Old Bailey Proceedings Online (www.oldbaileyonline.org, version 6.0, 23 August 2014), June 1778 (17780603).

Old Bailey Proceedings, 3rd June 1778.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS ON THE KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery for the CITY of LONDON; AND ALSO, The Gaol Delivery for the COUNTY of MIDDLESEX; HELD AT JUSTICE HALL in the OLD BAILEY, On Wednesday the 3d of June, 1778, and the following Days;

Being the FIFTH SESSION in the Mayoralty of The Right Honble Sir JAMES ESDAILE LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY JOSEPH GURNEY , And Published by Authority.

NUMBER V. PART I.

LONDON:

Printed for JOSEPH GURNEY (the PROPRIETOR) And Sold by M. GURNEY, No. 34, Bell-Yard, near Temple-Bar,

MDCCLXXVIII.

[PRICE SIX-PENCE.]

THE WHOLE PROCEEDING'S UPON THE

KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery for the CITY of LONDON, &c.

BEFORE the Right Honourable Sir JAMES ESDAILE , Knt. LORD MAYOR of the City of London; the Honourable EDWARD WILLES , one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of King's Bench; the Honourable Sir BEAUMONT HOTHAM , Knt. one of the Barons of his Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Mr. Serjeant GLYNN, Recorder; and others of his Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London and Justices of Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

London Jury.

William Carr ,

William Meadows ,

James Haslam ,

Thomas Parkinson ,

Thomas Duperoy ,

Almond Shroder ,

Henry Green ,

Richard Pepys ,

John Hayward ,

George Blyth ,

Joseph Potter ,

William Baker .

First Middlesex Jury.

Allen Wall,

Joseph Smith ,

John Maberley ,

John Carvel ,

John Allen ,

Robert Broomfield ,

Edward Berry ,

John Bakewell ,

Henry Tahourdin ,

Robert Evans,

Thomas Nevett ,

James Hawkes ,

Second Middlesex Jury.

John Bromley ,

Thomas Treslove ,

James Birchall ,

Thomas Reddish ,

Ralph Chambers ,

Thomas Nesbett *,

* Charles Whitecombe served part of the time in the stead of Thomas Nesbett .

Somerville Macqueen ,

Thomas Greaves ,

Benjamin Fox ,

John Jones ,

Thomas Boodger ,

James Gordon .

416. ELIZABETH TOWNSEND, otherwise HERRING , was indicted for stealing three guineas in monies, numbered , the property of Matthew Talley , April the 25th .

[The prosecutor was called, but not appearing, the court ordered his recognizance to be esterated.]

NOT GUILTY .

417. CHARLOTTE SMEE was indicted for stealing six guineas and 20 s. in monies, numbered, the property of Patrick Roney , in the dwelling-house of David Keeling , April the 6th .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM.

418. THOMAS DENNIS was indicted for stealing eight guineas and seven half guineas , the property of James Williams , March 8th .

[The witnesses were examined apart at the request of the prisoner.]

JAMES WILLIAMS sworn.

I am a farmer ; I came from Hereford-shire. Upon the 8th of March I was in London, and in going to my quarters at night I missed my way; after travelling about an hour or two I met a watchman, and asked him to show me the way; we went into a public house, and had a pennyworth of gin apiece; I pulled out a sixpence to pay for it; the sixpence being a new one; I said I would not change that, but carry it home to my children; I then put my hand into my coat pocket, and pulled out a glove, in which I had seven guineas and an half, and offered half a guinea to change; the publican could not change it; I had a penny; I gave that, and the watchman paid the other penny, and I put my money into my glove, and put it in my coat pocket again. The watchman and I came out, and the prisoner followed us; the watchman took hold of my right arm, and the prisoner took hold of my left, and asked me what countryman I was. I said a Herefordshire man; he said, he came from the same country, and talked very freely to me; just before we got to the watch-house I felt his hand in my pocket, and I felt the glove in his hand as he pulled it out, and he went off immediately; I did not pursue him, because as the other people were all strangers, I did not know, but they might all be concerned. I immediately lost sight of him, and did not know how to pursue him.

SAMUEL EDWARDS sworn.

I am a watchman. Williams came to me on the 8th of March, between one and two in the morning, and asked me where he could get a lodging. I said, as it was that time of night, I could not tell; he said he had a sum of money about him, and should be glad of a lodging; I told him I would take him to the watch-house, to the constable of the night, where he would be safe; we went into the Horse-shoe, a public house, in Benjamin-street , to have a pennyworth of gin; he pulled out sixpence to pay for it, it was a new one; he said he would not change that, he would take it home to his children; he then pulled out a glove with some gold in it, and wanted change for half a guinea; the publican would not change any gold at night; he had but a penny; he paid that, and I paid the other penny; we went out to go to the watch-house; I took hold of him by the left arm, and the prisoner came out and took hold of him by the right arm; when we came within ten yards of the watch-house, the prisoner ran off; I did not see him take any thing.

Was Williams drunk or sober? - He was not drunk; he had been drinking but was properly in his senses; I saw him put the money into his pocket again; I don't know what it was.

Did Williams say any thing to you before he came to the watch-house that he had lost his money? - When we got into the watch-house, I asked him if he had got his money? He said, no; he had lost it in coming-to the watch-house.

Did he say he suspected the person that held him by the right arm? - No; I don't recollect that he said the prisoner took it.

WILLIAM EVANS sworn.

I was at the public house; the prosecutor wanted change; the landlord would not give him change; he put his money up again, and Edwards and he went out together; the prisoner went out after them, and took hold of the prosecutor's arm; when he came near the watch-house, he quitted the prosecutor, and went off. Edwards called to him, and asked him if he would come in? He said, no; it was late, he would get home. When they came into the watch-house, they bid him show his money; he felt in his pocket, and said his money was gone; he did not say how he lost it; he only said it was gone; I believe he did not know how he lost it. I don't believe the prosecutor knew who had hold of him by the left arm, till the Monday morning. The prisoner was not mentioned till Monday morning by the prosecutor, not by the watchman. The prisoner asked me as he went out of the public house, which pocket he put his money into. I told him his right hand pocket.

[ Christopher Poul confirmed the evidence of the last witness, and that the prosecutor said in the watch-house, that he had his money on the table; in which he was confirmed by Thomas Brown .]

WILLIAM HASLING sworn.

I was constable of the night when the prosecutor came to the watch-house; he said he lost his money coming from the Horse-shoe; I did not hear him say any thing about it being on the table; he was in extreme confusion, and raved like a madman; I believe he was sober; for, to be sure, I stripped him naked, and he stood very steady all the time. I went with a candle and lanthorn to the Horse-shoe to see if I could find any part of the money, and found a black glove torn to pieces, but the watchman of the night thought it was not the same, because the glove he put his money into was a good one.

Jury to Edwards. You said the prosecutor told you in the watch-house, that the prisoner was the person who took the money out of his pocket? - I don't remember that he did say so in the watch-house.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I know no more of it than these gentlemen; the watchmen were none of them searched.

For the Prisoner.

JOHN JONES sworn.

I am a publican; I have known the prisoner fifteen years; I never heard any harm of him; I was before the justice at the time he had a hearing; the prosecutor said he could not swear to the identity of his person; he said he did not know who took his money, but he found a man's hand in his pocket.

JOSHUA RICHMOND sworn.

I have known the prisoner between three and four years; I never heard any thing amiss of him.

THOMAS BARKE sworn.

I have known the prisoner fourteen years; I never knew any harm of him in my life; I was before the justice; I heard the prosecutor say he lost his money going from Jackson's to the watch-house; but he could not swear to the person; he did not know who took it.

ELIZABETH PARTRIDGE sworn.

I have known the prisoner fifteen or sixteen years; I never heard any harm of him.

WILLIAM HEELING sworn.

I have known the prisoner between nine and ten years; he is a very honest just man; I never heard any harm of him in my life.

GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM.

[Branding. See summary.]

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

419. SAMUEL CLARK was indicted for stealing a silver tankard, value 5 l. a silver pint mug, value 40 s. two silver salts, value 30 s. a silver pepper box, value 15 s. and two salts, value 10 s. the property of John Darby , in the dwelling-house of the said John , March 16th.

JOHN DARBY sworn.

I keep a public house in Wentworth-street, Spitalfields . The plate mentioned in the indictment was cleaned the 28th of February. On the 1st of March, the prisoner and his brother (who lives near me) were at my house; on the 16th I missed the plate, and saw it and the prisoner at the Mansion-house on the 18th.

SOLOMON DAVIS sworn.

On the 4th of March Abraham Emanuel met me, and said he had been to Rag Fair; that a soldier had called him up an alley, and asked him to buy some plate; he said he had showed him a tankard, and he believed we should find it upon him; I went with him, and he showed me the soldier; the soldier ran up George Yard, in the Minories; I pursued, and secured him, and I found the tankard in his coat pocket, and the rest of the plate in his other pockets; I asked him how he came by it? He would not tell me; I got a coach, and took him to the Mansion-house; he said the next day, before his Lordship, that he took it from a Jew on Tower-Hill.

[The plate was produced in court, and deposed to by the prosecutor.]

JOSEPH MOSES sworn.

On the 4th of March the prisoner came to me, and offered me some plate to sell; I did not see it; I am sure the prisoner is the man.

ABRAHAM EMANUEL sworn.

On the 4th of March, while I was standing in Rosemary Lane, the prisoner touched me on the shoulder; I went into an alley with him, and he took a tankard out of his pocket, and asked me to buy it; I said I would have nothing to do with it; he said, if I would buy it, I should have it worth my money; I said, I would not buy it; I then went out, and met Davis in the Minories, and told him of it; the tankard he showed me was without a handle; I cannot swear that this is it.

JOSEPH CHIVERS sworn.

I am a constable; Davis and I secured the prisoner, and found the plate upon him.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I met a man on Tower-Hill; I suspected he had some run goods; I stopped him, and asked him what he had got. He said, what was that to me. Upon which I made a blow at him, and he dropped a stocking with the things in it; I stooped to pick them up, and he got off; the Jew wanted me to sell it to him; I would not; I told him I would advertise it; and because I would not sell it to him, he sent these two men after me, to take me up; I surrendered myself, after I had been cleared once before the Lord Mayor.

(The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.]

Guilty of stealing to the value of 39 s.

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM.

[Branding. See summary.]

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

420. DOROTHY SMITH was indicted for that she did traiterously colour, with a colour resembling silver, a piece of base coin resembling the silver coin of this kingdom, called a shilling .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM.

421. SARAH HAYWARD was indicted for stealing a watch, with the inside case made of silver, washed with gold, and the outside shagreen, value 3 l. the property of Anne Hawes , Widow , in the dwelling-house of the said Anne , March 26th .

ANNE HAWES sworn.

I keep a chandler's shop in Mitchell-street, Old-street . On the 26th of March last I lost the watch mentioned in the indictment out of my shop; it hung up by the fire-place; the prisoner lived in the house; she was twice in the shop, and sat down by the fire; she was stopped that night offering it to sale.

JOHN CHIVERS sworn.

I saw the prisoner in Rosemary-lane offering the watch to a Jew; I took it out of the hands of the Jew, and took her into custody; she said she found it at Iron-gate; before the justice she said she found it at the Victualling Office; going with her to Bridewell, she said she took it from Mrs. Hawes's fire-place, and she gave me a direction to the prosecutrix.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

They have told a great many lies:

Guilty of stealing to the value of 39 s.

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM.

[Branding. See summary.]

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

422. WILLIAM GLASS was indicted for stealing a linen handkerchief, value 10 d. the property of the Rev . Townsend Andrews , May 25th .

The Rev. Mr. TOWNSEND ANDREWS sworn.

On the 25th of May, as I was turning into Leadenhall-street , a person called after me, and asked, if my pocket had not been picked. I said, I did not know that it had; he then informed me that my handkerchief was picked out, and produced it; it had my mark upon it; I had used it not above five minutes before.

- COVIN sworn.

On the 25th of May, between twelve and one o'clock, I saw two boys following Mr. Andrews, at the corner of Billiter-Lane; his handkerchief hung a little out of his pocket; just as they were turning the corner, I caught the prisoner putting the handkerchief in his bosom; I did not see him take it.

[The handkerchief was produced in court, and deposed to by the prosecutor.]

JOHN CAMPBELL sworn.

I was coming out of my master's shop; I saw the last witness secure the prisoner, and take the handkerchief out of his breast.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I met a little boy with the handkerchief; he asked me to buy it; I gave him a shilling for it.

(The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.)

GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Whipping. See summary.]

423. ABIGAIL JONES was indicted for stealing a pair of women's silk gloves, value 4 s. the property of John Cayley , May 29th .

JOHN CAYLEY sworn.

I am a hosier in Aldgate, High-street . On the 29th of May, in the evening, the prisoner came to my shop, and asked for a pair of black silk gloves; my brother showed her some; I went out after she came in; as I came back I met her coming out; my brother called to me to stop her, and said she had stole a pair of black gloves; I brought her back.

BENJAMIN CAYLEY sworn.

I live with my brother; the prisoner came to my brother's shop on Friday the 29th of May, in the evening, and asked for some black silk gloves; I showed her some; she said they were not rich enough; I showed her some more; she fixed on a pair; I asked 6 s. for them; she bid me 5 s. there were but two pair of that pattern; as I turned the gloves over I missed one pair of them; at that instant she stooped down, she having, I believe, a suspicion that I watched her, and saw her put a pair in her pocket; she went out; my brother was coming in; I desired him to stop her, and said she had stole a pair of gloves; she denied it; I told her I saw her put them into her pocket; she then offered me half a guinea for the gloves, and desired me not to prosecute her; she was taken into the parlour, and shut in with the maid servant, while my brother went for a constable I saw the gloves found when the constable came behind the bureau in the parlour.

[The gloves were produced in court by the constable, and deposed to by the prosecutor.]

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I did not take the gloves.

(She called seven witnesses, who gave her a good character.)

Guilty of stealing to the value of 10 d.

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

424. Daniel Baker was indicted for stealing two leaden sash weights, 22 lb. weight, value 4 s. the property of John Richardson , May 14th .

JOHN RICHARDSON sworn.

I am a plumber . On Thursday the 14th of May, as I was going out to work, the prisoner watched me out; these weights were stolen while I was out.

THOMAS MONTAGUE sworn.

On Thursday morning, the 14th of May, I saw the prisoner's legs coming out of Mr. Richardson's window; I overtook him twenty or thirty yards from the house; I took him by the collar, and found these two weights upon him; he begged I would let him go, and he would never do so any more.

[The weights were produced in court, and deposed to by the prosecutor.]

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

That gentleman has known me twenty-five years, and never knew me wrong man, woman, or child before; I was not in the shop; I have a wife and four children.

GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Branding. See summary.]

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

425, 426. MARY HUGHES and ELIZABETH SAUNDERS were indicted for stealing a silk cloak, value 10 d. and a check apron, value 6 d. the property of Catharine Chapman , April the 29th .

CATHARINE CHAPMAN sworn.

I am a servant at a gin shop, the Half Moon in Duke-street ; the two prisoners came there, and drank; they went out, and returned about an hour afterwards; I missed the things, and charged them with taking them; they both denied it.

JOHN WHEATLY sworn.

I am a pawnbroker; the prisoner Hughes pawned the cloak and apron with me on the 29th of April.

[They were produced in court, by Arnold the constable, and deposed to by the prosecutrix.]

HUGHES's DEFENCE.

I never wronged any body of a pin's worth in my life.

[Saunders was not put on her defence.]

HUGHES GUILTY .

SAUHDERS NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Branding. See summary.]

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

427, 428. JOSEPH PENTECROSS and JAMES PENTECROSS were indicted for stealing a woollen cloth coat, value 10 s. and a woollen cloth waistcoat, value 5 s. the property of Mary Black , widow , April the 23d .

BOTH NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

429, 430. THOMAS EDDISON and SARAH EDDISON , his wife , were indicted for stealing a pair of linen sheets, value 3 s. a pair of bellows, value 10 d. two case knives, value 2 d. two earthen plates, value 2 d. and an earthern bason, value 1 d. the property of Dennis M'Cartey , being in a lodging-room, let by contract, by the said Dennis to the said Thomas and Sarah , March 17th .

BOTH NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM.

431. WILLIAM BURLEY was indicted for stealing a man's saddle, value 30 s. and a bridle, value 3 s. the property of John Wright , February the 10th .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM.

432. MICHAEL CASHMIN was indicted for escaping from on board the lighters, were he had been sentenced to hard labour on the river Thames for seven years , April 17th .

The Record of his Conviction was read.

[ John Marshall . the mate of the hulk, deposed that the prisoner was confined on board the hulk.]

JOHN EVANS sworn.

I am a constable. On the 16th or 17th of April, I found the prisoner concealed in a lost, near Tottenham court road; he had an iron bazzle (part of a fetter) on each of his legs.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I was starved to death when I was there; there is never a man there but would escape from that place if he could; I would rather be hanged than be there.

GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

433, 434. ANN MITCHEL and ELIZABETH HOLLIS were indicted for stealing two pieces of thread lace, value 40 s. the property of Joseph Wateridge , privately in the shop of the said Joseph , May 20th.

JOSEPH WATERIDGE sworn.

I live in King-street, Covent-garden . On the 20th of May, about five in the afternoon, the prisoner came to my shop, and asked to look at some lace; they said, they wanted some lace for a cap; they wanted a cap made up. I desired my sister to wait on them; they said, they wanted some very nice lace; they looked over a number of laces; in ten minutes after, Mr. Moravia came into the shop about some business with me. I left my sister, showing the prisoners the lace, and talked with Mr. Moravia in the farther part of the shop; I stayed there about ten minutes; he then went back, and spoke to my sister; he came back again to me in one minute, I believe; I went behind the counter again, and asked my sister if she could not please the ladies: she said, no, she could not; she seemed much confused; she wanted to pass me; I said, I believed, there was a lace that would suit the ladies; I looked in the box; I could not see it; my sister gave me a nudge on the toe with her foot, giving me to understand that she suspected them; I took a piece of lace from the window, and recommended it to Mrs. Hollis, and asked if that would not suit her: she said, no; it was not fine enough, and she hoped I would not wish her to buy lace that did not please her, that she would go else where and buy lace, and bring it, if we would make it up for her. Mrs. Hollis then ordered half a yard of gauze to be cut off, and paid a shilling for it; then they went out of the shop; my sister as soon as they were gone said, she was sure they had stole some lace. I went out, and took hold of one by one hand, and the other by the other, and desired them to come back again, for I suspected they had stole lace; I desired Mr. Moravia to watch that they did not drop any; he said he would, as soon as they came within the shop, Mr. Moravia said, here are two pieces of lace dropped; my sister immediately stooped, and picked them up. I did not see them dropped, but I saw my sister pick them up from the floor; I made them go into the back room, behind the shop, and sent for a constable, and searched them.

Cross Examination.

Did you find any thing upon Hollis? - Nothing.

When you went out after them, and told them you suspected they had stole lace; Did Mrs. Hollis make the least objection to going back? - Not the least.

ISRAEL MORAVIA sworn.

On the 20th of May I went to the prosecutor's to settle an account with him; when I came in, I saw the two prisoners cheapening some lace; I did not take any notice of them; they were very genteelly dressed; I thought they had a mind to buy lace; I went to the farther end of the shop with Mr. Wateridge; I told him what my business was; we stood talking two or three minutes; he said he would settle with me presently; I went to the farther end of the shop back again, and the sister looked at me very earnestly, and said to me, did you tell my brother what I told you this morning? I observed she was rather confused. I went back to her brother at the other end of the shop, and said, your sister looks confused, as if they had stole lace; go round the counter. He said, no; he did not think they looked like any thing of the kind; he went round; I walked to the farther end of the shop; I saw them looking at one card and at another. Mr. Wateridge showed them several cards of lace; at last he took one from the window, and said, I think that lace will suit you very well. Mrs. Hollis said, no; I think this is not good enough; I think to have a very good lace, and you would not have me lay out my money without I could please myself. Before she went out, she said, she would go and seek for lace somewhere else that might please her better, and if so, she would come back again, and she supposed they would have no objection to make the cap for her, if she got the lace elsewhere. He said, no; he said to Mrs. Mitchell, don't you want any thing? she said, yes; she wanted half a yard of gauze; they purchased that, paid for it, and then went out; as soon as ever they were gone out, the sister said, she believed they had taken some lace away. He asked me to go with him, and see that they did not drop it; we went out, and he caught them both by the arms; he desired me to keep behind, and see that they did not drop it; they made no objection to coming back to the shop. Hollis went in first, Mitchell followed her; as Mitchell was going in, I saw a piece of lace upon a card, and the other piece that is loose drop from under either her cloak or gown. I said to the prosecutor's sister, there, they have dropped the lace; she picked it up; they were taken backwards into the back room that adjoins the shop, and I went for a constable; the constable came, and they were both searched; there was nothing found upon them, but two or three bits of ribbond concealed under Mitchell's stays; they seemed to be very easy; they said, they knew they were very innocent, and not guilty of what they were charged with. The constable found but 7 d. or 8 d. about them, though they were bargaining for lace of 7 s. or 8 s. a yard.

Cross Examination.

The lace they were about buying, if they had met with any to the liking of Mrs. Hollis, was to have been put upon a cap, was it not? - Yes.

Counsel. Then there was no occasion for money to pay for it then?

Witness. This is the lace I saw drop from Mitchell.

What is it worth a yard? - Five shillings. I import lace. I sold this lace to Mr. Wateridge the day before.

MITCHELL's DEFENCE.

I never had a bit of lace in his shop. I met Mrs. Hollis accidentally; she said she was going to bespeak a new cap, so I went in with her.

Hollis was not put upon her defence.

(Mitchell called five witnesses, who gave her a very good character.)

MITCHELL Guilty of stealing to the value of 4 s. 10 d.

HOLLIS Not Guilty .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM.

[Branding. See summary.]

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

435. JOSEPH WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing eight pieces of silk and cotton, called Manchester, value 8 l. the property of William Challener , in his dwelling-house , April 6th .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM.

436. JOSEPH WILLIAMS was a second time indicted for stealing a metal watch, value 30 s. and a metal seal, value 2 d. the property of William Duncomb , June 27th .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM.

437. CHARLES EWINGTON was indicted for stealing sixty skins of parchment, value 3 l. the property of John Hughes , in his dwelling-house , April 30th .

[The prosecutor was not able to identify the parchment.]

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM.

438, 439, 440. JAMES MILLS , JOSEPH DRACOTT , and JOHN WEBBER , were indicted for that they, in the King's highway, in and upon Thomas Dickens did make an assault, putting him in corporal fear and danger of his life, and stealing from his person a stop watch, capped and jewelled with a silver case, value 6 l. and 12 s. in monies, numbered, the property of the said Thomas , May 7th .

THOMAS DICKENS sworn.

I keep Garraway's coffee-house , and I have a house at Islington. Going to Islington on the 7th of May, at near ten at night, at Mr. Allcombe's wall, as they call it, there stands a watch-box, the back of it to the road; on the other side of the watch box I saw three fellows; I did not see them till I had passed them; Mills and Dracott I can swear to be two of them; I cannot swear to Webber's face, but the clothes and hair of the other man were like his; there was a woman passed the watch box, and then they all three came up to me; two had pistols, the third a stick. As soon as the woman passed, they called to me to stop, and said, blast your eyes, if you don't deliver your money, I will blow your brains out! I did not give them the money directly, on which Dracott snapt his pistol; I bid them take away the pistol, and I would give them my money; there was a person coming up, and the biggest, which I believe to be Webber, turned round, and held out his pistol, and said, if he came a step farther, he would shoot him. Mr. Stratton coming up, they snatched my watch, and ran away; two ran down a lane, and the other, (which was Mills) ran up the town; I pursued him; he was stopped by a Mr. Hatfield, a shoe-maker; I never lost sight of him; Mr. Stratton and his brother pursued the others; in about a quarter of an hour after, I saw Dracott brought down the town; I knew him again immediately, and should know him from ten thousand.

FRANCES FOSTER sworn.

I passed Mr. Dickens that evening by the watch-box; there were three men behind the watch box; I can take my oath that the prisoner Mills was one of them; they all stood together; as soon as I had passed Mr. Dickens, they all came out upon him; I heard them say, now is the time; and then I heard them say, d - n your eyes, deliver your money! I was frightened, and went away as fast as I could; just after that, I heard a cry of stop thief! I met Mr. Hatfield, and told him to make haste, for that three men were robbing a gentleman; as Mr. Hatfield and I were together, Mills came full butt at us; Mr. Hatfield had a firkin of butter; he threw it down, and stopped him; Mr. Hatfield had a stick; Mills knocked it out of his hand. I am sure he is one of the men.

Was it a moon-light night? - Yes; a very light night.

JOHN HATFIELD sworn.

Mrs. Foster told me of this robbery as I was coming from London; I believe it wanted about a quarter of ten o'clock; she met me about fifty or and hundred yards from the place where the gentleman was robbed; I had a butter firkin on my head; I put it down; I saw Mills come running towards me; I went forwards to stop him; he struck at me; I secured him; the prosecutor came up. and said he could swear that he was one of the men that robbed him; he threw the stick away.

NELSON STRATTON sworn.

I was in a public house at Islington: A young man came in and said there were some people robbing a gentleman in the walk; I went to the door, and saw four men standing in the walk; I went towards them, and they ran off, two up Steward's-lane, and the other up the town; we pursued the two; one went up the road; the other (which is Dracott) ran into the field; I pursued Dracott up the field; I jumped over the bank after him; he went into another field; I kept sight of him; but just as I got over the gate, I all at once lost sight of him; I knew he could not be far off; I searched, and found him in a ditch; when I discovered him, he said either d - n your eyes! or blast your eyes! you are dead! and he flashed a pistol at me, but it did not go off; I then laid hold of him, and dragged him out; when Mr. Dickens saw him, he said he could swear to him.

Jury. Are you sure the man you followed was the same you took out of the ditch? - Yes; I have no doubt at all; it was a moonlight night; we delivered Dracott to Green, the constable of the night.

JOHN GREEN sworn.

I am a constable of Islington. Dracott and Mills were delivered into my custody; I searched them; upon Dracott I found this bullet-mould, and a key, and a large rope, with a knot at the end of it; upon Mills I found an old knife, and a paper, which had some gunpowder in it; I had a description of Webber as a person Dracott kept company with; and Webber also answering the description the prosecutor gave. I went to his father's and took him up on the Monday; when he was re-examined, his father delivered me the watch; when at the justice's. I found a rope, with a knot at the end of it, upon Webber.

(The goods found upon the prisoners were all produced in court, and deposed to.)

MILL's DEFENCE.

I know nothing at all about it; I had been in the country; as I was returning home, that man stopped me.

DRACOTT's DEFENCE.

I was coming from Hornsey house. Coming across the fields to London, the gentleman came after me, and called shoot him, and I got into a ditch. I have no witnesses; I was by myself.

Webber was not put upon his defence.

(Dracott called five witnesses, and Mills one, who gave them a very good character.)

MILLS GUILTY Death .

DRACOTT GUILTY Death .

WEBBER NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

441. MARY GARDINER was indicted for stealing a child's linen frock, value 3 d. a woman's linen bed gown, value 3 s. a linen bed-gown, value 3 s. a linen shift, value 8 d. and a dimitty waistcoat, value 2 d. the property of Mary Morgan , Widow , March 27th .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

442. ANN STEWART was indicted for stealing a cotton gown, value 10 s. and a linen handkerchief, value 18 d. the property of Charles Rutley , February 13th .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

443. GEORGE INGRAM was indicted for stealing 10 lb. weight of cast brass, value 5 s. the property of Thomas Parker , May 1st .

[The prosecutor was called, but not appearing, the court ordered his recognizance to be estreated.]

NOT GUILTY .

444, 445, 446. SARAH STRICKLAND , MARY ALLEN , and ANN DAY , were indicted for stealing a silver watch, value 5 l. a steel watch-chain, value 6 d. a Cornelian seal set in steel, value 1 s. a steel watch-key, value 2 d. and two brass trinkets, value 2 d. the property of Gaspar Fischer , May 31st .

GASPAR FISCHER sworn.

I am servant to a gentleman who is on his travels. I lost my watch on a Sunday night; I had been out a little way in the country; as I was coming home, I met a girl, who asked me to give her something to drink; I went with her up stairs; she asked me for sixpence for some drink, and said she must have another sixpence for the room; I gave her a shilling.

Who was that woman? - Sarah Strickland ; the other two came a little after Strickland and I were on the bed together; I desired the others to go out; they would not; they came to the bed side, after which they both ran out; I missed my watch while I was on the bed; I asked Strickland for my watch; she said she had not got it; I went down stairs to the landlady to take care of her while I went to speak to some honest people.

Were the two that ran away the other two prisoners? - Yes; when I returned, Strickland was gone; there is a man here who has my watch.

JOHN HALL sworn.

I was constable of the night; I was told by the watchman, that a man in George-alley had been robbed of his watch; I went there, and found the foreigner (the prosecutor); he said three girls had run away with his watch, and he would give any body two crowns that would find it. I went in search of the prisoners; Day delivered herself up, and wanted to be admitted an evidence; I went then to Allen's lodging, and found the watch in her shoe, under her head; she said Strickland gave it to her.

STRICKLAND's DEFENCE.

The prosecutor picked me up in Holborn , and asked me to have something to drink; I refused it at first; then he took us into a house, and treated us with some raspberry, and made us almost drunk. When he got off the bed, Mary Allen found the watch on the bed.

ALLEN's DEFENCE.

After he was gone out of the room, I picked the watch up on the bed.

DAY's DEFENCE.

I stood in the entry; Allen ran down and said she had got something; I followed her, and saw her show the watch to the woman of the house.

All Three Guilty of stealing the watch, but Not Guilty of stealing it privately from the person.

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Branding. See summary.]

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

447. SAMUEL WALLACE was indicted for stealing three iron bars, value 5 s. the property of William Wingfield , May 6th .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM.

448. ROBERT GREEN was indicted for stealing a silver tankard, value 6 l. four silver table-spoons, value 40 s. a silver teaspoon, value 2 s. a silver cream pot, value 20 s. a silver pepper-caster, value 16 s. a pair of silver tea-tongs, value 12 s. a silver punch-ladle, value 10 s. a silver snuff-box, value 4 s. three silver salt spoons, value 5 s. two cotton gowns, value 30 s. a white dimitty petticoat, value 5 s. and a black sattin cloak, value 15 s. the property of Andrew Bowers , in his dwelling-house , May 2d .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. BARON HOTHAM.

449. ANN FARMER was indicted for stealing a silver watch, value 50 s. a steel watch-chain, value 6 d. a base metal watch-key, value 1 d. and a steel seal, value 1 d. the property of John Bartram , in the dwelling-house of John Wood , May 13th .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice WILLES.

450. SAMUEL BULLOCK was indicted for stealing two linen table-cloths, value 30 s. the property of John Cornwall , Esq ; May 8th .

FRANCIS BARLOW Esq; sworn.

I live at Hendon . While I was walking in my garden with Mr. Willington, I saw two men with table-cloths under a hedge in my field, near the house of a woman who washes for Mr. Cornwall; it occurred to me that they had been taken from the washerwoman's hedge, which was in the next field; I called out to them, and asked them what they were doing with the linen; and I jumped over the pales into the field, with an intent to take them, but they separated, and one ran one way, and the other the other way, and each dropped a table-cloth; this was between eleven and twelve o'clock at noon. I am certain the prisoner was one of them; he was taken almost immediately. Mr. Cornwall's washerwoman used to hang her linen on the hedge of the field next to mine.

ROGER WILLINGTON , Esq. sworn.

I was with Mr. Barlow; I saw the two men under the hedge with two table cloths; they were not so far from us as I am from your Lordship; there were some open pales, about four feet high, which we could see over; the prisoner was one of the men; they ran away, and dropped the linen; the washerwoman's daughter took the linen up in my presence, and I took down the marks of it.

FRANCES KEMPTON sworn.

I wash for Mr. Cornwall; one of the table cloths is marked I C, No. 34, the other I C, No. 12. On the 8th of May I hung ten of Mr. Cornwall's table cloths on the hedge; I missed these two; they were picked up in Mr. Barlow's fields by my little girl.

Mr. Willington. I was present when the table cloths were picked up by the girl; these are the table cloths.

[They were produced in court, and deposed to by Frances Kempton .]

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I am entirely innocent of what is laid to my charge; I had been to see a friend at Edgware; as I was coming along I saw men running; I went to know what was the matter, and a man laid hold of me, and charged me with the robbery.

(The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.)

Guilty of stealing to the value of 10 d.

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice WILLES.

451, 452. JAMES YORKE, otherwise ROBERTS , and ROBERT SIDAWAY were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of George Deligne Gregory , Esq . on the 6th of May, about the hour of nine in the night, and stealing a steel-hilted sword, value 3 l. six pair of mens leather shoes, value 30 s. and one odd leather shoe, value 6 d. the property of the said George Deligne Gregory , and two silver tea spoons, value 5 s. and a silk handkerchief, value 1 s. the property of Mary Band , spinster , in the dwelling-house of the said George .

MARY BAND sworn.

I am servant to Mr. Gregory; I was left to take care of the house while the family were out of town. My master lives at No. 28, in Newman-street ; I came home on the 6th of May , at about eight in the evening. I found the door on the single lock; I left it double locked when I went out; when I opened it, three men rushed through the passage, out of the house, into the street. I am positive the prisoners are two of the men, though they were not both dressed as they are now; one was in a green coat, the other in a light; one of them was taken immediately, and was admitted an evidence. The things that were lost, part belonged to my master, and part to myself; the sword and the shoes were my master's; they were kept in the closet up one pair of stairs; what I lost, which were a silk handkerchief and two silver tea spoons, were kept in the back kitchen. I had used the spoons that day, and had the handkerchief about me very lately. I had seen the sword hanging up a few days before in the closet; the sword was found by a witness in the street, and the shoes were left in a bag at the bottom of the kitchen stairs.

[The sword and shoes were produced in court, and deposed to by the witness.]

BENJAMIN WOOTTON sworn.

I am a neighbour; I came to assist; the accomplice was brought back just as I came to the door. I found the shoes at the bottom of the kitchen stairs.

MARY WHITCOMB sworn.

I live with a Mr. Curry, in Newman-street; I heard about eight o'clock in the evening a cry of stop thief! I went forwards into the kitchen, and heard something fall into the area, which I found to be the sword, which has been produced.

MARY HORSLEY sworn.

On the 6th of May, while I was walking about with the children in my arms, in Newman-street, at a little distance from Mr. Gregory's house. Yorke and the accomplice passed me several times in the street; Sidaway was standing at Mr. Gregory's door; I observed them very particularly, for they walked about several minutes, and then I saw them all go into Mr. Gregory's house, and shut the door after them; they opened the door with a key, which Sidaway had in his hand, and they all went in, but I not suspecting any thing of it, and not knowing but they might have a right to open the door. I took no notice of them, but when the outcry was made, I came out and mentioned what I had seen; it was so light, I could distinguish them very plainly, and they walked about so much in the street, that I took particular notice of them.

CHARLES GRUBB sworn.

I am a constable. Upon the information of the accomplice, I went and apprehended the two prisoners three or four days after this happened. I found them in bed together at a house in King-street, Golden-square; there was not any thing found in their clothes, but two keys (producing them) which were in Sidaway's coat pocket. He said it was his coat; I tried one of the keys at Mr. Gregory's lock, and it looks and unlocks the door, just as well as the proper key.

BENJAMIN BROWN sworn.

I was sent to carry the prisoners to the justice's; a bunch of keys were dropped as they went along.

JOHN EVANS sworn.

I went to Mr. Gregory's house, and found this dark-lanthorn in the passage (producing it).

JOHN COLEMAN sworn.

I am a constable; I went with Grubb to apprehend them.

YORKE's DEFENCE.

I know nothing of the robbery.

SIDAWAY's DEFENCE.

I never saw the keys in my life, till they were produced before the justice; they got the keys somewhere on purpose to get 40 l. by us.

Both Not Guilty of breaking and entering the dwelling-house, but Guilty of stealing the goods to the value of 20 s.

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

453. RICHARD STEVENSON was indicted for stealing three live pigs, value 18 s. the property of Samuel Carr , May 18th .

JOHN KING sworn.

I am servant to Mr. Carr, at Hampstead ; my master resides chiefly in town; I had the care of the farm in May last; we had a sow with five large pigs, shut up in a stye, at Hampstead. I had not seen them from the Friday, for another person fed them, but when I came to the stye on Monday morning the 11th of May, I missed three pigs out of the five; they might be worth more than 6 s. a piece; the stye is about two furlongs from the house. Mr. Carr came to Hampstead on the 26th, and told me that he had seen his pigs; I went the next day to town, and found the pigs shut up in a back place, at the George Inn, in Long-Acre. I can swear to the three pigs; the next day I carried them to the sow.

How do you swear to the pigs? - By the marks that they had, AND THE SOW WOULD SWEAR TO THEM TOO; for when I carried them home, the sow and they perfectly well knew one another, and the pigs began to suck immediately.

THOMAS CARPMEAL sworn.

I am one of Sir John Fielding's men; I received an information against the prisoner for robbing Lord Onslow's fowl-house. I went down to the prisoner's house, at Clapton, when I came there: the prisoner had left his house; this was on the 14th of May, on Monday the 18th I saw him in Hatton-street, in a cart, selling turkeys. I laid hold of the cart and horse, and the prisoner not choosing to tell where he lived, in order to find out his dwelling-house, I let the horse take his own way with the cart, and the horse went down to the prisoner's house at Hoxton. I found his wife in the house; I knew her, and in searching, I found five pigs in the stable; his wife looked out at the window; I took the five pigs, and brought them to the George Inn, Long-Acre: these pigs were the same which were afterwards shown to King, and he swore to three of them; King described the pigs before he saw them.

For the Prisoner.

GEORGE BARRINGTON sworn.

I am a butcher; I live in Goswell-street, and deal in Smithfield-market; I have no shop. I was in Smithfield on the 15th of May, and there I saw a man cheapen six pigs; I believe the prisoner to be the same man.

What sort of pigs were they? - Prick ear ones of the Norfolk kind.

How large were they? - They might be worth seven or eight shillings a piece.

How came you to trouble yourself about these pigs? - I bid the man money before; six shillings.

Do you know whether the prisoner bought them, or no? - I cannot tell; I did not see him buy them.

What colour were the pigs? - Spotted.

All spotted? - I cannot say.

Were they all of the same size? - Yes.

You had no conversation with the prisoner at the time? - No; never in my life, other than seeing him about Smithfield-market.

Jury. How came you to appear here, since you are as you say, a stranger to the prisoner? - I heard the man was in custody.

Who told you so? - I was told by his friends.

Who came to you about it? - A man, that knew this man, came and asked if my name was not Barrington.

Court. How could they know that you could give material evidence, when you had no conversation with him at all?

Prisoner. I have known that man some time; I knew his name was Barrington, that made me enquire after him. I had enquired after several others, that knew better of it than he did, but they are not here, because it was in the news paper, that the court would not sit to day.

HENRY OLIVER sworn.

I am a coach-master, and live at the Pewter-platter, St. John's street; I have known the prisoner seven years; when I first knew him he was a farmer. I have bought many loads of hay of him; I do not know what he is now; I have not seen him above three or four times this year and half. I never heard any bad character of him.

Prisoner. I believe he saw me in the market that very day? - I saw him in Smithfield-market about two or three days before he was taken, near the Bear and Ragged-staff, by the Hog-market.

Court. What day was he taken?

Carpmeal On Monday the 18th.

Court. What had he got there?

Oliver. I did not see any thing that he had got; I saw him there, but did not speak to him.

WILLIAM HOWARD sworn.

I am a farmer; the prisoner and I went to school together; I never knew any misbehaviour of him.

Have you known him lately? - Yes; he had misfortunes, and went to live towards London; he comes to our country very much, and bears a good character.

Oliver. Mr. Howard would have known nothing about it, but he brought me a load of hay to day, and so I told him of it.

GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice WILLES.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

454. BURTON WOOD was indicted for stealing eight pair of worsted stockings, value 24 s. the property of John Berry and Joseph Howse , May 22d .

JOHN BERRY sworn.

I am in partnership with Joseph Howse . We are hatters and hosiers ; the prisoner and a woman came into our shop; the woman wanted to look at some black stockings; I showed her some; she said they were not big enough; it being almost dark; I called to my wife to bring a candle down stairs; when I returned, Wood was gone out; I immediately missed eight pair of stockings; I detained the woman, and sent my wife for a constable; and, as she returned, she saw Wood standing at the corner with a bundle of stockings under his coat.

ELIZABETH BERRY sworn.

I was called down stairs, it being dusk, to bring a candle; as I came down with the candle, I saw the prisoner going out; there was a woman looking at some goods. I was about to shut the glass door, because we could not hear what the woman said for the noise in the street. She said, do not shut the door, my husband is coming in: my husband then missed a bundle of stockings. I went to fetch a constable, and saw the prisoner, at the corner of George-yard, with the stockings under his coat; he attempted to run away; I laid hold of his coat, upon which he dropped the stockings, and a man took them up.

[They were produced in court, and deposed to by the prosecutor.]

THOMAS BUTTLER sworn.

I saw the prisoner standing at the corner of George-yard. Mrs. Berry came up, and said, you villain, you have my property! he asked what she meant by that, and attempted to run away; she laid hold of his coat, and he dropped the stockings. I pursued him, and never lost sight of him till I took him.

[The prisoner did not say any thing in his defence.]

GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

455. PETER WOODCOCK was indicted for stealing a linen handkerchief, value 10 d. the property of John Gibson , May, 6th .

JOHN GIBSON sworn.

On the 6th of May, at about nine o'clock at night, as I was going along the street, I felt something at my pocket; I turned, and saw the prisoner with my handkerchief; he put it behind him. I secured the handkerchief; he ran off, and I pursued, and took him.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I am not guilty.

GUILTY , B .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

456. JOHN BREMD was indicted for stealing 82 lb. wt. of cable rope, value 5 s. the property of Samuel Wing , May 26th .

SAMUEL WING sworn.

I am a master lighterman ; I missed the rope mentioned in the indictment; it was taken upon the prisoner who had worked for me.

LEONARD CASWELL sworn.

I saw the prisoner come a-shore with the rope; I went to stop him, and he attempted to stab me with a knife several times; I secured him.

[The rope was produced in court, and deposed to by the prosecutor.]

JOHN WILSON sworn.

I saw the prisoner cut the rope from a lighter of Mr. Wing's, and take it away.

JOHN LONDON sworn.

I was present when the prisoner was taken; I saw him attempt to stab Mr. Caswell; I helped to take him.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

They threw brickbats at me, and used me very ill. I hope you will forgive me; it is the first offence I have been guilty of.

GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Branding. See summary.]

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

457. ELIZABETH SWAN was indicted for stealing a silk bonnet, value 2 s. the property of John Butler , June 1st .

JOHN BUTLER sworn.

I am a publican on Snow-hill; the bonnet was taken from my child, which is six years old; I know nothing of it myself.

WILLIAM DAVIS sworn.

I was picking up some pieces of broken hoop, at the end of Turnagain-lane ; as I was putting them in my apron, I heard the prisoner say to the child, that she would buy her a half-pennyworth of gooseberries; she took the child's bonnet off, and put it into her apron, and ran away; I pursued her, and took her at the end of Field-lane, about two hundred yards off; I found the bonnet in her apron, and brought her back to the parent of the child; she said she found the bonnet.

[The bonnet was produced in court, and deposed to by the prosecutor.]

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I found the bonnet at the corner of Turn-again-lane; the witness stopped me; he took it from me, and bid me go about my business; I said no; I did not believe by his appearance that it belonged to him, and I should be glad to see the owner of the property; he said I should not, I should give him a shilling, and go about my business.

(The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave her a good character.)

GUILTY of stealing to the value of 6 d.

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Whipping. See summary.]

458. JOHN CARLISLE was indicted for stealing an iron key, value 1 d. and twenty-four brushes, value 6 s. the property of Peter Ashmore , May 19th .

PETER ASHMORE sworn.

I am a brush-maker ; the prisoner worked for me; I can only speak to the brushes.

[They were produced in court, and deposed to by the prosecutor.]

JAMES CLIFF sworn.

I found the key of the warehouse where the brushes are kept; the brushes are my making, and I can swear to them.

ROBERT MAYER sworn.

The prisoner is a soldier; I am serjeant of the company he belongs to; he has sold me a great number of brushes for a twelvemonth past; the brushes were taken from me.

JANE ROBERTS sworn.

I live opposite the warehouse; I saw the prisoner come out with a basket, and brushes in it.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

The brushes were my own; I made brushes, and sold them to Mr. Mayer for above a twelvemonth.

(The prisoner called a witness, who deposed, that he was of opinion, that there was nothing so particular in the work that a man could swear to. He called another witness, who gave him a good character.)

GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Branding. See summary.]

459. ANN COX was indicted for stealing a cotton frock, value 10 d. the property of Thomas Cooper , May 14th

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

460. JOHN ELWEE was indicted for stealing 14 lb. wt. of iron, value 3 s. the property of Edward Quiningham , May 18th .

EDWARD QUININGHAM sworn.

I am a smith ; the prisoner was my servant . On the 18th of May, at about four or five in the afternoon, I observed his coat hang in a place where it was liable to be burnt; I went to move it, and found it very heavy; I examined the pockets, and found my tools in it; I sent him out of the way, and asked my apprentice whose coat it was, and showed him what was in it; I laid five tools in a particular place the night before, and I missed one of them; we searched, and found it very near the coat; I bid my apprentice watch who the coat belonged to, and if he took that tool.

LEVI MOSES sworn.

I am a constable; the prosecutor sent for me, and gave me charge of the prisoner. When I came, he had the iron in his hand.

WILLIAM MOSES sworn.

I saw the prisoner put the tool into his pocket; as he was going out I stopped him, and the tools were found upon him.

Prosecutor. He pulled them out of his pocket before the constable came.

[They were produced in court, and deposed to by the prosecutor.]

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

The apprentice and another man wanted to raise money to go to a chair club, and having no other conveniency, they put these things in my pocket while I was at dinner; I knew nothing of it till four o'clock in the afternoon.

(The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.)

GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Branding. See summary.]

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

461, 462. MARY DRAPER and CATHERINE OBDAY were indicted for stealing a silver watch, value 30 s. a pair of silver shoe-buckles, value 15 s. a pair of silver knee-buckles, value 5 s. and five shillings in monies, numbered , the property of David Coleman , April 14th .

DAVID COLEMAN sworn.

I am servant to Mr. Wiggin, a china-merchant in St. Giles's. As I was going home on the 13th of April, between eleven and twelve, Mary Draper picked me up in Newtoner's-lane ; she took me into a house where she used to lodge; she took me up one pair of stairs; I went to bed; I laid my cloaths on a chest in the room; just after I got into bed, I saw her go to my waistcoat pocket, and take the money out, and then she ran out of doors; there was some silver and halfpence, but I don't know how much; there was no one else in the room at that time; I got up and bolted the door, that she should not come in any more, and put the candle out, and went to bed; I thought to remain there all night, as it was so late.

Court. When you had seen a woman rob you in the room, you put out the candle, and went to bed, and slept very comfortably? - I did. Between one and two in the morning I was waked by the landlady of the house coming up with a candle, and the door was broke open, which I had fastened; she asked me if I was not robbed? I then searched, and missed all the things mentioned in the indictment (repeating them).

Had you been drinking over night? - I had; but I was not so drunk but that I knew what passed: the man Draper keeps company with, and the other prisoner, were upon the landing place of the stairs when I went in.

[ William Patmore , a pawnbroker, produced the watch, which he deposed he received of Draper.]

[The prisoners were not put on their defence.]

BOTH NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second London Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM.

463, 464, 465, 466. ELISABETH HAY , ELEANOR MURPHY , FRANCES UTHERLEY , and HANNAH REEVES , were indicted for stealing a silver watch, value 40 s. a pair of silver shoe-buckles, value 10 s. a pair of silver knee-buckles, value 5 s. and a silver stock-buckle, value 18 d. the property of Daniel Murphy , June 1st .

[The prosecutor and his witness were called, but not appearing, the court ordered their recognizances to be estreated.]

ALL FOUR NOT GUILTY .

467, 468. MARY HUGHES and SARAH EDGERS were indicted for stealing a silver watch, value 20 s. a base metal watch-key, value 1 d. a half guinea and 2 s. in monies numbered , the property of John Wright , May 16th .

JOHN WRIGHT sworn.

I am a farmer's man at Plaistow: I was in town on the 16th of May: at about nine in the evening I was going to my master's house; I was rather flush in liquor; Edgers met me, and picked me up; she took me to her room; Hughes came in afterwards; Edgers and I went to bed together; she got up, and I asked Hughes to come to bed to me, which she did; I lost my watch between that and two o'clock; I saw it after Edgers left me.

How can you be sure you had your watch after Edgers left you? Did you go to bed in your breeches? - No; they lay under my head.

As soon as you got up from Edgers, you went to bed to Hughes? - No; she came to bed to me.

Did you give her any thing? - Yes; a shilling.

What did you give Edgers? - Four shillings. I was asleep when Hughes went away; when I waked, I missed my watch, and half a guinea, and two shillings.

Did you find your watch again? - Yes, the next week. Hughes came again, and pulling off one of my stockings waked me.

Did you go to bed in your stockings? - Yes.

What was she going to steal your stockings? - Yes; I went to snatch at my stocking, and she snatched my breeches from under my head, and went to the other end of the room and dropped them; the half guinea and two shillings were in my stocking; they had pulled that stocking off before I waked, and were pulling the other off.

JOSEPH LEVY , sworn.

On the 16th of May, I saw the two prisoners get out of a coach in Whitechapel; Edgers went down Petticoat-lane to a house that I knew was the house of a receiver of stolen goods; as she was going in, I asked her if she had any thing to sell? She said, what was that to me? I had no money to buy; I said, I had money enough; I took her into a public house, and she showed me the watch; I told her I must stop her and the watch too; she said it was her husband's watch; that he was out of bread; she said his name was John Roxton , and she would fetch him; I went to see for the other; she was gone; Edgers went to fetch her husband; I went to enquire after her where she said she lived, but could not find her. They were both taken the same afternoon.

MARGARET GARDINER sworn.

I was with the prosecutor along with Edgers and Hughes; he gave me a shilling, and afterwards a sixpence, which I gave to Edgers.

Was you in bed with him too? - Yes.

Were you both in bed together? - No; one after another. I gave the eighteenpence to Edgers, because I thought I had a right to a share of the four shillings as well as the eighteenpence; Mary Hughes and Sarah Edgers sat on the side of the bed; Hughes took the watch and gave it to Edgers; when I asked for any thing out of the five shillings and sixpence, she gave me but five farthings. He was indeed asleep when the watch was taken away.

So Sarah Edgers would not divide the four shillings with you? - I had but five farthings.

How came you to turn evidence? - I had only five farthings, and that they gave me for thread to mend my gown, which they had torn.

WILLIAM PARKER sworn.

I am an headborough belonging to Justice Welch's office. At the corner of Hog-lane I was spoke to by a woman, who said this girl and some others had robbed a countryman of some money; he said he had lost a watch, and that this was one of the girls, and gave me charge of her; I took her to a public house; (this was about four in the afternoon) I said, do you know any thing of the matter? She said, Sarah Edgers was one; I don't know any more than that.

HUGHES's DEFENCE.

I never was in the room with this man at all; I never handled his breeches, nor saw the watch, till I saw it at the justice's.

EDGERS's DEFENCE.

They swear so hard, and are so rigid, they will swear black is white, so that it is of no use to say any thing. The prosecutor and the evidence said they would hang us if they could.

BOTH GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice WILLES.

[Branding. See summary.]

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

469. MARY JONES was indicted for stealing a silver watch, value 40 s. a steel watch-chain, value 6 d. a silver seal, value 2 s. a steel watch-key, value 2 d. a steel watch-hook, value 1 d. and a base metal watch-key, value 2 d. the property of Richard Hayward , privately from his person , May 13th .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

470. JOSEPH ISAACS was indicted for that he, in the king's highway, in and upon George Strahan , Clerk , did make an assault, putting him in corporal fear and danger of his life, and stealing from his person a metal watch, value 40 s. a pair of silver shoe-buckles, value 10 s. four guineas and four shillings in monies, numbered, the property of the said George , May 17th .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

471. JAMES BANKS was indicted for stealing a silk handkerchief, value 10 d. the property of Thomas Hardy , May 26th .

[The prosecutor was called, but not appearing, the court ordered his recognizance to be estreated.]

NOT GUILTY .

472. CAROLINA MARIA QUEENLAND was indicted for stealing sixteen linen table cloths, value 8 l. three pair of linen sheets, value 30 s. and three linen napkins, value 3 s. the property of Theodore Henry Broadhead , Esq. in his dwelling house , April 24th .

THEODORE HENRY BROADHEAD ,

Esq . sworn.

The prisoner was my servant ; she had the care of the linen and furniture in my town-house; she left my service in April last.

Was there any complaint made of a deficiency in the linen? - There was, about two hours after she was gone.

THOMAS LYONS sworn.

I was one of the persons employed to take the prisoner; I apprehended her at the office door in Litchfield-street; I searched her in the office, and found a pocket-book upon her, with duplicates in it (producing them).

ROBERT ARTZ sworn.

I am servant to Mr. Humphry's, a pawnbroker, in West-street, Seven-Dials; the prisoner pawned the several things mentioned in the indictment with me, in the name of Montgomery; she said she was a house-keeper in Brook-street, Soho; the whole were pawned for 13 l. 12 s. they were pawned at different times, two table cloths together, for a guinea.

[They were produced in court.]

MARY HARDY sworn.

I am laundry maid, at Mr. Broadhead's; I can swear to every one of these articles produced.

To Robert Artz . What name; had she done business with you in? - In the name of Montgomery. People seldom choose to give in their real name that deal with us, and by her appearance, I took her to be a person of property.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

There are a pair of fine sheets there that do not belong to Mr. Broadhead; there is a Bon them, but the owner's name was Blake.

Mr. Broadhead: When she left my service; she gave up two keys, but not the key of the linen.

Court to Artz. She pawned these things at several times? - Yes; some, two years and a quarter ago.

Did she ever take any out of pawn again? - Yes, frequently.

(The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave her a good character.]

Prisoner. My master himself knows I had not given up the keys; I did not pawn them with a view to wrong my master. My master told me in Clerkenwell prison, if I would own it, he would forgive me.

Mr. Broadhead. I called on her in Clerkenwell prison, as I had bills coming in every day, that I had given her the money to discharge; I went to ask her, if she would tell me what bills were out-standing against me; I said nothing as to the linen.

Court to the prosecutor. Was there any wages due to her? - Only thirty-five shillings when she left me.

GUILTY of stealing to the value of 39 s. Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM.

[Branding. See summary.]

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

473. CHARLES YEATON was indicted for the wilful murder of Judith Roquez on the 5th of May , by throwing a piece of brick, to, at, and against the said Judith, and thereby giving the said Judith in, and upon her head, near her left ear, a mortal contusion, of which she languished until the 8th of the same month, and then died .

(He was charged on the Coroner's Inquisition, with feloniously killing and slaying the said Judith.)

THOMAS STEWARD sworn.

How old are you? - Fourteen.

Do you know the nature of an oath? - Yes.

Did you know Judith Roquez ? - Yes; she was about six years old; the prisoner threw a stone at her in the street where we were at play.

Was the girl at play with you? - No; she was standing upon the bench to see us play; Yeaton was standing amongst us all.

Who did he throw the stone at? - I cannot tell who he threw it at in particular; we were all playing at kicking one another's hats about; the stone hit her, and knocked her off the bench; she fell between two of the benches.

What street was this in? - Facing Thomas's-street.

Did you see her fall? - Yes; I saw her tumble off the bench; she was taken up, and carried into her own house.

Did Charles Yeaton know that he had hit her? - Yes.

What sort of a stone was it? - It was a piece of brick.

You had not quarrelled amongst yourselves, had you? - I do not know, that we had; I asked him to let me play; he said I should not play.

[Mr. John Gilson , the surgeon deposed, that the contusion on the left side of the child's head was the occasion of its death the next day.]

Not Guilty of Murder, but Guilty of Manslaughter , B . and IMP .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM.

474. THOMAS HILL was indicted for the wilful murder of Uriah Jordan , jun. on May 15th , by driving the near wheel of a certain two wheel cart upon, and over the head of, the said Uriah, and by means whereof the skull of the said Uriah was mortally fractured, of which he instantly died .

[He was charged on the Coroner's Inquisition with the like murder.]

ROBERT DAVIS sworn.

I keep a public-house; I saw the prisoner driving a cart on the 15th of May; he was against the shaft horse; he was coming out of Drury-lane into the Coal-yard ; I turned my head, and saw a child lying upon its belly on the pavement, playing with his finger; the child's body was on the footpath; its head was over the kirb stones, playing with his finger.

Was the prisoner on the side next the foot-path, or the other side? - He was on the foot-path; I suppose the child was thirteen or fourteen months old.

How near was the fore horse of the cart to the child when you first saw the child? - The fore horse was beyond the child's head before I saw it; he was driving very gently.

Do you think he saw the child's head? - I stood on the steps of my door; I cried out for God sake! take care of the child's head! take care of the child's head! I jumped down, and took hold of the middle horse; he cried wo! wo! but before I could stop the middle horse, the near wheel went over the childs head, and crushed its brains out; it died instantly; it never moved; the prisoner was walking on the foot-path; the cart way is narrow; there is bare room for the carriage to pass.

Was not the parent, nor nurse, nor no one near this child? - I did not see any one; it is a narrow place; there is not room for two carriages to pass one another.

JAMES COLNEY sworn.

I am a coach wheelwright; this coal-yard runs parellel with Holborn, and comes into Drury-lane. I saw this child crawling in the foot-path; its head was off the kirb stone; I followed the cart all the way from Short's Gardens; the prisoner was coming along the foot-path, on the same side where the child was lying.

Do you think he saw the child? - He must see the child, when he was going past it.

Jury. Did he step over the child? - No; he walked by.

How do you know he saw it? - He went by the child; I screamed out before the wheel touched the child; I saw the child for the space of half a minute before the wheel went over it; I screamed out just as the wheel was going over the child, and then it was not in the prisoner's power to stop it.

Did you hear the prisoner cry out wo? - No.

Was there any body by to take care of the child? - No.

Was that part of the street narrow where the cart went? - Yes.

Court. What is the father of the deceased?

The Father. I am a bed joiner; I have five children; my wife was washing.

How far is your house from where the child lay? - A yard and half.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I was coming by with my horses quietly and soberly; I never saw the child till the gentleman said stop, stop; as soon as he said that, I stopped the horses, but the wheel was gone over the child.

For the Prisoner.

JOHN BESTON sworn.

I was going on an errand; I saw the child lying in the path-way; I picked it up, and gave it to the mother, and bid her take care of it; that was about ten minutes before this happened this was about four o'clock; she called me a good boy, and thanked me for it.

How do you know that this was the child that was killed afterwards? - I saw it after it was killed.

Did you observe whether the woman took the child into the house? - I tried to let the child up; it could not stand, so I let it upon the steps of the door.

JOHN WATTS sworn.

I saw the cart upon the child.

Did you see it before the cart was upon it? - I did not; the cart killed it.

Did you hear the man cry wo! or endeavour to stop his horses? - No; I was his fellow-servant; I have known him from a child; he is a very honest, harmless man; he is married, and has got one child living.

Do you think he would do this on purpose? - No; if a worm lay in his way, he would not tread upon it, if he saw it.

WILLIAM PHILLIPS sworn.

I saw the child after it was dead; I did not see it killed.

EDWARD RHODES sworn.

Thomas Hill has lived as a servant with me four years. He is a sober man, and good-tempered; I don't think he would run his cart over a child wilfully; he was a careful driver; I don't think he saw the child.

Not Guilty of Murder, but Guilty of Manslaughter only .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice WILLES.

475, 476. RICHARD SHARPLIN and THOMAS RICE were indicted for stealing a pound weight of Indigo, value 12 s. a powder-horn, mounted with brass, value 1 s. and a leather pocket-book, value 6 d. the property of Lewis Berger , May 13th .

LEWIS BERGER sworn.

I am a colour-maker in Carnaby Market . On the 13th of May I lost a pound weight, and upwards, of Indigo out of my compting-house; I lost also a powder-horn and a pocketbook; the powder-horn was my servant's property; I had seen the Indigo in the desk the day before it was found; on the 14th I saw it at the justice's.

[The Indigo; powder-horn, and pocket-book, were produced in court by the constable Levi.]

Prosecutor. The Indigo is ground in a particular manner; I believe it to be mine; the pocket-book has some memorandums in it of my own making.

JOSEPH LEVI sworn.

On the 13th of May I had an information of three young men being seen to go to a house in Wimpole-street, Whitechapel, with a bundle. I went to the house at about eleven o'clock at night; I went up stairs, and found in a room (of which I forced the door open) the two prisoners, and an accomplice, and two women; I found them in the act of burning some papers.

Prosecutor. Some of the papers that are partly burnt, are my bills of parcels, and other memorandums.

Levi. I found them burning these papers, and I found all these other things in the room with them.

[The prosecutor's clerk deposed to the powder-horn.]

JOHN MUTTON sworn.

The prisoners and I had been playing together the night before at skittles; we had played some time, and drank some beer; Sharplin said he must get some money, and knew where to get a good deal, if Rice would go with him; he said he would get some out of his master's desk, (for he had formerly worked for Mr. Berger); we went to his master's place, and found the door open, but he did not choose to make the attempt that night, but said he would do it the next night.

Prosecutor. The door is open, because I have some men at work all night.

Mutton. The next day I met the two prisoners at a public house; then we went to Mr. Berger's house; he went in, and came out again in about five minutes; and then he gave me something in some brown paper, which I hid under some steps at a little distance; then Sharplin returned again into the house, Rice holding the door open for him; he stayed there some time; then he brought out the powder-horn and Indigo; he went in a third time, Rice still holding the door open; then he brought out several other things, and we all went away together; when we got part of the way over the fields, Sharplin wanted to go back to fetch some great coats, which were hanging up, which he had forgot, but we did not care to return; then Sharplin carried us to this house; when we got up stairs, we found two young women; we are some radishes; then we looked over the papers, but as Rice and I could not read, Sharplin undertook to see if they were of any consequence, and as they were of no consequence, he began to burn them, and while we were burning them, about three quarters of an hour after we got home, the constable came and took us.

(Sharplin called Mary Allum , with whom he lodged, who said she had known him five or six years, and never heard any harm of him.)

BOTH GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

477. MARGARET, the wife of JOHN PEARCE , was indicted for feloniously taking, with intent to steal, embezzle, and purloin, a pair of linen sheets, value 3 s. a copper, tea-kettle, value 3 s. a copper boiling pot, value 18 d. a checque widow curtain, value 3 s. two case-knives, value 6 d. and two forks, value 3 d. the property of William Norton , being in a lodging-room, lett by the said William to the said Margaret , May 30th .

SARAH NORTON sworn.

I lett a lodging to the prisoner and her husband; they lodged with me five weeks. Upon the 30th of May I had some reason to think every thing was not right. The man paid two shilling and threepence per week for the lodging, which was one room, ready furnished; I went up stairs; I asked for the sheets; turning up the bed, I found there were no sheets upon it; the prisoner said she had given them to wash; I said, if so, you have a pair of clean sheets in lieu of them, for it is my custom for my washerwoman to give a clean pair in lieu of dirty ones; at the same time she owned she had pawned them; then I looked about, and missed the rest of the things; I did not make her any promise; she owned she had pawned them all. I have got none of my things again, but the copper pot.

MARY SHERWOOD sworn.

The prisoner confessed before the justice that she had taken all the things and pledged them.

Sarah Norton . The pawnbroker is not here; he said he would not come; I got a subpoena, but have not had time to serve him with it *.

* The court sent on order to the pawnbroker immediately to deliver to the prosecutrix her goods, pain of being indicted for receiving the said goods, well knowing them to have been stolen.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I said I would redeem them, if she would give me a week; she would not; I pawned them because I wanted bread.

GUILTY . B .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice WILLES.

478, 479, 480. WILLIAM TYLER , GEORGE ROOK , and LYDIA HARDY , were indicted, the two first for stealing seven linen shifts, value 7 s. two callico petticoats, value 2 s. a pair of fustian pockets, value 1 s. four linen aprons, value 4 s. three muslin aprons, value 3 s. a pair of ticking pockets, value 3 d. seven pair of cotton stockings, value 7 s. three pair of thread stockings, value 3 s. a pair of stays, pair value 8 s. a sattin cloak, value 5 s. a camblet gown, value 5 s. two linen handkerchiefs, value 2 s. two silk and cotton handkerchiefs, value 2 s. three pair of linen shift sleeves, value 2 s. two pair of muslin ruffles, value 2 s. a pair of linen ruffles, value 1 s. seven pieces of linen cloth, value 1 s. two pieces of cotton, value 6 d. a tin cannister, value 6 d. a quarter of a pound weight of Bohea tea, value 1 s. and a pair of Bristol stone sleeve-buttons, set in silver, value 7 s. the property of Sarah Myers , spinster ; and a cloth surtout coat, value 20 s. the property of John Dabney , in the dwelling of Richard Angell , May 25th . - and the other, for feloniously receiving the above goods, well knowing them to have been stolen .

JOHN DABNEY sworn.

I live at Mr. Angell's, in Great Earl-street ; I lost a surtout coat out of the garret; I saw it there last Monday was a week, at six o'clock in the morning, when I went out to work; I came back between seven and eight at night; when I came back, I found the coat was missing; I saw it at the office last Friday.

[The coat was produced by Dennis M'Donald , and deposed to by Dabney.]

DENNIS M'DONALD sworn.

I found this great coat in a room in Castle-street, in which were these two prisoners and another, who escaped. Martin, my brother officer, and I, had intelligence of these people; one of them I suspected very much; we went there directly; Hyde, the other constable, went into the room first, and as soon as he entered, Rooke rose up, and the person who has escaped, knocked me down, and they forced their way out of the room; Tyler took up a shovel, and said he would knock us down; with that he struggled with Hyde, but got out of the window; Rooke was taken immediately, for I never quitted him; Tyler was directly pursued into the yard, and taken; I found in the room a great coat and two bundles of linen, a chissel, two dark-lanterns, and some pick-lock keys; this was about four or five o'clock, on the 25th of May.

[The linen was produced in court, and deposed to by Sarah Myers .]

[ James Hyde , the other constable, confirmed the testimony of M'Donald, and said he found a picklock-key on Tyler, which was likewise produced.]

SARAH MYERS sworn.

I had a great at Mr. Angell's; I had seen my things that day between one and two; they were stole that very afternoon, very soon after I had locked the door; I went afterwards to a taylor's wife, who wanted to get something out of it; they are my property; they are worth 20 s.

SAMPSON FENTON sworn.

I was just by the next door; I saw through a hole two men and another man there half an hour before they were taken, looking over several goods, particularly some stockings and other things; I desired another man to tell my master, who fetched the constables.

TYLER's DEFENCE.

I have a witness to prove where I was all that day. At about four o'clock I met a man with a bundle under his arm; he asked me to buy a pair of stockings, or something, and took me up into this room; there I saw them looking at these things; he first said they were shirts, and wanted me to buy them; I said, if they would suit me, I would; when I came to look at them, I said I would have nothing to do with them, and then these people came in; I never got up at all, though they said I got up and took the poker. The reason why I went to the window, was, I had a writ out against me; the other man came right up into the room.

ROOK's DEFENCE.

This woman washes for me, and the shirt I had hung at the fire when these men came into the room, this woman told me, if I would come up in the afternoon, that she would wash it, and get it done for me against Monday evening; when I went up, I saw a tall man and these men in the room; I set myself down by the chest of drawers, and I had not been in two minutes before these men came; that man was by the fire side; he took up a poker, and began to beat this young man as he was half out of the window; I said, don't hurt the young man; then he hit me on the head with the poker, and cut my head; I went to get out of the room, and the man that stands here knocked me all down stairs, and after I fell down, he came down after me, and beat me with the poker.

For the prisoner:

RICHARD GARDINER sworn.

I am a buckle-maker; William Tyler worked for me four months.

Do you know were he was on the 25th of May? - He was at the Wind-Mill over Black Friar's bridge; I was there with him from ten in the morning, the best part of the day; we staid till between three and four o'clock.

What were you doing there all that time? - Playing at skittles.

Was he your servant then? - Yes.

Did you pay him for that day's work? - Yes, I did.

You both of you drank a little, I suppose? - Yes; we both went away together to the Mercer's Arms in Mercer-street; we got there at about six at night.

When did you leave Mercer-street? - At about ten o'clock; I had nothing to do that day.

How many other servants do you keep? - Never another.

How long have you kept him? - Four months.

What day of the month was this? - It was last Monday was se'nnight.

What day of the month was it? - The 18th.

You said just now that it was the 25th that you was at the Wind-Mill? - I believe now it was the 25th.

One of the witnesses. The prisoner, Tyler, was never out of custody from four o'clock till he was committed to gaol, which was at half an hour after eight.

BENJAMIN MONTAGUE sworn.

Tyler worked for me eight or nine years as a silver-caster, in the silver-smith way; he left me about a year and a half age; I found him always an honest man to me. I know nothing of his chara cter since he left me.

THOMAS EATON sworn.

I have known him about a year and a half; he came to work with the master I worked with; he always behaved very well; I have left my master about two months.

What business was your master? - silver buckle maker.

- WALKER sworn.

I have known him a year and a half; he is an honest, just man; from all that ever I saw of him.

- HUMPHREYS sworn.

I have known him five or six years; I have not known him since he left my service.

- SMITH sworn.

I have known him upwards of seven years; he bears a very good character.

WILLIAM YATES sworn.

I have known him seven or eight years; I never know any harm of him before this.

( Lydia Hardy was not put upon her defence.)

The Justice of the Peace, before whom the prisoners were examined, being present, said that he committed them at eight o'clock. One of the jury said he saw them in custody at four o'clock.

TYLER and ROOK both Guilty of stealing to the value of 20 s.

LYDIA HARDY Not Guilty .

[The court committed Richard Gardiner to take his trial for perjury.]

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

481, 482, 483. RICHARD MOULDS , ANNE LAVENDER , and SARAH WOOD , were indicted, the first for stealing three linen table cloths, value 20 s. three linen shirts, value 18 s. two shifts, value 6 s. six pair of cotton stockings, value 5 s. a linen handkerchief, value 1 s. two woollen aprons, value 2 s. three check aprons value 3 s. two linen sheets, value 12 s. three linen pocket aprons, value 6 d. a damask napkin, value 2 s. three linen towels, value 1 s. two muslin neckcloths, value 2 s. and a pair of linen sleeves, value 6 d. the property of Henry Smith in his dwelling-house ; and the other two for receiving three linen pocket aprons, a linen table cloth, three linen towels, two linen aprons, and a check apron, parcel of the above goods, well-knowing them to have been stolen against the stature, &c. May 22d .

ALL THREE NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice WILLES.

484. EMANUEL MOSES was indicted for stealing a pair of silk cuffs for a gown, value 1 s. the property of John Davis , May 28th .

JOHN DAVIS . sworn.

On the 28th of May, coming over London bridge , I stopped to look through the bannisters; I felt my pocket shake; I put my hand into my pocket, and missed a pair of silk cuffs of a gown; I turned about, and saw a man going quick off; I came up to him, and said he had picked my pocket; he had the cuffs in his hand; he said, I found them, if they are yours, here they are.

[The cuffs were produced by the constable, and deposed to by the prosecutor.]

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

Coming over the bridge, I found the cuffs; the prosecutor came up to me; I told him, if they were his, he should have them; he said he could not say that I had picked them out of his pocket.

GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Whipping. See summary.]

485. LUCY WRIGHT was indicted for stealing a guinea, and 6 s. 6 d. in monies, numbered , the property of George Newland , May 25th .

GEORGE NEWLAND sworn.

As I was coming along Ivy-lane , on the 25th of May, after twelve at night; I met the prisoner; she took hold of my arm, and asked me to give her a glass of wine; I told her I would not; she asked me to go to her lodgings; I told her I would not; she then laid hold of me round the neck, and pulled me down, and said, will not you give me a kiss? I immediately felt her hand come out of pocket; I charged her with having picked my pocket; she desired it, and said she had not touched my pocket; I called the watchman, who was going his rounds, and had her secured; I had a remarkable halfpenny, and 6 s. in my pocket, that halfpenny was found upon her.

[The constable produced the halfpenny, which was deposed to by the prosecutor.]

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I was going down Cheapside; the gentleman asked me to drink a glass of wine, going down the passage, he put something into my hand to buy a pair of gloves, and said, if I would go to his lodging, he would treat me better; and, because I would not go, he called the watchman, and said I had robbed him of 6 s. and a remarkable halfpenny; I can bring you three or four halfpence the same as that; I did not take any thing from him; the watchman took my silver, and gave it to that gentleman.

Prosecutor. The whole of what she says is false.

GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Branding. See summary.]

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

486. WILLIAM AKERMAN , was indicted for stealing four quartern loaves of wheaten bread, value 2 s. the property of Thomas Rogers , May 20th .

THOMAS ROGERS sworn.

I am a baker ; I can only speak to the property.

JAMES JOHN sworn.

I am servant to the prosecutor; I went out with bread on the 28th of May; I set my basket down at Banyer's-alley , and went to deliver a threepenny loaf; when I returned, I missed four loaves; I saw the prisoner run from the basket with a bag on his shoulder; I went after him, and secured him; I found four loaves in his bag, which I am positive are the four I lost out of my basket; the bread was particularly hard baked that day.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I found this bag with the bread on the the pavement; I was going home with it; I did not know whose it was; the baker came and stopped me; I told him, if it was his, he was welcome to it; he asked me, if I had any money; I told him no, only 6 d. he said you have a watch, if you will give me that, you may go about your business.

John. He offered me his watch, and my master three guineas to let him go.

(The prisoner called a witness to prove that John offered to clear him for a guinea.)

John. I offered to clear him, if he would clear my master of his recognizance.

(The prisoner called another witness, who gave him a very good character.)

Guilty of stealing to the value of 10 d.

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Whipping. See summary.]

487, 488. WILLIAM BLAKE and MARY PEARCE were indicted for stealing nineteen reams and eighteen quires of writing-paper, value 10 l. the property of Henry Baldwin , May 30th .

WILLIAM WEED sworn.

I am clerk to Mr. Baldwin; we lost nineteen reams and eighteen quires of writing-paper; the prisoner, Mary Black, came to Mr. Baldwin's on Friday morning, and asked to speak to Mr. Baldwin, and said that the other prisoner had stole several quantities of paper from Mr. Baldwin; once in particular, that he stole a quantity, and carried it to a chandler's shop in Holborn; we went to Mr. Kettle's, and found twelve quires of the paper.

Were there any promises made to Mary Pearce to induce her to make this confession? - No; it was voluntary.

SAMUEL SELFE sworn.

I am overseer to Mr. Baldwin.

Do you know any thing of the prisoners? - Yes; I know them both; one was an apprentice in the house; but I knew nothing of the woman till she brought the information. I went with the clerk to Pearce's lodgings to see about the paper; she said, though she was concerned with him, he was so great a villain she would do any thing she could to get rid of him. I went and found the paper at Mr. Kettle's; then I went in search of Blake. As soon as Blake found the woman had betrayed him, he told me the woman was equally concerned with him; that she was as guilty as he was; that she went with him, knowing he was going to rob his master. I promised him nothing. After he was fully committed, he confessed twice to me that he took the paper.

- KETTLE sworn.

I keep a chandler's-shop in Union Court, Holborn: Blake sold me twelve quires of paper; this is the whole of it (producing it) he brought a quire first, and asked me if I would buy any of that paper; I looked at it; it was a damaged quire. I asked him if he had any more; he said he had, and brought the rest; he asked me three shillings, I gave him half a crown.

Mr. Selfe. I have compared the paper with that which is at home; it exactly corresponds both as to size and marks. I have no doubt of its being Mr. Baldwin's property. The paper was made for a particular piece of work - Johnson's Poets. Upon the woman's information we examined and missed the paper.

Question from Blake. Ask Mr. Selfe if ever I was near the house since I was out of my time, which was two years ago? - Yes, my Lord, and he knows I have frequently bid him go out.

BLAKE's DEFENCE.

A young fellow, one Clews, brought this paper to me; he is a barber; he said he was going to Bath, and bid me make the best of it. I sold it to that man.

(Pearce was not put on her defence.)

BLAKE GUILTY .

PEARCE NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

489. ROSE BLANCH FLOWER was indicted for stealing six pair of worsted stockings, value 2 s. the property of William Alcock , May 9th .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

490. JOHN HAMMOND was indicted for stealing twenty-eight yards of printed cotton, value 3 l. 10 s. the property of William Reeve , May 2 d .

WILLIAM REEVE sworn.

I am a linendraper in Bucklersbury ; I lost twenty-eight yards of printed cotton; the prisoner was detected with it by Prothreo.

DAVID PROTHERO sworn.

On the 2d of May I saw the prisoner in Barbican, with a bundle under his arm; I followed him into Aldersgate-street, and stopped him; he said he found it under a cart in Aldersgate-street; it had rained that morning; I examined it, it was not dirty; I opened it, and finding it damp, I said I thought it had been stole out of a cart or waggon coming from some callico printers; I showed it to a draper in Bridge's-street, who knew the mark, and the prosecutor was sent for.

[It was produced in court, and deposed to by the prosecutor.]

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I found it; it had rained that night, and was damp.

(The prisoner called six witnesses, who gave him a good character.)

GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Branding. See summary.]

491. ELISABETH IRELAND was indicted for stealing nine pieces of silk ribband, containing one hundred yards, value 40 s. and four pieces of gauze ribband, containing thirty yards, value 10 s. the property of William Poole , May 14th .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

492. JOHN CHAMBERLAYNE was indicted for stealing a pig's head, value 18 d. the property of David Carter , April 25th .

DAVID CARTER sworn.

I am a butcher in Fleet-market . On the 25th of April I lost a pig's head from the corner of my stall; I did not know that it had been taken till it was brought back again.

WILLIAM PAYNE sworn.

I saw the prisoner and another man together; suspecting them, I watched them; I saw them both go up to a butcher's stall, and I saw the prisoner take the pig's head; the other ran away upon seeing me; when the prisoner came near me, I took him by the collar, and he dropped the pig's head; I took up the pig's head with one hand, and secured him with the other, and took both heads to the stall where the butcher's wife was.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I was coming by with my brother, Mr. Payne swore I took up that pig's head, and stole it. I know nothing of it.

GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

[Whipping. See summary.]

493, 494. JOHN STAINES and BENJAMIN WHITE were indicted for stealing two hundred pounds weight of lead, value 20 s. the property of George Field , affixed to a building of the said George, and a metal bell, value 3 s. the property of the said George, affixed in a certain yard , May 11th .

BOTH NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

495, 496. JOHN ROGERS and JOHN NEAL were indicted for stealing a pair of silk stockings, value 2 s. four pair of worsted stockings, value 4 s. 6 d. a muslin neckcloth, value 1 s. a linen handkerchief, value 3 d. a muslin handkerchief, value 18 d. a cotton handkerchief, value 18 d. and four cheque aprons, value 4 s. the property of Janett Robinson , widow , May 8th .

JANETT ROBINSON sworn.

I live in Virginia-street ; I lost the things mentioned in the indictment (repeating them); most of them were taken out of my yard, and the rest out of my wash-house, in the night between the 8th and 9th. I was called out of bed about one o'clock by the person that detected them, and took the things upon them.

FRANCIS AMOS sworn.

I was coming down Virginia-street with William Shields ; we met the prisoners with two bundles; we secured them, and took them to the watch-house, and in the morning before the justice. When we secured them, we asked them where they got the bundles; they said at No. 4, Virginia-street; we went and informed the people.

WILLIAM SHIELDS sworn.

I was with the last witness when the prisoners were stopped; he took one bundle, and I took the other; they told us where they took them from; we went and alarmed the people, and they got up and went backwards, and found the things missing.

[They were produced in court, and deposed to by the prosecutrix.]

ROGERS's DEFENCE.

Coming along, we found the things against the wall.

NEAL's DEFENCE.

I had been at work on board a ship, and as we were coming along, we found the things; these men stopped us, and we told them where we found them.

BOTH GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Branding. See summary.]

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

497. ROBERT LYON was indicted for stealing a pair of pistols, value 40 s. the property of Robert Brannand , May 23d .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

498. JOHN WARD was indicted for stealing two sheep skins, value 2 s. the property of Morgan Austin , April 21st .

[The prosecutor was called, but not appearing, the court ordered his recognizance to be estreated.]

NOT GUILTY .

499. EDWARD PRICE was indicted for stealing a copper, value 20 s. another copper, value 5 s. four brass locks, value 4 s. and four iron keys, value 4 d. the property of Robert Palser , May 23d .

ROBERT PALSER sworn.

I am an assignee , and in possession of an house that belonged to a bankrupt at Hammersmith ; I lost a copper out of it on the 23d of May, between eight and nine at night.

GEORGE HUTCHINS sworn.

On Saturday the 23d of May, at about four in the morning, I met the prisoner in Kensington town; he had a copper; I stopped him, and secured the copper; I took it to Sir John Fielding 's, and then to Mr. Palser's dwelling-house. The prisoner said he brought it from Hammersmith.

THOMAS BURGESS , who was with the last witness, confirmed his testimony.

WILLIAM TALBOYS sworn.

I took the copper from the house of Mr. Palser, and carried it to the house it was supposed to be stole from, and it fitted the place exactly.

ELIZABETH ADAMS sworn.

I have had the care of the house a great while; I saw the copper when it was brought back; it fitted the place exactly; I believe it to be the copper belonging to that house.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I met a man on the road, who employed me to carry the copper to town.

Jury to Burges. Where did the prisoner say he got the copper? - He said he bought it of a brazier at Hammersmith, but he did not know his name.

GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

500. ROBERT HARROLD, otherwise HUTTON, otherwise SUTTON, otherwise JACKSON , was indicted for that he, in a certain field and open place, near the king's highway, in and upon George Hadley did make an assault, putting him in corporal fear and danger of his life, and stealing from his person, and against his will, half a guinea and four shillings, in monies, numbered, the property of the said George , January 30th .

GEORGE HADLEY sworn.

Do you know the prisoner? - Yes.

Where did you first see him? - At the first lamp just by Charlton house ; it was after tea time; I had been to Mr. Millan's to buy a book; he sent me to Mr. Dodsley's, as the only place to get it at; it was rather after seven; I drank tea rather late that evening; I cannot tell the day of the month; it was about the latter end of January; he joined me upon the left; he pulled off his hat, and accosted me in the most supplicant manner; he asked to speak to me; I said, what do you want? in the mean time, we had insensibly declined down to the left; I looked hard in his face to see if I could recollect him; I thought at first that he might be some old soldier in India that might recognize me, and want to ask me charity; at last I declined to the left again; I said, well, what do you want? he set forth his distresses and miseries; that he was driven to desperation, and desired me to relieve him; I told him I could not, and would not relieve him; at last he said, I must have something; it was then that I told him I would give him nothing, and endeavoured to resume my walk; upon which he got round between me and the palace; he got hold of me by the collar, and said, God d - n your blood, you shall not escape in this manner; he then quitted my collar, and with his right hand seized hold of my left, and forced it down under his great coat, against his naked privities; as soon as he had done that, the idea of resistance entirely forsook me, for had it ended in a bare robbery, I certainly would have fought him; he said, God d - n your blood you shall not escape so; there, there, you want to make an attempt upon me; I will have justice; the idea of resistance then forsook me; I comprehended his whole scheme; I said, be quiet, I see what it is you want, it is not justice you want, it is my money; he looked round carefully at the same time; it is so, said he, come, make me a present, I am a very poor man indeed; upon which I said, I will, there is all I have got, and I pulled out half a guinea and some silver, I believe about four shillings and sixpence or five shillings; no, says he, this won't do; do you think I run such risques as this for such trifles? no, this won't do; he then clamoured again for justice; I then insensibly drew him on to the green, which is between the row of trees going down the row to Westminster, behind where the cows generally stand to be milked; I drew him there because I knew it was not a frequented place, for I was more afraid: of any body than he seemed to be at the time; I said, be quiet, name what you want; he said, I must have five guineas; if you could give me five guineas in my necessities, it would be a very great relief to me; said I, it is a great deal of money, but sooner than he engaged in so disagreeable and troublesome a thing, you shall have five guineas; (and I believe at the time if I had had a hundred guineas in my pocket he should have had it) but what shall I do? there is no banker open to-night, I have not got the money; said he, cannot you give it me tonight? I said, I cannot; put your hands into my pocket and feel, I have no more, I have nothing here but my keys; he said, I live just by, I will show you the shop where I live, go over with me, I will take no advantage of you, but take care what you do; it is only to give you a bill of the shop, that you may not forget where I live; upon that I went over with him to the shop; I said, I don't want to go into the shop, for I was afraid of confederates, as I was all alone; but I went into the shop; he called out to two women that were sitting there, give me a bill of the shop this minute; they gave him one, and he gave it to me, then he asked again if I had no money; I told him, I had not, and then we parted; it was a trimming shop, two doors on the Westminster side of Cragg's court; it is now turned into a milliner's; all those people are gone away. My first idea was to go to my lawyer; I recollected that I had been weak enough to give him money, for before I parted with him, he said, be sure you come, for remember you have given me money; that was the burthen of his song, be sure you come, remember you have given me money. I went part of the way next morning to my attorney, and then upon reflecting how weak I had been, I thought it better to comply with my appointment; accordingly I wrapped up five guineas in a piece of paper; I passed the shop, looked into it, and turned up a little alley; he presently followed me, and I gave him the five guineas. Sir, said I, this is a wretched way of getting money, and I am a wretched fool for giving it you, but as I have been a fool in the first instance, I cannot help it, and I must pay for my folly; he received it with the greatest thanks; he asked for a few shillings to buy a pair of breeches; I gave them to him; he said that he was extremely poor; that he had no manner of living; his creditors were numerous, and he was forced to this. I said, though I have been injured by you, I am sorry to see a poor fellow creature in this way; that was I a great man, I would even compassionate a poor man; he then asked me if I could get him a place. I gave him a false direction, and a fictitious name, and then came away.

I believe it was a long time before you saw him again? - About seven days after that, as I was going along.

Counsel for the Prosecutor.

I do not know that there is any occasion to particularize what passed on the other meeting; at last by advice of your attorney and friends, you apprehended this man? - I got a couple of constables, and apprehended him in Lincoln's-Inn, where I had appointed him to meet me to give him twenty guineas; he was taken to Sir John Fielding's office; I went; I had given in an information at Sir John Fielding 's.

What was the behaviour of the prisoner at Sir John Fielding 's, when you made this charge against him? - He offered to fall down upon his knees, and ask my pardon in the most submissive manner; he said, Sir, I ask your pardon ten thousand times over! I declined accepting any such submission, and was bound over to prosecute.

Cross Examination.

The person you met in the park you had never seen before? - Never.

He was in a very shabby dress? - Yes, in a shabby large great coat.

Where did you first see him? - By the lamp, just by Carleton house, where he spoke to me; he was just by the first lamp, about one hundred yards from the Mall.

Were many persons passing by? - There were persons passing by, a few, when first he spoke to me; it was so light that one could discern, but it was not moon-light, nor was it a bad night.

How far off does the centinel stand? - It was some way before we came to the centinel, and I in the course of conversation inclined down to the left.

How far was you from the centinel, when he first laid hold of you? - I dare say farther than the length of this court.

You did not turn about to go to the centinel at all? - No, for till he seized me, I had no ideal what he meant.

Then you must have passed some centinel? - I do not, remember we passed any centinel; I believe there is not one between the Spring-garden gate and Carleton house.

When he laid hold of you, you was within the distance of being heard by the centinel? - I was as much afraid of being heard as he was; when he made use of the word attempt; I was afraid of confederates; I was afraid it was a laid scheme.

There were no arms produced by the prisoner? - No.

Then the fear that you had was that there might be other confederates? - My fear was of my character.

You thought there might be other people concerned? - I did not know.

The man did not know where you lived? - No; he told me the last time that he knew where I was to be found, but I do not know that he did; I lived then in Lancaster-court, and I go often down to Westminster, and therefore could not avoid him.

Going the next day with the five guineas was a voluntary act of your own? - Going with that was in consequence of the advantage I had given him, by giving him the first money, because I thought to have got rid of him by that.

But you might have called out? - I was afraid of confederates.

But the soldier, the centinel, could not be a confederate? - I feared, that if I had called out he might have confederates, who might accuse me to the soldiers.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I have several witnesses here. I can prove that the prosecutor came to the Hungerford coffee-house, and sent for me.

Mr. Hadley. I never was at the Hungerford coffee-house in my life.

For the Prisoner.

HANNAH HARROLD sworn.

Are you a relation to the prisoner? - No.

How long have you known the prisoner? - Six or seven years.

What is his name? - Robert Hutton .

What has been his character? - A very good character; he lodged and lived at our house.

Cross Examination.

You have known him regularly for six years? - Yes.

He never got into any scrape in the course of six years? - Never.

Do you mean to speak for the six last years? - I never knew him in my life to do any thing.

Has he lodged at your house regularly for these last six years? - Yes.

And how many years back? - He was away a month or two.

Do you know where he was when he was away? - No.

And you know nothing of any thing that has happened to him particularly in the course of that six years? - Never before this affair.

ANNE HARROLD sworn.

Are you sister to the last witness? - Yes.

What is the prisoner's name? - Robert Hutton .

How long have you known him? - Ten or a dozen years, on and off.

What has been his character during that time? - A very honest just man; I have trusted him with scores of pounds; he has transacted a great deal of business for me; I kept the shop the gentleman came to; he was shopman to me at that time.

Cross Examination.

How long has he been in your service? - This last time, he has lived in our houses, about seven years in all.

This was backwards and forwards, then perhaps you know what has become of him, during the whole of the time of that seven years? - Yes, he has come and gone often to my house backwards and forwards, but this last twelvemonth he has lived with me.

And you have never known him in a particular situation? - Yes; I do, because there was a thing he was wrongfully accused of before, and he was honourably acquitted.

But where was this place he had the misfortune to get into, when out of your service? - I am not obliged to follow him; he lodged somewhere, I suppose; I never visited him.

Counsel. But you do not know at all where he lodged, when he had this unfortunate charge made upon him?

Court. What wages had he from your? - Half a guinea a week, and board and lodging.

Court. You did not know that he was distressed for money in January last? - I do not know that he was; he has transacted my business for me, and I never lost any thing.

ROBERT SANDERS sworn.

I have known the prisoner three years; I made shoes for him; he always paid me very well.

JOHN SMITH sworn.

I am a breeches-maker by trade; I have known him but a short time; he is an acquaintance of my brother's; I was with him at the time he met the prosecutor in the coach; the prosecutor came into the shop one fight with Robert Hutton , and took a bill of the shop; he read it at the candle; he came the next day, and brought Mr. Hutton five guineas, and Mr. Hutton went out with him for ten minutes.

Hannah Harrold . In about a week after that, this gentleman came again, and asked if the young man was at home; I said, no, he was not, he would be at home in a minute or two, if he would leave any message, I would tell him; he said be so good as tell him I shall be at the Hungerford coffee-house till after eight o'clock.

At what o'clock did he come the last time? - Before candle-light, I believe about six o'clock in February; and two or three days after that, I saw the gentleman come in a great coat; I saw him looking through the shop door, as if he was looking for him that was in the morning, I believe between eleven and twelve o'clock; I have seen him several times.

To the Prosecutor. You told us when you went to give him five guineas, you looked into the shop, and turned up a little alley? - That was the next morning.

And that he came out to you, and in that alley you gave him the five guineas? - Yes.

Court. John Smith says you came into the shop; you gave him the five guineas, and then went out together? - I absolutely deny it, and I never since I was born was in the Hungerford coffee-house in my life, nor ever left any such message there.

Court. Was you ever near the shop after that time? - No; I always carefully avoided the shop, for fear of meeting with him again.

Counsel for the Crown to Anne Harrold .

I want to know where you live now? - In St. Margaret's church-yard, Westminster.

With whom? - My mother, sister, and I, were partners in this shop.

Do you follow any business there? - Yes, to be sure we do.

I am not sure till you tell me - what business do you follow? - The trimming business.

You quitted your shop? - Yes.

You have no occasion for a shopman then? - No.

Hannah Harrold . Yes.

Counsel. One says, yes; the other, no; which is truth? - We have not one now.

Did this young man live with you then, when he was taken up? - He was with us; we were obliged to leave the shop.

Did he continue with you? - Yes, all the time till he was taken up.

Then he was in your service, when he was taken up? - Yes, all the time.

Then you keep an open shop in St. Margaret's church-yard? - No; we keep a house; we do our business privately.

What is a shopman wanted for then, when you have no shop? What became of him, when you left, the shop? - He lodged with us after he was out of the service.

He lodged at your house all the time, but had quitted your service? - Yes.

How did he get his bread? - By trimming-making; he has earned us scores and scores of pounds.

Counsel for the Prisoner.

While you lived in the Strand, he lived with you as a shopman ? - Yes.

When you left the Strand, you did not employ him as a shopman? - No, but he lived with us.

Do you remember seeing Mr. Hadley come to your shop? - No; I was not there at the time he came.

To Sanders. Did you see Mr. Hadley at any time at Mrs. Harrold's? - Yes; I saw him come in with Mr. Hutton, and take a bill of the shop; I was there next day at twelve o'clock; I went for the money for a pair of shoes; I saw this gentleman open the door and speak to him; he beckoned him out; they stayed out about ten minutes, and after that, Mr. Hutton came in and paid me for the shoes.

Counsel for the Crown.

How long is it since you worked in Cranborn-alley? - Five or six months.

How did you get away from your master's in Cranborn-alley? - My master gave me my indentures, and I came away.

He made you a present of your indentures? - Yes.

He had no particular reason to dislike you? - No; I wanted to get away.

GUILTY Death .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM.

501. THOMAS HENSON was indicted (with DANIEL JONES not in custody) for that he, in the king's highway, in and upon Henry Jackson did make an assault, putting him in corporal fear and danger of his life, and stealing from his person 2 s. in monies numbered, the property of the said Henry , May 5th .

HENRY JACKSON sworn.

I am a farmer ; as my wife and I were going home, on the 5th of May, at about eight or nine in the evening, we were attacked by two men between Acton and Shepherd's-Bush ; we had been to Putney, and were returning home; I saw two men coming along; we crossed out of the footpath, before they came to us they crossed too, and when I came pretty near the stile to get over it. Daniel Jones came up to me, and asked me, if I had got any money; and then the prisoner came up. It was day-light, almost as light as it is now, and the moon shone bright; the prisoner came up, and stood by with a stick in his hand; he shook it over my head; he swore very much, and bid me make haste; the other had a pistol in his hand; they took from me 2 s.

Was that all the money you had? - No; I am sure the prisoner is one of the men; the prisoner damned his blood, and body, and eyes, and bid me make haste, for they were in a hurry.

Was it light enough to see his face? - Yes.

Had he any disguise upon his face? - The prisoner had not, Jones had.

Jury. What quantity of liquor had you drank that afternoon? - Very little; I was perfectly sober.

HANNAH JACKSON sworn.

As I was coming home with my husband we met the prisoner, and another man on the road; they crossed over to us, and we crossed out of the path-way; as we were going to get over a stile into a meadow; the other man damned his eyes and limbs, and said, if my husband did not deliver his money, he would blow his brains out; the prisoner repeated the same.

What had he in his hand? - The prisoner had a stick, and Jones a pistol.

What sort of a night was it? - It was a very light night; I am as sure the prisoner is the man, as that I am alive.

How soon was he taken? - We were near home; my husband returned with two or three men, and took him; he had a stick in his hand when he was taken.

Henry Jackson . He said he knew nothing of the matter when he was taken.

Did you observe his legs? - Yes; they were very crooked.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

The other man threatened to blow my brains out, if I did not assist him.

GUILTY Death .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice WILLES.

502. JOHN ELLIOT was indicted for stealing half a guinea , the property of John Adams , May 26th .

(The prosecutor was called, but not-appearing, the court ordered his recognizance to be estreated.)

NOT GUILTY .

503. WILLIAM DAWSON was indicted for wilfully, knowingly, and unlawfully having in his possession the mark and stamp of the Lion Passant, made to resemble the mark and stamp of the Goldsmith's company, used and to be used by the company of Goldsmiths, London, for the marking and stamping of gold and silver plate .

2d Count. For having in his possession the mark and stamp of a Leopard's Head, to resemble the mark and stamp used and to be used by the company of Goldsmith, London, for the marking and stamping of gold and silver plate.

3d Count. For marking, and stamping, and causing, and procuring to be marked and stamped, certain wrought plate of silver: to wit, a certain watch-box, with the mark and stamp of the Lion Passant, made to resemble the mark and stamp used and to be used by the company of Goldsmiths, London, in the marking and stamping gold and silver plate.

4th Count. For marking and stamping, &c. as in the 3d Count, with the mark and stamp of a Leopard's Head, to resemble the mark and stamp of the Goldsmiths company, against the statute, &c. March 6th .

JOHN CLARKE sworn.

I went to search the house of the defendant, in Warwick-court, Warwick-lane ; he is a watch-case maker ; I found him at work; I took his wife up stairs with me to search, not thinking he was at home; when I came up stairs, the first person I saw was the prisoner working at the lathe, in the middle of the shop; I think there were three workmen besides; I asked him how long he had worked there; he said, four years; I asked him his name; he said it was Richards; this was in the work-shop, in the garret; I asked him where Dawson was; he said he was gone out, and he expected him in two hours.

Court. You did not know him then? -

I did not; I suspected that it was Mr. Dawson, the person I wanted, but I was not certain. I took his wife down stairs into another room, and asked her why she said he was not her husband, and then I discovered that he was Dawson. I then took him down stairs into the bed-room, and searched the bureau, and there I found these three punches and a watch-case (producing the punches); I delivered the watch-case to the Assay Master.

(It was produced by the Assay Master.)

Clarke. This is the same I found; there is a piece put on one of the punches; I believe it had been broke, and that was put on to preserve it; he acknowledged the room to be his, and he put on his wig and clothes in it.

Was the bureau locked? - It was.

Who gave you the key? - I cannot say; either the wife or him; there was no one else in the room.

FENDALL RUSHWORTH sworn.

I am the senior Assay Master of the Goldsmiths company; I have assayed the watch-case; it is eight penny weights worse than standard; it is marked with a Lion, a Leopard's Head, and the letter B, which is the mark we use. The B is the mark for the year.

What do you call the Lion? - A Lion Passant. These marks are in imitation of our's, but are not the real marks.

Would they pass with persons that are not conversant with the company's marks? - I believe they might. I struck the marks with the punches found in the possession of the prisoner, on a piece of silver. The witness produced it, and a watch-case, with the real marks of the company, which were compared by the jury.]

DAVID HENHAM sworn.

I am a Warden of the Goldsmiths company.

These punches are made to resemble the marks of the Goldsmiths company? - Yes.

Are they false marks? - They are.

ELEAZER CHARTER sworn.

I am a watch-maker. I bought five pair of silver watch-cases and one outside case of the prisoner; I sent them to the Liner to be finished, and he sent them to the hall (producing them.)

Mr. Rushworth. They are marked with a counterfeit mark, and are worse than standard one ounce eighteen penny weights.

- To Chater. Wore these cases such as would pass upon you for standard? - Certainly they were; I was to have sent them to Leghorn.

Cross Examination.

You have known Dawson some time? - Yes, about four years; he is a married man; I believe he has six children, all very small; I never heard any thing amiss of him; I was very much surprized when I heard this.

(The prisoner in his defence called five witnesses, who gave him a good character.)

GUILTY Imp. 5 years .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM.

504. ALEXANDER SCOTT was indicted for that he, on the 23d of April last, unlawfully, wickedly, and maliciously, did publish false news, whereby discord, or occasion of discord, might grow between our Lord the King and his people, or the great men of the realm, by publishing a certain printed paper containing such false news , and which said printed paper is of the tenor following:

"In pursuance of his Majesty's order in

"Council to me directed, These are to give

"public notice, that war against France will

"be proclaimed on Friday next, the 24th

"instant, at the Palace Royal, St. James's,

"at one of the clock, of which all Heralds

"and Pursuivants at Arms are to take

"notice, and give their attendance accordingly.

"Given under my hand this 22d of

"April, 1778.

"EFFINGHAM, D. M."

RICHARD WILLIS sworn.

Do you know Alexander Scott ? - No, only by seeing him on the 23d of April last stick up a bill at the Royal Exchange, the purport of which was, that war was to be proclaimed on the 24th of April.

THOMAS WARD sworn.

I am 'Change-keeper at the Royal Exchange.

Did you on the 23d of April take down that bill that was put up? - I cannot say particularly the day; there were two bills on each side of the 'Change, and some about the quarters, about eight or ten of them; I pulled them down between eleven and twelve o'clock by the Lord Mayor's order. I cannot safely say, but I believe these are the bills.

Court to Willis. Where did you see the prisoner stick them up? - On both sides of the 'Change, at the gates.

[One of the bills was produced and read, which corresponded with the description of it in the indictment.]

JOHN KIRBY sworn.

I am the Keeper of Wood-street Compter. The prisoner was brought to me by a constable; I had a good deal of conversation with him, and I was at his examination at the Mansion-house; he said he did stick up the bills; that they were brought to him by a person at eleven o'clock at night, wrapped up in a great coat; that he asked him (Scott) calling him by his name, if he could stick up those bills; that he said, certainly it was his business; and that he stuck up eight at the 'Change in the morning, and one at Woodstreet.

The Right Hon. the Earl of EFFINGHAM sworn.

I am Deputy-Marshal of England.

You have an appointment from the Duke of Norfolk? - Yes; (his Lordship produced it.)

Was this paper printed or published by your direction or privity? - No; I heard nothing of it till after it was stuck up. I gave no authority to any person to print or publish such a paper.

Your Lordship sits and votes in the house of Peers as an Earl? - Yes.

JOHN DENCH sworn.

I am a broker.

Do you know whether an alarm was spread in consequence of this paper in London? - I heard of it; I bought stock one per cent. cheaper that day than it was the day before.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

On Wednesday night, the 22d of April, at about half after ten o'clock, a man came to me, and said, Scott, I am come from the King's printer, Mr. Strahan, and want you to stick up some bills to-morrow morning; you stick up bills for him? - I said, yes; he said I must stick some round the 'Change, and one at Wood-street, where war was to be proclaimed, and asked what he must give me; I said, how many was there? he said, only a dozen; I said I would not charge Mr. Strahan any thing for that; he said, he desired I should be paid, and asked if five shilling, would do; I said it was too much; he said no, and gave it me; he said it was not a thing that happened every day. I stuck one up at Wood-street, nine about the 'Change, and put one in my pocket. At eight in the morning I went afterwards to Justice Girdler to make affidavit of a fire that had happened, and told Justice Girdler what I had done; I gave him one, and he kept it, and has it now, I believe. I went into the Golden Cross, opposite, and Joseph Gates came in, and said I must go with him before the Lord Mayor; I went with him to the Lord Mayor; he said I had been guilty of high treason; I said, I hope not, I have a family of children; I read it; I did not know but it was true. The man that came had a great coat on up to his nose, and his hat flapped before; I have never seen the man since; he had got my name very distinct.

For the prisoner.

GEORGE PATTISON sworn.

The prisoner stuck up bills for Mr. Strahan when I worked there.

They were Royal instruments? - Yes.

How were they carried to him? - By any of the servants; but we never print any declarations or proclamations like that; we print them in a different manner and style; there is a very Large King's arms on the top, in the first place.

Was the difference so great, that he having been accustomed to Mr. Strahan's must have known it? - I cannot say that; I believe a person that reads it must know it to be forged.

Do you think he knew it to be forged? - No; I don't think he knew it.

What marks of forgery are there in it? - I don't know any in proclamations. Effingham, deputy-marshal, is generally at length; this is D. M. for deputy-marshal.

JOSIAH ROE sworn.

I keep a public-house. On the 22d of April, about half after ten in the evening, Scott came to me and pulled out one of these bills, and said, what do you think of war now; I have bills to stick up; it is to be proclaimed on Friday. I said, sure nobody has deceived you; he said no; they came from Mr. Strahan's; the next morning he put one up in my house. I don't think he knew his employer.

WILLIAM HOUSE sworn.

I was at Justice Girdler's when Scott gave him one of the bills. He said he had been sticking up bills about war.

Lord Effingham. The prisoner's witness has said that it is a mark of forgery, the paper not having deputy-marshal at full length, as they say it generally is in true proclamations. I mention it for the prisoner; they mistake it, for that is not the way of signing them neither.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

506. WILLIAM CRAWFORD was indicted for wilful and corrupt perjury .

NOT GUILTY .

[There was no prosecution.]

506, 507. RICHARD LINDALL and ELIZABETH, the wife of Isaac Pigott , were indicted for the wilful murder of James Lefevre on the 2d of May , that the said Richard with his hands and feet feloniously, wilfully, and of his malice afore-thought, did cast and throw the said James Lefevre unto and upon the ground, and did strike, beat, and kick, the said James Lefevre , in and upon the back part of his head, giving to him, the said James, one mortal fracture of the scull of the length of three inches, and of the breadth of two inches, of which he languished until the third day of the same month, and then died; and that the said Elizabeth Pigott was present, aiding, helping, abetting, comforting, assisting, and maintaining, the said Richard, the felony and murder in form aforesaid to do and commit .

[ They were charged on the Goroner's Inquisition, with feloniously killing and staying the said James Lefevre .]

JOHN PEACH sworn.

What do you know of the death of James Lefevre ? - I was in the house; it is called Basing-house; I do not know the sign; it is in Kingsland-road , on the left-hand side, a little way from Shoreditch church.

On what day? - The first of May: I was there about eight in the morning: this happened a little after ten. Mr. Lefevre came in a hackney-coach; he changed a guinea, and paid the coachman his fare; he appeared like a gentleman. After he was in the house, he spoke to the landlord, the landlord was very glad to see him: there was a soldier and me in the house when he came in: the landlord and he had something to drink, punch or something of that sort; Mr. Lefevre came and sat down in the box directly opposite me, and said I should drink with him, which I did once or twice.

Did you know him before? - I have seen him before, not to be particularly acquainted; the landlord drank with us; and as he had a shilling's worth, I desired my shilling's worth to be brought; it was, and in came Lindall, the waiter, and his mistress; the deceased was rather in liquor.

What are the two prisoners? - Lindall is the waiter , I believe, and Mrs. Pigott is the landlady : as soon as they came in, they turned about, and saw Lefevre, and she said to her husband, what does that blackguard Lefevre do here? turn him out of the house. He said he should not be turned out, for Mr. Lefevre was rather in liquor, and he would send a man home with him; they directly both replied he should be turned out, and got up to turn him out. The landlord went out first, and the waiter went and seized his master; his master said, will you turn me out of my own house? and he had a struggle with his master. Then the woman went behind her husband, and laid hold of the deceased, and pulled him out of the box, and he fell with his head against the door of the bar, against the hinge or somewhere there abouts.

Was he so drunk, that he fell down as a dead weight, on her pulling him out of the box? - No; he was as able to walk as I am now. I being a stranger, thought the man ill-used, and interfered; the waiter said he would serve every one of us so; on that, the waiter quitted his master, and dragged Mr. Lefevre along the floor, and threw him down the steps into the street. There are, I believe, three stone steps, and a wooden one. I never saw him move after the first fall.

Was he on his legs when he threw him down, or did he drag him along the floor and roll him down? - He rolled him down, I never saw him stir any more. The waiter came back directly and laid hold of the soldier that was in the house and threw him out; he said he would throw me out; I said he should not, if he did he must take the consequence, 'I would strike him; I said I would not be thrown out, I would go out, and I went out, and they flapped the door, and bolted it. I got a coach, and took the deceased home; he lived in Shoreditch; I carried him up stairs and undressed him; I never saw him stir! I went home, and heard no more of it for three or four days.

Cross Examination.

Was you in liquor? - No; I was as sober as I am now.

How was the soldier? - Very sober; else he would have fared the same fate.

Was the landlord sober? - He was rather in liquor.

You say the deceased could walk? - Yes; I saw him walk about the room just before.

Was the deceased desired by the landlady to go out? - He was not desired; she said turn him out! he made no answer at all; she insisted upon his being thrown out.

He made no resistance? - Not the least in the world.

Do you suppose she was strong enough to drag him out of the box and throw him down? - She certainly was, for I saw her do it. There was nobody in the tap-room at the time, but myself, the soldier, and their own servants.

He never got his legs again; the waiter drew him along the floor through the passage, and rolled him down the steps? - Yes.

Did you follow him to the door? - Yes, to the passage door; he threw him out of the other door; I interposed, and he shoved me on one side.

I wonder as you was shoved out of the way and ill-used; you did not knock the fellow down? - I did not like to make any disturbance.

WILLIAM BAGSHAW sworn.

I am a surgeon; I did not observe any marks of violence on my first going to see the deceased, except the left-arm and left-leg being a little discouloured.

What do you suppose was the cause of his death? - A large fracture in his skull; the back part of his head, which I suppose to be occasioned by a fall, or a stroke, by something blunt, for there was no cut.

Both Not Guilty of Murder, but Guilty of Man-slaughter only . Both B .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM.

508. JAMES BANKS was indicted for stealing a silk handkerchief, value 10 d. the property of Thomas Hard , May 26th .

[The prosecutor was called, but not appearing, the court ordered his recognizance to be estreated.]

NOT GUILTY .

509. 510. WILLIAM PRICE and GEORGE ANDREWS were indicted, for that they in the king's highway, in and upon William Selby , did make an assault, puting him in corporal fear and danger of his life, and stealing from his person four guineas, half guinea, a watch, value 3 l. and a silver watch chain, value 5 s. the property of the said William , May 10th .

BOTH NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice WILLES.

510, 511. WILLIAM PRICE and GEORGE ANDREWS a second time were indicted for making an assault upon Thomas Eccles , with a felonious intent, the monies of the said Thomas to steal , May 10th .

There was no evidence given.

BOTH NOT GUILTY .

The TRIALS being ended, the Court proceeded to give judgement, as follows:

Received Sentence of Death, 4.

James Mills , Joseph Dracott , Robert Harrold , alias - Hutton, alias- Sutton, alias Jackson, and Thomas Henson .

Navigation for 3 Years, 9.

Burton Wood , William Blake , James Yorke , Robert Sidaway , Richard Stevenson , Richard Sharplin , Thomas Rice , George Rooke , and Edward Price .

Branded and imprisoned I year, 6.

Lucy Wright , Thomas Dennis , Samuel Clark , Sarah Hayward , Anne Mitchel , and Carolina Maria Queenland .

Branded and imprisoned 6 months, 5.

Daniel Baker , Mary Hughes , Sarah Edgars , John Rogers , and John Neal .

Branded and imprisoned 3 months, I.

John Brand .

Branded and imprisoned 2 months, I.

John Elwee .

Branded and imprisoned I month, 4.

Mary Hughes , Sarah Strickland , Mary Allen , and Anne Day .

Branded, 2.

John Carlisle , and John Hammond .

Whipped, 6.

Peter Woodcock , William Glass , Emanuel Moses , Elizabeth Swan , William Akerman , and John Chamberlain .

Navigation for 14 years, 1.

William Cashmin .

*** William Tyler 's judgement was respited till next sessions .

This Day is published, Price Half a Guinea, (DEDICATED WITH PERMISSION TO HIS MAJESTY) BRACHYGRAPHY; OR, An easy and compendious SYSTEM of SHORT-HAND, ADAPTED ( After more than Forty Years Practice) to the various Sciences and Professions. By the late Mr. THOMAS GURNEY .

The NINTH EDITION, considerably improved according to the present Method, By his Son and Successor JOSEPH GURNEY , (WRITER OF THESE PROCEEDINGS) BY WHOM Trials at Law, and Arguments of Counsel are carefully taken in Short-hand.

Sold (Price Half a Guinea) by M. GURNEY, No. 34, Bell-Yard, Temple-bar.

OF WHOM MAY BE HAD,

The SESSIONS PAPER for the Last Sessions, containing the TRIALS of the notorious Gang of House-breakers, who are ordered for Execution; and also the remarkable Trial of George Barrington , with his very curious defence, verbatim.

*** The Book is a sufficient Instructor of itself, but if any Difficulties occur they shall be removed upon Application to the Author without any additional Expence.

This Day is published, Price Half a Guinea, (DEDICATED WITH PERMISSION TO HIS MAJESTY) BRACHYGRAPHY OR, An, easy and compendious SYSTEM of SHORT-HAND, ADAPTED (After more than Forty Years Practice) to the various Sciences and Profession By the late Mr. THOMAS GURNEY .

The NINTH EDITION, considerably improved according to the present Method By his Son and Successor JOSEPH GURNEY , (WRITER OF THESE PROCEEDINGS) BY WHOM Trial s at Law, and Arguments of Counsel are carefully taken in Short-hand

Sold by M. GURNEY, No. 34, Bell-Yard, Temple-bar, Price Half Guineaa,

OF WHOM MAY BE HAD,

The SESSIONS PAPER for the Last Sessions, containing the TRIALS of the Gang of House-breakers, who are ordered for Execution; and also the remarkable Trial George Barrington , with his very curious defence, verbatim.

*** The Book is a sufficient Instructor of itself, but if any Difficulties occur shall be removed upon Application to the Author without any additional Expence.