Old Bailey Proceedings Online (www.oldbaileyonline.org, version 6.0, 30 October 2014), January 1777 (17770115).

Old Bailey Proceedings, 15th January 1777.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS ON THE KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery for the CITY of LONDON; AND ALSO The Gaol Delivery for the COUNTY of MIDDLESEX; HELD AT JUSTICE HALL in the OLD BAILEY, On Wednesday the 15th of January 1777, and the following Days;

Being the SECOND SESSION in the Mayoralty of The Right Honble Sir THOMAS HALLIFAX , LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY JOSEPH GURNEY , And Published by Authority.

NUMBER II. PART I.

LONDON:

PRINTED BY WILLIAM RICHARDSON ; AND SOLD BY S. BLADON, in PATER-NOSTER ROW.

[PRICE SIX-PENCE.]

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS UPON THE

KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery for the CITY of LONDON, &c.

BEFORE the Right Hon. Sir THOMAS HALLIFAX , Knt. LORD MAYOR of the City of London; the Right Hon. Sir SIDNEY STAFFORD SMYTHE , Knight, Lord Chief Baron of his Majesty's Court of Exchequer; the Honourable Sir WILLIAM HENRY ASHHURST , Knt. One of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of King's Bench; the Honourable Sir GEORGE NARES , Knt. One of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Mr. Serjeant GLYNN, Recorder; and others his Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of Gaol Delivery of Newgate holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

London Jury.

Gilbert Pudner ,

Thomas Faulkner ,

Charles Phillips ,

George Allen ,

Robert Pickering ,

Thomas Bateman ,

William Adams ,

Joseph Miller ,

Thomas Nash ,

John Osburn ,

William Bennett ,

Thomas Standard .

First Middlesex Jury.

Henry Adkins ,

Silver Crispin ,

John Braithwaite ,

Nathaniel Morgan ,

Richard Wall ,

Lawrence d'Rippe ,

John Pearson ,

Daniel Hardy ,

Martin Robinson ,

Francis Carter ,

David Fountain ,

John Dowling .

Second Middlesex Jury.

William Halfpenny ,

Richard Marshall ,

William Leader ,

Francis Crowther ,

Thomas Clarke ,

William Lambert ,

John Smith ,

Peter Johannott ,

Thomas Simpson ,

James Campbell ,

Philip Howell ,

Norton Tyler .

66. CHARLES KENT was indicted for stealing three pair of silver shoe-buckles, value 6 l. the property of Augustus Levage , Dec. 5th .

JOHN PETER ESTEINNE sworn.

I am shopman to Mr. Augustus Levage , a goldsmith , the corner of Suffolk-street, Charing-cross : upon the 6th of December, between eight and nine o'clock in the morning, I opened the case and missed a pair of buckles; my master came into the shop and missed two more; on examination we found a piece of the glass broke out; I had seen them at three o'clock the preceding day.

[ Two pair were produced in court by Grubb the constable, and one pair by Lloyd the pawnbroker, and deposed to by the witness.]

CHARLES GRUBB sworn.

I am a constable: upon the 5th of Decem. I went into a pawnbroker's in Holborn, and found Ann Bolton offering these buckles to pawn; the pawnbroker would not take them in; I stopped the woman and secured the buckles; she took me to her house and shewed me the prisoner, who she said she had the buckles of: I took him into custody; she said to him, How could you bring me into a scrape, by sending me to pawn buckles that were stole, and he acknowledged he gave her the buckles, and hoped we would be as favourable to him as we could.

EDWARD LLOYD sworn.

I am servant to Mr. Lane, a pawnbroker: I took in a pair of silver buckles of Ann Bolton on the 5th of Dec. in the evening she came afterwards with the other two pair, and Grubb stopped her and the buckles.

ANN BOLTON sworn.

I went to Mr. Lane's in Holborn with a pair of buckles; Lloyd the shopman took them in of me.

Who gave you the buckles? - The prisoner: I keep a cloaths-shop in King-street; he brought them to me and asked me to buy them; I said, I don't know the worth of them; he asked me to go and pawn them for him, and I went to pawn them; I am sure the prisoner is the boy.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

As I was crossing Long Acre I saw the buckles lay on the ground rolled up in paper; I picked them up, and not knowing what to do with them I took them to this woman.

GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

67, 68. WILLIAM DAVIS and RICHARD OLDGATE were indicted for stealing twelve linen shirts, value 3 l. two silk handkerchiefs, value 2 s. a linen shift, value 3 s. ten muslin neck-cloths, value 20 s. five pair of cotton stockings, value 10 s. a woollen cloth coat, value 10 s. and a woollen cloth waistcoat, value 5 s. the property of Thomas Theed , December 13th .

THOMAS THEED sworn.

I live in Grafton-street, Soho : I lost the things mentioned in the indictment; on the 30th of Dec. between two and three o'clock, I sent Eleanor Peachy up stairs to fetch me a pair of breeches; she came down and said I was robbed; I went up stairs and found the lock broke open and all the things taken away; the room door had been opened with a false key; the prisoners were taken about three hours afterwards; all the things, except the coat and waistcoat and a shirt, were found in the lodgings of Oldgate; a shirt was found on the back of Oldgate before the justice.

What is Eleanor Peachy ? - She is not my wife, but she is the same thing as a wife to me.

[The shirt was produced in court and deposed to by the prosecutor.]

ELEANOR PEACHY sworn.

These neck-cloths and things I found in Oldgate's room.

How do you know it was his room? - The landlord said it was his room; Lane the pawnbroker told us where he lived, and Mr. Tubbs and I went to the house he lodged at; the landlord told us he lodged up two pair of stairs backwards: Oldgate had pawned the coat and waistcoat at Lane's.

What was contained in the bundle? - Eleven neck-cloths, five pair of cotton stockings, and two silk handkerchiefs; they are all Mr. Theed's property.

Do you live with Mr. Theed? - O yes; they are all marked and figured; eight of the neck-cloths are marked T T, and three are marked Theed at full length; here is a cloth that covered his linen I am very particular to.

ELEANOR HUGHES sworn.

On the day these things were stole, at about two o'clock I was going out for a loaf, and I met Oldgate in our passage; Mr. Theed lodges in the next room to me; I asked Oldgate who he wanted; he said one of the lodgers; I asked him if he wanted Mr. Hughes, that is, my husband, and he said, No; I went out; about 20 minutes or half an hour after Mr. Theed came into my room, and asked me if I heard any body breaking open his room, because he was robbed; I said, No, but I met a man in a light-coloured coat and a linen apron going up the stairs as I was going out, and asked him what he wanted; which was Richard Oldgate .

JOHN LANE sworn.

I am a pawnbroker: on the 30th of Dec. Oldgate brought this coat and waistcoat and pledged them with me; I lent him some money on them; my son; who keeps a pawnbroker's shop in Drury-lane, sent word to me that he had taken in two shirts of the prisoner Oldgate's wife, and had heard since that they were stole; I have known Oldgate a great many years; I desired my son to go to Mr. Welch's and get a constable and secure Oldgate and his wife, and get an account how he came by the goods.

[The coat and waistcoat were produced in court and deposed to by the prosecutor.]

JOSEPH AINGE sworn.

I live in Green-street, Seven Dials: the prisoner Oldgate rented a room of me; he and his wife took it; I don't know that the other prisoner lodged with him; he came backwards and forwards; a gentleman came and asked if a Mr. or Mrs. Watts lived there; I said, I believed not; then he asked if Oldgate lived there; I said I did not know his name, but he had come in to pay me some money and I would ask him; I asked him his name, he said it was Richard Oldgate ; he said that was the gentleman, and secured him, and then he searched his room and found the things.

DENNIS M'DONALD sworn.

I took Oldgate and searched him, and found a number of pick-locks in his pocket; and I searched his room and found the linen; Davis was in the room by himself; I searched him and found a pick-lock and some matches and tinder in his pocket; Tubbs went up first and secured him.

To ELEANOR HUGHES . Did you see any body with Oldgate? - No.

JOHN TUBBS sworn.

On the 30th of last month Mr. Theed came to the office, and laid a complaint that he had been robbed; I know the gentleman very well, living in the neighbourhood; I went round with him to different pawnbrokers, and found some of the property at Mr. Lane's, and some at a widow woman's, who said she knew the man that brought them very well; she is not here; she directed me, and I went to the place where the prisoner lived: Lane and his son came, and I went up and found Davis in the room, and a great quantity of things belonging to this gentleman.

DAVIS's DEFENCE.

Oldgate's wife used to wash for me; she had a shirt and neck-cloth to wash three weeks or a month before; I had been for them several times; she told me at last they were pawned, and told me I should have them on the Monday; I went on the Monday evening; they were both at home; they desired me to stay while she went for the shirt; she went out, and I saw no more of her till I saw her at justice Welch's; staying so long, Oldgate asked me if I would drink some beer, and went out to get some; he went into the landlord's room to pay him some money, and some men came in and took him; I knew nothing about it; I was almost asleep, and these men came into the room and asked me if Mr. or Mrs. Watson lived there; I told them, No; they bid me get up, and they opened a trunk and took some things out, and took me to justice Welch's, and I was committed.

OLDGATE's DEFENCE.

The things were brought there by a Mrs. Watson.

DAVIS NOT GUILTY .

OLDGATE GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice ASHHURST.

They were a second time indicted for stealing a fringed dimity petticoat, value 12 s. a pair of linen sheets, value 8 s. five linen shirts, value 40 s. five muslin stocks, value 6 s. four linen shifts, value 4 s. a pair of silk stockings, value 1 s. two pair of cotton stockings, value 3 s. four pair of worsted stockings, value 4 s. three linen mangle-cloths, value 3 s. a woman's linen cap, value 3 d. a man's cotton night-cap, value 3 d. a cotton night-gown, value 1 s. a flannel night-gown, value 1 s. a pair of muslin mittens, value 3 d. a muslin apron, value 6 d. three linen handkerchiefs, value 18 d. seven child's linen frocks, value 12 s. five dimity petticoats, value 2 s. a diaper petticoat, value 6 d. a flannel petticoat, value 2 d. two child's linen gowns, value 6 d. a pair of child's stays, value 1 s. five child's linen shirts, value 10 d. and seven pair of child's thread stockings, value 3 s. 6 d. the property of William Holmes , Esq ; Dec. 18th .

CHARITY FINCH sworn.

I am a servant to Mr. Holmes, at Wandsworth in Surry : on the 19th of December we missed all the things mentioned in the indictment (reading a lift of them); Tubbs the constable found part of them in the prisoner's room; they were lost out of the laundry which is an out-house; they had been washed and left there by the washerwoman who is here.

[The things were produced in Court and deposed to by the witness.]

ELEANOR BRESON sworn.

I am nurse to the children: seven childrens frocks, seven petticoats, six linen shirts, and a flannel one were stole out of the laundry.

[Three frocks, seven pair of stockings, and a pair of stays, were produced in Court and deposed to by the witness.]

MARTHA PITT sworn.

I am a washerwoman: I washed all the things that were lost, and left them in the laundry about nine o'clock on Wednesday night; they were missed about seven o'clock on the Thursday morning.

JOHN TUBBS sworn.

I am a constable: I searched Oldgate's lodging and found all the things in a box as they are produced; it was locked; I broke it open to search for things belonging to Mr. Theed, but found none of his things there.

Who had the key of the box? - I don't know; M'Daniel found a key upon Davis.

RICHARD THORNTON sworn.

I am servant to Mr. Holmes: I found two chissels among some brickbats by the wall.

CHARLES PITTS sworn.

I am gardener to Mr. Holmes: I found the laundry broke open about seven o'clock in the morning.

DENNIS M'DANIEL.

I have a key which I found in Davis's pocket that fits the lock of the box; I found also some matches and tinder and a pick-lock in his pocket; Oldgate said before the justice, that he met Davis with the box and took it home to his lodging.

DAVIS's DEFENCE.

I know nothing of the box; I never saw it till I saw one of the men pull it out from under the bed; I found that small key at Islington, and some money with it.

BOTH GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice ASHHURST.

69, 70. WILLIAM HALL and THOMAS JONES, otherwise BURDETT , were indicted for that they, in a certain field and open place near the King's highway, in and upon Arthur Hancock did make an assault, putting him in corporal fear and danger of his life, and stealing from his person a silver watch, value 40 s. a base metal watch key, value 1 d. three guineas, a crown, an half-crown, and 2 s. in money, the property of the said Arthur , October 15th .

ARTHUR HANCOCK sworn.

I live at Newington-green : on the 15th of October I was going from Canonbury-house to my house at Newington-green at about a quarter after five in the evening; the two prisoners came up to me in a field; the least of them (Jones) took my watch out of my pocket and three guineas, an half-crown, and a crown piece; he bid me be quiet and he would use me well: Hall had a stick, but he did not say much.

Did he say any thing? - I cannot recollect that he did; he had a stick or bludgeon in his hand, but did not do any thing with it: they ran back towards Canonbury-house; I followed them to Canonbury-house, thinking I should hear of them; I told several people afterwards of it and they were taken up, but my watch was never found; I had a full view of their faces; I am certain the prisoners are the men that robbed me.

NATHAN JEFFRY sworn.

I am an officer: I took the prisoners on a quarrel at Newington-green; when they were brought before the justice, Hall confessed the robbery; justice Blackbury told him, if he told the truth he would admit him an evidence; the other man did not confess any thing; the justice asked him what he had to say; he blasted the justice and constable; the justice said he was a hardened wretch, and bid us take care of him: the next day Mr. Hancock came and swore to them both.

Did Mr. Hancock give the same account then he has given now? - Exactly; he is very ill now; he was very well then; he is about 80 years of age: Hall confessed that they shared the money, and he disposed of the watch.

EDWARD DEAN sworn.

I saw the two prisoners behind a house in Paradise-row; we watched them because we thought they meant to rob the house; Jones came up to me and said, D - n you, what do you want with us, and abused me.

JAMES DEAN sworn.

I was near the garden: I saw Jones beckon Hall; he then lifted Hall over the pales.

'Another witness confirmed the evidence of

'Edward and James Dean .'

JONES's DEFENCE.

I was never in the fields where the gentleman said he was robbed; I am a weaver .

HALL's DEFENCE.

I never saw the man in my life to my knowledge.

BOTH GUILTY . Death .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Lord Chief Baron SMYTHE.

71. GEORGE FREELAND was indicted for that he upon Peter Burnett wilfully, maliciously, and feloniously did make an assault, and did demand the money of the said Peter with a feloniously intent , Jan. 3 d .

'There was no evidence to convict the prisoner.'

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Lord Chief Baron SMYTHE.

72, 73, 74. EDWARD GOSWELL , JOHN LIFE , and VALENTINE FULLER were indicted for that they in the king's highway in and upon Bartholomew Gibson did make an assault, putting him in corporal fear and danger of his life, and stealing from his person and against his will a metal watch, value 40 s. a silk and gold watch-string, value 1 d. a white cornelian seal set in metal, value 1 s. another seal set in metal, value 6 d. a metal watch-key, value 6 d. a guinea, a half-guinea, and 1 s. the property of the said Bartholomew , December 25th .

Mr . BARTHOLOMEW GIBSON sworn.

I was stopped upon the 25th of December on this side Gunnersbury-lane , between five and six in the evening; it was moon-light; I was in a one-horse chaise; Goswell and Fuller came up to the chaise; one came to the side of the chaise; Fuller stood at the horse's head; there was a third person there; the moon was bright and shone in the faces of these men; but I could not distinguish the face of the third, because his back was towards the moon: Goswell put a pistol to my breast and demanded my money; I gave him a guinea and an half in gold, and I think 7 s. in silver; my brother was in the chaise with me, and he was robbed likewise; he asked for my watch; I gave it to him; it was a metal watch; there was a cornelian seal and another seal, they were both set in metal; the string was green and gold.

Are you sure the prisoners are the men? - I am very positive as to these two persons.

When did you see them next? - I was called to go to Sir John Fielding 's on the Wednesday; I had given notice that very night of the robbery; when I came into Bow-street the men were much in liquor; I was in a degree of fright and did not choose to swear to them, but I saw them again on the Friday and then they were sober, and I have no doubt but these are the men; I knew their faces then; Goswell's voice struck me exceedingly, and I am very certain they are the men.

RICHARD BRYANT sworn.

I took this watch out of the prisoner Goswell's waistcoat pocket; upon searching further in his great-coat pocket I found a pistol and some powder; the pistol was loaded with four pebbles.

Prosecutor. This is my watch; there is a cypher upon it and my crest; Goswell rode a sorrel horse with a bald face; I did not take particular notice of the other two horses.

Mr. JOHN GIBSON sworn.

I was with my brother in a chaise: between Turnham-green and Gunnersbury-lane Goswell came up and demanded our watches and money; he took both; I am certain to his person; it was moon-light, very light; I saw the other two; one stood at the horse's head; I cannot be positive to either of their persons; I saw them at Sir John Fielding 's on the Wednesday; I told my brother then that I recollected Goswell the moment I went into the Court there, but declined swearing to him at that time; I knew both his voice and person.

You knew your brother's watch? - Yes, the watch now produced is his watch. Goswell was on a sorrel horse with a bald face.

HENRY BARNARD sworn.

I am a silk garter weaver, and live in Moorfields: upon the 23d of December, about 10 in the morning, Fuller came to me booted and spurred, and said, Goswell wanted to speak to me immediately upon some capital business; I went with him to Goswell, who was at a public house in Blackman-street; I do not remember exactly the house; Fuller went for Goswell, Goswell came: and asked me how I did? he said, he had a bill of Exchange, and if I would discount it for him, he should be obliged to me; this is it (producing a Bill of Exchange for 325 l. 11 s. 7 d.) I said, what will you have for it? he said, if you will get me 150 l. for it, I will give you 10 guineas; I said, I had no money at present; he said, when shall I call for it? I told him, to-morrow; then said he, I will either call or send: I went to Baker's Coffee-house to search the newspaper, whether this bill, which I suspected to be stolen, was advertised, but did not make any discovery that day; upon Tuesday the 24th I examined again; Goswell neither came on the Tuesday or sent, but upon Christmas-day all three of the prisoners came together on horseback, about noon; Goswell leaned down to my cheek and whispered, Have you done the bill for me? I said, No, I have tried a gentleman, but I could not get the cash for it, if you will stay till Friday I will do it for you; he said, give it to me again, I will give you 10 guineas for your trouble; I said, I could not; it was in the hands of such a person, but if he would call on Friday he should have it; on the 26th I went again to search the papers about this bill, and then found that it was advertised as having been stolen upon the 21st of December; they said, they must go, for they had some particular business; I took great notice of all their horses; Goswell's was a sorrel horse with a bald face, Fuller's a dark coloured chesnut gelding, Life's a chesnut mare, about the same colour as Fuller's; having made this discovery, I went to Sir John Fielding 's; I asked Mr. Bond whether they had heard of a robbery on the 21st, which was the time this bill was taken, and I told Mr. Bond what I had discovered; I returned then to my own house, and after I returned Fuller came to my house booted; I asked him, if he came for the bill, he said, No, what do you think we do no more business than that? I came upon other business, I have some watches; he shewed me the chain of one, hanging out of his breeches; he pulled out a tortoiseshell watch out of his waistcoat pocket, said he, you must come and dine with my partners, we have something dressing for dinner at such a place, and they have some watches too; I went to a public house in Primrose Street; Goswell and Life were sitting in a box; I sat down by Goswell; he took out two watches, and said, what do you think of these? I said, they are very pretty ones; upon this he said, this is not all; Life shew yours; then Life pulled out a gold watch and a pocket piece, and asked what I would give for it; I offered him 5 s. he gave it to me, but I did not pay him any money for it; I desired them not to talk of business there, but go home with me; they all went home with me; Goswell said, if you will send for that bill I will give you 20 guineas; I said, I cannot give it you, but I will send for it; I went down to a Mr. Asher, who was below, and desired him to go directly to Sir John Fielding 's, and to give them notice that the men were at my house; after Asher was gone, they took out all their watches and laid them on the table; Life then cut off the strings and seals; Goswell took them all up in his hand, said, he would throw them all away, if Life did not return the seals; for that they should all go together; upon which Life returned the seals; and then they took their watches again, and I desired them to be quiet: the watch the prosecutor has sworn to is one of the watches Life cut the seals off; they were going out of my house, I directed my servant maid to watch where they went, that she might give information when the messenger came back from Sir John Fielding 's; they went into a public house, 15 yards from my house; they all three went into the corner of the room, and whispered something, but I did not hear what it was; but Goswell took me aside, and said, Life and I will take all the property with us to another place, and we will leave Fuller here to wait for the bill's coming; we have 9 gold watches more, when you have bought these; then Fuller gave the two watches to Goswell, and gave him likewise a pistol: they went away out of the house rather before me; when I went out, I saw the girl; I enquired of her whether she saw where the men were gone; she said, they were gone into a public house not above 100 yards from my house; but they had gone 5 or 600 yards about, in order to conceal where they were going; I ordered this girl, if Sir John Fielding 's men came, to direct them to come where she saw us go in; presently afterwards Sir John Fielding 's men came; Fuller was secured immediately; then we went where the other two men were, and they were secured: Life was leaning his head upon his hands asleep.

JOHN CLARKE sworn.

I was sent for; I took this chain out of Life's pocket; I found a loaded pistol upon him, some gunpowder, a crape, and a wig.

Prosecutor. The two seals are mine, and that part of the string was fastened to my watch at the time of the robbery.

CLARKE. I said to Goswell, where are your horses? Goswell said, loose my hand and I will give you a direction where the horses are; I loosened his hands and he wrote this note (producing it); Barnard went down with me to the place; when we came there, Barnard said, he knew the horses that each person rode upon, and did specify each particular horse immediately upon his coming into the stable; Goswell's horse, he said, was that with the white face.

THOMAS ABELL sworn.

I am the ostler at the Golden Lion in Moorfields; I know Life and Fuller perfectly; I observed them the night they came in, and am positive to them; they came in on Thursday afternoon about two o'clock; they were leading the third horse, the third horse was the sorrel horse with a white face; they came in the evening after dark.

GOSWELL's DEFENCE.

Mr. Barnard has spoke very false in his evidence concerning the Bill.

LIFE's DEFENCE.

I have had no time to prepare for my trial; I did not expect my trial to come on the first day.

FULLER's DEFENCE.

I only went on a message as any other person might do; I never was concerned in any robbery in my life; I was foreman to Mr. Moore in Chiswel-street; I have sent to him, but he was busy and could not come.

ALL THREE GUILTY . Death .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice NARES.

75. CHARLES DRAKE was indicted for stealing a silver pint mug. value 3 l. the property of Robert Phillips , December 11th .

ROBERT PHILLIPS sworn.

I keep the Half-moon Tavern, Cheapside : the prisoner came into my house on the 11th of December, and ordered a couple of mutton chops for dinner and a mug of small beer, while he was eating I took notice of some marks on his hand; there was an anchor and 73. after dinner he ordered another mug of beer; I had some suspicion of him and gave the waiter a charge to watch him; I went to shew a gentleman up stairs, in the mean time the bell rang, and the waiter went up stairs, when I came down I asked the waiter, if the prisoner was gone; he said, he did not know; he went into the room, and the prisoner and the mug were gone; he ordered a pennyworth of tobacco, which he left, he had not smoked any of it: I went to Sir John Fielding 's in the evening, and coming home I called at the London Coffee-house, and gave a description of him; I heard of him by the name of Boots on the Monday following; I heard that he was stopped at the London Tavern, I went there; I knew him by the marks; he sent a man to me yesterday to know if I would forgive him if he produced the mug; I said it was out of my power.

' WILLIAM CUTTINGDON , the waiter,

'confirmed the prosecutor's testimony, and

'added, that he saw the mug standing on the

'table before the prisoner about 2 minutes

'before he missed him and the mug, and that

'there was no other person in the room.'

The prisoner said nothing in his defence.

GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

76. JOHN MOWETT was indicted for stealing a linen handkerchief, value 10 d. the property of Luke Hall , December 6th .

LUKE HALL sworn.

Upon Friday the 6th of December, in the evening, going up Cheapside , I felt something pull at my pocket, I turned round immediately and saw the prisoner with my handkerchief; he dropped it; I secured him and took up the handkerchief.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I did not throw down the handkerchief, it was another boy who run away.

GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Whipping. See summary.]

77. MICHAEL SWIFT was indicted for stealing 24 silver tea-spoons, value 40 s. the property of William Edwards , January 6th .

WILLIAM EDWARDS sworn.

I am a goldsmith , and live near Holborn Bars : I lost 4 half-dozen of tea-spoons last Monday se'ennight between the hours of 12 and one; the prisoner was going by in the custody of 3 men, handcuffed; as he went past he broke the glass of the shew-glass, and took out four half-dozen of tea-spoons; I did not see him do it myself, I was weighing two half-guineas in the shop; I heard the glass break, and ran out; the men that had him in custody brought him into the shop with the spoons in his hand.

[The spoons were produced in Court by Dinmore, and deposed to by the prosecutor.]

JOHN DINMORE sworn.

I am a constable: on Monday was se'ennight, between 12 and one o'clock, I had the prisoner in custody, handcuffed; I was close by the side of him; he knocked his handcuff into the window, and took the spoons out of the shew-glass.

He did it so openly, it was impossible to escape detection? - He could not escape; I had two other officers along with me; I seized hold of him, and took the spoons out of his hands, and took him into the shop to Mr. Edwards: I had him in custody on suspicion of house-breaking; he was cleared of that.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

It was frosty weather, my foot slipt, and my hand broke the glass, and the spoons came out; I could not help it.

GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

78. JOHN STEWARD was indicted for stealing two linen shirts, value 5 s. two muslin neckcloths, value 2 s. and a linen-sheet, value 2 s. the property of Samuel Wilcox , December 25th .

'The things mentioned in the indictment

'were stolen out of the house of the prosecutor

'by two men, who were seen in the

'house by a girl who was gathering in alehouse

'pots; she said, she believed the prisoner

'to be one of those men; but it appeared

'upon the evidence for the prisoner

'that the girl was mistaken in the person.'

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

79. CHRISTOPHER RICHARDS was indicted for stealing a metal watch, value 50 s. the property of William Holston , December 10th .

WILLIAM HOLSTON sworn.

I live in Skinners-street, in the Strand: on Tuesday evening, the 10th of December, as I was coming out of Drury Lane theatre , I missed my watch; I immediately seized the prisoner by his arm; I saw the watch in his hand; he attempted to give it to another person, and the watch fell; I took the watch off the pavement with one hand, and held the prisoner with the other; the outer case fell off, which I have never recovered.

Did you feel the prisoner at the time he took it away? - Yes, I felt his hand very distinctly, his back was towards me as he drew it out; I saw the chain in his hand.

From the Prisoner. Whether he did not cry stop thief, after another person, but I being the poorest person near him he challenged me with it? - I did not call stop thief.

GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice ASHHURST.

80. CHRISTOPHER SNARBON was indicted for stealing a Bath-beaver surtout-coat, value 18 s. a pair of woollen cloth breeches, value 20 s. three linen shirts, five linen stocks, and two muslin neckcloths, value 4 s. the property of William Paxton .

WILLIAM PAXTON sworn.

Upon the 9th of December my box was broke open at my lodgings at the Blue Posts, Bennet-street, St. James's : I lost a surtout-coat, some shirts, some stockings, and a pair of breeches: about 10 days after the coat was taken upon the prisoner's back.

[The coat was produced in Court, and deposed to by the prosecutor.]

WILLIAM EDMUNDS sworn.

Having heard that this coat had been stole, I took the prisoner at Ponder's End, and had him to the prosecutor; the prosecutor owned the coat.

JOHN LIBERTY sworn.

I came down on the Sunday; he had then the coat on.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I borrowed the coat of Christian Lamb .

FOR THE PRISONER.

FREDERICK RAYNES sworn.

I have known the prisoner 6 years; he is a labouring man ; I saw him borrow the coat the Sunday morning of one Christian Lamb ; Lamb worked then at a sugar-house; he is now gone to sea.

To LIBERTY. How long has he lodged with you? - Six weeks; he behaved honest; he paid me regularly.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice NARES.

81. ANTHONY LEBURT was indicted for stealing a diamond ring, value 100 l. the property of William Priestman , November 2 d .

[The prisoner being a foreigner and not understanding English, an interpreter was sworn.]

WILLIAM PRIESTMAN sworn.

I live in Princes-street, St. James's : on the 2 d of November, in the evening, the prisoner came into my shop and asked to look at some rings; I shewed him several; this among the rest; he put it on his finger, and run out with it; I catched him in the next street; he delivered me the ring from his finger.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I am not guilty; I know nothing of it.

FOR THE PRISONER.

WILLIAM LESSLEY sworn.

I heard the cry of stop thief, and took the prisoner; when I took him he sincerely confessed his error, and was very sorry.

Did he speak English then? - I don't recollect.

Do you understand French? - Very little; he spoke very broken English: I wish to recommend him to mercy.

GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice ASHHURST.

82. GEORGE BARRINGTON was indicted for stealing a pair of silver studs, value 1 s. a silk purse, value 1 s. an half guinea, and 3 s. 6 d. in money, numbered , the property of Ann Dudman , widow , December 18th .

ANN DUDMAN sworn.

Upon the 18th of last month my pocket was picked in the pit of Drury Lane playhouse by the prisoner of my purse, containing half a guinea, a half crown, and a shilling.

Cross Examination.

Was the playhouse very full the night you was there? - Yes.

The king and queen were there that night? - They were that night at the play-house; they were not come in.

The theatre was very full? - It was.

What part of the pit did you fit in? - Near the door.

You was very much crowded? - Yes, very much by the prisoner.

Did you detect the prisoner with your purse in his hand, or did you detect his hand in your pocket? - I felt his hand come out of my pocket; I seized him by the arm with my purse in his hand.

On what side did the prisoner stand? - First on my right, then on my left hand.

In the immensity of that crowd, how can you take upon you to assert, that the hand you felt in your pocket was the prisoner's hand? - By his crowding me very much: I am positive it was his hand; I had hold of his hand, and took the purse out of it.

Can you be peremptory in swearing it was the prisoner's hand, under all the circumstances of the great crowd that must be there? - Yes.

Was your purse dropped? - No, I took it out of his hand, and secured him directly.

By what means was he secured? - By a constable, I believe.

When you called out did you point the prisoner out to the persons to whom you called for assistance? - I did.

- MARSHALL sworn.

I was in the pit of the play-house: there was only Mr. Barrington between me and this Lady; she said Mr. Barrington had taken her purse; I charged him with it; he said he was a gentleman of fortune, and lived in Pallmall, and we were taking a gentleman's character from him; he was secured.

COURT. Did she ever express any doubt about his being the man? - No; at the instant she said she had lost her purse, she held it up; I saw it in her hand, when she said she had lost her purse I saw him draw his hand away across his breast.

Cross Examination.

Was not the theatre much crouded that night? - It was.

On what side of the lady did the prisoner sit? - On the left hand, and on my right.

Do you remember the first falling to the ground of the purse? - It did not fall; I saw it in Miss Dudman's hand; she took it from him, as she said; I did not see her take it from him, but I saw his hand come athwart his own breast; and at that instant she declared that the man had picked her pocket of her purse, and she charged him with it, and so did I.

Was no different relation given before the magistrate to what is now given before the court? - Only that he crowded Miss Dudman before that she complained to me; I desired him to be civil; he said, civility was not to be expected at that place.

Did you accompany the lady to the magistrate? - I did.

She was as peremptory to the prisoner then as she is now? - She was.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

My lord and gentlemen of the jury,

The evidence which has come before your lordship and these gentlemen, I hope you will not think sufficient to convict a man of the crime of felony; I shall relate the transaction as briefly as possible: I was in the play-house in that part of the pit which is called the standing part, and it was so very crowded that the doors were obliged to be screwed up, in order to push the people in; the seats were all taken, and those that were in the standing part were endeavouring, as far as they could, to procure seats; the crowd was so great that they hurt each other; this lady was before me, making towards a seat; I, as every person then present, was doing the same, and she cried out that some person had their hand in her pocket, and that she had taken her purse out of their hand; she looked round immediately and fixed upon me, at the same time that she was surrounded by many people, that it was a minute at least before she could turn round; I immediately professed my innocence, and called upon the company to declare, whether it was possible for such a transaction to happen without some person being privy to it, and seeing it, in such a place where so many people were assembled together; and every gentleman, who was present, was of the same opinion, and were unanimous in saying they were certain I was innocent. My lord and gentlemen, upwards of 5 minutes had passed in this altercation, and the noise in some measure had subsided; but some gentlemen, who had lost their property at the play-house that night, hearing a rumour, came immediately and declared, if there was a suspected person there, it was necessary he should give satisfaction and clear himself; that he should retire to some place and be searched; to this I assented, and was retiring at the time with several people who were there, when we were met by the constable, who told me I must go before Sir John Fielding ; when we were there I was searched, my property was taken from me and detained for 8 days, and then returned, because no person could claim a single article; if the evidence this lady has given is sufficient to convict me of the crime, it is in the power of any one to take away the life or liberty of any person whatsoever; such a crime as this could never happen in such a place without some person being witness to it; the lady might have found a hand in her pocket, and her fear might make her believe the man had her purse in his hand and she had taken it out, but the crowd was so exceeding great that it was impossible to turn; the people were crying out they were so excessively squeezed, and I hope it will have weight with the gentlemen of the jury; I mentioned just now that it was so exceedingly crowded, that, if such a transaction had happened, it was almost impossible to fix upon the person; the lady, I don't mean to reflect upon her, but I am obliged to take hold of every circumstance, in order to extricate myself, the lady is blind of one eye; this I conceive adds to the impossibility of fixing upon the identity of a person; and I would beg leave to ask the lady if she is acquainted with a Mr. Groves?

DUDMAN. I am: my lord, I received this letter from the prisoner.

COURT. Do you know it to be his handwriting?

DUDMAN. I don't know his hand-writing.

PRISONER. My lord, I admit that letter came from me: a gentleman came to Tothill-fields Bridewell, to see one of the prisoners in the gaol, natural curiosity prompted him to ask who I was, he was told; he said he was perfectly well acquainted with my prosecutrix, and had often heard her express her regret for the manner in which she had treated me; and he told me if I would address her with a few lines, as he said it was a disagreeable thing to appear in court, that the bill would be thrown out, and I should have no more trouble; this induced me to do it.

COURT. You may look at the letter.

PRISONER. (Looks at it.) This is my hand-writing.

(The letter read.)

'Madam,

'I am happy to embrace the opportunity

'which presents itself of addressing to you a

'few lines relative to a prosecution which

'you have lately commenced; I am convinced,

'Madam, that you are possessed of

'humanity, therefore hope that you will feel

'for my unhappy situation; deplorable as it

'is, you have it in your power to extricate

'me from it without sustaining the smallest

'injury; the Grand Jury are to find the bills

'to-morrow at Guildhall, and it depends

'upon your evidence to have the bill found

'or rejected; what shall I say, or in what

'words shall I address you? innocent or

'guilty, I have suffered severely, suffered

'more than you can think or suppose; my

'character, if not totally lost, is injured in

'the highest degree; my confinement and

'the manner in which I have been exposed

'I shall not mention, though I am certain

'they must have the greatest weight in an

'humane and feeling mind, and by such

'would be considered as a sufficient punishment

'even for a guilty person; may this

'consideration animate your heart, and induce

'you to put a stop to a prosecution which ' cannot be attended by any agreeable reflection;

'though I have received every

'assurance of safety from those who are versed

'in affairs of this nature, yet the thought of

'appearing in a court of justice, where the

'greatest innocence is sometimes ineffectual,

'compels me to address you in this manner,

'and to intrude upon a gentleman who, I hear,

'is acquainted with you, to deliver this letter,

'and to use his good offices, hoping they

'will be effectual, convinced that you are

'superior to interest, or being made an instrument,

'and with the greatest reliance

'upon your feeling and sensibility; I remain

'with the greatest respect your obedient

'humble servant,

G. BARRINGTON."

Tothillfields Bridewell, Monday, Jan. 6.

Directed to Miss Dudman.

FOR THE PRISONER.

HENRY FINCH sworn.

I am a perukemaker in Duke's Court, St. Martin's Lane: I have dressed at the Golden Cross, Charing Cross, for upwards of 16 years; I have seen Mr. Barrington frequently there; he lodged in the neighbourhood at one Mr. Deadcraft's before he came to the Cross; Mr. Deadcraft, where he had lodged, gave him such a good character, and the people at the Cross did too, that I was glad to get such a lodger; as I had a lodging in my house I let him a lodging; he kept good hours; he behaved exceeding civil, and bore one of the best of characters among the officers whom I have the honor to attend; his conduct was very regular; he was never out after 12 o'clock; he used to go out about 10 or 11 in the morning; he paid his trades people very genteelly.

GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice ASHHURST.

83, 84. GEORGE CHARLES PARSONS and CHARLES DAVIS were indicted for that they in a certain field and open place near the king's highway in and upon James Dunbar did make an assault, putting him in corporal fear and danger of his life, and stealing from his person 5 s. in monies numbered, the property of the said James Dunbar , December 1st .

JAMES DUNBAR sworn.

As I was going from Islington , between 7 and 8 o'clock, upon the first of December, in company with a young woman, I was met by the two prisoners at the bar; the prisoner Charles Parsons presented a pistol to my breast and demanded my money; I gave him my money; he asked me if I had no more: I said, I had some half-pence; he demanded them; I gave them to him; then he demanded my watch; I said, I had none; I bid him search to satisfy himself; which he did: Davis was present; he stopped the young woman Mary Spratley at the same time, then he turned about and presented his pistol to me.

Was it moon-light? - No; it was star-light.

How can you be sure to the persons of the men, as you say it was only star-light? - I know both their faces.

How were they dressed? - I cannot be certain; they were taken 9 days after; I knew them when they were taken; one was dressed as at the time he robbed me, in a great coat; I did not make any observation upon the dress of the other; the voice of the prisoner resembled Parsons.

MARY SPRATLEY sworn.

I was stopped by Davis; I cannot speak to the person of Parsons; I think I observed sufficiently the face of Davis to be able to swear to him; after he robbed me he turned towards Mr. Dunbar.

' Thomas Ward , Thomas Tapsell , and

' Thomas Tracey deposed that they took the

'prisoners under suspicious circumstances;

'that upon Charles Parsons they found a

'loaded pistol.'

PARSONS's DEFENCE.

I was at home when the robbery was committed.

DAVIS's DEFENCE.

I was at home at my father's house a-bed.

FOR DAVIS.

DANIEL CLASS sworn.

I am a watch-engraver: I have known Davis rather above a twelve-month; he has worked for me that time; I have entrusted him to receive different bills; I have such a good opinion of him that I would not refuse now to intrust him in the same manner I have before.

JOHN FELBY sworn.

I am a musick-engraver; I live in Petty France, Westminster: I have known the prisoner Davis from his infancy; I always looked upon him to be a very tractable good boy, industrious in his business and a good workman.

WILLIAM TABER sworn.

I have known Davis from his infancy; he bears a very good character.

RICHARD BRIGGS sworn.

I am a watch-engraver: I have known Davis from his infancy; I always thought him a hard-working industrious lad.

- BARNARD sworn.

I have known Davis 3 years; I lodged in the house with his father a year and a half; he worked very hard at home with his father.

FOR PARSONS.

ELIZABETH PEARSON sworn.

I have known Parsons about a twelve-month; he worked for my husband; he has a very good character; the very day he was taken he went with a note, and brought every thing right.

SAMUEL SEDGWICK sworn.

I am a joiner and house carpenter; I have known Parsons 6 or 7 years; he has a good character.

JAMES DAVIS sworn.

I am a carpenter; I have known Parsons about 8 or 9 years.

What is he by profession? - I cannot justly say.

How does he get his living? - I often see him at his father's very busy and industrious; his father is a carpenter and surveyor.

BOTH GUILTY . Death .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

85. ANN BUCKLE was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Mary Fielding , widow , on the 9th of November , about the hour of 8 in the night, and stealing a cotton counterpane, value 6 s. a callico petticoat, value 2 s. a flannel petticoat, value 2 s. two black silk clocks, value 4 s. four printed cotton bed curtains, value 40 s. a cotton head cloth for a bed, value 10 s. a cotton tester cloth, value 10 s. six cotton vallens for a bed, value 4 s. and a cotton bed-gown, value 5 s. the property of the said Mary, in her dwelling-house .

There being no evidence to affect the prisoner, but the testimony of an accomplice unattended with any corroborating circumstances, she was found.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

86. SAMUEL BRYAN was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Fortescue on the 31st of December , between the hours of 5 and 6 in the night, and stealing a wrought silver tankard, value 7 l. two silver salts, value 10 s. a silver table-spoon, value 5 s. two silver teaspoons, value 18 d. a pair of silver shoe-buckles, value 6 s. a silver chased snuff-box, value 6 s. and a coral set in silver, with seven silver bells, value 5 s. the property of the said John, in his dwelling-house .

JOHN FORTESCUE sworn.

I am a coachman : my house was broke open on the last day of the old year at night, between 5 and 6 o'clock; I was out with my coach; I was sent for home about 6 o'clock, when I found the prisoner in custody.

ISABELLA FORTESCUE sworn.

I shut up the house, and double locked the door, and went out at 4 o'clock; I returned between 5 and 6, when I found the house broke open and a great many people in it; the prisoner was taken under the bed: I left no one in the house; I fastened the window and the door; I don't know how he got in; there did not appear to be any injury done to the door; the lock did not appear to be hurt.

BENJAMIN NASH sworn.

I was drinking in a public house; I heard a cry of thieves; I went and searched the prosecutor's house, and found the prisoner concealed under the bed; I searched him and found a silver snuff-box in his pocket.

[It was produced in Court, and deposed to by the prosecutor.]

PHENIX FLETCHER sworn.

I live next door to the prosecutor: I knew Mrs. Fortescue; hearing a noise in the house, I went to the door and found it open, which startled me; I called out who is there? a man cried out, I am coming, and came down, and put a candle out; he ran out at the door, and said, stand clear; he ran off; the fright seized me so, I did not know what do to; I cried out, O! Mr. Fortescue's house is broke open, and some people came and found the prisoner in the house with the snuff-box in his pocket.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I leave myself to the mercy of the Court.

NOT GUILTY of breaking and entering the dwelling-house; but GUILTY of stealing to the value of 39 s.

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

87, 88. WILLIAM WICKSTEAD and EPIPHANY PARKER were indicted for that they with a certain offensive weapon and instrument called a pistol, upon Joseph Bell feloniously did make an assault, with intent the monies of the said Joseph to steal , against the statute, December 31st .

JOSEPH BELL sworn.

I live with Messrs. Rains and Barker in Lincoln's Inn Fields: upon the 31st of December, about 8 in the evening, as I was going, in company with Mr. Tree and Mr. Gains, up Park-lane , I was walking about 20 or 30 yards before them, when I was stopped by the two prisoners; they both took me by the collar and demanded my money; Parker put a drawn knife to my breast, and bid Wickstead clap a pistol to my breast, which he did; I rather pushed a little on one side, and Parker said, if I made the least resistance he would run the knife into me; they were putting their hands in my pocket to take out my money, when Mr. Gains and Mr. Tree came up, upon which they made off; I pursued them; I knocked Parker down with a stick, and John Tree secured him; Wickstead ran down Piccadilly, and Gains after him; I followed Gains, and when I came up to them Wickstead was standing with a pistol in his hand, and swearing, that the first man that came up to him he would blow his brains out; Mr. Gains struck him over the head with a stick he had in his hand; and then we both struck at him together and knocked him down, and the pistol fell from his hand on the ground; Gains took up the pistol and fired it into the air, and we secured him: the pistol was loaded and cocked; Mr. Tree brought Parker down; and we took them in a coach to Sir John Fielding 's.

Are you sure these are the men? - Yes.

From PARKER. Whether he did not run up against us with a great stick in his hand as we were going along? - I was going past him, he seized hold of my collar.

WILLIAM GAINS sworn.

On the evening of the 31st of December, about 8 o'clock I was going up Park-lane, in company with Mr. Bell and Mr. Tree; Mr. Bell was about 30 yards before us; the two prisoners stopped him under the wall; he was walking in the footpath under the dead wall; we heard Bell say, he had no money; they replied, D - n your eyes, you have money; we ran up, and Mr. Tree and Mr. Bell secured Parker; I followed Wickstead down Park-lane, and overtook him just at the bottom; he held out a pistol, and said, D - n your eyes, if you come any farther I will shoot you; I hit him on the side of his head with a stick, and he fell, and the pistol fell out of his hand; I took it up and discharged it, and secured him.

JOHN TREE sworn.

I was in company with the two last witnesses the last night of the old year; we were going up Park-lane; Bell was about 30 yards before us; I saw two men stop him and demand his money; he replied, I have none; they swore D - n your eyes, you have money; he said, he had none; one of them said, D - n your eyes, I'll shoot you dead if you don't resign your money; Mr. Gains and I came up to his assistance; Wickstead jumped into the road to make his escape; Parker ran up the lane; I said to Bell, knock him down, Bell immediately struck him over the head and he fell against the wall, upon which I went up and seized him by the collar, then Bell and Gains followed Wickstead down Park-lane; I brought Parker down the lane and found they had secured him; we put them into a coach and took them to Sir John Fielding 's.

WICKSTEAD's DEFENCE.

I met with Parker, who said he was going to meet the Uxbridge coach, he asked me to go with him to the Green Man in Oxford-road; we went down Park-lane, we thought we heard a postchaise stop; we made up to it, and a man threw a pistol at me, and the other as we thought had a stick in his hand; they made off; the postboy said it was very lucky we came up or else they would have robbed the chaise; I said to Parker, let's stay a little in the lane, we may meet with them; we saw Bell in the lane and thought he was one of the persons that was going to rob the chaise; I bid him resign, I did not ask him for his money.

PARKER's DEFENCE.

I was going to meet the Uxbridge coach, I met with Wickstead and asked him to go with me; we were going down Park-lane and we heard a postchaise stop; we ran to it, a man had a pistol which he threw at us, and the other had a stick; on our coming up they made off and we took up the pistol; we waited in the lane to see if we could meet with them; we saw one of these men with a great stick in his hand, we thought he had been one of them and made up to him.

GAINS. I was going up the lane just before, and there were two men in the lane stopped a chaise, and I believe a coach had just passed; I heard them say, D - n our eyes, I thought we should have had that, alluding to the coach that had just passed.

One of the Prisoners. Gains said before Sir John Fielding that they had laid this plot against us.

GAINS. I said, I thought there were two footpads in the lane; I had passed them before and apprehended they would have robbed me if I had not run; I heard them at the chaise, I did not see them.

BOTH GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice NARES.

89. RICHARD TAYLOR was indicted for stealing a pair of buckskin breeches, value 5 s. the property of William Penson , November 25th .

WILLIAM PENSON sworn.

I live at Twickenham : I lost a pair of leather breeches about six weeks ago; I will not be punctual to a day; they were in an old cloaths shop which I keep; I found a man wearing them; I saw them in the shop about two hours before I missed them.

ROBERT DAVIS sworn.

I bought the breeches of the prisoner; he offered them to sale at my house; I live at Twickenham.

To PENSON. They were not new breeches were they? - No; to the best of my knowledge I gave five shillings for them; I heard Davis had a pair of breeches that were not his own which he had bought of another man; I went and enquired after him and met with him at a public house; I told him the breeches he had on were mine, and desired him to deliver them; he said, he would not, that he bought them of Taylor and paid for them; I got a warrant and took him before the justice, and then we went and took the prisoner.

JOHN REID sworn.

I saw Davis buy the breeches of the prisoner, he brought them to his house; he was to give five shillings for them; I saw him pay 4 s. 6 d. of the money.

[The breeches were produced in Court, and deposed to by the prosecutor.]

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I had no bread for my family for three days and three nights.

GUILTY of stealing to the value of 10 d. W .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice NARES.

90, 91, 92, 93. HENRY DIPNALL senior , HENRY DIPNALL junior , WILLIAM WALKER and THOMAS SMITH were indicted for stealing 560 pounds weight of lead, value 40 s. fixed to an empty house , the property of Edward Ferry and William Lee , against the statute, December 13th .

The evidence was not sufficient to bring the charge home to the prisoner.

ALL FOUR NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice ASHHURST.

94. JAMES M'DORMOT was indicted for stealing a ham, value 6 s. and 84. pounds weight of bacon, value 30 s. the property of John Griffith , January 6th .

JOHN GRIFFITH sworn.

I am a cheesemonger near Clare-market : the prisoner used to sell rabbits; he was selling his rabbits at a public house, the man was ill-natured and would not let him stand there; out of compassion to him, as he appeared to be a decent sort of a man, I told him he might sell his rabbits at my bulk; I missed bacon afterwards from time to time, but did not suspect him; at last I heard it was the prisoner that had taken the bacon and a ham; upon this I got a warrant to take him up, he was by that time taken in the neighbourhood; he denied every thing; I took him to Sir John Fielding 's, he committed him for further examination; a Mr. Ray who keeps a public house in the neighbourhood, came to me and said, he heard I had lost some bacon, and he believed he had some that would suit me; I went to his house and saw three-quarters of a hundred weight of bacon; I did not hear of the ham till about a week after he was taken up.

CHRISTIAN RAY sworn.

I keep the sign of the Three Compasses in Little Wild-Street: on the sixth of January, about four o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner brought two pieces of bacon to my house in a flat basket which hung on a pole they hang their rabbits on, he desired to leave it a little while; he left it, and returned in about an hour with another piece; he laid it on a back-room table and asked me for his basket; I gave him his basket and desired him to put it in for it would dirty my table; he went away again and brought a fourth piece, which is a remarkable piece; I can swear to it; he was very much in liquor; there were some taylors in my house then that bid money for some of the bacon; after that I desired him to take away his bacon or take it off the table; he desired me to let him put it in the cellar, which I said I had no objection to, and he put it on the head of a butt in the cellar; he went away again and brought another piece, the largest piece of all, he carried that down into the cellar and was very troublesome: he said he had some more to fetch, he went away; the next day a woman came and related the story of Mr. Griffith's losing some bacon; I went down to Mr. Griffith's, he came with me to my house, and I shewed him the bacon the prisoner left at my house.

[The bacon was produced in Court, and deposed to by the prosecutor.]

THOMAS BURTON sworn.

I live with Mr. Griffith: the prisoner came into our house on twelfth-day in the evening, and stood by the fire; as I was serving the customers he walked out and in several times, presently he came in and I saw him unhook a piece of bacon, as he unhooked it he let it drop and said it would lie best there; it was the biggest piece that is here; just after; I missed the prisoner and the bacon; he came in again and my mistress chastised him with it, he said he knew nothing about it.

Prisoner. I only moved the bacon from the door into the shop, I used to move vessels and things in the shop.

To BURTON. Did the bacon hang at the door? - No; it hung behind the door for a week.

To the Prosecutor. Have you any witnesses in respect to the ham? - No; only that I lost one.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I never took a bit of his bacon.

GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Lord Chief Baron SMYTHE.

95, 96, 97, 98. DANIEL HOPKINS , HENRY HASLAM , JOHN TOLLEY , and ELIZABETH the wife of Thomas HOLLIS were indicted, the three first for stealing a hair trunk, value 10 s. twelve linen shirts, value 40 s. four pair of silver shoe-buckles, value 40 s. an onyx ring set in gold, value 5 l. a mock sardonyx ring set in gold, value 20 s. a wooden box covered with leather, value 2 d. six linen handkerchiefs, value 6 s. and a pair of toupee-tongs, value 6 d. the property of Charles Smith , December 18th ; and the other for receiving the above goods well knowing them to have been stolen , against the statute.

CHARLES SMITH sworn.

On the eighteenth of December I came from Nottingham, I entrusted a trunk to my servant to bring to town before a postchaise, the trunk was stolen between May-fair and Golden-square ; upon hearing of the loss I went to the public office in Bow-street; I saw the trunk afterwards in the possession of Sir John Fielding 's clerk, and the prisoners were in custody at Sir John Fielding 's at the same time.

Had the trunk been opened? - They acquainted me it had been opened; it was open when I went there, and I believe all my property in it; it was not in the situation it was packed up in; I lost nothing out of it I believe.

Cross Examination.

You did not see the trunk fastened to the postchaise? - No.

ILLI ROWLAND sworn.

I am servant to Mr. Smith: I was in a postchaise, the trunk was tied before the chaise; we came last from Barnet to London; I missed the trunk in Piccadilly.

You went to Sir John Fielding 's did you? - Yes; I saw the trunk there.

What time did you get to London? - Between six and seven.

What time did you see it at Sir John Fielding 's? - Ten o'clock; I know nothing of the prisoner.

Cross Examination.

How was it fastened to the chaise? - With a strap before the chaise; it was fastened by the ostler at Barnet.

EDMUND INGRAM sworn.

I am a postchaise driver: I drove the prosecutor from Barnet to London; the trunk was fastened on at our house, the Red Lion the bottom of Barnet-hill, with leather straps; it was safe at Tottenham-road-gate coming to London; I missed it in a street in Piccadilly; the servant put his head out of the chaise and said the trunk was gone; I turned my head and saw it was gone; the straps were cut and were hanging down.

Are you sure the straps were not wore? - Yes; they were cut: I know nothing of the prisoner.

Cross Examination.

You never saw any body near the chaise? - No.

COURT. You did not stop on the road? - Only at the turnpikes; I never stopped from May-fair till I came to the place where I missed it; as I came from Sir John Fielding 's, they asked me to drink with them and they took the straps out of my pocket; that was at the White-Bear; they had all hold of me and picked my pocket.

From HASLAM. Whether he had not been out of the room many minutes before he missed the straps? - I went up to Sir John Fielding's, I looked in at the window, and Hopkins asked me to go in and drink; I held my hands in my pocket, they sent me out, go out, said they; I put my hands in my pocket to see if I had lost any thing, and the straps were gone.

JOHN HELEY sworn.

Upon Wednesday the 18th of December Smith, a hackney coachman, came up to the Brown Bear in Bow-street, and said, that he had carried a trunk with three men down to Cold-bath Fields, and he verily believed one of them to be Daniel Hopkins ; accordingly we got into his coach and went to the bottom of Leather-lane, to the corner of Eyre-street I think; we walked down Warner-street; then he shewed us the door that the people took the trunk in at; he said they carried it up one pair of stairs; I believe there was a light in that room; I went up, and upon the bed I saw that trunk open with a quantity of linen and other things, and papers strewed about the floor; the prisoner Tolley sat upon the bed; I saw something in his hand which he put into his side-pocket; I seized hold of him and took these tongs out of his side-pocket, and this large clasp-knife; I tied his hands, and somebody else the other prisoners; after we had secured them, we put up all the things into the trunk again, and tied it up and brought it to Bow-street; when we came there we had information brought, that a trunk of that sort was lost; the gentleman's servant came, who swore to the things; we had got it to Bow-street before we knew a trunk had been lost.

To ROWLAND. There were a pair of irons, are these your master's? - No.

JOHN SMITH sworn.

I am a hackney coachman: I was standing in Pall-mall; on the 18th of December one of the prisoners called a coach up St. Alban's-street; I went to the call, and there were the three men, prisoners at the bar, standing with this trunk; I looked at them and opened the coach-door; they put the trunk into the coach; Hopkins and another man got into the coach and desired the third man to get behind; they desired me to drive to the White Swan in Leather-lane; I told them I did not know the White Swan in Leather-lane; I knew the White Bear at the top of Leather-lane; I made the best of my way to Leather-lane; when I came to the end of Purpool-lane in Leather-lane, the man behind the coach called to me to stop; I pulled up as much to the light as I possibly could, to take particular notice of the trunk; they got out of the coach there; I saw W upon the trunk, but I thought it was an A; two of them took it away; Daniel Hopkins asked me what my fare was; I told him 18 d.; he gave me a five-shilling piece; I gave him a half-crown and a shilling in change; he followed the man with the trunk; I pulled off my great coat and flung it into the coach and my whip, and followed them down Eyre-street-hill; they pitched the trunk down at the corner of Warner-street; I placed myself on the other side of the street; Daniel Hopkins went up Warner-street and came back; as soon as he came back again it was pitched on one man's head, and he carried it up Warner-street; I crossed the way and went up the other side of the street facing them; they went into a house; then I crossed the way and went to the door; I saw a light up the stair-case and the prisoners taking up the trunk; I took particular notice of the house; I saw a light up one pair of stairs, and the shutters put to; I immediately made the best of my way to my coach, and drove as fast as I could to Sir John Fielding 's; I asked the clerk if there was any information of a trunk being stole; he said, No; I said, I had been carrying a trunk with three men; that I had a great suspicion they had stole it; the clerk asked me what sort of men they were; I described the men as near as I could, and told him one was like Daniel Hopkins ; he ordered assistance to go with me; I went with the coach as fast as I could; I stopped at the end of Leather-lane; there we all got out; I went and shewed them the house that I saw them go up stairs, and they were secured.

Cross Examination.

You had no conversation with the prisoners?

- Hopkins said, when he gave me the five-shilling piece, he was sorry to part with it; that if he should know me again he would give me 6 d. for it.

COURT. How came you to know Daniel Hopkins ? - I remember his being evidence against a man that murdered a gentleman's coachman in Bloomsbury; he brought the man to light that murdered the coachman.

From HASLAM. I did not ride in the coach at all? - No, you rid behind the coach, but you helped to carry the trunk away.

DAVID PROTHERO sworn.

I was at Sir John Fielding 's office upon the 18th of December last, when Smith came in and said, he had carried a trunk which he believed was stole: we went with him; when we entered the room the four prisoners were looking over the linen; the trunk was open and the linen spread about; it was up one pair of stairs in a house in Warner-street.

Do you know whose room that was? - The landlady of the house told us it was Hollis's lodging.

COURT. Was the woman doing any thing? - She was stooping; I cannot say whether she touched any thing or no.

COURT to HELEY. You don't know whose house it is? - I don't know the landlady's name; Mrs. Hollis herself said it was her husband's lodging.

Was her husband there? - No; she said he was gone into the country.

You did not see her do any thing about the things? - No; she was only sitting by the side of the table; I did not see her meddle with any thing.

HOPKINS's DEFENCE.

I was by myself when I found the trunk; the other two men happened to see me; it was more than I was able to lift; I was dragging it on the pavement when these two people came by; they were not with me when I found it; I found it in Piccadilly; I had seen one of them before; I did not know the other: I am an engraver; I had been in the country, I had but just returned to town, or I should have had a lodging of my own; I had been to transact some business for a relation in the country.

HASLAM's DEFENCE.

I live in Clerkenwell-green: I was going upon some business to Park-lane; the prisoner's brother lives in Turnmill-street; I met him promiscuously, and asked him if he would take a walk with me; he agreed to my proposal; we went together; coming back again we met with Hopkins; I had never seen him before in my life; he told us he had found a trunk, and it was so weighty an affair that he could not carry it, and desired our assistance; we agreed to his proposal, and asked him where he was going to carry it; he said, To Warner-street; Tolley took it upon his shoulder; there was no coach in Piccadilly; Hopkins went for the coach; the trunk was lifted into the coach by Tolley; Hopkins and Tolley came in; he told me there was not room in the coach the trunk was so large, but if I liked it I might ride behind; I did; Mrs. Hollis was not at home when we went into the room: I did assist to carry the trunk down Leather-lane, that was all the hand that I had in it; I neither paid coach-hire, nor did I ride in the coach; I am no acquaintance with Hopkins, I am a shoemaker , and work for myself; I keep a small house in the Middle-street, Clerkenwell-green.

TOLLEY's DEFENCE.

I was going along, I met this gentleman in the street about five o'clock; he told me he was going to Park-lane, and desired me to take a walk with him; I did; I am a carpenter by trade; we generally don't work by candlelight; I am a journeyman carpenter ; I work for one Jones in Mary-le-bone; I have my landlady here.

REBECCA WATKINSON sworn.

I am a widow: I have known Tolley about four months; he lodged with me about that time; he said he was just come from Manchester; I don't know where he went to after he left me.

Did he keep good hours while he lived at your house? - Yes; he appeared to be a carpenter, and came to his meals and kept regular hours.

ANN WALLADER sworn.

Tolley was recommended by a particular acquaintance of mine that keeps the Horns in St. John's-street; they told me he was a very honest man, and always paid his way very well; he lived with me about nine weeks.

HOPKINS, HASLEM, and TOLLEY

GUILTY .

HOLLIS NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Lord Chief Baron SMYTHE.

99. MARY COXON was indicted for stealing a linen purse, value 1 d. four guineas and one half-guinea , the property of John King , December 19th .

The prosecutor was called, but not appearing the Court ordered his recognizance to be estreated.

NOT GUILTY .

100. ANN TWEDDEL was indicted for stealing a silver watch, value 30 s. the property of William Gilbert , December 15th .

There was no evidence to affect the prisoner.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Lord Chief Baron SMYTHE.

101. JANE STOCKER, otherwise MARY MANCASTER, otherwise STEPHENS , was indicted for stealing a silk cloak, value 30 s. four pair of cotton stockings, value 4 s. and a pair of thread stockings, value 1 s. the property of Barnard Charlton , November 30th .

FRANCES CHARLTON sworn.

I am the wife of Barnard Charlton ; my husband deals in coals : on the 30th of November the prisoner came to our house under pretence of recommending a customer to my husband; as I had some slight knowledge of her, I asked her to stay to tea; I went into the shop, after tea, to serve a customer, and left her in the parlour; while I was in the shop she came out and bid me good night, and went away; I went into the parlour in less than a minute after and missed the things mentioned in the indictment: my husband not being very well was sitting asleep in the parlour; I waked him and told him she had robbed us; I went round to the pawnbrokers, and at a Mr. Brown's I found my cloak pawned in the name of Groves; he refused letting me see it till I agreed to pay the money it was in pledge for; I asked him where this Groves lived; he said in Lomber-street or West-street; but he said, as it was not in for the value of it, perhaps she would come to take it out, and he would stop the money; I waited about a week but heard nothing of it; then I got a warrant and went and searched Lomber-street and West-street, but could hear nothing of her; then I went to the pawnbroker's again to see if he could not give me a better direction; he then looked in his book, which he had not done before, and told me the last direction was Little St. Andrews-street; I enquired there and found the prisoner; I asked her what she had done with my cloak; she was some time before she made me an answer; then she said, she believed it was at a pawnbroker's in Long Acre; the constable asked her where the duplicate of the cloak was; she said, she believed it was burnt; the constable searched her and her apartment, and found the duplicate of my cloak upon a woman that was in the room with Stocker; I asked her what was become of two pair of new stockings I lost that were my son's; she said one pair was sent to Groves in the Marshalsea prison, and the other pair was pawned at a pawnbroker's in Drury-lane; I found the other two pair in the apartment upon a table between the windows.

RICHARD BANNISTER sworn.

I am servant to Mr. Brown a pawnbroker; I took the cloak in of a person in the name of Groves; I never saw the prisoner till I saw her before the justice.

DENNIS McDONALD sworn.

I am a constable; I took the prisoner; I found two pair of stockings and a duplicate in her apartment (producing them); the prisoner said she had the duplicate of Mary Carr , who pawned the cloak in Long Acre, and sent us to get another pair of stockings in Drury-lane; she said she sent a pair over to the Marshalsea to one Groves.

[ The cloak and stockings were produced in Court, and deposed to by the prosecutrix.]

MARY CARR sworn.

I go out a charing: on the Saturday night when I came home about half after 8 o'clock the prisoner was sitting by the fire with this cloak on; she said, Peggy, go to Mr. Brown with this cloak: I pawned it in the name of Groves, the gentlewoman's name who keeps the room; I did not hear the prisoner's name.

PRISONER's DEFENCE

The prosecutrix lent me the cloak; I pawned it for a little money with intent to take it out again.

GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice ASHHURST.

102. MARY the wife of Thomas PLANT was indicted for stealing a pewter pint pot, value 1 s. and a pewter quart pot, value 1 s. the property of Robert Emery , December 11th .

ROBERT EMERY sworn.

I keep the Artichoke, a public house in Fleet-market : my servant detected the prisoner stealing some pots: I only speak to the property.

[The pots were produced in Court, and deposed to by the prosecutor.]

THOMAS CAMDEN sworn.

I use the prosecutor's house; I went to dine there; I carried an anchovy in a cup and set it up by the pots; the prisoner came in; I saw her busy among the pots; I went to reach my anchovy just after and missed it, and the prisoner was then gone, upon which the servant and I went after her; I stopped her and asked if she had a china cup; she said, yes, and gave it me; I pulled back her cloak and found a quart and pint pot upon her.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I was in liquor: when I came out I found the pots at the door; I took them up; I thought if I carried them by and by he would give me a glass of gin,

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

103. PETER GILBARD was indicted for stealing a pig of tutenague, 14 lb. weight, value 9 s. the property of Robert Allan , December 30th .

ROBERT ALLAN sworn.

I belong to the custom-house: on the 30th of December we were landing some India goods; when the tutenague was landed upon the scale board the prisoner took it up and hid it under his apron; I found it upon him; I am accountable for it; he said he was drunk, and made a trifling excuse.

- INWOOD sworn.

I am a weigher of his Majesty's customs: upon the 30th of December I was weighing this tutenague, and as I was giving the draft the prisoner took up this pig and put it into his apron; when he had gone about ten yards Mr. Allan followed him and took it upon him.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

There was a man there offered me a shilling to carry it to Love-lane, and I put it in my apron to carry there; I do not know the man.

GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

104. ELIZABETH BARBER was indicted for stealing a watch, the cases made of Pinchbeck covered with tortoiseshell, value 24 s. a steal watch chain, value 6 d. a steel seal, value 4 d. a brass key, value 2 d. the property of Stephen Sepseed , December 20th .

'The prosecutor deposed that he was much

'intoxicated with liquor, and suffered himself

'to be picked up by the prisoner and another

'woman; that while he was using some familiarities

'with the other woman the prisoner

'picked his pocket of his watch, and ran

'away; that he never saw her before.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice NARES.

105. JOHN THOMAS was indicted for stealing a cloth box-coat, value 30 s. the property of Philip Grafton , Esq ; December 27th .

WILLIAM SHIRLEY sworn.

I am coachman to Philip Grafton , Esq; of Stoke Newington : I left my box-coat in the stable; on the Friday after Christmas-day at about 9 o'clock, when I came to look after my horses, I missed my coat.

ISAAC MORRIS sworn.

I am a watchman at Newington Green: on Friday was fortnight, as I was going my rounds at 11 o'clock, and as I was coming out of the Church-yard the prisoner asked me his way to Shoreditch Church; I took particular notice of his having this coat on; I asked him where he had the coat; he said his father had lent it him, and he was coming from Islington going to Shoreditch; I took notice to him that he was going out of the way; I suspected he had got this coat improperly, and stopped him.

JOHN FIELD sworn.

Morris did not know of this coat being stole; I did; finding this young lad in custody of the watchman, and knowing this coat had been taken away, I asked him some questions about it; he told us his father had lent it him.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I found the coat.

FOR THE PRISONER.

JOHN THOMAS sworn.

The prisoner is my son; till this complaint he had never done wrong as I know of, or ever misbehaved himself; he was never in trouble before; he is a weaver ; I am one too. GUILTY of stealing to the value of 10 d. W .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice NARES.

106. RICHARD TAYLOR was indicted for stealing an axe, value 6 d. an hand saw, value 6 d. two augurs, value 6 d. three chissels, value 6 d. a hammer, value 2 d. a chalk line, value 1 d. two plains, value 6 d. a gouge, value 1 d. and a drawing knife, value 4 d. the property of Robert Nichols .

'The prosecutor is a carpenter ; the prisoner

'worked journey-work with him in the

'country; he was taken in town with the

'tools upon him.'

GUILTY of stealing to the value of 10 d. W .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice NARES.

107. DAVID MONRO was indicted for stealing 126 ells of Russia linen cloth, value 4 l. the property of Adam Smith , in his dwelling-house , December 10th .

- ADAM SMITH sworn.

I am a linen draper in King's-street, Golden-square : upon the 10th of December in the evening I missed a bundle of Russia linen; it was before 5 in the evening when I missed it; between 8 and 9 in the evening the constable came to me and told me he had taken some linen, which was at his house opposite Litchfield-street, and had the man too in custody; as it was not the turn of the same Justices to attend at the Rotation the next day, I did not go to attend the Rotation-office till Saturday following, then I saw these pieces of Russia linen, which contain in the whole 126 ells; I am very certain it is my linen; it had not been long brought into the shop; it lay upon some chests near the shop door.

SAMUEL WALLACE sworn.

I was coming by Mr. Smith's in company with the prisoner, who was my master; I worked for him; he went about with a jackass; I saw some linen lying near the door; Monro sent me in to take it; when I had taken it I gave it to him; he carried it to his own house; this was I think between five and six in the evening; I was taken up first almost immediately after the linen was carried to Monro's house; Monro and I went to Symon's, in order to get Symon to buy it; Symon said, he had not money enough; his wife came with me to the prisoner's house or near it; then Symon went away, and, as I understood, when he came again he had been to fetch Lyons the constable; when they came both together, Symon took me first and delivered me to Lyons; soon after we took the prisoner at an ale-house; he gave both Symon and Lyons an account where the linen was to be found.

MICHAEL SYMON sworn.

I have known the prisoner two or three months; I have bought cloaths of him; I deal in old cloaths; he and the lad came to my house upon the 10th of December I believe between six and seven o'clock; Monro sweat very much; after he had wiped his face he said, I have something to sell you, it is a piece of new cloth, and you shall have it a bargain; he mentioned, that it would be about five guineas; I said I had not the money by me, but I could get it; I made an excuse to him to let my wife go with the boy to where the linen was, and I would go and borrow the money, instead of that I went to Lyons' house; but I said first, cannot you bring these goods to my house? he said he could not bring them there, but desired that we would come with him; I went out under pretence to borrow the money, and my wife went with the little boy, who was to shew where the cloth was; presently afterwards I spoke in Hebrew to my wife, that I meant to go for a constable, and giving her a caution to keep with them, that they might be found when I came back again: I went to Lyons the constable; the little boy told me where they were to meet; we took the boy somewhere near the prisoner's house; we sent away the boy to the round-house; but the boy told us where we could find the linen; we got the linen; a person in the house, who appeared as the wife of the prisoner, opened the door: Monro's room was locked up; we could not find the linen at first, but at last discovered it under the bed, some at the feet and some at the head of the bed: I sat a mark upon the linen, but I cannot readily find that mark upon it now, the linen has been tumbled about very much; I took a girdle off my waist and tied round it; this is the girdle upon it now.

THOMAS LYONS sworn.

Symon told me that two lads had been with him to sell some cloth; that he had made an excuse that he was going to borrow money, but had come to me for the purpose of having them apprehended; we overtook the woman and the boy; we took the boy to the round-house; the boy discovered where the cloth was; we found it according to his direction; it was packed up in several parcels on the sacking under the bed; we took the girl into custody; she went with us and shewed us where the prisoner was, and we secured him.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I am innocent: it was not my lodging where the cloth was taken; I lodged at my aunt's; provided this had been my lodging it was impossible I could have done this fact, because I was at my aunt's between four and five o'clock, and that is the time about which the prisoner missed the cloth.

FOR THE PRISONER.

CHARLOTTE MONRO sworn.

My brother was every night at my aunt's in Oxford-road; he lived there.

What business is he? - A coach and coach harness-maker ; but he used to go about with a jack-ass.

Did you live with your aunt? - Yes.

He lays there every night? - Yes, and never staid out later than between nine and ten o'clock.

MARY COOKE sworn.

My husband is a coach harness-maker; the prisoner's father was the same trade: my husband took some work by the piece, more than he could do himself; he bid me go to the prisoner; I went on the 10th day of the month; he went with me to several places to seek his father; I left him at his aunt's at about five o'clock when I came away; she lives at No. 161, Oxford-road.

How do you know it to be that day more than any other? - I had a receipt given me that day for some money, which I find is signed the 10th.

What day of the week was it? - To the best of my knowledge the day of the week was Tuesday.

Court to the Prosecutor. How far is this place in Oxford-road from your house? - Not half a mile.

GUILTY of stealing to the value of 39 s.

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice NARES.

108. GEORGE PALMESTER was indicted for the wilful murder of Joseph Pierson , April 12 .

There was no evidence given.

NOT GUILTY .

109. JOHN LONGFORD was indicted for feloniously being found at large within the term of 7 years, for which term he had been ordered to be transported , December 12th .

[The certificate of the conviction and sentence were produced in Court and read.]

JANNET ATKINSON sworn.

I prosecuted the prisoner and two other persons in December Sessions 1775; he was convicted; I am sure he is the man.

JOHN EDMUNDS sworn.

I know the prisoner; he was tried in December Sessions 1775; he robbed me the night before he robbed the last witness.

CHARLES JEALOUS sworn.

I took the prisoner on the 12th of December; he was at large in Parker's-lane, St. Giles's; he was in the street.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I was taken no farther than the river; he took me in Parker's-lane, to be sure.

GUILTY . Death .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

110, 111. JOHN KING and HENRY GIBBONS were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of John Haines on the second of December about the hour of nine in the night, and stealing three linen shirts, value 9 s. a silk gown, value 6 s. two linen gowns, value 10 s. eight linen towels, value 6 s. two dimity petticoats, value 10 s. a flannel petticoat, value 2 s. a callico bed-gown, value 3 s. a cloth waistcoat, value 6 s. a pair of leather breeches, value 2 s. two pair of worsted stockings, value 4 s. ten pair of cotton stockings, value 10 s. a pair of muslin ruffles trimmed with lace, value 10 s. a lace cap, value 8 s. a damask table-cloth, value 2 s. a diaper table-cloth, value 1 s. a linen shirt, value 2 s. two remnants of callico, value 1 s. a lawn apron, value 1 s. a black silk handkerchief, value 1 s. a black stuff petticoat, value 8 s. the property of the said John in his dwelling house .

ELIZABETH HAINS sworn.

I am wife of John Hains ; we live in Gray-street, Mary-le-bone : on the second of December I lost the things mentioned in the indictment (repeating them) out of my back parlour; I was in the kitchen under ground at the time my father left the parlour between three and four o'clock in the afternoon; a person that lodged in the house picked up three towels in the passage.

When did you see the parlour? - About eight in the morning.

Was any thing broke in the parlour? - No; the things were taken out of the drawers which were not locked; they got in at the back-parlour window that looks into the yard; I saw the things that were taken away in the fore part of the day, I cannot say what hour.

Do you know whether that window was shut? - No; my father sat in the room, he generally pulls the sash down when he goes out, he is not here: I saw some of my things at the Rotation-office, they had been bought by a Jew.

MICHAEL SYMON sworn.

Some goods were brought into my house to my wife; my father died a few days before; it is the way with us when our parents die the first seventeen days to do no business, I did no business at that time.

Did you ever see the goods? - Yes, in the room; my wife called me up stairs, I did not see who brought them, I was not in the room when they were brought up; my wife agreed with Day and Gibbons for them, I was at the agreement; they were dealing for them, but could not agree about the price.

Your wife was to buy them? - Yes; they took the bundle down stairs and came up again in a few minutes, and said she should have them; I sent the girl with some things to the pawnbroker for a guinea and a half to pay for them, and the money was laid down on the table, I don't know who took it up.

Did you send some of the things they brought to pawn? - No; some of my own things; the things my wife bought are in court, she produced them to the officer, the officer has had the custody of them.

LEAH SYMON sworn.

Gibbons and Day brought some things to me to dispose of, I bought them for a guinea and a half; I raised the money by pawning some things.

Where was your husband at this time? - Below stairs; he was not there when I made the agreement; he came up just as I sent for the money; there were three gowns, three petticoats, several pair of stockings, several napkins, and tea-cloths; I sent them to be washed; when the gentleman came after the goods, I sent for them from the washerwoman and delivered them up.

Who came for them? - Grub the constable, I delivered them to him.

On her Cross Examination she said, 'that

'when her husband came up she gave him

'the key of the drawers to take something

'out to send the girl with to raise a guinea

'and a half to pay for the things; that she

'knew Gibbons before, but that she never saw

'Day before, but that he was recommended

'to her by Gibbons; that she dealt in old

'cloaths; that if people came recommended

'to her she did not think it was her place to

'enquire how they came by the things; that

'she believed them to be the property of Day;

'that when they came in Gibbons recommended

'Day to her; that Day asked the

'money for the things, and that when they

'could not agree, Day tied them up and took

'them down stairs; and came up again with

'them and let her have them; that when she

'delivered the things to Grub there was another

'man with him.'

[The things were produced in Court by the constable, and deposed to by the prosecutrix.]

JAMES DAY sworn.

On the second of December, Gibbons, King, and myself met in St. Giles's, and at night we went to Mary-le-bone and stole these things; the back-door and the yard door were open; Gibbons and I pushed the window up and King went in; King handed out the things to us, and we went from there to Symon's and sold the things for a guinea and a half.

GIBBONS's DEFENCE.

I know nothing of the affair; I met Day and King in Wardour-street, Oxford-road; Day asked me where he could dispose of this property, I took him to Symon, and she bought them of him and paid him the money; King went with us and staid below stairs.

KING's DEFENCE.

I met Day in Mary-le-bone-lane; he said he had found the property and asked me where had could dispose of it; I said I did not know; we met Gibbons, and he recommended him to Symon; I know nothing of the affair.

' Gibbons called three witnesses, who gave

'him a good character.'

KING NOT GUILTY .

GIBBONS GUILTY of stealing to the value of 39 s.

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

JOHN KING was a second time indicted for stealing three shirts, value 15 s. and a diaper table-cloth, value 2 s. the property of Francis Bumpstead , November 27th .

There was no evidence to bring the charge home to the prisoner.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

JOHN KING was a third time indicted for stealing six linen shirts, value 20 s. nine muslin neckloths, value 10 s. two muslin handkerchiefs, value 1 s. and a linen table-cloth, value 3 s. the property of Thomas Smith , December 12th .

MARY SMITH sworn.

I am the wife of Thomas Smith : I missed the things mentioned in the indictment out of my parlour, I was in the kitchen at the time I heard a man in the parlour; I had left them in the parlour about a quarter of an hour before; there was a person saw the prisoner going out with the things, but she is not here.

ROBERT STUDMAN sworn.

I took the prisoner and Day in bed; I found two neckloths on the neck of Day and two under King's bolster.

'The two neckcloths found under King's

'bolster were produced and deposed to by the

'prosecutrix.'

' Charles Grubb , who was with the last

'witness, confirmed his testimony.'

RICHARD PITCHER sworn.

I am a pawnbroker; I took in a pair of stockings on the 14th of December of a man that I believe to be the prisoner; he resembled him.

JAMES DAY sworn.

King and I were at an alehouse; while I sat there he went out two or three times to the prosecutor and brought these things; the last time he came out he dropped two neckcloths which I picked up; I was to have half.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I know nothing at all of the affair.

GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

112. JOHN FIELD was indicted for that he in the king's highway in and upon John Edgely did make an assault, putting him in corporal fear and danger of his life, and stealing from his person one bank post bill, marked X. No 6260, dated London, 13th May 1776, signed by John Boult , for the governor and company of the Bank of England, by which the said John at 7 days sight did promise to pay that his solar bill of exchange to Mr. Graham Wilkinson or order 20 l. sterling for value received of Robert Ladbroke , Esq; and Company, which said bill of exchange was of the value of 20 l. and the property of the said John, and then due to him the proprietor thereof; one inland Bill of Exchange, marked No 851, dated Bath and Somersetshire Bank, December 5, 1776, signed by William Street, for Horlock, Mortimer, Anderdon, Goldney and Self, and drawn on Messrs. Brown, Collinson, and Tritton, bankers, London, by which the said William Street at 7: days after did promise to pay Mr. Edmund Harvey or order 50 l. value received; which said bill of exchange was indorsed (to wit) Edmund Harvey , and was then of the value of 50 l. and the property of John Edgely , and the sum of 50 l. was then due to the said John the proprietor thereof, against the statute , &c. December 6th .

JOHN EDGELY sworn.

I live at Speenham-land; I drive the Bath diligence that comes from the White Lion in the market place at Bath; the diligence was robbed on the 6th of December between Langley Broom and Colnbrook ; Mr. Gilpin who was in it was robbed between 6 and 7 o'clock, nothing was then lost out of the carriage; between 7 and 8, or about 8 o'clock I was robbed on this side of Cranford Bridge, upon Hounslow Heath; I saw the prisoner three times; it was a very dark night; but the last time he stopped me, he ordered Mr. Gilpin to get out; Mr. Gilpin opened the door himself and got out of the carriage, but the prisoner opened the other door and took the seat off himself; he ordered Mr. Gilpin to get into the diligence and open the seat for him, and then he ordered me to take one of the candles out of the lamps that I had in the carriage, which were then lighted, but were not when it was first stopped; I lighted the candle to the front glass of the carriage: Mr. Gilpin could not open the seat; it was locked, and I had the key; the prisoner demanded the key of me; and I gave the key to Mr. Gilpin, who opened the feat, and then the prisoner ordered him to give him the parcels, which he did; some he made Mr. Gilpin read, and others he read himself, as I believe he did those that Mr. Gilpin read; he took out of it four parcels of that size as were convenient for him to carry off, and one of the parcels, I am sure I saw the name of Harvey upon; I believe the direction was, To Mr. Harvey in Cornhill; there was one directed to Mr. Vansommer and Company. I believe the prisoner is the man that stopped us; I saw him three different times: though he had a crape upon his face that hung down to the tip of his nose, I could distinguish the lower part of his face; and I had several opportunities to observe, being stopped three times; the first time the lamps were not lighted; I rather think I was stopped the second time by mistake, not knowing that it was the same carriage he had stopped before; it was the last time that he searched the carriage.

Cross Examination.

When did you get to town? - I believe it was between 10 and 11 before I got to the inn; he was some time in stopping me; I believe at one time at least 10 minutes.

How near was you to the prisoner? - Not farther off than I am from the table; I saw the lower part of his face which I could distinguish very plainly, because I held the candle to him; it was a dark night.

RICHARD GILPIN , Esq; sworn.

I was stopped upon the 6th of December, the first time between Langley Broome and Colnbrook; I lost some gold and some silver; the prisoner on this side the Magpie stopped me a second time, but then I let down the window and said to him, why you have been with me before, upon which he bid us drive on; the lamps were then lighted; they were not lighted when first he robbed me; a little on this side Cranford-Bridge he stopped us again; he said, you have somebody else in the carriage; but found we had not; he ordered me to get out, which I did; I was going to get out at the door that he was at, but he ordered me to get out on the other side; the prisoner himself opened the door next to him, and then took out the cushion; the seat was locked; he ordered the coachman to give me the key, and I opened it; then he ordered the coachman to take one of the candles out of the lamp to light him; and he asked me what there was there? I said, I don't know; here is some game; then he asked the coachman why he locked the seat? the coachman said to preserve the parcels from being lost: I handed up a parcel to the prisoner; he looked at it by the light; I told him I thought it was like a pair of shoes; he took out two or three other parcels, and I read the directions of some by the candle which the coachman held; he held it in at the front window; I read a direction on one of the baskets; the prisoner asked me what it was; I said I thought it was game; he took three other parcels that were like letters; he then went away and bid us drive on; but we did not immediately drive on; upon which he called to us again and bid us drive away; it was very dark at the time; he had a crape half way on his face; I had an opportunity of seeing his face tolerably plain.

Whether you believe the prisoner to be the man? - Yes, he is.

Have you any doubt whether he is the man? - I have no doubt at all of his being the man; I have seen him several times since at Sir John Fielding 's.

What time was it? - I believe I was at Slough about 6 o'clock; according to the distance where I was robbed, I fancy it must be about 8 o'clock; we did not come into London till half after 10; then we stopped at the White Horse cellar and at Mr. Vansommer's where one of the parcels was directed; we, stopped at Speenham-land and changed the carriage and the horses; in putting the parcels into the carriage I saw one directed to Mr. Vansommer.

Was the robber armed? - No; I saw none, but I apprehended there might be some accomplices near; he had a great coat on; it was not buttoned up, so as to hinder my seeing his face; I took particular notice of his voice too, and that is another reason that induces me to think the prisoner is the man; the lower part of his face is very remarkable as it is not equal; there is a difference between one side and the other of his face; I saw him afterwards at Sir John Fielding 's.

Cross Examination.

When you saw him at Sir John Fielding 's, did you know him to be the man? - He was brought in there as a culprit; I looked at him; I had no doubt about it; I said at that time that he was the man.

Whether you was not in such a hurry of spirits at the time you was robbed that you could not recollect yourself? - No; I was perfectly cool.

Did you take any notice of his horse? - I took notice that it was a dark bay horse; and there was no white in his face; this I mentioned at Sir John Fielding 's.

JOHN BROWN sworn.

I am a silversmith in Fleet-street: on the 7th of December the prisoner came to my shop and looked out a parcel of goods which came to 28 l. 8 s. he said they were for a relation near Bath, that was going to be married, and he offered me a Bath Bank post-bill of the value of 50 l. I gave him 20 guineas and 10 s. in change; but as I had not then all the goods that he wanted, he said he would come again in the afternoon; he came again at half past 2 o'clock and dined with me; he had been at my shop twice before; I had procured the other things against he came; after dinner he laid out all the rest of the money he received in change, which was 20 guineas, except 16 s. Between the time of his coming to my shop and his returning in the afternoon I went to Messrs. Brown and Collinson with the bill for acceptance; I left it there; on Monday I went for the bill, and then I was told they had received information that this bill had been stolen, and they told me I must give the best account I could of the person from whom I received it; having received this information I then recollected that some time before, for he had dealt with me for some silver tea-spoons and some salt-spoons or some such matters; I recollected where these were to be sent before, and upon this I sent my brother to go along with Sir John Fielding 's men to find out the person, from going to the place where the things were directed to be sent to before; I have known the prisoner about 3 weeks; I did on the Saturday night sell him a pair of pistols; but these pistols had never been used; they were found exactly in the same state as when I sold them.

'The note was produced in court and read,

'it was drawn payable to Harvey or order,

'and indorsed Harvey.'

Cross Examination.

Did the prisoner tell you his name? - He did not go by the name of Field; he went by the name of Harvey, and passed to me as the very Harvey who had the property in that note and had indorsed it.

Mr. JOHNSON sworn.

I am clerk to Brown and Collinson: this bill for 50 l. was called for on Monday by Mr. Brown; I don't know who left it; Mr. Brown said he left it himself.

Mr. BROWN. This is the bill I left for acceptance, which I received from the prisoner.

ROBERT TACKLE sworn.

I am brother to Mr. Brown and live with him: I was with him when the bill was brought; on the Monday we were informed it was stolen; then I went to Hicks's coffee-house in Nassau-street, and at last I found him there; he was afterwards carried to Sir John Fielding 's; I enquired for him by the name of Harvey, because he had passed with my brother as Mr. Harvey; at Sir John Fielding 's he told his name, and that his lodging was at No 33, Broad-street; I went to his lodging, and there I found all the plate that had been sent to him by Mr. Brown; I learned there that the prisoner was an apprentice to a person of eminence in Long Acre.

EDWARD HARVEY sworn.

I live at Bayford in Somersetshire about thirty miles from Bath: I had been at Bath for two months together, therefore this bill is indorsed at Bath; I sent this bill up by the Bath diligence and delivered it myself on the fifth in the evening, in a parcel with other things, to the book-keeper at the White Lion; it was directed to Mr. Henry Harvey , No 2, in Cornhill; a 20 l. bill was likewise included in the same parcel.

JOSEPH TOOSEY sworn.

I live in Sharrard-street, Soho; at the latter end of November the prisoner bespoke a hat of me; he presented to me that bank note of 20 l. I gave him nineteen guineas and a shilling, and he returned me one guinea as the price of the hat.

GEORGE STURTON sworn.

I took the prisoner.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I took these notes at George's coffee-house near Temple-bar.

FOR THE PRISONER.

- McDELLON sworn.

I am an ironmonger in Oxford-street; I have known the prisoner better than seven years; I never knew any thing amiss by him; I looked upon him to be a very modest, honest young man; I have known him all his apprenticeship; he has been out of his time but about half a year.

Mrs. WRIGHTEN sworn.

You are a married lady I believe? - Yes.

What is your husband? - A gentleman.

How long have you known the prisoner? - From his infancy.

What has been his general character? - I looked upon him to be a sober, honest, indusstrious young man.

- DUDLEY sworn.

I am a sadler and live at Knightsbridge: I have known the prisoner ever since he was a child; I always supposed him to be a very honest young fellow.

Reverend Mr. PERRY sworn.

I am curate of Southgate, where the father of the prisoner lives: I have known him about twelve months; he is a very honest, sober, good-natured young fellow.

- LANE sworn.

I am a taylor in King's-street, Soho: I have known Mr. Field about six or seven weeks; his character is that he is a very sober, honest young man.

WILLIAM BELL sworn.

I am a cabinet-maker: the prisoner lodged with me at the time; I have known him three quarters of a year; he has a very good character; he always behaved well; he kept very good hours.

JAMES JONES sworn.

I am a sawyer and timber-merchant: I have known him from his being in petticoats; this is the first time that ever I heard any imputation upon his character.

JAMES STEELE sworn.

I keep Hicks's coffee-house in King's-street, Soho: I have known the prisoner about two months; he always behaved very soberly.

- CROFT sworn.

I am an upholder: I have known the prisoner about six or eight months; he rented some shops of me; I enquired his character in Long Acre, and had a very good character of him; he always behaved very soberly.

- BENNET sworn.

I am a weaver: I have known him something better than two years; he is a very honest, industrious young man; I never heard any ill of him at all.

Mrs. BENNET sworn.

I am the wife of the last witness: I have known the prisoner more than twenty years; he was always a dutiful boy to his mother, and I never heard that he ever wronged any person of sixpence.

ANN WILKINS sworn.

I have known him twenty years; he is a very, honest, sober worthy young man.

Mrs. MORETON sworn.

I have known the prisoner eighteen years; he was sober and honest to the last degree; I never heard a miss word of him.

GUILTY. Death .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice NARES.

'He was humbly recommended by the prosecutor

'to his Majesty's mercy.'

113. EDWARD EDDES was indicted for that he with a drawn sword of the value of 12 d. feloniously, wilfully, and of his malice aforethought did strike, penetrate, and thrust one George Weaver in and upon the right-side of his body, under his right shoulder, thereby giving him one mortal wound of the depth of one inch and an half, and of the breadth of half a quarter of an inch, of which he languished from the 25th of December unto the seventh of January and then died .

'The coroner's inquisition was, that the deceased

'died by the visitation of God.'

ARTHUR WEAVER sworn.

The deceased was my brother.

What did he die of? - I don't know no further than what I saw in the room. - On Christmas day at night I was locked out of my lodgings, I went to King Henry the Eighth's Head, a public house at the Seven Dials ; I asked Mr. Gillet who keeps the house to let me lie in his house that night; I laid there; the prisoner came in about half after eleven and had a pint of beer, then he went up stairs to bed, it was about half past twelve. George Sugar and my brother and I went up stairs to bed; I asked Mr. Eddes to let me lie along with him that night, he said, No, no such dirty dogs like you, my brother gave him a pull of the arm and said he would lie along with him as he had done before; he undressed himself and went to the bed-side and said, Mr. Eddes, will you please to let me lie with you to night, he said, No, no such dirty rascals like you; he in a joking manner said, I will lie with you; he got upon the bed, the old man (the prisoner) turned aside his pillow, took a key out of his breeches pocket and took out this weapon, which I thought was a stick, and pushed at my brother several times, my brother took up a chair to defend himself, the prisoner pushed the instrument into his side, George threw the chair at him directly; the old man then followed him down stairs, and as my brother said, at the two pair of stairs he pushed at him again.

Did you see him wounded with this sword or instrument? - Yes, in the thigh.

Did you see any more than one wound? - Only one just by the pope's eye.

There was no provocation at all? - No more than what I tell you; he asked him to let him come to bed to him, and he would not.

Did the prisoner lodge in this house? - Yes, constantly.

Your brother and you were not lodgers? - Yes, my brother was, but I was not.

Did you see your brother afterwards below stairs? - No; I did not go down stairs after him, he came up stairs soon after with his shirt all bloody; George Sugar said, what, has the old man hurt you? O says he, he has run the sword into me.

Did you see any wound in any other part besides his thigh then? - Yes; on the right side just under his arm.

How long did he live after that? - Eleven days, as near as I can guess; he died in the Middlesex Hospital; I was in the hospital twice or thrice a-day all the while he was ill.

Do you know what he died of? - He had a great sever upon him.

Was this a sword or an hanger he was killed with? - A three-edged sword.

What is the business of the prisoner? - He is a carpenter .

What was your brother? - A leather-dresser ; the prisoner came up before my brother and he had a sword in his hand; he went into bed as usual; he laid the sword by the side of him, and laid down; as soon as my brother came up all bloody, George Sugar said, I will see what you have in bed; he pulled down the cloaths and saw the sword lying by him.

You spoke of your brother having a chair in his hand? - Yes.

Did he strike the old man with it? - He threw it at him.

Was that before the prisoner had wounded him or after? - After the prisoner had wounded him.

Then your brother used to lie with him before? - He had lain with him several times.

Did they lodge in the same bed? - No; my brother lodged in a bed by himself.

What was your brother's reason for wanting to lie with him? - Because there were four in another bed.

Cross Examination.

Did you know of any quarrel between the prisoner and your brother at any time? - None at all; I never heard the least word between them.

Did you go up with your brother at the time that he went to bed? - Yes.

You were in the room during the whole time of the transaction between your brother and the prisoner? - Yes.

Did your brother ask the prisoner civilly for permission to go to bed with him? - Yes; he said, Mr. Eddes, will you please to let me lie with you to-night, for there are four in a bed and there is not room.

He did not d - n his blood for an old son of a bitch? - I heard no such words.

Was he in bed when you say the prisoner was pushing at him? - Sitting up in the bed.

You said the prisoner took a key out of his pocket and took this weapon, which you thought was a stick, and pushed at him several times? - Yes; he pushed at him several times as he was sitting up in the bed.

Did your brother take the chair up before or after the sword was taken up? - After the prisoner took out the sword.

Did he pull the rug down? - Yes; pulled it down and said, he must lie with him.

Did he pull it down with any violence? - No.

And the prisoner was still averse to suffer your brother to lie with him? - Yes.

Was the chamber-pot or any thing but the chair taken up by your brother? - He did not take up the chamber-pot.

Not did any body take up the chamber-pot? - No.

How many people were in the room with you and your brother and the prisoner at the time of this unfortunate transaction? - There were three of us; one John Stutt , he is upon guard now; he was in bed, he was asleep all the time this was done.

Then you saw nobody take up the chamber-pot? - No; there was no chamber-pot taken up at all.

I am instructed that the chamber-pot was thrown into the bed? - No.

COURT. Did your brother or any body throw the chamber-pot into the bed? - No.

None of the water was thrown into the bed? - No.

During the time of your brother's illness you say you went two or three times a-day to see him? - Yes.

As you went so often to the hospital do you know the difference between a doctor's patient and a surgeon's patient? - No.

In what ward was your brother? - Nurse Medley's.

Did she belong to the doctor or the surgeon? - She belonged to all the ward.

Do you know whether your brother was taken out of the surgeon's hands or not soon after he went into the hospital? - No.

Mr. GEORGE BURROUGHS sworn.

I am a surgeon to then Middlesex Hospital.

Do you remember any thing of this Weaver being brought in there? - He was brought in on the night of Christmas-day; he had received two wounds, one in the thigh, the other on the right-side; I examined them both particularly that night and the following day, but I could not perceive that the wound had penetrated into the cavity of the chest, and the wound of the thigh was very insignificant; I examined the wound of the side most particularly, but could not by any means perceive that it had penetrated into the cavity of the chest.

The man died in the hospital, he was there eleven days? - Thirteen days.

What was the cause of his death? - I imagine from the sever he took after he came into the hospital.

Did you sever proceed from the wound? - I don't believe it did.

Then you don't conceive that the wound was the cause of his death? - I don't.

Did you attend to open the body before the coroner? - Yes; he was three days in the hospital in a very good way, on the fourth day he was seized with a fever, from which time he was under the care of a physician; I found he had such a disease upon him as would have killed him soon if he had not come into the hospital.

What disease was that? - A disease in his lungs; the lungs had a great adhesion and a vast quantity of matter in them; I opened him the next day after he died.

What do you believe was the cause of his death? - A sever, and an inflammation of his lungs.

The matter in the lungs collected there you think was the cause of the sever? - I do.

COURT. The sever is called the hospital sever, is it not? - No, I don't take it to be the hospital sever; but that sever would have come on without that; his liver was very much diseased too.

Then in your judgment upon your oath, neither of the wounds were the cause of his death? - No.

From the Jury. Was there any other surgeon that examined the body besides you? - Two other gentlemen were present.

Were they of the same opinion? - Exactly.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Lords Chief Baron SMYTHE .

114. BENJAMIN BROWN was indicted for that he in the king's highway in and upon Dominic McDonald did make an assault, putting him in corporal fear and danger of his life, and stealing a man's hat, value 2 s. 6 d. and 3 s. in money numbered, the property of the said Dominic from his person, and against his will , August first .

[The Prosecutor was called but not appearing, the Court ordered his recognizance to be estreated.]

NOT GUILTY .

115. BENNET STORER , Clerk , was indicted on the Coroner's inquisition, for that he feloniously did shoot off a pistol loaded with gunpowder and a leaden bullet at and against George Keith , thereby giving unto him one mortal wound in and through his body on the right side of his belly, of which he languished from the 28th of December until the 29th of the same month and then died .

RICHARD WHITE sworn.

I keep the Swan at the foot of Westminster-bridge : Mr. Storer lodged at my house.

COURT. Give an account of what happened there, and the manner in which the deceased got the wound of which he died. - About half past 12 at night on the 28th of last month, as I was sitting up waiting for a gentleman who lodged at my house, there came some people to my door who demanded admission, which I refused, desiring to know who they were; I did not choose to open my door to any but those I knew something of; they refused to give any other account than that he was a gentleman and an officer, but no name was given; I still repeated, I would not open the door to any body I did not know; the deceased immediately, with great violence, forced it open from its then fastening; he burst the door open about 18 inches; I got it shut with great difficulty, and put up the iron bar; when he found the door was made fast again he called out, D - n your blood, you are only a rascally waiter, and I will be revenged of your master to-morrow, and with great violence kicked at the door and stove the bottom pannel; I could no longer bear to have my door broke to pieces: I took up this stick (a very large one) and opened the door with the stick in my hand; the first thing that I saw was the deceased with his drawn sword; he made a lunge at my body; I warded off that, and many chops and thrusts, the marks of which are to be seen upon this stick; this created a very great noise; Mr. Storer was then gone up stairs to go to bed; he called out, White, what is the matter? I don't know that I made him any answer, if I did, I know not what it was, but very soon Mr. Storer came down with a pistol in his hand, and his servant attended him; Mr. Storer was in his night-gown and night-cap without his stockings; he came forward and demanded of the person who I was then engaged with, who he was, and what he wanted; the deceased immediately left me and made a thrust at Mr. Storer.

Where was Mr. Storer standing at that time? - In the middle of the passage; he retreated on seeing the sword pushed at him, and told the deceased, if he did not desist he should be obliged to shoot him; the deceased said, shoot and be d - d, and continued pushing; Mr. Storer repeated those words twice or three times, that he should be obliged to shoot him if he did not desist.

Whereabouts was Mr. Storer retired to when he fired? - Very near the bannisters; I cannot be certain whether he touched them or not.

He could not have gone farther back? - I apprehend not.

Where did he wound him? - On the right side of the belly; the deceased said he was wounded, and dropped the sword out of his hand; he asked to have his sword again, which was given him I believe by Mr. Storer's servant, and he walked away: at the corner of my house I saw he was joined by two women in red cloaks.

Cross Examination.

You had never seen the deceased before, he was an entire stranger to you? - Yes.

It is your custom I believe, though you keep an inn and a tavern, to shut up your house at a much earlier time than this? - I always fasten my doors with a temporary fastening, and never let any body in except a lodger or a person I am acquainted with.

And you never saw the deceased before? - No; I have seen his picture to-day, but I never saw him before that night.

JOHN BAILEY sworn.

I am servant to Mr. Storer: I followed my master when he came down stairs.

Had you heard any noise or uproar in the house before you came down? - I heard a violent noise, as if somebody was breaking into the house; my master asked me what was the matter; I told him, I did not know; my matter listened a while and found the noise more violent than before; he said, I believe somebody is breaking into the house, give me one of your pistols, I will go down and see what is the matter; I gave him one of my pistols and took the other myself, and followed my master down stairs; when we came to the bottom of the stairs I saw the door open, and a man with a sword drawn lunging at Mr. White in a very cruel manner; Mr. White was defending himself with a stick; my master asked Mr. White what was the matter; Mr. White told my matter, That there was a man had broke open his door, and chose to come in without giving any account of himself; my master advanced towards the door and asked the man what he wanted, and told him, he had no right to come in there; his answer was, By G - d, he would come in; he them turned from Mr. White and made a thrust at my master; my master retreated towards the stairs; then he made another lunge at my master, who retreated as before; my master, finding he could not retreat from him any farther because of the bannisters of the stairs, he told the deceased, if, he did not go back he would oblige him to fire upon him; the deceased said, Fire away and be d - d, and made another lunge at my master, who then fired at him, upon which he dropped his sword and said, I am wounded; he turned about and walked out at the door; when on the outside of the door he said, You will give me my sword; I took his sword up and gave it to him; he then went off without giving any account of himself: had not my master fired at the time he did, he must have been run through the body, as the sword was near his belly.

ANN SMITH sworn.

Captain Keith lodged with me: he dined with me on Friday at three o'clock; he went out between four and five o'clock; I never saw him afterwards till he was brought home at one o'clock on Saturday morning; somebody knocked at the door, and I found Capt. Keith, as the woman told me his name, for I did not know him, he was so much altered; he set on the step with his back to the door groaning exceedingly; when he came into the parlour I asked him, what is the matter, Capt. Keith? raising himself up a little he said, I am shot through the body, I am a dead man, lead me to bed; the women led him up stairs to his bed; I undressed him and put him to bed; he fell into a dose, and one of the women went with me for a surgeon; the other staid with him in the room; I went to Palace-yard and fetched Dr. Justamond; he came and took some blood from him; I asked the women, where they found the Captain in that said condition; they said, Between Pedler's-acre and the Swan.

Did he himself give any account how he came by this wound? - I asked him several times; he was in liquor when he came home; I went to the bedside after I sent the woman away, and asked Capt. Keith how he was; he made answer, O my side, my side, my side, could that pain be taken away in my side, it affects my breath; I asked him, when he was sober, if he could remember the person, or could he see the person that shot him; he said, I was so much in liquor I cannot positively say; I asked him in the morning, if he should know the person that shot him, or if he could tell me where it was; he said, Now I am sober, to the best of my knowledge, Mrs. Smith, it was done in the Swan.

He never told you any other way in which it happened? - No other than what I mentioned.

Did you never say that he told you it happened in any other way? - No; being in liquor he said it was between Pedler's-acre and the Swan; that was before he was sober.

Who did he say it was done by? - He did not say the person.

Did he say it was done by robbers? - No further; I said, Was it done by foot-pads? he spoke so low I could not distinguish what he said.

Cross Examination.

You were examined before a Justice of Peace about this? - Yes.

And a second time before the Coroner? - Yes.

I believe you forgot in both of those times to mention this circumstance, his saying it was done at the Swan? - I did not recollect it.

You was so much frightened both times? - I did not recollect it in my fright.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice ASHHURST.

116. LAWRENCE PETTIT was indicted for stealing a pair of silver shoe-buckles, value 5 s. a silver waistband-buckle, value 2 s. a silver knee-buckle, value 1 s. a pair of silver forceps, value 10 s. a silver spatula, value 1 s. a silver probe, value 1 s. five ruffled linen shirts, value 30 s. a plain linen shirt, five pair of silk stockings, value 20 s. two pair of thread stockings, value 2 s. three yards of muslin, value 20 s. six linen stocks, value 3 s. six muslin stocks, value 3 s. a silk handkerchief, value 2 s. eighteen cotton handkerchiefs, value 16 s. two pair of dimity breeches, value 4 s. four dimity waistcoats, value 8 s. a black velvet waistcoat, value 6 s. a cloth coat, value 4 s. and eight linen towels, value 4 s. the property of Frederick William Jericho , Dec. 21st .

'The prisoner was tried by a jury consisting

'of half foreigners, and not understanding

'English a gentleman was sworn to interpret

'to him.'

The Jury of half foreigners that tried Lawrence Pettit .

Henry Adkins ,

Bartholomew Ruspini ,

Silver Crispin,

Americus Bakers,

John Braithwaite ,

Lewis Masquerier ,

Nathaniel Morgan ,

Gabriel Bluard ,

Richard Wall,

Ferdinand Gilliard ,

Lawrence D'Rippe ,

John Christopher Eichorn .

FREDERICK WILLIAM JERICHO sworn

I live in Hanover-street, Long Acre : on the 21st of December I discharged the prisoner out of my service.

What are you? - A physician and an oculist : I discharged him on the 21st, of December; I missed some things on the 21st, the rest on the 28th; I lost the things mentioned in the indictment (repeating them); I asked him where they were; he said there were thieves in the other lodging; I told him he had the key of the trunk, and he must give an account of it; he said the linen and other things were at the washerwoman's; I did not know how much was wanting till the things came home from the wash.

Have you found any of those things again? - I have found most part of the things in the prisoner's lodging and at a pawnbroker's; I found some in the lodgings where the prisoner was a-bed in St. Ann's parish; I believe the name of the person that keeps the house is Ray; I found these shoe-buckles in his shoes.

[The things were produced in Court and deposed to by the prosecutor.]

'The prosecutor on his cross examination

'said, that the prisoner arrested him on the

'23d of December for 12 guineas, which he

'had paid him before; that he had discharged

'him on the 21st; that afterwards he got a

'warrant to take him up, but could not find

'him till the 3d of January.'

' John Davis , a pawnbroker, in Princes-street,

'Leicester-fields, produced two waistcoats,

'two pair of breeches, and a shirt,

'which were pawned with him on the 24th ' of December by the prisoner, which were

'deposed to by the prosecutor.'

' Henry Page , a pawnbroker, produced

'two waistcoats, two pair of new silk stockings,

'and some shirts, which he deposed he

'received of the prisoner, which were also

'deposed to by the prosecutor.'

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

My master gave me these for a gold watch I gave to a Frenchman for some drugs he had of him; he had no money to purchase them.

To JERICHO. Did you ever give him any of these things? - Never.

Have you ever had a gold watch from the prisoner? - No.

FOR THE PRISONER.

CATHERINE RAY sworn.

I am a milliner: my husband is a pernke-maker and hair-dresser; I live in Warwick-street, Wild-street, Golden-square; the prisoner lodged with me; he told me that he had a writ against his master for wages; that his master made him a great many presents to induce him to stay with him; he said he gave him a suit of cloaths.

Had you any conversation with Jericho about it? - Yes; the day the prisoner was taken; he came about three o'clock; he said he was very fond of the prisoner, but he wanted to leave his service a great many times; he said he had made him many presents; that he gave him a suit of cloaths and some linen.

Did you hear that he ever accused him of stealing any things? - No.

Do you remember the things being found in the room? - The constable went up; I had nothing to do with his room; Jericho said the prisoner had stole many things and pawned them; the prisoner said they were all what his master had given him.

What day was Jericho with you? - The 3d of January; on the 29th of December he sent an officer of the Marshalsea-court to make up the affair, and said he knew he owed him 12 guineas.

JERICHO. I paid the money to the officer.

GUILTY .

Tried before Lord Chief Baron SMYTHE.

117. PATRICK M'CARTY was indicted for stealing two silver table spoons, value 10 s. the property of Thomas Comyn , December 21st .

THOMAS COMYN sworn.

The prisoner was sevant to my fishmonger: he brought some fish to my house in the afternoon of the 21st of December; the spoons were brought to my house by a person who stopped them the same evening before we had missed them.

' Richard Walker , a constable, who was

'charged with the prisoner, produced the

'spoons, which were deposed to by the prosecutor.'

JAMES BLUNDELL sworn.

I live in Bishopsgate-street: on the 21st of December the prisoner asked me, if I bought old silver; I told him, Yes, and asked him what he had to dispose of; he said he had two spoons which he would send in about an hour, but returned himself with the two spoons produced in about ten minutes; as soon as I saw on the back of them, King's Arms, Corn-hill, I thought they were not his; I asked him whose they were; he said he bought them about two months before at a pawnbroker's on Snow-hill; I told him I would go to the King's Arms and enquire, and if he would come again in an hour I would buy them; he said he would send his wife; I went to Mr. Comyn's, and he said the spoons were his.

Did you know the man before? - No; my daughter went to Leadenhall-market and saw him at a fishmonger's, and came and told me; she was in the shop all the time he was there; on the Friday morning I went round the market, and saw him standing about the same spot; I informed Mr. Comyn, and he was taken up; I delivered the spoons to the constable.

RICHARD POOLE sworn.

I live with Mr. Comyn: last St. Thomas's day the prisoner came to our house in the afternoon with some crabs; he was servant to the fishmonger my master deals with; I am sure the prisoner is the man.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I know no more about it than the child unborn.

GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. Justice NARES.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

118. THOMAS WIGMORE was indicted for stealing a man's hat, value 10 s. the property of David Suttell , December 22d .

DAVID SUTTELL sworn.

I was coming down Long-lane on the 22d of December between 10 and 11 at night; I met the prisoner and three others; the prisoner shoved me off the path-way, and struck me on the side of my head with his fist and knocked my hat off; I was going to stoop for the hat and he struck me again on the head, and one of the others took it up, and as he was going off with it I called out, Watch; the prisoner said, D - n me, he would watch me, and gave me several blows on the side of the head with his fist; I had this stick in my hand; I held it up in this manner (describing it) to keep the blows off, and he snatched it from me and began beating me; if it had not been for Robert Upton coming to my assistance I believe he would have murdered me; when Upton came up, and we had secured him, he said, He was sorry he did not cut my bloody head open; I never got my hat again.

ROBERT UPTON sworn.

I am a victualler: on the 22d of December, as I was standing at my own door, I heard a scuffle at the end of Long-lane in Aldersgate-street; I went there immediately and saw the prisoner beating the prosecutor with a stick, which the prosecutor said was his; I called the watchman several times; as soon as the watchman came in sight I seized the prisoner by the collar and the arm, and told the watchman to asist me, and we secured him; as I came up I heard him say to the prosecutor, I wish I had cut your bloody head open; after his commitment, when he was hand-cuffed, he declared if ever he lived to come out he would back my bloody wissen, and he kicked me in the thigh.

FRANCIS CARTER sworn.

I was crossing from Long-lane to Barbican on the night of the 22d of December: I saw the prisoner beating the prosecutor as you see men beating of oxen; I went to his assistance, and was very near when Upton secured him.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I was coming down Long-lane; I met the prosecutor; I was walking in the path-way; he gave me a shove; I said, My friend, what is this? he struck me in the month; I asked him, What that was for? then he began beating me; I took the stick from him, and these men came up and laid hold of me.

GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. Justice NARES.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

119. JOHN WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing a brass candlestick, value 10 d. the property of John Isherwood , December 7th .

JOHN ISHERWOOD sworn.

I am a victualler : on the 7th of December, about 10 in the evening, we missed a couple of candlesticks; I was informed the prisoner had some candlesticks in his pocket; I found a candlestick of mine in his pocket, and a candlestick belonging to another person: he worked next door, and used frequently to come into my kitchen for water.

BARTHOLOMEW GARTER sworn.

I am a watchman: I saw the prosecutor search the prisoner and take the candlesticks from him; I asked him how he came by the prosecutor's candlestick; he said he went into the kitchen and took it: I took him to the watch-house.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I was in liquor; I did not know how they came into my pocket.

'The prisoner called one witness who gave

'him a very good character.'

GUILTY . W .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. Justice NARES.

120. SAMUEL LUCAS was indicted for stealing a bushel of oats, value 2 s. the property of George Millar , December 16th .

GEORGE MILLAR sworn.

I know nothing of the fact myself.

CHARLES FOX sworn.

I am hostler to Mr. Millar who keeps the Ipswich-arms Inn ; the customers that came daily to the inn complained of losing their hay and corn; our customers generally come in a morning before it is light to market and bring their own corn to feed their horses, and my master finds them stable-room; they generally put their corn under the manger where their horses stand: we suspected the prisoner and laid a plan to catch him; we laid four bushels of oats in two sacks, 2 bushels in a sack, and half a peck of chast in each sack; we locked it up in a two-stall stable till morning when the customers come in; in the morning between 6 and 7 o'clock the customers came and called me up; I acquainted them with our plan and carried the corn, and put it under the manager where their corn used to stand; and I hid their corn in another place; Alice Thornton and Thomas Millar were in a loft over where this corn lay; I went into my own room; when I had been there a few minutes I heard the prisoner go down stairs; he rented a room in the yard; he was coachman to a gentleman that had a carriage stood in the yard; I heard him go down, I followed him down without my shoes and got in at the stable window; as I was getting in at the window I saw him come out of his own stable with this sack upon his back; he had taken it into his stable, taken out a part of the corn and was bringing the other part back; I followed him to the place where he put it down; it was dark; I was within two or three yards of him when he put it down; he put it down in the place where he had taken it from, in the manger where the customers horses stood; I went up into the hayloft to Thomas Millar and Yates Thornton; we staid there all three together a few minutes, and he came again with his dark lanthorn, and we heard him take it up and walk along into his own stable again, in a few minutes we heard him come back again, as we supposed bringing back the sack; we were in the hayloft; we could not see him, we only heard him; we measured the corn, and there was half a bushel or better gone out of each sack.

Did the prisoner keep his master's horses? - Yes; he had so much a year to find them in hay, corn, and straw.

Will you venture to swear that he and nobody else took this sack away in this manner?

- Yes; I swear to the sack he had on his back when he came out of his own stable by the light of the lanthorn.

Yates Thornton, and Thomas Millar confirmed the testimony of Charles Fox .

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

When I first came to the place Charles Fox quarrelled with me because my master would not give him half a guinea, and said he would hang me if he could; it is a common yard.

To FOX. Did you ever say you would hang this man if you could? - No; never in my life.

To MILLAR. Did you ever know any quarrel between Fox and the prisoner? - No.

Had you no quarrel with the prisoner? - No.

'The prisoner called four witnesses who

'gave him a very good character.'

GUILTY of stealing to the value of ten-pence .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice ASHHURST.

[Whipping. See summary.]

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

121. WILLIAM READ was indicted for stealing a linen shirt, value 1 s. a linen gown, value 3 s. and a linen apron, value 1 s. the property of Jeremiah Saunders , December 27th .

JEREMIAH SAUNDERS sworn.

I keep a pawnbroker's shop ; I heard somebody in my shop; I went up out of the cellar where I was serving coals into the street, and looked through the window and saw the prisoner put something in his apron; I went up again and saw him handling some old cloaths.

JANE SMITH sworn.

I laid in wait to see who robbed us; the prisoner came for coals; I measured half a bushel, he took them away; he said his wife would pay for them; I saw a bundle in his bosom; I would not stop him till he came out into the street.

MARY SAUNDERS sworn.

I saw him take these things; I took him with the things upon him.

'The prisoner in his defence called two

'witnesses, who said they knew no harm of him.'

GUILTY of stealing to the value of ten-pence .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice ASHHURST.

122. ANN BUCKLAN was indicted for stealing two cotton gowns, value 10 s. two childrens linen jams, value 2 s. three linen shirts, value 1 s. a linen shift, value 6 d. a linen apron, value 6 d. a pair of linen sheets, value 1 s. four linen handkerchiefs, value 4 s. and two linen bedgowns, value 1 s. the property of Jeremiah Lawless , December 5th .

ELIZABETH LAWLESS sworn.

On the 5th of December, the things mentioned in the indictment were stolen out of our garden in Brayns's row, Clerkenwell .

JOHN GREEN sworn.

Upon the 6th of December I stopped the prisoner and a man, knowing the man to be a suspicious person, and seeing something under her cloak; I found a bag of wet linen.

[The things were produced in Court, and deposed to by the prosecutor.]

GUILTY of stealing to the value of ten-pence . W .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice ASHHURST.

123. MARY WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing two half crowns , the property of John Vale , December 16th .

JOHN VALE sworn.

On the 16th of December at about 9 o'clock at night I met with the prisoner; she asked me if I would give her a glass of gin; we went into a public house, I took out two half crown pieces and a six-pence; I paid the woman for the quartern of gin and gave her the threepence halfpenny; then she asked me if I would take a walk; I said I did not care if I did; then she took me into an entry and laid hold of me round the waist; I found her hands in my pocket, but I had no thoughts of her taking my money till I missed it.

Was not you stronger than her? - I did not try for that; then she said the watchman was coming and would take me up; I charged the watch with her; the constable examined her and found one half crown in her pocket and the other tucked in her hair.

HENRY JONES sworn.

I am a constable: on the 14th of December between 9 and 10 o'clock in the evening the prisoner was brought to the watch-house and searched there; the prosecutor accused her of taking 5 s. out of his pocket; I found one half crown and a shilling only in her pocket; when she had put on her cloaths I observed another half crown stuck in her hair.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I had but one half crown about me; I had a half crown in my hand; I was lifting up my hat; I had been hard at work; for I have three small children to maintain; the person I lived with some years is gone to America; he said if I would give him one half crown piece I might keep the other; I had no more than my own money; the beadle behaved very indecent to me.

GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice ASHHURST.

124, 125. MICHAEL NARY and MARGARET the wife of John NARY were indicted, the first for stealing a silver watch, value 30 s . the property of Thomas Morgan ; and the other for receiving the same, well-knowing it to have been stolen , November 15th .

'There was no evidence but that of a confession

'which was improperly obtained.'

BOTH NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

126. EDMUND PAGE otherwise DIXON was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Ruth Hurle , widow , on the 15th of December about the hour of 9 in the night, and stealing four silver tea-spoons, value 4 s. a cotton gown, value 1 l. a black calimanco quilted petticoat, value 20 s. a muslin handkerchief, value 3 s. three linen aprons, value 12 s. three linen table cloths, value 20 s. two pair of Holland sheets, value 20 s. eleven linen napkins, value 20 s. and twenty guineas the property of the said Ruth; a silver watch, value 40 s. a pair of silver shoe-buckles, value 12 s. a silver stock-buckle, value 2 s. a cloth coat, value 20 s. a cloth waistcoat, value 7 s. and a pair of cloth breeches, value 7 s. the property of Robert Hurle ; a blue silk gown, value 40 s. two cotton gowns, value 20 s. two linen gowns, value 40 s. a stuff gown, value 10 s. a plain white lawn gown, value 20 s. two silk handkerchiefs, value 7 s. two muslin handkerchiefs, value 7 s. a yard and a half of printed cotton, value 9 s. and a scarlet cardinal, value 15 s. the property of Ann Hurle , spinster , in the dwelling-house of the said Ruth .

'The prosecutrix deposed that she went out

'on the 15th of December, that she returned

'at about 9 o'clock at night, when she found

'her door, which she had left fast, wide open,

'and saw the prisoner run out; several witnesses

'deposed on the part of the prisoner

'that the prosecutrix told a different story before

'the justice, and in conversation had declared

'that she did not know the man; the

'prisoner likewise called two witnesses who

'clearly proved an alibi.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

127. THOMAS FLOYD was indicted for being found at large before the expiration of seven years, for which term he had been ordered to be transported .

'A copy only of the record of the conviction

'being produced, instead of the record

'itself, the prisoner was found.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

128. JAMES CRUMP was indicted for stealing a wooden box, value 18 d. a cloth coat, value 7 s. a cloth waistcoat, value 3 s. three pair of cloth breeches, value 6 s. a pair of silver shoe-buckles, value 7 s. a pair of silver knee-buckles, value 4 s. two linen shirts, value 4 s. and two pair of thread stockings, value 1 s. the property of Joseph Phillips , December 16th .

JOSEPH PHILLIPS sworn.

I am a bricklayer : I lost a box with the things mentioned in the indictment out of my lodgings in Westminster ; I saw it on Sunday night; I missed it on Monday when I came home to dinner; the prisoner lodged in the same room; I left him in the room when I went out.

JOSEPH BURTON sworn.

I am a salesman: William Spratt brought a coat, waistcoat, and breeches to me; the prisoner was not with him.

[They were produced in Court and deposed to by the prosecutor.]

Prosecutor. The prisoner confessed before the justice that he took the box to Rotherhith and left it with Spratt, and that Spratt and he had sold part of the things.

WILLIAM SPRATT sworn.

The things were brought to my quarters when I was not at home; when I came home the landlord told me a soldier had brought those things; the prisoner came afterwards, and we went to Burton's with the coat, waistcoat and breeches; he stood on the other side of the way while I went in; I had 5 s. of the money.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

Spratt lay with me that night; I got up and left him in bed.

'The prisoner called one witness who gave

'him a good character.'

GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

129. RICHARD JENNINGS was indicted for stealing a pair of linen sheets, value 8 s. a pair of blankets, value 6 s. a copper tea-kettle, value 1 s. an iron frying-pan, value 1 s. a brass candlestick, value 6 d. two flat irons, value 1 s. four stone cups, value 3 d. and four stone saucepans, value 3 d. the property of William Season , the said goods being in a certain lodging let by contract by the said William to the said Richard , against the statute, October 28th .

There was not any evidence to affect the prisoner.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

130. CATHERINE TOOLE was indicted for stealing seven yards of linen cloth, value 12 s. and 4 s. 6 d. in money numbered , the property of Anthony Malony , August 1st .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

131. STEPHEN MERCER was indicted for stealing four live pigs, value 4 l. the property of John Weston , December 7th .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

132. GEORGE PALMER was indicted for stealing 15 steel files, value 5 s. the property of John Horsley , October 5th .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

133. ELIZABETH ADAMS was indicted for stealing five silk handkerchiefs, value 10 s. the property of John Lucas , privately in the shop of the said John , January 14th .

MARY ADAMSON sworn.

I am servant to Mr. Lucas, a linen-draper in Prince's-street, Covent Garden : the prisoner came to the shop and looked at some silk handkerchiefs; I was serving a customer; a lad in the shop shewed her some handkerchiefs; I suspected her, and when I had done with the customer I was serving, I went to her; I asked her 3 s. 6 d. for a handkerchief; she would not give it and went out; I brought her back and asked her if she had not got some silk handkerchiefs? she said she had not; I pulled back her cloak and took three from under her arm, and two fell on the ground.

JOHN LANGLEY sworn.

I am a peace officer: I had charge of the prisoner; I searched her and found nothing but a few halfpence upon her.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

The handkerchiefs lay on the ground; there were two soldiers in the shop at the time.

GUILTY of stealing to the value of four shillings and ten-pence .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

134. ELISHA BASSETT was indicted for stealing thirty printed cotton handkerchiefs; value 3 l. four worked lawn aprons, value 20 s. a muslin apron, value 3 s. two muslin handkerchiefs, value 5 s. and a muslin cravat, value 2 s. the property of William Blain , privately in his shop , December 26th .

'The prosecutor was called, but not appearing,

'the Court ordered his recognizance

'to be estreated.'

NOT GUILTY .

135, 136. JOHN KERBY and ABRAHAM WOOLLER were indicted for stealing a surtout coat, value 20 s. a cloth coat, value 15 s. a cloth waistcoat, value 3 s. a pair of leather breeches, value 15 s. and a man's hat, value 10 s. 6 d. the property of Joseph Ballard , in his dwelling-house , January 7th .

'There was no evidence to affect the prisoners

'but the testimony of an accomplice unconfirmed.'

BOTH NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

137. MARY COX was indicted for stealing a piece of linen cloth, containing 23 yards, value 4 s. the property of John Ramsden , December 31st .

LEONARD WATSON sworn.

I am shopman to Mr. Ramsden; a linen-draper at Holborn-bridge : on the 31st of December, while there were a good many customers in the shop, the prisoner came in and asked to look at some handkerchiefs; I was informed when she was gone out, that she had taken something; I went after her and found her in an alley on Holborn-hill, where she had been stopped by a constable, who had her in one hand and the linen in the other; it has Mr. Ramsden's mark upon it.

[The cloth was produced in Court and deposed to by the witness.]

WILLIAM WOOD sworn.

I keep a tripe-shop: the prisoner came into my shop and asked to go into the yard; she seemed all confusion; I suspected she had something that did not belong to her; my wife directed her to go up an alley; she did not go up the alley but went in at the back door of a public house, and out at the fore door; I stopped her and took the cloth from her.

HANNAH WHEELER sworn.

I was in Mr. Ramsden's shop; I saw the prisoner take the cloth and go out; I followed her to the shop of the last witness; I saw her go through the alehouse, and saw her stopped, and the cloth taken from her.

'The prisoner called two witnesses who

'gave her a good character.'

GUILTY .

Tried the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

138, 139. JOHN AUSTIN and MARY SMOKE were indicted, the first for stealing a paper snuff-box, value 1 s. a cornelian seal set in gold, value 10 s. a cornelian seal set in silver, value 5 s. a chrystal seal set in silver, value 20 s. four gold rings set with stones, value 40 s. two pair of paste ear-rings, value 20 s. a pocket looking-glass set in silver, value 5 s. a leather pocket-book, value 5 s. a pair of steel nut-crackers, value 1 s. a tortoiseshell snuff-box, value 5 s. an enammelled etwee-case, value 1 s. two ivory fans, value 10 s. four pieces of thread lace, value 12 s. two yards of black silk lace, value 3 s. four muslin handkerchiefs, value 4 s. a pair of worked muslin ruffles, value 20 s. six muslin aprons, value 40 s. a sattin pin-cushion, value 1 s. a reading glass, value 5 s. two paper boxes, value 1 s. a silver tablespoon, value 10 s. a pair of silver tea-tongs, value 5 s. three silver tea-spoons, value 6 s. a silver pap-boat, value 20 s. a silver medal, value 2 s. and three silver dollars, value 12 s. the property of Matthew Pratt ; and a silver tablespoon, value 10 s. and three silver tea-spoons, value 6 s. the property of Martha Barrett , spinster ; and the other for receiving the above goods, well-knowing them to have been stolen , November 22d .

JANE PRATT sworn.

I am the wife of Matthew Pratt , who is a Manchester dealer : I was at the sign of the Flowerpot, Bishopsgate-street; I wanted a hackney coach to drive me to my own lodgings; a coach was called by Walter Prosser ; my sister was with me; I had two boxes, one contained all the things mentioned in the indictment; the coach was drove by the prisoner; I saw the two boxes put into the coach; I was drove home; I was big with child and very near my time; I was frightened at the manner in which he drove his horses; they were restive and he whipped them a great deal; I desired him to let me out of the coach, and I walked home, but the coach was drove up to my door; the prisoner came into my house, and I paid him his fair; I thought every thing had been delivered safe; soon after it appeared that only one box had been delivered.

[The pincushion, snuff-box, and several other things, which were found in a garden belonging to a house at Haggerstone, were produced and deposed to by Mrs. Pratt.]

Martha Barrett , Mrs. Pratt's sister, confirmed the testimony she had given.

WALTER PROSSER sworn.

I am a constable: upon the 30th of November I searched a house at Haggerstone and in the garden to that house, which belongs to the mother of the prisoner, I saw some loose earth; we lifted up the earth, and there we found the things which are produced.

JOHN GODFREY sworn.

I am a constable: I was present with Prosser, at the time, I had searched the apartments of the prisoner, and found the pincushion in a drawer belonging to Mary Smoke , who lived with the prisoner as his wife, but they both confessed that they were not married.

MARY BRIDGES sworn.

I lodge in the same house the prisoner lodges in: upon the 22d of November the prisoner coming home at night called for a light; I lit him; he took out a deal box about two foot long, well corded, and carried it into his room.

- Bridges, the husband of the last witness, and Ann Mason , who lodge in the same house, confirmed her testimony.

THOMAS BAILEY sworn.

The prisoner went upon the box with me; he had a box and a sack; he drove to his mother's house at Haggerstone.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I drove the gentlewoman: the next morning she came to me and asked me if I had got her box; I told her that I never saw the box; I drove down the corner of Baker's Buildings, Old Bedlam; the Lady said she was frightened there, and she got out, and the other gentlewoman unloaded the box herself.

SMOKE's DEFENCE.

I have had this pincushion between five and six years; Mary Howard gave it me.

BOTH GUILTY .

Tried the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

140. ELIZABETH DENNIS was indicted for stealing a piece of thread lace, containing nine yards, value 50 s. the property of Jerome Sharp , December 16th .

JEROME SHARP sworn.

I am a linen-draper : the prisoner came into my shop under pretence of buying something; I suspected from her behaviour that she had stole something; after she had looked at some black stockings and white stockings I insisted upon searching her, and I saw the thread lace fall from under her arm.

[The lace was produced in Court and deposed to by the prosecutor.]

FRANCIS ROWLEY sworn.

I am a constable: I was charged with the prisoner; she acknowledged she had the lace; she said she meant to pay for it and begged forgiveness.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I went into the shop in order to buy a piece of lace; my cloak was in pieces at the end, whether that catched hold of the lace or not, I cannot tell; the piece of lace was dragged off with my cloak; I knew nothing of it.

'The prisoner called one witness who gave

'her a good character.'

GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

141. AGNES PEARCE was indicted for stealing two pieces of thread lace containing 36 yards, value 9 s. the property of John Peach , December 26th .

2d Count. Laying the lace to be the property of Jane the wife of John Peach .

JANE PEACH sworn.

I am a married woman, but I keep a shop in the Fleet-market ; I had been out a short time; when I returned I was told a piece of lace had been taken away.

ELIZABETH DAY sworn.

I saw the prisoner pass by Mrs. Peach's shop; I saw her take a card of lace off the line; I watched her; she went into the shop and came out again with the lace; I called the little girl and sent her after her, and the lace was brought back.

[It was produced in Court and deposed to by the prosecutor.]

'The prisoner did not say any thing in her

'defence.'

GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

142. ANN the wife James BROAD was indicted for stealing 2 s. 7 d. in money numbered , the property of James Flood , Dec. 12th .

JAMES FLOOD sworn.

Having missed money out of my till, I marked some and put it into the till; the next day some was missing; a constable and I searched the prisoner and found the money upon her.

[The money was produced in Court and deposed to by the prosecutor.]

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I found the money.

'She called two witnesses who gave her a

'good character.'

GUILTY . B .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

143. GEORGE PALMER was indicted for stealing sixteen files, value 2 s. the property of Thomas Howard , October 21st .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

144, 145, 146, 147. JOHN READ , ELIZABETH EYRE , MARY JAMES , and SARAH FORD were indicted, the two first for stealing a portmanteau trunk, value 2 s. a black crape gown, value 5 s. a black quilted stuff petticoat, value 2 s. 6 d. a black silk cloak, trimmed with love riband, value 20 s. a cotton bed-gown, value 5 s. three muslin aprons, value 5 s. six muslin handkerchiefs, value 6 s. three linen shirts, value 12 s. three pair of cotton stockings, value 3 s. and a pair of worsted stockings, value 1 s. the property of Dudley Warren , spinster; a black silk cloak trimmed with love riband, value 20 s. a black silk apron trimmed with love riband, value 1 s. a pair of womens' black stuff shoes, value 1 s. six muslin handkerchiefs, value 6 s. three linen shifts, value 10 s. three pair of cotton stockings, value 3 s. the property of Catherine Richmond Strudwick , spinster ; a small silver candlestick, value 10 s. a silver soup-spoon, value 10 s. a silver punch-ladle, value 5 s. a silver snuff-box, value 2 s. a pair of silver shoe-buckles, value 2 s. a silver stock-buckle, value 2 s. a paste stock-buckle set in silver, value 2 s. and a silver tea-spoon, value 1 s. the property of Jannet Irwine , spinster ; and the other two for receiving parcels of the above goods, well knowing them to have been stolen , against the statute, &c. December 17th .

DUDLEY WARREN sworn.

On the 7th of December I came from Cambridge in the diligence: I delivered my portmanteau trunk to the coachman, and I saw it fastened behind; it contained the things mentioned in the indictment; when we came to the inn in town the trunk was missing.

CATHERINE RICHMOND STRUDWICK sworn.

I came up in the diligence with Mrs. Warren: I put the things in the trunk and saw it fastened behind the carriage; I know nothing of the prisoners.

THOMAS ROBERTS sworn.

I was standing at the corner of Mutton-lane, Clerkenwell-green: I followed John Read till he came within about four or five doors of Hatton-garden , there I saw him take the trunk from behind the carriage which was going to the White Horse in Fetter-lane; a hackney-coach was called and the trunk put into it, and the coachman was ordered to drive to Moor-lane; I followed the diligence and gave information of it.

WILLIAM BAKER sworn.

I am a constable: I went with the driver of the diligence and another man to find the man that took the trunk from behind the diligence; they said they knew him; we went and searched almost every alehouse in Tenter-alley; at last we saw the prisoner Read; they said that was the man; I took him into custody; they said it would be better for him to restore the property and there should be no more said about it; he desired the rest might go out of the house and he would tell me.

COURT. We cannot hear what he said in consequence of such a promise? - He took the master of the diligence and me into a room where part of the trunk was burning upon the fire (it was produced).

Prosecutrix. That is part of the portmanteau; there is the direction upon it in my own hand-writing.

[The things found in the room where the trunk was burning were produced in Court and deposed to by Mrs. Warren and Mrs. Strudwick.]

ROBERT BELAMY sworn.

I was with the last witness: when the man took us into the room I saw the things thrown about upon a place like a taylor's board; I gave the constable charge of him and Sarah Ford ; while we were there Mary James and Elizabeth Eyre came in; I then thought it necessary to call in Roberts; he came in and said Elizabeth Eyre was present when he took the trunk from behind the carriage.

To ROBERTS. Elizabeth Eyre was with him when he took the trunk?

BELAMY. Then I gave charge of her; Mary James said she knew nothing of the people in the lodging, only the old woman was a washerwoman, and she came after some things she had of hers.

ESTHER HART sworn.

I am a pawnbroker: I took in some things of the prisoner James by the name of Mary Read ; a gown, cloak, and apron for 18 s. and some ruffles, handkerchiefs, and other trifling things for 5 s. the same day.

[They were produced in Court and deposed to by Mrs. Warren and Mrs. Strudwick.]

THOMAS FOX sworn.

I am the driver of the diligence: I set a gentleman down at Enfield-chase; the trunk was safe then; it was missing when we came to the inn.

HENRY HIDDEN sworn.

I was at the coach-stand in Holborn: somebody in Hatton-garden called, Coach; I went with the coach; I saw Read and Eyre by the coach; Read had a portmanteau in his hand; I opened the door and put the trunk in the coach; the man and woman got in; he ordered me to tell the coachman to drive to Moor-lane; several persons came to me afterwards and asked me where the coach went to? I asked them, what business they had with it? a young man said he saw the trunk cut from behind the diligence; then I told them, and we went and found them out.

READ's DEFENCE.

Coming down Hatton-garden I saw the trunk lying in the middle of the road and took it up.

EYRE's DEFENCE.

I met with Read in Hatton-garden; I stopped a little with a young woman and then went on; I saw him at a distance pick the trunk up; when I came up to him he asked me to ride home with him: I know nothing of it.

To ROBERTS. How did they unfasten it? - It was dusk; I was at a distance; I did not see how he unfastened it, but I saw him take it in his hands; the woman was at the horse's head.

JAMES's DEFENCE.

I called at the house, and Read asked me to pawn some things for him.

FORD's DEFENCE.

I happened to be in the room when they came in: I know nothing of it.

'Read called two witnesses who gave him a

'good character.'

From the Jury to Baker. Did you secure Mary James at the time the trunk was on the fire? - No; I took them on the Saturday night; on Sunday I took James.

Was she present at the time the trunk was burning? - She came up while I was searching the room.

JOHN READ and ELIZABETH EYRE

GUILTY .

JAMES and FORD NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

148. WILLIAM TURNER was indicted for stealing two bushels of coals , the property of Richard Wooley , January 11th .

JOHN MAJOR sworn.

The prosecutor has lost coals at different times; several sacks of a night out of his lighter; I saw the prisoner in the lighter last Saturday about five o'clock scratching the coals into a corn sack with his hands; I jumped into the lighter; there were two of them; one jumped into the water and got a way; I seized the prisoner and found two sacks with about a bushel of coals in each.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I was only taking a few to make a bit of fire in a barge we were in; I picked some out of the dock, and some I swept out of the bottom of the barge.

GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. Justice NARES.

[Whipping. See summary.]

149. WILLIAM PRINCE was indicted for feloniously stealing a silver quart mug, value 30 s. the property of Thomas Aldersley , January 2d .

THOMAS ALDERSLEY sworn.

I keep a public house , the sign of the Dolphin, on Ludgatehill : upon Thursday the 2d of last month, some gentlemen dined at my house, the prisoner dined with them; they spent the afternoon together, and in the evening they desired me to lay a cloth in the parlour, which I did; those that chose to come down and partake of it came down along with the prisoner; when they had staid there some time, they all went up, I believe, but one or two; they desired my company, and I went up; I asked the prisoner to go up with me; he said, he liked to stay below best; I had not been up long before I was called down by my sister; she informed me, that a man in a light coat had got the plain tankard, and she believed he was gone; I came down to the parlour to look for it, and it was missing; I went to the door and met the prisoner coming in; he pushed by me and went up stairs; I followed him; I sat down by him and asked him what he had done with the tankard; he said, he had not the tankard; I asked him who was in the room with him below; he said, there was some stranger; I said, he knew something of the tankard; he seemed very much confused; I stroked him down and found he had not got it about him; I asked somebody to go out with me; we went and found the tankard; my sister came up into the room and pitched upon the prisoner as having taken it.

Cross Examination.

The prisoner belongs to the club at your house? - Yes; it is called the Combustible House of Lords.

You was lord Chalkstone? - Yes.

And the prisoner was lord Plumb? - Yes.

And the constable lord Cheshire? - Yes.

I suppose you thought it very odd, that a man that had stole a tankard should come again into your house and sit in company with you? - I cannot tell his motive for that.

That is the truth, he came and spent the evening with the rest of his fellow lords? - Yes.

MARY KEENE sworn.

I am sister-in-law to Mr. Aldersley: I was at the necessary; I heard somebody very anxious to get out at the back door; I wondered who it was, as that door was always fastened at night; I came out, and the prisoner was close to the door, I could hardly get by him; when I found my brother, the prisoner was gone from the place where I saw him; he could not get out at the back door, he came in and went out at the fore door, which opens in a court.

The tankard was found? - Yes, in the court.

SUSANNA GIRDLER sworn.

I am servant to Mr. Aldersley: I saw the gentleman go by very swift; as I was sitting down he went into the court.

Had he any thing with him? - I cannot tell, he went out very swift; I was in the taproom sitting in a box.

Cross Examination.

As he went out so swift how came you to take notice of him? - I knew him before.

JOHN FORCHEE sworn.

I am a watchmaker: I was at Mr. Aldersley's that night when the prisoner was drinking in company with another man; he asked the other person he was drinking with what metal the tankard was; the other person was rubbing it with his finger.

THOMAS KEYS sworn.

I was along with Mr. Aldersley when the tankard was found; it was under a little bench at Mr. Delafont's door in the court, about two yards and a half or three yards from the door.

FRANCIS ROWLEY sworn.

Mr. Aldersley came up stairs and looked round the room, he seemed to be confused, the prisoner came up just after him; Mr. Aldersley said, he missed a tankard; he went down and then his sister came up and said, the prisoner was the man, and he gave me charge of him.

Cross Examination.

You denied there? - Yes.

And this was eleven at night? - Yes.

You was not idle all that time I suppose? - No; we had been doing what we could to be merry.

You were all lordly drunk by that time I suppose? - I suppose not.

Prisoner. I leave my defence to my counsel.

'The prisoner called nine witnesses, who

'said he was a master plumber and glazier ,

'and gave him a good character.'

GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

150. WILLIAM PHILLIPS was indicted for stealing a linen handkerchief, value 10 d. the property of Thomas Bunham , January 8th .

THOMAS BUNHAM sworn.

On the eighth of this month, between eight and nine at night, walking very slowly up Holborn , I found my pocket shake; I caught hold of the prisoner who was close to me, and charged him with having my handkerchief; he said, he had not; I looked down and saw the handkerchief between his feet; there was nobody else near.

JAMES MYRATH sworn.

Hearing the prosecutor who had hold of the prisoner say his pocket was picked, I laid hold of the prisoner; he drew a knife and was going to run it in me, but another man seeing it, wrested the knife out of his hand.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I am innocent of the fact.

GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Whipping. See summary.]

151. JONATHAN HIGGENSON was indicted for stealing a peck of oats and chaff, value 6 d. the property of William Gould and Thomas Thorn , December 10th .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

152. ROBERT PARSONS was indicted for stealing a piece of stuff containing 40 yards, value 3 l. 10 s. and 144 yards of silk bed-lace, value 30 s. the property of John Bennet , January 1st .

JOHN BENNET sworn.

I am a warehouseman in Leadenhall-street: these goods were made into a parcel by one of my servants, directed to a correspondent in Bath; my servant carried it to the inn.

SAMUEL SPRINGTHORP sworn.

I am porter to Mr. Bennet: I carried three parcels to the Saracen's Head in Friday-street ; I set down one while I delivered the other two and it was stole; upon missing it I made enquiry, and met William Thompson with the prisoner.

WILLIAM THOMPSON sworn.

On the first of January I was going to the book-keeper's at the inn; I saw the prisoner among some things in the yard; I thought he was on no good design; I went behind the kitchen door and watched him; at last, I saw him take up a truss and run out at the gateway with it; I pursued him, and asked him what he was going to do with it; he said, he was going to throw it into the waggon, but he had got 30 or 40 yards beyond the waggon.

[The parcel was produced in Court, and deposed to by Springthorp.

THOMAS CHANDLEY sworn.

I am clerk to Mr. Bennet: I assisted in packing the parcel and delivered it to the porter; I know it to be Mr. Bennet's property.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I went to the inn to enquire for the Manchester coach; I had like to have tumbled over the parcel; I took it up and was going to put it into the waggon.

GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Whipping. See summary.]

153, 154, 155, 156. JOHN JONES , JAMES WRIGHT , SARAH the wife of John WALTHAM , and MARY the wife of John SHORT were indicted, the two first for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Robert Bradbury on the third of December , about the hour of eight in the night, and stealing fifteen pieces of printed cotton cloth, containing 400 yards, value 50 l. the property of the said Robert in his dwelling house ; the other two for receiving a parcel of the above goods, well knowing them to have been stolen , against the statute.

ROBERT BRADBURY sworn.

I am a factor in New-street, Cloth-fair : on the third of last month, between nine and ten at night, my compting-house window was broke open, and a quantity of cotton taken out; I was in the compting-house about five o'clock, and shut to the window but did not bolt it; the compting-house door was locked, and I had the key in my pocket; I lost fifteen pieces of printed cotton; a part of it is found and is in the hands of a witness.

FRANCIS RYDER sworn.

I found some of it in the house of a Mrs. Clarke in Golden-lane, the rest I found in the bed-room of Elizabeth Island; I was informed of it by a man who said he saw them carry it there the third of last month.

ROBERT LEWIN sworn.

I attend at Justice Wilmot's office: there was an information came that this robery was committed by one Jones and Malby; I took Jones; as I was carrying him to Bridewell, he cried and begged I would get him discharged for he knew nothing of it; and accordingly nothing appearing against him before the justice he was discharged; Jones desired me in the morning to take him out of gaol and he would shew me the prosecutor's house; he went with me to the prosecutor's, and told the prosecutor that he committed the robery.

ELIZABETH PAGGETT sworn.

On Tuesday evening at about eight o'clock as near as I can recollect, Jones, Malby, and Wright came to my house with some of these cottons; they went away and came again, and Waltham and Short had some cottons in their aprons; they asked me, if I could tell them where to dispose of them.

Was Wright with them? - They said it was Wright, I cannot swear to him; I went with Waltham and Short to Mrs. Clarke's, and asked her to buy them; she said they did not suit her; we asked her to let us leave some of them there; we left some in the kitchen; then we went to Mrs. Island and asked her the same question, and left some of the things there; Ryder came and took me with a warrant, and went to search Clarke's house; in the scuffle the candle was knocked out, and I went backwards and threw some of the things into the next yard.

[The things found at Clarke's and Island's were produced in Court, and deposed to by the prosecutor.]

JONES's DEFENCE.

I know nothing of the matter; I am innocent of it.

'Wright was not put upon his defence.'

'Waltham and Short said in their defence,

'that they never saw the cotton till they saw

'it in the hands of Ryder before the aldermen

'at Guildhall.'

'Jones called two witnesses and Short five

'witnesses, who gave them a good character.'

JONES GUILTY of stealing to the value of 39 s. NOT GUILTY of the burglary .

WRIGHT NOT GUILTY .

WALTHAM GUILTY .

SHORT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

157. ELIZABETH ISAACS was indicted for stealing six guineas and six shillings , the property of James Davis , December 11th .

JAMES DAVIS sworn.

Upon the 11th December, I had been receiving a bill of 15 l. as I was coming along Bishopsgate-street, I met with a prostitute who decoyed me into Gravel-lane ; soon after we got into a house; the prisoner came in and the door was bolted and locked; I demanded to be let out, they said I should not, without I made the prisoner a present; I gave her 2 s. then they would not let me go without giving the other woman 2 s. after I had done that, they demanded two more a-piece; I insisted on going out; the prisoner put her hand into my pocket where the 15 l. was and took out six guineas and six shillings; I then got out and got a constable; the prisoner was taken the same night; they offered me three guineas to make it up; I am sure the prisoner's hand was in my pocket; I had only eight guineas left out of the fifteen.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I never saw the gentleman till I saw him at Guildhall.

'The prisoner called several witnesses who

'gave her a good character, and attempted

'to prove an alibi, but were inaccurate as to

'the time.'

GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

158. JOHN OADES was indicted for stealing a silver milk ewer, value 10 s. a silver pepper castor, value 10 s. two silver table-spoons, value 10 s. and two silver tea-spoons, value 5 s. the property of Elizabeth Becket , widow , January 2d .

ELIZABETH BECKET sworn.

I live in Wine-office Court : I lost the things mentioned in the indictment out of the dining-room; I saw them in the room about an hour before the prisoner took them; as I was at dinner I heard somebody in the dining-room; I got up and went to see who it was, and met a boy in the kitchen; I asked what he wanted, he said, he came for the alehouse pots; he had a bundle; I asked him whose it was; he said, Mr. Tipping's; I looked at it and saw an apron of mine in it; a person came in and took him into the parlour; then he threw down the things mentioned in the indictment out of his pocket.

[They were produced in Court by the constable, and deposed to by the prosecutrix.]

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I was drawn into the affair; I never did such a thing before.

GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Branding. See summary.]

159. SUSANNA WRIGHT was indicted for concealing divers warlike ordnance-stores, marked with the broad arrow , the property of our sovereign lord the king .

2d Count. For having the same goods in her custody, against the statute, August 14th .

'It appeared in evidence that the prisoner's

'husband bought the things of a Sarah Gylight ,

'who appeared and deposed that she

'received them of a Mrs. Collins to sell for

'her, and sold them to the prisoner's husband.'

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

160. GEORGE CLUNIE was indicted for wilful and corrupt perjury, in his answer to a bill in chancery .

NOT GUILTY .

Deitz , who was convicted last sessions, ordered to be imprisoned six months from the time of his conviction

The trials being ended, the Court proceeded to give judgment as follows:

Received sentence of death, 9,

William Hall , Thomas Jones alias Burdett, Edward Goswell , John Life , Valentine Fuller , George Charles Parsons , Charles Davies , John Langford , and John Field .

To work on the river seven years,

Thomas Wigmore .

On the river five years,

John Read , and John Austin .

On the river four years,

Patrick McCarty .

On the river three years,

Charles Drake , Michael Swift , and John Jones .

Imprisoned a year in Newgate,

Elizabeth Eyre , and Elizabeth Isaacs .

Banished and imprisoned six months,

Elizabeth Dennis , Agnes Pearce , and William Prince .

Banished and imprisoned one month,

Peter Gilbard .

Whipped,

John Mowett , William Turner , William Phillips , and Robert Parsons .

Whipped and imprisoned six months,

Samuel Lucas .

Branded.

John Oades .

To be kept to hard labour in Newgate three years,

Mary Smoke , Sarah Waltham , and Mary Short .

Deitz , who was convicted last sessions, ordered to be imprisoned six months from the time of his conviction .

*** Judgment was not passed on any of the Middlesex prisoners who were convicted of grand larceny.

*** Trials at Law, and Arguments of Counsel, accurately taken in Short-hand by JOSEPH GURNEY , of Southampton-Buildings, Chancery-lane.

*** Trials at law, and arguments of counsel, accurately taken in short-hand by JOSEPH GURNEY (writer of these proceedings) of Southampton Buildings, Chancery-lane.

A new and considerably improved edition of his SYSTEM of SHORT-HAND, is in the press, and will be speedily published.