Old Bailey Proceedings Online (www.oldbaileyonline.org, version 6.0, 26 October 2014), January 1731 (17310115).

Old Bailey Proceedings, 15th January 1731.

THE PROCEEDINGS AT THE Sessions of the Peace, and Oyer and Terminer, FOR THE City of LONDON, AND County of MIDDLESEX; ON

Friday the 15th, Saturday the 16th, Monday the 18th, Tuesday the 19th, and Wednesday the 20th of January 1731, in the Fourth Year of His MAJESTY's Reign.

Being the Second SESSIONS in the Mayoralty of the Right Honourable HUMPHREY PARSONS , Esq; Lord Mayor of the City of LONDON, in the Year 1731.

No. II. for the said YEAR.

LONDON:

Printed for T. PAYNE , at the Crown, in Pater-noster-Row. 1731.

(Price Six Pence.)

THE PROCEEDINGS AT THE Sessions of the Peace, and Oyer and Terminer, for the CITY of LONDON; AND ON

The King's Commission of Goal-Delivery of Newgate, held at Justice-Hall in the Old-Bailey; for the CITY of London, and COUNTY of Middlesex.

On Friday, Saturday, Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday, being the 15th, 16th, 18th, 19th, and 20th of January 1731, in the Fourth Year of His MAJESTY's Reign,

BEFORE the Right Honourable HUMPHREY PARSONS , Esq; Lord Mayor of the City of London; the Rt. Honourable the Lord Chief Baron Reynolds ; Mr. Justice Probyn; Mr. Serjeant Raby, Deputy-Recorder of the City of London; and others of His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer for the City of London, and Justices of Goal-Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

London Jury.

John Purchass ,

Edmund Homer ,

Edward Chamberlain ,

Nathaniel Adams ,

Thomas Lander ,

John Mosden ,

William Smith ,

John Russel ,

William Picket ,

Charles Price ,

William Holliday ,

William Playstead .

Middlesex Jury.

John Prater ,

William Gilmore ,

John Fortescue ,

Stephen Clark ,

Charles Fairchild ,

William Blackwell ,

Thomas Baker ,

James Pinnot ,

John Clark ,

Edward Wren ,

John Power ,

William Belson .

Edward Hammock , of St. Michael Queen Hithe , was indicted for feloniously stealing 28 Bushels of Malt, value 3 l. 10 s. the Goods of a Person unknown, the 1st of August last.

He was likewise indicted a 2d time, for feloniously stealing 28 Bushels of Malt , the Goods of , Esq ;

Edward Day depos'd, That he having told the Prisoner that if he would come with a Skiff on board the Lighter, he should have 3 Quarters and a half of Malt; that he did come twice, and had each time 3 Quarters and a half of Malt, for the first of which he paid him (this Evidence) two Guineas, and for the second 1 l. 10 s. but it appearing that he bought and paid for the Malt, and it not appearing that he knew the Malt to be stolen, the Jury acquitted the Prisoner of both Indictments.

Thomas Young , of St. Paul's Covent-Garden , was indicted for feloniously stealing 4 Silver Spoons, the Property of Thomas Dashwood , Esq; and a pair of Boots, the Goods of Tho Murrey , in the Dwelling-House of Roger Manley , the 6th of December last.

It appear'd by the Evidence, That the Prisoner was employ'd as a Groom in Mr. Dashwood's Stables, and having taken an opportunity to steal the Goods, went away; the Fact being plainly prov'd, the Jury found him guilty to the value of 39s .

[Transportation. See summary.]

William Ashurst and James Ogilvy , of St. Margaret's Westminster , were indicted for assaulting Christopher Laughlin , on the Highway, putting him in fear, and feloniously taking from him 5 s. in Money , the 2d of December last.

The Prosecutor depos'd, That he having been drinking till about 3 o'Clock in the Morning, was going home to his Lodging; and was met by the Prisoners, who knock'd him down, and beat him very much, and running into the House where he lodg'd, got in and shut the Door against him.

It appear'd by other Evidences, That both the Prosecutor and Prisoners lodg'd in one and the same House, but pretended not to know one another, and that the Prosecutor at first only insisted upon Satisfaction for a Shirt that was torn in the Fighting that had been between them at coming into the Lodgings, not charging them with Robbing him of 5 s. till some time after, tho' the Prisoners lay several Nights after in the same House with the Prosecutor; whereupon the Jury acquitted both the Prisoners of the Indictment.

John Carrol , Edward Welsh , Patrick Gill and Edward Roe , of St. Ann's Westminster , were indicted for feloniously stealing divers wearing Apparel, in the Dwelling-House of William Williams , the 2d of this Instant Jan.

Katharine Williams depos'd, That the Prisoner Gill had brought her a Letter two Days before, for her to go to a certain Place to fetch some Materials for Apparel, that were to be made in haste (she being a Mantua-maker) but she not knowing the Person, did not go, and that after he was apprehended, he did own, that he had carried her a Letter, and that if she had gone out, the Robbery was to be committed at that time by the rest of the Prisoners.

Elizabeth Savil depos'd, That she had taken notice of all the Prisoners lurking about near the Prosecutor's for three or four Days before the Robbery.

Ann Goddard depos'd, That she lodging in the same House with the Prosecutor, saw Carrol coming down Stairs with the Prosecutor's Goods, and stopping him, caus'd him to be apprehended.

John Savil depos'd, That the other three Prisoners were apprehended, by means of the Impeachment of Carrol, upon which Carrol pleaded, he was by the Justice admitted as an Evidence, which appear'd to be so; but at finding the Bill, Carrol being put in the Indictment, was oblig'd to stand the Trial, and the Fact being plainly prov'd upon him, by his own Confession, as well as the Evidence of Anne Goddard , the Jury found him guilty to the value of 39 s. but there not being sufficient Evidence against any of the other three, they were acquitted .

[Transportation. See summary.]

Mary Malshaw , of Edmonton , was indicted for feloniously stealing divers Goods, in the Dwelling-House of Thomas Riggot , the 30th of December last.

The Prosecutor depos'd, That the Prisoner was his Servant, and getting up betimes in the Morning, went away with divers wearing Apparel , that he being inform'd by his Boy that the Maid was gone away, arose, and taking his Horse, rode towards Shoreditch and in the Road overtook her, and carrying her into a House, she delivered to him all the Things she had stolen; the Fact being plainly prov'd, the Jury found her guilty to the value of 39 s .

[Transportation. See summary.]

Henry Beby , Edward Goodwin , sen. and Edward Goodwin , jun. of St. Giles's in the Fields , were indicted for feloniously stealing four Yards of Broad-cloth, value 28 s. the Goods of John Lear , the 25th of December last.

It appear'd by the Evidence, That the Prisoners being Taylors , were Journeymen to the Prosecutor , and had several times cut off three Quarters of a Yard of his Cloth, and sold it; the Fact being plainly prov'd upon Beby and Goodwin, sen. they were found guilty to the value of 4s. 10 d. each ; but Edward Goodwin, jun. having only carried away three Quarters of a Yard of Cloth, which was given him by his Father, he was acquitted .

[Transportation. See summary.]

Sarah Cross , alias Civility , of St. Giles's in the Fields , was indicted for feloniously stealing a Hat , the Goods of Richard Bass , the 22d of December last.

The Prosecutor depos'd, That the Hat hung up at his Shop Window to fell, and he being inform'd it was taken away by the Prisoner, pursued her, and took her with the Hat; the Fact being plainly prov'd, the Jury found her guilty to the value of 10 d .

[Transportation. See summary.]

Margaret Oxley , alias Williams , of St. Giles's in the Fields , was indicted for feloniously stealing divers Goods , the Property of James Leak , the 7th of December last; the Fact being plainly prov'd, the Jury found her guilty to the value of 4s. 10d .

[Transportation. See summary.]

Sarah Tilbury , of St. Mary White-Chappel , was indicted for stealing Money of Joseph Ridley , in the Dwelling-House of John Walker , the 20th of November last.

Elizabeth Ridley depos'd, That the Prisoner came to live with her as a Servant , and having liv'd with her but three Days, she being gone to her Shop, which was distant from her Dwelling, the Prisoner ask'd her for the Key of her Chamber, under pretence to clean it, and taking the Money out of a Draw, went away; the Fact being plainly prov'd, the Jury found her guilty to the value of 39 s .

[Transportation. See summary.]

Richard Brand , of St. Mary Stratford le Bow , was indicted for stealing 40 Guineas , the Property of Thomas Middleditch , the 17th of September last.

It appear'd by the Evidence, That the Prosecutor and Prisoner were Fellow-servants to Ambrose Page , Esq; and that the Prisoner took an opportunity to open the Prosecutor's Box, and take the Money, and afterwards went away; and after he was apprehended, he restor'd 39 Guineas to the Prosecutor. The Fact being plainly proved, the Jury found him Guilty of the Indictment.

[Transportation. See summary.]

Richard Porter , of St. Brides , was indicted for feloniously stealing Brass-Wire , the Goods of Jeffery Gillingham , the 31st of December last.

It appear'd by the Evidence, that the Prisoner was Journeyman to the Prosecutor, and stole the Goods. The Fact being plainly proved, he was found Guilty to the Value of 10d .

[Transportation. See summary.]

William Bellinger & Francis Richmond , of Christ-Church , were indicted for burglariously breaking the House of John Downs , in the Night-time, and feloniously stealing two Silver Tankards, value 10l. and a Silver Rim of a Leather Mug, the 6th of December last.

The Prosecutor depos'd, That his House had been broken, and his Tankards stolen, and that his House had been entred at a Window which was over a Slaughter-House; that he suspected the Prisoner Bellinger, because he having lodged there some time before, knew the way, and had some times got into the House that way.

It appear'd by other Evidence, that Bellinger and Richmond had the next Day carried broken Silver to one James Hall, a Melter, to melt it down, who depos'd, That he did so, and the two Prisoners sat by him while he did it, and Bellinger gave him 2 s. for his Pains, and that it was broken into such Pieces , he could not discover what it had been, and that Bellinger pretended he had found it wrapped up in two Parcels on the Ground, kick'd it before him, and afterwards took it up. There were several Evidences that gave Occasion for strong Suspicion against the Prisoners; but the Prosecutor not being able to swear that the Masses of Silver which were produced in Court, and found where the Prisoners were after they were apprehended, and for want of sufficient Evidence of the Prisoners having committed the Fact, they were both acquitted .

Thomas French , of St. Dunstan's Stepney , was indicted for stealing divers Iron Water-Cock Keys, and other Things , the Property of Sir Richard Child , Bart. Lord Viscount Castlemain , the 14th of December last.

It appear'd by the Evidence, that the Iron was stolen out of his Lordship's Engine-House in the Park, and the Fact being plainly proved, the Jury found him Guilty to the value of 10 d. .

[Transportation. See summary.]

John Brooks , of St. Martin's in the Fields , was indicted for feloniously stealing two Pair of Shoes, in the Shop of Robert Rayner , the 31st of December last. The Fact being plainly proved, the Jury found him Guilty to the Value of 10d .

[Transportation. See summary.]

John Seal and Mary Evans , of St. Giles's Cripplegate , were indicted for feloniously stealing two Gold Rings, 14 Guineas, and ten Pounds in Money , the Property of John Ely , the 26th of December last.

The Prosecutor depos'd, That he lodged in the House of the Prisoner John Seal, and that his Money was in a Trunk in his Chamber, that he looking for his Money found it was gone, altho' he found his Trunk lock'd, and he had the Key in his Pocket; that he had Reason to suspect the Prisoners, in that they had an opportunity of coming at any time into his Room, Mary Evans being House-Keeper (altho' she did not lie in the House) to John Seal, and that in searching Evans's House, which was not far, a Key was found among her Keys that would open his Trunk; but it was also proved, that upon searching the Prisoners Houses, none of the Money nor Rings were found, and that the Key did also open one of her Drawers: There being no other Proof against the Prisoners, and they calling Persons to their Reputation, who gave them a good Character, they were acquitted .

William Darrel , of St. James's Westminster , was indicted for feloniously stealing divers wearing Apparel, the Goods of Elizabeth Parker , in the Dwelling-House of Israel Maurice , the 17th of December last.

Thomas Bever depos'd, That he liv'd at the King's-Arms Tavern in Pallmal, and going up to Bed, found the Prisoner lying upon his Bed, and the Prosecutor's Trunk, which had been brought out of her Chamber into his, under the Bed, and a great many Things taken out of it, and lying about the Room; that upon his coming into the Room, the Prisoner ask'd him, If his Lord was gone? That he suspecting him to be a Thief, caught hold of him, but he struggling with him, got from him, ran down Stairs, he pursuing him, and he getting into the Street, and he crying stop Thief, he was stopp'd, and two Black Hoods, two Mobs, &c. were found in his Pocket.

- Henry depos'd, That he hearing an out-cry of stop Thief, and seeing the Prisoner run, pursued him, and he to avoid him ran among some Chairs, and sell over the Chair-Polls, and so he seized him.

The Prisoner pleaded in his Defence, That he was Drunk, and did not know how he came there, nor what he did; but the last Evidence being ask'd, If he was Drunk? reply'd, No; for he ran more like a Greyhound than a drunken Man, that had he not fell (though himself could run pretty well) he never could have taken him; upon which the Prisoner reply'd, he had been a running Footman. The Fact being plainly proved, the Jury found him Guilty to the Value of 4s. 10d .

William Billing was indicted for feloniously stealing a Pair of Sheets, and other Goods , of Mary Stretton ; but no Body appearing against him, he was acquitted .

Mary Appleton , of Sunbury , was indicted for feloniously stealing a Leather Surcingle, and three rubbing Cloths, in the Stable of Sir Thomas Frankland , the 13th of December last.

She was likewise indicted a second Time for stealing a Table-Cloth , the Goods of Philip Day . The Facts being plainly proved, the Jury found her Guilty to the Value of 10d. upon each Indictment .

[Transportation. See summary.]

Samuel Gauthorn and William Highton , of St. John Wapping , were indicted for stealing a Brass Pound Weight, and a half Pound, in the Shop of Samuel Jecks , the 13th of this Instant January . The Fact being plainly proved, the Jury found them Guilty to the Value of 10d. each .

[Transportation. See summary.]

Katharine Strange , of St. Giles's Cripplegate , was indicted for feloniously stealing a Petticoat , the Goods of Thomas Picket , the 13th of this Instant January . The Fact being plainly proved, the Jury found her Guilty to the Value of 10 d .

[Transportation. See summary.]

William Strutt , of St. Faith's , was indicted for feloniously stealing two Books in Quires, the History of Japan, value 25 s. and the Ancient History of Britain, value 5 s. the Goods of Charles Davis , the 5th April 1729 .

The Prosecutor depos'd, That the Prisoner was his Servant , and he having Reason to suspect him, searched his Lodgings (he being a married Man) and there found the Books, which were produc'd in Court, and which the Prosecutor swore to be his; being ask'd how he came to defer the Prosecution so long? reply'd, He did not see him.

The Prisoner own'd his having the Books; but pleaded, That they were made out of the Waste when he collated the Books; that of the History of Japan, out of the Waste that came from Sir Hans Sloan , and that it was not the Prosecutor's sole Property, part of the Property being Mr. Wotton's, and the Property of the History of Britain being Mr. Giles's, Woodman's, &c. which the Prosecutor did not deny; whereupon the Indictment being laid for stealing the Books, as the sole Property of Mr. Davis, whereas it was the Joint Property of other Persons, the Jury acquitted him of the Indictment .

Mary Taylor , of St. Andrew's Holbourn , was indicted upon the Coroner's Inquest, for the Murther of her female Bastard-Child .

Dorothy Pedlar depos'd, That she suspected that the Prisoner was with Child, and that she complain'd she had the Gripes, and went to Bed, and rose again in the Morning about 10 o'Clock, and she thinking she look'd lesser about the Waste than usual, she took a Candle, and look'd into the Vault, and saw the Child; that this was on the Wednesday that she discovered it, but the Child was not taken out till the Tuesday following; but when the Child was taken up, she perceiv'd no Marks of Violence upon it; that it was the Beadle, Charles Lilly , that caused the Child to be taken up, and the Prisoner was carried before the Justice.

Charles Lilly depos'd, That the former Evidence came and acquainted him with the Matter, and he went to the Justice, got a Warrant, and got Eleanor Pace to take the Child out of the Vault, and carried the Prisoner before the Justice.

The Prisoner pleaded, That she did not think she was so near her time, and was delivered of the Child at the Vault by surprize, and that she had no Design to destroy it, but had made Provision for it, and had spoke to a Midwife, and for Proof call'd the following Evidences.

Susannah Freeman depos'd, That she being a Midwife, did view the Child, but saw no Marks of Violence upon it, and did believe that it came two Months before its time; but whether born Dead or Alive she could not say.

Elizabeth Price , a Midwife, depos'd, She likewise viewed the Child, and saw no Marks of Violence, and did believe it came two Months before its time; and she added, the Prisoner had several times ask'd her to come to see her, and did believe with an Intent to have discovered her being with Child to her, and to bespeak her for her Midwife; the Child-Bed Linen was produced in Court, which was taken out of the Prisoner's Drawers, as depos'd by several Witnesses.

She call'd several to her Reputation, who gave her a good Character, and the Jury acquitted her.

Sarah Bell , of St. Andrew's Holbourn , was indicted for feloniously stealing a Cloth Coat , the Property of Frances Palmer , the 14th of this Instant January . The Fact being plainly prov'd, the Jury found her guilty to the value of 10d .

[Whipping. See summary.]

Thomas Wright , of St. Mary White-Chappel , was indicted for feloniously stealing divers wearing Apparel in the Dwelling-House of John Simpson , the 15th of October last.

It appear'd by the Evidence, That the Prisoner lodg'd some few Days in the Prosecutor's House, and stole the Goods, and sold them to two Women in Rosemary-Lane; the Fact being plainly prov'd, the Jury found him guilty to the value of 39 s .

[Transportation. See summary.]

Eleanor Garnet , of St. Paul's Shadwel , was indicted for feloniously stealing divers wearing Apparel , the Goods of Andrew Herring , the 17th of November last.

It appear'd by the Evidence, That the Prisoner was Servant to the Prosecutor, and took the Goods, which were found upon her at her going away; the Fact being plainly prov'd, and the Prisoner owning it at the Bar, the Jury found her guilty to the value of 10d .

[Whipping. See summary.]

Abigal Gale , of St. Paul's Shadwel , was indicted for feloniously stealing a Feather-Bed, and other Goods , of John Cave , the 4th of this Instant January ; but no Prosecutor appearing against the Prisoner, she was acquitted .

Elizabeth Earle , of St. Giles's in the Fields , was indicted for feloniously stealing the Goods of John Smith , the 2d of this Instant January ; the Fact being plainly prov'd, the Jury found her guilty to the value of 10 d .

[Whipping. See summary.]

John Banks , of St. George in the East , was indicted for feloniously stealing two Hams of Bacon, the Goods of Edmund Wild , in the Shop , the 24th of December last; the Fact being plainly prov'd, the Jury found him guilty to the value of 4s. 10d .

[Transportation. See summary.]

Thomas Banks , of St. Sepulchres , was indicted for breaking the House of Mary Adams , at Two o'Clock in the Day-time, putting her in Fear, and feloniously taking a Pen-case, and two Guineas, the 15th of December last, the Property of John Pool .

He was likewise indicted a second time for feloniously stealing a Silver Seal, value 3 s. the Goods of Alexander Arbuthnot .

He was indicted a third time for feloniously stealing two promissory Notes, one of 45 s. and the other of a Guinea , the Property of John Pool , the said 15th of December .

He was also indicted a fourth time for assaulting John Pool , on the Highway, putting him in Fear, and taking from him 7 s. 6 d. the 14th of December last.

Mary Adams depos'd, That the Prisoner came to her Room, forc'd open the Door, came in upon her, and told her he wanted Money, and Money he would have, and took the Pen-case, with two Notes in it, and 2 Guineas, and went away, which Notes the Prisoner's Wife said he had burnt; that when her Son, John Pool , came home, she inform'd him of what the Prisoner had done, that thereupon he went out that Afternoon, and apprehended the Prisoner.

John Pool depos'd, That he did apprehend the Prisoner, having been informed by his Mother, Mary Adams , of the Prisoner having taken the Things and Money mentioned in the Indictment.

Mary Walker depos'd, That the Prisoner sent to her after he was in Custody, and gave her Six-pence to go with his Daughter to the Prosecutor's Mother's Lodging, and there to convey the Pen-case privately into some part of the House, and then to pretend to find it there.

The Prisoner deny'd the Fact, and produced two Notes of Pool's Hand, with order to go and take the Pen-case when he pleased in Satisfaction or Pledge of Money he lent him.

Pool deny'd that he gave the said Notes to Banks the Prisoner, and said that they were forged by the Prisoner; but in Contradiction to this, the Prisoner called Mary Banks , his Daughter, who depos'd, That she did see the Prisoner write all or part of those Bills, and was also desired by the Prisoner, as well as her Father, to sign those Bills, and did sign them.

Another Evidence depos'd, That he did believe the Prosecutor's Name was written by the Prosecutor himself.

As to the second Indictment, the Prisoner brought Evidence to prove, that the Prosecutor had agreed to take 3 s. for the Seal, and had not charged him with feloniously taking it, but upon the Instigation of John Pool .

As to the third and fourth Indictment of robbing Pool on the Highway, and taking from him 7 s. 6 d. there was no Proof but that of John Pool himself, nor confirm'd by any Circumstances, but seem'd rather improbable that the Prisoner should rob the Prosecutor the 14th of December, and that he should go to him, and borrow Money of him, and give him Notes on the 15th; and also, that when the Prisoner was committed by the Justice on the 16th, no mention was then made of this Robbery to the Justice, nor of the two Guineas till afterwards, when they came to find the Bill of Indictment against the Prisoner. After a full hearing of the Matter, the Jury acquitted the Prisoner of all the Indictments .

Benjamin Loveday , of St. George Hanover-Square , and Ann Booth , were indicted, the former for burglariously breaking the House of Henry Gary , the 19th of January last was Twelve-months , and stealing ten Hats , and the latter for receiving them, knowing them to be stolen ; but there being no Evidence against the Prisoners but that of Thomas Rowley , who was (as he said) an Accomplice in the Fact, the Jury acquitted the Prisoners.

Hannah Gosteloe , of St. George the Martyr , was indicted for feloniously stealing a Gown, &c. the Goods of Moses Mitchel , the 13th of December last; the Fact being plainly prov'd, the Jury found her guilty to the value of 10d .

[Transportation. See summary.]

Rosamond Dorman , of St. Mary White-Chapel , was indicted for assaulting Mary Mac Daniel , in an open Place, near the Highway, putting her in Fear, and taking from her an Apron, half a Guinea, and 5 s. 6 d. in Money , the 9th of December last.

The Prosecutor depos'd, That as she was going near Rag-Fair, in an Alley, the Prisoner met her, and calling her Bitch, threatened to be the Death of her (for her being an Evidence that her Landlady, Mrs. Sawyer, Miscarried, she having been arrested on that account) fell upon her violently, beat her, and bruis'd her with her Patten, and she felt her Hand in her Pocket, and that she lost the Apron and Money out of her Pocket, but could not swear that the Prisoner took the Money, &c.

Alexander Austin confirm'd the Prisoner's beating the Prosecutor, and that she said when she was beating her, Rose, don't Rob me.

The Prisoner pleaded in her Defence, That the Prosecutor first assaulted her, and that the Prosecution proceeded from Malice, and call'd William Fen , who depos'd, That there being a Warrant for apprehending the Prisoner, the Prosecutor had been employ'd by the Tip-Staff to set the Prisoner, and she meeting her, the Prosecutor fell first upon the Prisoner; after a full hearing of the Matter, the Jury acquitted her.

Thomas Brocket , of St. George the Martyr , was indicted for feloniously stealing an hundred Weight of old Iron , the Goods of Ralph Greathead , the 14th of this Instant January ; the Fact being plainly prov'd, the Jury found him guilty to value of 10d .

[Transportation. See summary.]

Thomas Wright , of Enfield , was indicted for feloniously stealing an Iron Lock and Bolt of a Sluce belonging to the Governour and Company of the New River Water , the 9th of May last.

The Prisoner deny'd the Fact, and pleaded, That he seeing two Men have them, took the Things from them, and was going to deliver them to the Walk's-Man, when the Surveyor of the Works met him, and charg'd him with having taken them from the Sluce . He like wise call'd some Persons to his Reputation, but the Jury found him guilty to the value of 10d .

[Transportation. See summary.]

William Winnard , of the Precinct of St. Catharines , was indicted for feloniously stealing a Cock, value 4 s. the Property of Francis Day , the 15th of this Instant January .

The Prosecutor depos'd, That his Bulk was broke open, and the Fowl was stolen.

Bennet Hern depos'd, That he saw the Prisoner breaking the Prosecutor's Bulk, and come out with the Cock, that he cry'd out, stop Thief, pursu'd him, and took him, he having thrown the Cock away in the Street; the Fact being plainly prov'd, the Jury found him guilty to the value of 10d .

[Transportation. See summary.]

William Winn , of St. John Wapping , was indicted for feloniously stealing a pair of Shoes , the Goods of Robert Wigg , the 24th of December last.

The Prosecutor depos'd, That the Prisoner was his Journeyman , and came to him to borrow some Money; that he being an idle drunken Fellow, refus'd to lend him any; that thereupon he going away, put his Hand behind him, and took the Shoes, and went out with them; the Prisoner being immediately followed, the Shoes were found upon him.

The Prisoner pleaded, That he took down the Shoes to look upon them, which is an usual thing, and being in Drink, happen'd to reel out of the Shop, and they came and charg'd him with stealing them; but the Fact being plainly prov'd, the Jury found him guilty to the value of 10 d .

[Transportation. See summary.]

Margaret O Neal , of St. Giles's in the Fields , was indicted for feloniously stealing a pair of Leather Boots , the Goods of Tho. Millichamp , the 13th of this Instant Jan . the Fact being plainly prov'd, the Jury found her guilty to the value of 10 d .

[Transportation. See summary.]

Joseph Wright , of St George in the East , was indicted for stealing several Fowls , the Goods of George Reed , the 16th of December last; but the Fact not being plainly prov'd upon him, the Jury acquitted him.

Mary Hewes , of St. Andrew's Holbourn , was indicted for feloniously stealing 28 Pound of Iron , the Property of Stephen Kite , the 8th of December last. The Fact being plainly prov'd, the Jury found her Guilty to the value of 10 d .

[Transportation. See summary.]

John Hall , of St. John Hackney , was indicted for feloniously stealing 18 Harrow Tines, value 6 d. and other Iron, the Goods of Persons unknown , the 8th of this instant January . But there not being sufficient Evidence against him, he was acquitted .

Mary Bagley , of St. Margaret's Westminster , was indicted for feloniously stealing divers Goods from Hannah Roberts and Benjamin Popplewel , the 1st of October last was twelve Months . But there not being sufficient Evidence against her, she was acquitted .

John Nodder , of St. James's Westminster , was indicted for feloniously stealing divers Goods from Anthony Rowse , the 16th of December last. The Fact being plainly prov'd, the Jury found him Guilty to the value of 4s. 10d .

[Transportation. See summary.]

Margaret Gale , alias Rich , of St. Mary le Bone , was indicted for feloniously stealing a Gown and Petticoat, value 3 l. the Goods of Joanna Worthington , the 1st of July last. But no Body appearing against her, she was acquitted .

Elizabeth Street was indicted for feloniously marrying Henry Hawkins , her first Husband Will Hind being Alive ; but no Body appearing against her, she was acquitted .

Elizabeth Nash , of St. Martin's in the Fields , was indicted for feloniously stealing the Goods of John Taylor , the 26th of December last; but no Body appearing against her, she was acquitted .

Elizabeth Ramsey , alias Smith , of St. Dunstan's in the West , was indicted for stealing divers Goods of Elizabeth Whitehurst , the 11th of December last; the Fact being plainly proved, the Jury found her Guilty to the Value of 10d .

William Lockwood , of St. Peter's Poor , was indicted for feloniously stealing 8lb. of Leaden Pipe, value 1s. the Property of Peter Myers , Esq; the 23d of November last; but no Body appearing against him, he was acquitted .

Thomas Bartlet , of St. George Hanover-Square , was indicted for feloniously forging and uttering a promissory Note for 10 l. 10 s. of Elizabeth Smith , payable to himself or Order ; but there appearing to be a Mistake in the drawing of the Indictment, it was quash'd in order to be rectified the next Sessions .

Barbara Gun , of St. George in the East , was indicted for feloniously stealing a pair of Sheets, and other Goods , the Property of John Mackey , the 24th of December last.

She was likewise indicted a second time, for feloniously stealing a Stuff Gown, value 4s. and other Goods , of John Mackey , the 24th of December last.

It appear'd by the Evidence, That the Prisoner liv'd in the Prosecutor's House, in a furnish'd Lodging, and that she took the Goods, and pawn'd them, and they were found accordingly; the Fact being plainly prov'd, the Jury found her guilty to the value of 10 d .

[Transportation. See summary.]

Thomas Jennings , of St. Ann's Black-Fryars , was indicted for feloniously stealing a Guinea , the Property of Richard Thompson , the 12th of December last.

- Loe depos'd, That he being a Taylor, the Prisoner was his Journeyman ; that having taken a Suit of Cloaths of Mr. Thompson's to alter, he taking hold of the Breeches by the Knees, a Purse sell out, in which was two Queen Ann's Guineas, three other Guineas, and two half Guineas; that thereupon he designing to go and acquaint Mr. Thompson, had put the Money again into the Purse, put the Purse into the Fob, and carrying the Clothes up into the Garret, was giving Orders to his Journeyman (the Prisoner) about the altering the Coat, and having laid the Breeches, with the Purse of Guineas folded up, was suddenly call'd down to a Gentleman who wanted to speak to him; that when he came up, he found the Breeches remov'd from the Place where he had laid them, and lying nearer to the Prisoner unfolded; and examining the Purse, found it had been unty'd, and left so, and one of the Queen Ann's Guineas gone; that thereupon he taxed the Prisoner with it, but he deny'd it; but it appearing that Mr. Thompson's Christian Name was Samuel, and not Richard, the Indictment was quash'd, and the Prisoner acquitted of it .

Sarah Page , of St. Giles's Cripplegate , was indicted for feloniously stealing divers wearing Apparel , the Goods of John Dun , the 5th of this Instant January .

The Prosecutor depos'd, That the Prisoner was taken into his House on Charity, and being handy, was employ'd to work at mending of Linen, &c. that she having been out, did not come home one Night till it was late, was let in by the Man, and sate up in a Room; that in the Morning he found his Fore-Windows had been broke open, and the Prisoner was gone, and the Goods missing, and that when she was apprehended some of the Goods were found upon her, as Head-Dresses, and other Linen.

The Prisoner in her Defence pleaded, That while she was lock'd up in a Room, a Man came into the room, at which she was frightened; that he had a Dark-Lanthorn, and threatened her, if she made any noise he would cut her Throat; that after he had taken some Money out of a Cupboard, and bundled up the Goods, he broke open the Fore-Windows, and went out, threatening to murder her, if she did not go with him; that she did do so, and afterwards, as the Man and she sat upon a Bench, he gave her the Things that were found, telling her, he would not be ungenerous to her; but this pretence did not avail, and the Jury found her guilty to the value of 4 s. 10 d .

[Transportation. See summary.]

Edward Welsh , of St. Giles's Cripplegate , was indicted, for that he together with James Dickson , did on the 24th of October last, feloniously steal a Tankard, in the House of Alice Kellum .

Francis Kellum depos'd, That three Men came in to drink, and after having drank several Tankards of drink, in the Space of an Hour, and he going down to draw some drink , they all run away without paying the Reckoning; that he immediately pursued them, and they running divers ways, he could pursue but one of them, which was Christopher Cornick , who was convicted for it the last Sessions. That he afterwards being informed by Thomas Hall, that the Prisoner was in Newgate, he went thither, and immediately knew the Prisoner to be one of the three in Company that stole the Tankard. The Fact being fully proved, the Jury found him Guilty to the Value of 4s. 10d .

[Transportation. See summary.]

John Taylor and Thomas Compton , of St. Botolph's Bishopsgate , together with Thomas Beck , not taken, were indicted for feloniously stealing a Money-Box and Money, in the Shop of John Sadler , the 4th of this Instant January . The Fact being plainly proved, the Jury found each of them Guilty to the Value of 10d .

[Whipping. See summary.]

Lewis Lee , of St. Michael's Cornhill , was indicted for feloniously stealing a Handkerchief, value 1s. the Goods of Edward Wild , the 19th of December last. The Fact being plainly proved, the Jury found him Guilty to the Value of 10d .

Simon Spencer , of St. Magnus the Martyr , was indicted for feloniously stealing a Cheese, value 3s. the Goods of William Cock , the 15th of this Instant January .

The Prosecutor depos'd, That the Cheese was stolen, and he pursued the Prisoner, and took him with the Cheese under his Arm. The Fact being fully proved, the Jury found him Guilty to the Value of 10 d .

[Transportation. See summary.]

Anne Neal , of St. Sepulchres , was indicted for feloniously stealing printed Linen, in the Shop of Moses Bradley , the 18th of December last. The Fact being plainly prov'd, the Jury found her Guilty to the value of 10 d .

[Whipping. See summary.]

Anne Wilson , of the Parish of St. Bartholomew the Great , was indicted for feloniously stealing Tobacco , the Goods of Joshua and Samuel Lock , the 5th of this Instant January .

It appear'd by the Evidence, That the Prisoner with another went into the Prosecutor's Warehouse, and ran away, but being pursued, the Prisoner was taken with the Tobacco in her Apron. The Fact being plainly proved, the Jury found her Guilty to the Value of 4 s. 10 d .

[Whipping. See summary.]

Elizabeth Flemming , of St. Giles's Cripplegate , was indicted for feloniously stealing Linen Cloth, in the Shop of Peter Hammond , the 21st of December last.

Timothy Bailey depos'd, That a Woman telling him that she saw the Prisoner going along Barbican, that had something betwixt her Legs, that she could scarce go, and was gone up an Alley to put it farther up, and that she came out of the Prosecutor's Shop, and that he went into the Alley and took it from between her Legs.

The Prisoner pleaded, That a strange Woman gave her two or three Drams, and gave her the Cloth, and bid her put it under her Coats. The Fact being plainly proved, the Jury found her Guilty to the value of 4s. 10d .

[Transportation. See summary.]

Thomas Coleman, alias John Haynes , of St. James Duke's-Place , was indicted for feloniously stealing two Pair of Shoes , the Goods of Thomas Johnson , the 2d of November last; but the Evidence not being sufficient, he was acquitted .

John Grace , and Sarah Grace , of St. Botolph's Aldersgate , were indicted for feloniously stealing 18 Stock Locks, value 20s. the Goods of Henry Bray , and 62 Groce of Metal Buttons, the Goods of Benjamin Faggot , the 18th of December last. But no Body appearing against them, they were acquitted .

William Lancaster , of Allhallows Lombard-street , was indicted for feloniously stealing a Cloth Riding-Coat, value 1 s. 6 d. the Goods of Richard Thompson , the 16th of this Instant January .

It appear'd by the Evidence, That the Prosecutor was going with Coneys in two Hampers on a Horse, and leading his Horse, the Coat lay between the Hampers, and that the Prisoner snatch'd off the Coat, and was running away with it, but was stopped. The Fact being clearly proved, the Jury found him Guilty to the Value of 10d .

[Transportation. See summary.]

Alexander Russel , of St. Margaret's Westminster , was indicted for assaulting Thomas Godbut , on the Highway, and taking from him a Shoulder of Mutton, a Remnant of Calimanco, some Linen, and other Goods, the Property of Arthur Garret , the 25th of December last.

Thomas Godbut , a Lad of 14 Years of Age, depos'd, That as he was going with the Things mentioned in the Indictment, the Shoulder of Mutton on his Head, and the other Goods in a Bundle under his Arm, in the Little Ambry (or Almonry) a Man came behind him, pushed him against the Steps, snatched the Things from him, and ran away; that he got up, followed him, cry'd out, stop Thief, upon which some Persons stopped him, but as he ran he threw away the Shoulder of Mutton in one place, and the Bundle in another; that when he was apprehended, he desired to be let go, saying, the Boy had all the Things again.

John Harris depos'd, That hearing an out-cry of Murther and stop Thief, he look'd out, and saw the Prisoner running with a Bundle, and he ran to him, and collar'd him, and he saw the Bundle lying between the Man and the Boy; that the Prisoner desired to be let go, saying, he had found the Things, and had given them all again to the Boy.

William Sims depos'd, That about 6 o'Clock at Night on Christmas-Day, he heard a Boy cry out, Thieves and Murther, he ran out, and Harris laid hold of the Prisoner, and he went and got a Constable; that the Prisoner said, why do you hold me, the Boy has got all his Things again, and he saw the Mutton lying in one place, and the Bundle in another.

James Clay depos'd, That he hearing an out cry of Murther, and stop Thief, he ran, and when he came the Boy and Soldier were together, and he taxed him with having taken the Goods from him, and that he assisted John Harris , in carrying him before the Justice. But of this Indictment, the Jury acquitted him.

He was indicted a second Time, of St. Margaret's Westminster , for assaulting Anne Roberts , on the High-way, putting her in Fear, and taking from her a Riding-Hood, value 3 s. the 25th of December last.

Anne Roberts depos'd, That on Christmas-Day at Night, as she was going along the Old Palace-Yard, Westminster , the Prisoner clapt his Hand cross her Eyes, she crying out, ho caught her by the Throat, and had almost strangled her, and violently pull'd off her Riding-Hood, and tore it at the Arm Holes in pulling it off; that coming into the Church-Yard, and meeting two Men, and she complaining that she had been Robbed, they said they had met a Man running, and she was well off it was no worse with her, and so she went Home, she added, that she could not swear to the Prisoner; but hearing a Man had been taken up for a Robbery near that place, and about the same time, and that there was a Ridinghood at the Constable's House, she went thither, and found it to be her Ridinghood.

Thomas Saunders , the Constable, depos'd, That the Ridinghood was given him at the Justice's House, by one Clay, that then the Prisoner would not own that he knew any thing of it; that the Prosecutor coming to his House, he shew'd her the Hood, and she said the Hood was hers.

James Clay depos'd, That when the Prisoner was apprehended, he perceiving something bulky within the Breast of his Coat, not knowing but he might have Arms, examined what it was, and found it was a Ridinghood or Cloak, and that the Prisoner said it was his Wife's; and that as he was going before the Justice, he dropp'd it.

Francis Jones depos'd, That he hearing the out-cry ran, and going before the Justice, saw the Ridinghood hang between the Prisoner's Legs, and it dropp'd down.

Jane Cook depos'd, That the Prisoner had the Cloak in his Bosom, and as he was going before the Justice, he dropp'd it, and it fell between his Legs, and a Boy that follow'd him took it up, and that she was just behind the Boy.

William Sims depos'd, That as he was following the Prisoner to the Justice, he saw the Cloak drop down between the Prisoner's Legs, and he stoop'd and took it up. The Fact being plainly proved, the Jury found him Guilty of the Indictment. Death .

John Trumbold , of St. Martins in the Fields , was indicted for that he being an ill disposed Person, and greedy of wicked Lucre, after the 1st of June 1723, that is to say, on the 24th of November 1730 , the Laws and Statutes of this Realm not esteeming, did knowingly, wickedly, and feloniously send a Letter sign'd Armstrong, to William Gaughton , demanding the Sum of five Guineas, otherwise threatening to burn his House, &c. to the evil Example of others, and contrary to the Peace of our Sovereign Lord the King, and contrary to the Statute in that Case made and provided.

The Prosecutor depos'd, That the Prisoner was his Servant , he keeping a Coffee-House , that he coming down about 8 o'Clock in the Morning, went to a Gentleman that wanted to speak with him, and returning about 10 o'Clock, found the Prisoner reading a Letter, and he gave it into his Hand, saying, Sir, here is a Letter for you; that he reply'd it does belong to you, it is one of the threatening Letters; that he taking the Letter, ask'd him, how he came by it? He said, he found it in the Cellar in the Morning, going for Chips to light a Fire; that he advising with some Gentlemen, they were of Opinion, that it was done by some of his own Family; he took no notice to the Prisoner, but set him to write out a Bill, which he did, and carrying it to his Friends, they were of Opinion, upon comparing the Hands, that they were the same, or at least, that there was a Similitude; upon which he went before a Justice, and caus'd the Prisoner to be apprehended.

The Substance of the Letter was as follows:

Mr. Gaughton, As soon as this Present shall enter your House, you are to place five Guineas in a Gutter, near the Door of your House, by 9 o'Clock this Night, if you do not, you shall have your House burnt by this Day Seven-night ; but if you comply, no harm shall be done; Gaughton comply, or it is at your Peril, we have sworn, &c.

Armstrong.

He added, That there were afterwards two other threatening Letters with bits of Cork in them, conveyed into his Yard, which seem'd to be the same Hand.

The Prisoner deny'd the Fact, or that he knew any thing of the writing or placing the Letter in the Cellar, and gave this reason for not shewing it to his Master in the Morning, immediately after he found it; That he going into the Cellar for Chips, found the Letter with a piece of Bread in it, about an Inch long, and throwing away the Bread, put it into his Pocket without looking into it; that while his Master was gone out, little Company being there, he being at leisure, was reading the News, and finding an Account of some threatening Letters, he pull'd out the Letter he took up in the Cellar, and was reading it when his Master came in, and finding it to be one of them, gave it to him. There being no farther Proof against him, and he calling several Persons to his Reputation, who gave him a very honest Character, the Jury acquitted him.

Jane Corklin , alias Cockland , was indicted as before, for sending a threatening Letter to Mary Lamb , demanding of her the Sum of two Guineas, to be put in the Spout of a certain Pump, threatening otherwise, that she should be burnt in her Bed .

The Prosecutor depos'd, That the Prisoner was her Lodger, and that she coming down Stairs stoop'd, pretending to take up a Letter, and without reading the Superscription, thrust it into her Hand, telling her, it was for her.

The Prisoner deny'd that she knew any thing of the writing or conveying the Letter to that Place, and call'd several Persons who depos'd, That there was an Animosity between her and the Prosecutor, on account of a Gentleman's going away from his Lodging, who had lodg'd with the Prosecutor; she likewise call'd a great many Persons to her Reputation, who gave her a good Character; and there being no farther Proof against her, she was acquitted .

Joseph Bell , of St. James's Clerkenwell , was indicted for assaulting John Goodday , on the the Highway, putting him in Fear, and taking from him 14s. in Money , the 9th of December last.

The Prosecutor depos'd, That the Prisoner knock'd him down near the Two Brewers at Clerkenwell-Green , and took 14 s. from him.

The Prisoner in his Defence produc'd Evidence, that he was at the time when the Prosecutor pretended he was robb'd, at the Sign of the French-Horn, and that he was not out of the House that Night; also that the Prosecutor and one Mrs. Moreland, who also pretended to have been knock'd down at the same time, and robb'd of a Band Box, with Goods in it, to the value of 3 l. had been at Islington, and were both very drunk, and afterwards went to the House where they had been drinking at Islington, to inquire if the Band-Box had been left there; he also call'd several Persons to his Reputation, who gave him a good Character, and especially his Grace the Duke of Leeds; and after a full hearing of the Matter, the Jury acquitted him.

Joseph Eves , and John Etty , of St. Dunstan's Stepney , were indicted for assaulting William Stock , on the Highway, putting him in fear of his Life, and taking from him a Wastecoat, a Woollen Cap, 18 d. in Money, a Handkerchief, and a Peruke , the 14th of November last.

The Prosecutor depos'd, That he was met by four Men, near the Watch-House, at Mile-End , about 7 o'Clock the Day laid in the Indictment, that they met him all a Breast, the tallest went by him, and the shortest cry'd, stand and deliver; that another cry'd, strip him; and another cry'd, shoot him; and they stript off his Cloaths, and took the Money out of his Pocket; that they turn'd him round to the light (the Moon shining) to view his Shirt, but it being torn, they did not like it; that one of them took off his Garter and ty'd his Hands, and afterwards unty'd him, and put on his Coat, then ty'd him again, and bid him go about his Business; that he did believe the Prisoners to be two of the Men by their Stature, &c. but could not swear to their Persons.

John Wills depos'd, That himself was present at the Robbing the Prosecutor, with the two Prisoners, and Richard Smith , who was executed the last Sessions; that himself was the Person who pass'd by the Prosecutor, that Smith clap'd a Pistol to his Breast, that Joseph Eves clap'd another Pistol to him on the other Side, and John Etty took of his Garter, and turned him to see his Shirt, and that he himself took the Coat from Etty, and put it on the Prosecutor, and Etty ty'd his Hands again.

The Prisoners both deny'd the Fact, or that they were acquainted with Wills the Evidence; but he to contradict them, call'd Margaret Lyon , who depos'd, That Wills and Etty came to her House, at the Ship in the Old-Bailey, about two Months or nine Weeks since, at about 9 or 10 o'Clock at Night, and that Wills went out several times, and Etty stay'd with two Women, and she not liking their Company, and the last time Wills went out, not returning, Etty, when he went away, left Word, that when he came again, she should tell him, he had left the Key he knew where; and that Wills and Etty had been at her House three times.

John Wills added, That the first time that he had been concern'd with them, was on the 6th of November, and that they went a Robbing, he resolv'd to quit himself of them, and informed Mary Tutton of it, and that they wanted him to go a Robbing with them, and call'd Mary Tutton , who confirm'd it: He added, That the Prisoners and Richard Smith all met him in Fetter-Lane, and pull'd out a Pistol , saying, he had divulg'd their Secrets, and they would shoot him through the Head if he did not go along with them; that upon this he did go, and after they had Robbed the Prosecutor, he and Etty went to the Old Bailey, and he went out, leaving Etty there, as Margaret Lyon had depos'd, saying, he would come again, but went and got himself made an Evidence; and returning with the Constable to the Ship, Etty was gone, having left Word with Mrs. Lyon as before; that then he went with the Constable to where Etty lodg'd, he got in at the Window, took him in Bed with Mary Wild , and directed the Constable to the Two Brewers in Parke's-Lane , where Joseph Eves was taken.

The Prisoners both deny'd the Fact, Joseph Eves pleaded, That he surrendered himself to the Officer without making any Resistance.

They call'd some Evidences, who depos'd, That Wills had said, he would hang Father, Mother, Brother and Sister, &c. for the sake of Money; and both the Prisoners call'd several Persons to their Reputation.

Etty's Evidences depos'd, That he was a Bargeman, who having come from Reading with the Barge the 19th of October, and sprained his Ankle thereby, prevented his going down with the Barge again; that they had known him many Years, that he had always the Character of an honest Man, and had been intrusted with receiving and paying great Sums of Money, and had always paid what he receiv'd, and made up his Accounts very justly. This Character being given him by many Persons, who had employ'd him, and there being no Evidence that affected the Prisoners as to the Fact, but that of John Wills , the Jury after a full hearing of the Matter, acquitted both the Prisoners.

William Tracey , Margaret Tracey , and James Coster , were indicted for feloniously stealing 5 lb. of Human Hair , the Goods of Philip Malloon , the 5th of December last.

The Prosecutor depos'd, That he having come from Ireland, and being a Stranger, inquiring for a Lodging, was directed to the Prisoner Tracey's, that desiring to have his Bag of Hair laid up safe, it was put into Margaret Lacey 's Trunk, and she gave him the Key of it; that when he went to look for his Hair , he indeed found the Trunk lock'd , the Key of which he himself had kept in his Pocket, but opening it, found the back had been opened, and 5 lb. of his Hair taken out. But it appearing that the Indictment had by Mistake been drawn in the Name of Mallard, instead of Malloon, it was quash'd, and another order'd to be drawn, and the Prisoners to remain in Custody, or to find sufficient Bail for their Appearance the next Sessions .

Anne, Wife of Lee Elkington , of St. Pancras, Soaper-Lane , was indicted for feloniously stealing a Silver Tankard, and a Mug, value 7 l. 10 s. the Goods of John Jones , the 11th of this Instant January .

The Prosecutor depos'd, That the Tankard and Mug were lost , but he could not tell how, and that they were miss'd at two several times, the one being seen in the House, and the other could not be found.

- Elkington, Sister to Lee Elkington, the Prisoner's Husband, depos'd, That the Tankard was in the House on Saturday Night, and miss'd on Monday, but she knew not how, nor which way it went, and that she had not seen the Prisoner for 7 Months.

Moses Hastings depos'd, That he drank out of the Tankard on Saturday Night, and that it was set in the Cup-board in the Kitchin, which is up one Pair of Stairs , and that he saw the Mug on Monday the Afternoon.

There was no Evidence, that either the Prisoner or her Husband had been seen at the Prosecutor's House, at any thing near the time, when the Plate was missing.

Mr. Curtis, the Pawn-Broker depos'd, That the Prisoner brought him the Cup and Tankard, and pawned it, in the Name of Steward , in which Name she had divers times pawned Goods to him, and as often redeem'd them; that having had Dealings with her a long time, and never found any dishonesty by her, he lent her 7 l. 10 s. on them; that afterwards having an Advertisement brought to him, he went and took up the Prisoner, and gave Notice to Mr. Forth, and acquainted him that he had the Plate, and also went in quest of Lee Elkington, the Prisoner's Husband , who went by the Name of Lee Hill .

The Prisoner own'd that she pawned the Plate, and said, that it was brought to her by her Husband , who sent her to pawn it; that she knew not where he had it, but told her it was lent him by a Friend to pawn to raise some Money, and that she gave he r Husband the Money, and she had never seen him since; that her Husband was a Journeyman Hatter, and a bad Husband.

She call'd several credible Evidences to her Reputation, who had known her many Years, and among the rest the Prosecutor himself, with whom she had sometimes liv'd, who all gave her the best of Characters, for Honesty and Industry; and some of them depos'd, That the Prosecutor had said he would do something to have her Transported; that they had heard Hannah Elkington say, they would hang the Prisoner if they could; the Reason of which was, that she had taken up a Whore, with whom her Husband kept Company, and got her sent to Bridewell. After a full hearing of the Matter, the Jury acquitted her.

John Kent , of Alhallows Lombard Street , was indicted for feloniously stealing six Pair of Worsted Stockings, and 12 Pair of Thread Stockings , the Goods of John Bell , the 12th of December last.

Edward Fog depos'd, That the Prisoner was Servant to a Barber in the Neighbourhood, and call'd him out to go to an Alehouse at the Goat and Gate in Gracechurch-Street , and bid him lay six Pair of Worsted Hose, and twelve Pair of Thread Hose at the Cellar Window, which he said was to pay off a Note of Hand for 30 s. which the Prisoner had induced him to give, for his Use, he pretending he wanted Money to pay his Rent; that he ask'd him, where his Master and Mistress would be that Evening? and he told him, they would be out of Town. That Shop being shut, he laid the Stockings in the Cellar-Window, as directed, and about 6 o'Clock the Prisoner came, and reaching his Hand down, took up one Bundle, and said, Tomlinson's Folks saw him, that then he took the other Bundle, and went away; being ask'd, how long the Prisoner had carried on this Practice with him? He said, since July last was twelve Months, and that he had given his Master an account of Goods he had had of him from time to time, value 30l. but he had since remembered more, and that if at any time he was unwilling to furnish him with what he spoke for, he would threaten him to inform his Master of what he had done before.

Mary Edwards depos'd, That she being Servant to Mr. Tomlinson, who liv'd over-against the Prosecutor, did see the Prisoner take the two Bundles of Stockings out at the Cellar-Window, and spoke of it, so that it came to the Prosecutor's Knowledge.

Peter Budge depos'd, That when the Prisoner was brought before the Prosecutor, he said, Mr. Bell, you don't desire my Life, you shall have your Stockings again, and own'd that there were five or six dozen of Hose pawn'd at Mr. Clark's in Goodman's-Fields.

John Grant , a Ticket-Porter, depos'd, That the Prisoner had sent him several times with Letters to Edward Fog , and also had sent a Handkerchief full of Stockings by him, home to his Wife.

Several Pair of Silk Stockings were produc'd in Court, and sworn to be the Prosecutor's, which had been pawn'd by the Prisoner, or his Wife.

The Fact being plainly prov'd, the Jury found the Prisoner guilty of the Indictment; and the Court commanded the Pawn-Broker, to let the Prosecutor see his Books, and return him all his Goods, that the Prisoner, &c. had pawn'd to him.

[Transportation. See summary.]

Thomas Hall , and Nathaniel Pippin , of St. George in the East , were indicted for stealing divers wearing Apparel , the Goods of Daniel Saffery , the 5th of July last.

The Prosecutor depos'd, That his Goods were stolen, and found in the Possession of Anne Sparks ; they were produc'd in Court, and he swore them to be his.

Anne Sparks depos'd, That the Goods were brought to her by both the Prisoners, and she bought them of them.

Hall pleaded, That he had been admitted an Evidence, and therefore ought not to be try'd for this Fact, which was committed before; but it appearing that he had not put this Fact into his Information, his Plea did not avail; and it being plainly prov'd, the Jury found them both guilty to the value of 4 s. 10 d. each .

[Transportation. See summary.]

William Smith , of St. Martins in the Fields , was indicted for feloniously stealing a Coat, a Wig, &c. of Charles Boyle , the 21st of December last.

It appear'd by the Evidence, That the Prosecutor having stripp'd himself to Fight, afterwards went into a Brandy-Shop, to wash and dress himself, and while he was dressing, the Prisoner snatch'd up the Clothes, handed them out to a Woman, and ran away, but being pursued, was taken.

The Prisoner deny'd the Fact, and said, That one Patrick Gill, alias Black Patty , in Newgate, indicted for another Felony, own'd, that himself committed the Fact, and call'd Thomas Johnson to prove it, who depos'd, That he being a Coachman, was standing near the place, and saw Patrick Gill run along with them, and being call'd by a Fare, set them down at the next Door to the House where Gill had pawn'd them, as Gill told him, he seeing him there; but this extraordinary Evidence, not seeming probable, did not avail him, and the Jury found him guilty to the value of 4 s. 10 d .

[Transportation. See summary.]

Robert Bowden , of Stoke Newington , was indicted for feloniously stealing 14 Guineas , the Money of Thomas Hills , the 14th of December last.

It appear'd by the Evidence, That the Prosecutor and Prisoner were Chamber-Fellows, and that the Prisoner took the opportunity to take the Money out of a Box in the Chamber, in the Morning, after the Prosecutor was gone out to his Work; that being pursued, he was taken, and the Money was found under a Bench where the Prisoner sat, he being carried into an Alehouse, when he was apprehended, and the Fact being plainly prov'd, the Jury found him guilty of the Indictment.

[Transportation. See summary.]

Elizabeth Howel , of St. Giles's in the Fields , was indicted for picking the Pocket of James Can , the 8th of this Instant January .

The Prosecutor depos'd, That as he was going along Drury-Lane, the Prisoner ask'd him to make her drink; that they went to a House and drank a Bottle of Ale, and a Quartern of Gin, and the Prisoner led him up Stairs, and she lay down with him on the Bed , and the Candle was put out, and she laid her Hand upon his Thigh, and he being free with her, gave her an Opportunity, and she pick'd his Pocket, and got up, and ran down Stairs; and he asking her, what she went for, she reply'd, she was going to make Water; that he ran down after her, but she got off, but what was stolen from him, was afterwards produced by one Hawkins, a Serjeant in the Guards, who received it, as he said, of the Prisoner's Husband, to whom she had carried it. He being ask'd, if there was no Body in the Room but himself and the Prisoner? reply'd, Yes; his Friend and another Woman, but they were sitting in a Chair, and did never come nigh him.

William Sutton depos'd to the same Purpose as the foregoing Evidence, and that the Prisoner and Prosecutor were upon the Bed together, but the Candle being out, what they did there he could not tell; the Fact being sufficiently prov'd, the Jury found her guilty to the value of 10 d .

[Transportation. See summary.]

Margaret Lamb , alias Niggy , of St. Martins in the Fields , was indicted, for that she, together with Carroty Peg , was indicted for assaulting Noel Lubert , putting him in Fear, and taking from him a Silver Watch, in the Dwelling-House of Sarah Dunbar , the 13th of December last.

The Prosecutor being a Walloon, told his Story in scarce intelligible English, to the Purpose following:

That he going along Windsor-Court, near, or in Drury-Lane , stopp'd to make Water, and Carroty Peg took hold of his Coat, and ask'd him, to go with her to drink; that he said, she had nothing to do with him; but she reply'd, that he should go with her; that he told her, he had but Six-Pence, and he had rather spend it, than have his Coat tore; that she held him by the Coat, and carried him to a House in Windsor-Court, and he not being willing to go in, she forc'd him in, and call'd for a Candle, and a Candle was brought by a little dirty Creature; that she holding him by the Coat, led him up Stairs, he following her, not to have his Coat torn, that she opened the Door, threw him upon the Bed, fell upon him, laid her Left-Hand upon his Breast, that then the Prisoner came up, and he said, you need not be so merry for a six-penny Piece; that the Prisoner pull'd out his Watch, and tore his Fob, and he caught hold of it, and lay upon his Arms, and Carroty Peg got hold of the Watch, and Carroty Peg got it from him, they putting their Hands on his Mouth, that he could not hold it long, and Carroty Peg gave it the Prisoner, and she ran down directly, and Carroty Peg ran down, and ran away, and he ran down after them, and follow'd them where they went in, but they shut the Door against him, and he call'd the Watchmen, and this Gentlewoman (the Prisoner) jump'd out at a Window one Pair of Stairs, and a Chairman said, he caught her in his Arms, and so she got away.

The Prisoner in her Defence deny'd the Fact, and pleaded, That the Prosecutor had drank with her since that time, and never charg'd her with the Watch, which he own'd, but said, it was for fear, because he had heard a Man had had his Eyes pick'd out in that House; after a full hearing of the Matter, the Jury acquitted her.

Thomas Brown , of St. George Hanover-Square , was indicted for sending threatening Letters, one to John Clements , demanding 15 Guineas , and two others to Burrel Smith , demanding in one a Watch, a Ring, and 10 Guineas, and in the second 20 Guineas ; John Clements not appearing, nor any Proof of that Letter being made, he was acquitted .

Burrel Smith depos'd, That his Boy gave him a Letter, which he told him he found in the Bakehouse (he being a Baker ) but he not bringing his Boy, this likewise caus'd a Deficiency in the Evidence, and the Letters which were produc'd in Court (and said by the Prosecutor to be full of dreadful Threatenings, profane and blasphemous Expressions, and direful Imprecations, and even treasonable ones) were not read in Court, because not legally proved.

Burrel Smith depos'd, That one of the Letters directing Money to be left between 9 and 10 o'Clock at Night, at a certain Post, in Turn-Stile-Alley , going out of Drury-Lane into Catharine-Street ; that Money was deposited, and he set Persons to watch to see if any Body came for it.

Adam Griffin depos'd , That a Bag of Cinders was first lest at the Post, but afterwards some Money in a Bag was ty'd to the Post, and that a Woman and a Boy about twelve Years of Age pass'd by, he leading her by the Arm, and as he pass'd by, he clapp'd his Foot upon the Bag, and drew it a little way from the Post, that a Person was sent to follow them, to see where they went, and saw them turn in, where it afterwards appear'd the Prisoner liv'd, but there lost Sight of them; that about a Quarter of an Hour after that, the Prisoner came within a Yard or two of the Post, and looked about, to see if any Body saw him, and afterwards crept to the Post, and there stood looking about him (and as he supposes) espying him, came back again the same way he went; that thereupon he ask'd him, what Business he had at that Post? That thereupon he demanded what Authority he had to ask him; he told him, he would make him give an Account; that then the Prisoner said, he had been at Piss; that then he and others went to the Post with a Lanthern, and there was no wet there, or thereabouts; that then the Prisoner said, that he had an Inflammation in his Bladder, and could not make Water.

These Circumstances were confirm'd by other Evidences.

The Prisoner call'd some Persons to his Reputation, who gave him a good Character; and there not being sufficient Proof of the Prisoner's either writing or sending any of those Letters, the Jury acquitted him.

N. B. At the Bottom of one of those Letters, which was sign'd Devil; there was an Escutcheon drawn with Figures like Devils, for the Supporters, and a Scroll under the Escutcheon, with this Motto, In Hell is all our Trust.

Anne Knowland , of St. Catharines Coleman , was indicted for privately taking from the Person of John Blake , 46 Guineas, a French Pistole, a Silver Watch, value 4l. and a Silver Snuff-Box, value 10 s. the 10th of December last.

The Prosecutor depos'd, That about Nine o'Clock at Night, the Day laid in the Indictment, as he was going along Cornhill, he was met by the Prisoner, who ask'd him to give her a Glass of Wine; that she carried him to a Tavern in Bishopsgate-street , and her Maid followed them in, that they had two or three Pints of Wine, and the Drawer was going to and fro, and she and her Maid were busy about his Breeches, and he began to suspect them, and was for going away, but the Prisoner persuaded him to stay, telling him, she liv'd near him; that he chang'd a Guinea to pay the Reckoning, and had the Change in Silver in his Pocket; that as they were going along from the Tavern, and going Home, he fell down, or she fell'd him down, he could not well tell which, and dirted his Cloaths, and broke his Sword, and that there the Prisoner took 8 or 9 s. out of his Pocket; that he was conducted to the Prisoner's House, and was afterwards turned out of Doors into the Street, and taken up by the Watch, being very much in Liquor, and did believe that they had put something in it to make him so, but he did not miss his Money till he had been some time in the Watch-House.

Jonathan Broadhurst depos'd, That he saw the Prisoner and Prosecutor together, and he was much fuddled, and he followed them down Star-Alley into Mark-Lane, and the Prosecutor fell down, and he heard some Money chink, and saw the Chain of his Watch hanging out of his Breeches, and the lappet of his Shirt was out, that he knock'd at the Door, and a Candle was brought, and he saw her pick up several Pieces of Money, and ask'd her, If she was Robbing the Gentleman? That she reply'd, No, he was her Husband; but he took Notice that she minded more the picking up the Money than to take care of her Husband, who was then lying in the Dirt; that he help'd the Prosecutor up, and assisted in leading him on one side, but he got his Arm loose, and giving a back stroke, struck him on the Chin, he perceiving that they did not care for his Company , left them to themselves; and Mr. Goodyer coming up, he suspecting the Prisoner, told him, that he believ'd the Gentleman was got into ill Hands, and so they agreed to follow them, and see the Event, and saw them go into the Court, and into the Prisoner's House, that they listened a little while , and heard some grumbling and muttering, but no distinct Words, and went and enquired the Character of the House, and finding it not to be very good, they went to the Watch-House at Aldgate, and gave Notice to the Constable.

Susannah Harrison depos'd, That she brought the Candle, saw the Prisoner pick up seven or eight Shillings, and her self help'd the Prosecutor up, and she saw his Watch-Chain hang out of his Breeches at that time.

Mr. Goodyer confirm'd the former Evidence.

John Ward , the Constable, depos'd, That about Eleven o'Clock, the two former Evidences came to the Watch-House, and gave him an Account of what they had seen, and desired him to take care of the House; that he immediately went with some of his Watchmen, and there found the Prosecutor lying, his Legs extended, so that if a Coach had come down Crutched-Fryars , it would have ran over them, his Sword broke under him, his Breeches down, his Back-side on the bare Ground, whether he had fouled himself or not he would not say, but he was in a dismal Condition; that he got him carried to the Watch-House, but he was so dead Drunk, that there was no putting up his Breeches, nor could he stand or speak for two or three Hours; that he order'd 4 Watchmen to guard the House, and not to suffer any Body to go either out or in; that when the Prosecutor came to himself, he said, he was robb'd and undone . That the next Morning one of the Watchmen came, and told him, the Window was open, so he went and secur'd the Prisoner, and her Maid, the Maid being about making a Fire, and the Prisoner above Stairs dressing herself; that he telling her that she was his Prisoner, and must go before the Justice, she said she would not go without a Coach; he then ask'd her, If she had any Money to pay for it? she said, Yes, she had two Guineas, and that was all the Money she had in the World, and pulled out a Pistole, and gave him, saying, there is a Guinea, do you pay for the Coach, and give me the Change; that he looking upon it, said, Madam, this is not a Guinea, it is a Pistole, that the Prosecutor said presently, I had but one Pistole in my Money, and looking upon it, said, this is my Pistole, it is mark'd, and I know it by that to be mine. That she deny'd the having the Prosecutor's Money still, he thereupon got a Coach, lock'd up the Door, and carried her and her Maid to go before the Lord Mayor; but going to the Swan Tavern to wait while they could know that the Lord Mayor was at leisure, there she desired to have some Talk with the Prosecutor, and after that, said, well, if you say so, my Maid shall go with you, and you shall have all your Things; that thereupon he took Coach, went back with the Maid and some other Persons to the House, and she taking up a Case-Knife, went up Stairs, ript the Feather-Bed about a Foot in length, and feeling among the Feathers, pulled out a Clout, in which was 45 Guineas, and then going down into the Cellar, took the Watch and Snuff-Box from out of some Rubbish; after which going back to the Tavern, the Captain upon telling the Money, said, there was 46 Guineas in his Purse, and now there wanted a Guinea, upon which the Prisoner put her Hand in her Pocket, and gave him a Guinea.

Most of these Circumstances were confirmed by other Evidences.

Mary Man depos'd, That she dwelling in Crutched-Fryars , over-against the Prisoner's House, Mr. Broadhurst and Goodyer knock'd and enquired the Character of the Prisoner's House, that she told them it had but an indifferent Character, though she had liv'd there but about three Weeks; that they desired her to observe if any Body went in or out, and she look'd through a Chink, and saw a tall Woman, which she believes to be the Prisoner, and a short Woman, which she takes to be her Maid, lug the Prosecutor out of the Court, and lay him directly over-against their Door, and the tall one took the Gentleman's Head and gave it a knock against the Door, and he cry'd, Damn her for a Bitch; being ask'd, what Colour her Gown was? she said, She took it to be Red and White. Mr. Broadhurst said, when she pick'd up the Gentleman, she had a Blue Gown, and a Scarlet Cloak, and Silver trimming, and Bobs in her Ears, but he believed she might change her Cloaths before she came out with the Prosecutor.

Susan Harrison depos'd, That she took her Gown to be Green; and the Fact being plainly proved so as not to admit of any material Defence, the Jury found her Guilty of Felony only, but not of privately taking from the Person .

[Transportation. See summary.]

William Maynee , of St. Mildred's Poultry , was indicted for unlawfully, wilfully, and feloniously erasing an Indorsement for the Sum of 15 l. upon a Bank Note for the Payment of 50 l. to Mr. Henry South , or Bearer, on Demand; and for erasing an Indorsement for 30 l. upon another Bank Note for the Payment of 50 l. to Mr. Henry Cole , or Bearer, on Demand, contrary to the Form of the Statute, &c . To which Indictments the Prisoner pleaded Guilty . Death .

Rebecca Lynn , alias Eaton , of St. Giles's in the Fields , was indicted for feloniously stealing 15 s. the Money of a Person unknown, the 30th of December last.

A Drawer of a Tavern depos'd, That 2 Men and 2 Women were drinking together, at the Horse-Shoe Tavern in Drury-Lane; that they drank till Morning, and having call'd for the Reckoning, they laid the Money on the Table, and the Prisoner caught it up, and the Gentlemen said, they would not pay the Reckoning twice, that they had given her a Crown, and charg'd her with having taken a Guinea, but would not concern themselves to prosecute her for it.

The Prisoner pleaded, That the Gentlemen were to give her and her Partner 15 s. and they insisted upon having a Guinea, saying, they deserv'd it for having kept them Company all Night; after a full hearing of the Matter, she was acquitted .

She was indicted a second time by the Name of Lucy Eaton , for feloniously stealing a Gold Ring with a Garnet and 2 Sparks , from the Person of , the 14th of December last.

The Prisoner pleaded, That the Prosecutor gave her the Ring as a Pledge till he came again, and brought her some Money as a Gratification for her Conversation, and her having joined Six Pence with him for a Duck they had for their Supper.

The Prosecutor did not deny but that he might have put it into her Hands, and could not tell how he lost it; whereupon the Jury acquitted her.

The Trials being ended, the Court proceeded to give Judgment, as follows:

Receiv'd Sentence of Death 2.

William Maynee and Alexander Russel .

Transportation 39.

Mary Appleton , John Banks , Henry Beby , Robert Bowden , Richard Brand , Thomas Brocket , John Brooks , John Carrol , Sarah Cross , Elizabeth Flemming , Thomas French , Samuel Gauthorn , Edward Goodwin , sen. Hannah Gosteloe , Barbara Gunning , Thomas Hall, Mary Hawes , William Highton , Elizabeth Howel , John Kent , Anne Knowland , William Lancaster , Edward Lee , Mary Melshow , John Nodder , Margaret O Neal , Margaret Oxley , alias Williams, Sarah Page , Nathaniel Pippin , Richard Porter , alias Smith, William Smith , Simon Spencer , Katharine Strange, Sarah Tilbury , Edward Welsh , William Winn , William Winnard , Thomas Wright , and Thomas Young .

Burnt in the Hand 1.

Stephen Gay , former Convict.

To be Whip'd 7.

Sarah Bell , Thomas Compton , Elizabeth Earl , Eleanor Garnet , Anne Neal , John Taylor , and Anne Wilson .

Books Just printed for, and sold by Joseph Marshall , at the Bible in Newgate-Street .

LA Plum Volante. Or the Art of Short-hand improved. Being the most Swift, Regular, and Easy Method of Short-hand writing yet Extant. Composed after Fifty Years Practice and Improvement of the said Art, by the Observation of Methods and intent Study of it. The Fifth Edition, with Aditions of the Terms of the Law, and much amended, By William Mason . Price 2 s. 6 d .

The and Miraculous Conversion from Popery, &c. of Joseph Perry , in Three Parts: 1. The Glory of Divine Grace. 2. The Protection of Divine Providence. 3. In the Goodness of God Manifested. The Second Edition. Written by himself. Price 1 s.

Military Discipline. The Word of Command, and Directions for Exercising the Musket and Bayonet, and the Carbine Pistols and Sword, as they are performed by the Gentlemen of his Majesty's House and Foot Guards. By W. B. Gent. The Second Edition. Price bound 1 s.

The Singing Master's Guide to his Scholars: With the Psalms according to the Old and New Translations; the on one side, and the New on the other. By several Hands, viz. Sternhold and Hopkins, Barton, Patrick, Tate and Brady Milbourne and Sandys. Contriv'd for Common Life: With the Tunes in Two Parts. By Daniel Warner , of Ewelm in Oxfordshire, Singing-Master. Price bound 2s 6 d.

Onania examined and detected : or, the Ignorance, Error, Impertinence, and Contradiction of a Book, call'd Onania, discovered and exposed. Wherein also is consider'd, the Differences and sundry Degrees of Self-Pollution in both Sexes. By Philo-Castitatis. The Second Edition . Price stitch'd 1 s. 6 d.

A further Guide to Parish Clarks: or, any other religiously and devoutly desposed to make Use of these Instructions. Being contriv'd for common Use, by Daniel Warner of Ewlem in Oxfordshire , Singing-Master. Price 6d.

The Art of Spelling, Containing, 1. A, B, C , for Children, consisting of Alphabets and Syllables, with short Rules and Examples of dividing Words. 2. Rules for true Spelling, Reading, and Writing of English, by way of Question and Answer. 3. Two Tables of the most useful Words, whose Spelling or Sense , may be mistaken . Also Christian Names, &c. By J. P. M. A. The fifth Edition, with Additions. Price 9 d.

The Greatness of the Soul, and the Unspeakableness of the Loss thereof; with the Causes of the Losing i. First preached in Pinners-Hall, and now enlarged, and published for good. By John Banyan . The 2d. Edition. Price bound 1 s. Also at the said Shop is to be Sold to all Stationers and School-masters in London and Country, Places for Christmas, Easter and Whitsuntide , &c. by wholesale and retale , curiously engraved on Copper-plates. I. King George the II. 2. Jerusalem . 3. The Temple of Solomon . 4. Geometry. 5. Adam and Eve in the Garden. 6. Haman hanged. 7. Hunting-Piece. 8. Grammar and Writing-School. 9 Christ's Burial. 10 The Lord Mayor's Show. 11. Moses in the Ask of Bull-rushes 12 History of Tobit. 13 Christ's Ascension . 14 The seven Sciences. 15 Dorastis and Fawnia. 16 History of Judith and Holofernis . 17 The four Evangelists. 18 Stool-Ball . 19 Joseph flying into Egypt. 20 Crucifixion; And many others in whole Sheets and half Sheets: Likewise, you may have an Elegiac Po in Commemoration of his late Most Sacred Majesty K. George, engraven, Price 6 d. Also Gospel. Mystery Emblematically illustrated, engraven on a large Copper-plate, Price 6 d.

This Day is publish'd,

CATO Condemn'd: Or, the Case and History of Self-Murder , argu'd and Display'd at large, on the Principles of Reason , Justice, Law, Religion, Fortitude , Love of ourselves and our Country, and Example; A Solution of this Problem, whether a Man of Sense, Goodness, and Courage, ever did , or can, Kill Himself? Particularly calculated to prevent it in the English Nation; Occation'd by a Gentleman of Gray's-Inn Stabbing Himself, in the Year 1730, and other Instances. A Theological Lecture, deliver'd at the Oratory in Lincoln's-Inn-Fields. By J. Henley, M. A. Publish'd at the Request of the Heaters .

A speedy Cure for the ITCH,

At the Crown and Ball in George's-Court in St. John's-Lane, near Hicks's-Hall, is Sold,

A WATER which perfectly cures the ITCH, or Itching Humour in any Part of the Body, having no offensive Scent ; and bath been prov'd by many Years Experience : Price 1 s. 6 d. a Bottle, with Directions. Prepared by A. Downing , Chymist.

At the same Place may be had,

The true Essence or Spirits of SCURVY-GRASS, both Purging and Plain, most Excellent in all Degrees of the Scurvy, at 8d. a Bottle. And the Great Elixir of Life , called DAFFY's ELIXIR, truly prepared from the best Ingredients , very useful in all Families. Price 2 l. 6 d. the Half-pint.

This Day is Published, The Third Edition with Additions , of

A PRACTICAL TREATISE; or, Second Thoughts on the Consequences of the Venereal Disease, in Three Parts , viz. I. On the Simple Gonorrhoea, Gleets , and other Weaknesses, whether from Venereal Embraces, Self-pollution, improperly called, or Natural Imbecillity. II. On the Virulent, Gonorrhoea of Clap . III. On the Venereal, or Grand Pox . Wherein are plainly shew'd the exact Degrees of Difference; with their Signs, Symptoms, and Cures in all Cases, their Beginnings, Progress, and fatal Periods, when neglected or unskilfully managed ; and how their absolves Cure, without Violence or Injury, is completed . With proper and effectual Remedies, in their, prescribed and recommended therein. With some Remarks on that proposterous way of Venery with Machines, &c. and a plain Discovery of the Dangers (tho' little expected) which is attend that vile practice. Also many other Discoveries relating to Infections in both Sexes, not before taken Notice of To which is, a Vindication of the practice of Salivating &c. The Whole, as for the Advantage of Patients as young Practitioners. By JOSEPH CAM M . D. London, Printed for the Author; and sold at his House, in Bow-Church-Yard; also by G. Strahan in Cornhill; E. Midwinter in St. Paul's Church-Yard; C. King in Westminster-Hall; J. Hodges on London-Bridge; and J. Mackenen at the Lamb without Temple-Bar . Price stitch'd 2 s. bound 2 s. 6 d.

Dr. GODFREY's GENERAL CORDIAL,

Universally approved of for the CHOLICK, and all Manner of PAINS in the BOWELS, FLUXES , FEVERS, SMALL-POX, MEASLES, RHEUMATISM , COUGHS, COLDS, and RESTLESNESS in Men, Women, and Children , and particularly for several Ailments incident to Child-bearing Women, and Relief of young Children in breeding their Teeth,

IS Sold in most Cities, Boroughs, and Market-Towns throughout Great-Britain and Ireland , and in most publick Streets in London; remov'd from Hunsdon to Bronborn in Hertfordshire : And for the Conveniency of supplying all those Parts, there are establish'd, by me BENJAMIN GODFREY, these following Wholesale Warehouses, viz.

John Westlake 's in Queen-street, Bristol; William Furly 's, Distiller, at the Black Prince in the Market-place in the City of Norwich.

Peter Leadbeater 's, Distiller, in West-Chester.

Mr. Button's, Bookseller, on the Bridge at Newcastle upon Tyne.

Mr. Brook's, Distiller, on the Blind-Key, Dublin.

As also at my Original Warehouse, facing Angel-Alley in Bishopsgate-street, without Bishopsgate, London.

Any reputable Shopkeeper in any City, Borough, or Market-Town, where this Medicine is not already sold, may be supplied at any of the said Warehouses, with good Allowance.

N. B. The Publick are desired to take Notice, (to prevent being imposed on) that there is an ill-minded Person who counterfeits the said Medicine, and puts the Title of Godfrey's Cordial on the Top of the Bottles, and in his Bills given with the Bottles, he calls it The GENERAL CORDIAL, and does not put the Person's Name who prepares it; but as this Counterfeit Maker is now found out by his own Confession, he and his Sellers will be prosecuted as the Law directs . ONE of the unfair Sellers of the sham Medicine without the Maker's Name who prepares it, is at a Silver-Smith's near Lombard-Street, another is at a Cheesemonger's facing Devonshire-Square in Bishopsgate-Street. But, to prevent the Buyers from being imposed on, I have put my Christian Name on the Top of each Bottle, as in the Margin, which is prepared

By me BENJAMIN GODFREY, M. D.

The Price of each Bottle is 6 d.

John Taylor , Agent for Merchants,

Next Door to the Cutler's, at the End of Castle-Alley, behind the Royal-Exchange, London, a Board of Directions at the Window. Several hundreds of good Countrymen, and Servants of all Trades, are wanted for Jamaica directly, Ships will Sail every Week for Jamaica. Good able Carpenters, Bricklayers, Wheelwrights, Blacksmiths, Sawyers and Coopers, shall have twenty-five Pounds yearly Wages, &c. and all Men Servants that will go to Jamaica, shall be entertained every Day, by John Taylor .

Vivant Rex & Regina.

To Distillers,

Jonathan Pead , Chymist, near the White-Swan Alehouse in New-Street-Square, between Shoe-Lane and Fetter-Lane,

Prepares and Sells a true Calcination of TARTAR, which has given a general Satisfaction, by cleaning Malt-Spirits from all their foetid Flavour, rendering them soft, sweet, and pleasant, fit for any Mixture, improving every Day; if upon Trial, it does not answer, the Money shall be repaid.

N. B. Six Pounds are sufficient for a Pipe, and require but one Distillation. Price Fourteen Pence per Pound.

Just Publish'd, The Third Edition of,

The Spelling Dictionary: Or, A Collection of all the common Words made use of in the English Tongue, carefully compared with the original Languages from whence they are derived and marked as they are to be pronounced. By T. DYCHE. Pr. 1 s. 6 d.

Sold by R. WARE, at the Bible and Sun in Warwick-Lane, at Amen-Corner.

Also may be had at the same Place,

1. The large House Bibles , Folio, with the six Maps of sacred Geography, and a brief Concordance for the more easy finding out of the Places therein contained. By J. Downame, B. D.

Bound in Calf Leather - 1 l. 6 s. per Book.

And with Mr. Sturt's Cutts at 2 l. 5 s. Ditto.

On a fine Paper, with Cuts 3 l. 3 s. Ditto.

Just Publish'd,

2. A Description of 300 Animals, viz. Beasts, Birds, Fishes , Serpents and Insects. With a particular Account of the Whale Fishery. Extracted out of the Authors, and adapted to the Use of all Capacities, especially to allure Children to read. Illustrated with Copper Plates, whereon is curiously engraven, every Beast, Bird, Fish, Serpent and Insect, described in the whole Book. Pr. 2s. 6d.

3. A Treatise of Architecture, with Remarks and Observations by that excellent Master thereof, Sebastian le Clerc, Knight of the Empire, Designer and Engraver of the Cabinet to the late French King, and Member of the Academy of Arts and Sciences. Necessary for young People who would apply to that noble Art. Engraven on 181 Copper Plates. By John Sturt . Translated by Mr. Chambers. Price 15s.

4. Emblems for the Entertainment and Improvement of Youth, containing Hieroglyphical and AEnigmatical Devices relating to all Parts and Stations of Life, together with Explanations and Proverbs in French, Spanish, Italian and Latin, alluding to them, and translated into English. The whole curiously engrav'd on 62 Copper Plates. Pr. 2s. 6d.

5. The compleat Constable, directing Constables , Headboroughs, Tything Men, Church-Wardens, Overseers of the Poor, Surveyors of the Highway, and Scavengers, in the Duty of their Offices, according to the Power allowed them by the Laws. Price 1 s.

6. Tradesman's Guide: Containing a List of all the Stage Coaches, and Carriers; with an Account of all the Fairs and Market-Towns in England. Price 1 s.

To all Masters of Ships, Country-Shopkeepers, &c. this publick Notice is given.

THAT WILLIAM DICEY , in Conjunction with Mr. BENJAMIN OKELL (to whom a Royal Patent is granted) THOMAS COBB , (in Right of ELIZABETH his Wife, late Widow of Mr. CLUER) and ROBERT RAIKES , continue , and jointly carry on the preparing and vending, both Wholesale and Retail, that excellent Medicine call'd, Dr. BATEMAN's PECTORAL DROPS, at their Warehouse against the South Door of Bow Church, at the farther End of the Church-Yard from Cheapside , London; at which Place (and no other in the City of London) Retailers may be furnish'd, with good Allowance for Profit, by directing for or sending to WILLIAM DICEY or THOMAS COBB and Company, at the Warehouse aforesaid.

N. B. These DROPS carry off the most violent Fever, if taken in Time, and is the best of Remedies for those that are afflicted with the present Distempers, viz. Coughs, Colds, intermitting Fevers, &c.

It gives present Ease in the most racking Pains of the Gout and Rheumatism, they have brought away Gravel and Stones almost as big as Horse Beans from divers Persons, and have restored Thousands of poor Infants to their Strength and Liveliness, that have been reduced to meer Skeletons . They never fail giving Ease in the most violent Pains of the Body and Limbs, and all the Ailments of the Breast, and is the best of Medicines in all manner of Consumptions.

Sold at One Shilling per Bottle, in which is contained three Doses. At the same Place you may have Gratis, a Book of Certificates, in which you'll find more Cures than can be produc'd from any one Medicine, since the first Use of Physick.

In Consideration of the daily Disturbance in Churches, by continual Coughing, is recommended, the Original, Inestimable, Angelical Electuary.

BEing a speedy Cure for Coughs, Colds, Asthma's, Prisicks , Wheesings, difficult Breathings, and Shortness of Breath: A Preparation, not only to be had in Esteem from the great Skill of all Medicinal Composition, but also from the Choiceness of its Ingredients, every one of them contributing, by their particular Virtues, to make it the most effectual Medicine in the whole Republick of Physick. It daily overcomes the most grounded Coughs, though of never so long standing, and perfectly cures them in a very little time: 'Tis found to be the most sure Help, and the only Medicine in the World for old Consumptions, Prisicks , Colds, Wheesings, Asthma's, Shortness of Breath, and all other Diseases of the Breast and Lungs, restoring those that are left off by Physicians, remaining in utter Despair under the Burthen of their miserable Lives. It dissolves congealed Phlegm in the Thorax; takes away the tickling in the Aspera Arterea; heals rawness and soreness of the Lungs, Breast, and Stomach, causing easy Expectoration; cures vehement Catarrhs, Distillation of Rheum, and all Fluxes of Humours, falling upon any of the Noble parts. It gives immediate Relief as soon as taken, in the severest of Coughing, and so perfectly frees the Patient at once. This Preparation is much more effectual than any Liquids or Tinctures: A Tincture may give Ease by its Opiate Nature, but this Electuary, by its balsamick and subtile Property, effectually performs the Cure.

It is likewise an effectual Remedy for Whooping-Coughs in Children.

Prepar'd and sold by the Author, a Chymist, at his House the second Door on the Right-hand in Bride-Lane, near Fleet bridge; where any Shopkeepers may be furnish'd therewith, with good Allowance. Also, at Mr. Robotham's, Toyshop, ne xt the Grid-Iron, White-Chapel Bars . At Mr. Brown's, a Book-seller, next the King's Sadlers , Charing-Cross. At the Mitre in Jewin-street. At Mrs. Garaway's , at the South-Gate of the Royal-Exchange . At the White Gallon-pot, a Chandler's-shop, in Bandy-Leg Walk , Southwark; and at Mr. Neal's, Toyshop, over-against the White-Hart Inn in the Borough of Southwark. At One Shilling the Pot, with printed Directions.

Just Publish'd,

The Modern Musick-Master or, The Universal Musician. Containing , I. An Introduction to singing, after so easy a Method, that Persons of the meanest Capacities may (in a short time) learn to Sing (in Tune) any Song that is set to Musick . II. Directions for playing on the Flute , with a Scale for transposing any Piece of Musick to the properest Keys for that Instrument . III. The newest Method for Learners on the German Flute, as improv'd by the greatest Masters of the Age. IV. Instructions upon the Hautboy, in a more familiar Method than any extant. V. The Art of playing on the Violin; with a new Scale, shewing how to stop every flat or sharp Note, exactly in Tune, and where the Shifts of the Hand should be made. VI. The Harpsichord illustrated and improved, wherein is shewn the Italian Manner of Fingering, with Sets of Lessons for Beginners, and those who are already Proficients on that Instrument and the Organ; with Rules for attaining to play a Thorough-Bass. In which is included, A large Collection of Airs, and Lessons, adapted to the several Instruments, extracted from the Works of Mr. Handel, Bononcini, Albinoni, and other eminent Masters. With a brief History of Musick, wherein is related the several Changes, Additions, and Improvements from its Origin to the present Time. To which is added, A Musical Dictionary, explaining such Greek, Latin, Italian and French Words as generally occur in Musick. Curiously adorn'd with Cuts, representing the manner of performing on every Instrument. Finely Engrav'd on above 320 Plates. Engrav'd, Printed, and Sold at the Printing Office, in Bow Church-yard, London. Price 7 s. 6 d. Where may be had Books of Instructions for any single Instrument, far exceeding any others extent. Price 1s. 6d. N. B. You are desir'd to take Notice, That the whole Volume and Books of Instructions for any single Instrument are printed in Royal Octavo , which is different from any other of that kind yet publish'd.

Newly Publish'd, The Fifteenth Edition of,

ONANIA: Or, The Heinous Sin of SELF-POLLUTION, and all its frightful Consequences (in both Sexes) considered, with spiritual and physical Advice to those who have already injured themselves by this abominable Practice.

As also the Sixth Edition of the SUPPLEMENT to it, both of them Revised and Enlarged, and now printed together in one Volume.

And as the several Passages in the former Impressions, that have been charged with being obscure and ambiguous, are in these cleared up and explained, there will be no more Alterations or Additions made to them.

These Editions contain some further and surprizing Instances of the Mischief , by that filthy, sinful Commerce with ones self, which so notoriously practised, as well by the Adult as Youth, Women as Men, Married as Single, to the weak'ning their Generative Faculties, and hindring Procreation, as their Letters of Complaints to the Author, herein inserted, shew.

And, amongst others, a curious Letter from a Lady, with his Answer to it, concerning the Use and Abuse of the Marriage-Bed; together with divers Casuistical and other Letters from both Sexes, of some secret unnatural Effeminacies , necessary to be known both by the married and single of each Sex.

To which is added,

A curious PIECE, translated out of the Latin, from L. S. SCHMLIDER , as it is inserted in the Acta Lipsiensia , concerning the Return of the Seed into the Mass of Blood; well worth the Perusal of Physicians, Surgeons , and Anatomists, and all others of Art and Curiosity.

As also Dr. QUINCY's Translation of Dr. CARR's remarkable Answer to a Letter sent by a Divine, concerning two Nuns of Rome, reported to have changed their Sex.

Likewise Dr. DRAKE's and several other Physicians Opinions of Hermaphrods and Women brought to a Resemblance of them, by the Practice of Self-Pollution, as was the Case of a young Lady of 18, whose well-wrote Letter to the Author, describing and lamenting her Condition, is (in order to detor others) inserted.

A very grave and learned Divine and Physician having perused this Discourse, before it went to the Press, returned it with his Opinion of it in these Words:

' This little Book ought to be read by all ' Sorts of People, of both Sexes, of what ' Age, Degree, Profession, or Condition soever, ' guilty or not guilty of the Sin declaimed ' against in it.

It is now Sold only by J. Isted, Bookseller, ( Mr. Crouch , Bookseller in Pater-noster Row being dead) at the Golden Ball between St. Dunstan's Church and Chancery-Lane, in Fleet-Street. Price stitch'd 3 bound 3 s. 6 d.

Where may be had ,

The SUPPLEMENT by itself. Price stitch'd 1 s. 6 d.

Dr. R. NELSON's most sure, and long experienc'd Anti-Venereal COMPOUND, or Never-failing Electuary, the like of which is not to be met with,

FOR the true Cure of fresh CLAPS, (and all the lurking Relicks or Remains of old Ones,) how virulent or obstinate soever they may be; for it immediately puts a stop to their Progress, and entirely, and as it were, instantly ferrets out and carries off all the filthy poisonous Infection, wears away the various Symptoms, and by Degrees, cleanses off the Running, and heals and strenghthens the Parts sensibly and firmly, without the too common consequences of leaving either Foulness, Gleeting, or Weakness behind.

This it does in a way so regular and gentle, both by Stool and Urine, and with a Does each Time, so small and pleasant (the Quantity but of a Nutmeg) that the nicest Persons are as well surprized as delighted with it, and the more, as it agrees with every ones Constitution, hinders no Business, nor gives the least Suspicion to the nearest Relation.

In a very small space of Time (living temperately ) it rids away a mild CLAP; and those more severe according to their several Degrees of Malignity .

There never was, or can be, in the whole Art of Physick contrived, any Medicine or Method, capable of performing the Cure more certainly, more safely, or more speedily, for it is so compleatly adapted to every Circumstance of the Infection, and so fully answers the several Intentions of curing, that it is impossible it should once fail.

But no more need to be said of it, for it will recommend itself, insomuch that no Person will ever after seek for Cure himself, or advise his Friend to any other Remedy.

Price 5 s. the Tin Pot. Prepared only, by the Doctor as abovesaid, and left (sealed up with Directions ) at Mr. Isted's, a Bookseller, at the Golden Ball between St. Dunstan's Church and Chancery Lane End in Fleet-Street; where it may be had by any Messenger, on asking only for a 5 s. Pot of The COMPOUND.

BEZALEEL CREAKE, (having married the Widow WHITLEDGE,) is Remov'd from the Bible in Jermyn-Street, St. James's, to the Red Bible in Ave-Mary-Lane , Ludgate-Street, near St. Paul's , London; who

SElleth Bibles and Common-Prayers of all Sorts and Sizes, French or English, with Cuts or without, Rul'd or Unrul'd, in all Sorts of Bindings: Also Books of Devotion, and on the Sacrament, Testaments, Psalters, Grammars, and School-Books of all Sorts in Latin or English, Wholesale or Retale, or Reasonable Rates. He likewise sells Books in all Faculties, as History, Divinity, Law, Physick, Poetry, Plays, Musick, Mathematicks, Husbandry, Architecture, &c. And buyeth any Library, or Parcel of Old Books.

N. B. At the same Place may be had all Sorts of Mill-Boards for the Use of Bookbinders, Packers, &c. at 16 s. per 100 Weight.

Books Sold by T. PAYNE in Pater-Noster-Row.

The Adventures of the celebrated Madam de Muci, with Count d'Albert, a noted Lord in France, and Celsus, a late English Nobleman . Written by her Woman. Translated from the French Original, just Publish'd at Amsterdam by John Frederick Bernard . Price 1 s. 6 d.

An Universal History from the earliest Account of Time to the Present. No. 1, 2, 3, to be continued. Price 3 s. 6 d. each Number.

Historia Literaria: Or, An exact and early Account of the most valuable Books published in the several Parts of Europe. No. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, to be continued. Price 1 s. each Number.

The New Political State of Great Britain, including the publick Affairs of Foreign Courts. No. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, to be continued. Price 1 s. 6 d. each Number.

The Art of knowing Women, or the Female Sex dissected, in a faithful Representation of their Virtues and Vices. Price Bound 4 s.

The Brothers, or Treachery punish'd, a Novel. Price Bound 2 s.

The Travels of Cyrus, by the Chevalier Ramsay. French and English. In Two Volumes. Price Bound 6 s.

The Invalidity of Lay-Baptism. Price 1 s.

The speediest and most approved Remedy for Coughs, Colds, Asthmas, Phthisicks , Wheesings and Shortness of Breath, &c.

COX's Original, Inestimable , Angelical Tincture, (Famous throughout Europe and the Plantations) that hath given such infinite Satisfaction to those that have made Use of it; it daily over-comes the most grounded Coughs, tho' of never so long standing, and perfectly cures them in a few Days, as Thousands can testify; 'tis found to be a sure Help, and the only Medicine of the Age for old Consumptions, Phtisicks, Colds, Wheesings, Asthmas, Shortness of Breath, and all other Diseases of the Breast and Lungs, restoring those who are left off by Physicians, remaining in utter Despair under the Burden of their miserable Lives: It cannot be sufficiently commended, and hath now been sold upwards of 30 Years with great Success.

Removed from the Golden-Ball in Nicholas-Lane, Lombard-street,

Prepared and sold Wholesale at the Golden-Ball in Pater-noster Row, near St. Paul's.

Where all Shopkeepers and others may be Furnished with any Quantity, with an Allowance to sell again: Sold also at Ned's Coffee-house, in Birchin-lane; Mr. Coldham, at the Golden-Fleece , at Cherry-Garden Stairs; at Burr's Coffee-house in Harp lane, near Bear-key ; Mrs. Leney's next to Brightman's Coffee-house, Wapping Old Stairs; Mr. Woodrooffe, Haberdasher of Small Wares, at the Golden-Key and Star in the Minories; Mr. Desca, at the Sign of the Spaniard in New-street, St. Martin's-lane; Mr. Bedberry's, a Confectioner, at the Black-Lyon, over-against Hand-Alley, without Bishopsgate; Mr. Taylor's, at the Three Wise Men of Gotham , in Shore-Ditch; Hatton-Garden Coffee -house, Hatton-Garden; at Wharton's Coffee-house in Clare-Market; Mr. Norris, Tallow Chandler, over-against the King's-Bench, Southwark; Mr. Gillender's, over-against White's Chocolate-house, St. James's; Monday's Coffee-house in New Round-Court in the Strand; Mr. West's a Tea-Shop on Garlick-Hill; Mr. Perry, at the Portugal Arms in Pall-Mall; Mr. Robotham's, a Toy-Shop near White-Chapel-Bars ; at Thompson's Coffee-house, Lancaster-Court near St. Martin's Church in the Strand; at Mr. West's a Pastry-Cook within the Gate on London-Bridge; at Mr. Page's, Cheesemonger in Rose-street Newgate-Market; at Mrs. Dalton's at the Green-Ball in Brown-street, Bunhill-fields ; and at most of the Cities and Great Towns in England. Price 1 s. a Bottle, with printed Directions, each Bottle being Sealed down with Black Wax, and the above Coat of Arms.

N. B. It may be taken without Cosinement or Hinderance of Business .