Old Bailey Proceedings Online (www.oldbaileyonline.org, version 6.0, 26 November 2014), February 1776 (17760221).

Old Bailey Proceedings, 21st February 1776.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS ON THE KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery for the CITY of LONDON; AND ALSO The Gaol Delivery for the COUNTY of MIDDLESEX; HELD AT JUSTICE HALL in the OLD BAILEY, On Wednesday the 21st of February 1776, and the following Days;

Being the THIRD SESSION in the Mayoralty of The Right Honble JOHN SAWBRIDGE , LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

REVISED AND PUBLISHED BY JOHN GLYNN , SERJEANT AT LAW, AND RECORDER OF LONDON.

NUMBER III. PART I.

LONDON:

PRINTED BY WILLIAM RICHARDSON ; FOR EDWARD AND CHARLES DILLY .

[PRICE SIX PENCE.]

SAWBRIDGE, MAYOR.

At a Common Council holden in the Chamber of the Guildhall of the City of London on Friday the 17th of November 1775,

A MOTION was made and QUESTION put, That the whole Proceedings on the King's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery for the City of London, and also the Gaol Delivery for the County of Middlesex, held at Justice Hall in the Old Bailey, be regularly, as soon as possible after every Session, published by the Recorder, and authenticated with his Name: The same was resolved in the Affirmative.

RIX.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS UPON THE

KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery for the CITY of LONDON, &c.

BEFORE the Right Honourable JOHN SAWBRIDGE , LORD MAYOR of the City of London; the Honourable Sir HENRY GOULD , Knight, one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; the Honourable EDWARD WILLES , one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of King's Bench; the Honourable Sir BEAUMONT HOTHAM , Knight, one of the Barons of his Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Mr. Serjeant GLYNN, Recorder; THOMAS NUGENT , Esq; and others his Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of Gaol Delivery of Newgate holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

London Jury.

Joseph Lacy ,

William Sibley ,

William Fletcher ,

John Whittingbury ,

Thomas Cook ,

William Thomas ,

John Jermaine ,

Stephen Ponder ,

Barnabas Byforest ,

Thomas Sedwick ,

Benjamin Clitherow ,

William Whiskard ,

1st Middlesex Jury.

James Sheredine ,

John Clare ,

Thomas Smith ,

Joseph Hobbs ,

William Babb ,

Richard Head ,

John White ,

Joseph Babb ,

Richard Holbrook

James Gillett ,

Hugh Jones ,

Richard Beck .

2d Middlesex Jury.

Humanitus Jackson ,

John Hillam ,

John Godfrey ,

Joshua Turner ,

Thomas Turmage ,

John Abrahams ,

Robert Sudlow ,

James Fitzgerald ,

John Hetley ,

James Lamb ,

Edward Brignall ,

John Powell .

[ James Armstrong served part of the time in the stead of William Sheredine , and William Greening in the stead of Richard Head . Edward Campion served part of the time in the stead of Robert Sudlow .]

207. GEORGE LEWIS was indicted for stealing a spotted muslin sacque and petticoat, value twelve shillings, a pink sattin quilted petticoat, value three shillings, a pair of womens stuff shoes, value one shilling, and a pair of silver shoe buckles, value ten shillings, the property of Isabella Berkley, spinster; a scarlet and white sattin gown trimmed with black lace, and a white lace tucker, value 7 l. the property of Margaret Gardiner , spinster ; a Manchester quilted bed gown, value four shillings, two linen night-caps laced, value five shillings, a pair of white sattin shoes, value five shillings, twenty-five silk handkerchiefs, value thirty shillings, a pair of treble lace ruffles trimmed with valencienne, value forty shillings, a pair of double point lace ruffles, value forty shillings, two pair of double worked muslin ruffles, value eighteen shillings, three lace tuckers, value twenty shillings, two pair of short double ruffles, value ten shillings, four yards and a half of new lace, value eighteen shillings, a net double handkerchief, value twenty shillings, a striped muslin apron, value four shillings, two yards and half of pattinet gauze, value seven shillings, a hair trunk, value five shillings, and a cotton night waistcoat, value three shillings, the property of Catharine Walker , spinster ; a dark coloured cotton gown, value fourteen shillings, a Pompadour silk gown, value twenty shillings, a worked muslin apron, value two shillings, a linen apron, value two shillings, and two pair of linen shift sleeves, value two pence, the property of Elizabeth Wilson , spinster ; a black stuff petticoat, value two shillings, and a pair of old stays, value two shillings , the property of Mary Martin , spinster ; January the 4th .

THOMAS JONES sworn.

I am driver of the Chertsey waggon. On Thursday the 4th of January, I took in a large hair trunk at Mrs. Walker's at Felton-hill; I received it from her gardener, one John Pullen ; it was to be left at the New White Horse Cellar in Piccadilly: I got to the White Horse Cellar about six in the evening; my master's son, whose name is Smith, was with me, he had the care of the goods; I saw no more of this trunk after it was taken in, and the next journey I heard it was missing.

MARGARET GARDNER sworn.

I am housekeeper to Mrs. Walker: there were some cloaths of my own, and likewise many others of the family had goods put into this trunk; part of the goods have been since recovered.

JOHN PULLEN sworn.

I am gardener to Mrs. Walker: I corded the trunk and put the direction upon it; they were for Mrs. Gardner, at the Earl of Loudoun's, Whitehall; I delivered this trunk to Thomas Jones the waggoner upon Thursday the 4th of January, between eleven and twelve is in the forenoon, and have not seen it since.

CHARLES STANLEY sworn.

I keep a cloaths shop in Field-lane, Holborn-bridge. Some days before twelfth-day, I believe it was on Saturday, but I am not certain as to one day more than another, the prisoner and another man brought some things to me to sell at about six o'clock at night; I knew the other person, his name is David Jones , the prisoner was a stranger to me; I bought these cloaths of David Jones and the prisoner. (Producing two pair of ruffles, a gown, a bed gown, a night-gown, three pair of ruffles, a pink sattin petticoat and a flowered sacque).

MARGARET GARDNER again.

These goods produced (looking at them) are part of the goods that were in the trunk; they belong part of them to my mistress, part of them to Betty Wilson , and the rest to Isabella Berkley.

CHARLES STANLEY cross examined.

Whether the prisoner had any of the money? - The prisoner and Jones had the money between them: the prisoner brought some of the things in a bag, and Jones brought the rest in a handkerchief. I gave 1 l. 13 s. for the whole; I should have thought them worth five or six pounds; I took the judgment of my wife; she said 1 l. 13 s. was enough. I said to Jones, what the duce have you been about? I heard he kept a girl; I thought these might be some of her things: he said no, I had them on the mace; this I understood to be, that he got them upon credit, in what is called the swindling way. The application to me by Dignam, who attends the justices, was not till about three weeks after they brought the goods.

RICHARD DIGNAM sworn.

I am servant to the governor of Clerkenwell Bridewell; I attend the rotation office in Litchfield-street; I apprehended the prisoner upon another charge. I heard that there were goods at Stanley's, I went there and took the Daily Advertiser with me, in which these goods were advertised; I asked him if he had any of them? he without hesitation immediately produced them: I asked him if he could recollect from whom he bought them? he said, he bought them of two persons in company, one of them was David Jones , and that Jones called the other George Lewis . I left the things Stanley produced in his custody, with a charge to take particular care of them. I did tell Stanley that I had Lewis in my custody, and told him to come to the office before the justice at a certain day; he accordingly did come: Lewis was there, and Stanley charged the prisoner before the justices; Lewis at that time acknowledged he had the goods, but said he found them.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

Jones found these goods; I know nothing at all of them myself: I went with Jones to this Stanley's; they were pawned upon Jones's account; I had no part of the money: it was a mere accidental business my falling into the company of Jones; he told me that he found this parcel of goods in Smithfield.

To Thomas Jones . What part of the waggon were they put in? - About the middle of the waggon.

Was it possible for them to fall out? - No, it was not.

GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice GOULD.

[Branding. See summary.] [Imprisonment. See summary.]

208. ANN SMITH was indicted for stealing a silver watch, value forty shillings, a steel chain, value six shillings, a brass watch key, value one penny, a stone stock-buckle set in silver, value seven shillings, a muslin stock, value two shillings, a muslin handkerchief, value one shilling, a guinea and seven shillings in money numbered, the property of Thomas Williams , in the dwelling-house of Joseph Briggam , January the 25th .

There was not any evidence to affect the prisoner.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice WILLES.

209. JANE BRYAN was indicted for stealing a silver watch, value 3 l. a steel watch chain, value six pence, two stone seals set in base metal, value one shilling, a chrystal locket set in gold, value two shillings, a base metal watch key, value one penny, and one steel watch hook, value one penny, the property of Alexander Bailey , in the dwelling-house of John Johnson , January 31st .

The prosecutor acknowledged that he promised to forgive the prisoner if she would produce his watch, which she did, and he declared that the prosecution of the prisoner was quite contrary to his inclination.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice WILLES.

210. Middlesex. The JURORS for our lord the king, upon their oath present, that Archibald Girdwood , late of London, labourer , being an ill-disposed person, and the law and statutes of this kingdom little regarding, and the punishments in the same contained in no wise fearing, on the 10th day of February, in the sixteenth year of the reign of our sovereign lord George the Third , now king of Great Britain, &c. with force and arms at the parish of St. George, Hanover-square, in the county of Middlesex , unlawfully, wickedly, knowingly, and feloniously, did send a certain letter in writing, with the fictitious letters of I. W. thereto subscribed and signed, to one John Edridge of the parish aforesaid, in the county aforesaid, poulterer , by the name and description of Mr. John Edridge , Davis-street, corner of Mount-street, Berkley-square, containing a threatening of the life of the said John, to kill and murder him the said John , against the peace of our said lord the king, his crown and dignity, and also against the form of the statute in that case made and provided: and the Jurors aforesaid, upon their oath aforesaid, do further present, that the said Archibald, on the said 10th day of February, in the 16th year aforesaid, with force and arms at the parish aforesaid, in the county aforesaid, unlawfully, wickedly, knowingly, and feloniously, did send one other letter in writing, with fictitious letters thereto to the said John, and directed to Mr. John Edridge , Davis-street, corner of Mount-street, Berkley-square, threatening to kill and murder him the said John, and which said last mentioned letter is in the words and figures following; that is to say,

Feb. 9th, 76.

"SIR,

"I am sorry to find a gentleman like you

"would be guilty of taking Mac Allester 's

"life away for the sake of two or three

"guineas; but it will not be forgot by one

"who is just come home to revenge his

"cause: this you may depend upon, whereever

"I meet you, I will lay my life for

"him in this cause; I follow the road

"tho' I have been out of London; but on

"receiving a letter from Mac Allester before

"he died, for to seek revenge, I am

"come to town. I remain a true friend

"to Mac Allester .

"J. W."

against the peace of our said lord the king, his crown and dignity, and also against the form of the statute in that case made and provided.

JOHN EDRIDGE sworn.

I live in Davis-street, at the corner of Mount-street, Berkley-square. Upon Saturday, the 10th of this month, I received this letter which I have in my hand by the penny post; I was alone when I read the letter, and was a little alarmed at the contents of it: I began to consider within myself what would be the most likely method of tracing it to its author; I went to the general receiving house for penny post letters in Conventry-street; from the marks upon the back of the letter, the clerk told me the letter came to them from the office in Throgmorton-street; that to Throgmorton-street it had been sent from a receiving house in Newgate-street, Mr. Peter White 's, a hatter: it was about three o'clock on Saturday afternoon when the clerk wrote me this direction upon the back of the letter: I called at Sir John Fielding 's for advice, Sir John was gone to his house at Brompton: I went immediately to Brompton, and communicated the letter to him; he said he wished before I had come to him, I had gone to Mr. White's to discover the author, for the discovery in a great measure depended upon that person's remembering who put it in the post; I went immediately to Mr. White's, who is a hatter in Newgate-street; I asked Mr. White if this letter had ever been in his office, he said this P. White, that is upon it, was his mark, that the letter had gone from his office that morning, which was the same day, Saturday; Mr. White called a person out of his shop, who is here, and asked him if he remembered any thing of this letter, the person said he did remember that he took it in on the preceding evening from an elderly woman that, he believed, went of errands for the prisoners in Newgate: I then went and enquired of Mr. Akerman if there was any woman attended the gaol that answered the description, he said there was; he sent one of his people to seek for her, but they were not able to find her that evening; Mr. Akerman told me if I would come the next morning he would certainly find the woman; I went the next morning to Mr. Akerman, and the woman was produced; she told me she went of errands for Girdwood, and that she did carry a letter directed to a gentleman, whose name she had forgot; but that it was directed to Davis-street, the corner of Mount-street, Berkeley-square, and that it was written in a secretary hand, as she called it: I went to Sir John Fielding 's, and he sent a detainer against Archibald Girdwood ; and Mr. Akerman was kind enough to bring up the woman to Sir John Fielding 's, where she confirmed upon oath what she had before said: I produced the letter, she there swore it to be the letter she received from the hand of Mr. Girdwood, and that she put into Mr. White's penny post house in Newgate-street; she said this writing at the back of the letter was not there when she put it into the post, which is the directions I got wrote at the post office: I have received a letter since from the prisoner signed with his name: his mother came to me, I suppose upon the detainer coming down, and talked upon the subject, and desired to see the letter, I thought it very improper to shew it her: a gentleman was with me last night to interceed for him.

ELIZABETH ROBINSON sworn.

I get my bread by going of errands for the prisoners in Newgate: I carried a letter from Mr. Girdwood the prisoner to Mr. White's in Newgate-street.

Should you know the letter again if you saw it? - I have seen it, and by the direction it is the same that I carried.

Can you read? - Yes.

Did you take particular notice of this letter? - I took notice that it was a very odd hand, a sort of secretary.

What do you mean by secretary? - It was a remarkable hand, not a common hand writing.

Was it sealed or wafered? - I cannot particularly say, it was fastened up, but whether sealed or wafered I cannot say.

What time of day did the prisoner give you the letter? - About seven at night.

Where did he give it you? - Up at the gate.

Was any body with him? - There were other prisoners about.

Did he give you any particular directions with it? - He ordered me to put it into the penny post as soon as possible.

Did he give you a penny with it? - No, I was to go to one of the turnkeys for a penny to put it in, which I did: I carried it immediately to the office.

Who did you deliver it to at Mr. White's? - I delivered it there, but I cannot say to whom.

Did you go back and tell him you had put it in? - No, I did not go back that night.

When did you hear of this again? - Not till Sunday morning: I was sent for to Mr. Akerman's (looks at the letter) by the direction that is the same, I saw no more than the direction.

Have you any doubt about its being the letter? - By the direction it is the same; I cannot say any farther, there is some writing at the back that was not upon it at that time.

One of the Jury. What night did you put the letter into the post? - Friday night.

Jury. Where did you look at it so particularly, to know the hand writing of the direction? - Where I went for the penny to the turnkey, I looked at it.

[The letter was read in Court, and exactly corresponded with the letter as set forth in the indictment.]

THOMAS WHITE sworn.

My master, Mr. Peter White , keeps a penny post office in Newgate-street: upon Friday, February the 9th, the last witness, a little after seven o'clock, brought a letter to our house; I believe this letter to be the same, I am pretty certain it is, I looked at the directions; I observed it was a comical sort of hand-writing, and I looked at the woman: I put it into the box.

Did you know the woman? - Yes, by frequently coming with letters to the shop: upon Saturday evening Mr. Edridge called at our house, and desired to know of my master if he could tell who put this letter in, my master called me, and asked me if I could recollect who put that letter in; I said I recollected it was put in by the woman who comes with letters from Newgate: I am clear this is the letter; I don't recollect that ever I saw such a hand.

Did you ask the woman any questions when she brought it? - None at all.

Did you mark the letters yourself that night? - I believe I did not.

Are they not marked before they go from your office? - Yes.

When did that letter go from your office? - Upon Saturday morning.

Prisoner to Robinson. Can you read the directions of that letter? - I can make out some of it.

Court. Can you read it now? - I cannot make out the name, nor I could not then; but I can make out Davis-street, the corner of Mount-street, Berkeley-square.

Jury. Whether you received any letter from any body else, or put any letter into the post that night from any other person? - No, I am very sure I did not.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

At the time this letter was received, I was lying in Newgate for transportation for fourteen years, from my former sentence: I gave that woman three or four different letters to carry out for me.

Court to Robinson. Had you seen this prisoner several times before? - I frequently went on errands for the prisoner.

Did you read the direction by a candle at the turnkey's? - I did.

There was no candle where you saw the prisoner? - No, only a lamp.

Court. You said nobody was actually with him I think, only a great many people about? - No; nobody with him.

Can you be positive about receiving the letter from the prisoner himself? - I received it from his own hand.

GUILTY . Death .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

See the Trial of Archibald Girdwood and Henry Mac Allester for robbing Mr. Edridge, No 529 and 530 in the last Mayoralty.

211. THOMAS JONES , otherwise EVANS , was indicted for that he, in the king's highway, in and upon Mitchell Newman , did make an assault putting him in corporal fear and danger of his life and stealing from his person three guineas and twelve shillings in money numbered, the property of the said Mitchell , September 29th .

MITCHELL NEWMAN sworn.

I am a Callico-printer at Mitcham in Surry: Upon Friday the 29th of September I went to Covent-garden playhouse; the house being very full, for want of room elsewhere I went to the one shilling gallery, when I came up it was very much crouded; I leaned on some persons shoulders to see the performance; the prisoner was sitting behind me, he said it was very hot, soon after he pushed by me, my hand was hanging down and might touch his breeches; the prisoner sat down on the form rather below where I stood; as soon as the play was over I went to a window for air; the prisoner soon came and stood by me, but no conversation passed: at the beginning of the entertainment I went and sat down on the form from which I came, in a little time the prisoner came and sat down on the same form about a yard from me; no conversation passed between us; a young man, who sat a few forms below, turned round, and asked me what it was o'clock? I replied I did not know: the prisoner turned his face to me, and said, Is that young man in your company? I said, No, Sir, I never saw him before: nothing farther passed till I left the house, then I came into Bow-street .

Did you and the prisoner come out together? - He walked on the other side of me with other people: as I was crossing the way he said, Sir, would not you choose something to drink after the heat of the house; I replied that it was my intention, and immediately I walked into a public house just straight before me in Bow-street, I cannot say exactly the house, I was never in it before; the prisoner came in directly after me, I called for a pint of porter, I drank what I chose of it, and asked him if he would take the rest; he said, Thank you, Sir, your good health, Sir; when he had drank the beer he set the pot down upon the table, and turned himself round to me with a kind of grin, and asked me,

"What I meant by the liberties I took with

"his person when we were in the playhouse?" I answered I knew of none; he replied,

"D - n

"you, Sir, but you did, and there were persons,

"reputable merchants, in the house, will

"take their oath of it:" alarmed at this, I replied I did not understand what he meant, and rose up in haste, called for the waiter, paid for the porter, and then hastened into the street: the prisoner came out directly after me, and at about eight yards distance from the public house halloo'd out.

How long had you been in the public house? - Ten minutes perhaps.

The prisoner came out immediately after you? - Yes.

By that time were the croud from the playhouse dispersed? - The people were not all come out of the playhouse, there was a great crowd coming down the street; he halloo'd out,

"D - n you, Sir, stop, I'll raise a mob about

"you if you offer to run;" he immediately came up to me and seized my arm, and said,

"D - n it, Sir, this affront is not to be put

"up with, such an insult is not to be borne,

"you have offered me an indignity, and nothing

"can make me satisfaction:" in my fright I asked him what he wanted; what would you have me do, was another of my expressions: Do, the prisoner said,

"why you

"must make me a present;

"a present of what I replied? he answered,

"Come, what money

"have you got about you, how much can you

"give me?" I said I had but little money about me.

At this time had he hold of you by the arm? - All the time - But what I had he must take, and accordingly put my hand in my pocket and pulled out about three guineas and some silver, to the best of my remembrance, which he took from me.

How much silver do you think there was? - About twelve shillings, as near as I can guess: he said,

"Is this all you have?" I said it is all indeed; he said,

"D - n it, Sir, this

"is not enough, I must have a farther sum:" I then attempted to leave him, but he kept hold of my arm and made me stand still, which put me in much fear; I was fearful he had a design of mischief upon my person, but soon after I walked on and he walked with me, still holding me by the arm.

Were the crowd there when all this passed between you? - The crowd were going by when he said he would raise a mob about me; I believe there was no crowd when he took the money; I walked across Russel-street down Bridges-street, he had me by the arm the whole time; he said on entering that street,

"I believe I know you, Sir, you live twenty

"miles from town; I replied I was sure he did not know me, as I never saw him before; advancing nearer to the Strand, he said to me,

"Come down to the bottom of this street, Sir,

"I have some friends at a coffee-house there,

"and we will go and settle this affair." I told him I should not go near his friends nor with him, as I knew nothing of them nor him: I turned back and came through Vinegar-yard.

Did he then let you go or keep hold of you? - I twisted out of his arm on turning back, and came through Vinegar-yard: he followed me, and in about ten or twenty yards, he took hold of me again in the way for Great Queen-street: as we were going down Queen-street, he asked me,

"If I would meet

"him at a coffee-house," I can't recollect the name of it, near Temple-bar; I replied I should not come to him or any of his friends; he said

"D - n it, Sir; if you are not ashamed of

"any thing you have done, you need not be

"afraid of meeting any man:" I answered, I was not ashamed to face any man, but would not meet people I knew nothing of: he asked me just afterwards where I lived, and what was my name, which I refused to tell him; then he said,

"He would see me to my lodgings," and he asked me

"what time I should be out

"in the morning:" I replied, it was uncertain, perhaps it might nine o'clock; he said,

"Very well, I shall see you." Nothing more material passed, but being late I hastened to my lodging; he went with me to the door: it was then near twelve o'clock.

Court. In all this time did you ever call out to any body to help you to get from him? - I was in such terror I had not power.

Counsel for the Crown. The threat, as I understand, was that he would raise a mob on account of indecencies? - Yes.

Your terror was for fear of being charged with an unnatural crime? - It was.

And you was afraid any body should hear what passed, as it would touch your character? - I was.

Cross Examination.

All the transaction of his laying hold of you, and your giving him the money, was in Bow-street? - Yes.

How long might you be in Bow-street? - About ten minutes.

People were passing and repassing the whole time you was there? - People were passing; I cannot say I observed, the whole time I was so much frightened.

Did you at the time this happened, look upon it to be a robbery? - I looked upon it as money forced from me.

You went to Sir John Fielding 's and told the whole story? - I did.

There are other indictments against the prisoner, I believe? - Yes, for an assault and conspiracy.

They are for the same fact? - Yes.

The next day he came to you? - Yes.

Did you take him up for the robbery then? - No, I had not recovered strength of mind to think of it.

Where is your lodging? - In Chancery-lane.

From the time he took hold of you, till you got to your lodging, you did not call out to any body? - I don't remember any body passing us after we came into Queen street.

How came you to remember so particularly the expressions made use of? - They made a very strong impression upon my mind.

Did he pretend to have any arms about him? - No.

The reason why you gave him the money, was on account of this accusation? - It was.

He did not use violence? - Only the threats.

Counsel for the Crown. You understood what he alluded to was a charge of S - y? - I do.

When he so threatened you, was you so frightened as to consider yourself in his power? - I did, I should have given him any thing I had to have got rid of the accusation.

Did he, give you any intimation of such an imputation before you went into the public-house? - He did not.

Did you say any thing to him before the porter came? - Not a word; as soon as he put the pot down, he turned to me in the manner I mentioned.

Was there any body in the room at that time? - I believe there were two people in a box at a distance.

Did he when he spoke this to you in the house, speak loud enough to be heard by the people at a distance? - No, he did not speak loud enough for them to hear.

Court. Did you, upon your oath, offer any indecencies to him in the playhouse? - No, I did not.

Court to Prosecutor. Did you give this money against your own consent? - Undoubtedly.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I was at the playhouse near six months ago, the prosecutor came and sat by my side, and asked me how I liked the entertainment, which was the Padlock; when I came down stairs he followed me and tap'd me on the shoulder and asked me if I would go and drink? I said I was very agreeable; we went to a public house in Bow-street, directly over the way; we staid there about three quarters of an hour; he called for the waiter and paid for the porter; I offered to pay for it, but as he asked me in, he said I should not pay for it; coming out he asked me my way home: I said I was going to Chancery-lane; he said he was glad of it, because he was going that way and would accompany me: as we were going along that part of Lincoln's-inn-fields next Holborn, he behaved very rude to me, and wanted to kiss me; I pushed him from me, and asked him what he wanted? he said he did not mean to affront me: we had not gone many yards farther before he wanted to force his hands into my breeches; I called out watch several times; he had then ran away, but hearing me repeat the call so often he was afraid he would be stopped, so he stopped and said, he was very sorry he had offered the thing to me that he did, and said, if it would be any satisfaction he would go on his knees to beg my pardon; he told me he was a gentleman living hard by, and begged I would not hurt him; that I should see where he lived, and begged I would see him home to his lodging, which he said was not far off, and if I would be so obliging to call in the morning, he would make me a present for the affront he had given me. I being poor, and not having wherewith to prosecute this man, if I had taken him up, I went to a friend and told him the affair, and asked him what I should do; he desired me as the gentleman had told me to call in such a time to go, and that he would go with me; we went at the time, which was between nine and ten o'clock, and Mr. Newman was ready to meet me below stairs; he called us into a back room, and bid me and my friend sit down; we had not spoke any thing at all then, but he went to a person in the shop and spoke to him; he came back into the back room from the shop, and said, he wished us to go along with him into the city; we went into the city, and just going up Ludgate-hill, he begged of me and my acquaintance to go to the London Coffeehouse, and that he would wait upon us in about a quarter of an hour's time or a few minutes; we went and he came there in about a quarter of an hour's time with a bit of paper and some money, as it proved afterwards, inclosed in it; he laid hold of my hand and put it in my hand, and at the same time told me, that was in token of my shewing him the friendship the night before, in not exposing him as I should have done; he gave me a 10 l. bank note, and the rest in money, to the amount of 40 l. I did not ask a farthing of him; we staid about half an hour after drinking a dish of coffee; as we were coming out he said to me, if I may rely upon your conduct, if you are in any necessity you shall never want; this was the day after the affair; so we parted; I know no more of the three guineas than the child unborn; he endeavoured to suck my blood like a vulture. I know nothing about it; the man that went with me is gone into the country; his name is Hopkins.

To the Prosecutor. What day was the prisoner taken up? - On the 5th of January.

You saw him the next day after the affair happened? - Yes.

Was there any one with him the next day or with you? - There was nobody with me, there was a man with him I did not know.

How came you not to take him up then? - I did not know how to act; I should have taken him afterwards when he came to my house, but I did not think I had proper authority.

When did he come to your house? - On the 18th of November.

Before that, had you told the story to any body? - I had intrusted a friend with it; upon the 18th of November, I got the prisoner's name, he wrote it down on a piece of paper, and I went to Sir John Fielding 's on the 21st of November.

Court. Did you tell your story at Sir John Fielding 's, the same as you have done now? - Yes, I told Justice Addington the story, he was on the bench; he said there was no occasion for a warrant, I might take him the first time I saw him; the first time I saw him after that was on the 5th of January, then I met him and took him up.

Counsel for the Prisoner. Would you have applied to any body if he had not come a second time for money upon the 18th of November? - I always had an intention to take him the first time I saw him, after I knew I had power so to do.

Counsel for the Crown. Had you any idea it was a felony? - I did not understand it.

What did he write down on the 18th November? - Hill Jones, Cateaton-street. I made enquiry there, but could hear nothing of him.

FOR THE PRISONER.

THOMAS ROBERTS sworn.

I have known the prisoner three years, his name is Thomas Evans ; he was out of place and came and lodged with me; I got him into place, where he staid a year; for any thing I know he behaved very well; he has been gone from me about a year.

HENRY WILLIAMS sworn.

I keep a public house. I have known the prisoner ever since he was a child; I never heard any bad character of him in my life; he is a shoemaker; I cannot tell whether he has been in any business lately.

FOR THE PROSECUTOR.

GEORGE BLACK sworn.

I belong to the excise. I have known the prosecutor ever since he was two years old; I never heard any imputation of t he kind upon him; I have frequently slept in bed with him. I have been in his house months together; I believe there is not living a man of a better character.

JOHN FOSTER sworn.

I have known the prosecutor twenty years intimately. I never suspected, nor can suspect such an imputation; he has the best moral character I ever knew in my life; I never heard him speak an immoral word, much less do an immoral thing.

GUILTY . Death .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

See the Trial of JAMES BROWN and THOMAS BROWN for a robbery perpetrated in the same manner, No 26, 27. in Mr. Alderman Chitty's Mayoralty (1760).

It appeared upon that trial, that Thomas Brown (with a view of being admitted an evidence) confessed before Sir John Fielding , that himself and his Confederates had, at different times, stopped 500 persons in the same way in St. James's Park; and had robbed them of their money, &c. and often of their cloaths, and had even stripped one man quite naked: James Brown was convicted of the robbery, but afterwards received from his late Majesty a free pardon: Thomas Brown was acquitted.

JAMES BROWN was tried again in Mr. Alderman Beckford's first Mayoralty (1763) see No 415. for robbing Ralph Hodson , in Middle Temple-lane, of his watch, his buckles, and his sleeve buttons: after stripping Hodson at different times, under the threat of charging him with a detestable crime, of near twenty pounds, Brown obtained Hodson's note of hand for five pounds, upon which he had the audacity to arrest him, and put him into a lock-up house: Hodson was then under the necessity of sending for his friends, who with great difficulty prevailed upon him to disclose the whole transaction; the consequence of which was Brown's trial for robbing Hodson in the Temple, upon which he was convicted and was executed.

212. THOMAS FEASEY was indicted for stealing a linen neckcloth, value ten pence , the property of Joseph Lockhart , February 7th .

JOSEPH LOCKHART sworn.

I know nothing of the matter, only prove the property.

THOMAS PINKER sworn.

Upon the 9th of November, coming over the bridge, I saw the prosecutor and his brother; the prosecutor's brother had his coat buttoned; the prisoner walked up to the brother, and seemed to sever his pocket from his great coat, then I saw him bend as if he put his hand into his pocket; afterwards the prisoner was searched, upon the charge of having taken a neckcloth, we found that neckcloth upon him, and delivered it to John Barber the constable.

JOHN BARBER the constable produced the neckcloth.

JOSEPH LOCKHART again.

I lent a neckcloth to my brother that day; I cannot swear that this is the neck-cloth.

JAMES LOCKHART sworn.

I am certain I had the neckcloth between ten and eleven o'clock, soon after that I missed it; it was produced by the constable.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I found the neckcloth.

The prisoner called six witnesses, who gave him a very good character.

The Jury to Barber. Was there any mud or dirt upon the neckcloth? - No, but if it had been upon the ground it would have been dirty.

GUILTY . Whipped .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

213. MATTHEW BOULTON was indicted for stealing eight hempen sacks, value nine shillings , the property of Abraham Cowley , February 7th .

JOHN GRISDALE sworn.

Mr. Cowley is a merchant ; I look after his affairs; having missed a great number of hempen sacks, I employed a servant to watch; he did watch, and the prisoner was apprehended.

THOMAS BARLOW sworn.

I was appointed to watch the warehouse: about eleven in the morning the prisoner came to the warehouse, he did not come in, but with a crook'd stick he took eight sacks out: I pursued him, and took him with the sacks upon him.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I did not steal the sacks.

GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Branding. See summary.]

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

214. JOSEPH ARNOLD was indicted for stealing four pound weight of tobacco, value ten pence , the property of persons unknown, February 16th .

The prisoner was found with four pound of tobacco upon him, but there was no evidence that any tobacco was missing, and the prisoner said he found it in a lighter after it was cleared.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

215. JAMES GREGG was indicted for that he in the King's highway, in and upon Samuel Brooks did make an assault, putting him in corporal fear and danger of his life, and stealing from his person half a guinea and shilling, the property of the said Samuel , February 3d .

It appeared upon the trial that the prisoner was insane: he was delivered to his friends to be taken care of.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

216, 217. EDWARD TAYLOR and JOHN PEDLEY were indicted for that they in the King's highway, in and upon Jacob Chinnin did make an assault, putting him in corporal fear and danger of his life, and stealing from his person half a guinea and four shillings and six-pence in monies numbered , the property of the said Jacob, February 11th .

Both the prosecutor and the prisoners were exceedingly intoxicated with liquor, they quarrelled and fought about a girl; but there was no evidence to prove a robbery.

BOTH NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

218. JAMES FRYER was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Lewis Dessameaux on the 18th of November , between the hours of twelve and six in the night, and stealing twenty-five pounds weight of silk, value 40 l. the property of the said Lewis, in his dwelling-house .

There was no evidence to affect the prisoner, but his own confession made at the time he was admitted an evidence for the crown. See the trial of Lamb Smith and John Davis , No 54, 55. in December sessions.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

219. JOHN HARTLEY was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Martha Cousins , Widow , on the 8th of October , about the hour of two in the night, and stealing twenty-four guineas and thirty shillings, the property of the said Martha in her dwelling-house .

"The witness deposed, that at the time of

"the robbery, a man about the size of the

"prisoner came up stairs with a candle in

"his hand; but that he had a mask or crape

"over his face, and they could not swear to

"him."

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

220. MARY, the wife of JOHN HOFFMAN , was indicted for stealing two black silk cloaks, value thirty-nine shillings, the property of John Crofton , privately in his shop , February 5th .

JOHN CROFTON sworn.

I am a pawnbroker in Silver-street, Golden-square : on the 5th of February I shewed two silk cloaks which I had in my shew-glass to a gentlewoman; we could not agree, she came next day and offered fifty-five shillings for one of them; I went to look for them and missed them; I sent my servant round to several pawnbrokers to enquire about them; he found one in Brook-street, and the other in West-street, Seven-dials: the prisoner used to come frequently to my shop, and I had some reasons to suspect her.

CHARLES MURTHWAITE sworn.

I am servant to Mr. Crofton: upon Monday the 5th of February I saw the cloaks in the window; the next morning a gentlewoman came and desired to look at one of the cloaks she had bid money for the day before; I looked in the window for them and they were gone; my master sent me to enquire if I could hear any thing of them at the pawnbrokers; I found one of the cloaks at Mr. Cordy's in Brook-street, and the other at Mr. Humphrey's in West-street, Seven-dials.

[They were produced in Court and deposed to by the prosecutor.]

JAMES ALDOUS sworn.

I am a pawnbroker in Brook-street: I took this cloak in pledge of the prisoner on the 5th of February at night; I lent her a guinea upon it; I asked her if it was her own; she said it was, that she had it made up, and it cost her three guineas: upon the 6th of February Murthwaite came to enquire if I had taken in such a cloak; I shewed it to him; he said it was one they had lost; I told him I took it of a woman I had seen in their shop.

MURTHWAITE again. She was in the shop on the Monday two or three times after the gentlewoman had looked at the cloaks.

ROBERT ARTZ sworn.

I live with Mr. Humphreys in West-street; the prisoner had been at our shop several times before; she pledged this cloak with me, which was on the 5th of February between seven and eight in the evening.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I did not take the cloaks, I was not in the shop on Monday till night.

GUILTY of stealing to the value of ten pence . W .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

221. JOHN HARE was indicted for stealing a linen stock, value one shilling, a linen handkerchief, value one shilling, a pair of worsted and cotton stockings, value one shilling, a blanket, value ten shillings, a bed quilt, value ten shillings, a linen apron, value one shilling, a razor, value eight pence, and a dimity waistcoat, value one shilling , the property of Thomas Lewis , January 11th .

MARY LEWIS sworn.

I am the wife of Thomas Lewis ; my husband lives in Swallow-street ; the prisoner was my journeyman , I keep a hair-dresser's shop; he lodged and boarded in the house; he went away on the Thursday: I missed the things mentioned in the indictment, and took him on the Saturday following in Rathbone-place; he had some of the things on him, and he owned to taking the rest; he said he had sold the blanket and quilt in Monmouth-street; the constable went with him, but he pretended he could not find the shop again.

GEORGE BOYTON sworn.

I am a constable: I heard the prisoner confess he had robbed his mistress of the things; he said he had sold the blanket and quilt in Monmouth-street: I went with him to Monmouth-street, but he pretended he could not find the shop.

Prosecutrix. I told him if I could get my things again, I would not hurt him; but I never got them.

[A stock and razor, found upon the prisoner, were produced in Court, and deposed to by the prosecutrix.]

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I took some of them, not all.

GUILTY of stealing to the value of ten pence . W .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

222, 223. JANE LANGHAM and MARY SAMPSON , otherwise BUCK , were indicted for stealing a Wilton riding coat, value eighteen shillings, a pair of silver shoe buckles, value ten shillings, and a pair of silver knee buckles, value three shillings , the property of Julien Anoit , January 23d .

[The prosecutor being a Frenchman, and not speaking English, an interpreter was sworn.]

JULIEN ANOIT. I am a taylor in Charles-street, St. James's: some time in last month, I don't remember the day, between three and four in the morning, I met with Langham in Piccadilly, and went to her lodgings in Westminster ; I don't know the name of the street, I was rather a little intoxicated with liquor: when we came to the house, I went into a room with her and went to bed: I staid there till about nine in the morning, then I got up; there was not a person in the chamber then, when I went to bed there was a soldier and a woman in bed; the soldier got up and I went into the same bed.

Did you undress yourself when you went into bed? - Yes, I put my shoes by the bedside, my cloaths upon the bed, and my buckles in my breeches pocket; I laid my breeches at the bed's head; I missed my coat and buckles when I awaked; I was advised by the man of the house to get a warrant and have the prisoners taken up; he gave instructions to a man who apprehended them; I found my things at a pawnbroker's: Langham owned that she pawned them.

EBENEZER STOKES sworn.

I am a pawnbroker: upon the 23d of January I took in pawn these shoe buckles of Jane Langham .

[The buckles were produced in court, and deposed to by the prosecutor.]

To the Prosecutor. Whether you was not too drunk to be able to know the woman's face again? - I do perfectly well know the woman's face.

Whether you was sober enough to be sure you had these things when you went into the room? - Yes.

Had you any money in your pocket? - I had some trifle of money, but not much; I had but one halfpenny in the morning, and I that I found on the bed.

HENRY WRIGHT sworn.

I am a pawnbroker; I have a coat here Sampson brought me on the 23d of January; I lent her six shillings upon it.

[It was produced in court, and deposed to by the prosecutor.]

CATHARINE TAYLOR sworn.

I am a pawnbroker: I have a pair of knee buckles that were brought to me by Langham on the 23d of January; the other prisoner was with her.

[They were produced in court, and deposed to by the prosecutor.]

LANGHAM's DEFENCE.

I met the prosecutor at the Swan, St. James's; we drank together and he went home with me to my lodging; he had no money and gave me these things to pawn one after another to raise money; and he staid in the house till near three o'clock in the afternoon.

SAMPSON's DEFENCE.

I went into the room to light my candle between seven and eight in the morning; the prosecutor and Langham were in bed together; she asked me to pawn this coat, he spoke very good English, as I could understand him; he asked her if she could trust me, she said, Yes; and he gave me the coat, and I brought him six shillings on it; I put the money into his hand, and he sent for a pot of brandy hot; I drank and went away; I saw no more of him till he took me up.

LANGHAM GUILTY .

SAMPSON NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

[Branding. See summary.] [Imprisonment. See summary.]

224. ELIZABETH CLARKE was indicted for stealing a silver watch, value thirty-eight shillings, a worsted watch string, value one penny, a base metal watch key, value one penny, and a steel watch hook, value one penny , the property of John Smith , February 9th .

JOHN SMITH sworn.

On the 9th of this month, about a quarter before two in the afternoon, the prisoner came to my house to look at a lodging; my wife desired she would walk into a little room even with the shop; I was down in the cellar chopping wood, I came up to her; she was sitting in the little room; I saw the watch hanging there; my wife was serving in the shop at that time; she was there about ten minutes or a quarter of an hour; I missed my watch in about five minutes after the prisoner was gone: she agreed for the room, and desired me to go for her character to the Ship and Baker, a public house in the Borough, which she said her sister kept: I ran to the Ship and Baker, but they did not know any thing of her. She had been before to see the lodging and a man with her: I recollected that the man said he lived at No 2. Windmill-street; I went there; I enquired at the Black Bull, and found the prisoner had lived servant there; I got a direction to a public house in Bear-street, Leicester-fields, where I found the prisoner; I charged her with taking the watch, she denied it; I afterwards found the watch at one Wood's, a pawnbroker, at the corner of George-court, Princes-street.

JOHN WOOD sworn.

I am a pawnbroker; the prisoner pawned a watch with me on the 9th of February, between the hours of one and four in the afternoon, in the name of Mr. Murray; she said it was her husband's property: I lent her a guinea upon it.

[The watch was produced in court and deposed to by the prosecutor.]

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I had been several times to the prosecutor's about the lodging; he said he could not get the people out that had it; but when he got them out I should have the room: while we were in the little room he wanted to lye with me; he said he had no money, and gave me the watch, and bid me keep it till he came and brought me some money; he never came, and so I pawned it.

SMITH. No such thing passed: we were in a little room adjoining to the shop; my wife was in the shop all the time and the door was open.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave her a very good character.

GUILTY . Burnt in the hand , and imprisoned six months .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice GOULD.

225. ISAAC KING was indicted for stealing two pewter pint pots, value two shillings , the property of John Feast , January 21st .

JOHN FEAST sworn.

I lost two pint pots on the 21st of January. I saw them taken from the prisoner at the Robin Hood and Black Boy, in Leather-lane.

WILLIAM BAILEY sworn.

I lodge up two pair of stairs in Leather-lane. I had been out last Sunday morning was a month; when I returned, I met the prisoner coming down stairs; when I got up stairs I missed the pots, which I had put on the outside of the door before I went out: I asked my wife if the people had been for the pots? she said, No: I immediately suspected the prisoner; I followed him, and brought him to the Robin Hood ; there I found a quart pot, and two pint pots in a bag; and there were two pints in his pockets, and two under his coat.

ROBERT WRIGHT sworn.

I am a constable: I have had the pots ever since. [They were produced in court and deposed to by the prosecutor.]

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I went to seek a person who owed me some money, and as I was coming down stairs, seeing the pots stand there, distress of a singular nature induced me to take them.

GUILTY of stealing to the value of ten pence . W .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

He was a second time indicted for stealing four pewter pint pots, value four shillings, and a pewter quart pot, value eighteen pence , the property of John Woolfe , January 21st .

JOHN WOOLFE sworn.

Here are four pints and one quart pot my property: I lost them upon the 21st of January about nine in the morning; I had them the evening before.

WILLIAM BAILEY sworn.

I found these pots upon the prisoner, two in his pockets, two under his coat, and one in a bag.

GUILTY of stealing to the value of ten pence . W .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

226, 227. JAMES LANGAR and WILLIAM DICKINSON were indicted for that they in a certain field and open place, near the king's highway, in and upon John Boulton did make an assault, putting him in corporal fear and danger of his life, and stealing from his person a silver watch, value 3 l. a steel watch chain, value one shilling, a brass watch key, value six pence, a cornelian seal set in metal, value five pence, a cloth coat, value twenty shillings, and five shillings in money numbered, the property of the said John , January 8th .

JOHN BOULTON sworn.

I was robbed on the 8th of January, between six and seven at night in Hyde Park , going from London to my lodging at Paddington: about twenty yards from the bason, a man came up and asked me what o'clock it was; I told him I did not know, upon which two more laid hold of me, and told me they would make me know, and blinded me immediately; one of them put his hands over my eyes, and told me if I offered to move, I was a dead man, upon which they took my coat off my back, and my silver knee-buckles out of my knees; they searched for my shoe-buckles, but found I had boots on: one of them desired them to give me my coat, but another of them swore, no, by G - d, they would have it; then they took from me a silver watch gilt, and about four or five shillings in money; then they turned me round, and said, if I offered to look, or move, I was a dead man; so I thought it best to stand as they ordered me: the next day I went to Sir John Fielding 's, and acquainted him how I was robbed; Sir John sent for me last week, and informed me my watch was found, and that three soldiers were taken up; I went to Sir John Fielding 's and saw the prisoners; the watch was found at a pawnbroker's in the Broad-way, Westminster.

Was it light or dark, when you was robbed? - Dark: they were tall men that robbed me; but I was taken so suddenly, that I cannot swear to them; I believe they had blue great coats on.

Have you got any thing again besides your watch? - Yes, my coat.

ROBERT JOHNSON sworn.

I am a pawnbroker in the Broad-way, Westminster; this watch (producing it) was pledged with me on the 8th of January, about eight at night; it was brought by a man who said his name was John Brooks , and that he kept a snuff-shop in High-street, Mary-le-bone; I never saw him before; I think to the best of my recollection, the prisoner Langar is the man; he was not dressed in regimentals, I had no apprehension of his being a soldier; I think he had a brown coat and a light surtout over it; he asked me three guineas upon the watch, I said I would lend him two; he gave a good account of himself.

Prosecutor. This is my watch, it was made on purpose for me.

Do you know how they were dressed? - I cannot positively say, I believe in brown cloaths; they had slouched hats on.

JOSEPH SADLER sworn.

I live with Mr. Johnson; a pawnbroker in the Broad-way, Westminster. On Monday the 8th of January, between seven and eight at night, a man brought a watch and asked three guineas upon it; I asked him whether it was gilt or metal; he said it was silver gilt; I offered him a guinea and half on it; he would not take it; I went for my master, and he lent him two guineas on it; I really believe Langar is the man, but I cannot be positive: he had brown cloaths on and a light great coat.

THOMAS COUSINS sworn.

I am a bricklayer; I was concerned with the prisoner in robbing Mr. Boulton; it was on Monday night the 8th of January, about six o'clock; as near as I can remember, it was near the bason in Hyde Park we met him, as we were coming from Grosvenor-gate; I went up to him and asked him what o'clock it was, I took hold of him, and the two prisoners came up and took his watch and his money as I held him.

Was that all you took? - No, we took his coat; I cannot remember much about the buckles: after we had taken his coat and watch and money, we desired him to go about his business; then we returned again towards Hyde Park corner; I pawned the coat at the corner of Derby-court, Jermyn-street, for five shillings, and Langar pawned the watch at Mr. Johnson's in the Broad-way, Westminster; I stood at the door while he pawned it; from Hyde Park we went down Piccadilly, Langar went to try to get the watch off; I met with him again at Charing-cross. Dickinson crossed the way to speak to somebody, we missed him and went and pawned the watch, and then we all met at the Bull-head in Peter's-street, Westminster; we had about seventeen shillings each.

How was Langar dressed? - He had on a brown close-bodied coat, a plain hat, white breeches, and I believe, a light-coloured great coat.

LANGAR's DEFENCE.

I know myself not guilty of the fact.

DICKINSON's DEFENCE.

I have nothing to say.

FOR THE PRISONERS.

BENJAMINE COKER sworn.

I am serjeant in Colonel Laney 's company: I know both the prisoners very well, they are soldiers in the same company; Langar has been inlisted about eight years or upwards; I looked upon him to work hard for his living; he did keep a tobacconist's shop, but has left it: I don't know his private character; if they come clean and do their duty, we count them good soldiers.

JAMES JONES sworn.

I have known Langar about seven years; I always apprehended him to be a sober honest man; he served me with tobacco, he has taken many pounds of my money; he has not served me this three or four months; I never heard an oath come out of his mouth, nor ever saw him fuddled.

JOHN STURLING sworn.

I have known Langar about three years; I look upon him to be a sober, honest, worthy, well-meaning man as ever I was acquainted with in my life.

MARY LUFF sworn.

I have known Langar about a year and half; I always heard he had the character of a very honest man.

LANGAR GUILTY . Death .

DICKINSON NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

They were a second time indicted for that they, in a certain field and open place near the king's highway, in and upon James Blair did make an assault, putting him in corporal fear and danger of his life, and stealing from his person a silver watch, value forty shillings, a steel watch chain, value three pence, and a brass watch key, value one penny, the property of the said James , December 29th .

There was no evidence to affect the prisoners but the testimony of the accomplice, unconnected with any corroborating circumstances.

BOTH NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice GOULD.

228, 229. JAMES LANGAR and WILLIAM KERRISON were indicted for that they, in the king's highway, in and upon John Terry did make an assault, putting him in corporal fear and danger of his life and stealing from his person a half-crown piece and nine shillings in money numbered, the property of the said John , February the 1st .

JOHN TERRY sworn.

I am a hackney coachman . At three o'clock in the morning upon the 1st of February, having put up my coach, I was walking home; by Whitehall , I walked in the highway because the foot-path was slippery, two men met me; one, which was Kerrison, was dressed in a blue great coat with a red cape; the other in a dark-coloured coat; it was a moonlight and starlight morning; they had nothing upon their faces, I could see them very plain, they were in the foot road; the prisoner Kerrison stepped up and took hold of my right hand, the other man took hold of my left hand; I am sure to Kerrison, but not to Langar; they came up before me: Kerrison came back and put his hand to my mouth, and put his fingers over my face to prevent my seeing him, but as I held my head back, I had a full view of his face; Kerrison said if I made any noise, he would blow my brains out; the other man took my money out of my pocket; I had nine shillings and a half-crown piece; they asked me for my watch, I said I had none: Kerrison took off my hat; it being a cold night, I asked for my hat; when they had got about ten yards from me, they threw me my hat; a hackney coach was coming, I cried out stop thief, and notwithstanding it was near the guard at Whitehall, they took no notice.

BENJAMIM COKER sworn.

Some information was given upon Cousins's turning evidence against Kerrison; he came to my house four times upon Saturday the 10th of February, to know if I had any charge against him; he came again on Sunday morning, because I was not at home at any of the other times: I then acquainted him there were some charges against him, and I must carry him before Sir John Fielding . He said, I shall gladly go before Sir John Fielding , for I am innocent of all the charges against me. I let him go that night, he came next morning and went before Sir John Fielding ; he was sworn positively there to be the other; he had a blue great coat with a red cape.

Is such a great coat usual among the guards? - They could not afford it in general, except they are some other business, besides that of a soldier.

From Kerrison. Please to ask the serjeant as to my character? - He behaves well as a soldier; but I beg not to say any thing as to his private character.

LANGAR, NOT GUILTY .

KERRISON, GUILTY . Death .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice WILLES.

230. JAMES LANGAR was indicted for that he, in a certain field and open place near the King's highway, in and upon Charles Clark did make an assault, putting him in corporal fear and danger of his life, and stealing from his person a silver watch, value twenty shillings, a steel watch-chain, value six pence, a cornelian seal set in metal, value six pence, a brass watch-key, value one penny, and a half guinea and seven shillings in monies numbered, the property of the said Charles , January 5th .

CHARLES CLARK sworn.

I was robbed upon the 5th of January, between seven and eight in the evening, a little beyond the bason in Hyde Park : I was carrying something in my way to a customer a pastry-cook at Pimlico, two men attacked me, one was a thickish man in dark-coloured cloaths, I am not positive, but I rather think he had a light-coloured great coat on, his close-bodied coat was of a brownish colour; the taller one came first to me, and presented what I took to be a pistol to my breast, and ordered me not to look at him; the shortest collared me, and they blinded my eyes with their hands; whilst the short man held me, the tall one took my watch out of my fob, and he took half a guinea and seven shillings in silver out of my pocket, which was in a purse of a bluish colour, and there was a bad half crown and a six pence amongst it. I lost my hat in the scuffle; one of the men struck me, and told me to go the other way, and not to look back or to follow them. The shortest proposed to kill me; but the tallest, which is the prisoner, opposed it, and said it should not be done. After some time I took courage, and looked round, and saw both of them running towards Grosvenor-gate; I gave information at Sir John Fielding 's, and yesterday se'ennight I saw them at Sir John Fielding 's; I could not swear to either of them: upon Friday was se'ennight I saw my watch at Sir John's.

JOHN PRIESTMAN sworn.

I am a pawnbroker, and live facing St. Ann's church Soho. Upon the 10th of January, between seven and eight in the evening, a tall man, but I took no particular notice either of his person or of his dress, pawned this watch with me, it is a very old one: I lent him half a guinea upon it; there was a chain and a key to it, but there was no seal.

JOHN HELEY sworn.

Upon the 9th of February in the morning, I apprehended the prisoner; he was in bed in a room with a woman; in a drawer in that room I found this seal (producing it). I asked the prisoner, if the seal was his? he said he knew nothing at all about it; but in the same drawer there were some regimental cloaths, and these the prisoner owned to be his: I have had the seal ever since.

CLARK again. This is my watch and my seal. I had taken an impression of the seal four or five months before I was robbed. When Heley shewed me the seal, I said I believed it was mine, and told Heley I had an impression which I had taken from the seal, and that is the same produced. [The seal and impression were produced in court.]

THOMAS COUSINS sworn.

The prisoner and I stopped a man in the Park, I cannot tell exactly the day, it was above a month ago; it was about six o'clock at night. I first stopped the man, whilst I held him, the prisoner took his watch and money; there was a bad half crown and a six-pence amongst it, there was likewise a purse and some half-pence, and there was half a guinea and some silver in that purse. We went through Grosvenor-gate: the prisoner had possession of the watch, it was pawned opposite St. Ann's Church Soho. I stood under the wall till the prisoner came back; he had half a guinea upon the watch. I had one half guinea and the prisoner had the half guinea that was taken from the prosecutor. The prisoner had on a close-bodied brown coat, I am not certain whether he had any great coat on.

HELEY. Cousins and the prisoner both lodged in the same house.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I see they are determined to swear my life away, I leave myself to the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY . Death .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice WILLES.

231. JOHN FOSSETT was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of James Ash on the 15th of February , about the hour of five in the night, and stealing two silver cruet tops, value three shillings, the property of the said James in his dwelling-house .

"The prisoner called a witness to prove

"he was at Darkhouse-lane at the time the

"burglary was committed; there were nothing

"found upon him when he was taken,

"nor were there any circumstances to confirm

"the prosecutor's servant, who swore that

"two persons, who broke into her master's

"house, came with pistols and a dark lanthorn

"to her bedside, and that the prisoner

"was one of them."

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

232. SUSANNAH HUDSON was indicted for stealing a pewter pint pot, value ten pence , the property of Josiah Roe , February 14th .

JOSIAH ROE sworn.

I live in Turnagain-lane : upon the 14th of this month the prisoner came to my house and asked for a glass of gin; I was in the tap-room; I went into the bar to serve her; there was a pot stood on the bar which she took; as she was taking it it made a noise; I suspected she had taken something, I looked over the bar and saw her hand behind her; I went out of the bar and found the pot concealed under her cloak.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I took the pot to give to the servant, to give me some water to put to the gin I had called for.

GUILTY .

[Whipping. See summary.]

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

233. WILLIAM EVANS was indicted for that he, in the King's highway, in and upon John Cooper did make an assault, putting him in corporal fear and danger of his life, and stealing from his person a canvas bag value one penny, and three guineas in money numbered, the property of the said John , January 30th .

JOHN COOPER sworn.

I am a farrier at Putney. On the 30th of January I was at the Black Lion in Bedford-row with a friend, and had a pot of beer, the prisoner drank with us; he called me out between eight and nine in the evening, and said he wanted to speak with me. I asked him what he wanted; I went out; when he got me about twenty yards he knocked me down, and took three guineas and a purse out of my pocket: as soon as he had robbed me he ran away. A man who was putting his horse in called out to know what I did there; when I got up I went to the Black Lion; I was all on a gore of blood; he cut my mouth very bad.

Was you sober? - I was as sober as I am now: we had two pots of beer among four of us. The prisoner was taken that night, and I saw him at the Rotation Office next day. I knew him, and immediately swore to him at the Rotation Office. Two of the companies at the Black Lion went out after him, and a coachman that is here took him; it was at the time the snow was upon the ground, and it was pretty light, but I did not see his face when we were out.

Cross Examination.

How came the prisoner in your company, if you did not know him? - He pushed himself into our company; I never saw him in my life; he would make himself free with any body, for what I know.

What did he knock you down with? - I don't know whether he knocked me down with a stick or his fist; my own stick lay by the side of me afterwards.

Did you call out? - No: it was under the dead wall; I called out, and a man asked what was the matter, and the prisoner said I would not let him go away.

How long had he been in your company at the alehouse? - He went backwards and forwards, he was there till we drank two pots of beer; I cannot say how long it was.

How long do you think? - I cannot tell.

You did not resist? - I could not resist, I am an old man. I came back to the house as soon as I could; he got me by the arm and ran me along.

Was the prisoner known at the house? - Yes, very well, he used the house.

JOHN WILCOX sworn.

I came to town with Mr. Cooper on the 30th of January. The first time we met with Evans was at Marshall's the Horseshoe and Magpye in Holborn; there was a woman that goes a nursing had got a shirt to sell, Mr. Cooper bought the shirt; I went to get change for a half guinea of Mr. Marshall; I brought the half guinea and gave it to Mr. Cooper again; the prisoner took up the half guinea, and did not lay it down again; then Evans said, if we would go to the Black Lion she was there, and would meet Mr. Cooper there; we went there and drank, he went out at the door, and said to Mr. Cooper, I want to speak something to you for your good, and the woman will give you the half guinea. As soon as they were gone out, the landlord said, Do you know any thing of that chap? I told him we knew nothing of him. I went after Mr. Cooper, and just as I was going, he came in al l over blood, and said, the man that took him out had robbed him. The landlord and others went out after him, and a little before twelve o'clock they catched him. I saw him at the watch-house after he was taken; he had shifted his cloaths, he had then lightish cloaths on; he had an old blue coat with a red cap on when he called Mr. Cooper out of the house. I saw the money the constable of the night took out of his pocket, there was eight shillings or thereabouts.

JOHN SORRELL sworn.

I keep the Black Lion. The prisoner and these two men came into my house about half past eight o'clock; they had one pot of beer; Evans went out two or three times; he came in the second or third time, and told Cooper, if he would come out, there was the woman would give him a half guinea they had lost. Cooper immediately got up and said, he would like to see the woman, for he knew her very well. I asked the prisoner, why he did not bring the woman in, because the woman would steal? and he said, she would not come in, she was down at the wall. Mr. Cooper went out with him; he came in again, and said he was knocked down. He asked me, if I did not know the man? I said I did, because I knew him in his apprenticeship. He said he would give any body ten pounds to take him; I said, I would go, if any body would go with me, and seek him; we could not find him for two hours; when we were out in Gray's inn-lane, we saw two lads, who said he was in a house; they took him in Gray's-inn-lane a little after that.

THOMAS DIXON sworn.

I was going home about half past eleven o'clock; I met Mr. Sorrell and two or three others in pursuit of this young man; they said he had robbed a man by the dead wall of three guineas; I told them he was some where there; he had come into the Goat before that when I was drinking a pint of beer; he nodded to me and went out again; I knew the prisoner before, I have known him six or seven years; I believe it was about nine or ten o'clock when I saw him; I saw him afterwards at the end of the King's road; I met Mr. Sorrell, he asked me if I had seen him: as I was going up Gray's-inn-lane about half after eleven I met him with three women and a little girl; I took him by the collar and took him to the watch-house; I put him into the custody of the constable of the night: I know no harm of him.

MARY LAGGETT sworn.

The prisoner used to come to the house I lodged in; he came home that same night with the money; he said his uncle gave it him; I know no more of him than by coming there; soon after he came in he went out again; then he came home and shifted his cloaths: he had on an old blue coat when he came first, he came back about a quarter of an hour after in lightish coloured cloaths.

THOMAS WILLIAMS sworn.

Thomas Dixon and I were drinking together at the Goat, and the prisoner came in and said, his uncle had given him three guineas; after that we met him and secured him.

RICHARD DIGNAM sworn.

On the 31st of January the two hostlers came to me in the morning, and told me there was a gentleman called out of Mr. Sorrell's house, and robbed by a man in a blue coat and red collar; I took the prisoner up to the office, and then I went and searched his lodging in Pearpoole lane; I found there this great coat (producing a blue great coat with a red collar) I found it between the sacking and the bed; I asked the people, who belonged to that room? I have seen the prisoner many times going into that room, but I don't say they were his lodgings.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I went to the Horseshoe and Magpye in Holborn; this Cooper and a gentleman were with a woman; they were both in liquor: I called for a pint of beer, and Mr. Cooper's friend knocked down the pint of beer; I called for another, and he knocked it down; he said he would pay for the beer before I went out of the house; I sat as far off him as I am now; there came in a woman, and said she had got a shirt to sell: Cooper said he would buy it; he looked at it, and then gave her a half guinea to change; she is a woman of the town; I know her very well, I have seen her with different fellows: she looked at the half guinea, and said it was not a good one; the woman put the half guinea into her pocket, then the half guinea was missing; I was not near them; this man said he was sure he had it not, and Mr. Cooper said so; this man had no money about him; the woman said she would go to the Cock and Hoop, the corner of Gray's-inn-lane; he said he wished I would go up to the woman's house; I went to the woman and let her know, if she would come to this man, he would not hurt her; if not he would have a warrant for her next morning; she came down and told me to tell them to come to the Black Lion, she said she would not go in; he called for a pot of beer, and said he would go with me; she said, tell Mr. Cooper I know him well, if he will come down the yard I will satisfy him for the half guinea, that makes no odds between him and I; I went and told Mr. Cooper, and I left him with the woman and went home to my my mother's; my mother had given me three guineas to get my cloaths out of pawn; I had heard of a place at Bath: I never touched him no more than I do this blessed minute, so help me God; he tumbled down going along, and a hackney coachman took him up out of the channel.

To SORRELL. Were the two men drunk? - I cannot say but Cooper was a little in liquor; the other man was very sober, he is an old man, I cannot say I think he was quite sober, but he behaved very well, and spoke very well.

The prisoner called James Murray , William Hands , and James Licence , who gave him a good character.

GUILTY . Death .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

The prisoner was recommended by the Jury to his Majesty's mercy.

234. WILLIAM SIMPSON was indicted for stealing a linen cloth wrapper, value one shilling, thirty-six linen handkerchiefs, value twenty shillings, two pieces of cotton, containing twenty-eight yards, value 4 l. and a piece of velveret, containing fifteen yards, value 3 l. 15 s. the property of William Scott , January 20th .

There was no evidence to affect the prisoner.

NOT GUILTY .

235. ROBERT WILSON was indicted for stealing one pair of gold knee buckles, value fifty shillings, and one gold locket, value 4 l. the property of John Deards , February 10th .

JOHN DEARDS sworn.

The prisoner was servant to my hair-dresser ; he dressed my hair every day and has done so for a year and a half: upon Saturday the 10th of this month, Mr. Fisher, a silversmith in Leicester-fields, came to me, and asked me if I had lost any thing; I said not that I knew of; Mr. Fisher pulled out of his pocket a pair of gold knee buckles and a locket; I said immediately they were mine; the knee buckles were of the value of about fifty shillings, the locket about five guineas; they were bespoke by two different gentlemen at different times, and they were put behind the compter into a deep drawer, where I put things that are bespoke till the gentlemen have them that bespeak them: my hair was dressed by the prisoner very near where the drawer was; he used to go to a drawer that stood by this drawer, because a cloth I put on when my hair is dressed is kept in that drawer; I had a very good opinion of the prisoner; I have suffered him to go up stairs into my rooms where there were things of great value, and I never missed any thing; and I will employ him again if he should be discharged here.

JOSEPH FISHER sworn.

On the 10th of this month a young man came to my shop and said some things had been offered him for sale, and he should be glad to know the value of them; that person was one Joseph Monier ; he told me he wanted to purchase these things; I asked him what the man asked for them? he said fifteen shillings: observing that the buckles were gold, and the locket set round with diamonds, I immediately suspected that these things were stolen; I asked him who it was that offered them to him; upon which he began to be pert, and we had some words; I said I must stop him till he produced the person he had these things of, and I would send for a constable and take him before a magistrate; he said I need not send for a constable, he would go willingly; we went first to justice Welch's, he was not at home, then to Sir John Fielding 's; Monier there said he received the things of Robert Wilson , and gave us directions where we might find him; as we were retiring to a public house in the neighbourhood, while Wilson should be sent for, I found Wilson at the door; Wilson first said that he gave 3 l. 15 s. for them, at last he was much frightened, and said he would take them to the gentleman he had them of; and then he said he had taken them from Mr. Deards that morning; I went to Mr. Deards with the locket and buckles: I believe this is the young fellow's first offence. He seemed very sensible of the enormity of the crime.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I was in such confusion, I confessed every thing before the justice.

He called his master and several other witnesses, who gave him an exceeding good character.

GUILTY . Burnt in the hand .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice WILLES.

236. ELIZABETH GILBERY was indicted for stealing eight pair of men's leather shoes, value eighteen shillings , the property of Mary Cook , widow , February 16th .

MARY COOK sworn.

I am a shoe-cleaner in White-yard, Rosemary-lane : I employed the prisoner to clean for me at two pence a dozen, the same as other people give; while I was gone home with some shoes the prisoner went off with eight pair of shoes; this was on Friday: I never saw her till the Tuesday following, when I took her up.

NICHOLAS GRIFFITHS sworn.

I am a shoemaker in Rosemary-lane: I deal in new and old shoes; the prisoner brought me two pair of shoes on Tuesday; I bid her four shillings and six pence for them, she said she gave four shillings and six pence for them in Long-acre, and would not take less than five shillings; I gave her five shillings for them.

[The shoes were produced in court, and deposed to by the prosecutrix.]

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I leave myself to the mercy of all you gentlemen.

GUILTY of stealing to the value of ten-pence . W .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

237. JAMES PENNINGTON was indicted for stealing two silver table spoons, value eighteen shillings, and two silver salt shovels, value one shilling , the property of Peter Smith , February 9th .

MARY SMITH sworn.

I am wife of Peter Smith : the prisoner is a locksmith , I employed him to do a job on Friday week; I saw the spoons on Friday, and missed them the next morning; the prisoner did not come to finish the job; he was taken on the Tuesday following, when he confessed he took the spoons and shovel.

WILLIAM LACY sworn.

I am a pawnbroker: on the 13th of February the prisoner pledged this silver table spoon (producing it) with me in the name of James Pennington for six shillings.

THOMAS MOORE sworn.

I am a pawnbroker: upon the 9th of February, about half after eight o'clock, I received this silver table spoon (producing it) from a man, who appeared to be a smith; he was like the prisoner; he pawned it in the name of James Cecil .

Prosecutrix. They are my spoons, there are the initials of my name upon them.

RICHARD CONION sworn.

I am a silversmith: I bought a silver salt shovel of the prisoner for nine pence; he said he found it (producing one): I cannot positively say that is the shovel, because there was another produced, and they were mismatched.

DAVID RANKING sworn.

I am a constable; I took the prisoner, he confessed taking the things.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

Through affliction attending me at this hard time, I did unfortunately do the thing.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY of stealing to the value of ten pence . W .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

238. EPHRAIM EPHRAIMS was indicted for stealing ten muslin handkerchiefs, value thirty shillings, a linen gown, value ten shillings, two stuff gowns, value twenty shillings, five yards of linen cloth, value four shillings, a stuff petticoat, value eight shillings, and six linen aprons, value three shillings , the property of Edward Downing , January 31st .

EDWARD DOWNING sworn.

I am a waggoner ; as I was driving my waggon by White-gate-alley , I lost a trunk and bundle, which was tied to it, out of my waggon; a person called to me and informed me of it: this is the trunk and bundle (producing it).

WILLIAM DAPLING sworn.

I saw the prisoner take the trunk and bundle from a boy or man in the waggon; there is a ladder behind the waggon, it rather lodged there; the prisoner snatched it from behind the waggon, as he took it, it fell and he took it up; I immediately laid hold of him as he was going off with it.

WALTER PROSSER sworn.

The trunk was delivered to me; I have had it ever since; it is now in the state in which I received it.

[The contents of the bundle and trunk, which were the things mentioned in the indictment, were produced in court, and deposed to by the prosecutor.]

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

It fell out of the waggon, and I picked it up.

The prisoner called a witness, who said he heard a noise; that indeed he did not see the trunk drop; but saw the prisoner take it up.

GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Branding. See summary.]

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

239. ANN DUFFIN , spinster , was indicted, together with three other persons whose names were unknown to the jurors, for that they in the dwelling-house of a person whose name to the jurors is unknown, in and upon Ebenezer Buckland did make an assault, putting him in corporal fear and danger of his life and stealing from his person a man's hat, value four shillings, the property of the said Ebenezer , February 8th .

EBENEZER BUCKLAND sworn.

I am a carpenter ; I live in Oxford-road; as I was going up Princes-street, in my way home, between nine and ten o'clock at night on the 8th of February, there were two girls standing together; they laid hold of me, and asked me to give them something; the prisoner was not one of them; I was in liquor: I told them I would give them a share of a quartern of gin; they took me to a private house at the corner of Peter-street ; when they came to the bottom of the stairs they called for a light, and the prisoner brought a candle to the top of the stairs; I gave the prisoner some money to go for some Gin; she staid a long time; I said I thought to have a sup of it before I went, but must go without it, and I got up to go; the prisoner and two others, besides the two that took me to the room, came into the room and said, I should not go till they had some money from me; I told them I had no money, and therefore they could not have any money of me; one took up the candlestick, and said she would cut my face if I did not give her some money; another had the key of the street door; I went to make a push to get by them, and one of them pulled out a knife, and said she would stick me if I did not give her some money; I attempted to go to the window to call the watchman; they came round me and insisted upon having my coat, and in the scuffle one of them took my hat, which it was I cannot tell: as soon as my hat was taken off, the prisoner and another girl went out of the room, and the other three shut the door; I said you will let me go now they have got my hat, you don't want any more of me; they said no, my hat was gone to be pawned for money, and they would oblige me to stay there till they brought the duplicate, and then I might go and be d - d and kiss their a - es; so this girl came back and threw a bit of paper down upon the drawers; I took it and went down stairs, and when I came to the door, I called the watch, the watchman refused to go into the house; some people came out of the public house, and a man asked me if I knew the door; I said, yes; he bid me go up and see if they were there; I said I would not go up again, I was afraid of my life when I was up, and then he went up with me, but the door was fast; he bid me go to another door and enquire for the man of the house, and tell him I had been robbed in his house and would indict the house if he did not produce the people; I did, and he went up and brought the prisoner, and she told me where she had pawned the hat; we went to the pawnbroker's and knocked at the door, but they would not open it; she was committed to the roundhouse for that night.

JOHN FREER sworn.

I am a pawnbroker; on the 8th of February, about half after nine at night, the prisoner pledged a hat with me for three shillings; I believe she was a servant in the house; she has pawned mens wearing apparel with me several times, and fetched them out again very honestly. [The hat was produced in court and deposed to by the prosecutor.]

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I lived servant with the woman that brought in the prosecutor; she went out between nine and ten o'clock and came home with this man; he gave me two pence halfpenny for a quartern of Gin; when I came in again, she gave me this hat and bid me pawn it; I asked the man if I might pawn it; he said, yes, for as much as I could; I went and pawned it and brought him the money and gave him the duplicate; he said as it was pawned in my mistress's name, he was afraid they would not let him have it; I told him I forgot to ask his name, but I would go and shew him where it was; I went with him, but they were shut up.

GUILTY of stealing the hat, but NOT GUILTY of the robbery in the dwelling-house .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

[Whipping. See summary.]

240. JOHN PLUNKET was indicted for stealing two hundred yards of silk riband, value 4 l. and a wooden drawer, value one penny, the property of Jane Dickinson , spinster , in her dwelling-house , February 15th .

ELIZABETH JONES sworn.

I live in Great Aliffe-street, Goodman's-fields ; I am servant to Mrs. Jane Dickinson , my mistress keeps a milliner's shop ; one Ann Johnson came in for some thread between six and seven o'clock in the evening of the 15th February: as I was taking the money for the thread, the prisoner came in, the door was open, I asked him what he pleased to have; he made me no answer, but came to the compter and took this box of riband out of the window, put it under his left arm and rushed out of the shop with it; I pursued him, the woman was still in the shop and stayed till he was taken; I cried stop thief, a black took him by the cuff of the coat; he tore the cuff of his coat off, but could not hold him; he brought the cuff to our house; I pursued him so closely, after the cuff of his coat was off, that he dropped the riband and box in the channel; I took up the box and riband, and a person pursued him and took him; I saw him in about five minutes after, and declared him to be the person: I took a great deal of notice of him when I asked him what he would please to have; he was without the cuff of his coat.

ANN JOHNSON sworn.

I was in the shop buying some thread; the prisoner came in and shoved by me like a person in liquor; he took the drawer and went out with it; I am sure the prisoner is the man; I saw no more of him till he was taken, which was about ten minutes after.

THOMAS MORRIS sworn.

I heard the cry of stop thief and pursued the prisoner; when I came almost up to him, there was another man scuffling with him, he got away from the other man; I pursued him about fifty yards and took him, but found nothing upon him; I brought him back, and Jones swore to him: I took him to a public house, and Johnson came and picked him out of a great many people.

[The drawer and riband were produced in court and deposed to by Jones.]

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I am a sailor ; I know nothing of the affair: I was walking along and they laid hold of me; I was in liquor.

GUILTY of stealing the goods, but NOT GUILTY of stealing them in the dwelling-house .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

[Branding. See summary.] [Imprisonment. See summary.]

241. AARON JACOBS was indicted for stealing twenty eight yards and a half of shalloon, value twenty shillings , the property of Josiah Verden , February 2 d .

JOSIAH VERDEN sworn.

I live in White Horse-lane, Drury-lane : I lost twenty eight yards and a half of shalloon on the 2 d of February; it lay in an open window to the street, exposed to shew. I gave information of the robbery, and heard the shalloon was in the hands of a Jew, on the Friday following.

WILLIAM HANSON sworn.

I am a taylor and keep a cloaths shop in Holborn. Mr. Verden came to me the first of this month, and informed me he had been robbed; the next day about two o'clock the prisoner came to me and offered the green shalloon to sale; he told me there were twentyeight yards of it; he asked me a shilling a yard; I asked him how he came by it; he said he bought it out of pawn; I told him I had som e reason to believe it was stolen goods; and I detained him and the stuff and sent for Mr. Verden; he came and said the shalloon was his: then the prisoner said he had it of another Jew.

[The shalloon was produced in court and deposed to by the prosecutor.]

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

When I was first taken before Sir John Fielding , I produced the man I bought the shalloon of, and he was committed to a separate prison; when we were examined again, because he had money and an attorney, he was heard and discharged; but when I went to speak they shut the door in my face, and I was not suffered to say one word: the name of the man I bought it of is Barnard French .

He called John Phillips , who had known him three years, who gave him a very good character.

GUILTY . B .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice WILLES.

242. JOHN HUGHES was indicted for stealing two linen shirts, value fifteen shillings, two linen stocks, value two shillings, and a silk handkerchief, value two shillings , the property of Robert Dillingham , January 12th .

ROBERT DILLINGHAM sworn.

I am an ironmonger : I packed up my shirt and stock in a silk handkerchief and delivered it to John Whatmore for his wife to wash the next morning: he informed me he had lost my linen.

JOHN WHATMORE sworn.

On the 12th of January, Mr. Dillingham gave me a bundle tied up in a silk handkerchief. I went with one Levi a Jew to a public house in Mitre-court to drink; I paid my reckoning and went away, and forgot my bundle; I went back and found the bundle was gone, and the prisoner who was drinking there was gone without paying his reckoning: on the Saturday following the Jew met with him, and stopped him, and sent for me; the prisoner sent for his wife, and she produced the handkerchief and stocks, and gave me a pawnbroker's duplicate of the shirts.

[The handkerchief and stocks were produced in court and deposed to by the prosecutor.]

HENRY DIXON sworn.

I am a pawnbroker: I took in these two shirts of the prisoner, on the 12th of January, [producing them.]

Prosecutor. I believe they are mine; they are not marked.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I had been drinking in the alehouse, when I came out I found this bundle in the street; I did not know what it was till I took it home: on Saturday I met the Jew that was in company with Whatmore, and he said he had been charged with stealing a bundle; and asked if I saw it on the bench; I told him, no; but I found a bundle as I was coming out; he said perhaps that might be it: I said if it was, he should have it; he told me to go to a public house, and I sent for my wife, who brought the stocks and handkerchief: I told them I was in necessity and had pawned the shirts.

FOR THE PRISONER.

Mrs. WHATMORE sworn.

He said he took them for fear any body else should, and if I would make it up, he would make me any satisfaction; as I did not understand the law I was willing to make it easy.

One of the Jury, who had known him three or four years, gave him a good character.

GUILTY of stealing to the value of ten pence . W .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

243. WILLIAM GRAY was indicted for stealing seven yards of printed cotton, value eighteen shillings , the property of William Whiteside , February 5th .

WILLIAM WHITESIDE sworn.

I am a linen draper : I lost seven yards of cotton; I saw John Whiteside bring in the prisoner; I met them at the door.

[The cotton was produced in court and deposed to by the prosecutor.]

JOHN WHITESIDE sworn.

The piece of cotton was lying exposed to shew in the window, the pane of glass was cracked where it lay; at about half after six at night, I heard somebody break the window; I ran to the window, the cotton was half pulled out, but the person was gone; as I was at the farther end of the shop, the prisoner came again and pulled it out; I ran out instantly, and saw him running with the cotton under his coat; I pursued him and he dropped it; I never lost sight of him.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I did not take the cotton; I never had it in my custody.

GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Branding. See summary.] [Imprisonment. See summary.]

244. MARY GREEN was indicted for stealing two tea chests, value twelve shillings , the property of Mr. Warlock , February 14th .

WILLIAM WARLOCK sworn.

I am a bed-joiner and carpenter : I keep an open shop; I was informed a person had stole two tea chests off a shelf where I keep tea chests and tea boards.

SAMUEL HOFF sworn.

I was going to work in Newport-market; going by Mr. Warlock's, I saw the prisoner take two tea chests off a shelf in the window; I went and enquired for the mistress of the house, and asked if that woman, pointing to the prisoner, belonged to her; she said, no: I said she had taken two tea chests, and the apprentice immediately pursued her.

THOMAS COWLEY sworn.

I am apprentice to Mr. Warlock. The last witness informed me that the prisoner had taken two tea chests off the shelf, and was gone down the next street; I went after her and brought her back with them: they have been in my master's possession ever since.

[The tea chests were produced in court and deposed to by the prosecutor.]

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

As I was going along I sell over these tea chests, they were tied together; a chimney-sweeper came to me and said they belonged to him; I thought he looked so black and ragged they could not belong to him, and said he should not have them; but I said if any creditable person came to own them, they should have them.

GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Branding. See summary.] [Imprisonment. See summary.]

245. MARY DUNN was indicted for stealing a silver watch, value forty shillings, a steel watch chain, value six pence, a stone seal set in base metal, value one shilling, and a brass watch key, value one penny , the property of Patrick Oats , January 24th .

"The prosecutor deposed, that he was

"drinking in a public house near Hungerford-market ,

"at three or four o'clock in the morning;

"that the prisoner came in, and they

"went into a box together; that she was

"feeling about his breeches, but he did not

"miss his watch till three or four minutes

"after she was gone; that there were a great

"many people and several women in the

"room besides her; that he was very much

"in liquor; that he took her three weeks

"after, but never found his watch.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

246. JOHN BEAN was indicted for stealing a scarlet cloth cloak, value eleven shillings , the property of John Brown , February. 10th .

JOHN BROWN sworn.

I live in Oxford-street : I lost a scarlet cloth cloak out of my shop; my brother told me the prisoner took it.

WILLIAM BROWN sworn. I live with my brother, who is a mercer in Oxford-street; I saw the prisoner take the cloak off the bar of the door, about two o'clock. I was in an adjoining room to the shop.

What do you call the bar of the door? - The bar that secures it in the night; I saw the prisoner come in and take the cloak, and give it to a soldier; I pursued them, and took the prisoner; the soldier threw the cloak into a draper's shop.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I never was in the shop at all.

GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Branding. See summary.] [Imprisonment. See summary.]

247. RICHARD JOHNSON , otherwise SQUIBB , was indicted for that he in the King's highway in and upon Anna Maria Amyand , spinster , did make an assault, putting her in corporal fear and danger of her life, and taking from her person one green silk purse, value six pence, and fourteen guineas, the property of the said Anna Maria , December 7th .

The witnesses were examined apart at the request of the prisoner.

Mrs. ANNA MARIA AMYAND sworn. On Thursday the 7th of December, about seven o'clock at night, as I was going across Grosvenor-square in my carriage, in company with my sister, a single highwayman told the coachman to stop, and then presented a pistol to me, and said, Your money: I immediately gave him a green and gold purse, containing fourteen guineas; upon which he went away: it was as short a time about as possible.

Did you observe whether there were any carriages passing, or people walking at that time? - There were a great many people walking, but not any carriages.

Had your servant a stambeau? - Yes; he desired the servant to hold it on the other side of the coach.

Could you distinguish the person of the man? - No, his face was covered with either a red handkerchief or a mask.

Can you charge your memory with what coloured horse he rode? - A chesnut, I think.

Have you any idea what sort of a man it was? - He appeared about the size of the prisoner.

Do you recollect how he was dressed? - He had a light-coloured loose great coat on, and his hat was slapped.

Did he appear to be a thin man or a fattish man? - Neither one nor the other.

Had he his own hair or a wig? - I could not distinguish that.

Was his mask, or whatever it was, over his face only or over his head? - It was not over his head; it seemed to be only over the lower part of his face.

On which side of the square was it? - The north side.

Did you see which way he went off? - We were going to Upper Grosvenor-street, he went the contrary way.

Did he overtake you or meet you? - He overtook us; when he had robbed us he turned back again.

" JOSEPH GILL , Mrs. Amyand's coachman,

"being sworn deposed, that the coach

"was stopped by a middle-sized man on

"horseback, a little before seven o'clock on

"the 7th of December: that it was not very

"dark: that the man came up and bid him

"stop, which he did not mind at first: that

"then the highwayman presented a pistol and

"bid him stop immediately, which he did:

"that he went up to the chariot door and

"demanded the ladies money: that he was

"dressed in a grey-coloured great coat and

"a round slapped hat, but was masked, or

"had something over his face: that he rode

"a dark chesnut horse, but his face being

"concealed, it was impossible to swear to

"him; he could not swear to him."

JOHN FRANCE , the ladies footman, gave the same evidence.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

248. STEPHEN SELF , was indicted for the wilful murder of William Ringrose , for that he on the 27th of November , and on divers other days and times between that day and the 22d of January last, feloniously, wilfully, and of his malice aforethought did neglect, omit, and refuse to administer to the said William sufficient and necessary sustenance and food for the preservation and support of his body; and that he the said Stephen in the nights of the days and times aforesaid feloniously, wilfully, and of his malice aforethought, did oblige and compel the said William to lay on the floor, without proper and necessary bed and bedcloaths for his defence against the inclemency of the weather, by reason of which said refusing to administer to the said William sufficient and necessary sustenance and food as aforesaid, the said William became sick, weak, and disordered in his body, and by reason of the said obliging and compelling of the said William to lay on the floor, without proper and necessary bed and bedcloaths in manner aforesaid, the said William became greatly perished in his limbs, and his feet did thereby mortify: of which said weakness, sickness, disorder, and mortification the said William, from the said 27th of November until the 22d of January, languished and languishing did live, and on the said 22d of January died .

He was charged with the like murder on the coroner's inquisition.

The witnesses were examined apart at the request of the prisoner.

JOHN KING sworn.

I am the beadle of Mary-le-bone parish: upon the 23d of January I was desired by the neighbours to go and see the body of the deceased; it was washed and laid out upon a deal table: I moved it to the bone-house.

JOHN KNOWLES sworn.

I am a chairman; I live next door to the prisoner, who is a hair-dresser ; he had two apprentice s, William Ringrose , the deceased, and John Moss ; I have often heard the apprentices cry out, and particularly about a week before Christmas; I looked into the shop window and saw the prisoner licking both his boys with a bit of cord, but it was not large; both the boys were lame: I went upon Friday, about a week before Christmas, to the Porters Arms; I had a broiled mutton bone, I eat part of it, and flung the rest to the dog; the deceased came in and took it up, and seemed to eat it very favorily, as if he had ate nothing for a month; I am not sure whether the dog had done with it, or whether he took it from the dog; as he was going out of the door he had a bone under his coat; I don't know whether it was the same or another: Mrs. Clarke took him down into the kitchen and gave him some boiled beef and beer; the boy looked very much perished.

HUGH CLARKE sworn.

The deceased used to come to my house to shave me, and to enquire for his master; some meat lay in the tap-room one time when he came, and he looked very wishfully at it; this was the latter end of October or beginning of November.

SUSANNAH CLARKE sworn.

The deceased used to come to my house; I remember the circumstance of the bone; he picked up the bone and ate it after the dog; I sent him down into the kitchen, and he had victuals, and he ate greedily as if he had been starved: I used sometimes to give victuals to the other apprentice; they were very ravenous; I believe it was owing to a want of necessary food.

To JOHN MOSS , the deceased's fellow apprentice.

How old are you? - Thirteen years of age.

Who made you? - God.

Can you say your catechism? - Yes.

Can you say the Lord's prayer? - Yes.

Repeat it. - [Repeats the Lord's prayer.]

If you don't tell the truth, where will you go when you die? - To the devil.

What book is that, look at it? - A testament.

Court. Swear him, [he is sworn.]

MOSS. I was bound apprentice to the prisoner almost three years ago; the deceased was bound only half a year ago; the deceased came apprentice about August last; he was well when he came, he had rosy cheeks; he ran away a month after he came, for one day only; the second time he ran away on a Tuesday, and was brought home on Saturday by the parish beadle; the reason of his running away was, because my master licked him; he went to the public-house to light a candle, and they gave him a bit of bread, and he staid there to eat it; he was sent to Bridewell the same night by Sir John Fielding , which was the 23d December; he was very well when he was sent to Bridewell, and his cheeks as rosy as they were before; he was there a fortnight and three days; he was confined from the 23d December to the 9th of January; when he came out of Bridewell, he had very bad legs and looked exceeding ill; he was brought home in a coach, because he was not able to walk; my master did not chuse to take him again: they went to Sir John Fielding 's; my master took him again at last, and paid the coachman; the deceased told me, he was kept three days longer in Bridewell, for he was committed only for a fortnight; he was kept three days longer, they expecting his master would come and pay the fees; when he came home from Bridewell, he was laid upon the floor in the shop, till a few days before he died; I lay in a small bureau-bed in the shop, where we both used to lie before the deceased was sent to Bridewell; but my master told the deceased, he should not now lie in this bed, because he had vermin about him and fores: by vermin I understood lice: he lay in this condition, till a few days before he died, before he was moved up stairs; he had for a few days some straw to lie upon in a bag: he came home the 9th of January, and died the 22d. He lay upon the floor without any thing under him or upon him, afterwards he had straw: he was removed up stairs the Friday before he died; I never heard him ask his master for a bed; when he was moved up stairs, he was moved into a back room, and there was a little grate and a fire-place there, and the same bag of straw that he had had for the last part of his time below stairs, was carried up stairs for him to lie upon, and a great coat to cover him; when he first got up stairs, he sat himself down in a chair by the fire, and then crawled into the bed; I carried him water-gruel and broth, and the day before he died, I carried him a bit of backed veal, which he ate; he had frequently tea and bread and butter; he groaned almost continually, till he died; my master locked him in: about three in the morning, on the Saturday before he died, he called for water, my master got up and gave him some; Mr. Day called my master up; he was locked in, and my master always locked the door and kept the key; I believe it was that no body should go in to give him any thing, when he came down he told my mistress, he had given the nasty dog a good kick.

Court. In the deposition before the coroner you said, your master said, with an oath, I have shaked the nasty dog.

MOSS. I am sure, whatever the coroner may have taken down, that he said he had given the nasty dog a good kick. The Sunday night before he died, he was brought down into the shop again by Mr. Griffiths, who is brother to the prisoner's wife, and by the prisoner himself; he brought down the bag and straw too, because he groaned so much that he disturbed a woman who was lying-in in the next chamber; when Griffiths and my master brought him down, my master scolded him for groaning: there was a little fire in the shop when he was brought down; there always was in the day-time a fire, it was not a cold place; the deceased lay in the shop till Monday morning nine o'clock, and then Griffiths and my master carried him up stairs again: I got up about four in the morning, in order to let my master and Mr. Griffiths out, for Mr. Griffiths was going in the coach to Wells; when they came to the in the coach was gone, and my master and Mr. Griffiths came back again: about nine in the morning when the deceased was sent up stairs again, I was ordered to bring the bag and straw up again in order to lay him above stairs in the manner before: I made a fire for him, and gave him some tea and bread and butter, but he could not eat it: this was the Monday morning before he died: I was sent then to the hospital with a galley-pot, when I returned the deceased was dead.

Prisoner. I sent him to the hospital for some ointment to put to the boy's legs.

MOSS. I came in and found the boy was dead; my master said, he would have a jovial burying of it, and would get drunk upon it; there was no body by when these words were spoke, but my master and Mr. Griffiths, and he said he would buy a coffin and bury him on Tuesday night; then Mr. Fryer rushed in, and insisted upon seeing the body of the deceased, and said, if any body touched him, he would put them all in Newgate. Mr. Evans laid him out: my master knew of his sore legs as soon as he came from Bridewell. Upon Monday the 15th of January there were some plaisters put on his legs, which Mr. Fryer had got from a surgeon: on Sunday the 14th of January my master sent him up into a back garrett, there he cried for cold, and then Mr. Fryer took him into his garret, made fire, and Mrs. Fryer made him some tea and toast; he staid there till the evening, then my master was angry, and sent me and the man to fetch him down; we fetched him down and he was laid in the shop; my master went about to several people to get letters to get him into the hospital; the deceased could not walk at all when he came from Bridewell; he had some meat two or three times; one time he asked for some supper and my master gave him some bread and cheese; he had his cloaths on when he died: it was a warmish shop, but when the boy lay there he had nothing to lay over him; as for myself I had a blanket, a sheet, and a little mattrass.

GEORGE FRYER sworn.

I lodge at Mr. Self's. I saw the deceased upon Sunday the 14th of January in a back garret, when I got up about eight or nine in the morning; there was a chair and a bedstead turned up, but whether there was a bed or no I cannot tell, but there was no fire; he seemed at that time in a most deplorable condition; his feet were wet; he said he had been in the yard to the privy, and had been twenty minutes coming through the snow; he said Mr. Griffiths had brought him up there: I immediately went and lighted a fire in my garret, and got the poor boy into my garret, he being starving with cold in the back garret; one Mr. Evans, another lodger in the house, brought him some tea and bread and butter, which he ate; I set him by the fire and gave him some brandy and sugar; as soon as my wife was up he had some more bread and butter and tea, and he seemed refreshed by the sustenance he had, but more particularly by the warmth of the fire; Mr. Griffiths brought him up some broth, and he eat the broth very chearfully; in the evening he was taken down by John Moss and another person, who demanded him in the name of Self; he walked down stairs with them, though with some difficulty; we intended to have kept him by the fire all night in our garret; I never saw him afterwards till he was dead, upon the Monday, in the corner of the back room up one pair of stairs; Moss, Griffiths, and M'Connelly were then going to lay him out; I requested to see the deceased; I called Day and the nurse to the woman that was lying-in, and they went to look at the deceased; there was no manner of objection to our seeing him; I was in a hurry, and did threaten them if they did not let me see the boy. Self had the week before solicited me to use my interest to get the boy into the hospital.

MARY FRYER sworn.

I am the wife of the last witness. We lie in a two pair of stairs room, and we have a sore-garret in the prisoner's house. While I was a-bed, on the 14th January, I heard somebody go up stairs about seven in the morning, and come down again: I cannot tell who it was; but I thought I heard Self's voice in the back garret. I heard the boy crying, and I thought I heard Self say, you shall not lie down, for I shall find it out, and will lick you. My husband got up first; for we were both in bed at that time; we heard people going up and coming down stairs. I went up and saw the deceased sitting by the fire in my garret; I asked, how his stockings came to be wet? he said he had been out into the yard in the snow, and his feet got wet: I carried him some tea and bread and butter, which he eat and drank heartily. He asked for some meat: he said his master had never given him any meat since he came from Bridewell, but only water gruel and broth. I carried him some pork and some two-penny. He said, he had had nothing but bread and water in Bridewell, and had lain upon the boards there, and since he came home he had never had his cloaths off, and had no bed to lie upon in the shop. Mr. Park the apothecary's man came to visit me that day; I desired him to send him some plaisters, which he did the same evening. I looked upon his legs; there was a little blister upon one knee, and upon his other leg a large blister, and in pulling down his stockings the stockings had eat in and they tore his flesh away. Self came up in the afternoon and brought him some broth. I said, that was not a time to bring the boy his dinner, for he was very ill, and I had taken care he should have his belly full before that time. His master said, I don't know, I believe he is lazy, though, I dare say, he will eat every drop; and he did eat up all. I told Self of the boy's blisters, and shewed them to him, and I bid him put him into a bed, or he would die. Self said he could not do that, for the boy was lousy; but he would endeavour to get him into the hospital as soon as possible. I told Self I had sent for plaisters to a doctor, and if he would leave the boy with me, I would put him into bed, and dress his legs. He seemed very angry at that, and went down stairs; the deceased begged of me that he might not go down stairs; but after Self and Griffiths were gone down, the journeyman and the apprentice were sent up for him; this was about half after five. I carried the plaisters that night to Self, and desired they might be applied to his legs. I heard him groan upon Sunday the 21st, but never saw him after this Sunday till he died.

WILLIAM SPENCE sworn.

I am a surgeon. I opened the body of the deceased: his principal disorder was in his heels occasioned by the kibes, and the severity of the weather, which numbers of his age were at that time and are still subject to; there are numbers that are not yet well. His feet were quite ulcerated, and the toes quite mortified.

What do you think these ulcers in the ancles proceeded from? - I am persuaded from the severity of the weather, what is commonly called kibes and chillblains.

From chillblains ill managed? - Yes, or more likely not managed at all.

Were there any sores upon his shoulders? - There was a slight bruise.

What did that proceed from? - It might be from lying hard, or any accident; but the bruise upon his shoulder did not appear to me to be the least dangerous, or any thing connected with his death. Upon opening him I found nourishment in his stomach and bowels near as much as I should have expected in one in his condition. When a mortification begins we generally suppose it prevents people from eating. I don't think he was starved to death; his flesh was much emaciated, but that must be the case from the mortification.

You have heard the whole evidence that has been given; now taking this lad in the condition he is proved to have been in when he came home from Bridewell, supposing due and proper care had been taken of him, and proper food had been given him, Do you believe, from the judgment that you form upon the whole of the evidence, that he might have been recovered? - Most probably; but there is no certainty, for it depends upon how far the disease was gone before he came from Bridewell. Upon the whole, it appears to me to have begun in Bridewell; it would increase faster in Bridewell than it would after he came home, because his food at Bridewell was bread and water, which would greatly emaciate his blood, and he lay in a room upon the floor where there had been no fire, whereas after he came home, though he had no bed to lie upon, yet he lay in what the apprentice calls a warmish room, in which there was always a fire kept in the day-time, and after he came home he certainly had a better diet than he had in Bridewell; suffering him to keep his worsted stockings on must have contributed very much to the increase of his disorder; I think his death was occasioned probably by his ill treatment both in Bridewell and after he came home. This disorder has been very frequent upon account of the hard weather; I have had a number of patients under my care, and not one who has been properly treated has died; but if any one of those I attended had lain but a single night in a garret or Bridewell, they might have been frost bitten, which might have brought on a mortification, and they might have died. I think the whole blood of this boy might be emaciated; the blood might have been made so thin by feeding upon bread and water, and lying in Bridewell, that he never could recover afterwards. Mr. Self was so solicitous for the preservation of this boy, that he did not only come once, but a week before the boy died, and desired I would get a letter to get the boy into the Middlesex hospital. I said I could not get him an in-patient, because I reserved my letter of recommendation for some body else; but could get him admitted an out-patient. He said the boy could not walk; when he said the boy was lame, I did not tell him that there was any danger in the disorder; he did not ask me to come and see the boy.

RICHARD CORFELL sworn.

I am servant to Mr. Park the apothecary. I was present at the opening of the body; I agree with Mr. Spence as to every thing relating to the appearance of the body of the boy. I was with Mrs. Fryer on the 14th of January; she asked me to go up to the garret and see the deceased; he was then sitting before her fire; he pulled down each stocking, and there was a large blister upon each of his legs. I did not pull off his stockings, for his feet smelt very offensively, and his legs were much swelled; there was no care taken of him, so that his stocking struck to his skin, and the stockings were eat into his legs. Mrs. Fryer desired me to send him some plaisters, which I did. After he was laid out there were no appearance of plaisters having been put on his legs.

JAMES M'CONNELLY sworn. I am servant to Mr. Self; I came there three days before the boy returned from Bridewell. He was very bad, he had water-gruel and bread twice that day, and mutton broth once or twice. It was Mrs. Self gave the orders to fetch the boy down upon the 14th of January. Mrs. Fryer asked me to help him down; I said he had gone up, and could come down.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

The boy had been very bad and wicked: I thought I had a right to break him of these tricks, which were robbing me and several other people; I never struck him all the time he was with me. I sent him of an errand on Tuesday, and he ran away, and did not return till Saturday. When he came from Bridewell he was very bad, I gave him necessaries; I thought he had got the goal distemper, that was the reason I did not let him go to bed; I had no design to hurt him; I tried all I could to get him into the hospital. Moss had the itch when he came to me first, he gave us the itch, which with difficulty we were cured of; I was afraid I should get some bad distemper from the deceased, as I had before done.

The prisoner called several witnesses, who said they never saw him behave ill to his apprentices, and that he always bore a good character.

NOT GUILTY of the murder, but GUILTY of Manslaughter only .

Burnt in the hand and imprisoned .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice WILLES.

249, 250. SAMUEL WHITLOW and WILLIAM STEVENS were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Jonathan Moore on the 11th of February , about the hour of eight in the night, and stealing a mahogany desk, value twenty shillings, ten guineas and forty shillings in money, the property of the said Jonathan Moore and William Gough , in the dwelling-house of the said Jonathan .

JONATHAN MOORE sworn.

I live at Aldgate, the corner of Houndsditch , I am a stationer and paper-stainer . My house was broke open last Sunday was se'ennight, about eleven o'clock at night. Sharplin the evidence, who was my apprentice, went down to let a person out who had supped with me; he came up and informed me that the counting-house window was broke open, and the desk shattered to pieces; a piece of the shutter was taken out, and a hand put in, and the bolt lifted up, and ten guineas and forty shillings were taken out of the desk: the upper part of the desk was found on the east side of the church-yard; a carpenter and some neighbours, on seeing it, said it was impossible it could by done by people on the outside only, which caused me to suspect my apprentice: there were some implements found by the watchman in the church-yard.

JOSEPH BROZIER sworn.

I am a watchman: I search'd the church-yard about eleven o'clock, and found the desk broke open in the manner Mr. Moore has described; I delivered it to Mr. Moore.

ROBERT MOORE sworn.

I am a constable. Brozier came to me on Sunday was se'nnight to unlock the church-yard gates; in the corner we found a little ladder; we went to the other side of the yard where Mr. Moore's window was, and there we found a desk that was broke open; the next day I was informed two persons were seen, one with a blue surtout coat with a red cape and a round hat, the other had brownish cloaths and a cocked hat; I gave the description to Galpin, and he said he believed he knew the parties, and the prisoners were taken, one on Wednesday, and the other next day.

JAMES GALPIN sworn.

Moore the constable gave me a description of the prisoners, and I apprehended them; I I know nothing of the burglary.

PRINGLE DAVIDSON sworn.

Upon Sunday was se'nnight, as I was going home to my lodgings, I saw the prisoner Whitlow come over the church-yard wall; that was about twenty minutes before nine o'clock; the wall is about ten feet high: I don't know what help he had on the other side, but when he got across the wall he dropped and ran away; the next day I heard of the burglary.

Was it light enough to distinguish his face? - Yes, he had dark cloaths and a flap'd hat on; I am certain it was him.

RICHARD SHARPLIN sworn.

About six or seven weeks ago I met with Whitlow; he asked me if I would agree to rob my master's house with him and Stevens; I agreed to it; and at first it was proposed that I should let them know when my master and mistress were out; two pistols were bought, and they were to come and ring at the bell, and put the maid and me in fear, and rob the house of the money and plate; and they were to leave us tied. A long time passed and no opportunity happening, it was agreed they should break in at the compting-house window last Sunday was se'nnight, and break open the desk. There are two bolts to the shutter, they bid me leave the upper bolt undone, and bolt the bottom bolt, and that they would break open the shutter and lift up the bottom bolt; they came on the Sunday night and broke in; I was on the outside of the wall, and helped Stevens over the wall; they broke open the window, and broke the clerk's desk open; and they came again a second time, I was then in the kitchen, which is right over the counting-house: they told me on the Monday, that there was but six guineas good; they took away the desk and carried it into the church; they said they got back again over the wall by means of a little ladder they had; that when they got over the wall the first time, it was about seven o'clock; that when they got over the second time, it was about nine o'clock.

WHITLOW's DEFENCE.

I never saw any thing at all of them that night, that he knows very well. STEVENS's DEFENCE.

I never saw him at all that night.

Whitlow called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

WHITLOW GUILTY . Death .

STEVENS NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Whitlow was recommended by the prosecutor to his Majesty's mercy.

251. LEVI SAMUEL was indicted for stealing a linen gown, value ten shillings, the property of Josiah Harrop , and a cotton gown, value ten shillings , the property of Hannah Sherman , spinster , November 5th .

"It was proved that the gowns were pawned

"by the prisoner; the prisoner said he

"bought them of one Lyons, whom the

"prosecutor had before charged with stealing

"them, and had put the prisoner as a witness

"upon the back of the bill, which

"bill was thrown out by the grand jury."

The prisoner called two witnesses to prove he spent the evening the goods were stolen in their company.

He called another witness, who swore he saw him buy the owns.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

252, 253, 254. WILLIAM COX , EDWARD POWELL , and JOHN BREWER were indicted for stealing 400 pound weight of moist sugar, value 4 l. the property of James Taylor and company , February 4th .

EDWARD WELLINGTON proved the Copartnership as laid in the indictment.

MORRIS BROWN sworn.

I am a watchman: between nine and ten o'clock, a woman told me she thought there were three men stealing sugar; I went and listened, but could hear nothing; as I was returning back to my lanthorn, I saw a person peep down the wharf, which raised my suspicion; I went and listened again, and then I was convinced there was somebody in the warehouse; I went and called Mr. Thomas, the master watchman, who was gone to supper; he came and fastened the door till he got more assistance, then we went in together, and we found the three prisoners lying one on the other: there appeared to be sugar taken from several hogsheads; there was a large parcel of sugar lying in an apron tied with four strings; there was another parcel in one side of a pair of trowsers, and a large lump lying ready to take away: there were four hogsheads broke open.

Morris Thomas and John Wild confirmed the evidence of Morris Brown .

JOHN ADAMS sworn.

I am a lighterman: I was up at the warehouse at twelve at noon; I am sure the door was fastened then.

- WELLINGTON.

The day after the robbery I had the hogsheads repaired and reweighed, and found there was 400 and three quarters gone out of them; the sugar found in the bundles was of the same quality with the sugar in the hogsheads that were broke open.

"The prisoners in their defence said they

"had been to Chatham to get employed in a

"ship; that when they came back they

"were tired, and having no money to get a

"lodging, they went into the warehouse to

"sleep."

ALL THREE GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Branding. See summary.] [Imprisonment. See summary.]

255. SIMON ISAAC was indicted for stealing a wooden tub, value two pence, and thirty pound weight of grease, value four shillings , the property of John Alexander , February 14th .

JOHN ALEXANDER sworn.

I am a stuff-melter : I delivered ten tubs of grease to the Norwich waggoner, and four tubs I had to deliver to the hostler at the Green Dragon ; as I was settling with the man for the ten tubs, a man came and told me my cart was robbed, and they had taken the man: my cart was at the Green Dragon gate.

HENRY GADSON sworn.

On the 14th of February, as I was going home, just by the Green Dragon I saw three or four men together; one of them went to Alexander's cart, which stood opposite the Green Dragon gate, took out a tub of grease, and carried it over the way to the prisoner; I went and told Alexander a man had taken something out of his cart, and immediately pursued the prisoner; when I came near him he threw down the tub and ran faster; I called stop thief, and he was taken.

[The tub of grease was produced in Court, and deposed to by the prosecutor.]

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I was going along Bishopgate-street; the last witness called stop thief, and they laid hold of me; he said I had dropped a tub of grease; that he saw a boy take it out of a cart and give it me; I asked him why he did not stop the boy, and he could give no answer.

The prisoner called a witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Branding. See summary.] [Imprisonment. See summary.]

256, 257, 258, 259. WILLIAM GORBELL , WILLIAM EASDEN , otherwise PLUMBE , ELIZABETH M'DANIEL , and MARY, the wife of JAMES TOLLIARD , were indicted, the two first for stealing a silk and stuff gown, value twenty shillings, the property of James Illingworth , Clerk , a linen surplice, value ten shillings, a printed book, called a prayer book, value one shilling, two pair of steel snuffers, value one shilling, a silver tea spoon, value one shilling, and three brass sconces, value one shilling, the property of the Right Honourable Selina, Countess of Huntingdon ; and a black silk scarf, value one shilling , the property of William Stanford , February 2d .

And the other two for receiving part of the above goods, well knowing them to have been stolen , against the statute, February 3d .

There was no evidence to bring the charge home to the prisoners.

ALL NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

260, 261, 262. SAMUEL WHITLOW , ISHMAEL BEAL , and WILLIAM STEPHENS were indicted for stealing three cloth coats, value thirty-nine shillings, two cloth waistcoats, value ten shillings, a pair of cloth breeches, value ten shillings, a nankeen waistcoat, value two shillings, a pair of nankeen breeches, value one shilling, a pair of casi-mere breeches, value three shillings, a striped sattin waistcoat, value five shillings, and eight linen shirts, value sixteen shillings, the property of Samuel Gray jun . in the dwelling-house of Samuel Gray sen. February 4th .

There was no other evidence to affect the prisoners, than that a shirt was found in Beal's lodging; Beal brought a woman to prove she saw his wife buy that shirt in Rosemary-lane.

ALL THREE NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

263. JOHN SIMMONDS was indicted for stealing a coach hammer cloth, value five shillings , the property of his Grace the Duke of Argyle , February 17th .

It appeared upon the evidence that the hammer cloth was found in the street by a girl, and so came into the hands of the prisoner.

NOT GUILTY .

264. GREGORY BOARD was indicted for ripping and breaking ninety-four pound weight of lead, value ten shillings, belonging to Richard Ravenshaw , John Tinkler , and John Willan , churchwardens of the parish of St. Paul's, Covent-garden, and then fixed to their empty house, with intent to steal the same against the statute.

2d Count. Laying the lead to be the property of the parishioners of St. Paul's, Covent-garden, January 29th .

PETER ASHTON sworn.

I am a labouring man; I took the prisoner on a workhouse belonging to the parish of Covent-garden; I got on the top of the house and found the lead cut off and rolled up and laid in the gutter.

THOMAS FOURACRES sworn.

I was employed by the parish to watch this place: on the 29th of January as I was going to my watch, I heard a noise as if somebody was walking on the building; I went up stairs and called who is there? I received no answer, but still I heard a noise on the house; I went down to Crouch and told him,

"there

"were some birds on the house, for I heard

"them sing:" I stood at the trap door, and Crouch and the last witness went up and took the prisoner.

ROBERT CROUCH sworn.

I took the prisoner upon the top of the house: I found the lead cut off with a chissel and rolled up; it weighed ninety-four pound.

JOHN SWALLOW sworn.

This house belongs to the churchwardens of Covent-garden.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I was coming from Mary-le-bone; I went into the house to ease myself in the lower part of the house; the men came in and I went up to the top of the house with my breeches in my hand, and was easing myself in the gutter when they took me.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Branding. See summary.] [Imprisonment. See summary.]

265. MARY, the wife of HENRY PARKER , was indicted for stealing a pier looking glass, value twenty shillings, a pair of linen sheets, value five shillings, a pair of linen pillow cases, value one shilling, a blanket, value one shilling, a linen quilt, value one shilling, a pair of bellows, value one shilling, a shovel, value two pence, and a pair of tongs, value two pence , the property of Matthew Furber , November 9th .

MARY FURBER sworn.

I am the wife of Matthew Furber ; we live in Jerusalem-passage, Clerkenwell ; the things mentioned in the indictment were lost out of a one-pair of stairs fore room, which we let furnished to Mr. Hall and his wife; the prisoner lodged in the one-pair of stairs back room; there was a door out of her room into Mr. Hall's, which had a bolt on each side of it, and it was papered up, and a pair of drawers set against it in Mr. Hall's room: on the second of this month, when Mr. Hall found the room robbed, I went into the room and saw all the paper was pulled down, and the drawers removed out of their place; I don't know when it was done: there was a sheet found at a pawnbroker's.

WILLIAM HALL sworn.

On the 2d of this month I missed the things mentioned in the indictment; I saw them in the room on the 8th of November; it was shut up from that time to the 2d of February; I was at home several times, but never went into the room; on missing the things I suspected the prisoner; I went to Mr. Humphries's, a pawnbroker, and asked him if he had any thing in the name of the prisoner, and he produced one sheet.

THOMAS HUMPHRIES sworn.

I am a pawnbroker; I took in a sheet of the prisoner on the 9th of November.

[The sheet was produced in court, and deposed to by the prosecutor.]

ELEANOR HALL confirmed her husband's evidence.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

Mrs. Hall sent me with the sheet to pawn, and bid me bring in a quartern of gin.

ELEANOR HALL . I never sent her with any thing: on the 8th of November I went with my husband to the other end of the town, and lived there with him.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY of stealing to the value of ten pence . W .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

266, 267. JOHN WILSON and WILLIAM DIXON were indicted for stealing a pair of worsted gloves, value ten pence, and two shillings in money numbered , the property of Samuel Hackett , January 17th .

The evidence did by no means amount to proof of a felonious taking.

NOT GUILTY .

268, 269, 270. THOMAS CHAMBERLAYNE , THOMAS FIELDHOUSE , and THOMAS FOREMAN were indicted, the two first for stealing seven bushels of coals, value ten shillings , the property of Robert Brown and John Colhoun ; and the other for receiving the above goods, well knowing them to have been stolen , February 16th .

ROBERT DAWSON sworn.

I am apprentice to Mr. Samuel Edmunds , waterman: yesterday was a week, at about half after six at night, I went down to Arundel-stairs to look after my boat; I saw the boat lay very well; as I came up the causeway I saw a man in a white coat coming over the mud with a shovel in his hand; I asked him what he wanted; he bid me go about my business, and not mind what he wanted; I went a little farther and met Fieldhouse; I knew him before, I had seen him at work about the place; he told me to go along and not mind what they were at, and he would give me some gin or beer by and by; I came up the stairs and went home and called my fellow servant, Robert Edmunds ; and we went down and saw five men in a barge called the Ord, belonging to Mr. Elwood; I knew three of the men, Fieldhouse and Chamberlayne were two of them, the other is gone off, they call him Peter, I don't know his other name; they were filling coals into a sack; we staid on the stair head, and Chamberlayne and Fieldhouse came with each of them a sack of coals from the barge; they pitched the coals on a wall on the side of the stairs, there is a wall on each side, and desired my fellow servant and I to look after them; we said we would, and they went to help Peter up with his sack, who they said had fell down; then they all came up again, and took each their sack of coals and went up the street; they went different ways; we followed Fieldhouse up Arundel-street thro' the passage into Essex-street, and they all three met again in the Strand and went through the passage of Clement's-church-yard into Butcher-row to the house of Foreman: we stood in the court and saw a lusty woman with a candle in her hand light them to shoot the coals in the cellar; they all came up out of the cellar; and then Foreman: came up, I saw him put his hand in his pocket, but whether he gave them any thing I don't know; they came out of the shop, and all went down to the waterside again, and we followed them; we staid about four minutes, but did not see them take any more coals; we went home and returned in about ten minutes, and they were gone: when we first saw them robbing the craft we went to Mr. Broughton's, the coal-merchant, but he was not at home; we went then to Mr. Pearson's, who owns the wharf where they lay, and he was not at home; Mr. Broughton sent for us next morning to know who were robbing the craft.

ROBERT EDMUNDS confirmed the evidence of his fellow-servant.

PEXALL ELWOOD sworn.

I have a barge called the Ord; it lay on the 16th of February at Arundel-stairs: Chamberlayne has served me a year and a half constantly, and the other prisoners occasionally; Chamberlayne was in my service at this time, Fieldhouse was not; I don't know what was in the barge.

JOHN COLHOUN sworn.

I had coals in this barge; it was impossible to miss them.

To ELWOOD. In consequence of the information you had, you went to Foreman's house? - Yes; he said Chamberlayne used his shop; that he knew he was a coal porter, and asked him the price of coals; that he told him coals were thirty-six shillings a chaldron, and he ordered him to bring him a chaldron, which he was to do in the morning, but he neglected doing it till night; he said he gave nine shillings for the three sacks; I believe he gave the full value; he went very readily before the magistrate: from the character I heard of him, I would not have prosecuted him if I had not been bound over.

FOR THE PRISONERS.

JOHN COLHOUN sworn.

I always had a good opinion of Chamberlayne; I would have trusted him as much as any servant I ever had in my life.

CHAMBERLAYNE GUILTY .

FIELDHOUSE GUILTY .

FOREMAN NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

[Branding. See summary.]

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

271, 272. WRIGHT HALE and FRANCIS HAMBLETON were indicted for stealing a pair of steel pistols, value ten shillings , the property of John Burn .

JOHN BURN sworn.

I live in High street, St. Giles's : I keep a coal shed and deal in brokery ; my shop is an open shop; I had a pair of pistols hung on a nail inside the window; I saw them on Thursday night, I took them down then to shew to a gentleman; I went to take them down again on Friday morning and missed them: on Tuesday morning I received an information from James Hyde ; in consequence of which I saw my pistols at justice Welch's office.

JAMES HYDE sworn.

I went on an information for another offence to take up the prisoner in Brown's-gardens, near Monmouth-street, and in the prisoners room up two pair of stairs, I found these pistols and this bundle of picklock keys (producing them): the pistols were in the drawers and the keys in a box; Hale was sitting by the fire, and Hambleton had his coat and waistcoat off washing himself; we were taken to the house by a Jew; there was a great bull dog, the dog flew at us, so I pushed the Jew in first; I told them not to make any resistance, or it would be worse, then they were quiet; I asked how they came by the pistols; Hale said at first he found them, then he said a man from Gravel-lane left them there; I thought I had seen such pistols hang up at a shop in St. Giles's; I went to Burn's on Tuesday morning, and asked if he had not a pair of pistols to sell; he told me he had lost them; I took him to the justice's, and he swore to them.

[The pistols were produced, and deposed to by the prosecutor.]

HANNAH STETT sworn.

A young man brought the pistols to my house about a week ago; it was not one of the prisoners; I don't know him, I never saw him before; he said he would come for them again: I live with Wright Hale ; they were found in my room.

HAMBLETON's DEFENCE.

I went to Stett's room to ask her to wash my shirt; I sat without one while she did it; just as she had ironed it, Hyde came and took me.

HALE's DEFENCE.

I never saw the pistols till I saw them before the magistrate; I was out.

Hale called one witness, who gave him a good character.

HALE GUILTY .

HAMBLETON NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice WILLES.

They were again indicted for stealing a cloth coat, value twenty shillings , the property of John Westbrook , Esq ; February 17th .

ELIAS WILLIAMS sworn.

I drive Mr. Westbrook; it is a job of Mr. Carr's. I had a great coat and a hat, Mr. Westbrook gives me while I drive the jobb only; it was lost on Saturday night last from the box in the coach-house, it was found on the Monday; Mr. Carr went and gave information at justice Welch's, and offered five shillings reward.

JAMES HYDE sworn.

Last Monday about one o'clock, I was in a coach going to Clerkenwell with some prisoners from the Rotation, I looked out of the window and saw Barnard, and another Jew; on seeing me he ran away; I got out of the coach and followed and took him at the Seven Dials; he had this great coat in a bag; I brought him to the Office, and by the description of the coat, it appeared to be Mr. Westbrook's: he said he bought the coat in the street, but would give no particular account; I said I would fetch the gentleman and he would prosecute him; he then said, if we would admit him an evidence, he would bring the people he bought it of; the justice would not make him any promise; he went with me to the room where I took the prisoners: he said he gave them fourteen shillings for it, and was to give them four more; he said he bought it of two men: we found the two prisoners and a girl in the room: the girl said they brought the coat at ten at night; it was lost at half after nine.

[It was produced in court and deposed to by the prosecutor.]

HANNAH STETT sworn.

Wright Hale brought the coat into my lodging between nine and ten o'clock last Saturday night; Hambleton was not with him at that time; Hambleton and Hale sold the coat to a Jew on the Monday following; I was washing Hambleton's shirt at the time, and did not hear what he gave for it; they went out together on Saturday; but did not come home together.

BARNARD FRANK sworn.

I bought this coat of Hale.

Did not you buy it of Hambleton? - No; Hale called me up; I agreed to give eighteen shillings for it: I gave him fourteen, and was to give him four more; I had no more about me.

How came you to run away, when you saw Hyde? - Because this man will say any thing against me; he wanted to extortion half a guinea from me, or he said he would hang me.

HALE's DEFENCE.

The coat was found in the highway.

HALE GUILTY .

HAMBLETON NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice WILLES.

[Branding. See summary.] [Imprisonment. See summary.]

273. ELIZABETH WEST was indicted for stealing ten shillings and six pence in money numbered , the property of Robert Sissell , February 20th .

There was no evidence to affect the prisoner.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

274. JOHN KELLY was indicted for stealing a gold watch chain, value ten shillings, and three seals set in gold, value 3 l. the property of Matthias O'Byrne , February 8th .

MATTHIAS O'BYRNE sworn.

Upon the 8th or 9th of February, between eleven and twelve o'clock at night, as I was going to the masquerade, just coming out of my chair, between the chair and the house I felt a pull at my watch; there was a large croud there to look at the masques; I put my left hand to my watch, and turned round and seized the prisoner by the collar; the watch was not pulled out, for I got hold of it just as he gave the pull; he still kept pulling, though I spoke to him and desired him to desist; at last I felt his hand break from my watch; I had hold of him: the rings were broke directly from the watch; it was a very handsome gold enamelled chain, with a large red cornelian seal set in gold; I brought him into the Opera House, and then he abused me, and said, I was a pretty gentleman to accuse an innocent man like him, that got his bread in a decent way, and did not stand in need of any such thing; I then felt and found my chain was gone; I said, notwithstanding that, you have got my chain and must deliver it me directly: he was ready to be searched, but I did not find it on him; I turned his pockets out, but found nothing: the constable made him strip afterwards in the watch-house, but found nothing upon him.

Jury. Had you your mask on at that time? - No, it was in my pocket.

Court. Was you perfectly sober? - Yes; I hinted to him if he would produce my property I would not transport him; he said, travelling might tell for him in the long run, and I should have nothing of him.

The prisoner in his defence called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

[Branding. See summary.] [Imprisonment. See summary.]

275. THOMAS COPE was indicted for traiterously counterfeiting and coining a piece of false, feigned, and counterfeit money and coin, to the likeness and similitude of the legal and current money of this realm, called a six-pence, against his allegiance , and against the statute, &c. February 7th .

NOT GUILTY .

276. HANNAH TWILLER , otherwise GREEN , was indicted for stealing fourteen yards of printed cotton, value twenty-five shillings , the property of Mary Cook , widow , February 12th .

JOHN BRIXEY sworn.

I live with Mrs. Cook: on Monday the 12th of February, between two and five o'clock, the prisoner came into the shop, and asked to see some printed linens; I shewed her several patterns, she said they were not the patterns she wanted; there were several things on the compter at the time; I had some suspicion of her taking something, because she shook her petticoats: a woman came into the shop just before the prisoner went out; when the prisoner was gone out that woman said, she saw her put something under her petticoats; I went after the prisoner and brought her back; I said I wanted to speak to her in the next room; she was not willing to go in; as I was pushing her into the room, she let fall this piece of printed cotton upon my shoes; I did not see it fall, because I was close to her; I stooped and picked it up; I said, that was what I wanted; then she wanted to go: I said, she must not; I took her into the parlour, and she offered me two guineas for the piece of print she had taken to let her go: I sent for a constable, who took her into custody. [The cotton was produced in court and deposed to.] I am sure the cotton was on the compter when she came in.

SARAH TODD sworn.

While I was looking at the prints in Mrs. Cook's window, I saw the prisoner draw this piece of cotton up her petticoats, some of it was on the ground: I went in and asked the price of a piece of printed linen, and when the prisoner went out of the shop, I informed them she had taken something, and had it under her petticoats, and the gentleman went after her and brought her back.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I know nothing of what they lay to my charge.

She called four witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY . T .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

277. MARY GOUGH was indicted for stealing a pair of silk stockings, value three shillings , the property of Edward Cramp , February 22d .

EDWARD CRAMP sworn.

I am a butcher : last Thursday morning the prisoner came to char in my room; my wife and I were in bed, there was nobody else in the room; when she was gone, I missed a pair of silk stockings out of the basket in the closet; I saw them the night before; I afterwards found them at a pawnbroker's.

MARGARET SAKES sworn.

I am a pawnbroker: I took these stockings in pawn of the prisoner, between ten and eleven on Thursday morning; I lent her two shillings on them; she pawned them in her own name: she has pawned many things for people, and fetched them out very honestly.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I went to the prosecutor, to see if she wanted me; she asked me to light the fire and put the kettle on for her; when I had done that, she gave me these stockings, and desired me to pawn them for eighteen-pence, or two shillings; I went and pawned them, and fetched her a quartern of gin, and then she desired me to fetch a quartern of brandy and put it under the bed; I did, and when her husband wanted the stockings she denied it; they were both in bed, and he was asleep at the time.

Prosecutor. I did not go to sleep after she came; no such thing passed.

Mrs. CRAMP sworn.

I never delivered her any stockings to pawn.

GUILTY of stealing to the value of ten-pence . W .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

278. JEREMIAH POPE was indicted for ripping, cutting, breaking, and stealing forty pound weight of lead, value three shillings, and three iron casements, value three shillings, the property of Sylvanus Hall , the said lead and iron being affixed to his dwelling-house , February 5th .

SYLVANUS HALL sworn.

I live in Paternoster-row; I was informed lead had been taken off three houses of mine that were empty; I went and missed about six hundred weight: I got a warrant to search for the lead, and found the three casements in the house of a woman that is here.

WILLIAM HIDS sworn.

I took the prisoner on the 5th of this month, a few minutes after seven in the morning, coming out of the passage belonging to Mr. Hall's houses; he was just coming into the street, I laid hold of him; this lead (producing it) which I found on him, I saw on the house on Saturday; they had broke out of one house into another, and stripped six gutters.

WILLIAM PAYNE sworn.

When I had the prisoner in custody, he confessed that he stole the lead, and a great deal more, and he told me where it was sold.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

As I was coming down on Sunday morning, within the court what was I could not tell; I took it up and just got it on my shoulder; I was going to a public house to see whose property it was, and this man came and took me.

HIDS. I saw him on the stairs in the house it was taken from; I took him coming out of the passage.

GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Branding. See summary.] [Imprisonment. See summary.]

279. BENJAMIN PAYNE was indicted for feloniously being found at large before the expiration of the term for which he had been ordered to be transported , January 20th .

It appeared in evidence, that the ship in which the prisoner was transported, was cast away, and that he was sent from Lisbon distressed; the pass from Lisbon was produced, and it appeared he had been before taken up for the same offence, and discharged out of Newgate.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

280, 281. WILLIAM GORBELL and WILLIAM EASDON , otherwise PLUMB , were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Margaret Fisher , widow , on the 29th of January about the hour of one in the night, and stealing a feather-bed, value six shillings, a pillowcase, value six-pence, two linen sheets, value two shillings, three blankets, value three shillings, and a copper coal skuttle, value one shilling, the property of Margaret Fisher ; a silver watch, value thirty shillings, eighteen linen shirts, value eighteen shillings, a cloth coat, value two shillings, a cloth waistcoat, value one shilling, a worsted waistcoat, value six-pence, a pair of velveret breeches, value two shillings, four pair of mens leather shoes, value five shillings, a muslin neckcloth, value six-pence, a blue woollen apron, value one shilling, three crown pieces in money numbered, the property of James Niven ; a gun, value ten shillings, a powder-horn, value one shilling, and a shot-bag, value six-pence, the property of John Pickering , in the dwelling-house of the said Margaret .

JOHN NIVEN sworn.

I am under gardner to Mrs. Fisher at Acton ; the hot-house and gardner's room were broke open; the gardner's room is in the garden, it is detached from the dwelling-house: on the 29th of January, I went out between four and five in the afternoon, and did not return till next day; I shut the windows and double-locked the door; it is a spring lock, it was not quite dark then; when I returned the next day in the evening, it was broke open, and all the things I had were gone; my master, who is the upper gardner, found it broke open in the morning; all the things mentioned in the indictment (repeating them) were taken away.

HENRY WRIGHT sworn.

The prisoners were brought to the prison I am keeper of; when they were brought in, I found a pair of shoes on Easdon's feet, which the accomplice said were stole from Acton; the man swore to them as soon as he saw them.

THOMAS MORRIS sworn.

I am a pawnbroker: this gun (producing it) was left with me by Easdon, the 31st of last month.

NIVEN. My master said he had a gun and had been shooting with it.

HENRY JONES sworn.

I attend the public office in Petty France; I apprehended the prisoners.

JOSHUA BURTON sworn.

The two prisoners and I robbed Mrs. Fisher's house about two o'clock on Tuesday morning; I cannot tell the month, nor how long it is ago; we took out of the house sixteen shirts and four pair of shoes; we got up the hot-house; Gorbell took them, Easdon took the bed and bedding; I took a silver watch: there were three crown pieces and a gun taken out of the hot-house: I helped to carry the things; they were sold to a woman in Ragfair; the gun was pawned by Easdon to Mr. Morris.

EASDON's DEFENCE.

I never was there; Burton gave me the pumps; I did not pawn the gun.

GORBELL NOT GUILTY .

EASDON NOT GUILTY of burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house, but GUILTY of stealing goods to the value of thirty-nine shillings .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

[Branding. See summary.] [Imprisonment. See summary.]

282. WILLIAM LOWE was indicted for stealing two cloth coats, value five shillings, four cloth waistcoats, value five shillings, two callimanco waistcoats, value two shillings, a black silk gown, value five shillings, two pair of stays, value six shillings, twelve pair of womens stuff shoes, value three shillings, nine boys cloth waistcoats, value one shilling, four boys cloth coats, value eighteen pence, and five pair of cloth breeches, value nine shillings , the property of Simon Hinchley , January 20th .

The prosecutor, who was an old cloaths man , left a bundle containing the things mentioned in the indictment in a public house, and desired the prisoner to look after them; he returned in an hour after and the prisoner and the things were gone.

NOT GUILTY .

283, 284. SAMUEL WHITLOW and JAMES SWINYARD were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Williamson on the 24th of December, about the hour of eight in the night, and stealing six silver tea spoons, value twelve shillings, five womens petticoats, value forty shillings, twelve muslin neckcloths, value twelve shillings, a scarlet cloth cloak trimmed with ermine, value twenty shillings, a silk gown, value twenty shillings, a cotton gown, value ten shillings, a stuff gown, value ten shillings, seven linen shirts, value forty shillings, eight linen night-caps, value two shillings, and ten linen handkerchiefs, value four shillings, forty-six guineas, ten crown pieces, eight half-crown pieces, and one shilling, the property of the said Thomas, in his dwelling-house .

There was no evidence to affect the prisoners.

BOTH NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

285, 286. WILLIAM WALKER jun . and WILLIAM WALKER sen . were indicted, the first for stealing three live sows, value 3 l. the property of Samuel Rhodes ; and the other for inciting; procuring, aiding, and abetting the said William to do and commit the said felony , February 1st .

SAMUEL RHODES sworn.

I am a cow-keeper and farmer ; I know nothing of the fact myself, I saw them after they were stopped.

RICHARD BARRETT sworn.

I live at Battle-bridge; I had been in town and was going home between four and five in the morning, I saw three people driving the hogs in a place where there was no road; I suspected they were stole; I went home and got another person, and we took William Walker jun. John Sharrard , and the property, the other absconded; we locked the pigs up in one Mr. Hall's stables.

RHODES. I saw the pigs next day in Hall's stables; they were my pigs.

JOHN SHARRARD sworn.

I worked with old Walker; it was wet weather, we could not work, and the old man told us if we could find any pigs strolling about, we might bring them to him and he would buy them; William Walker , Thomas Lovejoy , and I went and took three pigs out of Mr. Rhodes's stable; we saw a man in the road, we did not know who he was; he took us up.

Did old Walker know of your taking these pigs? - Yes, he knew of it the night before.

MARY STRUFF sworn.

I am servant to Mr. Rhodes; I put the pigs in the stable at nine o'clock at night, we missed them the next morning; I saw them at Mr. Hall's; they were the same pigs.

THOMAS BARWICK sworn.

Barrett called me up and I went with him and took the prisoner and the accomplice; and we carried the pigs, and put them into Mr. Hall's stable.

WALKER junior's DEFENCE.

The evidence asked me to go with him to get some pigs, and took me to the Green-yard.

He called one witness, who gave him a good character.

WALKER jun. GUILTY .

WALKER sen. NOT GUILTY .

[Branding. See summary.]

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

287. JOHN BRIKNELL was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John M'Phail on the 29th of January , about the hour of seven in the night, and stealing a quart mug plated with silver, value thirty six shillings, the property of the said John, in his dwelling-house .

"The prosecutor, who keeps a silversmith's

"shop, had his window broke and the mug

"taken out; which in pursuit of the prisoner

"was found dropped; but there was no evidence

"that the prisoner dropped it."

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

288. GRACE WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing a man's hat, value one shilling, a stone stock buckle set in silver, value two shillings, a watch in a base metal case covered with tortoishel, value 3 l. and a gold ring with a cornelian seal set therein, value ten shillings , the property of William Gill , February 14th .

The prosecutor was called, but not appearing, his recognizance was ordered to be estreated.

NOT GUILTY .

289. JAMES ROUPEL was indicted for feloniously aiding, abetting, and assisting Joseph Hunt in the wilful murder of Richard Smith .

No evidence was given.

NOT GUILTY .

See the Trial of Serjeant Hunt in the papers of the last Sessions.

The Trials being ended, the Court proceeded to give judgment as follows:

Received sentence of Death, four:

Samuel Whitlow , James Langar , William Kerrison , and William Evans .

Branded and imprisoned six Months, sixteen:

Matthew Boulton , Ephraim Ephraims , William Cox , Edward Powell , John Fryer , Simon Isaac , Jeremiah Pope , George Lewis , Elizabeth Clarke , John Brewer , William Gray , Mary Green, Wright Hale , John Kelly , William Walker , and Gregory Board .

Branded and imprisoned three Months, two:

John Bean and John Plunket .

Branded and imprisoned one Month, four:

Jane Langham , William Easdon , Thomas Chamberlayne and Thomas Fieldhouse .

Branded, three:

Aaron Jacobs , Robert Wilson , and Hannah Twiller .

Whipped, eleven:

Thomas Feesy , Elizabeth Gilberry , James Pennington , Susanna Hudson , Mary Gough , John Hare , John Hughes , Ann Duffin , Mary Park, Isaac King , and Mary Hoffman .

The judgments of Archibald Girdwood for sending a threatening letter to Mr. John Edridge , Thomas Jones , otherwise Evans, for robbing Mr. Mitchell Newman , and Stephen Self for manslaughter, were respited.

*** Trials at Law, and arguments of Counsel, accurately taken in Short-hand by JOSEPH GURNEY , writer of these proceedings, of Southampton-Buildings, Chancery-lane; who has lately published (printed to bind up with the Sessions Paper) an Account of the Arguments of Counsel, with the Opinions at large of the Judges upon Mrs. RUDD's CASE. - N.B. The above is the only full and accurate Account of the Arguments and the Opinion of the Court that has yet been made public. - Sold by S. BLADON, Pater-noster-Row.

*** Trials at Law, and Arguments of Counsel, accurately taken in Short-hand by JOSEPH GURNEY , writer of these proceedings, of Southampton Buildings, Chancery-lane; who has lately published (printed to bind up with the Sessions Paper) an Account of the Arguments of Counsel, with the Opinions at large of the Judges upon Mrs. RUDD'S CASE. - N. B. The above is the only full and accurate Account of the Arguments and the Opinion of the Court that has yet been made public. - Sold by S. BLADON, Pater-noster-Row.