Old Bailey Proceedings Online (www.oldbaileyonline.org, version 6.0, 18 September 2014), November 1803 (18031130).

Old Bailey Proceedings, 30th November 1803.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the Peace, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND ALSO, THE GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, HELD AT Justice-Hall, in the Old-Bailey, On WEDNESDAY, the 30th of NOVEMBER, 1803, and following Days,

BEING THE FIRST SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF The Right Honourable JOHN PERRING , LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY RAMSEY AND BLANCHARD.

LONDON:

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED, By Authority of the CORPORATION of the CITY of LONDON, By W. WILSON, St. Peter's-Hill, Little Knight-Rider-Street, Doctors' Commons.

1803.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the Peace, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, &c.

BEFORE, the Right Honourable JOHN PERRING , LORD-MAYOR of the City of LONDON; the Right Honourable RICHARD PEPPER LORD ALVANLEY, Lord Chief Justice of his Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir NASH GROSE , Knight, one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of King's-Bench; Sir JAMES GRAHAM , Knight, one of the Barons of His Majesty's Court of Exchequer; CHARLES PRICE , Esq. JOHN BOYDELL , Esq. Sir BROOK WATSON , Bart. Sir WILLIAM STAINES , Knt. Aldermen of the said City; JOHN SILVESTER , Esq. Recorder of the said City; - FLOWER, Esq. and JOSHUA-JONATHAN SMITH , Esq. Aldermen of the said City; and NEWMAN KNOWLYS , Esq. Common-Serjeant of the said City; His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the CITY of LONDON, and Justices of Goal Delivery of NEWGATE, holden for the said City, and County of MIDDLESEX.

London Jury.

Timothy M'Namara ,

Thomas Horncastle ,

James Harwood ,

Charles Clifford ,

William Christie ,

John Wilson ,

Charles Roshter ,

William Seguino ,

Abraham Marshall ,

Frederick King ,

William Long ,

John Sutch .

First Middlesex Jury.

George Dunnage ,

William Atkinson ,

James Grainger ,

Richard Williams ,

William Watson ,

William Fairbrother ,

John Summers ,

Alexander Campbell ,

Joseph Coxhead ,

John Neville ,

William Lee ,

George Thompson .

Second Middlesex Jury.

John Scott ,

Alexander Diak ,

John Knight ,

James Mason ,

Edmund Townsend ,

Robert Tate ,

John Clinton ,

Samuel Ellis ,

James Tracey ,

Robert Twyford ,

George Cressall ,

Thomas Bradley .

1. RICHARD GIBBONS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of November , a shift, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of the Trustees of the Islington Poor .

Second Count. Charging it to be the property of persons unknown.

THOMAS METCALF sworn. - I am master of Islington Poor-house ; the prisoner came with a load of bricks on the 3d of November, between one and two; one of the nurses of the Infirmary told me she saw him take something off the line in the yard; I run out, and searched him, but could not find any thing on him; I run after the cart, and found the shift under the tail-board of the cart, with his great coat upon it; I sent for a constable, and gave him into custody.

MARY OWEN sworn. - I am one of the nurses: On the 3d of November, between one and two, I saw the prisoner run to a line, and I saw him tucking something under his frock, but I did not see what it was; I then informed my master.

MARTHA DAVIS sworn. - The shift is mine.

(The constable produced a shift, which was identified.)

Prisoner's defence. I went with the bricks, and my horses startled, and broke the line; I threw the tail-board and great coat into the cart, and run to my horses' heads; they then came out, and said I had stolen a shift; I did not know it was here.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

2. JAMES COLLETT was indicted for that he feloniously intermarried with Joanna Shaddock , his former wife , Rebecca Brown , being still alive .

WILLIAM BROWN sworn. - I am a shoe-maker, and live in Long-lane; Rebecca Brown is my master, she was married about four or five years go, at St. John's church, Southwark, to James Collett , by banns, I was present; she is alive, and in Court.

Mr. Gurney. They lived together about a year and a half, I believe? - A. Yes.

Q. Then she called in a broker, sold off his goods, and run away? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. Did he leave her or she him? - A. she left him.

JOANNA SHADDOCK sworn. - I know the prisoner; he married me the 27th of July, 1802 , at St. Mary, Lambeth , by banns.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. He told you he was afraid he had another wife - did not he? - A. He said, he had lived with a woman, and had a child, and perhaps I might hear something disagreeable of her.

Q. How long did you live with him? - A. About sixteen months; I parted with him in consequence of his ill-usage, and had a warrant to take him up.

Prisoner. I leave my defence to my Counsel.

(For the Prisoner.)

JOHN COLLETT sworn. - I am the prisoner's father, and knew Joanna Shaddock before my son married; I sent to him, and desired him to bring her before me, which he did; I asked her if he had told her he had another wife; she said, yes, but if he went down into the country with her, there could be no harm in her having him; I said, they had better stop, for I certainly would not allow it; however, they went and put up the banns in my absence, and were married; if I had known of the banns, I would have forbid them; but she knew he was married before.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Confined one week in Newgate , and fined 6 d.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

3. RICHARD ROBERTS and THOMAS BROADBRIDGE were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of November , twelve pigeons, value 22 s. the property of Richard Houlditch .

RICHARD HOULDITCH sworn. - I live at Bow, in Middlesex; when I returned home on Saturday last, I was informed I had been robbed of fourteen pigeons; about an hour after, a woman came to ask if I had not lost some; I went to Brick-lane, to bird-shop, and there I saw the pigeons, which I knew; the man had stopped the boy s, and taken them before the Magistrate.

- KEMP sworn. - About a quarter before nine last Saturday morning, the prisoners came into my shop, and asked me if I would buy some pigeons; they gave me a bag containing thirteen pigeons, twelve alive and one smothered; I asked them how they came by them; they said, their father had told them if they did not take them away, he would wring their necks off. From their appearance, and the price they asked, I suspected they were stolen, and stopped the boys.

THOMAS HART sworn. - I went to Roberts's father, and when I came back, I spoke to Roberts again; and, after some conversation, he said, he had stolen them from Mr. Houlditch; Broadbridge said, he met the other, and came to town with him for a walk; afterwards he said, he was with theother boy when they took the pigeons, about six o'clock in the morning, and that they had nothing to do but go up the yard, stand on the ground, and take the pigeons out of the holes.

Roberts, GUILTY , aged 10.

Broadbridge, GUILTY , aged 10.

Confined two years in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

4. GEORGE BURBAGE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of November , thirteen geese, value 39 s. the property of James Battye .

JAMES BATTYE sworn. - I live at Ealing , and lost thirteen geese on Friday, I saw them last about half past one; on Monday following I saw them in possession of Cridland; I had one of them for thirteen years.

ANN ASHBY sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Battye, and saw the geese on Friday; I saw them at Cridland's, and know them to be my master's.

CHRISTOPHER CRIDLAND sworn. - I know the prisoner by apprehending him; I was going on my duty on the 4th of November towards Kensington Gravel-pits, about eight o'clock in the evening, and saw him on the road with a little girl and thirteen geese before him; I asked him where he brought them from; he said, from Henley-upon-Thames; I asked him where he was going to; he said, to his brother, a poulterer, in the Haymarket; I told him to go on, and followed him up as far as Tyburn-turnpike. Instead of turning the way to the Haymarket, he went through Cumberland-street; I followed him through different streets, and then I took him and the geese to the watch-house; I found Mr. Battye, and be owned the geese in the watch-house; the prisoner said, forgive me, for God's sake, for I bought them of a man and woman coming along the road.

The prisoner put in a written defence, which was read as follows:

"My Lords, with humble submission, I most humbly implore your humanity in behalf of my most unfortunate situation. Returning from Windsor with my child, I met a man and woman who had geese to sell, and I bought fifteen of them. I ever bore a good character, and I have written to my brother, but he has not come to town."

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 47.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

5. JOHN DURANT and EDWARD ENNIS were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of November , eight pounds weight of bacon, value 1 s. the property of Robert Fish .

ROBERT FISH sworn. - I am a cheesemonger , at the corner of Castle-street, Long-Acre : On Monday last, about eight o'clock, I was in my back room, and heard the shop-door open, and the prisoner, Durant, came in; a piece of bacon was laying on the counter; I saw him go out with it, and followed him; before he reached the curbstone I caught hold of him, and he dropped it; he said, he had not robbed me; the other came up, and, with horrid imprecations, swore he was not the man; I said, he was an accomplice; he swore much, and drew a knife, and began cutting at me and John Hughes ; after a violent resistance, they were both secured.

JOHN HUGHES sworn. - I live opposite to Mr. Fish, and saw the prisoners looking into my shop-window about eight o'clock; I had an apron on, which I pulled off, and went out to watch them; Durant went across the street, and looked first into one window, and then the other, of Mr. Fish's; he then went to the door, opened it, and brought this piece of bacon out; I cried stop thief, and laid hold of him; he then dropped it; Ennis stood at the door; Mr. Fish came out, and we seized Durant; the other run away, and then came back again, and said that was not the man who stole the bacon; I said, it was; he struggled much; Ennis drew the knife, and said, if I did not let him go, he would run me through the liver; I flinched back, and he struck me with the knife, and just touched me on the shoulder, but did not cut me, owing to my flinching; he again said, he would stab me if I did not let him go, and struck at me again; I then let him go, and they were taken in Castle-street.

JOHN WALKER sworn. - I saw the prisoners the same evening; hearing a bustle, I went out, and heard Ennis say that is not the man who stole the bacon, loose him; Hughes said, he would not; he said, he would make him; Hughes said, he was one of his accomplices; I saw him draw the knife, and seize hold of Durant, and strike Hughes with the knife; he repeated the blow five or six different times, and they let go Durant, and they run away.

JOHN HUNT sworn. - I live in James-street, Covent-garden, and stopped Ennis as I was coming down Little White-Lion-street; he was running; some person halloaed out, beware of his knife; in the course of half a minute he fell down, or somebody pulled him; he lay struggling and fighting; having a knife, every one was frightened; he recovered himself, got up, and run down Castle-street; he fell down again on his face, and a person before me fell upon him, and took hold of his arm; a man then put his hand on his wrist, and the knife was forced out of his hand; he got up, and was secured. A number of young men about, said, we had no business with him, because there was nobody to give charge of him.

Durant's defence. I had been but four days out of the country, and was in liquor; I know nothing of it.

Ennis's defence. I was coming up St. Martin's-lane, and saw them beating this young man very much; I said it was a shame to beat him so, and they instantly knocked me down.

Durant, GUILTY , aged 20.

Ennis, GUILTY , aged 32.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

6. THOMAS LONG was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of October , one hundred and twelve pounds weight of raw coffee , the property of Thomas Coles , Richard Godwin , William Coles , and Charles Coles .

Second Count. Charging it to be the property of William Payne .

Third Count. Charging it to be the property of persons unknown.

JOHN FERGUSON sworn. - I am clerk in the house of Thomas Coles , Richard Godwin , William Coles , and Charles Coles , No. 9, Scott's-yard, Bush-lane, Cannon-street, merchants'-broker s, and deal by commission: On the 24th of October, we had coffee in our warehouse, but the coffee supposed to be stolen, was from a vessel; I saw the coffee produced before the Magistrate by Smith, in two small bags, each containing about fifty-six pounds, marked Q. S. 77, and the other 97, on board the ship called The Four Sisters ; there was coffee of the same mark landed after the 24th of October, and those two numbers were wanting, and others also.

JOHN SMITH sworn. - I am a Thames Police-officer: On the 24th of October, about seven o'clock in the evening, I was on duty near St. Catharine's-lane, and saw the prisoner, (whom I had often seen before as a waterman ), in company with another man, each with a small bag on their shoulders, coming from the water-side, walking very fast; the moon was very clear; I had a suspicion, and followed them, and they both took to their heels and ran; when I pursued the prisoner he dropped his bag, and pushed into the door of a house, and slipped the bolt upon me. I then pursued the other, whom I also knew, and he dropped his bag; I picked up the two bags, and took them into a public-house, and coming out again, I saw the prisoner pass the door and looking about; he saw me, and ran away; I pursued him, and took him into custody.

Cross-examined by Mr. Hart. Q. Did you see them land? - A. No.

Q. You have not heard of the other man? - A. No. (The bags produced.)

Prisoner's defence. A young man came to me at the stairs, and asked me if I would assist him to carry a bag of smuggled coffee which he had purchased, and I did; I did not know it was stolen.

The prisoner called seven witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

7. CHARLES DAVIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of November , a pelice, value 12 s. and a silk cloak, value 3 s. the property of Sarah Dale .

SARAH DALE sworn. - I live with Sir Francis Vincent as house-keeper , at No. 17, Charlotte-street, Bloomsbury : I missed my pelice, and cloak, on the 23d of November, between ten and eleven o'clock in the morning.

JOHN CUMMINS sworn. - On the 23d of November, I was going along Charlotte-street, between ten and eleven o'clock, and saw the prisoner stooping and peeping through the palisadoes of No. 17, I went on, and looking round I missed him; I went back past the house, and saw him under the arch-way of the area-door, peeping in, and make a slip back, as if he saw something he was afraid of; he then went in, and came out again, and came up; I went on to Plumsted-street, where I met Lee, an officer, and told him there was a suspicious man; he went back, and saw the prisoner come up the stairs, I laid hold of him, and saw the pelice hanging out of his bosom; the officer then came up, and we took him to Bow-street. (The things produced and identified.)

(Lee, the officer, confirmed the testimony of the last witness.)

Prisoner. Q. Do you remember seeing me a minute before? - A. I remember seeing you come out of the area, and thought you were one of the servants at first, till I observed your bulk, and you began to run.

Q. What did I say? - A. Nothing.

Q. Did I not say, Lord have mercy on me? - A. No.

Prisoner's defence. I was born in the city of Frankfort, in High Germany, and have been in England above ten years; I have lived in Birmingham, and came to London for a pass to go home to my mother; going along to the Imperial Ambassador's, I met Cummins with those things in his hand, and he asked me if I would buy them; I said I was no such person, being a watch screw maker, and finisher; he held them up before me for half a minute, till Lee came and took me. When I was in the New Prison, a young woman came to see her husband, and said she lived at Cummins's, who had heard him say he had catched a nice green horn; I questioned her about it, and she promised to come in my behalf, and tell what he said; but as her husband is in confinement, and she has three or fourchildren, she is afraid of being turned out, I suppose, as she is not come.

Court. (To Cummins.) Q. Is any part of that true? - A. Not one part of it; I have no tenant in confinement, or any thing like it.

GUILTY , aged 27.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

8. JAMES INGRAM was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of November , a hen, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of David Lawrence .

WILLIAM ANDERSON sworn. - I live with David Lawrence , a corn-chandler , in Kingsland-road : On the 19th of November, I saw the prisoner run out of the yard with a fowl in his hand, which he had taken off the roost between five and six o'clock; I run in and told my mistress.

DAVID LAWRENCE sworn. - I heard an alarm given that somebody had stolen my fowls: I ran over to the Cherry-tree Inn, and the people desired me to go into the house at the corner; I fetched a constable, and he went up stairs, I stood at the door to prevent any body going out.

- LILLYWHITE sworn. - On the 19th of November, Lawrence came to me, I went to the house the corner of the Cherry-tree Inn, and went up stairs; I heard a hustling at the top of the stairs, I saw the prisoner throw something out, but did not observe what; I heard the ostler in the yard say, here is a fowl coming out of the window; I looked out and saw a fowl on the tiles; I took the prisoner, and he said he was just got up; I looked at his shoes, and he was up to his ankles in fresh mud.

WILLIAM ALGER sworn. - I am ostler at the Cherry-tree, and saw a fowl thrown out of window.

Prisoner's defence. I am a soldier , I had just come off duty, and went to bed; I am as innocent of it as a child unborn; there were other lodgers in the house.

GUILTY, aged 19.

Of stealing to the value of 10 d.

Confined one month in the House of Correction .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

9. THOMAS WARD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of November , a wheelbarrow, value 5 s. two sacks, value 2 s. and three bushels of potatoes, value 3 s. the property of Thomas Church .

THOMAS CHURCH sworn. - I live at Acton , am a farmer : On the 6th of November, I had intimation the prisoner, who was my servant , had been lurking about; I found one of the doors of my potatoe-warehouse had been opened, and locked again, by a false key; I found a potato heap greatly disturbed, and I applied for a warrant to search the prisoner's house, which I did; I found near three bushels of potatoes, and two sacks, with my mark on them.

JOHN-PARSONS MAYNARD sworn. - I searched the prisoner's house, and found the potatoes and sacks. (The sacks produced and identified.)

For the Prisoner.

ESTHER WATSON sworn. - The prisoner always bought potatoes of me, he bought some the day before this happened; I cannot say whether it was a peck or half a bushel, I was out with a cart selling them, and I sold them to his wife.

Prisoner. (To Mr. Church.) Q. Did you not lend me a sack when I bought two bushels of peas of you? - A. I did; and I saw you bring it home again.

GUILTY .

Confined six months in the House of Correction, and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

10. WILLIAM LEWIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of October , a sheet, value 2 s. a table-cloth, value 3 s. and two pair of stockings, value 2 s. the property of Elizabeth Williams .

ELIZABETH WILLIAMS sworn. - I live in the parish of St. Botolph, Aldgate , and keep the Seven-stars public-house : On the 25th of August the prisoner was quartered at my house; and on the 31st of October, our servant was cleaning the room where the prisoner slept, and behind a table she found some pawnbroker's duplicates, some in his name, and she brought them down stairs. I had missed some table-cloths out of a basket that came from the mangler's, the prisoner was out; when he came home, I taxed him with the things; he did not deny it, but gave me the duplicates out of his pocket.

WILLIAM BOURKE sworn. - I am a pawnbroker: I received a pair of stockings of the prisoner on the 31st of October. (The stockings produced and identified.)

JOHN BOURIL sworn. - I am a pawnbroker: On the 29th of October, the prisoner pledged a table-cloth with me, for one shilling and sixpence.

THOMAS GRIFFITHS sworn. - I am an officer: I took the prisoner; I searched him but found nothing; I searched his knap-sack, and found two odd stockings, the fellows of those pawned.

ELIZABETH WILSON sworn. - I live with Mr. Gell, a pawnbroker: The prisoner pawned a tablecloth and sheet, the 29th of October, which I produce; the table-cloth for one shilling and sixpence, and the sheet for two shillings.

Prisoner's defence. I leave myself to the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Confined one month in the House of Correction ,

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

11 SARAH WHITE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of November , a shirt, value 1 s. 6 d. a petticoat, value 2 s. 6 d. and anapron, value 6 d. the property of Charles Burdon .

MARY BURDON sworn. - I live at No. 13, Little Charles-street, St. Mary-le-bonne ; the prisoner was my chair woman , about three weeks ago; I did not miss any thing till I heard she had robbed somebody else, then I missed a shirt and petticoat, and an apron.

WILLIAM JACKSON sworn. - I am an officer, and searched the prisoner, and found the duplicates of the property upon her; Mrs. Burdon went with me to the pawnbroker's, and found the thing.

THOMAS ENSOR sworn. - I am a pawnbroker (produces the property;) I received these things in pledge, but I cannot recollect from whom; the duplicates correspond.

(The property was identified by Mrs. Burdon.)

Prisoner. I have not any thing to say.

GUILTY , aged 41.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

12. ELIZABETH BOOTE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of November , six guineas and seven shillings , the property of Henry Jollisaint .

HENRY JOLLISAINT sworn. - I am a wine-merchant , and live in Suffolk-street, Charing-cross: On the 7th of November, as I was coming down the Haymarket, I saw three or four women; the prisoner run after me, and took me by the coat, and pushed me up James-street , and said she wanted to speak to me; she wanted me to go home with her; when she found I would not, she lifted up her petticoats, and held me as fast as she could, and began to feel my pockets; I held my hands upon my breeches pockets; she put one arm round me, and I was afraid she would take my pocket-book, so I buttoned my coat; she then put her hands into each of my breeches pockets as hard as she could, and took six guineas out of one, and seven shillings out of the other; I seized her hand with the money, and said, she had robbed me; I called, watch; the called out, sister, to a woman, and gave her my money; I took hold of the other woman, and kept her also, and gave her in charge. Going through a court, the woman who received the money, let her patten fall, and called for another woman, by the name of sister, for the key to go into her room; the woman came, and, instead of giving her the key, she gave her the money; I seized her hand, and it fell on the ground; I picked up two guineas, and the watchman one; we went to the watch house, and the prisoner put some silver on the table, which she said she had before she met me; I am sure she is the same woman.

JAMES BAILEY sworn. - I am a watchman, and heard somebody call watch; I went up, the prosecutor had hold of two girls; I took the girl from his left-hand, and sprung the rattle; another came up, and took the prisoner. Going through Orange-court, a great many people got round, and the woman I had hold of called for her sister to take the key and her pattens out of her hand; in holding out her left-hand, she dropped the key, pattens, and some gold; three guineas were picked up; we then took them to the watch-house, and the prosecutor gave charge of the prisoner; the other woman was discharged.

(- Smith, the other watchman, confirmed the testimony of Bailey.)

Prisoner's defence. I heard a noise, and saw the gentleman with a girl having some words; I went to see what was the matter; he then laid hold of me, and said, I was the girl; I said, I would go any where, and went very quietly to the watch-house.

GUILTY . aged 22.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

13. ELIZABETH BRADFORD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of October , a handkerchief, value 2 s. a petticoat, value 2 s. 6 d. a tippet, value 6 d. two napkins, value 1 s. two frocks, value 2 s. 6 d. a piece of cotton, value 2 s. 9 d. two bed-gowns, value 2 s. two caps, value 6 d. and two shirts, value 6 d. the property of William Ford .

WILLIAM FORD sworn. - I live at Checquer-alley, Whitecross-street ; the prisoner was my servant , and quitted me on Saturday the 22d; I did not know the reason she did not come back, as she slept at home; I did not miss the articles till Sunday the 13th of November; my wife was confined to her bed; I was out; on my return, I missed the things out of my clothes-chest; the bundle was fetched home from the mangler's, and I looked to see they were right, and it contained the things named in the indictment. Suspicion fell on the prisoner; I applied to Edward Trigg , the officer, to go with me after the prisoner, and found she had given me a false direction; I then applied to St. Luke's charity-school, the prisoner having told me she had been in there, but they said she had not; the officer knew her, and we went to her mother's; I saw the mother; the officer opened the box in the room, and saw two new bonnets made up of cotton, which I believe to be mine; we searched, and found fifteen duplicates; we went and examined them at the pawnbroker's, but could not find the things. As we were going out of the shop, the officer called me back, saying, the prisoner said the things were there; the prisoner told the pawnbroker what they were, and he produced them.

CHARLES-EDWARD SALMON sworn. - I am a pawnbroker, and know the prisoner; I rememberFord, the officer, and her, coming to my shop, when she told me what the things were.

(The things produced, and identified.)

GEORGE SHEPHERD sworn. - I live with Mr. Salmon, and produce several articles pledged on the 18th of October by the prisoner.

EDWARD TRIGG sworn. - I am headborough of the parish of St. Luke's, and was sent for by Ford, and apprehended the prisoner, and asked her what she had done with the tickets; she said, she burnt them, but the goods were pledged at Mr. Salmon's; I made her no promises whatever; we went to the shop, and got them.

Prisoner's defence. My master said he would not hurt me, if I would tell him where they were.

Ford. I did not; I had a particular reason for not doing it.

GUILTY .

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

14. ELEANOR CLIFFORD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of November , two gowns, value 16 s. a pair of shoes, value 1 s. 6 d. two caps, value 4 d. an apron, value 2 d. a shawl, value 1 s. and a shift, value 3 s. the property of Sarah Hewitt .

SARAH HEWITT sworn. - I live at No. 38, Henry-street, Old-street ; the prisoner lives in Chick-lane, and is an unfortunate girl; I am a widow , and a weaver of gold and silver lace : On the 29th of October, between ten and eleven o'clock in the morning, the prisoner came to me, and said she had been laying in the street all night; I said, I would give her a night's lodging; my mother slept with me, and the prisoner slept on the floor; she staid all day on Monday. On Tuesday I went to work, and told her to take care of the place; at six o'clock I went back, and found my door open, and the things stated in the indictment gone; I did not know where to find her, and did not see her again till last Saturday, when I met her, and asked her if she was not ashamed; she said, she was foolish; I gave charge of her, and she told the constable where the things were.

JAMES GEARY sworn. - I am an officer belonging to St. Luke's: Last Saturday evening I took charge of the prisoner; I searched her, and she had an old apron on her; I asked her for the other things; she said, she had pawned them; she said, she lived at the corner of Black-Boy-alley, Chick-lane, and if I went there, I should find the duplicates; I went there, and her landlady gave me some; I went and saw the things at the pawnbroker's.

(The articles produced, and identified.)

- WOOD sworn. - I am a pawnbroker's shopman, and took a gown in from the prisoner, upon which I lent her five shillings.

Prisoner. I have nothing to say.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Confined six months in the House of Correction .

First Middlesex Jury, before Lord Alvanley.

15. WILLIAM BROADSTOCK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of November , a looking-glass, value 2 l. eight curtains, value 5 l. twenty blankets, value 10 l. two counterpanes, value 30 s. two vallances, value 5 s. and fifteen yards of carpet, value 20 s. the property of David Watson .

DAVID WATSON sworn. - I have a house in George-street, Westminster , but I do not live in it, it was not tenanted at the time: On the 13th of November, I was going by it, and thought the joint of the door was more open than it should be; before I could get to it, the door opened, and a man and boy came out; the man is the prisoner; I asked him what he was doing there; he said, he had been to see his friends; I took him by the collar; a scuffle ensued, and some hard blows passed; my hand slipped from his collar, and he run away, and I after him, calling stop thief; a soldier stopped him, and he was taken to prison; I found nothing on him; I went back to the house, and found the passage full of articles tied up in an apron, and a dark lantern; I knew the things had been removed; the bed-furniture was removed.

JOSEPH HUGHES sworn. - I was going down King-street, Westminster, and heard the cry of stop thief; I saw a man running, and stopped the prisoner.

THOMAS HAYES sworn. - I am a constable, and took the prisoner into custody.

Prisoner. I leave my defence to my Counsel; I have nothing to say.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

16. WILLIAM GOLDING was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 31st of October , an iron dog, value 1 s. and an iron bolt, value 1 s. the goods and chattels of the London-Dock Company .

Other Counts, varying the manner of charging it.

(The case stated by Mr. Knapp.)

JOHN TAPLIN sworn. - I am a watchman employed by the London-Dock Company, the prisoner was one of their labourer s: About six o'clock in the evening of the 31st of October, I saw the prisoner come out of the coffer-dam, and about one hundred others; I stood as near them as I could, to see they took nothing out; the prisoner and another came up abreast of one another; I suspected them, and gave them in charge to Burton, and they were taken to the watch-house; the prisoner was searched, and an iron bolt and dog weretaken from him; the bolt from between the waistband of his breeches and under his waistcoat.

Mr. Alley. Q. Was the dog fixed to the building or not? - A. It is moveable, but is driven into the ground; it is crooked at each end, to brace two logs to keep the piles even as they are driven down, and is moveable from one pile to another.

WILLIAM BURTON sworn. - I searched the prisoner, and found this iron on him, one on one side, and the other on the other, under his waistcoat. (Produces them.)

GEORGE SIBLEY sworn. - I am store-keeper of the London-Dock Company; these irons have the Company's mark.

Prisoner. I have nothing to say.

GUILTY .

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

17. THOMAS PATMORE was indicted for that he, on the 11th of October , feloniously, knowingly, and wittingly, had in his possession and custody, a certain forged and counterfeit Banknote for the payment of 1 l. he knowing the same to be forged and counterfeit .

The prisoner pleaded

GUILTY .

Transported for fourteen years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Lord Alvanley.

18. THOMAS PATMORE was again indicted for feloniously forging and counterfeiting, on the 11th of October , a Bank-note for the payment of 1 l. with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England .

Second Count. Charging him with feloniously disposing of and putting away the same, knowing it to be forged, with the like intent.

Two other Counts, varying the manner of charging it.

And Four other Counts, charging it to be with intent to defraud Edward Roach .

No evidence being offered, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Lord Alvanley.

19. MICHAEL BROWN was indicted for feloniously returning from transportation before the time for which he was sentenced was expired, without any lawful excuse for the same .

WILLIAM GLANNON sworn. - I am a Police-officer, and was present when the prisoner was tried, and know he is the man who pleaded, and was convicted. This is a copy of his conviction.

(Copy of record of conviction read.)

JOHN GRIFFITHS sworn. - I am a Police-officer, and apprehended the prisoner on suspicion of returning from transportation, on Sunday, the 30th of October , at the Star, Wentworth-street, Whitechapel .

Prisoner. I have nothing to say.

GUILTY , Death , aged 23.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

20. WILLIAM WOODROOFE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of October , three shirts, value 7 s. two pair of stockings, value 2 s. and a pocket handkerchief, value 6 d. the property of Edward Holdsworth .

EDWARD HOLDSWORTH sworn. - I am a carpenter : On the 27th of October, I lost the things mentioned in the indictment; I live in Windmill-street, Bethnal-green ; the prisoner had lodged with me a week, he is a seafaring lad ; he got up about seven o'clock; he went into the kitchen, and took the things; he then went out; I missed them in about a quarter of an hour; I went after him, and overtook him in Whitechapel, with the things upon him; I took him before a Magistrate, and he was committed. (Produces and identifies the property.)

GEORGE - sworn. - I am a constable and beadle; I took these things out of the prisoner's hand.

Prisoner. I have nothing to say.

GUILTY , aged 16.

Confined one week in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

21. JOANNA BENNETT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of November , a metal watch, value 2 l. 2 s. the property of Charles Hunt .

CHARLES HUNT sworn. - I am a barrister ; I live in Lincoln's-inn: On the 17th of November, in the fore part of the day, I went home with the prisoner; I put my watch down in the window-seat; after I had been there some time, she went out, and took the advantage of conveying away the watch; I followed her, but lost sight of her; she was stopped with the watch by a pawnbroker, about five hours afterwards, I am sure she is the person.

WILLIAM PARR sworn. - I am a pawnbroker; the prisoner at the bar offered to pledge the watch at our shop, and I stopped it.

Mr. Hunt. This is my watch.

Prisoner's defence. He was very much in liquor, and gave me the watch to pawn.

Court. (To Mr. Hunt.) Were you perfectly sober? - A. Yes.

Jury. Q. Did you give her any money? - A. I meant to have given her some if she had not left me.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

22. JAMES POTTER the younger, was indictedfor feloniously stealing, on the 14th of November , a pot of white lead, value 12 s. the property of James Prescott .

JAMES PRESCOTT sworn. - I am a painter and glazier , No. 22, Queen Ann-street East ; the prisoner was articled to me for three years, he lives with his father and mother; I know nothing of it myself.

MARY PRESCOTT sworn. - I saw the prisoner go out with a pot on his shoulder; what was in it I cannot tell.

DANIEL BRINK sworn. - I work for Mr. Prescott; I saw the prisoner take a pot of white lead from the back shop, and go into the street; he told me he was going to convert it to his own use; he said, he had a job of his own in Castle-street; I told him he had better fetch it back again; my mistress and the prisoner had some words, but he was not taken up till next day.

Q. Had you had any words with him? - A. No.

Prescott. He had no job out for me that day, I had stationed him in the front shop to work.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

23. HANNAH WELCH and MARY BRYAN were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of November , a card of lace, value 5 s. the property of James Maycock .

JAMES MAYCOCK sworn. - I am a haberdasher , No. 64, Broad-street, St. Giles's : On the 11th of this month, between seven and eight in the evening, the two prisoners, with another woman, came into my shop to look at some edging; Bryan had been there before; I shewed them a box of edgings. Having a suspicion, I took particular notice of their motions; I saw Welch take up a card of lace, and conceal it under her cloak; I did not speak, I had a mind to see how far they would go, but my young man asked her what she was going to do with that card of lace; she said, what card of lace? and immediately dropped it. I then sent for a constable, and they were taken to the watch-house.

JAMES HUSSELL sworn. - I am shopman to Mr. Maycock: On the 11th of this month, the prisoners came into the shop; I knew Bryan had attempted to rob us several times; I heard her voice, and I came and stood by the side of my master; while Bryan was employing my master, and asking him questions, Welch took up a card of lace, and concealed it under her cloak; I asked her what she was going to do with it; she seemed surprised, and immediately dropped it. I picked it up, and went for a constable. (Produces the lace.) I am sure it is my master's property.

Maycock. This is my lace.

Welch's defence. I know no more of it than the child unborn; he threw it down himself from the counter.

Bryan's defence. I am entirely innocent of it.

Welch, GUILTY , aged 45.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Bryan, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

24. JOHN DRISCOLL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of October , a pair of breeches, value 20 s. the property of Vincent Kennett, Esq .

JAMES GOOD sworn. - I was servant to Vincent Kennett , Esq. No. 2, New Cavendish-street, Portland-place : On the 29th of October, between eleven and twelve o'clock, the prisoner rung the bell, and asked for Mr. Kennett; I told him he was not at home; he then asked if the lady was at home, he would be very glad to speak to her; I rung the bell for the maid to let her know that Mr. Smith wanted to speak to her, that was the name he came in; my mistress, not knowing the name, sent word for him to wait ten minutes, and my master would be within; I then left him and the maid in the hall; I heard him desire her to go up again, and tell her mistress it was particular business, and he would not detain her two minutes; while she was gone, he went into the parlour, and took a pair of doe-skin breeches; they were hanging there not five minutes before; he went away, and left the street-door open; my master and I then went in pursuit with the carriage, and I took the prisoner with the breeches in his hand in Rosemary-lane.

ALICE ARUNDEL sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Kennett; James Good desired me to acquaint my mistress a Mr. Smith wanted her; the prisoner is the man; the prisoner desired me to go up a second time, and when I came down, he was gone, and had left the door open.

( Daniel Cartwright , an officer, produced the breeches, which were identified by Samuel Nunn , the maker, by Good, and by Mr. Kennett.)

Prisoner's defence. I had two small phials of brandy, as samples; the servant said he should like some brandy for the winter, and he said he had no money, and I told him a gallon of brandy for the breeches.

GUILTY , aged 59.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

25. THOMAS DORAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of November , nine pounds weight of solder, value 5 s. the property of John Wildman .

ANDREW TIDMAN sworn. - I am a constable of Aldersgate ward: On Saturday, the 19th of November, I was constable of the night; betweenbrought in by a watchman and patrol of Aldersgate-street.

FRANCIS - sworn - I am a watchman: I was on duty on the 19th instant, between eleven and twelve at night; a gentleman told me there was a drunken man on my beat; I went, and found the prisoner asleep on some steps; I endeavoured to raise him up, but he was so much in liquor he could not give me an answer; I rose him up a little, and found some solder where he had been asleep; he desired me to let him lie there a little longer; I called to Mr. Fowler, the patrol, and told him there was a drunken man asleep upon the steps; we rose him up, and I put the solder in his hand; Mr. Fowler said, you are a plumber ; he said, he was; then, says he, you have no business with this; we then took him to the watch-house, searched him, and found another piece of solder in his pocket; he was then taken to the Compter.

GEORGE FOWLER sworn. - I am a patrol: I assisted in raising up the prisoner, we found a piece of solder; I asked him if he was a plumber; he said, he was, he had been doing a job at Layton, and his master allowed him these perquisites; there was another piece found upon him at the watch-house.

Tidman. I unbuttoned his trowsers, and found a piece of solder at the watch-house; he told me it was his own, his master allowed it him as a perquisite; the prisoner told us where his master lived, Mr. Wildman; the next day, Sunday, Mr. Wildman and the patrol came to my house; I shewed him the solder. On Monday morning Mr. Wildman sent to Layton for the ladles in which it was melted; they are here. (Produces them.)

JOHN WILDMAN sworn. - I am a plumber , in Whitechapel , the prisoner worked for me; I had a job at Layton, the ladles were there; this solder was certainly melted in these ladles, one of them is particularly marked by a dent in the ladle.

Q. You never suffer men to take solder? - A. No.

Cross-examined by the Prisoner. Q. Did not Clarke say before you, that it was his, and that he gave it to me to keep for him? - A. Yes, he has since absconded; he swore positively before the Magistrate, that he gave it to this man to carry home for him.

Prisoner's defence. Clarke told me it was his own that he had to do a job with, and asked me to carry it home for him; he gave it me openly in a public-house, in Whitechapel; I immediately told who my master was when I was asked.

For the prisoner.

WILLIAM EASTON sworn. - I was present when Clarke gave the prisoner one of these cakes of solder on the 19th of this month, at the Bull, in Whitechapel-road; it was about seven o'clock in

GEORGE WHITSON sworn. - I am a labourer; I saw Clarke give the prisoner one of these cakes of solder.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

26. JAMES TROTT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of October , fifteen yards of cotton, value 2 l. the property of John Dowding , in his dwelling-house .

- GARDINER sworn. - I am shopman to Mr. Dowding, a linen-draper , in Redcross-street : On Saturday evening, the 22d of October, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, as my fellow-servant and I were behind the counter, we were informed that some people of a suspicious character were about the house; I kept a strict eye to the door, and in about half an hour after that I saw the prisoner come up to the door-post; I then saw him come into the shop, and take a parcel, which is here; as soon as he laid hold of it, I rushed out; I followed him about twenty yards, and laid hold of him by the collar; with assistance I got him back to the shop; he asked me what I wanted with him, and I asked him what he wanted with that parcel; he said, I must be mistaken in the person; I told him, I had never lost sight of him from the time he took the parcel; after that he went down upon his knees, and begged pardon, he hoped I would forgive him.

JAMES HARDING sworn. - I live opposite the prosecutor; I watched the prisoner and three more lurking about the prosecutor's window full three quarters of an hour; I waited about ten minutes, and then I told the young man there were such people; I kept upon the watch, and saw the prisoner at the window again; I went towards Beach-street, and heard the cry of, stop thief! they had got him in the shop before I could get back; I assisted in taking him to the Compter; in Long-lane there was a gang of twenty of them, or more; they swore they would have him from us; one of them gave me a very violent blow on the head.

JOHN GIBBONS sworn. - I was watching with the last witness; I saw the prisoner step into the shop; he came out again directly, and the young man after him, crying, stop thief! I ran across the road and collared him; I assisted in taking him back; I can swear to the man.

RICHARD CONSTABLE sworn. - I am a constable; I assisted in taking him to the Compter.

GEORGE CHILD sworn. - I am a cabinet-maker; I was coming across Smithfield when they were bringing the prisoner along; I had a bundle in my hand, and I was beat and cut dreadfully with sticks and their fists.

JOSHUA BRAY sworn. - I am a constable; I took charge of the prisoner, and took him towards the Compter; he went very quietly; there was amob of I suppose two hundred people; a gang of them came up to me with an oath, and desired me to let him go; they immediately began upon us with sticks, and I began with my stick, and we beat them off; I put the prisoner into the Lock and Key, and then we got a coach, and took him to the Compter; they cut the prisoner's head open as well as the rest; they beat me over the arm so, that I could not lie in my bed for a fortnight.

(The property was identified by Mr. Dowding.)

The prisoner did not say any thing in his defence, but called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY, aged 24,

Of stealing to the value of 39 s.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

27. JOHN BARNES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of November , a pocket, value 6 d. and four two-penny receipt stamps, value 8 d. the property of Thomas Ruff .

THOMAS RUFF sworn. - I am clerk to a warehouseman , No. 5, Ironmonger-lane, Cheapside: On Wednesday the 9th of this month, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I was going down Ludgate-hill, just before I got to Bridge-street, I met my Lord Mayor's show; I turned back with it, till I came opposite the Old Bailey , where it stopped; the people were taking the horses out of the late Lord Mayor's carriage; I, with a great number more, stopped to look at them; I had my pocket-book buttoned in my right-hand coat-pocket outside; directly after I stopped I put my hand to my pocket, I found the pocket unbottoned, but the book was there; I then saw the prisoner collared by Mr. Levy at my back, close to me; he took him off the foot-path into the horse-road; as soon as he had got off the foot-path, I saw my pocket-book in the prisoner's hand: I told Mr. Levy it was mine; Mr. Levy told me to go with him; I went with him and the prisoner to Giltspur-street Compter; Levy has the property.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. What did the prisoner say at the time? - A. He said he picked it up.

NATHAN LEVY sworn. - I am a constable: On the 9th of November I was on duty; I had seen the prisoner for an hour or two, I had seen him make several attempts; I followed him up Ludgate-hill; I saw him follow this young man; he put his hand first to his left and then to his right-hand pocket; I saw him take the book out of the young man's pocket; I took him by the collar, and told him, I had been watching him for two hours before; I took him to Giltspur-street Compter; going to the Alderman, he told me he would give me two guineas to tell the Alderman I picked it off the ground.

(Produces the book and the two guineas,)

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You did not begin the conversation with him? - A. No.

Q. There was nothing said by you about being turned up? - A. No; I suppose since last Wednesday I have not had less than twenty of his friends at my house.

Q. How long have you been a constable? - A. Six years.

Q. How long ago is it since you were in custody? - A. Any man might be taken up for an innocent affair.

Q. Did you never turn King's evidence against a prisoner? - A. Not to my knowledge.

Q. You must know - Were you never committed by a Magistrate, and afterwards gave evidence here? - A. Upon my oath never.

Q. Nor at Clerkenwell? - A. Never in no Court.

Q. Have you never been taken up? - A. Yes; I was taken up upon a charge of buying a note.

Q. A two hundred pound Bank-note? - A. Yes, and you were my Counsel; the Lord Mayor discharged me, knowing it was a wrong thing; that is the only time I ever was in custody in my life.

Q. You took the prisoner's two guineas? - A. Yes.

The prisoner left his defence to his Counsel.

For the prisoner.

HENRY SOUTHERN sworn. - I know the prisoner, and I know Levy; I saw him when he was taking him from the Compter to Guildhall to be examined.

Court. Q. What are you? - A. A publican at Mile-end; as they were going along, Levy said to the prisoner, you may give me what you like, I can do the trick; then we went into a public-house, and had something to drink, I believe a glass of brandy a piece, and I saw some money pass from the prisoner to the constable; I understood he was to give him part then, and part when he got to Guildhall. I have known the prisoner a twelvemonth; he was a pork-butcher in Golden-lane till within these three months; he bears a very honest character.

Court. Q. What are you? - A. I keep the George, in Pelham-street, Mile-end New Town; I kept the Stationers Arms, in St. John-street, before that.

The prisoner called eight other witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

28. JAMES TAYLOR was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of November , a great coat, value 20 s. the property of John Vine .

RICHARD VINE sworn. - On the 5th of November, about eleven o'clock in the day, I saw theprisoner take my brother's great coat out of my father's cart in Oxford-street , opposite the Green Man; I followed him, and took him with the coat.

( William Jackson , an officer, produced the coat, which was identified by the prosecutor, John Vine .)

Prisoner's defence. I was helping a drayman close to the cart; I threw my great coat into a cart, and I thought this had been mine; my own was gone.

GUILTY , aged 55.

Confined one month in Newgate , whipped in jail , and discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr Justice Grose.

29. ROBERT GRIFFITHS and JOHN GREEN were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of November , 70 lb. of lead, value 10 s. belonging to Thomas Lyons , fixed to the dwelling-house of Catherine Kiernan , widow .

THOMAS LYONS sworn. - I live in Charles-street, Drury-lane : On the 14th of last month I lost some lead from my house, between six and seven o'clock in the evening; it was taken from above the garret window. - (Produces the lead.)

WILLIAM KENNEDY sworn. - I had been at No. 3, Charles-street, Drury-lane; No. 2 is one of Lyons's houses, and at No. 3 there was an alarm that some men were going in at the garret window: the woman of the house asked me to go up stairs at No. 3; I went up into the garret, and found the two prisoners there; I am sure they are the same men; they were both stripped in their jacket sleeves, I stopped at the door till some more men came up; I desired them to stop while I went to see if there were any more men on the leads; I went out, and found some lead missing on No. 3; I returned into the room, and saw the lead hanging by the bed-side, part of it was under the quilt; I kept the prisoners in the room till two officers came.

Prisoner Green. Q. Were the garret windows open or shut when you went into the room? - A. Shut; when I came up to the door, Green let me in, while his partner was shutting the window, I found them both all over dirt, as if they had been at work; Green lodged in the room.

- WEDBY sworn. - I live at No. 2: I was alarmed on the 14th of November that there were thieves breaking into my garret-window, I went up, and learnt that a man had gone past the garret-window to No. 3; I then went to No. 3, and spoke to Mrs. Kennedy who keeps the house, it is a house of ill fame: I asked her who she had got in the garret; she said her brother was gone up; I went up and saw the last witness; one of the prisoners was sitting on the bed, and the other standing by his side; Kennedy asked them what they had been at; Kennedy went out at the window to No. 3, and called to me to detain those that were in the room: Mrs. Kennedy came up, and seeing the bed rather rumpled she turned down the bed-clothes, and there discovered the lead; I immediately went for two officers, and brought them with me, I gave charge of them; Green did not lodge there, he is a married man; it is a house of ill fame, and he might lodge there as any other man might do; he declared his innocence to the last: and when I first entered the room, he said, if there is any thing amiss, here I am, as innocent as a child unborn.

Prisoner Green. (To Kennedy.) Q. Were you not indicted for keeping a house of ill fame in Wharton's-court, Holborn? - A. It is a falsehood.

Q. Does not your sister, at this moment, keep a disorderly house for women of the town? - A. I cannot say; she lets her house out to lodgers.

JOHN TOWNSEND sworn. - I am one of the patrol belonging to Bow-street.

Q. Are you the young man that received the wound? - A. Yes; I was sent for to take charge of the prisoners; Green said he was innocent, and Griffiths said he knew nothing about it; the lead was in the room by the side of the bed. (Produces the lead.)

Lyons. I compared the lead with Wedby, and it corresponded with the window where it came off.

Wedby. I saw it compared, and it fitted exactly.

Q. (To Lyons.) Do you receive the rent of this house? - A. Yes; I have a lease of it from Mr. Leverton, I have three houses in the same street.

Q. (To Kennedy.) Did Green oppose your coming into the room? - A. Yes; he said I had no business there.

Q. How came you to say he lodged there? - A. He took the key up stairs just before, and wished me a good night, saying he was going to bed; he went up about six o'clock, as nigh as I can guess, and said he was going to bed; I had not seen Griffiths before.

Green's defence. I belong to the West London Militia , I went upon guard in Bunhill-row; I afterwards got very much in liquor, I got up to Drury-lane; I knew a person that lodged in this room and went there, and found this man in the room; I know nothing of the lead.

Griffiths's defence, My wife was not at home, and I went to the Red-lion to have a pint of beer; I found the young woman there that rented this room, and I asked her to let me cook a bit of victuals in her room, and she gave me leave; I went there, and pulled off my coat to wash my hands; Green came up, and said he had been upon guard, and was in liquor, and wanted to lie down; I told him I would not incommode him, I would go to the cook's-shop and get something; I was going away when those people came up, I know nothing of the lead; it is a house full of disorderly women,and the door is always open to all comers and goers.

The prisoner, Green, called his Serjeant, who gave him a good character.

Green. I had my great coat on, and my pouch and bayonet, as I came from guard; and I dare say Townsend will say so.

Townsend. He had his great coat on, but I do not recollect whether he had his pouch and bayonet or not.

Griffiths, GUILTY , aged 48.

Green, GUILTY , aged 35.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

30. ROBERT HOLMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of November , seventeen yards of calico, value 30 s. the property of John Williams , Joseph Williams , and Ephraim Burford .

(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

JOHN FENNER sworn. - I am an officer: I was sent for to Messrs. Williams's, in the Poultry , on the 18th of November, about ten o'clock, the prisoner was in the warehouse, Mr. Williams gave him in charge to me; the rest of the servants' boxes were searched, and finding his box was in the house I went to him at the Compter for the key, and he denied having it; I told him if he did not let me have it his box would be broke open; he then gave me two keys tied together, from his waistcoat-pocket, Mr. Williams went with me; I opened his box, and found this piece of printed calico, (produces it); Mr. Williams claimed it as his property. He said before the Lord Mayor -

Mr. Gurney. Q. What he said before the Lord Mayor was taken in writing? - A. I believe not that part.

Mr. HOBLER sworn. - Q. You are clerk to the Lord Mayor? - A. Yes.

Q. Was what the prisoner said reduced into writing? - A. It was not.

Fenner. He said before the Lord Mayor he was guilty; that he had been a good servant to them, and was very sorry.

JOHN WILLIAMS sworn. - (Proves the the firm.) The prisoner had been our porter between three and four years; in consequence of suspicion, I sent for Fenner, and this property was found in his box, I know it to be our property; he always behaved well till this time.

The prisoner did not say any thing in his defence.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Confined three months in Newgate , and fined 1 s. London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

31. DANIEL HAYDON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of November , seven hundred crab quicksets, value 7 s. the property of John Irons .

JOHN IRONS sworn. - I live at Market-street, I had a lodging at Enfield, I follow ditching and planting; the prisoner is a labourer in the same line; I had a large quantity of quicksets, some white thorn and some crab, in Mr. Plumb's stable, the Nag's Head, at Enfield ; they were my property. Last Sunday I was at Mr. Plumb's, I had seen them in the stable on the Friday. On the Sunday, the prisoner and another man were at Mr. Plumb's, in the tap-room, I had never seen them before, to my knowledge, it was between twelve and one o'clock; one of them said, it is time we should go; he said, we may as well go the back way; there is a back way leads up a passage by the stable, where my quicksets were; I had a suspicion they might take some of them, as I had lost a great many at different times; they went the back way, I went out at the fore door, where I could command the passage; I stopped there, they did not come out of the passage while I stood there; I saw the prisoner come across the lane, with a bundle of quicksets under his arm; I am sure the prisoner is the man; I called to him, and told him he had got my property; I desired him to carry them back, and put them where he had them from, which he did; he then turned to go about his business; I said, no, friend, you are not to go off so; we went down the yard together, and he said, call Mr. Plumb out; I asked Mr. Plumb his name, and he told me; the prisoner said, he took them out to look at, to see if they were as good as his own; I saw nothing more of the other man; they were close together when I saw the prisoner with the quicksets, about six yards from the stable-door; there were twenty-nine bundles in the place; this was only part of a bundle; he could have carried a great deal more, I should suppose half a dozen bundles; each bundle generally contains one thousand; it is worth one shilling a hundred; it was part of two bundles.

Prisoner's defence. I am in the same line as he is; I went with another man through the stable, both doors were open; I took them out to the other man to shew them to him.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Lord Alvanley.

32. CATHARINE GODDARD and ANN PRICE were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of November , nineteen yards of printed cotton, value 2 l. the property of William Prosser , privately in his shop .

SUSANNA PROSSER sworn. - I am sister to William Prosser , who lives at No. 8, St. Agnes Terrace, Tabernacle-walk , and keeps a linendraper's and haberdasher's shop : On the 17th of November, I was standing at the door, and saw Price and a young man, not taken, standing with Goddard a few doors off; then Price and the mancame and asked to look at some prints; I desired them to walk in, and my sister and I shewed them some; they chose a dark print, at two shillings and six-pence a yard, and desired two yards to be cut off; they gave a seven-shilling piece, which was not weight, and we returned it to Price, who gave it to the man; he gave a shilling, and said they would call for the print next day, and pay for it. Before they were gone out of the shop, Goddard came in, and asked for a yard of cloth, which she paid eleven pence for; when they were gone, we missed a piece of print.

Q. What became of the persons? - A. The man and Price went up North-street, and Goddard the other way; I followed Price, and said, my sister wanted to speak to her about the money they left on the print; she returned with me down the street, and the man went on; she then said, she would go back to her son; I said, I would go with her; we turned to the City-road, and as she was near the gutter, I looked down, and observed she kept her hand close down on her pocket-hole; I then drew back, and saw the print in her hand through her pocket-hole. I then charged her with the robbery; she dropped it to the ground; I held her fast with one hand, and picked the print up with the other; and, with assistance, took her back. My sister is not here, having lately been brought to-bed.

Q. Did Goddard speak to the man or woman? - A. No, I did not observe her speak to either of them; I observed nothing further between them than Price and the man speak to her in the street, and she came into the shop after them about five minutes.

JOHN RAY sworn. - I am a Police-officer, and was sent for to take the prisoner into custody, and to take charge of the piece of print.

(The print produced, and identified.)

Price's defence. I throw myself on the mercy of the Court; it was poverty that drove me to it; the other woman knows nothing about it.

Price, GUILTY, aged 55.

Of stealing, but not privately .

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Goddard, NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

33. MARGARET ALDUS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of November , twelve yards of lace, value 36 s. the property of William Crowder , privately in his shop .

There being no evidence to affect the prisoner, she was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

34. ELIZABETH KEMP, otherwise CHATTERTON , was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Judith Anthony , about the hour of twelve in the night of the 29th of November , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing a shift, value 1 s. an apron, value 3 d. a shovel, value 2 s. a pair of tongs, value 3 s. a poker, value 2 s. and a candlestick, value 2 s. the property of the said Judith .

JUDITH ANTHONY sworn. - I live at No. 3, Sun-yard, in the parish of Aldersgate : On Tuesday, the 29th of last month, I locked my door between eleven and twelve at night, and went into my next door neighbour's, and soon afterwards I heard I was robbed.

ELIZABETH GREENMAN sworn. - I live next door but one to the prosecutrix, and on Tuesday night, between twelve and one, a little girl was going out for some liquor, and saw the prisoner coming out of Mrs. Anthony's with the things; she called for assistance, and I went to her.

JAMES INCH sworn. - I am a watchman, and took the prisoner into custody, with the things in her possession.

(The property produced, and identified.)

MARGARET CALLIHORN sworn. - I saw the prisoner come out of Mrs. Anthony's house that night with the property; the candlestick was in her pocket.

Prisoner's defence. I was very much disguised in liquor at the time; a man gave me liquor, and told me he was going to sell those things, but I might have them; and by the same token he put the candlestick in my pocket, for I could not hold the things, and I stopped at that woman's house, where I met the child.

Q. (To Callihorn.) Did you see the prisoner come out of the house? - A. Yes.

GUILTY, aged 28.

Of stealing only .

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

35. GEORGE HAYES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of November , twelve pounds weight of hemp, value 12 s. the property of Charles-Hamden Turner , Esq .

WILLIAM GARDNER sworn. - I am foreman to Mr. Charles-Hamden Turner, a sail-cloth manufacturer , at Limehouse : On the 30th of September, I gave out twelve pounds of Italian hemp to Hannah Barlow , to spin. On the 1st of October, she was taken in labour. On the 8th of November, she was recovered, and, going to her work again, missed this hemp. On the 11th of November, it was brought to me by Mary Briant to sell, and, knowing it to be my master's property, I stopped it; I went with her and some other persons, and we took the man she bought it of, which is the prisoner at the bar.

HANNAH BARLOW sworn. - I work for Mr. Turner, I received twelve pounds of hemp from the foreman; I was taken in labour, and laid it by in the wash-house. On the 8th of November, I looked for it, and it was gone; I shall know it again.

(The hemp produced in Court.)

Barlow. I am sure this is the same.

MARY BRIANT sworn. - This hemp was brought to me by the prisoner, I cannot say the day, it was about a week before I went to sell it to Mr. Gardiner; this is the same hemp, I gave the prisoner four shillings for it.

Gardner. I had this hemp from Mary Briant , on the 11th of November; there is none in England manufactured in the same way for the same purpose; I know it to be my master's hemp; the prisoner is in the habit of going that way, and could easily have got it.

Prisoner's defence. I never saw this woman before.

Briant. The woman is here that paid him the money for it; I was sick in bed.

MARGARET KIRWAN sworn. - I saw the prisoner the day Mary Briant bought the hemp of him, I am sure he is the man; I paid him four shillings for it; this woman was sick in bed.

(The hemp was also identified by a servant of Mr. Turner's, who tied it up.)

GUILTY , aged 52.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

36. WILLIAM PITTMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of November , three pounds weight of bacon, value 2 s. the property of Daniel Reardon .

DANIEL REARDON sworn. - I am a cheese-monger , No. 17, Drury-lane : On the evening of the 17th of November, the prisoner, with another person, came into my shop; the prisoner said, we want a small quantity of bacon to cut into rashers; I cut the quantity he required, which was about half a pound; I turned round to weigh it, when the other man took a piece of bacon between three and four pounds from the window, and ran out of the shop with it, and the prisoner ran after him; I came round the counter as quick as I could to pursue them; it was between six and seven o'clock in the evening; I went out; a little girl in my service went out before me; I went down the coal-yard, I did not see them; I returned again, and saw two little boys that I had seen at my door when the little girl went out; in consequence of their information, I returned to the coal-yard, and there I saw the prisoner; I laid hold of him, and he kicked me, and beat me very severely, and in the scuffle Mr. Alexander's footman, of Lincoln's-Inn, was coming by, and saw the prisoner throw away some bad half-crowns; he picked up two of them; several people came up, one said, knock him down, and another said, stick him with a knife; that was when he was beating me; a neighbour came to my assistance, and we took him to the watch-house. The Magistrate gave him till the 19th to consider whether he would go into the Army of Reserve; he would not, and then he was committed. I am sure he is the man; he said before the Magistrate that the other young man and he had been drinking at the house of a man, of the name of Baldwin, in Fore-street, that they came together from Fore-street to Drury-lane, and that the other had led him a one side; that was the term he used.

Prisoner. I was committed for the value of ten-pence, and expected to be tried at Hick's Hall; my friends have been attending there, and did not know but I should be tried there.

Prosecutor. Not knowing whether he would go into the Army or not, Mr. Stafford, clerk at Bow-street, put it down at ten-pence; but I afterwards told him the bacon I lost was worth more than two shillings, and he said, I was entitled to indict him for that sum.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

37. GEORGE GREEN and JOHN POUNCEFORD were indicted for making an assault, in the King's highway, upon William Brooks , on the 20th of October , putting him in fear, and taking from his person three waistcoats, value 16 s. three night-caps, value 1 s. 6 d. five neckcloths, value 10 s. an apron, value 1 s. four handkerchiefs, value 5 s. five pair of stockings, value 12 s. 6 d. and five shirts, value 1 l. 15 s. the property of Thomas Penn .

WILLIAM BROOKS sworn. - I belong to Shadwell school, I am going of thirteen years old, my father is a cooper, and works at Shoreditch: On the 20th of October, I was going from Shoreditch to Goswell-place, near Islington, about six o'clock in the evening, I had a great bundle with me belonging to Mr. Thomas Penn ; I saw him pack up shirts, handkerchiefs, aprons, stockings, and waistcoats, into the bundle. As I was going along Shoreditch, I looked into a doctor's shop, and the least of the two prisoners, (Pounceford,) came up to me; he asked me if he should carry my bundle; I told him I was not going much further; as I went up Curtain-road, I met the other prisoner. Pounceford had followed me; they spoke together in the Curtain-road, but I did not hear what they said; I went into a public-house to ask what it was o'clock, and they stopped at the door.

Q. Was that for the purpose of getting rid of them? - A. Yes; and when I came out, they were waiting at the door; I kept on till I came to Vinegar-yard , and there both of them took holdof my collar, and knocked me down, and took my bundle from me.

Q. They knocked you down before they took your bundle? - A. Yes, I had it in both arms close to my breast, because it was a large bundle; I screamed, and Mr. Holloway came out; the prisoners ran away, and Mr. Holloway ran after them; he could not catch them, and then he took me in, and wrote a letter to Mr. Wilson, where Mr. Penn lived. The next day I went with Brown and Elby to look after them, and we met them in Rose-lane, Spital-fields, leading towards Whitechapel; I told Mr. Brown it was them that took the bundle from me; they heard me say so, and they both ran away, and got into the broad place.

Q. Are you sure those are the two boys? - A. Yes, I am certain of it, I have no doubt; I saw Pounceford at the doctor's shop, where it was very light, and I could see his face; I have not the least doubt they are the persons; I saw Green at a baker's shop in the Curtain-road, and I saw him at the public-house door; every light place I came to, I looked at their faces.

Q. What made you look so particularly at their faces? - A. They would keep up with me, and wanted to carry my bundle; when I came out of the public-house, they were waiting for me; I ran away, and they caught me at Vinegar-yard; I am perfectly sure they are the same persons.

ROBERT BROWN sworn. - Q. Has the property ever been found? - A. No part of it. I belong to the Public-Office, Shadwell: On the 21st of October I heard of the robbery, and sent for the boy, and asked him if he should know the persons again; he said, yes; I took him to the broad place where these kind of people toss up in a morning. In Rose-lane we passed the two prisoners; Elby was before me, and the boy behind; the boy said, here they are, both of them; upon that, they both ran away; we pursued them into the broad place, where there were, I suppose, twenty or thirty of these sort of people, and there we lost sight of the prisoners; I then had a private information of them, and I went to a private lodging in Wentworth-street, on the 25th of November, in company with Elby, and apprehended them both; they were in bed, in two different garrets; the servant went up first, and said, George, open the door, here is a gentleman wants to see you; he would not open the door, and I told him I would break it open; he then jumped out of bed, and unbolted the door; he was going into bed again, and I said, come, come, put on your clothes, I want you; I knew him immediately to be the person who ran away from me on the 21st; then I made the other get up, and open his door; the doors are close together; he said, Mr. Brown, do you want me too? he knew me very well; I told him, yes; we secured them, and brought them before the Magistrate. I knew them both before, and I am sure they are the same persons I had seen in Rose-lane; I took particular notice of the shortest, being very much pock-marked; they acknowledged running away from me in Rose-lane.

WILLIAM ELBY sworn. - I was in company with Brooks and Brown on the 21st of October, when the prisoners ran away from us; we did not find them till the 25th; we apprehended them at a lodging-house; Green knew me, but I did not know him.

THOMAS PENN sworn. - All I know is, that the property lost was mine. (Repeats the articles in the indictment.)

Pounceford's defence. I am not guilty of the thing the boy says I am.

Green's defence. I know nothing of the robbery; I am innocent of it.

Green, GUILTY , Death , aged 16.

Pounceford, GUILTY , Death , aged 14.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

38. JOHN WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of November , a set of bed-furniture, value 42 s. the property of John Harris , in his dwelling-house .

JOHN HARRIS sworn. - I am a furniture broker , in Tottenham-court-road : On the 24th of November last, I saw the prisoner in the centre of my my shop; the shop is all enclosed, except two folding doors; I saw him take a set of dome-top dimity bed furniture, which is my property; it was pinned together in a curtain; I saw him go out with it, I ran out after him, and cried stop thief; he run about fifty yards, and threw the bundle away; I let it remain on the ground, and kept pursuing him into Pitt-street, where he went into a door that was open; I ran into the passage, which was dark; I knocked at the door, and asked for a light, which the landlord got me, and I found him on the landing of the one pair; I then took him into custody.

The prisoner did not say any thing in his defence.

GUILTY, aged 19,

Of stealing goods, value 39 s.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

39. MARGARET RILEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of November , 12 l. 1 s. 6 d. in monies numbered, the property of Simon Farrell , in the dwelling-house of Catharine Callaghan .

SIMON FARRELL sworn. - I am a labouring man , I have no certain place to live in; all the harvest I have been in the fen country, and sincethat I have been potatoe digging. The first time I saw the prisoner was last Monday night, at No. 1, Wright's-buildings, near Smithfield. On Tuesday night, a fellow-labourer of mine, William Daly , and his wife, and the prisoner at the bar, asked me to go out, and we went to St. Giles's, to the Black Horse, and had something to drink; then we went to Phoenix-street , to a lodging-house, Mrs. Callaghan's; Daly and his wife went into one room, and the prisoner and I into another; I sent for some gin and beer; she desired me to tell her what I had about me, that it might be all safe in the morning; I pulled out eleven guineas and a half in gold; I put it down by the side of the bed, and my breeches under my pillow; she did not undress herself, she complained she was hungry; I told her the woman of the house would bring in any thing she wanted; she said, she had rather go herself, and get something nice for supper; the beer and the gin came in, and she took the beer down to take the chill off; she locked the door upon me, I thought she would come back again; after I had lain some time, I looked, and found my purse and my money gone; I tried to get out, but could not; I knocked at the door, but nobody came; I went to-bed again till eight o'clock in the morning, and then I knocked at the door again; the servant let me out, and I told Daly and his wife of it; then we went to M'Daniel's, and I told him of it; we found the prisoner very drunk with some gold rings on her fingers, which she had not the night before; I wanted to get her to Wright's-buildings, but she would not go; I sent for Mr. White, a constable, and he took her in possession; he has got 10 l. 19 s.

Q. Were you sober? - A. Yes, and as sensible as I am now.

THOMAS WHITE sworn. - I am an officer, I apprehended the prisoner in Hatton-garden; she denied having a farthing about her; she was searched three times before it was found; I stripped her almost naked, and then the purse, containing 10 l. 19 s. dropped from her.

Prisoner's defence. I went with these people in a coach to St. Giles's; we drank a great deal of beer and gin, and it affected my head very much; then we went to a lodging-house, and this man went to-bed; I sat on a chair; he desired me to come to-bed, and I told him I did not belong to him, and I would not; he then gave me a shilling to get something to drink, and I went away; I had no more of his money.

GUILTY

Of stealing, but not in the dwelling-house .

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

40. ISAAC CLARK and JONATHAN COOPER were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of November , a cask, value 10 s. and eighteen gallons of table beer, value 9 s. the property of Thomas Stratton .

WILLIAM KEMP sworn. - I am clerk of the stores to Thomas Stratton , a brewer ; the storehouse is in Hopkins-street, Carnaby-market ; the prisoners are draymen , and worked under me: In consequence of a suspicion I followed the dray, on the 30th of November, and found they had got one cask too much; I told them they had a cask more than I knew of, which they denied; I then shewed them the cask, which I knew, and then they declared it was for a customer; having a very heavy load I desired them to deliver it, and added it to my account, I told them we would talk about it the next morning; I acquainted Mr. Stratton with it, and he took them up; they did deliver it to a customer.

Cross-examined by Mr. Hart. Q. They did deliver it to a customer of your's? - A. Yes.

Q. You told them they would be transported? - A. Yes.

Q. And yet they came to work the next morning? - A. Yes.

Q. Has it never happened that a cask more has been taken out than has been booked? - A. Never in my time.

Q. Have your servants never accounted in the evening for more than was booked in the morning? - A. No; the drayman gives me an account of what he has upon the dray, and then I stand by the side of the dray and reckon it, and then they are answerable for that load; I look over it, and if there is any thing wrong I tell them so; I was more particular that day than ever I was in my life.

ROBERT TAYLOR sworn. - I am clerk to Mr. Stratton: On the Wednesday morning, after Mr. Kemp had taken an account of the load, I saw the prisoner, Clarke, put a cask more on the dray, and I went and told him of it.

Kemp. As soon as I have taken the load, I always say, pull away; and I thought they did pull away that morning.

Mr. Hart. I believe they had lived with your master two years? - A. Yes.

Clarke's defence. After the load was taken, I recollected another customer wanted a cask, and I put the cask upon the dray.

Clarke, GUILTY , aged 22.

Cooper, GUILTY , aged 28.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

41. HENRY REEDON was indicted for that he, on the 25th of November , being in the dwelling-house of Ann Nugent , Widow , feloniously did steal a cloak, value 20 s. her property; and acoat, value 10 s. the property of John White ; and that being in the said dwelling-house, about the hour of six in the night of the same day, the said dwelling-house burglariously did break to get out of the same .

There being no evidence to bring the charge home to the prisoner, he was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

42. ELIZABETH CHEESE and SARAH SMITH were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of November , a Bill of Exchange for the payment of 20 l. two Bank-notes, each of the value of 2 l. and two other Bank-notes, each of the value of 1 l. the property of George-Frederick Buckholtz .

GEORGE-FREDERICK BUCKHOLTZ sworn. - Last Saturday, between twelve and one o'clock at night, I was coming from the theatre to my lodging in Greville-street, Hatton-garden: Before I came to Middle-row, Holborn , the two prisoners accosted me, one on the right and the other on the left, they wanted me to treat them; Smith hustled me about a good deal, and behaved very indecent; I told them I had no money; I said, to get rid of them, that I had been with two women before, and spent every farthing; they hustled me till we got to the corner of Gray's-Inn-lane, they pulled me along and behaved very indecent, and feeling me about; I felt Smith's hand in my waistcoat-pocket; I told them I had no money, but if they would tell me their lodging I would come some other day to them; Cheese told me she lived at the Key, in Chandos-street; as soon as I found her hand in my pocket, I pulled myself away from them, and left them. I had in my right-hand pocket some money in a leather purse, and in my left-hand pocket a note for 20 l. two two-pound Bank notes, and two one-pound Bank notes; I found my watch and money safe, but the notes gone; I immediately went down Gray's-Inn-lane after them, and found them standing together; the tall woman (Cheese) had in her muff a piece of white paper, which I snatched out of her hand, I looked at it, and found it was the twenty-pound note; I said you have robbed me, and I called out watch immediately; a watchman came up, and I gave charge of those two women, I never recovered the Bank notes; I shewed the watchman the note, and the little one attempted to snatch it out of my hand, but she could not get it from me; they were then taken to the watch-house.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. What time did you get away from the theatre? - A. I think, half after twelve; I had been with some friends, I left the theatre between eleven and twelve o'clock; I then went with some friends to the Ship, at the corner of the theatre, and had some bread and cheese and some porter; about a quarter after twelve, Mr. Godwin, who belongs to the theatre, went with me to King-street, he lives at Somers-town.

Q. How much had you drank? - A. Very little, I was perfectly sober.

Q. You found the prisoners not more than two hundred yards from the place where you left them? - A. Thereabouts.

JOHN HUGHES sworn. - I am a watchman: I heard the cry of watch, and ran as hard as I possibly could; the prosecutor said he was robbed by those two women, he said he had lost some papers; I asked him what papers; he shewed me a paper, and said, here is a paper the lady has robbed me of; I asked him if he had lost any thing else; he said, four notes; I asked him what notes; he told me two two-pound notes, and one one-pound note; he said the shortest had robbed him; I laid hold of her, and the gentleman took hold of the other; the short one said she would not go to the watch-house; I sprang my rattle, and we got her to the watch house, with a great deal of trouble; they were searched, but I did not see them searched.

WILLIAM FORREST sworn. - I am a watchman, in Gray's-Inn-lane: I went to the spring of my partner's rattle, and the gentleman gave charge of the prisoners; Smith resisted very much, I was by when they were searched to their shifts, but nothing found upon them.

(The watch-house-keeper produced the twenty-pound not, which he received from the prosecutor.)

Prosecutor. This is my note.

Cheese's defence The gentleman wanted me to take a walk with him; I told him I would go with him to the Key, in Chandos-street; he said he had been there with two ladies, and spent fifteen shillings, which was all he had.

Cheese, GUILTY , aged 36.

Smith, GUILTY , aged 23.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

43. JOSEPH DOLPHIN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of December , a tea-caddy, value 20 s. the property of Brathwaite Cismore .

BRATHWAITE CISMORE sworn. - I can only prove the property.

ELIZABETH NEWBERRY sworn. - I chair for Mr. Cismore, No. 10, John-street, Bedford-row , he keeps a private house: I had left the hall-door for a moment yesterday morning, between eight and nine o'clock, I heard a man's foot; I saw the prisoner with the tea-caddy in his hand, it was on the table in the parlour; he ran out of the house with it, I went after him, he threw it down, I picked it up, and he ran away; he was pursued and taken immediately; I am sure he is the same man.

JOHN NEWMAN sworn. - I was coming down King's-road: I saw the prisoner running I stoppedhim; several persons came up, and I left him with them while I went to John-street; when I came back again to them, he had made his escape by means of a knife being drawn; I pursued him to Lambs-Conduit-street, and took him again; I am sure he is the same person; I did not see the knife.

(The constable produced the caddy, and a knife, which he found upon the prisoner; the caddy was identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. I never was in the street at all; I was in Red-lion-passage when I was stopped.

GUILTY , aged 17.

Whipped in the jail , and discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

44. RICHARD CROMHOLT was indicted for that he, not having the fear of God before his eyes, but being moved and seduced by the instigation of the devil, on the 2d of November , upon Sarah Summerfield , spinster, a woman child under the age of ten years, to wit: nine years and upward , violently, and feloniously, did make an assault, and her the said Sarah did carnally know and abuse .

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

45. DANIEL FITZMAURICE was indicted for being found at large, without lawful cause, before the expiration of the term for which he had been ordered to be transported .

JOHN MAY sworn. - Q. Do you know the prisoner? - . Yes.

Q. What are you? - A. A Police-officer belonging to Union-Hall.

Q. Do you know any thing of his conviction at Maidstone? - A. He was convicted at Guildford, in Surry; I have the certificate of his conviction; I received it from Mr. Knapp's office.

Q. Did you see it signed? - A. No.

WILLIAM-JEROME KNAPP , Esq. sworn. - Q. Is that your hand-writing? - A. Yes.

Q. Is that made out in the usual way? - A. Yes, it is. (The certificate read.)

"On Monday the 11th of March, in the thirty-ninth year of his Majesty's reign, at Maidstone, Daniel Fitzmaurice was tried and convicted of a burglary, that he was ordered to be hanged by the neck, and afterwards to be transported for seven years; that afterwards, on the 11th of May, he was found at large in the Borough of Southwark, and tried at the Assizes holden at Guildford, on the 9th of August, and ordered to be hanged by the neck, and that he was afterwards ordered to be transported for the term of seven years."

Q. (To May.) Were you present when he was tried at Guildford? - A. I don't know that I was in Court at the time of his trial, I was at the Assizes, and saw the prisoner there.

Q. Did you see him at the bar upon his trial? - A. I am not sure that I did.

Q. Do you know what name he answered to? - A. Daniel Fitzmaurice .

Q. From what circumstance do you know he went by that name? - A. He was brought to our office before he took his trial.

Q. Are you sure the prisoner is the man who was committed to take his trial at that Surry Assizes? - A. Yes.

Q. The last summer Assizes twelvemonth, were held at Guildford, were they? - A. Yes.

Q. When did you see the prisoner again? - A. I did not see him again till now; the officer who apprehended him is here.

Q. When you saw him in 1802, do you mean you saw him in jail? - A. Yes, with the rest of the prisoners.

- COLLINGBOURNE sworn. - I am a Police-officer belonging to Union-Hall.

Q. Do you know the person of the prisoner? - A. I do.

Q. When did you see him first? - A. I have known him for some years, I was present at his trial at Guildford.

Q. To what name did he answer at that time? - A. Daniel Fitzmaurice ; I was in Court when he was convicted.

Q. Did you hear sentence pronounced upon him? - A. No.

Q. Are you sure the man at the bar is the man you saw convicted? - A. I am.

Q. Did he ever go by the name of Brown? - A. Not to my knowledge.

Q. From that time, when did you next see him? - A. The next time I saw him was in Newgate.

Q. When was that? - A. Two Sessions ago - I think, the 20th or 21st of September; he had been taken up for another offence.

THOMAS CROWLEY sworn. - Q. What are you? - A. A baker.

Q. Do you know the prisoner? - A. Yes; I apprehended him for taking my watch; I took him in Sugar-loaf Court, Swallow-street, Minories.

Q. When did you take him? - A. The 18th of last August, I took him before a Magistrate, and he was committed.

Q. You did not prosecute him for stealing the watch? - A. Yes, he was convicted, and ordered to be transported for seven years, the Sessions before last.

STEPHEN GLANHAM sworn. - Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - A. Perfectly well; I apprehended him before upon a charge of returning, when he was tried in Surry; he was committed to Surry goal.

Q. Were you present at his trial there? - A. Yes, I was.

Q. And conviction? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you hear sentence pronounced upon him? - A. No, I did not; I afterwards delivered him on board the hulks at Woolwich; here is the receipt. (Produces it.)

Q. Where did you deliver him? - A. On board the Prince of Denmark.

Prisoner. I have nothing to say; I never saw the man before that is swearing to me now.

GUILTY , Death , aged 20.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

46. JOHN PALMER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of September , in the dwelling-house of Joseph Cox , two Bank-notes, value 20 l. the property of Thomas Brennan .

The prosecutor was called, but not appearing, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

47. MARY DEALY and ABIGAIL QUINLAND were indicted for making an assault in the King's highway, upon Elizabeth Warner , on the 26th of November , putting her in fear, and taking from her person a pocket-book, value 3 d. a memorandum-book, value 4 d. a leather pocket, value 2 d. and four Bank-notes, value 4 l. the property of the said Elizabeth .

ELIZABETH WARNER sworn. - Q. Where do you live? - A. In One Tun-court, in the Strand.

Q. What are you? - A. A potato-seller , in Covent-garden.

Q. Did you ever see the prisoners before? - A. Yes, I have known Abigail Quinland many years; I never saw the other before this, to my recollection.

Q. Do you recollect any thing happening to you on Saturday, the 26th of November? - A. Yes; I was standing in Covent-garden between four and five o'clock in the afternoon; Quinland came to me, and asked the price of some potatoes; I was going to tell her, but had not time to tell her, when she hit me a blow on one side of my head; I then felt her making for my side-pocket.

Q. How? - A. She got her hand at my pocket, under my petticoats; I resisted, and called out; somebody came to my assistance; she pulled the pocket from my side.

Q. Did she cut it, or break it? - A. The string came undone.

Q. Did she do it by force? - A. Yes, she pulled it off by force.

Q. How was it tied? - A. With tape.

Q. Was it tied pretty strong? - A. Yes; the tape broke, and she got the pocket away from me.

Q. Did you, during all this time, resist as much as you could? - A. Yes; the other prisoner was standing by.

Q. Did she assist? - A. No.

Q. What did Quinland do with your pocket? - A. She ran away with it.

Q. What was in your pocket? - A. A pocketbook, four one-pound Bank-notes in the pocketbook, and a memorandum-book; she was apprehended in the market.

Q. Who apprehended her? - A. I do not know; Mary Gurney was the first person that came up.

Q. You say you have known this woman a great while? - A. Yes.

Q. And you are sure she took it by force? - A. Yes.

Q. Without any thing more passing than you have stated? - A. Nothing more.

Q. Did you see any thing of your pocket afterwards? - A. Yes.

Q. Was it an hour after, or five minutes? - A. My fright was so great I cannot say.

Q. Who brought it? - A. Mr. Sylvester.

Q. What was in it when it was returned? - A. The memorandum-book only; the pocket-book, with the notes, was gone.

Q. How long was it before you saw the prisoner Quinland? - A. Immediately afterwards, she was never out of the market; she was taken to Mr. Gurney's house; I did not see her till she went to Bow-street.

Q. Did she go to Bow-street that evening? - A. Yes.

Q. Did Mary Dealy offer to buy any thing of you? - A. No.

Prisoner Quinland. Q. Did you ever know any harm of me? - A. No.

MARY GURNEY sworn. - Q. Were you present in Covent-garden Market on Saturday evening? - A. I was, in my own shop, near the last witness; I heard a great noise, thinking it was the basket-women, I did not go nigh; I afterwards heard a scream, and then I advanced, and found the prisoner Quinland -

Q. Did you know her before? - A. I have seen her before; I found her beating Mrs. Warner about the head; I took hold of her by the shoulder, and asked her what she was doing that for; she made me no answer, an answer was returned by another person that she had robbed Mrs. Warner of a piece of meat, and four one-pound notes.

Q. Was that said loud enough for the prisoner to hear? - A. Yes; I said, I knew the weight of the meat, for I had weighed it for her in the course of the afternoon; I turned round and took the meat from the prisoner Dealy, she gave it to me immediately, she did not appear as if she had stolen it; they were then taken up to my shop.

Q. Did you see Quinland take any thing at all? - A. No; the pocket had been taken before I came up; they were then taken to Bow-street.

JAMES SYLVESTER sworn. - Q. Are you an officer? - A. No, a harness-maker: I was in at the sign of the Green-man, on Saturday evening, adjoining Mrs. Gurney's shop; hearing a disturbance in the market I went out, the prisoners were then at Mrs. Gurney's shop-door; they were taken to Bow-street, and I went with them.

Q. Were they searched? - A. Not at Mrs. Gurney's house, they were at the Office; when I went out, the prisoner Dealy was shifting her hands under her apron, and upon moving from the position in which she stood, the pocket was laying on the ground, before Mrs. Gurney's shop-door.

Q. How near was she then to Quinland? - A. They were close together.

Q. Are you sure the pocket did not drop from Quinland, but Dealy? - A. Dealy.

Q. From which hand? - A. I am not positive which hand, her hands were both under her apron; I picked it up and looked into it, and found nothing but a memorandum-book; an officer then came from Bow-street, and they were taken into custody.

Q. Did you see the prisoners searched? - A. Yes: upon one of them the officer found two one-pound notes.

Q. What officer? - A. Mumford.

Q. Upon which of them? - A. Dealy. (Produces the pocket.)

Q. (To Mrs. Warner.) Look at that pocket? - A. It is mine.

Q. Does the tape appear to be broke? - A. Yes, it is broke.

Q. By the force of pulling it from you? - A. Yes.

Q. Now look at the memorandum book? - A. It is mine; it is the same that I had in my pocket when it was taken from me.

Q. How far was Dealy from you? - A. About a couple of yards.

Q. When they came up to you, they came together? - A. Yes.

Q. At the time that Quinland struck you, how near was Dealy to you? - A. A yard, or it might be a couple of yards; they were within a little distance of each other.

Q. At the time Quinland ran away, did Dealy run away too? - A. I was so confused I cannot say.

EDWARD TREADWAY sworn. - I am an officer belonging to Bow-street.

Q. On Saturday the 26th, you were sent for to Covent-Garden Market? - A. Yes; about five o'clock in the afternoon.

Q. Was it light or dark? - A. It was star light; I went to Mrs. Gurney's and took charge of the two prisoners.

Q. Who gave you charge? - A. Mrs. Gurney; I did not see Mrs. Warner then, they told me she had been robbed of a pocket, with a pocket-book, and four one-pound notes in it, with a neck of mutton; I gave Mumford the charge of Dealy, and I took Mrs. Quinland to Bow-street: I searched her, but found nothing upon her except two or three halfpence; then I took Mrs. Dealy to search her, and she told me she had given the notes to Mumford, and that she had them of Mrs. Quinland.

Q. Did she say what notes? - A. Not that I recollect; I searched her, but found nothing upon her.

THOMAS MUMFORD sworn. - I am an officer belonging to Bow-street: I went with Treadway, I brought Dealy out of the Market, and Treadway brought the other; we went to the Brown-bear public-house; I kept Dealy from the other, and Treadway searched the other, but found nothing; Treadway was then going to search Dealy, when she gave me these two notes out of her hand, saying, she had them from the other prisoner.

Q. Did she say so loud enough for the other prisoner to hear her? - A. Yes; she said she knew nothing at all about it; then Treadway searched Dealy, and there was nothing more found.

Q. (To Mrs. Warner.) Look at those notes? - A. I cannot swear to the numbers; I believe them to be mine, but I cannot swear to them.

Q. See if there is any mark upon them? - A. No, there is not.

Q. We have heard something of a neck of mutton? - A. Yes; the neck of mutton is mine, it was put in my apron.

Q. Did you lose it? - A. It was taken from me at the same time.

Q. Do you mean to say that Abigail took it from you? - A. Yes.

Q. And not Dealy? - A. Not Dealy; she took it out of my apron.

The prisoner, Quinland, put in a written defence, as follows: -

"The prisoners are charged with stealing the things away from the prosecutrix, the pocket containing, as is specified in the warrant of commitment, a pocket-book containing four one-pound notes, &c. the prisoners, when charged with taking the said pocket-book from the said prosecutrix, were nearly opposite Southampton-street, Covent-garden: the prisoner, Abigail Quinland , is a poor woman who is in the humble habit of carrying fruit, &c. from Covent-garden to any persons who may employ her; the prisoner coming past at a late hour, hearing a row, went up to the mob, seeing some papers lying on the ground she then picked them up, and they turned out to be Banknotes. Prisoner, Abigail Quinland, was fighting with the prosecutrix; in fact, the whole were so intoxicated that they were rolling about the street, when Abigail Quinland was taken, she was searched, and nothing found upon her. Mary Dealy , when the row was on, gave up two one-pound notes to the officer. As to character, Sir, they are humble, but honest, unable to employ Counsel, and pay the fees of Court, and humbly solicit your Lordship'shumanity and interference in behalf of the unfortunate prisoners.

Dealey's defence. I had been in Covent-garden on the Saturday evening, and this woman and the prosecutrix were both fighting; while the fight was on I stooped down, and picked up the two notes; that is all I know of it; I had four pounds of potatoes with me at the time, and my basket upon my shoulder.

Q. (To Mrs. Warner.) Are the prisoners basket-women? - A. Yes.

Q. Had Dealey a basket upon her shoulder? - A. I cannot say.

Q. They say you were intoxicated, were you intoxicated? - A. No, not but what I knew what I was doing.

Q. You were then fresh in liquor? - A. I was.

Q. Were you so fresh with liquor as to make it doubtful as to the person who struck you? - A. Yes, I am sure of the person who struck me.

Q. What had you been drinking? - A. I had drank a little brandy and water and a little gin.

Q. Was Quinland intoxicated? - A. Yes, I believe she was.

Q. Was she very drunk? - A. Yes.

Q. Had you been fighting with her? - A. No.

Q. Had you struck the prisoner at all? - A. I never struck her.

For the prisoner.

MARY GODFREY sworn. - Quinland worked for me a good deal on Saturday; she is a basket-woman.

Q. What are you? - A. A market-woman; I sell every thing in the fruit way but oranges and lemons; she has worked for me many years, and I always found her honest.

Q. Was she intoxicated that afternoon? - A. Yes, very much, more than I have known her for a long time.

Q. She is a married woman? - A. Yes, her husband is at sea.

Q. You did not see Dealy and Quinland together that afternoon? - A. No, and the other woman, Dealy, had no acquaintance with her that I know.

WILLIAM CARROLL sworn. - I have known the prisoner, Quinland, some years; she is a very honest woman; I saw her on Saturday afternoon, very much intoxicated indeed, before she was taken up.

JUDITH CONNY sworn. - Dealy lodged with me three years; she is a very quiet honest woman; Mrs. Warner and Abigail Quinland were quarrelling together; they were both very much in liquor; there was a great dispute between them about some money; there were some words, and I believe some blows.

Both NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

48. WILLIAM JEFFERSON was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Robert Gledhill , about the hour of eight in the night of the 10th of November , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing six gilt breast-pins, value 2 s. the property of the said Robert .

- DOWSEY sworn. - I am an apprentice to Mr. Gledhill, cabinet-maker , No. 5, Cole-street, near Aldgate .

Q. Look at the prisoner, do you know his person? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember seeing him on the 10th of November last? - A. Yes, between seven and eight o'clock.

Q. I need hardly ask if it was quite dark? - A. It was quite dark; I was at work in the shop, and I heard some noise above at the shop-window; I listened to hear what it was about, and I heard some lads say, you shove the glass in, and I will take the things out.

Q. What glass did you conceive them to be speaking of? - A. The glass of the shop-window; I came up stairs, and saw a piece of glass shoved in, and nobody near the windows.

Q. Did you hear any breaking of glass? - A. No.

Q. Had you seen the pane of glass any time before? - A. I saw it at dusk, about five o'clock; it was unbroken then.

Q. You are very clear about that? - A. Yes; I went down stairs again, and then heard somebody come again; I went up stairs again, and perceived a hand in at a pane of glass.

Q. Was it a man's hand? - A. No, it was a boy's hand; it was that very lad's hand; I immediately went out-side the door, and saw him with his hand still inside the glass; as soon as he took some things out he saw me, and ran away, and as he ran he threw some things into the kennel.

Q. You saw him do that? - A. Yes; I then caught him, and brought him back to the shop; I went with him again to where he threw the things away, and made him pick them up; he gave them into my hand, and I took him back to the shop; I then went for a constable; he was searched; the glass was cut with a diamond, and some things taken out a week before; it was the same pane of glass; it had been made fast again with putty.

Q. The putty was removed, and then the glass shoved in? - A. Yes; the constable found upon him a tea-ladle, which we had lost the week before.

Q. What were the things found upon him? - A. Only a tea-ladle.

Q. What was it that was picked up? - A. Six gilt pins; the constable has them.

THOMAS JONES sworn. - I am a constable; I was sent for on the 10th of November; I took the prisoner into custody, I searched him, and found upon him a tea-ladle, which he acknowledged tome he had taken about a week before. - (Produces the tea-ladle and the pins.)

ROBERT GLEDHILL sworn. - Q. Look at those pins? - A. There are so many of these sort of things alike, that I cannot swear to them.

Q. You are a cabinet-maker? - A. Yes; I am obliged to work as a journeyman, and I sell a few articles of this sort to help; the window had been cut before, and I put a piece of glass with some putty at the corner; it is possible that a spectator might have shook it out.

Q. Was it at the top of the pane, or the bottom? - A. At the top.

Prisoner. I have nothing to say.

Prosecutor. The boy's father is a very respectable man, a milkman, and the boy has borne a very good character up to this time; he was brought up in St. Luke's charity school.

GUILTY, aged 13,

Of stealing, but not of breaking and entering the dwelling-house .

Confined one week in Newgate , and whipped in the jail .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

49. JOHN BRYANT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of July , a brass candlestick, value 2 s. the property of Patrick Gibbons .

(The case stated by Mr. Gurney.)

PATRICK GIBBONS sworn. - I keep the Red Lattice public-house, in Frogwell-court, Charter-house-lane ; the prisoner lived in the same house: On the 23d of July I missed a metal candlestick; I had seen the girl cleaning it in the kitchen.

Q. How soon after she was cleaning it did you miss it? - A. About an hour.

Q. Did you make known your loss to the prisoner? - A. Yes, I was charging a boy of the name of May, who came into the house to have a pint of beer, with it; I told him no person had been in but him that I could suspect; he threw himself upon his knees, and declared himself innocent; the prisoner wanted me to send him to jail, but as the boy declared himself innocent, I would not; on Sunday morning, the 7th of August, I went up with the constable into the prisoner's room, and there I saw my candlestick lying on his table; I told the constable that was my property.

Q. What did Bryant say? - A. Not a word; I gave charge of him, and he was taken before a Magistrate. - (Produces it.)

Q. Do you know it to be your's? - A. Yes, by two dents in the side; I asked him how he came by it at the watch-house, and he denied that it was mine.

Q. Are you sure it was your's? - A. Yes, perfectly.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Who had the public-house before you took it? - A. A man by the name of Condon.

Q. He had taken it before of the prisoner, had not he? - A. Yes.

Q. Condon was appraised in, and so were you? A. No, I was not appraised in, I bought them without a broker; we lumped them.

Q. Did you buy more than two candlesticks? - A. Yes.

Q. Upon your oath you bought more? - A. I bought two brass candlesticks and two iron ones.

Q. You inhabit the whole of the house, excepting one room, which he had? - A. Yes.

Q. There had been considerable quarrels between you? - A. Not considerable.

Q. You have gone to law together, have not you? - A. As far as a summons went.

Q. Did you attend the hearing? - A. One summons I got a verdict, and the other was dismissed without prejudice.

Q. Had the prisoner any other candlesticks in his room? - A. I do not know.

Q. Mr. Bleamire committed him for a felony, did not he? - A. He ordered him over to bail.

Q. Do you mean to swear that? - A. Yes.

Q. For the candlestick? - A. Yes.

Q. Upon your oath, it is not true that he was dismissed upon that complaint? - A. Upon my oath it is not true, he was obliged to give bail.

Q. Was he not bound over for an assault, and was not that the charge that was made? - A. No, not to my knowledge.

Q. Will you swear positively the Justice did not bind you over to prosecute the assault at the next Clerkenwell Sessions? - A. No, he told the prisoner he must find bail.

Q. For the assault? - A. No, for the felony, I suppose.

Q. There was no charge of an assault before the Magistrate? - A. No, because I brought the candlestick before Mr. Bleamire.

Q. Was what you said before the Justice put in writing? - A. I don't know, I suppose it was.

Q. Was it not put in writing, and signed by the Justice and yourself? - A. His clerk put it down.

Q. Did you sign it? - A. Yes, but I never read it over.

Q. Nor it was not read over to you? - A. Not to my knowledge.

Q. When was it you went before Mr. Bleamire? - A. On the Monday after the Sunday.

Q. That was in July or August? - A. In July.

Q. Do you mean to swear it was in July? - A. Yes, I do; it was on the 7th of August that I found the candlestick, and on the 8th I went before Mr. Bleamire.

Q. And you mean to swear Mr. Bleamire made him find bail for this? - A. I am sure he did.

Q. Did you indict him at the September Sessions? A. No, I did not.

Q. How often did you take him up before Mr. Bleamire? - A. Never but that time.

Q. Do you mean to swear that too? - A. Yes.

Q. And Mr. Bleamire made him find bail to appear at the Sessions? - A. Yes.

Q. And bound you over to prosecute? - A. No.

Q. You preferred no bill in September Sessions? A. No, I was not well.

Q. When did you get your license for your public-house? - A. The licensing day at Clerkenwell.

Q. When was that? - A. I believe in September.

Q. What part of September? - A. I don't recollect: the first day I believe was the 9th, or the 6th.

Q. You have told my Lord and the Jury that you did not go to the next Sessions because you was ill? - A. I was not able to go.

Q. Then did you go upon the 9th to get your license? - A. Yes.

Q. And yet you could not go on the 12th to prefer you bill? - A. I might be three days waiting, and I was not able to go through the hardship of waiting, and I got my license in an hour.

Q. What was your illness? - A. A very heavy cold.

Q. When did you indict? - A. The last Sessions.

Q. How often have you had an opportunity of seeing the prisoner between August and October Sessions? - A. Very often.

Q. Did he not live in the same house? - A. No, opposite.

Q. You saw him every day? - A. No.

Q. Had you any warrant to apprehend him? - A. Yes, I apprehended him as soon as I got out.

Q. When was it - the 17th of November, was it not? - A. Very near.

Q. The indictment was found on the 21st of October, and you did not arrest him till the 17th of November? - A. No.

Q. Did you not see the prisoner between the 21st of October and the 17th of November? - A. I don't doubt but I did.

Q. Upon your oath did you not? - A. I don't doubt but I did, but I am not sure.

Q. Did you not see him before Mr. Leach at the County Court? - A. Yes.

Q. After you had indicted him? - A. Yes.

Q. And before he was taken up upon a warrant? - A. Yes, it was.

WILLIAM HOARE sworn. - I am a constable; I was sent for by the last witness to apprehend the prisoner; I went up into his room; Mr. Bryant was at the threshold of the door at the bottom of the stairs; he begged of me to let him go up stairs into his own room; I went up with him; we stopped some little time, and Mr. Gibbons came up to see what we were about, and he saw this candlestick, and said it was his property; he gave me charge of him, and I took him to the watch-house, and there I left him; Mr. Gibbons put the candlestick into his pocket.

Q. Did the prisoner say any thing about the candlestick? - A. To the best of my knowledge he did not.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. When you were sent for by Gibbons, the prisoner was at home? - A. He was at the door.

Q. Did he ask you to go up with him? - A. Yes; he made a noise, and wanted to go up to his own room, and he asked me to go up with him.

Q. The candlestick was upon the table, not secreted at all? - A. It was upon the table.

Court. Q. What were you to take him up for? - A. For making a noise on the Sunday morning; I was sent for to take him for an assault.

Prisoner's defence. This man came to me, and wanted to take my public-house; I had heard a bad character of him, I did not like him, and told him not to come after me, and then he got another man to take it, and then he put him in.

For the prisoner.

RICHARD BRAILSFORD sworn. - I am one of the clerks assisting at Hatton-street.

Q. Were you so at the time when this matter came on between the prisoner and the prosecutor? - A. Yes.

Q. Mr. Bleamire was the Magistrate then sitting there? - A. Yes.

Q. What was the charge? - A. He endeavoured to institute a charge of felony in the first instance for robbing him of a candlestick, but the prisoner clearly made out a claim to it.

Court. Q. What was the claim? - A. He called one or two persons to swear to its being his property.

Q. What was done upon this charge of stealing the candlestick? - A. That was dismissed.

Q. Was he made to find bail for stealing the candlestick, or dismissed from it? - A. He was dismissed from it.

Court. If you wish this to go on, Gentlemen, I will hear it.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Did he sign this? - A. Yes, it begins, Patrick Gibbons upon his oath charges him with an assault, and beating him.

Court. It is too bad.

Mr. Knapp. We have witnesses to prove his right to the candlestick.

Jury. We are satisfied.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

50. MARY SMITH, alias BLAKEMAN , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of November , two cards of lace, value 3 l. the property of John Gander , in his dwelling-house .

JOHN GANDER sworn. - I live in Ratcliff-highway ; I am a haberdasher .

Q. Do you know the person of the prisoner at the bar? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you ever see her before the 3d of November? - A. Not that I know of. On the 3d of November she came to my shop between one and two o'clock in the day; when she came in, she asked for a yard and a quarter of edging; when I opened the box, the first piece at the top of the box I shewed her; she said it was for a baby's cap she wanted it, and that was not the right sort; I went on, and shewed her some more; I desired her to lay that by, and she would look over them, and see if there were any she liked better; I shewed her another, and so on, till I looked partly over the whole box; upon putting them back into the box, she laid hold of a broad card of lace, and behind the broad card I saw her drop two cards of lace into her lap as she sat by the side of the counter; when I had seen her do that, I put my lace all up except these two cards of lace; when she had concealed it, she said, I will have a yard and a quarter of that, pointing to that which I at first shewed her; I then put all the lace away into the box except this card; I cut her a yard and a quarter; a man came to the door begging, and she pretended to put her hand to her pocket to give him a halfpenny, and concealed the lace; she got up, she said she had no change, and asked me what the edging would come to.

Q. Did you see her put it in her pocket? - A. Yes, I saw the edging, and she put it in her pocket; she laid three shillings and sixpence down, and I gave her three-pence in change; she then went to the door, and gave the man a halfpenny, or some halfpence; I made up her parcel, and gave it her, and then she went out of the threshold of the door into the street; I went round the corner as quick as I could to follow her; I told her she had got a couple of cards of my lace, taking hold of her at the same time; I brought her back, and when she came in, I gave a signal for assistance, by knocking my foot upon the shop-floor; my wife and daughter came up; my daughter, who is here, saw her drop them; I did not see them myself; my daughter shewed them me when she picked them up.

Q. Did your daughter pick them up from the same side of the counter that you stood to serve her? - A. Yes.

Q. When you say you saw her slip two cards of lace into her lap behind the broad card, are you perfectly clear of that? - A. Yes.

Jury. Q. Did you stand on the same side the counter at the time you were serving her that she was? - A. She was on one side of the counter, and I on the other.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. And the property when it was found, was found on the other side where you had been standing? - A. Yes.

Q. Were there many things on the counter at the time? - A. No.

Q. How many persons were serving in the shop? - A. Only myself.

Q. Was there a good deal of lace in the box? - A. Yes.

Q. Had you sold any lace of the same quality that you have been describing off the same card? - A. Not that day.

Q. But before? - A. Yes, it might be a month or two months before.

Q. You got possession of this lace again? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you ever sell any more of it afterwards? - A. Not any of the lace that was stolen.

Q. That you are quite sure of? - A. Yes.

Q. How long have you had this lace? - A. Some months.

Q. A year perhaps? - A. No, one card I think I have not had above three months, and the other six or seven.

Q. What would you give for them? - A. One I gave one shilling and sixpence a yard for; I had one from the maker, and the other was part of a bankrupt's stock.

Q. Do you know how many yards there are? - A. I cannot tell.

Q. You never sold any of it afterwards? - A. No.

Q. Nor shewed it for sale to any body? - A. No.

ELIZABETH GANDER sworn. - I am daughter to the last witness: On the 3d of November my father knocked against the shop floor; I ran up before my mother; the prisoner was in the shop.

Q. Your father had hold of her? - A. No, he stood close by her; I ran behind the counter.

Q. Did you go at your father's bidding? - A. No, I went of myself; I went behind the counter, and saw two cards of lace lying on the ground.

Q. Where you found them was where your father usually stood to serve the goods? - A. Yes; I picked them up, and shewed them to my father; the prisoner said, my father had thrown them there; my father said, these were the cards which she had taken; that is all I know of it.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You found the cards of lace on the side on which your father usually stands? - A. Yes.

Q. Whether they had fell there or not you cannot tell? - A. No.

Q. Your mother came up afterwards? - A. Yes.

Q. Did not your mother say, she believed they had fell from the counter? - A. No.

Q. You are quite sure of that? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. (To Gander.) Did she go out of the shop? - A. She had got off the threshold; I took hold of her arm, and desired her to come in, which she did; I was then behind her.

Q. Then if she put her hand in her pocket you must have seen her? - A. In my flurry I did not see her; there is a counter on the right and another on the left.

Q. Did you observe her throw any thing over the counter, or use any action that looked like throwing any thing over the counter? - A. No, I did not.

Q. She was in your sight the whole time? - A. Yes.

Q. What do you think the lace is worth to you? - A. The one that I bought of the bankrupt's stock is worth two pounds five shillings; the other about sixteen shillings.

Q. What did you give for these nine yards yourself? - A. It is worth five shillings a yard; I cannot say how much I gave for it; I bought it with other different patterns.

Prisoner's defence. He said before the Magistrate that he had shewed some of this lace for sale after I was taken up, and the Justice told him he should not have shewn it.

Gander. I never had such a question put to me; I never did say so.

Jury. Q. On which side did you see her put the lace into her pocket? - A. On the left side.

Q. And the lace was found behind the right hand counter? - A. Yes.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave her a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

51. JOHN FREEMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of November , 82 lb. of sheet copper, value 4 l. and 9 lb. of nails, value 4 s. the property of John Perry , the younger, Philip Perry , John Wells , William Wells , the younger, and George Green .

Second Count. Charging them to be the property of certain persons to the Jurors unknown.

(The case was opened by Mr. Reynolds.)

THOMAS GARRETT sworn. - I am foreman to Messrs. Perry and Wells (proves the firm); the prisoner was a watchman belonging to the dockyard at Blackwall: On the 16th of November the prisoner's watch-box was opened by a person of the name of Moore; I saw a great deal of copper, to the amount of ten new sheets, and a parcel of nails, iron, and copper together.

Q. Do you know to whom it belongs? - A. It certainly belongs to the firm; we had been using that sort of copper.

CHARLES MOORE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Reynolds. I am a labourer in the yard: On the 16th of this month I went with the last witness to the prisoner's box; I had the key delivered to me by a person of the name of Hawkins, who found the property there.

BENJAMIN HAWKINS sworn. - I delivered the key to the last witness; I received it from Mrs. Freeman.

Q. You delivered the same key to Moore? - A. Yes.

MARY FREEMAN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Reynolds. Yesterday fortnight I went to the Police Office, where the prisoner was in custody; I saw him, and he delivered to me a key, which he desired me to give to Hawkins to give to Moore, to give to the foreman of the yard for the watch-coats; I gave it to Hawkins.

Q. (To Garrett.) Were their great coats in the boxes? - A. Yes.

JOSEPH HOLEBROOKE sworn. - I am an officer (produces the copper and nails); they were delivered to me on the 27th of this month by Garrett.

Garrett. This is the copper I found in the watch-box.

Q. Had any body access to that box but the prisoner? - A. I should think not; he had the key.

JOHN GILBERT sworn. - I am clerk to Messrs. Murray: these sheets of copper are marked in going through the roller; it is a private mark: I can swear to its being Messrs. Perry's property; we had just got the copper in; I received the copper the day before, and gave a receipt for it; there was a ship to be cleared at that time; the watch-box was two hundred yards or better from the ship; the copper was along-side the ship, on the dock.

RICHARD COX sworn. - Examined by Mr. Reynolds. Q. You were a watchman on the Saturday night? - A. No, I was seeing the men go on; I am the Sunday watchman in the yard; the prisoner was a watchman on Saturday night; I saw him go upon duty.

MICHAEL JENKINS sworn. - I apprehended the prisoner about a quarter past six o'clock on the Sunday morning; he was taken to the Police Office, and detained for a misdemeanor till the Wednesday.

Q. How near the premises did you stop him? - A. Within 20 yards of one part of the premises.

Court. Q. From the Sunday to the Wednesday had any body access to this watch-box? - A. I believe not; nobody had any business there.

Prisoner's defence. I found it honest and just, and put it there for safety till Monday morning.

GUILTY , aged 44.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

52. PETER HASWELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of November , 6 1/2 lb. of sheet copper, value 6 s. 6 d. the property of the same persons .

(The case was opened by Mr. Reynolds.)

THOMAS GARRETT sworn. - (Proves the firm.) I went with Moore to the prisoner's box; we opened the box, and there we found one sheet of copper; this was not removed so far as the other; I had not missed the copper; I only went for the purpose of giving them their great coats, and found the copper and a quantity of nails.

CHARLES MOORE sworn. - I went with the last witness to the prisoner's box, and found some copper; I received the key of that box from Hawkins.

BENJAMIN HAWKINS sworn. - I received the key from Mary Freeman , which I delivered to the last witness.

MARY FREEMAN sworn. I saw the prisoner at the Thames Police Office; I received the key belonging to the watch-box from him; he desired me to give it to Mr. Hawkins to give to Moore, and Moore to give to the foreman of the yard to get the watch-coat; I delivered it to Hawkins.

RICHARD COX sworn. - I saw the prisoner go upon his duty on the Saturday night; I did not see him go off; he told me he would not go off till I saw him in the morning, but he did go off before I came down to the gate.

MICHAEL JENKINS sworn. - I apprehended the prisoner on the Sunday morning, about a quarter past six o'clock; he had 28 lb. of new copper nails about him; he at first said, what he had about him was clothes; he had it upon his shoulder, and upon examination I found it was nails; he requested me to let him go about his business, and he would give me all the money he had in his pocket, and a guinea more the next day; I took him to the Police Office, and he remained there till Monday morning.

(Mr. John Gilbert proved the property.)

Prisoner's defence. I did not take it by way of stealing it; it was at the head of the dock, lying between the deals, and the basket of nails lay amongst the planks; I did not intend to carry them out of the yard.

GUILTY , aged 53.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

53. HENRY JORDAN and MARGARET DENNY were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of November , two tippets, value 3 l. the property of Joseph Meyer and George Pook .

There being no evidence to bring the charge home to the prisoners, they were

Both ACQUITTED .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

54. JEREMIAH PEACOCK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of November , a pocket-book, value 6 d. and a pencil, value 3 d. the property of John Adams .

JOHN ADAMS sworn. - I lodge at the Lamb, in Fulwood's-rents; I am a soldier : On the 18th of November, rather before twelve o'clock in the day, I lost my pocket-book and pencil at the bottom of Ludgate-hill ; my comrade and I were looking in at a picture-shop; I had been there but a little while; I was turning to come home; I put my hand to my side; my comrade asked me if I had lost my pocket-book; I told him I had; he then pointed out the prisoner to me; we immediately went after the man, and as soon as we overtook him, the boy said, in the prisoner's hearing, that is the man that has got your pocketbook, I saw him take it out of your pocket; he immediately put his hand to his pocket, and threw it into a carpenter's shop, turning the corner towards Fleet-market; my comrade took him by the collar; the boy took the book out of the shop, and gave it to me; he was then taken to Guildhall, and committed; I am sure I saw him throw the pocket-book out of his pocket (produces it); it is my pocket-book.

DANIEL SUTHERLAND sworn. - I am a soldier, I was with the last witness; coming down Ludgate-hill, on the 18th of November, we stopped about five minutes at a picture-shop; as he turned to go away, he put his hand to his side, and said, he had lost his pocket-book; a boy came up at the same time, and informed us the prisoner at the bar had taken the book out of his pocket; the boy pointed to him; I was going up to take him by the collar, when he pulled the book out of his pocket, and threw it into the carpenter's shop; we then took him to Guildhall.

Prisoner's defence. I never was within thirty or forty yards of the men; there was another man on one side of me, who ran away.

GUILTY , aged 44.

Confined one month in Newgate , and publickly whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

55. PETER MULKERN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of October , forty-eight files, value 2 l. and forty-eight rasps, value 2 l. the property of Isaiah Millington , Thomas Calvert , Thomas Vardun , the elder , and Thomas Vardun , the younger .

(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

JAMES CROOK sworn. - Examined by Mr. Watson. I am a soldier belonging to the West London militia, and have been nearly five years; the prisoner employed me on the 26th of October; I was standing in upper Thames-street looking out for a job; I did not know him before; my comrade and I were standing together; he employed me to take a parcel over Tower-hill; he went away, and I went with him to the corner of the lane, a warehouse just opposite a church, in Upper Thames-street ; when the prisoner was ready, he called me to him, and asked if he could trust me with a parcel; I told him my name, and he put it on the counter with chalk; he lent me a porter'sknot, and I took it to No. 64, East Smithfield, to one Mr. Bryce's, a tallow-chandler's shop; the prisoner gave me a note with it; I took the parcel to the house I was directed to.

Q. Did the prisoner go with you? - A. No; I saw a woman in the house; I told her I had brought a parcel for Mr. Bryce; she said, come in; then she said, there is an officer behind, take it away, I will have nothing to do with it, this is not the place it is directed to; I said, it is directed here, and it is impossible for me to get it up again myself, it weighed one hundred and forty-four pounds; she said, take it out, here is an officer coming; an officer then came in, who is dead and buried, but here is one of the party, his name is Smith; they opened the parcel, it contained blacksmiths files and rasps, all new; they took me into custody, and took me before a Magistrate; I went along with the officers to the shop where I had the parcel from, and the prisoner acknowledged he had given me the parcel, and helped me up with it to take over to East Smithfield.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You were taken prisoner upon this occasion? - A. Yes.

Q. That was the first time, and the last time I hope? - A. Yes.

Q. The prisoner was quite a stranger to you? - A. Yes.

Q. When you went to the prosecutor's shop, did you see a Mr. Tyson there, who was the foreman? - A. I saw nobody but the prisoner.

Q. Did you not see another man there, not so tall as him? - A. No; there was no other person there.

Q. Do you mean to say you did not see a person of the name of Tyson in the shop? - A. There was no such person; there was nobody there but him and me.

Q. Do you remember, at the Thames Police-office, a person of the name of Tyson coming as a witness? - A. Yes; but he was not in the shop at the time I took the load, he was there in the evening, after I was taken up.

Q. Was not Tyson admitted a witness for the crown? - A. He was taken up by the prisoner's recommendation.

Q. And charged with having stolen the property, and given it to you? - A. No; no person gave me the property but this man.

Q. Was he not admitted King's evidence? - A. Yes.

Q. Is he here to-day as a witness? - A. He is somewhere about here.

Mr. Watson. Q. After you came before the Justice, did you see a little man of the name of Tyson? - A. Yes.

Q. And then he was charged by the prisoner? - A. Yes.

JOHN SMITH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am an officer belonging to the Thames Police: I went with the last witness to Upper Thames-street, to Dealy's and Company, at the bottom of Suffolk-lane, just by Allhallow's Church; when I got into the shop I saw the prisoner, the last witness was with me, and he pointed out the prisoner as the man that gave him the note; I then called him on one side, and asked him if he had sent any parcel out by this man; he told me he had; I asked him what it contained; he told me it contained eight dozen rasps and files, four dozen of each; I asked him if he could recollect when that order was executed; he told me it was executed last week, by Mr. Brice; I asked him if the order was made with him or with his master; he told me it was made with his master; I asked him if there was a bill of parcels given at the time the order was made; he told me yes; I told him it was not a customary way to give a bill of parcels when the order was made, it was customary to give it with the goods; I then told him the last witness was in custody upon suspicion of illegal possession of this property, and I should be very glad if he would go down to the office, as he stated it was a fair order; upon which he said, I cannot go now, my master is in Hyde-Park, and I have nobody at home to mind the shop; it happened to be the general review day; I told him he would not be gone above half an hour, or three quarters of an hour, and I persuaded him to leave a message with the maid servant, which he did; he went with me to the Thames Police-office, and in going by Brice's, I said to my brother officer, Glover, who is now no more, go into Brice's, and ask him if he has got a bill of parcels; he went in, but Brice was not at home; I went on with the prisoner, and the last witness and Glover followed me; when we got near Nightingale-lane, the prisoner ran away, I had not taken him into custody, nor told him that I had any suspicion about him; I then pursued and took him; he was very obstinate, and shewed fight to me; I asked him how he came to run away; and his reply was, he thought I was going to put him on board the Tender; he did not know what I was going to do with him; I took him to the office, and the next day he acknowledged his guilt.

Q. Was what he said taken down in writing? - A. I don't know.

Q. Do you believe it was taken down? - A. I don't think it was that night.

Q. It was afterwards, when the other man was apprehended? -

Mr. Alley. Q. Was not Mr. Mason, the clerk, writing at this time? - A. Yes.

Q. Did he not read over the next day, what he had taken in writing the night before? - A. No.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Tell us what the prisoner said?- A. He said, I have been led into an error, and even mentioned the man's name, Tyson.

Q. Is that all he said? - A. Yes, to my knowledge; the next day he represented the same thing to the firm of the house.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Did he not say, that Tyson was foreman, and that Tyson told him this bundle was to go to Brice's, and that he sent it off accordingly? - A. I don't recollect that.

Q. Was it not in consequence of that, that Tyson was taken into custody? - A. Yes.

THOMAS SMITH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Watson. (Proves the firm of Millington and Co.) I carry on their business at No. 151, Thames-street, the corner of Suffolk-lane, near the Church of Allhallows the Great: On Wednesday the 26th of October, I saw the prisoner in the shop, he had nothing to do with us, he belonged to Dealy and Company, which is about twenty yards from our shop; he was carrying out a load.

Q. Had that house any dealings with your house? - A. Yes, we had occasionally; he had come before, and I had not the most remote suspicion of him. (The property was produced, and identified by the witness.)

Q. Had your house any dealings with a house, No. 64, East-Smithfield? - A. Never to my knowledge.

Q. How long have you been connected with the house? - A. Thirty-three years; they are all new articles; every file has a private mark.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. The prisoner did not belong to your house at all? - A. No.

Q. He could have had no access to the property in that house, but through the medium of Tyson? - A. Tyson was the man who had access to it; four of our people were exercising in Hyde-park that day.

Q. The prisoner at the bar carried out before your face the parcel which was your property? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you not know that Tyson gave it to the prisoner to carry away? - A. I did not see Tyson deliver them; I saw the man go out with the property.

Q. Was not Tyson in the warehouse at the time? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. Did you know what he was carrying out? - A. I knew he had rasps.

FRANCIS JOHN TYSON sworn. - Q. You are a servant to the prosecutors? - A. No, servant to Mr. Smith's house.

Q. Do you know the prisoner? - A. Yes: On Tuesday evening previous to Wednesday the 26th, I went to the Three Cups, Dowgate-hill, where I ordered a friend to wait that I meant to sup with; I met the prisoner coming out of the same public-house; he wanted to talk to me upon this business, and I wanted to go to my friend; he called me a fool for going; he asked me if he could see me in the morning; he said, Mr. Dealy, his master, was going out to see the review, and the other gentlemen were going to exercise. On Wednesday morning I had occasion to go to Little Bush-lane, just beyond his house, and on returning back again he was leaning over the door, and called me a fool; about five minutes afterwards he brought me an order, which is since torn up, or lost, or something of that kind;

Q. You never saw it afterwards? - A. No.

Q. Was it his hand-writing? - A. I believe it to be his hand-writing; I had seen him write before.

Q. What was it? - A. The order expressed this:

"Please to deliver the bearer four dozen of fifteen-inch flat files."

Q. Do you recollect whether that order was signed by any body? - A. No, it was not.

Q. Were there any rasps? - A. Not in the order.

Q. Had you agreed that he should come with an order? - A. No, I had not.

Q. Upon the production of that order, what did you do? - A. I went up into the warehouse, and delivered three dozen, I think, of fifteen-inch flat files, and I think one dozen of fourteen-inch; about five minutes afterwards he came again, took me by the sleeve, and said, follow me up stairs; I went up stairs, and he took four dozen of rasps, which he said Mr. Brice would give him half-a-guinea, or ten shillings a dozen for, and he took them away; as we came down stairs, I saw my master talking in the warehouse; he went past my master, and he made way for him to go out; he took them away to his own master's house; I did not see him till near eleven o'clock.

Q. What time did all this pass? - A. Just before breakfast, about eight o'clock; I saw him come to our door, he asked me if I could let him have any more goods; I told him, while he was teazing me in this sort of way, I could not follow my business, and told him to go away; he said, before he went away, that he had sent a soldier off with those goods, and he was waiting for his coming back; he told me he had sent them to Brice's, I think that was the name, I have been at the house; I did not see the prisoner any more that day, I was taken up the next day morning; I have been in the House of Correction ever since.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You said, just now, you believed the man's name was Brice? - A. I used to call him Price.

Q. Have you not been often at Brice's house? - A. Not till the prisoner took me there.

Q. Did you not carry things frequently there when the prisoner was not there? - A. But once; and that I mentioned to the gentlemen.

Q. How long have you lived with these gentlemen?- A. I have lived twelve months with them.

Q. Were you ever a servant before? - A. Yes.

Q. What trade were you before you came to live with these gentlemen? - A. I was in the navy.

Q. A volunteer, no doubt? - A. I went as captain's servant.

Q. Were you a servant before you went on board a King's ship? - A. Yes.

Q. You swear that? - A. Yes:

Q. Do you know Mr. Turner? - A. I was apprenticed with him.

Q. What is he? - A. A watch case joint finisher; my master had a very bad wife, and she used me very ill; and one thing and another, my master cancelled my indentures, and I went with my master's consent.

Q. Upon your oath, do you mean to say that the reason you left your master's service, was because he had got a bad wife? - A. It was the reason.

Q. Did not your master charge you with robbing him? - A. Never, I will take my solemn oath before God and man, he never charged me with robbing him in his life.

Q. Do you mean to swear your master never accused you of any thing dishonest about his house? - A. He never did.

Q. How long did you live with him as an apprentice? - A. Two years, and rather better; I bore an excellent character from all the captains in the service.

Q. Do you mean to persist that the reason you left your master was that he had got a bad wife? - A. Yes.

Q. You had lived for twelve months with the prosecutors? - A. Yes.

Q. You never gave any information to your masters till you were taken into custody? - A. No.

Q. Had you never known of any thing else being stolen from the shop before this? - A. Yes, the prisoner enticed me to let him have these things; he took away some files, and told me he had lost them; that an officer came up, and he threw them down.

Q. You never told your masters any body wanted to entice you to rob them? - A. No.

Court. Q. This man was to bring you an order, was that agreed upon between you before? - He said he hoped I would be up soon in the morning, as they were going a soldiering, and he would come and take the things out of the warehouse, and go to Mr. Brice's.

Q. What was you to have? - A. He told me he would give me half the money.

Q. Then you let him have the things? - A. Yes, he told me he had sent a soldier with them.

Court. Q. (To Crook.) Where was this warehouse situated? - A. I cannot say the name of the lane.

Q. Nor you have not heard since? - A. No.

Q. (To John Smith .) The corner of what lane did you go to? - A. I think the corner of Suffolk-lane, but I cannot swear to the lane.

Q. You know the house where Millington and Co. live, that is at the corner of Suffolk-lane? - A. Yes.

Q. Was that the place where you went to the prisoner? - A. No, that is the corner of Bush-lane; I went to the other place to apprehend Tyson.

Prisoner's defence. On the 26th of October, Tyson came to me, and asked if my master was gone to the Review; Tyson desired me to come to the warehouse, and he gave me four dozen of files, and desired me to send them to East-Smithfield; afterwards he gave me four dozen of rasps, and told me to send them to Brice's; I called the soldier, and sent him with them.

GUILTY.

Judgment respited .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

56. WILLIAM NEALE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of November , 14 lb. weight of coffee, value 10 s. the property of Ascot Smith , Samuel St. Barbe , and Robert-Humphrey Martin .

Second Count. Charging it to be the property of John Tower , Richard Nowell , and John Thompson .

Third Count. Charging it to be the property of John Millar .

Fourth Count. Charging it to be the property of certain persons to the Jurors unknown.

(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

JOHN MILLER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a preferable watchman in the employ of his Majesty's Customs; I was on duty on the 24th of November at Wiggin's Quay ; I had the charge of this craft in which the coffee was, about seven o'clock at night; I saw the prisoner close by a bottle-hoy on the side of the craft; I saw him move the oars, and go into the craft; I did not know whether he was a ship's watchman appointed to look after the craft or not; I made enquiry, and in a few minutes I saw him go upon the bottle-hoy deck; I then went up to him, put my finger on his breast, and felt the coffee immediately; I opened his waistcoat, and found this bag between his legs full of coffee, and this handkerchief against his breast filled with coffee; (Produces them.) His hat was full of coffee; he said he had a wife and child, and begged for mercy; I called a brother-officer, and we took him before the Lord-Mayor.

Prisoner's defence. I had been at work in the day, I went into a public-house in the evening,and a man told me if I would go into the craft, he had got a bag and a handkerchief with some sweepings, and he would give me something for myself, and accordingly I went and found it there; he said there was some loose, and I put it in my hat.

GUILTY .

Confined one month in Newgate , and publicly whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

57. JOHN-LEWIS-MARIA TRIST was indicted for a libel .

There being no evidence offered on the part of the prosecution, the defendant was

ACQUITTED .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

58. JOHN PINCOTT was indicted for unlawfully publishing inflammatory and scandalous libels .

(The case opened by Mr. Watson, and stated by Mr. Gurney.)

MOSES MAY sworn. - I keep a grocer's shop, in Bartholomew-close , near Mr. Pincott's, and am one of the trustees of the parish of St. Bartholomew the Great: On the 2d of September, I, with some other of the trustees and a peace-officer, ordered the beadle to take away a chaise, which was standing opposite Mr. Pincott's house, in the coach-path, to the green-yard; it had stood there from nine or ten o'clock till about four o'clock; chaises were set out every day. When the chaise was taken away, Mrs. Pincott called stop thief; Mr. Pincott followed the man, and most cruelly used him, for which he was summoned before the Alderman. I returned home, and next day I observed a paper stuck up on the front of the defendant's house, with wafers, in a very conspicuous manner. On the 5th of September, I observed a paper stuck up as before, only in larger characters. (A paper shewn him.) This is the paper, and which was taken down by my order; I saw Mrs. Pincott, but not Pincott; his wife principally stood at the door while the paper was up. In consequence of the ill-usage the officer received from Pincott, we attended before the Magistrates. After the 5th of September, I observed a paper pasted within side the chaise-house, and after that it was chalked on a board, and exposed to public view, and attracted a crowd of people round the door.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You are a green-grocer? - A. No, I keep a grocer's shop.

Q. The defendant is a coach-maker? - A. He lets out chaises , I don't know that he is a coach-maker, though he writes it up; occasionally chaises come to be repaired.

Q. Don't you know the chaise you ordered to be taken away, was a chaise sent to be washed and repaired? - A. I do not know it of my own knowledge.

Q. Did you know to whom it belonged? - A. No.

Q. Had you seen that chaise washed in the course of the day? - A. I had seen some washed.

Q. It is a sort of bye-place, is it not - there is no thoroughfare for carriages? - A. There is a thoroughfare for foot-passengers, and a carriage way up to Albion-buildings, but no thoroughfare for carriages.

Q. The street opposite Mr. Pincott's is rather extensive, is it not? - A. Yes, but a carriage could not pass without going round Mr. Pincott's chaises, sometimes five, six, or seven, of them.

Q. In consequence of a chaise standing there one day, it was drawn away by your order? - A. Yes.

Q. You had not told the defendant you were going to take it away? - A. Not that day, but our vestry clerk had; and I went up myself, with some other trustees, a week or ten days before, with the act of parliament, to request Mr. Pincott would take the chaise away, or abide by the consequence.

Q. You did not do so on the day the chaise was taken? - A. I certainly did not.

Q. You have seen chaises washed there? - A. Yes, and I have seen them repairing chaises there, painting them, and doing the smith's work there.

GEORGE GOODCHEAP sworn. - I am apprentice to the defendant and his brother-in-law; I lived in his house on the 5th of September last.

Q. Look at that paper, and say whose writing it is? - A. I cannot say.

Q. Did you ever see Mr. Pincott write? - A. Yes, I don't believe it is his hand-writing; I cannot tell whose it is; I saw a paper stuck up, but cannot speak to it; this is something like it, but I cannot say, as there were two; I believe this is one; I only read a paper, and did not take any particular notice of it.

Q. Who put it up? - A. I don't know.

Q. Was the defendant at home when it was put up? - A. I don't know; he was at home at his meals.

Q. Did you see him standing at the door while the paper was there? - A. No.

Q. Did you see any body reading the paper? - A. Yes, a few.

Q. Do you mean to say there were only a few? - A. I was in and out all day; there might be five or six when I saw them.

Q. You know Mr. May? - A. Yes.

Q. Does he reside near you? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know Mr. Pratt? - A. Yes.

Q. Does he live near you? - A. Yes.

Q. Does Mr. Dover, the tailor, live near you? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you believe them to be the persons spoken of in the paper? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know Mr. Senior? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know Bishop, a tailor, and Dighton, a chandler? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you believe they are the persons meant in this paper? - A. Yes.

Q. Was any person standing at Pincott's door pointing out Mr. May's house? - A. No.

Q. Did you hear Pincott say any thing about the paper? - A. No, I am his apprentice, and work out; I am only in his presence at meal times.

Q. Upon your oath, have you never heard him speak of that paper? - A. Not to my knowledge.

Q. Did you ever hear any body else speak of it in his presence? - A. Not to my knowledge.

Q. Did you ever ask him how it came to be put up? - A. No.

Q. You were surprised to see it there? - A. Yes.

Q. How long did you see it there? - A. I cannot say; I saw it about ten or eleven o'clock.

Q. Were people looking at it when you went in and out? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you tell Mr. Pincott somebody had stuck a paper up? - A. No.

Q. You never asked him about it, or any body in his presence? - A. No.

Q. That you mean to swear? - A. Yes.

( William Senior and William Bishop corroborated the testimony of Mr. May, as to applications being made to the defendant to remove the chaises, and also as to the paper being wafered up.)

WILLIAM-ARCHER DICKSON sworn. - I am vestry-clerk of the parish of St. Bartholomew the Great: In our books there are the names of Moses May , William Bragg , George Dover , John Dighton , and the others named in the paper, all trustees; they are trustees when they become church-wardens.

Mr. JOHN RUTHERFORD sworn. - I am solicitor to the trustees: On Tuesday, the 6th, the defendant called upon me, and said if Mr. May and the other trustees would return him the twenty shillings, and the other expences he had been at in getting the chaise out, he would not expose them any longer. I told him I was very certain the trustees would not comply with it, but I had no objection to mention it to them; I had possession of the paper at that time.

GEORGE DOVER sworn. - I am one of the trustees, and saw a paper up at the defendant's, but did not read it; when Pincott was before the Alderman, he said he would keep the paper up a month if he liked.

(Paper read as follows:)

"A Singular Act of Cruelty and Oppression.

An Appeal to the Public and Neighbourhood.

Whereas, on Friday, the 2d of September, between four and five in the afternoon, a chaise was taken from this door, the property of a gentleman, and under repair, by order of the following persons, calling themselves trustees of the parish , appointed to protect the inhabitants thereof, which chaise they caused to be taken to the green-yard, forcibly and out of the hands of Mr. Pincott and his servant, charging a fine of twenty shillings and other expences.

Moses May , chandler's shop and grocer, Bartholomew-close.

- Bragg, shoe-maker, Ditto.

George Dover , tailor, Ditto.

- Senior, tailor, Ditto.

- Bishop, tailor, Ditto.

- Jones, tailor, Cloth-fair.

- Anderson, book-binder, Albion-buildings.

- Dighton, chandler, Long-lane.

And others in the conspiracy whose names will appear hereafter, or previous to a copy being inserted in the public newspapers."

[Mr. Alley addressed the Jury on behalf of the defendant.]

GUILTY .

Fined 30 l. and imprisoned till paid .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

59. JOHN EDWARDS and SAMUEL CLARK were indicted for a conspiracy to defraud Alexander Solomons .

It appearing there was a contract entered into between the parties, the defendants were

ACQUITTED .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

60. METHUSELAH SPALDING was indicted for an unnatural crime .

GUILTY , Death .

Lord ALVANLEY delivered the Opinions of the Twelve Judges on the Case of William Taylor , for Embezzling, as follows:

The prisoner, William Taylor , was tried at the last Sessions at this place, on an indictment in Middlesex. which set forth, that on the 27th of August, in the parish of St. Giles, he, being servant to James Barker , in the said parish, fishmonger, did receive and take into his possession, certain monies, to wit, ten shillings, for and on account of his said master, and having so received and taken into his possession the said sum of money, for and on account of his said master, he, the said William Taylor , then and there fraudulently and feloniously did embezzle and secrete the same, and so the Jurors aforesaid, upon their oaths, do say, that the said William Taylor , then and there, and in manner and form aforesaid, did steal from his said master and employer the said sum of ten shillings, the money of the said James Barker , for whose use and on whose account the same was delivered to, and paid into the possession of, the said William Taylor , against the statute in that case made and provided. And it appeared in evidence, that the prosecutor was a fishmonger, in Drury-lane, and the prisoner was his servant; that, on the 27th of August, the prisoner was sent with one hundred herrings to Cross-street, Blackfriars-road, in the county of Surrey, to Mrs. Stevens, who had agreed to buy them, and to pay the prosecutor ten shillings for them, which she was to send back by the prisoner, and the prosecutor told the prisoner he was to receive ten shillings for the herrings; he was sent with them about six o'clock in the evening, and delivered them to Mrs. Stevens, who paid him ten shillings for them, and the prisoner returned about eight o'clock, when his master asked him if he had brought the money for the herrings; he said, no, for that Mrs. Stevens had not paid him, and he never accounted for the money; the prosecutor paid him his weekly wages, it being on a Saturday, and the prisoner was to have returned on the Monday as usual, but did not. It was contended by the Counsel for the prisoner, that, under these circumstances, he could be indicted only in the county of Surrey, where he received the money, and that nothing had been done in the county of Middlesex to shew an intention to embezzle the money; the prisoner was found guilty, and the question was reserved for the opinion of the Twelve Judges. That opinion has been taken, and they are unanimously of opinion that the prisoner is well convicted.

This is the second case that has arisen on the late statute in the 39th George III . on which any doubt has occurred respecting the place in which the offence ought to be charged to be committed. In the case of the King and Hobson, which was tried at Shrewsbury Assizes in the last year before Mr. Justice Chambre, the point has been determined. John Hobson was indicted on the statute for receiving money by virtue of his employment, as servant of one Thomas Heighway , on account of the said Thomas Heighway , his master, and fraudulently secreting and embezzling, and so stealing it; the indictment stating the money to be the property of the master. After Mr. Justice Chambre had summed up the evidence to the Jury, the prisoner's Counsel suggested an objection that there was no proof of any fact arising in the county of Salop sufficient to give jurisdiction for trial of the offence in that county; the proof (so far as relates to objection) was, that the residence of the master was at Litchfield, in Staffordshire, where the prisoner served him in his trade; that in the morning of Saturday, the 22d of January, they were both at Shrewsbury, and the master having authorised one W. Beaumont to collect some debts for him at that place, returned home the same morning, leaving the prisoner at Shrewsbury to receive the money from Beaumont, and bring it to his master at Litchfield that night; the prisoner engaged so to do, and about noon received the money from Beaumont, and also a letter for his master, which had been left at Beaumont's, and did not relate to the money transaction; the prisoner left Shrewsbury soon after, but did not go on to Litchfield that night, having slept at a public-house on the road, and he did not go to his master till the following evening; he then delivered the letter, and being asked about the money, he said, he had not received any. A few days after, the master, in consequence of information he had received by letter, charged the prisoner with having received the money, and another servant, who had been at Shrewsbury on the Saturday, being present, told him that he had seen him receive money, but the prisoner persisted in denying that he had received any. Some time after, the master, having received further intelligence, bid the prisoner go to Shrewsbury to clear himself. On the Saturday following the prisoner went to Beaumont at his house at Shrewsbury, and desired him to make a search on the left-hand side of the room in which they had been; but no search was made, Beaumont telling him it was of no use to search, as the prisoner had received the money from him. The learned Judge, thinking the objection proper for the consideration of the Judges, made no observations upon it to the Jury, who found the prisoner guilty, and he received sentence. The prisoner's receipt of the money at Shrewsbury, his going thither afterwards to clear himself, and on that occasion desiring a search to be made for the money, as if he had left it there, being the only acts appearing to be done in Shropshire, these questions were made: - first, whether, under this statute, an indictment might not be found and tried in the county where the money or goods were received, although there was no evidence of any other fact locally arising within thesame county - secondly, whether, if further local proof was necessary, the subsequent conduct of the prisoner at Shrewsbury were not sufficient to obviate the objection as being an act in furtherance of the purpose of secreting or embezzling. In Easter Term following, the Judges having met to consider this case, were of opinion that the trial was properly had at Shrewsbury. Most of them thought, that, as in the case of larceny at common law, so in this, where the statute declared the offence to be of the same kind, the subsequent conduct of the prisoner in not accounting to his master, and denying the receipt of the money, was evidence to shew that the original taking was an intent to secrete and embezzle, and so to steal, within the meaning of the statute, and the more so, as the act of secreting was a negative act; and some considered that the offence was triable in either, as referable to the original taking in the one, and not accounting, but denying the act when called upon in the other. That case I have stated from a very accurate note in Mr. East's book, 24, and if there were any doubts upon that case, the same do not exist in the present. In that case there was very strong evidence to prove he had began to determine to embezzle this money in the county of Salop, and there was likewise a clear execution of that determination in that county, though it was said the not accounting for it arose in the county of Stafford; and when that took place, then the offence might be said to be complete, but not till then. The Judges were of opinion. the prisoner had began to embezzle in the county of Salop, and that he was well tried. In the present case there can exist no doubt whatever. The facts are these: at six o'clock on Saturday evening the prisoner is sent into the county of Surrey, where he receives ten shillings for his master; the receipt was perfectly legal, and there is no evidence whatever, that, till he came to account with his master, he had ever come to a determination to appropriate that money to his own use, so that there is not either expressly or impliedly any proof of his having done any act by which he could have embezzled his master's money before he came to the county of Middlesex; and the nature of the thing embezzled in the present case ought not to be laid out of the case, because the receipt of money is not like the receipt of an identical thing where it may be attended with such circumstances as plainly to shew he had determined to steal it; and then it may be said, if it should clearly appear, as for instance, if he had received a horse, and sold it, it might be said the act was complete in that county, and there could be doubt of it being all done in that county; but with regard to the case of money, it is not necessary the person receiving money should deliver to his employer the identical pieces of money he received, if he should have had any lawful reason for parting with them, provided he does account for the amount; therefore, if there had been any evidence of his paying away money, or spending money, that would have been sufficient; because non constat, they were those identical shillings he so received from the person by whom they were owing; so there is no evidence whatever which could bring him within this act of parliament, his receipt being lawful till he came to be called upon to account for it; when called upon, he denied having received it; therefore, that is the only time at which the Jury could say he had determined to embezzle it to his own use; therefore, without going into this case, which I would do if it were a case of doubt, but in this case there can be no doubt, I will only observe, there is no evidence either actual or presumptive, of his having done any act to embezzle the property; nor could the offence be complete, nor was he guilty within this act, till he denied it to his master; then his offence became complete, and he became well indicted in the county of Middlesex.