Old Bailey Proceedings Online (www.oldbaileyonline.org, version 6.0, 22 September 2014), May 1782 (17820515).

Old Bailey Proceedings, 15th May 1782.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS ON THE KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery for the CITY of LONDON; AND ALSO, The Gaol Delivery for the County of Middle sex; HELD AT JUSTICE HALL in the OLD BAILEY, On Wednesday the 15th of May, 1782, and the following Days;

Being the FIFTH SESSION in the Mayoralty of The Right Hon. Sir WILLIAM PLOMER , Knt. LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY JOSEPH GURNEY , And Published by Authority.

NUMBER V. PART I.

LONDON:

Printed for JOSEPH GURNEY (the PROPRIETOR) And Sold by M. GURNEY, No. 34, Bell-Yard, near Temple-Bar.

MDCCLXXXII.

[PRICE SIX-PENCE.]

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS UPON THE

KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery for the CITY of LONDON, &c.

BEFORE the Right Honourable Sir WILLIAM PLOMER , Knt. LORD MAYOR of the City of London; The Hon. EDWARD WILLES , Esq; one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of King's Bench; The Hon. Sir RICHARD PERRYN , Knt. one of the Barons of his Majesty's Court of Exchequer; JAMES ADAIR ; Serjeant at Law, Recorder; and others his Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

London Jury.

Joseph Proctor

Erasmus Lawrence

Stephen Adams

Robert Burton

Charles Pricket

John Vickerman

Charles Martin

Michael Clark

* Edmund Godsall

* Elias South served part of the time in the stead of Edmund Godsall .

John Harris

William Lingham

Samuel Little

First Middlesex Jury.

John Gregory

Richard Atkins

Joseph Wood

James Small

William Pilton

John Golden

George Locket

William Lockwood

William Fell

George Holmes

John Crompton

James Lee

Second Middlesex Jury.

William Lovegrove

John Lambert

John Flock Roberts

John Kane

Thomas Fulford

Thomas Laycock

John Lewis

William Banks

John Cunningham

Thomas Harrison

John Haywood

John Segrist

345. JAMES GARDINER was indicted for stealing a saddle, value 3 s. two bridles, value 3 s. three leather collars, value 2 s. a leather portmanteau, value 2 s. a woollen breast-cloth, value 6 d. and a sieve, value 6 d. the property of William Arthur Crosby , esq ; privately in his stable , April the 17th .

ISAAC HURRY sworn.

I am groom to Sir Harry Crofts . As I was coming home, about nine o'clock at night, on the 17th of April, I saw the prisoner, with the things mentioned in the indictment, at the top of Hill-street: there was a lamp-lighter's-ladder in Lord Scarborough's area; I saw the prisoner take that ladder, and lift it up to a place built for him at the top of Lord Scarborough's wall; he took some of the things up, and came down again for the saddle; I then went up to him, and asked him whose saddle that was: he said it was Sir James Lowther 's: I told him I would take it to Sir James's for him. As he was going with me, he stopped, and said it did not belong to Sir James Lowther , but to his master, Mr. Lucas, who is an oilman in Rupert-street. I took him to the Coach-and-Horses, in Hill-street; I left him in the custody of a person there, and then went back, and found the other things mentioned in the indictment in the place to which I saw him carry them; then I came back to the Coach-and-Horses, and charged a constable with the prisoner: he was taken the next morning before a justice; Mr. Crosby's servant came there, and swore that the things I had seen upon the prisoner were his master's property.

MILES WALKER sworn.

I am servant to Mr. Crosby. The things mentioned in the indictment I hung up on some pegs in a chamber over my master's stable, on the morning of the 16th of April; I was not in that room again that day. I locked the stable-door, and went out a riding till late with my master; I saw them in the watch-house the next day, where the prisoner was in custody.

(The several articles mentioned in the indictment were produced in court, when Miles Walker deposed that they were the prosecutor's property.)

Was the door of the hay-loft fastened? - Yes; by a nail in the hasp, inside the door. I found it fast when I came home. The prisoner was a servant to the lamp-lighter. There are two sash-windows; he must have got in at one of them; I can't be certain whether those windows were quite down when I went out.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I leave my defence to my counsel.

(The prisoner called four witnesses who gave him a good character.)

GUILTY of stealing the goods, but NOT GUILTY of stealing them privately in the stable .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

346. CATHARINE BUTLER was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Adam Peal , between the hours of eight and eleven in the forenoon of the 21st of April, Samuel Elmes , Mary Weston , and Rose Hannah Elmes , in the said dwelling-house then and there being, and stealing two featherbeds, value 5 l. two bolsters, value 10 s. three woollen blankets, value 6 s. and two linen sheets, value 5 s. the property of the said Adam Peal .

ADAM PEAL sworn.

I am a tide-waiter . I live in Aldgate parish, in the lower precinct . I was not at home when my house was robbed; I can only prove my property.

MARY WESTON sworn.

I am servant to Mr. Peal. My master has some lodgers. On the 21st of April I was alarmed by the lodger in the one pair of stairs, that she had seen the dirty foot of somebody who had gone up stairs; this was about eleven o'clock.

Can you tell whether the street door was open or shut? - I cannot be certain. I went up stairs into the garret, which is the two pair of stairs; there I saw a bed tied up in a sheet, and I saw another parcel of the same size; I saw a blue jacket, which alarmed me, supposing that there was a sailor in the room; I ran down, and called for assistance; David Thomas came, and Samuel Elmes , who lives in the house, stood at the bottom of the stairs with a cooper's adze in his hand till I got assistance; Mr. Thomas and we went up into the garret, and we found the prisoner up the garret chimney; Mr. Thomas pulled her down: the blue jacket was close to the door, which had made me suppose a man had been there, but we did not find any. When she was pulled out of the chimney, she was as black as a chimney sweeper; I did not at first know whether it was a man or a woman. The bed, and the blankets, sheets, pillows, and bolster, were scattered all about the room; but the bed which I had seen when I first went up, tied up in a sheet, was then untied.

Who lodged in this garret? - When Adam Peal was at home, I laid in that garret. I had been in the room about an hour before the alarm was made; there were two beds, one upon the other, there were three blankets, two sheets, and a coverlid; the bed was made fit for me to lie in, and the things were in order then. I locked the door, and put the key in my pocket. The bed that was tied up in the sheet was Mr. Peal's.

If you left the door locked, and found it locked when you went up again, how do you suppose the prisoner got in? - She confessed before the justice that she forced the staple out, and to got the door open, and that she afterwards put the staple in again.

What is Adam Peal 's bed worth? - It is worth 5 l.

DAVID THOMAS sworn.

On Sunday morning, the 21st of April, while I was at breakfast, at about half after ten o'clock, Mrs. Weston came out, and cried out fire! thieves! I went out directly; I found Mr. Elmes at the bottom of the stairs, with his adze in his hand; there was a butcher there besides; they were afraid to go up stairs; I went up; Mr. Elmes and the butcher went up with me, and Mrs. Weston followed us; I had a knife in my hand. I found the garret-door shut; the staple of the lock was out, and lay on the floor; the bolt of the lock was shot. I found the bed and the bed-clothes all upon the ground. There was a sailor's blue jacket in the room. Mr. Elwes went up towards the chimney with his hatchet; we looked up the chimney, but could not see any light through it; Mrs. Elmes took his axe, and beat it against the woman's tail; he thought it had been a parcel of rags; he said there was nothing there: I put my hand up the chimney, and took her by the thigh. I said it was no man, I was fire, for it had not breeches on. She was, I believe, about three foot up the chimney; she was nearly as black as a coal. She burst out a crying: she said her husband was a soldier; that she had pawned his shirts, and was determined to rob somebody's house to get them out of pawn, or else she should be killed by him: she said a man had told her to rob that house.

Did she say who the blue jacket belonged to? - No.

Did she say how she got in? - No.

Did you make her any promises of favour? - No.

What is the value of the bed that belonged to Peal? - I have been in the brokering business; I would not give above 5 l. for the whole; that bed is worth about 50 s. The prisoner's shoes were off; we looked about the room and found them, and she put them on.

Samuel Elmes confirmed the testimony of the last witness, and added that when he went up into the garret he saw two pole-axes, a false key, and a pair of women's shoes; that when the prisoner was pulled out of the chimney, she told them she wanted two pair of sheets to fetch her husband's shirts out of pawn, or else he would kill her.

To David Thomas . You did not mention any thing about the two axes? - I did not see them.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I had three small children; I buried the eldest a month ago. My husband is gone away with another woman; I was informed he lodged up in this garret; I had got a little drop in my head; I went to see whether he was there or no; the door was wide open; I sat down upon a chair. I did not see any body as I went up; I heard somebody coming up stairs; I thought it was my husband; the bed stood up in the corner; I stood up close to the chimney, upon the bed, but I was not up the chimney.

Court to Mary Weston . Do you know who the pole-axes belonged to? - They were Mr. Peal's; they had been taken out of the box.

NOT GUILTY of breaking and entering the dwelling-house, but GUILTY of stealing the goods to the value of 39 s .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice WILLES.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

347. ELIZABETH BRYAN was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Sheffield , on the 23d of April , about the hour of eight in the night, and stealing a green silk damask gown, value 2 s. a pair of women's stays, value 2 s. two linen bed-gowns, value 2 s. a dimity petticoat, value 12 d. a cotton petticoat, value 12 d. a printed cotton gown, value 6 s. a printed muslin gown, value 20 s. a child's printed cotton jacket and coat, value 3 s. a child's blue sattin cardinal, value 2 s. and a pair of black silk shoes, value 2 s. the property of the said William Sheffield , in his dwelling-house .

WILLIAM SHEFFIELD sworn.

I keep a house in Spital-fields Market . On the 23d of April, between the hours of eight and nine o'clock in the evening, I was called into my dwelling-house, upon the alarm of thieves being in the house; I went up stairs; I missed the things mentioned in the indictment. From the one pair of stairs room I went up into the back-garret; there I found the prisoner; she had lived with me as a servant about ten weeks, but had been discharged from my service about three months before; the prisoner was lying upon the ground, and appeared to be attempting to get under the bed; the several articles mentioned in the indictment lay by her, loose; she was taken off the floor: after some time she fell upon her knees, and begged for mercy.

- NICKLIN sworn.

I lodge in the prosecutor's house. As I was coming down stairs, a little after eight in the evening, with a candle in my hand, there was some person coming out of the back-chamber door, but, seeing me, shut the door in my face very hard. I went down, and enquired of the family if any body was gone up stairs; they said, no; then I thought some thieves had got into the house; I directed the prosecutor to be called in; I went up stairs into the garret with him; there we found the prisoner lying on the floor, upon her face; the several things lay just by the prisoner.

- PIKE sworn.

I followed the prosecutor, upon this alarm, up stairs; I pulled the prisoner up from the floor; she begged for mercy.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I beg for mercy.

GUILTY of stealing the goods to the value of 10 d . W .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron PERRYN .

348. JOSEPH NEWTON was indicted for stealing a wooden box, value 6 d. and 62 lb. weight of tallow candles, value 40 s. the property of Thomas Merriman , April the 27th .

(There was not any evidence to prove a felony.)

NOT GUILTY .

349. WILLIAM SIMMONDS was indicted for stealing a brass collar, value 1 s. the property of James Simmonds , April the 11th .

JAMES SIMMONDS sworn.

I lost a brass collar, on the 11th of April, in Hungerford-market ; it was on a bitch's neck.

Is the prisoner any relation to you? - None. One of Sir John Fielding 's men brought the collar to my house; it has my name and place of abode upon it.

THOMAS CARPMEAL sworn.

We went, upon an information we had received, to the prisoner's house, upon the 18th of April; it is in a little court, in Water-lane, Fleet-street; we went to search for some dogs that were lost. We found four dogs alive, and in the yard we found the carcases of nine dogs which had been skinned, and three carcases more in another place. We found the carcase of the bitch skinned, and this collar lying on a shelf.

(The collar was produced in court, and deposed to by the prosecutor.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I was out on the 11th of April. William Howard and William Downs came together to my house, as my wife informed me, and desired to leave this collar upon the shelf.

Prosecutor. The prisoner told me he would send my bitch home the next day. I had six puppies at home starving for want of her.

For the Prisoner.

MARY LLOYD sworn.

I was charing at the prisoner's; two men came, and desired to leave a collar there, which they said they would call for in the morning; I did not look at the collar.

GUILTY .

To be publicly Whipped , & Imp. 6 Months .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron PERRYN .

350. ANN WILSON , otherwise BRADY , was indicted for stealing a cotton gown, value 10 s. a linen handkerchief, value 4 d. three muslin handkerchiefs, value 8 d. a woollen apron, value 3 d. a linen apron, value 3 d. and a silk hat, value 2 s. the property of Charles Williams , May the 4th .

ROSETTA WILLIAMS sworn.

I am the wife of Charles Williams . The prisoner was in distress; I took her in, and kept her about a fortnight: while I was gone out she stole the things mentioned in the indictment (repeating them); I met her with some of the things on her.

JOHN LA NE sworn.

I took a gown in pawn of the prisoner.

(It was deposed to by the prosecutrix.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

She sent me to pawn it.

Prosecutrix. I never sent her to pawn any thing in my life.

GUILTY. 10 d .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron PERRYN .

[Whipping. See summary.]

351. BRYAN BURTON was indicted for stealing a canvas bag, value 1 d. and three guineas and four shillings in monies numbered, the property of John Edmonds , May the 10th .

JOHN EDMONDS sworn.

On Friday last I was at the Two Blue Posts in Old Bond-street , in company with the prisoner; we drank four pots of porter, and staid there three hours. I had a bag, containing three guineas and five shillings. The prisoner is my tenant. I took my canvas bag out, and paid the reckoning; then I fell asleep, and slept for an hour; we sat in a box opposite one another; there was no other person in the box: when I awaked, I got a coach, and rode home: when I went to pay the coachman, I missed my bag and money. I had the prisoner taken before a justice; there he acknowledged that he took my money, but he said he took it off the bench.

ELIZABETH EDMONDS sworn.

I am the prosecutor's daughter. I changed a half-guinea for my father.

JOHN COST sworn.

I am a constable. I searched the prisoner; I observed him put his hand into his breeches-pocket, take out a shilling, and tuck it into the waistband of his breeches. This is the shilling (producing it).

Eliz. Edmonds . This is the shilling I gave my father in change.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I did not take the money.

GUILTY of stealing the money, but NOT GUILTY of stealing it privily from the person .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron PERRYN .

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

352. WILLIAM LEES was indicted for stealing a hair trunk, value 4 s. eight linen shirts, value 16 s. eight stocks, value 8 s. a pair of cotton stockings, value 1 s. a linen bed-gown, value 1 s. nine linen frocks, value 18 d. four linen shirts, value 2 s. five pillow-cases, value 1 s. five table-cloths, four napkins, five linen-sheets, four pair of thread stockings, and three pair of thread stockings , the property of Charles Wiseman , April the 23d .

CHARLES WISEMAN sworn.

I am an oilman , in Newgate-street. A trunk, with linen to wash, was sent from my house, to go, by the Hammersmith coach, to Hammersmith, on the 23d of April.

MARY DAVIS sworn.

I live at Kensington . On the 23d of April, at about half after seven at night, as I was crossing the way, I heard the cry, Stop thief! stop thief! I saw the prisoner coming, running very fast along the highway; I laid hold of him, and stopped him: he said, What have I done? and fell a crying: a man immediately came up, and took him from me, and he was carried to the watch-house.

WILLIAM FORD sworn.

I am the driver of the Hammersmith coach. On the 23d of April, I had Mr. Wiseman's trunk behind my coach; I set out from London about six o'clock; when I came to the Adam-and-Eve, I missed the trunk; I turned my head, and saw the prisoner running towards London, with the trunk in his arms; he was about the distance of the length of this court from my coach; I jumped off the box, and ran after him, and cried, Stop thief! stop thief! upon which he threw down the trunk; some people ran out of the Adam-and-Eve like men, and ran smartly after him; I secured the trunk, and they brought the prisoner back to me.

(The trunk, with its contents, as stated in the indictment, were produced in court, and deposed to by the prosecutor.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I heard the alarm of Stop thief! I saw several people before me, so I ran on very briskly; I never had the trunk.

GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice WILLES.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

353. WILLIAM BROOKES was indicted for stealing a mahogany dining-table, value 10 s. the property of Andrew Burnett , May the 2d .

ANDREW BURNETT sworn.

I keep the Fountain, in Wych-street . Mr. Haynes informed me two men had carried a table out of my yard; I looked into the back-room, and missed a mahogany dining-table; it was about half after eight at night; Mr. Haynes and I ran out; and, about 200 yards from my house, we took the prisoner with my table on his back.

( Thomas Haynes confirmed the testimony of Andrew Burnett .)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

A man employed me to carry the table for him.

GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice WILLES.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

354. JOHN BIGGS was indicted for stealing 15 lb. of copper nails, value 5 s. the property of Arthur Clarke , May the 13th .

(There was not any evidence to affect the prisoner.)

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron PERRYN .

355. PETER AIREY was indicted for stealing a watch, the inside and outside case both made of gold, value 20 l. a gold chain, value 10 l. two cornelian stone seals set in gold, value 40 s. one other stone seal set in gold, value 20 s. and a gold watch-key, value 5 s. the property of George Awbrey , esquire .

(The prosecutor deposed, that, as he was going into the opera-house, on a masquerade-night, he felt a man drawing his domino aside, and he missed his watch; that he immediately seised the prisoner, who was close to him; and he verily believed the prisoner to be the person who stole his watch; that, just as he missed the watch, he saw it handed past him, but could not be certain that he had seen it in the hands of the prisoner; and that he had never recovered the watch again.)

(There being no other evidence to affect the prisoner, he was not called upon for his defence.)

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron PERRYN .

356. LAZARUS JACOBS was indicted for stealing a pair of men's leather shoes, value 5 s. the property of Robert Dobey , April the 29th .

ROBERT DOBEY sworn.

I am a shoemaker , in Old Gravel-lane . On the 29th of April, I lost a pair of men's shoes, worth 5 s. from out of my shop-window.

CHRISTIAN SADLER sworn.

I am mother to the prosecutor; I live with him; I was a-bed in the shop, about eight or nine in the morning; I saw the prisoner come into the shop, and take a pair of shoes out of the window; I got out of bed in my shift, and ran to the door after the man, and called out, Stop thief!

DANIEL SERJEANT sworn.

I am a lighterman. Coming up from the water-side, on Monday morning, I met the prisoner with a pair of new shoes under his arm, about twenty yards from the prosecutor's shop; when I had gone a little further, the woman came out, and cried, Stop thief! I turned back directly, and run after him; he was running then; I saw him toss the shoes over a wall; myself and some others got up to him, and seised him; he denied having had the shoes; a lad got over the wall, where I directed him, and found the shoes.

(The shoes were produced in court, and deposed to by the prosecutor.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I saw these shoes lying on the ground, and picked them up.

(The prisoner called eight witnesses, who gave him a good character.)

GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice WILLES.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

357. JANE LAMECROTE was indicted for stealing three linen gowns, value 15 s. a silk callimanco petticoat, value 6 s. a flannel petticoat, value 1 s. a callico petticoat, value 1 s. a linen apron, value 2 s. and a muslin apron, value 2 s. the property of Sarah Briddell , December the 22d .

(There was not any evidence to affect the prisoner.)

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice WILLES.

358. DOROTHY FLEMING was indicted for stealing a black crape gown, value 6 s. the property of Peter Coyle , May the 11th .

SARAH COYLE sworn.

I am the wife of the prosecutor. The prisoner took our garret of me; I had a crape gown, hanging upon a nail in the house; I missed the gown.

(A pawnbroker produced the gown, which he deposed he took in pawn from the prisoner.)

(It was deposed to by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner. I have nothing to say in my defence.

GUILTY of stealing to the value of 10 d .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron PERRYN .

[Whipping. See summary.]

359. MARGARET MURRAY , spinster , was indicted for stealing a watch, the inside and outside cases both made of metal, value 4 l. 14 s. the property of John Lavenu , in the dwelling-house of John Glover , April the 26th .

JOHN LAVENU sworn.

I was coming from the Strand; there were three women standing together; the prisoner, and two others; I asked them the way to the Black Bear; the prisoner said it would cost me two shillings for a bed there, and that I had better put another shilling to it, and sleep with her. I agreed to go with her; and, instead of taking me to the Black Bear, she took me to the British Hotel, in Shug-lane , the house of John Glover .

What age are you? - Eighteen.

In what situation of life? - A French teacher .

Who employs you in that capacity? - I am for myself; I am along with my father.

Where does your father live? - At Salisbury. I came up to town to get a clerk's place.

Are you sure the prisoner is the woman? - I am. We had a pint of wine at the Hotel; when we had drank a glass of wine apiece, she said she had a friend below, and asked if it would be agreeable to me to let her come up; I said, With all my heart. We were joking together, till at last I was to be engaged with the woman that came up. When I came to be engaged with the other woman, the prisoner said my watch would hurt the other woman; she took the watch out of my pocket, with my consent, and put it behind the sofa till I got up; when I came to get up from the sofa, my watch was gone.

Was you in liquor? - Rather, or I should not have been guilty of such a thing.

Court. Gentlemen of the Jury, this does not in point of law amount to felony; he had intrusted his watch to her.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron PERRYN .

360. THOMAS HALL was indicted for stealing a mahogany tea-chest, value 2 s. and three tin cannisters, value 12 d. the property of John Hayes .

GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice WILLES.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

361. THOMAS BROAD was indicted for that he, in the dwelling-house of Edward Taylor , in and upon Jane Jones feloniously did make an assault, putting her in corporal fear and danger of her life, and stealing from her person a gold ring, value 10 s. a pair of linen pockets, value 2 d. and five guineas in monies numbered, the property of the said Jane , April the 11th .

JANES JONES sworn.

At the time I was robbed, I lived in the house of Edward Taylor , at Newington , with his wife; they don't live together; he is a gentleman's coachman; he pays the rent of the house. I went out on the 11th of April, to drink tea at a carpenter's in the neighbourhood, and staid there till past ten o'clock. When I got home, I put the key into the door, and opened it, and immediately two men rushed in upon me, and both came into my room; the prisoner stood against the door; the other man, who I can't swear to, opened a dark lantern which he had, and came to me; they cut off my pocket, and took out a box with a ring in it, and five guineas, and he gave them to the prisoner, Tom Broad .

Do you usually carry so much as five guineas about you? - It was all I had got; I carried it about me, at that time, because I was at a lodging.

It was dark; had you any light but from the dark lantern? - The room was quite light from the lantern; I could distinguish his face so as to swear to him.

How long did they stay with you? - About ten minutes. There was nobody in the house but me; the person I lodge with goes out a washing; she was not come home.

Had you ever seen the prisoner before? - No.

When did you see him next? - Two men were taken up upon suspicion; I went before the justice to see them; they were not the people; then the constable desired me to go into a public-house, and see if there was any body I knew; I went in, and picked the prisoner out from among a dozen; I knew him directly.

Will you take upon you to swear that the prisoner is the man that received the money, and was present when the man took it from you? - I will. The light of the lantern reflected on the face of the prisoner; I could not see the face of the other man, when he cut my pocket off.

What are you? - A cook in gentlemen's families. I have kept a house in Carey-street.

You said, as soon as you opened the door they rushed in. Was that the outer door? - Yes; there are two rooms on the floor.

Is the prisoner dressed now as he was when you was robbed? - No; he had a black handkerchief on then.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I can bring plain proof where I was, the same hour she was robbed, ten miles off.

For the Prisoner.

WILLIAM OXTON sworn.

I am a bargeman; I live at Waltham-abbey. I know the prisoner; he was a bargeman; he worked along with me, with one Mr. Bridge, of Cheshunt; I have known him four or five years.

Was you in company with him in April last? - Yes; on Thursday, the 11th of April, up at the wharf in Cheshunt parish, where we unload our coals.

At what hour? - At ten o'clock at night; I was on board the barge; James Bagley and this man were a-bed together; this man was a-sleep; I was talking with Bagley.

Can you tell how he was employed at ten o'clock of any other night? - Yes; the night before we were a-bed together at Limehouse at twelve o'clock at night.

At ten o'clock? - Yes; at ten o'clock at night too.

What was you doing at ten o'clock at night on the ninth day of April? - I cannot recollect.

Can you give any account of him any other day in April? - Yes; on the twelfth. I was at work with him, getting the coals out of the barge.

JOSEPH CLARKE sworn.

I saw the prisoner on the 11th of April; he passed by Waltham-abbey about half after five o'clock, or it might be six.

What distance is Waltham-abbey from Stoke-Newington? - I believe, seven miles.

Jury. How came you to know it was the 11th of April? - We examined the toll-books, where the barges pass.

PHEBE TAYLOR sworn.

I have known him from an infant; I never heard any harm of him.

To the Prosecutrix. As you did not know the prisoner before, how came you to call him so familiarly Tom Broad? - I knew his name, having heard it so often; I did not know it till he was before the justice.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron PERRYN .

362. SUSANNA LEECH was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Parker , on the 15th of April , at about the hour of three in the night, and stealing two cotton gowns, value 10 s. two silk cloaks, value 5 s. a linen sheet, value 4 s. a half-pint mug, made of French plate; a muslin apron, value 3 s. a pair of silk stockings. value 6 s. and one guinea in money, the property of the said John Parker , in the said dwelling-house; and that, having committed the felony, she afterwards, about the same hour in the night, the said dwelling-house did break, to get out of the same .

JOHN PARKER sworn.

On the 15th of April, I was up the last person in the house; I am certain my street-door was fast when I went to bed, which was at twelve o'clock. Between two and three o'clock in the morning, my wife told me she thought there were thieves in the house, as she had heard a noise; I jumped out of bed; I heard a noise at the door in the street; I threw up the sash, and asked who was there: the watchman said, he believed the servant had robbed the house; I put on some clothes, and went down with a light; when I came down into the passage, I found the prisoner there, and three or four watchmen with her; she had got a bundle with her; upon examining it, I found it contained several of the things mentioned in the indictment. When the constable came, he said she must be searched; she said, if we would not search her. She would deliver up what she had got; then she pulled out a French-plate half pint mug, and then a guinea; she said, Here is your guinea; and she pulled out two or three caps, and some other little things; but the greater part of the things were in the parcel. She said a person who recommended her as a servant to my wife, advised her to steal what she could the first opportunity, and make her escape. She lived with me a month within two days.

Where does the person live that recommended her? - By Whitechapel.

Was it day-light when you came down at three o'clock? - No; not till an hour after.

JOHN BARKER sworn.

I am a watchman. On the 16th of April, at a little after three o'clock in the morning, I met the prisoner with a large bundle in Mansfield-street, Goodman's-fields.

Where does the prosecutor live? - In Swan-street, near the Minories . I stopped her, and asked her where she was going, and what she had got in her bundle: she said her master had come home in liquor, and had had some words, and her mistress had discharged her; that she was going into the country, and her mistress had put some bread and cheese into the handkerchief to keep her on the road. There was some bread and cheese in a handkerchief by itself. She told me her master lived in the Minories; I asked if her mistress was up; she said she was: I told her she must go with me to her mistress. As we were going up Swan-court, I saw Mr. Parker's door a-jar; the watchman shoved it open: I took the prisoner into the passage; she wanted to leave the bundle with me, and to be off; I told her she must see her mistress: we called Mr. Parker up; the officer of the night was sent for, and charged with the prisoner.

( Luke Herrod , a constable, produced the things found upon the prisoner, which were deposed to by the prosecutor.)

To the prosecutor. Had any of your own family been out that night? - No.

Do you know whether the prisoner had been to bed that night? - I saw her in the passage about twelve o'clock; but I don't know whether she was in bed before I fastened the doors.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I have nothing to say particular in my defence.

NOT GUILTY of burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house, but GUILTY of stealing the goods .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

[Whipping. See summary.]

363. BARNARD ISAACS was indicted for stealing 49 yards of worsted binding lace, 71 yards of seaming worsted lace, 36 yards of seaming one edge lace, 24 worsted roses, 6 pair of worsted glass-strings and holders, 4 pair of worsted strings, 12 yards of broad plain white worsted lace, 24 yards of binding white worsted lace, 12 yards of broad plain drab worsted lace, 24 yards of binding drab worsted lace, 4 yards of broad drab worsted lace, 2 pair of glass-string trimmings, 2 sets of worsted footmen's holders, 2 pieces of green spring curtain lines, and a set of orange worsted footmen's holders, the property of David Lyall , in the dwelling-house of the said David , April the 28th .

JAMES BUSH sworn.

I am book-keeper to Mr. Lyall, who keeps the Black Bear Inn, Piccadilly ; he keeps a warehouse there, for the booking of goods, and sending them by the carrier . The parcel alluded to came on Sunday, the 28th of April last; I received it, and booked it; i t was directed to Messrs. Morton and Co. at Bath, who are coachmakers, I believe; I booked it to go by the Bath coach; I soon after wrote a way-bill of it, and left it with one Burton, a porter, to give to the coachman, and then I went out. There was a coach to go that afternoon at four o'clock, another between eight and nine; it was to go with either of them.

ZACHARIAH BATTERBY sworn.

I am shopman to Mr. Matthew Davis , in Long-acre, who deals in coach and livery laces; Messrs Morton and Co. of Bath, deal with my master for coach laces. On Sunday morning, the 28th of April, I packed up a paper parcel, containing the articles mentioned in the indictment (repeating them); the bill of parcels was directed to Messrs. Morton and Co. at Bath, and then I delilivered it to a servant of my master's, Nathaniel Rees , to carry them to the Black Bear Inn, Piccadilly, to go by the Bath coach.

NATHANIEL REES sworn.

I am a servant to Mr. Matthew Davis . Mr. Batterby, on the 28th of April, delivered me a paper parcel to carry to the Black Bear Inn, at a little before four o'clock, directed to Messrs. Morton and Co. at Bath; I delivered it to Mr. Bush.

To Bush. Where did you leave this parcel? - In the warehouse.

Is that part of the dwelling-house? - It is, and there are rooms over it.

NATHANIEL HEATHCOTE sworn.

I live at the King's-Head, at Birmingham; I am book-keeper to the London and Birmingham coaches. On Tuesday, the 30th of April, I received a box, directed for Amos Archer , of Birmingham; hearing an indifferent character of Amos Archer , and of one Barnard who lived with him, I consulted with the master of the inn, and the gaoler of Birmingham, whether I should open the box or no; we opened it; the box contained lace; at the top was this bill of parcel, and these two letters.

( Zachariah Batterby deposed that the several pieces of lace produced by Heathcote were the same he packed up, and directed to Messrs. Morton and Co.)

(The bill of parcels, and the letters, were produced in court, and Zachariah Batterby deposed that the bill of parcels was the same he inclosed in the parcel directed to Messrs. Morton and Co.)

Heathcote. I delivered these two letters, and the bill of parcels, to Justice Addington. This letter the prisoner acknowledged he wrote; he said he wrote it for another person, but inadvertently he put his own name at the bottom of it.

The letter was read: it was dated April 29, 1782; directed, Dear Mother and Friend Archer; and signed, Barnard Isaac .

In a postscript he says, You will go to the coachmaker's, in Litchfield-street, Birmingham, and see if you can dispose of them, or do your best; here is the bill; you have no need to be afraid, for they were going to Bath.

Counsel for the Prisoner to Heathcote. Were there not other things in the box, besides what is contained in this bill of parcels? - There were some few things; they were delivered to Amos Archer .

WILLIAM PAYNE sworn.

I had a warrant from a Middlesex magistrate, backed by an alderman, to apprehend the prisoner; I took him last Monday was se'nnight, at his own door, in Houndsditch; I carried him to the Mansion-house; there I searched him, and found these letters upon him (producing them).

No. I. read.

Birmingham, Apr. 30th, 1782.

Sir,

Expecting a parcel by this day's coach, but their not sending the parcel home, therefore went to fetch the same; found the parcel is not come to hand. You will immediately go to the Swan-with-two-Necks, to find the same. You will answer this with the morrow coach.

(Signed) AMOS ARCHER .

(Directed) To Barnard Isaac , No. 23, Houndsditch, near Aldgate, London.

No. II. was read. It was a letter from Archer to Barnard Isaac , dated Birmingham, May 4, 1782, in which he says, that the proprietors of the coach at Birmingham were willing to pay for the box they had lost, and desires Isaac to copy a fictitious bill of parcels, which he sent to Isaac, of different quantities of silk, to the amount of 10. 1 s. 6 d. as the contents of that box, which they imagined to have been lost, but which had in truth been intercepted by Heathcote.

(The prisoner said he lost his defence to his counsel, who called Moses Levi and Benjamin Powers , who said that they were drinking at a public-house, and saw Henry Barnard bring some things, tied up in a handkerchief, to the prisoner, which he desired the prisoner to send to Birmingham, inclosed in a parcel he was about to send to his mother. He likewise called several witnesses, who said he was a watch-string maker, and bore a good character.)

GUILTY of stealing the goods, but NOT GUILTY of stealing them in the dwelling-house .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice WILLES.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

364. THOMAS LEE was indicted for that he, in a certain field and open place, near the King's highway, in and upon John Commins feloniously did make an assault, putting him in corporal fear and danger of his life, and stealing from his person a guinea and a half-guinea in monies numbered , March the 6th .

JOHN COMMINS sworn.

I am a gardener . On the 6th of March, I had been working in the neighbourhood of Whitechapel. As I was returning from my work, at about a quarter after seven o'clock, I was stopped by the prisoner and three other men in Stepney-fields . They demanded my money; I said I had no money: upon which the prisoner kicked me on my right side with his foot, and I fell down upon the ground: then the prisoner put his hand into my right-hand breeches pocket, and took out a guinea and a half.

How came you to have so much money in your pocket? - I took it with me to buy some clothes, but it was too dark when I had done work.

Was there sufficient light to see the prisoner's countenance, so as to be certain he is the man? - Yes; it was dusk, neither light nor dark; but I could see his face very well, as he had nothing over it; he had his hat flapped, but it was not over his face. I could not swear to any of the other persons.

Was not you very much frightened? - I was very little frightened; God kept me. When they left me, I went home, and went to bed, and in the morning I went to the Rotation-office, and gave information of the robbery. On the 18th of March, I was sent for to the Rotation-office; I saw the prisoner there in a room, in company with two other prisoners. As I passed them, the prisoner said to me, You sulky negro, what do you look at? upon which I fixed upon the prisoner; I knew him to be the man, though I said nothing till I went into the office. I am sure he is the person that took the money out of my pocket.

What description did you give of the prisoner when you laid the information? - That he was a red-faced man, and I should know him again, if I saw him.

Was that all the description you gave of him? - Yes.

(Upon his cross-examination, he said the prisoner was dressed either in blue or brown, he could not tell which; that he had no conversation with any person at the Rotation-office about the prisoner; and that he expressed no doubt whatever as to his identity.)

JAMES GLENTON sworn.

I am a constable. I went, by direction of Justice Staples, to endeavour to take the men who committed this robbery. On the 12th of March, we took the prisoner, and two persons who were tried here last sessions and convicted; the other two had cutlasses; the prisoner had a large stick; we took them before the magistrate.

( John M'Guire, who was with the last witness at the apprehending of the prisoners, confirmed his testimony.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I know no more of it than the child in my mother's womb.

For the Prisoner,

- LEVI sworn,

I belong to the Rotation-office, Whitechapel. I asked Commins by whom he was robbed: he said four men. I asked him if he should know them: he said he should know one, he was a tall man with a red face.

THOMAS LAKE sworn.

I live at Erith, in Kent. I was at the Rotation-office, on account of my son being there on a charge of felony. I heard Commins say, he was very sorry he had sworn that the prisoner was the man, for he could not be certain to him. I know nothing of the prisoner; I never saw him before I was at the justice's. I am a brick-maker, and employ a great many men.

JOHN CASTLEDINE sworn.

I am servant to Mr. King, a butcher, in Bluecross-street. I saw the prisoner about a quarter before five o'clock, on the sixth of March; I particularly recollect the day, because I hurt my arm on the preceding day, the fifth of March: I met him in Warwick-lane; we went into a public-house, and had two pots of beer, and staid about two hours together. I then said I could not stay any longer; I must go home to my master's: he went home with me to my master's, and then we went to the Feathers tavern, and had two or three pots of beer, and parted about ten o'clock.

Prisoner. Before the justice, I asked the prosecutor what dress I was in at the time he supposed that I robbed him: he said, the same dress I had on then. I have a person to prove I bought the coat I had on, four days after the robbery.

To the Prosecutor. Did the prisoner ask you what dress he was in when he robbed you? - I do not remember that he did.

Did you say he was in the same dress then, that he robbed you in? - I can swear I never said such a word.

Lake. The prisoner asked Justice Sherwood, whether he would ask that question about the clothes, or he should ask it himself; the justice told him he might ask it himself, and he did ask it.

SUSANNA GUTHELL sworn.

I know the prisoner.

Do you know what clothes he was possessed of on the sixth of March? - Yes; he had only a brown close-bodied coat; he had no great coat: he bought the great coat he has on of a young man I keep company with: on the 10th of March, he came home without his coat, and said he had sold it to the prisoner.

(The prisoner called two other witnesses, who gave him a good character.)

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron PERRYN .

365. JOHN FRENLOW was indicted for stealing a linen handkerchief, value 12 d. the property of William Powell , May the 13th .

Mr. WILLIAM POWELL sworn.

On Monday last, at about two or three minutes before two o'clock at noon, as I was walking up Warwick-lane , I felt the flap of my coat turned up; I looked round, and saw the prisoner with my handkerchief in his hand; I immediately collared him; he then dropped it: while I stopped to pick the handkerchief up from the ground, I observed him to put his right hand hastily into his coat pocket; that occasioned me to suspect he had taken other handkerchiefs; I immediately secured both his arms; he struggled to get his right hand out of his pocket, but I held it fast, and forced him in that manner before me down to the bottom of the lane, to the house of Mr. Proctor, who is beadle of the ward; I desired Mr. Proctor to search him before I let him go, and particularly his right-hand pocket: in that pocket he found a large clasp knife open, and nothing else. The prisoner was in liquor at the time; otherwise I am persuaded he would have got the knife out of his pocket, before I could have secured his arm. I desired Mr. Proctor to take him to the Compter, and he was ordered for trial.

(The handkerchief was produced in court by Proctor, the constable, and deposed to by the prosecutor.)

JOHN PROCTOR sworn.

I searched the prisoner; I found this knife (producing it); it was open in his right-hand pocket; he had nothing else in that pocket. In his other pocket, I found a leather strap. He said he knew nothing about it. He was very much in liquor.

Did he say what purpose he had the knife in his pocket for? - Not then; but going along, he said he had it to cut his leather strap.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I should be glad to go to sea.

GUILTY . W . & Imp. 12 M .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

366. EDWARD BURN was indicted for stealing a pound of green tea, value 5 s. the property of James Bennett the elder , James Bennett the younger , John Bennett , and Capell Cure , April the 20th .

EDWARD PYOT WESTLAKE sworn.

I am warehouseman to Messrs. Bennetts and Cure. In April last, Mr. John Bennett informed me that a quantity of green tea was lost from the warehouse. I ordered a quantity of tea to be weighed, and put into the second story of the warehouse, from whence the other had been taken. I saw Paul Etheredge weigh it, and put it loose on a cover, before the men went home from work; I ordered the tea to be weighed again that evening, and was informed there was a pound deficient. Mr. Bennett said the men should be searched; I went, and called the prisoner; he did not come immediately. When I got to the counting-house, I enquired why he did not follow me; he was then standing just by the place where the tea was; I suspected he was shifting the tea, or hiding it: after calling him a second time, he said he was coming presently, and followed me; the porters were all searched, but the tea was not found upon any of them. After the men were gone home, Mr. Bennett, myself, and the other evidence, searched the warehouse, for the tea; and, just at the spot I saw the prisoner at, the tea was found lying upon the ground, in a linen bag, covered with foul paper; it was under a kind of block, upon which we tie up parcels occasionally. We found it to agree exactly in quantity and quality with the tea that was missing. Afterwards, the tea was put again in the place where we had found it. On the following morning, before the men came to work, I secreted myself in the warehouse, where I could see what passed; and I had ordered the other men to quit the warehouse upon the prisoner's coming in. I saw the prisoner go to the place, pull the paper away, and take the bag up with the tea in it; he hunted a few seconds eagerly among the papers before he could discover the bag: upon his finding it, he took it up, and ran up stairs; I overtook him before he reached the second story; I called out to him by name, upon which I saw him throw the bag of tea down; I charged him with the theft, and said, Now I have found you out: he said, No, I had not; for I had not found it upon him. He was taken before a magistrate, and committed.

PAUL ETHERIDGE sworn.

I am shop-porter to Messrs. Bennetts and Cure. I weighed the tea, and carried it into the second story, and spread it on the cover; I weighed the tea again between two and three o'clock; there was not any missing then: when I weighed it in the evening, there was upwards of a pound wanting. In the morning, I was ordered by the last witness to take charge of the prisoner. The prisoner then said he came early in the morning to move it; but, if he had known their scheme, they should never have seen his face at the house again. I had before found the tea under the block; it was weighed, and answered in quantity as nigh as could be.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

Wken I went in in the morning, I kicked my foot against this bag; I took it up to see what it was; then I took it up to the second story; he called after me, and I put it down on the stairs.

(The prisoner called Daniel Knowlan , a soap-maker, with whom he had lived, who gave him a good character.)

GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

367. MARGARET MILLER was indicted for stealing 11 lb. weight of moist sugar, value 6 s. the property of Daniel Gallopine , May the 7th .

FRANCIS ROLLS sworn.

I live at No. 89, in Tower-street . On Tuesday, the 7th of May, between three and four o'clock, I went into the parlour; in a few minutes, I heard something in the passage; I went out, and found the prisoner in my house. I asked her what business she had there: she said she wanted to enquire for one Johnson, a journeyman cooper. I said I had a good mind to send for a constable to search her: she said, I might, she had nothing. I then turned her out. In about two minutes after, I had occasion to go into Mr. Gallopine's house, which is the next door; I saw the prisoner come out of the little room, with 11 lb. of sugar in her apron: she had taken it out of a closet in Mr. Gallopine's house, which is used for the purpose of keeping sugar in it: I cannot say whether the closet was locked. Upon comparing the sugar I found upon her, I found it was some of the same sort as that left in the closet. It was Mr. Gallopine's sugar.

(The sugar was produced in court by the constable, and deposed to.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I was going home to my three fatherless children; I saw a parcel of sugar on the threshold of a gentleman's door; I took it up, and went in to ask if a sugar-porter lived there; the gentleman told me no. I went to go out, but sat down to eat some: I took it to be broken victuals, and was very thankful for it: these two gentlemen came up, and used me very ill; they took my apron from my side, and made my nose bleed.

GUILTY . W . & Imp. 6 M .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

368. FRANCES OWEN was indicted for stealing a pewter pint pot, value 10 d. and a pewter half-pint pot, value 6 d. the property of John Dawson , April the 17th .

JOHN DAWSON sworn.

I keep the White Horse, in Friday-street . On the 17th of April, about five o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner came to my house. In about an hour after, I was sent for to the Blue Lasts, where I saw the prisoner, and a pint pot and a half-pint pot of mine.

JAMES WILSON sworn.

I keep the Blue Lasts; in Distaff-lane. On the 17th of April, the prisoner came into my house; I had some suspicion of her; I clapped my hand to her, and felt the pint pot; I searched her, and found the pots mentioned in the indictment, with some others, upon her; I sent for Mr. Dawson; he said they were his pots.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

A young woman, who was a gathering in her pots, found these two pots among hers: she said they belonged to such a person, and asked me to take them; I put them into my pocket, and went to the gentleman's house.

GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

[Whipping. See summary.] [Imprisonment. See summary.]

369. ANDREW GIFFORD was indicted for stealing six perukes, value 42 s. the property of Charles Callahan , April the 11th .

CHARLES CALLAHAN sworn.

I am a peruke-maker , and live in Little Bell-alley, Coleman-street . I lost six men's perukes on the 12th of April; there were two of them just made for two gentlemen, customers of mine; I missed them about four o'clock in the afternoon. I went down to Rag-fair. I went into an old wig shop, and enquired if they had any old tail wigs to sell, thinking they might produce them: they told me they had none. I went into a shop opposite, and asked them if they had any to sell: they said, No. Mrs. Brady, in that shop, beckoned to me, and asked me if I had lost any wigs: I said I had; could she give me any information of them? Yes, she said, she could, she knew one of her neighbours had bought some wigs; and, if I would describe them, she would send for them. She directly sent out her servant-girl, Elizabeth Steele . I described the wigs; the girl went and fetched them. Some were taken out of the windows, and some from the blocks.

(The wigs were produced in court, and deposed to by the prosecutor)

Mrs. Brady described the man to me that sold them; they said, probably, if I went into a public-house just by, I might meet with him. I went into the public-house, and saw the prisoner sleeping; I went and fetched Mrs. Brady: she said that was the man. I got a soldier to help me take him up; but he was rescued out of my hands several times in Rosemary-lane.

ELIZABETH STEELE sworn.

I live with Mr. Brady in Rosemary-lane. Elizabeth Harris came to our house with these six wigs, to tell us she stopped them; and if any person came to enquire for such wigs, to send them over to her, and she would let them have them again; the next day, Mr. Callahan came to enquire for those wigs, and I went and fetched them over.

ELIZABETH HARRIS sworn.

I sell old clothes and old wigs, &c. On the 11th of April, six wigs were offered me for sale by the prisoner at the bar, between eight and nine o'clock at night. I asked him how he came by them: he said they were his property. He asked me 6 s. for them: I told him I did not like the appearance of it. He asked me if I would lend him 3 s. till he would bring proof they were his property: I lent him 3 s. I went over with the wigs to Mrs. Brady, and told her of it; and desired her, if any person came to ask for the wigs, to send them to me. He sat down in my house till I went to Mrs. Brady's.

Did you go to Mrs. Brady's before you lent him the 3 s. or after? - Before; I lent him the 3 s. when I came back.

Did you know the prisoner before? - No.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I know nothing at all about the matter.

GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. Justice WILLES.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

370. SAMUEL LEVY was indicted for stealing a woollen cloth coat, a pair of woollen cloth breeches, and a green woollen bag, value 6 l. 11 s. the property of Henry Hammelburg , April the 13th .

HENRY HAMMELBURG sworn.

I am a taylor . I was employed to make a crimson coat and breeches for a gentleman in the city. I sent the clothes home by my son, on the 13th of April, wrapped up in a green wrapper.

HENRY HAMMELBURG , jun. sworn.

I am thirteen years old. As I was carrying the clothes home, I stopped some time to look at a little horse; the prisoner came up, and said I had been loitering upon my business, and snatched the clothes out of my hand; I said he must return me the woollen bag. I apprehended he was the clerk of the gentleman to whom the clothes were to be delivered. He returned me the clothes and bag, and then I went on towards the gentleman's house; but, before I got there, he came up again to me, and snatched the clothes out of my hand, and was going away with them; I cried Stop thief! upon which the prisoner returned me the clothes, but made off down Thames-street, through an alley, to the Three Tuns, a public-house. I delivered the clothes at the gentleman's, and informed the servant what had happened; they pursued the prisoner to this public-house, where he was apprehended; he was carried before a magistrate, who committed him.

JOHN DAVIS sworn.

I saw the prisoner take the clothes from the boy; and, upon the boy's crying Stop thief! I saw him come back, and return them to him.

THOMAS NICHOLAS sworn.

I am servant at the gentleman's house to whom these clothes were to be delivered. The boy informed me of the behaviour of the prisoner; my brother and I pursued him to the Three Tuns: when we came there, the prisoner acknowledged that he had taken the clothes from the boy, but said he had returned them.

RICHARD TRUELOVE sworn.

I am brother-in-law to the last witness. I joined them in the pursuit to the public-house; the publican turned them all out into the court; then the prisoner attempted to run away; we pursued him, and secured him.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I had given orders to a taylor to make me clothes of a maroon colour; I thought these had been the clothes.

GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. Baron PERRYN .

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

371. ESTHER ALLINGHAM (a negro) was indicted for stealing nine guineas and two half-guineas, in monies numbered, the property of John Baptista , privily from his person , May the 10th .

(The prosecutor not understanding English, an interpreter was sworn.)

JOHN BAPTISTA sworn.

Last Friday I had been at the Orange Coffee-house, and was returning home about half past twelve. I met the prisoner: she came up to me, and appeared very fond of me, and desired me to go with her. I went with her, and by compulsion went to No. 2. in Gloucester-court . When we came there, they let us into the house; but she smelt so strong and disagreeable, I had nothing to do with her; she was enough to poison any body. My breeches-pocket was open. I put my hands in my coat-pocket, to take care of my pocket-book; (it was a very valuable pocketbook) but I did not button my pocket; it is a very shallow one: and I think I lost my money then; but I did not perceive her take the money. Afterwards she forced her way out, and there was a struggle between her and the maid of the house. In a few minutes afterwards, I perceived I was robbed. I had never seen the prisoner before; nor did I see her again till she was in prison, which was on the Monday following. We were five or six minutes together in the room.

SAMUEL HATTON sworn.

I am a constable of St. Ann's. On Sunday, near one o'clock, I had an information of a person being robbed by a black woman; and that she was concealed in Gloucester-court. I went there, and apprehended the prisoner. I found a purse with six guineas and a half in it. I asked her how she came by the money: she said she had saved it, a shilling at a time.

MARY BATEMAN sworn.

I am servant at No. 2. Gloucester-court. The prisoner had been once in our house before: she came in with a gentleman: They both went into the parlour. I stood in the passage seven or eight minutes. Then the woman opened the door, and called for some water. I went to get the water: she got to the door to go out. I went and said, Ma'am, you brought the gentleman in; take him out with you. She opened the door, and rushed out. He held up his finger, and put his hand in his pocket: he spoke; but I did not know what he said. He staid about ten minutes after the prisoner went away. Another young lady came in when he went out; she went into the parlour. He held up his finger, and talked something, and put his hand into his pocket.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

This money they swear to, is my own, I have saved up at a shilling a time. When I met this gentleman first, he was with a black woman with a white gown and white coat on. What he had, was entirely unbuttoned. I was at a distance, against the rails. I went down towards Pall-Mall; I stood upon the stone of a door in Gloucester-court. He asked if there was any house he could go into; I said there was a house there. I knocked at No. 3, and went in. He said, My dear, I have no money; I have been with a black woman; my money is all gone. He pulled out his pocket, and said, I have got a snuff box, and a watch, and a pin valued at so much, and a pocket-book at so much, which he could not part with. I said, if he had no money, I would not go with him. I said, As you have no money, I do not chuse to give my carcase up to you for nothing; and I hope you will give me liberty to get some water, for I am dry. He said yes; but he would keep my cloak till I came back. What he offered to me, was what is not fit: he is a man neither fit for God nor the devil; he is neither fit for a black woman, nor a white woman. What he expressed to me, put a shock upon my spirits, and frightened me. I went to open the door. The maid said, Take this man with you. I said, No; I do not chuse to have any more to do with him. I ran out at the door: I heard no more of the gentleman till I went out; and then the constable took me; and said, I had robbed him of so much. It must be meer wickedness, because, when he took me into the house, he said, he had not any, and because I would not condescend to his will, he charges me with this. I did not come into close quarters; I was at arm's length from him.

For the Prisoner.

ANN GAGG sworn.

I keep a chandler's shop, close by Litchfield-street. The prisoner lived with me almost a twelvemonth: she has always behaved well in every respect.

Had she saved any money? - She lived upon bread and water, to go with good cloaths: I have had two or three guineas at a time of her.

What way of life was she in? - I cannot tell.

NOT GUILTY .

(Tried by the First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron PERRYN .)

372, 373. WILLIAM MERRY and JOHN DAVIS were indicted for stealing two trusses of hay, value 2 s. and two trusses of straw, value 18 d. the property of William Price and Charles Price , April the 25th .

JAMES NASH sworn.

I live in Fox and Knot yard . I looked after the yard for one Mr. Tarlin: Mess. William and Charles Price , who are oilmen , had a stable there, where they kept their cart horses. About two in the afternoon on the 25th of April, I saw two trusses of hay, and two of straw, handed out of the loft by William Merry , who was a servant at that time to Mess. Price; but he had no business with the stables. Davis stood below to receive the hay and straw, and he carried away the trusses, one at a time. The prisoners said, what they did was by order of Mr. Bedell, who was the general superintendant of Mr. Price's affairs. Just as the last truss was carrying off, I saw Bedell go down the yard. He used to come to the yard after Davis was turned away from Mr. Price's. Davis had been turned off a few days before; and, not having a new carter, the porter took care of the cart horses till a new carter should be appointed. Bedell has absconded ever since.

( Ann Nash confirmed the testimony of her husband, James Nash .)

Mr. CHARLES PRICE sworn.

Mr. William Price and I are partners in the oil business. Davis had the care of the horses while he lived with me; but had been turned off about ten days before this happened. Merry had nothing to do with the horses; he had been with me but about four or five days. During the time Davis had been turned away, one or other of our porters drove our horses. Davis had lived with me many years before he was turned away. At this time neither Merry or Davis had any thing to do in the stable.

WILLIAM PAYNE sworn.

I am a constable. On the 29th of April Davis gave me charge of Merry. Merry asked, For what am I taken? I said, for stealing hay and straw. He was carried before the Lord Mayor. He first denied the matter: he owned he knew of the affair; and upon second examination he owned he was concerned in the affair; and the hay and straw were carried to a public-house in Chick-lane.

MERRY's DEFENCE.

When I came into the shop, Mr. Price told me that I was to obey Bedell's orders, the same as if he had ordered it himself. Bedell had the general management of the oil business. While I was eating a bit of dinner, in Fox and Knot yard, Bedell called me out: he unlocked the door, and ordered me to throw out the hay and straw, which he said he borrowed. After the hay and straw was flung out, Bedell locked the door again; and he said, Go and help Davis carry it.

DAVIS's DEFENCE.

I was discharged from the care of Mr. Price's horses. I was loitering about the stable-yard; Bedell called me down, and desired I would go and carry a tru of hay, and he would give me something to drink. I was never present near the loft till the hay and straw was thrown down in the yard.

(Merry called four or five witnesses, who gave him a good character.)

BOTH NOT GUILTY ,

(Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. Justice WILLES.)

374, 375. WILLIAM BASS and THOMAS PICKERING were indicted for stealing 1213 yards of spotted cotton gauze, value 70 l. - 93 yards of other spotted cotton gauze, value 4 l. 17 s. - 99 yards of cotton lawn, value 9 l. 18 s. - 6 silk gauze handkerchiefs, value 10 s. and a cloth bag, value 3 s. the property of John Gatfee , May the 7th .

JOHN GATFEE sworn.

I live in Skinner-street, Bishopsgate. On the 7th of May, in the morning, I ordered my warehouseman to give a parcel of gauzes to Bass, to carry to a particular place.

- GATFEE sworn.

I am wife to the prosecutor. I delivered the goods myself to Bass, to carry.

Mr. Gatfee. We found Bass: he first said that he had got drunk and sleepy, and the things were taken from him: but afterwards he confessed the fact; that, in his way, he met Pickering and another man in Chiswell-street; that they asked him to drink with them; that they went together; upon which they proposed to him to dispose of the goods, which he consented to; and Pickering went and brought a man, who actually bought the goods; and he had eight guineas of the money.

BASS's DEFENCE.

What I told my master of, and what my master has now said, is very true.

(There being no evidence to affect Pickering, he was not put upon his defence.)

BASS GUILTY .

PICKERING NOT GUILTY .

( Sentence respited upon Bass till next Sessions .)

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

376. WILLIAM STENSON was indicted for selling halfpence at a less value than their denomination imports, viz. at the rate of 396 for half-a-guinea, against the statute , April the 11th .

JOHN SOWERBY sworn.

I keep the Mitre-Tavern, by the Monument. In consequence of a conversation I had with Elizabeth Davis , who had lived with me, I sent her to the prisoner's house for half a piece of brown, and half a piece of white.

What did you understand by that? - I did not know at the time; I find since, brown is halfpence, and white, silver. She went and brought sixteen shillings worth of half-pence for half a guinea.

What was the price of the whites to be? - The same.

ELIZABETH DAVIS sworn.

I was servant to Mr. Sowerby. My master sent me for half a guinea's worth of browns, and half a guinea's worth of whites.

What did browns mean? - Halfpence. I went to Mr. Stenson's, at No. 9, in Bull-and-Mouth street; I saw him, and asked him to let me have half a guinea's worth of brown ones, and half a guinea's worth of whites. He said, the whites were not quite ready, but they would be ready in an hour. He gave me half a guinea's worth of browns; he said he had not whites enough for his own customers, and I got none. I waited for the browns near an hour; then the prisoner gave them to me. I brought them home, and delivered them to my master; he counted them, and put them by.

Court. Was it the prisoner that gave them to you? - Yes.

THOMAS GATES sworn.

I was with Sowerby on the 10th of April, when he sent Davis to the prisoner for the halfpence. We went to the house on the 11th; we found in the cellar, the press, where the fly had stood; my brother found the dies. There were some halfpence and farthings found. (The halfpence and dies produced.) There were a parcel of unstruck farthings.

JOHN NICHOLS sworn.

I am a monier of the mint. They are all counterfeit, I believe: I do not see any good ones among them.

Gates. These halfpence were delivered to me by Davis and Sowerby.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

Davis came to me from the country; she was a destitute girl. I got her a place; she staid in that place about four months, and then came to me ill, and wanted me to get her into the hospital. I asked her, what was the matter? She said, she was ashamed to tell. I said, Betty, you have been playing the fool; she said, she had. I advised her to get into her own country. She came to me afterwards, and solicited my charity, to carry her into the country; she said she was not in place, and was better; and I gave her 15 s. in halfpence, to carry her into her own country.

(The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.)

GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

377. FRANCIS CUNDY was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Bellis , on the 12th of May , between the hours of two and five in the afternoon; Mary Day , widow, Edward Day , and others, then being in the said dwelling-house; and stealing a silver watch, value 40 s. another silver watch, value 40 s. two steel watch chains, value 12 d. two brass watch keys, value 2 d. a stone seal, set in metal, value 2 d. a silk gown, value 20 s. two silver table-spoons, value 20 s. six silver teaspoons, value 15 s. a pair of silver tea-tongs, value 10 s. a silver knee-buckle, value 12 d. a cutlass, value 12 d. a half guinea, a crown piece, and 20 s. in monies numbered, the property of the said John Bellis , in his dwelling-house .

JOHN BELLIS sworn.

I live at No. 76 , on Saffron-hill . On Sunday the 12th of this month, my house was broke open; the prisoner took a lodging of me on the 22d of April. I had not seen him from that time, 'till the Friday before the house was broke open; he had then a fox-dog with him. I asked him, if that dog belonged to him; he told me it was his dog. I did not see any more of him till after the fact was committed, which was on Sunday the 12th of this month. I went out on the 12th, about a quarter before one o'clock; I keep the lower part of the house for my own use, and let the upper part out to lodgers: there is a common passage to the house. I locked my door which opens into the passage, and put a padlock on it; I did not leave any person in my apartment, but in the upper part of the house were Mary Day , her son, and other persons. I returned a little before eight o'clock; when I went to unlock the door, I found it was not locked, but only pulled to; and there was a hole cut in the door-post, large enough to put three or four fingers through, to get at the lock; the staple had been attempted to be wrenched off the padlock, but not being able to do that, they had taken the hasp quite out, and left the lock hanging to the door. I went in, and missed the things mentioned in the indictment, (repeating them) and many others; I don't think 20 l. would replace what I lost. My bureau, which was a mahogany one, had a hole bored in it with a nail-piercer, under the flap, in order to wrench the hinges off; I found a nail-piercer in the prisoner's room, which answered to the hole, and the hollow part of the nail-piercer was full of mahogany. Upon the bureau there stood a table clock; in wrenching the bureau, the glass of the clock was broke all to pieces, and the glass falling among the work, had stopped the clock at twenty-five minutes before five. I got some people and an officer together, and asked the lodgers if they had seen any person at my door; they every one said they had not. The prisoner, and the woman who lived with him, were not at home at that time; I afterwards saw a light in the room; I went up stairs; the woman, whose name is M'Ginnis, was there. I asked her if she had seen any person at my door; she said, No: that she went out about two o'clock, and her husband (meaning the prisoner) with her; and that she had not been at home since, nor her husband. One of the lodgers said, he saw him go out between four and five o'clock, and saw the fox-dog with him; upon which I ordered M'Ginnis to be taken into custody, and then she confessed some of my property had been carried to the house of one Jones, in Fleet-lane. The prisoner came home that night, and we took him into custody. The next day we got a warrant, and searched Jones's house; we found there a part of my property, and the fox-dog I have mentioned was likewise found at Jones's.

(The watches, and some other articles mentioned in the indictment, which were found at Jones's, were produced in court by the constable, and deposed to by the prosecutor.)

(The prosecutor, on his cross-examination, said, the street door was usually left on the latch; and that there were not any promises nor threats made use of to induce M'Ginnis to make a discovery.)

JOHN STEVENS sworn.

On Sunday night, I went with Mr. Bellis, up into the room, and saw M'Ginnis; we charged her with breaking open Mr. Bellis's door. She burst out a crying, and said, It was he that did it. I asked who was he? She said, Frank. I asked where he was; she said, at her sister's in Wood's-close. I went there with a constable, but did not find him. When we returned to Mr. Bellis's, the prisoner had been there, and was sent to the watch-house; I went to M'Ginnis again, and asked her what he had done with the things; she said, she heard him say he had taken them to one Jones's, in Fleet-lane. We took her to the watch-house that night, and the next morning we got three search-warrants, to search Jones's, and the sister's. As soon as we went into Jones's, Mr. Bellis saw a gown, which he said was his wife's. Then I went with the constable to Jones's father's, where we understood he slept, and there we found two watches, which we took to Mr. Bellis, and which he owned; he mentioned the name to one before it was opened. On the Tuesday, Mr. Bellis told me he had found a nail-piercer in the prisoner's room, full of mahogany; I compared it with the hole in the bureau, and it fitted it. I saw the clock; the glass was broke, and it had stopped at twenty-five minutes before five o'clock.

WILLIAM CATCHPOLE sworn.

I am a constable. I searched the premises of Jones, in Fleet-lane; I saw his father, who informed me that he had a room that he slept in, in his house. Jones the father, and Jones the son, both lived in Fleet-lane. I went to the father's, and found the watches on a table, by the bedside. The prosecutor said, before he examined the watches, that the name in one was Howard; I looked, and found it was so.

JANE M'GINNIS sworn.

I lived with the prisoner, in the house of Mr. Bellis, on Saffron-hill.

On Sunday, the 12th of this month, do you know any thing respecting the door of Mr. Bellis? - I heard a noise, like wrenching the door, but did not see any thing done; I take it to be between two and three o'clock when I heard that; I was up in my room: after that the prisoner brought a cutlass up into the room, under his arm. I believe he had been out before that, for I heard the door go.

To the Prosecutor. Was that cutlass in the room when you went out? - It was.

To M'Ginnis. Mr. Stevens came up to you that afternoon? - Yes.

Did you tell him the prisoner had done it? - I did. He told me, when he came up, that he had broke Mr. Bellis's door open; I knew nothing of it before.

(On her cross-examination, she said she did not examine the cutlass, but she knew that which was produced in court was the same she saw under the prisoner's arm; and that there were not any promises or threats made use of to induce her to make a discovery.)

RICHARD PATIENCE sworn.

I lodge in Mr. Bellis's house. On Sunday, the 12th of this month, between four and five o'clock in the afternoon, I saw the prisoner come out of Mr. Bellis's house; he had a fox-dog with him; he went along Great Saffron-hill. The next day, I went with them to search Jones's house, and there I saw the fox-dog that I had seen with the prisoner.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I am innocent.

(The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.)

GUILTY . ( Death .)

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron PERRYN .

378. ANN HALFPENNY was indicted for stealing a linen shirt, value 20 s. the property of Richard Sanderson , April the 16th .

ELIZABETH SLATER sworn.

I had a ruffled shirt of Richard Sanderson 's to wash; he said it cost a guinea and a half; it was the second time of its being washed. The prisoner washed for me. On missing an apron, I went and searched the prisoner's lodgings; I found the apron: I then charged her with the shirt; she denied having it. I afterwards traced this shirt to a Mr. Hill's, a pawnbroker's.

ESTHER THORNTON sworn.

I am an old-clothes woman. I went with the prisoner to Mr. Hill's; I paid 4 s. 6 d. to redeem a shirt there, and gave her 18 d. more for it.

(The shirt was produced in court, and deposed to by the prosecutrix.)

JOHN EDWARDS sworn.

I am servant to Mr. Hill. I saw the prisoner in the shop at the time she redeemed the shirt, and saw the apprentice give it to her.

(The prisoner did not say any thing in her defence.)

GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron PERRYN .

[Whipping. See summary.]

379. THOMAS BROAD was indicted for stealing a cotton gown, value 20 s. a callimanco petticoat, value 10 s. four linen shifts, value 20 s. four linen aprons, value 16 s. two pair of worsted stockings, value 5 s. two silk handkerchiefs, value 8 s. a pair of stuff shoes, value 5 s. three laced caps, value 9 s. and seven yards of hempen cloth, value 5 s. the property of Jane Jones , in the dwelling-house of Edward Taylor , April the 11th .

(The prosecutrix deposed that the things mentioned in the indictment were taken out of the room adjoining to that in which she was robbed by the prisoner; and that they were taken by the companion of the prisoner, while the prisoner held her.)

NOT GUILTY .

See No. 361. in Part I.

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice WILLES.

380. SARAH JONES was indicted for stealing a quart pewter pot, value 12 d. the property of Pierce Furlong , May the 10th .

(A witness swore he saw the prisoner steal the pot; and that it was immediately found upon her.)

(The pot was produced in court, and deposed to by the prosecutor.)

GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

[Whipping. See summary.] [Imprisonment. See summary.]

381. JOHN LAWLEY was indicted for stealing a pair of linen sheets, value 10 s. two linen gowns, value 16 s. a bombazeen gown, value 10 s. a pair of stuff breeches, value 10 s. a dimity petticoat, value 6 s. and a flannel petticoat, value 12 d. the property of Isaac Gifford , in the dwelling-house of Mary Weston , widow , April the 20th .

ANN GIFFORD sworn.

I went out; when I came home again, upon going up stairs, I found my room door, which I had left locked, shut, but not locked, and saw the prisoner and a black man in my bed-chamber. I screamed out twice, upon which they both ran away; the prisoner was stopped, and brought back again in about two or three minutes; I am sure he is one of the men that was in my room. There was a picklock-key found upon the prisoner. I found some things packed up, ready to carry away.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I went to see a master I served my time with, in Moor-lane; I then went about some business of my master's. I went up an entry to make water; while I was stooping, my shoe having slipped down at heel, they laid hold of me. I do not know any thing of that gentlewoman's place. I never was up in it.

GUILTY of stealing to the value of 39 s .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

382. FRANCES BROWN was indicted for stealing a pewter pint pot, value 14 d. the property of William Kirby , April the 29th .

(The prosecutor deposed that the prisoner came into his house, and called for some beer; that she sat down by a table, on which were some pots; that he missed a pot, and charged the prisoner with stealing it; and, upon searching her, the pot was found under her petticoat.)

GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

[Whipping. See summary.] [Imprisonment. See summary.]

383. JAMES INNOCENT (adeaf and dumb man ) was indicted for setting fire to the dwelling-house of Anthony Bennett , May the 5th .

(The prisoner, when arraigned, stood mute. The sheriff was directed by the court to impannel a jury, to enquire whether he stood mute wilfully, or by the visitation of God. The sheriff returned the same jury as had served during the sessions.)

JOHN OWEN sworn.

I am servant to Mr. Akerman. I have attended the prisoner; I never heard him speak.

Who committed him? - Mr. Sherwood. He has been about a week in our custody.

How do you make yourselves intelligible to him? - The prisoners make motions to him.

Does he seem to want for sense or understanding? or only to be deaf and dumb? - Only deaf and dumb.

Does he act rationally? and eat and drink, and behave in the common actions of life as if he was sensible? - Yes.

ANTHONY BENNETT sworn.

The prisoner lived servant with me; he boarded and lodged in my house. He was born almost next door to me. He was always deaf and dumb.

He had sense enough? - Yes; he was very ready at his business; he always behaved civil and quiet in the neighbourhood.

The Jury found that he stood mute by the visitation of God .

384. JOHN SMITH was indicted for stealing a wooden drawer, value 3 d. and 15 s. in silver, and 244 halfpence , the property of Ann Taylor and Bryan Taylor , April the 22d .

BRYAN TAYLOR sworn.

My mother ( Ann Taylor ) and I keep a chandler's shop , in Monmouth-street, St. Giles's . On the 22d of April, at night, I went down into the cellar; I saw the prisoner walking backwards and forwards before the door; I had some suspicion of him, and watched him; he went into the shop; I came up out of the cellar, and met him coming out with the till; upon seeing me, he put it down on the compter; it contained the money mentioned in the indictment; I counted it after I had taken him.

Are you sure it was the prisoner? - He had a black coat on, and his hair tied behind; I don't know the prisoner is the man now.

What did you do with him? - I took him before the justice.

Is the prisoner the man you took before the justice? - I believe he is; but I cannot swear to him.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron PERRYN .

385. ANN MORRIS was indicted for stealing three quart pewter pots, value 1 s. 6 d. and a pint pewter pot, value 6 d. the property of Thomas Dolly , May the 9th .

THOMAS DOLLY sworn.

On the 9th of May, at about noon, in consequence of the information of a neighbour, I followed the prisoner into Grub-street, and found two quart pots of mine under her cloak. In searching her lodgings, I found another quart pot and a pint pot of mine. She had resorted to our house for liquor ten or twelve days; in the course of that time, I lost above 20 pots.

ELIZABETH HARPER sworn.

I saw the prisoner take a pot off Mr. Dolly's horse; I told Mr. Dolly of it: he followed her, and took two pots from under her arm.

(The pots were produced in court, and deposed to by the prosecutor.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I helped a child up that had fell down; I saw two quart pots; I took them up, and was carrying them to Mr. Dolly's, when he laid hold of me.

GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

[Whipping. See summary.] [Imprisonment. See summary.]

386. ESAU GIBBS was indicted for stealing an hempen bag, value 2 d. and 56 lb. of saltpetre, value 30 s. the property of our Sovereign Lord the King , April 30 .

WALTER LITTLE sworn.

I am a labourer at the Tower . On the 30th of April, between four and five in the afternoon, I happened to be looking about, and I saw a bag lie near the storehouse, under the carriage of a cannon. I took it up and shook it, and a pillow-case fell out, and there was something like the dust of salt in it. I called Dale: he said it was salt-petre; he took it to where Mr. Horton and another man were at work. Mr. Horton is the cheque-master of the works. John Dale brought it down to me again, and desired me to put it in the same place, which I did.

JOHN DALE sworn.

I am a labourer in the Tower. On Tuesday, the 30th of April, I carried the bag to Mr. Horton; he desired me to take it back, and put it in the same place where I first saw it, which I did; I saw it no more till the next day, when I saw it sealed up at Mr. Horton's, with the saltpetre in it.

Did you observe the bag, so as to know that it was the same you saw afterwards? - Yes, there was a darn in the side of it, which I took particular notice of.

JAMES JUDGE sworn.

I am a labourer in the Tower. On the 30th of April, about ten minutes after eight o'clock, I met the prisoner with the bag on his back; Mr. Horton sent me to watch it; I went up to him, and asked him what he had got there; he said he did not know; he said he picked it up upon the broad walk. I laid hold of his collar, and took him and the bag to my master's house; I saw the bag opened, there was saltpetre in it.

CLEMENT HORTON sworn.

I am assistant to the store-keeper. This bag was brought to me, on the 30th of April, about four in the afternoon, by John Dale and Walter Little . I examined the bag, and took particular notice of it; it was a different bag to what we use for saltpetre, and had a particular darn upon it. I directed them to put it in the place where they found it, having no doubt but somebody would come for it: it was carried there; I afterwards saw it there. About eight o'clock, I was informed they had got a man with some saltpetre. I went, and saw it was the prisoner. I asked him how he came by it; he said he found it by a bundle of hemp, which was about 200 yards from where the bag was concealed. I went and examined the warehouse; the window was broke: there are bars to the window, that would not admit the whole bag to be taken out; the bags were lying against the bars, three of them were cut, and the saltpetre taken out.

Whose property was it? - The King's. I am sure this is the bag I had first seen; we knew of four bags being lost; they weigh about a hundred and a quarter each bag; it was worth about 5 l. a hundred: this man had been employed, and knew the saltpetre was deposited in this place.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I was going home to my barrack: I stopped to make water against some old ropes that were by the warehouse, and found this bag, took it up to carry to my barracks, to shew it to my comrades. This man came and laid hold of me, and asked me what I had got; I said I did not know, I was going to my barrack to see that.

(The prisoner called the serjeant, who deposed, that the prisoner always attended to his duty as a soldier , and that he never had heard any thing against him.)

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

387. ELIZABETH STEVENS was indicted for stealing four guineas, and 5 s. in monies numbered, the property of James Hill , privily from his person , April 14th .

(The prosecutor was called, but not appearing, the Court ordered his recognizance to be estreated.)

NOT GUILTY .

388. WILLIAM SINGLETON was indicted for stealing three half-crowns in monies numbered, the property of John Edwards , privily from his person , April 28th .

JOHN EDWARDS sworn.

I met the prisoner on Sunday morning, the 28th of April, by the Brown Bear, in Bow-street, Covent-Garden, about five o'clock in the morning; he was attempting to go into the house, but the landlord pushed him out. He said to me, I know of another public-house; if you will go with me, you shall be well entertained, and have what liquor you chuse to drink. I went with him to a public-house, I cannot recollect where, but, to the best of my knowledge, it was the Feathers, Great Wild-street ; we had two pints and two pennyworths there. During the time we staid, he put his hand into my pocket, and took out three half crowns: I was almost asleep when he put his hand first into my pocket, but that awaked me; I missed my money, and called to him just as he was going out. I perceived his hand in my pocket; I am sure it was he, because there was nobody else in the tap-room. I called to him, that I wanted to speak to him, but he shut the door: I went and opened the door as nimbly as I could; by that time he was crossing the street. I called out that he had got my money; upon that he ran, I pursued him. It was then near seven o'clock. I followed him through several turnings for about five minutes, crying Stop thief. He was stopped by William Lee , a brewer's servant: he asked what I had to alledge against him; I said he had taken my money. I went and called a constable; the constable asked me what he had robbed me of; I said three half crowns; he asked me if I could swear to it; I said I could, and I described them. The constable searched him, and found three half-crowns in his coat poc ket, that answered the description I gave of them: there is one very remarkable, it is marked G H on the woman side; there is another, a bad one; the third I had no particular marks on; but I am sure the other two are mine.

( John Hutton , a constable, confirmed the testimony of the prosecutor.)

(The half-crowns were produced in Court, and deposed to by the prosecutor.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I was drinking with him all night; we were at a house in Long-acre; he came with me from thence to Red-lion street, Holborn, before he charged me with any thing; he would drink at almost every house that he could find open; he said the next morning, if I would give him a guinea, he would make it up. I said I was but a poor man, I believed I could raise half a guinea; he said we must go before the justice to have a proper discharge. When we came there, he swore point blank that I took the money out of his pocket.

To Hutton. Was the prosecutor sober when he came to you? - He appeared to have been drinking, but neither he nor the prisoner was drunk.

To Edwards. Did you carry the prisoner to the house of Mr. Davis, and want money of him? - He begged of me to go, and wanted me to take half a guinea; I said I dare not, it was compounding felony. After that I went with him to Mr. Davis's.

(The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a very good character.)

GUILTY of stealing the money, but NOT GUILTY of stealing it privily from the person .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

389. MARY BROWN was indicted for stealing a watch with a gold case, value 3 l. a steel watch-chain, value 5 s. three cornelian stone seals set in gold, value 30 s. a gold watch hook, value 6 s. a gold watch-key, value 6 s. a brown crystal stone seal set in metal, value 1 s. and a guinea in monies numbered, the property of Etienne Fenie , in the dwelling-house of Francis - , April 26th .

ETIENNE FENIE sworn.

On the 26th of April last, after one in the morning, I saw the prisoner in Piccadilly; there were two or three other girls with her. The prisoner asked me to go to her lodging in Oxford-road, which I did; then she took me to St. Giles 's, to a lodging that looked very suspicions. I staid in the room an hour and a half; she told me she was very dry. I said, have you no water in the room? She said, No. We went to bed together; she got up, and went and knocked at another door in the same house, and went in and staid three or four minutes; then she came again into the room, and another girl with her; the other girl held the door, but did not come into the room; the prisoner said, Take this away; that was a cloak, or apron, or some such thing; the other woman went up stairs again, and the prisoner went out into the street. I asked her where she was going; she said she would come back, but she did not come back again. I got up, and examined my breeches, and missed one guinea, and my gold watch with three seals; I am sure I had them when I went to bed; I had put my breeches under the bolster.

Did you perceive that she touched them before she went away? - No; I had not been asleep, but I was a little in liquor. I saw my watch at the Justice's the next day, and the prisoner, I am sure, is the person.

SAMUEL DURANT sworn.

I live at Mr. Cordie's, a pawnbroker on Snowhill. On the 26th of last April, about two o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner came and offered me this watch to pledge, and wanted five guineas upon it. I asked her if it was her own wearing watch: she said, No, it was her husband's. I looked at the seals, and saw one had W W, and a crest upon it. I asked her husband's name, she said it was Brown. I asked how it came to have a different cypher, she said her husband bought it second-hand; I asked her where she lodged, she directed me to a place. I went and enquired, and found she did not live there; upon which I stopped her and the watch, and took her to Bow-street, and she was committed, and we advertised the watch.

To the prosecutor. Whose house was this at? - I do not remember the name, somebody told me the name.

Durant. I enquired in Church-street, and heard the person's name who kept the house, was - . I know nothing but what I was told; I went to the house, and asked if one Brown lodged there: they said, Yes; she was taken up for stealing a watch.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

The gentleman left the watch with me till next day; he did not come. Being distressed, I was obliged to make away with it.

To the Prosecutor. Did you leave the watch with her to keep till next day, when you was to give her some money? - No; I gave her half a crown.

(The watch was produced in court, and deposed to by the prosecutor.)

GUILTY of stealing the money, but NOT GUILTY of stealing it in the dwelling-house .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

[Whipping. See summary.] [Imprisonment. See summary.]

390. JOSEPH BENT was indicted for stealing 106 lb. of bohea tea, value 26 l. the property of Tudor Griffiths , William Storrs Fry , and Nathan Robinson , May 8th .

GRIFFIN RICHARD sworn.

I live with Mess. Tudor Griffiths , William Storrs Fry , and Nathan Robinson , who are partners and tea-dealers , at the corner of Bow-church-yard . We lost 106 lb. of bohea tea from their yard, between seven and eight o'clock in the morning of the eighth of this month; it was in a chest which lay on a truck. I saw it there that morning when I was in the warehouse; I heard the voice of a boy at the bottom of the yard, and I perceived my fellow-servant running out of doors. I followed them as fast as I could; I went into Bow Church-yard, and across Cheapside, into the entrance of a passage that leads into Honey-lane Market; there I perceived the prisoner with the chest on his shoulders; my fellow-servant being a few yards before me, came up with him first, and laid hold of the chest; the prisoner stood still when he laid hold of the chest, and let the chest go down: I laid hold of the prisoner's collar.

Can you swear to the chest being your masters? - Yes; on the night before, I saw the chest filled with the bohea tea, nailed up, and put in a mat in order to be sent on board a ship the next day: it was directed R. Rayner, Hull; it was going to Hull. I laid hold of the prisoner's collar, and said, Friend, you must come along with us; he did not say any thing to us.

MATTHEW KEELEY sworn.

I directed the chest, and was present while it was packed up. On Wednesday, the 8th of this month, between seven and eight o'clock in the morning, we were in the warehouse. A boy ran up the yard, and said a man was going away with some of our tea. I ran out directly, and when I came to the corner of Bow Church-yard, I saw a man going up the passage into Honey-lane Market with this chest of tea on his shoulder; when we took him, I asked him where he was going with the chest; he said, he did not know.

JOHN SMITH .

I shall be 13 years old next 5th of November.

Who made you? - God.

If you do not speak the truth, what will become of you? - I shall go to hell (He is sworn.)

What did you see pass on the Wednesday morning in this gentleman's yard? - I live with Mr. Pool, in Cheapside. On Wednesday, the 8th of May, our young man sent me to the barber; I was going through Bow Church-yard, and saw the prisoner come down Mr. Fry's yard, with a stick in his hand; there were two more men and a boy stood at Mr. Fry's gate, and they all whispered together; I went through the yard into Bow-lane, to tell the hair-dresser to come to my master. As I came back, I saw the other two men bring down the chest of tea, and put it on the prisoner's shoulder.

Are you sure it is the prisoner? - Yes; I ran up the yard and knocked at the warehouse door, and informed Mr. Price's people of it, and they pursued him. The two men that took it away went towards Cheapside.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I am a porter . Going through the Church-yard, two gentlemen called me, and asked me to carry a chest of tea to Smithfield. I said I had not my knot. They said they would give me a shilling. I said I would endeavour to carry it. I was going with them for the chest; they told me to wait, and they would bring it out to me; they brought it out, and lifted it on my back; they said they would follow me; they bid me go through Honey-lane Market. When they stopped me, I told them two gentlemen gave it me, and they were behind me.

For the prisoner.

- COOKE sworn.

On Wednesday morning, the 8th of this month, about half after eight o'clock, I was coming from market, and was going through Bow Church-yard. As soon as I came out of Cheapside, on to the pavement by the church, I saw the prisoner, a man and two boys. The prisoner stepped across the Church-yard to me.

GUILTY . B .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. Justice WILLES.

391. JOHN TINNENT was indicted for stealing 15 lb. of hay saffron, value 30 l. - 27 lb. 4 oz. of scammony, value 24 l. 10 s. 6 d. - 12 lb. of opium, value 10 l. 4 s. - 5 lb. 8 oz. of rhubarb, value 3 l. 6 s. - 4 lb. 4 oz. of castorum, value 2 l. 15 s. 3 d. - 2 lb. 12 oz. of oil of mace, value 3 l. 17 s. - 35 lb. 8 oz. of Jesuit's bark, value 10 l. 13 s. - 3 lb. 12 oz. of other opium, value 3 l. 3 s. 9 d. - and 3 lb. 12 oz. of resin of jalap, value 6 l. the property of George Webster the elder , and George Webster the younger , April the 10th .

THOMAS HARRISON sworn.

I am warehouseman to Messrs. Websters; the prisoner was our porter . On Saturday morning, the 10th of April, I saw Clark, another porter of ours, reading a paper that was torn; I took it out of his hand, laid it on the counter, and, putting the pieces together, I read it myself. A few minutes after that, the prisoner came in; I read it over to him; and, after I had done so, the prisoner took it up, put it into the fire, and burnt it. I read the paper over twice; the prisoner's name was signed to it: I have seen the prisoner write, and believe the whole of that paper to be his hand-writing: the contents were in substance, as near as I can recollect, as follows:

"SIR,

"I have sent you 9 lb. of opium: if you

"will call on me on Sunday evening, there

"is 10 lb. more ready for you; if not convenient

"to call then, call on me on Monday

"evening, after eight o'clock.

" JOHN TINNENT ."

The time he appointed him to call, is after they leave work. We had weighed three packages of opium, and let them down into a cellar; the weight was entered in a warehouse book; and on weighing them again, after this discovery by the letter, we found one package deficient 13 lb. none had been sold from that package. The saffron also had been weighed a few days before; and, upon weighing it again, we found a deficiency of 15 lb. the weight was reduced from 37 lb. to 22 lb. and no part had in that interval been sold. The resin of jalap was found, in the same way, deficient 4 lb. We found at one M'Millan's, a taylor, a large quantity of medicines. Mr. Webster asked the prisoner, what money he had in his box? He had only a few shillings in his pocket; he said, three guineas only in his box. Mr. Webster asked for the key; he was not willing to give it; at last he did give it: upon searching, we found a large quantity of clothes, and three guineas and a half, in the box; and in a bag, at the bottom of the box, we found 36 guineas. The prisoner was asked to account for his having so large a sum, after he had said he had only three guineas: he gave two different accounts; first he said it was left in his trust for a young man that was gone abroad; I said that could not be, for the man he mentioned was worth nothing: then he with-held his story, and said it was money he had with-held upon a settlement with his creditors.

THOMAS CLARK sworn.

I am a porter. I found the paper torn, among some other papers, at the end of the counter. I know the prisoner's hand-writing; his name was signed to it; and I believe the whole of it to be his hand-writing.

(Mr. Webster, jun. being sworn, confirmed the evidence already given with respect to the deficiency of the opium, and of some other articles; and said that the prisoner confessed to him the stealing of the drugs, and informed him of the person who had received them.)

( Henry Washington , the constable, confirmed the testimony of Mr. Webster, as to the prisoner's confession.)

(The prisoner called several witnesses, who gave him a good character.)

GUILTY of stealing the opium only .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

392. JAMES M'MILLAN was indicted for feloniously receiving, well knowing them to have been stolen, 12 lb. of opium, value 10 l. 4 s. and 3 lb. and 12 ounces of other opium, value 3 l. 3 s. 9 d. the property of George Webster the elder , and George Webster the younger , April the 10th; for stealing of which, John Tinnent had been convicted at the present session .

(The record of the conviction of the principal was produced and read.)

THOMAS HARRISON sworn.

I am warehouseman to Messrs. Webster. I have seen the prisoner at our house three or four times. I believe he called upon John Tinnent .

MOSES MORANT sworn.

I am a constable. I had a warrant to search the house of M'Millan, in Cartwright-street, No. 12, East-Smithfield. We went about a quarter after seven in the morning in search of drugs, opium, and bark, and some other things. When we came there, M'Millan was not up; we knocked at the door, and he came and opened it in his shirt. When we were in the house, we told him we had got a search-warrant, to search for stolen goods. He said he had no stolen goods that he knew of. He said he did not know that there were any drugs, or any thing else in his house.

Court. Did he say any drugs, or stolen drugs? - I can't recollect he said there was no stolen drugs that he knew of. We told him we should find it if it was in the house, for we had a warrant to search. He then said there was a bag in the closet, pointing to the door. We went to the closet, and took the bag out. We asked him what there was in the bag. He said he did not know, but that John Tinnent had left it; then I searched the house all over, we found nothing else. We brought him to Bow-street. We took out of the bag four parcels, one of them of opium. At Bow-street, he said John Tinnent brought it there; he did not know what it was. Mr. Wright asked him if he had not any brought there before. He would not speak for a good while. The Justice said, he could tell him what he had before, and where he sold it, in Lombard-street; then he said he had some once before. He was asked if he had not had some twice. He said he had had some twice. He said he knew Tinnent, and made cloaths for him.

Did he tell the Justice where he sold them? - Yes; that he received 36 guineas, and gave Tinnent the money, and that he had none of it but half a crown.

Mr. GEORGE WEBSTER , jun. sworn.

I am in partnership with my father. We are drug-merchants , in Bucklersbury . I went with the search-warrant to the prisoner's house. Morant and another officer went first, and knocked at the door. The prisoner came in his shirt, and opened it. I followed them into the house, and said, we were come to search for stolen drugs. He denied having any stolen goods in his house. Upon being told that his house would be searched thoroughly, that we knew there were stolen goods in the house, and he had better not expose himself to his neighbours, but tell where they were, he pointed to a closet, and said, there they were. The officers searched the house, but found nothing else. They took the prisoner with the goods, as produced in court, to the Public Office, in Bow-street. We attended between eleven and twelve o'clock. The prisoner was examined by Justice Wright. He said that Tinnent had thrown the goods into the house, and he did not know what they were. Mr. Wright telling him that he knew more of the matter than the prisoner thought he did, he confessed he received two parcels of goods; that one parcel he had sold for 36 guineas, and retained a small premium for himself. It was with difficulty Mr. Wright got out of him who he sold them to. He did not mention any persons names, but said it was a druggist between the Post-office and the Mansion-house. He said he delivered Tinnent 36 guineas for the first parcel, and kept a small sum for himself; the second parcel, which came, I think, to 13 l. 9 s. the prisoner said he had delivered 10 l. of it to John Tinnent , and retained 3 l. 9 s. for himself.

Did he say what those parcels contained? - I do not recollect that he did.

Drugs were the subject of the enquiry? - Certainly; and I think the articles were mentioned by Mr. Wright.

Did he continue in this story of having given the 36 l. 12 s. and 10 l. to Tinnent? - I do not recollect that he was asked a second time.

Had you seen him after the principal was taken up? - He called at our house on the 13th; I expected him, and went to the door. He asked for John Tinnent ; I said he was not at home. I asked if he had any message for him. He said no; he would see him another time.

Mr. GEORGE WEBSTER sworn.

The first that I saw of the prisoner was after the goods were taken, and he was carried into Bow-street. I heard his examination. When he was first put to the bar, he pretended great ignorance, was exceedingly backward, and would say nothing; at last Mr. Wright said he knew the circumstances, and where the drugs were sold; upon which he said, I have done a very bad thing, but now I will tell the truth. He acknowledged that he had received two parcels of drugs of our porter, Tinnent, and sold them to a druggist, in Lombard-street; he sold the first parcel for 36 guineas, which he gave Tinnent, and that he kept only half-a crown for himself; and 36 guineas was the sum found in Tinnent's box: he said he sold the other parcel for 13 l. 9 s. that he gave Tinnent a 10 l. note, and kept the 3 l. 9 s. for himself. We had received three chests from Ostend, weighing near 1000 lb. we weighed two of the three chests; one wanted between 12 and 13 lb. of the weight. It is impossible to swear to the opium; it is lapped up in the way our opium generally is.

Other people have their opium lapped up in the same way? - Very probably they have. We have the bills and receipts, with M'Millan's name to them.

ROBERT MILLIGAN sworn.

I am shopman to Messrs. Wynne, Druggists, in Lombard-street. The prisoner came to our shop for the purpose of selling some drugs, which we bought of him.

Look at these two receipts? - The one is my own making out; I saw him sign it: the other was made out by John Dickins . The prisoner sent a person with some samples, one George Staples ; the samples were lest three or four days before an answer was given to them. He came with the drugs. He said he had got them from a friend at Portsmouth, who got them from abroad; and he was desired to dispose of them as soon as he could.

Cross-Examination.

You paid the usual price for them? - The same price which, with the addition of the duty, we could have had them for at Mr. Webster's shop.

Counsel. Did he represent to you that the duty was not paid, and it was deducted? - Yes.

JOHN DICKINS sworn.

I am servant to Mr. Wynne. (Looks at the receipt.) This is my writing; I saw the prisoner sign it. We bought the drugs; he said he had them from a friend at Portsmouth; that he was just come from the Portsmouth-coach.

(The receipts read.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I leave my defence to my counsel. John Tinnent told me it was overplus that was given him by the warehouseman; he did not like to dispose of them, and asked me to get them off.

(The prisoner called several witnesses, who gave him a good character.)

GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

393. MARY GARRETT was indicted for stealing a chintz bed-curtain, value 5 s. a linen shirt, value 2 s. a linen shift, value 2 s. a child's shirt, value 6 d. a pair of thread stockings, value 6 d. five pewter plates, value 2 s. a copper pottage pot, value 4 s. a velvet waistcoat, value 2 s. a cloth waistcoat, value 2 s. and a flannel waistcoat, value 2 s. the property of Simeon Bailey ; a pair of worsted breeches, value 2 s. a pair of stuff breeches, value 2 s. and a pair of velveret breeches, value 2 s. the property of William Bailey , April the 28th .

SIMEON BAILEY sworn.

The prisoner was my servant . My wife found a curtain hid in the prisoner's bed; upon her being charged with it, I heard her say she had pawned several other things. As we were going to the justice, I said, if she would tell me where every thing was, I would do the utmost I could to be of service to her.

What did she say before that? - That she had pawned several other things; and mentioned the other curtain, and the child's shirt; I do not recollect any thing else she mentioned. I went to the pawnbroker's immediately, and found several things.

WILLIAM BURROWS sworn.

I have a curtain here, and a shift; I have several other things at home, that Mr. Bailey could not swear to. The prisoner brought these things to me about the 27th of April last; I have known her backwards and forwards at my shop six or seven years. She told me where she lived, and said she brought them for her mistress: she had pawned things and fetched them out several times.

(The things were produced in court, and deposed to by the prosecutor.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I thought to bring them home again as soon as my quarter was up; the Saturday following, I thought to bring them in again.

To the prosecutor. Is that so? - I can't tell exactly; she had some money of her quarter; she told me she meant to take them out.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

394. JOHN MARDEN was indicted for stealing two saddles, value 21 s. the property of William Brice , April the 15th .

THOMAS BROWN sworn.

On the 15th of April, at night, while I was in the stable, the prisoner crept in through a hole that was stopped up with some litter, and set open the door, and then took down one saddle; I was lying down, waiting, expecting somebody to come; I saw him take one saddle down, and lay it at the door; then he took the other, and laid it upon it, and then put them both on the dunghill; then he went and looked up the yard, to see if there was any body; then he came and took the saddles, and was going off: I went immediately and stopped him with the saddles over his shoulder; he went down on his knees, and asked me to forgive him; I took him to a public-house, and gave a constable charge of him.

Who did the saddles belong to? - Mr. Brice; they were valued at a guinea.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I never was in the stable, nor never meddled with the saddles.

To Brown. How came you to watch? - Because a coat had been stolen out of the stable before. It was a boarded stable, and the bricks, under the boards, were pulled out.

(The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.)

GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

395. CHRISTOPHER WELCH was indicted for stealing 40 lb. of lead, value 6 s. the property of Ralph Clay , May the 11th .

(The lead was affixed to the freehold; but it not being charged in the indictment according to the statute, the prisoner was found

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

396. MARY WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing three silver tea-spoons, value 3 s. and a linen sheet, value 1 s. the property of Robert Sharp , May the 7th .

ROBERT SHARP sworn.

I am a journeyman silversmith . I lodge in Berwick-court ; the prisoner lodged in the same house, on the same floor: she is a married woman. On Tuesday, the 7th of this month, my wife and I were out; I came home about eight o'clock, and found the door wide open, and missed three silver teaspoons, marked R. E. S. I went round that night among the pawnbrokers, and found the spoons pawned at Mr. Martin's for 3 s. When we were going to bed, we missed the sheet.

- MARTIN sworn.

I am a pawnbroker. On Tuesday night, the 7th of May, a woman pawned these spoons with me for 3 s. in the name of Mary Davis . I cannot swear positively that the prisoner is the woman.

(The spoons were produced in court, and deposed to by the prosecutor.)

ELIZABETH SHARP sworn.

I am wife to the prosecutor. On Tuesday se'nnight, I went out about six o'clock; I double-locked the door, and put the key in my pocket. I came back before my husband; and was below, in my landlord's shop, when he came home, and gave him the key to open the door; and he found it lifted off the hinges. I missed three teaspoons, and a sheet off the bed.

Prisoner. We went out together; we met a chairman, who offered to treat us; and we went back to the prosecutor's room; we had some hot, and she sent me with the spoons to pawn.

To Elizabeth Sharp . Did you go out together? - Yes; she met with an acquaintance, and we went back again, and were at home about half an hour; then I went out again.

Prisoner. They sent me half-a-mile for the hot; and she made me take the key, and lock her and the man into the room together: when I came back, he gave me a shilling to go for another pot; and I locked them both in again; and when I came back, the door was broke open.

To Eliz. Sharp . Did the prisoner lock you and the chairman both in? - Yes; he was rude with me, and I called out at the window, and said I would not be locked in.

Prisoner. She sent me to pawn the spoons to get my cloak out, which I have on, because she wanted to borrow it, to go after some work in.

To Eliz. Sharp . Did the prisoner and you go together with the spoons to the pawnbroker's? - No; I said, if I wanted the cloak, I would go with the spoons to pawn myself.

- SHEPHERD sworn.

I live at Mr. Martin's, in Oxford-road. The prisoner came with the spoons, between six and seven o'clock, on the 7th; I wrote the duplicate, and gave it her.

Are you sure that is the woman? - I cannot swear positively to her.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice WILLES.

397. THOMAS GRIFFITH was indicted for stealing a silver Free-mason's collar, value 3 s. and a silver jewel, value 5 s. the property of William Cooke , April the 22d .

WILLIAM COOKE sworn.

I am a Free-mason . I keep the White Swan, at the top of Old Gravel-lane . On the 22d of April, I lost a silver collar and a jewel. The prisoner is a soldier , and was quartered at my house. I don't know any thing of his taking them, only by his own confession.

MARY HANCOCK sworn.

My mother keeps a clothes shop, in Rosemary-Branch alley. The prisoner brought the jewel to sell; my mother gave him half-a-crown for it; she did not think it was silver, only plated; I was present at the time, and am sure it was the prisoner that brought it.

Prosecutor. When I found where it was, I sent for it, and they made me pay 5 s. for it.

Hancock. My mother had sold it to a man for 4 s. she sent for it, and he would have a shilling for his trouble.

ESTHER DAVIS (a Black) sworn.

I was cleaning Mr. Cooke's bed-room, and Mrs. Cooke charged me with stealing it, and threatened to send for an officer; I said she might, that I was innocent. She asked the prisoner about it; he denied it: I took him into the other room, and said, if he would confess it, I would give him part of the money to get it again: Mrs. Cooke said, if he would confess, she would not hurt him, but pay the money, and send for it.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron PERRYN .

398. HENRY HERFORD was indicted for stealing 40 lb. weight of lead, value 5 s. the property of John Brasset , the said lead being fixed to his dwelling-house , May 9th .

JOHN BRASSET sworn.

I am a farmer . I have a lease for ninety-nine years of a house untenanted, in the parish of St. George's . I had it repaired for myself on the 9th of this month. Between eleven and twelve, as I was going to see the premises, I met my carpenter's brother, who informed me, that they had a man in custody for stealing the lead. I went, and missed about 500 weight of lead from the premises.

JOHN GARDINER sworn.

I am a plumber. On the 9th of this month, I was sent for to the Rotation Office. I was sent to compare the lead with the place it was taken from. It fitted exactly the nail holes, and every thing. It had been laid on four months.

(The lead was produced in Court, and deposed to by the plumber.)

WILLIAM FIDGIN sworn.

I am a night-man. On the 9th of May, between four and five in the morning, as I was going along with my cart, in a lane that leads from Whitechapel to the New Road, I saw the prisoner, with the lead rolled up upon his shoulder. He had nothing over it.

How far is that from the prosecutor's house? - About the 8th of a mile. Upon seeing me, he threw it over some pales into a rope-ground, and went on towards St. George's turnpike. I followed him, and stopped him opposite the house the lead was taken from. I desired him to come back and take the lead he had thrown over into the rope-ground. He said he knew nothing of it. I told him he was the man, and must go back with me. He was never out of my sight. He offered me a pint of purl to let him go. I said, I would not. I took him back, and found the lead that has been produced. My master said he would take care of him while I got the lead; but as soon as I let go of him, he threw down his bag and ran away, but I pursued him, and took him immediately.

ALEXANDER THOMPSON sworn.

I saw the lead on the house the day before.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I am very innocent.

GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice WILLES.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

399. MARY GRAVE was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Joseph East , on the 4th of May , about the hour of eight in the night, and stealing two cloth coats, value 40 s. a surtout coat, value 30 s. two cloth waistcoats, value 6 s. a velveret waistcoat, value 3 s. a stuff waistcoat, value 2 s. two pair of stuff breeches, value 6 s. two pair of cloth breeches, value 6 s. and sixteen yards of linen cloth, value 10 s. the property of the said Joseph East , in his dwelling-house .

JOSEPH EAST sworn.

I am a carpenter . On Saturday evening, the 4th of May, between nine and ten o'clock at night, as my wife and I were sitting by the fire, I heard a noise. I went up stairs, and found the prisoner on the landing-place of the stairs, and the things mentioned in the indictment lying by her. She was shoving them into the bed-room. They had been taken out of the chest, and laid in a chair, as I was going to lend the chest to a friend. The great coat was dropped in the middle of the room. I called a lodger down stairs, and sent him for a constable, and gave him charge of her.

TABITHA LANE sworn.

I laid all the cloaths in a chair in the front room, after they had been taken out of the chest, about four or five o'clock.

THOMAS LACEY sworn.

The prosecutor sent for me on the 4th of May, a little after nine at night, and gave me charge of the prisoner; the cloaths lay by her at the time. I carried her to the watch-house, and delivered her to the care of the beadle.

Was it light or dark when you was sent for? - Dark.

JAMES MATHEWS sworn.

When the prisoner was brought to the watch-house, I searched her, but found nothing upon her.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I went into the house to ask for one Mrs. Jones; that gentleman came out, and asked me who I wanted. I said, Mrs. Jones; and he shoved me up stairs, and said I had robbed him.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice WILLES.

400. ANN CARTER was indicted for stealing a piece of printed British callico, containing 28 yards, value 5 l. the property of Richard Willcox , privily in his shop , May the 13th .

RICHARD WILLCOX sworn.

I keep a linendraper's shop , in White chapel . On Monday, the afternoon of the 13th of the present month, I was serving a customer, who informed me a woman had stolen something, and gone out of the shop with it; I ordered Richard Brown to go after the woman, and bring her back; he brought the prisoner back in one hand, and in the other a piece of printed callico, which she had stolen: there are 28 yards of it; it has my private mark upon it.

MARY BROOKES sworn.

On Monday, the 13th of May, I was at Mr. Willcox's shop, buying a bit of cloth; I happened to turn myself round, and the prisoner appeared to be doing something with her petticoats; as soon as she was gone, I told Mr. Willcox I thought she had taken something, and he sent his young man out after her; I saw her brought back, and this piece of callico with her.

RICHARD BROWN sworn.

I am shopman to Mr. Willcox. I was sent to apprehend the prisoner; Mrs. Brookes said she had turned round the corner by our house, into Catherine-Wheel alley; I overtook her before she had got far up the alley, about three doors from the end of our premises, and I took this piece of callico from under her arm. I brought her back to the shop, and the piece of callico with her.

Are you sure it was the prisoner? - Yes.

Had you known the prisoner before, or seen her at your shop? - No.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

A young man had given it to me, who had got it for his sister, who promised to give me a gown of it; I went in, to buy the body-lining; I had it open in my hand; I work for a person, who makes tents for the camps.

GUILTY . ( Death .)

(She was humbly recommended, by the prosecutor and jury, to his Majesty's mercy.)

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron PERRYN .

401. JAMES KING was indicted for feloniously killing and slaying John Weir , April the 28th .

GEORGE HADDLE sworn.

On the 28th of April, the deceased ( John Weir ) and I went on board the Bombay-Castle ; James King and his father came on board: after that, I heard the deceased say to King, What, gallows! King said, What, York! - Weir being a Yorkshire-man. I took very little notice till I saw the deceased strike at King's legs, and set him down on his backside on the quarter-deck; it appeared to me to look serious; I took more notice; King got up, and they both took their jackets off.

Did you hear any thing before King got up? - Yes; I saw him strike him a slap on the face with his open hand: upon that they instantly stripped, and went to fighting.

Did Weir return the blow before they stripped? - I can't be positive, whether before or afterwards; they stripped instantly, and sought; King fell down; he rose, and they made several closes; I cannot say how many; there were several bouts, and several falls.

Which appeared to have the better in the fight? - I can't say which had the better; King fell three or four times, and Weir fell three or four times; the last fall, they went both down together; I don't know positively which was next the deck.

Did they fall over any thing? - No; on the flat deck. Upon the last fall, I put my hands round Weir to take him up; he put his head back, and gave one single groan, and departed.

In what manner did King behave, upon that? - He appeared to be very serious, when he saw what the circumstances were like to turn to.

Was he a good deal concerned? - Yes.

Was he much hurt? - I don't know upon my word.

( John Salmon , who was present, confirmed the evidence of George Haddle , and added that he thought a beam threw them down the last time; but that they fell clear of it; that the prisoner did not use any unfair means, or strike the deceased with any thing but his fist; that he was carried to the Globe, and a surgeon sent for, but he was cold before the surgeon came; he had a black spot on his breast; that he thought he was in a fit, at first; that it was very far from his thoughts, before the accident happened, that there was any thing to endanger his life; he had never seen the least animosity in the prisoner to the deceased.)

(The prisoner was not put on his defence.)

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

402. WILLIAM MAYNARD was indicted for stealing 80 lb. of lead, value 6 s. the property of Edward Hale , April the 12th .

(The indictment not laying it to have been fixed to the dwelling-house, it was insufficient to support the charge.)

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

403. ANN SHELTON was indicted for stealing an hempen sack, value 2 s. and 60 lb. of black pepper, value 7 l. the property of Matthias Palling , John Palling , and John Mather , privily in their dwelling-house , May the 1st .

JOHN TOTTY sworn.

I am warehouseman to Messrs. Palling, Mather, and Palling. We had two porters, who lodged and boarded in the house. On the 1st of this month, James Connor , one of the porters, called me a quarter before six o'clock; I gave him the keys, to open the warehouse; I came down in about five minutes after, and saw the prisoner going out of the back door with a bag of pepper; I instantly went to the door, and called to her, but she would neither look back, nor speak; I went and laid hold of her; then she said, James gave it me.

Who was James? - One of the porters; the man I gave the keys to, to open the warehouse. After I had stopped her, I told her, You know James has no right to give you any thing out of the warehouse; and desired her to bring it in. She put it down under the sky-light; I looked at it, and saw it was black pepper. I bid James go and call Mr. Palling, and desire him to come down directly; he went on the stairs, but never called him. As I thought I must be on my oath about the pepper, I took it to the scales, to weigh it; James Connor came to me, under a pretence of seeing the weight of the pepper, and the prisoner ran out into the lane; I went after her, and took her again. By that time, Mr. Palling was come down, and I left the prisoner in the care of the footman, while I went to seek for a constable. There were 60 lb. weight of the pepper. We sent her to the Poultry Compter. When Mr. Mather came home, we sent for another constable, and took the porters up, and sent them there also; but, not having any positive fact against them, the Lord Mayor discharged them.

(Upon his cross-examination, he said it was impossible for the woman to have filled the bag after he gave the porter the keys to open the warehouse.)

JOHN MATHER sworn.

I only appear here as prosecutor; I was not at home when the robbery was committed.

Prisoner. I leave my defence to my counsel.

(The prisoner called a great number of witnesses, who gave her a good character.)

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

404. PATRICK CARRICK was indicted for stealing a linen handkerchief, value 12 d. the property of Shaftoe Vaughan , April the 15th .

GUILTY of stealing to the value of 10 d .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. Justice WILLES.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

405. JOHN RAY was indicted for stealing three quartern loaves of wheaten bread, value 1 s. 9 d. the property of Samuel Barrow , May the 4t h.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. Justice WILLES.

406. EDWARD ABEL was indicted for stealing a woollen blanket, value 3 s. a cloth cloak, value 5 s. a silk bonnet, value 3 s. and a cambrick stock, value 12 d. the property of Joseph Blackman , April the 26th .

SARAH BLACKMAN sworn.

On the 26th of April, between five and six o'clock in the evening, I went into the yard; I heard somebody jump down; looking about, I saw the casement of the window had been broke open, and I found the prisoner in the yard; I laid hold of him, and called for assistance; Sarah Ash came up. I found the glass of the casement broke, and by that means it had been opened; it had been shut before. The things mentioned in the indictment were found laid all together by the window, ready to carry out; none of them had been there before.

SARAH ASH sworn.

When I came up, Mrs. Blackman had hold of the prisoner; he was then just got within the yard-door.

(The prisoner did not say any thing in his defence.)

GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

[Whipping. See summary.] [Imprisonment. See summary.]

407, 408, 409. JAMES LEWIS , WILLIAM CARR , and WILLIAM HAYES , were indicted for stealing 19 lb. of moist sugar, value 12 s. the property of John Budgman , May the 2d .

JOHN BUDGMAN sworn.

I am a carman . My cart was standing at Summers's-quay gate , between eight and nine o'clock in the morning, on the 2d of May; there were two hogsheads of moist sugar; I employed Lewis in attending the cart, to take care of it. I came there about nine o'clock the staves of one of the hogsheads appeared to have been broke, and some sugar stolen.

ALEXANDER DENNIS sworn.

I weighed two hogsheads of sugar, which were loaded upon Budgman's cart. No. 58 weighed 321 lb.; upon its being alledged, that some of it had been stolen, I afterwards weighed it; I found it 19 lb. deficient. I followed Lewis, and saw him have some sugar in his hat, and I saw Hayes sitting upon the hind part of the cart; I saw two of them have the sugar.

(The prisoners denied the charge, but did not call any witnesses.)

ALL THREE GUILTY .

CARR and HAYES, Imp. 6 Months .

LEWIS, Imp. 12 Months .

410. THOMAS BARNESLEY was indicted for stealing a wooden cask, value 2 s. and four gallons of raspberry-brandy, value 20 s. the property of William Annison , April the 19th .

(The prosecutor and his witness were called, but not appearing, the court ordered their recognizance to be estreated.)

NOT GUILTY .

411. JUDITH SOLOMON was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Joseph Essex , on the 5th of March , about the hour of five in the night, and stealing 42 yards of silk ribband, value 16 s. the property of the said Joseph Essex , in his dwelling-house .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

412. JOHN LUCAS was indicted for stealing one cloth coat, value 3 s. and one cloth waistcoat, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of John Andrews , April the 25th .

JOHN ANDREWS sworn.

On the 23d of April, about five or six o'clock, I came home; I found my wife had seized the prisoner by the collar, coming out of the chamber; we got him down stairs, and secured him. I went up stairs; I saw a coat and waistcoat of my son's lying on the top of the stairs, which had been taken out of a box; and there were three picklock keys.

ANN ANDREWS sworn.

I went and met the prisoner about half way up the stairs. He had taken the padlock off the back-door to get in. I seized him on the stairs.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I was ordered to go to this house to enquire for a particular person; I went into the house; I could not make any body hear; I went up stairs; these people met me, and said I wanted to rob the house. I am as innocent as the child unborn.

GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

[Whipping. See summary.] [Imprisonment. See summary.]

413. ROBERT STANTON was indicted for wilful and corrupt perjury , in his evidence on the trial of a cause at Nisi Prius, before the Right Hon. the Earl of Mansfield, at Guildhall, in the sittings after last Hilary term.

JOSEPH GURNEY sworn.

I took down in short-hand, in the sittings after last Hilary term, the trial at Guildhall, before the Earl of Mansfield, of the cause, Ford versus Yates. It was an action for words. The defendant, Robert Stanton , was examined on the part of the plaintiff: he deposed,

"that he was sent by Mr. Ford, of

"Lombard-street, with a letter, to Mr.

"Yates at Birmingham; that he delivered

"the letter to Mr. Yates; upon which Mr.

"Yates said to him, Mr. Ford has defrauded

"me of money and bills to a considerable amount;

"and that Mr. Yates said he had a man who

"would swear that Mr. Ford indorsed one of

"the bills with a forged name, Thomas Downer ;

"and he acquainted me that he could

"hang Mr. Ford, but he did not want to take

"away his life."

CROSS-EXAMINATION.

There was not any evidence produced on the part of Mr. Yates? - There was not.

The Jury gave a verdict for the Plaintiff, with 700 damages? - They did.

JAMES RICHARDS sworn.

I live with Mr. Yates of Birmingham, as a clerk. I remember the defendant coming, in September, 1780, with a letter; it was about six in the evening: he enquired for Mr. Yates, who was not then in the way: he said, he wanted to see him in particular. Mr. Yates was sent for, and after a few minutes came. The defendant then delivered the letter to Mr. Yates himself. Mr. Yates took it into a room, and read it. When he returned again, the defendant requested an answer. Mr. Yates said he would give none; he had received similar letters before. Then the defendant pressed a second time for an answer. Mr. Yates then asked his name, which he declined telling; said it was of no signification; that he came to Birmingham, and had been desired to deliver that letter to him: he said Mr. Ford had particularly desired him to get an answer in writing. Mr. Yates said he would give no other answer than he had given before, which was none. He then went to the door with the defendant, and I followed them. I was as near to the defendant, when the conversation passed in the warehouse, as him now the door at which they went out, was not farther from me than the door of the Sessions-house is now. I passed them on the landing, and went down the stairs before them; but they were not more than three steps after me. When we came to the bottom of the stairs, the defendant turned to the right-hand, and I to the left: he appeared going away; but I saw no more of him, nor of my master. What I have related, was the whole of the conversation that passed between Mr. Yates and the defendant. I did not hear him speak any such words as Stanton swore he did, nor any words to that effect: if he had, I must have heard it, in the situation in which I was. I met Mr. Whitworth at the bottom of the stairs: I returned again to the warehouse in about five minutes. I never saw the defendant at my master's since. Timmings and Hamper were present at the time of this conversation.

Upon his cross-examination, he said, That when the defendant came, he was writing at the desk: he said that the warehouse was not quite so long as the court; that when Mr. Yates came in, he (the witness) resumed his business at the desk; that the conversation was so loud, he could not help hearing it; and that he heard, he believed, every syllable that passed; that there was nothing said in the passage by either of them; that he did not recollect any thing passing between Mr. Whitworth and him about the letter; that Mr. Whitworth and Mr. Yates were reading the letter together when he came into the warehouse; that he listened, because the defendant mentioned the name of Ford; and that, knowing the dispute that subsisted between his master and Mr. Ford, he quitted his business to listen. At first, the witness said he did not recollect what he went down stairs for: afterwards he said he went about the business he was engaged in at the desk, which he could not do till he knew whether the things were finished they were at work upon; that he did not know which of the shops that work was carrying on in.

- TIMMINGS sworn.

I remember the defendant bringing a letter. I was not in the warehouse when he first came in. I came in before Mr. Yates came in. The defendant gave Mr. Yates the letter. Mr. Yates went into a room, and read it. When Mr. Yates came back, he told the defendant, that he had received, before, two or three letters similar, and should give the same answer, which was none at all. The defendant desired he would give an answer in writing. Mr. Yates asked his name: the defendant said it was of no signification; and Mr. Yates said, a second time, he should give no answer. Then the defendant left the warehouse. I was about four yards from the place where they stood conversing together. I did not hear the words charged in the indictment: if they had passed, I must have heard them.

Were Richards and Stanton conversing about the letter when you came in? - I cannot tell. As soon as Mr. Yates said he would give no answer, the defendant Stanton went out; and Mr. Yates went out about two or three minutes after him, and followed him close: he was not a yard distance from him.

You said Mr. Yates went out two or three minutes after the defendant, and that he was not a yard distance from him. How do you account for it, that the going of a yard could take up two or three minutes? - I was mistaken as to the time; he went out immediately after him, one directly after the other. Mr. Yates followed him out of my sight: I cannot tell where he went when he went out. What passed, or whether any thing passed, between Stanton and Mr. Yates, when they went out, I do not know. Mr. Yates was out about two or three minutes: then Mr. Whitworth and Mr. Yates came in together. Richards and the other clerk were employed at the desk. I did not continue long in the warehouse; I believe Richards went out before me. When I returned, Mr. Yates, Mr. Whitworth, Richards and Hamper, were in the warehouse. Mr. Whitworth had a letter in his hand. I do not remember taking notice of any words that passed then; I was about four or five yards off.

THOMAS HAMPER sworn.

I knew of letters coming from Mr. Ford before the defendant came.

(The witness then confirmed Richard's account of the conversation between Mr. Yates and the defendant, and added as follows.)

I saw the defendant go out, and go off the landing down the steps. Mr. Whitworth returned with Mr. Yates. I was at the desk all the time. No such words passed as those mentioned in the indictment; if there had, I should have heard them. When Mr. Whitworth and Mr. Yates came back, the letter was read. Stanton's first address was to me. Richards went down, and staid while the letter was reading. The subject matter of the dispute between Mr. Yates and Mr. Ford was concerning some bills and cash which had been sent to London. It was supposed by Mr. Yates, that Mr. Ford had received them, and refused to acknowledge the receipt. There was the name Thomas Downer put upon the back of one or two of the bills.

Mr. WHITWORTH sworn.

I was coming to the warehouse. I saw Stanton come out, and Mr. Yates follow him: there was not any conversation between them. Mr. Yates gave me a letter, which I read. We went up into the warehouse. I cannot say I saw Richards: I know he was at home at that time; but I do not remember seeing him.

For the Defendant.

- FRANCIS sworn.

I live at Birmingham. About the 10th or 12th of September, 1780, I went to Mr. Yates with a letter from Mr. Ford. Mr. Yates said, he did not believe the contents of the letter; but I really don't recollect what else he said.

(Upon his cross-examination the witness said, that some time previous to this application to Mr. Yates, Mr. Ford had entertained a suspicion that some person or persons then in Newgate had stolen Mr. Yates's box with its contents.)

OBADIAH WESTWOOD sworn.

Mr. Yates came to my house, at Birmingham, two years and a half ago; he told me he had every proof to prove Mr. Ford guilty of taking the box; that he could prove his indorsing the name, Thomas Downer , and that he passed many of the bills. This was said before the trial of the cause, Whitworth and Yates versus Ford.

JOHN WILLAN sworn.

I have heard Mr. Yates say, he suspected Mr. Ford to have the box which came for him by our carriage.

WILLIAM CURRE sworn.

I have heard Mr. Yates say, he believed Mr. Ford had the box and the property.

Mr. ROBERT ALBION COX sworn.

About two or three years ago, Mr. Yates applied to me about a bill which had been taken at our house, indorsed, Thomas Downer : he desired me to go with him to Mr. Ford's house. As we were going along, he said, This man has broke open my box, and taken out my bills and money to the amount of 100 l. or more: he said, I could hang him, but I would rather get my money of him. We went to Mr. Ford's. I sent up my name, and place of abode. Mr. Ford sent down his compliments, and said he would wait on me in the morning. The next morning, while Mr. Yates was conversing with me at my house, Mr. Ford came. As soon as I saw Mr. Ford. I said to Mr. Ford, in the hearing of Mr. Yates, Your are not the person that indorsed the bill Thomas Downer . I asked Mr. Ford to walk in: he said he would not while I was in company with that man. Mr. Ford, as he was going away, said, I have not done with you yet.

(The Defendant called five gentlemen, who gave him a very good character.)

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

John Young , otherwise Sparrow , capitally convicted in April Sessions, was referred to his former sentence.

The Trials being ended, the Court proceeded to give Judgment, as follows:

Received Judgment of Death, 2.

Francis Cundy , and Ann Carter .

John Young , otherwise Sparrow , capitally convicted in April Sessions, was referred to his former sentence.

Whipped, and Imprisoned 12 Months, 5.

John Fenlow , Susannah Leech , John Lucas , Edward Abel , Mary Brown .

Imprisoned 12 Months, 12.

Edward Burne , Andrew Gifford , John Tinnent , William Stenson , James Lewis , Catherine Butler , William Singleton , Bryan Barton , William Lees , Thomas Hall, Henry Hurford , John Marden .

Whipped, and Imprisoned 6 Month, 2.

Margaret Miller , William Simmons .

Whipped, and Imprisoned 3 Months. 4.

Frances Owen , Ann Morris , Sarah Jones , Frances Brown .

Imprisoned 6 Months, 9.

Patrick Carrick , Samuel Levy , William Carr , William Hayes , John Lawley , James Gardiner , William Brooks , Lazarus Jacobs, James Mac Millan .

Branded, 1.

Joseph Bent .

Whipped, 4.

Elizabeth Bryan , Ann Wilson , otherwise Brayley, Dorothy Fleming , Ann Halfpenny .

Imprisoned 2 Years, 1.

Barnard Isaacs .

The Judgment on William Bass , was respited for the opinion of the Judges.

JUST PUBLISHED, (From Mr. GURNEY's Short-hand Notes,) Printed in Folio, to bind with the STATE TRIALS, A New Edition of the genuine TRIAL of CAPTAIN DONELLAN; Containing the Evidence, the Letters, and all the Arguments of the Counsel at large.

Sold by M. GURNEY, No. 34, Bell-Yard, Temple-Bar, REMOVING into HOLBORN, the Corner of LEATHER-LANE.