Old Bailey Proceedings Online (www.oldbaileyonline.org, version 6.0, 31 July 2014), April 1778 (17780429).

Old Bailey Proceedings, 29th April 1778.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS ON THE KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery for the CITY of LONDON; AND ALSO, The Gaol Delivery for the COUNTY of MIDDLESEX; HELD AT JUSTICE HALL in the OLD BAILEY, On Wednesday the 29th of April, 1778, and the following Days;

Being the FOURTH SESSION in the Mayoralty of The Right Honble Sir JAMES ESDAILE , LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY JOSEPH GURNEY , And Published by Authority.

NUMBER IV. PART I.

LONDON:

Printed for JOSEPH GURNEY (the PROPRIETOR) And Sold by M. GURNEY, No. 34, Bell-Yard, near Temple-Bar,

M.DCC.LXXVIII.

[PRICE SIX PENCE.]

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS UPON THE

KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery for the CITY of LONDON, &c.

BEFORE the Right Honourable Sir JAMES ESDAILE , Knt. LORD MAYOR of the City of London; the Honourable Sir WILLIAM BLACKSTONE Knt. one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; the Honourable Sir JAMES EYRE , Knt. one of the Barons of his Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Mr. Serjeant GLYNN, Recorder; THOMAS NEWGENT , Esq. Common Serjeant, and others of his Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London and Justices of Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

First Middlesex Jury.

Christopher Kempster ,

Packer Oliver ,

David Davis ,

James Emelyn ,

John Villers ,

George Harrison ,

Thomas Knowles ,

Thomas Wallis ,

Thomas Bates ,

William Munden ,

David Egleton ,

George Cockson .

Second Middlesex Jury.

John Clark ,

John Frith ,

James Penny ,

William Rogers ,

George Jackson ,

William Hooper ,

John Shrimpton ,

John Brown ,

John Lowe ,

James Ball ,

Henry North ,

John Chipperfield .

The list of the London Juries will be given at the beginning of the second part.

294. 295. JAMES GRANT and THOMAS BRIGHT were indicted for that they in the king's highway, in and upon Thomas Farrow , feloniously did make an assault, putting him in corporal fear and danger of his life, and stealing from his person and against his will a hempen bag, value 1 s. six pounds of tea, value 30 s. ten pounds of sugar, value 5 s. a leather trunk, value 5 s. a deal box, value 3 d. ten pounds of ginger-bread, value 3 s. a basket of earthen ware, value 10 s. and a hempen sack, value 6 d. the property of the said Thomas Farrow , January 31 .

THOMAS FARROW sworn.

I keep a stage-cart between Enfield and London. I was robbed on the last day of January between seven and eight in the evening, between Edmonton and Enfield , by a tree that is called the Round Tree, in the road near the eighth mile stone. I sat upon the fore-board of my cart, with my horses double; there was a man in the cart with me; his name, I believe, is Minew, he is a weaver: as I was driving along, he said, Mr. Farrow your things give way. I turned my head and saw the tail of the cart open; it was a tilted cart, with a sacking cover, and was tied behind with a strong hempen rope. Seeing my cart open behind, I was stopping my horses; when a man came up on foot to the near side of my cart, and said, halloa! I said halloa! said he, what is the matter? I said matter enough; then he said, stop this minute or I will blow your brains out; I stopped. Then he put a cutlass to my breast, and said, if you stir or move I will cut your bloody head off. I did not see any pistol: as soon as he had said that, he halloed out, come on, come on; then Thomas Bright came on the off side of my cart, and another came up into the hind part of my cart, and one went to the horses heads; when he came to the horses heads, he said, what is the matter? the other said, go along, what is that to you, or I will blow your brains out; he replied, don't you know me, blast you come round, you are stupid, you don't know what you are about, and I have a good mind to blow your brains out; it was the man who stood over me that said that to the other that came on the off side of the cart; then that man came round to the hind part of the cart; then they called to one another, ship off, ship off. The man that stood over me kept threatening me that if I offered to look or turn my head he would cut my bloody head off. They then took a trunk containing ladies wearing apparel, a basket of earthen ware, a deal box of gingerbread, and an empty sack.

How long did they stay with you? - Full a quarter of an hour; they came off for London. After they had ransacked the cart the first time, when they did not take the bag of grocery, they did not seem to be satisfied with what they had got; the man that stood over me said, have you nothing else? I said no; he then put his foot over the foot-board of my cart and felt the bag; he said, this is a bag of grocery? I said it was, and that I had forgot to tell them of it. Then he called out to one of them, come on and get this out, here is a bag of grocery; upon that Grant came up into the cart, Bright came up on the off side, and then the others called out, come on. Grant could not get the bag of grocery out himself, he blasted my eyes, and said, if I did not help him out with it he would cut my bloody head off. I assisted them, and the man that stood over me helped it down. Grant continued in the cart and searched it a second time; he swore, if he found a box or any thing in it more than they had got, they would cut my bloody head off. I begged hard for my life: I told them I had a large family, and I told them I had nothing but paper and half a hogshead of ale, and I begged them not to throw that out; they blasted me and the ale too; then I thought they would have let me go. Bright said, now the man may go on; the man that stood over me replied no, d - n him, he shall not; he bid Bright come and take a pistol. Bright came towards me and took something, but whether a pistol or what I cannot tell; the other bid him go to the horses heads, and said, if he offers to stir or move blow his brains out, and I will go behind and see if they have got all off; Bright went accordingly and stood at my horses heads, and he went behind my cart; I believe he might be gone a full minute; then he came up again, and said they have got all off, all is clear; Bright said, now he may go on; no, said the other, d - n him, he shall not go; then I was afraid they were going to use me ill. I begged for mercy; they said d - n you we will cut your reins. I begged hard that they would not; yes, blast you, said the man that stood over me with a culass, we will cut your reins, or people will say you have not been robbed, this will convince them that you have. Then the man that stood over me with a cutlass cut my near horse's rein, and Thomas Bright cut the rein of the off horse; after they had done that they said I might go on. I said, gentlemen, pray don't use me ill, for I cannot go on without I tye my horses together, for my horse in the shafts is blind; the man with the cutlass said, you may get down and tye your horses together, but if you offer to come behind your cart or look back, we will blow your brains out; and they said, if I met any body and made any alarm, they would follow me and cut my head off. I said I would not. I was obliged to lead my horses all the way home.

How soon after this were the prisoners apprehended? - I don't know, the man is here that took them. I gave an information at Sir John Fielding 's the morning after I was robbed.

Did you tell the justice what sort of men they were, whether tall or short, or how dressed? - No; I did not.

Was it a moon light or dark night? - It was a duskish evening.

Had they any thing over their faces? - No.

Did you know any of them at that time? - No.

Did you know any thing of Sullen before he was taken? - No.

You swear very positively that Bright was one of the men; and that Grant was another? - Yes.

Do you mean to swear to their faces? - Yes; to their features.

Had you ever seen them before? - Never to my knowledge.

When did you see them again? - About three weeks ago; I cannot justly say the day; I saw them at Sir John Fielding 's; I immediately knew them to be the same persons; I begged of Sir John before I saw them, that he would let them be put into a room among others, and I would pick them out if they were the people that robbed me; they did so; and I fixed upon the prisoners, as soon as I came into the room.

Before they spoke? - Yes.

Did you know them by any thing else besides their persons; their voices for instance? - I could not swear to their voices; but their voices answer their persons; there were four in the gang; but one of them never came in sight, though I heard his voice.

Where was the empty bag found? - In Sullen's stable.

Where is that bag? - It is not here; the man who was along with me, said he was so frightened, that he could not say any thing.

Is that man here? - No; he thought much of the expence.

Court. You convicted a man last session, upon which conviction you are intitled to a reward; and therefore that cannot be true. - I had a great mind to subpoena him.

Did you say upon the last trial that there was a man in your cart? - I did not.

Here are three mens lives depending upon your testimony only, when another person was present. - The man would not come.

If you had told Sir John Fielding that you had a man in the cart with you, he would have made him come.

Are you quite sure that the prisoners are the two men? - I am.

GRANT's DEFENCE.

I am quite innocent of the charge. When this man was before Sir John Fielding , he said he only believed me to be one of the men that robbed him by my size. Sir John said I stood indicted, and I must therefore come here to be tried; or otherwise he would have admitted me to bail.

For Grant.

DAVID PROTHERO sworn.

The prosecutor said before Sir John Fielding ; that he was positive to Bright; but he made a doubt as to Grant; he said he believed him to be the man by his stature and his voice; but he was not positive to him.

Court to the prosecutor. Have you been able to trace these men to prove them in company any where that night? - I have not.

ELIZABETH BROOKS sworn.

I was at Grant's lodgings at No. 8. in George's Row, on the day of King Charles's martyrdom, and the two following days, which were Saturday and Sunday, nursing a child; I am positive that Grant was at home those three nights.

BRIGHT's DEFENCE.

I know nothing of this affair; I never saw that man in my life before I saw him at Sir John Fielding 's; I was at home when he was robbed; I am a paper stainer, and live in Maiden Lane, Southwark; I lived in Shoreditch at the time the robbery was committed.

Bright called Susannah Barnes , who swore that the prisoner lodged at her house; and that he was at home on the 31st of January; he likewise called Elizabeth Stone , with whom he had formerly lodged, who gave him a good character; and Thomas Lee , who attends at Justice Wilmot's office, who deposed that the prosecutor told him that he was so terrified at the time of the robbery, that he did not know that he should know the men again.

BOTH ACQUITTED .

*** See the trial of Edward Sullens , No. 233, in last Sessions paper.

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. BARON EYRE .

296. ROBERT HARMAN was indicted for stealing a silver watch, value 35 s. a steel watch chain, value 6 d. a base metal watch key, value 1 d. and a stone seal set in base metal, value 1 d. the property of Charles Willis , April 2 .

CHARLES WILLIS sworn.

When I was going to bed at my lodgings, at about ten at night on the 2d of April, I found the prisoner in my bed; I had never seen him in my life before; and I had received no intimation from the family where I lodged that such a person was there. I was waked at about five in the morning by the prisoner's getting out of bed; as he was going out of the room I thought I heard my watch chain rattle; I got up immediately and pursued the prisoner into the Hay-market, where I overtook him; and found my watch upon him.

[The watch was produced in court, and deposed to by the prosecutor.]

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I understood that the prosecutor wanted some money; and I took the watch intending to pawn it for him.

GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice BLACKSTONE.

[Branding. See summary.]

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

297. WILLIAM BOLTON , was indicted for stealing a gold ring set with chrystal and hair, value 20 s. the property of William Channing , April 2 .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before the Common SERJEANT.

298. WALTER TOWNSEND was indicted for stealing a silver watch, value 4 l. the property of William Horner , March 2 .

WILLIAM HORNER sworn.

I was a hackney coachman on the 2d of March when I lost my watch; I took up a fair in Salisbury-street in the Strand, between eleven and twelve at night; I was ordered to the Pantheon in Oxford street ; I got off the box to take for the coach hire at the Pantheon; my watch was taken out of my pocket before I could get to the coach door; I saw the prisoner's hands at my breeches pocket; and felt it go out of my pocket; I went to catch hold of his hand; he was too quick for me; he threw his hands behind him, and conveyed it away; I saw it in his hand; I have never recovered it; I seized him immediately; and he was secured.

Prisoner. I asked him why he charged me with it? he said, because I stared him in the face. - I said that, but that was not the only reason.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

The watch was not found upon me.

GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Common SERJEANT.

[Branding. See summary.]

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

299. BENJAMIN MANTLE was indicted, for feloniously stealing two woollen cloth coats, value 10 s. and two linen waistcoats, value 5 s. the property of Benjamin Foote , February 3 .

BENJAMIN FOOTE sworn.

I am a stage-coach-man . I lost my waistcoat on the 23d of February from my bed room, at the Golden Cross, Charing Cross ; and there were a great many other things lost with it, which have not yet been found; the prisoner was seen with my coat and waistcoat on.

- GRIFFIN sworn.

I saw the prisoner with the prosecutor's coat on his back.

WILLIAM HICKS sworn.

I am fellow servant to the prosecutor; I found the prisoner at a public-house in King's Street, Covent Garden; he had the prosecutor's hat on; he went to the bar under pretence of getting a glass of gin, and then he attempted to run away. I took him in the street.

JOHN HILLS sworn.

I am a pawnbroker in Carnaby Street. I took in a waistcoat of the prisoner; he was in company with another man; it was pledged for half a guinea in the name of Frankling. I do not know which of them I gave the money to.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I found the things by a baker's-shop in a coarse apron; I did not pawn them though I was with the man who did.

GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron EYRE .

[Branding. See summary.]

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

300. ROBERT CROSBY was indicted for feloniously stealing a watch, the inside case made of silver, gilt with gold, and the outside metal covered with shagreen, value 40 s. and a cornelian seal, value 10 s. the property of Henry Wayte , March 21 .

MARGARET WAYTE sworn.

I am the wife of the prosecutor. On the 21st of March, between eight and nine at night, as I was crossing Norwich Street, I was obstructed by the prisoner and another man; they were looking in at a milliner's window; a woman passing asked them why they stopped the way? they said they were looking at a pretty girl in the shop; I went on to the Hay-market , there I felt a hand in my right-hand pocket; I then felt in my other pocket, and missed my watch; I found it again in the hands of a pawnbroker, who produced it.

Cross Examination.

You advertised the watch as lost? - Yes; because I thought I might, by that means, get it the sooner.

In the market a woman put her hand in your pocket? - I do not know who it was; they were gone when I turned about; then I missed my watch.

JOHN WOOD sworn.

I am a pawnbroker in Prince's street, Leicesterfields. On the 21st of March the prisoner brought a watch to my house between nine and ten in the evening, he offered it to pawn; I stopt it; he wanted two guineas upon it; I asked him what it was made of; he said it was gold. I asked him the maker's name; he said he could not tell. I asked him whose it was; he said it belonged to an acquaintance of his in Russel Street, Covent Garden, and that he lived but a little way off, and he could soon fetch him. He went away: presently after a woman came and claimed the watch; I detained her, and she would not tell me where the man was who brought the watch; but said, if I would let her go, she would soon bring him. I would not let her go; I went out and saw the prisoner on the other side of the street, and went and secured him; he came quietly to the door, but then attempted to make his escape.

[The watch was produced in court and deposed to by the prosecutrix.]

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

As I was coming by Charing Cross, I met one John Hughes , an acquaintance, who had not seen me since May; we turned back to drink; I then met Ann Brown , and asked her to lend me a guinea; she said she could not; but she had a watch to pawn that she had found; and if it was advertised she could fetch it out on Monday morning; I went with it to the pawnbroker's, and he stopped it; I went to her and told her; she said she found it and went to the pawnbroker's.

For the Prisoner.

ANN BROWN sworn.

On the 21st of March I met the prisoner in the Hay-market; I believe it was between eight and nine at night; he asked me to go and drink something; I had been to tea in Swallow Street; we went in and had a glass of something to drink, and he asked me to lend him a guinea.

Where did you go in to drink? - I am unacquainted with that part of the town. He asked me to lend him a guinea; I said I had not got a guinea, but I had picked up a watch in the Hay-market, I would lend him that to raise a guinea on, and if it was advertised I could fetch it out. I afterwards saw the advertisement of it; he went to pawn it, and the pawnbroker stopped it, and he came and told me; I said they had no right to stop the watch I had found, and I went and claimed it, which I would not have done if I had stole it.

Court. What time did you find it? - I believe between eight and nine at night, near Panton Street on the pavement.

Wood. They were examined apart before Sir John Fielding , one said they met in Long Acre, and the other said they met in the Hay-market; the glass was cracked when he brought it to me.

Court to Brown. Who are you? - I am a widow; I keep a lodging-house in Little-Britain, which I have kept twenty years.

How came you to be at Charing Cross? - I had been drinking tea in Swallow Street with a gentleman from Bristol; I was returning home, and was going to take a coach at Charing Cross.

GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice BLACKSTONE.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

301. FRANCIS LEWIS , otherwise GRIMISON was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Thomas Edmondes , Esq . on the 14th of March , about the hour of one in the night, and stealing a gold ring, set with diamonds, value 40 l. a silver pin, set with a diamond, value 10 l. a silver shirt buckle, set with diamonds, value 10 l. two pair of silver shoe buckles, set with stone, value 5 l. a gold neckcloth slider, value 10 s. 6 d. a silver cream pot, value 20 s. two silver ragoo spoons, value 20 s. a silver marrow spoon, value 10 s. twelve silver tea spoons, value 24 s. two pair of silver sugar tongs, value 20 s. eight silver table spoons, value 40 s. a silver sugar basket, value 40 s. two silver ale-cups, value 6 l. four silver scewers, value 20 s. a silver strainer, value 15 s. a silver strainer spoon, value 5 s. a silver fork, value 10 s. a cork-screw with a silver handle, value 5 s. a silver tea-pot, value 5 l. a cane with a gold head, value 20 s. a silver tea tray, value 50 l. a silver salver, value 10 l. two silver waiters, value 10 l. a pair of silver candlesticks, value 10 l. a silver sauce-boat, value 50 s. two silver salts, value 20 s. a silver mustard castor, value 35 s. a silver mustard spoon, value 5 s. a silver bread basket, value 10 l. two woollen cloth coats, value 3 l. 2 woollen cloth waistcoats, value 20 s. two pair of woollen cloth breeches, value 20 s. eleven pair of silk stockings, value 50 s. a woollen cloth coat, with gold-lace thereon, value 20 s. a woollen cloth waistcoat, with gold-lace thereon, value 20 s. a pair of woollen cloth breeches, value 10 s. and a gilt sword knot, value 20 s. the property of the said Thomas Edmondes in his dwelling house; and that afterwards, to wit, on the same day and hour he burglariously did break the said dwelling-house, to get out of the same against the statute .

2d Count. For the said burglary; and stealing part of the same goods in the said dwelling house, laying them to be the property of the Right Hon. the Earl of Peterborough and Monmouth ; and the Rt. Hon. Lord George Germaine .

3d Count. The same as the first, for stealing part of the same goods in the said dwelling house; laying them to be the property of Thomas Edmondes , Esq;

4th Count. For stealing the same goods in the said dwelling house; laying them to be the property of the Right Hon. the Earl of Peterborough and Monmouth, and the Right Hon. Lord George Germaine .

MARY GILES sworn.

I am cook to Mr. Edmondes; the prisoner was hired into the family on the 21st of January as butler and master's man .

Do you remember, whether on the 14th of March Mr. Edmondes was out of town? - He was out of town; the prisoner was the only man servant then in the house; my master had discharged the footman on the 1st of March; there was the prisoner, three maids, and Mrs. Edmondes left in the house; the prisoner asked to go out in the evening to see his wife; he returned with my mistress about ten o'clock; I went up to warm my mistress's bed; when I came down it wanted about ten minutes of one; I fastened the fore area door; I barred and bolted it; it is a half sash door; there are shutters over the sash, and a bar goes across; the prisoner laid in the Butler's pantry, on the same floor; I went to bed and left him up in the kitchen. At about half after three the watchman knocked at the door; the other maid went down, and I went down after her; I was not down till they had untied the prisoner.

What is the name of the servant that went down first? - Constantia Jones .

From the prisoner. She said she did not recollect whether the door was barred. - I did not positively recollect whether I bolted the bottom bolt; but I am sure I fastened the shutters.

JOHN WADDING sworn.

I am a watchman; my box is in Queen-street; not ten yards as I imagine from Mr. Edmondes's house. At three o'clock I heard a pistol discharged in Mr. Edmondes's house; I turned back and rattled with my stick against the iron bars of the area where the prisoner lay, and knocked at the door; but there was no answer made; I stood there a few minutes, and then went and cried the hour; when I returned I leaned over the rails, but could hear no noise nor disturbance at all; at half past three, going my rounds, when I had got some few yards from the door; I heard the prisoner cry out; O Lord I shall be dead; I called out what is the matter; why do not you open the door; he said there were rogues, villains in the house; and he should be dead; I said why do not you open the door; he said he could not, that he was tied; I knocked hard at the door; and the maid servant came down with only her under petticoat on, and that untied; I asked her to show me the way into the kitchen where the prisoner lay; I went down and found him tied with a cord round his legs; and a garter tied loosely round his hands, and one end tied to the cord that was round his legs; I untied the cord, but cut the garter.

Did you observe the pistol? - I cannot say I did; he said three villains had been in the house, and robbed the house; and he was afraid his lady was killed; he said they came in at the area over the rails.

Repeat as particularly as you remember the description that he gave of the manner they came in; and what they did? - He told me that on the first man's entering his room, he discharged a pistol at him; we searched, but could find no dent of any ball in the wall.

What other particulars did he give you? - I cannot recollect any other particulars. We went up stairs and searched every room in the house; there were a great many clothes thrown about the dining room; on the terrass wall, on the outside of the house, there was a gold laced waistcoat.

Was the window of that room open? - Yes, in the inside.

Did you observe any plate missing at that time? - There was some plate, some trifling things dropped in different places.

Did the servants make any observation that a quantity of plate had been taken? - No, they did not.

Were the places where the things were dropped in the inside or outside of the house? - Inside.

The clothes were dropped on the terrass as if they were dropped as they were going into the park? - Yes.

From the prisoner. Did I say any thing to you, how the thieves came in? - Yes; you did.

Court. Were his hands tied in such a way that he could get them out without any trouble? - Very easily; I cut the garter in my hurry.

CONSTANTIA JONES sworn.

I heard the noise of the watchman; and came down about a quarter after three; I followed the watchman down to the Butler's room; and found the prisoner tied in his bed, with both his hands tied to his ancles.

Did you observe how they were tied, whether tight or loose? - I was so frightened, I did not observe.

Did he give any account to you and the watchman in what manner the house was broke open? - I do not remember that he said how the house was broke open; but he described three men that he said had broke into the house; he said there were three men came in; that the age of two of them was from thirty to six and thirty; and the other from twenty to four and twenty; that they had great coats on, and flapped hats; that one held a knife to him, and stood over him all the time; while the other two robbed my mistress.

When you came down stairs, how did you observe the area door? - I did not observe the door; I saw the shutter open; I was not the first that came to the door; the plate which was kept in his room in the closet with two folding doors was gone; the prisoner said he believed they had taken all the plate in general; but I found a spoon on the stairs and some trifling things.

From what place did he say they had taken it? - From out of the place where it was kept; I looked in the closet, and it was all gone.

From the prisoner. As I was tied, whether she did not see the marks of the string in my legs and hands? - I believe I did on his legs, but none on his hands.

To the watchman. Did you observe the mark? - Yes, upon his legs, but none upon his hands.

MARY ROBSON sworn.

I live at Mr. Edmondes's; I came down after the house-maid to see the situation of the house.

Did you make any observation on the area door? - Some time after I was in the room. I was so alarmed with the thieves being in the house, and his hands being tied. I said I would go and see how they came in; he said three men came in; and he fired a pistol at one, and then they tied his hands and legs; and asked where his mistress's jewels were; and where his mistress lay; that then they took the plate out of the closet. I went and looked at the area door, and saw there was a pane of glass broke; and the bar taken down; and the door carelesly put to; it was neither shut nor open; I asked how they came in; he said, I thought at first it was you, when they came to my door; he said, the plate was all carried away; that they insisted on having the key; and he gave it to them out of his coat; that they doubled a silver tea board together, and tied it up in a table cloth, and carried it away. I went up stairs into the dining room; the house-maid found a silver sauce spoon dropped on the stairs, and some wearing apparel of little value strewed on the dining room floor; the shutter was half shut; and the door not latched that goes on the terrass; there was a waistcoat and pair of breeches of my master's on the terrass; I then went to my mistress.

From the prisoner. Was the window broke on the outside or the inside? - I cannot say how it was broke, but the glass was in the area.

JOHN CLARKE sworn.

Do you remember the prisoner being before Sir John Fielding , and making a charge against some persons for having robbed his master? - I do.

Do you remember the description he gave of the offenders? - I was not there when he gave the description; I came in afterwards; there were three persons taken up under his description, that were discharged because he said they were not the men he described.

Did you go to see how this burglary had been committed? - I did on Sunday morning the 15th; after hearing that Colonel Edmondes 's house was broke open, it struck me that it must be done by somebody in the house; I went and saw the prisoner sitting by the fire, seemingly in very great pain, for he had two marks as if cut with a knife; I took him to the area with me, and on the outside there was a brick on which they were supposed to have stepped, which was a little broke. I got the cook to put the shutters up the same as they were on the night of the robbery; she did; and I asked if it was bolted or barred; she said both. I asked her if she would swear before a justice it was bolted and barred; she said she would not swear she bolted it, but she would swear that she barred it. The bar was a little broke; it went into a tenter-hook, which must have been wrenched had it been forced open; there was a pane of glass broke, and on the inside a cobweb, which must have been broke had any body got in there, and the tenter-hook was not forced, upon which I was sure it must have been done by somebody in the inside. I examined the door, and found that what force had been used, had been on the inside, and none on the outside; the box that receives the bolt was broke on the inside, but not on the outside. I told my suspicions to the major; and then I told Mrs. Edmondes I was sure it was somebody in the house; she was unwilling to admit any suspicion against the prisoner. I took her and shewed her the place, and asked her if she had given the prisoner leave to go out that night; she said yes, she gave him leave to go and see his wife. I said, is he married? she said yes; I said depend on it then the things are at his wife's. I got a direction from the Major and gave it to Jealous and another person, and they went and searched his wife's lodging, and there they found the things. I then told him there was enough to injure his liberty, and begged he would tell me where the rest of the plate was, that there might be no imputation on any of the servants; he said, if I would not take him to his mistress, he would tell me where the rest of the plate was; he said, he had thrown it into the cistern at his master's house. I went there and found it in the cistern; I was obliged to get a ladder to get at it, it is behind the area door, where he said they got in. I believe it is nine feet and a half from the ground, and a yard and a half deep. I found in the cistern, among some other plate, the large waiter bent double; it is in court.

Did you make any promises to him to induce him to tell you where the plate was? - No; God forbid that I should.

Prisoner. I beg you will describe how that cobweb is situated by the window? - I examined the glass of the window; the cobweb was so across the glass, that it was impossible to get in without breaking it.

CHARLES JEALOUS sworn.

I am an officer at Sir John Fielding 's. On Sunday about twelve o'clock I received a direction from the Major to go to the lodgings of the prisoner's wife, at a grocer's in Goswell Street; I went according to the direction; they said there had been such a person lodged there, but was gone away, and the people of the house said there was a dustman in the neighbourhood who knew where they had carried the goods to; I desired the dustman might be found; he was, and he took me to Holywell Street, in Clare-market, there we found the prisoner's wife; we searched the room, and found a large trunk with a quantity of plate and clothes in it; I have an inventory of the things; there was a silver tea pot, and two silver cups; I took the woman into custody; the prisoner said when they were before Sir John, that she was his wife, and that those were his lodgings; that he took the lodging himself.

Did you describe the street and place to him? - Yes, and he said it was his lodging.

[A large quantity of plate was produced and deposed to by the prosecutor.]

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I know nothing about what was found at my wife's; I was not with my wife that day; I did not go out of the house that day; I had not seen my wife for eight days before.

GUILTY, on the 3d Count, of stealing the goods in the dwelling house . Death .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

302. JOHN HOWSE , otherwise DUST , was indicted for the wilful murder of Margaret Lane , spinster , by giving her, on the 22d of February , with an iron three-prong dung fork, a mortal wound, of the depth of two inches, and the length of one inch, of which mortal wound she languished from the said 22d of February until the 23d of the said month, and then died .

He likewise stood charged on the coroner's inquisition with the said murder.

RICHARD DAVY sworn.

On Sunday the 22d of February last, I was in company with the prisoner, the deceased, Knapp and Middleton, and several others, at the Swan-alehouse, the corner of Downing Street, near Hyde-Park corner: the prisoner asked the deceased to go home, and he and the deceased went out together, for they used to cohabit together; they had both been drinking, but I did not observe that either of them were in liquor; they went to William Warren 's Stables, in Collins's Court ; where many people frequently lie. They appeared to be in friendship when they went out, and she was as willing to go home as he was to have her: we staid there about a quarter of an hour longer, and then Elizabeth Miller came in to us, and said for God's sake come and help, for John Howse is beating Margaret-Lane; we all went out of the house, and went towards the stable, and I heard Margaret Lane cry out; I was very sure it was her voice, as I knew her voice very well; I stood in a little alley close by, and heard it very plainly; all that I heard was a very horid dismal shriek; I believe, but I cannot say positively, that it sounded like a cry of murder. Elizabeth Knapp then went into her room and fetched down a candle, and I went towards the stable: Freeman got the candle up into the lost, and then he either went down, or else he gave the candle down into the stable, and I looked through the vacancy at the door, for the door had a loose kind of staple to it, so that the door might be moved backwards and forwards, and might be pushed to above an inch vacancy; I looked through that vacancy of the door, and saw Margaret Lane lying in the stable upon her back very bloody, and the prisoner standing up by her with a light in his hand; I saw the prisoner list her up and lay her down again; and I heard him say that she was drunk, and had been spewing over him. I never heard the deceased speak after she made that dismal scream; we dispersed from the door, and in about ten minutes after, as I was going up to my uncle's room, which is facing the stable-door; I heard the prisoner cry out, that her brains were out. I heard Freeman call out of the lost to the prisoner, Jack Dust , what is that you say? Freeman repeated that question three or four times, but Jack Dust , the prisoner, gave him no answer. I called Elizabeth Knapp up for a candle; she brought one; then we went to the stable door; I said I would get a hammer and break open the door if he would not open it; he said there was no occasion for that, but handed a three prong-fork over to Freeman to wrench the door open: having wrenched open the door, we all went in; I saw the deceased lying upon her back with a sack over her, and I believe a hat put over her face; I believe she was alive at that time, but could neither speak nor move, for she did not; her head was very bloody at that time; Mary Owen , I believe, cut off her hair; I saw a bit of a hole on the right side of the back part of her head, about as big as the top of my little finger; I saw some white matter, which I thought were brains, coming out at that hole; the prisoner said very little; but only, that as he was taking her out of the lost she fell backwards against a tub or the stones, I cannot be positive which; I believe there was a tub standing there; they washed her face while I was there; the prisoner said, if she should die he would not go away for it; then they took her into Knapp's room; I went to bed and saw no more; she lay at the distance of about two horse stalls off from the steps.

WILLIAM EASLY sworn.

I lodged in Collins's court in this hay-loft. Freeman lifted me into the lost; and then he came up himself; I heard the deceased stand upon the tub; the prisoner said you b - h come off the tub: she wanted to get up into the lost; he would make her lie in the stable; the steps were broke; the use of the tub was to assist to go up into the lost; soon after this, I heard her cry out; my dear Jack Dust don't kill me, my dear don't kill me, and I will' lie down where you please. I heard the door rattle and shake monstrously; Freeman went down into the stable; Thomas Turner gave him a light, then Freeman came up again; after that the prisoner called to Freeman to come down again, for he believed her brains were out; he said she had blown out the candle, by the breath of her nose; then Freeman and I went down, I was almost the last that went in; but when I came, the door was opened, and Davy was standing there; Davy had threatened to fetch the watchman, if he did not open the door; I saw the deceased lie on the straw; her head was very bloody, she did not speak or move; the prisoner said that he went to lift her off the tub and she sell over his shoulder; he would not let the woman cut off her hair, but did it himself; the wound was a very little one; the prisoner said that he beat her; and Davy said to him, you could not beat her so with your fist, you must have done it with the fork; he answered no he did not touch her with the fork; but had beat her with his fist, and the butt end of a whip, which he said he had in his hand; she was in the place of the third stall.

WILLIAM FREEMAN sworn.

I lay in Mr. Warren's stables. On Sunday the 22d of February; as I was passing by at about eleven o'clock at night, I was told that Jack Dust was beating the girl; I went there and said what are you doing, why are you beating the girl so? he made no answer at all; afterwards I heard her say, dear Jack Dust do not; before he went to the door, I lifted Easly and another man up into the lost, and then got up myself; I heard nothing pass; but finding a total silence, I got down and stood upon the tub, and asked him what he was doing; the prisoner made no answer, I then got a light from Turner, and went down into the stable to see what was the matter; I saw the deceased lie on her back in the straw; her head was wet with blood or water; I cannot tell which, for she had no cap on; and as her hair was black I could not distinguish by the colour, whether it was blood or water; she began to reach; I bid him turn her on one side, which he did, and she vomited; I saw a couple of sacks lie over her; I was getting up into the lost again, and Thomas Turner met me in the lost; Turner went down and I followed him; Turner took down the light, and left it with John Howse , for I had brought the light up again; Thomas Turner took up the dung fork, and said, Jack, you have not been hitting her with this? he made answer, no, Thomas Turner : the light went out, and the prisoner said it was put out with the blowing at her nostrils, when he put the light to her to see how she did. I got a second light, and he called out to me, O! Bill, I believe her brains are out; upon which I said several times, what is that you say? to which he made no answer; I then got down and helped to break open the door, and then all the people came in; we saw the deceased lying in the middle of the stable; the women carried her to the hospital afterwards; and she died the next morning; I talked with Howse about it early in the morning; he said that they were both in liquor; that he went to lift her off the tub, and they sell down together; and that she hurt herself against a flint stone, by falling over his shoulder. After that I told him she was dead! he fetched a sigh and said, Lord Jesus Christ what have I done; I must suffer for it: but I was wrong informed, for she was not then dead.

SOPHIA HOLLOWAY sworn.

I live in Collins's Court; I was waked out of my sleep with a great noise; I plainly-heard the deceased's voice in the stable, which is very near my house, crying out, pray dear Jack, don't kill me! pray Jack, don't kill me! This was repeated several times; at last I heard a great shriek and a groan; and then I heard no more; I did not go down to assist her, because I was ill in bed with a fore leg.

ELIZABETH FERRIS sworn.

I live in Collins's Court; I was in bed at the time I heard the deceased cry out, for God's sake, dear Jack Dust, don't kill me! she repeated this twice; and I heard several screams afterwards; I heard several violent blows given; I got up and looked out at my window, which is opposite, and heard Howse call to Davy to bring a candle; for he believed her brains were out; and his expression was this, blast her bloody eyes, I believe her bloody brains are out. He bid Freeman break the door open, and let in the whores to see how she lay in the straw. Upon opening my window, I heard the nature of the dispute before I heard any blows, I was so near the stable; I found she wanted to go up into the lost, and he wanted her to stay below; and while they were struggling about that, I heard many blows given.

MARGARET MILLER sworn.

As I was passing by the stable, I heard Jack Dust beating Margaret Lane, and particularly kicking her as it appeared to me with his feet; she said, dear Jack, don't kill me; dear Jack don't kill me; and I will do so no more; and he said, you bloody whore, you get money of me and go to other fellows: upon hearing this, and apprehending she was in danger; I went to the Swan and alarmed the people there; because he frequently used to beat her, and the people often came from the Swan and kept him from so doing; and I went in hopes they would do so now. Afterwards I heard her scream. I was there when the door was broke open; I helped to cut off her hair; she was lying senseless and could not speak.

MARY SAYER sworn.

While I was in my yard, which adjoins to the stable, at about eleven o'clock, I heard a great scream; I did not hear either the deceased or the prisoner say any thing; I only heard what the others said to him; I heard Freeman say, he might be ashamed of himself, for he had beat her head till it was as big as a horse's head; and he ought to be served so himself; I did not hear the prisoner make any answer to that, for he was below where the horses were.

To Davy. Do you recollect what the expression was that the prisoner made use of at the time, he said her brains were out? - I believe it was, blast her bloody eyes, her brains are out! or something of that kind; I said I thought it was not done with a blow of the fist.

Do you remember any thing being said in your presence by Freeman to the prisoner, about the deceased's head being swelled as big as a horse's head? - I don't remember any thing of that.

To Freeman. Do you recollect the words which the prisoner made use of when he said the deceased's brains were out? - He said for Christ's sake, Bill Freeman , some of her brains are coming out!

Did you hear him say any thing to Davy? - No.

When you came first to the prisoner and saw the condition in which the woman lay; what did you say to him about the swelling of her head? - I am sure I did not say any thing to him about the swelling of her head.

How long have you been acquainted with the prisoner? - From a child; and he has known me from a child.

To Mary Sayer . You said you heard Freeman say to the prisoner, that he might be ashamed of himself, for he had beat her head, till it was as big as a horse's head; and he deserved to be served so himself? - He did say so.

Freeman. I never said such a word; I said, you are a bloody rogue for using the girl so; you are no man at all.

How was she used then? - She was lying on her back as I said before.

But you said before in your evidence that you saw no marks of violence upon her? - I saw her lying and her hair wet with blood.

But you say you did not say any thing about her head being swelled? - I did not.

Court. What do you say to that Mary Sayer ?

Mary Sayer . I am sure it was said by one of them.

To Freeman. When the prisoner bid you break open the door, what was the expression he made use of? Did he say any thing about letting the whores in to see how she lay? - When he put out the fork to me, he bid me take care of myself; he said open the door and let them in at once.

Did he make use of the expression, let the whores in? - He might say so, but I did not hear it.

MARY OWEN sworn.

As I was coming home at about eleven at night, I saw them breaking the stable door open; I went in to see what was the matter; I saw the deceased lying upon the straw; he had covered her over with the sacks. I asked what he had done? he said, he had been beating her. I helped to cut her hair off and helped to carry her to the hospital. I asked the prisoner how it was done: he said he had been beating her with the fork, and he believed she had run her head against it.

Who was present when that was said? - I cannot tell particularly, but I know that Margaret Miller and William Middleton were by at that time.

To Margaret Miller . Was you present when there was any acknowledgment made by the prisoner about his beating the deceased with a fork? - No.

To Owen. You said that Margaret Miller was present? - I am sure she was by when he said that, but I cannot tell whether she might hear it.

WILLIAM MIDDLETON sworn.

Margaret Lane and the prisoner were drinking along with me from about a quarter after eight, till about a quarter after ten. The deceased wanted to go along with Howse; they went out together; I staid in the house for about half an hour, when Margaret Miller came and said, for God's sake come out, for John Howse is murthering Margaret Lane. I went to the stables; I heard them having some words together; I immediately got a light and got up into the lost; I put my head through the hole, and saw Margaret Lane lying in her gore with a sack over her.

Did you hear the prisoner say any thing about a dung fork? - I heard him say he never struck her at all with the fork.

To Mary Owen . You said Middleton was by when the prisoner said, he had been beating her with a fork, and he believed she had run her head against it; you see Middleton denies it?

Owen. I stick to what I said, they were both by, whether they heard it or not.

Middleton. The prisoner said while Mary Owen was by, that he never struck her with the fork.

ELIZABETH KNAPP sworn.

I live in Collins's Court; Margaret Lane lodged with me; I had been drinking with her the night that this happened; we had two or three pots of beer together; the prisoner and the deceased went out seemingly very agreeably together.

Were they sober? - They had been drinking; I heard nothing more till Margaret Miller came in, and said that John Dust was murthering Peg Lane: we went down the court directly, but we could not hear any noise at all; upon which we went to our own lodgings, and then I heard the deceased make a great shriek; we went to the stable; the prisoner would not open the door to us.

Did you hear the prisoner make use of any expressions? - I heard him d - n his eyes!

Did you hear him say any thing more about her? - Not till he put the fork through the place to break open the door; then the prisoner said, here take the fork and let the bloody mares come in and see whether she is dead or not. When the stable door was broke open, she lay in her gore; we washed her and her brains were boiling out of her head like the scum of a pot.

Did you hear him say any thing with respect to the manner of her death? - I heard him say that night in the stable, that she sell off the tub.

Mr. THOMAS PRICKARD sworn.

You are the coroner who held the inquisition upon the body of the deceased? - I am.

Is Mr. Hunter the surgeon here? - No; he is appointed surgeon to a man of war, and is gone abroad; he told me before he went, that Mr. Hawkins, one of the surgeons to the hospital, had examined the wound: Mr. Hawkins was subpaened to attend before the Grand Jury at Hicks's-Hall, as I understand by the father of the deceased; but Mr. Hawkins did not attend.

Court. Mr. Hawkins, not Mr. Caesar Hawkins? - No, Mr. Charles Hawkins , his son. I called upon Mr. Hawkins, and told him that this court would require his attendance here. Mr. Hawkins said it was not his business to attend, but the business of the house surgeon, who always attended upon these occasions.

You saw the head of the deceased I suppose when you held your inquisition? - I did.

What did you observe? - A small wound; the scull was fractured.

Did it appear as if broke with a sharp or a blunt instrument? - It appeared to me to have been done with a sharp instrument.

The prisoner has declared that the wound was occasioned by the deceased's falling upon a sharp flint; was it such a wound as might be occasioned by falling upon a sharp flint? - I cannot say; the skull was violently factured, and was quite open, so that the brain came out.

Did the wound run length-ways or round? - Round, about as big as a shilling I should suppose.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I was drinking with Margaret Lane; she was a girl I had lived with between three and four years; she wanted to go up into the hay loft to lie; I listed her up into the hay loft, there was neither hay nor straw there; I would make her go down, because there was clean straw in the stable, and two sacks; she was not agreeable to go down into the stable, because if my master should come in the morning and should see her, she was afraid that it would come to my wife's ears, because she had got a warrant for her before to send her to Bridewell for cohabiting with me. I said she should come down, and hit her several times with my open hand: she said, pray don't lick me, pray don't lick me, and I will go down. I listed her then upon the butt, there is another butt near it; she over swayed me, and I fell with my knees in the other tub, and dashed her down with her head upon the stones with all my weight upon her; she cried out, O Lord! I helped her up, and she never spoke afterwards. I had been beating her in the lost; they heard her; I was taking her into the stable when they went to call the people at the alehouse; they listed her on the straw; Richard Davy came to the door, and asked what was the matter; I made answer, nothing; but she and I had had some words, and I had let her fall; Davy said, we will break the door open; I said, no, I believed she was very well. She spewed all over me; I asked Turner for a light, he said, he would not give a light for fear we should burn the stable; for a stable in the neighbourhood had been lately set on fire. I found her head wet; I said, Freeman bring a light; a light was brought me by him or Turner. Freeman got up into the loft again; I was looking to see whether her head was cut; the wick of the candle was but a little bit, the tallow was broke off the wick, and it slipt through my fingers and went out; and upon that I called out to Freeman, for God's sake come in with a light, for I believe her brains are out!

To William Easly . When you was examined last, you declared, that you heard John Howse below in the stable, and the deceased say she would not go off the tub? - Yes.

When he called afterwards to Freeman to desire him to bring a light; what expressions did he make use of? - John Howse made answer for Christ's sake, Bill Freeman , get up; for my revenge is all over; and I verily believe some of her brains are out.

Why did not you mention that before; who has been desiring you not to tell these things? - Nobody.

Court. How came you not to tell me that, when I examined you before; you behaved very wrong?

To Freeman. When the prisoner called to you to come down with the light, what expressions did he make use of; did he say any thing about his revenge being over? - No.

Are you sure of that? - Yes.

Mention the words he did use? - He halloed out to me; and said that her brains were out.

Easly has now sworn, and he said so too before the Coroner; that the prisoner said, for God's sake, Bill Freeman , come down; for my revenge is over; and I believe her brains are out! - He did not speak any thing about his revenge; only said some of her brains were out.

From the prisoner to Mr. Prickard the Coroner. Whether the Surgeon had dressed her before you saw her? - I saw her at the Hospital; I believe she had been dressed.

From the prisoner. Whether the appearance of the wound might not be altered by the dressing? - I cannot say.

From the prisoner. Was the scalp taken off? - I don't recollect.

Court. Had the head been opened, the skull sawed to see if there was any confusion on the inside? - I think it was not; I think it had not been opened; it was not opened in my presence.

To Margaret Miller . Did you hear him say any thing to her when she said, dear Jack don't beat me so? - He said, you bloody where, you come and get money of me; and go to other fellows.

GUILTY . Death .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. JUSTICE BLACKSTONE.

The prisoner immediately received sentence. (This being Friday) to be executed at Tyburn on the Monday following; and his body to be afterwards dissected and anatomized, which sentence was executed upon him accordingly.

303, 304. ABR. HYAMS and JOSEPH SAUL were indicted; for that they in a certain field and open place, near the king's highway, in and upon Elizabeth, the wife of William Bibbins ; feloneously did make an assault, putting her in corporal fear and danger of her life; and taking from her person and against her will, 7 s. and 4 d. in monies, numbered; the property of the said William , March 4 .

ELIZABETH BIBBINS sworn.

I was stopped on the highway by two men, as I was going home from the tabernacle; they demanded my money; I gave them 7 s. and 4 d. and a thimble; they said they thought the thimble which I had given them was of no value to them; they behaved civil; Saul said, I need not be frightened, they would do me no harm; and he pointed the pistol up to the sky; the other man behind said, is here all; and put his hands to my coats, and shook my pockets; there was room to hear if any thing would gingle. I followed them, it being my way home; but I was not over solicitous to follow them quick, not wishing for more of their company. I was desired afterwards to go to the office in Litchfield street; there I saw the prisoners; as soon as I saw them I challenged them; I am sure Saul is one of the men; I am not certain to Hyams; the evening was tolerably light; there was a moon of a week old; and I had an opportunity to observe Saul's face; and therefore I can swear positively to his person.

MATTHEW ROBINSON sworn.

I live very near the prosecutor in Hoxton fields; I can be of little utility for or against the prisoner; only the lady said she was robbed of either 7 s. & 3 d. or 7 s. and 4 d.

Was you at the tabernacle with her? - Yes; and came home a little before her.

What time did she complain to you of it? - I saw her the next day; I know nothing of the robbery.

You did not see either of the men on the road that night? - It was moon light, but the moon was intercepted.

But did you see either of these men that night upon the road? - I could not swear to them, but I have seen them before.

DENNIS Mc DONALD sworn.

I am a constable; one Rogers confined in the Savoy Gaol sent up to the office that he could inform us of some robberies in Hoxton fields; I know nothing of the matter, but taking up the prisoners, and bringing them before the justice.

To the prosecutrix. What kind of a night was it? - So light that I could clearly discern them; the moon was about a week old.

Was any lamp near? - It was but a few yards to a lamp.

JAMES HIDE sworn.

I was at the taking of the prisoners. Saul desired to go with me; Saul acknowledged that Hyams was innocent of the fact; that he and another prisoner, who is since dead, were guilty of the robbery; he likewise mentioned it before Charles Grubb .

How came he to mention it? - His sister was by; and he mentioned it before her, as well as us.

HYAM's DEFENCE.

I am quite innocent of it; I was a bed at my mother's at the time.

SAUL's DEFENCE.

This man I declare is quite innocent. I have nothing to say in my own defence; my witnesses are not here.

HYAMS NOT GUILTY .

SAUL GUILTY . Death .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. BARON EYRE .

305. JOHN WHEELER was indicted for stealing two cloth coats, value 30 s. two cloth waistcoats, value 10 s. two callico waistcoats, value 4 s; a pair of cloth breeches, value 2 s. and a pair of silver knee buckles, value 4 s. the property of Thomas Jones , in his dwelling house , March 28 .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

306. SUSANNAH RACAULT was indicted for feloniously stealing a sattin gown, value 18 s. and a linen table cloth, value 1 s. the property of Martha Romelly widow , January 20 .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

307. JOB MASSEY and CHARLES KELLY , were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Phillis Hopkins , widow , on the 29th of March , about the hour of six in the afternoon; (no person being in the said dwelling house); and stealing five pair of plain muslin ruffles, value 4 l. a suit of plain muslin, value 20 s. a suit of spotted flowered muslin, value 15 s. a suit of worked sprigged muslin, value 15 s. a worked muslin apron trimmed with lace, value 16 s. five pair of cotton mittens, value 10 s. twelve muslin aprons, value 6 s. six yards of silk ribband, value 2 s. a suit of minionet lace, value 5 s. two India shauls, value 20 l. a silk sacque and petticoat, value 5 l. a black laced silk cloak, value 8 l. a black silk laced tippet, value 5 s. a white silk cloak, trimmed with blond lace, value 30 s. a gauze cloak, value 6 s. a gauze handkerchief, value 1 s. a hundred callico shifts, value 50 l. and ten gold trinkets, value 10 l. the property of the said Phillis Hopkins , in her dwelling house .

MARY JAMES sworn.

I was left in the house by my mistress, Mrs. Hopkins, the house is No. 11, Berner's-street , while Mrs. Hopkins was at Kensington: on Sunday the 29th of March, I went out between three and four in the afternon; I double locked the door, and shut the window shutters; I stayed till between eight and nine; the door I found when I returned as I left it, and the windows were all safe, there were no marks of violence about any part of the outside of the house, by which any persons might have forced their way in; I found the chests broke open and rifled; I informed my mistress next morning of what had happened.

Mrs. PHILLIS HOPKINS sworn.

Upon the information of my servant, I found my boxes broke open; and missed the things mentioned in the indictment, ( repeating them.)

CHARLES JEALOUS sworn.

An Information coming to Sir John Fielding's office of this burglary, and some robberies; the prisoner Massey and another were taken into custody, as they passed up Bow-street, and were carried into the office and examined; the other prisoner followed them in; and having followed them in, and being in their company, something having been found upon Massey, which led us to believe that Massey might have been concerned in this robbery; Kelly was also searched; and we found upon Massey two parcels of ribbands; and upon Kelly a pair of cotton gloves; (the ribbands and gloves were produced in court).

JANE WELLS sworn.

I can swear positively to these cotton gloves; they are Mrs. Hopkins's property; I mended them, and there is my own mark upon them; as to the ribbands I cannot undertake to swear positively to them, but there were two such parcels of ribbands in the bureau at the time the house was broke open; and I believe from that circumstance, and the appearance of the ribband, that they are the two pieces of ribband.

DAVID PROTHERO sworn.

I searched the prisoners lodgings; I know their lodgings very well; in the drawer under the bed, the bed being a turn-up bed, and a drawer at the upper end of it; I found a parcel consisting of pick-lock keys, a file, and other things. I have no reason to believe that the pick-lock keys would fit Mrs. Hopkins's door.

[They are produced in Court.]

RICHARD BRYANT sworn.

I was present when Massey and the other man was stopped and carried into Bow-street.

MASSEY's DEFENCE.

If the ribband be measured, it will be found they have each a yard less than the lady says. I bought these six yards of ribband of a pedlar in my own lodging that very morning; when my wife died I had a young woman to make my bed and clean my room; I told her I would make her a present of a ribband or two, and I bought these to give her. I bought it for six yards, and gave him half a crown for it, at the sign of the Queen's Head in the Strand, about eight o'clock in the morning; there was nobody in the house but a little boy that is gone away. I have not any body here; the landlord and his wife are very ill; I have been formerly a gentleman's servant, after I was out of place I learned to dress hair; I have been lately down to my own town; I have no friends here at all.

KELLY's DEFENCE.

I lodge likewise at the Queen's Head in the Strand with my wife and family, and have for about a year and a half. I came down stairs at about eight in the morning to read the news-paper; a woman came in with a large bundle, she seemed like an old clothes woman; she offered me some stockings and handkerchiefs to sell. I told her I wanted no such things; then she shewed me a pair of gloves. I said I never wore such things: the boy said your wife does. I asked the price; she said 2 s. I bid her one as I did not want them. I at last said I would give her 18 d. for them; she said if she took my money she would drink with me. I said she might drink the beer I left; I went out, going along Covent Garden I met this young man that stands by me and the other; we were going to Lincoln's-Inn-Fields to see a match that was going to be played at fives. Going up Bow-street, Massey said this was the nearest way; when we came to the Brown-Bear door, Jealous came out and stopped Massey; I was thirty or forty yards behind; he said there was an information of a robbery, and by the description he was one; and he said to the other young man, I believe you to be another. I said, do you want me? Jealous said no; we have no notice of you, nor description of you. I said I may go about my business then I suppose; he said yes, I might; but I said I would stop and see what was their fate; I was afterwards stopped and searched. If I had been conscious of having any stolen goods upon me, I should not have gone there: there was a person who was present at the time I bought these mittens, who sat in a box opposite me, but I never could find him out; the landlord and landlady would appear, but they are both lying at the point of death. I am now a waiter, I have been mostly in the tea gardens lately.

Both not Guilty of the breaking and entering the dwelling-house, but guilty of stealing the goods .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron EYRE .

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

308. JOHN TURPIN was indicted for stealing a black silk cloak, value 5 s. the property of Elizabeth Bulford , widow , February the 26th .

ELIZABETH BULFORD sworn.

I live in White Horse-street, Stepney ; I am a widow, and keep a little shop and sell earthen ware and little toys . The prisoner came to my shop on the 26th of February, at about nine in the morning, under pretence of buying toys; he asked for a very large doll and a large drum, then he said he wanted a quantity of earthen ware to send on board a ship; supposing him likely to be a good customer, I was willing to serve him. I offered to carry them on board his ship myself, but I had not a doll so large as he wanted; he perswaded me to go to Broad-street to see if I could not purchase one to his mind, he said he would go to about half a crown or 3 s. in the price; I called a neighbour, Isabella Mersin to mind my shop, and to accompany the prisoner till I came back; when I returned, the prisoner was gone, and I missed my cloak.

ISABELLA MERSIN sworn.

I was left in the back room with the prisoner, he sent me out of the room several times upon frivolous errands; at last he asked me for some small beer, when I brought it he desired it might be warmed and made very hot; he said he was going to leave a message just by, and he would be back by the time the beer was hot; he went away and did not come back again: while he sent me away upon these frequent errands, he had opportunities to take any thing. I had seen Mrs. Bulford's cloak hanging there that morning, but I did not observe it at that time.

AMBROSE HARPER sworn.

I happened to be at the next door to the prosecutrix, and I heard the prisoner give orders to have this small beer made very hot for him while he went on a message; I threw up the sash and saw him come out of the house, he stood hesitating in the street sometime which way he should go; at last he went Rosemary-lane way: when the cloak was missed I went in pursuit of the prisoner. I went and looked into all the shops in Rosemary-lane, but did not see the prisoner till I was coming back, then I met him going into Rosemary-lane, I watched him till I saw him go into a cloath's shop; he took out the cloak and offered to sell it; I ran into the shop and collared him and charged him with stealing the cloak, he then said it was his wife's cloak, after that he said he found it; the mob rose about us; there was no constable to be got, so I took him myself before a justice.

[The cloak was produced in court and deposed to by the prosecutrix.]

GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice BLACKSTONE.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

309. DANIEL SULAN was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of James Bonus on the 12th of February , about the hour of twelve in the night, and stealing a silver cream pot, value 5 s. a wainscot box value 2 s. 120 pieces of copper value 2 s. the property of the said James Bonus in his dwelling house .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

310. 311. EDWARD DANIELS and WILLIAM BURLEY were indicted for stealing a black gelding, value 10 l. the property of Jeremiah Seal , June 21 .

BOTH NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

EDWARD DANIELS and WILLIAM BURLEY were indicted for stealing a black gelding, value 30 s. the property of John Beck .

BOTH NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

EDWARD DANIELS and WILLIAM BURLEY were indicted for stealing a grey gelding, value 5 l. 5 s. the property of John Price , July 31 .

BOTH NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

WILLIAM BURLEY was indicted for stealing a black gelding, value 3 l. 3 s. the property of Henry Lacey , September 20 .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

EDWARD DANIELS was indicted for stealing a black gelding, value 3 l. the property of John Price , August 14 .

JOHN PRICE sworn.

I live at the Rising Sun at Hackney . I put a black gelding into the field over night, I missed it out of the field at four in the morning. I met the prisoner; he laughed at me, and asked me if I had lost my coach-horse which I had bought so lately; I told him I had: he said he would bring me my horse if I would give him something to do; but I never had my gelding again.

JONATHAN SAUNDERS sworn.

Edward Daniels and I took this horse out of the Mill fields, and he sold it to John Foster in Allen Street for 10 s. We took up Foster but he got out of the window and got off; we could not find the skin, for they carry them away to the tanners as soon as they kill the horses.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I know nothing of the matter; I don't know Foster, nor where he lives.

GUILTY Death .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

312. 313. FRANCIS MAJOR and JOHN HOSIER were indicted for feloniously stealing twelve linen table cloths, value 40 s. a dresser cloth, value 6 d. a linen waistcoat, value 6 d. a dimity petticoat, value 7 s. a linen shift, value 3 s. a linen shirt-body, value 3 s. and a linen shirt, value 3 s. the property of Sarah Musters , widow , January 27 .

BOTH NOT GUILTY .

314. MARY BISHOP was indicted for feloniously stealing a gold watch, value 10 l. and a base metal watch key, value 1 d. the property of Sarah Warner , spinster , in the dwelling-house of a certain person unknown , April 3 .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice BLACKSTONE.

315. JOHN BRISTOW was indicted for feloniously stealing three black silk cloaks, value 13 s. seven linen shifts, value 7 s. two muslin aprons, value 4 s. and a dimity petticoat, value 8 s. the property of Margaret Morris , widow , February 26 .

MARGARET MORRIS sworn.

I live near Carnaby Market . On the 26th of February last I lost some linen clothes that hung to dry in a one pair of stairs room (repeating them) three cloaks also were taken out of a drawer in the same room; the room was not locked; I cannot tell who took them.

[ Margaret Morris , junior, confirmed the evidence of the prosecutrix.]

CHARLES GRUBB sworn.

Having a suspicion of the prisoner, I stopped him in Tottenham Court-Road on the 28th of February: I found a bundle upon him. I asked him how he came by it; he said he found them in the street; it was a wet dirty night, and it was not dirty; upon examining the bundle I found it contained shifts wet as just from the wash. I took him into custody.

[The linen was produced in court and deposed to by Mrs. Morris and her daughter.]

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I found them in a door way; it was a frosty night.

GUILTY .

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

316. FRANCES BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing a metal watch, value 20 s. a steel watch chain, value 2 s. a pebble stone seal, set in gold, value 3 l. and a composition seal set in gold, value 10 s. the property of James Cobb , privately from his person , March 5 .

BOTH GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice BLACKSTONE.

317. JOHN SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing a pair of velvet breeches, value 2 s. a velvet waistcoat, value 2 s. and a pair of silk breeches, value 2 s. the property of Alexander Campbell , Esq . March 25 .

NOT GUILTY .

318. MARY DAVIS was indicted for feloniously stealing sixteen guineas in monies numbered , the property of Charlotte Deverneuil , April 27 .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice BLACKSTONE.

319. 320. 321. WILLIAM KNIGHT , FRANCIS MAJOR , and JOHN HOSIER were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of the Reverend John Hockley , clerk , on the 3d. of February , about the hour of two in the night, and stealing three silver soup spoons, value 3 l. nine desert silver spoons, value 40 s. and five silver table spoons, value 50 s. the property of the said John Hockley in his dwelling-house .

The Rev. Mr. JOHN HOCKLEY sworn.

I live at Parson's Green, in the parish of Fulham : my house was broke open in the night of the 3d of February. I know nothing of the circumstances of the breaking. I did not see the place fastened over night from whence the plate was stole; nor did I see it when it was discovered the next morning. After my servant had found out that the house had been robbed I saw the marks by which some persons had got over the walls and had got into this scullery in order to get the plate out of it. I had a very fierce dog in the yard, but one of them who is admitted an evidence for the crown, had lived three years ago in my service; he used to the dog, and the dog knew him again and was more grateful to him than he was to me, or he would have torn him to pieces.

EDWARD DALTON sworn.

I am servant to Mr. Hockley; the spoons were lost out of the scullery; they are usually kept in a cupboard in this scullery. I saw the door bolted the night before, and the window shut at ten in the evening. I saw the spoons in the cupboard, there were seventeen spoons in all, three large soup spoons, nine desert spoons, and five table spoons. I know nothing of the situation in which it was found the next morning, for the maid opened it, and she is not here. I did not see it till nine in the morning; I then saw some marks of some mortar which had fell down where somebody had climbed over the wall and got into the scullery window; they must have got over four or five walls, for it is an enclosure backwards; the garden walls must be climbed over; it must have been committed by some person pretty well acquainted with the situation of the house, and they must have got in at the window.

SARAH HEDGES sworn.

I live in the parish of St. Giles, in a common lodging house, kept by Frances Keeling , and she keeps a sort of a shop; there are two beds in this room; I and some other women were in one of the beds; and the four prisoners had their lodging on the other bed. On the 3d of February, between three and four in the morning, all the prisoners, and Griffiths who is the evidence, came in and laid down upon the bed in their clothes. Hosier had the property wrapped up in a blue apron. I heard there was something of value there; it gingled as he laid it down in the chair by the bedside; I wondered what it was; I did not enquire that night, but the next morning at seven, when the prisoners got up, I asked them what the bundle contained, Hosier and Griffiths said that they were spoons that they had got the night before. Hosier and Griffiths went down to Frances Keeling , and left the plate with her; and afterwards they came up again. Griffiths, in the presence of all the rest of the prisoners, desired me to go down to Mrs. Keeling, and desire her to send up half a guinea upon them, for they wanted half a guinea; I found Mrs. Keeling there with this plate, she had got some leaden weights and weighed the spoons; she said she had no money of her own, that she could send them up, but she would go to Whitechapel and sell the spoons, and bring the money there: if I would go along with her, she would treat me with a coach; we took a coach from St. Giles's to Whitechapel; there we sold the spoons for 5 l. 12 s. when we came back again, Mrs. Keeling gave the prisoner three guineas; I don't recollect whether she said that was the whole she got for them, or whether she endeavoured to cheat them out of part of it. I was by when she gave them the three guineas; there were three very large spoons; and the remainder seemed to be table spoons. I had nothing for my trouble.

JAMES GRIFFITHS sworn.

I was servant to Mr. Hockley three years ago last Bartholomew tide; I have been at sea since; and worked about in Gardens; and at last of all entered into a gang with these people; all the prisoners went out with me, with an intention to do this fact. The night of the 3d of February we went to a place called the New Ale-house, in Buckingham street, St. Giles's, about nine or ten in the evening. The reason of pitching upon this particular house was from my knowing that the plate was usually kept in that cupboard. We went along, and came to Parson's Green about one o'clock, but Francis Major was so much in liquor, that we were obliged to leave him behind us at Little Chelsea, under a hay-stack; so he did not go along with us. When we came to Parson's Green, we got over three or four walls by my directions; at last we got to the top of Mr. Hockley's wall; there are pales fixed upon the wall which have tender hooks in them; I attempted to get over, and I tore my leg in two places with these tenter hooks; I was the only person that got over, because I knew the house better than the rest; and also because of the dog which was very large and fierce; Knight was at top of the pales with me, but did not dare to get down. When I got down the dog knew me perfectly well and fondled upon me; I had never seen the dog since I left the service of Mr. Hockley; I chained him up; the dog readily submitted to it; Knight still stood at the top of the pales; and Hosier stood in the garden behind, in order to help us two up; when I got to the scullery I lifted up the sash window and put in my hand, and I found I could reach the cupboard without getting into the scullery; so I never was in the scullery, but put in my hand and took the plate out, and handed it up to Knight, who stood upon the pales; I remember particularly I took a soup ladle and two wooden spoons, which are used for the young gentlemen who are scholars there, and about fifteen others; if there were any more, they concealed them from me; I handed them up to them, they put them into a blue apron; Knight was upon the wall, and Hosier below; when this was done, I unchained the dog, and turned him loose; and then got over the wall back again; then we all set forward for London; and at Little Chelsea we called upon Major again, who was got something more sober than he was, and came home along with us; then we all went to Mrs. Keeling's house, and laid down upon the bed in our clothes. Sarah Hedges was there. We got up at seven o'clock, and Hosier and I went down stairs to Mrs. Keeling with the plate; I asked her if she would have it; she said yes, if it was a thousand pounds worth; but when she came to treat about it, she had but 3 s. in money, which we borrowed of her for out present expences; when I got up stairs I thought that would not do, and sent Hedges to Mrs. Keeling, in order to get half a guinea for the present she brought word that she had not half a guinea in the world, but would go to Whitechapel and sell the plate, and then we should have the money; accordingly Keeling and Hedges went out together, and staid about five hours; when they returned, Mrs. Keeling gave to me three guineas in the presence of Hedges; I got it changed, and we all four shared the money; which came to 15 s. and 9 d. Major had a share, as he went with us, though he had got drunk by accident by the way; one Charlotte Mc Clochlan , who kept company with Major, made a great noise about it, said he had been a great fool to be out all night and get but 15 s. and 9 d. and they must have cheated him; this made such a riot that we thought it best to get away. - We saw Grubb, and Knight had a loaded pistol in his hand, which he thought to fire at him.

CHARLES GRUBB sworn.

I had an information of this gang of housebreakers. I met Knight and Griffiths together, and stopped them, Knight had a loaded pistol in his hand; and he Holloed out to Griffiths, shall I go it? Griffiths immediately called out, no don't. Knight then ran off; I secured Griffiths, when Griffiths was secured, he said he had been long desirous to get out of the gang, and wished to be admitted an evidence; after that I took Mrs. Keeling up, who had sold the plate for them; she was admitted to bail, and was to have given evidence, but she has absconded.

Frances Keeling was called, but not appearing, the Court ordered her recognizance to be estreated.

KNIGHT's DEFENCE.

What this man has said is quite false. I am innocent of what has been sworn against me.

(Major was not put upon his defence.)

HOSIER's DEFENCE.

Griffiths came into the Crown alehouse, St. Giles's, and asked me to walk with him to Parson's green, to a gentleman, where he thought he could get a good deal of plate; he kept me in the yard; he said the dog would tear me to pieces; after we had got it, he gave me a guinea. He said I will give you this money for nothing; and if you have a mind, you may give me something out of it; I gave him a shilling and he was contented.

KNIGHT, GUILTY Death .

MAJOR, NOT GUILTY .

HOSIER, GUILTY Death .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice BLACKSTONE.

322. JOHN BENNET was indicted for feloniously stealing three guineas, a half guinea, and 3 s. in monies, numbered , the property of Martin Waghorn , March 24 .

MARTIN WAGHORN sworn.

I am a lieutenant in the navy . In the passage to Covent Garden playhouse , I found a hand in my pocket; I seized the prisoner's hand coming out of my pocket; and the same instant my money sell upon the floor; the money was picked up by some of the people about, I never got it again; my pocket was drawn inside out.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I never meddled with the gentleman's pocket; I was shoving in, to get as good a seat as I could; I was searched, I had no money but my own, about half a guinea and 7 s.

GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron EYRE .

323. JOHN RATFORD was indicted for stealing and embezzling eight wooden butts, value 8 l. the property of our Lord the King, and being the naval stores of our Lord the King against the statute .

2d Count. For stealing the same butts, being the property of our Lord the King, April 10.

JAMES YOUNG sworn.

I am the master store keeper at the Victualling Office, these butts are naval stores belonging to the crown.

JAMES HALL sworn.

I am a master carman, I contract with the Victualling Office to carry whatsoever they shall want, and employ my men under me with several carts. I employed the prisoner, as I have done several times before, to carry from Tower Whan night butts to the Victualling Office. I helped to load them up the same day as laid in the indictment; soon after I had an information that he had carried them off; I met him and asked him what was become of those butts; he at the first stoutly denied that he knew any thing of the master; then he burst out a crying, and said, he would tell where they were; he said, they were in a place in Virginia Street, I went with him to this house; I looked through the crevice of the door, the door was partly open, there I saw the butts. I got assistance and forced open the doors and examined them, and saw the broad R, which is the mark upon all the king's stores stamped upon the hoops, and also upon the casks themselves near the bunghole; therefore I had no doubt that these were the same butts that were loaded up by the prisoner.

ALEXANDER MITCHELL sworn.

I am a carman. I saw in Church-Lane, Spitalfields, one of my master's carts with a load of butts upon it, and Ratford driving it: this place is out of the road from Tower Wharf to the Victualling Office. I met some other people, we drank some gin together: after we had finished the conversation the prisoner desired me, for God sake! not to say that I had seen him, for he would tell my master a story that the horses ran away, and so he was going round to the Victualling Office. I went and discovered the whole matter to my master.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I just overtook the cart as he and this little lad came with the pitch-forks and shovels upon their shoulders; they said don't take notice to my master, I will go round Well-Close Square with them, and then to the office with them. Young Will Lane wrenched the whip out of my hand and drove the cart away, and he paid 6 d. at the bar; the butts were in the cart then.

[The prisoner called a witness who gave him a good character.]

GUILTY, of stealing to the value of 16 s .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice BLACKSTONE.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

324. AMEY DAWSON, otherwise PINHORN was indicted for feloniously stealing a silver watch, value 40 s. and 6 s. in monies numbered; the property of Thomas Matravers privately from his person , April 13 .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron EYRE .

325, 326, 327. JOHN EDWARDS , DAVID DOCKHAM , and THOMAS HODGE were indicted, the two first for feloniously stealing eight live pigs, value 8 l. the property of Daniel Sebbon , February the 18th , and the other for receiving four of the said pigs, well knowing them to have been stolen against the statute .

DANIEL SEBBON sworn.

I am a cow-keeper at Islington . On the 19th of February I missed eight pigs out of the back part of my premises; on the Saturday following the constable came and said there were some pigs lay dead in a stable in Caroline Court, Saffron Hill, and desired me to come and look at them. I went; there were four of them; they were stuck. I went down and looked at them, and swore to them by the marks and colour, it was a particular mark that they had wrung in their nose. I never had any other pigs with such a mark.

THOMAS ISAAC sworn.

Upon the Saturday following I had an information brought to me by a hand-bill, that some pigs were lost; then I had information that some hogs lay dead in a place. I looked at them by the description of the hand-bill, I went to Sebbon and told him there were some pigs, and asked him to come and look at them; he swore to them by particular marks. I took Edwards and Hodges.

EDWARD WILLIAMS sworn.

I and the two prisoners, Edwards and Dockham, were the persons concerned in stealing these pigs: we were at a loss when we got them where to put them; we met Hodge, who said he would help us to a place to put them in, and went with us, and we put them in a stable in Caroline Court. On Friday Hodge told us he could help us to a customer for some of the pigs; he said, his brother would buy two or three of them; and we hired an ass of one Fennell to carry two of them to Hodge's brother, two of them were killed in the stable, and removed to Boiling-Alley, and the next day were removed to Hodge's house, in Crown Court, Grubb Street. Hodge had part of the two guineas: he received of his brother for the two pigs, and helped in carrying the others; the pigs that were owned by Mr. Sebbon were never at Hodge's, they were in the stable.

JOHN MARTIN sworn.

I have a stable in Caroline Court: I came to the stable on Wednesday morning, and found eight pigs in it. I asked a man who has part of the stable with me, how they came there: he said, Edwards, Williams, Dockham and Hodge brought them there over night. I went to seek after them: I found Williams and Dockham in Smithfield, and told them to come and take the pigs away, or I would turn them out of the stable; they all four came down after me, when I went to the stable; I saw Hodge and Edwards with a sack and an axe, and I told them they had no occasion to bring them there, for nothing should be done to them in my stable; then Dockham and Edwards turned them into the next stable, and they all went in after them: that is the stable where the four pigs were found afterwards; they wanted to hire my ass; I would not lend it them; they hired Fennell's ass.

GEORGE FENNELL sworn.

On Friday William Dockham , Hodge, and Edwards came down Caroline Court, and asked me to lend them a jack-ass, and said they would pay me for it. I lent them one, and they took two pigs away. I went with them, they carried them to a butcher's shop near the end of Red-Cross-street: I don't know the butcher's name.

Do you know what was paid? - No; they sent me to an alehouse, and desired I would stay till they came; they gave me five shillings.

EDWARDS's DEFENCE.

I know no more of the affair than the child unborn.

Edwards called three witnesses who gave him a good character.

DOCKHAM's DEFENCE.

I met Williams, he asked me to assist in driving the pigs, and said he would pay me for my trouble; I know no more of it. I have been a drover all my life time.

For Hodge.

THOMAS RYLAND sworn.

I am a constable. I attend at Justice Blackborough's: I took Dockham and Williams by the information of Hodge, which was the means of this being brought to light, Williams said, before the Justice, that Hodge was innocent as to the thieving part; but that he helped them to a customer: he wanted to be admitted an evidence, but Williams got the preference, being first examined before the magistrate; he was then discharged, but the next day surrendered himself to me.

[Hodge called one other witness who gave him a good character.]

ALL THREE GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron EYRE .

[Edwards Dockham:Branding. See summary.]

[Edwards Dockham:Imprisonment. See summary.]

[Hodge:Imprisonment. See summary.]

328. HUMPHRY ALEXANDER was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling house of Judith Thompson , on the 12th of March , about the hour of seven in the afternoon, the said Judith and others being in the said dwelling house, and stealing twenty-three yards of Ruffia-cloth, value 10 s. the property of the said Judith in her dwelling house .

ANN BRADLEY sworn.

I am servant to Judith Thompson , who is a linen-draper , I was sitting in a parlour behind the shop about seven in the evening; the man was shutting up the shop. I went into the shop to serve a customer, and then went into the parlour again; and the shop being near shut up, I left the door unbolted: just as I had got in I heard the latch move; I went into the shop to see if any body was come in, and saw the door latched: just as I had returned into the parlour, I heard the latch move again; I turned quick about and saw a man go out of the shop in a hurry, with something under his arm; I ran out and pursued him: I ran as far as Brownlow-street, and found I had out-run my strength, and could not catch him. I called, stop thief! and then heard somebody else cry stop thief! I then recollected I had left the shop with nobody in it, and if there were any more of them they might strip the shop; so I ran immediately back. The things were dropped and brought back; they have our mark upon them.

SAMUEL BROMFIELD sworn.

I heard the cry of stop thief. I went to stop the prisoner, and he threw down two bundles: I took them up, and called, stop thief! and he was taken in less than two hundred yards, and brought back to the shop. I am positive the prisoner is the man that dropped the bundles. I delivered them to the last witness.

MARY CUNNING sworn.

I was going down Holborn: I stopped and was looking in at a toy-shop next door to Mrs. Thompson's: the prisoner and another man walked by me two or three times, and looked full in my face. I was afraid they were going to say something to me, and I went away. I looked back and saw the prisoner come out at Mrs. Thompson's door with something under his arm. I heard the cry of stop thief! he was taken. I saw him when he was brought back, and knew him again directly.

WILLIAM HARRIS sworn.

I stopped the prisoner in Gray's-Inn passage, he had nothing on him then. I brought him back to Mrs. Thompson's. He begged pardon and said he hoped for mercy.

[The things were produced in court and deposed to by Bradley.]

The prisoner did not say any thing in his defence.

Not Guilty of breaking and entering the dwelling house, but Guilty of stealing the goods .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

329. WILLIAM GARMENT was indicted for feloniously stealing four live hens, value 4 s. and a live cock, value 2 s. the property of William Elliot , March 19 .

WILLIAM ELLIOTT sworn.

I live at Hodsdon-Green ; this day six weeks I lost four hens and a cock from a stable adjoining to my house. I saw them about three hours before I missed them; the door was locked but the key not taken out. On the Saturday following Thomas Blissett found them in Oxford Street.

THOMAS BLISSETT sworn.

I am a constable at Hodsdon. I knew my neighbour had lost the hens and cock. On the Saturday morning coming to London I found two cocks and four hens on William Stone , who is the man that bought them; they were standing in the street.

WILLIAM STONE sworn.

I bought them of William Garment ; I believe there were a dozen and a half of them; there are some of them at my house now.

Did you shew any of them to Mrs. Elliott? - Yes, the cock.

Elliott. I saw the cock; he brought it to Hodsdon Green. I am sure it was my cock, it had a particular mark. I had cut its tail crooked, but I should have known it if it had not been cut.

For the Prisoner.

ANN CROKER sworn.

I am a lace maker at Turnham Green. On the 18th of March I went to Uxbridge to meet the laceman. He was carrying some potatoes; I asked him to let me ride. I got up and he went and fetched some fowls. I left him at Acton and went to Turnham Green.

GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

330. PHILIP ADSHEAD was indicted for stealing a fringed cloth hammer cloth, value 10 s. the property of John Leake , March 10 .

[ Barnard Barnard , the principal witness, was called but not appearing, the court ordered his recognizance to be estreated.]

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

331. JOSEPH WOOD was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Thomas Smith on the 26th of April , about the hour of nine in the night, and stealing two silver tea spoons, value 2 s. the property of the said Thomas in his dwelling-house .

THOMAS SMITH sworn.

I am a carpenter in the parish of St. Luke . On Sunday the 26th of March my wife and I went out about five o'clock: I locked up the house; we returned soon after nine: when we came near the house I saw a light up stairs; I left my wife and went and alarmed a neighbour; on my return my wife had stopped two gentlemen and told them there were thieves in the house. I desired them to help me, and then went and opened the door, and cried, holloa! who is there; then the people behind me told me the candle was put out. I then heard somebody running down stairs very fast: being afraid they might have some weapon concealed to do me a mischief, I went from the door about the length of my stick to strike at them as they came out. I struck at them, and I believe hit one; they ran off, but were pursued, and the prisoner was taken. I found the locks of my bureau broke open; there were six of my shirts packed up, but not taken away. I lost two spoons that I have never found again.

WILLIAM BIRCH sworn.

I was coming a cross Windmill Hill; the prosecutor's wife stopped me, and told me there were thieves in the house: the prosecutor went and opened the door, and cried out, holloa! who is there. The light was immediately put out, and some men came out of the house; we struck at them: I pursued the prisoner; I am sure he is one that came out of the house; I never lost sight of him till I took him.

[ William Holmes confirmed the evidence of the last witness.]

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I am sorry the gentleman should perjure himself. I was coming by, I heard an outcry; I stopped to see what was the matter; two men ran out of the house; I ran after them, and a man laid hold of me, and said I was one of them.

[The prisoner called several witnesses who gave him a good character.]

Not Guilty of breaking and entering the dwelling house, but Guilty of stealing the goods .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

332, 333, 334. WILLIAM ALLEN JOSEPH VAUX , and WILLIAM LATTIMORE were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Samuel Humphrys on the 21st of February , about the hour of eight in the night, and stealing fifty-two pair of metal shoe-buckles, value 1 l. 16 s. fourteen pair of metal knee-buckles, value 3 s. 6 d. fourteen pair of mourning shoe-buckles, value 5 s. 6 d. seven mourning stock-buckles, value 3 s. nine pair of child's metal clasps, value 18 d. thirteen paper snuff-boxes, value 7 s. two iron snuff boxes, value 2 s. eight enamelled snuff boxes, value 6 s. one enamelled nutmeg grater, value 6 d. five smelling bottles, value 4 s. fourteen pin-cases, value 4 s. 6 d. two tambour cases, value 1 s. 6 d. three watch trinkets, value 15 d. six steel watch-hooks, value 2 s. four ivory eggs, value 1 s. five button hole chissels, value 18 d. four brass watch keys, value 6 d. three pair of tweezers, value 9 d. three leather scissar sheaths, value 9 d. nine ivory thimbles, value 9 d. seventeen metal thimbles, value 10 d. six metal tea spoons, value 4 d. four clasp knives, value 2 s. 4 d. fourteen metal seals, value 3 s. two hair pins, value 6 d. four steel pencil cases, value 1 s. six pair of stone-buttons, set in pewter, value 18 d. three metal rings, set with stones, value 18 d. six hat buckles, value 6 d. four small fans, value 4 d. a stone stay hook, value 3 d. twenty-four gilt rings, value 2 s. eight cards of metal sleeve-buttons, value 5 s. four cards of mourning sleeve buttons, value 2 s. a tobacco stopper, value 4 d. eleven tortoiseshell combs, value 18 s. three tortoiseshell comb cases, value 3 s. and a show glass, value 20 s. the property of the same Samuel Humphrys in his dwelling house .

JANE HUMPHRYS sworn.

I am the wife of Samuel Humphrys ; we keep a toy-shop in Angel Court, Westminster . I had retreated into a little corner, not a yard from the shop, with the door opening into a passage; the shop door was shut, and a bell to it. I believe the windows were shut, but they were not fastened; I did not hear any noise at all. I don't know when these things were taken away. I went into the shop about eight in the evening, and then, to my great surprise, saw the glass-case, the show-glass that used to stand in the window, was gone; that the window was then standing open, not put down; the cases used to stand in the window. This glass-case contained a great number of articles which I cannot give an account of exactly, because I left it at the office when the indictment was drawn up. I am sure there were more than ten snuff-boxes, and fifty or sixty paper snuffboxes in the show-glass; the show-glass was taken with them. I informed the neighbours of my having been robbed, and Nicholas Bonwick was soon taken. I saw the glass-case at the Justice's. Nicholas Bonwick had come to the shop three or four evenings before on little trifling errands, in order, as I suppose, to take a view of the premises, and see whether any thing might be easily taken away.

NICHOLAS BONWICK sworn.

Allen told us he knew where there was a show-glass which might be easily taken away; myself and the prisoner went there; Vaux and I took the glass out of the window and carried it to St. John's Church-Yard; Lattimore was a little afraid to be concerned in it; he stood upon the watch ready to give us notice if any body arrived; we gave him a couple of snuff-boxes, and a penknife, not to tell any thing of the matter. We were carried before Justice Durden, where I told the truth, and was admitted an evidence.

JOHN CHEWTER sworn.

I am a constable. Henry Jones and I saw Bonwick brought as a prisoner to Justice Durden's. We went upon his information to search Vaux's lodgings, in Mitre street; there we found a parcel of buckles and other things, and Vaux himself whom we secured; afterwards we went to Allen's lodgings, in Duck Lane; he got upon the bed and secreted himself; in the next room we found a parcel of snuff-boxes, besides one which he had given to a woman in the house; then we went to Lattimore's lodgings, and found him in bed; we did not find any thing in his lodgings; but he acknowledged he had two snuff-boxes which he had hid among some ruins for fear of a discovery. He went with us and showed us where he had dug a hole; we opened the hole and found the snuff-boxes.

ALLEN's DEFENCE.

The things that were found were not in the house where I live; I know nothing of them.

VAUX's DEFENCE.

The evidence gave them to me to take home till next morning.

LATTIMORE's DEFENCE.

Allen gave them to me; I put them in the hole in the ruins.

All three not Guilty of the burglary, but Guilty of stealing the goods .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice BLACKSTONE.

[Branding. See summary.]

[Military/Naval duty. See summary.]

335. HENRY TURNER was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Anne Arnold , on the 20th of February , about the hour of ten in the night, and stealing a tin painted canister, value 1 s. and a pound weight of green tea, value 6 s. the property of the said Anne in her dwelling house .

ANNE ARNOLD sworn.

I keep a chandler's-shop ; the prisoner came into my shop on the 20th of February, between nine and ten at night for a twopenny loaf; he had the loaf and went out. I went backwards into my back room; in two minutes there was an alarm; I missed my cannister, and found the sash of my shop window thrown up. I suspected that the prisoner took an opportunity, while purchasing the loaf, to take a nail which fastened the two sashes together from the window frame, and so to be able to throw the sash up.

JAMES SMITH sworn.

John Draper and I found the cannister upon the prisoner the next morning.

[The cannister was produced in court and deposed to by the prosecutrix.]

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I bought this as smuggled tea.

Not Guilty of breaking and entering the dwelling-house, but Guilty of stealing the goods .]

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron EYRE .

336. HANNAH the wife of James White was indicted for feloniously stealing a black callimanco petticoat, value 2 s. four cloth aprons, value 4 s. a muslin apron, value 1 s. and a pair of worsted stockings, value 6 d. the property of Bridget Madden , spinster , March 1 .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice BLACKSTONE.

337. MARGARET CREAMER , widow , was indicted for feloniously stealing a guinea and seven shillings in money numbered , the property of Thomas Holifield , April 18 .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice BLACKSTONE.

338. JOHN RAVENCRAFT was indicted for feloniously stealing a linen sheet, value 8 s. the property of Elizabeth Antony , April 18 .

GUILTY of stealing to the value of 10 d.

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice BLACKSTONE.

[Whipping. See summary.]

339. 340. WILLIAM THOMPSON and CHARLES THOMPSON were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Jane Stevens , widow , on the 10th of March , about the hour of ten in the night, and stealing two linen shirts, value 16 s. one linen shirt, value 7 s. a linen stock, value 1 s. three pair of stockings, value 3 s. two pair of linen sheets, value 24 s. twenty-six linen dusters, value 12 s. two linen towels, value 1 s. a silk cloak, value 5 s. a pillow and case, value 6 s. a cotton handkerchief, value 2 s. and a dimity petticoat with pockets, value 8 s. the property of the said Jane in her dwelling house .

JANE STEVENS sworn.

I am a washerwoman in Hatfield Street : my house was broke open on the 10th of March, between nine and ten at night. At a little before nine I went up two pair of stairs to a lodger's room, and at half after nine I had word brought me that my door was unbolted and the clothes gone: Charles Thompson was a lodger in the house; a young woman that lived with him called me down and told me the clothes were gone; the other prisoner used to come backwards and forwards; the things were in the kitchen, in the lower part of the house. I fastened the street door with two bolts before I went up; there is but one street door to the house; the lodgers could unbolt the door and go out, and lock the door after them; there was a bell at the door which was gone too; the young woman was terribly frightened, and they sent for my sister, and we took Charles Thompson in custody; he was in the house.

ANN NAYLOR sworn.

I am servant to Mrs. Lodge, in Charter-house-square. The prosecutrix is my sister; she washes for my mistress. Charles Thompson came for the things to wash; he was very much in liquor; I went with him to see that he carried them safe. When I saw him safe in my sister's house I returned home. I had not been home above half an hour, before a person came and told me my sister was in fits, and as I was going along with her, she said she thought my sister had lost all the clothes out of the house, but that the thief was in the house. I went to the house, and we secured Thompson; the clothes are marked with a plain blue L.

JOHN DINMORE sworn.

I am a constable. By the information of a woman who is in court, I, and Isaacs, and Redgrave, went to the house of a Mrs. Palmer, in a court in Black Boy Alley; there we found the property.

[ Jonathan Redgrave confirmed the evidence of Dinmore.]

MARY PALMER sworn.

I live in Sharpe's Court, Cow Cross. William Thompson brought the things between nine and ten o'clock; he was very much in liquor; he said he was a gentleman's servant in St. Martin's Lane; that he was going to the washer-woman's, and as he was in liquor, he was afraid he should lose them, and desired to leave them with me. I met him the next day in Field Lane; he said he wanted me to go of an errand for him; he went to the New Gaol, and went in. I waited for him at the door; he was detained, and taken before the justice. I went to the justice's, and hearing what it was upon, I mentioned the clothes being left at my house.

ESSIEBE APPLETREE sworn.

I live with Charles Thompson in the prosecutor's house; I have lived with him six or seven weeks; he said if I would come and live with him, he would marry me at Easter; he came and asked me for a candle, and went down stairs, and I heard the door unbolt. I went down stairs, and asked him if he was going out; he said no, I might take his hat up stairs, and then I should be sure he was not going out. I took his hat, and went up stairs, and he came up just after, but went down again. I went down again, and somebody pushed the stair-foot door against me, and pushed me down; I found the door open, and the things gone, and called Mrs. Stevens down; she went into fits; Thompson and I were both taken to prison together; the justice discharged me the next day when I went again: he would not discharge me without bail. I lived with my father and mother in Fleet Lane before I lived with him, and live with them now. I am sixteen years old.

[The linen was produced in court, and deposed to by Naylor.]

WILLIAM THOMPSON 's DEFENCE.

I am innocent of what I am charged with. On Tuesday I went up to my brother's to dinner; after dinner we went out, and had two or three pints of beer; then we went to Fleet Lane, and had several pots; then my brother wished me good night. He afterwards came to me again to the public house, and asked me to go with him to his lodging; that he had some things to carry to Mrs. James's in Sharp's Alley. I went with him; he put them on my head; he said they were his own property. The next morning I went to see if he had been for them; I found he had not; I went to his lodgings, and heard he was in New Prison. I went to her again, and asked her to go with me to see what he was there for, and they detained me. My brother when he gave them me, said he was afraid they would open them, and bid me say I was a gentleman's servant in St. Martin's Lane, and was carrying them to wash.

CHARLES THOMPSON 's DEFENCE.

My brother is innocent of knowing any thing but that the basket of clothes belonged to me; I did not know but what they were my own property; I had some things in my room in the morning. I deal in old clothes; I came home very much in liquor; I looked round the room to see for the clothes; I did not see them; I went down into the kitchen, as I had the use of the whole house, to look for the bag of clothes; I did not see it, but saw my bag lying on the basket, and thought the things in the basket were those I had in the morning. I gave them to my brother to carry to Sharp's Court. Mrs. Stevens has trusted me several days, and never missed any thing; she gave up the whole of the house to my care at that time. If I had known they were her things, I would not have took them. I did not know Anne Naylor was with me when I came from Lodge's, I was so much in liquor.

[The prisoners called two witnesses, who gave them a good character.]

Both NOT GUILTY of breaking and entering the dwelling-house, but Guilty of stealing the goods .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron EYRE .

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

341. HANNAH GOULSON was indicted for feloniously stealing a wooden box, value 1 d. eight yards of silk ribband, value 2 s. a silk purse, value 2 d. seven guineas, two half guineas, and nine shillings and sixpence in monies, numbered, the property of William Savage , in his dwelling-house .

[The prosecutor was called, but not appearing, the court ordered his recognizance to be estreated.]

NOT GUILTY .

342, 343, 344. WILLIAM TURNER , JOSEPH DAVIS , and HENRY JORDAN , were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Eleanor Errington , widow , on the 26th of December , about the hour of two in the night, and stealing a silver milk pot, value 15 s. a silver mug, value 42 s. five silver table spoons, value 40 s. four silver salts, value 21 s. two silver pepper castors, value 10 s. six silver tea spoons, value 12 s. a pair of silver shoe buckles, set with stones, value 20 s. two pair of silver knee buckles, set with stones, value 20 s. a pair of silver shoe buckles, value 7 s. a silver stock buckle, value 3 s. two gold rings, value 20 s. four silk gowns, value 50 s. two silk petticoats, value 10 s. a crape gown, value 20 s. six linen shirts, value 15 s. six linen shifts, value 15 s. four linen sheets, value 10 s. two linen pillow cases, value 2 s. eighteen linen aprons, value 20 s. three linen table cloths, value 10 s. twenty yards of silk, value 30 s. six yards of silk lace, value 3 s. twelve yards of thread lace, value 20 s. four lawn caps, value 6 s. two silk aprons, value 20 s. three muslin handkerchiefs, laced, value 10 s. a silk handkerchief, value 10 s. a child's coral, set with silver, value 5 s. a watch with a metal case, value 25 s. a yard of woollen cloth, value 10 s. and fifty guineas, the property of the said Eleanor Errington, in her dwelling house .

ELEANOR ERRINGTON sworn.

I am a widow, and keep a public house , called Copenhagen House, in the fields near Islington ; it is a lone house; at the time my house was broke open, my family consisted of two servants, (a waiter and a maid servant). My servants went to bed over night by ten o' clock; I was in bed myself by twelve, the waiter secured the out doors. I fastened the door at the bottom of the stair case; I always make it a rule to fasten that; there are two bolts in the inside. At about one o'clock (I believe it was) in the morning I heard a noise in my kitchen, which was repeated; I then got up and found that people were in my house, I hoped to have driven them away by calling to my servants by several fictitious names in order to give them the idea of my having a large family about me, but the door upon the stair case was soon forced open, and the door of my room, which is upon the first landing place; the lower pannel was broke through, and the lock was forced off; the first person that made his appearance, had his face blacked, or a crape over it, and a round frock over his clothes; the next had a handkerchief tied up to his eyes, and a taller man had a dark lanthorn. I myself had fire arms in my room, which they immediately seized; the tall man d - d me, and asked me if that was my guard? they took them from me; then they broke open my bureau, in which were writings; I gave them my pokets; they broke the front of a chest of drawers, and they took my clothes and linen; my money, which I kept in a purse in one of the drawers, I had taken and concealed upon the first alarm, between the bed and the sacking; a wainscot desk, containing my plate, I had thrown under the bed on the first alarm, in hopes they might have escaped their search; one, that they called captain, said, he was certain that I had plate, and in my fright I was obliged to tell them where it was; they broke open the desk in which the plate was and took the plate; among other things they took a pair of buckles, set with stone. I begged for my clothes, but they took them all; they went down stairs and after some time three returned and threatened my life; one, which I take to be the tallest, had a cutlass; the second a pocket pistol; and the third, a shorter man, stood at the foot of the bed, they demanded my money, and said, they were well informed I had money: I heard a fourth voice upon the landing place, saying, don't ask her questions, cut her throat! I had a child of seven years old in the bed with me, very much frightened; I endeavoured to pacify the child, they threatened to dash the child's brains out if it made a noise; in the end I told them where the money was, and they took it and my watch which hung at the bed's head; there was about fifty guineas, and there was some money taken from my pocket, and some that lay loose in the drawer; they went down stairs very merry, and sung; there were bottles of wine found upon the table next day, from which it appeared they had been drinking; after some time one came half way up the stairs and asked how I did, and said, the beef was exceeding good, and they should call again in half an hour. I had a cold buttock of beef which they had been eating, and cold mince pies. Just as they went away, I heard a pistol fired off, I heard one say, you did not think it was me when you shot, I am wounded, I am afraid I shall be lame; this was repeated twice. They came into the house at about one o'clock, I think they staid till about four o'clock, there were some shot sticking in the mantle-piece.

HENRY DAVIS sworn.

I am a waiter at Copenhagen House. I made fast the doors and windows, I was waked in the night by my mistress calling to me between one and two; two persons came into my room, and asked me who was in the house; they said that they would blow my brains out if I did not tell the truth. I told them; they went into the maid's room, but she was not to be found; they said they would cut her to pieces. She called from the top of the house, and said she had hid herself, because she was frightened; she came down stairs upon their bidding her, and got into her bed; they tied me on my bed and left me so. I got up about seven in the morning, and found the doors of the kitchen, the cellar, and the street doors, and the windows were all open; it appeared that the thieves got in at the kitchen window, for there were the marks of iron crows there, and the bolts were bent double. Upon the first alarm, before they came up into my room, I had put a gun out at the window, and had threatened to fire. I was answered by one from below, d - n you, fire away! if you don't I will, and upon that I heard the report of a pistol, and they were up stairs instantly. I found upon examination the next morning, that there were swan-shot and cut lead sticking in the chimney-piece, the contents, as I supposed, of that pistol which was fired into the kitchen, and there were appearances of a pistol having burst, for there were pieces of the barrel of a pistol, and some of the guard there: there was a light near my room, if not brought into it; but I did not see any body; for the first thing they ordered me was, not to look at them, threatening to blow my brains out; they bid me lie on my face, and then they tied me.

ANDREW CARLETON sworn.

All the three prisoners were concerned with me in committing this burglary. We met in the Borough in the morning, and we met at my lodging in the evening in Feather-bed-lane, Cold-Bath-Fields; we set out and went the back way to Copenhagen-house. Turner had the crow; Davis and I broke the kitchen window; Turner and Jordan got in first; then a man called out from the house that he would fire. Davis said, if you don't put your head in I will shoot you; they who were got in called to us without to come in: I jumped with my two hands upon the window in order to get in, and in so doing an old horse pistol I had in my hand went off and burst, and cut my finger sadly; it jarred my arm so as quite to benumb it: we all went up stairs; I suppose the stair-foot door, which had been bolted on the inside, must have been forced before I got in, for I found no impediment; we all got in; Turner forced a pannel of the mistress's room; Turner bid me stay there and take care of her, and to shoot her if she offered to move. I objected to going higher up stairs, because the waiter knew me; therefore I was left in the room, while they went up and secured the waiter. Turner opened the doors. I and Davis had waggoners frocks on; Davis had a brown masque on, the others had black crapes on; I had a handkerchief across my face; I think Davis had a dark lanthorn; we found a box under the bed; Turner said, take the things out one by one. I answered, yes, Captain, I will. After we had taken the things out, we went down and got some beer, mince pies and beef: then Turner said, I will go up and pinch her again; he went up with Davis, and Jordan went up half way; soon after I heard money rattle, and Turner came down singing with a purse with thirty-two guineas in it, which we divided immediately. Davis and Jordan then tried their pistols whether they would go off or not, not meaning to do any mischief with them, and two of them went off. I made a complaint of my arm, and said that I was afraid I should be lame: we returned by a back way, (having lost our way in the fields) to my lodgings: the three prisoners took the things away to the other side of the water, because I did not care to have them in my lodgings. Turner said he would let the two women at the Dolphin in Red-Cross-street, in the Borough, have the two gowns; we had been at that house in the morning before we went upon this expedition; we met again on the Sunday, I and Turner went up stairs and bargained with the woman, while the other two staid below. Turner made them a present of the stone-buckles into the bargain: we sold the gowns for three guineas; there was a blue gown, a black gown, and an old fashioned gown, with white flowers. I was not taken up for this robbery, nor indeed any other. I was in company with some persons, and Sir John Fielding 's men thought I was one Andrews, and therefore they took me up and then I made this discovery.

FRANCES BENSON sworn.

I keep a public house in Red-Cross-street, in the Borough. I know these three prisoners and Carleton who passed by the name of Andrews. I bought three gowns of them on the Sunday morning following Christmas Day; they were all in the house, but whether they came all in together on that day, I cannot say. There was a blue gown, a black gown, and a grey gown, with white flowers. They had a pair of stone buckles, which they asked half a guinea for. I gave three guineas for the gowns, and had the buckles into the bargain. They passed for smugglers; they all had used my house before, and all seemed acquainted with each other; the bargain was made in the club room, up one pair of stairs; Turner and Carleton only were present, but I saw the others afterwards in the house.

Can you recollect whether they were at your house a few days before they made this bargain? - I cannot recollect the little man Jordan, they used to call Little Harry; he and Davis were with Turner that Sunday at my house after this bargain; Carleton, I think, went away, I afterwards delivered the gowns and buckles to Mr. Clarke. I agreed with Carleton for the gowns; I cannot say whether Turner had any thing to do with them or not; he did not say any thing while they were making the bargain. Turner brought the gowns to me a day or two before this bargain for them was made; he represented that there was a person who had three gowns to dispose of, and he would leave them with me to see if I should like to buy them.

JANE BLUNDELL sworn.

I am sister to the last witness. I saw these four persons in the house; Andrews, as he was called, that is Carleton; and Turner, who passed by the name of Scott; Jordan passed by the name of Little Harry; and Davis passed by the name of Joe. I remember the bargain; my sister said to me, shall we have the gowns? I said, just as you please; Turner and Carleton were in the room. I went into the tap-room, and whether the two other prisoners were in the house while the bargain was made, I cannot say; but within five minutes there was a knocking in the kitchen; I went into the kitchen, and there I found the three prisoners and the witness Carleton all together'; they called for some liquor, and drank together; they had used the house some time before, and had used to eat and drink in company.

[ John Clarke produced the gowns and buckles, which he received from Benson and her sister, and they were deposed to by the prosecutrix.]

PERCIVAL PHILLIPS sworn.

On the 1st of April, about twelve at noon, I apprehended the three prisoners on the other side of the water. Jordan was up; Turner and Davis in bed; there was but one bed in the room; there were five pistols in the room by the bed side, two crows, a dark lanthorn, and some gunpowder; the pistols were all loaded. The landlord delivered up to me a blunderbuss, which Turner afterwards claimed as his property.

TURNER's DEFENCE.

I leave it entirely to my counsel.

From Turner to Benson. Whether you was not threatened by Sir John Fielding 's men, if you did not swear against us? - I was not.

Turner. My Lord, is Carleton a sufficient witness?

Court. He is a witness that must be permitted to be examined. His credit the jury will determine upon, when they compare his testimony with the rest of the evidence.

Turner. When he was taken into custody, he was sworn to by four people to be concerned in robberies at Finchley, before ever he spoke about any thing of the kind; then he sent a letter, desiring to be admitted an evidence to save his own life.

DAVIS's DEFENCE.

I have nothing to say further than Turner has said.

JORDAN's DEFENCE.

I have nothing more to say than they have said.

ALL THREE GUILTY , Death .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron EYRE .

345, 346, 347, 348. JAMES FRYER , HENRY JORDAN , THOMAS CONDON , and THOMAS HORNER , were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Daniel Clewen , on the 1st of March , about the hour of one in the night, and stealing a silver quart cup, value 6 l. a silver pint mug, value 3 l. seven silver table spoons, value 3 l. 10 s. fourteen silver tea spoons, value 20 s. a pair of silver sugar tongs, value 5 s. a silver cream jug, value 10 s. a silver punch ladle, value 10 s. a pair of silver salts, value 30 s. a silver pepper box, value 15 s. a gold ring, value 12 s. three gold rings, set with stones, value 30 s. three gold mourning rings, value 30 s. and six guineas, the property of the said Daniel Clewin ; and one silver watch, value 3 l. a silver seal, value 1 s. and twelve guineas, the property of Richard Clewin ; two gold rings, value 20 s. and four guineas, the property of Elizabeth Godman , spinster , in the dwelling-house of the said Daniel Clewin .

[The witnesses were examined apart at the request of the prisoners.]

WILLIAM QUICK sworn.

I am servant to Mr. Daniel Clewin , a farmer at Finchley . On the 1st of March I came home about ten o'clock at night; Parsons let me in; I fastened the outer door when I came in. I lye in the fore garrat with Parsons, Carter, and Gregory. We were alarmed about half after twelve in the night, by the maid calling out, William Carter , for God's sake, get up! The men were bustling up stairs directly. I had hardly got out of bed before they were up in the room; there were four or five of them, I cannot say which. They had cutlasses, or pistols, or something of that sort, in their hands, and a dark lanthorn slipped half over the light. The first that came into the room, pushed me down in the bed, and covered me up; they told me to lie still, or else they would shoot me. They covered the rest up in bed; I could not see them, but I heard them cover them up. They asked my fellow-servant his name; he told them it was William Carter . Then they all went down stairs, except two; I could hear their tongues while they were left in the room to watch us that we did not get up. They stayed in the room all the while the others were in the house; when they went away, they said they were going down to have some victuals, and they should be up again in a quarter of an hour.

Did you make any observations of the persons that came into your room? - Yes; I think I should know one.

Had they any thing over their faces? - I cannot say; I was covered up so soon. The man that I think I should know again is not one of the prisoners; I don't know either of the prisoners.

RICHARD CLEWIN sworn.

I am the son of the prosecutor, who is a farmer at Finchley. On Sunday night, the 1st of March, between twelve and one o'clock, I heard a terrible noise; I got up in my bed directly; my room door stood open; it generally stands open all night; three men came in at first; the first of them I have never seen since; the second man that I saw I think was Fryer; I believe he was one of the three; then there was one came up to the farther side of the bed, who flung the clothes over my head, and struck me across the back with something that I took to be a little iron bar; then two of them went out of the room into another room, where my father lay, and some went into all the rooms on that floor; two of them came back again, and told me I must get out of bed, which I did; they made me hold my hands over my eyes all the while they took me into my father's room, and I went to bed to him; I lay about half an hour, while they rifled my room.

Did any of the people stay in the room with you? - Yes; I believe two were in the room all the while; there were three in the room afterwards; one of them bid me go to bed again; they said, I need not hold my hand over my eyes, for there was nobody in the room they were afraid of my seeing. I went into the room, and turning myself to get into bed, I saw one between my father's room door and mine, which I believe to be Fryer. They had several lights; he had a red and white handkerchief over his eyes; sometimes he twisted it on one side, and I could then see part of his face; he was just about the size of Fryer, and had such a coloured great coat on as I have now.

How many lights were there? - Three or four. The first, I believe, was a large candle, at the end of a stick; they were all candles, I believe; I did not see any lanthorn. I believe Horner was one of the persons that came in afterwards; they came to take my breeches from under my pillow; they had before taken my watch out of my pocket, and laid it in the chair by my bed side; one came in, which I believe was Horner, after I was in my own bed again, and said, if I would tell where all the money was, he would not take my watch; but I afterwards looked, and the watch was gone. In about ten minutes or a quarter of an hour after they left the house, I came down and found the stair-foot door fastened up; they had drove a staple in over the latch. The servants and I broke it open; we found all the other doors open; there were the marks of instruments which had been made use of to open the doors. They got in at the back door, which was bolted and barred, I believe; the staple of the bolt was wrenched out, and lay at a distance from the door. They took away money, and plate, and a watch, and about thirteen or fourteen guineas of mine, and a 30 l. and 20 l. bank note. There was a silver cup and silver pint mug taken, and several other things, (but I don't rightly know how many of the drawers were broke open) and some boxes opened, and the things taken out.

ANN CLEWIN sworn.

I am daughter to Mr. Clewin, of Finchley. I sleep in one of the fore rooms on the

first floor; I have a younger sister sleeps with me. In the night of the 1st of March I was alarmed; I got out of bed, and locked the door; they opened it upon me, and Jordan was standing at the door; I believe he entered, but I am not sure; but they bid me get into bed, and cover myself with the clothes. There were three of them, and I saw no more. He had a light in his left hand; I believe it was a candle.

The person that spoke to you, you take to be Jordan? - Yes.

ELIZABETH GODMAN sworn.

I am servant to Mr. Clewin. I was alarmed on Sunday the 1st of March; I lie on the first floor; hearing a noise I got out of bed, and went to the top of the stairs, and saw three men come up stairs; I saw a pistol in the hands of one of them, and a little dark lanthorn; it gave a light; I called out to the men servants up stairs, and then went back into my room.

Did any body sleep in the room with you? - Yes; my mistress. I observed Condon; I know him to be one of the men; they came up together side by side; they went up stairs; they did not come into my room. Condon said, If I made any noise, he would blow my brains out.

Did you take so much notice of his face as to be certain that he is the man? - I am sure of it, he had the pistol; the man in the middle had the light; he had his own hair tied up behind.

JOHN PARSONS sworn.

I am one of Mr. Clewin's men. I lay in the garret with the other three men servants; there were five men came up into our room; I got under the bed when they were coming up stairs; they all went down again but one; I then was going to get from under the bed; he heard me, and called the others up, and said to one of the men, lie still, you bloody thief, and he hit Quick a knock on the head, and covered him up; that was Condon; he had a light in his hand; I could see his face and all his person and clothes; he had his hair tied up, I know he is the man.

WILLIAM CARTER sworn.

I am one of Mr. Clewin's servants. I saw five men come into the room; they had a lanthorn; I took notice of the persons of two of them, Fryer and Condon; they were alofe to me; I could touch them; Fryer had a light in his hand in a lanthorn.

Court. Do you speak with certainty? - It is with certainty; I am very positive they are the men.

Did either of them speak? - Yes; Condon spoke a great deal.

Fryer did not speak, did he? - No.

Who was left in the room when the rest went down? - There were two in the room all the while.

Who was the man that struck Quick? - I cannot positively say which it was. Fryer was dressed in a brown coat, of a sort of French fashion; he had a bit of a linen handkerchief over his forehead, and his hair hung down over it.

Did not the handkerchief hinder your seeing his features? - Not in the least; it was but a little bit of a thing; they are certainly the men.

THOMAS GREGORY sworn.

I am a servant of Mr. Clewin's. I sleep in in the same room as the other men; five men came up into our room.

Did you observe either of them? - Yes, Condon; he came close up to my bed side. There was a dark lanthorn; I don't know who had it.

JOHN BARDOLPH sworn.

I work at Finchley. On fast day, which was before the Sunday that Mr. Clewin was robbed, I saw Fryer at one Mrs. Clary's, near Finchley church; he asked if a Mr. Clewin, a farmer, lived there; I said yes. He asked me what circumstances he was in? I said, I believe a pretty big one. He asked about his maid servant, and said he believed she had a brother who died and left her a trifle of money and a gold ring.

ROBERT DODD sworn.

I was at Mrs. Clary's, the public house, on the Friday before the robbery. I saw Fryer there, and another person in company with the last witness. They had some conversation together, but I did not hear the particulars of it. I saw Fryer on the Saturday evening going on Finchley common, in company with another person.

DAVID PROTHERO sworn.

I apprehended Fryer at his own dwelling-house, a little house in the City, New Road, near the Small-pox Hospital; and I apprehended Horner at his lodgings, the corner of Perkin's Rents, Westminster. In Fryer's lodging I found a parcel of pick-lock keys (producing them).

CHARLES JEALOUS sworn.

I was at the apprehending of Fryer and Horner. In Fryer's room we found a cutlass and a bunch of pick-lock keys. I found a cutlass in the bed with Horner when I took him.

MOSES MORANT sworn.

I apprehended Jordan and Condon, and was at the taking of Fryer. I took Condon at the White Swan in King's-street, Gravel-lane, but found nothing upon him. I found a hanger in the closet in Fryer's room, and two hangers in Jordan's room, at the Bear and Ragged Staff over the water.

FRYER's DEFENCE.

I have people to prove where I was the night Mr. Clewin's house was broke open.

For Fryer.

EDWARD CLARKE sworn.

I am a broker and auctioneer, and live at No. 26, Ratcliff Highway. On Sunday the 1st of March, which was the first Sunday after the Fast, I had some business at Saffron Hill, between seven and eight o'clock; there I met with Fryer; we went to the Half Moon Tavern in Aldersgate-street, and staid there till between eleven and twelve o'clock; then we went to Chisswel-street, and there we parted; I believe it was then pretty near twelve o'clock; he said he was going home.

On his cross-examination he said the prisoner was dressed that night the same as he was then; that his hair was clubbed behind, but that he did not know how it was before, because he believed he had not his hat off; that he believed that he sometimes used to wear his hair combed back, and sometimes with a toopee.

WILLIAM CORBET sworn.

I am waiter at the Half Moon in Aldersgate Street. Clark and Fryer came there on the 1st of March, between eight and nine in the evening; they stayed the last company in the house; we shut up at eleven; they had a pint of liquor after we had shut the shutters; they went about half after eleven. I knew them both.

On his cross-examination he said that Fryer was dressed in brown clothes, that his hair was not turned up, but combed down; that he had a Tyburn top; that he had his hat sometimes off and sometimes on.

WILLIAM CLARK sworn.

I am a pen-cutter in Golden Lane. On the first of March I had been to Whitechapel; I stayed there till about eleven o'clock; coming back about twelve I met Fryer and Clark in Chisswel-street.

On his cross-examination he said, he believed Fryer was dressed in brown clothes, that he never heard that Fryer was taken up till he was subpoened; that he knew it was Sunday the first of March, because he wanted to see Clarke to get him to appraise some goods for him on Monday the 2d.

JORDAN's DEFENCE.

I am very innocent of what is laid to my charge.

CONDON's DEFENCE.

I am very innocent: I have people to prove where I lay that night. I deal in a little tea.

For Condon.

ELIZABETH THOMPSON sworn.

On the 16th of February Condon came to lodge with me in New-Market-Street; he lay in my room up two pair of stairs with a little boy of mine; he always came in about ten o'clock; I used to call my boy up about six in the morning, because he goes to a charity-school, and I always found Condon in bed. I don't know that he was ever any night out of the house; he lodged there till he was taken; he sometimes went out after breakfast, sometimes before.

[ Dorethy Hagan, daughter to the last witness, who lodged in the same house, confirmed her mother's testimony.]

HORNER's DEFENCE.

I am innocent of what is laid to my charge.

ALL FOUR GUILTY Death .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron EYRE .

349. WILLIAM JOHNSTON was indicted, for that he on the 7th of March knowingly and feloniously did send a letter in writing, with the name William Johnston subscribed thereto, to one John Jowett , by the name and description of Mr. Jowett, Bell's successor, in Bridge-street, Westminster, demanding of the said John Jowett money (to wit) five guineas, and containing a threatening to charge him, the said John Jowett with some crime, punishable by law, if the said money was not sent according to the demand of the aforesaid letter, against the statute .

2d Count. That he knowingly and feloniously did send a certain other letter in writing, with the name of William Johnston subscribed thereto, and directed to the said John Jowett by the name and description of Mr. Jowett, Bell's successor, in Bridge-street, Westminster, demanding money of the said John Jowett against the statute, &c.

The prosecutor was called, he said his pocket book, which contained the letter in question and several notes of value, had been stole out of his pocket, so that no evidence was given against the prisoner.

NOT GUILTY .

350. JOHN FINNISON was indicted for feloniously stealing one guinea , the property of Ellis Jones , April 27 .

ELLIS JONES sworn.

I met with the prisoner at a public-house, he sat opposite to me; we entered into conversation about a dog my master had lost; we differed about the dog's name; we were to lay a wager of a guinea to six-pence about the name; the prisoner laid down six-pence: I put down the guinea; he took up both the guinea and six-pence and put them into his pocket and made towards the door; he was prevented from going out, and a constable was charged with him; the guinea was not found; there was some bad money found upon him, he was carried before the justice, and before the justice the guinea dropped from him.

GEORGE SAUNDERS sworn.

I went into the public-house with the prisoner, I remember the dispute between Jones and the prisoner; and the guinea being laid down, and a six-pence, the prisoner I remember took up the guinea; I endeavoured to stop him, he was searched, no guinea was found upon him, but afterwards the guinea dropped from him.

SAMUEL CLARK sworn.

I remember the guinea being taken up by the prisoner, and his being searched, and no money was found upon him.

JOHN DINMORE sworn.

I am a constable. I took up the prisoner and searched him, and found nothing but some counterfeit money upon him; the prisoner said he had no guinea about him; but when he was before the justice, the guinea dropped from him.

[ Richard Ditchfield confirmed the testimony of the last witness.]

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

It was my own guinea. I am now ready to make oath of it; I put it in my breeches, and there was a hole through which it fell down. I have not got any witnesses, for I don't stand in need of them.

GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Branding. See summary.]

[Military/Naval duty. See summary.]

351, 352. CHARLES BOND and PETER PEARSON were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Moore , on the 18th of January , about the hour of seven in the night, and stealing a silver watch, value 40 s. and a metal watch, value 40 s. the property the said William, in his dwelling-house .

BOTH NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

353. CATHERINE LLOYD was indicted for stealing a worked muslin gown, value 40 s. six pair of white cotton stockings, value 10 s. nine callico shifts, value 40 s. ten yards of linen check cloth, value 12 s. a child's dimity petticoat, value 2 s. three other dimity petticoats, value 10 s. a diaper napkin, value 2 s. a china cup, value 3 d. and two china saucers, value 8 d. the property of Charles Swift , March 7 .

MARY SWIFT sworn.

I am the wife of the prosecutor; the prisoner was our servant ; in about two days after she left our service, I missed the things mentioned in the indictment; the prisoner came for a character, and I charged her with stealing these things; she was searched and there were pawnbrokers duplicates of my clothes found upon her, and at her lodgings I found a gown.

( William Fleming , a pawnbroker, produced the stockings which he received of the prisoner, and they were deposed to by the prosecutrix.)

( John Goff , another pawnbroker, produced two shifts, which he took in pawn of the prisoner, and which were also deposed to by the prosecutrix.)

( John Langley , the constable, produced the duplicates he found on the prisoner, and a gown and the linen which he found at her lodgings, which were likewise deposed to by the prosecutrix.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I know nothing of the matter.

GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Branding. See summary.]

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

354. JOHN TAYLOR was indicted for feloniously stealing four cheque bed-curtains, value 10 s. a cheque tester cloth for a bed, value 5 s. a looking glass, value 20 s. a brass sender, value 3 s. a' cotton bed quilt, value 5 s. a bolster, value 5 s. two pillows, value 5 s. two linen pillow cases, value 2 s. a copper tea-kettle, value 3 s. and a brass candlestick, value 6 d. the property of Edward Fidler in a lodging room, let by the said Edward, to the said John against the statute , February the 7th .

EDWARD FIDLER sworn.

I let a lodging to the prisoner at three and six-pence a week; he was with me a month; he began another week, but left me in the middle of it without any notice. His long absence created a suspicion, the prisoner had put a padlock upon his room, which he did every day, and the key hole was filled up with paper. I took out the paper and looked into the room and missed the sender. I told my suspicions to a person in the house, who said he thought it was proper to break the door open. I had it opened and missed all the things mentioned in the indictment (repeating them.)

JOHN CRABB sworn.

I am a broker. The prisoner applied to me to take these things out of pawn. I agreed to take them out; he said they were his own property. I advanced him three pounds odd money upon them: all the things mentioned in the indictment were taken out of pawn by me, except two pillow cases and the brass candlesticks.

[There were some of them produced in court and deposed to by the prosecutor.]

GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Branding. See summary.]

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

355. ALICE HOLDER was indicted for feloniously stealing a silver watch, value 40 s. a base metal watch key, value 1 d. and a silver seal, value 1 s. the property of William Williams , February 28 .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

356, SAMUEL DUKES was indicted for feloniously stealing a cloth coat value 4 s. a cloth waistcoat, value 2 s. a pair of mens leather gloves, value 2 d. a man's hat, value 3 d. two clasp knives, with horn handles, value 4 d. half a guinea and 6 s. in monies numbered , the property, of Thomas Wakeling , February 28 .

THOMAS WAKELING sworn.

I live at Mr. Turner's, No. 2, Southampton-street, Bloomsbury . I am a coachman , I lost the things mentioned in the indictment out of the stable. I pulled my clothes off and laid them on a stall in the stable to go up into the hay-loft to take in some straw; there was nobody in the stable while I was in the lost; I saw a man go from the stable with some clothes on his arm. I called out to know who he was; he made no answer. I went down and missed my things, and pursued him, but he was got out of sight; he was pursued and taken, and the two knives, gloves and hat were found upon him. I never got my clothes again; the hat hung up in the stable; he left one in the room of it.

[ John Young , who searched the prisoner and found the things upon him, produced them, and they were deposed to by the prosecutor.]

ABRAHAM FORSYTH sworn.

I saw the prisoner going out of the yard with the clothes; on an alarm I went in pursuit of him, and took him and brought him back.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I bought the things of a man in Holborn.

GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Branding. See summary.]

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

357. MARY STEPHENS was indicted for feloniously stealing three linen handkerchiefs, value 9 d. a cotton handkerchief, value 3 d. a shift-body, value 1 s. a flat iron, value 6 d. a cheque apron, value 6 d. and a scarlet cloak, value 6 d. the property of William Briggs , April 18 .

ELIZABETH BRIGGS sworn.

I am the wife of William Briggs ; I live in Crown-Court, St. Giles's , the prisoner lived with me. I missed the things mentioned in the indictment: I charged her with taking them, and she confessed she had pledged them.

[They were produced by two pawnbrokers who deposed they received them of the prisoner, and they were deposed to by the prosecutrix.]

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I am sorry for it: I leave myself to the mercy of the court.

GUILTY of stealing to the value of 10 d.

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

358. WILLIAM DAVIS was indicted for stealing a pair of thread stockings, value 10 d. the property of William Ross , April the 21st .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

359. ALICE POWELL was indicted for stealing seven linen handkerchiefs, value 10 s. the property of James Webb , April the 14th .

JAMES WEBB sworn.

I am a linen-draper in Smithfield . On the 14th of April the prisoner came to my shop and bought two handkerchiefs. I suspected, from her behaviour, that she had taken something. When she had got near the end of the window, I stopped her and found these handkerchiefs upon her.

[The handkerchiefs were produced in court and deposed to by the prosecutor.]

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

He did not find the handkerchiefs upon me.

[She called a great many witnesses who gave her a good character.]

GUILTY of stealing to the value of 10 d. W .

Tried by the Second London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

360. JOHN BROWN was indicted for stealing a wooden ladder, value 2 s. the property of Thomas Page and John Rowley , March 21 .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

361. MATTHIAS BUTLER was indicted for stealing one hundred and fifty skins of parchment, value 10 l. 18 s. twenty-seven pieces of parchment, value 5 s. forty-five quire of writing paper, value 3 l. 17 s. the property of Robert Broughton , March 13 .

[The prosecutor was called, but not appearing, the court ordered his recognizance to be estreated.]

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

362. JOSEPH ARNOLD was indicted for stealing two iron crows, value 7 s. the property of John Hockley , April 20 .

[The prosecutor was called, but not appearing, the court ordered his recognizance to be estreated.]

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

363. MARY RUSSELL was indicted for feloniously stealing a mahogany tea chest, with three tin cannisters, value 3 s. the property of Thomas Gardiner , April 11 .

JOHN GARDINER sworn.

I am the son of the prosecutor, who is a broker in Harp-Alley . Upon Saturday the 11th of April there was a tea chest standing upon a chair at the door; the prisoner came by and took it; I heard it rattle in her hand; I lifted her cloak up and found it upon her. I sent for a constable and gave charge of her.

[The tea-chest was produced in court, by the constable, and deposed to by the prosecutor.]

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

Going by my cloak caught hold of the chair and jolted it; he laid hold of me and said I had got the tea-chest.

GUILTY .

Tried by the Second London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Whipping. See summary.]

364. PATRICK LYNCH was indicted for feloniously stealing three iron-bars, value 3 s. the property of Benjamin Deverall , the said bars being affixed to his dwelling-house , February 20 .

JOHN BROUGHTON sworn.

I am a watchman. I saw the prisoner break the bars belonging to Mr. Deverall's house; they were fixed before the kitchen window; he wrenched off three, and then took them to a gateway opposite: I secured him and took him to the watch-house. I compared the bars with the place they were taken from, and they fitted exactly.

[ William Stiles Jones, the constable, produced the bars in court.]

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I found the little bar I had under my coats they laid hold of me and said I stole it.

GUILTY .

Tried by the Second London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

365. JAMES ATTERBY was indicted for assaulting, beating, and wounding John Jones , January 17 .

JOHN JONES sworn.

I drive the Croydon stage . Coming to town the 17th I took up one John Crawley on the road; when I came into town I desired him to get into the basket and mind the things because I had been robbed just before. When I got into Bishopgate-street, I turned about to set the passengers down; the porter at the Spread Eagle, in Bishopgate-street , bid me take care of the basket, for he said there were three or four thieves in the street. I gave Crawley a fresh caution to take care. I let the passengers out, and Crawley gave some of the parcels out of the basket to the porter of the inn. Crawley had a side of pork on the wheel to deliver to the porter; and I observed a man pulling at it. I went and asked him what business he had with the pork, and put my elbow against his breast, and pushed him away, and Crawley pulled it in. I then saw the prisoner on the other side with his hands in the basket. I went round to see what he was about; he jumped down; I followed him and took him by the collar and brought him on the pavement; he struck me, and three or four more fell upon me at the same time: I defended myself as well as I could; I knocked one of them down under the coach; the prisoner struck me on my breast and several parts of my face: I had scarce a free part but what was cut or bruised. We dispersed them a little, and I believe the prisoner was knocked down; after they were a little dispersed I went to look into the boot to see if I had lost any thing; the prisoner came and caught me by the leg and pulled me down, and intangled my leg in the wheel of the coach: a neighbour came to my assistance, and we secured him. Since he has been in confinement, he says, he will never leave me nor my coach while he lives; so that if he is at liberty I shall not only be in danger of my property but my life.

[ John Crawley and Charles Norton confirmed the testimony of the prosecutor.]

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I was in Bishopsgate-street when the Croydon-stage came in; I thought I might get' a job. I am a coachman and water horses; there was a scuffle and they laid hold of me and threw me down. I never was in a gang of thieves; I never was guilty of any such thing in my life.

GUILTY .

Tried by the Second London Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

366. THOMAS FLATHERS was indicted for feloniously stealing a dimity petticoat, value 7 s. four yards of printed cotton, value 4 s. and a linen apron, value 1 s. the property of Joseph Imbleton , February 20 .

ELIZABETH IMBLETON swron.

I am the wife of the prosecutor. On the 20th of February, about eight in the evening, I went up stairs with my children; the things mentioned in the indictment were then in a bundle upon my bureau in the bar; I returned in a few minutes and they were gone; they were afterwards found at a pawnbroker's.

JOHN ETHER sworn.

I am a pawnbroker. I took in a piece of cotton and a petticoat of the prisoner for eleven shillings; the prisoner and his mother frequently pawned things with us.

[They were produced in court and deposed to by the prosecutrix.]

ELIZABETH MARKS sworn.

I was in the prisoner's room when he brought in these things; he told the woman he lives with that he found them.

ELIZABETH KING sworn.

I was at a public-house where the prisoner and the woman that passes for his wife were: she said to him why don't you redeem the things you stole and return them: the prisoner said nothing.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I found the things in Field Lane.

Prosecutrix. I live in Field Lane.

[The prisoner called one witness who gave him a good character.]

GUILTY .

Tried by the Second London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Branding. See summary.]

367. JOSEPH HALL was indicted for feloniously stealing twelve linen handkerchiefs, value 12 s. and six gauze handkerchiefs, value 6 s. the property of William Hayward , Peter Malbon , and William Wakeman , April 16 .

JONATHAN FRUBISHER sworn.

I was at the Castle and Falcon Inn, Aldersgate-street . I saw the prisoner going out at the gateway with a parcel under his coat. I hallooed out to him, You rascal! what have you got there? and he dropped the parcel and ran away. I alarmed the people of the inn, and he was pursued and taken.

[ Richard Davison , the constable, produced the parcel.]

THOMAS HOPKINS sworn.

I heard the last witness call out; I pursued the prisoner and took him; another man stopped him; he desire me not to hurt him, but let him have justice done him.

THOMAS MASON sworn.

I am agent to Messrs. Hayward, Malbon, and Wakeman. I put the parcel down by the warehouse door; I saw the prisoner drop it in the gateway. I am sure this is the parcel.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I saw a boy drop the parcel; they cried out, stop thief! the boy got away and they laid hold of me.

GUILTY .

Tried by the Second London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

368. GRACE FURNANCE was indicted for feloniously stealing a pewter quart pot, value 10 d. the property of Thomas Hill , April 21 .

THOMAS HILL sworn.

I am a publican ; the prisoner was in my tap-room; she took a pot and went backwards; when she returned, I asked her for the pot; she denied she had any. She went out, I followed her and brought her back, and found the pot in her apron, and charged a constable with her.

[The pot was produced in court, by the constable, and deposed to by the prosecutor.]

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I am not guilty. I did not take the pot.

GUILTY .

Tried by the Second London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

369. MARTHA MATTHEWS was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Tynan , on the 5th of April , about the hour of two in the night, and stealing ten pewter plates, value 8 s. and two pewter dishes, value 5 s. the property of the said William in his dwelling house .

WILLIAM TYNAN sworn.

On the 5th of April I went to bed about eleven or twelve at night: in the morning I went out into the yard, and found a pane of glass broke out from the bolt of the kitchen window; the persons that did it must have got over a wall eight feet high to get into the court this window looks into; there was a ladder found in the court the next morning.

THOMAS RYLAND sworn.

I am a constable. On Sunday morning about the hour of six I met the prisoner; first of all I had met two men before, whom I suspected to be bad people. I asked her what she had got; she said some pewter. I asked who it belonged to; she said she was going to carry it to one they used to call my Lord Woolgree, who lived in Mutton-Lane. I found this pewter upon her; I saw the direction upon the back part of the plate; I detained her and sent to the prosecutor's house; the man came and said the house had been broke open in the night.

[The plates were produced in court and deposed to by the prosecutor.]

[The prisoner in her defence called one witness who gave her a good character.]

Not Guilty of breaking and entering the dwelling house, but Guilty of stealing the goods .

Tried by the Second London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Branding. See summary.]

370. HENRY HOLLOWAY was indicted for wilful and corrupt perjury , October 18 .

[There was not any evidence given.]

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

371. THOMAS SPIKES was indicted for the wilful murder of William Brown , by feloniously, and wilfully, and of his malice aforethought, with both his hands and feet, casting and throwing the said William to and against the ground, and with both his hands and feet did feloniously, wilfully, and of his malice aforethought, striking, beating, and kicking the said William, and giving him several mortal wounds and bruises upon his head, stomach, back, and sides, of which he languished from the 12th of January to the 30th of the same month, and then died .

He was charged on the Coroner's inquisition with man-slaughter.

JAMES POWELL sworn.

I keep a public house, the Queen's Arms, the corner of Wardour-street , Oxford-street. The deceased was at my house on a Monday soon after Christmas (I don't recollect the day) between eleven and twelve o'clock at night he came in, and several with him. The prisoner and one Greenland sat down in a box by themselves. The deceased was a very quarrelsome man, but was very quiet, and, I believe, sober that night. He was in a box that was very full, and left he should quarrel with the people in it, I desired him to come out, and sit in the box where the prisoner and Greenland were, which he did very quietly. The prisoner said something to Greenland; what it was I don't know, but I thought it was to shove him out of the box. Greenland did not take notice of what he said; they were sitting on the same side; the prisoner came by Greenland to try to shove him out himself; I told him to let him alone, for he had not offended him. The prisoner then came out of the box, and struck the deceased in the face, without any provocation on the side of the deceased or moving off his seat; the deceased did not strike him again. I interfered, and shoved the prisoner, and desired him to sit on the other side from Brown, which he did; I then went about my business. I did not hear what words passed between them, but I heard Brown say, keep off, I am rather afraid; if you come nearer to me I will strike you. I was in my bar or room, I cannot say which. I came out and saw them both fighting; I took Spikes under the chin, and pulled him back, to prevent their fighting, and as I thought him the aggressor, I was for putting him out of doors. The company desired I would not, and said there should be no more of it. The prisoner went out some time after, and the deceased stayed in the house for some minutes. The deceased said to my wife, give your Billy (meaning himself) a glass of gin, and I will go home. She served him with a glass; after that the deceased went out, and some of the company told me that the prisoner was stripped, waiting at the door against he came out, and that the prisoner struck him as soon as he got out. I did not see the beginning of it; I saw several blows on both sides afterwards. While they were in the house, I did not hear any appointment or challenge to fight; I did not care to leave the house, so I did not see the end of it. Brown was not stripped while I was out. The deceased called three or four days afterwards, and said he was much hurt, and was afraid he should not get over it; he said he had two cuts in his head, but he did not mind that so much as a pain he had in his side.

[On his cross-examination he said the prisoner poured some beer on Greenland, who was asleep; that the witness said he would suffer no such usage in his house, but that he did not see the deceased interfere, but that afterwards the prisoner said Brown had struck him over the nose.]

JOHN STAGG sworn.

I am a stone polisher. I lived in the same house with the deceased; I was with him about an hour and an half on the Thursday evening before he went into the hospital, which was the Thursday se'nnight after the fray happened. He told me, that as he was coming home, he called in at Powell's to have a pint of beer; that the prisoner came in, and attempted to quarrel with him; that he did not know why he wanted to quarrel with him; for he had not given him any provocation, unless some words which passed at some place where they had met before. He said that the prisoner after he had aggravated him some time with words, struck him, but still he refrained from quarrelling with him; that some time after this, the prisoner, and two men that were with him, went out of doors, and that he supposed them to be quite gone; that he stayed some little time in the house after the prisoner went out, and then went up to the bar, and had a glass of gin; that he then wished them a good night, and then went out of doors, where he found the prisoner stripped; that as soon as he came out, the prisoner struck him and knocked him down; that before he could recover his feet, the prisoner struck him again, and knocked him down a second time; that he was so much stunned with the fall, that he could not recollect any thing afterwards. I asked him, whether the stunning was by the blow or fall? He said he believed it was by the fall; that he thought his head hit against an iron bar or scraper. I did not see the wounds, because I was afraid to undo the bandage which was done up by the surgeon of the hospital. He complained that when he coughed he had a pain in his side. The next day he was very bad, and the day after he went into the hospital, and then I saw no more of him.

[On his cross-examination he said that the prisoner did not tell him any thing of his taking up the quarrel of another man, not that he struck the prisoner; that the deceased was rather chearful that night, and that he believed the deceased was rather in hopes of recovery.]

Mr. SAMUEL KELSON sworn.

I am a surgeon at the Middlesex hospital. The deceased William Brown came to the hospital on the 14th of January, and continued as an out-patient about ten days. He had a contused wound on the left side of the fore part of his head; the wound did not appear to be dangerous; it got better the first four or five days, and after that got worse till the 24th, when he was taken into the Middlesex hospital, and made an in-patient. He continued there till the 20th, when he died. I opened his head after he was dead, and there was a great quantity of matter on the left side of the brain, spread all over the surface, between the membranes; the inflamation that came on the brain in consequence of the blow, was the occasion of the man's death; it was entirely from the blow. He was trapanned on the 26th or 27th, and a great quantity of matter came from the apperture that was made in his skull. I asked him how he came by the wound? He told me, he fell against the scraper of a door. He did not say any thing more.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I had been to a meeting of Plaisterers, where they meet every Monday night, at the Black Horse in Oxford Road; I got pretty forward in liquor. When we broke up, we called at the Plaisterers' Arms, intending to have a pot of beer, this Greenland, and I, and several more. Greenland fell asleep, and in order to wake him, I poured a little drop of beer down his neck. Powell said, I will be d - n'd if I will have any such usage in my house. Brown made answer, d - n the bloody dog, kick him out of doors. Upon that words arose between us, and he struck me on the nose, and made my nose bleed; a scuffle ensued between us. Mr. Powell came and laid hold of me by the back part of my neck, and pulled me down; he cut my head, and dragged me along the floor. His wife said he was wrong, for that Brown struck first; then he let me go. The company told him it was not my fault. I said to Brown, if you are a man, come out and fight like a man; I went out, and some men with me, and we went to fighting.

For the prisoner.

EDWARD KELLY sworn.

I was at Powell's house on the 12th of January. The prisoner and the deceased were in the house when I went in; they were all in peace; Greenland fell asleep; the prisoner was in company with him; there was no other in company but them. The prisoner threw some beer over Greenland to wake him; Powell on that said that he should not use a dog of his so. The deceased took it up, and had them turn him out of the house. The prisoner called him a dog, and said he could not turn him out. The deceased said, if he was to hit him he should kill him; the prisoner said he could hit as hard as he; the deceased said he could swell his head as big as a pumpkin, and hit him on the nose, and made it bleed; then the prisoner hit him again, and a skirmish began. Powell came and pulled the prisoner away; I told Powell it was not the prisoner, but the deceased that was the aggressor. The prisoner then said to the deceased, if you are a man, come out and fight like a man. Brown buttoned up his coat, and said, d - n the dog, I will go out and link him. Jonas lles made answer, calling him by his name. Billy, if you will go out, I will go out and second you, and do all I can. Accordingly he did, and there were two seconds on both sides, and they went out and fought till the watchman came and parted them.

There were two other persons confirmed the testimony of this witness.

Not Guilty of murder, but Guilty of manslaughter only .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice BALCKSTONE.

[Branding. See summary.]

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

372. 373. THOMAS TURNER and WILLIAM WALKER were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Blake , on the 16th of February , about the hour of one in the night, and stealing a silver table-spoon, value 7 s. five silver tea spoons, value 5 s. a pair of silver tea tongs, value 5 s. a plain gold ring, value 7 s. a pair of silver sleeve buttons, value 1 s. two cotton gowns, value 14 s. two pair of linen sheets, value 17 s. four linen shirts, value 4 s. a muslin neckcloth, value 1 s. four linen shirts, value 6 s. seven linen aprons, value 18 s. a silk petticoat, value 6 s. two muslin handkerchiefs, value 7 s. a callico handkerchief, value 1 s. a linen table cloth, value 4 s. a silk cloak, value 5 s. a pair of thread stockings, value 1 s. and 3 l. 8 s. in monies numbered, the property of the said William Blake , in his dwelling-house .

BOTH NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice BLACKSTONE.

374. WILLIAM ARMYTAGE was indicted for feloniously stealing a silver pin set with thirteen brilliant diamonds, value 20 s. the property of Sarah Billis , Spinster , February 25 .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron EYRE .

375. ANN FAIRBANK , otherwise GRANT , was indicted for feloniously stealing a piece of silk and cotton moreen for a gown, value 20 s. the property of Joseph Broches and Richard Egan , April 20th .

RICHARD EGAN sworn.

I am in partnership with Mr. Joseph Broches . We keep a Draper's shop in King Street, Covent-Garden . On the 20th of April the prisoner came to our shop, and desired to look at some Manchester moreens, as we sometimes call them. I showed her about a dozen pieces; she described a pattern which I had not got. I suspected her by her motions; I watched her, and saw her take a piece. She bid me much less for a piece than it cost me, She left my shop; I followed her into the piazzas; she had this piece in her hand, (producing it); she was looking at it; it is my property.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

It is true I went to this man's shop. About five or six months ago I bought a piece of Manchester, which was of a doe colour, striped with pink. I had this in my hand, and a tambour worked waistcoat, and a new pair of shoes; when I went into his shop I meant to change that, and give the gentleman 5 s. or 6 s. in lieu. I said I wanted a pink stripe; another gentleman brought a number of pieces, and put them on the counter, and said, will they do? I said, no; I was set to a pattern, and wanted doe colour, striped with silk; I said I bought one of you; this gentleman said, I remember you did. The gentleman pushed them aside to the bottom of the compter, and asked me to turn round and look at some hanging loose upon chairs; I said it was needless, as they had not the pattern I wanted. I had in my hand a pair of shoes and a half piece of a tambour waistcoat. I went out of the shop; the gentleman came after me, and charged a constable with me. I went into his shop again; I laid this piece out of my hand, and told him it was my property. I went on my knees, and begged he would send for my friends; he said no, he had been often robbed, and would make me pay for all.

[The prisoner called one witness, who gave her a good character.]

GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice BLACKSTONE.

[Branding. See summary.]

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

376. REUBEN WRIGHT was indicted for feloniously stealing a silver watch, value 20 s. the property of Priscilla Amy Price , widow , February 16 .

The prosecutrix was called, but not appearing, the Court ordered her recognizance to be estreated.

NOT GUILTY .

377. CHARLES ATKINS was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Callam , on the 12th of March , about the hour of seven in the night, and silver a watch, value 30 s. a steel watch chain, value 6 d. a stone seal set in silver, value 1 s. two women's black silk hats, value 4 s. two women's gauze aprons, value 5 s. two women's linen caps, with lace borders, value 2 s. two gauze handkerchiefs, value 3 s. and a linen apron, value 1 s. the property of the said John Callam , in his dwellinghouse .

The witnesses were examined apart, at the request of the prisoner.

JOHN CALLAM sworn.

I am a cooper ; my wife came for me to the cooperage I work at. On the 12th of March, at about seven at night, when I came to the house, I found the window open, and missed my watch from the mantle-piece.

MARGARET CALLAM sworn.

On the 12th of March, about seven in the evening, I fastened up the shutters of my parlour, as usual; I went into the kitchen to look at the children; then I went out; I locked the street door and the parlour door, and took the keys with me; I was out about twenty minutes. When I returned, I found the shutters of the parlour window open, and the sash thrown up. I looked through, and missed my linen from a chest of drawers in the parlour. Without going into the house, I ran for my husband; we came home together, and then we missed the things mentioned in the indictment. We examined, but could not find how the people got into the house, there was no appearance of any force having been used. I am sure I fastened the door.

ISABELLA LOOKHART sworn.

I am a servant at the King of Prussia, a public house; I have seen the prisoner there; I have seen him wear a watch, and wear silver buckles. I remember a man one time (whether the prisoner or no I cannot tell), was standing at the bar talking to my mistress about a silver watch; he asked my mistress to lend some money upon it; this was about two months ago, on a Wednesday or Thursday, about nine at night.

JOHN FARRELL sworn.

I had a search warrant against Rust. I went to his house, and said I had a search warrant, and wanted his watch. Rust produced this watch; he said he had it of the prisoner, who was then in the house, and we took him up.

FRANCIS RUST sworn.

I was in the parlour; my wife came to me and said the prisoner had a watch which he wanted a guinea and a half upon. I did not care to lend that; I said I wanted money to pay my brewer. Soon after she came to me and wanted money to make up a guinea; the prisoner paid half a crown out of it for part of his score.

JOSEPH WHITE sworn.

A watch, chain, and seal, were delivered to me by Rust; but the chain and seal to the watch were not Callam's, but another.

Rust. The next morning after I took the watch, the prisoner changed the chain and seal, and put it to another watch, which I delivered to White to clean.

Callam. I know the seal particularly; the impression is a cat; the motto is, Touch not a cat, but a glove.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

When I was first taken, Rust and I were carried down to the Justice together; three more young fellows were taken with me Rust said he bought this watch of me for two guineas, and that I owed him a guinea; he said that he gave me a guinea in silver. I never saw the watch in my life before I saw it at the Justice's. I am a cabinet-maker.

For the prisoner.

ELIZABETH ANDERSON sworn.

I live at the bottom of Kirby Street; I mend China. On the 12th of March, which was my birth-day, (and I will always keep that up) I had a leg of mutton and turnipa. I had this young man (the prisoner) and his wife in my company from the hour of six o'clock to ten o'clock.

Not Guilty of breaking and entering the dwelling-house, but guilty of stealing the goods to the value of 39 s.

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron EYRE .

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

380. JOHN ANDERTON was indicted for that he, in the King's highway, upon William Hill feloniously did make an assault, putting him in corporal fear and danger of his life, and stealing from his person, and against his will, 2 s. 9 d. in monies numbered, the property of the said William , February 26 .

WILLIAM HILL sworn.

I am a journeyman baker , and live in Liquor-Pond-street. As I was coming from the Ivy House in Hoxton Fields , just as I came at the back of 'Squire Lambert's gardens, I met two men; they walked past me, and then turned back. One struck me upon the nose, and said, d - n your eyes stop! I said, no, no, not to-night. Then I felt a blow upon my forehead, which knocked me down; when I lay upon the ground, I said they should not rob me, and I kept my hand on my breeches pocket. The prisoner held a pistol to me, and the other snatched his hand from my breeches pocket, and tore my breeches pocket out, with the contents of it. I had my hand on the outside of my pocket; I told them they should not rob me. They took from me 2 s. in silver and 9 d. I had a half guinea and also a half crown in my other pocket, but somebody coming, they ran away and did not take that. I positively swear that the prisoner was the man who held the pistol; I was afraid the pistol would go off every minute, and kept looking at him. I thought if any body came I would make a little more resistance. I saw him at the Rotation Office, and knew him directly.

JOSEPH BRIGAN sworn.

I was at the taking of the prisoner. At the Rotation Office the prosecutor picked him out as soon as he saw him.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

The prosecutor said at the Justice's that he knew me by a scar in my cheek. Dixon, who was in the Office, came up and looked in my face, and said there was no scar in my cheek, and then the prosecutor said he knew me by my shock head of hair. The Justice asked him if he knew me by any thing else? He said no.

Prosecutor. I did say that as I lay on the ground I thought he had a scar in his cheek, but I said that I could pick him out from a thousand. I might be mistaken as to the mark, but I can positively swear to the man, I did think, and I think now there might be a scar in his cheek; I said I knew him by the scar and his hair. He had the same clothes on he has now; I took notice of him, and the pistol particularly, because I thought it would go off every minute; I did not take notice of the other. At the time I was robbed it was so light that I could see a man coming from the top of the field.

GUILTY DEATH .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

[The prisoner was humbly recommended to his Majesty's mercy by the prosecutor.]

381. MARY WOOD was indicted for feloniously stealing a piece of printed cotton, value 20 s. and six remnants of printed cotton, value 10 s. the property of Marcus Dixon , privily, in his shop , April 15 .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

383. 384. RICHARD GATSFORD and ELIZABETH HARRIS , were both indicted for feloniously stealing a gelding, value 4 s. the property of John Dean , February 23 d.

BOTH NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

382. WILLIAM AGATE was indicted on the coroner's inquisition for killing and slaying Arthur Leary , an infant of the age of two years ; by driving a coach over the said Arthur , April 10 .

The prisoner is a coachman ; the deceased was a child of two years of age. It appeared upon the evidence, that the child ran under the coach as it was passing through Butcher-row, Temple-bar; and so was accidentally killed.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron EYRE .

383. 384. JOB MASSEY and HENRY HART were indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling house of Anne Grant , spinster , on the 29th of March , about the hour of four in the afternoon, (no person being therein,) and stealing a watch in a gold enamelled case, value 5 l. a steel watch chain, value 1 s. a gold locket, value 2 s. a seal set in gold, value 2 s. a vase, value 1 s. a silver milk ewer, value 10 s. and a pair of silver sugar tongs, value 10 s. 6 d. the property of Anne Grant ; a pair of silver sugar tongs, value 12 s. six silver tea spoons, value 12 s. a pair of silver shoe buckles, value 12 s. a striped silk gown, value 30 s. one other silk gown, value 30 s. three linen gowns, value 40 s. a muslin gown, value 20 s. two muslin aprons, value 20 s. five linen cloth aprons, value 20 s. and two linen shirts, value 15 s. the property of Anne Goodwin , spinster , in the dwelling house of the said Anne Grant .

(The witnesses were examined apart, at the request of the prisoner.)

ANNE GRANT sworn.

I live in Wardour street, I had taken a house of a Mr. Gibbot; at that time I lived in Duke-street Westminster ; I had taken the house but did not live in it, I was to go in at Lady Day; Miss Goodwin and a cousin of her's were in the house till the painters were gone out of it; I took it in my own name.

ANNE GOODWIN sworn.

I am a mantua maker ; I went into partnership with Mrs. Grant in this house, the lease was made to Mr. Parker, a relation of Miss Grant's; I lost the best part of my clothes out of this house; Miss Grant and I were to pay equal shares of the rent; I went out and took the maid with me, it was of a Sunday; I cannot recollect the day of the month; it is about six weeks ago; when I returned, which was about ten at night; I found my drawers stripped; the locks were all as I left them, except the lock of the street door, which we found upon the single lock; I left it upon the double lock, so that whoever came into the house, must have come in by a false key; I missed the things mentioned in the indictment (repeating them) I have never recovered any of them.

HARRIOT ADAIR sworn.

I live with my brother, Mr. Wm. Rob. Adair , in Wardour-street; our house is directly opposite Mr. Goodwin's. On Sunday, March 29, between three and four o'clock; I saw a man knock at the door three or four times; I believe that man to be Massey, but I am not quite certain, I told my brother I thought it was a pity a person should stand knocking at the door, for I believed all the family were out; a person ran to the door and said there was nobody at home; the man thanked him and went away; in two or three minutes afterwards Hart came to the door, I am sure it was Hart; I took particular notice, he could not for some little time get in; he put something into the lock, I don't know what it was; he went from the door again, I don't know where to, but presently after he returned, Massey stood at the corner house waiting for him; I am sure as to Hart, but am not quite sure to Massey; he got the door open in a short time; he went into the house; and in about a quarter of an hour came out with a bundle under his left side; this was between three and four in the afternoon; he came out, shut the door, and they went together down the next street.

(Mr. William Robert Adair confirmed the testimony of Miss Adair.)

CHARLES JEALOUS sworn.

I apprehended the prisoners the day after the robbery, by the description that was given of them; Prothero searched their lodgings.

DAVID PROTHERO sworn.

When the two prisoners and Kelly were apprehended, I went and searched their lodgings, they all lodged in one house; in Kelly's room I found a coat and waistcoat, and another waistcoat with a narrow gold lace upon it, and three handkerchiefs; I delivered two of them to Hart by the order of Sir John Fielding ; Hart said the clothes were his; I found a pick-lock key, some files, and other instruments in Massey's room, (producing them.)

(Mr. and Mrs. Adair deposed that they both believed the clothes which were produced, were those the prisoner Hart had on that night; Miss Adair said that she described them when she was before Sir John Fielding .

MASSEY's DEFENCE.

On the 29th of March, I went to set my brother into the country; I staid at Highgate all night, and returned in the morning.

HART's DEFENCE.

I have people to prove I was in St. Catherine's Lane, Tower Hill, at the time of the robbery.

ELIZABETH KNOWLES sworn.

I live with a relation in St. Catherine's lane, and keep a public house, the sign of the Black Boy. On the 29th of March, at about half after two o'clock, Hart and another man came into out house; they had a small bowl of gin and water, and a small bowl of rum and water; they said till dark; it was so dark I could not give them change; I believe it was between five and six o'clock, I believe nearer six than five; Hart had I believe a brown surtout coat on, they had nothing to eat, we don't serve in church time; they called for the bowl of rum and water and gin and water when they first came in; they had nothing afterwards.

Had they any fire? - No.

RUTH PEARSON sworn.

I am servant to Mrs. Knowles, who keeps the Black Boy in St. Catherine's lane. On Sunday the 29th of March, a little after two in the afternoon, Hart came to our house with another man and stayed till dark; I made them two bowls of liquor, a bowl of rum and water, and a bowl of gin and water, I believe Hart had a brown coat on, they paid a shilling; we charge nothing for fire.

Do you remember any thing about the fire? - Yes, I made it up twice.

BINGHAM sworn.

I saw Hart that day at his father's about one o'clock, he stayed till about two; then he said he was going to St. Catherine's.

WILLIAM ALCOCK sworn.

I met the prisoner accidentally on the 29th of March, between two and three o'clock, at the Black Boy in St. Catherine's Lane; I was in company with him about two hours and an half; there was no other company except the maid of the house, he seemed to know her pretty well; I drank about three pints of beer, he drank part of one pint with me.

Was he in company with any body else besides you? - There was a young woman and two young men, I don't know who they were.

Had they any other liquor, wine, or punch? - I cannot say; I did not see what liquor they had.

Both not guilty of breaking and entering the dwelling house, but Guilty of stealing the things .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice BLACKSTONE.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

385. BENJAMIN NORTON was indicted for stealing nine parcels of diamonds, value 300 l. the property of Philip Adelphos . February 15 .

There was not any evidence given.

NOT GUILTY .

386. WILLIAM WILMOTT was indicted for feloniously stealing a piece of linen cloth, value 1 s. a linen apron, value 6 d. five linen caps, value 2 s. a cotton bed gown, value 6 d. three linen aprons, value 2 s. a linen bed gown, value 6 d. a linen gown, value 2 s. six linen shifts, value 18 s. a cloth waistcoat, value 6 d. a pair of linen pockets, value 6 d. a linen bed quilt, value 5 s. five silk gowns, value 8 l. a pair of silver sleeve buttons, value 6 d. and three copper half-pence, the property of Joseph Wharton , in his dwelling house , April 26 .

JOSEPH WHARTON sworn.

I am a publican in King-street, Drury-lane . On Sunday evening between eight and nine o'clock, a lodger of mine informed me that my chamber door was open, and some of my things taken away; we pursued the prisoner, and took him with the things upon him; I found my bureau broke open, and all the things mentioned in the indictment (repeating them) gone; there were several pieces of coin which I can swear to.

JAMES EYRE sworn.

I am a lodger at the Prosecutor's; I met the prisoner on the stairs; he turned about and went down again when he saw me, and went up King-street, I followed, I walked faster than him, and passed him; I returned in a little time, and met him within twenty yards of Mr. Wharton's with a bundle; I went to Mr. Wharton's; I saw his door open, I informed him of it; and we pursued and took the prisoner in Drury-lane, with the bundle, he immediately dropped it.

CHARLES JEALOUS sworn.

I was sent for to search the prisoner; I found some remarkable halfpence, and a pair of sleeve buttons upon him.

(They were all produced in court, and deposed to by the Prosecutor.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

Coming down King-street, I saw two men running; I heard some halfpence drop, and took them up.

[The prisoner called four witnesses who gave him a good character.]

Guilty of stealing to the value of 10 d.

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

387. MARY FLEMING was indicted for feloniously stealing a wooden paid with an iron handle, value 2 s. a wooden bowl, value 6 d. a pair of iron keepers, value 3 s. two iron bars, value 1 s. 6 d. and a tin kettle, value 2 s. the property of Joseph Light , April 14 .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

388. PETER CUNNINGHAM was indicted for feloniously stealing two china plates, value 1 s. a china dish, value 6 d. two silver handle knives, value 2 s. a china sugar bason and cover, value 6 d. and two woollen blankets; value 12 s. the property of John Compton , April 25 .

JOHN COMPTON sworn.

I am and auctioneer , and live in South-street; the prisoner was my servant ; I discharged him from my service on Saturday night; on Monday morning I found my warehouse door open, and part of my property taken away; I suspected the prisoner, and went to his lodging; I found neither him nor his wife at home, but in his room I saw some silver handle knives that were my property; I went to Sir John Fielding 's; some of his men went with me, and found the things; and some pawnbrokers duplicates on the table. He owned before Sir John Fielding that he took them.

JOHN BROOKS sworn.

I am a pawnbroker. I took in two blankets and an apron of a woman, in the name of Margaret Cunningham .

PERCIVAL PHILLIPS sworn.

I went to search the prisoner's lodging; I found two duplicates; he said the blankets belonged to his master, and he intended to bring them back again.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I never pawned a thing in my life.

(The prisoner called six witnesses, who gave him a good character.)

GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

389. WILLIAM TWALLIN was indicted for feloniously stealing a pair of silver shoe buckles, value 7 s. a paper snuff box, lined with tortoiseshell and inlaid with silver and gold, value 5 s. and two pair of mens leather shoes, value 2 s. the property of Augustine John Mahew , Gent. Feb. 2 .

Mr. AUG. JOHN MAHEW sworn.

The prisoner was my servant ; I discharged him about the middle of February; after he was gone I missed a pair of shoes; I sent a person to him who had recommended him to my service to enquire after them, and he found my buckles upon him.

THOMAS GREENWOOD sworn.

I was send by the prosecutor to the prisoner, guilty. I found him at his father's; and I found these buckles in his pocket.

(They were produced in court, and deposed to by the prosecutor.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

My master used me very ill, and broke two sticks about my back; my legs have been bad ever since.

Guilty of stealing to the value of 10 d.

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

390. JANE WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing a silver watch, value 3 l. a silver salt, value 2 s. three silver clasps, value 1 s. two silk handkerchiefs, value 1 s. 6 d. a flowered lawn apron, value 9 d. a muslin apron, value 1 d. and a child's dimity petticoat, value 1 d. the property of John Kingston , April 7 .

JOHN KINGSTON sworn.

My wife took in the prisoner, she being out of place, and gave her victuals and drink for what she could do. I went out about my business; I lost my watch on a shelf, and left the prisoner in the house; when I returned the prisoner and the watch and the other things mentioned in the indictment were gone; I found the watch at a pawnbroker's.

ANN KINGSTON sworn.

I missed the things and charged the prisoner with taking them; upon which she owned she had pawned them.

[ Charles Burgess deposed that he received the watch of the prisoner. The watch was produced in court by the constable, and deposed to by the prosecutor.]

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I found the watch.

GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Branding. See summary.]

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

391. THOMAS PENN was indicted for feloniously stealing a cloth coat, value 20 s. a pair of leather breeches, value 18 s. a waggoner's linen frock, value 5 s. a pair of worsted stockings, value 4 s. and a linen shirt, value 5 s. the property of Richard Wild , April 21 .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

392. GEORGE MANDERS was indicted for feloniously stealing a muslin handkerchief, value 2 s. the property of James Powell , Feb. 24 .

JAMES POWELL sworn.

I am a victualler ; the prisoner drawed beer for me; the handkerchief was missed out of a drawer in the kitchen, and found tied round the prisoner's middle under his shirt.

(The handkerchief was produced in court and deposed to by the prosecutor.)

JOHN GREGG sworn.

Mrs. Powell missed the handkerchief, and suspecting the prisoner, desired me to search him; I did and found it tied round his middle, under his shirt.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I had a disorder upon me, and therefore I tied the handkerchief round my middle; I had no intention to steal it.

Guilty of stealing to the value of 10 d .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Whipping. See summary.]

393. ELEANOR WILSON was indicted for feloniously stealing two linen shifts, value 4 s. a linen apron, value 1 s. and three silver tea spoons, value 5 s. the property of William Nichols , April 5 .

WILLIAM NICHOLS sworn.

I live in Stacy street, St. Giles's , the prisoner lodges in the same house. On Sunday the 5th of April my wife and I went out; we locked the door; when we returned, which was about seven at night, we missed the things mentioned in the indictment, (repeating them). I had heard that there were keys in the house which would open the different doors; I suspected it was somebody in the house; I saw the prisoner go out with something; I followed her and found her in a pawnbroker's shop in the street, with the things in her apron, which she was offering to pawn. I charged a constable with her.

(They were produced in court, and deposed to by the prosecutor.)

[The pawnbroker confirmed the testimony of the prosecutor, as to the finding the prisoner in his shop with the things upon her.]

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I have nothing to say.

Guilty of stealing to the value of 10 d.

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

[Whipping. See summary.]

394. THOMAS FOX was indicted for feloniously stealing a silver table spoon, value 8 s. and a silver tea spoon, value 2 s. the property of James Weaver , Feb. 9 .

JAMES WEAVER sworn.

About the 9th of February I missed a table spoon and a tea spoon; the prisoner was backwards and forwards to attend on a gentleman who lodged in my house; after they were gone I missed the spoons. On Tuesday se'nnight I met with the prisoner, I followed him into a public house, and charged him with having the spoons, and he confessed he had pawned them, and gave me a duplicate of them.

(The pawnbroker produced the spoons, but said he did not recollect when he had received them, but that they were pawned in the name of Thomas Fox . They were deposed to by the prosecutor.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I know nothing of it.

GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

[Branding. See summary.]

[Military/Naval duty. See summary.]

395. JOSEPH FANTOM was indicted for feloniously stealing forty sheep skins, dressed in oil, value 30 s. and a deer skin dressed in oil, value 10 s. the property of Anthony Rugeroh , April 24 .

ANTHONY RUGEROH sworn.

I am a leather-seller , and live within Aldgate. On the 24th of last month, I lost forty sheep skins and a deer skin dressed in oil; while I was backwards in the compting house the prisoner came in and took them off the compter and went off with them. I pursued him and took him with the skins on his shoulder.

(The constable produced the skins which were deposed by the prosecutor.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I met a man with the skins; he asked me to carry them to Iron Gate for 6 d. and put them on my shoulder.

GUILTY .

Tried by the First London Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

396. LYON HYAM was indicted for feloniously stealing a tea spoon, value 2 s. the property of James Rowley , Feb. 28 .

GEORGE CLARKE sworn.

I am servant to the prosecutor, who keeps a coffee-house . The prisoner came into the coffee-house on the 28th of February; he had a tumbler of rum and water and there was a spoon in it. When he went out I missed the spoon; I followed him and brought him back, and I found the spoon wrapped up in a handkerchief in his hand.

( William Marsdell produced the spoon, which was deposed to by George Clarke .)

[The prisoner in his defence denied the charge.]

GUILTY .

Tried by the First London Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

397. ROBERT HAND was indicted for stealing a silk purse, value 1 d. and 20 guineas, 7 half guineas, and 50 s. in monies, numbered, the property of Nicholas Walker , in the dwelling house of the said Nicholas , March 15 .

NICHOLAS WALKER sworn.

I keep a public house on Great Tower Hill ; the prisoner was my servant . On Sunday, March the 15th, during church-time, I missed the money out of a drawer in my bureau, in the bar; the bureau was not locked.

SARAH MERRIWETHER sworn.

I am bar-keeper to the prosecutor. There was 28 l. 11 s. 6 d. in the drawer in the bureau; I counted it the night before, and put it in the drawer in the morning. I did not leave the bar till ten or eleven o'clock; during the time I was in and out, I had the bar constantly in my eye; nobody entered the bar, but the prisoner, who went there to cut some bread and cheese; he had an opportunity, if he thought proper, to take it, of opening the bureau, and taking the money out without my seeing him. The gold was in a green silk purse, the silver in a bag; the sum consisted mostly of gold; there was about 50 s. in silver, all the rest was in guineas and half guineas. The prisoner went out, and I missed it, about ten minutes after; he ran away, and never returned again.

ROBERT CHEVERLY sworn.

I am a butcher. I pursued the prisoner and found him at Waterfield, in Hampshire. I took him to the sign of the Drum, and asked him what he had done with the money he took out of Mr. Walker's bar; he immediately acknowledged that he had made away with all of it, but 1 l. 14 s. I found a watch and trinkets, and other things upon him, which he confessed he bought with part of the money. I made use of neither promises nor threats to induce him to confess. I said afterwards on the road, that if he behaved well I would do the best I could for him; but I did not say any thing before he confessed.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

It was my own money, I got it by gambling, by tossing up.

GUILTY Death .

Tried by the First London Jury before Mr. Justice BLACKSTONE.

The prisoner was humbly recommended by the prosecutor to his majesty's mercy.

398, 399, 400. GEORGE ROACH , ROBERT ELLIOTT , and JONAS PARKER were indicted, the two first for feloniously stealing a leaden coffin, three hundred pounds weight, value 5 l. the property of William Thornton Aston , Esq . and the other for receiving fifty pounds weight of lead, value 5 s. a parcel of the said goods, well-knowing the same to be stolen , March 7 .

2d Count. Laying the lead to be stole by George Roach and Robert Elliott , being the property of the parishioners of the parish of Aldermanbury.

3d Count. Charging Jonas Parker with receiving it, being the property of the parishioners of the parish of Aldermanbury, well knowing it to have been stolen.

WILLIAM THORNTON ASTON , Esq. sworn.

My brother was buried in Aldermanbury church on the 1st of January last, in a leaden coffin, that coffin was stole out of the church; it was missed on the seventh of March.

JAMES GOULD sworn.

The prisoners Roach and Elliott and I were journeymen carpenters working under Mr. Augurs in the repair of this church. Upon the 6th of March, which was on a Friday morning, Roach and I went down into this vault and unscrewed the screws of Mr. Thornton's coffin all but two, and returned again to our work; afterwards we, together with Elliott, agreed to go to work again upon this coffin. On the Saturday morning we went to the church; about five in the morning a watchman followed us in and desired us to plane a board, which I did; we unscrewed the other two screws, and turned the coffin bottom upwards, and so took off the outside coffin from off the coffin; we left nothing but the shell; we cut the leaden coffin to pieces, and then replaced the other upon the shell, and screwed it down again; by this time it was pretty near eight o'clock; we carried the pieces of coffin, and concealed it under the children's gallery; we proposed then to go and sell it; Elliott mentioned Parker, in Grubb-street. There were two pieces, one was put in a bag which was taken by myself, the other was put in a basket. When we got to London-Wall, Elliott beckoned to me, and we went to a shop first, where they refused to buy it. We then went to Parker's he immediately weighed the lead; he asked no questions; he said it was forty-two pounds, and he paid us three shillings and six-pence, reckoning it at a penny a pound. I was going away with the empty bag, Mr. Augur's apprentice came in and seized me, and desired Parker, who is a constable, to assist in conveying me and Elliott to his master Mr. Augurs, Parker said, you had better go to your master and try to make the matter up; we went and were all three charged; Parker said, give them a trevalle for it.

What did you understand by that? - I did not know exactly what it meant, but supposed it meant that we should try to get away; accordingly we made a run for it; Parker ran too; we did not get far; we were soon stopped and secured.

JOHN BROTHEROUS sworn.

I am apprentice to Mr. Augurs: upon the 7th of March, in the morning, as I was going up London-Wall, about eight o'clock, I saw Roach coming down Wood-street with a basket upon his back; he seeing me crossed over the way. I said what have you here; he said his tools. I looked at the basket. Roach turned round as if to avoid my looking into the basket. I looked in and saw there was lead; I seized Roach and sent for my master. I sent for a constable to take Roach into custody; that was the occasion of my going to Parker, for Parker was a constable. When I came to Parker's, I met the evidence Gould and Elliott coming out of Parker's shop with empty sacks, I supposed they had sold something there. I charged Parker with them: he said you had better go to your master quietly and make the affair up. I went and told my master what I had seen; my master charged them all, Parker amongst the rest. As they were going to the Compter they endeavoured to make off; but they were secured; after this we went and searched and found the leaden coffin removed from its place.

- REYNOLDS sworn.

I am an undertaker. I buried Mr. Thornton in a leaden coffin. I surveyed the vault the 7th of March, and the coffin was missing. I compared the pieces that were found at Parker's with the rest of the coffin that was found under the gallery of the church, and they were all beat up together again into the same from, they made out together the quantity and form of Mr. Thornton's coffin; we found the plate of the leaden coffin with Mr. Thornton's name upon it in Roache's chest, the lead which Gould said was sold at Parker's, was found afterwards under the counter in Parker's shop, it weighed fifty-two pounds weight, there is the folder now upon those two pieces which were sold to Parker; it is a sort of lead worked in a fashion peculiar to coffins; people in the trade know very well that it is coffin lead.

ISAAC MATHER sworn.

Old lead is worth about 13 s. 6 d. a hundred weight, which is about three half pence a pound.

ROACHE's DEFENCE.

I knew nothing of the lead being stolen; Gould put it into my basket.

ELLIOTT's DEFENCE.

I know nothing of the stealing of the lead, nor never received any money, nor any thing whatsoever on account thereof; but I was in Parker's shop, buying a hinge for my own private use. I was surprized to see the evidence Gould there, but more surprized when I saw my master's apprentice come into the shop and give charge of me.

PARKER's DEFENCE.

On Saturday the 7th of March the evidence came into my shop with some lead to sell; I did not know it was stole: I weighed it and was paying them for it, and Mr. Augurs's apprentice came in and gave me charge of them; when I came to his master's he gave charge of me with them. I told immediately where the two pieces were that I had bought, and they went and found them.

[Each of the prisoners called several witnesses who gave them a good character.]

ALL THREE GUILTY .

Tried by the First London Jury before Mr. Baron EYRE .

[Roach Elliott:Imprisonment. See summary.]

[Parker:Imprisonment. See summary.]

401. SAMUEL PEACHY otherwise CLARK , was indicted for the wilful murder of Henry Banks the younger , February the 21 .

(It appeared upon the evidence, that the deceased was on an ass at the corner of London Bridge , the prisoner's cart coming out of Thames-street turned the corner very short, and accidentally threw down the ass and went over the deceased and killed him.)

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First London Jury before Mr. Baron EYRE .

402. ABRAHAM BAREW was indicted for stealing thirty chip hats for woman, value 5 l. the property of Letitia Clarke , widow .

2d Count. Laying them to be the property of Joseph Williamson the elder, and Joseph Williamson the younger.

(It appeared upon the evidence, that the hats were stolen out of the Luton Waggon in Gilt-Spur-street . The prisoner afterwards sent two hats to the prosecutrix's as a sample of some hats he had to sell. A servant of her's, who manages her business, immediately knew them to be the hats which had been stolen out of the waggon. He made an excuse to leave the house, intending to fetch a constable; but when he returned with a constable, and searched the house, there was but one of the hats to be found, which was produced in court, and deposed to.)

[The prisoner in his defence called John Hart , Simon Robertson , and Isaac Alvary , who swore that the prisoner smuggled the hats from Guernsey.]

GUILTY .

Tried by the First London Jury before Mr. Baron EYRE .

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

403. ELIZABETH BARBER and REBECCA TILNEY were indicted for feloniously stealing a silver watch, value 40 s. the property of William Brown , March 19 .

The prosecutor was called, but not appearing, the court ordered his recognizance to be estreated.

BOTH NOT GUILTY .

404. JOHN GRIFFITHS and WALTER DICKINS were indicted for feloniously stealing two bushels of coals, value 2 s. the property of Joseph Consett , Isaac Jarvis , and Edward Thompson , March 13 .

(The prisoners were detected by a watchman in the act, taking the coals out of a lighter belonging to the prosecutors.)

BOTH GUILTY .

Tried by the First London Jury before Mr. Baron EYRE .

[Branding. See summary.]

[Military/Naval duty. See summary.]

405, 406. WILLIAM FISHER and JOSEPH WETHERBY were indicted for feloniously stealing a cheese, 70 lb. wt. value 30 s. the property of Samuel Butcher , March 12th .

(A boy saw one of the prisoners take the cheese from the window of the prosecutor, who is a cheesemonger , and give it to the other. He informed the prosecutor of it, who pursued and took them; one had the cheese upon him.)

BOTH GUILTY .

Tried by the First London Jury before Mr. Baron EYRE .

[Branding. See summary.]

[Military/Naval duty. See summary.]

407. ALICE PIKE was indicted for stealing three linen shirts, value 9 s. and a linen shift, value 1 s. the property of Sarah Chatterton , widow , April 26 .

(The prisoner lodged in the same house with the prosecutrix. The prosecutrix missed the shirts and a shift; she found the shift on the prisoner, and the shirts at a pawnbroker's. The pawnbroker produced the shirts, which were deposed to by the prosecutrix.)

GUILTY B . and IMP .

Tried by the Second London Jury before Mr. Baron EYRE .

408. ELIZABETH HART was indicted for feloniously stealing a piece of printed linen cloth, containing fourteen yards, value 14 s. the property of William Richardson , privately in the shop of the said William , March 21 .

WILLIAM RICHARDSON sworn.

I am a linendraper . The prisoner came into my shop on the 21st of March; she looked out some goods, and had a bill of parcels made; she went away under pretence of fetching the money, but I did not miss the linen till I was sent for and saw it and her at Sir John Fielding 's.

JOHN FITZGERALD sworn.

I am a pawnbroker. The prisoner brought this linen to me, and wanted 9 s. upon it; she said there were nine yards of it; I measured it, and found there were fourteen. I asked her where she bought it? She said at Portsmouth. I suspected her, and stopped her; then she said her sister sent her with it, and said she would go for her; I would not part with her; I bolted her in, and went to Sir John Fielding 's, and got one of his men, who came and searched her, and found a bill of parcels upon her.

[The bill of parcels and linen were produced in court, and deposed to by the prosecutor.]

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I went to buy some linen for a frock, for a child I had in my arms. I go out a chairing; my husband is a taylor.

GUILTY Death .

Tried by the Second London Jury before Mr. Baron EYRE .

409. MARY HOLLIS was indicted for stealing a bar of iron, 23 lb wt. value 2 s. the property of Daniel Morgan , February 28 .

[The servant of the wharfinger at whose wharf Mr. Morgan had some bars of iron standing, took the prisoner in the yard, with the bar of iron under her clothes.]

GUILTY .

Tried by the Second London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Branding. See summary.]

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

410. RICHARD DARNELL was indicted for feloniously stealing three pecks of coals, value 10 d. the property of persons unknown, April 19 .

[The prisoner was detected in the night by a watchman, as he was coming out of a barge at Puddle Dock , with the coals upon him.]

GUILTY .

Tried by the Second London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Whipping. See summary.]

[Military/Naval duty. See summary.]

411. WILLIAM BRANSON was indicted for stealing two wooden boxes, value 1 s. a wooden desk, value 6 d. a piece of printed cotton cloth, containing twenty yards, value 40 s. a piece of stuff, containing twenty four yards, value 12 s. and a punch-ladle, value 5 s. the property of Thomas Compton , March 28 .

[The box, containing the goods mentioned in the indictment, was taken out of a cart in Budge Row , into which the prosecutor, who was a porter , had put them. The box was found upon the prisoner, who was going off with it.]

GUILTY .

Tried by the Second London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

412. SAMUEL TYLER was indicted for stealing a linen handkerchief, value 10 d. the property of John Parker , April 12 .

[As the prosecutor was going up Holborn , he was told that his pocket had been picked; he turned about, and found his handkerchief on the prisoner.]

GUILTY .

Tried by the Second London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Whipping. See summary.]

[Military/Naval duty. See summary.]

413. MARY the wife of Thomas CAVENAH was indicted for stealing a silk purse, value 1 d. two guineas and five shillings in monies numbered , the property of John Woodhouse , February 28 .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

414. MARY JEALOUS was indicted for stealing a woollen cloth coat, value 2 s. a feather bolster, value 2 s. and two linen sheets, value 1 s. the property of George England , April 16 .

[The prisoner was taken in the prosocutors's house, with the goods mentioned in the indictment in her apron.]

Guilty of stealing to the value of 10 d.

Tried by the Second London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Whipping. See summary.]

415. GEORGE BARRINGTON was indicted for feloniously stealing a metal watch, covered with tortoise-shell, value 3 l. a silk watch string, value 2 d. and a glass seal set in metal, value 2 d. the property of Elizabeth Ironmonger , privately from the person of the said Elizabeth , March 15 .

As soon as the jury were charged with the prisoner, he addressed the court as follows:

Prisoner. My Lord, before I enter upon my trial, I shall beg leave to inform your Lordship that several articles, my property, are now in the hands of the constable. At my examination before the magistrate, who is I see sitting upon the bench, when I requested they might be restored, he assured me that after they had been advertised a few days I should certainly have them. They have been repeatedly advertised for these six weeks past, and they are now detained. Your Lordship will, I hope, previous to my trial, order them to be returned; they are my own property, and they cannot be produced as evidence against me.

Court. If you are entitled to them, you will have them again. We must wait the event of this prosecution.

Prisoner. No man, however innocent, can answer for the event of a trial.

Court. Who has them?

William Payne . I have them in my custody.

Court. Lay them on the table, till we see the event of the trial.

Prisoner. They will be returned to me after my trial, I hope?

Court. That will depend upon the event of the trial. You are now called upon here to answer to an indictment; you have pleaded Not Guilty; you are now to be tried.

Prisoner. With your Lordship's permission, and with all the respect and reverence due to a Court distinguished for its justice and humanity, I will humbly beg leave to offer a few words which I trust will deserve the attention of my jury. I believe it will be almost unnecessary to mention, what the news-papers themselves sufficiently witness, that every possible endeavour has been made use of, which the channel of a news paper can afford, to represent me to the public in a most infamous point of a view. The facts have been misrepresented and exaggerated, but I trust that sensible and impartial minds, such as I hope my jury are composed of, will not be influenced by news-paper invectives. They cannot but know that it is both cruel and unjust to from an opinion of a man by the character given him by mercenary hirelings; they cannot be ignorant that news-papers in general are white and black and black and white.

Court. This may be proper for you to say when called upon your defence; at present you must suffer the witnesses to go on; you will afterwards be heard as amply as you please when you come to make your defence.

Prisoner. I beg the witnesses may be examined separately.

Court. Have you any witnesses to call? because if you have, they must go out of court likewise.

Prisoner. I have none.

ELIZABETH IRONMONGER sworn.

Was you on the 15th of March last at St. Sepulchre's church ? - I was. I went to hear the sermon preached for the Humane Society; it was between eleven and twelve o'clock in the morning; the church was very much crowded.

Did any thing happen to you in that crowd? - Nothing in particular.

Did you miss any thing from your person? - I missed my watch in the evening. I did not miss it before.

Did you see any person near you that you had reason to suspect? - There was a strange man near me, very attentive and very civil; but that man was not Mr. Barrington; but I did not find any thing particular from him; I never saw the prisoner in my life till he was at the bar before the justice's. I did not see him at the church, to the best of my knowledge.

Are you sure you had your watch when you went to church? - I had it in my pocket on Saturday night; I don't recollect any thing of seeing it on Sunday morning.

So you might, or night not have it at church that day? - I cannot say; I might or I might not. I keep it usually in my pocket; I don't wear it hanging loose by my side.

Did you wind it up over night? - No; I wound it up on the Friday night, but not on the Saturday night.

The watch only goes twenty four hours, I suppose? - Only twenty four hours. I looked at it on the Saturday but did not wind up.

Why did you not wind it up? - Because it was an hour too fast; it was to be regulated. I looked at it on Saturday night; I did not, to the best of my knowledge, see it on Sunday morning; I am not positive that I had it at church, though I believe I had. It was a metal watch, with a tortoise shell case, and it had a striped silk ribband to it, and a common seal; I believe the seal is white glass.

Cross Examination.

I understand that you had this watch loose in your pocket with your handkerchief and other things? - I might; I cannot say what I had in my pocket.

This church you went to I understand was extremely crowded? - It was.

Had you occasion oftentimes when in the church in the crowd, to put your hand into your pocket to pull out your handkerchief or any thing else? - I don't recollect particulars; I know I was very much crowded.

Whether in your judgement it was not very possible that in putting your hand into your pocket to pull out your handkerchief, you may not have dropped this watch? - I cannot disprove it; I don't know how I lost it.

It is possible you may have lost it in that manner? - I cannot say that it is impossible; I cannot say how I lost it.

WILLIAM PAYNE sworn.

I was at St. Sepulchre's church on the 15th of March.

Who preached there? - Dr. Mylne, I believe his name is. The church was very much crowded; I believe I was there about eleven o'clock, or rather before. In a quarter of an hour after I had been there, a person came up to me, and told me that Barrington was in the church; I looked about from place to place; I could not see him; presently another told me; in short, not less than four different people told me that he was in the church; in about a quarter of an hour I found him, and I followed him I believe for three quarters of an hour from one door to the other, and kept watching him; I hid my face from him when he happened to turn his head towards me, because I supposed he knew me as well as I did him. I saw him with his hand in a lady's pocket in the south aisle, but I could not see that he took any thing out.

Is the lady here? - I believe not.

Court. Confine your evidence to this fact. - My Lord, I had a man along with me, with the key of the watch-house, expecting that I should catch somebody, the place being crowded. He was with me all the time; he was watching the prisoner, and saw him as well as I did. In about half an hour, or near three quarters of an hour, I saw Mr. Barrington had got sight of me, he was pointing me out to another person that was along with him. I endeavoured to shun the other, that he should not see me; the prisoner took that opportunity, and got out at a different door of the church. I did not see him at that time; the man that was with me told me that the man I was watching was gone out of the church; I asked which way; he said down Snow Hill. I immediately went out, and just as I turned the corner to turn-down Snow Hill, I saw the prisoner; I pursued him, and catched him just at the end of Cock Lane. I determined to take him upon the attempt I saw him make upon the gentlewoman's pocket. I talked with that gentlewoman afterwards; she said she had not lost any thing, for she had not any thing in her pocket. When I came up to him, I took hold of the cuff of his coat sleeve, and said, Mr. Barrington, you must go along with me; he turned back and came with me to St. Sepulchre's watch-house, where I put him in, without any resistance. I don't remember that he spoke a word. I brought him up to the watch-house in company with that man that saw him go out of the church. After I got him into the watch-house, I searched him; the first thing I saw was a gold watch, which I took out of his fob. He said it was his own, I could not contradict him. I put him up stairs, where there is a place on purpose to lock up prisoners for safety. I went back to the church, and staved about half an hour; I came back again; I left Fletcher in care of him; I was in the room when somebody either bid him pull off his hat, or they pulled it off; Fletcher immediately said, here is a watch has fallen from his head; he picked it up, and instantly gave it to me.

You did not see the watch fall down? - No; I did not see it till Fletcher picked it up, and gave it into my hand.

Payne. When I found that this watch had dropped from his head, I concluded he had robbed somebody; then I searched him; I made him pull off his breeches; I believe he had three pair of breeches on, and somewhere about his breeches I found a purse with thirteen guineas, and a 10 l. bank note, and several other things, which are in a paper in court.

Did you ask him how he came by this watch? - I don't remember that he gave any answer at all. I think he said be should leave his defence till be came before a magistrate; I believe that was all he said.

How came Mrs. Ironmonger to know any thing of it? - I carried three advertisements on the Sunday, and they were all three inserted in different papers on Monday morning, and on the Monday morning, I think it was, Mrs. Ironmonger came to my house at about eleven o'clock. I advertised the other watch and other things three times after in other papers.

Cross Examination.

Is the story that you tell to-day the same story that you told on your examination before the magistrate? - I believe exactly; I don't know that I have missed a word.

Did you tell before the magistrate what you have introduced to-day, (knowing very well that it is not evidence) about this other lady? - I don't know that I did; I don't remember that I did.

[The watch was produced in court by William Payne , and deposed to by the prosecutrix.]

- FLETCHER sworn.

I am a constable of St. Sepulchre's parish. The prisoner was brought to the watch-house; I searched him; the watch dropped down at my foot; I cannot tell whether from his head, his hat, or sleeve; I was searching his breeches and stocking; I was stopping, the watch fell from above where I was searching.

Had you meddled with his head? - Somebody there said, pull his hat off; whether he pulled his hat off, or somebody else, I cannot tell; but then the watch fell while I was stooping.

Do you know who the man was that said that? - I believe one Bethell.

Is that the watch? - I believe it is; it is very much like it. I did not take particular notice; I don't remember any particular mark.

Did you see the gold watch taken from him?

William Payne . I took that from him before Fletcher came up into the room.

WILLIAM BETHELL sworn.

I am an undertaker. On the Sunday the Humane Society had the sermon preached at St. Sepulchre's church; the prisoner was about the church; Payne informed me that he had an information of such a person; I watched him from post to pillar; at last he went out of the church; I informed Payne of it; Payne followed him, and secured him, and took him to the watch-house; from thence he carried him into the upper room, and searched him. In about a quarter of an hour, a lady came in and said she had lost two guineas and two dollars. A gentleman desired that the prisoner might have his shoes pulled off and be searched, which Fletcher the constable did; during that interval I desired him to pull off his hat while Fletcher was searching his shoes; he pulled his hat off with his left hand, and a watch dropp'd down at his left foot; I did not see it drop, but I heard it drop.

You did not see any thing come from under the hat? - I cannot say I did; it fell down at his left foot; the watch fell at the same time that he pulled off his hat; the watch was in a tortoise shell case; I delivered it, I believe, to Mr. Hawes afterwards. This is the watch.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I have no occasion to mention that every possible art has been made use of to draw me before the public eye. The daily papers have been filled with paragraphs against me; they have loaded me with a liberality bordering on profusion, with the epithets of notorious, infamous, and abandoned; yet infamous and abandoned as they would have me appear, this is the second time of my being tried in any court, while offenders more attrocious, that have visited this and other bars often, have escaped without even these epithets so plentifully cast upon me. If hitherto I have unhappily fallen into the commission of a crime, it is not to be inferred from thence that I am now guilty, or must always be so; and I beg of you to consider, gentlemen, if I have offended the laws, I have likewise suffered the punishment they have inflicted, nor would they have been mitigated, if signs of reformation had not marked the unhappy object; good men will charitably suppose it to have been genuine; and not withstanding the present charge alledged against me, it is very possible that it might have been entirely so; some I know have put the worst construction upon it; yet surely it would be but consistent with their duty, as Christains and fellow-creatures, to have refrained from infamously prejudging a trial. I flatter myself their designs will be frustrated; nor would I think, even for a moment, that my life will be paragraphed away, or that my jury would cast me before I came into court. I have been visited since I have been in consinement by a variety of persons, some led through curiosity, others from feeling and compassion. I was informed that Payne the constable had boasted in his convivial hours that I could not fall into worse hands(alluding to himself); that he would certainly hang me, and boasting his influence with the citizens of London. You, gentlemen, are the best judges whether he has endeavoured to prejudice your minds against me. I am firmly persuaded that there is not a man among you but what will lay his hand upon his heart, and say, he is unprejudiced and uninfluenced. Gentlemen, I am convinced, from many circumstances, that this man would pursue me with the utmost rigour; however you will be guided with candor, and will determine agreeable to the language of your oath, according to the evidence before you.

My profession of a surgeon occasioned me a visit on Sunday morning from a person then under my care. In the course of our conversation he informed me that several eminent performers, and particularly two ladies, famed for their musical skill, were that morning to perform at St. Sepulchre's church, for the benefit of the Humane Socie ty. As I had from my infancy a taste for musick, I went thither; I found the church so full that I could not get a seat. In leaving the church I found the article in the indictment, a metal watch; I put it in my pocket, intending to advertise it. I then left the church; I had scarce reached Snow Hill, when two men, who were behind me, and who might have seen me pick up the article, insisted upon my accompanying them to the watch-house; a search ensued; Payne took my gold watch, and left the other; he also took from me a bank note, made payable to myself. I reflected that how innocently soever I might have obtained the article in question, that yet it might cause some censure, and no man would wonder, considering the unhappy predicament I stood in, that I should conceal it as much as possible. I did not put it into my hair, as has been insinuated. While he left me there, I reflected as I have told your Lordship. Payne came up in a short space of time, and brought a person who professed losing a considerable number of articles; I was searched afresh, and then the watch and purse were taken; I was that evening committed to the Compter; the next morning I was brought before a magistrate, where a lady deposed that the watch I had found was her property; her evidence was in effect the same which she has now given; I therefore think it unnecessary to animadvert upon it, but beg to make a remark or two upon the consistency of the evidence.

Payne deposes, that he found upon me the watch in question; so far he is right; but the other circumstances he has related slow from a black and cruel imagination: he thinks that the reputation of the Little English Carpenter, as he is pleased to stile himself, will not be complete, without he follows it with my conviction. His frequent appearance upon these occasions will not, I hope, entitle him to any degree of credit. Lost to every just and tender feeling, destitute of any means of sensibility, and destitute of any knowledge of the nature and the consequence of an oath; he kisses the book with as much apathy and unconcern as he would do any indifferent thing whatsoever. Little credit will be paid to a man noticed as a common informer: swearing has for many years been his practice and profession; but of these matters you, gentlemen, are certainly the best judges.

My Jury, I doubt not, will keep in mind that maxim of the English law, whose humanity would spare the lives of ten guilty persons, rather than run the risk that one innocent man should suffer: our laws permit a man to avail himself of a good character, but will not let him suffer by a bad one.

If I have said any thing improper, my situation, I hope, will plead my excuse. I have not falsely or maliciously endeavoured to depreciate the character of any man: I have confined myself to a notorious truth. I shall desist trespassing any longer upon the patience of your Lordship and the Jury, with a sincere hope that prejudice will be entirely laid aside, and that I shall enjoy the benefit of a candid, cool, and deliberate judgement.

Guilty of stealing the watch, but not guilty of stealing it privately from the person .

Prisoner. My Lord, permit me, before I leave this place, humbly to appeal to the feelings and humanity of your Lordship; after conviction it is not my intention to arraign the justice or impartiality of the Jury; but, my Lord, I am a young man, there was a time when I had as little reason to expect the distress and misery that I now suffer as any man's son in this place? nor need I to inform your Lordship that mercy has always been considered as the darling attribute of Heaven. I am a young man, I am by profession a surgeon, let me be permitted to enter into his majesty's service, and I will endeavour to discharge my trust with affiduity and attention: if that favour cannot be granted, let me be banished his majesty's dominions during my life.

Gentlemen of the Jury, I hope you will second my petition, and may your children and children's children, never experience the misery I now suffer.

Court. You very well know where to make your application for a mitigation of your sentence, if you think the circumstances will deserve it.

Prisoner. I humbly request that what trifling property has been taken from me may be restored to me: I had not the opportunity of enjoying the benefit of an act by which a person is enabled to dispose of his property previous to his trial. I hope that will be no impediment to my having it.

William Payne . I delivered all the money and the bank note to him in Newgate.

Court. Your property, now you are convicted, is no longer your own, but belongs to the king, the king has granted it to the City of London, and therefore the city and the sheriffs are the persons for you to apply to.

Tried by the First London Jury before Mr. Justice BLACKSTONE.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

The TRIALS being ended, the Court proceeded to give judgement, as follows:

Received Sentence of Death, 14.

Francis Lewis Crimison , otherwise Grimison, Joseph Saul , John Anderton , William Knight , John Hosier , Edward Daniels , William Turner , Joseph Davis , Henry Jordon , James Fryer , Thomas Condon , Thomas Horner , Robert Hand , and Elizabeth Hart .

Navigation for 5 Years, 3.

Job Massey, Charles Kelly , George Barrington .

Navigation for 4 years, 1.

Henry Hart .

Navigation for 3 years, 21.

Robert Crosby , Charles Atkins , John Ratford , Thomas Hodge , Humphry Alexander, William Garment , Joseph Wood , Thomas Turner , William Thompson , Charles Thompson , William Wilmott , John Bristow , Joseph Fantom , Lyon Hyam, George Roach , Robert Elliot , Joseph Hall, Peter Lynch , Abraham Barew , William Branson , and William Bolton .

Imprisoned 3 years, 2.

John Turpin and Joseph Parker .

Branded and imprisoned 1 year, 7.

Walter Townsend , Benjamin Mantle , Robert Harman , John Edwards , James Dockham , Catherine Lloyd , John Taylor .

Branded and imprisoned 6 months, 5.

Ann Fairbank , otherwise Grant, Samuel Dukes , Peter Cunningham , John Williams , Thomas Spikes , Mary Hollis .

Branded and detained to go to sea, or to remain till next session, 9.

William Allen , Joseph Vaux , William Lattimore , John Finnison , Thomas Fox , John Griffith , Walter Dickins , William Fisher and Joshua Wetherby .

Branded 3.

Martha Matthews , Thomas Flathers , and Alice Pike .

Whipped 6.

John Ravencroft , George Manders , Eleanor Wilson , Alice Powell , Mary Russell , and Mary Jealous .

Whipped and to go to sea 2.

Richard Darnell and Samuel Tyler .

This Day is published, (DEDICATED WITH PERMISSION TO HIS MAJESTY) BRACHYGRAPHY; OR, An easy and compendious System of Short-hand, ADAPTED (After more than Forty Years Practice) to the various Sciences and Professions By the late Mr. THOMAS GURNEY

THE NINTH EDITION, Considerably improved according to the present Method, By his Son and Successor JOSEPH GURNEY , (WRITER OF THESE PROCEEDINGS) BY WHOM Trials at Law, and Arguments of Counsel are carefully taken in Short-hand.

Sold (Price Half a Guinea) by M. GURNEY, No. 34, Bell-Yard, Temple-bar.

*** The Book is a sufficient Instructor of itself, but if any Difficulties occur they shall be removed upon Application to the Author without any additional Expences.

This Day is published, (DEDICATED WITH PERMISSION TO HIS MAJESTY) BRACHYGRAPHY; OR, An easy and compendious SYSTEM of SHORT-HAND, ADAPTED (After more than Forty Years Practice) to the various Sciences and Professions. By the late Mr. THOMAS GURNEY .

The NINTH EDITION, considerably improved according to the present Method, By his Son and Successor JOSEPH GURNEY , (WRITER OF THESE PROCEEDINGS) BY WHOM Trials at Law, and Arguments of Counsel are carefully taken in Short-hand.

Sold (Price Half a Guinea) by M. GURNEY, No. 34, Bell-Yard, Temple-bar.

*** The Book is a sufficient Instructor of itself, but if any Difficulties occur they shall be removed upon Application to the Author without any additional Expence.

This Day is published, Price Half a Guinea, (DEDICATED WITH PERMISSION TO HIS MAJESTY) BRACHYGRAPHY; OR, An easy and compendious SYSTEM of SHORT-HAND, ADAPTED (After more than Forty Years Practice) to the various Sciences and Professions. By the late Mr. THOMAS GURNEY .

The NINTH EDITION, considerably improved according to the present Method, By his Son and Successor JOSEPH GURNEY , (WRITER OF THESE PROCEEDINGS) BY WHOM Trials at Law, and Arguments of Counsel are carefully taken in Short-hand.

Sold ( Price Half a Guinea) by M. GURNEY, No. 34, Bell-Yard, Temple-bar.

*** The Book is a sufficient Instructor of itself, but if any Difficulties occur they shall be removed upon Application to the Author without any additional Expence.