Old Bailey Proceedings Online (www.oldbaileyonline.org, version 6.0, 25 October 2014), October 1803 (18031026).

Old Bailey Proceedings, 26th October 1803.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS ON THE KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Goal Delivery FOR THE CITY OF LONDON; AND ALSO, The Goal Delivery FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, HELD AT JUSTICE-HALL, IN THE OLD-BAILEY, On WEDNESDAY, the 26th of OCTOBER, 1803, and following Days, BEING THE EIGHTH SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF The Right Honourable CHARLES PRICE , ESQUIRE, LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY RAMSEY & BLANCHARD.

LONDON: PRINTED AND PUBLISHED, By Authority of the CORPORATION of the CITY of LONDON, By W. WILSON, St. Peter's-Hill, Little Knight-Rider-Street, Doctors' Commons.

1803.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS ON THE KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Goal Delivery FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, &c.

BEFORE the Right Honourable CHARLES PRICE , LORD-MAYOR of the City of LONDON; the Right Hon. EDWARD LORD ELLENROROUGH , Lord Chief Justice of his Majesty's Court of King's-Bench; Sir ALEXANDER THOMPSON , Knight, one of the Barons of His Majesty's Court of Exchequer; NATHANIEL NEWMAN , Esq. WILLIAM CURTIS , Esq. HARVEY-CHRISTIAN COMBE , Esq. Aldermen of the said City; JOHN SILVESTER , Esq. Recorder of the said City; - ROWCROFT, Esq. Sir WILLIAM LEIGHTON , Knight, and JOSHUA-JONATHAN SMITH , Esq. Aldermen of the said City; and NEWMAN KNOWLYS , Esq. Common-Serjeant of the said City; His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the CITY of LONDON, and Justices of Goal Delivery of NEWGATE, holden for the said City, and County of MIDDLESEX.

First Middlesex Jury.

Ralph Morris ,

John Skirving ,

Benjamin Steinmetz ,

John Mashiter ,

Charles Hedges ,

Thomas Gibbs ,

William Gray ,

John Morley ,

William Higginbotham ,

James Stewart ,

Joseph Saunders ,

Thomas Smith .

Second Middlesex Jury.

Richard Davis ,

John Parker ,

John Lloyd ,

Richard Webster ,

Thomas Farmer ,

Joseph Groat ,

Charles Ashby ,

James Trigg ,

Isaac Bristow ,

William Pritchard ,

Thomas Scowling ,

Peter Nairne .

London Jury.

William Fisher ,

John-Goodrich Gosling ,

Joseph Cooper ,

Thomas Dixon ,

Thomas Tapp ,

Joseph Varley ,

George Earle ,

Peter Houghton ,

William Petchin ,

John Hunt ,

Thomas Massey ,

Henry Magin .

705. WILLIAM SMITH , otherwise MASON , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of September , twenty-six yards of cloth, value 10l. the property of Joseph Clementson , Thomas Borrodaile , and Philip Jackson , in the dwelling-house of the said Joseph Clementson .

PHILIP JACKSON sworn. - I am a Blackwell-Hall factor , in Basinghall-street : I am in partnership with Joseph Clementson , and Thomas Borrodaile, Mr. Clementson is the only partner who lives in the house; I can only prove the property.

WILLIAM KING sworn. - I am clerk to the prosecutors: On the 23d of September, about three o'clock in the afternoon, I saw the prisoner in the warehouse, with a piece of red cloth in a bag across his shoulder; I called to him, he threw it from his shoulder, and endeavoured to make his escape; I pursued him and took him, I knew nothing of him before; I don't know whether the warehouse-door was open or not; I cut a piece out of the cloth that I might know it again.

THOMAS BROGDEN sworn. - I saw the prisoner drop the scarlet cloth in the passage, and make his way out into the street, I did not pursue him; I took up the cloth, and Mr. King pursued him.( William Mead , a constable, produced the cloth, which was identified by Brogden.)

Prisoner. I have nothing to say.

GUILTY , aged 46,

Of stealing to the value of 39s.

Confined twelve months in Newgate , and fined 1s .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

706. JOHN FAULKNER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of September , six tea-cups, value 5s. six saucers, value 5s. two tumblers, value 1s. 6d. a goblet, value 9d. a bason, value 9d. and two butter-boats, value 6d. the property of Andrew Abbot .

ANDREW ABBOTT sworn. - I am a dealer in china, glass, and earthen-ware , at No. 82, Fleet-street , the prisoner was my carman : On the 28th of September, in the middle of the day, an old servant discovered some things secreted in a cellar among some straw, I went down and saw them; I desired they might remain, and the next morning there was an addition of six saucers, nankeen china; I saw no more of them till the prisoner was brought back with the things, mentioned in the indictment, upon him, they were packed in a basket.

THOMAS WAGSTAFF sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Abbott: On Wednesday the 28th of September, I saw some things concealed in the cellar, they remained there till Friday; the prisoner was suspected; we watched, and on the Friday evening, about six o'clock, the prisoner took an opportunity of taking them away, they were concealed under some straw; when he took them away, I was sent after him, and found him with the things upon him, and he acknowledged he had put them in the basket.

Q. Did you make him any promise? - A. No; I insisted upon searching him, and then he acknowledged it.

Prisoner. Q. Did I not tell you, when you came up to me, that I was sold? - A. No, he did not.

JOHN BADDELEY sworn. - I am packer to Mr. Abbott: I saw the things concealed, and I informed my master of it; I left them as they were, and my master ordered me to watch them.( Robert Smith , a constable, produced the property, which was identified by Wagstaff.)

Prisoner's defence. I hope your Lordship, and the Gentlemen of the Jury, will be as merciful as you can, I have lived with Mr. Abbott nearly two years.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 26,

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

707. THOMAS WHITMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of September , twenty-five pounds weight of sugar, value 10s. the property of John Greenfield .

JOHN GREENFIELD sworn. - The prisoner is my porter : I am a grocer in Lombard-street , my warehouse is in Clement's-lane; the prisoner had lived with me near three years.

DOROTHY HUNT sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Greenfield: On Monday the 19th of September, a little after eight o'clock in the morning, I opened the window, and saw the prisoner go down Clement's-lane with a basket, and I told one of the men of it.

WILLIAM HICKS sworn. - I am a victualler, I keep the Nag's-head in Red Lion-court, Clement's-lane: The prisoner came to me between eight and nine o'clock in the morning, and desired to leave a parcel for a little time, it was a basket; about half an hour after that Mr. Greenfield's shopman came to me, and I shewed him the basket the prisoner had left; he went away, and his master came and looked at it, and I delivered it to him.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q.Did you not say before the Lord-Mayor, you could not tell whether he was the man or not? - A. I said I believed hewas the man, but I could not swear to him; nor can I now.

Court. Q. Have you any doubt about his being the person? - A. I cannot swear positively; I was busy at the time he brought it in.

Q. How soon afterwards did you see him? - A.About three quarters of an hour.

Q. Had you then any doubt about his being the person? - A. I had.

Q. How far did he live from you? - A.About two hundred yards.

ROBERT SCOTT sworn. - I am a constable; I was sent for to take charge of the prisoner and the basket. - (The property was produced.)

Mr. Alley. Q.(To Mr. Greenfield.) Have you not trusted the prisoner with thousands of pounds? - A. Yes.

Q. And he always behaved honestly? - A. Yes.

Prisoner's defence. I am innocent of the charge.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

708. THOMAS HYDE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of October , a saw, value 3s. the property of Richard Wilson .

RICHARD WILSON sworn. - I am a carpenter , No. 3, Queen-street, Islington; I lost a saw from a building in Watling-street ; it was found at a pawnbroker's in Turnmill-street.

RICHARD WILSON , jun. sworn. - I am the son of the last witness: On Saturday evening, the 1st of October, I put the saw under the bench when we left off work, and on Tuesday the 4th I found it at Thomas Wells 's, a pawnbroker, in Turnmill-street.

JAMES HIGGINS sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Wells (produces a saw); I took it in pledge from Thomas Hyde ; I am certain he is the man; I took it in on Monday the 3d of October, between nine and ten o'clock in the morning; I lent him three shillings upon it.(The saw was identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. I was fuddled, and I don't know what possessed me to take it.

GUILTY .

Confined fourteen days in Newgate , and fined 6d .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

709. JOHN MARSHALL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of October , 23lb. of lead, value 6s. the property of the Governor and Company of the Bank of England .(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

EDWARD HAWES sworn. - I am a labourer ; I was employed at the Bank by Mr. Nelson, a stone mason, the prisoner was employed by him also, and has been for some years: In consequence of suspicion, on the 6th of October I watched the prisoner; the labourers were coming out of the Bank, facing Founders-hall-court, in Lothbury; I followed him, with Smith, a constable, up Basinghall-street, across Fore-street, into Moor-lane, where there is a back-door to an old-ironshop, in Grub-street; he went in there, and Smith and I followed him in, and found a lump of lead in his breeches in the back room, it weighed 23lb.

JOHN SMITH sworn. - I am a constable; I went with the last witness from the Bank to Grub-street, where the prisoner went in by a back-door; I went in, searched the prisoner, and found under the waistband of his breeches 23lb. of lead; it was then quite warm; the prisoner tried to prevail upon me to go home with him, and he would settle it in a better manner.

THOMAS JONES sworn. - I am a labourer; I was employed at the Bank. - (Produces a ladle with the lead in it, which exactly fitted the ladle.)

Prisoner's defence. I found the lead in Lothbury, in the Bank-buildings.

GUILTY , aged 43.

Confined three months in Newgate , and fined 6d .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

710. WILLIAM PRESCOTT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of October , 3lb. of lead, value 9d. the property of the Governor and Company of the Bank of England .(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

EDWARD HAWES sworn. - I was at work at the Bank; the prisoner was employed by Mr. Poynder; in consequence of suspicion I watched him in the afternoon; he always left work about half an hour before the rest; he always had a basket with some shavings; Smith, the constable, was with me; we stopped him in Lothbury, and found about 3lb. of lead in his left-hand coatpocket; he made a great deal of resistance.

JOHN SMITH sworn. - I searched the prisoner, and found the lead upon him; it was quite warm, just come out of the ladle; he said, he had forgot to put it out of his pocket.

Prisoner's defence. It was the bottoms of the ladle, and the foreman desired me to save it till the morning, and I forgot to put it out of my pocket.

GUILTY . aged 52.

Confined fourteen days in Newgate , and fined 6d .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

711. CATHARINE CARY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of Ocotber , a cask, value 1s. and two gallons of brandy, value 1l. 18s. the property of Richard Botheroyd .

RICHARD BOTHEROYD sworn. - I live at the corner of Beach-street and Golden-lane ; I am a victualler : On Saturday night the 15th instant, between seven and eight o'clock, the prisoner and another woman came in for a pint of beer, and in a few minutes after I heard a noise in the passage ofsomething falling; I looked towards the bar, and saw the prisoner stooping to pick something up, I could not tell what it was; I went to the door to see what she had got; I did not see her; I immediately went after her, and found she had something in her apron; I turned her apron on one side, and found this cask of brandy; I had missed the cask before I went after her; it was standing opposite the bar, within about a yard of where they were drinking the beer (produces it); it is my cask, it was standing in the passage ready to be sent out; it has my brand upon it, and the customer's name marked with chalk; I have known the prisoner for years in our neighbourhood.

Prisoner's defence. Another woman gave it me to carry for her.

Prosecutor. The other woman was left in the passage after the prisoner went out.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

712. THOMAS WITNEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of October , three turkies, value 12s. the property of Richard Williams , Esq .(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

RICHARD WILLIAMS , Esq. sworn. - I live at Tottenham ; I kept turkies in my orchard enclosed with a high paling, and spikes at the top; I missed three of them on Sunday the 16th of October; I had seen them the night before; I observed the footsteps of some person; I went round outside the fence, and observed feathers of turkies about fifty yards from the orchard; I then found the three turkies under a bush; I traced the feathers to the place; I knew them to be mine, and desired two persons to watch; I know no more of it myself.

JOHN DOBBS sworn. - I am a constable; I was ordered by Mr. Williams to watch these turkies, which I did, behind a hedge about three yards off; about nine o'clock the same night, I saw three persons come to the place; they stooped down, and packed them up; a man that escaped had two turkies, and I took the prisoner with one of them upon him.

Prisoner's defence. I am innocent of the crime.

GUILTY , aged 35.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

713. MARY CLAGHORN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of October , a silver table-spoon, value 10s. and a silver tea-spoon, value 1s. the property of James Thomas .

JAMES THOMAS sworn. - The prisoner came to live with me on the 30th of September, and on the 8th of October I asked the prisoner if she had seen a table-spoon, and she said she had not; on the 9th I missed a tea-spoon; she left me on the 8th; she afterwards came to me for some of her clean things, and I sent her up to my wife; she told me she was gone to live at No. 12, Windmill-street, but I could not find her there. On the 15th of October she came for her box, and I asked her after the spoons, she said she left them all right when she went away; she afterwards said she had taken the tea-spoon, and left it in Berwick-street for a shilling; I made her no promise; she said she knew nothing of the table-spoon; I have never seen it since; I found the tea-spoon in Berwick-street; she went with me and the officer; she had left it there in exchange for a bonnet.

ELIZABETH JACQUES sworn. - The prisoner bought a bonnet of me; she wanted a shilling of the money, and she left a tea-spoon, a gown, and a handkerchief with my daughter; I saw her deliver them to my daughter. - (Produces a teaspoon.)

ELIZABETH JACQUES , jun. sworn. - I took this spoon of the prisoner; I am sure she is the person. - (The spoon was identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner. I know nothing of the table-spoon.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Whipped in the jail, and discharged .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

714. SARAH DAVIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of September , a counterpane, value 8s. the property of Stephen Raymond .

MARGARET RAYMOND sworn. - I am the wife of Stephen Raymond ; I lodge at No. 1, Richmond-street, St. James's : On Tuesday the 8th of September, I hung a counterpane up to dry, about nine o'clock in the morning, upon some leads, up three-pair-of-stairs; I saw it when I went out about three o'clock in the afternoon; I returned between five and six, and the prisoner was then in St. Ann's watch-house; I went and saw the counterpane there; it was delivered back to me. -(Produces it.)

SARAH MACKENZIE sworn. - I lodge in the same house: On the 8th of September, about five o'clock, I heard a person fall down stairs; the house door is generally open; I was in my own room on the second floor; I went out, and found the prisoner lying at the bottom of the stairs, with the counterpane in her lap; she said she had been up to some person, and mentioned a name; I asked her where she got the counterpane, and she made me no reply; I sent for the watch-housekeeper, and she was taken to the watch-house, with the counterpane. Mrs. Raymond came homein about half an hour; she went to the watch-house, and claimed the counterpane.(The counterpane was identified by Mrs. Raymond.)

Prisoner. I have nothing to say.

GUILTY , aged 46.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson .

715. WILLIAM DUNNING was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of October , six pair of stockings, value 16s. 6d. the property of Hans Mortimer .

WILLIAM MOSS sworn. - I was going with a parcel to Great Queen-street, Lincoln's-inn-fields; I had to go to Howard-street with some change; I then saw the prisoner; he looked at my parcels, and asked the servant of the house where Mrs. Howard lived in Howard-street; she told him she knew no such person; when I got to Charing-cross I saw him again; I was going to Vine-street, Piccadilly , and then he asked me the way to Vine-street; I told him I was going there; he said he was going to Mr. Mortimer's; there was the name of Mortimer upon one of my parcels; I went and delivered my parcel to Miss Grellet, and went away; it contained six pair of brown cotton stockings, which Mr. Mortimer had bought of Mr. Churton, a hosier, upon credit.

ANN GRELLETT sworn. - I received a parcel from the last witness for Mr. Mortimer; the prisoner came immediately after, and asked if Mr. Mortimer was at home; I told him, no; I called Mrs. Lakin, and delivered the parcel to the prisoner, supposing he belonged to it; he then delivered it to Mr. Lakin.

Mrs. LAKIN sworn. - I keep the house; Mr. Mortimer is a lodger of mine; Miss Grellett knocked at my door, and said, here is a parcel for Mr. Mortimer; a young man in the passage rung the bell, and asked if Mr. Mortimer was at home; I am not sure whether the prisoner is the person.

Miss Grellett. I am sure he is the man.

Mrs. Lakin. I told him he might leave the parcel; he said, no, he could not leave it, unless Mr. Mortimer was at home; I told him, if there was any thing to pay I would settle it; he said, there was something to pay, but he did not know exactly what; I then gave him the parcel back; he asked me the nighest way to Knightsbridge, and went away.

Prisoner's defence. I leave it to the Jury.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

716. GEORGE GROVES and CORNELIUS CONNELL were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of October , a pair of shoes, value 4s. 6d. the property of Alexander Jacobs .

ALEXANDER JACOBS sworn. - I live in Little May's-buildings, St. Martin's-lane ; I am a shoemaker : On the 6th of October, between five and six o'clock in the evening, I lost a pair of shoes; I went out between four and five, and left my boy in the shop; I had shoes outside my shop-window, and when I came home, I missed a pair of shoes.

LAZARUS LEVI sworn. - I am an apprentice to Mr. Jacobs; I generally put the shoes out in a morning, and take them in of an evening: On the 6th of October I put out six pair of new shoes; when I took them in in the evening there were only five pair; when my master came home I told him of it; he was standing at the door very uneasy, and saw the little one, Connell, about the door; he was alone; my master brought him in doors, and asked him if he knew any thing about the shoes; he was very obstinate, and would not tell till a good bit; my master then went out to see if he could find any other boy, and left Connell with me; while I was putting up the half hatch he ran out; I ran after him, and caught him, and just as I was bringing him into the shop, my master came back again; Connell still said he knew nothing of them; my master offered him two shillings to tell where they were, and then he shewed the other boy to my master, but I was not present then; my master came home with the shoes; I knew them immediately; my master and me made them together.

Q.What has become of them? - A.I sold them, and my master made a great noise at me for selling them; I did not know they were to be kept; I knew them by my own work, and by the stamps.

Jacobs. I saw Connell near my own door, and laid hold of him; I asked him what he wanted, and he asked me if I had an old pair of shoes to give him; I told him, no; I asked him, have not you stole a pair of shoes from this window; says I, I am sure you have; I was a long time before I could get him to tell me any thing about them; I offered him two shillings if he would tell me, and I then went about Covent-garden with him for two hours; at last he said, he dare say the other had pawned them at Dirty Dick's, in St. Giles's; just before we came to Dirty Dick's I saw Groves; Connell immediately said, that is him; I immediately laid hold of him, and took the shoes from his bosom; he tossed himself on the ground, and began crying; I took Groves to Bow-street, and the little one followed; I knew the shoes to be mine; I took them home, and put them upon the shelf; I did not know that I was to keep them separate; I knew them perfectly well, and swore to them.

The prisoners did not make any defence.

Both NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson .

717. LYON LAZARUS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of October , seventy-two yards of bed-lace, value 4s. the property of John Ranshall .

ELIZABETH RANSHALL sworn. - I am the wife of John Ranshall : On Saturday I think the 11th of October, I missed some bed-lace; I bad seen it three or four hours before; there were about seventy-two yards of it (the bed-lace produced); there is no mark upon it, but I believe it to be the same; there was a small piece out off, which has been matched since.

JOSHEPH BUNTER sworn. - I work for Mr. Walker, in Shoreditch: Last Saturday fortnight the prisoner came in, and asked if I would buy any bed-lace; my mistress came out, and asked him what he asked for it; he said, what will you give me for it; she asked him how many yards there were, and he said he did not know; the said, it was extraordinary he should not know the length; he said he had swapped for it in the country: she asked him where, and he would not tell where; she said, she thought it was not honesty come by, Office, and have it advertised; she stopped the lace, and told him to go about his business; he would not go without the lace, and I went to the Officer, and brought an officer; while the lace and the man were gone to the Office, Mr. Walker went to Mr. Ranshall's which was just accoss the street; he brought a piece of the same pattern.

Mrs. Ranshull. I did not miss it till Mr. Walker came for the pattern, and I gave him a piece, which tallied with the piece I had missed: it had been lying loose upon the counter; I had been it about four o'clock.

Bunter. It was about six when he brought the lace to me; I was just shutting the shop up.

JOHN RAY sworn. - I belong to the Office in Worship-street: I was sent for on Saturday, the 8th of October, I took the prisoner into custody; the lace was delivered to me; I asked the prisoner who he got it from; he said he had bought it at Waltham-Abbey; after he got to the Office, he said he had gone into a broker's shop, and stole it; there was nothing said to induce him to acknowledge it.

For the prisoner.

ALEXANDER ISRAEL sworn. - I know the prisoner to be out to his mind; I was here by accident; I have known him seven or eight years; he has very good friends; I have known them give him five or six guineas at a time to go out with a bag to buy old cloaths, and instead of going out, he would lie in bed till all the money was spent; about seven or eight months ago, he laid down before my door, and I was obliged to throw a pail of water over him, to make him get up.

Q. Was he sober at that time? - A. Yes, as sober as you are.

Q.(To Ray.) Did he appear to you be insane? - A. No, he appeared to be quite in his senses.

Q.(To Bunter.) Did he appear to you not to be in his senses? - A. No; he appeared to be perfectly in his senses with regard to dealing for the goods, but seemed in a great hurry to get them disposed of.

DANIEL DAVIS sworn. - I have known the prisoner about two years; he came into my house, and I was obliged to thrown half a pail of water over him, to get him down stairs.

GUILTY , aged 55.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

718. JAMES OLIVER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of September , a bag. value 1s. and a peck and half of split peas, value 2s. the property of Sarah Bowstreed .

EMANUAL CASTLE sworn. - I keep the Bull in Kingsland-road: On the 20th of September, I was in my own kitchen washing some oysters; in the kitchen there is a window which looks into the yard; it was broke, a pane of glass was out; it was the window of the door, the door was bolted; I heard a noise, and asked, who is there; I then saw the prisoner at the bar, I knew him before; he said he had got some peas for Mr. Proctor's man, and I desired him to take them away; he said, Mr. Proctor's man should stand a pot or two of beer; I then desired him to take them away; he did not go away, but put a bag through the broken, and put it into an armed chair; his miscress lived opposite; he was servant to Mrs. Bowstreed, a corn-chandler.

Q.Who is Mr. Proctor's man? - A. I don't know; I understood it was Mr. Proctor, the brewer, in Shoreditch; I went to Armstrong's, the officer; he was not at home, and then I sent to Mrs. Bowstreed; nobody came to enquire after the bag; it remained at my house till the next morning, and then it was carried to Worship-street; Lydia Bowstreet came to my house, and Armstrong; the prisoner was called down, and said, he took it from his mistress's binn up stairs.

LYDIA BOWSTREED sworn. - I am the daughter of Sarah Bowstreed , No. 16, Kingsland-road ; I live with her, she is a corn-chandler ; the prisoner was her servant : On the 20th of September, I received a message from Mr. Castle, and went to his house; he shewed me a bag, containing about a peck and a half of split peas; I knew the bag to be my mother's property, it was marked S. B. the prisoner said they were his mistress's; Mr. Armstrong had called him out of the stable.

JOHN ARMSTRONG sworn. - I am an officer: On Tuesday, the 20th of September, I was applied to about ten o'clock at night to go to the Bull, next door to my own house; I went into the parlour, and saw a bag; I then called the prisoner out of his mistress's stable, adjoining Castle's dwelling-house; I brought him in; I let him see the bag as it was, and then said to him, Oliver, Mr. Castle says you have left, these peas here; his answer was, I have, they are my mistress's, I took them; those are the very words, I put them down that night.

Q. Before this, had you or any body else advised him to confess? - A. No; I left the bag in Mr. Castle's possession.

Castle. I delivered it to Bishop, the officer.

- BISHOP sworn. - I received this bag from Castle, in the same state it is now. (Produces it.)

Lydia Bowstreed . The S is marked the wrong way; it was done in a hurry by my youngest sister, when the bag was going to Ware; it was impossible to miss this quantity of peas.

Prisoner's defence. Mr. Castle has taken a false oath; I did no such thing at all.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 6d .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson .

719. ELIZABETH PURNELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of September , twelve silver tea-spoons, value 32s. a cap, value 6d. and two earthen plates, value 6d. the property of Richard Roberts .

WINIFRED ROBERTS sworn. - I am the wife of Richard Roberts : The prisoner lodged with me a few days before the 12th of September, when I missed a dozen tea-spoons which I had taken out of my cupboard on the 10th; the prisoner was by, and asked me why I did not have my name upon them; I put them back into the cupboard, and locked it; she then asked me if I was not afraid of losing my spoons from such a cupboard as that; I said, no, I never lost any thing; she asked me to let my child go for a farthing's-worth of pins, which I refused; I saw the spoons on the 12th, about three o'clock; I went out between three and four, and told the child not to go out for any thing; the prisoner came down, and said she would mind the place for me; I told her I did not want her, the child could take care of the place; I missed the spoons the next morning, I have never seen them since: On the 12th, about three o'clock, I put by a cap on a bureau close by the cupboard, where the spoons were; I missed it the next morning; about eight o'clock, and also two plates, which I found in the prisoner's apartment the same evening; Mr. Ray was present when I found the plates and the cap; the prisoner was in bed with a man who passes as her husband; they took the room in the name of Trott, and she was taken up in the name of Trott; I asked her how she came to send my child out; she had a carving knife in her hand, and she swore she would run me through.

Q. Had you never lent her the plates? - A. No, I never did.

Q. Were the plates concealed? - A. No, they were lying in a brown dish that I had lent her.

Q. Had you lent her the cap? - A. No, it was a child's cap; I found that behind a box in her room.

FRANCES BARLOW sworn. - I saw the prisoner send the child of an errand, for a farthing's-worth of milk, and white the child was out, she shut the door to; when the child came back, she opened the door to her; she was gone about five minutes.

MARY HARMAN sworn. - I heard the prisoner say she never sent the child of an errand, and it was I that served her with the milk; it was on the 12th of September, a little after five o'clock.

JOHN RAY sworn. - I searched the room, and found some keys; this one (producing it) opened the cupboard door; I did not find any spoons; the woman found the cap and plates herself; the prisoner said she knew nothing about the spoons; she did not say any thing about the cap, or the plates.

The prisoner called two witnessess, who gave her a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

720. GEORGE PURDIE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of September , two silver table-spoons, value 24s. two silver teaspoons, value 5s. and a silver pap-spoon, value 8s. the property of Thomas Wickings .

The prosecutrix not being able to identify the property, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson .

721. HENRY SMITH , THOMAS GOODMAN , and ALICE SHERRARD , were indicted, the two first for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of September , twenty-four feet of lead pipe, value 30s. the property of Edward Langley , and the other for receiving the same, knowing it to have been stolen .

EDWARD LANGLEY sworn. - I was making an alteration in a house of mine, No.1, Great Cumberland-place , in the occupation of Lord Jersey; a roll of lead had been carried to the premises, for the purpose of making a water-closet, it was in the one pair of stairs, but was ordered to be taken away by Lady Jersey, and it was put in the area; I saw it in the evening of the 28th, and missed it in the morning of the 29th; I discovered the lead by an advertisement from the Public-office.

Cross-examined by Mr. Hart. Q. Was not thisalteration to be made at the expence of Lord Jersey? - A. No, at my own.

WILLIAM FREEMAN sworn. - I work for Mr. Langley, I have seen the lead, (it is produced); this is the same lead that was taken from the house; it had been in the drawing-room, and was removed into the area.

Cross-examined by Mr. Hart. Q.Are you a plumber? - A. Yes; I furnished the lead.

Q. Did you furnish it in the state in which that is? - A. No, coiled up in one roll; I can swear to its being the lead, because, in trying it with one of my men, I found a particular hole in it, (points it out); it is a hole blown in the metal, such as you will not find in one roll in fifty.

JOHN WARLEY sworn. - I am a shoemaker: On Michaelmas morning, about eight o'clock, I saw the lead upon the prisoner Smith's shoulder, in Short's-gardens, Drury-lane; it was coiled round, and hung upon his shoulder; I saw Goodman before him; I got up behind a coach to see where they went to, I suspected it was not honestly come by; then Goodman and Smith went into Mrs. Sherrard's, in Bowl-yard; I heard a noise, and immediately went to Bow-street, and told Treadway of it; he came with me, and caught the two prisoners coming out at the door; he took them into custody directly.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Was any body in company with you who can confirm your account? - A. No.

Q. You are a very honest lad - have you ever been here before? - A. Yes, last Session:

Q. Were you admitted an evidence for the Crown? - A. Yes, for a robbery in Bedford-square.

Q. Were you never tried yourself? - A. Yes, I have been tried at Bow-street.

Q.Any where else? - A. Yes, at Marlborough-street.

Q. Were you ever tried any where else? - A. No.

Q. Were you ever committed as a vagrant? - A. Yes.

Q. Were you ever committed to Clerkenwellprison from Hicks's-hall? - A. Yes.

EDWARD TREADWAY sworn. - On the 29th of September, the last witness gave me information; in consequence of which, I went to Mrs. Sherrard's, I took Smith and Mumford with me; the two prisoners came out of the house, and were going towards St. Giles's; we took them into custody; I then returned back to the house, Mrs. Sherrard was standing at the door in her bed-gown and night-cap; I said, Mrs. Sherrard, there is some lead, or some lead pipe, brought into your house; she said, there is some there, pointing to the shop, where I found this pipe cut in pieces; I gave Smith the lead, and I brought her to Bow-street; there was no money found upon the men.

Gross-examined by Mr. Watson. Q. What length of time was consumed from the time the boy came to you, and the time when you saw Mrs. Sherrard? - A. About a quarter of an hour.

Q. She appeared as if she had just come down from her bed? - A. Yes.

WILLIAM SMITH sworn. - I was with Treadway: I saw the two prisoners come out; I went over, and collared Smith, and Treadway collared the other, and we took them to Bow-street; Smith had sixpence, a knife, and three farthings; and the other had some halfpence, and a knife; I went back with Treadway; the lead was standing at the end of the counter; I put it in a bag, and it was taken to Bow-street; Treadway came down to the Office about a quarter of an hour after with Mrs. Sherrard.

Cross-examined by Mr. Watson. Q. The lead was exposed to view upon the counter, and not at all concealed? - A. Not at all.

THOMAS MUMFORD sworn. - I know no more than my brother officers have stated.

The prisoners left their defence to their Counsel, and the prisoner Sherrard called eight witnesses, who gave her a good character.

Smith, GUILTY , aged 30.

Goodman, GUILTY , aged 39.

Transported for seven years .

Shertard, GUILTY , aged 50.

Transported for fourteen years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

722. ANN WALLACE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of October , eleven pair of stockings, value 21s. the property of Thomas Austin .

Second Court. Charging them to be the property of William Cubitt .

THOMAS AUSTIN sworn. - I live at No. 6, Upper John-street, Golden-square ; I am a stocking-dresser : On Thursday, the 28th of September, I received eleven pair of stockings to dress; I received then from Mr. Lonsdale, a hosier, they were silk stockings; I missed them of Saturday, the 1st of October, from my counter; I had packed them up, ready to go home to Mr. Lonsdale, about eleven O'clock in the forenoon, I missed them about twelve; I know nothing of the prisoner; I discovered six pair of Stockings, in consequence of an advertisement from Bow-street; I found the prisoner there, and the stockings; I knew them to be the same by the marks; one pair was marked W. Cubitt , and two marked C; I know them to be Mr. Cubitt's.

WILLIAM CUBITT sworn. - On the 28th of September, I sent eight pair of silk stockings to Mr. Londsdale's to be dressed; two pair of them are marked W. Cubitt , and two marked C. withcommon ink; I saw part of them again at Bow-street on the 6th; the prisoner was there; five pair of them belonged to me.

- HARRIS sworn. - I am a pawnbroker, in High-street, Bloomsbury: On the 1st of October, about dinner time, a woman, not the prisoner, brought one pair of silk stockings to pledge; I asked her whose they were, and she told me she was sent with them; I told her they could not belong to a woman in her condition, and desired her to fetch the person that sent her; she went away, and took them with her; a short time after, the prisoner came, and brought me six pair of stockings; she asked me six shillings upon them; one pair is new, and one of them appeared very like the pair the other woman had brought; I asked her how she obtained them; she said she did not know how she got them; I told her they appeared to me to have been stolen from some laundress; I believe she was intoxicated, she could hardly reply to me; I then sent to Bow-street, an officer came, and she was taken into custody, and on the Monday I advertised them, which led to a discovery of the owner.(The stocking were produced (five pair) and identified by Austin and the prosecutor.)

Austin. The other pair is marked S, I lost them at the same time; it stands for Sanderson.

Prisoner's defence. I was coming home with my water-cresses, and found these stockings in an old handkerchief.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 6d .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson .

723. MICHAEL EZEKIEL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of September , a pair of boots, value 12s. two shirts, value 7s. a pair of pantaloons, value 5s. a coat, value 14s. and a bag, value 1s. the property of Levi Simmonds .

The prosecutor not being able to identify the property, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

724. CATHERINE FITZGERALD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of October , a purse, value 6d. two guineas, a half guinea, a seven-shilling piece, three shillings, and twelve pieces of foreign coin, value 1s. the property of John Davis .

JOHN DAVIS sworn. - I am an ironmonger : On Sunday-morning the 2d of October, between nine and ten o'clock in the morning, as I was coming along Dyot-street , the prisoner decoyed me into the passage of a house; she laid hold of me without saying any thing to me.

Q. Had you any conversation with her before she laid hold of you? - A. No; I did not see her till she laid hold of me; she slipped her hand into my left hand breeches pocket, and took out two guineas, a half guinea, a seven-shilling-piece, and three shillings in silver; she turned the pocket inside out; she took from the other pocket a purse containing twelve pieces of foreign coin; she ran away, and I pursued her; but in going through the passage into a yard, and then through another passage into the street, I lost her.

Q. Were you sober? - A. Yes.

Q. How came you to say before the Magistrate you were a little intoxicated? - A. I was not so much but I knew what I was doing; I had been drinking that morning with a person.

Q. What had you been drinking that morning? - A. Two glasses of brandy.

Q. Will you swear it was not by your consent you went into this passage? - A. Yes; I went the next morning to Bow-street, and got two officers; I took them with me to Dyot-street; I saw the prisoner standing in the street, with two others, and I identified her.

Q. How long were you with her? - A. Not half a minute; I saw her face, I am sure she is the person; she was searched in my presence, and I saw found upon her a Dutch coin that I had lost; I had had it six months; the foreign coins were all different; the purse was not found, nor any other money.

EDWARD TREADWAY sworn. - On Monday the 3d of October, I went with the prosecutor to Dyot-street; the prisoner was standing in Dyot-street; the prosecutor pointed her out; I took her into the Turk's Head, and searched her; I pulled out this piece of foreign coin, which he immediately said was his; the prisoner said, it was not, for she had had it two months; it had been given her by a girl, afterwards she said she found it in Rat's Castle on the Sunday, which is close to where he was robbed; he shewed me the house and the passage.

THOMAS MUMFORD sworn. - I was with Treadway; I held the prisoner while he searched her; she refused to be searched; a piece of foreign coin was taken out, which the prosecutor owned.(The piece of foreign coin was produced and identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. I heard a great noise on the Sunday morning as I lay in my bed, and a person calling out, watch! I asked what was the matter; the people said, it was a drunken man had been robbed; I put on my cloaths, and went to the door; the people were all laughing at his calling out, watch! he pulled some papers out of his waistcoat pocket, and said he had got some notes left; he then pulled out some silver and halfpence, and gave to a parcel of girls that were about him; he went into a public-house with them, and I saw nomore of him till the Monday morning; after he was gone I found this foreign coin in the passage; when I was taken I was so flurried I did not know what I said; I told them I had had it two months; but when I came before the Magistrate I told the truth, that I had found it.

Davis. There is not a word of truth in what she has said. NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

725. WILLIAM COX, otherwise COCK , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of September , a wooden cask, value 1s. and 104lb. of butter, value 5l. the property of Charles Flower , Esq .(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

JOHN ALLEN sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Charles Flower; the prisoner was carman to Mr. Stapp, cheesemonger, on Snow-hill, a customer of Mr. Flower's: On the 24th of October, the prisoner came to our house for twenty firkins of butter for Mr. Stapp; I delivered them to him myself at St. Catherine's Wharf ; he went away with them; after he was gone I missed a cask of Waterford butter from the wharf; there were ten casks; the prisoner's cart was about ten yards from them; I made enquiry about it, and went after the prisoner, but I did not see him again till after he was taken on the 26th.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. A certain quantity of butter had been delivered before that? - A. Yes.

Q. And the prisoner came for the remainder without knowing the number? - A. Yes.

Q. Were not these firkins nearly together? - No; one parcel was in the warehouse lowered down by a crane, and the other on the wharf.

CORNELIUS CORNELLON sworn. - I am cooper to Mr. Flower: On the 24th of September I saw the prisoner on the wharf; a cask of butter was missed, and I went after the prisoner as far as Tower-hill; I got up into his cart, and saw twenty firkins of Cork butter; I saw a hay-basket in the cart bottom upwards; I turned up the basket, and found a cask of Waterford butter; I charged him with having a cask of butter that he had no right to, and he denied it; I told him, of he did not give it up, I would have him taken up; then he said, it was a cask that was due to his master; I said, you should not take it without asking those that had the charge of it; I got a man to take it to the warehouse; he gave him a shilling to take it back, and then he begged I would not say any thing about it, and he would treat me with a glass of liquor, which I refused; the cask is here, it is the property of Mr. Flower; we always had a good opinion of the prisoner, or we would not have trusted him on the wharf.

The prisoner did not make any defence, but called his master, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

726. MARY ROBE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of September , four women's hats, value 20s. three children's bonnets, value 12s. and three men's beaver hats, value 2l. 18s. the property of Daniel Pedder , in his dwelling-house .

DANIEL PEDDER sworn. - I live at No. 1, in Beach-street ; the prisoner lined and bound hats for me, and had done so about nine months; I never sold her any; I had not missed them till in consequence of information, I searched the prisoner's lodgings in Whitecross-street; a little girl opened the door, and I found upon the table little bonnets and caps that we never put out to be bound; she had never had them delivered to her.

Q. Are you sure you had never delivered them to her to be bound, or for any other purpose? - A. Yes.

PHILIP GREEN sworn. - I am a constable; I had been to the prisoner's lodgings before Mr. Pedder, and found the property; Mrs. Pedder was with me. - (Produces them.)

ELIZABETH PEDDER sworn. - I went with the constable to the prisoner's lodgings; I went up stairs, and found three bonnets and some caps, I cannot say how many, and a man's hat, laying upon the table, and two more in a ban-box; they had our shop marks upon them; I knew them to be my husband's property, I can swear to the marks; I cannot say when they were taken; we never sell hats in this state; I cannot swear that the men's hats had not been put out; there are six children's hats that never were put out; when I found them I sent for my husband.

Q.What is the value of them? - A.About 2l.

Prosecutor. They are not worth so much, my Lord; they are my property; some of them I had not had in from the country above three weeks; the prisoner used to come two or three times a day to my house.

Q. Where did you use to deposit them? - A. They used to lie open on the counter.

The prisoner put in a written defence, stating, that she had received the hats from the prosecutor's shopman, who was his brother-in-law; that she bought one of them; that he gave her the children's hats, telling her they were old shopkeepers; that she had the others to line and bind, as would appear from the book in which the shopman entered every thing, and which she had to produce.

Q.(To Pedder.) Where is your shopman now? - A. He is gone for a soldier; he enlisted into thefirst regiment of Surrey militia, and is now at camp near Ashford, in Kent.

Q. Did you part with him for any dishonesty? - A. No.

Q. Were the children's hats old shopkeepers? - A. No, some of them had not been in three weeks.(The prisoner produced a book.)

Prisoner. Here is an entry in the book of a child's white had lined.

Q.(To Pedder.) Then you see the prisoner had had one child's white hat to line? - A. It appears so from this entry; it is a book that she herself keeps, and upon the return of the goods they are entered in the book.

Q. Then these hats might have been delivered to her, and there would be no entry of them in the book, because they have not found their way back again? - A. They were not put out with my knowledge. NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

727. MARY ROBE was again indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of August , a sheet, value 5s. the property of Edward Harnett .

MARTHA HARNETT sworn. - I am the wife of Edward Harnett, at the Baker's-arms, Whitecross-street : I missed a sheet on the 28th of August, from a bed in the three pair of stairs back room; the prisoner lodged in the two pair back room, her husband and two children lodged with her, she lived in the house before we took it; we have had the house better than five months; a young couple left the three pair of stairs back room on that day, it was on a Sunday, they went away about a quarter before six o'clock in the morning, I knew they were to go; about a quarter past seven, I went into the room, and missed a sheet; I never suspected the prisoner, or any person then in the house; the prisoner was taken up, I think, on the Monday fortnight following, when a duplicate of the sheet was found.

EDWARD GREEN sworn. - I am a headborough of St. Luke's: I searched the prisoner's lodgings on Monday the 28th of September, the prisoner was not there; I found on the table some hats and caps, and in a hat-box I found a vast number of duplicates, and among them this duplicate of a sheet, for five shillings; I went with Mrs. Harnett to the pawnbroker's and saw the sheet; she looked at the corner of it, the marks were taken out, but she swore to its being her sheet.

- SHEPHERD sworn. - I am a pawnbroker: I took in this sheet of the prisoner on the 29th of August, in the name of Ann Betts; she had been a customer at the shop a long while. (Produces it.)

Mrs. Harnett. The mark has been taken out, it was marked E M H, the remains of the mark is very plain, it is exactly the same as my other sheet in every respect, I made them myself, and have no doubt it is the same sheet.

Prisoner's defence. It never was Mrs. Harnett's sheet.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave her a good character. GUILTY , aged 27.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 6d .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

728. WILLIAM HALL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of September , two geese, value 16s. the property of Daniel Lott .(The case was opened by Mr. Alley.)

DANIEL LOTT sworn. - I am a farmer , at Twickenham : On the 3d of September, I found a goose hid in some straw, about three yards from a barn, where I afterwards placed myself to watch; I watched from seven o'clock till near twelve, when the prisoner came; it was a moon-light night, I heard a rustling in the straw, I had a gun with me, he took the goose and put it in a bag; I cried out, is that you, Hall, stop; he dropped the bag and ran away; I fired at him low, and hit his leg, but he got away; after he was taken, he was examined by a surgeon, and he found a shot mark; the goose had been killed in the barn. The prisoner had been at work for me some time, I am sure he was the man.

THOMAS LOTT sworn. - I am the son of the prosecutor: I went by my father's desire to see the prisoner's leg, and there were the marks of six or seven shots in his leg; he said he had had somebody to pick them out.

WILLIAM KEEZEY sworn. - I was watching with Mr. Lott: I am sure the prisoner is the man, I knew him very well; he has four children.

Prisoner's defence. On the Saturday evening I got too much liquor, my wife came to fetch me home, and I would not go, we had some words and she said she would lock me out; I said, I did not care if she did; I went to lie down in the straw, and then I altered my mind, and thought I would go home, and as I was going away I was fired at.

GUILTY , aged 33.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and publicly whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

729. GEORGE HAYES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of October , a copper, value 30s. the property of William Richards .

WILLIAM RICHARDS sworn. - I live at No. 108, Shadwell ; I lost a new copper on the 19th of October; it was brought home for the purpose of being put up; it came in before I was up; I saw it about eleven o'clock in the cellar; the bricklayer who had been at work returned fromdinner, and told me, he missed the copper; it has never been found; I know nothing of the prisoner.

JOHN BENNER sworn. - I am a bricklayer: On the 18th of this month, I was employed by Mr. Richards to buy a copper for him; the next morning I carried it to his house, and put it in the kitchen, about six o'clock in the morning; I saw it there about twelve o'clock, I then went away to dinner; and about a quarter before one o'clock, I met the prisoner at the bar with the same copper upon his head, about half a mile from Mr. Richards's house, I did not know him before, I took particular notice of the man; I observed the copper, there was a bruise upon it, which I had noticed in the morning, upon the join near the bottom; I knew it to be the same copper, but did not know that I could take him; I did not know what to do, and I let him pass; at six o'clock the same evening, I was sent for, and saw the prisoner at a public-house opposite the Office; it was a remarkably deep copper for the circumserence of it.

WILLIAM JARVIS sworn. - I am a weaver, in Love-lane, Shadwell: I saw a new copper on the prisoner's head, going towards Tower-hill, between twelve and one o'clock on the Fast-day; I knew him by sight before.

ELEANOR OSBORN sworn. - I live at the corner of Love-lane: I saw the prisoner pass my door with the copper on his head about a quarter before one o'clock, on the Fast-day, I had seen him before, he was going towards St. George's turnpike; I saw him again in about an hour returning back into Brook-street, and I saw no more of him; it was a new copper.

ROBERT BROWN sworn. - I belong to the Police Office, Shadwell: On the 19th of October, in the evening, I took the prisoner into custody at a public-house within a few doors of Mr. Richards's; I know nothing of the copper; I knew the prisoner very well.

Prisoner's defence. I had been at work all that morning at Blackwall, and never had a copper upon me at all.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

730. MARY SMITHERS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of September , a silver table-spoon, value 10s. 6d. two silver tea-spoons, value 3s. and a sheet, value 4s. the property of William Sherwin .

WILLIAM SHERWIN sworn. - On Monday, the 6th of September, my wife missed a silver tablespoon and one tea-spoon, and upon searching, another; I had the prisoner taken up, and in consequence of a story she told about a sheet, my wife went home, and missed one; the property is here.

GEORGE JUPP sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Davison, a pawnbroker; (produces a table-spoon); I took it in pledge on the 6th of September, but cannot say from whom; it was pledged in the name of Sarah Gardner .

Sherwin. I am sure this is my table-spoon; the prisoner lived in the same house with me; I made enquiry in the house, and she left the house that night; I saw nothing of her till the next day, when she was taken up.

ANN SHERWIN sworn. - I am the wife of the last witness; the prisoner lodged with a person of the name of Butterfield, the house is let out in tenements: On the 6th of September, I missed a table-spoon and a tea-spoon, I know the tablespoon to be mine, I told the prisoner I had missed it, and she said, she was very sorry, she hoped I should find it; she went away, and did not return that night; she was sometimes absent all night, but very seldom: she was taken up the next night, and on the Saturday following she owned she had taken the table-spoon, but knew of nothing else; the constable and I were with her at the time; I made her no promise of favor; she gave me the duplicate, and my husband went to the pawnbroker's, and saw the spoon.

THOMAS GABELL sworn. - When the prisoner owned it, she said, Cadman was as bad as she; she told me where Cadman was, and I took her into custody; the prisoner said, she had spent the money at Edmonton-fair: On the 15th, I went to to search the lodging, and received the duplicate from Mrs. Butterfield.

SARAH BUTTERFIELD sworn. - I interrogated the prisoner, and got the duplicate from her; she acknowledged it, but it was in consequence of a promise of forgiveness from the prosecutor, and I got the duplicate from her upon that promise.

JOHN WILLIAMS sworn. - I am a pawnbroker; I remember the prisoner and another woman being in our shop, about the 6th of September, but I cannot recollect taking the goods in. (Produces a sheet and a tea-spoon).

Gabell. The prisoner told me she had pledged them with Susan Cadman's sister.

SUSAN CADMAN sworn. - I went with the prisoner to Mr. Davison's, to pledge a table-spoon.

Mrs. Sherwin. This is my sheet, I know it by some tears in it.

The prisoner did not say any thing in her defence.

GUILTY , aged 16.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and whipped in the jail .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

731. MARTHA WEBB was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of September , two pair of slippers, value 5s. the property of Mark Yelf .

FRANCES YELF sworn. - I am the wife of the prosecutor, No. 146, Oxford-street ; The prisoner came to live with me two days before I lost the property: On the 8th of September, she asked leave to go out at seven o'clock in the evening; I told her she should, if her master was home in time; a customer came into the shop, and I went next door to get change of a one pound note; I left her in the parlour, and two errand boys in the shop with the customer, I was absent three or four minutes; when I came back, she was in the parlour, I suspected she had something in her pockets, as they stuck out very much, and insisted upon searching her; I found in each pocket a pair of jean slippers, and I sent for a constable; she said, she picked them up in the shop.

Q. Did you receive any character with her? - A. Yes, I had a very good character with her - a nine months character.(William Lane, the constable, produced the slippers, which wre identified by the prosecutrix).

Prisoner's defence. I have neither father nor mother, nor any creature in the world to speak for me; I lived with my mistress a week.

GUILTY , aged 18.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 6d .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson .

732. FANNY WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of September , a cotton gown, value 2s. the property of Ann Harwood .

ANN HARWOOD sworn. - On the 21st of September I was mending a black cotton gown, at the White-horse in Rupert-street , kept by Mr. Tibby, I am his servant ; I left it upon the back of a chair; my mistress called me away to take the child; the prisoner was sitting with her back against the chair where my gown hung, that was between nine and ten o'clock; when I came back, the gown was gone; there was another woman with her.

- SLADE sworn. - I am a constable; I searched the prisoner's lodgings, I think, on the 22d of September, in consequence of information that I received; I went up stairs, and found this gown in an unlocked cupboard, about two yards from the prisoner's room, there was nothing else in the cupboard; there was another lodger in the back room.

Q.(To Harwood). How long was it between the time of her sitting against the chair and your charging the constable with her? - A.Not a quarter of an hour.

Prisoner's defence. This cupboard is never made use of by any body in the house; I know nothing at all of the gown.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave her a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

733. SARAH DANCER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of October , sixteen pieces of welting leather, value 12s. the property of Charles Hyatt , privately in his shop .

CHARLES HYATT sworn. - I am a leather-cutter , No. 183, Shoreditch : On the evening of the 22d of October, about nine o'clock at night, the prisoner, in company with another woman, came into my shop to purchase some leather; I sent her into the cellar with a little girl, and a candle to light her, to look out what she wanted; I went into the cellar with another customer myself; she stopped in the cellar with the little girl about two minutes; I was at the other end of the cellar, and told the little girl to light her up; when she came into the shop, she told the woman with whom she came in, that she wanted to go out to speak to a closer or binder-woman; she told the woman to wait, she would be in again in a minute; when I came up, she had just returned, she looked out some leather in the shop, had it weighed, and paid for it; she went away; about a quarter of an hour after, I missed a bundle containing sixteen pieces of welting leather, I suspected the prisoner had got it; I instantly enquired where she lived, went to the watch-house, and laid an information, the officer of the night went with me to the house; I told her, I had missed a bundle of leather, and suspected she had it; she said, she knew nothing of it; I saw some leather lying upon the floor, just behind her, I instantly went to it, and found it was the property I had missed; the officer then took her into custody; she had been a customer about a fortnight.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. I believe this poor woman has a husband who is a maniac? - A. She has a husband who is deranged, and two children.(The officer produced the leather, which was identified by the prosecutor).

Mr. Alley. Q. This leather was not in your shop, but in the cellar? - A. No, it was not exposed for sale.

Court. Q. Is your cellar a part of your shop? - A. We consider it so, because we keep in it articles for sale as well as articles not for sale; this leather is not manufactured, it is not in a saleable condition.

The prisoner did not say any thing in her defence. GUILTY , aged 45,

Of stealing the goods, but not privately in the shop.

Confined one week in Newgate , and fined 6d .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

734. JOHN HADLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of October , thirty pounds of sheet lead, value 6s. the property of Felix Bulkeley , Esq .

JOHN HARRISON sworn. - I am a surveyor and builder, in Berkeley-square: On Friday evening, the 21st of this month, a person of the name of Ellis gave me some information.

THOMAS ELLIS sworn. - I am a constable: On the 21st of October, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, I was at the bottom of Essex-street, Strand, under the arch-way, I saw the prisoner come out of the house of Mr. Plowden, he had a parcel wrapped up in a dirty sheet of white paper; I had a suspicion, and followed him to an old iron shop in Shire-lane, he was there about two or three minutes before I followed him in; when I went in, I saw the lead in the scale, which is here to be produced; I asked him what he had got there, he first said, it was his own property, and at the watch-house, he said, it was the property of General Bulkeley ; I searched him, and found in his pocket a key that opened Mr. Plowden's door; I then went to General Bulkeley 's, and from thence to Mr. Harrison's, whom I found to be the prisoner's master; the lead does not match to any thing; the prisoner slept in the house, it was repairing, and the key was the proper key of the house.

Mr. Harrison. Mr. Plowden's house belongs to General Bulkeley, his name is Felix, he is the landlord of it; I don't know that the lead belongs to General Bulkeley; the prisoner has worked for me four or five years, I always found him very honest.

THOMAS ASKEW sworn. - I am foreman to Mr. Harrison; I know there was lead on the premises, but I know nothing of this lead, I did not miss any.

Prisoner's defence. I picked up the lead in coming up the street.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

735. ELEANOR KEEFE, alias WELCH , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of October , a child's frock, value 2s. a seven-shilling piece, five shillings, twenty-four penny-pieces, and a Bank-note, value 1l. the property of Hugh Martin .

Mrs. MARTIN sworn. - I live at No. 5, Barley-court, Holborn , I work at army work; the prisoner worked for me, to clean my room , on the 22d of October; she said, she wished I would let her work for the next day, Sunday, to get something for her back; Sarah Tanner brought me a one pound-note to take twelve shillings out for rent; I gave her eight shillings; after she was gone, a man of the name of Keefe came to see the prisoner; a little while after, Sarah Tanner came up again with one shilling, and said it was scrupled; I took twelve penny pieces out of the box, and put in the one pound-note and fourteen shillings in it, and locked the box; I went out to market, and left the prisoner to take care of the room; I was gone about three quarters of an hour; when I came back, I found the box broke open, the child asleep, and nobody else in the room; I missed one pound fourteen shillings out of the box, and my child's frock off the bed; there was a one pound note, a sevenshilling piece, two shillings in penny pieces, and five shillings in silver; the next day, I had Mr. Keefe taken up, he was very solid, and about three quarters of an hour after, the prisoner was found in St. Giles's, very much in liquor, with a new gown, new slippers, and every thing new upon her, and then she was put in the watch-house; on the 24th I went to Marlborough-street, and the man was discharged; the frock was found at the pawnbroker's.

SARAH TANNER sworn. - I paid my landlady twelve shillings towards rent; I carried her a one pound note; she gave me change; I offered a shilling, and it was refused; I took it back to her, and she gave me twelve penny-pieces out of her box; I saw her lock the box up with the money in it, and she told me she had one pound fourteen shillings towards her rent, and then she came down stairs after me; she stopped in my room a little bit, and then I heard a lumbering down stairs, which was the man that was with the prisoner; I went out, but could see nobody; I called to know if any body was gone down stairs, and the prisoner said, no, nobody has been here.

JANE WRIGHT sworn. - I lodge in Mrs. Martin's bottom room; Mrs. Martin went out soon after the man that was with the prisoner fell down stairs; he was very drunk; I went up stairs, and the prisoner was sewing a pair of trowsers; the child was awake, and she desired her to cover herself over, and go to sleep, her mother would be very angry with her for being awake at that time of night; about five minutes before Mrs. Martin came home, the prisoner went out.

- WYBURD sworn. - I am a constable; I took up the prisoner and the man; the man was discharged, and the woman detained; the frock was found at a pawnbroker's; the pawnbroker is not here.

Prisoner. I know nothing at all about it.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

736. ELEANOR SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of September , in her dwelling-house, a Bank-note, value 25l. the property of Richard Aycott .

Second Count. Charging it to be the property of Olave Aycott .

RICHARD AYCOTT sworn. - I am a farrier ; I lodge at No. 1, Queen's-head-court, Great Windmill-street; I lodged with one Macdonald, who kept a coal-shed: On the 27th of August, I received a twenty-five pound Bank-note, which I gave to my sister, and a one-pound Bank-note besides; she lived at No. 4, Mark-lane, at that time; she left her place on the 2d of September, and lodged with the prisoner three nights.

OLAVE AYCOTT sworn. - I am sister to the last witness; my brother gave me twenty-five pounds on the 27th of August to take care of; I left my place on the 2d of September, and was recommended by my sister to go to lodge with the prisoner; she lived at No. 3, Hewist's court, in the Strand ; I slept there three nights: On the 4th of September I had the note; on the 5th, I went to my place, near Battersea; I looked into my box to see that every thing was safe, and missed my pocket-book, which contained the money; I missed a twenty-five pound note, and a one-pound note; the next morning I went to my brother; that is all I know.

- BARBER sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Corby, pawnbroker, Green-street, Leicester-square: On the 6th of September, the prisoner at the bar bought some cotton handkerchiefs, and I exchanged a twenty-five pound note for her; I have not the least doubt of her being the person; she gave me the name of Griffiths, which I put upon the note; it was in the middle of the day.

JOHN GIBBONS sworn. - (Produces the note.) I am librarian to the Bank of England; I brought this note from the Bank.

Barber. This is the same note; it has upon it, in my writing, Griffiths, No. 17, York-buildings, 6th of the ninth month.

Q.(To Olave Aycott.) Is that the note? - A. I cannot say; I did not take notice of the number.

Aycott. I know this to be the same note that I gave my sister; it has Masterman and George Talser wrote upon it.

Prisoner's defence. I never had such a thing in my possession.

GUILTY , aged 51.

Of stealing, but not in the dwelling-house.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 6d .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

737. JOHN FITCHETT was indicted for that he, on the 20th of June , being employed in the capacity of a servant to James Watkins , did receive and take into his possession, for and on account of his said master, 19l. 10s. and that he afterwards did embezzle and secrete part there of, to wit, 9l. 10s .

The person by whom the money was paid being called, but not appearing, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

738. JOHN FITCHETT was again indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of July , a pound weight of tea, value 8s. the property of James Watkins .

JAMES WATKINS sworn. - I am a grocer , in Market-street, Westminster ; the prisoner had lived servant with me ten or eleven months: On the 9th of July, we were at breakfast; I ordered him to enter to Mr. John Titler, of Bayswater, six pounds of green tea; after breakfast, I went out for half an hour; when I came back, he had done up the six pounds of green tea, and was gone to Newcastle-street, in the Strand; I observed the six pounds of green tea lying on a sugar hogshead, as I went through the shop; I observed it very awkwardly packed; I turned round the corner, and then I was opposite to it; I observed it was not done up in a tradesman-like manner; I went to it, and felt it, but it was stuffed so tight I could make no impression upon it; I put it in the scale, and found it weighed seven pounds three ounces; I looked at the entry in the book, and the bill of parcels in his own hand-writing was six pounds, and the bag was marked on the outside six pounds; I consulted with a neighbour, Mr. Challon, and we agreed to let him come home, and then open it; he came home, and weighed another six pounds of tea, and took them one in each arm, and went out; Mr. Challon, who lived opposite, immediately followed him; I followed at a distance; we followed him to the corner of Brewer-street, and there Mr. Challon lost sight of him in turning the corner; we did not see any thing of him till be brought both the parcels to Mr. Titler's, and they were sent out to be weighed; we were there before him; I said to Mr. Challon, you see that parcel has been unpacked, and tied up property; I had the prisoner in, and desired him to sit down; I told him, I thought he had been using me very ill this morning; he said, he had not; I asked him what he had done with the green tea out of that, and he said he had done nothing with it.

Mr. Knapp. Q.Have you any partner? - A. None.

JOHN CHALLON sworn. - I live opposite Mr. Watkins; I am a tallow-chandler: On the 9th of July, I went over, and saw a parcel of tea weighed, which laid upon a sugar hogshead; it weighed seven pounds three ounces; it was marked fine hyson tea; I don't recollect that there was any mark of the weight upon it; I afterwards saw the prisoner take two parcels of tea up Market-street; I followed him to Brewer-street, and there I lost him; I did not see him again till I got to Bayswater; he came there in about a quarter of an hour, or twenty minutes; he was brought in to us by Mr. Titler's servant; I saw that the parcel of tea, which weighed seven pounds three ounces,was unpacked, and packed in the circumference of six pounds; we then had the prisoner in; Mr. Watkins told him he thought he had been using him very ill; the prisoner said, he did not know that he had; Mr. Watkins asked him what he had done with the tea that was in that bag; he said, it came untied, and he had lost it out; he told him that was not likely, as it weighed six pounds as it ought to do; when he brought it there, he said he did not know any thing about it; Mr. Warkins left the room, and I talked with him; I told him he had better acknowledge his crime -

Court. Then you must not tell us any thing he said after that.

CHRISTOPHER NORTH sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Titler, at Bayswater; I was standing at the door when the prisoner came with the tea; I delivered it to my master, and my master gave it to me, and desired me to go and weigh it, which I did; each parcel weighed exactly six pounds, neither more or less; a little girl standing by put in a half ounce weight, and it would not turn that.

Prisoner's defence. I weighed both parcels, to the best of my knowledge, six pounds exactly.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character. GUILTY , aged 35.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

739. JOHN HICKS was indicted for that he, on the 6th of June , being employed in the capacity of a servant to Joseph Clarke , did receive and take into his possession 2l. for and on account of his said master, and afterwards feloniously did embezzle and secrete the same .

Three other Counts for a like offence, varying the manner of charging it.(The case was opened by Mr. Gurney.

MARY-ANN CLARKE sworn. - I live in Tavistock-place ; I am the wife of Joseph Clarke; I reside with my mother; the prisoner came to live with me as footman in May last: On the 4th of June, to the best of my recollection, I gave the prisoner two one-pound Bank-notes to pay what he had borrowed in the neighbourhood of Mr. George Colemer, an oilman; it was borrowed for want of change; the oilman afterwards called with his bill, and charged the two pounds again; I called the prisoner, and he denied ever having seen the notes; there was nobody in the room but himself and me when I gave them to him; I gave them to him in the room, just as he was going to hand me into the carriage; he was not going behind the carriage; I am quite sure he saw the notes, and I gave him directions to take them to the oilman; he did not take them up while I was in the room.

GEORGE COLEMER sworn. - I am an oilman, in Little Guilford-street; the prisoner came to me on the 1st of June, and asked for change of a ten-pound note; I could not, and I lent him two pounds; the prisoner never afterwards came to pay it.

Prisoner's defence. I never saw the notes, now did I hear my mistress say any thing about them.

The prisoner called six witnesses, who gave him a good character. NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

740. JOHN HICKS was again indicted for that he, being employed in the capacity of a servant to Joseph Clarke , did receive and take into his possession, on the 11th of July , 2l. 7s. for and on account of his said master, and afterwards did feloniously embezzle and secrete the same .

Three other Counts for a like offence, varying the manner of charging it.

There not being sufficient evidence to bring the charge home to the prisoner, he was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

741. WILLIAM PHILLIPS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of October , nine Bank-notes, value 9l. the property of James Bartlett .

ANN BARTLETT sworn. - I am the wife of James Bartlett; the prisoner is a sailor , and lodged with me at Shadwell ; before that, he lodged with me six months; I keep the Globe and Three Pigeons : On the 4th of October, I gave him a pocket-book, containing his certificate; he was going to Greenwich to get his pension; I had forgot that I had put nine one-pound Bank-notes, and a two-pound Bank-note into the pocket-book; I am sure they were in it; I was going to pay them away; he brought me back the pocket-book and a two-pound note; I never saw the other notes again: he said, they had given him the two-pound note for subsistence money.

EDWARD RODGERS sworn. - I apprehended the prisoner in a public-house, opposite the India-house; he was entirely new dressed, with a watch, and some extravagant bills in his pocket; he told me he had got ten pounds from Greenwich.

The prisoner did not say any thing in his defence

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

742. THOMAS PAYNE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of September , 3lb. weight of lead pipe, with a brass cock fixed thereto, value 2s. the property of John Weldon , fixed to his dwelling-house .

Second Count. Charging it to be the property of John Dent .

JOHN DENT sworn. - I am a stay-maker , No.7, Milk-alley, St. Ann's, Soho : On the 23d of September, between four and five in the afternoon, I lost some lead; it was cut from the main pipe in the back kitchen, with a brass cock fixed to it; I rent the house of John Weldon ; I went down into the kitchen, and found the prisoner; he offered me money to put it on again, and say nothing about it; he said, he went there to ease himself.

MARY PAGE sworn. - I look after the prosecutor's house and family; I was by when the prisoner offered him money to put it on again.(The lead produced.)

THOMAS BOWEN sworn. - I am a stone-mason; I live in the front kitchen of this house; I was ill with a cold, and stopped at home; I saw the pipe move; I sent a girl into the back kitchen to see if any body was there; I then saw the prisoner with the pipe in his hand; he was going up stairs to the yard, and I laid hold of him by the collar till Mr. Dent came.

Prisoner's defence. I went into the back kitchen to ease myself; I asked leave of a man who stood in the passage; the last witness followed me, and knocked me down. GUILTY , aged 39.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 6d .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

743. HENRY PEYTON was charged on the Coroner's Inquisition with the wilful murder of Phoebe Cox .

In consequence of an informality in the Coroner's Inquisition, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

744. WILLIAM TAYLOR was indicted for that he, on the 27th of August , being employed in the capacity of a servant to James Barker , did receive and take into his possession 10s. for and on account of his said master, and did afterwards feloniously embezzle, secrete, and steal the same .

JAMES BARKER sworn. - I am a fishmonger , No. 108, Drury-lane; the prisoner was my servant : On the 27th of August, he was sent with one hundred herrings to Cross-street, Blackfriars-road ; Mary Stevens bought them in the morning, she was to pay ten shillings for them; I told the prisoner he was to receive ten shillings; I sent him about six o'clock in the evening, and he came back about half past eight, saying, Mrs. Stevens did not pay him; it was about a fortnight, or three weeks, before I found it out; he never accounted to me for it; he left my service the same night; he was to have come again on Monday morning, but did not.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. How long had the prisoner lived with you? - A.About twelve months.

Q. Mrs. Stevens resides in the country of Surrey? - A. Yes.

Q. I believe you yourself was inclined to settle the business? - A.At Marlborough-street, I wished the Magistrate to send him for a soldier or a sailor, to prevent the trouble of prosecuting him.

MARY STEVENS sworn. - I live in Cross-street, over Blackfriars-bridge: On the 27th of August, I bought one hundred herrings of Mr. Barker; I was to pay ten shillings on delivery; the prisoner at the bar brought them between six and seven o'clock in the evening; I asked him if it would make any difference if I paid him part halfpence; he said, no, and I gave him either three shillings or three shillings and sixpence in halfpence, and the rest in silver; then he went away.(Mr. Knapp stated an objection, that, in order to convict the prisoner, it was essential that the whole of the crime charged should be proved to have been committed within the county in which the prisoner was tried.) - The point was reserved for the opinions of the Twelve Judges.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character. GUILTY , aged 26.

Judgment respited.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson .

745. GEORGE CLAYTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of September , a silver watch, value 1l. 11s. 6d. the property of Margaret Gooldhawke .

MARGARET GOOLDHAWKE sworn. - I live at No. 43, St. John's-street : On the 26th of September, I stepped out of my house about three minutes, and when I came back, the prisoner stood in the middle of the shop; he asked me if I had any children's chairs; I asked him if he would have a basket chair, or a wooden one; he made me no answer; I took an oak-stick to reach a chair, and saw my watch was gone from the book in the parlour; he said, he would call again; I suspected he had taken the watch; I took him by the collar, and called my son; he took him into the parlour, and I went for a constable.

JOSEPH GOOLDHAWKE sworn. - I took the prisoner into the parlour; I told him he should be searched, and then he produced the watch out of his left-hand breeches pocket.

Prisoner. I cannot say any thing in my own defence; I am a man greatly afflicted with a rupture, and very poor.

GUILTY , aged 66.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 6d .

First Middlesex Jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

746. THOMAS PICKERING was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of October , a silk handkerchief, value 2s. 6d. and a pair of cotton stockings, value 2s. 6d. the property of Charles Ferguson .

Second Count. Charging them to be the property of Dorothy Hall .

DOROTHY HALL sworn. - I live servant with Mr. Waring, No. 10, Caroline-street, Bedford-square ; the prisoner was a painter at work in the house: I lost a handkerchief and a pair of stockings out of a box in a back room that he was painting; they belonged to a Mr. Ferguson, who is gone to Scotland, and left them in my care; I missed them on the Sunday se'nnight after he left the house; I had him apprehended; the stockings were found upon him, and a duplicate of the handkerchief.

EDWARD CROCKER sworn. - I took the prisoner into custody on Saturday morning last; he was in bed; he put on these stockings, (producing them.) I asked him where he got them; he said, he bought them at Birmingham; I found in his pocket-book a duplicate of silk handkerchief.(Thomas Vincent, servant to Mr. Dobree, a pawnbroker, produced the handkerchief.)(The property was identified by the prosecutrix.)

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 44.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 6d .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

747. JOHN ANTHONY GARBAROLIO was indicted for that he, on the 26th of February , being employed in the capacity of a clerk to George Wright , notary-public, did, by virtue of such employment, receive and take into his possession, a bill of exchange for the payment of 40l. for and on account of his said master, and afterwards did embezzle and secrete the same .(The case was opened by Mr. Alley.)

GEORGE WRIGHT, Jun. sworn. - My father is an attorney and notary-public , near Manchester-square ; he was employed by Messrs. Hammersley and Co. to note their unpaid bills; the prisoner was employed by my father as a clerk: On the 26th of February, I received two bills to protest, one of them was a bill for forty pounds on Mr. Peter George, of Newton-street, Holborn; I delivered that bill to the prisoner for the purpose of going to Mr. George's, to know the reason the bill was not paid; he went away about six o'clock, but never returned; I did not see him again till about three weeks or a months ago; he used to lodge at his father's, but I was not able to find him there.

GEORGE WRIGHT, Sen. sworn. - The prisoner never accounted to me for this bill; I have paid the money.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. I take it for granted, the next day you paid a visit to Mr. Gregory, to enquire whether the bill was paid or not? - A. No, I did not, I sent Charles Garman, my servant.

Q.George is deceased? - A. I do not know.

Q.Were you not here at his trial? - A. No, I have not been in this Court these ten years.

Q. There was another note of nine pounds upon Mr. Jeffery, of Pall-Mall? - A. Yes.

Q. You afterwards called upon Mr. Jeffery, and indemnified him? - A. Yes.

Q. Did not the mother of the prisoner inform you he had lost the notes? - A.She came and made some excuse.

Q. Did you not say, if they paid the money, and ten pounds more, you would not proceed against him? - A. I left it open before I instituted any judicial proceeding for his friends to make any proposals.

CHARLES GARMAN sworn. - I am clerk to Mr. Wright; I went to Mr. Gregory, No. 14, Newton-street, and he shewed me the forty-pound bill, which he had paid.

Prisoner's defence. I was very much intoxicated. I had been at a house in St. John's-street, Smithfield; I had a green money-bag in my pocket; I went to Gregory's house, he was not at home; a gentleman in the parlour told me, if I wanted to see Gregory, he was at a house in the neighbourhood; he went with me, and after taking me through several courts and turnings, we went into a public-house; Gregory was there; he asked me to sit down, and he would pay me; I repeatedly objected to staying, but he prevailed upon me to drink to a great excess; I staid about two hours; I then came out of the house, and became insensible; Gregory left me; I went through several turnings, and at last fell against a wall, and went to sleep; I waked about two o'clock in the morning; my recollection returned, I missed my pocket-book, green bag, and every thing out of my pocket; I then went into the fields, and remained the rest of the night. Through fear and shame, I absconded for a fortnight; I then went home to my mother's, and was concealed there till I was apprehended; Mr. Wright came in a blustering manner, and said if my friends had come forward, he would have taken it at half-a-crown a week.(For the Prisoner.)

PHILIP DIGNAM sworn. - I keep the Black Horse, Little Wild-street; I saw Gregory at my house on the 26th of February; I made up twenty-five pounds to oblige him to take up a bill with, which I lent him.

Q. Do you remember seeing that young man with him? - A. Yes, he was in liquor.

Q. Did you see any exchange of paper between them? - A. Not that I recollect.

Q. What is become of Gregory? - A. He has been executed.

Mrs. ARABELLA GARBAROLIO sworn. - I amthe mother of the prisoner; he lived with me and his father while he was in Mr. Wright's service; he absented himself on the 26th of February for sixteen days; he was in a deplorable state; he had sold his great coat.

The prisoner called two other witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

748. SAMUEL GOODMAN was indicted for feloniously killing and slaying Richard Toon , on the 10th of October .(The case was opened by Mr. Alley.)

PETER BURKITT sworn. - I am a watch-case-joint-finisher: On the 24th of September I met with the prisoner and the deceased at Mrs. Maypowder's, the Plough, in Fleet-street; I was drinking part of a pint of beer with the prisoner; the deceased came in, and was very abusive to the prisoner; he said, he would fight him for five shillings, or any of his family; I thought it had ended there, till I went with the prisoner again on the Saturday following; the deceased was there; he wanted the prisoner then to fight him; he squared up in his face, and said, he would give him a good hiding if he would come out; the prisoner, seeing he was very anxious to fight, said, he would sight him on Monday; it was then agreed that they should meet at Mrs. Maypowder's; they were to fight for half a guinea a side; the deceased said, he had put down half a crown into the hands of a young man there to bind the wager; the prisoner put a shilling into his hands, he had not half a crown, and then the deceased put down a shilling; they were to meet on Monday at one o'clock; I then went home with the prisoner; they were to fight in the Spa-fields at three o'clock; I went about half past three; the fight was then began; they fought about half an hour after I got there without their shirts; they had seconds; several blows passed, and they both fell together; the second to the deceased helped him up, but he was not able to stand; he staggered, and the mob cried out, now hit him; the prisoner said, no, I won't; he then went out of the ring, and put his coat on; he went to a house a little lower down, had something to drink, and washed his face; I went with him; about an hour afterwards I heard that the deceased was dead, and I went with another person to see him at the house of a Mr. Jenner, in Red-lion market, Old-street; he was laying in bed dead; there were several marks about his neck, back, and belly; the prisoner drew the stakes out of Mrs. Maypowder's hands; he did not then know the man was dead.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q.How long have you known the prisoner? - A.Four or five years; he is a young man of a very quiet disposition; I never heard of his fighting before.

Q. Did you see any thing unfair in his manner of fighting, or any thing indicating malice? - A. No.

Court. Q.There was a great uproar and confusion? - A. Yes, there were a great many hundreds.

Q. Where did you hear the man was dead? - A. At Mrs. Maypowder's, about ten minutes or a quarter of an hour after we went in.

Q. Are you sure it was after the money was drawn that you heard of the death? - A. Yes.

JOSEPH JENNER sworn. - I live in Red-lionmarket, Golden-lane: Last Monday fortnight I came home, and found the deceased in bed; he was then dead; I sent for a surgeon; he said, it was of no use to bleed him, for he was dead; I felt his wrist and heart, and could find no signs of life; he was very much beat about the face, and had a terrible blow over one of the ears.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q.Part of Golden-lane is in the City? - A. Yes; my house is the second house in Middlesex.

Prisoner's defence. I had been interrupted by the deceased several times to fight, and I told him I did not want to fight. GUILTY .

Confined six months in Newgate , and fined 6s. 8d .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

749. JOHN JOHNSON and THOMAS BARNES were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of September , in the dwelling-house of Joseph Mascall , a leather purse, value 1d. a seven-shilling piece, two shillings, four Bank-notes, value 8l. nineteen other Bank-notes, value 19l. a Cambridge Bank-note, value 1l. 1s. and another Cambridge Bank-note, value 1l. the property of Peter Foy .

PETER FOY sworn. - I went into the Oxford-Arms, Whitecross-street , with one Crosby to pay him six shillings that I owed him; I called for a quartern of gin in the tap-room, and I drew out the purse and notes, and asked the landlord to change me a one-pound note; he said, he had no change; the prisoner, Johnson, was by; Crosby said, call for a pint of beer, and I will get you change; we went into a room, and Johnson followed us; I pulled out my purse, and took out a one-pound note, and gave it to Crosby; I placed my purse upon the table, with my breast leaning over it; Crosby went out, and brought me in the change, and a bad half guinea; Crosby took the half guinea, and said, he would get it changed; on his coming back, Barnes came in with him; Johnson was leaning out at the window, when Crosby came up to lay down the change, and Barnes came behind me, whipped his hand undermy arm, took the purse off the table, and ran out with it; there were only those three persons in the room; Johnson and Crosby then came on each side of me, to prevent my stirring till he was out of the room; I cried out, murder! and they ran away after him; there were in the purse nineteen onepound Bank-notes, four two pound notes, two Cambridge notes, a seven-shilling piece, and two shillings in silver; I had had them all in my hand just before, and put them in again; Johnson was taken the next day at the Three Mariners, in Fore-street, and on Sunday the 2d of October, I met Barnes coming up Whitecross-street; I made a snap at him, and he ran off, and turned down a lane; I called out, stop thief! and he was brought back to me; I am sure the two prisoners are the same men; Barnes said, when he was taken, "I did not rob you, but I know who did," and as he was going to prison, he said, "am I to die now for this, and have been only ten months from Ireland."

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. How long have you been out of Ireland? - A.Five years.

Q. In what way of life are you? - A. I work in the country in harvest time, and in winter I buy skins, and deal in hair; I received this 28l. from Mr. Bride, for horse-hair.

Q.Is he here? - A.No.

Q. Did you ever charge a person in Essex with robbing you of ten pounds? - A.Never; I was at a public-house, where there was a riot, and a man was very ill-used; I appeared as an evidence for him; I dropped some notes in the yard, and the ostler brought them to me; I was not robbed of them.

WILLIAM COLLIER sworn. - On the 2d of October, about nine o'clock in the morning, I was going through Cow-heel-alley; I heard a cry of, murder and stop thief! I saw the prisoner, Barnes, running; I caught him by the collar; the prosecutor came up, and gave charge of him for robbing him of twenty-nine pounds.

JOSEPH MASCALL sworn. - I keep the Oxford-Arms; Johnson, Crosby, and the prosecutor came to my house on the 23d of September; Foy had a great many Bank-notes; I desired him to put them in his pocket; that was in my back kitchen; he gave Crosby a note to get change; he got change; soon after I heard Foy cry out; I was in the bar; I went to assist him, and they were gone; the bar is at some distance from the kitchen.

Mr. Alley. Q. You did not see Barnes there? - A. No.

The prisoners left their defence to their Counsel, and Barnes called five witnesses, who gave him a good character. Johnson, GUILTY , aged 28,

Barnes, GUILTY , aged 24, Of stealing the goods, but not in the dwelling-house.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

750. JOHN EDWARDS , otherwise EDDOWES , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of September , four pillow-cases, value 3s. and a table-cloth, value 3s. the property of Richard Beat .

SARAH SIMMONDS sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Beat, No. 27, Coventry-street, Haymarket : The prisoner was put in by the auctioneer, on the 16th of September, to lot the things; I missed the articles mentioned in the indictment, on Sunday morning, the 18th; I went to Bow-street, on Monday, the 19th, having a suspicion that the prisoner, and a man of the name of Williams, had broke open my box, and stolen the cloaths, and in the evening I went with an officer to search the prisoner's lodgings, in St. Martin's Church-yard, where I found four pillow-cases, and a damask table-cloth, the property of Mr. Beat; I had seen them about a fortnight before.

JOHN DORRINGTON sworn. - I am an officer: I searched the prisoner's lodgings, and found the property in a chest, which he opened with a key.(The property was identified by the prosecutrix.)

Prisoner's defence. I bought the things in question at a public sale, at Mr. Squibb's, in Saville-passage.

GUILTY , aged 37.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

751. ANN, the wife of WILLIAM TUBBY , and ANN CLAVERING , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of October , twenty-four yards of printed cotton, value 2l. 8s. the property of Hugh Wright , in his dwelling-house .

ROBERT BROWN sworn. - I am a constable belonging to the Public Office, Shadwell: On Saturday the 22d of this month, I was at the Crooked Billet, Ratcliff-highway, three doors from Mr. Wright's, when the two prisoners and another woman came in; I knew Tubby, and she knew me; I observed her change countenance, and suspected she had been shop-lifting; I took hold of her by her gown to turn her round, and Clavering immediately attempted to pick up this bundle (producing it); it was behind Tubby, close under her petticoats; I am sure it was not there when they came in; I secured them all three, and took care of the bundle; Clavering said, she believed Tubby got it a few doors off; I then went to Mr. Wright's, and he missed the property.

HUGH WRIGHT sworn. - I am a linen-draper , in Ratcliff : In consequence of information I received from Brown, I examined the number of pieces I had just bought, and missed one of them; I saw them between ten and eleven in the morning; I had been out twice before I received the information; I had not seen either of the prisoners inthe shop; my son and daughter were left in care of the shop, they are not here; this is a piece of printed cotton that I bought four or five days before; they were on the counter; it has my shop mark upon it; it cost me two shillings a yard.

Tubby's defence. I met with this woman and another near Wellclose-square; I went with them to the Crooked Billet to have a pint of beer; I could not pay for it without changing half a guinea; I missed the half guinea out of my-pocket; I stooped down to look for it; Mr. Brown came up, and took a bundle out of this other woman's hand; he asked me if I knew any thing about it; I told him I did not; he took the other girl up stairs, and made her intoxicated, and told her, if she did not say what he bid her, she would be hanged.

Clavering's defence. I went with this young woman to have a pint of beer; she missed a half guinea; I saw this bundle on a porter's knot in the corner; I went to lay hold of it, and Brown took it from me; he took me up into a garret, and gave me beer and gin, and made me intoxicated; he said, if I did not speak the truth, I should be hanged; he bid me say this woman had it; she is as innocent as the child unborn.

Brown. There was a porter's knot in the window, but no bundle.

Tubby, GUILTY ,

Of stealing to the value of 30s.

Transported for seven years .

Clavering, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson .

752. JAMES POOLE and JAMES HARRISON were indicted, the first for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of October , eight beech quarters, value 8s. the property of Benjamin Ingram ; and the other for receiving the same, knowing them to have been stolen .

BENJAMIN INGRAM sworn. - I am a bedstead-maker , I live in Old Bethlem ; I had been in the country nearly a fortnight; I came home on the fast-day at night; I was informed I had been robbed by three of my men; I found part of my property at Sapwell's, the constable; the marks corresponded with what I had in my shed; they are beech quarters, and were marked on the end J. P. and an H. the marks are put on by the persons who cut them in the country.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q.Have you any partner? - A. No.

Q.Yewell was a servant of your's? - A. Yes; he was taken up, and the Lord-Mayor discharged him; he is gone to sea, I believe.

Q. Upon your oath, do you not know that the Lord-Mayor sent him on board the tender? - A. I know he ordered him on board the tender.

MARTHA INGRAM sworn. - I can only prove the property; they were brought into the yard the day before, and were marked with the letter H by Yewell; it is the only letter he can make.

SAMUEL BARKER sworn. - I am an apprentice to Mr. Ingram: On the 18th of October, between six and seven o'clock in the evening, in consequence of information, I followed the prisoner, Poole, to No. 9, Baker's-court, Half Moon-alley, Bishopsgate-street; he had some beech quarters; he took them into the prisoner Harrison's house, and put them down in the back yard; I directly came away, and informed Mr. Sapwell, the constable, of it; we then went, and found eight pieces; I looked at them, and found the mark H on them, a chalk mark; it corresponded with other wood we had in the shed at the same time; Harrison said before the Lord-Mayor, he was at home when the first load came; there were two loads went that evening; I saw the last go; there were eight pieces found; I did not see Harrison there; I saw Poole go from my master's shed with them on his shoulder.

THOMAS SAPWELL sworn. - I am a constable; I went with the last witness to the house of Harrison, and found the wood; I apprehended Poole at his master's house, and the next morning I apprehended Harrison going to his shop in Windmill-street.

JOHN WHITE sworn. - I saw the prisoner take four beech quarters from his master's shop, and gave information to Barker.

ISAAC HEADLIN sworn. - I am a publican: On the 18th of this month, I saw the prisoner, Poole, going with four pieces of beech from Mr. Ingram's, between five and six in the evening; I followed him as far as Baker's-court; I returned, and informed the apprentice of it, and in about half an hour, I saw Poole go with a second load; I did not follow him.(The wood was identified by Mrs. Ingram.)

Poole's defence. Yewell told me to take them to Harrison's; he said they were paid for.

Harrison's defence. I am innocent of it; I did not know but Yewell had bought them for me.

The prisoner Harrison called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Poole, GUILTY , aged 50.

Confined three months in Newgate , and fined 6d .

Harrison, GUILTY , aged 35.

Transported for fourteen years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

753. SARAH BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of October , twenty-four yards of calico, value 3l. the property of William Gillman , privately in his shop .

JOHN GREENWELL sworn. - I am shopman to Mr. William Gillman , linen-draper , Barbican : On the 8th of October, about twelve o'clock, theprisoner came into the shop to purchase a gown; I observed her to shuffle about her cloaths, and as she was going out of the shop, her cloaths seemed to stick out a good deal; I followed her, and brought her back; as I brought her up the steps, the print dropped from under her petticoats; a gentleman passing by, brought it in; there was another shopman, Mrs. Gillman, and a customer or two in the shop at the same time; it was taken from the shop counter.

Q.Some of the persons in the shop might have seen her take it, for any thing you know? - A.They might.

- MOODY sworn. - I am a clerk in the house of Dimsdale and Co. On the 8th of October, I was going along Barbican, and saw the prisoner drop a piece of calico at Mr. Gillman's door; I took it in, and it was claimed by Mr. Gillman.( John Mills , a constable, produced the print, which was identified by the prosecutor, as having his private mark upon it.)

Prisoner's defence. I am innocent of the charge.

The prisoner called one witness, with whom she lived servant, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Of stealing, but not privately in the shop.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

754. JOHN WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of September , twenty-seven yards of calico, value 2l. 16s. the property of Joseph Harrison , in his dwelling-house .

JOSEPH HARRISON sworn. - I am a linen-draper , at No. 66, Newgate-street ; I was not at home at the time of the robbery.

THOMAS- ROBERT SMITH sworn. - I am shopman to Mr. Harrison: On the 27th of September, about eight o'clock in the evening, I was folding a piece of linen, when I saw the prisoner come in, and snatch a piece of print from a horse on which it was hanging, on the inside of the shop-door; I pursued him, and took him with it upon him; I took him to the Compter.

JOHN- CHARLES SMITH sworn. - I was passing through the street, and saw the prisoner taken, with a piece of calico in his arms.( William Shepherd , an officer, produced the print, which was identified by T. R. Smith.)

Prisoner's defence. I picked it up outside the door.

GUILTY, Of stealing goods, to the value of 39s .

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

755. MARY MAY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of September , a cotton headpiece, value 5s. two cotton valances, value 3s. and a bed-curtain, value 6s. the property of Nicholas Phene the elder , and Nicholas Phene the younger .

NICHOLAS PHENE , the elder, sworn. - I am an upholsterer , in London-wall ; I am in partnership with my son; the prisoner was one of our work women: In consequence of suspicion, having missed several pieces of cotton, I went to the prisoner's lodgings, and found a bed-curtain, and some duplicates, which led to other property.

GEORGE PERRIN sworn. - I am foreman to Messrs. Phene; I was sent for to see a piece of furniture in the prisoner's apartments, which I knew to be my master's property.

JOHN JUPP sworn. - I am a pawnbroker: On the 26th of August, I took in the valance of a bed from the prisoner; I lent her sixpence upon it; she had used our shop some months. (Produces it.)( John Cox , a constable, produced the bed-curtain, which was identified by Mrs. Phene.)

Perrin. Here are other articles pledged by the prisoner, but the persons who took them in are not here; I know this valance to be my master's property.

The prisoner did not say any thing in her defence. GUILTY , aged 31.

Confined three months in Newgate , and fined 6d .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

756. HYAM MITCHELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of September , a pocket-book, value 2s. and six twopenny stamp receipts, value 1s. the property of John Jordan , privily from his person .

JOHN JORDAN sworn. - I am a victualler , in Tabernacle-walk, Finsbury-square: On Monday, the 26th of October, between five and six o'clock in the evening, I was returning home from the City; I stopped to see the soldiers exercising in Moorfields ; a woman, with a child in her arms, tapped me on the shoulder, and told me a man had picked my pocket of a handkerchief; I felt in my pocket, and found my handkerchief, but missed my pocket-book; the woman pointed out the prisoner to me; I pursued him, and took him, with my pocket-book concealed under his left arm; I took him to Worship-street.

Mr. Alley. Q. He had done it so clumsily, that the woman saw him do it? - A. Yes.

THOMAS COLE sworn. - I saw the pocket-book taken from under the prisoner's coat.( John Read , a constable, produced the pocket-book, which was identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. I picked up the pocket-book, and several people who saw me pick it up, claimed half of it.

GUILTY , aged 14.

Of stealing, but not privily from the person.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

757. JOHN HOLLIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of October , a handkerchief, value 3s. the property of Mark Broadley , privily from his person .

MARK BROADLEY sworn. - I live at No. 4, Bartlett's-buildings, Holborn: On the 19th of October, about five o'clock in the afternoon, just at the corner of Bartlett's-buildings , a gentleman tapped me on the shoulder, and told me I had had my pocket picked; he pointed out a man to me who was running towards Fetter-lane, and I called stop thief; he went through King's-head-court, and was stopped in Fetter-lane; he dropped the handkerchief, but I did not see him drop it.

- BROUGHTON sworn. - On the 19th of this month, going up Holborn-hill, I saw the prisoner in the act of taking a silk handkerchief out of Mr. Broadley's pocket; I pointed out the man to him, and he pursued him, crying out stop thief.

Prisoner's defence. I was going to meet an acquaintance, and I ran for fear of being behind my appointment; I was stopped in Fetter-lane, and charged with stealing a handkerchief; I never did any thing of the kind.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character. GUILTY , aged 20.

Of stealing, but not privily from the person.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

758. TIMOTHY TOOL , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of February , five bottles, value 15d. and a gallon of wine, value 18s. the property of Charles Dickinson , James Brett , and Aaron Morgan .

Second Count. Charging it to be the property of William Hopkins .

AARON MORGAN sworn. - I am a wine-merchant , in Savage-gardens , in partnership with Charles Dickinson , and James Brett ; the prisoner was employed by a servant of ours to assist in bottling port wine.

CHARLES GRANT sworn. - I am a victualler, in Cooper's-row, Savage-gardens: On Monday afternoon, the 24th of this month, I heard something fall in the passage, between the outer door and the inner door; I opened the door, and saw the prisoner with two bottles in his hand, and two on the floor, one broke and one not broke; I asked him what he was doing, there was no wine to come here; he said it was an accident; he put the bottles in the window by the bar, and went out at the door; I called a servant to pick the pieces of glass up, and sweep the place out clean; he had been gone but a few minutes, when I heard somebody at the door say to the servant, d-n you, stand out of the way; I went to the door, and observed the prisoner with five bottles more in his hand, he wanted me to let him pack it up; I said he should not pack it there; he then went up Savage-gardens, stopped at No. 22, and spoke to the cellar-man; in about half an hour he came back for the other bottles of wine, and I refused them; he came again, and I still refused them; about seven o'clock Mr. Morgan came to my house, and said his servant had been robbing him of some wine; I told him I had five bottles left with me, which I would not part with till I knew who they belonged to.

THOMAS HANTS sworn. - I am a cellar-man: I employed the prisoner, on the 24th of this month, to help me bottle a pipe of wine; I was obliged to go out, and when I returned, I thought he was rather in liquor and incapable of packing; I desired he would go, and leave packing, left there should be any misfortune in breaking them; when he went away, I thought I heard the rattling of a bottle; I went after him, and saw him with a bottle on the stairs, which I took from him; the bottles were placed nine in a row, and I missed one row.

Prisoner's defence. This man discharged me, saying I was in liquor; I had a bottle of wine in my hand at the time, and he took it from me.

GUILTY , aged 39.

Confined three months in Newgate , and publicly whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

759. WILLIAM TILLER was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Chaney , about the hour of twelve in the night of the 22d of September , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing a napkin, value 6d. a sixpence, a bad sixpence, value 1d. sixteen halfpence, and eight farthings, the property of the said John .

JOHN CHANEY sworn. - Q.State what you know of the robbery? - A. On the 28th of September, I got up about five minutes after five o'clock in the morning, and found my bar had been broke open.

Q. Is it your dwelling-house? - A. Yes; there are two hatches to the bar, one above that locks, and a lower one which bolts on the inside, and which I found unbolted, as if somebody had come out of it.

Q. Are you sure it was bolted when you went to bed? - A. I am certain of it; I had locked it the last thing before I went to bed; I had been robbed a little while before, which made me very particular in looking round the house.

Q. What time did you go to-bed? - A.About eleven o'clock.

Q.What did you miss? - A.In looking round, for I took every thing of value out before I went to bed, I saw two sixpences lay at the corner of a small shelf, but do not know them again; at the further end of the shelf, I saw a quantity of bad halfpence and farthings, but I did not think them of any consequence, and left them there; there was a small napkin also, which I took up in myhand and threw over some butter in a small room behind the bar, left the cat should get in; I cannot swear to it, only from its general appearance; in the morning I missed the things I have stated.

Q. In what state did you find your house as to the fastenings? - A. I saw a stool placed under the bar-window.

Q. Where is the bar? - A.In the passage.

Q. Was a stool necessary for the purpose of approaching the window? - A. Yes; the bar-window was a sash which drew to and fro; it had not been broke open, but was drawn back, as I had forgot to fasten it; the stool had been taken out of the bar too.

Q.The stool was inside the house? - A. Yes.

Q.How could it be used to get into the house? - A.Not to get into the house, but to get into the bar window.

Q.Was any part of the house broke? - A. The pannel of the back door was broke; I had fastened it myself the night before, when it was quite entire, and not broke at all.

Q.Was it dark when you fastened it? - A. I fastened it a few minutes before I went to bed.

Q. Was this the whole you missed? - A. Yes.

Q. Was any thing else broke? - A. It was necessary, after he broke the back door, to come through the tap-room, where there is another door, the line of which was out which pulled the door to, which I had fastened round a staple.

Q.When did you see any of these things again? - A. They were produced before the magistrates; I cannot swear to the cloth, but my daughter can.

JOHN GRIFFITHS sworn. - Q.Did you make any search at the lodgings of the prisoner? - A. I did; on Wednesday, the 28th of September, about eleven o'clock in the morning, at No. 5, Court-street, Whitechapel, and in his room I found a napkin, which I carried to Mr. Chaney's, and his daughter knew it.

Q. Are you sure that which you shewed her was the identical napkin you found in his lodgings? - A. Yes; I asked the description of the man who lodged there, and having got it, I went to a place called the Broad-place, near Petticoat-lane, where I took the prisoner, about twelve o'clock; he was pointed out to me by a little lad; I searched him, and in his pockets I found three sixpences, two good and one bad, and some halfpence and farthings. (The napkin and sixpences produced.)

ANN CHANEY sworn. - Q. Look at that napkin, and say whether you know it? - A. I am sure it is my father's napkin that was in the house; I saw it about ten o'clock at night, and left it on the table in the back-room; this sixpence was brought back to change on Tuesday; we had paid it away, and it was brought back again, being a bad one; I am sure it is the same, it is so remarkable; I saw it again the next morning.

ROBERT COOMBES sworn. - Q. Did you assist in searching the prisoner's room? - A. Yes, and found, underneath his bed's head, a ripping-chissel and an old saw (produces them), and I saw Griffiths find the cloth, and saw the sixpences taken out of the prisoner's breeches pocket.

SUSANNAH SCRIVENER sworn. - Q.Where do you live? - A. I rent a room in the same house with the prisoner, at No. 5, Court-street; he lodged over me; I heard somebody come in on the 27th, between two and three; I cannot say it was him, for I did not see him, as I was in bed; I saw him go out in the morning about ten o'clock; I was by when the search was made, and saw the things taken.

Q.Are you sure the napkin was taken from the room occupied by the prisoner? - A. Yes.

Prisoner's defence. I took the sixpence in change of a shilling the over-night: as to the napkin, I know nothing of it, for my door was open all day.

GUILTY , Death , aged 21.

First Middlesex Jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

760. JOHN KENNEDY , WILLIAM BENTLEY , and JOHN PALMER were indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Reuben Barrett , about the hour of eight in the night of the 24th of September , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing two yards of patchwork, value 8s. a pair of breeches, value 1s. and a wooden pill-box, containing eight shirt buttons, value 1d. the property of the said Reuben .

REUBEN BARRETT sworn. - I am a labourer , and a soldier in the East-India Company's service , and live at No. 1, Thomas-street, Mile-end, Newtown : on the 24th of September I went out about seven o'clock in the morning, and left nobody in the house but my wife; I did not return till about eleven at night.

ELIZABETH BARRETT sworn. - I am wife to the last witness: I went out about a quarter before seven in the evening, on the 24th of September; I locked the door, and took the key with me; the windows below were all shut down, and the shutters bolted; one of the windows up stairs was fastened down, but the other was not; I returned in about an hour, and found the door locked, but the window up stairs that was not fastened was drawn up as high as it could be pushed, though I had left it down; it is nine feet from the ground; I went in, and found the drawers pulled out, and the things about the room; the box with the buttons had been removed, and put on a board under the window, and a pair of breeches had been removed from off a box to the drawers; I had seen them all before I went out.

THOMAS MITCHELL sworn. - I live at No. 9, Thomas-street, Whitechapel: On Saturday, the 24th of September, about a quarter before seven, I went out, as I returned, about ten minutes after seven, I saw the prisoner Palmer standing at No. 1, and another man standing opposite; I cast my eye up to the window over the door, and saw a light in the room, which appeared to me to come light and dark; sometimes I saw it, and sometimes I did not; I went to my own door, and then walked back again, and saw the men had changed their position; Palmer was on the opposite side of the way, and Bentley was on Barrett's, not many yards from his house; I saw Mr. Harrison at the Grasshopper door, and told him my suspicions; we went back to the house, and when we came there, Bentley was standing at No. 3, and Palmer right opposite Barrett's window; Harrison knocked at Barrett's door, and Bentley came past me and stood against the garden wall of the public-house; Harrison knocked a second time, and then a man jumped out of Barrett's window which I saw open; I was about four or five yards behind Harrison, and just saw the face of the person as he rose up and run away, and have not the least doubt that Kennedy is the man; it was between light and dark; I just saw his face, and knew him again directly, and pointed him out two days after in custody; as he jumped out, he fell on all fours; Mr. Harrison laid hold of him, but Palmer and Bentley rescued him, and they all ran away together; I ran after them, and secured Palmer, the others run away; I can also swear to Bentley.

- HARRISON sworn. - On the 24th of September I was standing at the public-house door, at about a quarter past seven o'clock; Mitchell and I went up the street to Barrett's house, and I saw Palmer standing opposite to Barrett's, and Bentley at No. 3; I knocked twice at Barrett's door, and a man jumped out at the window; in jumping out, he cried, Halloa! halloa! what is the matter? I said I would let him know, and made a snatch at him, and instantly got him on the ground; Palmer and Bentley then came up, and rescued him from me; I halloaed out stop thief, and they repeated it; Mitchell caught hold of Palmer, and I proceeded after the others, but could not take them; I cannot say who the man was that jumped out, because, as he lay upon the ground, and I had hold of him, they rushed in; I can swear Bentley was the man that was standing there, and helped to rescue the other. (The property produced and identified.)

JOHN KNOWLAND sworn. - I am an officer, and apprehended Bentley and Kennedy: On the 28th of September, Palmer was brought into custody by Griffiths and Smith; Palmer's girl came to the Office, and Griffiths and I followed her home; I went up one pair of stairs, and found Bentley there; I asked him who lodged up stairs, he said he did not know, it was a strange man; I went up, and found Kennedy there, and took them both to the Office.

Kennedy's defence. I know nothing of it; I was going to bed, and was half undressed when I was taken.

Bentley's defence. I was at supper, and they asked me who lived up stairs; I said I did not know.

Palmer's defence. I had been to my brother's to tea, and was making water on the opposite side of the way; I heard that gentleman sing out, stop him; I crossed over the way, and asked what was the matter, and they took hold of me, and said they thought I was one; I said, if they thought so, I would go any where with them to satisfy them to the contrary.

Kennedy, GUILTY , aged 22.

Bentley, GUILTY , aged 27.

Palmer, GUILTY , aged 24.

Of stealing, but not of the burglary.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson .

761. JOHN KENNEDY was again indicted with ANN THOMAS , the first for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Perfect , about the hour of six in the afternoon of the 17th of August , Elizabeth Perfect , Sarah Satcher , and others being therein, and feloniously stealing two shifts, value 6s. three frocks, value 4s. a pin-cloth, value 6d. a shirt, value 6d. a petticoat, value 6d. the property of the said William; and a shift, value 14s. the property of the said Sarah ; and the other for receiving the said property, knowing it to have been stolen .

There being no evidence to affect the prisoners, they were ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson .

762. JOHN BRADFORD was indicted for feloniously stealing, in the dwelling-house of John Denning , on the 1st of October , a cloth coat, value 30s. a seven-shilling-piece, and two one-pound notes, the property of Abraham Webb .

ABRAHAM WEBB sworn. - I am a horse-keeper , and lodge at John Denning 's, No. 34, Henry-street, St. Luke's , up two pair of stairs; there were three more lodgers in the same room: I put my money into my box on Wednesday night, and locked it up; all was then safe; on the 1st of this month, I went to take a seven-shilling piece out, and found the box broke open, and my coat and money gone; the prisoner did not return that night; I went to where he said he worked, which was at a coal-shed in Old-street-square, but found he did not work there; on Sunday, between four and five in the afternoon, I saw him in the brickfields the other side of the City-Road; I caughthold of him, and said, you are the lad that broke my box open; he fell crying, and said, he would tell me all about it when he got home; I took him up in the room, and he said he broke it open with the blade of an old knife on Saturday morning; I did not promise it should be better or worse for him; he gave me a duplicate of the coat pawned in the name of John Bradford ; he said, he never saw the notes.

THOMAS STILES sworn. - I live with Mr. Marshall, a pawnbroker, No. 30, Barbican, and produce the coat pledged by the prisoner the 1st of this month, between eight and nine in the morning; I lent him twelve shillings, and asked him who he brought it from; he said, from his parents, who lived at No. 97, Golden-lane. (The coat produced and identified.)

Prisoner. I have nothing to say.

GUILTY , aged 14.

Of stealing the coat.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

763. WILLIAM CHRISTIE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of October , three men's Duffield great-coats, value 3l. two other great-coats, value 25s. five children's great coats, value 20s. three pair of leather breeches, value 40s. two pair of pantaloons, value 30s. two pair of nankeen breeches, value 6s. a pair of velveteen breeches, value 10s. four waistcoats, value 17s. four shirts, value 10s. and six pair of trowsers, value 17s. the property of William Chambers , in his dwelling-house .(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

WILLIAM DANIELS sworn. - Mr. Knapp. Q. Are you servant to Mr. Chambers? - A. Yes.

Q.Was the prisoner his warehouseman ? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember, on the 19th of September seeing him go out of your master's house, and tell us what you know? - A. Yes; between seven and eight, and took a bundle out under his arm, which I informed Mr. Chambers of.

RICHARD BENTLEY sworn. - I am constable of the parish of St. Giles: On Wednesday, the 19th of October, I went to the house of one Foss, the Black Horse, in Queen-street, Seven Dials, with Mr. Chambers, about nine o'clock; Foss pointed to a place, which I opened, and took a bundle out; it was a cupboard under the staircase in the tap-room; I opened the bundle, and it contained three Duffield great-coats, with shop marks on them; Mr. Chambers claimed them.

Q. Did you know the prisoner before? - A. Yes, I have seen him many times, as I used the house; I had seen him that morning, about an hour before, in the tap-room, with a bundle under his arm, which he left in the house; he had something to drink, and as he went out of the back door, he said to the landlord, put it up; I apprehended the prisoner soon after, who immediately said, Lord have mercy upon me! have mercy on me! I had only told him he was my prisoner; I then took him to the Black Horse, and shewed him the bundle; he said it was his first offence, and hoped his master would forgive him.

Mr. Alley. Q. Did he not mean, put the reckoning up to him as a score, and not the bundle? - A. I don't know; for my part, I thought he meant, put the bundle up; he went out at the door in a great hurry.

RICHARD LOVATT sworn. - I am an officer belonging to Marlborough-street: I was sent for and went to Islington to search the prisoner's lodgings; no body was at home; I went to the prisoner in the watch-house, and he gave me the keys of his boxes; I went next morning, and found his wife and mother-in-law; I opened one box, and found it full of clothes of different descriptions, and the other full of wearing-apparel, with shop marks on them. (The property produced, and identified by Mr. Chambers)

Prisoner. I leave my defence to my counsel.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Of stealing to the value of 39s.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson .

764. MARY SULLIVAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of September , three shawls, value 7s. the property of James Harris , privately in his shop .

MARY HARRIS sworn. - My husband is a linen-draper , in Whitechapel-Road : On Wednesday, the 21st of September, between five and six, the prisoner came into the shop, and asked for some shawls, and pointed to the window, where there were three different pieces of shawls hanging up; I said, I would shew her some presently, as I was serving a customer; she stood close against the counter, next the window where the shawls hung on a line, but I did not see her take any thing; I got upon a stool to put up a bundle of stockings, and the prisoner said she would call again presently, and went out; the moment I got off the stool I missed the shawls from the line; I mentioned to the woman in the shop, who is a neighbour, and she said she would go after her; she did so, and came back and said she was in the Nag's Head public-house, about ten doors from my house; I took an officer, and found her there; she said; she had not been in my shop; the officer desired her to come along; he brought her back to my shop, and I saw a bit of the shawls hanging out of a bundle she had; it was opened, and there were three shawls, which are mine.

JOHN GRIFFITHS sworn. - I am an officer, andapprehended the prisoner at the Nag's Head, with the shawls. (The shawls produced, and identified.)

Prisoner. I know nothing at all about them.

GUILTY , aged 29.

Of stealing to the value of 4s. 9d.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson .

765. JOHN ROBINS was indicted for feloniously making an assault on the King's highway upon Richard Stone , on the 5th of October , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, five hundred hand-bills, value 11s. the property of Edward Roberts .

Second Count. Charging them to be the property of Thomas Jones .

RICHARD STONE called. - Court. Q. What age are you? - A.Thirteen.

Q.Now you are going to be sworn, to call God to witness that what you say is true, what will become of you if you say that which is false? - A. I shall go to a bad place. (Sworn.)

Q. Where do you live? - A.At Hammersmith.

Q. What is your master's name? - A. Edward Roberts .

Q.What is he? - A. A stationer .

Q. Are you an apprentice to him? - A. No.

Q. What are you? - A. I went to fetch a parcel for him, he employs me sometimes.

Q. Who do you live with? - A.My father and mother; sometimes he employs me to go of errands for him.

Q. What day did this happen? - A. On Wednesday, the 5th of October.

Q. What time of the day did you come to town? - A.About half past three in the afternoon.

Q. What were you sent upon? - A. For a parcel, from Mr. Jones, a printer, in Little Chapel-street, Soho.

Q. Who delivered you any parcel there? - A. The apprentice.

Q. That parcel was for Mr. Roberts? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you know what was in the parcel? - A. No.

Q. What did you do with it? - A. I was coming home with it.

Q. What time? - A. It wanted twenty minutes to seven.

Q.What had you been doing all that time? - A. I had been waiting at Mr. Jones's, while they were printed.

Q. What time were they delivered to you? - A. It wanted twenty minutes to seven when I received the parcel.

Q. Did you set out directly to go back? - A. Yes; I was running behind a coach in Piccadilly , when the prisoner came up to me, and asked me what business I had behind his coach.

Q.Was the coach going on at the time? - A. Yes; I went away then, and he came and knocked off my hat with his hand, and took the parcel away from me.

Q.Was it a blow that knocked your hat off? - A. Yes; he then went, and gave the parcel to another man.

Q. Where had you the parcel? - A. In my hand.

Q. Was it a large parcel? - A. No, not very large; it was done up, and tied with string; I cried out give me my parcel.

Q.Where was the other man? - A. In the road.

Q. What did the prisoner say? - A. He said he had not got it.

Q.What became of the other man? - A. He went away.

Q.What became of the prisoner? - A. He went on the path, and I followed him, and kept asking him for my parcel; he said, the man behind the coach had got it; William Smith came up, and asked me what was the matter; I told him, and he said the prisoner should not go any further till he gave me satisfaction; then there came up a crowd of people, and they asked him where his address was; he told them in Duke-street; he asked Smith whether he would go with him? Smith said, yes; we went till we got to Bolton-street, Piccadilly, when the prisoner run away, down Bolton-street, and we after him, halloaing, stop thief! and Mr. Neil stopped him.

Q. Did you ever lose sight of him? - A. No.

Q. Can you safely swear the prisoner is the man that took the bundle from you? - A. Yes; we all then went to Marlborough-street.

Q. Had he turned any corner? - A. No.

Q. Did you run? - A. Yes; it was all down a straight street.

Q.Are you sure he knocked your hat off. - A. Yes.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not lose sight of me? - A. No.

Q. How far did I run down Bolton-street? - A. To the bottom; you were on one side of the way, and I on the other.

Court. Q. Are you sure he is the same person? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see him turn any where? - Yes; he turned into Bolton-street, from Piccadilly.

Prisoner. Q. Was there any body behind the coach besides yourself? - A. Yes, a man was upon the coach.

Court. Q. That man went on with the coach? - A. Yes.

Q. It was not a man holding behind? - A. No.

EDWARD ROBARTS sworn. - Q. Are you a stationers at Hammersmith? - A. Yes.

Q.Did you send that boy on any errand? - A.Yes, to Mr. Jones's, in Chapel-street; I sent him with a letter for the bills, and if they were not done, he was to wait till they were.

Q.What were they? - A.We call them stolen bills; bills for advertising property lost.

THOMAS JONES sworn. - Q. What are you? - A. A printer .

Q. Do you remember, on the 5th of October, that boy coming to you? - A. Yes, and brought a letter; the bills were not near ready, and he waited a considerable time.

Q. What number were the bills? - A. Five hundred.

Q. Who delivered them? - A. My apprentice, in my presence.

Q. How were they done up? - A. In a paper, tied with a string.

Q. Was it a bulky parcel? - A. It might be three or four inches thick.

Q. What time did the boy go away? - A. I suppose about half past six.

Q. What did the printing of them come to? - A.Half-a-guinea or eleven shillings.

WILLIAM SMITH sworn. - Q. What do you know of this? - A. On the 5th of the month, I saw the prisoner and the boy at the end of Downe-street, Piccadilly; the boy was crying very much, and following the prisoner, saying, give me my parcel; I asked the boy what was the matter in the prisoner's hearing; he said, that man had taken a parcel away; I followed him across the end of the street, and got before him, and insisted upon it that he should not go any further till he gave the boy satisfaction for his loss, meaning, he should clear himself; the boy was without his hat; he said, the prisoner had given him a knock on the head, and knocked it off.

Q. Did the prisoner say any thing to that? - A. No, not that I know of; I told the boy it was a very serious charge, and the boy said he was sure of it; I asked him in what manner? he said, he was running behind a coach, and the prisoner came up to him and hit him a knock on his head and his arm, and snatched the bundle away from him; he said, he did not look after his hat, but after the prisoner, and was certain that was the man; the people advised taking him to the watch-house, or to the office; I said, it was a pity such a man should be taken any where, as he was dressed very genteel, if he would give his address; he said, he lived in Duke-street, and asked me if I would go with him? I said, yes; he went along, and I followed him with another young man aside of me; when we came to the end of Bolton-street, he run away down Bolton-street; I run as fast as I could, and halloaed, stop thief; when I came to the bottom, I found him in the possession of William Neale .

Q. Are you sure he was the person you had the conversation with? - A. That is the man I first saw with the boy, and who run away, and who I found in William Neale 's possession.

Prisoner. Q. Did you ever lose sight of me? - A. I dare say I did.

Q. How long was it before you saw me laid hold of? - A. It could not be much above a minute and a quarter; the street is short.

WILLIAM NEALE sworn - On the 5th, I was passing the end of Bolton-street, next to Bolton-row, I heard the cry of stop thief; I immediately stopped till the prisoner came very close to me; he was running very fast, and I seized him; he struck at me, but missed, and at the same time said, let me go; I secured him, and he was taken to Marlborough-street; instantly almost Smith and the boy came up.

Q.(To Richard Stone .) Smith has said you told him the prisoner struck you on the head and arm, did he strike you on the arm? - A. Yes; he hit me on the arm, when I was behind the coach.

Q. Then he hit you two blows? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you pick up your hat? - A. No.

Q. Did any body do it for you? - A. No.

Prisoner's defence. On the 5th of October I was going along Piccadilly, I heard the boy making a noise, as I thought; I went across the way to him, and asked him what was the matter? he immediately said to me, you have got my parcel; some man came up to him and gave him a shilling. and told him to go along, which he did, and I went on till I met the witness Smith.

Court. (To Richard Stone .) Did any person give you a shilling? - A. Yes, some man did, but I don't know who it was.

Q. Did he tell you to go away? - A. Yes.

Q. He gave you the shilling because you were crying? - A. Yes, I was.

GUILTY ; Death , aged 19.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson .

766. HENRY O'HARA was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of September , in the dwelling-house of Sir Richard-Carr Glynn , Bart. Charles Mills , Thomas Halifax , and Henry Parry , a Bank-note, value 50l. their property .

Second Count. Charging it to be the dwelling-house of Henry Parry only.(The case stated by Mr. Watson.)

THOMAS HALIFAX , Esq. sworn. - I am partner with Sir Richard-Carr Glynn, Charles Gill , and Henry Parry ; a Bank-note, No. 8881, dated 23d August, 1803, for 50l. appeared on the books on the 3d of September.

RICHARD SEWELL sworn. - I was cashier to Sir Richard-Carr Glynn and Co. On the 3d of September, on that day, I found a deficiency of50l. I traced it, by checking over all the check articles of the day entered, and all the 50l. notes, and found one deficient; we then copied down the number of every note of 50l. that came into the house on Thursday and Friday, to check them against every note we had paid away, and discovered one note of 50l. had come in twice, without being paid away at all, No. 9140, to the best of my recollection, which created suspicion, and I examined who had paid them in, and found it was entered in the prisoner's collection first, and then in Mr. Allen's; the entry is No. 9140, on the 23d of August; Mr. Allen is a collecting clerk; these are Goldsmith's books; on the 3d of September, there is no such note for 50l. No. 8881, in our book; I carefully examined the books, to see whether there was, or not.

Court. Q. Do all the collecting clerks come back at the same time? - A. No, there was a difference of about three quarters of an hour; in point of order, O'Hara's account was first entered; I sent for Mr. Parry, and there it rested till Monday morning, when Mr. Hallifax was informed of it, and there it rested again till three o'clock on Tuesday, when an anonymous letter was brought in by Mr. O'Hara, addressed to the head cashier of the house of Sir Richard-Carr Glynn, inclosing a 50l. Bank of England note; I gave them both to Mr. Halifax, after putting my mark on them, (a letter and note shewn to the witness); these are the same; the note is No. 9550, dated 24th August, 1803.

(Letter read.)

"To the head cashier of the house of Sir Richard-Carr Glynn and Co.

"You paid me two 50l. notes for one on Saturday; I would have you be careful for the future."(Note read, No. 9550, for 50l. dated 24th August, 1803.)

Court. Q. Had you been possessed of a note of the last number and date? - A. No, not till it came with the letter.

JOSEPH BROWN sworn. - I am clerk in the house of Messrs. Newnham and Co. I paid this note, No. 9550, to a clerk of the house of Messrs. Glynn and Co. most likely to the prisoner, but I cannot say; the entry is Glynn; I paid it in exchange for twenty country notes, on the 6th of September; it was paid by a 50l. note, No. 9550, and several small notes; the person gave me country notes to the amount of 47l. 12s. and a 5l. Bank of England note, No. 2624, which made 52l. and I gave the 50l. note, and the others small notes.

HENRY GUBBINS sworn. - I am clerk to Messrs. Snow and Co. and paid the note, No. 9550, for 50l. to a clerk of Newnham and Co. on the 6th of September.

MATTHEW WILLIAMS sworn. - I am clerk to Messrs. Snow and Co. and received this note, No. 9550, from the Bank of England, on the 31st of August.

WILLIAM HARRIS sworn. - I am a grocer, in Blackfriars-road: On the 3d of September, I paid the prisoner a 50l. Bank of England note, which I received the day before from Leserve and Co. but I don't know the number or date.

- HOGSFLESH sworn. - I am an apprentice to Mr. Harris, and fetched a 50l. note from Lesevre's, which I paid to my master.

CHARLES CHURCHYARD sworn. - I am clerk to Messrs. Lesevre and Co. On the 3d of September, I paid a Bank-note for 50l. No. 9140, in the name of Harris, for a draft of Abraham Young .

HENRY CARTER sworn. - I am entering clerk to Messrs. Glynn and Co. On the 3d of September, the prisoner rendered his accounts, in which was the note, No. 9140, for 50l. dated the 23d of August, and the same note is entered in Mr. Allen's collection on the same day; I passed it in Mr. O'Hara's account, and went to dinner at six o'clock, and on my return, I found Mr. Allen's ready for entry, and correct.

Q.In Allen's account, did you enter a note, No. 8881, for 50l.? - A. There is no such number.

THOMAS ALLEN sworn. - I am clerk to Messrs. Glynn and Co. On the 3d of September, I rendered my account of the notes I had received that day, but had no note, No. 9140.

- DAVIS sworn. - I am clerk in the Bank of England, and exchanged the 50l. note, No. 8881, dated the 23d of August, on the 5th of September, to a person of the name of Thompson, and the name of Thompson is on the back of it; I paid two 10l. notes, Nos. 4128 and 4129, dated the 22d of August, 1803, four 5l. notes, No. 1116 to 1119, dated the 25th of August, and ten 1l. notes, Nos. 4225 to 4234, dated the 24th of August.

Q.(To Carter.) Have you seen the prisoner write, and do you believe the name of Thompson to be his writing? - A. It resembles his writing very much, and to the best of my belief, it is his.

Q.(To Allen.) Look at the name of Thompson and Harris on the note, No. 9550, and say, whether you believe it to be the prisoner's writing? - A. Yes.

HENRY MOUNSHED sworn. - I am clerk to Messrs. Glynn and Co. and know the prisoner; I received a 50l. note of him on the 5th of September, No. 8881, and was requested by him to take it to the Bank, and get it exchanged for a friend of his, of the name of Thompson, whose name was written on it, which I did, and gave the prisoner the change.

Prisoner. I leave my defence to my Counsel.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Of stealing, but not in the dwelling-house.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

767. JOHN FISHER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of October , a grey mare, value 7l. the property of Daniel How .(The case stated by Mr. Gurney.)

JAMES BURNER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Are you servant to Mr. How, the prosecutor? - A. Yes, his apprentice.

Q. Where does he live? - A. At Aylesbury, in Buckinghamshire .

Q. On the night of the 13th of this month, did you see the mare in the field? - A. Yes, I did, I put her there.

Q. What colour was she? - A. A grey mare.

Q. Did you fasten the gate? - A. Yes.

Q. What time in the evening? - A. About six o'clock.

Q. On the morning of the 14th, did you go to the field? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you find the mare there, or gone? - A.Gone.

Q. How did the gate appear? - A. The gate was shut.

Q. Was there any fastening? - A. No.

Q. Have you seen the mare since? - A. Yes, on Saturday last; I saw her in my master's stable.

Q. Is that the same you lost? - A. Yes.

DANIEL HOW sworn. - Q. In consequence of some information you received, did you come to town? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you find your mare in town? - A. Yes, in the hands of the constable.

Q.What day was that? - A. The 18th.

Q.When had you missed it? - A. On the 14th.

- MARNHAM sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You are a farmer at Acton? - A. I am.

Q. On the morning of the 14th of this month, did you see the prisoner? - A. Yes, on Ealing Common; he was on foot, leading a grey mare along the road.

Q. Did you offer to buy the mare of him? - A. Yes, I asked him if he would sell it; he said he would; I asked him what price he would have for it; he said, eleven pounds; I told him I was not a judge of it, that I would give him five pounds for it; he then said, if I would give him six pounds, I should have it; I told him, if he would take the horse into the yard, I dared to say he and I should make a deal, which he did; I asked him to go to a public-house, and have something to drink; he said he would have some beer; I said, what do you mean to say about the mare; he said, if you will give me half-a-guinea more, you shall have it; that was half-a-guinea more than the five pounds; I told him I thought he had not come honestly by it, and I should take him, and the mare too, which I did, and sent for Maynard, the constable, and gave him in charge.

Q.While the mare was in your custody, did you shew her to Mr. How? - A. Not that I know of.

Q. On the 18th, or 19th, did you see Mr. How? - A. No.

Court. Q. What do you think is the value of the mare? - A. I suppose it is worth ten pounds.

Q. What age is it? - A. It is an aged mare, I cannot say any thing to it; the mark is out of the mouth; if I had wanted such an one, I dare say I should have been glad to have given ten pounds for it.

Q. Is five pounds, and half-a-guinea, clearly short of the selling value? - A. Yes, I think so.

Prisoner. Q. What did I ask you for the mare the first time? - A.Eleven pounds.

Q. You said, I will give you five pounds, and I said, I dare say you will, and another to it, for it was worth twelve pounds? - A. I never heard him say any thing about twelve pounds.

THOMAS- PEARSON BAYNARD sworn. - A. Are you a constable? - A. Yes; I was sent for, and took the prisoner into custody; I had some conversation with him, but could make nothing of him, till after we had been before Mr. Wegg.

Q. Had you given him any promise of favor, or threatened him, to induce him to say any thing? - No; he told me what his father was; I asked him what he could think of himself for bringing such disgrace on him; he said, he was very sorry for what he had done, for that he had stolen the mare belonging to Daniel How , of Aylesbury; I asked him what time he set out; he said he took it out about nine o'clock, and set off about ten at night the night before; he told me his father was a respectable man; I told him I would write to Mr. How, and he begged me to write to his father, which I did; I shewed the mare, which was taken from the prisoner, to Mr. How, on the 18th.

Q.(To Daniel How .) Was the mare that you saw, and which was shewn you by the last witness, the same you lost on Thursday, the 14th? - A. Yes.

Q. What do you consider the value to be? - A. I thought it was worth seven or eight pounds; she is getting old; I suppose she is ten years old.

Prisoner. I have nobody here, or any thing to say.

GUILTY , Death , aged 19.

Recommended to mercy by the prosecutor, on account of belonging to a respectable family.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

768. WILLIAM JONES and JOSEPH EDWARDS were indicted, the first for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of October , five bottles, value 10d. three quarts of oil, value 9s. and two pints of sauce, value 3s. the property of Alexander-Sinclair Gordon and Walter Emmett ; and the other for receiving the same, knowing them to have been stolen .(The case stated by Mr. Bolland.)

- COLLIER sworn - I am a brush-maker, in Hughes's-buildings, Kent-road: On the 5th of October, I was looking for Edwards on Londonbridge, about a quarter before seven in the morning; I don't know what he is; I saw him with an empty basket, and I followed him to the King's-head, in King's-head-court, Fish-street-hill, where Jones soon after went in, with the neck of a bottle out of one pocket sealed with red wax; he came out again presently, and Edwards came out with the basket apparently full; Jones's pockets seemed empty; Mr. Emmett and I followed Edwards to the bridge, and stopped him; Mr. Emmett took the basket from him, and gave it to me, with three bottles of oil in it, and took one bottle out of his right hand coat pocket, and I took a pint bottle out of the left; they were marked Gordon and Emmett, Harvey's Sauce, and red wax; Edwards said, they were not Mr. Emmett's property; before the Lord-Mayor he said he bought them of a mate of ship, and gave fifteen shillings for them, near Billingsgate; Jones at first denied it, but the second day he owned he took it from his master, and gave it to Edwards, at the King's-head, in King's-headcourt.

WALTER EMMETT sworn. - My partner's name is Alexander- Sinclair Gordon : On the 5th of October, in consequence of information, I hid myself in a house opposite, which had a view of our warehouse and down the court; I saw the prisoner, Jones, ring at the warehouse-bell about ten minutes before seven, in a great coat, with the pockets flat to his side; he went in, and remained three or four minutes in the warehouse; he came our, his pockets sticking out, and went into the court, took down three shutters, and went into the King's-head, where he remained a short time, and came out and finished opening the warehouse; he was in about a minute, when Collier informed me Edwards was gone over the bridge; we followed him, and took him with the property. (The bottles produced.) I missed some oil; Jones was our porter, and had no power to sell any articles; the sauce is made for exportation; we don't sell retail, only wholesale.

Jones's defence. My confessing was by the promise of the constable that I should be liberated.

Edwards's defence. As I was at Billingsgate, I met with the mate of a ship, who asked me if I would buy those bottles of oil and sauce for a guinea; I offered fifteen shillings, and he took it.

Jones, GUILTY , aged 43.

Confined three months in Newgate , and fined 6d .

Edwards, GUILTY , aged 28.

Transported for fourteen years .

The prisoner, Jones, was recommended to mercy by the Jury and prosecutors.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

769. JACOB ISRAEL and ELIZABETH DAVIS were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of September , a pair of breeches, value 10s. and a pair of pantaloons, value 1l. the property of John Brent .(The case stated by Mr. Knapp.)

SARAH OVERTON sworn. - I live in Mr. Brent's yard, at Greenland-dock , and had a pair of pantaloons and a pair of leather breeches of his for my husband to clean; I placed them on my stairs about nine o'clock in the morning, and went out about four, and saw them on the stairs; I left the door on the latch, and returned in half an hour, and found the door open, and missed the things; I have seen them since at the Magistrate's.

RICHARD BARTON sworn. - I am a shipwright, and foreman to Mr. Brent; I live opposite to him, and was in the yard on the 7th of September; I observed a man go past with a pair of pantaloons and leather breeches under his arm, about twenty yards from the watchman's house; I cannot swear to I srael, it was just such a man; nobody was with him; he appears to be the same, and I think it is the same; I turned round, and looked at him, and he stopped, and looked at me; I went into the yard; next morning I gave information to Overton, and described the man as well as I could; he had a light-coloured coat on, much the same as the prisoner has.

CHARLES OVERTON sworn. - I was not at home at the time; I went to Rosemary-lane on Thursday the 8th, and walked up and down seven or eight times; I went to Shadwell Office, and Brown told me to go again; I did, and found them; Ridgway's man brought me the pantaloons, which are my master's; I had given a shilling earnest to the man for them; then Brown came in; we found Stevenson at Whitechapel.

JOSEPH STEVENSON sworn. - I am a wholesale dealer in leather breeches and leather pantaloons; I know I srael by sight, and the woman; I saw them on the 7th of September between four and six; Israel said, a young woman had got two pair of leather breeches to sell; I went to the woman, and bid her twenty-four shillings for them; she said, she could not take it; Israel came after me, and said she would let me have them; I paid for them in Harrow-alley, Petticoat-lane.

- BROWN sworn. - I am an officer, and produce the things.(The articles produced, and identified.)

Mr. Gurney. Q.(To Stevenson.) Where do you live? - A. No. 14, Queen-street, Tower-hill.

Q. Did not the officer come and tell you thebreeches were stolen? - A. He found them in Ridgway's shop; Ridgway's man came and said, he had brought a pair of white leather pantaloons to sell, and that they were stolen; I said, if so, I had another pair at home, which I then fetched, and they took me to the Magistrate, but I was discharged after telling my story. Israel is a dealer in clothes; I don't know whether the woman is or not, but I have seen her before.

Israel's defence. I am innocent of it; the woman sold them, I did not.

Davis's defence. I know nothing of them.

The prisoner, Israel, called four witnesses, and Davis two, who gave them good characters.

Israel, GUILTY .

Confined three months in Newgate , and fined 6d .

Davis, NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

770. JAMES STEELE was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Edward Dowman , about the hour of twelve, in the night of the 14th of October , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing a piece of woollen cloth, value 28s. four men's cloth coats, value 3l. four waistcoats, value 45s. two pair of breeches, value 36s. a pair of pantaloons, value 30s. and a nutmeg-grater, value 2d. the property of the said Edward .

Second Count. For breaking and entering the said dwelling-house in the day-time, the said Edward, and others, being therein, and feloniously stealing the said goods.

EDWARD DOWMAN sworn. - Court. Q.What are you? - A. A tailor , and live at No. 1, Church-court, in the Strand , and sell clothes that are ready made.

Q.Did any thing happen in the night of the 14th, or morning of the 15th? - A. It was about six o'clock in the morning of the 15th, I heard somebody walking about over my head, as I slept in the kitchen.

Q. It was light then? - A. It was getting light.

Q. Was it light so that you could see the face of any man? - A. Yes; I came up stairs from the kitchen, and attempted to unlock the parlour-door, but could not; I gave the door a pull towards me, and it pulled open; I saw two men, the prisoner and another, and was inclined to shut the door again on seeing them, but they rushed out upon me, and knocked me down. I fastened upon one of them, and pulled him down upon me; I did not see the features of the other that made his escape; the man I pulled down got up, and I with him, and we had another scuffle, he threw me down again at the passage-door, and ran away, but I got up and pursued him, and it proved to be the prisoner; he was taken in Hungerford-market, by William Gordon , a coalheaver, in consequence of my calling out stop thief; he was taken to St. Martin's watch-house, and on searching him there was found a nutmeg-grater box which was mine, and was in the parlour when we went to bed, on the table or bureau, we had made use of it to grate some ginger in some beer. A bundle was found when I returned from the watch-house in the parlour, packed up in a blue apron,(produces it); I know all it contains to be mine, they had been removed from the shop into the parlour; all are here but a pair of small-clothes, which I let a customer have who was going out of town; the cloth is worth twenty-six shillings.

Q. How had the men got into the house? - A. I think they must have got in by a pick-lock key, I did not see any mark of violence at all; a pair of shoes and a hat were left in the parlour, which the prisoner owned to be his, he would not own the blue apron; he was without hat or shoes when he was taken to the watch-house; the things in the bundle are worth more than five pounds.

Prisoner. Q. Was any part of the house broke open, or any wards broken? - A. I apprehend the lock was picked; I fastened the house up myself between seven and eight o'clock.

WILLIAM GORDON sworn. - Q. What do you know of this? - A. I stopped the prisoner in Hungerford-street, and delivered him into the hands of the prosecutor; I heard him cry stop thief, as I was going to work, about six o'clock, and I am sure he is the same person; Mr. Dowman was about five yards behind him.

PHILIP PILGRIM sworn. - Q.What are you? - A. I am watch-house-keeper of St. Martin's in the Fields: On saturday morning, about ten minutes past six, on the 15th of October, I was shutting the door, and was going to bed, when I heard a noise in the street; I looked out, and saw Mr. Dowman and the prisoner, with some other person; I let them in, and observed the prisoner had no hat or shoes on; I searched him, and found in his right hand waistcoat pocket a little nutmeg-grater box. (Produces it.)

Q.(To Dowman.) Is that the box you lost? - A. Yes.

Q. Did he give any account how he came in that situation? - A. No.

Prisoner. He asked me if I knew the shoes; I said, no.

Dowman. He asked me to bring both his hat and shoes into the watch-house; I did not know they were at my house at the time, but he did.

Q. Did he take them from you? -

Pilgrim. He was locked up; I took them to him, and shewed them to him, he owned them both; I told him to be sure they were his, but did not put them on.

Q.Did you say any thing to induce him to own them? - A. No; as soon as he owned them, Itold him he should not have them, but I would take them up stairs; he begged of me not to say any thing that he owned the shoes.

Prisoner. I have nothing to say.

GUILTY , Death .

Of stealing to the amount of 40s. but not of the burglary.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

771. JOHN TURNER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of October , a box, value 2s. and an organ-barrel, value 18s. the property of William Bradford .

Second Count. Charging them to be the property of John Fernyhough .

JOSEPH CLEWS sworn. - I am porter to Mr. Fernyhough, in Holborn, and had the care of the box which was taken out of the cart; I saw the prisoner take it out, and run off with it; I followed him, and took him by the collar, and brought him back; he got away, but I caught him again, and dragged him into the yard, having never lost sight of him; he pulled out a knife, struck at my throat, and cut my handkerchief; he was then taken into custody by a constable.

JAMES TOLLETT sworn. - I am a constable, and produce the box.(The box produced, and identified by Clews.

Prisoner. I was in liquor, and a man asked me to carry it to the White Horse, Fetter-lane; I know nothing of the robbery.

Clews. I saw him take it out of the cart.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Transported for seven y ears.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

772. EDWARD SCELIGMAN was indicted for that he, on the 30th of July , being employed as clerk to Emanuel Bientz , George Hosch , John-Dietrich Lubbreu , and William Hosch , did, by virtue of such employment, receive and take into his possession a bill of exchange for 30l. 14s. on their account, and afterwards did fraudulently embezzle and secrete the same .

Second Count. Charging him with stealing the same.(The case stated by Mr. Knapp.)

ISAAC HOSCH sworn. - My partners' names are Emanuel Bientz , George Hosch , John- Dietrich Lubbreu , and William Hosch , merchants ; we had a correspondence at Exeter, and had bills sent to us from James Pearce and Co. among others, one of thirty pounds fourteen shillings, which I took out of a letter myself on the 4th of May, drawn on Messrs. Hoares, bankers, in Fleet-street; the prisoner was with us as clerk without any salary, and is a foreigner; I gave the bill to him to take out for acceptance, and did not enquire for it next day; but in three or four days after, looking over my bills, I found this missing, and asked him if he had not called for it; he said, he had, and he had put it on my desk; I searched, but could not find it, and let some time elapse before I made further enquiry; near the time it became due, I sent to Hoare's to stop payment, and went myself the day after it became due, and found it had not appeared; I wrote to my correspondents, and applied again to Messrs. Hoares, but did not get payment of the bill; sometime after, Mr. Pearce came to town; I sent a clerk again to Messrs. Hoares, but did not get the money; at the beginning of August I sent again, and found the bill was paid; I went myself to Messrs. Hoares, and saw the bill; I suspected by whom it was received, by the handwriting on the back. (The bill produced.)

Mr. HARRISON sworn. - I am clerk to Messrs. Hoares, but cannot speak to the person of the prisoner; I paid the bill to a person on account of the receipt written on the back, on 30th of July, but whether it was wrote at the time I cannot say; I have a recollection of the prisoner's voice.

Mr. Hosch. I believe it to be the prisoner's writing.(Receipt read as follows:)

" R. F. Hosch, Bientz, and Co.

" William Martins ."

The prisoner was taken up above a month afterwards, soon after I found the bill was paid. Our house was solvent when the bill was sent to us; we stopped payment on the 5th of July, and were declared insolvent on the 15th; the bill was due on the 28th of May, and was paid on the 30th of July.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. The prisoner was not a clerk, but learning the business of a merchant? - A. He was recommended by a friend to us for employment, to keep him out of harm's way.

PHILIP LEIBNITZ sworn. - I was employed by Mr. Hosch, and know the prisoner's writing; I believe this indorsement to be his.

DANIEL CARTWRIGHT sworn. - I am an officer, and apprehended the prisoner on Sunday the 11th of September, at Hammersmith; I saw him looking out at the window; I went up stairs, he would not open the door, and I broke it open; coming home in a post-chaise, I read the warrant to him; he said, he was a foreigner, but knew he could not be arrested for debt on a Sunday; he said, Mr. Hosch was under trouble, and was arrested, and he could not find him out to pay him; I said it was very odd, I could see him every day; he said, he had not the money, but would give it him.

GUILTY , aged 19.

The prisoner was recommended to mercy by the Jury.

Confined three months in Newgate , and fined 6d .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

773. JONATHAN STONE was indicted for making an assault, on the King's highway, upon Joseph Hopgood , on the 7th of October , putting him in fear, and taking from his person a pocketbook, value 1d. and three Bank-notes, value 3l. the property of the said Joseph .

JOSEPH HOPGOOD sworn. - I work in the Laboratory, at Woolwich , and went into the Star and Crown public-house, at Broadway, Westminster, on the 7th of October, about six o'clock in the evening, and pulled out my little pocketbook, which had four one-pound notes in it, and took out one to change, which I did; I put my book in my pocket, and staid till after seven o'clock; the prisoner took me out, and said he would get me a lodging; I went with him, and he took me through Snow's-rents into Tothill-fields ; then he put his hand round my body, and put his hand into my right-hand breeches pocket, and took my book out, and went away; I told him he had taken my property; he said, I might go to hell, and away he went.

Q. Were you sober? - A. Yes, I had been drinking, but was not drunk; I went back to the public-house, and told them he had robbed me, and staid there all night; the prisoner was taken up between seven and eight o'clock the same evening; I never got my book or notes again; he came into the public-house again in regimentals, which he had not on when he robbed me, and was taken.

- ARNOLD sworn. - I keep the Star and Crown public-house; the prosecutor came into my house with his wife, who was in liquor, he was very well; I gave him change for a pound-note, and he left his wife while he went to fetch some things out of pledge; when he came back, he set himself down, and there were three or four soldiers; she said, take care of your pockets, you know you have four one-pound notes; the prisoner called for liquor, and the prosecutor paid for some; my husband would not let them have any more at the prosecutor's expence; Stone asked me to let him have a pot; I said, yes, and did so; he asked me if I could accommodate the old man and woman with a lodging; I said, no; he said, he would take them to his landlady's; I asked the old man to leave his money with me; Stone said, he had done so; I said, no; he then took him by the arm, and dragged him out of the house; I said, don't drag him in that way, but take his wife with him; I saw him drag him into Snow's-rents; one of the soldiers took the old woman up, but she sell down; I sent to see where the old man was, but could not find him; in about twenty minutes Stone came in in soldiers' clothes, he was in plain clothes before; he went away again, and presently the old man came in again, and said he was robbed; I went to Bly, and told him the transaction; he went to the barracks, and took the prisoner, and brought him to my house; I told the prisoner they were not the clothes he had on when he robbed the man; he said, I wanted to swear his life away; I said, I knew he had a room, and wife, or girl, and no doubt it was there; he denied it, but owned he had a coloured coat; next day the constable found his wife.

THOMAS BUTCHER sworn. - I am a soldier in the second regiment of Guards, and saw the prisoner in the house in coloured clothes, and drag the old man across the street to Snow's-rents; in about twenty minutes, or half an hour, the prisoner came in, and soon after the old man came in, and said he had robbed him.

JONATHAN BLY sworn. - I apprehended the prisoner in bed, and took him to Mrs. Arnold's; I asked him where he changed the clothes; he said, at the barracks; I had information where he lodged, and found the clothes, which I produce, a pair of overalls and a blue coat.

Arnold. I believe they are the same clothes.

Butcher. I am sure it is the coat.

Prisoner. I am innocent of what I am charged with; the old man was so drunk he could not stand.

GUILTY , aged 31.

Of stealing, but not violently.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

774. MARY JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of October , a counterpane, value 16s. and a sheet, value 4s. the property of Sarah Lucas .

SARAH LUCAS sworn. - I live at Britannia-row, Lambeth ; the prisoner lodged with me: On Monday, the 24th of October, she came home between seven and eight, and about half past nine I missed the counterpane, which had laid on the table; she did not return all night; the sheet was taken off the bed.

JAMES FITZGERALD sworn. - I am a watchman: On the 25th, about five o'clock in the morning, I was going off duty, and saw the prisoner with a bundle in her lap; I asked her what she had there; she said, it was her own property; I asked her to look at it; she refused, and I opened it, and found the counterpane and sheet.(The articles produced, and identified.)

Prisoner. I have nothing to say.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Confined fourteen days in Newgate , and fined 6d .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

775. MARGARET MAXFIELD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of September , one pound and a half of horse-hair, value 15d. the property of Peter Spencer and John Spencer .

JOHN SPENCER sworn. - I live at No. 10. Newton-street, Holborn ; my brother and I are feather merchants and horse-hair dealers ; the prisoner worked for us: On the 27th, she being desired to leave off work, and being longer than the rest, gave me suspicion; I let her pass by to the street-door, and called her back, and told her I thought she looked very bulky; she said, she did not; I laid hold of her petticoats, and felt the horse-hair there; my partner came, and I fetched a constable, who searched her, and found the property.

JOHN WYGATE sworn. - I am a constable, and searched the prisoner, and found this horse-hair under her apron and round her stays. (Produces it.)

Prisoner's defence. I only took it to put into a chair-bottom, and not to sell.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 6d .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

776 ROBERT LEWIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of October , in the dwelling-house of John-Gordon Sinclair , a Banknote, value 30l. and a Bank-note, value 10l. the property of the said John .

Mrs. SINCLAIR sworn. - I live at No. 24, Upper Berkeley-street, Portman-square ; my husband's name is John-Gordon Sinclair ; I do not live with him; my maid, who discovered the circumstance, has absconded; the prisoner was my groom ; I went to Newmarket, and had forty pounds in my house, which I put inside a table-cloth in my linen trunk; on my return, I forgot the table-cloth, and gave out the one to lay for dinner in which the notes were; I had the prisoner taken up, and the notes were found upon him.

Mr. Alley. Q.Can you swear to the notes? - A. Yes.

THOMAS HUGHES sworn. - I am shopman to Mr. Chandler, jeweller, in Leicester-square; a young man, apparently the prisoner, purchased a watch of me on the 8th of October, between nine and ten o'clock, and paid five guineas, by a tenpound note, and I gave him change, but I have not the note or number.

WILLIAM ATKINS sworn. - I am an officer, and took the prisoner into custody; on searching him, I found in his fob-pocket a metal hunting-watch, and a ribbon and key, all which he said he bought in Bath about three years before; I went and enquired, and found the watch had been purchased on the Saturday; he was then committed; I searched him on Sunday in the House of Correction; he took off his coat, and I observed he had something between his shirt and waistcoat; I took hold of his hand, which he drew out of his waistcoat, and dropped two notes, one of thirty pounds, and the other a two-pound note. I said, what do you think of it now; he said, I don't care, I broke open no locks, I picked them up.(The note produced, and identified by Mrs. Sinclair, having part of her name on it, the other part being torn off.)( Fanny Massey , the maid, was called upon her recognizance.)

Prisoner. I leave my defence to my Counsel.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Of stealing, but not in the dwelling-house.

The prisoner was recommended to mercy by the prosecutrix.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 6d .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

777. ELIZABETH WRIGHT , MARY DEAN , and MARGARET WELLS , were indicted, the first, for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Katt , about the hour of three in the afternoon of the 18th of October , no person being therein, and feloniously stealing four gowns, value 3l. 10s. three petticoats, value 9s. two cloaks, value 36s. a pair of stays, value 7s. a bed-quilt, value 10s. a half handkerchief, value 2s. a half shirt, value 3s. a child's bed-gown, value 2s. a child's frock, value 1s. a shawl, value 1s. a half-guinea, and four shillings, in monies numbered, the property of the said John ; and the other two, for receiving the same, knowing them to have been stolen .

MARY KATT sworn. - I live at No. 31, Turnmill-street : On Tuesday, the 18th, I went out after dinner, between two and three, and met Elizabeth-Wright in the street, who lived in the same house with me; I live in the front room, one-pair; she had the two-pair, back room; I left my door locked, and latched; she said to me, you are going out again; I said, Yes; she said, be sure and be home in time, because I had not returned before my husband, and we had had words; she said, what time will you be at home; I said, about six o'clock; when I went home, I found the door broke open; the lock was strained, and the hasp forced out; I examined the drawers, and two of them were broke open, and the handles of the others pulled off; I missed the property stated in the indictment, which I am sure I left locked up; the prisoner was never but twice in my room, and I never left the key with her; she works in the tobacco line.

JOHN KATT sworn. - On the 18th, I returned home soon after nine at night, and saw the doors and drawers broke open; the officers came and stopped till three o'clock in the morning, but nobody came home; the next morning we went two doors below the Black Dog, Gray's-Inn-lane, and faw Elizabeth Wright .

MARGARET BROWN sworn. - I live opposite the prosecutor's, and saw two women in Mrs.Katt's room in the afternoon, but don't know who they were.

JAMES RANDALL sworn. - I am a constable: On the 19th, about three o'clock in the afternoon, I was called in by Mr. Katt, we went to No. 113, in Gray's-Inn lane, and saw Elizabeth Wright with this bundle of clothes on the stairs, I took her in charge; we went up stairs to look for more property, but found none then; I locked her up in the watch-house, and went back again to the same room, which belongs to Mary Dean ; Margaret Wells and she live on one floor; I asked Wells whether she knew any thing of the property, she seemed to hesitate; I searched the front-room, and in the tea-chest I found a duplicate of a cloak for eight shillings, on the 18th of October; I searched her pockets and pulled out a pair of gloves, which Mrs. Katt owned; I took her to the watch house, and went back again and took Dean into custody.

JOHN PURCHASE sworn. - I am shopman to Mr. Obie, pawnbroker, in Holborn: On the 18th of May, Mary Dean pledged the patch-work for four shillings.

- JONES sworn. - I live with Mr. Lowther, pawnbroker, No. 3, Fox-court, Gray's-Inn-lane: On the 18th of May, the daughter of Margaret Wells pledged a black silk cloak, and a gown and petticoat, in the evening; the duplicate found in the tea chest corresponds with ours.

ELIZABETH GILES called. - I am twelve years old, I have not learned all my catechism, but know it is wicked to tell lies; (sworn.) I live at No. 31, Turnmill-street, in the room opposite Mrs. Katt's; Elizabeth Wright came to the door in the afternoon, and asked me if I would go and see the soldiers; I went with her as far as Castle-street, and then she said she would go back for her cloak; soon after that I returned home, and did not see her afterwards that evening; nobody was at home but my brother and sister, one about eight, and the other about five years old.

HARRIET BUCK sworn. - I am eleven years old, and am daughter to Margaret Wells , my father is an ostler; I took the cloak to pledge.

- CHAPPLE sworn. - I am an officer belonging to Hatton-garden: On Tuesday the 18th, I was fetched to Katt's, and staid there all night, but the prisoner did not come home; about ten the next morning I went to Mary Dean 's, who is sister to Elizabeth Wright ; I enquired after a gown, and Wells said it was pledged in Fox-court.(The property produced, and identified.)

Wright's defence. I have nothing to say.

Dean's defence. Wright brought the patch-work to me, and asked me to pledge it for her, and said it was her own.

wells's defence. Wright brought the cloak, and asked my child to pledge it, and get what she could for it, which she did, and Wright took the money.

Wright, GUILTY , aged 19.

Wells, GUILTY , aged 29.

Of stealing, but not of breaking and entering the dwelling-house.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 6d .

Dean, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

778. MATTHEW DENMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of October , two lambs, value 40s. and a sheep, value 30s. the property of John Stopp .

(The evidence being gone through, one of the Jury was taken so ill that he was not able to perform his duty, upon which another Juryman was sworn, and the evidence again gone into as follows:)

JOHN STOPP sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You are a salesman in Smithfield , and live in Bedfordshire? - A. Yes: On Thursday, the 6th of this month, I received fourteen lambs from Lord Offory's bailiff, at Wooburn, and eight sheep from Mr. Cumberland; I delivered them to John Burbridge, my servant, to bring them to town; the lambs were marked with ruddle marks round the neck and head, a stroke on the off shoulder, and a pitch brand on the near side; the eight sheep were marked with a ruddle down the head and neck, and a dot on the off hip; I was at Smithfield on the Sunday night, but did not see them till Monday morning at seven o'clock; I was informed that two lambs and a sheep were lost; I saw them afterwards at Mr. Probert's, a butcher, in Great Bath-street; I am sure they are the same.

JOHN BURBIDGE sworn. - On Saturday, the 8th of October, I brought fourteen lambs of Lord Offory's, and eight sheep of Mr. Cumberland's, to Holloway, they were all right at five o'clock on Sunday evening; they were kept secure within the railing till I delivered them to William Grant to take to Smithfield, they could not get out themselves; I delivered them to him about eight o'clock, I have seen them since, and am sure they are the same.

WILLIAM GRANT sworn. - I am drover to Mr. Stopp: I received the sheep and lambs from the last witness; I took them to Smithfield, and when I put them in the pens I found two lambs and a sheep missing; I saw them again on the Monday following, and am sure they are the same.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q.There was no circumstance to induce you to suppose they were stolen from you? - A. No, it was an uncommonly dark night.

RICHARD MARTIN sworn. - I am a watchman at the end of Mutton-hill: On the 9th of October,about twenty minutes before eleven o'clock, I was standing at my box leaning over; I saw three sheep coming up the hill, towards Clerkenwell-green, from Hatton-garden; the prisoner at the bar was following them, with a pipe in his hand, or in his mouth, I do not know which; the sheep made a stop in the road when they got to the top of the hill; the prisoner came up, and seemed rather confused which way he should turn them, as I thought; I went out of my box, and the sheep turned about to the right; I said to the prisoner, holloa, my friend, what are you going to do with these sheep; he said, they belonged to a man in Liquorpond-street; I asked him who the man was, but he did not tell me his name; I told him I thought they belonged to some drover in Smithfield; he said, no, they did not; I told him I thought he had not come honestly by them; he said, he knew the man very well, he was a drover in Liquorpond-street; I told him I did not think any drover lived there; he said he had them in Liquorpond-street once, and he wished to get them there again; then he went on till he came to Castle-street, which is the next turning on the right hand, it leads up to Saffron-hill, and goes to Hatton-garden again; he was going to turn the corner, when I caught hold of him by the collar, and told him I should take him into custody till I was perfectly satisfied, and I should take care of the sheep; I got assistance, and took the sheep to Mr. Probert's, a butcher, in Great Bath-street; I saw the sheep again on the Monday, when Mr. Stopp owned them; I never saw the prisoner before; he was not sober; but seemed to know what he was doing.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You are a watchman? - A. Yes.

Q. You are acquainted with a great number of drovers about Smithfield? - A. I do not know any of them.

Q. You know of the remuneration given to persons for the detection of sheep-stealers? - A. No.

Q. What do you expect if this man should be convicted? - A. I don't know what to expect.

Q. Upon your oath, do you not expect fifty pounds, and do you not wish for it? - A. I do not wish for any thing.

Q. What situation of life are you in? - A. I am a watchman.

Q.Fifty pounds is no object to you? - A. Yes, fifty pence is an object, but not in a clandestine way; if the man is convicted by the real truth, I wish to have it; the prisoner said, he had been led into this, and he would be d-d if he would do a good-natured action any more; then he offered me five shillings if I would give up the charge.

Q. Did he not tell you where he lived? - A. Yes.

Q. Upon the oath you have taken, have you never said to any body that you believed in your conscience the prisoner was an innocent man? - A. I did say something to Dean that I thought there were more concerned as well as this man.

Q. Did you or not say to Dean, or any body else, that you believed the prisoner at the bar was an innocent man? - A. Yes, I did say I believed the man was led into it.

Q. My question is, did you or not say you believed he was innocent? - A. I have told you as near as I can recollect what I did say.

Court. Q. Had you seen any other person with him? - A. At the time I saw him upon the hill there were two or three men following him up the hill, but I did not see them interfere with the sheep, or driving them.

ROBERT PEARCE sworn. - I am a watchman; I received the prisoner from the last witness, and conveyed him to the watch-house; he said, he had brought the sheep from a drove in Liquorpond-street; he said, a drover asked him to stop them while he drank his pot of beer; that they ran away, and he ran after them to bring them back; he did not tell me his name, but said it was an acquaintance of his.

WILLIAM CHAPMAN sworn. - I am a Police officer belonging to Hatton-garden; I received information that there had been three sheep ranning about for a considerable time in Hatton-wall and Vine-street, and that the parties driving them were not drovers; I found by the watchman that they were gone up Mutton-hill; I followed them; I heard a noise, and thought it was down the courts there, and in Turnmill-street I met a man with the prisoner in custody; I took him to St. James's watch-house; I asked him who the other two were that were with him; I was informed there were two others; the prisoner told me it was Turner and Will the Sailor, who lodged at the Royal Oak; he informed me there was a flock of sheep coming down Back-hill, and he stood making water against the wall; that these three sheep turned round Christopher-street, and that the drover halloaed out, Turner, stop them; I asked him if he knew the drover; he said, he believed his name was Mills, or Giles, or Miles; I told him I knew the name of Miles, but did not know the other names; I asked him how he came to know the drover, and he said the way he came to know the drover was, that they drank a pot of beer together at the Royal Oak the Friday evening before, and he ran after the sheep. On the Monday morning I apprehended Will the Sailor and Turner; they were discharged before the Magistrate, as not knowing any thing of it.

Prisoner's defence. I went out of the house to make water at the corner of Liquorpond-street and Christopher-street, and as I was standing at the corner of the place, very much in liquor, somebody sung out, stop them, and I ran after them,and I did not cease running till I was stopped myself.

For the Prisoner.

JOHN WILBY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Do you recollect on the 9th of October being in company with the prisoner at the bar? - A. Yes, at the house of Turner, about eight o'clock in the morning, and was in company with him backwards and forwards till twenty minutes past ten o'clock at night; I lodge at the Royal Oak; he was drunk when I left him.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. He was not absent from you ten minutes the whole day? - A. He might be absent about an hour at twelve or one o'clock; he dined with me about half past one, and we were together till five o'clock.

Q. Do you remember what you had for breakfast? - A. Yes, toast and coffee.

Q. If any body has said you had crumpets, that is not true.? - A. It is not.

Q. What had you for dinner? - A.Roast mutton and potatoes; I believe it was a bit of the back of the neck.

Q. What had you for supper? - A.Bread and cheese.

Q. If any body has said you had cold mutton, that is not true? - A. It is not.

Q. What had you to drink? - A.Porter.

Q. If any body has said you had spirits and water, that is not true? - A. I had not; perhaps the women might have a little; I did not see any.

Q. Who was present at supper? - A.Myself, Mr. Turner, and his wife that is now, Mr. Cropley's daughter, her mother, and Mr. Denman.

Q. Did any body else come in? - A. Mr. Death.

Mr. Alley. Q. Have you ever known an honester man than the prisoner? - A. He has been a very honest man for any thing I know, as long as I have known him, which is about three weeks or a month.

SARAH CROPLEY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You are the wife of Samuel Cropley ? - A. Yes; I know the prisoner: On the 9th of October he came home with me about twenty minutes after ten o'clock at night; I went to Mrs. Turner's a little before nine; I met with the prisoner there; he stopped at my house till a quarter before eleven.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q.You went there a quarter before nine? - A. I cannot say particularly as to the time; I thought it was time for the girls to come home, and I went to fetch them.

Q.You said, when you were examined before, that you went a quarter before ten? - A. I cannot tell rightly.

Q.Have you had any reason to alter your opinion since? - A. No.

Q.Your youngest daughter had been there all day? - A. Yes.

Q.She came home with you that night? - A. I cannot say whether she did or not.

Q. Did you not swear two hours ago that your youngest daughter came home with you? - A. My youngest daughter lit me down stairs.

Q. Did you not swear you brought them both home with you? - A. No; I said my daughter came down stairs with me; but whether they both went home with me, I cannot tell.

Court. She said before, her youngest daughter did not come home all that day.

Mr. Gurney. Q.After you had given your evidence, you heard your daughter give her's? - A. Yes.

Q. And you heard her say she slept there? - A. Yes.

Q.Your youngest daughter never was out at service? - A. No.

Q.Therefore, if any body has said they became acquainted with your daughter six months ago at service, that is not true? - A. No.

Q. And if any body describes her as a servant out of place, that is not true? - A. No.

Q. Did Turner never become acquainted with her in place? - A. No.

ELIZABETH GODDARD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Your mother keeps the Royal Oak? - A. Yes; on the 9th of October the prisoner came in about half past ten, or a quarter before eleven o'clock.

Q. Do you recollect after that his going out for any purpose? - A. No.

Q. Do you remember his taking a pipe to smoke? - A. No; he came into our house about half past ten, or a quarter before eleven o'clock, very much in liquor, with a pipe in his mouth; my mother said, Mr. Denman, go to-bed, for all the other lodgers are gone; he went from the bar, and I thought he was gone to-bed.

Q.Do you know whether he went for any purpose into the street? - A. No, I thought he was gone to-bed.

JOHN PETTY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You are a coach-master? - A.Yes: On the 9th of October I saw the prisoner at the Royal Oak, about a quarter before eleven o'clock at night; he had a pipe in his mouth; I was paying my reckoning; Mrs. Goddard desired him to go to-bed; she said, the rest were gone to-bed, and there was a candle waiting for him; he appeared to me to be rather drunk; he then turned as though he was going to-bed; I went out of the house; I had occasion to stop, and heard something gently padding up Back-hill; I turned about to go home, and saw the prisoner in the middle of the street; I then saw three sheep; I heard somebody cry out, turn them; the voice came from the end of Hattongarden.

Court. Q. Was there nobody with the sheep? - A.Nobody at all.

Q. Then who called out, turn them? - A. I cannot say.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. The voice you heard say, turn them, was in Hatton-garden? - A. Yes.

Q. That is the opposite way from Liquorpond-street? - A. Yes.

LEWIS BATTLE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You are a watchman? - A. Yes: On the 9th of October I saw three sheep astray, one large one and two small ones, under St. John's-gate; I saw them come out of the square just before I went half past ten; they went up Berkeley-street towards Red-Lion-street.

Court. Q. That is the contrary way from Backhill? - A. Yes.

CHRISTOPHER FALKINGHAM sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. Q.Where do you live? - A. I am a boot and shoe maker, No. 1, Passing-alley, Clerkenwell; I have lodged there going on thirteen years: On the 9th of October, as I was coming home, about half past ten o'clock at night, I met three sheep, a large horned one and two small ones; they turned up Red-Lion-street towards Clerkenwell-green; I met them the corner of Berkeley-street; I did not see any body with them.( John Manning , a watchman, was called to the same fact.)

JAMES DEAN sworn. - I am a watchman: I received information that there were some sheep astray upon Clerkenwell-green; I went to look for them, but could not find them.

Q. Had you any conversation with Martin? - A. Yes; I will not be sure whether it was on the Tuesday or Wednesday after the first examination at Hatton-garden; after coming from duty, at six o'clock in the morning, the superintendant of the night, and me, and Martin, were going down Benjamin-street, Martin said to us, will you go and have any gin? I rather equivocated, and said, I did not wish to have any gin; he then said to me, I am a d-d fool; I said, for why; says he, when the man asked me to go along with him to help turn the sheep, I might have napped the other two.

Q. What is the construction of the word napping? - A.Taking them.

Q. That is, he might as well have had a reward of one hundred and fifty pounds as fifty? - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. How came the prisoner to find out that you had had this conversation? - A.Because I communicated it to his sister, Mrs. Browning.

Q. Where does she live? - A.Somewhere in Bell-yard, by Temple-bar.

The prisoner called five other witnesses, who gave him a good character. NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

779. JOSEPH BENNETT and MARY SMITH were indicted, the first, for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of October , three yards of carpet, value 12s. seven yards of printed cotton, value 21s. four yards of check for bed-furniture, value 6s. and ten pounds weight of bed feathers, value 30s. the property of Edward Foxall and James Fryer ; and the other, for receiving the same, knowing them to have been stolen .(The case was opened by Mr Watson.)

JAMES FRYER sworn. - I am an upholsterer , in partnership with Edward Foxall , in Old Cavendish-street ; the prisoner, Bennett, has been our porter since last February; I received some information, in consequence of which I measured some check, and found that a part of it was gone, about four yards, or four yards and a quarter. Our foreman, Edward Pettifer , brought a piece of check which corresponded exactly with that which remained; I then missed some cotton and some carpeting; in consequence of a search-warrant, we found some cotton and some carpeting at the house of the prisoner, Smith, which exactly joined the place from which they were cut off; we also found a quantity of down feathers, about ten pounds weight, of the same quality with those I had in my feather-room; they are of a particular sort; I am positive they are mine.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Have you any other partner besides Mr. Foxall? - A. No.

Q. You are in a considerable way of business? - A. Yes.

Q. You had not taken stock for some time before this? - A. No.

Q.Supposing your foreman and you were out, have you any body else who would serve in the shop? - A. Yes, my clerk and my partner.

Q. Are they here? - A. No.

Mr. Watson. Q. Has it been your habit to sell such pieces of carpeting as this? - A. Only when it is made up; if any body that we know in the same way of business wanted a remnant, we should let them have it.

JOHN STEVENSON sworn. - I live in Marybone-lane, about thirty or forty yards from the prisoner, Smith's, on the opposite side of the way: On Tuesday, the 18th of October, I saw the prisoner, Bennett, go into Smith's house, about a quarter past eight o'clock in the morning, with a bag of feathers; he gave it to Mrs. Smith, and she put it on the stairs; I heard her say, I expected you would have brought them before. On Thursday, the 20th, I saw him again, about ten minutes past eight o'clock in the morning; he had on a brown great coat, buttoned up; I had a suspicion of him, and watched him; he went in very quick; he came out again in about ten minutes, with his clothes unbuttoned, both coat and waistcoat, and an apron loose; I followed him into Oxford-street, and there I lost sight of him; I came back past Mrs. Smith's door, and saw her opening some check; in about ten minutes after, Mrs. Smith's little girl brought some cotton and some check to my house for sale, but I sent them back, having first measured the check; I did not measure the calico; I afterwards gave information to Messrs. Foxhall and Frver.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. What are you? - A. A cabinet maker and joiner, and fell brokery goods.

Q. You keep an old iron-shop? - A.No, a broker's shop; I make new furniture, and from people that I work for I take old furniture in exchange.

Mr. Gurney. Q. What shop is Mrs. Smith's? - A. An old iron-shop.

ANN WILSON sworn. - I live next door to Mrs. Smith; I have seen the prisoner, Bennett, go into Mrs. Smith's almost every morning for three months; the most that I have seen visible was horsehair; about a fortnight ago, I saw him carry in a carpet; at other times I have seen him carry in nails, and small pieces of bed furniture; I have seen him go in four or five times a day frequently; I gave information of it to Mr. Fryer.

Mr. Knapp. Q. What shop do you keep? - A.- A. I sell tobacco, snuff, and old clothes.

Stevenson. Mrs. Smith's little girl took back the check; I sent for it the next morning, and Pettifer had it from my house; it was cut so that it was very visible it came off the same piece.

EDWARD PETTIFER sworn. - I received a piece of check from Mr. Stevenson; I took it home, and matched it with some check in the warehouse; I found it had been cut off that piece; I then returned it back to Stevenson, and then took it to Mrs. Smith's; I told her I was the person who wanted to buy that check; she said she could not take less than four shillings, and I gave her four shillings for it.

RICHARD LOVETT sworn. - I am a Police Officer, and went with a warrant to search Mrs. Smith's house, on the 21st of this month, and found two pieces of Turkey-pattern carpet, and two pieces of Scotch carpet; she made no objection to my searching.

JOHN WARREN Sworn. - I am an officer, and was with Lovett; I found three pieces of cotton, a pillow-case, which appears to have had feathers in it, a quantity of feathers, and the key of the feather-room in his pocket.(The articles produced, and identified by the prosecutor.)

The prisoner, Bennett, called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Bennett, GUILTY , aged 29.

Transported for seven years .

Smith, GUILTY , aged 32.

Transported for fourteen years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

780. JOHN GOODWIN was indicted for that he, on the 23d of September , a piece of false and counterfeit money, made to the likeness of a good half-guinea, as and for a good half-guinea, unlawfully, unjustly, and deceitfully, did utter to William Bunyan , he at the same time knowing it to be false and counterfeit .(The case stated by Mr. Knapp.)

WILLIAM BUNYAN sworn. - I am a baker , and live in Thames-street , at the corner of Harp-lane: On the 23d of September, the prisoner came to my shop, about six o'clock in the evening, in a great hurry, and said, can you give me change for half-a-guinea, or a one-pound note; I said, I don't know; he said, he came up from Blackwall with a fare, being a waterman, and he and his partner should lose it if he could not get change; I said, I would give him change for the note; he said, the note was with the fare at the boat; I agreed to give him change for the half-guinea, which I did, by a seven-shilling piece, two shillings, and a shillingsworth of halfpence; he was gone in a moment, and I immediately discovered it was a bad half-guinea; I run down Bear-Quay-passage, where he said the fare was, but he was not there; I run to St. Dunstan's-hill, and saw the prisoner coming down Harp-lane; I called out stop thief, and he turned back, and run away as fast as he could to St. Mary-at-Hill, where he was stopped by Edwards; he was searched, and found the change of the half-guinea, and about four-pence halfpenny; he begged hard to be forgiven, and allowed it was my change.

GEORGE EDWARDS sworn. - I stopped the prisoner when he fell down, and I gave him into custody; he was searched, and said as has been described.

- WOODLAND sworn. - I am an officer, and searched the prisoner, and found the change. This is the bad half-guinea. (The half-guinea produced.)

CALEB-EDWARD POWELL sworn. - This is a counterfeit half-guinea.

Mr. Alley addressed the Jury in behalf of the defendant.

The defendant called one witness, who gave him a good character. GUILTY .

Confined six months in Newgate .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

781. FELTON NEVILLE HUTCHINSON , ROBERT CORROCK , and WILLIAM SHEVILL , were indicted for a conspiracy .(The indictment was stated by Mr. Vaillant, and the case by Mr. Knapp.)

THOMAS JARMAN Sworn. - Examined by Mr.Vaillant. - Q.You are in partnership with your brother Peter? - Yes; we are farmer s, and deal in wool and butter, near Buylth, in Brecknockshire: I was at Chalford Bottom, in Gloucestershire, the end of July last, at the house of Mr. Antill, a clothier. On Saturday, the last day of July, I saw the prisoner, Shevill, there; he appeared to be buying cloth; he sat down by a sample of wool, which my brother had brought there; he asked me if I would sell the lot of wool; I told him I should be glad to sell it; he put some in his pocket, but no agreement was entered into at that time; he said, he should pay with ready money, or bills as good as ready money. On the Monday following, I went to Wotton-under-Edge, and saw him there with a Mr. Gardiner; Mr. Antill was with me; he told him I was ready to sell him the wool; we there agreed for the price; it was to be about twenty-pence farthing a pound, the stone is about fifteen pounds and a half; he was to have all the wool that I had at Gloucester at that price; it was in twenty-nine packages, in the possession of one Mr. Lewis, till Friday morning; Shevill told me he was an agent for five houses in London; he told me he was to have an hundred pounds a year from one, and a guinea a week from another, and a guinea a day for every day that he went out; he said he should draw bills upon the house of Felton Hutchinson, Esq. in Suffolk-lane, Cannon-street; he said, when the peace came, he took a coach and four, and went to Deyonshire to buy fish, and that that journey cleared him between two and three thousand pounds for one of his houses; he said, Mr. Hutchinson was a merchant to send goods to America; he said, he was able enough to pay these bills, when they became due, if all the shillings were guineas; I was paid in bills on the 4th of August.

Q.Look at those bills? - A. I received these bills from Shevill; they were drawn in my presence; they are eight pounds short of the price of the goods, and there was five pounds besides for the packages; my brother received the thirteen pounds in Bank of England bills, that made up the whole amount; he said, he should have the wool worked up into cloth in Chalford-Bottom; Mr. Gardiner was to work it up; the wool was to lie in the warehouse till I was satisfied of the goodness of the bills; I remained there till Friday morning; I gave an order to Mr. Lewis to deliver the goods the same day that I received the bills; Mr. Shevill made application for it.

Q. Did you ever see Corrick before? - A. Not till latterly. I returned on the Tuesday following, in consequence of a letter I received from Mr. Lewis, and found that the wool was gone; I came up to London on Thursday morning; I went first to the Bell, in Warwick-lane, and found seventeen packages; I went to the Swan, Holborn-bridge, four or five days afterwards, and found twelve packages more; I saw Shevill the very day I came to town; I saw him at the Bell, in Warwick-lane, in the yard, with the prisoner, Corrock; I told the book-keeper not to deliver the wool; there was another man with them, who said, he was a lawyer, and he would have the wool, and offered to pay the carriage; I said, it should not be delivered till the bills were paid; I told Shevill I did not think they were worth any thing; when I came to London, they told me the man they were drawn upon was not sufficient; Shevill asked me if I should like to see the man, and we made an appointment to go to the Swan, at Holborn-bridge, that evening; I went, and saw Corrock, and two or three others, the lawyer was one of them; he said, they wanted fifty pounds, and they would give up the goods; he said, that was for his trouble and expence in the country; I saw Corrock several times afterwards, and had conversation with him; he said, he had come to make up the matter between me and Mr. Shevill; I did not like to speak to him much; he wanted twenty-five pounds for Shevill's expences in the country, and I was to have the wool back, which was worth about five hundred and sixty pounds, but I would not pay it; I did not see Shevill again till he was taken.

Q. You saw Shevill write the drafts - look at these letters, and say whether you believe them to be his writing? - A. To the best of my belief, they are his writing.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley, (Counsel for Shevill.)

Q.Shevill was introduced to you by a friend of your own? - A. Mr. Gardiner and Mr. Antill introduced me to him.

Q. They had been dealing with you before? - A. Yes.

Q. There was no immediate adjustment of the contract? - A.No.

Q. You went twenty or thirty miles after him for the purpose of inducing him to buy this wool, which he had resused to buy? - A. Yes.

Q. At Wotton-under-Edge, he told you he should pay you by bills upon London? - A. Yes, or ready money; the bills were drawn at Gloucester, and I received them on the Thursday following.

Q. That afforded you an opportunity of sending to London to enquire after the person on whom the bills were drawn? - A. Yes.

Q.Do you remember making a further demand for the packages? - A. Yes.

Q. Now, did he not then desire to break off the bargain, and say he would not give any more than he had bargained for; and, if you would return him the bills, you should have the goods? - A. No, he did not.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gleed, (Counsel for Corrock.) Q. You never heard of, or saw the prisoner, Corrock, till you came to the Swan? - A. No.

Q. And it was the lawyer who wanted you to repay him a sum of money? - A. Yes, a man who said he was a lawyer.

JOHN LEWIS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q.You are a wharfinger, at Gloucester? - A. Yes. The latter end of July last I received thirtyfour packages of wool, addressed Thomas and Peter Jarman; they were to remain with me till further order: On the 3d of August, Mr. Shevill came to inspect the wool, and had it weighed; Mr. Jarman was with him, myself, and my porter, and Mr. Antill; I afterwards saw Mr. Jarman and Mr. Shevill at my warehouse; Mr. Jarman afterwards shewed me the bills; I expressed a doubt whether they were good or not, and advised him to take one of them to Turner and Co's banking-house, and get it sent up. After Mr. Jarman had left town, Mr. Shevill came to me, and produced me an order for the wool; Mr. Shevill went away; he returned again, and said, he had seen a gentleman to whom he had sold the wool, and he gave orders respecting it; in consequence, he gave me an order to direct it to No. 4, Suffolk-lane, Cannon-street; he wanted me to return the first order.(The orders read:)

"Sir, Gloucester, Aug. 4, 1803.

"Please to deliver immediately to Mr. William Shevill , or his Order, thirty-four packs of English wool in your warehouse, he having bought and paid us for the same, and for so doing this shall be your sufficient authority,

"Peter Jarman.

" Thomas Jarman ."

"Sir,

"I request you to deliver to Robert Corrock, Esq. of Walworth, Surrey, or his Order, all my packs of English wool that I bought of Messrs. Peter and Thomas Jarman , and for so doing this shall be your sufficient authority.

"William Shevill,

"No. 4, Suffolk-lane, Cannon-street."

Lewis. On the evening of the 4th of August, Mr. Shevill asked me the best mode of conveyance from Gloucester to London; I told him the cheapest was by water, but he said that would be too tedious; upon turning his eye, he saw a waggon in my yard; I told him it was going to London, and I could forward part of it with that waggon, and the remainde the next day, and he said that would do; I accordingly sent twelve packs that night; they were not directed; I gave the waggoner a way-bill where to deliver them, at No. 4, Suffolk-lane, at the same time giving him a caution that waggon went to the Swan Inn, Holborn-bridge; I wrote a letter the same evening to Mr. Jarman, to inform him of it; the next day I sent seventeen packages by a waggon that goes to the Bell Inn, Warwick-lane; Mr. Jarman came the Tuesday following, and I went with him to the Bank to see if the bill was returned, and we found it there.

Q.Look at that? - A.This is the bill.

ROBERT BROUGHTON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Vaillant. - Q. You keep the Swan inn, Holborn-bridge? - A. Yes; the Gloucester waggon inns there; I received twelve packs of wool addressed Robert Corrock , Esq. No. 4, Suffolk-lane, Cannon-street, on the 15th of August.

Q. Is that the way-bill that arrived with the waggon? - A. Yes; Shevill came before the wool arrived, with two or three other persons, but I am not sure that Corrock was present on that day; Shevill enquired for Mr. Jarman, and saw him; I saw Corrock on the day the wool arrived, and a person who called himself an attorney; Jarman said he would not have the wool delivered till he was satisfied of the value of the bills; Shevill offered to deliver up the wool if he would return him the money back he had paid Mr. Austin, and fifty pounds; I believe Corrock was not present then; Corrock came the Monday after, to know what was to be done about the wool, and Jarman said the same as before; Corrock said he would come with Shevill next day, but did not; Shevill was to have come on several days to settle it, but never came after the first time.

WILLIAM NICHOLL sworn. - I am bookkeeper at the Bell, in Warwick-lane; the Gloucester waggon inns there: On Thursday, the 16th of August, seventeen packs of wool came to our house, directed to No. 4, Suffolk-lane, but no name; Shevill and Corrock came to me, and demanded the wool on the day it arrived; I would not deliver it; they asked me my reason; I said, I had directions not, and should not till I received another letter from Gloucester; they went away, and said they would call again; they returned again in about two hours, with a man who said he was an attorney, and tendered me the carriage for the wool, which I would not take; Mr. Jarman came up, and shewed me a copy of the letter he had received from Gloucester, and on his shewing me that, I told him those were the persons who came for it, and I left him in discourse with them.

RICHARD TIPPER sworn. - I am an officer, and apprehended Shevill at his house, No. 26, Charlotte-row, blackfriars-road, and Corrock at the Swan inn, Holborn-bridge, in company with two more; I searched Shevill, and found a pocketbook upon him, in which there were a number of bills of exchange to the amount of 4, 400l. drawn upon Mr. St. George Caulfield ; Corrock was not searched till he came before the Lord-Mayor.

JOHN NEALL sworn. - I am clerk to Saunders and Co. hop-sactors; Corrock has lodged with me for four years, and I know his hand-writing.

Q.Look at those four papers, and tell me what you believe as to whose writing they are? - A.(Looks at them.) I believe them to be Corrock's; I searched his apartments three or four days after he was taken up, and found a parcel of letters tied up in a bundle, and a book.(Letters read as follows:)

"Wotton-under-Edge,

"Dear Sir, Gloucester, Aug. 3, 1803.

"Yours of Monday night's mail came duly to hand, and you will please to inform my friend Binford that I have bought to the amount of nearly 5000l. but they cannot possibly be got ready in less than three weeks, none of the manufacturers having any on hand finished; those are agreed to be paid for by bills on Hutchinson, or Gover and Co. Nothing whatever can be done here with C.'s bills, and I assure you it is almost (at some places that Sedley took me to), impossible with Abraham Newlands' to do business; the people at Chalford, &c. have been, they say, completely swindled by a person of the name of Hayes, &c. and how any man could be so foolish to take me to such a place I am lost to know; however, if I have my health, much business may and shall be done, if it is properly conducted at the office, and I supplied for expences, which I am now without. I go this morning for Gloucester, to meet a manufacturer, who has a large parcel of goods, and doubt not but I shall besuccesful; Sedley has not been with me since Saturday morning, believe he is going to Hayes; so Mr. Gardiner informed me.

"As, of course, enquiries will be made at the office, it ought to be put into a better trim, and my things taken out with all possible speed, and the office properly attended to. I am waiting your reply, and am, with great respect to Mr. B.

"Yours sincerely,

"W. S.

"Pray call on my wife before you write, and let me know how they are.

"To Mr. Corrock, Suffolk-lane,

"Cannon-street, London."

"Suffolk-lane,

"Dear Sir, Aug. 4, 1803.

"Yours of the 3d ult. received this morning; I did not shew letter to B. but communicated the contents; he was struck at it, and having built upon stopping the demands on him from the resources you were to send, he will be completely fixed, and is free to confess he must get out of the way; he can get no money to send you this week; has 500l, to pay next, besides near 100l, more to publicans, butchers, bakers, &c. &c. at home, therefore you will act accordingly; Hardham not having had the 25l. I inclose 20l. reserving 5l. for H. as F. has not done the note, and he has not any money; and Mrs. Ching, about the house, expects the fixtures to be paid for immediately, before she gives the house up, which amounts to about 10l. but as this 25l. is applied otherwife, I cannot have the means to comply, and think some of the articles overcharged, therefore waved, without your concurrence, paying the money, but would give her what she wished on account, which she did not chuse; and unless you instruct me further, it will remain until your return. I observe, in your letter to your wife, what you have been doing, but you must say where you will have them deposited, and what done with them; I have just heard that Myers is completely done up: I have not heard or seen any thing about the business of C. since my last, and when I do, shall advise you, but he will be clamorous for money after Monday; B. has only given me 2l. so that I have been obliged to borrow of Mrs. S. as I was much distressed; she begs her best love, and hopes Providence will return you in health, and the sooner you come home the better.

"I am, yours sincerely,

"R. C."

"Gloucesier,

"Dear Sir, "Aug. 4, 1803.

"Yours, bearing date 2d ult. directed to Wotton, with contents, has this instant come safe to hand, and have noted the contents. In reply, I really think (though I will do my best) I shall not be able to make any cash with C.'s paper here: to keep C. sweet, you had better write him (never date any letter or note you send him, and only the initials of your name, and mind, never send per post, only by a porter; and you should not acknowledge before any of his friends that you or any one but H. has any thing to do with his paper,) as his business is in a train, which may be successful, but cannot be accomplished for some days; that to accommodate him he may if he pleases draw on Mr. Huchinson for thirty or forty days for 1000l. or 2000l. or more: should this take place, you know the bills ought not to be accepted, and returned directly, as H. is supposed to be in the country; but if C. draws, and pays them away, they will then come regular to the office: should C. draw, get him to send a letter of advice to the office, what he intends to draw, for this ought to be done without fail; it will shew they do business together; this is all I can at present say on the subject: I hope you see the necessity, and that you will keep Mr. H. as sweet as in your power; he must have a few pounds, if he accepts for C. and should I draw on him, no delay whatever must be attached to any bills that come in for acceptance, but you must see him as soon as possible after, say, after you shut up the office; should it so happen that any bills come in from me for H. s acceptance, and you cannot get them accepted in time, tell the person that calls that they are sent to H. and will be accepted. In respect of my drawing on Pearce, it will be of no use; I could sooner negociate H.'sbills than, his. H. living in the City, the house founds more respectable man in the country, but it will not be in my power to get cash on either of their bills, I thesefore hope you will beg Binford to sand me a supply without fail, for I am now stuck fast, and have none.

I am respect to Mr. Binford,

" Yours, W. S ,.

"You had better ask Binford if he can get Gover and Co. or any other respectable houses, to draw on to buy with. If this can be done, hand them me with all speed. Pray call on Mrs. S. before you write this post."

"Mr. Corrock,

"Suffolk-lane, Cannon-street, London."(Orders to Lewis read as before.)(Paper read, in Corrock's hand-writing, as follows:)

"In the transaction of the wool, Sheyill wrote from the country that he purchased some to the amount of 500l. or there abouts, and should send it up; he came to town before it arrived, and after he had come, he asked me if the bills, he had drawn, had been sent to the office, to which I told him, no; he, in the course of a day or two, sent me to the inns to enquire after it, and I brought him word back that the waggon in Warwick-lane was expected in the latter end of the week; I called again by his orders, and I was informed it would be in on Friday, at twelve o'clock; he sent me with the money to pay the carriage, and I went and asked for it, having consigned it by letter from Mr. William Shevill , according to the note I shewed; the person at the office replied, that he had orders not to deliver it to any body, and he should not, until he had heard from the country; I returned to the office, and acquainted Shevill with it, and he replied, what was to be done; I answered, I did not know; he asked me if I knew of any attorney to go to; I replied, no; after some time, he said, he would go to Mr. Hall, in Queen-street, Fowler's attorney; we went, and he stated the business, and shewed him the papers; Mr. Hall said, he would go with him, which he did, and we went to the inn when the owner of the wool was there; Mr. Hall asked what was the reason the wool was not delivered; the owner of the wool, Mr. Jarman, said, because he was not satisfied that the bills were good, and no such person as Mr. Hutchinson was to be found, and it should not go till he was; Shevill then said, if he was not satisfied, he did not desire to have the wool, but was willing to come to terms of accommodation, according to the agreement entered into, but Mr. Jarman would not consent, and Mr. Hall, Shevill, and myself, came away; Shevill consulted with Mr. Hall what was best to be done, and Mr. Hall advised taking opinion of Counsel, which Shevill waved, and here it rested. In the mean time, two of the bills came in, and were accepted by Hutchinsoti, by Shevill's orders I went to enquire after the other wool, and was informed the waggon was expected in a few days; I returned, and acquainted him of it; he then desired Mr. Fowler to go with me, which he did, on the day they said it would arrive; Shevill sent me with the money to pay the carriage, and I went and asked for it, it having been consigned by shevill, according to the note I shewed; the person at the office replied as at the other inn, on which I acquainted Shevill with the result; Shevill, on the next or following day, went to the Swan, to propose a settlement; which was; the money he had advanced to be paid him, the notes given up, and the agreement not being fulfilled, the forfeiture, he said, he had an undoubled right to; Mr. Jarman objected to the whole, adding, who was to pay his expences and loss of time. Nothing decisive was done; they parted to meet again. After Shevill had returned to the office, he drew out an account of what was expected to be paid, which he ordered me to copy, and carry to Mr. Hall, and appoint a time when to go, which was done; and Mr. Hall and myself went with it. On its being stated to Mr. Jarman its contents, he entirely objected to it, and added, that Shevill had charged fifteen pounds money advanced, when only eight pounds were had. It was agreed I should acquaint Shevill of it, and to meet again to endeayour a settlement, which I did two or three times; I called at the inn, and Mr. Jarman was out once, if not more; Mr. Fowler was with me; at last Shevill said, what was to be done? I answered, why settle with the man, and give up the wool on his payment of the money you advanced, but he says it is only eight pounds; have the bills back, the rest come to any terms fair and reasonable. He replied, no, I'll never do that, you must get the agreement stamped, and I will agree to take half the penalty. I answered, you may depend he will never do that; he then said, call and tell Jarman I will meet him on Saturday morning; one o'clock, which I did, and left word with the master of the inn, but I had previously made the appointment; when I returned, he said, now what am I to do? Do as I advised before. No, that I never will, he added. I tell you what you shall do; you shall make oath before a Magistrate that you bought the wool of me, and after that is done, I will provide you with vouchers and documents that shall secure it to you so certainly, that nothing shall get it out of your hands; after which, you shall attach it, and then they may do their worst; I would have paid two or three of their bills, but when you have done that, I won't pay one. (When he had done,) I answered, not for the world. He replied, what then am I to do, lose the wool, the profit of it,the money I have advanced, and the fifty pounds forseited. I replied, that is nothing to me, come to terms of accommodation, and settle it somehow, that is the best way; consider at what expence Jarman is while here, for you will never get him to comply to any terms of paying any money; on the contrary, he claims a right to some amends being made to him for all the loss he has sustained. After this conversation had ended, and he continued in the office slent, he went out, and returning shortly, he desired I would go up either in the evening or next morning to Fowler, in Tottenhamcourt-road, and tell him he wanted to see him at the office about ten o'clock the next day, or soonet if he could, about some business, but not to mention any thing to him about what had passed between him and me. I must add, that when I refused to comply to swear the wool my own, he said, if he had known that, he never would have sent it to me, as he could have consigned it to one or two that would have done it. For answer, I said, that's nothing to me. In the morning, by his orders, I went up to Fowler, and told him Shevill desired to see him at the hour stated, as near as he could; he asked me what the business was; I told him, and that he had strongly pressed me to do it, but I would not, and advised him not by any means to consent when he came, and to take no notice of what I had said to him that he like wife wished him to go with me to settle the dispute, if possible, about the wool; he replied, that he would do in the morning; when Soevill came to the office, I told him Fowler would be there about the time; he came, and when he went in, Shevill ordered me out of the office; and after a long conversation it was then proposed by Shevill that he should endeavour to dispose of some cloth he had bought and paid for, to enable him to pay a bill he had accepted for him; Fowler undertook to do so, and took patterns with him, and the price Shevill said he would have, and in the course of the day, or the next, came to the office and acquainted Shevill of what he could get for them, and took an opportunity to acquaint me, but I do not know whether it was that day or the next, that Shevill had proposed the same to him of swearing to the wool, and had offered him some money to engage him to do it, and for him to then attach it, which he had refused. On the Saturday Mr. Fowler, myself, and Shevill, set out to go to the Swan, and at the end of Fleet-marker, next Holborn, Mr. Shevill said, go you and see if the parties are there, and I will wait till you come back; Fowler being before me, I went over with him to the Swan, and we both sat down; I then came out and turned towards Holborn-Hill, went a little way up, and came down to Fleet-market, where I saw him, and told him the parties were there; he said he would step a little further, adding, to the York Coffee-house, and if he did not come to me, to put off the settlement till Monday; I returned, and we were taken into custody; Shevill several times proposed to himself to arrest Jarman, but said he should, he thought; be able to settle it without."

Mr. FRANCIS NALDER sworn. - I am under City-Marshal; and apprehended Hutchinson on Sunday, the 21st of August, in consequence of some information, at his house at Norwood, which is a small cottage; he was leaning over the gate; I went up to him, and told him I had a warrant against him; he resisted very much; Mr. Holdsworth assisted me, and with some difficulty we secured him, and conveyed him to a coach, and brought him to London; I searched him, and found a pocket-book, in which there were some notes, and a foreign note; he was examined with regard to the transaction with Jarman, and was asked about the notes; he acknowledged that Shevill drew those notes, and that he accepted them; he also said those notes were for the purchase of the wool .

[Mr. Gurney for Hutchinson , Mr. Alley for Shevill, and Mr . Gleed for Corrock , each addressed the Jury in their behalf .]

Shevill, GUILTY .

Corrock, GUILTY .

Confined two years in Newgate .

Hutchinson , NOT GUILTY .

London Jury , before Mr. Recorder.