Old Bailey Proceedings Online (www.oldbaileyonline.org, version 6.0, 31 August 2014), December 1730 (17301204).

Old Bailey Proceedings, 4th December 1730.

THE PROCEEDINGS AT THE Sessions of the Peace, and Oyer and Terminer, FOR THE City of LONDON, AND County of MIDDLESEX; ON

Friday the 4th, Saturday the 5th, Monday the 7th, Tuesday the 8th, and Wednesday the 9th of December 1730, in the Fourth Year of His MAJESTY's Reign.

Being the First SESSIONS in the Mayoralty of the Right Honourable HUMPHREY PARSONS , Esq; Lord Mayor of the City of LONDON, in the Year 1730.

No. I. for the said YEAR.

LONDON:

Printed for T. PAYNE, in Pater-noster-Row. M.DCC.XXXI.

(Price Six Pence.)

THE PROCEEDINGS AT THE Sessions of the Peace, and Oyer and Terminer, for the CITY of LONDON; AND ON

The King's Commission of Goal-Delivery of Newgate, held at Justice-Hall in the Old-Bailey; for the CITY of London, and COUNTY of Middlesex.

On Friday, Saturday, Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday, being the 4th, 5th, 7th, 8th, and 9th of December 1730, in the Fourth Year of His MAJESTY's Reign,

BEFORE the Right Honourable HUMPHREY PARSONS , Esq; Lord Mayor of the City of London; the Honourable Mr. Justice Page; the Honourable Mr. Baron Commins ; Mr. Serjeant Raby , Deputy-Recorder of the City of London; and others of His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer for the City of London , and Justices of Goal-Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex .

London Jury.

Richard Freebody ,

Paul Lucas ,

William Jackson ,

John Champion ,

William Peers ,

John Powel ,

William Busby ,

John Sherley ,

Nathaniel Basnet ,

James Pilkington ,

William Clutterbuck ,

Henry Warner .

Middlesex Jury.

Thomas Whitehorn ,

Thomas Woodward ,

Thomas Miller ,

Joseph Smith ,

William Harwood ,

Alexander Horrock ,

Henry Williams ,

John Wright ,

John Woolley ,

Robert Beak ,

Thomas Taylor ,

Thomas Crouch .

Thomas Hudson and Elizabeth Pugh , were indicted for feloniously stealing a Piece of Leaden Pipe , the Goods of , the 24th of October last. The Fact being plainly proved against Thomas Hudson, the Jury found him Guilty to the Value of 10 d. But the Evidence not being sufficient as to Elizabeth Pugh, she was acquitted .

[Transportation. See summary.]

Robert Gibson , was indicted for marrying Mary Waters , his former Wife Mary Chambers being Alive . Both the Marriages being prov'd in Court, the Jury found him Guilty of the Indictment.

[Branding. See summary.]

Mary Tonson , alias Shilback , of St. Sepulchres , was indicted for feloniously stealing a Ridinghood, value 10 s. and other Goods , the Property of Henry Kirkpatrick , the 30th of October last.

The Prosecutor depos'd, That he being in Liquor, was going Home with a Bundle of Things under his Arm, and 3 Women were standing at the End of Sword and Buckler Court , who ask'd him to make them drink, that he refusing , they said, they would treat him; that thereupon he going with them to an Alehouse, there fell asleep, that in the mean time they took the Ridinghood and other Things out of the Bundle, and flunk away with them, and that the Prisoner was one.

The Prosecutor's Wife depos'd, That the Prisoner's Husband came to her, and told her, she might have the Goods again if she would .

The Prisoner in her Defence pleaded, That she being eating some Oysters upon Ludgate Hill, saw the Prosecutor picking up Women, that he was drunk, had been tumbling in the Dirt, and that he ask'd her and Black Nell to go with him to drink a Pint of Drink; that they went to an Alehouse and drank two or three Pints, and he had a fancy to lie with Black Nell, and would go Home with her, but the reckoning being to be paid, he said , he had no Money; that then she ask'd him, what he had in the Bundle? And it was opened before him, and there being a Ridinghood and some Children's Cloaths, they ask'd him, If he had not a Wife? that he reply'd, No, that he had had one, but she was Dead; that he gave Black Nell the Things to pawn to pay the Reckoning, and gave her Money to go Home to lie with her all Night. After a full hearing of the Matter, the Jury acquitted her.

John Pearse , of St. Catherine's-Creed Church , was indicted for feloniously stealing a Pair of Sheets and Pillowbier, value 20 s. the Goods of Malachi Barnes , the 23d of October last.

It appear'd by the Evidence, That the Prisoner came to the Saracen's-Head Inn, near Aldgate , to Lodge, and after he was gone away in the Morning the Sheets were missing. But there not being sufficient Proof of his taking them, he was acquitted .

Thomas Cook , of St. Bartholomew the Great , was indicted for feloniously stealing 5 Linen Mobs, and 3 Handkerchiefs , the Goods of William Blake , the 20th of October last.

The Prosecutor depos'd, That the Prisoner came to his House to drink, and the Linen lying on a Dresser, the Prisoner took an opportunity of taking it; that he had confess'd the Fact, and that he had sold them in Rag-Fair. The Prisoner having nothing to say in his Defence, the Jury found him Guilty .

[Branding. See summary.]

John Smith , of St. James's Clerkenwell , was indicted for feloniously stealing 5 hundred Weight of Lead, value 3 l. the Property of Israel Wilks , jun. the 31st of October last.

It appearing by the Evidence, That the Lead was taken off from the Prosecutor's Compting-House , and being fix'd to the Freehold, the Indictment should have been laid for a Misdemeanour, and not a Felony, the Prisoner was acquitted upon this Indictment ; but the Prosecutor was inform'd by the Court, that he might Indict him again for taking it from the Freehold.

Jane Danbury , of Hammersmith , was indicted for feloniously stealing five Window Curtains, value 25 s . the Goods of Edward Turner , Esq ; the 4th of April last. But the Evidence not being sufficient to prove, that though she pawn'd them, she did it with a felonious Intent, the Jury acquitted her.

Christopher Cornick , of St. Giles's Cripplegate , was indicted, for that he together with Edward Welsh and James Dickson , did feloniously steal a Silver Tankard, value 8 l. the Property of Alice Kilham , the 27th of Oct . last.

Alice Kilham depos'd, That the Tankard was lost from the Golden Hind in Redcross-street .

Jane Bordwell depos'd, That the Prisoner and two other Men came to her Mistress's House, and call'd for a Tankard of Beer; that she drew it, and deliver'd it into the Hand of the Prisoner, and afterwards going up Stairs with the Child, hearing a Noise below, ran down Stairs, and found the Men and Tankard gone, and her Mistress's Son and others ran after them.

Francis Kilham depos'd, That he drew the Prisoner and his Company a second Tankard, and deliver'd it into the Hand of the Prisoner, who took an opportunity of commending the Beer; that he going down in the Cellar to draw a Pot of Drink, in the mean while they ran away with the Tankard, not staying to pay tho Reckoning.

Tho Ansel depos'd, That he hearing a cry of stop Thief, and seeing the Prisoner running, pursued him, and another Man striking up his Heels, he apprehended him.

The Tankard was not found upon the Prisoner, the two others of his Companions having ran a contrary way, got clear off with it; but it appearing very plain that the Prisoner and the others were all of a Gang, and ran all away together, and therefore was equally Guilty with the Person who actually had the Tankard, the Jury found him Guilty to the Value of 39 s.

[Transportation. See summary.]

John Baker , of St. Botolph's Aldgate , was indicted for privately stealing a Silver Thimble, and 18 s. in Money, the Money of Stephen Chiddick , from the Person of Mary Chiddick , the 11th of November last.

Mary Chiddick depos'd, That as she was standing at her Shop-Door in Hounsditch to see a Funeral pass by, between Ten and Eleven o'Clock at Night, the Prisoner came and stood by her, that she spoke to him two or three times to go away, but he would not, that he having cut her Pocket, and got her Money, went away; and she missing her Money, and finding her Pocket cut, the Prisoner being immediately pursued, was apprehended, and the Money found upon him, which was all wrap'd up in a Piece of Linen Bag, which she depos'd to be hers.

The finding the Prosecutor's Money upon the Prisoner was confirm'd by John Darby , the Beadle, and several Watchman; and the Prisoner did not deny the Fact, but said, he did not value it, if he were not tuck'd up, it was only going over the Herring Pond. The Fact being plainly proved, the Jury found him Guilty to the Value of 10 d.

[Transportation. See summary.]

John Denston was indicted for a Misdemeanour, in unlawfully and unjustly ripping off 120 lb. of Lead, from the Freehold of Henry Campion , Esq ; The Fact being plainly prov'd, the Jury found him Guilty of the Indictment.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Hannah Ayres , and Elizabeth Seymour , of St. Sepulchres , were indicted, the former for privately stealing a Silver Watch, value 4 l. a Chain, &c. from the Person of Richard Bryan , the 23d of November last, and the latter for receiving the said Watch, knowing it to be stolen .

The Prosecutor depos'd, That as he was going near the End of Chick-Lane , there were three Women standing in the Street, one of which was the Prisoner Ayres, who ask'd him to give her something to drink, which he refusing to do, they dragged him into a little Alley, and the other two Women, being one on each Side of him, the Prisoner Ayres said, lets feel what you have got, and putting her Hand to his Fob, pulled out his Watch, and made off with it, the other two stopping him; but he got away from them, and pursued her to a House in Chick-Lane, where the other Prisoner shut him out of Doors, till he got the Watch and Constable, and got her sent to the Compter; and that the Prisoner own'd she knew where the Watch was, but he should never have it.

Hannah Ayres pleaded in her Defence, That she was not with the Prosecutor, but having been for a Midwife, was going along, and seeing the Prosecutor with two Women, and halting, and asking, what they were doing with the Man? They swore at her, and damn'd her for a Bitch, what was that to her, and she went away, and the Prosecutor following her, charg'd her with his Watch; she added, that the Prosecutor was drunk, and own'd that he had before lost 3 Guineas and a Piece of Silk on Ludgate-Hill. After a full hearing of the Matter, the Jury acquitted them both.

John Gladmore , of St. Mary le Bow , was indicted for feloniously stealing the Carcass of a Sheep, value 9 s. the Goods of William Street , the 28th of November last.

John Kellet depos'd, That he being hired to carry five Sheep to Newgate-Market for the Prosecutor, having taken three of the Sheep out of the Basket, and left two, when he came again found but one, and pursuing the Prisoner, found him with the Sheep upon him.

The Prisoner did not deny the Fact, but said, he seeing a Man carrying away Sheep, thought he might carry away a Sheep as well as another Man; the Jury found him Guilty of the Indictment.

[Transportation. See summary.]

Martha Cook , of St. George Hanover-Square , was indicted for feloniously stealing a Silver Spoon, value 10 s. the Goods of Joseph Betilly , the 14th of November last. The Fact being plainly prov'd, the Jury found her Guilty to the Value of 10d.

[Transportation. See summary.]

Stephen Gay , of Kensington , was indicted for breaking the House of William Roberts , in the Night-time, and feloniously taking thence a Bag, value 1 d. a Gold Ring, a Moidore, 11 Guineas, and 35 s. in Silver, the Property of John Bonny , the 30th of October last.

William Roberts depos'd, That he having gone with his Ware to Covent-Garden-Market , about Three o'Clock in the Morning, had News brought him about Eight that his House had been broke open; went Home, and found a Pane of Glass had been broken, and though he miss'd nothing of his own out of the House, yet found Bonny's Box (who was his Servant ) broken open, and the Money, &c. gone; and suspecting the Prisoner, who had been employ'd by him as his Servant , had lain in the House, and knew it very well, he caused him to be apprehended.

John Bonny depos'd, His Chest was broke open, and the Money, &c. mentioned in the Indictment was stolen.

Elizabeth Jones depos'd, That she being at Mr. Aldar's, where the Prisoner lodg'd, and hearing of the Robbery, and the Prisoner suspected, told Mr. Aldar, his Landlord, she had seen him that Morning go into the Yard to the Vault, and they going to look in the Vault, in the Cieling of it, where there was a Hole broke, found the Bag of Money, Ring, &c.

Mr. Aldar depos'd, That he hearing the Prisoner who lay over his Head walk about the Room, and go down Stairs about Two o'Clock in the Morning, wondered what was the Matter with him, but thinking no harm, went to Sleep again; but hearing of the Robbery, began to be suspicious of the Prisoner, and did with the former Evidence search in the Vault, and found the Money as the former Evidence had depos'd; that there was in the Bag, a Ring, a Moidore, 10 Guineas, 6 Crown Pieces, and a half Crowns.

The Prosecutor swore to the Bag, to the Ring and Money. The Fact being clearly prov'd as to the Prisoner's having stolen the Money, the Jury found him Guilty of the Felony, but acquitted him of the Burglary .

[Transportation. See summary.]

John Matthews , of St. Peter's Cornhill , was indicted for feloniously stealing a Pair of Silver Spurs, value 20 s. the Goods of Charles Fag , Esq ; also another Pair of Silver Spurs, value 20 s. the Goods of Thomas Thompson , the 24th of November last.

John Chymist depos'd, The Spurs were in his Possession, and stolen out of his Room.

Joh Tripplet depos'd, That the Prisoner came to him with a Pair of Silver Spurs upon his Boots, and chang'd them away for a Pair of Buckles, and pulled another Pair out of his Pocket, offering to sell them, saying, they were his Father's; but he suspecting him, stopped him, and he c onfess'd where he had them.

John Chymist swore to the Spurs, and the Jury found him Guilty to the Value of 10 d.

[Transportation. See summary.]

Katharine Wilcox , of St. Catherine's Creed-Church , was indicted for privately stealing a Guinea and a half, from the Person of William Kirkham , the 3d of November last.

The Prosecutor depos'd, That he having been at Christ-Church on the other side of the Water, coming Home had the Misfortune to fall into the Water, that going to an House, the Landlord lent him dry Clothes, and there he drank hot Liquors to prevent his taking Cold, and had drank more than he usually did, and coming on this side of the Water to the Old Swan, drank 2 or 3 Pints with two Friends, from whom he parted in Cornhill; and as he was making the best of his way Home, he met two Women, and they ask'd him to make them drink, that he reply'd, he had no Business with them; that presently after he met two Women again, but did not know whether they were the same Women or not. That one of the Women came up to him, which was the Prisoner, and he knew not what became of the other; that she clapped hold of him, and he put his Hand in his Pocket, miss'd his Gold, laid hold of the Prisoner, and said he was Robb'd, and call'd the Watch, and carried her to the Watch-house, where she refus'd to be search'd; but she desiring that he himself might be search'd, he consented, and the Watchman search'd him, and found only 18 d. in Silver, and no Gold; that afterwards the Prisoner coming to him, put her Hand in his Coat Pocket, and pull'd out a Guinea, but the half Guinea was still missing.

- Frisby and - Carter, the Watchmen, and Mr. Rimes, the Constable, confirm'd the searching the Prosecutor, and finding no Gold about him; and as to the finding the Guinea, afterwards they could not say she put it there.

There were several Persons call'd to the Prisoner's Reputation, who gave her a good Character; where upon the Jury acquitted her.

John Durant , of St. Dionis Back-Church , was indicted for privately taking Money to the Value of 39 s. from the Person of Robert Stock , the 5th of this Instant December .

The Prosecutor depos'd, That he being selling his Goods in the Fowl Market of Leaden-Hall , the Prisoner and another Person justled him, and the Prisoner kneeling down before him, while the other push'd him, had almost thrown him down; that he felt the Prisoner's Hand at his Pocket, that as soon as he could recover himself, he cry'd out, clap'd hold of him, pursued him, and that he being apprehended would have made the Matter up with him, and sent to an Inn in White-Chappel , where his House stood, for Money, offering his Horse to the Innkeeper, but he refus'd it.

The sending for Money to make up the Matter was confirm'd by other Evidences; and the Jury found him Guilty to the value of 10 d.

[Transportation. See summary.]

Charles Ray , of St. Martin's in the Fields , was indicted for feloniously stealing 5 Silver Watches, value 30 l. in the Dwelling-House of Paul Beauvau , the 29th of October last. And John Winslow was likewise indicted for receiving one of the said Watches, knowing it to be stolen .

The Prosecutor depos'd, He lost his Watches out of his Shop, but he could not tell at what time, nor how they were stolen.

Mary Ray , the Prisoner's Wife, depos'd, That she went to John Winslow 's Cellar, and told him, she had a Favour to ask of him, but he must not divulge it; that she knew a young Woman, that had not been long about the Town, who had pick'd up a Gentleman , and got a Watch, but knew not how to dispose of it; that he agreed to do it, she promising him half a Guinea, and bid her bring the Woman to him the next Morning, that then she said she would tell him the Truth, that she had stolen it her self, that he said then they knew better what to do between themselves; that then she gave him the Watch, and also pulled out another Watch, and said, she would make a present of it to him for pawning the other; that then Winslow gave a Penny to have his Wig powder'd, put on a clean Shirt, and borrow'd a Footman's Shoes and Buckles, and went out to pawn it, and the Watches being advertis'd, he was stopp'd.

It appear'd by other Evidences, that Charles Ray was a Barber, and used to trim the Prosecutor , and by going to him on that Account, found opportunity to steal the Watches; two of the Watches were found in the Prisoner's Lodgings by the Direction of Mary Ray , and the Prisoner Charles Ray could not deny the Fact, whereupon he was found Guilty of the Indictment.

John Winslow deny'd his Knowledge of the Watch being stolen, and called several Persons to his Reputation, who giving him a good Character, he was acquitted .

[Transportation. See summary.]

Anthony Wrigglesworth , of St. Martin's in the Fields , was indicted for feloniously stealing 23 Guineas, 3 Moidores, and other Money, the Property of Susannah Carlton , then Widow, and now the Wife of William Deer , in the House of Anne Combs , the 26th of March last.

Susannah Deer depos'd, That Dwelling in the Country, her Husband and she coming to Town, took Lodgings in the House of Anne Combs , that her Husband falling Sick of the Small Pox, died; upon which she remov'd her Lodgings, being also very ill her self, and sent her Nurse to get her things brought over; that she could not have the Chest in which the Money was, the Prisoner Wriggles-worth having taken it into his Custody, and that he did own he had taken out 29 l. out of the said Chest. That when she demanded her Money to pay her Nurse and Apothecary, that he said he would pay them, and did pay the Apothecary 5 l. and the Nurse upwards of 20 s. and herself two Moidores and a Crown , but refus'd to give her the rest of the Money, because (as she supposes) she being very ill, he expected she would die: And she depos'd she never committed the Money to his keeping.

There were other Evidences to the Prisoner's Acknowledgment of his having taken the Money out of the Chest; and that he said, when it came to a Trial, he would make it appear what Right he had to detain the Money; but it appearing to the Court not to be a Felony, he was acquitted .

John Gage and John Knight , of St. John, Hackney , were indicted for feloniously stealing two Cocks, and six Hens , the Property of James Lever , Esq ; the 23d of November last. The Fact being plainly prov'd, the Jury found them Guilty to the Value of 4 s. 10 d. each.

[Transportation. See summary.]

William Davis , of St. Martin's in the Fields , was indicted for feloniously stealing a Velvet Cap, value 15 s. in the Shop of Charles Henry Beauly , the 23d of October last.

He was likewise indicted a second time for stealing a Hat, value 5 s. from William Holden , the 23d of October last.

Mr. Beauly depos'd, That the Cap was stolen out of the Shop-Window.

Other Evidences depos'd, That seeing him steal some other Things in Cornhill, they apprehended him, and found the Cap and Hat, and other Goods upon him. The Facts being plainly prov'd, the Jury found him Guilty to the Value of 4 s. 10 d. upon each Indictment .

[Transportation. See summary.]

William Hollywell and William Huggins , were indicted, the former for an Assault , with an Intent to commit the detestable Crime of Buggery upon the latter, and he for consenting and submitting to the same .

John Rowden depos'd, That it had been for many Years his Business to show the upper part of the Cathedral of St. Paul's ; that the 19th of November , betwixt 12 and 1 o'Clock, he was going to Dinner, and having heard the old Man's Door shut, he afterwards heard some Persons that seem'd to be coming up softly, he hearken'd, but heard no Voices, that suspecting something more than usual, he look'd through the Light of the Newel Stairs, he being about 30 or 40 Steps from the Prisoners, and did discover the Prisoners in very indecent Postures, whereupon he made haste to them, and surpriz'd them in the following Posture; Huggins's Breeches were down, he stooping very low, so that he could not see his Head, his Shirt was turn'd up on his Back, and his Back-side was bare; Hollywell was standing close by, with his fore Parts to the other's Posteriors, and his Body in Motion, but his fore Parts he could not then see, his Back being towards him, this Evidence: That having thus surpriz'd them, Huggins was busy'd in putting up his Breeches, and Hollywell struggled with him to have got from him, and to have gone off, and tore his Turnover, but he having disengag'd himself, Hollywell got to the Church Door, but could not get out, it being Lock'd, and he having the Key in his Pocket, so he Lock'd them into the Side-Isle , and went to get the Clerk of the Works to go with him to acquaint the Dean with the Matter; that when he came again, Hollywell was got out of the Place where he left him, and could not be found for a considerable time, but at last was found hidden in a Gallery adjoining to the Organ-Loft ; and when they were before the Justice, Hollywell's Shirt was examin'd , and there appear'd plain Tokens of Emission.

The Prisoner Huggins call'd a great many of his Neighbours, who gave him the Character of an industrious Man in his Calling (which was that of a Waterman ) of a loving Husband to his Wife, of a tender Father to his Children, of an honest Man in his Dealings , and of a religious Man that kept to his Church constantly on Sundays, and one of the last Men they should have suspected as to such Practices, and should more readily have credited his Familiarity with Women, he commonly associating himself with Women more than Men, but this Character did not avail him against positive and credible Evidence; and Hollywell not calling one single Evidence to his Character, and the Fact being plainly prov'd, the Jury found them both Guilty of the Indictment.

[Pillory. See summary.]

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

[Hollywell: Fine. See summary.]

Alexander Reytown , of St. George, Hanover Squ are, was indicted for assaulting, ravishing, and carnally knowing Elizabeth Sanderson , Spinster, the 19th of August last, contrary to the Will and Consent of the said Elizabeth.

Elizabeth Sanderson depos'd, That she being a Servant to Mr. Druit, a Baker, in Shepherd's-Street , the Prisoner Lodging in the House, he having been Abroad that Day, came Home about Twelve o'Clock at Night, or near One, that she being in Bed with her young Mistress, and fast asleep, did not hear him knock, but he was let in by her old Mistress, who lay below; that the Captain came up to her Chamber-Door for a Candle, and she getting up, and slipping on her Petticoats, carried a Candle, set it in his Room , that then he bid her shut the Window-Shutters, and afterwards unbuckle his Shoes, and pull off his Stockings, and then took her in his Arms and threw her into a two-arm'd Chair, and put his Hands up her Coats, but she strugling , he could not deal with her there, then he laid her cross the Bed, having put her out of Breath, and stopp'd her Mouth with his Sleeve, and put his Fingers into her Body. She being ask'd, what he did to her more? reply'd, She could not tell what he did to her, but he was within her Body a good while, but how long she could not tell. Being ask'd, what part of him was within her Body? she reply'd, That it was his P - tle, that she felt something come from him, and that it was Moisture. Being ask'd, If she made any Resistance, or call'd out for help? she reply'd, She did as much as she could, but he stopp'd her Breath with his Sleeve, and hurt her Eye very much, and almost put her Eye out, and he sent for his Surgeon to cure her Eye, and he bled her, and plaister'd her, that when he had thus abus'd her, he offer'd her a Guinea to say nothing of it, and said, if he had gotten her with Child he would keep it, and thrust half a Guinea into her Hand, but she would not take it.

The Prisoner deny'd the Fact, and call'd the following Evidences.

Anne Druit depos'd, She let the Captain in, and he went and call'd the Maid to get him a Candle, that she heard her carry him a Candle, and in a few Minutes go into he Room again, and shut her Door, and she heard no Noise, neither struggling, nor calling, which she must have done if there had been any, her Door being open, nor did hear her complain of any ill Usage the next Morning, nor for some considerable time after.

The like was depos'd by Mr. Druit himself.

Mrs. Sophia Druit depos'd, That the Prosecutor and she lay in the Chamber over the Captain's, and that she went and carried him a Candle, and came up again in a few Minutes ; and she never heard her cry out, nor did she make complaint to her of the Captain having used her ill.

There were other Evidences who depos'd, That the Prosecutor complained not of any such Injury till a considerable time after; and being ask'd, if the Captain had offered any such Injury? She reply'd, No; and that afterwards she said, if he did not give her 30 Guineas, she would work him, and lead him a dance; after a full hearing of the Matter, the Jury acquitted him.

John Lewis and John Jones were indicted for a Conspiracy, with design to charge John Battle with the Crime of Sodomy, unless he would give them ten Guineas .

John Battle depos'd, That on the 6th of November he was at the Castle in Mark-Lane , and Jones came to his House, and ask'd for him, his Apprentice offering to go with him to show him where he was, but Jones said he would go himself; that he came to the Castle, and he was called out from his Company, that he ask'd him his Business, and he then ask'd him, if he knew one John Lewis , a Bridewell Boy? that he reply'd, He did not. That he reply'd, he knows you, he is hard by, if you will have him call'd; that they going into a Room, in came Lewis, leaning upon a Broomstick ; that Jones said he was very ill, he had got a Fistula, and he had carried him to a Friend of his, a Surgeon, and he said it came by Buggery, and he says you have been concern'd with him, and that the Surgeon would have 10 Guineas, and he must have 6 Guineas now; that he reply'd, He had not so much Money, that Jones reply'd then, He must borrow it; that he put them off till the next Day, and thereupon Jones told him, he must give Lewis something to bear his Expences, for he himself should not come, being obliged to go to Woolwich, that he let him have half a Guinea; that the next Morning he went to the Globe Tavern at Stocks-Market, (being in much Confusion of Mind to have such a Crime charg'd upon him, and not willing any such thing should come to the Ears of his Neighbours, to blast his Reputation, they threatening otherwise to expose him, and his Attorney being out of the way,) and there he found both the Prisoners, and he gave them five Guineas and a half more, having forgot that Jones said be must make it up 10 Guineas, and that would cure him, and he should hear no more of them; that being unwilling to be expos'd, and to be further troubled with them, he went Home and fetch'd four Guineas more, and ask'd for a Receipt, and Jones wrote one, and Lewis signed it, and Jones witnessed it, that this was on Saturday the 7th of November; and on Monday the 9th, Jones came to him again, and said, he must needs drink a Glass of Wine with him, and they being at the Tavern, he told him, Lewis had been Gaming, and lost all the Money, and that his Mother was a turbulent Woman, and she would come to his House and make a Riot, unless he would give him 20 Guineas, and if he would, he would go away to Holland, and never trouble him more. That then he appointed to meet them at the Sun Tavern by the Monument the next Day, and when he came, Jones was there, and he asking for Lewis, Jones said, he was such a shabby Dog, he was asham'd to bring him thither. That then they went to the Bell Tavern in Nicholas-Lane, and Jones fetch'd Lewis, that then they propos'd to have 20 Guineas as before, and Lewis said he would go to Holland , and trouble him no more, and Jones said he would put him on Board of Ship, and see him part of the way; he making some Hesitation, Jones said, if he did not, his Mother would come and be very riotous , and Lewis could be a Witness for the King; that then he told them he had not so much Money, that they must stay while Thursday, and that Jones said he had a Friend that should write a general Release. Upon this he promised to pay the Money on Saturday Morning, that he went and acquainted his Attorney, and got a Warrant for apprehending them of Sir Richard Brocas ; that he went to the Tavern at the time appointed, and found both the Prisoners there, and Lewis ask'd him, If he had brought the Money? he said, No; but he had a Friend below that would lend it him, and stepping down Stairs, call'd up the Constable and Attorney; and the Constable being charg'd with them, Jones said, Mr. Battle, Lord, what have you done, I did not think you would have serv'd me so, and they both fell a trembling , and begging, and praying not to be carried before a Justice, and that they might not be prosecuted, and said, they would do any thing, or give any thing, owned that they never knew any harm by him (Mr. Battle) begged the Attorney to intercede for them, and when in the Coach begg'd and pray'd for Mercy, and before Sir Richard Brocas own'd, that they had never seen him (Mr. Battle) before in their Lives, and that they did it to get Money.

This Confession was confirm'd by Mr. Harrison, and the Constable; and the Fact being plainly prov'd, the Jury found them Guilty of the Indictment.

[Pillory. See summary.]

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

[Provide sureties for good behaviour. See summary.]

John Russel , of Ealing , was indicted, for that being an ill-disposed Person, and greedy of wicked Lucre, after the first Day of June, in the Year 1723, that is to say, on the 28th of November 1730 , the Laws and Statutes of this Realm not esteeming, he did knowingly, unlawfully, wickedly, and feloniously send a Letter, without a Name, to Edward Leicester , by the Name of James Leicester , demanding the Sum of 5 l. to the evil Example of others, and against the Peace of our Sovereign Lord the King, and contrary to the Statutes in that Case made and provided .

He was likewise indicted a second time for sending a Letter to Thomas Stump , demanding the Sum of two Guineas , on the 28th of November .

He was likewise indicted a third time for sending a Letter to James Barret , demanding the Sum of 50 l. the said 28th of November .

Edward Licester depos'd, That finding a Letter at his Door about Eight o'Clock in the Morning, the Letter being as follows,

To James Leicester , Malster, at Brandford , You miserly Son of a Bitch, as soon as you get this , lay 5 l. at the Back-door of the Sign of the Anchor, and take Care to set no Watch; if you comply we will give no further Trouble, if not, by God, we will destroy you.

Upon reading it, he went and shew'd it to the Justice of the Peace, that suspecting the Prisoner, he being seen lurking about the Town, and being apprehended, and search'd, a Piece of a Letter was found about him, and there seem'd to be some Similitude in the Hands, but he said this was a Letter of his Wife's; that he owned himself to be an Irish Roman Catholick , was look'd upon as a Stroller, and was seen in the Town about Nine o'Clock that Morning.

Thomas Stump depos'd, That he found his Letter just within his Door, as he suppos'd, thrust in between a Vacancy of the upper and under-part of his Shop-door. The Substance of the Letter is as follows:

You are hereby order'd to leave two Guineas under the right Post of - If not, by God, we will destroy your House, and all your Family; if you wait twelve Months you shall not take us.

James Barret 's Letter was thus:

I desire you will to morrow Morning put 50 l. at the Back-door of your Meeting-House, otherwise we will destroy you and your Family; and, by God, if the Persons who have these Notes sent to them, and do not comply, we will lay the Town in Ashes . Saturday Night.

There being no Proof against the Prisoner, but that he was seen lurking about the Town that Morning, and not giving any good Account of himself; he was ask'd several Questions by the Court, which he answer'd as follows,

That he liv'd at Chelsea, and had liv'd there 13 Months, and that he came from France; being ask'd as to his way of living, he reply'd, he had none, that he was uncapable of working, by Reason of a Swelling in his Neck, that he was supported by his Wife, (who, as Justice Venner, who examin'd her , depos'd, said she was no otherwise his Wife than before God,) that he set out from Chelsea on Saturday about One o'Clock, designing to go to one Mr. Williams, a Romish Priest, at the Lord Shrewsbury's , but it being dirty, lay at Hammersmith on Saturday Night.

It was likewise depos'd, That upon Examination, he own'd, that he had formerly kill'd a Man at Lisle, and therefore went to France, and that his true Name was not Russel, but Kelly. He deny'd his having any Knowledge of the Letters, and there not being sufficient Evidence that he had, he was acquitted .

Roger Johnson , of St. Dunstans in the West , was indicted for assaulting Mordecai Pitts , on the King's High-way, putting him in Fear and Danger of his Life, and taking from him, a Periwig, value 30 s. and a Hat, Value 10 s. the 10th of November last.

Mordecai Pitts depos'd, That on the 10th of November, Mr. Muggleston came to ask him to go with him to carry the Prisoner before a Judge, that they went to the King's-Head, at the Corner of Chancery-Lane , and waited there till they were inform'd the Lord Chief Justice Raymond was to be spoke with, that when they came out of the House, having gone a little way, the Prisoner with his Left-hand catch'd off his Wig and Hat, and with his Right, threw a handful of Snuff in his Face, ran cross the way with his Hat and Wig, and got away, but was afterwards taken, and that he himself was very much beaten and abus'd.

Nathaniel Pool depos'd, That he is Yeoman to Mr. Pitts, a Serjeant of the Poultry-Compter, that they went to carry the Prisoner before the Lord Chief Justice Raymond; that they went in a Coach to Chancery-Lane, to the King's-Head Tavern, and drank a Pint of Wine, and being inform'd his Lordship was ready, were going to his Chambers, and when they came near Chancery-Lane, they saw four Men with Clubs, and the Prisoner with his Left-hand catch'd off Mr. Pitt's Hat and Wig, and with his Right threw Snuff in his Face, and ran away; and that he was knock'd down.

Benjamin Pulford depos'd, That he was walking along about Six o-Clock, and hearing an out-cry of stop Street-Robbers, he seeing the Prisoner running, stopp'd him, and he said, for God-sake, don't stop me, I am a dead Man; and that soon after Mr. Pitts came up, and charg'd him.

The Prisoner desir'd the Prosecutor might be ask'd, If he had not seen the Wig, and did not make a Demand of it? to which he answer'd, No.

The Prisoner call'd the following Evidence.

Bartholomew Powel depos'd, That he heard a Riot and Tumult, and clashing of Sticks, and a Woman cry out Murther, and his Boy going out kick'd a Wig before him, that the scuffle began at the King's-Head Back-Door, and that he heard some Body say, D - n him, he's gone, he's gone; that he carried the Wig to the King's-Head Tavern, and an Officer that was there, said, it is my Partner's Wig, give it me. It appearing by the Evidence to be rather a Riot in order to an Escape than a Robbery, the Prisoner was acquitted .

Frances Clinch , of St. Stephen's Wallbrook , was indicted for feloniously stealing one Guinea, and 13 s. the Money of Samuel Harrison , the 20th of October last. But there not being sufficient Proof against her, she was acquitted .

George William Monguibert was indicted for forging a promissory Note for 60 l. in the Name of William Sparks , payable to himself or Order, for Value receiv'd, and afterwards for tearing the same ; but the Note never having been executed, nor the Forgery prov'd, he was acquitted .

Mary Hawkins , of St. Giles's in the Fields , was indicted for feloniously stealing the Goods of Elizabeth Morris , the 28th of November last. The Fact being plainly prov'd, the Jury found her Guilty to the Value of 10 d.

[Transportation. See summary.]

William Isaacson , and Arthur Moor , of St. Paul's Shadwell , were indicted for breaking the House of Joseph Watson , and stealing Goods, value 9 s . 6 d. And Jane Molloon , of White-Chapel , for receiving them, knowing them to be stolen ; the Fact being prov'd against the two former Prisoners, as to the Felony, but not as to the Burglary; the Jury found them guilty of the Felony only, each to the value of 4 s. 10 d. but it not being made out that the latter knew the Goods to have been stolen, she was acquitted .

[Transportation. See summary.]

Daniel Wood , of St. John the Evangelist , was indicted for feloniously stealing the Goods of John Churchill , Esq ; the 30th of October last; which Fact being plainly prov'd, the Jury found him guilty, to the value of 4 s. 10 d.

[Transportation. See summary.]

John Russel , of St. Martins in the Fields , was indicted for feloniously stealing 94 Guineas, in the Dwelling-House of William and Thomas Earle , the 1st of November ; but there not being sufficient Evidence against the Prisoner, he was acquitted .

Magdelen Bucknel , of St. Botolph's Bishopsgate , was indicted for picking the Pocket of Edward Hawkins , the 27th of October last; the Fact being plainly prov'd, the Jury found her guilty to the value of 10 d.

[Transportation. See summary.]

Joseph Chandler , of Alhallow's the Great , was indicted for feloniously stealing the Money of Richard Hammond , the 20th of October last; which Fact being prov'd upon the Prisoner, the Jury found him guilty to the value of 10 d.

[Whipping. See summary.]

Joseph Bigrave , and Mary Kilpatrick , of St. Botolph's Bishopsgate , were indicted, the former for feloniously stealing the Goods of Sarah Ford , and the latter for receiving them, knowing them to be stolen ; the Fact being plainly prov'd, the Jury found them both guilty to the value of 10 d. each.

[Transportation. See summary.]

Anne Rowe , of St. Sepulchres , was indicted for feloniously stealing the Goods of John Nevil , the 3d of November last; the Fact being plainly prov'd, the Jury found her guilty to the value of 10 d.

[Transportation. See summary.]

Mary Macartney , of St. Sepulchres , was indicted for picking the Pocket of John Fletcher , the 3d of October last; the Fact being plainly prov'd, the Jury found her guilty to the value of 10 d.

[Transportation. See summary.]

Elizabeth Westmore , of St. Giles's Cripplegate , was indicted for feloniously stealing the Goods of Francis Wagstaff : the Fact being prov'd, the Jury found her guilty to the value of 10 d.

[Transportation. See summary.]

Jane Taylor , of St. Botolph's Aldgate , was indicted for feloniously stealing the Goods of William Sansum , the 19th of November last; the Fact being plainly prov'd, the Jury found her guilty to the value of 10 d.

[Transportation. See summary.]

Ann North was indicted for feloniously stealing the Goods of James Mawson , the 14th of November last; but no Body appearing against her, she was acquitted .

Richard Gardner , of St. Giles's Cripplegate , was indicted for feloniously stealing the Goods of Elizabeth Strange , the 3d of this Instant December ; but there not being sufficient Evidence against him, he was acquitted .

Maudlin Aubour , of St. Leonard Shoreditch , was indicted for feloniously stealing 70 Guineas , the Property of Jane Borroughs , the 1st of November last; but there not being sufficient Proof against the Prisoner, she was acquitted .

Elizabeth Lambert , of St. Andrew's Holbourn , was indicted for stealing the Goods of Anne Whitehead , the 8th of November last; the Fact being plainly prov'd, the Jury found her guilty to the value of 10 d.

[Transportation. See summary.]

Jane Conner , of St. Martin's in the Fields , was indicted for stealing the Goods of James Ashley , the 21st of October last. The Fact being plainly proved, the Jury found her Guilty to the Value of 10 d.

[Transportation. See summary.]

John Wyatt and Daniel Harris , of St. James's Westminster , were indicted, the former for feloniously stealing the Goods of John Forster , and the latter for receiving them, knowing them to be stolen ; to this Indictment the former pleaded Guilty , but there not being sufficient Proof against the latter, he was acquitted .

The Prisoners were likewise indicted a second time, the former for stealing the Goods of Michael Mitchel , the 28th of November last, and the latter for receiving them, knowing them to be stolen ; the Fact being prov'd against Wyat, the Jury found him Guilty to the Value of 4 s. 10 d. but the Evidence not being sufficient against the latter, he was acquitted .

[Transportation. See summary.]

Mary Benson , of St. Giles's in the Fields , was indicted for feloniously stealing a Guinea , the Money of Elizabeth Davis , the 29th of November last; but for want of sufficient Proof, she was acquitted .

Mary Parsons and Honour Davis , of St. Clement's Danes , were indicted for feloniously stealing the Goods of John Faber , the 28th of August last, and the latter an Accessory after the Fact . It appear'd by the Evidence, that the Prisoner being Servant to the Prosecutor, stole the Goods, and the latter deluded her to do the Fact to give her Money to tell her Fortune, promising her great Things. The Fact being plainly prov'd, the Jury found them Guilty to the Value of 4 s. 10 d. each.

[Transportation. See summary.]

Alice Evans was indicted for stealing the Goods and Money of Elizabeth Rag , on the 27th of September last. The Fact being plainly prov'd, the Jury found her Guilty to the Value of 39 s.

[Transportation. See summary.]

Anne Harris was indicted for stealing the Goods of Thomas Fletcher , the 6th of November last. The Fact being plainly prov'd, the Jury found her Guilty to the Value of 4 s. 10 d.

[Transportation. See summary.]

Margaret Lewis was indicted for feloniously stealing the Goods of James Hornby , the 31st of August last.

She was likewise indicted a second time for stealing the Goods of Robert Thomas ; both which Facts being plainly prov'd , the Jury found her Guilty to the Value of 10 d. upon each Indictment.

[Transportation. See summary.]

Mary Smith , of St. Ann's Westminster , was indicted for privately stealing 5 s. in Money, from the Person of John de la Port , the 23d of October last.

The Prosecutor depos'd, That he being near Leicester-House , and going pretty fast, because it Rain'd, the Prisoner catch'd hold of his Coat as he pass'd by, and ask'd him to give her a Pint of Wine, which he refusing, she clap'd her Hand to his Pocket, and got out a Crown-piece.

The Prisoner in her Defence pleaded, That he gave her the Crown to oblige him, which she did, though he desir'd to have it done in a beastly manner , and afterwards demanded the Crown again, saying, Six-pence was enough for such an ugly Bitch as she; but this Plea not availing her, the Jury found her Guilty of the Indictment. Death .

William Mansel , of St. Mary le Bone , was indicted for feloniously stealing a Gelding, value 3 l. the Property of Anne Hartshorn , Widow , the 20th of October last. The Fact being plainly proved, the Jury found him Guilty of the Indictment. Death .

Sarah Hilliard , of St. James's Clerkenwell , was indicted for feloniously stealing half a Guinea, &c. in the Dwelling-House of Thomas Curtis , the 27th of October last; which Fact being plainly proved, the Jury found her Guilty to the Value of 4 s. 10 d.

[Transportation. See summary.]

Mary Johnson , of St. Martin's in the Fields , was indicted for feloniously stealing the Goods of Elizabeth Yates , and also two Bank Notes, for 200 l. each, the Property of the said Elizabeth Yates , the 23d of November last.

It appear'd by the Evidence, That the Prisoner (a young Girl about 10 Years of Age) liv'd with her Mother, in a Cellar, belonging to the Prosecutor's House, and that the Prosecutor being abroad, she took the Opportunity to take the Goods, which were stopp'd, she going to pawn them; the Fact being plainly prov'd, the Jury found her guilty to the value of 10 d. As to the Bank Notes, upon Examination, she own'd, that she had burnt them; but the Evidence of the Prosecutor not answering to the Indictment, as to the Notes, she was acquitted of that part of the Indictment .

[Transportation. See summary.]

John Butcher , of St. Giles's in the Fields , was indicted for assaulting John Caine , in an open Place near the High-way, putting him in Fear, and feloniously taking from him a Handkerchief, a pair of Silver Buttons, and a Waistcoat , the 2d of November last; but the Fact not being fully prov'd upon him, he was acquitted .

Matth.ew Goodwin , of St. Giles's Cripplegate , was indicted for feloniously stealing a Tar-pawlin , the Property of Mary Whitehead , the 13th of November last; the Fact being fully prov'd, the Jury found him guilty to the value of 4 s. 10 d.

[Transportation. See summary.]

Edward Mecchum , of St. Sepulchres , was indicted for privately stealing 5 Cheeses, in the Shop of Thomas Hooker , the 4th of November ; the Fact being plainly prov'd, the Jury found him guilty to the value of 10 d.

[Transportation. See summary.]

Christopher Husband , of St. Mary White-Chapel , was indicted for taking a Wire-show-Grate from the Shop-window of David Marshal , the 10th of November last.

The Evidence depos'd, That they apprehended the Prisoner carrying away the Grate. The Fact being prov'd, the Jury found him Guilty to the Value of 4 s. 10 d.

[Transportation. See summary.]

Anne Anderson and Mary Tomlin , of St. Giles's Cripplegate , were indicted for stealing a Shirt, value 1 s. the Goods of William Fuller , the 11th of November last. The Fact being plainly proved against Anderson, the Jury found her Guilty to the Value of 10 d. but it being not proved against Tomlin, she was acquitted .

[Whipping. See summary.]

Isaiah Marshal , of Christ-Church , was indicted for stealing three Shoes , the Goods of John Ingleberd , the 8th of November last. The Fact being prov'd, the Jury found him Guilty to the Value of 10 d.

[Transportation. See summary.]

Mary Cuppleditch , of St. Clement's Danes , was indicted for feloniously stealing the Goods of Thomas Dummer , the 12th of November last. The Fact being prov'd, the Jury found her Guilty to the Value of 10 d.

[Transportation. See summary.]

Alice Grace was indicted for stealing Goods to the Value of 3 s. the Property of Joseph Hollyman ; but there not being sufficient Proof against her, she was acquitted .

Richard Feuterel , of Pancras , was indicted for stealing the Fowls of Joseph Wright , the 7th of November last. The Fact being plainly proved, he was found Guilty to the Value of 10 d.

[Transportation. See summary.]

Joseph Hillary , of St. James's Westminster , was indicted for picking the Pocket of Thomas Batt , the 26th of November last. The Fact being prov'd, the Jury found him Guilty to the Value of 10 d.

[Transportation. See summary.]

Francis Lewis and William Price , of St. Giles's in the Fields , were indicted for feloniously stealing a Show-Glass with Cutlery-Ware , the Goods of Patrick Forster , the 30th of November last. The Fact being plainly proved, the Jury found them both Guilty to the Value of 4 s. 10 d. each.

[Transportation. See summary.]

Edward Paul and Christopher Husband , of St. Mary White-Chapel , were indicted for feloniously stealing a Show-Grate , the Goods of Peter Riding , the 28th of October last. The Fact being proved upon Husband, he was found Guilty to the Value of 4 s. 10 d. but Paul for want of Evidence against him, was acquitted .

[Transportation. See summary.]

Rawbone William , of St. George, Hanover-Square , was indicted for feloniously stealing Cocks and Hens , the Property of Charles Lachston ; but no Body appearing against him, he was acquitted .

James Peck and Thomas Wilson , of St. Martin's in the Fields , were indicted for stealing Goods, in the Shop of Thomas England , the 27th of October last. The Fact being plainly proved, the Jury found them both Guilty to the Value of 4 s. 10 d. each.

[Transportation. See summary.]

Samuel Dexter and Mary Thorp , of St. James's Clerkenwell , were indicted for stealing the Goods of James Smart , the 3d of October last; but for want of sufficient Evidence, they were acquitted .

John Austin , of St. Giles's in the Fields , was indicted for receiving a Silver Watch, the Property of Gabriel Verdiere , knowing it to be stolen , the 30th of August last; but there not being sufficient Proof against him, he was acquitted .

Martha Harris was indicted for wilful and corrupt Perjury ; but no Body appearing against her, she was acquitted .

Mary Sullivan , alias Stanley, alias Wall , and Isabella Gwyn , alias Eaton , of St. James's Westminster , were indicted for privately stealing 2 Guineas, from the Person of John Richards , the 6th of November last.

John Richards depos'd, That about 7 or 8 o'Clock at Night, he went to the Crown Tavern in Sherard-street , by Golden-Square, that he went into the Kitchin and sat down, and drank several Pints of Wine, five or six at the most; that after he was there, he counted his Money, laying it on the Table, and then put it up in his Pocket, that he had two Guineas, and 3 s. 6 d. in Silver; that the Prisoners being present, came and sat down by him, sometimes one, and sometimes another, alternately, and drank with him; that he never stirr'd from the Place where he sat, and that when he call'd for the Reckoning, they charg'd him 14 Pints, tho' he is certain he had not above six at the most, that feeling for his Money, his Guineas were missing; that while they were contending about the Matter, a Guinea was thrown under the Table.

John Neal depos'd, That he passing by the Prisoners House, heard a Bell-Harp there, and looking in, espy'd his Friend sitting, and knowing that he used to carry Money about him, and thinking him in danger of loosing it there, he went in to p ersuade him to go home; that feeling in his Pocket for Money to pay his Reckoning, he miss'd his Money, saying, he had two Guineas when he came in; that the Prisoners said, he (the Prosecutor) had sunk the Guineas to bilk them of the Reckoning; that there was at length a Guinea thrown under the Table, as he believes, by Mrs. Eaton, which he heard fall under or near Sullivan, which she took up and gave to Eaton, saying, here's a Guinea, Madam, take your Reckoning out of it, which, according as she said, was 14 Shillings, but to the Prosecutor said it was but 5 Shillings; but the Prosecutor not being able to swear positively which of them took the Money from him, they were both acquitted .

Abraham White , Francis Saunders , John Mines , alias Minshum , alias Mitchel , of St. Giles's in the Fields , were indicted for assaulting John Ross on the Highway, putting him in Fear, and taking from him a Hat, value 5 s. and four Pence Half-penny in Money , the 3d of November last.

John Ross depos'd, That he was set upon by the Prisoners in Bloomsbury-Square , that there were five of them in Company; that Mines held a Pistol to him, Saunders riffl'd him , but as to White he could say nothing; that he making Complaint next Door to where he liv'd, he was told, that the Persons who had Robb'd him would be there by and bye, that they had sold his Hat, and were to come to drink the Money out in Gin; that they coming , he was call'd down, and knew them, but they shuffled him and got away.

Rowland Jones depos'd, That the Prisoners, himself, and James Gray committed the Robbery, that Minshum held the Pistol to the Prosecutor, that Saunders riffled him, and took his Hat, and that having sold the Hat, and going to the Brandy-shop, the Prosecutor came in and taxed them with it.

Caleb Jencock depos'd, That he having taken Minshum, he confess'd he had Robb'd the Prosecutor .

John Debel depos'd , That he taxing Rowland Jones with having Knowledge of this Robbery, he offer'd to make himself an Evidence, and gave him Notice to apprehend Saunders ; and that Minshum own'd, that the Pistol produc'd in Court was that which he presented to the Prosecutor's Breast .

The Prisoners having little to say in their Defence, and the Fact being plainly proved, the Jury found them all three Guilty of the Indictment. Death .

Francis Saunders , Robert Tylor , and Constance Buckle , of St. Giles's in the Fields , were indicted for assaulting Richard Smith , on the Highway, putting him in Fear, and taking from him a Hat, value 5 s. the 2d of November last.

The Prosecutor depos'd, That as he was going along the Street about 8 o'Clock at Night, he was knock'd down, and his Hat was taken away.

Rowland Jones depos'd, That himself and the Prisoners having been drinking at Mr. Griffith's Shop in Holbourn, they all came out together with a design to get Money, and and met the Prosecutor in St. Giles's , that Saunders hit him a knock, but his Hat did not fall off; that then Tyler hit him another and it fell off, and Constance Buckle took it up and put it under her Coats, and went next Morning and sold it.

James Sharples depos'd, That he and James Debel apprehended the Prisoners, and that Tyler own'd that he had been that Night with Rowland Jones , and that Constance Buckle own'd that she was with them when the Prosecutor was knock'd down.

John Debel depos'd, That Rowland James bid him apprehend Saunders for the Robbery .

The Fact being plainly proved, the Jury found them all three Guilty of the Indictment. Death .

[Buckle: Death -respited for pregnancy. See summary.]

William Brabent and James Hall , of St. Giles's in the Fields , were indicted for assaulting Richard Taylor on the Highway, putting him in Fear, and taking from him a Hat, value 5 s. and 15 s. 6 d. in Money , the 29th of October last.

The Prosecutor depos'd, That as he was going along the Street , near the Turn-stile in Holbourn, the two Prisoners pass'd by him two or three times, and Brabent stood still and stared him full in the Face; that when he came to the Coal-Yard, near Drury-Lane , Brabent came up to him and knock'd him down, struck him first on the right side of the Head, and made him real, and struck his Cane out of his Hand; he making some Resistance , then he struck him on the left side, and then he fell, and lay stunned for a few Minutes, and coming to himself found his Wig lying under him, his Breeches unbuttoned, and his Money which was 15 s. 6 d. taken out of his Fob.

John Debel depos'd, That he having a Warrant against James Hall for another Robbery, when he had taken him, he own'd that Brabent did this Robbery, and that himself ran away with the Hat; but that Brabent had sunk the Money upon him, and that Hall wanted to be made an Evidence.

It was confirm'd by John Tyrrell , that Hall offer'd to impeach several if he could be made an Evidence.

This was likewise confirm'd by Edward Ward ; and the Fact being plainly proved, the Jury found both the Prisoners guilty of the Indictment. Death .

James Hall , of St. Andrew's Holbourn , was indicted, for that he together with one William Sherlock , not taken, did on the 1st of November assault James Ramsey on the Highway, put him in Fear, and taking from him a Hat, value 5 s. a Peruke, value 10 s. and 1 s. in Money .

The Prosecutor depos'd, That he was going down Holbourn between 2 and 3 o'Clock in the Morning, and at the end of Dean-street , he saw Hall standing near the Channel, and the other stood near the Houses, that he could not see them so plainly, that he look'd at them for two Minutes, that they came and knock'd him down, giving him 2 or 3 Cuts on his Head, and he lost his Hat and Wig, and found his Breeches unbuttoned, and his Money gone. That taking Notice that a Man and Woman look'd out at the Window, he went to that House and enquir'd if they did not remember a Man to have been knock'd down and robb'd thereabouts, that they reply'd, yes; and that the Prisoner had been taken up and kept 3 Days and 4 Nights, and discharg'd, they not knowing where to find the Prosecutor , and that he was afterwards taken at a Brandy-shop near that place.

Jeremiah Goodale depos'd, That he saw the Prisoner passing to and fro in the Morning about 2 or 3 o'Clock, and saw him knock down the Prosecutor, and that William Sherlock was with him in the Robbery; that he knew the Prisoner, he living next Door to a Brandy-shop that they used, where he was again apprehended 2 or 3 Days after.

John Debel depos'd, That he had taken the Prisoner, and kept him three Days, but not finding the Prosecutor, he was discharg'd; that the Prosecutor coming afterwards to him, and describing him, he knew him to be the Person, and so he went and apprehended him again at the Brandy-shop, and that he did own that he was in the Robbery, but deny'd that he knock'd him down. This Fact also being plainly proved, the Jury found him Guilty of the Indictment. Death .

William Holland and Peter Norman , of St. George in the East , were indicted for assaulting Samuel Addison on the Highway, putting him in Fear, and taking from him a Handkerchief, value 1 s. and 10 d. in Money , the 17th of October last.

The Prosecutor depos'd, That as he was going along the Fields between White-Chappel and Ratcliff Highway , in the Field beyond the Night-Field, three Men came up to him, and the first presented a Pistol to his right Breast, and the second a Bayonet ; that they turn'd his Apron aside, took his Money out of his Pocket, which was about sixteen Pence, or sixteen Pence Farthing, but did not offer him any personal Abuse, and at going away, pull'd his Handkerchief from off his Neck; but he could not swear positively to the Prisoners, but did believe Holland to be the Man that presented the Pistol.

James Asey depos'd, That on the 17th of October, himself and the two Prisoners were going over Stepney Fields , and meeting the Prosecutor, Holland went up to him with a Pistol, and himself with a Bayonet, and that Norman put his Hand in his Pocket and took out ten Pence Farthing, and out of the other Pocket six Pence, and took off his Hat, but it not being a good one, they did not take it, and also took his Handkerchief, that he had eight Pence of the Money, and Holland eight Pence, and Norman the Handkerchief, and the odd Farthing they threw away.

Norman call'd some Evidences to his Character, and to prove, that he was Sick at the time when the Robbery was committed; but they not making it out to the Satisfaction of the Jury, they found them both guilty of the Indictment. Death .

Matthias Pepin , John Smith , and William Holland , of St. Dunstan's Stepney , were indicted for assaulting Richard Griffith , on the Highway, and taking from him a Silver Watch, a Cornelian Seal set in Gold, and two Guineas, the Property of the said Richard Griffith , and a pair of Spectacles and Case of Joanna Griffith , the 3d of October last.

Capt. Griffith depos'd, That on the 3d of October last, on Saturday Night, between 10 and 11 o'Clock at Night, he being going home to Mile-End , beyond the Turnpike , about a Stones throw, was attack'd by several Men, that Hall came up to him, and presenting a Pistol, said, D - n you, your Money; that he reply'd, your Money! Friend do you always say so when you are drunk? That thereupon Smith said, shoot him thro' the Head, that he desir'd them to use him as a Gentleman; and Hall reply'd, we will use you like a Gentleman; that they riffling him of his Watch and Money, he desir'd them to leave him some Silver, and that one of them, which he thinks was Pepin, said, leave the Gentleman some Silver; that there being a great Number of Sheep coming through the Turn-pike, they having robb'd him, made off; that he went back to White-Chapel, and acquainted the Watch, and Charles Barton went in Quest of them, and found the outer Case of his Watch near the Place where he had been robb'd, and the Watch was afterwards found in Holbourn; that Hall was taken the 23d of October, and made an Evidence.

- Hall depos'd, That himself with the Prisoners committed the Fact; that tho' Holland was not indeed present, yet he was on the other Side of the Way, to look out, and to be ready to come to their Assistance, if they should want any; that they parted the Money, and Holland had 5 s. and 3 d. of the Money, and himself 5 s. 3 d. and that Pepin had the like part.

Charles Barton depos'd, That he being at Justice Philips's upon another Account, was told by Harry Cox , that they had discover'd who the Fellows were that had robb'd Captain Griffith, that he went and inform'd Captain Griffith, and got him apprehended; and that when Captain Griffith came to him to inform him the Night he was robb'd, he being an Headborough, search'd several suspected Houses in order to apprehend the Prisoners; after a full hearing of the Matter, the Jury acquitted Pepin, and found John Smith and William Holland guilty of the Indictment. Death .

William Holland and John Barnet , of St. Mary's White-Chapel , were indicted for assaulting James Ivory , in a Field, or open Place, near the Highway, putting him in fear, and taking from him a Bag, Value 1 d. an Iron Tobacco Stopper, and 17 s. in Money , the 15th of October last.

The Prosecutor depos'd, That he being in White-Chapel-Fields , at the back-side of the Mount, about 10 o'Clock at Night, he met two Men in Soldiers Clothes with Cutlasses, he passed by them, and they bid him good Night; that then he saw two others, the two first came back, and said, they must have his Money; he told them, he was a very poor Man, and hoped they were but in jest; they told him, they were in earnest, and would have it, and the Man in Soldiers Clothes stood by him with a Pistol, and the other riffled his Pocket, and they asked him, If he had a Fob? That when they had robbed him, the Soldier said, go about your Business.

James Asey depos'd, That the Prisoners were with him that Night at a Brandy-shop, and they agreed to go out a Robbing, and went together into the Fields, and the Prisoners broke open a Shed, and found nothing there but an old Broom, and an old Tinder-Box, and they pull'd the Stick out of the Broom, and took it away; that they staid till about Ten o'Clock at Night, and met the Prosecutor with a Basket, that Holland went up to him with a Pistol, and Barnet took the Money out of his Pocket, which was about 17 Pence three Farthings as he pretended, and he gave them 3 d. a-piece, and spent Four-pence Half-penny, but sunk the Money that was in the Bag; that he did see something in his Hand like a Purse or Bag, and the next Morning Barnet had bought him new Shoes, Stockings and Shirt, upon which they rallied him for cheating them, telling him, he said, last Night he had not a Farthing, and that thereupon Holland said he would keep the Pistol.

John Falkener depos'd, That on the 16th of October, Barnet, Asey and Holland were at Shelton's drinking, and they were talking about the Money, and they said they had but 3 d. Half-penny a-piece, and Holland said he saw Barnet take something out of his Pocket that look'd like a Purse, and that they were all talking together of that Robbery, and that Barnet had bought new Shoes, Stockings and Shirt, and gave half a Pint of Gin for Beverage; after a full hearing of the Matter, the Jury found them both Guilty of the Indictment. Death .

Joseph Eves , John Etty , and Richard Smith , of St. James's Clerkenwell , were indicted for assaulting Thomas Dickinson , in a certain Field, or open Place, near the Highway, putting him in Fear, and taking from him a Hat, a Peruke, a Pair of Scissors and Sheath , the 15th of November last.

The Prosecutor depos'd, That on Sunday between 6 and 7 o'Clock at Night, he was going between Sir John Old-Castle 's and Black Mary's-Hole , several Men assaulted him, and the first Man that came up bid him stand and deliver, that he reply'd, he had nothing that would do them any Service; that there came four about him, and they cry 'd, D - n him, shoot him through the Head, and they clap'd a Pistol to his Head, beat him, and abus'd him very much, so that he could hardly see for several Days, and cut him cross the Lip, and it being put in the News that such Persons were taken up, he went and found his Scissors, Hat and Wig in the Custody of John Cauthery .

John Cauthery depos'd, That John Wills came to him, and told him, he would make a Discovery of several Robberies, and delivered him the Prosecutor's Hat and Wig, upon which he took up Eves and Etty.

John Forster depos'd, That after Smith was apprehended, and when he was before Justice Gifford, he owned he committed this Robbery, and gave him Direction to go home to his Lodging and fetch the Prosecutor's Scissors out of a certain Box.

Peter Levet depos'd, That he took a loaded Pistol out of one of Smith's Pocket, and Powder out of another. This was confirm'd by Henry Rogers , who added, the Prisoner said he was a dead Man.

Stephen Chelsham depos'd, That the Prosecutor came into his House bound, and in a very bad Condition, his Face being cut so that he could scarce see, and that he led him Home.

John Wills depos'd, That he was in Company with the Prisoners at the Commission of this Robbery, that Smith seiz'd on the Prosecutor, that they struggled together, and he held a Pistol to his Breast, and they fell down, that then Joseph Eves came up and held another Pistol to him, and that the Prosecutor resisting, Smith kick'd him on the Face, and that he himself took the Knife and Scissors out of his Pocket, and gave them to Smith.

Nicholas Tutton and Mary Wild were call'd, who depos'd; That the Prisoners and John Wills had been in Company together before the Commission of this Fact, and had lodg'd in the same House.

The Prisoners all call'd Persons to their Reputation; and there being no positive Evidence against Eves and Etty, but that of John Wills, the Jury acquitted them, and found Richard Smith only Guilty of the Indictment. Death .

William Whitford , of St. Giles's Cripplegate , was indicted for assaulting Elizabeth Wright , on the Highway, putting her in Fear, and taking from her 18 Guineas , the 12th of November last.

Elizabeth Wright depos'd, That she saw the Prisoner near Moorgate, and he followed her over the three Moorfields , and when she came to the Dissenters Burying-Ground , he gave her a thrust, and held a Pistol to her Breast, and said, you old Bitch, if you do not give me your Money, I will shoot you thro' the Heart, that this was in the Afternoon about 4 o'Clock, a quarter of an Hour over or under; that he pull'd out a Penknife, and cut her Pocket, and took the Money, and that two of the Guineas dropping, he turn'd back to pick them up; that she perceiv'd him to turn into an Alehouse at the Corner of Featherstone-street, (which was his own House,) she follow'd him thither, laid hold on him, and charged him with taking her Money, but he, his Wife, and the Gang in the House, abus'd her, call'd her old Bitch, and thrust her out of Door, and she standing there and demanding a Constable he went out (as she supposes) at another Door.

John Carter , the Constable, depos'd, That he being sent for, went in with the Prosecutor to search for the Prisoner, and he held a Candle, while she look'd on, and view'd all the Company that was in the House, which were 20 or 30 loose vagabond Fellow'd, but she fix'd upon none of them; that she describ'd the Person who robb'd her so exactly, that he was fully persuaded that it was the Prisoner; that not finding him that Night, and having gotten a Warrant to apprehend him, he sent for the Prosecutor, and planted her in a House over the way, while he went in to see if the Prisoner was at home, giving her a Sign when she and those with her should come over; and going in, the Prisoner told him, that an old Bitch the Night before had scandaliz'd him with Robbing her, saying, he would give five Pound to know her; that thereupon he told him, if he would give him a full Pot of his Amber Beer he would inform him who she was; upon which he fetch'd the drink, and in the mean time he made the Sign, and the Prosecutor came over, and upon sight of the Prisoner, charg'd him to be the Man that robb'd her, upon which he trembled and quak'd; that they carried the Prisoner before Justice Manley , and there the Prisoner sent for Mr. Grierst, his Brewer, who inquiring as to the time when the Robbery was done, asserted the Prisoner was in his Company from 3 o'Clock till 7; and that there came in another who ha d been a Brewer, who lodg'd in the Prisoner's House, who affirm'd , that at 4 o'Clock he met him going to Mr. Grierst, as he told him, to get his Licence renew'd, and own'd, that when he came he found the Prosecutor at the Prisoner's House.

Richard Richardson depos'd, That he was present with the former Evidence, and that the Prosecutor was positive the Prisoner was the Man that robb'd her.

John Forth depos'd, That he passing by the Prisoner's Door between 4 and 5 o'Clock, saw the Prosecutor go in and get the Prisoner hold by the Arm, and that she then charg'd him with the Robbery, and said, he had taken 18 Guineas from her, and that the Woman of the House push'd the Prosecutor out of Door.

The Prosecutor being ask'd, If she was sure the Prisoner was the Person who robb'd her? She reply'd, she was sure he was the Person, and no other.

The Prisoner deny'd the Fact, and call'd the following Evidences.

Thomas Grierst depos'd, That the Prisoner came to him at 3 o'Clock, to go with him to renew his Licence ; that he knew the time, he hearing St. Paul's Clock strike 3, and he desir'd the Prisoner to stay while he was shav'd, which might be half an Hour, and was never out of his Company till 7 o'Clock.

William Langley depos'd , That he came to Mr. Grierst at about half an Hour past 3 o'Clock, and the Prisoner went with them to Clerkenwell to get a Licence, and then to Sadler's-Wells , and came back to St. Martins le Grand , and the Prisoner was not out of their Company till about 7.

Jacob Batt depos'd, That he went with Mr. Langley to Sadler's-Wells , that he went to Mr. Grierst's somewhat after 3 o'Clock, and it was near 4 when they went to Sadler's-Wells , they were there a little after 4 o'Clock, stay'd there about 3 Quarters of an Hour, and came back to Smithfield at near 6.

Thomas Philips depos'd, That on the 12th of November between 5 and 6 o'Clock, the Prisoner and Mr. Grierst's came to his House at the Corner of St. Ann's-Lane, in St. Martins , and bought half a dozen of Pots, he being a Pewterer .

The Prisoner call'd some Evidences, who depos'd, That the Prosecutor said the Person who robbed her was in a light-coloured Coat, and a light Wig; but this was contradicted both by the Constable, the Justice of the Peace, and others, who affirm'd, and said it was a Man whose Hair was as Black as the Constable's, which was pretty Black. After a full hearing of the Matter, the Jury found him Guilty of the Indictment. Death .

Charles Green , of St. Clement's Danes , was indicted, for that he being an ill-dispos'd Person, and greedy of wicked Lucre, after the 1st of June 1723, that is to say, the 18th Day of November in the Year 1730 , the Laws and Statutes of this Realm not at all esteeming, did with Force and Arms knowingly, unlawfully, wickedly and feloniously send a Letter without a Name to one Obadiah Marriot , demanding the Sum of three Guineas, to the evil Example of others, and against the Peace of our Sovereign Lord the King, and the Statute in that Case made and provided .

John Neal depos'd, That upon the 18th of November about Nine o'Clock at Night, he found a Letter in the Passage, which seem'd to be thrust under the Door, directed to Mr. Marriot; that this Letter he gave to his Master. The Substance of the Letter was as follows.

I am an unfortunate Gentleman, driven to great straits, I desire you to send me three Guineas; upon your sending I shall not trouble you again, but upon your not sending, I will assure you, I will send to you in another manner. I charge you upon your Peril not to send any Body with the Porter, nor to ask any Questions, but leave it till call'd for.

Direct it to be left at the Magpye Alehouse in Essex-street, for Mr. Ralph Blunt , to be left till call'd for.

Mr. Marriot depos'd, That he considering what was best to be done, and this being to be sent that same Evening by Six o'Clock, he made up a Pacquet, with 2 or 3 Sheets of Paper, sealed it with three Seals, and sent it by a Porter, and also sent a couple of Porters to sit and drink in the House, and narrowly observe if any Body should come to ask for it, but not hearing any thing till about Nine or Ten o'Clock at Night, he sent his Clerk to fetch it away, and order'd him to say his Name was Charles Blunt , and that upon his asking for the Pacquet, the People readily delivered it to him; upon this being satisfied that the People of the House were not privy to the Design, he went there and communicated the Matter to them, and left a Packet there as before, desiring them to secure the Person that should call for it; the Matter rested Friday, Saturday, and Sunday, and on Monday they brought a Woman to him, who had come to demand this Pacquet, that this was the Prisoner's Wife, who being ask'd, If she knew this Ralph Blunt ? answer'd, she did not, but pretended she came to demand the Pacquet by Virtue of a Letter which came to her Husband; and being ask'd, If her Husband had seen or knew of the Letter? After several Prevarications, she at length own'd that he had seen it, and that she, her Husband, and her Sister Mrs. Poynter had a Consultation upon the Letter, and that her Husband had come with her to show her the House, and as it afterwards appear'd, waited for her in St. Clement's Church-Yard, whilst she went to the Magpye Alehouse to demand the Packet; but she not coming for a considerable time, he suspecting something had happened, went away, that afterwards Mr. Coward came to the Justice's, and finding they were for committing the Prisoner's Wife, he said, he could produce the Prisoner, and went away, and soon brought him to them.

Elizabeth Davis depos'd, That the Letter came to her the 19th of November, that it was brought by a Porter, that she refus'd to take it, saying, she did not know any such Person as Ralph Blunt , but a Gentleman that sat there, said, take it in Mrs. Davis, it may be it is for some Gentlemen that used the House before you came to it, they having liv'd there but a little while; that this was about 6 o'Clock in the Evening, and that about 9 or 10 a Gentleman came for it, saying, his Name was Ralph Blunt ; that afterwards a Pacquet was left again, with Instructions to apprehend the Person who should come to demand it; that on Monday following a Gentlewoman (the Prisoner's Wife) came to demand it, that she desir'd her to sit down, her Husband being gone to Market , and having gotten the Key of the Cupboard (as she pretended) in the mean time she found an Opportunity to send for a Constable, and giving her a Letter that Mr. Marriot had left, she insisted upon a Parcel, and the Constable coming in, apprehended her; and she added, that she looking out of her Door, as if she look'd for her Husband, saw the Prisoner leaning against a Stone-Pillar in St. Clement's Church-Yard ; and that after she was apprehended , she shew'd a Letter, by means of which, she said, she call'd for it; and John Davis confirm'd the Evidence of Elizabeth Davis his Wife.

The Prisoner in his Defence pleaded, That he liv'd at the Old Barge-House, and being a Lighterman , his Master, Mr. Rich; having ordered him to get some Sails mended, he came from Home about Six o'Clock in the Morning, and knew nothing of the Letter, but about Ten o'Clock was inform'd that there was a Letter sent to him, that upon hearing this he went to Mrs. Poynter's, his Wife's Sister, and there met with his Wife, who shew'd him the Letter, the Contents of which was to go to Mr. Davis's House to receive a Parcel, and to go to the Rose and Crown at Ratcliffe-Cross, which Letter was sign'd J. King. That he not knowing from whom it came, nor what to make of it, sometimes thought it might be a present from some Relation in the Country, he said he would go himself, and call for the Parcel, but his Sister Poynter advised him not to appear, left it should be some Trap laid for him, he having been in some Trouble, and having a Law-suit now depending; so at length he went with her, and staid hard by for some time, but she not coming, he was going away about his Business, but then meeting his Sister Poynter, was inform'd, that his Wife was in Custody on Account of the Letter; that upon this he went to Mr. Coward, who was his Attorney, and inform'd him what had happened to his Wife, and advis'd with him what to do, and desir'd him to go to her, and inform himself how the Matter was; that Mr. Coward advis'd him to stay at an Alehouse whilst he came to him again, and when Mr. Coward came again, he went very readily to the Justice's.

Mrs. Poynter depos'd, That the Prisoner's Wife (her Sister) came on the 23d of November to her to the Compting-House in Black-Fryars , and they Breakfasting together, she told her she had received the oddest Letter that she ever saw, and shew'd it her; that she said to Mrs. Green, I fancy your Sister or Mother has sent you a Present out of the Country, and has done it by an unknown Hand, that her Husband mayn't know of it; that she sent a Porter to enquire for the Prisoner, and he came, and his Wife shew'd him the Letter, and he said he would go and fetch the Parcel; that she ask'd him, If he knew Ralph Blunt ? He answer'd, No. That his Wife being in a surprize , he jocosely said, it may be some Body has laid a Bastard Child to me; that he saying he would go to fetch the Parcel, she advis'd him not, left it should be a Trap laid for him, he being at Law; that he went away, and she advis'd her Sister to go, but they meeting together afterwards, did go both, she to the Magpye in Essex-street, and he to St. Clement's.

Elizabeth Charles depos'd, Mrs. Green came to her in Water-street about Twelve o'Clock that Day, and told her she had an Estate sell to her, and she knew not from whom, or how, and shew'd her the Letter, which directed her to go to the Magpye to receive a Parcel and Money.

Mr. Coward depos'd, That the Prisoner came to his House, he being his Attorney concern'd for him in a Law-Suit about some Lighters, he being then at Mr. Lightbound's, a Master in Chancery, his Servant came with him thither, then he inform'd him of what had happen'd to his Wife, and desired him to go and see what the Matter was, that he did go, bidding the Prisoner stay at an Alehouse till he brought him Word; that he went to the Justice's, while she was under Examination, and finding they were for committing the Woman, he went and fetch'd some of the Prisoner's Hand-writing, and he went very readily with him to the Justice's.

The Prisoner call'd a great many Persons to his Reputation; and after a full hearing of the Matter, the Jury acquitted him.

The Trials being ended, the Court proceeded to give Judgment, as follows:

Receiv'd Sentence of Death 17.

John Barnet ,

William Brabent ,

Constance Buckle ,

Joshua Cornwell ,

James Hall ,

William Holland ,

William Mansel ,

John Mines , alias Minsham , alias Mitchel,

Peter Norman ,

Charles Ree , alias Ray,

Francis Saunders ,

John Smith ,

Richard Smith ,

Mary Smith ,

Robert Tyler ,

Abraham White ,

William Whitford .

N. B. Joshua Cornwell was convicted the last Sessions of opening the Door of his Master's House in the Night-time, and letting in two Persons to rob him; the Jury bringing in a special Verdict, the same was referr'd to the Twelve Judges, who adjudged his Case to be Burglary.

Transportation 47.

John Barber , alias Baker,

Joseph Bigrave ,

Magdalen Bucknel , alias Foot,

John Butcher ,

John Cheshire ,

Jane Conner ,

Martha Cook ,

Christopher Cormick ,

Mary Cuppleditch ,

William Davis ,

Honour Davis ,

John Durant ,

Alice Evans ,

Richard Feuterel ,

John Gage ,

Stephen Gay ,

Thomas Gladmore , alias John Lanham ,

Matthew Goodwin ,

Anne Harris ,

Mary Hawkins ,

John Hillary ,

Sarah Hilliard ,

Thomas Hudson ,

Christopher Husband ,

William Isaacson ,

Mary Johnson ,

Mary Kilpatrick ,

John Knight ,

Elizabeth Lambert ,

Margaret Lewis ,

Francis Lewis ,

Mary Macartney ,

Isaiah Marshal ,

Edward Mecchum ,

John Matthews ,

Arthur Moore ,

Mary Parsons ,

John Parsons ,

James Peck ,

Philip Price ,

Anne Rowe ,

Jane Taylor ,

Elizabeth Westmore , alias Osbourne,

William White ,

Thomas Wilson ,

Daniel Wood ,

John Wyat ,

Burnt in the Hand 3.

Thomas Cook ,

Robert Gibson ,

Anne Barnes , alias le Graves,

To be Whip'd 4.

Anne Anderson ,

Robert Robinson ,

Elizabeth Tugg , alias Stubbs,

Joseph Chandler ,

William Hollywell to stand on the Pillory near St. Paul's, for an Hour, to suffer 6 Months Imprisonment, and to pay a Fine of 40 l.

William Huggins , to stand on the Pillory for an Hour at the same Place, and to suffer 8 Months Imprisonment.

John Lewis and John Jones , to stand on the Pillory twice, for an Hour each time, once at the Exchange, and once in Crutchet-Friars , near the Prosecutor's Habitation, to suffer a Year's Imprisonment, and to give Security for their good Behaviour for 3 Years.

John Denston to suffer one Month's Imprisonment.

Constance Buckle , and Mary Smith , pleaded their Bellies, and a Jury of Matrons being impannelled, found them both quick with Child.

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A WATER which perfectly cures the ITCH, or Itching Humour in any Part of the Body, having no offensive Scent; and hath been prov'd by many Years Experience: Price 1 s. 6 d. a Bottle, with Directions. Prepared by A. Downing, Chymist.

At the same Place may be had,

The true Essence or Spirits of SCURVY-GRASS, both Purging and Plain, most Excellent in all Degrees of the Scurvy , at 8 d. a Bottle. And the Great Elixir of Life, called DAFFY's ELIXIR, truly prepared from the best Ingredients, very useful in all Families. Price 2 s. 6 d. the Half-pint.

This Da y is Published, The Third Edition with Additions, of

A PRACTICAL TREATISE; Or, Second Thoughts on the Consequences of the Venereal Disease, in Three Parts, viz. 1. On the Simple Gonorrhoea , Gleets, and other Weaknesses , whether from Venereal Embraces, Self-pollution, improperly called Onanism, or Natural Imbecillity. II. On the Virulent Gonorrhoea , or Clap. III. On the Venereal Lues, or Grand Pox. Wherein are plainly shew'd the exact Degrees of Difference; with their Signs, Symptoms, Prognosticks, and Cures in all Cases, their Beginnings, Progress, and fatal Periods, when neglected or unskillfully managed; and how their absolute Cure, without Violence or Injury, is compleated. With proper and effectual Remedies, in their several Stages, prescribed and recommended therein. With some Remarks on that proposterous way of Venery with Machines, &c. and a plain Discovery of the Dangers (tho' little expected) which attend that vila practice. Also many other useful Discoveries relating to Infections in both Sexes, not before taken Notice of To which is annexed, a Vindication of the practice of Salivating. &c. The Whole fitted, as well for the Advantage of Patients as young Practitioners. By JOSEPH CAM M . D. London, Printed for the Author; and sold at his House, in Bow-Church-Yard; also by G. Strahan in Cornhill ; E. Midwinter in St. Paul's Church-Yard; C. King in Westminster-Hall; J. Hodges on London-Bridge; and J. Mackenen at the Lamb without Temple-Bar. Price stitch'd 2 s. bound 2 s. 6 d.

Just Publish'd, The Third Edition of,

The Spelling Dictionary: Or, Cltion of all the common made use of in the English Tongue, carefully compared with the original Languages from whence they are derived and marked as they are to be By T. DYCHE. Pr. 1 s. 6 d .

Sold by R. WARE, at the Bible and Sun in Warwick Lane, at Amen-Corner.

Also may be had at the same Place,

1. The large House Bibles, Folio, with the six Maps of sacred Geography, and a brief Concordance for the more easy finding out of the Places therein contained. By J. Downame, B. D.

Bound in Calf Leather - 1 l. 6 s. per Book. And with Mr. Sturt's Cutts at 2 l. 5 s. Ditto. On a fine Paper, with Cuts 3 l. 3 s. Ditto.

Just Publish'd,

2. A Description of 300 Animals, viz. Beasts, Birds, Fishes, Serpents and Infects. With a particular Account of the Whale Fishery. Extracted out of the Authors, and adapted to the Use of all Capacities, especially to allure Children to read. Illustrated with Copper Plates, whereon is curiously engraven, every Beast, Bird, Fish, Serpent and Insect, described in the whole Book. Pr. 2s. 6d.

3. A Treatise of Architecture, with Remarks and Observations by that excellent Master thereof, Sebastian le Clerc, Knight of the Empire, Designer and Engraver of the Cabinet to the late French King, and Member of the Academy of Arts and Sciences. Necessary for young People who would apply to that noble Art. Engraven on 181 Copper Plates. By John Sturt . Translated by Mr. Chambers. Price 15 s.

4. Emblems for the Entertainment and Improvement of Youth, containing Hieroglyphical and AEnigmatical Devices relating to all Parts and Stations of Life, together with Explanations and Proverbs in French, Spanish, Italian and Latin, alluding to them, and translated into English. The whole curiously engrav'd on 62 Copper Plates. Pr. 2s. 6d.

5. The compleat Constable, directing Constables, Headboroughs, Tything-Men , Church-Wardens, Overseers of the Poor, Surveyours of the Highway, and Scavengers, in the Duty of their Offices, according to the Powe allowed them by the Laws. Price 1 s.

6. Tradesman's Guide: Containing a List of all the Stage Coaches, and Carriers; with an Account of all the Fairs and Market-Towns in England. Price 1 s.

To all Masters of Ships, Country-Shopkeepers, &c . this publick Notice is given.

THAT WILLIAM DICEY , in Conjunction with Mr. BENJAMIN OKELL (to whom a Royal Patent is granted) THOMAS COBB , (in Right of ELIZABETH his Wife, late Widow of Mr. CLUER) and ROBERT RAIKES , continue, and jointly carry on the preparing and vending, both Wholesale and Retail, that excellent Medicine call'd, Dr. BATEMAN's PECTORAL DROPS, at their Warehouse against the South Door of Bow Church, at the farther End of the Church-Yard from Cheapside, London; at which Place (and no other in the City of London) Retailers may be furnish'd, with good Allowance for Profit, by directing for or sending to WILLIAM DICEY or THOMAS COBB and Company, at the Warehouse aforesaid.

N. B. These DROPS carry off the most violent Fever, if taken in Time, and is the best of Remedies for those that are afflicted with the present Distempers, viz. Coughs, Colds, intermitting Fevers, &c.

It gives present Ease in the most racking Pains of the Gout and Rheumatism , they have brought away Gravel and Stones almost as big as Horse Beans from divers Persons, and have restored Thousands of poor Infants to their Strength and Liveliness, that have been reduced to meer Skeletons They never fail giving Ease in the most violent Pains of the Body and Limbs, and all the Ailments of the Breast. and is the best of Medicines in all manner of Consumptions.

Sold at One Shilling per Bottle, in which is contained three Doses. At the same Place you may have Gratis, a Book of Certificates, in which you'll find more Cures than can be produc'd from any one Medicine, since the first Use of Physick.

Dr. GODFREY's GENERAL CORDIAL,

So universally approved of for the CHOLICK, and all Manner of PAINS in the BOWELS, FLUXES, FEVERS, SMALL-POX, MEASLES, RHEUMATISM, COUGHS, COLDS, and RESTLESNESS in Men, Women, and Children, and particularly for several Ailments incident to Child bearing Women, and Relief of young Children in breeding their Teeth ,

Is Sold in most Cities , Boroughs, and Market-Towns throughout: Great-Britain and Ireland and in most public Streets in London; remov'd from Hunsdon to Broham in Hertfordshire : And for the Conveniency of supplying all those Parts, there are establish'd, by me BENJAMIN GODFREY, these following Whosesale Warehouses, viz.

John Westlake 's in Queen-street, Bristol; William Furly 's, Distiller, at the Black Prince in the Market-place in the City of Norwich.

Peter Leadbeater 's, Distiller, in West-Chester.

Mr. Button's, Bookseller, on the Bridge at Newcastle upon Tyne.

Mr. Brook's, Distiller, on the Blind-Key, Dublin.

As also at my Original Warehouse, facing Angel-Alley in Bishopsgate-street, without Bishopsgate, London.

Any reputable Shopkeeper in any City, Borough, or Market-Town, where this Medicine is not already sold, may be supplied at any of the said Warehouses, with good Allowance.

N. B. The Publick are desired to take Notice, (to prevent being imposed on) that there is an ill-minded Person who counterfeits the said Medicine, and puts the Title of Godfrey's Cordial on the Top of the Bottles, and in his Bills given with the Bottles, he calls it The GENERAL CORDIAL, and does not put the Person's Name who prepares it; but as this Counterfeit Maker is now found out by his own Confession, he and his Sellers will be prosecuted as the Law directs. ONE of the unfair Sellers of the sham Medicine without the Maker's Name who prepares it , is at a Silver-Smith's near Lombard-Street , another is at a Cheesemonger's facing Devonshire-Square in Bishopsgate-Street. But , to prevent the Buyers from being imposed on, I have put my Christian Name on the Top of each Bottle, as in the Margin, which is prepared.

By me BENJAMIN GODFREY, M. D.

The Price of each Bottle is 6 d.

John Taylor , Agent for Merchants,

Next Door to the Cutler's, at the End of Castle-Alley, behind the Royal-Exchange, London, a Board of Directions at the Window. Several hundreds of good Countrymen, and Servants of all Trades, are wanted for Jamaica directly, Ships will Sail every Week for Jamaica. Good able Carpenters, Bricklayers, Wheelwrights, Blacksmiths, Sawyers and Coopers, shall have twenty-five Pounds yearly Wages, &c. and all Men Servants that will go to Jamaica, shall be entertained every Day, by John Taylor .

Vivant Rex & Regina .

To Distillers,

Jonathan Pead , Chymist, near the White-Swan Alehouse in New-Street-Square, between Shoe-Lane and Fetter-Lane,

Prepares and Sells a true Calcination of TARTAR, which has given a general Satisfaction, by cleansing Malt-Spirits from all their foetid Flavour, rendering them soft, sweet, and pleasant, fit for any Mixture, improving every Day; if upon Trial, it does not answer, the Money shall be repaid.

N. B. Six Pounds are sufficient for a Pipe, and require but one Distillation . Price Fourteen Pence per Pound.

Just Publish'd,

The Modern Musick-Master, or, The Universal Musician. Containing, I. An Introduction to singing, after so easy a Method, that Persons of the meanest Capacities may (in a short time) learn to Sing (in Tune) any Song that is set to Musick. II. Directions for playing on the Flute, with a Scale for transposing any Piece of Musick to the properest Keys for that Instrument. III. The newest Method for Learners on the German Flute, as improv'd by the greatest Masters of the Age. IV. Instructions upon the Hautboy, in a more familiar Method than any extant. V. The Art of playing on the Violin; with a new Scale, shewing how to stop every flat or sharp Note, exactly in Tune, and where the Shifts of the Hand should be made. VI. The Harpsichord illustrated and improved, wherein is shewn the Italian Manner of Fingering, with Sets of Lessons for Beginners, and those who are already Proficients on that Instrument and the Organ; with Rules for attaining to play a Thorough-Bass. In which is included, A large Collection of Airs, and Lessons, adapted to the several Instruments, extracted from the Works of Mr. Handel, Bononcini, Albinoni, and other eminent Masters. With a brief History of Musick, wherein is related the several Changes, Additions, and Improvements from its Origin to the present Time. To which is added, A Musical Dictionary, explaining such Greek, Latin, Italian and French Words as generally occur in Musick. Curiously adorn'd with Cuts, representing the manner of performing on every Instrument. Finely Engrav'd on above 320 Plates. Engrav'd, Printed, and Sold at the Printing-Office, in Bow Church-yard, London. Price 7 s 6 l . Where may be had Books of Instructions for any single Instrument , far exceeding any others extant. Price 1 s. 6 d. N. B. You are desir'd to take Notice, That the whole Volume and Books of Instructions for any single Instrument are printed in Royal Octavo , which is different from any other of that kind yet publish'd.

Books Sold by T. PAYNE in Pater-Noster-Row.

The Adventures of the celebrated Madam de Muci, with Count d'Albert , a noted Lord in France, and Celsus, a late English Nobleman. Written by her Woman. Translated from the French Original, just Publish'd at Amsterdam by John Frederick Bernard . Price 1 s. 6 d.

An Universal History from the earliest Account of Time to the Present. No. 1, 2, 3, to be continued. Price 3 s. 6 d. each Number.

Historia Literaria: Or, An exact and early Account of the most valuable Books published in the several Parts of Europe. No. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, to be continued. Price 1 s. each Number.

The New Political State of Great Britain, including the publick Affairs of Foreign Courts. No. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, to be continued. Price 1 s. 6 d. each Number.

The Art of knowing Women, or the Female Sex dissected , in a faithful Representation of their Virtues and Vices. Price Bound 4 s.

The Brothers, or Treachery punish'd, a Novel. Price Bound 2 s.

The Travels of Cyrus, by the Chevalier Ramsay. French and English. In Two Volumes. Price Bound 6 s.

The Invalidity of Lay-Baptism. Price 1 s.