenty pounds? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you take it to Messrs. Were and Bruce, in Bartholomew-lane? - A. Yes.

- ENSHAM sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You are clerk-to Messrs. Were, Bruce, and Co.? - A. I am.

Q. On the 7th of November, did you receive of Sarah Earl a twenty pound Bank-note? - A. I did, on the 8th of November; the number of the note is - (looking at his book) 7547, 12th July, 1804.

Mr. Alley. Q. Is that your own hand-writing? - A. It is.

Mr. Gurney. Q. Whom did you pay it to? - A. I paid it on the same day, to whom I do not know; I paid it in a payment of a cheek, for 256 l. upon our house, drawn by T. P. Marter.

WILLIAM THOMAS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. On the 8th of November, did you receive a check for 256 l. drawn by Mr. Marter, on the house of Messrs. Were and Co.? - A. I did; and received the value of it.

Q. Did you receive it of the last witness? - A. I did.

Q. To whom did you give the notes you received? - A. I gave the whole of them to Mr. Evans, directly, at the India-house; I received the whole in Bank-notes, but what notes I do not know.

WILLIAM EVANS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Did you receive from the last witness 256 l. 4 s. 6 d. for a cheque of Mr. Marter's, and did he bring back the money for the cheque? - A. He did.

Q. Did you pay some of these notes to any person on that day? - A. Yes, to Mr. Potter, the treasurer of the East-India company.

GEORGE POTTER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Did you receive any Bank notes from Mr. Evans? - A. On the 8th of November I did.

Q. To what amount? - A. I cannot exactly tell.

Q. Amongst others had you a 20 l. paid you that day? - A. Yes, and I paid it on that day, in half an hour afterwards, into the Bank of England.

Q. Did you write any thing upon it before you parted with it? - A. I did, the name of Marter; (The note shewn him;) this is the note.

WILLIAM GRIFFIN sworn. - Q. Do you know any thing about that note? - A. I recollect it, I brought it from the Bank.

EDMUND CHAMBERS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Watson. Q. Do you recollect that note? - A. I perfectly recollect that note to have passed through my hands; I received this note at Mr. Bruce's shop, in the Strand, on the 29th of October, 1804. (Witness held a paper in his hand.)

Mr. Alley. Q. Is that a memorandum? - A. This paper in my hand is a bill of costs, to the amount of 21 l. 5 s. this bill of costs, before I paid it, I marked down the Bank notes with which I intended to pay it; my mark is 7547, 12 July, 1804, a 20 l. note; (looking at the note handed to him;) I find this note in my hand to correspond with that memorandum; the number of the 1 l. note is 3041, 8th of August, 1804; I paid them on the 1st of November, so numbered, and so dated, to Mr. Shawe.

JAMES WARD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You are a clerk at the Bank? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you, on the 3d of November last, pay any dividend to Mr. Shawe - what is that you have in your hand? - A. I was told to bring a copy of the entry.

Q. Have you brought your book here? - A. No.

Q.(To John Jarrard .) Q. Did you ever see the prisoner at the bar write? - A. I have.

Q. Look at that, and tell me whether you believe that to be his hand-writing? - (Witness looking at a paper.) - You are not called on to swear positively. A. I really believe it to be his own.

Q. Look at the other, and tell me whether you believe that to be his hand-writing? - A. I believe this to be the same.

Mr. Alley. Q. Had you any correspondence with him? - A. No.

Q. What opportunity have you had of seeing him write? - A. Making out bills.

Q. That consists mostly of figures? - A. Not altogether.

Q. Do you think you can safely, with your own conscience, say it is his own hand-writing? - A. I should not wish to swear any thing about it; I believe it to be his own hand-writing.

Court. Q. Unless you saw him write it, you cannot positively say. The question is, whether you believe it to be his hand-writing? - A. I do believe it to be his hand-writing.

- CUNDEY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Watson. Q. What are you? - A. I am clerk to Wood and Co. brewers.

Q. Did Wood and Co. serve the prisoner Tennent with beer? - A. They did.

Q. On the 3d of November did you see the prisoner? - A. I did not.

Q. Did you see him a few days before the 6th? - A. To the best of my recollection I did not.

Q. Did you see him on the 6th? - A. I did. On the 6th of November I received of him thirty-four pounds and four shillings, and twelve shillings in copper.

Q. Look in that book, and tell me whether there is any memorandum of it? - A.(Looking at the book.) Yes, the receipt is in this book.

BENJAMIN SAMUEL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Do you live in Rose-lane, Spitalfields? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you give that letter to Mr. Nalder last night? - (A letter handed to him.) - A. I did; I received it by post about sixteen or eighteen days ago.

Q. Did you know the prisoner at the bar before that time? - A. No, I never saw him.

Q. Had you any intercourse with him at any time? - A. I had seen him and conversed with him, previous to receiving that letter.

Mr. Gurney. This is a paper delivered by the turnkey of Newgate to Mr. Nalder. (It is read.)

"My dear friend - I shall think it a great favour if you and Jarrard will come on Wednesday for a witness, as Sam Grace and William Parker brought these things to my house, which they certainly did; all that you will have to say will be, that you saw Sam Grace and William Parker give John Tennent a small brown canvass bag, about the size of a small shot-bag, and told him to take care of it, and when they wanted it, they would ask him for the bag: it was about the 8th of November,about two o'clock in the day, in the little room behind the bar, Pray do not say any thing about it; if you do, we shall not find them. I told the Lord-Mayor that you would come for a witness, and I hope you will; I will make you any satisfaction for it."

(Another letter read, addressed to Mr. Benjamin Samuel , Rose-lane, Spitalfields, dated Dec. 14, 1804, Newgate.)

"Dear friend - This is all that you will have to say on the 8th or 9th of November: I was sitting in the house of John Tennent , in the room adjoining to the bar; I saw two men come in, the one was a groom, and the other was a footman; the groom was a great bit larger than the footman; I saw him give J. Tennent a small brown canvass bag, about the size of a small shot-bag, and told him to take care of it for him, and when they wanted it they would ask him for it again, that was about eight o'clock in the evening; I heard J. Tennent call the groom by name William Harris , and the footman's name William, but I do not know what his other name is, but he is a little man, and wears powder; I believe that is all you can say. My trial is put off till next Sessions, which I believe will be the 9th of next month. So no more at present from your well-wisher,

J. TENNENT."

The prisoner left his defence to his Counsel, and called Robert Shawe , Esq. who said, when he came into his service, he came with a good character, and during the time he was with him he was a good servant.

GUILTY , Death , aged 24.

Mr. Robert Shawe recommended him to mercy, as the prisoner, since he had been in confinement, had returned him bills of exchange, inclosed in a letter, to the amount of five hundred and odd pounds, which were not in the indictment; he did not mention it by way of extenuation of guilt, but by way of inducement to mercy.

London Jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

85. JANE TUES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of December , a petticoat, value 10 s. a spencer, value 5 s. three pair of silk stockings, value 5 s. a pack of cards, value 2 s. and a leather case, value 1 s. the property of William-Henry Boutevile .

WILLIAM- HENRY BOUTEVILE sworn. - I am a wholesale goldsmith and jeweller , I live at the corner of Little-Britain, Aldersgate-street : On Monday morning, the 17th of December, we had strong reason to suspect Jane Tues , who had lived with us near four months; I told her I insisted upon seeing her box opened; she refused, without I got a search-warrant; I sent for a constable; I followed her as she went up stairs, and staid with her the whole time till the constable came, and then we searched her box, and found the articles mentioned in the indictment.

THOMAS WOOLLEY sworn. - I am a constable, I produce the articles; I was sent for; the prosecutor was up stairs in the garret, when I came, with the prisoner; he searched her box, and took out the articles, and afterwards owned the things. (The property produced and identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. The silk stockings were given to me by my mistress when she was looking up some things to sell; she looked up seven pair of stockings, and she promised me one more pair, and the shift and the spencer likewise were given me by Mrs. Boutevile.

Q.(To the prosecutor.) Did she pretend to say so then? - A. No; this is the first time I ever heard it; we have taken another shift out of pledge which is not in the indictment.

Q. Had you a character with her? - A. Yes, from one Mrs. Twigs; she gave her a character, but I had reason to suspect her honesty.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY , aged 18.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

86. THOMAS JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of December, four pair of shoes, value 20 s. six pair of stockings, value 6 s. four pillow-cases, value 3 s. five shirts, value 20 s. six handkerchiefs, value 3 s. a table-cloth, value 10 s. and two caps, value 1 s. the property of John Willan .

Second Count. For like offence, the property of John Willan , John Julip , Richard Ironmonger , Richard Coster , and Benjamin Fieldhouse .

Third Count. For like offence, the property of William Harris .

(The case stated by Mr. Knapp.)

WILLIAM HARRIS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. On the 24th of December did you drive a waggon for Mr. Willan? - A. Yes; he keeps the Bull and Mouth, Bull and Mouth-street .

Q. Had you a parcel directed to Mr. Wilkinson in that waggon? - A. Yes; it was put in at the Bell-inn, Holborn; I put my hand on it there in the waggon; it was brought in the waggon to the Bell Savage, Ludgate-hill, and there we took some more parcels up, and my own hand was upon that parcel at the Bell Savage-inn, Ludgate-hill, it was directed to Mr. Wilkinson; I rode in the waggon from there to Bull and Mouth-street , and there I got out of the waggon, and went into the yard to see whether there was any vacancy for me to come into the yard; I left Hatherway to guard the waggon; I was going back to the waggon again, andjust as I came to the gates I heard Hatherway call Thomas; I ran to assist him, and when I came to him, he had got the prisoner by the coat; he said he had took a parcel out of the waggon; I laid hold of him by the collar; he said, do not pull me about; I said I would not; the waggon stood still, and the parcel was standing down by the wheel.

Q. Is that the man you laid hold of by the collar? - A. Yes.

Q. Had you seen him before you went from the waggon to go into the yard? - A. No; it was crouded with people, the mail coaches were just going out between six and seven o'clock.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Your yard is paved with very rough stones, so as the waggon might be put in such a position that a package might tumble out? - A. It was not rough at all where the waggon stood.

WILLIAM HATHERWAY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am porter to Mr. Willan.

Q. Were you left in charge of the waggon while the last witness went into the yard? - A. Yes, on Christmas eve; we stopped the waggon in Bull and Mouth-street; I was standing by the tail of the waggon, and I saw the prisoner come and put his foot on the wheel, and take this parcel out of the waggon.

Court. Q. You saw him put his foot on the wheel, and take the parcel out of the waggon? - Yes; and as soon as he took his foot off the wheel I laid hold of him, and he tried to get from me, but he could not get away from me with the parcel; he dropped the parcel.

Q. Whereabouts was the parcel dropped? - A. On the pavement, close by the waggon, Charles Lucas picked it up; it was directed to Mr. Wilkinson; he struggled much to get away; I secured him till Harris came, then he took him from me, and I staid with the waggon.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Do you know whether the prisoner was to have any parcel sent by the waggon? - A. I do not know.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Did the prisoner ask you for any parcel that was expected to come? - A. No.

CHARLES LUCAS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I have got the parcel, it is directed to George Wilkinson , Esq. No. 24, Southampton-row, Russell-square.

Q. Where did you get it? - A. I took it off the pavement close by the prisoner; I did not see him drop it; I have had it in my custody ever since.

(The property produced and identified by Harris and Hatherway.)

GUILTY , aged 20.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

87. JOHN SPARROW was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of January , a carcase of mutton, value 20 s. the property of Christopher Scales and Michael Scales .

CHRISTOPHER SCALES sworn. - I live at No. 66, Aldgate High-street.

Q. Have you any partner? - A. I have, Michael Scales : On Friday evening last the prisoner was detected by a witness who is here present; he knocked at the door, and asked me if the prisoner, who was going across the road, had bought a sheep of mine; it is commonly called a sheep, but it was a carcase of mutton; I followed him, and collared him, and brought him back.

HUGH BIGWELL sworn. - I am a butcher, I live in Paternoster-row, Spitalfields; I saw the prisoner carry the sheep out of the shop, I did not see him take it; it was a carcase of mutton, and as he carried it out of the shop, he dropped the cloth from off his shoulder; he took it out of one butcher's shop, and went into the next shop with it, and when he came out of that shop, I gave him the cloth; he said it was his; I told Mr. Scales what I had seen; we then went across the way, and fetched him back, and sent for an officer.

Q. What became of this carcase of mutton that was in this shop? - A. Mr. Scales had it again.

Q. Are you sure that this man who went into that shop with the carcase of mutton was the same man who took it out of Mr. Scales' shop? - A. I am sure, I never lost sight of him; it was about seven o'clock in the evening last Friday.

Q.(To Mr. Scales.) You had an information against this man by the witness - you went across the road, and took him? - A. Yes; I took him back into my shop; I went into the shop where the sheep was, I knew it to be my sheep; he said he knew nothing about it, he did not take it; I then asked him his name; he told me, William Wells , or Willis, as near as I can recollect; it was not John, nor William Sparrow ; he said he worked at the docks; I then thought it necessary to send for an officer, and give charge of him; I took the sheep home.

Q. You are sure it was your sheep? - A. I am certain of that; the next butcher does not kill mutton, and that was the only sheep there was in the shop.

Prisoner's defence. I know myself very innocent of the crime alledged against me; I was going over the way; this gentleman took me on the shoulder, and shoved me along, and said, you have stole a sheep of mine, will you come to the shop along with me; I said, by all means I will; they overhauled my cloaths to see if I had any grease about me; I had no grease whatever about my clothes; that man said I had it on my back; I am a hardworking man, I have been with Lord Nelson at Egypt; I belonged last summer to Alderman Curtis's pleasure boat.

Q. Where, here or at Ramsgate? - A. If I was at home I could tell; it was at Ramsgate.

Q. Only name the month? - A. I cannot really say the day of the month.

Prosecutor. We found grease on his hands and on his elbows.

GUILTY , aged 34.

Confined one month in Newgate , and during that time to be publickly whipped in Aldgate High-street .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

88. JOHN INCE was indicted for that he, on the 8th of December , was employed as servant to William Stapleton , and by virtue of such employment, did receive and take into his possession of and from Elizabeth, the wife of Edward Chamberlain , the sum of eleven shillings, for and on account of his said master, and that he afterwards fraudulently did embezzle, secrete, and steal the same, and so the Jurors say that he, the said John Ince , feloniously did embezzle, secrete, and steal the same from his said master .

Second Count. For like offence, only varying the manner of charging it.

Mrs. CHAMBERLAIN sworn. - Q. What is your husband's name? - A. Edward Chamberlain , a bricklayer; the prisoner is a servant to Mr. Stapleton, I have always bought sand of Mr. Stapleton; the prisoner came with the sand, and delivered it; he came another time with the receipt, I gave him eleven shillings for the load of sand, and he gave me the receipt; I gave him half a guinea in gold and a sixpence; I am positive he is the man I paid the money to.

WILLIAM STAPLETON sworn. - I am a coal-merchant and sandman ; a load of sand was sent to Mrs. Chamberlain by her order, this man with another took the load of sand; in consequence of his being in the habit of receiving money, and appropriating it to his own use, he was ordered to receive no more, and this load of sand being on my books, I sent my young man to receive the money; I found Mrs. Chamberlain had paid for it.

Q. When was this that you first found it out? - A. Three or four days after Christmas-day; after he was detected, I interrogated him; he acknowledged having received it, and not paying it to me, together with several others.

Prisoner's defence. My master trusted me to carry out a dozen bills a little while before; I called on that lady at one time, she was not at home, and then I called again, she paid me the money.

GUILTY , aged 51.

Confined one week in Newgate , and whipped in the jail .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

89. WILLIAM COLLIER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of December , a cruet-stand, value 16 s. three glass cruets, value 8 s. a tea-board, value 1 s. seven cups, value 2 s. 6 d. seven saucers, value 2 s. 6 d. a candlestick, value 1 s. a bason, value 1 s. two salt-cellars, value 2 s. and two pounce-boxes, value 1 s. the property of Thomas and John Burn .

JOHN BURN sworn. - I am a china and glass man , I live at No. 22, Barbican ; the prisoner was porter in the house; this morning, as he was going to breakfast, I followed him into the street; I asked him where he was going; he said, he was going to breakfast; I said to him, what have you got in your pocket; he said, not any thing; I said, I insist upon searching you; putting my hand in his pocket, I perceived a cup uppermost in one pocket, and two cruets in the other pocket, and a gilt cruet-stand concealed partly in his small clothes under his apron; I left him with my brother while I went in pursuit of an officer; on my return, he was in custody of an officer; there were various other articles found in his apartment, I have no doubt of their being my brother's and my property, but I will not swear to them.

SAMUEL RUSSELL sworn. - I am a City officer; between the hours of nine and ten, I perceived a number of people in Barbican, I went up and enquired what was the matter; I saw Thomas Burn have hold of the prisoner at the bar; I went in, and he gave charge of him to me; on searching him, I took a cruet out of one pocket, and the other out of the other.

Q. Where was the cruet-stand? - A. I took that out of his breeches from under his apron, and a mustard-pot, and a vinegar cruet; I took a key from his breeches pocket, and went to his lodgings on Saffron-hill, and Jonathan Trott went with me, we found a great many more things.

Q.(To Mr. Burn.) Is there your mark on them? - A. Yes, P on the five glasses; I am sure they are my property, this is the paper they were in.

Q. What did the prisoner say? - A. The first excuse he made was, he said he wanted them for his own use, and afterwards he said he was a deserter from the Guards, and he wanted to make a present of these to his serjeant to keep his desertion a secret.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Fined 1 s. and delivered to his serjeant.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

90. MARY MARKWELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of November , five pounds in monies , the property of George-Gascoign Bamber .

The Court being of opinion it was a gross fraud, but not a felony, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

91. BENJAMIN AYRES was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Boards , about the hour of two atnight, on the 23d of December , and burglariously stealing therein sixteen ducks, value 32 s. three turkies, value 18 s. and a gander, value 5 s. the property of John Boards .

(The case stated by Mr. Gurney.)

JOHN BOARDS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. On the night of the 22d of December, was your poultry all safe? - A. Yes.

Q. On the morning of the 23d, did your servant call you up? - A. Yes.

Q. How is that hen-house with regard to your dwelling-house? - A. There is a coal-house that joins to the hen-roost, the coal-house is next to the brewhouse.

Q. Is it all under one roof, and connected together? - A. It is the same nature as the brewhouse, but not of the house.

Court. Q. It is not in an enclosed yard? - A. No.

Q. If it is within an enclosed yard, it is protected as well as the house - it is no part of the dwelling-house neither? - A. No.

Mr. Gurney. Q. What time in the morning were you called up? - A. About two o'clock.

Q. Did you find the turkey-house had been robbed? - A. Yes.

Q. And the tiles taken off the house? - A. Yes; we had a strong door made to the hen-roost, he got in the coal-hole way; we lost three turkies, sixteen ducks, and a gander.

Q. Did you and your man pursue him? - A. Yes, and we found him in the lane; as soon as we came to a waggon, we asked the waggoner if he had seen a man with any poultry; he said, he was the off-side of the waggon, and he pulled the poultry out of the waggon in a moment, and said he had just put them in; the waggoner was quite a young fellow, I was obliged to hold the prisoner down by the butt-end of the gun; he said he would lick us all.

JOSEPH WEBSTER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You are servant to Mr. Boards? - A. Yes; about two o'clock I was going to my master's stables, I found a man in a field adjoining my master's yard, he was pulling some long feathers from a duck; I said, halloa, mate! what are you doing there? he said, he was doing a job for himself; I went up to him with a candle and lantern; I said, you have got a fine parcel of ducks here; yes, he said, I will sell you some if you like; I went and called another man, and I went to him again; he then said to me, b - r your eyes, if you are not gone, I will send some small shot in you; I went and called my master, and James Gray was in the lane.

Q.Where did you find him next? - A. I found him along with the waggon, I asked the waggoner where he was; he said, he was the off-side of the waggon, and the poultry was in the waggon, and there we took him.

Q. Were you quite sure that that man you found with this waggon was the same man you saw in the field? - A. Yes.

Q.(To Prosecutor.) Are you quite sure that this poultry was your's? - A. Here is my wife here that will swear to them; she had put some red rags round their legs to mark them for store-ducks.

Prisoner's defence. I had been going about for work, I was coming down the road, and these men met me; they began knocking me about, I thought they were going to take my life away from me.

GUILTY, aged 27,

Of stealing only .

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

92. THOMAS SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of December , six silver table-spoons, value 3 l. and three silver teaspoons, value 10 s. the property of Matthias Magrath .

MATTHIAS MAGRATH sworn. - I live in Crown-street, Westminster : On the 29th of September, I lost six table-spoons and three tea-spoons, all silver.

Q. What might be the value of them? - A. I cannot properly judge of the value of them, some of them being worn, I suppose three pounds; I missed them about half an hour after four o'clock, in the evening; the prisoner's master was a lodger in my house, and the prisoner had them to clean: my wife knows he had them.

MARY MAGRATH sworn. - Captain Shaw, the prisoner's master, came to my house on the 24th of December, he belonged to the 23d regiment; on the 29th, the captain was to have company to dinner, he asked me to let him have some silver spoons, which I did; when the dinner was ready, there was no cloth laid, nor no servant to be found, and when the lady came to lay the cloth there were no spoons, and the prisoner was gone; finding him gone, I asked captain Shaw if he was a man of character, and why he brought him into the house, if he did not know his honesty; he told me he knew him from the month of June; we went to Bow-street, and he was taken on the Sunday morning; I have seen one spoon since, which was found in his pocket, that I have sworn to; the man is here that took it out of his pocket; I knew the spoon, and know it to be mine.

Q. Has any more been found besides this single spoon? - A. No.

THOMAS - sworn. - I am one of the patrols belonging to Bow-street: On the 30th of December, I was sent for while the prisoner was in custody to receive him into my custody, at the watch-house, St. Giles's, where I immediately searched him, and in his right-hand coat-pocket I found this spoon, in a pocket-book; on Monday morning I took himto Bow-street, Mrs. Magrath came forward, and swore to it, and he was committed. (The spoon produced, and identified by the prosecutrix.)

Prisoner's defence. I am a private soldier, I belong to the 23d regiment of foot, I never was servant to captain Shaw, I only came up with him; as he was an officer, he said, he would renew the pass to Sunday morning following, neither did he trust me with any property whatever; I never received any property from the woman.

Prosecutrix. You received two spoons marked W A S, out of my hands.

GUILTY, aged 20,

Of stealing to the value of 39 s.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

93. JOSEPH NASH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of December , eighty pounds weight of bacon, value 28 s. the property of Mary Lucombe .

MARY LUCOMBE sworn. - I live at No. 27, Lamb-street, Spitalfields; I keep a shop in Spitalfields market .

Q. Do you sell bacon? - A. Yes; on Saturday, the 22d, I left the shop about twelve at night; I locked it up, and on Sunday morning I was alarmed by the watchman, between four and five o'clock, and when I came to the shop I found it was open; I examined it; there were two sides of bacon gone, three parts of another side, and several pieces; I stopped in the shop till eight o'clock in the morning, and then I locked the shop up; I heard no more of it till the Wednesday, when my brother was going past the prisoner's shop; he keeps a sheep's head shop.

Q. Did you go to the prisoner's shop? - A. Not till after my brother and Mr. Pike went.

JOHN LUCOMBE sworn. - I am brother to the last witness; I was coming up Well-street, by the prisoner's shop, on Wednesday, the 26th of December, and I saw the bacon in his shop.

Q. How far is that from your sister's shop? - A. A very little distance; I saw three pieces lying on his counter.

Q. Lying on the counter so as any body might see it? - A. Yes.

Q. How do you know it was your sister's? - A. I was not certain it was my sister's, but coming by, it struck me that it was; my sister gave me twopence; I went to the prisoner's shop, and bought a quarter of a pound of it, and when I came home my sister dressed it, and it had very much the same flavour as my sister's; I eat some of it.

Q. Can you tell your sister's bacon from any other person's by the taste? - A. I think I can.

Q. Hardly enough to tell your sister's bacon from any other? - A. Mr. Pike and I went down to the prisoner's shop; I stopped out while Mr. Pike went in.

WILLIAM PIKE sworn. - Q. You went down to the shop of the prisoner with this boy? - A. Yes; Mary Lucombe sent to me to go down and look at this bacon; I asked him how much he had got of it, and where he got it; he said, it was a very unfair question; I told him that a neighbour of mine, that rented a shop of me, had her shop broke open on Sunday morning; then I asked him what he gave for it; he said he gave two shillings a stone for it; I said, you have bought it cheap enough; I said he could get money by it; he said he could tell me where he bought it, and if I would send the young woman down he would tell her; as soon as she went down, the bacon was gone; I saw three large pieces.

Q. Did you go and tell her? - A. Not directly; Mary Lucombe told me when she went it was gone; the wife told her he had taken it back to the person he had bought it of, and when we got the warrant, he and the bacon were gone.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. In point of fact did he not surrender himself? - A. Yes, he sent word afterwards.

Q. It is old rusty bacon? - A. No, it is bacon of two years old.

Q. It is an inferior sort? - A. It is old bacon, the salt eats away the rhind.

Court. Q. What might it be worth? - A. You can buy it at one place at 3 s. a stone; you could not buy it at other places under 3 s. 6 d. a stone, at 8 lb. to the stone; that is the wholesale price.

Q. Do you deal in bacon? - A. Not now, I have.

Q.(To Prosecutrix.) Did you go to the shop of the prisoner after Mr. Pike had been there? - A. Yes; I told him I had come to see the bacon; he said he had sent it all away to the person he had bought it of; he told me I could not hurt him, he could tell me the person he bought it of.

Q. Did he? - A. No; I told him if he would not tell me, he must be made to tell; I left the shop.

Mr. Alley. Q. You went directly from the shop; you did not give him time to tell you.

Court. Q. He did not tell you, and when you came back the bacon was gone and the prisoner too? - A. Yes.

Prisoner's defence. When Mr. Pike came to me to see the bacon, he saw it in the shop; while he was looking at it I said to him, here is some more of it; he saw it all; I then had a man who had bought two hocks, I told him; and I said, if you please, I will go, and fetch the two hocks from the people, if possible, perhaps there may be some marks on them; he said he did not think it wasthe bacon, it was too wet to be her's; I told him I could sell it all, a man had bid me 7 d. a pound for it, it was all open in the shop, and if I had known it had been stolen, I would not have put it there; the man came back that bid me the money, and I let the man have it that bid me the most money for it.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

94. MARY REGAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of December , a gold ring, value 18 s. the property of Thomas Whitford .

ELIZABETH WHITFORD sworn. - I lost a ring about two years back; it was made for Mr. Dean, it came to be altered; there came two women to ask for the ring; I put out the drawer that contained the rings for them to choose the ring; they cried, this is it, and this is it, and so I supposed they took it; I cannot swear to the day of the month; my husband was not at home when it was lost.

- sworn. - I am a constable; I was sent for about the 12th of December to Barnard Benjamin 's, Golden-lane; the prisoner and her daughter were fighting, but when I had got there they were not fighting then, and there was a woman named Johanna, who said to me, look at that woman's finger, she has got a ring that belongs to a silversmith, opposite the butter-shop in Smithfield-bars; I took it off her finger, and took her to the watchouse, and then went to Mr. Whitford with the ring; he said it was his ring, that he had made it for Mr. Dean, who keeps the Bull's-head, Smithfield, about two years ago.

THOMAS WHITFORD sworn. - I know that ring to be my property; I know nothing more about it.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

95. MARTIN RYAN was indicted for feloniously making an assault on the King's highway, upon Susannah, the wife of William Waun , on the 27th of November , and putting her in fear, and taking from her person, against her will, a screw box, value 1 d. a cap, value 3 d. seven pawnbroker's duplicates, value 3 d. and one shilling in money , the property of the said William.

SUSANNAH WAUN sworn. - My husband's name is William; on Tuesday night, the 27th of last November, between ten and eleven o'clock, I was going on an errand, through Brooke-street, Ratcliff-highway , when the prisoner stopped me, pushed me down, put his hand into my pocket, and took out what I had.

Q. Did he say any thing to you? - A. No, he gave me a push upon some steps; he laid hold of my arm and set me down.

Q. What did he take? - A. A little box of tickets, a shilling, and a night-cap.

Q. Where was the shilling? - A. In my pocket, he took them out all at once, and then he went away.

Q. Had you ever seen him before? - A. No, I know him because I could see him by the lamps; I did not call for assistance, because there was nobody to call to, and I was frightened; there were duplicates of a pair of blankets, a gold wire to put over a ring, a silk handkerchief, a waistcoat, and a coloured apron.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Upon what errand were you going? - A. The person I went for was very ill, and I was going to the public-house for some gin.

Q. You had been drinking some gin before? - A. No, I was not fuddled.

Q. Were you sober? - A. Yes, I had but one glass, and that could not fuddle me.

Q. Did you drink any beer that day? - A.Yes, about a pint.

Q. Where is your husband? - A. At sea.

Q. Had you pawned any thing that day? - A. No.

Q. How much money had you in the morning? - A. None; the woman gave me the shilling to get something to drink; she is very bad, in Love-lane, and her husband is at sea.

Q. Did you not tumble down, instead of being pushed down? - A. No.

Q. Did you carry any bottle? - A. Yes.

Q. And you had the shilling in your hand to pay? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you mean to say the shilling was in your hand? - A. Yes.

Q. Now, you never said you would not have prosecuted this man, if it had not been for Mr. Brown, who told you there was 40 l. reward? - A. No.

Q. Have you not said so to Mr. Duff? - A. No.

Q. Have you not said to the pawnbroker, that you lost the box, and it was not taken from you? - A. No.

Q. Do you recollect seeing the prisoner the day after? - A. Yes, he sent for me.

Q. Upon your oath did you not say you had never seen him before? - A. No, I never saw him before to speak to him; I said I had never spoke to him before.

Q. When did you complain of this transaction? - A. I went to the Justice.

Q. Brown told you of the reward? - A. No, I never heard it till now.

Court. Q. You say you had the shilling and bottle in your hand? - A. Yes.

Q. You first said it was in your pocket? - A. The box and cap were in my pocket, I made a mistake, the shilling was in my hand.

Q. You say this was in Brooke-street; have you not said it was in another place? - A. No.

Q. In your examination before the Justice, you said it was in Butcher-row? - A. It is close by, I take it to be all one.

Q. How came you to say it was in Butcher-row? - A. I made a mistake.

ROBERT BROWN sworn. - I am an officer: I sent for the prisoner, and he came to me; I asked him what became of the box, and through the hole in the door of the room in which he was locked he gave me this box, and a duplicate of a ring; I received a handkerchief, apron, and a pair of blankets, from Mr. White; (produces them.)

JOHN WHITE sworn. - On Wednesday morning, between ten and eleven o'clock, Martin Ryan desired me to take them in, and let them be till he called for them; I gave them to Brown.

ALBERT NICHOLS sworn. - I am a pawnbroker, in Broad-street, Ratcliff; on the 28th of November the prisoner came with six duplicates, in the name of Waun, early in the morning; he said he had bought them; about an hour afterwards the prosecutrix came and said she had lost her tickets, and she believed she had lost them in the public-house. (The property produced, and identified.)

Prisoner. I leave my defence to my Counsel.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

96. ROBERT MITCHELL and DUNCAN M'DONALD were indicted, the first for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of December , twelve amputating saw-handles, value 14 s. and fourteen dozen of amputating knife-handles, value 30 s. the property of James Stodhart , in his dwelling-house ; and the latter for receiving the same, knowing them to have been stolen .

There being no evidence to effect Mitchell, the prisoners were both

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

97. RICHARD SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of December , in the dwelling-house of James Davis , two Banknotes, value 2 l. the property of Peter Armstrong .

(The case stated by Mr. Gurney.)

PETER ARMSTRONG sworn. - I am a Swede, and a shipwright ; I lodge at James Davis 's, who keeps the Three Foxes at Limehouse : About half past ten on Saturday night, the 29th of September, I was introduced to take a glass of punch with Mr. Peterson, Mr. Butterfield, Mr. Gammon, and Mr. Copers; I had no change, and asked Davis to change a ten-pound note; he gave me four two-pound notes, and two one-pound notes; I and Copers played at all-fours; the prisoner came in with a pipe, and called for some gin and water; Butterfield, Patterson, and Copers said, if he staid, they would go; Davis desired him to go, and he refused.

Q. Did the prisoner play? - A. The landlord said he would take one hand with him, if he would walk out of the house afterwards; the prisoner agreed, and pulled out a two-pound note, and so did Davis; they were both given to Copers; a squabble took place, and Davis wanted his note back.

Q. The landlord desired him to go off? - A. Yes.

Q. What Davis asked for, was his own two-pound note? - A. Yes; Mr. Davis desired him to walk out, and the prisoner said, I will not for you nor any b - r in the town; Copers said, I will back you for fifty pounds, or a hundred; the prisoner struck the landlord on the face, and after he had beat the landlord he robbed me of two one-pound notes; the landlord came up again; then the prisoner asked for the two-pound; Mr. Copers pulled out a one-pound note, which was Mr. Davis's; I do not know whether Mr. Copers gave the two one-pound notes to the prisoner, or not; he asked me for it; I said I have only got a one-pound note, which I laid down on the table; I said, that is not the note; Mr. Davis said, no; the prisoner at the bar put his hand over to the one-pound note, and tore it in half, and put it in his breeches pocket; I said, do not rob me; yes, he said, you b - r, I will rob you, and you shall not take it again; I begged him to give it me; he called me a d - d b - r, and struck me over the face; I struck the prisoner, and knocked him on the floor, and when he came to me again, I knocked him down again; then they said, if I was a man, I should give him room; I knocked him down again; after that he acknowledged that he had robbed me of two one-pound notes; he said, Mr. Armstrong, I beg you will not take the law of me.

Court. Q. Did he say he had robbed you? - A. He spoke the same words that I have said myself.

Mr. Gurney. Q. Give us the same words over again? - A. He said, Mr. Armstrong, I acknowledge I have robbed you of two one-pound notes, I will give them to you, and ten pounds to-morrow, I have none about me now.

Q. Was it for robbing you, or striking you? - A. I take it, for robbing me; the prisoner wished to leave off, as he had the worst of it.

Q. Did Mr. Copers say any thing then? - A. He said they were school-fellows, and he would give me ten pounds, or twenty pounds, if I would not take the law of him.

Q. Was the prisoner by at the time? - A.He was.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

98. MARY HARDING was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of December , a silver watch, value 30 s. the property of John Snipe , privily from his person .

JOHN SNIPE sworn. - On Sunday evening, the 16th of December, between eight and nine o'clock, I was in Parliament-street ; I met one Scholey, and I went into the Axe and Gate public-house to treat him with some liquor.

Q. Being in liquor yourself? - A. Yes; this woman, the prisoner, sat down in the same box where I was sitting, and when I came out of the public-house to go home, Mr. Scholey asked me if I had my property about me; I put my hand to my sob, and found my watch was gone, and my money out of my pocket; he wanted me to go back; I, being in liquor, did not, but desired him to look after it, and the next morning I found the prisoner in the watch-house; I did not know that I had lost the watch till I came out of the public-house.

Q. When had you felt your watch was safe? - A. When I was in the public-house I looked at the watch, I was fearful of being too late for going home.

EDMUND POOLE sworn. - I am a watchman of St. Margaret's; I was in Tothill-street, and heard the alarm of a watchman's rattle; I hastened to the spot, and found Mary Harding laying on the ground in the Almonry; Scholey had followed the girl there; I watched in Tothill-street; I went up there, hearing the watchman's rattle spring, and from information I had from Scholey I felt in her pocket, and found the watch and a dollar in her pocket. (The watch produced and identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. I was coming along Charing-cross in the evening, and met this gentleman and Mr. Scholey; they took me to the Duke's Head, in Charing-cross, and we had two pints of gin hot; we came out of there, and went to the Axe and Gate, in Parliament-street, and sat there drinking; Mr. Scholey took the watch and two dollars out of his pocket before he went out of the house; after he had gone, this Scholey, a soldier in the Third Regiment of Guards, took one dollar away from me, and wanted me to deliver the watch up to him, and because I would not he gave charge of me to the watchman.

GUILTY, aged 24,

Of stealing only .

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

99. MARGARET SULLIVAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of January , a cloak, value 8 s. the property of John Macdonald .

JANE MACDONALD sworn. - My husband is a watchman ; I live in the parish of St. Andrew, Holborn : On Saturday, the 5th of January, the prisoner at the bar came to our house a little after nine o'clock, I let her in; she said she was an acquaintance of my husband's, and she wanted to speak to him, or his wife; I said, I am his wife; I mentioned a person to her that I knew, and asked her if she was that person; she said she was that person, and was a milk-woman that served me with milk, but her name I do not know; she said she came to beg a favour of me, and she should be very much obliged to me if I would do it; I asked her what it was; she said it was to go to the public-house that served me with beer, (I had no particular house that served me with beer,) and to tell a man that was there in a velvet jacket and a red waistcoat, that she wanted to speak to him, and to be so kind as to make haste. Innocently I went out, and when I went into the public-house there was no such a person there; I was not four minutes gone, and when I returned the prisoner was gone, and had left the passage-door open; I missed the cloak directly, because it was hung just by the door.

JOHN MACDONALD sworn. - Last Saturday night I went out on duty in the King's road, at nine o'clock, and about ten o'clock my wife came to me, and informed me of the circumstance; I asked my wife, if I met with this person, whether she could swear to her; she said, yes, she could; I took her before two o'clock in the morning, as she was going up Gray's Inn-lane; I took her to my wife to see whether she could say she was the person, or no, and when my wife saw her, she said, that is the person that robbed me; I said to the prisoner, return me the property, and I will have no more to do with you; then she denied that she took the property, and as I was taking her to the watch-house, she acknowledged that she took the property, and had pawned it, and she had the ticket in her pocket; she gave me the ticket and the money, but my wife would not take it; when I came to look at it, there was only three shillings and sixpence.

- sworn. - I am a pawnbroker; I know the prisoner by coming to our shop several times; I know the cloak, I took it in myself of her; she was the person, I can swear to her. (The cloak produced and identified by the prosecutrix.)

Prisoner's defence. Please you, my Lord, I was very intimate with these people; I went on Saturday night to this woman's house, and told her I was deficient of a little money, and I was going to meet a person; if she would lend me a trifle, I would bring it her to-morrow; she said she could not lend me any money, but she would give me something to make it on, but she did not wish her husband to know it, which she did accordingly; I went to this pawnbroker's, where I have dealt a number of years; if I had stole the cloak I would not have gone where I had been known so manyyears; I bought a small article out of the money I had pledged the cloak for; I gave the man the rest of the money, and the ticket; they accepted of the money, and the ticket, and when I was at the watch-house, they returned the money again; since I have been in the milk business, because she could not drink tea to do her good, as she had an asthma on her lungs, I have sent her bottles of neat milk from the cow to do her good.

Prosecutrix. Please-you, my Lord, I never took an oath before a Judge or Jury in my life till now, and I will take my oath I never saw the woman before in my life.

Prisoner. (To Prosecutor.) Q. Can you speak God's truth, Macdonald - do not you know me? - A. No more than any other woman in the neighbourhood; I know you by seeing you in the street, that is all I know of you.

Court. Q. You have seen her? - A. Yes.

Q. Is she a milk-woman? - A. I do not know.

Prisoner. My cousin is a milk-woman.

Jury. (To the prosecutor.) Q. How came you to know this woman had robbed your wife, when you met her by accident in Gray's Inn-lane? - A. When I came home to my wife, I said, can you describe the woman to me; yes, said she, she is a very big woman, with a full breast, and she wears a bonnet like a scuttle; with that I went out, and found her a little before two o'clock.

Prisoner. Please you, my Lord, this is the ribbon that she bought for my cousin, being so kind in sending the new milk to her; I am telling you the truth, if you please to hang me up this minute.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

100. JOHN BREWSTER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of December , twenty-three yards of flannel, value 25 s. the property of William Todd and James Hutchinson .

WILLIAM TODD sworn. - I am a linen-draper .

Q. Have you any partners? - A. Yes, James Hutchinson ; we live at No. 5, Great Russel-street : On the 12th of December, the prisoner took the flannel from just the inside of the door of our shop; there were about twenty-three yards.

Q. What time of the day? - A. Between four and five o'clock in the afternoon.

Q. Did you see him take it? - A. I did not; I missed it, and immediately looked after it, and saw the prisoner with it under his arm; I immediately ran after him, and just as I was going to take hold of him, he dropped the flannel; I took hold of him and the flannel, and brought him and the flannel back to the shop.

Q. Is that the flannel? (the flannel produced) - A. Yes.

Q. How far was he from your shop? - A. About twenty yards.

Prisoner's defence. I was walking along Russell-street with my hands in my pocket; I had nothing of the kind; that gentleman came after me, and said I had stole a piece of flannel from his shop; I know nothing of it; he swore at Bow-street Office he saw me take it.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Confined two years in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

101. WILLIAM WALKER was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Champante , about the hour of five at night on the 11th of December , and burglariously stealing therein a ream of paper, value 15 s. the property of William Champante and Benjamin Whitrow .

WILLIAM CHAMPANTE sworn. - I am a wholesale stationer , I live in Jewry-street .

Mr. Knapp. Q. What relation is the prisoner at the bar to you? - A. He is a natural son of a first cousin to me, he is no manner of relation to me; he had connection with a lay-woman; this is the produce, his father is the governor of Bencoolen.

THOMAS BUSSARD sworn. - I am a painter by trade; I live in Jewry-street, within a few doors of Mr. Champante: On the evening of the 11th of December, about a quarter before five o'clock, I was going down Jewry-street to my own house; I saw a man stand at the door of Mr. Champante's warehouse; I thought at first he was peeping through the window; I stopped for a moment, and saw him open the door in a very gentle manner; that raised my suspicion. I stopped about half a minute longer, and saw him shut the door in the same gentle manner, and before he had shut the door, I saw him take a bundle of paper from behind the door; as soon as he had shut the door, I opened it, and gave the alarm to the first person that I saw in the warehouse, which was Joseph Birch , one of Mr. Champante's clerks; he came out with me, and we pursued him; he was stopped about the middle of the Little Minories, as we cried out stop thief; as soon as we got up to him, the clerk said to him, what, Walker, is it you! then I left him in the security of the young man, and went home to my own house.

Q. What had he about him? - A. He had a bundle of paper with him; the clerk took it from him.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You saw this evidently enough? - A. I did.

Q. Are you sure the door was close fast too? - A. It was upon a single latch; he went up close to the door, trying to open it, in a kind of fly way.

Q. You had not been inside of the house before? - A. No, not that day.

Q. Therefore, whether the latch was unsecured before that time, you cannot tell? - A. No.

JOSEPH BIRCH sworn. - Q. You are clerk to Mr. Champante? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know whether the door was shut, or not? - A. I do not.

Q. When you were alarmed, what did you do? - A. I immediately pursued the prisoner, and overtook him in the Little Minories.

Q. What had he with him? - A. A bundle of paper; I took it from him, and led him by the hand to Mr. Champante's.

Q. Did you know him before? - A. Yes; he has been frequently backwards and forwards in the warehouse; I delivered the prisoner and the bundle of paper to the constable.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You say you had frequently seen the prisoner at your warehouse? - A. Yes.

Q. Has Mr. Champante any partners? - A. Yes, Benjamin Whitrow .

Q. Do you know what business the prisoner came upon to Mr. Champante's warehouse? - A. He had no particular business to come upon.

Q. Did you know he was a relation? - A. I had heard something of the kind, but I cannot tell.

Q. Had he been there lately before this time that the charge is against him? - A. I do not remember seeing him for a fortnight before this.

THOMAS SKINNER sworn. - I am a constable, I was sent for on the 11th of December, about the hour of five in the evening; Mr. Champante gave me charge of the prisoner at the bar, for stealing this ream of paper, value fifteen shillings, I have had it in my custody ever since.

Q.(To Prosecutor.) Is that your paper? - A. I cannot identify it, my servant can.

Q.(To Joseph Birch .) Look at that paper? - A. It is the property of Messrs. Champante and Whitrow.

Mr. Knapp. Q. What paper is it? - A. Printing demy.

Q. Of course you have plenty of that paper; is there any private mark upon it that you can possibly distinguish it from any other paper that might be found at any other wholesale dealer's? - A. I cannot pretend to swear to any particular mark upon it, I can say I saw it in the warehouse that morning.

Q. Then tell us any particular mark? - A. There is no particular mark on it.

Q.(To Prosecutor.) Did you miss any paper before you heard it was gone? - A. I only knew it through my neighbour, I was up stairs at the time.

Q. Who pays the rent of the house? - A. Myself and partner; we pay jointly in proportion, I allow my partner something for the dwelling, and the partnership comprises the whole.

Prisoner's defence. I have been distressed, and several times Mr. Champante has thrown me back, though he has had thousands that came from my father abroad; I have been put on one side as a beggar; I unfortunately lost a trifle of money, I have applied to him upon several occasions, and could get no relief.

Court. Q. What answer do you make to this charge, because no distress should make a young man like you do this; tied to no country, you could get your bread any where.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Confined one month in Newgate , and whipped in the jail .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

102. OGLE WILLIAMSON was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Joseph Adcock , about the hour of eight at night, on the 29th of December , and burglariously stealing therein a glass bottle, value 6 d. and three pounds weight of the oil of pepper-mint, value 6 l. the property of Joseph Adcock .

JOSEPH ADCOCK sworn. - I live in St. Mary-Axe , I am a druggist .

Q. What do you accuse this man of? - A. Of stealing a bottle of oil of pepper-mint; I was not in London at the time this happened.

JOHN BIRD sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Adcock: On the 29th of December, between the hours of seven and eight, the prisoner, Ogle Williamson, came to me under pretence of changing a small paper bag for a large one, which I exchanged with him.

Q. Did you know him before? - A. I had seen him frequently before, I knew him by sight; he said he wanted some arrow-root, but he thought ours was not very good, but he might call again if we had not shut up shop when he came back; with that he went out of the shop, and I went up stairs to get some candles for the shop; when I brought the candles into the shop, I saw his face appear through the glass-door; I said to my fellow-servant, that I thought Williamson was the person that took the two glass bottles we had lost three days before.

Q. He was outside was he? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you know his name? - A. Yes; I knew his name before.

Q. I thought you only knew him by sight? - A. I did not know any more of him; with that, I told my partner we had better put out the lights in the accompting-house, and one of us go on each side of the door, which we did; and in the course of five minutes he opened the door, and came into the shop, and made towards the window; a gentleman came into the shop for some pill-boxes, and he then ran out of the shop directly; as soon as I served the gentleman I went into the accompting-houseagain, the clock struck eight; I said to my partner, we had better shut up the shop windows; he said, no, stop a few minutes; with that, he came in again directly, and made towards the window, and took the bottle out of the window; we followed him to the door, he held the door on the outside, and we pulled on the inside, till he let go; and as soon as we got out of the door we cried out stop thief; he turned round the corner of Bevis-Marks, and as he ran, he threw the bottle down, and broke it; I then got hold of him, and took him to the shop; I saw him take the bottle.

Q. When the gentleman went out, did you see him shut the door? - A. The door was shut, I am sure of that.

Q. Has your master any partners? - A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You had a great many pepper-mint bottles besides that? - A. We had only four, they stood in the window together; I cannot say they were all full up to the neck.

THOMAS GOODALL sworn. - On the evening of the 29th of December, the witness, Bird, came to me in the accompting-house, and told me that the prisoner, Ogle Williamson, came to him in the shop to change a bag, and he informed me that he was standing at the glass-door; he told me we had better wait in the accompting-house, and put the lights out, to see whether the prisoner came in again, as we had lost two bottles of pepper-mint before; after waiting a few minutes in the accompting-house, the prisoner came in; a surgeon's young man came in for some pill-boxes, the prisoner ran out again; when I had served the young man, I returned to the accompting-house, at that time the clock struck eight; the witness told me we had better shut the shop up; I told him we had better wait a little longer, and while we were peeping we heard the prisoner open the door, and we saw him come into the shop and take the bottle; as he was taking the bottle, it hit against the other bottle that stood by it, and made a noise, and the witness, Bird, exclaimed, he has got the bottle; we pursued him to the door, he held the door against us on the outside, and when we got the door open the prisoner ran across the street; we pursued him, and called out stop thief; he threw down the bottle in Bevis-Marks, and we both immediately seized him; we then took him to the shop.

Mr. Alley. (To Prosecutor.) Q. How long did the prisoner live with you? - A. Twelve or eighteen months, about four years ago.

Q. You had no reason to suspect him? - A. No.

Jury. Q. What kind of a latch is your's? - A. A common shop latch, it goes by a common spring.

Q. Then it might miss fastening? - A. It might.

GUILTY, aged 36.

Of stealing only, to the value of 39 s.

Confined one month in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

103. GEORGE ADAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of December , a pound weight of tea, value 7 s. the property of John Watts and William Baxter .

JOHN WATTS sworn - Q. What are you? - A. I am a tea dealer , I live in St. Mary Axe .

Q. Have you any partner? - A. Yes, William Baxter ; the prisoner lived with me as porter about three months: On the evening of the 26th of December, he was sent to the Post-office, he threw his great coat over a chest of tea in the warehouse just before he went out, and when he was gone I happened to go down the warehouse, and put my hand upon the coat, and I felt something in it which apparently was like tea; when he returned, I let him have his usual course; he took his coat to go home; after he went out, I sent a young man that lives with us to call him back again, and when he had fetched him back, I asked him what he had got in his pocket; he seemed rather reluctant when he returned, he threw his great coat down inside of the door before he came into the accompting-house; when he came in, I asked him where his coat was, and why he had left it behind; the coat was brought into the accompting-house, he took the tea out of his pocket in a paper bag; I then asked him how he came by it; he rather acknowledged it, and said it was his first offence; I then sent for a constable, and gave charge of him; there was rather better than a pound of tea found upon him.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. How did he behave in your service? - A. Extremely well, and I had the highest character with him.

WILLIAM LEWIS sworn. - On Wednesday evening, the 26th of December, I was in the accompting-house, Mr. Watts called me to know whose coat this was; I told him; he requested me to search the pocket, which I did, and I found a paper of tea in it; when he went home, I stood at the street-door, to see which way he went; as soon as he got from the house, I requested him to come back, as Mr. Watts wanted to see him; I brought him back, and when he came into the accompting-house Mr. Watts questioned him as to what he had in his great coat; he was told to take it out, which he did; he said, it was the first time that he ever committed such an offence, and he hoped Mr. Watts would overlook it.

CHARLES BLOXHAM sworn. - I am a constable; I produce the tea found in his pocket, and some more tea, chocolate, and some paper bags, that were found in his lodgings the next morning.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Privately whipped and discharged.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

104. ELIZABETH BARRON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of December , a box scraper, value 4 s. 6 d. the property of Thomas-Lowth Sedgwicke .

(The case stated by Mr. Gleed.)

WILLIAM WRIGHT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gleed. Q. You are a servant of Mr. Thomas-Lowth Sedgwicke? - A. Yes, he is an ironmonger , in Mark-lane .

Q. On the 20th of December last, what did you observe? - A. I was coming through the shop, about half after four o'clock in the afternoon, I saw the prisoner out of the window; I immediately pursued her, and took her near the bottom of Mark-lane.

Q. Where did you find it? - A. Under her cloak, in her right hand; she dropped it when I took her, and I immediately picked it up, and I brought it and her to my master's shop; I produce it; it is the property of my master, I am sure of it, because it was never out of my sight.

Court. Q. Do you know any thing of the woman? - A. No, I never saw her before.

Q. Where did she take it from? - A. She did not come in the shop, she took it outside of the shop, it was in the window on the street side.

Prisoner's defence. I never saw the scraper at all.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Confined one month in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

105. BARTHOLOMEW FITZGERALD was indicted for that he, on the 29th of October , a pocket-book, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of John Davis , feloniously stolen by a certain evil disposed person, unlawfully did receive and have, he then and there well knowing it to have been stolen .

(The case stated by Mr. Knapp.)

JOHN DAVIS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Where do you live? - A.Hern-hill, near Dulwich.

Q. On the day laid in the indictment, were you in London? - A. I was in London on the 29th of October, and about eleven o'clock at night I was returning down Fleet-street in my way home to Dulwich, I was accosted by a female, near to the watch-box of the prisoner, soliciting as those ladies do; I resisted, and did not go.

Court. Q. At last you did go? - A. As a man who has the fear of the Maker of an oath in his heart, I did not stop above a minute or two with her; I felt something move from my side, and seeing her hand going to her bosom, I seized hold of her hand, and felt the pocket-book in her hand; I was positive of having it, and when I put my hand in my side pocket it was not there.

Q. How lately had you seen your pocket-book before? - A. In Fetter-lane, about five minutes before.

Q. What did it contain? - A. It must contain what I had in it at the time of my coming out; it contained a twenty-five-pound Bank-note, a forty-pound, and a five-pound Bank-note.

Q. What time did you leave home for the purpose of coming to London? - A. When I came to town it might be about three o'clock. Finding my pocket-book was gone when I got to St. Bride's passage, I laid hold of her hand, she cried out murder, and she said was I going to rob her; the watchman never offered to move.

Q. Who was the watchman? - A. The prisoner.

Q. How near was he to where you were? - A. It might be about the distance from where I stand to where the prisoner stands, or not quite so much.

Court. Q. Did you see the watchman? - A. Yes, when I came down to the watchman, I took hold of both the woman's hands, and brought her down to the box, as he did not move up to me; I told the watchman to take charge of this woman, and that she had robbed me; says he, I will not take her in charge, I won't take her he said, for you will say I have taken your pocket-book; I was obliged to do his duty, and she walked very readily with me to the watch-house; she then was searched by the constable of the night before me, and no book being found, my suspicion immediately turned to the watchman, as no object being near in the street but him, but the constable gave so good an account of him it staggered my opinion, I did not take him in custody that night.

Q. Then afterwards you proceeded against the woman, and the bill was thrown out? - A. Yes.

Q. Tell us how soon you took up the prisoner? - A. On the second day of the December Sessions he was taken in Chancery-lane, by Thomas Stanton , a Police-officer, I was present; he was taken to the Police-office in Hatton-garden, and from thence committed for hearing in the City; and as we were going along, he denied having any knowledge of the pocket-book, but afterwards, before the Alderman, he confessed the fact, his daughter had passed one of the notes; he said, his daughter was innocent of having any knowledge of the pocket-book, and she did not know of the note being stolen; he said, he received the pocket-book from Catherine Turner ; he said, the daughter was innocent, he would take the whole upon himself.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. This was after his daughter had been accused of passing the twenty-five-pound note? - A. Yes.

Q. Are you a married man? - A. No.

Q. You live in the country? - A. Yes, at Dulwich.

Q. You had dined in town that day? - A. No, I had dined in the country that day; I had come to town to transact business.

Q. I suppose you were not perfectly sober totake up with such a sort of a woman as that - were you sober or drunk? - A. Sober, as I believe, from my recollection.

Q. Some men have not their recollection when they are drunk? - A. I had drank a chearful glass, and a chearful glass will not make a person drunk.

Q. It is a plain question to answer - were you sober or drunk? - A. Sober.

Q. Then you, as a sober man, took up with such a woman as this, and went down Bride's passage with her? - A. It was in my way to Blackfriars-bridge.

Q. You did not pick the woman up, she picked you up? - A. I did not.

Q. After you lost your pocket-book, you took hold of both her hands, you never let her hands go till you took her to the watch-house? - A. No.

Q. You say you had seen your pocket-book, and the contents of it, a little time before? - A. Yes.

Q. Was the watchman in his box? - A. He seemed to remain in the dark side outside of his box.

Q. You did not charge him with this that night? - A. No.

Mr. Knapp. Q. When you took the prisoner before the Alderman, and heard his confession, were you drunk or sober then? - A. Sober.

Court. Q. The moment you felt something go from you pocket, and when she put her hand to her breast, you put your hand on this woman's hand, did you feel the pocket-book there? - A. I felt it in her hand, but somehow or other she seemed to get rid of it; while she was crying out murder, she struggled much, and by that means it gave her an opportunity of parting with it from her hand.

Q. How near was the watchman to where she was? - A. He might be about the distance from where I stand to the window.

Q. She cried out for him to hear? - A. Yes, she cried out very loud, but he never came to my assistance nor to her's.

THOMAS STANTON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are a Police-officer belonging to Hatton-garden? - A. Yes: On the 6th of December, I apprehended the prisoner in Chancery-lane; I took him before the Magistrate in Hatton-garden, he was committed for further examination; I took him from the House of Correction to the Alderman at Guildhall, he there told me that his daughter was innocent, for he had received the pocket-book from the lump of a wh - e, Kit Turner; I received the pocket-book from a person of the name of Blundell; Mr. Davis has the pocket-book.

(The pocket book produced by the Prosecutor.)

Q.(To Prosecutor.) Is that the pocket-book in question that contained the notes? - A. Yes.

Q.(To Stanton.) At the time the prisoner made that confession, that pocket-book was the pocketbook upon which he spoke of? - A. Yes.

Q. Was that pocket-book produced before the Magistrate at the time the prisoner was speaking what you have mentioned? - A. It was.

Court. Q.This pocket-book was produced before the Magistrate, and claimed by the prosecutor? - A. Yes, it was.

Q. And spoken of in the way by the prisoner as you have said? - A. It was.

Q.(To the prosecutor.) Is that your pocketbook? - A. Yes.

Q. That is your pocket-book that contained the notes that you lost that night? - A. It is.

GUILTY , aged 60.

Confined twelve months in Newgate and fined 1 s.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

106. THOMAS KALEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of January , a quart pewter pot, value 14 d. the property of Alexander Miller .

ALEXANDER MILLER sworn. - I live at the Coach and Horses, Dean's yard, Westminster .

Q. What is the prisoner? - A. He was a publican last Saturday; there was an appraisement at his house on that day; he kept the Westminster Arms, Bowling-street, the corner of Little Swiss-street; in consequence of information, I went to the scourer that scours pots for the defendant; I found there several pots defaced, and the pot I now produce.

Q. Has it the appearance of being defaced? - A. It has; there was A. Miller, Coach and Horses, Deans' yard, Westminster, marked on the pot, and on the handle was engraved, No. 5, but the figure of 5, on the bottom, was not engraved; we left the pots at the scourer's, as we found them, and proceeded to the prisoner's house; the scouring woman came into the house with a basket full of pots and pints; she delivered them into the custody of Mr. Kaley, down on the tap room table, and before I had said any thing to him about the pots, a publican came in, and asked him, if he had not got some of his pots; he examined the pots, and Mr. Mitchell, that was along with me, said, you have got one of mine; he claimed one, Clifford claimed one, and I claimed one.

Q. Is that pot in your hand, the pot you saw at the scourer's? - A. Yes; he said they were not our pots, he had bought them at a sale, and we had better not take them away without proper authority, if we did it would be worse for us, he would take us before a Magistrate; we told him we would not give him the trouble of going to a Magistrate, we would go ourselves, which Mr. Mitchell and I did, and they immediately sent an order, and brought him before them; he was examined how he came possessed of these pots, to prove which, he said he bought them of a respectablebroker; the broker was sent for, and by his books he denied having ever sold those pots to the prisoner.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. There was a sale of a publican's goods, some misfortune had happened to him, in consequence, there was a sale of all the pots he had in his house; the prisoner said he purchased those pots at his sale? - A. The prisoner said he bought them of that man, pointing to the number in the catalogue; the broker said, the pots I sold at the sale were to a blind man, but they are not the pots.

Q. When you went to Queen-square, he had not absconded? - A. No.

Court. Q. The mark is defaced on the handle but remains perfect at the bottom? - A. Yes.

JAMES GILLMORE sworn. - I am an Officer of Queen-square; I apprehended him on the 5th of January; I have got six quart pots at home and five pints, besides what I produce here; they are all defaced, and some of them with his own name put on them.

Q. Did the prisoner say any thing to you? - A. He said he had bought them at a sale.

Prisoner's defence. The man that sold me the pots went about selling Jews pots, his name was Green; it is all spite and malice of the publicans in the neighbourhood; when I first took the house it had but little custom to it; I brought the house round from three butts of beer a month to three butts a week; the publicans in the neighbourhood have even sent people into the house to quarrel with me, on purpose to ruin the house; the house for many years went up seven stone steps; I took them away, and made the tap-room and bar level with the ground, but seeing how I was envied, I agreed to let the house; the pots I bought of this man on the same morning of the sale, part of them he marked in the house that day, but on account of the small engraver, the edge being broke, he could not mark them all; I said to him, you must be sharp, because I am leaving the house; I did not with to stop at Westminster.

GUILTY , aged 39.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

107. ANN HALEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of October , a coffee-bag, value 6 d. a pint bason, value 1 s. two sugar basons, value 1 s. a cheese-toaster, value 1 s. and a box, value 1 s. the goods of John Willan and Co.

The Counsel for the prosecution declining to offer any evidence, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

108. JOHN HOLLIS was indicted for returning from transportation before the expiration of the term for which he was ordered to be transported .

WILLIAM HANSON sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Newman, keeper of Newgate: On the 26th of October, 1803, the prisoner at the bar, John Hollis , was tried and convicted for stealing a handkerchief, the property of Mark Bradley .

Q. What became of him? - A. He received sentence of transportation for seven years.

Q. Are you sure he is the man? - A. I am sure he is; I put him to the bar myself at the time he was tried, and took him back again; on the 13th of March, 1804, I ironed him with others to go to Woolwich; I went with him to Blackfriars-bridge, and delivered him on board the barge, in company with Mr. Kirby; I have a copy of his conviction.

Q. Whom did you receive that from? - A. From Mr. Shelton, I saw him sign it.

(The copy of conviction read in Court.)

"These are to certify, at the General Sessions of the Peace, and Jail Delivery of Newgate, held at Justice-hall, in the Old-Bailey, on Wednesday, the 26th of October, in the 44th year of his present Majesty's reign, before the Right Hon. Lord Ellenborough, Sir Alexander Thompson , Knt. &c. John Hollis was in due form of law indicted for that he, on the 19th of October, in the year aforesaid, with force and arms, in the parish of St. Andrew, Holborn, one handkerchief, value 3 s. from the person of Mark Bradley , he did feloniously steal and carry away; the said John Hollis was taken, tried, and convicted, for feloniously stealing and carrying away the goods and chattels aforesaid, and was thereupon ordered to be transported beyond the seas for the term of seven years, to such place pursuant to the statute made in such cases and provided.

WILLIAM CHAPMAN sworn. - I am an officer of Hatton-garden: On Sunday morning, the 23d of December, as I was going my round with my brother officers, I met John Hollis in Field-lane, in company with a young woman that her man was transported last Sessions.

Q. He was in company with a loose woman? - A. Yes; I was certain I had seen him before; I asked him where he lived; he said he lived over the water; I asked him where he had been; he said he had been at his laundress's, she lived in Crown-court, Liquor-pond-street; I thought it looked singular, as he had a dirty shirt on, and no bundle; I went to enquire; he gave several references over the water, where he said he worked, but all false. On Monday, when he was examined, finding all that he had said was false, we sent him down for another examination, where he remained till Thursday; and on Thursday, not giving a good account of himself, he was sent on board the Tender, and between that and Saturday I found that he had returnedfrom transportation; I applied to Mr. Leech for an order to fetch him from on board, and they gave him up.

GEORGE READ sworn. - I am commander of the hulk at Woolwich: On the 13th of March, the prisoner, John Hollis , was delivered to me, with several other persons; he remained on board the hulk till the 26th of April; I then received his Majesty's pardon for him and several others, on condition of their serving in the navy, and I delivered him to an officer on condition of that pardon.

Q. You do not know how long he continued in the navy? - A. No.

(His Majesty's pardon read in Court.)

" Whereas the persons hereafter mentioned having been convicted of divers felonies, (it mentions a great number of persons, and amongst them, John Hollis , the prisoner at the bar,) we, in consideration of some favourable circumstances that appeared in their behalf, have been graciously pleased to grant them our pardon for the crimes of which they respectively stand convicted, on condition of their going into our service in our royal navy, and that if they enter themselves voluntarily they will be delivered to such officers as shall be duly authorised to receive them for that service, dated 26 March, 1804. - C. Yorke, to Richard Hawkes , commanding his Majesty's tender, the Roebuck."

Prisoner's defence. My Lord, I had liberty to go on shore; I had drank rather too much liquor, and staid beyond my time; I was afraid to go on board again, for fear of punishment, and I came up to London for employ.

Court. You knew that the condition of your pardon was, that you were to continue in the service till you were discharged; his Majesty was graciously pleased to grant you a pardon, on condition of your entering into the navy until duly discharged; you have entered into the navy; it becomes you to prove that you are duly discharged.

Q.(To Mr. Read.) Where was this Roebuck? - A. Sent up to Woolwich, on purpose to receive them by the Admiralty.

GUILTY , Death , aged 21.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

109. JOHN SILK was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Charles Taylor , about the hour of seven at night, and burglariously stealing therein four tin canisters, value 4 s. twenty pounds weight of tea, value 4 l. 10 s. twenty pounds weight of bacon, value 10 s. twenty pounds weight of butter, value 20 s. and twenty pounds weight of cheese, value 10 s. the property of Charles Taylor .

CHARLES TAYLOR sworn. - Q. I live in Poland-street, Westminster ; I keep a chandler's shop ; my house was broke open on Sunday, the 2d of December , between seven and eight o'clock in the evening; I was up stairs in the bed-room at the time; a little girl came across the way for a penny candle; she called me, and told me the shop-door was open; I came down stairs, and found the shop-door broke open.

Q. How had they opened the shop-door? - A. They had got a false key, and opened the door.

Q. No marks of violence? - A. No.

Q. Were you the last person that had been at the door? - A. Yes.

Q. How does the door fasten? - A. It has a thumb-latch and a lock, it only locks once; there is a key-hole outside of the door.

Q. Are you sure you had locked that door? - A. Yes; I tried the door after I locked it; when I came down stairs, some of the things were laying about the shop; I applied to Mr. Bly, and told him what I had lost.

Q. Did you find any of the property? - A. Yes; one of the tea canisters.

Q. Of your own knowledge you have no reason to accuse this man? - A. No; I never saw the man before.

Q. What did you lose? - A. Four canisters of tea, a large Cheshire cheese, almost a whole one, about half a tub of salt butter, and a large piece of bacon; there was one tea-canister found afterwards, and a piece of bacon.

Cross-examined by Mr. Watson. Q. You applied to Bly, and had this man taken up? - A. Yes.

Q. How many men were taken up for this robbery? - A. There were two men taken up.

JANE TAYLOR sworn. - Q. You are the wife of the last witness? - A. Yes.

Q. What do you know of this business? - A. On the 2d of December my house was broke open; I can say no farther than I found some of the property on the person that Mr. Bly took.

Q. You do not know any thing of your own knowledge? - A. When I came down stairs I found all the things gone.

JAMES BLY sworn. - I am an officer belonging to Queen-square; I received information of the robbery from the witness; there had been other robberies of a similar nature, which generally had taken place on a Sunday night; I had reason to suspect the prisoner had been concerned in some of these robberies. On Monday, the day after the robbery was committed, I took two assistants with me in the middle of the night to make a search; I went to a place called Pear-street, adjoining Duck-lane, Westminster, and searched several houses; at last I found the prisoner and another in bed together; he got out of the bed with his breeches on; the other person that was with him was a suspicious character; we took them both into custody; there lay a piece of bacon on the table, which he disowned knowing any thing of.

Q. They both disowned the bacon? - A. Yes, and John Harp , that went with me, found a canister over the tester of the bed, the prisoner on his first examination, said the canister had been there a week in the room, and on his second examination, he said it had been there three weeks.

Cross-examined by Mr. Watson. Q. When you apprehended the two men, and took them into custody, what sort of a house was this; were there not a good many people that inhabited this house? - A. It is a house where the girls of the town live, and where the woman of the house was in custody at the time.

Q. You found two men in bed together? - A. Yes, up stairs there were other lodgings that were let to two girls; the woman that inhabited that room was sent to Bridewell Precinct.

Court. Q. This room had been inhabited by a woman who was in custody? - A. Yes, it had been occupied by that woman who lived with Kemp; she had been in custody about three weeks, the prisoner told me so, and he said, he had been in possession of that room since that woman had been in custody.

JOHN HARP sworn. - I was in company with Bly and Raney: On the tester of the bed in the room where the prisoner was, I found this canister with some tea in it.

THOMAS RANEY sworn. - I was in company with Bly and Harp; I know nothing more than what they have told. (The canister produced.)

Q.(To the prosecutrix.) Look at that canister? - A. It is my canister; I know it by the mark inside of it, No. 4, and by a scratch made in it.

Mr. Watson. Q. When was that mark made? - A. By the supervisor.

Q. Perhaps he makes that mark wherever he goes? - A. No, sir, when he comes the first time he always marks it.

Q. So he always does to every shop? - A. I know this is my canister.

Court. Q. From the appearance of it, as well as the marks, do you know it to be your canister? - A. Yes, I had it nine months last Lady-day; that canister was in my house and full of tea.

Prisoner's defence. I was taken with that canister in the room, and I have people to come forward that will prove, that I have had that canister a twelvemonth; at the Office they asked them if they could swear to the canister, she said she could; they asked her what marks were on it; she said, no marks at all; they asked her particularly if there was any mark at the bottom; she said she was never so particular as to look; there is a mark and it is stamped; they asked her what tea was in the canister; she said it was full of green tea; when I was taken there were about four ounces of black and green tea; I will call a witness to prove that I have had this canister a twelvemonth.

Mr. Watson. I shall advise you to let the case stand where it does.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who said they had known him about four or five months, and gave him a good character.

GUILTY , Death , aged 28.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

110. MARGARET SULLIVAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of December , a gridiron, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of Mary Jones .

MARY JONES sworn. - I live at the Golden Anchor, Saffron-hill : On the 29th of December the prisoner at the bar came into the tap-room, between six and seven in the evening; she had half a pint of beer and paid for it; I was in the taproom, she gave me a shilling to change, and asked me for a glass of gin; I went into the bar and something detained me; she came to the bar for the glass of gin and the change; I observed her right hand confined in her pocket; it was with some difficulty that she could open the street door; I went after her and felt down her petticoat, and asked her what she had got there; I found she had a gridiron; she said it was her own property; I took her back into the tap-room, and found it was my own property; I sent for an Officer, and delivered her to him.

JOHN HURST sworn. - I was in the tap-room at the time the woman was detected with the gridiron in her possession.

WILLIAM ROSE sworn. - I am an Officer of Hatton-garden; I was sent for to take this woman into custody. (The property produced, and identified by the prosecutrix.)

Prisoner's defence. I came into the gentlewoman's house for half a pint of beer; I gave her a shilling to get a drop of gin; she did not come with it, and I went to the bar to get the change of the shilling; I stood at the bar and was going back again, and how it was the gridiron was at the bar, and my apron being ragged, it caught hold of the gridiron; she put her hand to my side, and said, you have got my gridiron; I said, no, I am sure I have not, madam, and on my looking round, there was the gridiron hanging by the handle in the hole of my apron; I am a poor woman, who works in the street for my bread, and my having the liquor in my head, I did not know any thing of it; I have two small children to take care of; I work for my bread very honestly.

GUILTY , aged 35.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

111. MARTHA NEEDHAM was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 31st of December ,seven yards of printed cotton, value 10 s. the property of James Teasdale .

THOMAS WILDER sworn. - What business are you? - A. I am a linen-draper, in Ratcliff-highway : On the 31st of December, about half past one in the day, the prisoner at the bar stood at the shop door for a considerable time, and afterwards at the window; I went to the door to get her into the shop, to shew her some goods, but she would not come, and customers coming in I was obliged to leave her at the door; a lamplighter's boy came and informed me that she took a piece of cotton from the door.

JOSEPH WHITEHOUSE sworn. - I am a lamplighter: I saw this woman come by one time, and she looked at this piece of print.

Q. Where was this piece of print? - A. Hanging outside of the door, on a round piece of iron, on the left-hand side of the door; the prisoner at the bar, and an elderly woman, were together, the elderly woman stood right fronting the door, and the prisoner stood on the left-hand side; they went away about twenty yards, and they had a little bit of discourse, I do not know what they said, I was not high enough to hear them; they came back again to the same place, and looked at the same print, and the prisoner at the bar unpinned it, and then went away about twenty yards again; they came back again to the same place, and looked at the same print they had unpinned; the elderly woman still kept her place towards the door, for a little while, and the prisoner at the bar snatched it off; they both then went away, looking at it for a little time, and then the elderly woman went a different way; I then run across the way, and told the gentleman that a woman had taken a piece of print from the door; the shopman and the master came out directly, and the shopman ran after the prisoner; I am very certain the prisoner at the bar is the woman that took it.

Q.(To Wilder.) When you were informed of this by the boy, what did you do? - A. I pursued her, and took her with this print; when I came up to her she threw the print down, and dropped on her knees, and begged that I would forgive her. (The property produced, and identified by Thomas Wilder .)

The prisoner made no defence.

GUILTY , aged 22,

Confined six months in the House of Correction .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

112. THOMAS YOUNG was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of January , a bullock's head, value 2 s. the property of Thomas Covington .

THOMAS COVINGTON sworn. - I am a butcher , in Lamb-street, Spitalfields : Yesterday evening, just at dark, my boy informed me that a man had stole a bullock's head, and had gone down Crispin-street with it; I ran after him, and overtook him, with the bullock's head in his hand; I brought him back, and took him into custody.

ROBERT NEALE sworn. - I am apprentice to Mr. Covington: Last night as I was going into the shop, I saw a man standing at the door about five or six minutes before I saw him take it down; he took it down, and had the bullock's head in his hand, and went up Crispin-street; I told my master, and he ran after him.

Prisoner's defence. As I was coming from my wife, who was out to a day's washing, I was rather distressed, I had been out of business a long while, I took it to support my family; it was merely for want that I did such a thing.

Prosecutor. A man came to me this morning, from his wife, and gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 40,

Recommended to mercy by the Jury and the Prosecutor.

Whipped in jail and discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

113. MARY JONES , alias MARY MULLINS , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of January , a muslin handkerchief, value 2 s. a linen handkerchief, value 6 d. a pair of silk stockings, value 2 s. and a pair of cotton stockings, value 6 d. the property of Matilda O'Connor , widow .

It appearing from the evidence of the prosecutrix that she was a married woman, the Court were of opinion the prisoner could not be found guilty of stealing the property from the person as described in the indictment, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

114. WILLIAM RAWLINS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of December , a silver watch, value 25 s. steel key, value 1 d. the property of John Fido .

MARY FIDO sworn. - I am the wife of John Fido , I live at No. 45, Turnmill-street, Clerkenwell : My husband lost the the watch on the 17th of December last; about twelve o'clock I went out.

Q. Did you know that your watch was safe when you went out? - A. Yes; I left my little girl in the room to take care of a child only fifteen months old; I did not return till between four and five o'clock in the evening.

Q. When you left the house, what part of the room was the watch in? - A. Hanging up at the fire-place, in the one pair of stairs room.

Q. Have you any lodgers in the house? - A. Yes, two in the two pair of stairs floor; but there was only one of them at home, their names are Ireland, a mother and son; when I returned, I was informedby Mrs Ireland of the loss of the watch, and I saw the watch at the pawnbrokers the next day; I have known the prisoner at the bar from a baby, he is deaf and dumb.

Q. Could you make him understand? - A. Yes; being to used to him; I always called him a pensioner, and when he came I used to give him some halfpence.

MARY BENSON sworn. - Q. Do you know the nature of an oath? - A. Yes.

Q. Is it a good thing, or a bad thing, to tell a lie? - A. A bad thing; I believe I should go to the devil if I told a lie.

Q. Mrs Fido is your mother, is she? - A. Yes.

Q. Did she leave you at home on Monday the 17th of December, when she went out? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know that lad? - A. Yes, I know him very well; he came to my mother's after she was gone out, he came up into the one pair of stairs front room about a quarter after four o'clock.

(The prisoner's master, that he had lived with, was permitted by the Court to stand with him. He attempted to make the prisoner understand what the witnesses said by motions, said, that the prisoner acknowledged he was in the prosecutrix's room.)

Q. Did you see the watch? - A. Yes, it was hanging at the side of the fire-place.

Q. Was it a silver, or a gold watch? - A. A silver watch.

Q. How long did he stay in the room? - A. Not ten minutes.

Q. Did you see him do any thing with the watch? - A. No; when he came up stairs he pulled a shoe out of his pocket, without any bottom to it; I made motions to him that my mother was gone out; I went up five stairs, and called John Ireland , I asked him to write, that my mother was gone out; when I went to call him, I left nobody but the prisoner in the room; when I called him, he stood by the fire-place; and when the young man came down stairs, and wrote this, I made motions to him to go, then he was standing by the fire-place; he looked at it, and he went directly; he can understand writing. (What the witness said was written on paper, and shewn to the prisoner; his master said, he seemed to acknowledge it.)

Q. When did you miss the watch? - A. About a quarter of an hour after he was gone; I went to see what it was o'clock.

Q. Had any body else been in the room? - A. He was the only person that had been in the room before I missed the watch; directly my mother came home I told her of it, and my mother went after him directly; he was taken up between eight and nine o'clock that night.

EDWARD TRING sworn. - When I first apprehended the prisoner, I did not find the duplicate; but some time after he pulled out the duplicate, and gave it me; the watch was pawned by Mary Wood , I have searched for her, but could not find her.

JAMES MORREL sworn. - I am servant to Mrs. Fothergill, pawnbroker, Aldersgate-street: I produce a watch; I never saw the prisoner till I saw him at Worship-street; the watch was pawned by a person in the name of Mary Wood , about five o'clock in the evening. (The watch identified by the Prosecutrix.)

Q.(To Prosecutrix.) As you knew this lad a long time, how did he behave? - A. I always understood him to be an honest comfortable lad.

Q.(To Thomas Twist .) As this lad lived some time with you, did he conduct himself honest and fairly? - A. He continued in my service till October; he behaved very well, a steady, sober, industrious, and, for ought I knew, an honest youth.

Jury. (To Mary Benson .) Q. From the time that the boy went, to the quarter of an hour after he went that you missed the watch, were you at all out of the room? - A. No.

Q. At the time when you went out of the room to call the young man down stairs, when you returned in again, did you miss the watch then? - A. No.

GUILTY , aged 18.

The Jury and Prosecutrix recommended him to mercy.

Fined 1 s. and discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

115. FRANCIS CLEER , alias FRANCIS CLARE , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of December , four cambric handkerchiefs, value 12 s. two tin card-racks, value 6 d. a flannel shirt, value 2 s. 6 d. three pair of silk stockings, value 15 s. and a silver watch, value 4 l. the property of the Honourable Henry-Augustus Dillon .

(The case was stated by Mr. Const.)

HON. HENRY- AUGUSTUS DILLON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Const. Q. What was the prisoner? - A. I took the prisoner as my servant about a year ago, and trusted him with the whole management of the house.

Q. When did you miss these articles? - A. In the month of November last, from information that I then had, I applied to Bow-street for a search-warrant; I saw the things taken out of the box by the Officer; it was a box of mine, but I had no particular use for it; I desired him to send up all the keys of what I had in the house; having some suspicion, he sent every key whatever, except the key of this trunk; he appropriated this trunk intirely to himself, it contained every thing of his own property; when I saw the contents of this trunk, the thing that struck me most was the handkerchiefs, and from what I understood, he had accused the other servants of taking them; what we found in that trunk he owned; the four handkerchiefs and the two card-racks were foundin that trunk at my house, No. 3, York-street, Baker-street, Westminster, on the 24th of December.

Q. Those things were found in your box; do you know them to be your property? - A. Yes.

Q. You missed them in November? - A. I was informed of it in November.

Q. Had you ever mentioned any thing to the prisoner of the loss of cambric handkerchiefs? - A. No, I did not, because he mentioned it to me on my arrival in the house of the four handkerchiefs being lost.

Q. Did you keep these handkerchiefs in York-street? - A. They should have been there.

Q. Were the handkerchiefs lost before the watch was missing? - A. I believe the watch was missing many months before the handkerchiefs; I was informed of them both on the same day.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. The prisoner at the bar had accompanied you to Ireland? - A. Yes, I arrived in Ireland on the first of August, and remained there till the 21st of November.

Q. During all this time the prisoner was attending you? - A. Yes.

Q. Have you any recollection whether this watch was in Ireland? - A. I do not recollect it, if it had, I should have taken notice of it.

Q. Had you not seen the watch at the hotel? - A. I do not recollect.

Q. The intelligence you received of the loss of your four handkerchiefs was immediately upon your return from Ireland? - A. Yes.

Q. Supposing the prisoner to have appropriated them to his own use, can you say it was done in your house in York-street, or that it was not done in Ireland? - A. I cannot say whether it was done in Ireland; they were found in his possession after my return to York-street; I received information from the prisoner himself, saying, that there were four handkerchiefs lost, and after he had had some conversation about some other servants, he charged them with taking them; with respect to the watch, I had delivered it to the housekeeper, for the use of the servants, when I took the house in York-street, there being no clock in the house, about two years ago.

Court. Q. Therefore, if it had been taken down, it was not by your own knowledge? - A. Certainly not.

JULIA BURT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Const. Q. You are housekeeper to Mr. Dillon? - A. I am, I came into his service some time last May.

Q. Do you recollect the time-piece that hung in the housekeeper's room; you saw it when you came? - A. I do not know that it hung there when I came, I have seen it.

Q. Do you know of its being missed at any time? - A. My fellow servants do.

Q. Did you enquire of the prisoner about it, in consequence of any thing being said? - A. Yes, I asked him for the watch after I came there; he said it was in Burton-street, at Mr. Dillon's watch-maker; I went and enquired, it was not there; I told the prisoner it was not at the watchmaker's; he said it must be there; I went the second and third time to the watch-maker's, but I could not find it there; I came back, and told him each time; he told me it was not worth my while to bother my head about it, it was not worth keeping in repair; he then said the late housekeeper had told him she had left it there, and he knew no more about it; I had not seen it in York-street, I had seen it in lodgings at Piccadilly, when Mr. Dillon lodged there, and on the day I went to Mr. Dillon's, Mr. Dillon went to Oxford-races; the prisoner had four or five Jews every day in his room.

Court. Q. Did you ever see these cambric handkerchiefs and flannel shirt, or the silk stockings in York-street? - A. Not till the box was broke open.

Q.(To Mr. Dillon.) Had you ever seen them in York-street? - A. I certainly had seen them in York-street.

Q. Since the prisoner came into your house do you reccollect ever having seen them? - A. No.

JOHN MURPHY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Const. Q. In what situation do you live in Mr. Dillons house? - A. Footman.

Q. Do you recollect the silver watch that used to hang in the housekeeper's room? - A. Perfectly well; I have seen it hang in the house in York-street.

Court. Q. Have you seen it in the house since the prisoner was there? - A. I have, it as hung there for the use of the house ever since; I was in Mr. Dillon's service, till the housekeeper went away.

Q. Did you ever see it after the present housekeeper came into the service? - A. No, I have not till I saw it at Bow-street.

Q. Can you say whether she left it behind, or took it away? - A. I do not know, I asked the prisoner if he had got the watch, and he said no, and about three weeks or a fortnight ago I asked him if he had got the watch, he said he had not, and he told me not to bother him about it.

Q. Did you ever see it in his own room; - A. Yes; he was at his chest of drawers, and I turned round and saw the watch in his hand, I said nothing about it at that time.

Q. How long was that before the search was made? - A. That was sometime in July.

Q. From that time to the time he was taken up was it in the housekeeper's room? - A. No.

Court. Q. Never replaced? - A. No, never.

Q. Before that till you missed it, it always usedto hang there? - A. Yes, it always hung there over the fire-place.

JOHN GRIFFITHS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Const. Q. You, I believe, searched the box? - A. Yes, on the 24th of December we searched the trunk, it was locked, I broke it open, and found four handkerchiefs and two card-racks.

Q. What did the box contain? - A. Wearing-apparel belonging to the prisoner; there was no property in the trunk belonging to Mr. Dillon, but what is mentioned in the indictment; and on the 26th I went to Dixley and took the prisoner into custody, at his Lordship's house; I told him I had a warrant for him from his master, charging him with stealing a number of things belonging to his master, and that, among other articles, he was charged with stealing a silver watch or time-piece; he said the time-piece he had in his trunk; I took the key from him immediately, and took him into custody; I unlocked it, and he put his hand down and pulled the watch out; the flannel shirt was in the trunk at Dixley; the stockings were in a sort of drawers in his room; they were locked up with some of his own things; he said he put them there to send them to wash, but being only three pair, he had not sent them; he always kept them to a greater quantity to send to the washerwoman's. - (The property produced and identified by the prosecutor.)

Q.(To the prosecutor.) What is the value of the watch? - A. Twenty shillings; the flannel shirt, 2 s. 6 d. the cambric handkerchiefs, 1 s. each; I know they are mine, and I am certain I did not give them to him; and the card-racks, 6 d. I am sure they were in my possession; they are either mine or General - .

The prisoner left his defence to his Counsel, and called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 39.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

116. JOHN MASON , alias WILLIAM MORETON , and JAMES SPRAGGS , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of December , a bill of exchange, value 75 l. 16 s. 7 d. and a promissory note, value 25 l. the property of William Ticken , the said bill of exchange and promissory note, at the time of committing the felony, being then due and unsatisfied to him .

(The indictment was opened by Mr. Alley; and the the case was stated by Mr. Const.)

WILLIAM TICKEN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You are master of the academy at Great Marlow; in consequence of your seeing an advertisement, you applied to Mr. Moreton, and, in consequence of that application, did you receive a letter? - A. Yes, from a person, signed Moreton.

Q. Have you got that letter? - A. Yes.

Q. Look at the prisoners at the bar, and tell me whether either of them you know by the name of Moreton? - A. Yes, when he was at my house, at Marlow, he admitted that he wrote this letter to me; (produces it.)

"September 8th, 1804.

Addressed -

" William Ticken , Esq. of the Royal and Military Academy, at Marlow, Bucks.

"Sir, - In answer to your's of the 6th instant, I beg leave to say, that I have got left in my hands 120 l. which I can dispose of for such bills as I can take; I have no objection of taking them upon terms that I am sure you will be perfectly satisfied with; you will please to deliver to me the particulars of your bills, that I may consult whether they will be accepted in payment or not; you shall have an answer by the return of post.

(Signed)

"WM. MORETON."

"P. S. Direct to me at Moreland's coffee-house, Dean-street, Soho, London, as I am generally there about post time.

Q. In consequence of this you wrote to him? - A. Yes, and I received another letter before he came to Marlow, wherein he informed me he was coming into the country, and he would make Great Marlow in his way back to town, for half an hour's conversation, he said, would do more than a week's correspondence by letter.

Q. In consequence of this letter he came to you? - A. Yes, he came in about nine o'clock in the morning; he said his name was Moreton, and acknowledged this letter; I then began talking to him, about this bill of 75 l. 16 s. 7 d. I wanted to get discounted; I asked him upon what terms; he said he knew the nature of these things, he must not charge any more than 5 l. per cent. but he must charge the expenses down to Marlow; he then asked me to let him have the bills; I said I did not like to part with the bills out of my possession; he then asked me for a copy; I sat down and wrote him a copy; he stated the inconvenience of doing a bill of 75 l. he only having a hundred pound in his possession, he wanted me to make it up a hundred.

Q. In the letter he sent down to you at Marlow he said he had got 120 l.? - A. Yes.

Q. All that you wanted discounted was a bill of 75 l. he wanted you to give him a bill of 25 l.? - A. Yes, to make up the hundred; I asked him to sit down, and write me the form of the bill for 25 l. he refused, and begged me; I wrote it, and he named the person to whom I was to promise to pay it, which I think was Nathaniel Holmes ; he then stated, that it would be necessary for him to have a copy of that; I wrote a copy of that; then he appointed to meet me on the next Wednesday, at the Gloucester coffee-house, in Piccadilly; on the 19th of September, I think it was.

Q. Did you, according to his appointment, come to the Gloucester coffee-house? - A. Yes, I looked into the Gloucester coffee-house, and saw he was not there, and presently after I saw Mr. Spraggs, a man I had not seen before; he was walking backwards and forwards before I observed the other prisoner; he was looking for some person that he wanted.

Court. Q. Was Spraggs walking before the coffee-house door? - A. Yes, he was; the other prisoner came in about five minutes afterwards; he merely looked into the coffee-house, and said there were too many gentlemen there.

Q. When Moreton came, did he seem to take any notice of Spraggs? - A. No, nor Spraggs took no notice of him; Spraggs kept walking backwards and forwards; we went into the Old White Horse cellar, over the way; we set in the coffee-house there.

Q. Was there any other person there? - A. Not one; when we sat down I asked him whether he had got the money; he said he had, twice; I then took out the note of 25 l. I gave it into Moreton's hands, and I asked him if that would do; he said it would do, and at the same time I took out the bill for 75 l. 16 s. 7 d. drawn by myself, on a man who is indebted to me, William Walker , of Great Marlow, payable at three months date, and accepted by him; when I took that bill out, the prisoner Moreton snatched it from me; he got to the door, and said he was going to St. James's street for the money; he ran out of the coffee-house, and I saw him making motions to Spraggs; he held up his hand as I was passing through the coffee-room; I went to the door almost immediately, and in the interim I lost sight of the prisoners; they both disappeared; I saw no more of them.

Q. When Moreton held up his hand, did you see Spraggs then? - A. I did, but before I got out of the door they both disappeared.

Mr. Alley. Q. You never heard any thing of your bills afterwards till in point of fact Moreton was taken up? - A. Never: On the 13th of December, near three months afterwards, I came up to London; I was walking up Parliament-street with Mr. Goldsmith, and met Spraggs in Parliament-street; I challenged him with his name; Spraggs said, do you want to say any thing to me; I said, no, but here is a friend of mine does, pointing to Mr. Goldsmith; with that they both talked together, and I walked a little way behind them; I heard Mr. Spraggs mention Mr. Ticken's bills; I went up to Mr. Spraggs, and told him my name was Ticken; Mr. Spraggs said, if possible, he would get my bills back again; if I would behave like a gentleman, he thought probably he might do something for me; Mr. Goldsmith made an appointment to meet him the same evening at eight o'clock, at the Golden Cross, Charing-cross; he refused to give his address.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. At the time Mason went out of the room with your two bills, you followed him to the door? - A. I did.

Q. You say in your way to the door you saw him make some motion with his hand that you thought was directed to Spraggs; on your seeing that, which side of the way was Mason? - A. He was crossing; I saw them within two yards of each other; it appeared to me that they went away together.

Q. Did you see whether they went one way or separate ways? - A. That I cannot tell.

Mr. Watson. Q. When Mason came out of the White Horse cellar with the bills, did you hear him say where he was going to? - A. He said he was going into St. James's street, and that he would be with me in ten minutes.

Q. Which way did you go? - A. In fact, for a minute or two, I did not know what to do; some time elapsed before I did any thing; when I came out of the door of the White Horse to look after him I had left my hat; I went back to get my hat.

Mr. Alley. Q. Was it necessary for him to have crossed the street, in his way to St. James's street? - A. By no means.

Q. He did cross the way to where Spraggs was standing? - A. Yes.

Q. He knew where you lived because he had been at your house? - A. Certainly.

Q. You never after heard of him till you saw him at Bow-street? - A. Never.

Q. Did you mean to part with the bill without the money? - A. By no means.

Court. Q. Before this time had you ever seen Spraggs at the Gloucester coffee-house? - A. No, nor after, till I saw him in Parliament-street; he kept his appointment to the Golden Cross, Charing-cross, and there Rivett, the Officer, took him.

HENRY GOLDSMITH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Const. Q. You live at Marlow? - A. Yes; I am an attorney; I arrived in town with Mr. Ticken: In consequence of the apprehension of Moreton, I met Spraggs in Parliament-street; after he was challenged by the name of Spraggs, I asked him whether he knew Moreton; he said he did not; I then asked him whether he knew Mason; he said he did; I told him he had been fortunate enough to procure Mr. Julian's bill; he said he had, and if it had not been for him, Mr. Julian would have lost his bill; I asked him if he knew that we were so unfortunate as to lose one; I asked him if he knew any thing of Mr. Ticken's bill; he said, you mean Ticken's bills; I then said that I knew of only one bill, Mr. Ticken had informed me only of one bill; I asked him whether he could be ofany service in procuring us the bill; yes, he said, he thought he could, he would do the best for us he could; I asked him for his address, which he refused to give; he agreed to meet at the Golden-cross, Charing-cross. I told him we were going to Mr. Julian; he said, you had better not go to Mr. Julian, he did not behave handsome to me in the last, for the stiller and the quieter we were in this business the better; he then asked me whether I had seen Mason; I told him no; Mr. Ticken made answer, I hope I shall see him in half an hour at Bow-street; I do not know whether the prisoner heard him, or not; he said he wanted to see Mason, and he would give five guineas to see him; we then parted, and he asked me my name, and he promised to meet me at the Golden-cross, Charing-cross, which he did, at eight o'clock, and Rivett came and took him to Bow-street.

ELIZABETH WESTLEY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You are a house-keeper in Duke-street, Adelphi? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know the two prisoners at the bar? - A. I know them both; Moreton took a room of me about the beginning of September; about a fortnight before, Moreton had Mr. Julian's bill; he only lodged with me a week and five days; Spraggs came to my house about a fortnight after Moreton had absconded, and asked what apartment I had to let, as I had a bill in the window; I told him I had got a parlour which I had let to one Mr. Moreton, and a very disagreeable circumstance had happened between Moreton and Julian; I have got a paper that he sent, which I received from a porter.

Q. Did you see who the porter brought it from? - A. I saw Mr. Spraggs standing at the corner of Buckingham-street, when I received it from the porter.

Q. What became of the porter after he left your house? - A. He went towards Spraggs.

SARAH BUTTICAZ sworn. - Examined by Mr. Const. Q. Do you know either of the prisoners at the bar? - A. I know them both; I live in Meard's-street, Soho; Spraggs lodged with me.

Q. In what situation was Moreton? - A. I looked upon him as a servant to Mr. Spraggs, he acted as a servant; he used to light his fire, and brush his clothes; it was about the beginning of August when he took the room.

JAMES PARKER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Const. Q. You are a waiter at Moreland's coffee-house, Dean-street, Soho - have you ever seen either of the prisoners at your coffee-house? - A. Yes, both of them, about three or four times; I saw them drink there together about the middle of September.

FRANCIS JULIAN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Const. Q. In the course of any thing that has happened, whatever it might be, have you known the two parties connected together? - A. No other way than Mr. Spraggs procuring my bill from me.

Q. From whom? - A. That I do not know; he told me that there was no other man on earth that could do it.

Q. Did Spraggs procure for you the bill that you delivered to Moreton? - A. He did, for five guineas.

Q. When was it that you delivered the bill to Moreton? - A. On the 15th day of September, or about that time.

JOHN PALMER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Const. Q. What are you? - A. I am a carrier.

Q. Do you know Mr. Spraggs's hand-writing? - A. I have seen him write.

Q. Look at that, and tell me whether you believe that to be his hand-writing? - A. It is very much like it, I do believe it to be his hand-writing.

(The letter read in Court, containing an apology for Moreton from Spraggs.)

Mr. Watson. (To the prosecutor.) Q. Was that bill drawn on Mr. Walker accepted by you? - A. No.

Q. Then I do not think you could have procured any money on it? - A. If I kept it in my own hands I could have got the money from Mr. Walker.

Q. You knew it was not negociable without you had endorsed it -

Court. Q. How came you first of all to become acquainted or to be introduced to Moreton? - A. In consequence of an advertisement in the Morning Herald, Sept. 6th; that induced me to apply to Moreton. (The advertisement read in Court.)

"Money, 850 l. to discount. - A gentleman has remitted this sum from the country to his correspondent in town for good bills or notes, which the advertiser can make answer, as well as the payment of money; therefore any person of real or known credit may be accommodated to any sum not less than 50 l. by applying either personally or by letter to Mr. Moreton, at Moreland's coffee-house, Dean-street, Soho, and they will have an immediate answer."

Moreton did not say any thing in his defence.

Spraggs's defence. I would wish to state all the transaction that I know about this business. Gentlemen of the Jury, I am implicated here in a very disagreeable manner, of stealing a bill; I know just so much of stealing or swindling a bill as any gentleman in Court. I unfortunately, about twelve months ago, got acquainted with Mason; the first of my acquaintance with this man was in Newgate; I paid some money for his discharge, and from some circumstances I relieved him, and after I relieved him, he, not having it in his power to pay me, used to come backwards and forwards to do some things for me; sometime last September he came and told me about Mr. Julian, that hehad transactions with him; what transaction, I said, can you have with Mr. Julian (for I would not take a bill, nor even a Bank-note from the hands of Mason;) this Mason said to me, Mr. Julian will accept a bill of thirty pounds, provided any person will draw it for me; I drew a bill on Mr. Julian for thirty pounds, I never had the least intention to discount it at first or last, whatever Mr. Julian had. After I had done it, I thought I should be implicated without any benefit; I went to Mr. Julian to know the transaction of it; Mr. Julian told me the particular transaction, for at that moment I meant to burn the bill; I saw Mr. Alley afterwards, and it was agreed that he should pay the five guineas; I then went to Mr. Julian with the bill, and he gave me five guineas; he told me about Mr. Ticken, of Marlow; I said, what have you done with it; he said, there is a warrant at Queen-square; I said, I know nothing at all about Mr. Ticken's bills, nor shall I trouble myself at all about it. On the 13th of December, as I was coming up Parliament-street, I met these gentlemen, and after we had passed each other ten yards, he came up to me, and asked me if my name was Spraggs; I said, yes; he said, do you know a Mr. Moreton; I said, no; he said, do you know Mason; I said, yes, I would give five guineas to see him; Mr. Ticken said, have you heard that he has got a bill from me; I said, I have heard that he has got a bill from a gentleman of Great Marlow; he said, can you render me any service in getting that bill, for I find that you have got Mr. Julian's, if I could get him the bill he would behave like a gentleman; I never told him I would, if he would behave like a gentleman; he said it first; he said, seventy-five pounds was a great deal of money to lose; they wanted me to meet them at their lodgings in the City; I said, that is a great way, cannot we meet nearer; I appointed to meet them at the Golden Cross, Charing-cross; I told them, if I could render them any service I would; I went there; Mr. Goldsmith and Mr. Rivett came into the coffee-room, and said I must go along with them; Mr. Rivett began searching me in the coffee-room; I said, do not expose me in the coffee-room; they took me to the Office, and Mr. Ford asked me what I knew of these bills; I said nothing, but that I heard that that man had got some bills from Mr. Ticken, of Great Marlow; Mr. Ticken gets up, in a kind of surprize, and said, now I am satisfied Mr. Spraggs knows something about this business, as I have not mentioned any thing about the other bill of 25 l. no, not even to my wife; that, he said, he drew at Marlow, payable to one Holmes, and that he voluntarily gave Mason, but he catched up the other, and ran away; I was committed for re-examination, but Ticken swore positively that he saw me in the street both before and after Mason took the bills. Now I declare to God that I never was in the street at that time; Sir Richard Ford asked him how he came to know that my name was Spraggs; he said, from the description that Mr. Julian gave of me; I was recommitted, the bill was due on the 20th of December, to see whether the bill would be presented for payment; and when re-examined again, the bill was not presented for payment at that time; Mr. Ticken was particularly asked whether he had endorsed the bill; he said, no; the bill not being endorsed by Ticken, it was said that Mason could not have stole it; Sir Richard Ford said, there was a something stole, but nothing to go to a Jury; he should commit Mason fully, and me on suspicion; and he said, Ticken had no occasion to trouble himself so much about the bill, as he had not endorsed it, it could be of no use to any person but him; Mr. Walker was still a debtor to him as before.

Mason, GUILTY , aged 62,

Spraggs, GUILTY , aged 63,

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

117. SUSANNAH JOHNSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of October , a cap, value 6 d. three aprons, value 2 s. two shirts, value 3 s. and two table-cloths, value 2 s. the property of John Williams .

ELIZABETH WILLIAMS sworn. - I am the wife of John Williams , my husband keeps a public-house in Nightingale-lane : The prisoner lived with me three weeks or a month; about six or seven weeks ago I lost the articles mentioned in the indictment.

Q. How long had she left your service before she was apprehended? - A. I cannot justly say, because I was brought to-bed, and when I got up I missed these things; and some time after she was apprehended, and on her person was found my cap, and two aprons were found afterwards.

Q. Did you find the table-cloths? - A. No.

EDWARD BELLAMY sworn. - I am a pawnbroker's servant, I live with Mr. Heir, No. 6, in Nightingale-lane: I produce two aprons, the prisoner at the bar pawned them at our shop. (The aprons identified by the Prosecutrix.)

Prisoner's defence. I did not steal these aprons; you brought them to me, and desired me to tie them before me, and you asked me if I had put off the aprons when I came to you; I said they were dirty, I will wash them before I bring them to you; I asked you for my wages, you said, you could not pay me my wages; I pawned your aprons to pay my lodging, I expected my money from you, I worked hard for it; and your husband d - d and swore he would not give me above sixpence a day; I was going to bring them to your house as soon as I got my wages from you; you recollect, your own dear self lent those aprons to me.

Q.(To Prosecutrix.) Did you lend her these things? - A. I lent her one apron, but I have lost three; she was only to have the same money she had before, that was three shillings a week, and her victuals and drink; I did not lend her the cap that was on her head.

Q. How much was due to her? - A. I cannot say, whether it was three or four shillings.

Q. After she was gone away, and you missed your things, did you inquire after her? - A. I did not.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

118. SUSANNAH JOHNSON was again indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 31st of October , a shirt, value 3 s. 6 d. the property of George Neale .

GEORGE NEALE sworn. - I am a stone-mason ; I live in St. John's court, George-street, St. George's in the East: at the time I lost this shirt, I slept at the sign of the Phoenix, in Nightingale-lane ; the prisoner was a servant in the house at that time, and as the Officers were searching for some of the things belonging to the landlady, they found a shirt marked in my name; I went and looked at it, and knew it to be mine; I had lost it about six or eight weeks.

WILLIAM BELLAMY sworn. - I produce a shirt, pawned on the 31st of October, for 3 s. by Hannah Macdonald .

HANNAH MACDONALD sworn. - Susannah Johnson brought it out to me, and told me, that James the soldier told her to pledge it, to buy herself a pair of shoes.

Q.(To Prosecutor.) Was there a man that lodged in your house called James the soldier? - A. There were no soldiers in the house at all that lodged there. (The shirt identified by the prosecutor.)

NATHANIEL OLIVER sworn. - This woman delivered this duplicate to me; she told me she pawned it for the prisoner at the bar.

Macdonald. When I pawned it for her, she told me to keep the ticket, for she was with child by him; I have known her these two years, and I never knew her to be a thief before.

Prisoner's defence. I gave it her to pawn where I was, because I could not go myself, to pay for my lodging; and when Mr. Williams came to pay me, he would not give me more than sixpence a day, I could not sleep in the street.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Confined one month in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

119. JANE M'PHERSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of January , two sheets, value 10 s. and one blanket, value 7 s. the property of Ann Burr .

ANN BURR sworn. - I live in Charles-street, Wheeler-street, Spitalfields : On this day four weeks I let a furnished room to the prisoner; she was with me three weeks and three days; she was to pay me 3 s. 6 d. a week; she paid me one week; she said she was a weaver.

Q. Had she any loom? - A. No, she worked out at another house.

Q. Had she left her lodgings? - A. No; last Tuesday I sent for an Officer and searched the room, upon which I missed two sheets and one blanket; I believe she said she meant to take them out; she said she had pawned them, and she gave the ticket to the Officer.

Q. She said she meant to take them out before she left your lodging? - A. Yes, but there was no probability.

Q. Why? - A. She did not seem as though she had any means.

Q. How did she get her bread? - A. By weaving.

Q. Then she had means of getting them out of pawn. -

WILLIAM MATTHEWS sworn. - I am a pawnbroker: I produce a blanket and a sheet; the sheet was pawned on the 22d of December last, in the name of Ann Allen , for 3 s. and the blanket was pawned on the 31st of December, in the name of Jane Allen ; I cannot say it was the prisoner.

BETSEY FLORA sworn. - I am a pawnbroker: I produce a sheet pawned on the 22d of December, for 2 s. in the name of Jane Allen ; I cannot say it was the prisoner.

JAMES KENNEDY sworn. - I am an Officer: I apprehended the prisoner last Tuesday, about one o'clock; I was sent for to Mrs. Burr's, to take the prisoner into custody; as soon as I went into her room Mrs. Burr gave me charge of her, and told me she missed two sheets and one blanket; the prisoner told me she had pawned them, and I immediately asked her for the duplicates; she pulled out her hussiff from her pocket, and presented it me; these are the duplicates I found in her hussiff, with sixteen more duplicates of other articles; she told me she expected her husband home that afternoon with money to redeem them; I asked if she was a married woman; she said, no, the man she lived with was a soldier in the Tower-Hamlets militia, and a weaver by trade.

Q.(To the prosecutrix.) Did she come to your house as a married woman? - A. Yes, and the person who gave her the character said he was a soldier; he did not come with her when she took the room; I have seen him go up and down stairs; I thought it might be her husband, but now it seems he is not. (The property identified by the prosecutrix.)

Prisoner's defence. I did not intend to defraud her of the sheets, or of her blankets; I was out of work at the time and the young man too, and Iwas very much distressed; when they sent the Officer, on that day the young man was to bring home half a guinea, which he did, but before he was come home I was at Clerkenwell; I meant to get the things out with that money; I hope you will have mercy on me; I never mean to do so again; when I was taken to prison I was all that day and the next day without any thing to eat till dinner time.

Prosecutrix. I had a good account with her.

Court. Why were you in such a hurry?

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

120. JOHN FIELDER was indicted for that he, on the 17th of December , being servant to William Cooling , did receive and take into his possession the sum of 27 l. for and upon the account of his said master, and that he, afterwards, feloniously did embezzle, secrete, and steal, the same .

It appearing from the evidence that the prisoner was a partner, and not a servant, he was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

121. JOHN WILSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of December , a pair of breeches, value 13 s. the property of William Page .

Prisoner. I am guilty ; I was never guilty of any thing of the kind before; I leave it to the just Judge and Jury.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

122. JOHN LEMON was indicted for that he, on the 28th of December , a piece of false and counterfeit money made to the likeness of and for a good shilling, unlawfully and deceitfully did utter to Ann, the wife of James Shepherd, he knowing the same to be false and counterfeited; and that he had about him, in his custody and possession, one other piece of false and counterfeited money, made to the likeness of and for a good shilling, he knowing it to be false and counterfeited .

(The case was stated by Mr. Knapp.)

ANN SHEPHERD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are the wife of James Shepherd, he is a baker, living in Great Eastcheap ? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember the prisoner coming to your house? - A.Yes, on Friday, the 28th of December last, between five and six o'clock; it was dark, I had a light in the shop; he came into the shop, and asked me for half a quartern loaf, and he gave me a shilling; I was to give him change for it; my husband came in at the same time, and he asked me to let him look at it; I gave my husband the shilling, and he said it was a bad one.

Q.What became of the shilling? - A. My husband had the shilling, and my husband told the prisoner that he suspected that he had seen him before.

JAMES SHEPHERD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Do you remember being in the shop on the day your wife has been speaking of? - A. I came into the shop at the time; I asked her for the shilling, and she gave it to me; I observed it was a bad one; I told the prisoner that he had been there twice before; he had bought two half-quarterns before that, I served him myself, and he had tendered to me two bad shillings before; I sent for the Officer, and he searched him; he stood just against the back of a bin just in the shop; I saw a shilling and sixpence lay in the bin.

Court. Q. The bin was open? - A. Yes, there was nothing in the bin but a piece of mat at the time; I found the shilling and the sixpence there; I took it out and gave it to the Officer.

Q. Did you see any thing else? - A. Yes, there was a sixpence found on the floor.

HENRY CHURCH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are one of the Officers of the city? - A. Yes; I produce the shilling that was tendered to Mrs. Shepherd, and 1 s. 6 d. that was found in the corn-bin; I saw it in the corn-bin; I have had it in my custody ever since.

Q.There was a sixpence that lay on the floor just by where he stood; did the prisoner say any thing? - A. He said that nothing of that kind belonged to him.

Q. Did he say any thing about the first shilling that he tendered to Mrs. Shepherd? - A. No, nothing at all.

Prisoner. Q.(To Prosecutor.) Did I stand near the bin where the money was found? - A. Yes, with your back against it.

Mr. Knapp. Q.(To Prosecutor.) Was that the shilling that the prisoner uttered to you first (handed to him)? - A. Yes.

WILLIAM PARKER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are a silversmith, and acquainted with money; look at this shilling? - A.(Looks at it.) It is a counterfeit shilling.

Q. Look at the other? - A. It is impossible to tell some till I break them; (breaks them;) they are both counterfeit.

Q. They are particularly well coloured; it requires your breaking them to tell what they are? - A. It does.

Court. Q.(To the prosecutor.) Are they all bad? - A. They are.

Q. When you saw this man in your shop, you say you knew him, you had seen him there twice before; are you sure that he was the man that you saw before? - A. Yes, once before; he came on the Friday week before that.

Q. Was the money bad then? - A. Yes, and I believe he had been there once before that, I perceived it was a bad one just as he went out of the shop; I pursued after him, but missed him.

The prisoner left his defence to his Counsel.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Confined one year in Newgate , and at the expiration of that time to find sureties for two years more .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

123. ELEANOR HARLOW was indicted for uttering, on the 15th of December , to one Thomas Dawson , a counterfeit Bank dollar, knowing it to be counterfeit .

(The indictment was read by Mr. Giles, and the case stated by Mr. Fielding.)

THOMAS DAWSON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Giles. Q. You are a poulterer , in Leadenhall-market ? - A. I am: On Saturday, I think the 15th of December, about eight o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came to purchase a goose; she offered a dollar in payment for it; I went with the dollar into Mr. Glover's shop, a neighbour of mine, knowing that he had a balance with which he weighed dollars, and upon weighing it we found it was light; Mr. Glover then took it out of my hand and rubbed it on a steel; after that, he returned it to the prisoner at the bar; I told her I did not think it was a good one, and I would not take it; she then said she would leave her basket and the goose, and bring me the money presently; she left the basket and the goose.

Prisoner. I had dealt with the gentleman often before.

Q. Had you known her before? - A. I had seen her twice.

GEORGE GLOVER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Giles. Q. You were applied to by the last witness to examine a dollar.

Q. Look at that? - A. This is the dollar; here is the mark I made upon it; I said to her, you know it is a bad one as well as I do; I returned it to her, and she went to Mr. Barber's, who is an egg-merchant, and deals in butter, up Ship-tavern passage, in Leadenhall-market, about five doors from my house, on the same side of the way; I followed her for the purpose of watching her; there were a number of butter-flats piled up; I stood behind them, and heard her ask the price of two lumps of butter; she agreed for the price, and went into the accompting-house to pay for it; I saw the clerk found a dollar, and upon hearing it found I thought it was the same, or one similar; I went in, and said to Mr. Barber's clerk -

"this woman is offering you a bad dollar, and she knows it is a bad one, I have just convinced her of it; Mr. Barber's clerk desired her to go about her business; I went to my own shop, and she immediately came to me and abused me very much, and said, if she took the devil she had a right to pass it again; I examined the dollar at Mr. Barber's, and found it was not the dollar I had rubbed upon the steel; I take so many that I am partly a judge of them, and I knew that to be a bad one; when she abused me, I told her, if she did not go about her business, I would send her to the Compter; she then went to Mr. Dawson's again, and told him she would come for that goose directly; I watched her to Mr. Wood's, the Poulterer's Arms; I saw her go in; she stopped some time, and I saw a man sounding a dollar upon the table; being a busy time, I went away, and sent my lad, John Marsh , to follow her, and a lad of the name of Davies likewise went with him; I did not see her again till she was in custody; she then said she was innocent, and I gave charge of her; I did not see any thing found upon her.

- DAVIES sworn. - Examined by Mr. Giles. Q. Where do you live? - A. I live with Mr. Brasier: I went with Mr. Glover, and saw the prisoner go into the public-house and call for half a pint of something to drink; I stood there about half an hour, and Mr. Glover went to his customers; she shewed a gentleman a dollar; I was watching her; they shoved her out of doors, and then she went into the Poultry-market, behind the pump, and kept stooping several times, for near half an hour or twenty minutes; I then called John Marsh and Thomas Glover ; I saw her stoop several times afterwards; Thomas Glover went up and said, what are you doing; she said, only doing up my shoe; let us see, said Thomas Glover , and he immediately picked up a dollar, it was buried under ground; she tore my waistcoat, and abused me very much; we took hold of her, and she went alittle farther, and chucked down another dollar, which John Marsh picked up, and then she said she would be d - d if she would go any farther without a constable.

THOMAS GLOVER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Giles. Q. Did you pick up a dollar? - A. Yes, by the pump; there were some ashes raked over it.

Q. Look at that? - A. That is the dollar I picked up; when I first saw her she was stooping behind the pump; she wiped her hand at the same time.

JOHN MARSH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Giles. Q. Were you with Davies? - A. Yes, and Thomas Glover ; we were present when the prisoner was apprehended; she threw away a dollar, which I picked up behind the shutters; I gave it to the constable.

Q. Look at that dollar? - A. That is the dollar I picked up.

Q.(To George Glover .) Look at that dollar which Marsh picked up - is that the dollar that you had rubbed upon the steel? - A. It is the same dollar.

Q. Is it silver, or not? - A. I am confident it is not.

JOHN WHITE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Fielding. Q. You are one of the tellers of the Bank of England - look at those dollars? - A. I was down at Mr. Bolton's at Birmingham when the whole were stamped; in the first place I am confident they are not of that die, and in the next place that they are base metal.

Court. Q. Have they the resemblance of the Bank dollars? - A. Yes; but any person in the habit of taking dollars might see they are counterfeit.

Prisoner's defence. I know no more of what is laid to my charge than God upon his throne; I have dealt with Mr. Glover four or five years.

GUILTY .

Confined six months in Newgate , and to find sureties for six months more .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

124. MARY-ANN GOODMAN was indicted for a fraud .

SAMUEL BARNEY sworn. - I am a baker; Mr. Barber, a Sheriff's officer, is a customer of mine: The prisoner came to my house on Friday, the 7th of December last, and asked for a quartern loaf and a quartern of flour; I served her myself; she said it was for Mr. Barber; I booked it, and sent in the bill on the Monday following; she had been in the habit of coming to me from Mr. Barber; she had been a servant of his.

SAMUEL BARBER sworn. - I live in Wood-street; the prisoner had left my service about two months; she was in the habit of going to this shop, and had been trusted to pay the bills; when she was before the Lord-Mayor, I wished her to be reprimanded.

GUILTY .

Confined one week in Newgate , and discharged.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.