Old Bailey Proceedings Online (www.oldbaileyonline.org, version 6.0, 27 November 2014), April 1774 (17740413).

Old Bailey Proceedings, 13th April 1774.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS ON THE King's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol-Delivery FOR THE CITY of LONDON; And also the Gaol-Delivery for the County of MIDDLESEX; HELD AT JUSTICE-HALL in the OLD-BAILEY, On Wednesday the 13th, Thursday the 14th, Friday the 15th, Saturday the 16th, Monday the 18th, Tuesday the 19th, and Wednesday the 20th of APRIL, 1774.

In the Fourteenth Year of His MAJESTY's Reign. Being the Fourth SESSION in the MAYORALTY of The Right Honourable Frederick Bull , LORD-MAYOR of the CITY of LONDON.

Taken in SHORT-HAND by JOSEPH GURNEY .

NUMBER IV. PART I.

LONDON:

Printed for J. WILLIAMS, No. 39, in Fleet Street.

[PRICE SIX-PENCE.]

THE PROCEEDINGS ON THE

King's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol-Delivery, held for the City of LONDON, &c.

BEFORE the Right Honourable FREDERICK BULL , Lord Mayor of the City of London; the Honourable GEORGE PERROTT , Esq. one of the Barons of his Majesty's Court of Exchequer*; the Honourable Sir WILLIAM BLACKSTONE , Knt. one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of Common Pleas +; Mr. Serjeant GLYNN, Recorder ++; THOMAS NUGENT , Esq; Common Serjeant ~, and others his Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

The *, +, ++, and ~, refer to the Judges by whom the Prisoners were tried.

(L.) First London Jury.

(M.) First Middlesex Jury.

(2d L.) Second London Jury.

(2d M.) Second Middlesex Jury.

First London Jury.

William Harrison

William Marston

Isaac Fearon

John Falkener

Thomas Godwin

William Bunyard

William Clay

Thomas Sidebottom

John Everard

John Fellows

William Archer

James Ingram

Second London Jury.

William Wilbraham

Henry Hardy

Thomas Fitzhardy

John Taylor

Harry Gearing

John Parke

George Pargiter

William Hewitt

Richard Woodyer

John Richards

Robert Saddington

James Scott

First Middlesex Jury.

Joseph Finch

John Haley

Thomas Bromley

John Evans

Francis Pope

Benjamin Gee

Edmund Franklin

Richard Atkinson

Thomas Briggs

George Stalker

Joseph Baker

Richard Hart

Second Middlesex Jury.

Thomas Smith

John Lock

Richard Walkden

Stephen Bragg

Hildeband Smith

Robert Cassell

John Erwood

James Stevenson

Benjamin Groves

Nicholas Moseley

John Smellson

Henry Jackson

213, 214. (M.) JAMES TUFFNELL and CHARLES COCKLEY were indicted for stealing a cock Canary bird, value 5 s. the property of Joseph Smith , March 9th ++

The court were of opinion that this charge could not be the subject of a criminal prosecution, they were therefore

Both acquitted .

215. (M.) ELIZABETH LEWIS , spinster, was indicted for stealing a linen shirt, value 2 s. a red and white linen handkerchief, value 4 d. and two gold rings, value 6 s. the property of Thomas Cornwell , Feb. 24th ++

Elizabeth the wife of Thomas Cornwell deposed, that the prisoner was her servant ; that having some suspicious respecting her honesty, the witness insisted upon the prisoner's shewing her the contents of her box; that the prisoner unlocked her box in be presence and gave her her linen shift and handkerchief, and took out of the pocket the two rings. (They were produced and deposed to by the prosecutrix).

The prisoner in her defence denied the charge, but called no witnesses.

Guilty . T .

There was another indictment against her for robbing another mistress.

216, 217 (M.) JOHN COX and WILLIAM GRIFFITHS were indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling house of Ann the wife of Nicholas Clarke , on the 26th of March , about the hour of eleven in the night, and stealing a silver coffee pot, value 7 l. five silver tea spoons, value 7 s. and a gold watch, value 7 l. the property of Priscilla Payne , spinster; and two silver pint mugs, value 8 l. four silver table spoons, value 20 s. a pair of silver tea tongs, value 3 s. the property of the said Ann Clarke in her dwelling house .

Second Count laying it to be the dwelling house of the husband Nicholas Clarke . ++

Both acquitted .

218. (M.) MARGARET NUGENT , widow, was indicted for stealing a pair of silver shoe buckles, value 12 s. a pair of stuff shoes, value 2 s. a sattin cloak, value 10 s. and a cotton gown, value 5 s. the property of Ann Veezey , Dec. 27th . *

Acquitted .

219, 220, 221. (M.) WILLIAM BROWN , JOHN GRIFFIN , and JAMES STEWARD , were indicted, the two first for breaking and entering the dwelling house of John Tullock , on the 27th of February , about the hour of two in the night, and stealing a silver pint mug, value 3 l. a silver cream pot, value 20 s. a silver pepper castor, value 20 s. eight silver tea spoons, value 16 s. a pair of silver tea tongs, value 11 s. a silver table spoon, value 10 s. and a woollen coat, value 30 s. the property of the said George, in his dwelling house ; and James Steward for receiving the said goods, well knowing them to have been stolen .

All three acquitted .

222, 223. (2d. M.) JOHN BEBB and JAMES WELCH were indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling house of Henry Ball , on the 23d of March , about the hour of nine in the night, and stealing four linen aprons, value 8 s. six linen caps, value 1 s. a cloth cardinal, value 8 s. a linen shift, value 1 s. a linen sleeve, value 6 d. two rows of gold beads, value 20 s. a gold locket, value 5 s. a pair of silver shoe buckles, value 4 s. and three gold rings, value 20 s. the property of the said Henry, in his dwelling house .

On account of an error in the indictment they were

Both acquitted .

224, 225. JOHN SHIRLEY and PHILIP DOUGHTY were indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling house of Mary Poultney , widow, on the 14th of March , about the hour of nine in the night, and stealing twelve pewter plates, value 6 s. two pewter dishes, value 4 s. and a linen napkin, value 6 d. the property of the said Mary, in her dwelling house . ++

Mary Poultney . I keep a public house near Golden Square ; my house was robbed of the things mentioned in the indictment, ( repeating them) on the 14th of March, they got in about nine o'clock at night, by breaking a glass casement that leads into the kitchen; (a napkin found upon Doughty produced and deposed to by the prosecutrix ).

James Greenway . On Monday night between eight and nine o'clock, Shirley came by and called me by my name; I went to the window; Shirley returned; I saw him again soon after; he came the second time; I saw Doughty leap out of the window; I went for a constable to secure them both, finding the house had been broke open and the things stole.

Thomas Pratt . I am a constable: Greenway having charged me with Shirley and Doughty, I examined them and found this bolt (producing it) upon Doughty.

Prosecutrix. I believe that to be my bolt; it is such a one as was taken from a passage door that goes into my garden.

Shirley's Defence.

I know nothing of it.

Doughty's Defence.

I found the bolt in the street.

Both guilty. Death .

Recommended to mercy by the Jury .

226. (2d. M.) EDWARD JESSON was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling house of Thomas Thompson , on the 14th of March , about the hour of nine in the night, and stealing a ham of 8 lb. value 4 s. the property of the said Thomas, in his dwelling house . ++

Acquitted .

227. (M.) JOHN JENKINS was indicted for stealing a looking glass in a mahogany frame, value 5 s. a woollen blanket, value 3 s. two linen sheets, value 6 s. and a copper tea kettle, value 1 s. Mar. 18th .

Acquitted .

228. (M.) LEONARD WARDELL was indicted for stealing six silver tea spoons, value 15 s. a silver strainer, value 1 s. a linen table cloth, value 6 d. 5 lb. of green tea, value 25 s. and twelve shillings in money, numbered , the property of Ralph Wells , Feb. 27th . *

Ralph Wells . I am servant to Mr. Howard who lives in Savile Row; my wife keeps a chandler's shop in little Poultney-street ; I had information that my shop was broke open on the 27th of February; I went to the shop about eight o'clock, there I found that it was broke open, and the several things mentioned in the indictment had been taken away; upon a suspicion that my wife entertained from what had been said by the apprentice of her brother of having seen such a sort of man about, I had him taken up at his lodgings, and carried before Sir John Fielding ; there he was searched and a bunch of keys found of mine, but they are not mentioned in the indictment; the next morning I went with the constable to search his lodgings, there we found every thing that had been stolen except the money.

William Taylor . I am a constable: I went with Mr. Wells and found every thing in the prisoner's lodgings.

John Fullwood , the landlord of the house where Well's wife keeps her shop, deposed, that he took the prisoner.

The prisoner in his defence said, the goods were brought to his house by another man, but called no witness.

Guilty . T .

229. (M.) CHARLES GREEN was indicted for stealing a bay gelding, value 20 l. the property of John Sherwood , Dec. 10th. 1771 . *

John Sherwood . I live in Conduit-street ; whilst my servant was dressing my house on the 10th of December at the door, I observed the prisoner in conversation with him for some time; he seemed to know the horse; I asked him how he came to know it; he said it was put up at the same stable his master's horse was; I thought he seemed rather surprized when he saw me; I bid my man take care of the horse and not leave it, as I did not like the looks of the prisoner; I thought he came to fetch him; my man came to me about eight o'clock, where I dined, and said the stable door was broke open, and the horse lost; I sent out several persons after him, in consequence of which I got my horse again, about ten days after he was stole.

Francis Wenham . I am a servant to Mr. Sherwood; the prisoner came up to me as I was dressing the horse and asked me who learned me to dress a horse, and found fault with me; I locked the horse up in the stable; after that when I went to open the stable door at night, I found the lock broke open and the horse gone; I ran to my master and informed him of it; he sent out several persons in pursuit of him; I found the horse three or four days afterwards at 'squire Weston's in Surry.

Q. Do you know the horse?

Wenham. Yes, vastly well; Mr. Weston's butler knowing he wanted such a horse bought it for him; I fetched the horse from Mr. Weston's.

John Chunn . I bought a horse of the prisoner about the time this was lost.

Q. What colour was it?

Chunn. A bay horse with a white face.

Q. You are sure it is the prisoner you bought it of?

Chunn. Yes; I was to give him ten pound for it, but in paying the money there was threepence over, which I gave him.

Q. Was the horse you bought of him the same you delivered to Wenham?

Chunn. Yes, it is the same.

Q. to Wenham Are you sure it is the same horse that you lost that was delivered to you by the last witness?

Wenham. I am.

Robert Bloss . I keep a public house at Epsom; the prisoner came to my house between ten and eleven o'clock at night, about the time horse was stole, and lay there all night; he had a brown bay horse with him; when he got up in the morning he said he was going to shew it to a gentleman that he believed would buy it, and whether he did or did not he should come back and pay his reckoning, but he never did come back or pay his reckoning.

Q. Have you seen the horse since?

Bloss. Yes, since it has been restored to the prosecutor; I am sure it is the same I saw the prisoner with.

Prisoner's Defence.

I am innocent of the affair; I went to the yard to ask for the Bishop of Chichester's coachman; I came out again; I went down into Hertfordshire; I did not go to Epsom; I never sold any horse to Mr. Chunn; I expected my friends here, but they are not come.

Guilty . Death .

230, 231, 232. (M.) RICHARD GARRETT , JOHN EDDIN , and FRANCES HALL, otherwise FRANCES the wife of Joshua HALL , were indicted for making an assault upon Valentine Guerin , in the dwelling house of John Benfield , and stealing from his person, sixteen china dishes, value 3 l. eighty-four china plates, value 4 l. two china tureens, value 5 s. two china tureen covers, value 2 s. two china tureen dishes, value 10 s. four china sallad dishes, value 4 s. four china sauce boars, value 10 s. and four china salts, the property of the said Valentine .

The second count lays the goods to be the property of Thomas Morgan , Feb. 3d . *

William Hyde . I am servant to Mr. Morgan, who is a china man ; on the 22d of February Guerin, my fellow servant , ordered me to go to Mr. Benfield's the corner of Queen Ann street with some patterns of china; I went and delivered them to Frances Hall , who was called Mr. Benfield's housekeeper; she took them up stairs and came down and said they would do very well, and desired I would bring the whole set next morning; I told her the price of the set was sixteen pound eighteen shillings, and that I would bring it in the morning, and I asked in whose name I should make out the bill; she said in Mr. Benfield's name, because the lady they were for was ill, and could not be spoke with; I carried the patterns back and told Guerin, and when Mr. Morgan came in I told him of it; he ordered us to pack it all up that night against morning, and bid us both go with it, and not leave it without the money; we took the china in the morning; we took it into a large room by the shop; we took it out and laid it on a table, and made out the bill in Benfield's house and put it on the china; then Guerin asked who was to pay for it, Mrs. Hall said Mr. Benfield would call and pay for it, and that he was gone to pay for it; then Guerin went home to know whether we should leave it or not, and left me in possession of the china; he returned and said my master was not at home; I said we had better pack it up again and take it home and not stay all day for no purpose; I began to pack it up, and the prisoner Garrett said I should not pack it up, for Mr. Benfield was gone to pay for it, and I should not take it out of the house; soon after this Mrs. Hall came and took away the bill of parcels; then I went home to inform my master of it; my master came back with me, and then all the china was taken away; my master asked for Mrs. Hall, and was told she was in the kitchen; my master went down into the kitchen; I followed him and would have gone in, but they would not let me; they went to shut the door, but I got my foot in and kept it open; there were three men there; my master asked Mrs. Hall for his goods; she said he might get them as he could, or words to that effect.

Valentine Guerin. On the 22d of February, one Abraham Staick came to Mr. Morgan's and told me I must carry some patterns of china to a lady in Queen Ann-street, to the house of Mr. Benfield, for some gentlefolks to look at; when Hyde came in I sent him with the patterns; he came back and said they would do; the next morning we went with the china and set it out on the table; there was no less than eleven people in the house backwards and forwards; I asked who was to pay for the things; Mrs. Hall said Mr. Benfield, and that he would come in two hours; I went home to acquaint my master and to take his directions; when I came back Hyde proposed to carry the china back; we began to pack it up; Garrett said what are you doing, I would not have it taken out of the house for five hundred pound; it would be a discredit to Mr. Benfield, who was a man of property, and had seven estates; I put my hand on the goods to take possession of them; they offered me some bread and cheese and some rum; I refused to take any of it; they went down stairs with it, and then Eddin came up with them and took away two dozen of plates; I asked him what he was going to do with them; and the poor man would have brought them back, but they would not let him; I took hold of sixteen dishes, and said if they took the rest they should not have them; Garrett came and after many oaths forced them away from me; I attempted to go after them; I met Mrs. Hall at the foot of the stairs; she said what are you doing here, you shall not go up a stair of mine, and bid me go into the room where I was before, and stay there; my master came, and I told him the china was taken; he said he would soon make them produce it; my master said he would go and get a warrant; while he was gone Hall said go get a warrant for this fellow, and take him out of the house; I staid there till my master sent for me.

Benjamin Turnbull . I am servant to Mr. Benfield; the two last witnesses brought a basket of china to our house, and asked me to help them down with it; I refused, I did not care to meddle with it, because I thought it was on a bad cause; I thought they were goods that would never be paid for, because there were a great many goods came on the same footing, that were never intended to be paid for; they brought in the china, laid it on an ironing board, and the bill of parcels upon it; Garrett came to me and said it the bill of parcels was taken away the goods would be delivered; then he went down immediately into the kitchen to Mrs. Hall; she came up directly and took away the bill of parcels; Guerin was in the room with the china, and said he would keep possession till his master came; Eddin took away some of the china by the order of Mrs. Hall; he was a servant in the shop, and she took some herself; Guerin said something at that time, but I could not hear what; Guerin took up some china, and was bringing it into the shop; Garrett followed him and said d - n your eyes deliver it to me, and took it out of his hands; Guerin smattered something and turned up his eyes and seemed startled.

Q. Who was to have the goods in case they were left?

Turnbull. They were to be among them; Mrs. Hall said, any body that ordered in goods was to have one third and Benfield two thirds; Garrett was a servant in the house before I came; he had no business there after I came; I was but three weeks in the family; they were ordering goods in in this manner every day, from various tradesmen, that they could get them of; after they were taken up, I delivered five parcels to the owners of them, and took receipts for them.

Q. Was Benfield at home any part of that day to give orders?

Turnbull. I believe not; he was a bankrupt a day or two afterwards.

Q. Did you see Garrett take the dishes and a parcel of china from Guerin by force?

Turnbull. Yes; Mrs. Hall only acted under the direction of Benfield, and had the whole management of the house.

Q. from Garrett. Did you ever see me concerned in any thing, or did you ever hear me order any thing in?

Turnbull. I know nothing of his ordering in any goods; he was there among them when the goods were brought in.

Thomas Morgan . On the 22d of February, my men told me there was an order for some goods; I ordered them to go the next morning with them and not to leave them without the money; they came back to me twice; I went with them and found the china gone; I went down into the kitchen; I saw the woman and two men there; they attempted to shut my servant out of the kitchen; I went to Justice Wright's to get advice, and when I returned home I found Benfield and another person in my house; they offered me a note for the goods; I said I knew nothing of their note; I would not have any thing to do with it; they had got my goods unfairly, and I would take a proper course; but Turnbull had told me they were all to be removed the next night within the rules of the King's Bench, therefore I thought it prudent not to make much noise about it, so I bid him leave the note till morning.

Turnbull. Hall told me so.

Morgan. I got a warrant next day, and took all the people we could find in the house, and I found the goods and brought them to Sir John Fielding 's; I did not think the note was worth a farthing; it was drawn upon one Luff a publican in Holborn; I sent to enquire after him, and found the house was a very bad house.

Q. Did Benfield indorse the note when he left it?

Morgan. Yes; I applied to Justice Wright before I ever saw the note.

Garrett's Defence.

I was not in the house; I knew nothing of the china being ordered in; I was just come in from the country; we looked upon Mrs. Hall as our mistress; what she bid us do we did; she ordered us to take the china up stairs, and we did; I am foreman to Mr. Benfield.

GARRETT guilty . Death .

HALL guilty . Death .

EDDIN acquitted .

233, 234. (2d. M.) WILLIAM ASSENT otherwise GRANT , and WILLIAM WAINE were indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling house of William Grindall on the 27th of February , about the hour of eight in the night, with intent the monies and effects of the said William to steal .

A Second Count for stealing five table spoons, value 3 s. a metal candlestick washed with silver the property of the said William, in his dwelling house. ++

Both acquitted .

235. (M.) GEORGE WALL was indicted for stealing a guinea , the property of Richard Maddie , March 5th .

Richard Maddie . I am a salesman in St. James's market ; the prisoner and another man came to me to buy a truss of hay and a truss of straw; they asked the price of it; I told them sixteen pence the hay, and eight pence the straw; the other man pulled out the money and paid me for it; he gave me two sixpences, one of which was bad; the prisoner came back and said the other man had given me a French shilling, he would take it again; I pulled out my purse, the prisoner put his hand in and took out three guineas; I said that was not the French shilling, and he put it in again; I searched the purse and missed a guinea; I afterwards looked and there was no French shilling in the purse.

- Jeffreys. I work in the yard; I saw the prisoner and Jenkins, whom I knew to be a bad one, about Maddie; I thought they were about no good; I kept my eye upon them; I saw the prisoner take something out of the purse; I came up to him immediately; Maddie had him then by the collar; I desired him to be taken into the house and searched, but no guinea was found upon him.

The prisoner in his defence denied the fact, but called no witnesses.

Guilty . T .

236, 237. (M.) JOHN GAHAGAN and GEORGE LITTLE were indicted for stealing, on the 1st of February, about the hour of nine in the night, one gold watch, value 10 l. a silver watch, value 40 s. two silver medals, value 5 s. four pair of stone sleeve buttons, value 4 s. eleven silver coat buttons, value 13 s. one silver pap boat, value 10 s. a pair of paste shoe buckles, value 15 s. seven guineas, four crown pieces, and eight shillings in money, numbered, the property of John Cheeke , in his dwelling house, and that they being in the said dwelling house, and having committed the said felony, feloniously and burglariously did break the same to get out, against the Statute .

Second Count for stealing the same goods in the dwelling house of the said John Cheeke . *

John Cheeke . I live in Red Lion-court in Russell-court ; I am a carpenter and builder ; Gahagan worked with me as a bricklayer ; on the first of February about nine at night, when my family and I were going to supper, a knock was heard at the gate; my daughter went out and brought me a letter; before I had opened the letter, there were pistols and cutlasses over my head, and the cry of your life or your money; there were three or four, I think four men; they took my money out of my pocket, and then one of them cut me down with a cutlass which brought me to the floor; when on the floor I had a cutlass at the side of my ribs working about; Little the prisoner was one of them; I saw him go up and down stairs several times; I am sure he was one; I believe he was the first that entered the house; he held a cutlass over my head.

Q. What dress was Little in?

Cheeke. A sort of a brickdust coloured coat; they took my watch and then went out; then they went up stairs: they broke all the locks except two; they shut all the doors and staid in the house above an hour; I know nothing at all about Gahagan being there, but what Little confessed.

Court. Little's confession is no evidence against Gahagan; therefore you must not go on to mention what he confessed.

Cheeke. I went afterwards with my son and William Taylor , one Clarke, and one Senhouse, on an information of Little being concerned in this business; we found Little; I knew him again directly.

Hannah Cheeke . I am the daughter of the last witness; about five minutes before nine I heard a knock at the gate; I went to the gate and Little gave me a letter; he stammered very much and seemed much confused, which made me take more notice of him; I carried the letter to my father; I was leaning over him to see him open it, when four men came in; I think there were four of them; they had pistols and cutlasses, and immediately the cry was your life or your money; one of them came to me; I had got to a dresser and I said, Lord Jesus what is the matter! one of them came up and presented a pistol to me and swore he would blow my bra out if I spoke a word; after that I took up a candle and got into the back kitchen; one of them came and tried at the door; I opened it, but he pulled it to again and went up stairs; then my brother came; I went to open the door to my brother, and saw one of the men with a pistol at his breast; I immediately shut it.

John Cheeke , jun. gave the same account as to the manner of the thieves getting into the house that his father and his sister had done, and added as follows: before my father could open the letter to see a word of it, four men came in, and the cry was d - n your blood your life or your money; I gave them my money, and then a tall man cut my father down, he knocked my mother down three times, he was going to do the same a fourth time, when I catched hold of him by the collar; we had a tussel and came down on the floor together; this man was a very tall man; Little and this tall man went up stairs together; I am very sure Little is one of the persons; I attempted to follow them, and attempted to get away first by the gate and then to escape by a ladder against a pent house, and I was thrown down the ladder by this tall man; on the 19th of February I was told by a person that he suspected Little to be concerned in this robbery; I went accordingly with my father, Mr. Taylor, and two others to Little's lodgings; as soon as I saw him in the room I knew him directly; I am very positive Little is one of the men.

William Taylor . I went in pursuit with young Mr. Cheeke and his father; young Cheeke as soon as Little sat up in his bed said he knew him.

John Holland . I am a publican; the prisoners were drinking with two more at my house the night of the robbery; they went out of my house about eight o'clock; my house is within twenty yards of Mr. Cheeke's outer gate.

Mary Street. I am servant to the last witness; the prisoners and two other men were drinking there at the time my master has mentioned; they asked for a pen and ink, I think it was Riley asked for it; they had a piece of paper of a smallish size; I did not see any of them write, but they asked me for a wafer; I had some in the house, but I could not find any; I went out to buy some; the woman I applied to had no wafers, but gave me a bit of sealing wax, which I laid down on the table but did not see them make use of it.

John Purvey . Once on a time I was at work for Mr. Cheeke; Little came and asked me whether the two houses we were at work upon were Mr. Cheeke's own; Gahagan said no, but he had houses in other places, and he believed him to be a man of worth.

Elizabeth Jones . I live in Red Lion-court; I went down the court to fetch some coals the night Mr. Cheeke was robbed; I saw Gahagan walking by Mr. Cheeke's gate; as I came back I saw him close by the gate; after I returned home I was sent for to a gentlewoman, and I went down the court again; then I saw him walking between the two walls at Mr. Cheeke's gate; he watched me down to White Hart-yard, which made me take the more notice of him; all this passed in about a quarter of an hour; he had a lightish coloured coat on.

Mary Street and John Holland deposed, that Gahagan had on a lightish coloured coat when at their house.

Thomas Halliday . Gahagan lodged in my house; I found a cutlass in my necessary; it was after Gahagan was in custody, therefore it could not be put down by him.

Little's Defence.

It is wonderful he did not take me up before this time; I past by four times a day, breakfast, dinner, supper and at night, and all hours; I was meeting them every day, one or other of them; it is surprizing they did not take me up if they had a mistrust of me; but only upon a false information of a publican, that my wife and he had a falling out in regard of seventeen pence halfpenny he cheated her of; when Sir John Fielding 's men came they made me do any thing they pleased; I have no witness except my landlord and people for my character.

For Little.

George Cooper . Little had lived in my house upwards of two years, when he was taken up for this unfortunate thing; during that time I never saw any thing but what was civil and honest by him.

Q. Did he come in in good hours?

Cooper. He used to come to his meals and sometimes worked till eleven or twelve at night in order to make five quarters of a day.

Q. Do you know where he was on the first of February?

Cooper. No, I do not.

Edward Bryan . I have known Little these twelve years; I am a carpenter; I never knew any misbehaviour of him in my life; I know him to be a very honest lad.

Elizabeth Mackurdy . We were brought up children together in Ireland; I never heard his character stained before.

Francis Joyce . I live in Drury-lane; I am a hatter; I have known Little ever since he was ten years old; he always had a good character.

Gahagan's Defence.

I worked for this gentleman in the burying ground in Russell-court; I was in the burying ground the same day; it was a snowy day, that broke off my work; I worked the day before this Tuesday night he was robbed; at night a little after six, as it is common, I went down to him for some money; he gave me two shillings in halfpence; about six o'clock I went down the end of the court; turning the corner two or three doors from my master's house, I saw Little hanging the lamp, standing upon the steps; he asked me if I would have some beer; two men were with him; one I knew, the other I did not; Relly was one; we all went in together and had three pots of beer; we sat for an hour; then we all came out together to the end of the court; Relly and the other went to the left hand, and we came to the right; I came to Little's door with him; we parted about seven o'clock; he went up stairs and I went home. One of my witnesses will tell you where I was the rest of the night. Relly wrote a penny-post letter to a friend about four miles off; what it was about I cannot inform you.

Little. I was not by at the writing of the letter.

For Gahagan.

Elizabeth Holmes . -

A Bye-stander. My Lord, it is said this witness is wife to one of the prisoners.

Gahagan. She is not my wife.

Holmes. I live at the Nag's Head -

Q. They talk of your being Gahagan's wife?

Holmes. No; he lived a lodger with me in Ireland four years; I know nothing of him but honesty; I never knew any harm of him; I have known him these twelve or thirteen years.

Patrick Carrol . I lived in Cross-street, Holborn, fifteen years; I have known him eight years; he kept a house facing me; he might have robbed me at times of five hundred pounds. He worked hard for his bread ever since he was out of our neighbourhood, five or six years; I knew him work for Mr. Jones in St. Giles's; I never saw any thing but a good behaviour by him.

Gahagan. I beg your lordship will enquire of Mr. Cheeke about my character.

Cheeke. While he worked with me I took care to make him do his duty as near as I could; sometimes he would get fuddled as other workmen would do; I had no reason to suspect him before; I kept him when I turned other men off, therefore I thought him a good servant.

William Scott . I am a glover: I have known Gahagan about eight years; he was a very honest hard working man while he lived in the neighbourhood; it is four or five years ago since he left the neighbourhood; I have not known much of him since.

James Aga . I keep a publick house in St. Giles's; I have known him two years; he has a good character.

John Poole . I have known him eight years; he bears a good character.

LITTLE guilty . Death .

GAHAGAN acquitted .

238. (M.) GEORGE NICHOLSON was indicted for stealing four 36 s. pieces, one moidore, one 4 s. 6 d. piece, five diminished and cut guineas, value 4 l. 10 s. and one diminished and cut half guinea, value 8 s. the property of John Dobree , in his dwelling house , March 26 . +

James Everest . I live with Mr. Dobree, a pawnbroker , in Holborn . On the 17th of March, between one and two in the afternoon, when I was in the shop, I saw the prisoner put his hand through a broken pane of glass, and take a handfull of gold that lay on a board in the window to shew; we buy light gold; I ran out and secured him before he had got five yards; I took the pieces of gold mentioned in the indictment out of his hand; the guineas and half guineas were light but not cut. I did not know what was in the window.

The constable deposed that he found the pieces of money in the prisoner's hand that are mentioned in the indictment.

Prisoner's Defence.

I am a soldier : I had been at my quarters to receive a month's money; being very much in liquor, as I was going by this man's shop, a porter pushed me against the window, my hand went through, and the money came into it.

For the prisoner.

Francis Jent . I am a serjeant in the guards; the prisoner belongs to the same company I do: I have known him seven years as a soldier, but know nothing of his private character.

Guilty of stealing but not in the dwelling house . T .

239. (M.) MARY BARKER was indicted for stealing a silver watch, value 40 s. a cotton handkerchief, value 4 d. an enamelled snuff box, value 12 d. a penknife, value 6 d. and four shillings in money, numbered, the property of John Jones , privately from the person of the said John , Feb. 21st . +

John Jones . On the 21st of February, as I was returning from Chelsea, I met with two young fellows I was acquainted with; we came to the Red Lion, Piccadilly, where we staid drinking till past twelve o'clock; I was rather disguised in liquor; I went to see one of them home; he would have some liquor; that made me worse; about two o'clock I left him, and coming by Monmouth-street, I met the prisoner; she laid hold of my arm, and insisted on my going with her to a private house, but I would not consent to that; I agreed to go to any alehouse, and we accordingly went to the Two Brewers, as the watchman told me it was; I do not know; there I called for a pint of beer; I fell asleep; Joseph Brown came in and waked me; I found my breeches tore a-cross the thigh, and my watch and money were gone, and the other things mentioned in the indictment; I am certain I had them when the prisoner came to me first; I had my hand in my pocket at the time, and had just looked at my watch, and it was then past two to the best of my knowledge.

Q. Was the woman gone when you waked?

Jones. No, she was there; I believe it was about five o'clock when I waked; I am not certain; I said I had been robbed, and Brown and Cartwright, the watchmen, took the prisoner in custody; they found the watch, and I saw it produced before the Justice next morning.

Joseph Brown . I am a watchman: between one and two in the morning Cartwright and I saw the prisoner dragging this man by the arm; they went into St. Ann's parish together; there was no house open, and they came into Monmouth-street again, but I lost them in the back alleys, and did not see either of them till I called the hour five; then we went into the Two-Brewers, High-street, St. Giles ; that is a house of call for watchmen: I saw the prisoner sitting by the prosecutor, who was fast asleep; I looked at her, and she blasted me, and said what was I looking at; I said she had robbed the man, and desired Cartwright to lay hold of her till I waked the prosecutor; she got up, and went to a man, whose name is Wakelin; he was in another box; she took the watch out of her bosom or pocket and gave it to him; Cartwright seeing her give the watch to him, challenged him with it; he denied that he had it at first; afterwards he gave it to Cartwright. The prosecutor said he was robbed, his breeches were cut all to pieces; she had left the chain and seal in his pocket. The cotton handkerchief was found upon her when she was in custody; we found none of the other things.

Arthur Cartwright confirmed the evidence of the last witness.

John Wakelin . The woman came up to me and put the watch in my arm; I put it in Cartwright's arm.

Q. How came you to deny you had it?

Wakelin. I don't recollect I did deny it; it put me then in a flutter; I did not know what it was.

John Young . I am keeper of St. Giles's round house; I searched the prisoner and found this handkerchief upon her (producing it) and sixpence; (the handkerchief was deposed to by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's Defence.

On Sunday night, about eleven o'clock, coming home by Broad St. Giles's, I met the prosecutor; he took hold of my arm, and asked me to go with him; I said I was not a person that got my living in that way; I left him and went home about two in the morning; a woman in the house where I live was taken very ill; I went to the Two Brewers to get something for her; when I came there I saw the prosecutor asleep, and the watchman sat by him; he offered to put the watch in my hand, and said I knew how to dispose of it better than him; I went home again; the woman continued very bad; about five o'clock I went for some more liquor, and then Brown, the watchman, was looking over the prisoner, and said he was robbed, and asked him where his watch was; it was found on the coachman, and he said I gave it him; I never had the watch.

Guilty . Death .

240. (M.) SARAH, the wife of John ROUT , was indicted for stealing eight yards of lawn, value 20 s. the property of Hubert Hussey and John Whitter , March 21st . *

Acquitted .

241. (M.) THOMAS MACKLIN was indicted for stealing one linen gown, value 10 s. one quilted petticoat, value 12 s. and nine India pictures, value 5 s. the property of Edward Watson , Feb. 27th . ++

Acquitted .

242. (M.) ROBERT CAMPBELL was indicted for stealing two canvas bags, value 1 s. one pewter pint pot, value 4 d. two iron bolts, value 3 d. and 50 lb. wt. of iron nails, value 12 s. the property of John Schoolbread , April 5th . ++

John Brown. Mr. Schoolbread is owner of the Snow Peggy ; these two bags and pint pot (producing them) are the ship's property; there is the ship's name on the bags. I know nothing of the prisoner.

Robert Wood . I am a carpenter in the Snow Peggy : I locked the iron in the cabin at seven on Saturday night; when I came on board on Sunday morning, I found the cabin door broke open and the iron gone; the prisoner was stopped with it by the watchman; this bolt I gave to the black boy; I am sure it was in the cabin.

Robert Edmonds . I am a watchman; I stopped the prisoner with the bag on his back; when I laid hold of him he threw the bag down and ran away; I cried stop thief; he was stopped; I am sure he is the man that had the bag.

Matthew Woolfington . I am a watchman; I heard the last witness call stop thief; I stopped the prisoner; he had the bolt in his right hand.

John Whellock I was constable of the night; I was called at half after three to take charge of the prisoner; he had the bolt; I asked him how he came by it; he said he had it out of a ship at Deptford that he had been at work on board; I asked the name of the ship, but he said he did not know it, nor the captain's name, nor the mate's, nor boatswain's.

Prisoner's Defence.

I know nothing of the things; I had been at work that day at Deptford; I was coming up with a man who had a cag of rum in a bag; this man laid hold of him; he let down the bag, and I was stopped with the bolt in my hand which the man gave me.

Guilty . T .

243. (2d M.) JOHN MARSHALL was indicted for stealing a silver tankard, value 5 l. three silver table spoons, value 15 s. a silver cream pot, value 5 s. a silver butter boat, value 20 s. a silver pepper castor, value 10 s. and one silver salt holder, value 5 s. the property of Mary Miller , widow, March 8th . *

Mary Miller . I lodge at No. 99, in the Strand : I lost the things mentioned in the indictment; the prisoner is my first cousin, and lived with me; he absconded, and then I missed some things; I went and searched his room, where I found a large spoon that he had left behind him; he was taken, and before Sir John Fielding he confessed he took the things, and carried them to Duke's Place; he went there and shewed us the house where he sold them, and we found they were melted down.

Q. When he confessed, was it in consequence of any promise not to prosecute him?

Miller. No.

Q. Do you remember who he said he sold it to?

Miller. Aaron Spencer . Sir John Fielding was about to make an order to get the plate, but the prisoner said he believed it was melted down, for Spencer said he would melt it down before his face if he would stay. Spencer is not to be found.

Prisoner's Defence.

I am not guilty of the offence; they made me confess when I was in liquor; I did not know what I said.

Prosecutor. He seemed to be very sober before Sir John Fielding ; he was taken in Hampshire: I advertised him in the country newspapers.

Guilty . T .

244. (2d M.) THOMAS HIGGIMBOTTOM was indicted for stealing a pair of leather breeches, value 12 s. the property of John Bellam , March 11th . ++

Samuel Purney . I am a breeches-maker; these are John Bellam 's breeches, (producing them); I had them to mend; they were stolen out of my shop; I found them on the prisoner; Bellam is a gentleman's servant , and is gone in the country with his master.

Edward Jebson . Coming from work by the breeches-maker's stall, I saw the prisoner come out backwards with the breeches under his arm; seeing the lock lie on the ground, I suspected he had stole them; I took him into the public house; the breeches-maker was there, and said the prisoner had stole them out of his shop.

Prisoner's Defence.

As I was going along I saw a man come out of the shop; he threw the breeches down; I took them up and went into the ale house to call the breeches-maker; I told the man when he found me with them, they did not belong to me.

Guilty . T .

245. (2d M.) THOMAS JONES was indicted for stealing a plain gold ring, value 3 s. the property of John Stead , March 11th . ++

Acquitted .

246. (2d M.) JANE EVANS was indicted for stealing a pair of linen sheets, value 4 s. and a blanket, value 6 d. the property of Ann Webb , widow, March 18th . *

Ann Webb . I live in Dane's-court, Oxford-road ; the prisoner did work for me by the direction of her daughter; I found the sheets pawned in her name; I got a warrant for her, and took her before Justice Welch; there she owned she had pawned them; she said she intended to take them out again without my knowledge. I found the blanket in her lodging. (The goods produced and deposed to by the prosecutrix.)

Prisoner's Defence.

I took the blanket home to mend; I was necessitated for money.

Guilty of stealing to the value of 10 d. T .

247. (2d M.) THOMAS PHILLIPS was indicted for stealing three silver tea spoons, value 4 s. the property of John Bampton , April 8th . *

John Bampton . I keep a tallow-chandler's shop at Bethnall Green ; on the 8th of April, about seven o'clock in the morning, the prisoner came to sweep the chimney; he went backwards to leave his bags, and came again at nine; when he was gone my servant told me she missed the spoons.

Amy Jones . I am servant to a watchmaker in Whitechapel. On Friday last, about twelve o'clock, the prisoner brought this piece of a silver tea spoon (producing it) to me, and I bought it.

Q. Do you make a practice of buying such things?

Jones. We buy them when they are brought to us.

Q. What you buy any thing that is brought to you?

Jones. I did it without a thought.

Elizabeth Wacket . I am servant to the prosecutor; the prisoner came on Friday morning to sweep the kitchen chimney; the three spoons lay on the dresser when he came in; I missed them when he was gone; there was nobody in the house but him and me; he went into the kitchen and I followed him; I told him to come again after nine o'clock. He owned before Sir John Fielding they were each broke in two and sold at six different places.

Thomas Clarkson . I took the prisoner and brought him to Sir John Fielding 's; he confessed there he had sold them at six different places; he went with us to four places; we went to one Reynolds's in Rag-fair, where he said he had sold this handle ( producing the handle of a silver tea spoon) and got it; (the handle deposed to).

Prisoner's Defence.

I know nothing about it.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Guilty of stealing to the value of 10 d. W .

248. (2d M.) JANE, the wife of JOHN FRANKLIN , was indicted for stealing a lawn apron, value 4 s. the property of Mary Foster , spinster, March 2 d .

Acquitted .

249. (2d. M.) MARY SAUNDERS was indicted for stealing a silver watch, value 40 s. the property of Daniel Sidney . Feb. 21 . +

Daniel Sidney . On the 18th of Feb. I lost a watch out of my house; I was not at home at the time.

Mary Sidney . I am the prosecutor's wife; the prisoner had been a lodger at my house; on the 18th of Feb. she came to see me; I never left the kitchen while she was there, only to open the door to let my child in from school; I suppose she took the watch then; it hung over the mantle piece; I did not miss it till my husband came home at six o'clock, when she had been gone a quarter of an hour; I saw the watch at half after four.

Daniel Sidney . On the Sunday night following I met the prisoner in St. Martin's Lane; I took her to St. Giles's round-house; on Monday I took her before Justice Welch, and he committed her to Clerkenwell prison, and there I told her I would not hurt her if she would tell me where the watch was; she gave me a direction, and I found the watch at one Elizabeth Littlejohn 's, in South Norton-street, where she had sold it; she is here.

Elizabeth Littlejohn . I keep a shop in South Norton-street: about six weeks ago the prisoner came to me, and said she was going to a place in the city; she said she was bare of money, that she had a watch of her husband's in pawn at one Mr. Howell's, and should be glad to sell it for something more than it was pawned for; I went with her, and paid 12 s. for taking it out; I had it valued, and was informed it was worth but 15 s. I gave her the other 3 s. when she was taken; the prosecutor came to me and said it was stole, and I went with him to the Rotation-office.

Prisoner's Defence.

I went to drink tea with Mrs. Sidney; I have lived with a young fellow three years, who threatened me if I did not bring him money; I saw the watch hang over the mantle piece; I took it for him, and thought to return it next day.

For the Prisoner.

George Saunders . I am brother to the prisoner; I believe distress drove her to it; I am a gentleman's servant.

Guilty T .

250, 251, 252. ( 2d. M.) WILLIAM HATFIELD , JOHN RICHARDSON , and BENJAMIN PRICE were indicted for stealing twenty-one yards of cloth, value 21 s. the property of James Clough , December the 4th ++.

James Clough . I am a whitster , and live at Old-Ford below Bow; my wife and I had been to Whitechapel, and bought twenty-one yards of white linen cloth; we went to the Whittington and Cat; while I was telling out two shillings worth of half-pence my cloth was taken away; the prisoners were in the room; I charged them with it; they denied it; I sent for an officer, but he said the suspicion was not strong enough to detain them; I went to enquire after my cloth among the pawnbrokers, but heard nothing of it; some time after the prisoners were taken up, and I was sent for to Whitechapel; there Thorpe the evidence confessed stealing the cloth.

William Sheldon . I am servant to Mr. Nemias the pawnbroker; a soldier came to my master's and sold a piece of linen cloth, my master sold it afterwards; I believe it was brought by Richardson; I do not think Thorpe brought it.

John Thorpe . The prisoners and I stole the cloth from the prosecutor, at the Whittington and Cat in Whitechapel ; Richardson took it out of the box while he was drinking; Richardson and I went with it to Nemias's; Richardson went in with it, and I waited for him at the door; Richardson told me he got 13 s. 3 d. for it; we shared the money between us four.

Q. From Hatfield. Did I know any thing of it being taken out of the house?

Thorpe. No, he did not; we told him of it afterwards, but he did not see it taken out of the house, but we gave him part of the money; he went with us to assist us in disposing of it.

Q. from Price. Did I know of it being taken out of the house?

Thorpe. Yes.

Court. Did Richardson know of it?

Thorpe. Yes, he took it.

Richardson's Defence.

I know nothing further than Thorpe desired me to sell the cloth for him, he said it was his own cloth, that it was sent him out of the country.

Price's Defence.

I know nothing at all of it. I was drinking in the public house, the Whittington and Cat; I went to my quarters; I know nothing at all of it.

For the Prisoners.

Benjamin Cooper . I am a corporal; the three prisoners belong to the same regiment I do; I never heard any thing against their characters as honest men; I never heard a complaint of either of them. The evidence does not bear so good a character; he has deserted once or twice.

HATFIELD and PRICE acquitted .

RICHARDSON guilty T .

The court reproved Nemias for his improper conduct.

253. (2d. M.) ISAAC MARTIN was indicted for stealing two ounces of shot silk, value 5 s. the property of Stephen Dolignon , March 8th ++.

Acquitted .

254. (2d. M.) SARAH SIMMS was indicted for stealing a silver watch, value 3 l. the property of John Daintry , March 1st . ++

Acquitted .

255. (1st. M.) THOMAS MORGAN was indicted for that he in a certain field and open place near the king's highway, in and upon Edward Minton , did make an assault, putting him in corporal fear and danger of his life, and taking from his person, eleven half-pence and two farthings, the property of the said Edward Minton , Feb. 13th ++.

Edward Minton . I live at Twickenham with Mr. Wilday; I have lived with him four years and a half; I have known the prisoner almost two years; the first of my acquaintance with him, was at the Crooked Billet, a public house in St. Paul's church-yard; he was at my master's house twice; he wanted to borrow money of me; I had it not in my power to lend him any. On the 13th of February he came to my master's house and desired to see me; I went to the door; he said he was very glad to see me; I said I had forbid him my acquaintance some time ago, and should not ask him in; he said he did not desire to be asked in, but said he had some particular business with me; I told him I was busy; he said he would come again in half an hour; he came again and I took a walk with him from Twickenham towards Richmond ; when I had got a little way, I asked him what he wanted; he asked me to go a little further, and I went with him to the second field; then I asked him what was his business; he said he was going abroad and would be obliged to me to lend him five guineas; I said he had a great deal of assurance to ask it of me; he said it would be worse for me if I did not; I desired him to explain himself; he said then if I did not he would swear sodomy against me; I threatened to take him into custody and take him before his former master, he said, d - n me, he would swear the same against him and his brother too: then I walked away from him as fast as I could; he came up to me and asked me to lend him four shillings to pay his reckoning at Twickenham where he had been in company. Then he laid hold of me and d - d my eyes, and said if I did not lend it him he would blow my brains out; he then put his hand on my breeches pocket and said here is money; then he put his hand in my waistcoat pocket and took out the half-pence and ran away; he said he was going to Richmond. On the 12th of March he came to my master's; I was then in town; when I came home, the maid told me such a person had been enquiring for me; by the description she gave of him, I knew it was the prisoner; I went in pursuit of him; I ran three or four miles before I overtook him; I took him at Brentford; I charged a constable with him, and had him before Sir John Fielding , who committed him.

On his cross-examination he said he was not an hired servant to Wilday; that he asked in the capacity of a hired servant ; that he always had access to his master's table; that the business he transacted for him was marketing, gardening, and going of errands; that when his master came to town, sometimes he came with him; afterwards he said he did not come with him, but followed him; that his master came to town very often and lodged at the Bolt and Tan Fleetstreet; that he had been with his master at the Cock coffeehouse, Temple-bar; that he once met the prisoner at the Goose and Gridiron, but that his master was never there with him; that he had given the prisoner several shillings at different times, but never gave him but a shilling at a time; that he liked the prisoner at first, till he was told he was a person of very bad character; that he was told he had robbed a gentleman; that after this he met him dressed like a nobleman; that the prisoner passed, and then turned back after him, and said he was sorry he would pass him and not speak to him; that he told the prisoner he would not have any acquaintance with a man that had no visible way of living; that it was three o'clock in the afternoon when he robbed him; that it was in the high-road to Richmond; that he did not go to Richmond after him, though he (the prisoner) told him he was going there, because he knew where to find him, and that he did not think he would run away; that it was a month or six weeks after when he came again to enquire after him; that he (the witness) came home in half an hour, and pursued him directly and took him at Brentford; that he was two days in a week in town with his master; that he had a lodging in Shoe-lane for two days in the week, but could give no account of his master's business in town, but that he was in town with him to do messages for him.

John Wilday . I was at my father's on the 13th of February; the prosecutor came in and told me he had been robbed by the prisoner; he asked me what was best to do; I advised him to go to Sir John Fielding 's; he told me the circumstances of the robbery, the same as he has done now. I know nothing of the prisoner. I went with Minton to apprehend him; Minton ran before; when I came to Brentford I saw the prisoner in custody.

On his cross examination he said the prosecutor told him, that the prisoner, when he robbed him, said he would charge him with sodomitical practices; that the prisoner said he was going to Richmond; that the prosecutor was servant to his (the witness's) father; that the prisoner and he dined together once at his father's table; that he did not know his father's business, nor what the prosecutor was employed in when he was with him in town.

John Henley . I am a constable; I was sent for to take charge of the prisoner; I put him in a chaise between the prosecutor and me to take him to Sir John Fielding ; when he was in the chaise, he said to the prosecutor, what are you going to lie with me now? What do you want to do with me, now you have got me in the chaise? he said he should know that when he came to Sir John Fielding 's: then the prisoner said, you know, Mr. Minton, we have been acquainted a long while together; you won't swear my life away for a few half-pence; he said don't you think you are a villain to take so much from me by violence? I brought him to Sir John's, and he was committed.

Prisoner's Defence.

I never robbed him of a farthing in the world; he gave me a great deal of money; I have had of him and his master I dare say to the amount of 20 l. one time and another; he said he was not his master, he kept him there; I asked him what he did; he would not give any account of it; Wilday at Brentford said, though he had lived so many years with his father he did not know how he lived.

Guilty . Death .

256. (2d M.) JOHN BILLINGS was indicted for stealing a wooden box with an iron lock, value 4 s. two cloth coats, value 40 s. two cloth waistcoats, value 20 s. a thickset waistcoat, value 5 s. two pair of leather breeches, value 20 s. a velvet cap, with a gold lace band, value 10 s. two yards of gold lace, value 6 s. a silver tea spoon, value 2 s. a pruning knife, value 4 d. a pair of spurs plated with silver, value 2 s. a leather pocket book with a silver clasp, value 4 d. a common prayer book, value 1 s. two crape hatbands, value 4 d. three pair of black worsted stockings, value 18 d. a man's hat with a silver button and loop, value 2 s. a pair of base metal shoe buckles, value 1 s. and eight guineas, the property of James Clark ; a pair of fustian breeches, value 1 s. and a pair of worsted stockings, value 3 s. the property of William Wanklin junior, in the dwelling house of William Wanklin senior , Feb. 16th +.

James Clark . I live with Mr. Wanklin; my box was in the three pair of stairs room; I saw it on the 11th of February; I did not miss it till the 16th, all my things were in the box, which was locked; the prisoner lay in another bed in the same room with me; he never lodged there after I missed my box; I suspected him and went in search after him; it was two or three days before I found him; at last I found him at the George Ale-house , in Grafton-street, with a pair of my buckskin breeches on, my buckles in his shoes, and a crape hatband on; I had him before Justice Welch; the rest of the things were found in one place or another.

The buckles and breeches produced and deposed to by the prosecutor.

William Wanklin , junior . I lost a pair of fustian breeches, and a pair of worsted stockings at the same time; I found the stockings on the prisoner's legs when he was taken.

William Hutchinson . I keep a publick house in Red-Lion-street, Holborn; the prisoner is my countryman, a Staffordshire man; he asked me to give him room for a box for a few days that came from Gravesend; I said he was welcome; he brought the box and said he had lost the key of it; and desired I would send for a man to open it; when he opened it, there were a great many things in it; he said he should like to sell some of the things; there was a livery, a gold band, and among the rest a silver spoon; a Jew bought some gold lace and the spoon of him; my wife afterwards bought the spoon of the Jew for 2 s. 8 d. at the same time the prisoner made me a present of the bookcase (the pocket book and spoon produced and deposed to by the prosecutor). In a day or two after, he called for the box; I desired my servant to fetch it down; he tied some things in a handkerchief, and gave me this prayer book and these spurs (producing them).

Clark. My name is in the prayer book; it is mine, and it is my box.

James Wigley . One morning I was sent for to the last witness's house, and I opened a box for the prisoner.

John Devine . The night before the prisoner was taken he brought some clothes to the George in Monmouth-street, and desired my mistress to put them up for him; he said he was going to sea and would fetch them away next morning. (The clothes produced and deposed to by Clark).

Prisoner's Defence.

The box was given to me by a man in the street.

Guilty of stealing the goods to the value of 39 s. T .

257, 258. (2d M.) JOHN PLATT and MARY, the wife of JOHN ELDER , were indicted; the first for stealing thirty-four pair of women's shoes, value 4 l. seven pair of men's shoes, value 20 s. and eight remnants of callimanco, value 5 s. the property of Robert Jefferson , in his dwelling house , March 18 , and the other for receiving fourteen pair of womens shoes, being parcel of the above goods, well knowing them to be stolen . +

Robert Jefferson . I am a shoe-maker in Cranbourn-alley ; I lost a parcel of shoes out of my shop the 18th of March, some time in the forenoon; I believe at different times; James Everett came with a pair of shoes, and asked if they were mine; he said a woman brought them to pawn, and he suspected they were stolen; I went with him to Justice Welch's; the woman was examined there; she said she had them of Platt; that woman was not the prisoner; from thence we went to Platt's lodgings, and found fourteen or fifteen pair of men's and women's shoes, and eight remnants of callimanco; I can swear to the shoes; he acknowledged they were mine before the Justice.

Q. Was any promise made to him to confess?

Jefferson. Not that I know of. He was examined again the 21st of March; then there were seven pair of women's shoes produced by one Brooks. Elder acknowledged pawning seven pair of the shoes for Platt; Platt had lived with me seven months; he said he took them out of my shop; the woman said she did not know but they were Platt's own property.

James Everett . I am a pawnbroker: I stopped a woman that called herself Ruth Platt with a pair of shoes, and took her to the office, in Litchfield-street; she is not the prisoner at the bar; the Justices directed me to make enquiry in Cranbourn-alley after the owner of the shoes; I went and found they belonged to the prosecutor; I was present when the shoes were found in Platt's lodging; I think there were eleven pair of women's and seven pair of men's; he said they were Mr. Jefferson's property, and that he gave them to that woman to pawn; there were other shoes pawned at our house by the prisoner, Elder, in the name of Mary Brown ; there were in all about twelve pair, four pair only were pawned by Elder, and the rest by different persons in different names; Platt said he gave the four pair to Elder to pawn.

John Brooks . I took in pawn two pair of shoes of the prisoner, Elder, on the 11th of January, two pair on the 24th, two pair on the 31st, and two pair on the 12th of February; they were pledged in the name of Mary Brown ; she said they were her own.

Dennis M'Donald. I am a constable: I went to Platt's lodgings, and found twelve pair of shoes and eight pieces of callimanco.

Platt's Defence.

My wife was lying-in; I was distressed for money, and sent Elder, who was nursing my wife at the time, to pawn them for me; she is innocent of it.

The prisoner, Platt, called four witnesses to his character.

PLATT guilty of stealing the goods, but not in the dwelling house . T .

ELDER acquitted .

259. (M.) JOHN DAWSON was indicted for stealing two plain gold rings, value 4 s. the property of Charles Rapley , April 12th . +

Charles Rapley . I am a jeweller in St. Martin's-court, St. Martin's-lane . On Tuesday the 12th of April, between five and six o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came into my shop and asked for some plain wedding rings; he tried several; and then he asked for a thicker sort; I told him I could make him one that evening; he said he would come again in about four hours time; I thought it an odd time; I asked him for his address, he said his name was Johnson, and he was to be found at the Bull and Gate, Holborn; as I was writing it, I looked into the box and missed a ring, and saw a metal ring among them; he went away, I called my wife in the shop, counted the rings and missed two; I pursued him and bid him give me the two rings, and take his own, and go about his business like a scoundrel as he was; I told him not to hesitate for I knew he had them; he told me not to make a noise and he would go back with me, but that he had not the rings, he had given them to a companion; I saw a man while he was in the shop looking at the show glass on the outside, who I missed when the prisoner went away; when I brought him back he begged for mercy, and desired I would not send for a constable; he wanted to go into the back room; he went to the end of the compter where there was a show glass, and then I suppose put one of the rings under it, which I found there the next morning; I sent for a constable and took him into custody, he was searched and nothing found upon him but a farthing.

Jeremiah Rapley , the father of the last witness, confirmed his evidence.

Prisoner's Defence.

I went to look at a ring for another person; I was to carry back the price and go again; I never meddled with the rings.

Guilty . T .

260. (M.) JOHN ACHER was indicted for stealing 2 lb. wt. of lump sugar, value 1 s. 2 lb. wt. of moist sugar, value 6 d. and two ounces of bohea tea, value 4 d. the property of Berry Sharpe , Feb. 18th. +

Berry Sharpe . I am a miller and keep a teem; the goods were stolen from the teem while my son drove it.

John Sharpe . I drive my father's waggon; this parcel was taken up in London for my father; it lay in the hind part of the waggon, wrapped up in paper which was put in a sack; the prisoner desired me to let him ride; I carried him from Finchley Common as far as Hadley , to the Rose and Crown; we lay all night there; he got out and gave me three-pence; I saw the tea and sugar in the sack just before he got out; I missed them just after he went away; they lay in such a manner they could not possibly fall out; the prisoner returned in an hour and an half; I charged him with taking the tea, he denied it.

Benjamin Hubbins . I live at Barnet; on the 18th of February the prisoner brought some lump sugar to sell to me; he said he was a smuggler, that he had smuggled it; he had some tea he would have sold me, I did not see it; he had the sugar weighed, there was just two pound of it; he offered it for nine-pence; the common price is about seven pence a pound; I did not chuse to buy it of him.

Prisoner's Defence.

I know nothing of it.

Guilty of stealing to the value of 10 d. W .

261. (M.) BENJAMIN BATCHILDER was indicted for stealing sixteen bushels of wheat, value 4 l. and four hempen sacks, value 2 s. the property of James Lyon , Dec. 24th . +

Acquitted .

262, 263, 264. (M.) WILLIAM RICE , PETER PERRIER , and SARAH GROSS , spinster, were indicted; the two first for breaking and entering the dwelling house of Thomas Baugh on the 1st of March , about the hour of eight in the night, and stealing a blanket, value 4 s. two linen sheets, value 8 s. two bed quilts, value 10 s. two check aprons, value 2 s. and a pocket handkerchief, value 1 s. the property of William Picking , in the same dwelling house , and Sarah Gross for receiving one linen sheet, well knowing it to have been stolen .

William Picking . I lodge at Mr. Baugh's on Bethnall-green ; I occupied the lower apartment; I came home from my work at eight o'clock in the evening, and found my apartment broke open I left it locked a little after dinner when I went to work; when I went out to my afternoon's work I left my wife in the house; she came to me at six to my master's, we spent some time together and returned home a little after eight; when we went out we had fastened the sash down with a gimblet; my wife is ill at home at present and cannot attend; when I left it it was so fastened; when I came home at night the middle square of the sash window was broke, the gimblet taken out, and the sash thrown open; I lost the things mentioned in the indictment. (Repeating them).

Bet Martin . I live at Hoxton; I went to see Mrs. Picking the prosecutor's wife on the 1st of March; I did not come there till seven in the evening; I knocked at the door of her apartment, there was nobody within, nobody answered; then I went round to the window in order to look through to see if there was any light; there is only one window to the apartment, a sash that looks into the street; the window at that time was fastened down, and the glass whole; I saw nobody in the house; it was very dark.

Thomas Mainwaring . I am headborough of Hackney; I found two quilts at Charles Johnson 's in Spitalfields, where the prisoner Rice had a room; I found the door locked; I broke it open and found these quilts. (They are produced and deposed to by Picking.)

Philip Gosset . I am a weaver; I attend Justice Wilmot's office; I apprehended Gross; she confessed that several things were pawned at several pawnbrokers by her; and that she received them on the 1st of March of the two other prisoners and Stevens who is the accomplice. I found a sheet at one Mackaboy's, a pawnbroker's at Shoreditch; a blanket at another's; and two aprons at a third: she went with me to these pawnbrokers, and confessed that she had pawned the things that were taken out by her and by me. When Rice was taken up there was a bunch of about thirty keys found in his pocket.

Ann Rice . I was at Johnson's the night of the robbery; Rice came in and laid down the two quits and a pillow, which is not in the indictment. (The quilts produced and deposed to by the prosecutor).

John Lucas . I am a servant to Mr. Mackaboy in Shoreditch; Sarah Gross pawned this sheet (producing it) at our house, in the name of Fisher, on the first of March.

Picking. This was taken off my bed at the time that I was robbed.

James Stevens . About half past seven o'clock on Tuesday night, the day before the last execution, we were going along in Dyal-street, I and Rice and Perrier; Rice pushed his hat which covered his hand through a pane of glass at Picking's window without cutting his hand, and took out the gimblet which fastened the sash down, and threw up the sash, then he put me in at the window; by his directions I took the bed clothes off the bed and gave them out of window, some to Rice and some to Perrier: they carried them into Shoreditch; I was not there when they were pawned; they delivered them to these people to get pawned; they cheated me out of part of the money; I had but eight pence for my share; I cannot say who pawned them of my own knowledge.

Court. As there is no evidence against Perrier but that of the accomplice, I shall not call upon him for his defence.

Gross's Defence.

I had them from the accomplice, not Rice.

Rice's Defence.

Another man picked them up; I carried them home for him.

RICE guilty . Death .

PERRIER, acquitted .

GROSS, guilty. T. 14 Years .

265. (2d. M.) MARY, the wife of John WELSH , otherwise WALSH . was indicted for stealing a brown camblet gown value 5 s. the property of Charles Riley , April 2d . +

Acquitted .

266. (2d. M.) GEORGE HEASMAN was indicted for stealing three cotton handkerchiefs, value 5 s. the property of Nicholas Smith , Feb. 17th . *

Nicholas Smith . I am a pawnbroker ; on the 17th of February I lost three handkerchiefs, I know nothing of the taking of them.

Thomas Ragg . As I was coming through Caple-street, I saw the prisoner come by the prosecutor's door and catch down the handkerchiefs which were hanging at the door, pinned to a gown sleeve; he put them under his arm; I laid hold of him when he had got about five yards from the door; I found the handkerchiefs and two hats under his arm at the same time. (The handkerchiefs produced and deposed to by the prosecutor).

Prisoner's Defence.

I went to buy one of these handkerchiefs, as I had hold of them the wind blew pretty hard and they came down into my hand; I did not snatch them down.

Ragg. When I took him he offered me handkerchiefs and hats to let him go.

Prosecutor. I believe he was so drunk he did not know what he said.

Guilty of stealing to the value of 10 d. W .

267. (2d. M.) THOMAS COLLEDGE was indicted for stealing a silver watch, value 40 s. a steel watch chain, value 6 d. a cloth waistcoat, value 2 s. a thickset frock, value 20 s. a pair of men's leather gloves, value 6 d. a linen handkerchief, value 6 d. and a leather pocket book, value 6 d. the property of John Adams ; five linen shirts, value 18 s. two muslin neckcloths, value 5 s. a pair of silver shoe buckles, value 12 s. and a cloth frock, value 30 s. the property of John Campfield , Feb. 17th . ++

Acquitted .

268. (M.) ABRAHAM ABRAHAMS was indicted for feloniously forging a paper writing, partly written and partly printed, with the name John Firlue and son, thereto subscribed, purporting to be an order for the payment of money, and to be signed by one John Firlue , for himself and son, and to be drawn on John Baldero , Richard Carter , William Gregg Barnston , and John Snaith , of London, bankers , in which said paper writing are contained the words and figures following:

London, December the 9th, 1773 .

Mess. Baldero, Carter, Barnston, and Snaith, pay to Mr. Wm. Longdon , or bearer, fifty pounds.

John Firlue and Son.

50 0 0

with intention to defraud Anthony Chapman , against the stature, Dec. 9th.

Second Count for uttering and publishing the same knowing it to be forged.

Anthony Chapman . I live in Norton Falgate; I am a weaver . On the 9th of December the prisoner came to my house, and asked if I made sattins; I told him I did; he bought as many as came to 55 l. he gave me this draught on Baldero and Co. for 50 l. (producing it) in part of payment; I allowed him a discount of 7 1/2 per cent. that reduced it to 51 l. 2 s. 4 d. he said he had no more cash about him than this bill, and he would call and pay the rest; I asked him where he lived, he said in New-street, Portland-square, and that his name was Peter Manstaff , and he pulled out a pocket book with that name upon it; he indorsed his name on the back of the bill; I asked him if it was a good draught; he said it was; I took the goods to a stand of coaches, and he took them away in a coach. The next day I went to Mr. Baldero's with the draught; they asked me how I came by it; I told them I received it the night before for goods; they asked of whom; I said I did not know the man, he had put his name on the back of it; they said they had no cash in their hands of any such persons; they knew neither the drawer nor indorser of it; Mr. Snaith made a mark on the front, and I marked a C on the back of it that I might know it again. Mr. Snaith gave me notice of the prisoner. (The draught read).

Anthony Sturdy . I am a sea-faring man. On the 9th of December I dined at Mr. Chapman's; about three o'clock in the afternoon the prisoner came there to look at some sattins; Mr. Chapman went up into the warehouse with him, and served him with goods to the amount of 55 l. they were packed up, and he offered the draught on Baldero and Co. Mr. Chapman asked if it was good; he said yes, and Mr. Chapman accepted it; the goods were carried to the stand of coaches; the prisoner took them away in a coach.

Q. Are you sure the prisoner is the man?

Sturdy. Yes.

Q. to Chapman. Are you sure the prisoner is the man?

Chapman. Yes: the first time I saw him after he was taken, was in the Poultry Compter; several people were there; I knew him as soon as I saw him.

Mr. John Snaith . I am partner with Baldero and Company.

Q. What is the firm of your house?

Snaith. Baldero, Carter, Barnston, Snaith, and Carter.

Q. How long has it been so?

Snaith. About two years and a half; before that time it stood as you have it before you in that bill.

Q. So this is an old check in your shop?

Snaith. Yes. The bill was brought and given to my brother, our cashier; my brother shewed it to me; I asked Mr. Chapman how he came by it, and had some suspicion he might be the person guilty of the forgery; but a gentleman coming with him that I knew very well, I took no further notice of it, only made a cross upon it; I know nothing of the party it was drawn by. I told Mr. Chapman there had been three or four others offered for payment that I believed were drawn by the same hand. Knowing the person of the prisoner, I took him in the Borough, and brought him before my Lord Mayor; I sent to Mr. Chapman immediately, who came with the other witness, and swore to his person, first before my Lord Mayor, and afterwards before Sir John Fielding . I thought it a duty to the public as well as ourselves to bring him to justice.

Prisoner's Defence.

If I had time I could prove my receiving the draught in the way of trade.

Guilty . Death .

269, 270. (M.) GEORGE HARTLEY and WILLIAM HALL were indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling house of Richard Lord , on the 7th of March , about the hour of ten in the night, and stealing two silver milk pots, value 10 s. one pair of silver tea tongs, value 2 s. six silver tea spoons, value 6 s. two silver table spoons, value 10 s. two silver salts, value 12 s. a silver punch ladle with a wooden handle, value 2 s. a pair of paste shoe buckles set in silver, value 5 s. and three pounds in money, numbered, the property of the said Richard . *

Both acquitted .

271. (2d M.) CHARLES GRUBB was indicted for stealing a pistol, value 5 s. the property of Richard Perryn , Jan. 17th . *

Acquitted .

272. (2d M.) DANIEL BRYANT was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling house of Francis Silva , on the 2d of February , about the hour of seven in the night, and stealing a silk cloak, value 20 s. the property of the said Francis . +

Acquitted .

275. (2d M.) JANE, the wife of John BENNETT , was indicted for stealing a copper teakettle, value 2 s. and a cheque linen apron, value 1 s. the property of Sarah Dickinson , spinster, Feb. 18th .

Acquitted .

276. (2d M.) THOMAS LOVEGROVE was indicted for stealing a silver table spoon, value 5 s. the property of Ann Lentware , widow, March 24th . ++

Acquitted .

277, 278. (M.) THOMAS BRIGHT and ROBERT IRONMONGER were indicted for stealing three live ducks, value 2 s. two live cocks, value 2 s. two live hens, value 2 s. and two bushels of apples, value 6 s. the property of James Field , Feb. 26th . ++

Both acquitted .

279. (M.) CATHERINE M'GUIRE was indicted for stealing a gold watch, value 6 l. a cornelian seal set in gold, value 5 s. a brass watch key, value 1 d. and a steel watch chain, value 6 d. the property of William Harris , March 30th . ++

William Harris . On the 30th of March last, as I was passing along the Strand, by the corner of Catherine-street, the prisoner came up and invited me to go with her; I refused; then she took my hat from me: in attempting to take my hat from her I lost the watch out of my pocket; (the watch produced) I am positive it is mine, and that I had it in my pocket a short time before; I missed it the instant the prisoner quitted me.

Dennis Dumphy . The prisoner took Harris's hat off, and ran into a house; Harris followed her in, and then he complained of losing his watch; I followed the woman and stopped her, and found the watch in her bosom.

Prisoner's Defence.

He had no money, and wanted to lie with me all night, and gave me his watch to raise money.

Guilty . T .

280. (2d M.) SAMUEL SANDYS was indicted for stealing two linen shirts, value 5 s. the property of John Biggs , March 3d . ++

John Biggs . My wife takes in linen to wash.

Sarah Biggs . I am wife of the prosecutor; I hung two shirts belonging to two gentlemen's servants on the line in my garden, and the finest by the rails; about ten o'clock, about an hour after I put them there, I found them wanting, and the line cut; I was alarmed by my daughter, who said thieves had been there; I went to look at the line and found it cut, and the linen gone; my husband and I pursued the person pointed out to us as the man that had taken them; my husband took the prisoner, and he dropped the shirts. (The shirts produced and deposed to by the prosecutrix.)

The prisoner said nothing in his defence.

Guilty . T .

281. (2d M.) JOSEPH CLEWBY was indicted for stealing a silver watch, value 20 s. a steel watch chain, value 4 d. a base metal seal, value 2 d. and a brass watch key, value 1 d. the property of William Season , March 11th . ++

William Season . I keep a public house at Clerkenwell-green ; the prisoner is a soldier ; he was quartered at my house. On the morning of the 11th of March he desired me to lend him the key of the chamber, for the purpose of taking out his clothes; another person hurried him to make haste; I lent him the key; a short time after I had occasion to go up, and found my watch gone; then I went on the guard; the prisoner had deserted; I afterwards found he was taken up as a deserter; I went to him; first he denied he had the watch; afterwards he said he took the watch and was sorry for it.

Jane Wilbough . I was sent by the prosecutor to the prisoner in New Prison; I saw him there; he said he was very sorry for it; he had sold the watch for thirty shillings.

Prisoner's Defence.

That confession was obtained from me on advice given me by the prosecutor to say this to deliver myself from military punishment.

Guilty . T .

282, 283. (2d M.) ELIZABETH DEWITT and MARY JONES were indicted for that they in the king's highway, in and upon William Blindell , did make an assault, putting him in corporal fear and danger of his life, and taking from his person, and against his will, a mahogany staff mounted with silver, value 10 s. a leather pocket book, value 6 d. a silk handkerchief, value 6 d. a pair of leather gloves, value 6 d. and fourteen shillings in money, numbered, the property of the said William , Feb. 1st .

Second Count for stealing at the same time a silver watch, value 50 s. a steel chain, value 1 s. a metal seal, value 2 d. a base metal watch key, value 1 d. a metal watch with a tortoiseshell case, value 41 s. a steel chain, value 1 s. a cornelian seal, value 1 s. one base metal key, value 4 d. and two clasp knives, value 6 d. the property of the said William, in the dwelling house of Ann M'Cormack , spinster. ++

William Blindell . Going up Salt Peter Bank , on the first of February, four women robbed me; the first came up to me, and put her hands in my pocket; they stopped my mouth; I got a cut on my finger with a knife from one of them, I cannot tell which; they asked me what I had got, and then they held my hands and got it out of my pocket; there were others made their escape; the others were in company with me, but not when they first attacked me; I saw them all together; the two prisoners I am sure were two of them.

Thomas Castleman . I was before the Justice; there I heard Dewitt say that the other people were concerned.

John Mayland deposed the same, and that she said it was a pity she alone should suffer.

The prisoners, in their defence, denied the charge.

Q. to the prosecutor. Did they accost you or pick you up?

Blindell. No; they all surrounded me, and forced the things from me.

Both guilty of stealing the goods only . T .

284. (M.) JAMES MANN was indicted for stealing three pewter pint pots, value 3 s. the property of Joseph Tett , March 17 . *

Joseph Tett . I keep the King's Arms, Oxford-street . The pots were taken away from one Baddeley, a shoe-maker's door, between six and seven in the evening; afterwards they were brought in, and the prisoner charged with having taken them; he pretended he had gathered them up for the man at the Crown.

Knight Turtle. I am clerk to a timber yard next door to the Pantheon: our maid observed the prisoner loitering about, and informed me of it; we agreed to watch him; at last I saw him take the three pint pots; the maid and I followed him as far as Brook-street; there he made a short turn to go between some coaches, and made back again for Oxford-street; we followed him still on till we came to the next door, to Mr. Tett's. On asking him what he had in his bag, in his apron, he said some pint pots he was going to take to the Crown; that was not the way to the Crown, nor did the pots belong there; upon that he was taken and carried to Tett's.

Hannah Fox . I am the maid servant: I saw the prisoner loitering about the door; I had a suspicion that he was about something he ought not; it being the great road there was such a number of passengers he could not find an opportunity very soon of doing it; I told my fellow servant of it, and we watched him; we saw him take the pint pots off the ground, and whip them into his apron; we followed him; when we came up to him I bid my fellow servant lay hold of him; he bid me; I said Knight you had better take hold of him; he said no, do you; at last I took hold of him; I said, hollow, my lad, what have you got in your apron; I opened his apron and saw some straw. I thought he might want some straw to put into a cradle or something.

Prisoner's Defence.

Going up Oxford-road I saw four pots stand in the footway; I took them up with intent to carry them to the next publick house; I looked at the inscription on them under a lamp, but could not discern whose they were.

Q. to Fox. Did he take them off the ground?

Fox. No; they were against the side of the wall; he looked round to see if there was any body coming up the passage; then he put them in his apron: the pots were standing quiet enough.

The prisoner called several witnesses, who gave him a go od character.

Guilty of stealing to the value of 10 d. W .

285, 286. (M.) ANN MORRIS and THOMAS MORRIS were indicted; the first for receiving a silver pepper box, three silver tea spoons, two silver salt spoons, six linen shirts, thirteen linen shirts, four silver table spoons, three silver tea spoons, one silver pepper box, and a silver salt spoon, being parcel of the goods whereof William Hurley was, at the last sessions held for the city of London, convicted of stealing, the property of George Geering , well knowing the same to have been stolen; the other for receiving two gold rings, one other gold ring set with a stone and two diamond sparks, one pair of silver knee buckles set with stones, one pair of shoe buckles, a crown piece, six silver three-penny pieces, four silver four-penny pieces, four silver two-penny pieces, and two silver pennies, being other parcel of the goods so stolen as aforesaid, well knowing them to have been stolen, against the statute , Jan. 16th . ++

Both acquitted .

287. (M.) WILLIAM WARD was indicted for stealing a guinea, a half guinea, and thirteen shillings in money, numbered , the property of James Bradley , April 12th .

Acquitted .

288. (M.) JOHN GOODA was indicted for stealing a linen shirt, value 4 s. and a linen handkerchief, value 4 d. the property of Joseph Foster , April 13 .

Joseph Foster . I lost the things mentioned in the indictment out of a drawer in my kitchen.

Sarah, the wife of Joseph Foster . I ironed the things on Wednesday night, and put them into the drawer; I missed them about nine o'clock on Thursday morning; I found them at the pawnbroker's; the prisoner lodged in my house at this time; he was a gentleman's servant.

Lawrence Pearson . I am a pawnbroker; I received the shirt and handkerchief of the prisoner; (they are produced and deposed to by the prosecutrix.)

Prisoner's Defence.

I am as innocent as the child unborn.

Guilty of stealing to the value of 10 d. W .

289. (M.) THOMAS DAY was indicted for stealing three trusses of hay, value 4 s. 6 d. the property of Thomas Brown , Esq ; Feb. 20th . ++

Acquitted .

(M.) THOMAS DAY was a second time indicted for stealing three trusses of hay, value 6 s. the property of Thomas Brown , Esq; March 31 . ++

Acquitted .

290. (M.) JAMES DAVIS was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling house of John Leeson ; on the 9th of April, about the hour of ten in the night, and stealing a pair of leather breeches, value 7 s. the property of John Leeson , in his dwelling house . ++

John Leeson . I am a breeches-maker in Petty France, Westminster . About ten o'clock at nightof the 9th of April , as I was in a little room adjoining to my shop, I heard the glass of my shop break; I came out and missed the breeches which I saw there just before; (the breeches produced.) I am positive they are mine; I sent to Mr. Miller on Monday to enquire whether any such thing was pawned with him; he sent to me to let me know the man was at his shop; I went there and found the prisoner; upon his being interrogated about the breeches, he said he bought them of one Mitchel, in Shoreditch; afterwards he confessed he had taken them.

John Miller . I am positive the prisoner pawned the breeches to me on the same night that Leeson lost them, between ten and eleven o'clock; having intelligence from Leeson with regard to the breeches. when Davis the prisoner came on Monday, I secured him, and sent to Leeson to let him know it; Leeson came; the prisoner said he bought them of one Mitchel, in Shoreditch; he told the same story before the Justice.

Prisoner's Defence.

I bought them of one Mitchel; I do not know whether he is here or not.

The prisoner called seven or eight reputable witnesses, who gave him the best of characters.

Q. from the Jury to the Prosecutor. Do you know them by any particular marks?

Leeson. I had altered them a few days before.

Not guilty of breaking and entering the dwelling house, but guilty of stealing the goods . B .

291, 292, 293. (2d M.) JOHN RAND , WILLIAM CLAYTON , and ROBERT SHEPPARD , were indicted for that they in the king's highway, on William Somers , did make an assault, putting him in corporal fear and danger of his life, and taking from his person four shillings in money, numbered, the property of the said William , March 7th . +

All three acquitted .

(2d M.) They were a second time indicted for that they in the king's highway, in and upon Charles Langford did make an assault, putting him in corporal fear and danger of his life, and taking from his person twenty-one shillings in money, numbered, the property of the said Charles , March 7th . +

All three acquitted .

(M.) WILLIAM CLAYTON and ROBERT SHEPPARD were indicted for stealing two pair of livery breeches, value 10 s. and a man's hat, value 5 s. the property of Samuel Pechell , Esq ; two cloth coats, value 20 s. a pair of cloth breeches, value 5 s. six pair of stockings, value 5 s. and two pair of metal shoe buckles, value 2 s. the property of Robert Kendall ; six linen neckcloths, value 6 s. four linen shirts, value 12 s. five pair of worsted stockings, value 4 s. the property of John Symour , and two linen shirts, value 4 s. the property of William Giles , March 7th . +

Both acquitted .

(M.) ROBERT SHEPPARD was indicted for stealing a pair of worsted stockings, value 2 s. a linen neckcloth, value 1 s. five linen shirts, value 20 s. a small wooden box, value 6 d. an iron lock, value 4 d. and three iron keys, value 3 d. the property of Robert Nicholls , Feb. 2 . +

Robert Nicholls . I am coachman to Miss Bennett, in Bear-street, opposite Oxford chapel; I lost the things mentioned in the indictment (repeating them) out of the Duke of Manchester's stables.

John Tubb . I am a constable; I searched the apartment belonging to Sheppard, and found these three keys, a neckcloth, and a pair of stockings (producing them) locked up in his box; he said he was very sorry for what he had been guilty of, that things were very hard with him: (the neckcloth and keys deposed to by the prosecutor.)

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, but called several witnesses who gave him a good character.

Guilty . T .

294 (2d. M.) WILLIAM SAMPSON was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling house of William Seaton , on the 3d of March, about the hour of twelve in the night, and stealing a linen shirt, value 3 s. a linen gown, value 5 s. a pair of worsted stockings, value 2 d. a child's shirt, value 2 d. a silk handkerchief, value 4 d. and three check aprons, value 2 s. the property of the said William in his dwelling house . *

William Seaton . My house was robbed on the 3d of March ; but I was not at home at the time it happened.

- Seaton. I am the wife of William Seaton ; I latched my door about half after eleven o'clock at night, and then I went to sleep.

Q. What day of the month was this?

Seaton. I believe it was the 14th; I am not certain of the day.

Q. Was it a room on the ground floor?

Seaton. Yes.

Q. Are you sure your door was latched?

Seaton. Yes; the linen was drying in the room; it was taken wet off the lines.

Q. Did you hear any body?

Seaton. No; I lost the things mentioned in the indictment (repeating them); the prisoner was stopped by Carter the watchman with the linen upon him; I saw the prisoner take the handkerchief off his neck when he was before the Justice.

William Carter . I am a watchman of Whitechapel; Thomas Ives gave the prisoner in charge to me; this Ives and the prisoner and two more had a dispute or quarrel among themselves; after I had the prisoner in charge we had an engagement, and both of us came down together; he got from me, but he was stopped; the things were lying upon the flags; Ives picked them up, and we carried the prisoner and the things to the watch house; I do not know where Ives is; he was admitted an evidence against the prisoner, I believe.

Q. What did the prisoner say when Ives charged him with having stolen these things?

Seaton. The prisoner did not say any thing about them; he only asked what he had done; I heard him say before the Justice, that Ives was as big a thief as himself; Mrs. Seaton was asked if she knew any thing of the clothes; she looked over them and said they were all the things she had lost excepting one handkerchief; upon her saving this, the prisoner took a silk handkerchief fifth neck and said to her may be this is it; she looked at it, said it was, and that there was a tear in the hem at one of the corners; when that handkerchief was examined, it appeared to be tore as she described. (The goods, particularly the handkerchief, produced and deposed to by the prosecutrix).

Elizabeth Stone . I was at my brother's, who keeps a public house; a person sent for a pot of beer about twelve o'clock that night; I carried it; I took a candle in my hand; as I came near Mrs. Seaton's door, I met the prisoner with some clothes loose under his arm; as I knew she had been washing I suspected they were her's; I found her door wide open; I went in; she was asleep; I called to her; she did not hear me at first; I then went to the door and cried out, stop thief!

Q. Did you know the prisoner before that time?

Stone. No; I had a candle in my hand and I took particular notice of him; I am certain he is the man; he was close to Mr. Seaton's door, I did not see him come out of the house.

Prisoner's Defence.

I am fully innocent; as I was going up Red Lion-street, I met Thomas Ives and two more; when this Ives saw himself surrounded by the watchmen, he gave me charge of this bundle, and then said I was guilty of stealing it; Ives will not come here now for fear of being tried.

Not guilty of breaking and entering the dwelling house, but guilty of stealing the goods . T .

295. (2d M.) ELIZABETH BOWLES , spinster, was indicted for stealing a linen gown, value 9 s. a linen shirt, value 2 s. a linen bed gown, value 3 s. four pair of linen shift sleeves, value 2 s. a child's blanket, value 1 s. and two linen aprons, value 3 s. the property of John Brown ; and a pair of linen sheets, value 6 s. and a linen pillowbier, value 8 s. the property of Isaac Reeves , Feb. 19th . *

Mary Brown . I am the wife of John Brown who lives at the house of Mr. Reeves a pewterer in Shoreditch ; on the 19th of February I went out about nine in the morning; I came home again about seven in the evening; when I got up stairs I found the door unlocked; I went into the room and found one of my boxes open; there was another box at the door; there were several things in that box; upon searching it I found every thing gone, and part of these things were produced by the evidence on the Wednesday following.

Joseph Barber . One of Justice Wilmot's men asked me on Sunday evening if I knew the prisoner; I said I did; he desired if I saw her I would stop her, for she had robbed somebody in Shoreditch; on the Tuesday following I was at the Half Moon and Punch Bowl in Whitechapel, when a woman came in and asked the landlady to lend her some money to buy a shift a sheet and two aprons, which the prisoner had pawned; I followed the girl and the prisoner; when they had taken them out of pawn from the several pawnbrokers, I took them both and carried them before Justice Wilmot.

Elizabeth Edwards . The prisoner pawned the several things (which were produced); the gown and two aprons at one time; afterwards a sheet and shift; the prisoner came afterwards with a young woman to take them out of pawn.

Phoebe Reeves deposed to a blanket and sheet that were taken at the same time, and pawned to Elizabeth Edwards .

The prisoner in her defence said, she had the goods of another person.

Guilty . T .

296. (M.) MARGARET, the wife of Thomas ADAMSON , was indicted for stealing one silver bread basket, value 10 l. three silver waiters, value 25 l. nineteen silver table spoons, value 7 l. two silver boats, value 8 l. a silver soup ladle, value 20 s. four muslin sacks, value 4 l. four muslin petticoats value 4 l. a linen corded muslin gown, value 20 s. a sattin sack, value 3 l. a sattin petticoat, value 20 s. a callimanco quilted petticoat, value 10 s. five cotton handkerchiefs, value 10 s. two gingam waistcoats, value 6 s. a linen shift, value 5 s. nine linen table cloths, value 10 l. seven linen sheets, value 10 s. fourteen linen pillowbiers, value 30 s. eighteen yards and a half of silk, value 4 l. forty-two yards of linen cloth, value 3 l. 15 s. and one woollen coat embroidered with silver, value 3 l. the property of Daniel De Castro , Mar. 26th . +

Daniel De Castro . I live in Goodman's-fields .

Q. What is your occupation?

Castro. I am a gentleman ; the prisoner was my servant ; on Wednesday the 23d of March she had warning from her mistress, my wife; on Friday the first of April Mr. Davidson a pawnbroker, now in court, came and informed me that the prisoner and a man servant of mine had pawned a quantity of goods with Mr. Windsor a pawnbroker, in the name of Adamson, the name of the prisoner; I went to Mr. Windsor and saw my plate with my cypher on it, and much of my wearing apparel with my mark on it.

Q. Had you missed any thing out of your house before you received this information?

Castro. I had not missed any thing; she had been pawning these things nineteen months; she had lived with me twenty months.

Q. Is Windsor here?

Castro. No, he is charged with receiving the goods knowing them to have been stolen; he delivered me the goods; they are my property; they are here now. (Reads a paper, on which he had taken an account of the goods at the pawnbrokers; which account was exactly the same as in the indictment). These goods were not all at Mr. Windsor's; the greatest part of them were; there was some part of them at Mr. Bunn's, some at Mr. Hop's, and some at Mr. Watson's; all I found at Walson's were pawned in the name of Scott; I have now some duplicates I found in the prisoner's trunk; after I had seen the goods at the pawnbrokers I returned home; when I had been at home an hour or two, I received a letter from my man servant, Isaac Flawn , by his mother, confessing the robbery, that he was an accomplice with the prisoner and it was done at her instigation; he is an evidence; I went and got a warrant for the woman; when the prisoner surrendered herself to me. I promised her if she would speak the truth and nothing but the truth, and be as useful to me in getting my things again as she could, I would be as favourable to her as the law would permit me; she went with me to all the pawnbrokers but one, and asked for the things.

William Tyger . I live with Mr. Bunn, pawnbroker; on the 26th of March the prisoner brought to our house three table cloths, two sauce boats, and two table spoons; I lent her seven pound upon them; she pawned them in the name of Margaret Adamson . (They are produced and deposed to by the prosecutor).

Sarah De Castro , the wife of the prosecutor, deposed to the table cloths.

- Cummings. I am servant to Mr. Hop, pawnbroker; on the 29th of March, the prisoner pawned a piece of silk and five table spoons at our house; I lent four pound ten shillings on them. (They are produced and deposed to by the prosecutor).

The prisoner said nothing in her defence.

For the prisoner.

Richard King . I have known the prisoner ten years; she always bore a good-character.

Sarah Moore . I keep a house in Hatton-garden; I have known the prisoner eleven years; I never heard a bad character of her; I have entrusted her in my house.

Guilty . T .

297. 298, (M.) WILLIAM PRIGG and SAMUEL ROBINSON were indicted for that they in the king's highway, in and upon Abigail Potter , spinster, did make an assault, putting her in corporal fear and danger of her life, and taking from her person, a piece of foreign silver coin, value 2 s. the property of the said Abigail , February 18th . *

Abigail Potter . I live at Mr. Reynolds's at Kensington; I know, the prisoners very well: on the 18th of February coming from the Gravel-Pitts towards Kensington , between seven and eight o'clock at night, it was a very light night; a Mr. Vevers and Mrs. Glayre were with me; three men came after us; the prisoners were two of these three men; I took particular notice of them, so that I am sure of their persons, for I stood ten minutes before they spoke to me; the third man who is not here, took a pistol from Grigg as I think, and presented the pistol to Mr. Vevers's breast: he took Mr. Vevers's watch, and then demanded his money; Mr. Vevers gave them a guinea; they were not satisfied with that; he gave them another guinea, and said he had no more; then they took three shillings from Mrs. Glayre; after that they came to me and demanded my money; I delivered them a piece of silver; they asked me what it was? I said half a crown; it was not so big as a half-crown; it was not English coin; they took that and then they went away.

Henry Vevers . I had been with Mrs. Potter and Mrs. Glayre on the 18th of February towards the Gravel-Pitts; in returning we heard a noise of some people following us; I turned round, and saw three men; one said Hollow! clear the road; we made way for them to pass; but instead of going forward they stopped, turned round to us, and said D - n you, your lives or your money; I asked what they meant? they said they werethree poor boys out of place, and money they wanted! and money they would have! after they had robbed me of a guinea a pistol was produced by one of them; he gave it to another; I cannot remember the men; they might be about five minutes in committing this robbery; after they had robbed me of a guinea one catched my watch out of my pocket; Mrs. Glayre said do give the gentleman his watch again; one of the men said d - n it I will not return the watch unless I have more money: upon which I gave the man another guinea, but he never returned the watch; they said if we did not deliver they would shoot us; I was in confusion at the time; I will not undertake to swear to either of the prisoners being the men that robbed us.

Q. from the prisoners. You now speak of the 18th of February: whether you did not say before Sir John Fielding you was robbed the 27th of February?

Vevers. I do not remember that I did, for I gave the day in a note to Sir John Fielding .

Elizabeth Glayre . I was with Mr. Vevers and Miss Potter when they were robbed; coming towards Kensington from the Gravel-Pitts, three men came up and desired us to give way, which we did; then the three men pushed us up against the wall, and desired us to deliver our money, or they said they would blow our brains out; they went first to Mr. Vevers; I saw them take his watch; I was frightened and did not take particular notice of them, so that I cannot swear to their persons; the prisoners resemble two of the men that robbed us very much; afterwards they robbed Miss Potter; one produced a pistol, and gave it to another; they robbed me of three shillings, and Miss Potter of a pocket piece.

John Scott . I am a constable of St. Giles's; I found a horse pistol in Robinson's apartment.

The prisoners in their defence denied the charge, but called no witnesses.

Both Guilty , Death .

299. (M.) WILLIAM HUGHES was indicted for stealing a pair of copper shoe buckles, value 6 d. a clasp knife, value 2 d. a canvas bag, value 1 d. five guineas, a half guinea, and six shillings in money, numbered, the property of George Day , privately from the person of the said George , March the 2d . *

George Day . On the second of March the prisoner met me in the street at Brentford , and took me to the sign of the Royal Oak; I was a little in liquor; there we had some beer; then I went out to ease myself, and the prisoner came out and took me up; I bid him stop till I had done my breeches up, and I would go in with him; whether it was there then or no I cannot say, but I lost five guineas and a half, a pair of copper buckles and a knife; the next day I complained I had been robbed, and the prisoner confessed he had hid the money, some in one place and some in another; three guineas and a half, and one of the buckles were found; I was present at the finding of one of the guineas.

One of the buckles produced by Boone and deposed to by Day the prosecutor.

Christopher Boone . I am a watchman belonging to the parish of New Brentford. At half after one o'clock in the morning of the third of March I found the prosecutor very much in liquor, leaning over some rails going into Brentford Butts; I saw a miller coming out of a house with a lanthorn; I asked him to help me to get him into the market-place; I put him into one of the pens where they sell pigs, and got a nail, and fastened the door that he should not fall out; when I went by the place at two o'clock I heard him snoring; afterwards I found he had got out and gone off; when I went home in the morning my wife informed me a man had been there, and charged me with taking five guineas and a half from him, and would not go out of town till he got satisfaction; I then went in search of him and found him, and asked him if he charged me with having his money; no he said, he could not charge me; he was very much obliged to me for my care of him; by his description I afterwards took the prisoner, and he voluntarily confessed that he took the money; the evidence went with me, and I found a guinea and a half hid in one place, and another man found a guinea in another place; he said he had given a guinea and half to his wife to take some things out of pawn; he said he had put the buckles down the gully hole in the town; I went to the gully hole, but could not see them; a little boy put his hand in and found one of them; it was shewn to the prosecutor and he said it was his; the prisoner said he had hid the knife in a bank, but when he went with me he could not find it; he could find the place where he hid the money fast enough.

Prisoner's Defence.

I picked up the money in the tap room where the old gentleman was drinking; Allum and I were drinking a pint of beer together; I gave him two guineas out of the four and a half, and we agreed to go and hide it left it should be owned.

John Allum the accomplice was called by the desire of the prisoner.

John Allum . The prisoner and I saw Day very drunk at Brentford; he tumbled into a grocer's shop, and broke a pane of glass; the prisoner went to get him away left he should break any more windows; getting him away he tumbled into the road; we picked him up left he should be run over; he tumbled down again, and the buckles fell out of his pocket; I took them up, and put them in my pocket; being wet and cold he desired us to lead him to the Royal Oak a publick house; we did, and there we had a pint of beer or two; he took out a guinea and paid for it the prisoner called me out to the door and said here is the old man's purse, here is three guineas in it; he gave me two and kept one himself.

Prisoner. He was there in the house when I picked the money up; I did not know whose money it was.

Allum. When we had got the money we went into the house again and sat drinking almost all night; the next morning we hid one guinea in a bank, the other by a chimney; by the desire of the prisoner I threw the buckles down the gully hole; one of them was afterwards found; the landlord where we lodged said, keep all close and it will be right enough.

Q. What is his name?

Allum. London.

Q. You did not keep your own council; you told where the money was hid?

Allum. Yes, I went with Boone, and shewed him where the money was.

Guilty of stealing the goods, but not privately from the person . T .

300. (L.) MARY . the wife of John STEEL , was indicted for stealing 7 linen handkerchiefs, value 40 s. the property of William and Francis Foot , March 31st. ++

The prosecutors, Messrs. William and Francis Foot , are linen draper s in Ludgate Street ; one of their apprentices deposed that the prisoner came into Mr. Foot's shop on the 31st of March, and asked to see some printed linen; that he shewed her some; that then she desired to look at some other linen; and whilst the witness was upon the counter reaching down another parcel, he observed the prisoner slip a piece of handkerchiefs from the bottom of a pile of linens that were upon the counter, and put them under her arm and covered them with her cloak and then came towards the witness; that he called the other apprentice, and then they proceeded to search her, when she struggled, and in the struggle dropt the handkerchiefs (they were produced and deposed to).

The other apprentice confirmed his evidence.

The prisoner in her defence said she was not near the place.

Guilty . T .

301. (2d L.) SAMUEL EMANUEL was indicted for stealing 3 men's hats, value 20 s. the property of Oliver Banks , and Leonard Lowdon , March 26th . ++

Acquitted .

302. (L.) THOMAS PROBAIT the elder , and THOMAS PROBAIT the younger , were indicted for stealing 6 pair of worsted stockings, value 8 s. the property of Robert Walker , privately and secretly in the shop of the said Robert , March 9th . +

Robert Walker . I am a hosier on Snow-hill . On the 9th of March last the father of the boy came into the shop, and asked to look at some black stockings; the boy was with him: he produced a bill of an advertizing hosier, and wanted to know if they could not be sold as cheap as that; at last he said he could not deal at all, he would talk to his wife and send her about it; just as he was saying this the little boy went out of the shop; I thought it a suspicious circumstance; I followed him to see if he had got any thing; at the next door I overtook him, and found this large bundle of stockings tucked under his coat, and he was going away; I brought him home; he began crying and begged forgiveness; I charged the father as thinking him accessary with the son; I took them before a Justice, and they were carried before an Alderman; they said little in their own excuse there.

The Father's defence.

I was going to Newgate-Market; I went up Snow-hill; I live just by; I went into the shop thinking to buy a pair or two of stockings; this gentleman shewed me a pair or two behind the counter; I never moved from the place; the child went in along with me; I asked him the price; he said four shillings, I said I believed I could buy them cheaper; my eyes were but indifferent; I said I would leave it till the afternoon; I was going to market to buy something for dinner, and would be back in an hour's time; the prosecutor went from behind the counter; there was nobody else in the shop, and left me for about a minute or two; he came back again and brought this poor unfortunate child of mine with a bundle he had under his arm; he was not gone a minute; he came in crying; I said what is the matter? the gentleman said he had got a bundle of stockings; the child is but eleven years old.

The Boy's defence.

I took them out of the shop; I did not think they were stockings; I thought they were not worth much; I thought them two or three bits of paper; I was making a lottery, and as I had no money to buy paper I thought to take them home to make up my lottery among my playfellows.

For the prisoners.

William Eastwood . I have known the father six years; he is in the brokering way; he lets public houses anywhere, where he can let them.

Thomas Regis . I am a water gilder by trade; I have known the father twelve or fourteen years; I never heard any thing but that he was an honest man.

Q. What employment have you known him in?

Regis. The brokering business .

Both guilty of stealing to the value of 10 d.

The father Transported , The child Whipped .

303. ( 2d L.) WILLIAM MOORE was indicted for stealing 21 yards of printed linen cloth, value 40 s. and 27 yards of linen cloth for handkerchiefs, value 50 s. the property of Joseph Barlow , January 10th . ++

Joseph Barlow . When the prisoner was taken he confessed stealing the cloth, and said they were sold to one Bugden; and were in the cellar under the stairs.

- Jones. The goods were in a warehouse done up in a truss; I never saw the truss opened.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence.

Guilty . T .

304. (M.) PETER STRINGER was indicted for stealing three silver tea spoons, value 5 s. 20 lb. wt. of wax candles, value 20 s. seven drinking glasses, value 2 s. two water glasses, value 1 s. two cut glass salt holders, value 2 s. sixteen china tea cups, value 8 s. twenty three china saucers, value 8 s. five coffee cups, value 3 s. seven china basons, value 6 s. three china plates, value 2 s. two cream jugs, value 1 s. one china mug, value 6 d. twenty pair of snuffers, value 2 s. thirty linen glass cloths, value 5 s. a linen napkin, value 1 s. eighteen table knives, value 18 d. eighteen forks, value 18 d. three kitchen knives, value 1 s. three metal spoons and a ladle, value 1 s. a drinking copper, value 1 s. two brass candlesticks, value 1 s. four brass cocks, value 2 s. one pair of steel yards, value 5 s. two pewter plates, value 2 s. four long hair brooms, eight hand brushes, and one pair of bellows, value 2 s. a pair of tea tongs, value 2 s. an iron poker, value 1 s. and Boyer's French Dictionary, the property of the Right Honourable George Harry , Earl of Stamford; one watch in a case made of metal, value 4 l. 4 s. the property of the Right Honourable Lady Henrietta Grey , spinster; a linen shirt with lace ruffles, value 40 s. a plain linen shirt, value 5 s. a pair of mens lace ruffles, value 40 s. a pair of mens plain ruffles, value 1 s. two pair of silk stockings, value 8 s. eight linen handkerchiefs, value 8 s. a muslin cravat, value 1 s. a pair of linen drawers, value 2 s. the property of the Right Honourable Booth Grey ; three linen handkerchiefs, value 5 s. the property of Mary Clerke , spinster; a silk handkerchief, value 2 s. and two linen handkerchiefs, value 1 s. the property of James Turner , in the dwelling house of the said George Harry , Earl of Stamford .

2d Count, for stealing the same goods but not in the dwelling house, March. 10th .

Mary Clerke . I am housekeeper to Lord Stamford; I have lived there about six years; the prisoner was porter there; he was there about three quarters of a year before me; his business was to take care of the door, and take in and deliver messages; he did nothing in the house; I missed things at different times almost ever since I had been in the family; I spoke of it in the family; the things are most of them here. (A large quantity of goods produced by the constable ); one of the footman's rubbers, there is a coronet upon it, a glass cloth and various other cloths, they are all my Lord Stamford's; I know the buying and making of them; my handkerchiefs are marked F. 11. and 12. I missed the purple and white one two years. ago.

Court. There was no large loss at one particular time?

Clerke. No; (the metal watch produced) the watch is a young lady's of ten years old at a boarding school; it is a metal watch.

Thomas Smith . I am servant to Mr. Booth Grey who lives in Lord Stamford's house.

Q. Did he miss any thing?

Smith. Not at the time I lived there; (a shirt produced).

Q. What do you know of that shirt?

Smith. I know nothing of it.

Clerke again. I first suspected the prisoner on missing some things while the family were out of town; I alone was left in the house; I complained to my Lady; she asked me who I suspected; I told her Peter, because I lost some things while the family were out of town; my Lord spoke to him and discharged him, and made him open his chamber door, and we found these things; his bed chamber was kept locked; he made his bed himself; I never saw the room open for three years; he kept the key of it himself; when the door was opened I could not put my hand in for boxes and packing cases; the things were all found in the room, some in the bed, some under the bed, and some in boxes.

Q. In whose care was the linen?

Clerke. In my care.

Q. The knives and forks?

Clerke. They were in my possession in my room; when the door was first opened I saw some china cups; I said they were my Lord's; he said they were not; the constable was present when the things were taken out.

Samuel Rabey . I have lived servant with my Lord Stamford thirty-three years; I was present when this man's room was searched; my Lord desired me to go and search it; I lost three silver spoons at different times.

Q. You have heard the account Mrs. Clerke has given of the searching the room, is that account true?

Rabey. Yes, it is, and I lost a dictionary; I found this bunch of keys in the prisoner's pocket (producing them); one of them will open fifteen locks in my Lord's house; some of them will open seventeen or eighteen locks; (produces another large bunch of keys found in his box); one of these keys opens my Lord's cellar where the wax candles are kept.

Andrew Broach . I have been butler to Lord Stamford two years; I was present at the search; there was not any thing found that was under my care that I can speak to.

Q. Is the account Mrs. Clerke has given of the search true?

Broach. Yes.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence.

Guilty of stealing to the value of 39 s. T .

305. (M.) JAMES MULLINS was indicted for stealing a table clock, value 12 l. a silver table spoon, value 10 s. three silver tea spoons, value 3 s. a pair of silver tea tongs, value 2 s. a brown lutestring night gown, value 20 s. a linen sheet, value 5 s. four linen aprons, value 2 s. a muslin handkerchief, value 1 s. three linen shifts, value 6 s. a white linen gown, value 5 s. and a petticoat, value 5 s. the property of Elizabeth Du Chesne , spinster, in the dwelling house of John Dodd , Mar. 13th . ++

Elizabeth Du Chesne . I live in West-street, St. Giles's , at the house of Mr. Dodd a Bookseller; on the 13th of March I went out at seven o'clock at night; my door was locked; I did not lock it myself, but I saw it locked; the clock was on the table when I went out; I had the key in my pocket; when I came home the same evening I missed the clock and the other things mentioned in the indictment; the door seemed as though it had been unlocked; (some shifts produced); they are mine, they were taken out of my drawer.

Percival Phillips . I found the things produced at Mullins's house in New-street Hill; there was a woman there said it was his house; I never saw him at that place; he was taken up upon another affair; when Mullins was before Sir John Fielding he said the girl that was in the house had nothing to do with it, that they were his own things.

John Heley . I was with Philips at the searching of Mullins's house; I found a receipt for rent in the name of James Mullins ; Mullins was then in custody; before the Justice he said the girl was innocent, and that the things found there were his property.

Prisoner. I did not say they were my things, they belonged to a lodger in the house.

Q. from the prisoner. Where were the things found?

Heley. Up one pair of stairs at No. 13. New-street Hill, locked up in a box with a padlock; I asked the woman whose box it was; she said it belonged to the owner of the house.

John Clarke confirmed the evidence of Heley, and produces about four dozen pick-lock keys which he found in the same box.

Prisoner's Defence.

On the 29th of March while I was at dinner a woman came and asked me if I had a lodging to let; I told her I had; my wife shewed her the room and she took it at five shillings and six-pence a week; she returned in about half an hour with her husband, a coachman, and two boxes; the husband had one box, and the coachman the other; my maid servant, my wife and I were in the house when they came; I have a witness to prove that room did not belong to me; it belonged to one Thompson; I let it for five and three-pence a week; the woman gave me a shilling earnest; Mr. Field, my wife and I were at dinner together at the time.

For the prisoner.

Samuel Field . I know the prisoner, he lives at New-street Hill; on Tuesday the 29th of March I called at his house about one o'clock and staid dinner; while we were at dinner a woman came and asked if he had a lodging to let; he said yes; they agreed for five and three-pence a week; she went away and said she should be back in an hour; she came again with her husband and a coachman, and brought a couple of boxes; the coachman brought one box and the husband the other; I think she said at the time her name was Thompson.

John Clarke . My Lord, I was in court when this man made an affidavit in the name of Jones to put this trial off; now he appears by the name of Field.

Q. to Field. What is your name?

Field. Field.

Q. Did you ever go by any other name?

Field. No; the name of Jones was put to the affidavit by mistake; I did not see the affidavit before I swore.

Q. Was it not read to you in the name of Jones?

Field. No.

Q. Was you asked whether the name Jones was your hand writing?

Field. I did not answer to the name of Jones.

Q. Is that your hand writing?

Field. No.

Q. Did not you swear to the name of Jones?

Field. I do not know that I did.

Guilty . Death .

The court committed Field to Newgate to take his trial for perjury.

306, 307. (M.) JOHN BUNCE and RICHARD BUNCE were indicted for stealing one weather sheep, value 20 s. the property of John Meggott , Esq . Mar. 19th . ++

Both acquitted .

308. (M.) GEORGE RECULEST was indicted for forging a certain order for the payment of money in the words and figures following,

April 1st. 1774.

SIR,

On demand please to pay to Mr. George Reculest , the sum of five pounds, five shillings, for which this shall be your sufficient security, and place it to his account; from

your humble servant, Brackley Kennett.

To James Brown , Esq. St. James's Square.

with intention to defraud Thomas White , against the statute, April 4th .

2d Count for uttering and publishing the same, knowing it to have been false, forged and counterfeit, with the like intent, against the statute.

Acquitted .

309. (2d L.) THOMAS JONES was indicted for stealing a linen handkerchief, value 10 d. the property of Edward Ashworth , March 5th . ++

Edward Ashworth . On the 5th of March I was looking at the prints in St. Paul's church yard ; Mr. Payne came up to me, and asked me if I had lost my handkerchief; he produced it, and said he saw the prisoner take it out of my pocket.

William Payne . As the prosecutor was looking at the prints in St. Paul's church yard, I saw the prisoner come to him, and take the handkerchief out of his pocket; I secured him and informed the gentleman of it.

Prisoner's Defence.

I have an ancient father in trouble; I never did such a thing before.

Guilty . T .

310, 311. (L.) SAMUEL LOVELL and WILLIAM JENKINS were indicted for stealing a linen handkerchief, value 10 d. the property of a person unknown , March 3 . ++

William Payne . On the 3d of March, as I was going along St. Paul's church yard , I saw the two prisoners; the big boy was pushing on the little one to pick pockets; I kept my eye upon them: at last I saw the little one take this handkerchief (producing it) out of a boy's pocket; before he could give it to the big boy a gentleman laid hold of him; the least is about seven or eight years old.

LOVELL acquitted .

JENKINS guilty . T .

312. (L.) MARY MAGDALEN EDGLEY was indicted for stealing a silver table spoon, value 6 s. the property of Edward Williams , March 13th . ++

Edward Williams . The prisoner was my servant ; her mistress sent her out of an errand; she was brought back about nine at night with the spoon.

- Essex. The prisoner brought a spoon to me to pawn on the 16th of March, between the hours of seven and eight in the evening; (the spoon produced and deposed to by the prosecutor.)

The prisoner said nothing in her defence.

Guilty . T .

313. (L.) WILLIAM HAYWARD was indicted for stealing seven weather sheep, value 10 l. the property of Benjamin Cherry , April 11th . ++

Acquitted .

314. (L.) WILLIAM POWELL was indicted for stealing a Young Man's Companion, value 2 s. the property of Stanley Crowder , April 11th . ++

Acquitted .

315. (2d M.) ABRAHAM PORTRAIT was indicted for stealing six shillings in money, numbered , the property of Robert Baldy , Feb. 24th . ++

Robert Baldy . I am a baker : I was sitting in my parlour about ten o'clock (I had just before that changed some money for a customer, and had put about six shillings into the till with some halfpence ) I heard a noise afterwards in the shop; I went out and found the prisoner in the shop; he said he came for a loaf; the door was not open; he must have got over the hatch; I looked into my till, and missed all the silver out of it; I searched the prisoner's pocket and found six shillings or six and six-pence; then he said two other boys had lifted him into the shop.

The constable, who was present when the prisoner was searched, confirmed the evidence of the prosecutor.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence.

Guilty . T .

316. (2d M.) JOHN STEDMAN was indicted for stealing five horn combs, value 20 d. a comb case, value 3 d. three pocket knives, value 1 s. a tortoiseshell comb, value 4 d. an ivory comb, value 3 d. a tooth pick, value 6 d. a pencil, value 2 d. four hundred black hair pins, value 4 d. a gilt metal stock buckle, value 18 d. a pair of metal knee buckles, value 8 d. and five shillings and two-pence in money, numbered , the property of Francis Tremlitt , Feb. 23d . ++

Acquitted .

317. (M.) ANN SCULLY was indicted for stealing a half guinea, the money of Hugh Tucker , March 12th . +

Hugh Tucker deposed that he went into the George alehouse in Monmouth-street , on the 12th of March, at half after ten at night; that the prisoner followed him in and sat in the same box; that he had half a guinea, some silver and halfpence, and two receipts in his pocket; that he put the half guinea into his fob, and being tired, laid his head on the table; that as he was almost asleep he felt the prisoner's hand go out of his pocket; that she slipped away before he could lay hold of her; that he searched his pockets and missed his money and receipts; that he knew Scully before because she plied at the corner of Monmouth-street; that he told one Brown, a watchman, that Scully had robbed him, who afterwards took her.

Joseph Brown , the watchman, deposed that the prosecutor informed him he had been robbed by Scully, and that he took her the same night coming out of Duke's Head, Monmouth-court; that he searched her, and found ten shillings in silver, two had sixpences, six pennyworth of halfpence, and a farthing upon her.

The prisoner, in her defence, said she never saw the man in her life.

Guilty . T .

318. (L.) ANN LARNER was indicted for stealing six yards of check, value 5 s. the property of John Taylor , March 11 . *

John Taylor . I am a silk weaver , and live in Queen-street ; I deal in linen check; on the 11th of March last, I lost six yards of this check; Daniel Boyer told me about three days after the fact, that he saw the prisoner take it; I took her up and she confessed it.

Daniel Boyer . I am apprentice to a carpenter; I was at work for Mr. Taylor; some check lay on the counter where I was at work; I saw the prisoner come and take a piece of check and put it in her apron, and go down into the kitchen with it; I presently after told Mr. Taylor's clerk of it, and he told Mr. Taylor.

Thomas Warwick . I am a constable: Mr. Taylor sent for me, and charged the prisoner with robbing him of this check; she confessed it, and said she had given it to a woman; Ann Blanchard coming to Taylor's house, I suspected it might be at her house; I went there, and there I found it.

Prisoner's Defence.

I ask my master pardon; it is the first time I ever did such a thing.

The prisoner called four witnesses who gave her a good character.

Guilty of stealing to the value of 10 d.

[Transportation. See summary.]

319. (L.) ROBERT HILL was indicted for stealing one wicker basket, value 1 s. one linen cloth, value 6 d. and four dead pigs, value 16 s. the property of John Ross , March 19 . *

John Ross . I live at Abbot's Langley in Hertfordshire; I brought some pigs and things in a cart to the Oxford Arms; as I was going with the cart through the gateway, the prisoner stole the basket and these four dead pigs; I saw him take them, and immediately secured him; he said he was a poor man and earned his living as he could.

Prisoner's Defence.

I am a poor man: I made a mistake and went to the wrong cart.

Guilty of stealing to the value of 10 d. W .

320. (L.) RICHARD BURNETT was indicted for stealing a promissary note, called a bank note, of 30 l. No. E 41, London, 10 Feb. signed Charles Jewson , for the Governor and Company of the Bank of England, payable to Francis Duncan ; and another bank note 50 l. marked No. 456, Dec. 12, 1772, made, signed and subscribed for the Governor and Company of the Bank of England, payable to Thomas Minton , the property of Thomas Jacobs , in the dwelling house of James Webb and Thomas Jacobs , March 20th . ++

Mr . Thomas Jacobs . I am in partnership with Mr. James Webb ; we carry on business in West Smithfield ; the house belongs to the partnership; the prisoner came to live with us on the 15th of March; I hired him as a porter on the 18th of March; I had occasion to send to Sir Robert Ladbroke 's for a check of Nicklin and Wells for 81 l. my servant brought me a 50 l. note, a 30 l. note, and one pound in cash; this was on Friday evening about six o'clock; I put them in my bureau in the compting house, and locked the bureau: the notes were my private property. We have a shop facing the street, and a shop backward; the compting house is between them; the bureau was in the compting house. I have learned since, my apprentice who brought the notes wrote on the back of them. I missed the notes on the Tuesday following, which was the 22 d; I had not been at the bureau from Friday; I put my hand on it, and found it open; then I put the key in, and found the lock so damaged the key would not turn; I looked in the drawer where I put the bank notes, and they were gone; I called my other servants, and asked if they knew any thing of the bureau being open. On the evening before, my apprentice informed me he was afraid the prisoner was going to leave me, for he said he was going to Newcastle; he was then lighting the candles; I went to him and said I heard he was going to Newcastle; he said he had met Dr. Pringle, and he told him he must go immediately to Newcastle, to give evidence on a trial at the assizes; I asked him if he had a subpoena; he said no; I said I could not consent to his going without his producing a subpoena, or my seeing Dr. Pringle; about nine o'clock the same evening I was informed he was set-off. On missing my notes the next day I suspected the prisoner; I went to the George and Blue Boar, in Holborn, and found a person answering the description of the prisoner had taken a place in the stage to Newcastle; that he was very much in liquor, and had taken a woman of the town with him to Highgate or Barnet; I got the number of the notes and took a post chaise, and pursued him; when I got to Grantham I found he had left the coach and taken a post chaise; when I came to Doncaster I found a person of the description of the prisoner was gone in a post chaise, and had changed a 50 l; note with one Mr. Giles; I told Mr. Giles if he had my note it was dated Dec. 12, 1772; he produced a note of that date; then I went forward and found at Borough-bridge that I had overshot the prisoner, and missed him; I pursued him to Newbrivest, where his parents live, and found him at a publick house; I put him in the chaise and brought him back to the Hoop and Lion, a public house at Northallerton; we had no conversation till we came there; only the prisoner said London had been the ruin of him, and confessed the fact at Northallerton; I took him before the Justice; the Justice asked what money he had in his pocket; he took out thirty-three guineas and a half, and said to me, Sir, this is your property, I beg you will take it, and said it is what is left out of a bank note I have changed at Doncaster; he took a watch out of his pocket, and said he had bought it with my money, and desired me to take it; I have it here; he said he had changed the 50 l. note with Mr. Gill of Doncaster; he said he changed the 30 l. note at London, at a publick house in Hosier-lane, Snow-hill; he said the landlord had only 20 l. that he left word for one Soaper to receive the 10 l. for him against he came back. He said that he broke open the bureau on Sunday evening; that he did it by the instigation of some bad women. His confession was taken in writing, before Mr. Peacock, the clergyman, who committed him to York Castle; when I returned to London I found my people had traced out the 30 l. note; it was in the hands of one Dennis in Chiswell-street.

Q. Did the prisoner lodge in your house?

Jacobs. He did.

Q. Was you out on Sunday?

Jacobs. I was.

Q. Had he any opportunity of breaking open the bureau on Sunday?

Jacobs. He was left alone; there was only the servant maid in the house at the time; her name is Mary Cook .

Q. Do you know where the information is?

Jacobs. I left it with Mr. Reynolds, the gaoler of York; I saw the Justice sign it.

Paul Colvill . The bank note of 30 l. being traced out I was applied to on the 28th of March to go and take it out of the hands of Mr. Dennis in Chiswell-street; I gave him 30 l. for it; it has been in my hands ever since (the note produced.)

Jacobs. This note answers the description of mine.

Q. from the prisoner. Mr. Jacobs said the night I was taken he did not know whether the bureau was locked or open?

Jacobs. I did not say any such thing to the best of my knowledge.

Prisoner. The constable and another person heard it; he said if I would give him the money I should be set at liberty.

Jacobs. I declare I never said any such thing.

James Cleeland . I am apprentice to Messrs. Jacobs and Webb; on Friday the 18th of March Mr. Jacobs sent me with a draught for 81 l. to Sir Robert Ladbroke 's; I received for it one bank note for 50 l. another bank note for 30 l. and one pound in money; as soon as I received them I wrote on them Ladbroke and company, March the 18th. ( The note shewn him ); that is the note; I received no other bank notes that day.

Charles Jewson , out of the cashiers of the bank, produces the 50 l. note.

Cleeland. This is the other bank note I received; there is my writing on it.

Jewson. That 50 l. note has been paid; we were out collecting bills; this is one that was collected among the rest; the 30 l. note is my signing; (the information and confession produced; Jacobs looks at them).

Q. to Jacobs. Who was the information signed by?

Jacobs. It was taken before Justice Peacock; I saw the prisoner sign it; he made the confession freely and voluntarily; there were no threats nor promises made use of. (It was read, in which he confessed the fact as mentioned in the evidence of Mr. Jacobs).

William Murphy . I am a clerk to Sir Robert Ladbroke and company; I paid the 81 l. check; I cannot positively say it was to Cleeland; I paid a 50 l. note and a 30 l. note in discharge of the 81 l. check of Nicklin and Wells who keeps cash at our house; the 50 l. note 45 C the 12th of December; 50 l. C 41 the 10th of February; 30 l. the date I understood to be 1774.

Q. to Jacobs. What check did you send to the banker's?

Jacobs. It was a check of Nicklin and Wells.

Q. Was any one with you when you went to Yorkshire?

Jacobs. Yes, a gentleman, Mr. Divat; he is a quaker.

Samuel Dennis . I received the 30 l. note of Robert Sanckster , and delivered it to Mr. Colvill.

Robert Sanckster . I received the 30 l. note of Thomas Ivers in Cow-lane, Smithfield; I paid it to Mr. Dannis.

Thomas Ivers . Mr. Sanckster changed a 30 l. bank note for me on the 21st of March; I took it of a gentleman that came with Elizabeth Soaper on the 1st of March between the hours of eight and nine in the evening; I cannot be certain it was the prisoner; he is like the prisoner; that note I gave to Sanckster in the presence of Elizabeth Soaper . I gave him 20 l. and Soaper was to come the next day for the other 10 l. I changed the note for her. I live at the Red Cow the bottom of Cow-lane within two doors from Hosier-lane.

Elizabeth Soaper . I live in Charlotte-street, Rathbone-place; I saw the prisoner twice before the night he brought the note to my cousin's in Smithfield; I was there on Monday the 21st of March; he came in and said he was going to Newcastle, and wanted a pound of tea to take with him to his mother; when it was weighed he said he had not money to pay her without she could change a 30 l. note; she said she could not change it, and did not know where to get it changed; then my cousin desired me to go to Mr. Ivers to get it changed as he knew me. I went and the prisoner with me; I told Mr. Ivers the gentleman wanted to go out of town that night; Mr. Ivers said he had 20 l. he asked him if it would not be the same if he left the 10 l. as he talked of returning so shortly; he said it would be the same; he gave the note to Mr. Ivers himself.

Ivers. I paid the note to Mr. Sanckster; (the notes both read).

Prisoner's Defence.

I was innocently brought into the affair; coming home from the Borough with two women they went home with me into the passage; I knew nothing of having these notes in my pocket till Monday night, as I was lighting the candles, I pulled the notes out to wrap round the candles; I cannot tell how I came by them.

Guilty. Death . Recommended to mercy by the Jury and the prosecutor .

321, 322. (L.) THOMAS WHITTAL and JOHN OVERALL were indicted for stealing 30 l. in money, numbered, and a bank note for 10 l. the property of John Weaver , in his dwelling house , Jan. 25th . +

Sarah Weaver . My husband keeps the Bull Inn on Addle Hill ; on Tuesday the 25th of January between six and seven in the evening Mr. Overall came into our house the back way, with another man not taken; they called for a glass of brandy at the bar, and change for a guinea; I gave them change, they scrupled a sixpence, I changed it; they went out and soon after Whittal and the other man came in and called for six pennyworth of brandy and water, and pen, ink and paper; I did not much like their appearance, and being strangers to me, I went in and locked up a cupboard in that room which contained a little plate; I thought it not proper to trust to strangers as I was busy running up and down the house; soon after this my husband brought down a guinea to be changed; I went into the room where they were; I took the change out of a little nest of drawers by a book case; I locked the drawer again and put the key in my pocket; soon after that they called for more liquor; as I went in I observed the prisoner Whittal at the drawer by the book case, and he was, as I thought, admiring the curiosity of the workmanship, and taking measure of it, in order to have such a one made for himself; soon after that they came to the door and offered me a shilling to pay the reckoning; they were then going out the same way they came in, the back way; I said they could not go out that way, the gate was locked; they went out at the fore door; I went directly to the drawer and missed the 30 l. in gold, a 10 l. bank note, a crown piece, and two canvas bags of silver, the exact contents of which I cannot say; I saw them at the time I unlocked the drawer in order to give my husband change; the whole time that had passed, from the time I gave the change till their leaving the house, was not above ten minutes; when my husband came to me I was in such an agony that I had not power to tell what I meant; I only said the men, the men; I explained myself afterwards that they had robbed me of all the money in the house except what was in my pocket; I am sure to their persons; I saw Whittal at Sir John Fielding 's; I pointed him out and said that is the man that robbed me; the whole time they were in the house, and the whole transaction from the beginning to the end, was not above twenty minutes; they drew the curtain half-way but not totally over the glass, but what what they did obscured a great part of the room.

John Weaver . I saw my wife open the drawer and give change; when we told Whittal and the other man they must go out another way, and not the back way, Whittal was much chagrined, and trembled like a leaf when he found he could not go out at the back way; I could not get my wife to explain what she meant; she was almost in a fit; if she had explained herself immediately, I could have taken the men then in the passage; I am positive to the persons of both the prisoners.

Robert Skelton servant to the last witness confirmed his evidence.

The prisoners in their defence absolutely denied the fact.

WHITTAL guilty . Death .

OVERALL acquitted .

323. (L.) JOHN ALLEN was indicted for stealing a silk handkerchief, value 10 d. the property of Montague James , Feb. 23d . +

Montague James deposed, that his handkerchief was picked out of his pocket near Newgate ; that a gentleman that followed him saw the prisoner pick it out of his pocket and immediately seized him, and took the handkerchief from him. (The handkerchief was produced and deposed to by the prosecutor).

Guilty . T .

324. (L.) JOHN WEST was indicted for stealing a linen handkerchief, value 10 d. the property of Joseph Naylor , Mar. 21st . +

Joseph Naylor . As I was walking in Leaden-hall-street the 21st of March between eight and nine in the evening, I missed my handkerchief out of my pocket; I turned round and saw it in the prisoner's hand; he dropped it immediately; I seized him, and as I was carrying him to gaol he drew a knife on me and endeavoured to cut me with it in order to make his escape.

Prisoner's Defence.

I did not steal the handkerchief; I was going of an errand for my mother.

Guilty . T .

325, 326. (L.) ANN FIELD and ANN GAHAGAN were indicted for stealing two leather pocket books, value 2 s. a bank note for 25 l. and another bank note for 20 l. the said notes being due and unsatisfyed, the property of John Bayes , privately and secretly, from the person of the said John , March 29th . +

John Bayes . I was going up Cornhill on the 29th of March, between eleven and twelve at night; I was going to the Cross Keys in Grace-church-street to bed; I was perfectly sober; I had no conversation with these women nor any other women. I passed by the two prisoners in Cornhill; they spoke to me; I did not regard them; then Field came back to me, and catched me round the waste; I struggled and pushed her from me, but I apprehended at that time she took the two pocket books from the pocket in the breast of my coat; they contained two bank notes (describes them) and a bond of 40 l. I did not perceive her take any thing away, nor feel any motion there as if they had been taken away; I shoved her away with my left hand, and she went about her business. When I came to Gracechurch street, I thought my coat felt a little light; I put my hand into my pocket, and missed both my pocket books; I had seen and felt them not above two minutes before I met the prisoners; I turned back immediately, and run as fast as I could up to Cornhill; there I saw the two prisoners again; I am positive to their persons; I charged the watch with them; they were carried before the constable; I told him I had lost a couple of pocket books; the constable was going to rumage them; upon which I saw Ann Field drop the red pocket book; I said that was mine, but that was not the book of value, but an older one that contained some bank notes; accordingly she dropped that too; they were put in the constable's hand. (The pocket books produced and deposed to by the prosecutor.)

John Godfrey . I am a constable of Bishopsgate Ward. On the 29th of March I was going round to see if the watch were properly set and minding their business; while I was enquiring into it, Bayes came running up the street; I thought he had been robbed; he said he had; he laid hold of Field, and charged me to take care of her; then he run after Gahagan; he soon brought her back, and then told us he had lost two pocket books, which contained two bank notes; several people then began to croud round them; the watchman and I kept the people off, and kept the women separate by themselves; one of the women (I am not sure which) dropped the red pocket book; it was picked up nearest Field; I did not see her drop it; the prosecutor saying there was another pocket book, which contained the bank notes, I made them stand upright, and set their backs to the houses; then the other pocket book dropped under Field which contained the bank notes.

Court. As there is no evidence to affect Gahagan I shall not call upon her for her defence.

Field's Defence.

This woman and I were walking arm in arm; I never saw this man at all till he came and charged me with stealing his pocket book; there were above a hundred people at least round us.

Q. to the prosecutor. Are you positive to the person of Field?

Bayes. I am.

Field called Ann Terry and - Johnson, who said she was a black milliner , and gave her a good character.

FIELD guilty , Death .

GAHAGAN acquitted .

327. (M.) CATHERINE WIGMORE was indicted for returning from transportation , March 7th . *

Acquitted .

(M.) CATHERINE, the wife of John WIGMORE , was a second time indicted for stealing three looking glasses, value 10 s. the property of Daniel Gallimore , Feb. 26th . *

Acquitted .

328, 329. (L.) EDWARD WALTER and ROBERT DENNIS were indicted for stealing 50 lb. wt. of lead, value 5 s. the property of Isaac Clark and Edward Weston Phillips , the said lead being affixed to their dwelling house , March 14th . +

Both acquitted .

330, 331. (M.) RICHARD GRISFORD, otherwise GAISFORD , and ELIZABETH CLARK , were indicted; the first for stealing a leaden pump, value 10 s. the property of our Sovereign Lord the King ; and the other for receiving the above pump, well knowing it to have been stolen , March 7th . +

Both acquitted .

332, 333, 334, 335, 336, 337, 338. (L.) THOMAS HAYWARD , THOMAS PICKERING , JOHN DAVIS , JOSEPH MEETWOOD , CLARK BAILEY , WILLIAM TURNER , and JAMES WHITEHOUSE were indicted for coining and counterfeiting a a piece of copper money of this realm called a halfpenny, against the statute .

2d Count, the likeness and similitude of legal and good copper money of this realm, did make coin and counterfeit against the statute, Mar. 30th . *

Percival Phillips . I went to the house of Hayward in Old Fish-street on the 30th of March; I knocked at the door, Hayward and Turner let me in; they were both without their coats; Turner had a red cap on; I went with Richard Bond , John Clark , John Heley , William Taylor and Peter Senhouse ; Mr. Bond came in and bid me take care of Hayward and Turner, and he himself went into the cellar; Senhouse come in next to my assistance; I saw all the other prisoners when they were brought up from the kitchen.

Richard Bond . I went to the house; I bid Phillips take care of Hayward and Turner and then I went down into the kitchen, and there round a press I saw Pickering, Davis, Whitehouse, Bailey and Meetwood; I let Meetwood pass by me up stairs; the others run into the area; I bolted them out; when the three that were got up stairs, that is, Hayward, Turner, and Meetwood were secured; I secured the others; I did not see them do any thing in the kitchen; but there were two lighted candles, and the sticks of the candles were almost covered with halfpence; I would not meddle with any thing, but left it to be done by Clark, who understands these things better than myself.

Q. from Meetwood. Whether I did not stand in the passage when you came in?

Bond. No; Taylor brought you up stairs; I did not see Turner till he came up with the other; Pickering was in the kitchen; I could not find them at first; I looked into the cellar, they were not there; then I looked into a little dark place filled with chips, there I found Pickering, with two others; one had got off; Pickering had no coat on; they were all without their coats; Pickering made a strong resistance.

Pickering. I was not without my coat, ask Phillips if I was.

Phillips. I cannot say whether he had his coat on or not.

John Clark . I had received an information that coiners were at work in Fish-street; on the 30th of March I went to this house; Phillips knocked at the door; when I went in I saw Hayward and Turner; Turner was obstinate and would not be tied; Taylor brought up Meetwood; there was a coat in the parlour; we desired Turner to put it on; he said his was in the kitchen; Senhouse went down and fetched his coat, and he put it on; I went into the kitchen; Bond had secured four in the cellar, as he told me; I will not be sure whether Pickering had a coat on, but he sat down in this little back place; I said d - n you come down or I will shoot you; then Pickering said he would come down; he did come down, and we had great difficulty to tie him, as he made a strong resistance; I found in the room a press and two dies for coining halfpence; and there was a great quantity of warm halfpence, and copper ready for scowering, and several other dies; in another cellar I found a cutting out press and several slips of copper for cutting out (produces a gauge ) this is a thing they use to mark the copper so as to cut it according to the size of a halfpenny; that I found in the garrett; in the one pair of stair's room I found some counterfeit halfpence; (producing them) when there are a great quantity to coin it will take at least seven men; the other presses I found are too big to be brought into court; they are at the door; (he produces the copper cut in slips, and also that which was ready for scowering; and also a great quantity of counterfeit halfpence); in one of the dies there is a stroke just under the Britannia's-head; some of the halfpence have the same stroke on the impression, and therefore I am sure they were struck with that die.

Peter Senhouse . When I came into the house Turner's shirt sleeves were turned up; when I offered Turner the cloaths in the parlour, he said his cloaths were in the cellar; I went down and brought them up, and he put them on; he resisted, and I was forced to knock him down before I could get his hand tied.

John Heley . I was set at the beginning to prevent any body making their escape; these men got into the area; I saw Davis get out of the area; I let him get over the rails, for fear, if he changed his position, the spikes should run into his belly; as soon as he had got over I secured him; nobody could have got down into that area while I was there without my having seen them.

George Taylor . Hayward took this house of me; he paid me a quarter and half a quarter of a year's rent but a little while before these people were all taken up; but at the time he paid the rent he did not say any thing that he had let the house to Mr. Palmer.

Hayward. I did not mention that because I was tied down to a year's certain.

Whitehouse's Defence.

I never was in the cellar; I work for Mr. Hill; Mr. Hill sent me to this house in Fish-street; I never had my coat off.

Bond. He was in the kitchen; I think he had his coat off.

For Turner.

Susannah Dumont . I live with Mr. Palmer; Turner used to bring coals to our house; he brought some that morning.

John Davis 's Defence.

I am a labouring man ; I was going by this house two days before; I saw a step at the door broke down, upon which I knocked at the door and asked them if I might mend it; they said I might; I did mend it the next day; Palmer was not at home, so the next morning I called for the money due to me for mending the step; I had not been there two minutes before Sir John Fielding 's men came; upon that I run down stairs; I heard a cry of Fielding's men; I did not care to be in their mess; I should not like to meet them any where, much less in a house.

For Davis.

Susannah Dumont . Davis came that morning for his money for mending the step; I bid him sit down; I do not know that he went down stairs.

Q. How many people breakfasted there that morning? how many cups and saucers were set for breakfast?

Dumout. Five or six.

Q. Did not you set eight?

Dumout. No; I might set five or six.

Hayward's Defence.

I took the house; I did not like it, so I took another house in Adam's-Court, in Bread-street; seven weeks before this happened I let it to John Palmer ; the maid that lived with me went afterwards to live with John Palmer , for my mother came out of the country to live with me, and I had no occasion for a maid; I discharged my baker, and bid him bring my bread to my house in Adam's-Court; I let the house for a guinea a-week; the morning these people were taken up I called for my rent; going along I had a little slip which had dirted me, so when I came in I desired some water and soap to wash me; I called for a pen and ink to write a receipt; Palmer was not then at home; just at this time Fielding's men came there.

For Hayward.

Susannah Dumont . Hayward came to our house that morning; he said he had slipt down, and asked for some soap and water to wash himself; he pulled off his coat to wash himself.

John Ellis . I am a baker; I served Hayward with bread when he lived in Fish-street; six weeks ago he ordered me to send the bread to him in Bread-street; he always paid me very well; he has a good character.

Q. Have you never heard him charged with any thing before?

Ellis. I have heard some charge about some bad halfpence.

Pickering's Defence.

I had some business with Mr. Bearblock; he had been a Grand Master of the Free-masons; I was master of the Lodge this year; a man had applied to me to be made a free-mason; I was not so well acquainted with the solemnities as Mr. Bearblock, therefore I applied to see him; I saw a man come out of the area of this house; I saw Heley take him, upon that I got over the rails into the area to satisfy my curiosity; I was sent to the Compter; being taken, I could not go on to Mr. Bearblock's at all.

For Pickering.

Thomas Townsend . I have known Pickering five years; he always had the character of an honest man.

Meetwood's Defence.

I was in company with Mr. Palmer a night or two before at a house in Shoreditch; I said I had a watch to repair; Palmer said if I came to him on Fish-street-hill he would get it repaired for me; I went, but Palmer was not at home; just as I got there Fielding's men came and took me, but I am perfectly innocent.

Meetwood called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Clark Bailey 's Defence.

I am a gunsmith , a servant to Mr. Peele; at half past eight Peele bid me go to No. 8. at Fish-street-hill, to know when Mr. Palmer would want his gun; accordingly I went and a young woman told me he was not at home, but she expected him every minute, and desired me to sit down; immediately Fielding's men came, and I ran down into the cellar.

Bailey called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

All seven guilty .

[Branding. See summary.]

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

339. (2d L.) WILLIAM DAVIS was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling house of Thomas Parry , on the 10th of April, about the hour of one in the night, and stealing a copper saucepan, value 3 s. a copper tea-kettle, value 4 s. and a plain cloth coat, value 2 s. the property of the said Thomas, in his dwelling house . ++

Thomas Parry . I am a shopkeeper and live in Aldersgate-street Buildings ; my house was broke open on the Sunday the 10th of April ; I am sure they were all safe, I saw them between ten and eleven o'clock; when I got up on Monday morning between six and seven o'clock I found the sash of my window thrown up; I missed the tea-kettle and sauce-pan, and found an iron chissel and some matches; a man came into the shop in the morning and said he heard a man was taken in Clerkenwell with such things upon him; I went with him to the constable. (Produces a great coat, sauce-pan and tea-kettle, which the prosecutor deposed to).

Thomas Blower . On the 11th of April in the morning as I was crying the hour four, I met the prisoner coming along with a bag on his back; it has been in my custody ever since; he said he found them at Smithfield-bars.

Q. What time, was it light?

Blower. About a quarter before four.

John Caller . Blower brought the prisoner to me; he said then he found them in the rounds in Smithfield; I met him in Turnmill-street, Clerkenwell; he said he was going to his brother's in Kirby-street, but he was going quite a contrary way.

The prisoner in his defence said he found the things.

He called seven witnesses who had known him some time, and gave him a very good character.

Not guilty of breaking and entering the dwelling house, but guilty of stealing the goods . T .

340. (2d L.) JOHN BROWN was indicted for stealing a silver pencil case, value 6 s. the property of Thomas Wood ; and two leather pocket books, value 6 s. the property of John Banes , April 11th . ++

John Bollard . I am a watchman; on the 11th of April between two and three in the morning I found the prisoner in Mr. Wood's compting-house; I secured him and found the things mentioned in the indictment upon him. ( They were produced and deposed to by the prosecutor).

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, but called seven witnesses who gave him a good character.

Guilty . T .

341, 342. (2d L.) MOSES LYON and MICHAEL LACEY were indicted for stealing a silver watch, value 40 s. a half guinea and four and sixpence in money, numbered, the property of Richard Ryan , in the dwelling house of a person unknown , March 16th . ++

Richard Ryan . I lost my watch on the 15th of March, about eleven o'clock at night, or half after; I did not lie in my own lodgings; I went in search of one; I met a woman who offered to conduct me to one in St. Mary Axe ; I went there, a woman first demanded a shilling for the bed; then another shilling for sheeting the bed; then liquor was demanded, and then more; when I was preparing to go to bed there were two women; one was to lie with me, the other desired to lie in the room; I consented at last; she said she was to lie upon the chair. I am a hair dresser ; with the black pins I use in dressing hair, I pinned my pocket up and put it under me; three or four men came into the room, I am positive to the prisoners; they quarrelled and asked how I dare use women in that manner; there was a scuffle, I was knocked down, afterwards I found my watch gone.

Joseph Gates . I apprehended the two prisoners; Lacey told me it was very hard that Lyons, whom he called M'Carty, knocked him down and robbed him too.

The prisoners in their defence denied the fact, and said they were not present.

Q. Where did you spend the evening?

Ryan. At the Dog Tavern Bow-lane, Garlick-hill.

The prisoners called several witnesses to prove an alibi.

Both guilty of stealing but not in the dwelling house . T .

343, 344, 345. (2d L.) HENRY WATKINS , JOSEPH MITHAM , and THOMAS TOOTH were indicted for stealing three bushels of sea coals, value 2 s. the property of Barnard Turner , March 7th . ~

All three acquitted .

346. (2d L.) ELIJAH CLARKE was indicted for stealing a linen handkerchief, value 10 d. the property of John Tagg , March 15th . ~

John Tagg . On the 15th of March in Lower Thames-street , the prisoner passed me and gave me a shove; I missed my handkerchief; I pursued him and found my handkerchief upon him.

The prisoner in his defence denied the fact, but called no witnesses.

Guilty . T .

347. (L) JOHN BLAKE was indicted for stealing 30 lb. wt. of lead, value 3 s. belonging to the Mayor, Commonalty, &c. of the City of London , and to the Master, Guardians, &c. of the Hospital of Bethlem , affixed to a certain building of theirs , March 15th . ++

William Sheppard . I took a man that was stealing some lead from the Hospital of Bethlem , but I cannot swear to the man; I saw him bring a basket with rubbish seemingly down the ladder from the top of the hospital; I laid hold of him by the collar; I found forty pound of lead in the basket; I gave the porter of the hospital charge of him.

William Dodd . The last witness brought the prisoner to me and gave charge of him; the lead was taken from a building contiguous to the Hospital of Bethlem. The prisoner said before the Alderman that poverty drove him to do what he had done.

The prisoner in his defence denied the charge, but called no witnesses.

Guilty of stealing to the value of 10 d. T .

348. (L.) JOHN KENT was indicted for stealing a tenant saw, value 3 s. the property of Joseph Richards , March 31st . ++

Joseph Richards . I am a carpenter ; my saw was stole while I went to dinner. (The saw produced and deposed to by the prosecutor).

Edward Field . I work in the same buildings with Richards; on the 31st of March at dinner time, as we had lost several tools I staid to watch them; about one o'clock I saw the prisoner come in and take the saw, and put it under his coat; I secured him.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, but called two witnesses to his character.

Guilty of stealing to the value of 10 d. W .

349. (L.) JOSEPH SPENCER was indicted for stealing a pannel saw, value 6 s. the property of Joseph Richards , April 1st . ++

Joseph Richards . I saw the prisoner take the saw from the place where I work, and put it under his coat; I laid hold of him directly.

Prisoner's Defence.

I bought the saw at Snow-hill.

Guilty of stealing to the value of 10 d. W .

350. (L.) JOHN WHITEHEAD was indicted for stealing two linen shirts, value 20 s. and a linen neckcloth, value 2 s. the property of Samuel Harrison , March 17th . ++

Samuel Harrison . The prisoner John Whitehead is my son; on the day before St. Patrick's day I missed the linen out of my chest; I did not know the prisoner had it till I saw him with one of the shirts upon him; upon which I secured him, and then he owned he had took the shirts. (The shirt was produced by the constable, and deposed to by the prosecutor).

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, but called several witnesses to his character.

Guilty 10 d. T .

351. (L.) THOMAS PIERCE was indicted for stealing a silk handkerchief, value 10 d. the property of Richard Carter , April 16th . ++

A witness. I saw the boy take the handkerchief out of Mr. Carter's pocket.

Richard Carter . My handkerchief was picked out of my pocket, which was found on the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence.

I picked up the handkerchief in the street.

Guilty . T .

352. (L.) THOMAS ENGLEFIELD was indicted for stealing a half guinea , the property of Solomon Steward , March 20th . ++

Solomon Steward . I got into company with the prisoner at a public-house; I took out my money; one of them said I had a light half guinea; he threw it into a hat and then the prisoner ran away with it.

Guilty . T .

353. (2d L.) PETER PERYN was indicted for stealing a featherbed, value 10 s. three linen sheets, value 1 s. 6 d. and a linen apron, value 3 d. the property of Susanna Jones , widow , March 2d .

Susannah Jones , widow. This day seven weeks I went out in the morning, locked my door, and put the key in my pocket; I came back about three in the afternoon and found my door open, and the things mentioned in the indictment were stolen.

Phillip Gossel . By the direction of the accomplice I found the bed at one Mrs. Dean's, and the other things at one Martha Pratt 's.

Martha Pratt . I bought the sheets of two young lads, but I did not know whether the prisoner is one of them.

James Stevens . William Rose , the prisoner, and I went at nine o'clock on Wednesday morning to the prosecutrix's lodgings, and the prisoner opened the door with a false key; Rose took the things out, and gave them to the prisoner.

Q. to Platt. Do you know the witness? is he one that brought the sheets?

Platt. I cannot say, upon my word.

Q. What are you?

Platt. An old cloaths woman.

Q. to the Evidence. Who sold the sheets?

Platt. I two, and the prisoner two.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence.

Guilty .

354, 355. (L.) MARY TYLER , and JOHN TYLER were indicted for stealing a plain cloth coat. value 15 s. and a plain cloth waistcoat, value 5 s. the property of Robert Gilbridge , March 7th .

Robert Gilbridge . On the 7th. of March, at about 10 o'clock at night, I found my house broke open, and my coat and waistcoat were taken out of my chest that I put them in the night before; I found them on the Friday following; the prisoner pulled down the partition between my cellar and theirs, and so got in.

Howard. I am a Pawnbroker; I took the coat and waistcoat in of Mary Tyler , on the 17th of March. (They are produced and deposed to by the prisoner.)

Moore. I am a constable; I took the prisoner, John Tyler said he broke the chest open.

The prisoners, in their defence, denied the charge.

Both guilty .

356. (2d L) JOHN AILSWORTH was indicted for stealing a pair of girls leather shoes, value 10 d. the property of John Edwards , Feb. 19th . ++

John Edwards . I keep a shop in Barbican ; I heard my window break at night on the 9th of February.

A Witness. Passing by Mr. Edwards's house I saw the prisoner drop a pair of shoes; I took them up; he was secured and carried into the shop: I am positive he is the person.

Prisoner's Defence.

I am innocent of the charge.

Guilty . W .

357. (L.) JAMES PARRY was indicted for that he did feloniously make, forge, and counterfeit a promissory note for the payment of money :

Three days after date I promise to pay to J. Parry, or his order, forty-two pound two shillings, by me

Robert Gardner .

with intention to defraud the said Robert.

Second Count for uttering the same with intention to defraud the said Robert Gardner .

There being no other evidence than the prosecutor and his wife, the Court were of opinion that they were both inadmissible.

Acquitted .

358. (2d L.) THOMAS LOVELL was indicted for stealing a pair of women's stuff shoes, value 3 s. a pair of pattins, value 1 s. a pair of men's leather shoes, value 6 s. and ten pieces of leather shoes, value 3 s. the property of Thomas Smith and Leonard Leach , March 12th . ++

Thomas Smith . I am a shoemaker in partnership with Leonard Leach , in Cornhill ; the prisoner was our porter ; we lost some shoes and leather (the shoes and leather were produced and deposed to by the prosecutor.)

John Squire . I am a constable: on a suspicion entertained by Mr. Smith that the prisoner had robbed him, I searched his lodgings, where I found the piece of leather and the shoes in a box.

Prisoner's Defence.

I took the shoes with an intention to pay for them.

He called one witness who gave him a good character.

Guilty of stealing to the value of 10 d. W .

359. (2d L.) WILLIAM WINDSOR was indicted for receiving one silver bread basket, value 10 l. three silver waiters, value 25 l. nineteen silver table spoons, value 7 l. two silver boats, value 8 l. a silver soup ladle, value 20 s. four muslin petticoats, value 4 l. a linen corded muslin gown, value 20 s. a sattin sack, value 3 l. a sattin petticoat, value 20 s. a callimanco quilted petticoat, value 10 s. five cotton handkerchiefs, value 10 s. two gingam waistcoats, value 6 s. a linen shift, value 5 s. nine linen table cloths, value 10 l. seven linen sheets, value 10 s. fourteen linen pillowbiers, value 30 s. eighteen yards and a half of silk, value 4 l. forty two yards of linen cloth, value 3 l. 15 s. and one woollen coat embroidered with silver, value 3 l. the property of Daniel De Castro , he the said William knowing the said plate to have been stolen .

Acquitted .

See the trial of Margaret Adamson for stealing the above goods No. 296.

350, 351, 352, 353, 354, 355, 356, 357. (L.) CHARLES LEES . WILLIAM ORME , the elder , WILLIAM ORME , the younger , THOMAS ORME , WILLIAM HUGHES , JOHN SAUNDERS , SAMUEL CREED , and BENJAMIN LEES , were indicted for coining half-pence, against the statute . *

John Squire , a constable, deposed,

"that in

"consequence of an information he had received

"he went to the house of the prisoner Saunders,

"in Shoe-maker-row , in company with several

"other witnesses; that after they had beset the

"house, he saw Saunders, Benjamin Lees , and

"Orme, the younger, come out of the cellar;

"that Lees, who had his coat off, made resistance;

"that when they had secured them, the

"witness went into the cellar, where he found

"all the implements necessary for coining, and

"a large quantity of new coined halfpence,

"and that there he took Hughes, who was

"without his coat and waistcoat."

Richard Marston and John Doncaster confirmed the evidence of John Squire , and Doncaster deposed that he took Charles Lees .

Louis Augustus Alexander deposed,

"that at

"the time the prisoners were taken he was apprentice

"to Orme, sen. that the house was

"rented by Saunders; that his master and himself

"had been at the house three weeks, and

"that he had at different times seen all the prisoners

"employed in coining halfpence; that

"they sold at the rate of 25 s. of their counterfeit

"halfpence for a guinea; that Saunders

"paid the rest of the prisoners 36 s. a week for

"their work."

- Road and William Payne , deposed,

"in

"consequence of Alexander's information, they

"found a large quantity of counterfeit half-pence

"in the bog house."

Charles Lees ' Defence.

I am a watch-case maker by trade; I called there that day to see them, not having much to do; sometimes I work in a smith's shop.

William Orme , the elder's, defence.

I am a cutler by trade; I was at work at my own branch for Mr. Squires, in Cheapside, as I have done for many years.

William Orme , the younger's, defence.

I have not been in town but about a month; I have done jobs for my father several times at his house; being out of business the Monday this affair happened, I had been at the house about an hour; my father had promised me constant work; I was working at the wheel when that man came up in the shop and laid hold of my coat and said I was a prisoner.

Thomas Orme's Defence.

I work for Mr. Squires, in Cheapside; I have done so for seven years; when the people came to the house I had Mr. Squires, of Cheapside, in the house at the same time; he came for the things I was about.

Hughes's Defence.

I am a weaver by trade; work being dead I was glad to do any thing; on Sunday night I went to this house for a job of about four or five hours work; I went there about 10 o'clock; about two I was taken; I know nothing of the affair.

John Saunders's Defence.

I taok a house of Mr. Smith, the Upholdsterer in the Broadway, Blackfriars, No. 3. Shoemaker-Row; after I had taken it at the rate of eighteen pounds per annum, it did not suit me; I let the upper part to William Orme the elder, for six shillings per week, and a small place below, which was a compting-house formerly, to one James Taylor; I let all the places below and this compting-house for three shillings per week; the day before this happened I received three shillings in Whitechapel-road; and the Monday, about half after two, I came to Orme's to receive my six shillings rent, and for a knife handle he was to put two blades in; I went up to Orme's, he paid me my money, I gave him a receipt, he said he had not done the knife; I believed he would not do it, I went down into the forge to see if the blade was forged, and at the same time I went down to the necessary; coming up again I met Lewis Alexander , he came round to the vault door as I was coming out of it.

Samuel Creed 's Defence.

I know nothing of it.

Benjamin Lees ' Defence.

I am a gunmaker by trade; I am in the foot-guards; our business has been bad some time; I had twelve pounds left me by my aunt that is dead; I gave Orme three guineas to learn me cutlery; I came there and brought my own cloaths and my regimentals to lodge there; that is all that I saw; I never saw any thing of the kind acted in the house since I have been there.

The Ormes called three witnesses, and Charles Lees one witness to their characters.

All guilty .

[Branding. See summary.]

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

John Osborn alias Hobson , Robert Simmonds , James Bishop , and Thomas Murrell alias Cliffe , formerly capitally convicted, were executed at Tyburn on Wednesday the 2d of March; and William Hurley , Robert Anderson , George Brown , Dennis Doyle , and Thomas Ives were executed at Tyburn on Friday the 22d of April.

The Trials being ended, the Court proceeded to give judgment as follows:

Received Sentence of Death, 15.

Thomas Withall , Ann Field , Richard Burnett , Charles Green , Richard Garrett , Frances Hall , John Hurley , Philip Doughty , George Little , Mary Barker , William Rice , Thomas Morgan , James Mullins , William Grigg , Samuel Robinson .

Sentence was respited on Abraham Abrahams .

Transportation for fourteen years, 1.

Sarah Gross .

Transportation for seven years, 41.

Elizabeth Lewis , Leonard Wardell , George Wall , George Nicholson , Margaret Adamson , Robert Campbell , John Richardson , Thomas Higginbotham , John Marshall , John Platt , Elizabeth Dewett , Mary Jones , Catherine M'Guire , Ann Scully , John Dawson , George Heasman , John Billings , Samuel Sandys , Joseph Clewley , Peter Stringer , William Sampson , Elizabeth Bowles , Robert Sheppard , William Hughes , John West , Ann Larner , Robert Hill , Thomas Probeart , Mary Steel , William Moore , Mary Magdalen Edgley , William Jenkins , John Blake , Mary Tyler , Thomas Pearce , Peter Perrier , John Brown , William Davis , Elijah Clarke , Mosey Lyon , Michael Lacey .

Whipped, 15.

Thomas Phillips , Jane Evans , John Acker , Abraham Portrait , James Mann , John Gooda , John Allen , Thomas Probeart , jun. Thomas Lovell , John Alesworth , Thomas Jones , John Tyler , John Kent , Joseph Spencer , John Whitehead .

Branded, 3.

Mary Saunders , James Davis , Samuel Field .

Branded and imprisoned six months, 1.

Thomas Inglebert .

Branded and imprisoned one year, 15.

Thomas Hayward , Thomas Pickering , John Davis , Joseph Meekwood , Clark Bailey , William Turner , James Whitehouse , Charles Lees , William Orme , sen. William Orme , jun. Thomas Orme , William Hughes , John Saunders , Samuel Creed , Benjamin Lees .

John Osborn alias Hobson , Robert Simmonds , James Bishop , and Thomas Murrell alias Cliffe , formerly capitally convicted, were executed at Tyburn on Wednesday the 2d of March; and William Hurley , Robert Anderson , George Brown , Dennis Doyle , and Thomas Ives were executed at Tyburn on Friday the 22d of April.

Trials at Law, Pleadings, Debates, &c.

Accurately taken in SHORT HAND, Also the Art of SHORT WRITING completely and expeditiously taught, By JOSEPH GURNEY , SOUTHAMPTON BUILDINGS, near STAPLES-INN:

Of whom may be had, the eighth Edition of BRACHYGRAPHY, or SHORT WRITING Made easy to the meanest Capacity, Price bound, 8 s.

The Book is also sold by his Sister MARTHA GURNEY , Bookseller, No. 34. Bell yard, near Temple-Bar.

This Day were published, the following REMARKABLE TRIALS:

1. The Sessions Paper for the County of HERTFORD, (price Six-pence); containing the Trials of all the Prisoners at the last Assize at Hertford, before the Hon. Mr. Baron Perrott .

2. The Sessions Paper for the County of ESSEX, (in two Numbers, price Four-pence each); containing the Trials of all the Prisoners at the last Assize at Chelmsford, before the Hon. Mr. Justice Willes.

3. The Sessions Paper for the County of KENT, (Price Six-pence); containing the Trials of all the Prisoners at the last Assize at Maidstone, before the Hon. Mr. Justice Willes.

4. The Sessions Paper for the County of SURREY, (price Six-pence); containing the Trials of all the Prisoners at the last Assize at Kingston, before the Hon. Mr. Justice Willes.

All taken down in SHORT HAND by JOSEPH GURNEY , And published by Permission of the Judges.

Sold by MARTHA GURNEY , Bookseller, No. 34, Bell Yard; and J. FRENCH, Bookseller, near St. Mildred's Church in the Poultry, and may likewise be had of all the Booksellers in Town and Country.

*** These Numbers contains the Trials of no less than thirty-two Prisoners who are under sentence of Death.

Trials at Law, Pleadings, Debates, &c.

Accurately taken in SHORTHAND, Also the Art of SHORT WRITING completely and expeditiously taught, By JOSEPH GURNEY , SOUTHAMPTON BUILDINGS, near STAPLES-INN:

Of whom may he had, the eighth Edition of BRACHYGRAPHY, or SHORT WRITING Made easy to the meanest Capacity, Price bound, 8 s.

The Book is also sold by his Sister MARTHA GURNEY , Bookseller, No. 34. Bell-yard, near Temple-Bar.

This Day were published, the following REMARKABLE TRIALS:

1. The Sessions Paper for the County of HERTFORD, (price Six-pence); containing the Trials of all the Prisoners at the last Assize at Hertford, before the Hon. Mr. Baron Perrott .

2. The Sessions Paper for the County of ESSEX, (in two Numbers, price Four-pence each); containing the Trials of all the Prisoners at the last Assize at Chelmsford, before the Hon. Mr. Justice Willes.

3. The Sessions Paper for the County of KENT, (Price Six-pence); containing the Trials of all the Prisoners at the last Assize at Maidstone, before the Hon. Mr. Justice Willes.

4. The Sessions Paper for the County of SURREY, (price Six-pence); containing the Trials of all the Prisoners at the last Assize at Kingston, before the Hon. Mr. Justice Willes.

All taken down in SHORT HAND by JOSEPH GURNEY , And published by Permission of the Judges.

Sold by MARTHA GURNEY , Bookseller, No. 34, Bell Yard; and J. FRENCH, Bookseller, near St. Mildred's Church in the Poultry, and may likewise be had of all the Booksellers in Town and Country.

*** These Numbers contain the Trials of no less than thirty-two Prisoners who were capitally convicted.