Old Bailey Proceedings Online (www.oldbaileyonline.org, version 6.0, 23 October 2014), April 1730 (17300408).

Old Bailey Proceedings, 8th April 1730.

THE PROCEEDINGS AT THE Sessions of the Peace, and Oyer and Terminer, FOR THE City of LONDON AND County of MIDDLESEX; ON

Wednesday the 8th, Thursday the 9th, and Friday the 10th of April, 1730, in the Third Year of His MAJESTY's Reign.

Being the Fourth SESSIONS in the Mayoralty of the Right Honourable Sir RICHARD BROCAS , Knt. Lord Mayor of the City of LONDON, in the Year 1730.

No IV. for the said YEAR.

LONDON

Printed for T. PAYNE, at the Crown in Ivy-Lane, near Pater-noster-Row. M.DCC.XXX.

(Price Six Pence.)

THE PROCEEDINGS AT THE Sessions of the Peace, and Oyer and Terminer, For the CITY of LONDON; AND ON

The King's Commission of Goal-Delivery of Newgate, held at Justice-Hall in the Old-Bailey; for the CITY of London, and COUNTY of Middlesex.

On Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday, being the 8th, 9th, and 10th of April 1730, in the Third Year of His MAJESTY's Reign,

BEFORE the Right Honourable Sir RICHARD BROCAS , Knt. Lord Mayor of the City of London; the Rt. Honourable the Lord Chief Justice Raymond, the Honourable Mr. Baron Carter , Mr. Justice Denton, the Worshipful Mr. Serjeant Raby; and others of His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer, and Goal-Delivery for the City of London, and Goal-Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

London Jury.

Henry Allen .

John Martin .

Joseph Hall .

Richard Garton .

David White .

Thomas Stackhouse .

William Grosbury .

James Smith .

Joseph Bolt .

William Petley .

John Backwith .

Hammond Potter .

Middlesex Jury.

Samuel Chandler .

Thomas Coggin .

John Baker .

William Goddard .

Michael Tasman .

George Harrington .

William Pritchard .

Edward Owen .

William Wyat .

John Phillips .

James Perry .

Robert Brearcliff .

John Hopkins , of St. John Wapping , was indicted for feloniously stealing a Cock and a Hen , the Property of Thomas Spicer , the 18th of December last.

The Prosecutor depos'd, He lost the Fowls which were in his Shed, which had been broken open, and found them at one Burnham's , to whom the Prisoner had sold them; the Fact being plainly proved, the Jury found him Guilty to the Value of 10 d.

[Whipping. See summary.]

Bartholomew Nicholson , of St. Brides , was indicted for assaulting Francis Archibald , putting him in Fear of his Life, and taking from him 7 s. in Money, a Handkerchief, and a clasp'd Knife , the 30th of March last.

The Prosecutor depos'd, That as he was standing in Fleet-Street, and seeing the Blue Coat Boys pass by, the Prisoner and two others , who were Walter James and Thomas Molineux, came up to him, and the Prisoner said to them, I charge you take this Man into Custody , charging him with being a Pick-pocket , and they carried him to the Sugar-Loaf , and forced him into a Room, and being there, the Prisoner unbuttoned his Breeches , took from him his Money, Handkerchief, and Knife, the other two holding his Hands behind him; and when they had so done, they all ran away, the Handkerchief was afterwards delivered to him again by James.

The Prisoner pleaded, That as they were going along Fleet-Street, Molineux said to him , this is a Day to look out for Pick-pocket , and bid him look out; that he seeing the Prosecutor have his Hand in a Gentleman's Pocket, he apprehended him, and he gave them the Money, &c. so run away from them; but the Jury not giving Credit to the Prisoner's Plea, found him Guilty of Felony .

[Transportation. See summary.]

Sarah Long , alias Sheppard , of St. James's Westminster , was indicted for feloniously stealing a Snuff-Box , the Property of Margaret Plane , the 10th of September last .

The Prosecutor depos'd, That the Prisoner being employed as a Nurse to look after her Grandmother , took the Box out of a Drawer, and pawned it.

The Prisoner did not deny her having the Box, but pleaded, that the Prosecutor's Grandmother gave it her in Pledge for a Guinea that she lent her ; but this pretence not availing, the Jury found her Guilty to the Value of 4 s. 10 d.

[Transportation. See summary.]

Anthony Bagley , alias Baggerly , of St. Margaret's Westminster , was indicted for feloniously stealing Pewter Dishes, Plates, and other Goods, in the Dwelling-House of John Holland , the 6th of February last.

It appear'd by the Evidence, that the Prisoner lodg'd in the Prosecutor's House, and had at times carried the Goods out of his Lodging, pawned some, and sold others; the Fact being plainly proved, the Jury found him Guilty of Felony.

[Transportation. See summary.]

John Harris , of St. James's Clerkenwell , was indicted for stealing an Iron Porridge Pot, value 10 s. the Goods of Daniel Frankwell , the 9th of February last.

The Fact was plainly proved upon the Prisoner, and he having nothing to plead in his Defence, but that he was in Liquor, the Jury found him Guilty of Felony.

[Transportation. See summary.]

James Reynolds , alias Bush , of St. James's Clerkenwell , was indicted for feloniously stealing a Ridinghood, and divers other Wearing Apparel, &c. in the Dwelling-House of Thomas Hardwick , the 30th of January last.

The Fact being proved to the Satisfaction of the Jury; he was found Guilty to the Value of 39 s.

[Transportation. See summary.]

Joseph Malin , of St. Ann's Westminster , was indicted for feloniously stealing twenty-nine Yards of Lace, value 30 l. the Goods of Anne Ridley , the 1st of March last. But the Evidence not being sufficient to Convict the Prisoner, the Jury acquitted him.

Isaiah Emmery , of Isleworth , was indicted for feloniously stealing Iron Cheeks, Bars of Grates, &c. value 10 s. the Goods of Joseph Worster , &c. the 3 d of February last. Which Fact being plainly proved upon the Prisoner, the Jury found him Guilty of the Indictment.

[Transportation. See summary.]

Katherine Walters , alias Robinson , alias Johnson, of St. Clement's Danes , was indicted for feloniously stealing a Table Cloth, Candles, and divers other Goods, in the Dwelling-House of Matth.ew Cremer , the 29th of March last.

The Prosecutor depos'd, That the Prisoner was employ'd as a Chair-Woman in his House, at the Five Bells in the Strand, and that missing Things from time to time, they suspecting her, watched her, and searching her, found Candles in her Pocket; and searching her Room, found some of the Goods, and others, where she had pawned them. The Fact being plainly proved, the Jury found the Prisoner guilty of Felony.

She was likewise indicted a second time for feloniously stealing divers Goods in the Dwelling-House of Robert Peeling .

Mrs. Peeling depos'd, That the Prisoner being likewise employ'd by her as a Chair-Woman, they had at several times miss'd Linen, and that upon searching her Room by Mr. Cremer, they found some in the Room, and others where she confess'd she had pawned them; this Fact likewise being plainly proved upon the Prisoner, the Jury found her Guilty of this Indictment also.

[Transportation. See summary.]

Jonathan Faithful , of St. George Hanover-square , was indicted for feloniously stealing 2 Holland Shirts, Value 50 s. the Property of Sir Peter Vanderhurst , Knt. the 3d of March last; but the Evidence not being sufficient to fix the Fact upon the Prisoner, the Jury acquited him.

, was indicted for feloniously marrying Jane Brereton , his former Wife Elizabeth Powduch being alive ; which being plainly prov'd , the Jury found him guilty .

Joseph Vaughan , of St. Mary le Bow , was indicted for feloniously stealing a Quarter of Mutton, and 31 lb. of Beef, in the Shop of John Barrow , the 23d of March last.

John Barrow , depos'd, That he lost 31 lb. of Beef and a Quarter of Mutton, out of his Shop; that the Prisoner having stolen and carried Home the Beef came again for the Mutton, and being seen as he was carrying it away, was apprehended with the Mutton, and own'd also the taking of the Beef, and directed them to his Lodgings, where it was found. The Fact being plainly proved, the Jury found him Guilty to the Value of 4 s. 10 d.

[Transportation. See summary.]

Sarah Cross , of St. Giles's in the Fields , was indicted for feloniously stealing three Sheets, &c . the Goods of Thomas Graham , the 9th of March last; but the Evidence not amounting to a full Proof that she stole them, she was acquitted .

Richard Jones , of St. Dunstan's Stepney , was indicted for feloniously stealing a black Gelding, Value 5 l. and a Mare, Value 5 l. the Property of Benjamin Coker , jun. the 14th of March last.

The Prosecutor depos'd, That the Horses were lost out of his Stable, in the Night time, and they were found in the Green-Yard , by the Information of the Constable of the Green-Yard .

Thomas Elderkin depos'd, That he secur'd the Horses in the Stable on the 14th of March in the Evening, and in the Morning they were gone, the Halters having been unty'd; that the outward Gate of the Yard was hasp'd with an Iron Chain, but was found open.

Thomas Howard depos'd, That as he was going to Work at Mr. Martin's , he met with the Prisoner, and he gave him a Mug of Drink, and told him, that he would give him a Shilling if he would go with him, and appointed him to come to him in Mr. Preston's Hay-loff that Morning, where he found the Prisoner; that he went with him to Stepney Church-Yard , and the Prisoner bid him stay there, and went away a little while, and came again, and said there were Horses, and brought one, and then went and fetcht another, and that they rid them away, the Prisoner directing him to turn sometimes to the Right-hand, and sometimes to the Left , and they came to White-Chappel, and from thence to Moor-gate , and that a Watchman examining where they were going, the Prisoner reply 'd, D - n you, you Son of a Bitch, what is that to you; that the Prisoner bid him carry the Horses to the Green-Yard.

Richard Paul , William Lake, and William Devereux , the Gate-keeper, and Watch at Moor-gate depos'd, They saw the Evidence Howard with the Horses, but did not see the Prisoner ; so there being no Evidence against the Prisoner but that of Thomas Howard , the Jury acquitted him.

James Todd , of St. Giles in the Fields , was indicted for feloniously stealing 3 pair of Shoes, Value 6 s. the Goods of William Gourney , the 3d of March last; the Fact being prov'd upon the Prisoner, the Jury found him guilty to the value of 10 d.

[Transportation. See summary.]

John Hutchins , of St. Andrew's Holbourn , was indicted for feloniously stealing 4 Pewter Plates , the Goods of Robert Ducket , the 10th of March last; but No-body appearing against the Prisoner he was acquitted , and the Prosecutor's Recognizance was order'd to be estreated.

Samuel Pritchard , of St. Andrew's Holbourn , was indicted for feloniously stealing 2 pair of Stockings, a Silk Handkerchiefs, &c . the Goods of William Spence the 14th of March last; which Fact being plainly prov'd, the Jury found him guilty to the value of 10 d.

[Transportation. See summary.]

Mary Gardener , of St. Peter's Cornhil , was indicted for privately stealing a Watch, Value 4 l. from the Person of William Fan , the 15th of March last.

The Prosecutor depos'd, That as he was passing thro' Peter's-Alley at a little past 11 o'Clock at Night, being come near the Turning, the Prisoner came up to him, and clapp'd one Hand upon his Neck, which while he was endeavouring to put away, he felt her other Hand at his Pocket, and perceiv'd her to draw out his Watch; that she ran away, and he follow'd her out into Grace-Church-Street, and call'd to the Watch, who was then calling past 11 o'Clock, and that the Watchman apprehended her near the Corner of Cornhil. He added, that the Prisoner was not out of his Sight, but just while she turn'd the Corner; that she was carried to the Watch-house on the Change, and was indeed searched there; but the Watch was not found there, being none but Men to search her.

The Prisoner deny'd the Fact, pleaded that she was going along Grace-Church-Street, the Watchman bid her make haste Home, and she stopping a little, he laid hold of her, and she knew nothing of the Watch, nor had ever seen the Prosecutor; that she was carried to the Watch-house and searched 3 times; and the Watch not being found, the Prosecutor swore she had put it into her private Parts, and that he was so drunk he could not speak plain, and had been tumbled all over in the Dirt. - The Prosecutor being ask'd, when he had seen his Watch? Answer'd, he saw it just before, when he came from the Crown Tavern in Smithfield, and was sure No-body had been near him in coming from thence to Peter's-Alley. - The Constable being ask'd, if he was in Drink? Answer'd, he was indeed in Liquor, but not so, but what he said the Night before, he said the same the next Morning, and that there was indeed some Dirt upon his Coat - And the Prosecutor being ask'd, did own, that indeed his Foot had slipt, and he had a Fall. Upon a full hearing of the Matter, the Jury acquitted her.

James Rogers , and Thomas Leather , of St. Botolph's Aldgate , were indicted for feloniously stealing 8 lb. of Iron , the Goods of Charles Tovey , the 20th of March last; the Fact being plainly prov'd upon Thomas Leather , the Jury found him guilty to the Value of 10 d. but there not being any sufficient Proof against James Rogers , he was acquitted .

[Transportation. See summary.]

William Smith , of St. James Duke's-Place , was indicted for feloniously stealing 2 Hens , the Goods of Isaac Levy , the 3d of March last.

David Vanderhouse depos'd, He saw the Prisoner take the Fowls off from a Shelf in the Prosecutor's Shop, and he following, took him with the Fowls upon him; the Jury found him guilty to the value of 10 d.

[Whipping. See summary.]

Thomas Walker , of St. Ethelberghs , was indicted for feloniously stealing 13 dozen of Buckles, 2 dozen of Penknives, and divers other Cutlery Ware , the Goods of John Stiles , the 15th of March last.

Sarah Stiles depos'd, That she kept a Stall in Bishopsgate-street , under Mr. Rogers, the Stationer, and that it was broken open about 4 o'Clock in the Morning, and the Goods stolen.

Thomas Francis depos'd, That he being upon the Watch, saw a Piece of a green Rug lie in the new Buildings, was looking in it, and saw the Prosecutor's Goods; and that the Prisoner came to him, and claimed the Goods to be his, saying that his Mother had given them to him the Night before, and that he getting drunk had laid them there for safety. The Goods were produced in Court, and sworn to by the Prosecutor; the Fact being plain, the Jury found the Prisoner guilty to the value of 10 d.

[Transportation. See summary.]

Thomas Bunker , of St. Sepulchres , was indicted for feloniously stealing a Cow, Value 6 l. the Property of John Burton , the 26th of March last.

The Prosecutor depos'd, He lost his Cow from Hackney .

Thomas Bunny depos'd, That on the 27th of March, the Prisoner offer'd the Cow to sale in Smithfield, and ask'd 6 l. for her. But the Evidence not being sufficient to satisfy the Jury, that the Prisoner stole the Cow, the Jury acquitted him.

Barbara Newal , and Mary Delaport , of St. Martins in the Fields , were indicted, the former for feloniously stealing 9 lb. of human Hair , the 8th of February last, the Goods of William Grierson , and the latter for receiving it, knowing it to be stolen ; the Fact was prov'd upon Barbara Newel , and also by her own Confession, whereupon the Jury found her guilty of the Indictment; but altho' it was prov'd that Mary Delaport bought part of the Hair, yet it not being sufficiently prov'd that she knew it was stolen, the Jury acquitted her.

[Transportation. See summary.]

Ann Story , of St. James Westminster , was indicted for feloniously stealing 8 Yards of Silk, 2 Aprons, a Ring, and other Goods, in the Dwelling-house of Thomas Bradford , the 9th of March last.

It appeared by the Evidence , that the Prisoner was Servant to the Prosecutor, and took the Goods while her Mistress was in the Country; the Goods were found in the Prisoner's Lodging, she being gone away from the Prosecutor. and they being produced in Court, were sworn to by the Prosecutor; the Fact being plainly prov'd upon the Prisoner, the Jury found her guilty to the value of 39 s.

[Transportation. See summary.]

Thomas Bunker , of the Parish of Hendon , was indicted for feloniously stealing a Heifer , the Property of Joseph Tidd , the 16th of March last.

The Prosecutor depos'd, He lost the Heifer out of his Yard, and coming to London in search after it, found it in John Bunnil 's Slaughter-house.

John Bunnil depos'd, He bought the Heifer of the Prisoner for a Guinea and a Half.

The Prisoner pleaded, He bought the Heifer for 25 s. but not proving it, the Jury found him guilty of the Indictment.

[Transportation. See summary.]

Mary Sullivan , alias Wall , alias Stanley , and Isabella Eaton , alias Gwin , of St. James Westminster , were indicted for feloniously stealing a Gold Watch, Value 20 l. and 28 Guineas, from a Person unknown , the 25th of September last.

Timothy Walker depos'd , That he liv'd with Mrs. Eaton at the Crown Tavern in Sherard-street , and that on the 24th or 25th of September last, a Gentleman came to his Mistress's House in a Coach, and had a Supper there, and when he came to lay the Cloth, the Watch lying on the Table, Mary Sullivan took the Watch and hung it at her Side, and went about the Room with it, and went down Stairs, strutting about the House, shewing her self to the Servants, saying, why should she not wear a Gold Watch as well as her Mistress, that afterwards the Gentleman ask'd for the Watch, and what was become of the Woman; that the Gentleman came the next Morning, and ask'd for his Watch, and he went up again, and Mary Sullivan gave him the Watch; there not appearing to the Jury any felonious Intent in taking the Watch, the Jury acquitted both the Prisoners.

Joseph Jaques , of St. George Bottolph-lane , was indicted for feloniously stealing a Hogshead of Tobacco, Value 20l. the Goods of Persons unknown the 1st of November last; but there not being sufficient Evidence to prove the Fact upon the Prisoner, the Jury acquitted him.

Thomas Ginn , of St. Giles in the Fields , was indicted for feloniously stealing a Box, Value 6 d. and 2 Pound of Tobacco , the Goods of Thomas Sherring the 24th of February last; but there being no Evidence against the Prisoner, he was acquitted .

John Fletcher , of St. Michael Cornhil , was indicted for feloniously stealing a Common Prayer Book, Value 4 s. the Property of the .

It appeared by the Evidence, and the Prisoner's Confession, that the Book was taken out of St. Michael's Church , and was stopp'd by William Coggin , to whom the Prisoner offer'd it to sale; the Fact being plain, the Jury found him guilty to the value of 10d.

[Transportation. See summary.]

Nathaniel Harris , was indicted for stealing 11 Foot of Leaden Pipes, fix'd to the Freehold of Michael Martindale .

It appear'd by the Evidence, that the Pipe was fix'd on the out-side of the Prosecutor's House for the Conveyance of the Water; and that the nailing was loosned, and the Pipe taken down; but the Evidence against the Prisoner not being able to fix the Fact upon him, the Jury acquitted him.

Peter Lock , alias Lord , and James Durham , of the Parish of Allhallows Barkin , were indicted for feloniously stealing 224 lb. of Lead , the Property of our Sovereign Lord the King , the 7th of this Instant April .

Mr. Steward, Clerk of the Works, depos'd, That the Prisoners knew there was no Lead to be carried out of the Tower without his Order, and that he was inform'd that the Prisoners had been seen about 12 o'Clock, to carry out Lead upon their Shoulders, when he always sends it by a Cart he has for that purpose , and that he is obliged to weigh it in and out, and to take an Account of it.

The Prisoners carrying the Lead out of the Tower was confirmed by several Evidences.

They pleaded, that they carried it out that it might not be lost, and did design to carry it to the Plumbery the next Morning when they got the Key.

The Master Plumber depos'd, He never gave Orders for so doing; and that when he examined Durham about carrying it out, he at first deny'd it, but afterwards own'd it.

The Prisoners pleaded, that they did not conceal it, but carried it to Mr. Wilson's, where their Master used to pay them their Wages, and laid it openly in a publick Room.

Elizabeth Wilson depos'd, That they did bring it to her House, and did lay it in a publick Room, and had brought Lead before; and she did not suspect any thing, and so ask'd no Questions.

After a full hearing of the Matter, the Jury found Lord and Durham guilty, each to the Value of 10 d. But B - coming into the Work, as the Master own'd, but the Day before, and being ignorant of the Custom of the Place, was acquitted .

[Transportation. See summary.]

James Gwin , of St. Martins in the Fields , was indicted for privately stealing 50 thousand of Sprig Nails, in the Shop of John Harrington , the 20th of February last.

The Prosecutor depos'd, That the Nails were taken out of his Shop about 7 or 8 o'Clock at Night.

Mr. Spears depos'd, The Prisoner brought the Bag of Nails to him, and ask'd him if he would buy some rattling Traps; that looking on them, found they were Glaziers Sprigs, and he asking the Prisoner how he came by them? Reply'd, that he had been a Board a Holland-Trader , and they were given him there, and offer'd to sell them to him for 2 s. but he suspecting him, follow'd him, and he perceiving it, flung down the Bag, and run away. The Prosecutor swore they were his Nails; the Fact being plain, the Jury found him guilty to the value of 4 s. 10 d.

[Transportation. See summary.]

Thomas Thompson , of St. Leonard Shoreditch , was indicted for feloniously stealing a Saddle, Value 2 s. 6 d. the Property of Thomas Smith , the 4th of March last.

The Prosecutor depos'd, His Saddle was taken out of his Stable, and he found it where the Prisoner had sold it; and Ann Harman depos'd, she had bought it of the Prisoner; the Fact being prov'd, the Jury found him guilty to the value of 10 d.

[Transportation. See summary.]

Jane Tredwel , and Jane Ferguson , alias Parkinson, were indicted for privately stealing a Piece of chac'd Plate, value 15 l. the Property of Robert Eddoes , Esq ; from the Person of Robert Finch .

Robert Finch depos'd, The Prisoners met him in King Street at about 11 o'Clock at Night, and ask'd him to go with them to drink, which he refus'd, and at the same time Ferguson pick'd his Pocket of the Plate, it being in his Coat Pocket, and his Coat loose, and then they ran away into a dark Alley; that he pursued them, but not knowing the way, lost them.

Robert Foreside depos'd, That he being drinking at one Blackbourn's about 11 o'Clock on the 8th of March, the Prisoner Tredwel came and sate down by him, and drank with him till about 4 o'Clock in the Afternoon, and then went away, and came again between 11 and 12 at Night, and as she sate by him, he said to her, I treated you before, if you have any Money you should treat me now; and putting his Hands round her, he felt such a Piece of Plate as the Prosecutor had describ'd in her Pocket, and she said she was going to make something of it for her Husband who was in Goal, and he had ventured his Life for her, and she would for him; and added, rather than she would come into any trouble about it, she would throw it into the Thames.

The Prisoners however deny'd the Fact, or that they did see the Prosecutor that Night he laid the Fact to be done, or till three Days after; after a full hearing of the Matter, the Jury acquitted them.

William Hacker , of Hampton-Court , was indicted, for that he, together with William Field , did on the 5th of this Instant April , feloniously steal 4 Cocks, 17 Hens, 5 Drakes, and 5 Ducks , the Property of Christopher Tilson , Esq;

John Nicholson depos'd, That himself, the Prisoner, and William Field being drinking at Teddington , they went about 11 o'Clock at Night, and stole the Fowls, and carried them to Brentford, and put them into a Stable, and they got one Guy Moore to sell them.

The Prisoner pleaded, that this Evidence got him to go with him to fetch the Fowls, telling him he had bought them; the Jury found him Guilty to the Value of 10 d.

[Transportation. See summary.]

George Brown , of St. George in the East , was indicted for privately stealing 50 lb. of Cheese, in the Shop of Susannah Pretty , the 13th of March last.

John Pretty depos'd, That as he was sitting in the Compting-House, he saw the Prisoner come into the Shop , and carry them out, that he ran out after him, and saw him fling them down, and he apprehended him; the Fact being plain, the Jury found him Guilty to the Value of 4 s. 10.

[Transportation. See summary.]

Mary Cross , of St. Ann's Westminster , was indicted for feloniously stealing a Pair of Shoes, value 4 s. in the Shop of William Dean , the 2d of this Instant April ; the Fact being plainly proved, the Jury found her Guilty to the Value of 10 d.

[Transportation. See summary.]

Sarah Laurence , of St. Giles's in the Fields , was indicted for feloniously stealing a Guinea, and 18 s. in Money , the Property of Robert Fleetwood , the 6th of this Instant April .

The Prosecutor depos'd, That the Money was in a Drawer, and the Prisoner was washing for her; and that she missing the Money, the Prisoner owned the taking of it, and that she had 13 s. 6 d. of the Money again; the Jury found her Guilty .

[Transportation. See summary.]

Mary Jane Long , of St. Mary White-Chappel , was indicted for feloniously stealing a Pair of Flaxen Sheets, value 5 s. the Goods of Thomas Styres , the 29th of March last.

The Prosecutor's Wife depos'd, The Prisoner was her Lodger, and while she was gone to Church, she went away, and the next Morning she miss'd her Sheets.

Mary Simon depos'd, The Prisoner brought the Sheets to her, desiring her to lend two Shillings upon them; the Fact being plain, the Jury found her Guilty .

[Transportation. See summary.]

John Francklin , John Pittam , and John Mobberly , were indicted, the first for the Murder of John Fox , the 12th of March last, by beating and striking him on the left Part of the Breast, and other Places, of which Bruises he languished from the 12th of March till the 17th, and then died; and John Pittam and John Mobberly for being present, aiding, and abetting the same .

They were likewise indicted a second time for the unlawful slaying the said John Fox.

There were several Evidences, as John Lough others , who depos'd, That he heard and going to a Stable, saw the Deceased down on some Straw, and the Prisoner Francklin fighting with him, and the other Prisoners present, but knew not the occasion of the Quarrel; that as they fought, sometimes one was down, and sometimes another.

William Fox , the Father, depos'd, His Son, the Deceased, came Home, and told him, that three Fellows, mentioning the Prisoner's Names, had fallen upon him, and almost knocked him on the Head; that he went to Bed, and continued very ill, and the next Morning desir'd to be blooded, and complained of a Pain in his Side; and he had afterwards a Looseness, a Vomiting, and a Fever, and died in five Days after.

Mrs. Fox depos'd, That the next Morning he complained of a Pain in his Stomach, and said, Father, I shall Die.

Paul Lewis , a Surgeon, depos'd, That he opened the Body of the Deceased, and found no Marks of Violence about it; and that it did appear to him that he dy'd a natural Death.

John Baker , a Surgeon, depos'd, That he was at the opening of the Body, and there was a great Inflammation of the Lungs. He being ask'd, if there were no Bruises on the Body? He reply'd, There were some Bruises. He being ask'd, Whence he thought the Inflammation of the Lungs proceeded? He answer'd , He believ'd it might be from a Fever, and that the Fall and Blows might throw him into a Fever.

The Prisoners call'd several Persons to their Reputation; the Jury after a full hearing of the Matter, found John Francklin guilty of Manslaughter , and acquitted Pittam and Mobberly .

[Branding. See summary.]

William Rudd , alias Russ , of Northall was indicted for feloniously stealing two Ewe Sheep, value 7 s. the Goods of John Wilchin , the 10th of January last.

He was likewise indicted a second time for stealing one Ewe Sheep , the Property of Matth.ew Blundel , the 10th of January last. But the Fact not being plain against the Prisoner as to his stealing them, the Jury acquitted him.

Elizabeth Jolls and Mary Thorn , of St. Clement Danes , were indicted for feloniously stealing a Book, value 2 s. 6 d. the Property of John Torbuch , the 25th of March last.

The Prosecutor depos'd, That he lost the Book, and found it in the Possession of Samuel Boyce , who depos'd, That it was brought to him to sell by Elizabeth Jolls, and the other Prisoner, Mary Thorn, stood hard by, and owned the Book to be hers; the Jury found Mary Thorn guilty to the Value of 10 d. but acquitted Elizabeth Jolls.

[Transportation. See summary.]

Joseph Dawson , of St. John Wapping , was indicted for feloniously stealing a Coat and Wastecoat, value 3 l. 10s. four Shirts, value 20s. and twelve Guineas, the Goods of Timothy Crawley ; an Iron Pot, an Apron, two full Pots, the Property of Thomas Hunt , the 3d of March last.

Timothy Crawley depos'd, That on the Day laid in the Indictment, he was at his Lodging at the Rising-Sun in East-Smithfield , sitting with his Landlady; between 11 and 12 o'Clock at Night, the Prisoner and two more came in, and call'd for Drink, and drank to him, and fell into Discourse with him, saying to him, that he (this Evidence) was, he supposed, a School-Master of a Man of War, and saying, that himself belonged to a Man of War, and other such Discourse; and after the third Pot, they call'd for a Glass to drink the Beer in, to which his Landlady objected, saying, it was not usual to drink common Beer out of a Glass; that he had drank but two Glasses when he got up to go to the sink to make Water, and he found himself very much disordered, and intoxicated, that finding himself so, he desir'd a Candle to go to Bed, but stumbled in attempting to go up Stairs; that the Prisoner, whom they call'd Capt. Dawson, said, he would see the Gentleman up to Bed, and came and took hold of him, and another of them follow'd him; and when he came up, he sate down upon the Side of the Bed, and Dawson took off his Cloaths, and gave them to the next Man, and he carried them towards the Bed's Feet; and the Prisoner pulled off his Stockings and Shoes, and laid his Breeches under his Head, and put out the Candle; and he perceiv'd the Breeches to be pulled away by the Prisoner from under his Head, and they went away: Being ask'd, If he did not call out? He answered, That he could not speak, he could not tell what they put in the Glass that made him so; but nevertheless he had his Senses and Reason very well.

Isabel Hunt depos'd, The Prisoner and two others came to her House as the former Evidence had depos'd, and that one of them said to her, she should not affront the Gentleman, he was a Man of a good Estate, and that Dawson flung his Gloves into the Fire, and one of them said, Capt. Dawson, you have burnt your Gloves, that then the Prisoner went into another Room, told her, that he was a Midshipman, had receiv'd a pretty deal of Money, desiring her to lay it by for him; that she reply'd, She would not take charge of any Body's Money. That Mr. Crawley finding himself disorder'd, desired a Candle to go to Bed, and his Foot slipping at the Stairs, the Prisoner and another would needs go up with him, that the other three would have had her gone to draw more Beer, but she refus'd to go; and that she did not see the two come down Stairs, they being screen'd by the other.

The Prisoner deny'd the Fact, and call'd several Evidences to prove that he was at Home at the time the Fact was committed.

John Graham depos'd, That the Prisoner came Home to his Lodging, at the Plough and Harrow in East-Smithfield, between 8 and 9 o'Clock, and did not go out that Night, and that he lay in the next Bed to him, there being but a Board between them.

John Young depos'd, That he lives at the Plough and Harrow in East-Smithfield, and the Prisoner lodg'd with him, and was at Home at about 8 or 9 o'Clock, and was not out that Night; that himself is always the last up, and carries the Key up with him.

Alice Young confirm'd the former Evidence, and so did Isabella Car, the Servant Maid .

Several Persons also appear'd, who gave the Prisoner the Character of an honest Man ; and upon a full hearing of the Matter, the Jury acquitted him.

Sarah Row , of St. Dunstan's in the West , was indicted for privately stealing a Watch, value 4 l. a Chain, value 5 s. from the Person of John Clark , the 11th of March last; but no Prosecutor appearing, she was acquitted .

William Wheatley , of St. Alhallows the Great , was indicted for assaulting Henry Thorp , near the Highway, putting him in Danger of his Life, and taking from him two Rings, value 17s. 6d. and a Hat , the 29th of May last; but no Prosecutor appearing, the Prisoner was acquitted .

Martha Bryan and Anne Smith , were indicted for falsely charging Mary Gifford with Felony ; but no Prosecutor appearing, they were acquitted .

Samuel Lighton , of St. James's Clerkenwell , was indicted for assaulting Sarah, the Wife of Thomas Long , in a Field, or open Place, near the Highway, putting her in Danger of her Life, and taking from her 1 s. 6 d. in Money , the 14th of January last; but no Prosecutor appearing, he was acquitted .

Ralph Dobson , of St. Martins in the Fields , was indicted for feloniously stealing a Gold Ring, with a Cypher, value 10 s. the Property of John Berrington , the 14th of November last: but no Prosecutor appearing, the Prisoner was acquitted .

Sarah Rook , of St. Mary White-chappel , was indicted for privately stealing 15 s. in Money, and 1 Queen Elizabeth's Shilling, from the Person of John Ball , the 12th of February last; but no Prosecutor appearing against the Prisoner, she was acquitted .

Elizabeth Brock , of St. Margaret's Westminster , was indicted for feloniously being married to Francis Smith , her first Husband, Thomas Jones , being alive ; but no Prosecutor appearing, she was acquitted .

Thomas Jones , of St. Brides , was indicted for feloniously marrying Susannah Andrews , spin. his first Wife Elizabeth Brock being alive ; but no Evidence appearing against the Prisoner, he was acquitted .

Henry Grimes , of St. Mary Islington , was indicted for assaulting John Bull , in an open Place, near the Highway, putting him in fear of his Life, and taking from him 3s. 6d. but no Evidence apearing against the Prisoner, he was acquitted .

Mary Morris , of St. Giles in the Fields , was indicted for privately stealing a Silver Watch, Value 15s. from the Person of Thomas Beckinton , the 30th of December last; but no Prosecutor appearing, she was acquitted , and the Prosecutor's Recognizance was order'd to be estreated.

Esther Worril , was indicted for feloniously stealing a Gown, a Petticoat, and other wearing Apparel , the Goods of Martha Earle , the 28th of March last; the Fact being plainly prov'd upon the Prisoner, the Jury found her guilty of the Indictment.

[Transportation. See summary.]

Francis Lewis , was indicted for breaking the House of James Shevalier , and feloniously stealing an Iron Fender, and other Goods, the Property of James Shevalier , the 15th of March last; but for want of sufficient Evidence, he was acquitted .

Anne Wisbich , was indicted for feloniously stealing a Gown, Value 7 s. the Goods of Richard Austin ; but no Prosecutor appearing, he was acquitted .

Ibraham Israel , alias Jonas , of St. Peter's Poor , was indicted for feloniously stealing eight Silver Spoons, five Silver Forks, two Silver Canisters, one Diamond Ring, Value 250 l. a pair of Diamond Ear-Rings, Value 90 l. three Diamond Buckles, and other Goods, in the Dwelling house of John Mendez de Costa , the 4th of March last.

Mr. Mendez de Costa depos'd, That he having been Abroad, when he came Home, upon enquiry, found that the Prisoner, who had gone out with him behind the Coach, had been at Home, and was gone; upon which, going to the Scriptore, found that the Things mentioned in the Indictment were missing; that he sent after him divers Ways, to Dover, Harwich, &c. and that the Prisoner was taken at Canterbury, viewing the Cathedral.

John Pisin depos'd, That he being sent in pursuit of the Prisoner, found him in Canterbury, with the Diamond Ring, and other Things in his Pocket, and that upon his being apprehended, he confess'd he had taken them out of the Scriptore; that he found the Spoons and Forks, at a Goldsmiths at Canterhury , where he had offer'd them to sale.

Christopher Simpkins depos'd, That the Prisoner brought 2 Silver Canisters to him to sell, asking 4s. an Ounce for them, and he stopp'd them. The Goods were produc'd in Court, and own'd by the Prosecutor, and the Prisoner having nothing to say in his Defence, the Jury found him guilty of the Indictment. Death .

John Tizzard , of St. Leonard Shoreditch , was indicted for feloniously taking 8 Yards of Cloth, Value 40 s. the Goods of John How , from the Tenters, between the Hours of 11 and 12 at Night , the 15th of November last.

Joseph Taverner depos'd, That the Cloth was upon the Tenters in the Dog-house Ground , the Night before the Day mentioned in the Indictment, but was missing the next Morning, that he put out an Advertisement, and was afterwards inform'd that the Cloth was at one Johnson's in Grub-street, that the Prisoner's Lodgings being search'd, part of the Cloth was found.

James Philips depos'd, That the Prisoner came to him, and told him he had heard that Davis ( his Accomplice) was taken, and gone to the Compter, and he was afraid he would make himself an Evidence, asking him what he should do? That he told him he could not advise him, but he would carry him to an Acquaintance that could; that he went with him to one Mr. Jarret , and the Prisoner bid him not say that he was the Man; but to tell Mr. Jarret, that the Prisoner came to enquire for a Friend of his, that desired to be admitted as an Evidence; but he did at length tell Mr. Jarret, that the Prisoner was the Man, and that he, (the Prisoner) did promise that he would come the next Morning, and make him self an Evidence, but did not come; that he talking with his Mother about it, she said, that if her Child made himself an Evidence, he must hang 6 or 7, and that was a hard Thing, and he should first go as far as a pair Shoes would carry him.

Samuel Jarret depos'd, That Philips did bring a Man to him, to know the Method of a Person's making himself an Evidence, and he did tell him, the Person present was the Man; that he ask'd him if there were no Dogs in the Ground, that he reply'd, no; but if there were, they did not value them; that he promised to come the next Day in order to be made an Evidence, but did not come, but he, (this Evidence) would not be positive that the Prisoner was the Person that came along with James Philips .

The Prisoner deny'd the Fact; but it being plainly prov'd, the Jury found him guilty of the Indictment. Death .

Thomas Paul , of St. George in the East , was indicted for burglariously breaking the House of Thomas Littlewood , in the Night-time, and stealing a Cloth Coat, value 5s. the Property of John Thong , and a Cloth Coat, value 5 s. the Property of William Wiseman , the 15th of February last.

Thomas Littlewood depos'd, That he keeping the Tap-House at the Fox Brewhouse , a little below the Hermitage, the two Persons, before-mentioned, were drinking at his House, having laid their great Coats down on a Table that stood near the Window; that about Nine o'Clock at Night, the Curtain being drawn before the Window, he perceived the Coats to be drawn off the Table, and taken out at the Window, upon which he ran out of Doors immediately, and saw the Prisoner drop the Coats about twenty Yards, or three Doors from his House; the Witness was positive that the Sash was shut when they came into the Room.

William Kitson depos'd, That he hearing the Prosecutor cry out, stop Thief, he stopp'd the Prisoner about three Doors from the Prosecutor's, and saw him drop the Coats; the Fact being plainly proved, the Jury found him Guilty of the Indictment. Death .

Margaret Walker , alias Walter , of St. Martin's in the Fields , was indicted for privately stealing twenty-one Yards of Linen Cloth, value 20 s. in the Shop of Henry Warcopp , the 16th of March last.

Edmund Thomas depos'd, That the Prisoner came to his Master's Shop, under pretence of buying Irish Linen, that she shew'd her several Pieces, all which she dislik'd; that he went cross the Shop to reach another Piece, but suspecting her, kept his Eye as much as he could towards her, and thought he perceiv'd her to put something under her Ridinghood; that upon his shewing her the Piece of Cloth that he fetch'd, she, upon casting her Eye on it, pretended not to like it, and went hastily out of the Shop; that his Master being at the Shop-Door, talking with a Gentleman, he told him, he suspected the Prisoner had stolen something; he bid him follow her, which he did, and brought her back, and she being tax'd with it, did take the Piece of Cloth from under her Ridinghood; the Prisoner's taking the Cloth from under her Ridinghood, being also confirm'd by Mr. Goodchild , and the Prisoner having nothing to say in her Defence, but that she had been drinking, and was in Liquor, and knew not what she did; the Jury found her Guilty of the Indictment. Death .

James Dalton , of Pancras , was indicted for assaulting John Waller , in a certain Field, or open Place, near the Highway, putting him in Fear of his Life, and taking from him 25 Handkerchiefs, value 4l. five Ducats, value 48 s. a three Guilder Piece, two Guineas, a French Pistole, and 5 s. in Silver , the 22d of November last.

The Prosecutor depos'd, That he being a Holland's Trader , had carried the Handkerchiefs, some Tea, &c. to Hampstead, and had received 45 s. and returning to London, went in to drink at the Adam and Eve at Pancras; that it being Night, he bought a Link, and the Prisoner being there, desired to go with him, to have the Benefit of the Link; that when they came to the End of the second Field, the Prisoner pretended to go to ease himself; and he going on, the Prisoner call'd to him; that being in the Fields between Tottenham-Court and Bloomsbury , the Prisoner pull'd out a Pistol, and damn'd him, bidding him give him the Bundle that he had under his Arm, and afterwards damn'd him, bid him give him his Money too, and cut him on the Head, and knock'd him down, and he took the Money mention'd in the Indictment; that he having on a strip'd Gingham Wastecoat, he took that likewise; that he threatened him, if he made any Noise, he would shoot him through the Head, saying, he knew him; that afterwards hearing he was in Newgate, he went thither in January last, and saw his Gingham Wastecoat on the Prisoner's Back; and that the Prisoner said to him, D - n you, I am sorry I did not blow your Brains out. The Prosecutor added, That the Pistol which the Prisoner had when he robb'd him, was a short, thick, knobbed Pistol, without a Guard to the Trigger, and a Pistol that answered this Descripion was produced in Court by the next Evidence.

Edmund Howard produc'd the Pistol, and depos'd, It was the same that was dropp'd by the Prisoner when he attack'd Dr. Mead's Coach, as he thinks, about the 1st of December , near Leather-Lane in Holbourn, which Pistol the Prosecutor swore to be the Pistol he presented to him when he robb'd him.

The Prisoner ask'd Waller, whether it was Light or Dark? He reply'd, It was Dark, but the Link was lighted when he offered the Pistol to him, but he afterwards put it out.

The Prisoner did not deny but that was the Pistol that he attack'd Dr. Mead's Man with; but he deny'd that he ever attack'd the Prosecutor.

Thomas Brerecliff depos'd, That at the time that the Prisoner attack'd Dr. Mead, he hearing an out-cry of stop Thief, did stop the Prisoner, that he had a Pistol that flash'd in the Pan, but did not go off; and the Pistol was taken up where the Prisoner had dropped it.

The Prisoner deny'd the Fact charged upon him by Waller, exclaim'd against him as a Man of a vile Character, that he was a common Affidavit Man, and was but lately, before the time charg'd in the Indictment, come out of Newgate himself; that though he himself had done many ill Things, and had deserv'd Death many times, yet not for this Fact, he being Innocent of it; and said, the Prosecutor was as great a Rogue as himself, and there was never a Barrel the better Herring. He likewise deny'd that he ever wore a Gingham Wastecoat in his Life, and said, he could falsify the Prosecutor's Evidence; and to that end desired that three Prisoners might be fetch'd from Newgate, which the Court granted.

Charles North depos'd, That while the Prisoner was in Newgate, he never saw him in a Gingham Wastecoat, but in a Cloth one, and he saw him when he first came into Newgate.

Edward Bromfield depos'd, That the Prosecutor coming to Newgate, said, he came to see Jemmy Dalton, and being ask'd by Dalton , Did I ever wrong you? The Prosecutor reply'd, No, you never wrong'd me of a half Penny in your Life. Being ask'd at what time this Discourse pass'd between the Prosecutor and Prisoner? It appear'd to be after the time that the Prosecutor had found the Bill of Indictment against the Prisoner; it was therefore thought scarce probable he should then say so.

John Mitchel was also called by the Prisoner , but he having been proved to have stood in the Pillory for falsely charging a Man with Sodomy, the Court did not think fit to admit him as an Evidence.

The Prosecutor swearing the Fact positively upon the Prisoner, and his Evidences being Persons of no Reputation, the Jury found him guilty of the Indictment. Death .

David Aubert , of St. George Hanover-Square , was indicted for burglariously breaking the House of Francis Fox , in the Night time, and feloniously stealing a Silver Tea-Kettle and Lamp, value 30 l. two Silver Candlesticks, value 7l. a Silver Cup and Cover, value 10 l. three Castors, fourteen Forks, six Tea-Spoons, and other Plate, a Pair of Pistols, value 5 l. the Property of Charles Ecklin , Esq ; on the 4th of March last.

The Prosecutor depos'd, That about Seven o'Clock in the Morning, on the Day laid in the Indictment, his Butler came up, and told him, the House had been broken, and the Plate stolen, that he found the Pantry Window, which was under Ground, had been opened, the Bar taken out, and the Plate, some of which was there, and the rest on the first Floor had been stolen; that the Prisoner had been his Servant about a Year, or fourteen Months before, and he being suspected, the Plate was found in the Prisoner's Lodging.

The Prisoner's Confession before the Justice was produced in Court, and read, wherein he confess'd, that on Wednesday the 4th of March, he went to Mr. Ecklin's , opened the Pantry Window, took out the Bar, put the Plate into a Bag, that he carried for that purpose, carried it to his his own Lodging, and did design to have gone beyond Sea. The Plate was produc'd in Court, tho' most of it broken to Pieces; but it was plainly prov'd to be the Prosecutor's, by his Coat of Arms, or Crest , being Engraven on it.

He call'd two Gentlemen to his Reputation, with whom he had liv'd as a Servant, who gave him the Character of a very honest Servant while he had liv'd with them, and that he was a Swiss by Nation; but the Fact being plainly prov'd, the Jury found him guilty . Death .

George Downing and William Downing , of St. Martin's in the Fields , were indicted, the former for feloniously stealing a Tin Box, value 1 d. two Gold Thimbles, value 26 s. ten Gold Rings, value 3 l. an Emerald Ring, value 4l. a Gold Chain, value 8 l. two Pieces of Rock Gold, value 7 l. and ten Guineas the Property of Thomas Wilson , in the Dwelling-House of Sarah Sutcliff , the 29th of January last, and the latter as an Accessory after the Fact, in receiving the said Goods, knowing them to be stolen .

Mr. Wilson depos'd, That the Prisoner, George Downing , was his Servant , and the Scriptore in which the Things were, was broken, and the Goods gone; that he suspecting the Prisoner, took him up, and he was carried to the Round-House, but he not being able to prove that the Prisoner had taken them, he was admitted to Bail, and spoke to Mr. Barker, a Goldsmith, in Lombard-Street, to advertise them according to the Custom of the Trade, the Things being pretty remarkable; the Rings being made some of them in Guinea; and some of them in Brazil; and offering 10 l. Reward for the whole, and proportionable for any part; that on the 9th of February, Mr. Barker told him, that one Jasper Robins had been with him, and said, that if he would give him the Reward, he believ'd he could direct him to recover his Goods; that some time pass'd, and the Goods not being produc'd, and receiving an Account that the Prisoner had them, he took him up the second time; that thereupon William Downing came to him, and ask'd him, why he took his Brother up again? That he answering him, he had receiv'd Information that his Brother had taken them, and had Reason to believe they were in his ( William Downing 's) Custody; he desir'd him to deliver them up, but he deny'd that he knew any thing of them, and pretended to go and speaks to his Brother George about them; that afterwards George being charg'd positively with having taken them, fell down on his Knees, and acknowledg'd the Fact, and desir'd a Pen, Ink , and Paper, and wrote six or seven Lines , but what it was he did not know; and when his Brother William came, he gave it to him, who reading it, immediately tore it in Pieces , upon which, he, the Prosecutor telling him, that his tearing the Note, confirm'd the Suspicion upon him, after taxing him more some , he at last confess'd that he had had the Things, but could not help him to them, for he had dropped them in Hemming's Row , which he said he did to avoid the Shame, he having never been guilty of any such thing before ; that thereupon he ( this Evidence ) sent to inquire in Hemming's Row, and had Intelligence, that such a Tin Box had been taken up by a Servant Maid , which was brought the next Day by the said Maid, who had five Guineas for her Reward, there not being all the Things lost, in it.

Jasper Robins depos'd, That he had had several Meetings with the Prisoner, George Downing , and had several times discourse with him about a Partnership in Trade; that the Prisoner offer'd to advance 50 l. in order to a Partnership with him, in dealing in Cutlery Ware; that he told him (this Evidence) that indeed he had it not in Money, but it was in Gold, and that was as good; that they met sometimes in Gracechurch-Street, and sometimes in Suffolk-Street, that he going to meet him about the beginning of February, at a Publick House in Suffolk-Street, and there being some Persons there, he heard them talk of the Prisoner's having been taken up upon Suspicion of his taking Mr. Wilson's Goods; that upon this, he went to Mr. Langton's , a Goldsmith, in Lombard-Street, and desired him to let him see his File of Advertisements, which he permitted him to take; and he carried it to George Downing, who acknowledg'd that he had those Goods, telling him, that it was all Gold, and so was as good as Money; but that he never saw any of the Things till after he had been taken up the second time. That then he went to Mr. Barker's, a Goldsmith, to whom the Advertisement directed, and gave him an Account of what Intimation he had receiv'd, that going to the Prisoner from time to time, with design to get some of them of him, in order to carry on the Partnership propos'd , he put him off from time to time, sometimes promising to let him have a Diamond Ring, and sometimes Gold, saying, his Brother had them in keeping, who was at Up-Park, he being a Servant to the Earl of Tankerville ; the Matter rested for about a Fortnight, but seeing that he could make nothing of the Design of getting any of the Things into his Hands, he acquainted Mr. Barker, and he was taken up a second time; that then George sent for his Brother William, who protested he was an utter Stranger to the Matter, knew nothing at all of it, said, that he was sorry his Brother should do such a scandalous Action, but that he would go and consult his Brother; and when he came back, he said, he had had the Things, but had flung them in Hemming's Row, and the Reason he gave for doing so, was, because his Brother having committed it, he was willing to conceal it; that the Things were advertised, and the next Morning the Tin Box and Things were brought by a Servant Maid.

Mr. Barker depos'd, That the Prosecutor having desired him to get an Advertisement printed, according to the Custom of the Trade, he did, and thereupon received the Information from Jasper Robins, as before depos'd, and by that Discovery, the Prisoners were apprehended, and part of the Goods recover'd, as has before been related, and that he paid Susan Baker , who brought the Goods, the next Morning, five Guineas.

Susan Baker depos'd, That she took up the Tin Box, and Rings, and other of the Things mentioned in the Indictment, in Hemming's Row, and carry'd them to Mr. Barker, and he gave her the five Guineas according to the Advertisement.

James Ward , the Constable, confirm'd the Confession of both the Prisoners, as before depos'd, at the time of their being apprehended.

The Prisoners call'd some Persons to their Reputation, which gave them an honest Character till the time of the Commission of this Fact; but the Fact being plainly prov'd, the Jury found George Downing guilty of the Indictment. Death . And William also as an Accessory after the Fact .

[William Downing: Branding. See summary.]

Thomas Williams , jun. and Thomas Williams , sen. of St. James's Westminster , were indicted, the former for burglariously breaking the House of John Hurst , and feloniously taking a Copper Stew Pan, four Pewter Plates, and other Goods, the Property of John Hurst , the 12th of February last; and the latter as an Accessory after the Fact, in feloniously receiving them, knowing them to have been stolen .

They were likewise indicted a second time of St. Andrew's Holbourn , for burglariously breaking the House of John Fisher , the former for feloniously stealing five Pair of Leather Shoes, the Goods of Andrew Rutherford , the 18th of February last, about 7 or 8 o'Clock at Night ; and the latter for receiving them, knowing them to have been stolen .

They were likewise indicted a third time, the former for burglariously breaking the House of Robert Hewet , between 7 and 8 o'Clock at Night, and stealing from thence a Perriwig ; and the latter for receiving it, knowing it to be stolen .

John Hurst depos'd, That his Casement was opened on the 12th of February, between 8 and 9 o'Clock at Night, and his Goods were taken away, but he knew not who took them; that he was sure the Casement was hasped, and he believ'd a Pane of Glass was broken, but could not be sure of that.

Mr. Hawkins, the Constable, depos'd, That having a search Warrant, went to the House of Thomas Williams , sen. and there found the Goods of the Prosecutor mentioned in the Indictment, and also a great many others; that he (i.e. the Father) deny'd he had any such Things in the House, but he found them in a private Place where they were hid; but that the Boy owned that he had been a Robbing with James Nattris .

James Nattris depos'd, That Thomas Williams, Sen. brought him into the Gang, drew him out of Squire Parkinson's Service, and having lodg'd there about a Week, he sent him out with his Son a Thieving, and told him, that let him get what he would, he had ready Money to pay for it, and that was better than being in a Gentleman's Service. That the Day laid in the Indictment, Thomas Williams, jun. went out with him a Thieving, and opened the Prosecutor's Casement, and he (this Evidence) took out the Goods, and carried them to the old Man, and that he gave them a Crown for them all, and took a Punch that he uses in Shoe-making, and stamp'd out the Mark of the Plates, and that the Goods were put in a Chest, upon which a Feather Bed was laid, and upon which himself, and the Prisoner, Thomas Williams, jun. lay upon after they had been out a Thieving, and that this was in the Cellar, where the old Man lay himself. And he added, that while he (this Evidence) was in the Round-House, the Son brought him Money from the Father, that he might make no Discovery . The Fact being plainly prov'd, the Jury found them both Guilty of the Indictment.

John Rutherford depos'd, That upon the Day laid in the Indictment, he went out of his Shop about 7 or 8 o'Clock at Night, and coming in again about 9 or 10, he found his Shop Window was broken, and 5 pair of Shoes were taken away.

James Nattris depos'd, That himself and Thomas Williams, jun. went to the Prosecutors, that Williams broke the Sash, and himself took out the Shoes, and the old Man told them they could make five Pair of Shoes before he could make one, and gave them 6 s. for the five Pair.

The Constable depos'd, That the Shoes were found in a Trunk, with the old Man's wearing Apparel. The Shoes were produc'd in Court, and sworn to be his by the Prosecutor; this Fact being also plainly prov'd, the Jury found them both Guilty of this Indictment likewise.

Robert Hewet depos'd, That his Shop Window was broken open, the 18th of December, that a Pane of the Sash being broken, there was a Pane of Wood instead of it, nailed on with Tin; that the Wig hung upon a Block in the Window, about 8 o'Clock at Night, and that he being gone out, the Wood was taken off, and the Perriwig taken away.

Nattris depos'd, That himself took off the Tin and Wood, and took out the Wig, and gave it to young Williams, and he carried it to his Father, and he gave them 4 s. for it, and wore the Wig several Sundays.

Mr. Hawkins depos'd, He found the Wig in the old Man's Box; and Mr. Flavel confirmed his Evidence, adding, that the old Man said, that it was his own wearing Wig; the Wig was produc'd in Court, and the Prosecutor swore it to be his. This, being also plainly prov'd, the Jury found them both Guilty of this Indictment likewise; the former Death , the latter Transportation .

William Shrimpton , of St. Dunstan's Stepney , was indicted for assaulting Richard Pridgeon , in a Field, or open Place, near the Highway, putting him in Fear of his Life, the 13th of January last, and taking from him a Fustian Frock, value 20 s. a Pair of Breeches value 14 s. a Silver Tobacco-Stopper, a Wastcoat , an Apron, ten Keys, half a Guinea, and 9 s. 6 d. in Money .

He was a second time indicted for a Robbery in an open Field, near the King's High way, upon Edward Powney , and taking from him his Goods, value 4 s. and 4 s. 6 d. in Money .

Richard Pridgeon depos'd, That as he was coming over Stepney-fields , about 10 o'Clock at Night, on the 13th of January, they were attack'd by the Prisoner, Ferdinand Slrimpton , and - Frier, alias Drummond, that one of them put a Pistol to his Breast, and bid him deliver his Money, and took from him a Silver Tobacco-stopper, 9 s. 6 d. and half a Guinea; that then they stripp'd him naked all but his Stockings, took also his Hat, Wig, Stock, Shirt, and Buckles; that he said to them, Gentlemen, it is very cold, give me something to keep me warm; that they gave him his Wastecoat, Shoes, and Wig, and also the Keys; and he being ask'd, if he was sure the Prisoner was one of the Persons who robb'd him? He reply'd, yes, that he knew him again, it being a Moon-shine Night, and he with them a great while. He added, that it being very Cold, and he having no Breeches, after he had gone some Distance from them, he went back, and found them on the same Spot; that they said, D - n your Blood, you impudent Son of a Bitch, do you come here again? and Frier knock'd him down, and took a Horse-whip, and whipt him, and took the Keys from him again, though they had given them to him before; and that when they were in Southwark Goal, they gave him his Stock and Shirt again.

Edward Powney depos'd, He saw him take off Pridgeon's Hat and Wig, but what Money they took from him he could not tell; he added, they took from him 4 s. 6 d. and they had unbutton'd his Clothes, in order to strip him , but he took an opportunity to slip from them; but the Prisoner took his Hat, and struck him. The Facts being plainly prov'd, and the Prisoner not denying it, the Jury found him Guilty of both Indictments. Death .

The Prisoner pleaded, that he had been admitted an Evidence, and had convicted Frier and Ferdinando Srimpton of Murder, and had put this very Fact in his Information, and therefore thought his Case hard to be try'd for this Fact; whereupon the Court intimated , that his Case should be favourably represented to His Majesty.

Hugh Horton , alias Norton , of St. Margaret's Westminster , was indicted for assaulting Stephen Croucher , in the King's Highway, putting him in Fear of his Life, and taking from him a Sorrel Gelding , of the Price of 5 l. the Property of Thomas Austwick , a Mail, value 4 l. and fifty Leather Bags, value 5 l. the Property of our Sovereign Lord the King , the 1st of March last.

Stephen Croucher depos'd, That as he was going with the Bristol and Gloucester Mail, and being near Knight's-Bridge , a Man came out of a Gateway, and bid him Stand, catching hold of the Horse by the Bridle, that thereupon he (this Evidence) said, you are mistaken, I am but a Post Boy ; that the Man answer'd , I know what you are, you must come along with me, and threatened, if he cry'd out, or spoke a Word before he told him which was the Bristol Bag, he would kill him; that then he led him to the farther Side of a Field, pulled him off the Horse, took off the Mail, and took a Knife in his Hand, and either out open, or unbuckled the Mail; and having a Sack by him, he took out several Bags, and put them into the Sack, and ty'd him, and cut off the hinder Mail Pin, and the Cropper , and laid the Sack upon the sore Mail Pin, and was going to get up, but came to him again, and said, he had not ty'd him fast enough, and ty'd his Hands behind him, and then got up on the Horse, and carried away the bags ; and when he rid away, threatened, that if he (this Evidence) offered to stir before the People came to fetch the Oxen sent of the Ground, he would kill him.

This Evidence being ask'd, what time this was? Reply'd, about 4 o'Clock in the Morning. Being ask'd, if he knew the Prisoner to be the Man ? He answer'd, he could not swear positively to that, but that his Stature and Size was very like, and that he talk'd much like the Prisoner. Being ask'd , what Coat he had on? He reply'd, he had a great Coat on, the Cape of which was button'd about the lower part of his Face, and his Hat flapping over the upper part, and as to the Colour of his Coat, he could not tell what it was, it being very dark, and it Snowing very hard, it was cover'd with Snow.

Daniel Burton depos'd, That he and the Prisoner lodg'd together in the same House, at one Mr. Marlow's, and that the Prisoner had divers times sollicited him to go along with him to rob the Bristol-Mail, telling him, that they were both short of Money, and it was better to go out and raise some Money, saying, it was very easy to be done, there was only a Boy with it, and then they should be be made for ever; that he not liking his Proposal, did not Consent, and being afterwards in the Company of one Mason, he told him (this Evidence) that the Prisoner was but an indifferent sort of a Man, and had been the Ruin of him, and the Prisoner also proposing to rob Mrs. Marlow some Night when she went out, he acquainted Mr. Marlow and his Wife, that she was in great Danger if she went out of a Night; and likewise told him, if he did not turn him (the Prisoner) away, he would go away himself, and that Mr. Marlow did turn him away; that when he went away, he ow'd Mr. Marlow five Pound ten Shillings, that he came several times afterwards to the House, and Mr. Marlow told him, if he would pay him in a Month's time, he would abate him 10 Shillings of the Sum.

This Evidence being ask'd, about what time it was that the Prisoner propos'd to him the robbing of the Bristol-Mail? He answer'd, it was about 2 or 3 Months ago, when he first propos'd it, and that he propos'd it several times.

William Marlow being call'd, depos'd, That the Prisoner had lodg'd with him about half a Year, and ow'd him five Pound; and being gone away from his House, came and knock'd at his Door on Monday the 2d of March, in the Morning, that he look'd out of Window, and the Prisoner bid him come down, which he did, and he told him that he was come to pay him his Money; that he reply'd, that was very well; that he then gave him a Bank Note, that he not having Money to Change it, he went to Mr. Broadhead, his Brewer, and the Prisoner stay'd in the Tap-house; that there being 2 or 3 Clerks with him in the Compting-house, he gave it to them, asking them if it was a good Bill, they all looking on it, said, it was, so he gave him 15 l. in Money, and set 5 l. off from his Account.

This Evidence being ask'd about the occasion of his giving the Prisoner Warning, and if it was not upon the Information that Burton had given him, of his Design against his Wife, and his Proposals of robbing the Bristol-Mail? Said, his Memory was bad, he could not well remember. Being ask'd, what Character he had heard of the Prisoner? He answer'd, that he had heard, that he, and one Mason, had been turn'd out of the Guards for some Misdemeanour.

Henry Bingley , Clerk to Mr. Broadhead, depos'd, That a 20 l. Note was brought by Mr. Marlow, to Mr. Broadhead, on Monday the 2d of March, and there was an Endorsement upon it, but he could not say what the Endorsement was, and that he paid this Note away to one Mr. King , a Factor.

James King depos'd, That he did receive a 10 l . Note of Mr. Bingley, and there was an Endorsement, and he thinks it was this, Not to pay till the 5th; and he paid it away to Mr. Victorine's Man, in Thames-street.

William Yates depos'd, That he was Servant to Mr. Victorine, and did receive a Bank Note of 20 l. of Mr. King , on the 7th of March , and there was an Endorsement, to be paid the 5th of March, and that he paid it to Mess. Knight and Jackson's Man.

Thomas Swift depos'd, That he did receive a Note of one of Mr. Victorine's Men, the 7th of March; but could not be positive which of them it was; the Note was produced and read.

To Henry Collet , or Order, 20 l. for the Governor and Company of the Bank, and indorsed, not to be paid till the 5th of March.

G.C.

George Clark depos'd, That upon the 28th of February he inclosed this Note in a Letter, and directed it to Bath, and sent it from the Crown Tavern in Leaden-hall-street , to the Post-Office.

Francis Collins depos'd, That he receiv'd this Letter of Mr. Clark, and deliver'd it in at the Post-Office.

William Burleigh depos'd, That upon searching the Prisoner, he took out of his Breeches a Pocket-book, or Case, and that the Prisoner said he found that, and the Bills in it, in Common-Garden; and that it was between the Lining of his Breeches, and his Flesh, near his Garter ; that he had in his Pocket, two Guineas, a Moidore, and some Silver.

Richard Dukinson confirm'd the Evidence of Burleigh, and added, That this was in the Board-room at the Post-Office.

Mr. Jones was ask'd, where the Prisoner said he found the Notes, at the time he took the Prisoner, and the Pistols? He reply'd, to the best of his Memory, he said, in Lincoln's-Inn, or Lincoln's-Inn-Fields.

Mr. Langley, Turnkey of Newgate, depos'd, That when he was brought to Newgate, he search'd the Prisoner, and found 3 Bank Notes, and five 50 l. Notes of Mr. Hoare's, and he deliver'd them to Mr. Archer.

Mr. Archer confirm'd the Evidence of Langley.

Woodford Moore depos'd, That on the 28th of February, he inclos'd two Bank Notes of 20 l. each, in a Letter, and directed it to Mrs. Martin at Bath, and deliver'd the Letter to Mrs. Gibson.

Elizabeth Gibson depos'd, That she receiv'd the said Letter of Mr. Moore, and deliver'd it to the Post-man.

Thomas Eggleston depos'd, That Mrs. Gibson gave him three Letters; and he put the Letters into the Bag, and sent them to the Post-Office.

Thomas Gregory depos'd, That he took out a Bank Bill of Exchange at the Bank, of February , and got a Friend to inclose it in a Letter , and directed it to Mr. Chandler, and desired a Person to go with him to see him put it in; this was one of the three taken upon the Prisoner by Mr. Langley.

Mr. Wayte depos'd, That he put this Letter into the Post-Office, and this Note was inclos'd.

William Gore depos'd, That he had the five 50 l. Notes from Mr. Hour , and directed them in a Letter, and put them into the Bag at Lincoln's-Inn-Gate , and they were directed to Mr. Richard Evans , at Bristol; that this was on Saturday the 28th of February.

Bryan Hull depos'd, That he carried the Letters to the Temple, and put them in at the Window in Temple-Lane, and Robert Jones took them of him.

Robert Jones depos'd, That he belongs to the Receiving-Office, and he receiv'd the Letters, and put them in a Bag, and they were receiv'd by Alexander Rose to carry to the Post-Office.

Alexander Rose depos'd, That he receiv'd the Bag the 28th of February, and carry'd it seal'd to the Post-Office.

Mr. Houghton depos'd, That the Bill that was found in the Pocket-Book, was in his (this Evidence's) Custody on the 28th of February, that it was directed to Matthew Wales in Bristol, and that he called his Servant to see him put in the Bill, and gave it to Mr. Wallet to carry to the Post-Office.

Mr. Wallet depos'd, That he saw the Bill inclos'd by Mr. Houghton, and he deliver'd it in at the Post Office.

Samuel Potts depos'd, That he tax'd the Bills the 28th of February, and he put the Bristol Letters into the Bag, and deliver'd them to Charles Davis .

Charles Davis depos'd, That he assisted in sorting the Letters, put them into the Bag, and deliver'd it seal'd to the Post-Boy, Stephen Croucher .

Mr. Potts depos'd, That he seal'd all the Bags that were in the Bristol Mail, and buckl'd it up, and saw it deliver'd to the Post-Boy.

Mr. Jones depos'd, That when he search'd the Prisoner's Lodgings the 14th of March, he found in a Trunk, the Receipt the Prisoner had of Marlow for 5 l. and there were several slips of Leather, which were suppos'd to be part of the Bag, in which the Bristol Letters were.

Mr. Crawley , who dresses the Leather for the Post-Office, depos'd, That he did believe those slips of Leather did belong to the Mail, but could not be positive it was part of the Post of five Bags.

Mr. Archer depos'd, That he did believe those slips were part of the Post-Office Bags, and the rather, because of the Marks of Wax dropp'd upon it, which is what frequently, or always happens in sealing them; being oblig'd to use a great deal at a time.

The Prisoner deny'd the Fact, said, he was not the Man that committed it, and that he did really find the Notes; exclaim'd very much against Daniel Burton , and said, he believ'd it was a Trap laid for him; and that he would produce Evidences, to prove, that he was at Home all that Night that the Post-Boy was Robb'd, and call'd the following Evidences.

Elizabeth Hales depos'd, That the Prisoner lodg'd in her Room, and that he was at Home that Night the Bristol Mail was Robb'd; that he came in that Night at 9 o'Clock, and did not go out of her Room till 6 o'Clock in the Evening the Sunday following.

Being ask'd, what Day of the Month t hat was? She answer'd, The 30th or 31st of February, and was at Home all Day the 1st of March.

Being ask'd, How she knew that it was that Day the Mail was Robb'd? She reply'd, That she heard the People talk of it as she look'd out of her Window in Long-Acre.

Being ask'd, How long the Prisoner had lodg'd with her? She answer'd, Almost three Months.

Being ask'd, If she was not his Wife? She reply'd, No. And whether she did not some times go by his Name? She answer'd, No.

Being ask'd, If she had two Beds in her Room? She reply'd, No. And whether they did not use to lie together? She reply'd, When he went to Bed, she sometimes sate up, and sometimes lay down upon it, and when she went to Bed, he did the like; She added, she nurs'd his Child, and it had been sick about a Fortnight.

Being ask'd, How she could be sure the Prisoner was in her Room all Night the 28th of February? She reply'd, That he went to Bed, and she sate up, the Child being sick.

Sarah Andrews depos'd, That she having some Work to do that Night in haste, she went to her Sister Elizabeth Hales about Six o'Clock, to get her to help her; and that the Prisoner came in, and she work'd till Twelve o'Clock, and then she and her Sister went to Bed, and the Prisoner fate up; and when she awak'd about Six o'Clock the next Morning, he was in the Room sitting by the Fire; that she staid till about Eleven or Twelve o'Clock, and then went away; and this was on Sunday, Her Majesty's Birth-Day.

The Jury, after a full hearing of the Matter, found the Prisoner guilty of the Indictment. Death .

Thomas Wilcox , jun. of St. Catharines Creed-Church , was indicted for feloniously stealing 200 Yards of Shalloon , the Property of Thomas Wilcox , sen. the 3d of this Instant April ; but no Prosecutor appearing, he was acquitted .

Francis Charteris , Esq ; appear'd in Court, and by Vertue of his Majesty's Warrant, was admitted to Bail, upon Security given, that he should appear at the next Sessions, and plead to his Majesty's most gracious Pardon.

N. B. The Trial at large of Francis Charteris , Esq; will (by the Approbation and Order of the Judges) be next Week printed; and Publish'd by T. Payne at the Crown in Ivy-Lane, near Pater-noster-Row.

The Trials being ended, the Court proceeded to give Judgment, as follows:

Receiv'd Sentence of Death 10.

Abraham Israel , alias Jonas, John Tizzard , Thomas Paul , Margaret Walker , alias Walters, James Dalton , David Aubert , George Downing , Thomas Williams , jun. Hugh Horton , alias Norton, and William Shrimpton .

Burnt in the Hand 5.

John Pearse , alias Pias, John Francklin , William Downing , Thomas Sharp , and Ann Borket , former Convicts.

To be Whip'd 2.

John Hoskins , and William Smith .

Transportation 22.

Bartholomew Nicholson , Sarah Long , alias Sheppard, Anthony Bagley , alias Baggerly, John Harris , James Reynolds , alias Bush, Isaac Emmery , Catharine Walker , alias Robinson, alias Johnson, Joseph Vaughan , James Tod , James, alias Samuel Pritchard , John Leather , Thomas Walker , Barbara Newel , Anne Story , Thomas Bunker , John Fletcher , Peter Lord , James Durham , James Gwin , Thomas Thompson , William Hacker , George Brown , Mary Cross , Sarah Laurence , Mary Jane Long , Thomas Williams , sen. Sarah Thorr , and Esther Worrel .

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La Plum Velante . Or the Art of Short-hand improved. Being the most Swist. Regular, and Easy Method of Shorthand-writing yet Extract . Composed after Fifty Years Practice and Improvement of the said Art, by the Observation of other Methods and intent Study of it. The Fifth Edition, with Aditions of the Terms of the Law, and much amended, By William Mason . Price 2 s. 6 d.

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This Day is publish'd,

The Second Edition, (with many Additions and Amendments ) of

A Practical Treatise: Or, Second Thoughts on the Consequences of the Venereal Disease. In Three Parts, viz. I. On the Simple Gonorrhoea, Gleets, and other Weaknesses, whether from Venereal Embraces, Self-Pollution, improperly call'd Onanism , or Natural Imbecillity. II. On the Virulent Gonorrhoea, or Clap. III. On the Venereal Lues, or Grand Pott . Wherein are plainly shew'd, the exact Degrees of Difference; with their Signs, Symptoms, Prognosticks , and Cures, in all Cases; their Beginnings, Progress, and fatal Periods, when neglected, or unskillfully managed; and how their absolute Cure, without Violence, or Injury, is completed. Wish proper and effectual Remedies, in their several Stages , prescribed and recommended therein. With some Remarks on the preposterous Way of Venery, with Machines , &c. and a plain Discovery of the Dangers (tho' little expected) which attend that vile Practice. And many other useful Discoveries relating to Infections in both Sexes, not before taken Notice of. To which is annexed, a Vindication of the Practice of Selivations; being an Answer to Monsieur Chicognean's Pamphlet against Mercurial Salivations , no way deratory to Dr. Turner's Answer on the same Subject . By Joseph Cam , M. D. Printed for the Author; and sold by G. Strahan in Cornhill , W. Mears without Temple-Bar, C. King in Westminster-Hall, E. Midwinter on London-bridge, and Mrs. Baker over-against Hatton-Garden in Holborn. Price 2 s.

Just Publish'd (Dedicated to the Hon. Mrs. Pultenty.)

The Brothers, or Treachery punish'd, a Novel. Interspersed with, I. the Adventures of Don Alvarez . II. The Adventures of Don Lorenzo. III. Cupid and Bacchus, a Dramatic Entertainment. IV. The Adventures of Marinna , Sister to Don Alvarez. Written by a Person of Quality. Printed for T. Payne at the Crown in Ivy-Lane, near Pater-noster-Row. Price 1 s. 6 d. Where may be had, the Travels of Cyrus, by the Chevalier Ramsay , with a Discourse on the Theology and Mythology of the Ancients, in 2 Vol. French and English. Price Bound 6 s.

Already PUBLISH'D, and will be continu'd Monthly,

THE New POLITICAL STATE of Great-Britain; Including the Public Affairs of Foreign Courts. Compiled by Mr. Morgan.

Numb. I. For the Month of January, 1730. Containing, 1. Memoirs of the Life and Writings of Sir Richard Stocle , wherein are two Cases of Conscience resolv'd by Dr. Burnet late Bishop of Salisbury, concerning Polygamy and Divorce, sent from Scotland. 2. Some Account of the Lives, Characters and Conduct of the Earls of Nottingham and Portmore, and other Persons of Eminence who died this Month. 3. Births, Marriages and Promotions, Ecclesiastical, Civil, and Military. 4. The Treaty of Seville , His Majesty's Speech to the Parliament, Addresses, the King's Answers, &c. 5. Advices from Foreign Parts, with Remarks, viz . Persia, Turkey, Barbary , (with some curious Particulars of the present Bey of Tunis, the Algerines , &c.) the Czar's Marriage. The Grand Duke of Tuscany's Family. 6. The success of the Dutch Whale Fishery in Greenland, &c. from 1683 to 1724, both inclusive. 7. The Regulation of Jails, containing, The Original Institution of the Marshalsea, by Mr. Asgil; with the Fees of that Prison, Ludgate, Newgate, the two Compters, &c. pursuant to the late Act of Parliament. 8. An Account of the new Plays that have been acted on the Theatres this Winter, &c.

Numb. II. For the Month of FEBRUARY. Containing 1. Memories of the Life and Writings, &c. of the late Learned John Friend , M. D. 2. An Abstract of the Quadruple Alliance; With Advices from Persia, Turkey, and Russia; including the Young Czar 's Death, and the Old Czar's Ordinance relating to the Succession. 3. A Genealogical Account of the Duke of Parma's Family: With a Memorial shewing the Independency of the Grand Dutchy of Tuscany. 4. The Tryals at large of, 1. R. Lyddel , Esq; for Adultery with the Lady Abergavenny. 2. Of K. Ward, Esq; for Breach of a Marriage Contract with Miss Holt. 3. Of Coll. F. Charteris for a Rape. 5. Deaths, Marriages and Promotions, Ecclesiastical, Civil and Military . 6. Proceedings at Court, in the Privy Council , Admiralty, Parliament, &c.

Numb. III. For the Month of MARCH, 1730. Containing I. The Close of Dr. Friend's Life. 2. Answer by the German Ministry, to the Memorial relating to Tuscany. 3. Articles of Peace and Commerce, now subsisting between the British Crown, and Regency of Algiers . 4. Short Memoirs of Vincent Maria Orsini , the late Pope, Benedict XIII . Written by Count D'Elci , Gentleman of the Bed - Chamber to several Popes. Other Foreign Affairs. 5. A curious Letter, relating to publick Credit, &c. Regulation of Fails continued, viz. the Fees of the Fleet, Middlesex Officers, &c. 6. Deaths, Births, Marriages and Promotions, Ecclesiastical , Civil and Military. 7. A Discourse of the present State of the Colonies in America, with respect to the Interest of Great-Britain, and an exact Estimate of the Imports and Exports to and from all Parts, compared with the Excess of each Country.

N. B. As (next to the inserting nothing beneath the Dignity of History) one of the main Articles of our Scheme, is constantly to oblige our Readers with concise Memoirs of some Persons, whose Works are in Esteem among the Learned, wholly separate from the Political Part, &c. [as we did in Numb. I. with an Account of Sir Richard Steel , and have done in this Numb. II. of Dr. Friend, which shall be concluded in our next] each Purchaser, by this Method, will, at the Year's End, have a useful and entertaining Volume of Biography, not to be met with elsewhere. - If therefore any Gentlemen are desirous of having any Particulars of this Nature imparted to the Publick, such Notices shall be faithfully inserted, (if proper) and the Favour gratefully acknowledged. Commands of this or any other kind, will safely come to our Hands, if directed, Postage paid, to Mr. Creake's in Jermyn-street. Printed by A. Campbell, in King-street, Westminster; for B. Creake, in Jermyn-street; J. Brotherton, in Cornhill; T. Payne, in Ivey-Lane ; C. Norris, in St. Paul's Alley; J. Hazard, near Stationer's Hall ; R. Montague, at the Post-Office in Great Queen-street; and J. Brindley, in New Bond-street .

Just Publish'd, in Octavo,

THE Art of Heraldry. Containing, I. The Original and Universality of Arms and Ensigns, with their Use and Necessity; their Blazon, Distribution, Abatements, and Rewards of Honour .

II. Of diverse kinds of Escotcheons, and of the Bearing or Using the Ordinaries in Coat Armour .

III. Of Coat Armour form'd of Artificial Things, whether Civil, Ecclesiastical, Military or Marine, such as are made by Man, or for his Use.

IV. Of Charges in Coat Armour form'd of Colestials, as the Sun , Moon, Stars, Angels, &c. Of Vegetables , as Trees, Flowers, Plants, Fruits, &c . Of the Parts of Man's Body, as the Hands, Legs, Arms, Heart, &c. Of Animals, as Lyons, Tygers , Horses, Snags, &c. in Whole and in Parts.

V. Of Charges from Fowls and Birds of all Sort, in Whole and in Parts.

VI. Of Charges from Fishes of all kinds, in Whole and in Parts.

VII. Of Charges from Monstrous Animals , in Whole and in Parts.

Embellish'd with Forty Copper Plates, containing above 900 Coats of Arms of the Nobility and Gentry of Great Britain, and Ireland, curiously Engraven, with their particular Descriptions, and by whom borne. Interspers'd with the Natural History of the several Species of Birds, Beasts, Fishes, Vegetables &c. comprehended therein. Together with Occasional Explications of all the Terms used in the Science of Heraldry, and peculiar thereto. To which is prefix'd, An Alphabetical List of the Names of the Families whose Coats are delineated in the Book, with References to the Pages where they are to be found. London; Printed for J. Osborn near Dock Head, in Southwark; and Sold by A. Bettesworth in Pater-Noster-Row. 1730. Price Bound in Calf Three Shillings.