Old Bailey Proceedings Online (www.oldbaileyonline.org, version 6.0, 22 December 2014), October 1800 (18001029).

Old Bailey Proceedings, 29th October 1800.

736. JOHN ANTIENT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of July , two ducks; value 4s. the property of William Want .

(The case was opened by Mr. Vaillant.) BENJAMIN WHITE sworn. - On Sunday, the 13th of July, I was in a field in the parish of Hackney , where I had been making a stack the week before; I got over the hurdles, and saw a piece of hay, pulled off the stack, upon the ground, and under it were three ducks; I took one of them, and carried it to Mr.Griffiths, the constable; they were all three warm, and the blood in them; Griffiths desired me and Bradford to watch them, which we did; I was in one field, and Bradford in another; I saw the prisoner go up to the stack with a basket; he passed by the ducks, and took up some sticks in his hand, which, I supposed, were to make skewers to fasten up the basket; he then turned himself round, as if to see is there was any body looking, and then he kicked off the hay, slooped down and picked up the ducks, and put them in the basket; then Bradford came up to him, and stopped him, and Mrs. Want claimed the ducks.

BENJAMIN BRADFORD sworn. - I was with White; I watched in a hedge near the stack; I saw the prisoner come into the field; he walked very near the stack; he picked up a little bundle of sticks, looked round about him, and then went up to the stack, stooped down, picked up the ducks, and then came back over the hurdles; I went towards him, and said, holt partner, how are you; he then said, he would be d-d if he had not found three ducks; I told him he must go with me to Mr. Griffiths, and we took him to Mr.Griffiths; Mrs. Want saw them in my hand, and said they were her's.

Q. (To White). Was the duck that you took away carried back again? - A. Yes.

ANN WANT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Vaillant. I saw three ducks in the possession of Bradford; I knew two of them to be mine; they were marked in the right foot; I knew them by that mark; I can swear positively to them.

Prisoner's defence. I found them by the hay stack.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

737. WILLIAM STOREY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of August , five sheets, value 2s. 6d. the property of James Colverley .

ELIZABETH COLVERLEY sworn. - I am the wife of the prosecutor: I lost the sheets from the bottom of a house that was repairing; I had given them to a white-washer to hang round the room, to save the paper while he was whiting the ceiling; the moment that I missed them, I saw the prisoner running down the street with them; I went after him, and stopped him myself; I asked him how he came by those sheets; he did not make any particular answer, but turned back, and went home with me; I told him if he would tell me who he was, I would not do any thing to him, but he would not tell me his name, on account of his family.

GEORGE LONGDEN sworn. - I was sent for to take the prisoner into custody, (produces the sheets): I received them in the room where the prisoner was; they have been in my possession ever since.

Q.(To Mrs. Colverley). Can you swear to those sheets? - A. I think I can; they are marked J E C.

Q. Have you any doubt? - A. None.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. These sheets were of very little value? - A. Very little; hardly any thing at all.

Q. This person you have discovered to have respectable connections? - A. Yes.

Q. The prisoner was intoxicated; was he not? - A. Yes.

Prisoner's defence. I was very much intoxicated at the time.

GUILTY . (Aged 42.)

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction , fined 1s. and discharged.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr.Justice HEATH.

(The trial of the above prisoner had been put off from the former Sessions, in consequence of an affidavit made by him of the absence of a material witness of the name of Joseph Raynes , without whose testimony he could not safely proceed to trial; and no such witness, having been produced, the court assured him that his punishment would be aggravated, on account of the perjury he had committed).

738. JAMES THWAITES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of September , a gelding, value 20s. the property of Richard Burgess .(The case was opened by Mr. Vailiant).

WILLIAM BARROW sworn. - Examined by Mr. Vaillant. I am a horse slaughterman in Tothillnelds, Westminster: About a fortnight before the prisoner was apprehended, he brought a horse tothe yard; he said he brought it from one Mr. Bowman, at Kensington Gravel-pits, and he was to have it killed, and take back the ear, to shew the owner that the horse was dead; I told him the horse should not be killed, nor should he have it, till I sent one of my men to Kensington Gravel pits, to enquire for such a person; I observed the Hackney Marsh mark upon it-H M O. Hackney Marsh open; the prisoner said, he would call again at twelve o'clock the same day, but he never came till the Friday week following; I had kept the horse, and advertised him; he wanted the money for the horse, and said, he thought the horse would have been dead; I told him the horse was not dead, for I had advertised him; I told him I should send for a constable, and he ran away directly; I pursued him with my man, and took him; I sent for a constable, for he knocked me about, and played the deuce with me; I took the horse till I got within about three miles of Mr. Burgess's, and then I turned him loose, and he went home to Mr. Burgess's, and I followed him. Court. Q. Cannot you fix the day at all? - A. I think it was on a Thursday, but I cannot be positive; the prisoner was committed on the 26th of September. Mr. Vaillant. Q. How long was it before the day that he returned, that he had the possession of the horse? - A. About ten days.

RICHARD BURGESS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Vaillant. I live at Newington, in the parish of Hackney. Q. Can you tell the day of the month when you lost the horse? - A. It was on a Wednesday evening that I saw him, and on the Thursday morning I missed him; it was either the 15th or 16th of September, the last day of Edmonton-statue; about ten days after that, my horse came home of himself, and Mr. Barrow and his servant followed the horse; it was the same horse that I had missed; it was an old horse, twenty-two years old; I used him to draw my cart about with bread; I had had him four years; he had the mark of Hackneymarsh upon him.

Prisoner's defence. I bought the horse of Mr. Bowman, and paid for him; he told me he lived at Acton, and if I had any doubt of it, he would wait for me at the watering-house at Acton; there was a man saw me buy him upon the road.

Court. (To Barrow.) Q. Did he tell you he brought the horse from Mr. Bowman, or had bought it of him? - A. He said, he had brought it from Mr. Bowman, and he was to take the ear back.

GUILTY Death . (Aged 45.)

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron THOMPSON .

739. JAMES ENNIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22nd of September , a mahogany plank, containing, in length, fourteen feet, value 41. the property of John Hale and Thomas Hale .

Second Count. Stating it to be two pieces of mahogany, containing fourteen feet in length.(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp).

THOMAS HALE sworn. - I am a carpenter , in partnership with my father, John Hale , in Bush-lane; we have a yard at Saltpetre-bank; the prisoner was a sawyer employed by us: In consequence of information, on the 23d of September, I went to Mr. Newman's, and found a piece of mahogany; I took half of it to the yard at Saltpetre-bank, and found it tally exactly; it had been sawed from the other; we did not see the prisoner afterwards till he was taken on the Wednesday following.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Saturday, I see was the 20th? - A. Yes.

Q. And on the 23d, Tuesday, you saw the prisoner again? - A. Yes.

Q. It is no uncommon thing for men to make holiday on Monday? - A. No.

Q. Myers was in your service also? - A. Yes.

Q. Do not you know that the prisoner at the bar worked under the direction of Myers? - A. No.

Q. Do not you know that the accounts made out, were in Myers? name? - A. I believe they were.

JOHN NEWMAN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a cabinet-maker in Catherine-street: On Monday, the 22d of September, in the afternoon, the prisoner and another man came to me, and asked me if I would purchase a plank of mahogany; I asked him the size of it; he said it was seven feet long, two and a half thick, and sixteen or eighteen inches broad; I said, if you will bring it, and I approve of it, I will give you a fair price; they then went away, and returned in about half an hour; I went out, and when I returned, I found the prisoner and the other man in the shop, and two pieces of mahogany standing there; why, says I, you have got two, instead of one; I observed that they had been cut asunder.

Q. Does that make it better or worse? - A. Worse, threepence or a groat a foot; I asked them what they cut it asunder for, and they both said, for the ease of carriage; I said it was very extraordinary they should lessen the value of it so; they said, every person had a right to do as they liked with their own; I asked them how they came by it; they said, they bought it in the log; I then asked them where they worked, and for their address, and Ennis told me where he lived; I told him I would make enquiry, and if I found all things right, I would give them a fair price; they went away, and I sent my foreman to enquire;they came again, and I told them if they would bring me a bill of parcels, I would be satisfied; but, till then, I should hold it, and I stopped it; they went away; I did not see either of them again, till the prisoner was apprehended; the next morning, in consequence of information, I sent for Mr. Hale, and young Mr. Hale and the foreman came and saw the mahogany; the prisoner was taken up on Wednesday, and then produced the receipt.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. The prisoner gave you his correct address? - A. Yes.

Q. Myers did not give you his correct address? - A. I do not know.

Q. Do you not know that the answers to every question you put were given by Myers? - A. No; the prisoner was the principal spokesman, because he knew me.

JONATHAN LEGGETT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am foreman to Messrs. Hale, (the property produced); I believe them to be Mr. Hale's property; they tallied with what I found in the yard; there is a knot in one that tallies; we have one here. Mr. Hale. There is, in the inside, a knot, which exactly tallies, and some accidental zig-zag marks done by the adze in the country, and they all match; I have no doubt of its being our property.

JOSEPH HAYNES sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am an officer belonging to Shadwell-office: I apprehended the prisoner on Wednesday, the 23d, in a court near Saltpetre-bank, at his lodgings; I found a piece of hard wood, and a piece of plank end of fire wood; it was very heavy,(produces a recipt); he said he had purchased it of a man of the name of -

Q. That is the man who has absconded? - A. Yes.

Q. What is the date of that receipt? - A. The 5th of March,(reads)."Received of James Ennis the sum of four pounds two shillings and sixpence, for fifty five feet of mahogany plank. Received the contents. 4l. 2s. 6d. R.B. MYERS."

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel.

GUILTY . Confined twelve months in the House of Correction , fined 1s. and discharged.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr.Justice HEATH.

740. ANN BLAKE , MARGARET, the wife of JAMES BERRY , and ELIZABETH BERRY , were indicted, for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of October , in the dwelling-house of the said James Berry , five half joes, value 8l. a Bank-note, value 10l. and another Bank-note, value 5l. the property of William Michael .

WILLIAM MICHAEL sworn. - I am an invalided seaman from Yarmouth Hospital : On Thursday the 9th of this month, I was at the Black-dog, in Drury-lane; I came to London on the 7th at night: I fell in with the prisoner, Blake, I had a fellow lodger of mine with me; I left the public-house with her, before it was dark, and went to her lodgings, No. 22, in Mr. Berry's house; I gave her half-a-guinea to go out and get something to drink, and then I gave her half-a-guinea to sleep with her; I cannot rightly say whether she went to bed with me or not; I was very much in liquor; I awoke somewhere about the dead of the night, and found nobody in bed with me, and I began to think about my property; I found my jacket under the bed, upon the floor.

Q. You cannot say where you put it when you went to bed? - A. No; I missed my pocket-book out of my jacket.

Q. When can you speak to having had it before that? - A. I am sure I had it at six o'clock at the Black-dog; I lost a twenty pound, and a five pound note, and six half joes; in about half an hour after I awoke, the prisoner, Blake, came to bed to me; I mentioned nothing to her about it till day-light; when it was day-light, I got up and began to put my cloths on, she was in bed at that time; I asked her to get up, which she did immediately; I then asked her if she had seen any thing of my pocket-book; she said, she had not, but told me, that I put my cloths under the bed, when I went to bed; I happened to cast my eye under the bed, and saw the pocket-book lying open, about three feet from where the cloaths lay; I took the book up, and I looked into it, I missed a twenty pound and a five pound note; there were three five pound notes, and a one half joe left; I did not say any thing at that time, I was rather ashamed of myself; then we both went out, and had some purl and gin; I then went in search of my fellow-lodger; I found him in bed with another girl, I told him to get up, and we went home to our lodgings.

Q. You had not then mentioned any thing to her about it? - A. I had told her I missed my money, but did not say how much, and when she saw that half joe, she said, lord, here is your money, you cannot have lost any; after we had been in our lodging sometime, I got some intelligence from Maria Hill, and I saw five half joes found, that were hid in the garden of Berry's house; Treadway was with me, and Mumford, and about five o'clock we took Margaret Berry , and Elizabeth Berry upon suspicion; the half joes were covered over with mould, in an earthen pot.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Is it not usual with you to put your jacket under your head for protection, when you have property in it, and sleepin a strange place? - A. Yes, if I had been in my proper senses.

Q. Have you always given the same account? - A. Yes.

Q.You lost a twenty pound and a five pound note? - A. Yes.

Q. You have charged a ten pound note in the indictment, how is that? - A. I cannot say.

Q. There were three five pound notes and a one left? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. You saw nothing of either of the Berrys while you were in the house? - A. Not that I can remember.

WILLIAM DRAPER sworn. - I am a soldier belonging to the first regiment of foot-guards; I was at the Wheat-sheaf, in Drury-lane, on Friday evening, the prisoners were all three there; I did not know them before Mumsord came in and took Ann Blake , and searched her; I saw Margaret Berry , apparently to me, give Elizabeth Berry a note, it was paper, and apparently Bank-paper; I was very near to her, I took hold of Elizabeth Berry 's hand, and said, here is one of the sailor's notes; she upt with her hand and struck me, called me a thief, and said, was I going to take her mother's property from her; I let go her hand, and she returned the same paper back to Margaret Berry, and Margaret Berry put it into her bosom, I do not know what became of it afterwards; Mumford was then by himself, and he had got Ann Blake in custody; he took Blake away, and then Berry went away directly.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You mean honestly to say, that you do not know what that paper was? - A. I cannot say, but it appeared to me to be Bank-paper.

Q. Were you there when Blake was searched? - A. Yes, and nothing found upon her.

MARIA HILL sworn. - I live in Bird-in-hand-court, Long-acre, I know all the prisoners by sight; on the Friday morning I breakfasted with Ann Blake and the sailor, at No. 1, Stuart's-rents, she and the sailor both went out together; there was nothing said about what was lost: about eleven o'clock the same day, I met her in Stuart's-rents, she was very much in liquor, and said, she had given her landlady a twenty pound Bank-note, and a five pound Bank-note, and the landlady said, there was only a two pound note, and she said, she would not be done out of the money, but she would have it.

Q. Was any thing said about where they came from? - A. Blake said, they were taken from the sailor; then I went over with Ann Blake to her own lodgings; she and her landlady had some words about the money, she had been to pawn a gown and cloak to make up the money, the two pounds for Ann Blake ; Ann Blake said to Margaret Berry , you know the money is hid in the yard; Margaret Berry told her to hold her tongue.

Q. Was it said what money? - A. No.

Q. Do you know if there were other lodgers in the house? - A. I believe there are, hard-working people.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Are you a hardworking person? - A. I do any thing I can get for my living.

Q. Did you happen to go with the sailor's companion that night? - A. It was another young woman; I was locked out from my own lodgings, and I came there and laid down upon the same bed.

Q. You know them by sight only? - A. I have been in company with them.

Q. And you would have us believe that she told you all this, though they were almost strangers to you? - A. She was very much in liquor.

JAMES BOYD sworn. - I am a pawnbroker, in Clare-street, Clare-market; on Friday the 10th of October, about three o'clock in the afternoon, Margaret Berry came to my shop, and tendered me a twenty pound note to redeem two articles out of pledge, the one for fifteen shillings and the other one shilling and sixpence, but not liking to take it, I refused to give her change; the article for fifteen shillings was pledged in the morning of the same day; she said, I need not be afraid of it, for it was a very good one, she had it sent to her from sea by her son; but not believing her story, I would not take it, and she went away.

EDWARD TREADWAY sworn. - I am a constable; on Friday the 10th of this month, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I took Elizabeth Berry in custody, at the corner of Stuart's rents, Drury-lane, I searched her, but found nothing upon her; the witness, Hill, who was by, said, if I would go into Mr. Berry's yard, in a white mug, I should find the money.

Q. Did she say a white mug? - A. Yes; I went there and found this jug full of mould, and a bit of a tree standing upright in it; I pulled out the tree, and knocked the mould out, and found these five pieces of gold in a bit of rag; and about six in the evening, I found the mother standing at her own door; I searched her, and found nothing upon her but a parcel of duplicates.

Q. How did you get to this yard? - A. Through the house, there is no other house that has a communication with the yard.

Q. Do you know whose house it is? - A. Yes; I have known Mrs. Berry some years, they have kept the house many years, her husband's name is James.

Q. Are you sure of that? - A. I have heard him called James.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q.Do not you know that she has the sole management of the house, and that her husband only comes occasionally? - A. No, they live together.

THOMAS MUMFORD sworn. - I apprehended Blake at the Wheat-sheaf; I searched her, and in her pocket found seventeen shillings and two half-guineas; I then took her to the Brown-bear, at Bow-street, and afterwards went with Treadway, and apprehended the other two.

Blake's defence. The sailor went home with me, and said all night; the next morning we went to drink at the Wheat-sheaf, he did not tell me he had lost any thing at all, he was asleep when I went to bed to him; the constable took the money out of my pocket that the man gave me, two half-guineas and seventeen shillings; Elizabeth Berry had not been in the house at all for more than a week, she was out, nursing her sister-in-law, who was very ill, and only came into the public-house to see what was the matter.

Margaret Berry 's defence. It was a note that my husband gave me.

Elizabeth Berry 's defence. I was at my brother's for a week before this; the paper that I had was a small cap, and a half-crown wrapped up in it, which my mother had given me to carry to my sister; I concealed it, because my father was there, and I did not want him to know it.

Blake, GUILTY. (Aged 27.) Of stealing, but not in the dwelling-house .

Transported for seven years .

Margaret Berry , Not GUILTY .

Elizabeth Berry , NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron THOMPSON.

741. SARAH GORDON and SARAH HARPER were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of October , two shawls, value 7s. and ten yards and a half of lace, value 10s. 6d. the property of James Henley , privately in his shop .

JAMES HENLEY sworn. - I am a linen-draper , in the parish of St. Luke's : On the 11th of October, the two prisoners came in to buy half a shawl, my wife told me to go after them, which I did; I saw two shawls hanging out of the pocket of Sarah Gorden ; then I took them to the watch-house, and they were searched, some lace was found upon Harper.

LUKE CARLISLE sworn. - I am a constable; the prisoner was brought to the watch-house; I searched Harper and found under the peak of her stays, ten yards and a half of lace. (Produces it.)

Henley. This is my property, it has my private mark upon it, and the shawls I can swear to by the private mark.

Gordon's defence. I went in to buy half a shawl, and they fell down, I do not know what became of them.

Harper's defence. I picked up the lace at the threshold of the door.

Gordon, GUILTY. (Aged 21.)

Harper, GUILTY. (Aged 20.)

Of stealing, but not privately .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice HEATH.

742. THOMAS WILLIAMS and THOMAS NEROD , alias WILLIAMS , were indicted for that they, in the King's highway, in and upon Michael Hodgson , did make an assault, on the 15th of October , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, a metal watch, value 8l. a pair of spectacles and case, value 5s. and two Bank-notes, each of the value of 1l. the property of the said Michael.

MICHAEL HODGSON sworn. - On the 15th of this month, I was riding up a lane, called Maiden-lane , which leads from the turnpike-road, at the end of Gray's-inn-lane, up to the down of Highgate; when I had got pretty near the top of the lane, about twelve o'clock in the day, as near as I can tell, I observed two men coming towards me, on foot, the elder Williams (Thomas) was the leading man, the other followed him about fourteen or fifteen yards from him; when he had come within ten yards of my horse's head, I saw him break his direction, and come towards my horse's head, and at the same time, I observed that he raised a large pistol by degrees; he mended his pace, and laid hold of my horse's bridle with one hand, and put the pistol to my breast with the other; the younger Williams immediately crossed my horse's head, to the other side of me, to the right-hand, and raised another horse pistol, as it appeared to me, cocked, to my breast, the elder Williams then demanded my money, I put my hand in my pocket and gave him four one pound Bank-notes; I have charged two in the indictment, but in truth I lost four; they then demanded my watch, which I gave.

Q. Which of them did that? - A. It was the elder Williams, that was the active hero, he took my watch; he then said, I require your pocket-book, sir; I told them I had no pocket-book; they searched me, but not finding a pocket-book, they took from my waistcoat pocket, a pair of spectacles, in a case, which I now hold in my hand, then they let me go; my horse's head being pointed to Highgate, and they going the reverse way, towards London; but before they had got twenty yards from me, they broke into the fields, on that side of the lane, which adjoins to Holloway; immediately as I observed this, before I had time to run round,a gentleman's servant came riding as hard as he could ride; with some difficulty I stopped him, he agreed to assist me, and we leaped our horses over into the fields where they were; I pointed out to him the two men a little before us; I then began to holloa after them as footpads, crying stop thief; upon hearing my voice, they turned round with their faces, and began to run; the young man on horseback and I, pursued them, but we did not get quite up to them till they got over the hedge of the next field; in the next field I got up to them, and got rather before them with my horse; I told them they had robbed me, and I would take them; they drew their pistols, and pointed them at me, and bid me keep off, or they would shoot me; I told them, I did not regard their threats, they might depend upon it I never would leave them till I had taken them, they then holding their pistols to me, and the young man, with me, broke away into an adjoining field,still we followed; then they run and got into the third field, and there we got the assistance of some men that were making of hay; we kept on pursuing them, and in the third field, at the end of it, they were pressed so close, that they fired a pistol, I was a very little way off, and they were in the hedge, but which fired it I do not know; after this pistol was fired, I saw clearly that they were desperate men, and that there would be no taking them without some fire-arms; I desired the people round to go to Holloway, or some place near, and get some fire-arms, some of the men that had come up to us, and we kept them at bay for some time, backwards and forwards, and in different parts of the field, and as frequently as I pressed upon them, they levelled their pistols at me; they then crossed the lane into the fields, leading to Kentish-town; at last there appeared a man at the top of the hill, with a gun; I cried out loudly, here is a gun, give it me, and I will blow their heads off; upon their feeling the gun, they laid down three pistols, and surrendered themselves; I had them tied together with a handkerchief, and they were searched by the people that got about me, but no part of my property was found upon them; I then took them to Bow-street early the next morning; I got up and went to the fields where this bustle had happened, a boy had picked up the spectacles and case, which I received from the boy's father, his name is Thomas Watson.

Q. Are those the spectacles of which you were robbed? - A. They are positively the spectacles, I have had them many years.

Q. Are you positively sure that the two men who robbed you, were the same that you afterwards found in the fields? - A. I am very positive that they are the same men; I never lost sight of them, but while they were getting from one field to another.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. There were several persons collected? - A. Yes.

Q. How long a space of time do you think might elapse before you saw the servant? - A. I can scarcely think it was one minute.

Q. How far is the field where you took them, from where you were robbed? - A. I should suppose the fifth field.

Q. There are hedges which divide each field? - A. Yes.

Q. The persons who committed the robbery had got over one hedge before you began to pursue? - A. Yes.

Q. There were five hedges-do you mean to say that you always had a constant view of the prisoners? - A. Allowing for the time of getting over the hedges.

Q. None of your property was found upon them? - A. No.

Q. Can you at all say in what direction the pistol was fired? - A. No.

JAMES WHITE sworn. - I was riding down Maiden-lane, towards Battle-bridge; I met Mr. Hodgson; he told me he had that moment been robbed by two thieves; he turned back; we went in pursuit of them; I immediately saw two men going across under the hedge; I asked him if those were the men; the one had a black, and the other a brown coat on; I leaped my horse over the hedge, and holloaed, stop thief, upon which Mr. Hodgson followed me, and they began to run; they had their hands in their pockets, in this way, (describing it), to hold the weight of the pistols up; they ran across the field, and after that field they had to cross a little lane; I leaped the horse over the hedge, and then I was in the same field that they were again; then they presented each a brace of pistols, one in each hand.

Mr. Hodgson. He is certainly right in correcting that they had two brace of pistols. White. They asked me if they had hurt me; I told them, no, they had not; I said, I know that very well, but you have robbed that gentleman of his watch and money; they told me; if I did not leave them, they would shoot me; I told them, they might depend upon it I would follow them; if they did shoot me, they could not shoot that gentleman; in going over the third field hedge, one of them fired a pistol, but which way the pistol was directed. I cannot say, for I was paying attention to my horse to leap the hedge; in the next field there were some farmering men came up and surrounded them; they threatened, that the first man that touched them they would shoot him; they swore they would not suffer themselves to be taken; they got out of that field into another, they were crossing a little narrow lane, upon which one ofthem that was going up the furthermost hedge from me, fired another pistol, but I did not see the direction of it; a little time after that they surrendered themselves, and put down their pistols; there were only three pistols then: they were secured, and we took them to Bow-street.

Q. Are you sure that the men that you pursued till they surrendered themselves, were the same that Mr.Hodgson first pointed out to you? - A. I am sure of it.

Q. This was about noon day? - A. Yes, as far as I can guess, I had no watch with me.

JOHN NEWBERY sworn. - I was moving in a field near Maiden-lane the day that Mr. Hodgson was robbed; about twelve o'clock I heard some people holloa out, stop thief; I made the best of my way towards them; before I could get out of the field that I was at work in, I saw two men crossing the field next to me; I got over into that field, and went towards them; Mr. Hodgson came up, and said, those men had robbed him; the prisoners at the bar are the same men; when I came near to them, they desired me to stand back, I was several yards from them; soon after that one of them fired a pistol, I did not see which way it was held; they ran up the field, and were surrounded by a great many; they first chased after one, and then another, with a pistol in each hand, up the field; soon after they fired another pistol, but I do not know in what direction; then they took across Maiden-lane again to some fields at the back of Kentish-town, and there we overtook them again; they said, we had better keep back, if we had any regard for ourselves, for they would not be taken; soon after that a man came into the field with a gun; presently after they put their pistols down; I got over the hedge, and went to them, but the pistols had been picked up by a man who is here; Mr. Hodgson said, these were the two men that robbed him that day.

THOMAS COUSINS sworn. - I was at work in the field; I heard a great hue and cry of stop thief; I stepped across a narrow lane where there were two hedges; I saw two men coming up the field running as hard as they could run; I met them, they had each a brace of pistols in their hands; the two prisoners are the same men; they asked what I wanted; I said, nothing, gentleman; I stood with a pitch-fork upon my shoulder, within six feet of them; the elder one, Thomas Williams ,swore a great oath, that if I came any nearer he would blow my brains out; upon which they went from me immediately across a little bit of a hedge, about ten yards from me, and one of them fired a pistol, I cannot tell which of them it was, nor in what direction; upon that I called the rest of the men after me: I followed them across two fields towards Holloway, and then they returned back again across the lane; they were on one side the hedge, and the men on the other, and then they made towards Kentish-town; I saw no more of them till they were taken.

Q. How long after might that be? - A. It might be near a quarter of an hour after I lost sight of them.

Q. Are you quite sure the prisoners are the same men? - A. Yes, I am positively sure of it.

JOHN JAMES sworn. - I was at work binding hay in a field; I saw Mr. Hodgson and the servant riding down the lane; they holloaed out; stop thief; I saw two men running in the adjoining field, the prisoners are the same men; I came up to Mr. Hodgson, he said he had been robbed, he was then very near them; I had a fork upon my shoulder, I went up to them; that was two or three fields from Holloway; they turned back upon me, and told me to stand back; Cousins was near me, at that time; they told me to stand back, which I did, and they then made away over towards Kentish-town; I pursued them, and went across that field, and within one field on the other side of Maiden-lane, I came up to them; they were then lying under the hedge; they ran up the hedge on one side, and I on the other; I then came up to them again, and told them it was impossible for them to get away, they were so surrounded; and I rather think, they then saw a man coming over the field with a gun; upon that, they threw down their three pistols, and the elder one said, he would resign to me; I then left him, took up the pistols, and went and secured the other one; in the course of a minute or two, Holmes and Newbery came up to me; I gave Holmes one pistols, and kept the other two; all the three pistols were loaded; they were drawn at Bow-street; I delivered up the pistols that I had, at Bow-street, by Mr. Ford's order.

Newbery. I delivered up the pistol, that I had, at Bow-street.

RICHARD COOPER sworn. - I was in the next field spreading dung; I heard the outcry, and I fetched a gun; I heard a pistol fired, but do not know any thing about the direction of it; they declared they would not be taken just before I got up to them; I saw them drop the pistols when I came up; there were three pistols.

PATRICK MACMANUS sworn. - I am an officer of Bow-street: At the prisoners lodgings I found this cutlass, and some powder.

RICHARD LIMBERICK sworn. - I am an officer belonging to Bow-street, (produces three pistols): these two had three bullets a piece; I drew them; the other had two bullets; I have had them ever since.

The prisoners left their defence to their Counsel.

For Nerod.

- ARIEL sworn. - I am a watch-movement maker: I know the prisoner, William Stebbing , that is the youngest of the two; he served his ap-prenticeship with me; was always very sober and steady; has always been very active at his work; and since he has been out of his time, he has worked for me at his lodgings till about a fortnight ago; his real name is William Stebbing .

Court. Q. Did you never know him in the name of Williams? - A. No.

Q. Nor by the name of Nerod? - A. No; his father is a shoemaker.

Q. Is his name Stebbing? - A. Yes, I believe so.

Q. How much money may he have earned from you in the course of the last month that he worked for you? - A. He works for three or four different people.

The prisoner, Nerod, called four other witnesses, who gave him a good character, but three of them had not known him within the last two years.

Williams, GUILTY Death . (Aged 32.)

Nerod, GUILTY Death . (Aged 23.)

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron THOMPSON .

743. WILLIAM GRAY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of October , a great coat, value 8s. a shirt, value 2s. three pocket handkerchiefs, value 3s. a neck handkerchief, value 1s. two pair of stockings, value 2s. two gowns, value 30s. five aprons, value 10s. four petticoats, value 18s. three shawls, value 7s. and one sheet, value 9s. the property of George Butcher , in his dwelling-house .

GEORGE BUTCHER sworn. - I lodge in Old Gravel-lane , No.44: On the 16th of this month, I went out, and left the articles, mentioned in the indictment, in my room; I rent the house, and have one lodger; I came home in the afternoon, and found the prisoner in custody, with the property; I knew it to be mine; it contained my wife's cloaths, and my own.

MARY BUTCHER sworn. - I am the wife of the last witness: I had seen the things in the room, between seven and eight o'clock in the morning, (repeats the articles mentioned in the indictment); I locked the door of the room, and hung the key up; it was a padlock to the door, which appeared to have been wrenched open; I was in the shop, and saw Mr. Delaney run by the window; I came to the shop-door to see, and there was Mr. Delaney stopping with the prisoner at the corner of the passage, with the bundle upon the ground; the bundle was brought back into my shop, and, upon opening it, I knew them to be my things; I saw the prisoner drop a spotted pocket handkerchief.

JOSEPH DELANEY sworn. - I am a pawnbroker in Old Gravel-lane, nearly opposite Mrs. Butcher's: On the 16th of October, I was cleaning the inside of my window, and I observed the prisoner go past, I never saw him before; there were two other that appeared to be in company with him, one of the opposite side of the street, the other on my side; I observed the prisoner look into the window of a house that was nearly opposite, which induced me to take particular notice of him, and I saw him go up this passage that leads to Mrs. Butcher's apartments; he was gone about ten minutes, I dare say, and then came out again with a bundle; I then jumped over the counter, and followed him; the prisoner was then leaning over a post with one of the other two; the prisoner then went on, I followed him, and took him with the bundle on him, about three hundred yards from Mrs. Butcher's; I asked him where he was going with those things; he said, a man had given him, or was to give him, a shilling, I am not positive which, for carrying the bundle; I took the bundle in one hand, and laid hold of him by the other, and brougth him back; he came back with me, without making any resistance, to the end of the passage; Mrs. Butcher, among other, came up; she did not seen to recollect the things at first, but, afterwards, when we got in doors, she discovered them to be her property.

JOHN WINTER sworn. - I came up by chance when Mr. Delaney had brought back the prisoner; I had the proprty delivered to me. (Produces it). Mrs. Butcher. This is the handkerchief that was dropped; it is my husband's.

(Most of the other articles were deposed to by Mrs. Butcher, as having the mark M B upon them).

Q. What value did you put upon these things? - A. Four pound sixteen shillings and six pence, altogether.

Prisoner's defence. I stopped at the corner of this court to make water, and a man gave me a bundle, and offered me a shilling to carry it for him, and the-gentleman came after me, and stoped me; I told him so at time.

GUILTY. (Aged 17.)

Of stealing goods, value 39s.

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron THOMSPON .

744. ROBERT CLASSON was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Monkhouse , about the hour of three in the night of the 23rd of October , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing two silver tea-spoons, value 3s. the property of the said Thomas. THOMAS MONKHOUSE sworn. - I am a tailor :I live in Jermyn-street ; I was not at home at the time of the robbery.

SARAH HOBBINS sworn. - I am a servant with the prosecutor: Last Thursday night, my mistress and I were the last up, we left every thing safe; I was alarmed by the watchman about half past three in the morning; I got up, and I heard somebody in the yard; I found the parlour window open; it had been shut fast at night; I missed two silver teaspoons from the pantry in the kitchen; I had seen them about six o'clock the evening before.

WILLIAM WILSON sworn. - I am one of the patrols belonging to St. James's parith; I saw the prisoner and two more lurking about Piccadilly at three o'clock in the morning; I knew nothing of him before; we reported at the watch-house, that there were three ill-disposed people lurking about; upon hearing that Mr. Monkhouse's house was broke open, I suspected these three men,and they directly ran away; I pursued them, and in Coventry-street, I saw the prisoner throw away two teaspoons behind him; I pursued till he was taken; John Murphy took up the spoons, and either him, or his companions, threw away a dark lanthorn, and a wrenching crow steel bar.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q.What distance was this from the house that was robbed? - A. About one hundred yards.

RICE EVANS sworn. - I pursued the prisoner from the corner of Great Windmill-street into Coventry-street; there were two others with him; as soon as they saw us, they ran away, and the prisoner threw down two spoons behind him, which struck me.

JOHN MURPHY sworn. - I joined in the pursuit of the prisoner last Friday morning, from the bottom of Great Windmill-Street; there were two men in company with him; they were walking along in very deep discourse,and as soon as ever they looked at the patrols, they took to their heels, and ran along Coventry-Street; we pursued and took the prisoner; I picked up the spoons, and delivered them to the beadle of the night.

EDWARD MYERS sworn. - I am a beadle,(produces two tea-spoons, a dark lanthorn, and a crow); they were given to me by one of the patrols; I cannot say which; it was either Wilson or Evans.

Q.(To Morgan). Are these your master's spoons? - A. They are something like them, but I cannot swear to them.

Monkhouse. To the best of my knowledge, they are my spoons; they tally with the others exactly.

Q.Are there any marks upon them? - A. Yes, T M.

Q. Had the spoons, that you lost,such marks? - A. Yes.

Q. Have you any doubt about it? - A. Not the least.

Prisoner's defence. I was knocked down by some watchmen, but what it was about, I do not know.

GUILTY Death .(Aged 25.)

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice HEATH.

745. HONOUR NEVIN , alias CONWAY , was indicted for that she, on the 20th of October , twenty-four pieces of false and counterfeit milled money and coin, made and counterfeited to the likeness of a good sixpence of the current coin of this realm; and thirteen pieces of false and counterfeited milled money and coin, made and counterfeited to the likeness of a good shilling of the current coin of this realm, the same not being cut in pieces, did put off to one Richard Lillywhite , at a lower rate and value than the same, by their denomination, imported to be worth, that is to say, for one piece of gold money and coin of this realm, called a half-guinea, being of the value of 10s. 6d. against the form of the statute .(The case was opened by Mr.Watson.)

RICHARD LILLYWHITE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Watson. I am a hair-dresser , and a peace-officer of the parish of Shoreditch : On Friday, the 17th of October last, about six o'clock in the evening, I went to the prisoner's house in Cock-court, Snowhill; I asked for Mrs.Nevin, she said her name was Nevin; I asked her if she knew Fitzpatrick; she said, yes, she had received a letter from him yesterday; I told her I wanted half a piece of whites, meaning bad money, that is thirty shillings worth; but I said, we would drink first, and we went over to Mr.Weskett's, No.6, Snowhill; when she had drank, I said, let me have half a piece, she said, sit down, and I will fetch them; she went away, and returned in a short time with a paper, containing bad money, (produces it); I gave her half a guinea for them,and, laid on the 21st,I went before the Lord Mayor, and laid an information, On Monday the 20th, about six o'clock in the evening, I went again by appointment; she came out, and we went down the court together; I asked her, if she had any thing with her; she said, no, she never carried any about her; then we went over to Mr.Weskett's again, to drink, and when she had drank, I said to her, let me have half a guinea's worth of shillings and sixpences; I desired that they might be of a good size and colour; she said,they should, and desired I would sit down, and she would fetch them; she came back, and put a paper into my hand, containing twenty-six sixpences, and seventeen shillings, all bad, for which I gave her a good half-guinea; some of them appeared to be of the French coin, but how many, I cannot say.

Q. Were they such as you would take for the current coin of this realm? - A. No.(John Armstrong produced the paper of counterfeit money).

Q.(To Lillywhite.) Look at that paper; what are the number of sixpences which appear to be of the current coin of this realm? - A. Twenty-five; the other sixpence is a bad French one; and here are four shillings of the French coin bad, and thirteen other shillings; making seventeen in all.

The Court were of opinion that the indictment could not be maintained, in as much as it was necessary that the contract should be charged exactly as it was made between the parties.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

746. JOSEPH HUTCHINS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23rd of October , a handkerchief, value 2s. the property of James Bearblock , privily from his person .

JAMES BEARBLOCK sworn. - I am a clergyman : On Thursday last, the 23rd of this month, I was passing the bottom of Holborn-hill , about eleven o'clock, and on putting my hand into my coat-pocket I missed my handkerchief; I immediately turned round, and observed the prisoner running across the street, he ran into Plumbtree-court, and his manner of running excited my suspicion; and on going up some steps, at the end of the court, he fell down; I then caught hold of him, and insisted upon searching him; he made some resistance at first, but in a short time, pulled my handkerchief from under his coat, and gave it me; there were several people at their doors, and I inquired of them for a constable, but no one would tell me where a constable was to be found; a gentleman passing by, told me there was one within twenty yards, at the public-house; I could not get him there, he threw himself upon his back; I could get no person to assist me, every body seemed for letting him go, till very fortunately Mr. Cafeby came by, or else I believe they would have got him away from me; as he was talking him down Holborn, Mr.Caseby called to me to assist him, he was struggling with him; and he was apprehensive that he was about to draw a large knife, which was afterwards found in his pocket.

Q. Had you any sensation at your pocket at the time you missed your handkerchief? - A. None at all, it was the running alone that caused my suspicion; I had it in my hand not two minutes before in coming down Snow-hill.

Q. What may the value of it be? - A. Above two shillings; it is a silk handkerchief, nearly new.(Produces it).

LEMAN CASEBY sworn. - On Thursday morning last, I was coming through Shoe-lane, I saw a mob surround this gentleman, and the prisoner laying upon his back, in Plumbtree-court; I asked what was the matter; and they said, this gentleman had been robbed; I immediately took the prisoner by the collar, and pulled him up; in coming down Holborn-hill, he was very obstreperous; I searched him in the Compter, and found upon him a fellowship-porter's ticket, a pocket-book containing five duplicates, and a knife.

Prisoner's defence. I picked it up at the bottom of Holborn-hill.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character. GUILTY. (Aged 29.) Of stealing goods, value 11d.

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

747. JOHN BELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of October , seventeen pounds eight ounces of bacon, value 10s. the property of John Morgan , the elder , John Morgan , the younger , and Christopher-William Morgan .

JOHN MORGAN , sen. sworn. - I am in a partnership with John Morgan , jun. and Christopher- William Morgan , both my sons: Last Friday evening, as I was in the accompting-house, I heard my shopman call out stop thief, or stop him; I immediately saw a man running out with nearly half a side of bacon, my man was close to his heels; I saw him drop the bacon, and my man laid hold of him immediately; my man took up the bacon, and I took hold of the prisoner, and sent for a constable; he had a great bundle of brushes in his hand at the time; the constable has had the bacon ever since; I questioned him who he was, and he had told me he was a painter.

WILLIAM BLANK sworn. - I am a shopman to Messrs. Morgan's: Last Friday evening I saw a man pass half the length of the shop-window, and return back again; I then saw him do the same again, and I kept my eye fixed upon him, and saw him come into the shop, and take hold of the bacon; I came forward thinking he might want to ask the price of it, and he immediately ran out at the door with it; when he heard my feet, he immediately dropped the bacon on the fill, and walked off; I did not stop to pick up the bacon, but jumped out and seized him; he had not got two doors before I took him by the collar; when I seized him, he said, do not take any notice, let me go on; I said, no, you shall go back, and I took him back.

Q.(To Morgan.) What is the value of the bacon? - A. It cost me one shilling a pound; there is seventeen pounds and a half of it.( Francis Bailey , the constable, produced the bacon, which was deposed to by the prosecutor).

Prisoner's defence. I have nothing to say, but thatI was so very much intoxicated that I did not know what I did.

Q.(To Morgan.) Did he appear to be intoxicated? - A. No; he was perfectly sober, and was very abusive. GUILTY . (Aged 26.)

Confined six months in Newgate , and publicly whipped .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

748. WILLIAM PINDLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of September , four quartern loaves, value 5s. 7d. the property of Andrew Wright .

Second Cunt. Laying them to be the property of Thomas Gale .

THOMAS GALE sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Andrew Wright , a baker , in Fore-street; I am responsible for the loaves that I take out: On the 24th of September, I saw the prisoner take four loaves out of my basket, in Jewin-street , I had left the basket to serve some customers; I ran up to the prisoner as fast as I was able, and laid hold of him; he had the loaves in his arms, and I made him carry them home to my master.

Q. Are you sure you saw him take them out of the basket? - A. Yes, I am.

GEORGE KILKIN sworn. - I am a constable: I took charge of the prisoner; that is all I know of it.

Prisoner's defence. I had been five weeks out of work, and could not get any to do, I had not had a bit of bread for three days before; I went to take one loaf, and there were four stuck together.

Court. (To Gale.) Q. Were these four loaves united? - A. Yes, they were; there were loose loaves in the basket besides; these were at the bottom of the basket. GUILTY . (Aged 59.)

Fined 1s. and discharged.

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

749. JAMES LATHAM was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of October , five pounds of brass, value 4s. the property of John Warner , and Joseph Warner .

JOHN WARNER sworn. - My partners name is Joseph Warner, we are brass-founders and coppersmiths , at No.139, Fleet-street; the prisoner was our porter and labourer ; we had a suspecion of the prisoner, and set a watch upon him; On Tuesday morning he was sent out on an errand,and then called back again; I was called down stairs, and when I came down, I saw some brass, and some copper, that had been taken from the prisoner.

JOHN STUBBS sworn. - I am foreman to Messrs. Warner: In consequence of suspicion the prisoner was watched, I did not watch him; the prisoner afterwards delivered the key of his box to me; I wen to his lodgings from his own direction; I went up stairs with the landlord of the house, and in his box I found some brass and some copper, there is about three pound and a half of brass, (produces them;) I received them from the constable to-day, he is ill in bed; I knew it to be the same metal that I delivered to the constable; there is one piece that I can swear positively to be Mr. Warner's; it is the pipe of a gun, in the rough, I made it myself; we never send them out unfinished.

WILLIAM HAM sworn. - I work for Mr.Warner, as a founder: we had a suspicion of the prisoner, and on Tuesday afternoon he was called to be sent to the Borough, with some cocks; Mr. Warner's brother sent him, and he observing something in his pockets, called him back, and I took this metal out of his pocket, (producing it;) the constable has had it, but I can swear to this being the same that I took from him, but I cannot swear to it's being Mr.Warner's property; here is a piece of copper that I can swear to as having been cast that very morning, it is what we call a tea-kettle here.

Mr. Warner. Here is a parcel of buttons with a remarkable head upon them, which I can swear to; I had bought them two or three days before, they are brass; and the pipe of a gun, which has a W upon it, for my name, and a broad R, it is government work; and here is a piece of copper that I can swear to.

Prisoner's defence. I pulled off my jacket, and threw it amongst the matting, as I always do; and when I was called to go into the Borough, I put on the jacket; I did not know that there was any thing in the pocket, nor I do not know how it came there, GUILTY. Of stealing goods, to the value of 11d.

Confined three months in Newgate , and publicly whipped .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

750. SUSANNAH BROUGHTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of October , a purse, value 1d. a half-guinea. and nine shillings and sixpence in monies numbered, the property of James Thornton , privily from his person .

JAMES THORNTON sworn. - I am a wine-merchant : On Thursday evening, the 16th of this month, between twelve and one o'clock in the morning, I met with the prisoner, and she solicited me to go with her; I went with her to an alley, that goes from Bearbinder-lane into Lombard-street; after having been with her some time, she seemed desirous of going away, and I put my hand to my pocket, and missed my purse; she deniedthat she had got it; there was a watchman at a little distance, and the watchman, and she and I, all went together to the watch-house; the constable of the night examined her, and found my purse and money, I did not see it found; the constable desired me and the watchman to walk out while he examined her pretty closely; the purse contained half a guinea, and nine and sixpence in silver; I just before changed a guinea; I cannot swear to the money, excepting that there was a new shilling found in the purse, and I know I had one; I can swear to the purse.

Q. Were you perfectly sober? - A. No, I was not perfectly sober; if I had, I believe I should not have been in that situation; I had been drinking both in the afternoon and evening.

Q. You had not drank with her at all? - A. No; I was not in the least affected so as not to know what I was doing.

Q. Did you perceive it going from you? - A. No.

Q. Was there no circumstance from which you can guess when she took it? - A. No; I missed it, but did not discover how it was gone.

WILLIAM CROW sworn. - I am a constable of Langbourn Ward: On Thursday the 16th of this month, being officer of the night, between twelve and one on Friday morning the 17th, the prisoner was brought in by the prosecutor, he said she had robbed him of his purse; she denied it; I asked her to give me the purse; and she said she had not seen any purse; I told her to pull off her petticoat and her stays; she still persisted that she had not got it, and Mr. Thornton would have it that she had; the woman being almost naked, I ordered them all out, that I might search her more closely; I put my hand, and was working my fingers down her under petticoat, and the purse dropped from her; I saw it the instant it fell, close at her feet; (produces it); I have kept it ever since; there was in it a half-guinea, a half-crown, five shillings, and three sixpences; the prisoner said, hide it, for God's sake, do not let him see it; I then called out to the prosecutor, the patrol, and the rest of them, to come in; they came in, and Mr. Thornton said he could swear this to be his purse; I asked the prosecutor what there was in it; and he said he could not properly tell, but there was a half-guinea and some silver, and that one of the shillings was a new one; there is one new shilling among them; I then immediately took her to the Compter.

Thoonton. This is my purse.

Prisoner's defence. I am an unfortunate woman: I went with the prosecutor up an alley; he would not go into any house; and he wanted me to oblige him; and I being an unfortunate woman, naturally wanted the money first; he was to give me two shillings; and he said if I was afraid, I should have his purse to hold till I had obliged him; and when I had obliged him, he directly charged the watchman with me. NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

751. THOMAS JEFFERYS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of October , a cloth coat, value 10s. a petticoat, value 10s. a gown, value 5s. and two cotton shawls, value 3s. the property of William Johnson .

ELIZABETH JOHNSON sworn. - I am the wife of William Johnson, No. 23, Holywell-row: On Tuesday the 14th of this month, I pulled off a gown and petticoat, and two shawls, at three o'clock in the afternoon, as near as I can tell, in my bedroom; they were taken off the bed, and tied up in a coarse cloth that is not mine; the great coat was found at the bottom of the second pair of stairs, by my lodger; the bundle was found in my bed-room; I delivered them all to the officer; the prisoner is a stranger to me; when I came down stairs, I went to washing, and some time after I was going up stairs again, and saw the prisoner come out of my room; I am sure he is the man; when he came down stairs, I shoved him into my room below, myself, and secured him; he was never out of my sight.

RUTH HICKSON sworn. - I lodge in the same house with the last witness: I heard an alarm about three o'clock; I came down stairs, and trod upon a great coat; it laid upon the stairs above her bedroom; I looked into the bed-room and saw the bundle tied up, lying upon the floor; then I went down stairs, and saw the prisoner in custody.

WILLIAM MASON sworn. - I am one of the Police-officers: (produces the property). Upon searching him, I found upon him these keys; (producing a large bundle; )the things were in a coarse cloth;(producing it; ) it has strings to it, like a man's apron.(The property was deposed to by Mrs. Johnson.)

Prisoner's defence. Mrs. Johnson did not see me come out of the room; I was only at the door; I wanted a Mr. Roberts, a locksmith, who I understood lodged there; the street-door was open, and I went up; but was never in the room.

Q.(To Mrs. Johnson.)Did you or not see him come out of the room? - A. I did.

GUILTY .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr.RECORDER.

752. JOHN BROWN, otherwise COMPTE LA PROVENCE , was indicted for feloniouslystealing, on the 2d of October , six pounds of tobacco, value 12s. and one pound of cakes, value 1s. the property of Ann Barstow , privately in her shop .

ANN BARSTOW sworn. - I keep a shop in Wapping High-street : On Tuesday the 7th of October, between eight and nine in the morning, the prisoner came into my shop; I was in the back-room; I came into the shop upon being alarmed by Isabella Manland; the tobacco and some heart-cakes were tied up each in a separate parcel; I saw the prisoner behind the counter, but I did not see him take the things; they had only come in the night before; they were upon the shelf behind the counter; the property cannot be produced, it was consumed in the fire at the Police-office, Wapping; they were not taken out of the shop.

ISABELLA MAITLAND sworn. - I live servant with Mrs. Barstow, she keeps a chandler's shop: I was in the back-room on Tuesday morning, the 7th of October; I went into the shop to serve a boy with a two-penny loaf, and saw the prisoner behind the counter, with two parcels of tobacco under his arm, and the cakes in his hand; I called to Mr. Lercester, a lodger, for assistance; upon which the prisoner put the parcels where he had taken them from.

JOHN HERBERT sworn. - I am an officer belonging to the Police-office: I had charge of the prisoner and the goods, which have been destroyed by the fire.

Prisoner. I have nothing to say.

GUILTY of stealing, but not privately . (Aged 38.)

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

753. ANN MILLER was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Daniel Croney , no person being therein, about the hour of one in the afternoon of the 9th of October , and stealing a tea-chest, value 3s. a silk bonnet,value 2s. seven penny pieces, and twenty-three halfpence , the property of the said Daniel.

DANIEL CRONEY sworn. - I live at No.7, White-horse-court, Rosemary-lane ; I am a milkman : I was not at home at the time. MARGARET CRONEY sworn. - I went out on the 9th of October; I left nobody in the house; I was the first that returned; I had left the door locked; when I came home I found the door open, and missed a tea-chest and a bonnet from the kitchen table, and some penny pieces and halfpence; I met the prisoner coming out of doors against me; I found the property upon her; the prisoner was quite a stranger to me.

JOHN BASSETT sworn. - I am headborough of Whitechapel: I was sent for to take the prisoner into custody; (produces the property;) I found seven penny pieces and twenty-three halfpence upon the prisoner.

Mrs. Croney. This is my tea-chest.

Q. Do you know how much copper money you lost? - A. No, I cannot say; I lost several pounds in gold and copper, the day before. Prisoner's defence. I knocked at the door to ask for a lodging, and there was nobody in the room; I went in and took up the tea-chest, but I had no intention of taking it away.

GUILTY (Aged 35.)

Of stealing goods, value 4s. 9d.

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice HEATH.

754. RICHARD RUSTED was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Robert Clarkson , about the hour of four in the night of the 24th of September , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing a shirt, value 4s. the property of the said Robert.

HARRY WALKER sworn. - I live with Robert Clarkson, in Manor-row, Tower-hill , in the parish of St. Botolph, Aldgate ; I sleep in the shop: About half past four in the morning of the 25th of September, I was awaked with the noise of breaking of glass in the fan-light over the door; I looked up, and saw a man's head above the fan-light.

Q. Was it by the lamp-light that you discovered it to be a man's head? - A. There was a lamp about a yard from him; I got up and awaked Mr. Clarkson; I was not gone two minutes; Mr. Clarkson returned with me; the man was then gone; we waited a short time, and the man came again to the fan-light; that might be in about five minutes; he went away again, and returned in a few minutes, when he put his arm through the glass of the fanlight, and Mr. Clarkson seized it, while I went out at another door, and secured him outside.

Q. How high is this fan-light from the ground? - A. Ten feet; he must have been assisted by somebody; I did not see any other person when I came out; the prisoner is the man that I secured; I missed a shirt which I had seen at eight o'clock the night before; it was hanging upon the line, near the fanlight; there were three hanging upon the line, but this was the only one within his reach.

Q. Did you find any shirt upon him? - A. No.

Q. What sort of light was it? - A. It was then twilight.

Q. So that you could easily distinguish the features of the prisoner? - A. Yes.

ROBERT CLARKSON sworn. - I live in Manor-row: Harry Walker called me on the morning ofthe 25th of September, I got up and went down stairs with him directly; I waited a little bit, and a man came up to the fan light, and put his arm in; I then heard some person say, they are coming; and immediately I heard a footstep, and the prisoner dropped down from the fan light; I then went up stairs and dressed myself; Harry Walker dressed himself also; I came down again, and saw the man at the fan-light again; and again, some person came past, and the man dropped again; in a little time, a person, which was the prisoner at the bar, came up to the same situation at the fan-light, and put his arm into the same place; I then laid hold of his arm and held him there, till Harry Walker went out and secured him; we took him to the watch-house, but there was nothing found upon him; I missed a shirt; we always spread the shirts so, that it is impossible not to miss them if one is gone; the line was within a foot of the light.

Prisoner. Q. Can you undertake to say, that I was the first person that broke the window? - A. No.

Prisoner's defence. As I was going along, I thought I heard a noise in the shop, and saw the window broke; I stepped up, and put my hand upon the frame of the window, and looked in to see what was the matter, and my hand was laid hold of directly.

Clarkson. His arm was through, quite up to the shoulder. GUILTY. (Aged 16.)

Of stealing the goods, but not of breaking and entering the dwelling-house.

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron THOMPSON .

755. THOMAS WELLS was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Edward Cramp , no person being therein, about the hour of four in the afternoon of the 26th of September , and stealing four cotton gowns, value 20s. a muslin gown, value 5s. a napkin, value 6d. two pair of stockings, value 1s. a silver cream-pot, value 10s. a pair of silver sugar tongs, value 2s. four yards of cloth, value 4s. a frock, value 1d. a bed gown, value 6d. and two silk handkerchiefs, value 1s. the property of the said Edward.

EDWARD CRAMP sworn. - I keep a little house at Camden-town , I am a salesman ; I was not at home at the time.

MARY HUGHES sworn. - I keep a little house at Battle-bridge: On Friday, between four and five in the afternoon, the prisoner brought these things to me; I knew him before I was married.

Q. How long ago? - A. About four weeks ago. ELIZABETH MASSEY sworn. - I live at No.3, Southampton-row, Camden-town, nearly opposite the prosecutor; between three and four in the afternoon, on Friday the 26th of September, I saw the prisoner come to Mr. Cramp's street door, I had once seen him at Mr. Cramp's house before; I knew him again, he came to the street door, locked round, and then went in and shut the street door after him, and I saw no more of him; I had not the smallest suspicion at that time; when Mrs. Cramp came home in the evening. I heard that the house had been robbed, and I described that young man.

CATHERINE CRAMP sworn. - I am the wife of the prosecutor; I went out at one o'clock, I left nobody in the house; I secured the street-door, by locking it; the garden-door was fast, and the backdoor I think was upon the latch, to the best of my knowledge.

- RUSSEL sworn. - I am a constable; I took charge of the property at Worship-street; I have had it ever since. (Produces it.)

Prosecutor. I found the property at Mrs. Hughes's, and produced them at Worship street.

(The property was deposed to by Mrs. Cramp.)

Prisoner's defence. I am entirely innocent of the affair; I was at Mrs. Cramp's in the morning, and she sent me out for half a pint of gin, and Mrs. Cramp, and my wife and I, had some gin and some bread and butter; I was at my mother's from two o'clock till four.

Q. (To Mrs. Cramp.) Was he at your house in the morning? - A. Yes. The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY. (Aged. 21)

Of stealing goods to the value of 39s.

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice HEATH.

756. DAVID JACOBS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of September , a basket, value 6d and a bushel of pears, value 5s. the property of Sarah Townsend , widow .

RICHARD GREGORY sworn. - On the 27th of September, about half past seven in the evening, I saw the prisoner at the bar come to the stall of Mrs. Townsend, and take a basket; he carried it about forty yards, and gave it to two little boys that I had before observed with him; the manner in which he took them, for he ran smartly with them before him, gave me a suspicion; I went to inform Mrs. Townsend of it, and then I went after the prisoner and laid hold of him, the little boy that had the pears, threw the basket down and ran away; I am certain the prisoner is the person that took the basket; and I am certain he is the person that gave it to the little boy; I had seen him before; Mrs.Townsend was there, but she was standing sideways, sorting over some damsons.

Cross-examined by Mr. Beville. Q. Was it dark or light? - A. It was dark, there were lamps lighted.

Q. Did you see his face? - A. Not distinctly, I saw his back.

Q. Do you mean to swear that you had not at all lost sight of him? - A. I cannot positively say whether I had or not, but I should rather think I had not, than that I had.

Q. How far was he from you at the time you went after him? - A. About 60 or 70 yards; and he was near 200 yards from Mrs. Townsend's when I took him.

Q. But you did not see his face at all? - A. Yes. I saw his face before he went to Mrs. Townsend's premises, and I saw his face when he was carrying the pears to the little boys.

SARAH TOWNSEND sworn. - I am a widow; when Mr.Gregory came up to me, I missed a basket of pears from just within the shed.

Q. You had not sold the basket of pears to any body? - A. No; this is the basket that Mr.Gregory brought back, I know it to be the basket that was taken from me.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character. GUILTY (Aged 18.)

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron THOMPSON .

757. TERESA JEFFERYS was indicted for feloniously stealing a wooden tub, value 2s. the property of Ann Hewson .

ANN HEWSON sworn. - I live in Clement's-lane, Clare-market ; I lost a tub out of the kitchen where I live; I know nothing of the tub being taken.

RICHARD MOSELEY sworn. - I lodge in the same house with the last witness; I was going down into the kitchen, and met the prisoner coming up with a watching tub in her hand; she said, she had made bold to go below; she asked forgiveness, and I stopped her. (Produces the tub.)

Hewson. This is my tub, my mother gave it me; there is W. W. on it for my mother's name.

Prisoner's defence. I have three children, I humbly beg for mercy, I am in great distress.

GUILTY . (Aged 38.)

Fined 1s. and discharged.

Tried by the second Middlefex Jury, before Mr. Justice HEATH.

758. JOHN LECK was indicted, for that he, on the 25th of September , two pieces of false and counterfeit milled money, made and counterfeited to the likeness of a good seven-shilling piece, the same not being cut in pieces, did put off to one John Parker , at a lower rate and value than the same by their denomination imported to be worth, that is to say, for 3s. 6d. of the current coin of this realm, against the form of the statute .(The case was opened by Mr.Watson.)

CORNELIUS RICHARDSON sworn. - I am a labouring man: On the 24th of last month I saw the prisoner at the Red-Lion, in Cow-Cross, and, in consequence of what passed, I saw him again the next day at six o'clock in the evening, at the same house, I had agreed with him to come for some more money; I had a half-crown and two shillings of good money, they were marked by Mr. Rogers in my presence, John Parker was there waiting for me, I had appointed him to come; I went up to the prisoner, and asked him what he had got for me; he said, he had got thirty shillingsworth of whites; I told him I would take half of them; I asked him what else he had got; he said, he had brought me four seven-shilling pieces; then I introduced Parker to the prisoner, to purchase some bad money.

JOHN PARKER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Watson. On the 25th of September I went to the Red Lion public-house, at Cow cross, the prisoner at the bar was there; Richardson and I went in, I was there first; when he came in, he said, how do you do; I sat down on one side the box, and Richardson on the other; I then heard Richardson and him have a discourage together, how much money he had brought with him; Richardson said; he could not purchase all of it; he then said, Parker, will you purchase two seven-shilling pieces; I said, with all my heart; the prisoner put two seven shilling pieces into my hand; he said; they were to be three shillings and sixpence; I gave him half-a-crown and one shilling good; they were marked, I had the shilling and the half-crown from Rogers, the officer.

EDWARD ROGERS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Watson. I am an officer belonging to Shadwell-office, (produces two seven-shilling pieces); I received them from Parker, they are base metal gilt over, I have tried them with a pen-knife.

Court. Q. Is there nobody here from the Mint?

Mr. Watson. A monier was expected, but is not come.

Rogers. On the 25th of September I went with Richardson and Parker to a Public-house near St. James's-street, Clerkenwell, and there, with a penknife. I marked a good half-crown and a good shilling, and gave it into the hands of Parker; Richardson and he went away together; Eibe and I went to a street leading to St. John's Gate, and waited till Parker cameto us, and told us he had made a purchase; I do not think it was more than from ten minutes to a quarter of an hour after I went to the Red Lion, and saw Richardson and the prisoner sitting in a box in the tap-room; I instantly secured the prisoner, I told him I had a warrant against him; I searched him, and in his breeches pocket I found this half-crown and this shilling, (producing them); they are the same which I had marked and given to Parker, they are good money; I found in his fob these two seven-shilling pieces. (Producing them).

THOMAS GREEN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Watson. I am a goldsmith, on Ludgate-hill.

Q. Look at these two pieces, are they good or bad? - A. They are bad, they are metal gilt; the weight alone in the hand is sufficient to determine them to be counterfeit.

Q. Are you able to say, upon your oath, that they are bad? - A. I am.

Prisoner's defence. Richardson had the money of me, not Parker.

Q.(To Parker.) Did I understand you right, that you purchased these two pieces? - A. Yes.

GUILTY . (Aged 58.)

Confined one year in Newgate , and fined 6s. 8d.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron THOMPSON .

759. MOSES ROBUS was indicted for that he, on the 10th of October , two pieces of false and counterfeit milled money, made and counterfeited to the likeness of a good half-guinea, and two pieces of false and counterfeit milled money, made and counterfeited to the likeness of a good seven-shilling piece, the same not being cut in pieces, did put off to one Thomas Mead at a lower rate and value than the same by their denomination imported to be worth, that is to say, for 11s. 6d. of the curent coin of this realm, against the form of the statute , &c.(The case was opened by Mr. Fielding.)

THOMAS MEAD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Watson. My father keeps the Crooked Billet, at Shadwell: On the 9th of October I saw the prisoner at the sign of the Captain Cook, in the parish of St. George's in the East: I saw him again the following evening at the same public-house by appointment, and he asked me if I wanted any more -

Q. Any more what? - A. Bad gold; I told him to go and fetch three wholes, that is, business; three halves, that is, half-business; and three small ones, which were three seven-shilling pieces; he then went into the wash-house of the public-house, and took out three guineas, three half-guineas, and three seven-shillings pieces; he told me he supposed I would take them all; I told him I could not, as I had not enough about me to buy them; I then bought two half-guineas and two seven-shilling pieces; I gave two shillings and three-pence for each of the seven-shilling pieces, and three shillings and sixpence a-piece for the half-guineas.

Q. Look at those pieces? - A. These are the same.

Q. Should you know the money again that you gave him, if you should see it? - A. I should; Rogers, the officer, was in waiting for a signal which I gave him.

THOMAS GREEN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Watson. I am a goldsmith upon Ludgate-hill.

Q. Look at these pieces? - A. They are all counterfeit; they appear to be worse than the former ones.

EDWARD ROGERS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Watson. On the 10th of October a warrant was issued from the Public-office; the money I have in my hand I found upon the prisoner in his breeches pocket; the good money that I found upon him is a half-crown piece, two shillings, and a seven-shilling piece, which I had previously marked and given to Mead for the purpose of purchasing bad money, about an hour before I apprehended him.(Produces it.)

Mead. This is the money that I gave the prisoner for the bad money.

Prisoner's defence. I am entirely drawn into this snare by Rogers and Mead; they go about giving people money to trap others; I leave myself, my Lord and Gentlemen, to the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY . (Aged 50.)

Confined one year in Newgate , and fined 1s.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice HEATH.

760. HENRY PAUL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of October , an earthenware cream-pot, value 5d. a wine-glass, value 3d. halfpenny, and a japan tea-cannister, value 5d. the property of Thomas Beaumont , in a lodging-room let to him .

THOMAS BEAUMONT sworn. - I live at No. 24, Chandos-street; I have known the prisoner two years and upwards; he came to lodge with me about a month ago; he occupied the one pair of stairs, front; my wife let the lodgings to him; there was another young man lodged with him.

Q. Who paid you the rent? - A. They paid it between them.

Court. Then there must be an end of this prosecution: the indictment charges the contract to be made with no person but the prisoner.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron THOMPSON .

762. THOMAS CLARKE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of October , eight penny-pieces, thirteen halfpence, and a farthing , the property of Thomas Moore .

THOMAS MOORE sworn. - I am an ironmonger , in Little Earl-street, Seven Dials ; the prisoner has been my porter for the last four months: On Monday morning last, about eleven o'clock, I had been out, I returned home, and found the prisoner behind the counter, where the till is, he had the till in his hand; he immediately, in great haste, put the till in again, and, whatever he had in his right hand, he put into his right hand coat pocket, and seemed much confounded; I had got very near him then, and said to him, Thomas, what are you doing at the till; he answered, he had not meddled with it; I asked him where was the key; he denied having it: I then felt at the till, and looked likewise, and perceiving there was no key, and finding the drawer fast, I immediately insisted he should deliver whatever he had taken out of the till; he denied it a second time; at last, after some hesitation,he pulled out eight penny-pieces, six-pence halfpenny in halfpence, and one farthing; now, says I, the key, and he gave up the key out of the same pocket; I observed to him that was not the key; he said, it is the key; I tried it, and said, an excellent sit, Thomas, indeed, it unlocked the till; I asked him is that was all he had got this time; he said, yes, it was; I felt on the outside of his waistcoat pocket, and observed, as I supposed, some few halfpence in the inside, by the chinking of them; he said, they were his own, that he had them before; he then begged my pardon, and hoped I would not hurt him; I then went to Bow-street, and got a constable.

Cross-examined by Mr. Watson. Q. When you returned from Bow-street, you found him in your shop? - A. Yes; I had desired my journeyman to take care that he should not go.

Q. You had a very good opinion of him, I believe? - A. Yes, I had.

- sworn. - I am journeyman to Mr. Moore; I was coming through the shop at the time Mr. Moore came in; I saw him take the money out of his pocket, put it upon Mr. Moore's counter, and say, that was all he had taken.

The prisoner left his defence to his Counsel.

GUILTY . (Aged 34)

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice HEATH.

762. JAMES CHESTERMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of October , a cloth great coat, value 10s. 6d. the property of William Dart .

WILLIAM DART sworn. - I was at the Ship and Horse Shoe, in East Smithfield , last Monday was a week: I lost my great coat from there, it was a blue surtout coat, I had it on when I went into the house, I pulled it off, and put it on a chair in the back parlour, that was the room I sat in; I might have been in two or three hours before I missed it; the prisoner was in the room; I never saw the coat afterwards.

MARY READING sworn. - I am servant at the Ship and HorseShoe; Mr. Dart pulled off his coat in the parlour; the prisoner came in a little after him; about two hours and a half after that, I saw the prisoner take the coat off the back of the chair, put it on his arm, and go out at the door; I had no thought that it was stolen till the coat was enquired for about ten minutes after.

Q. You knew it was Dart's coat? - A. Yes.

Q. Why did not you mention when you saw him take it? - A. I did not pay any attention, I was taking my reckoning.

Q. Are you sure it was the prisoner? - A. Yes.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not say that you saw a black man take the coat, and go out with it upon his arm? - A. No, a black man opened the door to assist him out, they both came into the house together, and drank together.

MARY RILEY sworn. - I live in New-street; I went into the parlour of the Ship and Horse Shoe, I saw Mr. Dart lay his coat upon the back of the chair; I saw the prisoner take the coat, and go out at the door with it; I told Mr. Dart of it, but he was so much in liquor, he did not take notice.

Q. Did you see the black man? - A. Yes, he was a sidler in the parlour, and after the prisoner was gone away, the black man came back to look for his stick.

KENNETH MACLEOD sworn. - I am one of the headboroughs of St. John's, Wapping: About six o'clock the same evening I apprehended the prisoner on Saltpetre-bank, a little distance from where the coat was taken from; I went over several apartments in the house, and at last found him concealed behind the door; I asked the prisoner what he had done with the coat, the black man was with me; the prisoner and the black man had some conversation together, and then he said he would tell me where the coat was sold; I went to the place where he directed me, but it was not there.

Prisoner's defence. He told me he would let me go if I told him where the coat was; I was very much in liquor. GUILTY . (Aged 20.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron THOMPSON .

763. JOHN FARNHAM , and JOHN, alias WILLIAM DAY , were indicted for feloniouslystealing, on the 22d of October, twenty-six yards of linen cloth, value 4l. the property of William Smith .

WILLIAM SMITH sworn. - I am a travelling linen-draper ; I lost the linen cloth from the Queen's Head , in Tottenham parish ; I left it in the single-horse chaise that I travel in; I saw both the prisoners there; Farnham fed my horse, and when I returned to my cart, they were both there.

JANE GROVE sworn. - I am horse-keeper at the Queen's Head, at Tottenham; the prisoner, Farnham, officiated as hostler; when Mr. Smith missed the linen cloth, I sent a servant up into the prisoners room; then Mr. Smith went up and brought down a knapsack, containing cloth and linen; when he found it was cut, he said he had lost a great deal, and he was ruined; I then went up stairs myself, and found a handkerchief, containing linen; there were two different sorts of prints; it has been in the possession of the constable ever since.

HENRY WALKER sworn. - I am a constable,(produces the knapsack); I received it at the Queen's Head, in presence of the prisoners.

Smith. There is a name in the knapsack, and said, it was not theirs; there was no other knapsack there.

Grave. Day said to me, that it was his knapsack, and desired that I would intercede with Mr. Smith for pardon, for they were both guilty alike.

Smith. The linen is all my property, it has my private mark.

Day's defence. The knapsack is not mine, there were more knapsacks in the room; it was an outer room, free for any body to go into.

Q.(To Grove.) Did you say any thing to Day to induce him to confess? - A. No, I did not.

Farnham, NOT GUILTY .

Day, GUILTY . (Aged 22.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice HEATH.

764. WILLIAM GRANEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of October , four sugar hogsheads, value 20s. the property of Richard Dames .

RICHARD DAMES sworn. - I am a cooper , in Goodman's-fields, the prisoner was my servant , he was employed by me as a labourer : On Friday the 3d of October, he was sent out to the sugar houses where we do business, to bring some empty hogsheads home; he brought home one load from the house of Lucas and Martin, but I do not know how many it consisted of; sometimes we have thirty or forty from one house in a day; I found four hogsheads at Mr. Smith's, a cooper, in Cable-street, St.George's, Middlesex, they were marked H. D. that is the plantation mark, in the West-Indies, No. 2, No. 4, and No. 10. and G. H. No. 5. they agreed with the accounts in the books, and were what he ought to have brought to me from Lucas and Martin's.

STEPHEN SMITH sworn. - I am a copper, No. 36, Cable-street, St. George's; I bought four hogsheads of the prisoner, in Church-lane.

Q. What, in the street? - A. Yes.

Q. You knew him to be Mr. Dames's servant? - A. Yes; the prisoner told me he had got some hogsheads, which he had purchased at the Court end of the town; I asked him whether they were grocer's hogsheads, he answered me, yes; he asked me if I would buy them of him, if he brought them to me; I told him, yes, if they were grocer's hogsheads, I would buy them of him; I saw no more of the prisoner till the third of this month, he came to the cooperage in Cable-street, and told me he had got the four hogsheads that he had informed me of; I asked him where they were, and he told me, in Church-lane, Whitechapel, that was on the Friday; he asked me if I would let the lad go with the truck to fetch them; if they were good, I was to give him five and sixpence for each cask; the lad went with him, and brought three hogsheads on the truck, and one was rolled by another lad that we employed for carrying out casks; when they came, I thought they were not grocer's hogsheads, and I saw no more of the prisoner after; I bought them for my brother, I am in his employ.

Q. Did you apply to Mr. Dames? - A. I meant to go to Mr. Dames, but he came to our cooperage.

Q. How soon after the hogsheads were left there? - A. I believe, about an hour; Mr. Dames saw the hogsheads, and had them back the next day.

Q.The hogsheads that Mr. Dames had away - were they the same that you had received from the prisoner? - A. They were.

Q. What is the difference between a grocer's hogsheads, and your's? - A. In grocer's hogsheads, when sugar is turned out, there is some left in, but the refiners steam them, which makes them quite clean inside.

HENRY BROWN sworn. - I live with Mr. Smith, I went with the prisoner and the truck to fetch the hogsheads from Church-lane, Whitechapel, they stood out in the street; I loaded three hogsheads upon the truck, and my fellow-servant rolled the other; I took them home to my master's.

Prisoner's defence. Smith employed me to get these hogsheads.

Q.(To Smith.) Are you sure that he represented them as grocers' hogsheads, coming from the other end of the town? - A. I am.

GUILTY . (Aged 22.)

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron THOMPSON .

765. THOMAS HINSTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23rd of October , a child's petticoat, value 1d. and four shawls, value 10s. the property of Robert-Jefferies Calow .

ROBERT JEFFERIES CALOW sworn - I am a calico-glazer, in Blackfriars-road; I had four Norwich shawls for pressing and glazing; I sent my child with them, Robert Calow , to Mrs. Knight's, in the Strand, they were wrapped up in a child's petticoat.

ROBERT CALOW called. Q. How old are you?

- A. Ten years of age.

Q. Have you been taught your catechism? - A. Yes.

Q. What becomes of bad people after death? - A. They go to hell.

Q. What becomes of good people? - A. They go to heaven.(Sworn.) I live with my father; I was sent to Mrs. Knight's, in the Strand, I ran after a coach when I was at Temple.b.r, about; seven o'clock in the evening, last Thursday night; the prisoner came up to me, and asked me, if he should lift me up, which he did; he ran behind the coach, till we got to the New Church, in the Strand, then he snatched the bundle from me, and ran away, he was stopped by a person that is here.

Cross-examined by Mr. Watson. Q. Where did you see the prisoner after your bundle was gone? - A. Round the corner of the church.

Q. Then you had lost sight of him? - A. Yes.

THOMAS MARTIN sworn. - I heard a child's voice crying loudly, stop thief, I immediately turned round and saw the prisoner close by me, with a bundle in his hand; I called out, stop him, and then he immediately dropped the bundle, which I picked up, he was stopped immediately; I never lost sight of him. (The property was deposed to by Calow.

Prisoner. I have nothing to say.

GUILTY . (Aged 17.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr.Justice Heath.

766 WILLIAM SMITH and SARAH SMITH were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of September , a pair of linen pockets, value 1s. and four shillings in money , the property of Elizabeth Nuttall , widow .

ELIZABETH NUTTALL sworn. - I am a widow; I live in King's-head-court,Shoreditch; I let a furnished room to the prisoner, Sarah Smith , about three months ago; they left me about a month ago, I believe, last sunday; I saw him the day before; I asked him for the rent; he owed me six shillings and sixpence the following Monday, and on the Sunday they went away; I saw her again the Tuesday week following, and I laid hold of her; an officer came by; I gave charge of her; the was searched at the office, and a pair of pockets found upon her sides by the officer; I had miffed them on the Wednesday after they went away.

Q. Had the access to your room? - A. No; I had a piece of carpet, that lies by the side of my bed, to put my feet upon, and I put the pockets upon the carpet that night, and the next morning, the carpet was found dragged under the door, and the pockets gone.

Q. What money had you? - A. I had one shilling and sixpence in silver, and between four and five shillings in halfpence.

(Simpson, the officer, produced the pockets, which were deposed to by Mrs. Nurtall.)

Sarah Smith 's defence I picked up the pockets upon the stairs, but there was no money in them.

William Smith was not put upon his defence.

Both, NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron THOMPSON .

767. PETER WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of September , a coat, value 21s. the property of Jacob Mayers .

JACOB MAYERS sworn. - I am a shoemaker , in Bridges street, Covent-garden : On Friday the 12th of September, I hung some clothes out in the morning for sale, about nine o'clock; and miffed the coat between one and two o'clock; I went to several rawnbrokers, and found it at Mr. Harrison's in Tottenham-court-road.

THOMAS CHAPMAN sworn - I am servant to Mr. Harrifon, pawnbroker, in Tonenham-court-road; I took in a coat on the 12th of september, bout half past one, and on the Saturday, the prosecutor came and had the coat; on the Tuesday following, the prisoner came and wanted to sell the duplicate of the coat, and I stopped him; he said, it was himself that pledged the coat. (The coat produced, and deposed to by Mayers.)

Prisoner's defence. I bought the coat and paid for it. GUILTY .(Aged 23.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice HEATH.

768. WILLIAM WEBB was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of October , a brush,value 1d. and fourteen fowls, value 21s. the property of Thomas Dorchester .

THOMAS DORCHESTER sworn. - On the 16th of this month, in the morning, I missed fourteen fowls; I had twenty-nine in the whole, locked up in a stable, young and old; the stable-door was fastened with a padlock, which I have in my pocket,(produces it;) I had seen it safe at nine o'clock at night; there were fifteen lost in all, but one of them lay dead outside the stable-door; I saw my fowls again the same morning, in the possession of the watchman; I can swear to the sowls; there were five of them all white, they call them French fowls, their feathers stood quite upright; the stable door was found open in the morning, and the padlock on the ground.

- CARTER sworn - I am a watchman at Action; as I was crying the hour of three in the morning, of the 16th of this month, I turned round, and saw the prisoner close by me; I said, good morning to you, young man; I observed he was loaded with something upon his left shoulder; I clapped my hand upon it, and said, what have you got here, my friend; he said, he had got a few fowls; I asked him how he came by them at that time in the morning; he said, he had fetched them from his brother, on Hillingdon-common; says I, you mean Hillingdon-heath, I suppose, and he said, yes; I put him in the watch- house, and locked him up; I took the property home with me for safety; the fowls were all dead, there were fourteen of them; in consequence of information, Mr. Dorchester came the next morning and claimed them; I found this brush in his pocket, it was on the right-hand side, going into the stable door.

Prisoner's defence. I had been down to Uxbridge; as I was coming to town, I found this bag of fowls.

GUILTY (Aged 34)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron THOMPSON .

769. JOHN HERMAN was indicted for that he, in the King's highway, on the 4th of October , upon Sarah Watson , spinster , did make an assault, putting her in fear, and taking from her person four handkerchiefs, value 1s four shirts, value 5s three petticoats, value 2s. a flannel petticoat, value 6d. four frocks, value 4d. and seven pin-cloths, value 1s 6d. the property of Sarah Allen , spinster .

SARAH WHATMAN called. - Q. How old are you? - A. Eleven years.

Q. Have you been taught your catechism? - A. Yes.

Q. Where do good people go when they die? - A. To God.

Q.And what becomes of wicked people; who takes them? - A. The Devil.

Sworn. - Q. Is your mother living? - A. Yes; I live with my mother, Sarah Allen , who is a washerwoman: She gave me a bundle of linen, on Saturday, the 4th of October, between six and seven in the evening, to carry to Mr. Pennington's, the corner of Chapel-street, Lamb's-conduit-Street; I met that man, (pointing to the prisoner,)and four more, in Ormond-street; he snatched the bundle away from me.

Q. Did he say any thing, or do any thing to you? - A. No. Q. Nor any of the reft? - A. No; I called out for help, and a brewer's servant caught hold of him, he had thrown the bundle away, I saw him throw it, away, I picked it up, and gave it to Sarah Allen .

SARAH ALLEN sworn. - I gave the last witness a bundle of linen to carry to Mr. Pennington's,it is here; it is the same bundle, it belonged to Mr. Pennington's little boy.

WILLIAM FASSON sworn. - I saw the prisoner running as hard as he could, and when he saw me coming, he threw it from him, I stopped.

( William Chapman , the officer, produced the bundle, which was deposed to by Sarah Allen .)

Prisoner's defence. I was employed by a man to carry the bundle as far as the Foundling, and he would meet me there.

GUILTY(Aged 16.)

Of stealing, but not violently .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr.Justice HEATH.

770 WILLIAM HUNT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of October , three pounds eight ounces of lead, value 5d. the property of John Fenn and Joseph Wickenden , fixed to their dwelling-house .

Second Count. Laying it to be the dwelling-house of John Fenn only.

JOSEPH WICKENDEN sworn. - I am in partnership with John Fenn , but I sleep and reside in another house; Mr. Fenn pays the rent of the house; I went up yesterday morning, and saw that there was a piece of lead missing.

JOHN KING sworn. - I am porter to Mr. Wickenden: On Thursday, the 16th of this month, a person came across the way, and said, there was a person at the top of the house doing something that he should not do; I immediately went up, and found the prisoner hammering the lead together, under the stone-work, over the tiling, in the front part of the house; and under his waitcoat I found about three pounds and a half of it.

Q. Did it appear to be newly cut? - A. It wastwisted off, not cut; it appeared to be fresh done; I brought the prisoner down into the warehouse, and a constable was sent for; the lead and the prisoner were delivered to him.

THOMAS HAMPSHIRE sworn. - I am a bricklayer: I was going past Mr. Fenn's, on the other side of the way; I saw the prisoner doing something at the top of the house, and I supposed it was stealing lead; I went and informed Mr. Fenn's people of it.

THOMAS TYRRELL sworn. - I am a constable of the ward of Tower-hill: I was sent for, and took the prisoner into custody; I received this piece of lead from Mr. Fenn's porter, John King, (produces it); it weighed three pounds and a half; I weighed it.

King. This is the same lead; it fits the place exactly.

Prisoner's defence. I was at work upon the top of the next house; I saw this piece of lead lying, and I put it into my bosom, under my jacket; it was laying loose, and this man came up, and laid hold of me.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

771. CADWALLADER JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of October , three wainscot boards, value 5s. the property of John-Hallett Sherwood .

JOHN-HALLETT SHERWOOD sworn. - I am a cabinet-maker in Bartholomew-close.

EDWARD JONES sworn. - I am a constable of St. Bartholomew's: Sumner, the watchman, brought the prisoner to me, about ten o'clock in the morning of Friday, the 10th of October, with these three boards; I have had them ever since, (produces them); he said, he had bought them of a friend; I asked him where his friend was, and he seemed to me to be quite stupidly drunk; he gave me no answer; by and by, he said he would tell the truth; he saw them laying in the street, near the Blakeney's-head, and he picked them up; he appeared to be very much in liquor, and very foolish in his answers, and I sent him to the Compter.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. He was so stupidly drunk, that he did not know what he was about? - A. He was very drunk.

JOSEPH SUMNER sworn. - As I was going round my beat, I met the prisoner at the bar in King-street, with these three boards upon his shoulder; Mr. Sherwood's house is at the back of King-street; I asked him where he had brought them from; he told me, he had brought them from Piccudilly; I told him, he must take them back to the watch-house; I asked him how he came by them, and he said, he came honestly by them, he had got a receipt in his pocket, and he would shew me; then he pretended to put his hand to his pocket, and ran away; he ran about the space of a hundred yards before I caught hold of him; upon that, I took him to the watch-house.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Do you know the prosecutor? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know that there is no getting at his wood, without getting over a high wall? - A. A paling.

Q. That must be worse for a drunken man to get over? - A. Yes.

Q. No drunken man could get over that paling? - A. I should think not.

ROBERT OATLAND sworn. I am an apprentice to Mr. Sherwood.

Q. What sort of premises are these, where this wood was kept? - A. There is a paling, but a man might reach over, and take them out; I was called up by the watchman; I went to the watch-house, and looked at the boards; the man seemed very much in liquor; they were Mr. Sherwood's; I compared two of them the next morning with the others, and the knots and grain, and every thing matched.

Q. Did you miss any of them? - A. Yes; and some of the pegs were pulled out, by reaching over the paling.

Q. What pegs? - A. Pieces of wood put in, to hold the boards up.

Cross-examined by Mr.Alley. Q. You did not see any body take away these boards? - A. No.

Q. How often do you take stock at your house? - A. Once a year.

Q. You have not taken stock lately? - A. No.

Q. And it is only by comparison that you say these boards are your master's? - A. No.

Q. If you had seen one of these boards twenty miles off, you would not have known it was your master's? - A. Yes, if I had compared it.

Q. But not without comparing it? - A. No.

Mr. Sherwood. I have no doubt of their being my boards, from the appearance.

Q. Was it possible for any person to reach these boards? - A. I have tried myself to-day, and cannot do it.

Prisoner's defence. I had been at a benefit club at Doctor's-commons, and had had two or three pipes of tobacco, which I am not used to, and drinking beer and punch, till I was so intoxicated, that I did not know where I went, or what I did, till I waked, and found myself in the watch-house in the morning.

The prisoner called eight witnesses, who hadknown him up to the present time for many years, and who all gave him an excellent character.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

772 NATHANIEL HOLMES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23rd of October , seven charts, value 48s. five printed books, value 1s. 25 sheets of paper, value 1s. three pounds of printers' black, value 2s. the property of Robert Laurie , and James Whittle .(The Case was opened by Mr. Knapp).

ELIZABETH SELWOOD sworn. - Examined by Mr.Knapp. I am the wife of William Selwood , foreman to Messrs. Whittle and Laurie, print-sellers and map-sellers , in Fleet-street ; we live in premises belonging to them, in Bolt-court, in which are deposited maps and prints, and various articles; On Thursday; the 23rd of October, about two o'clock in the afternoon, I was in the parlour; the door was ajar; and, in consequence of information that I received, Mr. Selwood went after the prisoner.

WILLIAM SELWOOD sworn. - I am foreman to Messrs. Laurie and Whittle: I live in premises of theirs, No.8, Bolt-court, Fleet-street: On the 23d of October, about two in the afternoon, in consequence of information that I received, I went to Wine-office-court, and perceived the prisoner walking up the court, I followed him into King's-head-court, leading from Gough-square into Shoe-lane; at the second turning, on the left hand, I lost him; I saw him again, in the course of the afternoon, at the warehouse in Bolt-court.

Q. Did you go to any public-house? - A. I did not, the prisoner lodges at Mr.Sabine's, the Crown and Anchor, in King's-head-court.

Q. When did you go there? - A. Not at all.

Q. Were you present when the prisoner was apprehended? - A. Yes, at No.8, Bolt-court, where I occupy.

Q. Did you hear any thing that passed? - A. No, I did not hear any thing particular.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. If any thing had passed, you must have heard it? - A. Yes. Q. This house was under your control and direction, you had the management of it? - A. Yes Q. You were answerable for all the property deposited there? - A.Certainly.

Q. If through your negligence any thing is lost, you would have to answer for it? - A. I should have the blame of it.

Q. And you would have to pay for it too? - A. No, I should not.

WILLIAM MARCH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am the ward-beadle of Farringdon- without; I live in Fleet-street: On the 23d of October, I was sent for to the house of Meffrs, Laurie and Whittle; I went to Mr. Sabine's a public-house, in King's-head-court, on the left side; I went up stairs to the apartments in which they said the prisoner lodged, and at the further end of the room, upon a bedstead, I saw some clothes, and under those clothes, I found these maps, prints, charts, and books, (producing them); Mrs Sabine and her brother, Mr. Whittle, and Mrs. Selwood were present; Mr. Whittle took an account of them in their presence, and claimed them as the property of him and his partner; I then went to Mr. Whittle's warehouse, in bolt-court, and apprehended the prisoner; I took him from there to the Compter, and before the sitting Alderman the next day.

Q. Was what the prisoner said there, taken down in writing by the clerk? - A. Yes, I believe it was.

Q. Before he got to the Magistrate, did you hear any thing that the prisoner said about this business? - A. No.

Q. Are you certain that the clerk took it down? - A. He was writing; I cannot tell what he was writing.

Cross examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You took this man at the warehouse? - A. Yes.

Q. I suppose there cannot be a more proper place to find an honest man, than in his master's warehouse? - A. No. Q. He lodged at the public-house? - A. Yes. Q. There were other persons who had access there, as well as the prisoner? - A. Yes. Mr. Knapp.( To Mrs. Selwood). Q. After the prisoner was gone out from where you lived, you went to Mr Sabine's house? - A. I did. Q. Did you go into the apartment which you were told was the prisoner's? - A. Yes; and there I saw some charts and maps, which said upon a bedstead, under a blue coat; after I had looked at them, I placed them there again; Mrs. Sabine was with me; when we came out, she locked the door; I desired her to keep the door locked till somebody came back with me; I then gave information to Mr. Whittle, and went with Mr. Whittle; I shewed him where the property laid; when I went back, the door was open, and the maps and charts exactly in the state, in which I left them; Mr. Whittle claimed them, and wrote in one of the books.

Q. Are these the sort of things that you saw? - - A. Yes; I then returned home.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Do you know the difference between a chart and a map? - A.Certainly, when I see them.

Mr.Knapp. Q. Whatever they were, Mr. Whittle claimed them as his own? - A. Undoubtedly.

JAMES WHITTLE sworn. - Examined by Mr.Knapp. My partner's name is Robert Laurie ; the prisoner was my servant, and has been a number of years; In consequence of information, I went with Mrs. Sallwood, and Mr. March, to Mr. Sabine's, the Crown and Anchor, in King's-head-court, Shoe-lane; we saw Mrs.Sabine; we went up into the prisoner's room, and on a sort of bedstead, we found a quantity of charts and maps; there was one of them that he had been at work upon, and another, that had rough edges, not in a state in which they are when they came to my shop; they were not trimmed round; they were damp, and appeared not to have been out of the warehouse two hours; these are the charts of the British channel, which are very large, and are folded up in a small compass; whereas those which come to my shop, are trimmed round the edge, and as smooth as marble, fit to show a gentleman.

Q. Were these charts, or any such, ever suffered by you to be taken to his lodgings? - A. Never.

Q. Would these charts, in the state before they are prepared for sale, be in that damp state? - A. No; they are always put upon the line to dry; here are live books of directions for sailing, which are printed for me, and which I believe to have been taken away from my warehouse.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley, Q. How long has this man lived in your house? - A. Twenty years; he was formerly a porter.

Q. Did you not engage him to take work home for his wife and himself to do, for you? - A. Some time ago, I did, some few trisling charts; but never did I suffer any of these large charts any where, but in my own warehouse.

Q. You have been in the country yourself; who conducted your business in your absence? - A. My partner, and his son.

Q. What there conduct towards the prisoner might have been, you cannot say? - A. I am sure they would never suffer these sorts of charts to go out.

Q. You have sold a vast number of these sort of things? - A. I have.

Q. You do not put a memorandom upon every one you sell, with the day of the month? -

Mr. Knapp. Q. Have you any doubt, from the appearance, and the view of these charts, that they are your's? - A. I am confident, in my own breast, that they are mine.

Q. Have you a copy-right in them? - A. I have. ELIZABETH SABINE sworn. - Examine by Mr. Knapp. I am the wife of James Sabine ; I keep the Crown and Anchor, in King's-head-court; the prisoner at the bar lodged in our house, and has done three months: On the 23d of October, Mr. March, Mrs Selwood, and Mr. Whittle, came to our house, and I shewed them up stairs, the prisoner had been home, and gone again; he went up, he had been gone again about a quarter of an hour; when I went up stairs, I saw these things found.

Q. They were in his room? - A. Yes, upon a bed sacking, where there was no bed; and his great coat upon it.

Q. Nobody else slept in that room? - A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Did he generally lock his room-door when he went out? - A. No

Q. Any body might have gone in, and seen these things? - A. Nobody went into the room, but him and myself.

Q. Did not the servant go in to make the bed? - A. Yes.

Prisoner's defence. I do not admit the taking of these things away, but times are very hard, and I had but a very small pittance; I did not take them with any view of defraud; I had only sixteen shillings a week, out of which I allowed my daughter eight shillings a week to learn a business, and that made me take them, with a view of making a few shillings upon them, till a friend came to town that I expected to assist me.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character. GUILTY , ( Aged 52.)

Confined one year in Newgate , and whipped in the jail .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

773. ANN RICE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of September , a silver watch, value 3l. a watch chain, value 3s. and a seal, value 2s. 6d. the property of William Bowen .

WILLIAM BOWEN sworn. - Q. Are you a single or a married man? - A. A married man , I am a journeyman tin-plate worker : On Friday the 26th of September, coming through Fleet-street about eight o'clock in the evening, the prisoner asked me to give her a halfpenny towards some beer.

Q. Were you drunk or sober? - A. I was sober then; I said, what, are you in want of a half-penny? she said, yes, she was; I said, I was rather dry myself, we would go and have a pint together; she took me to a public-house, in Shoe-lane, the Red-hart, we had a pint of beer, and after we had drank that, she asked me to give her a drop of gin; I gave her some gin, which she drank, and I drank with her, for about an hour or two.

Q. You had got drunk by that time, I suppose? - A. A little freshisn; I then got up, with intent to go home to my lodging, she came out of doors with me, and went a little way with me; we were out some little time together, and then she went away from me, and I lost her; when she went from me, I felt for my watch, and missed it; I thought it was of no use to go back to look for her thatnight; I went in the morning to the public-house, and the landlord sent for a person that knew where the prisoner lived; then I got a constable, Edward Drewett , and I went with him, and we searched the prisoner's apartments, we found her there; I told him, that I was the woman, I am certain she is the same woman; I asked her to give me the property again; she said, she had not got it, she knew nothing of it; I said, you had better give it me, or worse trouble will come of it; she said, she knew nothing of it, and the constable searched about and found the duplicate of the watch; I went to the pawnbroker's upon snow-hill, and found my watch there without the chain and seal, the maker's name is Durham, Liverpool; I knew it again the moment I saw it; there are several bruises in it that I Know it by.

Prisoner. He gave me the watch to pawn.

Brwen. I did not give her the watch to pawn, upon my oath.

Q. Were you sober enough to know whether you did or not? - A. Yes.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not go with me to three places to get a guinea upon the watch? - A. I never went out of the house, till I went out with her.

Q. Is there any truth in that? - A. There is not. Prisoner. I gave him half a guinea that I got upon the watch.

Q. Is that true? - A. It is not; I never had any money from her.

EDWARD DREWETT sworn. - I am a constable: On Saturday, the 27th of September last, the prosecutor came to my house; I went with him to Red-lion-court, Saffron-hill, where we found the prisoner; the prosecutor said, that was the woman: he asked her for the watch; she said, she had not got it; I told her, she had better give me the watch, if she had got it; she said,she had not; I searched the room, and found three duplicates in the said of a tin saucepan, and underneath it, I found the duplicate of a watch, (produces it); I took the prisoner to the Compter; I then went to the pawnbroker's, and found the watch; the prosecutor claimed it.

JOHN MERRITT sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Cordy, No. 79, Snow-hill: On saturday morning, the 27th of September, between eight and nine in the morning, a man pledged this watch (producing it) for twenty-seven shillings and sixpence; it is a silver watch, with a steel key to it, and a bit of ribbon.

Q. Look at that duplicate? - A. It is a duplicate of this watch.

Jury. (To Bowen.) Q. What time did you go into the house in Shoe-lane? - A. About eight o'clock.

Q. How long did you stay? - A. About an hour or two.

Q. Cannot you tell within an hour? - A. About an hour and a half.

Q. Which way did you go, when you came out of the house? - A. Down shoe-lane.

Q. Between ten and eleven o'clock, I suppose? - A. Yes.

Prisoner's defence. He gave it to me to pledge for him, and we went to several places till twelve o'clock at night; I pledged it for him, and he wanted at the door; we had drank a great deal of gin, and I was so very much intoxicated, that I do not know how I got home; when I waked in the morning, I was laying upon the bed with my clothes on, and I had never been out from that time till the constable came.

GUILTY , (Aged 29.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

774. JOSEPH TURNER and ALEXANDER HOOD were indicted, the first for feloniously stealing, on the 13th, of September, eight tallow candles, value 13d. the property of Ambrose Bradbury , and the other for receiving the same,knowing them to be stolen .(The Case was opened by Mr. Alley).

AMBROSE BRADBURY sworn . - I am a tallowchandler in Upper Marybone-Street, Portland-place ; I have lived there ten years; the prisoner, Turner, is an articled servant of mine; he was articled to me for two years; he has been with me six months; in consequence of some information, I took the prisoner, Turner, into custody.

Q. He was taken to Bow-street? - A. Yes.

Q. Was what he said there taken down in writing? - A. No, it was not; he said, he had taken candles to Hood, and received liquor for them; Mr. Hood did not attend to the summons; he was not there.

Q. Where does Hood live? - A. In Norton-street, about two hundred yards from me; he is a publican; on the day of the first examination, the 13th of October, the prisoner, Hood, came to my house, and I asked him into the parlour; there were two gentleman there, promiscuosly; I said to him, pray Mr. Hood, have you received any of those candles which my man has robbed me of; his answer was, I received two pounds, or two pounds and a half, or three pounds, to be sure.

Q. Did any thing else pass, with respect to the candles, in the present indictment? - A. No.

Q. Was Hood before the Magistrate, upon the second examination? - A. Yes.

Q. Did he give any account of the transaction? - A. No. Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp.Q. What is the value of two pounds, or three pounds of candles? - A. Three pounds we sell at two shillings and seven-pence halfpenny.

Q. You have charged thirteen-pence; do you mean to say that eight candles amount to that? - A. No.

Q. Hood was not taken up by a warrant, was he? - A. I do not know whether it was a warrant or a summons.

Q. Do not you know, in point of fact, it was a summons? - A. They told me it was a summons.

Q. He told you that he had received candles from the prisoner? - A. Yes.

Q. Is Footman here? - A. Yes.

Q. He was an apprentice of your's? - A. Yes.

Q. When did you find out that you missed some candles? - A. About six week before; I had a fuspic on before that.

Q. Was there any complaint lodged against you before the Board of Excite; and was the prisoner, Turner, a witness against you to support that information? - A. I do not rightlyunderstand you.

Q. There was a complaint lodged against you before the Board of Excite? - A. Yes.

Q.Was not Turner a witness against you upon that occasion? - A. I do not know that he was; I always understood, that in case that matter came forward, he would be a witness for me.

Q. Do not you know that he was a witness against you? - A. No.

Q. How long after you had missed the candles did the Commissoners of Excise make their complaint? - A. About ten days.

Q. Did you ever make any complaint against Turner or Hood, before the complaint had been exhibited before the Commissioners? - A. No.

Q. You do not know whether the eight candles, in the indictment, were all taken at one time? - A. No.

Q. Was it possible for you to miss eight candles? - A. No.

JAMES FOOTMAN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. I have lived with the prosecutor six months; the prisoner; Turner, is my Fellow-servant.

Q. Did you see him at any time do any thing particular in the store-house? - A. Yes; I saw him take eight candles off the rods, about six weeks ago, one morning, between four and five o'clock; he put them in a sheet of paper, put them inside his coat, and then took a bottle, and went out; he was gone about ten minutes; when he came back, he said he had been to Mr. Hood's; he brought back some gin, and said he had given Mr. Hood the candles for the gin.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. These eight candles were taken six weeks ago? - A. Yes.

Q. When did you tell your master of this? - A. I did not tell my master, because he was always telling me my master would not find it out.

Q. Then you partook of the gin? - A. I had a little the first time; and he has been giving me things to wear, not to tell my master.

Q. And you have been so wicked as to see your master robbed, and to parrake of the plunder? - A. Yes.

JOHN WILSON sworn. - I am a tallow-chandler's I served my apprenticeship to Mr.Bradbury.

Q. Do you know Mr. Hood? - A. Yes; I saw him at Mr. Bradbury's house; Mr. Bradbury said to him, pray, Mr. Hood, have you received any of those candles I have been robbed of; he seemed very much alarmed, and said, yes, Mr.Bradbury, I have; then Mr. Bradbury said, pray, how many have you received; I have received about two pounds, two pounds and a half, or three pounds we will say, to be sure, at different times; I asked him if he made no objection to received them, he said, no, he had received all that Joseph Turner brought him, and had given him liquor for them.

Cross-examined by Mr, Knowlys. Q. When Hood came in, did he not say, that all he received from his young man was two pounds and a half, or three pounds, five or six months ago? - A. He did not say how long ago it was.

Q. Did he not say it was four or five months ago? - A. No.

Q. Was there no mention of time? - A. None tah.

Q. Hood was admitted to bail? - A. I believe he was.

Q. And he has come here to take his trial? - A. Yes.

Turner's defence. I am not guilty.

The prisoner, Hood, left his defence to his Counsel, and called twelve witnesses, who gave him a good character.

The prisoner,Turner, called four witnesses,who gave him a good character.

Hood, NOT GUILTY .

Turner, GUILTY.

Of stealing to the value of 11d.

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

775. MARY WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of September , two window curtains, value 15th. a waistcoat, value 2s. and a muslin cloak, value 2s. the property of Thomas Pearson .

THOMAS PEARSON sworn. - I live in Chandos-street : On Saturday the 20th of September, in the evening, I lost these articles from my apartments; I missed them about eight o'clock in the evening; the prisoner was a stranger to me; I found them again the same evening, at a pawnbroker's in Chandos-street; I took a curtain with me to matchit; I found the clock, the waistcoat, and both the curtains there; I have a private door, which is frequently open.

GEORGE WIGNELEN sworn. - I am a pawnbroker in Chandos-street, (produces the property): On Saturday, the 20th of September, between seven and eight in the evening, the prisoner at the bar brought these two curtains, a waistcoat, and cloak, to my shop; she had been in the habit of coming to the shop, but had always redeemed the things, so that I had no suspicion of her; she pledged the curtains for fifteen shillings;she then gave a ticket to my young man of a pair of ear-rings, for four shillings; and she left the cloak and the waistcoat for the ear-rings, which she took away; she had a very different appearance from that she has now; she was dressed very genteel; about an hour after that; Mr. Pearson sent a little boy to me with a pattern; I compared it, and found they were the same curtains; I then sent word to Mr.Pearson, that I had taken them in; she gave me her address, Wharton's-court; I went there on the Sunday, but no such person lived there, and on the Monday, the next day, she came to my shop again, to pledge the very ear-rings that she had redeemed on the Saturday; in consequence of that, I told her the curtains were stolen;she said, they were given to her by a young man who had been a compositor, and was now at the Star printing-office, his name I do not recollect; I told her, if she did not produce the person, she would be answerable for it; I sent for Mr. Pearson, and took her to Bow-Street;she there said,she had received them from this man, and described him to have something remarkable upon his cheek.

Q. Was what she said taken in writing? - A. I am not certain; the Magistrate granted a warrant or summons to apprehend the man; the man came, and from his appearance, answered every description she had given of him; and when he came, she said he was not the man.

Pearson. These are my curtains.

Prisoner's defence. I watched for a young man of the name of Thomas Johnson; he owed me six shillings; he called upon me, and asked me to lend him two shillings; he said,she could get a place in the Star printing-office; I told him, I could not; I pledged a petticoat of my own for four shillings, and I let him have the two shillings on the Saturday night; he said, he wanted some money to go to work on the Monday, and he brought me these things to pledged for him, which I did

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron THOMPSON .

776. THOMAS MIMMS was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Stephen Watkins , about the hour of twelve in the night of the 31st of August , and burglariously stealing two coats, value is 11s.a jacket, value 1s. a pair of shoes, value 1s. 6d. a pair of stockings, valuers. and a shirt, value 3s. the property of the said Stephen.

STEPHEN WATKINS sworn. - I am a gardener , in the parish of Isleworth ; I was not at home at the time of the robbery; my wife and I were both at Newgate-market.

WILLIAM KILSBY sworn. - I keep a clothes-shop at Brenford: On Monday, the 21st of September, between nine and ten in the morning, the prisoner brought me a jacket and a coat, which I bought of him; I asked him if they were his own property, and he said his uncle had given them to him; he said, he was out of work at that time; I hung the jacket out for sale, at the door, and Mrs. Watkins came and claimed it; the prisoner came again, to ask me to buy something else, and I stopped him; he persisted in the same story, that his uncle had given them to him.

Q.(To Watkins). Who left the house last, you or your wife? - A. I did; we left the house about half past nine, the night before, Sunday; it was dark then; I saw the windows all safe; we returned together.

Q. Did you observe any marks of violence? - A. Yes; a pane of glass was taken out, and the shutters were open; we returned on the Monday evening, between five and six o'clock.

- EAGLES sworn. - I am a constable, (produces the property).

Kilsby. These are the same that I received from the prisoner.

Watkins. These shoes I know to be mine, by a cut in the toe, when I was cutting savoys; the jacket, I know, by two holes burnt by the fireside, drying.

prisoner's defence. They can't prove that I broke the house open.

Q.(To Watkins ). Did you know the boy before? - A. He had worked for me and for my father.

The prisoner called John Trufs , who had known him four years, and gave him a good character.

GUILTY. ( Aged 16.)

Of stealing the goods, but not of breaking and entering the dwelling-house .

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice HEATH.

777. MARY BYRNE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of October , three cotton shawls, value 9s, and fourteen yards of printed cotton, value 8s. the property of Robert Robinson , privately in his shop .

NOAH SIMONS sworn. - I live with Mr. Robinson, linen-draper , No. 62, Broad-street, St. Giles's : On Monday, the 20th of October, between eight and nine in the evening, the prisoner came to our shop with a child, and asked for some printed cotton for a bed-gown; I showed her several; she seemed very much intoxicated, and insensible of what she did; she convinced me she wanted the article, by shewing me a half-guinea in her right hand; I then paid her more attention, and she bought a remnant of print, which came to seven shillings and fourpence; then she bought a yard of white calico, which came to ninepence, and a pair of women's common black stockings, fourteen-pence; I gave her change for half-a-guinea, and she went away with the child; she might have been in the shop, altogether, about a quarter of an hour; there were prints, and other goods, lying upon the counter.

Q. Did you miss any goods? - A. No; there were three young men in the shop, besides, all the time; there was a report that a woman was taken up with linen-drapery goods upon her, and I went to the watch-house from curiosity; that was about three quarters of an hour after she had left the shop.

Q. Are you sure that the prisoner was the same woman? - A. Yes; there I saw two remnants of print, three cotton shawls, and the print I had sold her; the remnants of print were of a different pattern from what I had sold her; she had one remnant that I had not sold her, of six yards, and another of eight yards.

Q. Whose property were they? - A. Mr. Robert Robinson 's; I had seen the remnant of six yards about one o'clock, at the furthermost end of the shop; the others I do not recollect to have seen.

Q. The prisoner could not possibly have taken it from the futher end of the shop? - A. No; she could not; whether it had been moved since one o'clock I do not know.

Q. You observed her to take nothing but what she had bought of you? - A. Nothing.

GEORGE RUSSELL sworn. - I live about six or seven doors from Mr.Robinson's; I apprehended the prisoner for another offence, at my shop-door, about nine o'clock at night; I took her to the watch-house, and going along, I observed some print hanging out of her apron; it was wrapped up in her apron, under her child and two shawls; when we got to the watch-house, we found another shawl under her stays; Mr.Robionson's young man opened them; I have had them ever since. (produces them).

JOHN COLLIER sworn. - I am a headbrough: I assisted Russell in taking the prisoner to the watch-house; I took two shawls from out of her apron;

she was very obftreperons,and wanted to lie down at my door, No7, Drury-lane; I saw the print in her apron, and I faw another shawl taken from under her ( says, in the watch-house).

HEBDITCH sworn. - I am a watchman: I had charge of the prisoner from Mr.Russell, and saw the things taken from her.

Simons, Both these remnants have got Mr. Robinson's shop-mark, which was put on when we took stock; they are in the hand writing of one of our young man; there is Mr.Robinson's handwriting upon one of the shawls; they were all three in one piece, but they are now separate; they have not been cut; they have been torn apart, and torn into the border.

Q. Will you undertake to swear that these things were not sold by your master, or in his shop? - A. Yes.

Q. If these remnants had been sold, would they have been sold with these marks upon them? - A. They would.

Q. Prisoner's defence. I paid for what I bought, and come out of the shop; when I had got about three doors from the shop; I kicked my foot against something; I stooped down, and picked up these things, and put them in my apron.

GUILTY. (AGED 29.)

Of stealing to the value of 4s 9d.

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron THOMPSON .

778. MARY DELANY , alias SMITH , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 31st of July , a gold watch, value 10l. a silver table-spoon, value 5s. and a silver tea-spoon, value 1s. the property of Sarah Ewald .

SARAH EWALD sworn. - I keep a house in Leicester-street, Liecester-square ; the prisoner was my servant ; I had seen my watch, which was a French gold hunting-watch, and the spoons, in the table-drawer in the parlour, on the 30th of july; I am very certain the drawer was locked, and I had the key by my side; I missed it on the 2d of August; I saw the watch again, on the 4th of this month in the possession of Mr.Bright, a jeweller.

Q. Did the prisoner leave your service? - A. Yes, early in the morning of the 31st of July; I had paid her wages the night before; she was only to be empolyed as a chairwoman; the next day she was apprehended in St.James's workhouse, in the name of Smith; I could not find her by the name of Delaney.

SAMUEL BRIGHT sworn. - I am a jeweller in St.Martin's-court, Leicester-square: On the 1st of August, the prisoner came to my shop, and offered a gold watch for sale; she said it was in pawn forfour guineas and a half, for one Miss Rice, living in Hemlock-court, Carey-street; I stopped the watch, suspecting it was stolen; she said, if I would send any person with her to Hemlock-court, I should be convinced that it was right; my servant girl accordingly went with her, but came back again without her. (Produces the watch).

Q. What is the value of it? - A. Eight or nine guineas, I suppose; I applied to Bow-street immediately, and they advertised the watch.

JOHN WARREN sworn. - I am an officer: I took the prisoner, a pauper, in St.James's work-house, in the name of Smith; she voluntarily confessed, before the Magistrate, that she had the watch.

Q.(To Mrs.Ewald) Are you sure the drawer was locked? - A. Yes.

Q. And did you find it locked? - A. Yes .

Q. Is that your watch? - A. It is; There is no particular mark upon it.

ISAAC FISHER sworn. - I told Mrs. Ewald a French gold hunting watch, similar to this; but I cannot take upon me to say that is the identical watch.

Prisoner's defence. I know nothing at all of it; I never robbed her in my life; she keeps a disorderly house. GUILTY Death (Aged 55.)

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice HEATH.

779. EDMUND BURKITT was indicted for feloniously forging and counterfeiting, on the 16th of September , a certain order for the payment of the sum of 95l. with intent to defraud George, Lord Kinnaird , William Morland , Scrope Barnard , John Hosier , and Henry Bowes .

Second count. For uttering the same knowing it to be forged, with the like intention.

And two other Counts, for a similar offence, with intention to defraud Edward Stables .

Jacob Michael , a Jew boy, the only witness to prove the uttering by the prisoner, having prevaricated, and given different accounts of the transaction, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr.Justice HEATH.

780. THOMAS WHITE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of October , an iron bar, value 10s. the property of Richard James Thomas Weatherhead and Thomas-Turner Weatherhead .

THOMAS WEATHERHEAD sworn. - I live at Wapping; I am in partnership with Richard James , and my son, Thomas-Turner Weatherhead ; On Wednesday the 15th of October, we lost this iron bar from our premises, upon the ruins occasioned by the fire; I saw it in the afternoon of the Wednesday, upon the ruins of a chimney that had fell down, it had laid there ever since the 6th, when the fire happened; I saw it again afterwards, in the possession of a labourer of our's.

THOMAS MOWATT sworn. - On the 15th of October, Mathew Wayland, a labourer to Messrs. James and Weatherhead, desired me to come with a candle to Green-bank, St. George's, Middlesex, a few yards from Messrs. James and Weatherhead's premises; I went with a candle; and about twelve yards from my own door, I saw the prisoner standing with an iron bar in his hand; I asked him how he came by it; be seemed confused, and told me a man had given it him; I took him to my house at the time; the bar was carried to the Thames Police-office.

MATTHEW WAYLAND sworn. - On the 15th of this month, about seven o'clock in the eveing, I was sitting at my own house, within about twenty yards from the place where the bar was taken from; in consequence of information that I received, I came out, and saw the prisoner with a bar in his hand, close to the gate of the prisoner; when I came near him, he put the bar out of his hand; I put my hand down and found it was iron; he then moved across the way, and screened himself against a door, like; he then walked in to a public-house, I followed him, and saw him get some beer; I asked him whether it was too hot or too heavy for him, that he had left it; he said, what; I then desired Mr.Mowatt to let me have a candle, and there was the prisoner again standing with the bar in his hand; I did not see him pick it up the second time; I took the prisoner into Mowatt's house, and there was kept till he was given charge of; I know the bar to be the property of Messrs James and Weatherhead, beacuse it was made for a particular chimney.

RICHARD PERRY sworn. - I am an officer; I took charge of the prisoner; and have had the bar ever since. (Produces it).

Weatherhead. This is my property; as old iron it is worth ten shilling; it cost us a great deal more, and it will answer the same purpose again.

Prisoner's defence. I picked the iron up exactly where they stopped me.

Q.( To Weatherhead) How are your premises secured? - A. By a gate, and a lock, which he must have a got over.

GUILTY . (AGED 35).

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the first Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baran THOMPSON.

781. HENRY QUENNEL and THOMAS MILES were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 7th of October , a hop-pocket, value 5s andtwo hundred pounds weight of hops, value 40l. the property of George Beldham .(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

GEORGE BELDAM sworn. - I am a farmer , at Wrecklesham, in the parish of Farnham, in the county of Surry : On Friday the 3rd of October, I had seen twelve bags of hops in the kiln with my mark, G. Beldam, and the Excise mark; and on the Sunday morning, the 5th, I missed one; I observed the bars of the window pulled out; then I went and got the key, and went into the kiln, and missed a whole bag, containing one hundred three quarters and ten pounds; I think they must have been cut asunder, for the bags were full big to get out at the window; there were some hops dropped under the window; and a pretty many on the out side; I traced them, by the hops, for about a mile and a half; I heard afterwards that they were at Hounslow, and I went there on Wednesday; I saw the hops at Brentford, and two of the pockets were put up in the same cloths that my hops were in; there were some bags turned inside out, and some marks upon them that I shall be able to ascertain them by.

Cross-examined by Mr. Peat.(Counsel for Mills.)

Q. Is there any other person concerned in the firm with you? - A. No.

Q. How do you know that the hops you found were your hops? - A. By tracing them from the Kiln; and they are of the same quality and colour.

Q. Do you mean to swear to hops? - A. No.

Q. There were many others of the same quality and colour in your country? - A. Yes.

SAMUEL SPREADBOROUGH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp I drive the Farnham coach; I know the prisoner, Quennell, but not Miles: On Sunday the 6th, upon Hounflow-heath, I overtook a cart with three horses, and three men with the cart; there were two men lying flat in the cart, one of them was Quennell, because he lifted up his head, the other did not; they were lying upon some straw, and there was something underneath, because they laid so high in the cart; upon seeing him look up, I suspected farmer Beldam's hops were there, and I mentioned it at Hounslow.

JAMES BROWN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. In consequence of the information of Spreadborough, I observed a cart going through Hounflow, and three men with it; they were all three strangers to me; the two prisoners were walking by the side of the cart, and Everitt, the accomplice, was driving; I followed them, and passed them; I saw them go into the yard of the Three Pigeons; Mr. Wale then jumped into the cart, and pulled out a little pocket of hops, and took Everitt and Miles; Quennell went on a little way, and I went after him, and told him to come back, and he came back with me; Mr. Collett locked up the hops, and kept the key.

Cross-examined by Mr. Peat. Q. Did Miles make any resistance? - A. None.

- WALE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a constable at Brentford: I saw the prisoners, Quennell and Miles, walking by the side of the cart; I apprehended them; I saw the hops taken out of the cart; Everitt said, he had borrowed the cart, and the horses were his own; he said, they were stopped in time, for they meant to sleep at Brentford; the hops were put into a stable, locked up, and the key delivered to Collett.

Prisoner Quennell. Q. I ask you whether I had not every opportunity of escaping? - A. He came back voluntarily.

CHARLES COLLETT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a constable at Brentford; the hops were delivered to me; they had been in my possession ever since, under my lock and key, produces a pocket of hops); upon Miles I found a paper of powder for making ink, to mark hop-bags with,(produces a bag); this bag was full of hops, and they were turned out before the Magistrate to search for a mark, which Mr. Beldham swore to.

Q.(To Wale). Is that the bag you delivered to Collett? - A. There were nine bags.

Q. Is that one of them? - A. I cannot say.

Collett. This is one of the bags that I received from Wale.

Beldham. Here is the Farnham stamp upon this bag, but it has been altered; and here is, in the seam, part of the cypher of the so, which I saw the exciseman put on, to the best of my knowledge.

Cross-examined by Mr. Peatt. Q. There are a great quantity of hops grown in the county? - A. Yes.

Q.Hops are various, in size and quality? - A. Yes.

Q. There are a great many hops, besides your's, of the same size and quality? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you never see the exciseman make more than one ought? - A. I never saw that man mark but that one ought; he marked all the twelve bags.

- EVERITT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Harry Quennell , Thomas Miles , and his father, got the hops out of Mr. Beldham's hop-kiln.

Q. How do you know that? - A. They told me so; Harry Quennell told me, he cut the bag in two; the first I saw of the hops was, on Fleet-pond Common, about three or four miles from Mr. Beldham's, as they told me, for I do not know where the place is; old Mr. Miles hired me, with two of my horses, to fetch them from the common; we changed the bags, and put them into others; they were not long enough to ride upon the horses; then they were put upon the horses, and we went on to old Miles's; they were all four together then; they were there all the Monday, andon the Tuesday we took them up, and brought them in the cart to Brentford; there was a little bag sold at Staines, as nigh as I can recollect; the two prisoners sold it.

Q. Had you any part of the profit? - A. No farther than victuals and drink; I had no money; we were all taken up at Brentford.

Cross-examined by Mr. Peat. Q. All that you have been describing about the hops being taken, is what you were told by other persons, and not what you saw yourself? - A. Yes.

Q. There were a great many robberies of hops in that part of the country? - A. I cannot say.

Mr. Knapp. Q. What you have been describing, was told you by other persons; those other persons were the prisoners? - A. Yes.

Quennel's defence. I never saw either of the men before, in my life, till the Sunday as I was going across, Fleet-Pond Common, and there I saw old Miles and Everitt upon two horses; and that is all I know of it.

Miles's defence. My father owed me three guineas, and he asked me to remove these hops; I did not know that they were stole, nor I do not now.

Quennel, GUILTY . (Aged 27.)

Miles, GUILTY . (Aged 21.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice HEATH.

782. ANN JOHNSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of September , a cotton gown, value 3s. and a pair of stays, value 6d. the property of William Parker .

MARY PARKER sworn. - I am the wife of William Parker; I live in Church-lane, St. Giles's : The prisoner lodged in the same room with me three nights, about five weeks ago; I missed my property the very morning she left the house; I had but that one gown to my back; I have it on now; I had pulled it off the night before; I saw the gown that very day week, hanging for sale in Monmouth-street; the prisoner was taken with my stays on, last Tuesday.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not lend me the things to wear? - A. I did not; I know nothing at all about her taking them; she left behind her this rag of a shawl that I have got on, and an old bed-gown.

GRACE MACBRIDE sworn. - I keep a shop in Monmouth-street: Five weeks ago last Monday, the prisoner came in to buy a bed-gown of me; she said the must sell the gown she had on; she asked me three shillings for it; she pulled it off, and I gave her my bed-gown, which was one shilling and sixpence, and one shilling and sixpence more in money; she came again last Tuesday to sell a bedgown not made up; I told her I did not think it was her own; I did not recollect her till she had got out at the door, and then I followed her, and took her into custody; I delivered up this gown, and paid her half-a-guinea besides; the gentlemen at Bow-street said I must do it, to pay her for her trouble, or else I must go to prison; and I borrowed half a guinea in Court.

Q.(To Parker.) Where are the stays? - A. I have left them at home; I am sure they are mine; I am sure this gown is my own; she herself at Bow-street said that she had got my stays on, and pulled them off.

Prisoner's defence. She lent me the things the over-night.

Q.(To Parker.) Did you receive half-a-guinea? - A. Yes.

Q. What was that for? - A. For my loss.

Q. But why was that woman, Grace Macbride , to pay it to you? - A. I cannot say.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave her a good character. GUILTY. (Aged 26.)

Of stealing goods, value 10d.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before

Mr. Baron THOMPSON .

783. WILLIAM DOLLAR was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of October , two bars of iron, value 15s. the property of Joseph Bennel .

There being no evidence to show that the property was ever in the possession of the prisoner, he was ACQUITTED .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice HEATH.

784. ISAAC JONES and JOHN CLARKE were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of October , one hundred feet of fir timber, value 4s. and fifty feet of oak timber, value 2s. the property of Martha Wade and Martha Port .

Second Count. Laying it to be the property of Thomas Wade .

LEONARD LAMMAS sworn. - I am a constable of the parish of St. Sepulchre's Without : On the Ist of October, I had information of some people plundering a brewhouse in Three-Fox-court , belonging to Mr. Wade; I went there between five and six in the evening; it is an empty brewhouse; I saw Clarke in the brewhouse; and Jones was brought to me by Mr. Styles: I kept them in custody, and took them before the Magistrate, and that same evening I took a cart-load of timber from the premises where Clarke worked, in Three-Fox-court; Styles was with me, and Mapham; the timber consisted of fir, and oak, and deal slabs; in Bartholomew-fair week there was a great fall of timber in the brewhouse; I saw styles mark the timber.

Q. Who was it that pulled the timber down? - A. I do not know; we suppose these men; there was a great quantity of it.

THOMAS WADE sworn. - I am only agent for the proprietors of the premises; I am agent to the estate: These premises belong to Martha Wade and Martha Port; I cannot swear to the timber; I can only say that the premises have suffered greatly.

- STILES sworn. - I am a butcher: In Barthoronew-fair week I and three or four more that are here, were in this brewhouse; and I marked, I may safely say,forty pieces of timber of different sizes; I marked them with a knife; there had been a fall of timber, it lay cross-ways, as if the building had been undermined; a great deal had fell: on the Ist of October Styles charged me, in the King's name, to aid and assist him; I saw Jones throw a saw out of the building, and then jump after it himself, and as soon as he was out he made the best of his way off, and I persued him; then he turned round and made a stroke at my leg with the saw, which went under my feet; I gained ground upon him, and struck him with a stick, which was the means of my apprehending him; I secured Clarke also, in the brewhouse; Lammas came to me immediately; I delivered him to Lammas; as soon we had put them in the watch-house, Lammas and I and the patrole went to the house where Jones said he lived, in Three-Fox-court, and found twenty-six pieces of timber; part of it is here; we went that same evening to the house where Carke said he worked, he did not live there; I had seen him at work there, bundling small bundles of wood for lighting fires; it was an empty house that they had taken possession of; Jones told me he was a sawyer: when we came to look it over we found a great number of pieces marked.

JOHN EVANS sworn. - I live in Fox-court, in a parallel line with the brewhouse: On the 26th of September; I saw Jones carry a great deal of timber out of the brewhouse; I have seen him and Clarke repeatedly, times without number, carrying wood away, and have reproved them many times; I did not take any particular notice when I saw them together; but I have seen Clarke on the premises on the 20th of September; they were joists, and large pieces of girders.

Court. (To Mr. Wade.) Mr. Wade, you have charged this as a joint taking, whereas the evidence is, that the one has taken at one time, and the other at another; you must now make your election against which you will go -

Mr. Wade. I will go against Clarke, then.

Evans. I saw Clarke, on the 20th of September, carrying timber out,of the brewhouse; some person inside handed it out, and he carried it away.

Q. How came you not to have him apprehended? - A. There was nobody came forward to prosecute, nobody took notice of it; it was nobody's business.

Q. The fall you speak of was accidental, was it not? - A. No; the girders were all sawed off close to the wall, and so let down by villainy.

(Styles produces one of the pieces of timber found in the house in which Clarke worked.) I am certain this is one of the pieces that I marked; Clarke has claimed the horses that he cut the wood up upon; and that he tied the bundles up with; he claimed them himself at Hatton-garden, and had them from us.

Clarke's defence. On the Ist of October the boys in the brewhouse were throwing stones, and to prevent their breaking my windows, I went into the brewhouse to drive them away (it is an open place and has been for these two years) when this gentleman came and laid hold of me; I have lived twenty-one years there, and never had a stain in my character. Jones, NOT GUILTY .

Clarke, GUILTY . (Aged 48.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron THOMPSON .

785. JOHN SINISTER and ELIZABETH KNIPE were indicted, the first for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of September , a cotton gown, value 16s. the property of Charles Sharpley , and the other for receiving the same, knowing it to be stolen .

MARY SHARPLEY sworn. - I am the wife of Charles Sharpley, a perfumer , in Holborn : I know nothing of the prisoner; I lost a cotton gown from behind the counter, which I had been at work upon; I had left it upon a stool, behind the counter, to go to dinner, very near two o'clock; I was sitting in the parlour, with the door open, at the time; Crocker, the Bow-street officer, came in about ten minutes after I had left the shop.

EDWARD CROCKER sworn. - I am one of the patrols belonging to Bow-street: On the 10th of September, I was going up Holborn; I observed the prisoner, Sinister, standing against the window of the prosecutor; I stood a minute or two, and saw a man come out of the shop with something under his coat; I observed the prisoner, Sinister, follow him immediately up Brownlow-street; I ran over to the shop, and asked the prosecutrix if she had lost any thing; she missed a gown; I went up Brownlow-street with Mr. Sharpley, but could not find the prisoner; on the 23d of September, the prisoner came to Bow-street to make affidavit about a watch, and I knew him again immediately; Limbrick, another of the patrol, came over to me, and asked me to look at the pattern-piece, which I had got; I went over towards the Brown Bear , opposite the office, and there the prisoner, Knipe, was standing with this gown upon her back,(producing it); I took her into the office, and immediately went to Mrs. Sharpley, and she came forward, and swore to the gown.

RICHARD LIMBRICK sworn. - I am a patrol: when Sinister was in custody, I asked Crocker if he knew the girl that he lived with; I had often seen them together; and Crocker came out, and took her into custody.

Mrs. Sharpley. This is my gown; I know it by my own work.

Sinister's defence. I know nothing of the gown; I came voluntarily to Bow-street.

Knipe was not put upon her defence.

Both NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice HEATH.

787. WILLIAM WRIGHT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of October , a gold ring set with pearls, value 36s. three cornelian seals set in gold, value 3l. 3s. a pair of silver buckles, value 12s. a pair of other silver buckles, value 26s. a steel watch-chain, value 10s. a gold ring, value 3s. a silver thimble, value 1s. 6d. and a gold seal with a topaz, value 20s. the property of Richard Clarke , and William-Boyce Clarke .

WILLIAM-BOYCE CLARKE sworn. - My partner's name is Richard Clark , we are silversmiths and jewellers in Cheapside; the prisoner was our porter : On Monday the 13th of this month, John Dawson, a witness, called at my house, and shewed me a ring set with pearls; in consequence of which, I apprehended the prisoner, and my property was produced before the Lord-Mayor, which I can identify.

WILLIAM BRYSON sworn. - I am a working-goldsmith; the prisoner sold me a gold seal, I cannot exactly say when, but it was immediately after the riots at Snow-hill; the prisoner told me he found it there, (produces it); I gave him nine shillings and sixpence for it, which is the full value of it, as old gold, for it is an engraved seal, and of no use to me as a workman.

JOHN BRIDGEN sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Barker, a pawnbroker in Houndsditch: On the 27th of September, a pair of silver buckles was pledged, but I am not positive that it was by the prisoner; I afterwards saw the duplicate at the Mansion-house; they were pawned for eight shillings.

RICHARD TIPPER sworn. - I am a city-officer: On Monday the 13th of October, in consequence of a warrant, I went to the prisoner's apartments, in company with Mr. Canner, the marshal; in searching the bed-room, we found a little deal-box, which was locked; I called the wife of the prisoner; she could not find the key, and we broke the box open; on searching the box, we found a pair of silver buckles, a steel chain, a silver thimble, a gold ring, and a duplicate of a pair of silver buckles; I shewed the duplicate to Bridgen, got the buckles, and took them to Mr. Clarke, and he claimed them.

Mr. Alley. Q. How do you know they were his apartments? - A. His wife was there.

JOHN READ sworn. - I was with the last witness; I know no more than he does.

Court. Q. Do you know that they were the prisoner's apartments? - A. No; only what his wife told me.

Q. How do you know it was his wife? - A. She passes for his wife.

JOHN DAWSON sworn. - I am a silver-manufacturer and jeweller: On the 9th of October, the prisoner brought this ring to me; he had, before the 9th, called, and told me it was a lady's ring that was pawned for a guinea and a half; it is a pearl ring; he said, he was to give half-a-guineafor the ticket; and, on the 9th, he came, and said, I should have it for two guineas and a half; I told him I would give him two pounds ten shillings; on the Monday following, I went to Mr. Clarke's, and he claimed the ring.

Q.(To Mr. Clarke.) Does any body know where the prisoner lived? - A. Yes, I myself.

Q.(To Tipper). Where did you get these articles that you have produced? - A. From a barber's shop upon Snow-hill, opposite St. Sepulchre's-church; I do not think there is any number to it.

Q.(To Clarke). Where did the prisoner lodge? - A. I only know from what my servants have told me.

WILLIAM CANNER sworn. - I am one of the City-marshals: At the time the prisoner was taken to the Compter, he told me that his lodgings were at a hair-dresser's shop, at the top of Snow-hill, and I went with Tipper, according to his directions, to the first house on the left-hand, opposite the church-yard, where I saw a woman, who answered to his name, and I understood was his wife; he told me the person's name that kept the house, but I have forgot it.

(All the property was deposed to by the prosecutor, having his private shop-mark upon them, except the ring and the tumbler).

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You have a pretty extensive business? - A. Yes.

Q. I take it, when you sell things, you do not take off the shop-mark? - A. No.

Q.Therefore, I might have a ring with your mark to it, which I might have very honestly come by? - A. You might, if you bought one at my shop.

Prisoner's defence. Mr. Clarke came to me at the Compter, and said, he would shew me all the lenity that he could, if I confessed every transaction, which I did; Mr. Dawson has been a great deal more to blame than me; he has asked me many times for patterns of things, and he has influenced me very much. GUILTY . (Aged 33.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

788. EDWARD PERSALL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of October , twenty pounds of leaden pipe, value 4s. the property of the United Company of Merchants trading to the East-Indies , fixed to a certain building of theirs .(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp).

SAMUEL BURGIN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a watchman belonging to the India-Company: On Saturday, the 25th of this month, I was upon my station at Cutter's-street, New-street, Bishopsgate-street, to protect a house under repair, belonging to the East-India Company; the prisoner was a labourer, working under the plaisterer to the Company; between five and six o'clock on Saturday last, in the evening, I observed the prisoner coming into the building, and suspecting that he had something about him which he ought not, I stopped him, and asked him what he had got about him; I then called for assistance, and desired him to unbutton, and he unbuttoned the bottom of his waistcoat, and there was some lead concealed, which dropped; I called for the constable; when he came, I gave him charge of the prisoner, and he was taken to the Compter, where I delivered the lead to the constable; on the Monday morning, I went with the foreman of the plumbers to the building, and found the lead fitted.

- FRANCIS sworn. - I am a constable, (produces the lead); I was called to the assistance of Mr. Burgin; I took the prisoner into custody in Bishopsgate-street; Mr. Burgin had a piece of lead in his hand, which he delivered to me at the Compter; I searched the prisoner, and under his waistcoat I found another piece; he wore an apron, which helped to keep it up; the prisoner said he was very sorry for what he had done; on the Monday following, I went with the foreman, and Mr. Burgin, to the premises; we took the lead with us, and searched round the building to see where the lead was missing; there was one side like a closet, and a leaden pipe ran down by the side of it; we matched these pieces, and they fitted; it appears to have been broken off very lately.

- FOSTER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am foreman to the plumber, employed by the East-India Company; I went to compare this lead with the premises, and found it sit as high as possible; it was broke off, but what was taken from the prisoner is not enough to make good the deficiency.

Prisoner's defence. I beg for mercy; I have a family. GUILTY . (Aged 62.)

Publicly whipped , and discharged.

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

789. JANE EVANS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of October , a sheet, value 5s. the property of Sarah Robinson , widow .

Second Count. Laying it to be the property of the Mayor and Commonalty of the City of London , and of the hospital of St. Bartholomew, near West-Smithfield, London, of the foundation of King Henry VIII .

SARAH ROBINSON sworn. - I am a widow, a sister of St.Bartholomew's-hospital; the prisoner has been employed by me as nurse for a month, all but two days; she went out on Wednesday the 29th of October, in the morning; she was stopped by the pawnbroker, and I was sent for.

HENRY BATT sworn. - I am servant to Mr.Fleming, in Newgate-street,(produces a sheet); I stopped it, with the prisoner, last Wednesday morning, she offered it to pawn; I stopped it in consequence of St. Bartholomew's-hospital being stamped upon it; I sent for an officer, and she was secured; I have kept it ever since.

Robinson. I know the sheet by two holes in the corner, besides the ward-mark, (looks at the sheet); this is not the same sheet that I saw at the Mansion-house, this has no holes at the corner; but it is the same sheet, for I have had it in my possession ever since. (The witness locked again and found the holes).

Prisoner's defence. I picked up the sheet in the Square, coming from Little-Britain to the Hospital, and took it into the ward; the next morning, after I had done the ward-business, I went to the pawnbroker's, and he stopped me; I did not see the mark.

GUILTY (Aged 51.)

Privately whipped and discharged.

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

790. JOHN SIMMONS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of October , eight whips, value 3s. a snaffle, value 2s. and two bits, value 2s. the property of John Wyatt .

JOHN DENNIS sworn. - I am a patrol; as I was going my rounds on Sunday evening, the 5th of October, I met the prisoner, and two more, in West-street, commonly called Chick-lane; upon my coming up, they ran away, and I followed them; the prisoner at the bar threw this parcel down in the kennel; upon that, I called to my partner, William Dodd , to pick up the parcel, but he did not; I called out stop thief, and the prisoner turned up a place where there was no thoroughfare, the King's-arms Yard; I followed him, and kept in sight of him all the way, till he got behind some logs, where he hid himself, and there he was taken by Morgan and Dodd; I went back to the place where he had thrown down the parcel, where I found it in the kennel, (produces the property); I have had it ever since.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. What distance was this place from Goswell-street? - A. About half a mile.

Q. Was this a place through which he could possibly have escaped? - A. No; without he got over the gates.

Q. Did not you say, before the Magistrate, that you saw one of the other two men drop it? - A. No.

Q. Had you ever seen the prisoner before? - A. No.

Q. Do you mean to swear that that was the man who dropped the bundle? - A. Yes.

Q. You did not see his face? - A. Yes, I did, by the lamp.

JOHN WYATT sworn. - I am a sadler and whipmaker, in Goswell-street: I know this bit to be mine, it is a very particular one, I made it for a particular person; they are plated bits, and a part of the plating is knocked off in cleaning, that is what I know them by.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Any bit might have met with a similar accident? - A. Yes; but I am certain they are mine, because I have had them in the house a considerable time; the whips are my own make, they are quite out of the present fashion; I know the snassle to be mine.

DAVID MORGAN sworn. - I am a private watchman, in West-street: I saw the prisoner, and two others; Dennis called stop thief, and they immediately ran away; I ran across the street to stop him, and he ran up this yard; I did not see the prisoner drop the bundle; I followed him up the yard, and there we found him concealed behind some timber; I took him to the Compter.

WILLIAM DODD sworn. - I am a patrol belonging to St.Sepulchre's: On Sunday the 5th of October, my partner, Dennis, and I, going up West-street, we saw the prisoner, and two others, running; the prisoner turned up the King's-arms Yard, I did not see him throw away the property; we found the prisoner concealed behind some timber, in the same yard; I am certain the prisoner is the same man.

Prisoner's defence. I was going up West-street, I turned up that yard to ease myself; I know nothing about the property.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character. NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

791. ROBERT ELLIOTT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of October , six pounds weight of iron nails, value 2s. the property of Francis Sills , Joseph Sills , and Jonathan Sills .(The case was opened by Mr. Gurney.)

THOMAS WRIGHT sworn. - I am a labourer in the service of Messrs. Sills, in Upper Thames-street; between the hours of three and half past four, I was on duty as a watchman, upon the Hambro' Wharf I suspected the prisoner; he went down the Whars, and went into the privy, and came out again; there were some bags of nails standing upon the Whars, near the privy-door; I saw the prisoner cut open one of the bags of nails, and fill his pockets, they were the property of Messers. Sills; I called Mr. Sills, and he and I met the prisoner about twenty yards from the nails, Mr. Sills immediately took hold of him; the prisoner then said, I have got two or three nails to repair a summer-house; he was taken into the accompting-house, and the nails takenout of his pocket; there were six pounds odd, the constable has got them.

Prisoner. Q. Was any knife found upon me? -

A.Not that I saw.

- HUGHES sworn. - I am a constable; I was called to take charge of the prisoner; I received the nails of Wright. (Produces them).

Wright. These are the same nails.

JONATHAN EARLE sworn. - (Proves the firm of the house.) I received the nails before they were delivered to the constable; they weighed six pound odd; the nails were Mr. Sills's property; I weighed the bag, and found six pounds three quarters deficient.

Prisoner's defence. I had no knife at all about me.

For the Prisoner.

- HORDER sworn. - I am a pavier: The prisoner served his time with me; from me he went to work for Mr. Charles Hamerton , and when he left Mr. Hamerton he came to me again; he has worked nine years for me as a journeyman; he was in my service at the time he was apprehended; and if he should be extricated from this, I should be glad to take him into my service again.

GUILTY . (Aged 32.)

Whipped one hundred yards in Thames-street, near Hambro' Wharf .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

792. JOHN HUGHES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of October , fifty-one bed-screws, value 4s. twenty-five nuts for screws, value 1s. and a buckle, value one farthing , the property of James Lambeth .

SUSANNAH LAMBETH sworn. - I am the wife of James Lambeth, at No. 85, Shoe-lane, Fleet-street : On Saturday fortnight, the 11th of October, the prisoner came in, and asked me if I bought iron; I looked at it, and bought it, it weighed twelve pounds; as I was no way suspicious, I did not think he was a thief, and in going out at the door, I saw him take a box, containing the articles mentioned in the indictment; I made out after him, but he went so quick that I could not see which way he went; an officer came up to the door and asked what I had lost, and I told him; and in a short time after that, the prisoner was brought back by the officer; I knew the property again.

JOSHUA BRAY . sworn. - I am a constable: On the 11th of October, I stopped the prisoner on suspicion, with his brother, in Fleet-lane, with the screws and nuts in his hat before him, and I delivered them to Mr. Lovett, in Fleet-lane, hat and all; his brother was discharged before the Magistrate on the Monday morning.

- LOVETT sworn. - I am a paper-maker,(produces the property); I received them from Bray; I saw them taken from the prisoner in Fleet-lane; in about a quarter of an hour, or less, Bray and I went to Mrs. Lambeth, and told her we had got them; I lodged with Mrs. Lambeth, and she told me she had lost the screws, and I went with Bray in pursuit of them; I carried the screws and the nuts back to shew her, and have kept them ever since. (They were deposed to by Mrs. Lambeth).

Prisoner's defence. - I am lame with one hand and cannot do any work, and I go to the water-side and pull in the boats, and some gentlemen give me a penny, and some a halfpenny; I found some iron where they were mending the bridge, upon the causeway, and a boy gave me this iron; my father has been dead three years last August.

GUILTY . (Aged 14.)

Confined six months in Newgate , and fined 1s.

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

793. HENRY ROPER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of October , three miniature pictures, value 4l. three towels, value 6s. six china plates, value 6s. two salt-cellars, value 6d. a china dish, value 1s. ten yards of lace, value 20s. an earthenware pint mug, value 2d. a tin saucepan, value 6d. and six plates, value 1s. 6d. the property of John Blackburn , in his dwelling-house .

There being no evidence to shew that the apartment, in which the property was found, was occupied by the prisoner, he was ACQUITTED .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

794. JAMES BARRAS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of October , two brass candlesticks, value 2s. the property of James Born .

JAMES BORN sworn. - I am a publican , I keep the Hole-in-the-wall in Kirby-street, Hatton-garden ; the prisoner is a stranger to me; In consequence of information from my servant, I saw the prisoner take one of the candlesticks out of his pocket in Charles-street, Hatton-garden; I took the prisoner to Hatton-garden office; my servant has had them ever since.

FRANCES HATTON sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Born: On Friday the 10th of October, between eleven and twelve O'clock, the prisoner came into the parlour and called for a glass of ale, for which he gave me two penny-pieces, and told me to keep the halfpenny; as I was going to fetch the pot-horse in, I saw him come from the fire-place to where the candlesticks were, and I went, into the parlour and missed two; I asked him if he had got any candlesticks, he said, no, he had not, and then he went out; I told my master, and he ran after him, and brought him back with the candlesticks, they were in his pocket. (Produces them).

Born. These are the candlesticks that were taken out of the prisoner's pocket.

Prisoner's defence. May it please your Lordship; and you Gentlemen of the Jury. At the time this happened, I was very much distressed indeed, having been seven weeks in the hospital; after my deliver ance from there, I endeavoured to get an honest situation, during which time I was under the necessity of pledging my watch and wearing apparel; and I solemnly declare, that for three days previous to this I had not eat any victuals; Mr. Born offered me to serve his Majesty by land or sea, and an application was made for that purpose, but I was found too old for service; I throw myself upon your Lordship's mercy to inflict what punishment you please upon me.

The prisoner called James Egginton , who had known him sixteen years, and gave him a good character. GUILTY . (Aged 48.)

Confined one week in Newgate , and fined 1s.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

795. GEORGE CLAYTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of September , two paintings on copper, in gilt frames, value 18s. the property of William Dawes .

WILLIAM DAWES sworn. - I am a broker , at No. 30, Little Queen-street, Holborn : On Monday the 29th of September, between seven and eight o'clock in the morning, I lost these two paintings on copper; I can only prove them to be my property. (Produces them).

JAMES BERRYMAN sworn. - I am servant to Messrs. Simpson and Houghton, in Holborn: On Monday the 29th of September, between seven and eight o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner go into Mr. Dawes's shop, with a bag in his hand, and put two paintings into it; I met him in the middle of the street, with the bag and the paintings in it; I took him back to the shop, and delivered him, and the bag with the paintings, to Mrs. Dawes; these are the same paintings that he had in the bag.(The paintings were deposed to by the prosecutor).

Court. Q. Is Mrs. Dawes here? -

Prosecutor. No; she told me, in the hearing of the prisoner, that these were the paintings that Berryman had brought back with the prisoner.

Prisoner's defence. I was just come out of the workhouse, and could scarce get work enough to supply my need; it was necessity made me do it.

GUILTY . (Aged 63.)

Confined six months in House of Correction , and publicly whipped .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

796. WILLIAM HUMPHREYS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of September , five pair of scissars, value 4s. five other pair of scissars, value 4s. five other pair of scissors, value 4s. and five other pair of scissors, value 4s. the property of Horatio Lewis .

Second Count. Laying them to be the property of James Gibbs .

HORATIO LEWIS sworn. - I am a cutler , No. 137, Bond-street; the prisoner had been in my employ about a week or a fortnight: When I lost my scissars, in consequence of suspicion, I got a search-warrant, and searched his boxes; we found the articles mentioned in the indictment; he confessed he had taken them.

Q. Did you make use of no promise that it would be better for him if he would confess? - A. No.

Q. Nor threaten him if he did not? - A. No.

Q. How came you to lay them to be the property of James Gibbs ? - A. I succeeded Mr. Gibbs in his business, and we did not know the time exactly when they were taken; but they belong to one or the other.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. He did not confess that he took any thing belonging to you? -

A. No, he said they were taken before.

Q. Is Mr. Gibbs here? - A. No.

SAMUEL HAMILTON sworn. - I am an officer: I found these scissors in the prisoner's box,(Produces them.)

Q.(To Lewis.) You do not know these things?

- A. I know they were in the shop the day before the things were appraised to me, and the numbers marked upon them.

Mr.Knowlys. Q. That was three months before you had possession? - A. No, one day before.

The prisoner left his defence to his Counsel, who was about to call twenty witnesses to the prisoner's character; but the Court observed that in the case of servants robbing their masters, they must have had a good character, or their masters would not have employed them. GUILTY . (Aged 18.)

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice HEATH.

797. JOHN BERWICK and ROBERT CANNON were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of September , three hens, value 4s. the property of George Dennett .

GEORGE DENNETT sworn. - I live in Gray's-inn-lane Road : On Sunday morning, the 28th of September, I missed three hens; the watchman stopped the prisoners with them.

JOHN MURPHY sworn. - On Saturday night, the 27th of September, between ten and eleven, I was on duty as watchman to Mr. Dennett; he is a cow-keeper; I heard a noise of the fowls while theywere killing them; they were upon a beam in the off; there was a ladder across the beam; the prisoner Berwick was upon the ladder; Cannon was below; he had the fourth fowl in his arms; they were just killed; I laid hold of them both, and secured them; three of the fowls belonged to my master, and the other belonged to a neighbour.

Donett. I saw the fowls afterwards; they were my fowls; the fourth was a cock belonging to my neighbour; the prisoners both worked for me at the time.

Berwick's defence. I was rather in liquor; I went up to lie in the barn; I was asleep when the watchman came to me; I know nothing about the fowls.

Cannon's defence. It was so late, I could not get into my lodging, and this barn was open; I went in to sleep, I saw no fowls.

The prisoner, berwick, called Joseph Gunn, a chymist and druggist, in Tottenham-court-road, who had known him nine years, and gave him a good character.

Berwick, GUILTY . (Aged 20.)

Cannon, GUILTY . (Aged 26.)

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron THOMPSON .

798. THOMAS DONNISON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of October , a yard and three quarters of printed calico, value 4s. one yard and a quarter of yellow calico, value 2s. four yards of striped linen, value 4s. a yard and a half of bed-ticking, value 4s. one yard and a half of printed calico, value 4s. a yard of other printed calico, value 1s. 6d. a yard of other printed calico, value 2s. 6d. ten yards of printed cotton border, value 1s. 6d. two yards of carpet border, value 1s. two yards of tammy, value 2s and three pieces of Morocco leather, value 3s. the property of William Snell .(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

RICHARD OVEY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Cliston. I am a furniture-printer in Tavistick-street; I have supplied Mr. Snell with printed furniture for some time: On the 6th of October, in consequence of information, I went to Mr. Jones's, and there I saw a remnant in his window, a yard and three quarters of a new pattern, of which I had sold four or five pieces to Mr. Snell.

Q. Had you sold any of it to any other person? - A. I had only sold one other piece, which is properly accounted for.

Cross-examined by Mr. Const. Q. Do you mean to swear positively you had sold no more? - A. Yes.

- JONES sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a piece-broker in Wych-street; Mr. Ovey applied to me; I delivered to him some pieces of furniture, which I had bought of a woman.

Mr. Const. Q. You do not know the prisoner? - A. No.

THOMAS CARPMEAL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Cliston. I went with Mr. Snell and Mr.Ovey to the lodgings of the prisoner, where I found these things(producing the property); we took the prisoner with us from Mr. Snell's shop; his wife was at home, and a little child; I found part of the things between the bed and sacking; he confessed that he had taken them.

Q. Were any promises or threats made use of? - A. No; this piece of ticking I found under the bed; it is four yards of striped linen.

Did the prisoner say any thing about the piece found at Jones's? - A. His wife said; in the presence of the prisoner, that she took it to Mr.Jones's

WILLIAM SNELL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am an upholsterer, in Hanover-street, Long-acre; the prisoner was my foreman; I trusted and reposed every thing in him; he had a guinea and a half a week, besides the liberty of making any thing at over hours, which amounted in all, I am sure, to more than a hundred guineas a year; I went to his house, and found these things, which Carpmeal has produced; they are all my property; this piece, found at Jones's, is also mine; I was present in the room when he acknowledged his guilt, and begged for mercy.

Q. Was that a voluntary confession? - A. Yes.

Q. Have you any doubt of these articles being your property? - A. No more than of my own existence.

Q. Did you ever suffer him, or give him authority, to take such articles home? - A. No; he did work for me at over hours, but never such things as these; I had not the smallest suspicion of him till the morning before. GUILTY . (Aged 38.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr.Justice HEATH.

799. THOMAS DEAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of October , two pair of silver buckles, value 20s. the property of George Price .

GEORGE PRICE sworn. - I am a goldsmith and jeweller , No. 89, Oxford-street, the prisoner was my porter : In consequence of an information that I received, I sent for a constable to examine the prisoner's box, which was in a kind of back kitchen; the prisoner was present; he had the key of the box; I asked him to open his box, and he paused for sometime; he then unlocked his box, and took out a great coat, in the pocket of which were twopair of silver buckles, which I delivered to the constable; they were my buckles, and had a private mark upon them, searched upon the chape.

Q. If you had sold them, would that mark have been taken off? - A. No.

Q. Had you missed them? - A. No, I had not.

Q. When had you seen them? - A. I had not seen them for some months before.

Q. How long had he lived with you? - A. About ten weeks.

JOSEPH THOMPSON sworn. - I am a constable,(produces the buckles); I found them in the prisoner's great coat pocket, in his box.

Price. I can speak to them from the pattern, having had them in the house a number of years, and likewise from the private mark; I cannot say whose mark it is, it was put on so many years ago.

Prisoner's defence. My Lord and Gentlemen, I met a young man of my acquaintance about six or seven weeks ago, near Temple-bar, and, after some conversation, he told me he wanted a pair of silver buckles, and desired me to get him a pair; he told me not to get them of my master, but of some workman; I let it elapse for some time, and, on last Wednesday evening, Mr. Price and the shop man were up stairs at tea, I went to the glass case, where I was authorized to go, and took out these two pair of buckles; I put them in my inside coat pocket; I took out one of the buckles to give it a rub with a leather, and the shopman, coming down stairs,observed me put it in my pocket again, but he took no notice of it, and, in the morning, the constable was sent for; I locked the coat up in my box, in order to keep it clean; I told him, they were to shew a young man, and if he had chosen the buckles, I should have asked Mr. Price what he would have let my friend have them for; I am extremely sorry that I did not apprize Mr. Price that the young man wanted a pair of buckles first.

Court. (To Price.) Q. Before he opened his box, did he say any thing about having buckles there? - A. No, he did not; I did not understand him to have said any thing before the box was opened.

Thompson. He said, before I searched his pocket, that there was something there which was not his own, but was Mr. Price's.

Mr. Price. I had a very good character with him. GUILTY . (Aged 17.)

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron THOMPSON .

800. RICHARD KNIGHT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of October , a leather cover for a chaise, value31. an iron bill-hook, value 1s. six linen bags, value 3d. an oil skin apron, value 2s. an oil skin cover for a hat, value 3d. and two geese, value 3s. the property of Charles Pratt .(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

THOMAS JOHNSON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am servant to Charles Pratt , of Tottenham: On Saturday night, the 18th of October, I saw the coach-house safe; I locked it up about seven in the evening; the next morning, about half past six, I came to the coach-house, and sound the lock broke open; I missed a smock-frok, an iron bill-hook, two live geese, and the leather apron from the chaise.

WILLIAM RANN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am a labourer, servant to Mr. Summers: On Sunday, the 19th of October, I went to fetch the cows out of the field, between five and six o'clock in the morning; I saw a tall man go out of the foot-path to the other side of the field, with something under his right arm; he went to the hedge, and then he got into the ditch, and then he returned to the foot-path; he had no parcel with him then; and then he came within fifty or sixty yards of me.

Q. Was he near enough for you to see his face?

- A. No; I went home, and milked the cows; after that, I went to the ditch, and found a goose dead, with the feathers on; I then returned to my master, and acquainted him of it; I left the goose on the same spot; then my master went to look at it, and I know no more of it.

- SUMMERS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I live at Tottenham: In consequence of an information I received from the last witness, I went and fetched a goose home from the ditch, and shewed it to Mr. Pratt; it remained till six o'clock in the evening at my house; I then carried it to the place where I took it from, and watched it some time; and then Mr. Hill and Mr. Iredale watched.

JOHN HILL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am a constable at Tottenham; I was upon watch in the field at Mr. Pratt's request, a few minutes after six in the evening, and about half past seven, the prisoner at the bar came by the side of where I redare and I were, in the ditch, lying upon the ground; we saw the prisoner stooping down to lay gold of the goose, and then we seized him; we took him to the Red Lion, and found upon him four sample bags, which Mr. Pratt claimed; then we secured him; he said, he was in liquor, and was going to lay down to sleep. (Produces the bags).

Mr. Const. Q. What did he say about the bags?

- A. That he had found them.

THOMAS IREDALE sworn. - I was with the last witness; the prisoner is the man; we took him as he was stooping down to take up the parcel.

Mr. Const. Q. It was placed so that any body might see it? - A. No, it was not; it was put in among the nettles and briars; and it was very dark.

CHARLES PRATT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. It was my chaise-house from which I lost these things; three of these sample bags were part of a parcel that I bought the latter end of July, and, on the other, is Mr. Morley's name, in my hand-writing; I have no doubt but they were in my chaise-box at the time it was broke open; I saw the goose, but it was impossible for me to swear to it; it had every appearance of being mine; Thomas Johnson was in the habit of feeding the geese,

Johnson. I know it to be Mr. Pratt's goose by the marks of the feathers; I had fed it about two months.

Prisoner's defence. I found these four small bags, as I was going to work, in the path-way.

For the prisoner.

WILLIAM MYONETT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Const. I am a labourer: On Sunday, the 19th of October, I called the prisoner up, between five and six o'clock; he followed me, and my father, to the Ferry-house, where he overtook us, and we all went together, and he was at work with us at the oil mills till between five and six o'clock; the foundation had given way, and we had been at work three Sundays running; on the Sunday morning, at breakfast, between eight and nine, he produced four sample bags; and said, he had found them coming down to his work; he did not say where.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Where do you live? - A. Near the Roebuck.

Q. You did not lodge in the same house with the prisoner? - A. No.

Q. And, therefore, whether he was in bed, or up, you do not know? - A. No.

Q. You did not see him find these things? - A. No.

Q. Did he tell you he had found a goose? - A. No.

Q. Did he tell you he knew of a goose? - A. No.

JOHN CHITTY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Const. I am a labourer at the same place; I lodge within about twenty yards of the prisoner; the last witness is the man that generally calls him, and then calls me; we went to our work on Sunday, and continued there all day; I found, by his talk, that he had found some bags as he was coming to work, and he shewed them to us; he was at work with us all that day.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. You did not see him find them? - A. No; he was at work before me.

Q. Did he tell you he had the good luck to find where a goose was hid? - A. No.

Court. Q. Do you know where Mr. Pratt's coach-house is? - A. Yes, I go by it.

Q. And the prisoner goes by it? - A. Yes.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury,before Mr. Justice HEATH.

801. WILLIAM MORRIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of October , a sack, value 3s. and a bushel of beans, value 7s. the property of John Shore .

JOHN EAGLES sworn. - I am servant to John Shore , at Hanwell, in Middlesex; the prisoner lived servant with Mr. Shore, as carter : On Monday last, between three and four, I delivered to him two bushels of beans; he had three horses to look after; and these beans were to last a fortnight; they were in a sack, almost new, with my master's name upon it; I delivered them to him in the barn, where I was threshing.

Q. Where they horse beans? - A. No, they were garden beans, but they were for horses.

WILLIAM GROVES sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Shore: last Monday evening, I saw the prisoner take the beans to Eades's house; I saw him coming from the yard with the sack; I was about thirty yards from the yard-gate; I passed him, and turned my head, and saw him go in at the wicketgate of Eades's house; I did not see him go in at the door; Eades is a blacksmith.

JOHN SHORE , jun. sworn. - I am the son of the prosecutor; the prisoner had the care of my father's cart horses; the beans were kept in a bin; the prisoner had the key; on Tuesday morning I went to the bin, got a hammer, and drew the staple, and found but half a bushel of beans in the bin.

NATHANIEL HARDIMAN sworn. - I am a constable of the parish of Hanwell: On Tuesday the 28th, I went to Eades's house with Mr.Shore, the elder, with a search-warrant; I found this sack, containing something more than a bushel of beans.

Shore. This sack is mine; it has my name on it -

"J.Shore;" I bought it last July; the beans are Nassagin beans; I had offered them to a seed-shop in London, but we did not agree, and I sent them out for my horses; he had lived with me but ten days.

Prisoner's defence. I own I am in fault, but I am not the person that did it; there were others concerned besides myself. GUILTY . (Aged 16.) Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron THOMPSON .

802. JOSEPH TURNER and ALEXANDER HOOD were indicted, the first for feloniouslystealing on the 10th of September , nine tallow candles, value 17d. the property of Ambrose Bridbury , and the other for receiving the same, knowing them to have been stolen .

The object of this prosecution being to convict the accessery, the principal having been already convicted, and there being no evidence to shew that he had received candles to the value of 17d. at one time, the prisoners were Both ACQUITTED .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice HEATH.

803. WILLIAM PARCOX was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of October ,a shirt, value 5s. a pair of stockings, value 2s. a neck handkerchief, value 1s. a pair of pantaloons, value 2s. a cloth coat, value 4s. a waistcoat, value 2s. two shillings, a sixpence, three penny pieces, and five halfpence , the property of Thomas Barnett . THOMAS BARNETT sworn. - I am a Georgian; I was steward on board the ship Suspicious ; I lodged at Mr.Hamilton's, the corner of Neptune-street , the White Hart: On Saturday morning, the 18th of this month, between four and five in the morning,I received an alarm from the maid of the house; I got up, and missed all the clothes that I pulled off before I went to bed; the prisoner slept in the same room in another bed, for that night only; I go to bed very early in general, and he went up with me, I think, between eight and nine o'clock; when I came down stairs in the morning, the servant-maid had hold of him by the collar, and the bundle in her hand.

SARAH GOWARTH sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Hamilton, the corner of Neptune-Street; Thomas Barnett lodged in the house; the prisoner lodged there for that night, I did not know him before; I heard somebody go down stairs next morning between five and six o'clock, I slept in the next room; I called over the bannisters of the stairs, and said, is that you young man; he made no answer; I asked him again if that was him, and he said, yes; I instantly went into the bed-room to see whether the sheets were on the bed, and I asked Thomas Barnett where his clothes were; I looked for them, according to his description, and they were gone; I told him to get up, and I went down stairs directly in the dark, and opened the middle door, and I went into the parlour to get the key to open the street-door; I did not open the door, but found the prisoner in the tap-room, and I immediately laid hold of him; he had a bundle under his arm, the waistcoat being white, I could see it; I then called for my master, he came down with a light, and I took the bundle up in my hand; my master asked him what he could do it for; he said, he did it for want; my master ordered me to take the bundle up stairs, which I did; the officer was sent for, and I deliverd it to him.

THOMAS-FRENCH HAMILTON sworn. - I keep the White Hart public-house, the corner of Neptune-street: the prisoner came to sleep at my house on the 18th of October, I knew nothing of him before; it was agreed that he should sleep in the room with Barnett; in the morning I heard a voice, is that you young man; after that I was called down; I came down with the light, and saw the servant, and the prisoner at the bar, the servant had the clothes under her arm; I desired her to take them up into her own apartment, and I sent the prisoner up into his own apartment, and kept him there till eight o'clock; Barnett was in the room with him all the time, locked in; the constable was sent for, and I gave charge of him; and the bundle was also delivered to the constable.

Q. Did he give any account of himself? - A. Yes; he said he came from St. George's Fields, where he had been working; I asked him where he was going to work now; he replied, that he was going to work for a master bricklayer for six months, if they could agree; if so, he should make my house his home; he mentioned the name, but I cannot recollect what the name was.

(Marsb, the constable, produced the property, which was acpesed to by Barnett).

Prisoner's defence. I went to that house to lodge, meaning to go to work for Mr. Froome, the bricklayer, the next day; I got up as usual to go to work in the morning; I had given Mr. Hamilton my bundle the night before, and I did not Know that I had not got the right bundle.

Hamilton. He left a bundle with me overnight, containing a pair of shoes, and an apron, like a butcher's, which his brother has had away from me. GUILTY . (Aged 32.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron THOMPSON .

804. THOMAS SIM was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of November , in the 39th year of his Majesty's reign, two hearth-rugs, value 2l. the property of Thomas Willows the elder .

It appearing in evidence that the servant of the prosecutor delivered the property to the prisoner, who was in a gig, and who immediately drove off with it, the Court were of opinion that it could not amount to the crime of felony. NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice HEATH.

805. EDWARD HORNE and MARY HORNE were indicted for that they, on the 20th of October , one piece of base coin resembling thecurrent coin of this realm, called a shilling, did falsely and traiterously colour with materials producing the colour of silver .

There were three other Counts, varying the manner of charging the offence.(The indictment was stated by Mr. Watson, and the Case by Mr. Raine).

RICHARD LILLYWHITE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Watson. On Monday, the 20th of October, I saw the prisoner, Edward Horne , at the White Swan, Fetter-lane, Holborn; I met with him there, according to appointment; when I went in, he was sitting in the tap-room; I said to him, have you any thing with you; he said, no; he said directly, I could have anything I wanted to-morrow; I told him I must have half a piece of whites, that I had not got any left; he asked me if I had not got a guinea; I told him, I had only half-a-guinea and a few shillings; he said, well, have what you like, give me the half-guinea; I gave him the half-guinea, which had been marked by an officer before it was given to me, and said, let me have half-a-guinea's worth, let the shillings be of a good colour, and good found; he went away, and returned in about ten minutes; he put a paper into my hand; I said, are the shillings of a good colour now; he said, they were as good as I had before, if not better, I might depend upon their being good, what I had of him, for he was the real maker; after that, I was coming away, and chucked down a sixpence, and, he said, that would be a good one for a pattern; I said, it was rather large; he said, so it was, but if ever I had a shilling, or a sixpence, that I liked the pattern of, send it to him, and I might have it craft to that pattern; I then came out to the door along with Horne, the prisoner; I then gave the signal to the officers, Armstrong, Ray, Vickery, Mason, and Clarke, and they immediately secured him.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. What situation of life are you in? - A. A hair-dresser.

Q. You were employed, I take it, to carry on this business? - A. Yes.

Q. That is, in plain English, you laid down your trade of hair-dresser, and took up the trade of entrapping this man into the commission of a crime that he would not have committed, if you had not entrapped him? - A. I did it for the good of the public, that he might be detected, and brought to justice; I am not a common informer.

Q. It was for the purpose of prosecuting, that you did this? - A. Yes.

Q. What time of the day was this? - A. Between seven and eight at night.

Q. That is just about the time that poor people go to the public-house to refresh themselves with a pint of beer, after they have done work? - A. Some may.

Q. How many people were in the public-house? - A. I do not know that any body was there, except Horne and me, and another man or so.

Q. Will you swear there were not several people there? - A. I think I saw one; I was in a separate box from the rest.

Q. I take it for granted, a waiter attends there? - A. The landlord brought in the beer.

Q. How was the bar situated? - A. In the passage.

Q. Commanding a view of the top-room? - A. No.

Q. Do you mean to say that a publican would have this beer in such a situation, that he could not have a view of the tap-room? - A. He could see but a very small part of it.

Q. Had you any other money in your pocket, besides the sixpence? - A. I had another.

Q. Was it by accident, or design, that you pulled out that sixpence? - A. By accident.

Q. Had you any halfpence? - A. I had three or four pennyworth; I cannot say exactly.

Q. What did your beer come to? - A. We had had three pints, and I paid for all of them, and Horne said, he would be a pints.

Q. Is there any boy here to prove this conversation, but yourself? - A. No.

Q. He said, he was the real maker; are you sure that was the particular expression? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember being before the Lord-Mayor? - A. Yes.

Q. I ask you, upon your oath, if that was the expresion you used before the Lord-Mayor? - A. It was, that he was the real maker.

Q. Did you say any more than that he was the maker, omitting the word real-

Court. Q. Where is the difference? He might have said it, and they not put it down; it certainly is not in the deposition.

Mr. Watson Q. Are you a constable? - A. I am, and have been these seven years.

Q. And did what you have described, in consequence of directions that you had received? - A. I did.

JOHN RAY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Raine. I am an officer belonging to the Police-office, Worship street.

Q. Did you receive any directions,respecting Horne? - A. Yes.

Q. Had you, before that, learned where he lived? - A. Yes, in Elim-court, Fetter-lane: On Monday, the 20th of October, I apprehended him at the door of the Swan public-house, in Fetter-lane;I, after that, went to his house, in company with Mason and Clarke, leaving the prisoner in custody with Armstrong and Vickery; I knocked at the door on the left, below stairs, and enquired for Horne; I received information which room he inhabited; I went up stairs, in company with Mason and Clarke; when I got up stairs, Mrs. Horne was just coming out of the room that I had been directed to; I knew her very well; I asked her name; she told me her name was,Baresford, I think, or some such name, though I knew her person perfectly well, and knew her to be Mrs. Horne; I immediately laid hold of her, and said, we must search your apartments; says she, we have got none here; I knocked at a door fronting of her's, upon the same floor; a woman came to the door, and I asked her, in the presence of Mrs. Horne, which was Mrs. Horne's apartments; she said, why that is Mrs. Horne's apartments, which was the room I saw her coming out of; we took her into that room, and proceeded to search the chest of drawers, and, in the top-drawer, I think, I found nineteen shillings, and twenty-two sixpences; they are all base, and sit for circulation; they were wrapped up in a paper, screwed up; I opened them, Mrs. Horne stood close by; I informed her, that her husband was in custody.

Q. Do not tell us what she said? - A. In the window was a white mustard-pot, and three or four phials; while we were making a farther search, Mrs. Horne had shifted herself from the place where they were standing; I turned round, and she was gone; I ran down stairs after her, and she was then returning out of a yard from the privy; I immediately laid hold of her, and desired Clarke to come down stairs; I got a light, looked down the privy, and took up a mustard-pot, the soil being very near the top; it laid upon the surface of the soil; it was the same kind of mustard-pot I had seen in the room by the phials.

Q.From this, its appearance, do you believe it to be the same? - A. I really do; when I went up stairs, I missed the mustard-pot that I had before seen; I was present when Clarke found two files, and, in the teeth of the files, were some fresh filedust, that had been apparently used for filing white metal.

Q. You are acquainted a good deal with this kind of business; were those the sort of files used by persons in the business of coining? - A. They were; Mason has got the mustard-pot, and Clarke the files.

Q. Are these coins in the same state now, that they were when you found them? - A. I believe they are.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. All the coin that you found, you have now produced? - A. Yes.

Q.When you have apprehended persons for this sort of offence, have you not generally found some in the process, and some in perfection? - A. Sometimes.

Q. Did you find any file-dust? - A. I did not.

Q.Did you find any thing fixed upon which coiners usually work? - A. I did not.

Q.Neither did you find any grease, aqua-fortis, or corks? - A. No further than I found in the mustard-pot.

Q. You do not mean to say you saw any aquafortis in that mustard-pot? - A. No; I did not see what was in the mustard-pot.

JOHN CLARKE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Watson. I am one of the marshalmen of the City of London; I was with Ray; I was directed, by a warrant from the Lord-Mayor, to search the prisoner's apartments, in Elim-court, Fetter-lane; I was with Ray when he found the base metal that has been produced from that room; I went to another room, where there was only a door and partition divided one from the other; I searched the beds; there were two in the room; I found nothing there, but in searching a little box that stood by the wall, I found these two files, (producing them); they are now in the same state in which they were when I found them; the first that I saw of the mustard-pot, was on the table, in the middle of the room; it was a white mustard-pot.

Q. Did you see it in the window? - A. No.

Ray. I put the mustard-pot upon the table, after I had brought it up stairs.

Clarke. There was a liquid in it, that appeared to be like a thick cream; I could compare it to nothing else.(Peter Mason produced the mustard-pot).

JOHN ARMSTRONG sworn. - Examined by Mr. Raine. I went to the apartment of the prisoners, while the officers were there.

Q. You have had a great deal of experience in this business; are files of this description necessary to finish base coin that is put into circulation? - A. I should believe this had been used to file the edges of the counterfeit money, or blanks, before it comes to money.

Q. Look at these files? - A. The dust appears to be a composition of brass and copper, and other metals mixed together, of which blanks are genenerally made.

Q. Have those blanks any silver in them; or are they made of other metal? - A. Sometimes; this mustard-pot was produced before the Lord-Mayor on the 21st of October; and to shew his Lordship what it would effect, I rubbed it over that farthing,(producing it), which I have had ever since; it was a good copper farthing that I had in my pocket; it is done by the finger and thumb, without the necessity of using aqua-fortis. (The witness shewed the Jury the experiment upon a halfpenny).

Q. Do you know that if a composition, in which there is any silver, is used, they make use of aquafortis, in order to bring that silver to the surface? - A. Yes.

Q. But is this mixture of that description, or not? - A. No; I should think this mixture would do it in an easier way; it produces an uncommon strong colour, is sooner done, and does not subject the hands of the people who work, to be discoloured; aqua-fortis will always make their nails yellow, and their hands, as if they had been using uncommon dye; and, if thrown down, when you go into a room, you must perceive the smell.

Q. I ask you whether this mixture is calculated to produce a colour resembling silver upon any blanks? - A. I have no doubt of it.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You never saw this mustard-pot, till Ray, the officer, brought it up? - A. No.

Q. If you put your finger into aqua-fortis, you would feel it burn? - A. Yes, undoubtedly, if it was not killed; but whatever composition has been put to this, it has killed it.

HENRY- WILLIAM ATKINSON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Watson. I am one of the moniers of his Majesty's mint.

Q. Be so good as to look at that parcel in brown paper? - A. They are all counterfeits, both the shillings and sixpences; there is not one good one among them.

Q. Mr. Raine. (To Armstrong). Q. Look at these shillings; the monier of the Mint has told us they are counterfeits; how does it appear to you to have been done? - A.(Scrapes one of them). This appears to be of a copperish cast.

Q. Does it appear to have been a blank of base metal? - A. It does.

Q. Can you undertake to say how that surface has been produced? - A. If you please, I will try it. (Tries it).

Q. Do you believe that that surface has been produced upon a blank of base metal, by rubbing that composition upon it? - A. I should believe so.

Mr. Alley. Q. I take it for granted, if there is a small portion of silver in base metal, dipping it in aqua-fortis will drive that to the surface? - A. Certainly; the people who are in the habit of doing this kind of business;some make them out of a metal which costs more money, and therefore they sell them at a certain price; but these are, what are called in the trade, fig-shillings, worked by the finger and thumb.

Q. You are not able to ascertain, merely by scratching off the surface, whether it is done by that mixture, or by aqua-fortis? - A. I should believe this to be a solution of silver, aqua-fortis, and salt, killed, on purpose for them to work it without putting it into that pickle, which would be too strong for this kind of metal.

JOSEPH MORTON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Raine. Q. Do you know this house that the officers pointed out to you in Ellm-court? - A. Yes; I rent the house.

Q. To whom did you let the right-hand room, up one pair of stairs? - A. To the woman at the bar.

Q. Did you ever see the man in the apartment?

- A. Never; I have seen him once or twice coming down stairs, upon the stair-case.

Q. Do you happen to know whether he is her husband? - A. No.

Q. How often have you met him? - A. I may have seen him as many times as three, but I was not conscious that he was my tenant; she has had in six or seven weeks; she paid me weekly.

Mr. Raine. (To Lilly.white). Q. Did you happen to have any conversation with the man-prisoner at the bar, upon the subject of where he lived? -

A. No; I never knew where he lived.

Mr. Raine. (To Armstrong). Q. Do you remember wiling the prisoner about his wife being taken into custody? - A. When she was brought into the Swan that same evening, where he was left, he said, don't take my wife, you have got me, she is my wife; I said, she must go; upon that, they were both taken to jail.

Q. Do you remember the man-prisoner saying any thing about the things that were found in the room? - A. Yes; he said the files were what he used in doing shoes, and the crucibles were what he put paste in.

Q. Had you, or your brother officers, before him, said where the things were found? - A. He knew we were gone to his room.

Ray. The landlord of the Swan directed us to his house; he said, he would go and shew the officers where he lived; the prisoner was present at the time.

Q. Did the landlord say, in the hearing of the prisoner, where the apartment was? - A. No, not in my hearing; he went with us, and shewed us the house.

Edward Horne 's defence. Last Wednesday was a fortnight, a person came to me of the name of Jones, and asked me to be so good as to go and get him half a piece of goods; he told me, it would be of great service to him, his wife being in trouble, and he should get something by it; accordingly, I went to the White Swan, in Fetter-lane, with him; when I went in, there was a gentleman that he called his friend, who had come from Portmouth; he said, that he kept the two Blue Posts, at Portsmouth; that he was a man I could trust, and not be afraid of him; accordingly, this Portsmouth gentleman gave me half-a-guinea; they said, how long should I be gone; I told them, about an hour; I came back in that time, and brought the things, and gave them to them; then they drank,and paid the reckoning, and went to the King's Arms, upon Holborn-hill; there we had beer and spirituous liquors, till it got into my head; I gave Jones four shillings out of it, and had but sixpence for myself; we made an agreement to meet the next Monday, at the White Swan, in Fetter-lane; There I met the man, and he gave me half-a-guinea, and I went to fetch the goods, part I brought with me, and part I left behind, and then I was taken.

Both NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. Baron THOMPSON .

806. MARY SMITH was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Alwey , about the hour of five in the afternoon of the 7th of September , the said John Alwey , Henry Goodwin, and Lydia Stamford , being therein, and stealing a cloak, value 10s. a gown, value 10s and a sheet, value 2s. the property of Stephen Gale .

MARY GALE sworn. I am the wife of Stephen Gale ; we lodge at No. 40, Union-street, Middlesex-hospital; John Alwey keeps the house; he lives in the house; I live in the one pair of stairs frontroom; I went out between two and three in the afternoon; my husband was at work; I left nobody in the room; I turned the key in the lock, and put the key in my pocket; I returned between five and six in the evening, and found the door safe, as I left it; I met a woman on the stairs, with a bundle in her lap; she passed me, and asked me for a strange name; my landlord stood at the door, and had some suspicion; I missed a sheet from off a large bible, on a table, in my room, a white gown, and my long red cloak; I heard no more of my things till five weeks afterwards; I heard that a woman was taken up.

Q. Do you know if the woman that you passed was the prisoner? - A. I cannot say, for I took no notice of her; I had no suspicion; I went to Pancras watch- house, and there I owned my sheet, that was on Wednesday the 15th of October; and, the same evening, my landlord went with me to Marlborough-street, where I saw the prisoner with my red cloak on; I said, it was my cloak, and a young man took it from her; she said, she brought the cloak from Bristol with her; I told her it was my cloak, I could swear to it; the said, if it was my cloak, they must have changed it where she had been the night before; I attended the Monday following, and swore to my cloak; the sheet was delivered to me at the same time, (produces it); Lovett has got the cloak.

Q. Did you ever see the prisoner at all about your premises? - A. No.

Q. Was there no violence done to the door? -

A. No.

Q. Then the door could only have been opened by a key? - A. I do not know how she got them.

Q. Are you perfectly sure these things were in the room when you went out? - A. I am certain of that.

Q. Who was in the house when you went out?

- A. John Alwey , Henry Goodwin , and his family, and Lydia Stamford, were all at home, and so they were when I came back.

JOHN ALWEY sworn. - I keep a house, No. 40, Union-street, Middlesex Hospital: On the 11th of September, I was standing against the street-door for half an hour, or better, about five o'clock; the prisoner at the bar was coming out of the passage with some things wrapped up in her gown tail; I am sure it was the prisoner at the bar, I had seen her very often before, and knew her well by sight; I saw a red cloak hanging down, which made me suspicious that she had been robbing some of my lodgers, she had got her gown-tail over it; I followed her to the corner of Suffolk-street, and saw her go down into a milk-cellar; I then went back, and made inquiries whether any thing had been lost or not; and I saw no more of her till she was taken.

Q. Are you sure she is the same woman? - A. I am.

EDWARD LOVETT sworn. - I am an officer belonging to Marlborough-street, (produces a red cloak); I took it off the prisoner's back on the 15th of October, about six o'clock in the evening; the prisoner was delivered into my custody at the office.

WILLIAM POSTLETHWAYTE sworn. - In consequence of an information, I went to the apartment of the prisoner: On the 14th of October, -

Q. How did you know it was her apartment? -

A. From the information of a person who is here; I found a great quantity of wearing apparel of different sorts, and I carried the whole to St. Pancras watch-house; Mrs. Gale came there and claimed a sheet, which I got from her lodging, it was delivered to her at Marlborough-street; in the table-drawer I found these keys, (producing eight door keys); they are none of them skeleton keys.

ANN NEVILLE sworn. - I went with the last witness to the prisoner's apartments, my husband is a locksmith: The prisoner came to me, and wanted my husband to pick a lock for her, for she had lost the key; I told her she lived too far off, and my husband was not at home; I saw no more of her till Tuesday the 14th; she said, she wished my husband would pick the lock of her door; I asked her if she had not been in her room since Monday; and she said, no, she had been at a friend's house; she seemed very much intoxicated, she had a bundle, and I begged her to put down her bundle, and try and have a bit of sleep; she sent my husband to pick the lock at No. 2, in John-street; she asked him tosit a key to it, which he did; she asked me to let her sit till she was a little recovered; she asked me to go home with her, which I did, and carried the things for her to her lodgings; I had not returned above a quarter of an hour when Mr. Ansell came to ask my husband whether he had been sitting a key any where, and I told where she lived.

Q.(To Postlethwayte.) You did not find the prisoner at her lodgings? - A. Yes, I found her in bed.

Mrs. Gale. This sheet and cloak are my property, they are worth ten shillings.

Prisoner's defence. I bought the ticket of the cloak, it was in pledge for four shillings; and the sheet for one shilling; I bought it of a woman that was at the Justice's with me, and the Justice discharged her and committed me. GUILTY (Aged 28.)

Of stealing the goods, but not of breaking and entering the dwelling-house .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

807. MARY SMITH was again indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of October , four gowns, value 30s. a pair of stays, value 5s. a petticoat, value 1s. a shirt, value 4s.a shirt, value 2s.four pillow-cases, value 4s. a bed-gown, value 1s. a waistcoat, value 5s. three table-cloths, value 28s. a napkin, value 2s. an apron, value 2s. two window-curtains, value 2s. an apron, value 1s. four neck-handkerchiefs, value 4s. a silk handkerchief, value 2s. two caps, value 1s. a pocket-handkerchief, value 6d. and a crape hatband, value 1d. the property of James Ansell , in his dwelling-house .

JAMES ANSELL sworn. - I am a dealer in potatoes ; I keep a house, No. 55, Tottenham-court-road : On Tuesday the 14th of October, I lost the articles mentioned in the indictment, between five and six o'clock in the evening; I went up to the bed-room, and found a false key in the door, which I have in my hand, (produces it); it is not a skeleton key, I observed that it had been filed; I went to a locksmith's shop, and in consequence of information, I went with a constable to the prisoner's apartment the same evening, and we found her in bed; in searching the room we found the property mentioned in the indictment, the constable has it; I had not been up stairs from eight o'clock in the morning till that time.

Mrs. ANSELL sworn. - I got up in the morning about eight o'clock, and when I came down I left the door locked; I did not go up stairs again till my husband gave me an alarm; I went up stairs, opened two drawers, and saw my clothes gone, the drawers were not locked; I saw my things again the next day in St. Pancras watch-house, I knew them to be mine; the prisoner was a stranger to me; the things were delivered to Postlethwayte.

(Ann Neville gave the same testimony as in the former trial).

WILLIAM POSTLETHWAYTE sworn. - I am a constable, (produces the property); I took them to the watch-house, and from there to my house; I found the prisoner in the lodgings where I found the property. (The property was deposed to by Mrs. Ansell).

Q. Do you think these articles, if they were sold, would bring the sum you have put down? -

A. They would; I am certain they are all mine, they have my name upon them.

Prisoner's defence. Last Tuesday was a week I had these things from a woman that I had lent ten shillings and sixpence to, and when I took them home I had lost my key, and I went to that woman's to get the lock picked, that is the way I came by the things; she was to call for them the next morning; I had the woman taken, and she was before the Justice, and the Justice acquitted her and committed me.

Q.(To Ansell.) How far distant is your house from the prisoner's? - A. Three or four doors.

GUILTY. (Aged 28.)

Of stealing goods, value 39s.

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

808. ELIZABETH BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22nd of October , two shawls, value 1s. 6d. the property of Mary Miles , widow .

MARY MILES sworn. - I am a widow, the prisoner lived in the next room to me, in Bainbridge-street, St. Giles's : Last Wednesday was a week, about eleven o'clock, or thereabouts, I missed my shawls, she could not have got into my room without a false key, or something of that sort; I found one of the shawls upon her, about four o'clock the same day, in Dyot-street; I took her, and brought her home to my landlord's house, and there the shawl I dropped from under her arm; I have had it ever since; she said first, she found it upon the stairs, and afterwards she said she went into my room and took it; I did not tell her it would be better for her to confess, or worse for her if she did not; I am sure it is my shawl.

- M'CARTHY sworn. - The prisoner and the last witness were both lodgers in my house: The prisoner was brought home to me last Wednesday was a week, Mrs. Miles charged her with stealing two shawls, and other things; I saw the prisoner drop the shawl from under her cloak.

Prisoner's defence. I found that handkerchief on the top of the stairs. NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

809. HENNY MARTIN, alias WINTER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of September , a blanket, value 2s. the property of John Hoyle , in a lodging-room .

JOHN HOYLE sworn. - I keep a house in Lascelles-place, Broad-street, St. Giles's ; I let a lodging to the prisoner, she was to pay three shillings a week for it; she was in the lodgings five weeks on the 21st of September, which was on a Saturday; on the 24th, I missed a blanket, and all the goods in the room, except the bedstead, table, and chairs; there has been nothing found but the blanket; I had not seen her for a week before she was taken, she had paid all but one week; I have a witness to prove that she went out that morning early, with a bundle; I went to several places after her, at last I found her in Gilbert-street, Bloomsbury; and in going along to the watch-house, she said there was a blanket at Star-court; we took her to Marlborough-street, and she told the Magistrate that she had taken the blanket there to keep her warm.

MARIA READ sworn. - On the 24th of September, about seven o'clock in the morning, the prisoner brought a blanket to my room, No. 1, Star-court; I asked her where she got it; she said her husband had bought it some time back, for two shillings, and she was going to sell it; she said and worked in my room till three o'clock, and she never came back afterwards; the constable took away the same blanket that she brought, it was folded up on a chair. (The constable produced the blanket, which was deposed to by the prosecutor).

ELIZABETH BUTLER sworn. - On Wednesday the 24th of September, about a quarter, or twenty minutes before seven o'clock in the morning, I went over to Mrs. Hoyle's, and the prisoner passed me at the bottom of the stairs, with a bundle under her gown-tail, I could not see what was in it; I told Mrs. Hoyle which way she was gone, but she could not find her.

Prisoner's defence. I took the blanket to keep me warm, while I was sitting up all night to work.

GUILTY. (Aged 50)

Of Stealing goods, to the value of 11d.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

810. JOHN WHITEHEAD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of October , two salt cods, value 2s. the property of John Grove .

JOHN GROVE sworn. - I am a fishmonger , at No. 130, Drury-lane : I missed two salt cods last Thursday, between six and seven o'clock in the evening; my man stopped the prisoner with them, and brought him back; I had seen them between four and five o'clock.

JOHN GOODMAN sworn. - I am journeyman to Mr. Grove; on Thursday last, as I was at work, I saw the prisoner about a yard or two before he came to by master's shop, and as he came past, I saw him take a couple of salt cod, they were lying upon the show-board; he immediately ran, and I followed him; I did lose sight of him, but I caught him with the fish in his hand, he then threw them down.

Prisoner's defence. I never had the fish at all.

GUILTY , (Aged 34.)

Publickly whipped and discharged.

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

811. SAMUEL STEELE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of September , one hundred and fourteen yards of printed cotton, value 281. twelve yards of silk, called Persian, value 1l. and a hempen wrapper, value 1s. the property of William Young .(The case was opened by Mr. Watson.)

WILLIAM TODD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Watson. I am clerk to Mr. William Young , wharfinger, at Bell wharf, Upper Thames-street : I hired the prisoner on the wharf, from ten o'clock till two, on the 29th of September, as a labourer to assist upon the wharf ; at that time, he wished to be discharged, as he was to attend a funeral in Westminster; Samuel Field was a constant porter on the wharf; in consequence of information, I took Field into custody; I missed a trufs from the wharf, containing waistcoat pieces, the outside was a wrapper; I learned, that Steele lived in Great Peter's Street, Westminster, where I went after him; I found him there between ten and eleven at night.

Prisoner. Q. Did you see me about the premises after two o'clock that day? - A. No, I did not.

Q. Do you know the direction of that trufs? -

A. It was directed for R. Patterson, at Alnwick, I received it myself.

JOHN SMITH sworn. - Cross-examined by Mr. Watson. I am servant to Towle and Jackson, warehouseman, in Newgate-street: On the 17th of September, we sent a trufs to Bell-wharf, directed to R. Patterson, Alnwick, it contained one hundred and fourteen yards of printed cotton for waistcoats, and twelve yards of Persian silk, in a brown wrapper.

ABRAHAM ROBINSON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Watson. I am drayman to Mr. Calvert; on the 29th of September, I was at work near Dowgatedock; I saw a tall man with a soldier's coat on, but I cannot say that the prisoner was the man; I saw him take something out of a barrow, just by Dowgate-dock; I saw the man wheeling it along.

Q. Was the barrow coming as in a direction from Bell-wharf? - A. Yes.

Jury. Q. What time of the day was it? - A. About four o'clock.

RICHARD BROWN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Watson. I work at Mr. Calvert's cooperage; I was at work with Robinson, on Michaelmas-day, loading a caravan, near Dowgate-dock; I saw Field come by with a barrow, and a parcel it.

Q. Do you know where Field worked? - A. Yes, at Bell-wharf; he went just past the caravan, and there a man took it out of the barrow, but I did not see him take it out; I saw a man, with a soldier's coat, take it away upon his shoulder, along Brewer's-alley, into Thames-street, I heard an alarm some time after, in the evening, and that is all I know of it.

MARY CHANDLER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Watson. I live in Brewer's-lane, Thames-street; on the 29th of September, in the afternoon, I was in Thames-street.

Q. Look at the prisoner at the bar, did you, that afternoon, see him? - A. Yes; I saw him in Thames-street, with a bundle upon his shoulder; he was coming from Brewer's-lane towards London-bridge.

Q. Did you know him before? - A. Yes, I have seen him many times plying about the wharf.

Q. Have you any doubt that he is the man? - A. I have none; it was about four o'clock, as near as I can guess.

Court. Q. How do you know it was the prisoner? - A. By the features of his face; he has many times asked me, when he has seen me standing in the street with oysters, if I knew of any body that had got any work.

SAMUEL FIELD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Watson. I work at Mr. Young's, Bell-wharf; I have worked there seven or eight weeks.

Q. Do you know the prisoner? - A. Yes.

Q. Was he at work there on the 29th of September? - A. Yes, from ten till two; I was overpersuaded by that soldier to take the trufs off the wharf; he said, I think that trufs will just suit us, and will fetch us the value of five or six shillings a piece.

Q. What sort of a trufs was it? - A. In wrap-pering.

Q. Can you read? - A. No.

Q. Then you cannot swear how it was directed? - A. No; he told me I must put it into the wheel-barrow, and wheel it to the corner of Mrs. Froome's, near Dowgate-dock; I wheeled the barrow with the trufs in it, and then the soldier took it away, and I saw no more of it.

Q. Did you see the soldier after that? - A. Not till he was in the Poultry Compter.

Q.What time of the day was it taken away? - A. About four o'clock in the afternoon.

Prisoner. Q.What was it the man touched you upon the shoulder in the public-house for? - A. There was no such thing done.

Prisoner. Q. Were there not three other soldiers in the public-house besides me? - A. No, there were not.

Prisoner. Q. Did you see me in the public-house at all? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. Was that before you wheeled the trufs away, or after? - A. Before.

Prisoner's defence. I was taken to work upon Mr. Young's wharf, precisely at ten o'clock, on the 29th of September; I worked upon the wharf till two o'clock, when I requested to be paid off, on account of some business I had to do for the regiment; he paid me off, and another soldier at the same time; upon being paid off, I went to the public-house, with that identical soldier, and had some porter; I waited for my serjeant a considerable time, when a man employed me to carry a basket for him to the Saracen's-head, Snow-hill, and he himself carried a box; he gave me sixpence, and a pint of porter, it was then five o'clock; I then went from there to No. 71, Great Peter's-street, where I live, and went to bed, when I was awaked between ten and eleven o'clock, with a thundering noise at the door, and I was taken to the watch-house.

The prisoner called his serjeant, who had known him upwards of seven years, and gave him a good character.

Prisoner. I have been eighteen years in the regiment.

GUILTY . (Aged 44.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

812. EDWARD HORNE was again indicted for that he, on the 20th of October , fifteen pieces of false and counterfeit milled money, made and counterfeited to the likeness of a good shilling, and twenty-four pieces of false and counterfeited milled money, made and counterfeited to the likeness of a good sixpence, the same not being cut in pieces, did put off to one Richard Lillywhite ; at a lower rate and value than the same, by their denomination imported to be worth, that is to say, for one piece of gold money and coin of this realm, called a half-guinea, against the form of the statute , &c.

(The indictment was stated by Mr. Watson, and the case opened by Mr. Raine.)

RICHARD LILLYWHITE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Watson. I am a hair-dresser and parish constable : On the 15th of October last, I saw the prisoner at the Old White-swan, in Fetter-lane Holborn; in consequence of what passed at that time, I saw him again on the Monday following, by appointment, at seven o'clock at the same place, I got there between seven and eight; I went into the tap-room and sat down in the box, at the left-hand going in; the prisoner then came into the tap-room, and sat down by the side of me; after we had drank together, I asked him if he had any thing with him, he said, no, I might have any thing I wanted tomorrow; I said, I must have half a piece and nothing less, that is half-a-guinea's worth; he said to me,have not you got a guinea; I told him, no, I had only half-a-guinea, and a few shillings; he said, give me the half-guinea, and I will fetch them; I then gave him a half-guinea which had been marked; I received it from Armstrong, the officer, that same evening, at the Duke of Northumberland's Head; when I gave him the half-guinea, I said to him, let the shillings be of a good found and colour; he said, they should; he went out, and returned in about ten minutes, or a quarter of an hour; he put a paper into my hand, containing sixteen base shillings, one of them was a French one; the others were resembling the current coin of this country, and twenty-eight base sixpences, four of there were also French.

Q. Were they of any value? - A. No; there were twenty-four that resembled the current coin of this country; I asked him if they were of a good colour and found, and he said, they were as good as I had last, if not better; then I was for coming away; I chucked down a sixpence to pay for the reckoning; Horne said that sixpence would be a good one for a pattern; I said, yes, it was a large one; he said, it was large, but any time that I met with a sixpence, or a shilling, that I liked, to send it to him, and he would cast me the pattern; then we came out, and when we came to the door, I gave a signal, which the officers understood; Horne was immediately secured, taken back into the same house, and searched; the money that I received from the prisoner, I delivered to Armstrong, exactly as I received it from the prisoner.

Court. Q. What business had you with him the first time? - A. I went, at the request of the officers and Mr. Powell, for the same purpose that I went the second time.

Q. Who is Mr. Powell? - A. The solicitor for his Majesty's Mint; I had of the prisoner, the first time, some bad silver for a good half-guinea.

Q. Why was there not a prosecution for that; why was that abandoned, and not followed up?

- A. It was followed up by the second appointment.

Mr. Watson. Q. Was the first half-guinea marked? - A. No.

Q. Were the officers then waiting to apprehend him? - A. No.

JOHN ARMSTRONG sworn. - Examined by Mr. Raine. I am an officer belonging to Worship Street: On Monday the 20th of October, I met Clarke, Ray, Vickery, Mason, and Lillywhite, at the Northumberland's Head, next door to the office; I took out a half-guinea, and marked it on the woman's side, by the date; I marked it with the letter A, and kept it in my own possession till we got into the neighbourhood to which we were going, and then I gave it to Lillywhite, and searched him in the presence of the other officers, and took his pocket-staff from him; he then went into the public-house, the officers being placed to watch, he having a signal to repeat, if he had purchased; he was in the Swan, I dare say, twenty-five minutes; I and Clarke were on one side of the way, two other officers placed, one above, and the other below, and Ray continually passing and repassing the window and door of the house; Lillywhite and Horne came out; Lillywhite gave the signal, and Horne was taken into custody; we took him into the public-house, and from Lillywhite's hand, I took this money, (produces it); he was then taken into a back room, and Ray searched him in my presence, and found the same half-guinea that I had marked and given to Lillywhite, and a sixpence; Ray has got it; I then returned Lillywhite his staff, in the presence of Horne; upon which Horne said, I thought I was dealing with a friend, but I find him a traitor; he asked me to give him his money again, but I had not it; here are fifteen shillings, and twenty-four sixpences, resembling the coin of this country, and four French sixpences, and one shilling.

Court. Q. Are they of any value at all? - A. I should think none; the whole are counterfeits.

Court. Q. From whom did you recieve your instructions to go to this place? - A. From Mr. Powell.

Q. Had you any information upon which you went the first time? - A. Yes; an information came to Mr. Powell, and it was his request, that I should find some person that I could trust, to see if such things were done, or not; in consequence of that, Lillywhite went, and then an information was taken, and a warrant granted.

JOHN RAY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Watson. I was in company with Armstrong, and the other officers, when the prisoner was apprehended; we took him into the back parlour of the Old Swan, in Fetter-lane; I searched him, and found upon him one half-guinea, and a sixpence; the half-guinea I have had ever since, (produces it); the prisoner asked me for it several times, and said it was a good one.

Armstrong. This is the same half-guinea that I gave to Lillywhite, and that Ray took from the prisoner.(Mr. William Parker proved the shillings and sixpences to be all counterfeits).

Prisoner. I throw myself upon the mercy of the Court.

The learned Recorder having summed up the evidence in the above case, proceeded to the following effect:

Gentlemen, With respect to the kind of testimony that you have heard in this case, which differs from all others, it is of the utmost importance that you should watch it with an eagle's eye: for, as it strikes me, this crime could not have had its existence, but for a preconcerted plan laid by these witnesses, as they all acted under the direction of Mr. Powell, and were all looking to the same object, of fixing this man with this crime; it is necessary, that what they say, should be very closely examined: for indisputably you cannot but feel that, having the same view, to say no more of it, they must have a very strong bias. Upon the first transaction, you find that there was a regular information taken, and why that should be abandoned to follow up another, which has been imagined and planned by those who have carried it into execution, I am at a loss of conceive. Gentlemen, this method of prosecuting, to say the best of it, is certainly novel. I think, I can recollect persons being prosecuted without the testimony of persons sent from the Mint, for the purpose of soliciting the commission of the offence, without that sort of trap, and that sort of contrivance; however, it is for you to say, whether you can have such a reliance upon the kind of testimony that has been given, as to pronounce a verdict of guilty, which might be followed up by a counter-plea; and, in that case, the prisoner would have to answer for the offence with his life. Gentleman, it happened to me, not a long time ago, to report a prisoner to the King, exactly in that situation; that prisoner had been convicted, and afterwards, upon the counter-plea, was reported to his Majesty, but it was the King's pleasure, in Council, though that prisoner was a notorious offender, that his life should be spared; I afterwards had a conference out of the Council, with the first law-officer in the country, the Lord Chancellor, who was of opinion, that it would have been a dangerous precedent, indeed, to deprive a man of his life for an offence which would not have had an existence, if he had not been solicited to commit that offence by the persons who were the witnesses against him; the Lord Chancellor requested me to take the first opportunity of declaring, that he was of opinion with me, that prisoners ought to be prosecuted for this, as well as other offences, in the usual way, and that he did not approve of prosecuting men, by traps of this sort; upon the whole, he was of opinion, though the crime was greatly injurious to society, that this mode of prosecution had better be spared. I have, therefore, not been singular in my opinion; if I was convinced I was wrong, I would instantly give it up; but it is my duty to state, that it is his opinion, and that it is mine, and if the remedy, by the usual mode of prosecution, is not sufficient, an application may be made to the Legislature; in short, if this mode of prosecution is to be carried on in one instance, on account of the difficulty of detecting the crime, it may be considered as a proper thing to be carried on in others, and the only reason that I have heard asserted, has been the difficulty of detection. It has often been said, that these sort of cases are very much like the case of servants robbing their masters, where the money is marked before the felony is committed; but I do not think it is, at all, that case; it does not fix the offence upon any particular servant; it is only the means, after the robbery is committed, of detecting who the robber is; the circumstance of the master putting it into the till, is only the mode of detecting the offender, not an inducement to the offence. It appears to me, notwithstanding all that has been suggested, that the means may be found of prosecuting upon an original information, in the same manner, that all other prosecution are conducted; it is my bounden duty to support all prosecutions that are brought forward in the ordinary and common mode; but it is not only my opinion, but that of the first law authority in this country, that these sort of prosecutions should be spared.

I have now done my duty; I leave the whole case with you; if you are satisfied that, upon this evidence, the prisoner is guilty, you will say so; if you have any reasonable doubt, you will acquit him.

GUILTY (Aged 60.)

Confined one year in Newgate , and fined 1s.

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

813. MARY LEE was indicted for uttering, on the 25th of September , to Elizabeth, the wife of Edward Dundas , a counterfeit sixpence, knowing it to be counterfeit .(The case was opened by Mr.Raine.)

ELIZABETH DUNDAS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Raine. I am the wife of Edward Dundas , who keeps the coffee-room of the New-Inn in the Old-Bailey : On Thursday the 25th of September, about eleven o'clock in the morning, the prisoner came to our house for some gin, she put down a shilling; I said it was a bad one, and gave her the shilling back again; she then put down a sixpence; and I gave her two-pence halfpenny in change; I was very busy, there being a great many people at the bar, but I put it by itself, and in a few minutes, when I had time to look at it, I found it was a very bad one; I expected she would be coming again, and I kept it by itself in a little box in the till; in the evening, between five and six o'clock, she came again for some gin; after I had served her, she put down a sixpence; I saw it was of the same sort that I had taken of her in the morning, and I took it out of the box and compared them; I said, mistress, where do you get so much bad money, you ought to be searched;

Mr. Lucas, the constable, happened to be in the house and he immediately searched her; I saw him take from her bosom a bag containing bad money; I gave the two sixpences that I had taken of her to Lucas.

EDWARD LUCAS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Raine. I was at Mrs. Dundas's in the afternoon of Thursday the 25th of September; I searched the prisoner, and in her stays I found this little bag, with bad money in it, (produces it); there was a bad shilling and two sixpences, but which are the two sixpences I cannot tell, they have been mixed by some means or other, they are all bad; there was no other money found upon her at all; I have had them ever since.(Mr. William Parker proved them to be counterfeit).

Prisoner's defence. I am a poor distressed woman, I have no defence to make; I should be very glad if you would send me to the workhouse.

GUILTY .

Confined six months in Newgate , and find sureties for six months more .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

The SESSIONS being ended, the COURT proceeded to GIVE JUDGMENT as follows:

Received sentence of Death - 5.

James Thwaites ,

Thomas Williams ,

Henry Nerod , alias Williams,

Robert Classon ,

Mary Delaney , alias Smith.

Transported for seven years - 25.

Joseph Hutchins ,

Ann Rice ,

William Wright ,

Samuel Steele ,

Ann Blake ,

Sarah Gordon ,

Sarah Harper ,

William Gray ,

Thomas Jefferys ,

Ann Miller ,

Richard Rustead ,

James Chesterman ,

John, alias William Day ,

Thomas Hinston ,

Peter Williams ,

William Webb ,

John Herman ,

Joseph Turner ,

Mary Byrne ,

Henry Quennell ,

Thomas Miles ,

John Clarke ,

Thomas Donnison ,

William Parcox ,

Mary Smith .

Confined one year in Newgate, and whipped in the jail - 1.

Nathaniel Holmes .

Confined one year in Newgate, and fined 1s. - 2.

Edward Horne , Moses Robus .

Confined one year in Newgate, and fined 6s. 8d. - 1.

John Leck .

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction, and fined 1s. - 10.

William Storey ,

James Ennis ,

Thomas Wells ,

Thomas Clarke ,

William Graney ,

Thomas Mimms ,

Thomas White ,

William Humphreys ,

John Berwick ,

Robert Cannon .

Confined six months in Newgate, and publicly whipped - 1.

John Bell .

Confined six months in Newgate, and fined 1s. - 1.

John Hughes .

Confined six months in Newgate, and find sureties for six months more - 1.

Mary Lee .

Confined six months in the House of Correction, and publicly whipped - 1.

George Clayton .

Confined six months in the House of Correction, and fined 1s. - 5.

John Brown , alias David Jacobs , William Morris , Count La Provence , Thomas Dean , Henny Martin , alias Winter.

Confined three months in Newgate, and publicly whipped -1.

James Latham .

Confined one week in Newgate, and fined 1s. - 1.

James Barras .

Whipped 100 yards in Thames-street, near Hambro' Wharf -1.

Robert Elliott .

Publicly whipped, and discharged - 2.

Edward Persall , John Whitehead .

Whipped in the jail, and discharged - 3.

Jane Evans , Ann Johnson , Patrick Kelly .

Fined 1s. and discharged - 2.

William Pindley , Teresa Jefferys .