Old Bailey Proceedings Online (www.oldbaileyonline.org, version 6.0, 03 September 2014), May 1798 (17980523).

Old Bailey Proceedings, 23rd May 1798.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS ON THE KING'S Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND ALSO, The Gaol Delivery FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, HELD AT JUSTICE-HALL, IN THE OLD-BAILEY, On WEDNESDAY, the 23d of MAY, 1798, and the following Days, BEING THE FIFTH SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF The Right Hon. Sir JOHN WILLIAM ANDERSON, BART.

LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY WILLIAM RAMSEY , AND Published by Authority.

LONDON: Printed and published by W. WILSON, No. 15, St. Peter's-Hill, Little Knight-Rider-Street, Doctors' Commons.

1798.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS ON THE KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, &C.

BEFORE Sir JOHN WILLIAM ANDERSON , Bart. Lord Mayor of the CITY of LONDON; Sir NASH GROSE , Knight, one of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of King's-Bench; Sir JOHN WILLIAM ROSE , Knight, Serjeant at Law, Recorder of the said City; JOHN SILVESTER , Esq. Common-Serjeant at Law of the said City; and others, His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the CITY of LONDON, and Justices of Gaol Delivery of NEWGATE, holden for the said City and County of MIDDLESEX.

London Jury.

John Gresham ,

Samuel Peyton ,

John Halsey ,

Thomas Huntley ,

Thomas Perrin ,

Benjamin Rutt ,

Adam Blackwell ,

William Clementson ,

Robert Nelson ,

Richard Ware ,

James Halbird ,

John Taylor .

First Middlesex Jury.

James Crompton ,

Edward Rymer ,

Dennis Jacob ,

John Grant ,

William Hale ,

Cornelius Connell ,

Francis Bristow ,

Charles Fourdrinier ,

Charles Hill ,

John Stevenson ,

Levis Ransom ,

Thomas-Courtney Devenish .

Second Middlesex Jury.

Robert Randall ,

Richard Thomas ,

Thomas Rowling ,

Isaac Brown ,

John Thompson ,

William Woodhouse ,

Isaac Kendall ,

Robert Battersby ,

James Masters ,

Richard-Rowley Watkins ,

William Paskall ,

Thomas Conway .

351. MARY SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of May , a silk handkerchief, value 2s. a silver watch, value 40s. a steel chain, value 6d. a metal seal, value 2d. a brass watch-key, value 1d. and 4s. in monies numbered, the property of John Connor , privily from his person .

JOHN CONNOR sworn. - I am a plumber : On Sunday, the 13th of this month, about ten o'clock at night, I was robbed in Twister's-alley, Bunhill-row ; I met the prisoner, she asked me to treat her with a glass of liquor, which I did; I then went with her to her lodgings, and being in liquor I laid down upon the bed, with my cloaths on, and went to sleep; I awoke next morning about four o'clock, and missed my watch, four shillings in money, and a silk handkerchief off my neck; the prisoner was gone; I waited some time but she did not come back; I went to the house two or three times but could not find her; I found her the next morning about ten o'clock, at a public-house, and she gave the duplicate of the watch to Mrs. Howe, she is not here. I did not see her give the duplicate; the constable is here, and the pawnbroker.

JOHN GASS sworn. - I am a constable: I produce some money, and a duplicate that I received from the prisoner, seven shillings, and three-pence halfpenny, and five farthings; she acknowledged to me that it was part of the money she had pledged the watch for; I did not make her any promise of favour.

CHARLES SAVILLE sworn. - I am a pawnbroker, (produces the watch); I had it from the prisoner on Monday the 14th instant, between eight and nine in the morning; I know her person; the watch is silver.(The watch was deposed to by the prosecutor, from the maker's name and number).

Prisoner's defence. I met this gentleman between eleven and twelve o'clock, at the corner of Golden-lane, it rained very hard, and he asked me to take him home to my lodgings, which I did; we went to a public-house and had some peppermint; he had but one shilling and sixpence in silver left, and he wanted to sleep with me for that, and I said I could not let him sleep with me for that, and he then desired me to pawn the watch.

Q. (To Connor.) Did you give her any money? - A. No.

Q. Are you sure of that? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you give her the watch? - A. No, I did not.

Jury. Q. Where had you the watch? - A. In my fob. NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

352. JOHN GRIFFITHS was indicted for that he, on the 27th of April , on the King's highway, upon Benjamin Ward , did make an Assault, putting him in fear, and taking from his person one shilling, two sixpences, and six halfpence, the property of the said Benjamin .

BENJAMIN WARD sworn. - I live in Little Moorfields: On Friday the 27th of last month, about twelve o'clock at night, I was coming home from Islington, through Goswell-street , the prisoner at the bar, and another, laid hold of me and threw me down, and took from me all that I had about me, there was one shilling, two sixpences, and three-pennyworth of halfpence; they drew a knife upon me after I was down; as soon as I could relieve myself I went to the watchman, and gave an alarm; when the alarm was given, the watchman saw the prisoner run, and he followed him and took him.

Q. When the watchman took the prisoner, were you sure he was one of the men that robbed you? - A. Yes; he was carried to the watch-house, but was not searched; the next day, before the Magistrate, he was searched, and a knife and sixpence found upon him; the knife was a crooked one.

Q. Were you perfectly sober at that time? - A. Yes.

Q. What sort of a night was it? - A. A moonlight night, as light as day.

Q. How many minutes might pass while they were robbing you? - A. I suppose not three minutes.

Q. Was it so light that you could clearly see the faces of the men? - A. Yes.

Q. Were you pretty much frightened? - A. Yes, I was.

Q. Were there any other people in the street? - A. No.

Q. Did you cry out? - A. Yes, I did.

Q. Was the prisoner the man that knocked you down, or was it the other man? - A. It was the prisoner.

Q. How long did you see the prisoner before he was close to you? - A. Scarce two or three hundred yards, they met me both of them.

HENRY MAY sworn. - I am a watchman: On the 27th of April, about a quarter, or twenty minutes past twelve, I was standing at my box inGoswell-street, the corner of Old-street-road, when the alarm was given, by another watchman below me by springing his rattle; upon that, I saw a man walking up by the Charterhouse-wall, and I went and stopped him; with that, the prosecutor and the other watchman came up, and the prosecutor looked in the man's face that I had stopped, and said, that is not the man. Then I turned round, and saw a man run across the road, and go into the Leaping-bar public-house; I told the prosecutor he had better go in and see if that was the man; he went into the passage, and he came out, and said, that is the man, I will take my oath to him; the prisoner had not got into the house then, I went in and took him by the collar, and told him he had robbed a man, and he must go with me; he said, no, I have not robbed a man; I said, the prosecutor says you robbed him, and drew a knife upon him; oh, says he, then hang me at once. I took him to the watch-house and put him into the cage; the next day I took him to Worship-street.

JOHN ARMSTRONG sworn. - I searched the prisoner at the office, and found this knife and a sixpence; that is all I know of it.

Q. (To Ward.) Did you go into this public-house that May speaks of? - A. I went into the passage belonging to the house.

Q. How came you not to tell me that before? - A. I forgot it.

Q. He drew a knife upon you? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see the knife? - A. Yes; it was a crooked blade, very much like this, I believe this is the same knife; he said, if I did not give him my money he would cut my side, and then he took it from me; the other man held me while the prisoner robbed me.

Prisoner's defence. I had been at the Black-horse all the afternoon, and was very much in liquor, and fell down in Hatfield-street; I would not go home with my wife, and I fell asleep in the street, and she took my hat and carried it home; a man picked me up, and I said I would give him something to drink, and we went to the Leaping-bar.

Q. (To Ward.) Did you observe whether either of the persons that robbed you had a hat on? - A. The prisoner had no hat.

Prisoner. The prosecutor came to me in Newgate, on Friday, and said, if I would give him a guinea, he would make it up.

Ward. No, he offered me a guinea, and I said, I could not do it.

Jury. Q. Did the prisoner appear to be in liquor at the time of the robbery? - A. He did not.

Jury. Q. Why did you come to Newgate to see the prisoner? - A. I went to see another person, one Murray, a man that I had known a good while, and I saw him accidentally.

Q. What was Murray in Newgate for? - A. For a felony. The prisoner's wife came to my house five or six times, and said she would give me a guinea.

Q. Did you ask to see the prisoner? - A. No, I did not.

Prisoner. I was not in the same yard, and he could not see me till he sent for me.

Mr. Kirby. If the prosecutor did see him, he must have sent for him.

Ward. A friend that was with me sent for him.

For the Prisoner.

MARGARET SHEPHERD sworn. - I have known the prisoner several years: On the the 27th of April, I saw him at the Black-horse, at past eleven o'clock, I went in to get a pint of beer for my supper; I left him there; he borrowed sixpence of me, I gave him sixpence, and bid him good night; when I went home the chimes played twelve. I saw the prosecutor yesterday, at Hicks's-hall, and said to him, are you come to find a bill against Mr. Griffiths, and he said, yes, he had; I said, you promised to make it up for a guinea; he said, he did, but we did not attend on him; I told him we did attend on Mr. Wright, where he promised to come for the money; he said, if I had come an hour and a half before I did, yesterday, before he had thrown in the bill, he would have settled it.

Q. (To Ward.) Is what this woman has said true? - A. It is not.

Q. Is no part of it true? - A. She came to me yesterday with another woman, and asked me to make it up; I told them, I could not do any such thing, I was bound over to prosecute him, and could not; they staid a good while, and I told them it was of no service to stop any longer, for I could not do any thing in it. She first of all asked me if my name was Ward.

Q. She says she told you, that you promised to make it up for a guinea? - A. It is no such thing.

Q. Did you ever promise to make it up for a guinea? - A. No.

Q. Did she tell you any thing about Mr. Wright, the fishmonger? - A. Mr. Wright, the fishmonger, was in Newgate, and offered to make up the money.

WILLIAM HEARNE sworn. - I am a watchman: I was beating twelve o'clock, and when I came back, I found the prisoner stone blind drunk in the kennel, it was on a Saturday morning, I do not recollect what day of the month it was, he had no hat on; I asked him where he lived, and he could not give me a proper answer, and we went to Old-street, and there was a public-house, and I was obliged to lead him over, for he could not walk over, it was the Leaping-bar, in Old-street; and while he was with me in at the Leaping-bar, the prosecutor came up, with May, and another watchman, May and the prosecutor were both drunk; and they said to me, that that man had been robbed; I asked him where, and they said, in Bell-alley; I said, that is not in my beat; then the prosecutor said, I believe that is the man that robbed me; I told him to look, and be sure he was the man; for says I, the man has been in my company these ten minutes; he went to look at the man, he came back again to me, and said, he believed he was the man; then says I, you must be sure he is the man; instead of looking at the man, he called for a pot of beer, they would not draw any; I said to May, go and take him into custody, and I went upon my beat.

Q. How came you to tell a drunken man to take him in custody? - A. Because he was not in my beat, and there was another watchman with him.

Q. (To May.) You have heard what Hearne has said, is any part of it true? - A. No, it is all false, I never drank more than half a pint of beer the whole night, nor the following day.

Q. Was Ward drunk? - A. I cannot say, he was very much frightened; he appeared very well.

JAMES FROST sworn. - I have known the prisoner many years, he is a watch-finisher ; I was drinking with Mrs. Shepherd; I left the prisoner there at half past eleven o'clock, he was very much in liquor.

WILLIAM SMITH sworn. - I never heard any thing bad of him; he is a hard working, industrious, honest man; and, if he is acquitted, I will take him again to-morrow.

For the Prosecution.

JOSEPH WILKES sworn. - I am a constable of the night.

Q. Did you see May the night of the 27th of April? - A. Yes; I went to the watch-house about ten o'clock, and I found May on his beat; I stopped in the watch-house till about half past eleven; then, at half past eleven, I went round the watch-boxes to see that the watchmen were upon their duty, and when I came up Brick-lane, one of the watchmen said, master, you are wanted.

Q. Was May drunk or sober? - A. He was sober.

Q. The prisoner was taken after twelve, was he sober then? - A. he was; and the prosecutor was sober. NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice GROSE.

353. JAMES MURRAY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of April , a guinea, the property of John Rubery , privily, from his person .

JOHN RUBERY sworn. - On the 28th of April in the evening, it might be eleven or twelve o'clock; I was very much in liquor; I met the prisoner in Bunhill row , and I asked him to have something to drink, and he said, he did not know whether he could find any body up; he said, they had got the nightmen at the Jack of Newbury; and I went in and asked for some peppermint, and I believe I spent to the amount of a shilling upon him.

Q. In rum or brandy, or what? - A. It might be both, I cannot say; I pulled out a guinea, and a half guinea, and four shillings, and the mistress of the house saw that I was in liquor, and said to the prisoner, patrol, you had better take care of him; and I fell asleep, I believe; at last the nightmen and the patrol together waked me; I did not miss any thing till the lady of the house told me I was robbed, and then I missed my guinea; she told the prisoner, he was a very bad man, for that he had robbed that poor man (pointing to me), and should be brought to justice for it; he denied it, and said, that he had but three or four pennyworth of halfpence in his pocket; then the night-men collared him, and wrung the guinea out of his hand.

Prisoner. Q. Do not you remember giving me your money in Bunhill-row, amounting to a guinea, and a half-guinea, to take care of? - A. I cannot remember a word of it; I do not think I should to a strange man.

DANIEL THOMPSON sworn. - I was coming out with a tub of stuff; he was very much in liquor, and I set him up against the wall; the prisoner is a patrol; Mrs. Hoare came out, and insisted upon his being searched; my fellow-servant and I were, I dare say, two or three minutes getting it out of his hand.

GEORGE MITTEY sworn. - I helped the patrol out with the prosecutor; and the lady came out, and said, I insist upon your not going away without seeing that man searched; the patrol put his hand into his right hand pocket, and turned his hand backward, and he had got it clenched in his hand; the landlady of the house has got it.

Prisoner's defence. The property was delivered into my hand, a guinea and a half, and four shillings; and going to this house, the Jack of Newbury, the prosecutor desired his money again, and I gave it him; and when he paid for his liquor, he put it all upon the bar, before the landlady.

The prisoner called six witnesses, who gave him a good character. NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice GROSE.

354. RICHARD PHILLIPS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of April , an ingot of gold, of the weight of 2 oz. 3 dwts value8l. the property of Charles Aldridge , the elder , in an out-house belonging to his dwelling-house .

( Charles Aldridge , sen. proved the situation of the premises, in Aldersgate-street .)

WILLIAM ALDRIDGE sworn. - I am the son of Mr. Aldridge: I live at the flatting-mills.

Q. Do you know the prisoner? - A. I know him by coming to the mills; he used to bring silver to be flatted.

Q. What do you know of this gold? -Thursday, the 26th of April, I kneeled [Text unreadable in original.] making it red hot; I laid it on the anvil; after that John White made a skillet of silver red hot, and pushed the gold off the anvil, to hammer the silver; I picked it up, and put it on the anvil again; I went down to the house to tea, and left it on the anvil; the prisoner was there at the time, that is all I know about it; the man sent down stairs to me to know where the gold was; I went up, and missed it; that was about twenty minutes after I had left it; I shall know the gold when it is produced.

JOHN WHITE sworn. - I work with Mr. Aldridge in the flatting-mills; In about twenty minutes, or half an hour after the prisoner was gone, I missed the gold; he was there when I moved it off the anvil; a short time after, we went to run it again, and missed it; we looked about the mill for some time, and then we sent off to the prisoner's master; there was nobody else there but him, while the gold was there; be came back in about an hour after I missed it, and he was sent to the Compter. I shall know the gold when I see it.

Q. Is this mill an out-house? - A. Yes, it is.

Q. Is it connected with the dwelling-house? - A. Yes; by adjoining walls.

- EBSWORTH sworn. - I am a porter to a Fire-office, and a constable: About nine o'clock on Thursday, the 26th of April, I was sent for, and apprehended the prisoner; I said, my friend, you must go along with me; I took him to Giltspur-street Compter; when I was going to put him in, when I got to the door, he said, dear, dear, why you are not going to put me in here; yes, I said, I am till to-morrow; says he, if you will take a walk along with me a little farther, instead of knocking at the door, I will talk to you; he took me to his master's house at Islington; I went backward with him to the privy, and he pulled out this piece of gold, which he gave me.

HENRY ALDRIDGE sworn. - I was at my brother's the evening the prisoner was brought back; I know nothing of it, but giving charge of him.

ISAAC MACKIE sworn. - I manage the affairs of Mr. Charles Aldridge in his absence: On Thursday, the 26th of April, Mr. Aldridge went out of town; I was at home about six o'clock; I was informed they had missed a piece of gold from the mill; I immediately went up, and they shewed me the place it was lost form; I suspected the prisoner, and I went up to Islington immediately, where he lives, and I sent a constable to search him, but could not find any thing of it; he strongly denied it for a long time; at last the constable went with him to his master's, and found it.

William Aldridge . I am sure this is the piece of gold; I know it by the marks running crooked.

Jury. Q. Is not that very common? - A. Not always. I am sure this is the same piece.

John White . This is the same piece of gold that I missed from the anvil; there are very few that run their gold so wide as we do for the goldbeaters; I know it by the shape of it, and the width of it; it is run crooked, and I know it by the flux of it, which is this black that is worked into it.

Q. What may be the value of it? - A. Eight pounds.

Prisoner's defence. I was promised to be forgiven if I gave the property up; they said they would not hurt a hair of my head.

The prisoner called his master, and three other witnesses, who gave him an excellent character.

GUILTY Death . (Aged 17.)

The prosecutor recommended him to mercy, on account of his youth .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

355. JOHN WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of March , fourteen gallons of pickled olives, value 5l. and a wooden cask, value 6d. the property of George-Allen Alwin and Thomas Chapman .

Second Count. Laying it to be the property of Andrew Johnson .

Third Count. Laying it to be the property of certain persons to the Jurors unknown.

(The case was opened by Mr. Alley.)

JOSEPH FLETCHER sworn. - I am servant to the prosecutors, Messrs. Alwin and Chapman; I do not know their Christian names; on the 6th of March I met the prisoner in Thames-street .

Q. Were the prosecutors, at that time, removing any olives from the quays? - A. Yes. When I met the prisoner, he had a half-barrel of olives; he was resting his half-barrel upon the Custom-house window; he was as far as I could see him; I was behind all the rest of the men walking in rotation.

Q. How many men were there? - A. Four, with chests of oil.

Q. What distance were you from him? - A. Not a hundred yards

Q. Was it day-light? - A. It was the middle of the day, or thereabouts.

Q. Are you perfectly sure it was the prisoner that you saw? - A. Yes; a man that I did not know was lifting a half-barrel of olives from the Custom-house window on to the prisoner's back.

Q. Was it the same half-barrel that you had seen before? - A. Yes; I told him if he did not take the olives up in a better manner he would not carry many more olives from the quays; he had his hat in one hand, and appeared to be in a great sweat.

Q. Did you hear any particular observations made use of to the prisoner? - A. No, not particularly; he said, he would get on as well as he could, and see if he could not carry it to the warehouse.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Did you ever know the prisoner at the bar before this transaction? - A. No; I have not been used to work on the quays.

Q. He seemed to have a half-barrel of olives that he said he was taking to the warehouse-what warehouse do you suppose he was going to take them to? -(Mr. Alley objected to the question).

Court. Q. Did any thing pass to induce you to understand what warehouse he was going to take it to? - A. Messrs. Alwin's and Chapman's.

Mr. Alley. Q. Did he or did he not take it to the warehouse? - A. He certainly did not.

ROBERT BREWSTER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. I am a soldier belonging to the second regiment of Foot Guards: I was employed by the prosecutors, in March last, to fetch olives off the quays, and take them to the warehouse.

Q. Do you recollect, on the 6th of March, meeting the prisoner any where? - A. Yes, some time in the afternoon.

Q. Was it day-light? - A. Yes; it was before four o'clock, within twenty yards from the Custom-house quays, in Thames-street; he had a half-barrel of olives upon his left shoulder, and his hat in his right hand.

Q. Did any conversation take place between you and him? - A. No; I heard a man behind me speak to him, but I cannot tell what he said.

Q. Do you know whether the prisoner was employed by your master that day? - A. I cannot tell.

Q. This was the 6th of March? - A. Yes.

Q. When did you see him afterwards? - A. On the 8th of April; when he was apprehended, the prisoner said, well, if I must go to Mr. Alwin's and Chapman's, I will go; I do not recollect any thing else that he said.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. He might be employed by the prosecutors for any thing you know to the contrary? - A. I cannot say.

JOSEPH PRANDET sworn. - I am warehouseman to the prosecutors.

Q. Do you recollect any thing being lost out of a ship laden with olives? - A. There were some olives lost off the quays.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. The ship was unloading? - A. Yes.

Q. Messrs. Alwin and Chapman had not warehoused them? - A. That one half-barrel had nor been warehoused.

Q. During the time it was upon the quays it was the property of the merchant? - A. Yes.

Q. And what is his name? - A. Andrew Johnson .

Q. Do you know that that particular barrel of olives is his property more than any other? - A. I cannot say, I never saw it.

Q. Are you cunning enough to swear to one barrel of olives from another? - A. Yes, from the marks.

Q. When did you see the marks? - A. All the others were marked.

Mr. Alley. Q. Do not you know that Messrs. Alwin and Chapman, as the brokers, and agents to Mr. Johnson, pay the duties at the Custom-house? - A. I do not know.

Court. Q. Messrs. Alwin and Chapman are warehousemen? - A. Yes.

Q. Then they are answerable for them while they are upon the wharf? - A. They are, if they are not put on watch.

Mr. Alley. Q. Are they not answerable for them from the time that they have paid the duty? - A. Yes.

JOHN HULL sworn. - I am a labourer for the prosecutors: On the 6th of March I was moving olives, and I saw the prisoner on that day with a half-barrel upon his shoulder, at the end of the Custom-house quay; I said to him, what you are going on with your load, but I think it is rather too much for you; says he, I have got enough of it; he made no other reply.

Q. Was he employed that day to work for the prosecutors? - A. I do not know.

Q. Was it the same sort of barrel as those that were in the ship? - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. He said he had got enough of it because the weight was enough for anybody to carry? - A. Yes.

Q. You do not know that he was not employed by the prosecutor that day? - A. No.

JOSEPH BELASCO sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - A. I never saw him before that day; I saw him in Duke's place, shewing some olives in a bottle as a sample, I think about nine or ten weeks ago.

Q. Did you treat with him yourself about the olives? - A. He told me he had fourteen gallons of them; he asked me eighteen-pence a gallon. Itold him I would go and look at them; he took me to the Magpye, in Aldersgate-street, and I bought them, I gave him a guinea for the half-barrel.

Q. You took them home? - A. Yes; he put them into a coach, and I went home with them.

Q. Does he live in that public-house? - A. No.

Q. Did you see any more olives there but that half-barrel? - A. No.

Q. What are you? - A. A dealer in fish, and damaged pickles.

Q. Were these damaged pickles? - A. I do not know, I sold them for three shilling and four-pence a gallon; I sold the cask for nine-pence.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. So, my friend, I make you out to be a pickle - had you any knowledge of the prisoner at all before this transaction? - A. I never saw him before.

Q. And where may you have the happiness to live-in Duke's-place? - A. I sell things there, different sorts of things that I can get a shilling by.

Q. Honestly if you can - but if not what then? - A. I do not understand olives.

Q. Duke's-place is pretty much frequented, is it not, by persons of your fraternity? - A. I do not know particularly, I cannot answer that; I have bought them as good for nine-pence a gallon before now, in the wholesale warehouses.

Q. Then there is nothing to lead you to recollect this circumstance more than any other? - A. I thought I would do the most I could.

Q. Can you inform my Lord of any other purchase of damaged pickles on any other day? - A. No.

Q. You never saw the prisoner before that day? - A. No; I have bought pickles of Mr. Lambert of Ludgate-hill.

Q. Have you never bought pickles of any other persons that came into the market of Duke's-place? - A. No, not in Duke's-place.

Q. Do you mean to swear that? - A. Yes.

Q. What do you think of Houndsditch? - A. No, I never did.

GEORGE-ALLEN ALWIN sworn. - I am in partnership with Thomas Chapman, we are merchants' agents, and coopers: We had the unlading of part of a ship of olives, consigned to Andrew Johnson ; the moment they pass the King's beam they become our property; as soon as they are landed by the officer they are delivered into our charge, and become our property.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - A. I do.

Q. Do you recollect, after the prisoner was apprehended, having any conversation with him? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you hold out any inducement to him to confess himself guilty, or any threat? - A. No, I did not.

Mr. Knapp. Q. What was communicated to you by the prisoner was communicated by you to the Magistrate? - A. Yes.

Q. And was not that taken down in writing? - I cannot say whether it was or not.

Q. Did that or not form a part of the examination? - A. I cannot say.

Q. Will you swear it did not? - A. It is impossible.

Q. Previous to the conversation you are about to relate, what did you say to the prisoner at the bar? - A. He said he was brought up by one of the people, he did not know what for. I asked the man in the interim, whether he had been for an officer.

Q. Did the prisoner hear that? - A. It is most likely he must.

Mr. Knapp contended that desiring an officer to be sent for, ought to be consirued into a threat, and that therefore evidence ought not to be given of what was said by the prisoner after.

Court. Merely sending for a constable is a regular part of the business, and if that was to be the case, no conversation, after a prosecution was commenced, could be given in evidence.

Mr. Alley. Q. Was any body present at the time of the conversation but you and the prisoner? - A. Yes, Mr. Prandit, the warehouseman.

Q. Now relate the conversation? - A. He said, he could not tell what it could be for, unless it was for a half barrel of olives he took from the Custom quay, put into a cart, and then upon his back.

Q. Were there any other olives upon the Custom-house quay at that time, but your own? - A. No other in the river.

Q. Did he say any thing else to you? - A. He said, when he had it on his back, he attempted to proceed to our warehouse, he was stopped in Thames-street by some carts, and was under the necessity of going up one of the lanes, he thought, Harp-lane, and in coming across one of the cross lanes, he met with an accident, the barrel sell from his back, and being a poor man, and fearful of the damage, he ran away and left it; and he repeated it over several times.

Q. Did you ever see any of the olives you had lost afterwards? - A. No.

Q. Do you know of your own knowledge whether the prisoner at the bar was employed by you? - A. Not that I know.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Has Mr. Johnson any partner? - A. No.

Q. Whether the prisoner was employed by any body else under you, you cannot tell? - A. No.

Q. You cannot undertake to swear, of your own knowledge, that you have had any loss? - A. The quantity was landed right with the lighter bill.

Q. Is the lighter bill here? - A. No, it is not.

Mr. Alley. Q. (To Prandit.) Do you know, of your own knowledge, that there was any loss? - A. Yes, half a barrel.

Q. Was the prisoner employed for your master that day? - A. No.

Mr. Knapp. Q. What other warehousemen have you? - A. White and Hull.

Q. And White is not here? - A. No.

Q. Then you will not undertake to swear that White did not employ the prisoner that very day for that very business? - A. No.

Mr. Alley. Q. Was it your business, or White's, to employ the men? - A. Mine.

Prisoner's defence. I know nothing at all about it.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who had known him upwards of twenty years, and gave him a good character. NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

356. THOMAS SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of May , four live tame hens, value 1s. 6d. a live tame cock, value 6d. a hempen bag, value 6d. and a hand-saw, value 6d. the property of William Walker .

WILLIAM WALKER sworn. - I am a greengrocer , in Mile-End Old Town : I lost four tame hens, a tame cock, a hempen bag, and a hand-saw, on Monday, the 7th of this month, from the yard behind my house. I was going out early on Tuesday morning, and found my back door open. I saw them afterwards at the Police-Office, Lambeth-street.

RICHARD PERRY sworn. - I am an officer; I stopped him on Monday night, the 7th of May, at near 12 o'clock, with this bag, a saw, four hens and a cock, at Whitechapel, very near a mile from the prosecutor's house; I stopped him, asked him what he had got there, he said, he had nothing but his own property; and I took him to the watch-house. The fowls appeared as if they had been just killed, they were warm. The next morning the property was advertised, and on Friday, the prosecutor came forward, and swore to them before the Magistrate.(Produces the bag and the saw).

Walker. I knew the fowls to be mine by the marks; there were two white hens, two speckled hens, and a pye coloured cock. This saw is mine, I know it by wanting a screw in the handle; and the bag is marked W.

Prisoner's defence. I was coming from Romford, about twelve o'clock at night, past Mr. Walker's house, and the fowls, the bag, and the saw, were thrown at me by somebody, I do not know who.

GUILTY .

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction , publicly whipped , and discharged.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

357. SOLOMON LEVY was indicted for that he, on the 4th of April , thirteen pieces of false and counterfeit milled money, made and counterfeited to the likeness of a good shilling, the same not being cut in pieces, did put off to one Stephen Edlin , at a lower rate and value than the same by their denomination did import, that is to say, for six shillings .

No evidence being offered on the part of the prosecution, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

358. MARY WYER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of March , a linen sheet, value 4s. the property of William Cordy .

JOHN CAYENNE sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Cordy, pawnbroker : On the 27th of March, the prisoner came into the shop to pledge a bed-gown and hose; in the mean while a person came in to look at some sheets; I shewed the sheets, and none of them suited the person; the prisoner was served, and went away; in about half an hour afterwards a young man from Mr. Briggs's, a pawnbroker, in St. John's-street, came to know if we had lost any sheets; I went down with him, and he had the prisoner in his custody; I looked at the ticket, and knew it to be our's.

SAMUEL WOODHOUSE sworn. - (Produces the sheet.) I live with Mr. Briggs, pawnbroker, in St. John-street: The prisoner brought it to pledge with me on the 27th of March, between ten and eleven in the morning; she said it was her own, and as I was examining it, I observed a ticket pinned on the corner of it, and saw that it was Mr. Cordy's; upon that I went to Mr. Cordy's to enquire if they had lost a sheet; I have had it ever since.

Cayenne. This sheet is Mr. Cordy's property, the time is out; I am sure it was on the counter at the time the prisoner was in the shop.

Prisoner's defence. I was in Mr. Cordy's shop, it was lying there; I did not know who might have dropped it, or else I should not have taken it.

GUILTY (Aged 23.)

Privately whipped and discharged.

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

359. EDWARD WRIGHT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of May , two pennant pocket-knives, value 1s. 6d. the property of Gabriel Aughtie .

GABRIEL AUGHGIE sworn. - I am a hardware-man : Last Thursday evening the prisoner at the bar came into my shop, the corner of Friday-street , and asked me if I sold plated buckles; there was aparcel of desert-knives upon the counter; he had a bag upon his shoulder, which he threw over this little parcel; I suspected he wanted to steal them; he saw me looking at him, he took his hand off, and said I might sell buckles another time; he went away, and I followed him; he crossed the way to another shop that I have within two doors of Milk-street; he was then stooping down, and examining a tea board that I had hanging within the door; he then got up, and came to the door; he returned again, and there was a drawer of pen-knives on the counter; he laid his hand over that drawer, in the same manner that he had done over the desert-knives, and then came out of the shop; as soon as he came out, I took hold of him, and took him in doors, and asked him what he had taken; he gave me no answer, but slipped his left hand down by the side of him, which I immediately caught hold of, and took the two knives out of his hand, and sent for a constable immediately; the constable has them; they are pennant pocket-knives.

William Shepherd , the constable, produced the property, which was deposed to by Mr. Aughtie.

Prisoner's defence. I am a poor distressed fellow, I have no friends, I am obliged to pay a shilling a night for my lodging, and where am I to get it.

GUILTY (Aged 74.)

Confined three years in Newgate , publicly whipped , and discharged.

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

360. LAWRENCE WILLIAMSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of May , two silk cloaks, value 3l. a muslin gown, value 20s. a piece of cotton, value 20s. a linen sheet, value 5s. a pair of nankeen breeches, value 10s. and a pair of cotton drawers, value 2s. the property of William Freeland , in his dwelling-house .

WILLIAM FREELAND sworn. - I keep the King's Arms, Wapping High-street : Last Tuesday was a week I was at Gravesend, and my wife ill in bed, when the things were taken.

SARAH GERMAINE sworn. - I live at No. 4, Crown-court: Mr. Freeland lives at the corner next door but one; I saw the prisoner at Mr. Freeland's house the evening before the robbery; and on the Tuesday evening I was going to Mr. Brookes's, in East-Smithfield, for some leather to bind shoes, and I saw the prisoner in East-Smithfield, counting money in the street, a good step from Mr. Freeland's; he had this bundle slung upon his arm; I asked him if he did not lodge at Mr. Freeland's; he said, no, he did not lodge there, but he knew Mr. Freeland very well; I asked him if he would not go with me to Mr. Freeland's, for they had been robbed; I had heard so about half an hour before; I was next to the wall then; and he was next to the pavement; I went to the other side of him; I laid hold of his jacket, and then he pushed me in the side, and run away.

Q. How came you to take hold of his jacket? - A. They said it was him that had robbed Mr. Freeland; I called out for assistance, and nobody would assist me, and then a butcher's boy stopped him, but who the boy was I do not know; then I got hold of him, and he went with me to Mr. Freeland's house; then the officer took him in custody.

Q. He was strong enough to have pushed you away, was not he? - A. Yes, but he did not do it.

Q. What became of the bundle? - A. He carried it on his arm till he came to the office at Mr. Freeland's house, and then he dropped it at Mr. Freeland's door, outside, the officer took it up; I have had it ever since. (Produces it).

Q. Did he say how he came by the things? - A. I did not hear him.

CATHERINE NORMAN sworn. - Yesterday se'nnight, in the evening, I was standing at the public-house door, in East-Smithfield, where I had ordered a pint of beer; the prisoner came up to me, and asked me if I wished to have part of a pint of beer with him, he had a bundle in his hand; he sat down in the tap-room, and untied the bundle, and said, he wished to dispose of them; he said, the woman that he had had on board of ship had left him, and had left the kit behind; he said, they stood him in eleven pounds, and he meant to sell them as soon as he could, and he sold some of them in the tap-room; he asked me if I would buy a piece of cotton of him for a gown; I told him I had not money; and then he said, would I be so good as pawn it for him, and I pawned it in the Minories.( John Shepherd , servant to Mr. Windsor a pawnbroker, produces a gown-piece).

Mrs. Norman. This is the same piece of cotton that I pawned at Mr. Windsor's; I had it from the prisoner.

Q. (To Shepherd.) What is the value of that piece of cotton? - A. About two shillings and three-pence a yard, there are eight yards of it; I lent twelve shillings upon it.

Prisoner. She ran away with it from me.

Prosecutor. I left the prisoner in the house myself that day, Tuesday, about two o'clock, he slept on Sunday-night, and Monday-night, in my house; I did not miss any of the things.

Q. Look at the two cloaks? - A. They are my wife's; I have brought a piece of lace to match it,(produces it); this pair of nankeen breeches and drawers I had pulled off that morning, and left them in the back room up stairs.

Q. What are they worth? - A. Six or seven shillings; this muslin gown I know to be mine, I have got a piece of the fellow of it; and this sheet is mine.

- BRUNDELL sworn. - I am a tide-waiter, in the Excise: The prisoner came into the Blue-anchor, where I was, offering things for sale; I asked him what he would have for that cloak; he asked me fifteen shillings; I gave him twelve shillings, and spent two pots of ale in the house.

Freeland. This is my cloak.

ROBERT ALLEN sworn. - I was sitting at the Blue-anchor when the prisoner came in; I bought a sheet of him, I gave him five shillings for it.

JOHN SMITH sworn. - The prisoner came into the Blue-anchor, and I bought this gown of him for eight shillings.

JAMES SMITH sworn. - I live at Mr. Morris's, a pawnbroker: On the 15th of this month, Mr. Griffiths and Mr. Nowland came to our house to enquire if any thing was pawned by the prisoner; I cannot swear to the prisoner; but there was a cloak pledged for half-a-crown, which Mr. Freeland owned.

Prisoner's defence. I was very groggy; the things were given to me to dispose of.

GUILTY (Aged 30).

Of stealing to the value of 39s.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice GROSE.

361. MARY MASON and ANN DAVIES were indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Ann Beaford , about the hour of twelve in the night of the 24th of April , with intent the goods in the said dwelling-house to steal, and burglariously stealing a silver watch, value 40s. the property of William Wells .

ANN BEAFORD sworn. - William Wells lodged in my house, at the time of the robbery, in the one pair of stairs back room: On Tuesday the 24th of April, between 11 and 12 o'clock at night, I laid in the back-parlour behind the shop, I heard a great noise, I went up stairs into Mary Mason 's room, up one pair of stairs, she lodged in my house, and there was Mary Mason and two men, and another woman, there was a man lying across Mary Mason 's bed; I told them I would not have such a noise in the house, and they should go out of the house that night; Ann Davis did not belong to the house; they all came in together, the street-door was wrenched open, the lock was forced from the staple; I went up stairs, as I told you before; upon that, Mary Mason said, that man was going to sleep there with her, and he should not go; I went down stairs and met another man coming up, and I begged of him to make peace, for I could not; then, directly, a noise began with a hammer, and driving the door open; upon this, William Wells , he lodged in the room even with Mary Mason ; I went to call assistance, the watchman was at the door, and I could not get him to come in.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You keep a house in which a number of people lodge? - A. Wells, and the prisoner Mason, and a woman of the name of Harold.

Q. Was not the door that was broke open a door that she had a right to break open to get to her bed? - A. Yes.

Q. You went up stairs and found a disturbance in her room? - A. Yes.

Q. It was not a thing unusual for a man to come and sleep there with her? - A. She has told me she would.

Q. Do not you know that you gave permission for this woman to bring in anybody she pleased? - A. I have given her warning several times.

Q. The prosecutor, Wells, had a woman in the room with him of the name of Harold? - A. Yes.

Q. Did not they say their object was to get this woman, Harold, from Wells, for, that one of those men she had lived with before, and was with child by? - A. No.

Q. Are you the mistress of the house yourself? - A. Yes.

Q. Are you married? - A. Yes.

WILLIAM WELLS sworn. - I lodge at Mrs. Beaford's: On the 24th of April, about ten minutes after ten o'clock, Elizabeth Harold took the watch out of my pocket, and hung it up by the bed, we both went to bed together, and she double-locked the door; between eleven and twelve o'clock I heard a noise, there was a door knocked with a hammer, and three men, and the two prisoners, came in.

Q. Did you know the men? - A. Yes, one was named Astbury, and the other Martin; they came into the room with a candle, and began to curse the girl that was in bed with me, and one of the men struck her; I got up in the bed and asked what was the matter; upon that, Ann Davis jumped at me, struck me, and then asked the girl if she was not ashamed of herself to be in bed with a man of my colour, (the witness was a Crecle); upon that, this man seized me immediately, and tore my new shirt violently, and struck me most cruelly about the eyes; they said, d-n you, why do not you kill the black b - r; they made at me with a piece of a bedstead, the candle was knocked out, and I felt for my watch at the head of the bed, and the watch was gone; I said, are not you ashamed to rob me in my own apartments, and try to take mylife; upon that, Elizabeth Harold made the best of her way in her shift, with her petticoat in her hand, and her gown, and put them on in the back yard; then they said, let us throw the black b - r out at the window; they lifted me to the edge of the window, and I made a spring from them, I had then but half a shirt on; says Ann Davies, bring a light, and let us see how pretty the black b - r looks.

Q. Do you know any thing more about the watch? - A. Nothing more than these two women were nearest to it when the light was struck out; I missed it directly.

Q. What was your watch worth? - A. I gave four pounds ten for it; I have never found my watch since. The next morning I had them taken up.

Q. Did you search their lodgings? - A. No; the officer did that.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You lived in these lodgings with Mrs. Harold? - A. Yes.

Q. I believe she had lived with one of those two men that came into your room? - A. No.

Q. How long has she lived with you? - A. Ever since I have been from sea, except the first week.

Q. Are you a married man? - A. No, I am not.

Q. Did not these men abuse her as you say, and was not the cause of their abusing the woman, because she had gone to live with you a black man, and had deserted one of them? - A. No, they did not.

Q. Did you not state that at the office, to the Magistrate? - A. No, I never knew she kept company with the man in my life.

Q. Have you never said so? - A. No, I never did, because I could not say that that I never saw.

Q. Was not Mason apprehended in her own lodgings the next day? - A. Mr. Brown took her.

Q. The other prisoner was taken near the Public-Office? - A. Yes.

Q. Was she not there for the purpose of exhibiting a complaint against you for the assault she alledged you had committed against her? - A. I was in at Mr. Staples's office at the time, and I do not know rightly whereabouts they took her.

Q. you missed your watch at the time the candle was gone out? - A. Yes.

Q. You gave an alarm, and said you had lost your watch? - A. Yes.

Q. After that, the prisoner, Mason, brought a light up, did not she? - A. Yes.

Q. Consequently you had an opportunity of examining whether it was gone or not? - A. How could I when I was alone, and all these people beating me.

Court. Q. When the candle was brought up, was the watch there? - A. No.

Mr. Alley. Q. How long have you been from sea? - A. Between eight and nine weeks.

Q. You know this is an indictment for a burglary, and that there is a reward of forty pounds for each of these women? - A. I do not know what the law is.

Q. Do you mean to swear you have never heard there is a reward of forty pounds on conviction for a burglary? - A. Yes, I have.

Q. Have you not sent to the prisoners, and said, that if they would give you six or seven guineas, you would not go on with the prosecution, because you knew they had not taken the watch? - A. No, I never did. Mr. Nixon has been with me, and offered me a great deal of money; I said, I would not, because it is against the King and country to do so; it is in the hands of the law now.

ELIZABETH HAROLD sworn. - On the 24th of April, about ten minutes after ten, I went to bed, the two prisoners and three men came into the room, and broke a piece out of the door with a hammer; I said, O Lord, have mercy upon me, and I had no sooner said so than the door came off the hinges: Upon that the three men all came in and struck me; William Wells got out of bed, and asked what was the matter; I saw the watch hanging there; then they had a light with them, and one of the men threw the candlestick at me, and that put the candle out; I made my escape out of the room as soon as I could, with my gown and petticoat upon my arm.

Q. Did you miss the watch before you went out of the room? - A. No.

Q. Who stood nearest to that part of the bed where the watch hung? - A. They all stood together.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. You were an acquaintance of one of these men? - A. Formerly I was.

ROBERT BROWN sworn. - I am a constable belonging to the Police-Office, Shadwell; On the 25th of April, in the morning, I received information from Wells, that he had been robbed by two women and three men, he mentioned the woman's name that I know very well; I met one of them in the street, and apprehended her; I afterwards went to his lodgings, to see how it was broke open, and there appeared to be a deal of violence at the door; I came again to the mistress of the house, and she delivered this hammer to me, and a knife. I searched the prisoners, but found nothing upon them.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Where did you find Mason? - A. I think at Mrs. Beaford's.

Q. The other prisoner you found near the Public-Office? - A. Yes.

Prisoner Mason's defence. I am an unfortunate woman: this woman of the house always had half-a-crown of me when I had any body with me; I went out to order a pint of beer, and met with this young woman, and asked her to come up and havesome salmon; two of the men came up to ask if Elizabeth Harold was at home; I said, I did not know; and just after we heard a noise, and I took a candle to see what was the matter.

The prisoners called five witnesses, who gave them a good character.

Both NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice GROSE.

362. JOHN PRICE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of April , a silver fork, value 5s. the property of Winchcome-Henry Hartley , Esq .

- CLARKE sworn. - I lived as footman with Mr. Hartley, in Devonshire-street, Portland-place ; the prisoner was a servant out of place: On the 29th of April last, before I left Mr. Hartley, I met the prisoner in Princes-street, Oxford-road; I told him I was going to leave Mr. Hartley, and if he could inform me of a situation I should be very glad; accordingly he came in the afternoon, and was let in by one of the maid servants, to tell me of a situation; I asked him to eat and drink, and the plate was on the table where he was eating; there was but half a dozen forks out at dinner time. While he was eating, I had occasion to answer the bell several times, nobody but myself being in the kitchen at that time; I did not miss the fork that night, he stopped about an hour. The next morning I missed the fork, I enquired amongst my fellow servants, they did not know any thing about it; the prisoner had told me that he would be the next morning at a public-house, the corner of Quebec-street, to give me more information concerning this situation; missing the fork I went to meet him, but he did not come to the time appointed; I saw no more of him till evening; after dinner I met him in Portland place, I told him we had missed such a thing, and he strongly denied having it; I asked him if he would go with me to the butler, and satisfy him that he had not it; he said he would after he had been to Upper Harley-street; he went there, the person was not at home; then he would not go with me, he said, he had got to go to Upper Grosvenor-street, the person was not at home there; and then he would not go; then we went to Curzon-street, May-fair, and then I got him to go with me; he would not go in then, he said, I might send the butler out to him, for he would not go in; I went, and in the mean time he ran away, and I saw no more of him till the fifth of May, when he was brought to Marlborough-street Office.

WILLIAM FOX sworn. - I am a dealer in silver: The prisoner came to me on Friday evening, the 4th of May, and asked me if I bought old silver, to which I replied in the affirmative; he then produced some part of a fork; I suspected it was stole; I asked him how he got it; he told me it was his own, that he was a servant out of place, that he had received it of another gentleman's servant to sell; I told him, that was not likely, and begged him to tell me the truth; he said, if I must have the truth, he found it in Wimpole-street; I told him, I did not believe either of his stories. I sent for an officer, and he was apprehended.

Clarke. I cannot swear positively to the fork, I can produce another like it, they were both made by one maker; I bought a fork in the room of it, which cost me twenty-seven shillings.

Prisoner's defence. I picked it up the corner of Wimpole-street.

GUILTY (Aged 35.)

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice GROSE.

363. JOHN HOWE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of May , an iron kitchen range, value 5s. belonging to John Liversuch , being a utensil fixed to a house of his, he having no title or claim of title thereto .

Second Count. For feloniously stealing, a hempen sack, value 6d. a live cock fowl, value 12d. and four live hen fowls, value 4s. the property of the said John.

JOHN LIVERSUCH sworn. - I keep a house, No. 15, in Brick lane, Old street : On the 14th of May, in the evening, or early in the morning of the 15th, I was informed that all my fowls were gone but one; I found a great many feathers pulled out and laid about the ground; I missed a cock and four hens, and a hempen sack. As I was coming by the window I saw a great many bricks lying about, I looked in and saw that a range was gone, three feet and a half long. In consequence of some information, I went, with a constable of the name of Wilkes, to the prisoner's apartments, in Trotter-bone-alley, Brick-lane, up two pair of stairs; there was a young man of the name of Stokes, held his head down that I should not see his face; I suspected him, I said to him, I did not know that you lived here, I suspect my fowls are here; I looked at Howe's bedstead, he was in bed, and presently I perceived the end of my sack upon his bed, underneath him, he was lying on it, and I said, I have found you, have I; I took the sack, and told the constable I could swear to it, (produces the sack); it is marked I.S.B. and a patch at the bottom of it.

Q. Did you find any thing else? - A. I was going to search about the room, but the constable said I had no right; Howe said, he did not know how it came there, he supposed it was brought in by two young men.

- WILKES sworn. - I am a constable: On the 15th of May, I went with Liversuch to the prisoner's house, I told him, I could not search without a search-warrant; he turned himself round and saw this sack, and he gave me charge of the prisoner, and of a young man of the name of Stokes who was discharged.

Prisoner's defence. I came home from my benefit club, about a quarter after ten o'clock, and the next morning I went to Islington with a pair of shoes that I had soled and heeled, and when I came back I laid down, I had been very ill; I do not know how the sack came there.

Q. (To Liversuch.) Did you ever see him about the premises? - A. No.

For the Prisoner.

WILLIAM SEAWARD sworn. - I live in the same house with the prisoner, I have known him eight years, he is a very honest hard-working man: On the night of Monday, or early on Tuesday morning, I heard a noise of fowls, like a hen cackling, near his house, but I could not pretend to say that I saw any thing.

Q. Did you see any thing of a fire-range, or grate? - A. No.

WILLIAM SMITH (a boy) sworn. - I have known the prisoner twelve years, he is a very honest man as far as I ever heard; I work with him, he is a shoe-maker ; while he was gone to Islington, on the Tuesday morning between eleven and twelve o'clock, a young man came up, and asked me if Mr. Howe was at home; I said he was not; and then he asked me if I would be so good as let him leave it till the evening, and I let him; it was a bag something like this, I am not sure; the man's name was Dickins, he laid it on the bed and went away.

The prisoner called two other witnesses, who gave him a good character. NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice GROSE.

364. THOMAS FLOWERS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3rd of May , a pair of brass moulds, value 2s. two dies made of iron and steel, value 2s. and four hubs made of iron and steel, value 12d. the property of Charles James .

CHARLES JAMES sworn. - I am an engraver , in Moorfields : On the 3rd of May I was robbed by the prisoner, who worked for me; I went to look for a collar that I had to engrave, which I missed, he was out at the time; when he came back, I asked him if he knew any thing of this collar; he said he did not, and was going out of the room; I said, you shall not go, for I will send for an officer; he went down to the yard, and I got before him; I asked him where he was going; he said he was going to the privy; I told him he should not go there, or into the shop any more, I had entirely done with him; he then, after some little hesitation, pulled a die out of his pocket, made of iron and steel; I desired the nurse to come down stairs and take the things of him; when he took the first die out of his pocket, he said, take it, and hang me out of the way, for I am tired; then he came down and took five more out of his right-hand pocket, there were four of them particular dies, that are called hubs, I gave them to the nurse; I told him, as I could not get an officer, I would take him myself, and desired him to go with me to a public-house in our neighbourhood, he there dropped a pair of brass moulds upon the floor; soon after that the officer came, and I delivered him into his custody.

Q. Had you given him any orders to take them any where? - A. No.

MARY BROWN sworn. - (Produces the property.) I have kept them ever since; I believe he was in want; he did attempt to hang himself once in the shop, when my master was out; he said, he did this on purpose that he might be hanged.

Prosecutor. He had applied to the parish, and they would not take him in; the night before this happened, he told me he had fell into a well; and I told him, it was very strange he could not see a well in the middle of a field; why, says he, I went backwards into it, to get some water to water the garden; I asked him how he dried his clothes; and he said, he walked about the field; he was not in liquor. NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

365. WILLIAM JEFFERIES and JAMES MERCER were indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Sarah Macknelly , about the hour of two in the night of the 14th of May , with intent the goods in the said house to steal, and burglariously stealing therein two feather-beds, value 40s. a pier looking-glass, value 20s. a carpet, value 10s. two steel senders, value 8s. and a metal sender, value 8s. the property of the said Sarah .

There being no evidence to bring the charge home to the prisoners, they were Both ACQUITTED .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice GROSE.

366. NICHOLAS VARGIN was indicted for that he, on the 21st of April , on the King's highway, in and upon James Stowe , did make an assault, putting him in fear, and taking from his person a red-morocco card-case, value 2d. a half-crown, and one shilling, the goods and monies of the said James .

JAMES STOWE sworn. - I am an engraver , at Hammersmith: About half past eight o'clock on Sunday evening the 21st of April, as I was going home, between the White-horse public-house and the Hand-and-flower, I met two men, a tall one and a short one; the tall one stopped me, he caught hold of me, and in a low tone demanded my money; I gave him half-a-crown, and one shilling; the short one came by the side of me and searched my pockets, he took from me a red-morocco card-case; during the time he was searching my pockets, I could perceive the end of a short thick stick underneath his coat; after which they desired me to go on. I stopped at the Red-cow, a little farther on, where I met with the Bow-street patrol, and I described the tall man to the patrol; I took but little notice of the short one, my attention was fixed on the tall one; upon my description he was taken; I saw the tall man again at Bow-street on the Tuesday following, this was Saturday; he was dressed in a dark coloured coat, I do not know whether it was black or blue, and a black handkerchief round his neck; the moon shone very bright so that I saw his face perfectly distinct, he had a round hat on, not of a very good shape; the prisoner at the bar is the tall man.

Q. Have you any doubt about his person? - A. Not the least; the moon shone so bright that I could see his face very distinctly; I am sure he is the man.

Q. When you saw him at Bow-street, was he in the same dress that you had seen him before? - A. No.

Q. Is there nothing else besides his face, and figure, that you can swear to? - A. Nothing else.

Q. Did you ever find any of your property? - A. No; he was taken from the description I gave of him.

Q. Do you keep a house - are you a master engraver? - A. Yes.

Q. When you saw him at Bow street who was there first, you or the prisoner? - A. I was there about five or six minutes before the prisoner.

Q. When you first saw him was he brought to the bar? - A. Yes.

Q. Was he brought with any body else? - A. Yes, with two others.

Q. You were there for the purpose of seeing him? - A. Yes; the officer had called upon me in the morning.

Q. Were they all brought up in irons? - A. No, none of them.

Q. But they were brought up as prisoners? - A. They were.

Q. Did you understand, when they were brought, that you were to select a man out of those three? - A. Yes, if it was the man.

Q. Then you were to look at those three men to see which of them was the man? - A. Yes.

Q. And did you immediately fix upon the prisoner? - A. I did, in my mind, but I was not asked any questions till they were all examined; as soon as Mr. Bond, as I believe it was, put the question to me, I immediately said the prisoner was one of the two men that stopped me.

DUNCAN GRANT sworn. - I am a patrol belonging to Bow-street: I met Mr. Stowe, at Hammersmith , directly after he was robbed, he described the man very clear; on the Monday following, between ten and eleven o'clock at night, I apprehended the prisoner, and two more soldier s, near the three mile-stone at Hammersmith, he was dressed exactly as he is now; I searched him, and found this in his left-hand pocket, (producing a short thick stick); I did not find any thing else; he was brought to Bow-street on Tuesday morning.

Q. (To Stowe.) Look at that stick? - A. I cannot swear to the stick; it was under the other man's coat that I saw it, it was a short thick stick; I only saw the end of it as he stopped to search me.

Q. How long might this transaction take up? - A. Not a minute; it was all in an instant as it were.

Q. Were you alarmed at all? - A. Yes, very much.

Q. Look at the prisoner, and tell me if you are positive he is the man? - A. I am positive he is the man.

Prisoner's defence. I am as innocent of it as the child unborn. GUILTY Death .

The prisoner was recommended to mercy on account of his offering no violence to the prosecutor .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

367. SAMUEL HALL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of April , a cheese of thirty pounds weight, value 14s. the property of John Strange and William Strange .

JAMES CHIDLEY sworn. - I am porter to John and William Strange , cheesemongers , in Bishopsgate-street : On the 20th of April, about eight o'clock at night, I was unloading some cheese at the door, and the lamp-lighter came and told me a man had taken some cheese out of the cart; I followed the man down Warner-street, he had the cheese upon his head; he turned round, and seeing me follow him, he threw down the cheese and ran about thirty yards further, and then I caught him; the prisoner is the man, he never was three yards from me all the way; I brought him back, and the cheese with him; the constable has the cheese.

THOMAS SAPWELL sworn. - (Produces the cheese.) I received it from Mr. Strange.

Chidley. This is the cheese that I took from the prisoner, it is the property of Mr. Strange.

Prisoner's defence. I went to look for a ship to go to sea, and as I was coming back through Bishopsgate-street, a man came up and asked me to carry that cheese for him; I never did such a thing in my life before.

The prisoner called six witnesses, who gave him a good character.

The Jury expressed a wish to hear the evidence of the lamplighter.

JACOB ABBOTT sworn. - I was crossing Bishopsgate-street, I had my light in my hand: I saw two men standing by the cart, seeing me come up with the light they went away; as soon as I had crossed the way I put my light out, and they both returned again, and then I saw the other man, not the prisoner, take the cheese out of the cart; he went about five yards, and then gave it to the prisoner. I went and told the carman of it, and he went after them. NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

368. JAMES GALLAWAY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of May , two pounds of brass tubes, value 3s. the property of Charles Fairbone .

NATHANIEL STEINE sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Charles Fairbone , No. 20, Great New-street, Fetter-lane ; the prisoner was also a servant to Mr. Fairbone, but he did not work in the house: On Tuesday the 8th of May, having a strong suspicion that the prisoner was robbing my master, I watched him very narrowly for the course of an hour and a half, during which time, I saw him take several pieces of brass and put into his pocket; I saw him take three pieces of tube off a board, put it on the floor, put his foot on it, and stamped on it to flatten it; he stooped, picked it up, and put it into his pocket; about a quarter of an hour after, I saw him pinch several pieces of brass in a vice, and put them into his pocket; determining to detect him in his villainy, I went down stairs, at half past seven o'clock, I stood on one side of my master's door till a quarter before eight, till such time as the men had left off work; he was the first or second man that came down; I let him go twenty yards off my master's premises, as nigh as I can tell the distance; I went to him and said, Gallaway, my master wants you; he came back, and in the passage he made a bit of a turn; I put my hand upon his shoulder, and said, go along, you must go; he went into the yard; Mr. Middleton, the constable, was sent for, he came and searched him, and found the property upon him; he took it out of his pocket before my eyes, my master, and most of the men.

ROBERT WITHERSPOON sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Fairbone; I suspected the prisoner at times leaving bits of brass and missing them: On Tuesday the 8th of May, about two o'clock, I observed him very busy at his lathe with brass, cutting it up in bits; I told my master's son, and he told me to look after him; I did, and observed him frequently putting bits down upon the ground, and stamping upon them, and putting them into his pocket, he was doing that till near about a quarter before five o'clock; there is one bit that I can swear to.

RICHARD MIDDLETON sworn. - I am a constable. (Produces the property found upon the prisoner)

Q. (To Mr. Fairbone.) How long as the prisoner lived with you? - A. Twenty-six years, but he has been robbing me many years; he has been forgiven several times by my son, without my consent; I can swear to several articles, because I am almost the only person that has tools for making some of them.

The prisoner did not say any thing in his defence.

GUILTY (Aged 46.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

369. JOHN PEARSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of May , a printed book bound in leather, value 1s. four pounds of pork, value 2s. and a wooden box, value 6d. the property of John Whitmarsh , John Brown , Henry Whitmarsh , and Nicholas Brown .

Second Count. Laying it to be the property of persons unknown.

HENRY BISHOP sworn. - I am porter to Messrs. Brown and Son, proprietors of the Taunton waggon , Saracen's-head, Friday-street , their names are John Whitmarsh , John Brown , Henry Whitmarsh , and Nicholas Brown : On Monday the 14th of May, a little after five o'clock in the afternoon, we were busy loading the waggons, and I saw the prisoner go by with a box, he had it in his hand, I thought he might have come into the yard and fetched it as being his own; I immediately went into the warehouse to our master, and asked him if he delivered in a little box; he said, no, he had not; I then went after him; sir, what are you going to do with that box; he made me no answer, but walked very fast towards the gate-way; I called out stop, stop the man with the box; the Bath coach was just loading and going out, and the Bath horse-keeper stopped him; he had let the box fall.

Q. Are you sure that is the man who had that box in his possession? - A. Yes; I am clear of it.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. What are you? - A. Head porter in the yard of the Saracen's Head.

Q. You do not know any thing of the proprietors of the Taunton waggon yourself? - A. Yes, and have for many years.

Q. You do not yourself know who are the parties concerned in this waggon? - A. Yes, I do; I am head porter to their waggon.

SAMUEL-WISE OSBORN sworn. - I am porter to the Taunton coach: I saw the prisoner at the bar pass by me, as I was standing in the yard at the tap-room door, between five and six o'clock; he walked by me a steady pace, with a box under his arm; Mr. Bishop followed after him, and said, what are you going to do with that box; the prisoner made him no answer, but mended his pace; as soon as he got underneath the gateway, by the side of the Bath coach, he began to run, and let the box fall by the Bath horse-keeper; but he was followed, and we took him just without side the gate; we brought him up the yard, and immediately sent for a constable.

JOHN SPARKES sworn. - I am book-keeper to the Bath coach: I saw the prisoner walk down the yard with the box under his arm, and Bishop, the first witness, pursuing him; when he came under the gateway, he dropped the box, and I took it up; the box is in the possession of the constable; the horse-keeper pursued him, and took him just out of the gateway.

JOHN RUTHERFORD sworn. - I am a constable: I know nothing more of it, than taking the box. (Produces the box).

WILLIAM OSBORN sworn. - I keep the inn, and am book-keeper to Messrs. Whitmarsh and Company: I know no further of the box than has been related to your Lordship; in fact, I never saw the box at all till after this transaction.

Bishop. This is the same box; when the goods are unloaded from the waggon, they are placed at the warehouse door, and it is my business to call the goods over; I had called them over, and here is my mark that I had put upon it, one shilling carriage; the box had come from Taunton to London.

Q. What does it contain? - A. It was opened at the Mansion-House; it contains some country pork, a few apples, and a book.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. Who is the waggoner of that waggon? - A. Robert Vickery .

Q. He is not here? - A. No.

Q. He has the way-bill? - A. No; the waybill is always confined to Mr. Osborn.

Q. It was by the way-bill that you were able to ascertain that this box had been in the waggon? - A. I took it myself off the rade of the waggon.

Prisoner. I was very much intoxicated.

Rutherford. He was either drunk or mad.

Prisoner. I knew nothing of the affair till the next morning.

Mr. Knapp. Q. (To Bishop.) Was he drunk, or not? - A. He was either drunk or mad.

GUILTY (Aged 36.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

370. JOHN HARRIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of May , a pound and eight ounces of tea, value 4s. the property of the East-India Company .

Second Count. Laying it to be the property of certain persons to the Jurors unknown.

(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

THOMAS MILLS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a labourer in the India Company's Warehouses, in Haydon-square, in the Minories : The prisoner was a labourer at work also in the same warehouses; on the 14th of May I saw him put his great coat over his left shoulder and part of his left arm; he leaned across one side of the chest of tea that was open, and then his right hand he put into the chest of tea, and took out some tea, and put it underneath the left side of his coat; after that I saw him shake the coat several times, as if to shake the tea down; he then sat down for five or six minutes, then he doubled up his coat in a very care-taking manner, and put it upon a chest of tea three high, next to the wall; I told Mr. Joyce what I had seen; about two hours and a half after that, Mr. Joyce came up again, and desired Harris to go to the next floor to order some chests to be brought down to us to be mended; while the prisoner was gone, Mr. Joyce brought his coat, as it hung upon the nail, and there he found a quantity of tea, as he thought; he took the coat down and carried it to the accompting-room; I did not see the tea produced.

Q. Was that the prisoner's coat? - A. He owned it.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. How many persons were there up stairs at this time? - A. I cannot tell.

Q. Was any body there but yourself, when he took the tea? - A. There were a great many in the same room.

Q. The coat remained till near one o'clock in the room where all these people were at work? - A. Yes.

Q. You are in the Company's military service? - A. I was.

Q. You have been dismissed from that Company? - A. Yes.

Q. Have you had any ill-blood in consequence of your dismission? - A. No, never in my life.

Q. Do you mean to swear that? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you deny that you ever had any dispute with the prisoner? - A. It is unknown to me if I have.

Q. Will you swear that you have had no quarrel with him? - A. I do not know that I ever had.

THOMAS JOYCE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am an Assistant-elder in the Company's warehouses: In consequence of the information of the last witness, I went on the 14th of May up into the warehouses, about half past one; I saw the prisoner at the bar there, his duty called him to work in a place surrounded with tea open; I ordered him and others upon other business; I clapped my hand upon his coat as it was hanging up, and felt a very great bulk in the pocket of it, and I took it down to the accompting-house, to the Elder's office, and left it with Mr. Bourne, and told him I would fetch him the owner; I went into the yard, and called John Harris, and he came immediately; Mr. Bourne asked him if that was his coat, he said, yes; he asked him how the tea came in his pocket, and he said he did not know. I saw the tea weighed; it was Congou tea; there was upwards of a pound and a half; there was a vacancy in one of the chests.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You did not communicate your intention before you went into the room where the prisoner was? - A. No.

Q. He hung his coat up very near you? - A. Yes.

Q. Is it not usual for persons to be searched and rubbed down? - A. Yes.

Q. And a man cannot hope to get off with any quantity? - A. No.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Where was this pocket? - A. An inside breast-pocket.

WILLIAM-PALMER BOURNE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a King's locker: I saw the great coat brought into the accompting-house; I took this tea out of it, (producing it); I asked the prisoner if this coat was his, and he said, yes, it was; I asked him how he came by the tea, he said, he did not know any thing of the tea; he said he had put some bread and cheese in his pocket, but knew nothing of the tea; there was some bread, but no cheese.

Q. Was the bread over or under the tea? - A. Over the tea.

Prisoner's defence. I know nothing at all about the tea being in my pocket.

The prisoner called William Starke with whom he had lodged two years, and who gave him a good character.

Mr. Knapp. Q. How many names may this man have? - A. I cannot say; people have called him nicknames; they have asked for him sometimes by the name of John Harris , sometimes Oliver Beard, and sometimes Harlequin.

Court. Q. By what name did he announce himself to you? - A. By the name of Oliver Beard . GUILTY (Aged 50.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice GROSE.

371. JAMES JONES and THOMAS GRIFFIN were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of May , an iron anchor, value 30s. and an iron barge-chain, value 25s. the property of Stanhope Hillier , in a barge lying upon the navigable river Thames .

(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

STANHOPE HILLIER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am a barge-owner , and live at Brentford: On the 11th of May, I was returned from below bridge up the river towards Brentford; in the evening of that day I made fast my barge, with a headfast, to some craft at Milford-lane-road , on the Middlesex side of the water; I left an iron chain and an anchor safe in the barge, between nine and ten o'clock at night.

Q. Fixed to the barge? - A. No; the anchor was fixed to the chain, but not to the barge. I went to bed between ten and eleven.

Court. Q. Had you more than one anchor on board? - A. No.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. How soon did you perceive it was lost? - A. Between five and six the next morning. I saw the chain on Monday following, at the watchman's house, his name is Went; I had lost it on the Friday; I heard that such a chain had been stopped, and I went to see it.

JOSEPH WENT sworn. - I am a watchman to Messrs. Wood and Company's coal-wharf, at the bottom of Northumberland-street; I have known the prisoner at the bar for several years: On the 11th of May, about five in the afternoon, I saw them shove a peter-boat, which is the property of Griffin; they put this peter-boat out from York-buildings; they shoved the peter-boat to the Black-lion causeway, that goes up to Charles-court, where they both reside; Griffin went up the court, and shortly returned with a basket; they both rowed down the river together. I went over to inform Mr. Butt, the officer, and desired him and Richardson to watch their return; and we went about twelve o'clock, that was the time of the return of the tide; I waited for them till they returned, about one o'clock in the night, as near as I can tell; we all three of us were close upon the stairs, waiting for them; they came to the back of the Black lion public-house, adjoining to the stairs where we were; and they put out some deals from the boat, and then they put their boat back again to the upper side of the causeway, and put this basket, with a chain,out upon the causeway that I was going down; then they put their boat back, and fastened it close to a house built upon a barge; then they returned to the basket, and both stood by it for some little time; then Jones came up to the foot of the stairs apparently to see if the way was clear; I suspected he saw us there; he looked and said, a hoy! a hoy! I then said, lay hold of him, Richardson then laid hold of him; Mr. Butt and I immeditely jumped up and secured Griffin and the basket; immediately as we went down to the basket, Butt said to Griffin, what have you got here; Griffin said, a basket of chains; he asked him where he got it; he said, he got it out of Mr. Bailey's sailing boat, Jones was within hearing at the same time, in custody of Richardson; he said, he was going to carry it ashore for safety; he said, he had the care of Mr. Bailey's boat; we secured them in the watch-house; and the next day, Mr. Bailey came to the watch-house, and asked Griffin what brought him there; Griffin said, it was for a piece of chain that he had found; Mr. Bailey asked him again, how he came by the chain, and he told him that one of their anchors run foul of it; Mr. Bailey said, he had no chains.

Q. In point of fact, had their boat any anchor? - A. No, nor grapling, nor any thing else.

Q. Did you afterwards see Mr. Hillier, the prosecutor? - A. Yes, I shewed him the chain, it has been in my possession ever since. (Produces the chain.)

Mr. Hillier. I am sure it is my property.

Q. What is the value of it? - A. About twenty-five shillings.

Q. Under forty shillings? - A. Yes.

- RICHARDSON sworn. - I was present when the prisoners were detected; I laid hold of one of them, and secured him. The account they gave of it was exactly what the last witness has stated

Prisoner Jones's defence. We were plied by a West-country barge, to tow her up to Putney, we agreed for five shillings; and then rowed back home. I never saw the basket nor chain either till Mr. Went brought it upon his shoulder, in the basket, to the watch-house.

Prisoner Griffin's defence. I went with Jones up to Putney; I never saw the basket or the chain either.

Jones, GUILTY (Aged 23.)

Griffin, GUILTY (Aged 25.)

Of stealing to the value of 25s.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , publicly whipped , and discharged.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

372. CHARLES BACON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of May , two yards of Manchester cotton breeches stuff, value 7s. three quarters of a yard of white marcella waistcoating, value 4s. half a yard of vandyke stripe marcella waistcoating, value 3s. and half a yard of cross stripe marcella waistcoating, value 3s. the property of John Wagstaff .

JOHN WAGSTAFF sworn. - I am a man's mercer and taylor , No. 86, Oxford-street : I did not miss the property till it was found upon the prisoner; it was missed by a servant of mine.

WILLIAM JOHNSON sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Wagstaff: On Monday, the 7th of May, the prisoner came into the shop about four o'clock in the afternoon, to buy some cloth, I observed at the time he came in, he had nothing under his coat, and while I was serving another person in the shop, as he said he was in no hurry, he was pulling the things about upon the counters, and I soon after observed that he kept his hand down, and had something under his coat, when he purchased the cloth of me, and he would not have the cloth put up in paper, but would lay it down by the door upon some breeches paper; I had put it in paper, and he took it out again; having a suspicion of him, I called Mr. Wagstaff, and desired him to be careful of him; upon that he took up the coat piece, and left the shop; I told Mr. Wagstaff I had missed some things; I followed the prisoner, and overtook him in Castle-street, he had then just taken the white waistcoat piece from under his coat, and was holding it up to look at; a young man that was with me ran on past him, and I saw him go into a public-house in Bolsover-street; I followed him into the tap-room, and laid hold of the breeches and waistcoat pieces; he said, that some man out of the square had given them to him to make, and he would take me to him. As soon as I came out, he begged I would speak to Mr. Wagstaff to forgive him; I told him, I should leave it to Mr. Wagstaff to do as he pleased; I had seen the breeches piece in the shop while he was there. I found upon him the breeches piece and a white marcella waistcoat piece.( Samuel Hamilton , the officer, produced the property, which was deposed to by Johnson).

Prisoner's defence. I bought them on the 5th of May, I have a bill and receipt for them. (Produces it).

Court. I see this bill is made out exactly in the words of the indictment.

GUILTY (Aged 36.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice GROSE.

373. SARAH HOLLOWAY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of May , in thedwelling-house of Charles Dibdin , a Bank-note, value 10l. the property of the said Charles .

JOHN COUCHER sworn. - I am clerk to Mr. Charles Dibdin of Leicester-place, Leicester-square , he keeps a house there: On Tuesday the 1st of May, I had a check for 21l. drawn on Messrs. Hammersley, in favour of myself; I got it cashed, I received a 10l. note, two five pound notes, and a one; on Saturday I changed the two five pound notes for a ten pound, for a friend; I afterwards took out the one pound note and put in a two pound note; I had occasion to leave town on particular business, suddenly, on the Saturday, and I put the notes somewhere, I do not exactly recollect where; on Tuesday I had occasion for the notes, I looked round the house but could not find them; it continued in that way till last Saturday, when Mr. Dibdin came to town; the prisoner was a chair-woman in the house. In consequence of information I received, I sent for her, and went with Miller a Bow-street officer, the prisoner, and her husband, to Mr. Rodbard's, a pawnbroker, in Broadway, Blackfriars, last Sunday; Mr. Rodbard was not at home, and we left word for him to come to Bow-street in the morning; we then went to Whitechapel, to a Mr. Barber, and he acknowledged having received a 10l. note of the prisoner's husband; we took the prisoner and her husband to Bow-street, and Mr. Rodbard produced a 10l. note which he had stopped, and which is the note in question, it has my own hand-writing upon the back of it, it was deposited in Mr. Carpmeal's hands; I do not know the number of it, I only know the hand-writing upon the back.

- RODBARD sworn. - The prisoner came to my house to buy a silk cloak, and offered that note in payment, I had never seen her before, but I am sure she is the same person; she put down a 10l. note and said it was a two pound; I then thought she did not come honestly by it; I told her she must tell me where she took that note; she said, she took it of Mr. Axton, a coach-painter; I went there, and there was no such person to be found; the next morning I took it to the Bank, to see if it was stopped payment, I heard nothing of it there, and I delivered it up to the Justice at Bow-street; I should know it again, it has got written on the back of it 21l. Wheelwright.

- CARPMEAL sworn. - I am an officer of Bow-street, (produces a Bank-note); this note was delivered by Mr. Rodbard to Sir William Addington, and Sir William delivered it to me, I have kept it ever since.

Rodbard. This is the note that I received of the prisoner, and that I delivered to the Magistrate.

Coucher. This is the note that I lost, it has my hand-writing upon it. (The note read).

Q. The prisoner came backwards and forwards to the house, as a chairwoman? - A. Yes, every day.

Q. Did the husband come occasionally? - A. No; he was never employed about the house.

Prisoner's defence. I found the notes as I was sweeping the shop out.

For the Prisoner.

WILLIAM TEW sworn. - I keep a public-house at Kentish-town: I have known the prisoner these twenty years, her husband is a hair-dresser, she has two children; I never heard any thing amiss of her in my life, I have trusted her with scores of pounds; she is silly at times, and when anybody has given her a farthing, she has stood laughing for half an hour; they used to call her foolish Nan.

GUILTY Death .

She was recommended to mercy by the Jury on account of the carelessness of the prosecutor, in laying his notes about not knowing where, and her apparent simplicity and ignorance .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

374. ELIZABETH KING was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of May , an earthenware jug, value 6d. twelve penny pieces, value 12d. and 245 halfpence, value 10s. 2 1/2d. the property of John Crook .

ELIZABETH CROOK sworn. - I am the wife of John Crook , the prisoner was our servant , we keep a public-house : She came to us on the 30th of June, and on Tuesday the 1st of May, she getting intoxicated before dinner I discharged her; I told her to go up stairs, fetch down her things, and go about her business; she said she would not without a month's wages; I then went up to fetch her things down myself, and she followed me up; I was called down in a hurry, I thought her long, and I went up to see for her, and saw her coming out at my room-door; upon that, she brought her things down into a little room, and would not take them away with her; then she went under pretence of fetching the gentlewoman who recommended her to me, and she returned back in the course of an hour; in the mean time I had been up stairs, and missed an earthen jug, with eleven shillings and two-pence halfpenny worth of halfpence and penny pieces; I then went to Hatton-garden, where I met her, I brought her back, and sent for an officer; the mug was afterwards brought to me by a witness now in Court.

ANN BOWDEN sworn. - (Produces an earthenware pint jug). On Tuesday the 1st of May, the prisoner came to me, and asked to go to the privy of my house, in King's-head-court, Holborn, she was quite a stranger to me. I never saw her beforein my life; I went down with her, and she gave me this jug; she said it was of no use to her, and told me to let nobody see it; as she was coming out of the necessary I heard money chink, and she said it was what she used to keep her money in; she told me she was out of place; I asked her where she lived, and she told me at the Rose, Hatton-wall; when she went away I sent my husband to her mistress, and she was then taken, that was about two hours after she had given it me; it is a cracked jug, and particularly remarkable.

GEORGE LONGDEN sworn. I am an officer belonging to the office in Hatton-garden: I had this jug from the last witness, it was locked up in the office till to-day, I gave it her to bring into Court; I was sent for to take charge of the prisoner on Tuesday the 1st of May, I took her to the office, and she was committed; I searched her, and found four pennyworth of halfpence only, contained in this hussis.

Mrs. Crook. This is my jug, I know it by being cracked at the bottom with being put over the fire, and a star in the side of it; I cannot swear to any of the halfpence.

Prisoner's defence. I never saw the inside of the room, for my mistress always made her own bed.

Court. (To Mrs. Crook.) Q. What is the value of this jug? - A. A penny or two-pence.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

375. MARY JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of May , a linen shirt, value 3s. the property of Benjamin Marshall .

MARTHA MARSHALL sworn. - I am the wife of Benjamin Marshall: Last Sunday was a week, about nine o'clock in the evening, I lost a shirt, the prisoner was a stranger to me; I saw the prisoner and another woman pass the top of our stairs. I keep a kitchen in Monmouth-street , and sel linen; about ten minutes after, I saw the prisoner come down stairs, she asked me if I had got a shift; I said I had not; she then said, she wanted a shirt at about two shillings; I got up to shew her one, and she put out my lamp that hung at the bottom of the cellar stairs, with her arm; I said to her, I am sure you have burnt your arm; she said, no, she had not; I told her I would go and get a light, and while I was gone to get a light, I could see the other woman unpin a shirt that hung at the side of the stairs; I threw down the light, and ran to the top of the stairs, but finding I could not overtake her I stopped the other woman till the watchman came; she tried to get away, but I would not let her; she struck at me several times with her fist, and I having a child in my arms she struck the child in the stomach, and when I came back from the watch-house the child was in fus; the shirt has never since been found.

Prisoner's defence. While I was down there, there came something like a man's hat, and put out the lamp, and then she said she was robbed by somebody and I should suffer for it; I had nobody with me but my child, I never saw the shirt.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

376. SARAH SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of April , a Bank-note value 5l. another Bank-note, value 5l. another Bank-note, value 2l. and another Bank-note, value 1l. the property of William Hemsley .

WILLIAM HEMSLEY sworn. - I am a stable-keeper : On Friday the 27th of April, about eleven o'clock in the evening, I was intoxicated, and after coming out of the Cock-and-hoop, at Holbornbars, I met with the prisoner, she took me to her apartments, No. 10, Wharton's-court ; she then fetched a pot of ale, I might be half an hour in her company, I sat down on the side of her bed, and she sat down by me; after a little time I fell asleep for about five minutes, I immediately got up, ran down stairs, and went directly home; after I had got home and sat down, I missed my-notes.

Q. Had you given her any money? - A. No; I asked her what she would have, and she made a demand of half-a-guinea; after that, I said, it won't do; I went down stairs, and went home, but I was so intoxicated I could not find my way to the house again.

Q. Did you, while you were in the room, pull out your money? - A. I did not; I had my hand in my pocket when I paid my reckoning at the public-house door, and the notes were then in my left-hand breeches pocket.

Q. When had you last seen them? - A. About six o'clock in the evening, in Smithfield; there were two five pound Bank-notes, one two, and one one; I have never seen them again. On the Tuesday after I got information where she lodged, I went to the house, and found her up stairs, in the same apartments; I knew the apartments again, and I knew the prisoner again; I sent for an officer, and she was taken to Hatton-garden.

WILLIAM PAGE sworn. - I keep a sale-shop: About three weeks ago, the prisoner at the bar came to my shop to buy a ring and some other articles; it was on a Saturday, and she changed with me a five-pound note; I have not got the note; I had no suspicion of her.

GEORGE LONGDEN sworn. - I am an officerbelonging to Hatton-garden: I found a ring upon the prisoner. (Produces it.)

Page. This is like the ring that I sold the prisoner, but cannot swear to it; it is not in the same state in which I sold it.

Prisoner's defence. I never saw the notes.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave her a good character for honesty, but admitted she was an unfortunate girl.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

377. JOHN KEAY was indicted for the wilful murder of Henry Burton , on the 5th of May .

SAMUEL BROOKSBY sworn. - On Saturday, the 5th of May, between seven and eight in the evening, I cannot say justly to the time, I was at the Bell public-house at Battle-bridge ; the deceased was there; it is a house where we used to pay our people; they had been paid; the deceased was waiter to his son-in-law, to look after the business; the prisoner was there, very much in liquor; I had some beer, and the prisoner came, and drank out of my beer several times, and then I called for another pot of beer, for my wife and I, and one of the men, he came and took part of my beer, and poured it into his own pot; and I said to the deceased, if I pay for a pot of beer, I expect to have it; the deceased then went to the prisoner to take the beer away from him, then there was a little scuffle arose between the deceased and the prisoner; in the scuffle, some of the beer was spilt, and the rest the prisoner threw over him; then he pushed him against a sand-bin, and then Mr. Burton said, when he was helped up, I really believe it is my death-wound; but to do it wilfully, with malice in his heart, to do the man an injury, I do not believe he did; Mr. Burton lived two or three days after.

Prisoner. Q. Did not the deceased, after he got up, strike at me with his fist? - A. No; I never saw either of them strike at all; only the prisoner pushed him backwards.

Q. Was the deceased in liquor at all? - A. No; he was very busy in his business.

ELIZABETH GREEN sworn. - I live servant at this public-house: I was in the kitchen at the time Burton was pushed, facing the tap-room, I saw him fall; I ran into the tap-room, and helped to pick him up; I did not see whether it was occasioned by a push or a blow; after he got up, and sat upon the sand-bin, he said, this is my death-wound, he has killed me.

Q. How does the sand-bin stand? - A. It is like a bench, and he fell with his left side against it; the prisoner then said, d-n your eyes, you old b-r, I will jump upon your breast-bone; and then we got him into the bar as soon as we could.

Q. Was Burton at all in liquor? - A. No, very sober; the prisoner was in liquor.

JOHN MARSON sworn. - The deceased was my wife's father; he has lived with me for near five years; I keep a public-house.

Q. What age was he? - A. Sixty-six, as night as I can recollect.

Q. Was he a tolerable healthy man? - A. A very hearty man.

Q. You did not see the accident? - A. No; I did not see him till after he was taken up; I went in to assist him, and he said to me, he has killed me, he has done my business for me; I said, I hope not; upon that I led him up stairs; the prisoner afterwards abused me very much; he was in liquor; I led the deceased up stairs, and undressed him, I put him to bed, and gave him some nourishing things; he lived till the Tuesday night; I found his breath very much affected about three o'clock on the Sunday morning, and I sent for an apothecary to bleed him.

Q. Can you tell what he died of? - A. According to the apothecary's account, he died of broken ribs, in consequence of this accident.

Q. Was the prisoner a person that used to come to your house? - A. He used some time ago.

Q. There was no ill-blood or spleen between the prisoner and the deceased, was there? - A. Not that I know of.

RICHARD WAKEFIELD sworn. - I am an apothecary: I was called up about three o'clock on Sunday morning, the 6th of May, to the deceased; I found him lying on his back, in great agony of pain; I examined, and found two of his ribs were broken.

Q. Did he die of that accident? - A. His breathing was very bad; I bled him, in hopes that might relieve him; in the morning I found it had not relieved him; I suppose, from his age, his lungs were unsound; he had had a cough sometime before.

Q. Are you clear that he died of that accident? - A. I have great reason to suppose he died from that accident.

JOSEPH INWARDS sworn. - A warrant was applied for to apprehend the prisoner: I went in search after him, and did not find him for some time after the death of the deceased; but before Burton died, I thought it right to go and talk with him; I went up to the deceased's bed-chamber.

Q. Was he then sensible that his last hour was approaching? - A. Yes, very sensible; I asked him how it happened, and he said, the prisoner had got a pint of beer, and had drank part of it, andfilled his pot out of another man's pot that was standing by his; the deceased said, you have taken another man's beer, that is not your beer; upon that, the deceased went to lay hold of the pot, to fill the other man's pot up again, they spilled part of the beer in the scuffle to get it away, and the prisoner threw the remainder at him, he pushed him over the breast, and he fell upon the sand-bin upon his side, and that he had broke two or three of his ribs, he believed, which will be the occasion of my death, says he, that I shall never be able to come down stairs any more; that is all that I know.

Prisoner's defence. I have got some witnesses here that saw it.

For the Prisoner.

RICHARD MARTIN sworn. - I have known the prisoner twelve or thirteen years; he lodged with me; he was a peaceable quiet man as ever lived, except he had got a little too much.

EDWARD NEWMAN sworn. - I have known him about two years; he is a peaceable quiet man.

HENRY LUCAS sworn. - I did not know the prisoner; I was at the bar, paying my money, and the deceased struck the man on the mouth; I will not swear it was the prisoner; I do not know him when I see him.

JOSEPH SMOAKER sworn. - I have known him about half a year; he is a peaceable quiet man.

CHARLES MIRTHWAITE sworn. - I have known him two years; he is a very humane man; I saw the prisoner come in, and set his goods down, and Brooksby called him, and asked him to drink of his beer; with that he went and drank of his beer, and when he returned his goods were all stole out of the basket; he asked very civilly who had stolen his goods, and they all said, nobody; he did not make any piece of work about his goods; they had got a full pot of beer upon the table, and he put some of it into an empty pot; upon that he went and demanded the pot from him; some of it was spilled, and the prisoner let go the pot; and the deceased jawed him; he pushed him against the settle, and he lay there a little while, and then he was picked up.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice GROSE.

378. GEORGE BOWMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of May , four pair of thickset breeches, value 15s. and a pair of Corderoy breeches, value 3s. the property of James M'Kane .

The charge not being brought home to the prisoner, on account of the illness of a principal witness, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

379. GEORGE DEGRANGE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 25th of April , a cotton gown, value 10s. the property of William Clark .

Mrs. CLARK sworn. - I am the wife of William Clark : On Wednesday, the 25th of April, between nine and ten in the morning, I lost a gown out of the passage; I keep a cloaths shop; it hung up for sale; a person of the name of Ashley told me of it.

JAMES ASHLEY sworn. - On Wednesday the 25th of April I saw the prisoner and another standing looking in at the shop window of Mrs. Clark for some time; the prisoner then ventured into the passage; the other remained at the shop window; he came out again; he then went into the passage a second time, and unhooked a gown; he looked at two or three, but he took one down which hung upon a nail; he wrapped it up in as small a compass as he could, and put it under his left arm under his coat, and went off with it; I immediately ran out of doors without a hat to pursue him, which I did; I first crossed the way to tell Mrs. Clark of it; I laid hold of him fast by the collar, and brought him back to Mrs. Clark's house, and there I took the gown from him.

Court. (To Mrs. Clark.) Q. You saw Mr. Ashley come back with the prisoner? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see him take the gown from him? - A. Yes; I know it is mine by the print.

- GIBBONS sworn. - (Produces the gown.) I received it from Mr. Ashley.

Mrs. Clark. I believe this is the gown; I had hung it in the passage that morning.

Q. Have you any doubt about it being your gown? - A. No, I have not.

Prisoner's defence. As I was going along the street, I saw this gown lying at the side of the door, right under the window; I took it, rolled it up, and put it under my coat, and that gentleman came and took hold of me.

Q. (To Ashley). Did he pick it up from the ground? - A. He unhooked it from a nail; it was his second attempt.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a very good character.

GUILTY (Aged 17.)

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction , whipped in the gaol , and discharged.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice GROSE.

380. THOMAS CHADWICK and MARY GLAZEBROOK were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 8th of April , a watch, the inside case made of silver, and the outside case made of metal, gilt with gold, value 3l. the property of James Price , in the dwelling-house of Thomas Horwood .

There being no evidence to bring the charge home to the prisoners, they were

BOTH ACQUITTED .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice GROSE.

381. JOHN WILD , JOHN SMITH , and JOHN ROBINSON , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of April , a piece of gold coin called a guinea , the property of Thomas Jones .

THOMAS JONES sworn. - I am a blacksmith by trade, but having lost the sight of one of my eyes, I do not follow it. On the 23d of April, I hired the prisoner Smith to shew me about London, being a stranger, I had come to town the night before; I gave him half-a-crown for his day's work, and every thing to eat and drink that he liked; we then came home to the Three Kings public-house, in Piccadilly, where I lodged, between one and two o'clock; there we eat our dinners, and Wild and Robinson were drinking there; Smith took me into their company to drink with them; after we had dined, we all went out to take a walk, between three and four o'clock, they took me to shew me a little about London; and then we went to the George in the Hay-market , we were drinking together there, and I had no silver to pay for what we had had; I pulled out a guinea, and put it upon the table to get change, and John Wild picked up the guinea and ran away with it; Robinson sat next to me, next the door, so that I could not get out to catch him quick enough; I said to Robinson and Smith, now he has got my guinea I shall go home, or, may be, I shall loss more, and I desired they would take me home; they said he was only gone to get change, and would be back in a few minutes; but I did not stop, I went out of the house directly, and Robinson and Smith with me; as I was going along, Robinson walked on the right side of me, and Smith on the left; I felt Smith rush against me twice, and I felt my purse drawing out of my pocket; I caught him by the collar directly, and said, you have robbed me of my purse and two guineas, he had the purse in his hand; Robinson then said to Smith, give him his purse; and in the course of a minute, he gave me the purse and one guinea.

Q. Are you sure there were two guineas in it after you had said the other guinea down upon the table? - A. Yes; I said to Smith, now I have got you, you have robbed me, and I will have you confined, and then Robinson ran away immediately; I took Smith back to the George, where we had been drinking before, and sent for a constable; the patrol and constable came, their names are Woodley and Evans, I gave them charge of Smith, and he was taken to St. James's watch-house, and the next morning to the Magistrate; I gave a description of the other two, and they have been taken since; I knew them again perfectly well.

ROBERT WOODLEY sworn. - I am a constable of St. James's parish: On Monday night, the 23d of April, I was at the watch-house, and was told I was wanted directly in the Haymarket; I went down, and Rice Evans, the patrole, was there with the prosecutor, who gave charge of Smith; he said he was not guilty, and would go willingly; I did not search him, I took him to the watch-house; I took the other two prisoners upon another charge.

RICE EVANS sworn. - I was a patrole at that time; I went down to the George, I was there before the constable; when I got there, this countryman had Smith in custody, he charged him with robbing him of his purse and a guinea; Mr. Woodley came about ten minutes after; he told him the affair, and we took him to the watch-house.

WILLIAM PAYNE sworn. - I am a constable; I attended the Opera-house that night very near the George, I was told that I was wanted to take charge of a man that was in custody for picking a man's pocket of a purse, with two guineas in it; I went to the George, and there I saw Robinson and Wild; I knew Robinson very well by the name of Ground Ivy, I did not know him by any other name; I went in, and Ground Ivy was leaning with his elbow upon the bar; Wild was standing on his left hand almost facing the front of the bar; I went between the two, I turned round and looked Robinson in the face very hard, and perceived that one of his eyes was black; then I looked to my left and observed Wild with a brown coat on, I did not know him so well as I did the other; I went straight forward past the bar into the kitchen of the public house, I returned back, took a second view of them, and asked the landlady who it was that wanted a constable; oh, sir, says she, that business is all settled, they have taken the man to the watch-house that you were sent for to; she meant Smith; then I spoke to Robinson, alias Ground Ivy, and said, how do you do, master; he said, how are you; that was all that passed at that time; I saw no more of them that night; the next day, Tuesday, I was at Marlborough-street Office, when John Smith was examined; and after he was examined, I asked the countryman how it was he was robbed; he told me, he had employed this John Smith to shew him the nature of the town, that he had introduced him to the other two men; that they had had him about from place to place till he had lost his guinea, and then afterwards lost his purse; he told me what kind of men they were; his description was that of the other two prisoners at the bar;I told him I knew them very well, for I saw them at the public-house. After Smith was taken to the watch-house, I went in quest of them, with the countryman, on Tuesday afternoon, to several places, to see if I could find them; I went to several public-houses, but could not find them that day; I could not find them on the Wednesday; the Monday following after that, I saw them both at the watch-house, Woodley, the constable, had got them as his prisoners; I asked him, what have you got these two men for, I wanted them myself; why, says he, for robbing a man of a pocket-book and two five puonds notes; says I, what are you going to do with them; he said, to take them to the Magistrate's; says I, do you think they will go with you quietly alone without their hands being tied; and he said, I believe they are; their hands were tied, and they were taken before Mr. Conant, at Marlborough-street and as soon as the countryman saw them, he said they were the men.

Wild's defence. I never saw that man before in my life, it was a man named Fred, not me.

Smith's defence. I attend the mails; this countryman came up with the Oxford mail, very much in liquor, on the 21st of April; he was so much in liquor that he fell off the top of the coach; I went and got him a bed at the request of the coachman; he laid a bed till ten o'clock, he got up, and said he was very well, he should have some breakfast; and he wanted to go to different parts of the town, to buy an organ, and I shewed him into Cheapside and Holborn; he could not find one for his price; we came back to th Three Kings, and there was Robinson, and a man they call Fred, and the countryman, all playing at cards, and drinking and tossing; he went away after that, with a strange man, a barber, to see for an organ, for an hour and a quarter; then they agreed to go to the George, in the Haymarket; what I had I paid for myself; the countryman pulled out a guinea, and Fred. the man that is not here, that Wild is here for, went out to get change; I never saw Robinson before in my life; I had seen Fred. twice before; then he said, he would go and look for his guinea, he pulled out his purse, and stood by the door sometime with his purse in his hand; Robinson and he went to see after the guinea, and I followed them behind, I am lame; I heard them talking about his having lsot his purse. Just as we got to the corner of Orange-street, there was a light in a shop window, and there was the purse on the ground, I showed it to him, and then he said, there was a guinea gone out of it, and Robinson ran away, and he took hold of me, and said, he would have me.

Robinson's defence. I was drinking along with Fred. at the Three Kings. and we were drinking and playing at cards, and tossing, when the countryman and Smith came in; he lost five shillings at cards, and then he took us to the Geroge where we got drinking again; and he took out a guinea to pay for what we had had, and Fred. ran away with it.(One of the Jury said, be was a near neighbour, and that the George was an in famous house)

Wild, GUILTY (Aged 22.)

Smith, GUILTY (Aged 32.)

Robinson, GUILTY (Aged 22.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice GROSE.

382. MARY GLAVE was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Holcomb , no person being therein, about the hour of twelve in the night of the 21st of April , with intent the goods in the said house burglariously to steal, and stealing, a feather bed, value 40s. a mattress, value 20s. two feather pillows, value 2s. three woollen blankets, value 15s. a looking-glass in a gilt frame, value 10s. two linen bed-curtains value 12s. a linen vallance, value 2s. and a linen headpiece, value 2s. the property of the said Thomas .

(The case was opened by Mr. Const.)

Court. There must be an end of the burglary, for it is necessary, in order to bring it within the statute upon which this indictment is founded,"no person being therein," that it should be done in the day-time; therefore, that part of the indictment is clearly bad.

WILLIAM SKEAY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Const. I am clerk to Mr. Holcumb; the house is situated in Glass-house-fields, Ratcliff-highway : I do not know any thing of the goods in the house, I know that they were left in the house in the care of one of our coopers, William Stone ; I was present at the time the inventory was taken; I know that such goods were there at that time.

WILLIAM STONE sworn. - Examined by MR. Const. I am cooper to Mr. Holcomb, in Glass-house-fields, I do not know in what parish it is situated; the last time I was there was on the 11th of April; at that time the goods were all safe confined in one room, nailed up, I did it myself; I did not go to the house again till I heard it was broke open, and then I missed the things.

MARY LEARMAN sworn. - I know Mr. Holcomb's house, I live at No.16, Brook-street, almost opposite the fields where this house was; I know the prisoner perfectly well, I saw her coming out of the house on the 21st of April, between eleven and twelve at night, my son was with me; she was coming out at a pair of folding doors behind the house, with a bed; I could see the stripes of the bed very distinctly.

Q. Was any body with her? - A. Nobody that I saw; she went towards her own house with it.

Court. Q. How far does she live from Mr. Holcomb's? - A. Not further than that wall.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Did you know the prisoner before? - A. Yes.

Q. Why did not you take her into custody? - A. I had not such a thought of it; I had no thoughts of law.

Q. Did not you go to the Public-office the next day? - A. Yes; when I was fetched.

Q. How long was it since you had seen the prisoner before? - A. I often see her as I pass.

Q. How came you out so late at night? - A. I was about my own business.

Q. What business might you have been out upon? - A. My husband is a labouring man, and I had no money till I got his wages, and I went out to market.

Q. Have you ever lodged with the prisoner? - A. Yes.

Q. You lived upon very good terms? - A. Always; till I gave her warning.

Q. Did it ever happen that she summoned you before a Magistrate? - A. Yes; for three broken panes of glass.

Q. You had a little dispute about that, I believe? - A. Very little, for I never had much talk with her.

Q. Did she ever summon you for any thing else? - A. Yes, for a stove-brush; but that I knew nothing of.

Q. Then you were very angry with her for that? - A. I had no spite against her.

Q. Has she ever summoned you for rent? - A. I owed her none.

Q. How long had you lived with her? - A. Thirteen months; I was to pay her twenty pence a week.

Q. Had you paid her all that? - A. I sent her the keys and the money.

Q. Do you mean to swear that she did not summon you for rent? - A. She did not.

Court. Q. According to this account, you have known this woman for some time? - A. Yes; she is a rope-maker's wife , his name is Joseph Glave .

GEORGE LEARMAN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Const. I went out with my mother on Saturday night, between eleven and twelve, and saw the prisoner coming out of a pair of folding-doors, at Mr. Holcomb's house, with a bed.

WILLIAM ELBY sworn. - I am an officer of Shadwell: I was employed to apprehend Mrs. Glave, at her house in Glasshouse-fields; she absconded; I saw her husband on the Monday, the 23d, I told him it would be as well for her to come up in the morning, the 24th, and he told me that she should; instead of that, Mr. Haines and I, and another officer, got up early in the morning, and waited for the house being open, with a search warrant; that was about seven o'clock; the prisoner was there; and while we were there, the husband came in, I asked him to open a chest that was in the room; I asked him what was in it, he told me there was nothing but feathers; in searching, I found this looking-glass; and here is a sample of the feathers; (producing them); I found two or three duplicates upon her, and two duplicates she threw down upon the floor; I picked them up, and it contains a bed-tick pawned for five shillings, in a different name to that she goes by; she said she bought it of a Jew in Rosemary-lane, she gave six shillings for it; the pawnbroker is here; she told me she had had this glass for a good while.

Q. How many feathers might there be? - A. They were three or four inches deep.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You went to the husband's house on the Monday? - A. Yes.

Q. And, notwithstanding that, on the Tuesday morning you found her at home? - A. Yes.

JOSEPH HAYNES sworn. - I went with Mr. Elby; I know no more than he does.

JAMES BALL sworn. - I know the prisoner at the bar: I live at Mr. Dexter's, a pawnbroker, in Whitechapel-road; she pledged with me a bed-tick for five shillings, on the 23d of April. (Produces it.)

Q. Look at that duplicate? - A. That is my writing, I gave it her; she pledged it in the name of Astor.

Mr. Const. That is her maiden name.

Q. (To Stone.) Can you undertake to swear that that is the tick of a bed that was in Mr. Holcomb's house? - A. I lay upon the bed near three weeks, and I made it every night, and have no doubt but it is the same bed; I have not the least doubt about it.

Q. Do you know any thing of the glass? - A. No; I cannot say about the glass.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You are servant to Mr. Holcomb? - A. Yes.

Q. You were before the Magistrate? - A. Yes.

Q. Were not you examined about the identity of some bed-curtains that were produced? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you not undertake to say that these bed-curtains were in the house? - A. I said they were like them.

Q. Did you not say they were the curtains that were in the house, till the person came forward, and proved that they were in his possession? - A. I never said any thing but that they were like them.

Q. The curtains hung round the bed, and of course, you had a better opportunity of being acquainted with them than you could have of the tick? - A. No, I cannot say that I had; only in regard to the pattern.

Q. And you made no observation upon the bed, but when you were making it? - A. No.

Q. There are many qualities and sizes of ticking? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you not think you are as likely to be mistaken in the one as in the other? - A. I have no doubt it is the same tick.

The prisoner left her defence to her Counsel.

One of the Jury. Q. I wish to know by what particular mark you can distinguish that bed-tick from another of the same size and stripe? - A. There is an addition made to it in widening it, and also a very remarkable seam.

Jury. Nine bed-ticks out of ten are made in the same way; that is not an addition, but the way in which they are usually made.

The prisoner called Rebecca Wright , who gave her a good character.

GUILTY (Aged 39).

Of stealing goods to the value of 4s .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice GROSE.

383. JOHN CASTLE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of May , five pounds weight of pearl-ash, value 2s. 6d. the property of John Kent .

JOHN KENT sworn. - The prisoner was a servant of mine; I am a refiner of salt-petre and pearl-ash : Having a suspicion of the prisoner, I went with an officer to search his house; upon searching his lodgings, we found four or five pounds of pearl-ash in his room; upon comparing them with the cask that I supposed they came out of, they appeared to be the same.

Q. You cannot swear positively to them? - A. Yes, I can; by their being my own manufacture, and by the make and shape of them; and there were some pieces that were broke from what was left in the cask, which tallied exactly; the moment I saw it, I said, this comes out of such a cask; we have lost a great deal of late. The prisoner has lived with me, I believe, near twelve months.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You manufacture yourself? - A. Yes.

Q. You have a very considerable manufactory? - A. Yes.

Q. You have a partner, I believe, in the business? - A. No.

Q. Was the prisoner at home when you went to his lodgings? - A. No.

Q. How do you know they were his lodgings? - A. The officer and my foreman can tell more about that.

Q. Have you got those other pieces, that you say tallied with these? - A. No, I have not.

Q. Do you think it possible for a man to swear to one piece of pearl-ash for another, merely because it happens to tally? - A. Yes.

Q. You send a great quantity of pearl-ash about town? - A. Yes.

EDWARD SILVERWOOD sworn. - I am foreman to Mr. Kent's factory: I had some reason to believe my master was robbed; I missed a great deal of pearl-ash; I have frequently seen my master's property in the prisoner's pocket; when I have not seen it, I have seen his pockets loaded; I was afraid to take him, there being three men together, going out to breakfast; I was afraid of being knocked down; I told my master of it, and he got a search-warrant, and went to the prisoner's house.

EDWARD ROGERS sworn. - On the 17th of this month, Mr. Kent came to the Shadwell-office, and got a warrant; I went to the prisoner's house, and was directed to the upper story, I went up, and there was a woman there.

Q. Did the prisoner acknowledge that they were his lodgings? - A. He told me they were; in the afternoon, after he was in custody, in that room, I found this property, this bag was lying in the room, and this pearl-ash, in this cloth, lying on the bag, (produces them); I asked his wife to open a trunk, and she gave me the key out of her pocket, I found nothing else; I took the prisoner in the evening working at a rope-ground, at Stepney; I took him to the office.

Q. (To Mr. Kent.) Was not he in your service at that time? - A. In the morning he was, but had absented.

Rogers. The prisoner said, that the former foreman had given him little quantities of pearl-ash for his own use, and he thought he had a right to take them, because the other foreman had given them to him.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. He said, the apartments you were at were his? - A. Yes; I pointed out the garrets and asked if they were his; and he said, yes.

Q. Did he say whether he had apartments in the house, or that the apartments you were in were his? - A. He said, the garrets, were his; the doors were both open.

Q. There were other lodgers in the house? - A. Yes.

Q. He said, he thought he had a right to take some, because the former foreman had permitted it? - A. Yes.

Q. What did you say to him, did you not tellhim it was a trifling thing, and he had better tell the truth? - A. By no means, I would not say such a thing.

WILLIAM ELBY sworn. - I was with Rogers, that is all I know of it.

Q. (To Silverwood.) Look at these pearl-ashes, can you undertake to swear that those are part of Mr. Kent's property? - A. It is impossible, the air has taken them; I could have sworn to them at the time that they came out of a Russia butt that held about eleven hundred weight.

Q. Can you swear that the ashes brought from the prisoner's to Mr. Kent's were his ashes? - A. I have no doubt of it; when I put them together they tallied exactly.

Mr. Kent. The officer was present when they were compared.

Q. (To Rogers.) Did you see them compared? - A. Yes; Mr. Kent put them together, and they seemed to match exactly.

Prisoner's defence. I have lived with Mr. Kent about six months; a fellow-servant told me it was very common for the men to have a little pearl-ash for their own use; Mr. Silverwood and I have had words several times; those were not my lodgings that these ashes were found in.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Court. (To Mr. Kent.) Q. Did you ever give them leave to take any little quantity for their own use? - A. Never in my life.

GUILTY (Aged 27.)

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice GROSE.

384. AARON HEAL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of April , a muslin handkerchief, value 1s. 6d. and a cotton shawl, value 1s.6d. the property of Marthaugh D'Arcey .

MARY D'ARCEY sworn. - I am the wife of the prosecutor, I keep a public-house in Lower Shadwell , the prisoner was quartered upon us: On the 26th of April, I went up stairs, I had locked my chamber-door about a quarter of an hour before, and left the key in it; I found it open, I was very much alarmed at it, I took courage and went into the room, and saw a man's feet under the bed; I screamed out, and a man that is here came up stairs, and looked under the bed, and saw it was the prisoner; I told him to fetch an officer, and when he came, he found a double muslin handkerchief in his bosom, and a shawl dropped from him on the stairs.

Q. Were had the shawl and handkerchief been in your house? - A. The shawl was in a double chest of drawers, and the handkerchief was in another, half dirty.

Q. Were either the handkerchief or shawl in a drawer locked? - A. No; there were no locks broke open.

Q. What did the prisoner say? - A. Some other people came in, and he began fighting; I did not hear him say any thing.

WILLIAM BALDWIN sworn. - I was in Mrs. D'Arcey's house; I heard her scream, and I went up stairs, and saw the prisoner under the bed; he came from under the bed, and I went and fetched an officer.

ROBERT BROWN sworn. - I am an officer: I was sent for to Mrs. D'Arcey's on the 26th of April; I went up stairs, when I got up to the landing-place, I saw the prisoner lying upon his back, a great deal of violence appeared to have been used upon him by some of the parties; I asked him what was the matter; and he said he had done wrong, and in consequence of that, I told him I was an officer; he said, if you are an officer I will surrender to you; I took the man from them, got the prisoner upon his legs, and searched him; I found this handkerchief in his bosom, and this shawl was delivered to me by a man that found it on the stairs.

Mrs. D'Arcey. I know this shawl to be mine, it has been torn by a latch.

Mr. Alley. Q. The shawl you never saw in his possession? - A. No.

Q. I believe the poor fellow was very drunk? - A. I cannot say.

Mr. Alley. (To Brown.) Q. Was the prisoner drunk? - A. He was rather worse for liquor.

The prisoner called his serjeant, and one other witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY (Aged 21.)

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice GROSE.

385. PENELOPE JOHNSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of March , a cotton gown, value 9s. the property of Daniel Lorey .

DANIEL LOREY sworn. - I live in Wingfield-street, Spitalfields : I lost a cotton gown the 2d of March, out of my yard, it was hung up to dry; I saw it about twelve o'clock that day before it was hung out; I found it at a pawnbroker's about six weeks after.

JOSEPH BRODIE sworn. - In the middle of April. I bought a gown for six shillings of the prisoner at the bar, I am sure she is the person; my master is a pawnbroker, and a wholesale clothes-dealer.

Q. What day of the week was it she brought it to you? - A. I forget the day of the week, it wastowards the evening, about seven o'clock; I think she said that her husband had bought it for her in Rosemary-lane, and that he was now gone as a sailor.

Q. Did you know her before? - A. No. (The gown produced).

RACHEL SEXTON sworn. - I mended the gown for Mrs. Lorey, and altered it before it was washed; I know this gown to be Mrs. Lorey's.

Prisoner's defence. This gown was bought for me by my husband. NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice GROSE.

386. MARY WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of May , a half-guinea, and three shillings , the property of John Wilkes .

JOHN WILKES sworn. - Last Tuesday night I was going down the Broadway, Westminster , and met with the prisoner; I went with her into a house, and gave three-pence for a bed; I went up stairs and gave her a shilling.

Q. How old are you? - A. Nineteen; I went on the bed with her, and when I got up I missed half-a-guinea, and three shillings; I had it in my pocket when I went into the house with her, I felt it in my pocket when I went into the room; she pretended to go down stairs to light a candle, and never returned. I went down stairs to seek for a patrol, the patrol found a half-guinea, and three shillings, under the grate, amongst the ashes; I can swear to one of the shillings.

ROBERT GREENHILL sworn. - I am a patrol: Last Wednesday morning, about a quarter before two o'clock, I was going my round in the Almonry, I met the prosecutor, he told me he had been robbed of half-a-guinea, and three shillings; he said he should know the girl again; I went into the room, and searched in the tea-pot, and every where I could think of; at last I found the half-guinea, and three shillings, amongst the ashes under the grate; he described one of the shillings to me as being marked with No. 8, and an H. (Produces the money).

Wilkes. This shilling I know to be mine.

Prisoner's defence. The man went with me, and that shilling that he has sworn to is the shilling he gave me; the other money I found upon the bed after he was gone. NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice GROSE.

387. EDWARD LONG was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of January , eighteen yards of black silk lace, value 3l. the property of John-Henry Bluck , in his dwelling-house .

JOHN-HENRY BLUCK sworn. - I am a lace-manufacturer , I keep a shop in Bishopsgate-street : I lost some lace on or about the 20th of January last, about one o'clock in the day; I saw the prisoner at the bar come to our shop-window, with a little boy with him, I was talking with a gentleman backwards in the accompting-house, and I perceived something move in the window; in consequence of which, I went into the shop, and I perceived that a square of glass in the window was broke; I perceived the prisoner taking up a card of lace, which is cut off, we have an alley on one side of the house that I imagine he made his escape through; I pursued him but could not take him.

Q. Look at the prisoner, can you undertake to swear that that is the person? - A. I can; I dare say he was ten minutes, or a quarter of an hour, about the window, I am perfectly satisfied in my own mind as to his person; he was not apprehended till the 27th of April; the same square of glass was broke a second time that day. I had seen him four or five days about the house prior to that, and did not know whether I should take him or not; the lace I have never found.

Prisoner's defence. I am really innocent.

GUILTY (Aged 18.)

Of stealing, to the value of 39s.

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

388. MARY CARLTON was indicted for that she, on the 28th of April , seven pieces of false milled money, made and counterfeited to the likeness of a good shilling, the same not being cut in pieces, did put off to one Israel Mulberry , widow , at a lower rate and value than the same did import, that is to say, for half-a-crown .

(The case was opened by Mr. Ward.)

ISRAEL MULBERRY sworn. - On Saturday, the 28th of April, I went by the direction of the officers of Worship-street, to the prisoner's house, in Three-tun-court, Smithfield ; they went with me; I received half-a-crown from Mr. Armstrong, to buy half-a-crown's worth of bad money of Mrs. Carlton.

Q. Do you know if any mark was made upon it? - A. I did not see it made, but Armstrong shewed me the mark upon it, before I went to Mrs. Carlton's; the officer searched me before I went; when I went in Mrs. Carlton was in bed; she asked me how much I wanted, I told her half-a-crown's worth.

Q. Did you or she say of what? - A. No. She gave me seven pieces, bad shillings, and I gave her the half-crown that Mr. Armstrong gave me; there was another woman in the room, and Mrs. Carlton gave her the half-crown to get her an ounce oftea, and I staid in the house till she came back with the tea; when I came away, I carried the bad money to Mr. Clarke, the officer.

Q. From what place did she give you this bad money? - A. From a comb-box under the bolster.

Q. Did you see that woman any more that day? - A. Yes, at Guildhall.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Were you an acquaintance of the prisoner? - A. No, I never saw her before.

Q. You know this Court? - A. Yes.

Q. You have been here before? - A. Yes.

Q. You are in the same trade as you were before? - A. Yes.

Q. You were here a Sessions or two ago, were you not? - A. Yes.

Q. And the Jury would not believe you, and the prisoner was acquitted? - A. Yes.

Q. You did it merely to assist the public, in detecting a bad offender? - A. Yes.

Q. And that is as true as all the rest you have swore? - A. Yes.

Q. What trade do you follow besides that of an informer? - A. I go out a chairing.

Q. You do not earn any great deal? - A. One shilling a day.

Q. And so you have given up for the good of the public, six days work-merely for the good of the public? - A. I have sworn the truth.

Q. The officers searched you, they did not put their hands in your bosom, or any other place that would not have been decent, where you might have had shillings? - A. They could feel whether I had any without putting their hands inside my bosom.

Q. Do not you know she was very ill at the time? - A. No, I do not.

Q. What other woman was in the room at the time? - A. I do not know.

Q. The prisoner was sick in bed? - A. She was in bed.

Q. You gave the other woman half-a-crown to get some gin to enliven your spirits? - A. No such thing, I gave it to Mrs. Carlton, and she sent out for some tea.

Q. Upon your oath, did not you give it her, and desire her to send for some gin? - A. She brought in some gin with the tea.

Q. You talk of seven pieces, you have been in the copper trade, I suppose you know five shilling's worth of halfpence wrapped up are called pieces? - A. No, I do not know that.

Q. And though you were a stranger to her, she carried on this traffic, and you were also treated with gin into the bargain, besides having seven shillings for half-a-crown? - A. No, she did not treat me with gin.

Q. You sat down on the beside by the prisoner? - A. Yes, while she gave me the money.

Q. Did the officers take the other woman? - A. No.

Q. They would not have this woman, though they could, to corroborate your honest story? - A. No.

Q. I dare say you will swear that you did not take in these seven bad shillings with you, and that this is not a trick to get something for your lost time? - A. I did not.

JOHN ARMSTRONG sworn. - On Saturday, the 28th of April, I gave Mrs. Mulberry a half-crown piece to purchase some bad money, which half-crown I marked with a pin in the form of an A on the woman side. I pulled Mrs. Mulberry's shoes off, and searched her stockings, her pockets, and her bosom, and she had no money about her; I went to the room, in company with the other officers, where I found Mrs. Carlton and another woman, Mrs. Carlton then was near the side of the bed; on the bolster of that bed stood this little comb-case, which, when I took it, I found eleven counterfeit shillings in it, which are here, (produces them). Mrs. Carlton being taken into custody, I went, with the woman that was in the room with Mrs. Carlton, to Mr. Ward's, and there I saw a half-crown that he had from that woman; I desired him to keep it, I took his address. The prisoner was taken before the Alderman, and committed.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You searched her thoroughly? - A. As far as decency would permit, I did.

Q. Do not you know that women very commonly carry their money in little bags inside their bosoms? - A. No; I have searched many, and never found such a thing.

Q. Who is this gentleman of the name of Ward? - A. A grocer.

Q. I thought he was a gentleman who keeps a gin-shop? - A. No, he is not, he is here.

JOHN CLARKE sworn. - I am a marshalman.(Produces seven shillings); I received them from Mrs. Mulberry.

Mr. Alley. Q. When you went into the room, who did you find there? - A. Mrs. Carlton and the other woman.

Q. Did you take the other woman before the Magistrate? - A. Yes; and she was discharged.

Q. She might have been made a witness? - A. She might.

Q. This comb-case is a very convenient thing, if any body wished to play tricks, to carry into any place? - A. I did not see it carried in, I saw it found.

ISAAC WARD sworn. - I am a grocer, on Snowhill: On Saturday morning, the same morning that the officers came to me, a woman came to buy an ounce of tea, for which she paid me a half-crown piece.

Q. Did you see the same woman again that day? - A. Yes.; the officers brought the same woman I have got the half-crown, which I have kept apart ever since. (Produces it.)

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You have a good many customers in your shop about that time in the morning, for breakfast? - A. Not particularly. There was no other half-crown in the till but that.

Q. Had not you given change that morning? - A. No.

Armstrong. It is the same half-crown that I gave to Mrs. Mulberry.

Mr. Ward. Q. Are these shillings good or bad? - A. They are all counterfeit.

Q. Look at those that were found in the comb-box? - A. They are all bad.

The prisoner left her defence to her Counsel.

GUILTY .

Confined one year in Newgate , and fined 1s.

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

389. JOHN ROBINSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of March , a pannel saw, value 7s. a carcase saw, value 7s. a sash saw, value 12s. a dove-tail saw, value 5s. a stock, value 7s. twenty-seven bits, value 13s. and one saw pad, value 1s. 6d. the property of John Westfield .

JOHN WESTFIELD sworn. - I am a cabinetmaker ; the tools were lost out of my chest; I went out of town the 12th or 13th; I left it in Banner and Bruce's shop, the corner of Long-acre ; I staid in the country six weeks. When I returned, I found the chest broke open in the shop, and the articles in the indictment taken out; they have all been found since. In consequence of a suspicion, I went to Worship-street, got a warrant, and went with an officer to search the prisoner's lodgings; I found the small saw pad in his chest, and we found the duplicates of all the rest, except one saw, which we found; the duplicate had been lost.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You and the prisoner were on very good terms, and worked together? - A. He was only as porter , he is a carpenter by trade, and our shop is a coachmaker's.

Q. But he works occasionally, and has use for saws as well as you? - A. Yes.

Q. A great many men work in the shop? - A. Yes.

Q. It was in the shop that your chest was? - A. Yes.

Q. How many men are there in the shop? - A. In the shop that my chest was in, sometimes seven, sometimes eight, and sometimes nine.

Court. Q. You never lent him these tools? - A. I have lent him tools, but I do not recollect ever to have lent him these; I am certain they were locked up in my chest when I went away.

JOHN WRAY sworn - I am an officer: The prosecutor came to our house for a search-warrant, on the 26th of April, to search the apartments of the prisoner, No. 3, Hackney-road; I went there, and asked the woman of the house if he was at home, she said he was not, nor did he lodge in the house; I was confident he did; I went up stairs, and opened two boxes there; I found a number of duplicates, some for saws, and one for a stock and centre-bit; I learned that he worked at the India-house, and I went from one to another till I found him; the prosecutor was there; and he begged for mercy.

WILLIAM CROUCH sworn. - (Produces a stock and bits, and saw.) On the 31st of March I took them of a young woman, who said they were her husband's, and his name was John Westfield ; the name upon the ticket is John Westfield , lodging in York-street; the name on the stock is the same.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. I believe you know it is no unusual thing, when poor people have duplicates that they fell them, and honest persons sometimes get possession of duplicates of things improperly come by? - A. It is very often the case.

Westfield. This is my saw, it is of my own sharping; the stock has my own name engraved upon it at length.

Mr. Alley. Q. Do you mean to swear that that is your saw, merely because it is of your sharping - do you sharpen differently from any body else? - A. There is a great deal of difference in sharpening, the same as difference in hand-writing.

Q. Because it is done in a more bungling way than common, perhaps? - A. I do not know but it is.

Q. Any young beginner might blunder in the same way? - A. There is as much difference as there is in hand-writing; and there is a stain of porter upon it that I know it by.

Q. Have you never sold or swapped any stock? - A. Never.

- TYLER sworn. - I am a pawnbroker;(Produces a dove-tail saw and a pannel saw); I took them in on the 29th of March; the dove-tail saw was taken in of a man, I think the prisoner at bar; it was pledged in the name of John Robinson ; the other saw was taken in of a woman, pledged for John Robinson.

Mr. Alley. Q. You are not certain whether it was the prisoner or not? - A. No.

Wesifield. These are both of them my saws.

Mr. Alley. Q. If you had seen that saw fifty miles from London, and did not know that you had been robbed, would you have said that wasyour saw? - A. I might not have taken that notice.

The prisoner left his defence to his Counsel, and called several witnesses, who were not examined.

GUILTY (Aged 24.)

Confined three months in Newgate , and fined 1s.

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

390. ESTHER URIN and ELIZABETH SPARKES, alias SMITH , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of May , a canvass bag, value 1d. six shillings, and half-a-crown , the goods and monies of Edward Goodram .

EDWARD GOODRAM sworn. - I am a corn-porter : I was coming home from Milford-lane, about one o'clock in the morning of the 12th of May; I had stopped there so late to shift some craft; and coming round the corner of Bridge-street, Blackfriars , I stopped to make water, and Urin came and caught one arm round me, and the other hand in my pocket, I directly attempted to shove her off with my right hand, and I found her hand hung in my pocket, and directly another woman came up, and took something from her, but what I could not see.

Q. Were you sober? - A. Yes; as sober as ever I was in my life.

Q. What did the take from you? - A. Six shillings and half-a-crown, in a canvass bag; I immediately called the watch, and told her I should take her to the watch-house; she said, if I took her to the watch-house, she was done; and I told her, if she would return me half the money, I would not take her to the watch-house; the patrol took the other woman. After she had been in the watch-house, she owned that she had given it to Sparkes, but I cannot swear that she was the other woman.

Q. Are you sure Urin is the woman? - A. I am very sure she is the woman; I never parted from her till I got her to the watch-house.

- MIDDLETON sworn. - The prosecutor brought this woman to the watch-house, and gave me charge of her.

- CHALICE sworn. - The prosecutor brought Mrs. Urin to the door of the watch-house, about one o'clock in the morning, and gave me charge of her.

Prisoner Urin's defence. I was going down Bridge-street, and saw the prosecutor with this woman and two others, and he came up and said he wanted to speak to me; I went up to him, and thought he was going to give me something, and he said he had lost his money; he caught hold of my hand, and said I had got it; I am a cripple in this hand, and have been ever since I was born; I never saw a farthing of his money.

Urin, GUILTY (Aged 52.)

Confined three months in Newgate , and fined 1s.

Sparkes, NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

391. WILLIAM BROWN and WILLIAM BARNETT were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of May , fifty-five pieces of printed cotton cloth, containing 1500 yards, value 150l. the property of Thomas Jackson , James Jackson , and Robert Potts .

Second Count. Laying it to be the property of John Morson .

Third Count. Laying it to be the property of Joseph Lamb , Robert Scott , Robert Ormiston , John Foster , and Robert Wildy .(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

DAVID FOSTER sworn. - On the 2d of May I delivered a package to the Carlisle waggon, marked M. No. 77, carriage paid, May 2d; it contained seventy-eight pieces of printed cotton.

Q. Who were the proprietors of that cotton ? - A. Joseph Lamb , Robert Scott , Robert Ormiston , John Foster , and Robert Wildy .

Q. Who was it intended to go to? - A. To Mr. Morson.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. (Counsel for Brown.) Q. There were a great number of other parcels delivered to this waggon? - A. Yes.

Q. You are now speaking from recollection? - A. Yes; I do recollect it.

Q. Do you recollect any other packages that were delivered that day? - A. Yes; there was another bale for Mr. Morson delivered the same day.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. (Counsel for Barnett.) Q. Did you yourself pack up this? - A. No.

Q. Then, of your own knowledge, do you know that it contains seventy-eight pieces of printed cotton? - A. I do.

DUNCAN PYRKE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am apprentice with Mr. Morson in Watling-street.

Q. Did any package come from Carlisle to Mr. Morson's house, from Messrs. Lamb, Scott, and Company? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you receive a package, No. 77? - A. Yes.

Q. Did that package come with its full contents? - A. No; we received but twenty-three pieces in that package.

Court. Q. What day did you receive it? - A. On the 15th of May.

Q. Was that the regular day for receiving it by the waggon setting out from Carlisle on the 2d of May? - A. I do not know exactly; it does not always come on the regular day.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. It is not within your knowledge to know the exact time it ought to arrive? - A. Not within a day.

Q. Were you in your master's premises when the cart arrived with these goods? - A. I was in the warehouse when the man arrived with the goods on his back.

Q. Is that man here? - A. No.

Q. How long was it before you were able to discover that there was some part of the package wanting - did any body else make the observation before you? - A. Mr. Jobling did; he is here.

Q. Is the man here that brought it you? - A. I do not know that he is.

JOHN JOBLING sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I keep the White Horse inn, Cripplegate: The Carlisle waggon came to our inn on the 15th of May.

Q. Had you any waggon and package marked M. No. 77? - A. Yes; I observed that the bale had been cut open on one side.

Q. Was the bale complete? - A. No.

Q. How much did it weight when it arrived? - A. About an hundred and three quarters; I followed the man to Mr. Morson's, and saw the bale counted out.

Q. Did you afterwards receive that which was supposed to make up the other quantity? - A. Yes; from the constable, about two in the afternoon of the same day, fifty-five pieces, which made up the quantity corresponding with the waybill.

Q. Where have these fifty-five pieces been since? - A. They were sealed up by the constable, and have been in my possession ever since, under lock and key.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Who was it brought them to the inn? - A. They came in a cart to our inn.

Q. Who was the driver of that cart? - A. I do not know; it was a cart the waggoner was obliged to hire a cart.

Q. The waggoner, of course, knew him? - A. Yes.

Q. And therefore we might have seen him here, if your waggoner had given him information where he was to be had? - A. He is not here.

Q. How far did he drive this cart with the property? - A. Eighteen or nineteen miles; he took the cart about eleven or twelve o'clock the evening before, and arrived about eight at night.

Q. But you did not ask the name of the man who actually drove, and have not him here to-day? - A. The carter is that kind of young man, that I do not think he could know any thing about it.

Court. Q. He is not here? - A. No.

JOSEPH GREEN sworn. - I am a waggoner: I had the charge of Messrs. Jacksons' waggon, at Fairburn, in Yorkshire.

Q. Do you remember seeing any package in your waggon, marked M. No. 77? - A. Perfectly well.

Q. Was your waggon pretty well loaded? - A. It was over-loaded.

Q. When did you see that package last? - A. I saw it at Hatfield Wood-side, in Hertfordshire, about eighteen miles from London; that was about four in the afternoon; I got two horses of the land lord, and unloaded this package, with others, the waggon being over-loaded, and put them into a cart; the waggon went first, and the cart followed it; we set off from Hatfield Wood-side exactly at twelve o'clock; I went with the waggon and the cart both as far as Potter's-bar, about fourteen miles from London; at Potter's bar I got into the waggon.

Q. Who took care of the cart? - A. A man that I employ, of the name of Eccles; the cart was drove by a man employed by the landlord to drive the cart.

Q. How were the packages in the cart secured? - A. Tied round with a rope. When I got within about a quarter of a mile of the high-stone, I heard that there had been a loss; in consequence of that, I got out of the waggon, and went to the cart; I found the rope cut, and the tarpaulin cut; then I examined, and missed a quantity of prints out of the bale.

Q. Was it out of that bale marked M. No. 77? A. Yes, it was; I immediately got upon my poney, and rode back; when I got a little way, I met a man with a hay-cart; in consequence of what I heard from him, I proceeded down a road called the Chase-road, and saw a fresh track of wheels that had turned down that way, near Galley-corner; I cannot say whether it is in Middlesex or Herts; when I had got about a quarter of a mile down the Chase-road, I met the tall man at the bar (Barnett) in a brown coat, I wished him a good morning, and gave him the time of the morning, and he did me the same; when I got further on, I found another waggon; and, by information, I pursued the track till I got almost to Southgate; at the end of Southgate, there is a little lane upon the right hand, I perceived the fresh track go down that lane; I then rode to Mr. Day's house, about four hundred yards from the lane, and called him up, and told him what I had observed, and then I went and called up Sayer the constable; then we returned to the bye-road, whereI had seen the track go down, and when I got there, we saw a cart and horse stand within the brick fields; in consequence of what the landlord said, I jumped over the paling, and went into the brick fields, I saw Brown, the prisoner, covering some straw upon the property; as soon as he saw me, he made the best of his way to his cart and horse, which stood just by; I went into the shed where the goods laid, I lifted up the straw, and saw the prints lie; I immediately went to Brown, and caught him by the collar; I asked him if he knew what laid under that straw, he said, no, he did not; I told him I would learn him to know before I had done with him. He rather refused to be held by me, and wished I would let him go; I told him I would not, for he had robbed me of my property, and he was my prisoner; this was about four o'clock, as near as I can guess. He said, the cart and horses were his, and insisted upon my letting him take them away; after some little hesitation, he got away, and made his escape; I ran after him, and he jumped over the hedge into the high-road again. I told him he might run as he would, for he was guilty, I had got his horse and cart, and I would have him, let the consequence be what it would. He returned back, and I took him to the horse and cart again, and, with a little conversation, he asked me what I would have to make it up with him; I told him I did not know, if he would go to the public-house, Mr. Day's, I would talk with him about it; he hesitated a minute or two, and looked down the road, and saw the prisoner Barnett coming up, and he shouted to him to come to his assistance; he said, here, here; before he could come up, the constable and a young man came up, then I gave the constable charge of him; before the constable could get hold of him, he ran away again, and we caught him again.

Q. Did you hear whether Barnett said any thing? - A. He seemed to make a push for it just at the first, but the constable came up, and took charge of Brown.

Q. Did you go to the place where you saw Brown covering over these things with straw? - A. Yes.

Q. How many pieces of cotton did you find there? - A. Fifty-five.

Q. Was there any thing there besides the pieces of cotton? - A. There was a sack laid by the side of them, and there were the cushions belonging to Brown's cart.

Q. What became of those pieces of cotton? - A. As soon as the men were in custody, I fetched baskets, and took them to Day's house.

Q. Were they such as a man could carry? - A. Not in that situation; a man might carry them if they were done up tight, they took me three turns.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. The first time you had any suspicion that you had lost any property, was near Potters-bar ? - A. Between Potters-bar and Barnet.

Q. The carter's name you do not know? - A. No.

Q. You saw nothing of Brown at all at Potters-bar? - A. No, I did not.

Q. And how far is Potters'-bar from where you found these things in the brick field? - A. I suppose it may be three miles, or near four.

Q. And any body might have taken them from Potters-bar, and taken them to Brown, at South-gate? - A. It might be so, but they were very handy if they did.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. After you had got Brown in custody, you saw Barnett coming along the road? - A. Yes.

Q. At some distance? - A. Yes.

Q. When you say Brown called for assistance, he only called out, here, here? - A. Yes.

Q. Then hearing the cry of here, here, you thought Barnett quickened his pace? - A. Yes.

Q. You never saw Barnett in the field with him, or with the goods? - A. No.

Q. You never saw him near the goods till after he was called to by you and Brown? - A. No.

WILLIAM DAY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I live at Southgate, I keep the Crown: I was called up by the last witness, on the 15th of May; in consequence of that, I went with him into a brick-field, about four or five hundred yards above my house.

Q. Is the road through which you went leading any where else? - A. Only leading into the same fields beside the brick fields.

Q. Do you know the prisoner, Brown? - A. Yes, he was employed in the brick field by a Mr. Kingston, who has a contract for making bricks; I went into the field, and as I was going up the road, I saw the prisoner Brown's cart; and as soon as I got into the field, I saw the prisoner and his cart standing by a kind of shed used for putting in sand; the waggoner went just before me into the shed, and I followed him; as soon as he got in, he lifted up some straw, and there were some pieces of cotton; the waggoner came out, and said, he must take care of him; Brown said, for what; he said, those were his goods that he had lost; Brown said, he knew nothing about the goods; the waggoner endeavoured to lay hold of him, and he ran round the cart two or three times; Brown soon after made a run up the field into the road, and the waggoner after him; I took the waggoner's poney and rode round into the road to meet him, and stopped him; the waggoner then took hold of him, and brought him down towards the cart; Brown asked me, up in the road, if I could lend him 5l.

Q. Did Brown explain what he wanted you to lend him five pounds for? - A. No; I told him I I had no money that I could lend; and immediately after came up one of the men, Nicholls, and laid hold of Brown, and took him down to my house.

Q. Are you sure that that cart and horse was Brown's? - A. It was a cart and horse that Brown has often come to my house in.

Q. Did you see the place where the pieces of cotton were found? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see any thing else there besides the cotton? - A. No, I did not. The cotton was conveyed to my house.

Q. Did you see the other prisoner, Barnett? - A. I did not see him till after he was taken by the constable.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You say you knew Brown before? - A. Yes.

Q. Perhaps you know that he was concerned in a contract for bricks with Mr. Kingston? - A. Yes.

Q. Therefore it was not at all unusual to find him in his brick field? - A. It was a place he had a right to go to.

Q. And he went backwards and forwards whenever he pleased, in order to inspect the workmen? - A. Yes.

Q. I think you told my learned friend, it was the waggoner that lifted up the straw, and discovered the goods? - A. Yes.

Q. Are you sure you are correct in so stating it? - A. Yes.

Q. Then Brown was not covering them up when you came up? - A. No, I was rather behind.

Q. Did Brown, when you came up, allow that they might be his goods, but he knew nothing at all about them? - A. He did.

Q. It is a pretty large brick field? - A. Yes.

Q. About what hour in the morning? - A. About four o'clock.

Q. When these goods might be put under the straw I should think you will not swear? - A. No.

Q. Was it unusual for Brown to come into the field with a horse and cart? - A. No.

Q. Do you know how long a time Brown had to fulfil his contract with Kingston? - A. No.

Q. You do not know whether it was pretty near being fulfilled, and that it was necessary for him to be there early in the morning? - A. No, it was just began.

Court. Q. When you went into the field did you see anybody else in the field, or about this place? - A. I did not see anybody else.

Q. You did not see anybody running away from Brown's cart? - A. No.

ROBERT SAYER sworn. - I am a constable at Southgate: I was called upon by the waggoner, Green, about a quarter after four in the morning; I got up and called assistance; I was ordered to take up a man with a pig tail and a brown coat, and a sore hand, if I met such a man; I went up the road, and Mr. Day was coming running for me to make all the haste I could; then I went into the brick field to follow him, there stood Mr. Brown's cart, and Mr. Brown by the side of it; as soon as Mr. Brown saw me coming, and another with me, he took to his heels and ran away as fast as he could, Brown knew me before; then two of my men ran after him over the field, and then he got over into the road, and Mr. Day was there, and they had some consultation together, then my man went up and secured Brown; the other man, Barnett, was just by, walking down the road for Southgate, as unconcerned as could be; then the waggoner bid me take his horse and ride after him to take him; I got on the horse, and took one of my sons with me, I rode part of the way, and got off the horse, and ran after him, and told him he was ordered to come back, he came back with me directly without any interruption; then we had got them both at the Crown door, and they sat down on a bench that was there; then Mr. Brown wanted to get up to speak to Mr. Day, I bid my lad release his collar for him to speak to Mr. Day, and he took to his heels and ran round the corner of Mr. Day's house; and as soon as Brown started to run away, the other started to run the other way; but my brother was coming over the road and picked up a butcher's knife, and he happened to lay hold of Barnett, and brought him back; I sent for a pair of handcuffs and handcuffed them together; I heard Brown say, several times, that he had no money in his pocket, and he dare say Mr. Day would lend him five guineas to give the waggoner; then I took them into the house, and searched Barnett first, I found nothing in his pocket at all; then I searched Brown, and found the tin plate of his cart in his pocket, with his name, and the words "a taxed cart" wrote upon it; then I went to the cart, and there was a brown coat in the cart, and a sack; the seat of the cart was taken out, and was not there at all; the cushions of the cart laid where the property was; then I brought the coat, and neither of them would own it; when I went before the Justice Mr. Brown recollected and said it was his coat.

Q. What became of the cloth? - A. It was up in the sand place, and I lent a hand afterwards to get it away; I took it in a cart to Mr. Jobling's, the White-horse, and there I sealed it down with three seals.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Where is this brick field? - A. Leading from Southgate to Potters-bar.

Q. In what parish? - A. East Barnet.

Q. That is in Hertfordshire? - A. Yes.

Q. Is any part of the road from Galley-corner to the brick field in Middlesex? - A. Every part of it.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You say Barnett was going along the road as unconcerned as could be? - A. Yes.

Q. You never saw him in company with Brown before that? - A. No.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Are you sure it was a brown coat? - A. Yes, I have the coat here.

JOHN NICHOLLS sworn. - I went with Sayer the constable in pursuit of these people; I was called up by the constable and was ordered to lay hold of Mr. Brown, I took him to Mr. Day's public-house while they went after Barnett; when I got to Day's house, Brown said, he would be glad if Mr. Day would lend him any sum of money to make it up with the waggoner, what the waggoner should wish to have, and then they brought Mr. Barnett up at the same time; then Brown made an attempt to get off, he had got away, and I followed him and got him again, and Barnett made a start at the same time, the other way; Barnett got a very little way, I suppose not ten yards, the waggoner stopped him; I went after Brown. (Some of the cloth produced).

Mr. Foster. This was our's, I know it by the number.

Court. Q. Is there any mark there? - A. Yes; here are two or three, here is Lamb and Company, Carlisle; it is made by the person that measures them.

Mr. Knapp. Q. There are more in your warehouse with that mark? - A. Yes; there is the same mark of Lamb and Company upon all the other pieces; there is the number of the print field upon it.

The prisoners left their defence to their Counsel. Brown called five witnesses and Barnett one witness, who gave them a good character.

JOHN NICHOLLS sworn. - I am servant to the prisoner Brown, I saw him harness his horse that morning about half past three o'clock.

Mr. Knapp. Q. (To Day.) How far is it from Tottenham High-cross to Galley-corner? - A. About eight miles; the brick-fields are much about the half way.

Q. (To Nicholls.) Are you sure your master took his horse at half past three in the morning? - A. Yes.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. How do you know it was half past three? - A. By our own clock in the house.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Then, if he had gone from Tottenham to Galley-corner, and back again to the brick field, that would have been twelve miles? - A. Yes.

Prisoner Barnett. I had been to St. Alban's to see an aunt, and when I got there I found she was dead; I did not want to stay, I wanted to go to Blackwall; I enquired if there were any coaches going to town, I could not hear of any, and I set off towards Blackwall to go to Southgate, through Highgate and that way, the nighest way to Blackwall; I had every opportunity of getting away, if I had been guilty, when I was called to by the constable.

Q. (To Green.) You said that Brown shouted to Barnett, which way was Barnett then going? - A. Towards London.

Brown, GUILTY (Aged 28.)

Transported for seven years .

Barnett, NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice GROSE.

392. WILLIAM STACEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of January , a cloth coat, value 40s. a Bath beaver great-coat, value 24s. a pair of leather boots, value 20s. a pair of corderoy breeches, value 3s. a cloth coat, value 7s. a linen waistcoat, value 5s. and a linen shirt, value 2s. the property of Henry Freer , in the dwelling-house of Charles Ellington .

HENRY FREER sworn. - I am a private in the third regiment of Foot Guards : I lodged in the house of Charles Ellington , No. 38, Duke-street, St. James's ; I went to lodge there on Thursday the 18th of January, and on Saturday morning I breakfasted with Mr. and Mrs. Ellington, then I went to work, at Mr. Thomas's, in St. James's-street; I am a breeches-maker; I stopped to finish some work before I went out, and Mr. Ellington came up and asked me to consent that the prisoner should sleep with me, and as they had been very civil to me, I consented; I finished my work, and took it to the shop; I left the shop about nine o'clock, and we had a pot of beer and some bread and cheese; I got home a little before or a little after eleven on the Saturday night; when I came home, the landlady told me he was gone up to bed, I soon went up after, and saw the door a little open; I was a little alarmed; the bed was facing the door; I looked, and saw nobody in bed; my box was at the bed's feet, and that was burst open with a screw-driver; the screw-driver is here that it was done with; I left the box locked when I went out, between eleven and twelve; I lifted the box lid up, and found my property mentioned in the indictment gone; (repeats them); I have found all the things again but the waistcoat; they were at different pawnbrokers; I should know them again; Bly the constable went with me; the coat and breeches were delivered to me at Queen-square, the other things were found to-day; when the prisoner was committed last from Bow-street, he told me where to find the things.

Q. And you found all this property by his direction? - A. Yes; all that I had not found before.

CATHERINE ELLINGTON sworn. - I am the wife of Charles Ellington : Henry Freer lodged in our house; I had the key of the room in my pocket all day on the Saturday; the prisoner came in at ten o'clock; I asked him, whether he chose to go to bed then, or whether he would wait till Freer came in; he said, he chose to go then, and my little boy lighted him up into the prosecutor's room, and he asked particularly the way out, as he should have to get up soon in the morning; I shewed him the private door; I heard him run down in ten minutes after he had been lighted up, as I thought; I sat at work by the fire close to the staircase.

Q. But you cannot say, not seeing that person, who it was? - A. No, I cannot.

Q. Are you perfectly sure that the prisoner is the man you let in? - A. Yes.

CHARLES ELLINGTON sworn. - I am the husband of the last witness: I know no further than I let the prisoner the lodgings; I was not at home when he came in the evening; I am sure he is the man.

WILLIAM CHAMBERLAIN sworn. - I am a pawnbroker. (Produces a shirt.) I had a pair of corderoy breeches also, which I delivered up at Queen-square. I do not know the prisoner; I took them in of a girl, who called herself Ann Smith .

JAMES BLY sworn. - (Produces the breeches). I received them of the last witness.

MARY CURRY sworn. - I pawned this shirt and breeches with Mr. Chamberlain; I gave the duplicates to William Stacey . I know the prisoner by drinking with him in a public house; and he asked me to go and pledge them for him; I received the shirt from him in my lodgings in the Almonry.

Q. Did you live with him? - A. No; and when he was in Tothill-fields Bridewell, he sent for me, and asked me to pawn the breeches, which I did.

JOHN SIMMONDS sworn. - I am a pawnbroker; I cannot swear to the prisoner. There was a blue great coat pledged on the 22d of January, in the name of William Smith , it is a Bath beaver great coat, I cannot say whether it was the prisoner or not, the coat was delivered up at Queen-square by order of the Magistrate. (It was produced by Bly).

WILLIAM BOURNE sworn. - I am a pawnbroker; I have a coat to produce, but I do not know who I received it from.

GEORGE MOTTE sworn. - I am a soldier in the first regiment of Foot Guards; I have nothing to say, I do not know the man. Milligan, one of my comrades, told me he had got a duplicate of a coat, if I had a mind to buy it; and I went to the pawnbroker's, and tried the coat on, and it fitted me; it was in for eighteen shillings; I asked him what I must give him for the duplicate; he said, five shillings, and I gave him five shillings, and paid the interest; I wanted a coat at the time, or else I must have bought a new one; it was a blue coat; I have worn the coat, (produces it); I have had it ever since.

JOHN MILLIGAN sworn. - I am a soldier in the first regiment of Guards: I got the duplicate of the coat that I sold to Motte from the prisoner; I could not raise the money to purchase it myself, and I sold it to him.

GEORGE FLINT sworn. - I am a pawnbroker, in Paradise-row, Lambeth: There was a coat pledged at our shop, on the 22d of January, in the name of William Smith , but whether it was the prisoner or not, I cannot tell; it was taken out and repledged by a soldier of the name of Motte, and redeemed by him on the 31st of January.

Prosecutor. This is my shirt, it is marked with my name; it is worth two shillings and sixpence or three shillings; the breeches I have not worn, but they have been worn since they were taken from me; I am a breeches maker by trade, if they had not been worn, they would have been sold for fourteen or fifteen shillings; this coat I believe to be mine, I have not wore it, it cost me two pounds nineteen shillings; it would fell now for two pounds.

Prisoner's defence, as read by Mr. Shelton. I have pleaded not guilty to this indictment, because I look upon it, when a man has once been discharged by the due course of Law, for an offence, he has no right to be apprehended again for it. In the latter end of January last, I was apprehended on suspicion of stealing a watch, and was taken before Serjeant Kirby, Esq. at the Police-office, Queen-square, and ordered for further examination; on Thursday, when I came there, there were all these people against me that are here now; and when I saw that, I told the Magistrate I should wish to speak to him in private; the Justice and I, and one of the officers, went up stairs into a room; I told the Justice if he would admit me an evidence for the Crown, and dismiss the business that I was there for then, together with the affair with which I am charged now, I would make a free confession of a great number of footpad robberies, and burglaries, and tell where they were to be found. Mr. Kirby told me if I really did that, and he should find that the account that I gave of burglaries and robberies done by myself, with two others, in Kent and Surry, was true, I should be admitted an evidence for the Crown. I was committed, andthe two men were taken, and one was fully committed to the Kingston Assizes for a highway robbery, and another for a burglary, and I was admitted evidence for the Crown; these people now against me were dismissed by Mr. Kirby, who told them I had turned evidence against two other men, upon condition of my being pardoned for this; I was concerned alone in this. I remained in jail till I was taken down to Kingston, I gave evidence against them, I was discharged, and was at home with my friend for three weeks, till having occasion to go to Westminster, the constable came into the room and apprehended me for this robbery; he then told me I must go before a Magistrate, and though it was close to the office at Westminster he would not take me there, because he knew Mr. Kirby could not commit me for it; he took me to Sir William Addington 's, and I told him the same; and he said, if the Judge found it to be true I should be acquitted. I have nothing more to say, I confessed every thing I had done by myself, and particularly this affair that I am now here for. To prove what I say, I shall call William Bowyer , William Messenger , and Creedland, who were present when I was examined before Mr. Kirby, and who took me down to Kingston.

WILLIAM BOWYER sworn. - Q. Do you know whether this charge was a charge upon which he was to be pardoned? - A. Undoubtedly; and part of the property was given up.

Q. Do you know that he gave evidence at Kingston? - A. Yes; and the men were acquitted before Judge Buller, at Kingston.

The prisoner called one witness, who said he did not know any dishonesty of him till lately.

GUILTY (Aged 24.)

Of stealing goods to the value of 39s.

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

393. GEORGE TUNSTALL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of December , a pair of pier looking-glasses, value 7l. 7s. and three dimity window-curtains, value 3l. the property of Henry Robins and John Robins .(The indictment was opened by Mr. Jackson, and the case by Mr. Lockhart).

WILLIAM KITELY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Jackson. I am porter to Henry and John Robins , co-partners and auctioneer s.

Q. Do you remember on the 21st and 22d of December their selling the goods of Filmer Honeywood , Esq.? - A. Yes; I was employed by them to get the goods ready for the sale, and to take care of them; they were sold at Mr. Honeywood's, No. 7, Charles-street, Berkeley-square .

Q. At the time of the sale, and up to the delivery of the goods, who had the custody of the house? - A. I had, as servant of Mr. Robins.

Q. Was any servant of Mr. Honeywood's there at that time? - A. The days of sale there was; but after the sale was over, Mr. Honeywood's servant quitted the house; I had the keys, and deposited them every evening in my master's accompting-house; on the Wednesday, about the 26th or 27th, I left the premises, and fastened the doors and windows myself, I double-locked the door, and took the keys to the accompting-house; I did not go again till Friday the 29th, I found the door then on the single lock, I am sure I left it double locked; when I went on the Friday, I missed a bed that I was going to deliver; upon that, I looked round to examine the house, and I missed another bed, two pier glasses, and three white dimity window-curtains; when I had left the house on Wednesday the curtains were drawn up at the windows, and the glasses were nailed up; the curtains had been forced down, and torn from the laths, and the lines cut.

Q. Whose property had the pier glasses been? - A. Mr. Robins's.

Q. Whose property had the curtains been? - A. Mr. Honeywood's; the curtains had been sold at the sale to a gentleman; I do not know who it was.

Q. Had the glasses been sold? - A. No, they had not.

Q. Let who will have bought the curtains, had they been left with other things in the custody of Mr. Robins? - A. Yes; upon missing these things I locked the door, and came down to acquaint my master of it; I have seen the things since, and should know them again.

RICHARD REEVES sworn. - Examined by Mr. Lockhart. I am a carver and gilder, No.27, Drury-lane.

Q. Do you know the prisoner? - A. Yes; about four or five years ago he bought a small quantity of glasses of me: On the 30th of December, the porter of George Tunstall , of the name of John, brought me a pair of frames of pier glasses, saying they were to be re-gilt, he said he had brought them from Mr. Tunstall; I asked him which Tunstall; and he said, George Tunstall; he said, the frames were to be new gilt, but they were not to be put in hand till his master called; about three hours after the prisoner called respecting these frames, about four o'clock in the afternoon; he said, he had called about gilding these frames; I shewed him the frames.

Q. Were they the same frames which the porter had brought? - A. Yes; I told him the frames were hardly worth gilding, because they were old, and the pattern old-fashioned, and he had betterhave new frames; he then desired me to go to his house and look at the plates, the plates of glass belonging to the frames, I was to look at the glasses; there was a fault in one of them, from the quicksilver being rubbed off it. I saw the porter again, he took up these plates standing behind some furniture, at the prisoner's house.

Q. What did you do with them? - A. One plate I received from the prisoner, the other plate he brought himself; I had them both.

Q. Did you make any alteration in them at all? - A. I put the frames to them, I did nothing to the glasses, they remained just as they were.

Q. From any thing that you had heard, did you know any thing respecting these frames? A. I suspected the prisoner, and immediately applied to Messrs. Robins, and I was informed that they had lost some property, different glasses, -

Q. Did you shew them this property? - A. I desired them immediately to go to my house, and I would shew them the glasses I had in my possession.

Q. Did you afterwards see Tunstall? - A. I saw Tunstall the same evening, he called at my house, and he asked me about those glasses, the attorney was with him; I told them the circumstance, that Mr. Robins had claimed the glasses.

Q. Did Tunstall make any reply to you? - A. He said he had bought the glasses in Bedfordbury.

Q. Did he say of whom he bought them? - A. He did not; he said he would immediately go to Messrs. Robins, from my house, from whom the glasses had been stolen.

Q. Did he tell you what he would do when he found Messrs. Robins? - A. I cannot recollect any thing that he said particularly.

Q. Do you you recollect what day of the month it was when you saw the prisoner in company with his attorney? - A. I think it was the Wednesday following the 3d or 4th of January, it was the same day the search-warrant was granted; I think it was either Wednesday or Thursday, but I am sure it was in the middle of the week.

Q. Did you see the search-warrant executed? - A. Yes; I was in company with Mr. Robins and the officer.

Q. Was any thing more found upon the prisoner which was the property of Messrs. Robins? - A. Not to my knowledge.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. How far did you live from the prisoner? - A. Not many yards.

Q. When the porter came to you, he made no secret of his master's name? - A. No; he said it was George Tunstall , and he told me the house where he lived.

Q. It was intended at first that those old frames should be gilded? - A. It was.

Q. And he desired you not to do it till his master came? - A. Yes.

Q. And for fear you should not know the glasses again, he pointed out the slaws that was in them? - A. He desired me to go to his house to observe this mark, and he desired me to make a new pair of frames for them of the pattern he had seen.

Q. A report had gone about that some things of Messrs. Robins were stolen two or three days before the search-warrant was executed? - A. I don't know that particularly; the same day I was informed of it, I told Mr. Robins, and the search-warrant was executed that very day in the afternoon; the frames of the glasses were at my house.

Q. Then he did not attempt to get them back from you? - A. I had orders not to let them go.

Q. Did he attempt to get them back? - A. No, he did not.

HENRY ROBINS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Jackson. I am an auctioneer, my partner's name is John Robins : It was upon the 20th or 21st of December, I sold the furniture and effects of Mr. Honeywood.

Q. At the time of the sale, were the goods laid in the indictment, the glasses, and three pair of curtains, in the sale? - A. Yes; the glasses were the property of Mr. Honeymood, the curtains the property of other persons; the curtains were bought by a Mr. Clarkson.

Had the pier glasses, or curtains, been sold? - A. The curtains had been sold, with other things, to Mr. Clarkson, but the glasses had not. Mr. Clarkson desired me to take care of them, and he would fetch them away when convenient.

Q. Did Mr. Clarkson pay for them? - A. We did not charge them in his account as they were lost.

Q. You had been told by Kitely that the things were stolen? - A. I had; when we discovered the property had been lost, I went to Bow-street to take advice what was best to be done.

Court. Q. When was that? - A. I believe it was on the Friday or Saturday morning. I published a hand-bill, describing the property.

Q. Did you advertise the prisoner, or give any description of him? - A. No, only the property; we did not suspect any particular person at that time. A few days after that, the last witness, Mr. Reeves, called at my house, and described the property he had in his possession; I went to Mr. Reeves's house myself, together with my brother, and he shewed us the glasses; I was very positive to the frames, but the glasses I was not. I enquired of Mr. Reeves who he had received these glasses from; I then went to Bow-street and took out a search-warrant, and we then went to the prisoner's house.

Q. What happened when you got there - was the prisoner in the way? - A. No, he was not; there was a woman that called herself Mrs. Tunstall; I enquired for Mr. Tunstall, and they told me he was not at home; before I went up stairs, I discovered some dimity upon a bed in the shop, which I immediately suspected to be part of the curtains.

Q. Why did you suspect it? - A. Being the same dimity, and having made the curtains.

Q. Was it in the state of curtains, or bed-furniture? - A. It appeared as if intended for bed-furniture, the top part of the curtain had been cut off so as to make valance for a bed. The officer took the property away, it has been in my possession ever since, I cannot tell the exact quantity. I asked Mrs. Tunstall where Mr. Tunstall was; she said, he was not in the way, but he should call upon me.

Mr. Jackson. Q. Did Mr. Tunstall call upon you? - A. I never saw him till I saw him at Bow-street, about the 16th of May.

Q. After you had left Tunstall's house, and had taken away the dimity furniture, what step did you next take? - A. I waited a day or two before I took any other step, thinking Tunstall would call upon me, according to the promise made by his wife; he not coming forward, I was advised to advertise him, and offer a reward for his apprehension, which accordingly I did.

Q. Did that advertisement contain his personal description? - A. It did; we described his person as well as we could. (The advertisement produced.)

Q. After this advertisement of the 10th of January, what steps did you take? - A. I of course ordered the officer to watch him; I went there repeatedly, and walked up and down before his house, and never could see him; I also made enquiries among the neighbours, but could not gain any intelligence; I continued that vigilance up to the time he was apprehended, which was on the 16th of May.

Mr. Alley. Q. I understand the dimity was on a bed in the shop? - A. Yes; and I believe there was a woman at work upon it. (The property produced.)

Reeves. This is the property I got from the prisoner.

Mr. Robins. That is my property.

Kitely. That is the property I missed out of Mr. Honeywood's house.

Q. (To Robins.) Is that the property you found laying on the bed in the prisoner's shop? - A. It is; it is my property.

Mr. Alley. Q. (To Mr. Robins.) I understand, Mr. Robins, that those curtains which you now undertake to swear to be your's, are not in the state they were formerly? - A. They are not; they were festoon curtains.

Q. Do you undertake to swear that those are your curtains? - A. Yes, I do; I made those curtains originally, they were a drawing-room suit of furniture; the chairs and sopha were sold to a gentleman I know, and I sent and borrowed a cover of the chairs, and it is the same dimity.

Q. Upon your oath, have you any difficulty in knowing that it is your property? - A. Not in the least.

Mr. Lockhart. Q. (To Kitely.) Did you ever see this dimity before? - A. To the best of my knowledge I saw it in window-curtains at Mr. Honeywood's; I really believe it is the same dimity.

JOHN EDWARDS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Lockhart. Q. Did you carry any pier glasses to Mr. Reeves, the gilder, from the prisoner? - A. Yes, I did.

Q. Do you recollect when that was? - A. I cannot tell the exact day; it was drawing to the latter end of December, it might be about the 27th or 28th; I did not take any notice of the frames.

Q. Do you know where your master was about the 12th of January? - A. I saw my master several times in January, at different places, but I don't know where he was upon the 12th; I believe he was in Bishopsgate church-yard the 15th or 16th of January.

Q. What was he doing there? - A. I went for the purpose of doing some business about a chest of drawers, which he thought he could fell to a friend.

Q. Do you know where he was the 17th, 18th, 19th, and 20th of January? - A. Several times I saw him in Great Queen-street, Drury-lane; I met him there upon some business.

Q. From the 12th of January to the latter end of January, did you see him in his own shop? - A. He has let me in on a morning; I have seen him twice in his shop in the middle of the day; soon after one o'clock, he was in the yard, and came out of the yard into the shop; I conducted his business from the 12th of January to the end; he was a good deal in the country, in order to seek after the men from whom he had bought the glasses; he might be gone about eighteen or nineteen days.

Q. Now, where was he all February? - A. In February I saw him.

Q. Where did he live? - A. He lived in Featherstone-street; but he came home, or near home, and sent to me every day.

Q. Do you know whether he was all the month of February looking after these men he had bought the glasses of? - A. I don't know where he was all the month; the fact was, he was not willing to come forward, till he could find the men, in order to clear himself. I was not with him all the month of March, but I saw him seven or eight times;he was at his own house about the 13th or 14th of March, and let me in; it was in the morning, about six o'clock, a little after six; he had not discovered the men at that time.

Q. In the month of April, did you see him? - A. I saw him every evening in Newton-street.

Q. Did you ever see him in his shop during that month? - A. I saw him one Sunday.

Q. You never saw him in the open day? - A. Never, but once or twice.

Q. His shop is an open shop? - A. Yes.

I believe it is the custom of brokers to walk to and fro before the shop? - A. Some do, and some do not; it is the custom in Castle-street, but my master never did it in his life.

Cross-examined by Mr. knowlys. Q I believe, in point of fact, those gentlemen called you forwards as a witness at Bow-street? - A. Yes; and bound me over to attend here as a witness.

Q. What questions did they ask you there? - A. They asked me of whom my master bought these glasses; I told them he bought them of two men, who came up to the shop, and asked him if he wanted to buy a pair of glasses; they said they came from Bedfordbury; my master told them if they brought the glasses he would look at them, and if he liked them he would buy them.

Q. Did your master agree to buy them? - A. Yes; he gave ten guineas for them.

Q. Did you tell this at Bow-street? - A. Yes, I did; I saw the money paid upon the hob of a stove; I went to Bedfordbury.

Q. Now I ask you, upon your oath, has not your master taken great pains to discover those persons he bought those glasses of? - A. I am sure he has; he gave me directions to look after these people.

Q. How long were those glasses exposed in the open shop for sale, before they were sent to Reeves's? - A. They were a day or two in the shop, till I took them to Reeves's.

Mr. Lockhart. Q. Where did the glasses stand? - A. The glasses stood up upon the first pair of stairs.

Q. Did they stand before or behind any thing? - A. They stood behind a frame, where all the glasses stood.

Q. Was it dark when he bought the glasses of the two men? - A. No. it was drawing towards dark; I never saw the two men before.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. Did your master ask where they had got them from? - A. Yes; they told him they were to be sold for rent for their landlord, and they were at Bedfordbury, the other side of Covent Garden.

Q. Did you observe the number? - A. No; it is pretty near the Scotch Arms.

Q. Did you go into the house? - A. No, I did not; the men brought the glasses, and my master gave ten guineas for them; I should not have given so much for them.

Q. Look at those glasses - upon your oath, did you ever know a broker give ten guineas for such glasses before? - A. If they were as good a pair as these, I have known them sold at a sale to a broker to sell again, and I think he would get a profit upon them.

Q. How much? - A. According to the customer; we would willingly get a guinea by them.

Q. Do you think you could sell them for eleven guineas? - A. With a little repair. I went to Bedfordbury afterwards, in search of the men, but the house was shut up.

Q. Did you ever go to Messrs. Robins, and tell them where your master got those glasses? - A. Yes; that very night the search-warrant was granted, I saw Mr. John Robins and his brother at Mr. Reeves's house.

Mr. Lockhart. Q. (To Mr. Robins.) In your opinion, what would a broker give for such a pair of glasses? - A. No broker would give above seven guineas for them.

Mr. Knowlys. Q (To Mr. Robins) Do you mean to say, that glasses of that size have not been sold for twelve guineas? - A. I do.

Q. Will you swear that glasses of that size have not been sold for twelve guineas? - A. I mean to swear they never were worth twelve guineas; I don't think they would fetch ten guineas; I should have been very glad to have sold them for eight.

Q. (To Reeves.) Do you not think they would have sold for twelve guineas? - A. They must have been sold for more than they were worth then.

Court. Q. In the state they were sent to you by the prisoner, what would you have given for them? - A. I would not have given above six guineas for them.

Court. Q. What would a broker have given fo them? - A. Six or seven guineas.

The prisoner left his defence to his Counsel, and called ten witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY (Aged 48.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

394. MARIA JENNINGS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of May , two guineas and four half-guineas, the property of Thomas Hopkins , in the dwelling-house of John Cooke .

THOMAS HOPKINS sworn. - I am a mariner , I keep a house at Falmouth, in Cornwall; I metwith the prisoner last Wednesday evening, in Chick-lane; I agreed to lay with her all night.

Q. Were you drunk or sober? - A. I was rather in liquor, but I was sensible. I went with her to her lodgings in Chick-lane .

Q. Do you know, of your own knowledge, whose house it was? - A. No. I undrest and went to bed with her between eleven and twelve o'clock; I was not in bed above an hour, but I had fell fast asleep; I had two guineas and four half guineas, and I tied it up in my fob pocket. I looked at my money when I undressed; she told me there was no occasion for me to look at my money, for it would be perfectly safe; and then she locked the door. There was a man, who slept in the next room, knocked against the wainscot, and told me, my wife was gone, and to look at my money; I looked for my money, and the fob was cut out of the breeches, and the money gone, and she too; I immediately called the watchman, and he came up with a light, and examined the bed, but could not find any thing; the watchman and I went down stairs in search of the prisoner, and found her next door but one; we searched her, but could not find any other money but what I gave her, that was three shillings and sixpence.

Q. Were you sober enough to know that it was the same woman? - A. Yes.

Q. In whose company did you find her? - A. There was a man and some women in the room with her.

Q. What did you know her by? - A. By a stain in her face; I am positive she is the same person.

JOHN KEENE sworn. - I am a watchman: About a quarter after eleven, the prisoner and the prosecutor were coming up Field-lane, and he asked me if I would call him up, to go with the Exeter coach; he asked me if I would have any thing to drink, and we went into a house the corner of Chick-lane, and had a glass of rum a piece, then we parted; I saw him go with the prisoner to her lodgings. About twelve, a man called the prisoner down stairs, and she came down stairs almost naked; I said to her, if you are going to have another man, how am I to call that man in the morning; and I desired her to go in doors, and she would not; she went along with the man that called her out to the next door but one; about a quarter of an hour after that, the landlord called to me for a light, and said, there was a man robbed in the house; the prosecutor called to me, and I took him to the next door but one; I searched the bed, but could not find any thing. I then took her into custody, and carried her to the watch-house; the officer of the night searched her, but there was nothing found upon her but three shillings and sixpence.

Q. Did you see the prosecutor's breeches? - A. Yes; he told me where they were cut.

Q. Q. Do you know who keeps this house? - A. Yes, Mr. Cook, a shoe-maker.

Q. What is his Christian name? - A. I believe John, I am not quite sure.

Prisoner. Q. Did you ever know me charged with any thing of the kind before? - A. Never; she was always very quiet when she walked along the street.

Prisoner's defence. I know nothing of his money, I never saw it.

GUILTY of stealing to the value of 39s . (Aged 21).

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

395. SARAH KIRK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of April , a cloth great coat, value 3s. the property of James Poore .

The prosecutor's name being mispelt in the indictment, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

396. MARY ALLEN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of May , a tin waterpot, value 2s. the property of John Hinde .

ROBERT TAYER sworn. - I am servant to Mr. John Hinde, tinman : On the 7th of this month, about two o'clock in the afternoon, I was called from dinner by a gentleman, who informed me I had lost a water-pot from the door; I followed, and about an hundred yards from the house I took the water-pot from the prisoner; I saw it outside the door about an hour before; I cannot swear to the pot; here is a witness here who made it; the one I missed was a red one, and the one I took from the prisoner was a red one; she said she was very sorry for it.

JOSEPH PEARSON sworn. - I am a tinman, journeyman to Mr. Hinde: I know the water-pot to be Mr. Hinde's property; I missed it on the 16th of April, I know it by a particular mark on the handle; in the wiring of it there is some folder put in the handle, which I never saw upon any other water-pots but what we make.

Prisoner's defence. I have nothing to say, but leave it to the Judge's mercy.

GUILTY (Aged 37.)

Whipped in the gaol , and discharged.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

397. SAMUEL HIGLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of April , ten steel files, value 10s. four steel rubbers, value 6s. three pieces of iron, value 1s. 6d. and a screw bolt, value 6d. the property of John Vidler .

It appeared in evidence that the property was found in the shop of the prisoner, and the Court were of opinion, that however there might be evidence shown that be was a receiver, there was no evidence to bring home the charge in the indictment to the prisoner.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice GROSE.

398. JOHN WILD and JOHN ROBINSON were again indicted for that they, on the King's highway, in and upon Alexander Webley , did make an assault, putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, a leather pocket-book, value 2s. a cotton handkerchief, value 1s. and two Bank-notes, each of the value of 5l. the property of the said Alexander .

ALEXANDER WEBLEY sworn. - On Friday the 27th of April , between eight and nine o'clock in the evening, as I was walking along Coventry-street with a woman, the prisoner Wild accosted the woman with how do you do, and said he would treat her with something to drink but had no money; the woman answered, if that was the case she would treat him; we all went into a house the corner of Coventry-street, and Robinson was called in afterwards; the woman asked Wild if he was an acquaintance of his; he said, yes; she then said, let him be called in.

Q. Who was this woman? - A. A married woman that I had known some years ago.

Q. Was she upon the town? - A. No; they pleaded poverty, and said they were out of place; I treated them, the woman left us, and wished us a good night; I sat with them half an hour in the parlour, she went home, and I meant to do the same, it was at the corner of Coventry-street; I went about a quarter of a mile, as soon as the woman had left me, to go home; the prisoner Wild accosted me, he had followed me, he asked me if I had missed of the woman; I said, she was gone home; he said, she was not gone home, he knew where she was gone, if I would permit him, he would shew me where she was; I was guided by him down Princes-street to Coventry-street again, to a court in Whitcomb-street , I found the prisoner Robinson in the court, he had got there by another way; Robinson ran against me violently, and knocked me down; the prisoner Wild desired him not to hurt his friend; being in company with them half an hour before I perfectly knew them; I told them they were both thieves, and desired them to let me go about my business; after being knocked down, I felt my watch in my pocket, and thought myself perfectly safe, and out of danger; I made the best of my way out of the court, the court was very dirty, and I had occasion to search for a pocket handkerchief to wipe my hands and missed it; I then missed my pocket-book containing two five pound notes, there was no other property besides memorandums in it; I made the best of my way home, and depended upon the woman, they being her acquaintance, to find them the next day; I went to the woman the next morning, to know if she knew where they lived; she said, she knew one, but knew nothing of the other, and did not know his direction; she had heard him say he would be at Princes-street at four o'clock the next day; accordingly I went to the street, and staid about an hour, and saw both the prisoners; I enquired for a constable directly, but as soon as they got to the first street, they began to run, I suppose they saw me; in running, they parted from each other, and I found Robinson some time after at the corner of Windmill-street, standing alone; I seized him, and insisted upon his going into a public-house with me, and I sent for a constable, and charged the constable with him; I then went into the street to search for Wild, I found him with the woman, at her lodgings in Little Pultney-street; I seized John Wild in the same kind of manner, and told him there was a friend of his at the public-house would be glad to speak to him, accordingly he went very calmly; Robinson, as soon as I took him into the public-house, went upon his knees, and begged for forgiveness.

Q. Before you sent for a constable, or after? - A. Before; the prisoner, John Wild, said he knew nothing at all of the matter, and went very calm to the public-house, where I found Robinson and the constable; the two prisoners consulted each other, Wild said he was innocent of it, and knew nothing at all of it. Robinson offered me any satisfaction; he said he was going into the cavalry, and was to have thirty guineas bounty, and I should have satisfaction out of that; they were then taken before a Magistrate.

Jury. Q. Have the notes ever been found? - A. No; I do not know the numbers; nor the person I took them of did not know the numbers.

ELIZABETH LARNER sworn. - I was walking in Coventry-street with Mr. Webley; the prisoner, Wild, stopped me by the arm, and asked me how I did; he said, he would ask me to drink but he had no money; I said, that being the case I would treat him; we went to the Black-horse, in Coventry-street, and Robinson was standing there, and Wild said to him, what do you stand there for; I said, if he was an acquaintance of his he could drink too; I knew Wild two years ago at Brighton, he was servant in a family that used to visit the family that I lived servant in.

ROBERT WOODLEY sworn. - I was sent for to the Duke of Argyle's-head, the corner of Windmill-street, where I found Mr. Webley and Robinson; I went in and sat down, and Webley asked, where is the constable; I said, I am here; sir, says he, I give you charge of this man; for what, sir, says I; he has stole my pocket-book, and two five pound notes; he fell down upon his knees and cried, and said, he was very sorry, and hoped he would not hurt him, for he was a servant out of place, and it would be hurtful to his character; then I said, come and sit down here; then Webley said, I dare say the woman is now waiting with the other man, for she knows I want him; if you think so, says I, take a turn round, and see if you can find them, I will take care of Robinson myself; Webley was gone nearly half an hour; when he came back, he brought with him this lady that stands here, and Wild; he said, he knew nothing of it, and said it must be the other.

Q. (To Larner.) Did you see either Wild or Webley the next day? - A. Yes; he came to me, and asked me if I knew either of those two men that drank with us; I told him I knew John Wild some little, but John Robinson I never saw before that evening.

Q. Look at the prisoners, are you sure you saw those two men on the night that was mentioned? - A. Yes, I am sure of it; this was on the Friday evening, and on the Saturday evening, I saw both of them in Coventry-street, just upon the spot where I saw Wild the night before Mr. Webley had asked me to go out to see for them.

Q. (To Webley.) You told me you were knocked down? - A. Yes.

Q. How long before that had you felt your pocket-book in your pocket? - A. Not five minutes; it was in my inside coat pocket, the right-hand side.

Q. When did you put the notes into it? - A. The same day I took them in Bond-street.

Q. Was it in the same pocket with your handkerchief? - A. No, my handkerchief was outside.

Q. Could you at all tell when the pocket-book and the handkerchief went? - A. I cannot say; I am convinced that it went when I was down, for the prisoner, Robinson, laid upon me some time.

Q. What was Wild doing at that time? - A. Wild persuaded him not to hurt me, his friend he called me.

Q. Did Wild help you up? - A. No, he did not; I turned the other over as soon as I could; I felt myself in danger, and thought I must help myself.

Q. How long might you be? - A. I suppose about three minutes.

Q. Were you perfectly sober? - A. Yes; I knew them again as soon as I saw them.

Larner. He was very much in liquor.

Q. (To Webley.) You hear what the girl says, were you in liquor? - A. No.

Jury. Q. Have you any reason to suppose the prisoners knew of your having the Bank-notes about you? - A. No; on the contrary I said I had no money.

Larner. He was in liquor; he said he had no money about him.

Prisoner Wild. Did not Webley say he had no money, and offered you his watch to have connections with you? - A. He offered me his watch, but I refused it.

Court. Q. Where was that? - A. At the public-house.

Q. What did he offer you his watch for? - A. To stay out with me all night; but I knew he was a married man, and had a large family, and I was a married woman, and he knew it.

Q. Was that before the two prisoners? - A. Yes.

Prisoner Robinson. Did not Webley tell you he did not miss his pocket-book till he got home? - A. He told me he missed his property when he got home; and that some time before he had the misfortune to think he had lost a note, and some time after he found it in a place where his wife had put it; that she had taken it out of his pocket when he was intoxicated with liquor, and he thought he had lost it by being in bad company.

Wild's defence. I parted with this man in Sydney's-alley, and then I parted with Robinson; I met the prosecutor again, talking to a woman, I asked him if he was not gone home, he said, no; I said, if he would give me leave, I would see him home, as he was very much intoxicated; we were going through a court I met Robinson, and he run against him, and he fell down, and then he got up, and struck Robinson, and then run away.

Robinson's defence. The prosecutor was so very much intoxicated, that the landlord of the house would not let him have any more; I happened to meet this gentleman, and I happened to touch him, and he was so very much intoxicated that a very little thing would make him fall; he did fall several times; the next day the woman said that he had been after us; we told her we would go and clear up the point; I went up to see for him; I met with him; he offered to treat me with a pint of beer, and when I went into the house with him, he charged a constable with me; he said if we would give him eight pounds, he would make it up; I told him I was going into the horse cavalry, and I would sooner give him money than he should send me to prison.

Prisoner Robinson. He wanted eight pounds before I offered him any thing.

Webley. I did; but it was in order to make him acknowledge the robbery.

Both NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice GROSE.

399. HANNAH CLARKE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of April , a feather and flock bed, value 12s. a feather and flock bolster, value 2s. a linen sheet, value 12d. a pair of bellows, value 12d. and an iron trevet, value 6d. the property of Daniel Dawson , in a lodging-room .

ANN DAWSON sworn. - I am the wife of Daniel Dawson ; my husband is at sea: I let lodgings; I let a lodging to the prisoner at three shillings a-week, better than six weeks ago; I think it was on a Friday evening towards the beginning of April, and the latter end of April she went away; I missed the articles in the indictment; I have not seen any of them since.

Q. For whose use was this furniture let to her? - A. For Hannah Clarke and John Clarke ; she said he was her husband, and said he was at sea; she came back in a few days after I had missed the property, and told me she could not give me the property back, because it was sold, but she would pay me for it.

JOHN SULLIVAN sworn. - I am a weaver by trade: Before the prisoner was taken up, she went with Mrs. Dawson and I, to a friend of her's at Tower-hill, to get the money to pay her for the things; I heard her acknowledge that she had taken them.

Q. Was any promise of favour made her, or any threat? - A. No.

Prisoner's defence. The Justice said, that upon paying thirty-five shillings, I should be discharged; I have been in the House of Correction upon this charge.

GUILTY (Aged 20.)

Fined 1s. and sent back to the House of Correction .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

400. ELIZABETH ABIGAIL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of April , a linen shirt, value 5s. a muslin handkerchief, value 12d. and a child's linen shirt, value 6d. the property of Winifred Maddison .

WINIFRED MADDISON sworn. - I go out washing and chairing : I was out five weeks, looking after a person that was ill at Stepney; I frequently came home to see after my child; I was at home on Saturday, the 21st of April; I had a shirt in the drawer, belonging to a young man, that was not locked; I came home on the Monday afternoon; I missed the shirt out of the drawer, and a muslin handkerchief of my own, and a child's shirt; I found them afterwards at the pawnbroker's; I never saw the prisoner before that day; I heard she had been in the house, and I went to her, and asked her what business she had in my house, and she said she had not been in the house.

ANN FINLAY sworn. - (The pawnbroker produces a handkerchief and a shift). I had them from the prisoner, on the 23d of April, I did not ask her how she came by them, I knew her very well, she used to pawn things very often for her mistress, who is now outside the door. I sent her four shillings on them. (They were deposed to by Mrs. Maddison.)

ELIZABETH BAXTER sworn. - I was going past Mrs. Maddison's, I saw the prisoner there, on Monday, the 23d of April, I do not know how long she was there.

Prisoner's defence. I was going of an errand, I met with a gentlewoman, who asked me to pledge these things for her, which I did, for four shillings, I came out and gave her the ticket.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY (Aged 19.)

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice GROSE.

401. MARY PARTIN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of April , a Banknote, value 40l. another Bank-note, value 10l. another Bank-note, value 5l. another Bank-note, value 2l. another Bank-note, value 1l. the property of George Bell .

The case was opened by Mr. Knapp, but there being no evidence to bring the charge home to the prisoner, she was ACQUITTED .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice GROSE.

402. MARY CHATTLE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of May , ten pounds and three quarters of beef, value 5s. the property of Joseph Fisher .

JOSEPH FISHER sworn. - I am a butcher , in Newgate-market : Last Wednesday, between twelve and one o'clock, I missed a piece of beef; the prisoner was brought back in two or three minutes.

Q. Did you know it to be the same piece of beef? - I knew it again.

Q. How did you know it, had you weighed it before it was taken? - A. No; it was a mouse-buttock of beef.

- sworn. - I am a journeyman to Mr. Fisher; I had seen the beef not two minutes before it was gone; I pursued the prisoner, and stopped her; I did not see the prisoner near the shop; the beef was brought back by Smith; I know it because I helped to cut it.

Q. (To Fisher). What is the value of it? - A. Between four and five shillings.

WILLIAM SMITH sworn. - I am a servant to Mr. Peppercorn, opposite Mr. Fisher's: I heard an alarm given that a woman had taken a piece of beef, I ran out immediately, and took it from her; she did not say a word.

- WOODMAN sworn. - I am a constable; the woman was delivered to me; that is all I know of it.

Prisoner's defence. I was in great distress, I had not a gown to my back; I have got three children, and no husband; I had not eat any thing for almost a week.

GUILTY .

Privately whipped and discharged.

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

403. JOSEPH HUTCHINS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of May , a silk handkerchief, value 1s. the property of George Wilson .

The prosecutor not appearing, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

404. ABRAHAM OTTEY was indicted for that he, on the 12th of April , upon Elizabeth Watson , spinster , did make an assault, and her the said Elizabeth, against her will, feloniously did ravish and carnally know .

(The Court ordered that the evidence upon this trial should not be published).

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice GROSE.

405. JOHN CANEY and THOMAS CANEY were indicted for a misdemeanor , to which they pleaded GUILTY .

Confined six months in Newgate .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

406. JOHN CANEY was again indicted for a misdemeanor , but no evidence was offered.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

The SESSIONS being ended, the COURT proceeded to GIVE JUDGMENT as follows:

Received sentence of Death - 3.

Richard Phillips , Nicholas Vargin , Sarah Holloway .

Transported for seven years - 13.

James Gallaway , John Harris , John Robinson , John Pearson , Charles Bacon , Mary Glave , Edward Long , John Wild , William Brown , George Tunstall , John Smith , William Stacey , Maria Jennings .

Confined three year in the House of Correction, and publicly whipped. - 1.

Edward Wright .

Confined one year in Newgate, and fined 1s. - 1.

Mary Carlton .

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction, whipped in the jail, and discharged - 2.

George Degrange , Thomas Smith .

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction, and fined 1s. - 3.

John Price , John Castle , Aaron Heal .

Confined six months in the House of Correction, publicly whipped, and discharged - 2.

James Jones , Thomas Griffin .

Confined six months in Newgate - 2.

Thomas Caney , John Caney .

Confined six months in the House of Correction, and fined 1s. - 2.

Lawrence Williamson , Elizabeth Abigail .

Confined three months in Newgate, and fined 1s. - 2.

John Robinson , Esther Urin .

Privately whipped, and discharged - 3.

Mary Wyer , Mary Chattle , Mary Allen .