Old Bailey Proceedings Online (www.oldbaileyonline.org, version 6.0, 23 October 2014), October 1792 (17921031).

Old Bailey Proceedings, 31st October 1792.

THE TRIALS AT LARGE OF THE CAPITAL and other CONVICTS, ON THE KING'S Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery for the CITY of LONDON; AND ALSO The Gaol Delivery for the County of Middlesex, HELD AT JUSTICE HALL in the OLD BAILEY, On Wednesday, the 31st of OCTOBER, 1792, and the following Days;

Being the EIGHTH SESSION in the Mayoralty of The Right Honourable John Hopkins , LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON,

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY E. HODGSON, PROFESSOR OF SHORT-HAND; And Published by Authority.

NUMBER VIII. PART I.

LONDON:

Printed for E. HODGSON (the Proprietor), No. 14, White Lion Street, Islington; And Sold by J. DALBY, No. 22, Fetter-lane, opposite Rolls-buildings; Also by J. WALMSLAY, No. 35, Chancery Lane; and S. BLADON, No. 13, Pater-noster Row.

MDCCXCII.

N. B. Letters and Messages for Mr. Hodgson, left at No. 22, Fetter-Lane, will be instantly forwarded to him.

THE TRIALS AT LARGE OF THE CAPITAL and other CONVICTS, ON THE

KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery for the CITY of LONDON, &c.

BEFORE the Right Honourable JOHN HOPKINS , LORD MAYOR of the City of London; the Right Honourable LLOYD Lord KENYON , Lord Chief Justice of his Majesty's Court of King's Bench: the Honourable Sir JOHN HEATH , Esq. one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; the Honourable Sir ALEXANDER THOMPSON , one of the Barons of his Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir JOHN WILLIAM ROSE , Serjeant at Law, Recorder of the said City; JOHN SILVESTER , Esq. Common Serjeant at Law, of the said City; and others his Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

London Jury.

Philip Vivian

John Allison

John Taylor

Michael Ellis

Ralph Newham

Henry Goddard

William Sibley

Robert Orton

Edward Johnson

Joseph Alsop

Richard Harris

Francis Hodges

First Middlesex Jury.

Hugh Wright

Lacey Punderson

Peter Taylor

John Hartshorn

James Stewart

Thomas Dawson

Joseph Appleford

Benjamin Stemetz

Thomas Varney

Samuel Wardell

David Conty

Charles Cooper

Second Middlesex Jury.

Edmund Kitchen

Clements Leeds

Thomas Lawn

James Partridge

William Pearson

John M'Cord

Walter Thwaites

Benjamin Skelton

James Clew

Joseph Stanley

Joseph Gaitshell

John Henfree

447. JOHN HUGH was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Edward Lascelles , Esq . about the hour of nine in the afternoon, on the 1st of August last, at the parish of St. Mary-le-bone , and feloniously stealing therein a man's livery cloath coat, value 13 s. his property: seven silver teaspoons value 7 s. two linen shirts, value 3 s. six neckcloths, value 4 s. a pair of silver tea tongs, value 3 s. seven pair of cotton stockings, value 7 s. a pair of silver shoe buckles, value 20 s. four woolen waistcoats, value 3 s. a pair of linen trowsers, value 12 d. two cotton handkerchiefs, value 2 s. a silk handkerchief, value 12 d. a linen ditto, value 12 d. a cotton night cap, value 12 d. fourteen yards of linen, value 6 s. a pepper box, value 1 d. a steel bodkin, value 2 d. two ivory ditto, value 2 d. a pair of steel scissars with silver bows, value 6 s. a steel watch chain, value 2 d. a pen knife, value 2 d. one top of pepper castor mounted with silver, value 2 d. and one pencil, value 1 d. the property of James Westmaker ; and five pair of cotton stockings, value 5 s. a pair of silk ditto, value 6 s. a shirt, unmade, value 3 s. two silk handkerchiefs, value 6 s. a muslin ditto, value 12 d. the property of Elizabeth Friend , in the dwelling-house of Edward Lascelles .

ANN WESTMAKER sworn.

I know the prisoner. My husband, James Westmaker , lives butler to Captain Edward Lascelles , and the prisoner was his helper : Elizabeth Friend is a servant out of place; she slept with me; my apartment was over Captain Lascelles' stables; she brought some things there: on the evening of the 1st of August the things in the indictment (enumerating them) were taken away: the things belonging to my husband were worth five pounds: I left the prisoner in care of the place when I went out, and when I came home I found the stable door open; I returned about a quarter before nine: the prisoner was missing, and the things gone, and my room door was open; I double locked my room door when I went out, and left the prisoner in the stable; I saw the things at Justice Bond's, in Bow-street.

(The things produced and deposed to.)

Court. Is there any door out of the house into the stable? - Yes; but it is always fastened on both sides.

ROGER HODGKING sworn.

I took the prisoner with the things the 2d of August, at a publick-house at Hounslow; he had all the property except two pair of stockings and a pair of buckles; some were tied up; a waistcoat and shirt on his back, and a coat ready to put on.

Prisoner. I hope you will all be merciful to me: I was very much in liquor: I have not a friend within a hundred miles.

GUILTY 39 s. not of the breaking .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Lord KENYON.

[Transportation. See summary.]

448. JOHN BROWN and WILLIAM GRAHAM were indicted for feloniously assaulting Richard Taylor , on the king's highway, on the 25th of October , and putting him in fear and danger of his life, and feloniously taking from his person and against his will, a silver watch, value 50 s. a piece of steel chain, value 1 d. two guineas, and half a guinea, his property .

RICHARD TAYLOR sworn.

I am a taylor . I was robbed on the 25th of October, at a quarter past six at night; I was going towards Mile-End , on business, from John-street, No. 3; I met two men; one knocked me down with a stick; the prisoners are the two men: Brown knocked me down with a stout stick; he gave me a blow on the head just right when he met me, without speaking to me; I had no suspicion of them at first; I was stunned by the blow: I did not take any particular notice of them till I received the first blow; I had three blows before I fell: Graham did not strike me at all: when I recovered my senses I observed the two prisoners standing over me, giving me many blows: it was a silver watch, and two guineas and a half, and two copper halfpence: they staid with me a few minutes, and then went away; John Brown walked off; and on returning he gave me another blow: he struck me withhis fist on my head; he went away then; it was a publick road for foot and horse, not a carriage-way; this was a quarter after six; I was very punctual in taking notice of the time; I saw nobody pass by; I went home; I saw the two prisoners next day at Shadwell, at Mr. Staple's office; I was there before the prisoners came; they were not in irons at first; I knew them immediately; I am sure those are the men; I suppose they were with me altogether about six or seven minutes.

Prisoner Brown. When Justice Staple's asked him who were the men, he said a tall man and a little man; says the justice, that will not do; and Mr. Mayne went up to him and said, why do not you swear to them.

Court. Did you say one was tall and the other short? - Yes.

JOHN WATTS sworn.

I am a waiter to a publican. Last Thursday night, between the hours of six and seven, very nigh seven, I was going with a pot of beer, and the prisoner Graham came to me (that is the shortest); I live at the Sun in Catherine's-lane; and he asked me to buy a watch; I said yes; then he took me on one side, and shewed it me; he asked three pounds: he went away; next morning he came again and offered me the watch for thirty shillings; then I suspected it was stolen: Brown was with him: I offered twenty six shillings for it; Brown said I should not have it; and they came again and sold it me, and I went directly and laid an information.

Prosecutor. The Sun is about a mile from the place where I was robbed.

PETER MAYNE sworn.

I had the watch from Watts: it has been in my possession ever since.

(Produced and deposed to by the name and number.)

Prisoner Graham Would you have known us if you had met us in the street? - Yes: here is some pieces that correspond, of the chain, which they left in my pocket.

PRISONER BROWN's DEFENCE.

I was, during the whole day, at Mr. Frenche's, in Church Lane, at the Blacksmith's Arms, only half an hour at night.

PRISONER GRAHAM's DEFENCE.

I was there too; the watch I offered to sell was my own watch, he often wanted to buy it before.

BOTH GUILTY , Death .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice HEATH.

449. JAMES CARPENTER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of October , a silver milk pot, value 3 l. the property of Richard Ponsonby , Esq . commonly called the Hon. Richard Ponsonby , in his dwelling house .

CATHERINE PHILLIPS , sworn.

I live with Mr. Richard Ponsonby , called the Hon. Richard Ponsonby , in New-street, Spring Gardens ; I am his servant. On the 5th of October, between seven and eight in the morning, the prisoner came down the area steps about a quarter before eight, from the street into the kitchen; the kitchen door was wide open; it is seldom shut; he asked if Mr. Welch, or Walch, lived there, I told him no; he then went up into the street; he staid about two minutes, and then returned: he asked me if this was not Mr. Sponsby's house: the name Ponsonby is on the door; I said my master's name was Ponsonby; then he asked for Mr. Johnson: we have no servant in the house of that name: the silver cream pot stood on the kitchen dresser; and then said this is what I want, and thank you, and he ran up the area steps; I cried stop thief! I could not overtake him: I saw him again I believe the Saturday week after; this happened on the Friday morning; I knew him again; I am very sure the prisoner is the man; he was taken on mydescription; I never saw the milk pot after; I had not so little as five minutes conversation with him at both times; it was about a quarter after eight; I am regular in my work; I general rise at half past six; I was standing on the kitchen table dusting coppers; I said he had very black hair, and a shortish person, nobody pointed him out to me.

JOHN JONES sworn.

I was opening my master's shop, No. 4, Spring Gardens, about a hundred yards from Mr. Ponsonby's, about a quarter before eight, and I saw a man come round the corner very fast, and he ran into Charing Cross, and about a minute after this gentlewoman came running, and calling stop thief! it was the prisoner that ran; I have seen him several times about Spring Gardens before; I saw him again in New-street, going into the Park; I went to tell Mr. Ponsonby, and he was gone; I saw him again the night following in Coventry-street; I came to Charing Cross and told two of the Bow-street patrols; it was at night, about eight; I went with them, but he was gone, and we came down the Haymarket, and we saw him at the corner of Suffolk-street, and they laid hold of him and took him to the Hope; I attended at Bow-street on Monday, I am sure of him.

JAMES CHEW sworn.

I am one of the patrol belonging to Bow-street; I apprehended the prisoner; I found nothing on him.

WILLIAM BLACK sworn.

I am the other patrole, I was also present; the boy pointed the prisoner out as the man.

Court to Mrs. Phillips. What sort of a milk pot is this? - A handsome high newfashioned milk pot, stood on a foot, and had a lid, I do not know the weight of it.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I was in Covent-garden market that morning, buying a bushel of apples, which I get my bread by selling on a jackass; know nothing of the matter.

GUILTY, 39 s.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron THOMPSON.

[Transportation. See summary.]

450. JOHN CASTLEDINE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of October , five guineas, a silver watch, value 4 l. a silver seal value 12 d. a composition seal, value 12 d. a steel seal, value 12 d. the property of Daniel Ford , in the dwelling-house of Anthony New .

DANIEL FORD sworn.

I came from Gloucester to do a job of work for the Margrave of Anspach; I went to him at Hammersmith, and I met my master the Reverend Mr. Fearon; he took me to town to the Old White Horse Cellar, the 16th of last June; I asked for some victuals and a pint of beer, and went out of the Old White Horse Cellar about a quarter before five; coming out at the door I met the prisoner; I never saw him before; I asked him the road to Albemarle-street, he said he was a stranger just come into town, but knew Albemarle-street very well, and in walking down he asked me what countryman I was; he said he was going down there, and we walked together; I told him I was a Gloucestershire man; he asked me if I knew Stroudwater, in Gloucestershire, I told him I did very well; he asked about several other village places which I did not know; he asked me about one Hickman of Gloucester: in walking 200 yards, or not so much, he was on the left hand side of me, there was a fine lady's purse on a step of a gentleman's door; he whipped round me; at that time I saw the purse; he got hold of the purse in his right hand, and slapped it into his waistcoat pocket; then he took me athwart the road, and said, as we are strangers just come into town, God, we have met with a fine prize; he took me to a publick house to have one pint of beer; I do notknow that landlord's name; a stout lusty man in a blue coat came in, and then the prisoner pulled out the purse, and a note that was in the purse, and mentioned in the note that it was bought of a Mrs. Smith, a jeweller, a locket valued at 135 l. there was a locket in the purse, in a tortoise shell case; he said he had a friend living up higher in the street, and he asked me if I had picked it up would I have given him half? I said I should; he said he would go to his friend and fetch 20 l. and give it to me for my share, and he would take the locket; then we three went to Mr. News, the Crown in Silver-street, there he called for a quart of porter, and went into the parlour, and then he said he would step and fetch the money; the other man said he was a stranger to both of us, he thought he had a right to leave this locket, with him; then the prisoner pulled the purse out of his pocket and gave it to his companion, and went out of the room for the valuation of ten minutes, then returned, saying his friend was not at home; and he asked me what money I had in my pocket, I said I had five or six guineas, I did not know which; I pulled out my purse; I had but five guineas and three shillings; he asked me what sort of a watch I had, I told him it was almost a new one, I had just bought him, and given four guineas and a half for him; I put down the watch on the table with the five guineas, in the mean time the other man spoke to me, and the prisoner took my watch and five guineas off the table and walked off, and I never saw him any more till I came to swear to him.

Court. Before he took up the watch and the five guineas had you agreed that he was to take the watch and five guineas as part of the bargain? - No, I had no thoughts of his having my watch and money when he when out; the other man then pulled the purse out of his pocket and gave me the locket, and said he would be with me at nine o'clock, at the White Horse Cellar; he walked off, and I never saw him since; I took the locket after the prisoner was gone; nothing was said about his having my watch and money; I did not observe him take it, the other man was on the other side of the table; I saw the prisoner's hand upon the watch and money while I was talking to the other man: I went into the country and was sent for; I never saw him till he was in custody in Bow-street, about three weeks ago, since the 16th of June; I know him again; I never saw my watch and money; I have no doubt but the prisoner is the man.

Prisoner. Had you not the locket from me? - No, I had it not till after he was gone off with my watch and money.

Did you say the locket was left with you as a security? - No, the other man gave me the locket to meet me again at nine o'clock (the locket produced); I did not know what it was till afterwards they said it was a diamond stone.

ANTHONY NEW sworn.

I keep the Crown in Silver-street, Golden-square ; the 16th of last June the prisoner and prosecutor, and another in company, went into my parlour and called for a pot of porter; I never saw either of them before; the prisoner walked backwards and forwards from the parlour to the tap-room several times while the other two were in conversation; they were there about half an hour; I was not out of the tap-room the whole time; the prisoner went out first; I saw him; he said not a word to me; I am positive to the prisoner; I did not see him till he was taken five weeks ago; the other man went out afterwards; he asked me if the pot of beer was paid for, and he paid me for it, and in a few minutes after Ford came out enquiring after the two men, and he said I doubt I am wronged out of my watch and property, and have nothing to shew for it but this locket, which I told him was worth very little; then he went away.

JONH BECK HEATHER sworn.

I live in Long Acre; the utmost value of this locket is not worth more than 6 s. or 7 s. at most; the stones are ordinary paste.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

Walking down Piccadilly, I met the prosecutor, we walked on and I saw a purse; says he there lays a purse, I picked it up and he cried halves immediately; then he asked me what countryman I was, I told him a West countryman; he said he was the same country; he said as we are countrymen I hope you'll give me half; we went into Mr. New's; there was a strange man; I took out a bill and receipt, and a locket, from the purse; the prosecutor asked if there was nothing else in the purse, and there was a locket, but I cannot say whether that is the same locket; I went to my friend, he was not in town, I came back and told him; says he I should like to keep this, it is the first thing I ever found in my life; and the prosecutor said he would leave his money and his watch in my hands as an indemnification; he first gave the money to this man, a stranger to me; I went on Monday morning to the same place, he was not there.

GUILTY , Death . (Aged 48.)

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron THOMPSON.

451. THOMAS FOULKES was indicted for feloniously assaulting William Dunn , in a certain field near the king's highway, on the 11th of September 1791 , putting him in fear, and danger of his life, and feloniously taking from his person and against his will, five pieces of copper money called halfpence, his property .

WILLIAM DUNN sworn.

I am a journeyman taylor , I live in Spice-gardens, Ratcliffe-highway; on the 11th of September 1791, I was going towards Stepney, between five and six in the morning, my business requires my early rising, and that morning I got up to take a walk; it was on a Sunday; I work for Mr. Gillespie in Basinghall-street: about a quarter of a mile from Stepney, this Mr. Thomas Foulkes overtook me, and said it is a fine morning, master, I said yes; he said it is a fine morning for-mushrooms; it may be says I, for I don't understand them; says he here are none to be got here, for people gather them every day, but if you take a walk with me as far as Bow-common there are plenty; I said I had no notion of going so far; he asked me if I was not an Irishman, I said no; he said I know you are from the North; I said I was; he asked me if I would have any thing to drink, says he you be a penny to my penny and we will have a quartern of gin at the Walnut-tree, they know me very well; we went there and they were not up; there he met a man whom he knew; I left him at the public house and went into a field opposite the Walnut-tree; there is an open place large enough to admit a carriage into the field; I walked round the field and came out again, and found this man talking to the other man that he before met with; the people at the Walnut-tree were then up. He asked me if I would not then have a drop of gin, I said I did not care; the prisoner called the landlord, Smallwood, bring a quartern of gin, it was brought, and he said to the landlord don't you know me? yes, says the landlord, I know your face very well; says he don't you know I was drunk in your house on Sunday, and I fell over your pump and cut my lip; he pulled down his lip and shewed the mark; I remarked his lip; the landlord and him were talking, and I paid for the gin two pence, and went out: the prisoner had a piece of wood about three quarters of a yard long, and three inches square every way; it appeared to be a joist for flooring, sawed off one way and broke the other; as I was going out of the house he followed me; the landlord said to him, you may as well leave that piece of wood for me to light the fire; he said he would leave it as he came back again; we went out together, I was rather before; I was going towards Bow-common ; sometimes he was first, and sometimes me: Bow-common was not my road home, but it was indifferent which way I went, I went merely for the air; I had walked about a quarter of a mile from the house towardsBow-common, I had no intention of going to any particular place, we had come to a brick wall, and the prisoner said you had better come over here, (he was on the other side of the road not of the wall,) it is a chance if we don't get some mushrooms here; I went to him, and he said in the field, that butcher is to be at the publick house to pay me five shillings, and to bring a bit of steak; and he said there was another man who owed him four shillings, and he asked me if I could give him change for half a guinea, I said no, I could not for a sixpence; but says I, as you are known at the publick house, they will give you change; the prisoner said so they will I dare say; then I began to suspect my companion, and thought he meant to take my money, so I made towards the road he came after me, and come over my head with that piece of wood, and struck me over the head and cut my hat; and he said, d - n your eyes, give me your money; I said have not got any, for Christ's take don't murder me; then he said, d - n your eyes, if you speak or look I will cut your throat with my knife; then he struck me on my face with the wood, the first blow knocked me down, the second blow put me past speaking; after the second blow I felt his fingers in my right hand waistcoat pocket; I do not know what else he did: this happened about half past six, as near as I can judge: I lay senseless half an hour, and about seven I got up off the ground; I was senseless from the blow, and, as near as I can guess, I lay in that state half an hour, as I heard the clock strike seven when I recovered; I had two pence halfpenny in my pocket, I had four pence halfpenny when I came out, and had spent two pence for gin; the two pence halfpenny was in that pocket, I had a shilling and a penknife in the other pocket, which fell out when I fell down, and when I got up I found them on the ground under where I was down; I got up as well as I could; I was helped up, there were two gentlemen came by: when I paid for the gin I am sure I had the two pence halfpenny in my pocket; I went back to the Walnut-tree, and they washed my wounds and poured some brandy down my throat; I saw the prisoner ten months afterwards, it was ten months to a day; I went the day I was robbed to the magistrates in Wellclose-square; I gave a particular description to the runners, and I went home and was laid up four months: the first time I saw the prisoner afterwards was on the 4th of July; I met with him on the cross road from Whitechapel, near the London Hospital; I was struck with a kind of fear; the features of his face I was sure of, I crossed the road, turned about and ran before him, and had a full view of his face a second time; I knew him to be the man; I sat down to rest me, I was so weak and tired, there was no assistance in the way; I did not speak to him or he to me on the Wednesday following, this was on a Thursday; (I had sent word to the office that I had seen the person who is at the bar;) just about twelve at noon I saw the prisoner in Basinghall-street, he was going into Coleman-street through a passage; I was four or five yards behind him and run past him into the passage; I looked him in the face; says I is not your name Foulkes? the butcher told me his name was Foulkes; he whispered like, and said yes, do you know me? I said yes I know you; says he, tell me where; yes, says I, I will tell you; says he, why do you not tell me; I got him out of the narrow part of the ally into Coleman-street, and laid hold of him by the collar, and I said to him you are the man that left me for dead in Stepney-fields, and robbed me; there were two draymen standing, and I charged them in the king's name to assist me; one of them collared him, and asked a boy to fetch a constable; in the course of five minutes he said, d - n you, let me go, I will go to a justice; I took him before Justice Clerk; he denied seeing me; he was committed.

Court. Now, considering the distance of time ten months, and that this man's life is at stake, can you venture to swear that the prisoner is the man? - Yes, I am perfectly sure; if his head was cut off I should know it.

Court. I am sure, if it is upon such a recollection as that, it will have but little weight. - Looking at the cut of his lip, and every feature of his face, I am very positive nothing can be more so.

Prisoner. At the first hearing did not you set it down as an assault? - Upon my oath my first complaint was both an assault and robbery, and the second complaint was the same.

Lord Kenyon. It should be understood that the magistrates ought to return the examinations.

JOSEPH SMALLWOOD sworn.

I keep the Walnut Tree. The prisoner and prosecutor came into my house on a sabbath day in the morning, in September, a little after six; I knew the prisoner; I never saw Mr. Dunn before to my knowledge; they called for a quartern of gin; I served them; Dunn paid twopence for it; they went towards the Mile End Road together, from our house; I saw them in an hour or two afterwards; Dunn was brought in by two acquaintances of mine, William Palmer and Fat Jack, a waterman; Dunn was cut and mangled in a bad situation; I gave him some brandy inwardly as well as outwardly; I thought a little inwardly was as well as all outwardly; his left cheek was cut terribly, swelled ever so big: he said the man that went out with him had beat him and abused him, but whether he mentioned a robbery I cannot charge my memory, I was so much frightened; I never saw the prisoner after, till the second examination; I knew him by having the accident of the cut on his lip, by tumbling over a pump at the door, and he asked me if I did not remember it; I recollected him from that, and I am sure he is the man.

JAMES HALL sworn.

I live at Hoxton; I am an officer belonging to the city; on Wednesday, the 11th of July last, I apprehended the prisoner; I asked what he had done, the answer was, this is the man that robbed and murdered me; I thought it a very odd expression: I took him before Mr. Justice Rupert Clarke : the prisoner said he could bring witnesses to prove that he was at the Chest at Chatham: he was committed.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I thank you, my Lord, and the honourable Court. I assure you I grant the first part of Dunn's evidence, in meeting with him and going to the Walnut Tree, to Mr. Smallwood's house; there we drank together; but as to ever hurting him, or putting my hand on his person, I never did; in the next place he has crossed himself very much: he did say to the carman, this man has murdered me; why, d - n me, says the carman (begging your pardon, my Lord) you look like a murdered man: I said I would go before any magistrate, I know my innocence; we walked arm and arm together, and we went to Guildhall, where 'Squire Boydell was sitting alderman; he sent us in a coach to Mr. Justice Clarke; there he only swore at the first hearing that I committed very violent assault, but never mentioned a word of robbing him till the Saturday, then he said I had robbed him of two-pence halfpenny; I was only committed for a violent assault, till the last session the grand jury found a bill for robbery.

Jury to Smallwood. Did you see a certain piece of timber of three inches broad in the hands of the prisoner? - The piece of quartering, of floor joist, he carried it away with him; I asked him to give it me to light the fire; and he said he would give it me when he came back: I never saw it again.

Prisoner. I only came out of the sick ward this morning; I was seven weeks there: I have no witnesses: I am very weak.

GUILTY , Death . (Aged 38.)

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM.

452. MARTHA MARSHALL was indicted for feloniously breaking and enteringthe dwelling-house of William Lowe , about ten in the forenoon of the 17th of October , no person being therein, and stealing therein a man's hat, value 6 s. a velveret waistcoat, value 2 s. 6 d. and a linen shirt, value 12 d. his property .

WILLIAM HOW sworn.

I am a gardiner , near the Three Tuns, Kingsland . On Wednesday, the 17th of October, I was robbed; I went out at six in the morning, and returned at nine to breakfast; I went out at half past nine again; I left nobody there; I fastened the house by driving a large nail in the shutter; it is a cottage; I locked the door, and staid till ten, when I was called home, and found the window broke open, the nail broke in two, which I have in my pocket, and the pots of mirtles broke; there were the marks of patten rings all over the floor; there is but one boarded floor: it was a wet day: I found nobody in it: my neighbours were with me: the window was very low: I looked in my box, and missed a man's hat and a shirt, and a velveret waistcoat; the key was in the lock of the box, which was unlocked; I saw the prisoner go by in the morning, between six and seven, with a brickmaker, to a publick-house; I took the prisoner in the road going to Ball's Pond Turnpike, about half a mile from my house, about four in the afternoon; I took two duplicates from her; I gave them to Mr. Harper: I found all the things at Mrs. Pepperall's, a pawnbroker at Hoxton; the value of the hat was two shillings or half-a-crown; the waistcoat was almost new, worth two shillings and sixpence; the shirt is worth one shilling: my wife is not here.

ELIZABETH PEPPERALL sworn.

I am a pawnbroker at Hoxton town: (produces the things) the prisoner came with them to me on the 17th of October, between eleven and twelve, and pledged the things in the name of Martha Marshall : I knew her before: I gave her three duplicates; I should know them again; she said they were her husband's.

SAMUEL HARPER sworn.

I produce the things which I had from the pawnbroker's; I shewed her the duplicates, but I have since mislaid or lost them; the pawnbroker's is about a mile from Mr. How's house. (The things deposed to by the prosecutor).

Prisoner. A man asked me to pledge them, and gave me a shilling; he told me to put the duplicates into my pocket.

GUILTY 2 s. (Aged 23),

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

453. SARAH COWDEN was indicted for feloniously returning from transportation, and being found at large on the 27th of September last, without lawful cause .

JOHN OWEN sworn.

I am a servant to Mr. Akerman; I know the prisoner; in February 1788 the prisoner was capitally convicted; this is a certificate from Mr. Sheldon of her conviction; in June 1789 she received a conditional pardon; I delivered her for transportation, on board the Lady Juliana; she has behaved very well; I have no doubt of her person whatever. (The record of the conviction read).

PETER MAYNE sworn.

I apprehended the prisoner in Spital-street ; she was at work in the silk way; it was on the 27th of the last month; I have made enquiries into her character, it is a very good one; she has had a child or two, I believe, since she got away.

JOHN COOK sworn.

I speak to the same effect as Mayne.

Prisoner. I have witnesses to my character; I have worked hard ever since I left the ship: the prisoner called five witnesses, who had known her since she escaped,who gave her a very good character for honesty and industry.

GUILTY, Death .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron THOMPSON.

Recommended to mercy by the jury.

Court. Gentlemen, you are right; I shall certainly join my recommendation.

Lord Kenyon to the Prisoner. If you are let loose, I hope you will pursue the same line of industry which you have done according to the character you have had given you this day.

454. JOHN DODRIDGE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th day of August , a wooden chest, value 6 d. and eighty-one pound of tea, value 10 l. the goods of Edward Eagleton , privately, in his dwelling house .

JOHN WRIGHT sworn.

I live shopman with Mr. Eagleton; he is a tea dealer in Cheapside ; Mr. Constable came on the 25th of August and enquired if we had not lost a chest of tea; we examined our stock and found the tea deficient; we knew the number of the chest; it was 4683; I saw the chest at Hercules' Court, in Threadneedle-street, about twelve o'clock the same day; it was delivered to Mr. Hunt, he is a constable (looks at a paper); the box contained about eighty-two pounds: I never saw the prisoner about our house.

WILLIAM RENSHAW sworn.

I am a ticket porter; on the 24th of August, about nine o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner and two men coming along Cornhill; I followed them through Finch Lane; they went up Threadneedle-street; they pitched the box; I suspected they had stole it, and ran for Hunt, and he took the prisoner; the box was on the prisoner's back; he could not carry it, but dropped it: he said before the Lord Mayor that they gave him 6 d. to carry it.

WILLIAM HUNT sworn.

I was called by Renshaw; when I went to lay hold of the prisoner he had the box on his shoulders and threw it down; he ran away; I took the chest of tea to my house; I have kept it ever since (produced); there was tea in it, the chest was stove by falling.

Wright. This seems to be the same; it is marked 4683; there are two initial letters, G. C. they signification are of the ship the General Coote; we had three chests by the same ship; they were amongothers in the front shop.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I know nothing about it; they asked me to cary it, and said they would give me 6 d. I said I would if I could, but it was too heavy.

Court. What is the value of the tea? - don't over value it, place it rather under than over the mark? - It is worth at least 10 l. my Lord.

The prisoner called four witnesses to his character.

GUILTY, 39 s.

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Transportation. See summary.]

455. JOHN SMALL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th day of September last, 16 pounds of raw sugar, value 8 s. the goods of persons unknown .

THOMAS HUNTER sworn.

I am officer to the West India merchants; the prisoner had charge of the lighter between five and six in the afternoon; he was watchman ; he came up the ladder, and I said he had a bundle; I searched him, and he had some sugar tied in a handkerchief, and his great coat wrapped in it; he said he brought it from the ship, the Hannah, from Jamaica; Wells saw me take it; he hada little bag in his jacket and another in his breeches. (Produces the bags and handkerchief).

WILLIAM WELLS sworn.

I know no more than the last witness; we found this (a cane scoop) in his pocket; it is not a thing commonly used on board a ship.

GUILTY , (Aged 49).

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

[Whipping. See summary.]

456. THOMAS GIBSON and JOHN MATHERS were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of September , thirty-six pounds of brass, value 18 s. the goods of certain persons unknown .

WILLIAM DOLLOWAY sworn.

On the 24th of September, about two o'clock, I saw the prisoner Gibson and the other come out from among some casks, where there was some copper and brass; I was adjoining the Custom House quay, and I saw the tall man, Mathers; he helped to lay the brass under Gibson's jacket; they attempted to cross the way; I followed them and asked what they were going to do with it; Gibson then let it fall, and Greenwood took him by the collar and brought him back to the place where he had taken the brass from; Mather got away; I am positive Gibson is the man, and I believe Mather to be the other.

- THORNTON sworn.

I saw the prisoner Mather assist Gibson in taking this brass out of the cask, and Gibson assisted Mather to put it under his jacket.

JAMES GREENWOOD sworn.

I am a weigher on the keys of London; when the noon tender took the man I took him back to the key; that was Gibson.

WILLIAM GREEN sworn.

I am a constable; I took Gibson; and by inscriptions given of Mathers, I took him next day.

The prisoners, in their defence, said they knew nothing of it. (The brass produced).

BOTH GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Whipping. See summary.]

457. HENRY COWARD was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of October , a man's cloth coat, value 5 s. a cloth waistcoat, value 4 s. and a cambric handkerchief, value 1 s. the property of William Clark .

WILLIAM CLARK sworn.

I live in King-street, Tower Hill ; I keep a clothe's shop , the prisoner is a sailor ; two of his shipmates lodged with me; he came by their desire to my house in May; he was to stay till he could get a ship; I took him in out of kindness, and he staid till Oct. 4th; in the afternoon of that day he told me he had got a birth on board a sloop, and was going away either that evening or the next morning; I went out, and returned about eight o'clock; the prisoner was gone; I had seen the coat and waistcoat that day in the one pair of stairs back room; I missed them next morning; I saw no more of him till the 18th; before the justice he confessed it; he was taken on the 17th of October; as I was coming from the justice's I saw my waistcoat hanging up at the door of a clothe's shop, I went in and desired the woman to shew me the waistcoat; her husband is here; it is the same waistcoat I lost; then I asked her if she could shew me a coat, she did, and the handkerchief was produced before the justice, it was marked I. B.

JAMES M'EWEN , sworn.

I live at No. 60, Rosemary Lane; I am a salesman; I produce the propertywhich I bought of the prisoner, either the 4th or 5th of October; I am sure he is the man of whom I bought them; he came in and asked me 18 s. for all the things; I agreed for 17 s. I asked him how he came by them; he said they were made for him when he came home from sea; I thought the coat was not his size; he offered to try them on; I said, there is no occasion if they are your own.

Clark deposes to the clothes.

Prisoner. I had been among my shipmates, and was in liquor.

GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron THOMPSON.

[Fine. See summary.]

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

458. WILLIAM YOUNG CHANT was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of October , one cloth coat, value 5 s. one waistcoat, value 2 s. and a hat, value 1 s. the property of Joshua Walker .

JOSHUA WALKER sworn.

I live in Compton-street, Clerkenwell ; on the 10th of October I lost my things; I was sitting at dinner; I was informed a man had gone out with a bundle; I pursued him; I went to the prisoner, he had nothing of mine.

JOSEPH WALKER sworn.

I am son of Joshua Walker ; as I was sitting at dinner on the 16th of October William Stone , our apprentice, came in and said, is any body gone out? my father said no; my father sent me after the prisoner; I came up with him; he was running across Northampton-street; I overtook him; he had the coat and hat under his right arm; I told him to stop; he dropped the coat and hat; I told him to stop; he would not; I knocked him down, and apprehended him; he said, do you want to rob me? and asked me to come out and fight; this is the hat and coat he dropped.

Joshua Walker deposes to the things.

WILLIAM STONE sworn.

I am Mr. Walker's apprentice; I was at work in the back shop; my fellow apprentice said, there is somebody gone out of the shop; I did not see him go out.

Prisoner. I had been drinking with a young man, and he desired me to carry the goods to Islington, and he would pay me for my trouble.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Lord KENYON.

[Fine. See summary.]

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

459. WILLIAM CLANCEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of October , 4 lb. weight of printing types, value 4 s. the goods of Simon Stephenson .

SIMON STEPHENSON sworn.

I am a letter founder in Bream's-buildings, Chancery-lane, I can only speak to the property.

JAMES BARKER sworn.

I am a printer; on the 19th of October the prisoner came to my shop and wanted to sell some types, I asked him how he came to sell such a quantity; I live in Russell-court Drury-lane; he told me his brother was a printer and was dead, that this was all that was left; I asked him who had bought the rest, he said his sister had sold them, and he could not tell to whom; he seemed flurried, and desired I would give them to him again; I said I would not till he gave a better account of himself; he took to his heels and ran up the court, and I pursued and took him to Bow-street; going into the office he said he had told me a lie, that he had no brother a printer, he was a founder; I have kept them ever since.

John Allen . Court. How old are you? - Twelve, Sir.

Court. What becomes of boys who tell lies? - Go to a bad place, Sir.

JOHN ALLEN sworn.

I am servant to Mr. Stephenson; I set up the letters; I put the letters upon a stick to be dressed; I was carrying the things home; I set them down at the corner of Bedford-bury; it was on a Thursday, about six o'clock; I had three parcels, which I took from my master's in Bream's buildings, and was to carry them to Orange-street, Leicester-fields: at the corner of Bedford-bury, I asked the man to help me with the types on my head; yes, my lad, says he, they are very heavy; the prisoner is the man; he asked me where I was going; I said, to Orange-street, Leicester-fields; he said he would take one for me; he had two, I had one; at the corner of St. Martin's-lane , he put it out of his right hand into his left; I said, Sir, there are two; no, says he, there is not; I will run back, I can run faster than you; I ran after him, and he gave me the dodge; I lost him; I am not sure the prisoner is the man; I believe he is the man.

Mr. Stephenson. I am sure this is my type, the letter X has a flaw in it.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

He said that he kicked against it in the street; and that he did not know the value of it; that he took it to an old iron shop, and they told him it would be of more value to a printer; and that he took it to Mr. Barker, in Russell-court, who stopped him.

GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

460. JAMES MILLHOLLAND was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of October , two linen shirts, ruffled, value 1 l. one other shirt, value 10 s. and other articles, the goods of William Sumner , Esq . and eight silver table spoons, value 4 l. the goods of - Crockett , Esq . in his dwelling-house :

A second count, laying the robbery to have been committed in the dwelling-house of Messrs. Castell, Powell, Sumner, and Wilson.

Mr. Garrow, Counsel for the Prisoner.

(The prisoner desired the witnesses to be examined separate.)

WILLIAM SUMNER Esq. sworn

I live in Lombard-street ; Samuel Castell , Walter Powell , William Sumner , and William Wilson , is the firm of our house; the prisoner was my butler ; the articles mentioned in the indictment were in his care; the plate was Mr. Crockell's; he sent his property to be taken care of, not as to a banking-house, but as a friend; I received information from Kennedy, and went to Marlborough-street on the 23d of October; I can only speak to the property.

JAMES MEAD sworn.

I am a pawnbroker in Carnaby-street; I have two shirts; I took in a shirt of the prisoner on the 15th of October; on the 18th, about half past six, the prisoner came to my shop, and produced eight spoons and two waiters; here they are; (produced;) he wanted twelve guineas on them; I found the waiters were only plated; and I suspected they were not his own, as he asked more than they were worth; he said they were left him by Mrs. Crockett; and I said, then I suppose the waiters are silver, oh yes, sir, says he; I then told him I had not sufficient cash; I went out, and told him I would get change for a note; I went to the public-office, and took one of the spoons; I returned with Kennedy and he was gone; he was taken in half an hour.

JAMES KENNEDY sworn.

I am a police officer; I apprehended the prisoner, and took him to the office; I searched him, and found ten duplicates.

JAMES WILLIAM TYLER sworn.

I am servant to Dixon; I produce two decanters, two shirts, one pair of cotton stockings, one handkerchief, and two muslin neckcloths; some of those things were pledged in August, some in September, and some in October; I saw the prisoner pledge the shirts; I saw the duplicates delivered.

WADE KENDREW sworn.

I am servant to a pawnbroker; I took in a pair of silk stockings; (produced;) I don't know the prisoner.

Mr. Sumner. - These are a particular kind of stockings; they were made for me on purpose; I am sure they are mine: here is a shirt marked with red silk, or red cotton.

Prisoner. I have nothing to say, I only beg for mercy.

GUILTY, 39 s. (Aged 32.)

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Transportation. See summary.]

461. WILLIAM NEWMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of October , two bacon hams, value 30 s. the goods of Philip Sewell .

(The witnesses examined separate.)

PHILIP SEWELL sworn.

On the 17th of October I lost two hams; about a quarter before eight in the evening, the prisoner and another came and asked me for a quarter of a pound of cheese; the man threw down a shilling hard on the counter, and it fell down behind the counter; in picking up the shilling, I saw Newman was reaching something out at the door, and I could not think what it was; they were the only two hams in the shop; then Newman laid hold of another ham; as soon as I saw that, I ran round the counter, and cried stop thief! Newman ran out of the shop; they got one ham clear off, the other they dropped; I never recovered the ham again; the hams were both together in the shop, in one place; when the prisoner ran away, he ran about thirty yards; I lost sight of him; when he was brought back, I knew him to be the same man; he offered me two guineas to let him go.

Mr. Garrow, Prisoner's Counsel. - It was between seven and eight in the evening when you lost your hams? - Yes.

You lost only one? - No more.

THOMAS GURNEY sworn.

I am an apprentice to Mr. Wade, cabinet-maker; I heard the prosecutor cry stop thief! he was running, and I stopped him.

HENRY ABBOT sworn.

I am a baker; I was going by between seven and eight, and I saw Newman have a ham; I don't know who the man was he gave the ham to; then he went into the shop and fetched another, and run out of the shop; we stopped him.

Mr. Garrow. It was dusk, was it not? - Yes, Sir.

Did you ever say, before the alderman, that you did not see him give the ham to any one? - No, sir.

JOHN KING sworn.

I am a constable, and produce a ham; I had it from the prosecutor.

RICHARD ELBY sworn.

I know no more than the last witness.

Prisoner. I leave it all to my counsel.

He called nine witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Transportation. See summary.]

462. THOMAS BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of October , nine pieces of worsted stuffs called wildbores, value 15 l. the goods of William Deacon .

WILLIAM DEACON sworn.

I live at No. 59, Walling-street ; on the4th of October, I lost nine pieces of wild-bores from my warehouse; about half past five in the evening I was in my compting-house, and heard the bell tingle; I went into the warehouse and missed two rolls of wildbores: I went into the street and saw the prisoner not twenty yards off, returning; he had one roll on his shoulder; I pursued and took him: they are here. (Produced). This is mine.

Prisoner. A man offered me a shilling to carry it to Billingsgate.

GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Lord KENYON.

463. ANN THORN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of October , two silver table-spoons, value 7 s. one pair of man's shoes, value 2 s. and other things , the goods of Philip Bond .

PHILIP BOND sworn.

I am a gun-maker : the prisoner was my servant ; she lived with me two months; I had her taken upon Wednesday; I lost the things named in the indictment: I speak from my own knowledge of the loss of the spoons and shoes; in consequence of knowing this loss I sent for a constable.

ABIGAIL STEWART sworn.

I am apprentice to Mrs. Bond, mantua-maker. On Monday I was out all day, and came home at night, and Mrs. Bond said she missed an apron, and on Tuesday she missed two spoons; on Wednesday a constable was sent for, and she confessed; the constable searched her, and found several duplicates, and among them was some of Mrs. Bond's property; she was taxed with it; she owned to having taken the wearing apparel, but not the spoons; she had a muslin apron in her pocket; she begged for mercy; Mrs. Bond said it was better for her to confess: they begged her to confess every thing: I was in the room all the time, she never said she had made away with the things.

JOSEPH CRORKEN sworn.

I am a pawnbroker; I produce two sheets, one spoon, one pair of men's shoes; I took in one sheet and a napkin: I have kept the things ever since; I know the prisoner, she frequented our shop.

THOMAS WOOD sworn.

I am a constable of Langbourne Ward; on the 31st of October I searched the prisoner, and found this checked muslin apron; I found near forty duplicates on her, five in this book, and the rest in a stocking; they were in her pocket.

Stewart. I know this is Mrs. Bond's sheet, it is marked A. it was her's before she was married; the napkin is marked P. A. B.

Prosecutor. These shoes are mine, this spoon is mine.

Prisoner. I parted with those things not with any design to wrong my master or mistress. Some of the duplicates were found on the ground, and so was the pocket-book.

GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Transportation. See summary.]

464. WILLIAM CAUSEWAY was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of October , four metal watch chains, value 2 s. the goods of John Saunders .

JOHN SAUNDERS sworn.

I am a hardwareman ; I live in Fleet-market ; on Saturday the 13th of October I lost four gilt watch chains, I was informed that my glass-case was robbed, I ran out, and found the show-glass robbed; I pursued the prisoner, and brought him back and searched him; a neighbour said search his hair (I had forgot Barrington's scheme), and I took his hat off, and the chains dropped down from his hair.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I bought them of a school-fellow that I was playing with; I am not 12 years old.

GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury, before Lord KENYON.

Has the prisoner been here before? John Owen . Five or six times.

[Transportation. See summary.]

465. MARTHA HALL was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of October , twenty linen sheets, value 5 l. a damask table-cloth, value 5 s. and divers other things, the property of Henrietta Maria Hungerford , in her dwelling-house .

HENRIETTA MARIA HUNGERFORD sworn.

I live in Cavendish Square ; it is two years since I went into the country; I returned in October last; I found my house in great confusion; all the articles mentioned in the indictment, and many more were missing to a very great amount: I applied to the Police office; I had a very good opinion of the prisoner.

SAMUEL HAMILTON sworn.

I apprehended the prisoner, and found eighty-three duplicates on her: I went to the pawnbroker's and found that the things were chiefly the lady's.

- THACKERAY sworn.

I am a pawnbroker; I received this table cloth from Martha Hall ; and a napkin, the 24th of October.

- MULCASTER sworn.

I produce a sheet and petticoat; I took in the sheet on the 25th of May of the prisoner.

SEPTIMIUS SADLER sworn.

I am a pawnbroker: I produce five sheets and two bolster cases: I received on the 12th of November, 1791, a sheet; on the 12th of September a pair of sheets; they are worth about fifteen shillings; I had them of the prisoner.

JOHN BROWN sworn.

I am a pawnbroker: I produce a sheet and a table-cloth.

Prisoner. My husband was long upon me; I have had a lying-in, and I have lost the use of my hand, and I did this because I was urged by the greatest distress: I have lived with Mrs Hungerford four years and an half, and there is a great difference between us now.

GUILTY, 39 s.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Lord KENYON.

[Transportation. See summary.]

466. ANN LUMLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of October , one shirt, value 2 s. a muslin neck-cloth, value 1 s. and a pair of nankeen breeches, value 3 s. the goods of John Manning .

JOHN MANNING sworn.

I live at No. 1, Little White Lion-street, Seven Dials : I lost the things on Monday, the 1st of October: I took the things to the prisoner to wash, on the 28th of September: on the Monday I went to her lodgings, No. 12, in Castle-street; I received them of her, and went to the shop where I work, which is in the house where she lives in, and on the same floor; there I put on a clean shirt, and under the bench I placed the shirt, breeches, and neck-cloth: I am a locksmith: I threw my foul shirt over them, to keep the dust from them; then I went out about nine o'clock in the morning; I did not return there that day; on Tuesday morning I missed the things, when I went to work: on Wednesday morning I went to the prisoner's door, and she opened it; I asked if she knew any thing of my linen; she said she knew nothing about them since she gave them to me on Monday; I enquired of my shop-mate; I had a suspicion of this woman,and enquired at several pawnbrokers, and at last, at Mr. Brown's, I found my shirt and neck-cloth; I have never found the breeches: I got a constable and took her up at night.

JOHN MINGAY sworn.

I am apprentice to Mrs. Lane, in Castle-street: the prisoner came to me in the shop, and desired me to give her John Manning 's dirty shirt and stockings; I gave them to her; she saw the clean things laying there, and said they will get dirty; she brought me a piece of old silk to lay over them, which I did; then I went down stairs.

- HALES sworn.

I am servant to Mr. Brown, Long Acre: I produce a shirt and neck-cloth; I took them in of the prisoner at the bar, both in one day, though at different times; I lent one shilling on the shirt and sixpence on the neck-cloth.

(The shirt and neck-cloth deposed to.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I own I took the shirt and neck-cloth through distress: I meant to redeem them; he owes me more than the things were worth.

GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron THOMPSON.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

467. JOHN FRANCIS was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of October , a silver table spoon, value 5 s. the property of William Reeve .

WILLIAM REEVE sworn.

I live at Islington : I lost a silver table spoon: I don't know when it was stolen.

MARTHA CLARK sworn.

On the 24th of October I saw the prisoner take a silver spoon from the kitchen window of Mr. Reeve, and put it in his pocket; it is a private house; I am an opposite neighbour; I went out and pursued the prisoner; I spoke to the prisoner, and said you villain give me the spoon; and a man that was with him laid hold of my sleeve, and said I will take him for you; I wrenched my arm from him, and he run down Bray's-buildings, and I followed him till he was taken; I am sure he is the man.

GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Lord KENYON.

[Transportation. See summary.]

468. WILLIAM BRIDGES was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of September , twenty-nine pounds of pork, value 6 d. two pewter pots, value 8 d. and one shilling and elevenpence in money, the property of Thomas Davis .

THOMAS DAVIS sworn.

I keep a publick house . The prisoner stole two pewter pots and two quarts of beer.

SARAH SAWYER sworn.

I am a servant to Mr. Davis. I remember the prisoner; he came in about nine, and ordered two pots of porter and change for half a-crown, to No. 8; I went there; and he said it was No. 4; then he said it was not there, it was No. 30; he called a man to take them, and wanted me to go back for another pot, tobacco, and pipes; I would not; he got the change out of my hand by force, and said he would not pay me or give me the half crown; I laid hold of his coat, and he came back to my masters, and delivered up the change; what became of the porter and pots afterwards, I don't know; I went back again to see about the beer and pots, and my master came with the prisoner.

Thomas Davis . I was in the house when the man came back; and he gave me the change, and I said it makes no difference if you will let me have my beer and pots: I went to No. 30, and the man and thepots were gone; I took him to the watch-house.

EDWARD HALL sworn.

On the 15th of September, I was going into the cellar, and the prisoner came to the door and ordered two pots of beer to go to No. 8.

GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice HEATH.

There was another indictment against the prisoner for stealing from James Johnston two pots of porter and two pewter pots, and one shilling and eleven-pence , of which he was found guilty .

[Transportation. See summary.]

469. EDWARD BURN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of October , a truss of hay, value 18 d. the goods of Richard Mortimer .

RICHARD MORTIMER sworn.

I am a farmer in the New Road, St. Pancras. I lost a truss of hay on Wednesday, the 24th of last month; it was lost out of my loft.

ELIZABETH KELLEY sworn.

I am a milk-carrier. I was going to Mr. Mortimer's house, and the prisoner was behind me; he went away, and presently he came out with a truss of hay on his back; I followed him and took it off his back, and stopped him, and brought him back to Mr. Mortimer's yard; it was past nine in the evening: he said the hay was his own.

JOHN CLARKE sworn.

I am a servant to Mr. Mortimer; I packed the hay, and know this hay belongs to Mortimer; the cutting and colour of the hay; and the bands, I know, and the twisting, it came from a rick that heated, and there was a mouldy place.

JOHN CAMMELLS sworn.

I am a watchman: Kelley told me that a man had got a truss of hay; and I followed him and took him with the hay, which hay I delivered to Mr. Mortimer.

GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Transportation. See summary.]

470. CHARLES ANKLE was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of September last, a blue damask cushion, value 4 s. the property of John Lane .

JOHN LANE sworn.

I am a broker : I live at No. 15, Daker-street, Westminster : I lost a cushion on the 18th of September; I was at work in the yard; and I was informed a person had taken one of them; I went into Maidenhead-court: my wife came, and a parcel of people: I cannot swear to the prisoner; I think he is very like him; he came into the court; he ran away: I cried stop thief! I never lost sight of him; he was caught in two minutes afterwards, in a court, by two officers belonging to Queen-square office, and brought back to the house; the officer and I went up stairs; and my cushion lay in the window, in a room up two pair of stairs.

Court. Did you see the prisoner come out of the two pair of stairs? - I saw him come out of the house; the officer had the cushion.

ELIZABETH TROTMAN sworn.

I live at No. 14, Daker-street, next door to the prosecutor: I was sitting at my window, and I saw a man go by with a cushion; I believe it to be the prisoner, but I cannot swear to him; I informed Mr. Lane of it.

ELIZABETH SHANNAN sworn.

I live in Snow's-rents, Maidenhead-court: I was at my door at work, and a man came by me with a cushion; I believethat is the man; he went into my two pair of stairs room with it; he told me he would give it me; he came in softly; he was very much in liquor: I would not have it; he laid it down in the window, and went down stairs, and I did not see what happened in the court: the constable came up into my room and took the cushion away: I saw the prisoner at the office in Queen-square: I think the prisoner is the man; I am not positive.

Prisoner. Was any body with me at the time? - Another man in a white coat; the prisoner brought the cushion; the prisoner belongs to the same regiment my husband does.

Court to Trotman. How many did you see pass your window? - Two; one in a white coat, and the other in a soldier's dress.

JOHN CRIDLAND sworn.

I am an officer at Queen-square, Westminster: I heard the cry of stop thief! and I laid hold of the prisoner; he was in a soldier's coat: the people said he had stole a cushion from Mr. Lane: I took the prisoner to the place where the cushion was found, and I have kept the cushion ever since.

(The cushion produced and deposed to by the prosecutor.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

There are many persons in a red coat; one may be like another.

GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Whipping. See summary.]

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

471. EDWARD BENEFIELD was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of October , a muslin handkerchief, value 2 s. and a cotton gown, value 2 s. the property of Agnes M'Carty .

AGNES M'CARTY sworn.

I live at No. 81, Berwick-street, Soho : I am a servant : I lost the things from the line in the yard, on Thursday, the 4th of October, about four o'clock in the afternoon; I saw them about that time, and missed them directly; I saw them after they called out stop thief! and I saw the prisoner running back into the yard; Hamilton, the constable, had the things.

JOHN MACKEY sworn.

I am an apprentice: I saw a muslin handkerchief taken by the prisoner; he unpinned it from off the line; he put it into his breeches, and made off, and the handkerchief was afterwards produced by Hamilton.

- HAMILTON sworn.

I was constable: I searched the prisoner and found no handkerchief on him; at the next area I saw it lay in a wisp; I took it up; the gown has never been found.

Prisoner. I know nothing of it.

GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Whipping. See summary.]

472. RICHARD POWELL was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of October , eight shillings, in monies numbered, the monies of Thomas Lovat , privily from his person .

THOMAS LOVAT sworn.

I am a hackney coachman : I lost eight shillings on Monday, the 8th of October, between one and two in the morning; I was waiting at the Piazza Coffee House, and was asleep in my coach; I was quite sober; I had been sitting some time, and I felt something go out of my breeches pocket; I jumped up, and the prisoner got out of the coach; I never lost sight of him, and pursued him: I charged him with the watch; he was searched in the watch-house; nothing was found upon him; my breeches were cut. (Produced cut at the bottom of the pocket.)

Mr. Garrow, Prisoner's Counsel. When this man was searched there was only threepence found upon him? - I don't know. -

Did not you offer to let him go about his business if he would give you eight shillings? - I asked him for my money again.

THOMAS RYLEY sworn.

I am a watchman in Covent-garden; the prosecutor gave me charge of the prisoner, and I took him to the watch-house.

Prisoner. I leave it to my counsel.

The prisoner called five witnesses who gave him a very good character.

GUILTY, not privately .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Transportation. See summary.]

473. MARY THOMAS was indicted for stealing, on the 1st day of October , twelve leather pocket books, value 30 s. a pocket book covered with silk, value 2 s. twelve clasp knives, value 12 s. and six pair of scissars, value 6 s. the goods of Nicholas Middleton .

NICHOLAS MIDDLETON sworn.

I am a stationer ; I was sent for to Bow-street, to ascertain the property; I believe them to be mine; they were marked by my wife, but we have so many that I cannot positively swear to them.

JOHN BECK HEATHER sworn.

I am a pawnbroker in Long Acre; I produce five pocket books, the prisoner brought them to pledge on the 10th of October, and asked me half a guinea on three of them; I stopped her, I sent for an officer and took her to Bow Street; she said she had them from abroad, I suspected they were stolen; there was one found in her shoe.

CHARLES DAVIS sworn.

I produce eight pocket books, I was sent to search the prisoner's box; she was a servant to the prosecutor, I found them in her box the prosecutor was in the room.

Prosecutor. I saw them taken out of the box.

MARGARET MIDDLETON sworn.

The prisoner was left in the shop on Tuesday the 9th of October; while Mr. Middleton and his brother drank tea; I can swear to two of the books, I believe them all to be mine, I had not sold either of them; I was not present.

Mr. Middleton. I left the girl in the shop on that night; the pocket books were in drawers without locks.

Prisoner. I leave it to my Counsel.

She called three witnesses who gave her a good character.

GUILTY , (Aged 14.)

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Fine. See summary.]

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

474. JOHN BUSKIN was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of October , three iron handled sifting-shovels, value 2 s. the property of - Johnston .

(The witnesses examined separate.)

- HUSBAND sworn.

I am apprentice to Mr. Johnston; he is an ironmonger; I never saw the prisoner before the robbery; on the 27th of October I packed some goods; they are here; I sent them to Chester's key, to go on board the Sandwich hoy; I saw the things afterwards at the police office in Hatton Garden.

CHARLES BAILEY sworn.

I received a parcel from the last witness to take to Chester's key; I lost it at Chester's key, in Thames-street , I went to deliver another parcel, and returned and missed it.

WILLIAM MULLINS sworn.

I am a patrol; I was one that stopped the prisoner last Saturday, in Cow-Cross; it is in St. Sepulchre's parish, in the county of Middlesex; I found the things on the prisoner, between seven and eight in the evening, and delivered them to Appleyard; I asked the prisoner where he was going; he said to No. 20 or 21, on Clerkenwell-green; he said he was employed by a porter; I took him into custody; he said they were frying pans.

THOMAS APPLEYARD sworn.

I received the things from Mullins; I am a constable; I have kept them ever since.

Husband deposes to the goods.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I was coming down Thames-street, and a gentleman said he would give me a shilling to take them to No. 21, Clerkenwell-green; I have no friend in the world.

GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice HEATH.

[Transportation. See summary.]

475. WILLIAM CROKER was indicted for stealing, on the 10th October , a man's cloth great coat; value 3 l. the property of William Howard , Esq .

JAMES ELLIOT sworn.

On the 20th of October, in Suffolk Mews , I lost my master's great coat from the coach box; I had seen it not three minutes before; I am coachman to Mr. Howard; I saw the prisoner drop the coat.

GEORGE PERFECT sworn.

I saw the prisoner take the coat off the box, and put it in his apron; I had seen him loitering about; I am a breeches maker by trade.

- AUSTIN sworn.

I saw the prisoner drop the coat.

GUILTY , (Aged 39).

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice HEATH.

[Transportation. See summary.]

476. NATHANY BLEWIS was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of October , two silver table spoons, value 5 s. a desert spoon, value 3 s. a man's hat, value 3 s. and an umbrella, value 2 s. the goods of William Loftus , Esq . and a man's hat, value 1 s. the property of Frederick Townshend , Esq.

ANTHONY BAKER sworn.

I live with Colonel Loftus, in Harley-street ; on Sunday the 7th of October, between five and six, during the time the family were at dinner, the footman, Alexander Grant , was sent out; Grant not returning, I rang the bell, and he, not answering it, I went to know the cause; in the passage I met the footboy; he informed me that we had been robbed; I went to the street door, and saw some people at the public house opposite; I went over, and saw the prisoner and half a dozen people round him; Grant gave me two hats; I returned to the house, and the cook told me there had been spoons taken out of the kitchen; I returned, and took him into custody; I know the prisoner, he was my master's coachman about two months before; I desired Grant to sit by him, to see that he dropped nothing, and to take care of him till I returned; I was obliged to go back to take away the dinner things; I returned to the publick house, and the constable searched him, and found two silver spoons in his pocket; I saw them taken out; the constable has kept them since; the spoons were on the kitchen dresser; I had not seen the prisoner that day before.

ALEXANDER GRANT sworn.

I am a servant to Colonel Loftus; I was sent out of the parlour into the drawing-room; on the second or third step of the stairs, towards the bottom, I saw the stick of this umbrella, (produced,) going out at the door; the person who had it, shut the door; I went and opened it, and looked out, and I saw the prisoner turning round the heads of the horses of a hackney coach; he had been in our kitchen about ten minutes before; I followed him to the coach; the coachman was standing at the door with the handle in his hand; I tapped the coachman on the shoulder, thinking he must have got the umbrella in the coach; I asked him what he had there, he said, he did not know; it was something which that man had thrown in; I took out of the coach two hats, and this umbrella; then our butler came; and the prisoner and the coachman stood wrangling about the fare; I gave the butler the two hats; and he ordered me with the prisoner into the publick house;and I staid with him till the butler came; I did not see him searched.

JOHN GIRDLER sworn.

I drive a hackney coach; on Sunday, about three o'clock, my coach was standing at Half Moon-street end, Piccadilly; the prisoner ordered me to go to the watering-house on the high-ground, near Bond-street; he wanted to find the number 89; then he ordered me to the Bull and Mouth, in Hart-street; from thence to Moorfields; thence to Whitechapel; back again to Moorfields; and then to the Bull and Mouth in Hart-street; from thence to the Turk's Head in Charlotte-street; and from thence to the Turk's Head in Harley-street; there he stopped, and told me to get a pint of ale; he went to a gentleman's house; I did not see him go in, but I saw him come out, and he threw in two hats and an umbrella: Grant came and tapped me on the shoulder, and asked what was there? I told him, I did not know; I drew back, and he took the things out; and the prisoner was going to get in and go further; I told him I would not go any further; I did not like his appearance, and demanded my fare.

JOHN PYNER sworn.

I am a constable; I took this table spoon and this desert spoon out of the prisoner's left-hand side pocket.

Baker. These are my master's spoons; his cypher is on one, and his crest on the other; they were in the kitchen; I know both the hats very well, and the umbrella.

Prisoner. I was coming up stairs, and found the spoons on the stairs; I was going to fetch a pint of beer for the cook, and I took the hats and umbrella, thinking my fellow servant, Grant, would come over and drink a pint of ale; I wish to clear up the point; I am not guilty of the crime.

GUILTY . (Aged 29.)

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron THOMPSON.

[Transportation. See summary.]

477. HENRY WILD was indicted for feloniously making an assault on William Bush , in the king's highway, on the 12th day of August last, and putting him in fear, and feloniously taking from his person, and against his will, a canvas bag, value one penny, and eighteen guineas and a half, his property .

(Witnesses examined separate.)

WILLIAM BUSH , sworn.

I am a huntsman ; I lived in Wiltshire, with Mr. Gore, he is dead, my mistress sent me to town to look for some hounds that were lost; on Sunday morning, between ten and eleven in the morning; I was going out of the park, through a passage into the palace; it was the passage that turns up to Pall Mall ; there were other people coming along at the time I was robbed; my thumb was in my left hand breeches pocket; it was on some part of my purse, and the prisoner pushed my hand out of my pocket, and then pulled my purse out, a yellow canvas purse; there were eighteen guineas and a half; I took him on the spot, with the property in his hand; I never lost sight of him, nor did he get away from me; when I had got hold of him he delivered the purse to another man; he desired me to let him loose, and not get a mob of people about him; he had got his shoe off, and he wanted to stoop; he pulled it off with his other foot; somebody followed and gave him his shoe; I took him to Tattarsal's tap room, at Hyde park corner, and sent for a constable; I lost the money; I never had it again; the prisoner is the man, I am sure; I had been in the park walking.

Mr. Garrow, prisoner's counsel. Did you ever say before the justice any thing of his having the purse in his hand and giving it to another? - I saw it in his hand.

Did you drink any thing with the prisoner? - No.

Did you ever tell this man if he would give you some of the money you would let him go? - No, Sir, never.

Did you never talk of the reward in the coach, going to gaol? - No, not that I remember.

Do not you know there is a reward of 40 l. if this man is convicted? - I have heard people talking of it, but I do not know any thing of it.

Upon your oath, did not you have some conversation with the constable relative to the reward? - Not to my recollection.

JOHN TOWNLY sworn.

I am a constable; I was sent for on Sunday the 12th of August, to Tattarsall's; I went and found the prisoner in the custody of Bush; the charge was that he had robbed him of eighteen guineas and a half; he said he picked his pocket in the passage of the palace, by the chapel; he said that he was hustled and that his thumb was on his purse in his pocket; that the man who picked his pocket threw it away, and another man took it; the prosecutor and another man went with me in the coach to bridewell.

Mr. Garrow. Had you any conversation with the prosecutor, at any time, respecting the reward? - Not at all to my recollection.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I am totally innocent.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY, Death .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Jury. We wish to recommend him to mercy .

478. ISAAC BALL was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of October , a pair of velveteen breeches, value 5 s. two linen shirts, value 14 s. and two dimity waistcoats, value 4 s. the property of John Norwood .

JOHN NORWOOD sworn.

I am a coachman to Mrs. Gibson, in Hertford-street, May-fair; I lost the things mentioned in the indictment; I went out of town and returned the 2d of October; when I came to town the things were missing; I had left them in a box locked up at the Chesterfield arms; some of the things were found at the pawnbroker's.

MARY GARD sworn.

The prisoner lodged in the same house with me; I wash for him; he asked me to wash these two shirts; I did not wash them; then he asked me to pawn them; I put frills on them, and pawned them at Mr. Moore's.

SUSANNAH BERRY sworn.

My husband is a brewer's servant; I pawned a pair of breeches for the prisoner about five weeks ago, for five shillings; I have known the prisoner some years.

THOMAS WATKINS sworn.

I am a pawnbroker; I produce two shirts. (Produced).

Mary Gard . I bought a waistcoat of him for half a crown; this is it.

JOHN BAKER sworn.

I found the other waistcoat in Ball's room, and a very large bunch of keys fit for a bureau; I am a patrol.

Norwood. These shirts are mine; when I lost them they had no frills; I know the waistcoats, they are mine; I left my two boxes in the club-room, I lost things out of one box only.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I bought the two shirts of James Point ; Mrs. Gard bought two shirts at the same time; Mrs. Berry bought a waistcoat and breeches; I never saw the Chesterfield arms, nor do I know where it is.

Gard. I bought the waistcoat of Isaac Ball .

Berry. I bought the breeches of Isaac Ball .

GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Whipping. See summary.]

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

479. PHILLIP DAVIS was indicted for feloniously assaulting Edward Peterson on the king's highway, on the 15th of September , and putting him in fear, and feloniously taking from his person, and against his will, one guinea and a half, his monies .

(The case opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

EDWARD PETERSON sworn.

I live at No. 151, in Fenchurch-street: I am in the commission-line, selling hardware : I lodge at No. 10, Great Bell-alley; I am a married man, and have four children; my family are in the country: on the 15th of September I was returning from the Haymarket to the city; just as I was coming into Cheapside I observed the prisoner by my side, who was looking earnestly at me; he followed me; I went to the Saracen's Head, in Friday-street, to call on a friend on business; the prisoner passed the gate; I did not find my friend, nor was any one in the street; there is a church in Friday-street ; I stopped to make water; the prisoner came up and stood in the same position; as soon as I had done he came up to me and took hold of my arm, and put the other forcibly in my breeches, on my private parts; he immediately said what compliment do you mean to make me; I was much surprised; but I looked at him, and I asked him who he was, and what he wanted; he said he was a distressed man, and must have two guineas, and I was a gentleman that could give it him; if not he would charge me with behaving in an indecent and unnatural manner, and would raise a mob about me, and he would soon do me; he followed me and behaved in a very indecent manner, and made use of very abusive language, pulling me by the arm, and said he would not leave me till he had something from me; he made use of very abusive language, calling me b - r, and those names, and would not leave me till he had got money from me; I was very much alarmed; I went down King-street and Cateaton-street, into Coleman-street; the prisoner still kept at my elbow all the way, attempting several times to take hold of my arm; when I came into Coleman-street I considered I had some friends there, that if the man should follow me in, some might think me wrong and the others might think me right, therefore I was determined to walk on to try to get rid of him; then I went to London Wall, through the church yard, and in that part the prisoner said he would have money before I went any further; I told him I had only half-a-crown; he then insisted he would rifle my pockets; he put his hands into my waistcoat pocket, and attempted to put them into my breeches pocket, which I would not suffer; my alarm encreased; I went into Bishopsgate-street; he was more trouble some and louder, and said he would go no further; he said if I did comply, and give him a guinea and a half, he would leave me immediately, and I should never see him again; I there considered that I had every thing at stake, and perhaps my life; if he had accomplices with him, and if not, my character, which was as dear to me as my life; my family's happiness was at stake, and every thing I held dear; I told him that if he would walk quietly along I would give him a guinea and a half, if that would relieve his distress, but it was only under this consideration, that if he attacked me in the street the mob would not think as they ought to think, and that my character might suffer; for that, and that only, I promised him; I thenimmediately went to the Butler's Head; I had not a guinea and a half about me; I had half a guinea and half-a-crown; I asked the landlord, James Baldwin , to lend me a guinea, and desired the prisoner to stop at the Butler's Head, and I would give him a guinea and a half as I promised; he did not stay at the door, he followed me in; he came into the tap room; I borrowed a guinea and gave him a guinea and a half, and he seemed satisfied and went away; none of my friends were there at that time; I went into the room and drank one glass of brandy and water; sit down, I could not, I walked up and down the room; in about half an hour he came to the door of the room where I was and enquired for me, but not by name; he beckened me out of the room, and I went out to him, and he said he had a friend there that wanted to speak to me; I found, as he said, that there was a person with him; it was just outside the door; says he I am sorry for what I have done; I have a friend [Text unreadable in original.]that wants to speak to you; I said go along like a couple of rascals as you [Text unreadable in original.]nothing to do with you; the [Text unreadable in original.]with him spoke something in a voice [Text unreadable in original.] manly; I could not distinguish it; when I went home the prisoner stood near the door of the court waiting for me; he then said I only stopped to tell you never to mind the fellow that came with me, for he is a d - d rascal; and if you see any thing of him charge the watch with him; I walked to my lodgings and made no answer to him; when I rang the bell he said I know you Mr. Peters; my name, in point of fact, is Peterson; I wondered how he came to know so near my name; the next morning I went to Mr. Baldwin, and took him up stairs, and his own lad, recollecting the lad, was putting up the shutters at the time I went out to speak to this man; I told it to Mr. Baldwin first, he is the master of the house; I told him all then why I had borrowed the guinea; I told him exactly what happened, and if the fellow came there to let me see him; I told it to Mr. Waldron, who came into breakfast; I related it to Mr. Collier; he is here also; my friends advised me to be there again on the Sunday evening: we all went into the country to dinner, as we had engaged in the middle of the week; at nine me and my friends met there; about half an hour after the prisoner came to the door of the room, as he had done the night before; the master of the house was in the room, and the prisoner said he wanted to speak to Mr. Peters, Mr. Baldwin said there was no such one there; I saw him at the door; and I said to my friend there is the scoundrel who accosted me last night; I then said to Mr. Baldwin desire him to walk in; he said he could not, he wanted to speak to me in private; I went to the middle of the room and desired him to come in, that I did not want to see him any more in private; that my friends were there, and I wanted to know what he meant by his demand; I proposed to go up stairs; he seemed averse, and still said he wanted to speak with me in private; I insisted upon it he should go up stairs, and one of my friends laid hold of my arm and took him up; I then desired he would explain his conduct on the evening before; one of my friends said there wants no explanation; send for a constable directly, and send him to the Compter; the prisoner then put his hand in his pocket and pulled out a guinea and half a crown, and a shilling, and said it was all the money he had left, and begged for God's sake that I would excuse him, and take that and make it up; my friend, Mr. Collier, then said, you scoundrel down on your knees and answer me any question I shall put to you; he immediately dropped on his knees, and Mr. Collier asked him did Mr. Peterson behave in any indecent manner whatever to you that should give you cause to accuse him of any thing; he immediately clapped his hands together and said, in the presence of God, it was only distress that caused him to do it; I sent for a constable; Mr. Collier said to me, I ask you in addition to that, on the solemn oath you shall take, did you offer the least indecency, or give him the smallest reason to suppose you wasa man of that detestable character? I said not the least; I never saw him before in my life, to the best of my knowledge; on Monday he was taken before the Lord Mayor.

Would you have parted with this money if it had not been through fear? - I am not subject to fear; if he had stopped me on the highway I should not have thought any thing of it; but to attack my character!

Prisoner. Did not you come past me three or four times and look in my face? he says never mind, you are not a native of England; what countryman are you? I said of Holland; I said I am going to Holland next Monday; he said what kind of country is that; he asked me many questions; he asked me to have some Burton and a bowl of bunch. - Not a word of the sort.

Prisoner. He said you are rather low spirited, is there any thing in my power that I can serve you? - Never a word passed between us but what I have related.

Prisoner. Then he laid hold of my arm, as we were walking along. - By no means, he attempted several times to take hold of my arm.

Prisoner. He said I should not be afraid of him, he was a true Englishman and could afford to spend a thousand guineas. - I, thinking the man was drunk, said I wish you good night, Sir.

Prisoner. When you gave me the guinea and a half, did not you appoint me to call upon you on Monday? - By no means; before the Lord Mayor he said it was Sunday, but that was false.

JAMES BALDWIN sworn.

I keep the Butler's Head; on the 15th of September the prosecutor came into my house followed by the prisoner; I think it was him; he went out and came back again; and he asked me to borrow a guinea; I lent him one, and he went out; he seemed very much frightened; on the Sunday morning he told me the story, and in the evening the prosecutor, Mr. Waldron, and Mr. Collier came in, and afterwards the prisoner came to the door; I asked him who he wanted, he said Mr. Peters; I said there was no such person there; he said that is the gentleman, I want to speak to him in private; I proposed taking him up stairs; then he began to beg for mercy; he pulled out a guinea, half a crown, and a shilling; chucked them on the table and said he was sorry; Mr. Collier said, down on your knees and say if Mr. Peterson has offered any thing indecent to you; and he said no, it was distress; when the prisoner was taken before the Lord Mayor he called me on one side, and begged I would do my endeavour to speak to Mr. Peterson to forgive him, and he would immediately go into his own country.

JAMES COLLIER sworn.

I lodge at the Saracen's Head, Friday-street; I am not at present in any business; I was present on Sunday evening, not exactly at the express desire of Mr. Stephenson; the situation I stood in precluded me from seeing the prisoner as he came in at the door; but Peterson said to me, that is the rascal that insulted me last night; I saw the prisoner; the man at the house proposed taking him up stairs; the prisoner said he wanted to speak to Mr. Peterson in private; I said, he had the night before, and now must speak in publick; he put his hand into his pocket and took out one guinea and half a crown, and said, it was all his money; he would give it to make it up with the prosecutor; I desired him to go on his knees, and declare to me whether Mr. Peterson had made any such attack upon him the preceding night; he protested to me in a solemn manner, with his hands up, that he had not: when the constable came in, he came round a little table in the room and demanded the money; the man said he should not have it; then he said to Mr. Peterson, he knew what he had earned the money for, and it was his; I would not go near the rascal.

JOHN WALDRON sworn.

Deposed to the same effect: he fell on his knees, and said, in the most solemnmanner, he appealed to God that Mr. Peterson did not behave in an improper or indecent manner to him; but that distress, and distress alone, led him to it.

JOHN RANNS sworn.

I am the waiter at the Butler's Head; I recollect the prisoner; he came to me about eleven on Saturday night as I was shutting up my master's shutters, he asked me whether I knew who that person was that went in, I told him Mr. Peterson.

Prisoner to prosecutor. When I came into the room, did not you take hold of my ring, and say, you d - d rascal this is my ring? - When he came into the room, I observed he had a ring on his finger; I said you cannot be a man in much distress to have a ring, let me look at it.

Prisoner. My Lord, my life is in your hands; how came this Mr. Peterson to be in bodily fear, if innocent? and take me to his home, where there were twenty or thirty people, and lend me a guinea and a half; why did he not take me then; he said, I am a gentleman, there, take this; I said I was going to Holland on Monday; he said call on me on Monday; I came back to tell him I could not call on him on Monday, but would call on Sunday night; he said, keep the money, my good fellow, you are welcome to it as long as you come from Holland; on Sunday evening I went there, having a guinea and half a crown and a shilling in my pocket; I said I came here to return him a guinea, and I will leave him any thing, and my direction, till I come from Holland to pay him the rest.

The prisoner called one witness to his character.

GUILTY , Death .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. Justice HEATH.

480. THOMAS RADLEY was indicted for feloniously assaulting, on the king's highway, Mary Ann, the wife of George Thellusson , Esq. and putting her in fear, and feloniously taking from her person, and against her will, a gold enamelled watch, with a diamond on the pendant, value 30 l. a leather purse, value one penny, and one guinea and two shillings, the property of George Thellusson , Esq .

(The case opened by Mr. Garrow.)

MARY ANN THELLUSSON sworn.

I was going from my own house at Totteridge , into Hertfordshire; I did not see the highwayman till he came close to the carriage; he had a crape over his face, and a pistol in his hand; I desired him to take away his pistol, he did so; he asked for my money, I told him I had very little; I said I had a watch; he said I do not want that; I gave him a red leather purse which had a guinea and two shillings in it; seeing him stop after that, I asked him what he wanted; he said give me your watch; he desired me not to be frightened, and put the pistol in his pocket when I desired him; I was very much alarmed, but he certainly behaved very well.

STEPHEN GOODALL sworn.

I am coachman to Mr. Thellusson; I was driving the carriage; I had met the man at the bar about ten minutes before he stopt the carriage, then he came up and called to me to stop; I thought he wanted to pass me; I knew him to be the man I had seen before; I observed him very particularly when he came up; he put a crape over his face; I had observed his face and person; he had a light-coloured great coat on; there was a tear in his great coat, which had been mended.

CHRISTOPHER CREEDLAND sworn.

I am an officer of Bow-street; I apprehended the prisoner on the 18th of September, in Drury Lane; I found this crape on him; his hair was loose; Mr. Hughes,took some duplicates, and powder and ball from him.

STEPHEN LAVENDER sworn.

I took this purse from Mary Ann Fowles .

JOHN BECK HEATHER sworn.

I am a pawnbroker; on Monday the 17th of September, Mary Ann Fowles brought me a brilliant to sell; I asked her where she got it, she said she found it in Broad St. Giles's; I went to Bow-street, and an officer came and secured her.

MARY ANN FOWLES sworn.

I offered a brilliant to sale to Mr. Heather; I found that diamond in Broad St. Giles's; I received a red leather pocket book from a gentleman in Ireland; I left Ireland about a year and a half ago. (The pocket book produced). I know nothing of this; it is not mine; I had not that purse of the prisoner at the bar; I never said at the office that I had the diamond of the prisoner at the bar. (The prisoner's great coat produced).

Mrs. Thelluson. This purse I verily believe to be mine; I bought it in the city.

Prisoner. I leave it to my counsel.

BURNET ISAACS sworn.

Radley lodged in my house nine months; I understood him to be a hackney writer ; during that time Fowles lived with him.

JOHN M'DONALD sworn.

I am a taylor; the prisoner lodged upwards of five months with me, and behaved exceedingly honest.

MICHAEL DONAHUGH sworn.

I always thought him a good character.

Two other witnesses gave him a good character.

GUILTY, Death .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Lord KENYON.

Recommended to mercy by Mr. Thellusson .

EDWARD HUGHES sworn.

I was present when Mary Ann Fowles was examined; and she said she had the purse from that fellow, and the magistrate told her to point him out, and she touched him.

Mary Ann Fowles was indicted to take her trial for perjury.

481. ANN TURNER was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of September , two wooden bobbins, value 2 d. and sixteen ounces of raw silk, value 5 s. the property of Job Allen .

JOB ALLEN sworn.

I am a weaver ; on the 16th of September I lost two bobbins of silk; it was dyed, it was not raw silk, it was upon the bobbins; it was lost from the second floor; the prisoner is a stranger to me, I saw her there, I thought she was a bad woman; and when she went down I missed the silk and followed her, I took her and found the silk upon her; I am sure they are mine by the mark, which is J. A. she had them in her pocket, and said she had taken them; it was on the sabbath day, between three and four in the afternoon.

THOMAS SHEEN sworn.

I saw her deliver the property to the man; she took it out of her pocket.

Prisoner. I know nothing of it.

GUILTY, stealing to the amount of 2 d.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

482. JAMES FIELD and CHARLES BURN were indicted for breaking thedwelling house of John Dutton , and stealing divers things his property .

JAMES FIELD , NOT GUILTY .

CHARLES BURN GUILTY, 10 d.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Transportation. See summary.]

483. SARAH NEWTON was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of August last, two yards and a half of printed cotton cloth, value 5 s. four yards of printed cotton for bordering, value 4 s. and four chair covers, value 4 s. the goods of Lady Ann Lindsay .

And JOSEPH GOWER was indicted for receiving the same, knowing them to be stolen .

LADY ANN LINDSAY sworn.

I know the prisoners, Gower was my servant a year and a half ago, Sarah Newton continued with me till the 29th of September; I missed all the articles in the indictment, and many more; I cannot say the day; Sarah Gower , the female prisoner's name is, she was married on the 23d of August to the prisoner; these articles were in a parlour, in order to be made up; I missed some on the 10th of October, and others at various periods; (the things produced); these are part of the property lost.

THOMAS CARPMEAL sworn.

I am an officer of Bow-street; I had a search warrant to search the woman's lodgings in Little Titchfield-street; I found these things there; she was not at home; I secured the prisoners on the 7th of October, at the house of the sister; the man was in the parlour, and the woman was hid behind the counter.

JOHN PLIMMER sworn.

I am a shoemaker; the prisoner came from Lady Ann Lindsay 's to lodge at my house; he lodged eight weeks with me; he came first, and she some time afterwards; I was present when Carpmeal searched the room, it was their lodging; the door was locked; the man got work with a painter, and went very regularly; I know no harm of her.

ANN HOOPER sworn.

The prisoner lived with Lady Ann Lindsay ; I was present with Carpmeal when the search was made; I saw the things found; I was not present when the cotton and chair covers were found.

Sarah Newton . I kept my clothes in a drawer in which my lady kept some clothes; I had no notice to quit my lady's service.

Lady Ann Lindsay . She had notice three months; I gave personal notice.

SARAH NEWTON , GUILTY .

JOSEPH GOWER , NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Lord KENYON.

[Transportation. See summary.]

484. SARAH GOWER was again indicted for stealing a cotton counterpane, value 12 s. and some printed bound books, the goods of Lady Margaret Janet Fordyce ; and a written bound book, value 12 d. the goods of the said Lady Margaret Janet Fordyce and Lady Ann Lindsay .

And JOSEPH GOWER was indicted for receiving the same knowing them to be stolen .

LADY ANN LINDSAY sworn.

These things were lost at various periods; (produced.)

LADY MARGARET FORDYCE sworn.

This counterpane is mine, and so are the books.

Sarah Gower . I wish to see the books, (handed to the prisoner); these books were left in the housemaid's box in my care, how she came by them I do not know.

THOMAS CARPMEAL sworn.

I searched the apartments and found these things.

JOHN PLAINNER sworn.

These people lodged in my house.

SARAH GOWER , GUILTY .

JOSEPH GOWER , NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Lord KENYON.

[Transportation. See summary.]

485. JOHN ORANGE , ISAAC ORANGE , and RICHARD CAMPBELL were indicted for stealing, on the 28th of September , a cloth great coat, value 5 s. and other articles of wearing apparel, the goods of John Daley , in his dwelling-house .

JOHN DALEY sworn.

I live in St. Thomas's-street, Bethnal-green ; I rent half the house; I am a weaver ; I did not know the prisoners before they were taken up.

ANN DALEY sworn.

I am wife of the last witness; the property was in a lower room; I saw it between one and two at noon on the 28th of September last; the door was locked; I had the key in my pocket; my husband and me were up stairs, when I came down I saw the street door and the room door both open; I missed the property; part of it is in court.

JOHN DISERT sworn.

I am a weaver; I was looking out of a window, I saw two men look into the window, and they passed that door and the next, and came back and opened the door and went in; I saw them come out two or three minutes after; I cannot speak to the men; the second that came out had a brown bundle under his arm.

HANNAH BASS sworn.

I am a silk winder; I live in Spicer-street; I was looking out of the window, I saw Isaac Orange come through Ram-Alley, that is facing where I live, and about three or four streets distance from Daly's house, it is the road from Daly's house, he stood at the corner of the alley about five minutes; soon after his brother came with a bundle under his right arm; they turned down Hunt-street; Campbell followed, and went after them up Hunt-street; I have known them four or five years.

MARY BRACKNELL sworn.

I saw Isaac Orange come to the corner of Ram-alley; I remember Daly's house being robbed; it was about half past three o'clock; he came down the alley, which is in the road from Daly's house; John Orange came with a bundle; he was walking fast; it was a small bundle; Campbell followed them, he was about ten yards distance; I saw them afterwards altogether in the neighbourhood. (The constable produced the goods).

JOHN ARMSTRONG sworn.

I went with Harper and Ferris, and searched a house in Spicer-street, and found Campbell and John Orange ; I found part of a black stocking, the foot was cut off and the seam at top; we left them in custody of Ferris, and went to Dunk-street, and a woman opened the door, and we found Isaac Orange ; and under the bed was a shirt and this apron; I found this key, (an open warded key;) he said it was the key of his door, but it was not.

ELEANOR MITCHELL sworn.

I let a room to the prisoner Isaac's wife; I know nothing more.

NATHANIEL REYNOLDS sworn.

I keep a publick house; on the 28th of September the prisoners were drinking inmy house, they went in and out of my house frequently.

Prosecutrix. These articles are all my property.

John Orange . I never saw the property; and know nothing about it.

Isaac Orange . I was drinking in Mr. Reynolds's house, and a man said he would help me to work; he hand a bundle, and I lent him a shilling, and they took me up.

Prisoner Campbell. I know nothing of it.

JOHN ORANGE, ISAAC ORANGE ,

GUILTY 5 s.

RICHARD CAMPBELL , NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice HEATH.

[Transportation. See summary.]

486. JOHN STANLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d day of October , one wainscot pillar and claw table, value 3 s. a wire sieve, value 1 s. and a garden pot, value 3 d. the goods of Thomas Haycock ; and an iron spade, value 2 s. the goods of Timothy Hobbs .

A second count, for stealing on the 24th day of October , a piece of sail cloth, value 6 s. 6 d. the goods of Thomas Haycock .

THOMAS HAYCOCK sworn.

I keep the white Raven public-house, at mile end ; on the 23d of October I was working in my garden, I left my tools when I had done work in a shed; on Wednesday I went to the garden, between six and seven, I saw a place broke open between another garden and mine, then I thought I was robbed; I missed a shovel, a watering pot, a wire sieve, a table which stood in a drinking place; the things were all safe on Tuesday night; on Wednesday morning I went up into the summer house to look at some India pink seed, which I had left to dry, and saw the sail cloth then safe; on Thursday morning I found the same door open that had been broke open before; I had secured the door with an iron pin; it was broke away on Thursday night; I watched, I had not been there ten minutes when I saw a man on Hobbs's wall, about twenty yards from the gate; I went and procured some neighbours and surrounded the garden, and me and another went into the field the way that he had come; I saw him jump into the garden, I followed him the same way, I searched the garden, I saw a person go over the wall into the street; I had information that they were gone to the London hospital; I was making after him, and I met somebody with the prisoner, in custody, that was Mr. Austin and the patrol; I brought him to my house; he had a basket, a chissel, a pair of pincers, and a piece of canvas; we found nobody else; we took the prisoner to the office; he told us he lived at No. 4, Wilmot's Grove, Bethnel Green; the officer, and I and Hobbs went to his lodgings; Nash is the officer, his wife opened the door; she was frightened on the officer's asking her some questions; we found the shovel in an out-house, we found nothing else, but went back to the office, and took the shovel with us; I went with the officer and prisoner to an iron-shop opposite Shoreditch Church, there I saw the canvas lay open upon the flag stones, in the front of the shop, exposed to sale; I found the sieve, the round table, and the watering pot at the same place.

JOSEPH NASH sworn.

I am an officer in Whitechapel; I went with the last witness to the house of the prisoner after the prisoner was apprehended; I was present when the shovel was found, and then I went back to the office; the prisoner did not confess to me, but to another officer who is not here; I went afterwards to the house of Mr. Snelson; Mr. Haycock told him if he would confess where the property was it would be better for him.

- NELSON sworn.

I keep a broker's shop; on Wednesday the 24th of October, between nine and ten in the morning, the prisoner brought me to felt awire sieve, a garden pot, and a round wainscoat table; I gave him 5 s. for the whole; he said they were his own property; he said he was much reduced in his property, and that was the cause of his selling them; on Thursday morning, between ten and eleven he brought this piece of canvas to sell; he said he was a gardener , and kept it to cover the beds in the garden for use; I gave him 6 s. 6 d. for it; the things were delivered to Haycock. (The things produced and deposed to).

Prisoner. They said if I confessed it would be better for me.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY . (Aged 47.)

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron THOMPSON.

[Transportation. See summary.]

487. OWEN SCOTNEY was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of October , one linen pillow case, value 1 s. one child's dimity petticoat, value 6 d. the property of William Stephenson , a pair of velveteen breeches, value 6 s. a silk handkerchief, value 1 s. a pair of worsted stocking, value 1 s. the property of William Smith , and a linen shirt, value 2 s. the property of John Anderson .

WILLIAM STEPHENSON sworn.

I am a publican ; I live in Tottenham Court Road ; I lost a child's dimity petticoat and pillow-case out of my own club room, about half past ten at night, I found them in the prisoner's pocket directly, up one pair higher, in the room where he lodged; he said they were in a bundle in his room.

- WIGHTMAN sworn.

I am a constable; I took these things out of the room; I received them from the prosecutor; I have had them ever since. (Produced and deposed to).

Prisoner. The bundle was on the table, and I expected a bundle; the things were not in my pocket.

GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr Justice HEATH.

[Transportation. See summary.]

488. ALEXANDER RIGLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of October last, two blocks, with iron hoops, value 1 s. and four fathom of rope, value 2 s. the property of John Perry , Esq . and Philip Perry .

- DALTON sworn.

I am foreman to Mess. John and Philip Perry , ship-builder s; I know of no other partners; I am a watchman in dock; I took the prisoner with a sack on his shoulder, he came from the other side of the yard; he came in through the yard gate, it was open, I saw him, but he did not see me; I stood close by the gate; I stopped him and asked him where he was going with that tackle, it was open on his shoulders; he made me no answer; I threatened him to tell an officer, and I took him to the watch-house, and the tackle with him. (The rope produced and deposed to.)

GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron THOMPSON.

[Transportation. See summary.]

489. ROBERT PRICE was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of October last, a wooden drawer called a money till, value 6 d. an iron key, value 1 d. 73 halfpence and 59 farthings, value 3 s. 6 d. the property of Ann Russell .

ANN RUSSELL sworn.

I live in South-street, Manchester-square , I keep a chandler's shop ; I lost my money in the till, mentioned in the indictment, on the 9th of last month; at half past eight in the morning, the prisoner came in and took it; I saw him go out, nobody was in theshop; I called out stop thief! immediately, and he was stopped; I saw him set down the till at a distance from the door, that was on my calling out; he was brought back by a life-guardsman.

JOHN COOPER sworn.

I apprehended the prisoner; there was a cry of stop thief!

Prisoner. I was not nigh the house.

GUILTY , (Aged 17).

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Lord KENYON.

[Transportation. See summary.]

490. GEORGE MASON was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of September , one woollen blanket, value 4 s. a linen bed quilt, value 1 s. two linen sheets, value 5 s. the property of John M'Donald .

Mrs. M'DONALD sworn.

The prisoner was a lodger of ours twice, about three months in the whole; I let him a bed but not a room; I missed the things in the indictment; I saw them at the office; I had not seen them for six weeks before; my daughter made the bed.

WILLIAM MANLEY sworn.

I am a pawnbroker; I produce a pair of sheets, a quilt, and a blanket, which, on the 21st of September, I took from the prisoner; he said he was the son of Mrs. Taylor, of Whitechapel; I am sure of the boy ; I never saw him before. (Produced and deposed to.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

The prosecutor keeps a common lodging house , and the very night before, his wife came up, or his daughter least-wise, threatening to turn me out of the bed; we pay every night; being out of work, I was almost starving, and I took the sheets, and I pawned them with that gentleman.

GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice HEATH.

[Transportation. See summary.]

491. GEORGE KELTING and JOB POWELL were indicted for stealing, on the 6th of October last, two dimity waistcoats, value 3 s. five linen shirts, value 20 s. and a muslin apron, value 12 d. the property of George Hardiman .

GEORGE HARDIMAN sworn.

I lost the things in the indictment, on the 6th of October; they were hung out to dry; the yard is open to the fields, only walled in.

WILLIAM DEAN sworn.

I am a brick-maker; on the 6th of October about one, going to dinner, I saw Job Powell walk about near the yard, about twenty yards off; nobody was with him then; I saw George Kelting come out of an unfinished yard next to the prosecutor's.

JOSEPH WIGHTMAN sworn.

I am constable of the parish of St. Pancras; on the Monday after the robbery I went, in consequence of an information, and took the prisoners in custody; I searched them and found two duplicates, one upon each prisoner; this for a waistcoat on Kelting, and this for another waistcoat on Powell, pawned for 1 s.

JOHN BROWN sworn.

I am a pawnbroker; I took in a waistcoat, but cannot swear to either of the prisoners; it answers to the duplicate found on Kelting. (Deposed to).

Another PAWNBROKER sworn.

I took this waistcoat of Powell. (Deposed to.)

GEORGE KELTING , JOB POWELL ,

GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Lord KENYON.

Lord Kenyon. I wish those pawnbrokers would bear in mind that they go on extreme slippery ground; it is expected that they take in nothing to pawn but from personswhom they know, or who come recommended; I do not know how a jury would deal with such pawnbrokers if they were to be indicted for receiving stolen goods; it would be for the good sense and discretion of a jury; I should be very much inclined to think they would be convicted; it would be better for the public if the whole trade was abolished; it is high time for the legislature to bestir themselves, and do something in it.

[Transportation. See summary.]

492. ROBERT EVANS was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of October last, 100 lb. weight of lead, belonging to Richard Mortimer , and affixed to a barn of his , against the statute.

RICHARD MORTIMER sworn.

I am a cow keeper ; I lost some lead from a gutter adjoining the dwelling, and the barn was adjoining to that, it was affixed to the barn, it is my barn but not my house, it was Mr. Ring's house.

JOHN CLARKE sworn.

I am a servant to the prosecutor Mortimer; I saw the lead some days before; the 14th of October I went to the barn to bind a load of hay, the doors of the barn were broke open, and I observed about half the gutter was cut off and laid on the mow, none of it was taken away; while I was on the hay, I heard a rustling between the wall and the hay, and I saw the prisoner in the barn; I asked him what he did there, and he said he did not know; I got down from the mow immediately, and he broke a hole through the barn; the door was locked, but a plank was broke off it; he ran away; he was taken in Hampstead road; I saw the lead fitted.

- BATEMAN sworn.

I keep a publick house near this barn, when I came to the barn I saw the prisoner and a place broken; I followed and took the prisoner; about ten feet of the gutter was taken away, I immediately compared it and it exactly corresponded, and this knife was lying on the girder of the barn.

Prisoner. I came from Shropshire, and it rained, and I went to get a lodging.

GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice HEATH.

[Transportation. See summary.]

493. JOHN WESTCOATE and GEORGE WILMOT were indicted for stealing two live geese, value 8 s. the property of Richard Pyle .

BOTH GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Wilmot: Fine. See summary.]

[Westcoate, Wilmot: Imprisonment. See summary.]

494. GEORGE BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of October , two tin saucepans, value 4 d. a prince's metal candlestick, value 4 d. nine tin bottoms for candlesticks, value 4 d. the property of William Wrathall .

- MILLINGTON sworn.

I live with Mr. William Wrathall of Snow-hill , plate worker ; on the 13th of October, the prisoner at the bar was sent by his master to erect some building in the warehouse adjoining to the premises of Mr. Wrathall, which he completed on the 25th, and at half past five o'clock Charles Crowden brought some bottoms of candlesticks, and asked if they belonged to Mr. Wrathall, which he immediately acknowledged; he said he had been at a publick house called the Sailor's Last Shift, and a carpenter came in and enquired for a bag of tools; the prisoner having something under his coat, and of a suspicious appearance, they suspected it to be a pot, and desired him to unbutton, upon which the article now in my hand fell from under his coat; I went to the publick house and had the prisoner committed to the Compter; the prisoner lodged at No. 8, ina court in Shoe-lane, there we found the articles mentioned in the indictment, and sundry others; there was a metal candlestick, and the bottoms of some other candlesticks, this is the piece I received from Mr. Crowden.

CHARLES CROWDEN sworn.

I am a tin plate worker; I was at the Sailor's Last Shift about four o'clock, it is in Poppin's-court, it was the 25th of October; the prisoner came in and asked for a bag of tools, and something appeared under his coat, and a young fellow pulled his coat open and these things dropped from it; this is what they call block tin, it is the bottom of a candlestick; I told him he could not have made it himself, he said he found it among a parcel of things in Shoreditch; in the mean time Mr. Millington went and fetched a constable, and the prisoner was taken into custody.

THOMAS HUCHLER sworn.

I am a constable, I was sent for to the Sailor's Last Shift on the 25th of October; I took the prisoner into custody, and took him to the Compter.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I bought these things of the prosecutor's clerk.

GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Lord KENYON.

[Whipping. See summary.]

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

495. WILLIAM SAUNDERS was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of October , five ounces weight of indigo, value 2 s. the goods of the Honourable United Company of Merchants trading to the East Indies .

A second count charging it to be the property of persons unknown.

Mr. Garrow opened the case.

GEORGE PARRY sworn.

I am one of the elders of the warehouse for private trade in the India House; from some information I had received, when I was going to lock up, I called the prisoner into the private counting-house and told him he was accused of stealing some indigo, I hoped it was not so; I searched him and found about five ounces of indigo in his breeches pocket; he begged to be forgiven, and said it was the first time; his breeches seemed died through.

ROBERT GRAY sworn.

I saw the prisoner searched, and in his left-hand breeches pocket was this indigo.

THOMAS CABLE sworn.

I saw the prisoner take the indigo out of the chest; I am a labourer in the warehouses; I gave the information to Mr. Parry.

The prisoner called two witnesses to his character.

GUILTY.

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Recommended to mercy .

[Fine. See summary.]

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

496. ROBERT FOSTER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of October , twelve ounces of quicksilver, value 2 s. the property of the Honourable United Company of Merchants trading to the East Indies .

A second count charging it to be the property of persons unknown.

GEORGE PARRY sworn.

I found about twelve ounces of quicksilver in the kennel, the prisoner tried to sweep it away but could not; I had some information which led me to go there; he had just come from the floor where the quicksilver was; I speak only from information, I suppose it to be the property of the East India Company, they do not sell it retail; the prisoner told me a cask had been upset, and that he was bringing it to me in the neck of a quart bottle.

PETER TIB sworn.

I was called to take up the quicksilver; I should think it the property of the company, I have no other reason for thinking so, than being on the premises.

ROBERT HARLEY sworn.

I was delivering some goods and I saw some quicksilver fall; I cannot say I knew who it fell from, it was not far from the prisoner; I saw a bottle fall and the quicksilver splash about, I cannot say who dropped it; the prisoner was coming from the floor where the quicksilver was kept.

CHRISTOPHER ANDERSON sworn.

I saw the prisoner walk in the yard with his hands before him, and he dropped a phial, and I saw some quicksilver in the kennel close by Foster, and he went and threw part of the phial behind the grind-stone, and tried to cover the quicksilver with dirt.

THOMAS CABLE sworn.

I saw the silver drop from him, he said he got it to try a maxim with; he hit it against his button and that broke it.

MARTHA BRYAN sworn.

I know the prisoner at the bar, he served his time with my husband; some stores were left when my husband died, which I gave him at my husband's death; he was gunner of the Belvidere; the prisoner always bore a good character.

JOHN WILLIAMS sworn.

I am a shoe-maker, I have known him three years, he always bore a very good character.

GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

[Transportation. See summary.]

497. JOHN BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of September , four lawn handkerchiefs, value 7 s. 6 d. and other goods , the property of Joseph Procter and William Brownlow .

WILLIAM BROWNLOW sworn.

I am in partnership with Joseph Procter ; the things were found in the prisoner's box, in our house, he was our porter ; I missed one particular piece, which determined me to search, and I found the articles specified in the indictment; he opened the box himself, it was in a garret where some of the servants boxes were; I delivered them to the constable; he had lived with me near about eighteen months, and he went away; he behaved so well that we took him in again; he has goods booked to him, we never refused him credit; I remember Mr. Mills having words with the prisoner; if he wanted any thing for his own wear they would have been put down; he once asked my leave to take some gowns to shew to a friend, one was kept, it was booked to his account; some of the goods found in his box were in the shop the day before, and I know they are not entered in his name as sold to him; I called all the servants in my house, and told them I had suspicion of some goods being stolen, and desired to search their boxes; they all said yes.

HENRY MILLS sworn.

I am shopman to Procter and Brownlow; on the 27th of September Mr. Brownlow called upon us, and said he missed a piece of goods, and wished to search our boxes; we went up stairs and opened our boxes in the prisoner's presence; we found a variety of handkerchiefs, shawls, &c. in his box; they were delivered to the constable; he said he had lost the key of his box, then he and I broke open his box; we all agreed to have our boxes searched; I was not on very good terms with the prisoner; I had no malice against him; I never said I would ruin him, or that I would do for him.

- GREEN sworn.

I am constable of St. Bride's; I producethese things, I had them of Mr. Brownlow, the corner of Water-lane, Fleet-street . (Deposed to by the prosecutor).

JOHN SCRIVEN sworn.

This matter happened about three months after I lived in Mr. Brownlow's service.

SARAH PAGE sworn.

I am a servant to Mr. Brownlow; I know Mr. Mills and the prisoner, they have had words, as all other servants do, but I never heard Mr. Mills say he would be d - d if he did not do for him.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Transportation. See summary.]

498. WILLIAM SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of October , one muslin handkerchief, value 15 s. and a great variety of other articles, the goods of James Davidson , in his dwelling-house .

JAMES DAVIDSON sworn.

I live in Ludgate-street , I am a linen-draper ; on the 18th of October, I had suspicion of the prisoner, who was my porter ; I staid at home on the following Sunday, he had leave to go out; I searched his pocket, and found in it a very fine white handkerchief, which I have no doubt but it was cut off the same day; as soon as he came home he took that handkerchief and put it into his pocket; I seized him, and I went to his washerwoman; I told him he had better confess.

- WARREN sworn.

I am a constable, I searched and found the goods; I went to his mother's and to his washerwoman; I produce the goods.

(Mr. Davidson deposes to the handkerchief found on his person).

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY stealing 4 s.

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

[Transportation. See summary.]

499. THOMAS POORE was indicted for burglariously and feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Ann England , about the hour of ten in the night, of the 25th of September , and burglariously and feloniously stealing therein one linen sheet, value 5 s. the goods of Ann England .

A second count laying it to be the property of John Paggett .

A third count laying the burglary to be in the dwelling house of John Paggett .

ANN ENGLAND sworn.

I live at No. 3, Rodney's-row, Farmer-street, Shadwell ; on the 25th of September, between nine and ten, I left my own home; when I came home, and coming up the row, I saw a man run out of the passage, that was Thomas Poore ; I left the door padlocked, it is a ground floor; I went in and found the hasp was gone, and the door was broke open; I pursued up the alley, and called stop thief! when I gave the alarm, he dropped the sheet; there was a man took hold of him and brought him back to the top of Farmer-street, and the officer took him to the watch-house; the staple was drawn and a piece broke off the door; (looks towards the bar); that is the man; the sheet was dropped about one hundred yards from where I live, I am a single woman and have two rooms; I am very sure my door was fastened, I shewed the door to Phillips and the constable.

Prisoner. It is very hard for a man to have his life sworn away, she is a common prostitute on the town.

JOHN PHILLIPS sworn.

I am a biscuit baker, I live at No. 2, Lower Gun-alley; about a quarter before ten, on the 25th of September, I was going along Shadwell High-street, I heard the cry of stop thief! the prisoner was running as hard as he could and I stopped him, and Abberley assisted me to take him back into Farmer-street; the woman said that is the man; we then went to the house, and the staple was gone, and a piece of the wainscot torn away.

THOMAS ABBERLEY sworn.

On the 25th of September, I was going along Shadwell, and this girl charged the prisoner with breaking open her room; I examined the room and found it had been broke open, as before described. (The sheet produced and deposed to by the prosecutrix).

Prisoner. I know no more of it than the child just born into the world.

GUILTY of stealing the sheet .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

[Transportation. See summary.]

500. JUDITH BIDWELL was indicted for stealing, on the 18th day of October , a metal watch with a tortoiseshell outside case, value 30 s. the goods of Matthew Fisher .

MATTHEW FISHER sworn.

I lost my watch the 18th of October, about nine in the evening; I live in Old-street , it was lost out of the bed room, the prisoner had been a servant , but went away the Tuesday before; I keep a cook's shop , I found my watch pledged.

THOMAS EADES sworn.

I am a pawnbroker, I live with Henry Page in Chiswell-street; on Friday morning the 19th of October, I took this watch in of Elizabeth Perkins , and lent her half a guinea.

ELIZABETH PERKINS sworn.

I am a shoemaker's wife; at eleven o'clock on the 18th of October, I went from my house in Bunhill-row; she came to me about a quarter before nine on the 19th of October in the morning; she said to me, Betsey, I found a watch last night going home to my lodgings, I desired her to let me look at it, she put it into my hand, and begged I would pledge it; I asked how much I was to ask, she said half a guinea or 12 s. I took it to Eades, and he lent me half a guinea; I never saw the outside case.

ANN GREEN sworn.

I saw Judith Bidwell going with Mr. Perkins for her clothes on the night Mr. Fisher lost his watch.

Prisoner. I found this watch on the 18th, in the state it is now, and I desired Perkins to pawn it. (The watch produced and deposed to, it had no outside case).

GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

[Transportation. See summary.]

501. GEORGE JOHNSTON was indicted, for stealing, on the 11th of October , a linen table cloth, value 12 d. a tea caddee, value 12 d. and a child's frock, value 4 d. the goods of James Groves .

ANN GROVES sworn.

I am the wife of James Groves , he lives at Mile End ; on the 11th of October, between the hours of eleven and twelve in the day, I lost a table cloth, a tea caddee, and a child's frock; I lost them out of my house in the lower room: George Johnston owned he had took the goods.

WILLIAM BOYER sworn.

I keep a publick house, the sign of the Black Bull; the prisoner came to my house on the 11th of October, between the hoursof eleven and twelve o'clock, and had a pint of beer in company with another black man, and offered a tea caddee to sell; he had another bundle.

THOMAS FRENCH sworn.

I am a pawnbroker's servant in White Chapel; on the 11th of October, about twelve o'clock, I saw the prisoner in our shop with a tea caddee, a table cloth, and a child's frock; he lent 2 s. 6 d. on the tea caddee, and 4 d. on the frock. (The caddee, table cloth, and frock deposed to.)

Prisoner. I was very drunk.

GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

[Transportation. See summary.]

502. JOHN BONUS was indicted for, that he on the 2d of June last having in his custody a certain parchment instrument, partly written and partly printed, called a debenture, with an indorsement signed and subscribed by Sir Alexander Munro , knight, and others, four of the commissioners of the customs in England, and directed to Augustus Pechell , the receiver-general and cashier of the customs of our lord the king, at London, for payment or allowance to Edward Payne , Rene Payne , and George Smith of London aforesaid, merchant s and partners in trade, by the name and description of Edward and Rene Payne and Co. of 127 l. 11 s. 7 d. and unlawfully divising to fraud the said Messrs. Payne and Co. afterwards; (to wit) on the said 2d day of June, did feloniously make, forge, and counterfeit, on the back of the said parchment instrument, and under the said order, a certain acquittance and receipt for money, with the name George Smith thereto subscribed, purporting to be subscribed by him for himself and the said Edward Payne , Rene Payne , and partner, for the said sum ; the tenor of which receipt is as follow:

'Received by me the 2d of June, 1792,

'for partners and self, George Smith,' with intention to defraud them.

A second count, charging him with uttering the like instrument with the like intention.

A third and fourth counts, for the same offence, with intent to defraud Augustus Pechell .

A fifth and sixth count, for the same offence, with intent to defraud the king .

(The indictment opened by Mr. Giles, and the case by Mr. Garrow).

(The witnesses examined separate).

GEORGE DELAVAN sworn.

I am an officer of the customs. (Puts in the commission).

Mr. Shelton read the names of the commissioners and found them correspond.

AUGUSTUS PECHELL , Esq. sworn.

Puts in his patent as receiver-general and cashier of the customs.

(Mr. Mills produced the debenture, and Mr. Delavan proved the signatures of the four commissioners, having often seen them write).

CHARLES COSTAN , Esq. sworn.

I am an officer in the customs; I am employed by Messrs. Payne and Co. to transact their business; I delivered a number of debentures for them to Mr. Bonus.

Mr. Fielding, prisoner's counsel. Have you any responsibility to the commissioners? - No, none but personal responsibility.

Mr. Garrow. The nature of the business you do for them is to pass their papers through the custom house? - I believe it was forty-four; I have seen their debentures in the hands of Mr. Mills, and I know this to be one of them; I cannot tell the amount of the whole forty-four; but it was a considerable sum.

Mr. Fielding. Have you known Bonus any time? - I should believe he had been about a year and a half clerk to Mr. Payne.

He had been the person always employed to transact this business? - Yes.

- MILLS sworn.

Mr. Giles. Do you recollect seeing the prisoner any time in June? - On the 2d of June he brought a large number of debentures to me to be examined and marked for payment.

Did you examine them? - I did, and marked them, and delivered them to the prisoner.

Did you make any observation at that time respecting them? - Not in particular.

Had they any receipt on them? - They had not.

Did he apply to you for payment of them? - No sir, the application was made to the treasurer.

Did you recommend to him to do any thing with them? - The person who brings them to me to be marked for payment of course carries them afterwards to the treasurer of the customs for payment; this is one of them that I marked.

JOHN RELPH sworn.

I am in the treasury, in the custom house, where the debentures are paid; in the morning of the 2d of June forty-four were brought to me in my office, I believe by the prisoner; as soon as he had laid them down on the counter I told him to witness one of them, which is a form that we require, to witness the signature of the person, that is the receiver; then we compare the sums with a list which he gives us of the total sums; then I looked at the acquittance to see if that was regular; it so appeared; the name of the witness was rather saint, therefore I said your name, Sir, to which he spelt the letters Bonus; then I withdrew, and my brother clerk next to me came and took the order; I only wrote the name of Bonus; the course is to carry it to the teller; the amount of the whole was 1062 l. 19 s. so far as I know to my knowledge, I believe it to be the prisoner.

Mr. Fielding. But you do not say positively? - No.

HENRY COLLIER sworn.

Do you recollect whether you made any order on the teller for the payment of a debenture on the 2d of June last? - I did, in consequence of Mr. Mills having marked it; this is one of those that I made the order for; I am clerk under the receiver general.

Mr. Fielding. You seeing what Mr. Mills had done, that was the foundation upon which you made the order? - I could make it no otherwise.

Mr. Garrow. Was the debenture in the condition it is now when you made the order? - I cannot say that, I looked only at what Mr. Mills had done, and I examined it to see that the commissioners names were to it.

Mr. Garrow. Had it the acquittance of the merchant? - Yes, it had.

Mr. Fielding. You looked principally to Mills having done right? - No, I looked to several parts; I looked to the commissioners hands, and whether the indorsement corresponded to the commissioners order, seeing that I deemed it all right.

Mr. Garrow. But do you pay upon it without an acquittance purporting to be the acquittance of the person receiving the draw-back?

Mr. Fielding. You ask no questions about that, you look at the instrument, if the instrument appears to be regular you then make your order.

Mr. Garrow. Do you take it to be perfect, or ever pay it unless there is an acquittance? - I always ask them to witness it.

Mr. Fielding. Did you, at the time when these debentures were tendered to you for your order, enter into any conversation with the person that produced it? - No.

Was Mr. Smith's receipt upon it before you made the order yourself? - Certainly, the acquittance was upon it or else I should never make an order; I make the person who brings it witness it; I was certainly satisfied with it.

Mr. Fielding. Have you a recollection whether you did or did not more particularly inspect this than the other forty-three? - I looked at them all to see whether they were properly indorsed by the merchant.

RICHARD HOPKINS sworn.

I am a teller in the office of the receiver general of the customs; I have a note on Mr. Collier for 1062 l. 19 s. on various debentures, I paid the amount of it to the person that brought them; I do not recollect the person; it was the 2d of June, I cannot tell the time of the day.

Mr. Fielding. In fact you actually paid it on that note being produced? - Yes.

So that any person coming into your office with such a volume of paper would be a sufficient warrant for you to pay the money. - Yes.

Nothing is produced to you but that paper? - Nothing at all.

JOSIAH LANE COLVIN sworn.

I am acquainted with the writing of George Smith , Edward Payne , Rene Payne , and George Smith , I am acquainted with all their hands; it is not the hand writing of George Smith , it has very much the appearance of the prisoner's hand writing.

Do you see the witness's hand writing; whose writing is that? - John Bonus , the prisoner.

Do you know at what time the prisoner went away.

Mr. Fielding. You are in the house of Messrs. Payne? - I am.

What time did the prisoner go away? - He was not there after the 30th of July; I did not see him till he was taken, that was in the New Prison; I believe it was about the beginning of September.

First, as to the hand writing of Mr. Smith, can you only say that it is not like the hand writing of Mr. Smith? - Yes.

Bonus was in confidential service with Mr. Payne at this time. - He was his collecting clerk .

He had the care of many debentures before, and of course of that debenture? - He had.

He was not called upon to account particularly for this money? - It was always customary that that very day he should come down and make his receipts in our cask books; it is generally known the day he goes there for that purpose, there is no entry in the book; these debentures were in his custody, and he took them himself.

Mr. Fielding. He was till the end of July in the constant habit of making his appearance? - Yes, there was no particular absence.

A large sum of money appears to have been paid on these debentures together; does not the house look out for it? - It is a custom to leave it to the settling clerk to get up these debentures, and he applies to Mr. Costin; it is Mr. Bonus's business to look out for the first day in which they might be paid.

Is it not likewise the custom of the partners to see when the day arrives to receive 1000 l? - No, Sir, the prisoner was the person; it was altogether intrusted to him to do.

From the commencement of June to the end of July was no enquiry made about these debentures? - That was entirely out of my department; I do not know that any application was made to me.

JOHN FRANCIS KALM sworn.

I was in the employ of Messrs. Payne and Co.

What was the business of the prisoner? - To attend and do the business at the custom house.

What was the course of the house with respect to the debentures after they had passed through Mr. Costin's hands? - To receive the money, the value of them; he most generally brought them to the house for one of the house to sign the acquittance.

Upon their being so brought did they find their way into any book of the house? - They were then entered in the cash book.

Then they were signed by one of the principals? - Yes.

Upon that the commissioners were credited in the cash book? - Yes.

Look at the cash book and see whether these forty-four were entered? - I have looked and there is no such entry.

Were they ever brought to account as having been paid? - No, never.

Not during the whole of the month? - No.

How soon in the common course did he make the commissioners creditors for the amount of the debentures paid? - That very day, and though he continued a month this never came to account; I am acquainted with the hand writing of Mr. George Smith ; I have seen him write many time.

This is not his hand writing? - By no means.

Would you have paid a draft for 20 l. on that signature? - By no means, I am perfectly acquainted with the hand writing Bonus, and would say that name, George Smith , is Bonus's writing; the name John Bonus I should think is the prisoner's writing; I take the whole of the writing of the acquittance to be the prisoner's writing; to the best of my belief I think so; he was not seen in the house of trade after the latter end of July till he was apprehended, and that was in September.

Mr. Fielding. Is it in your department to know when the money may be paid on debentures? - As soon as they are signed it is my chief look to see that they are paid; I know nothing of it till they are brought in for signature.

All I can ask you is, from the 2d of June up to the end of July, if you saw Mr. Bonus in his duty as usual in the house? - Yes.

WILLIAM MANING sworn.

I am well acquainted with the hand writing of George Smith , one of the partners in Mr. Edward Payne 's house; I am perfectly well acquainted with his hand writing.

Look at that name and say whether it is his hand writing; I am perfectly well acquainted with his hand writing; I do not believe it is his hand writing.

JOHN HUNTER sworn .

I was a clerk in the house of Mr. Payne and Co. I was well acquainted with the hand writing of Mr. George Smith ; I do not think this is his signature.

Do you know Bonus?

Was you acquainted with the character of his hand-writing? - I cannot say whose hand-writing it is, I have not any belief about it.

Whose hand-writing do you believe it to be? - Was this paper shewn me at any other time, I could not say positively, nor could I think whose hand-writing it was.

Mr. Fielding. You have seen Bonus write as often as you have seen Mr. Smith write? - I have.

And cannot say whose hand-writing this is? - I may have supposition, but I cannot say.

JOHN DEWKESBURY sworn.

I am well acquainted with the handwriting of Mr. George Smith , (looks at the leaf), this is not his hand-writing, to the best of my knowledge and belief.

HENRY SMYTH sworn.

I am not well acquainted with the handwriting of George Smyth , I am acquainted with Bonus's manner of writing.

Look at this instrument, whose handwriting do you believe that signature of George Smyth to be? - I have examined this with a book, and there is a strong similarity.

Mr. Garrow. If you speak merely by having compared that with any other writing, I do not ask; if you speak by looking at it, you will say? - It is impossible.

THOMAS CARPMEAL sworn.

I apprehended the prisoner at Dover. (The indorsement read.) -

'Received by

'me the 2d of June 1792, for partners and

'self.

' George Smyth .'

'Witness J Bonus.'

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

My Lord, and gentlemen of the jury, under the unfortunate situation in which I now stand, and have been these two months, my mind is too much embarrassed, and my spirits too much depressed, to attempt to say any thing for myself; the honour, the justice, and humanity of this court I have always held in the greatest reverence; to that honour,and to that justice, and the humanity of the court, and on you, gentlemen of the jury, I rely very much, not only for myself, but for my wife and our aged parents; my counsel will call such witnesses as I have given, and the gentlemen of the jury will take it into consideration; I can say no more.

JOHN HEATH sworn.

I live in Milk-street, Cheapside; I have known Mr. Bonus between 10 and 12 years, during which time he has always sustained a character unimpeached; I have been connected with him in the course of business, and always found him honest.

Mr. Knowlys. Do you know Mr. Bonus's hand writing, I have known it almost the whole of the ten years.

In your judgment is that name, George Smith , the hand writing of Mr. Bonus? - George Smith at the bottom here, it does not appear to me to be like the hand writing, I have seen him write.

Mr. Garrow. Had you ever occasion to see him write the words George Smith ? - Never.

Will you look at the words John Bonus ; whose writing do you believe that to be? - I do not believe that to be Mr. Bonus's, from my knowledge of his writing; he used to sign John.

Do you think the word Bonus is not his writing? - I do not think that it is, I do not upon my word; it is not so fair a hand as he usually wrote; I never saw him write on parchment, or any of his writing on parchment.

ROBERT KILLINLY sworn.

I knew Mr. Bonus at school, and have known him all that time; I was in the habits of intimacy with him, and I always found his connections were extremely respectable, and himself always regarded; he bore the general character of an honest man; I have had frequent opportunities of seeing his hand writing lately.

Will you be so good to look at that and tell us whether, in your judgment, that is the hand writing of Mr. Bonus? - I do not believe it is, from his general method of signing his name, it was much smaller, and the letters more regular.

Mr. Garrow. Not like what you have seen written on paper for honest purposes? - All his purposes were honest that I was concerned with him in.

Did he use to write the Christian name at length? - Yes, but here it is not at length.

The prisoner called four more witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , Death .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. Justice HEATH.

503. JAMES JONES and JOHN HARRISON were indicted for stealing, on the 18th of October , two pair of silver shoe buckles, value 40 s. the property of Robert Rutherford .

- CAVE sworn.

I am shopman to the prosecutor; I was standing in the middle of the shop; between two and three in the afternoon I heard the shop glass break; the prisoners were together; they ran away; these buckles were missing; I pursued them, and saw one deliver to the other something, and when they came to the end of the street, one went one way and the other the other; I pursued Jones, and he threw a pair of buckles over the church-yard wall. (The buckles produced and deposed to.)

Cave. I am clear the prisoners are the persons that broke the glass and took out the buckles.

Prisoner James Jones. I only came out of the country on Sunday morning.

Prisoner Harrison. My Lord, I leave what I have to say to my counsel.

The prisoner Harrison called one witness to his character.

BOTH GUILTY .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. Justice HEATH.

504. THOMAS CLARK was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of October , a cotton quilted morning gown, value 20 s. a flannel gown, value 20 s. and another cotton morning gown, value 10 s. and a linen towel, value 1 s. the property of Thomas Cruden .

THOMAS CRUDEN sworn.

I live in Ten Court, Fenchurch-street, a doctor of physic ; the back of my Phaeton was cut, and three gowns tied up in a towel were taken away; it was about six in the evening; I observed nobody by me; I missed them the side of St. Mary Axe; I saw them in Bishopsgate-street ; I found the articles at the magistrates on the Saturday following.

JAMES HALL sworn.

I am a constable belonging to the city; on Wednesday the 17th of October, near eight o'clock, I was going along Bishopsgate-street, and I stopped to speak to the toll-man, at the end of Sun-street, Bishopsgate-street; I saw a suspicious person pass me, a little taller than the prisoner; then I saw the prisoner come by with a bundle, I followed him at some little distance till I came to a publick-house, where there was a light, I caught hold of him and asked him what he had got there; says he they are two gowns; they were tied up in an old silk handkerchief; I asked him where he came from, he said from Shackelwell, and was going to Wallbrook with two gowns to Mr. Grice; the publican knew him, and said he was an honest lad; he sent for his father, he is a hackney coachman; immediately, on the father's coming in he said, father, here is a man has stopped me with these two gowns; and says he, I took them out of a coach which some gentlemen had left; the father shook his head, said nothing, and went out. (The gown deposed to).

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

A young man asked me to mind his coach and horses, and in the coach I saw this bundle and took it out, and put it up in my handkerchief, then Mr. Hall took me; I told him I found them in a coach.

GUILTY .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

505. RICHARD RUSSEL was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of October , one sextant, unfurnished, made of wood, brass, and ivory, value 50 s. the goods of Robert Gota .

ROBERT GOTA sworn.

I am a mathematical instrument maker , No. 146, Wapping ; on Tuesday, October 9th, between eight and nine in the morning, while I was at breakfast, a young lad knocked at the door and asked me if I had lost any thing, I looked round and saw a glass case door open, and the sextant in it taken out; this glass case stood in the shop, about nine feet from the door, against the shop wall; I immediately missed the sextant; I received information of it; I went and saw it; at one o'clock a boy came, and I went with him and caught hold of the prisoner in Newmarket-street, at the bottom of Gravel Lane, he was with his companion, he d - d my bloody life and said he would rip it up if I did not let him go; he was in company with another; he ran from me and ran down King-street; I never lost sight of him at that time, but I did afterwards till he was secured; he was taken that evening, and I saw him at Justice Davis's; I found the sextant in the house of one of the evidences, Downing, between one and two o'clock; hesaid that the prisoner had left it about ten minutes, and gave no further account of it, and justice Davis thought proper to commit him; about six o'clock the same evening the prisoner at the bar came to Downing's house to demand the instrument, and he was seized; it was made of ebony, brass and ivory.

WILLIAM ETHERINGTON sworn.

I am a constable; I produce the sextant, I got it from Downing, a shoemaker; Mr. Gota gave me charge of him; I have kept it ever since.

BARTHOLOMEW CONNER sworn.

I am a labourer; I was coming from my day's work; I lodge at Downing's, and the prisoner came and asked for what he had left in the morning, it was the 9th of October, Tuesday, I never saw him before; he asked for the thing he had left in a blue apron that morning; he did not say what it was; I never saw the sextant in the house: I took him into custody, and had him to the justice.

SUSANNAH CHAMPION sworn.

I lodge at Mr. Downing's, the shoemaker, in King's-street, Wapping this young man came in at eight or nine o'clock in the morning; I had never seen him before; he is the same man that brought the quadrant into Downing's house, and came for it; he said I will leave this here for a minute or two, and ran off again, before he could get an answer.

Did you ever see this man with Downing? - I never did; Downing did not know it was there till twelve o'clock; he never knew it was in the house till his wife examined; the owner of it came and took it away from our house, but, between six and seven at night the prisoner came and asked for what he had left in the blue apron in the morning, and he was taken by Conner.

MARY HAMPTON sworn.

I saw the prisoner come in the morning, between eight and nine, and asked leave to leave that thing in the blue apron; Downing did not come in till he had seen the owner, and he came in for it, and took it out to carry to the owner, and the prisoner came again about six or seven at night, for the thing he had left in the blue apron, and Conner said if he would come in he would give it him, so when he came in he took hold of him.

CHARLES DOWNING sworn.

I am a shoemaker; I was committed upon a charge of taking this instrument; I went out about eight in the morning; Mr. Gota was running down, and asked me if I saw a man with a long white coat pass by, I told him I had not; I went up to the house and got the thing to carry it to Mr. Gota's house, and at the bottom of New Market-street, he got me there, and gave me in charge to an officer, and had me before the magistrate, and I was committed, and he discharged me afterwards, upon proper evidence that I was not in the house; I never saw the prisoner before; Mr. Gota's house is about a quarter of a miles from mine.

Court to Prosecutor. Was that boy a servant of yours? - No. (Deposes to the sextant).

Prisoner. A man who appeared to be a steward of a ship asked me to carry this to No. 2, King's-street; I carried it, and the man went with me, and the same man went with me at six o'clock to fetch it.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY 30 s. (Aged 22.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

506. JAMES TINGAY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of October , three thousand steel needles, value 5 s. the goods of Thomas Shearwood .

THOMAS SHEARWOOD sworn.

I am a needle-maker ; the prisoner had been in my service as a labourer in the finishing of needles ; the needles lost were fixed in a nest of drawers, ready for sale, put each side separate; I saw him arise to take them; this good man I had placed great confidence in, and had left him to eat his dinner, in the room; he had come to finish his work left undone that day; I went to eat my dinner, I saw him arise from his dinner, which I suppose was to take the property; after he had left the place I examined these drawers, he went backward to the shed where he used to work; and, finding the goods missing, I immediately applied to an officer, who came and searched him, and found the property upon him; the officer took the property, his name is Furnell.

RICHARD FURNELL sworn.

I examined the prisoner, and found these needles upon him. (Produced and deposed to).

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY 1 s. (Aged 49).

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

507. WILLIAM SHARPE was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of September , one cotton frock, value 2 s. one cotton and linen apron, value 21 d. one cotton shirt, value 3 s. and one pinnafore, value 2 d. the goods of William Matthews .

- MATTHEWS sworn.

I am wife of William Matthews ; the articles mentioned in the indictment were hanging on the line, in the lower room, in the parlour, in the room we live in, in Brook-street , facing School-house Lane; between eight and nine in the morning I saw them there; on Friday morning the 28th of September, I saw them again brought to my door by Henry Bridges , very soon after; I saw him coming out of the premisses, and asked the prisoner what he wanted, he made no answer; I am sure it was the prisoner, I saw him coming out of the door.

HENRY BRIDGES sworn.

I am a journeyman baker; I was in my own house and heard Mrs. Matthews say, some person had been in her house; I ran after the prisoner, and took him not far from the house, and he took the bundle from his left side and threw it over his right, down School House Lane; I had not lost sight of the bundle or prisoner. (The bundle produced). Here is a cotton frock, a linen apron, a cotton pinnafore, and a linen shirt.

Prisoner. I would wish to ask where I was taken? - He was taken at the bottom of School House Lane.

Prisoner. I was taken by a butcher. - A butcher coming along threw a wet cloth over his face while I took him. (The things deposed to).

Prisoner. I was coming up from Black-wall, when I was stopped by a butcher; presently after this man came out of School House Lane, who was passing by me, and the butcher called to him and said, this is the man, and he took me, and afterwards a man came and brought this property, and said I stole it.

GUILTY . (Aged 20).

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Fine. See summary.]

[Transportation. See summary.]

508. MARY CAVE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of October , one cloth great coat, value 15 s. and one petticoat, value 5 s. the goods of William Turner .

WILLIAM TURNER sworn.

I am a publican in Holborn ; I keep the French Horn facing Ibberson's, the George; on the 25th of October, this Mary Cave came into my service; on the 28th I disapproved of her, this was Sunday evening; she was sent up stairs and came down again, and I desired her to be searched; from under her petticoat there was taken a boy's great coat; in further searching, there was a little pin case and a book, I saw the great coat and book; I went to Mr. Wells's, a pawnbroker, on the 29th, and took with me a duplicate found on the prisoner; the pawnbroker produced a petticoat of my wife's.

THOMAS WELLS sworn.

I am a pawnbroker; the prisoner came to me on the 26th of October; she brought the stuff petticoat to me; and I took it in and lent her 5 s. on it.

GUILTY .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

509. MARGARET SNOW was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of October , nine yards of worked muslin, value 3 s. the good of George Twynam and Thomas James .

A second count, for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of October , three muslin shawls, value 5 s. the goods of the same persons.

THOMAS LEADHAM sworn.

I am shopman to Thomas James and George Twynam ; on the 19th of October I remember seeing the prisoner at the bar, and served her one shawl, she did not pay for it; I had seen the prisoner at the bar once before only; she was in the shop about a quarter of an hour or twenty minutes; Mr. James attended her before me; during the time I was separating the shawl that she had agreed for from the rest, she drew these three shawls from off the counter on her lap; I saw her; she sat side ways, with her elbow on the counter, and she made use of her other hand to draw them off; she did it in the manner as I conceived to be concealing them, I said nothing to her on observing this; after I had cut her the shawl, she went away, and bid me good morning; I went and spoke to Mr. James; I went after her and asked her to walk back, Mr. James wanted to speak to her; I took her into the back shop, Mr. James followed, and observed to her that she had got some property that was not her own; I took the shawls from her, from underneath the cloak; I really cannot say she said any thing. (The constable was sent for).

Mr. Garrow, prisoner's counsel. You did not know the nature or extent of her dealings at the house? - I did not.

What do you call them? - Callico muslin.

THOMAS JAMES sworn.

I am in partnership with Mr. George Twynam ; I know the prisoner at the bar; I saw her in my shop on the 19th of October; I remember her being brought back into the back shop, and I saw the young man take from her side three shawls.

What do you call them? - Callico muslin; it is a muslin as thick as callico; the prisoner said she hoped I would forgive her, she had never taken any thing before; a constable was sent for, and we took her in a coach to Bow-street, and the prisoner wanted something at her lodgings, and I went to her lodgings with her to Hide-street, Bloomsbury, and I saw taken out of a drawer about nine yards of muslin; it is worth about 60 s. the constable took out a great variety of things, among which was this one piece of muslin. (Deposed to by the hand-writing). It had never been sold out of one shop.

Mr. Garrow. How many people sell in your shop? - Seven.

How long had she dealt in your shop? - About a year and a half.

Had she paid you any money that morning? - Ten guineas in part of a bill.

When at any time on the payment ofher bills did you make her any present? - Yes, we have.

How much had she laid out in this year and a half? - 100 l. I suppose.

Do you always cut off your mark when you sell your goods? - No.

- GEARING sworn.

I know this muslin; I did not sell it; I had missed it about six weeks or two months.

Mr. Garrow. Is that part of your master's stock? - It is.

Do you know whether it is part of Mr. James's stock? - I do not know.

ROGER GASHELL sworn.

I am a constable; that is what was picked out of her drawer; I know nothing else.

Prisoner. I leave it to my counsel.

JOSEPH MANN sworn.

I live in Aldermanbury; I am a wholesale hosier, I have known her between fourteen and fifteen years; - a most irreproachable character till this charge.

Court. What are her habits in life? - She is a chamber milliner .

BENJAMIN FULLER sworn.

I live in Clement's courts, Milk-street; I have known her twelve or fourteen years in a very creditable situation. She lived lived very creditable as a shop woman to several gentlemen.

JOHN WANLESS sworn.

I live in Fore-street, Cripplegate; I have known her seven years; she lived with me two years, and conducted the millinery business for me; I reposed implicit confidence in her, and never found she abused it.

RICHARD BECKETT sworn.

I live in Duke-street, Lincoln's Inn Fields; the prisoner lodged with me from February, 1791, to July 1792, her character was very good in every respect.

WILLIAM BOWERS sworn.

I live in Vere-street, Clare Market; I am a grocer, I have know her twenty months last, she had a very fair character, she always paid very well, and behaved as an honest woman should do.

GUILTY of stealing the shawls, value 29 s.

Fined 1 s. and imprisoned twelve months .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

510. MARY ANN SHORT was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of October , one muslinet gown, value 8 s. and one muslin half handkerchief, value 9 d. the goods of Joseph Kendal .

CHARLOTTE KENDAL sworn.

I am the wife of Joseph Kendal ; I live in the parish of St. George; I lost a corded muslinet gown, and a muslin half handkerchief, the 15th of October, Monday, from Catherine Cotterell 's room; she lives facing the Bunch of Grapes, in Cable-street ; when I am not at work, I used to go and be in her room, and undressed myself; I left my dirty things in her room on Sunday, where I dressed myself, and went on Monday morning, and changed my cloaths between nine and ten o'clock, and I went again in the afternoon and found they were gone, and from what I was told I suspected Mary Ann Short ; the handkerchief was found at John Murray 's, pawnbroker.

CATHERINE COTTRELL sworn.

Charlotte Kendall came up into my room and left this gown and handkerchief on Monday morning in my room; I went out about two or three o'clock, and left the things in the room; when I went home I saw Mary Ann Short , and she was inliquor, and asked me to drink, and I said I had no money.

What is Mary Ann Short ? - She lived in the opposite room to me, but I don't know what she is; she was very much in liquor indeed; this was between six and seven on the same day.

JOHN MURRAY sworn.

I am a pawnbroker in East Smithfield, I have got half an handkerchief, pawned by the prisoner on Monday the 15th of October, in the afternoon, between the hours of three and four; (produced). I lent nine pence, on it, I am quite confident the prisoner is the person. I have known her a considerable time, (Deposed to).

Prisoner. Mrs. James, did not you lend me the handkerchief to pawn it yourself? - I did not; I never saw her till I saw her to take her.

Prisoner. I pawned it for nine pence, and did not go back with the money, but staid and spent it; and on the next morning I found myself in the watch-house, and then she charged me with stealing a gown.

GUILTY of stealing the handkerchief, 9 d.

Fined 1 s. and imprisoned three Months .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

511. JAMES THOMPSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 31st of October , one linen shirt, value 18 d. and thirty-six copper halfpence , the goods and monies of Robert Wringer .

ROBERT WRINGER sworn.

I am a private in the second regiment of foot guards ; I live in Broad-way, Westminster ; last Wednesday, in the afternoon, the 31st of October, I went out about half past two, and returned back about a quarter before five; I found my own street door fast; I immediately got the key, and I heard the foot of some person in my own bed-room; the whole house is mine, I immediately cried out, who is there! five times; no person answered; I went up stairs, and as I was going up, I heard a person come out of the room and go up two pair of stairs; and at the foot of the two pair of stairs, I found the shirt I had pulled off; the prisoner laying on the floor seemingly asleep; I called to him and asked him what business he had there, and how he got in; he said a man, Bill Eaves , sent him there to sleep; one who is of the same regiment with me; this Bill Eaves was on guard; I told him to come down, for I was very sure he had no business there; he came down to my shop, and asked me if I thought he came there to rob me; I said it looked very much like the matter, as I was sure he must have taken something; he said he came in at the back door, the back door was open at that time; the prisoner took off his coat and asked me if he had got any thing belonging to me; I told him he had got nothing of any bulk, and if he had any private concern, as he was a soldier of the same regiment, I should know where to find him; my wife came, and we found there were thirty six-pieces of copper halfpence taken out of the tea-chest, which was broke open. When I saw him take off his coat, I heard the jingle of halfpence in his pocket; he went away, and about half an hour after I found him.

ANN WRINGER sworn.

I am the wife of the last witness; I left my house about a quarter after four; about ten minutes before I left it, I took in halfpenny out of my tea chest to buy some gooseberries, and locked my tea chest safe; and when I went out I bolted my back door and locked my fore door and went to my sister's; in about half an hour afterwards my husband came to me for the key; I had left the shirt on the chair in the far end of the room; when I went home I found my tea chest broke open, and the eighteen pennyworth of halfpence were all gone.

WILLIAM ASTON sworn.

I am a constable of Queen Square, Westminster;on the 31st of October the prosecutor came to me, and I took the prisoner in the Broad-way, Westminster, between five and six o'clock; I took him to the Wolf and Grapes; and found nine pence halfpenny upon him in halfpence; I went afterwards to the house, and it appeared to me by a mark on a sieve at the window that the man had slept up there, and got in at the window: I found this tea chest broke open, standing on the table; I also have a shirt. (Produced, and deposed to.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

John Hunt , who lodged at Wringer's, had offered me to lodge with him, and I went in backward, and went up and was asleep when Wringer came, being intoxicated; I told him I hoped he did not think I came there to do him any harm; and I would be very happy if he would search me.

GUILTY .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

512. THOMAS MORRIS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 30th of October , seven block straps, value 5 s. the goods of Peter Young .

- GRAY sworn.

I am servant to Mr. Young of Limehouse; on the 30th of October I observed this Thomas Morris to be on the premisses, at the rigging house; it was about four o'clock in the day, and I saw him take about a couple of block straps and open the window and throw them towards a window, and he opened the window and threw them within side; after that I saw him come out of the rigging house and go round and open the window on the other side, and put his body and reached his body in, and he took out seven block straps and two pieces of rope; and I went and informed, and planted myself again, and saw him come again and take another piece of rope; he took them to a place just by the New Cut, and pulled the grass over them; he worked that day about three hours; he returned, after he hid them, about a quarter before six at night, and put this property into a jacket, and went off, and took them off about thirty yards, and then he was stopped by Hughes; he has the property now.

- HUGHES sworn.

I am a rope-maker; I watched this man, I saw the prisoner with the property, and stopt him; I did not see where he brought it from; he had the things upon his head. (Produced, and deposed to.)

JOHN RICHARDS sworn.

I am foreman to Mr. Young; these are the same ropes as produced at the Justice's; I saw them in the ditch, where they were planted, before taken away by the prisoner; the value is 5 s.

Prisoner. I was in liquor.

GUILTY . (Aged 19.)

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Transportation. See summary.]

513. ANN VAUGHAN was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of October , one printed bound book, value 1 s. one other printed book, value 6 d. two yards of linen cloth, value 3 s. one gold pin, value 5 s. and other things, the goods of Mr. Turner ; one silk handkerchief, value 2 s. and two pocket handkerchiefs, value 2 s. the goods of Benjamin Neal ; one thimble, value 3 d. one linen cloth apron, value 12 d. one muslin handkerchief, value 6 d. one callico cap, value 6 d. one muslin border, value 6 d. three yards and a half of ribbon, value 6 d. and some other ribbon, value 3 d. the goods of Anna Martin spinster .

ANNA MARTIN sworn.

I live at the house of Messrs. Neale and Turner, the prisoner lived servant with mymaster two months and one day; she left the service before we took her up; she was taken up a fortnight last Saturday; the 13th of October I lost a cloth apron, a muslin handkerchief, a silver thimble, and other things; I know also that my master's things were lost; there were two books lost, two pocket handkerchiefs, some linen, and a gold pin; these were the property of Mr. Turner; and two pocket-handkerchiefs, and one silk one, the property of Mr. Neal: I found the things in her lodging, in a place called Cat's Hall, near St. Catherine's Square. When I went to her lodgings she was at home, and she gave me leave to look at her box, and there was nothing in it but her own; I looked round that room, and then went up in the garret; I found the things in a bundle, and a gold pin, which I did not take, because I did not know of the loss the prisoner begged I would not hurt her, I told her I would not; she is a young girl not eighteen.

- TURNER sworn.

I know nothing more than what the first witness has represented: I went a second time to the prisoner's lodgings, and found the gold pin.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave her an excellent character.

GUILTY, (Aged 17.)

Recommended to mercy

Fined 1 s. and imprisoned three months .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

514. ROBERT TWIGG and JOSEPH FOX were indicted for feloniously stealing, the 31st of October , twenty-nine pounds of raw sugar, value 15 s. the goods of Robert Leghorn and Co.

- SPINEY sworn.

I work at Botolph Wharf ; last Wednesday morning, between nine and ten o'clock, I was looking through a loop hole and saw one of these men, Twigg, go into the cellar and shut the door after him; I came down and told my fellow servant of it, and came up to the gateway; in a short time afterwards Twigg came up out of the cellar, opened the door, and threw out a bag, and then got up and took up the bag, and I came up; he made a push towards the gateway, and we took him, and he had got sugar in the bag; the gangsmen came up, and a constable came, and I gave him the sugar; Twigg said there was another in the cellar, we went down and saw an handkerchief of sugar upon the stairs, and another bag of sugar close by, and an hogshead broke open; and we found the other man, Fox, concealed between the tubs, at the far end of the cellar; we secured him, and gave that sugar to Mr. Merriman, the constable.

WILLIAM EDINGTON sworn.

I am a constable, I took them into charge.

- MERRIMAN sworn.

I produce the sugar, I have had it in my custody ever since.

ROBERT TWIGG , (Aged 24,) JOSEPH FOX, (Aged 18,)

BOTH GUILTY .

Fined 1 s. and imprisoned three months .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

515. JOSEPH LEAVER was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of October , one silk handkerchief, value 2 s. the goods of Giles Long .

GILES LONG sworn.

I am a sheriff's officer , I was going along Cannon Street on Tuesday last, about three o'clock, I was informed my pocket was picked, and I went up to the prisoner, seized him; and took it from under his coat. (Produced, and deposed to.)

Prisoner. there was a young man in a green coat, that dropped it and I picked it up, and that man came.

GUILTY . (Aged 21.)

Transported for seven Years .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

516. ANN HARRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of October , one canvas purse, value 1 d. one half guinea, four half crowns, and 19 s. the goods and monies of Thomas Lovell .

THOMAS LOVELL sworn.

I am a poor working man, had been at the harvest at Kent, and was going down to Sussex, and as I passed through London I thought I would go to the fair and buy some wearing apparel; I had been bargaining for a pair of breeches, and pulled my purse out to pay for them, the prisoner asked me if I wanted a coat, I said I believe I should buy one before I left the fair; she said she would take me to her brother, where I should get a good one; I went, but did not like any one; I went out, and at another place was bargaining for a waistcoat, and she took the waistcoat out of my hand, and said she would double it up; I said she had no business with it, it belonged to me, so I took out my purse to pay for it, and took out the silver and put the purse into my waistcoat, and while I was feeling for three-penny-worth of halfpence, to make up the money for the waistcoat, she took the purse out of my pocket; I took hold of her hand to stop it, and a man ran between us, and I took hold of her immediately again, but the purse was gone.

- VAUX sworn.

I searched her, and found nothing upon her; the man charged her with taking 1 l. 19 s. 6 d. upon the whole.

Prisoner. I am a poor girl; I have lost all the use of my limbs on one side; my business is to stop at the shop door to bring in customers; I took this man to the Ship alehouse, and he did not deal, and when he came out he bought a waistcoat, and the people were jostling him about, and I went to him to double it up and to advise him to take care of it; no, says he; you b - h, I will put it in my bag; and presently he cries out, where is the woman; that woman, says he, you b - h, you have robbed me; they took every thing off me and left me as naked as I came from my mother, to search me, and found nothing; now, gentlemen, guilty or not guilty use, your own pleasure.

BENJAMIN DORAN sworn.

I keep a clothe's shop, in Rosemary Lane, in Rosemary Branch Alley; the prisoner at the bar lived nine months with me, and I never knew any thing dishonest by her; she left me about five months ago; I employed her at the door as a baker.

GUILTY . (Aged 33.)

Fined 1 s. and imprisoned twelve Months .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

517. RICHARD WILBERRY was indicted for obtaining 21 s. by false pretences .

CHARLES ASTILL sworn.

I keep a green grocer's shop ; I know the prisoner; he was servant to Mrs. Sarah Andrews , she lives in the neighbourhood; I know her very well, she keeps a publick house I had my beer there; the prisoner came to my house about nine o'clock on the 3d of October last, Tuesday, and said his mistress would be much obliged to me to let her have two guineas worth of silver, as his mistress was busy, as some of the watchmen were not paid; he said my mistress will send you the money up by and by; I told him I could not spare above one guinea's worth, which I gave him, seven half crowns, three shillings, and one sixpence; I saw him about ten days after in his mistress's house with the constable.

SARAH ANDREW sworn.

I am a widow woman; the boy was a servant of mine; on Tuesday, 12th of October, he had lived two months; we had a very good character with him; I gave him no orders to go to Mr. Astill that day; I was not up, it was between eight and nine in the morning; I never saw him all the day; on the Saturday before I had given him several guineas to change, and he brought them, but he had no orders that Tuesday; he quitted my house that morning a little after eight, and never returned.

STEPHEN WARRINGTON sworn.

I am the constable; in consequence of Mrs. Andrew speaking to me, I found, the boy last Friday, in Turnmill street; I found him in a hay loft, according to directions; he confessed it as soon as I took him to his mistress's house.

Prisoner. I am willing to make it up in my work when I am in work.

GUILTY . (Aged 18.)

Whipped , and imprisoned nine Months .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

The Trials being ended, the Court proceeded to pass Sentence, as follows:

Received sentence of Death, 9, viz.

Bonus John - 502

Brown John - 448

Castledine John - 450

Cowden Sarah - 453

Davis Philip - 479

Foulkes Thomas - 451

Graham William - 448

Radley Thomas - 480

Wild Henry - 477

A jury of matrons were impannelled on Sarah Cowden 's application to the court that she was pregnant, and they returned a verdict that she was with quick child, upon which the execution was stayed.

Received sentence of Transportation for Seven years, 43, viz.

Bidwell Judith - 500

Blewis Nathaniel - 476

Bridges William - 468

Brown John - 497

Buskin John - 474

Burne Charles - 482

Cave Mary - 508

Causeway William, alias Corsey 464

Carpenter James - 449

Clarke Thomas - 504

Croker William - 475

Doddridge John - 454

Evans Robert - 492

Foster Robert - 496

Francis John - 467

Gower Sarah - 484

Hall Martha - 465

Harrison John - 503

Hugh John - 447

Johnston George - 501

Jones James - 503

Kelting George - 491

Leaver Joseph - 515

Long Thomas - 407

Mason George - 490

Millholland James - 460

Morris Thomas - 512

Newton Sarah - 483

Newman William - 461

Orange John - 485

- Isaac - ibid.

Poore Thomas 499

Powell Job - 491

- Richard - 472

Price Robert - 489

Rigley Alexander - 488

Rolf, Jeremiah - 402

Russell, Richard - 505

Smith William - 498

Stanley John - 486

Scotney Owen - 487

Thorne Ann - 463

Thompson James - 511

To be imprisoned Twelve Months.

Margaret Snow (fined 1 s.)

Ann Harris (fined 1 s.)

To be imprisoned Nine Months.

Robert Wilberry .

To be imprisoned Six Months.

William Young Chant (fined 1 s.)

Isaac Ball .

Mary Thomas (fined 1 s.)

Charles Ancle .

John Westcoate .

George Wilmot (fined 1 s.)

To be imprisoned Three Months.

George Brown.

John Small .

Ann Vaughan (fined 1 s.)

Robert Twigg .

Joseph Fox (fined 1 s.)

Mary Ann Short (fined 1 s.)

To be imprisoned Two Months.

William Saunders (fined 1 s.)

To be imprisoned One Month.

Ann Scott .

William Short (fined 1 s.)

Henry Coward (fined 1 s.)

Edward Burne .

To be imprisoned One Week.

Ann Turner .

Ann Lumley

To be whipped.

Thomas Gibson .

John Matthews .

George Brown .

John Small .

Richard Wilberry .

Edward Boneyfield .

Isaac Ball.

Edward Burne .

Charles Ancle .

JOHN DAVIS 'S Sentence was respited till the next Session, which will begin on WEDNESDAY the 3d of December next.