Old Bailey Proceedings Online (www.oldbaileyonline.org, version 6.0, 21 December 2014), December 1724 (17241204).

Old Bailey Proceedings, 4th December 1724.

THE PROCEEDINGS ON THE KING'S Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery, FOR THE CITY of LONDON, and COUNTY of MIDDLESEX, HELD AT JUSTICE-HALL, in the OLD-BAILEY, During the MAYORALTY of the Rt. Honble Sir George Mertins, Knight, LORD-MAYOR of the CITY of LONDON.

In the 11th Year of His MAJESTY's Reign.

1725.

LONDON:

Printed for George James , in Little Britain.

THE PROCEEDINGS ON THE KING's Commission of the Peace, AND

Oyer and Terminer, and Jail-Delivery of Newgate, held for the CITY of London, and COUNTRY of Middlesex, at Justice-Hall in the Old-Baily,

On Friday, Saturday, Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday, being the 4th, 5th, 7th, 8th, and 9th of December, in the Eleventh Year of his MAJESTY's Reign.

BEFORE the Right Honourable Sir GEORGE MERTTINS , Knt. Lord Mayor of the City of London, the Right Honourable the Lord Chief Justice King, Mr. Justice Dormer, Mr. Baron Page , John Raby Esq; Sergeant at Law, and several of his Majesty's Justices of the Peace for the City of London and Country of Middlesex.

The JURORS were as followeth:

The London Jury

Thomas Dawson ,

Isaac Howsell ,

William Lawrence ,

John Henchman ,

Philip Green ,

Robert Hall ,

William Rose ,

Robert Coleman ,

John Allen ,

Thomas Middleton ,

George Markham ,

Stephen Chidwick .

The Middlesex Jury.

Thomas Wyton ,

John Walker ,

John Stringer ,

Jonathan Catlin ,

Richard Mills ,

Edward Percival ,

Elisha Impey ,

William Carpenter ,

Francis Whitemarsh ,

John Hossack ,

Walter Bury ,

Joseph Smith .

The Proceedings were as follows, viz.

John Rider , alias Regar , of S. Dunstan's in the East , was indicted for feloniously stealing fifty six Pound of Butter, value 25 s. the Goods of Rich. Spearing , on the 23d of November last. It appear'd, that sixty Firkins of Butter were landed near the Custom-House Key , for the Prosecutor; one of them was between Three and Four in the Morning taken from thence by the Prisoner, who was stopt with it under the Custom-House Gate by Philip Harrison , (a Tide-waiter.) Harison had but just eased the Prisoner of his Burden, when Peacock (a Watchman on the Keys) came up and claim'd a Share of the Seizure; for both he and Harrison at first imagined the Prisoner to be a Smugler; but finding their Mistake, they carry'd him to the Watch-house, and the next Day he was committed to Newgate by Sir Francis Forbes . The Prisoner in his Defence said, that he found the Butter upon the Keys, about Four in the Morning and added, (to make his Innocence more visible) that a Carman's Boy saw him take it away. The Jury found him guilty to the Value of 10 d. Transportation .

Amy Burrows , of S. Andrew's, Holborn , was indicted for privately stealing out of the Shop of Mary Toothaker , 12 Yards of Scarlet Ribbon, value 6s. on the 30th of October last. Mary Toothaker deposed, that the Prisoner and two more came into her Shop, next the Cross-Keys Tavern in Holborn , to buy a Cross-Knot; at which time she saw the Prisoner take the Goods in the Indictment, and go away; but having no body to take care of her Shop, she did not pursue her, for fear the others in the mean time should rob her of something more valuable: But two Weeks after, she saw the Prisoner again, and causing her to be apprehended, she confess'd she had pawn'd them for 2s. at a Chandler's Shop in Plumb-Tree Court in Holborn; at which Place the Goods were found. Guilty to the Value of 10d. Transportation .

Benjamin, alias William Baker , of S. Mary Colechurch , was indicted for privately stealing a Hat, value 10 s. the Goods of Robert Pead ; and a Hat, value 5s. the Goods of Edward Vergow , out of the Shop of the said Robert Pead . It appear'd that the Prisoner came into the Shop of the Prosecutor, (an Apothecary ) and ask'd for a Halfpennyworth of Spanish Liquorish. Vergow, the Prosecutor's Servant, who was in the Back-Shop, came out and told him, they did not use to sell such small Quantities; with which Answer the Prisoner went away, and Vergow immediately missing his Master's Hat, and his own, (both which before hung on the Pegs in the Shop) he pursued the Prisoner. His Master's Hat, with four more, he found in a Basket which the Prisoner had on his Shoulder, and his own Hat under the Prisoner's great Coat. The Prisoner, to excuse himself, said, that he had bought the Hats but just before, and call'd John Baker to his Reputation, who deposed, that he was a Gardener at the Old Rose in Marybone, had known the Prisoner 20 Years, and had often employ'd him in his Business, but never knew him guilty of any Dishonesty. But the Fact being plainly proved upon the Prisoner, and his Defence being frivolous, the Jury found him guilty to the Value of 4s. 10d. Transportation .

Sarah Hughs , of S. Sepulchre's , was indicted for feloniously stealing six Pewter Plates, value 6s. and other Things , the Goods of John Medley . It appeared that the Prisoner was a Chair-woman to the Prosecutor, and made use of an Opportunity of carrying away the Plates; but offering them to Sale, she was stopt, and upon Examination confest the Fact before the Justice. Guilty to the Value of 10 d. Transportation .

Dorothy Thompson , was indicted for feloniously stealing a Linnen Sheet, value 7s. and several Diaper Clouts, value 2s. the Goods of Samuel Walter , on the 14th of November last. Barbara George deposed, that being a Nurse at Mr. Walter's, a Druggist , in Cheapside , where the Prisoner was a Servant , she often missed some of the Child's Clouts in washing, but could never think what became of them, till one day she happened to find the Maid's Petticoat, which was made of the same Clouts that before had been missing. And upon further Search, found a Gown of her's that was lined with part of the Prosecutor's Sheet. The Prisoner confessed the Fact before Sir John Fryer , and said that she threw the remaining part of the Sheet down the Vault, to prevent a Discovery, having dream'd that her Mistress had found out what she had done. But this she deny'd at the Bar, and said that that Gown was lined with two of her own Aprons, and that she had the Petticoat before she came to the Prosecutor's Service. Her Confession was read in Court, and the Jury found her guilty to the Value of 10 d. Transportation .

Edward Templeman , of S. Ann's near Aldersgate , was indicted for privately stealing from the Person of Robert Ray, a Silk Handkerchief, value 1s. the Goods of Robert Ray . And also for privately stealing 4 more Handkerchiefs, the Goods of Persons unknown. Robert Ray deposed, that coming out of S. Ann's Church on Sunday Night, he miss'd his Handkerchief, went back to see if he had not left it in his Seat; and returning to the Door, he saw Mrs. Smith holding the Prisoner, and heard her say that he was a Pickpocket. Upon which he was taken into the Vestry and search'd. Four Handkerchiefs were found upon him, and two lying at the Vestry-Door, one of which at last proved to be the Prosecutor's. Mrs. Smith depos'd, that seeing the Prisoner's Hand in her Cousin D. Humphries's Pocket, she clapt her Hand upon his, held him fast, and cried out, a Pickpocket, till the Beadle came and carried him into the Vestry. But there being no positive Proof that the Prisoner was the Person that dropt the Prosecutor's Handkerchief at the Vestry-Door; and no body owning any of the Handkerchiefs that were found upon him, the Jury acquitted him.

Peter Crisp , of S. Ann's, Blackfryers , was indicted for breaking and entring the House of Matth.ew Bond , and taking from thence 16 s. the Money of Matthew Bond, on the 20th of October last, in the Night Time . Matthew Bond being dry in the Night, he got up about Two o'Clock, and found all the Doors fast; he returned to Bed, and rising again about 7, found that his Shop Door and his Till were broke open, and the Money taken out. He called to Mr. Collier, and told him he was robbed, and it must be done by somebody in the House. Collier answered, I wish it is not Peter, for be went down to the Vault about Six this Morning They examined Peter, (the Prisoner): He deny'd it strongly at first, but afterwards said, if they would make the Matter up, he would pay them whatever they had lost, by so much a Week. Mr. Collier depos'd, that he was a Looking Glass Polisher, lodged in Mr. Bond's House, where the Prisoner work'd Journey-work with him. That on the Night mentioned in the Indictment, the Prisoner having quarrel'd with his Wife, he got Leave to lie for one Night in Mr.Bond's Garret, with another Servant of Mr.Collier's. About 4 in the Morning, the Prisoner and his Bedfellow got up to work, and about 6 the Prisoner said he was griped, and must go to the Vault. He went down, staid near a quarter of an Hour, and coming up again, told his Master Collier that he had found Mr. Bond's Shop Door open, but that he had shut it again. The Evidence not fixing the Fact on the Prisoner, and he bringing some Witnesses to his Reputation, the Jury acquitted him.

Mary Noon , of S. Dunstan's in the West , was indicted for privately stealing from the Person of Tho. Burgess two Guineas and Half a Crown , on the 28th of November last. Tho. Burgess depos'd, that as he was going by S. Dunstan's Church in Fleetstreet , being indifferently drunk, the Prisoner and another Woman ran full against him, held him fast, and pickt his Pocket in half a Minute. He call'd to the Watch; upon which three or four Men came up, beat him, and threw him down; but the Mob gathering, and the Watch appearing, the Men and one of the Women that assaulted him ran away; but the Prisoner was secur'd, and carry'd to the Watch house. The Fact was plainly proved upon her: But the Indictment being laid for privately stealing, and this appearing to be an open Assault, the Jury found her guilty of the Felony only . Transportation .

Ann Simpson , of Edgworth , was indicted for stealing out of the House of George Montague 18 Guineas, the Money of George Montague, and half a Yard of Sattin value 12 d. the Goods of Richard Brasier , on the 3d of November last. Jane Montague deposed, that on the 26th of October she put 80 Guineas into a Cup, and lock'd it in her Father's Cupboard, which was in his Bed-Chamber. That her Father, in the beginning of November, just before he went to Dunstable Fair, sent her up to fetch him some Money; at which time she miss'd 13 Guineas, but did not tell her Father for fear of Anger, nor her Sister till her Father was gone. When her father return'd, he gave her some Money to lay up, and then she miss'd 5 Gunieas more, of which she told her Sister. They then searched the Cupboard, and found that a Board on the top of it had been loosen'd and taken up. Their Father died. They examined all the Servants; but no body was more suspected than the Prisoner, because the Prosecutor being a Higler , was two or three Days in a Week at Country Fairs and Markets, and always left the Care of the House to the Prisoner, and the other Servants never used to go into her Father's Room; nor did they know that any Money was kept there. Mary Montague deposed to the same Effect, and added, that in searching the Prisoner's Trunk, they found the half Yard of Sattin mentioned in the Indictment, which she produced in Court. Elizabeth Brasier deposed, that having bought a Piece of Sattin for a Suit, she left it at her Father Montagne's, to the Charge of the Prisoner; and fetching it away again when she went home to Bedford, and there sending for her Mantua-maker, they found it was half a Yard of Shorter than when she bought it. That the half Yard that was afterwards found in the Prisoner's Trunk was exactly of the same kind, Stripe and Colour. The Prisoner in her Defence said, that none of the Rooms in the House were kept lockt; that people were frequently coming in, and the other Servants often going up and down Stairs, and might know as well as the where the Money was kept. That she was busy a Washing when the Money was lost, and could not observe every body that came in and out. That the Sattin was given her two Years ago; and that her Masters Daughters had several times bought new Cloths without his Knowledge; and that he had often complain'd of it, and said, he was at more Charges now than when his Wife was alive. The Jury acquitted her.

Richard Thompson , alias Blackbeard, alias Evans of Thistleworth , was indicted for feloniously stealing a She Ass, value 5 l. a Ram 5s. and a tame Deer value 40 s. the Property of John Mead Esq ; on the 8th of August last.

He was a second time indicted for a Misdemeanor in breaking into an enclosed Ground of John Mead Esq; and killing two Fallow Deer, value 20s. on the 27th of October last. Mr. Mead depos'd, that the Deer were lost out of his Ground at the Times mention'd in the Indictment; and he was soon after inform'd, that the Prisoner was one of the Persons that stole them. Robert Brown of Brentford depos'd, that the Prisoner told him, that in August last he and Tho James laid a Toil (or Snare) to catch Deer in Mr. Mead's Park. The first that was caught in it was a She Ass, the next a Ram, and the third a tame Deer. They set the Ass and Ram at liberty, but took the Deer away, and sold it for 23s. to Richard Beck , a Porter in Aldersgate street, who frequently bought Venison that was stolen. That on the 27th of October last, about 9 at Night, the Prisoner, this Evidence, and Tho. James, met at the King's-Head at Eling, and from thence went together to Mr.Mead's Park, and stole away a white Doe and a Fawn, which they brought to Smalbury-Green, and there this Evidence left the Prisoner. Robert Misselbrook , a Butcher, deposed, that in last August, falling into Discourse with the Prisoner about Deer-stealing, the Prisoner told him that he had taken one of Mr. Mead's tame Deer, which he caught in a Toil. Mrs. Goodneighbour at the Two Cocks in Thistleworth, deposed, that the Night Mr.Mead's tame Deer was lost, the Prisoner came to her House with a Toil in a Basket. The Prisoner in his Defence acknowledg'd the killing of the two wild Deer in October, but deny'd that he was concern'd in taking the same Deer in August, any farther than that he knew the Persons that took it, because they had asked him to go with them; but he refused them. The Jury acquitted him of the first Indictment, but found him guilty of the other. Fined .

He was a 3d time indicted for stealing a black Gelding Value 5 l. the Goods of Ralph Farr , on the 1st of Oct. last. But Farr not appearing, he was acquitted .

Constance Hales , and Elizabeth Nelson , alias Dixon , the Wife of John Dixon , were indicted for feloniously stealing a Silk Gown, value 10 s. a quilted Petticoat value 18 s. and a Dragget Coat and Wastecoat value 12 s. the Goods of James Mosely , on the 16th of November last. James Mosely depos'd, that he lives in Well-close-Square ; that the Prisoners were his Lodgers, and that about Four in the Morning another of his Lodgers cry'd out Thieves. He got up, ran down into the Yard, and there found his Wastecoat upon the Wall; and afterwards going into his Closet, he miss'd the other Goods in the Indictment, and suppos'd them to be stolen by some body belonging to the House. Soon after Mrs. Shepherd, (another of his Lodgers) inform'd him that his Goods were pawn'd at Mrs Goodfellow's in King-Street, Wapping; and if he would apprehend James Goodwin and the two Prisoners, he might know more of the Matter. He thereupon apprehended Goodwin, (who pass'd for Hales's Husband) and had him committed to New-Prison; but being set out upon Bail, he ran away. Jane Goodfellow depos'd, that Hales, in Company with Nelson, brought the Goods to her House, and pawn'd them for 12 s. 6 d. The Prisoner Hales in her Defence said, that Goodwin was her Country man, and coming to visit her, Mrs. Mosely told him, (as it was common for her to tell any Man that came to her other Lodgers) if he would pay for the Lodging, he should lie with her (the Prisoner) all Night; but she refus'd, and told her Landlady, that she had a Husband at Sea, and would not defile his Bed for the World. Goodwin soon after went away, and then Mrs. Shepherd call'd the Prisoner, and said, Take your Landlady Mosely aside, and give her a Dram; and in the mean time I'll carry off her Box with the Rings in it: But she would not consent to it. However Shepherd brought out a Bundle of Cloaths: She desired Shepherd to carry them back to the Place she had them from; but instead of that, Shepherd gave them to her Sister, who carry'd them out to Goodwin, from whom the Prisoner Nelson took them, carry'd them to pawn at Mrs. Goodfellow's, and received the Money herself. Nelson in her Defence said, that she accidentally met Hales with a Bundle of Cloaths: Hales desired her to go with her to Goodfellow's, which she did, and there Hales pawn'd the Goods, and took the Money herself. The Jury found Hales guilty to the Value of 10 d. but the Evidence not reaching Nelson, she was acquitted .

William Hicks and Robert Archer , of S. Andrew's Holborn , were indicted for privately stealing, in the Shop of Tho. Parks, 36 Iron Hinges, value 35 s. and five Locks, value 5s. the Goods of Robert Parks , on the 24th of November last. Tho. Parks depos'd, that he keeps a Smith's Shop in Leather-Lane , and that the Prisoner Hicks was his Journeyman , and was intimate with Archer the other Journeyman, who was Prisoner to Daniel Carpenter , a Carpenter. That missing the Goods, he suspected the Prisoners, and upon Enquiry, found that Hicks, in Company with Archer, had sold the Goods mentioned in the Indictment to Mr. Carpenter and Mr. Panta. The Evidence not being sufficient against Archer, he was acquitted ; but Hicks was found guilty to the Value of 4s. 10 d. Transportation .

John Randal , was indicted for privately stealing from William Woodroff a Handkerchief value 10d. on the 24th of October last. It appear'd, that as the Prosecutor was coming out of the Playhouse in Drury-Lane , the Prisoner ran against him, and took the Handkerchief out of his Pocket. Mr.Shrimpton saw him commit the Fact, seiz'd him, and he being searched, 4 other Handkerchiefs were found upon him. Guilty . Transportation .

Elizabeth Morris , alias Mary Tipping , of S. Giles's in the Fields , was indicted for feloniously stealing three Smocks value 10 s. the Goods of John Penny , on the 17th of November last. John Penny, Constable , depos'd, that between One and Two in the Morning, the Prisoner was brought to him at the Watch-house, with a Bundle and a Box, and said that her Husband had beat her, and taken another Woman to Bed, and so she catch'd up those Things to secure them at a Friend's House. He bid her send for somebody to her Reputation, which she did, and two Women came and gave her the Character of an honest Woman, and that they believed the Goods were her own. However, he carry'd her and her two Friends before the Justice, who finding nothing proved against her, discharged her. They then went to drink together, and afterwards came to his House, where she sent for three Quarts of Twopenny to treat him and her two Friends. While they were drinking, he was call'd out, and at his Return found her at Dinner with his Wife. Mrs. Penny deposed, that after her Husband was gone, a Neighbour came in, who having some Knowledge of the Prisoner, fell into Discourse with her; but in a little time the Prisoner appear'd to be very drunk, and tumbled out of the Chair; she rais'd her again, carried her up Stairs, laid her upon the Bed, and very considerately set a Chamber-Pot by her, for fear she might have Occasion to make Water. This done, she left her, and in about half an Hour after, thinking she heard her rising, went up to see how she did, and found her kneeling on the Bed, with the Chamber-Pot betwixt her Legs. She seem'd to be a little recover'd, and upon Persuasion came down to Dinner, and after Dinner went away. Next day this Evidence miss'd her Linnen, and suspecting the Prisoner, enquired after her of the Neighbour that accidentally met with her the day before; by which means she found her, charged her with the Felony, and had her before Justice Kirby, to whom she confess'd that she stole the Goods, part of which were found upon her, and the rest at Pawn. The Prisoner in her Defence said, that the Prosecutor's Daughter came up Stairs, and beg'd her to pawn those three Smocks for her, and bring her the Money. She pawn'd them accordingly, and intended to bring her the Money next day; but being very busy, was prevented. It appear'd very unlikely that the Prosecutor's Daughter should, on such a short Acquaintance, put so much Confidence in the Prisoner, especially when she saw her in such ill Circumstances. The Jury found her guilty . Transportation .

Edward Betty , Katharine Betty , alias Cook, alias Macoon , and Katharine Keys , of S. Martin's in the Fields , were indicted for breaking and entring the House of Robert Rawlings , on the 29th of October last, about the Hour of 12 at Night, and taking from thence a Gold Ring, set with Diamonds, Value 15 s. a Gold Ring Value 5 s. a Watch Value 30 s. five Silver handled Forks Value 30 s. a Silver Snuff-Box, Value 30s. six Silver Spoons Value 38 s. three Pair of Silver Buckles Value 6 s. a Pair of Gold Studs Value 8 s. a Silver Handled Knife Value 3 s. three Tortoiseshell-Snuff-Boxes Value 18 s. twelve Ells of Holland, 2 Neckcloths, 32 Ounces of Silver, Value 6 l. 6 Perukes Value 6 l. and 6 l. 6 s. in Money, the Goods and Money of Robert Rawlings and John Rawlings , and five Gold Rings Value 3 l. a Watch Value 10 s. a Pair of Ear-Rings, six Cane-Heads, one Silver Spoon, two Gowns, a Drugget Coat, and other Things, the Goods of Persons unknown .

Robert Rawlings depos'd, that on the 29th of Oct. last, he heard no Noise in the Night, but found next Morning that his House had been broke open, and the Goods in the Indictment taken away; that the Entrance was made at the Cellar Window under the Shop Bulk, from whence they came up the Stairs, and forced off a Staple, into which the Bolt of the Door shut on the other side, and so got into the Shop. That on the 31st of the same Month, Jack Sheppard (who has since been executed) was taken with some of those Goods upon him, and Katharine Keys being in his Company when he was apprehended, they suspected her to be an Accomplice; but she escaping then, and he having Intelligence where she lodged, went thither with some others in quest of her. When they came there, they were told she was gone to her Husband in Ludgate. They followed, found her, and told her they were come to search her Lodging. A Man that was with her would have had the key to have gone to her Lodging before them. She readily offered to give it him; but the Prosecutor would not suffer it, thinking that his Design was to remove some of the Goods before any other came there. K. Keys then desired them not to expose her, and she would go with them quietly. They went, and there found 9 Ells of Gulix Holland, which appeared to be part of the 12 Ells which the Prosecutors had lost. By examining her, they understood that Kate Cook alias Macoon was another Acquaintance of Jack Sheppard's, and that she and Ned Betty (the other Prisoner) frequently lay together lay together at his Lodging in Litchfield-Street. Thither they went with a Search Warrant, and found a Pair of the Prosecutor's Shoes, but neither Kate Cook nor her Bedfellow. From thence they went to another Lodging that belong'd to Cook in Cranborn-Alley, Leicester-Fields, where Kate Keys and she sometimes lived together, and of which Kate Keys had the Key. Here was likewise no body at home, but they found the Prosecutor's Sword, the remaining 3 Ells of Holland, and a Basket with Thieving Tools, and Jack Sheppard's Feetlocks and Handcuffs in it. Mr. Gowder, at the Dolphin Alehouse in Long Alley, Moorfields, depos'd, that on the 3d of Nov. about six in the Morning, the Prisoners came to his House with a Bundle of Goods, and called for Drink. They were very earnest in whispering, and often mention'd the Name of Jack Sheppard, which made him suspect the Goods were stolen. When they had drank 2 or 3 Pints, they went out to seek for a Lodging, and in the mean time this Evidence and his Man searched the Bundle, in which they found several Wigs, a Coat, Gown, Petticoat, and several other Goods tumbled together. This increasing his suspicion, he went for a Constable, and at his Return was inform'd, that Ned Betty had been there again for the Bundle, and was just gone to the Black Dog, to which Place he went with the Constable and other Assistance, and there apprehended all the Prisoners. They found a Silver Handled Knife and Fork, a Silver Spoon, a Watch, Ring, and other Goods in Kate Cook's Stockings. She confess'd that she had them from Jack Sheppard, and added, with a vulgar double Entendre, that she was Jack Sheppard's Washerwoman, and had many a time wash'd his three Pieces betwixt her ***. She farther told them, that Ned Betty was entirely innocent, for she had only hired him as a Porter to carry the Bundle. These Depositions being corroborated by other Witnesses, the Prisoners then made their Defence.

Edward Betty protested that he was wholly ignorant of the Matter, that he was hired to carry the Bundle for a Shilling; and as to the Shoos that were found at his Lodging, they were sent him by Kath Cook. Kath Keys in her Defence, said, that she was a Seamstress, and the Linnen that was found in her Room was brought her by a Gentleman to make him 3 Shirts. Kath Cook in Defence of herself and Ned Betty, said, that the Shoos were left her in Pawn, but the Owner never came to redeem them; that she wash'd Linnen for Ned, and he coming to her for a Shirt, and seeing the Shoos, desired her to lend them him, which she did: That he knew nothing of the other Goods which they were taken with in Long-Alley; and that he never cohabited with her, as was reported. As to her own part, she said the Bundle was brought to her one Morning by a Coachman, whom she had no Knowledge of. She asked him who they belong'd to; but he would not tell her, but bid her take Care of them, and the Gentleman that own'd them would be with her in the Evening. This Gentleman proved to be Jack Sheppard, who told her that they were his Wife's Cloaths; that she took Sheppard for a very honest Man, and did not in the least imagine that the Goods were stolen, till afterwards she heard that he was apprehended. She own'd indeed that she had known Sheppard two Years, and that she became acquainted with him by living next door to his Master when he was an Apprentice; and yet she pretended to be ignorant of his ever being in Newgate, tho his twice escaping from thence had been the common Discourse of the whole Nation. She then called two Witnesses to prove that she was not in Company with Sheppard that Night the Robbery was committed. Alexander Polson , at the Nag's-Head in Newport-Market, deposed, that on the 29th of October, between 9 and 10 at Night, Ned Betty, and Mr. Laycock (a very sufficient Man) came to drink at his House, and about to they were follow'd by Kate Cook. Laycock went away about One in the Morning, and Ned and Kate in about half an Hour after. Mary Price , in Farmer's-Court in Dyers Street, near S. Giles's Church, deposed, that on the 30th of October, about Two in the Morning, Ned Betty and Kate Cook came to her Lodging, and lay there (but not together) till 7 the same Morning. Each of the Prisoners call'd several to their Reputation; and the Burglary not being positively proved upon them, the Jury acquitted them. But the Court ordered the Prosecutor to bring a second Indictment against Cook and Keys for receiving the aforesaid Goods Pursuant to which,

Katharine Cook was a second time indicted for a Misdemeanor in receiving the Goods of Robert Rawlings , knowing them to be stoln . The Depositions in the former Trial were repeated in this, with additional Proofs of her Intimacy with Sheppard, by her frequently coming to him when in Newgate, acknowledging that he had often lain with her, and confessing that she knew that the Goods which were found upon her in Long-Alley came from him. The Jury found her guilty . Fined and Imprison'd .

Katharine Keys was a second time indicted for receiving 9 Ells of Holland, the Goods of Robert Rawlings , knowing them to be stoln . Tho. Lewin deposed, that as he was coming with his Master from the Round-house with another Prisoner, he was told by a Boy that Sheppard was at a neighbouring Brandy Shop in Drury-Lane, against the End of Parker-Lane: He went directly thither, and rushing in between two Watchman, seized upon Sheppard, just as he was saying, I must go Landlady, for I can stay no longer. The Prisoner being there, immediately took hold of this Evidence's Arm, and said, Hold, hold, where are you going to carry him? The Linnen, as before deposed, was found at her Lodging, and she said at first that she had it from Kate Cook; but afterwards that Sheppard brought it to her to make him some Shirts; but that she did not know it was stolen. The Jury acquitted her.

Mary Stratton , of S. Peter Cheap , was indicted for stealing 19 Yards of Tape, one Thousand of Pins, 10 Yards of Ribbon, and other Things , the Goods of Thomas Fletcher , on the 2d of December last. To which Indictment she pleaded guilty . Burnt in Hand .

William Butler , of S. Andrew's, Holborn , was indicted for feloniously stealing a Leather Belt, Value 18 d. and a Hartshorn Handled Hanger, Value 16 s. the Goods of John Mills , on the 17th of Oct . last. To which Indictment be pleaded Guilty . Transportation .

Richard Scurrier , of S. Dunston's in the East , was indicted for stealing a Coat, Value 10 s. the Goods of Edward Bine on the 1st of Nov . last. The Prosecutor Bine (who keeps the Bull in Rochester ) not appearing, the Prisoner was acquitted , and Bine's Recognizances ordered to be estreated.

Mary Hawks , of S. Magnus Martyr , was indicted for stealing in the House of John Hammerton, a Gown value 12d. a Ring value 12s. the Goods of Margaret Eaton ; a Smock value 6d. the Goods of Eliz Austin , and 6 Guineas the Money of John Hammerton , on the 4th of Nov . last. It appeared that the Prisoner was Servant to the Prosecutor, (at the Globe Alehouse on Fishstreet-Hill ) and went away with the Goods and Money, part of which was taken upon her, at the Bull Head in Leadonhall-Street. Guilty to the value of 10d. Transportation .

Richard Okely , of S.Botolph's Bishopsgate was indicted for stealing a Brass Cock, value 2 s. the Goods of the President and Governor of the Poor of the London Work-house . Guilty to the Value of 10d. Whipt .

John Elan and William Philips of S.Antholin's , were indicted for privately stealing out of the Shop of Josiah Lambert , a Wig, the Goods of Thomas Trustan , on the 13th of Nov. last. It appeared that the Prisoners going to the Prosecutor's Shop to have their Wigs powdered, and finding none but a Boy in the Shop, one of them stole the Wig, which being quickly miss'd, and they pursued, it was taken upon Elan. The Jury found him guilty to the value value of 10 d. Transportation ; and acquitted Philips.

Margaret Mace , of S. Brides , was indicted for privately stealing from John Hancock , a Gold Watch, value 13 l. on the 1st of Dec. last. John Hancock depos'd, that having been drinking at the Globe Tavern in Covent Garden, he took Coach there, and ordered the Coachman to drive to his Lodgings, at Mr. Pain's, a Brasier, at the Golden Lyon in Grace-Church-Street. The Coach stopt by the way, and he lost his Watch, but by what means he could not tell, he was so disordered with drinking. Daniel Andrews the Coachman deposed, that in Fleet-Street the Prosecutor got out of the Coach. Why do you get out here, Sir? says the Coachman. Because I am at home, says Mr. Hancock. - No, Sir, you are in Fleet-Street. - Pray don't you trouble yourself about that, but take your Money and begone, said he; and taking out his Watch, offered it to the Coachman for his Fare. As they were in this Discourse, the Prisoner and another Woman came to the Coach, and seeing the Gentleman's Watch in his Hand; Come, my Dear, says one of them, let you and I go home to Bed together. The Prosecutor then put them both into the Coach, and this Evidence drove on to Ludgate-Hill , where the Women got out of the Coach, and one of them ran down the Old-Baily; but he (the Evidence) jumping off the Coach-Box, stopt the Prisoner, and the Watch coming to his Assistance, secured her. Edward Jomes depos'd, that the Prisoner three times offered him a Shilling to let her go; but he refused, and carried her before the Constable, where she was searched; but the Watch was not found upon her. The Prisoner in her Defence said, that coming from Wood-Street Compter, where her Husband was confined, she saw the Man and a Woman talking together at a Coach-Door, they asked her to go and drink, but she refused, and went on towards Fleet - Ditch, where a Man clapt her on the Shoulder, at which she was very much surprized; and turning back, he charged her with taking a Gentleman's Watch, of which she was then as innocent as she was at the Hour of her Birth. The Jury acquitted her.

Penelope Adair , alias Bertless, alias Countess Spinello, alias Sylvia Anna Landina , of S. Mary Aldermary , was indicted for feloniously stealing 12 Gross and a half of Silk Lacing, value 8l. 324 Yards of Ribbon value 54s. 70 Yards of Silk Breed value 4l. 4 Gross of Silk Binding value 4l. the Goods of James Birch , on the 2d of Nov. last. Aaron Pritchard depos'd, that he keeps a Warehouse at the Blue Leg in Bow-Lane , in the Quality of Factor for James Birch of Coventry. That the Prisoner had been a Lodger in his House, being recommended to him by Capt. Murray, who brought her over from Ireland, and told him she was the Daughter of Sir Robert Adair , Bart. and Widow of Count Spinello; and that whatever Charges he was at on her Account, should be repaid him with Advantage: That he was as tender of her, as if she had been his Daughter; sent her Money, bought fine Cloaths for her, made her welcome to a plentiful Table, kept her in her Sickness, paid her Doctor, and defray'd the Charges of her Lying-in, the Nursing and Burial of her Child, which he was as kind to, as if it had been his own: That he for some Reasons (which he did not think fit to mention in Court) took her another Lodging at Hoxton; she had a third Lodging in Wardrobe-Court in Carter-Lane, and a fourth at Mr. Falkenham's in Thames-Street. So that in a little time she had cost him near a hundred Pounds. Yet, after all this, she ungratefully, and like a wicked jade as she was, had endeavoured to ruin him. He had lost Goods out of his Warehouse at several times, to the Amount of about 300 l. But little! Ah very little did he think that Mrs. Adair, that Sylvia, that the Countess Spinello was the Thief! He sometimes found Letters directed to her from Dublin, in which great Things were promised her by her Relations in Ireland. These he then thought she had carelesly mislaid, and they so established his good Opinion of her, that he lent her 91 l. She some time after gave him in part of Payment a Note of Hand for 42 l. from her supposed Brother Robert William Adair , which was endorsed with the Name of Robert Shelden , Sheriff of Worcoster. Upon this he wrote to Mr. Sheldon, who returned him no Answer; but in about a Week he received a Letter dated from Salop, and signed as the Note, R.W.Adair. In this he had Thanks return'd him, and Promises of Recompence made for the Care he had taken of Mrs. Penelope. It concluded with Advice to meet Mr. Sheldon, (who would be in London in the following Week) at Mr. Johnson's a Woollen-Draper in Covent-Garden. He took his Sylvia with him, and went thither. Mr. Johnson received her with a great Shew of Respect, and spoke much in the Favour of her Brother, and said that he was sorry they did not come a day sooner, for Mr. Sheldon had been there, but was then gone back for Worcester. Being thus disappointed, he returned home with his Lady. But yet, he was far from entertaining even the least Suspicion of her Dishonesty, till one Day, to his great Astonishment, he was informed that she had sold some of his Goods to Mr. Camm. Upon which he apprehended her, and she own'd, that beside what she had offered to Camm, she had sold several Parcels to Tho Baylis a Dealer in Irish Linnen, at the Two-Neck'd Swan in Lad-Lane, and that he gave her but 15 d. a piece for the best Sort, which were worth a Crown. Mr. Camm depos'd, that on the 6th of Nov. last, the Prisoner came to him in a Coach, and offered a Parcel of Silk Lacing to Sale. She said she had taken it for an old Debt that was owing her at Coventry, and that she was recommended to him by Mrs. King, a Porteress at an Inn in White - Chappel. He told her, he was willing to buy the Goods, if he could be satisfy'd that they were her Property. She reply'd, she would leave them with him till 10 of the Clock next Morning, and then he should either buy them or return them. She left them accordingly, and went into the Coach, but presently came out again, and told him she had bethought herself, and would take them with her. No, says he, as I have a mind to buy the Goods, I am willing to look them over first; and since 'twas your Proposal that I should keep them till to-morrow Morning, I shall not part with them before. She went away in a Huff, and he sent a Servant to Mr. King, who was not at home; but her Husband told the Messenger, that he believed the Lady was one of his Sisters, neither true nor trusty. In the Evening Madam Adair came again, with Gilbert an Attorney, at Numb.5. in Garden-Court, and demanded the Goods. Mrs. King was again sent for; she came, and said, she admired the Gentlewoman should make use of her Name to Mr. Camm, when she never sent her, nor ever saw her but once, accidentally at a Friend's House. This gave this Deponent a greater Suspicion of Miss Penny than he had before; and therefore he positively refused to part with the Goods, till he had made farther Enquiry. The Countess and her Attorney, went away very angry, and left a great many Menaces behind them. Next day, this Deponent's Servant found out Mr. Pritchard, who came and own'd the Goods. Mr. Winnock deposed, that having heard that Pritchard had been robbed, and Baylis in Lad-Lane offering to sell him such Goods, he informed Pritchard of it, who came and found them to be his own.

The Prisoner, in her Defence, did not deny that she had the Goods, but said that she bought them all of Pritchard, except some odd Parcels which he gave her. The Court bid her produce her Bills of Parcels and Receipts. She said she had none, for she commonly bought for time, and conditionally to pay the Money, or return the Goods if not sold; and for that Reason, she always gave him a Note of Hand under his Bills, and whenever she paid him any part of her Money, he indors'd it off. These Bills she called upon him to expose in Court. He told her, he would produce what Bills he had about him, and so took some Papers out of his Pocket, but they appeared to be but of little Signification as to the Point in hand, being only Accounts of the Expences she had put him to for Childbed-Linnen, a Midwife, Nurses, Chickens, Caudles, Possets, and divers other Necessaries. She farther said then, when she was gone from his House, she had often ordered a Porter to him for Goods in her Name, which he always sent, - if his Wife did not happen to be in the way. That he would afterwards have persuaded her to have confess'd a Bond and Judgement to him for the Goods; which she urged as an Argument, that she had bought them fairly: That he had often confess'd that he was sorry he had troubled her, for she had never wrong'd him, and he only did it to secure his Credit with Mr. Birch; for if that was lost, he should be ruin'd. She then called several Witnesses to prove these Assertions. Thompson the Porter deposed, that he often went for Mrs. Adair to Prichard for Goods, but had Orders not to let Prichard's Wife see him, because she knew who he belong'd to. That Prichard himself did several times deliver Parcels to him for her. And one time, it being rainy, Pritchard bid him take Care, and not let the Parcel be wet, for it was Silk Lacing. Another time, when he brought a Parcel from thence to Mrs. Adair, she opened it before him, and he saw it was Silk, and did believe it was the same Parcel as was then produced in Court, which Mr. Camm had before depos'd, was offered to him by the Prisoner. An Attorney depos'd, that in July last, Prichard came to him to draw a Warrant of Attorney, to confess a Bond and Judgment from the said Mrs. Adair to him (Prichard) for Money and Goods, and that Prichard told him, part of it was Cloaths which he bought for her in Henrietta-Street.

Mary Wood deposed, that living at Mr. Falkenham's in Thomas-Street, where the Prisoner lodged 16 Weeks, commencing the 1st of June last, Prichard often came to visit the Prisoner, and several times gave her Lace and Ribbon out of his Pocket. That one time in particular, he came at Nine in the Morning, and gave her six Pieces of Silk Lacing and Breed, and afterwards went with her to Vaux-Hall, &c. Another time he came and brought Coffee, staid and drank part of it with her, and then told her she must pay for it; she gave him 2d. and he laugh'd, and gave her a Parcel seal'd up in a Paper-Bag; which being open'd, she (this Evidence) saw that it was Yellow Lacing.

Mrs. Falkenham deposed, that when the Prisoner lodg'd at her House, Prichard often came to see her, and always gave her a good Word.

Eleanor Ray deposed, that she was the Prisoner's Nurse, and several times when she went to see her at Mrs. Falkenham's, she found the Prosecutor there, and saw him give her Silk; and often heard him bid her make free with him when-ever she wanted Money, for he was her dear Bosom-Friend: That she attended upon the Prisoner when in the Compter, and Prichard constantly visited her every Day: That he cry'd to her, and said, That he could not swear she had ever robb'd him; only he beg'd of her to own that she had, because otherwise he should be ruin'd, for his Goods were gone, and he could not make up his Accompts with Mr. Birch; And if she would serve him so far, he would afterwards make her whatever Amends she would require. The Turnkey of Woodstreet Compter deposed, that when the Prisoner was brought in there, Prichard was with her, and said, He could not swear against her for the World: That Prichard agreed with him for the Prisoner's Lodging for the first 5 Nights, at the rate of Half a Guinea Fee, 2s. for the first Night; and 1 s. each for the 4 next. Moses Levi deposed, that Prichard told him at the Mitre Tavern, that he would never have sworn against her, had he not been oblig'd to it: That Prichard seeing the Prisoner next Morning, he ran to her and said, O my Dear, how do you do? I neither can nor would swear against you for the World. Mr. Dugdale deposed, that being at the Tavern with Prichard, after Mrs. Adair was in Custody, Prichard told him, He could never swear against her. What do ye mean, (says this Witness) have you not swore against her already? Is she not committed upon your Oath? No, (says Prichard) I neither have, nor will, nor can swear against her; - it was an Imposition of the Justice's Clerk; and I'll see if the Bill can't be brought in Ignoramus. Prichard then called some Witnesses to invalidate the Evidence of her Porter Thompson, who plies in S. Paul's Church-yard. Smith deposed, that but last Night he heard Thompson say, that he thought the Prisoner was as great a Thief, a Bite, and a Cheat, as any England; and he was afraid she'd never have the Punishment she deserved. Several others gave Thompson but a scurvy Character. The Jury considering the Whole, acquitted the Prisoner.

Joseph Clutterbuck , of S. Michael Crooked-Lane , was indicted for feloniously stealing 40lb. of Tallow, value 30s. the Goods of Robert Hutchinson , on the 30th of October last; but the Evidence not being sufficient, the Jury acquitted him.

Sarah Joyner , alias Cecily Knight , was indicted for privately stealing in the Shop of John Wagstaff and John Fellows , 2 lb. of Sewing Silk, the Goods of the said Wagstaff and Fellows , on the 13th of November last; but the Fact not being clearly proved, she was acquitted .

John Landis , of S. Andrew Undershaft , was indicted for feloniously stealing 13 Canes, value 16 s. the Goods of Ralph Martland , on the 29th of Oct. last. It appeared that as Jos Brown , Servant to the Prosecutor, was going along Cornhill, the Prisoner met him and cheapen'd one, and going to the Cross-Keys Tavern Door, he took the Bundle from the Boy, under Pretence of going to the Candle at the Bar to choose one out; and bid him wait in the Entry, that his Aunt (who he said kept the Bar) might not see him (the Boy); for (continues the Prisoner) I have a Kinsman that sells Canes, and my Aunt would be angry if she knew that I bought one of any body else. The Boy waited a quarter of an Hour, and wondering why his Chapman was so long in choosing 2 Cane, went to the Bar-Keeper, and enquir'd for her Nephew. The Gentlewoman said she had no Nephew: But when he mention'd the Canes, the Drawers inform'd him, that the Tavern was a Thorowfare, and remember'd that a little while ago they saw a Man go through with a Bundle of Canes. The Prisoner afterwards selling the Canes to Mr. Powel in the Borough, he was discover'd and apprehended, But it appearing to be no Felony, but a Cheat, the Court directed the Jury to acquit him of this Indictment, and order'd the Prosecutor to prefer another Bill against him for a Misdemeanor, in unlawfully and fraudulently taking away the said Canes . This was done accordingly, and the Jury found him guilty . Fined and Imprisoned .

Mary Hilliard , of S. James Clerkenwell , was indicted for feloniously stealing in the House of Tho. Nash three Gold Rings, value 40 s. two Silk Aprons value 8 s. a Pair of Stockings value 3 s. and 4 s. in Money, the Goods and Money of Tho Nash ; and a Mob and Apron, and other things, the Goods of Mary Howell , on the 10th of Sep. last. It appeared that on Tuesday the Prisoner came as a Servant to Mr. Nash, a Victualler in Peter-street. Clerkenwell , and on the Thursday following went away with the Goods. The Prosecutor offer'd half a Guinea Reward for apprehending her; upon which a Men that lay with her the preceding Night came and carry'd him to her Lodging, where they took her a-bed. Her Confession was read in Court, and the Jury found her guilty to the Value of 4 s. 10 d. Transportation .

Susan Stevens , of S. Giles's in the Fields , was indicted for stealing a Stuff Gown value 4 s. the Goods of William Sallis , on the 20th of Aug . last. But the Evidence being too weak, she was acquitted .

Ann Allington , alias Aldrington , of S. Giles's in the Fields , was indicted for stealing a Hoop-Petticoat, value 3 s. 6 d . the Goods of Tho. Farmer on the 10th of Nov. last. It appeared that the Prisoner worked at the Prosecutor's Shop, took away the Petticoat, and was stopt in offering it to Sale. Guilty to the Value of 10 d. Transportation

Sarah Clarkson , of Stepney , was indicted for feloniously stealing in the House of Tho Prig , a Silver Mug value 36s. the Goods of Tho. Prig , on the 20th of Nov . last.

She was a second time indicted of Norton-Folgate , for feloniously stealing in the House of T. Smith, three Coats value 12 s. a Hat, Gown, and other Things, the Goods of several Persons , on the 30th of October last. It appeared that Smith lett a Garret to the Prisoner and her Mother, from whence several Things in the second Indictment were lost. The Prisoner and her Mother being charged with them, forsook their Lodging at Smith's House, and took another: Upon which Smith procured Prig the Constable to apprehend them. Prig brought the Prisoner to his House, where she confess'd the Fact; and at the same time stole from thence a Silver Mug, carried it to the Watch-house, and hid it under the Coats; but it being mist, and she suspected, she was accused with it, and confess'd. The Jury found her guilty of each Indictment to the Value of 10 d. Whipt .

Margaret Roberts and Sarah Alexander , of S. Giles's in the Fields , was indicted for stealing in the House of Rob Gaston , a Gown value 12 s. a Pair of Stays 15 s. six Smocks value 30 s. and 12 Suits of Head-Cloaths value 50 s. the Goods of Jane Blakeway , on the 22d of October last. It appeared that the Goods were taken out of the Prosecutor's Box which she had left in her Room unlock'd. The Prisoners were taken up the same Night, and sent to the Round-house upon Suspicion of another Robbery; which the Prosecutor hearing, went thither, and found them awkwardly rigg'd in her Cloaths. Roberts in her Defence said, that Alexander put her into the Room, and fill'd her Apron with the Cloaths: But Alexander deny'd it, and said she met Roberts in Short's-Gardens with the Cloaths in her Apron, and they went together to a Gin-Shop in Vinegar-Yard, where she drest Roberts in some of the Cloaths, and left the rest in Pawn for the Reckoning. The Jury found Roberts guilty to the Value of 10 d. Transportation . And acquitted Alexander.

Margaret Roberts and Sarah Alexander, were a second time indicted for breaking and entring the House of Mary Jones on the 23rd of October last, about the Hour of 3 in the Morning, and taking from thence a Gown val. 5s. a Pair of Shoos 2 s. 6 d. a Pair of Stockings 2 s. 6 d. the Goods of Eliz Ellison ; and a Suit of Head-Cloaths value 2 s. the Goods of Sarah Gilbert . Eliz. Ellison depos'd, that she lives at Mrs. Jones's in Holesford-Alley in Drury-Lane , and that as she lay a-bed in a Moon-light Night, between 2 and 3 o'Clock, Peg Roberts came into her Chamber, and took the Cloaths off the Bed; which awakening her, she started up and cry'd, Who's there? Peg answer'd, Tis I. I! Who are you, and what do you want? - Why, my Mistress sent me to see if the Candle was safe. - Your Mistress! Who is your Mistress? - Go look, says Peg; and snatching a Suit of Head-Cloaths off the Table, ran down Stairs. She (this Evidence) then jumpt out of Bed quite naked, and so ran down after her into the Street, and call'd the Watch. The Prisoners got off for the present, but were taken up on Suspicion the same Night, and put into the Round-house, where Roberts confesed, that Alexander put her down the Cellar-Window. But when she came to make her Defence at the Bar, she said that Ellison was a common whore, and gave her the Gown to live with her, and follow the same Trade, in Coleston's-court (and not Holesford's Alley) in Drury Lane: But she refusing to comply, the other prosecuted her. The Jury acquitted them.

William Anderson , of Aldgate , was indicted for assaulting Hannah Rickaby , putting her in fear, and taking from her a Pocket value 9 d. a Handkerchief value 2 s. and 26 s. in Money , on the 27th of Oct . last. Hannah Rickaby depos'd, that going by Alderman Parsons's Brewhouse in Wapping , a Man shoved her from the Wall, snatch'd off her Pocket, and run up Barr-Street; but she pursued him as fast as she could, and cry'd, Stop Thief. In a few Minutes the Prisoner was brought back to her by William Cuthbert . She believ'd it was the same Man that robb'd her, but could not be positive, and the Pocket was not found upon him. Eliz Thomson depos'd, that she was walking with the Prosecutor, and had hold of her Arm, when she was robb'd: That as the Prisoner was taking the Wall of them, she turn'd about, and look'd at him, the Lamp then shining full in his Face, and therefore she was positive that the Prisoner was the very Man that snatch'd the Prosecutor's Pocket. William Cuthbert depos'd, that hearing a Woman cry stop Thief, and perceiving the Prisoner running apace, he stood to receive him, and threw up his Heels. The Prisoner beg'd to be let go, for he was pursued by Bailiffs. But he (this Evidence) told him, he should go back to the Woman first. The Watch quickly came to their Assistance, and secur'd him. The Prisoner in his Defence said, that as he was going to Execution-Dock, a Man clapt him on the Shoulder, and he being under fear of an Arrest, thought it had been a Bailiff, and so took to his Heels, which was the only Reason of his running up Burr Street. Guilty . Death .

James Strong , of Whitechappel , was indicted for stealing a Shirt value 15 s. a Smock value 12 s. and two Napkins value 2 s. the Goods of Susan Gilbert , on the 5th of Nov . last. It appear'd that the Prisoner and others were seen in the Ground where the Cloaths hung to dry, some of them being taken off the Lines and carried away, the Prisoner was taken; but nothing being found upon him, the Jury acquitted him.

Ann Nixon , of Whitechappel , was indicted for privately stealing in the Shop of William Austin 12 yards of Stuffs, value 14 s. on the 19th of Nov . last. It appear'd that the Prisoner and another, whom she call'd Sister, came into the Shop together, and while the Prisoner was looking on a Petticoat, the other Woman ran away with the Goods. He was afraid to pursue her, left the Prisoner should rob him of a greater Value in the mean while. The Prisoner in her Defence said, that the other Woman was a Stranger to her, and came in at the same time by Chance. The Jury acquitted her.

Richard Ford , of S. Giles's Cripplegate , was indicted for stealing an Iron Key of a Turn-cock, val. 5s. the Goods of Dame Eliz Feast and Henry Dolden , on the 22d of October last. It appeared that the Prisoner (who had formerly work'd at that Brewhouse) was seen in the Yard with the Key under his great Coat. In his Defence he said he found it left carelesly in the Yard, and he took it up only to put it into its place. He was acquitted .

Thomas Powel , of S. James's Westminster , was indicted for privately stealing from Robert Midford Esq , a Handkerchief value 18 d. on the 21st of Nov . last. Guilty to the Value of 10d. Transportation .

Mary Rutter , of S. Giles's in the Fields , was indicted for feloniously taking out of her Master's House a Silver Candlestick, two Silver Spoons, and other Goods, to the Value of 39 s. The Jury considering the Matter, found her Not guilty .

John Wood , of Chelsea , was indicted for feloniously stealing a Coat, Wastecoat, Breeches, Shirt, and Hat , the Goods of William Man , on the 23rd of November last. It appear'd that the Prisoner was lodg'd in a Room over the Prosecutor; and when the Prosecutor was gone out, the Prisoner got into his Room, took away his Cloths, and was stopt selling them in Monmouth-Street. Guilty to the Value of 4 s. 10d. Transportation .

Thomas Gritton , of S. Martin's in the Fields , was indicted for privately stealing from Margaret Dixon , two Gold Rings, value 40 s. a Handkerchief, a Fan, and three Guineas , on the 30th of Nov . last. Robert Mow deposed, that the Prosecutor was Servant to - Hawes Esq; in Channel-Row, Westminster; that having a Holiday given her, and being a Stranger in London, she came to him to desire him to go with her into the City to find out a Person that ow'd her some Money: They went, she received the Money; he brought her back to his House, where she staid till about Eight that Night, and he went with her as far as Katharine-Street in Covent-Garden. Marg. Dixon deposed, that soon after she had parted with Mr. Mow, she enquired the Way of two Men; and one of them, who was the Prisoner, told her he lived not far from thence, and would go home with her: He carry'd her out of her Way, and pulled her into a Tavern in a strange Place; she cry'd, and beg'd of him to to put her in the right Way; he promised her he would, and call'd a Coach, which drove to an Inn, and by the Way he pull'd her Rings off her Finger, and took away her Handkerchief and Fan. She was frighted, and knew not what to do; but when she came to the Inn, she desired him to give her back what he had taken from her: He swore that he would not, except she would pay for the Wine and the Coach. She consented, rather than lose her Things; and knowing that she had three Guineas before she met him, she put her Hand into her Bosom to take one out, but found that they were all gone. She cry'd out that the Rogue had got her Money too; upon which he endeavour'd to get off, but was prevented, and she fell into a Swoon. The Tapster and the Maid, at the Bear-Inn in Piccadilly, confirm'd the latter Part of the Prosecutor's Evidence; adding, that when she said the Rogue had robb'd her of all, he cry'd, Damn the Bitch, I'll have no more to say to her, and was going away; but the Maid catch'd him by the Hair and stopt him. This was corroborated by the Constable, who farther deposed, that he conducted the Prisoner to the Round-House; and thence next Morning before the Justice, where he deliver'd the Rings to him, (the Constable) and the Constable produced them in Court. - Hawes Esq; gave a very good Character of his Maid the Prosecutor, by assuring the Court that he believed her to be a good natur'd, innocent, modest, honest, Country Girl, and entirely unacquainted with the Town. The Prisoner in his Defence said that as he was talking with his Friend in Russel-street, the Prosecutor came by very drunk, and desired him to shew her the Way to Channel-Row; he having Business that Way, was glad of her Company; they went across the Park, where he having Occasion to make Water, went aside, and in the mean while a Man came up and took her round the Waste: She was frighted; but he stepping up to the Man, ask'd him what he meant by it? Sir, says the Man, I ask your Pardon, I did not know the Lady belong'd to you; and so saying, he retired. Soon after, she dropt her Handkerchief and Fan, he took them up, and she pray'd him to carry 'em for her. They then came to the Sun Tavern in King-Street, Westminster; where she told him she would treat him for his Trouble in coming so far with her. They drank two Pints, and she was so drunk, that she fell out of her Chair, and her Rings dropt off her Finger: He took both her and them up again, and she desir'd him to take care of them till they parted. She said it was too late for her to go home that Night, and therefore beg'd of him to provide a Lodging for her. They then went to a Brandy-Shop by the Gatehouse, from whence they took Coach to the Bear-Inn in Piccadilly, where he spoke for a Bed; but she being willing to drink first, they sat down together, and in a little time the began to cry about her Rings, which he did not refuse to give her, if she would pay for the Wine and the Coach; but she falling into Fits, the Constable was called, came, and carry'd him to the Round-House. Robert Ship deposed, that he was the Person that stood talking with the Prisoner when the Prosecutor came to them; that she was very drunk, and ask'd one of them to shew her the Way home. Robert Mow then deposed again, that the Prosecutor was sober when he left her; and the Tapster, Maid, and Constable, at the Bear-Inn, farther deposed, that the Prosecutor was in Fitts, but not drunk, when she was at that House. but yet two or three Gentlemen appear'd to the Prisoner's Reputation, he having been Servant to some of their Acquaintance: One more in particular said, having once by Mistake given him a Guinea in changing Half a Crown, he very honestly brought it him again the next Morning. The Jury acquitted him.

Thomas Herbert , of S. Giles's in the Fields , was indicted, for that he, in Company with Tho Hemmer , Tho Rowden and Rich Mason , did break and enter the House of Stephen Watts , and feloniously take from thence 16 pair of Breeches, Value 36 s. the Goods of Stephen Watts, on the 6th of Nov . about the Hour of 12 at Night . Stephen Watts depos'd, that he keeps a Sale-Shop at the Cross-Keys in Monmouth-street , and between 11 and 12 at Night he made fast his Door and Windows, and went to Bed; but about 3 he was called up again by the Watch, and found that the Shop had been broke open and robb'd. Tho Flemm deposed, that himself, the Prisoner, Tho. Rowdon and Richard Mason , met at the Prisoner's House about 7 at Night, and agreed to try their Fortune in Monmonth-street. About Midnight they all went out together, and passing by the Prosecutor's Shop, Mason struck the Bar of the Windows with his Hand, and said it would be no great Difficulty for them to get in there. He then forced off the Staple. The Prisoner ript off the Hinges of the Outer-Shutters, and wrenched off the Runner of those within, and pushing one of them back, took out the Goods, and so they all returned to the Prisoner's House, where they spent the remaining part of the Night. Next day they put the Breeches into a Sack, went all together, and carried them by turns, till they had dispos'd of them. Two Pair this Evidence pawn'd to Norwood in Hart-street, Covent-Garden for 4s. Five Pair the Prisoner sold to Jos Collins , and 4 Pair to Sarah Shad , both in Rag-Fair. Collins depos'd that the Prisoner brought the Breeches to him, and told him that he was a Taylor, and made them himself, but the other he had bought. He observed the Prisoner go a-cross the Way to two of his Companions, who waited for him with a Bundle in a Sack. This made him suspect that they were stol'n, and therefore he stept out after these 3 Men; but they being aware of him, made off. He then had the Breeches cry'd; by which he found that they belong'd to Mr. Watts. John Shorey depos'd, that having heard of Watts's being robbed; and going along Hart-street, he saw Flemmer, whom he knew to be a Rogue, go into Norwood's with 2 Pair of Breeches, while the Prisoner and Mason waited with a Sack on the other side of the Way. All which gave him ground to think that these were the Men that had robb'd Mr. Watts; and therefore he stood still to take Notice of them, which the Prisoner suspecting, said to Mason - D - that Chuckle-beaded Son of a Bitch. What does he stand watching us for? - Go over and take him a Knock. As Mason was coming towards him, Flemmer came out of the House without the Breeches, and so they went away together. This Evidence then went and gave Norwood a Hint, and desired him to stop them when they came again And Flemmer happening to come the same Evening, Norwood apprehended him. He impeached the others, and made himself an Evidence. The Prisoner in his Defence said, that the others indeed were at his House the Evening before the Robbery, and they would have had him gone with them; but he refused, went to Bed, and left them below with his Wife. About 3 in the Morning they came again, and called, but he made no Answer. They came a 23d time at Break of Day, with a Sack, and Breeches in it, and told him, if he would go with them to vend them, he should have Part of the Money; which he did; but was no way concern'd in the Robbery. Guilty . Death .

Edward Fox , of Stepney , was indicted for stealing 60 lb. Weight of Sugar, Value 15 s. the Goods of and , on the 27th of Nov . last. But was acquitted .

Frances Watlin and Sarah Roper , of Stepney , were indicted, F. Watling for stealing privately out of the Warehouse of Joseph Smith 36 lb. of Yarn , on the 10th of Oct . last; and S. Roper for receiving the same, knowing it to be stolen . The Jury found them not guilty .

Ann Eagle , of Stepney , was indicted for stealing 2 Yards of Lace, 1 Guinea, and a Half Guinea, the Goods and Money of Hannah Gordon , in the House of Tho Sanders , on the 26th of Sep. last. Acquitted .

William Smith , of S Bride's was indicted for stealing a Silver Watch, Value 3 l. the Goods of Hen. Wright , on the 13th of Nov . last. It appeared, that at Night the Prosecutor left his Watch on the Table at the Bricklayers Arms by Fleet-ditch . He could not find it the next Morning; but in about a Week after it was found upon the Prisoner, who was Tapster at that House. Guilty to the Value of 10. d. Transportation .

William Page , of S. Bride's , was indicted for feloniously stealing a Silver Watch, Value 5 l. the Goods of John Barton Esq ; and 2 other Watches, Value 10 l. the Goods of Tho Martin in the shop of Tho Martin , on the 5th of Sept . last. Tho. Martin Watchmaker in Fleet-street depos'd that about 8 at Night he left his Boy at Work in the Shop; but returning soon after, found his Sash broke, 3 Watches taken away, and a Gimblet sticking in the Door-Post, to which it appeared the Knocker had been ty'd to prevent a Pursuit.

The Boy depos'd that between 8 and 9, Jack Sheppard and the Prisoner came by the Shop Window, and bad him stick up his Tools, and not use his Master to such ill Habits of working so late. They went away, came by again, and repeated the same, and so past to and fro several times. The last time they came together, he pulled out the Drawer to look for something; and they thinking he was going to put his Tools up, one of them said, Well done, my Lad, now I like you. Upon which they seemed to part, and in a few Minutes after, Sheppard dash'd his Hand thro the Glass, and snatched away 3 Watches. He (this Evidence) went to run after him, but could not open the Door, it being fasted on the Outside. Guilty to the Value of 4 s. 10.d. Transportation .

William Page was a 2d time indicted, for that whereas John Sheppard, of the Savoy, was on Wednesday the 12th of Aug. last indicted at Justice-Hall in the Old-Baily, for breaking and entering the House of William Kneebone , and feloniously taking from thence 108 Yards of Woollen Cloth, 2 Silver Spoons, and several other Goods, on the 12th of June last, and was then and there convicted of the same; and the said John Sheppard afterwards flying from Justice, he the said William Page, well knowing the said John Sheppard to be convicted as aforesaid, did notwithstanding, on the 10th of Sept . last, receive, comfort, and harbour the said John Sheppard . It appeared that after Sheppard's first Escape from Newgate, several of the Keepers, Mr. Rouse, Mr. Langly, Mr. Alston, Mr. Ireton, and others, 3 in a Coach, and as many on Horseback, rode to Finchly in pursuit of him, they having heard that he had been seen thereabouts, in Company with the Prisoner, (who was a Clare-Market Butcher) that they were both dressed in Butchers Frocks. Mr. Langly coming upon Finchly Common, quickly spy'd the Prisoner and Sheppard together; and they perceiving him, struck off into the Fields. Upon which he quitted his Horse, and ran after them, and took the Prisoner, and searching him, found a Chissel in his Pocket. Mr. Alston leaped his Horse over a Style, and rid after Sheppard, who ran round a Farm-House, and at last hid himself in a Barn, where, after some Search, Mr. Alston took him, and found under his Armpits 2 of the Watches that he (Sheppard) in Company with the Prisoner, snatched out of Mr. Martin's Shop. The Prisoner confes'd to them, that he had kept Sheppard Company ever since he broke out of Newgate. That Ireland, who was one that assisted Shepard in getting out of the Condemn'd-Hold, and who has since absconded himself, told him that Sheppard was at the Paul's Head in Spittle-Fields. He (the Prisoner) went thither to see him, and there they agreed to go to a Relation of the Prisoner's who lived at Wandham beyond Woburn. They went together, staid there a Week, then came back to London; and hearing that a Reward was offered for taking Sheppard, they retreated to Finchly. Mr. Ireton depos'd, that he lost his Handkerchief the same Night that Mr. Martin lost his Watches, and seeing the Prisoner near him, he charged him with it. The Prisoner said he knew nothing of the Handkerchief, but if he wanted Jack Sheppard, he was but just gone before. He went the Way that the Prisoner directed him, but could not find Sheppard, for Sheppard (as he since heard) hid himself at that time under a Coach in the Street. Guilty . Transportation .

Stephen Dyer , of S. Martin's Ludgate , was indicted for privately stealing a Firkin and 43lb. of Soap, Value 15s. in the Shop of John Tims , on the 21st of Oct . last. Rich Boomhall Jun depos'd, that at Night, as he was easing himself in Prujan-Court in the Old-Baily, he saw the Prisoner go into the Shop and came out with the Goods; and suspecting them to be stolen, he called to the Woman in the Shop, and then ran after the Prisoner and step him in Black and White-Court. Guilty to the Value of 10 d. Transportation .

Nathanael Woodland of S. Andrew's Holborn was indicted for privately stealing from Sarah Davis 4s. the Money of her Husband Humphrey Davis , on the 17th of Oct last. Sarah Davis depos'd that on Saturday Night 3 Men met her in the Street, one of them kissed her, and thrust his Hand down her Bosom, which she bore very patiently; then he put it up her Coats and she was still unwilling to make a Disturbance in the Street; but at last she missed her Money, and then she thought it was high time to cry out. The Watch came to her Assistance, the Prisoner was taken, and the two other Men ran away. But since the Prisoner's commitment, she had seen a Brother of his who was so very like him, that she could not distinguish them, and therefore she could not swear to the Man. The Jury acquitted him.

Daniel Cook , of Wapping , was indicted for stealing a Gown and Petticoat, Value 5 s. the Goods of John Kent , on the 25th of Dec . last. Not Guilty .

Margaret Annis , alias Hall , of Wapping , was indicted for stealing a Shirt, a Smock, a Frying. Pan, and other things , the Goods of John Nicholas , on the 2d Nov . It appeared that the Prisoner was a Chairwoman at the Prosecutor's House and made use of several Opportunities of taking away the Goods, which upon Search were found at her Lodging. Guilty to the Value of 10 d. Transportation .

William Jones , of S. Martin's in the Fields , was indicted for stealing a Petticoat, Value 7 s. 6. d the Goods of Rich. Turner , on the 30th of Oct . last. Guilty to the Value of 10 d. Transportation .

Michael Herring and William Holbrook , were indicted, Herring for stealing privately 58 Pair of Stockings Value 38 s. the Goods of Edmond Le Neves , in the Shop of E. Le Neves , on the 4th of Dec. last, and Holbrook for receiving the same, knowing them to be stolen . Tho Neves deposed, that himself and Herring stole the Stockings, and sold three, Dozen of them, (which were Childrens) for Penny a Pair; and eight Pair of larger for 4 d. a Pair, to the other Prisoner Holbrook, at his Shop next to the Broken Trooper in Holborn; and that the said Holbrook knew how they came by them. Holbrook was acquitted , and Herring found guilty to the Value of 4 s. 10 d. Transportation .

Michael Herring, of Stepney , was a 2d time indicted, with Jeremy Reynolds , for privately stealing a Wig, value 30 s. in the Shop of Tho Chaloner , on the 1st of Oct . last. Tho. Neves deposed, that himself, the two Prisoners, and Ned Price , committed the Theft, between Eight and Nine at Night. Reynolds ty'd the Latch of the Door, Price and this Evidence stood upon the Watch, and Herring dashing his Hand thro' the Sash, took away the Wig. They sold it for 3 s. went to Southwark-Fair, spent 6 d. in Brandy, and lost the rest at the Pass-Table. The Jury found them both guilty to the Value of 10 d. each. Transportation .

John Gold , of S. James's Westminster , was indicted for privately stealing four Pair of Gloves, value 4 s. 4 d. the Goods of Edw. Smith , in the Shop of Edw. Smith , on the 22d of Nov . last. Guilty to the Value of 10 d. Transportation .

Henry Marrian and Joseph Ships , of Stepney , were indicted for stealing three Coats, value 25 s. two Wastcoats, value 10 s. two Hats, Pair of Shoos, and two Pair of Stockings , the Goods of Charles Lewin . It appeared that the Prosecutor had hired the Prisoners to go in the Quality of Workmen for New-England; but when they had go the Cloaths that were provided for them, they ran away. This not being Felony, the Jury acquitted them.

Philip Harper , was indicted for feloniously stealing four Books, value 13 s. the Goods of Tho. Green , on the 10th of Nov. last. Guilty to the Value of 10 d. Transportation

Isabel White , of Stepney , was indicted for stealing the Movement of a Watch in a Gold Box, value 17 l. in the House of John Baron , on the 2 d of Nov . last. Guilty to the Value of 4 s. 10 d. Transportation .

Ann Hunter , of S. Clement Danes , was indicted for feloniously stealing a Gown and Petticoat, value 12 s. the Goods of Tho. Beckley , on the 22d of Oct . last. Not guilty .

John Mitchel , of S. Margaret Westminster , was indicted for stealing a Handkerchief, value 4 s. 10 d. the Goods of Tho. Smith . Not Guilty .

George Fox , was indicted for privately stealing 60lb. of Iron, the Goods of Anthony Ireland , in the Shop of Anth. Ireland , on the 15th of Oct . last. Guilty to the Value of 10 d. Transportation .

Mary Mackey , of S. Giles's in the Fields , was indicted for stealing a suit of Head-Cloaths, and an Apron, Value 1 s. the Goods of Susan Wilson , on the 11th of Nov . last. Not guilty .

William Sawd , of S. Martin's in the Fields , was indicted for stealing two Trowels, a Hod, and two Lattin Hammers , the Goods of Michael Read , on the 17th of Nov . last. Guilty to the Value of 10 d. Transportation .

Elizabeth Powell , of S. Giles's in the Fields , was indicted for feloniously stealing a Riding-Hood, value 9 s. the Goods of Hannah Clark , on the 20th of Oct . last. Guilty to the Value of 10 d. Transportation .

Thomas Winston , of S. Andrew's Holborn , was indicted for feloniously stealing a Hat, value 5 s. a Wig value 20 s. and a pair of Spurs, value 2 s. the Goods of John Pain , on the 6th of Nov . last. Guilty to the Value of 4 s. 10 d. Transportation .

Thomas Butler , of S. Ann's Westminster , was indicted for feloniously stealing a Gown, value 12 s. the Goods of John Wells , on the 20th of Nov . last. Guilty to the Value of 10 d. Transportation .

Richard Duffit and Solomon Harvey , of Stepney , were indicted for stealing a Sack and four Bushels of Wheat, value 14 s. 6 d. the Goods of Persons unknown , on the 22d of Oct . last. The Felony not being proved, the Jury acquitted them both.

Warren Knot , of Stepney , was indicted for stealing 10 lb. of Solder, value 4 s. two Tin Lamps, 1 s. 6 d. two Cinder Shovels, value 1 s. 6 d. and four Tin Pots , the Goods of , on the 16th of Nov . last. He was a 2d time indicted for stealing 2 s. 6 d. the Money of , on the 20th of July last. But the Evidence not being sufficient, the Jury acquitted him.

Eleanor Lock , of Clerkenwell , was indicted for privately stealing from Tho. Miller , a Silver Watch and Chain, value 3 l. 10 s. on the 24th of Nov . last. Tho. Miller deposed, that between Ten and Eleven at Night he met the Prisoner in S. John-Street, and she ask'd him where he was going? He told her to Islington. Tis a long way, (says she) and you had better drink before you go any further, for fear you should faint upon the Road. - Come, my Dear, treat me with a Pint. With all my Heart (says he), but what House shall we go to? - Why, I'll tell you Child, I don't much Care for drinking Beer; but if you'll go to my Landlady's in Butcher's Alley , we'll have a Quartern of Gin. They agreed, and went together; and going out about half an Hour after, he mist his Watch, but could not imagine which way it could be gone without his perceiving it. He turn'd back, and examin'd the Prisoner; but she denying it, he called a Constable, and search'd her, but no Watch was found. However, before the Justice she confest that she had hid it in a Hole in the Chimney; and being brought back, she shew'd them the Place, and took it out. The Prisoner in her Defence said, that she was a poor old Woman that got her Living by selling Pyes about Street , and coming Home one Night as soon as she had dispos'd of what she carry'd out, she had not been long sat down, before the Prosecutor came in with a Woman. They went up Stairs together, and in about half an Hour the Man came down and went out; but quickly return'd, and said he had lost his Watch, and tax'd her (the Prisoner) with taking it: He fetcht a Constable, and went into the Chamber to search, and found it upon the Bed. The Jury found her guilty to the Value of 10 d. Transportation .

Charles Towers and John Webb were indicted, for that they, with twenty others, after the 1 st of June, in the Tenth Year of his Majesty's Reign, that is to say, on the 21 st of June last, being arm'd with Guns, Pistols, Swords, Staves, or other offensive Weapons, and having their Faces black'd, or being otherwise disguised, did feloniously appear in the Highway commonly called Wapping Wall, in the Parish of S. Paul's Shadwell , to the great Terror of his Majesty's Subjects, against the Peace of our Sovereign Lord the King, his Crown and Dignity, and against the Form of the Statute in this Case made and provided. The Council for the King open'd, that the Prisoners were Inhabitants of the New Mint, and so Notorious in the Riots committed there, and in Places adjacent, that they were distinguished by the Titles of Captain Towers and General Webb. That a Book was kept and Place called the Seven Cities of Refuge, in which the Names of all the New Minters were enter'd, they paying half a Guinea at the time of subscribing, and obliging them selves to the utmost extent of their Power to rescue and set at Liberty any Person on the said List, whenever he was arrested or imprison'd. That accordingly the Prisoners and seven others did at the Time, after the Manner, and in the Place mention'd in the Indictment, appear; and by Force of Arms take a Person Arrested out of the House of John Errington . The Prisoners desired, that when any Witness was giving Evidence, the rest might be put out of Court; which the Court granted.

John Errington depos'd, that on Saturday the 20th of June last he arrested John West , at the Suit of Geo Manisold , on a Note of Hand for 50 s. and carried him to his own House, the Red Lion on Wapping-Wall, opposite to King James's Stairs. The next Morning, being Sunday, about 11 o'Clock, the Street-Door being left a-jar, a Man rush'd in with a great Stick in his Hand like a Quarter-Staff, his Face and Breast all black, as if besmear'd with a Mixture of Soot and Grease; his Hair shot off no Hat no Wig, no Shirt nor any thing on his back but a blue Pee Jacket flying open before D - ye, say he, you have put one of our Prisoners,and we'll have him away,for we are sworn to one another - Who's that? Charles? (says Errington; for he was so disguised, that he did not Know him till he spoke, tho' he had often seen him before.) Yet D - , (says Towers) and then Webb and several others follow him in, with Broomsticks in their Hands, but not disguised. Errington told 'em he had but one prisoner, and he belong'd to Tower-Hill. 'Tis no matter for that, (says Tower, and Pull'd out a paper) we have his Name bere and he's enter'd in our List. 'Tis really so Mr. Errington (says Webb in a milder Tone) and therefore we desire you'd restore him to us, and we'll go away Quietly. Errington knew 'twould not only be in vain, but dangerous, to deny 'em, and so deliver'd his Prisoner up. They went out in Triumph, with repeated Huzza's; but Towers turning back, and seeing Daniel Taylor , a Waterman, lifted up his Quarter Staff, and said, I must have one Knock or two at that setting Son of a Bitch. But Errington catching hold of his Arm, persuaded him to take another Opportunity for it, and so he went out again. Most of these Particulars were repeated in the Depositions of Mary Errington and Daniel Taylor. George Errington deposed, that he lives in Mill-Yard in Star-street, within a Stone's-throw of his Brother John Errington's House: and that on the Sunday Morning in which West was taken from his Brother; he saw Towers disguised as aforesaid, with Webb and 12 or 14 more, all arm'd with Clubs, pass by his Door towards his Brother's on Wapping-Wall. In about half an Hour after, as he was leaning over his Hatch, he saw them all returning in the same Manner as they went, bringing West along with them; and as they were passing this Evidence's Door, Capt. Towers (whom he knew by his Tongue) stept up towards him with his Quarter-Staff, and said, I must have one Knock at his Napper: But the other clapping the Door to, prevented him, and then the Mob went off.

Towers in his Defence said, that he was not disguised, and that his Face was only dirty, and not designedly made black: That having formerly unfortunately been bound for others, to the Amount of 400 l. he was forced to fly to the Old Mint; and when that broke up, and he could not be discharged by the Act, he took Shelter in the New Mint; and thought that he had better reside there, and live honestly, than go upon the Highway for Money to pay his Debts; and that he was never guilty of Rioting, any farther than defending himself when he was pursued by Bailiffs. That supposing he had been disguised at that time, yet as (he persuaded himself) there had been no sufficient Proof of his having committed any Violence, he thought the Masqueraders were as liable to be convicted by the same Act as himself. Webb in his Defence said, that he did not appear in any Disguise; and indeed there being no Evidence to prove it upon him, the Jury acquitted him, and found Towers guilty . Death .

John Tims was indicted, and Charles Towers a 2d time indicted, for that they, with John Bowler , John Tibbs , and John Fencott , (not yet taken) did on the 15th of August last unlawfully and riotously, the Dwelling House of Henry Brookshank , begin to destroy . But no Evidence appearing, they were acquitted .

John Tims was a 2d time, and Charles Towers a 3 d time, indicted; for that they, with John Bowler, John Tibbs, and John Fencott , (not yet taken) did break and enter the House of Henry Brookshank , and feloniously take from thence 12 lb. of Tobacco, value 18 s.5 Pints of Brandy, Pipes, and 14 s. in Money, the Goods and Money of Henry Brookshank, on the 15th of Aug. last, about 8 in the Evening . But no Evidence appearing, they were acquitted .

Thomas Maggy , of S. Martin's in the Fields , was indicted for privately stealing from Mary Stevens 2 s. in Money , on the 20th of Aug . last. Guilty to the Value of 10 d. Transportation .

Samuel Shaw , of S. Sepulchres , was indicted for breaking and entring the House of William Cox in S. John-street , about 12 at Night, and taking thence 4 Pair of Shoos value 12 s. on the 28th of July last. Guilty to the Value of 4 s. 10 d. Transportation .

William Wells and Rowland Swanson , of S. Giles's in the Fields , are indicted for feloniously stealing a Suit of Drugget value 50 s. two Cloaks value 4 l. 10 s. one Rug Coat value 20 s. two Pair of Breeches value 20 s. three Yards and a half of Woolen Cloth value 40 s. and 5 l. 3 s. in Money, the Goods and Money of Thomas Bear , in the House of Thomas Bear , on the 4th of December last. Thomas Bear deposed, that he kept a Sale-Shop in Drury-Lane ; that the Prisoner Wells was his 'Prentice ; that he had several times mist Goods and Money, but knew not who had wrong'd him, till the Management of John Pearson discover'd the whole. John Pearson depos'd that on the 30th of Nov. at Night, happening to be in Company with Wells at an Alehouse opposite to the Prosecutor's, they staid till 11 o'Clock, when Wells appeared very uneasy, and said he had no mind to go home; and after some other preparatory Discourse, he told this Evidence, that he should be glad of his Assistance if he could keep a Secret. Never fear me, (says Pearson) what is it? - Could you dispose of a Coat or Pair of Breeches cleverly? - Ay, or any thing else that you can bring me. - Indeed! Why, I'll tell thee then - My Master's Shop is very well stock'd - and - you understand me. - Yes, yes, you mean that he cannot easily miss an odd thing. - Right. I know it to be so, for Rowland Swanson and I have try'd it several times. - Have ye, faith! Why then here's my Hand, I'll make the third Person; appoint the Time. - Let me see! - to morrow Night about this time; - My Master will be gone to Bed, and I'll wait for you at the Door. - They agreed, and parted; and Pearson the next day informs the Prosecutor of all that had past between'em. He desired Pearson entirely to fall in with the Prisoners Measures, and to carry whatever Goods they stole to Mr. Long's the Pawnbroker, to whom he would discover the Secret, and desires him to lend Money upon'em. The Plot succeeded, Pearson betray'd all to the Procecutor and the Prisoners were apprehended. - Marriot in Hounsditch deposed, that 3 or 4 Weeks ago, about 11 at Night, he was sent for to the Bell Tavern at Aldgate, where he saw the two Prisoners, and Swanson taking up a Scarlet Roquelaur, desired him to lend two Guineas upon it, for he said he was a Taylor, and had made it for a Gentleman, but he was gone out of Town. Their Confession was read, in which they both own'd that they had taken out of the Shop a Suit of Cloaths, which they pawn'd in Drury Lane for 31 s. 6 d. a Scarlet Cloak which they pawn'd to Mr. Marriot for two Guineas; and that they had sold several Goods in the Shop, and kept the Money.

Wells in his Defence own'd the Fact, but said he was drawn in by Swanson. Swanson own'd that he had a Suit of Cloaths and a Roquelaur, but nothing else. The Jury found Wells guilty to the Value of 4 s. 10 d. Burnt in the Hand . And Swanson guilty of the Indictment. Death .

Jane Loveday , of S. Mary le Bow , was indicted for fel. stealing a Silver Spoon value 10 s. a Pair of Boots, a Riding-Hood, Clouts, Caps, Shirts, &c . the Goods of Robt. Sanders , on the 29th of October last. Guilty to the Value of 10 d. Transportation .

Joseph Johnson , of S. Giles's in the Fields , was indicted for feloniously stealing 4 Pair of Stockings, an Apron, and two Handkerchiefs , the Goods of Francis Robuck , on the 16th of Oct . last. Guilty, 4 s. 10 d. Transportation .

John alias Christ. Cornwick, alias MacCornwick of S. Ann's Westm. was indicted for feloniously stealing three Holland Shirts, val. 15 s. and a Handkerchief, the Goods of John Hatch ; two Shirts val. 2 s. four Pair of Stockings val. 8 s. the Goods of Tho Mills ; and two Shirts value 2 s. the Goods of John Smith , on the 19th of Nov . last. Guilty to the Val. of 4 s. 10 d. Transportation .

Barbara Bishop , of Shoreditch , was indicted for assaulting Mary Jones , (a Child ) putting her in fear, and taking from her a Suit of Cambrick Head-Cloaths val. 40 s. the Goods of John Wood , on the 16th of Nov . last. Not guilty .

Hannah Simmons , of S. Andrew's Holborn , was indicted for fel. stealing a Sheet val. 8 s. and a Blanket val. 2 s. the Goods of Dan. Paskins , on the 18th of Nov . last. It appear'd that the Prisoner was a Lodger, pawn'd the Goods, add fetch'd 'em home again. Guilty, 10 d. Transportation .

Thomas Kewin , of S. Giles's in the Fields , was indicted for feloniously stealing a Pair of Sheets value 4 s. 6 d. 6 Plates val. 3 s. and Glass val. 7 s. the Goods of Jos Ash , on the 17th of Nov . last. He was a 2d time indicted for feloniously stealing two Copper-Pots val. 8 s. two Turnovers val. 2 s. and a Towel , the Goods of Sam Strowd , on the 20th of Nov . last. He was a 3d time indicted for feloniously stealing a Pair of Sheets val. 10 s. a Glass val. 10 s. &c . the Goods of Wm Bennet , on the 12th of Nov . last. He was a 4th time indicted for feloniously stealing a Pair of Sheets val. 8 s. the Goods of Josiah Jarman , on the 11th of Nov . last. He was a 5th time indicted for feloniously stealing a Sheet value 6 s. the Goods of Matth.ew Macraken , on the 7th of Nov . last. It appeared that the Prisoner had hired Lodgings of the several Prosecutors, and took the first Opportunity of going away with what he could conveniently carry off. Guilty of each Indictment to the Value of 10 d. Transportation .

Elizabeth Martin , of S. Martin's in the Fields , was indicted for privately stealing from the Person of Samuel Watts , Gent . 33 Guineas , on the 15th of Oct . last. Mr. Watts depos'd, that the Prisoner asked him to give her a Pint. They went to the Tavern, and from thence to her Lodging at Isaac Frestling's in Vine-street, Long-Acre , where they went to Bed together. But they had scarce taken a Nap, when her Landlord came in swearing, and pull'd them both out of Bed. They dressed themselves again, and went out together. By the Way they called at another Tavern, where he miss'd his Money, and charged her with it. She ran away. But finding her again 3 days after, she confess'd she had taken it, and bought New Apparel with it. The Prisoner in her Defence said, that about 7 at Night, as she was walking with another Woman, the Prosecutor came by, and the other Woman knowing him, called him by his Name. They went to the Tavern, and from thence home, where she went to Bed alone, and fell asleep, but never was so surprized, either before or since, as when she awaked and found a Man in her Bed, except it was when he afterwards accused her of picking his Pocket, of which she was entirely innocent. Guilty of Felony only . Transportation .

Sarah Burrows , of Shoreditch , was indicted for stealing a Pair of Blankets, a Sheet, Frying-Pan, two Kettles, and other things , the Goods of Sarah Burt , on the 25th of Nov . last. It appeared that the Prisoner was a Lodger, and pawn'd the Goods. Guilty to the Value of 10 d. Transportation .

Jane Watts , of S. Giles's in the Fields , was indicted for stealing a Suit of Head-Cloaths, the Goods of Eliz Brown , and one Yard and three Quarters of Holland, and 7 Shirts, the Goods of Jane Rowen , on the 2d of Nov . last. Guilty to the Value of 10 d. Transportation .

Elizabeth Parsons , of S. Giles's in the Fields , was indicted for stealing a Gown and Petticoat, Value 4 s. the Goods of Hannah Baker , on the 16th of Oct . last. Guilty to the Value of 10 d. Transportation .

Maria Maconell , of Stepney , was indicted for stealing a Smock, Value 5 s. the Goods of John Cuddle , on the 14th of Nov . last. Acquitted .

Elizabeth Miles , of Whitechappel , was indicted for stealing a Hat, Value 3 s. the Goods of Sam. Taylor , on the 4th of Nov . last. Guilty to the Value of 10 d. Whipt .

William Wood , of Aldgate , was indicted for privately stealing a Handkerchief, Value 6 d. the Goods of Robert Sherlock . But the Jury acquitted him.

Daniel Haver , of Stepney , was indicted for stealing 20 s. the Money of John Boeet , on the 8th of Nov . last but the Fact not being proved, the Jury found him not guilty .

John Pelter , of Stepney , was indicted for stealing a Silver Spoon, Value 6 s. the Goods of John Collet on the 5th of Dec . But the Jury acquitted him.

Flemming Evans , of S. Katharine's , was indicted for the Murder of a Male Infant (unborn) on the 6th on May last, by striking and kicking on the Belly Susan, the Wife of John Davis , then quick with the said Infant . The Child was still-born, very much bruis'd, and one of its Arms broken. But the Law supposing it impossible for a Child to be murdered before it is born, the Court directed the Jury to acquit the Prisoner of this Indictment, but ordered the Prosecutor to bring another against him for the Assault.

Elizabeth Johnson , was indicted for wilful and corrupt Perjury, in making Oath before the Lord Chief Justice Pratt, on the 28th of Jan . last, that on the Night preceding the said 28th of Jan. about 8 of the Clock, she was violently assaulted and beaten in an Alley by Mary Robert , and Margaret Larking . Several Witnesses proved that Roberts, was sick and not out of her Room all the Day and Night; and others proved that Johnson was in another Place at the time mention'd. The Case being plain against her, the Jury found her Guilty .

[Pillory. See summary.]

Mary Maddcoks , was indicted for wilful and corrrupt Perjury ; but her Affidavit differing in 2 or 3 Words from the Record, the Jury acquitted her.

Katherine Speed , alias Bromly , was indicted for privately stealing 18 s. 6 d. from the Person of Tho. Tutty , on the 30th of Oct . last. Tho. Tutty depos'd that being drunk between 12 and 1 in the Morning, he went to Coleston's Court in Drury-Lane , where he met with the Prisoner and another Woman. The Prisoner asked him to give her a Dram, which consenting to, went in with them both, and spent Half a Crown. Then as he was sitting upon the Bed betwixt them, in a very loving Posture, the Prisoner thrust her Hand down his Breeches and pull'd out all that he had, - which was 18 s. 6 d. and then she and the other ran down Stairs. He ran after them, and found them at another Gin-Shop. The Jury acquitted her.

Jane Bishop , was indicted for receiving a Suit of Head-Cloths, the Goods of Tho. Povey , knowing them to be stolen . But no Evidence appearing, she was acquitted .

Mary Vaughan , of S. Giles's in the Fields , was indicted for stealing a Pewter plate, Value 6 d. the Goods of Katherine Bonny , on the 12th of Nov . last, but no Evidence appearing, she was acquitted .

Henry Glinn , of Kensington , was indicted for privately stealing 19 s. from Edith Thorp , on the 6th of Nov . last. Guilty to the Value of 10 d. Transportation .

Juliana Lane , of S. Clement Danes , was indicted for stealing 2 Silver Spoons, Value 25 s. the Goods of Charles Connor ; but no Evidence appearing, she was acquitted .

Ann Dear , of S. Martins in the Fields , was indicted for feloniously stealing two Silver Spoons val. 12 s. 2 Gown and Petticoat val. 50 s. &c. and 5 s. in Money, the Goods and Money of William Kelly , in the House of Tho Greenfield , on the 13th of Oct . last; but no Evidence appearing, she was acquitted .

John Irwin , was indicted for privately stealing 3 Shirts val. 3 s. a Wig val. 3 l. 2 Mother of Pearl Boxes val. 8 l. and other Things , the Good of Tho. Gale , on the 20th of June last . But the Prosecutor not appearing, he was acquitted .

William Wells , Mary Stratton , Hannah Lawson , Nicolas Row , Sarah Roberts , Bartholomew Brady

The Tryals being over, the Court proceeded to Judgement as follows, viz.

Received Sentence of Death, Four.

William Anderson , Thomas Herbert , Charles Towers , and Rowland Swanson .

Burnt in the Hand, Eight.

William Wells , Mary Stratton , Hannah Lawson , Nicolas Row , Sarah Roberts , Bartholomew Brady , Mary Eustace , and Joseph Bondshaw . All but the two first were former Convicts.

To be Whipt, Six.

Sarah Clarkson , Constance Hales , Elizabeth Mills , Richard Okely , Edward Doe , and Mary Andrews . The two last former Convicts.

To be Transported, Forty Five.

John Rider , Sarah Hughs , William Hicks , Mary Hawks , Ann Allington , John Wood , Stephen Dyer , Michael Herring , Amy Burrows , Dorothy Thompson , John Randal , John Elan , Margaret Roberts , William Smith , Margaret Annis , Jeremy Reynolds, Benjamin Baker , Mary Noon , Elizabeth Morris , Mary Hilliard , Thomas Powel , William Page , William Jones , John Gold , Philip Harper , William Sawd , Thomas Winston , Thomas Maggy , Joseph Johnson , Thomas Kewin , Jane Wats , Isabel White , Elizabeth Powel , Thomas Butler , Samuel Shaw , John Cornwick , Elizabeth Martin , Elizabeth Parsons , George Fox , William Butler , Eleanor Lock, Jane Loveday , Hannah Simonds , Sarah Burrows , Henry Glynn .

John Landis , Fined Five Nobles, and to suffer Three Months Imprisonment.

Elizabeth Johnson , to stand in the Pillory at the End of Fatter-Lane, in Fleetstreet.

Richard Thompson , alias Blackbourn, fin'd six Marks, and to suffer three Months Imprisonment.

Katherine Betty alias Cook, fin'd six Nobles, and to suffer four Months Imprisonment.

NB. All those Persons who were bound over to Prosecute, and did not appear are to have their Recognizances Estreated by Order of the Court.