Old Bailey Proceedings Online (www.oldbaileyonline.org, version 6.0, 20 September 2014), February 1801 (18010218).

Old Bailey Proceedings, 18th February 1801.

211. JAMES WRIGHT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of January , a pair of drab cloth breeches, value 12s. a swansdown waistcoat, value 8s. and a cloth great coat, value 21s. the property of Richard Angel , in his dwelling-house .

LYDIA ANGEL sworn. - I am the wife of Richard Angel , I live at No. 133, Great Saffron Hill , my husband is a porter in an ironmonger's shop , and I keep an old clothes shop: On the 23d of January last, about six o'clock in the evening, two men came into the shop, the prisoner at the bar was one, and asked for some corduroy or velveteen breeches; I told them I had none; I shewed them some other breeches, and Wright chose a pair of new drab cloth ones; during the time Wright was trying on the breeches, the other man chose a pepper and salt coloured great coat, and a pair of leather breeches; they thought I did not shew them the best things I had, and the prisoner told me not to be afraid, that they had got a pound or two to lay out, if I had got goods that would suit them; upon that account I shewed them more goods than usual; they asked for some waistcoats, and I went to a chest in the shop and took out two swansdown waistcoats, and they chose one; then I shewed them some great coats, which did not please them; then I shewed them another, and Wright put the great coat, swansdown waistcoat, and drab cloth breeches on, in order to see whether they fitted him or not; the other man asked for a piece of chalk, to see what they came to; I told them I could cast it up, they then went out of the shop; I immediately leaped over the counter; one took up the street, and the other down; I pursued Wright, and caught hold of him by the skirt of his coat, about eight yards from my shop, and he sell down; I called out for assistance, and my next door neighbour came and assisted me in bringing him back; I had him committed; the property is here; Mr. Rose has got it.

WILLIAM ROSE sworn. - The prisoner was brought to our office, Hatton Garden, on the 23d of January, in the evening, he had the property on him; I took off the great coat and waistcoat, the breeches he has on. (Produces the coat and waistcoat).

Mrs. Angel. I know those things to be mine; here is my mark with my own hand.

JOHN KENNEDY sworn. - I live at No. 133, Saffron Hill; I am a constable; I heard my landlady cry out, stop thief, and I came, and she said, for God's sake take this man into coustody; he had those things upon him; here is my mark upon them.

Prisoner's defence. I went into the shop, and asked for a pair of breeches, and she reached me down a pair of black kerseymere, which would not do; she then reached me down these pair of breeches, and I put them on; I then asked for a waistcoat, and I put it on, then a coat, and it fitted me very well; I laid my own breeches on the counter, with the money in them, and the man along with me took hold of my breeches, and ran away with the money; I ran after him, and my heels kicked up; it was not my meaning to take any thing from the woman; when I returned to the shop, she took me into custody.

The prisoner called one witness to his character.

GUILTY of stealing to the value of 39s. aged 24.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Hotham .

212. MICHAEL CASSIDY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of February , one shirt, value 3s. and a pair of silk stockings, value 2s. the property of William Bushby .

JOHN MARSHALL sworn. - I live with Mr. Bushby, in Great Cumberland-place ; my master lost a shirt and a pair of stockings upon the 1st or 2d of February; the prisoner was hired as a servant to my master in the capacity of a footman; he came, after he was hired, to the house, but not to serve; I did not miss any thing of my master's; the officer found the shirt on him.

JAMES KENNEDY sworn. - On the 6th of February I took charge of the prisoner; I searched his pockets, and I found a pair of silk stockings; I apprehended him going into Mary-le-bonna watch-house; I saw Mr. Bushby's name printed upon the top of them; I found the shirt upon his back, (the shirt and stockings produced); Mr. Bushby's name is upon both the shirt and stockings; I have had them ever since in my possession.

Marshall. These stockings are my master's, the name is in full length; this shirt is my master's.

Prisoner's defence. Marshall asked me to come and help him to clean the plate, and accordingly I did; I took off my great coat, and when I had done, I put it on, and I did not search it for two or three days afterwards, and then I found the shirt and stockings; when I was going after my place on the Thursday morning, I put the shirt on, that is all I know about it. GUILTY , aged 22.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le B'anc.

213. SUSANNAH MOORE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of December , one silver table-spoon, value 10s. the property of James Brewer .

JAMES BREWER sworn. - I keep the Swan and Two Necks , Lad-lane ; I was robbed of a tablespoon by the prisoner at the bar, who lived with me as kitchen-maid; the spoon was lost about a week before she was discharged from my service, and about a week after she quitted my service, a pawnbroker came to my house, and said that a woman had brought a spoon to pledge.

Court. Q. Can you swear to your spoon when it is produced? - A. Yes, I think I can.

SUSANNAH JOHNS sworn. - I am bar-maid at the Swan and Two Necks; we missed the spoon nearly a week before the prisoner left our house; I am positive to the spoon were I to see it.

WILLIAM ANTHONY sworn. - I am an officer belonging to Bow-street; I know nothing further than apprehending the prisoner on the 24th of December, in the evening, at the pawnbroker's shop, in St. Martin's-lane; I was sent for by the pawnbroker.

DAVID PERRYMAN sworn. - I am a pawnbroker's servant; on Christmas eve the prisoner at the bar offered a silver table-spoon to pledge; I asked her how she came by it; she stated that her father had it given him while he was a servant to some gentleman; I live in St. Martin's-lane; I asked her where she lived; she said, in Castle-street; the mark appeared to be taken out, and I suspected she had stolen it; she said she had not, for the spoon was in the same state as it was when her father left it her; I sent for an officer from Bow-street; I have had the spoon from that time to this. (The spoon produced).

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Had you seen her before the time she brought the spoon to pledge at your shop? - A.Not to my knowledge.

Mr. Brewer. I believe this to be my spoon, I have many more of the same sort and the same mark; the mark is "James Brewer, Lad-lane." We missed a spoon, I cannot say it was that spoon or another.

Court. Q. I ask you whether there is enough of this mark left by which you, or any other person, skilled in this kind of business, can trace out"James Brewer, Lad-lane?" - A. I cannot say I can.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. I understand the house was kept by Mr. Wilson? - A. It has been kept by me fourteen years; Mr. Wilson is proprietor of the coach-office, and I am the proprietor of the house.

Mr. Alley. (To Susannah Johns ). Q. Can you say, looking at that spoon separately, that the mark "James Brewer, Swan and Two Necks, Lad-lane, was upon that spoon? - A. Yes.

Q. You are upon your oath; you say that the mark Swan and Two Necks, Lad-lane, has been upon that spoon? - A. Yes; because the spoon is the same with others we have got.

Q. Do you mean to swear that that is the very spoon you lost? - A. I cannot swear it is the same.

The prisoner called two witnesses who gave her a very good character. NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

214. JOHN HANSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of January , twenty yards of carpeting, value 39s. the property of Richard Gwillim .

RICHARD GWILLIM sworn. - I am a broker : On the 22d of January last, the prisoner at the bar stole a roll of carpeting from my house; I did not see him take it.

JAMES SMITH sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Gwillim: I was in the opposite shop; we keep two shops the bottom of Harp-alley, Fleet-market; I saw the prisoner come into the shop, and my young master said, mind him, I think he has taken something up; I directly went out and saw the carpeting under his arm; he was going away with it across Fleet-market; I went and secured him, with the property under his arm; I took the property from him; he never stirred or made any resistance at all; I am sure it is my master's property, I offered it to a customer about an hour before; I have kept it sealed up just as I took it from him.

Jury. Q. What time of the day did this transaction happen? - A.Between two and three o'clock in the afternoon.

HENRY ROGERS sworn. - The alarm was given by a smith that a person had taken the property out of the shop; I saw the prisoner about two doors from Mr. Gwillim's, and I followed him and laid hold of his collar, and he dropped a part of the carpeting upon the ground, and the other was under his arm; Smith came and picked it up; the whole property was delivered up to Smith, and he brought it back to the shop.

Mr. Gwillim. My shop mark is on this carpeting, and my son's mark, and here is "Lot 120," which I bought at a sale.

- TILLCOCK sworn. - On coming up Fleet-market, about three o'clock, there was a charge given about the carpeting; I took the man to the Compter, that is all I know about it.

Prisoner's defence. I was out of employment, and was standing up Fleet market, and a genteel man came up to me and asked me if I would carry the carpet for him, I took it up under my arm, and I missed the man all at once; I am innocent of the robbery; I have a wife and family.

GUILTY , aged 41. - Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

215. JOSEPH MILES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of January , 40lb. of cheese, value 30s. the property of William Davis .

MARGARET KEMPSTER sworn. - I am sister-in-law to William Davis; he is a cheesemonger ; On this day week we were robbed; I don't recollect the day of the month; in the evening, about half past five o'clock, the prisoner came in and another man with him; I served the prisoner with a quarter of a pound of cheese, which he paid for, and then they went out both together; about half an hour after they came in again, and the prisoner asked me the price of some butter that stood a distance off; I was reaching him the butter to taste, and the other man came and whispered the prisoner, and then another man came in and took two pieces of cheese; the man who whispered the prisoner held the door during the time; then the two men went out, and the prisoner at the bar was also going out and I caught hold of him, and, in struggling to get out, he pushed my arm through a pane of glass, which hurt me very much.

Court. Q. Did the other man let in the man who took the cheese? - A. Yes; I never saw the prisoner before he came in for the cheese; I am sure he was the man, he never escaped out of my hands; the cheese was my brother's property.

Court. Q.When you stopped him, did he attempt to use you ill? - A. No otherwise than pushing my arm through the glass; then a person came to my assistance.

WILLIAM DAVIS sworn. - I keep the shop; I was not at home; I left the last witness in my house; I came back a little before seven in the evening, there were a great number of people about the window; I was surprised to see it, and I saw the prisoner in the custody of three gentlemen; I asked them what was the matter, and they told me he was the person who had taken away the cheese; I missed about 40lb. of cheese; I last saw it in the window; I went out a little after eight o'clock in the morning; this young woman charged the prisoner with being concerned with the other man who took the cheese away; he offered to pay for the cheese as far as his money would go, if we would let him go.

JOHN BULLOCK sworn. - I am a carpenter; I live next door to Mr. Davis; at the time this robbery was committed the young woman screamed out very much; I heard the glass break and I ran down stairs to her assistance; when I came to the door, I saw her have fast hold of the prisoner in the passage; she told me she had been robbed, and that the prisoner was concerned with two more in robbing the shop; another man came in at the same instant, and we secured and took him into the shop, and kept him there till a constable came to our assistance; he offered, in my hearing, to pay for the cheese as far as his money would go; I asked him what money he had got in his pocket, and he said seven shillings.

CHARLES COOKE sworn. - I am a painter; I had just left off work, between six and seven, and I heard the cry of murder and thieves, and I saw Mrs. Davis struggling with the prisoner; I asked her what was the matter, and she told me that she had lost a cheese; I went into the shop, and Mr. Bullock came in, with abother gentleman, and they immediately dispatched me off for a constable.

THOMAS HARRISON sworn. - I am a constable; the last witness came for me; when I came into the house I saw a great confusion; I asked what is this about; they told me they had been robbed of some cheese; I said, where is the man; the prisoner said, here am I that this piece of work is about; says he, I know nothing about the cheese, but rather than have this disturbance I have offered to pay for it; Mr. Davis gave me charge of him, and I took him away; that is all I know about it.

Prisoner's defence. I went in to buy a piece of butter, and whilst I was buying it somebody took the cheese, but I don't know the person; the young woman caught hold of me and said I was connected with the man who had taken the cheese away. NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

216. MARY PROSSER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of January , one pair of blankets value 17s. and a shirt, value 3s. the property of Nicholas Valentine .

NICHOLAS VALENTINE sworn. - I am a shoemaker ; I rent a house, No. 13, Round-court, St. Martin's-le-Grand ; the prisoner is a stranger; I lost the blankets upon the 24th of January, on a Saturday; I went into my garret, where I generally keep my leather, with an intention of taking a piece down, which I did; I locked the door, and left the key in it by reason I had thought of going up again, but being engaged below I did not go; about six o'clock my wife came home, and about seven she went up stairs to make the bed, and she found the door wide open; she came and called me, and directly I missed my property; I sent my wife to the pawnbroker's (Mr. Fleming), and she found the things there.

SUSANNAH VALENTINE sworn. - I am the wife of the last witness: On the 24th of January, on a Saturday, I lost a pair of blankets and a shirt; I went up stairs to make the bed and the garret door stood wide open; I went down immediately and acquainted Mr. Valentine, and we both went up together; I missed a pair of blankets and a shirt; my husband wished me to go to the pawnbroker's, in Newgate-street, and enquire if any such articles were pawned, and about half an hour afterwards I went and found a pair of blankets and a shirt; Ihad marked the blankets with No. 13, which was the number of the house, with dark blue thread; the shirt I know by an iron-mould on the sleeve; there was a new collar on it which was made of finer cloth than the shirt; the pawn-brokers have had it in their custody ever since.

The Pawnbroker's Servant sworn. - I produce a pair of blankets and a shirt, they were pawned on the 24th of January by the prisoner, in the evening, and I gave her a duplicate; I am sure she is the woman; she came a few days afterwards to redeem an apron she had pledged, and we stopt her; I have kept the things from that time to this.(The blankets and shirt produced).

JAMES WOODMAN sworn. - I am a constable; I took the prisoner into custody, and took her to the Compter; I found no duplicates upon the prisoner.

Mrs. Valentine. I have no doubt but these blankets are mine, here is the mark; I know the shirt perfectly well, it is my own mark.

Prisoner's defence. As I went down Cock-lane, I passed by Mrs. M'Quire, and she asked me if I would go of an errand for her, and she gave me these blankets and shirt to pawn for her, because she had a child and would not leave it.

Court. (To Mrs. Valentine). Q. Was there any other woman charged with this robbery? - A. There was another person brought forward, but she was discharged on account of her good character. GUILTY , aged 29.

Six months in Newgate and whipped in the Gaol .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

217. JOHN GOULD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of February , 2lb. of raw sugar, value 1s. the property of Thomas Shearcroft , John Ratcliffe , John Philips , and Thomas Rawlins .

THOMAS RAWLINS sworn. - I work at Cox's quay , the second from the bridge; on Tuesday the 10th day of February, the prisoner at the bar was employed by me and my partners to house and unhouse some sugars; in the course of the day going backwards and forwards on the different floors, I found there were in one or two hog sheads a part of the head knocked away; I gave the prisoner and the rest of the men a caution about it, and when their work was done I rubbed the prisoner down, and I found some sugar in the knees of his trowsers, about 2lb. of raw sugar as near as I can guess; when I found he had got this sugar upon him, I got one of my partners to go and fetch an officer, and gave him in charge.

Court. Q. How do you know that this was sugar in your charge? - A. It was very likely it was, for it corresponds with the sugar, I found the hogsheads knocked out; I was responsible for the sugar; I looked upon it there was nearly a quarter of hundred weight deficient; there was more than this two pounds taken out of it.

Q. What is the value of this two pounds of sugar? - A. I take it to be about one shilling.

THOMAS MERRYMAN sworn. - I am a constable, I took the prisoner into custody, I have had the sugar from that time to this.

Prisoner's defence. I was coming down about nine o'clock in the morning, and there were some hogsheads of sugar knocked down, and I picked it up.

GUILTY , aged 31; - Confined one month in Newgate , and whipped 100 yards on Cox's-quay .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

218. ANN HILTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of January , one cotton counterpane, value 9s. the property of William Clarke .

CHARLOTTE CLARKE sworn. - I am the wife of William Clarke , my husband is a plaisterer , the prisoner is a stranger to me, I had seen her once before; she came on the Tuesday to my lodgings, No. 20, Green harbour-court, and staid all night; on the Wednesday morning, she took the counterpane out of the room, it was upon my own bed; we were in our sleep when she went away, we missed it as soon as we got up; in the afternoon, between four and five o'clock, we saw the prisoner in Upper Thames-street, and my husband caught hold of her.

Court. Q.Did you see her searched for the duplicate? - A. Yes; she opened herself in the parlour, and there was no ticket about her, except a ticket of a shirt for four shillings, she gave me the ticket of the counterpane in the Poultry-Compter, and I found the counterpane at the pawnbroker's.

JOSEPH MESSENGER sworn. - I am a pawnbroker, I live in Tooley-street, in the Borough,(produces the counterpane; it was pledged at my house; the prisoner at the bar brought it on the 21st of January, between nine and ten o'clock in the morning, I knew the woman again as soon as I saw her at the Mansion-house.

Clarke. There is a large pattern in the middle of it like roses; it is not my property, it is my landlady's, she lent it me.

Court. Gentlemen of the Jury, you must acquit the prisoner, for it is laid in the indictment as the property of the witness's husband.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

219. ANN SALTER and JOHN OSBORN were indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas-Bassett Reid , about the hour of five in the night of the 8th of January , and burglariously stealing therein, three pair of women'sshoes, value 7s. and one pair of men's shoes, value 3s. the property of the said Thomas.

THOMAS-BASSETT REID sworn. - I keep a house , No. 37, Beach-street, Cripplegate , the prisoner was a servant of mine; on the 9th of this present month, I was alarmed on the Monday morning, I cannot exactly tell the time, it was between five and six o'clock, I jumped out of bed, opened the door, and enquired what was the matter, a strange voice below said, "Mr. Reid, all is not right;" on going down stairs, the patrole informed me the watchman had taken a man coming down stairs; I went to the watch-house, and I saw four pair of shoes, I returned and charged the watchman with my maid servant.

Court. Q.Was it light or dark when you were alarmed? - A. I was rather frightened at the time, and I brought a candle down with me, but when I went to the watch-house, I found it sufficiently light to walk along; there was light enough to distinguish the features of a person's face; I probably was the last of the family up, excepting the prisoner; I cannot say whether my house was fastened over-night, but probably it was.

Q.Was any part of your house injured, or broke open? - A. Not that I saw, the patrole was in the entry at the time.

Q.What is the value of those shoes? - A. I value the women's shoes at seven shillings, and the men's shoes at three shillings.

Cross examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. I observe your name is Thomas-Bassett-Reid - have you any partner? - A. No.

Q.You say, that probably, the house was secured, but you don't mean to say that? - A. No.( Francis Phillips was then called as a witness, but being quite intoxicated, the Court commited him.)

WILLIAM FOSSEY sworn. - I am an officer,(produces the property;) it was brought to me at the watch-house; I cannot pretend to say whether Osborn had them of the watchman.

Mr. Reid. This is my property.

Both NOT GUILTY .

London Jury before Mr. Recorder.

220. HENRY COSBY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of February , five ounces weight of tea, value 1s. the goods of the United Merchants of England, trading to the East-Indies .

Second Count. Laying it to be the property of persons unknown.(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

THOMAS ALDERTON sworn. - I am a labourer in the East-India Company's warehouses, in Jewry-street, Aldgate; the prisoner was employed in the warehouses as a labourer .

Q.Upon the 9th of February, was the prisoner at work in the top warehouse? - A. Yes, he was; he had been employed about a year and a half; I saw the prisoner, about a quarter past one o'clock, turn down one of the alloys, and take the lid off one of the tea-chests, and put his hand into it, and take tea out, and put it into something, and then put it into his breeches; I then went to Pepperal, the commodore, whom the prisoner worked under, and gave him information of what I had seen.

Q.After you had told Mr. Pepperal, did you go back? - A. I went back, and pointed the prisoner out to him, after shewing him the chest.

Q. On looking at the chest, did you find any deficiency? - A. I did; I have no more to say; he was taken into custody by Pepperal.

SAMUEL PEPPERAL sworn. - I am one of the commodores of the East-India Company's warehouses, in Jewry-street, Aldgate.

Q. In consequence of the information given you by Alderson, did you go to the chest of tea? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you find a deficiency there? - A. Yes; I then went to the prisoner, and told him to get on with his work, and looked to see if his countenance altered; finding it did not, I called him along-side, and told him to come with me; and as we jogged on, I kept my eyes down towards his breeches; when I came to the stair-case, I put my hand to his shoulder, and begged him not to resist, and he begged for mercy; I immediately told him I could shew him none; he then put his hand to his breeches, and pulled out a bag of tea, and said, he was very sorry for what he had done; he said it was the first time, and hoped I would not take him to the accompting-house; I told him I was obliged; I took him down to the accompting-house, and I gave the tea into the charge of Mr. Brookes, the elder; I went to the chest of tea afterwards, and apparently the tea were both alike; that is all I know about it.

JOHN BROOKES sworn - I am an assistant elder at the warehouses, in Jewry-street, Aldgate.

Q.Had you any tea delivered to you by the last witness? - A. Yes, (the tea produced); the next day I went and saw it was the same sort of tea that we have in our warehouses.

Court. Q. What is the value of the tea? - A.About one shilling.

Mr. Knapp. Q.How many persons do you employ in that warehouse in Jewry-street? - A. I should suppose two or three hundred.

Q. Did the prisoner say any thing to you? - A. Yes; when I went to Mr. Stockwell with him, he said, going along, he hoped there would be nothing come of this, more than a dismissal from his employ; he said, he could not think what could induce him to do it.

Q. Did you compare it with the other tea? -A. It is exactly the same sort of tea; it is congou. GUILTY , aged 26.

Confined one month in Newgate , and whipped 100 yards in Jewry-street .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

221. ESTHER FRANKS and RACHEL FRANKS were indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Daniels , about the hour of six in the night of the 6th of February , and stealing four pair of boots, value 5l. and four pair of shoes, value 20s. the property of the said John.

JOHN DANIELS sworn. - I keep a house , No. 13, Princes-street, Brick-lane, Spitalfields : On Thursday, the 6th of February, about six in the evening, at dusk, I shut up my shop, and double locked the door; I did not return till about eight o'clock the next morning, and then I found I had been robbed.

Q. Do you ever sleep in the house? - A. No, I have not yet.

Q. Nor any servant of your's? - A. No, the house had just been repaired; it was rather damp, and I had not put a bed in it yet; I came into it since Christmas; I have seen the articles since in the possession of the pawnbrokers; the Saturday week following I saw them at the Public-office, Lambeth-street.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. There were a number of bricklayers employed about the house, I believe? - A. Not at one time.

Q. Were not two bricklayer's labourers taken up upon this charge? - A. Yes, and discharged.

Court. Q. Was there light enough to distinguish the countenance of a man, when you left the shop? - A. I think there was not, it was dusk.

CHARLES DENNIS sworn. - I am servant to Mr. William Vincent , pawnbroker, No. 105, Whitechapel: On the 9th of February, the prisoner, Elther Franks, came with a pair of boots, and pledged them for twelve shillings, (produces them); I had known her for some months before; she pledged them in her own name.

JOHN PRICE sworn. - I am a pawnbroker: On the 9th of February, Rachel Franks pledged a pair of boots and a pair of shoes with me; I have known the prisoners some time. (Produces them).

CHRISTIAN MATHEWS sworn - I am apprentice to my father, who is a pawnbroker: On Monday, the 9th of February, I took in a pair of boots from Ether Franks. (Produces them.)

GEORGE HALE sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Morris, No. 19, Minories; I took these boots in on the 9th of February, from Ether Franks; I lent her ten shillings on them. (Produces them.)

THOMAS GRIFFITHS sworn. - I am an officer of Lambeth-street: On Monday, the 9th of February, I went to Mrs. Franks's house, and told her I had an information of a quantity of boots that had been stolen; she said she had not them, or knew nothing about them; I apprehended them.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You found no false key upon them? - A. No.

Q.Did not the prosecutor's house appear to have been opened by a false key? - A. Yes.

Q. You apprehended them under a warrant as receivers first, did you not? - A. I had no warrant.

Court. Q. What sort of a shop did this woman keep? - A. Not any.

Q.How far from the prosecutor's? - A.Near a quarter of a mile.

Mr. Alley. Q. I believe you apprehended two men, whom they said they received the property from? - A. Yes, and they were discharged. (The property was deposed to by the prosecutor.)

Esther Franks 's defence. I have been eighteen years a servant in the country, and twenty-one years a wife, and never had any thing laid to my charge in my life; I was not at home when the men came with the boots.

Rachel Franks's defence. Two men came, and left these boots to sell for them; I pledged one pair on Saturday, I gave my mother the others to pledge; I paid that money to these two men; I described them to Mr. Griffiths, and they were taken up, but the Justice let them go clear.

The prisoners called four witnesses who gave them a good character. Both NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

222. WILLIAM CLARKE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of January , two heifers, value 10l. the property of Joseph Ravenhall .

JOSEPH RAVENHALL sworn. - I live at Penn ; I had ten heifers, in a meadow at Penn, on Monday the 19th; I saw them there in the morning between seven and eight o'clock; on the 25th I saw two of them in the possession of Mr. Brown, at Paddington, one was black, and the other black and white; I bought them the Michaelmas before; the prisoner's friends live near me; but I have not seen him near Penn for a long time.

CHARLES COUSINS sworn. - I am a butcher; I live at Paddington, close to Mr. Brown's; on Wednesday, the 21st, the prisoner came to me about the middle of the day, and asked me to buy two beifers; he said they would not walk any further, and rather than take them back he would sell them; he had left them upon the waste ground in the Harrow road; he told me he had brought them from Penn, in Buckinghamshire; he said he had taken them to a gentleman who had bought them, and who would not have them; he took me to them; they were about half a mile from my house; the beifers were both black and white, I am not sure to the colour of them; he asked me nine guineas; but having some suspicion of him,I took him to a public-house, got a constable, and detained him; I delivered the heifers into the custody of Mr. Brown; he said that they could not walk; I found that they were not lame, they could walk, and that gave me a suspicion.

Q. Did you see Ravenhall afterwards? - A. Yes; I delivered the heifers to him.

Q. Are you sure that the heifers you delivered to Ravenhall were the same that the prisoner offered you for sale? - A. Yes, I am sure of it.

GEORGE SALTER sworn. - I am a farmer, I live at Penn: On the 24th of January a letter came to me from Marlborough-street, to knew if any person had lost any heifers; I came up with Ravenhall, and saw the heifers.

(To Ravenhall). Q. Had you sent your heifers to any gentleman? - A.No.

Prisoner's defence. I don't know any thing of it.

GUILTY , Death , aged 21.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

223. CHARLES BLAKE , CHARLES POPE , and GEORGE SPENCER were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of February , 16lb. of tripe, value 6s. and four neats feet, value 1s. the property of Sophia Payne , widow , and David Payne .(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

DAVID PAYNE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am in partnership with my mother, Sophia Payne, widow, tripe-merchants , in St. John-street; the prisoner Blake was our carter ; it was his business to collect the tripe from different butchers; he had been a servant to us about three years; in consequence of information that I received, I went to Mr. Hill, a butcher, in East Smithfield.

Q. Did you miss any tripe on the 4th of February? - A. Yes, one, and four neats feet.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. The business of Blake was to collect tripes from the different butchers? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you yourself send him out that morning? - A. No.

Q. Did you count the tripes that he brought home? - A. I saw them counted; he brought home forty-six tripes.

- VENABLES sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am servant to Mr. Payne: On the 4th of February Blake came home with his cart to the tripe-shop door: I said to him, how many have you brought home; he made answer, forty-six; I asked him if he had them all from Mr. Mellish; he said, no, he had thirty-six from Mr. Mellish and ten from Mr. Hill; the tripe was taken in, and he went away upon other business; I saw the cart unloaded, there were forty-six of them.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Were there no other tripes brought home that day? - A.There were some brought in afterwards; but these tripes were counted, and forty of them dressed before the others came in; I had the boiling of them that day.

JOHN FOSTER sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Hill, butcher, in East Smithfield.

Q. Had he been in the habit of collecting tripe from your house for Messrs. Payne? - A. Yes; he came on the 4th of February, with the prisoner Pope; Blake asked how many tripes we had, I told him I did not know; he told them over, and said there were eleven.

Q. Did you deliver them to him as the servant of Messrs. Payne? - A. Yes, for Mr. Payne.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You did not watch his counting, to see whether he counted right? - A. I did not.

JAMES TURNHAM sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a constable belonging to the Thames Police-office: On the 4th of February, about eight o'clock in the morning, I saw Mr. Payne's cart standing at Mr. Hill's door, with tripe and neats feet; I saw Blake and Pope standing together at the door; I saw the cart go up East Smithfield, and at the end of Dirty-lane stood Spencer, with a little poney, about three hundred yards from Mr. Hill's; Pope stopped and spoke to Spencer; then the cart went on to the middle of Dirty-lane; I was going on for Tower-hill; I turned round, I saw Pope and Blake in the cart; I was about forty yards from them; I saw Pope with a sack which was in the cart; Pope had got hold of the sack, Blake was pulling up the tripe; Blake and Pope put the tripe into the sack; their backs were towards me; I saw some neats feet put in besides; then Pope got up and looked round, I thought he saw me; then I ran up King-street, because they should not see me, and went round upon Towerhill, and there I saw the cart, and Spencer, Pope, and Blake at the Black Horse door.

Q. What was done with the sack? - A. I did not see the sack after; I saw Spencer put his hand in his pocket and give Blake something, but I do'nt know what, which Blake put into his breeches pocket; then I saw the sack taken out of the cart and put upon Spencer's poney, and then they went away for Rosemary-lane: then I took Pope and Spencer into custody at the end of White Lion-street; they asked me for what; I said you know for what, for this you have got upon the horse; I took them to the office, and going along they offered me something to let them at liberty; Spencer said he was just going to begin business, and he would give me any thing; I said, no, they should go before the magistrate; I took Blake the same day at Mr. Payne's; I took him into the accompting-house, and asked him for an account of the tripe that he had brought home; he said, thirty-sixfrom Mr. Mellish and ten from Mr. Hill's; then he said it was the first time he had sold any thing out of the cart, and he hoped his master would forgive him.

Cross-examined by Mr. Beville. Q. At the time this passed, what was said to induce him to confess? - A. I did not hear any thing of the kind; we took him into custodody.

Q.Whether the tripe that you saw put into the sack came from Mellish's, or Hill's, or any where else, you cannot say? - A. No.

Q. Did you examine the bag after you got to the office? - A. Yes; there was one tripe, four feet, a rule, a recd, and a bunch of lights.

Mr. Knapp. Q. This was Messrs. Payne's cart? - A. Yes.

Mr. Gurney. (To Mr. Payne). Q. Did you pay Mr. Mellish for thirty-six tripes that day? - A. No.

Q. Did you pay Mr. Hill for eleven tripes that day? - A. I have not paid either of them yet; my account is not yet come in.

Blake's defence. I am not guilty; I never stole any thing in my life.

The other two prisoners left their defence to their Counsel.

Pope called two, Spencer six, and Blake three witnesses, who gave them a good character.

All Three NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Hotham .

224. GEORGE BOYER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of February , two saws, value 5s. the property of Peter Kelly .

PETER KELLY sworn. - I am a carpenter ; I lost two saws from a house that I am repairing, the corner of John-street, Edgware-road ; I had a man at work for me of the name of Williams, and his two saws were taken as well as mine: On the 11th of February, about one o'clock, I missed them; I had not been at the building since breakfast; one was a hand-saw, and the other a dovetail saw; I saw one of them about two hours after at a pawnbroker's, in Wardour-street, Mr. Layson's; the prisoner was at work in the house, he was making a seassold to stucco the front of the house; he is a master plaisterer; he was at work when I left the house.

WILLIAM NICHOLLS sworn. - I am apprentice to Mr. Layton, pawnbroker, in Wardour-street,(produces two saws): On Wednesday, the 11th of February, the prisoner brought these saws to me, I lent him five shillings upon them; I have no doubt about the prisoner being the same man; I saw him again about three hours after, when he was taken up.

Kelly. This hand-saw is mine, I know it by the maker's name, and I broke a tooth in it when I was setting it; I have had it about a twelvemonth.

Prisoner. Q.What time of the day was it that you say I pawned the saw? - A.From half past one to two o'clock.

Prisoner's defence. I am innocent of the charge; I have witnesses to prove where I was at the time the saw was pawned.

For the Prisoner.

THOMAS JOHNSON sworn. - I am a carpenter; the prisoner is a plaisterer, what we call a task-master; I have not known him for more than two or three months: Yesterday was a week he was at work in the Edgware-road, the corner of John-street; I met him in the New-road, within four hundred yards of his work; I was at work at Lisson-grove at that time, about four hundred yards from the house where he was at work; I met him about ten minutes after twelve, I was going from my own house; I had been home, and found my dinner was not ready, and I went back and worked till one o'clock; he was coming towards town; I spoke to him, and was talking to him about five minutes; he went back with me to my building at Lisson-grove, it is a house that I am building upon speculation; he stopped with me till within about a quarter or ten minutes of one, and then he went away; I was treating with him about some business I wanted done to my house; he was recommended to me by a respectable person; I saw no more of him that day.

WILLIAM GRUBBS sworn. - I am a plumber: Yesterday was a week I was at work in John-street, and passed by the building where the prisoner was at work, in John-street; it was between two and three o'clock, he was erecting a seaffold.

Q. How came you to know it was between two and three? - A.Because I went home to fetch a piece of pipe, and I recollect the clock was nearly two.

Q.Where is your house? - A. In the Harrow-road, Paddington.

Q. And how far was that from where he was at work? - A.About two hundred yards.

Q. If you came from home before two o'clock, and this house only the distance of two hundred yards, you could not be long? - A. No; I saw him, and spoke to him, but am not certain whether it was going or coming back that I spoke to him; I have known him three or four years; he has been, during that time, a task-master.

THOMAS BOYER sworn. - The prisoner is my father; I am a plaisterer, and work for my father; I was at work with my father at the time: On Wednesday, the 11th of February, we went to work at half past ten in the morning, and continued at work till ten minutes after twelve, when we went home to Grafton-court; he is a housekeeper there, and has been two years, to the best of my knowledge, I cannot exactly say; I have a family of my own, I don't live with my father;my father met Mr. Johnson, and he went with him, and I went home, I was wheeling his wheelbarrow before me; I left it at my own door, thinking he would take it as he went by, and after I had had my dinner, I saw my father take the barrow, and go away with it, that was as near one o'clock as I can say, he went home with it; I followed him in about a quarter of an hour, as near as I can tell; he was getting a barrow of rubbish from the front of the house; I staid with him at his own house till we went up to our job again; we got poles and cords, and went to the house where we were erecting the scaffold; we got there about two o'clock, as near as possible; I was with him the whole time, till he was taken up, about four o'clock.

Q. Is this account true that you have been giving? - A. Yes; as true as God is in heaven.

Q.What age are you? - A.Twenty-seven.

ELIZABETH GREEN sworn. - I live servant with Mr. Collinson, a bricklayer, in the Harrow-road: Yesterday week, the prisoner and his son came to my master to borrow some seaffold poles, between one and two o'clock; I went up to ask my master, and he told me he might take them.

THOMAS SUTER sworn. - I am a plaisterer's labourer: I worked for the prisoner, as my master, on the Monday and Tuesday, and on the Wednesday, between two and three o'clock, I saw him at the corner of Winchester-row; it snowed in the morning, and he said, we should not be able to do any thing to-day, but desired me to call again; after dinner I met him and his son, and he desired me to come to work the next morning; I have known him about seven years, he has been a task-master all that time; I never worked for him but that Monday and Tuesday.

MARY PARROTT sworn. - I lodge in Mr. Boyer's house, I was washing in the kitchen: On Wednesday week I saw Mr. Boyer and his son backwards and forwards during all the morning, mixing the lime, and taking away stuff to their building; I heard him come in at dinner-time, about one, or a few minutes before, he went into his own shed; then he came back, and went into his own parlour to dinner; I was washing in the kitchen all day, and I did not see him after; I have lodged in the house half a year.

The prisoner called four other witnesses, who gave him an excellent character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

225. GEORGE BOYER was again indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of February , two saws, value 5s. the property of John Williams .

The evidence being the same as in the former trial, he was ACQUITTED

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justic Le Blanc.

226. JAMES WALLIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of February , forty-six pounds weight of rope, value 5s , the property of Joseph Lifford and William Lifford .

JOSEPH LIFFORD sworn - I am in partnership with my brother, William: I had missed a quantity of new rope from my rigging-house, and Thursday, the 5th, between one and two o'clock in the morning, I went into the rope-ground, and listened if I could hear any body in the premises, and I heard some person walking in the rigging-house; I immediately went in doors to the man who had the keys of the rope-ground, I unlocked the wicket, and as soon as I went in I saw a man's coat tied up with rope in it, about thirty-five yards from the rigging-house door; I then went up the ladder into the rigging-house, with a candle and lantern, in my hand, and found the door open; as soon as I went in, I saw the prisoner lying upon some yarn, asleep; I immediately went down again, I did not wake him, and went into my yarn-house; about four o'clock the man awoke, and came very softly down the ladder; he stopped about five minutes listening if any body was about, and then he went on past where I was, very slowly, to the gate where I had seen the property; he stopped at the gate a little time, and then came back again, past where I was standing; he then went very softly again past where I was, down to the gate; I then heard a creaking, as if somebody was getting over the gate; I went down very softly, and the property was gone; I then unlocked the wicket very gently, and went out, the prisoner was standing outside the gate, with the bundle tied up at his feet; I immediately caught him by the collar, and asked him what he had got there; he said, he had only got a little rope to buy him some bread; I told him if he offered to stir I would knock him down; he rushed from me, and I stepped before him and knocked him down with a stick that I had in my hand; I made him take the rope upon his back, and I took him to the watch-house.

Q.Did he work for you? - A. I never saw him at work myself; but I understand from my foreman he did work two days for me two months ago; the rope that I found in the bundle was old rope, such as we used to bind new rope with; we are rope makers.( Robert Brown , the officer, produced the rope.)

Mr. Lifford. I have no doubt of the rope being mine, but I cannot swear to it.

Brown. He told me that it was his coat, and he had no coat on when he was brought to the watch-house.

Prisoner's defence. I am a stranger here, and I did not know where to get a lodging; I had been trying to get on board a vessel; I went that night to lie down in the rope-walk, and found this rope, I thought it might get me a piece of bread in themorning; and after I had had some sleep I came away, and this gentleman knocked me down; I had been nine months in a French prison, and came from there here; I am a native of Boston, in America. GUILTY .

Judgment respited to go to sea .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Hotham .

227. PATRICK CRAWLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of January , a trunk, value 2s. two gowns, value 15s. two petticoats, value 10s. a pair of pockets, value 2s. a bed-gown, value 1s. four muslin handkerchiefs, value 4s. two pocket handkerchiefs, value 2s. a night can, value 6d. two fans, value 1s. a netting cale, value 6d. a towel, value 6d. a pair of gloves, value 6d. an apron, value 1s. 6d. a printed bound book, value 6d. and three pamphlets, value 1s. the property of Rebecca Withers .

Second Count. Laying them to be the property of Richard Ward .

REBECCA WITHERS sworn. - On the 11th of January I lost a trunk, containing the articles mentioned in the indictment; I came up in the stage from Great Baddow; it was in the coachman's care; I came up in the stage at the same time; the last time I saw it, was at Baddow; I was waiting for the trunk in the coach-office at Whitechapel, and it could not be found.

WILLIAM ANGELL sworn. - I am a coachman; I drive the coach from Burnham to London; Burnham is the furthest stage; I took up this lady with the trunk at Great Baddow; I did not miss the trunk till we got into the yard of the Bull Inn, Aldgate; we got in a little before five; I think the trunk was put into the basket behind, at the top; we missed it in the yard; the prisoner came up with the coach from Maldon, he sat upon the hind part of the roof of the coach; he left us in the Inn yard; I did not see him go out of the yard; he paid his fare when he got up.

CHARLES GORING sworn. - I keep a winevaults in Clare-street, Clare-market: and Mrs. Sunderland, who keeps a house in Holles-street, came to me on Monday, the 12th of January, and gave me information; in consequence of which, I went over with her, the prisoner was in Mrs. Sunderland's back parlour; I questioned him respecting the trunk; I had not seen it then; he said it was his; I went up stairs with him, and asked him to point out what things were in the trunk; he said it was women's wearing apparel in the trunk, as much as cost him thirty guineas; he said he had bought them for his wife, and after he had bought them, she behaved ill to him, and he had taken them away from her, and left her at Portsmouth; I asked him to recollect particularly if there was any thing in the trunk belonging to any person besides him, and he said, there was not; upon that, I told him I should detain him and the trunk, upon suspicion of his having stolen it; I took him to Bow-street; I told him the consequence of owning things that did not belong to him, but he still persisted; I gave him an opportunity several times of going away, if he pleased; I went over to the office, and left him at the Brown Bear , and when I came out again, he was walking backwards and forwards; he might have got away, if he would; when he was before the Magistrate, he said they belonged to a Mrs. Walker at Gosport; that she had intrusted him to take them into his care, as he was coming to town; the Magistrate then committed him for further examination; the next day, or the day after, Mrs. Withers came to my house, and saw the trunk.

Mrs. SUNDERLAND sworn. - I live at No. 20, Holles-street, Clare-market: On Sunday evening, the 11th of January, the prisoner came to my house about seven o'clock; he came to take a lodging for himself and another sailor; there was a young man with him dressed like a sailor; the prisoner at the bar had a small box; I saw him open the box, to shew that he had abundance of things in it to pay the lodgings; it was only corded round when I saw it; it was not locked; he told me his wife had gone away from him, and he had kept all her clothes; I said, I could not conceive it could be his wife's, for she was a small woman; he lodged at my house with her four months before; these things were much larger than her's; besides, she had only common clothes; they lodged with me four days, they had no box then; the young lad that he brought along with him, said, have nothing to do with that box, ma'am, for he has stole it; he denied the charge; I let him put it in a two-pair of stairs back room, which he had taken, and then they both went away, and said they would return in about half an hour; I saw no more of him till the next morning, then I asked him what was to be done with the box, and the young man again said he had stole it from a coach, and then the prisoner went to strike him; I was very much alarmed; then they both went up stairs, and opened it; I told him to be honest, and go and give up the box to the inn again; then he came down stairs, and said he would go to the inn, and bring the lady, or get her to send a porter for it.

Q. Did they say what inn? - A. No; they both said they came by the Portsmouth coach; I then went, and asked Mr. Goring's advice; while he was gone, there came a little woman, who said, she was his wife, that she had come for a box of her things that he had taken away, and that it had been left there by mistake; it was not the woman that lived with him when he lodged with me before; I asked her what it contained, and she could not inform me; she was going away, and the prisoner came in, and he insisted upon my giving upthe box, and I would not; I asked him if that was his wife, and he said, no, it was a woman he lived with; about four o'clock, he came with a man that called himself a constable, and three other men, to make me give it up, and then I went and fetched Mr. Goring, but the man afterwards disowned being a constable.

Prisoner's defence. I was coming through Whitechapel; I met a woman that asked me to take this trunk to my lodging; I opened it before Mrs. Sunderland, and when I lodged with her before, I rigged her and her daughter out with money that I had taken at Somerset-house. GUILTY , aged 31.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Hotham .

228. BENJAMIN COTTERELL and JAMES DILLON were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of February , a copper saucepan and cover, value 3s. the property of James Griggs .

JAMES GRIGGS sworn. - I keep the Rose , the corner of Wigmore-street, in Wimpole-street : On the 5th of February, in the afternoon, the two prisoners came into my house and had a pint of porter, and went away; as soon as they were gone I missed a copper saucepan and a tea-kettle; the copper saucepan was just taken from the bar into the kitchen; and about a quarter before ten o'clock at night, the same evening, they both came in again, and called for a pint of porter; Cotterell sat about ten minutes, and then went into the kitchen; I saw him come up the steps and turn into the street, with this saucepan upon him, (produces it); he had the cover in his bosom, and the saucepan under his coat, Dillon remained in the tap-room drinking a pint of beer; I ran out immediately after him, and asked him what he had got; he seemed to sham drunk, and said, nothing; I immediately told him he should go back, and I would see what he had got, and I pushed him back into the house; he did not appear to be tipsy when I drew him the pint of beer; I sent for the watchman, and they were taken to the watch-house; they were searched in my presence, and a great quantity of picklock-keys, and skeleton keys, were found upon them; I never found the tea-kettle again.

RICHARD MOAY sworn. - I was constable of the night, I did not see the prisoners till they were brought to the watch-house; I searched them, and found, in Cotterell's pocket, a number of picklock-keys, and skeleton keys; and in Dillon's pocket, I found a chissel and some keys, but not picklock-keys. (Produces them).

RICHARD ELMAN sworn. - On Thursday the 5th of February, I was coming out of Mr. Griggs's house, about ten o'clock at night, I saw Mr. Griggs lay hold of the prisoner; I went with them to the watch-house, and as they went along, I saw Cottorell drop this bundle of picklock-keys. (Producing a large quantity).

Cotterell's defence. I went into the kitchen to ask the girl to lend me a saucepan to boil a few potatous in; Dillon and I were going to have a bit of supper.

Q.(To Griggs.) Do you happen to know if there, was any person in the kitchen at that time? - A. No; there was no person in it, nor any light.

Cotterell, GUILTY , aged 35.

Transported for seven years .

Dillon, NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

229. ELIZABETH CRAIG was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of February , a pewter quart pot, value 1s. 6d. and six pewter pint pots, value 5s. the property of William Dickinson .

WILLIAM DICKINSON sworn. - I am a publican ; I keep the Bald-faced Stag in Worship-square : On Sunday morning last, as I was gathering in my pots, about ten o'clock in the morning, I had six pint pots, and one quart, upon my string; I hung them across a post at a customer's; when I came back, the strap and all was gone; upon that, I set off running till I came to the back of Long-alley; I saw two women before me, and I ran past them; I turned again, and saw that the prisoner, apparently, had a bundle before her, under her cloak; I asked her what she had got there; she refused to let me look; I turned her cloak on one side, and saw the strap hang; I told her she had got pots there; she said, yes, she was a pot-girl, and was collecting her pots in; I asked her to let me look at the name on the pots, I then saw my own name; I told her I would swear to the name, and then I took her to the officer; I knew nothing of the prisoner before.

JOHN RAY sworn. - I am an officer, (produces the pots); I went to search her lodgings, and found a saucepan-lid, which had been used for running down metal; there were three or four very large covers, some of them having the pewter sticking about them. (The pots were deposed to by the prosecutor).

Prisoner's defence. It is the very first time I ever was guilty of any thing in my life; I have got four fatherless children; one is in Bartholomew's-hospital with a broken arm, two of them are in the workhouse, and my biggest girl, I do not know where she is; I hope you will shew me mercy, for the sake of my children. GUILTY , aged 38.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

230. PHILIP DAVIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of February , a shirt, value 4s. 6d. and a pillow-case, value 6d. the property of John Dibble .

SARAH DIBBLE sworn. - I am the wife of John Dibble: Last Saturday week, between five and six o'clock in the afternoon, I went to call my husband from a few doors off, and in returning home I saw two boys come out of my door, the prisoner at the bar had something under his arm, but I did not take any notice of it; I took hold of him, and said, do you want any thing, and he immediately ran past me; I then observed a handkerchief which was falling under his arm; I called to him, and told him, he would lose his things; I then saw a cap lying at the threshold of the door; my husband then came up, and ran after him, and brought him back; I am pretty sure he is the boy; he rather resisted when my husband brought him back; he had under his jacket a shirt and pillowcase; he was taken to the officer's in Shorter-street.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. It was dusk? - A. Yes.

Q.And the boy had a round hat on? - A. Yes.

Q.He is but a very little boy, and therefore you could not very well have seen his face, you being so much taller? - A. That is the boy that had the clothes under his arm when he went from my door, I am sure of it.

Q. Did you never tell any body you did not think that was the boy you first saw at your door? - A. No; I never did.

JOHN DIBBLE sworn. - In consequence of what my wife told me, I went after the prisoner; he was then about seven or eight yards from me; I came up to him, and asked him what he had been doing; he said, nothing, he was upon his master's business; I saw the shirt under his coat.

Jury. Q.Was it wet? - A. Yes; just wrung out from the wash-tub; I took the shirt and pillow-case from under his jacket, and carried it with the boy to the officer.(The officer produced the property, which was deposed to by Mrs. Dibble).

Prisoner's defence. I was going of an errand; my mistress sent me to look for my master, and I saw two boys come out of this shop and drop something, and run away; I picked it up; the gentleman came after me, and asked me what I had got; I said I had got a prize, but I did not know what it was.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character. GUILTY , aged 13.

Fined 1s. and discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

231. NATHANIEL HOOPER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of January , four table cloths, value 10s. the property of Richard-Thomas Hopkins .

ELIZABETH HOPKINS sworn. - I am the wife of Richard-Thomas Hopkins , dancing-master, at Coachmaker's-hall : The prisoner came every day to dress Mr. Hopkins's hair; he had access to every part of the house, I cannot say what part they were in; he used to go up stairs to call my son, and my husband, of a morning; the prisoner was taken up for another offence; I was sent for to a Mrs. Clarke's, and there I saw my table cloths.

ROBERT NEWMAN sworn. - I am a constable,(produces the property): I received them from Mrs. Clarke; I took the prisoner into custody at the George-inn, Aldermanbury, Mrs. Clarke's house; I searched him, and found in his left boot fourteen duplicates; I saw him stuff them in; I gave the duplicates of these four table-cloths to Mr. Dobson, the pawnbroker, in Chiswell-street, who delivered up the property, but he was not bound over, because he could not swear to the prisoner.

ELIZABETH CLARKE sworn. - I am the wife of Robert Clarke: I went to Mr. Dobson's, in Chiswell-street, with Mr. Newman; he took the duplicates, which he gave the pawnbroker, and I took out the money, and paid for them; I delivered them to the constable.

Mrs. Hopkins. I know these to be my tablecloths, they have my mark to them.

Prisoner's defence. My Lord and Gentlemen of the Jury, on the 16th of January last, as I was going to work between seven and eight in the morning, going through Aldermanbury, I found a paper containing these duplicates; I put it in my sob, and my fob-pocket being broke, it slipped down into my boot. GUILTY , aged 25.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

232. WILLIAM BROWN , alias CHALKLEY , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of February , two cows, value 27l. the property of William Chalkley .(The case was opened by Mr. Clifton.)

JAMES MONEY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Clifton. I am servant to Mr. William Chalkley , of Long Ditton : On Sunday, the 1st of February, I saw the two cows in the evening in Mr. Chalkley's yard, just at dusk, and I missed them on the Monday, about four o'clock in the afternoon; I did not miss them before, because I had nothing to do with them in the morning, only to give them some straw; I did not look for them; when I missed them in the afternoon, I told my master of it; I saw them again the following Wednesday at the Ram-inn, in Smithfield, one was a whitish colour, with red spots; the other had two red sides, a bald face, and white all along the back; that with the red sides, my master had all last summer, and the other, my master has had longer.

Q. Had they borns? - A. Yes, both of them.

Court. Q.Where they quiet cows, or vicious cows? - A. They were quiet; I am sure that thetwo cows that I saw at the Ram-inn, were the same that I missed from my master's yard.

ROBERT COLLINS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Cliston. I am a drover, and attend Smithfield-market; I know the prisoner, I saw him in Smithmield-market on Monday the 2d of February; he was standing against the George-inn with two cows, mixed with some others; I said to him, what, you have been at your old trade again; I sent for a constable, and gave charge of him, upon suspicion of having stolen these cows.

Court. Q.What do you mean, by his having two cows mixed with more? - A. The two cows had run in amongst more; I took the cows to the Ram-yard, Smithfield.

ROBERT ROSOMAN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Clifton. I am one of the City constables: I was sent for on Monday, the 2d of February, by the last witness; I went up to the prisoner, and said to him, my good man, where are you going with these two cows; he said, I am going out of the market with them; I said, it is very odd you should go out of the market with them, just as you come into it, before you sell them; who do they belong to, says I: he said, a gentleman; I asked him where the gentleman was; he said, he would be here by and by; I told him I should keep him in custody, and lock up the cows; I then took him into custody, and locked up the cows at the Raminn; he said they were his cows; I took him to the Compter, and he gave in his name Chalkley, and, instead of that, it was the farmer's name; I was present when Money afterwards saw the cows, and said they were his master's.

WILLIAM CHALKLEY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Clifton. I am a farmer at Long Ditton: I came to town, in consequence of information, on Wednesday the 3d of February; I went to the Ram-inn, and saw my two cows in the stable; I had missed them on the Tuesday morning, I was out all day on Monday; I have had one of them ever since last Easter, and the other, I have had three years; I am sure they are mine.

Court. Q. If you had not known your cows were missing, and had seen them in Smithfield-market, would you have said, these are mine? - A. I certainly should; one of them is a bald-faced cow, with dark red sides, and a white back; the other is a spotted cow; I am sure they are mine.

Q.What is the value of them? - A.Twenty-seven pounds.

Prisoner's defence. I have nothing to say; I did not steal the cows. GUILTY , Death , aged 48.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

233. WILLIAM DAVIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of February , the second volume of a printed bound book, entitled, the Works of Alexander Pope , Esq. and another printed bound book, value 1s. 6d. the property of William George .

SARAH WILSPEARE sworn. - I am servant to Mr. George, a bookseller , in Brick-lane : My mistress desired me to look if there were any books gone, and I looked, and observed two gone; I then saw the prisoner running across the way; I went after him, and the witness, who is here, was going past, and stopped him, his name is Martin; he brought him back to the shop, and then I went for the officer.

WILLIAM MARTIN sworn - (Produces the books). I saw the prisoner run, I pursued him, and the moment I touched him, he dropped this book, (producing it), Adamson's Loss and Recovery of elect Sinners; the other, I found underneath his coat; I took him back to the shop.

Wilspeare. These are the same books that I missed; they were taken out of the box at the door; they have my master's mark upon them.

Martin. I can swear to these books, being the books that I took from the prisoner.

WILLIAM GEORGE sworn - These are both my books, they have my private mark upon them; I had put them in the box, in the morning, myself.

The prisoner did not say any thing in his defence.

GUILTY of stealing to the value of 10d.

Publicly whipped and discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Chambre .

234. PETER FITZWATER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of January , a copper coal-scuttle, value 5s. the property of George Swaine .

ELIZABETH SWAINE sworn. - I am the wife of George Swaine; I live at No. 7, Charles-street, Hatton-garden ; he is a jeweller : On Wednesday, the 28th of January, I missed a copper coal-scuttle from the door of the room, up two pair of stairs; I had seen it on the Tuesday, the prisoner was a stranger to me; on the Wednesday I went into Hill's wine-vaults, and the prisoner came in with a scuttle in his hand; I asked him if it was to sell, and he said, no, he had just bought it; the person who keeps the house said, perhaps he could tell me where he had bought it; he said, yes, he would; I then said, I can swear that it is mine, I lost it either this morning, or yesterday, I don't know which; he said, he had bought it in Fleet-lane, at a broker's shop, next door to a public house; he went out along with me, and a woman that was with me; he took us to Fleet-lane, up to the top, and then came back again, and said, he must go in at the back-door, and then he said, he could not find the shop where he bought it; he then went into a court, called New-court, and made his escape, he had the coal-scuttle in his house all the time; I called, shop thief and so did the woman who was with me; he was stopped in about fiveminutes, he was never out of my fight; he was then taken before the Magistrate; the street-door of the house in which I live, is always open.

WILLIAM GRANT sworn. - I am a stone mason: On the 28th of January, about half past twelve, going past New-court, I heard the cry of stop thief; I saw the prisoner with a coal-scuttle in one hand, and a bundle in a silk handkerchief in the other, and the two women running after him; he was walking very fast up the court; I stopped him till the women came up, and Mrs. Swaine said it was her coal-scuttle; he said, he bought it at a shop in Fleet-lane; I asked him if he should know the shop again; he said, he did not; I then took him to the constable's, and he was secured.(Henry Beadle, the constable, produced the coalscuttle, which was deposed to by Mrs. Swaine).

Prisoner's defence. I bought it in Fleet-lane; I told the lady so, as soon as she asked me; I walked with her to Fleet-lane, but there are so many shops alike in that line, that I could not tell which it was; I went up the passage to see if that was it, and the lady gave the alarm of shop thief, immediately; I had it openly in my hands, and I might have got away before, if I had had a mind.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character, and deposed, that when he had been drinking, he was in a state of derangement. NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Hotham .

235. JOHN HARRIS was indicated for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of January , a petticoat, value 5s. a shirt, value 5s. two pair of silk stockings, value 2s. and two pair of worsted stockings, value 2s. the property of Sarah Hall , widow .

SARAH HALL sworn. - I am a widow, I live in South-street, Manchester-Square : On Thursday, the 29th of January, while I was at work in one room, I thought I heard somebody in the next room; I am a laundress ; I said, is any body there, and nobody answered; I said again, is nobody there, and a voice that I did not know, answered, a friend, a man; then, he immediately rushed by me, and ran up stairs with a bundle of linen in his hand; I ran up stairs; through the passage, into the street, and called, stop thief; I lost fight of him about a minute, while he turned the corner, and then he was laid hold of, and brought back; I know him to be the same man that I had seen in my room, the prisoner is the man; the things were brought back to me by a lad, I cannot say who it was.

JOHN SOUTHWOOD sworn. - I was in High-street, Mary-le-bonne, I heard a cry of stop thief; I saw the prisoner running with some things in his apron, I followed him, and saw him stopped; I came up to him, and saw some things drop out of his apron, I am not positive whether I had hold of him, when he dropped them, or not; I told a baker's boy to pick them up; I did not see him pick them up; I took him to the watch-house; I saw the baker's boy give them to Mrs. Hall; the baker's boy is not here.( Henry Bates produced the property, and deposed that he had them from Mrs. Hall).

Mrs. Hall. I know these things, they belonged to a customer of mine; I had hung them up that day.

Prisoner's defence. I am innocent of what is laid to my charge, I know nothing about it.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Six month in Newgate , and publicly whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

236. JOHN COLE , JOHN SAUNDERS , and THOMAS BARTON , were indicated for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of January , eleven baskets, value 2s. and 640 pounds weight of raisins, value 8l. the property of John Parkinson , Charles Read , and Thomas Bell .

Second Count. Laying it to be the property of Thomas Bolt .

Third Count. Laying it to be the property of certain persons, to the Jurors unknown.(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

THOMS BOLT sworn. - Examined by Mr. knapp. I am a wharfinger ; I was employed by Messrs. Parkinson and company to unload the ship called the Friendshaft, Captain Schoffer , at one of my wharfs; there were two other ships at the wharf, and consequently she was obliged to lie outside; a lighter of mine, called the Cazinove, was put along side her, for the purpose of unloading part of her cargo; she received a quantity of baskets of raisins, which my clerk will state.

Court. Q. Are you answerable for the goods put into this lighter? - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Was the lighter compleatly unloaded on the 17th? - A. Yes.

Q. Were either Saunders or Cole employed on board the lighter that day? - A. No; I thought they were at Barking with some dung; I wanted some dung, particularly for some land of mine; I expected them both to be there, and do nothing else; it was their duty to have been at Barking.

Cross-examined by Mr. Clifton. Q. They return backwards and forwards to their families? - A. Yes.

Mr. Knapp. Q. They had nothing to do on board the lighter? - A. No.

ROBERT JONES sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am land waiter to the Customs; I was present during the loading of considerable part of this lighter, at Fresh-Wharf, close to London-bridge; I have the lighter bill in my pocket from the ship, to Mr. Bolt's wharf.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Whose handwriting is that? - A. It comes from the officer on board the ship.

Q. Is he here? - A. No.

Mr. Alley. Then that will not do.

RICHARD DAVIS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am clerk to Mr. Bolt; I was present at the unloading of this ship to the lighter of Mr. Bolt, on Friday the 16th of January; there were 410 baskets of raisins unloaded upon the wharf, and on Saturday, 1031, making in all 1441; how many should have been on board, I can not say.

THOMAS RADFORD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a servant to MR. Bold; On the Friday, the day before the property was lost, I saw the three prisoners on board the lighter; they were taking a few plumbs in their hands, that was all I saw them do; I had some suspicion taht there were some baskets concealed in the lighter, and, on Saturday night, I told Mr. Davis, and he got a key, and I went on board with him.

Q. How long had you observed them on board the lighter? - A.About a quarter of an hour; we found eleven baskets in the locker, we left them there, and locked them up.

Cross-examined by MR. Alley. Q. You saw these men tasting the plumbs? - A. Yes.

Q. That is thing you all do, I suppose? - A. Yes.

Q. Was there no key to this lock but the one that Davis had? - A. Yes, they all had keys.

Mr. Davis. I went on board the Cazinove with the last witness; I unlocked the locker, and found eleven baskets of raisins.

Q. Was that the place where raisins were likely to be found? - A. That place had nothing at all to do with the bulk of the raisins that ought to have been put into the lighter; I locked them up again, and left them exactly as they were; I set Mr. Wilson, another clerk of Mr. Blot's and three others, to watch the lighter; I was with them; we watched from the accompting-house window, where we could see the lighter, that was on Saturday evening.

Mr. Alley. Q.Then you might suppose that there was some robbery going forward? - A. Yes.

Q. And for the purpose of inducing some person to commit a theft, you left them? - A. I certainly did.

WILLIAM JOHNSON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am clerk to Mr. Bolt: In consequence of information, I took my place upon the staircase of the accompting-house, about five o'clock in the afternoon, where I could see Mr. Bolt's Fghter; I was about eight or ten yards from it; Mr. Davis was with me, Mr. Penford; Mr. Wilson, and Mr. Reece; I saw the prisoner go down into the Cazinove; he walked all round the lighter, and then returned; very soon after, the three prisoners all came together; and went on board the Cazinove again, and loosened the headfast and sternfast, and got her away from the wharf into the stream; I desired Davis and Penfold to stop at Billingsgate; Wilson, Reecc, and I, got into a wherry, and followed as fast as we could to the stairs, and passed the lighter as she was at Ralph's quay; I saw the three men in her when I left Fresh wharf; I lost fight of her five or six minutes, while I was getting into the wherby.

Court. Q.Have your lighters business out of a night? - A.Sometimes.

Q. You saw them at Ralph's quay; what did you see next? - A.They hauled her up to Dice quay, along-side the William of Aldborough, a Suffolk Vessel; I then desired Reece to row the ashore, for I thought they were then going to take the baskets on to the wharf; I then went on shore, and on to the wharf; I then went over the vessels to see if she was still by the side of the Aldborough vessel, I found she was gone; I then went over some other vessels, and found her along-side the Hawk, of Deal, the three prisoners were in her then; I then went to Smart's quay, and waited there some time, then Reece came to me, and I told him to row about till he found her; she was then gone from along-side the Hawke; I then went on board a Yarmouth vessel, called the Hope, of Deal; in three or four minutes, I saw Saunders hail the Cazinove lighter out of the dock; he then led her along-side the Hawke, of Deal, again; I then went to look for Mr. Bolt, to know what was to be done; I could not find him; I sent for an officer, and saw them coming out of the gun-tap; we followed Saunders and Cole, and took them in Salutation-court.

Court. Q.How long was this after you had seen them on the river? - A. I dare say half an hour; they said they did not know what they were taken for, they were delivered to Green; we did not apprehend Barton till last Monday, at Spice lslands; after we had apprehended the prisoners, we went out, and found ten baskets of raisins inside of the Hope of Deal, and one basket outside, the ten laid between the Hope of Deal, and the Hope of Yarmouth.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q.There were five of you set to watch this evening? - A. Yes.

Q. You were provided with arms, I take it for granted? - A. I took a pistol with me when I went on the water.

Q. If the lighter had remained where she was, if they had not hauled her out, would not she have been a-ground? - A. No, she can never be a-ground there.

Q. Do you mean to swear that those men were the three prisoners? - A. Yes.

Q. How do you know that? - A. I know them very well.

Q. Did you see their faces? - A. Yes; I can swear to their features.

Q. There were a good many barges about at this time? - A. Yes; at one time I was so near to Saunders, that I turned round, and was afraid of being discovered; I have known Cole working for us for some years, and Saunders has worked five months with us.

Court. Q.Where was it that you last saw all the prisoners together on board? - A. While the Cazinove lay along-side the Hope, of deal.

JACOB REECE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I was with Mr. Johnson upon the watch at Freshwharf; I saw the Cazinove lay along-side the Hope, of Deal, at Billingsgate-dock; I afterwards saw her shoved out along-side the Hawke, it was dark, and I did not see any body on board her when she was at Billingsgate-dock; but when she was shoved out, I saw the prisoner, Saunders, on board; he shoved her out, and made her fast along-side the Hawke.

JAMES CUTHBERT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I was on board the Hawke, on Saturday night, the 7th of January.

Q. Do you know the prisoners? - A. I know one of them, Cole, he came on board our vessel, and enquired for the Hope, that was between nine and ten o'clock, there were two more with him, but I don't know them; they made the lighter fast to our vessel, and then came on board our vessel.

Q. Do you know the Cazinove? - A. No; Cole asked me for my master, Thatcher; I told him my master was not Thatcher, but Hill; then I hailed the Hope, and Cole was going to throw me over-board, because I made such a noise; he called me a young b-r, and if I did not hold my tongue, he would knock me to hell.

Cross-examined by Mr. Clifton. How long have you known Cole? - A.Ever since he failed in the Hawke.

Q. How long ago is that? - A.Six months.

Q. You were before the Lord-Mayor? - A. Yes.

Q. You were asked there to pick out the man that spoke to you? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember who you picked cut at that time? - A. Cole.

Q.Recollect yourself - Did you not point out Saunders as the man who spoke to you? - A.They all three spoke to me about making a noise.

Mr. Alley. Q. How came you to point out Saunders? - A. I knew him by his great coat.

Q.How came you to say just now, that the only one of the three that you knew was Cole? - A. I knew Saunders by his coat.

Q. Do you mean to swear, knowing that man's life is at stake, that Saunders was one of them? - A. Yes; he had on a fustian great coat; and when he was before the Lord-Mayor, he had the same coat on.

WILLIAM GREEN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a constable, (produces the property): I was present when they were taken out of the mud in the dock; there were eleven baskets, containing raisins.

Mr. Knapp. (To Johnson.) Q.Whereabout is the value of these baskets of raisins? - A.There are about five hundred and a half; they are worth more than eight pounds.

The prisoner Saunders called eight, Barton one, and Cole ten witnesses, who gave them a good character.

Cole, GUILTY Death , aged 38.

Saunders, GUILTY Death , aged 50.

Barton, NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

237. JOHN HARRIS was indicated for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of January , a handkerchief, value 1s. the property of George Simcock .

GEORGE SIMCOCK sworn. - I keep the Bolt-and-Tun Inn-yard : On the 27th of January, about three o'clock in the afternoon, as I was going through Fleet-street , near Serjeant's-inn, towards the Bolt-and-Tun, I felt something touch my thigh; I put my hand to my pocket, and missed my handkerchief; I saw the prisoner close to me; I said, you scoundrel, you have picked my pocket; I took him by the collar with one hand, and with the other took the handkerchief from under his right arm, under his jacket, he was not two inches from me; this is the handkerchief, (produces it); I took him to the Compter myself.

Prisoner's defence. I have been at sea six years past; I was going through Fleet-street, and saw this handkerchief laying upon the ground; as soon as I had picked it up, the gentleman laid hold of me, and said, I had robbed him; I am as innocent as the child unborn. GUILTY , aged 24.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

238. SARAH HILL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of February , a pair of shoes, value 2s. and a linen pinafore, value 6d. the property of Nicholas Humphreys .

ELVIRA JOHNSTON sworn. - My husband is a private gentleman; we live at No. 16, Fountain-place, City-road; this child, Alexander-Joseph- Theophilus Humphreys , was brought to my house last Monday by the prisoner at the bar, and I detained her till an officer was sent for; the child's mother is in Court; he is as much at my house as he is at his mother's; his mother lives in Bunhillrow.

WILLIAM RENTON sworn. - I am a gardener;I saw the prisoner at the bar with his child in a lane leading to the brick fields from the City-road, she was stooping down, and I was too far off to see what she was doing; I almost immediately heard acry of stop thief; I looked round, and saw the prisoner come running down in a direction from the child, with the shoes and pinafore in her hand; she dropped them, and I stopped her; I never lost fight of her.

THOMAS WILLIAMS sworn. - I work for Mr. Lowndes, green-grocer, at Hoxton: On Monday last I saw the prisoner stooping down at the child's feet; I then saw her run away, and the child ran after her, and cried, give me my shoes; I cried, stop thief, and the other witness stopped her; the child shewed me the way to Mrs. Johnston's I took her and the prisoner there; I delivered the property to the constable.( John Gass , The officer, produced the shoes and the pinafore.)

LOUISA HUMPHREYS sworn. - I am the wife of Nicholas Humphreys ; I am the mother of the child; I sent the child to his aunt's as he had often gone before, it being so very near.

Q. What this field in the way to his aunt's? - A. Not at all; these are my child's shoes and pinafore.

Prisoner's defence. I know nothing at all of it; when Williams caught hold of me, he beat me very much, and then he took me to that lady's house, and she knocked my head against the wainscot, and beat me. GUILTY .

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction . and whipped in the jail

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

239. RICHARD JONES was indicated for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of January , ten yards of calico, value 10s. the property of William Nias .

DENNIS SHELLEY sworn. - On the 29th of January, about five in the evening. I was passing by Mr. Nias's door, in Leicester-fields , I saw the prisoner and another with him; the one that was with him went up to the door, and he took one of them and walked off with it; then the prisoner went up and took the second piece under his arm; as soon as they had got about ten yards past the window, I called, stop thief; the prisoner then dropped the piece, and I ran and picked it up, and kept crying, stop thief, and he was stopped at the corner of Leicester-place; I carried the calimanco back to the shop.

- HISCOCK sworn. - I am shopman to William Nias, in Leicester-fields; I was engaged in serving a customer; there were a great many pieces of calimanco at the door, and I heard one of them fall; I then heard a cry of shop thief, and almost immediately Shelley brought in a piece, but I cannot swear to the property, there is no mark on it.

Q. Did you miss such a piece of calimanco as that? - A. No, we had such calimanco at the door, but I cannot say that is it. (Produces it.)

Q.(To Shelley). Is that the piece that you carried back? - A. I cannot say. A. Is that the piece that you saw the prisoner drop? - A. I cannot swear that it is.

Q.(To Hiscock.) Is that the piece that was delivered to you by Shelley? - A. I cannot swear that, because there were two pieces brought back and delivered to the constable; I cannot say which was which.

Prisoner's defence. I did not run at all, I know nothing about it. NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Hotham .

240. RACHEL MATHEWS was indicated for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of January , a canvas purse, value 1d. four guineas, two half-guineas, a seven-shilling-piece, and two half-crowns , the property of William Cable .

WILLIAM CABLE sworn. - I work at sawing and day portering : On Sunday night, the 18th of January, between seven and eight o'clock, I had been at the bottom of Gravel-lane to see a friend of mine, and as I was coming home, I met the prisoner at the corner of Saltpetre-bank.

Q. Were you sober? - A. Yes, quite sober; she said, who do you do, my dear; and I said, how do you do; says she, will you give me something to warm me; no, I says, I shall not; she asked me several times, and I would not; I then gave her two penny pieces to get her a glass of gin, and then I felt her pulling my money out of my breeches pocket; I did not feel her put in her hand. but I felt her take it out, and I laid hold of her, and directly her hand was out of my pocket, I said, she had got my money; she said, she had not; I then took her into a chandler's shop opposite, and I told the man of the shop, Robert Shaw , that she had robbed me, and what money she had in her hand was mine; she would not let me have it; I sent for a constable, he persuaded her to give it me again, and she would not; he opened her hand, and then took it away from her; there were four guineas, two half-guineas, a seven-shilling piece, and two half-crowns; I had put it in my pocket that same morning, I felt it there several times in the course of the day; It was delivered to the constable with the prisoner; after I came back from the watch-house, I found the purse in the road.

Q.Was there any mark upon the money, by which you should know it? - A. It was turned of a different colour, being to long in my pocket, and sweating.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not prostitute my bodyand give me the money, saying, they were halfpence? - A. No; I had no connection with her at at all, I was not with her three minutes.

Court. Q. Did you give her the money? - A. No, I did not.

ROBERT SHAW sworn. - I keep a chandler's shop, facing Saltpetre-bank: On Sunday night, the 18th of last month, a little before eight o'clock the last witness brought the prisoner into my shop; he had hold of her hands; he charged her with robbing him of four guineas, two half-guineas, one seven-shilling-piece, and two half-crowns; she said, did not you make use of my body for it; and he said, no; she kept her hand shut; she did open it once, so that I saw there was money in her hand, but I did not see what; I then sent for a constable.

Q. Was Cable in liquor, or sober? - A. He appeared quite sober; the constable desired her to lay the money down, and she would not; he opened her hand, and took out four guineas, two half-guineas, one seven-shilling-piece, and two half-crowns; she had some in both hands; I took care of the money till I went before the Magistrate the next day, and then the officer took it; his name is Phillips.( John Phillips , the officer, produced the money, and deposed, that the prisoner told him cable had given her the money for sixpenney-worth of halfpence.)

Cable. I can swear to the purse, and the money looks different from guineas in general.

Prisoner's defence. This man asked me if he should go home with me, and he went with me into the entry, and gave me every farthing of that money. GUILTY , aged 31.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

241. THOMAS PULLEN was indicated for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of February , two sheets, value 25s. a blanket value 2s. and a pillow-case, value 1s. the property of John Irvin .

JOHN IRVIN sworn. - I keep the Three Nuns , Aldgate High-street : On Tuesday, the 10th of February, I went up two pair of stairs, and missed two sheets, an under-blanket, a pillow, and pillow-case, and about one o'clock in the morning the constable came to me, in consequence of which I went to the watch-house, and there I saw the prisoner and the property, I never saw him before

ELEANOR MILLS sworn. - I am chamber-maid at the Three Nuns; I went up stairs about nine o'clock to turn the beds down, the sheets were on the bed then; about eleven o'clock the same evening I went up with a pan of coals to warm a gentleman's bed, and I found the bolster at the feet of the bed, and the sheets gone, and the blanket and the pillow-case; I came and acquainted my young master.

JOHN MACARTNEY sworn. - I am a watchman of Whitechapel parish: On the 10th of the February, about ten o'clock, I saw the prisoner past my stand, with a bundle, and I apprehended him, he carried them in a very suspicious manner; I asked him what he had got there, and he said, they are my own; I told him he must go with me to the watch-house; I took him before the constable of the night with the things, and left him there; there were two sheets, a pillow and pillow-case, and an underblanket.

BENJAMIN CONSTABLE sworn. - I was constable of the night; the prisoner was brought in by the watchman on Tuesday night, the 10th of February, a little after ten o'clock; I asked him where he had got these things; he said his wife had bought them at a sale, in Spitalfields; he said he lived in Haydon-yard; I asked him who was the landlord of the house, and he could not tell me; he said he paid the rent to one Mr. Butcher, who keeps the Blue Anchor; the sheets had the name of Irvin upon them; I made an enquiry, and, after some time, I found out the prosecutor; he went with me to the watch-house, and claimed the property. (They were produced, and deposed to by the prosecutor and the chamber-maid.)

Prisoner's defence. Going down the Minories, a young woman asked me to carry these things for her into Whitechapel; I went on till I was hailed by the watchman, and then I stopped directly.

GUILTY , aged 27. - Confined six months in the House of Correction , and publicly whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

242. GEORGE PERFECT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of January , fifty-six pounds of iron, value 5s. the property of Richard Mortimer .

RICHARD MORTIMER sworn. - I live at Kentish Town; I can only swear to the property.

ANDREW TAYLOR sworn. - I am a patrol belonging to Bow-street: On the 30th of January I was on the Hampstead-road, I met the prisoner at the bar between eight and nine o'clock in the evening, about thirty yards on this side of Tottenham-court-gate, he had got a bundle; I asked him what he had got there; he said it was his own property; I asked him what it was; he said it was iron; I asked him where he got it; he told me he had found it; I asked him where, and he said, under a hayrick, as he was cutting hay; I think he said in Mr. Mortimer's ground, but I am not sure whether he mentioned Mr. Mortimer or not; I was going to take him to public-house; he said, for God's sake, Mr. Taylor, don't hurt me; he knew me, but I did not know him; he said, you know me very well, I live in Kentish-town; I cannot hurt you, says I. If it is your own property, I must see what it is; I looked at it, and found it to be someold rusty iron bars, and some new iron, for something in the farmering line, that I believe had never been used; he said he knocked his knife against them as he was cutting the hay; I asked him who he worked for, and he told me Mr. Mortimer; I went and acquainted Mr. Mortimer, and he came to Bow-street and claimed the iron.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q.He told you it was iron? - A. Yes.

CHARLES GREGORY sworn. - I was with Taylor; I know no more of it than Taylor has said.(The iron was produced and deposed to by the prosecutor.)

Court. Q.Where did you keep the iron? - A. In a place adjoining the kitchen; I had seen it about a fortnight before; he has worked for me from a year to a year and a half, or two years.

Mr. Gurney. Q. By what mark do you swear to that iron? - A. Here is a harrow tire, which is made out of an old tire, and here are the nail holes, they are made remarkably stout and out of size.

JOHN BRADY sworn. - I am a blacksmith, at Camden-town, I made these harrow teeth, they have not been used, they were made out of some old strakes, I never saw such before nor since, I can swear positively to them, I never made such things before in my life, nor any body else, I verify believe.

The prisoner left his defence to his Counsel, and called six witnesses, who gave him a good character. GUILTY , aged 32.

Privately whipped and discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Hotham.

243. MATTHEW REARDON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of January , a razor, value 4d. three small pieces of velvet, value 4s. half a yard of cotton, value 6d. a great coat, value 7s. and a yard and a half of blue cloth, value 26s. the property of Alexander Mackenzie .

ALEXANDER MACKENZIE sworn. - I am a master tailor , No. 2, Harvey-buildings , I have since removed: On the 28th of January I missed a large parcel of clothes from the parlour, the prisoner worked for me at that time; and in consequence of information I went to Bow-street, and got a search-warrant to search his lodgings, in Castle-court; he was at work with me on the 28th, and also on the 29th; I found at his lodgings a great coat, some pieces of velvet for coat collars, and some pieces of cotton for waistcoat linings; he was afterwards searched at my house, and a duplicate of a yard and a half of cloth was found upon him.

Prisoner. Q. Did not you give me leave to wear the clothes in the house? - A. No; he helped me to tie up the parcel about ten days before; I gave him a pair of breeches out of the parcel, because he was in want of them; I had before given him a waistcoat and a hat.

Q. You did not give him these things? - A. No.

GEORGE DONALDSON sworn. - I am a constable of St. Martin's in the Fields; I executed the search-warrant at the prisoner's lodgings, and found these things, (producing them); I afterwards searched the prisoner at Mr. Mackenzie's; he had two pair of breeches on, and in the under pair of breeches I found this duplicate, (producing it.)

JOHN MATTHEWS sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Fleming, a pawnbroker, in Newgate-street; this is one of our duplicates; it is a duplicate of one yard and a half of blue cloth; I took it in of the prisoner on the 28th of January, about dusk, I lent him fifteen shillings upon it.(Produces it).

Prisoner. Q. Did you not say that you did not know whether it was me or the man that lodged with me that pledged the cloth? - A. I was not quite certain at first; but afterwards, when I recollected, I was sure that it was the prisoner.

Mackenzie. There was another man who lodged in the same room with the prisoner.(The property was deposed to by Mr. Mackenzie.)

Prisoner's defence. I did not take the cloth.

GUILTY , aged 21. - Confined six months in the House of Correction , and publicly whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

244. HENRY SPELLER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of January , a sack, value 2s. and three bushels of oats, value 15s. the property of Charles Hutchings .

CHARES HUTCHINGS sworn. - I live in the parish of Edmonton : On Saturday, the 17th of January, there was a quarrel between my barnman and the prisoner, and in consequence of information, I found a sack in a situation in which it was not usual to put it; the prisoner was a servant of mine; it was situated at the extreme end of the bays of the barn, about the height of a man's shoulder, upon some trusses of straw; I first examined the sack, I observed it was a sack that I had a little before purchased some seed wheat in, and from the dampriess of the weather I had not marked it; but from the particular quality of the sack, I was clearly of opinion it was my sack; it was nearly full of oats; I was convinced they were my oats; I then wrote upon a paper my initials and the day of the month, I put it into the sack and tied it up again, and in consequence of information I received, I went to the prisoner, and told him he had no right in the barn, and the barn-man did right in not letting him meddle with the corn; the prisoner was employed in looking after my cows and calves that I was then weaning; I told he hadno right to be in the barn; I then went to the barn and directed the barn-man to watch who came for the sack of corn; it was Saturday night, and I directed him, after I paid him, to go into the barn, fasten the door, and hide himself; a little while after this I paid the prisoner his wages, and just after that, between six and seven o'clock, Anderson, the barn-man, brought the prisoner to me; he seemed very much frightened; I asked him how he had got into the barn; he told me by means of a nail he forced the lock open, which nail, he said, he had thrown down on the left hand side of the barn door.

Q.Had you made him any promise? - A. No.

Q. Nor threatened him? - A.Neither; I kept charge of the prisoner all night, for I could not procure an officer; in the morning I procured an officer, and told him that was his prisoner, I gave charge of him; when I went to look for the sack I found it removed very near the barn door; I went to search for the nail he spoke of, but instead of finding the nail I found this key, (produces a skeleton key); before I put my initials into the sack I looked at the heap of corn on the barn floor, and there appeared to be some gone; It was put there to be cleaned, and I found in the sack a quantity of the same sort of dust; corn is generally skreened, and this was taken out before it was skreened; I have no doubt of it being part of the same heap, there are three bushels and three pecks.

Prisoner. I took the corn with intent of giving it to the horses.

Q. Had he any thing to do with feeding the horses? - A.Nothing at all; he had no business with it.

RALPH ANDERSON sworn. - I am barn-man to the last witness; I was ordered into the barn by my master, on the 17th of January; I had been employed that day in cleaning corn in the barn; the prisoner was backwards and forwards in the barn several times; the street door of the barn was left open in the evening, and I let myself in and fastened the door, and I covered myself in the sheaves that were not threshed; after I had been there about ten minutes, I heard somebody open the door and come into the barn; he came down the barn floor and went to the sack of oats, at the end of the barn; it was upon some trusses of straw, about my height; I heard him take down the sack, he moved it to where the floor rose, and then he took it upon his shoulder; I rose from out of the sheaves that I was covered with, and said, stop, or I will shoot you dead; he turned round and said, will you; I said, yes Henry; I went up to him and told him he must go with me to my master, and then it would be explained who came for the lack of oats; he said he did not care for that, for he was only going to take them to Joe, who was our carter, and has since absconded.

Q.Was it usual for you to skreen the oats before you gave them to the horses? - A. Always before it is given to the granary, or else they are not finished.(Potter Batson, the constable, produced the sack; containing some oats and a piece of paper with the initials of the prosecutor upon it).

Hutchings. This is the same piece of paper that I put into the sack; the prisoner came to live with me last Michaelmas.

The prisoner did not say any thing in his defence.

The Jury having retired about an hour and a half, returned with a verdict of GUILTY , aged 27.

Six months in the House of Correction and publicly whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

245. FRANCIS VINE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of February , a truss of hay, value 2s. the property of John Addison .

JOHN ADDISON sworn. - I am a brewer and farmer at Highgate ; I know nothing of the loss.

EDWARD SCOTT sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Addison; In consequence of having lost hay, I placed myself in Mr. Addison's garden close to his hay-stack, and about one o'clock in the morning I saw the prisoner at the bar; and a person unknown, come to the hay-stack; I saw the prisoner put some loose hay from the stack into a sack or bag; the person unknown then went away with it; the prisoner took up a truss of hay from the bottom of the rick; that truss had been placed there and marked; it was new hay; he then went off with it; I pursued and took him with it on his head, at the distance of about thirty yards from the rick yard.

Q.Did you at all lose sight of him? - A. Yes; while I was going round the hay-stack, that was all; I seized the prisoner and said, what, I have got you at last; upon which he threw down the truss of hay and put his hands in his great coat pockets; I told him to take them out or I would cut them; I then made him take up the truss of hay and carry it to a pair of high yard gates which opened from the yard; I got over the gates to unfasten them; the prisoner then threw down the truss of hay and ton away; I pursued and retook him, at the distance of about forty yards from the gates, and made him come back; I desired him to take up the truss of hay and carry it into the high road, which he would not do; I then threatened to cut him unless he went into the high road, which threats I repeated three or four times to no effect; I was under the necessiry then of cutting him on the leg with a sword; after this the prisoner went with me, and I put him into the custody of the watchman of the night; I then returned to the yard gates where the truss of hay was; I took it to the accompting-house, and thereit has been ever since; he acknowledged before the Magistrate that he had taken the hay for his horses; he keeps a cook's-shop at Highgate.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q.Did he not tell you that the man who ran away had told him that he was a servant of your's, and had desired him to take it? - A. No, he did not.

Q. Did you weigh this hay? - A. I did not.

(To Mr. Addison). Q. Do you know what this hay weighed? - A. No; a truss ought to weigh 56lb.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who had known him fourteen years, and gave him a good character. GUILTY , aged 34.

Confined three months in Newgate .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Hotham.

246. JOHN WILSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of January , a cloth great-coat, value 30s. and six halfpence , the property of William Bellamy .

WILLIAM BELLAMY sworn. - I keep a public-house in King-street, Finsbury-square : On the 28th of January, about three o'clock, the prisoner came in for a pint of beer; he called for a pipe, and afterwards three penny worth of gin and water, which he had and paid for; my great-coat was lying upon the settle; I went into the yard to sweep it up, and my wife called me in; the prisoner was then gone; I ran after him and overtook him about a hundred and fifty yards from my house; he was running very fast; I cried stop thief, and then he dropped the coat, and turned up a place which was no thoroughfare, and a person laid hold of him till I came up; I am sure the prisoner is the same man; I took him and the coat to Worship-street, and at the office there were six halfpence found in the pocket which I did not know of; I am sure it is my coat.

Prisoner's defence. I leave it to the decision of the Court. GUILTY , aged 33.

Whipped in the gaol , and discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

247. HUGH TALLY and JOHN MULLINGS were indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Matthew Moggridge , about the hour of seven, in the night of the 27th of January , and burglariously stealing a pair of shoes, value 4s. the property of the said Matthew.

MATTHEW MOGGRIDGE sworn. - I keep a house , No. 158, Fleet-street : On Tuesday the 27th of January, I went over to the Bolt in Tun, about seven o'clock in the evening, and upon my return I found a mob round my door; I was not gone more than five minutes; it was then dark; when I came in I saw the two prisoners at the bar in the custody of my next door neighbour, Mr. March.

WILLIAM MARCH, jun. sworn. - I am a fishing-tackle-maker: I was putting up my shutters on Tuesday evening, about seven o'clock, and I saw the two prisoners standing at Mr. Moggridge's window; I looked at them and they walked away, but returned back almost immediately, and went away again, and just as I had finished putting up my shotters I observed them coming across the way a third time; I told my father I thought they were going to cut Mr. Moggridge's window, and I put on my hat and went out; Tally was then going past our door, and I saw him putting a shoe under his coat; I immediately laid hold of Tally, and called out to stop the other boy; on laying hold of him he fell down, and the shoe was under him; I delivered him into the hands of another person and went after the other boy, who had not got more than four or five yards, and in taking Mullings into Mr. Moggridge's shop I kicked the shoe before me; I took him into the shop and delivered him to the officer.

WILLIAM MARCH , sen. sworn. - Upon my son running out and hearing a cry of stop thief, I ran out to the door and laid hold of Tally, and at his feet laid a shoe, which I picked up and carried with the prisoner to my neighbour Moggridge's shop, the other shoe was brought to me. (Produces them).

(To William March , jun.) Q.Was the shoe that you kicked before you the same that you saw Tally putting under his coat? - A. No, it was not.

Mr. Moggridge. Upon examining the window directly after I came home, I found it had been cut; it was broke before, but had been mended by a glazier; the glass was cut in a three corner square, sufficient to take out the shoes; it was impossible they could have fell out, they were the top pair of a pile of seven that I had taken in from the women binders at five o'clock that evening; they laid one in another upon their sides; there is no particular mark about them, only that they are my own cutting and trimming, and they correspond in the number; there are six pair left.

Q.What may the value of them be? - A.Four shillings.

William March, jun. When they were searched Tally had a knife in his waistcoat pocket, which I saw taken from him.(Mr. March, sen. produced the knife).

Mr. Moggridge. The putty was quite fresh, and might have been taken away with the finger, it was removed all round; I made particular search after the glass, but could not find it; it was puttied inside and out, and some sacks put in to strengthen the frame.

Tally's defence. I was coming up Fleet-street, and that young man laid hold of me; I saw a pair of shoes lying upon the payement, and I went topick them up and that young man knocked me down.

Mulling's defence. One of my sisters was taken very sick; my father works at London bridge, and I was going to fetch him, and that young man followed me and took me back to the shop.

The prisoner, Tally, called his mother and the mother of Mullings, who deposed that they had never heard any thing amiss of him before.

The prisoner Mullings called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Tally, GUILTY , Death , aged 12.

Mullings, NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

248. THOMAS BRAY was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Anthony Harrison , John Litley, his servant, and others, being therein, about the hour of four in the afternoon of the 18th of February , and burglariously stealing seventy-two yards of ribbon, value 9s. the property of the said Anthony.

ANTHONY HARRISON sworn. - I live at No. 5, Panyer-alley, Newgate-street, and have a house and shop in Fenchurch-street ; John Litley, a servant of mine lives there, I do not sleep there myself.

JOHN LITLEY sworn. - I am shopman to Mr. Harrison, in Fenchurch-street: On Wednesday last, between five and six o'clock, as near as I can tell, Sapwell came in to know if our shop-window had been cut; I then looked in the window, and missed the goods; upon which he immediately produced to me eight pieces of ribbon; I looked at them, some had the marks torn off, and others had part of the marks left, which I knew to be my marking; I looked at the window, which had been cut before, and mended by a glazier, the piece which had been put in was gone; I had seen the ribbon there at eight o'clock in the morning; the piece was put in with putty and sacks, about a fortnight before; the hole was not large enough for me to put my hand in, a boy's hand might go in; Mr. Sapwell has the ribbons, they are Mr. Harrison's property.

THOMAS SAPWELL sworn. - I am an officer of the Ward of Bishopsgate: Last Wednesday, about four o'clock, I was sent for to Mr. Page's, in Bishopsgate-street, haberdasher, the prisoner was there; I took off his hat, and in his hat I found five rolls of ribbon, and one roll, which I believe dropped from behind him, but I did not see it drop, and two rolls were taken from him by Mr. Bevan; I asked him how he came by them.

Q. Did you make him any promise of favour? - A. No; I said he had better tell the truth. (Produces the ribbons).

GEORGE THOMAS BEVAN sworn. - When the prisoner was brought into our shop, he fell down upon the floor, and two rolls of ribbon rolled from him; I believe these to be the two.

Q.(To Litley.) How many servants have you in the house? - A. A shopwoman, and a little schoolboy.

Q. Can you venture to swear, that from eight o'clock in the morning, when you saw the ribbons, till Sapwell came in, there was not one minute of time when some one of you was not in the house? - A. I can; I am sure of it.(The two rolls that fell from the prisoner upon the floor, were deposed to by Litley).

Prisoner's defence. It was not me that did the crime. GUILTY, aged 14.

Of stealing the goods, but not guilty of breaking and entering the dwelling house .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

249. JOHN LEACH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of January , a pair of boots, value 16s. the property of John Hoppe .

JOHN HOPPE sworn. - I am a shoe-maker , and keep a shop in the Minories : I can only speak to the property.

JOHN SWIFT sworn. - I am a servant to Mr. Hoppe: On Friday the 23d of January, about half past four o'clock in the afternoon, I heard a cry that a man had stole a pair of boots; I stopped at the door, and saw the prisoner running with the boots in his hand; I ran after him, and took the boots from him, which boots I can swear to be the property of Mr. Hoppe; I had hung the boots in the morning at the shop window, upon an iron hook; I delivered the boots to the officer.

JOHN PERRY sworn. - I am a clothes salesman: On Friday afternoon, the 23d of January, I saw the prisoner put up his hand and take one boot down, he then put up his hand and took down another; he then passed the door, and I called out that he had stole a pair of boots; I pursued him, and saw the boots taken from him by Mr. Swift.(Joseph Solomons, the officer, produced the boots, which were deposed to by Mr. Hoppe, and Swift).

Prisoner's defence. After I was paid that day, I drank more than I should have done; I know nothing about the boots; I found myself the next morning in jail all over dirt; I have served his Majesty fourteen years.

The prisoner called three serjeants, and a corporal, who gave him a good character.

Court. (To Swift.) Q. Did the prisoner run like a drunken man? - A. No; he ran very fast, and very strait, and if he had not slipped, I don't think I should have overtaken him; after he was taken he pretended to be drunk.

GUILTY , aged 31.

Confined one month in Newgate , and fined 1s.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

250. JOHN MARCHANT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of February , a pewter pint pot, value 1s. the property of Benjamin Whitaker .

BENJAMIN WHITAKER sworn. - I keep the sign of the Hercules in Leadenhall-street : I know nothing of the circumstances, I can only prove the property.

ISAAC GUY sworn. - I am a messenger to the East-India Company: I went into the Hercules, and have a pint of beer; when I had drank it, I put the pot on the table, and I saw the prisoner slip it into his pocket; he then got up and attempted to go away; I told Mr. Whitaker that that man had a pint pot in his pocket; he was then pursued and taken.

BENJAMIN DICKINSON sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Whitaker: I went in pursuit of the prisoner immediately, and I took him about twenty yards from our house, I caught him by the collar, and brought him back; I told him he had got a pint pot in his pocket, and he denied it; when I brought him back, I pulled the pint pot out of his pocket myself, and delivered it to the officer.(James Hall, the officer, produced the pot, which was deposed to by the prosecutor).

Prisoner's defence. I went into this house with a seaman to have some grog, and took the pot to get some rum to make the grog in.

GUILTY , aged 54.

Publicly whipped , and discharged.

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

251. JOSEPH DELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of February , three pieces of oak timber, containing in length forty feet, value 30s. the property of William Goodman .

WILLIAM GOODMAN sworn. - I keep a chandler's shop , in Water-lane, Whitefriars: I lost the timber from Bouverie-street , on Wednesday night last, it laid upon some ruins; I can only prove the property.

WILLIAM JEFFERYS sworn. - I drive a cart for my father.

Q. Were you taken up for this? - A. Yes; and was discharged: On Wednesday night last, a little after seven o'clock, I drove the cart into Bouverie-street from Old-street-road, my father was not with the cart; the prisoner appointed to meet me in Bridge-street, Blackfriars; he met me there, and shewed me into Bouvrie-street, he was a stranger to me; he told me to turn the horse's head round, and then the prisoner, and two more, put a piece of oak into the cart; a gentleman came up, and they all three ran away; he sent for Mr. March to take care of the cart, and detained me; Mr. Goodman came, and said that was his wood, and that I had no right to take it away; I saw the prisoner again the next morning, at the Compter.

WILLIAM MARCH, sen. sworn. - On Wednesday evening, about half past eight o'clock, I was sent for by Mr. Haylett, who keeps the Black-lion, in Water-lane: I took the last witness into custody, and I took the cart and the timber into Mr. Haylett's yard; in consequence of information, I took a person of the name of Josselin into custody, and sent them both to the Compter; they were taken the next morning before the Magistrate.

CHRISTOPHER JOSSELIN sworn. - I deal in coals and wood, in Old-street-road, near the turnpike at Shoreditch Church: I hired Jefferys's cart to fetch away this wood, which I was to buy of a man of the name of Creed, I know nothing of the prisoner; I went into Water-lane, but could not find the place, and I then went home; after I had been home some time, I was informed that the boy, and the horse and cart, had been stopped; and I was taken into custody.

WILLIAM JEFFERYS, sen. sworn. - I let my cart to Joffelin, and sent my son with it.

LYON SOLOMONS sworn. - I am an officer: I apprehended the prisoner, about ten o'clock last Thursday morning, in Old-street-road; he had another man with him, but he ran away.

Goodman. The timber is not here; I knew it to be mine by a mark that I put upon it when I bought it; I had not given any body authority to take it away.

Prisoner's defence. I was employed by two coalheavers to help to load the cart, I did not know the men; I lent a hand to put three pieces of timber into a cart, I know no more about it; it is very common at the water-side for us to lend one another a hand. GUILTY , aged 32.

Six months in Newgate , and publicly whipped .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

252. SAMUEL BABEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of January , a half-handkerchief, value 1s. a pair of cotton stockings, value 1s. a pair of worsted stockings, value 1s. a child's shirt, value 1s. a child's cloth dress, value 5s. a sheet, value 2s. a pillow-case, value 6d. an apron, value 6d. and a shift, value 2s. the property of John Carter .

JOHN CARTER sworn. - I did lodge at No. 13, North-street , at Mr. Buss's; I left a box there, containing the articles mentioned in the indictment: On the 17th of January, between eleven and twelve o'clock, I had occasion to go for my box, and when I got home with it, I found every thing gone out of it that was worth any thing; I was obliged to break the lock to get it open.

CHRISTIANA BUSS sworn. - John Carter lodged at my house, he went away on the 12th of January, and left a box in the room; on the Monday after, he came for it, and took it away; he then came back, and said it had been robbed; I told him nobody had been in the room but prisoner; he then challenged the prisoner with it, but he denied it; Carter then claimed the handkerchief that he had round his neck; the prisoner slept in the room on the Thursday and Friday night.

CHARLES CHINNERY sworn. - I am an officer: I took this handkerchief from the prisoner's neck; I found upon him a great number of duplicates, which led to the rest of the property; the pawnbrokers delivered up the goods, and they were not bound over. (Produces the property).

ELIZABETH CARTER sworn. I am the wife of John Carter; I know all these things to be mine.

Prisoner's defence. I leave it to the Court: I did not open any lock. GUILTY , aged 31.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

253. HENRY WHITTON and WILLIAM AGLES were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of February , the carcase of a sheep, value 30s. the property of Samuel Higgins .

There being no evidence to bring the charge home to the prisoners, they were Both ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.(There was a second indictment against Whitton and Agles, and a third against Whitton, but the evidence being of the same nature, they were again acquitted).

254. JOHN SHATTOCK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of February , a brass lamp, value 2s. 6d. a japan powder-box, value 1s. a tin callender, value 1s. a tin oil-bottle, value 1s. a flat-iron, value 6d. an iron stand, value 6d. a japan waiter, value 1s. a japan snuffer-stand, value 1s. a dozen of knives and forks, value 16s, and a great variety of other articles , the property of William Stewart .

WILLIAM STEWART sworn. - I am a tinman and brazier , in Piccadilly : On the 8th of February I had information that I had been robbed; I went with the officers to No. 15, Great Windmill-street, the apartments of the prisoner, where we found a number of articles, and from there to No. 5l, Bedford-street, Covent-garden, the apartments of Frances Humphreys , where we found another part of the property; then we went back to Windmill-street, and found some more articles; we also found some at the pawnbroker's; the prisoner was my porter, and had lived with me eight years.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q.And you gave him a good character to the person with whom he he has lived since? - A. Yes.

Q.Have you any partner? - A. No.

JOHN MILLER sworn. - In consequence of information, Carpmeal and I went with Mr. Stewart to the prisoner's apartments, in Windmill-street, where we found these articles. (Produces a lamp, and several other articles).

Stewart. This lamp I know particularly, there is not a lamp in London of this form but what is of my make; I am sure I never sold it; I believe all the articles to be mine; there are several of them that have my mark.

Mr. Alley. Q.How long is it since the prisoner left you? - A.About five months.

Miller. Here are a dozen of knives and forks, a carving knife and fork, a pair of snuffers, a stand, a japan knife-tray, and a duplicate of a copper tea-kettle; I found them in the apartment of Frances Humphreys .

FRANCES HUMPHREYS sworn. - I am the wife of a gentleman's servant; I bought the duplicates of these things of the prisoner's wife for half a guinea; I lodged in the same house with them for seven weeks; that is about five weeks ago.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q.Was any body present when you bought these duplicates of the prisoner's wife? - A. No.

Q.These things were found in your possession? - A. Yes.

Q. And therefore you think sit to say you had them of the prisoner's wife? - A. I gave her half a guinea for them.

Miller. The things I now produce I found at the lodgings of Mrs. Blackwell, in Windmill-street. (They were deposed to by the prosecutor).

SARAH BLACKWELL sworn. - I bought these things of the prisoner's wife; they lodged in my house in Great Windmill-street.

WILLIAM ANTHONY sworn. - I was in company with Miller when these things were found.(Miller produces the duplicates).

GEORGE YOUNG sworn. - I am a pawnbroker, in Sherrard-street, (produces a tea-kettle, six spoons, and a bread-basket); I received them from a woman in the name of Avery. (They were deposed to by the prosecutor).

The prisoner left his defence to his Counsel.

GUILTY .

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

255. JAMES MARSTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of February , a brass cock, value 5s. and 20lb. of lead, value 5s. the property of Roger Boahrn , Esq. fixed to a certain cistern in his garden .

Second Count. For stealing the same, at Common Law.

The Court being of opinion that it should have been stated "in a certain garden belonging to his dwelling-house," the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

256. JAMES MARSTON was again indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of February , forty-nine horse-shoes, value 4s. and a pick-lock key value 1d. the property of Richard Alcorn .(The case was opened by Mr. Raine.)

RICHARD ALCORN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Raine. I live at Hampton : On Friday morning, the 6th of February, I discovered my shop was broke open, and I missed a quantity of new horseshoes; I cannot say how many; I heard of them again on Saturday morning; they were produced to me by the constable and John Nottman; they were on the premises of the prisoner; I did not see the bag till I saw it before the Justice: it was marked R. A. I know the horse-shoes to be mine; I also found a pick-lock key; that was found in the prisoner's bed-room; I saw the officer take it up from the bed-room window.

Q.Had the lock been forced? - A. Yes, with a punch or a crow, or some such thing.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q.Was it the door that was broke open? - A. They broke in at the window.

Q. A picklock key would be a very useful thing to break open a window with? - A. No; they got at the key afterwards.

JOHN NUTTMAN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Raine. I am a smith and farrier, at Hampton; I work upon the premises of Mr. Marston; he has kept the key of it ever since I have been there: On Saturday morning, the 7th of February, the horseshoes were shewn to me; they were found by my boy in a bag upon my premises; I knew them to be Alcorn's shoes from the make of them; I had heard of the robbery on the Friday morning; I went to Marston, and asked him if he knew any thing of that iron that was there, and he said, no, I said, either you, or somebody belonging to you, must; he then went up to the fire with his two hands in his pocket and said, work them up; I could not rightly hear the first word, but he said, work them up; I said, sharply, what I and he said, d-n you, you can't hear nothing, nor yet understand; he called me out, and said, I want to speak to you; I went out backwards, and he said, d-n it, if you had not said any thing to my boy Jack, you might have worked them all up, and nobody been the wiser; I told him I would not do it if he would lay me down 2001.; do you want to hang me; I said, I would go and inform the constable and Mr. Alcorn; and he said again, as I understood him, d-n you, work them up.

Q. Are you sure he said that? - A. Yes; I then went to the constable, but I went first to speak to two men about it, and he followed me in, and looked very solitary.

Q. Who were those two men? - A.Servants to Mrs. Bayer, at Hampton; the name of one of them is John Cooke .

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. How long have you had this shop of Marston? - A. A twelve-month in April; I had a key, and he had a key; he would not let me the place without he could have a thoroughsfare through it; his cart always stood there.

Q. Was there not a great deal of talk about this robbery, at Hampton? - A. No; I had a little conversation with a sarrier of the name of Franklin about it; and on the Friday morning I saw some gentlemen going to search the farries' shops.

Q.How early on the Friday did you hear of the robbery? - A.About seven o'clock, I believe.

Q. Did not you hear a great deal of talk about it that day? - A. No; I was at work all that day with my boy; I drank at a public-house on Friday night with some farriers, who told me their shops had been searched.

Q. You were then a little uneasy, for fear your shop should be searched? - A. No; I had no doubt of that.

Q. The boy found them in the shop - perhaps you sent him to the shop first in the morning? - A. He always does go first; I found three bars of iron at my own house that were carried home by my boy, which did not belong to me, and that gave me the first suspicion.

Q. When you say he told you to work them up, nobody heard him, I dare say? - A. Yes, my boy heard it.

Q.What, when he took you on one side to speak to you privately, did he speak loud enough for your boy to hear it? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you not fear that you might get into some trouble about it yourself? - A. Yes.

Mr. Raine. Q.How came your boy to take this iron home? - A.Because I was afraid of being robbed myself; I ordered him to take every thing home.

EDWARD WOOD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Raine. I am servant to the last witness: On Friday night I took some bars from my master's shop to his house, I took all that there were; the next morning I went to the shop about six o,clock, and my master came about seven; before my master came, I saw a bag lying there under some straw; I opened it, and found it contained horse-shoes; I did not tell my master of it first; he went home to get some small chains, and when he came back, I said, master, there is a bag under the straw, do you know any thing about it; he pulled out the bag, opened it, and said, by G-d, they are Alcorn's shoes, and then he went to call Marston; Marston came in, put his hand in the bag, and took out two or three; my master said, they are Alcorn's shoes; he said, I believe they are; then he came up to the fire where I stood, and said to my master, d-n it, work them up; my master did not understand him, and then he said, d-n you, you can't understand nothing,come out, here; he called him out, and then I heard him say, if you had said nothing before my boy Jack, you might have worked them up, and nobody would have been the wiser; my master said, I would not for 2001. work them up, what, do you want to hang me; Marston did not say any thing to that; but my master said, I will go and report it to Mr. Alcorn and the constable.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q.Which of you left the shop first, you or your master? - A. I did, about seven o'clock, when we leave off work.

Q. Were you with your master all the evening after that? - A. Yes, he came home and smoked his pipe, I went up to bed, and I heard him come up after me.

Q. I am speaking of Friday evening, - Was he at home all that evening? - A. Yes.

Q. He was at no public-house at all? - A.No.

Q. You are quite sure of that? - A. I think he went to this man's house.

Q.When you found that the bag contained Mr. Alcorn's shoes, you were both frightened? - A. Yes.

Q.Was he frightened? - A. Yes.

Q. Since Marston has been committed, have you and he had any conversation about the evidence that you were to give? - A. No.

Q. Will you swear that? - A. To the best of my recollection I have not; he told me I must come up, and so on.

Q.What do you mean by so on? - A. He told me I must tell the truth.

JOHN RUSSELL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Raine. I am a constable of Hampton: On Saturday morning, the 7th of February, about half past seven o'clock, Nuttman came into my house, and said, did you not come and search my premises yesterday; I said, why do you ask me such a question; he said, the whole of Alcorn's property is there; upon going with Mr. Nuttman to the shop, I found a bag, containing forty-nine new horse-shoes; we then went to Alcorn's, and Alcorn shewed Nuttman a tool called a pritchell, which Nuttman said belonged to him; I went to Marston's about ten o'clock in the morning, and in his bed-room Thorpe found a picklock key; I was in the room.(Produces the shoes and the tool.)

Alcorn. I found this tool under the window that was broke open.

Nuttman. I believe this to be my tool, but I cannot swear to it.

JOHN THORPE sworn - Examined by Mr. Raine. I am a headborough, at Hampton; I assisted Russell in the search, and in Marston's bed-room I found this picklock in the window. (Produces it.)(The property was deposed to by Alcorn)

Prisoner's defence. I am as innocent as ever was a child sucking at its mother's breast.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character. GUILTY , aged 48.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

257. JAMES BARNES , MARY HODGES , and JAMES-HARRISON GODDARD , were indicted, the first for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Kern , about the hour of twelve in the night of the 3d of February , and burglariously stealing, nine yards of linen check, vaule 9s. two yards and a half of Welch flannel, value 2s. 6d. five yards and a half of printed cotton, value 5s, 6d a linen gown, value 5s. four pair of worsted stockings, value 4s. three pair of thread stockings, value 3s. a pair of child's cotton stockings, value 6d. two pair of child's fustian breeches, value 3s. three shammy leather skins, value 3s. a pair of cotton gloves, value 1s. 6d. a pair of men's shoes, value 2s. 6d. two yards of printed cotton, value 2s. two yards of linen check, value 2s. five pair of worsted stockings, value 5s. half a yard of brown cloth, value 6d. two yards of wrapper, value 1s. 6d. a pair of corderoy breeches, value 7s. a cotton gown, value 4s. a linen check apron, value 2s. two pair of worsted stockings, value 4s. three pieces of brown Holland, value 2s. nine yards of linen cloth, value 6s. three yards of flannel, value 3s. four yards of linen check, value 4s. seven yards of printed check, value 7s. a pair of thread stocking, value 1s. a pair of velveteen breeches, value 7s. a pair of cotton stockings, value 2s. 6d. four yards of linen check, value 4s. eleven shammy leather skins, value 11s. twenty-four pair of cotton stockings, value 24s. thirteen pair of worsted stocking, value 13s. seven pair of breeches, value 2l. 11s. seven waistcoats, value 20s. a lady's great-coat, value 3s. two coats, value 3s. a fustian coat, value 1s. two pair of trowsers, value 4s. four pair of gloves, value 8s. a dimity petticoat, value 3s. eighteen pair of gloves, value 18s. five pair of cotton gloves, value 5s. eighteen yards of flannel, value 18s. thirty-four yards of check, value 34s. and eight yards of Holland, value 8s. the property of the said William; and the other two prisoners for receiving a parcel of the same goods, knowing them to have been stolen .(The case was opened by Mr. Raine).

ELIZABEEH KERN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Raine. I am the wife of William Kern, who keeps a country shop , at Sunbury, in Middlesex ; my husband was the last up; he is not here.

Q. Do you yourself know, that the premises were secured? - A. Yes; I went to bed on the night of Tuesday the 3d of February, about eleven o'clock, the shop windows were barred, I saw them safe; between six and seven o'clock the next morning, we were called up by some people going past; when I came down, I found the window framewrenched out from the brick wall, they got in between the brick wall and the window frame, they had attempted at another place, but did not succeed, at the window next the water-side; one part of the house fronts the river Thames, and the other part is in French-street; upon examining the goods, we missed the articles mentioned in the indictment; I found a dark lantern that they had left behind them, in a passage, coming from the upper warehouse to the door; the warehouse and shop are all one, there is a step-ladder goes from the one to the other.

Q.Shall you be able to speak to the goods, when they are produced? - A. Yes.

Court. Q.Then the shop and the warehouse make part of you dwelling-house? - A. Yes, it is all under the same roof.

Q. You were not at all alarmed in the night? - A. No, only by the wind, which was excessively high; I heard a noise between one and two o'clock, and got up, but I thought it was the wind, and I went to bed again.

JOHN RUSSELL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Raine. I am constable of Hampton: On Wednesday the 11th of February, Mr. Bushell brought me this bundle, containing eleven shammy leather skins, and in the afternoon I went to search the house of Barnes, at Kensington, Thorpe and Mr. Bushell went with me; we found Mrs. Gillett there, her husband went out upon our going in, and said, he would go and fetch Barnes and Mary Hodges, but I have never seen him since; I found in that room, the articles contained in this bundle, (producing it;) Barnes was brought over to the White-hart, in custody, and upon him was found a pair of breeches, which Mrs. Kern claimed; Mary Hodges was brought in custody also, and upon her person was found this gown and check apron, which were claimed by Mrs. Kern: On Thursday morning, the 12th, I went to Mr. Goddard's, at Sunbury, I told him we were come to enquire what goods he had belonging to Mrs. Kern; he seemed violently agitated, and desired me to go down stairs to his wife, who would inform me, and she informed me, that they were buried in the garden; she directed me to an apple-tree, in their garden, before the house, it was a very frosty morning, and I could easily discover that it had been fresh dug; I dug there and found two pair of stockings, some check, some brown Holland, and some coarse linen, which have been sworn to by Mrs. Kern; I then went to Mr. Luker's, a pawnbroker, at Kingston, and to Mr. Clarke's, who is also a pawnbroker, at Kingston, and from there to Michael Hayman's, in Blackman street, in the Borough, where I found as many goods belonging to Mrs. Kern, as would fill two sacks.

Q. Is he a pawnbroker? - A. He sells a variety of articles, he is a general dealer.

JOHN THORPE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Raine. I was with Russell, I apprehended Barnes and Hodges, while Russell was gone with the goods over to the Wick; I apprehended them in a two pair of stairs back-room, in Dalton's lodging-house, as it is called, that was immediately after the search; I took them to the White-hart, at Hampton-wick; Barnes attempted to make his escape.

Court. Q.Where is Dalton's lodging-house? - A.Very near the church-yard, in the horsefair; Barnes lived in Back-lane; he had on a pair of breeches, and a pair of stockings, which Mrs. Kern claimed; Mary Hodges had on a gown, a check apron, and I think a petticoat, which Mrs. Kern claimed; they did not attempt to deny but what they were the property of Mrs. Kern; Barnes hardly uttered a word; Mr. Russell has had them ever since; I have the dark-lantern, (produces it;) and here is the fill of the window,(producing it;) we have also a tool here that was found at Barnes's, which matches with the marks in the fill.

THOMAS BUSHELL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Raine. I am a tailor, at Kingston: Last Tuesday was a week, Mary Hodges came to my father's house, and said, she had got some skins, and some other articles; she asked me if I would buy them, they were shammy leather skins; I bought them of her, and after she was gone, I observed Mrs. Kern's name upon the paper; I went over to Mrs. Kern's, she was not at home, but I found her at Russell's; I shewed her the skins, and she claimed them; I went with Russell to the house of Barnes, the next day, and found this crow that has been produced in the lower room, occupied by Gillett, and in Barnes's apartments, up stairs, I found some brown Holland, a piece of canvas, and some stockings, which I delievered to Russell and Thorpe.

MARY GILLETT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Raine. Q.Now be careful and speak the truth, and the whole truth exactly as it occurred? - A. Yes.

Q. Are you married to John Gillett? - A. I am.

Q. He is gone out of the way? - A. Yes; James Barnes and Mary Hodges rented a room of me.

Q. Do you remember any conversation among any of the prisoners at the bar, before the robbery was committed, about going to Mrs. Kern's? - A. A day or two before, I heard Barnes and my husband say, that they would go and get into a house, at Sunbury, and they would get something that should satisfy them.

Q. Did they say where the house was? - A.Near the water-side; they both went out that night, about ten o'clock, and returned between four and five in the morning, saying that they were put by atthe shop, and they concluded to go again on the Tuesday evening, which they did; they left my house about ten o'clock, and said they were going to the shop, at Sunbury, by the water-side; they returned between four and five, it might be five o'clock in the morning, they came and called me up.

Q.Was it dark when they called you? - A. Yes; they brought three sacks of wearing apparel, such as gowns and gown-pieces, checks, brown Holland, and stockings, both cotton and worsted, gloves, silk and cotton, and a great many other articles; there were a great many shammy leather skins, the things were all put into their room; Mary Hodges cut off a piece of check, with which she made herself an apron; there were two gowns, she had one and I the other, and a black quilted petticoat likewise; Goddard came to my house the same evening; Mary Hodges and I went up stairs, and cut off some flannels, some check, and some white coarse linen, which I gave to my brother.

Q. Is Goddard your brother? - A. Yes, he is my own brother; and there was also a pair of stockings.

Q. Did you, or Hodges, or Barnes, tell him where these things had been got from? - A. No, I don't think they did, he is as innocent as my child.

Q. What was Barnes? - A.He had been a sailor and a soldier.

Q.What is Goddard? - A. He works at daylabouring work for a gentlemen.

Q. What did he want with checks and linen? - A. It was given to him as a present; Barnes and Mary Hodges went to Mr. Clarke's, and sold a great number of things and I went with them to keep them company; I took a piece of dark cotton of seven yards to Mr. Luker's.

Q.Recollect yourself, whether upon any occasion, your brother was present when this robbery was talked of? - A.Never in my hearing.

Court. Q.How many pair of stockings had Goddard? - A.Two pair of men's stockings, and I believe two pair of boys, two yards of brown Holland, and a piece, four yards of flannel, and four yards of check.

Q. Look at that crow - did you ever see that before? - A. Yes; that is that bar that they made to attempt that shop, and other places that they chose to go to; Barnes brought it from a house by the water-side, it was the top bar of a kitchen range, they both made it red-hot over the fire, they pointed it at one end, and made it flat at the other.

JOHN CLARKE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Raine. I am a pawnbroker, at Kingston: On Wednesday the 5th of February, the prisoner Hodges brought me this piece of cotton, seven yards, I lent her six shillings upon it; Mrs. Gillett sent me, by her daughter, a pair of breeches; she told me, that whatever was brought by her daughter, was the same thing as if she came herself; the next day, Gillett and his wife both came to my shop, and I bought of them a pair of velveret breeches, a pair of leather breeches, and a petticoat. (Produces them.)

Q.Are they new? - A. No, they are secondhand; they are sale made things.

Q.Open them? - A. The linings seem to be new.

Q. Is the petticoat worn out? - A. It is a very good petticoat, she has worn it one day, I think she said.

One of the Jury. They are all new.

- LUKER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Raint. Mrs. Gillett brought me a gown-piece, it laid a few days in pawn, and then she came and took it out; I bought it of her, and gave her fifteen-pence a yard, there were seven yards.

Russell. Upon enquiry for it, he told me he had sold it again.

Court. (To Luker.) Q.Did this woman deal in linen? - A. She said she had bought it to make her a gown, it is a very common cotton.

Q.You buy goods of people, and never enquire who they are? - A. I knew the woman very well, I never heard any harm of her; Mary Hodges brought me a pair of cotton hose, and a pair of new velveteen breeches; I lent her seven shillings upon them, that was as much as she wanted, and also two check aprons.

Q.(To Mrs. Gillet.) Look at that dark lantern? - A.This is the same lantern that Mary Hodges said she had borrowed of one Mary Long, at Kingston, for my husband and Barnes to go out with that night.

Q.(To Mrs. Kern.) Look at the breeches found upon Barnes? - A.They are mine, they have my mark; here is the gown found upon Mary Hodges ; I know this to be mine, and the black stuff petticoat that she had on was mine, a pair of cotton stockings, and this apron.

Q.Now look at the shammy leather skins? - A.There is my own hand-writing upon it.

Q.Now look at the articles found under the apple-tree, at Goddard's? - A.This linen cloth is mine, and the flannel; this brown Holland is mine, it is now cut into pin-cloths.

Q.Have you examined all these articles? - A. Yes, they are all mine.

Q. To what amount do you suppose you were robbed? - A. I am sure they could not be replaced for one hundred pounds.

Russell. Here are two sacks of the articles that I found at Hayman's.

Mrs. Kern. I have looked them over, they are all mine.

Barner's defence. These breeches, that the lady has sworn to, are mine; I bought them in town,she put the mark upon them after they were taken from me.

Q.(To Mrs. Kern.) Did you put the mark on before or after? - A. There was a mark upon them before.

Goddard's defence. I am innocent of the charge; my wife was frightened after she heard that my sister was taken up, and she hid them, I did not hide them.(The prisoner Hodges put in a written defence as follows:)

The defence of Mary Hodges, most humbly addressed to this honourable Court, who am now in your presence, on a charge of buying a gown, a petticoat, apron, and skins: It is represented that I bought them, knowing them to the stolen, which charge I do most solemnly declare is wrong, as when John Gillett spoke to me of buying the things, I had not the least idea of their being stolen; the apparel I bought for my own use, at a price I thought a sufficient value for them; the skins I had no use for, but as I am a tailoress by trade, I told him I thought I could find a purchaser for them, as they would do for linings of breeches; I took them to Mr. Bushell, a master tailor, who bought them of me. My Lord and honoured Gentlemen, permit me to beg of you to consider my unhappy case, with that great judgment, as well as mercy, which is ever known to reign in your breasts, that it is not probable I should have taken these things to any person to tell, with the name of the owner upon the paper round them; being fully assured there was nothing to fear, I innocently went to the first person I thought they would suit, thereby thinking to serve the buyer and the seller, without ever thinking such an affair would end in such fatal consequences as this proves to me; robbed of my liberty, and being now far advanced in my pregnancy, makes my trouble heavier, as I have no friends in London to assist me, or to do any thing for me in my unhappy affair; all my consolation is, that I am to be tried by gentlemen who discard not the poor unfortunate culprits, whose misconduct or misfortunes brings before them, but with mercy and probity searches into facts; that I may be one who may be thought worthy of your attention, is the most ardent prayer of my Lords and Gentlemen, your humble petitioner.

MARY HODGES.

Barnes, GUILTY , Death , aged 28.

Hodges, GUILTY , aged 38.

Transported for fourteen years .

Goddard, NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

258. JOHN ARNOLD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of January , two brushes, value 8d. a hammer, value 6d. a pair of gloves, value 6d. a pair of shoes, value 3s. forty yards of broad girth webbing, value 20s. six yards of narrow girth webbing, value 9d. and a quantity of silver, value 3s. the property of Robert Lyon and Gregory Watkins .

GREGORY WATKINS sworn. - I am a plater, founder, and iron-monger , No. 107, Long-acre ; On Tuesday, the 20th of January, in consequence of suspicions that I entertained, I sent for a constable, and about eight o'clock in the evening, when the men left work, I called the prisoner into a little room where the constable was; I told him we had missed a great variety of things, and asked him if he knew any thing of them; he said he did not know any thing at all of it; I then asked him if he had any objection to being searched, and to have his lodgings searched; he said he had not; Carpmeal then asked him if he had any thing about him that was not his own property, and he said, no; he again asked him, and he again said, no; he then searched him, and in his left hand waistcoat pocket he found some silver that had been missed, in a paper, and some loose silver in his pocket; he said it was his own property; I said, it was silver that he had taken from Beckwith's vice about half an hour before, and then called Beckwith in to look at it; he knew it again immediately; he then begged that Beckwith might go out, which he did, and then fell down upon his kness, begged for forgiveness, said that he had had a bad knack of taking silver, but if we would let him go about his business he would never be guilty of the like again; he was then taken to Bow-street; we then went to his lodgings, No. 3, Star-court, in the Strand, and there we found the other articles mentioned in the indictment; the prisoner came to live with us in the beginning of September.

JAMES BECKWITH sworn. - On the 20th of last month, in the evening, I wrapped up my silver, and went from my vice to the fire; when I returned to my vice the silver was gone; the prisoner and two boys were in the shop; I then got some more silver and wrapped it in paper, and when I went to look for that at eight o'clock, it was gone; when I was going away my master shewed it me again.(Thomas Carpmeal, the officer, produced the property).

Mr. Watkins. I cannot swear to the silver; but I believe it to be mine.

Beckwith. I am sure that great part of this is the silver that I lost, and I have reason to believe the whole is.

Mr. Watkins. I cannot swear to the girth, the hammer I know by a mark upon the handle, and the brushes I believe to be mine.

The prisoner called five witnesses who gave him a good character. GUILTY .

Confined six months in the House of Correction .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

259. SAMUEL WOOD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of January , a greatcoat, value 10s. 6d. and a handkerchief, value 1s. the property of John Harris , privately in his shop .

JOHN HARRIS sworn. - I am a broker , No. 77, Tottenham court-road .

Q. You don't sell great coats and handkerchiefs? - A. No: On Monday the 26th of January, I had been out the greater part of the day, I came home about five o'clock, took off my great coat, and laid it on the arm of a sofa, by the parlour door in the shop; I had occasion to go out to the back part of the house, and in the mean time the prisoner at the bar, with another man, came into the shop; when I returned I saw them speaking to my wife; upon my coming in my wife cried out that my coat was gone; the prisoner stood between my wife and the great-coat; I then took the prisoner by the collar; he made a strong plunge, disengaged himself from me, and ran away; I went after him, and called stop thief; he went down Pitt-street; I did not see the great-coat upon either of them; it was found in the passage of No. 23, in Pitt-street, just by where the prisoner was stopped; he had run past that door; there was a handkerchief in the coat pocket, and some cards of my address; I am sure the prisoner is the man.

JOSEPH GERRARD sworn. - I am a carpenter; I was going along Charlotte-street, I heard the cry of stop thief; I saw a man running across from the corner of Pitt-street, angle corners to Goodge-street; I advanced a few steps towards him, and attempted to catch him; he aimed a blow at me, but I brought him to the ground; he got up again and got from me; he ran, and I pursued him till he was taken.

CHARLES CHINNERY sworn. - I am watch-house keeper: In consequence of information I went to No. 23, Pitt-street, and there I found this coat. (Produces it).

Harris. I am sure this is my coat, here are my cards and my handkerchief in the pocket.

Prisoner's defence. While I was in the shop the woman said she had lost a great-coat, and that somebody belonging to me had taken it; I said I was a seafaring man, and not a thief; I was a little groggy, and said I would not be taken by the collar; that gentleman made a blow at me, and I struck him again; I am as innocent as the child unborn.

ELIZABETH HARRIS sworn. - I am the wife of John Harris; two men came into the shop with a pint mug to ask the price of it, and they took it out again and put it down where they found it; they then consulted and came in again; the prisoner offered me twopence halfpenny; I said I would not take less than threepence; he said he must have it, for he had nothing to use; he then gave me a shilling, which I doubted, and he gave me another, and as soon as I had taken his second shilling, they both turned round very quick; I then missed the coat, and immediately accused them with it; my husband immediately came in at the door, I don't think they made any answer; my husband then collared the prisoner, but he disengaged himself, and ran away; there had been nobody else in the shop.

Jury. Q. Did he run away without his change? - A. Yes; I returned him the shilling at the shop door. NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

260. THOMAS DAVIS and WILLIAM MAYNARD were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of February , a silver watch, value 50s. a looking-glass, value 18s. two bed curtains, value 20s. two sheets, value 12s. a table cloth, value 5s. a man's hat, value 5s. guinea, two half-guineas, two seven-shilling pieces, a half-crown, two shillings, six penny pieces, and twenty-four halfpence, and a Bank-note, value 1l. the property of Joseph Richards .

JOSEPH RICHARDS sworn. - I am a turner , and live in Playhouse-yard : On the 9th of this month, I lost the articles mentioned in the indictment, I know nothing of the loss; I have found part of the money since, but none of the other properry.

Mrs. RICHARDS sworn. - I am the wife of Joseph Richards : On the 9th of this month, I was going up stairs about a quarter before eleven o'clock, and I saw the prisoner Davis on the stairs, with a stick in his hand; he stood across the stairs, so that I could not go up, and Maynard was stooping down, and doing something to the key-hole of the door; Davis said, here, here, Maynard, and beckoned to his with his hand several times; then Maynard turned round, and began rubbing his hands, and they both seemed very much confused.

Q.Did he see you when he turned about? - A. Yes, he asked me where my husband was; my husband works in Cherry-tree-alley, White-cross-street; then Davis pulled out a piece of cheese, wrapped up in an old silk handkerchief, and asked me if I would buy it; I told him, no; if he wanted any thing with my husband, he was at the shop; Davis asked me if I would give him a crust of bread, and I cut a crust of bread, I know Davis by sight, and Maynard too; then they went down stairs, and I locked my door, and went out; I was going out of an errand; I went to my husband, and told him what I had seen, and he sent me home to take the money out of the drawer, and the watch off the mantle-piece, and put it in another drawer; then I went out with some bottle-boards, and my husband got home before me; I came back about four, and found the things gone.

FRANCIS STOKES sworn. - I am a constable; I went with the prosecutor to apprehend the prisoner; I took Maynard that afternoon at the prisoner's father's lodgings; upon searching him, I found five seven-shilling pieces, a guinea in gold, ten shillings and sixpence in silver, and three shillings and one farthing in copper money.

THOMAS GERARD sworn. - I was with Stokes: I found upon Maynard a half-crown, five shillings in silver, and sixpence, at Maynard's lodgings; Richards said he could swear to the half-crown, and two of those shillings; I found them in his fob pocket, on his right-hand side.

Stokes. I did not search his sob, I did not perceive that he had one.

SARAH WILKINS sworn. - On Monday, the 9th of February, about half past eleven, the prisoner Maynard came to my mother's, and said his wife was in quod, and said, a guinea and a half would release her; he asked me and my mother if we could tell him where he could get it; I said, it was a good deal of money, I could not tell him where to get it; and he said, he would get it before the afternoon was over, that is all I know of it.

Richards. When I came home, I found the door forced open, and the bolt standing out about an inch and a half, and the bed was tumbled about very much.

Q. Did you ever conceal your money there before? - A. No, my wife came to me about half past eleven, to inform me of it.

Q.(To Mrs. Richards.) Do you know whether the prisoners saw you go out? - A. Yes; when I went out, I saw them under a gateway whispering together.

CATHERINE DUNKLEY sworn. - On the 9th of February. I was going backwards and forwards in the morning about my business, and saw the room-door of Mrs. Richard's apartment; I saw that the bolt was out, and I went and told my husband of it; he sent me to tell Mr. Richards of it, which I did; I saw the bed-clothes had been pulled about, and the glass gone out of the room.

Richards. I took two seven-shilling pieces, and two half-guineas out of his hand; one of the half-guineas I can swear to.(The money was produced by the officer).

Richards. This half-crown I took particular notice of, it is marked with aqua-fortis, I had it of my mother; here are two shillings, one of them is George the Second's, and the other a Queen Ann's shilling; there is no mark upon them, but I am almost certain these are the two shillings that I had from my mother, with the half-crown; this half-guinea has a flaw close to the fleur-de-lis; it seems to have been a flaw in making of it, and under the eye of the same half-guinea there was a lump bigger than I ever saw in a half-guinea.

Maynard's defence. I went up to Richards's upon business, and met with this man, Davis; Mrs. Richards came up, I told her I wanted to see her husband; she told me he was at shop; I went away, and parted with this man at the door, and went immediately to him.

Davis's defence. On Monday week I met with Maynard; I went up to Mr. Richard's with him; I went in with Maynard, and partook of some bread and cheese; he asked her if her husband would have the cheese; she said, she did not know, but if he did not, her father would; I then came down stairs, and Maynard and I parted; I saw no more of him till I was taken up; they found upon me fourpence halfpenny, between me and my wife and two children.

Maynard, GUILTY , aged 46.

Transported for seven years .

Davis, NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Hatham.

261. MARGARET CAMPART was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of January , a seven-shilling piece , the property of Joseph Bond .

JOSEPH BOND sworn. - I am a journeyman bridle and bit-maker : On Saturday, the 24th of January, about ten o'clock at night, I was going to give Mr. Ridgway, who was with me, a glass of liquor, and this lady pushed herself in, and would have a glass too; I gave her the liberty to have a glass of gin, and she would have a glass of rum, that was at the White-hart tavern, Bishopsgate-street ; I gave the woman at the bar a one-pound note for change, she gave me a seven-shilling piece, eleven shillings in silver, and the rest in halfpence, and while I was ringing the seven-shilling piece, the prisoner took it up, and put it in her mouth; she said she did not think it was a good one; I asked her to give it me, and she would not; she told me she would go to prison before she would give it me; I sent for a constable, and took her to the watch-house, but no seven-shilling piece was found.

Q.Had you been drinking? - A. I had only had part of three pints of beer with Ridgway, I was as sober as ever I was in my life.(Bryan Ridgway confirmed the evidence of the prosecutor.)

Q.(To Bond.) Do you think it was a good, or a bad seven-shilling piece? - A. I think it was a good one, by the ring.

THOMAS SAPWELL sworn. - I am a constable; I searched the prisoner, but found no seven-shilling piece.

Prisoner's defence. These two men treated me with some rum; there was an enquiry about aseven-shilling piece, and an unfortunate woman who was there, that I had had some words with in the course of the evening, said, Miss Campart has got it, and then I was taken to the watch-house.

Bond. There was no other woman there.

Q.(To Sapwell.) Were these men drunk or sober? - A.They both appeared to me to be sober; the girl was very much intoxicated.

GUILTY , aged 21.

One week in Newgate , and whipped in the jail .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

262. GEORGE BURL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of January , a gold ring, value 3s. 6d. the property of Thomas Baker .

THOMAS BAKER sworn. - I am a labouring man , and live at Heston : The prisoner lodged at my house a week; I did not see him take the ring, I saw it at Marlborough-street on the Thursday after I missed it.

JAMES MARCHANT sworn. - I am beadle of Isleworth: On the Monday I was sent for to apprehend the prisoner, which I did, at the Rose and Crown, Isleworth, about two miles from the prosecutor's house; he owned to me that he had sold the ring at Kensington.

JAMES FLINT sworn. - I keep a sale-shop at Kensington: On the 26th of January, the prisoner brought me this ring to sell, I gave him three shillings and sixpence for it; I am sure the prisoner is the man. (Produces it).

Baker. This is my ring; it was my wife's grandmother's; it has been in the family 100 years; it was too small for my wife's finger, and a goldsmith had it to stretch, and he burst it; I am sure it is the same ring.

Prisoner's defence. I picked it up at the head of the stairs. GUILTY , aged 21.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and publicly whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

263. FRANCIS GARDINER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of February , a chaise-saddle, value 15s. a pair of reins, value 4s. and two tugs, value 2s. the property of Benjamin Coates and Philip Gosling .

BENJAMIN COATES sworn. - I am a coach-maker , in partnership with Philip Gosling , in Park-lane, Piccadilly : On the 14th of February I missed the articles from my shop, I had seen them between nine and ten in the morning, and on the Monday following I saw them at Marlborough-street.

GEORGE BROWN sworn. - I am clerk to a stable-keeper in Curzon-street, May-fair: I met the prisoner about two o'clock on Saturday the 14th of February, in Berkeley-Square, with the property upon his arm; having some suspicion of him, I followed him into the Strand, I stopped him near Exeter-change; I went with him, at his desire, to Queen-street, to Mr. Judd's, where he left them with the boy; the boy afterwards delivered them at Marlborough-street, and a mark was put upon them; I then took him to our accompting-house, Mr. Coates was sent for, and he claimed the property. (Produces it.)

RICHARD HUTCHINS sworn. - I am a harness maker, apprentice to Mr. Judd, in Little Queen-street; Last Saturday week, the prisoner was brought to our house by Mr. Brown, and the things were left with me; these are the same things.

Mr. Coates. They were left with me by a gentleman to dispose of for him, and I am answerable for them; I cannot swear to them, but I have every reason to believe they are the same, from the make of them.

Prisoner. I have nothing to say.

GUILTY , aged 21. - Six months in the House of Correction , and publicly whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

264. JANE PEDEY was indicted for felonously stealing, on the 10th of February , eleven pint pewter pots, value 5s. the property of John Hull .

There being no evidence to bring the charge home to the prisoner, she was ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

265. WILLIAM LEACH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of February , two shirts, value 10s. the property of George Burns .

HANNAH BURNS sworn. - I am the wife of George Burns, I live in Ratcliffe-row, near the City-road ; I am a laundress: On the 18th of February, about six o'clock in the evening, I lost two shirts from line in the yard, it is an open yard, and I saw a man in the yard taking the shirts; I pursued him, and cried, stop thief; he was stopped by Matthew Dixon .

MATTHEW DIXON sworn. - On Wednesday evening last I was going down French-row; I heard a cry of stop thief; I saw the prisoner coming towards me, and I stopped him; I heard something fall, I turned round, and picked up two shirts about five yards from the prisoner; I took them with the prisoner to the prosecutor's house.( William Winder , the constable, producted the sheets, which were deposed to by Mrs. Burns).

Prisoner's defence. The lady wished me to go to sea; she said that was all she wanted.

GUILTY , aged 27. - One month in Newgate , and publicly whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

266. MARY BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of February , two shirts, value 8s. the property of Edward Pit t.

EDWARD PITT sworn. - I live at the Dispensary in Margaret-street, Cavendish-square : On Wednesday, the 18th of February, I was making up some medicines in the back shop, and I saw the prisoner in the back yard; I asked her if she wanted to consult the physician; she said, yes, and I ordered her up stairs; the physician always sits in the first floor; after the business of the Dispensary was over, and the outer door shut, I met the prisoner coming down stairs with a bundle under her arm, which she had not when she went up stairs; I asked her what she had got there, she made some resistance, and I forced the bundle from under her cloak; I found it to contain two shirts of mine; they had laid in my bed-room up two pair of stairs, the door was not locked; she had no letter for the Dispensary, but upon searching her, I found a letter for St. Thomas's hospital; I delivered the shirts to the constable.(William Jackson, the officer, produced the shirts, which were deposed to by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. I have had a cancerous complaint in my side; I had a letter for the hospital, but I could not get any body to be security for me, in case of my death, and I met a woman, who persuaded me to got to the Dispensary, and she would speak to the gentlemen for me; I had occasion to go into the yard, and just after I came out of the yard, she gave me the shirts. GUILTY , aged 48.

One month in Newgate , and whipped in the jail .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

267. JOHN WHITE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of February , twelve pounds weight of beef, value 7s. the property of Dennis Cutler .

DENNIS CUTLER sworn. - On Saturday, the 14th of February, in the evening, I missed a rump of beef; I went out to the shop-door, and looked both ways, but could see nobody but the prisoner; I went after him, he threw down the rump of beef, and I laid hold of his collar; I picked up the beef about a yard from his feet, and called my brother to assist me; I delivered the prisoner to the watch man.

Prisoner's defence. I picked up the beef.

GUILTY , aged 63. - Confined one month in Newgate , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

268. JOHN BRANNING was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Sarah Dane , widow , about the hour of seven in the night of the 24th of December , and burglariously stealing a silver desert spoon, value 8s. the property of the said Sarah.

SARAH DANE sworn. - I am a widow; I keep a silversmith and watchmarker's shop , No. 133, Oxford-street : On the 24th of December, between six and seven in the evening, my shop-window was broke, and a spoon taken out; Edward Wheatley was in the shop at the time.

EDWARD WHEATLEY sworn. - I am journeyman to Mrs. Dane: On the 24th of December, about six o'clock, I was down stairs at tea; Thomas Dane , Mrs. Dane's son, came down, and told me there were some suspicious boys about the window; I went up stairs, and took my seat at my work-board, close to the window; I saw three boys at the window; I then observed them divide; one stood at the middle of the window, and the prisoner and another boy at the next window, which is a medicine warehouse; I saw then looking very stedfastly in my face, I looked at them several minutes very hard, and they at me; presently, I heard the spoons jingle in the window; I desired a little boy to pull the sliding-sash back, and he told me the wind came in at the window; I got up, and observed that the window had been cut, and a piece of glass flew to the opposite side of the spoons; I told the boy to call his mother up; I took my hat, and immediately went out of doors; I went about 200 yards down Oxford-street, but did not see any thing of them; upon that I crossed over the way, and presently met the three boys that I had seen at the window; one boy I laid hold of, and the prisoner slipped away; some time in February I was sent for to the Marlborough-street office, I knew the prisoner immediately, and I was bound over to prosecute.

Q.Did not you hear the noise of the glass being cut? - A. No; I heard the glass fall in; the whole glare of the light of the medicine shop, which was transparent, was shining upon their faces, so that I could not be mistaken.

Q. Are you sure this was one of the boys? - A. Yes.

Q.Are you certain? - A. Yes.

Q. What became of the boy that you held? - A. He was tried and convicted.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Upon hearing the jingling of the glass, you did not go out immediately? - A. I desired the boy to pull back the sliding sash, and I went out immediately.

Q. The boy, upon whom the property was found, was convicted? - A. Yes.

Q. Upon your oath, did you know the person of the prisoner before that night? - A. No, I did not.

Q. This boy was not at your window at the time you heard the jingling of the glass? - A. No; but he was in company with the others.

Q. You did not see him again till a month after? - A. No.

Q.And then in custody? - A. Yes.

Q. You have perhaps heard, that there is such a thing as forty pounds reward, if this boy is convicted? - A. I did not know any thing of it.

Q.Don't you now know? - A. Yes.

Q. Don't you expect a part of the reward? - A. That would very ill pay me for my time and trouble.

Q. You have had a part of the reward for the other boy? - A.Certainly.

Q. Don't you expect, if this boy is convicted, to have a part of another sorry? - A. I imagine I shall come in for a part of it.

Court. Q.Supposing you had seen that boy not in custody, should you have known him? - A. I should, set me have seen him where I would.

THOMAS DANE sworn. - Q.How old are you? - A.Going of thirteen years of age.

Q. Do you know whether it is a good thing, or a bad thing, to tell a lie? - A. I ought not to tell lies.

Q.Do you know what you have been doing now? - A. Yes, I have been sworth to speak the truth, respecting these boys.

Q. Do you know, that if you say that which is not true upon your oath, you will be punished not only in this world, but in that which is to come? - A. Yes; I am the son of Mrs. Dane; I was going of an erralid for Mr. Phillips, a paper-hanger, Princes-street, Cavendsh-square, and saw three boys next door to my mother's, and another coming across to them; after I had been back to Mr. Phillips's, I came home; one of the boys had been taken; I went to the watch-house, but I could not swear to him, it was so dark.

Q.Look at the prisoner? - A. To the best of my knowledge he was one of them, but I cannot swear to him, it was so dark; he was about his heighth, and had a short blue jacket on, and the same countenance, as near as I can tell.

EDWARD LOVITT sworn. - I am an officer: On the 6th of February I went with Warren to take the prisoner into custody, he was dressed in a blue jacket; we took him up, upon the deseription of Wheatley; we took him down into the kitchen in Belton-street, St. Giles's; when we got into the kitchen, the candles were knocked out, and the prisoner escaped; I found this wire upon him, (producing a piece of wire bent up at the end); he got away, and I did not take him again till the 24th, (produces the spoon); I took this from the little boy who was tried before.

Mr. Knapp. Q. You know that there is a forty pounds reward, I suppose? - A. Yes; people of our profession cannot be off knowing that.

Wheatley. I am positive this is the spoon that was taken out of the window that night.

Prisoner's defence. I am innocent of the charge.

For the prisoner.

MARY FLINN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I keep Covent garden market: On the 24th of December, I saw the prisoner about four o'clock in the afternoon, at his mother's house, in Betton street.

Q. How long did you remain in his company? - A.Till he went to bed; I lodged in the house for six weeks before Christmas.

Q. From four o'clock till six, was he out of the house? - A. No; he never stirred out of the room from me till he went to bed.

Cross-examined by the Court. Q.Did you know Andrew Branning ? - A. Yes, he is the prisoner's brother.

Q. Of what persuasion are you? - A. A Roman Cathotic.

Q. Where were you the night after Chirstmasday? - A. In their apartment, I am there every day regular.

Q. Then how comes you to recollect his being there that evening? - A. He and I sat opposite one another at the fire, and we argued cases and that.

Q. It is now almost two months ago; how can you recollect the particular day? - A. I never knew his to be out.

Q. Was Andrew there, too? - A.Not that day, nor that night; there was a little girl, about twelve years of age, there, and another woman, who is here, Mary Ruth .

Q.What had you for supper that night? - A.Some tea and some pickled herrings, and the other woman had the same; the prisoner's mother had bread and butter and tea.

Q. You were here last Sessions, were not you? - A. No. I was not; his mother and sister were out, and they came in just as I had got the tea ready, and I had my bread and butter and tea to myself;

Q.Were you at home on the 6th of January, when he was taken? - A. No, I was not.

Q.Were you examined before the Justice? - A. Yes.

Q.You went there to prove the same as you do now? - A. Yes.

MARY RUTH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I lodge In James-street, Covent-garden: On Christmas eve, I was at the prisoner's mother's, in Belton-street, from between three and four till after nine o'clock at night; the prisoner was all that time in my presence, I have known his five or six years.

Q. The boy that was tried last Sessions was not at home? - A.No.

Q.Were you before the Justice? - A. Yes.

Q. He did not bind you over to give evidence? A. No.

Cross-examined by the Court. Q. Did you drink tea there? - A. Yes.

Q. What had you with your tea? - A. A herring; we all eat together.

Q. The boy was not very well that day? - A. Yes, he was, for any thing I know.

Q.How came he to go and lie down? - A. He did not, in my presence.

Q.Are you a Protestam? - A. Yes.

Q. You mean to say this boy was not out of your company all that evening? - A. No, only to make water.

Q. He did go out of the room, then? - A. No, he did not.

Q.How came you there that evening? - A. I often go; but I went that evening for a trifle of money that she owed me.

Q. Did you know his brother Andrew? - A. Yes.

Q.Was he at home that night? - A. No.

The prisoner called four other witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , Death , aged 18.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

269. THOMAS LITTLE and JAMES BROWN were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of February , a great coat, value 7s. three silk handkerchiefs, value 8s. a shirt, value 4s. a waistcoat, value 5s. two pair of woollen drawers, value 5s. two pair of trowsers, value 6s. a jacket, value 2s. a cap, value 2s. a piece of white line, value 1s. a frock, value 4s. and two yards of check, value 4s. the property of Samuel Clarke .

SAMUEL CLARKE sworn. - My father is a fishmonger; I belong to the Warley East Indiaman , lying at Blackwall : On the 10th of February, about half past six o'clock in the morning, I missed my chest of cloaths; the prisoners were sailors on board the same ship, and they were missing also.

EDWARD ROGERS sworn. - I am an officer belonging to the Public office, Shadwell: In consequence of information, I went with Elbe, another officer, to the house of Little's father, and as soon as we entered the door, we saw the prisoners; we secured them, and searched the house; we found all the property within a trifle; we found some in the house, and some on the persons of each of the prisoners; the next day we went to the house of Moses Phillips , in Rosemary-lane, and there we found two coats, one belonging to Clarke, and we found some other things at the pawnbrokers. (The property found upon the prisoners, and in the house of Little's father, was produced and deposed to by Clarke).

(Moses Phillips produced a coat, which he bought of Little; Elisha Ray , a frock, and Charles Williams, a remnant of check, which were all deposed to by Clarke).

The prisoners put in a written defence, stating that they had the property from a person of the name of Powell, who was brought before the Magistrate and discharged.

Brown called two, and Little three, witnesses, who gave them a good character.

Little, GUILTY , aged 14,

Brown, GUILTY , aged 14.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

270. JOHN WHITTINGHAM was indicted for that he, on the 20th of January , being a servant to John Gregory , did receive, and take into his possession, the sum of 641. 1s. 3d. for and on account of his said master, and having received the same, feloniously did embezzle and secrete the same .

Second Count. For that he, being a servant of the said John Gregory, did, by virtue of such employment, receive and take into his possession 7s. of and from Hannah Morris, on account of his said master, and afterwards fraudulently did embezzle and secrete the said sum of 7s.(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

JOHN GREGORY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a potato merchant , in Crispin-street, Spitalfields; the prisoner was my servant, he has lived in the family seven or eight years, he was entrusted by me to receive and pay money: On the 20th of January, I went to Mr. Buxton, and asked him to mark some money, to send to my warehouse, for the purpose of detecting the prisoner, of whom I had a suspicion; a seven shilling-piece was marked by Mr. Buxton, and his son, in my presence; I took it away with me on the Saturday, and carried it to him again on the Monday; a half-guinea was also marked, but not in my presence. On Monday evening, the 19th of January, I asked him what money he had taken, and he gave me a guinea, two half-guineas, and some silver, among which was the half-guinea but not the seven shilling-piece; I asked him where he got the guinea and a half; he said he took the guinea and a half of one person; I said no more to him then, but went to Mr. Buxton's again; the next morning I called the prisoner into the parlour, and desired him to sit down; I told him I had suspected a long while that he had been guilty of embezzling my money; he at first denied it.

Mr. Alley. Q.Did you tell him you would prosecute him if he did not tell the truth? - A. No.

Court. Q. Did you promise him any favour? - A. No, I did not; I told him he might acknowledge it, or deny it, as he thought sit, for I was convinced I had proof that he had been guilty.

Court. Q. Did you make use of the word convinced? - A. I said I was certain he had done it; I asked him if he had received a seven shilling-piece on the Monday; he at first denied that he had; I told him the circumstance of its having been marked; upon which, after some hesitation, he said that he had taken a seven shilling-piece; I asked him what he had done with it; he said he had it up stairs; I said no more to him then, but went for an officer; when he saw me going out, he desired I might be called back, he wanted to speak to me; I came back, and he said he would be glad to speak with me by myself; I then took him into a room by ourselves; he asked me if I would make it up;I told him I did not know what he meant by making it up, if he he had any thing to say to me to say it; after some hesitation, he told me that he had taken five pounds of my money, at which I laughed, and walked away; he then desired that I might be called again; I came back, and then he acknowledged that he had taken ten pounds; every time that I returned he wanted to make up the matter; after that, he acknowledged that he had taken twenty pounds; I went away again, and he called me back; he then acknowledged to twenty-five pounds, and expressed the same wish to make it up every time I went away; and when I returned again the next time; he said he had taken sorry pounds; I returned again the last time, and he said he had taken fory-five pounds; when I was going away again; he said he would give this money up to me; I asked him where he had not the money; he said it was at his aunt's; upon which I asked him how I was to get it; he said he would give me a note to his aunt; I immediately went to Worship-street office, and got a search-warrant to search his aunt's house in Wheeler-street, Spitalfields.

Q.Did he give you directions where to find any money? - A. Yes; particularly forty guineas, his aunt had it in her pocket; I was to ask for it; he said they were most of them new guineas, and were in a shagreen box in her pocket; which we found according to his description.

Q. Are any of those guineas marked? - A. No.

Q. Then you cannot say that they were your's? - A. No; the officer took the aunt to the office; I then went back to my house with the officer, and took him up stairs to search the prisoner's box, where we found the seven shilling-piece that had been marked by Mr. Buxton.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q.Have you repeated every thing that he said? - A. Yes.

Q.He did not tell you the date at which he took each particular sum? - A. No.

Q. You went to this poor old woman's house and found forty guineas in her pocket? - A. Yes.

Q. Is she a married woman? - A. I believe she is.

Q. She did not charge you with robbing her of it? - A.No.

Q. I think she ought. - Did you not expect, that if this boy was convicted the money you had taken from her would go into your own pocket? - A.That was not the impression upon my mind; I understood it would go to the Sheriff.

JOHN RAY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am an officer belonging to Worship-street: I went with Mr. Gregory to the house of the prisoner's aunt, Mrs. Trumbell, and found sorry guineas in a shagreen case in her pocket, and other money, making in all about sixty-four pounds; I afterwards shewed the prisoner the shagreen box, and asked him if he knew that box; he said, yes, he knew it very well, he said that was the box; I went up stairs into the prisoner's room, at Mr. Gregory's, and the prisoner unlocked his box, and there I found a guinea and seven seven-shilling-pieces; he said the sorry guineas belonged to Mr. Gregory; he begged for mercy, and hoped he would forgive him; he said he had a friend that would make up a hundred pounds, or two hundred pounds, if Mr. Gregory would look it over; Mr. Gregory said he should go before a Magistrate.

WILLIAM BUXTON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I live in Bishopsgate-street: I marked a half-guinea, and a seven shilling-piece, for Mr. Gregory.

Q.Look at those seven shilling-pieces, and point out the one that you marked? - (The witness looked at them, but could not point it out).

Gregory. This is the seven shilling-piece that I delivered to Mr. Buxton, and which I saw him mark; it has three marks upon it.

Buxton. I marked it with a punch; but my eyes are so indifferent I cannot see it. (A pair of spectacles were handed to the witness by one of the Jury).

Buxton. I see it now, it is the same seven shilling-piece; I delivered it to Hannah Morris , on Monday the 19th of January, to puchase potatoes at Mr. Gregory's, and she brought back five shillings and nine-pence.

Mr. Alley Q.Will you venture to swear that it was a good seven shilling-piece? - A. Yes.

HANNAH MORRIS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. On Monday the 19th of January, Mr. Buxton sent me to get some potatoes at Mr. Gregory's which I received from the prisoner at the bar.

Mr. Alley Q.He gave you five shillings and nine-pence in change? - A. Yes.

Court. Q.Where did he gave you the change from? - A.Out of his pocket.

Court. (To Gregory). Q.Have you no till in your shop? - A. No; there is an accompting-house, and I left silver on the desk for him to give change with if he wanted it; I left two pound's worth of silver, which he had not touched when I came back; he gave me in all about five or six pounds.

(Mr. Alley, on the part of the prisoner, took three objections, which were argued on the part of the prosecution by Mr. Knapp.)

Court. Three objections have been taken, first, That the delivery must be by a third person, and that, therfore, this being by the medium of the master cannot come within this Act of Parliament; I am perfectly satisfied there is nothing in that, if he receives it on account of his master that is sufficient, and all that the Act of Parliament requires; if a master, suspecting his clerk, chuses to send, by another person, even his own money, that is directly within the words of the Act, and therfore there is nothing in it.

The next objection is to the competency of the witness. I am perfectly satisfied that he is a competent witness. Your objection does not go so much to his competency as to his credit; all persons coming here, as witnesses, come with a hope of reward, by the return of their goods, that is always a question for the Jury to decide; and therefore; though Mr. Gregory comes here with the hopes of having his money replaced, yet it cannot affect his competency. But, I think, the last objection, that of the seven shilling-piece, is really a very serious objection, because the Act of Parliament says, any person who shall receive money, goods, bonds, bills, banker's notes, or other valuable security, on account of his master, or shall fraudulently embezzle, or make away with the same, and so on, why then it must be the thing that he makes away with. Mr. Knapp says, suppose a man was indicted for stealing seven shillings, and you only prove a part of it, would not that support the indictment? - Why, yes, because the indictment is for stealing seven shillings in monies numbered; but does Mr. Knapp think, that if a man is indcted for stealing seven shillings, and a seven shilling-piece is produced, that that indictment is good? - Certainly not; if you charge seven shillings in monies numbered, and you prove but one it is sufficient. How is it here? - This man receives a seven shilling-piece; if he had taken the change out of his master's till and given it to the customer, I should have held that that was embezzling seven shillings of his master's property; but here the fact does not warrant that; Hannah Morris says, he gave her five shillings and nine-pence; then, why might not this indictment have stated, that this man received seven shillings, and embezzled one shilling and three-pence, part of the said seven shillings? - You charge that he embezzled and secreted the sum of seven shillings; no, he has not; he has secreted and embezzled only one shilling and three-pence of it, the rest he paid out of his own pocket. The second count certainly is not proved; I shall state to the Jury the evidence upon the first count, offering such observations upon it as I shall think right to submit to them.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

271. RICHARD MEREDITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of February , a saw, value 3s. the property of George Shirtcliffe .

GEORGE SHIRTCLIFFE sworn. - I am a coachmaker , and live in Greyhound-yard, High Holborn: On the 4th of this month, I missed a hand - saw from my bench, about ten o'clock in the morning; I went to several pawnbrokers, and found it the next day at Mr. Hinckesman's, in Bowl-yard, St. Giles's.

WILLIAM HINCKESMAN sworn. - I am a Pawnbroker in Broad-street, St. Giles's (Produces a saw); I lent the prisoner three shilling upon this saw; I am sure he is the man.

Prisoner's defence. I found it in the yard.

GUILTY , aged 32.

Confined one month in Newgate , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

272. ANN KIRBY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of February , a pocket-handkerchief, value 1s. 6d. and 2l. 10s. in monies numbered , the property of Ananiah Bolathe .

ANANIAH BOLATHE sworn. - I am a teacher of languages : On the 16th of February, I was stopped, in the middle of the Strand, by a girl, who took me to a house, No. 3, Vine-street ; I wanted a lodging that night, and it being late I went home with her, it was after ten o'clock; I went with her, and she took me into a two pair of stairs back room; she asked me for something to drink; I gave her sixpence, and she went out, but never returned; after a little while the prisoner, and another girl, came up to the room; the prisoner said, I might either go about my business or stay with her that night; I preferred staying with her, and then she took me into the first floor back room; after I had been ther about three quarters of an hour I went to bed; but before I came down from the second floor, I put my money, amounting to about fifty shillings, into my pocket-handkerchief; when we had been in bed about three quarters of an hour, she said she wanted something to drink; she got up and went out, saying, she would come back directly, she did not dress herself; then there came a young man into the room, that used me very ill, he used very bad words, knocked me down, and said I had no business here; I got up, and dressed myself; I then missed my money and my handkerchief, and I was forced out of the house; the third day after I went with an officer to the same house, and apprehended the prisoner; there were several girls in the room, and I picked her out directly; I am certain she is the person; I never found my handkerchief, or my money.

Cross-examined by the Prisoner. Q. Was not I in bed with you when two young men came into the room? - A. No.

Q. Did you not agree for another yound woman to sleep with you also; and did not you make room for her to came into bed? - A. Yes; but she did not come into bed, she was on the bed.

Q. Then she was near your coat? - A. Yes; about two minutes.

Q. Did not you make the other young woman, and me, change sides, after you were in bed? - A. Yes.

Q.Were you not dressed when you missed you money? - A. All but my coat.

EDWARD TREADWAY sworn. - I apprehendedthe prisoner, at No. 3. Vine-street, Chandois-street; there were six girls in the room, and the prosecutor picked out this girl; there was a lusty girl there that he had picked up first, and she said she did not rob him.

Prisoner's defence. He brought in a young woman, and supped with her, and she said she had a dislike to stop with him, and asked me to go up stairs to him; I went up stairs, and asked him if I should stop with him, which he agreed to; there was another young woman asked him if she should stop with him too, and he said, yes, and she was in bed with him, I dare say, twenty minutes, and then two young men came up stairs, in a state of intoxication, one of whom I knew, and they insisted upon my getting up, and the prosecutor too, and I went out into the passage to dress myself, there being three men in the room.

Q.(To Bolathe.) Whereabouts was the coat? - A.Upon the middle of the bed. NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

273. JOHN BRAME , GEORGE BAKER , and TIMOTHY JAQUES , were indicted, the first two for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Norborn , about the hour of three in the afternoon of the 29th of January ; Hannah his wife, and others of his family, being therein, and stealing a gold enamelled locket, value 2s. 6d. three gold rings, value 3s. a paste pin set in silver, value 2s. a glass smelling bottle with a gold top, value 1s. 6d. and a silver pedometer, value 12s. the property of the said John; and the other for feloniously receiving a part of the said goods, knowing them to have been stolen .

There being no evidence to bring the charge home to the prisoners, except that of an accomplice, who was ignorant of the nature of an oath, the prisoners were All Three ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

274. JOHN BRAME and TIMOTHY JACQUES , were again indicted, the first for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Samuel Chandler , about the hour of seven in the night, of the eighth of January , and stealing forty silver thimbles, value 20s. five silver bodkins, value 1s. 3s. twenty-four plated knee-buckles, value 6s. and twenty gilt rings, value 5s. the property of the said Samuel, and the other for feloniously receiving the same, knowing them to have been stolen .

The evidence being of the same nature as in the former case, the prisoner's were Both ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

275. JOHN-DANIEL FEARE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of February , a metal watch, value 40s. a gold seal, value 5s. a silk handkerchief, value 1s. and a pocket knife, value 6d. the property of Benjamin Woodhouse , privily from his person .

BENJAMIN WOODHOUSE sworn. - On Tuesday night, the 17th of this month, I lost a metal watch, with a gold seal, as I was going in hackney-coach from St. Paul's to my own house, in Park-row, Knightbridge, about half-past ten o'clock at night, I think the number was 192; my watch was found upon the prisoner, in his hat upon his head; he was in the coach with me; when I came to pay the toll at Hyde-park, I missed it; I had taken some punch in the course of the day, which had made me rather intoxicated, having eat no animal food that day; the streets were very slippery; I was staggering in the street, and the prisoner laid hold of me, I believe, in Lombard-street, about nine o'clock; he said, I seemed to be very much in liquor, I told him I was, and if he would see me home, I should be very much obliged to him; he conducted me to a coach in St. Paul's Church-yard, which I got into, and he with me; when I missed my watch at the toll-house, I said, you are a thief, I have got a thief with me; the turnpikeman assisted me, and my watch was found in the crown of his hat, on his head, and my handkerchief under his arm-pit; when he got out of the coach, he got from me, but did not get more than one hundred yards, or perhaps not fifty, before he was taken and brought back, he was then taken to Mount-street watch-house.

JOHN NASH sworn. - I am a watchman, in Hamilton-street, Piccadilly; I was sent for to the Toll-house, I searched the prisoner, and found a metal watch with a gold seal, under his hat, and a silk handkerchief under his arm.

JOHN PEDDINGTON sworn. - I am constable and watch-house-keeper, at the parish of St. George, Hanover-square; I searched the prisoner when he was brought to the watch-house, I found in his right-hand coat pocket, the knife which the prosecutor claimed. (Produces the whole of the property.)

THOMAS HORNE sworn. - I am a coachman; the prosecutor and the prisoner got into my coach, I drove them to Hyde-park-corner, and them Mr. Woodhouse said, the prisoner was a thief, and I went for the watchman; I saw the watchman take a silk handkerchief from under his arm-pit, and a watch from under his hat; and after he was at the watch-house, I saw a knife taken from his righthand coat-pocket. (The property was deposed to by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. I took his watch to take care of it, he was very much intoxicated, and it was falling out of his pocket, and my pockets being had, I put it in my hat.

GUILTY of stealing, but not privately, from the person , aged 35.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Ricorder.

276. JOHN NEALE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of February , a shewglass, value 10s. eighteen tortoishell spectacles, value 4l. fifteen pair of steel spectacles, value 15s. two brass spectacle cases, value 10s. a pair of brass spectacles, value 5s. four pair of hand spectacles, value 20s. forty-six reading-glasses, value 4l. 12s. four eye glasses, value 4s. six ivory rules, value 12s. and fourteen spectacle cases, value 28s. the property of Abraham Lyon , in his dwelling-house .

ABRAHAM LYON sworn: - I keep a shop in Oxford-street, No. 408 ; I was not at home at the time I lost the articles mentioned in the indictment, they were in a shew-glass upon the counter.

Mr. Clifton. Q.Have you a partner? - A. No.

MARY LYON Sworn. - The prosecutor is my father-in-law, I happened to be there when the robbery was committed; on the 9th of February, between one and two o'clock, I was in the parlour adjoining the shop, my mother thought she heard the door open, I went into the shop, and saw the door wide open, the shew-glass was then gone off the counter; I went in and told my mother, I came to the door again immediately, and saw Mr. Cleaver, I begged of him to go with me in pursuit of the person, which he did; we went down Charles-street, Soho-square, and when we came into the square, we saw the prisoner, with the shew-glass on his shoulder; Mr. Cleaver and I brought him back again to my father's shop, and Mr. Bramble brought back the shew-glass.

Cross-examined by Mr. Clifton. Q. You and your mother were in the back parlour? - A. Yes.

Q.From that parlour you can see into the shop? - A. No, there is a door, but it is facing the shop window, and not the shop door.

Q.When you came out, you did not see any body with the shew-glass? - A. No.

Q.Therefore, whether any body between your father's house, and Soho-square, had given him the shew-glass, you cannot tell? - A. No.

BENJAMIN CLEAVER sworn. - I am a tobacco manufacturer; I went in pursuit of the prisoner, at the request of the last witness; I first saw him in Sutton-street, about three hundred yards from Mr. Lyon's house, he had a shew-glass upon his shoulder; I came up to him, and asked him how he came by it, I charged him with stealing it, and desired him to come along with me, he hesitated at first, and threw down the glass; he then went with me; Mr. Bramble took up the glass, and we all went to Mr. Lyon's house.

Cross-examined by Mr. Clifton. Q. You did not see the prisoner till he had got three hundred yards from the door? - A. No; I saw him go by with the shew-glass, and about a minute and a half after, I went to the door, and saw the last witness who had missed it.

JOSEPH BRAMBLE sworn. - I am a watch-maker, I saw the prisoner drop the shew-glass, and I picked it up, I carried the shew-glass to Mr. Lyon's, and from there to Marlborough-street, where I delivered it to the constable.

HENRY LOVETT sworn. - I am an officer belonging to Marlborough-street, I produce part of the property; I have brought one of each sort by the direction of the Magistrate.

Lyon. These articles are all my property.

Prisoner's defence. I was coming past the house of the prosecutor, and a middling sized woman, rathere handsome, called me, and desired me to take that shew-glass to Mr. Jones, in Russel-court, and she would give me a shilling; I was running, that I might get home time enough to dine with my father at two o'clock, and as I was coming through Soho-square, I was stopped and taken to Marlborough-street.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY, Death , aged 16. (The prisoner was recommended to his Majesty's mercy by the prosecutor, on account of his youth, and by the Jury on account of his youth and good character.)

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

277. MARY STEPHENS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of February , a copper tea-kettle, value 10s. the property of John Morris .

JOHN MORRIS sworn. - I am a smith , and keep a broker's shop : On Wednesday last, I put a teakettle at the door, and in about five minutes afterwards, I missed it.

ANN MORRIS sworn. - I am the wife of John Morris ; I was standing at the door, the prisoner came up and asked me if I had a knife to sell, I told her, no, and she went away; she seemed very much intoxicated, and directly after, my husband came up stairs and missed the kettle; I went after her, and overtook her with it in her apron; I asked her what she had got there, she said, what was that to me; I said she had got my tea-kettle, she said she had not; I pulled down her apron, and there I found the tea-kettle, I immediately brought her back. (The tea-kettle was produced and deposed to by the prosecutor.)

The prisoner did not say any thing in her defence. GUILTY , aged 55.

Whipped in the gaol , and discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

278. CATHERINE WARREN and JANE STANLEY , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of February , three shillings, five Bank-notes, each of the value of 2l. and one Banknote, value 1l. the property of Peter Nordbeck .(The case was opened by Mr. Glead.)

PETER NORDBECK sworn. - Examined by Mr. Glead. I am a sailor ; I have been in this country since the 28th of December; I was robbed of 11l. 3s.; there were two or three shillings and some notes; I was at a house near the Danish church, in Wellclose-square, with the two prisoners at the bar; I met with them between seven and eight in the evening last Wednesday; they asked me to go home with them; I opened my pocket-book while they were in the room, and put six or seven shillings into it; I gave the little girl half-a-guinea to get some beer, and she brought me the change; when I put my pocket-book in my pocket, I pulled off my coat, and put it on the chairs, and when I put on my coat again, I found my pocket-book open, and all my money gone but four shillings; the next morning the prisoners were apprehended.

THOMAS ROGERS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Glead. I am an officer; I went to Stanley's father's, in Wellclose-square, with the prisoner Warren, and the prosecutor; Warren said, Stanley had got part of the Captain's money; Stanley said, no, I have not, but I saw you with a 2l. note of the Captain's last night; then Warren said, she had changed it at a shoe-maker's, next door; I went to the shoe-maker's, and he delivered me a 1l. note, (produces it); Warren then said, Stanley had a note as well as she, and then Stanley gave me this note. (Producing it.)( John Higgs , the other officer, confirmed the evidence of Rogers.)

JOHN SPENCE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Glead. On Wednesday night the prisoner Warren bought a pair of shoes of me, and gave me a 2l. note, which I paid away the next morning before the officers came; I gave her a 1l. note, and the remainder of the change in silver; my wife had a note given her in a paper, but I did not see it given to her, my wife is not here.(The note was deposed to by the prosecutor, from an oil-mark which appeared upon it).

Warren's defence. I was going along Towerhill with this young woman, and we met with two girls that don't act right, and they met with this man, and we all went together, and when we got into the room, the two girls went out for a candle, and then be wanted to behave not right to me, and then I screamed out; he then stuffed the watch down my bosom, and the notes he pushed some down my bosom, and some down this young woman's bosom, and then we went away.

Stanley's defence. I was with this young woman; we went with these two girls, and this man, and when we had got into the room, the girls went out to get a candle, and fastened the door upon us, we could not get out any how, and then this man wanted to put his hand up my petticoats, and I would not let him; I screamed out, murder, and then he stuffed some Bank-notes down my bosom, and a watch down this young woman's bosom; he said to me, here is the money, and wanted to throw me down upon the bed; I would not let him; he then said, give me the money again, and I gave him two 1l. notes back, and kept the 2l. note.

Both NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

279. ALEXANDER M'COUL was indicted, for that he, on the 4th of February , one cow, value 10l. the property of Frances Radford , feloniously did kill .

The prosecutrix and witnesses were called, but not appearing, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Hotham .

280. CATHERINE MACMILLAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of December , a pocket-handkerchief, value 2d. one half-guinea, one shilling, a half-crown, and six halfpence , the property of William Keerly .

WILLIAM KEERLY sworn. - I am a perfumer : On the 28th of December last I lost half-a-guinea, a half-crown, one shilling, some halfpence, and a pocket-handkerchief, in Tothill-street , about two o'clock in the morning; I had been at a public-house, and was a little in liquor, but I knew what I was doing; as I was going into Tothill-street, I slipped down; there was a court on the left hand side, in which the prisoner was; she took hold of me by the hand, and pulled me up; instantly a man followed her; she picked my pocket, and gave the property to the man; I felt her draw her hand out of my pocket; I did not get any of it again; the watchman took her to the watch-house; I am certain I had the money in my pocket.(John Hall, the constable of the night, deposed, that the prosecutor was a little in liquor, but clear in speech).

Prisoner's defence. A woman that lived in our house was in labour, and I went for the midwise; coming back I met that man, who was very much in liquor, and fell down in the mud; I lent him my apron to wipe his hands; he then said I had robbed him; I went with him to the watch-house, and he would not give charge of me.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Hotham .

281. THOMAS HALL was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Cobley , no person being therein, about the hour of one in the afternoon of the 9th of December , and stealing a wooden stool, value 10s. a walking-stick, value 2s. two swords, value 10s. a candlestick, value 9d. and four pounds weight of nails, value 1s. the property of the said John.

No evidence being offered on the part of the prosecution, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

282. THOMAS JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of January , a coat, value 8s. two pair of breeches, value 15s. two waistcoats, value 8s. a pair of cotton drawers, value 6d. a pair of stockings, value 2s. two pocket-handkerchiefs, value 6d. a pocket-book, value 5s. a silver pencil, value 1s. 6d. two half-guineas, and two seven-shilling-pieces, the property of James Bradburn , in the dwelling-house of James Marth .

JAMES BRADBURN sworn. - I am a gentleman's servant out of place , and lodged with the prisoner at the bar, at No. 7, Woodstock-street ; we had lodged there a fortnight, he lodged there before me: On Tuesday, the 20th of January, I had been out; I returned about ten o'clock in the evening, and found the door locked, and the prisoner gone; I got into the room by going through an adjoining room, and immediately missed the articles mentioned in the indictment, (repeating them); the prisoner had taken his own property with them; I had seen part of them on the Monday, and the rest on the Sunday; the tea-spoons I had used on the Tuesday morning; the trunk was locked, and the key of it in the tea-chest; the tea-chest was locked, and the key in my pocket; I found them both locked as I lest them; on the 22d I found a pair of stockings and a pair of drawers in the prisoner's bundle, among his own things, at the house of James Gregg , in Wigmore-street; the pocket-book was found in the prisoner's pocket when he was taken, on the 24th, I saw it at the watch-house, but the silver was taken off; I have found nothing else; I could not replace them under seven guineas.

JAMES GREGG sworn. - I keep the Rose public-house, in Wimpole-street: The prisoner came to my house on the 20th of January, and left a bundle, I cannot tell the day of the week, it was in the morning; I have known him by living in a gentleman's family; he left it with my wife, she is not here; he came again on the 21st, and asked me for the bundle he had left the day before, that was about eight o'clock in the morning; I gave him the bundle; he took away a coat and a pair of breeches, and left the rest; on the 22d Bates came with the prosecutor, and I shewed them the bundle that he had taken the things out of; I gave Bates the bundle; the prosecutor said, part of it was his; on the 24th the prisoner came in for a glass, and he was apprehended.( Henry Bates , and another constable, produced the property, which was deposed to by the prosecutor).

Prisoner's defence. I am innocent of the charge; I paid my lodging; it was dusk in the evening: I tied up a few articles in a handkerchief, I did not know that I tied up any thing belonging to him; the pocket-book I picked up two days before, under the drawers; the woman that we had the room of had a door out of her's into our's, and she had an opportunity to come in as often as she pleased, it was always open.

GUILTY, aged 28.

Of stealing goods, value 39s.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blane.

283. MARY PARTNER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of February , a silver watch, value 3l. a cotton handkerchief, value 6d. a snuff-box, value 2d. five shillings, and twenty-four halfpence, the property of Henry Thorpe , privily from his person .

HENRY THORPE sworn. - I am a gardener : On the 6th of February, I was going up Broad-street, St. Giles's, about two o'clock in the morning, with a friend; the prisoner stood at the corner of Dyot-street; I asked her where I could get something to drink, and stay till day-light; she took us to a public-house, and they would not let us in; she said she had a good fire at home, I was welcome to go there, and she would get something to drink; I did so, and sat down by the fire; she prevailed upon me to lie down upon the bed, which I did; then she laid down too; I missed my watch about six o'clock in the morning; I only pulled off my coat, and hung it on the back of a chair; she was there when I awoke; my friend and another woman were in the room; I detained the prisoner, and sent my friend for a watchman; the other woman went away; I never found any of my property; I had been drinking, but was sober enough to know what I was doing; I gave her a seven-shilling piece to fetch half a pint of gin with before I laid down, and I had my watch then, for I wound it up as I sat by the fire; she came back and gave me the change.( Robert Caldecott confirmed the evidence of the prosecutor).

The prisoner, in her defence, denied having any knowledge of the property. NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Hotham .

284. JOSEPH ROBINS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of February , twenty-four dressed sheep-skins, value 44s. the property of Thomas Law , in his dwelling-house .(The case was opened by Mr. Gurney.)

THOMAS LAW sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am a leather-seller , in Chiswell-street : On Saturday evening last I had some bundles of dressed sheepskins in my shop; I returned home about half past seven o'clock, and found the prisoner in custody of Evan Morgan , and a bundle lying upon some skins, with my private mark.

EVAN MORGAN sworn. - I am servant to Mr.Law: On Saturday, the 14th of February, about seven o'clock, I was going into the shop, and met the prisoner coming out with two dozen of tanned sheep skins; I never saw the prisoner before; says I, what you do with that leather; he made no answer, but dropped it, and ran a few yards; I pursued him, and brought him back, I never lost sight of him; my master's shopman picked up the bundle; I am sure he is the man that had the bundle.

Prisoner's defence. I was asking his shopmate what it was o'clock, and he was reaching over my shoulder to take the man who had the leather, but who ran away; says he to me, never mind, you will do as well.

Court. Q. Was there any body with him when you saw him coming out of the shop? - A. No, no farther than people passing; I am certain the prisoner is the man.

JAMES AYLETT sworn. - I was going past Mr. Law's shop, and saw the prisoner drop the skins, and run into the road; Morgan immediately pursued him; I saw him taken; I never lost sight of him.( John Ray , the officer, produced the skins, which were deposed to by the prosecutor.)

Mr. Law. The cost price is 2l. 6d.

GUILTY of stealing, value 39s. aged 40.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

285. ELIZABETH GARRETT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of November , three table-cloths, value 20s. and eighty-four damask napkins, value 4l. the property of Dowager Lady Jane Harewood .(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

JOHN BENNETT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am porter to Lady Harewood; the prisoner was employed as a chair-woman by my fellow-servant, Jane Lewis ; I have known her five or six years; the property was missed on the 29th of December, and I gave information, in consequence of which Mrs. Perkins came to town.

ELIZABETH PERKINS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am house-keeper to Lady Harewood: In consequence of information I came to London on the 14th of December by my Lady's order; on examining the drawers, I missed seven dozen of napkins, and three table-cloths; I have seen some of them since; they were left in the still room, in drawers locked.

CATHERINE WOLFE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am the wife of Moses Wolfe , and know the prisoner, the lives three or four doors from our house: On the 25th of November I bought of her ten napkins, one table-cloth, and two napkins she got from a pawnbroker's; I enquired of her how she came by them; she said, they came from old Lord Courtney's house, who had been dead some time; that she had them to fell for an old house-keeper, who was rather in distress, and who did not wish to shew herself out of the house with them; she asked me 4l.; I said it was too much, but if you will leave them till my husband comes, he shall look at them; he did so, and told me to give her 3l. which I did; I kept two napkins for my own use, which are in Court; the others my husband sold.(The two napkins were produced, and identified by Mrs. Perkins).

MOSES WOLFE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am the husband of the last witness; I sold Mr. Levy ten napkins and one table-cloth.

Mrs. Wolfe. I had no others but what I bought of the prisoner.

SIMON LEVY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I purchased some napkins and a tablecloth of Wolfe, which I delivered to Kennedy.

ISRAEL ISAACS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am a dealer in clothes, in Holywell-street; I bought a dozen napkins of the prisoner about ten weeks ago, and gave her 38s. for them; she said they belonged to a lady in distress; I delivered them to the police officer.(James Kennedy, the officer, produced the property, which was deposed to by Mrs. Perkins.)

The prisoner put in, by way of defence, a written petition, acknowledging her guilt, and throwing herself upon the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY , aged 29. - Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Hotham .

286. JOHN WHITEHEAD , and SARAH WHITEHEAD , otherwise GRIFFITHS , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of February , two pair of breeches, value 30s. the property of Judah Moses , privately in his shop .

MARY MOSES sworn. - My husband is a dealer in clothes, and keeps a shop in Russell-court : On the 4th of this month we lost two pair of small clothes, about two o'clock in the day, I had seen them about twelve o'clock on the counter; the two prisoners and another man came to buy a suit of clothes; I only was in the shop; they staid near two hours trying on small clothes; they did not try on either of the two pair that laid on the counter; they did not buy any thing; they bid me money which I would not take, and then all three went away together; I missed the things, and I called them back, and told them I would take their money; the two prisoners came back, the other ran away; I threw up the woman's cloak, and said, you have robbed me, and I there found a pair of small clothes hanging over her arm; I examined them, and found my husband's mark on them; it was one of the two pair that was on the counter; I then said, I supposed the man had robbed me,and I found another pair of small-cloaths behind his great-coat; I sent for a constable and gave them into custody.

Q. Did you charge them from any thing you had seen them do? - A. They would not come in without a great deal to do; I did not see them take them; I knew nothing of them before.( Thomas Mumford , the officer, produced the property, which was identified by Mrs. Moses.)

John Whitehead 's defence. I was never out of the shop; she told the Justice that she picked them up behind the counter; is it likely that I should come back if I had any such thing about me?

The prisoner Sarah Whitehead did not say any thing in her defence.

John Whitehead GUILTY, aged 34,

Sarah Whitehead GUILTY, aged 28,

Of stealing, but not privately . - Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

287. JOHN WHITEHEAD and SARAH WHITEHEAD , otherwise GRIFFITHS , were again indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th January , a pair of leather breeches, value 10s. the property of Rowland Allen , privately in his shop .

ROWLAND ALLEN sworn. - I keep a cloaths shop , No. 44, King-street, Seven Dials : On the 7th of January, about half past seven at night, the two prisoners came to my shop; the man went up stairs with me to look at some breeches; he said he wanted a strong pair for himself, and a pair of stouter for his brother; I shewed him several; there were a heap of breeches on each side of him as he sat on the bed's foot; while I was looking for some more he got up in a great hurry, and said, bring them two pair, they will do very well; he was to give me two pounds for them; he went down stairs, and I followed him as close as I could with a candle; he came down in the dark, and attempted to go out through a private door in the passage; I told him that was not the right way; he then went into the parlour; he asked me if I would take penny pieces; I said I had no objection; he asked me if I would lend him any thing to put them in; and he said I have not far to go, I will bring them in my hat; they both went out, and I never saw them after till they were taken up; when I went to put the breeches up I missed one pair, that was about an hour after they were gone; they have never been found; I did not see him take them.

The prisoner, in his defence, denied the charge.

John Whitehead GUILTY, aged 34,

Of stealing, but not privately . - Transported for seven years .

Sarah Whitehead NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Hotham .

288. THOMAS KING and SARAH GRADLEY were indicted, the first, for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Charles Thomas , about the hour of twelve, in the night of the 12th of November , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing a cotton counterpane, value 20s. a cotton frock, value 1s. another cotton frock, value 1s. a clout, value 4d. a muslin cap value 4d. six linen shirts, value 30s. three linen shirts, value 8s. two pair of drawers, value 1s. and four tablecloths, value 30s. the property of the said Charles, and the other for receiving a parcel of the same goods, knowing them to have been stolen .

The evidence not being sufficient to bring the charge borne to the prisoners they were

Both ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

289. ELIAS FLODION was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of February , three waistcoats, value 10s. 6d. two sock handkerchiefs, value 5s. one pocket handkerchief, value 6d. three pair of nankeen breeches, value 10s. and a shirt, value 2s. 6d. the property of John Marsh .(The prisoner being a foreigner, a Jury of half foreigners were impannelled.)

Wm. Thompson ,

John Fellows ,

John Heath ,

Samuel Smith ,

Samuel May ,

John Knight ,

George Dipple ,

John Hallence ,

Moses Hegonian ,

John Emmock ,

John Imhoff ,

Peter Poland .(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

JOHN MARSH sworn. - I am chief mate of the Betsey, East-Indiaman : The prisoner was employed for a day or two to assist in the navigation of the ship up to London ; on the Thursday morning was a week he was discharged from the service, I don't remember the day of the month; on the Saturday following I found that I had lost a quantity of wearing apparel; I had seen my property the night before, the Wednesday evening.

Q. In consequence of your missing the articles contained in the indictment, did you give information? - A. I had strong suspicion of this man, and was advised to proceed, and I went to the officer, Cohan, and gave him information; I did not know exactly where the prisoner lived, but upon enquiry I found where he lodged, and about half after two o'clock on the Sunday afternoon, to the best of my recollection, we went to the prisoner's lodgings, in Farmer-street, Shadwell; I went into the front room, where Mr. Sedarhoon, the proprietor of the house, was, and enquired for this man; he was in a back room, and he was called into. Mr. Sedarhoon's apartment and there I saw the prisoner; I found on him part of the property now produced; I found the shirt upon him, and two neck handkerchiefs, and a pocket handkerchief; I found theother articles in the apartment where he lodged; I have attested to all the property except two pair of stockings.

Q. Did the prisoner say any thing? - A. He made some defence, but I did not understand exactly what he said; I gave him in charge of the officer; and after the officer went up to the prisoner's apartments I was called up, and there I saw him in possession of two pair of nankeen breeches, which I recognized to be mine; he shewed me them in the presence of the landlord of the house; that is all I know about it.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q.What day was it you discovered the prisoner? - A. On last Sunday.

Q. Were you able to understand any thing that the prisoner said at all? - A.Very little.

Q. Did you not understand that the prisoner had been to church that day? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you not understand that he had those cloaths of a man of the name of Chader, that he might appear decent? - A. I did not understand it from him; the interpreter said something of the kind.

Q. I take it for granted there were other people that lodged in the house besides the prisoner at the bar? - A. That I know nothing of, I only saw one person at that time.

Q. My question to you is, do you not know there were other lodgers in the same room and same house? - A. I cannot pretend to say; I saw no more than the man who is now in Court and the prisoner at the bar.

Q. Was the door locked up stairs or not? - A. I cannot pretend to say.

Mr. Knapp. Q. You did not tell me where you kept your property, whether your box was broke open or not? - A. The lock of the box has been wrenched where I kept my cloaths; my box was kept on the half deck where I resided.

Mr. Alley. Q. That is a situation which is exposed to the sailors on board? - A. Yes.

GEORGE COHAN sworn. - I am one of the officers belonging to the Institution of the Thames Police: I was applied to by the prosecutor, John Marsh, to apprehend the prisoner at the bar; I apprehended him on the Sunday at Mr. Sedarhoon's, No. 47, Farmer-street, Shadwell; the prisoner had on his person three waistcoats, two neck handkerchiefs, a pair of breeches, and a shirt; all these things Mr. Marsh claimed as his own; they are all marked.

Q. In consequence of his claiming them, did you take them into your possession? - A. I kept them that night, and then I put them into the charge of my waterman, and he has had them ever since; I was then shewn up stairs into the prisoner's lodging-room; the prisoner was left in the charge of my waterman; I found two pair of nankeen breeches in a closet; Mr. Marsh was called up stairs, and he claimed them as his property; I put them into the same bundle; I took the prisoner into custody, and he was committed the next day.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q.When you went up stairs the prisoner was not there? - A. No.

Q. You say he had three waistcoats upon hiem? - A. Yes.

Q.This was last Sunday, it was a hard frost I believe? - A. It was cold weather.

ANDREW SEDARHOON sworn. - I live at No. 47, Farmer-street, Shadwell; I know the prisoner at the bar; he lodged with me on Sunday last; he occupied a one pair of stairs room.

Q. Did you shew the officer up stairs to his room on the day he came? - A. Yes, I did.

Q.Did you see any thing found in the room he occupied? - A.Only these two pair of nankeen breeches, and the prosecutor claimed them as his own.

Q. Did any body else lodge in that room? - A. Yes, there were three more; they were sailors: when the prisoner went out on the Friday night he had his own cloaths on.

Q. Did he return the same night? - A. Yes, he did.

Q. Did he return with the same cloaths on? - A. No; he had the prosecutor's cloaths on; I believe he returned about eight or nine o'clock at night.

Q. The Friday night was the first time you had seen the prosecutor's cloaths? - A. Yes, the first time I had seen the prisoner wear them.

Q. Was that the Friday before the Sunday that the officer came? - A. Yes.

Q. Had you any conversation with the prisoner about those cloaths? - A. Yes, I had.

Q. What passed between you and the prisoner? - A.When he came home I asked him where he got all those fine cloaths from; he told me that a shipmate had bought them at Portsmouth, and he had got them from that shipmate.

Court. Q. Did you understand that he had bought them of a shipmate? - A. No; I cannot tell whether he said, lent them or bought them; but after that he said a shipmate had lent them to him.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q.How many men lodged in your house? - A. Six at that time.

Q. Did you know a man of the name of Chader? - A. Yes; that was the same man that he said he had borrowed the cloaths of.

Q.Since this man has been taken into custody have you made any enquiry after Chader? - A. I have; but I have not been able to discover him.

Court. Q.When he said he got those cloaths of a shipmate at Portsmouth, did you understand him to mean Chader? - A. Yes, the same man.

NICHOLAS NORTH sworn. - I am a waterman attached to the Thames Police office; Mr. Cohangave the things into my custody; I have had them ever since. (The property produced.)

Mr. Marsh. These two neck handkerchiefs are mine, my initials are on them; the pocket handkerchief is mine, my initials are on that; the waistcoats are mine; the nankeen breeches are all three pair mine.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q.The marks have not been taken off? - A. No.

Q.These are linen waistcoats? - A.They are.

Q. It is not an extraordinary thing to see a man wear two or three waistcoats in cold weather? - A. No.

Mr. Knapp. One of them is a flannel waistcoat.

Prisoner's defence. Simon Chader told me if I would come home with him he would lend me the cloaths, and that he and I should be dressed gentlemen like.

EMANUEL AMMEREIN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Of what country are you? - A. I am a Swede, and the prisoner is a Swede.

Q. In what line of life are you? - A. I have been in the English service.

Q. Have you been acquainted with the prisoner at the bar? - A.Not before he came to London; I have only known him two or three days.

Q. Do you mean two or three days from the present time? - A.From the time he came up to London.

Q. Do you know a man of the name of Chader? - A. Yes.

Q.How long have you known Chader? - A. Only two or three days.

Q. Do you remember seeing the prisoner on the Friday before the Sunday that he was taken into custody? - A. Yes, I did.

Q. Did you see Chader on the Friday? - A. I cannot recollect that; he was there almost every day.

Q.Did you see them together any day either on the Friday or the Saturday before the prisoner was taken into custody? - A. I cannot tell whether it was Friday or Saturday; but I saw him on one of those days.

Q.Did you see Chader in company with the prisoner on the Friday or Saturday? - A. Yes; but I cannot say which.

Q.I ask you whether you saw any transaction take place between them? - A. No, I did not.

ELIZABETH FOWL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - A. I have known him since last Friday; I know Chader, he lodges in the same house where I live.

Q.Did you ever see the prisoner at Chader's lodgings? - A. Yes, on the Thursday evening, and I saw him on the Friday morning; he breakfast with us.

Q. Did you observe any transaction take place between them? - A. No, I did not; they went up stairs together.

Q.How was the prisoner at the bar dressed when he went up stairs? - A. In a blue jacket, blue trowsers, and a check shirt; when he came down stairs he had on white stockings, nankeen breeches, white waistcoat, white shirt, white neck handkerchief, a white pocket handkerchief with a red border, and a great-coat, the same as he has now got on.

Q.Did he stay any time in the room after he came down stairs? - A. Yes, more than half an hour; I tied his neck handkerchief on my self.

Q. Do you know what cloaths he had on when he went up stairs? - A. Yes; they are at my house now.

Q. Do you know what is become of Mr. Chader? - A.He left his lodgings on Sunday night, and I have not discovered any thing of him since that time.

Mr. Knapp. Q.Chader was a Swede was not he? - A. I believe he was, and so was the prisoner.

Q. You are sure he had a white waistcoat on? - A. Yes.

Q. And two pair of breeches on? - A. Yes.

Q. The pocket handkerchief had a red border? - A. Yes. NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

290. CATHERINE SHEHAN was indicted for the wilful murder of Elizabeth Griffiths .(The case was opened by Mr. Const.)

THOMAS GRIFFITHS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Const. I am a horse-keeper at the Angel Inn, Sr. Clement's; I lived there upon the 12th of October.

Q.Did you know the woman that is dead? - A. I did; we lived together four years.

Q.Where did she live? - A.At the house of the prisoner, in Eagle-court, White-hart-yard ; upon the 12th of October, after I left work, I went home, but the deceased was not in my room; I stopped a little while there, then I went down stairs to get a piece of cheese; when I returned, Mr. Shehan was in the court, and we came in together, and we heard a noise in Mr. Shehan's apartment; I went in, and there was Mrs. Shehan and my woman a quarrelling.

Court. Q.Where was the apartment? - A. On the lower floor; Mr. Shehan persuaded them to leave off, and he put a stick between them; they were quarrelling and pulling one another about, such as scratching one another, but not any blows; Mr. Shehan went off to his watch, it might be a little past ten, and he wished me good night, and I wished him the same; I thought my woman was gone up stairs before me, but when I got up to my room I found she was not there.

Q.Do you know where she was? - A. No; in a few minutes time she came in, with her face a little scratched about her nose; I said, you have got a scratched face by quarrelling with Mrs. Shehan; I said, you had better been in my room and you would not have got a scratched face; she made light of it, and went and wiped her face with a cloth; directly the prisonerrushed into the room and caught hold of her with her left hand by the side of the head, and made two blows at her with her right hand.

Q. Where were the blows given? - A.Under the jaw, on the left side.

Q. Did you see whether she had got any thing in her hand at the time? - A. I did not apprehend that she had any thing at that time.

Q. Did neither of them say any thing? - A.There was no words spoke berwixt them; on seeing her struck, I was sitting on the bed, I jumped off the bed to part them; I made three steps towards them, and I saw the blood run in such a violent stream I had not power to go any further; as soon as I recovered myself I called out for assistance from the persons down stairs, and Mrs. Landrecy came up immediately with a child in her arms and looked in, and she run back immediately; Mrs. Shehan held the deceased up with her left hand against the side of her cheek as long as she could, and then she fell, first falling against a small table, and then upon the floor; after which Mrs. Shehan slipped away down stairs.

Q.How soon afterwards did you see Mrs. Shehan? - A.Not till I saw her at Bow-street.

Q. What happened then? - A.People stocked in as fast as they could.

Q. Do you remember a knife being found there? - A. The patrol found a knife there, which he has in his keep; it is the knife which my woman used to have in her pocket for her own use; when I came into the room first the knife was lying upon the table open, with another case knife and fork; I did not see it used; it was found upon the floor; she searce lived a moment after she was down; she could not speak; she made a rattling in her throat and attempted to speak to me, but I could not understand her at all; I was then taken to the watch-house.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q.You were taken by the officer upon this charge? - A. Yes; by the patrol.

Q. The knife was the deceased's knife? - A. It was; I had seen it upon the table.

Q.You did not know, of your own knowledge, who took the knife off the table? - A. I do not.

Q.There had been words between the prisoner and the deceased below stairs, before, when you parted them? - A.There had.

Q. And when they came up stairs they had words? - A. No words till the prisoner came up.

Q. But who took the knife off the table you don't know? - A. I did not see it taken off by any body.

Q.When the blood spouted out, then it was that the prisoner was giving all the assistance to the deceased by holding her up as long as she could? -

Court. Q.Were these two women sober? - A. I really believe they were neither of them right sober.

Q.Were you quite sober yourself? - A. I had had some been, but not incapable of doing my business.

Mr. Knapp. Q.You were not quite sober yourself? - A. I had had a few pints of beer, but not quite seized over; I had not land above three pints of beer.

Court. Q. Can you all us, as nearly as you can recollect, what space of time might elapse from their being parted below and their coming up to the room where you were? - A. I don't think it was much less or over than a quarter of an hour.

Q. Do you recollect whether any thing passed between the two women by way of making it up below stairs? - A.Nothing was said in the least.

Q.You went out immediately? - A. Yes.

CATHERINE LANDRECY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Const. I am the wife of Edward Landrecy ; he is a watchman in our parish; we live in Mrs. Shehan's house, the two pair of stairs, the room under the deceased's room; Mr. Shehan and the prisoner lived in the lower part.

Q. Do you know any thing of the first part of the quarrel between the two women? - A.They had words below stairs.

Q. Did you hear the quarrel at night in Shehan, the prisoner's room? - A. Yes; it was between ten and eleven o'clock; I went up to my supper, and then Mrs. Griffith's came into our room and had a drop of beer out of our pot; she stopped some time with me, and then went up to her own room.

Court. Q.Did she go up immediately? - A. Yes.

Mr. Const. Q. Did you hear Griffiths go up first? - A. He was up in the room first.

Q.Was it whilst she was with you? - A. I cannot say that; she was no sooner in the room than Griffiths and his wife went to quarrelling; they had very high words together; I could not hear what it was about; then Mrs. Shehan came into our room, as I suppose to see whether the noise was there; then she went up stairs to give them warning, as she said she would not have her lodgers disturbed; she was not above four or five minutes up stairs before we heard the alarm of murder cried out.

Q. Do you know who cried murder? - A. I think it was Mr. Griffiths; I went up stairs, and I saw Mr. Griffiths standing in the room with a bundle; he was standing as if he was coming out of the room; I saw Mrs. Shehan laying hold of the woman in this way,(putting her hand up to her neck), and trying to stop the blood; I tumbled down stairs; I was incapable of giving any assistance; the two women were quite drunk; they were at it all the day.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. I believe you said the two women were quite drunk? - A. Yes.

Q. Mr. Griffiths was not quite sober? - A. I don't think he was; they used to have such a row generally when they were drunk, which happened very often.

Q. The noise which induced Mrs. Shehan to go up was pretty considerable? - A. Yes.

Q. What time of the night was it that Mrs. Shehan came into your room, and afterwards went up stairs? - A.She did not stay long in our room; it was between ten and eleven o'clock at night; Mrs. Shehan was nearly stripped and going to bed when she heard the noise; she had only her stockings and her flannel petticoat on.

Q.Did it appear to you that Mrs. Shehan went up to quell the noise and to prevent the lodgers being any further disturbed? - A. I think it was; I cannot tell.

Q.When you went up into the room the situation of the parties were in this way, Mr. Griffiths as if going out with a bundle at the time the prisoner was holding up the other woman and giving her assistance? - A. Yes.

Q. He was in the act of going out with a bundle at the time the wife was supported by the prisoner at the bar? - A. Yes.

Q.Then it was Griffiths that was attempting to go, but not the prisoner, who was giving all the assistance to the poor unfortunate woman that she could? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. Did you hear Mrs. Griffiths go up stairs into her room? - A. Yes, I did; she was in my room before she went up.

Q. Can you recollect about how much time had elapsed between her going up stairs, and the prisoner's going up? - A. Not very long; I cannot exactly tell; about five or six minutes.

EDWARD LANDRECY sworn. - I am a watchman; I am the husband of the last witness; when I went up up stairs, Griffiths was coming out, he was just by the door.

Court. Q.Had he any thing with him? - A.Not that I took notice of; Griffiths was rather between me and the deceased; I took notice that Mrs. Shehan had hold of her, and trying to stop the blood; I took hold of a cloth, and tried to stop the blood myself, and the blood did stop then; the woman was down at the time; the prisoner, Shehan, and the other person, left the room, I was all alone; I then ran out to the surgeon's house.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q.Whether Mr. Griffiths, at the time you went up, was coming out of the room with a bundle in his hand, you don't know? - A. No: he might have one, but I did not see it.

Q. He was coming out of the room, and Mrs. Shehan was trying to stop the blood of the deceased? - A. Yes.

Q. And she never left the deceased, till you got a cloth to give your assistance? - A. No.

Q. And then she went? - A. Yes.

LUCY COTTON sworn. I live at No. 11, Swanyard, in the neighbourhood where the prisoner Shehan lived; I was standing talking to a person at the top of the court, and I heard somebody cry; I turned about, and I saw Mrs. Shehan, and stopped her; I asked her where she was going; she said, let me alone, the place is on fire.

Q.By the place, did you think the house? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you observe any thing particular about her? - A.Nothing particularly, it was dark.

Q. Did she touch you at all? - A. Yes, I stopped her, and the could not be off touching me; I remarked nothing more but that she was very tipsy, and so was Griffiths; I saw Griffiths going away, and he fell into the passage, and could not get up again, he was so drunk.

Court. Q. He was so drunk, he could not stand? - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. I think you said, the prisoner was also drunk? - A. Yes.

Q. And Griffiths was so drunk, he could not stand? - A. Yes.

Mr. YOUNG sworn. - I am a surgeon: I was called in to examine the body of this woman; I saw the wound.

Q.Are you able to say, that that was the cause of her death? - A. I think it was.

Court. Q.Where was the wound? - A. On the left side of the neck.

Q. Do you suppose it was from the loss of blood that she died? - A. Yes, I think it was from the loss of blood.

Q.Did you examine the wound? - A. I looked at it, but I did not examine what depth it was.

Q. Can you positively say that the death was occasioned by the blow? - A. Yes, I think it was.

Q. Did you see the two wounds in the throat? - A. I saw but one.

Q. Do you think that wound in her neck was the cause of her death? - A. I have no doubt about it.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. I understand you first of all to believe about it, and next, that you did not examine the wound, and last of all, that you have no doubt about it; - how long have you been a surgeon, young gentleman? - A. Not long.

JOHN MILLER sworn. - I am an officer; I made all search in my power after the prisoner.

Q. How long was it after the crime was committed, that you heard or traced any thing of her? - A. It was upon the 18th of December last, I found her at Bristol.

Q. By what means? - A. By a letter sent to her husband; I went to Bristol, and there I found her.

The prisoner left her defence to her Counsel.

Mr. Alley. I have a great number of witnesses to prove the same fact, as to the way in which those persons lived, and therefore I will not trouble the Court. GUILTY of Manslaughter .

Confined one year in Newgate , and fined 1s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Hotham .

291. ABRAHAM DAVIDSON and THOMAS FERGUSON were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of January , a coil of rope, value 39s. the property of James and Edward Ogle .

Second Count. Laying it to be the property of James Hibbert , George Hibbert , Edward Fuir , and John-Vincent Purrier .

Third Count. Laying it to be the property of persons unknown.(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

HENRY OGLE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am in the service of Messrs. Alderman Hibbert and Company; their firm is James Hibbert , George Hibbert , Edward Fuir , and John- Vincent Purrier ; I gave an order to Messrs. Davidson and Son for a quantity of rope; I issued the order, accompanied with the mark R. S. B. with a little wat top, and No. 10 underneath.

Q. Was this coil of rope afterwards to go by the gangsman to a particular West-Indian ship? - A. Yes; the ship was called the West Indian, commanded by Captain Hooke , lying in the River; I have examined the cargo-book of the said ship, and have discovered that that package is missing; that is all I know about it.

THOMAS FINALACION sworn. - I am a gansman, at Wiggins's-quay: On the 31st of December I received some rope on the account of Messrs. Hibbert and Co. marked R. S. B. with a w at top, and a figure No. 10 underneath.

Q. Did you put it on board the Commerce? - A. I had it in my possession from the 31st of December till the 9th of January, and then I shipped it on board the Commerce lighter; I have no doubt but it is the same rope; I saw it at the Police-office; it had the same mark at one time as the other, but the mark was rather defaced, No. 10 was rubbed.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q.How many coilsof rope did you receive on account of Messrs. Hibbert and Company? - A. I don't know.

Q.Was it ten, twenty, thirty, or forty? - A. I cannot tell; sometimes one hundred, and sometimes one hundred and twenty; I cannot tell within thirty or forty.

Q.This coil of rope being left in the rackle-house, did you put it into the Commerce alone? - A. No; with other coils of rope, upon the 19th of January.

Q. You say, one mark was rather defaced, the chalk mark? - A. Yes.

Q. Was not that likely to be defaced by moving the rope away? - A. Yes.

Q. Was the ink mark defaced? - A. Yes.

Q. In what manner? - A. By rolling about the tackle-house.

CHARLES COLE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am servant to Messrs. Ogle and Company.

Q. Did you see any rope put on board the Commerce lighter? - A. I did, but I do not recollect the mark; I was to take the Commerce down the River to the West Indian.

Q. Did Batt go with you? - A. Yes; we went down from Wiggin's-quay, to Deptford; after we had delivered some goods on board the Ann, we delivered the remainder on board the West Indian.

Q. Did you deliver all that was delivered to you, on board the West Indian? - A. Yes, every thing, to the best of my knowledge.

Q. What did you do with the Commerce afterwards? - A. I brought her up to the ship called the Portland, at Wapping, and made her fast to the Portland, and came a-shore about nine o'clock at night.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q.Where did the Portland lay at this time? - A. At Wapping.

Q. This was on the Saturday night? - A. Yes; I did not go on board the lighter for several days afterwards; the night was dark when I quitted her.

Q. You were examined at the Magistrate's? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you not say at the Magistrate's, you could not ascertain whether you delivered all the goods on board the West Indian? - A. No, I did not.

Mr. Knapp. Q.Were any small packages on board your vessel? - A. Yes; there were some under the locker, and I felt about that I might not leave any behind.

JOHN GOTTIN sworn. I am a surveyor to the Thames Police Institution: At one o'clock in the morning of the 19th of January, I went on board a lighter loaded with sugar, lying along-side the Enterprize West Indiaman, I don't know who the lighter belonged to, she was in the employ of Mr. Briant; on looking under the stern sheets, I observed a coil of cordage matted and packed; from that situation, I considered it as being illegally obtained; I put a man on board the Enterprize, to see who came and fetched this lighter away: in the morning, between eight and nine o'clock, the prisoner, Abraham Davidson , came on board the lighter to take her away; I stepped into the lighter, and requested he would let me look down the sore peak, which was locked; he said he could not, for he had not the keys; I asked him if he knew of any thing down aft; he said, yes, there was a coil of cordage, or some cordage; I asked him how he came by it; he told me he took it out of a lighter belonging to Mr. Ogle; I asked him how he came to do so, what reason he had for taking it out of Mr. Ogle's lighter; he said, because it was in his craft; I asked him if he had any directions with respect to that particular coil of cordage, or whether he had a general direction, if he should meet with such a coil of cordage in such a situation; he said he intended to take it to Mr. Ogle, but that he had no directions at all; this proving not satisfactory, I took him and the cordage to the Police-office.

Q. Did you see any thing of the other prisoner? - A. I did not; I looked at the mark, and I saw it marked R. S. B. with a w at top, and No. 10 at the bottom; I could not discover the mark at first, it being dark; it had been rolled in the dirt, and by some means had been defaced.

Q. Who has had the custody of the rope? - A. I have had it ever since, till this morning I delivered it to the officer of the Court.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. As soon as the prisoner, Davidson, came on board, you asked him what he had got aft? - A. Yes, and he told me.

Q. Did you not ask him who was with him? - A. He said, Ferguson was the person who was with him, and helped him to take the coil of rope out of the lighter.

JOHN BRIANT sworn. - Q. Were the two prisoners in your service upon the 13th of January? - A. Yes, they were.

Q. In what lighter? - A. I do not pretend to do any business at the water-side; my watermen do all the business.

JOHN GILMAN sworn. - I am an officer belonging to the Thames Police-office; I apprehended Ferguson in consequence of a warrant from the office: nothing particularly passed.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. It was upon the information that was given by the other man, that the warrant was granted? - A. Yes.

Q.Where did you find him? - A. On board the Enterprize.

- BROKER sworn. - I am foreman to Messrs. Ogle; I delivered the goods on board the Ann, but afterwards she went to deliver her goods on board the West Indian, and then I left Cole unloading her.

Q. Do you know at the time you left her, whether the coil of rope was or was not in the lighter? - A. I cannot answer that; there was one in her; whether there were any more, I cannot say.

EDWARD OGLE sworn. - My partner's name is James Ogle ; I am a wharfinger; I was employed by the Messrs. Hibbert's house, respecting this coil of rope, the value is about 39s. I am answerable for the care of it.

(Mr. Gurney submitted to the court, that there was no evidence to affect Ferguson, in consequence of which he was immediately acquitted, and sworn as a witness.)

THOMAS FERGUSON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. In whose employ were you in the month of January? - A. In the employ of Mr. Briant.

Q. Was Davidson in his service likewise? - A. Yes; on the 13th I was at work in the lug-boat: on Sunday, the 11th, I went down about half past eleven o'clock on board the Friendship lighter.

Q.Did you, on that day, see any lighter belonging to Mr. Ogle? - A. Yes, the Commerce; she was layinga-stern of the ship called the Portland; we went on board that lighter, as we had occasion to hand the hurdles over that lighter to put them in our own, and there we found a coil of rope.

Q. Did you or Davidson do any thing with that rope? - A. Yes, we took it out of the lighter for safety.

Q.Where did you put it? - A. We put it down out stern sheets.

Q. Did you attempt to alter the mark that was upon that rope in any one respect? - A.Not at all; as we took it we left it.

Q. Was there any difficulty in pulling off the mark? - A.We could have pulled it off with our hands.

Q. What was the mark upon? - A. Upon a mat; we took it only with a view of bringing it to Mr. Ogle, when the lighter came up; Davidson told me that he should bring the lighter up on the Thursday morning, and then he would take it himself.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You and Davidson were employed by Mr. Ogle? - A. Yes.

Q. You received no direction from Messrs. Ogle to take care of their property? - A. No.

Q.What day of the month was this? - A. It was upon the 11th.

Q. You had the rope in your possession all Sunday, Monday night, and Tuesday morning? - A. Yes.

Q. You knew where Messrs. Ogle lived? - A. No, I did not.

Q.Did you take the pains to find out Messrs. Ogle? - A. No, I had other business to do; it was done with no other intent but honesty.

Q. What time of night were you taken up? - A.Between five and six o'clock.

Q. Then you had all day on Monday and Tuesday, and yet you told niether Messrs. Ogle, or made any enquiry about them - Upon your oath, did you mention it either to Mr. Ogle or his servants, or any one member living, besides the prisoner at the bar, that you had found it? - A. No, I did not.

Mr. Gurney. Q. Upon your oath, the reason why you did not take any means to tell Mr. Ogle, was, because Davidson said he would go himself and give it Mr. Ogle? - A. He said, I know Mr. Ogle, I know him to be an honest man, I will give it to Mr. Ogle.

Court. Q. Do you know where Mr. Ogle lives? - A. I do not, more than a child unborn.

JOSEPH TUNK sworn. - I am a lighterman and waterman; the prisoners were taken into custody on the 13th of January, on a Tuesday; on the Sunday morning I saw this coil of rope in a lighter called the Commerce; it laid in the middle of the lighter for every body to see; I saw it was a light rope.

Mr. Knapp. Q.Did you take particular notice of this coil of rope? - A. Yes, I did.

Q.Have you seen it now? - A. I saw it rolled into Court; there is the mark I made with my knife at the time, to see whether it was a coil of rope; the man that was along with me thought it was a mat of brimstone.

Q. You have never discovered any other mark, except that you put upon it yourself? - A.None at all.

Q.How long have you known Davidson? - A. I have known him since I was first apprentice.

Court. Q.When did you first hear that either of those prisoners were taken up? - A. Not till a fortnight after.

Q. Did you hear what they were taken up for? - A. I heard that they were taken up for a coil of rope, it was at a public-house; it was mentioned to one Walker; I told Walker that I had been such a coil of rope, and Walker said, I will give your name, and Robert Barrowby's name; I had seen Walker every day for a fortnight before.

Q. Upon what account was it that you mentioned to Walker that you had seen such a coil of rope? - A. I told him the night before he gave me the subpoena; I did not know the men were taken to the Compter, nor nothing else.

ROBERT BARROWBY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am a waterman, I know Tunk; I knew Davidson before he was taken up, which was upon Tuesday, January 13.

Q. Had you been on the River the Sunday before that? - A. Yes, I was on board a sloop called the Jacob, which was bound for Dieppe, in France; we had occasion to go on board a lighter to make a rope fast, it was the Commerce, Tunk was with me; I saw something laying at the bottom; he stepped down into the lighter, and saw it was a coil of rope, (the coil of rope produced); it is as near like that I saw in the lighter as any one I can see; I did not take notice of any mark.

Mr. Knapp. Q.This coil of rope, when you saw it, was lying in the bottom of the Commerce? - A. Yes; I knew who the coil of rope belonged to, though Mr. Ogle's name was not upon it.

Q. What do you mean by saying it was Mr. Ogle's? - A. Mr. Ogle's name was upon the craft, and I supposed the coil of rope belonged to Mr. Ogle; I could not tell whom it belonged to.

Q. I suppose you took pains to enquire? - A.Not in the least, I heard no more about it.

The prisoner called six witnesses, who gave him a very good character. NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

292. STEPHEN CATON was indicted for uttering, on the 23d of January , a counterfeit shilling, to one Richard Roberts , knowing the same to be counterfeit; and also for uttering, on the 26th of January , another counterfeit shilling to the said Richard, knowing it to be counterfeit .(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

RICHARD ROBERTS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I keep the Crown , in the Paul's-alley, St. Paul's Church-yard : On Wednesday, the 23d of January, within about a quarter of nine in the morning, the prisoner came to my house, and asked for a pint of purl, which I made; he then gave me a shilling, which I observed was a bad one; I put it in a glass that stood by itself upon a ledge in the window, and gave him change; I immediately went to see for an officer, but when I came back he was gone. On the Monday morning following he came to my house again; I had given directions for Newman and Kinchin, two officers, to be in the house every morning till he came again; the prisoner then offered me another bad shilling, and I gave them charge of him; he threw something in the fire; I first took out a seven-shilling piece with the fire tongs, and then three shillings and a six-pence; I gave them to Newman; they appeared to me to be bad ones; I also gave him the shilling which I had put into the glass wrapped up in a piece of paper.

Prisoner. Q. Have you not received a guinea from my wife, and was I not to spend three guineas more in your house? - A. There came some people to my house and left a guinea, and they agreed, if I would make it up, to spend three guineas more; they have been tempting me with money all this week.

Court. Q. You have taken one guinea then? - A. Yes, it was left at my house, and I forgot it, or else I meant to have brought it with me into Court.

Q.When you took this guinea did you tell them you would make it up? - A. I never told them whether I would or not.

Q.However, you took the guinea? - A. Yes.( Robert Newman and John Kinchin , the constables, produced the money which was all proved by Mr. William Parker to be counterfeit, except the sixpence, which appeared to be a good one.)

Prisoner's defence. I have nothing to say; I thought the matters were made up.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character. GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

293. WILLIAM THOMPSON was indicted for that he, on the 17th of December , about the hour of three in the night, the dwelling-house of John Metcalf did break, with intent the goods therein being to steal, take, and carry away .

JOHN METCALF sworn. - I am a jeweller and toyman , No. 54, Holborn-hill : On the 18th of December, in the morning, I went to take down my shutters, and found in one of them a number of holes cut, there were nine holes large enough to put my finger through; and there was another hole made about eight inches below them; I had put up the shutters myself the night before, about nine o'clock; the shutters were fined with tin, and the glass was broke inside, and some sawdust upon the goods in the window.

WILLIAM PINDER sworn. - I am an inspector of the watch: On the 18th of December I recieved information, in consequence of which I went, and saw two men across the way at Mr. Metcalf's, and another about one hundred yards distance from them; that was about twenty minutes after three in the morning; there was a lamp over Mr. Metcalf's door; by means of which I saw them boring the shutters, but seeing a person come up they went away, and as soon as that person had passed they went to the shutters again; I went further up near Hatton-garden, and stood within a door-way, where we were concealed; then another person coming along they crossed over to the Hatton-garden side, and as soon as that person had passed they crossed again; then the watchman and I went and concealed ourselves between the coaches on the coach stand; the watchman who was on that beat then came crying half past three o'clock; upon that they crossed again, and, as soon as he was gone, they went to Mr. Metcalf's shutters again; I saw them boring some considerable time; I waited till I heard the glass break, and upon that we rushed upon them; I took hold of one of them, and then the prisoner ran up Holborn-hill, and the watchman after him; he then ran back again towards me full speed, and the watchman after him; I said, don't approach nearer or I must run you through; I had a cutlass in my hand; I was then thrown upon my back by the man that I had hold of, and he got away; the prisoner was pursued by the watchman till the constable took him; I did not lose sight of him more than a minute, and that was while I was down; I am certain he was one of the men; he had on a brown coat and boots.( James Neagle , the watchman, confirmed the evidence of Pinder, and deposed, that he never lost sight of him till he was taken.)( William Harwood and JOhn Howarth produced a bag and a chissel which were found near the spot.)

Prisoner's defence. I had been out late spending the evening, and as I was going down Holborn-hill I heard the cry of stop thief; I ran with the rest, and was stopped and taken to the watch-house.

GUILTY .

Confined six months in Newgate .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

MR. BARON HOTHAM delivered the Opinions of the Judges in the Cases of James Deakin and William Smith , and James Mackintosh .

DEAKIN and SMITH's CASE.

Mr. Baron Hotham. James Deakin and William Smith, you were indicted in April sessions of stealing some silver spoons and other property laid in the second count of the indictment, to the property of Thomas Dancer Markham . The goods were proved to have been sent by the Boston coach to Spalding, and stolen at Ponder's-end out the boot. The first and third counts of the indictment were abandoned; but the Jury found you guilty on the second. A doubt arose whether the goods, which were laid to be the property of Thomas Dancer Markham , who was not the owner of the goods, but the driver of the coach, were properly said. The Judges directed this point to be argued before them. Mr. Knapp was assigned as your Connsel, and he argued the question for you with great ability; nothing that could be urged in your favour was wanting. All the Judges have deliberated, and a very great majority are of opinion, that the property was well laid to be in the driver. The only doubt that arose was, on a ground of distinction between a person having the possession and having only the bare charge of them; but, on consideration, this is materially distinguishable from that class of cases, because here the coachman must be legally considered as not only having the charge, but the possesion also. It is very true, that, not being master of a coach, but coachman, he must be considered as having the charge of goods only, and not the possesion, which would remain in the master, and as against all the rest of the world be must be considered as having such a special property in him as will support the court charging them as his goods; he has the possession and controul over them, they are entrusted to his disposition during the journey, and it would be extremely inconvenient if it was not so; there would be endless mistakes and difficulties in hunting after all the proprietors of a flage coach; so that though a coaching on a indictment against him upon the prosecution of the matter, would be taken to have the charge of the goods in question, against any body else, he would be held to have the possession of them. They are of opinion, therefore, there is no doubt on the second count as to the conviction, and of course, that you are properly convicted.

MACKINTOSH's CASE

Mr. Baron Hotham . James Mackintosh , you were indicted at the Old Bailey be September last for forging, and also for uttering knowing it to be forged, a certain order for payment of money, in the words and figures following, that is to say: Sir, Petersfield, 6th August, 1799.

Please to pay to Mr. Hugh Young, or order, all my proportion of prize-money due to me for my services on board his Majesty's ship Leander, for which this shall be your authority. Witness my hand,

JOHN JOHNSON, his X mark.

This is addressed to Alexander Davidson , Esq. No. 21, Milkbank-street, Westminster, London.

Signed before us, Walter Noble , minister; John Williams, Francis Gibbons , churchwardens.

With intention to defraud John Johnson .

There are two Counts, stating it to be an order for payment of money, and two others, stating it to be a bill of exchange, uttered with intent to defraud Alexander Davidson , Esq. The evidence of your having actually forged, as well as having uttered it, knowing it to be forged, and having recieved the money, 14l. 12s. 6d. under the said order, was most clearly and satisfactorily proved, the Jury found you guilty, and sentence was passed on you; but it was suggested by the Counsel, that this was not an order for the payment of money on a bill of exchange within the statue of the 7th Geo. II . and it was also objected, that this instrument did not come within the meaning of the 32d Geo. III . which exacts, "That no letter of attorney, or order, made or executed by any petty officer, seaman, non commissioned officer of marines, or marine, who shall have been discharged from the service of his Majesty, his heirs, and successors, and who shall be at or within the distance of seven miles from any of the ports where seamens's wages are paid for such service, at the time of making such letter of attorney, shall be good and valid, and sufficient for receiving the whole or any part of the wages, prize-money, or other allowances of money, due, or to grow due to such petty officer, seaman, non-commistioned officer of marines, or marine, for such service, unless such letter of attorney, or such order shall be signed before, and witnessed by a clerk of the traesurer of the Navy at such port, or by the inspector of seamen's wills and powers of attorney, any thing the aforesaid act to the contrary the notwithstanding"

In order to give due consideration these objections, seven of the twelve Judges have met and berated upon them, and I am now authorised to declare it as their opinion, on the first point, that the order stated in the indictment proved at the trial, was, in law, in language of the indicment an order to obtain money, and as such, a forgery might be commited onit. With regard to the second point, whether on the second count in the indictment the facts proved, amount in law to the crime of forgery, they are equally of opinion that they do. It is unnecessary for me to say, that the order itself purports to be made by John Johnson , of Petersfield, which is beyond the distance of seven miles, and within which distance, unless such order is signed before and attested by the proper persons mentioned in the act, it is not good, valid, and sufficient; this attestation the legislature thought necessary for the security of those who are entrusted with the payment of money, and who cannot be expected to know the fact themselves, but who must rely on the sidelity of the attestation, and upon its being fairly obtained; this order purports to have been made by the party claiming the money at Petersfield, which is beyond the distance within which the attestation is required, when in truth and fact it was not at Petersfield, but was an untrue representation, and the money was obtained under such false suggestion, it appearing on the face of the evidence to be false. The Judges are therefore clearly of opinion, that this is such a false making of an order for payment of money as amounts to the crime of forgery; and the Jury having been satisfied with the facts proved in support of such indictment, the unanimous opinion of the Judges is, that no objection arises to the indictment on either of the grounds stated, and that your conviction is therefore good in point of form.