Old Bailey Proceedings Online (www.oldbaileyonline.org, version 6.0, 21 October 2014), October 1798 (17981024).

Old Bailey Proceedings, 24th October 1798.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS ON THE KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Goal Delivery FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND ALSO, The Gaol Delivery FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, HELD AT JUSTICE-HALL, IN THE OLD-BAILEY, On WEDNESDAY, the 24th of OCTOBER, 1798, and following Days, BEING THE EIGHTH SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF The Right Hon. SIR JOHN WILLIAM ANDERSON, BART. LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY WILLIAM RAMSEY , AND Published by Authority.

LONDON: Printed and published by W.WILSON, No. 15, St. Peter's-Hill, Little Knight-Rider-street, Doctors' Commons.

1798.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS ON THE KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, &c.

BEFORE SIR JOHN WILLIAM ANDERSON , Bart. LORD MAYOR of the City of LONDON; Sir BEAUMONT HOTHAM , Knight, one of the Barons of His Majesty's Court of Exchequer; JOHN HEATH , Esq. one of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir JOHN WILLIAM ROSE, Knight, Serjeant at Law, Recorder of the said City; JOHN SILVESTER , Esq. Common-Serjeant at Law of the said City; and others, His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of LONDON, and Justices of Gaol Delivery of NEWGATE, holden for the said City and County of MIDDLESEX.

London Jury.

Richard Atkinson ,

Richard Draper ,

William Archer ,

Thomas White ,

George-Thomas Turner ,

John Poole ,

Edward Daniel ,

Thomas Willan ,

Samuel Peacock ,

William Finlay ,

James Otterbury ,

Robert Orton .

First Middlesex Jury.

Hugh Wright ,

Benjamin Bond ,

Richard Mount ,

Matthew Moody ,

John M'Cord,

John Watson ,

Robert Salter ,

George Oliver ,

James Gibson ,

James Herbert ,

James Stewart ,

Joseph Green .

Second Middlesex Jury.

Samuel Folger ,

Edward Kent ,

Joseph Butler ,

Richard Francis ,

James Powell ,

John Brock ,

Peter Bacon ,

Robert Musket ,

William Brown ,

William Bridgman ,

Robert Gleddell ,

Peter Taylor .

548. JOHN BOLTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of September , a pair of bellows, value 1s. 6d. the property of Thomas Mallard .

THOMAS MALLARD sworn. - I am porter to a broker, and keep a little broker's-shop besides: On Monday the 17th of September, about half past eight in the evening, I lost a pair of bellows; on the Tuesday morning, a neighbour of the name of Cooper came to ask me if I had lost a pair; I told him I did not know that I had, I looked and missed a pair; I went with him to the watch-house about eleven o'clock, and saw them in care of the watch-house-keeper, I knew them to be mine by my own writing, and my own work in them; I never saw the prisoner till I saw him at the watch-house.

WILLIAM BROWN sworn. - I am a watchman: I took charge of the prisoner from John Cooper, and I took him to the watch-house, with a pair of bellows and a tub of oysters, the bellows were lying on the tub, (produces them); I gave them to the watch-house-keeper, and when I came to Marlborough-street they were delivered into my care.

JOHN COOPER sworn. - I am a journeyman painter: On Monday night, the 17th of September, about half past nine o'clock, a boy came in, and said, there are two men gone off with a tub of oysters of your's; I immediately went after them, and in High-street, St. Giles's, I saw the prisoner with the tub, and a pair of bellows at the top of it; I laid hold of him, and told him they were mine; I called the watchman, and gave charge of him and the property.

Q. Look at the bellows? - A.These are the same bellows.

Mallard. These are my bellows, they have my own mark upon them in writing (1s. 9d.), and the loop had dropped off, and I put on another made out of a strap of an old pair of boots of mine.

Prisoner's defence. A man asked me to carry them for him to Oxford-road. NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

549. JOHN BOLTON was again indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of September , a wooden tub, value 6d. and thirty-six oysters, value1s. 6d. the property of John Cooper .

JOHN COOPER sworn. - My wife keeps an oysterstall in New Compton-street : On Monday night, the 17th of September, I was informed of my loss; I pursued immediately, and in High-street St. Giles's, I perceived the prisoner with a tub of oysters under his arm; I seized him, and called the watch, he struggled very much to get away; I called the watch, and he was taken to the watch-house, the oysters were carried the next morning to Marlborough-street; the tub has a C at the bottom of it, I had six of them made together, they were then delivered to the watchman; he gave in several different names.

JOHN BROWN sworn. - I am a watchman: I had charge of the prisoner, and this tub with oysters in it, it is the same tub.

Prisoner's defence. I am as innocent as the child unborn. NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

550. NANCY HOLMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of September , twenty-five yards of Irish linen cloth, value 3l. the property of William Trye and John Thomas , privately in their shop .

JOHN THOMAS sworn. - I am a linen-draper , in partnership with William Trye ; I was not at home at the time of the robbery.

WILLIAM- MILES TRYE sworn. - I am shopman to Messrs. Trye and Thomas, linen-drapers, in Bridge-street : On the 20th of September, about five o'clock, the prisoner at the bar came in, and requested I would shew her some cloth; I shewed her several small quantities of cloth, she fixed upon one, and I cut her off three quarters of a yard, she told me it was for caps; she then asked for some muslin borders, I then sold her a quarter of a yard of muslin for borders, she paid me for it; I had no suspicion of her being a thief, and just as she was going out, at the end of the counter, I saw a motion with her gown as if she was covering something, but I did not see her take any thing; I thought it was very singular, but I had no suspicion of her; a person came in immediately, and asked us whether we had lost any thing; I immediately followed her, and upon Westminster-bridge I put my hand upon her shoulder, and said, good woman, you have left something behind, and instantly the cloth dropped from her, (produces it); a witness, who is here, picked up the cloth, and we took her to Queen-square; I know this to be my master's property by the private mark upon it.

Q. Was it upon the counter while she was in the shop? - A. I cannot say whether it was or not, I had seen it about two hours before she came in.

Mr. Thomas. This is my cloth, I know it by my own mark; I had taken it down and left it upon the counter, I dare say it had lain there full three hours.

WILLIAM KITTEY sworn. - I am a waterman, I saw the prisoner come out of Messrs. Trye and Thomas's shop with her clothes up so high that we could see her naked thigh, I thought it was very odd. and I went into the shop and asked if they had lost any thing; I told them a woman was gone over the bridge that I thought had got something; I went with Mr. Trye over the bridge, he desired me to take hold of her, and I held her till the constable came.

The prisoner did not say any thing in her defence.

GUILTY (Aged 55.)

Of stealing but not privately in the shop .

Confined one year in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron HOTHAM.

551. WILLIAM RUSSELL and GEORGE SHIRLEY were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of September , a jacket, value 7s. and two pair of breeches, value 5s. the property of George Rous , Esq. a cloth coat, value 21s. two shirts, value 5s. a waistcoat, value 3s. four pair of cotton stockings, value 8s. two pair of silk stockings, value 6s. six neck-handkerchiefs, value 6s. two waistcoat, value 3s. a pair of shoes, value 2s. 6d. a pair of silver buckles, value 10s. 6d. and a pocket-handkerchief, value 12d. the property of Thomas Hulse , in the dwelling-house of the said George Rous , Esq.

THOMAS HULSE sworn. - I am butler to Mr. Rous, in Bedford-square : On Monday morning, the 24th of September, between eleven and twelve in the day, I and two of the servants were sitting in the front parlour, with the blinds put to, which prevented us from seeing any thing of the transaction; somebody rang at the door, and said there had been a man in the area, and upon coming out of the house, I saw a bundle tied up in a silk handkerchief, lying on the top of a door in the area; I then immediately ran across the square with some other people; I did not see any body, and therefore I returned; the next morning I went to Bow-street, and stated what things were lost. The property that was taken away was my own property; four pair of cotton stockings, two pair of silk, two waistcoats, an upper one and an under one, a pair of shoes, and a pair of silver buckles; six neck-handkerchiefs and a coat were taken out of the area, but not carried away, and a jacket and two pair of leather breeches belonging to my master; that is all I know of the transaction.

MICHAEL JOHN MASON sworn. - I am going of thirteen years of age.

Q. Do you know the nature of an oath? - A. Yes.

Q. What will become of you if you swear falsely? - A. I shall go to hell.

Q. Where shall you go if you behave righteously? - A. To God. (He is sworn). I live in Plumtree-street; I was going with a child across Bedford-square, I saw the prisoner Shirley looking down Mr. Rous's area, and I turned round the square; when I go into the square, I generally sit at Mr. Rous's steps; I sat down, and then I saw the prisoner Russell in the area, and afterwards I saw Russell look over the window, and then from that window to the door, there were three windows, he looked in at all of them, and then he went in at the hall door, it was not locked, he just turned it round; he went in, and Shirley gave me a knock of the head, and asked me what I was looking there for, why could I not look strait; when I was at Clerkenwell I forgot to mention that; then Russell came out with the clothes and went under the watch-box, at the corner of the square, and put the clothes down on the pavement; he gave Shirley some of them in his apron, and he walked as far as Great Russell-street, and then afterwards he ran, and Russell tied the other clothes up, and put them in the corner of the dust-hole door, and then came back to the watch-box, and he opened the watch-box gate, and came out; I went and rang at Mr. Rous's door, and some of the servants came out.

Q. Are you sure these are the two men? - A. I am positive they are the men.

Q. How soon did you see the prisoners afterwards? - A. As I was going home I saw Shirley.

Q. When were they taken up? - A. Russell was taken up that same night; I cannot rightly say when Shirley was taken up.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Are you perfectly sure the prisoners were the men? - A. Yes.

Q. I believe you said at Bow-street, that the man that you took for Shirley was marked with the small-pox? - A. No, he had a mark upon his lip.

Q.Did not you say that was the reason why you knew him? - A. No, I did not; I said he had a remarkable plain face.

THOMAS RABBITS sworn. - Q. How old are you? - A.Thirteen.

Q. Do you know the nature of an oath? - A. Yes.

Q.Where will you go if you take a false oath? - A. To hell.

Q. If you behave well in this world, what will become of you then? - A. I shall go to heaven.(He is sworn). I live at the Bedford-arms; I wentout with a pot of beer to Serjeant Hill's, the day that Mr. Rous's house was robbed; I saw the prisoner Russell come out of the area, and as he came out of the area, I saw a slit in his coat, and that is all I know him by; I saw him at Bow-street, he had the same coat on then, I did not see his face.

WILLIAM BARRETT sworn. - I live at the Bedford-arms, in Charlotte-street: On the Monday that Mr. Rous's house was robbed, I saw Russell running across the square.

Q. Did you know him before? - A. No,I never saw him before.

Hulse. This property was left behind, tied up in the prisoner's handkerchief. (Produces it).

Q. They are of no great value, I believe? - A. No; here are two coats which I can swear to, and two shirts, which have the initials of my name.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You do not know whose handkerchief that is? - A. No, only what Wilson told me.

HENRY CROCKER sworn. - (Produces a coat). This is the coat that was on Russell at Bow-street, which answered the description the boy gave of it.

Shirley's defence. I am quite innocent; I know nothing at all of it; the mark that the boy spoke of on my lip, was done with shaving the first night that I was in prison.

For Shirley.

JOSEPH GRIMSHALL sworn. - I was in Tothillfields prison for stealing a sheep's kidney of the value of a penny; Shirley, when he first came to the prison, asked me to shave him, I shaved him, I think it was this day month, I accidentally cut his upper lip, which caused a mark; he had no visible mark on his upper lip before.

Court. (To Wilson.) Q. Had the prisoner, Shirley, a cut in his lip? - A. Yes, he had.

Q. And did you say so at Bow-street? - A. Yes.

Hulse. When he appeared at Bow-street, he had a cut in his lip, which appeared to have been of a long standing; he first said it was a cold, which had broke out, and afterwards he said it was a cut; a person, who examined him, said, in the hearing of the prisoner, that it was a cut of a much longer standing.

The prisoner Shirley called six other witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Shirley, GUILTY (Aged 24.)

Russell, GUILTY (Aged 21.)

Of stealing goods, value 39s.

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice HEATH.

552. ANN BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of October , a cotton gown, value 9s. and a black petticoat, value 6s. the property of Eleanor Rook , widow ; a waistcoat, value 3s. and a blanket, value 3s. the property of Daniel Holland .

ELEANOR ROOK sworn. - I lodge in Mr. Holland's house, in Cartwright-square, in the Minories ; I went out of an errand last Monday was a week, between five and six o'clock, I returned in about ten minutes, and saw the prisoner come out with a bundle, I had never seen her before; I stopped her, and found upon her a black petticoat and a cotton gown belonging to me, and a waistcoat and a blanket belonging to Mr. Holland; I had left the key in the door, and she had turned the key and gone in, the property is here, (produces the petticoat); I had just taken the petticoat and gown off; I am sure they are mine.

ELEANOR HOLLAND sworn. - I am the daughter of Daniel Holland; the officer has got my father's property; I stopped the woman at the same time that Mrs. Rook did.

SAMUEL DOWSEY sworn. - I am an officer,(produces the property).

Eleanor Holland. I know this waistcoat to be my father's.

Prisoner's defence. I was informed there was a woman that gives out slop-work lived there, I went into the house to enquire for her, and I found this bundle on the stairs, and when this woman came up, I told her if it was her's, there it was for her.

GUILTY (Aged 40.)

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

[Fine. See summary.]

553. JOHN BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 17th of October , a silk handkerchief, value 2d. the property of Henry Smale .

HENRY SMALE sworn. - This day se'nnight, in the middle of the day, as I was passing just on this side Temple-bar , I felt a twist at my pocket, I looked round on my right hand, and saw no person, I then turned round on the left hand, and saw my handkerchief drop from the prisoner at the bar; I immediately took up my handkerchief, and seized the prisoner by the collar; I took him to a friend's house, and sent for a constable, who took him before the sitting Magistrate.

Q. Did there appear to be any others connected with him? - A. I cannot say that.

JOHN YOUNGHUSBAND sworn. - I am a constable, (produces the handkerchief); I received it from Mr. Smale, at Whieldon and Butterworth's.

Q.(To Smale.) Is that your handkerchief? - A. I have no doubt of it; there is a great similarity in handkerchiefs, and there is no mark upon it.

The prisoner did not say any thing in his defence.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

554. JOHN BOND was indicted for the wilful murder of Ann, his wife , September the 29th .

He also stood charged with the like murder on the Coroner's Inquisition.

The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.

MARGARET HUDDLESTON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am a lodger in the same house with the prisoner, No. 4, Dean-street, Tothillfields ; the prisoner and his wife lodged in the one pair of stairs over my head: On the 29th of September, the deceased had been out chairing, she came home about half past six o'clock, her husband. the prisoner, was not then come home, she could not get into her own room, and she came into my room; her husband came home in about ten minutes, she followed him up in the course of five minutes.

Q. How soon after that did you hear any thing? - A. In about ten minutes I heard a bustle, and the sounding of blows, but I did not think it was upon her; he came out of his room as soon as the blows ceased, and was coming down stairs; then I heard Sarah Shaw come down, she lived over his head; Mrs. Shaw called out, that the old villain had murdered his wife; he had then got almost to my door in the passage, I stepped out of my room and laid hold of him, and would not let him go out; he said, he wanted to go out to get some beer; then Mrs. Shaw went up with the prisoner and me, I rather forced him up; she had a candle in her hand; we found Mrs. Bond lying on the floor with a great deal of blood upon her, to all appearance, half a pailful, it had spread a great deal.

Q.From what part of the body did the blood seem to issue? - A. From her head, it flowed out of her mouth, her nostrils and her ears.

Q.Did you hear Mrs. Shaw say any thing to him? - A. No, she called out, in her fright, for me to stop him, thinking it was so.

Q. Had Mrs. Bond any life in her, when you got into the room? - A. No, there was no appearance at all of any life.

Q. When the prisoner was in the room with you, did he say any thing? - A. He said, his wife had killed herself by falling against the bedstead; then Sarah Shaw ran for a surgeon, to try if there were any hopes of life, and I remained to take care of the prisoner; he would go down stairs, and I went down with him, and knocked at a neighbour's door, and he came and assisted me till the constable came; the constable said, you must go with me; he said, for what, I have done nothing, she has killed herself by a fall.

Q. Were you in the room when any thing was found? - A. Yes, I was in the room when the bill-book was found, about an hour after, it laid withinside the fender.

Q. What is his business? - A. A carpenter .

Court. Q. Is a bill an instrument of his trade? - A. I do not know.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. The first you heard was a noise of blows, as you supposed? - A. Yes.

Q.Whether they were all blows of one person, or of two fighting, you could not tell? - A. The blows followed one another as quick as possible; the deceased was at work mending stockings at the time, the stocking was not off her arm, nor the thimble off her finger.

Q. Have you known the unhappy man and the unfortunate deceased long? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know if he had been, during the time you have known him, in a found state of mind? - A. Yes, as far as has come within my knowledge.

SARAH SHAW sworn. - I live over the prisoner's head; I was not at home when the prisoner and the deceased came home; when I had been in my apartment a little while, I heard them quarrelling about some money that the deceased had to receive, a yearly income her father had left her upon his decease; a year's money became due that day.

Q. Could you at all hear what was said about money? - A. I heard Bond say that it was his money as much as her's, and she said it was not his, her father had left it her, and she should see about that; presently after I heard Mrs. Bond cry murder, and then I heard five or six-blows, they followed one another as fast as they could; I then took the candle and went down stairs, and met Bond coming out of his own door, and drawing the door after him; I said to him, you villain, you have killed your wife; he said, he had done nothing to her, and was going to get a pennyworth of beer; he went to go down stairs, I told him he should come up, I would see what he had done, and he said, no, he should go for the beer; Mrs. Huddlestone then laid hold of him, and told him he should go up and see what he had done; she did go up, but I cannot say what situation she was in, for I was so terrified, that I did not know what I did.

Q.Did you see any thing that caused your fright? - A. I saw Mrs. Bond lying in a heap, and a vast deal of blood about, I was very much frightened before that, for I thought he had doneso, though I did not know; I then went to fetch Mr. Franks, the surgeon.

Q. Were you present when any thing was found in the room? - A.No.

Q. Did you see Mrs. Bond when Mr. Franks came in? - A. The house was so full, I could not get in.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. How long had you lived in that house? - A. I had lived there about eighteen or twenty months; the prisoner and his wife lived there before I came.

Q. Were you intimate at all? - A. Only how do you do.

Q. I perceive Bond is very far advanced in life? - A. He is better than seventy years old, I believe.

Q. He seems very infirm? - A. When he meets with any thing to take any particular effect upon him, he may.

Q. Have you observed that before? - A. Yes, he is an old man.

Q. Have you ever heard that he has been actually out of his senses? - A. No.

Q. However, from your own observation, you have found his nerves a good deal affected, when any thing particular has happened? - A. It cannot be expected otherwise.

ANN MOFFAT sworn. - I lodge in the same house with the prisoner, in the two pair of stairs, with Mrs. Shaw; I came home between six and seven on Saturday night, and when I went up, I heard the prisoner and his wife having words about the money that her father had left her, which came due that day, and as soon as I had got into my own room, I heard Mrs. Bond cry murder, and then I heard repeated blows, I could hear it distinctly, the doors were both; what happened afterwards I do not know, for I was so frightened I was not able to stir off my chair till after the surgeon came, she was then lying in an immense quantity of blood.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Have you lived in that house any length of time? - A. About eighteen or twenty months.

Q. Had you any opportunity of knowing whether he was deranged in his mind? - A.According to my judgement there was nothing of that sort.

Mr. FRANKS sworn. - I am a surgeon in Great Smith-street, Westminster; I was called in about seven o'clock in the evening to the assistance of Mrs. Bond; when I came into the room, she had expired; the body was lying upon the floor, in the middle of the room; finding the woman irrecoverably dead, I endeavoured to discover the cause; I removed the cap of the deceased, and with my finger I soon traced a fracture of the cranium, with a wound on the left side of the head.

Q. Did that appear to have been given by a blow with the fist, or an instrument? - A. With an instrument. The next morning, about eleven o'clock, I again attended, ordered the head to be shaved, and found another fracture of the skull, on the same side of the head, about two inches from the other wound, there was a depression of the cranium, the bone had been forced inwards.

Q. Is it your opinion that those blows were the cause of the death of the deceased? - A.Certainly.

Q. Have you any doubt? - A. Not the least in the world.

Q. Did you either on Saturday or Sunday discover any instrument? - A. On the Sunday morning I discovered a bill-book lying within the sender, and I give it as my opinion, that that instrument was adequate to the mischief that had been produced.

Q.Did it appear to you that the wound had been given by such an instrument? - A.Certainly.

Q.Did you observe the hands of the deceased? - A. The woman had a stocking on. - On the Wednesday after the Coroner had seen the body at Mr. Chippendale's, an undertaker's, I discovered a confused wound on the left hand of the same kind with that on the head, and appeared to have been given by the same instrument.

Court. Q.Do you conceive that it might have been possible for this woman, by any fall against the bedstead, or sharp corner of any furniture in the room, to have received these wounds? - A. Impossible; she might have had a mere simple fracture, these things are common; but something else must be superadded to cause instantaneous death.

The prisoner left his defence to his Counsel.

JOHN SMITH sworn. - I am a coachmaker, No. 38, Tuston-street, Westminster: I have known the prisoner twelve years, till within about a fortnight before this happened, he had frequently been at my house; he is sixty-nine years of age.

Q. Were you intimately acquainted with him? - A. I have frequently sharpened his saws for him, and he has communicated his mind frequently to me.

Q. From the opportunities you had of observing his mind, tell the Court and Jury what your ideas were with respect to the sanity of it? - A. I have frequently known him so disturbed in his mind, and so perplexed, that he was like a madman at times; a little more than a twelvemonth ago he came to my house in a disturbed unhappy state, and was communicating how disturbed he was in his mind, and that he should make away with himself; he said, he was going up Millbank-row, and supposing I was to throw myself in the water, says he what will the consequence be; my wife said to him, suppose you were to put your finger in the fire, and you were to feel the smart, how would you bear that for a whole eternity; he then said,I thank you, God bless you, and bounced out of the room in a mad freak.

Q. At any other time can you recollect any thing particular taking place? - A. Yes, at various times similar to this; I followed him out of the house at that time, and he went up Orchard-street; I persuaded him to compose his mind, and go in and have a drop of purl, being early in the morning; I reasoned with him upon his disturbed state of mind. and not to go near his wife till he was more satisfied; but, when I left him, I could not get any kind of answer from him, in any measure, like a man.

Q.How came you to speak of his wife? - A. He frequently used to say, his mind was so disturbed he could have no peace at home; and he and his wife used to quarrel a great deal.

Q. Did he ever explain to you what they quarrelled about? - A. No, not particularly.

Q.Can you tell us of any other particular occurrence that led you to notice the state of his mind? - A. Rather less than a fornight before this affair happened, I think it was about Monday or Tuesday was a week before it happened, he came to me to sharpen a saw for him, and he communicated his unhappy mind to me, that his shirt was in a pail soaking, it was not washed for him, and he was very bad with a cold, he could hardly crawl about; I said, don't mind that, Mr. Bond, get somebody else to wash it for you; he went away, and said, God bless you, I shall not see you any more.

Q. At the time that he uttered that expression, did it strike your mind, at the time, that it was the observation of a person frantic with melancholy and despair? - A. Yes, as it had been at various times before.

Q. You did not know him at all in Berkshire, at a place called Bracknell? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember any thing particular happening to him there? - A. I left that country before it happened.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Perhaps you know who this man works for? - A. He worked for the same master that I did.

Q. You did not continue working for that master so long as he did? - A.No.

Q. Was he in that master's employment at the time this melancholy affair took place? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see him at all that day, or the week before? - A. No.

Q.Therefore how his mind was on those days, you do not know? - A. No.

Q. Do you know of his being absent any day from work for the last fortnight? - A. No.

Q. Do you know that his wife had a little money of her own, independent of him? - A. It is a little cottage that was left by her father.

Q.Have you heard him converse at all upon the subject? - A. Yes.

Q. Have you ever heard him express any discontent about her having that money? - A.There was always a controversy about it.

PHILIP PECKHAM sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a carpenter and builder, in Jermyn-street, St. James's; I have known the prisoner many years; in the year 1792 and 1793, he was in the habit of working for me the greatest part of the time.

Q. During that time, was there any thing led you to take notice of the state of his mind? - A. At different periods he would be away from his work, and walk about the streets like a man deranged in his senses, without any known cause; I have set him to work in a morning, and he has left it before night without any known cause.

Q. Did his conduct evince to your mind that of a disordered mind? - A. At those times that I have now mentioned it did.

Q. Has he worked for you since? - A. In 1794. and 1796 he worked for me, and his fits grew worse upon him, and more frequent; I employed him but a very short time, at that period, in consequence of that; since that time I have known nothing of him.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. You don't mean to say he was constantly deranged in his mind, but had occasional fits of derangement? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. Did you observe any thing particular that brought on those fits upon him? - A. Many times his wife has come and sent for him, but at other times, without any known cause to me, he has gone away and left his work.

Q.Did you ever observe any other symptoms about him than that of a gloomy melancholy disturbed man, that could induce you to suppose he did not know what he was doing? - A. I cannot say that I ever did.

GEORGE SEARLE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a smith, at Battle-bridge: I have known the prisoner at the bar all my life.

Q. Did you know him intimately? - A. Yes.

Q. Of course then, you had an opportunity of observing the state of his mind? - A. Yes, at times it was like the mind of a man who was not in his proper senses; he was not capable of his business at different times; there was one instance about nine years past, he attempted to make away with himself, by hanging himself in his work-shop; he was saved by being cut down in time.

Q. Did you see him on the 29th of September last? - A. Yes, he came a little after two o'clock in the day; he stopped with me till just the turn of four o'clock.

Q. Did you observe particularly the state of his mind at that time? - A. I saw that he was enraged about something, and was not at all like the person that he was before, from the particular motion of his hands, and of his eyes, that I took particular notice of.

Q. Did his mind, at that time, appear to have been the mind of a person deranged? - A. He said to me, I am very careless about any thing, for I am not for this world, as if he had meant to make away with himself; he mentioned these words several times.

Q. Was there any thing else particular in his conduct, so as to induce you to conceive his mind was disordered? - A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Something had made him angry? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know that his wife had some little property of her own? - A. Yes.

Q. Do not you know that that was the cause of his anger that day? - A. I cannot say.

Q. Did you ask him what he was angry about? A. No.

Q. Do not you know he expressed himself angry that he could not get at this money? - A. He has told me of the money, that he was expecting of it.

Q. Did not he tell you that his wife would not let him have it? - A. No.

Q. Did you never hear him express himself angry that his wife should have this money at her own command? - A. No, never in my life; he told me, the Thursday before this happened, that he was going with his wife to take that money.

Q.When you saw him on the Saturday, did not you ask him what had put him in a passion? - A. No, I did not.

Q. How long was he with you? - A.About two hours.

Q. And you never asked him what had made him angry? - A. No.

Q. And did he leave you in the same degree of anger in which he came to you? - A. Yes.

Court. Q.Were you in the room with him all the time of those two hours? - A. Yes.

Q. You had a good deal of conversation with him about different things? - A. Yes; I spoke several joking things with him, and asked him to drink.

Q. However, you had a good deal of discourse? - A. No great deal.

Q. Did he give you rational answers? - A. No.

Q. Did he seem to understand you? - A. He gave me some times quite contrary answers.

WILLIAM WOODS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. - I live at Bracknell, in the county of Berks; I have known the prisoner these twenty years.

Q. What was the state of his mind? - A. I cannot say.

Q. Do you remember any thing particular happening? - A. Yes; at his first connexion with the woman that is dead, he resided at my premises, and between nine and ten, or ten years ago, he hung himself up by a rope to a beam in his workshop, and locked himself in; I was present when he was cut down, and took away the rope from his neck.

GUILTY Death . (Aged 69.)

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron HOTHAM.

SENTENCE.

Mr. Recorder. Prisoner at the bar, After a very patient and a very humane discussion of your case, by the learned Judge who tried it, you have been convicted of the most horrid crime of murder, a crime so malignant in its nature, that it is difficult to find words to express its atrocity. All civilized nations are agreed in punishing this great offence with death: by the law of this country, the murderer is condemned to die; a law which has the very high sanction and authority of the sacred scriptures. Even in the atrocious crime of murder, there are very different shades of malignity; your's is a case of the very deepest die, you have, in savage brutality, most wantonly dared to spill the blood of an unarmed, innocent, and helpless woman, to lift up your blood thirsty hands against the partner of your bed, the partaker of your forrows and your happiness, when she was in the act of sober honest industry; a person to whom, under the most solemn vow, you had engaged to afford shelter and protection from every harm; what could excuse such an offence? nothing short of the deprivation of reason. Most unfortunately for you, the Jury, in the discharge of the duty they owed to themselves and to their country, have found that this most horrid deed was done in found mind, and in most wicked malice. Inasmuch as your offence is of the greatest enormity in the sight of God and man, so ought your contrition and your repentance to be most sincere and most unfeigned; I most earnestly request you, therefore, to make the very best use of the very short space of time that will be permitted you to remain among us; and I pray Almighty God in the attributes of his great mercy, that the very ignominious death you are about to suffer, and the public exposition of your body after death, will expiate your high offence here, and restore you to happiness and peace hereafter.

As the Law commands me, I now proceed to pass this dreadful sentence, that you, John Bond , be taken from hence to the place from whence you came, and that from thence you be taken to a place of execution, there to be hanged by the neck until you are dead; and afterwards, that your body be dissected and anatomized .

Prisoner, the Lord have mercy upon your soul!

555. SARAH WOOD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of September , in the dwelling-house of John Hearne, a pocket-book, value 1d. two guineas, a half-guinea, and a Banknote, value 10l. the property of Charles Croney .

CHARLES CRONEY sworn. - On the 30th of September, in the afternoon, I lost my property in a house in Hearne's buildings: This woman met me in the street, about half past one o'clock, and I went with her to this house, I staid there till about four o'clock; I had a 10l. note and two guineas and a half; I am sure I had them when I went into the house.

Q. Did you go to bed? - A. No, I pulled off my long jacket, and laid it by me; I had a short jacket underneath.

Q. Were you drunk or sober? - A. I was not drunk when I went into the house. She told me, she was going out, and would come back in a short time; and then I missed my money. I had her taken up about four o'clock in the public house.

Q. Was your money found upon her? - A. No.

Q. Was any body else in the room with you besides her? - A. There was another woman, but I did not know who she was.

Prisoner. Q. Do not you remember my fastening the door, and our going to bed together for an hour and a half? - A. No, I did not.

Court. Q. Had you been in bed? - A. No, I had been nigh hand her.

THOMAS PARSONS sworn. - I keep the Blue Anchor, in Upper East-smithfield, facing these buildings: This girl came in at two o'clock precisely, and called for a bottle of wine, half a pint of gin, and a pot of porter, and change for a 10l. note, for which I gave her regular change; she went away, and in less than half an hour returned with 9l. 2s. and put it into my care till the morning. About five or ten minutes past four, she returned again rather in liquor, and asked me what she had deposited in my hands for care; I told her, 9l. 2s. In going away again, crossing the street towards home, the prosecutor met her, and brought her back to my house, and there accused her of the robbery, which she denied.

Q. Whose house is it? - A. A Mr. Hearne's, who lets it out in tenements.

Q. You knew her before? - A. Since I took the house, which was only on the 10th of August. They drank together for, I dare say, upwards of an hour, to the amount of two shillings and two-pence halfpenny; the altercation between them was not much, any further than he accused her; they went out of my house together, and about six they returned in custody of the officer. (Produces the note.)

Q.(To Croney.) Is that the note that you had? - A. Yes, it is.

GEORGE KEARSLEY sworn. - I am a milkman: I was serving Mr. Parsons with milk at his house, and while I was there, the prosecutor came in with the woman, and made a great noise, and said, that she had robbed him; she said, do not make a noise here, go home with me, and I will give it you.

Q. Are you sure you heard her say that? - A. Yes; and then they went out, I followed them out, the prosecutor said, you know there is a 10l. note and two guineas and a half you have got of mine, and I will have it; I did not hear her make any answer; and they went across the way towards her home directly.

SAMUEL DOWSEY sworn. - I am a headborough; I apprehended the prisoner: she told the prosecutor, he had got the pocket-book the notes was in, and he took it out, and it was empty; she told me, she would call at Mr. Parson's, and borrow some money to go to prison with; I went to Mr. Parsons, and he told me he had 9l. 2s. of her's in his hands.

Q. Did the prosecutor say any thing about any other woman having it? - A. No.

Prisoner's defence. I was waiting for a halfpennyworth of milk, and this gentleman asked me for Mr. Wright's, a taylor, I went with him and shewed him, and he took me into the wine-vaults, and gave me some liquor, then he went home with me, and he gave me a 10l. note, to get a bottle of wine, half a pint of gin, and a pot of beer, which I did; I returned with the change, and he gave it to me for the use of my body; I then gave it to Mr. Parsons, to take care of; and when he asked me for it again, I told him, I would not give it him, till he had paid me for the use of my body, and then he went and got a constable.

Court. (To Parsons.) Does the owner of the house, Mr. Hearne, live in that house? - A. No, he does not; it is his house, but he does not live in it.

GUILTY (Aged 21.)

Of stealing, but not in the dwelling-house .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

556. JAMES WILSON , WILLIAM SAGGERS , WILLIAM LEE , JOHN WARD , and WILLIAM YOUNG , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of September , a deal box, value 3s. a pair of boots, value 10s. two pair of shoes, value 2s. a pair or breeches, value 2s. a pair of cotton drawers, value 12d. two under waistcoats, value 2s. a waistcoat, value 2s. a cloth coat, value 2s. 6d. a dressing-gown, value 10s. five pair of cotton stockings, value 5s. six linen shirts, value 42s. thirteen muslin cravats,value 13s. two cotton night-caps, value 6d. two net caps, value 2d. five pocket-handkerchiefs, value 1s. 6d. a hat, value 2s. two razors, value 5s. a shaving-box and brush, value 12d. a cribbage-board, value 12d. a pack of cards, value 2d. and a cork-screw, value 3d. the property of Richard Remnant .

RICHARD REMNANT sworn. - I live at Kentish-town. On the 15th of September I came into town with two ladies in a post-chaise, over Blackfriars-bridge, with a box and trunk fastened to the front of the chaise: we stopped in Hatton Garden to set down one of the ladies; we all got out of the chaise, and were taking leave of the lady that we sat down; we got into the chaise again, and I directed the boy to drive us the nearest way to Kentish-town; he drove to the bottom of Hatton-garden , and, as I conceived he was going wrong, I called to him; he turned down Hatton-wall, into Portpool-lane, and into Gray's inn lane; the boy there called to me, and said, Sir, I am afraid the luggage is loose; I told him to draw up and fasten it; he drew up, and I immediately missed the box; the trunk remained.

Q. Is the boy here? - A. No.

Q. How soon after did you see any of your things? - A.This was on the Saturday evening; I saw part of them again on the Monday, the 17th, at the Rotation-office, in Hatton-garden.

NICHOLAS BOYLSTONE sworn. - On the 15th of September I was going up Hatton-garden about half past nine o'clock; I saw a post-chaise standing at a door, and a lady getting into it, and the door open, with two trunks or packages before. I saw several persons standing at a little distance; after this the chaise passed me, and several people were running on each side of the way, to the number of a dozen; the chaise stopped, and after that went up Hatton-wall; the men were then checked, and one of them was very near down; they turned down Hatton-wall, I passed on through Hatton-wall, into Portpool-lane; I had not been in it a minute, when the same men returned about the same number, one of them having a box upon his shoulder; I then gave notice at the Police-office; I then went back to where I had seen the chaise stop, and told the gentleman of it.

JOSEPH INWARDS sworn. - I am an officer belonging to Hatton-garden: On the 15th of September, in consequence of information from the last witness, I and three more officers, Chapman, Rose, and Oburn, went in pursuit; we went from one public-house to another to see if we could find them, we went to a suspicious house, the Sun, in Vinegar-yard, Red-lion-street, Clerkenwell; I went into the kitchen, and saw the prisoners Saggers, Young, and Ward; we were going to secure them, and they all made a rush past us, but I secured Ward, and another officer secured Wilson; I brought Ward into a box; we searched the house, but could not find the rest; we suppose they got out at the top of the house; we found in the kitchen where they were a great number of things tied up in an apron.

Q. How far was that apron from the prisoners? - A. In the same room, but I cannot say that any of the prisoners were near to it; Chapman was the first in the room; I afterwards took Lee; when we went into the room, there were some papers burning in the fire; we saw a part of them, which I believe the prosecutor can identify.

WILLIAM ROSE sworn. - I went with the last witness and two other officers, to the Sun; Wilson made a rush out; I had a struggle with him, and my brother officer, Chapman, assisted me, and we secured him; then Ward was brought to us by Inwards out of the kitchen; I did not see any more, because I was guard over them; I afterwards saw the things tied up in an apron, upon the table; when we were taking Ward from the box in the taproom, there was a razor, and a handkerchief, and a neckcloth dropped from him on the ground.

Q. Might it not come from any other of the prisoners? - A. No, there was no other person near. On the Monday morning I apprehended Saggers; there had been some papers burning in kitchen range; we found them quite hot.

Prisoner Ward. There were several people in the box besides me.

Rose. There was nobody but myself and brother officer.

WILLIAM CHAPMAN sworn. - I am an officer; I did not go in till after Ward was brought out of the kitchen; I stopped Wilson; I found the apron, containing the property, in the kitchen, behind the door, upon a press bedstead, (produces it; I saw nobody there that I can ascertain, but Ward and Wilson; when Ward was moved out of the taproom, here is a handkerchief, and neckcloth, and razor, which were under his seat where he sat; there was a fire, and papers burning, in the kitchen.

LEVI OBURN sworn. - I cannot identify any body but Ward and Wilson; I saw a great number of papers burning in the grate; I found the property tied up in an apron upon the bedstead; I took these papers out of the fire. ( Produces some burnt papers).

Prosecutor. I packed up the box myself, there were two small books and tradesmen's bills that I had paid at Brighton.

Q. Look at these remnants of paper? - A. This is one of them; the neck handkerchief I can swear to, and to the initials of my name and the number; therazor is also marked, the pocket is marked in the same manner. (The property found in the apron was deposed to by the prosecutor, being most of them marked.)

Wilson's defence. - I went into the public-house to call for a pint of porter, and I was immediately laid hold of by these people, who made use of words very improper to mention, and treated me very ill.

Saggers's defence. Inwards said, at Hatton-Garden, that he could not take upon himself to swear to me.

Q.(To Inwards.) Did you say you did not know whether Saggers was there? - A. I swore that he was there.

Ward's defence. I went into the house to get a pint of beer, I know nothing of it; no man here can say I made any resistance.

Lee, NOT GUILTY .

Wilson, GUILTY (Aged 21.)

Saggers, GUILTY (Aged 25.)

Ward, GUILTY (Aged 23.)

Young, GUILTY (Aged 19.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice HEATH.

557. WILLIAM GALLOWAY and JOHN MILTON , otherwise MULTON , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of October , four pounds weight of bees'-wax, value 4s. the property of Valentine Labrow .

VALENTINE LABROW sworn. - I live in St. John's-street, West Smithfield: On Friday the 5th of October, I lost four pounds, and upwards, of bees'-wax, from my shop at Islington ; I was not in my shop at the time, I know nothing of it.

WILLIAM ROBERTS sworn. - I live with Mr. Labrow, I keep a shop at Islington for him: On the 5th of October, between ten and eleven o'clock in the morning, I went out into the garden, I heard the door go, and I immediately came in again; I missed the bees'-wax, it was in the window when I went out; the constable followed the prisoners and brought them back, Benson and Galloway.

Prosecutor. Benson was admitted a King's evidence.

Roberts. Milton was not taken at that time; a piece was found upon him afterwards. (The bees'-wax was produced by the constable, who deposed, that he saw them run from the door, and that it was dropped by Galloway and Benson).

Roberts. I know this wax, it is very remark able bees'-wax, it had been in the shop two months.

JAMES BENSON sworn. - On the 5th of October, between ten and eleven in the morning, me and John Benson , and William Gallaway , went up to Islington, and seeing nobody in Mr. Labrow's shop, Gallaway went in, and brought out a piece of white bees'-wax, and gave it to me at the door; I had not it a moment before I gave it to John Milton ; we went a little way along the houses, and then Milton crossed the way and stood leaning on a post; me and William Galloway went back to the shop, and saw there was an opportunity again; I went in, and took the bees'-wax that is now produced, and gave it to Galloway, who was then at the door; Mr. Isaacs then came after us, and took me and Galloway back; Milton was not taken till next morning.

Q. Are you sure that what you have said is true? - A. Yes.

The prisoners did not say any thing in their defence.

Galloway, GUILTY . (Aged 14.)

Milton, GUILTY. (Aged 16.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

558. SARAH KELLOW was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of September , a black satin cloak, value 15s. the property of Joseph Pratton ; and a black mode cloak, value 2s. the property of Martha Daniels .

ELEANOR PRATTON sworn. - I am the wife of Joseph Pratton, who keeps several houses in Tripe's-yard, Spitalfields: The prisoner was employed by Martha Daniels to assist her in work for me, I lent a black satin cloak of mine to Martha Daniels; I do not know any thing about the mode cloak.

MARTHA DANIELS sworn. - I employed the prisoner to assist me in my work: On Wednesday the 19th of September, I went out for about five minutes, I left my own black mode cloak upon the bed; when I returned, I missed the cloak and the prisoner; on the Thursday I saw the black satin cloak again, at a pawnbroker's in Tooley-street.

JAMES GATTEY sworn. - I am a pawnbroker,(produces a black satin cloak); my young man took it in of the prisoner, in my presence, in the name of Sarah Adams, he lent ten shillings upon it; she said she brought it from her mother.

Q. When was this? - A. The 19th of September, between eight and nine o'clock. (The cloak produced, and deposed to by the prosecutrix).

Daniels. This is Mrs. Pratton's cloak, it has my work upon it, I repaired it.

Prisoner's defence. She lent me that cloak, and the other cloak she gave me a month before.

Q.(To Daniels.) Did you lend her the cloak? - A. I did not. GUILTY (Aged 27).

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice HEATH.

559. MATTHEW MORTON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 14th of September , 25th. of pewter metal, value 18s. 9d. the property of Richard Yates .

RICHARD YATES sworn. - I am a pewterer in Shoreditch ; the prisoner had worked for me some months. On the 14th of September he came down to me, and asked me for some pewter to work upon; I went out of town to Leicestershire that very day, and desired my son to keep an eye upon him.

EDWARD YATES sworn. - I went up into a place adjoining where the prisoner worked, nothing but a deal partition parted it; I saw him through a crack let down his breeches, and put a large piece of metal that I have here into his breeches; he was alone at that time; there is only room for one person to work where he was; then he put out his candle, and came down stairs; I watched him out at the door, and called him back into the accompting-house, and sent for an officer, who took the property from him; he also took another piece from under his arm, which I had not seen.

JOHN ARMSTRONG sworn. - I am an officer; I took this piece from under the prisoner's coat, and this from out of his breeches. (Producing them).

Yates. This is exactly the same sort of pewter that we gave him; I suppose that is about the same quantity that was given him; it is what we call our finest metal; it is worth to me nine pence halfpen ny a pound.

Prisoner's defence. What I am indicted for I am guilty of, I hope for the mercy of the Jury.

Court. (To Yates.) Q. How long has he lived with you? - A. Six months, during all which time I have been robbed.

GUILTY . (Aged 30.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

560. RICHARD JACKSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of September , nineteen pigs, value 20l. the property of Jonathan Nevitt .

JONATHAN NEVITT sworn. - I am a farmer , at Ealing ; I had seen the prisoner once or twice before I lost my pigs, they were lost on the Friday night, the 28th, I told them all about five o'clock, I missed them the next morning; about half past five o'clock my man called me, and told me the pigs were stolen, he is not here; the lock was broke open; I went in pursuit of the pigs, and overtook them in Cumberland-mews; the prisoner was driving them, he had sold five of them; I told him they were my property, and he was a prisoner of mine; then I took him away to a public-house about a quarter past seven in the morning; I am sure they were my pigs, I have had six of them ever since March last, I found fourteen upon him.

Q. You cannot swear to all of them, I suppose? - A. Yes, I can swear to them all; the prisoner told me he was ordered by a man to drive them from Hammersmith, and if he could sell any of them he was to sell them; that he was to have half-a-crown a piece for selling them.

WILLIAM-HENRY HALL sworn. - I am a constable of Mary-le-bone parish; I know nothing more than taking the prisoner into custody from Mr. Nevitt; I saw the pigs in the yard.

Q. Did he say where he was driving them to? - A. No.

JOHN ATWELL sworn. - I am a labouring man, I live near the King's-head, in the Edgware-road; the prisoner stood with the pigs about a quarter past six in the morning; he asked me if I knew any place he could put them in to give them some beans; I told him I did not; he asked me if I thought any body would take notice if he drove them under the gateway in the mews, and I told him I dare say he would not be interrupted; he told me he had bought the pigs very reasonable, and he could sell them cheap, they were different sizes, he sold one for ten shillings.

Q. What was the value of it? - A. I cannot tell, I saw him take the money for it, and then the man bought the fellow to it; the man said, he thought they were over-driven, and were not well; he said, no, they had only come from Colnbrook, and he had brought them from Hammersmith that morning, and then I agreed for the two biggest of them, and as I was driving them away, Mr. Nevitt came up upon his mare, and collared the prisoner.

Q.(To Nevitt). What was the value of your pigs? - A. I was offered three guineas a piece before harvest for them.

Prisoner's defence. Coming through Hammersmith, there was a man with these pigs, and he told me to drive them to the Wilkes's-head, near Tyburn-turnpike, and if I could sell a few of them, I was to have two shillings and sixpence a piece for selling them. GUILTY (Aged 26.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice HEATH.

561. JAMES WALKER was indicted for that he, in the King's highway, in and upon Sarah, the wife of Lazarus Lacey , did make an assault, on the 13th of October , putting her in fear, and taking from her person four men's muslin double neck-handkerchiefs, value 3s. 6d. twomen's single muslin neck handkerchiefs, value 2s. two muslin neck handkerchiefs, value 2s. a muslin cap, value 12d. a muslin worked apron, value 2s. and a silk handkerchief, value 6d. the property of the said Lazarus.

SARAH LACEY sworn. - I am the wife of Lazarus Lacey. On the 13th of October, I was going home with my linen that I had washed, very near upon half an hour after eight o'clock in the evening, there were six neckcloths belonging to a gentleman, several handkerchiefs, and belonging to a lady, one cap and one apron. As I was going through King-street, Seven-dials , the prisoner at the bar came walking very quick behind me, he put his arm over my left shoulder, and snatched it from me, and ran away; I followed him, and cried stop thief; he was stopped immediately by the watchman; he dropped the bundle, and I picked it up.

VALENTINE ROMLEY sworn. - I am watch-house keeper, (produces the property); I received these things from one of my watchmen, at the watch house.

Q.(To Mrs. Lacey.) Look if you can swear to any of these things? - A. I can swear to them all.

JOHN HALSEY sworn. - I am a watchman; I heard a cry of stop thief; I saw the prisoner running, and I saw him stopped the corner of Belton-street, the woman was running close behind me.

THOMAS FAULKNER sworn. - I am a watchman; I stopped the prisoner, and threw him down till the last witness came up to help me.

Prisoner's defence. I was very much in liquor, I know nothing of it; if you will forgive me this time, I never will be guilty of the like again.

GUILTY (Aged 30.)

Of stealing, but not violently .

Confined six months in the House of Correction , fined 1s. and discharged.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

562. THOMAS SPARKES was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 21st of September , one hundred pounds of raw sugar, value 2l. 10s. seven pounds of tea, value 14s. one pound eight ounces of pepper, value 1s. five ounces of ginger, value 2d. seventeen pounds of leather, value 1l. 5s. fifty-nine balls of twine, value 19s. seven quires of writing-paper, value 3s. 6d. fifty pens, value 1s. two spike bits, value 3d. nine gimblets, value 6d. seventy-six yards of Hessian cloth, value 2l. 10s. six pieces of calico, value 3s. three iron shovels, value 6d. three iron crows, value 2s. two planes, value 1s. 6d. an iron hatchet, value 6d. an iron hammer, value 6d. twenty pounds of iron nails, value 10s. and three Hessian bags, value 4s. the property of the United Company of Merchants trading to the East-Indies .

Second Count. For stealing like goods, laying them to be the property of certain persons to the Jurors unknown.(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp).

THOMAS JOYCE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am one of the elders of the warehouses of the East-India Company, at their warehouses, in Parker's-gardens, in the Minories; the prisoner was store-keeper to the Company in those warehouses; he has been in that office above ten years.

CHARLES STEWART sworn. - I am a labourer employed in the Company's warehouses, in Crutched-friars; I saw the prisoner selling some Hessian, upon which I gave information to the elders, and Armstrong and I went to the prisoner's lodgings, in Artillery-street, with a warrant, I have known it to be his lodgings for years past; we found a great quantity of stores belonging to the Company; Armstrong has had them ever since.

JOHN ARMSTRONG sworn. - I went with a warrant to the prisoner's lodgings, (produces the property); I have had them ever since.

Q.(To Mr. Joyce.) Look at these things, and tell us if you had any such things in the warehouses? - A.Here are seven pounds of tea, and here is an iron crow with the Company's mark upon it; here are three shovels, with the company's stamp upon them, and here is a quantity of Hessian, such as he had the receiving of, and giving out; there is nothing here but what we have in great numbers; I have every reason to believe they are the Company's property.

Cross-examined by Mr. Const. Q. Do you know these things by the marks only? - A. By the mark only, and besides the Company's mark, there is P G upon them.

Q. Do the Company ever dispose of them after they are done with? - A. They never have since I have belonged to the Company.

WILLIAM PEACH sworn. - I apprehended the prisoner, and the moment I searched him, in his waistcoat pocket I found this piece of cord; we had no conversation with him at all.

The prisoner did not say any thing in his defence, but called nine witnesses, who had known him from seven to forty years, who gave him an excellent character.

GUILTY (Aged 55.)

Confined six months in the House of Correction , fined 1s. and discharged.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice HEATH.

563. SARAH MARSHALL was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 20th of September , sevenpair of cotton, stocking, value 7s. and a pair of pockets, value 12d. the property of Elizabeth Field , widow .

ELIZABETH FIELD sworn. - I am a widow, I take in washing: On the 20th of September, I think it was Friday, I lost seven pair of cotton stockings and a pair of pockets out of the yard, where I had hung them to dry; I was coming down stairs to take them in, and saw the woman at the bar going out with them in her apron; I live in St. Andrew's-street, Seven-dials; upon seeing her, I went up to her, and said, ma'am, I beg your pardon, I think you have got something there belonging to me; I then saw the stockings hang out; then she said, if I would let her go, I might have them again, if they were mine; I then called for assistance, and knocked at the door; a young woman came to my assistance, and I sent for a constable; I had lost other things that same evening. (The constable produced the property, which was deposed to by Mrs. Field).

ANN BLACKBURN sworn. - I was at work for Mrs. Field; I heard the alarm, I went down stairs, and Mrs. Field had hold of the prisoner by the petticoat; she said, she had robbed her, and the property hung between Mrs. Field and her, and one stocking hung upon her arm; I took her towards the yard, and held her till some people came to my assistance.

Prisoner's defence. I was not sober when I went into the yard. GUILTY (Aged 23.)

Confined six months in the House of Correction , fined 1s. and discharged.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM.

564. WILLIAM BOWERS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of September , four carpenter's planes, value 5s. the property of Robert Mitchell .

ROBERT MITCHELL sworn. - I am a journeyman carpenter ; I lost four planes on the 20th of September, out of the lower part of a house I was at work in repairing in Henrietta-street, Covent-garden ; I was using them in the morning that I missed them in the afternoon.

Q. Do you know any thing of your own knowledge about his taking them away? - A. No.

JOHN FIELDING sworn. - I am a waiter at the Burton alehouse, Henrietta-street, (produces the planes); the prisoner threw them down at the door; I saw him tucking something under his coat, and I called my master to ask if he was at work there, and he said, no; I followed him, and took him; he told me he had borrowed the planes of one of the men; this was about three in the afternoon of Thursday, the 20th of September.

Prisoner's defence. I went into the parlour and brought them out, and they followed me, I put them down at the door; necessity was the cause of it.

Mitchell. I know these to be my planes, I was at work with them at the same time, I have had them seven years.

GUILTY (Aged 50).

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice HEATH.

565. ELIZABETH BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 18th of October , eleven yards and a half of cotton, value 17s. the property of Robert Waithman and Charles Bristow , privately in their shop .

THOMAS MYERS sworn. - I am servant to Messrs. Robert Waithman and Charles Bristow, linen-drapers , the corner of Fleet-street ; the prisoner at the bat came in on the 18th of October; a lady had dropped her glove, and the prisoner stooped to look for it; she picked it up, and at the same time picked up a piece of print that lay at her feet upon the ground, and threw it upon the counter; she looked at several pieces of print, which she objected to; I shewed her some more, and she asked me the price of one, and I measured it; I told her it was twenty-three pence a yard, that there were six yards of it, good measure, and she should have it for eleven shillings and sixpence; she then wished me to measure another; she said she wanted it for herself and the child, when she first came in; she said she wanted something of the mourning kind, as her husband had been killed in Nelson's victory; she at first had her child loose in her arms, but afterwards she had got her gown up round the child's neck, and up to her own neck; she then asked me if half-a-guinea would not do for the quantity I had asked her eleven shillings and sixpence for; she then got up, and said she would call her mother; I asked her if she was not capable of buying a gown without her mother's approbation; she said, she was only at the door, and she would call her; I then jumped over the counter, she was never out of my sight; she called out some woman's name, I cannot say rightly what; she then stepped out to the door, I went with her; she called outside the door, but no person came; then she said she would go over the way, I wished her not, and said her mother would come to her, as she knew she was come to buy a gown, or something to that purpose; she went over the way, and I went with her, I believe I had hold of her arm all the way; after she had got over the way, she began calling out the same name again; then she went into the liquor-shop, Mr.Wright's, and enquired if her mother had been there, or her sister, I am not sure which; a person made answer, that there was nobody there; she then came out; I believe at first she wished to go down Fleet-market, I said she should not, till she had been to our house again, as I was apprehensive the had got something; she began calling out again, and in the course of a minute or two she asked a boy where her mother was, and at last I think the boy said, she was gone home; then a man came up, whom she called her husband or her brother, I do not know which, and she told him that she had been to look at a gown, and she wished her mother to see it, and that the young man, meaning me, would not let her go till she went back; she then said she would go, but wished to deliver the child up to this man, which I would not let her do; she then began loosening her gown a little; I had desired a person to go over to our house, and tell them that I wanted them; she then said she would go with me, and she immediately dropped the cotton upon the ground; I picked it up, and sent for a constable.

Q. Are there any other partners in the house? - A. No.

- WEATHERFIELD sworn. - I am a constable. (Produces the property).

Myers. It has Waithman and Bristow's private mark upon it: I am confident it was in the shop when the prisoner came in; I recollect shewing it.

Prisoner's defence. Nothing dropped from me of the kind; I had a half-guinea in my hand to purchase a gown and a frock for my child; I have three small children; my husband was killed in the late victory; I come of a very respectable family, my father is a clergyman, and I did not chuse to expose myself to my own family, or I could have had many friends here.

THOMAS MALING sworn. - I am clerk to Mr. Prickett, cabinet-maker, in Aldersgate-street; I have known her from a child at school; she was married to a young man, who is since dead; she has two children, besides the one she has in her arms; she has always borne a good character; she belongs to a very respectable family, and was well brought up, her father is a clergyman in the country.

The prisoner was recommended by the Jury to the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY (Aged 24.)

Of stealing, but not privately .

Confined six months in Newgate , fined 1s. and discharged.

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

566. MARY BATTERSBY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of October , a base metal watch gilt with gold, value 21. the property of William Plumley , privately in his shop .

Second Count. Laying it to be the property of Peter Upjohn .

WILLIAM SINFIELD sworn. - I am a shopman to Mr. Plumley, silversmith and watch-maker , Ludgate-hill : On Monday, about four o'clock in afternoon, the prisoner came into my master's shop, to look at some watches, I shewed her several; she wished to look at one with the old fashioned figures on the dial plate, she said, It would suit better; upon that, I looked into the window, to see for one of that description, but not having one, she said, she would let the person know, they lived over the bridge; upon that she went on to the shop of Mr. Jones, in Fleet-street, a pawnbroker. I saw no more of the prisoner till I saw her the next morning, before the Magistrate.

Q. Was there any body else in the shop at the time? - A. No, nobody About two hours after she had left our shop, Mrs. Jones sent to our house, there was a watch of our's found upon her, and then I heard that she was in custody.

Q. Had you missed that watch? - A. No, I had not, nor I do not recollect shewing her that watch, I did not miss it till the constable shewed it me; according to our books, it answers in the name and number to one that we had.

JOHN SMITH sworn. - I live in Wine-office-court; I was in Mr. Jones's shop when this woman came in and asked to look at some watches, on Monday, about half past four; Mr. Jones shewed her some, but she wanted to see one with a green case, she said, it was for a lady; in consequence of some suspicion, she was stopped, and a watch found concealed under her cloak, that she had taken from Mr. Jones's counter; I said, You have taken more than one; upon that I searched her, and found one in her pocket; I asked her, where did you steal this from; says she, I took it out of a shop in Cheapside; says I, you had better send for a constable, and she said, if you will go along with me, I will shew you where I took will go along with may be the man will forgive me, or something to that purpose. We then sent for a coach, and sent her to the Compter.

Q. What became of that watch that was found in her pocket? - A. I gave it to the constable when he came. I forgot to mention that I asked her, what part of Cheapside, and she said, on the same side as Fleet-market, between that and St. Paul's Church-yard; we went to the different shops about Cheapside and Ludgate-street, and found that Mr. Plumley had lost a watch answering to the name and number.

JOHN YOUNGHUSBAND sworn. - I am a constable: (produces the watch in question); as I was going with the prisoner to the Compter, in a coach, she told me, she never did such a thing before, that she was driven to it by distress.

Q. Did you tell her you would forgive her, if she confessed it? - A. No, I told her the law must take it's course. She said, she had it from a shop on the side of the way that Fleet-market is on, and before we came to St. Paul's, I enquired, as I came home, at the different shops, and found that Mr. Plumley had lost such an one.

PETER UPJOHN sworn. - The name and number corresponds with the memorandum that I have; Mr. Plumley had such a watch of me to sell for me.

Q. Does it ever happen that the same name and number is put upon more watches that one? - A. It may, from different manufactories.

Q. Do you believe that to be a watch that you had sent to Mr. Plumley's? - A. As far as human nature can say, I believe it is.

Prisoner's defence. I did it from distress, I hope the gentlemen will forgive me.

GUILTY of stealing, value 4s. 6d. (Aged 33.)

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

567. MARGARET BATTERSBY was again indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of October , a base metal watch gilt with gold, value 2l. 5s. the property of Thomas Jones , in his dwelling-house .

THOMAS JONES sworn. - I am a silversmith and pawnbroker , in Fleet-street : On Monday last, the prisoner came into my shop between four and five o'clock, and desired me to shew her some watches, I shewed her some; she wished to look at one in the window, in a green case, I shewed it to her; after seeing that, that did not please her, she wished to look at a thin one, because they were more fashionable than the others; then, after seeing that, she wanted to look at some wedding rings, I shewed her one, which she put upon her finger, and which was rather too tight for her, I assisted her in taking it off; in the mean while, with the other hand, I saw her drop her cloak over the watches, my suspicion was well grounded, she conveyed one of the watches under her cloak, which I suppose she put in her pocket; I immediately laid hold of her by the shoulder, and asked her where she was going with that watch; I searched her, and took it out of her hand; Mr. Smith laid hold of her, and took it out of her hand.

John Younghusband produced the watch.

Jones. This is the watch I had shewn her, it has my private mark upon it.

Prisoner's defence. I did not do it from any bad principle, but from distress.

GUILTY of stealing to the value of 39s .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

568. JAMES KIRK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of October , four worsted stocking-pieces, value 2l. 4s. the property of Joseph Peart , in his dwelling-house .

JOSEPH PEART sworn. - I am a hosier , No. 12, and 13, in the Poultry ; I saw nothing of this transaction myself, I have no partner, I live in the house.

JOHN COFFEE sworn. - I am an officer of Cheap Ward: On the 15th of October, about half past five in the evening, I was going with four letters to the Post-office, for Alderman Boydell, I am porter to him; I saw the prisoner at the bar, and another, taking notice of different shops, which gave me a suspicion of him; when I came to No. 12, in the Poultry, I saw this lad stop at the prosecutor's shop, the young lad in the shop appeared to me to be going to take a candle down into the cellar; as soon as ever the lad had turned his back the prisoner went in, and brought out four stocking-pieces; when he came out, I immediately laid hold of him with my right-hand; he then dropped the pieces, and I picked them up; he called out to several different names, and bit me; I directly threw him into Mr. Harper's shop, till I got assistance to take him to the Compter. (Produces them).

Prosecutor. I believe them to be my property, I cannot positively say they are mine.

Q. But were the stockings that were in your shop your property? - A. Most certainly.

Prisoner's defence. I know nothing at all about it, I never was in the shop.

GUILTY of stealing to the value of 39s.

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

569. HANNAH HARDCASTLE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of October , six yards of calico, value 15s. the property of William Gibson .

WILLIAM GIBSON sworn. - I live at No. 103. Newgate-street ; On Monday evening, the 1st of October, about six o'clock, I lost six yards and rather more than a half of calico, it was hanging upon a horse just within the door; I had seen it about tow minutes before, there is a witness here that saw it taken.

- ROWBOTHAM sworn. - I was going alongNewgate-street, I saw the prisoner at Mr. Gibson's door pulling at something, I followed her, and laid hold of her; she had a piece of calico in her hand, and I took her and the calico into the shop.

- WOODMAN sworn. - I am a constable.(Produces the property).

Q.(To Rowbatbam.) Can you say that that is the same calico? - A. I believe it is; it is the same colour and pattern.

Gibson. I know this to be mine; it has no mark upon it, but I know it from several imperfections in the printing of it. (Pointing them out).

Prisoner's defence. I was looking at the quality and width of this piece of calico, when it sell into my hand, and that gentleman laid hold of me just as I was going to take it into the shop.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY (Aged 20.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. Baron HOTHAM.

570. MARY BARRETT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of September , four pounds of soap, value 3s. two ounces of tea, value 6d. a quarter of a pound of sugar, value 2d. a quarter of a pound of bacon, value 3d. and an earthen-ware pint mug, value 9d. the property of Robert Taylor .

ROBERT TAYLOR sworn. - I keep a grocer's and cheesemonger's shop , in Marshall-street, Carnaby-market : The prisoner was my servant , I had some time suspected I had been robbed; one Sunday evening, the 23d of September, I requested her to take up a saucer, for fear it should be broke, that had been set down to the dog, and as she stooped to take it up, a large piece of shop dropped from her breast; I asked her what it was, and she said, a log of chump wood; I insisted upon seeing it, and found it to be soap; upon searching her person, I found about four pounds, there were two bars concealed in a very curious manner, tied up in one corner of her shift; she had thrown her stays into her box, and stowed sugar all round her body.

Q. Did you tell her it would be either better or worse if she did not confess? - A. No, I did not.

Prisoner's defence. I took the soap to wash my things. GUILTY (Aged 15.)

Confined one year in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice HEATH.

571. ANN FORBES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of March , a pair of linen sheets, value 7s. a pair of bellows, value 12d. a brass candlestick, value 8d. and an iron fire-shovel, value 6d. the property of Joseph Priest , in a lodging-room .

JOSEPH PRIEST sworn. - My wife let the prisoner the lodging, I was not at home.

MARY PRIEST sworn. - I live in William-street, Shoreditch : On the Saturday in March the Prisoner came to me, and asked for a ready furnished room; I let her a one pair of stairs room for half-a-crown a week, she said her husband was in the country; she came in one the Saturday, and went away on the Tuesday; I gave her a light on the Tuesday night, but whether she slept there or not I cannot say, I did not see any thing of her again till I took her; when she was gone I missed the things mentioned in the indictment, I have never found any of them since; I took her up the 3d. of this month, when the grand rejoicing night was; I met her by accident, and knew her by the lightness of the night.

Prosecutor. I broke open the room, and missed the things mentioned in the indictment.

Prisoner's defence. I was distressed for a lodging and I took this, I am as innocent as the child unborn; I have lodged ever since June last within two hundred yards of him, I went out a chairing, and sent the key to him by another lodger of his.

Q.(To Priest.) Are you in the habit of letting your lodgings or your wife? - A. If I am at home I let them myself, if I am not she lets them.

Q. You ratify what your wife does? - A. Yes.

GUILTY (Aged 50.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron HOTHAM.

572. ANN HARDMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of September , five ounces of nutmegs, value 10s. eighteen pounds of shap, value 15s. a jar filled with vinegar and gherkins, value 3s. a carpet-broom, value 2s. 6d. a clothes-brush, value 2s. and two yards of black lace, value 12d. the property of Joseph Vollam .

JOSEPH VOLLAM sworn. - I am an oilman in Wardour-street: The prisoner was my servant six or seven months; I know nothing of the transaction myself.

JOHN HAWTHORNE sworn. - I am a constable of St. Ann's: About eleven o'clock at night I was sent for to take the prisoner into custody.

Mr. Vollam. I was present when the things were taken out of her boxes, they were searched in the prisoner's presence, in the back kitchen; there was a jar of vinegar and gherkins, and a clothes-brush, and two yards of black lace locked up in her box; it was impossible for me to miss these things out of about thirty or forty thousand articles; the property is most of it here; the soap was found upon the cistern.

Q. How do you know the prisoner at the bar stole that soap? - A. I believe either she or the man that was in bed with her did; I found a man in bed with her between eleven and twelve o'clock at night; the nutmegs were found upon the top of the bureau bedstead.

Q. How do you know she put them there? - A. I do not know; it is impossible to swear to any articles in my shop.

Q. Do you know any thing of the lace? - A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gruney. Q. This person who was with the prisoner, I believe, you had some acquaintance with? - A. He was an acquaintance of my wife's sister.

Q. The only things found in the box were the brush and the lace, and the gherkins? - A. Yes.

Q. And the only thing you have any mark upon is the brush? - A. Yes.

Q. Will you swear you had never sold that brush? - A. Yes; I will swear I never sold one like that in my life.

Q. I believe you had a gentleman a lodger? - A. Yes.

Q. You will not swear that she had not taken that brush to brush that gentleman's coat? - A. He had a man to brush his coat.

Q. But will you swear that she never did? - A. I think I could.

The prisoner did not say any thing in her defence, but called one witness, who had known her seven years, and gave her a good character.

GUILTY (Aged 30.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice HEATH.

573. JOHN KINGSBURY and MARY SLANEY were indicted, the first for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of September, three pair of women's shoes, value 11s. and two pair of children's leather shoes, value 3s. 6d. the property of John Cartwright ; and the other for receiving the same goods knowing them to have been stolen .

There being no evidence to affect the prisoners they were Both ACQUITTED .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

574. SARAH THOMAS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of September , a half-guinea , the property of William Hayward .

WILLIAM HAYWARD sworn. - I am a journeyman smith : On Saturday the 29th of September, between the hours of eleven and twelve at night, I lost half-a-guinea.

Q. Were you drunk or sober? - A. Quite sober. As I was going home on Saturday night, at the corner of Portland-street, I met the prisoner, she said she was very cold, and asked me to give her something to drink; I gave her a glass of liquor at the door of a public-house in Portland-street ; I was within a minute's walk of my own house, and this woman pulled me about, and I caught her hand in my waistcoat-pocket; I took hold of her hand, and squeezed it against my side that she should not draw my money out; then she drew her hand out of my pocket of close, that I could not perceive that she had taken any money out; I then went into the public-house, and had a glass of gin, to see whether I had lost any money or not, and I missed half-a-guinea, and some silver, I had about nineteen shillings in my pocket in all; I sent for a constable, and he found the half-guinea in her mouth, at the watch-house, I saw him take it from her.

HENRY BATES sworn. - I belong to Mary-le-bonne watch-house: The prisoner, was brought in by the watchman and prosecutor, nigh upon twelve o'clock at night; the prosecutor said he had been robbed of half-a-guinea, and some silver; I was searching her for near a quarter of an hour, I made her open her mouth, and I heard something grind against her teeth; I did not like to put my fingers into her mouth, and I got the bowl of the watch-house key into her mouth, and then I took it out.(Produces the property).

Prosecutor. I believe this to be my half-guinea.

WILLIAM HEARNE sworn. - I am a watchman: I put the key into her mouth, and the half-guinea dropped out.

Prisoner's defence. I met with a gentleman who took me to a house in Wimpole-street, I was with him near three hours, he walked with me back into Cavendish-square, and gave me half-a-guinea and some silver, and I was to meet him the next evening at eight o'clock; I went a little further, and there was a man in liquor, not this man, who asked me if I would have something to drink; he had a glass of gin, and I had a glass of peppermint, and in pulling out my money to pay for it he saw the half-guinea; when I came out, he said, he would have that half-guinea; I told him it was my own, and he said he would have it, and he called the watchman, and they took me to the watch-house; I never saw the prosecutor in my life till the day after I was taken to the watch-house.

GUILTY (Aged 36.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

575. RICHARD-WARNER WILSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of September , two pewter pint pots, value 2s. the property of William Stevens .

JOHN CORBOULD sworn. - The prosecutor keeps a public-house the corner of Wimpole-street and Mary-le-bone-street : I saw the prisoner take two pint pots from a door, about two doors from the prosecutor's, he passed the, and I gave information to Mr. Stevens, who came up and claimed them as his; the prisoner said, he had taken them from distress.

WILLIAM STEVENS sworn. - I am a publican: I found some pots upon the prisoner, two of them were my own property, they have my name upon them.

Prisoner's defence. I have been an inhabitant of St. James's. Clerkenwell, I have brought up eleven children, I have had five paralytic strokes, and they will not take me into the workhouse.

GUILTY (Aged 59.)

Confined one years in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice HEATH.

576. JANE SKELTON and ELIZABETH CARROLL were indicted, the first, for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of October , a linen sheet, value 8s. the property of Nicholas Alston , and the other, for receiving the same, knowing it to have been stolen .

There being no evidence to affect the prisoners, except that of an accomplice, they were Both ACQUITTED .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice HEATH.

577. RICHARD GARDINER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of October , six coal sacks, value 15s. the property of William Windle and Charles Windle .

The prosecutor being called, but not appearing, his recognizance was ordered to be estreated.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

578. WILLIAM AMBRIDGE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of October , a chest, containing 89 lb of tea, value 20l. the property of Matthew Bell .

Second Count. Laying it to be the property of Joseph Ball .

MATTHEW BELL sworn. - I am a tea-dealer , in Goodge-street: On the 19th of September, I lost a chest of tea, on the road from the Company's warehouses to my house; I can only prove the identity of the chest.

SARAH BALL sworn. - I keep town carts, I ply at the warehouses; I was employed on Friday, the 19th of September, to carry six chest of tea to Mr. Bell's house, I was present at the loading of them, there were thirteen in the cart, but six only belonging to Mr. Bell; they were loaded about five o'clock in the afternoon from the warehouses in Fenchurch-street; I had two men to go with the cart, one to drive, and the other to watch the property.

JAMES BACCUS sworn. - I drove the cart: As I was going pretty sharp through Broad-street, St. Giles's , one hyson chest jerked off the copse of the cart, I turned round and put that chest upon the copse again, where it was before; I then looked at the tail of the cart, and found the rope had been cut; I did not see the prisoner, by, upon turning round, I saw the chest upon the ground, in the possession of the officers.

WILLIAM CHAPMAN sworn. - I am an officer: On Friday evening, a little after six o'clock, I and three of my brother officers going up Holborn, saw the prisoner and another, as I thought, lodging a cart loaded with tea, we followed them up Holborn, and about Little Turnstile, the prisoner went to the tail of the cart, he then went back again to his companion, and they kept on even with the cart till they came into Broad-street, St. Giles's; about the middle of Broad-street, St. Giles's, the prisoner went to the cart, and thrust the chest down to the ground from the hind part of the cart; his companions directly went to assist him, and then all four of us went to lay hold of him; the prisoner ran up Compton-street, and I followed him, I never lost fight of him; the carter was along side of his horses, and the other man upon the copse of the cart; I did not see him cut the rope, but I found this knife in his pocket, (producing it.) The chest of tea produced.

Q. Was it light or dark? - A. It was just about the lighting of the lamps, about six o'clock.

LEVY OBURN sworn. - I am an officer: I know nothing more than Mr. Chapman has said; I never lost fight of the prisoner.

Prisoner's defence. I am innocent of the charge that is laid against me.

Oburn. The prisoner made use of very bad expressions, he said, he would cut our bloody lifetimes out, and it was half an hour before we could tie his hands, he was so very obstreperous.

Mr. Ball. I know this chest to be my property.

Mrs. Ball. This is one of the chests that I saw put into the cart.

GUILTY (Aged 20.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

579. CATHERINE HINDE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of October , a cloth great coat, value 20s. two shirts, value 7s. a pair of cotton stockings, value 2s. two cotton handkerchiefs, value 2s. and a flannel waistcoat, value 12d. the property of Thomas Dore .

THOMAS DORE sworn. - I am a labourer , in the parish of Hillingdon: On the 10th of October, I lost the things mentioned in the indictment,(repeating them), from the tap-room of the Green-dragon, at Uxbridge , about ten o'clock in the evening; I saw them afterwards, in the hands of the constable, William Bondley.

WILLIAM BONDLEY sworn. - I am a constable, at Uxbridge:(produces the property); I took them from the prisoner, at the Dragon, the next day.

THOMAS LONEGROVE sworn. - I keep the Dragon: I recollect seeing the man go in with a bundle, and I saw the constable take the bundle from the prisoner.

Dore. These are my shirts, they are marked, T.D. they are all my property.

The prisoner did not say any thing in her defence.

GUILTY (Aged 18.)

Confined six months in the House of Correction , whipped in the Jail , and discharged.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr.Justice HEATH.

380. JOHN ROMANINE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of September , sixty-four new iron vat hoops, value 4l. ten old iron vat hoops, value 7s. forty old iron butt hoops, value 12s. a half hundred lead weight, value 2s. 6d. five half hundred iron weights, value 15s. and a bundle of tackle rope, value 5s. the property of George Shum the elder, Harvey-Christian Combe , Joseph Delafield , George Shum the younger, and William Packer .

The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.

George Shum, junior, proved the firm of the house, which corresponded with the indictment.

ROBERT BROWN sworn. - I live at the Welchharp, Tottenham-court-road, not a quarter of a mile distant from Mr. Shum's premises; I went with some ale to Moore's iron shop, next door, for the prisoner and others to drink. On the 1st of October I went down into the cellar, I saw four large bundles of vat hoops at the back part of my house; when I came out of the cellar, I looked up and saw that two of them were gone; I then immediately went into the-shop with the ale, and saw two bundles in the scales weighing, the prisoner was there, and John Cummings and Robert Kent .

Q. What were they doing? - A.Seeing the weight of the hoops when I went in, and then they drank the ale that I carried them; in consequence of what I saw, I gave information to Mr. Shum's people.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. The first time you saw any vat hoops was at the back of your house? - A. Yes.

Q. Who brought them there you don't know? - A. No.

Q. You saw some hoops weighing in the shop? - A. Yes.

Q. But who brought them there you don't know? - A. No.

Q. You did not see him doing any thing with the hoops? - A.No.

ROBERT KENT swron. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. - I am servant to Mr. Shum, at the store-house, in Tottenham-court-road, the prisoner was the same.

Q. Do you know any thing of any vat hoops that were stolen? - A. Yes, Romaine, Cummings, Bray, and King-

Q. Had you no hand in it? - A. Yes.

Q. What did you do with them when you had stolen them? - A. We took them to Mr. Moore's shop, and sold them for a penny a pound.

Q. How long before you were taken up were you there? - A.About a fortnight,and we had some beer from the Welch-harp, John Brown brought it in to us at Moore's.

Q. How was that money divided? - A. It was shared equally.

Q. What was your share? - A. Half-a-guinea.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You were taken up on the 2d of October? - A. I cannot tell.

Q. You are endeavouring to hang this man to save yourself? - A. Yes.

HENRY CROCKER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. On the 2d of October I went with a search-warrant to Moore's house, but did not serve it till the 3d in the morning; I broke open the premises, I found eight bundles of new hoops, a quantity of old ones, a quantity of weights, and a quantity of rope; Moore has never been heard of since.

JOSEPH HOLT sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Shum; I missed a great quantity of vat hoops from the premises in Store-street; I went with Crocker to Moore's house, with a search-warrant; I found eight bundles of new vat hoops, a bundle of old vat hoops, and some tackle rope; the vat hoops are most of them marked with two T's and a W; the prisoner is a labourer under me; I pointed him out to Crocker, and told him, that is your man; I desired Crocker to take him over the way to the public-house, and I would search after the other men, but they had gone off; I then went over to Romaine; I have not the least doubt but these vat hoops are mr. Shum's property; they are new hoops, eight feet long, and have never been rivetted; they are in straight bars.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. The mark you speak of is the mark of the maker? - A. Yes.

Q. He makes for a great many other persons besides Messrs. Shum and Combe? - A. Yes.

Q. And he perhaps puts the same marks upon those he makes for other brewers? - A. He may, he works for a great many coopers.

Mr. Knowlys. Q.Did the prisoner at this time work for any other brewer? - A. Not at that time.

Q.What is the value of these? - A. About half-a-guinea a bundle.

Court. Q. Did you steal these things at different times, or at once? - A. At several times.

The prisoner did not say any thing in his defence, but called four respectable witnesses, who gave him an excellent character.

GUILTY (Aged 28.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

581. AGNES TOWELL was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 19th of October , two pewter pint pots, value 2s. the property of James Brown .

JAMES BROWN sworn. - I keep the Swan, at Tottenham ; I was not at home at the time of the transaction, but in consequence of what I heard, I pursued the prisoner, who drives a jack-ass, for half a mile; she said she was willing to be searched, I searched the baskets upon the ass, but there was nothing of mine there; she had a box slung over her shoulder; I searched that, and found a pot of mine with my name upon it; she hesitated at first, and then said she had quite forgot it, she had found at in a ditch; I have lost four pounds worth of pots within six weeks.

SARAH WRIGHT sworn. - I live with the prosecutor; the prisoner came to our house, and had a pint of porter; I saw her put a pint pot into her pocket; when she had got out at the door, I went into the bar, and told my mistress; my mistress called her back twice.

Prisoner's defence. I did not steal the pot, I found it in a ditch.

The prisoner called eight witnesses, most of whom had known her near twenty years, and gave her a good character.

GUILTY (Aged 58.)

Confined one year in the House of Correction , fined 1s. and discharged.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice HEATH.

582. RICHARD WATTS and JAMES HARROD were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 21st of September two hempen sacks, value 5s. five bushles of houshold flour, value 40s. and five streak of rough stuff, value 5s. the property of William Davison .

Second Count. Laying it to be the property of Henry Lott Mason .

HENRY-LOTT MASON sworn. - I live in the parish of Hayes, in the county of Middlesex: On the 21st of September, I went to the mill in the morning, and gave orders for fifteen sacks of flour for Wingfield, in Mount-street; I left the mill, and upon information I received, I found I had been robbed to a very considerable amount; I went from my house to the mill, near Drayton; I armed myself and secreted myself; it was a remarkable moon-shiny night, I could see any thing a very great distance; I got into a shady place, where I could observe the waggon when it came to load, which was about eleven o'clock; I was watching in Mr. Greenfield's garden; I saw the carter come and open the door, and get in at the tail of the waggon; I saw him put in fifteen of Wingfield's sacks, as I found them to be afterwards; the miller was James Harrod ; then he put in two other sacks besides the fifteen that I had ordered; as soon as the miller had done delivering the flour, he went to a man with a candle in his hand, and then I came out of the garden, and for fear I should accuse a man that was innocent, I threw a stone up at the window, and spoke to Mr. Davison, the master of the mill, and then I went after the waggon; says I to Watts, the driver, you have got more sacks than you ought to have; he said he did not know as he had; I counted seventeen sacks, and when Mr. Davison came up, I said to Watts, you are my prisoner, you shall not go to London to night; Mr.Davison said to Dick Watts , why, here is a bag of Read's here that is so very different from the rest, that it must be a wilful mistake; we then went to his master to know about it; I had the waggon drawn down to the mill, and told the miller he was my prisoner; I took them into custody, and fat up with them both myself that night.

Q. Had you a good deal of flour at the mill? - A. Yes, I had forty load grinding off at that time; that, that was in Read's sack, was a sack of household, and that, that was in a sack of mine marked H. Mason, was rough stuff, in an unfinished state.

Q. Had you in the mill at that time household flour and rough stuff? - A. There might be seventy or one hundred sacks.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. - Harrod is servant to Davison? - A.He was then.

Q.Davison is a miller, near Drayton? - A. Yes.

Q. Davison carries on a great deal of business? - A. He does for other people more than he does for himself.

Q. Then of course Davison grinds for other people besides you? - A.Undoubtedly, he ground for John Read .

Q. Therefore rough stuff, and the articles you have mentioned; might just as well be found in his mill, ground for other people, as for you? - A. They generally clear as they go.

Q. Will you undertake to swear that there was no rough stuff there but your's? - A. No, though I do not believe it.

Q. You will no ventur to swear to flour or rough stuff? - A. No, certainly not, I can swear to the bags.

Q. The moment you taxed Watts with taking seventeen, he said, master, I do not know that I have? - A. Yes; but he turned as white as a sheet.

Q. The moon shone very bright? - A. Yes.

Q. Is it not a common thing for persons to borrow sacks in the trade? - A. I never borrowed any in my life.

Q. The sacks that contained the rough stuff and the flour were not your's? - A. The sack that contained the rough stuff was mine, the other was Read's.

Q. And you do not borrow them? - A. No.

Q. Will you take upon you to swear that Davison never puts your flour into other people's sacks - have you not hired your neighbour's sacks before now? - A. I have hired my backer's sacks, and John Ball and Michael Constable 's, of Shad Thames wharf.

Q. These prisoner lived in your neighbourhood? - A. Yes.

Q. Have you known them some time? - A. Yes; and I had a very suspicious character of them.

JOHN READ sworn. - There was a sack of mine put in the waggon that night; I had not ordered any sack of mine to go that night.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. What are you? - A. A chandler, at Wemley-green, near Harrow.

Q. I suppose many of your sacks have been in the custody of Davison before this? - A. Many.

Q.Perhaps it has occurred to you to know, that sometimes your sacks may be lent? - A.Not knowingly; I never knew that any of my sacks were ever lent; it is not a customary thing.

JAMES KENNEDY sworn. - I am an officer.(Produces the sacks.)

Read. This is my sack.PMajon. This is the sack that was taken out of the waggon, I put a private mark upon it.

Mr. Knapp.(To Mason.) Q. We have heard from Mr. Read that that is his sack? - A. Yes.

Q. You found that sack in the waggon? - A. Yes, I saw it put in.

Q.When did you put the mark upon it? - A. Mr. Davison took it to his house on the Sunday, and then I put the mark upon it.

Q. This was on the Friday, and they remained till the Sunday morning before you put the mark upon them? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you ever see any of Read's sacks with precisely the same marks as that? - A. Yes, exactly the same.

WILLIAM DAVISON sworn. - I am a miller; Mr. Mason called to me after the waggon went from the mill; he followed the waggon, and so did I; I found seventeen sacks in the waggon; there were fifteen of Wingfield's sacks, of Mount-street; one of the other sacks was Read's, and the other Mason's; then Mason went away to the man's master; I sent my lad to keep watch for the waggon in the night, and we found them to be household and rough stuff; Mr. Bishop ordered us to mark them. I had them under lock and key till I carried them up to Mr. Mason's.

Q. Had you directed either your servant Harrod or Watts to load these two sacks? - A. No; Mason's note expressed fifteen sacks, and what they had over was unknown to me.

Q. Had Mr. Mason more rough stuff and more flour in the mill? - A. Yes, there was some in what we call the pester, not sacked up; I did not know that there was any more sacked up than that fifteen sacks.

Q. Do you know if any body else had any rough stuff in the mill at that time? - A. I cannot pretend to swear, but really I think nobody else had besides Mr. Mason.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. I understand you to say very fairly, that you won't swear that no other person had rough stuff in the mill? - A. It was a thing I might not be acquainted with, and therefore I would not wish to swear it.

Q. You are employed by a good many of your neighbours? - A. Yes, and I have two men to look after my business when I am out of the way.

Q. Therefore there are more persons besides the two prisoners that worked in the mill? - A. Only one for the night time.

Q. It has of course happened to you to have a sack of Read's before? - A.We are never without scarcely.

Q.You were not present at he delivery of these sacks? - A. No.

Q.Is it an uncustomary thing, suppose you have an order to deliver goods from your mill to Mason, to send home such sort of articles by your servants in the sacks of Read? - A. Never.

Q.How long has Harrod lived with you? - A. Almost five years.

Harrod's defence. I gave him nothing more but some stuff for the horses.

Watts's defence. I asked him for a sack of twenty-penny, and he gave me this rough stuff, if it was rough stuff, I did not know any difference.

The prisoner Harrod called three, and Watts two witnesses, who gave them an excellent character.

Watts, GUILTY (Aged 34.)

Harrod, GUILTY (Aged 25.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

583. SAMUEL SOLOMONS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of October , a cheese, value 6s. the property of Thomas Hill and Daniel Austin .

THOMAS HILL sworn. - I am a cheesemonger , in partnership with Daniel Austin, No.8, Mansell-street, Goodman's-fields : On Monday evening last, I was informed that a boy had run away with a cheese, I immediately missed it, I followed him and took him with the cheese under his arm, about forty yards from my house; when I took hold of him, he dropped the cheese from under his arm, I picked up the cheese, and brought him back; I have kept it from that time to this, I know it to be mine from the mark, it was marked No. 1; the prisoner offered to pay me for the cheese.

Prisoner's defence. I saw a young man go along with the cheese, he dropped it, and I picked it up.

GUILTY (Aged 16.)

Privately whipped in the Jail , and discharged.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

584. JAMES TOMKINS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of September , five wether sheep, value 10l. the property of James Boys .

JAMES BOYS sworn. - I am a farmer at Hendon : On the 27th of last month, I lost five wether sheep; I went round, and on Saturday, the 29th, I found three of them alive, and two he had killed; I heard of Them at Watford, and I found three of them upon the common field; I found the two dead ones at the prisoner's house, at Watford, he is a butcher.

Q. How did you know them to be your's? - A. I can swear to the three that were alive, they were marked with a G on the rump and across the shoulders; he had riddled them afresh across the shoulders, and cut the G mark out.

Q. How can you swear to those in the field? - A. I had had them about two months, and I had been so used to the sheep, that I could have sworn to them if they had not been marked at all; I found the two skins in the Fell-market, the G was cut out, and they were marked fresh across the shoulders, but I can swear to the sheep by the skins of them; I lost them from the fields at Mill-hill, in Hendon parish.

STEPHEN IRLWIN sworn. - On the 29th of September, the prisoner brought two skins into my yard, at Watford, which I purchased; I did not observe any particular mark, any further than they were very much riddled; when Mr. Boys came to enquire for them, I examined them, and found the mark had been cut out of them; the prisoner is a butcher at Watford; I asked him no questions about them, he brought them as he usually did.

JOSEPH FOUNTAIN sworn. - I am shepherd to Mr. Boys: I missed the sheep in the morning, and at night I told my master; there were five sheep missing, I searched after them three days and could not find them; I afterwards fetched them back from Watford, the mark was cut out from the rump, I saw the skins at Mr. Irlwin's, and the mark was cut out; I had been shepherd to these sheep many years, I can swear to the sheep.

Q. Your mark was gone - by what can you swear to them? - A. By the riddle over the shoulder.

Q. That is impossible; no man can swear to the riddle of a sheep? - A. I can swear they are our sheep.

Prisoner's defence. I met a man with five sheep, between Edgeware and Stanmore, that I had bought sheep of before; he told me they were almost knocked up, they seemed very tired, and he wanted to fell them; he asked me ten guineas for them, and I gave him ten pounds.

GUILTY Death .(Aged 35.)

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

585. JOHN MILLS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of October , a metal bell, value 4l. the property of William Sims , in a certain ship called the Sims, upon the navigable River Thames .

Second Count. For the like offence in a certain ship called the Sims, lying in a certain creek belonging to the River Thames.

JOHN DIXON sworn. - I am master of the ship Sims, the property of William Sims : I know nothing of the transaction; the bell that was lost was fixed to the ship; I had seen it the same evening, I missed it the next morning at seven o'clock.

CORNELIUS RICHARDSON sworn. - I am an extra constable, at Shadwell: On the 5th of October, at five o'clock in the morning, I was standing in St. George's Parish, I saw the prisoner, and another, coming along, I knew him immediately, he had got something upon his head; I put my band to it, and found this piece of a bell, wrapped up in a black gown, and the other immediately ran away; when I stopped him, he said it belonged to the other man, who had ran away; it is a ship's bell. (Produces it).

Dixon. I know it to be our bell; here is a piece that was left behind after they had broke it to pieces, which matches, and there is the ship's name upon it.

Prisoner's defence. Robert Richardson, that ran away when I was taken into custody, called me out of bed that morning, and asked me to go with him to fetch a bundle, and he would give me a shilling, which I did, and he took it out from behind some rails; he said, he had left it there the night before, when he came from work; I did not know it was stolen; I could have proved that he called me up that morning, but I did not expect my trial to come on so soon.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice HEATH.

586. THOMAS DUDFIELD was indicted for feloniously receiving, on the 11th of February , divers goods, the property of John Nicholson , (feloniously and burglariously stolen by Augustus Seaton and Thomas Cliston, where of they have been convicted), knowing them to have been stolen .(Mr. Knapp, on the part of the prosecution, stated, that on account of the absence of a material witness, it was impossible for him to proceed.)

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

587. THOMAS COX was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d. of October , a Bank-note, value 40l. another Bank-note, value 25l. two other Bank-notes, value 5l. each, and another Banknote, value 2l. the property of William Massey .(Mr. Const, on the part of the prosecution, stated, that, from his instructions, he did not think he could bring the case home to the prisoner, and therefore he declined producing any evidence).

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

588. MARY FORBES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of October , a copper tea-kettle, value 5s. the property of Benjamin Whitaker .

BENJAMIN WHITAKER sworn. - I keep a public-house in Leadenhall-street : On the 6th of October, the prisoner at the bar came to my house, and called for a penny worth of beer, she stopped about an hour, or thereabouts, it was about half past seven when she first came in; when she went away, I heard my servant call out. mistress, what have you got there; I directly ran out of doors, and she had got hold of the prisoner; she said to me, this woman has got the tea-kettle; she took it from her and gave it to me; I brought her into the hosue again, and sent for a constable; I delivered the kettle into his charge as well as the prisoner, and he took her to the Compter.

CATHERINE WORLIDGE sworn. - I am servant to the last witness: I saw the prisoner go out as I stood at the bar, and she had her clothes up in such a bulk that I thought she had got something about her; I followed her, and asked her what she had got; she said, nothing; I found a tea-kettle under her petticoats, which my master took out of my hands, it was my master's tea-kettle; I missed it from the fire side, I knew it again; it had a remarkable mark on the spout.( James Blundell , the constable, produced the tea-kettle, which was deposed to by the prosecutor).

Prisoner's defence. A man in the tap-room gave me sixpence to carry it.

GUILTY (Aged 37.)

Privately whipped , and discharged.

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

589. WILLIAM MOORE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of September , seventeen yards of cotton, value 29s. the property of William Webster .

WILLIAM WEDSTER sworn. - I am a linendraper , in Fore-street, Cripplegate ; the property in question was upon a stool at the door: On the 18th of September, between two and three o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner was brought back to me by William Brownett, who is a witness here.

WILLIAM BROWNETT sworn. - I am a goldbeater, I work next door to Mr. Webster: On the 18th of September, about three o'clock, I saw the prisoner take two pieces of cotton from a pile that stood outside the door; I followed him, and he dropped them in Grub-street; I brought him back with the cotton; I delivered one piece to the prosecutor, and another witness brought back the other.

JONATHAN POWELL sworn. - I am a goldbeater, I work in the same shop with Brownett; I saw him run out, I looked after him, I heard him cry, stop thief, and ran out; when I got into Grub-street, I saw a piece of cotton lying in the roadway, I ran past it because the mob turned a corner into an alley; then I saw them stop, and I saw Brownett holding the prisoner; that was the first time I saw the prisoner; Brownett gave me a piece of cotton to hold, which I took back, and laid on the counter; it was a piece of reddish printed cotton.

Q.(To Brownett.) Should you know the pieces of cotton again? - A. I think I should: one was a reddish, and the other a blueish pattern.

JOHN CROUCH sworn. - I am a constable, (produces the property); I had these cottons from Mr. Webster; I have had them ever since.

Webster. There is my own hand-writing upon one of these pieces; and the hand-writing of a servant of mine upon the other; I am sure they are mine.

Prisoner's defence. I never saw any thing at all of them.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY (Aged 17.)

Confined six months in the House of Correction , publicly whipped , and discharged.

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

590. WILLIAM RUSSELL , GEORGE SHIRLEY , and THOMAS BROWN , were indicted for that they, in the King's highway, on the 24th of September , in and upon Mary Ginney , did make an assault, putting her in sear, and taking from her person a muslin neck-handkerchief, value 12d. and four shillings in money, the property of the said Mary .

(The prosecutrix was called, but not appearing, her recognizance was ordered to be estreated).

All Three Not GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

591. JOHN MATTHEWS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of October , three pounds of copper, value 2s. 3d. the property of Thompson Warner and John Warner .

JOSEPH DEAKIN sworn. - Mr. Warner is a Quaker , I work for him; the firm of the house is Thompson Warner and John Warner , they live in Fore-street ; On Thursday, the 11th of this month, we had a suspicion of the prisoner being a thief, my master desired me to mark some copper, which I did, that was about three o'clock in the afternoon, it was in a little room in the shop, where I left it, I marked about six or seven pieces; when he went out, at watering-time, about five o'clock, he was called back, and there were two of the pieces that I had marked found upon him.

Q. What was the prisoner? - A. Porter and labourer ; Mr. Warner told him he had got something about him of his property; and he told him he had not; he said, he had no property but a penny or two penny-pieces, which he pulled out of his pocket; upon his being searched, some copper was taken out of his left-hand waistcoat-pocket, and some out of the thighs of his breeches; it was delivered to the constable, Crouch, but he had some business to do, and I saw him give it to Eldridge, another constable; there were three pounds of it all but an ounce.

JAMES SMILETT sworn. - I saw the copper marked with a tool that I made, called a screw tool, there are seven pricked marks; I saw it taken from him and given to Eldridge.( Richard Eldridge , the constable, produced the copper, which was deposed to by the two last witnesses).

Prisoner's defence. I am not guilty of the crime I am charged with.

The prisoner called one witness, who had known him sixteen years, and who gave him an excellent character. GUILTY (Aged 36.)

Of stealing goods to the value of 10d.

Privately whipped , and discharged.

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

592. SAMUEL COOK was indicted for that he, on the 27th of September , was an officer, servant to the Governor and Company of the Bank of England , called an out-teller , and was entrusted by the said Governor and Company with a certain note, called a Bank-note, of the value of one hundred pounds; and the indictment further states, that he, being such officer, and servant of the said Governor and Company of the Bank of England, and being so entrusted with the said note, did secrete and embezzle the same, against the form of the statute .

There being no evidence to bring the charge home to the prisoner, he was ACQUITTED .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. Justice HEATH.

593. EDWARD GALLAGHY was indicted for that he, on the 24th of October , upon John Dyer , a subject of our Lord the King, on purpose of his malice aforethought, and by lying in wait, did make an assault, with a certain knife, which he, in his right-hand, then and there held on purpose, of his malice aforethought, and by lying in wait, feloniously did cut off the nose of him the said John Dyer , with intention, in so doing, to disfigure him, in manner before mentioned .

There being no evidence to prove a lying in wait, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

594. JOHN COLE was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Robert Shaw , about the hour of six in the night of the 17th of October , with intent to steal the goods therein being, and burglariously stealing a silver watch, value 3l. the property of the said Robert .

The only material witness being absent, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice HEATH.

595. THOMAS CLARKE and WILLIAM FIELD were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of September , a cloth great coat, value 20s. the property of John Williams .

Second Count. Laying it to be the property of George Barr .

(The prosecutor and pawnbroker not appearing, their recognizances were ordered to be estreated).

Both NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Boron HOTHAM.

596. GEORGE GREEN was indicted for that he, on the 12th of June, 1797, at the parish of St. Mary-le-bonne, did marry and take to wife Rebecca Culeman , spinster , and afterwards, that is to say, on the 31st of December , at the parish of St. George, Hanover-square, did marry and take to wife one Margaret Smith , widow , the said Rebecca, his former wife, being then alive .

There being no evidence to prove the second marriage, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

597. JOHN WHEELER was indicted for that he, on the 5th of December, in the parish of St. James, Westminster, in the 16th year of his present Majesty, took to wife Mary Goodall , spinster , and afterwards, that is to say, on the 22d of April last, at the parish of St. Bridget, otherwise Bride , feloniously did marry and take to wife Elizabeth Watkins , spinster, the said Mary, his former wife, being then alive .

The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.

ANN STEVENS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp.

Q. Do you know the prisoner? - A.Perfectly well.

Q. Do you know Miss Goodall? - A. Yes; I was present when they were married at St. James's Church, Westminster, December the 5th, 1776.

Q. Is she now living? - A. Yes; I have been in her company to-day.

FRANCES MITCHEL sworn. - I know the prisoner, and I knew Miss Goodall; I was present at their marriage in December, 1776; I have been in her company to day.

ANN EYRES sworn. - I know the prisoner at the bar.

Q. Do you know Miss Elizabeth Watkins ? - A. Yes; I was present when she was married to the prisoner at St. Bride's, on the 22d of April last.

Cross-examined by the Prisoner. Q. Whether Miss Watkins and her mother did not lodge at the house opposite the mother of the witness, previous to the marriage taking place? - A. The wife and the daughter lodged at my mother's.

Q. Do you know the reason of her quitting Watkins's house? - A. I do not.

MARY WRIGHT sworn. - I know the prisoner, and I know Miss Watkins, I saw her yesterday; I was present at the marriage between her and the prisoner, at St. Bride's; Miss Eyres was with me at the same time.

Cross-examined by the Prisoner. Q. Have you not advised Mrs. Watkins several times to apply to the Civil Power, in consequence of the outrageous conduct of him towards his wife and family? - A. I never did.

Q. Remember you are upon your oath? - A. I am.

Q. Have not you said to me, that you have been afraid of your life? - A. What is that to your marrying this girl.

Prisoner's defence. I should not have troubled your Lordship with any observations, if I had been brought to this bar by a man whose character was even commonly decent; he is a man notoriously disaffected to his King and Country; he is a man who has been guilty of murder in his own family; and if I had not more mercy for him than he has for me, I could have proved it out of the mouth of his wife and daughter. -

Court. I am sorry to interrupt you or any other man in the course of his defence, but the rules of justice must be observed; it does not become the Court to hear circumstances stated so irrelevant.

Prisoner. Then I shall not trouble your Lordship with any further observations.

GUILTY (Aged 38.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

598. JOHN CRAWLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of August , 117 half-pence, value 4s. 10d. and a farthing , the property of Jane Baker , widow .

JANE BAKER sworn. - I am a widow, I live in Fleet-lane : I was sitting in the back room, and heard some money drop, I sent my servant there, and she told me, there was a boy under the counter, I went into the shop and saw him; I did not see him searched, I believe there were 15s. in copper lying on the window, folded up in sixpenny worths; I pulled the boy out, and sent for a constable.

ANN BARNES sworn. - I was sitting at work, and heard the halfpence fall, I went to look, and saw the prisoner underneath the bin.

HENRY BEARD sworn. - I am a constable: I took the prisoner; I found this money, four shillings and ten pence farthing, in his right hand waistcoat pocket; he fell a crying, and said, he hoped Mrs. Baker would forgive him.

Prisoner's defence. I went in to buy a loaf, anddropped thres halfpence behind the counter; I thought no harm in going round to pick them up, and Mrs. Baker caught me there.

GUILTY (Aged 13.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. Justice HEATH.

599. JOHN LEONARD and EDWARD THOMPSON , otherwise BURNHAM was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of October , eleven fowls, value 11s. the property of a person or persons, to the Jurors unknown.

JAMES BLY sworn. - I am a constable of St. John's Westmintler: On the 10th of October, about eight in the morning, I was at Kensington, and at the west end of the town: the prisoners passed me, one of them I had a suspicion of, Leonard, he had a bag under his arm, and Thompson had got something tied up in a smock frock; I let them pass me, and then followed them; I said to Burnham, you are the man, I believe, that brings fowls to town; he said, no; I told him, I suspected he had some about him; I searched their bundles, and found, upon Burnham, eight fowls, and upon Leonard, three.

Q. Have you not found the owner? - A. No; I have advertised them. Burnham said, that he and another man, not in custody, and Leonard, had taken these fowls from a gentleman's house, near three miles below Brentford.

Q. Was any thing said to him to induce him to confess? - A. At that time he was charged with another robbery, and I believe he was induced to say so, because he thought the other prosecution would be set aside, if he owned this; but the Magistrate told him, he would give him no hope of it.

Leonard's defence. We were employed by a man to carry them to the White-horse cellar; I had not been able to get any employment.

Burnbam's defence. A man employed us to carry them to town; I never saw the man before in my life.

Both NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice HEATH.

600. THOMAS CAMBOURNE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of October , a cloth coat, value 10s. the property of George Cratton .

GEORGE CRATTON sworn. - I live at St. George's in the East , I am a taylor : Last Monday I lost a coat out of my own house, I saw it a little before seven in the evening, in a chest in my kitchen, I went that same night to the chest, to put on a clean shirt, to go to Gravesend, and I missed it; I immediately went to a pawnbroker's shop, and found it.

JAMES BKUCE sworn. - I am servant to a pawnbroker: (Produces the coat): I took it in of the prisoner at the bar, on Monday morning, I lent him seven shillings and six-pence upon it.

Cratton. This is a coat that was delivered to me to repair.

JOHN NOWLAN sworn. - I am an officer, I took charge of the prisoner, and found a duplicate upon him.

Prisoner's defence. I have worked for the prosecutor many years; I was very much in liquor; I went and took the coat out to pledge, but not with any intention to defraud him of it.

Prosecutor. He always behaved well before this.

Prisoner. I wanted a little money, he was not in the way, and I thought there would be no harm in taking of it till he came back.

Prosecutor. I do not believe he meant to hurt me at the time.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

601. JOHN BAYLISS and ALEXANDER SMITH were indicted for forging and counterfeiting on the 17th of October , a certain order for the payment of 15l. the tenor of which is as follows:

"October 16, 1798.

"Gentlemen, Please to pay to Serjeant-Major Seston, or hearer, the sum of 15l. levy money, due to George Davis , a town recruit, posted to Colonel Thornton 's company.

" J. D. Burnby, Serj. and Adj. First Guards.

"Messrs Cox and Greenwood."

with intent to defraud Richard Cox and Charles Greenwood .

Second Count. For uttering the same as true, knowing it to be forged, with the like intention.

Third and fourth Counts. Laying it to be with intention to defraud John-Dick Bornaby , Esq.

(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

JOSEPH- GEORGE BRETT sworn. - I am a cashier in the house of Cox and Greenwood; the firm of the house is Richard Cox and Charles Greenwood . On or about the 17th of October, the prisoner, Serjeant Bayliss, came to our office, and presented a draft for 15l.

Q. Look at that draft? - A. This is the draft that he presented for payment.

Q. Had the person whose name appears at the bottom of the order an account at your house? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. It appears to me from the abstract, that the name is not the same, it is difficult to saywhether it is Burnaby or Barnby. (Here the learned Judge compared the abstract with the indictment, and found it a sac simile.)

Mr. Knowlys. Q. Look at the bottom of it; there is something besides the name, I believe? - A. Yes, Lieutenant and Adjutant of the first foot guards.

Q. Did that regiment keep an account with you? - A. Captain Burnaby keeps cash at our house, and draws bills on our house on account of the regiment besides.

Q. In consequence of his presenting this draft, did you pay it? - A. No, I suspected it to be a forgery.

Q. Are you at all acquainted with the handwriting of captain Burnaby? - A. Yes.

Q. Have you seen him write? - A. Yes.

Q. Is that his hand-writing? - A. No, it is not; I asked the prisoner in what way he came by it; he said, he received it from serjeant-major Seston, of the same regiment.

Q. It appears to be drawn in favour of serjeant-major Seston? - A. Yes.

Q. From the account he gave, what did you do to him-did you secure him? - A. No, he went away.

Q. What became of the draft? - A. I sent the bill up stairs to Mr. Rickaby, it was left at the office, and it was afterwards sent to the orderly-room.

Q.Did you put your name to it before it left the office? - A. No, not till he was examined at Bow-street, which was three or four days after, but I am persuaded it is the same draft that he presented.

Cross-examined by Mr. Raine. Q. You cannot swear that it is the same of course, not having it in your own custody? - A. No, another draft might be drawn exactly like it; it was two or three days before it was returned from the orderly-room.

Q. What have you seen captain Burnaby write? - A. He keeps an account at Cox and Greenwood's.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. Who did you shew it to after it was first presented to you? - A. I gave it to Mr. Lucas.

St. JOHN- WILLIAM LUCAS sworn. - I am a clerk in the office of Cox and Greenwood.

Q. Look at that draft, when did you first see it? - A. On Wednesday, the 17th instant; Mr. Brett gave it to me to shew Mr. Rickaby to form an opinion upon it.

Q. Are you sure that is the same draft Mr. Brett gave you to shew to Mr. Rickaby? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you ever see the person who appears to have signed that draft write, Mr. Burnaby? - A. I have.

Q. Is that his hand-writing? - A.It is not.

Cross-examined by Mr. Raine. Q. At the time Mr. Brett gave you this supposed draft, you did not put any mark upon it? - A. No.

Q. Then if a similar draft had been produced to you, you would not have known it from that? - A. I am confident it is the same draft.

- RICKABY sworn. I am a clerk in Cox and Greenwood's house; this draft was shewn to me by Mr. Lucas.

Q.Are you sure that is the same draft? - A. I have every reason to suppose so.

Q. Did you ever see Mr. Burnaby write? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you believe that to be his hand-writing? - A. It is not.

Cross-examined by Mr. Raine. Q. You cannot undertake to swear that that is the same bill? - A. It is exactly similar.

Q. You did not mark it at all? - A. No.

WILLIAM SEFTON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am serjeant-major of the 1st regiment of foot guards; the prisoner, Bayliss, was serjeant in the regiment.

Q. Look at that draft, did you deliver that to the prisoner? - A. No.

Q. Had you ever possession of that draft before he was taken into custody? - A.Never.

Q. Did you take Bayliss into custody? - A. No.

Q. Who took Baylis into custody upon this charge? - A. I do not know.

Q.Do you know the prisoner, Smith, at all? - A. No.

JAMES HORTON sworn. I am a serjeant in the first regiment of foot guards.

Q. Do you remember the time when Baysiss was first in custody upon this charge? - A. Yes.

Q.When did you first see Smith? - A. Sunday evening last.

Q. Was that after Bayliss was in custody? - A. Yes.

Q.At the time you saw Smith, did you see him in company with Bayliss? - A. I did.

Q.When you saw Bayliss and him together, were you within their sight, or concealed? - A. I was concealed by the desire of captain Burnaby.

Q.What room were you in? - A. In the same room, in Portman-street barracks; Bayliss knew I was there, but Smith did not; I was concealed underneath the bed-cloths in a bedstead turned up.

Q.At the time that Bayliss and Smith were together, could you hear what they said to each other? - A.Yes; I saw Smith come into Bayliss.

Q.Tell us what conversation passed? - A. First, Smith shook hands with Bayliss, and asked him how he did, and how he should come on; Bayliss said, he thought he should be there about a week.

Q. Was the room in which Bayliss was, a room of free access, or a room of confinement? - A. A room of confinement; he said, he thought he should be there about a week, or till the commanding officer came to town; Smith said, d-n my blood, if I have not been walking about these barracks for this hour, before I could come up to you; Bayliss said, please God I live to get through this, you shall never persuade me to have any thing to do with your forged notes any more; this is the first time your forged notes any more; this is the first time I ever had any thing to do with them.

Q. Upon what occasion was it that Bayliss was confined in this room? - A. By order of the commanding officer, on account of this note; then the conversation, turned to something else, and they came and sat down upon a bench before the fire, and drapk a share of a pot of beer; after some time Smith says, this day week you were on the provost guard; Bayliss said, yes, there it was; you dated the note; Smith said, yes, it was; then the discourse turned to something else, and a little while afterwards Bayliss said, Smith was that note for 15l. that you wrote out; Smith said, yes, it was; Bayliss then asked him whether he recollected the date of the note, or not, whether he dated it the 15th or 16th; Smith said, he was not certain, but he thought it was either the 15th or 16th, he was not certain which, and then there was some conversation about something else; then Smith was seized by a constable, and taken away to Mary-le-bonne watch-house; Bayliss was asked, in the presence of Smith, whether he chose to give charge of Smith for forging the note, and Bayliss said, he did; I went and saw him in the watch-house myself.

Cross-examined by Mr. Raine. Q. I think you said that Bayliss knew of your being confined under the bed-clothes? - A. Yes.

Q. And it was a contrivance for the purpose of extracting something from Smith, in order to excuse himself? - A. That I cannot tell; it was to hear the conversation.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. (For Baylis). Q. You were placed there on purpose? - A. Yes.

Q. And you were put there in consequence of a promise, that if Bayliss would lead to the detection of any body else, he would receive every indulgence? - A. Not that I know of; it was the serjeant-major that desired me to go there.

Q. With the approbation of Bayliss? - A. Yes.

Q. And that was in order that he might extract something from Smith, that he might himself escape? - A. That I cannot tell; certainly it was to find out whether Smith was concerned in it or not.

Q. Is Captain Burnaby here? - A. Yes.

Mr. Raine. Q.Bayliss was asked whether he would not charge Smith? - A. Yes. (The draft read.)

Smith's defence. I never saw that note in my life, that note was not my hand-writing, not did I utter that note.

Bayliss's defence. I received the note of Mr. Smith.

For Bayliss.

JOHN- DICK BURNABY , Esq. sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. I am a lieutenant of the first regiment of guards; I know the prisoner, Bayliss, perfectly well.

Q. Did you not plan this contrivance for the purpose of inducing from him a confession? - A. I did it for that purpose; I waited upon him in his room, and told him his critical situation, and I likewise told him, it was very certain, tht for the sake of his family, if any body was concerned with him, it would be better to say it.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Be so good as look at that draft; does that purport, upon the face of it, to be your draft? - A. Not in the least.

Q. Is that the description of yourself, J.D. Burnaby, lieutenant and adjutant? - A. It is.

Q. Is that your draft? (Mr. Alley objected to this question.)

Mr. Alley. Q. What is the character of this man? - A. I have been five years in the same battalion with him; I always believed him to be as honest a man as could live.

The prisoner Smith called Mr. Alexander Wyllie, who had known him from four years old, and gave him an excellent character.

Bayliss, GUILTY Death (Aged 36.)

Smith, GUILTY Death (Aged 30.)

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice HEATH.

602. THOMAS BURGESS and WILLIAM HARVEY were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 19th of June , a silver watch, value 20s. a steel watch chain, value 12d. a metal seal, value 6d. a metal watch key, value 6d. a half-guinea, and a seven-shilling piece , the property of John Jacobs .

The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.

JOHN JACOBS sworn. - I am a seaman belonging to the Endymion; in the latter part of June, I did not know the day, I met the prisoner, Harvey, in Houndsditch, he spoke to me, we walked to the end of Houndsditch together, I had never seen him before; I then went through a church-yard, into Moorfields; as we came in front of Bedlam, there was a book lying on the ground; I did not see him drop it; I saw him stooping to pick up something; I did not know what it was at that time; I then saw it was a book; he said, I have found something; it was a pocket-book with a black cover; he said, he would put it in his pocket till he got to a convenient place to look at it,for fear any body should take it from him; after that we walked over to the fields near the Rosemary-branch, near the lead-mills.

Court. Q. How came you to walk with him as he was a stranger to you? - A. I had nothing to do, I was upon levity that day, and I did not care where I went; he took me over the bank into the fields, and when we got into the fields and he pulled out the book, he shewed me a receipt, and said, he could not read, but if I could read, I should look at the receipt; accordingly I took the receipt, and looked at it; I remember there was the name of Jones at the bottom, and a stamp; I had only read part of it, when the other prisoner came up, Burgess.

Q. Had you ever seen Burgess before? - A. Never; when he came up, he wanted to know our names, and what we did in the field; he took out a pocket-book, and said, he would make me suffer for trespassing on his ground; Harvey made him an answer, and said, do not be in a passion, we have found something, I will thank you to look at it; I said, I was an entire stranger, and if I had done any thing wrong in the fields, I was very sorry for it, and Burgess took the receipt, and said it was of considerable value, if the property was in the book; he then opened a book, and took out a square buckle, set with stones, wrapped up in cotton, with a piece of purple ribbon on it; he said, it was worth a considerable fight of money, and that his share-was eighty-guineas: after that Burgess asked the other man whether he could pay me eighty guineas; he said, no he could not, but he had an uncle a little distance off that would advance him the money; Harvey left me then, and went to a row of houses, but he went at the back of them, so that I could not see whether he went into one of them or not; Burgess staid with me till Harvey returned, which was in about a quarter of an hour; he said his uncle was gone into the city, and he could not get the money at that time; then Burgess made reply, and said, he would settle it; then Burgess took out three papers; he said, they were 10l. notes, but I was not curious enough to look at them; they had the appearance of Banknotes; then Burgess said to Harvey, I give this to you, which is 30l. and he said, the young man, meaning me, must give me his watch, and what money he has, and he was to keep the pocket-book, and that was to secure us all; I gave my watch and money into Burgess's hands, it was a silver watch, with a sleel chain, a seal, and two keys, one silver and one brass, a guinea, a half-guinea, and a seven shilling piece; I have never got any of it again; then there was an agreement for us all to meet at three o'clock, at a house near the lead mills; it was then as near as could be about ten o'clock; Burgess pretended to he owner of the lead-mills, and I was to go there, he told me his name, but when I came there, I forgot the name; I went immediately to the house, to enquire who was owner of the lead mills.

Q. Did you find Burgess to be the owner? - A. No.

Q. When did you find Burgess afterwards, or Harvey? - A. As near as I can say, about a fortnight after; I was in St. James's Park, and saw them both at a distance from each other, I had a ship-mate with me; I then went up to Burgess, and took hold of him, and said, he had my watch and money a few days ago; he asked me, what I wanted with him; I told him, I wanted my property from him again; I then said, I would have a constable; Burgess said, do not make any noise, and you shall have your property again. I then desired my shipmate to look after Harvey; and I went with Burgess and Harvey and my shipmate over the bridge to Lambeth, and there I got a constable of the name of Tunnicliffe, and he took them into custody.

Q. Did Burgess make use of any expression when you first saw him? - A. Yes; he said, d-n me, I dreamed, last night, that you would take me.

Q. Are you quite sure they are the men? - A. Quite positive, I knew them directly as I saw them; I saw the constable search them, and I saw two pocket-books taken from Burgess, he endeavoured to shove them under a woman in the public-house.

Q. Did you take notice enough of them, to say whether either of them was the same pocket-book that had been produced to you? - A. I cannot say positively, but I think one of them was the same.

Q. Did you ever see the receipt or the book afterwards? - A. I cannot say I did, only at the Mansion-house, the Lord-Mayor read the receipt, and I saw the buckle.

Q. Who had the buckle at the first meeting? - A. I had, and when we were going to Lambeth, I gave it to Burgess to look at, he asked me to look it, and then he put it in his pocket, and never gave it me again.

Q. Did you, while you had it, enquire the value of it? - A. No, I never did.

Court. Q.What was done with the receipt? - A.They kept the receipt.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are a seaman belonging to the Endymion? - A. Yes.

Q. How long have you been a seaman? - A. Ever since I was fourteen years of age.

Q. And how old are you now? - A. Twenty-six.

Q. You are a native of this country? - A. I am a native of Harwich.

Q. You had been pretty much used to walking in that part of the town? - A. No, I never was there before.

Q.You could read, you have been to school, I take it for granted? - A. Yes.

Q. You have heard of such things as these before? - A. I have heard very little of that kind.

Q. At the time you saw Burgess first, he was stooping to pick up something? - A. Yes.

Q. Upon its being picked up, you thought it was a good thing to have a share of what was picked up? - A. I did not say any thing about it.

Q. Did not you mean to be entitled to your share of it? - A. I thought there was no value in it.

Q. Do you mean to say that you expressed, at the time, that there was no value in it? - A. Yes, I did.

Q.And yet you agreed to take the buckle, and part with your money, though there was no value in it? - A. I said, I dare say there was no value in it.

Q. But when you found it was worth 80 guineas, you thought it would be a very good thing to have that sum? - A. Yes.

Q. And this thing being picked up, clearly not belonging to you, you very honestly meant to have your share of it? - A. Yes.

Q. When Burgess did come up, the pocket-book was in Harvey's hands? - A. Yes.

Q.And then it was that the conversation took place? - A. Yes.

Q. The receipt expressed it to be of considerable value? - A. Yes.

Q. And then Burgess said, naturally enough, if the thing is agreeable to what is stated in the receipt, it is of so much value, and you will be entitled to 80 guineas? - A. yes.

Q. Having parted with your watch and money, and learned that you were entitled to 80 guineas, did not you part with your watch and money voluntarily? - A. I said, again and again, that I did not want any thing to do with it; I certainly did give him my watch and money.

WILLIAM TUNNICLIFFE , sworn - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am a constable, at Lambeth: On the 12th of July, a sea-faring man came to me to act as a constable; I went to a public-house where the two prisoners were, Burgess had got some buckles and things in his hands, (produces them); which he was going to shove under a woman that was sitting there; I asked him what he was going to do, and laid hold of his arm, and snatched them away from him: I took three pocket-books from him, and three notes, and a receipt signed John Jones , (produces them); Burgess told me I had no business to take them to Union-hall; I did not know any better, but I took them there; he said, the business was done in the City; Harvey did not say any thing; I then took them before the Lord-Mayor, and they were committed.

Mr. Knowlys. (To Jacobs.) Look at that receipt, and tell us if you think that is like the receipt that was shewn to you? - A. I can swear that the receipt I looked at had the name of Jones to it, and a stamp, that is all that I can say about it; there is the name of John Jones to this.

Q. Look at that buckle? - A. I can swear to that buckle.

Q. Look at that pocket-book? - A. It was a common black book like this; I cannot swear to it, but I believe it to be the same.

Mr. Knapp. Q. You can read? - A. Yes.

Q. Then of course you can read that this is a receipt for 280l.? - A. Yes.

Q. Therefore anybody reading it would see it was a receipt for 280l.? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you ever see such a buckle as that before? - A. Yes; I have seen buckles like that in the shop-windows.

Q. Then will you swear that this is the same buckle? - A. I gave it into his hands, and he had no opportunity to drop it afterwards.

Burgess's defence. I am innocent of what I am accused of.

Harvey left his defence to his Counsel.

Burgess, GUILTY (Aged 78.)

Harvey, GUILTY (Aged 56.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

603. ROBERT HICKS was indicted for assaulting and obstructing Arthur Polibank , an officer of excise, on shore, in the due execution of his duty .

There being no evidence to affect the prisoner, he was ACQUITTED .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

604. ISAAC SOLOMONS was indicted for that he, on the 20th of October , two hundred and seventy-eight pieces of false and counterfeit copper money, to the likeness of a halfpenny, the same not being cut in pieces, feloniously did sell and put off to one Thomas Head , at a lower rate than the same by their denomination did import, that is to say, for seven shillings .(The indictment was opened by Mr. Ward, and the case by Mr. Fielding.)

THOMAS HEAD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Ward. On the 19th of October last, in consequence of directions, I went to the prisoner's house, in Church-street, Spitalfields . In consequence of fresh directions from the Magistrate, I went to theprisoner's house a second time on Saturday evening; two half-crowns and two shillings were given me, which were marked by Nowlan before we left the office; I knocked at the door, and asked if he had got them all ready; he said, yes, they were all ready; I told him I only wanted but seven shillings worth, but I should want more the next day; he said, you may have a cart load if you want them; he went up stairs, and brought down three papers, with five shillings in each paper, he opened them, and took one shilling's worth out, and said, there are fourteen shillings; I then came out, the officers were at the door, they immediately went in, and searched him, and took from him the money that I had given him; the halfpence are here.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. What way of business are you in? - A. A tailor.

Q. How long have you employed yourself in apprehending offenders for the public good? - A. Never before.

Q. Have you never said that you were a person who dealt in metal, and wanted metal to melt down? - A. I told him I was in the habit of paying a great many men at the water-side, and could use a great deal; he said, if you can recommend any body else, I have a great quantity.

Q. You had been with him the day before? - A. I had.

Q. You had possession of some halfpence? - A. No, I gave them to the officer.

Q. The officer sent you the second time? - A. Yes.

Q. You know you had full leisure, if you pleased, to put some halfpence into a parcel, and make them up, if you had been so inclined? - A. No. doubt there was time enough.

Q. You never gave information before? - A. No.

Q. Your business as a tailor was too great for that? - A.I attended to my business.

Q. They tell me that some of your family have happened to get into a scrape about this very sort of business? - A. I cannot help what my family do.

Q.Pray who is this very respectable member of your family that was concerned with coiners? - A.His name is Wolfe.

Q. Did you give this information before you brother-in-law, Wolfe, got into the scrape? - A. I did not know any thing of it till the Thursday.

Q. Did you never hear that he was under prosecution? - A. Yes.

Q. How long had you heard that before you went to lay this information, not many weeks, I believe? - A. Some weeks it might.

Q. I dare say you have not the least expectation, that if you convict this man, it will help your brother? - A. I don't know, I did it to servo the public at large.

Q. Did that fit of serving the public ever seize you before Wolfe was under prosecution? - A. I did not know any thing of this man before.

Q. Did you ever look out for such a thing before your brother-in-law was under prosecution? - A. No.

Q. Upon your oath did not your wife and her sister plan this? - A. No, my wife knew nothing about this, nor her sister neither, that I know of.

Q. Upon your oath, did not Wolfe help you on to this? - A. Upon my oath he took me to the house.

Q. Don't you know that these halfpence are sold by weight to melt down, often and often? - A. I don't know.

Q. Did not you yourself, by way of betraying the man, tell him they were to melt down? - A. I did not.

Q. That you swear? - A. I will swear it.

Q. Where do you carry on your business as a tailor? - A. At home.

Q. Where is that? - A. At Bethnal-green.

Q. Do you work for yourself? - A. Yes, or any gentlemen that chuse to employ me.

Q. This was not done till after Wolfe had got into the scrape? - A. No.

Q. Wolfe, I believe, is indulged, is not he? - A. I cannot say.

Q. Has he not found favour? - A. I do not know.

Q. Will you swear you never heard him say that? - A. Never.

JOHN NOWLAN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Fielding. I am an officer; I went to the house of the prisoner with the last witness; before he went into the house, he was furnished with two half-crowns, and two shillings, which I marked.

Q. Had he any counterfeit halfpence, or any halfpence about him, at the time he went to Solomon's house? - A. I do not know; I went in company with Griffiths, and took Mr. Solomons into custody; I searched his breeches pocket, and found a half-crown, a half-guinea, and a sixpence.

Q.Had he the money that you had marked? - A. I saw Griffiths take them from him; I searched the house, but found nothing of any consequence; Griffiths and Coombes found a quantity of halfpence.

Q. Did you see the money that Griffiths took from his hands? - A. I did.

Q. Did you know the money again? - A. Yes.

THOMAS GRIFFITHS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Fielding. I went to the house with Nowlan, where I met the prisoner and Had in the passage talking together; Nowlan laid hold of the prisoner, andasked him to go into the parlour; I immediately shoved into the parlour, I mistrusted he had something in his hand; I laid bold of his left hand, and took two half-crowns and two shillings which Nowlan had marked and given to Head. (Produces them).

Nowlan. This is the same money that I marked.

Griffiths. I then went into the warehouse, and up a ladder into a lost over the warehouse, which seemed to me like a store-room, and in searching round that warehouse, I found a large bag of halfpence, with another small bag; there is about three or four hundred weight of them; after I had found this bag, I was then by my self in the warehouse; I then called for Coombes, and they all came up together, and asked the prisoner if he had got any more of these halfpence; he said, yes, I believe I have; he said, I believe there is another bag; he went into the warehouse, and pulled out another bag of about one hundred weight.

Q. Who took the money away from Head? - A. I did, (produces it); there were two papers of five shillings each, and the rest were loose; they were sealed by the Magistrate before Mr. Powell.

Q. Do these correspond with those in the sack? - A. Yes, they do.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. This warehouse of his did not contain halfpence only? - A. No, there was copper, and lead, and pewter, and those sort of things.

Q. Were there not woollen goods and linen goods? - A. I did not see them; there were old and new nails.

Q. You have attended upon these sort of prosecutions before? - A. Yes.

Q. Do these halfpence appear to be newly coined at all? - A. No.

Q. Nor of one impression? - A. No.

Q. Have they not the appearance of having been in circulation? - A. They have; there are a great many of them tokens.

Q. Do you not know that lately the circulation of bad halfpence has been stopped? - A. yes.

Q. Don't you know that lately the circulation of bad halfpence has been stopped? - A. Yes.

Q. Don't you know that the founders buy them up to melt? - A. I cannot say.

ROBERT COOMBES sworn. - I found these two bags of halfpence below.

Prisoner's defence. My Lord, and Gentlemen of the Jury, I was never guilty of such a thing in my life; that man and another came and wanted to buy some halfpence, and I sold them to him by weight; I have got a witness to prove that I sold them by weight.

Mr. Knowlys. (To Griffiths.) Q.Among the halfpence you took from Head, which he said he had from the prisoner, you found four shillings loose, not in paper? - A. Yes.

For the Prisoner.

JAMES CLARKE sworn. - I am a founder, No. 90, Houndsditch. Previous to this transaction, I was about to buy these halfpence of Mr. Solomons, for the purpose of melting down.

Q. Then it is not an uncustomary thing for founders to purchase halfpence? - A. There is now a very great influx of halfpence; I bought a hundred weight yesterday for that purpose; a neighbour of mine bought a day or two ago eight hundred weight.

Cross-examined by Mr. Fielding. Q. What were you to give for this sort of copper? - A. The intrinsic value is about five pounds per hundred weight.

Q. Twenty-four halfpence is a shilling's-worth; how much would that be worth as old copper? - A. I never calculated.

Q. What is the name of your neighbour, who has bought eight hundred weight? - A. Mr. Martin, four doors from my own house.

The prisoner called nine witnesses, who gave him an excellent character.

GUILTY .

Confined one year in Newgate , and fined 100l.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice HEATH.

605. MARY HARRINGTON was indicted for that she, on the 20th of October , a piece of false and counterfeit money, counterfeited to the likeness of a good shilling, as and for a good one, did utter to one Mary- Ann Frost , widow, knowing it to be false and counterfeit .

Second Count. For that she, at the time she so uttered the said piece of false and counterfeit money, had in her custody and possession, another piece of false and counterfeit money, counterfeited to the likeness of a good shilling, she knowing the same to be false and counterfeit.(The case was opened by Mr. Ward,)

MARY-ANN FROST sworn. - I am a widow, I keep a public-house in Star-court, Fenchurch-street: On the 20th of October, the prisoner came into my house for a quartern of raspberry, she asked for change for a seven-shilling-piece; I would not change it, because she had been, about a fortnight before, and changed two or three shillings with me, and therefore I did not like to give her change; she said she had no silver; then she put her hand into her pocket, and said, yes, here is one shilling, she gave it to me, and I saw it was a bad one; she then put her hand into her pocket and gave me another, which was not quite so bad.

Q. Are you perfectly sure they were two different shillings? - A. Yes; I then reckoned the change out ready for her; I had a carpenter at work, andI asked his opinion of the shilling, and when I returned to the bar she was gone; there was a man having a pint of beer in the house who is the street-keeper of the Ward, he rubbed it, and said it was a very bad one, and then he went after her; he has got the shilling, his name is Perry.

Q. Are you sure the shilling you received from the prisoner was the one that you gave Perry? - A. Yes; it was never out of my hand.

THOMAS PERRY sworn. - I was at Mrs. Frost's house, the prisoner came in, and asked for some raspberry, she wanted change for a seven-shilling-piece; Mrs. Frost told her she could not give her change; she then produced a shilling; Mrs. Frost said it was a bad one; she after that chucked down another; Mrs. Frost gave her nine-pence out of it; I asked Mrs. Frost to let me look at the shilling; I rubbed it against the sole of my shoe, and found it to be a very bad one; I immediately returned to the bar where she had been drinking, and she was gone; I went after her, and stopped her about thirty yards from the door; I searched her, and found a good seven-shilling-piece, and two bad shillings, she had but one good shilling about her; I took her to the Compter.

CHARLES SANSUM sworn. - I am an officer: I was standing in Fenchurch-street, I saw the prisoner, and another woman, pass by, whom I knew very well; I saw Mr. Perry come out, and look round, I thought he was looking after them, and I told him which way they were gone; I went up to her and found her hand clenched, I forced it open, and there were two bad shillings, (produces them); I found one good shilling besides, and a seven-shilling-piece, upon her; I took her back to Mrs. Frost, and she marked one of the shillings, which she said she knew; then we took her before the Lord-Mayor, and she was committed.

Mrs. Frost. This is the shilling that she first offered me; I am very positive it is the same from a mark that I observed upon it.

CALES- EDWARD POWELL sworn. - I am clerk to the Solicitor for the Mint; these are both counterfeits.

The prisoner said in her defence, that she had received the money from a seaman on board the Serapis at Woolwich, and did not know it was bad.

GUILTY on the First Count.

Confined six months in Newgate , and to find sureties for six months more .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Mr. BARON HOTHAM delivered the opinion of the Judges upon the case of Robert Harris ,(who had been convicted of perjury, in September Sessions, 1797), as follows:

Robert Harris , you were convicted of the crime of perjury at a former Sessions, which was fully proved upon you; but the judgment of the Court was respited upon a doubt being entertained whether the form of the indictment, upon which you were tried, was strictly proper. The indictment stated, that you committed the perjury in question at Guildhall in the City of London, and went no further. The Judges have taken this into their consideration, and, upon examination of all the precedents, it appears in former as well as later times, that the indictment has always laid the perjury to have been committed either in some Parish or Ward within the City of London, that not having been done in your case, the judgment of the Court is, that you be discharged .

Confined two years in Newgate - 5.

Edward Atkinson , Luke Ball , Nathaniel Lynham , John Turk , John Warwick .

The SESSIONS being ended, the COURT proceeded to GIVE JUDGMENT as follows:

Received sentence of Death - 3.

James Tomkins, John Bayliss, Alexander Smith .

Transported for seven years - 26.

Margaret Battersby,

James Kirk,

Hannah Hardcastle ,

John Wheeler,

John Crawley,

William Russell ,

George Shirley,

Sarah Wood ,

James Wilson,

William Saggers ,

John Ward,

William Young,

William Galloway ,

John Milton , otherwise Multon,

Matthew Moreton,

Richard Jackson,

William Bowers ,

Ann Forbes,

Ann Hardman,

Richard Watts ,

James Harrod,

Sarah Thomas ,

William Ambridge,

John Romaine ,

Thomas Burgess,

William Harvey.

Confined one year in Newgate, and fined 100l. - 1.

Isaac Solomons .

Confined one year in the House of Correction, fined 1s. and discharged - 4.

Nancy Holman, Mary Barrett, Agnes Towell , Richard-Warner Wilson.

Confined six months in the House of Correction, publickly whipped and discharged - 1.

William Moore .

confined six months in the House of Correction, privately whipped and discharged - 1.

Catherine Hynde.

Confined six months in Newgate, fined 1s. and discharged - 1.

Elizabeth Brown.

Confined six months in Newgate, and find sureties for six months more - 1.

Mary Harrington .

Confined six months in the House of Correction, fined 1s. and discharged - 4.

James Walker, Thomas Sparkes , Sarah Marshall, Ann Brown.

Privately whipped and discharged - 3.

Mary Forbes , John Matthews, Samuel Solomons .

Confined two years in Newgate - 5.

Edward Atkinson , Luke Ball , Nathaniel Lynham , John Turk , John Warwick .