Old Bailey Proceedings Online (www.oldbaileyonline.org, version 6.0, 31 October 2014), April 1775 (17750426).

Old Bailey Proceedings, 26th April 1775.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS ON THE King's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol-Delivery FOR THE CITY of LONDON; And also the Gaol-Delivery for the COUNTY of MIDDLESEX; HELD AT JUSTICE-HALL in the OLD-BAILEY, On Wednesday the 26th, Thursday the 27th, Friday the 28th, and Saturday the 29th of APRIL; and on Monday and Tuesday the 1st, and 2d, of MAY, 1775.

In the Fifteenth Year of His MAJESTY's Reign. Being the Fourth SESSION in the MAYORALTY of The Right Honourable John Wilkes , LORD-MAYOR of the CITY of LONDON.

Taken down in SHORT-HAND by JOSEPH GURNEY .

NUMBER IV. PART I.

LONDON:

Sold by T. BELL, at (No. 26.) the Top of Bell-Yard, near Temple-Bar.

THE PROCEEDINGS ON THE

King's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol-Delivery, held for the City of LONDON, &c.

BEFORE the Right Honourable JOHN WILKES , Lord Mayor of the City of London; the Honourable Sir WILLIAM BLACKSTONE , Knt. one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of Common Pleas *; Mr. Serjeant GLYNN, Recorder ++; THOMAS NUGENT , Esq; Common Serjeant ~; and others his Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and Country of Middlesex.

The *, +, ++, and ~, refer to the Judges by whom the prisoners were tried.

(L) London Jury,

(M) First Middlesex Jury,

(2d L) Second London Jury,

(2d M) Second Middlesex Jury.

First London Jury.

John Kidman

John Brightwell

John Jennings

William Grice

John Harrison

John Daniel

William Whitehead

John Martin

Abraham Brookes ,

William Baker

John Chamberlin

William Russell .

Second London Jury.

James Priest

William Savage

Joseph Burnley

Richard Wingfield

James Cowden

Samuel Hooper

John Smith

Frances Pearse

Thomas Nash

John Mitchell

Thomas Harrison

John Thompson .

First Middlesex Jury.

Thomas Calcott

William Young

Thomas Stokes

James Penny

William Rogers

William Birkes

Thomas Lewis

William Edwards

John Pembertley

George Bride

Eleazear Gibbon

Thomas Bush .

Second Middlesex Jury.

John Wright

Henry Hewitt

William Barker

Thomas Hall

Joseph Pocock

Thomas Light

Rice Davis

William Reeves

Benjamin Bryan

John Jefferys

Godolph Hyme

John Sheercroft .

264. (M) CHARLES COOPER was indicted for stealing a wooden box, value one shilling, five linen aprons, value five shillings, two pair of silk stockings, value one shillings, six pair of cotton stockings, value four shillings, a pair of trebble linen ruffles, value five shillings, a linen handkerchief, value one shilling, an iron tobacco box, value six-pence, a silver hat pin, value one shilling a pair of steel scissars with silver bows, value two shillings, and sixty copper halfpence , the property of John Edmonds , February 23 . ++

John Edmonds . I live in Petty France Westminster. On the 23d of February, between seven and eight in the evening, there was an alarm of fire, and my house was in danger. I took my writings and carried to a neighbour's. I returned in about five minutes and found about a dozen soldiers in my house: they assisted me to carry off my goods, some to one place and some to another. The next day, the prisoner, who is a drummer , came and demanded payment for removing the goods: my wife charged him with taking a box out of a particular room, and asked him what he had done with it; he said, he had took it into Pye Street for safety.

Mrs. Edmonds. That box was kept in a closet. I remember seeing the prisoner take it away; I told my husband that the prisoner had taken this box: he charged a constable with him: we got a warrant, and searched the prisoner's lodging, in Rochester Row, Tottlefields; there I found a part of my property, (some of the things produced in court and deposed to) part of the box was found, and the prisoner confessed he had burned the other part. Rochester Row is about a quarter of a mile from Pye Street.

Prisoner's Defence.

I removed the goods to my wife's aunt's for safety, they were afterwards conveyed to my lodgings without my privity or knowledge by my wife.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

Guilty T .

265. (M) EDWARD MILESTON was indicted for stealing a shilling and fifteen half-pence , the property of William Cooksley , March 11 . ++

Acquitted .

266. 267. (M) ROBERT WILLIAMS and JAMES DAWSON were indicted for stealing a gelding, value ten pounds , the property of Edward Gover , February 24 . ++

Both Acquitted .

(M) ROBERT WILLIAMS and JAMES DAWSON were a second time indicted for stealing a mare, value ten pounds , the property of Thomas Holroyd , February 24 . ++

Both Acquitted .

263. (M) ROBERT BOWERS was indicted for stealing three hundred pounds weight of lead, value twenty shillings, the property of John Davis , the said lead being affixed to an empty house , the property of the said John, January 21 . ++

A Witness. On the 21st of January I saw the prisoner and a woman in the house of Mr. Davis, in Chamber's Street, Goodman's-fields ; they were seemingly cutting a roll of lead. Soon after that I saw the woman come out with something under her cloak; I took hold of her arm, and asked her what she had got; she said, nothing at all. I told her, she was a thief, and then she dropped the lead. When I saw the prisoner in the house, he seemed very busy, and had his shirt sleeves tucked up above his elbows, and his hair tied behind.

Joseph Wrickets . On the 21st of January, between the hours of six and eight at night, returning from the city, passing by this house I observed a light; I looked through the keyhole, and saw the prisoner with his shirt sleeves up above his elbows cutting lead up in the kitchen: the woman, who is admitted evidence, was standing with a candle in her hand by the dresser. I got some neighbours to watch the house, and soon after the woman opened the door, and came out with the lead in her apron: we stopped her, she dropped the lead: being asked how she came by it, she said, the prisoner gave it her: the prisoner was taken as he was endeavouring to escape out at the back of the house.

John Davis . I am owner of the house. The lead was taken off a sink in the kitchen. (The lead was produced in court and deposed to by the prosecutor.)

John Wyat . I was charged with the woman; she had dropped a parcel of lead in the street, the other part was left in the house; it was in two parcels.

William Simmons . On the 21st of January Mr. Davis sent for me. Before I got to the house the woman was in custody. I was desired to go round to the back of the house to prevent the prisoner escaping that way. I found him there; he drew a knife upon me, but I secured him, and found two keys and the knife upon him.

William Siddon . The night before the prisoner was taken, I saw him in the house through the key-hole, cutting lead; I went to get assistance to secure him, but before I returned he was gone: he was taken in the house the night following.

Prisoner's Defence.

I was not found in the house, neither was any of the lead found upon me: I am as innocent as the child unborn.

Guilty T .

269. (M) PETER HARCOTT was indicted for stealing a silver watch, value three pounds, and six shillings in money numbered, the property of James Wise privately from the person of the said James , April the 5th . ++

James Wise . On the 5th of April, about ten at night I was at the Butcher's Arms in Carnaby Market . The prisoner came in, and asked me to drink; we drank a pint or two of beer together, and then I fell asleep; when I waked I missed my watch and my money. I wound the watch up just before I fell asleep; there was nobody in the room with me but the prisoner and the landlord. When I awaked the prisoner was gone: having a strong suspicion of him, I had him taken up, and a pawnbroker's duplicate of my watch was found upon him; he had pawned it in his own name. I was rather in liquor. (The watch was produced in court and deposed to by the prosecutor.)

Henry Dixon . I am a pawnbroker. On the 6th of April, the prisoner, in company with another man, pawned this watch with me; it has been in my custody ever since.

Francis Perry . Wife and the prisoner were drinking together at my house on the 5th of April. Wife fell asleep; while he was asleep, the prisoner desired me to draw him a pint of beer: when he had drank the beer he went out, and did not return again.

Prisoner's Defence.

I was drinking with the prosecutor at the Butcher's Arms. I had occasion to go to the necessary, and there I found the watch: the next day I pawned the watch to get some things out of pawn.

Q. to Wise. Was you ever at the necessary?

Wise. No, I never stirred off my seat.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Guilty of stealing the goods, but not guilty of stealing them privately from the person . T .

270. 271. 272. (M) THOMAS COXON , ROBERT ANDREWS , and JAMES GRANT were indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling house of Thomas Spence on the 7th of March , about the hour of two in the night, and stealing four silver table spoons, value three pounds, eleven silver tea spoons, value forty shillings, a silver castor top, value one shilling, a pair of silver tea tongs, value five shillings, two silver salt spoons, value four shillings, and two pair of silver shoe buckles, value ten shillings, the property of the said Thomas, in his dwelling house .

All three acquitted .

273. (2d. M) CHARLES MAYBRICK , otherwise JOHN JONES , was indicted for stealing a pair of women's shoes, value three shillings, and eight pair of men's leather shoes , the property of John Grear , March 1 . ~

John Grear . I am a shoemaker in Newport Street . In December and the latter end of January, I missed several pair of shoes. On the 1st of March, Mr. Leighton a pawnbroker in Wardour Street, sent to me, and informed me that a pair of men's shoes were offered him to pawn, that answered to the description I had given him of some I had lost. I found there the rest of the shoes mentioned in the indictment.

James Vincent , I am servant to Mr. Leighton, a pawnbroker in Wardour Street. The prisoner offered a pair of shoes to pawn on the 1st of March: knowing he worked with the prosecutor, I suspected the shoes belonged to him; I went and informed him of it. The prisoner had pawned a pair at our house before.

- Priestman. The prisoner pawned four pair of shoes at my master's.

- Wilson. I am a pawnbroker. I took in four pair of shoes of the prisoner in January and February. The shoes were produced, and deposed to by the prosecutor.

Prisoner's Defence.

I kept a shop in Little Poultney Street. I rather failed, and then I removed to Wardour Street, where I worked sometime for my own customers. These shoes were my own property; I pawned them because I wanted a trifle of money.

The prisoner called six witnesses, who had known him a great many years, and gave him a good character.

Guilty T .

274. 275. (2d M) DANIEL GREGORY and RICHARD BARRETT were indicted for that they in the king's high way, in and upon Thomas Pike did make an assault puting him in corporal fear and danger of his life, and stealing from his person five shillings in money numbered , the property of the said Thomas, March 19 . ~

Thomas Pike . On Sunday was five weeks the 19th of March, I was coming to London from Bath; I called at Patridge's at Salt Hill, and desired him to let me have a good pair of horses, that would carry me over Hounslow-heath before dark, I intended to take fresh horses at Hounslow; he said he would help me to a pair that would carry me in 60 minutes; he said I need not be afraid, I should have time enough to stay tea: we set out from Salt Hill in the chaise between five and six; we were robbed just after sun set, but, it was very far from dark. The boy drove at the rate of a mile in three minutes and a half and four minutes Mr. Penwarne was in the chaise with me, and his servant rode behind the chaise; I delivered him a pistol; we were stopped just at the enterance of the last heath towards Hounslow; which I find since, is called Butcher's Grove , in a Lane the enterance into the heath within five hundred yards of the Heath. I saw at a distance two men coming from the Heath into the road, they road, they rode on at a moderate rate towards the chaise, it was between the two Heaths; we were going at the rate of fourteen or fifteen miles an hour, they were coming moderately on at the rate of five or six mile an hour: when they came within about five yards of the heads of the horses, one dropped on one side of the chaise, and the other on the other, and came up to the body of the chaise; just as they were about the windows of the chaise, the man on the right hand of the chaise cried Holloa, stop, and the chaise immediately stopped. I find since that that was Barret , by his being taken in the situation in which he was with his hair over his shoulders, I laid hold of a pistol and dropped my own glass, the glass on that side was up, we were going so fast I suppose it was all done in two or three seconds before they came to the chaise door; as soon as the man upon the right hand side cried holloa stop, he said d - n you down with your door, as soon as my glass was let down, the man on the left hand side run a pistol into the side of the chaise, and said, d - n your blood deliver your money, or I will blow your brains out.

Q. What kind of a pistol was it.

Pike. It appeared to be a short pistol, the lock was on the side of the barrel in the old fashion way, I leaned forward to look at him, he cried G - d d - n you, he swore very much, he appeared very drunk. I told him not to behave ill, and he would have what he wanted presently; after that, he swore very much; he was not I suppose pleased at my looking at him; he said God d - n you be quick or I will blow your brains out; at the instant, I was lifting my pistol to fire at him, for I thought myself in great danger from him as a drunken man: at that instant the pistol came in at the other door, and the other man said d - n you deliver your money instantly; finding there was one on each side, I thought I had better desist.

Q. I suppose that pistol was presented to the other gentleman in the chaise?

Pike. It was in the chaise door; they endeavoured to avoid shewing their faces a good deal, but I saw the faces of both of them. I gave them more than five shillings: Gregory was on the left hand, my side of the chaise, Barrett on the other side. I gave my purse to Barrett, and so did Mr. Penwarne.

Q. How came you not to give your purse to the man on your side?

Pike. He appeared to be drunk, he reeled upon his horse, I imagined he was in danger of falling from his horse.

Q. Did you give your purse as well as the five shillings?

Pike. Yes, Barrett said, when I gave my purse, let the gentlemen off. Barrett behaved exceeding well, very decent; he did not appear so violent, nor did I apprehend myself in so much danger from him as Gregory; I thought that, as a drunken man, he might have inadvertently fired, and his pistol was within a few inches of my head. As soon as I had delivered my purse, and Barrett had left me, Gregory said, Now G - d d - n you, now for your watches.

Q. Did they both demand your watches?

Pike. Yes, I told him I had none: he said, G - d d - n you, say upon your honour. To comply with his whim, I said, I had none upon my honour; he bid me say so again, which I did; then he said to the driver, D - n you go on, or I will blow your brains out. The driver drove on to Hounslow: when we came to the corner, there were some lusty young fellows standing there. I said, my lods, I am this moment robbed, there is forty pounds a piece reward for you, and I have a brace of pistols, and you may have the horses. They swore they would go after them. I ordered the driver to get fresh horses, and go to London. I was a good deal fatigued, I had come from Bridgwater, which is near a hundred and fifty miles that day; and I got into London about eight o'clock: I went to the coffee house, and sent for one of Sir John Fielding 's clerks. I had word brought, that it would be better to go to the office: I went there, and laid an information.

Q. Are you sure that either of the prisoners or both of them, are the men that came up to the chaise and robbed you?

Pike. I verily believe from my conscience that they are the same: but as I said before Sir John Fielding , I beg to be excused from that positive evidence that you might require.

Q. It was not dark?

Pike. No.

Q. Was there light enough to distinguish a man's face so as to know him again?

Pike. Perfectly so, I verily believe them to be the same.

Q. You will not undertake to say positively that they are?

Pike. I beg to be excused saying that; the one rode upon a bay horse, the other upon a black horse; the person that was upon my side upon the left hand, was upon a black horse or a more: the person on the right side of the chaise, rode upon a bay horse.

Q. How long might they be at the chaise?

Pike. Five or six minutes, as near as I can recollect. I have received a letter respecting the prisoners, from one Littleton.

Court. That is not evidence.

Pike. I mention it with respect to the person that wrote it, that it might be found out, but I don't mention it as a circumstance of any disadvantage to the prisoners, not in the least.

Q. How soon after did you see the prisoners?

Pike. We came to town on Sunday evening, the 19th of March, I believe it was last Sunday was five weeks. Sir John Fielding had sent to several people in town. That letter was left for me at Mr. Reddington's, in Fenchurch Street; and in consequence of that letter I went to Bow-Street, I saw Barrett in the room: he had flaxen hair; he had irons over his hands: this was about eleven, next day.

Q. Were they both at Sir John's, or only one?

Pike. I saw but one in the room at that time. Barrett, who I thought to be the same person that was upon the right hand side of the chaise: the other was brought to Sir John Fielding's before they were examined.

Q. When you saw Barrett there, did you recollect, that, that was the man that robbed you?

Pike. I did verily believe it was; I said so at the time:

Q. Had you such a recollection of him, that you could say with a degree of certainty that he was one of the men?

Pike. I do verily believe that he was the person that was upon the right hand side of the chaise; his hair was then loose about his shoulders, as it was when he robbed us. I was introduced into the back room, where Sir John was sitting: Barrett was in the outer room, with his hair down. I sat about ten minutes or a quarter of an hour in Sir John's room, when they were both brought in, and examined together. I had a bad crooked sixpence in the purse, I received it in change; I put it into my green purse, and gave it altogether into his hand. When Sir John ordered them to be searched, there were two farthings taken upon them, about eighteen or nineteen shillings in silver, and a bad sixpence. Sir John Fielding asked me if I could swear to it. I told Sir John, I did not chuse to swear to money, though I believed it to be the same sixpence, that sixpence was found upon Barrett.

Cross Examination.

Q. You took the chaise at Salt Hill.

Pike. Yes.

Q. You said, it was between five and six; might it not be near six?

Pike. I apprehend it was nearer six than five.

Q. You were very fortunate to get a good pair of horses; that went at the rate of fourteen or fifteen miles an hour?

Pike. We were drove a mile in three minutes and a half.

Q. How long might you be coming from Salt Hill to the place where you was robbed?

Pike. I do suppose we were not quite fifty minutes coming: I had my watch in my portmanteau when we were robbed; but when I came into Hounslow I asked what o'clock it was, they said, between six and seven; it was not quite seven.

Q. If you set out at near six, I suppose it must be pretty near seven when you was robbed. This was pretty near Hounslow?

Pike, Yes, we drove pretty fast, as we did all the way. We came from Salt Hill to Hounslow in less than sixty minutes, and were robbed.

Q. Partridge's is about the twenty-second mile-stone, I believe?

Pike. Yes, I paid him twelve miles, from Salt Hill to Hounslow.

Q. You say, you saw these men upon the road some time before they came up to you?

Pike. They came into the road.

Q. Your chaise was going at a prodigious great rate, and the glasses were up: it was impossible to make much observation upon them then?

Pike. I could see them clearly through the glass.

Q. I think you said, they avoided shewing their faces?

Pike. They passed the chaise, and immediately cried, holloa stop.

Q. I observe you give your evidence with great caution of the sixpence, and as to the persons of the men; that you will not be positive they were the men?

Pike. I should be very sorry to prejudice the court, I would rather go on the other side. I feel a great deal in my own mind upon this occasion.

Francis Penwarne . I was in the chaise with Mr. Pike on Sunday evening, March the 19th. When we came to Salt Hill, Mr. Pike seemed to be dubious of our going over the Heath; we did not stay, I believe, at Salt Hill five minutes. It was nearer six than five when we left Salt Hill: we desired Mr. Partridge to give us a good pair of horses to put us over the Heath as quick as possible; we asked for four, but he said, there was no danger in the world, and he would give us a pair of horses that would carry us over exceeding well. We passed over the greater part of the Heath very safe, till we came to the latter part of the Heath, towards Hounslow. Just as we were entering the latter part of the Heath I saw two men; one came on one side of the chaise, the other on the other: I saw him that came on my side of the chaise take a pistol out of his pocket, he could not be two yards from me, when I saw him take the pistol out; he immediately turned his horse short round and came up close to the glass and bid me put it down; he said, put down your glass, then he said, I want money, and money I must have. I put my hand in my pocket and gave him, to the best of my remembrance, about eight shillings, though I think rather more.

Q. Do you know whether you delivered your money to either of the prisoners?

Penwarne. I can positively swear Barrett is the man I gave my money to; I took a good deal of notice of him.

Q. In what manner was he dressed?

Penwarne. In a light colour beaver surtout coat; I did not observe what cloaths he had under it, as it was buttoned; his hair hung about his ears, and was pinned at the sides; his hair hung down very strait. I saw them at Sir John Fielding 's the next morning after. When I gave them my money, they asked me for my watch. I said, I had no watch. Said he, upon your honour. - I said, upon my honour I have no watch. Barrett said, let the gentlemen go off. The other said, he would have the watch. He said, don't delay the gentlemen, driver go on, or I will blow your brains out: upon which the driver went on. As soon as I saw Barrett at Sir John Fielding 's, I recollected him that very moment. I did not see Gregory till he was brought to the bar; I knew him immediately.

Q. How long might he be at the chaise?

Penwarne. He did not detain us above five minutes: he behaved as civil as could be.

Q. When you saw him at Sir John Fielding's, was his hair in the like condition as when he robbed you?

Penwarne. Yes, I remarked his hair a good deal.

Q. Did you take any notice of Gregory?

Penwarne. No, I never so much as looked at him, I heard him swear a good deal, and thought he was drunk, by his talk.

Q. What time in the evening was it, that you was robbed?

Penwarne. I suppose it might be before seven; we drove at a great rate. I did not observe him till I saw him put his hand into his pocket and take out a pistol, then it struck me a good deal; I thought what his errand was immediately.

Q. What coloured horse was Barrett on?

Penwarne. It struck me that it was a bay.

Q. Could you distinguish his face clearly?

Penwarne. I could distinguish very clearly.

Cross Examination.

Q. You say, you set out from Partridge's at near six o'clock in a chaise and pair?

Penwarne. Yes.

Q. How many miles did you come an hour?

Penwarne. I should suppose twelve or fourteen miles: the horses set off a gallop, and never stopped galloping till we came to a little town, I don't know the name of it, I believe it is Cramford.

Q. How long might you be before you was robbed?

Penwarne. About fifty minutes, I should suppose.

Q. Why, it is about twelve miles?

Penwarne. Yes.

Q. Do you think you came it in an hour?

Penwarne. I had not a watch.

Q. You took no notice of these men before they came to the chaise?

Penwarne. No.

Q. You was not surprised at all?

Penwarne. Yes, I was.

Q. How long might he be at the chaise?

Penwarne. I believe, about five minutes; he was not there so long as Gregory; Gregory was not easily contented.

Q. Was it dark?

Penwarne. No, very good light.

Q. You gave him eight shillings, did you give him the money directly?

Penwarne. Yes.

Q. Then he went away directly?

Penwarne. No, he asked me for my watch, he stood at the chaise door still.

Q. Do you swear to his hair or his person?

Penwarne. I am certain to both.

Q. Though you never saw him before?

Penwarne. I never saw him before to my knowledge.

Valentine Crew. I was behind the chaise on the 19th of March. When the chaise was coming to town, it was stopped at Hounslow Heath: just as we got to Butcher's Grove, I saw two men coming up to the chaise; I took particular notice of Barrett before he came to the chaise. Barrett rode a brown bay horse: when they came to the chaise, Barrett twice cried, stop; the driver pulled in; and he said, down with your glasses: the other was up close by the driver's side. He cried, down with the glasses; which they immediately did; then he said, I want your money. He was on the right side of the chaise: in less than a minute Gregory came from the driver with another pistol, and said to me, D - n you, if you stir I will blow your brains out. I had a single pistol, with which I was going to blow Barrett's brains out.

Q. Are you sure it was Barrett?

Crew. Yes, I am certain of it. I did not take the pistol out of my pocket.

Q. I understand you was going to fire?

Crew. I did not take the pistol out of my pocket; I unbolted it.

Q. Did Gregory see what you was going about?

Crew. I do not know; he came round by the wheel of the chaise, fronting the hind wheel, and said, if I stirred, or to that purpose, he would blow my brains out, and said, Deliver, deliver, or I will blow your brains out directly. Barrett, I believe, had got the money, and Gregory demanded the watches.

Q. Barrett demanded the money of Mr. Pike?

Crew. Yes, and said, D - n your blood deliver directly.

Q. Look at the two prisoners: what do you say as to Barrett?

Crew. I say, he is the person, but his hair was not done up as it is now. Barrett was on the right hand side of the chaise. I am positive as to Barrett; his hair was hanging strait over his shoulders, in the same manner as it was when he came before Sir John Fielding the next morning: there were about forty people in the room at he Justice's: as soon as I opened the door, I recollected him and said, that is the man, he was standing up against the chimney piece.

Q. What cloaths had he on?

Crew. A light coloured great coat.

Q. How long were they at the chaise?

Crew. About four or five minutes.

Q. You know this man's life is at stake: I ask you once more, if you are positive to the man?

Crew. I am positive upon my oath.

Q. What do you say as to Gregory?

Crew. I am certain he is the other; he had a lightish coat on too, he rode a black horse with a white face.

Cross Examination.

Q. What time was it when your master was robbed?

Crew. I believe it was about eight minutes before seven o'clock; I had my watch in my hand about ten minutes before, when on the other heath, it then wanted a quarter of seven; it was not above five minutes after. I observed how long we were going the mile.

Q. The money was given directly as the glasses were put down?

Crew. No, it might be a minute and a half after. When they had got the money, Barrett asked, if they had any watches? Mr. Pike, and Mr. Penwarne said, they had no watches: the prisoners said, have you not, upon your honour. They said, they had not, upon their honour: then they bid the driver drive on.

Q. When you saw Barrett, you saw his hair?

Crew. I saw his features before he came to the chaise, just as he came to the horses head, before the chaise stopped.

Q. Do you swear you could distinguish his face before the chaise stopped?

Crew. Yes, but not so well as I could afterwards.

Q. Did you ever see either of them before?

Crew. Not to my knowledge.

Court. When you went to Sir John Fielding 's, Gregory was there as well as Barrett?

Crew. No, he came in about half an hour: when I saw him, I knew he was the person. Gregory's hair was in drop curls.

Q. Did you say any thing to any body on the road, about ten pounds a piece for them?

Crew. I said no such thing. Mr. Pike said something about it.

Court. You say, you knew them both by their hair and features?

Crow. Yes, I did.

Q. It could not be very light?

Crew. It was light enough to distinguish their faces.

Q. Was it a dark wet night, or a clear sky.

Crew. I do not know. It was light enough to distinguish a man's face.

Q. to Mr. Pike. What sort of a night was it?

Pike. It was a very light night, I saw the sun go down, myself, very bright.

William Godfrey . I drove the post chaise. I live with Mr. Patridge. I drove the two gentlemen from Mr. Patridge's on the 19th of March. We were stopped on Hounslow Heath by two men; I did not take any notice of them; they were very much in liquor: they held their heads so down on their horses, I could not take notice of them.

Q. You remember the circumstance of the chaise being robbed: have you always told the same story you do now?

Godfrey. Yes.

Cross Examination.

Q. At what rate did you drive?

Godfrey. About ten miles an hour.

Q. What time was the chaise stopped?

Godfrey. About dusk; it was very dark when we got into the town.

Q. Was it dark when you was stopped?

Godfrey. It was dusk.

Q. It was quite dark when you got into the town?

Godfrey. Yes.

Counsel for the crown. Did you go directly to the town, or stop any where first?

Godfrey. We stopped about ten minutes at the end of the town.

Q. to Mr. Pike. You gave an account, that you met some men at the end of the town?

Pike. Yes, and stopped ten minutes, or a quarter of an hour with them, I believe.

Q. What kind of light had you, when you got to the end of the town?

Pike. It was dusk, not quite dark, I could see the people under the trees, I could see who, and what they were.

Richard Bryant . I attend at Sir John Fielding 's. I was returning to town, about eight in the evening. I stopped at the Sun, at Hounslow; the landlord informed me, two gentlemen had been robbed in a chaise, on the Heath. And Mungo, (which is a name they call the last witness by) drove it, who was over the way. I went over to Godfrey, and he gave me a description of the men: he said, one had his hair about his ears, and the other was very much in liquor, and had had a fall from his horse: he said, they were two young men; one was mounted on a black mare, and the other on a bay gelding, which had been let blood. Upon receiving this information, I said, I had seen two such men on the Heath between five and six o'clock, and could tell them from a thousand. James Othen , Lord Berkley's keeper and I went in pursuit of them; we were both on horseback. We took the prisoners at the King's Head, Longford. I asked the landlady, if such men were there, describing them, she said, yes, they had supped, and were just going to bed. I desired to see them; we went up stairs, I laid hold on Gregory, and found this pistol, (producing it) in his pocket: just after I had found it, he said, d - n my blood, I ought to have another. Just as he was speaking this, the hostler brought in another, which he had dropped at the stable door, which exactly matched that I had taken from him. I then searched his pockets, and found a guinea and half in gold, fourteen shillings and sixpence in silver, a bad sixpence, eight pennyworth of halfpence, and two farthings. Mr. Othen took this pair of pistols out of Barrett's pocket, (producing them.)

Cross Examination.

Q. Is it not usual for gentlemen to travel with pistols?

Bryant. No.

Q. How far is the King's Head from the place where the robbery was committed?

Bryant. About five miles: it was near nine o'clock when we got there.

James Othen . I am servant to Lord Berkley at Hounslow. When the information was given of the robbery, I went with the last witness to Longford.

Court. Was you present when the post-boy gave the description of the men?

Othen. When we came to Hounslow, we stopped at the Sun. Mr. Holmes, who keeps the Sun, informed us, there had been a robbery committed, and said, he would fetch the post boy: he did, and the post boy said, the chaise was robbed by two little men; that was all I heard him say about it. I did hear him say something about his hair. I went with Bryant to Longford: I enquired at the King's Head, at Longford, if they had seen two such men as I described; they said, there were two such young men in the house. Bryant went into the room first, I followed him, he laid hold of Gregory, and took a pistol out of his pocket: I laid hold of Barrett, and I took a pistol out of each of his pockets; these are the pistols, ( which are produced.

Gregory's Defence.

Mr. Barrett asked me to go down with him to Alysbury; he said, he was engaged with a company of comedians. I agreed to go with him; his horse was taken lame, that we could not proceed any further than Longford that night: just as we were going to bed there, these people came, and said, there had been a robbery committed on the road, and they believed we were the people, and accordingly they took us to Bow Street.

Barrett's Defence.

On the Sunday, before I was taken, I had engaged in a party with a company of comedians, I met with Gregory, and asked him to accompany me. We dined at Kew Bridge, and stayed till four in the evening: accordingly we set forward; my horse became lame, I had him bled at Hounslow, for which I paid sixpence. By the time the horse was bled it was quite dusk; accordingly, I said, to Gregory, we must keep up a sharp pace, or else we shall be very late before we come to any place: we rode on, it was quite dark before we got two miles over the Heath. I said, then we would put up at the first house we come at. It had been a very rainy day, I began to repent of my undertaking, because it was such a rainy day. We were riding fastish, I was intimidated; he said, you have got pistols, you can defend yourself. I said, I was not used to be out of an evening, I was not found of it; I would therefore put up at the first house we came to. Accordingly we put up at the King's Head at Longford; we asked if they had any thing for supper; we went first, and saw the horses safe in the stable, and desired them to be taken care of: the lame one, the ostler said, he was very lame, but believed, he would be able to proceed on the journey in the morning: we desired to be called early. After we had been in the house about an hour, two men came in, one, a man of Sir John Fielding 's, the other a servant of Lord Berkley's. I thought they might be people come to the house as we were; one of them came up to me, and said, young man, I must search you, and collared me, and he pulled a pistol out of my pocket. I then asked his reason for searching me, he said, there had been a robbery committed on Hounslow Heath, and he imagined we were the perpetrators of it. I well knowing my innocence, readily consented to let him search me; I knew he must execute his duty, and therefore, I consented to it immediately. I did not know I should be tried to-day, my witnesses are to come out of the country.

For Gregory.

Edward Lovybond . I am a hatter, opposite Great Turnstile, Holborn. I have known Gregory six years or upwards, I never knew but he bore a very fair character; he lived at this time with his father-in-law, an attorney, in Castle Yard. I never heard to the contrary but that he was a sober honest lad.

James Parkinson . I am a taylor, in Leather Lane. I have known Gregory six or seven years; he is a sober honest man as ever I knew; he was with his father-in-law, who is an attorney in Castle Yard.

Margaret Done . My husband keeps a public house in Castle Yard. I have known Gregory two or three years; he lived with his friends in Castle Yard; he was a very sober young man, and bore a very good character.

Mary Shepherd . I live in Wharton's Court, Holborn Bars, my husband is an attorney's clerk. I have known Gregory five years; he was a very sober honest gentleman.

Robert Capon . I live in Gate Street, Lincoln's-Inn-Fields. I have known Gregory eight or nine years; I always heard a very good character of him.

Both guilty , Death .

276, 277. (M) ANN WINTER and ANTHONY HARRIS were indicted, the first, for breaking and entering the dwelling house of Euphen Witherspoon on the 14th of February , about the hour of eleven in the forenoon, (no person being in the said dwelling-house) and stealing a black silk gown, value ten shillings, a black silk petticoat, value four shillings, a blue silk gown, value twenty shillings, a quilted yellow silk petticoat, value ten shillings, two linen gowns, value twenty shillings, a linen bed-gown, value sixpence, a black quilted calimanco petticoat, value four shillings, a fly dimity petticoat, value eight shillings, a white linen under petticoat, value sixpence, thirteen cheque linen aprons, value eight shillings, a fine flowered muslin apron, value four shillings, five linen aprons, value two shillings, a flannel petticoat, value two shillings, two pair of cotton stocking, value two shillings, twelve linen shifts, value twelve shillings, two yards of linen cloth, value two shillings, a pair of white silk stockings, value two shillings, a pair of black silk stockings, value two shillings, a pair of white worsted stockings, value sixpence, two pair of white cotton stockings, value on shilling, two pair of linen sheets, value eight shillings, an odd linen sheet, value two shillings, three pair of linen pillow cases, value three shillings, two yards and a half of plain white-silk, value two shillings, a flowered white sattin cloak, value four shillings, a black sattin cloak, value four shillings, a red deffield cloak, value three shillings, two linen table cloths, value one shilling, a pair of white silk gloves, value one shilling, eight linen napkins, value four shillings, eight linen towels, value two shillings, eight linen dusters, value one shilling, seven linen night caps, value three shillings, a pair of laced ruffles, value six shillings, two laced muslin handkerchiefs, value four shillings, four single linen handkerchiefs, value four shillings, two single cotton handkerchiefs, value three shillings, five double muslin handkerchiefs, value six shillings, two double cotton handkerchiefs, value four shillings, one yard and three quarters of a yard of Selisia lawn, value five shillings, two yards and a half of Irish cloth, value three shillings, a mahogany tea chest, value five shillings, three tin cannisters, value three shillings, six silver tea spoons, value six shillings, a silver salt spoon, value one shilling, a pair of woman's stays, value ten shillings, a flannel ironing cloth, value one shilling, two yards and a quarter of plain book muslin, value six shillings, six small iron keys, value one shilling, an iron ring, value two pence, a copper saucepan, value one shilling, a mourning ring with two diamond sparks, and a chrystal stone set in gold, value ten shillings, two stone rings set in gold, value ten shillings, a pair of black sattin shoes, value two shillings, and a pair of woman's leather pumps, value two shillings , the property of the said Euphen, in her dwelling house, and the other for receiving the above goods, well knowing them to have been stolen . ++

Both Acquitted .

278. (M) THOMAS GREGORY was indicted for stealing a silk and thread purse, value one shilling, a five moidore piece, a three pounds-twelve piece, three five guinea pieces, four two guinea pieces, eighteen quarter guineas, one guinea, and one half guineas, the property of Joseph Faikney , Esq ; in his dwelling house , February the 23d . ++

Acquitted .

279, 280. (2d M) WILLIAM PERKIS and CHARLES SANGO were indicted for stealing a pair of leather breeches, value three shillings , the property of Richard York , April 21 . ~

Both Acquitted .

281. (2d M) ANN TENNANT was indicted for stealing twenty yards of check muslin, value ten shillings , the property of Thomas Rawle , Thomas Jenkins , and John Blake , April 22 . ~

John Blake , one of the partner's proved the muslin to be his and his partners property.

Thomas Covard . I am shopman to the prosecutors who are partners . On the 22d of this month, (last Saturday) about five in the afternoon the prisoner came to our shop; she bought two yards and a half of white cotton, which she paid for, she then went out of the shop; Mr. Rawle desired me to go after her, as he suspected she had taken something. I followed and stopped her, when she had not got twenty yards distant from the house; I told her, I believed she had taken something out of the shop: she said, she had not; I lifted up her cloak, and took this piece of muslin from under her left arm, which I am sure, is the prosecutors property.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence.

Guilty . T .

282. (2d M) MARGARET, the wife of JEREMIAH STACEY , was indicted for stealing a silk gown, value seven shillings, a crape gown, value seven shillings, a cotton gown, value three shillings, a black silk cloak, value two shillings, a piece of flowered cotton, value one shilling, a piece of stuff, value sixpence, the property of Elizabeth Boorer , widow ; and a silk and stuff gown, value four shillings , the property of Mary Boorer , spinster , January 30 . ++

Acquitted .

(2d M) MARGARET, the wife of JEREMIAH STACEY , was a second time indicted for stealing a pair of linen sheets, value two shillings, two pewter plates, value sixpence, and a copper tea kettle, value ten-pence, the property of Elizabeth Boorer , widow, being in a lodging room, let by the said Elizabeth to the said Margaret, against the statute , January 30 . ++

Acquitted .

283. 284. (2d M) WILLIAM BRANSGROVE and MARY, the wife of JAMES TERRY , were indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling house of Henry Jackson on the 17th of April , about the hour of ten in the night, and stealing a pair of Blankets, value sixteen shillings, one bed-quilt, value fourteen shillings, four linen sheets, value eight shillings, two table cloths, value eight shillings, a napkin, value one shilling, a black quilted petticoat, value eight shillings, a linen gown, value ten shillings, a pair of stays, value one pound one shilling, a black silk cloak, laced, value ten shillings and sixpence, three pair of cotton stockings, value six shillings, a hat, value one shilling, a thickset frock, value five shillings, a pair of leather breeches, value one shilling and sixpence, three linen shirts, value ten shillings and sixpence, a pair of worsted stockings, a cotton handkerchief, value one shilling, the property of the said Henry: a a pink shaloon petticoat, value twelve shillings, a black callimanco petticoat, value five shillings, a flannel petticoat, value one shilling, two cotton gowns, value twenty one shillings, a stuff gown, value four shillings, four linen shifts, value eight shillings, five check aprons, value ten shillings, a white linen apron, value three shillings, a black silk handkerchief, value two pence, a band box, value two-pence, three pair of linen sleeves, value one shilling, three silk ribbands, value sixpence, and two linen caps, value fourpence, the property of Mary Jackson , in the dwelling house of the said Henry . ++

Henry Jackson . I live at a place called Northolt . My house was broke open last Monday se'nnight at night. I was at Watford, I went on Sunday, and returned on Tuesday about seven in the evening. When I came home, I found the house open: there was no marks of violence. The prisoners owned they got in at a window.

Mary Jackson . I am sister to the last witness: I was at Watford with my brother when the house was broke open. The goods mentioned in the indictment were produced: and deposed to by Henry Jackson and Mary Jackson .

John Palmer . I am one of the patrole. I stopped the prisoners with these bundles upon them in Oxford Street, on Tuesday the 18th; the constable has had them ever since.

Richard Barnard . I am a constable. I received these things that have been produced, from the last witness, and have had them in my custody till now . I took the prisoners before the justice; I found a knife upon the man, with which, he said, he had broke open two boxes, in Mr. Jackson's house, at Northolt. He said, the woman had been there to nurse Mr. Jackson, in the small pox: that they got a ladder from the hay-rick, by which they got into the house; but the woman denied it, till the people came, then she confessed it, and craved mercy: we took coach, and went down and found the ladder there, as they had said; and the things were missing out of the house.

William Watkins . I stopped them on the road, and examined them, as my brother patrole has told your lordship.

Bransgrove said nothing in his defence.

Terry's Defence.

I never did so before.

Both guilty of stealing the goods, to the value of thirty-nine shillings; but not guilty of burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house .

T .

285. (2d M) THOMAS EVANS was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling house of John Holden , on the 19th of January , between eight and ten in the forenoon, (no person being in the said dwelling house,) and stealing a cloth great coat, value seven shillings, a cloth coat, value fifteen shillings, a cloth waistcoat, value five shillings, a linen shirt, value two shillings, and a pair of Buck-skin breeches, value two shillings, the property of the said John Holden : two linen shirts, value one shilling, a pair of leather breeches, value fifteen shillings, two pair of worsted stockings, value five shillings, a pair of men's leather shoes, value four shillings, a pair of steel shoe buckles, plated with silver, value three shillings, a man's hat, value three shillings, and a muslin neckcloth, value one shilling, the property of John Branch , in the dwelling house of the said John Holden . ++

John Holden . I am a paper maker at Hare-field . My house was broke open the 19th of January. I have no family but a son-in-law, and myself. We went to work at six, or between six and seven in the morning. I fastened the door and left all safe. When I returned at about four o'clock, I found the casement open. I saw some old ragged cloaths on the floor, that I had observed on the prisoner, the night before: there was a red string I observed in his breeches, that hung down below his frock, when he was at my house the night before. I missed all the things mentioned in the indictment; they were in the house when I went out in the morning.

John Branch . I am son-in-law of the last witness. I lost the several things mentioned to be my property in the indictment.

Charles Branch . I took the prisoner, with a pair of breeches, a great coat, a shirt, and a pair of stockings, on him, that were stole out of the house. (The great coat produced, and deposed to by Holden.

Prisoner's Defence.

I found the things.

Not guilty of breaking and entering the dwelling house, but guilty of stealing the goods .

T .

286. (2d M) ABRAHAM AARONSHAW was indicted for stealing a cloth great coat, value five shillings , the property of William Cooper , February 9 .

Acquitted .

287. CONSTANTINE MOLLOY was indicted for stealing a cloth great coat, value two shillings , the property of Bladen Hawke , Esquire ; April 5 . ++

The prosecutor was called, and not appearing, his recognizance was ordered to be estreated.

Acquitted .

288. THOMAS PALMER was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling house of Robert Brookes , on the 17th of April , about the hour of nine in the night, and stealing two linen sheets, value ten-pence, a callico petticoat, value one shilling, a black stuff petticoat, value one shilling, two linen gowns, value two shillings, a silk and stuff gown, value one shilling, a red cloth cloak, value eight pence, three linen aprons, value one shilling, a lawn apron, value four-pence, two check aprons, value sixpence, a silk crimson apron, value one shilling, two pair of linen sleeves, value one shilling, seven linen caps, value two shillings, five linen handkerchiefs, value two shillings a pair of worsted stockings, value sixpence, a linen pillow case, value four-pence, a linen towel, value four-pence, forty half-pence, a half crown, and seven shillings in money, numbered, the property of Elizabeth Smith , widow : a linen shirt, value three shillings, a check apron, value two-pence, and three linen towels, value two-pence, the property of Jane Chapman , spinster , in the dwelling house of the said Robert . ++

Robert Brookes . I am a clock maker in King Street, Old Street Square . I rent a house. Elizabeth Smith and Jane Chapman lodge with me. On the 7th of April, I went out about half after seven, in the evening; I left no one in the house; I took care to leave the house secure, I lifted up the latch of the street door to be sure I had locked it. I returned home about twelve o'clock, and found my house broke open. I went up stairs, and saw a parcel of things tied up in a bundle. The next day I saw the prisoner before the justice, but he said nothing.

Jane Chapman . I am a lodger in the house of Mr. Brookes. On the 17th of April, I went out about six in the evening, and returned home after nine. As I came down the street, I saw a light in Mrs. Smith's room. I was very much starried, knowing there was nobody at home. I got Mr. Chapman, and two or three neighbours to go into the house. When I returned, I saw the light was removed into my room, I unlocked the street door, and three men run down stairs; they blew their candle out, but the snuff was a-light: hearing them running down stairs, I pulled the door to again, but they wrenched it out of my hand, and rushed out, one, one way, another the other way, and the prisoner ran across the street. Mr. Hudson tripped up his heels as he was running. I saw him next day, before the justice: I did not see him when he was tripped up and taken by Hudson, not to be sure to his person, I went up to my apartment; I found the door wrenched open; I left it double locked when I went out: there were a shirt unmade, an apron, and a piece of cloth dropped on the outside of my door. I went to Mrs. Smith's room, and found her drawers broke open, and a bundle of things without the door; they had made an attempt to open the lock of my bureau with a chissel, or some such tool.

Richard Hudson . I live next door to Mr. Brookes. I was at my door when the last witness came home; she told me, she was sure there was some body in the house, because she saw a light, and she knew there was nobody at home: she went to get some assistance, and while she was gone, I saw the light move out of the one pair of stairs into the two pair of stairs room. She returned with Campion and some other people: she seemed slurried, and said, now they have got into my room; she opened the street door, and they were coming down stairs with as much speed as they could. I cannot say how many came out, it was so dark: I am positive the prisoner is one that came out of the house, I kept my eye upon him; I took him three or four yards from the door, I never had my eyes off him till I took him; I was close to the door: I delivered him to proper people to take care of him, and went home; I was not in the house. I went next day before the justice; there he said, there were two more besides him in the house. I am very positive he is one that came out of the house.

Robert Camplon . Mrs. Chapman came to me, and told me there was somebody in their house. I went with her; I did not see them come out: the first I saw was the prisoner, in Mr. Hudson's custody; we took him to the coal-shed, there I saw his face, and am sure he is the man. We sent for a constable and gave charge of him.

Robert Short , who keeps the coal-shed, deposed, that Chapman came to him, and further confirms her evidence.

Elizabeth Smith . I lodge at Mr. Brookes's. On the 17th of April I went out about five in the evening: I was fetched home about nine. I found my door broke open, and a bundle of my things tied up in a sheet; my drawers were all broke open. I am sure I fastened my door when I went out. (The bundle produced by the constable) these things are my property; the constable has an apron which he took out of the prisoner's pocket; that apron is mine, I described it before I saw it.

William Jackson : I am a constable, I was sent for to take charge of the prisoner, a watchman searched him, and found in his pocket a bunch of picklock keys, a tinder-box, a stint, a steel, some matches and this apron; he told me, there were two others concerned with him, whose names are George Hartley, and James Pagget , I told him if he turn'd evidence he might save his life.

Prisoner's Defence.

As I was coming by this place, the people laid hold of me, I found the things.

Guilty Death .

289. (M.) WILLIAM WOOLEY , was indicted for, that he in the king's highway in and upon William Ruthvin , did make an assault, putting him in corporal fear and danger of his life; and taking from his person nineteen shillings in money, numbered , the property of the said William; March 23 . *

Acquitted .

(M.) WILLIAM WOOLEY, was a second time indicted, for making an assault on George Urquhart with a certain offensive weapon and instrument, called a pistol, with a felonious intent, the monies of the said George to steal . Against the statute, March 24 , *.

George Urquhart . On Friday, the 24th of March, between seven and eight in the evening, I walked out from my chambers in Gray's Inn, to a lodging at Kentish Town, that I had for the sake of the air: that evening, Mrs. Camplin, at whose house I lodged, and I and a young gentleman, my nephew, a studentin physic, took a walk. We set off a little after seven; and in a field, on the other side of Fig-lane, we saw before us, three men in the foot path; one of them staid behind.

Q. It was duskish then, I suppose?

Urquhart. Rather dark, it was pretty dark. The men were about twenty yards off, when we saw them; one of them lagged behind, and stood by the bank: there is a high bank, on each side of the foot-path; I went on and passed that man, and Mrs. Camplin and my nephew followed me; when I came within about a yard and a half of the two foremost men, both of them turned about, and one presented a pistol to my head and said stop or you are a dead man; I was a little alarmed at this; I said, what is the meaning of all this, Sir, said he, your life or your money; he had scarcely finished these words, when my nephew left me and made a blow at the pistol with a stick, that surprized me a little, as I would have given them a little money, rather than run any risk; but, however, he drove the pistol out of the man's hand, and it fell into the ditch, I think, then he beat them about the head, the other two seized me, and pulled me by the neck and arm to get me down, but my nephew knocked them about so, that two of them were under the necessity of creeping off as well as they could, the third who is the prisoner at the bar, had hold of me by the neck, he pulled me down with him; he was knocked down, he fell like a stone, by some lucky blow the young gentleman gave him; we secured him, the other two went away and we heard no more of them; when the man recovered a little from his blows, we said, he must go along with us; he said, he would, my nephew got hold of one of his arms, Mrs. Camplin the other, and we took him into Kentish town; we had him into the Blackhorse alehouse, and a great many people came about; my nephew and some of the people conveyed him to St. Giles's round-house; he was the next morning examined before the justice and afterwards committed; we did not find the pistol then, but I saw it plainly knocked out of his hand; we told the people at the Blackhorse, that the pistol was there; some people went with lanthorns to look for it; but I was not present at the time.

David Urquhart . I was with my uncle; the prisoner was the man that presented the pistol and demanded our money; I knocked it out of his hand; we took him upon the spot, he was never out of our custody.

Prisoner's Defence.

I came up by mere chance, I was knocked down and fought in my own defence; I never presented a pistol.

For the Prisoner.

Mary Penny . The prisoner lodged in the house where I live, he was very sober and honest; he kept regular hours, he lived in Steward's Rents, Drury-lane.

Mary Tyner . The prisoner lodged with me two years, he kept good hours, I never heard any harm of him.

John Hands . I am a hairdresser and peruke-maker, the prisoner worked for me going on of two years, I never found any thing but what was just and honest by him.

Guilty . T .

290. (2d M) ANN WATSON , was indicted for stealing two silver teaspoons, value two shillings, a pair of stays, value two shillings, three linen aprons, value three shillings, and a child's cap, value six-pence , the property of William Hampshire , April 8th . *

Acquitted .

291. 292. (2d M.) MICHAEL CONWAY , otherwise IRISH MICK , and THOMAS M'DONALD , were indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling house of John Henderson , on the 16th of February , about the hour of one in the night, and stealing a stone ring, set in gold, value ten shillings, and a pair of silver buckles, value sixteen shillings; the property of William Hunter , in the dwelling of the said John . *

The witnesses were examined apart at the request of the Prisoner.

John Henderson . I am a taylor , and live in Bird-street, by Wapping Church , my house was broke open on the 16th of February last, between one and two in the morning, my wife and I were both in bed, we went to bed before Sarah Hunter , who is one of my lodgers; I saw the kitchen window shut before I went to bed that night, the kitchen is below stairs, there is an area goes down to it, I heard the watchman cry past one o'clock, and before that, about two or three minutes, I heard Mrs. Hunter, (my lodger) squeal out, that is all I know of the matter, except that I heard the words d - n your eyes, spoken by somebody or other, I lost nothing that I know of, the bell was twisted off my kitchen door, and found next morning by the scavengers in the street.

Sarah Hunter . I lodge at Mr. Henderson's, I was up last in the house that night, the kitchen window was fast when I went to bed, my husband's name is William Hunter , he was not at home with me that night, I was a-bed with Elizabeth Theobald ; about two in the morning three men came into the room, I lay upon the ground floor, I was much surprized at that and screamed out, I am positive Conway was one of the three men, one of them, who I don't know, came and seized me by the throat, and swore if I made any sort of noise he would cut off my head, and they drew a sword or cutlass, and held it over me, and the other woman that was in bed with me, upon this I ceased from calling out, and held myself still, but Mrs. Theobald, (the woman that lay me) attempted to scream out, and then they got the bed cloaths over our heads, and almost shifted us, I begged for a little air then they took off the sheets and gave me an opportunity to see them; they brought a dark lanthorn with them, with a candle in it, they demanded my keys and money; they took from me two shillings and a silver thimble, they swore they would cut my head off, if I did not tell where my money was, I gave them the keys of my chest of drawers, and they riffled the chest of drawers; Conway particularly asked if there were any men in the house, I told him, there were none; then he said, he would go up stairs, in order to see what he could get there and swore bitterly, that if we offered to move, he would cut off our heads: in the mean time, Mr. Henderson's wife gave the alarm, so that the prisoners did not go up stairs, before that they had the keys from me they rumaged my drawers and took a small stone ring set in gold off my finger, and the silver buckles from my shoes; upon the alarm given they all ran out. I have never seen the ring or buckles since; but I saw the prisoners at justice Camper's, and am very positive Conway is one of them; I cannot swear to M'Donald; I saw kitchen window had been forced open and the hinges had been wrenched off, that was the way they got in.

Elizabeth Theobald. I was bed fellow with Mrs. Hunter that night: I saw the two prisoners, I am positive to both of them; they and another man came into the room, I can positively swear to both the prisoners; I was not awaked out of my sleep, I was rather between sleep and awake, when they came in, not quite asleep, I did not hear any noise before it was between one and two o'clock; they had a dark lanthorn with them, they turned it round, and in it there was a large candle, one of the men said d - n your eyes, if you speak a word, off go both your heads, and they held a naked sword over us. I would have screamed out, but they stopped my mouth first with their hands, then with the bed-cloaths, they took nothing particularly from me, but riffled Mrs. Hunter; they took a ring from her finger and the buckles from her shoes; they found two shillings in Mrs. Hunter's pocket, when they found there was no more than two shillings, they said they would give it her again; Mrs. Hunter said, she did not want it, but they returned it her, and said they would do that to buy, her a breakfast; this they did of their own accord, without being asked to do it, they took all the things that were in the drawers, and tied them up in order to carry them off but were interrupted by Cecilia Henderson who gave the alarm, they heard a noise at last they cried out by G - d we are gone, then they got up off the bed and ran out of the street door and made their escape.

Q. from M'Donald. Whether you did not say at the justices you knew nothing of me.

Elizabeth Theobald . No. I am very positive as to him, I had a greater opportunity of seeing him than Conway, for he lay upon the bed over me, and had his hand upon my breast, his head was over my head, and I saw his face very plain, and therefore am absolutely positive to M'Donald; I can swear likewise to Conway.

Cecilia Henderson . I am the wife of John Henderson ; I heard the noise, and heard voices of people talking below stairs; I heard them enquire whether there was any man in the house, and heard them say that they would come up stairs; I came down in my shift; I went out through the kitchen, and so up the area; I observed the kitchen window broke, the hinges, were broke off two panes of glass were broke out of the window it was very safe before, I had shut it myself over night; I went up the area stairs, and heard the watchman going past one o'clock. I called the watchman several times, at last, he came back and asked what was the matter. I told him there were thieves in the house; he asked whether there were more than one, I said, I believed there were three or four, upon which he got assistance; but in the mean time the thieves were alarmed and made their escape.

Alexander Tate . I belong to justice Camper, upon the information, the prisoners were taken up upon the 17th of November.

Conway's Defence.

I had been drinking at a public house when this man took me up, I am as innocent as the child unborn.

M'Donald's Defence.

I know no more of it than the man that is unborn.

Both guilty , Death .

293. (2d M) THOMAS COOK , was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling house of Edward Webb on the 6th of April , about the hour of eight in the night and stealing a silver watch, gilt with gold, value five pound, a steel watch chain, value eighteen-pence, a silver seal, value two shillings and a cornclian stone seal set in base metal, value eighteen-pence; the property of the said Edward in his dwelling-house ++.

Acquitted .

294. (2d M.) NATHANIAL CHAPMAN was indicted for stealing a pair of silver tea tongs, value nine shillings, seven gold rings, value fourteen shillings, two garnet necklaces, value ten shillings, four ear rings, value ten shillings, a deal box, value twopence, three French beads, value three shillings, two silver hair pins, value sixpence, a silver stay-hook value one shilling, a pair of garnet studs, value sixpence, a necklace of cut glass, value sixpence, a callico bed gown, value five shillings, two linen shifts, value one shilling, nine pair of ruffles, value ten shillings, a muslin apron, value four shillings, two lawn aprons, value four shillings, six linen handkerchiefs, value six shillings, six laced caps, value twelve shillings, six muslin caps, value twelve shillings, a black silk tucken, value one shilling, a black silk handkerchief, value three shillings, a child's hat, value one shilling, and three pair of cotton stockings, value three shillings, the property of Robert Lawson , in the dwelling house of the said Robert , March 17 . *

Robert Lawson . I am a taylor , I live opposite St. Giles's Church . My house was robbed between the hours of one and three in the afternoon, on the 17th of March. I was out at work. Some of the things pawned by the prisoner, I have seen again, some I have not. I lost all the things mentioned in the indictment, ( repeating them)

Cross Examination.

Q. Did you, or your wife owe the prisoner any money?

Lawson. No, not a farthing; he was a stranger to us.

Mary Lawson . I am the wife of the last witness. I lost the several things mentioned in the indictment, (repeating them.) I don't know who took them; I might have seen them that morning.

James Vincent . I am servant to Mr. Layton, a pawnbroker. This pair of tea tongs' and these three rings, (producing them) I took in of the prisoner, and lent him ten shillings upon them.

They are deposed to by Mrs. Lawson.

John Brooks . I am servant to Mr. Masters, a pawnbroker in Holborn. This ring, (producing one) was pledged by the prisoner, on the 17th of March, my fellow apprentice took it in, he is not here.

John Tubb . I am a constable, I took Chapman in his own apartment, I charged him with this robbery, he said he knew nothing of it said if he would confess it would be better for him: I did not make him any promise that he should not be prosecuted, nor did I, hear that any body else did.

Joseph Wood . I am a constable. I found a neck-lace, two rings, some hair pins, a bedgown, and a pair of stockings in the prisoner's lodgings.

(They are produced and deposed to by Mrs. Lawson.)

Dennis Mc . Donald. I am a constable, I was with the last witness when he found these things.

Prisoners Defence.

My lord, I received them of Mrs. Pearce, on the 17th of March, between five and six o'clock, she owed me a little money, I told her I was going in the country, and should be glad of it; she said, she had some things which were left her at the decease of her father she would give me to raise the money on, and she gave me these things.

The prisoner called.

" John Lewis , who deposed, that he attended

"in the East-India company's service in

"the morning, and collected tradesmen's debts

"in afternoons. That he had known the

"prisoner five years, that on the 17th of March

"about three or four in the afternoon, the prisoner

"desired him to go with him to one

"Mrs. Pearse, who owed him some money;

"that he went with him; that the prisoner told

"Mrs. Pearse he was going into the country,

"and wanted the money she owed him; that

"she said, she had no money, but she had some

"valuable things she would let him have to " raise the money, and delivered him some

"rings and some linen, thereabouts there

"were six rings, that he should not the

"linen, but thought he should know the rings;

"upon looking at the things, he said, he would

"swear to the rings and necklace and tongs,

"that she sold they were her husband's property

"that the witness had no suspicion they were not

"honestly come by Upon his cross examination,

"he said, he could not say particularly, why

"he could swear to the things, that there was

"no mark on them, that he never had them in

"his hand, but that they were like the things

"she gave to the prisoner, that he did not

"know whether there was any crest, mark or

"coat of arms on them, he did not examine

"them so far, that there were six rings, three

"red and three green; that Mrs. Pearse took

"no account at all of the things when she delivered

"them to the prisoner."

"The prisoner called one other witness to

"his character."

Guilty of stealing the goods to the value of 39 s. T .

295. 296 (1st M) MARY WILLS and MARY the wife of WILLIAM WARD , were indicted, the first for stealing twelve pewter plates, value three shillings, two pewter dishes, value one shilling, four copper saucepons, value two shillings, a copper tea-kettle, value six-pence, two bed quilts, value two shillings, and a pound weight of tea, value four shillings , the property of John Mort , and the other for receiving the above goods, well knowing them to have been stolen April 7th . *

Acquitted .

297 (1st M) JANE BATSON , otherwise HOBBS, otherwise DAVIS , was indicted for stealing a copper tea-kettle, value two shillings, the property of Benjamin Legoe , being in a lodging room let to the said Jane by the said Benjamin , December 23d ++.

Acquitted .

298. (1st M) LEWIS BOWDREY was indicted for stealing a pistol mounted with brass, value two shillings, and a whip mounted with silver, value two shillings , the property of John Craig , April 12th ++.

Acquitted .

299. (2d. M) DAVID COLLINS , was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Harris , on the 26th of February , between the hours of five and six in the afternoon, (the said William and others of his family being in the said dwelling-house,) and stealing a scane of black silk of the weight of ten pound one ounce, value ten pounds, the property of John Conner , in the dwelling-house of the said William Harris ++.

Acquitted .

300. (1st M) GEORGE STANLEY and SAMUEL RILEY were indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling house of Margaret Jones , spinster , on the 28th of March , about the hour of nine in the night, and stealing two silk and cotton handkerchiefs, value three shillings, the property of the said Margaret, in her dwelling house . ++

Both Acquitted .

301, 302. (2d M) THOMAS URDELL and JAMES LEECH were indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling house of Mary Delare , widow , on the 17th of March , between the hours of twelve and two in the night, and stealing a red cloth cardinal, value ten shillings, a black sattin cardinal, value twenty shillings, a paduasoy cardinal, value three shillings, a silver punch ladle, value two shillings, a lawn apron, value three shillings, three linen handkerchiefs, value three shillings, two silk handkerchiefs, value four shillings, a crown piece, a silver tea spoon, value one shilling, five check linen aprons, value five shillings, a linen bed gown, value five shillings, six yards of Irish linen cloth, value nine shillings, a linen shift, value four shillings, three hundred and sixty halfpence, a canvas bag, value one penny, and eight pounds weight of bad copper halfpence, value three shillings the property of the said Mary, in her dwelling house . *

Both Acquitted .

303. (2d M) WILLIAM YOUNG was indicted for coining a piece of copper money, called a halfpenny of this realm .

2d Count. For coining a piece of false, seigned, and counterfeit copper money to the likeness and similitude of the good, legal, and current copper money of this realm, called a halfpenny, March 1 . ++

Acquitted .

304. (2d M) ELIZABETH, the wife of JOHN WHIME , was indicted for marrying Bartholomew Patterson , on the 6th of February : John White her former husband being then living .

The prosecutor was called, but not appearing his recognizance was ordered to be estreated.

Acquitted .

305. (2d M) MICHAEL M'CANN (a Black) was indicted for stealing a silver watch, value thirty shillings, the property of John Dobree , privately in the shop of the said John , March 24 . *

John Dobree . I am a pawnbroker , I live at the corner of Bloomsbury Court, High Holborn . On the 24th of March, the prisoner and two other men came into my shop to purchase a watch. I shewed them several watches; they bought one, they gave earnest for it, and left it to be repaired. After they were gone, I missed a silver case single watch, maker's name, J. Davis. On Monday, one of the men, who were with the prisoner, who bargained for the watch, came for it. I told him, when they were there, on Friday, I missed a watch; he seemed surprised, and said, the Black must have taken it. Having no suspicion of him, I let him have the watch away, he had bargained for. Two or three days after, the prisoner came into my shop, and shewed me an old watch he had, I took the watch, and then charged him with the robbery: he denied it; I sent for a constable, and he was taken to justice Welch's office. I found a watch paper in the watch I took from him; by the direction of that paper I went to Mr. Triquet, in Cranbourne Alley, and there I found my watch.

John Valiance . I am servant to Mr. Triquet. The prisoner brought a silver watch to be cleaned, the latter end of March: it is a single case silver watch, maker, I Davis, No. 104. (The watch produced, and deposed to by the prosecutor.

Prisoner's Defence.

I went to this gentleman's shop with two young fellows to buy a watch: this watch was handed up and down, I had it in my hand several times; I had no intention to steal it.

Guilty of stealing to the value of four shillings and ten-pence .

B .

306. (2d M) MARTHA SLADE was indicted for stealing two silk gowns, value twelve shillings, a white linen gown, value six-pence, a damask petticoat, value two-pence, and a white dimity petticoat, value two shillings , the property of Ann Smith , spinster , April 11 . *

Ann Smith . I live at Mr. Ferguson's, Great Russel Street, Bloomsbury. I left the things mentioned in the indictment, in a box, with Ann Watkins , in Great Ormond Street , with whom I had been a fellow servant .

Ann Watkins . I am servant to Mr. Trant, in Great Ormond Street. Ann Smith lived fellow servant with me nine weeks: she left her box with me; she desired me to send it to her by the prisoner, on the 10th of April. I delivered it to the prisoner.

Joseph Thacker . I am a salesman at Uxbridge. On the 11th of April, the prisoner offered to sale two gowns, two petticoats, and several other things. I thought they were not her own; I got a constable and stopped them. (They are produced, and deposed to by the prosecutrix.) She said, at first, they were her own, but afterwards told me where the person lived, they belonged to.

John Read . The last witness gave me charge of the prisoner and box of things; the box was broke open.

Prisoner's Defence.

I took the box on my shoulder, it fell down and broke open, and one of the gowns fell out. I never was in a prison before.

Guilty of stealing the goods to the value of four-pence .

W

307. (1st M) ANN THOMPSON was indicted for stealing a linen gown, value twelve shillings, a linen sheet, value two shillings, a woman's hat, value one shilling, a pair of woman's stays, value ten shillings, a linen shirt, value two shillings, a Nankeen waistcoat, value two shillings, a dimity petticoat, value two shillings, the property of John Percy : a sattin cloak, value three shillings, a check apron, value one shilling, and two pair of cotton stockings, value one shilling , the property of Elizabeth Wilkinson , March 30 . ++

John Peircy . I live in Red Lion Street, Whitechapel . On the 30th of March I went out about ten o'clock, I double locked my door; my wife was out: about half after two my wife came to me, and told me, the room was broke open, and all the things gone. I had a description of the prisoner, from a woman who lives in the house, who saw her go out. I catched her with some of the things, which she was going to pawn.

Elizabeth Shirn . I was just come out of place. The sattin cloak, and two pair of stockings found upon the prisoner, are my property; I left them with Mr. Peircy. I have been married, and consequently have changed my name since. (The things were produced and deposed to by Peircy and Shirn.)

Elizabeth Taylor . I live in Peircy's house. I saw the prisoner go out with a bundle; I thought she had stole it. I sent directly to Mrs. Peircy, to her father's, to let her know of it.

Robert Moore . I took charge of the prisoner; the things were all found in her apron, but the sheet.

Prisoner's Defence.

I deal in Rag Fair; a woman offered me the things, I had not money to buy them, I offered to sell them for her: she was taken, and cleared.

Guilty T .

308. (1st M) THOMAS WOOD was indicted for stealing a black coloured heifer, value three pounds, and two black coloured cow calves, value five pounds , the property of John Board , March 6 . ++

John Board . I lost a black heifer and two black calves, from Enfield Chase . I found them in Mr. Arnold's yard.

Jeb Arnold . I bought the heifer and two calves from the prisoner. He brought them to me to Winchmore Hill. He said, they belonged to a welch Lord , on the other side of the Chase. I bought them a little after Christmas; they were almost starved then.

Board. I turned them on the Chase a little after Michaelmas: I saw nothing of them for about a quarter of a year. I am sure the heifer and calves I saw in the possession of Arnold, are mine.

Prisoner's Defence.

I have nothing to say, I leave myself to the mercy of the court.

Guilty Death .

309. (1st M) THOMAS CROWTHER was indicted, for that he, in the king's highway, in and upon Mary, the wife of John Wilson , did make an assault, putting her in corporal fear and danger of her life, and stealing from her person, seven yards of red and white spotted cotton, value fourteen shillings, a linen shirt, value three shillings, a yard of linen cloth, value one shilling, and a silk handkerchief, value one shilling , the property of the said John, March 15 . *

Mary Wilson . On the 15th of March, going through Bloomsbury Court, Holborn , about five minutes before ten o'clock at night, the prisoner came up to me, snatched a bundle out of my hand and ran off; he did not say a word to me, or offer to insult me. I pursued him with the cry of stop thief: he was taken and brought back to me; he was out of my sight, but I knew him the moment I saw him brought back. I am sure the prisoner is the man that robbed me: it was a moon-light night; he had no bundle when he was taken. I have never heard of my things.

Q. Was you in no kind of fright?

Wilson. Yes, after he had taken the bundle I was.

Francis Young . I am an engraver. On the 15th of March, coming from Bloomsbury Market, down Bloomsbury Court, I met the prisoner with a bundle; and just after, I met the prosecutrix, who said, he had robbed her. I pursued him, and cried, stop thief: he turned up a timber yard, and there he, was taken, but he had no bundle then.

Charles Barton . I am a coachman. On the 15th of March, going up Holborn, I heard a cry of stop thief. I saw the prisoner running, and the last witness pursuing him. The prisoner turned up a yard: I followed him, and took him, and brought him to Mrs. Wilson, who charged him with robbing her. I took him to the watch house, he had no bundle then.

Prisoner's Defence.

I had been to Gray's-Inn-Lane, and was returning to Westminster. I went up this yard to case myself; as I came down again, these people laid hold of me; and said, I had stole a gentlewoman's bundle.

Guilty of stealing the goods, but not guilty of putting the prosecutrix in fear in the king's highway . T .

310. (1st M) ANN EDWARDS , otherwise JONES , was indicted for stealing two linen sheets, value four shillings, a linen table cloth, value one shilling, four linen towels, value one shilling, two linen dusters, value two-pence, six linen shirts, value twelve shillings, three linen stocks, value one shilling, six linen handkerchiefs, value three shillings and six-pence, a pair of worsted socks, value two-pence, and a linen night-cap, value twopence , the property of Henry Fidler , March 30 . *

Henry Fidler . I live in little Newport Street, Newport Market . I was out when the robbery was committed: when I came home, I was informed of it, and ordered to attend the Rotation Office next morning, which I did, and saw my things there.

Hannah Austrey. I am a washer-woman; I wash for the prosecutor, who lives at one Mr. Sharp's. I carried the prosecutor's linen home: I took it up stairs, and left it in the passage, and went up stairs to speak to a person. When I returned, the bundle was gone: I went down to the door and saw the prisoner with the bundle and took it from her. (The things produced and deposed to by the prosecutor

Prisoner's Defence.

I went into this house in a mistake; I went up stairs, and saw a bundle in the passage, and left it there.

She called one witness, who gave her a good character.

Guilty , T .

311. (1st M) DAVID ERMON was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling house of John Fry , on the 13th of March , about the hours of twelve at noon, (the said John Fry and others of his family being therein) and stealing a nest of wooden drawers, value four shillings, a half guinea, thirteen shillings and six-pence in money, numbered, and thirty-six halfpence, the property of Thomas Hudnell , in the dwelling house of the said John . *

Thomas Hudnell . I live in the house of Mr. Fry, at new Brentford . On the 13th of March I went over to my father's: while I was there, a message came to me that my room was robbed. I found my drawers and money in the custody of John Monday , who took the prisoner.

John Monday . I went up to the Market-house to see what it was o'clock, I heard something make a noise, I peeped through, and saw the prisoner sitting in the hay lost, with the box in his hand telling the money, and saw a hole made out of the lost into the prisoner's room. I called to some of my fellow workmen, and took him.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence.

Not guilty of breaking and entering the dwelling house, but guilty of stealing the goods . T .

312. (1st M) HANNAH, the wife of JOHN MILLER , was indicted for stealing, six silk handkerchiefs, value fifteen shillings, seventeen linen handkerchiefs, value seven shillings, a linen shift, value two shillings, a linen shirt, value three shilling, and a pair of silk stockings, value five shillings , the property of John Forbes , Esquire ; April 4 *

Mrs. Elizabeth Forbes . The prisoner washed at my house. I missed the things mentioned in the indictment, at different times. I applied to Sir John Fielding ; and some of my things were found.

Mary Cooke . I live with Mrs. Forbes. There was nobody about the house but myself, my fellow servant, and the prisoner; there was no one to suspect but the prisoner. On the 3d of April the prisoner came to wash a bed, and came next day to get it up. I sent her up to make the bed, and next morning I missed a pair of silk stockings; there had been nobody else in the house.

Agnes Clayton . I live in Short's Gardens. I pawned a handkerchief for the prisoner at Mr. Lane's; I don't know how long ago.

John Thorne . I live at Mr. Lane's, pawnbroker, in High Holborn. On the 18th of March I lent the last witness one shilling on this handkerchief, (producing it.) Ddeposed to by Mrs. Forbes.

The prisoner, in her defence said, the servant, Mary Cooke , used to send her to pawn things for her; which Cooke denied.

She called three witnesses to her character.

Guilty of stealing to the value of four-pence .

W

3013. (1st M) JAMES HAINSWORTH was indicted for stealing a wooden till, value two-pence, two shillings in money, numbered, a hundred and seventy eight halfpence, and twenty farthings , the property of Ann Guliher , spinster , April 20 . ++

Ann Guliher . I was in an inner room behind the shop. I heard a noise, I came out and saw the prisoner in my shop: at first I took him to be a customer, but observing him move cautiously to the door, I suspected him. I saw he had my till, I followed him, he dropped the till and the money, the money was picked up by the people who were there: I took my till up. I am positive the prisoner is the man, I saw him in the shop with the till.

John Callow . I followed the prisoner upon this alarm, and secured him.

Allen Pickering . I came to the prosecutor's assistance. I saw the prisoner first drop the till: he took some out in his hand, he dropped the rest.

Prisoner's Defence.

I am innocent of the charge.

Guilty T .

314. (1st M) JAMES NEWTON was indicted for stealing seven linen napkins value seven shilling and sixpence, and a linen sheet, value four shillings , the property of Samuel Edkins , April 15 . ++

Samuel Edkins . I am an engraver , I live in White Chapel . I was told by my apprentice, while I was fitting in an inner room, my parlour, that somebody was going out of my shop. I followed the man that was pointed out to me, and overtook him; and upon him I found six napkins, one he had dropped: (produces, and deposes to them.) The prisoner I am positive, is the man.

William Mitchell . I am apprentice to the last witness. The prisoner is the man I saw go out of the shop: I alarmed my master of it.

(Confirms the rest of his master's evidence.)

Prisoner's Defence.

I was not sensible of any thing at the time.

Guilty . T .

315. 316. (1st M) MARY POLLARD and MARGARET BERRY were indicted for stealing a silver watch, value three pounds , the property of Benjamin Moore , March 15 . ++

Benjamin Moore . Another young fellow and I, were drinking with the prisoners, on the 16th of March; we fell a-sleep in the taproom, at a public house in Cow Cross .

Q. The prisoners are women of the town, I suppose?

Moore. I believe so.

Q. You pretty well know that, I supose?

Moore. I cannot deny that. We had been drinking from seven in the morning till twelve, then we fell a-sleep: when we waked, my friend complained he had lost his money; and I, that I had lost my watch. While I was making the complaint, the two prisoners were brought back by Mr. Wood the constable, and the pawnbroker, to whom they offered it to pawn.

Michael Wood . I am a constable. I saw the two prisoners at the pawnbroker's, I suspected them. I made an excuse to talk to the pawnbroker; I saw the watch in his hand. I said, it is a pretty watch, and asked her whose it was. She first said, it belonged to a person in the hospital. I insisted upon seeing the owner: then she said, it belonged to the prosecutor, and took us to the house at Cow Cross.

William Borroushs . I am a pawnbroker. The prisoners offered the watch to me. I did not proceed so far as to agree to advance any thing upon the watch; the constable came in, and the women took me to the place where the prosecutor was.

Samuel Warrey . The prosecutor's acquaintance confirms his evidence.

The prisoners in their defence, said, the prosecutor and his friend lay with them at night, and having no money, the prosecutor left his watch to pawn, to raise money.

The prosecutor denied that he gave them the watch.

Guilty , T .

317. 318. SAMUEL STORER and SAMUEL CROSS , were indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling house of William Willmot , on the 2d of April , about the hour of nine in the night, and stealing a carcass of mutton, value twenty-five shillings, three legs of mutton, value nine shillings, two necks of mutton, value five shillings, half a buttock of beef, value four shillings, and five pounds weight of veal, value two shillings, the property of the said William, in his dwelling house . *

The witnesses were examined apart, at the request of the prisoners.

William Willmot . I am a butcher in Clerkenwell parish . My house was broke open on the second of this month, about nine in the evening. My wife and I went out at half after seven o'clock; it was then dusk; I saw all the doors and windows fast myself; we left no one in the house. We returned at half after ten, when we found the house broke open, the lock of the door was broke, and a pannel drove out of the wainscot: there were taken away a carcass, three legs, and two necks of mutton, half a buttock of beef, and part of a neck of veal. I got a search warrant and a constable, and searched Cross's lodgings, where I found part of the neck of veal. I can swear it was mine, I cut it myself, it was particularly cut, I can swear to it.

Q. Are there no two butchers in London that cut veal exactly alike?

Willmot. No, I do not believe any two butchers do; I can positively swear to it.

Q. Did you find it raw or dressed?

Wilmot. Raw.

Q. Could you tell it after it was dressed?

Wilmot. No, there is no swearing to it after it is dressed; it was the same end of the neck that I lost. There were two legs of mutton found on Storer, by the evidence.

John Dinmore . I am an officer of Clerkenwell parish. I went to search the house of the evidence and Cross, under the warrant, in Cross's lodging, we found a piece of neck of veal; the prosecutor owned it directly. I took Mincher, the evidence before the Justice; there he confessed who committed the robbery We went to search Storer's lodging: when we came opposite the house, a woman opened a window in the next house, and cried out, murder, and thieves, and said, there was a man breaking into her house, for that his foot had come through the ceiling. We went into that house, and found Storer, and two legs of mutton hid there, which the prosecutor owned: he had been going along the top of the house, and his foot broke through the ceiling.

Prosecutor. I can swear to the legs of mutton, they are my cutting.

Dinmore. They all confessed before the Justice, that they committed the robbery, and told the manner in which they did it: they said, one held up the knob of the door, another set his back against it, and a third bumped open. There were no threats or promises used to induce them to confess, that I heard: I was there all the time.

Edward Reynolds . I am a child's shoemaker. I was coming along, on the third of April; I live in the same court with the prisoner Storer. I heard a woman cry out, somebody was breaking into her house. Dinmore ordered me to aid and assist him. We went into the house, and found Storer, and two legs of mutton inthe cock-loft, which the prosecutor owned.

John Mincher , (the accomplice.) Samuel Storer and Cross and I went on Sunday night, and broke open Mr. Wilmot's shop, and took a whole sheep, three legs of mutton, and two necks of mutton, half a buttock of beef, and a neck of veal: there was a latch to the outer door, we opened that; it was the shop door we broke open. Finding nobody at home, I laid hold of the brass knob, and while a coach was going by, the two prisoners bounced it open with their backside; we took the meat away, and hid it, and then got a bag. I cut the carcass in half, and sold half of it for five shillings. Storer sold two of the legs of mutton, he was paid before hand for it, he took it to the people, they were not at home, so he kept them at his own house, and Dinmore came and found there and found Storer in the cock-loft. We dressed part of the veal, and ate it, and Wilmot came and found the rest of it; we ate the beef on Sunday night.

Q. What time did you do this?

A. About a quarter after nine. We had no candle; we know the way of the shop; we lost one of the necks of mutton going along; the other necks of mutton were eaten by the hogs, for we hid them in a place where people keep hogs. I am a Collar-maker, I live just by the shop.

Storer's defence.

I know nothing of the affa ir.

Cross's Defence.

I know nothing of it.

Both Guilty , Death .

319. 320. (1st M.) HENRY JORDAN and FREDERICK WILLIAMS , were indicted for stealing two silver candlesticks with silver nossels, value 7 l. two silver salt-cellars, value 12 s. two silver table spoons, value 12 s. fourteen silver tea spoons, value 14 s. and four silver salt spoons, value 2 s. the property of Thomas Nugent , Esq ; in his dwelling-house April 23d . *

Elizabeth Martin . I am servant to Mr. Nugent in Queen's-square . At half past five o'clock in the morning of the 23d of April, (last Sunday) as I was coming down about my business, I opened the kitchen door, and saw some men, I believe three, I am not quite positive to the number; I was so extremely surprized with it, they were going out of the kitchen window, which is below stairs, into the area, they had forced the door of the kitchen into the area, I went immediately back again up stairs to alarm my fellow-servants. I found my fellow-servants, Andrew Bolan , I told him there were thieves in the house, upon which he got up, put on his waistcoat and breeches, he did not stay to put on his stockings and shoes, he came into my room, put up the sash, and saw with me all the these three men in the area: one was getting over the rails at the time, they got over: and in the mean time when Andrew had seen them, he went down in order to apprehend them; I still kept my eye upon the men, and saw them get into the garden at the bottom of the square, one side of the square is open to the fields, and at the bottom of that, there is a garden which is defended by a small wall, which is within forty yards of Mr. Nugent's house. Andrew asked which way they were gone, as he had lost sight of them during the time he was going down stairs: I said they were got into the garden, upon which he barefooted as he was, jumped into the garden after the men; my master's house is the last but two on the last hand side, I heard one of the persons say, but who I don't know, d - n you, blow his brains out; there were no watch at that time, it was so late they were gone off their stand. I kept my eyes upon them till I saw Andrew run after two of them across the fields, the other had made his escape another way. I looked as long as I could see them running across the fields, then I came down stairs in order to take this bag of plate that was left in the garden, for I saw one of them fling a bag over the area when I looked out of the window, and the first man that got over, picked up this bag, and ran away with it, and got into the garden.

Andrew Bolan . I am servant to Mr. Nugent, I was alarmed by my fellow-servant about half past five in the morning with a cry of thieves in the house; upon which I got up and went into her room, and saw two men in the area, one with a laced hat, and another with a bag, there was a third man that was getting over the rails. I did not stay there much longer, but ran down stairs, and just as I ran down stairs the house bell rang, which I imagine alarmed the people more than they were alarmed before, and made them hasten away as fast as they could; but by the time I had got down stairs, and had opened the bars and bolts, and opened the door, they had got quite out of sight, and had got over the garden wall, which is about thirty yards off. I asked my fellow-servant which way they were gone: she said into the garden; upon which I jumped down; one of the fellows immediately said, d - n you, blow his brains out. I am not certain which said that, there being three to one, it put me to a stand; I did not advance to them, but they were endeavouring to make their escape, and got over the rails into the fields; and Jordan, the shortest of the two prisoners, dropped the bag as he was getting over the pails, I am certain it was him; I got over after them, and pursued two of them, which were the two prisoners, and pursued them as far as the burying ground, there I met with one Parsons, who accompanied me up to the brick kilns. I was barefoot, so that when we ran upon the grass I had the soot of them, and ran faster, but when they came upon hard road I could not run so fast; by that time many people were alarmed, and Parsons went and seized Jordan in my sight; I lost sight of Jordan about two minutes while he was dodging backwards and forwards among the brick kilns, but I am sure to his person, though I had not my eyes upon him during the whole time; I saw him again afterwards, and I am very certain to his person, I went up the moment Parsons had laid hold of him, and said what a fool was you to break open a house at such a time in the morning, at this was; he said he was innocent; then I went round the kiln to look for the other, he was taken not quite in my presence, he was at some short distance. I might have seen him very plain, only the multitude of people that were between me and the prisoner were such, that I cannot exactly say that I saw him taken, neither can I swear to his person. The other had a plain hat; Jordan was much behind, and I had a better opportunity of viewing his face, and I am certain to his person.

Elizabeth Martin . I went down to the garden wall after I had directed my fellow servant where to go, in order to see after this bag, a man had picked it up, and gave it me, it was opened, and contained the several things mentioned in the indictment, except one salt-seller.

The plate was produced in court, and deposed to be the property of Mr. Nugent, by Martin and Bolan.

Andrew Bolan After I had seen this man thus taken, I got Dr. Preston's servant to convey them to prison. and I being barefoot, could not get home quite so easily, I got behind a gentleman's servant on horseback, who conveyed me home.

Parker Thompson . I heard a noise about this time, of a dash on the pavement, I locked out and saw a bag on the pavement, which I suppose made that dash falling on the pavement; I saw Jordan, to the best of my knowledge, taking it up.

Q. Can you swear positively to his person?

Thompson. No, not directly and positively; but it was very much like him, and I believe it was him; he had no hat on at the time he came over the rails from the area, and went into the garden. Andrew came out, and asked where they were gone, and was informed they were in the garden. I also heard somebody say, d - n him, blow his brains out. The short man, which I take to be Jordan, got over the pails into the fields, and dropped the bag, and Andrew pursued him till out of sight. I still kept at the window, while Martin went down stairs, Martin went down to the garden wall, and took the bag in which was the plate from a man, who gave it to her, I had my eye upon them all the time.

Bolan. I saw the candlesticks and most of the plate the day before: it was kept in the cupboard in the kitchen, who I am sure was locked that night this breaking open happened.

Joseph Parsons . I am a shoemaker in Hart-street, Covent-garden. I was accidentally out in the fields to take a walk at half past five last Sunday morning. I heard a cry of stop thief, and saw the two prisoners running, they were pursued by four or five, one a gentleman's servant without shoes or stockings on. At first, I thought it was only some people in play together, I took no notice of it, but seeing the gentleman's servant coming running without shoes or stockings, then I began to think it was something serious, and turned and joined in the pursuit. William, the tallest man, turned round, and said to one of the men that followed after him, You bloody thief, if you touch me I will blow your brains out. I followed Williams, who, in order to avoid me, jumped into a pond up to his middle, I caught at him but could not catch him at that time, and then he ran into a brick kiln, and dodged backwards, there I got a piece of a brick and gave him a blow on the head, which a little stunned him; he put his hand to his head, then I closed upon him. I never lost sight of him from the first, I am certain he was the man. The gentleman's servant then came up and said, What a regue or fool was you to rob a house by day-light; and the prisoner desired him not to use him ill.

Aaron Leigh. I was wheeling some dung to Mr. Harding's yard, who keeps cows; near his cow house, in the fields, I heard a cry of theives, and saw Williams running with a pistol in his hands. upon which I alarmed the milk people, who were in the yard, and they all ran after him; I saw Parsons lay hold of Jordan, and they hunted Williams about for above a quarter of an hour in the brick-kiln, where they dry bricks, dodging about before they caught him. One of the men found him there, and they, to the number of twenty surrounded him; he still stood upon his defence against them all: one of the men, Dick Haslam , offered to seize him, upon which, Williams fired at him, and wounded him in the head: upon his discharging the pistol, they closed in upon him; I was one that did, and then took him, and searched him, for fear he should have more pistols about him; we found no other pistol about him, but we found a silver salt-seller in his pocket. (The salt-seller produced, and deposed to by Bolan, who said, he absolutely saw it the day before, that it was one of a better sort, and was frequently papered up when it was not in use, and stood in that cupboard where the rest of the plate was.

Leigh. This man, when he was taken, he was very stubborn, and said,

"he wished he had

"had two pistols and then he would have fired

"amongst them more; and said, he had as good

"be hanged for a sheep as a lamb. This he said

"as he went to Bridewell."

Williams's Defence.

I only want that man to swear it, I was in the garden to get a flower, they cried stop him, stop him, I ran out of the garden as fast as I could, I know nothing of the robbery more than the child unborn

Jordan's Defence.

I don't know any thing of this man at the bar, I was coming this way and I looked over these pales.

Both guilty , Death .

321. 2st M.) WILLIAM HOPPING was indicted for the wilful murder of William North , by divers times kicking, beating, and throwing the said William North against the ground, thereby giving him a mortel bruise upon the right side of his head, under his right ear, of which he instantly died , April 19th . ++

Acquitted .

322. (2d M.) JOHN WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing a live pig, value 7 s. the property of Samuel Spooner , Feb. 28th . ++

Samuel Spooner . I live in Dyot-street, St. Giles's . I lost a live pig on the 28th of February, I found it afterwards in the house of James Spurlock . I can only swear to my property, I found it alive.

James Spurlock . I bought the pig of the prisoner at a public house the night before the prosecutor claimed it. I gave him 7 s. and a pot of beer for it.

Thomas Lewis . I saw the prisoner take the pig from Mr. Spooner's door, and go off with it. I believe it was about seven o'clock on Friday evening.

Prisoner's Defence.

Going up this street, I saw this pig lying up against the chapel; I took it up, and a chimney sweep asked me what I was going to do with the pig. I said it was none of my property; he took it from me, and sold it to Spooner,

Guilty of stealing the pig to the value of 4 d.

[Whipping. See summary.]

323. (2d M.) MARY LAURENCE was indicted for stealing sixteen yards of blond lace value 40 s. the property of Wm. Cheavly , March 19th .

Acquitted .

324, 325, 326, 327, 328. (2d M.) MARY JOHNSON , otherwise HURST , ANN FRAZIER , JANE BEATY , THOMAS JOHNSON , and RICHARD WINHET , were indicted, the four first for stealing a mocoa ring set in gold, value 20 s. and six guineas in money, numbered , the property of Will. Stukely ; and the other for receiving the above ring, well knowing it to have been stolen , April 8th .

All five acquitted .

329. (2d M.) MARGARET LATHAM was indicted for stealing a silver soup ladle, value 12 s. the property of Peter Rainbeck , April 24th .

Peter Rainbeck . I live in Cecil-street, St. Martin's lane . The prisoner was my servant . I did not miss the ladle till I was sent for, it was offered to sale and stopped.

Robert Salmon . I am a silver smith. The prisoner brought this ladle broke as it is now, (producing it) and offered to sell it me.

The ladle deposed to by the prosecutor.

Prisoner's Defence.

He keeps a bad house, and one of the bad women gave it me to sell, I did not know it was my master's.

Prosecutor. She had the washing of it every day she was with me.

Salmon. The prosecutor keeps a public house , and has an ordinary every day; it is a house of resort for foreigners; it is not a house for girls of the town as she says.

The prisoner called one witness who gave her a good character.

Guilty of stealing the goods to the value of tenpence .

[Whipping. See summary.]

330. (2d M.) SAMUEL ABBOT was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling house of Samuel Chapman , on the 6th of April , between the hours of Eight and Ten in the night, and stealing a leaden pump, value 20 s. four iron bars, value 12 d. and two iron door hinges, value 4 d. the property of the said Samel Abbot, in his dwelling house .

The prosecutor was called, but not appearing, his recognizance was ordered to be estreated.

Acquitted .

331. (2d M) JOHN ADAMS was indicted for stealing two plate conch glasses, value 10 s. the property of Edward Bertles , March 31st .

Acquitted .

332. (2d M) WILLIAM CADWELL , was indicted for stealing a pair of double muslin laced ruffles, value 20 s. a pair of double lawn laced ruffles, value 24 s. two pair of laced robeins, value 2 s. two lace lappets, value 2 s, a muslin apron, value 2 s. two lawn aprons, value 2 s. five muslin handkerchiefs, value 3 s. a lawn handkerchief, value 1 s. four double muslin laced caps, value 10 s. and a single muslin laced cap, value 1 s. the property of Stephen Dawson , in his dwelling house , March 23d .

The prosecutor was called, but not appearing, his recognizance was ordered to be estreated.

Acquitted .

334. (2d M) ANN WILKINS , otherwise WALLER , was indicted for stealing a silver tea-spoon, value 2 s. the property of John Jason , April 14th . ~

John Jason . I live in King's court, Oxford street ; I am a pawnbroker . On the 14th of April, while I was out, the spoon was lost. I left my maid and child in care of the shop, they told me the prisoner had been to take a gown out of pawn. I suspected her, I got a warrant and took her up, and she produced the spoon out of her box; she owned she took it, and begged to be forgiven.

Prisoner's Defence.

I found the spoon.

Guilty of stealing to the value of four pence .

[Whipping. See summary.]

335. (2d M.) JONATHAN SALMON , was indicted for stealing a pair of silver shoe-buckles, value ten shillings, the property of Gabriel Rand , and a cloth waistcoat value five shillings , the property of the John Hunter , February 3d ~.

Acquitted .

336. (2d M) THOMAS GREEN was indicted for stealing a watch, the inside case gold and the outside shagreen, value five pounds and a steel watch chain value four shillings, the property of the Right Hon. Lord North , in his dwelling house , January 20th *.

Acquitted .

337. (M.) MARGRET MARTIN was indicted for stealing a half guinea and a shilling in money, numbered the property of Francis Teer , November 20th .

The prosecutor was called but did not appear.

Acquitted .

338. (2d M) THOMAS TUNKS and JOHN HINES were indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling house of Richard Jackson , on the 28th of December , about the hour of two in the morning, and stealing a mode cloak laced, value twenty shillings, a silver pint mug value forty shillings, and a silver punch ladle value five shillings, the property of Richard Jackson , two pair of brass p istols value twenty shillings, a silver milk pot value five-shillings, a silver pint mug value forty shillings, and a powder flask value one shilling, the property of Harry Pyle , and a pair of silver buckles, the property of George Jackson , in the dwelling house of the said Richard . *

Richard Jackson . I live in the parish of Stepney , my house was broke open on the 28th of December between the hours of two and four in the morning, I went to bed about ten o'clock at night; Elizabeth Nash was the last person up in the house, the doors and windows were all fast when I went to bed; about two in the morning four fellows got into the house, they got in at a side window, one pair of stairs high, the sash of that window was down over night, I am not sure whether the shutters were fast, they broke the shutters of the kitchen window but did not get in there, I heard nothing of them till they broke open the chamber door next to mine, where my father lay, I heard my father cry out murder, that waked me, I got up and went into the room, I saw four men with dark lanthrons and crapes over their faces, I laid hold of one of them who had a pistol in his hand and struggled with him and then two others came up to me with pistols and swore d - n my eyes, if I did not let him go they would blow my brains out, then I sat down on the bed post and said no more to them, there is besides in the family my son and two maid servants, my son came down on the back of me, the fellows knocked my son down, one of the men went up to the servant maids, who were in bed, and those that were left behind demanded my money and the keys of my plate, I could not furnish them with the keys, upon which they broke all the locks in the house; they took fifty-five guineas, and a ten pound bank note.

Court. These things are not in the indictment.

Jackson. The things mentioned in the indictment are the things that are found (repeating them) then they put me and my son in bed to my father and put our caps over our faces and covered us with the bed cloths, all the curtains were undrawn and one of the fellows stood in the room with a pistol for a guard, while the rest rumaged the house; we lay an hour, or an hour and half in that condition, then they all went out of the house at the street door and left the door open, when I came down in the morning, I found the side window open and there were the prints of their feet against the brick wall, I cannot swear to any of them, they took particular care to conceal their persons.

George Jackson . I am the son of the last witness, I heard my grandfather cry out murder, I went into his room which is opposite mine, I met a man who presented a pistol to my breast and swore If I spoke a word or made any resistance be would shoot me dead, there were two other men in the room, I had nothing on but my shirt, I went to one corner of the room; then one cried knock him down, shoot him, murder him, and one of them knocked me down, I got up again and they stood close by me, I desired to be released from that confinement then they put me to bed to my grandfather and covered me with the curtains.

Q. How was the room lighted?

Jackson. There were dark lanthrons, while I was on the floor they desired me to inform them where the money was, and said it should be worse for me if I did not, I told them there was some money in the drawers in that room, they opened the drawers, but found nothing then they opened a box, in which they found thirty guineas and twenty-five pound in another, they took away things to the value of one hundred and fifty pounds in the whole, we lay there till about four o'clock, I cannot swear to their persons, the street door was bolted and bared, they undid the bolts and bars and went out at the door, I apprehend they got in at the side window, which was left open, I did not observe it the night before.

Elizabeth Nash . I am servant to Mr. Pyle, who is Mr. Jackson's father-in-law, and has part of the house. I was last up in the house the night of the burglary; I fastened the door, the sash of the side window where they got in, was down and the shutters put to; I don't know whether they were fastened. I heard my master's door break open; I jumped out of bed, and called out to know what was the matter; I had not opened the door a minute before two fellows rushed in upon me: one clapped a pistol to me, and swore he would kill me if I spoke a word, and did not immediately get into bed. One of the men held a dark lanthorn in my face; there I lay in bed till they went out of the house; one of the men staid in the room all the time, which was almost two hours, they staid in the house from two, to four. I don't know the person that staid with me, I believe he had a piece of brown paper drawn down as low as over his eyes, the other man's face was black all over, or he had a crape on: he that held the lanthorn to my face, was such a made man as Tunks; they went out about four o'clock. The man that was in my room went on the the stairs, he d - d the other men, and bid them open the door; and then they all went away. When I came down, I found the window and door open, and I found this dark lanthorn in Mr. Jackson's room, (producing it.)

Ann Allen . I live in Little Bull-head Court, Jewin Street. On the 9th of January the prisoner, Tunks, came to my house with one Elizabeth Braband : Tunks had a box; Braband asked me to let her leave it an hour and half, she was about taking a room of me; the box was left on the 13th, Elizabeth Braband came and demanded the box, I would not let her have it till she opened the box and satisfied me nothing was gone, least I should get into any trouble about it: the box was locked and corded. She gave me a good deal of ill language, and said, she would have the box. She went away, and brought the two prisoners, Tunks and Hines and another man, and said, she had brought a constable for the box. I asked, which was the constable? She said, Tunks was; I said, he was the man that brought the box; and I set my back against the closet door where it was. One of them swore d - n her bang her; I was afraid and went to go out, one of the men stopped me at the door and Braband put her hands over my mouth, Tunks put his hand over her's and held me till I was black in the face, then Tunks took up the box and ran away with it. I struggled and got from them to the door and cried stop thief and alarmed the neighbourhood, and he was brought back with the box; one Mrs. Williams, who lives in the house with me, took up the box and weighed it in her hand and said there was something valuable in the box, it was very heavy, Hines said, I suppose you have seen what it is, there is plate in it marked J. B. E. I went for a constable and gave charge of them to the constable, but he would not take him, still I would not let them have the box, then they went away, I sent for my husband from his work, my husband is a taylor, and told him what had happened and he went and gave information of it at Sir John Fielding's and then there came three of Sir John Fielding's men, with my husband and broke the box open in my room, and they found some plate, pistols, dark lanthron and flask; I did not know any thing of the prisoners till the woman came to take the lodging.

Thomas Allen . I am the husband of the last witness, my wife sent for me home and told me what had happened, I went to a neighbour one Aldred and found the same woman had left a box there, we went to Sir John John Fielding's and told the story to Mr. Leigh, one of Sir John's clerks, he said he did not know we had any right to stop it; we went over to the Brown Bear and told one of Sir John's men of it, and he got two more and came to my room and broke open the box and took an inventory of the things; we were obliged to go the circuit almost on this business, we went to Chelmsford, Maidstone, and Kingston; I saw Tunks and Braband when they brought the box, I was at home at dinner, it was left on the outside of the chamber door from Monday till Wednesday; (produces the inventory of the things) John Clarke has had the possession of the things ever since, the things mentioned in the indictment are in the inventory.

John Clarke . I belong to Sir John Fielding .

Q. Who is that Leigh that discouraged the people from making this discovery?

Clarke. He is a clerk to Sir John Fielding , I saw the box broke open, these things (producing the things mentioned in the indictment) were taken out of the box, I have had the custody of them ever since.

Question to Mr. Allen. The box was never opened while it was in your possession before.

Allen. No.

George Jackson . I know well that the things produced are the property of my grandfather and my father.

Clarks. These silver buckles (producing a pair,) were in Tunks's shoes, when he was taken, he said his mother gave them to him.

George Jackson . They are my buckles they were taken out of my shoes that night, there is J. Tunks engraved upon them, which has been done since they were lost, the pistols, powder, flask, and the pint mug and punch ladle were my grandfather's, I don't know whether they were marked or not.

Richard Jackson . I lost a punch ladle but that is not found.

Clarke. There were three chissels, a dark lanthron, and a box of tinder in the box.

William Aldred . I am a watch spring maker in Jewin-Street, on the 12th of January I let a room to one Mrs. Braband, a man came (not one of the prisoners) and left a large chest, the next day there was a hue and cry of stop thief, I went out and John Hines was stopped with a box just by my door, I went with the man to Mrs. Allen's apartment, she said a woman came with the man that brought the box, and by the description she gave of the woman, I found it was the same that brought the box to my house; she sent for Mr. Allen home from his work and he and I went to Sir John Fielding 's, we told Mr. Leigh, the clerk of it, he said he did not know we had any thing to do with it, they might be honest men or they might be rogues, we went to the Brown Bear , and found Heley there, we told him of it, he got Phillips and Clarke and went with us, we took Tunks in Jewin-Street, a journeyman of mine informed us that Hines was at the Red-Lyon, we went there and took him, the cloak mentioned in the indictment was found in the trunk at my house.

Tunk's Defence.

Mrs. Braband hired me and the other prisoner to carry these boxes, as we were carrying the boxes somebody called out to stop us and said there was a bastard child in the box and we were taken to Sir John Fielding's, and they took the buckles out of my shoes, I bought them of a Jew on the 4th of June last.

Hines Defence.

I was hired to carry the box, I know nothing of the contents.

Both Guilty Death .

339. (M.) JOHN ROGERS was indicted for stealing 15 guineas, half a guinea, and 7 s. in money, numbered, and a bank note for 49 l. and one other bank note for 25 l. the said notes being due and unsatisfied, the property of John Bowles , in the dwelling house of the said John Bowles , March 18th . *

Acquitted .

340 (M.) PHILLIS SILVESTER was indicted for stealing four linen shirts, value 20 s. the property of Eleanor Williams , spinster , April 21st .

Eleanor Williams . I take in washing , I lost some linen on the 21st of April, out of the yard where I hang my linen to dry; it was between five and six in the evening; I acquainted my neighbours with it, and it was found out.

John Evans . On the 21st of April I took up the prisoner; she carried me about to different places, but at last to the place where she lodged, and gave me the things produced in court: she acknowledged she took them, and said she was in liquor. I believe it to be her first offence; she bore a good character till now.

The prisoner in her defence, called four Witnesses who gave her a good character.

Guilty of stealing to the value of 4 d. W .

341. (M.) WILLIAM HACKNEY was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling house of John Parkinson , on the 6th of March , between the hours of two and three in the afternoon, the said John Parkinson and others of his family, being in the said dwelling house, and stealing twenty guineas, the property of the said John Parkinson , in his dwelling house , March 6th. *

John Parkinson . I keep a public house at Chelsea . On the 6th of March, my wife who had been at London, came home in the afternoon; we went into the parlour, and missed twenty guineas out of the bureau; by carelessness, my bureau was left unlocked, and the key lay upon it. The house door was not locked, because it is a public house, and a thoroughfare; but the door of the parlour in which the bureau was, was locked up, and my wife had the key of it in her pocket; when she came home she missed the money, and asked me in a great fright what I had done with it. I advised her to make no noise about it, and we might probably hear of it again. Sarah Wright , one of my lodgers, seeing a cloud upon our countenances, enquired what the matter was, and said considering what had passed the day before, she wished the chimney sweeper had done no wrong; upon which my wife and I went into the parlour in order to see whether there were any tracks of this chimney sweeper or no; when we came in we observed the tracks of a footy foot, from the chimney to the bureau. The chimney that was in the back building, that Elizabeth Simmonds live in, had been swept the day before, and therefore I concluded it must have been the chimney sweeper's boy that had stole my money. I went to Sir John Fielding 's, and he sent after the boy, he was taken up, and made a confession; that confession was taken in writing, but it is not here.

Elizabeth Simmonds . I lodge in the back building in Mr. Parkinson's house; my chimney was swept the 6th of March, there were some peculiar circumstances attending the sweeping of it; this boy, the prisoner, came about two or three in the afternoon, and begged very hard for leave to sweep my chimney, in order to get the foot; he said, he had got but half a bushel of foot, and he was obliged to bring a bushel home, or else his master would beat him; he begged leave to sweep my chimney; I gave him leave; he went up once, and continued a long time, then he came down, and brought but little foot. I observed that, and said the chimney was not so foul as I thought it had been. Said he, the other part of the foot is lying up in a part of the chimney, I must go up again. I refused at first to let him go up, I said that as there was a slit in the chimney I was afraid he would burst it out; he said he would go up, and up he went; I put something on the fire to prevent his burning of his feet: he staid up a great while that time; when he came down again, a pretty great quantity came, and down tumbled this candlestick, (producing it) that astonished me. I thought it an odd place to find an iron candlestick in; I knew it immediately to be my landlord Parkinson's candlestick that they burnt a candle in their chimney, for purpose of watching a sick child. Sarah Wright and another woman with me, let him go off, not in the least imagining at that time, he had been in Mr. Parkinson's room.

Prosecutor. This candlestick stood in our chimney ever since last Christmas, on account of a sick child we had in the room, therefore we burnt a light at night in that iron candlestick. I set it upon the hub of the chimney. It is all one stack of chimnies between mine and the back building, Simmonds lives in the two buildings joined, so that any one that goes up one chimney might easily get down the other.

Sarah Wright , and Elizabeth Quickley confirmed the last witness in the former part of her evidence, but said, that they both went out of the room before the prisoners came down the second time.

Prisoner's Defence.

I am quite innocent of the fact.

Witness. He said, before the justice, that his master had got a great part of the money.

The prisoner called his master, and his master's wife, who deposed, that they never lost anything by him, that he had been a very serviceable boy to them, that he had brought home seven or eight shillings a day. They appeared in a very indifferent light to the court: they mentioned several suspicions they had laid under, from a great number of other people, of which they said they were innocent.

He called two other witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Not guilty of breaking and entering the dwelling house, but guilty of stealing the money .

T

342. (M) JOHN SAUNDERS was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling house of William Pallett on the 9th of March , about the hour of two in the afternoon, (no person being therein) and stealing a watch, the inside case made of silver, and the outside case covered with shagreen, value twenty shillings, a pair of silver shoe buckles, value five shillings, a silk handkerchief, value one shilling, and a half guinea, the property of the said William, in his dwelling house . ++

William Pallett . I am a labouring man . I live at Tottenham : I left my house about seven in the morning of the 9th of March, to go to London. I did not return till five; I left my wife in the house; when I returned I missed the things, which I saw safe when I went out. I came with Patrick Connuck to Smithfield, he told me, he had met the prisoner. Soon after that we both met him, we seized him. At first he said, he had not taken the things; at last, without any promises made to induce him to confess, he said, he had took the things, and named Charles Martyr , a pawnbroker; we went there, there we found the watch.

Patrick Connuck confirmed the prosecutor's evidence.

Charles Martyrs . I am a pawnbroker. I received this watch of the prisoner, (producing it.

Prisoner's Defence.

I did not go into the house.

Not guilty of breaking and entering the dwelling house, but guilty of stealing the goods to the value of ten-pence .

T

343. (M) MARTHA PRICE spinster , otherwise HAMNARE , spinster, was indicted for stealing three linen sheets, value four shillings, a copper tea kettle, value two shillings, two crimson bed curtains, value one shilling, a brass saucepan, value six-pence, a blanket, value one shilling, a bed coverlid, value one shilling, and a feather bolster, value one shilling, the property of Robert Fitzmorris , the said goods being in a ready furnished lodging , let by the said Robert to the said Martha, March 4 . ++

Acquitted .

344. (1st M). THOMAS BEETS was indicted for the wilful murder of Dorothy his wife , otherwise Dorothy Day , widow , by stabing her in the breast with a certain dagger, thereby giving her a mortal wound of the length of one inch, and the depth of three inches, of which she instantly died , March 7 . *

The witnesses were examined apart, at the request of the prisoner.

Sarah Coster . I know the prisoner, and know his wife. I was out with the deceased all the afternoon of Monday the 6th of March. I don't know the name of the street where we were, but it was near Clare Market: we returned home to Orchard Street, Westminster, about eight at night, we ate a bit of supper, and I parted with her just at ten o'clock at night, her husband was not at home then: after we came home I went out to see for him, but could not find him; when I returned, the deceased told: me, he had been at home, and was gone to Tottlefields to the Three Gardeners. At ten o'clock I left the deceased alone, she was in liquor, she had drank several glasses of brandy and gin, she was apt to he in liquor, and was very quarrelsome when she was in liquor.

Q. Who did she use to quarrel with?

Coster. Chiefly her husband, I believe any body that came in the way.

Q. Was her husband apt to be in liquor?

Coster. Not very often, as ever I heard; I never heard that he behaved amiss to her, I never heard that they lived unhappily: I was frequently with them.

On her cross examination. she said, that she heard the prisoner say, that the deceased struck him first, and that when she was in liquor she would strike any body that affrented her: the witness said, that she has seen the deceased take up the poker, and offer to strike him; and that she was very passionate

Joseph Thomas . I keep the sign of the Wheat Sheaf, in New Tottle Street. I have known the prisoner five or six years. He came to my house on Monday the 6th of March, about six at night as near as I can recollect, he staid till near eleven, he drank some gin and water, but not a great deal. About eleven o'clock I got up to shut the windows, while I was shutting the windows, the deceased came in, and asked him to go home, and they went home together. I could see Beets had been drinking, he was what we call half and half, he was rather concerned in liquor: I cannot say how the deceased was, I did but just see her. In about the space of ten minutes the deceased returned, and asked if her husband had been at my house again. I told her he had not, and asked her, whether he had out-run her, or some such word. She said, he was gone some where or other, that he was a little in his airs. I believe the prisoner to be a very honest man; he was not a quarrelsome man; he was as quiet a man as ever I was in company with in my life; he was so far from being quarrelsome he would rather endeavour to unite people together who had any words.

Q. How did she appear when she came the second time?

Thomas. I cannot give any account of her, I thought her quite sober, I just passed two or three words with her.

Thomas Danks . I am a watchman in Orchard Street, Westminster. On Monday the 6th of March, as I was calling the hour of twelve by the prisoner's door, I saw a serjeant, (I believe it was the prisoner, I am not much acquainted with him) on the steps, he knocked at the door once or twice; I believe somebody answered, I did not hear them, I supposed so, by what he said: he said, d - n you for a bitch, I will be your butcher, or, will butcher you, one or the other, I cannot say which; then the door was opened, he went in, and shut it. I came back, after I had been my beat, and listened at the door, for fear there should be any words, but I heard nothing.

Catherine Mackey . I am wife to serjeant Mackey; we lodge in the fore parlour of the prisoner's house. On Monday the 6th of March, about eleven at night, I heard the deceased go out: she came in again in about a quarter of an hour or ten minutes by herself: about twelve o'clock I heard the prisoner come home, I did not hear him knock at the door.

Q. How do you know that he came home at that time?

Mackey. I heard Mrs. Beets speak to him.

Q. Was that when he was in the house, or out of the house?

Mackey. In the house, I heard his foot come in, to the best of my knowledge. I heard Mrs. Beets in the passage say, God rot you, I will heave all that is on the table in your face. I heard her desire him to bolt the street door. He said, he would not, or did not mean that, I don't know which was the words. Then Mrs. Beets said, God rot you, if you don't shut the parlour door, I will throw all the things on the table in your face. Mr. Beets said, God d - n your drunken soul.

Q. Did they appear to be quarrelling together.

Mackey. I heard no more, I heard the back parlour door shut directly; about a quarter of an hour after. I heard a foot go down the kitchen stairs, I don't know whether it was a man or woman's, in about two minutes after I heard the other go down, I did not know who they were, they came up both together, I heard no words at that time: when they came up the cellar stairs, I heard one go towards the street door and the other towards the parlour door; I heard the one that went towards the parlour door go afterwards towards the street door; then I heard Mr. Beets ask Mrs. Beets to come in; she was got without the street door, and the door pulled to after her; she said, I won't, I did not hear him make any answer to that; but I heard the flap of a hand three or four times, as if upon the back of another person; I could not distinguish whether it was the husband upon the wife, of the wife upon the husband, I heard only the found; then they both came in together, I heard the found of both their feet together; they went into the parlour and shut the door, I did not hear any thing more pass between them; not one word; about a quarter of an hour afterwards, I heard a foot come out of the parlour, and go down the kitchen stairs; it did not stay long below; I cannot be sure how long I was a-bed at this time.

Q. Do you know whether it was an hour, or less than an hour.

Mackey. It was not a quarter of an hour, I heard the person come up again and go into the parlour it staid near ten minutes, then I heard a foot go out at the street door and pull the door after them; I could not distinguish by the tread whether it was man or woman; I heard no noise, no words, nor blows.

Q. Should you have heard them if there had been any.

Mackey. I don't know: I have lived two years in the house, I never heard any words between them, I have seen her in liquor sometimes, I don't know any thing of her behaviour, she used to pass and repass me, I cannot say whether she was quarrelsome at those times.

Elizabeth Coleson . I live at the King's arms in Orchard-street, it is my business to gather in pots, on the 7th of March about nine in the morning I went to Serjeant Beet's house, I found the door on the latch, I knocked, but there was no answer, then I opened the door there I saw the deceased Mrs. Beet's lying on the floor, she lay on her left side with her right hand on her hip.

Q. Was she living or dead?

Coleson. I do not know, I did not touch her, I ran out of the room again and went and informed my mistress of it, and she informed the neighbours of it.

Henry Jones . I belong to Mr. Jordan, I went with him to this house on the morning the woman was found dead, I believe it was on a Tuesday morning, I do not know the day, about half after nine we heard of it at our office; when I went into the house, I saw a woman that lay dead in a gore of blood, she lay on her left side.

Q. Where was her right arm?

Jones. I cannot positively say, her leg was drawn up, there was a great quantity of blood, she was quite stone dead, quite cold.

Q. Whereabouts was the blood?

Jones. By her face and all round.

Q. Was it in any other part of the room?

Jones. Yes, round the bed: the prisoner was not at home, there were my master and I and a concourse of people, we went into the kitchen where the soldiers ammunition was kept, and I found these things, (producing a waistcoat, a pair of breeches, two pair of stockings, one pair of shoes and a hanger in a Sheath) they are bloody.

Q. Did you draw the hanger?

Jones. Yes, it was smeer'd and there was a spot of blood upon it, it had been wiped there has nothing at all been done to it since.

Court. There appears to be nothing of smear upon it, there is something of a little spot at one corner, of dirt, or rust, or blood, or something; there is not much blood on the cloaths, the breeches are very much stain'd.

William Mackey . I am a Serjeant in the Guards, I lodged at the prisoner's house he was a Serjeant in the third regiment at that time, (Looks at the cloaths) they are regimental cloaths, such as he used to wear, and such as every Serjeant of the regiment wears; I have seen the prisoner have such a hanger as this, I cannot swear this is it, that is no part of the regimental dress of a Serjeant. I slept at home the night the woman was killed; I went to bed a few minutes before eight, I was a sleep, I did not hear the least noise, I heard nothing of what my wife has given an account of.

Mr. Archibald Harris . I am a surgeon, I examined the body of the woman that was killed on the 8th of March, I found a wound on the breast more than an inch long, it penetrated between the 3d and 4th rib, through the right lobe of the lungs, into what we call the cavity of the thorax.

Q. You cannot tell how deep the wound was ending in the cavity of the thorax.

Mr. Harris. I traced it, I believe, about five inches.

Q. Did the wound appear to be made by such an instrument as that dagger.

Mr. Harris. It did, I found no other marks of wounds or bruises about her.

Q. Do you think that wound sufficient to occasion her death.

Mr. Harris. Yes, I do.

Prisoner's Defence.

All I have to say is, she struck me first, and gave me provocation, it was the effect of passion, she opened her breast several times, and dared me to do it and pulled me off the bed.

For the Prisoner.

John Armstrong . I am Serjeant Major in the 3d regiment, I have known the prisoner fourteen years, he was a Serjeant in our regiment, during that time he has bore an unblemished character, he was a sober, peaceable man, I never heard that he was given to quarrell.

James Lees . I am a Serjeant major in the same regiment, I have known the prisoner better than twelve years; I never looked upon him to be quarrelsome; I never heard but he was a man of an undeniable character in every respect.

Benjamin Cosgrove . I am a serjeant in the regiment, I have known the prisoner ten years; he behaved extraordinary well, in my opinion, I was with him shooting that very afternoon: we parted about a quarter before nine. I have been at his house, he treated his wife very well; she was a woman of a very haughty temper, I have seen her in liquor; I never saw any quarrel between them. I look upon him to be achumane a man as any in the army.

Q. To Armstrong and Lees. Did you know the woman?

Both. Yes, we looked upon it they lived upon good terms: she was a little given to drinking.

William Tape . I am a serjeant in the same regiment, I have known the prisoner about ten years: he was a very humane man, his character was universally good in every respect.

James Earle . I am a serjeant in the same regiment, I have known the prisoner from the year 1763, I did not know the deceased; the prisoner bore a good character; if any thing, he is better natured when in liquor, than at another time,

He likewise called Henry Caller , George Twig , Joseph Thomas , and Serjeant Mackey, who also gave him the same character.

Not Guilty of Murder, but guilty of Manslaughter only .

[Branding. See summary.]

345 (L.) WILLIAM CONSTANT was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling house of John Biddle , on the 25th of March , about the hour of nine in the night, and stealing a velveret coat, value 40 s. a velveret waistcoat, value 20 s. a pair of leather boots, value 10 s. a pair of spurs plated with silver, value 2 s. and 24 linen shirts, value 10 l. the property of Israel Jaylet , in the dwelling house of the said John Biddle .

Acquitted . ++

346. (L) HENRY HART was indicted for stealing a man's frock, value 4 s. a linen stock, value 1 s. a man's hat value 1 s. a pair of woollen breeches, value 2 s. a linen waistcoat, value 3 s. and a silver watch, value 10 s. the property of John Fosset , the younger , Feb. 19th . ++

Acquitted .

347. (L) CHARLES DOWNES was indicted for stealing a wooden kit, value 1 s. 150 lb. weight of pickled salmon, value 20 s. and a woollen cloth great coat, value 4 s . the property of Robert Steward , March 21st .

Robert Steward . I was asleep on board a boat at Billingsgate , I heard a noise, I was alarmed, I got up, and caught the prisoner in the very fact; he had removed it from the hatchway, and was endeavouring to make off; we secured him.

Richard Griffin . Steward, the last witness, and I were asleep, we were alarmed, we found the prisoner had broke open the hatch, the kit was taken out.

Prisoner's Defence.

I was on board the boat, but was not there for the purpose of stealing any thing.

Guilty .

[Transportation. See summary.]

348. 349. (L) ANN, the wife of GEO. BABB and SARAH, the wife of PHILIP SAMUEL , were indicted for stealing two pieces of printed cotton cloth, containing 12 yards, value 20 s. the property of John Keys , privately in his shop , March 29th .

John Keys . I keep a linen draper's shop in the Minories . The two prisoners came into my shop on the 29th of March, to look at a gown; I shewed them several things; they fixed upon one, but we did not agree about the price; they went away, and went into the next door. Some time after, the young man from next door came to me and asked me if two women had not been in my shop that did not buy, and asked me to go into his shop. and there I should see them. I went, and there I saw there two remnants of printed cotton, (producing them) I received them from William Bafield . I am certain they are my property; one piece has my mark upon it.

William Bafield . I live with Mr. Warrens, who is next door neighbour to Mr. Keys. The two prisoners came into our shop, and Ann Babb asked to see something for a gown, I saw something under her apron, I turned it aside, and they dropped two pieces; I immediately shut the door, and sent for Mr. Keys. as he lives at the next door, to ask him if they were his property, and he owned them. I delivered them to Mr. Keys.

Babb's Defence.

I don't know how it came there.

Court. As there is no evidence to affect Samuel, I shall not call on her for her defence.

Babb called three witnesses, who gave her a good character.

Babb guilty of stealing to the value of 4 s. 10 d.

B . and imprisoned three months .

Samuel, acquitted .

350. (L) JOHN TOPPING was indicted for stealing a brown gelding, value 10 l. the property of Thomas Miles , March 10th . ++

Thomas Miles . I live at New Brentford ; I kept a gelding in a field of my own; I put him in the field about seven o'clock on Wednesday the 7th or 8th of March; I sent my man to fetch him, and he could not find him. I came to town, and found him in Smithfield, in the custody of John Hall. I am sure it was my horse.

John Hall. Miles found the horse in my boy's custody; he took it of the prisoner, while I went to pay the man for it, and have it tolled. I bought it of the prisoner.

Miles. It was in the possession of the boy,

Hall. It was a brown gelding, about fourteen hands aigh; it was lame; I was to give two guineas, eighteen pence, and sixpenny worth for it.

Prisoner's Defence.

I was going to seek work, and a man desired me to take the horse to Smithfield for him.

Guilty. Death .

Recommended to his Majesty's mercy by both the prosecutor and the jury.

351. (L) THOMAS NORTON was indicted for stealing six pounds weight of moist sugar, value eighteen pence , the property of persons unknown, March 15 . ++

Samuel Willington . I am a porter. On the 15th of March, I rolled up some sugar to an area; the prisoner and two or three more boys got into the area, and broke a cask, the rest got away; the prisoner was stopped and delivered to me.

John Jeffs . I took the prisoner; I found six pounds and a half of sugar upon him, some in his pocket and some in his hat; that there was one of the hogsheads broke, and a quarter of a hundred and four pounds gone out of it.

Prisoner's Defence.

I saw the sugar lie on the ground, I took it up to sweeten my tea.

Guilty of stealing to the value of ten-pence . T .

352. (L) MARY SMITH was indicted for stealing four silver table spoons, value forty shillings, three silver tea spoons, value nine shillings, and a linen sheet, value three shillings , the property of Timothy Bluck , April 9 . ++

Timothy Bluck . I am a cooper , in Grub-Street. The prisoner was my servant . The things mentioned in the indictment were missing; I charged the prisoner with it, and she took me to the pawnbroker's where she had pawned them. I told her, if she would let me have my things again, I would make it as easy as I could. The constable found two spoons in Barbican; I found the rest.

- Fox, a pawnbroker produced a table spoon, which he received of the prisoner, and another was produced by William Clarke , a constable, who deposed, that when he took charge of the prisoner, she directed him to a pawnbroker's in Barbican, where he found it.

The spoons were deposed to by the prosecutor.

Prisoner's Defence.

My master told me he would not hurt me if I told him where the things were.

Guilty , T .

353. (L) THOMAS MEADOWS was indicted for stealing a carpenter's plough, value five shillings , the property of Thomas Gunner , March 18 . ++

Thomas Gunner . I am a carpenter . I was at work in Draper's Hall on the 18th of March, the prisoner enquired there for one King, there was no such person worked there: he walked about some time, and Samuel Urham saw him take my plough, and roll it up in his apron, he pursued him and took it upon him.

Samuel Utham . I am a carpenter. I worked in Draper's Hall. I took the prisoner, and the plough upon him, it was in his apron, rolled up.

Prisoner's Defence.

I was with one King over night, he borrowed a plough of me, and told me, to go to Draper's Hall for it, that I should find it on the left hand bench, and might take it, if he was not there.

He called several witnesses to his character:

Guilty of stealing to the value of ten-pence . W .

354. (L) HUGH LAWRENCE was indicted for stealing two shillings in money, numbered , the property of Job Heath , March 9 . ++

Job Heath. I am a shoemaker , in Fore-Street . The prisoner was my journeyman . Having missed money several times, I gave fifty-six shillings of marked money to Thomas Jackson , who pays my men, lay on the pay table, and I set my brother to watch; the prisoner came, and took two shillings from it, my brother found it on him, and gave it me. I counted the rest of the money, there was but fifty-four shillings left.

James Heath . I marked the money, and bid myself behind the partition, where I had he command of the place. I saw the prisoner come and take two shillings from the place where the money lay.

Prisoner's Defence.

I was dealing with a customer in the shop; I took it to give him change, not to wrong my master.

He called several witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Guilty , T .

355. 356. (L) THOMAS POWELL and NATHANIEL COOPER were indicted for stealing ten guineas in money, numbered , the property of Abraham Solomon , March 6 . ++

Acquitted .

357. (L) HENRY WESTAL was indicted for stealing thirty-four pieces of cast silver, of the weight of four ounces and three-penny weights, value sixteen shillings , the property of John Qaulkner , March 27 . ++

John Qaulkner . I am a silver caster . The prisoner came into my shop, and asked to look at some silver seals; my apprentice called me down, and informed me the prisoner had something of my property in his pocket. I charged him with it, and he took the silver out of his pocket and put it on the counter; I sent for a constables and gave charge of him. I am sure it was my property; I saw it in the drawer in the morning, but it was then gone. I knew the prisoner before, he was a jeweller.

William Briggs . I am apprentice to the last witness. On the 27th of March, the prisoner came in, and desired to look at some silver seals; there was another customer in the shop. Turning round to serve him, I saw the prisoner put something into his pocket, I watched him, and saw him put some more in his pocket; then I jumped over the compter and laid hold of his hands, and called my master down stairs, and he made him take them out of his pocket.

Prisoner's Defence.

I was looking at them, I let one drop; I never had them in my pocket.

Guilty , T .

358. (L) ALICE BERRY was indicted for stealing a silk gown, value five shillings , the property of Rebecca Hill , widow , February 20 . ~

Rebecca Hill. On the 13th of February, the prisoner came to me as a servant . On the 20th she went away; I missed a gown out of one of the drawers: I pursued her, and charged a constable with her, and she confessed she had pawned it with one Howard, in Houndsditch.

William Blazey . I am servant to Mr. Howard, a pawnbroker. I took in this gown of the prisoner on the 21st of February, in the name of Alice Brown , (producing it.) I have taken in many things of her in that name.

The gown was deposed to by the prosecutrix.

Prisoner's Defence.

She said, she would make me a present of the gown, if I would stay with her, she liked me so well.

She called two women, who gave her a good character.

Guilty , T .

359. (2nd L.) WILLIAM LEVERIDGE was indicted for stealing a linen handkerchief, value ten-pence , the property of John Wood , March 27th . ~

John Wood . On March 27th, coming along Grace-Church-Street , the prisoner picked my handkerchief out of my pocket; I catch'd him in the act, he put the handkerchief in his pocket and ran across the way, I pursued him, I never lost sight of him till he was taken; I delivered him to Wood the constable.

The Handkerchief produced and deposed to by the prosecutor.

Prisoner's Defence.

I know nothing of it, no more than the dead I heard a cry of stop thief, I ran to see what was the matter and a person laid hold of me.

He called two witnesses who gave him a good character.

Guilty . W .

360. (2d L.) WILLIAM GIBBS was indicted for stealing fifty pounds weight of malaga raisins, value ten shillings , the property of William Robbins , March 2d ~.

Acquitted .

WILLIAM GIBBS was a second time indicted for stealing forty weight of malaga raisins , the property of William Robbins , March 4th ~.

Acquitted .

361. (2d L) JOHN BAILEY was indicted for stealing two woollen cloths, value ten shillings, a woolen cloth waistcoat, value one shilling, a pair of woollen cloth breeches, value eighteen pence and two linen shirts, value two shillings , the property of Thomas Slark , March 7th ~.

Thomas Slark . I lodge in Swan Alley London Wall , my things were lost out of my box in the night of the 7th of march, I saw them in my box at eleven at night when I went to bed, the box was locked, but it was a very bad lock; in the morning the lid of the box was lying on the floor, and the things were gone, the prisoner used to be with me; not coming home all that night to my knowledge, nor to work the next morning, I suspected him, I informed my brother of it and he went to Justice Wilmot, and got one of his men to go in search of the prisoner, when he was taken he confessed the fact, when I was present. I found my things at the pawnbrokers in consequence of his direction.

John Slark the Brother of the last witness confirmed his evidence.

John Glem , a pawn-broker produced a coat, a waistcoat, a pair of breeches and two old shirts, which he received of the prisoner, on the 8th of March.

- Fox a pawnbroker produced a great coat, which he deposed he received of the prisoner on the 8th of March: They were deposed to by the prosecutor.

Prisoner's Defence.

I worked for the prosecutor, he was short of money, he gave me leave to take them out of the box to pawn, to raise some money to buy tools (this the prosecutor denied.)

The prisoner called two witnesses who gave him a good character.

Guilty .

[Transportation. See summary.]

362. (2d L.) SAMUEL BRYANT was indicted for stealing twelve shillings in money numbered the property of Thomas Wood , April 7th ~.

Thomas Wood . I keep a coal shed , on the 7th of April between seven and eight in the morning, I caught the prisoner in the coumpting house with the till, as I was backwards and forwards, I had left the key in the till, I secured him and called a constable, and then he throwed down twelve shillings on the table, there were just twelve shillings missing out of the till.

The constable confirmed his evidence.

Prisoner's Defence:

I went into the shop to buy coals, I was not in the compting house, I did not meddle with the till.

Guilty .

[Transportation. See summary.]

363. (2d L.) MARGARET MILLER was indicted for stealing six pair of spurs, plated with silver, value eighteen shillings, twelve pair of shoe-buckles, plated with silver, value eighteen shillings, and a muslin handkerchief value three pence , the property of William Blundel , April 16th ~.

William Blundel . I keep a hard ware shop in Bishopsgate-street , on the 16th of April, I went out about two in the afternoon, about six or seven in the evening my apprentice came to me and informed me that my house was broke open, I returned about eight or nine, and found the glass case in the shop open and the things mentioned in the indictment gone, I had some suspicion of the prisoner, she being backwards and forwards in the house, I got a constable and searched her lodgings and found the buckles the spurs, and a handkerchief under her bed, she confessed taking the goods, but said she meant to return them next day.

John Graves . I was with the prosecutor when he searched the prisoner's lodging and found the things, before the justice the confessed she took the things and said she must suffer the law.

Elizabeth Gray . I was at the prosecutor's, on the Sunday, when the things were lost, the prisoner was there, she had the door open where the things were.

Prisoner's Defence.

I have lived with the prisoner's brother two years, I did not take the things, there was a little boy at the door, and the door was left open.

Guilty .

[Transportation. See summary.]

364. (2d L.) ISAAC ROYER was indicted for stealing a pewter quart pot, value two shillings the property of Thomas Brute , April 8th +.

Acquitted .

365. (2d L.) PETER BARRETT was indicted for stealing, a linen handkerchief, value ten pence , the property of Dalphan Micah Andre , February 27th ++.

Dalphan Micah Andre. Going down Thames Street , I stopped at a gate way to let a cart go past and the prisoner came and took my handkerchief out of my pocket, I turned round and laid hold of him by the collar and found my handkerchief in his hand.

Prisoner's Defence.

The gentleman droped the handkerchief, I took it up and was going to give it him.

Guilty .

[Transportation. See summary.]

366. (2d L.) JOHN ANDERSON , was indicted for stealing a pair of muslin ruffles, value twenty shillings , the property of Thomas Stock , March 17th ++.

- Cooper. I am shopman to Mr. Stock, who is a linen draper , the window was broke had the ruffles taken out, I did not see it.

Emanuel Rush . On the 17th of March, as one of the beadles of St. Andrews parish, and I were going down Holborn , we saw two lads standing together just by the prosecutors shop, we suspected what they were about and stoped to watch them, they went to the window, and went away again; I sent the other person to look at the window a there was a hole in the corner, we went into a house opposite, we saw them come back, the prisoner drew the ruffles out and ran away, I pursued him and took him, and found the ruffles on him.

The ruffles were produced in court, and deposed to by Cooper.

Prisoner's Defence.

I picked the ruffles up in Holborn.

He called several witnesses who gave him a good character.

Guilty of stealing to the value of ten-pence , W .

367. (2d L.) WILLIAM RANSMORE was indicted for stealing a linen handkerchief, value ten-pence , the property of William Bramble , March 15th ++.

Acquitted .

368. (2d L.) PATRICK DOYLE was indicted for stealing a pewter dish, value one shilling, and three pound weight of pewter, value six-pence , the property of Richard Pitt and John Floyd , February 27th ++.

John Floyd . I am a pewterer in Shoe-Lane , in Partnership with Richard Pitt , the prisoner worked for us, he came on the 27th of February, I was suspicious of him, I thought he had something concealed under his apron, I turned it up and found a pewter dish under his waistcoat, quite down into his breeches and a lump of melted mettle, he asked my pardon and said it was the first time he had ever done such a thing.

The dish was produced in court and deposed to by the prosecutor.

Another witness who worked for Mr. Floyd confirmed his evidence.

Prisoner's Defence.

I never said any such thing.

He called several witnesses to his character.

Guilty of stealing to the value of ten-pence . W .

369. (2d L.) JOHN FOLKES was indicted for stealing two pound weight of black trolly silk, value forty shillings , the property of Robert Wickham , March 8th ++.

Acquitted .

370. (2d L.) WILLIAM DONALDSON , was indicted for stealing a linen shift, value two shillings , the property of John Whitehead , February 25th ++

John Whitehead . The prisoner was taken up on suspicion of stealing the shift which was hanging on the horse to dry.

Sarah Broad . I saw the prisoner take the shift off the horse and ran away with it. I am sure to his person, I had seen him before several times, he was taken and the shift found upon him, the person that took him is not here, it is my shift it was put out to dry.

Prisoner's Defence.

It was not found upon me.

Guilty , T .

371. (2d L.) JOHN CHILDS was indicted for stealing two hundred weight of moist sugar, value thirty-nine shillings , the property of persons unknown, April 7th .

Acquitted .

372. (L.) ISAAC MORDICA was indicted for stealing two hundred and eighty-eight boys hat linings, value twenty-four shillings, two hundred and sixteen mens hat linings, value twenty-one shillings, two hundred and sixteen other mens hat linings, value twenty-seven shillings, two pound weight of hat loopings, value four shillings and eight pence, seventy-two fringed hat loops, value four shillings, one hundred and forty-four yards, of silk braiding, value five shillings and sixpence, four pound weight of goats hair, value fourteen shillings, three pound weight of cod wool, value six shillings, six brass money weights, value two shillings, two yards of canvass, value one shilling, a pair of money scales, value twenty-one shillings, two hundred and eighty-eight mens black hat linings, value twenty two shillings, and four pound weight of cod wool, value eight shillings ; the property of Thomas Norman , John Fowler , and Robert Norman , January 29th ++.

Acquitted .

373. (2d L.) RICHARD WALTHALL was indicted for stealing a certain warrant for the payment of money, subscribed by Christopher Alderson , on behalf of himself and John Story , with the names Story and Alderson thereto subscribed, bearing date the 16th of March, directed to John Dorrien , John Anthony Rucker , Peter Mucker , Thomas Dorrien and Alexander Charleton , bankers, and co-partners, by the names and description of Messrs. Dorrien, Ruckers and Carleton, for the payment of two hundred and thirteen pounds, to Edward Marsh , by the name and description of Edward Marsh ; and a certain other warrant for the payment of money subscribed by Christopher Alderson , on behalf of himself and John Story , with the names Story and Alderson thereto subscribed, bearing date the 16th of March for the payment of one hundred and fifty-six pound sfour shillings, to Edward Marsh , or bearer, the said notes being the property of the said John Story and Christopher Alderson in their dwelling house .

Second count. Laying the notes to be the property of Edward Marsh , in the dwelling of John Story and Christopher Alderson , March 16th *.

Christopher Alderson . The prisoner lived with me and Mr. John Story , who are partners, from the second of January to the 16th of March last, and had a very good character at that time. On the 16th of March last, I signed several orders for the payment of money; five in all the course of the house, is that when any bills are due and payable in the course of the day, in the morning we make out so many draughts for the sums we expect to be called for that day, upon our bankers, payable to the persons who are to bring the bills, five sell to that day, I made out the orders upon the bankers for the payment of those sums of money, and they were all put in the usual place where we keep such orders, a drawer in the compting house; the drawer is open, the book-keeper is the person that has the special charge of it, but all the clerks know where to go and take out these orders, the two orders in particular which are stated in the indictment, were made out and signed by me, one was for two hundred and thirteen pounds, the other one hundred and fifty-six pound four shillings upon Dorrien and company, these bills produced here are the very same that I drew that morning, I left them in the drawer between eight and nine that morning, soon after nine one of the bills for two hundred and thirteen pounds was presented to us for payment, we went to the drawer in order to find the draught to answer that bill, we missed it, on further search the other was missing too, we went to the bankers to enquire whether they were paid that morning, the clerk that went with that message is not here, the prisoner was in the compting house at the time. I put the draughts in the drawer, he went out soon after, the same day he sent a letter by the penny-post, which in a manner acknowledges the fact, it acknowledges having done something wrong and promises to repay the money with interest, it appears to be put in by the post mark at about twelve o'clock.

The letter was read in court which was as follows:

"To Messrs. Story and Alderson.

"Gentlemen,

"Such an unjust act, I am sorry to be found

"guilty; but was under an obligation of acting

"so imprudent, but you may rely on as under;

"As sure as I have been guilty of such

"an unfortunate obligation, so sure it shall be

"returned, and the interest thereof, your dependence

"may be placed upon the same. I

"am in London at present, and may be heard

"of at Mr. Saunders's, Holborn, and at Mr.

"Hunter's, Broad street, Carnaby Market. If

"I had never gone out with one person, it

"would never have happened."

I received this in the afternoon, the 16th of March, 1775, and finding that it was put in the post, in Leaden-hall Street, we enquired about the inns where the letter was put in, whether any such man had set out for the sea-coast, and found he had gone the Essex road, from the Bull in White-chapel. We applied to Sir John Fielding , and got some of his men, they pursued, and took him at Dunmowe, in the manner you will hear mentioned. He was brought back the next day, and carried before Sir John Fielding , who committed him.

Mark Harrison . I am clerk to Messrs. Dorrein and company. On the 16th of March last, the prisoner, who I know very well, having been clerk to Messrs. Story and Alderson, presented these two draughts for payment, and received the money: it was paid to him in cash.

Benjamin Folkes . I keep the Sacacen's Head at Dunmowe. On the 16th of March; the prisoner came to my house in a chaise and four, and wanted to change horses and chaise, he said, he was going to Holland in search of a sister that had been lost. His behaviour was such, as gave me a suspicion he had robbed somebody. I did not care to stop him rashly upon my own suspicion, but let him have four horses, and consulted with somebody; they agreed it was proper he should be stopped. I went afterwards and stopped him at an Inn at in Braintree, in the road to Harwich. When we took him, after some discourse, he confessed what he had done, and gave up to me, for the use of his master, three hundred gunieas, and then thirty-four more: soon after this, Sir John Fielding 's men came. I detained him that night in my own house, and the next morning I brought him in a chaise and delivered him to his master.

Court.

"Your behaviour is very commendable, and the prosecutors are much obliged to you.

Prisoner's Defence.

I make no defence at all, my master said, I should not suffer: I have some gentlemen here, that have known me some time.

Question to Mr. Alderson. You looked upon him to be an honest man, I presume?

Alderson. We had a good character with him, and looked upon him to be honest, or else we should not have placed the confidence in him that we did.

Guilty Death .

374: THOMAS MUNN was indicted for the murder of Benjamin Fisher with a certain instrument, called a chissel, by giving him a wound on the inside of the right thigh, of the depth of four inches, and the breadth of one inch; on the first of April , of which he languished until the 10th, and then died . *

"The prisoner was an apprentice , the deceased

"a journeyman to Mr. Silvanus Hall,

"a carpenter ."

"It appeared upon the evidence, that the

"deceased and the prisoner, were joking, between

"jest and earnest; that the boy behaved

"improperly, and the deceased said he would

"give him some proper correction: to which " the boy said, if he did, he would strike him

"again, and that instantly the deceased was

"wounded."

"The account the deceased gave of it, in

"the hospital, was, that the boy threw the

"chissel at him, which entered his thigh. He

"said, he freely forgave him, for he believed,

"the prisoner did not mean to hurt him."

"Mr. Hall gave the prisoner a very good

"character; he said, the deceased and the

"prisoner were frequently playing together,

"and that the prisoner was very fond of the

"deceased, and had set his name down in a list

"of persons he meant to treat, upon the day

"he was bound apprentice."

Not guilty of murder, but guilty of manslaughter only .

B .

375. (L) JOHN HARRIS was indicted for stealing a linen handkerchief, value ten-pence , the property of John Pickering , March 22 . *

Mr. William Hurford . In passing from the custom-house to the Coal Exchange, I saw the prisoner pick a gentleman's pocket, and run down to the keys. I pursued him, he threw the handkerchief away, but was stopped before he was out of my sight. The captain, whose pocket was picked, is a quaker, and don't care to appear, his name is John Pickering .

The prisoner said nothing in his defence.

Guilty , T .

376. (L) WILLIAM YOUNG was indicted for stealing a linen handkerchief, value ten-pence , the property of Charles Wilkins , junior , March 18 . *

Charles Wilkins . On the 18th of March, going over Tower Hill into the Tower, I felt my handkerchief go out of my pocket; I turned round, and seized the prisoner with it in his hand; he tucked it behind him. I charged a constable with him, and took him immediately before my Lord Mayor: there was a great boy stood near, who, I suppose, was ready to receive it, he ran away immediately, upon my securing the prisoner. (The handkerchief was produced in court, and deposed to by the prosecutor.

Prisoner's Defence.

I was seven years old last February.

Guilty ,

[Whipping. See summary.]

377. (M.) WILLIAM HARRISON was indicted for stealing a linen handkerchief value ten-pence , the property of Thomas Grose . April 22d . *

Thomas Grose . I was coming up Cheapside on the 22d of April, a coachman jumped off his box and informed me I was robbed of my handkerchief, and told me, the prisoner who was before me, had it in a blue apron that was tied before him; the prisoner ran down Gutter-lane, I followed him, he was never out of my sight, I caught him; he took the handkerchief out; I saw it in his hand; it was afterwards found in a cellar within two doors of where I took him; I did not see him throw it down.

The handkerchief produced in court and deposed to by the prosecutor.

Wm Bowen. I am a coachman, I was sitting on my box in the afternoon, opposite the Half Moon Tavern, Cheapside: I saw the prisoner take the handkerchief out of the prosecutor's pocket; I jumped down and informed the prosecutor of it; I did not go to see what became of him.

Wm Roberts. I live in Gutter-lane, I found the handkerchief down my cellar window.

Prisoner's Defence.

I was going up Cheapside just by this gentleman, I heard a cry of Stop Thief, I ran as others might, they happened to lay hold of me and searched me, but found nothing upon me.

Guilty .

[Transportation. See summary.]

378 (L.) THOMAS CLIFT was indicted for stealing a linen handkerchief value ten-pence , the property of Richard Thornton , April the 7th . ~

Richard Thornton . On the 7th of April, when I was in Smithfield , a person informed me my handkerchief was taken out of my pocket; I followed the prisoner and took him; I never lost sight of him.

Thomas Camden confirmed the prosecutor's evidence.

Wm. Payne produced the handkerchief, in court, which was found upon the prisoner, and it was deposed to by the prosecutor.

Prisoner's Defence.

I picked up the handkerchief on the ground.

Guilty .

[Transportation. See summary.]

379. 380. 381. (L) GEORGE STANLEY , SAMUEL RILEY and JAMES HAYWARD were indicted, the two first for stealing a glass lamp value two shillings , the property of Thomas Price , the other for receiving the said lamp well knowing it to have been stolen , January 20th , ~

All three acquitted .

(L.) They were a second time indicted, the two first for stealing another glass lamp value two shillings , the property of Thomas Price , and the other for receiving it well knowing it to have been stolen , January 20th.

All three acquitted .

382. (L) SAMUEL GOLDSMITH was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Samuel Colmer on the 10th of April , about the hour of ten in the night, and stealing two woollen cloth coats, value forty shillings; a woollen cloth waistcoat, value twenty shillings; a pair of woollen cloth breeches, value 20 s. a woollen great coat, value 20 s. a quilted sattin waistcoat, value 23 s. 2 dimity waistcoats, value 2 s. a woollen cloth cloak, value 5 s. three linen sheets, value 12 s. three linen shirts value 3 s. two linen table cloths, value 2 s. three linen aprons value 3 s. and a printed cotton bed gown, value 18 d. the property of the said Samuel in his dwelling house . ~

Mary Colmer . I am the wife of Samuel Colmer , my husband is not able to attend; we live in Great Bartholomew Close , my husband and I went out of town on the 26th of March the Sunday fortnight after we were gone, we heard the house was broke open, we returned home the next day, the 11th of April, and found the house broke open; the windows were all fastened and the door double locked when we went away; when we returned the street door was unlocked, the lock was not broke; up one pair of stairs the door was broke open and the things mentioned in the indictment [repeating them] were taken away; a coat and waistcoat were droped; we found none of the other things.

Mary Davenhill . I keep a house opposite the prosecutor's; I was standing at my door on Monday the 10th of last month about ten at night, it was a very bright moon-light night, I saw the prisoner come from the back of the watchman's box, the watchman was crying the hour; he went up close to the prosecutor's door; I saw him turn his hand, but I saw no key in it; the door opened and he went in: I informed Wm Tutt, who was in our house, and he fetched the watchman; the watchman and I and Tutt went up to the door; the watchman pushed against it, and the door opened; then the prisoner put his head out at the door and said, holloa, my friend, what do you want here, then the watchman asked the prisoner if he lived there, he said, Yes, and the maid was gone to light a candle, I said, he did not live there, for the fa mily who lived there were out of town, he was then within the door, and the door a jar that I could just see his face; he repeated it that he did live there and the maid was gone to light the candle, he then run out, and run away, we called out stop thief and he was stopped by a watchman, he dropped two waistcoats and a red cloak inside the door, I am sure the prisoner is the man, he had the same cloaths on he has now and white stockings.

The two waistcoats and red cloak were produced in court and deposed to by Mary Colmore .

Daniel Donally the watchman who was first called and William Tutt , confirmed the evidence of the last witness.

Henry M'Cray. I am a watchman in Bartholomew Close, upon hearing the cry of stop thief, I met the prisoner and told him if he did not stop I would knock him down, he stopped very readily, I collared him and he went with me back to the house that was broke open, I went in and examined the house, I believe the locks were all opened with a pick lock key.

Elieazer Chater. I am a constable of the parish, I was charged with the prisoner, I secured him, I found upon him nothing but an old knife and a little old rusty key not longer than my finger.

Prisoner's Defence.

I had been at the Jacob's Wells, a public house in Barbican all the evening from six to ten, going through Bartholomew Close, there was a cry of stop thief, they laid hold of me and said I had robbed a house.

For the Prisoner.

Jane Robinson . I keep the Jacobs Well, in Barbican, the prisoner was at my house till about ten o'clock the night he was taken.

Ann Cox . I am servant at the Jacob's Well's, he was at our house that night till past ten o'clock.

The Prisoner called three other witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Guilty of stealing the goods, but Not Guilty of breaking and entering the dwelling house .

[Transportation. See summary.]

383. 384. (L) LIDIA GOMEZ and CATHERINE FRANKLIN , were indicted for stealing nine guineas and fourteen-pence in money numbered , the property of John Hollingworth , March 30th ++.

John Hollingworth . The two prisoners and another woman pulled me into a house in Gravel-Lane ; I did not go in willingly, they took my money from me by force; there were four of them, they all held me together, and Franklin put her hand in my pocket; one said

"D - n you what are you about, why don't

"you have his money; I will have it or be

"his butcher.

"On his cross examination, he said, he

"did not pick the woman up, but that he

"had been in the bed-chamber with one, and

"was come out of the house when they pulled

"him in and took his money from him,

"that he was sure he had all his money when

"he came out of the bed chamber; that

"when they took the money from him, he

"did not see it, but he heard it, that he told

"his brother three men had taken the money

"from him in the street; because he was

"servant to his brother and was afraid to

"tell him the truth."

Henry Harris . I was sent for by one Solomon, a butcher in Duke's Place, he pointed out the prosecutor, and told me he had been robbed; I went to him, he said, if I would get his brother to forgive him, he would tell the truth, and then said, he had been robbed by four women, and I went and took the prisoners.

Gomes's Defence.

I had been at work all that day, coming home I heard a noise, I asked what was the matter, and the man said he had been robbed; as I was coming by the same place the next day they laid hold of me.

Franklin's Defence.

I was coming down the street, I saw a mob of people, I asked what was the matter, the prosecutor said he had been robbed, that three men had knocked him down.

They both called several witnesses, who gave them a good character.

Both Guilty .

[Transportation. See summary.]

385. (1st L.) JEFFERY ASHBY was indicted for stealing a quilted stuff petticoat, value two shillings , the property of Richard Wallford , April 19th ++.

Robert Judson . I am a journeyman to Mr. Wallford, a mercer , in Houndsditch ; Thomas Grime informed me a petticoat was taken from the door, I ran out and saw the prisoner running away with it, I pursued him and took him, he dropped the petticoat.

The Petticoat was produced in court and deposed to by Judson.

Thomas Grime . I was at my father's, opposite Wallfords, I saw the prisoner take the petticoat from a hook at the door post, I informed Mr. Judson of it, we pursued him and took him; it was between eleven and twelve at noon, he was not out of sight before he was taken, I saw him drop the petticoat.

The Prisoner said nothing in his Defence.

Guilty .

[Branding. See summary.] [Imprisonment. See summary.]

386. (1st L.) RICHARD RICHARDSON was indicted for stealing a silk handkerchief, value three shillings , the property of Robert Bennett , May 1st ++.

Robert Bennet . I lost my handkerchief last night at the top of Mincing-Lane , I had it just before, a gentleman asked me if I had not lost my handkerchief and said he thought the prisoner had it, I pursued the prisoner and he ran and threw it away.

The handkerchief was produced in court and deposed to by the prosecutor.

- Lewis. About seven o'Clock last night, as I was in my shop, I saw the prosecutor come up Mincing-Lane and the prisoner very near him, I did not see him take the handkerchief, but I saw him with a handkerchief in his hand endeavouring to conceal it.

I informed the prosecutor of my suspicions; he pursued the prisoner, and the prisoner droped the handkerchief.

Prisoner's Defence.

I never saw the handkerchief, till I saw it in the gentleman's hand.

Guilty .

[Transportation. See summary.]

387, (L.) ELIAS THOMAS was indicted, for obtaining by false pretences from Charles Doxey , a large iron chest , the property of the said Charles Doxey , September 21st ++.

Charles Doxey . I am an iron chest-maker , in Eagle-street ; on the 21st of September last the prisoner came to me genteelly dressed; with his knocker wig, and said,

"Mr. Doxey

"I want an iron chest: I said, I had plenty;

"he said, he had some property of his own, and

"others under his care, and he desired me to let

"him have a very good one." I told him the one I shew'd him was a very good one, he saw it weigh'd, he a little scrupl'd my weights, but I wish, he had been half as honest as my weights, he desired me to bring it home with a bill and receipt, and gave me this card, (producing it)

"Thomas and Co. Factors, No. 5 Dowgate-hill," He told me to bring it soon or he should be gone on change, a pretty figure to go on change, when I came to the house there was a little boy, I asked for Mr. Thomas, he said he was out, there was another man, his Co.

"O!" says he,

"you have brought the iron chest," he got men to help to get it into the house, he said Thomas was just gone out to get a bank note changed to pay for it; I wanted a little refreshment, I told him, I would go to the Three Crowns with him to get some refreshment, he said it was a bad house and bad company * and so decoyed me to the Falcon in Thames-street, there we drank together, and as I was lame, he said he would go and see if Thomas was come home and he would return to me; I stay'd three hours, then I went to the house to enquire if Thomas was come home, he said no, I asked what was come of the chest, I saw it was not in the passage; he said it was carried up stairs, Thomas came to me the next morning and said I had not left the key nor the bill, he put his hand in his pocket and pulled out a bill and said he had not change enough, and asked me to change a note of seventy pound which he said was due in three days.

* The Three Crowns is in sight of the house the chest was left at, the Falcon is at the other end of the hill.

Q. Did you ever get your chest again.

Doxey. I traced it for a matter of three weeks, before I got it again; I searched the house for the chest but it was too late, the chest was taken away three hours before, it was taken to White Chapel, and there God Almig hty set a curse upon the cart, and would not let it go any further it broke the cart all to pieces.

" Luke Marlow , and Henry Phillips , who

"were at work in Doxey's shop when Thomas

"came and ordered the chest; confirmed

"Doxey's evidence in that particular. And

"- Flower, another of Mr. Doxey's

"men who went with the chest, confirmed the

"other part of his evidence."

John Pearce . I live at Dowgate Hill, opposite the house, I saw the chest taken away in a cart.

Prisoner's Defence.

I was only a servant to one Millikin, he was a bankrupt not long ago and desired me to buy things in my name, because his credit was bad, he said he had money enough at command to pay.

Guilty .

[Transportation. See summary.]

388. (L) WILLIAM ASKEW , was indicted for obtaining by false pretences, three chased etwee cases, value forty-nine shillings , the property of William Carter , October 14th , ++

William Carter . I am a silver smith , the prisoner came to my shop and said Mr. Bingham sent him for three etwee cases, to shew a customer; Mr. Bingham has credit with me.

Q. Would he have had them if he had not made use of Mr. Bingham's name.

Carter. No: the next day I called upon Mr. Bingham, I was going that way and asked him if any of the three cases, he sent for pleased his customer, he said, he had sent for none, I said his man had three the night before; he informed me that the prisoner who had been his servant, had left him some time; by enquiring we heard of him, his mother wanted me to make a debt of it, but I would not I told her I would prosecute him.

"On his cross-examination he said he had

"received two of the cases back again

"and if he had been offered the money for

"the third he believed he should have taken

"it, that the prisoners mother promised

"to bring the money but he would not make

"a debt of it, but would prosecute him if he

"had not his goods, that it was three weeks

"after before he thought of indicting him,

"and if he had not been guilty of a similar

"affair he should have thought no more about

"it.

- Bingham. I did not send the prisoner to Mr. Carter's for any etwee cases, he has left my service ever since July 1772, he did not bring any to my house.

Guilty .

[Branding. See summary.] [Imprisonment. See summary.]

389. (L) THOMAS CHALKLEY was indicted for wilful and corrupt perjury, in the evidence he gave upon the trial of Davis Burdet , and Clarke , at the last session, at the Old Bailey . ++ See No. 191 last session

Edward Brown . I was the prosecutor of Davis Burdet and Clarke, the last sessions, for robbing me on the highway. The prisoner, who was also concerned in that robbery, was admitted an evidence for the crown. In the evidence he gave in court, he positively swore that Burdet was not in company with them, when the robbery was committed. I am positive Burdet was one of the persons that robbed me.

John Marsom . I am clerk to Mr. Gurney. I was in court when the prisoner gave evidence upon the trial of Davis, Burdet and Clarke; but his evidence was taken down by Mr. Gurney.

Q. Is Mr. Gurney here?

Marsom. No, he is taking down the arguments on an appeal in the House of Lords: but I remember perfectly, without refering to Mr. Gurney's notes, that the prisoner swore, that, neither Davis nor Burdet, were in the robbery.

Nicholas Bond . I am Clerk to Sir John Fielding . This information, (producing it) I took down from the prisoner's mouth, after he was sworn an evidence for the crown; it was read over to him, and he signed it.

"The information was read in court, in which he says; -

"That Burdet, Clarke,

"Davis, and himself, robbed the prosecutor

"of a metal watch, &c. and the Burdet sold

"the watch."

Prisoner's Defence.

I spoke the truth when I was here, but when I was first taken up, I could not say the particulars of every thing. I spoke the truth as far as I could.

Guilty , T .

The trials being ended, the Court proceeded to give Judgment as follows.

Received Sentence of Death, 14.

John Topping , Richard Walthall , Daniel Gregory , William Barrett , Thomas Palmer , Michael Conway , alias Irish Mick, Thomas McDonald , Thomas Wood , Samuel Storer , Samuel Cross , Henry Jordan , Frederick Williams , Thomas Tunks , John Hines .

Transported for 7 Years, 39.

Charles Downes , Thomas Norton , Mary Smith , Henry Vesthall , Alice Berry , John Bailey , Samuel Bryant , Margaret Miller , Peter Barrot , William Donaldson , William Harrison , Thomas Clift , Samuel Goldsmith , Lidia Gomez , Catherine, Franklin , Richard Richardson , Thomas Chalkley , Alias Thomas , William Butts , Charles Cooper , Robert Bowers , Peter Harcot , Charles Maybrick , William Bransgrove , Mary Terry , Thomas Evans , William Wooley , Nathaniel Chapman , Michael M'Cann , Ann Thompson , Thomas Crowder , Ann Edwards , David Emon , James Hainsworth , James Newton , Mary Pollard , Margret Berry , William Hackney .

Whiped 13.

Thomas Meadows , William Loveridge , John Anderson , Patrick Doyle , John Harris , William Young , Martha Slade , Hannah Miller , John Williams , Margaret Latham , Ann Wilkins , Phillis Silvester , John Saunders .

Branded, 6.

Thomas Munn , Ann Babb , and imprisoned three months; Hugh Lawrence , Jeffery Ashby , and imprisoned three months, Thomas Beets , and imprisoned six months; Ann Tennant , William Askew to be imprisoned 6 months.

On Saturday the 13th of May will be published, To be continued Weekly. (Price 6 d.)

NUMBER I. of THE NATURAL HISTORY OF ANIMALS, VEGETABLES, AND MINERALS; WITH The THEORY of the EARTH in General Translated from the French Of COUNT de BUFFON.

By W. KENRICK L. L. D . and J. MURDOCH.

Where may be had.

THE LIFE OF ROBERT LORD CLIVE , Baron Plassey .

By CHARLES CARACCIOLLI , Gent.

London: Printed and Sold by T. BELL, No. 26, Bell-Yard, Temple-Yar.

Trials at Law, Pleadings, Debates &c.

Accurately taken down in SHORT HAND, Also the ART of SHORT WRITING completely and taught in Right Lessons. By JOSEPH GURNEY , Southampton Buildings, near Staples Inn;

Of whom may he had, the Eight Edition of BRACHYGRAPHY, or SHORT WRITING. Made easy to the meanest Capacity, Price bound 8 s.

The Book is also sold by his sister MARTHA GURNEY, Bookseller, No. 34, Bell-Yard near Temple-Bar.

On Saturday the 13th of May was published, To be continued Weekly. (Price 6 d.)

NUMBER I. of THE NATURAL HISTORY OF ANIMALS, VEGETABLES, AND MINERALS; WITH The THEORY of the EARTH in General Translated from the French Of COUNT de BUFFON.

By W. KENRICK L. L. D . and J. MURDOCH

Where may be had.

THE LIFE OF ROBERT LORD CLIVE , Baron Plassey .

By CHARLES CARACCIOLLI , Gent.

London: Printed and Sold by T. BELL, No. 26, Bell-Yard, Temple-Yar.

Trials at Law, Pleadings, Debates &c.

Accurately taken down in SHORT HAND, Also the ART of SHORT WRITING completely taught in Eight Lessons By JOSEPH GURNEY , Southampton Buildings, near Staples-Inn;

Of whom may be had, the Eight Edition of BRACHYGRAPHY, or SHORT WRITING. Made easy to the meanest Capacity, Price bound 8 s.

The Book is also sold by his Sister MARTHA GURNEY , Bookseller, No. 34, Bell-Yard near Temple-Bar.