Old Bailey Proceedings Online (www.oldbaileyonline.org, version 6.0, 02 August 2014), July 1730 (17300704).

Old Bailey Proceedings, 4th July 1730.

THE PROCEEDINGS AT THE Sessions of the Peace, and Oyer and Terminer, FOR THE City of LONDON, AND County of MIDDLESEX; ON

Wednesday the 1st, Thursday the 2d, Friday the 3d, and Saturday the 4th of July, 1730, in the Fourth Year of His MAJESTY's Reign.

Being the Sixth SESSIONS in the Mayoralty of the Right Honourable Sir RICHARD BROCAS , Knt. Lord Mayor of the City of LONDON, in the Year 1730.

No. VI. for the said YEAR.

LONDON:

Printed for T. PAYNE, at the Crown in Ivy-Lane, near Pater-noster-Row. M.DCC.XXX.

(Price Six Pence.)

THE PROCEEDINGS AT THE Sessions of the Peace, and Oyer and Terminer, for the CITY of LONDON; AND ON

The King's Commission of Goal-Delivery of Newgate, held at Justice-Hall in the Old-Bailey; for the CITY of London, and COUNTY of Middlesex.

On Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, and Saturday, being the 1st, 2d, 3d, and 4th of July 1730, in the Fourth Year of His MAJESTY's Reign,

BEFORE the Right Honourable Sir RICHARD BROCAS , Knt. Lord Mayor of the City of London; the Honourable Mr. Justice Probyn, the Worshipful Mr. Serjeant Raby; and others of His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer, and Goal-Delivery for the City of London, and Goal-Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex .

London Jury.

Richard Blundel .

Thomas Warner .

Ezekiel Dow .

Leonard Ashbourn .

William Ogbourn .

Jeremiah Batley .

John Hickman .

Jacob Reeves .

Francis Mattoon .

James Brent .

Thomas Cramphorn .

John Walker .

Middlesex Jury.

Charles King .

John Hall .

John Wilkins .

Robert Bencroft .

Thomas Goff .

John Spinnage .

Robert Kentish .

Isaac Mansfield .

Richard Powel .

John Mountany .

John Anson .

Joseph Goff .

Susannah Miller , of St. Ann's Black-Fryars , was indicted for privately stealing from the Person of Katharine Chambers , a Gold Watch Case, value 4 l. the Property of Nathaniel Chambers , the 14th of June last.

Katharine Chambers depos'd, That as she was coming from a Meeting, and stepping into a Coach, two or three Women came and jostled her, and Madam Jacomb telling her that her Watch Case was gone, the Prisoner was pursued, and the Case was in her Hand.

Richard Thomas depos'd, Upon hearing his Mistress cry out that she had lost her Watch Case, he followed the Prisoner, saw the Case in her Hand, and she seeing him, threw it away. The Fact being proved as to her having the Watch Case, but there seeming to be three in Company, and it not being proved that she took it, the Jury found her Guilty of Felony only, to the Value of 10 d.

[Whipping. See summary.]

John Ward , was indicted for feloniously marrying Sarah Woodward on the 2d of March last, his first Wife Anne Huffman whom he had married the 4th of February last, being Alive ; both the Marriages being plainly proved, the Jury found him Guilty of the Indictment.

[Branding. See summary.]

Mary Clark , of St. Giles's in the Fields , was indicted for feloniously stealing a Silk Gown and Petticoat, value 15 s. and other wearing Apparel , the Goods of Elizabeth Griffith , the 27th of May last.

The Prosecutor depos'd, That the Prisoner was with a Person that lodg'd in the same House with her; that she went out about Two o'Clock in the Afternoon, and coming Home about Eight at Night, she found her Door open, and her Cloaths to have been stolen, and that she found the Goods where the Prisoner had pawn'd them; the Jury found her Guilty to the Value of 10 d.

[Transportation. See summary.]

Mary Cooper , of Ealing , was indicted for stealing a Gown and Petticoat, value 3 s. the Goods of Mary Hearsay , the 23d of May last; the Fact being plainly proved, the Jury found her Guilty to the Value of 10 d.

[Transportation. See summary.]

John Hopkins was indicted for stealing a Goose, value 2 s. the Property of Joseph Willis , the 10th of June last; but the Goose being seen in the Possession of another Person, who got away, and left the Goose with the Prisoner in a Room, and there being no Evidence against the Prisoner, he was acquitted .

Anne Pearse , of St. Ann's, Westminster , was indicted for privately stealing a Pair of Shoes, value 2 s. the 15th of June last, in the Shop of Cecil Griffith ; the Fact being plainly proved, the Jury found her Guilty to the Value of 10 d.

[Whipping. See summary.]

Hugh Williams , of St. James's Westminster , was indicted for feloniously stealing a Silver Watch, value 3 l. the Goods of Clement Mills , the 13th of June last.

Jane Mills depos'd, That she left the Watch in a Drawer in her Shop, and went up Stairs to get her Husband up, who was Sick, and on her coming down she saw the Prisoner going out at the Door; but she could not say the Prisoner took it, nor was it found upon him, the Jury acquitted him.

Jane Ball , of St. Giles's Cripplegate , was indicted for feloniously stealing a Pair of Sheets, value 3 s. a Looking-Glass, value 1 s. 6 d. the Goods of William Latham , the 23d of May last; the Evidence against the Prisoner not being satisfactory to the Jury, they acquitted her.

Morgan Ellis , of St. Giles's in the Fields , was indicted for feloniously stealing a Pair of Sheets, value 5 s. the Goods of William Fowler , the 7th of May last.

The Prosecutor depos'd, The Prisoner was his Lodger, and went away, and examining his Lodging after he was gone, the Sheets were missing; but there not being sufficient Proof that the Prisoner stole the Sheets, he was acquitted .

Gamaliel Bishop , of St. Mary le Bone , was indicted for feloniously stealing a Linen Gown, value 12 s. the Goods of Dorothy Man , the 18th of June last.

Dorothy Man depos'd, She had put the Gown into a Tub of Water which stood in an Area before the House, there being Iron Rails before it, and hearing the next Day Linen cry'd, she went and found the Gown in the Hands of the Constable.

Richard Pratt , a Watchman, depos'd, That upon the 18th of June, about Three o'Clock in the Morning, he going Home, saw the Prisoner with a Stick of nine Foot long, with a Hook at the end of it, and a Woman following him; that going to his back Window, he saw the Woman holding up a Bag, and the Prisoner putting in wet Linen; that he ran down Stairs, and pursued him; that thereupon the Woman ran away, and the Prisoner knocked him down with his Stick, which broke with the Blow; that the Prisoner ran, he got up, and pursued, and calling out stop Thief, a Man came and seized him; and that he found the Bag and Gown in it, about two Yards from the Place where the Prisoner had knock'd him down. That he and another Watchman had seen the Prisoner about Three o'Clock in the Morning several times with the said Stick, and he being a Bailiff's Follower, supposed he might be going to Arrest somebody, and had not then suspected him, had he not seen him with wet Linen putting in into the Bag; that the Gown and other Linen being cry'd, was own'd by the Prosecutor; and other Linen the Owners, whereof refused to Prosecute; the Jury found him Guilty to the Value of 10 d.

[Transportation. See summary.]

John Cooley , of Hampstead , was indicted for feloniously stealing a Brown Gelding, value 5 l. the Property of John Thomas , the 13th of August last.

The Prosecutor depos'd, That he lost two Horses out of his Ground in August last, but knew not what become of them, till lately he saw one Bird riding through Hampstead, who he said had hired the Horse of the Prisoner.

The Prisoner owned he had the Horse; that he Lett it to the said Mr. Bird; that he bought the Horse of a Man between Islington and London, and had had him two Months, kept him publickly, and Lett him out publickly, as was his way of living; he called several Persons to prove it, and to his Reputation, who gave him a good Character; after a full hearing of the Matter, the Jury acquitted him.

Jane Jones , alias Jenkins , of Hampstead , was indicted for feloniously stealing 3 Suits of Headclothes, value 10 s. three Mobs, value 9 s. and other Goods , the 4th of June last, the Goods of Daniel Bell .

She was likewise indicted a second time for feloniously stealing two Silver Spoons, value 17 s. and other Goods , the Property of Elizabeth Jones , the same Day and Time.

It appear'd by the Evidence, that the Prisoner came to live with the Prosecutor, claiming Kindred with her, and had liv'd there about four Days, when she took the opportunity to go away with the Goods mentioned in the Indictment, part of which were Elizabeth Jones 's, whom she call'd Aunt, and the other Part were the Goods of Daniel Bell , who had Lodgings there.

The Prisoner having little to say in her Defence, the Jury found her Guilty of the first Indictment to the Value of 10 d. but acquitted her of the second .

[Transportation. See summary.]

Margaret Lametta , of St. Martin's in the Fields , was indicted for privately stealing a Silver Watch, value 5 l. a Snuff-Box, value 10 s. a Gold Ring, value 7 s. a Guinea, and 8 s. 6 d. in Money, from the Person of Alexander Jackson , the 15th of June last.

The Prosecutor depos'd, That he had been out of Town about six or seven Miles, and was coming Home between 12 and 1 o'Clock on Monday Morning, and seeing a Crowd, he put his Watch, &c. into his Coat, ripping the Lining to put them betwixt the Outside and Lining, he having the Curiosity to go into the Crowd, that there the Prisoner ask'd him to give her a Glass of Wine, that they went to a Tavern, but being Night, and there being four Taverns together, he could not tell what Tavern; that there they drank two Pints of Wine, and changing half a Guinea to pay the Reckoning, had 8 s. 6 d. in Change; that then the Prisoner deluded him to go with her to her Lodging to drink a Dram with her, that he had not been there above half an Hour, before she slipt away from him, and feeling for his Watch, &c. found they were gone; that the next Morning , i.e. on Tuesday, he found the Ring in the Custody of Mary Barret .

Mary Barret depos'd, The Prisoner came to pawn an Apron for 18 d. and she having no Silver less than half a Crown, which she would not trust her with, she pull'd the Ring off her Finger, and left it with her in Pledge while she went to get the half Crown chang'd; and the Prosecutor coming and leaving in Writing the Posy of the Ring, which was, No Riches, no Content, she stopt the Ring.

The Prisoner in her Defence pleaded, That the Prosecutor had been in Company with another Woman before he pick'd her up, and that he followed her, and would have her go to drink with him, and followed her to her, Lodging, spent two Shillings, and he gave her the Ring, leaving it in pawn for three Shillings for carnal Copulation with her, which he had. She desir'd the Court to ask the Prosecutor, if he was not Drunk? He reply'd, He had been drinking, but was neither drunk nor sober. The Prosecutor deposing, The Ring was taken off his Finger, but he did not know when it was taken, or how: upon this the Court ordered him to put the Ring on his Finger, which he did not do without difficulty; and when it was on, a Stander-by, endeavoured to pull it off, and pulled very hard, but the Ring came not off; after a full hearing of the Matter, the Jury acquitted her.

Francis Smith and Elizabeth Skagg , of St. James's Westminster , were indicted for feloniously stealing two Silver Cups, five Silver Spoons, two Tea Spoons, eight Gold Rings, divers Sheets, Napkins, Table Cloths, and other Goods, in the Dwelling-House of Sarah Jones , the 7th of May last.

The Prosecutor depos'd, That she going out on Whit-Sunday, at her coming Home, found the Door of the Room seemingly fast, but could not open it; but calling the Prisoner Skagg, she at last did with some Difficulty open it; that the Prisoner Smith having been her Lodger for some time, and Skagg her Neighbour and Acquaintance, and frequently at her House, she had no Suspicion of them for the present; but afterwards having some Reason to suspect them, got a Search Warrant, and upon searching of Skagg's House, found some of her Linen, and was carried by the Prisoners to Places where part of the Linen was pawned, and both of them owned the Fact; and that they had got a false Key, by which they had opened the Lock, took the Goods, and confess'd where they had sold the Plate; that they laid the Fault upon one another, one charging the other with putting them on the Commission of the Fact, and express'd a great deal of Sorrow that they had so ill used the Prosecutor. The Prosecutor's Evidence was confirm'd as to the finding of the Linen in Skagg's House, and other Circumstances; and their owning the Fact was confirmed by the Constable, and other Evidence; the Fact being plainly proved, the Jury found them both Guilty to the Value of 4 s. 10 d.

[Transportation. See summary.]

, of St. Martin's in the Fields , was indicted for feloniously stealing divers wearing Apparel , the Goods of Jane Lloyd , the 14th of April last; the Fact being plainly proved, the Jury found her Guilty to the Value of 10 d.

[Transportation. See summary.]

Christopher Stockdon was indicted for stealing five Geese, and nine Chickens , the Property of John Jackson , the 29th of May last; but the Proof against the Prisoner being deficient, he was acquitted .

James Baker , of St. Martin's in the Fields , was indicted for Burglary, in breaking the House of John Gothridge , the 24th of March last; but there being no Evidence against the Prisoner but that of John Sheffield , who had been admitted as an Evidence, and own'd himself an Accomplice in the Fact, which he denying in Court, the Prisoner was acquitted .

Mary Clark , of St. Martin's in the Fields , was indicted for stealing a Guinea, and three Shillings , the Money of Robert Ross , the 7th of June last; but the Evidence against the Prisoner not being satisfactory to the Jury, she was acquitted .

Margaret Brown , of St. Clement's Danes , was indicted for stealing a Steel Box, and a Guinea, the Money of William Coney , Esq ; from the Person of Joanna Man , the 13th of June last; the Fact being plainly proved, the Jury found her Guilty to the Value of 10 d.

[Transportation. See summary.]

Eleanor Hayward , of St. George in the East , was indicted for feloniously stealing a Shirt, value 2 s. and a Handkerchief, value 1 s. 6 d. the Goods of John Hopkins , the 16th of May last; the Fact being plainly proved, the Jury found her Guilty to the Value of 10 d.

[Whipping. See summary.]

Spurstow Henry Tempest and Alice Tempest , alias Tesser , of St. James's Westminster , were indicted for assaulting Jane Welsh , in the King's Highway, putting her in Fear, and taking from her a Pocket, value 1 d. a Guinea, 34 s. in Silver, and some Half-pence , the 16th of May last.

Jane Welsh depos'd, That the Day laid in the Indictment, she having a Law-Suit with one William Collins , an Intimate of the Prisoners, they had taken out a Judge's Warrant against her, to which she had been to put in Bail that Day; that going Home about twelve o'Clock, she having been at a Neighbour's House, at one Mr. Taylor's, and drank a Pint of drink, the Prisoners being in the same House, and she complaining of their Usage of her to Mr. Taylor, the Prisoners took occasion to call and abuse her at a high Rate, and afterwards they going away before her, she paid her Reckoning, and went Home, and between Twelve and One o'Clock hearing a Noise, she went to the Door, and the Prisoners with another Man rush'd in upon her, calling her Bitch, and beating her, pulled her out of her House, and she enquiring the Reason, the Prisoner said, they were come to serve a Judge's Warrant; that the Prisoner Tempest held her, and Alice Tesser cut off her Pocket, in which was the Money mentioned in the Indictment.

Anne Chamberlain depos'd, That she Lodging in the Prosecutor's House, heard her cry out about One o'Clock in the Morning, as she thinks, on Saturday Morning, the 8th of May; but she not rising out of her Bed, did not see the Prisoners.

Mary Bury depos'd, That she Lodging in the Prosecutor's House, her Husband wak'd her about One o'Clock in the Morning the Saturday after the Judge's Warrant had been Bail'd on the Friday, and hearing an Outcry got up, and went to the Stair-head, but being in her Shift only, went not down, but heard a great Noise, and the Prosecutor cry out.

John Bury depos'd, That about One o'Clock in the Morning before-mentioned, he heard a great Noise, and the Prosecutor cry'd out, she had lost her Pocket, and that the said Tempest had held her, and Alice Tesser had cut off her Pocket, and there was in it the Money mentioned in the Indictment.

Mr. Taylor depos'd, The Night that Bail had been put in to the Judge's Warrant the Day preceding, the Prosecutor came to his House, he keeping an Alehouse a few Doors off, that the Prisoners likewise came in, and there was Scolding betwixt them; that this was about 11, or between 11 and 12 o'Clock that the Prisoners went away, and afterwards the Prosecutor, and that he being gone up to Bed, heard a great Noise and Outcry, and Mrs. Welsh cry out, that the Prisoners and a little Constable were come to serve a Judge's Warrant, but he heard no mention of a Robbery.

John Bury depos'd, That when he apprehended the Prisoner, Alice Tesser, in Rag-Fair, she said, D - n the old Bitch, she had forswore herself, for there was but 33 s. in the Pocket, whereas she had sworn to 34 s. This was also confirm'd by another Evidence.

The Prisoners deny'd the Fact, and Tempest call'd several Persons to his Reputation, who depos'd, That he had been brought up to the Law, and practised as an Attorney or Solicitor, and that as to his Practice they had nothing to say, but never had heard that he had been Guilty of Robbery. He likewise call'd some Evidence , who depos'd, That the Prosecutor and Prisoners had been in Company together after the time that the Prosecutor said the Robbery had been committed, and though she did pretend to have legal Satisfaction for Abuses received from the Prisoners, did not at that time mention any thing of the Robbery; upon a full hearing of the Matter, the Jury acquitted both the Prisoners.

John Dean , of St. Magnes the Martyr , was indicted for feloniously stealing 38 lb. of Tobacco, value 20 s. in the Warehouse of Jonathan Forward , the 10th of April last.

James Forward depos'd, That the Prisoner and one Leonard Walker , being Cooper s and Servants to Mr. Jonathan Forward , in order to pack up some Tobacco, desired to have the Keys of the Warehouse to fetch the Screws, that they staying long, he went to the Warehouse, and met Leonard Walker with the Tobacco in his Apron, and the Prisoner coming out with the Screws; that Walker being ask'd, what he did with it? said, D - n him, it was a Frenchman's Tobacco, and they had had enough of his, desired him to take no Notice of it to his Master, he would give him a Bottle of Wine, but he refus'd, and gave an Account to his Master. That the Prisoner being ask'd, where he had the Tobacco? He reply'd, It was taken out of the Hogshead A, No. 8.

The Prisoner deny'd the Fact, and call'd the following Evidences.

Francis Millard depos'd, That he saw James Forward stop Leonard Walker with the Tobacco in his Apron at Cox's Key , about forty Yards from the Warehouse; that he made him bring it back to the Warehouse-Door, and he threw it down, and that the Prisoner was then coming out of the Warehouse with the Screws, and that about two Hours after, James Forward gave him, this Evidence, a Pot of Beer to put it again into the Hogshead .

John Turner depos'd, That he had known the Prisoner ten Years, that he was a Cooper by Trade, and had the Character of an honest Man.

John Hyat depos'd, That Leonard Walker going by his Door, ask'd him, How the Prisoner did? And he telling him, he was sent to Newgate; he reply'd, he was very sorry that he should suffer on account of what he himself had done; and that afterwards when these Hogsheads were weigh'd off, which was some Weeks after, Leonard Walker was employ'd to weigh it off, and there was no Notice taken of stealing the Tobacco at that time; the Prisoner having a good Character given him, the Jury acquitted him.

Richard Ridgley , of Stepney , was indicted for privately taking a Pair of Silver Buttons, a Pair of Buckles, a Penknife, a Thimble, and two half Crowns, some Shillings, and an Irish Half-penny, from the Person of Elizabeth Eustace , the 18th of June last.

The Prosecutor depos'd, That about Two o'Clock in the Afternoon, the Day laid in the Indictment, she being near the Turn-pike at Mile-end , there was a Race, and just as the Racers were come to the Turn-pike, that she perceiving something to be doing about her Pocket, she clapt her Hand upon it, found it was cut, and missing her Money, clapt hold of the Prisoner, telling him, he had her Money, and some By-standers assisting, got the Prisoner into the Turn-pike House, where she searching him, found her own Penknife, Thimble, Pair of Buttons, one Buckle, the other being taken up from the Ground, and about half a Crown in Money in one Pocket, and two half Crowns, Shillings, Six-pences, and the Irish Half-penny in another Pocket. This was confirm'd as to the finding the Money, and the Things sworn to by the Prosecutor upon the Prisoner, was confirm'd by other Evidences, and also another Penknife taken out of his Pocket by another Evidence.

Richard Lunn , and another Evidence depos'd, That when he was at the Justice's House, he said, (there being about 12 s. and 6 d. found about him,) the Prosecutor had half a Crown of his Money. The Prisoner pleaded, he found the Things and Money on the Ground as he was stooping down to get through the Turn-pike; the Jury found him guilty to the value of 10 d.

[Transportation. See summary.]

Elizabeth Kent , alias Oxford Bess , was indicted, for that she, together with Hannah Whitman, alias Clarety Hannah , did upon the 8th of June last assault Barbara Minekin , putting her in Fear, and taking from her a Handkerchief, and half a Guinea .

Barbara Minekin depos'd, That she was going along near the 7 Dials , when the Prisoner and Hannah Whitman met with her, telling her, she should give them a Dram; that she reply'd, she had no Money; that they damn'd her, calling her Dutch Bitch, telling her, she had Money, and the Prisoner took her Handkerchief, and half a Guinea, that was ty'd up in the Corner of it, Hannah Whitman holding her, while the Prisoner ran away with it, that she crying out, Claret-fac'd Hannah d - n'd her, and said, if she made any Noise, she would Murder her in the Street, threatening to cut her Throat with a Penknife; she being in Fear, said, she would do what she pleas'd; that then she carried her to a Brandy-shop, and in came the Prisoner, and she having a Nosegay in her Bosom, the Prisoner said, D - n you, I long for your Nosegay, and snatch'd it away, and then said, she had a mind to her Gown, and got a Penknife of Claret-fac'd Hannah, and cut her Gown, Apron, and Head-cloaths, all to Pieces, and carried it away, so that she was forced to go home half naked, with her cut Apron hanging about her Shoulders.

Thomasin Partridge depos'd, That the Prosecutor lodg'd with her, and told her, that she had half a Guinea, and would go and fetch home a Gown she had in Pawn; and that she told her, the Woman who had it, not being at home, she was coming home, and gave her an account how she had been us'd by the Prisoner and Hannah Whitman , and did come home without any Gown, with an old Apron hanging over her Shoulders; that when the Prisoner was apprehended, she said, D - n the Prosecutor, she would see her out, if it came to the worst, she should only go over the Water after her Husband, Jarvis Rhodes , who was Transported.

John Bartlet depos'd, That on the 8th of June, the Prisoner and Prosecutor, and Clarety Hannah, were at Mr. Avelins Shop, and had a Quartern of Gin, that there the Prisoner snatch'd away the Prosecutor's Nosegay, that then she said, D - n you, you have had three or four Gowns of your Landlady, and never paid for one, and ask'd Clarct Hannah, have you a Pen-knife? And she gave her one; and she cut her Gown off her Back, and her Apron, and that the Prosecutor said, she had lost half a Guinea, and a Handkerchief, and she would swear a Robbery against her; and she made answer, that she did not matter her, she had those would bring her off from any thing ten times worse than this.

The Prisoner deny'd the taking of the Money, but own'd the cutting of the Gown, and said the Gown was hers; that she had lent her the Gown, and had ask'd her for it several times, and that she swore she would never let her have it, and took a Pen-knife, and swore, D - n you, you Bitch, I'll cut you down the Nose, and threatned to swear her Life away.

Jane Obrine depos'd, That the Prosecutor came to her the Day this Fact was said to be committed, about 6 o'Clock, and brought her an Apron to wash, and that afterwards she met her in Covent-Garden, and there heard her swear, she would damn her Soul, but she would hang the Prisoner, and get Money to put herself into a House.

Elizabeth Welsh depos'd, That she saw the Prosecutor, and Prisoner, and Hannah Whitman in the Brandy-shop; that there was a Noise, and Scolding, but she heard nothing of a Robbery.

Mary Hall depos'd, That on the 11th of June, she thinks, the Prosecutor came to her to pawn her Apron for 6 d. saying, she had not a Farthing, and was very Hungry.

Isabel Higgins depos'd, She had known the Prisoner seven Years, and never heard any Body say she had wronged them; that she had employ'd her to wash for her.

Mary Adams depos'd, She had known the Prisoner, and had intrusted her with the Value of 30 or 40 l. and always found her very honest; and that she had heard the Dutch Woman (i.e. the Prosecutor) say, she would Hang the Prisoner, and her too; and that when the Prosecutor was in Newgate for picking a Gentleman's Pocket of a Watch and Snuff-Box , the Prisoner sent her a Shilling to pay her Fees; but as to the Prisoner she could not say, but that she was an idle Woman since the Death of her Husband .

Mary Leadheater depos'd, She had known the Prisoner five Years, and she had lived with her at Dr. Monroe's, and never heard she had wronged any Body.

Matthew Curseworth depos'd, The Prisoner lodg'd with him four Months, and she never wrong'd him of any thing.

John Forster and John Bartlet depos'd, That the last Evidence and Mary Adams kept disorderly Houses, lodg'd and entertain'd lewd People.

John Palmer depos'd, He knew the Prosecutor's Evidences , that all of them were of the Seven-Dials Society , and that he would not hang a Dog upon the Evidence of fifty of them; after a full hearing of the Matter, the Jury acquitted her.

John Roff , of St. Giles's in the Fields , was indicted for feloniously stealing 40 Ounces of Silver Thread, value 12 l. the Property of John Fletcher , the 6th of June last.

The Prosecutor depos'd, That he being an Orris Weaver , the Prisoner was his Apprentice , and missing his Goods from time to time, suspected the Prisoner; and that his Fellow-Servant acquaiuting him that the Prisoner had risen in the Night, and gone to the Work-room, and wound Silver-thread off from the Bobbins, he search'd his Pockets, and found there an Ounce and half a Quarter; and that upon examining him, he confess'd he had sold it at a Silversmith's Shop in Russel-Street, near Covent-Garden; after a full hearing of the Matter, the Jury found him Guilty to the Value of 10 d.

[Transportation. See summary.]

Mary Cotterel , Widow , was indicted for buying the said Ounce and half of Silver Thread, and other Parcels of the Prisoner, knowing it to be stolen .

Mrs. Cotterel did not deny the buying of the Goods of the Prisoner, but pleaded, she bought it publickly in her open Shop, and did not know it to be stolen, and gave the full Price for it, which was 2 s. 9 d. she called several Persons of the same Trade to her Reputation, who were themselves all Persons of Credit, and depos'd, That she had given the full Value for the Goods, and as much as they themselves would give in the Condition they were in; that they had known her for 9, 12, and 17 Years, and all gave her the best of Characters for fair Dealing, Probity, Prudence and Vertue; upon a full hearing of the Matter, the Jury honourably acquitted her.

Henry Thomas , of Stepney , was indicted for assaulting Laurence Pain , in a Field, or open Place, near the Highway, putting him in Fear, and taking from him a Hat, value 1 s. a Wig, value 3 d. and five Pence in half Pence , the 31st of May last.

The Prosecutor depos'd, That he having been a Watchman in the Watch-House at Bethnel-Green , was about One o'Clock in the Morning going, together with his Wife, to drink with his Brother Watchmen; that being near the Sign of the George , he was met by two Men, who ask'd him, what was a Clock? That he answer'd, between One and Two; that no more Words pass'd, but the other Person knock'd him down with a Truncheon he had in his Hand; and the Prisoner went to his Wife, and put his Hand down her Bosom, as he supposed, to feel for Money; that the other Person beat him in an unmerciful manner, giving him divers very great Wounds on his Head, as he endeavoured to rise, the Prisoner left his Wife, and came to assist his Partner, and kneeling on his Stomach, kept him (this Evidence) down, and he crying out, said to his Comrade, D - n him, cut his Throat; that his Wife running and crying out to the Watch, the Prisoners ran away, and the Truncheon (which was a Rolling-pin) was found by the Side of the Bank they had got over; that he lost five Pence in Half-pence, and his Hat and Wig.

Isabel Pain confirm'd the Evidence of her Husband as before, and added, that while the other Person was beating her Husband, and he endeavouring to rise, the Prisoner left her, and went to her Husband to assist his Comrade, and said, D - n him, cut his. Throat, and put his Hand in his Pocket, and took his Money; that her Husband being almost kill'd, she ran and call'd out to the Watchman, Stephen Martin , who coming, got her Husband to the Watch-house.

Stephen Martin , the Watchman, depos'd, That as he was going his Rounds between One and Two o'Clock, heard an Outcry of Murder, went and found the Prosecutor in a sad bloody Condition, and so bruis'd, that he was almost kill'd; that he having got him to the Watch-House, ran for a Surgeon, and in the mean time the Beadle had taken the Prisoner, and was going to let him go; but he said he must not, for he answer'd the Description given by the Prosecutor, (that he had a Black Cap, and a Black Crape Neckcloth about his Neck,) of being one of the Persons who had done the Fact; and he being carried to the Prosecutor in the Watch-house, both the Prosecutor and his Wife affirm'd he was one of the Men that had done the Injury; and that he was put in the Cage, and the Prosecutor coming to himself, desir'd to see the Prisoner again, and was positive that he was one of the Men; and that the Prisoner being carried to the Prosecutor's House the next Morning, the Prosecutor affirm'd he was one of the Persons, and both the Prosecutor and his Wife swore the same positively in Court.

Joseph Enstace depos'd, That Stephen Martin and the Surgeon came the next Morning to his House to drink, and at that time, in way of discourse, Stephen Martin said, that when the Prosecutor saw the Prisoner the first time in the Watch-House, he could not be positive that he was the Man; but when he saw him the second time, he then was positive that he was.

Elizabeth Wadley depos'd, That she being a Neighbour went to see the Prosecutor after he was brought Home the next Morning, and asking him and his Wife, if they could know the Persons if they saw them? That Mrs. Pain reply'd, She had no time to take Notice, being in a Surprize, and did not know whether she should know them again if she did see them.

Elizabeth Newbury depos'd to the same purpose.

The Prisoner pleaded, That he had waited late before his Master he work'd for came Home to pay him, and being too late to go to his Lodging, he took a Walk in the Fields, and walking near Bethnal-Green, he there happened to be charg'd with the Fact, but knew nothing at all of the Robbery; upon a full hearing of the Matter, the Jury acquitted him.

Thomas Newstead , of St. Mary le Bone , was indicted for feloniously stealing a Pewter Pot, &c . the Goods of Robert Steward , the 26th of April last; the Indictment being wrong laid, he was acquitted .

Dorcas Thorp , of St. Giles's in the Fields , was indicted for feloniously marrying William Flanders , her first Husband John Macqueen being Alive ; but the Evidence being deficient, she was acquitted .

Martha Weston was indicted for feloniously stealing a Sauce-pan , the Goods of Richard Brown , the 23d of March last; but no Evidence appearing against the Prisoner, she was acquitted .

Thomas Mann , of St. Botolph's Aldersgate , was indicted for feloniously stealing fifteen Ounces of Silver Plate, value 3 l. the Property of Arthur Parsons , the 16th of March last.

The Prosecutor depos'd, That he hired a Room, and employ'd the Prisoner to work up what Silver Plate he sent him in Buckles, he being a casting Silversmith , and that he had found it at a Pawnbrokers where he had pawn'd it, it not appearing to be a Felony; upon a full hearing of the Evidence, the Jury acquitted the Prisoner.

John Burnham , of St. Bartholomew Exchange , was indicted for picking a Gentleman's Pocket of a Handkerchief , the 20th of June last; the Fact being plainly prov'd, the Jury found him Guilty to the Value of 10 d.

[Transportation. See summary.]

Peter Gates , of St. Dunstan's in the East , was indicted for feloniously stealing 180 lb. of Pot Ashes, value 23 s. the Property of Robert Prior , the 30th of June last.

It appear'd by the Evidence, that the Ashes were lost from the Keys at the Custom-House , part of them being found upon the Prisoner, the Jury found him Guilty to the Value of 10 d.

[Transportation. See summary.]

Isaac Smith , of St. Sepulchres , was indicted for feloniously stealing a Brown Gelding, value 6 l. the Property of John Williamson , the 10th of June last; but the Fact not being proved to the Satisfaction of the Jury, they acquitted him.

Savil Hornby and John Akers , of St. George the Martyr , were indicted for breaking the House of Martha Atkinson , Widow , in the Night-time, and stealing seven Gold Rings, two Diamond Rings, and 15 l. in Money , the 8th of April last; but there being no Evidence against the Prisoners, but an Information of Savil Hornby, which she afterwards would not abide by, the Jury acquitted them.

Alice Leader , of Christ-Church, Spittle-Fields , was indicted for feloniously stealing two Silver Snuff-Boxes, a Ring, and other Goods , the Property of Jonathan Haskins , the 11th of June last.

It appear'd by the Evidence, that the Prisoner was a Wet Nurse in the Prosecutor's House, and carried the Goods at several times to pawn; that the Pawnbroker suspecting her, sent Word to the Prosecutor, and he came and owned the Goods; that he examining her, she own'd the Fact, and said, she pawn'd them to raise Money to pay a Debt of her Husband's, deceas'd: But this she deny'd upon her Trial, alledging, that she pawned them by the Order, and for the Use of the Prosecutor while he was Sick; but this Plea not seeming probable, she made use of another Plea, viz. That the Prosecutor had given her the Goods to pawn to have carnal Copulation with her; but this also not being believed, the Jury found her Guilty to the Value of 10 d.

[Transportation. See summary.]

James Blanchet , of St. George in the East , was indicted for feloniously stealing 3 Handkerchiefs, in the Shop of Adam Walker , the 12th of June last.

It appear'd by the Evidence, that the Handkerchiefs were lost from the Prosecutor's Shop-Window, and were found upon the Prisoner; the Fact being plainly proved, the Jury found him Guilty to the Value of 10d.

[Transportation. See summary.]

Katharine Lewer , alias Owen , of St. Andrew's Holbourn , was indicted for feloniously stealing 50 l. in Money, and two Oliver's half Crowns, in the Dwelling-House of William Haydon , the 2d of April last.

It appear'd by the Evidence, that the Prisoner was a Servant to the Prosecutor, and that the Money was taken away by Degrees in small Sums for the Space of two Years; there were several Circumstances relating to the Prisoner, that were very good grounds for Suspicion; but there being no sufficient Proof to fix the Fact upon the Prisoner, the Jury acquitted her; but being charg'd in Court with another Felony, she was order'd to be continued, and indicted for that Fact.

Richard Macey , of the Parish of St. Faith's , was indicted for feloniously stealing divers Books , the Property of James and John Knapton , the 26th of May last; the Fact being plainly prov'd, the Jury found him Guilty to the Value of 4 s. 10 d.

[Branding. See summary.]

Anne Carter , of St. George in the East , was indicted for privately stealing three Guineas, and twelve Shillings in Money, from the Person of Erasmus Bowen , the 26th of May last.

The Prosecutor depos'd, That he having been at a Club, being pretty much in Drink, was coming Home into East-Smith-field between 11 and 12 o'Clock at Night, and in Ratcliff Highway met with the Prisoner, who ask'd him to make her Drink, and carried him to a Publick House, the Sign of the Three Tobacco-Rolls , and afterwards to her Lodging, which was but a few Doors off; that there he fell asleep, and slept, he believes, about two Hours, or two Hours and a half, and when he awak'd he miss'd his Money, and was sure he had it when he went into her Room, and there was no Body in the Room but themselves.

Susan Ramber depos'd, That she was Sister to the Prosecutor's Wife, and Dwelling in the same House, the Prosecutor not coming Home, as usual, her Sister was very uneasy; and she hearing her walking about in her Chamber, she went up to her about Three o'Clock in the Morning, whereupon she being in fear he had been killed, or some Mischief had befallen him, he having not used to stay out, she desir'd her to go to inquire after him at the Watch-House, or any Places that she might be likely to get Intelligence of him; that as she was going by the Alehouse-Door in Ratcliff Highway, where he was, he called her; that the Prisoner likewise being there, she abused her very much, and afterwards an Officer being sent for, she went out at the Back-Door, and hid herself; that afterwards going home to her own Room to dress her self, she (this Evidence) looking through the Key-hole, saw the Prisoner take a Guinea, as she thought out of her Bosom, and put it in her Pocket, saying, D - n him, this is one of his Guineas; and that when the Watchman came, and she was search'd, a Guinea and 10 s. were found in her Pocket.

The Prisoner in her Defence pleaded, That as she was going to get a Pint of Drink, and a Candle, he pick'd her up, and was Drunk, and would go with her into the Alehouse, and would not let her go till they had drank two Pints of Two-penny, that she going away, the Prosecutor followed her to her Lodging, and said, he would not go away till she had fetch'd him half a Pint of Rum, that she fetch'd the Rum, and he said he would not go away that Night, and lay down upon the Bed, and gave her a Guinea, and had carnal Copulation with her; that he went to Sleep, and when he awak'd demanded his Gold; that she refus'd to give it him, telling him, he had the Satisfaction of her Body for it, according to Contract, and that she had no more of his Money than the Guinea he gave her, and as to the 10 s. it was her own Money; after a full hearing of the Matter, the Jury acquitted her.

Peter Bluck , of St. Andrew's Holbourn , was indicted for the Murther of Anne Bluck , his Daughter, an Infant of five Years of Age , the 19th of February, in the first Year of his present Majesty King George .

The Prisoner upon his Arraignment pleaded Guilty to the Indictment; but the Court being credibly inform'd that the Prisoner was not in his right Mind, and perceiving some Tokens of Distraction in him at the Bar, refus'd to take his Plea; but the next Day being brought to the Bar, and pleading not Guilty, the Court proceeded to examine the Witnesses for the King, who depos'd as follows.

Mr. Fish, the Constable, depos'd, That he had heard the Prisoner had been to enquire for him, and going to Justice Newton's the next Day upon another Occasion, he saw the Prisoner in the Justice's Entry; that afterwards, he being near St. Clement's Church, heard some Enquiry made for a Constable, and that the Prisoner came to him, and told him, his Conscience accus'd him of a Murther he had committed two Years and a half ago, and he wanted to go before a Justice to make a Confession; and he seem'd at that time to be in some Confusion; that he afterwards went to Justice Burdus, and made a Confession.

Justice Burdus depos'd, That the Prisoner came to him the 21st of June, and said, he had been at two Justices before, and that he was come to make a Confession of a Murther he had committed; that he seeming to be melancholy, he ask'd him, If he had not been Sick lately? He reply'd, No. That he took his Confession, and sent to inquire in the Neighbourhood if any such Fact had been committed. The Substance of his Confession was, That on the 19th of February last was two Years, he having one Son and two Daughters, was afraid that they would use his little Daughter, Anne Bluck , hardly, and therefore he took a Hair-Line, and made a Noose in it, ty'd it up to the Canopy of a Bed, and put the Child's Head in it, and let it hang for three Quarters of an Hour, and then cut her down, and pretended, that she dy'd of an Apoplectick Fit, and then sent for an Apothecary: He added, that he had twice attempted to Hang himself, but was prevented; and once to Poison himself, but his Heart fail'd him, that he did not do it; and that his Conscience troubling him for the Murther of his Daughter, he confess'd it, that he might be brought to publick Justice.

Edward Aldern , an Apothecary, depos'd, That he was for several Years Apothecary to the Prisoner's Family, and that he was about two Years and a half since sent for by the Prisoner's Daughter, now living, to the Child, but when he came, the Child was dead; and not having any Suspicion, did not examine the Body narrowly, but perceiv'd no Marks of Violence, nor was there any Discoloration; and that the Child was subject to Convulsion-Fits , and that he had twice cured her of them before; and was of Opinion she dy'd of the Convulsions . That as to the Prisoner he had known him several Years, and at that time he said nothing about the Child, and by his walking about the Room, and looking out at the Window, which was his usual Behaviour, seem'd to be of a melancholy Disposition.

Elizabeth Horton depos'd, That she was one of the Searchers of St. Andrew's Holbourn, and was sent for to examine both the Child and the Mother; that they perceiv'd no Marks of Violence on the Child's Body, were of Opinion, and gave it in, that the Child dy'd of Convulsion-Fits.

Joyce Boyce depos'd, That she liv'd in the Prisoner's House at the time both of the Death of his Wife and Child, and that the Prisoner always acted like a Madman; that the Prisoner's Wife call'd her, and told her, her Child was dying, and that she gave it Water and Nutmeg.

John Farmer depos'd, That he had seen and heard visible Tokens and Expressions of Distraction in the Prisoner, and that he had made over and given away all he had in the World that he was capable of, all but his Wife's Jointure.

John Shaw depos'd, That he had several times given a Guinea a time to a Minister to pray by him, and had given away 400 l. in five Weeks time, and had scarce a Six Pence left to help himself; there being no Evidence against the Prisoner, but his own Confession, the Jury acquitted him.

Alice Binnel , of St. Giles's in the Fields , was indicted for feloniously stealing a Camblet Cloak, and forty Guineas, the Property of James Armsby , in the Dwelling-House of Peter Boswell , the 18th of April last.

The Prosecutor depos'd, That the Prisoner was taken into the Family, and kept on Charity; that he knew of no other Person but the Prisoner who had Knowledge where the Money lay; and that she went away from the House abruptly, which gave him Reason to suspect her; but though the Money was lost, there being no Proof that she took it, the Jury acquitted her.

Tifford Willington , Henry Fleming , and John Hawkswell , of St. Paul's Shadwell , were indicted for stealing a Brass Porridge Pot, value 10 s. two Sauce Pans, value 5 s. and other Goods , the Property of Thomas Johnson , the 21st of June last.

They were likewise indicted a second time for stealing divers Linen, Mobs, Aprons, &c . the Goods of Charles Smart , the same 21st of June .

The Prosecutors both depos'd, They lost the Goods before-mention'd, and having heard that the Prisoners had been taken up, and were in Custody on Suspicion of having stolen Goods, they went to the Watch-house, and there found both the Prisoners, and their Goods, in the Custody of the Officer.

John Shillingford depos'd, That as he was going over Stepney Fields about Three o'Clock in the Morning, he saw the Prisoners carrying Sauce Pans, and perceiving Hawkswell's Pockets bulk out, he suspecting them to have committed some Robbery, therefore ask'd Hawkswell (the old Man) where he had the Goods, and whither he was carrying them? That he reply'd, He was in fear that his Landlord would seize them for Rent, and so he had come from his Lodgings; that he searching his Pockets, found wet Linen, which further confirming his Suspicion, he would not let them go from him, till he came to White-Chapel, and got a Constable, and secur'd them, except one Boy, which ran away; and having got it out of the other Boy, that they had brought the Things from New Gravel-Lane , the Boy pretending, that as they were going to get Bird's Nests, the Prisoner met them, and desired them to carry the Things for him; he went thither, and upon inquiry found the Prosecutors; and in coming over an Hay-Field, found the Boy which had run from him, lying in a Hay-cock, who carried him to the Farthing-Pye-Fields , and shew'd him where they had hid a Porridge Pot in a Ditch.

Hawkswell in his Defence pleaded, That he being out late on Saturday Night, met a Man, who desir'd him to help him to carry some Goods for him out of his House; but produc'd no such Person.

Willington pleaded, That they were going a Bird's Nesting, and met with Hawkswell, and he was to give him a Half-penny to carry the Things for him. There was no Evidence against Fleming, but his being with the other, nothing being found upon him, and also that he could discover where the Porridge Pot was hid in the Ditch; and Willington calling some Evidences, who gave him a good Character, the Jury acquitted both him and Fleming, and found Hawkswell alone Guilty to the Value of 10 d. upon each Indictment .

[Transportation. See summary.]

Robert Wheeler and John Collins , of St. Dunstan's Stepney , were indicted for feloniously stealing two Yards and a half of printed Linen, in the Shop of William Brimer , the 10th of June last.

The Prosecutor depos'd, That the Cloth hung out at her Window for Show, and she being gone up Stairs, her Neighbour call'd to her, asking her, if she would stay there, and let her Shop be Robb'd? That she came down, but they had got the Cloth, and ran away with it, but were afterwards taken; and one of them confess'd that it had been Sold in Rag-Fair.

Mary Richardson depos'd, That she living over-against the Prosecutor, saw the Prisoner lurking about her Window, and suspecting them, ask'd them, what they had to do at her Window? That they gave her saucy Language, and she saw Wheeler take the Cloth, and Collins standing at a little Distance from him, and she going towards them, they ran away, she was positive to the Prisoners; the Fact being plainly prov'd, the Jury found them Guilty each to the Value of 10 d.

[Transportation. See summary.]

Edward Shaftoe , of Hampstead , was indicted for feloniously stealing a Hog, value 15 s. the Property of Nathaniel Gray , the 26th of May last.

The Prosecutor depos'd, The Hog was in his Stye in his Yard, and he being in Bed, and hearing the Hog grunt, and make a Noise, he got up, pursued the Prisoner, and took him leading the Hog in a String; the Fact being plainly proved, the Jury found him Guilty to the Value of 10 d.

[Transportation. See summary.]

David Dickson , of St. Martin's in the Fields , was indicted for feloniously stealing eighteen Guineas and a half, the Property of William Cushnee , in the Dwelling-House of Mr. Hall , the 21st of June last.

William Cushnee depos'd, That the Prisoner was his Lodger, and he having come lately from Scotland, and having three Guineas and a half, desir'd his Wife to lay it up for him, and give it him as he had occasion for it, and had had a Guinea and a half of the Money at times as he wanted it; that the last Money he wanted, he went himself to give it him, it was in the Prisoner's own Pocket Book, which was laid in the Drawer of a Trunk, in which lay the eighteen Guineas and a half scatter'd about in the Drawer, which the Prisoner standing by, and looking over his Shoulder, had an opportunity of seeing; that this was about eight Days before the Money was lost; that the Prisoner having a Watch, and having broken the Chain, wanting Money, desired him to sell it for him, which he refusing, the Prisoner pawn'd it for 15 s. as was proved in Court by the Pawnbroker.

This Evidence was confirm'd by the Prosecutor's Wife, Anne Cushnee , who depos'd, That the Prisoner having desired her to lay up in his Pocket Book three Guineas and a half, he having no Conveniency to lay it in, and not caring to carry it about him, that she did so, and the next Week he desir'd to have half a Guinea of it, and about ten Days after that he desir'd to have another Guinea, which she gave him, and soon after ask'd for his Pocket Book, and the other two Guineas, which was given him, as her Husband had before depos'd. That on Sunday, the 21st of June, the Prisoner came into her Room, and sate there Reading, that she telling him, it was time to go to Church, that the Bells had rung in, he went, but came back again in less than half an Hour; that she asking him, why he came back so soon? He said, the Prayers were ended, and he was weary of standing; that she not knowing how to get him out of the Room, and wanting to shift herself, was oblig'd to go down into a Neighbour's Room to do it; that while she was out of the Room, the Key of that Drawer in which the Money was, hung with other Keys in the upper Part of the Trunk, the Prisoner sitting by the Trunk reading, that she suspecting nothing, never look'd for her Money till the Wednesday following; that then she being washing, the Prisoner desir'd to have his Linen wash'd, saying, he was to go into the Country; she knew not by what foreboding of Mind, ran up in some surprize to look for her Money, and having taken the Keys out of her Trunk some Days before, and thrown them among some Clothes into a Basket, open'd the Drawer, and found that all her Money was gone; upon which knowing that no Body had been alone in her Room but the Prisoner, she complained before the Prisoner of her Money being lost; and she observing that the Prisoner took little Notice of it, there being no other Person for her to suspect but the Prisoner, she charg'd him with it; but he deny'd it, she got an Officer, and would have him consent to be search'd, but he said he would not be search'd but before higher Powers; whereupon he was carried before the Justice, and being search'd, in his Pocket Book were found twenty Guineas and a half; that before she saw the Money, there were among her Guineas two that she had taken particular Notice of, and if at any time she took out Money, she always took Care to look over them, and lay them by, resolving not to part with them while she had any other left; that they both of them had a Pig (as she call'd it, i. e. an Elephant) under the Head, one of them was a very fair new Guinea, and the other an old one, that had been a little defac'd or worn; that upon looking over the Money, there were two such Guineas there, which she swore positively to be two of those she had lost; and the same she swore in Court, they being produc'd and shewn to her.

Justice Webster depos'd, That she did before him describe one, or both, of the Guineas before ever she saw them.

The Prisoner began his Defence with a florid Harangue, That it was some Alleviation to the Greatness of his Misfortune, that tho' he was a Stranger in the Country, distant from his Friends, he had the Happiness to stand and vindicate his Innocence before so honourable a Court, the Fame of whose Justice and Impartiality he had so often heard. That as to the Fact he was charg'd with, he was intirely Innocent; that he descended of a reputable Family, had the Happiness of having had a Gentleman-like , learned, and virtuous Education; had commence Master of Arts in the University of A ; was capable of taking his Trial in Latin or Greek ; was always train'd and educated in Christian Principles , and his Mind embellish'd with such noble Notions of Vertue, that it was not probable, may, possible, he could be Guilty of so base a Fact as he stood charg'd with; that he had serv'd several Years in the Excise in Scotland, had good Recommendations thence to London; that he had indeed married unhappily, and for that Reason came to London in Expectation of some Advancement; and that he brought Money with him from Scotland, and could prove he had more Money than the three Guineas and a half, but being a Stranger, kept it conceal'd, being sew'd up in his Fob. And in Proof of this, call'd Isabel Pearson , who depos'd, That she met with the Prisoner in Wapping, he being just come on Shore, that they went in to drink together, discoursing of several Persons in Scotland ; that the Prisoner at paying the Reckoning, pull'd out a great deal of Money in Gold and Silver, she could not tell how much, but it might be twenty Guineas, or more; she added, that the Prosecutor told her he would not willingly do any harm to the Prisoner, if he would give him his Money as a present, he would make it up at any Rate.

Justice Webster depos'd, That this Evidence came to him, and demanded the Money as a Relation of his.

Mr. George Hays depos'd, That the Prisoner came to him the 23d of June, to be hired by him as an Usher , he keeping a Boarding-School at Chiswick; and that he taking Notice of his Cloaths, not thinking them good enough to appear in the Capacity he was to act in, ask'd him, what Money he had? And he told him, but three Guineas.

Margaret Crookshank depos'd, That she heard the Prisoner say, the Day before he was taken up, that he had but three Guineas and a half when he came to Town.

Thomas Staples , the Constable, depos'd, That when he was carrying the Prisoner to Prison, in the Coach, he advis'd him to confess, and make the Matter easy; that he said, that he would be willing the Prosecutor should have all the Money in the Justice's Hand; but he would not confess, he would be Hang'd first , and he would go and prepare himself for Death.

The Prisoner intimated, that the Prosecutor was but a Journeyman Taylor, and his Wife a Washerwoman, and that it was unlikely that he should have so much as eighteen Guineas and a half, and call'd some Witnesses who had heard the Prosecutor's Wife complain for want of Money.

To this the Prosecutor and his Wife reply'd, That upon Occasion of some Words between him and his Wife, the Prisoner took upon him to say, what need have you to complain, you have Gold enough.

But the Prosecutor call'd others who establish'd his Character as to that; and that he and his Wife were honest, saving, and industrious People, and did generally pass in the Neighbourhood for Persons aforehand in the World.

The Prisoner likewise call'd some Persons to his Character, but their Acquaintance with him was but of short Continuance; and the Fact being plainly proved, the Jury found him Guilty to the Value of 39 s.

[Transportation. See summary.]

Mary Murrey , of St. Mary le Strand , was indicted for feloniously stealing divers wearing Apparel , the Property of Mary Wilson and Elizabeth Smith , the 11th of June last.

It appear'd by the Evidence, that the Prisoner was a Lodger in the Prosecutor's House, and took the Goods; the Fact being plainly prov'd, the Jury found him Guilty to the Value of 10 d.

[Whipping. See summary.]

, of St. Martin's in the Fields , was indicted for feloniously stealing four broken Brass Cocks, the Goods of a Person unknown , the 5th of June last; but it not appearing that he stole them, but was sent to sell them, the Jury acquitted him.

Jane Jenkins , alias Jones , of St. Giles's Cripplegate , was indicted for feloniously stealing 2 lb. of Bacon, nine Ounces of Tobacco, a Candlestick, and other Goods of Joseph Swabey .

It appear'd by the Evidence, that the Prisoner being a Chore-woman in the House, stole the Goods; the Fact being plainly proved, the Jury found her Guilty to the Value of 10 d.

[Transportation. See summary.]

Esther Tims , was indicted for feloniously stealing divers Linen, &c. value 8 s. the Property of Thomas Newman , the 24th of June last; the Fact being plainly proved, the Jury found her Guilty to the Value of 10 d.

[Whipping. See summary.]

Susannah Payne , of St. Martin's in the Fields , was indicted for feloniously stealing 14 s. 4 d. in Money , the Property of Henry Fordnon , the 28th of May last.

The Prosecutor depos'd, That he going Home from Work late at Night, so that he could not get into his Lodging, he went to the Prisoner's, and gave her a Shilling for a Bed; and that after he was in Bed, she came and took his Breeches from under his Head, and he demanding his Breeches, she threatened to kill him, and her Husband, or some Man came up and knock'd him down.

The Prisoner deny'd the Fact, and pleaded, That the Prosecutor came to her, and ask'd, if she were Mistress of the House; telling her he was there the last Night with a Woman, and gave her a Shilling to lie with her; and she would not let him, and if she did not procure the Woman, he would prosecute her; after a full hearing of the Matter, the Jury acquitted her.

Mary Williams , of St. Martin's in the Fields , was indicted for stealing half a Guinea, the Money of George Ward , from the Person of Henry Alley , the 29th of June last.

It appear'd by the Evidence, that the Prosecutor having receiv'd some Money of his Master's, of one of his Customers, for which he had given a Receipt in his Master's Name, and therefore call'd it his Master's Money, though his Master had paid it him for his Wages; as he was going along in Drury-Lane , telling it in his Hand, the Prisoner catch'd the half Guinea out of his Hand, and beat 9 s. 6 d. more out of his Hand. The Indictment therefore being laid wrong, the Prisoner was acquitted , and he was order'd to bring another Indictment.

Elizabeth Burton was indicted for stealing a Pair of Sheets, and otherGoods , the Property of Mary Comb , the 12th of June last; the Fact being plainly prov'd, the Jury found her Guilty to the Value of 10d.

[Whipping. See summary.]

Margaret Robson , Mary Smith , Francis Lambert , and Mary Belcher , alias Smith, alias Coney , of St. Martin's in the Fields , were indicted, the two former for stealing divers Goods , the Property of Thomas Blodwell , the 23d of May last, and the latter for receiving them, knowing them to be stolen ; the Fact being plainly proved upon Hobson and Smith, the Jury found each of them Guilty to the Value of 10 d. but the Fact not being proved upon Lambert and Belcher, they were acquitted .

[Transportation. See summary.]

Susannah Collins , of St. Giles's in the Field , was indicted for privately stealing 40 Yards of Ferret , in the Shop of Robert Slater ; the Fact being plainly proved, the Jury found her Guilty to the Value of 10 d.

[Transportation. See summary.]

Edward Lee , of St Martin's Ludgate , was indicted for the Murther of Thomas Bennet , the 2d of June last.

Mr. Webster depos'd, That the Prisoner was going to unload some Bales of Paper at Messieurs Hoole and Brewer, near Ludgate ; that the Deceas'd coming by with an empty Cart, carelesly run his Wheel against the Head of the Prisoner's Horse; that upon this the Prisoner struck the Deceas'd a Blow with his Fist, which the Deceas'd return'd with his whip, striking him over the Head, and then the Prisoner gave the Deceas'd one Blow which made him stagger, and he not being able to recover himself, fell under his own Cart-Wheel, which being going, went over his Head. This Evidence was confirm'd by other Evidences for the King.

The Prisoner call'd several to his Reputation, who gave him the Character of a Man of a peaceable and quiet Behaviour; the Jury therefore brought in their Verdict accidental Death .

Andrew Maccouli , of St. Katherine's Coleman-street , was indicted for feloniously stealing a Silver Spoon , the Property of Alexander Brown , the 8th of June last; the Fact being plainly proved, the Jury found him Guilty to the Value of 10 d.

[Transportation. See summary.]

Sarah Shakespear , alias Bird , of St. Dunstan's in the West , was indicted for feloniously stealing two Silver Spoons , the Goods of William Tomlinson , the 4th of June last; the Fact being plainly proved, the Jury found her Guilty to the Value of 10 d.

[Whipping. See summary.]

Elizabeth Hanmore and Mary Thompson , of St. Brides , were indicted for breaking the House of Matth.ew Arnold , and feloniously stealing a Pewter Dish, five Plates, and other Goods , the 29th of May last; the Fact being plainly proved as to the Felony against Mary Thompson, she was found Guilty to the Value of 10 d. but there being no Proof of the Burglary, she was acquitted ; and there not being sufficient Proof against Elizabeth Hanmore, she was acquitted .

[Transportation. See summary.]

John Priglove , of St. Leonard Shoreditch , was indicted for feloniously stealing a Shift, and other Goods , of Daniel Round , the 18th of May last; the Fact being plainly proved, the Jury found him Guilty to the Value of 10 d.

[Transportation. See summary.]

Peter James , of St. Sepulchres , was indicted for feloniously stealing four Sheep's Kidneys, with the Fat , the Goods of John North , the 10th of June last.

Robert Howard depos'd, That he being a Watchman to some Sheep which hang at Butchers Stalls, saw the Prisoner cutting a Shoulder of Mutton off with a Penknife, and that the Fat and Kidneys had been cut off of four Sheep; the Evidence not satisfying the Jury, he was acquitted .

William West , of Stepney , was indicted for breaking the House of John London , between the Hours of Twelve and One in the Night-time, and Ravishing, and Carnally, knowing Elizabeth, the Wife of the said John London , the 15th of June last, against the Consent of the said Elizabeth .

Elizabeth London depos'd, That at the time said in the Indictment, about the Hour of One in the Morning, she being in Bed with her Child, and fast asleep, the Prisoner got in at the Sash-Window up one Pair of Stairs, (by the help of an Oar, as she supposed, there being an Oar reared up to the Window, and the Sash being found open,) that having undress'd himself there (as it did appear by his Clothes being found there) he came up to her Bed Chamber which was on the other Story, and she being fast asleep, knew nothing of it, till she was awak'd by his vile Actions; that as soon as ever she perceiv'd it, she immediately in a great Fright got out of Bed, and cry'd out, and rais'd her Neighbours, who coming in to her Assistance, found the Prisoner in, or on the Bed.

The Prosecutor being ask'd, what those vile Actions were, and what the Prisoner did to her? She reply'd, That he entered her Body. Being ask'd, How she lay? She answer'd, That she, in her Fright, could not very well tell, but it was on her right Side, and one Leg over the other. Being ask'd, How the Prisoner lay? She reply'd, behind her, between her and her Child. Being ask'd, If they lay in that Posture, how that could be done to her which she said was done? She reply'd, It was Backwards, not in the common way. Being ask'd, - She reply'd, Not in that Part. She added, She did not awake till she found him in the Action, and as soon as ever she perceiv'd it, in a great Fright got out of Bed, and call'd out, and rais'd the Neighbourhood to her Assistance.

Robert Swasey depos'd, That he lodg'd at the next Door to the Prosecutor, and that between Twelve and One o'Clock, the Night mentioned in the Indictment, he heard the Prosecutor crying out, there were Rogues and Thieves in the House; that she came down without any Clothes but her Shift, and opened the Door in a great Fright, saying, she fear'd her Children were murder'd, and he going up into the Room one Pair of Stairs, found the Prisoner's Jacket, and other Clothes lying in that Room; and going up the second Pair of Stairs to the Prosecutor's Chamber, he found the Prisoner lying on her Bed with his Breeches on, but all his other Clothes off; and that there was a Waterman's Oar rear'd against the first Chamber Window; that he asking the Prisoner, how he came there? He made no Answer. This Evidence being ask'd, what the Prosecutor said the Prisoner had done to her? He answer'd, That she did not tell him particularly, but said he had done she could not tell what to her; that she ran about, and rav'd, and tore like a mad Woman, saying, she was ruin'd, she was ruin'd.

Elizabeth Cellins depos'd, That she being a Neighbour to the Prosecutor, came that Night to her House about Eleven o'Clock to light a Candle, and went to Bed; that she hearing her cry out, got up, and found an Oar rear'd against the Window, and the Sash open, and saw the Prisoner there; and that the Prosecutor said, the Prisoner had lain with her; being ask'd, If the Prisoner was Drunk or Sober? She reply'd, She thought he was Sober.

Mary Roberts depos'd, That she hearing the Prosecutor cry out in a very dismal manner, look'd out of her Window, and saw the Sash open, and an Oar rear'd against the Window, and call'd up the following Evidence.

Epbraim Eccles depos'd, That he being a Neighbour, and coming Home after a Eleven o'Clock that Night, saw no Oar against the Window at that time, that he being call'd up, saw the Oar, the Sash open, and found the Prisoner on the Bed in the manner before depos'd; that he seem'd to be Sober, but talk'd a great pace; and being ask'd, how he came thither? He said, He came in with the Prosecutor; but being confronted in this, made no Answer, but cry'd. This Evidence being ask'd, what the Prosecutor said the Prisoner had done to her? He answer'd, That she said you don't know what he has done to me; but she told the Women.

The Prisoner in his Defence pleaded, He being just come Home from a West-India Voyage, brought a-shore two Bottles of Rum to his Sister, who lodg'd in the Prosecutor's House; that the Prosecutor ask'd him to stay and sup with them, which he did, and they drank most of the Rum, and afterwards went to carry a Pint home to his Mother; that she not being at Home, they came back, and his Sister and the Prosecutor together; that he went to a Neighbour's House, and that himself and Prosecutor were both very much in Liquor, and he knew not how he came into her Chamber.

Hannah West depos'd, That she lodg'd in the Prosecutor's House on the first Floor, and the Prisoner being her Brother, came and brought her two Bottles of Rum; that the Prosecutor having been at London, brought Home a Breast of Mutton, and two Colly-flowers, and said, she had drank three Drams before she came Home, which was between four and five o'Clock in the Afternoon; that she ask'd him to stay and sup with her, which he did, and they drank the Rum freely, and she was very free with the Prisoner; that the Prisoner going up to see her Room, she open'd the Sash to show him the Prospect of the Thames, and did not know whether he shut it down again or not; that the Prosecutor carried him up into the Garret to show him a better Prospect, that in the mean time Mrs. Green came, and call'd to her. asking, what she did above with the young Man? She answer'd, What was that to her, if she had a mind he should do her over. That this was about Five or Six o'Clock, that they went afterwards to her Mother's, and drank Rum there, came back to Mrs. Green's, with the Prosecutor and Prisoner, and that they were both in Liquor; and that it was near Twelve o'Clock before the Prosecutor went from Mrs. Green's; and that she lay that Night at Mrs. Green's, her Husband being Abroad.

Mary Green depos'd, That she coming to the Prosecutor, while she was gone up into the Garret with the Prisoner, did ask her, what she did there with the young Man? And she answer'd, what if I have a mind he should do me over. That after they had been at the Prisoner's Mother, they came back to her House; that the Prosecutor and Prisoner were very free one with the other, she chucking him under the Chin, and calling him dear Billy; that the Prisoner went away about Eleven o'Clock, and the Prosecutor staid till near Twelve, and she was not Sober when she went away.

Mary West depos'd, That her Sister, the Prisoner, and the Prosecutor came together to her Mother's, drank near three Quarters of a Pint of Rum, and a Pot of Beer, were and the Prosecutor call'd to her Husband, who was in Bed, and ask'd him, if she would do her a good Turn? That they went away about Ten, that she was much in Liquor; that she was as Drunk as the Prisoner, and he was very Drunk.

Susannah Boyce depos'd, That she went and spoke with the Prosecutor , and that she was so suddled she could scarce speak to her, and that she had the Report of a Woman that was much given to Drink ; after a full hearing of the Matter, the Jury acquitted him.

James Brennan , of Alhallow's Staining , was indicted for feloniously stealing two Silver Candlesticks, value 8 l. a Pair of Silver Snuffers, &c. in the Dwelling House of Henry Vand , the 25th of April last.

The Prosecutor depos'd , That the Prisoner was his Servant , and stole the Goods, which were stopp'd , and he had notice given him by Mr. Bundel , a Silversmith, to whom he offer'd them to Sale.

Mr. Blundel depos'd, That the Prisoner brought the Plate to him to sell, (at Greenwich,) the Prisoner saying it was his own; but he suspecting of it, detain'd it till he brought him some satisfactory Proof of it; he brought two Persons, but they not satisfying him, and the Prisoner's account how he came by it varying, he produc'd him to be apprehended, and he confess'd he had stolen it from the Prosecutor; the Fact being plainly prov'd, the Jury found him guilty to the value of 39 s.

[Transportation. See summary.]

John Ward , was indicted for feloniously marrying Sarah Woodward on the 22d of March last, his first Wife Anne Huffman whom he had married the 4th of February last, being Alive .

Benjamin Baron depos'd, That the Prisoner own'd both the Marriages before the Lord-Mayor, on the 28th of May last; and both Wives then and there appear'd, and swore they were both lawfully Married to him, and accordingly the first Wife there produced a Certificate of her Marriage, and deliver'd the same into the Hands of Mr. John Saunders , the Attorney, for the Prosecutor.

John Saunders himself declar'd the same to be true.

Sarah Woodward , the second Wife, depos'd to the same Effect, and that she was lawfully Married to him on the 2d Day of March last.

Elizabeth Wooldrige depos'd, That she heard the Prisoner own the first Marriage, and that she had seen the Certificate thereof, and that they lodg'd in her Master's House as Man and Wife for some time.

Mary Jeffery heard the Prisoner likewise own that he was Married to Anne Huffman his first Wife, and likewise saw the Certificate.

Robert Cuthbert , the Minister, fully proved the first Marriage.

The Prisoner had nothing to say in his Defence, but that he was Drunk when he was Married to the first Woman.

But Robert Cuthbert , the Person, who Married them, being ask'd, whether he made the Responses regularly or no? Answer'd, That he did; for it being a long Ceremony, 'twas impossible for a drunken Man to answer; and being in the Morning, declared the Prisoner was then very Sober; and both the Marriages being plainly proved, the Jury found him Guilty of the Indictment.

[Branding. See summary.]

Thomas Wood , of Christ-Church , was indicted for a Misdemeanor, in uttering a counterfeit 6 d. knowing it to be Counterfeit , the 16th of April last.

Thomas Hancock depos'd, That he looking out at a Window, saw the Prisoner stand at a private Place rubbing of Money, and took some Dirt off his Stick to rub upon it; upon this he ran down and watch'd him, and meeting a Woman that sold Shrimps, he ask'd her, how she sold them? She said, a Penny a Pot, he bid her a Half-penny; and seeming to go away, turn'd back, and gave her a Six-pence to change, which she not liking, he told her, it was a very good one; that he would hastily have caught it from her, but he observing it, as he was leaning upon a Post, seiz'd him, and found a Shilling and Six-pence more of the same sort in his Glove; the finding more in his Glove was confirm'd by Mr. Priestly, the Constable.

Elizabeth Layton depos'd, That the Prisoner did give her the Six-pence to change for Shrimps, and she not liking it, bit it with her Teeth, and they making an Impression, said, it was not good; the Prisoner said it was, and then the Prisoner was seiz'd by Mr. Hancock as before; the 6 d. and other like Money was produc'd in Court.

Robert Low , Deputy-Weigher of the Mint, depos'd, It was a Counterfeit Coin.

Thomas Hancock added, That the Prisoner being search'd, had got Sausages, Polonia Puddings, and other Things in his Pockets, which he suppos'd he had before bought with the same kind of Money; the Fact being plainly prov'd, the Jury found him Guilty .

[Fine. See summary.]

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Mary Kingston , Wife of William Kingston , of St. Andrew s Holbourn , was indicted for uttering and vending several Sheets of Paper stamp'd with Counterfeit Stamps, knowing them to be Counterfeit , contrary to the Statute in that Case made and provided .

The Counsel for the King having opened the Cause, supported the Charge by the following Evidence.

Mr. Barret depos'd, That the Prisoner came to his Shop over-against St. Dunstan's Church , on the 15th of April last, and brought four half Crown Stamps, and a Quire of Double- Penny Stamps to be chang'd for Double-Six- Penny Stamps .

John Cole , in Fleet-Street , depos'd, That on the 22d or 23d of April last, the Prisoner came to his Shop, and brought a Double-Half-Crown Stamp Paper, and on the 25th of April she came on the same Errant, and brought a Guinea to pay 10 s. her Husband ow'd, and paid him the rest of the Money, which was 16 s. he taking the Double-Half Crown Stamp at a Crown in part of Payment; that he afterwards looking upon the Stamp, and suspecting it, carried it, and laid it before the Commissioners, who sent for their Engraver, who made Affidavit, that the Stamps were Counterfeit; that upon this the Prisoner's Shop was search'd, and in a Drawer a great deal of Paper was found, with Counterfeit Stamps, and also in a private Place, under a Buroe, as he thinks, was found an Iron Instrument, or Skrew, which was thought might be us'd in stamping of Paper .

Richard Stanton depos'd, That he was present at the finding the said Paper, &c. and he believes there was six Quires of it .

Mr. Rollos, the Engraver, depos'd, That there were found fifteen Sheets of Paper, with Double-Half-Crown Stamps, and six Quires and 13 or 14 Sheets of Paper with Double- Penny Stamps that were Counterfeit, and an Iron Press or Skrew, which he thought might be made use of for stamping Paper; and that this Instrument was found upon the Floor under a Chest of Drawers: He further depos'd, That all the Paper before-mentioned was stamp'd with counterfeit Stamps, and were distinguishable by several visible Variations from the true Stamp, which was produc'd in Court, and shewn to the Jury.

Henry Sydenham , the Supervisor, depos'd, That those Stamps were Counterfeit, and might be distinguish'd from the true one; that the H in the Counterfeit was larger than that of the true H, some Parts of the Crown larger than that of the true one; the G in the Penny Stamp at a larger Distance from the Circle than it was in the true Stamp.

The Prisoner pleaded, That what she did in uttering or vending the said Stamps, was by the Command and Direction of her Husband, and that she did not know they were Counterfeit; the Jury acquitted her.

She was likewise indicted a second time for uttering or vending sixty-one Sheets of Paper, with Double-Penny Stamps ; but no Evidence appearing against her, she was acquitted of this Indictment likewise.

William White was indicted for defrauding Benjamin Lipscomb of 31 s. under Pretence of compounding for the Penalty of 40 s. for the Offence against the Statute made in the Year 1724, for selling, and sending out Drink in Pots containing less than a Gallon .

The Council for the King opened the Cause, setting forth, that the Prisoner being an Attorney , or Sollicitor, did, contrary to the Statute made in the 18th Year of Queen Elizabeth, take upon him to compound the Penalty of 40 s. for 31 s. with Benjamin Lipscomb , Victualler , dwelling at the Sign of the Cross-Keys in Smithfield , making use of the Name of Richard Standford , as the Informant, in a Process taken out against the said Benjamin Lipscomb , in His Majesty's Court of Common-Pleas at Westminster, and serv'd on the said Benjamin Lipscomb , the 27th of January last, by a Servant of the said William White ; and to support the Charge call'd the following Evidence.

Benjamin Lipscomb depos 'd, A young Man came to him, he thinks, the 27th of January, and brought him a Copy of a Writ, as he told him, it was for selling, and sending out Drink in Pots less than a Gallon, telling him, he must come to Mr. White's, at Johnson's Court in Fleet-Street; that he afterwards saw him that deliver'd the Copy of the Writ, writing in Mr. White's House; that he went to Mr. Smith's to put an end to the Matter, and he demanded 3 l. which he not being willing to pay, offer'd him a Guinea, but he would not take it; that he afterwards sent him a Letter, desiring him to let him know whether he would appear to that Writ, and if he did not make an end of the Matter before Ten o'Clock the next Morning, he must be oblig'd to take out another Writ against him; that he took with him an Acquaintance of his, and of Mr. White's, and he did then out of Friendship, as he pretended, take a Guinea and a half, to put an end to the Prosecution, and he was to hear no more of the Matter; that he ask'd for a Receipt, but Mr. White was not willing to give it, saying, that he us'd only to write his Receipts on the back-side of the Writ, but did at last give him a Receipt for 3 l. which he said he did, because he usually had 3 l. of other Persons; and if the Receipt were seen, it should not appear that he had taken less of him than of others.

Henry Linford depos'd, That he was present at the Payment of the Money, saw the giving the Receipt, and had sign'd it himself; and that the Prisoner took down a File of Writs, saying, he had generally had 3 l. upon them, and that he believ'd there was 500 of them. The Receipt was produc'd in Court, and likewise the original Capias by the Custos Brevium ; the Fact being plainly prov'd, the Jury found him Guilty , but his Sentence was respited .

The Trials being ended, the Court proceeded to give Judgment, as follows:

None receiv'd Sentence of Death.

Burnt in the Hand 4.

John Ward , Richard Macey , and Isaac Emmery , Thomas Jeweller , former Convicts.

Transportation 28.

Mary Clark , Mary Cooper , Gamaliel Bishop , Francis Smith , Elizabeth Skegg , alias Scagg , F - S - , Margaret Brown , Jane Jones , alias Jenkins, Richard Ridgely , John Roff , John Priglove , Susannah Miller , John Burnham , Peter Gates , Alice Leader , James Blanchet , John Hawkswell , Robert Wheeler , John Collins , Edward Shaftoe , David Dickson , Jane Jenkins , Margaret Hobsor , Mary Smith , Susannah Collins , James Brennan , Andrew Maccoului , and Mary Thompson .

To be Whip'd 7.

Elizabeth Burton , Anne Pearse , Eleanor Howard , Susannah Miller , Mary Murrey , Esther Tims , Sarah Shakespear , alias Bird.

Thomas Wood , was Fin'd five Marks, and order'd to suffer one Month's Imprisonment after Payment.

Dr. GODFREY's GENERAL CORDIAL,

So universally approved of for the CHOLICK, and all Manner of PAINS in the BOWELS, FLUXES, and RESTLESNESS in Men, Women, and Children ,

Is Sold in most Cities, Boronghs, and Market-Towns thro' out Great-Britain and Ireland; remov'd from Hunsdon to Broxborn in Hertfordshire , and for the Conveniency of supplying all those Parts, I have establish'd these following Wholesale Warehouses, viz.

John Westlake 's in Queen-street, Bristol;

Peter Leadbeater 's, Distiller, in West-Chester.

Mr. Button's, Bookseller, on the Bridge at Newcastle upon Tyne.

Mr. Brook's, Distiller, on the Blind-Key, Dublin .

As also at my Original Warehouse in Bishopsgate-street, London.

All Merchants, Shopkeepers, and others, may be supplied at any of the said Warehouses, with good Allowance.

N. B. The Publick are desired to take Notice, (to prevent being imposed on) that there is an ill minded Person who counterfeits the said Medicine, and puts the Name of Godfrey on the Top of the Bottles; and in his Bills given with the Bottles, there is no Name who the Person is that prepares it; but as this Counterfeit Maker is now found out by his own Confession, he and his Sellers will be prosecuted as the Law directs (as Impostors): And to prevent the Buyers from being imposed on, I have put my Christian Name on the Top of each Bottle, which is prepared

By me BENJAMIN GODFREY.

The Price of each Bottle is 6 d.

Just Publish'd,

The Music Speech, spoken at the Public Commencement in Cambridge, July the 6th, 1714. By Roger Loug , M. A. Fellow of Pembroke-Hall.

- Qui placere se studeat bonis

Quamplurimis & minime multos laejere . Ter.

The third Edition. Printed for T. Payne, at the Crown in Ivy-Lane; and W. Thurlbourn in Cambridge.

This Day was Publish'd,

A Description of three hundred Animals, viz. Beasts, Birds, Fishes, Serpents and Insects. With a particular Account of the Whale-Fishery. Extracted out of the best Authors, and adapted to the Use of all Capacities; especially to allure Children to Read. Illustrated with Copper Plates, whereon is curiously Engraven, every Beast, Bird, Fish , Serpent and Insect, describ'd in the whole Book.

Printed for R. Ware at the Bible and Sun in Amen-Comer ; T. Boreman , the Corner of St. Clement's Lane without Temple-Bar; and T. Game at the Bible in Prince's-Street, Drury-Lane. Price Bound 2 s. 6 d.

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La Plum Volante. Or the Art of Short-hand improved. Being the most Suitt, Regular, and Easy Method of Shorthand-writing yet I want. Composed after Fifty Years Practice and Improvement of the said Art, by the Observation of Methods and intent Study of it. The Fifth Edition, with Additions of the Terms of the Law, and much amended, By William Mason . Price 2 s. 6 d .

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Divine Poems (by way of Paraphrase) on the Ten Commandments . In Twelve Parts: Illustrated with Twelve Copper-Plates. The Second Edition. By George Wither Esq; Price 1 s .

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The Christian's hidden Life. A Funeral Sermon occasioned by the Death of the late Rev. and Learned Mr. John Nesbitt , who departed this Life October the 22d, 1727, in the 67th Year of his Age Preached October the 29th. By John Hurrion . Price 6 d.

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The Art of Spelling, Containing, 1. A, B, C , for Children, consisting of Alphabets and Syllables, with short Rules and Examples of dividing Words. 2. Rules for true Spelling, Rading , and Writing of English, by way of Question and Answer. 3. Two Tables of the most useful Words, whose Spelling or Sense, may be mistaken . Also Christian Names , &c. By J. P. M. A. The fifth Edition with Additions. Price 9 d.

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The Greatness of the Soul, and the Unspeakableness of the Loss thereof; with the Canfes of the Losing it. First preached in Pinners-Hall, and now enlarged and published for Road. By John Banyan . The 2d Edition. Price bound 1 s. Also at the said Shop is to be Sold to all Scariners and School-masters in London and Country, Pieces for Christmas, Esier and Whitsunside , &c. by wholesale and retail, curiously engraved on Copper-plates . 1. King George the II. 2. Jerusalem . 3. The Temple of Solomon. 4. Geometry. 5. Adam and Eve in the Garden. 6. Haman hanged. 7. Hunting-Piece. 8. Grammar and Writing School . 9. Christ's Burial. 10 The Lord Mayor's Show. 11. Moses in the Ark of Bull rushes . 12. History of Tobit. 13. Christ's Ascension. 14. The seven Sciences. 15. Durastis and Fawnia . 16 History of Juditha and Holofernis . 17. The four Evangelifts. 18. Stool-Ball . 19 Joseph flying into Egypt. 20 Crucifixion; And many others in whole Sheets and half Sheets: Likewise, you may have an Elegiac Poem in Commemoration of his late Most Sacred Majesty K. George, engraven, Price 6 d. Also Gospel Mystery Emblemarically illustrated, engraven on a large Copper-plate, Price 6 d.

A Water that perfectly cures the Itching Humour in any Part of the Body, in a Short Time, having no offensive Scent: Prepared and Sold only by A. Downing, Chymist, at the Crown and Ball in George-Court in St. John's-Lane near Hicks's-Hall. Price 1 s. 6 d. a Bottle. Also the true Essence or Spirits of Scurvy-Grass, both Purging and Plain, most Excellent for all Degrees of the Scurvy, at 8 d. a Bottle. And the great Elixir of Life, called Daff's Elixir, truly prepared, so very useful in all Families in the greatest Exigencies. Price 2 s. 6 d. the Half-pint

Just Publish'd

Spiritual Songs for Children, or Poems on several Subjects and Occasions. By Mr. Wright: London Printed and sold by Joseph Marshal at the Bible in Newgate Street. Price Bound Six pence.

Where may be had just Publish'd, Price Six pence. Light in a Candlestick to all that are in the House: Or, the Impartial Churchman; Containing the Celebrated Discources on the 30th of January, of the Right Reverend the Bishop of Bristol, before the House of Lords, of the Reverend Dr. Croxall, before the House of Commons; and of the Reverend Dr. Trapp, before the Lord Mayor and Court of Aldermen. Wherein, with a just Praise of their Merits, Respect to their Characters, and Deterence to the Church: their Matter, Method. Explanations of, and Deductions from Scripture are observ'd, especially as to Dr. Trapp's Notion of visiting the Sins of the Fathers on the Children. With Readings in the Hebrew, Chaldec, Arabick, and Vulgate, noted: and to take in what is most remarkable on this Head, a Reflection on a Principle of the Right Reverend the Bishop of Saturn, and the Dispute of Milton and Salmatius , Mr. Milbourn and Mr. Bradbury: With a Rule to judge and apply all Sermons on that deplorable Occasion. By J. Henley , M. A. Founder of the Oratory.

Just Publish'd (Dedicated to the Hon. Mrs. Pulteney )

The Brothers, or Treachery punish'd, a Novel. Interspersed with I. the Adventures of Don Alvarez. II. The Adventures of Don Lorenzo. III. Cupid and Bacchus, a Dramatic Entertainment . IV. The Adventures of Mariam, Sister to Don Alvarez. Written by a Person of Quality. Printed for T. Payne at the Crown in Ivy-Lane, near Pater-noster-Row , Price 1 s. 6 d. Where may be had the Travels of Cyrus, by the Chevelier Ramsay, with a Discourse on the Theology and Mythology of the Ancients in a Vol. French and English. Price Bound 6 s.