Old Bailey Proceedings Online (www.oldbaileyonline.org, version 6.0, 18 December 2014), January 1802 (18020113).

Old Bailey Proceedings, 13th January 1802.

80. WILLIAM PEARCE , alias BENTON , was indicted for unlawfully and maliciously shooting at Ann Houghton , with a pistol loaded with ball , on the 6th of October .

ANN HOUGHTON sworn. - Q. Did any thing happen to you on the 6th of October last? - A. Fourteen weeks yesterday; I live at No.39, Eagle-street; I went to Mr. Trotter, the landlord, to pay my week's rent.

Q. What time of day was this? - A. On Monday morning, between nine and ten o'clock; I went to pay my rent, and he wanted to double my rent, and would not take the money, and the next day two men came to seize my goods.

Q. Tell me any thing that happened to you that was dangerous on that day? - A. I live at No.39, and was going to get some necessaries for the children's supper; I was on the top step, I had not been there five minutes before Mr. Pearce, or Benton, or whatever his name is, came out of No. 38, with a loose coat upon his left arm, and he passed me, and went into the road, and took a pistol out, and fired at me immediately, I had not time to say, Lord have mercy on me.

Q. Did you know him before? - A. No; I had no acquaintance with him, only with a girl of the town that he cohabited with, and his landlady was this girl's aunt; I never gave him an angry word.

Q. What was the consequence of the shooting? - A. My scull was shattered to pieces; I was taken up for dead, and was taken to the hospital.

Q. Had you ever had any words with this man at all? - A. No, I never changed a word with him to the best of my knowledge; it was out of the aunt's house that he came.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. I understand you to say, that you never had any quarrel with this young man, nor ever changed a word with him? - A. Never in my life to the best of my knowledge.

Q. You were going into the house, with your face towards the house? - A. Yes.

Q. Therefore, the pistol must have been fired at the back part of you? - A. Yes.

Q. Before the pistol was fired, you did not see it at all? - A. Yes, I did, under the coat.

Q. Do you know how the prisoner was dressed at that time? - A. He had a brown coat and a striped waistcoat.

Q. What time in the evening was this? - A. I dare say almost half-past eight.

Q. At this time, were there not illuminations taking place? - A. No, nothing of the kind.

Q. Where had you been spending your evening? - A. I had been in a great deal of trouble that day, I was obliged to sell my bed from under me.

Q. Had you been drinking that day? - A. No.

Q. That you are sure of? - A. Yes.

WILLIAM DAY sworn. - I am an officer of the parish; I knew nothing of this, till the next day I apprehended the prisoner.

ELIZABETH MARRA sworn. - Q. Where do you live? - A. In Eagle-street; I parted with the last witness about half-past eight o'clock in the evening, in the middle of Holborn; she asked me to go home with her, and help to move her goods; I told her I could not.

Q. Did you see any thing of this transaction? - A. No, I did not know any thing of it till next morning.

ELEANOR CORNELEY sworn. - I did not know any thing of it till the next day.

ANN WINTER sworn. - I knew nothing of it till the next day.

JOHN PRICE sworn. - I only know of taking the prisoner.

Prisoner's defence. My Lord and Gentlemen of the Jury. On the 6th of October in the evening, I went out from a friend's house about six o'clock in the evening, and went to the Courier-office, in the Strand; I went home at twenty minutes past eight, my mother said it was half past eight, and she looked at the clock, and said it was exactly twenty minutes past eight, and I then sat down to my supper, and sat by the fire-side smoking my pipe till after nine, and this accident did not happen till nine o'clock, which I shall be able to prove.

Court. (To Houghton.) Q. How long have you known the prisoner by fight? - A. A great while.

Q. How long have you lived in the house? - A. Going on of four years.

Q. Had these people lived next door to you for any length of time? - A. The girl that he cohabited with, did, and he came backwards and forwards, and kept her and clothed her.

Q. How long had you seen him coming backwards and forwards in this way? - A. Seven or eight months.

Jury. Q. Are there not a great many girls in that house? - A. Yes, it is for nothing else.

Q. And a great many young men are backwards and forwards with them? - A. Yes, all hours of the day and night, and they let out the rooms at so much a time for any body that chuses to bring a girl in.

GEORGE-FREDERICK FURNIVAL sworn. - I am a surgeon; the scull was excessively sractured by some hard body.

Q. Do you think the wadding of a pistol would have done it? - A. No, I don't think it would.

For the Prisoner.

MATILDA BICKNELL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. On the 6th of October, where did you live? - A. In Norwich-court, Fetter-lane.

Q. Are you acquainted with the prisoner? - A. Yes.

Q. Was he in your company on the 6th of October? - A. Yes; he came to me about a quarter before six in the evening; I went out with him almost immediately to the Strand: he had been in the house about ten minutes before I went out with him; we went to the Courier office in the Strand; then we came up to Long-acre, and I saw him into his father's house, the corner of Drake-street, Redlion-square, No. 6.

Q. Did you see him again in the course of that evening? - A. No; and when I came to Middlerow, by the pastry-cook's-shop, it was half past eight o'clock.

Court. Q. What day of the week was this? - A. On a Tuesday.

Q. What was your reason for going with him? - A. Upon business.

Q. Had he business there? - A. Yes.

Q. What was his business? - A. I do not know.

Q. What was your business there? - A. I had no business.

Q. You told me just now you went upon business - what was the occasion of your going with him? - A. To accommodate him, to keep him company.

Q. How long was he at the Courier-office? - A. About ten minutes; it was reported that there were to be illuminations, but there were not.

Q. How did you occupy yourself those two hours? - A. We did not hurry.

Q. So I think - how did you employ your time? - A. Nothing particular, only walking.

Q. And you were two hours walking from Fetter-lane to Long-acre, and back to Middle-row? - A. Yes.

WILLIAM BENTON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are the father of the unfortunate man at the bar? - A. Yes.

Q. You are a butcher and live in Drake-street, Red-lion-square? - A. Yes.

Q. And have lived there about thirty years? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you recollect the night of the unfortunate accident? - A. Yes; the 6th of October, my son came home about twenty minutes past eight o'clock, and never went out of the house afterwards.

Q. Have you any particualr reason for remembering the time your son came in? - A. Yes; he had promised his sister to come home to supper at eight o'clock, and had mentioned that there would be a hot supper; when he came in, my wife said it was half past eight o'clock; my son looked at the clock, and said, no, mother, it is not, it is but twenty minutes past eight.

Q. Are you sure he never went out after that? - A. I am.

Q. What makes it so clear to your mind, that it was the 6th of October? - A. On account of the firing of guns, it was expected to be an illumination, it was so for two or three nights.

Q. How far is Eagle-street from Drake-street, how many minutes walk? - A. I should imagine, not two minutes.

Court. (To Haughton). Q. What distance might the person be from you, that had the pistol in his hand? - A. About a yard.

BENJAMIN BENTON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am the brother of the prisoner.

Q. Do you remember the night this old woman received this injury? - A. Yes.

Q. Was there expected to be an illumination that night? - A. Yes, and some of the neighbours had lit up.

Q. Had there been fire-arms used by idle people to induce the neighbours to light up? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember what time your brother came home that evening? - A. Yes, it was exactly twenty minutes past eight o'clock; my mother accused him with not coming home to his time; she said it was half past eight, and he said it was not, and my mother, and my sister, and myself, looked at the clock, it was exactly twenty minutes past eight, and he was never out of the house that night after.

Q. If he had gone out but for two minutes, must you have known it? - A. Yes, I must; he never stirred out of the house till the next day.

Court. (To Houghton). Q. What time was this? - A. About half past eight.

Q. Was there any thing to lead you to be very exact as to the time? - A. The cheesemonger told me just before, that it was half past eight, or not so much.

Jury. Q. Was it light enough for you to observe the person? - A. If it was the last breath I had to draw, and I never was to enter the kingdom of heaven, that is the man that fired at me, and no living soul saw it besides myself.

Court. (To Old Benton). Q. Were you present at the moment your son came in at the door? - A. Yes.

Q. Had he any thing in his hand? - A. No.

Q. He had no great coat? - A. He had a loose great coat, a brown great coat, but not so dark as this I have on.

Court. (To Haughton). Q. The person that shot you, had a coat on his arm? - A. Yes.

Q. What colour was it? - A. Dark brown, almost the colour of my cloak.

Q. Were you then able to see him, so as to know him? - A. It was as he passed me; if I was never to draw another breath, he is the man.

Q. What sort of light was there to enable you to see him? - A. There was a light in the passage, I am sure he is the man.

JAMES MASH sworn. - Q. Do you know any thing about this transaction? - A. Yes, I saw the whole of it; I was standing at my own door; I live at No.39, Eagle-street, the same door where the accident happened; I was within five yards, or five yards and a half of the woman, when she was shot.

Q. What time was it? - A. Ten minutes after nine, as near as possible.

Q. Did you see the man who fired? - A. Yes; it was a pistol fired by a man unknown to me.

Q. How was he dressed? - A. He had on either a white or a light jacket, I am not sure, like a pastry-cook or baker; I was not more than three yards from him.

Q. What did he do after he had fired the pistol? - A. He walked for a little way as men generally do, and then ran.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - A. I never saw him till after he was a prisoner.

Q. Is that like the man? - A. No, no more than I am, nor yet a bit like the man.

Court. Q. How do you happen to know the time to be ten minutes after nine? - A. The watch did not set till nine o'clock; there are at least thirty watchmen to call over, and they do not call the roll over till nine, and the watch was then set.

Q. Were there any other men in the street? - A. No; no man standing near, nor woman.

Q. Where was the woman at the time? - A. Standing upon the step.

Q. Where was the pistol which this man had? - A. He seemed to carry it in his hand.

Q. Did you see the woman wounded - did she fall down? - A. No, she stood equally the same, only she held her silence, before that, she was singing and swearing, and intoxicated, as she had been all day.

GEORGE FELLOWS sworn. - I am a watchman in Eagle-street: On the 6th of October, I saw the woman about a quarter before nine, as I was going to the watch-house, at her own door; she was upon the top step but one of the cellar; she was very much intoxicated, and had a great mob of men, women, and children about her; she had a pint of beer three parts full, and I begged her to go into the cellar; she sells oysters, and garden stuff, and fruit; I have known the woman for some time about ten minutes after nine, or a quarter of an hour, I had lit my candle, and was going upon my beat; I was called, and saw the woman had been shot; between ten minutes and a quarter after nine, I helped her into a coach; it was the night before the general illumination; there were a great many guns and pistols firing about in all directions.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

81. SUSANNAH YOUNG was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of January , a silver watch, value 61. 6s. the property of Richard Quakley , in the dwelling-house of Catherine Brown , widow.

RICHARD QUAKLEY sworn. - On the 4th of January, I lost my watch in the house of Catherine Brown, in Whitechapel , I do not know the name of the street, I believe it is White's-yard; I was in bed with the prisoner, asleep, when I lost my watch; I picked her up on Sunday evening the 3d, and slept with her the next day, Monday; I met with her again between twelve and two o'clock in the day, in a public-house; she asked me, if I would go home with her; I said, I did not care if I did, for I had a head-ach, and a little sleep might bring me round.

Q. Had you been drinking? - A. Yes; then I went with her to Mrs. Brown's; we went up stairs, and I laid down upon the bed; she asked me for sixpence, which I gave her, and then I fell asleep; Mrs. Brown's son came up to me, waked me, and asked me, if I had lost any thing; I told him, I did not know; the first thing I felt for was my watch, and I missed it.

Q. When had you seen it last? - A. I had the chain in my hand when I laid down upon the bed.

Q. How came you to put your hand to the chain? - A. I commonly do when I lay down any where; when I missed it, I went down stairs, and the prisoner was there; Mrs. Brown said to her, I am sure you have got the property, she said, she had not it, and Mrs. Brown said she would have her searched; I sent for a brother tradesman of mine, and my wife happened to be there; she, came and I sent my wife for an officer, and while she was gone, the prisoner put her hand in her bosom, and said, here is your watch, take it; I said, no, it is too late, there is an officer sent for; she then put it upon the hob in the fire-place, and said, who can hurt me, if the property is not found upon me; a little while after, the officer came in and I gave charge of her.

Q. Are you certain you were sober enough to know that you had the chain of your watch in your hand? - A. Yes.

Q. How much had you drank? - A. I was about half the worse for liquor, what they call half-seas over.

JOHN NOWLAND sworn. - On the 4th of January, the prisoner's wife fetched me to take charge of the prisoner; I went with her, and the prosecutor gave charge of the prisoner; I asked her where the watch was, and she said, in the chimney-corner; I found it upon the hob of the grate; then she said, there is his watch, give it to him, you cannot hurt me, because you found no property upon me; I took her before the Magistrate. I have had the watch in my possession ever since.(Produces it.)

Quakley. This is my watch; I know it by a mark where it fell upon the payement, and it has my name inside.

Prisoner's defence. I know nothing of the property at all, nor I never saw it.

GUILTY, aged 25.

Of stealing goods, value 39s.

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction .

Second Middlesex Jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

82. HANNAH COWLEY and MARIA CASTLE were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of December , a pocket-book, value 6d. a guinea, two seven-shilling pieces, a crown-piece, and thirty-five shillings, the property of Elizabeth Collier , in the dwelling-house of Cornelia Joyce , widow.

ELIZABETH COLLIER sworn. - I left a place of servitude on the 8th of December, and went to sleep at the house of Mrs. Joyce for that night; I was in company with the prisoners all the next day, the 9th, at the Black Dog, where I went to have a dinner; it was about a quarter before twelve o'clock when I went in; I knew the prisoners before, I had been an unfortunate girl; the people that I lived with a twelvemonth took me out of the street; I went out with them after dinner, and we came back again to the public-house; Hannah Cowley asked me for one shilling; I said, I thought she had drank enough, if she had a mind to have some tea, she might; I went to a chandler's shop, and pulled out my pocket-book from my bosom; and let them have a shilling; I then put my pocket-book into my right hand pocket, and we went to the house of Mrs. Joyce to get some water for tea; I sat down, and they sat themselves down by the side of me; Mrs. Castle was on my right hand side, and Hannah Cowley next to her; I laid my head down in Mrs. Castle's lap, and she thought I was asleep; I felt Mrs. Castle's hand in my pocket, I then said, there is somebody's hand in my pocket, and Mrs. Joyce immediately took me away, and put me in an arm chair by the fire-side; I put my hand to my pocket, and found the pocket-book out of my pocket, and hooked inside of my gown; I sat down in the armchair, and Mrs. Castle sat down by the side of me, and Cowley next to her; Mrs. Castle desired me to lay my head in her lap; which I did, for I was rather sick, not being used to liquor lately.

Q. How came you to do that, when you had found her attempting to pick your pocket - why did not you desire Mrs. Joyce to take care of your pocket-book for you? - A. I had not that thought about me.

Q. How old are you? - A. Twenty-one; I went to sleep in Mrs. Castle's lap; when I waked, Mrs. Joyce said, Mrs. Cowley is gone, and Mrs. Castle is going; Mrs. Castle got up, and with her getting up, I waked; Cowley was gone; I then said, my pocket-book is gone, I am ruined for ever; Mrs. Joyce then said, I have not got it; Mrs. Castle said, so help me G - d you have not, Mrs. Joyce; then Mrs. Castle went out, and said, she would go and fetch Hannah Cowley, and I did not see either of them again till they were taken by Day, the constable, on the 10th.

Q. How much money had you in your pocketbook? - A. A guinea, two seven-shilling pieces, a crown-piece, five or six shillings, new coin, and about a guinea and a half's worth of silver.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You had been in servitude, and left your place the 8th of December? - A. Yes.

Q. It was on the night of the 10th, you fell in company with the two women? - A. On the 9th.

Q. When you went to Mrs. Joyce's, did not a man go with you? - A. No.

Q. Had you not been drinking with a man? - A. No.

Q. Not all that night? - A. No.

Q. What sort of a house does Mrs. Joyce keep? - A. A lodging-house.

Q. A. lodging-house for women, or what? - A. I had not been in her house for a twelvemonth before.

Q. You used her house frequently then? - A. Not at that house, she lived then in Bell-court.

Q. When you say you lost your money at Mrs. Joyce's, do you recollect, when she asked what you had lost, that you said, a guinea and eighteen shillings, and only a guinea and eighteen shillings? - A. Mrs. Joyce did not ask me what I had lost; I said I had lost my money, I did not mention any sum to her.

Q. Had you been paid your wages that night? - A. Not all; I had been paid part before; I received eight or nine and twenty shillings for wages, that was all that was due to me.

Q. How long might you have had the rest of the money in your possession? - A. I saved it up while I was in service.

Q. What wages had you? - A. Six guineas, besides perquisites.

Q. You had occasion to buy some clothes, I suppose? - A. My master clothed me when I went there.

Q. Did you not say to Mrs. Joyce, or any body else in Mrs. Joyce's house, that all you had lost was a guinea and eighteen shillings? - A. Never.

Q. Do you recollect a Scotch girl being in the room that night? - A. Yes; there was a Scotch girl that Hannah Cowley beat out of the house.

Q. Did you never say it was the Scotch girl that robbed you? - A. Never; she was not in the house at the time.

Q. What time was it you missed your money? - A. In the evening.

Q. Were you sober at that time? - A. I was not justly sober, but I was not so intoxicated but I knew what I was about.

CORNELIA JOYCE sworn. - I live at No. 1, Spread Eagle-court, Gray's-inn-lane: Elizabeth Collier came to my house on a Tuesday night, and they all three of them slept there together; they wanted a night's lodging.

Q. In what month was it? - A. I cannot tell; it was the day before they were taken up.

Q. Do you recollect any thing particular passing? - A. They all got up in the morning, and went out together; they did not come in again till four or five in the afternoon; they brought in bread and butter, and tea, and I gave them water; one of the prisoenrs desired me to go and get a quartern of gin; I went, and when I came back, Elizabeth Collier said somebody had had their hands in her pocket; I then put her into my husband's arm chair; I made them tea, and then I saw Mrs. Castle give a white handkerchief into Hannah Cowley's hand; I don't know what that was for; Mrs. Castle sat next to Collier, and her head upon Mrs. Castle's lap, and Cowley sat next to her.

Q. Was there any thing in the handkerchief? - A. I did not see any thing in it; after tea, Cowley said to Mrs. Castle, that she would go out, and about a quarter of an hour after, Mrs. Castle said, I shall go out too; I then said, I shall wake Bet, to see that every thing is safe, for as they had been out together all day drinking, I thought, if there was any thing lost, I might be blamed for it; I waked Elizabeth Collier , and she said, she had lost her pocket-book; Mrs. Castle said, she had not got it; she went out, and I saw no more of her that night; before Mrs. Castle went out, she desired me to put my hand in her pocket, and feel if she had got it; I said, no, I never put my hand in any body's pocket, and then she went out, and said, she would fetch Hannah Cowley.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. After the handkerchief was delivered from one to the other, they stopped till the day was over? - A. Yes.

Q. Castle offered to be searched? - A. Yes.

Q. Was Collier drunk? - A. Yes; they had all been drinking, and the prosecutor was very drunk.

Q. Did you ever know a drunken girl save four pounds out of six pounds in a year? - A. No.

MARY WARD sworn. - I lodge at the Black Dog, in Gray's Inn-lane: On the 9th of December, the two prisoners brought in some muttonchops, and asked me to dress them; Elizabeth Collier came with them; I dressed the steaks, and after dinner Elizabeth Collier took me into the bar, and treated me with a glass of liquor, and she shewed me the money in her pocket-book; there was a guinea in gold, two seven-shilling pieces, a crown piece, and twenty-four or twenty-five shillings; I did not count it, but she told me how much there was; she was a little in liquor, and I told her to take care of it.

WILLIAM DAY sworn. - I am a constable: On the 10th of December, I was sent for by the prosecutor; I took the prisoners into custody at the White Hart, in Brookes Market, about five o'clock in the afternoon; I took them into another room, and searched them; I found one shilling and nine-pence upon one, and one shilling and seven-pence upon the other; I found a pocket-book upon Castle, but it was delivered back to her.(The prisoner, Castle, produced a pocket-book.)

Collier. this is not my pocket-book.

Castle's defence. I never saw the pocket-book, or the money; she came to me when I was in custody, and said, if I would give her two guineas, she would make it up, and told me, she had not the smallest suspicion of me.

The prisoner, Cowley, put in a written defence, stating that she was innocent of the crime imputed to her. Both NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

83. JOHN CAYHILL and RALPH WOOD were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of December , fifteen yards of baize, value 12s. the property of John Whiting .

JOHN WHITING sworn. - I keep a shop in Beach-street, Cripplegate : On the 23d of December, a man, having the appearance of a sailor, came in to look at some stockings; then the prisoner, Wood, and his wife, came in to look at some black silk stockings, that was between five and six o'clock; an officer going by, came in with the baize, and told me I had been robbed; I desired the officer to look at the people in the shop, and he knew the prisoner, Wood, but not having any thing against him, I let him go for that night; the officer has the baize.

- ELLIS sworn. - I am a patrol belonging to Worship-street: On Monday, the 21st of December, a little before six o'clock, I was going along Beach-street, and saw the prisoner, Cayhill, come out of Mr. Whiting's shop, with this roll of baize, or flannel, whatever it is, in his hand; I attacked him three or four doors from Mr. Whiting's; Iasked him what he did with that, and a scuffle ensued between us; he got away from me, and left the flannel behind him; I picked it up, and took it into Mr. Whiting's shop; I told him he had been robbed,(produces the property;) I did not apprehend the prisoner till the next night; I knew Wood to be a companion of Cayhill's; Wood went in first, the flannel stood behind Wood; when Cayhill took it up, and came out with it, I saw Wood and his wife in the shop; I knew them all before.

Q. Did you observe Wood have any conversation with Cayhill in the shop? - A. None at all; I had not time to see that; I found them both in company together at a public-house the next evening in Whitecross-street; I only took Cayhill first, for there was such a set uses the house, that I was afraid of their being rescued from me.

JAMES FITZGERALD sworn. - I was with Ellis when he apprehended the prisoners: I was lame in the arm, and we were afraid to take them both at once; after we had taken Cayhill to the office, I came back through Golden-lane, and met Wood, and we took him.

Q. (To Whiting.) Did you see any thing of the prisoner, Cayhill, in your shop? - A. No, I did not.

Q. Did any conversation pass between Wood and the sailor in the shop? - A. None at all; the officer brought in the baize before any of them were served; I followed them out, and saw Wood and the sailor go into a public-house, the corner of Golden-lane; I saw them drinking together.

Q. Look at that property? - A. It is mine; there is a mark upon it, No. 8; this was the outside piece; I had removed it from the door about half an hour.

Caybill's defence. I know no more of the robbery than the child unborn.

Wood's defence. I know nothing of the robbery, nor the man neither; I never saw him till I saw him at Worship-street.

Cayhill called one witness who had known him eight or nine years, and gave him a good character.

Cayhill, GUILTY , aged 19.

Transported for seven years .

Wood, NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

84. MARY, alias ELIZABETH MACDONALD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of December , a counterpane, value 5s. a a set of fire irons, value 8s. a sin candle box, value 6d. and a pound of candles, value 10d. the property of John Smart ; and a great-coat, value 4s. and a waistcoat, value 2s. the property of David Thomas .

JOHN SMART sworn. - David Thomas is my clerk , I have chambers in Staple's-inn, but I do not reside there, I live in Red-lion-square; the prisoner is a total stranger; Mr. Thomas resides in the chambers, and the furniture is mine.

DAVID THOMAS sworn. - I am clerk to Mr. Smart; Staple's-inn is part in Middlesex, and part in London; this part, No. 8, has been always reputed to be in London: On Sunday evening the 27th of December, about a quarter before nine, I was going up into the chambers; I unlocked the door, and heard the chairs move, which led me to suspect there was somebody in the room; I called out, but no answer was made, and the chairs still continued to move; I immediately shut the door again, and went to the porter's-lodge for assistance; the porter and two or three others went with me; when we got to the staircase, we heard somebody on the staircase, and when they heard our voices, they went back again on the staircase; there are a number of closets which they searched a considerable time, and at last found the prisoner at the bar concealed in one of them, with a candle-box, and candles secreted under her clothes; the candles were in the candle-box; we took her into the chambers.

Q. Whose property were they? - A. Mr. Smart's; we searched her, pulled off her pockets, and found about seventy pawnbroker's tickets in them; we then went into the bed-room, and found the bed-room had been stripped; there were four blankers, a counterpane, and the sheets, gone; I then missed a great-coat and waistcoat of my own; the prisoner then said, she had removed the articles I missed, to her lodgings.

Q. Had you made her any promise of favour? - A. No.

Q. Did you threaten her? - A. No; she said, they were at her lodgings, in Portugal-street; we took her there, and she delivered me a counterpane, a set of fire-irons, and my great-coat and waistcoat; she hoped I would forgive her, the devil had been very busy with her that afternoon; but I made her no promise.

JOHN HOWARD sworn. - I am inspector of the watch and lamps of St. Andrew's, Holborn; about a quarter before ten, on Sunday the 27th of December, I was sent for to take charge of the prisoner; I found her in the Lodge, at Staple's-inn; she said, as you have got your things again, I hope you will forgive me; Mr. Thomas desired I would go up stairs with him; I went up, and he shewed me the property. (Produces it.)

MARY CRAMMOND sworn. - On Sunday evening, the 27th of December, I was at the lodge, my husband is the porter; Mr. Thomas came, and said, there was somebody in the chambers; I went, and heard somebody in the room, and I came away to the lodge again; I had seen the prisoner in the summer several times upon that staircase; after I had heard that they had taken a woman, I went, and knew her to be the same person; I then went into Mr. Thomas's sleeping room, and missed all the bed clothes, except the pillows and the under blanket. (The property was deposed to by Mr. Thomas).

Prisoner. I beg mercy of the Court, and acknowledge to all the things that were found in my possession. GUILTY , aged 32.

Confined one year in Newgate , and whipped in the jail .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

85. WILLIAM RICHARDS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of December , a ham, value 1l. 5s. the property of John Strickland .

JOHN STRICKLAND sworn. - I keep a shop in Newgate-market ; my clerk saw the prisoner take the ham; I saw him brought back with the ham upon him, on Wednesday the 23d of December.

FRDERICK KNIGHT sworn. - I am clerk to Mr. Strickland; this ham was in the market, fronting the warehouse, in a basket, upon a truck; there was a bladder of hog's-lard in the basket; I was sitting in the accompting-house; I was cautioned against the prisoner, and I observed him, for near half an hour, about the place; he stood nearly opposite the accompting-house window, and looked in; there was another truck loading, which bid part of the accompting-house window; I then saw him go and stand again by the truck which had the ham in it; he then looked round, lifted up the flat lid, several times, and let it down again; it being a new flat, it made a noise, and he then threw it quite open, took a sack; from undr his arm, and put the ham into the sack; I then gave the alarm that he had got it, and we all ran out; he ran round the shambles, and we lost fight of him for the space of half a moment; then Mr. Jones laid hold of him, and I instantly laid hold of him too, the ham was then in his possession.

DAVID JONES sworn. - I stopped the prisoner with a sack, and a ham in it, under his arm; when I laid hold of him, he attempted to throw the sack away, but I laid hold of the sack and him likewise.

William Kimber , the constable, produced the ham, which was identified by Mr. Strickland.

Prisoner's defence. I was going into the market, there were a great many people about, and this gentleman stopped me.

GUILTY , aged 34.

Confined twelve months in Newgate , and publicly whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

86. DIANA CROW was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of January , a pair of silk stockings, value 5s. two riding shirts, value 10s. a linen shirt, value 3s. a glass bottle, value 2d. and a pint of rum, value 2s. the property of William Robertson .

MARY CAWTHORNE sworn. - I live at No. 27, Chiswell-street ; Mr. Robertson is a private gentleman, and lodges in our house; the prisoner was in his service about a fortnight; on the 4th of January she was going to leave his service; I was called down stairs to look into her box; I told her to open her box, which she did; there was nothing in her box but a duster; we told her we wished to see what she had in her pocket; she said, she would not let us; at last, with a great deal to do, she went up to the fire-place, and threw something on the fire, I cannot say what; then she threw a white handkerchief under the sink, and then we told her she should not go till she had stripped herself; she stripped, and pulled off her pockets, and in one of her pockets was a quart bottle full of rum; in her pockets I found a shist, two riding shirts, and a pair of silk stockings; the shist was upon her back; we delivered the things to the officer, and she was taken before the Magistrate.

( John Ray , an officer, produced the property, and deposed that he received them from Mrs. Cawthrone.)

WILLIAM ROBERTSON sworn. - I believe these stockings and shist belong to my children, but I am not sure; the shist is marked with M and a figure of 2; I believe them to be mine, but I am not certain.

Mrs. Cawthorne. I know these shirts to be Miss Jane Robertson's; she is about eleven years old; I sold her the lace that is now upon them; the stockings belong to Miss Mary Robertson , but I cannot swear to them; I believe they are the same by the clock; the shist is marked with Miss Mary's name.

Prisoner's defence. I had had a great wash that week; I forgot to wash these things, and I put them in my pocket, intending to take them up into the bed room. GUILTY , aged 22.

Confined six months in the House of Correction .

First Middlesex Jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

87. WILLIAM BESSIKER and PATRICK MERRIMAN were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of December , in the dwelling-house of David Sonter , one printed book, entitled Fair Rosamond, value 6d. two bank-notes, each of the value of 100l. another bank-note, value 20l. three other bank-notes, value 30l. and four other bank-notes, value 20l. the property of Robert Harwood .

Second Count. Charging it to be the dwelling-house of the said Robert.(The indictment was opened by Mr. Reynolds, and the case by Mr. Hovell)

GREGORY RENDALL sworn. - I am clerk in the house of Messrs. Hankey, (produces a book;) here is the entry in my own hand-writing of a check paid to Messrs. Henley and Sons, on the 9th of December.

Thomas Sapwell , a constable, produced the notes.)

Rendall. The check was for 266l. 13s.

Q. To whom did you pay it? - A. I cannot say.

Q. Look at that - is that the check? - A. I believe this to be the check.

Q. Do you know in what notes you paid that check? - A. Yes; (reads,) December 3d, No.9428, 50l.; December 5th, No. 758, 50l.; October 27th, No. 4162, 20l; August 13th, No. 4156, 20l.; December 3d, No. 5801, 20l.; September 26th, No. 7310, 20l,; September 18th, No. 5286, 20l.; September 16th, No. 6276, 10l.; October 29th, No. 8800, 10l.; November 11th, No. 4228, 10l.; August 25th, No. 2646, 5l.; November 6th, No. 9151, 5l.; October 30th, No. 649, 5l.; October 10th, No.2784, 5l.; November 4th, No. 6940, 5l.; September 10th, No. 7453, 5l.; and the six pounds thirteen shillings was paid in small notes and money; we never take the numbers of small notes.

Q. Now look at these notes? - A. They agree with the numbers of the notes in the book; I cannot swear that these are the notes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You do not know to whom you paid that check? - A. No, I do not.

Captian ROBERT HARWOOD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Hoveil. Q. Look at that check - did you take that to Hankey's banking-house, and when? - A. On the 9th of December I received it, to the best of my recollection, but did not present it till the 15th; I received it from Mr. Henley.

Court. (To Rendall.) Q. When did you pay this check? - A. The 9th of December - I beg your Lordship's pardon, it is an error, it was the 15th; I turned over the wrong leaf.

Mr. Hoveil. Q. (To Captain Harwood.) On the 15th of December you took that check there to Hankey's banking-house? - A. I did.

Q. Did you receive payment of it? - A. I did.

Q. From whom? - A. From Mr. Rendall.

Q. Do you recollect how you received it? - A. I cannot cliumerate the notes, except the two of fifty pounds, and the five of twenty pounds; the others I cannot recollect.

Q. Did you receive the payment of the whole from in bank-notes? - A. I did, except the thirteen shillings, which I had in cash.

Q. Do you recollect the number or dates of the notes? - A. I do not.

Q. What did you do with the notes after you had received them? - A. I took them home, and gave them to my wife, and she walked up stairs with the notes in her hand to her bed room, where I saw her put them into a drawer.

Court. Q. Did you go directly home? - A. No. I was at a variety of places before I went home.

Q. Was it the same day you received it? - A. Yes; I saw them in the drawer several times afterwards.

Q. When did you first know that they were lost? - A. On the 22d of December, to the best of my recollection.

Q. In what house was that? - A. No. 90, Ratcliff highway, the house of David Sonter ; the goods were removed from there to No.17, High-street, Shadwell; I was removing my goods; the drawers in which the notes were, were removed on the 22d, between twelve and one o'clock; I opened the drawer to take out the notes.

Q. Had you employed the prisoners to remove these goods? - A. I had not; I opened the drawer, and missed the money; the upper part of the chest of drawers were divided into two drawers; I looked in the drawer that I left the notes in, and they were gone; the other drawer had been taken out; I observed a piece of paper in the place where the drawers had been taken from; I looked, and found that to be the three twenty-pound bank-notes; I immediately inquired who had been there, and, in consequence of information, I went in quest of the two men who had removed these drawers; I found the prisoner Merriman; Sapwell, the officer, was with me; I don't recollect the name of the street; we found him in the street, and his wife with him; we took him to a public-house on the other side of the street; Sapwell searched him; I observed the woman drop something, watch proved to be a small pocket-book; Sapwell opened the pocket-book, and found two two-pound notes; we inquired of the woman where she got them; she said, she got them by her own earnings; she said, she was a silk weaver, or winder; she had a red cloak with her tied in a handkerchief, which she said she had bought six years ago at Portsmouth, where she bought the cloak she was then wearing nine years ago; Sapwell interrogated her a good deal where she had bought this cloak, but we could not find where she had bought it; Merriman was in the room all the time, in the custody of another officer; I then went to look after Bessiker; we found him, but could not discover any mark of suspicion on him, and the next day he came forwards before the Lord-Mayor, and told the whole story, and the Lord-Mayor thought proper to commit him.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You found three twenty-pound bank-notes in the vacant place where the drawer with the other notes had been? - A. Yes.

Q. Then that partition could not be very close? - A. No.

Q. Was it so wide that they might have fallen into that space? - A. They might; I had soldedthem in a piece of paper not an hour before they were missed; the cover in which they were solded was left in the drawer.

Court. Q. I understand you to say, that, upon inquiry for the notes, and upon looking into the lrawer, you found the paper in which they had been folded? - A. No, it was found, but I did not find it.

Mrs. HARWOOD sworn. - Q. You are the wife of the last witness? - A. Yes; on the 21st of December last I lived in the house of my father, David sonter, No. 90, Ratcliff-highway; were moved the goods on the 22d, I think.

Q. By whom were they removed? - A. By the two prisoners at the bar; they were porters.

Q. Did you receive any bank-notes at any time? - A. Yes; Captain Harwood brought some banknotes home, and I put them in the drawer; I cannot tell what day it was; I put the amount down upon a piece of paper; there were two of fifty pounds, three of ten pounds, and five of twenty pounds.

Q. What was the amount of the whole? - A. Two hundred and sixty odd pounds; I put them into a drawer in a nest of drawers.

Q. When had you seen them in that drawer? - A. I saw them about eleven o'clock in the morning of the day that the prisoners removed them; I saw the prisoners take them out of No. 17, Shadwell High-street; I was there when the prisoners throught them in; about ten minutes after they were gone, Captain Harwood came in, with the key in his pocket; I wished him to take the notes but, as we were going out; I saw my husband open the drawers; the notes were not in the drawer, except three that were lying at the side where the other drawer should he.

Q. What else was there in the drawer? - A. Some papers and some books.

Q. What books were they? - A. Roach's Beauties of the Poets.

Q. Any pamphlets? - A. No; one of the volumes of Roach's Beauties of the Poets was gone; Fair Rosamond was one of the stories in the book.

Q. Should you know the notes again? - A. Yes, by the numbers.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You did not see the drawers come out of your father's house? - A. No; they were a long time getting them up stairs, and I suspected they were doing something.

Q. What is the distance between your father's house and your house to which you had removed? - A. About twenty or thirty doors; the servant followed with the empty drawers.

Q. Is that servant here? - A. No.

Court. Q. After they brought the drawers in, were they left in the room with the drawers, or did they go away immediately? - A. They turned the drawers about several times into the back parlour to get them up stairs.

Q. Were you by during all that time? - A. I was in the passage.

Q. What were these notes wrapped up in? - A. In a piece of paper.

Q. Closely folded together or loosely? - A. No; they were folded flat.

Q. Was there any mark upon that paper? - A. The number of the notes was upon that paper.

Q. Did you ever see that paper again? - A. Yes, in the drawer.

Q. Did you yourself find it in the drawer? - A. Yes, about ten minutes after the men went away.

Q. Was that after your husband had missed the notes? - A. Yes.

Q. Where was your husband when you found the paper in the drawers? - A. He was standing by.

Q. Was that before your husband went after the men? - A. Yes.

Q. What was there in the paper? - A. Nothing.

Q. Was that paper open, or folded as you had left it? - A. It was open.

Q. Is that paper here? - A. No, it was burnt at the Lord-Mayor's by mistake.

Q. Was that paper folded at the end? - A. No, it was open at the two ends.

Q. I mean when you saw it in the morning? - A. Yes, it was open at the two ends.

Q. Then in the twisting of this chest of drawers about, these notes might have sell out of the paper? - A. They were at one cornerof the drawers; they might have got out of the paper.

THOMAS SAPWELL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Hovell. I am a constable; I apprehended the prisoners; I apprehended Merriman first, on the 22d of December, in Sun-street, Bishopsgate-street; I searched him, but found nothing upon him; I searched Bessiker, but found nothing at all upon him; On Thursday, the 24th of December, Bessiker sent for me, after he was committed; I went to him along with his master.

Q. What did he say to you -Mr. Gurney. Q. Before he said any thing to you, did you or his master promise him any savour? - A. His master did.

Mr. Hovell. Q. Did you, in consequence of any information from Bessiker, find any notes? - A. I did, at NO. 7, Honey-lane-market, over the privy; I found a ten-pound note, No. 6276, dated September 16th, 1801.

Q. Did Beibker point out the place were it was concealed? - A. He did.

Q. Did you find any thing else there? - A. I did not; I went back with Bessiker to the Compter, and Bessiker and Morman were put into a room together; I could not hear what passed, but Mr. IIell and Mr. Pheney were with them; I thought I heard Marriman say, that the notes were hid inthe passage of the house where he lived; they were both servants to Mr. Hall; I afterwards went with Merriman to his lodgings, No. 1, Ship-yard, Bishopsgate-street without; and between the passage and the stair-case I found two fifty-pound notes; Merriman put up his hand, and shoved up a paper between the wainscol and the boards, in which I found two fifty-pound notes, No. 9428, December 3d, and No. 758, December 5th; a twenty-pound note, No. 5801, December 3d; a ten-pound note, No. 4228, November 11th; a ten-pound note, No. 8800, October 29th; a five-pound note, No. 2646, August 25th; a five-pound note, No. 9151, November 6th; and a five-pound note, No. 7453, September 11th; I afterwards went to the French-Horn, in Crutchedsriars, and searched the privy with Bessiker, and he pointed out this book, (produces it;) the title of it, I believe, is Fair Rosamond.

Q. Have these notes been in your custody ever since? - A. Yes.

Q. (To Mrs. Harwood.) Look at that book - is that the book you lost? - A. This is the book I lost, but it is very much disfigured.

Q. What is the title of it? - A. Roach's Beautiful Extracts.

Q. Now look at the notes - did you make any mark upon them? - A. No; the numbers correspond with the numbers of the notes that I received from Captain Harwood, which I put into the drawer.

Q. Was the aperture of the drawer large enough for that book to have fallen out by the accident of removal? - A. It might have fallen out; the vacaney was large enough for a person's hand.

Bessiker's defence. On the 22d of December, we went to Captain Harwood 's with this lady said she would give us six-pence to bring a chest of drawers from her old house; we went, and were told that another porter had got them bringing, and we went back again; the porter was an old man, and could not bring them.

Mr. Gurney. Prisoner, you had better let me call your witnesses.

The prisoners called Mr. Hall, their master, who gave them an excellent character.

Bessiker, GUILTY, aged 40.

Merriman, GUILTY, aged 38.

Of stealing the notes, but not in the dwelling-house . confined twelve months in the House of Correction . First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

88. JOSEPH THOMPSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of January , a jacket, value 5s. the property of Alexander Peatt .

ALEXANDER PEATT sworn. - I am a sailor ; my ship was lying at New Crane: On Saturday last, I went on shore, and left my jacket in my hammock; I was absent from the ship about ten minutes; I came on board again, and the prisoner went a-shore; I then missed my jacket, and found it upon him about ten minutes afterwards; he said, his shipmate, Bob, had given it to him.

Prisoner. Bob gave it to me to pawn.

ROBERT BODKISON sworn. - Q. Did you give the prisoner this jacket? - A. No, I was cooking the dinner, and saw the prisoner go on to the halfdeck where the jacket was, and I saw him button his jacket up, and go a-shore; when Peatt came on board, he missed his jacket, and went a-shore, and found the jacket upon the prisoner, buttoned up underneath his own jacket, with his arms through it.

Q. Upon your oath, did you give it to him to pawn? - A. I did not.

WILLIAM PARKINS sworn. - On Saturday last I saw the prisoner, and the mate of the ship had hold of him; I then saw him drop a jacket; he had pulled them both off, and when he got out of the gate, he heard the mate in the street, and ran away; a butcher stopped him, and held him till we came up to him; I assisted in taking him to the office.

Prisoner's defence. I had pawned the coat and waistcoat, and the shirt, for the boy, and I had pawned things for the other boy.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Whipped in the jail and discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

89. WILLIAM WILCOX was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of January , a silver watch, value 30s. the property of Joseph Atkins .

There being no evidence to bring the charge home to the prisoner, except his own confession, which appeared to have been extorted by a promise of forgiveness, he was ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

90. THOMAS CASLIN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of December , two shawls, value 2s. six pair of stockings, value 6s. two yards of baize, value 1s. six yards of cloth, value 1s. 6d. a pocket handkerchief, value 6d. two yards of check, value 1s. two yards of flannel, value 1s. two yards of coating, value 4s. a shirt, value 1s. a pair of trowsers, value 1s. and two yards of brown linen, value 1s. the property of James Powell .

JAMES POWELL sworn. - I am a slop-seller in Wapping ; the prisoner has been in my service upwards of two years: On Wednesday morning, the 9th of December, the prisoner was going out to his breakfast with a bundle under his arm; when he got to the door, I asked him what he had got, and he said, a pair of bespoke trowsers, which he was going to carry home to where they were ordered; I requested to see them; he returnedvery willingl into the shop, and went behind one of our counters; he untied the bundle behind the counter, and dropped something out upon the floor; I saw it fall and he gave it a kick with his foot; having great confidence in the man, I sent him to another part of the shop, that I might have

an opportunity of going round to see what it was before I made the accusation; he then gave it another kick for a yard, or a yard and a half, and then stooped down, and threw it under the packing utensils; I was still unwilling to accuse him, and let him go to breakfast; when he was gone, I examined it, and found it to be a pair of trowsers and a shirt; I had the highest opinion of the man, and I believe, till then, he deserved it; I then marked them in the presence of my lad, and put them where I took them from, knowing the prisoner had no business in that part of the shop, that if he took them I should have abundant confirmation; when he returned, he went to the packing stool, stooped down, and laid the articles upon the counter where there was less suspicion; I then sent for an officer, took the prisoner into custody, and searched his house, where I found the other articles mentioned in the indictment; upon the person of the prisoner's wife and daughter, I found a shawl each.

JOSEPH CANDLIN sworn. - I saw the prisoner go behind the counter after he came from break fast, and remove the things from under the packingstool, and placed them upon the counter.

The prisoner left his defence to his Counsel.

GUILTY , aged 50.

confined twelve months in the House of Correction .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

90. THOMAS DAYMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of January , two bushels of oats, value 5s. the property of James Clarke .

JAMES CLARKE sworn. - I live in Shoreditch : On the 7th of January, about noon, I went into my stable, I heard corn ratling in the shoot that conveys it to where the horses are fed from; I listened, and heard the found of some persons stirring over my head; I ascended the ladder into the lost, and found the prisoner coming out with a sack, containing two bushels of oats; it was taken from a bron in the lost; the sack was not mine; the prisoner had been in the habit of coming for four years to take away the dung.

Q. What are you? - A. I am in the oil and wine trade; I sent for an officer, and he was taken before the Magistrate.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Whose the sack 1s, you do not know? - A. No.

Q. Do not you know he was a servant to Mr. Glover, at Tottenham? - A. Yes.

Q. And has been for four years? - A. Yes, I have understood so.

Q. Did he say what he had gone up stairs for? - A. No; he said it was but the second time he had taken corn from the binn.

Court. Q. Did you encourage him to make a confession? - A. Not at all.

Prisoner. I have a wife and four small children.

GUILTY .

confined two months in Newgate , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

92. GEORGE ALLANSON was indicted for that he, on the 16th of October , being employed in the capacity of clerk to Boyce Combe and William Bridgman , did, by virtue of such employment, receive and take into his possession, from George Grote , and William-Willoughby Prescott, two Bank-notes for the payment of 200l. each, one other Bank-note for the payment of 25l. and one other Bank-note for the payment of 1l. for and on account of the said Boyce Combe and William Bridgman; and afterwards on the same day did embezzle, secrete, and make away with the same .

Second Count. For stealing the said Bank-notes, the property of Boyce Combe and William Bridgman.(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

WILLIAM BRIDGMAN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Who is your partner? - A. Mr. Boyce Combe, we are merchants and insurance-brokers; the prisoner was in our employment as a clerk, and had been three or four months.

Q. Did you, on the 16th of October, entrust him with any draft, for the purpose of being presented to your banker's, and for what amount? - A. I did, for 4261. I have the draft here, (produces it); that is the draft, it is upon Prescot's house for 4261.

Q. Did you give him any directions respecting the application of that money? - A. I desired him to receive it from the banker's, and make a payment upon 5000l. scrip consols.

Q. Did you deliver the draft to him yourself? - A. I did.

Q. Did you expect him to return that day into your service? - A. He did return, and the following morning he was not at the accompting-house, but I had no suspicion, knowing he had had a bad cold; I thought he might be indisposed.

Q. Did he ever appear again at the accompting-house till he was apprehended? - A. Not to my knowledge; I think it is three weeks to-day since he was apprehended.

Q. Was that instalment upon scrip paid by him? - A. It was not.

Q. To which purpose he was to apply that 4261.? - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney Q. Of course, an instalment upon scrip is received by some person in the Bank? - A. Yes, the cashier.

Q. I take it for granted the cashier is here, who was to receive it? - A. Not that I know of.

Q. You saw the prisoner again at Mr. Morris's, in Rood-lane; I believe about the 28th, or 29th of December? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you receive your scrip back from him, or Mr. Morris, in his presence? - A. From Mr. Morris, but not himself.

Q. When you sent him first of all to pay this instalment, you put into his hand a receipt for former payments? - A. Yes, they are all on one sheet of paper.

Q. I need hardly ask, if these scrip receipts in the City of London are not marketable? - A. I do not know that that unfortunate young man could have converted them into money, but any person that was known certainly might have disposed of them with the utmost facility.

Q. I believe nearly 400l. had been paid upon these receipts? - A. Yes.

Q. He had been in your service a few months? - A. Yes, I had the highest opinion of him.

Q. And his friends are most respectable? - A. They are.

WILLIAM HEATH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys.. I am clerk in Messrs. Prescott and Grote's house, their names are George Grote, and William-Willoughby Prescott.

Q. Do you recollect the draft being presented at your house on the 16th of October, from Mr. Bridgman, for 426l. - look at that draft? - A. It was.

Q. Do you recollect the person who presented it? - A. It is impossible to do that; I paid the person who presented it, two notes of 200l. each, a 25l. and a 1l. note; the 200l. notes were numbered 109, and 110.

THOMAS NORTHOVER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am a clerk in the Bank.

Q. Do you know the prisoner? - A. I do.

Q. Do you recollect seeing him on the 16th of October? - A. Yes, he brought two notes of 200l. each, to change into smaller notes.

Q. What was the number of those two notes? - A. 109 and 110; I did not pay him the notes myself, I only saw John Jarvis deliver them to him; I received the two 200l. notes myself, and Mr. Jarvis gave him ten 20l. ten notes of 10l. each, and one hundred notes of 1l. each.

JOHN JARVIS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am a clerk in the Bank; I delivered the prisoner the change for two 200l. notes.

Q. Look at that note - is that one of the 20l. notes that you delivered to the prisoner? (refers to his book)? - A. I believe it to be one of the 20l. notes, it checks with the book.

THOMAS MORRIS sworn. - Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - A. I do.

Q. Were you present when he was taken? - A. Yes; on Saturday the 26th of December, I was at Drury-lane Theatre in the boxes.

Q. Did you, at that time, know of his having left his master's employ improperly? - A. Yes; I had not been in the boxes above five minutes when the prisoner came in; the prisoner, on seeing me, ran out of the boxes; I immediately followed him, and persuaded him to go along with me; I said, George, I am very sorry to see you here; I then called a coach and took him with me in a coach to the Ordnance-tavern, on the Surry-side of Westminster-bridge; we both remained there that evening.

Q. Did you explain to him why you pursued such conduct? - A. When we came to the office, I explained to him, that I was acquainted with his having taken Mr. Bridgman's property; I told him, if, according to the advertisement that had appeared, in which Messrs. Combe and Bridgman wished to shew him lenity, if he would make all the restitution in his power, I would see what I could do for him; he then went and fetched the scrip.

Q. Did you accompany him to the place from whence he fetched the scrip? - A. I did not; he went by himself, and brought the scrip to me at my house, in Rood-lane.

Q. Did he give you any thing besides this scrip? - A. Not at that time; I continually repeated to him to disclose the property if he had any left, and on the Tuesday evening he produced me a 20l. Bank-note, a 1l. note, and a 7s. piece; he laid, that was all he had left.

Q. Look at that 20l. Bank-note, and tell me if that was the note you received from him? - A. I believe this to be the same.

Court. Q. The scrip receipts that he delivered up to you was a security for former payments? - A. Yes; that scrip was to the value of near 3000l. that had been paid.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurnty. Q. Which he returned to you, and you returned to Mr. Bridgman? - A. I did.

Q. On Saturday the 26th of December, you met him at the Theatre? - A. Yes.

Q. On what day was it Mr. Bridgman met him at your house? - A. On the Monday following, which was the 28th.

Q. On what day was he taken before the Lord-Mayor? - A. Not till the Thursday following.

Q. During a great part of that time, I believe, he remained in your house, with Mr. Bridgman's permission? - A. He did.

Q. How long have you known him? - A. More than four years.

Q. Previous to this transaction, did you know a young man of a better character? - A. None; Ihad that opinion of him, that I would have been bound for a thousand pounds for him.

Prisoner. I leave my defence to my Counsel.

GUILTY , aged 18.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

93. JOHN WALKER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of December , a piece of mahogany, value 2s. the property of John Ingram and Benjamin Ingram .

JOHN INGRAM sworn. - I am a bedstead and cabinet maker in Old Bethlem, in partnership with my brother, Benjamin Ingram; I missed a piece of mahogany; I know nothing of the prisoner.

- WEST sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Ingram: On the 14th of December I was set to watch in the shed; the prisoner came for the purpose of buying some pieces, as he said; he wanted some long pieces, three quarters or an inch thick; I left him in the shed looking at some; I went up the back way, and came back the front way; I then saw him look round, and take a piece of timber upon his shoulder; I told my master of it, and we went after him as fast as we could run, but could not find him till we heard where he lived; my master and I got an officer, and went to his hoose, where we found the board.(An officer belonging to Worship-street produced the board, which was identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. I bought that with three more pieces the Friday before from Mr. Benjamin Ingram , and told him I should call for them on Monday evening.

The prisoner called his serjeant, who gave him a good character.

Q. (To Ingram.) Is your brother here? - A. No.

Jury. Q. Do you know if the prisoner had ever bought timber of you or your brother? - A. Yes, several times.

Court. Q. Did the prisoner say any thing when you saw him at his own apartments? - A. He said he had taken it, and meant to call and pay my brother for it.

Q. Did he state to you that your brother had sold him this piece? - A. No, he did not.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

94. ELIZABETH AUSTIN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of August , two quilts, value 15s. a blanket, value 10s. 6d. and three pictures, in frames, value 14s. the property of Elizabeth Wilson , widow .

ELIZABETH WILSON sworn. - I am a widow; I live servant with Mr. Wallis, No. 54, Red-Lion-street, Clerkenwell; I had left my things at a room in Little Moorfields; I had let the room to a person of the name of Saunderson, who delivered me up the key on the 9th of August, and on the Sunday he came to inform me the door had been broke open; I went, and missed the articles mentioned in the indictment; I found a quilt at a pawnbroker's; that is all that I have found; the prisoner came to me to let her my room, and I told her I did not choose to let it again.

WILLIAM SAUNDERSON sworn. - I took this room of the last witness on the 5th of June; I delivered up the key on the 9th of August; I went one morning afterwards, about the 10th or 11th, to take down the bedsteads, by her desire, and found that the door had been opened, and the things taken away; I left all safe on the 9th; I know nothing of the prisoner, only she wanted me to let her sleep in Mrs. Wilson's room, and I would not let her.

EPHRAIM HARLEY sworn. - I am servant to Marsh and Spink, No. 30, Barbican; I took in this quilt, (producing it,) of a woman on the 15th of August, but I cannot say who she was.(Joshua Bray, the officer, produced the duplicate of a quilt, which he found in a comb-case in the prisoner's apartment in Moor-lane.)(The quilt was indentified by Mrs. Wilson.)

Prisoner's defence. I bought the quilt for three shillings and six-pence of a woman who buys and sells old clothes; the other things I know nothing about. NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

95. JOHN COLE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of November , three miniature pictures, value 21s. and ten silver tea-spoons, value 26s. the property of Elizabeth Oliver , widow, in her dwelling-house .

ELIZABETH OLIVER , jun. sworn. - I am the daughter of Elizabeth Oliver; my mother is a widow , and keeps the sign of the Standard , in Well-street, in the parish of Whitechapel : On the 16th of November we lost the articles mentioned in the indictment; the prisoner lodged in our house, and upon the spoons being missed, he left our lodgings the next night; the miniature pictures were taken from a drawer; there did not appear to be any violence done to the drawer; he was brought back to our house about five weeks after.

( James Harding , servant to Mr. Matthews, a pawnbroker, in the Minories, produced six tea-spoons, pledged in the name of John Owen, but could not say from whom be received them.)

EDWARD SMITH sworn. - I am an officer belonging to Lambeth-street; I apprehended the prisoner on Sunday, the 13th of December; on Saturday, the 12th, I received these pictures from Mary Seaman .

JOHN NOWLAND sworn. - I am an officer; the prisoner told me if I would go backwards withhim he would tell me all about it; I made him no promise or threat; he told me he found the spoons on the stairs one night when he was going to bed wrapped up in two papers; he said he was very much distressed, and pawned them; he said he found the pictures in his coat-pocket, and did not know how they came there; he said he had left them at Mrs. Seaman's, to be taken care of; he told Smith where the spoons were pawned.

smith. He told me one pawnbroker lived in the Minories, and the other in Rosemary-lane, but did not know their names; we found the other four spoons at a pawnbroker's in Rosemary-lane.

MARY SEAMAN sworn. - I live at No. 5, Iron gate; my father keeps an eating-house; the prisoner came to lodge at my father's on the 14th of November, and on the 16th he gave me those three pictures, saying, they were his father, his mother, and his sister; I was to take care of them for him; one evening afterwards I had occasion to go to Mrs. Oliver's to inquire after a young man who had lodged at our house, and I thought I observed a likeness between Mrs. Oliver and the pictures I had at home; I mentioned it to her, and afterwards delivered them to the officer.

JOHN PEGRIM sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Ray, a pawnbroker, in Rosemary-lane, (produces four tea-spoons;) I took them in pledge of a person, I believe the prisoner at the bar, but I cannot be positive; they were pledged on the 16th of November in the name of John Cole .(The pictures and spoons were identified by Miss Oliver.)

Prisoner's defence. I found the pictures in my great coat pocket, how they came there I do not know; I was going on board a ship, and left them with that young lady to take care of them for me; I picked up the spoons on the stairs as I was going to bed one evening, and being very much distressed I pledged them till I could get some money to redeem them again, and then I meant to find out who they belonged to.

GUILTY, aged 21.

Of stealing goods to the value of 39s.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

96. BRIDGET READING was indicted for feloniously receiving, on the 17th of November , two hundred pounds weight of lead, value 2l. parcel of goods belonging to James Donaldson and Daniel Davies , whereof James Barry was convicted last Sessions, knowing it to have been stolen .

JAMES DONALDSON sworn. - I am a surveyor and builder , in Hart-street, Bloomsbury, and at Esher, in Surrey: On Tuesday, the 17th of November, between nine and ten in the morning, my servant , James Barry , called upon me at Esher; and, in consequence of suspicion, I sent him of an errand into the house while I examined his cart and horses; he had the care of them; he was going to London to bring back building materials; he was to go empty, except a little basket or two of greens and vegetables for the family; I there found two parcels of lead, in bags, the property of Daniel Davies and myself; Mr. Davies and I had the contract together for rebuilding and repairing a large house at Stoke, near Cobham, four miles below Esher; he then went away towards London, for I was anxious to find out where he was going with it; there was about a hundred and a half in one parcel, and about a hundred and a quarter in the other; I followed the cart towards London, and about five o'clock in the evening I went to a house in Crown-street, St. Giles's, and in a fore room of the first floor, I found my servant, James Barry, and Bridget Reading, with one of the bags of lead upon the floor; the other was still in the cart, which was then standing at the door; I had sent a person, of the name of Stapp, to give notice at Bow-street, and they had got there before me; my servant seemed to be quite at home in this house, and though he was in so much affiction, he called for something to drink, as though it was his own home; the prisoner's daughter, about twelve years old, went and fetched him some beer, by the prisoner's desire; there were several articles lying upon the floor, which were not my property; there was a ladle for melting lead or folder; I know the lead to be my property, having been previously marked by both of us at the building.

Q. Whose house was this at which you found the lead? - A. I don't know whose house it was; the prisoner said she knew nothing of the man; before I came, she had said she was his wife, but she afterwards said she was confused, and did not know him.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. This lead was taken from a house in Surrey? - A. Yes.

Q. Was it ripped from the building? - A. It had been pulled from a gutter by the workmen.

Q. Are the officers here to day? - A. No, I have sent for them.

Prisoner's defence. I have ne'er a daughter; I have five boys; I am innocent of what is laid to my charge; I never saw the man till the officers brought him into my room.(The record of the conviction of James Barry read.)

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave her a good character, and deposed that she got her livelihood as a chair-woman, and her husband kept a horse and cart, and dealt in iron.

GUILTY , aged 40.

confined one year in Newgate , and fined 1s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

97. SAMUEL COOPER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of December , an ounce and a pennyweight of silver, value 6s. the property of Peter Bateman , Ann Bateman , and William Bateman .(The case was opened by Mr. Gurney.)

PETER BATEMAN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. What is the firm of your partnership? - A. Peter Bateman, Ann Bateman , widow , and William Bateman; we are working gold and silversmiths , in Bunhill-row; the prisoner came first to our house as an errand-boy, served seven years apprenticeship, and, since that, a journeyman , in all about ten years: On the 9th of December, some suspicion having fallen upon the prisoner, I desired my foreman to look after him; on the 8th, about eight o'clock in the evening, I was passing through the shop accidentally, and saw the prisoner cut three slips off the full lenght of the silver; I took no notice of it, but communicated it to my foreman; the next day, in consequence of information, about five minutes before one, I requested him to come into the accompting-house; my partner followed him in; I then informed the prisoner that we had been considerably robbed, and I had a suspicion he was the person who had been guilty of it; I think he said, why me, Sir? why do you suspect me? I told him I had good grounds for it, and knew more of the business than perhaps he thought of; but, to avoid the painful business of a search, if he had any thing, he had better deliver it up; he said, he had not any; upon which my partner said, you know you have; and he said, what; my partner immediately said, three pieces of wire, which was apparently next kin to electricity to him; I then sent for an officer, and took him down to my dwelling-house, as being a less public place; he went with me to the dwelling-house, and the officer came and searched him; but, finding nothing, he began to be a little insolent; but, upon further search, it was found under his shirt, under the waisthand of his breeches.

Q. What was the purpose for which that silver was intended? - A. For strainers for funnels that he had to make, and that which was found upon him was the pieces that were too long, and which he had cut off the three pieces that will be produced, and the pieces found upon him will make up the exact deficiency.

Court. Q. Do you leave it to your men to help themselves to silver? - A. If the foreman is not in the way, or myself and partner, they frequently help themselves from the skillets.

Cross-examined by Mr. Vaillant. Q. Did you weigh this yourself? - A. No, nobody weighed them; but silver of the same breadth, the same lenght, and the same thickness, weighs that weight.

Q. Did you yourself run this out to know that it was exactly the same? - A. I have got the very piece of silver here from which it was cut off; three such strips would weigh exactly three ounces fifteen pennyweights; it is a flat piece of silver.

Q. How is it that you cut off exactly pieces of the same breadth? - A. It was the whole length of the silver, and we have the rings here that are turned up that he cut off that night; we take them, and divide them as we want them, and mark to that breadth along that silver, and it must come to that weight.

Q. Is it measured in such a way that the strips must be of the same weight - how do you manage to cut them so exactly? - A. There is no difficulty in that; the silver, when it is produced, will shew how easy it is done.

Q. How is it you ascertain that? - A. The silver is flatted to a gauge; we gauge the breadth and length.

RICHARD LABRUM sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You are foreman to Messrs. Batemans? - A. I am: On the 9th of December, in consequence of directions I received, I paid particular attention to the prisoner; he was finishing some wine funnels, vase funnels; he had three pieces of wire off a piece of silver the evening before to make strainers to them; the next morning, the 9th, it not requiring the whole lenght to go round the funnel, I saw him cut off the three waste pieces, and put them in the skin before his board, which is placed there for the purpose of saving the metal; I saw them in the skin at twelve o'clock, and, a little before one, the prisoner was not in the shop; I looked in the skin, and missed all the three pieces; I had informed Mr. Bateman of it; I afterwards saw them before the Magistrate.

WILLIAM MARCHANT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You are a constable? - A. I am: I was sent for to search the prisoner; I found upon him three pieces of silver, (produces them;) I found them under his shirt next his skin.

Labrum. These appear to be the same that I saw in his skin, and afterwards missed; (produces three rings.) These rings and the waste pieces make the exact length and weight with the whole length piece.

Mr. Bateman. I have no doubt of these being my property.

WILLIAM BATEMAN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. I believe you followed the prisoner into the accompting-house? - A. I did; I saw the waste pieces weighed by the constable in my presence, and they correspond exactly in length and in weight.

Prisoner's defence. I was going to put the silver into my box, and seeing my work in the forge, and my shirt being open, I put the silver into mybosom, but had not the least intention of taking it off the premises.

The prisoner called five witnesses, who gave him a good character. GUILTY , aged 26.

confined twelve months in the House of Correction .

First Middlesex Jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

98. RICHARD JOHNSTONE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of January , forty-five yards of carpeting, value 7l. the property of Thomas Eyre , in his dwelling-house .

THOMAS SMITH sworn. - Last Saturday, between six and seven o'clock, I was coming down Oxford-street, and saw a butcher coming out of Mr. Eyresls shop, I believe the prisoner at the bar to be the same man, but I cannot be sure; I was standing opposite the door, upon the foot pavement, on the same side of the way, and about a minute after, a man came out, in a blue coat, with a roll of carpeting upon his shoulder; I don't know who that man was; before he had got five yards past the window, he let it fall, I suppose it was rather too heavy for him; then the person that I believe to be the prisoner, looked round and saw the carpet upon the ground, he had got about ten yards before the other man; he turned back, and lifted the carpet upon his shoulder, and told him to go along, and he went along with it, and Johnstone went along with him.

Q. Did he follow him or how? - A. He walked along-side of him; a gentleman desired me to knock at the door, and ask Mr. Eyre if they had lost any thing, which I did, and Mr. Eyre immediately went after them.

Q.Look at the prisoner? - A. I cannot swear to him, he was a man very much of his appearance, but he had not the coat on that he has now.

JAMES EYRE sworn. - I am the son of Thomas Eyre ; upon the information I received from Smith, I went in pursuit of the man; I found the prisoner in Adam and Eve-court, about two or three hundred yards from our house, there was a man with him; the prisoner had the piece of carpeting upon his shoulder; I then took him to a wine-vaults, kept by a man of the name of Place, and desired him to take care of the prisoner while I went after the other man, but he said, it was no business of his, and he would have nothing to do with it, the other man got away; I took the prisoner to my father's and sent for a constable.

Q. Are you certain it was the prisoner who had the carpet? - A. I am.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Are you in partnership with your father? - A. No.

Q. Has he any partner? - A. No.

Q. When you laid hold of the prisoner, did he not say the other man had found it too heavy, and asked him to carry it for him? - A. Yes.

Q. Is the shop a part of your father's dwelling-house? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. What is the value of this carpet? - A. Six or seven pounds, (the carpeting produced:) I know it to be my father's carpeting.

WILLIAM CASTLE sworn. - On Saturday night I let the prisoner in at Mr. Eyre's, I have worked there these seven years; he said he was come to take money for some meat, that was a little before seven o'clock; I then shut the door and went out into the street to go home, and then another man asked me, if there was not a butcher in the shop; and I said, yes; I left Johnstone in the shop with my master, taking money for the meat.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Then you left the prisoner and your master together? - A. I sent him to my master, who was in the accompting-house at the other end of the shop, about twenty or thirty yards off.

For the Prisoner.

JOHN CLESBY sworn. - The prisoner had been my servant for four or five weeks.

Q. Is he an honest man? - A. Particularly so; I sent him that evening to collect my cash accounts, and he had some Bank-notes, and some silver of mine in his pocket at the time.

Jury. Q. Did you send him to Mr. Eyre's? - A. Yes.

Q. Did he receive from Mr. Eyre the money you sent him for - did he pay it to you? - A. Yes, fourteen and sixpence, and change for a one pound note.

The prisoner called three other witnesses, who gave him a good character. GUILTY , Death , aged 18.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

99. EDWARD WARREN was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William-Sackville Turner , about the hour of twelve in the night of the 3d of December , and burglariously stealing a waistcoat, value 2s. the property of Joseph Noble ; and a hydrometer, value 40s. six guineas, twenty-one shillings, and fourteen hundred and forty halfpence , the property of the said William-Sackville Turner.(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

JOSEPH NOBE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. You are clerk to Mr. William-Sackville Turner? - A. I am.

Q. What is Mr. Turner? - A. A brewer , at Bow, opposite the church, in the parish of St. Mary, Stratford, Bow: On Thursday the 3d of December, I left the accompting-house about three o'clock in the afternoon, and did not return till between six and seven o'clock the next morning; I left my desk locked, it contained a quantity of writing-paper, a waistcoat, and eight pennyworth of halfpence; when I returned to the accompting-house in the morning, I went to the dwelling-house to get the key of the accompting-house door; I found the door locked, I found the stool removed; I then opened the desk, and found all my papers thrown about.

Q. Did you find your desk locked? - A. I did; I missed the halfpence, but did not miss the waistcoat till after the officer had found it; I then looked at Mr. Turner's desk, and saw that open; I found the lock had been wrenched clear off; I missed a hydrometer from his desk; I did not examine it any further, but sent for Mr. Turner; it was about a week after, that I saw the waistcoat in possession of the officer.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. How is this accompting-house situated - does it adjoin the house? - A. Yes; the house and accompting-house is all enclosed in one yard, you go out of Mr. Turner's house into the accompting-house.

WILLIAM-SACKVILLE TURNER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys Q. You are a brewer, at Bow? - A. I am; on Thursday the 3d of December, I left my accompting-house about four o'clock; I left my desk locked, it contained six guineas in gold, to the amount of a guinea in silver, a bag of bad copper, a bag of good copper, halfpence and penny-pieces, some writing-paper, and a hydrometer, and there were about fifty shillingsworth of halfpence on the desk, not locked up; they were tied up in five shillingsworths, except two, which I believe were half-crown papers; the accompting-house is usually locked up about seven or eight o'clock, and the key brought to the house by one of my servants; the next morning, Friday the 4th, I was alarmed that the accompting-house had been broke open; I found the slap torn from the staple, and missed the articles I have mentioned.

Q. How is your house situated? - A. The accompting-house is under a separate roof, but it adjoins the wash-house within two or three yards of the dwelling-house; it is in the brewhouse yard, behind the dwelling-house, it is enclosed in the same yard with the dwelling-house; and the outer gates locked.

Mr. Alley. Q. Is there any wall that separates the dwelling-house from the accompting-house? - A. No.

JOHN GRIFFITHS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. You are an officer belonging to Lambeth-street? - A. I am: On Friday the 4th of December, about four o'clock in the afternoon, we went to Pritchard's house; while we were waiting for him, the wife of the prisoner came in, she called herself his wife; she was searched, and in her pocket was found a large key.

Q. Did you go with her to the prisoner's house? - A. Yes: Coomes and I went with her to No. 2, Ponderson's-place, Bethnal-green Road; she unlocked the door and got a light; it was between eight and nine o'clock in the evening, there are but two rooms in the house; in the bed-room I found a waistcoat, (producing it;) lapped up with other things, in the end of the curtain; in the other room, I found these halfpence tied up in a very large bason, like a wash-hand bason; there was a large quantity of bad halfpence, which we left behind, to the amount of about a dozen or fourteen shillingsworth; the prisoner was at that time in custody at the office; on the Tuesday following, we went to the prisoner's house a second time, and searched the necessary; I saw Coomes put his hand underneath the seat, and take out a parcel tied up in a white cloth.

Court. Q. Was it to be seen by any body that went in? - A. No, not without you put your head down to the hole; and in that cloth we found a quantity of picklock keys, a bad half-guinea, a bad dollar, and some bad silver; I then went to Mr. Turner's brewhouse, at Bow; I found this latch key opened the wicket, in the large gates going into the yard, and this picklock key opened the accompting-house door. (Produces them).

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. A person stooping down in the necessary to buckle his shoe, might have seen this parcel? - A. No, they could not.

Q. This privy is so situated, that Pritchard, or any body else going past, might have gone into it? - A. It is in a garden, any body might have gone in.

JOHN KNOWLAND sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Did you go with Griffiths to the prisoner's house? - A. Yes, I went with Coomes on Saturday the 5th of December, the prisoner was in custody on the Friday; upon searching a chest of drawers, I found some writing-paper, and this paper I found with the sheets torn right in too, in a hat-box.

Mr. Alley. Q. Pritchard was not in custody when you found the paper? - A. No.

ROBERT COOMES sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Did you apprehend the prisoner? - A. I did, on Friday, about one o'clock in the day.

Q. Was that before the wife was taken? - A. Yes, it was; I took him at the Fir-tree public-house, Church-lane, Whitechapel, upon another charge; I was with Griffiths when he found the waistcoat and other things, with the curtain twisted round them, so as to conceal them from sight; I afterwards found the picklock-keys under the seat of the privy; we took Pritchard on the Tuesday morning following, the 8th.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Persons coming in would have observed these things sooner than if the curtains had been hanging down? - A. Certainly, if we had not pulled the curtain down, we should not have seen them.

Q. It was from Pritchard's information that you found the keys? - A. Undoubtedly.

Mr. Noble I am sure this is the waistcoat I left locked up in the desk.

Mr. Turner. This paper of halfpence I think I recollect, the packages had laid upon my desk three or four days, and I had seen them many times, it is a half-crown paper; I had about half a dozen quire of this sort of writing-paper in my desk, and half a dozen quire of letter paper.

BENJAMIN PRITCHARD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. How long have you known the prisoner? - A. I suppose twenty years; I have known him from a boy, he lived in Ponderson's-place, Bethnal-green Road.

Q. Tell us all you know of the robbery of Mr. Turner? - A. About three o'clock in the morning, the prisoner and myself went to Mr. Turner's gates, I opened the wicket gate with a latch thing, and went into the yard.

Q. Do you see that latch thing there? - A. Yes, this is it; then the prisoner unlocked the accompting-house door with this key; then we got a light by a bottle of phosphorus, which the prisoner had, then we broke open the desks with this (a screwdriver;) we took out of one desk this waistcoat, some paper, and some few halfpence; out of the other desk, we took six guineas in gold, some silver and some bad halfpence in a little bag; we took some halfpence tied up in paper off the desk; then we brought out a little box with something in it that brewers use, like a weather-glass.

Court. (To Turner.) Q. What is the use of the hydrometer in your business? - A. To ascertain the gravity of the wort.

Pritchard. We were about a quarter of an hour about it; the prisoner locked the door again, and we came out at the gate, the gate shuts of itself; then we went to Bow-fair-field, and the prisoner put on this waistcoat; we took the money to the prisoner's house, some we left there, and some I carried home; he left the waistcoat at his house, and then went home with me; it was then, I suppose, between four and five o'clock.

Q. When were you taken? - A. On the Tuesday following.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. When you went to this house, there was nobody in company with you but the prisoner? - A. No.

Q. Where is your son now? - A. I do not know, he has been from me these three years.

Q. You divided the property fairly, I suppose? - A. We divided the money fair.

Q. And the paper as well as every thing else? - A. I don't recollect what we did with the paper, I believe some of it was left at my house.

Q. What became of the picklock-keys; he left them at his house.

Q. And the phosphorus box? - A. No, that was left at my house.

Q. You said the prisoner had it? - A. Yes, he gave it to me in the accompting-house to get a light, and then I put it in my pocket, and brought it home.

Q. What time did the prisoner leave you? - A. About five o'clock, or a little after.

Q. Had you any person living in the house with you, besides your wife and family? - A. No.

Q. Is your wife here? - A. No.

Q. She must have seen the prisoner, if he came to your house that morning? - A. No, she was not up, I had the key.

Q. Have vyou any vchildren grown up? - A. Yes.

Q. And there is nobody here to say he was with you that morning? - A. No.

Q. The prisoner was taken up before you? - A. Yes.

Q. I must not ask you if you put these keys in the privy after he was taken up, but you know this privy very well? - A. Yes; but I never was in that quarter after he was taken up.

Q. Have you ever been accused of having keys of this sort about you? - A. At Stafford, fourteen or fifteen years ago, I was tried for an assault.

Q. Were you not tried at Stafford as a vagrant, having false keys about you? - A. No.

Q. Where have you been tried besides Stafford? - A. At Coventry.

Q. Were you ever a witness in this Court before yesterday? - A. Yes; you examined me before about this time twelvemonth about some notes of the Bank.

Q. Against whom? - A. A man of the name of Wooldridge.

Q. You turned evidence then, as you do now, to save your own life? - A. They sent for me to Whitechapel office, and I told the truth.

Q. You have had sufficient experience to know that the evidence of an accomplice requires some additional support? - A. I don't understand you.

Q. Did not you know it was necessary, in order to corroborate your story, that that waistcoat should be left at the house of the prisoner? - A. I cannot tell what you mean.

Prisoner's defence. Pritchard gave me this waistcoat to go to the Bank in, to get change for a note; I am as innocent as the child unborn; Pritchard has done this to clear himself and his son, and I will take care never to have any thing to do with such a man again; I don't know where the brewhouse is, as God is my Judge; he has brought up his own son in the same way; his son was detected in carrying false keys to him while he was in jail, to let him out.

The prisoner called six witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY of stealing the waistcoat, but not guilty of breaking and entering the dwelling-house .

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

100. JAMES LANGLEY was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Wheeler , about the hour of seven in the night of the 27th of December , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing a metal watch, value 20s. three gold rings, value 2l five silver tea-spoons, value 15s, three table spoons, value 30s. a pair of silver shoe-buckles, value 30s. a gown, value 8s. a cloth cloak, value 6s. a silk cloak, value 20s. a petticoat, value 2s. an apron, value 1s. a silk handkerchief, value 1s. a muslin neckcloth, value 1s. a pair of leather breeches, value 15s. two waistcoats, value 15s. a cloth coat, value 30s. a shawl, value 1s. an iron bed-winch, value 2d. a silver-handled knife, value 2s. a silver-handled fork, value 1s. a deal box, value 2s. a shirt, value 3s. and a bonnet, value 2s. the property of the said Thomas Wheeler .(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

THOMAS WHEELER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. What are you? - A. Foreman to Messrs. Rhodes and Barker, dustmen ; I live in a room over a stable in Suffolk Mews, near the Middlesex Hospital; the prisoner had worked for me about six weeks; he knew my apartments as well as I did myself: On Sunday, the 27th of December, my son and I went to the King's Head in Tottenham Court Road; the prisoner came in about six o'clock, he did not stop above five minutes.

Q. Were you drunk or sober? - A. We were perfectly sober.

Q. How came the prisoner to leave you? - A. I had two daughters, one came from Bethnalgreen that day to see me; my son said to the prisoner, where is Sarah, meaning Sarah Allen ; he said, she is at home along with your mother.

Q. There was some little affection between your son and her? - A. Yes, I believe so; my son said, I wish you would go and fetch her as well as the rest, because my two daughters had come to the King's Head to wish me a good night; the prisoner said he would go and fetch her.

Q. Did either of you desire the prisoner to bring your wife with Sarah Allen ? - A. No; for since the death of her child, she has not had a right compliment in her head; Sarah Allen came in about a quarter of an hour without the prisoner, and I saw no more of him till he was taken up; my wife came with Sarah Allen , but they did not stop a minute.

Q. How long was it before you returned? - A. We did not return till the girl came back and told us the place was stripped; I went home, and found the top box taken away entirely, and the under box stripped of every thing; I missed the articles mentioned in the indictment.

Q. What do you suppose they were all worth? - A. I suppose about twenty-four or twenty-five pounds.

Q. How lately before that had the prisoner worked for you? - A. About three weeks.

Q. Had you paid him any money? - A. No; my master always pays the men; I tell him what they have done.

Court. Q. How much had he a week? - A. Twelve shillings.

JOSEPH WHEELER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Were you with your father at the King's Head public-house? - A. Yes; the prisoner came in about six o'clock in the evening.

Q. Were you or your father at all in liquor? - A. No, never a one of us; the prisoner only stopped while he drank a glass of peppermint, and then he went to fetch Sarah Allen , but did not come back.

Q. Did you or your father desire him to bring your mother? - A. No; but she came with Sarah Allen , and went away again in a few minutes.

Q. How long was it from the time the prisoner went away till Sarah Allen and your mother came? - A. About a quarter of an hour.

Q. How far is the King's Head from your house? - A. Rather better than a quarter of a miles.

SARAH ALLEN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Were you at Wheeler's house on the 27th of December? - A. I was.

Q. How soon in that day did you see the prisoner? - A. About three o'clock, at Mr. Wheeler's house; he drank tea with Mrs. Wheeler, her two daughters, and myself, and staid till half past five; she took the two daughters with him, and returned about six o'clock, he seemed to be in a very great heat, with his hat in his hand; he said, Joseph, meaning Joseph Wheeler , was at the King's Head very much in liquor, and said, he would not come home till I went to fetch him home; he said, he thought it was proper for me to bring him home, if I could; then he turned round to Mrs. Wheeler, and said, Mr. Wheeler desires also that you will go; upon that, we locked the door, and both went; we left nobody on the premises but the carter below feeding his horses; I said, James, as you have come for us, we may as well all go together; he immediately said, he would walk on by the Hospital; we went on by the Hospital, and called several times, but he was not there; we went to the King's Head, but found neither of them intoxicated, and when we found we were not wanted, we immediately returned home again; we went up stairs together; we found the door wide open, it had been wrenched open, and the place rifled; upon that, I returned, to let Mr. Wheeler know.

RICHARD HCBBARD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. You are a carter? - A. Yes; I was in the stable when Mrs. Wheeler and Sarah Allen went out; in the course of three or four minutes after they were gone, I saw the prisoner; he askedme if any body was at home; I said, I believe the daughter is at home; he went up, I heard him knock at the door, and then he came down again; I had a light in my hand, and looked him in the face; he had not been gone three minutes before the son came, he could not have got out of the Mews; he asked me to drink, and I had a glass of peppermint with him; I told him his mother and Sarah Allen were gone to him.

Q. Was that before the mother and Sarah Allen returned? - A. Yes; and then he went back to the King's Head again.

Court. (To JOseph Wheeler.) Q. Did you come back? - A. Yes; I thought they were a long time before they came, and I went for them.

Q. How long did you wait at the public-house after you sent for them, and before you went? - A. About a quarter of an hour; I ran all the way.

JOHN DAWSON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Did you apprehend the prisoner? - A. No; he was brought to me on the Sunday night at the watch-house by Thomas Wheeler.

Thomas Wheeler. I apprehended him as high as I can guess, a quarter after ten o'clock, or thereabout, on the same night; I found him at Mrs. Sudbury's in Church-lane; I charged him with having robbed me, and he said he knew nothing about it; the watchman and I took him to the watch-house, and delivered him over to Dawson; he was searched, and in one of his boots was found a seven-shilling piece and some silver; I cannot say how much.

Dawson. I searched the prisoner, and found upon him about thirty shillings in silver, and a knife; Perry then came in, and pulled off his boots, where he found a seven-shilling piece and some silver, amounting to thirty-three shillings.

- PERRY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Did you search the prisoner? - A. I did; he had been searched before he got to the watch-house; I made him pull off his boots, and in one of them I found twenty-three shillings, a half-crown, a seven-shilling piece, and a sixpence; he said he had received it for a fortnight's wages.

Prisoner's defence. I am as innocent of the fact as the child unborn. NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

101. ROBERT FRANCIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of December , a carpet, value 4l. the property of Ann Brooks , widow .

Second Count. Charging it to be the property of John Ruff .

JOHN RUFF sworn. - I am a chairman : On the 11th of December, I had a carpet to beat and clean belonging to Mrs. Ann Brooks , a widow lady; I put down the carpet at the Worcester Arms, George-street, Portman-square ; I went in to get a glass of ale, and a boy came in, and said, a man had taken away the carpet; we all went out of the house as fast as we could go, and when we got to the corner, we saw the prisoner about a hundred and fifty yards before us, with the carpet upon him; we called out, stop thief; he heard us, and threw down the carpet; he ran to the corner of Quebec-street, where he was stopped by Britton; I am sure the man that was stopped was the same man that had the carpet, I saw his face; we then took him to Marlborough-street.

JOHN WAY sworn. - I am a chairman; I went in pursuit of the prisoner; I saw him with a carpet on his shoulders; we all cried out, stop thief, and he threw down the carpet; he was stopped at the corner of Quebec-street by George Britton.

GEORGE BRITTON sworn. - I am a chairman; I went in pursuit of the prisoner, and stopped him at the corner of Quebec-street.

Q. (To Ruff.) Where did you place this carpet when you went into the public-house? - A. Upon a rail against the chair-house, close to the door.

Prisoner's defence. I follow portering; a man hired me to carry this carpet; he took me into the very house where these men were, and treated me with part of a pint of porter, and he came out of the house with me; these people came up, and cried, stop thief, and I was frightened, and threw down the carpet. GUILTY , aged 46.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and publicly whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

102. BENJAMIN HICKS and HENRY PRYKE were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 31st of December , three hundred and ninety-two pounds weight of iron horse-shoes, value 5l. 2s. the property of William Moorcroft and John Field .

JOHN FIELD sworn. - I am a horse-doctor , No. 224, Oxford-street, in partnership with William Moorcroft: On Sunday, the 20th of December, I received information that there were a quantity of shoes of ours at Messrs. Parkes's, Broad-street, St. Giles's: On Monday morning I went there, and found them; the weight of them was one hundred two quarters and twenty-one pounds; I desired to see Mr. Parkes, and after a communication with him, I gave directions, in case any more were brought, to let me know: On the 31st of December, about seven o'clock in the evening, I was sent for; I went and saw the two prisoners at Mr. Parkes's with 162 shoes, weighing one hundred three quarters and seven pounds; they were taken to Marlborough-street.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Which of the prisoners is it whose son was at your house? - A. Pryke.

Q. These two prisoners had no access to yourhouse? - A. The same as other people; Pryke has been there in the day.

Q. The son had an opportunity of taking these things, if he had been so disposed? - A. Yes.

Q. But neither of these men had the opportunity without being observed by your servants? - A. No; the son of this man has absconded, and I have a warrant out against him.

Q. It was very easy for the son to get the father to dispose of them? - A. Yes.

BENJAMIN JONES sworn. - I am servant to Messrs. Moorcrost and Field, I can only prove the property; I made a great number of the shoes (a sample of the shoes produced); I know these to be Messrs. Moorcrost's and Field's property.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Young Pryke has absconded? - A. Yes; he worked there on the 31st of December, and never came afterwards.

Q. It was not found out till the 31st, in the evening? - A. No.

JOHN FENWICK sworn. - I am shopman to Mr. Parkes, ironmonger: On the 31st of December, the prisoners brought a parcel of horseshoes; they came together about seven o'clock in the evening; the shoes weighed one hundred three quarters and seven pounds; I know the vmen well from having been there on the 18th of the same month; I sent up to Messrs. Moorcrost and Field's, as I had been directed to do; they were asked where they brought the shoes from; they said, they brought them from Paddington, from one Morris; a little time after, Messrs. Moorcrost and Field came to the shop; they were to have thirty shillings a hundred for them.

Mr. Field. I know these shoes to be mine; they are marked with the letter M; the shoes are made by two different people, each has his own mark.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. Have you never said that you believed this man's son was the person who had stole them, and these people the persons who disposed of them? - A. I may have said so, but not that I know of.

Q. Do you not now believe your servant who has run away, was the person who stole the shoes? - A. I have no doubt but he had something to do with stealing them.

Q. Have you any doubt that he had the whole to do with the stealing of them? - A. That I know nothing about.

Jones. I have no doubt of these shoes being Messrs. Moorcrost and Field's.

Hickes's defence. I was employed to carry these shoes by the man that had them, Mr. Pryke's son.

Pryke's defence. I was coming from Pedlar's Acre; I met my son and this man, and they asked me to take a walk with them, and I did.

Court. (To Mr. Field.) Q. Did you miss any shoes? - A. Yes, about three days before the 31st, we missed half a yard of shoes.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. You missed them from time to time, so that it must be some person who had the opportuinty of frequently taking them? - A. That night we found the yard-door open, and the shop-door open.

Hicks, GUILTY , aged 51.

Pryke, GUILTY , aged 57.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

103. ROBERT PARKER and WILLIAM LONSDALE were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of January , in the dwelling-house of the said William Lonsdale, four guineas, and a bank-note, value 30l. the property of Cuthbert Kitchen .

CUTHBERT KITCHEN sworn. - I am a farmer , near Bishop's Castle, in Shropshire; I came to town this day fortnight, and it will be a fortnight tomorrow since I lost my property; I was sitting in the parlour of my nephew, who is a cheesemonger, in Whitcomb-street, and a man came in and fetched him to decide a wager of a foot-race that was run at York some years back; he asked me to go with him, and I did; we went first to a public-house in the Haymarket that my nephew used, and there we had a pot of beer between us two and the man that fetched him; one man came, and said, if it was not decided by such a time, he would lose his wager; and my nephew went, and came back again to me, and then I went with him to the Robin-Hood, in Charles-street, St. James's-square.

Q. Who keeps it? - A. I don't know; there were some people drinking punch; they knew my nephew by pretence, that they had seen him before, and they asked us to drink with them, and then cards were introduced, and my nephew played.

Q. Who were the parties that sat down to play? - A. There is one there, (Parker.)

Q. What did they play at? - A. They played at whist; there was my nephew and three of them made the party; I sat by them, and then they proposed to lay money; my nephew said, uncle, I have an extraordinary good hand of cards, I can beat them myself, I am sure of the odd trick.

Q. Did he say that openly, so that the others could hear? - A. Yes.

Q. They would not take your best after that, I suppose? - A. Yes, they did.

Q. What did you lay? - A. I laid forty pounds to twenty.

Q. Did you win? - A. No; as soon as they put it down, I thought there was something wrong; I thought they were going to rob me, and I saidto my nephew, John, you have brought me here to be robbed.

Q. Before all the company? - A. Yes; he said, no, uncle, I know the men very well, they will not rob you; Mr. Parker, the man at the bar, got the money in his hand, and I snatched it out of his hand by force, and, in getting it from him by force, I tore the thirty-pound note in three pieces; I had put into his hand a thirty-pound bank-note and two five-guinea country-bills; then that caused a disturbance in the house, and they were angry with me, and he said I had robbed my nephew, for he could have won the game if I had let him.

Q. Was he to go halves with you? - A. There was nothing said about halves, and my nephew himself was angry with me; upon that we all went away from that house, and I thought of going home, and all the way I went, my nephew and these two men were chiding me that I had ruined him, by not letting him win the money; they said, they were my nephew's friends, and they would not let him be robbed; so in going home, some of the party proposed to get some more drink; then we went to a public-house in the Haymarket; they call it the tap at the Opera house; we went all straight away in the parlour.

Jury. Q. What time of night was this? - A. I do not know, for I had been drinking punch with them, and had more liquor than I should have had.

Court. Q. Do not you know what time it was - was it dark? - A. Yes; I dare say it was nine o'clock before we went out.

Q. Who keeps the tap? - A. The prisoner Lonsdale.

Q. Was he sober? - A. I do not know whether he was drunk or sober; I did not see any thing by him; when we went into the parlour, they called for some more punch, and some of them began to produce a pack of cards again; my nephew was as keen of playing as any of them, and he said only put it down, and we will soon have the money; and they proposed a wager again, and one of them said, oh, he is drunk, we will soon do him.

Q. Who was that? - A. One of the party that was playing.

Q. You thought him drunk too, I suppose? - A. I thought he was in liquor; he appeared very much like a gentleman; they would not let him speak, and I thought they used him ill; and then I laid the same wager as I had done before; I laid forty pounds to twenty again; I was thinking I could get some money.

Q. And did you think that perfectly honest? - A. I cannot say; then my nephew laid twice over ten to one, that was threescore pounds, and I put it down for him; he said, he had got such a hand of cards; he had got all the trumps in his own hand; he had got seven trumps; he had only one trick to get; he had only one card left when the wager was laid, and that was a trump.

Q. You knew all this, and saw it? - A. Yes; and one of the men wanted to look at the cards that had been played, and he played a trump; my nephew said, you are a rascal, I played that card, it was the seven of hearts; then the gentleman, that pretended to be drunk, snatched up the money, and ran away with it.

Q. Did you see Lonsdale in the room at all? - A. No, I did not.

Court. Gentlemen, you see this is a scene of iniquity from beginning to end.

Jury. Q. Who held the stakes? - A. Another man that they brought in; I did not know him.

Q. You recollect all these circumstances perfectly well, and yet you say you were so drunk you could not tell what time it was? - A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Will you just tell the Gentlemen of the Jury how many jails you have been in? - A. I never was in any jail for any harm.

Q. How many jails have you been in? - A. I do not know.

Q. Clerkenwell, one; Newgate, two; Hereford, three; and so on? - A. I never was in any country jail.

Q. Do you know that place behind you? - A. I suppose you know that as well as me.

Q. What were you in Newgate for? - A. For no felony.

Q. For gambling? - A. No.

Q. What for? - A. For debt.

Q. What were you in Clerkenwell for? - A. I was there once for something; I changed a horse at Smithfield, and the horse that I changed for was stole, and they took me upon suspicion, but I was discharged.

Q. Do you recollect a man of your name being indicted for horse-stealing, and run away from his bail? - A. No.

Q. You never heard of such a man? - A. No.

Q. Your's is a singular name - I do not ask you if you are the man -

Court. I don't know whether we should go any farther in a case like this; they are playing at cards in a public-house, and his nephew, being sure of winning, lays two to one; what credit can you give to so drunken, so abandoned, a witness.

Jury. We should like to hear the nephew, my Lord.

JOHN BOLDERSON sworn. - I am a cheesemonger, No. 7. Whitcomb-street, Haymarket; Parker called upon me.

Q. How long have you known him? - A. I did not know any thing of him further than coming to my shop for cheese and butter: On Tuesday, the 6th of January, he called upon me, about eighto'clock at night, and asked me if I was busy; I told him I was; he said, he had betted a wager of a bowl of punch about a foot-race at York; and I told him I knew the man won his wager that he run for, but I could not tell what time it was to be done in; I told him I had an uncle from the country, if he would take him with me, I would go; we went first to the tap under the Opera, and there they said he was gone to the Talbot; then we went to the Talbot, and then a man came in with a note from the Robin-Hood, saying, that his bowl of punch would be forfeited, unless I came directly; I left my uncle, and went there; there was only one person in the back parlour, and he asked me what I knew about the wager, and I told him; he said, he was satisfied that he had lost, and called for a bowl of punch; I had a glass of punch, and a man came in, and said, Mr. Bolderon, how do you do? I was astonished at his knowing me, and he asked me to have some brandy and water; he said, he should like to smoke a pipe with me, and persuaded me to fetch my uncle; Parker went with me, and my uncle came; after we had sat down some time, a pack of cards was produced, and my uncle was asked to play; he said, he never did; we played for a bowl of liquor; I had a capital good hand, and they proposed to bet wagers as far as forty pounds; my uncle put down a thirty-pound note and two five-guinea notes; Parker took them up; and then my uncle, dreading something, said, John, you have brought me here to be robbed; I said, G - d bless you, no, we are all countrymen together; then there was a proposal to go to the tap under the Opera.

Q. Were you sober? - A. I was rather fresh in liquor.

Q. How long have you lived in London? - A. Only since May; we went to the tap, and then the cards were introduced again, and we stopped to play; hearts were trumps, and I had the ace, king, queen, knave, nine, seven, and six, of hearts, Parker was my partner; the other two were Furby and Harrison; Harrison was the man who was represented as the gentleman.

Q. He was drunk, was not he? - A. He pretended to be drunk; when I looked at my cards, I said to my uncle, I am sure I can get the odd trick; I trumped one of their cards with the seven; then Furby said, let me look at your cards that you have played, and he did look at them, and stole the seven from my cards; after a little while, he played my trump seven, and then I perceived he had stole it; then the gentleman swore he had won, and snatched up the money; my uncle had betted thirty pounds, and put down five five-guinea notes and four guineas in gold; Mr. Harrison put down his pocket-book and his gold watch against it; it was all put into the hands of a man of the name of Solliker, and as soon as there was a row about it, he snatched the money from Solliker, and ran out; my uncle ran out immediately, but he was gone.

Jury. Q. Was Lonsdale any one of the party that was gambling? - A. No, only bringing in the liquor.

Q. Did he seem acquainted with the persons who were playing? - A. Not at all.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. What part of the country do you come from? - A. Near Richmond, in Yorkshire.

Q. Do you know what time this was? - A. I think, to the best of my recollection, it might be about one o'clock in the morning; we went out between eight and nine.

THOMAS BLISS sworn. - I am one of the Inspectors of bank-notes: On the 6th of January, the prosecutor came to the Bank to say something about a thirty-pound note that he had lost in the scramble the night before; and, while he was there, Parker came and presented it; I stopped it, and have kept it ever since, (produces it;) it was torn in this manner.(Kitchen produced some pieces of a bank-note, which corresponded with that produced by Mr. Bliss.)

- MACKENZIE sworn. - I am a watchman: On Wednesday, the 6th of January, about two o'clock in the morning, I heard the found of the rattles; I went to the tap under the Opera, and there was the prosecutor and his nephew; they both said they had been robbed, and the man was gone; there was a great deal of confusion.

WILLIAM PERCY sworn. - I am a watchman in the Haymarket: At near half past two o'clock I heard the spring of a rattle, and went to the Opera tap; they wanted me to take the landlord, but I said I knew where to find him, and as he was not the man that robbed him, I did not know that I should do right.

WILLIAM WARREN sworn. - I apprehended Lonsdale and his wife upon a warrant.

Court. (To Kitchen.) Q. Cuthbert Kitchen is an odd name, were you never in Newgate but for debt? - A. No.

Q. It is a name known in this Court, were you tried for that horse that you say you changed? - A. No, I told the Justice how it was, and I was discharged.

Prisoner Parker. I wish to have the landlord of the Robin-Hood called.

MATTHEW BARNES sworn. - I never saw these people before; they asked me for cards, and I refused them; I saw the cards on the table packed up twice, but I did not see them played.

Q. Did you know any thing about this? - A. No, Bolderon was very much intoxicated, and abused my wife because I had refused the cards.

Both NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

104. JOHN LEWIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of December , a handkerchief, value 1s. 6d. the property of Philip Hay , Esq. (The case was opened by Mr. Raine.)

PHILIP HAY , Esq. sworn. - I live at No. 48, Jermyn-street ; the prisoner was my servant : I had missed other things before the 16th of December, and amongst them this handkerchief; I inquired for his box of my other servant, and I broke it open; we found the cambric handkerchief marked with my name at full length; the prisoner absented himself for two days, and during his absence I opened his box.

JAMES DEMPSEY sworn. - I am groom to Captain Hay , and was with him when he broke the box open; a day or two after the prisoner left his apartments; I took out the handkerchief. (The handkerchief produced, and identified by the prosecutor.)

The prisoner put in a written defence to the following purport:

John Lewis , a native of Africa, declares he lived with Captain Hay eighteen months; that the pocket-handkerchief found in the poor boy's trunk was put there, in consequence of washing it, for safety; declares, that the said Captain reduced him from his first master, and positively declares his innocence; and he conceives the charge is instituted for the purpose of getting rid of his demand for his wages. GUILTY , aged 20.

Publicly whipped , and discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

105. GEORGE BREWER and MICHAEL DOYLE were indicted for feloniously making an assault, on the 27th of December , on the King's highway, upon Jeremiah Hargan , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, against his will, a watch, value 5l. a chain, value 6d. and a seal, value 2d. the property of the said Jeremiah.(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

JEREMIAH HARGAN sworn. - I am foreman to Mr. Millan, warehouseman , in Ironmonger-lane: On Sunday evening, the 27th of December, about seven o'clock, I was in Leman-street, Goodman's-fields , with Jeremiah Leary, who was much in liquor, I was as sober as I am now; near the bottom of the street we were met by a party of men, to the number of six or seven; Brewer was the first who came up to me, in company with another man, whom I do not know; they came on each side of me, hurted me, and struck me, and at the same time Doyle came in the front of me, and pulled the watch out of my pocket; when they struck me they swore, d - n your eyes what do you want, or something to that purpose; Doyle was dressed at that time in sailor's clothes, I never saw them before; I spread my arms, and pushed them off, ran into the Brown-Bear public-house, and told them what had happened; I was struck, both on my eyes and nose, my nose bled by the blow; I found nobody to assist me, and as I went out the prisoners were passing the door, in company with several more; I seized Brewer; I have not the least doubt he was the man who first came up to me; Doyle returned back with two or three more of the gang, crying out what is the matter; coming up to me he struck me across the ear, splirting it in two, and knocked the blood out of both my ears; they then directly set off. When I recovered myself, I followed, crying out stop thief, to Rosemary-lane, and to Salt-petre-bank, but was afraid to go any further, being a stranger. I have not the least doubt that Brewer was one, and that Doyle took my watch. I was perfectly sober, if I had not been so I could not have acted as I did. I have never had the things again.

Cross-examined by Mr. Raine. Q. Was your comvanion drunk? - A. Yes; I had been drinking with him in a public-house about two minutes before, we had sixpennyworth of rum and water; I had been drinking some beer in a private house, but I drank no more than I thought would do me good, I cannot tell how much; I did not drink three quarts, nor two, but cannot tell how much; I only drank sufficient to quench my thirst, I was not drunk; there might be seven or eight pots among four or five in company.

Q. You never saw either of the men before? - A. Not to my knowledge.

Q. It was dark, was it not? - A. It was starlight enough for me to distinguish their faces; and there was a light from the public-house door.

Q. The man who took your watch was in sailor's clothes? - A. Yes.

Q. That is a common dress in that part of the town? - A. Yes.

Mr. Knapp. Q. How long did the first scussle last? - A. Not two minutes; and the second not a minute. I have no doubt they are the persons with whom I had the two scussles.

Court. Q. Is Leman-street lighted with lamps? - A. It was at the bottom, in the very darkest part; there was one lamp belonging to the sugar-house that gave a bad light; I trusted to the star-light, and the light of the public-house.

SARAH CARTER sworn. - My husband keeps the Brown-Bear in Leman-street: On the 27th of December, the prosecutor came in, about seven o'clock, bleeding at his nose, and saying he had been robbed, and received the blows of some thieves at the door; he came in for assistance, but it being Sunday we had only two lodgers, an old man, and a middle aged man.

Cross-examined by Mr. Raine. Q. Did he appear to be ill-used? - A. Yes; he appeared to be slurried, his nose was bleeding, and his eyes were growing black from the blows.

Q. Did he not appear to be worse for liquor? - A. No; he seemed to be slurried.

JOSEPH HAYNES sworn. - I am an officer belonging to Shadwell: I had information, and went to Salt-petre-bank, and on the Tuesday evening I apprehended Brewer in St. Catherine's-lane, I knew him well before; Doyle was in company with another man, I had an information against him at that time; I found on Brewer a black crape round his hat, he said, he was in mourning for his mother; and upon Doyle I found two keys, one he said belonged to his house, and the other to a lodging in St. Catherine's-lane.

Brewer's defence. I had been two days locked up before they took the crape from my hat; and the prosecutor at first said he did not know either of the men, and took a man with a green coat on, because he said he did not know either of our faces.

Doyle's defence. A man, named Farmer, asked me if I wanted a constant birth, I said I did, and he took me to Shadwell office; I staid at the White Lion while he spoke to the clerk, as he told me; he came to me, and said he had got me the birth; we had some beer, and in about five minutes the officers came in; they called Brewer by name, he got up, and they hand-cussed him; they said, young man we want you, but did not know my name; Cook said they wanted nothing with me, and I staid there till near ten o'clock; I met Brown, and said, what did you want with me; he said, nothing of no great consequence, but I want you now, and he took me; I have people to prove where I was at the same time.

For the prisoner Doyle.

ELIZABETH GUELCH sworn. - I have known Michael Dyle for the last six or seven months: On the Sunday after Christmas-day, he was in my company the whole day, in my apartments, No. 9, St. Catherine's, till past nine o'clock; I am sure he was not outside of the room.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Did you know him before that time? - A. I cannot say I did, ever to be in his company.

Q. What business are you? - A. An unfortunate woman; St. Catherine's is about half a mile from Leman-street; Doyle has lived along with me three months; I did not attend at the Justices; I told he officers he was with me all day, to the best of my knowledge, but cannot be positive; I don't know how he has got his living; he went to the water-side umping, and sometimes to biscuit-baking.

Q. Do you know where he came from? - A. I heard people talk; he told me he came from abroad.

Q. Is there any other day you can tell me, when he was with you all day? - A. No, I cannot tell any day but that; he dined, and drank tea with me; he drank tea with me often; I know Brewer of further than seeing him in the public-house with thers; a woman drank tea with me that day.

SARAH HYNDES sworn. - I know Elizabeth Guelch, and visited her on Sunday after Christmas-day; I went there about five o'clock, Michael Doyle was with her, I had often seen him; I staid there from five to nine, and I am sure he was there all the time.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. What are you? - A. I am a poor woman, and go out a chairing, I have known Doyle about two years, he is a biscuit-baker by trade, and has lived about St. Catherine's, as far as I know; I have seen him about for the last two years; when I went there, at five o'clock, he was there.

Brewer, GUILTY , Death , aged 22.

Doyle, GUILTY , Death , aged 33.

First Middlesex Jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

106. JEREMIAH NEALY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of December , twenty-eight yards of printed cotton, value 28s. the property of Thomas Milne , and Charles Nunn .(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

WILLIAM WARD sworn. - I am employed by Messrs. Ainsworth and Co. in Cheapside , and know Messrs. Milne and Nunn, who are wholesale linendrapers , in Cheapside: On the 10th of December, I was going by their door, about five o'clock in the afternoon, when it was dark, and saw the prisoner standing with the door open, looking in at the warehouseman, who was sitting at a desk above; I returned in about a minute, and he was standing in the same situation, it created in me a suspicion that he was about something that was not right; I walked to our warehouse-door, passed him, and came back again; when I went back again, he was bringing a piece of print in his hand; they laid close to the door; as soon as I saw him bringing it out, I laid hold of him, and he threw it down, and began begging and praying I would let him go; I took him into Mr. Milne's warehouse, and the print was brought in.( Thomas Trimby , a constable, produced the print, which was identified by Mr. Milne.)

Prisoner's defence. I have nothing to say.

GUILTY, aged 15.

The prisoner was recommended to mercy by the Jury, on account of his youth .

confined six months in Newgate , and whipped in the jail .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

107. JOHN INYON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of January , eleven gallons of brandy, value 7l. and a wooden cask, value 4s. the property of Thomas Fassett , Sir Robert Burnett , Knt. Robert Burnett , the younger , and Thomas Fassett .(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

RICHARD KILNER sworn. - I am servant toMessrs. Fassett and Burnett: On the 2d of January, about five o'clock in the afternoon, I had a cask of brandy, with other goods, in my cart, at Dice-Quay gateway, in Thames-street ; I left my cart, and all safe in it, for about five minutes, because I could not get down the Quay; when I returned to it the cask of brandy was gone, the tail board had been taken down and put up again, but not fastened; I saw it again about three minutes afterwards pitched in the middle of the street, and the prisoner in custody.

THOMAS MERRIMAN sworn. - I am streetkeeper and constable: On the 2d of January, coming along, I saw the prisoner run across Thames-street, from Dice-Quay to St. Dunstan's-hill, with a cask upon his back; I pursued him till he got into Tower-street, where I stopped him, and he threw the calk off his back. I secured him, and he said he was employed by a man to carry it; the cask was staved by throwing it down; then the carman came and claimed it. (The cask produced, and identified.)

ROBERT BURNETT , Esq. sworn. - The firm of the house is Thomas Fassett, Sir Robert Burnett, Robert Burnett , the younger, and Thomas Fassett ; the cask contained between eleven and twelve gallons, and the value about ten pounds.

Prisoners defence. I was going home, and two gentlemen, very well dressed, asked me to carry it home for them. GUILTY , aged 30.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

108. JOHN CHESTER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of December , a mare, value 14l. the property of Nathaniel Humphreys .(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp).

BENJAMIN SMITHEN sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Flack, at Ware: The mare lost was in his straw-yard, she was lost on the 10th of December; I saw her there with others between six and seven o'clock, I fastened the gate with a chain and nail; I went to the yard between four and five o'clock the next morning, and did not see the mare, the gate was shut, but fastened in a different manner; indeed it was only shut to. Four horses were gone as well as the mare, which I have seen since; she was found in Smithfield; I had her in my care but three or four days, and took no particular notice of her, but I think it was the same mare; she was a grey mare, and there was no other in my master's yard.

Cross-examined by Mr. Watson. Q. On the 10th there was a grey mare, and four others, in the strawyard? - A. Yes.

Q. What day of the week was it? - A. On a Thursday.

Q. You fastened the gate, and the next morning the chain and nail was unlassened, and five horses had strayed away? - A. Yes.

Q. After they had strayed away, did you ever find any of them? - A. I did not.

Q. Were they found? - A. Yes; four were found the next morning, in the neighbourhood.

Q. You afterwards saw a grey cart mare? - A. Yes.

Q. And you said that you could not take upon yourself to swear it was the same mare that was in Mr. Flack's straw-yard? - A. Yes.

Mr. Knapp. Q. My Friend has talked about straying - I take it for granted a horse could not unchain the gate? - A. No.

Q. Four horses, and the grey mare, strayed out of the yard, as my Friend calls it? - A. Yes.

Q. And the grey mare found her way to Smithfield to be sold? - A. Yes; I hear so.

HENRY ADAMS sworn. - I work for Mr. Humphreys, and came up to London after the mare, I knew her well: I went to Smithfield on the 11th of December, where I saw her tied up to the rails for sale; I inquired for a constable before I did any thing, then I went up to the man, and asked who was the owner, Chester said he had got the selling of her; I immediately gave charge of him; he said he had the selling of her for another man, and wanted us to wait till the man came. I am sure it was my master's mare; Chester lived at Ware, but has followed no business lately.

Cross-examined by Mr. Watson. Q. When you came to Smithfield, you saw a grey mare belonging to Mr. Humphreys? - A. Yes.

Q. You never knew that it was in Flack's strawyard, only as you were told? - A. No.

Court. Q. Are you sure the mare you saw at Smithfield was Mr. Humpbreys's? - A. Yes, she was a very plain mare, with a large carcase; I have known her five or six months.

NATHANIEL HUMPHREYS sworn. - I put this mare, and two others, into Mr. Flack's straw-yard; I sent Adams to Smithfield, where he found her; I have no doubt she is mine. she is worth fourteen pounds, and cost me seventeen; I never gave the prisoner authority to sell her.

Cross-examined by Mr. Watson. Q. When had you last seen your grey mare? - A. Not for some time, I had been ill.

JOSEPH BOTTS sworn. - I was applied to by Adams, and took the prisoner, who said he had the selling the mare for another person.

Cross-examined by Mr. Watson. Q. What else did he say? - A. After we got to the New Prison he wished to stop in the passage till the person came.

RICHARD DEAN sworn. - I am a City constable, and took the prisoner: He said a man left him the mare to sell; Adams said she was Mr. Humphreys's mare.

Prisoner's defence. I rode on the stage to the Basing-house, and was going to buy a few fowls; a man asked me to buy him a poney, and going through Smithfield I saw a man upon a poney, with the mare; I asked him the price of the poney, he said four pounds, I bid him three guineas; he said he would give me an answer presently. He tied the grey mare up to the rail, and said he would return; then that man came and asked me who was the owner, and I told him a man had left the price with me; the constable took me to Giltspur-street Compter, and I wished to wait till the man came back, because, as I said, I was not the real owner, though I had the price of it.

The prisoner called seven witnesses, who gave him a good character. GUILTY, Death , aged 25.

Recommended to mercy by the Jury, on account of his good character .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

109. JOHN ARMSTRONG was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of January , a box, value 8d. sixty breeches balls, value 30s. and twelve rubbers, value 6s. the property of William Bellingham .

WILLIAM BELLINGHAM sworn. - I keep the Blue-Boar Inn at Aldgate : On Friday the 8th of January, I was robbed of the box from the side of the waggon, I put it there myself about six o'clock in the morning; I observed the prisoner come twice from across the road, and go up my gateway; my man went to the other side of the way, and the prisoner immediately snatched up the box; I pursued him, he threw it down. and I knocked him down with my stick; I was responsible for the box, it broke; it contained sixty or seventy breeches balls, and some rubbers.

GEORGE THOMPSON sworn. - I am porter to Mr. Bellingham, and know the prisoner by sight: I saw him running with the box, which he dropped about five yards before he came to me.

Prisoner's defence. About half past six o'clock, I was going along across the yard, and I saw the box standing in the middle, I picked it up, and that man immediately knocked me down, saying, he put it there on purpose, thinking to catch somebody.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

110. JOHN M'NEALE was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Ridgway , about the hour of eight, in the night of the 3d of January , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein four coats, value 1l. three pair of overalls, value 1l. seven pieces of linen cloth containing one hundred and seventy-eight yards, value 15l. 9s. two silver table spoons, value 1l. and three silver tea-spoons, value 6s. the property of the said William Ridgway ; also, one handkerchief, value 1s. two pair of ear-rings, value 2s. a silver milk-pot, value 12s. a silver thimble, value 6d. a guinea, and a half-guinea , the goods and monies of Elizabeth Ridgway , spinster .

WILLIAM RIDGWAY sworn. - I am a salesman in Sparrow-corner, at the bottom of the Minories : On Sunday, the 3d of this month, I went out about half past one o'clock, and locked the door, leaving nobody in the house; I returned about ten minutes before eight, and went to unlock the door, but found I could not; I took hold of the knob, and gave it a shove, upon which it opened, and I saw two men in the shop; I looked in to see if there were any more; the man nearest the door rushed out, panly upon me, and the prisoner rushed out immediately after the other, and ran against me; as he was passing me I caught him by the collar, and he dragged me into the road, I pulled him back, and took him to the light of the public-house; he then struck me three or four violent blows on the side of the face; I thought if he struck me once or twice more he would knock me down, so I struck him again, he rolled, and I pulled him more to the light; then he fell down, and I upon him, I kept calling out murder, and a young man came up to my assistance; we secured the prisoner, and found nothing on him but a knife and a dark-lantern; I I went into the house, and found the things packed up in two bags; my daughter's things were all taken away; a great number of things were laying about up stairs. I am quite sure I double-locked the door, and it appears to me the lock was picked.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Is your daughter in your business? - A. No.

Q. The thieves must have been a long time in the house? - A. I should suppose so.

Q. Have you never said you did not know whethe prisoner was one of the thieves or a passenger? - A. No.

Q. Did he not tell you he was merely a passenger? - A. Yes.

Q. He was searched, and no spoons found on him? - A. No.

DENNIS SOLOMON sworn. - Last Sunday night was a week, between seven and eight o'clock, I heard a cry of murder; I went up to it, and saw Ridgway and the prisoner on the ground; I laid hold of the prisoner, and said to Ridgway, how you are cut; for he had several cuts or scratches about his face; we took the prisoner to a public-house, and searched him; when we brought him in, just by the corner, I put my hand on his pocket, he turned short round, looked at me, and drew his hand to his pocket, got to the fire-side, and threw something into the grate; I immediately seized what he threw away, which was a dark-lantern, and a snuff of a candle in it, just going out; it was quite warm, and clear to me it had been lately used.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. What are you? - A. A salesman.

Q. Were you passing by accident? - A. I was just come out of the public-house, the prosecutor's is about thirty yards from it.

Q. Did any body else see this lantern besides you? - A. Yes.

Q. Were you before the Magistrate, and did you speak of the lantern there? - A. Yes.

WILLIAM COBLEY sworn. - I was in the public-house when the prisoner was brought in, they searched him; I saw him drop something into the fire, I thought it was a pistol, and said, there is a pretty rogue, he has thrown a pistol into the fire, but it was a dark-lantern. (The constable produced the goods stolen, the dark-lantern and pen-knife.)

Ridgway. Three pieces of cloth are marked D K, another D L, and three more are marked C K; they were removed from the place where they were in the shop to the bags on the floor; the cloth was in one bag and three pair of overalls, and four coats in another.

Prisoner's defence. I have nothing to say, but as I was coming by, Ridgway said he had been robbed, and struck me immediately; I tried to get from him, for I saw nobody near; I was going promiscuously along, when he accused me of robbing him, threw me down and called out murder; what those people have sworn is false; before the Mayor, he said, there were three people in the shop, and that he took me as I was going along.

GUILTY , Death , aged 48.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

111. GEORGE CLAYTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of January , a saw, value 5s. the property of Mark Eddington .

MARK EDDINGTON sworn. - I am a carpenter : On New Year's day, I met the prisoner at the door, with the saw under his jacket, at No. 2, White's-row, Spital-fields ; I had been working there with the saw for two days; my name is on it, and I have had it above eight years. (The saw produced and identified.)

Prisoner's defence. I was just come out of a fit of sickness, and was quite distressed, as I had nothing to put into my mouth.

GUILTY, aged 64.

Recommended to mercy by the Prosecutor .

Publicly whipped and discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

112. THOMAS HUMPHREYS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of January , a copper pot and cover, value 21s. the property of Joseph Watson .

WILLIAM IVES sworn. - Last Friday, between two and three o'clock, coming by Mr. Watson's house, at Chelsea , I saw the prisoner stoop, and take the pot from the door, and carry it before him till he came to George-street, I enquired at the prosecutor's, whether they had lost a pot or sold one, and said I had seen a man take one; I pursued him, and he threw the pot at my legs and ran away; but he was apprehended. (The pot and cover produced and identified by the prosecutor.)

WILLIAM BEARFIELD sworn. - I heard the cry of stop thief, I pursued him and took him.

Prisoner's defence. I was going to Chelsea, and I met a person with this pot on his head; he asked me to help him down with it, which I did; I heard somebody call, stop thief, and the man run away; a person came up, and asked me what business I had with it; I was frightened, let it fall, and run away.

GUILTY , aged 17.

Confined six months , and whipped in the jail .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

113. JOHN COOPER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of January , a glass bottle, value 1d. a pint of brandy, value 2s. a razor, value 1s. and a key, value 1d. the property of Charles Warwick .

CHARLES WARWICK sworn. - I keep the White-swan public-house , in Bunhill-row ; the prisoner was servant to me: On the 5th of January, I lost the key of my bedchamber door; I had suspicion, and searched the prisoner, and finding the key in his pocket, I fetched an officer, and searched his box, in which I found this glass bottle, and a pint of brandy in it, and the razor, I can swear to the bottle because I had it constantly in use for three or four years, and it is a flat bottle. (The articles produced and identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. I found the key in the kitchen, and kept it in my pocket for a week, and was afraid to give it up then, because of a suspicion; I bought the brandy at the Rose and Crown, and found the razor in the tap-room, and kept it to cut my toe-nails. GUILTY , aged 15.

Confined six months , and whipped in the jail .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

114. GEORGE SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of November , two pair of silver salts, value 6s. a gold seal, value 1l. twenty-four silver handled forks, value 20l. two silver tish knives, value 4l. a silver soup-ladle, value 30s. a pair of silver sugar-tongs, value 9s. a silver snuffers-stand, value 30s. four silver saltspoons, value 12s. a silver salled-fork, value 1l. four silver sauce-ladles, value 2l. twelve silver tea-spoons, value 2l. eighteen silver table-spoons, value 10l. two silver watches, value 6l. and two silver snuff-boxes, value 2l. the property of William Grey , in his dwelling-house .(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

WILLIAM GREY sworn. - I am a jeweller , and live in Bond-street , the prisoner was my shopman ; in consequence of suspicion and information, I went to a pawnbroker, and got a plain silver snuff-box, which I missed about the 17th of November, and which I am sure is my property.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. This young man, after this unfortunate transaction, did all he could to lead to a recovery of the property? - A. Yes, he did.

GEORGE TURNER sworn. - I am a pawnbroker, and know the prisoner; he brought a silver snuff-box, and pledged it in the name of Emma Carey , for a guinea; this is the box. (Produces it.)

Prisoner's defence. With respect to this, I am aware of what I am guilty; I was very uneasy, and left Mr. Grey's house; I wrote a letter, offering to give the Christmas-box in payment, and was willing to give every information in my power, to which he put an advertisement in the paper, appointing an interview; I went, and he told me he was sorry such a thing had happened, and was glad I came forward to give such an explanation; he asked me what I would do; I said, if he thought proper, I would surrender; he said, there was no occasion, for he was satisfied; something I have been asked to confess to, but cannot, because I don't know them; other people, finding my unfortunate situation, have taken advantage of it.

GUILTY, aged 23.

Of stealing to the value of one guinea .

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

115. AMBROSE WELLS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of December , two hundred and forty pounds weight of lead, value 10l. the property of John Hosier , fixed to a certain building of his .

Second Count. Charging it to be the property of George Lord Kinnard , William Moreland , and Thomas Hammersley , fixed to a certain building of theirs.(The case was opened by Mr. Gurney)

WILLIAM-BURRIDGE CAVILLE sworn. - Exmined by Mr. Gurney. I am clerk to George Lord Kinnard, Mr. William Moreland , and Mr. Thomas Hammersley .

Q. Do you know the house from which the lead was taken? - A. Yes, it is situated the corner of Engine-court, Piccadilly, it is the property of Lord Kinnard, Mr. Moreland, and Mr. Hamnersley; Mr. John Hoster is trustee for them.

Mr. Raine. Q. Is not this house in some litigation in chancery? - A. Not that I know of.

SAMUEL DANE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am beadle of the parish of St. George, Hanover-square; in the afternoon of Wednesday, the 23d of December, about four o'clock, Murdock and I went to the back of this house, with intention to beat a carpet; we saw there six pieces of lead lying down among some rubbish, by the side of the chimney-place, it appeared to have been cut from the top of the house.

Q. Was this rubbish inside or outside of the house? - A. Inside the house; Murdock and I, and another person concealed ourselves in the evening to see who came for the lead, and between five and six o'clock, George Sims came into the buildings first, Samuel Tomlins next, and Ambrose Wells was the third; Murdock called out for assistance; I went to him, and he had hold as Sims; Wells and Tomlins made their escape in the dark; when Murdock called me, they jumped out of another window.

Q. Are you sure these three men came there at that time? - A. Yes.

Q. Are you sure Wells was one? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see his face? - A. Yes; there is a lamp directly opposite the window where they came in at.

Q. Did that lamp enable you to see Wells's face, so as to be able to swear to him? - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Raine. Q. That was between five and six o'clock on the 23d of December? - A. Yes.

Q. It was quite dark? - A. Yes.

Q. This lamp was outside? - A. Yes.

Q. How could that lamp light you in a dark place in which you had concealed yourself? - A. I saw them when they came into the room.

Q. Do you mean to swear that you could distinguish their faces? - A. I had known them for a long time, I had known two of them ever since they have been children.

Q. And do you mean to say you could distinguish their faces so as to know them? - A. Yes.

GEORGE MURDOCK sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am beadle of St. George's, Hanover-square; I was lying in wait when the prisoner and two others came in, George Sims was the first, Tomlins next; one of them said to Sims, I cannot say which, d - n rhy bl - y eyes, give me that bl - y heavy piece, for I am the strongest; I then immediately seized Sims with the lead upon him; he was in the act of lifting it on the other's shoulder, the other escaped.

Cross-examined by Mr. Raine. Q. When these people came in, you could not see their faces? - A. Yes, I could, if I had known them before.

GEORGE TALBOT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I was with the last witness, lying in wait, I knew them all three, I saw them come in, I saw their faces by the lamp; I saw George Sims heave a piece of lead upon Tomlins's shoulder, and the prisoner was heaving another piece up an end; thenMurdock seized Sims immediately, and Wells brushed out at the window; he was taken between five and six at his mother's room the next day.

GEORGE SIMS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. On the 22d of December, we were coming down Piccadilly, Wells the prisoner, and Tomlins and I went into the building, the corner of Engine-court.

Q. The building in which you were afterwards taken? - A. Yes; they cut six pieces of lead, and threw it down from the back garret window, and I put it in the place where the beadle found it; we were in the house about an hour and a half; about half-past three in the morning we parted, Wells went home, and Tomlins and I went to a public-house, in Piccadilly; the night afterwards we all three went to fetch it away; I went in first, Tomins followed me, and Wells came after us both; I put a bit of lead upon my shoulder, and Tomlins says, d - n my eyes, give me the bl - y large bit, and I will take that, Wells was raising a bit from the ground, and then the officers made a rush and took him into custody immediately.

Cross-examined by Mr. Raine. Q. You were below while the others were gone aloft? - A. Yes.

Q. You were the least guilty of the three? - A. I was guilty as much as they wore then.

Q. Do not you come here to swear against this young man to save yourself? - A. Not wrongfully.

Q. Do you not come to swear against this young man to save yourself? - A. I do.

WILLIAM LINSELL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am a plumber; two pieces of lead were produced to me, which I sitted upon the top of this house; they both sitted exactly; I had the lead from Murdock.

Mr. Raine. Q. When was this? - A. Last Tuesday.

Murdock. These are two of the six pieces of lead that we found in the house.

The prisoner left his defence to his Counsel, and called two witnesses, who gave him a good character. GUILTY , aged 19.

confined six months in the House of Correction , and publicly whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

116. JAMES PENNY was indicted for making an assault, in the King's highway, upon Margaret Paulin , widow , on the 27th of December , putting her in fear, and taking from her person a bonnet, value 1s. and a pair of shoes, value 1s. the property of the said Margaret.

It appearing in evidence, that the husband of the prosecutrix was living, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

117. DANIEL CRAWLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of December , a yard of woollen cloth, value 10s. the property of John Pearce , Nicholas Pearce , and Bryce Pearce .(The case was opened by Mr. Const.)

NICHOLAS PEARCE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am in partnership with John and Bryce Pearce , my brothers, who are army clothiers ; the prisoner was employed by us as a cutter ; we had lost very large quantities of cloth at different times; suspicion fell on the prisoner at the bar in particular: On Tuesday, the 8th of December, I went to Red-Lion-Square, about seven o'clock in the evening, and, that no suspicion should attach itself to any one in particular, I desired that the whole body of cutters would submit to be searched; the prisoner at first hesitated at coming forward, and I said, if you are honest, you can have no objection to be searched; upon opening his waistcoat, a piece of red cloth was so extremely ingeniously wrapped round him, under his waistcoat, that it was impossible for any human being to have discovered it if he had not been stripped; he said, one of our people had lost a piece for sleeves, and they were very poor, and he mean to give it to them; I put a seal upon the cloth, and delivered it to Mr. Roberts, my clerk.(Mr. Roberts produced the cloth, which was identified by Mr. Pearce.)

Mr. Alley. Q. (To Mr. Pearce.) Is it not the custom of the cutter to have a certain quantity of garments to cut out from a certain quantity of cloth? - A. They are to account to us for every inch of cloth; it would be much too dangerous a licence if it were otherwise.

The prisoner left his defence to his Counsel.

GUILTY , aged 27.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

118. JOHN WHITMORE, alias BEVERLEY , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of December , a set of bed furniture, value 7l. a pair of sheets, value 2l. and a counterpane, value 30s. the property of John Teasdale , in his dwelling-house .

Second Count. For stealing the like goods, charging it to be in a lodging-room.

ANN TEASDALE sworn. - I am the wife of John Teasdale, who keeps a house in Featherstone-buildings, Holborn : On the 3d of December last, the prisoner took an apartment in our house, about four o'clock in the afternoon, and came in about six; I had sent for his character, but the messenger had not returned; he went out again about eight o'clock, and I found the inner door locked, which I did not get open till eleven o'clock, and then I missed the whole of the bed furniture, a pair of sheets, and a white cotton counterpane; hewas to pay me one pound eight shillings per week for the lodging; I had no doubt at all about him.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Have you ever found any of your things since? - A. Yes.

Q. If he took these things, he might have taken them at several times? - A. I have reason to believe he took them all at once.

DAVID PERRYMAN sworn. - I am servant to Messrs. Berry and Patmore, pawnbrokers, in St. Martin's-lane; the prisoner offered me some

things on the 7th of December; I had a suspicion of him, and detained him; after I had stopped him, I recollected an advertisement from Bow-street, and I sent to Mr. Teasdale.

JOHN SPINCKES sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Spinckes, a pawnbroker, (produces a pair of sheets, a counterpane, and curtains;) I cannot say whether the prisoner is the person who pledged them.

Q. Have you any doubt of it? - A. Yes, I have.

Q. Look at the prisoner again? - A. He is so altered in his dress, that I cannot say he is the man; they were pledged in the name of Lumley; I cannot say that I believe the prisoner is the man.

Q. Do you believe him to be the man? - A. I do not.

Q. When did you see him at Bow-street? - A. About a fortnight after.

Q. Had you any doubt then? - A. Yes, I had; for I did not write the ticket myself.

Q. If you form any belief upon the subject, it is that he is not the man? - A. Yes, I must say that.

Court. Q. You were examined at Bow-street before Mr. Robinson, the Magistrate? - A. Yes.

Q. Had you any doubt at that time? - A. Yes, I did express a doubt before Mr. Robinson.

Q. Take care, young man, I hold in my hand your examination before the Magistrate, and I will read your words: "And the said John Spinckes, for himself, says, that on Friday, the 4th of December, the prisoner Whitmore came to their shop, and pledged the said bed furniture, sheets counterpane, and curtains, now produced, for four pounds, in the name of James Lumley ?" - A. I must beg leave to say it is entirely a mistake.

Court. Q. You are in a business which may, and has been, carried on very honourably, but it is frequently carried on very much otherwise; you are but a young man, and I advise you to be cautious - now look at the prisoner? - A. That was a mistake.

Q. Is not this your hand-writing? (shewing him his signature to the examination.) - A. Yes.

JAMES BLY sworn. - I was sent for by Mr. Perryman to take the prisoner into custody.(The property was identified by Mrs. Teasdale.)

The prisoner left his defence to his Counsel.

GUILTY , on the Second Count.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

119. HYAM PHILLIPS was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Robert Edwards , Sarah Stockdale and others of his family being therein, about the hour of two in the day of the 13th of January, and stealing a pair of silver salts, value 5s. the property of the said Robert.

ROBERT EDWARDS sworn. - I live in London, but I have a house at Highgate ; Sarah Stockdale lives in the house; she is the old nurse ; there were two children and her in the house; I know nothing of the robbery.

SARAH STOCKDALE sworn. - On the 13th of January, about two o'clock, I was alarmed by a person knocking at the door, and telling me there was a man gone out of the house; I went into the parlour, and missed two silver salts out of the cupboard where they used to stand, and then the prisoner was brought to the door.

JOHN PEERS sworn. - I am a bricklayer's labourer: I was at work in a shed a little below this house, when I saw the prisoner at the door of Mr. Edwards's house; I do not know whether the door was upon the latch or not, but I saw him go in, and I saw him come out again; then I saw him go in again; I called my partner, and then I saw him come out again; and he went to the next door, and asked if they had got any silver or silver lace to sell; I thought he was after no good; when he came out of the yard, he asked us what o'clock it was; we told him it was two o'clock; then Joseph Covington went to inquire if they had lost any thing; I did not go with him.

JOSEPH COVINGTON sworn. - I am a bricklayer: I saw the prisoner come out of the house; he asked me what it was o'clock, and went away; then I asked if any thing was lost, and went after the prisoner; I took him, and delivered him to the constable; he was searched, but nothing found upon him; they were found in a ditch near the place where I took him; he was turning back again to come to Highgate.

JAMES WOOD sworn. - I am a, bricklayer: On hearing a hue and cry, I went in pursuit of the prisoner; I followed him till I came to the fourmile stone; I called to Covington, and we secured him, and took him to the constable's.

Q. How far is the four-mile stone from the house that was robbed? - A. Rather better than half a mile; about twenty yards from where we took him, we found the falts in a ditch; he was coming back towards Highgate when we took him; we found the falts opposite to him, as near as could be on one side of him; he had gone by the spot, and returned.

ROBERT WINTER sworn. - I found one of the salts, and delivered it to the constable.

- COULSHER sworn. - I found the other salt, and delivered it to the constable.( John Worley , the constable, produced the salts, which were identified by the prosecutor.)

Q. (To Stockdale.) Do you know whether this door was latched or not? - A. I cannot tell whether the children had opened it or not.

Prisoner's defence. I never was near the house at all; I was going to Hampstead to try if I could buy some old clothes, and as I was going up the hill, these two men laid hold of me.

The prisoner

called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY, aged 19.

Of stealing the goods, but not of breaking and entering the dwelling-house .

Confined six months in the House of Correction .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

120. THOMAS NORRIS was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Taylor , about the hour of ten in the night of the 26th of December , and burglariously stealing four pair of stockings, value 10s. the property of the said William.

WILLIAM TAYLOR sworn. - I am a haberdasher-and-hosier , No. 12, High-street, St. Giles's : On the 26th of December last, between ten and eleven o'clock at night, the prisoner at the bar was pushed into the shop by a neighbour of mine, of the name of Brough; as he lay upon his hands and knees upon the floor, the stockings dropped from under his coat, and he was taken to the watch-house.

JOHN BROUGH sworn. - I keep a liquor-shop within three doors of Mr. Taylor: On the 26th, a little before eleven o'clock, a person called me out; I went out, and I saw the window was broke, and I saw the prisoner take a pair of stockings out of the window; he then came about a yard from the window, and looked into the street; I immediately took him by the collar, and he held up his fist, and struck me; I hit him a knock on one side of his head, and knocked him into Mr. Taylor's shop; he then tried to get out of the shop, and, in the struggle, he tumbled four or five pair of stockings from under his coat; I then wished Mr. Taylor to get a constable, and he was secured.

Q. (To Mr. Taylor.) Do you know when the window was broke? - A. I did not hear the window broke.

Q. You don't know what time it was broke? - A. It was not broke in the evening.(David Wood, the constable, produced the stockings.)

Mr. Taylor. These are all my stockings.

Prisoner's defence. The gentleman says very false. GUILTY, aged 30.

Of stealing the goods, but not of breaking and entering the dwelling-house .

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

121. WILLIAM REEVES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of December , fifty pieces of wood, value 5s. the property of Aaron Brandon , Samuel Cortissos , Moses Brandon , Isaac Brandon , and Samuel Cortissos , the younger .

MAJOR PRATT sworn. - I am foreman at Mr. Brandon's coffee warehouse, at Hoxton. (Proves the firm, as stated in the indictment.) On the 22d of December, we had some carpenters at work; the prisoner was one of them; about three o'clock in the afternoon, I looked through the warehouse window, having some suspicion, and they were not at work; I then set Thomas James , one of the labourers, to watch; and, in consequence of his information, I went round, and saw the prisoner come in with a basket in his hand, such as they commonly carry tools in; the basket was then empty.

THOMAS JAMES sworn. - I am a labourer in the warehouses of Messrs. Brandon and Company; I saw the prisoner take out one basket of wood; I was set there to watch; and observed him saw some wood into pieces, of about a foot and a half, or two feet long; he put them in his basket, and took them off the premises; I then went and informed the foreman of it; I went round with him to the back of the building, and saw the prisoner come out of the house of Ann Bayes ; she lives near the premises; he had the same sort of basket in his hand empty.

Pratt. I went to Mrs. Bayes's, and found this wood; (produces a quantity of wood.)

ANN BAYES sworn. - My husband is a tailor; I was standing at my father's door, the prisoner came up, and asked me if I would buy some firewood; he asked me eight-pence for it; I offered him six-pence, and he went away; I then called him back, and agreed to give him eight-pence; he said, he had two other baskets, and I gave him two shillings for the three.

PETER MASON sworn. - I apprehended the prisoner, and found the wood; it is all old wood, and, I believe, all deal rafters.

Prisoner's defence. If every carpenter that sold fire-wood was to be taken up, Newgate would be full of them; I was always told by my forefathers that the old wood was the perquisite of the carpenters.

The prisoner called five witnesses, who gave him an excellent character. GUILTY .

confined twelve months in the House of Correction .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

122. WILLIAM CLARKE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of December , a saw, value 4s. the property of Robert May , and an axe, value 4s. the property of Edward Lewis .

JOHN BIGG sworn. - I am a labourer; I work for Mr. Grimshaw, a builder, in Bernard-street, Upper Russel-square: A great many tools having been lost from the building, I was set to watch, and on the 4th of December, about nine o'clock at night, it rained very hard, the prisoner came by with his left arm strait, instead of swinging it, which made me conceive he had something that was not his own; I asked him what he had got; he said he had nothing but his own property; I knew his tongue, for I had taken him the winter before for the same fact; I looked under his arm, and pulled out a tenon saw and an axe covered up in his apron; he told me, that was to keep the rain from it; I immediately took him to Hatton-garden, and the next morning I found out the two men that owned them. (The tools were produced and identified by May and Lewis.)

Prisoner's defence. I own I took them; it was distress drove me to it. GUILTY , aged 57.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

123. WILLIAM HUGGINS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of December , a silver watch, value 21s. the property of John Saunders .

There being no evidence to bring the charge home to the prisoner, he was ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

124. JAMES SPRIGGS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of January , four hands of pork, value 10s. and two legs of pork, value 10s. the property of Richard Bailey .

RICHARD BAILEY sworn. - I live in Fleet-market ; I keep a warehouse for pickled pork ; we keep it in pickle: The shop was broke open on Sunday evening, the 3d of January, about half past six o'clock, and some pickled pork taken away; there were four hands and two legs of pickled pork; I saw it at Marlborough-street before the Justice; I immediately knew it to be my property.

THOMAS CROSSBETT sworn. - I am a watchman in St. Giles's parish: On the night of the 3d of January, I was coming down by a street from St. Giles's watch-house, I met a man of the name of Hayfield at his own door, and the prisoner at the bar had a quantity of pork wrapped up in an old blue apron; I asked him what he had got there; he said he had some pork; I looked at the pork, and asked him where he was going with it; he said, a little way up the street; upon seeing a man of his description have such a quantity of pork, I took him to St. Giles's watch-house upon suspicion; he had four hands, and two legs of pork; he said he had it from No. 14, blackfriars-road; I went there, and they denied it; he mentioned several other shops, and I found out the prosecutor; he described them before he saw them.

Bailey. I know this pork by the cut, and I described them within an ounce of the weight.

Prisoner's defence. I was going up Holborn, and a man gave me sixpence to carry it for him.

GUILTY , aged 14.

Confined six months in the House of Correction .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

125. GEORGE WARD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of January , seven mats, value 7s. the property of Thomas Jenkins and James Cockran .

THOMAS JENKINS sworn. - I live in the New Road: On Tuesday, the 5th of January, about seven in the evening, I sent George Wheeler to see after the fire in the stoves belonging to the hothouses; he came back to me, and in consequence of what he told me, I went to the green-house, and missed the mats from the green-house, where we had a great quantity of valuable plants; there had been a very heavy fall of snow, and I got a light to see if I could track the thief, but as soon as I got a candle, I heard a cry of, here he goes; I went in pursuit, but could not find him; I came back, and then tried if I could track him any other way; I went another way, and over a fence I found the mats-tied up, as they are now, upon the prisoner's shoulder, about two hundred yards from the nursery in the adjoining field, it was very dark; I was within a yard of him before I saw him; we then took him to the watch-house; I know them to be mine by the number of them, and they were new mats; they were wet when I lost them, and the mats I found upon the prisoner were wet; it was a deep snow, and there was a track of no other foot but his; he told us which way he came in.

Q. Did you make him any promise or threat? - A. None; he said he got over the pales, and saw some smoke, and he made to the smoke for a lodging, he saw these mats, and he took them off; they were Prussia mats.

GEORGE WITHERS sworn. - I work in Mr. Jenkins's garden; I went to look after the fires, and missed the mats; I informed Mr. Jenkins of it, and we went in pursuit of the thief; we found some bits of matting upon the ground as we went along in pursuit of the thief; we found him with the mats upon him in the field adjoining the grounds; they were the same number of mats that we lost; the snow had been on them, and they were wet; I have no doubt of their being the mats we lost; the prisoner said, he took them for want.

Prisoner's defence. I had been very ill for aboveeight weeks; I had no money to pay for my lodging, and seeing the smoke in the ground, I thought I might find a place to lay down there.

GUILTY , aged 59.

Fined 1s. and discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

126. JOHN STANLEY and WILLIAM BEVANS , were indicted for that they, on the 8th of January , upon John King , maliciously and feloniously did make an assault, and with menaces, and in a forcible manner, did demand the money of the said John, with intent to rob him .

The prosecutor being under twelve years of age, and not knowing the nature of an oath, the prisoners were

Both ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

127. NELLY MACDONALD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of December , a half-guinea , the property of John Richardson .

The prosecutor was called, but not appearing, his recognizance was ordered to be estreated.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

128. THOMAS HAYES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of December sixteen, yards of printed cotton, value 38s. the property of Joseph Craig , and Benjamin Webb .

JAMES BRYAN sworn. - I am shopman to Craig and Webb, No. 316, Holborn : On the 14th of December, about seven o'clock, I was behind the counter, and saw a print drawn from the door; I pursued him, and he dropped it; I saw him by the light of the candle, in the White-hart window, Chancery-lane; he had on a white waistcoat, an apron, and a great-coat.

JOHN PRICE sworn. - I saw the prisoner run down Chancery-lane, with a piece of cotton dragging along the pavement; I run after him, and he turned into Southampton-buildings; he was taken, and on opening his apron, a shawl dropped from it which we could not find an owner for; he denied it then, but the next day he said, I'll be d - d if this is not the first thing that ever I stole, and should not have done it if I had not been drunk.

( William Day produced the cotton which was identified.)

Prisoner's defence. On Monday, as I was going along Holborn, some cloth was drawn from the door by some person; there was a person with a white apron and white jacket, looking at it; it hung on my feet, and I stopped to disemangle myself from it; being rather in liquor, and seeing some people coming, I strove to get away; they took me, and I said I never was before a Justice in my life.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character. GUILTY , aged 25.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before the Lord Chief Baron

129. ANN DIXON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of December , four gowns, value 4l. Is. the property of James Shipley , in the dwelling-house of James Gray .

SARAH SHIPLEY sworn. - My husband is a paper-hanger , and we live at No. 26, Knightsbridge : On the 4th of December, the prisoner called, are desired I would go to No. 16, Park-lane, to fetc work from a lady; going along, she said she had to call upon an old lady, who was lame, and desired I would go on; I went to No. 16, Park-lane, but found no such name as she sent me for; I went back to the house she was to call at, and enquire if an old lady was lame, and if a young woman going to No. 16, Park-lane, had called there; I was told, no; I went back to my apartments, and missed three gowns; my father was in the room when I went out, and I asked him, if he knew and thing of them, he said, yes, the girl had come back and got two or three gowns, and said I had sent her back for them; three was missed immediately, and another I missed soon after.

SAMUEL LACEY sworn. - I am father of the last witness; I was in the house when the prisoner came, and my daughter went out with her; the prisoner came back in about a quarter of an hour in a hasty manner, and told me my daughter had sent for three or four gowns; she mentioned the patterns in a very apt and prompt manner, so deliberately, that she deceived me; I gave her a dark cotton gown, and three others on the table in another part of the, room, all of which she took away; I got her apprehended in North-street, Mary-le-bone; she asked forgiveness and mercy but I made no promises; the articles she took from me were carried to a Mrs. Ellis; one was a piece for a gown, and the other a gown without sleeves and unfinished; a piece we call a gown.

JANE ELLIS sworn. - I bought three gowns of Mary Manley ; one was finished, one was unfinished, and the other was a piece; I gave one pound thirteen shillings for them.

MARY MANLEY sworn. - I am servant to Jane Ellis: I sold two gowns and a piece of cotton to my mistress, which I had from the prisoner, who lodged in the next room to my mother; I had le my place, and she asked me if I would go of ac errand for her; she knew my mistress by lodging in the neighbourhood; she said, the gowns were given to her, and were at a mantua-makers to be altered; that as she was going out of town, she was obliged to fetch them away part made av some unmade; and that she then wanted to pay 4 bill; she told me a gentleman in Portland-placekept her; I took them to Mrs. Ellis, and she thought them.(Weekly produced the gowns, which were identified.)

Prisoner's defence. I went into my own place, where there was nobody but Weekly; he took me aund the neck, and began to shake me very much, and said, he would forgive me if I confessed every hing to him.

Weekly. There is no truth in that; I heard her going down stairs, and took her.

GUILTY, aged 17.

Of stealing to the value of 39s.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

130. ANN DIXON was again indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of November , three gowns, value 3l. 8s. the property of John Barclay in the dwelling-house of Robert Huckins .

SARAH BARCLAY sworn. - My husband is abroad: I am a mantua-maker, and live at No. 19, Queen Ann-street East; the prisoner came to me in the 28th of November, soon after eight o'clock in the morning, and said, I must go with her to Mrs. Lawson, for she had recommended me a very good customers; I said, I could not that minute, but would presently; she turned round to a gown that lay on the table, and said, it was very pretty, and asked if I had no dresses to bring her mistress; I said, I kept none. she went away for about a quarter of an hour, and returned again; I told her I was coming, and went with her part of the way, when she said she must call at a place; I went on to No. 17, Brook-street, but was not wanted, as Mrs. Lawson was gone to Weymouth; I then screamed but, and said, I was robbed; I went home, and said to my little boy, O Charles, it is a thief, what was she got? he told me she had been for some ins and paper, and a red gown, which he gave er; I have paid a guinea for one to the owner of it.

CHARLES BARCLAY sworn. - I am twelve ears old; and was at home when the prisoner came back, and said, my mother had sent her for he red gown, and some pins and paper; I gave her the red gown; was looking for some pins and paper when she took the other two.

THOMAS WEEKLY sworn. - I am a parish-officer, and took the prisoner; she said, will you forgive me? I said, how could she expect it; she would not tell where they were; we then found but where they were; Mary Manley had bought one of the black gowns, and given eighteen shillings for it to her.

MARY DOVER sworn. - Mary Manley had the gown on, and I bought it off her back, and gave her eighteen shillings for it.

MARY MANLEY sworn. - When I left my place, I had a few clothes, and Ann Dixon asked me to lend her them to pawn, to ger her things to go and meet her friend to; and at the same time she brought me this black gown, and asked me to buy it; I said, I could not then; she said, she would give it me for the money I had lent her; I sold it to Mary Dover , as I had allowed sixteen or eighteen shillings for it.

Prisoner's defence. They harbour all sorts of bad people, and I being distressed for a lodging, was obliged to be there very near a quarter of a year Mary Manley was servant with Mrs. Ellis, who will buy any thing if she thought it safe; she asks if it is safe, and then buys any thing; if not, then she sends it out of the house till it is settled.

GUILTY, aged 17.

Of stealing to the value of 18s.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

131. EDWARD WARREN was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Mark Hudson and Edward Gordon , about the hour of twelve at night, on the 3d of December , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing a barometer, value 20s. ten guineas, a counterfeit half guinea, value 6d. a counterfiet dollar, value, 2d. a banke-note, value 20l. another bank-note, value 15l. another bank-note, value 5l. eighteen banknotes, value 18l. and an order for the payment of twenty-two pounds, value 22l. the said sums of money and bank-notes being the property of the said Mark Hudson and Edward Gordon .(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

JAMES DAY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp.

Q. Are you servant to the prosecutors? - A. Yes, and was so on the 4th of December; Mr. Hudson's Christian name is Mark, and Mr. Gordon's is Edward.

Q. Relate what you knew of this transactioned - A. Their accompting-house is next the street at Bow, in th parish of St. Mary; they are between the brewery joins the accompting-house; it is all under the same roof; I sleep in what is called the upper accompting-house, adjoining; the whole buildings are all under the same roof; the partners sleep at Bromley, about one hundred yards off, more or less; I have been servant to them nine or ten years; and have slept there during that time, and I had the care of the premises: On the 3d of December, I went to bed near one o'clock; I had made every part safe, and kept the keys; I got up a little before eight, or thereabouts, in the morning; the watchman generally opened the accompting-house door before I went there; the first thing I discovered was Mr. Hudson's desk a little raised and unlocked; I thought he had overshot the bolt, but I found the nails were drawn; Iwas alarmed, and then inspected the other desks; there are four in all, I found three forced open, and the other close, but that was also broke open; I do not know what they had contained; my desk was also picked, which I had locked the night before, and I missed about nine or ten pounds worth of copper; there was an iron safe, which I had locked, four drawers of which I found unlocked, and which appeared to have been picked; there was a drawer also in the inner accompting-house broke open; when I found it out, I told my fellow-servants.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Your masters live about one hundred yards from the accompting-house, in a different parish? - A. Yes; there is no communication between their house and the brewery; their servant attends at the inner accompting-house, and makes my bed; there is no connection between their house and the brewery.

Q. This parish is called St. Mary-le-Bow? - A. Yes.

WILLIAM NEVILLE sworn. - I am clerk to Messrs. Hutlson and Gordon, and know their accompting-house in the parish of St. Mary-le-Bow, commonly called Bow; there is no parish that I know of like that name; my dwelling-house is near the brewhouse; I left my desk-locked, and in it I left my pocket-book, containing memorandums and promissory notes; two counterfeit half-guineas in a water box; a quantity of bad silver, consisting of a dollar, several half-crowns, shillings, and sixpences, to the amount of thirty or forty shillings; three pounds in notes, a two-pound, and a single one, or three single notes of one pound, I am not sure; I am collecting clerk, and there was a drawer in the safe in which I deposited bank-notes to the amount of one hundred and twenty pounds; in a twenty-pound, fifteen-pound, ten-pound notes, and others; the twenty-pound note was No. 7373, the fifteen-pound No. 3979, the ten-pound No. 7028, and the five-pound No. 2262; and there were several one-pound notes, I suppose about twenty-seven, which I have not the numbers of; there was also a check for twenty-two pounds, drawn on Lesevre's house, by Thomas Dacre , to Mr. Ledger, or bearer; another check for five pounds four shillings, and two sixteenths of Irish lottery-tickets; I locked the drawers that night, and between eight and nine in the morning I was sent for; I then discovered all the desks were broke open; the doors of the safe were opened by the accompting-house clerk; I applied to my drawer to see if the property was safe; my key would not do its office, and after trying some time, we sent for a smith, who tried an hour or two, and could not open it; I then gave it a sudden pull, and it opened after all; every thing was gone except the wrapper of the two sixteenths; I know there was a barometer in the accompting-house, but cannot swear to it.

JOHN BASS sworn. - I live at Woodford, in Essex, and had made a payment to Mr. Neville on the 3d of December, in notes and drafts, among which was a draft on the house of Lesevre, for twenty-two pounds; (the draft shewn to the witness;) this is the draft I had of Mr. Ledger; I can ascertain one of the notes, because I had taken it of a lady, and I wrote her name upon it.

CHARLES CHURCHYARD sworn. - I am clerk in Messrs. Lesevre's house, and produce the draft for twenty-two pounds, which was presented for payment on the 4th of December, before I went into the office at nine o'clock, but I don't know by whom; the person appeared to be in haste; I told him the clock had not struck nine; when it did, I paid him in a twenty-pound note, No. 6062, dated 6th June, 1801, and two pounds in cash; about half past ten, a person came and informed us of the robbery; I immediately went to the Bank to stop the note, and in about an hour a person fetched me to the Bank, where I saw the prisoner and the note I had paid him for the draft; we questioned him, and he said he had received it from a person in the street, whom he was to meet at the top of Cornhill; we took him there, and not meeting him, he said he was to meet him at the Red-Lion, in Whitechapel-road; we got an officer, and went to the Red-Lion, where we staid five or ten minutes, but did not see the other man; we then took him to the Whitechapel office, where he was searched, but nothing found on him, and there I left him.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Have you ever seen the man since who applied for the payment of that check? - A. Not that I know of.

THOMAS NEEDHAM sworn. - I am inspector of bank-notes, and produce the twenty-pound note that was stopped on the prisoner, No. 6062. (Produces it.)

Q. (To Mr. Churchyard.) Is that the twenty-pound note that you have been speaking of? - A. Yes, it corresponds in number and value.

ROBERT COMBES sworn. - I am an officer, and took the prisoner in custody on Friday, the 4th of December; he said, if I would go with him to the Red-Lion, he would shew me the man who gave him the note; we waited five or ten minutes, but he did not come; I searched him, but found nothing on him; Griffiths and I went to Benjamin Pritchard 's house, in King-street, Mile-End New Town, and searched his wife; in her housewife, wrapped up, I found a fifteen-pound note, and eight one-pound notes; I apprehended Pritchard afterwards over the water; I had known him before; he gave me a five-pound note and ten ones, without searching; he sent for me, and resigned himself up; upon which I took him to the office;I afterwards searched the prisoner's lodgings on Bethnal-green; his wife shewed us the house, and said it was his, but we found nothing; on the Tuesday we again searched it, and, after searching a long time, we found upon a rail, behind one of the uprights, a bag hanging, and a piece of white cotton over it; the bag contained a quantity of picklock-keys, and some others, a twenty-pound bank-note, a bad half-guinea, a bad dollar, two shillings and six-pence, all bad, tied up.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Did Pritchard accompany you? - A. No, it was in consequence of information from him.

Q. You discovered nothing the first time? - A. No.

Q. I suppose the prisoner's wife knew the purpose for which you came the first time? - A. Yes.

Q. Is the privy in an open place, and it is not necessary to go through the house to it? - A. No, it is in a garden.

Q. To which Mr. Pritchard might have gone as well as any body else? - A. Yes.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Did you look into the necessary the first time you went? - A. No.

JOHN GRIFFITHS sworn. - I am an officer, and produce a barometer which I found in Pritchard's house: On Friday, the 4th of December, I accompanied Mr. Combes to Pritchard's house; he searched Pritchard's wife, and I searched his daughter's pockets, in which I found two sixteenths of Irish lottery-tickets; we then went to the prisoner's house, No. 2, Ponderson's-place, Bethnalgreen-road; this might be about eight o'clock; we searched it, but found nothing; we went again on Friday, and searched the privy, and found the bag, as Combes has described, under the seat; I took the keys to Mr. Hudson's brewhouse, and tried them; (producing a great number of keys;) this large key unlocks the wicket of the gate leading to the street; this small key unlocks the accompting-house door; and this key unlocks the iron safe as regular as if it was its own key; there was no appearance of violence.

Q. (To Mr. Bass.) Do you know that fifteen-pound note - is that the one you gave to Neville? - A. Yes; I wrote Miss Dodd's name on it, November 20th, 1801.

BENJAMIN PRITCHARD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Do you know the prisoner? - A. Yes; he and I went to Hudson and Gordon's brewhouse on the 3d of December, about twelve o'clock at night, and staid about there till one; when we unlocked the wicket door with this key, which we took with us; then we went to the accompting-house door, which we unlocked also; we got a light from a bottle of phosphorus, with a match, and looked about us; this key opened the iron cupboard, from which we took a quantity of bank-notes, and several other papers; then we broke open the desks with this thing, (a large screw-driver,) and took out some bad money and a one-pound bank-note; there was a bad dollar, bad shillings, and bad six-pences; and a quantity of halfpence; we took out of a drawer some shares of tickets, and a quantity of notes; also two checks.

Q. Is that one? (Shewing a check.) - A. Yes, it is; I took this, and the twenty-five, the twenty, the fifteen, the five, and a great quantity of one and two pound notes; this is the fifteen pound note which I gave to my wife; I live at No. 8, King-street, Mile-End New-Town; I do not know the other notes; when we had taken them out of the iron safe, we slammed the door, locked the accompting-house door, and came through the wicket into the street; we then went to Bow-fair Field, where we left the thing like a weather-glass, which we brought out of the accompting-house, and went and committed another robbery. I had the fifteen pound note, and some of the ones, and the check; and Warren had the twenty pound note, and some of the ones; after that, we went to Warren's house first, and then he went to mine, where we parted the things, as well as we could, in the morning, and then he went home; this check I told him I could get money for, and the other too; he fet off to Bow to inquire about the robbery, and if any body was coming after us, and was to meet me; I went to the end of Gracechurch-street, where I met a man, and asked him if he knew where that check was payable, he said he did; I did not know, but I asked him to go for it, and I waited at the door; it was a few minutes before nine, and he stopped some time; I went in and asked for change for a five pound note, they said I had come too soon, and the man said he was waiting for his money; I went out, and in a few minutes he came out, and gave me a twenty pound note, and the rest in money; this is the gentleman who said it was too soon,(Mr. Churchyard); I gave the man two shillings, and he left me. I then met Warren, who said, there was a great disturbance at Bow about the robbery; I gave him the twenty pound note I received for the check, and we then went to my house, this was about ten o'clock, he said he would go and get small notes for it; I told him he had better not, but he said he would go to the Bank of England, and he went away, and I never saw him again till I saw him at Whitechapel Office.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Nobody else accompanied you but the prisoner? - A. No.

Q. You kept the check, and employed a man to take it to the banking-house? - A. Yes.

Q. That is just as true as that you don't know the man at all? - A. He was a staranger to me; when I went into the banking-house, he said he was waiting for the money, not for his money.

Q. You did not tell him you stole it? - A. No.

Q. May I ask, is your own son in London at present? - A. I believe he is.

Q. Have not the officers been looking for him? - A. I don't know, I heard they have been at his house; I have been a prisoner myself ever since I resigned myself up on Tuesday.

Q. Upon your oath, was not your son the person who went to the banker's? - A. No; my son is about my size, or a little taller, with hair rather lighter than mine.

Q. How long is it since you were a witness here before? - A. About twelve months, on the trial of one Woolridge, about Bank-notes.

Q. As a voluntary witness, to save your own life? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you turn evidence against any other man for forging Bank notes at any time? - A. No.

Q. Have you ever been tried here? - A. No.

Q. Or any where else? - A. Yes, at Stafford.

Mr. Knapp. (To Mr. Neville.) Q. Look at the fifteen pound note, and the twenty pound note; do you know them? - A. They correspond with the numbers in my book.

Mr. Alley. I submit, that this being a place at some distance from the dwellings of the two partners, and not communicating with either, it is impossible to call it their dwelling, because, though there might be a pretence for saying it was the dwelling of the two if they live together, yet, in as much as they live in two separate houses, it is impossible that it can be considered as the dwelling of both; it must be shewn; taking it that they both lived in one dwelling, that it would then constitute a felony; I know it has been considered that our houses might be taken as dwellings, but there is a case where an out-house, separated only eight yards from the principal dwelling, was not considered as a house in which a burglary could be committed; that case is in Ist Hawkins, 219; here the evidence stated, is, that the brewery is upwards of one hundred yards from the dwellings which the partners occupy, which is a much greater distance than that stated in that case; the proof is, that they occupy two several houses, and the out-house is charged as being a part of the joint occupation of both; I therefore contend the indictment cannot be sustained, but it is not proved to be the fact.

Court. It is not stated to be a part of the dwelling, but is charged to be a burglary on the ground of it being an out-house.

Mr. Alley. My Lord, it is also stated to be out of the parish of St. Mary-lc-Bow.

Court. I am not aware of any thing to induce me to say that an out-house is a place in which a burglary cannot be committed; the case which you cite, was a case in which it could not be connected with the dwelling-house; in this case, though it has not been distinctly proved to be a part of the partners' dwelling, yet it is a part of their premises; if you mean to say there was a distinction between the accompting-house and the other part, the answer is, it is connected with the place where the man slept, by a continuation of building. However, if upon further consideration you think there is any thing to be made of it hereafter, the prisoner shall have the advantage of it.

JAMES BILLINGS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Do you know the premises of Messrs. Hudson and Gordon, and if so, describe them? - A. I begin with the accompting-house that was broke open next the street, from which we go to the marsh run on the stage, next it a store-house, and a passage from one accompting-house to the other, all under one continued roof; there is a ready communication without any interruption whatever.

Prisoner's defence. I am quite innocent of the robbery: Pritchard came on Friday morning to my house with a bundle, containing a red waistcoat, and writing paper, my wife said the waistcoat was too big for me; he said it could be altered, and then he sent for some gin, and took me to his house; he said his son was waiting at the new pump by the Bank; I went with him, and we met his son, who took the check to the banker's? he bought a fowl, and told me to take it to his house, and says he, you shall have a bit of fowl, and a drop of wine after dinner; then he asked me if I would go and get change for a twenty pound note; I said, yes, and went and asked for it; they told me the note was stopped, and asked me who I had it of; I said a man, who was to give me something for my trouble. He wanted to bring me in about two months ago, as he has now, when he gave me a Norwich bank-note, and I went to the White-horse in Fetter-lane for change; they told me it was stole a twelvemonth before; I might have been stopped there as well as for this; Combes knows Pritchard put the things in the privy himself. I have been a man that have always got my living by the sweat of my brow, and he never did in his life.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character. NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

132. WILLIAM ROBERTS was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Revell , on the 7th of January , about the hour of seven in the evening, with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing two axes, value 2s. a saw, value 2s. five knives, value 15d. and five forks, value 15d. the property of the said Thomas.

JOHN ELLIS sworn. - On the 7th of this month, about seven o'clock at night, I was at Shoreditch , and saw the prisoner at the bar, with another young man, looking in at Mr. Revell's window, who keeps an ironmonger's shop ; I suspected they wereabout to commit a robbery, and I passed the window, but did not see any thing amiss; they went away just before I came up to the window; I immediately crossed the way, and saw them come back to the window again, I heard the other, who is called Billy the Sweep, because he was formerly a chimney-sweeper; they went away again, but as a cart came by, they went up to the window again, and shoved it in; I saw them do it, but could not hear it from the noise of the cart; the window had been cracked across but mended with putty, and was perfectly safe; they went a few yards from the window and looked round, to see if anybody was coming, and then went up both together; I saw them both put their hands in, and take something out, and come away; I crossed over to them, and as I was stepping on the pavement they turned round and saw me; the prisoner said to the other, bolt, and he immediately absconded; I caught hold of the prisoner, and asked him what he had about him; he said, nothing; I unbuttoned his coat, and underneath were two small axes, and a small saw; I took him into the shop, and afterwards to Worship-street, where five knives and forks were found in his pocket.

THOMAS REVELL sworn. - I keep an ironmonger's-shop in Shoreditch: Ellis brought the prisoner into the shop, on Thursday evening the 7th of January, about seven o'clock; the glass was split before, and mended with putty, but then it was quite taken out, it was perfectly safe before; all the goods were gone as far as they could reach; the prisoner begged that he might be sent to sea; I said it was a pitty such as he should be sent into his Majesty's service, and gave him in charge. (The property produced.)

Revell. These are my property, I know them by my private mark; there was a box of table and desert knives and forks, but the box and all is gone.

Prisoner's defence. The glass was broke big enough to put my hand in before I touched them.

GUILTY, Death , aged 16.

The prisoner was recommended to his Majesty's mercy, by the Jury and prosecutor, on account of his youth .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

133. FRANCES GOSS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of December , two children's frocks, value 3s. and a clothes-bag, value 2s. the property of Lucy Thomas .

LUCY THOMAS sworn. - On the 9th of December last, I lost two frocks in a bag, one was a black and white cotton frock, and the other a red cotton; they were in the care of Mrs. Daniel to dry, she lives in the kitchen, and I in the two pair of stairs; she called out to me for assistance, between twelve and one o'clock; I run down, and the two frocks and bag lay on the stairs, Mrs. Daniel had hold of the prisoner.

MARY DANIEL sworn. - On the 9th of December, Mrs. Thomas hung some things on my line in the passage down stairs; my husband came home and found the prisoner on the stairs, and told me of it; I run up, and asked her what she wanted; she said she had made a mistake, for the person she wanted did not live there; I followed her, and said, I thought she had robbed me; she said she had not; but as I had a suspicion, she having a bundle under her arm, I took it from her, and found it was Mrs. Thomas's things; I threw them on the stairs, and held her. (The property produced, and deposed to by the prosecutrix.)

WILLIAM DANIEL sworn. - I am landlord of the house, and assisted in taking the prisoner.

Prisoner's defence. I beg for mercy; I never was confined before, and have been very ill.

GUILTY , age 28.

confined twelve months in the House of Correction .

First Middlesex Jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

134. JAMES HAYES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of December , sixty pounds weight of sugar, value 40s. the property of John Dixon , Thomas Ramsay , and James Allen .

THOMAS RAMSAY sworn. - Our firm is, John Dixon , Thomas Ramsay, and James Allen : I know nothing of the prisoner.

THOMAS YATES sworn. - I am keeper of the warehouse of Messrs. Dixon and Co. at the back of Church-lane, Whitechapel: On Friday night, about five o'clock, on the 5th of December, I locked the door, and not being very well on the Saturday, nobody went to open the warehouse till I went on the Monday morning, when I found it was broke open, and plundered.

JAMES DAY sworn. - I am a wine and brandy cooper: My premises run parallel with Messrs. Dixon's, and a passage between them, about three feet six inches wide, and about sixty feet up, in which the horse-dung is put; and the warehouse is about eight feet high; I was looking if all was safe in my premises, when I heard a noise in the passage, just by where I was standing, in the warehouse, when the noise ceased, I went into the passage through the stable-door, and saw the prisoner with something in his hand, which he dropped by the dunghill, where some tiles lay; having a light in my hand, I went forward, and looked in his face, he was quite in a sweat; as I advanced towards him, he met me, seemingly with a design to hide what he had from me, he seemed very much confused; I asked him what he was doing, but don't know what he said; I passed by him, and found two bags of sugar; he walked down the passage and went off; the wind blew my candle out, but I took the sugar into my premises, and as I was securing it I heard feet passin the passage again; I went out but could see nobody; I heard them again, and then I run out of the street door, and caught the prisoner coming out of the passage, with another man, one took the left hand, and the other the right; I pursued this man, and as I pursued him he ran down Lambeth-street; I cried stop thief, and the officers who were sitting there, came out and took him; that is the man I saw with the sugar.

JOHN NOWLAN sworn. - I am a police officer: I heard the cry of stop thief, and pursued the prisoner. (The sugar produced).

Yates. This is sugar of the same quality that was lost.

Prisoner's defence. I work at Wapping; and when I had done, as I was going over Tower-hill, I was met by two wine porters, who hired me to draw some wine out of a cellar, which I did; I then wanted to ease myself, and went into this passage, when that gentleman came out and asked me what I was doing; I said, nothing, but walked aways he followed me, and I began to run.

Q. (To Day.) Had he been in the situation he describes? - A. No, by no means.

Nowlan. His hands were all over sugar when I took him. GUILTY , aged 21.

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

135. JONATHAN COOPER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of December , fifty-four pounds weight of copper, value 27s. the property of John Lightly , John Twalin , and William Murray .

WILLIAM MURRAY sworn. - I am a gangsman at Ralph's Quay ; the piece of copper was landed from a ship called the Mary: On the 14th of December, it lay there a long time on account of the duty not being paid, I weighed it, and saw the mark on it, a G and a diamond E, with the King's broad arrow in chalk; it weighed a quarter of an hundred-weight, and twenty-six pounds; all things landed on our Quay we are responsible for, notwithstanding they are under the care of the King's watchmen.

THOMAS-SUMPTER JOHNSON sworn. - I am a watchman belonging to Ralph's Quay, and was on duty on the 14th of December; the copperlay at the back of the tackle-house, and a row of casks of sugar was in front: About half past four o'clock, I saw a man making an attempt, as I thought, to plunder the sugar casks; I went up to the front of the tackle-house, and the man went away; I turned back again and missed the copper; I did not see anybody take it, but I heard a man run up the gateway.

THOMAS BEVAN sworn. - I am chief watchman; I was told of the robbery, and went in search of it to Rosemary-lane, where I found the prisoner with it, in a shop; I went in and asked the woman if the copper belonged to her; she said, it did not, it was then in the scale; I turned to the prisoner, and asked him if he brought it there, he said, no; I asked the woman also, she hesitated, and said to her daughter, you, Bet, bring it here; I took the copper out of the scale, and said to the prisoner, I thought he had stole it, and took him by the collar; he was then sent to the Compter.

MARY KEEF sworn. - My mother and father keep a piece-broker's shop, in Rosemary-lane; the prisoner and another man came in, and asked me, if we bought copper, I said, no; they said, they had it from some distillers, where they worked; I said it did not signify, upon which they took it away, and I went into the kitchen; they returned back again, and as I came out of the kitchen, I saw Mr. Bevan and the prisoner in the shop, and another man going out just as Bevan came in; the copper was lying down, part on the floor, and part in the scale, but no weights were near the scale; Bevan asked me who it belonged to, I said, to the man that went out; the prisoner said nothing, and Bevan took it away; I saw the copper at the Mansion-house, and I think it is the same.

THOMAS HUNTER sworn. - I took the prisoner into custody and produce the copper. (The copper was identified by William Murray.)

Prisoner's defence. I had been working on the quays, and going over Tower-hill, a man overtook me, and asked me where there was an old iron shop; I said, there was plenty in Rag-fair; he said, he would give me sixpence to shew him one, which I was glad to do, in order to pay for my lodging.

Q. (To Bevan.) Did he tell you so then? - A. No.

Jury. Q. Did you see another man in the shop? - A. No; there was not a foul but the woman and him, nor did any body pass me as I went in, it was impossible.

Jury. Q. (To Keef.) Was there another man? - A. Yes; and I told Bevan I rather thought the other man brought it in first; they both came in together the first time, and did not lay it down at all; I think the other man had the copper and not this, but will not be sure.

Bevan. What she has said is entirely wrong; when I went in, she was in the shop with the man, stooping down to put weights in or taking them out; the copper was properly in the scale, and she was in the shop with the prisoner, and not a soul besides. NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

136. JAMES WESTBROOK and NATHANIEL INCH , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of December , a Cheshire-cheese, value 8s. the property of Hugh Jones .

HUGH JONES sworn. - I keep a cheese and butcher warehouse , in Cow-lane ; I was robbed on the 29th of December, but was not present.

CHARLES EVERINGHAM sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Jones; on the 29th of December, I saw a boy take a cheese out of the shop; I run after him, and took the cheese from Westbrook; but he cannot say he took it; he pointed out luch, and said, he bid him do it, Inch run away, but I took him; another young man was watching on the other side of the way, as we had been robbed before; they were then sent to the Compten.

WILLIAM JONES sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Jones; on the 29th of December, between four and five o'clock, I was standing outside the door, and saw the prisoner, Inch, with another boy, taller than him; there were four in all; Inch stood by the window, and westbrook went into the shop and brought a cheese out, I saw him put it in his apron; I followed him, and he said, that man told him; I took the cheese from him, and took him into the shop; Everingham followed Inch, and brought him back in about five minutes; as I was taking him into the warehouse, tow men told me. to lose the boy, but I would not; I marked the cheese. (The cheese produced.)

DANIEL GRAHAM sworn. - I am constable, and took the prisoner into custody.

Weshbrook's defence. I was going of an errand, and a man said, if you will warry this cheese, I will give you two-pence, I did, and they took hold of me; I shewed them the man that gave it me, but they took this boy instead of him; I know nothing of this boy.

Inch's defence. I was going to St. Bartholomew's-hospital, to see my sister; I saw some people, but would not stop for fear of being too late; I was running, and some people run after me, and took me; they told they boy, if he would tell the truth, they would let him go, and he said, a man gave it to him to carry.

Q. (To Jones.) Did Westbrook point to Inch, Westbrook, GUILTY , aged 12.

Confined six months in Newgate , and publicly whipped .

Inch, NOT GUILTY ,

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

137. JOHN REYNOLDS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of January , a pewter pint pot, value 10d. the property of David Neale .

DAVID NEALE sworn. - I keep a public-house called the Fleece, in Threadneedle-street ; I lost a pot on the 10th of January, but was not present.

WILLIAM METCALF sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Neale; I asked him first if he had it, and he immediately held up his coat; I took it out of his right-hand pocket; Mr. Neale's name is on it.(The pot produced.)

Neale. It is a new pot, with my name on it.

Prisoner's defence. I beg the gentleman's pardon, I never was guilty of such an offence in my life before. GUILTY , aged 68.

Publicly whipped , and discharged.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

138. JOHN ROBINSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of January , forty yards of rope, value 10s. the property of Robert Coucy . NATHANIEL FENNER sworn. - I am a servant belonged to the Vintner's-Company: On the 9th of January, going along Queen-street, Cheapside, about four o'clock, I saw the prisoner with a rope; I followed him, he stopped near the bottom, when I asked him, where he was going to work, and whose rope it was, and where he brought it four; he said, from Eastcheap first, and then from St. Dunstan's-hill; I took him and the rope as he could not give a better account, and sent a man to find out who had lost it.

JOHN TAYLOR sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Coucy; the rope was missing on Saturday afternoon, from St. Dunstan's church-wall, in Thames-street; in the evening a man came to let us know where it was; I know it to be my master's.

JOHN CHAPMAN sworn. - We had been using the rope as wine-coopers, and laid it along the church-wall, as we had some work to do it idol-lane; I know it my working often with it.

Prisoner's defence. I was going down St. Danstao's-hill, and a man asked me to work; I said, I would; he bid me take up one of those ropes, and to with him to Garlick-hill; I did so, and one of the men stopped me.

Q. (To Fenner.) Did he tell you so at the time? - A. No., I did not see any body near him.

GUILTY , age 24.

Publicly whipped , and discharged.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

139. JOHN BLANCH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of December , one pound four ounces of tea, value 10s. the property of the United Company of Merchants trading to the East-Indies .

Second Count. Charging it to be the property of persons unknown.

It appearing that the indictment was wrong as to the county in which the theft was committed, and the same tea not being traced to the prisoner's hands, the Court ordered him to be ACQUITTED .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

140. THOMAS LITTLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of December , seventy-three pounds of pork, value 30s. the property of George Bowler .

GEORGE BOWLER sworn. - On Wednesday morning, the 9th of December, about three o'clock, William Duncan , the watchman, called me up, and said, my shop in Clare-market was broke open; I went and found the padlock broke off; I afterwards found the prisoner in the Three Tuns public-house, about eight o'clock, without his hat, and with one shoe on; I searched for the pork in the stable of the public-house, where three pieces were found, one piece I can swear to; the preceding day the prisoner had been with me to Whitechapel, to fetch this very same pork home; I had 116 pounds of it, and I weighed what was left, which shewed me 73 pounds were taken; he said he knew nothing about it.

WILLIAM DUNCAN sworn. - I am a watchman: On the 9th of December, the prisoner came to me about two o'clock in the morning, and asked me to go with him and drink; I said, I would not: he said, if you will go with me, I'll give you a shilling, but I would not; about a quarter before three, I heard a noise in Bowler's shop, and there was the prisoner with the door wide open, and coming out of the shop with three pieces of park; when he saw me, he chucked them into a tub; I laid hold of him, upon which he said he wanted to case himself; I let him stoop down, and he slipped under my arm, and ran away, but left his hat and shoe behind him; he was found in the morning, and three pieces of pork were found in a manager.

Q. (To Bowler.) How can you swear to the pork that was found? - A. I can swear to one out of the three, because it has got a scratch on the rind, and is the very same piece I told him to cut a piece off for his supper.

Prisoner's defence. I got up at four o'clock to go to work, and going down the market, I saw this watchman and a girl; I asked him to go to Drury-lane to have something to drink; he would not, but I went, and when I came back again, I was going to ease myself by the door, and he came and laid hold of me; I went to work till eight o'clock, and when I went to the public-house, they took me; I should not have gone there if I had stole the pork. GUILTY , aged 18.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

141. THOMAS ALLEN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of December , one sack, value 3s. and a bushel of wheat, value 10s. the property of John Shore .

JOHN SHORE sworn. - I live at Hanworth , and am a farmer ; the prisoner worked for me, he fed the horses, and drove a team: On Sunday, the 21st of December, I went home between seven and eight, and met Benn and a constable; they took me to the prisoner's house, I called him, and he came down in his shirt, and opened the door; I asked him what he had been stealing; he said he had nothing that he was ashamed or afraid of; we went up stairs, and searched his room, but could not find any thing but some empty sacks belonging to me; we then went into another room, and behind the door we found this sack, with the wheat in it, (produces it); he voluntarily said he got it out of the barn, and that he stole it to feed his horses; it is unclean wheat out of the barn; the sack has my name on it.

WILLIAM BENN sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Shore: I went to fetch a bundle of hay out of the lost, and found this sack and wheat bid in a haylost adjoining to the barn; I watched, and saw the prisoner fetch it home to his house, where we went and found it.

Prisoner's defence. I have nothing to say.

Jury. (To Benn.) Q. Did you examine the heap of wheat the morning following? - A. When the men leave work, they brush it up smooth; there was the mark where this was taken from.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and publicly whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

142. JOHN DALLIMORE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of June , eleven guineas, three Bank-notes, value 10l. each, four other Bank-notes, value 5l. each, four other Banknotes, value 2l. each, and ten other Bank-notes, value 1l. each, the property of Sampson Hanbury . John Trueman Wiheboys and Sampson Hanbury.

Second Count. Charging them to be the property of Benjamin Claypole .

(The case was opened by Mr. Raine.)

CHARLES WORTLEY sworn. - I am a cooper in the house of Messrs. Hanbury, and collect money for them occasionally; I had collected from various publicans on the 9th of June; I enter the notes I take, and did so then; I received a ten-pound note, No. 2626, dated 10th April, 1801, from Mr. Oliver at Finchley; the next morning I gave it to Mr. Claypole.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. That collection you paid over to Mr. Claypole amounted to a great deal more than ten pounds? - A. Yes; a great deal more.

BENJAMIN CLAYPOLE sworn. - I am clerk in the house of Messrs. Hanbury: On the 9th of June, I received a bag from Mr. Wortley, the contents of which I did not know; I put it into a drawer in the iron safe; two or three days after, I was asked for it by Mr. Wortley, and I could not find it, the drawer was then locked; the prisoner was in the service of Messrs. Hanbury, in the accompting-house.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. There are a great many clerks in the house who have access to this safe? - A. Yes; the doors of the safe are open, but the drawers are locked; two drawers hold the cash collected, and the other holds common papers, and different things; they have each of them a different lock, so that one key will not open two; I had one key in my possession the whole time this bag was in the drawer; I had been there several times before I missed it; there were two or three other bags in the drawer; the notes were tied up in a little sample bag, I did not miss it, because there were other bags, and this was a very small bag.

Q. Then nobody could have access to this drawer but yourself? - A. No; but it has been found open once or twice, nothing was missed before then; it was entirely forgetfulness of me to leave it open; I am sure I locked it when I put the bag in.

PATRICK SMITH sworn. - I was collecting clerk to Messrs. Hanbury, and know the prisoner; his province was to post the cellar-books: On the 26th of December last, I was in the box which is appropriated for the use of the clerks to make up their cash, in order to carry to the banker's, and the prisoner came to me, and asked me if I could oblige him with change for a ten-pound Bank-note; I asked him if he chose small notes, or gold; he said, gold, which I gave him; I asked him if he had marked the note; he asked me what I meant; I said, there were a great many forged notes about, and I always wrote on the notes the person's name I took them of; he said, it was almost impossible he should remember who he took it of, because, perhaps, he had had it in his possession six or seven months, but if he wrote his own name on it, he supposed it would do; I said, yes, but I should write his name also upon the face of the note, as I always did; he took up the red-ink pen, and wrote his name on the back; I did not know how he wrote his name, but I looked at the manner in which he had spelt it, and wrote it myself on the face of the note, with the date of the month; he thanked me for the gold, and walked away; I put the note into a bundle of notes without taking any account of it, which led to a disagreeable mistake, for I found myself ten pounds out of pocket; that delayed me an hour or more from going to the banker's, but when I found it out, I carried it to Taylor's and Co. No. 60, Lombard-street; I had mentioned this circumstance to Mr. Evelyn, who asked me about it, and of whom I had taken it, which introduced the enquiry after the note; I paid it into Taylor's the same day I received it of the prisoner, about two hours after.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. It was a fact well known, that a number of notes had been lost in June last? - A. Yes, I believe it was.

Q. It would have been an easy thing for this young man to have got change for the Bank-note any where else? - A. Most certainly.

Q. He did not know what you meant by marking the note? - A. No.

Q. You explained, by saying you meant marking the name? - A. Yes.

Q. He told you, he did not think it possible for him to do that, because, perhaps, he might have had it for six or seven months? - A. Yes, I think that was his expression.

Q. He did not mean to fix it precisely, whether five, six, or seven months? - A. Just so.

Q. He said, if he put his name, he supposed it would do? - A. Yes, and I said it would; upon which, he wrote it at full length; he never attempted to decline or conceal it.

JAMES LAKESBURY sworn. - I am clerk in the house of Taylor and Co. I remember receiving a payment of Smith in Bank-notes, drafts, and other things, on the 26th of December, which I tied up together by themselves; Mr. Claypole, in about half an hour after, made application for a ten-pound note, describing the number, which I took out of the bundle, (the note shewn the witness); this is the note, the name of John Dallimore on it.

Mr. Knowlys. (To Claypole.) Q. So lately as the 2d of January, there was a twenty-five pound note found at the door, I believe? - A. Yes, there was.

Q. Had that ever been in your custody before? - A. I believe it was.

Q. The bags are sometimes thrown across the yard from one to another - are they not? - A. Not that I know of.

Q. Your accompting-house is frequented by all the draymen and publicans that come to settle accounts? - A. Yes.

Q. Where things are carelessly kept, numbers of people have opportunities of taking advantage of it? - A. Yes, certainly.

WILLIAM HOLDEN sworn. - The prisoner posted the cellar-books on the 11th of June; I left him in the accompting-house, there being no other person.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. He was very diligent, I believe? - A. Yes, very, and I had a good opinion of him; he had been there four years or more; he might know of cash being there, from being with the clerks.

JOHN ARMSTRONG sworn. - I apprehended the prisoner when he was at the accompting-house; I and Ray took him to his lodgings, but the door was locked, as his wife was out; I told him we must search the place; upon which he broke open the door himself; there was nothing found but a twenty-pound note, two ten-pound notes, and areceipt for some stock; he gave every assistance; and while I was looking about, by some mistake the receipt had got into a book, but he shewed it to me.

Prisoner's defence. I have stated the fact to my Counsel; every body in the accompting-house knows that I received money from my brother in the West-Indies about that time.

Mr. Knowlys. (To Mr. Holden.) Q. Do you know that fact? - A. very well know it; he received a bill of lading of some coffee, which he put into my hands, and a bill of exchange for fifty pounds, which I received for him, so that he might well be in possession of that sum; it was sent to him about twelve months ago, and he might receive the proceeds about five or six months ago.

The prisoner called eight witnesses, who gave him a good character. NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

143. STEPHEN BYRNE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of January , a guinea, four shillings, three Ramsgate bank-notes, value 5l. each, a Bank of England note, value 2l. and another Bank of England note, value 1l. the property of George Trounce , in the dwelling-house of James Taff .

GEORGE TROUNCE sworn. - I am a sailor , and had just come from Demarara with the prisoner; we lodged in Spital-fields; the day after Newyear's day, he gave me a one-pound note to pay me what he owed me; I had all my wages, three five-pound Ramsgate notes, a two-pound note, a one-pound note, a guinea in gold, and four shillings in a pocket-book, which I had locked up in a chest; my landlord took me with him to get change for the note Byrne gave, and while we were gone, he took the opportunity to go up stairs, and open the chest, and take money, book, and all; I was not gone above eight minutes; when I found he was gone, I suspected something then, and my landlord followed him to Islington, as he had rasked of going to Liverpool; I have seen the notes since, before the Magistrate.

JAMES TAFF sworn. - I keep a lodging house in Wheeler-street; Spital-fields; Trounce and Byrne came to lodge with me on the Saturday morning; Trounce and I went to get change between eight and nine at night, and Byrne was to have five shillings back; we were not gone ten minutes, when we returned, Byrne was gone; I pursued him, and found film at the Bluecoat Boy, in Islington; he asked me to sit down, I would not; he then run out, and I after him, and asked him to give me the man's money; he said, it was his own; I then cried, stop thief, and he was taken to the watch-house; the notes were taken out of his pocket; he said; it was his own money.

THOMAS FRANKLIN sworn. - I am an officer: About half past ten at night, on the 5th of January' I took the prisoner, and found three Ramsgate bank-notes, two Bank of England notes, and a one-pound note, and a shilling, on him.

BENJAMIN CLARKE sworn. - When the robbery was committed, I saw the prisoner and one Ryley go up stairs together; sometime after, Ryley came down, and then I heard a knocking with a hammer, but it did not continue above half a minute; then I heard a kind of rummaging, and I saw Byrne come down about twenty minutes after; I heard no knocking when Ryley was up stairs.

- RYLEY sworn. - The property was in my box; Trounce asked me for my key to put it in, as he was afraid Byrne would rob him, as he had attempted to do coming up from Canterbury; my box was broke open, and two seven-shilling pieces and half-a-crown of my money taken.

- DAVIS sworn. - I am a watchman at Islington; I heard the cry of stop thief, and Taff said, the prisoner had got his ship-mate's money; he immediately turned round to make a blow at Taff, but I caught him; he was taken to the watch-house, and the money found on him.

Prisoner's defence. I live at Liverpool; Trounce and I came together from Demarara; the captain whom I went out with paid me thirteen joes, and told me to call on his agent for the remainder; when we got to Ramsgate, I sold the joes to a Jew for fourteen pounds eight shillings, and he gave me a small red pocket-book; that very day the captain I came home with, paid me seven pounds ten shillings for my passage; the Jew gave me two five-pound Ramsgate notes, and the captain gave me a one and a two-pound Bank of England note, and some silver; I forced them all into the pocket-book, and burst it; the prosecutor had paid some money for me on the road, and I gave him a one-pound note to take it out of; we had been drinking freely that day, and I went and lay down on the bed; while he was gone for change, I fell asleep, but don't know for how long; when I awoke, there was a man sitting on the bed with a candle; I got up, put on my shoes, and went down, when Mrs. Taff began to abuse me, and bid me begone; I went out, and intended to go to Liverpool, I did not know my road, but got to Islington, and had some supper, where Taff came in, and said, Trounce had lost seventeen pounds, and I had it; I said, I had not, but he called the watch, and that gentleman took my own notes out of my pocket.

For the Prisoner.

Ryley. I was present when he offered eighteen pounds, and that he would make up the remainder, and he said he would work and pay me.

Q. (To Tass.) Was he in liquor? - A. Yes, he was; Trounce clapped his hands together, and said, he was rifined for ever.

PHILIP MULVANY sworn. - I heard Trouncesay that by the Holy Ghost he would hang him or his father for twenty pounds; and I heard him, at another time, say, holding a drop of gin in a glass, that he thought no more about his life than that drop of gin, or so much.

GUILTY , Death , aged 36.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

144. WILLIAM NOTT was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Harry Stow and George Stow , about the hour of three in the night, on the 4th of December , and burglariously stealing fourteen pound weight of pork, value 5s. the property of Harry Stow ; three tea-spoons, value 4s. 6d. the property of John Jeffreys , the elder ; a child's coat, value 2s. and a child's frock, value 1s. 6d. the property of John Jeffreys , the younger .

Second Count. Charging him with being guilty of the like burglary in the dwelling house of John Jeffreys, the elder, and stealing the like goods.(The case was opened by Mr. Gurney.)

JOHN JEFFREYS Sen. sworn. - I am a gardener , and live in the parish of Chiswick , in the service of Messrs. Harry and George Stow, in their house; I pay no rent; they never sleep there: On the morning of the 4th of December, I came to Covent garden market, about half past two; I pulled the door after n e, which has a spring lock, and I tried the latch, and found all fast; the window was not broke the night before, because I set by it, and sel no air; there was a dead hog in the house of Mr. Harry Stow, and a child's great coat hanging on a line behind the door, and a blue cotton frock, which I had in my hand, all belonging to my son, and the silver tea-spoons to me; the child is about three years old; I keep it, but it is my son's.

JOHN JEFFREYS, Jun. sworn. - I am son to the last witness: On the morning of the 5th, I went into the yard, about seven o'clock; I looked at the house, and saw a window open; in the first room entering the house a pane of glass was taken out, and the fash was open; I went into the back place, and missed a piece of the pork; I looked into the drawer, and missed a little piece of pork and apple pudding; then I alarmed my mother.

JOHN VICKERS sworn. - I am a gardener, and went the morning of the robbery to Mr. Jeffreys, about half past six; the window was open; I went in, and found the side of the hog cut out; there was about sixteen pounds gone.

THOMAS JULIET sworn. - I was present when the prisoner made a voluntary confession, and saw him put his mark to it; it was read over to him first.

Confession read:

Middlesex to wit, Voluntary confession of William Nott.

"This examinant says, that, about three weeks ago, on a Saturday morning, he and one Thomas, Smith broke open the house of John Jeffreys, at Chiswick, between two and three o'clock, when it was dark; that Smith took a pane of glass out, opened the window, and got into the house, and let in this examinant; that it was so dark they could not see; they searched in the dark, and found some pork, a tea-spoon, a child's great coat from a line near the door, which, on examining by day-light, they found to be a blue great coat trimmed with red, and with a red cape, like that produced; they also found a child's blue cotton frock, all of which articles they stole, and the same morning they took them to the house of William Stevens, now present, who is a green-grocer, and lives near the church at Lambeth, in the country of Surrey; that they left all the articles with him, and asked him if he bought garden-stuff, or knew Jeffreys, and told him the articles had come from Jeffreys; that he laughed, and gave the examinant a piece of the pork back again, and six-pence; that he could not fail to know that they had stole the same, and that the examinant has frequently disposed of articles to Stevens, which he knew were stolen; the pork could not weigh less than ten or twelve pounds; and that Stevens returned him about a pound of it."

JAMES KENNEDY sworn. - I am an officer; on the 28th of December last, I and Warren went to Stevens's house, in Lambeth; he is a greengrocer; we searched his apartments, and found this great coat. (Produces it.)

SARAH JEFFREYS sworn. - This is the coat my child wore.

Prisoner's defence. I have nothing to say.

GUILTY , Death , aged 16.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

145. SAMUEL THOMSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of December , two wax leather calf-skins, value 9s. the property of James Atkinson .

Second Count. Charging them to be the property of Samuel Corley .

Third Count. Charging them to be the property of Thomas Berkley .

Fourth Count. Charging them to be the property of Morris Berkley .

Fifth Count. Charging them to be the property of Robert Wyatt , John-Thody Berkley , and Clement Wyatt .

Sixth Count. Charging them to be the property of Richard Cotton .

Seventh Count. Charging them to be the property of John Bryant , and the

Eighth Count. Charging them to be the property of certain persons to the Jurors unknown.

There being no evidence to bring the charge home to the prisoner, he was not put on his defence.

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

146. SARAH MURPHY , alias MARTIN , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of January , three quarters of a yard of printed cotton , the property of James-Sebastian Wilmot .

JAMES-SEBASTIAN WILMOT sworn. - I am a linen-draper , in East-Smithfield; I can only identify the property.

MARY FLETCHER sworn. - I am shopwoman to Mr. Wilmot; about half past nine in the morning of the 7th of January, the prisoner came into the shop to complain of some Irish she had bought a week before; she then wanted to look at some calico, I turned to get it, and while I was turned, she laid hold of the piece of print which she took; I turned my head quick, and she asked me if it was not a shawl; I said, no; she laid it down again, and said, the calico was not thick enough; I turned again, and I saw her put the cotton under her cloak; I let her go out of the shop, and sent the boy after her; he brought her back, and I said, I wished to speak to her; she took it from under her clock, and threw it over the counter, and begged forgiveness.

Prisoner's defence. I went to change a piece of linen, and asked her to let me look at a piece of calico, she did, I paid for it, and came out of the shop; she called me back, and sent for an officer, saying, I had taken it, but it lay on the counter when I went in.

Fletcher. I saw her take it from under her cloak; I have known her for a number of years coming to the shop.

The prisoner called one witness to her character.

GUILTY , aged 35.

confined six months in the House of Correction . Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

147. ELIZABETH ODELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of December , seven pair of women's shoes, value 21s. the property of William Bowes-Shrubsole .

WILLIAM-BOWES SHRUBSOLE sworn. - I am a boot and shoe-maker , at No. 8, Norton-falgate : On the 15th of December, bundles of velvet shoes hung up at the door, as usual, my daughter was in the shop, I heard her call out, and missed the shoes.

ELIZABETH SHRUBSOLE sworn. - I am twelve years old, and know the nature of an oath; I was left to take care of the shop; on the 15th of December, in the forenoon, the prisoner came in, and said, is any body in the way? I said, yes, and called my aunt; she said, don't call your aunt, I will take them down; then she took the shoes down and gave them a little child, who went away with them; she kept saying to me, what's the matter with you, because I cried out; just as my aunt came up, the prisoner went away; I law her about a fortnight after going by the door, and I called my uncle, and told him; he went out and brought her back.

Prisoner. Q. Can you swear to me? - A. Yes.

JEREMIAH SHRUBSOLE sworn. - I am uncle to the last witness, and pursued the prisoner: I asked her if she had bought any shoes at that shop; she said, what do you mean by that, what did I mean by stopping her on the King's highway; I told her she was accused of stealing some shoes, and she must go with me, she resused; an officer was sent for, who went to her lodgings, and while he was gone, I found she had a pair of velvet shoes on.

HENRY PASLEY sworn. - I live with Mr. Clarke, a pawnbroker, No. 158. Bishopsgate street; the prisoner came to our shop on the 5th of December, and pledged a pair of velvet shoes, in the name of Mary Ogle . (The shoes produced.)

- WOLFE sworn. - I made these shoes and can swear to them.

JOHN RAY sworn. - I am an officer; I went to the prisoner's lodgings, and found six duplicates for six pair of velvet shoes, in Bishopsgate-street.(Three other pair of shoes produced.)(The shoes were identified by Joseph Rattenback, foreman to Mr. Shrubsole, and by Wolse.)

Prisoner's defence. I am not guilty.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY , aged 57.

confined two years in the House of Correction .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

148. SAMUEL BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of December , a silver tea-spoon, value 1s. 6d. the property of John Glover .

JOHN GLOVER sworn. - I am a shoe-maker , at Clapton : On the 21st of December, about a quarter past six in the evening, the prisoner came and asked me to give him a cup of tea; I had known him for a dozen years; I desired my people to give him some tea; after tea, I missed a tea-spoon; I asked him for it, he said, he had put it down upon the table; he sold sprats; I searched his basket, but could not find it; I made him turn his pockets out, but I could not find it, and having a good opinion of the man, I let him go; after he was gone, my daughter said, she was sure he had it; I went after him, and overtook him at Hackney; I charged him with it again, he said, he was very willing to be searched, and I took him to the house of Mr. Carter, a publican; Mr. Carter searched him, and I saw him take the spoon from between his waistcoat and his shirt.

- CARTER sworn. - I searched the prisoner, and found the tea-spoon upon him. (Produces it.)

Glover. This is my spoon, I know it by the cypher.

Prisoner's defence. I was very much disguised in liquor. GUILTY , aged 67.

Publicly whipped and discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

149. DAVID BUCKINGHAM was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Robert Smith , about the hour of six in the night of the 31st of December , and feloniously stealing eight bed-curtains, value 10l. six window-curtains, value 5l. two pistols, value 1l. a dirk, value 2s. thirty yards of printed cotton, value 1l. 10s. twelve bed-valances, value 1l. six bed-bases, value 1l. four table-cloths, value 4s. and three counterpanes, value 4l. 10s. the property of Richard Winstanley .

Second Count. Charging it to be the dwelling-house of the said Richard. And

WILLIAM BLAKE was indicted for feloniously receiving the aforesaid three counterpanes, being part of the above property, he knowing them to have been stolen .(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

ROBERT SMITH sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Richard Winstanley, who lives at No. 10, Paternoster-row, and is an auctioneer ; he has the premises in Angel-court, Snow-hill , which were the late Hand-in-Hand Fire-office, for a warehouse, where a quantity of goods are deposited, and where I slept: On the 31st of December, the things mentioned in the indictment were there, I did not discover it was broke open till the next morning; I went to bed at ten o'clock; the window at which the robbers entered was over the door; it was not broke open the day before; none of the things lost have been found.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Do you know that any property was lost? - A. Yes; of my own knowledge I had seen them two days before.

Q. The property is removed from time to time to be sold at different places? - A. They are sold at the warehouse, but they were not sold.

Q. What employment was your son in? - A. He was errand-boy to a butcher in Aldersgate-street, he was not employed by my master; he used to sleep with me when I went first there, and afterwards come backwards and forwards; he had an opportunity of taking things, if he would, then.

Q. John Smith , your son, is the accomplice? - A. Yes; I took him myself, I had been told of it; I charged him with it, and he confessed it.

PHILIP HOLDSWORTH sworn. - I am the City-Marshal: On Thursday the 7th of January, I received information from John Smith , at my house, No, 28, Coruhill, his father came with him; Cartwright my officer, and I went to No. 5, Grub-street; it was agreed between John Smith and me, that he should stand in the street and call Buckingham by a name he was known by, he did so, and in about two minutes Buckingham made his appearance in the street; we took him to a coach, and left him with an officer, while we went and searched the apartments he came out of, belonging to his mother; Cartwright looked up the chimney, where he found these keys, (producing a number of keys), some of which are intended for picklockkeys; they were behind a brick.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Is not the house let out in different tenements? - A. Yes; the man who was proprietor of the house told me it was an apartment hired by Buckingham's mother, and that there were other people lodged up stairs.

DANIEL CARTWRIGHT sworn. - I am a City constable, and went with Mr. Holdsworth to No. 5, Grub-street: Smith called out, and Buckingham came down; he was taken, and I found a small key on him, that had been filed for opening drawers, and a common pocket knife; he wanted to know what he was taken for. Mr. Holdsworth and I then went up one pair of stairs, at No. 5, I got a light, and found the keys as is already stated; in the back room I found this stock, (produces it); there was no centre-bit.

JOHN SMITH sworn. - Q. Are you the son of Robert Smith? - A. Yes.

Q. Mind and speak the truth - do you know the prisoner Buckingham? - A. Yes; I lived with his father, about two years ago, who was a fishmonger in Fore-street; I know one Belcher, but never saw him but once: the last day of December, Buckingham, Belcher, and I, went towards Covent-Garden; and had a pot of beer, about three o'clock; Buckingham-said he knew of a good place, but for want of a centre-bit they could not get in; Belcher said, let us go and see if we can't rob it; going along we saw a lamp-lighter's ladder, and he persuaded us to take that; Buckingham said we could get one nearer than that, in Aldersgate-street; we then agreed to go to the Old Hand-in-Hand Fire-office, but first we took a ladder from Aldersgate-street; Buckingham said I looked more like a lamplighter than he, and I took it; we walked about till it was dark, we went to Buckingham's room, No. 5, Grub-street, up one pair of stairs, he brought down a sack, those keys, and a chisel, and between five and six o'clock we went to Angel-court; then Belcher got a pipe of tobacco, a farthingsworth of matches, and a halfpenny candle, the ladder was put against the wall, and Buckingham told me to go up and stick a knife in the putty; I said I could not; he said, then break the window; I said I could not without making a noise; he said, if any body comes he would stick his knife in them; thenI broke the top window over the door; I was to put my hand over, shore the thing round, and hoist up the sash, but I could not open it; I then broke the bottom window, got in, and went down stairs and let them in; Buckingham put a match into the pipe and lit the candle, and we all went up stairs to the first-floor; Belcher put a pair of pistols in his pocket, and we all filled the sack full of things; Belcher and me held the sack open while Bucking ham put them in, bed-furniture, and table-cloths; three counterpanes were tied up in my apron, and not put into the sack; Buckingham wanted Belcher to pull off his smock-frock to make a sack of it, but he would not; Belcher went down first with the sack, I was to wait and see that nobody was coming after him, Buckingham came back to me, and then Belcher ran away with the things; Buckingham and I took the three counterpanes to a man of the name of Blake, in Angel-alley, Bishopsgate-street, he keeps a private-house; Blake took us up three pair of stairs, to an empty room, first he told me to wait down stairs, but I said I would not, and I went up with them; Buckingham asked three pounds for them, Blake said he would give eight shillings a piece, and that three times eight was twenty-eight; he meant twenty-four, but he gave Buckingham a one pound note, a seven-shilling-piece, and a shiling; I had the seven-shilling-piece and the shilling; we then went to an Alamode beef-shop, and I changed the seven shilling-piece; I said I was afraid to go home, as I had left my place,and he said he would take me to a house in Chick-lane, where we went and slept two or three nights; the house is kept by one Smith; next day we went to an ironnonger's in Redcross-street,and bought a stock and centre-bit, which I paid for, I gave two shilling, and had sixpence in change, Buckingham took them to his lodgings in Grub-street; going down Snow-hill, on Friday fortnight, we went into a gingerbread-baker shop, and bought a plumb-cake, I gave the one pound note, and the young woman went for chage; Buckingham gave me the twenty shilling note to take care of, because his pocket was not good; I staid with him till the money was all gone, then he told me I had better go home till he could get more tools to work with; I told one Jago, the next day after the robbry, what I ahd done, but my father spoke to me about it first; I went to Buckingham several times, to ask him what I had better do; he told me not to say any thing about it, for they could not hurt us, as it was only a warehouse,and not a dwelling-house, at most they could only trasport us for it; I told my father five days after I had told Jago, and he took me to Mr. Holdsworth, who took me to Buckingham's, in Grub-street, the same night; I called him down by the nick-name of Kebble, and he came dwon, and was taken.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Buckingham could not avoid knowing you, to his misfortune? - A. Yes; I lived with his father, and I used to call on his mother.

Q.Did you know, when you committed the robbery, that your father lived in the house? - A. Yes.

Q. Possibly you thought you mihgt endanger his life? - A. I did not think about that.

Q. How long have you been a thief? - A. I never did any thing before that.

Q. Will you swear that? - A. Yes; I never stole any thing, only a gentlemean's son brought two watches,and told me to pawn them, but I would not; I told him there was a woman, of the name of Rigby, who sold apples in Aldersgate-street, would do it, and she did; he gave her something for it.

Q. I suppose they were honestly come by? - A. I did not think of that.

Q. How long had you been acquainted with him? - A. We used to serve his father with meat; his father was a tea-dealer, and he told me, afterwards, they were his father's.

Q. What goods did you take from your father's house? - A. Bed-furniture.

Q. Have you been honest enough to tell where to find them? - A. I could not, only the counterpanes, the rest were taken away; Jago is a jewelcase maker, he used to go to school with me; my fatehr told me to confess to save my life.

Court. Q. Did any body reside there but your father? - A. No.

Q. Where did Buckingham keekp the keys? - A. In a hole up the chimney, he told me so.

MARY WOOD Sworn . - I know the accomplice, and the prisoner, Buckingham, I live at No. 80, Snow-hill, and am servant to Mrs. Wilson, who keeps a gingerbread-baker's shop; they came on New-year's day to the shop, and bought a plumbcake, at about eight-pence or nine-pence in price, and Smith gave me a one pound note, I went and got change.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Smith gave you the note, and not the other? - A. Smoth gave it me.

JOHN SMITH Sworn. - I live at No. 7, Chick-lane: I know Buckingham by sleeping four or five nights at my house, Monday week was the last time he slept there; I think Smith was with him, I believe he was.

Court. Q. What business do you follow? - A. I let lodgings to men only; I have three houses on lease, all in one.

HENRY CLARKE Sworn . - I live at No. 3, Redcross-street: I know Smithand Buckingham by sight, they came to my shop, about three weeks ago,and Smith asked for a stock, he had one, and paid a shilling for it; then he asked for a bit, for which he paid fixpence. (The stock produced).

Clarke. This is the stock.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. Smith bought them, and not Buckingham? - A. Yes.

JOHN REED sworn. - I am an officer, and apprehended Blake at his house; I told him what for, and he said he knew nothing of it; I found nothing there.

RICHARD WINSTANLEY sworn. - I am proprietor of the warehouses, and pay rent and taxes for them; Smith slept there for the security of the property.

Buckingham's defence. My Lord, I am innocent of the robbery laid to my charge.

Blake's defence. I did not expect my trial on so soon; I have nobody here, and nothing to say; before the Magistrate, Smith said, he never had seen me, and only knew what he had been told.

The prisoner, Buckingham, called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Buckingham, GUILTY , Death , aged 18.

Blake, NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

150. MARY PERRY and PHEBE GIBBS were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of December , eight yards of printed muslin, value 40s. the property of William Porter , privately in his shop .

WILLIAM PORTER sworn. - I live at No. 36, Cranbourn-street, Leicester-fields , and am a linendraper ; I can only swear to the property.

JOHN BARRETT sworn. - I am a pawnbroker's servant: The prisoner, Phebe Gibbs , came on the 10th of December to pledge the piece of muslin for a guinea; she said it belonged to Mr. Brenfield of the Broadway, Westminster; I suspected it was stolen, and stopped her.

JOHN MARSDEN sworn. - I am an officer of the Police: On the 10th of December, I was sent for, and took Gibbs into custody; she had this piece of muslin before her, (produces it;) she said she had it from Perry; I said, she must go with me; going out of the shop, I saw Perry standing by the window in the street; Gibbs said, she had it of her; Perry denied it, and I took them both.

(The property was identified by the prosecutor.)

Perry's defence. My Lord, on the 10th of December, I met Phebe Gibbs , and she said she was going to pawn that piece for a man who lived with her, and asked me to lend her my apron; I went to see what kept her, and Marsden took me out of spite.

Gibbs's defence. On the 4th of December, going down the Strand, I met a young man, who stayed with me till the 6th, and said, there were seven yards of muslin he would give me, which he had bought and paid for; I was distressed, went to pawn it, and was taken up.

Both NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

151. STEPHEN ADAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of December , two umbrellas, value 30s. two linen bags, value 1s. and two brass rings, value 2d , the property of George Lane .

JAMES COURTNEY sworn. - I am shopman to George Lane, a pawnbroker , at No. 185, High-Holborn : On Saturday, the 5th of December, two umbrellas were hung at the door; about two o'clock I missed one of them, and about half past three, I saw the prisoner standing for some minutes at the window, then go to the door, and take down another; he had one in his hand; another young man and I run after him, upon which he threw away one; I returned, as nobody was in the shop.

EDWARD BAYLIS sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Lane; I saw the prisoner take the umbrella down from the door, and go off; I jumped over the counter, and pursued him; he threw the second umbrella, he had taken, away, he had the first, he had taken, in his hand, when he took the second, and which he threw away; they are both here, but I cannot swear to them. (The umbrellas produced.)

WILLIAM BACON sworn. - I searched the prisoner, and in his pocket I found this bag, which belongs to one of the umbrellas. (Produces it.)

Courtney. When this umbrella was first given to the officer, there was a private mark in ink, which is now worn off, I put it on myself, it was B with G. GUILTY , aged 19.

confined twelve months in the House of Correction , and whipped in the jail .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

152. ELIZABETH BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of January , twenty yards of printed calico, value 30s. the property of William Adams , privately in his shop .

WILLIAM ADAMS sworn. - I am a linen-draper , in High-street, St. Giles's : On Thursday last, the prisoner came to my shop to buy a few things to the value of eight or nine shillings; when she was gone, I missed a piece of calico, which was among other things I had shewed her; towards the latter part, she asked for several trifling articles; first, she bought a yard and a half of print, then a pair of stockings, and pointed to some shawls; I had some small suspicion, but did not see her do any thing; I followed her, and taxed her with it; upon which she acknowledged it, opened her gown, and gave it me; she hesitated a moment, then confessed she had, and asked me whether she must go back with me; I said, she must, and she did, and I sent for an officer; I know it to be my property by the shop-mark.

Prisoner's defence. I went to buy a few things, and after I had paid for them, I asked him what it was o'clock; he said, past twelve; I was in a hurry about my husband's dinner, and my child teazingme, I took up the wrong parcel, and left my own behind.

Adams. She took them both away at first, and when the officer took her, she forgot to take her own parcel; it is at our house now.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave her a good character. GUILTY, aged 27.

Of stealing, but not privately .

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction , and whipped in the jail .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

153. JOHN SNOOK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of December , ninety pounds weight of lead, value 12s. fixed to a certain building, called a stable , belonging to her Royal Highness the Duchess of Gloucester .

Second Count. Charging it to be fixed to a certain building, called a house.

There being an error in the indictment, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

154. HENRY NEWLAND was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of December , a cloth great coat, value 10s. a table cloth, value 4s. a petticoat, value 2s. a muslin handkerchief, value 3d. a cotton handkerchief, value 3d. and two aprons, value 4s. the property of James Wilkins .

JAMES WILKINS sworn. - I am a stone-mason ; On the 11th of December, I was in at Mr. Windfor's, a pawnbroker, to sell some articles; a bundle, containing the things, was laying by my left-hand; I was learning on my left elbow, and had refused a shilling, the prisoner was standing behind me; in a small space of time, he said, I wish you good morning, gentlemen, and went out of the shop; in about half a minute, I missed my bundle; I thought he must have it; I found out where he lived, and went to him; I said, Master Newland, do you remember taking away a bundle from such a place just now; he appeared very strange; I said, don't deny it, because the gentleman is here who saw you bring it up stairs; G-d bless my soul, says he, my wife said that was not my bundle, as soon as I brought it in; immediately the bundle was produced to me from some secure place, from behind a curtain or cupboard in the room; says he, I hope no offence, you shall have a drop of something to drink before you go out of this room; I said, I would not; he said, he hoped there was nothing the matter; O, no, said I, nothing; says he, will you call again; I said, you may depend on it, I will; I then went to Lambeth-street, and got an officer.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Did you know that he had been a sailor twenty or thirty years, and had been fractured in the skull, and in consequence of that was out of his mind at times? - A. No.

Q. The pawnbroker was in the shop? - A. Yes, his man was.

Q. Is he here to-day? - A. No.

Q. He told you he had got the wrong bundle? - A. Yes; but hesitated sometime; there was nothing taken out of it; he said, it was a mere mistake.

Prisoner's defence. I was blown up in the Cormbrant sloop of war, and was fractured in the skull, so that when I drink a little drop of spirits, or any thing of that kind, I don't know what I do.

For the prisoner.

JANE WALLIS sworn. - I have known the prisoner about six months, and know he has been frequently deranged, having received a wound in his head; I have even been afraid to open my door, even at nine o'clock at night for him; he has always borne a good character; I never saw him intoxicated.

SUSANNA HAMMOND sworn - I am a widow, and employed the prisoner to fetch some ear-rings, and a bundle, from two different pawnbrokers; he returned between twelve and two, and threw down a bundle that was not mine; I would not open it; he said, all was right; I desired him to take it back, as it did not belong to me; he said, all was well, and that he was happy if I was, and he would be d-d if he would take it back; then that man came and demanded it; the prisoner is at times deranged; he was blown up in the same ship that my brother was, who was killed; I have seen various proofs of it, such as buying a string of rings of sixpence or a shilling value, to the amount of twelve or fourteen shillings, and telling me, he bought them to make me a present of, and that he had made a fortune for me; he passed them to me as gold rings; people have begged me to take care of him, as he is infane, but I know his heart is good.

Court. Q. What time did you send him out? - A. About a quarter past twelve.

Q. How came you to send a man perfectly out of his senses for your things? - A. I did not wish to let the people of the house know I pledged things, and he seemed collected that day; he returned about two o'clock, or after; I think the bundle was at Sowerby's, and the ear-rings at Windsor's; I took the bundle in a passion from him, and threw it on the ground.

Court. (To Wilkins). Q. Was this lady present? - A. The prisoner and she lives together; he called her his wife, and she called him her husband; I am sure the bundle was taken from behind a curtain.

MARY- ANN TYLER sworn. - I look upon the prisoner to be a deranged man.

DAVID CLARKE sworn. - My father and I are in the wholesale hardware line, in Wellclose-square:I have known the prisoner nine years; at times he is deranged, by a wound in his head; I have met him with a parcel of boys about him, hooting and halloaing; I have such an opinion of his honesty, that I would take him into my service.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

155. JAMES JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of December , a coat, value 12s. a waistcoat, value 4s. the property of John Dean ; and a waistcoat, value 3s. a jacket, value 2s. three pair of stockings, value 2s. a shirt, value 2s. and a silk handkerchief, value 6d. the property of Thomas Cooper .

THOMAS COOPER sworn. - I live at Mr. Dean's, a stable-keeper , New Bond-street : Those articles were stole from a lodging over the stable; I saw them overnight of the 23d of December, and next morning, I saw them at the watch-house with the prisoner.( John Dean corroborated the testimony of the last witness.)

WILLIAM SMITH sworn. - I am a watchman: Isaac Bowley run out of the yard, crying stop thief, on the 23d of December, about twenty minutes before seven; I ran after the prisoner, and took him with the property under his arm; he owned he took it, but would not own where he got in. (The property identified by Cooper and Dean).

ISAAC BOWLEY sworn. - I was in the privy under the stair-case, and heard somebody come down; I said, halloa, and the prisoner said, halloa, and asked me where young Will was; I said directly, you have been thieving; I looked up stairs, and there say a bundle; I asked the man in the yard whole it was; the prisoner said, it was his, and run out of the yard with it; I ran after him, and he was taken. GUILTY , aged 19.

confined six months in the House of Correction , and publicly whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

156. MARY BOUQUETON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of October , a gown, value 3s. 6d. a shift, value 1s. an under petticoat, value 6d. two caps, value 9d. two handkerchiefs, value 9d. two aprons, value 6d. a pair of pattens, value 6d. a pair of shoes, value 6d. a pair of stockings, value 6d. a frock, value 6d a shift, value 6d. and a flat iron, value 9d. the property of Mary Portsmouth .

MARY PORTSMOUTH sworn. - I live in Clement's-lane : I went out about nine o'clock, and she came to me as a friend, according to promise, to mend my gown, on the 22d of October; I left her in care of my room; when I went home, about five o'clock, the door was open, and she was gone; I never saw her again till the 4th of this month; when I stopped her, she told me where she had pledged the flat iron, but I never got the other things.

Prisoner's defence. I have nothing to say.

GUILTY , aged 29.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and whipped in the jail .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

157. JOEL DAY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of December , two shirts, value 6s. a shift, value 3s. two children's petticoats, value 3s. a table-cloth, value 4s. a shawl, value 5s. two pillow-cases, value 1s. 6d. a night-cap, value 6d. two handkerchiefs, value 6d. and a pocket handkerchief, value 6d. the property of John Allsuffle .

SARAH DRINKWATER sworn. - I was nursing the prosecutor's wife, who lives at No. 118, Longacre: On the 1st of December, I delivered the things to the prisoner, to take to his wife to be washed; the next day, his wife came for the linen, as he had not been home all night; I told her he had it the night before; there was nothing found but the sheet.

GEORGE SIMSON sworn. - I am a journeyman pawnbroker; the prisoner came to my master's shop, on the 1st of December, and pawned the sheet for four shillings, in the name of Joel Day.(The sheet identified.)

Prisoner's defence. I have nothing to say.

GUILTY , aged 27.

confined six months in the House of Correction , and publicly whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

158. JOHN MULLINS , otherwise MURRAY , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of January , a pewter quart pot, value 16d. the property of John Saunders .

JOHN SAUNDERS sworn. - I keep the Blue-boar public-house , in Long-acre ; the prisoner came to my house on the 11th of last month; I suspected him, and put some pots in the place where I thought I had lost some others from; he made a pretence to go back to the yard, and while he was gone, I went to look, and missed this pot, (producing a pewter quart pot) from a table in the passage, going to the yard; I waited till he returned; he was going to pay me for a pint of beer, but I charged him with it, and found it in his breeches.

Prisoner's defence. The girl said, there was some beer in the passage I might drink; I did not like to let her master know it, and I put the pot there; I did not want it, it was no use to me.

GUILTY , aged 36.

Publicly whipped , and discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

159. JOSEPH SMITH was indicted for feloniously receiving two coach cushions, value 18s. the property of Thomas Coleman , stolen by Thomas Glen, he having been convicted of stealing them; he, the said Joseph Smith , well knowing them to have been so stolen .(The record of the conviction of Thomas Glen, in September Session produced.)

THOMAS COLEMAN sworn. - I am a chandler , in Westmoreland-street, Mary-le-bonne; I had hired a chaise, and about five o'clock in the morning of the 6th of July last, I looked at it, the horse was not there as it rained; I laid my hand on the cushions, which were of a drab colour, bound with worsted lace; about six o'clock, I went out again to see if the rain was over, and they were gone; Glen was taken about eight o'clock; I got a warrant against Smith, who keeps a little iron shop in John's-court, Mary-le-bonne-lane, but we found nothing there, we went about nine o'clock.

HENRY OAKLY sworn. - I live at No. 2, John's-court: On the the first Monday in July, I opened the shop-door about seven o'clock, and saw Thomas Glen standing at the prisoner's door, with a couple of drab-coloured chaise-cushions; he went in with them, and I stood at the door till he came out again without them; I never saw the cushions before.

WALTER NORRIS sworn. - I am a carpenter: On Monday the 6th of July, I was passing Mary-le-bonne lane, in the morning, and saw Glen standing at Smith's door, with two chaise cushions; I knew him to be a bad character; he had them on his back, and stooped as if he was ill; I asked him what was the matter, he said, he had a bad pain in his back; then the prisoner opened the door, and he went in; I asked the prisoner whether he had any old hinges, he said, no.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. How does Smith's door open? - A. Inward.

Q. The man who opened it was concealed? - A. I saw him and spoke to him, I knew him by fight.

THOMAS CHRISTLE sworn. - I am a painter and glazier, No. 54, Paddington-street: Going out in the morning of the 6th of July, I saw Glen was liberated, and I went with the constable and apprehended him; I then went to the corner of John's-court, and watched Smith's door, and saw him take some gowns from the door, and put them into a bag, and saw him and his son come out with a bundle about eighteen inches square; I followed them, but lost them in an instant.

JAMES PRIDDY sworn. - I am constable and took the prisoner.

Prisoner's defence. They said, if I would leave my shop, they would never trouble themselves with me; Oakley wants to turn my shop into a shoemaker's; Christie said, they never should have looked at me, or thought of the prosecution, if it had not been at the persuasion of Christie; as to the cushions I know nothing of them.

GUILTY , aged 32.

Transported for fourteen years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

160. THOMAS ASHFORD was indicted for feloniously breaking the dwelling-house of William Warne , about the hour of six in the night of the 2d of January , and stealing twenty-five yards of kerseymere, value 7l. 10s. twenty yards of Marsella, value 7l. fifty-four yards of dimity, value 8l. and fifty-six yards of printed dimity, value 8l. 7s. the property of the said William Warne .

WILLIAM WARNE sworn. - I am a tailor and man's mercer , in Pall-Mall : On the 2d of January, between five and six o'clock, while I was at dinner, I heard a great noise in the passage; I went out, and saw the prisoner with several people, and these things; there is the shop door, and a private door; the private door was shut; I had seen the things about five o'clock at the end of the shelf.

JOHN STROUD sworn. - I am a gentleman's servant: On Saturday, the 2d of January, between five and six, I was going through Paved-alley, St. James's, when I met the prisoner with a large bundle in his arms; I thought he had robbed some shop; I turned round to follow him, and met Mr. Sherlock, and told him what I thought; we both went in pursuit of him; Sherlock being first, stopped him in King-street, St. James's-square; the prisoner dropped the goods, and run away through the Square; I took possession of the goods till Sherlock brought him back; I thought they came from Mr. Warne's shop, because no other was near; we took him there, and I can swear to the man.

CHRISTOPHER SHERLOCK sworn. - I am a chairman: On Saturday, the 2d of January, I met Mr. Stroud; we pursued the prisoner; I was close to him when he dropped the things; I took him, and brought him back.

JOSEPH GREGORY sworn. - I am a constable, and took the prisoner into custody; I searched him, and found some matches a wax taper, and some duplicates; he said, he watched the clerk through the window, and then went into the shop, and took the things.

RALPH JACKSON sworn. - I am clerk to Mr. Warne: On the 2d of January I had occasion to go backwards to pay the men; I shut the street door, and then went to the front shop door, and locked that; there was another door that leads into the passage, at the back part of the shop, which we call our private door; and, to the best of my recollection, I shut that; they could not get to that without opening either the street door or shop door; I cannot conceive he could come in any other waythan that; some of the servants had left it open, or that he had picked the lock; I was not gone more than a quarter of an hour.

Q. (To Mr. Warne.) Did any of your servants go out? - A. Not as I know of; two of them were attending at dinner, and the cook was below.

Prisoner's defence. I have nothing to say.

GUILTY , Death , aged 21.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

161. PATRICK DUFF was indicted for feloniously making an assault in a certain field and open place, near the King's highway, upon John Barclay , on the 14th of January , putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, a clasp knife, value 2d. a cork-screw, value 2d. a tobacco-stopper, value 2d. four shillings, ten six-pences, and thirty-six halfpence , the property of the said John.

JOHN BARCLAY sworn. - I keep the Queen's Head , in Lower-street, Islington; my wife was gone to town, and I was going to her, about half past nine, on the 14th of January; I turned down Queen's-Head-lane, towards the Shepherd and Shepherdess, and met a man and woman at the top, and another man and woman at the bottom; in consequence of which, I thought it was safe; a little before I got to the pitching-block at the bottom of the field, I thought I saw something move, (for it was very light,) and I saw two men rise and come out of the ditch, from behind a bank; I had no suspicion of their being thieves, as I thought they might go there for other occasions; it was to light, I could see the cupola on the dome of St. Paul's; I saw those men go through the posts, and proceed for London; one was in a sailor's dress, and the other in a soldier's; they were about sixty yards before me, and took the right hand of the path, and left me room enough on the left hand to pass them; they were walking slow, with their arms folded; the sailor was about two paces behind the soldier; I attempted to pass them, and the sailor turned his hand round with such violence, that he almost knocked me backwards; he catched me by the collar, and, at the same time, the prisoner turned round, and catched me by the other side of the collar, and the arm, and said, halloa! where are you going? I said, to town; my great coat was buttoned; they instantly tore it open, and searched for my watch, which I had left at home; I said, my friends, I have nothing for you only a few six-pences; don't use me ill; I thought it was very hard to be used in that manner; they said, it was bl-y hard for them to be without money; the sailor instantly put his hand into my waistcoat-pocket, where there was about eighteen pennyworth of halfpence, which they took out, with a knife, a cork-screw, and a tobacco-stopper; he then put his hand to search for my breeches pocket, and the prisoner held me; I had nothing in that pocket; there were four shillings, and there might be a dozen six-pences, which he took out, and run off directly; when the prisoner loosed me, he gave me a shove round, and he run off; on turning round, I saw the heads of two gentlemen; I halloaed to them, and begged their assistance, for I had been robbed; we pursued them about one hundred yards, and took the prisoner; the other run away; they had no arms.

MATTHEW MACKENZIE sworn. - On Thursday last, the 14th of January, I was in company with Mr. Greenly, going home, and it being so clear a night, we agreed to go across the fields; when we got about one hundred yards of the pitching-block, I saw a man, who called, I am robbed, give your assistance; we agreed to pursue the men who were running; and, after running a few yards, took the prisoner; he made no resistance, or was he out of my sight.

- WYATT sworn. - I am a constable; I searched the prisoner, but only found an old pocketbook, a knife, and tobacco-box,

Prisoner's defence. I was going along the footpath, and heard two men running; I stood up, and a man passed me; I saw two more coming up, and, thinking it might be a quarrel, I turned out of the road; upon which they came and took hold of me; I was not going to run away, I had done nothing; there is my discharge from the army in that pocket-book, in consequence of being wounded three times.

GUILTY, Death , aged 32.

Recommended to mercy by the Jury and prosecutor, on account of not having used any violence .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

162. MARY MICHINER was indicted for making an assault in the King's highway, upon James Jennings , on the 15th of January , putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, a metal watch, value 2l. 2s. the property of the said James Jennings .

JAMES JENNINGS sworn. - I am coachman to Surgeon Sharpe , of Fulham: About half past twelve on Thursday night, I was going through Panton-street, in the Haymarket, and saw a public-house open; I was going to have a glass at the bar, as I had to go to Fulham; there were two women and a man near the house; and the prisoner asked me if I would give her a glass; I said, I did not mind, as it was a very cold night, and we all went in together; I gave the woman a glass, and we all came out pretty near together; she stood next to to me, on the right hand of the other woman, and the man stood on the other side of me; she caught my watch out by force, and I saw no more of it; I laid hold of her, and she was taken to the watchhouse; she said, she had not got it; I am sure shetook it, but don't know what she did with it; I was sober enough to know what she did; I had not drank much to hurt; I saw no more of the other man and woman; they were gone after she took the watch.

PHILIP PILGRIM sworn. - I am constable of St. Martin's: Between twelve and one, the prisoner was brought in. charged by the prosecutor with robbing him of his watch; I searched her, but found only a half-crown piece; I asked her what she had done with it; she said, she knew nothing of it; I asked her who was the other girl; she said, she knew nothing of her, but that she walked the Haymarket; she appeared much intoxicated; next morning she said, the other girl said to her, he has got a watch, draw him of it, and give it to me; and that she did take it out of his pocket, and give it her. GUILTY of stealing only , aged 23

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

163. WILLIAM BRYAN was indicted for feloniously making an assault, on the King's highway, on Thomas Cooly , on the 15th of November , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, a check shirt, value 1s. his property.

Thomas Cooley was called upon his recognizance, but not appearing the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

164. THOMAS TAYLOR was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of January , six feet of leaden pipe, value 6s. and a brass lock and fixtures, value 6d. fixed to a certain building called a house , belonging to Thomas Williams , and Susanna, his wife , and James Deacon , and Ann, his wife .

Second Count. Charging them to be fixed in the same manner to a house belonging to Susanna, the wife of Thomas Williams , and Ann, the wife of James Deacon .

Third Count. Charging it to be the property of Thomas Williams , and James Deacon .

THOMAS WILLIAMS sworn. - I live in Blackfriars-road: The lead was taken from an empty house, in Crown-street ; the lead was compared, and answers to that left behind in every respect.

JOHN COCKING sworn - I am one of the patrols belonging to Bow-street; going along on the 1st of January, my partner and I heard the cry of watch, watch; we went down Crown-street, and saw a woman standing at the door; she said, she was sure there was some person in that empty-house, for she heard them cough; I told her nor to be alarmed; Perry and I knocked at the door, and the prisoner finding he could not escape, opened the door, and let us in; we secured him; he had a black apron on that had a deal of mortar or whitewash on it; while I hand-cussed him, he said to me, you'll observe that basket does not belong to me; I did not ask you, said I; there was a bunch of matches, a wax taper, a pipe of tobacco, a piece of green baize, a brass lock and five iron ones, and a piece of lead. (The property produced, and identified by Williams.)

Prisoner. Q. When you heard the woman cry watch, did you not hear the cry of fire? - A No.

Prisoner's defence. I was going down Crown-street, and there was a woman alarming the neighbourhood with a cry of fire in the empty house; I put my hand to the door and found it open; a man immediately rushed by me, and shut the door; I was in the dark, the house was then surrounded, and I let them in; I never saw the basket before.

GUILTY , aged 51.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

165. ELIZABETH FORMISTER , otherwise FORRESTER , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of January , a sheet, value 3s. the property of William Downs .

ELIZABETH DOWNS sworn. - On the 6th of January, I was up stairs, the girl said there was somebody in my room; she went and tried the door and found it open, and the sheet gone off the bed; the girl said she should know her again.

MARY- ANN SMITH sworn. - I live with Mrs. Downs: I found the door open, and the sheet gone.

WILLIAM KENDAL sworn. - I am a shoemender, and live in the lower part of the house: On the 6th of January, I saw the prisoner come down stairs, and soon after I was told or the rubbery; On the Friday she passed my window, but before I could get up she was out of sight, I went to the next door, where I found her up one pair of stairs; I asked her what brought her there; she said she went there to tie her petticoat; I brought her down, and called Mrs. Downs; she begged for mercy, and said, if you send me to Newgate, or Bridewell, it will be of no use.

JOHN OLIVER sworn. - I am a constable, and took her into custody: I searched her, and found eleven keys in her pocket, and eight duplicates of sheets, but not of Mrs. Downs's.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Confined six months in the House of Correction .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

166. JANE SAVAGE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of January , three pewter quart pots, value 4s. and two pewter pint pots, value 1s. the property of Nathan Hewitt .

NATHAN HEWITT sworn. - I keep the Stag's-head , Cow-cross: I can only prove the pots to be mine.

THOMAS CLARKE sworn. - I keep a greengrocers: The pots lay at my door, when this woman came by and took them away; the girl came down stairs and went after her, and took her with the pots in her apron. (The pots produced).

MARY GERRARD sworn. - Those are the pots I left at the door.

Prisoner's defence. I did not take them away with an intent to keep them, I meant to take them to he owner. GUILTY , aged 36.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave her a good character.

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

167. GEORGE SPIKES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of January , twelve pounds of pork, value 6s. and a dish, value 4s. the property of Matthew Barwell .

MATTHEW BARWELL sworn. - I keep a porkshop in Cleveland-street , but I did not see the dish taken.

RICHARD KAY sworn. - I live within a door or two of the prosecutor: About seven o'clock on the 7th of January, I saw two people watching his window; I saw one go into the shop and buy something, he left the door open, and the prisoner went in, to a stooping position, round the door, and took up a large dish with three pieces of pork on it; he slipped out again as quick as possible with it, and run plump into my arms; I don't think he saw me.

GUILTY , aged 14.

Confined six months in the House of Correction .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

168. JOHN BOLTON was indicted for that he, on the 19th of December , being employed as a servant to Philip Gibbons , did receive into his possession the sum of two pounds, on account of his said master , and that he did embezzle, secrete, and steal the same .

There being an error in the indictment, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

169. JOHN BOLTON was again indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of December , two waistcoat-pieces, value 8s. the property of Philip Gibbons .

PHILIP GIBBONS sworn. - I am a woollen-draper , in Tottenham-court-road : The prisoner was my shopman , and having a suspicion as to his honesty, I had him searched, and found on him some duplicates, amongst the rest, of some waistcoat-pieces; I went to Hill's, in Rathbone-place, and to Chandler's, a pawnbroker, in Holborn, where I saw them, and knew them to be mine.

GEORGE SIMPSON sworn. - I am a pawnbroker's servant, and live with Mr. Hill, in Upper Rathbone-place: The prisoner pawned this waistcoat-piece, on the 19th of December; for half-a-crown. (Produces a waistcoat-piece).

JAMES WOODHOUSE sworn. - I am a pawnbroker's servant: On the 19th of December, the prisoner at the bar pledged this piece for three shillings. (Produces a waistcoat-piece).(They were both deposed to by the prosecutor).

- CROCKER sworn. - I found the duplicate which corresponds with the pawnbroker's, in his pocket, on the 23d of December.

GUILTY , aged 17.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

170. JOHN BAKER , otherwise EDWARD SHERMAN , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of November , sixty-four ounces of silver, value 181. the property of Thomas Richards .

Second Count. Charging him with stealing the same, laying it to be the property of Charles Aldridge .

There being no evidence to affect the prisoner, he was ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

171. PETER LE NORMAN was indicted for a conspiracy .

The prosecutors not appearing. he was ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

172. WILLIAM JOHNSON and JOHN BROWN were indicted for that they, on the 30th of November , about the hour of eight in the night, the dwelling-house of Joseph Bainbridge unlawfully and injuriously did break, with intent to enter the said dwelling-house, and the goods, chattels, and monies of the said Joseph, in the said dwelling-house then and there being, feloniously to steal, take, and carry away .

JOSEPH BAINBRIDGE sworn. - I am an officer on Holborn-hill : On Monday, the 30th of November, about eight o'clock in the evening, I heard the shop-window rattle, like the cutting of glass; I desired my man, Charles Haigh , to step out, which he did, but saw nothing; he afterwards went out again, and returned in the same manner; I heard the same noise the third time; he went out again, and returned, saying, there was nothing; I then sent him out to pay a little bill four doors off, and when he came back, he said, the window is cut, and he went out to watch; in about five minutes, he returned with the prisoner, Brown, by the collar; I then sent my man for a constable, and he returned, bringing in the prisoner,Johnson, with this knife sticking in his head; they were then taken to the Compter.

CHARLES HAIGH sworn. - I am servant to Joseph Bainbridge : On the 30th of November, a little after eight in the evening, there was a noise in the window, as if the glass was breaking; I went out, but the window was not broke; there were three people round it, and the window not being broke, I did not suspect them; a short time after, the same noise was repeated again; I went out again, as before, and there were the same three persons at the window, but there was no window broke; when I went out, they went away different ways; about a quarter of an hour after, the same noise was repeated again; I went out again the third time, and saw the same three standing round the window; they went off in different directions, as before; I went to the window, but still did not perceive it broke; my master then gave me a small bill, and told me to go and pay it, about four doors lower down; upon coming back again, I saw the same three standing round the window, and heard the glass crack; they perceived me, and went away; I went up to the glass, and saw there was a piece of glass gone out of the corner; I then told my master the window was broke, and if he liked, I could take one out of the three; he told me by all means to take them, if I could; I directly followed them, they were all going up Holborn-hill together; Brown was a little before the other.

Q. Are you sure that these were the same three that you had seen at the window? - A. Brown I am sure of; I saw all their faces at the window, and, when I followed them up the hill, I saw the face of Brown only; I am sure they were all of them the same people; I then took Brown, and brought him into the shop, the other two walked off together; I then went for a constable, but could not find one; and, in coming back, I saw two men in conversation, and I suspected they were the other two men; they were standing on the opposite side of the way, looking at our shop; I stepped close up behind them, and the one who made his escape, said, I am glad he did not take me; they did not see me at that time; Johnson immediately repeated, so am I; for, when he came out the third time, I had my knife in the window; I then stepped in between them, and took hold of one with each hand; the one, who made his escape, kept several times saying, it is not me; I asked him what it was that he had done; he still repoased, that it was not him; Johnson, in the mean time, jumped up, and stuck a knife in here, (pointing to his head;) as soon as he had done that, he got my hand up to his mouth, and began biting; I having hold of the other as well as him, could not defend myself but by drawing my hand out of his mouth, which I did three times, and the fourth time he got hold of my finger; I then found that my finger was so fast in his teeth, that I could not draw it out, and I was obliged to let the other one go; I then got my finger out of his mouth, and took him over to the shop; the knife was so stuck into the bone, that I could not get it out; I tried twice, but could not get it out; Mr. Bainbridge got it out for me.

Q. Did it not give you a considerable deal of pain? - A. Yes; for a fortnight I could not use my hand.

Q. You never lost sight of the man that stuck you in the head? - A. No.

Q. Are you perfectly sure he was one of the persons at the window? - A. Yes.

JOHN VAUGHAN sworn. - I am a constable; I was sent for to Mr. Bainbridge's, where I found the prisoner in custody.

Johnson's defence. When that gentleman took me back, he said some man had given him a violent blow in the face.

Haigh. I never said so; I told my master it was Johnson that stuck the knife into my head; I called for assistance, but could not get any.

Brown's defence There were a great many people round the window; I had not got but a few doors from the window, when this gentleman came after me, and said I had broke the glass.

Johnson, GUILTY .

Confined two years in Newgate , and fined 1s.

Brown, GUILTY .

Confined six months in Newgate , and fined 1s.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

173. THOMAS WILLIAMS , alias WILLIAM MEYERS was indicted for feloniously uttering, on the 12th of December , one piece of false and counterfeit money, of the likeness of half-a-guinea, as and for a piece of good and current money, called half-a-guinea, unlawfully did utter to Carter Cooke , knowing it to be false and counterfeit .(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

CARTER COOKE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am a tallow-chandler , in West Harding-street, Gough-square : On Saturday, the 12th of December, between ten and eleven in the morning, the prisoner came into my shop, he was not then dressed like a soldier; he asked for a pound of candles, which came to ten-pence; he put me down a crooked half-guinea; I looked at the half-guinea, which I conceived to be a good one, but to be sure of it, I put it in the scales and weighed it; I was going to give him change; he then put his hand in his waistcoat pocket, and took out a few pence; he put them backwards and forwards in his hand, and said, as I seemed to doubt the half-guinea, he believed he could pay me without; I gave him back his half-guinea, and said, I would thank him if he would; he put the halfpence backwards and forwards, and said, you must giveme change at last; he then put down this counterfeit half-guinea, which I have now in my hand; it was a crooked one like the other. (Produces it.)

Q. Can you say with certainty it was not the same he first gave you? - A. Certainly I could see that the moment it was laid down; I took it in my hand, and told him I should keep that half-guinea and secure him; I desired my wife to send my servant out to get assistance; another man had come into the shop just at the time that I had given the prisoner the good half-guinea back, and asked for a quartern of soap; I went to cut it, and he desired me to serve the other gentleman first, meaning the prisoner; I told him I could serve him in a minute; I cut him a quartern of soap, and took his money; they were both in the shop at the time the prisoner offered the bad half-guinea; I went round the counter to lay hold of the prisoner, and they both went out of the shop; I followed them into the street, and took the prisoner by the collar with my left-hand, and called for assistance; it was some time before any body made their appearance; a third person came up in the street, of the name of Fowles, who was discharged, and the man that was in the shop called me all the thieves and bad expressions he could use; Fowles doubled his fist at me, and threatened me; the man that had the soap, brandished-a-stick over me, and as soon as they saw some neighbours coming to my assistance, they made a grand pull, and got him away from me; the prisoner ran up West Harding-street; I went after him, and never lost sight of him till he was taken; he ran nearly as far as Fetter-lane; Mr. March was upon the spot, and I delivered-him to him.

WILLIAM MARCH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am ward-beadle and fishing-tackle-market; I took charge of the prisoner; I was at the vestry-clerk's, and upon hearing the cry of stop him, stop him, I came out into Fetter-lane; I observed Mr. Cook running after a man; I followed him, and just as I got up, Mr. Head, who keeps a coal-shop, stopped him; we forced him into Mr. Head's shop, and searched him; I found upon him two guineas in gold, two seven-shilling-pieces, and three or four and twenty shillings in silver, sixpences, shillings, and half-crowns.

Q. He had silver enough then to have paid you for a pound of candles, without change? - A. Plenty.

Q. Was the money you found upon him good? - A. Yes, all good.(Mr. William Parker proved the half-guinea to be counterfeit).

Mr. Alley addressed the Jury on behalf of the prisoner. GUILTY .

Confined six months in Newgate , and find sureties for his good behaviour for six months more .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.