Old Bailey Proceedings Online (www.oldbaileyonline.org, version 6.0, 21 December 2014), August 1724 (17240812).

Old Bailey Proceedings, 12th August 1724.

THE PROCEEDINGS ON THE KING's Commission of the Peace, AND

Oyer and Terminer, and Goal-Delivery of Newgate, held for the CITY of London and COUNTY of Middlesex, at Justice Hall in the Old Bailey,

On Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday, being the 12th, 13th, and 14th of August, in the Eleventh Year of his MAJESTY's Reign.

BEFORE the Right Honourable Sir PETER DELME , Kt. Lord Mayor of the City of London; Sir William Thompson , Knt. Recorder, and John Raby , Esq; Serjeant at Law; and several of His Majesty's Justices of the Peace for the City of London and County of Middlesex.

The JURORS were as followeth.

The London Jury.

Pargister Austin ,

Charles Drinkhill ,

John Burton ,

Mark Neuth ,

James Edwards ,

William Walker ,

William Clark ,

William Hutton ,

Christopher May ,

Thomas Beaton ,

Samuel Illin ,

James Winn .

The Middlesex Jury.

Robert Kent ,

Samuel Fish ,

John Hern ,

Francis Tailor ,

William Atley ,

Thomas Fry ,

Valentine Arnold ,

John Hyron ,

Maurice Boheme ,

Matthew Hutchins ,

Marmaduke Bramley ,

William Burchet .

The Proceedings were as followeth, viz.

John Claxton , of the Parish of St. Botolph Bishopsgate , was indicted for feloniously stealing a Shift, the Goods of John Clement , the 18th of July last. It appear'd by the Evidence, that the Shift was hung out in a Yard to dry, and the Prisoner came and took it off from the Line, and upon an outcry, he threw down the Shift and ran away, and was stopp'd. The Jury found him guilty of the Indictment. Transportation .

John Grimes , of the Parish of St. Peter Cornhill , was indicted for privately stealing a Handkerchief, from the Person of Thomas Newnham , the 30th of July last. It appear'd by the Evidence, that as the Prosecutor was going thro' Peter's Alley in Cornhil , there was the Prisoner and another Person, who took the Handkerchief out of his Pocket, and the Prisoner receiv'd it, and upon an outcry threw it down on the Ground, but was apprehended. The Jury found him guilty to the value of 10 d. Transportation .

John Heath , of the Parish of St. Sepulchres , was indicted for feloniously stealing 2 Hogs, value 36 s. the Property of Edward Taylor , the 25th of July last. It appear'd by the Evidence, that the Hogs were lost out of the Prosecutor's Neighbour's Yard, at Westminster , and were found upon the Prisoner, selling them at Smithfield. The Jury found him guilty of the Indictment. Transportation .

Elizabeth Francis , and Mary Clark , of the Parish of St. James Westminster , were indicted for feloniously stealing leather Shoes , the Property of George Frazier , the 12th of July last. It appear'd by the Evidence, that the Shoes were taken out of the Prosecutor's Stall, and the Prisoners were apprehended between 2 and 3 a Clock in the Morning by the Watchmen. The Prisoners pleaded, that they were sent for a Midwife, about 3 or 4 a Clock in the Morning, and found the Shoes in a Sack. The Jury found them both guilty to the value of 10 d. Transportation .

William and Ann Lewis , of the Parish of St. Giles in the Fields , were indicted for Felony and High Treason, in keeping knowingly, and having in their Possession, a Press and a Mould for Coining, contrary to the Statute in that Case made and provided, they having concealed them . Margaret Thompson depos'd, that the Prisoners came to her House to lodge, and that missing two pewter Pots, and going into the Room to look for the Pots, the Prisoners were gone abroad, but a Girl their Daughter in Bed, and looking under the Door, she saw a piece of Mettle lie on the Ground, which giving her some suspicion, she went with her Daughter into the Room, and found the Tools under the Bed, between the Cords and Marring, bundled up, and also some melted Mettle, and that her Daughter raking in the Ashes, found a false Shilling, and taking hold of a Silk Rag that was in a Hole of the Chimney, where the Andirons used to go in, and pulling out the piece of Silk. 5 other Shillings sell out, which were false Shillings; the Mould and Money were produced in Court; and afterwards when Ann Lewis came home, being in drink, she gave her Daughter a good and bad Shilling before she lay'd her self down to sleep; and that Hannah Lewis the Prisoner's Daughter confessed that one Howel used to make those Shillings, 30 or 40 at a time. Margaret Thompson's Daughter depos'd the same that her Mother had done. The Prisoners deny'd their knowing any thing of the Tools, and said, that a Pedlar and his Wife lodg'd in the same Room, and also a Soldier one Night during the time they lodg'd there, which the Landlady allowed, but said they were the Prisoners Acquaintance. The Jury, upon a full hearing of the Matter, acquitted them.

Thomas and Elizabeth Howel , were indicted for High Treason, in counterfeiting the Coin of this Kingdom, and making 4 Pieces in the resemblance of King William the third's Shillings , the 6th of August last. Hannah Lewis depos'd, that Thomas Howel used to come to her Father's Cellar, near St. Giles's Pound , and there did several times with the Moulds produced in Court, being filled with Chalk, and making an impression with a good Shilling, pour in melted Mettle, which was pewter Pots, and that having made the Money of pewter Pots melted, they afterwards passed it off, and that she had been several times at several Places with him, to put off that bad Money, and that he brought the Mould to her Father's House, and left it there, telling her Mother there was no harm in them, and that he brought the Piece of Sodder to the Lodging of her Father, when he and her Mother were abroad, and she in Bed, and that he put it under the Door, and bid her rise and lay it up, but she falling a-sleep did not, and the Landlady coming to search for Pots did find the Sodder, the Moulds and counterfeit Money.

The Prisoners intirely deny'd the Fact, and objected against the Credit of Hannah Lewis, as being not much above 10 Years old, and that she was brought to his Cellar, and behav'd her self very strangely, crying there was the Devil and the Cat, and bid them give the Devil and the Cat Geneva, &c. The Proof of the Fact depending only upon the Evidence of the Girl, the Jury acquitted them.

Anthony Upton , and William Harvey , of St. James's Westminster , were indicted of Burglary, for breaking the House of Oliver Truelove , in the Night time, and feloniously stealing 10 Bars of Iron, value 5 l. the 18th of June last . The Prosecutor depos'd, That his Cellar Window was broken open, and the Bars of Iron were stolen. Upton's Confession was read in Court, wherein he confessed, that he and Harvey did at 3 several Times steal 10 Bars of Iron from the Prosecutor, breaking open his Cellar in order to commit the Fact. He did not deny it at the Bar. Harvey, upon their being apprehended at work together upon the Iron, pretended that the Iron was bought of one Wilkinson, but that he could not make appear in Court. The Jury found Anthony Upton guilty of the Indictment. Death . And acquitted Harvey.

Mary Rainsbury , of the Parish of St. Mary Whitechapel , was indicted for feloniously stealing the Goods of John Harper , the 19th of July last. It appeared by the Evidence, that the Prisoner was employed to sit up with the Prosecutor's Wife, she being sick, and stole the Goods. She confessed the Fact before the Justice. The Matter being plainly prov'd, the Jury found her guilty to the value of 10 d. Transportation .

Miles Allison alias Coatsworth , and Mary Allison , of St. Martin's in the Fields , were indicted for feloniously stealing a Damask Gown, and Holland , the Property of John Seneff , the 1st of this Instant August . It appear'd by the Evidence that the Prisoners lodg'd in the Prosecutor's House. The Goods were found where they were pawn'd, by Miles Allison. The Jury found Miles Allison guilty to the value of 39 s. Transportation . And acquitted Mary Allison.

Mary Garret , of the Parish of Stepney , was indicted for feloniously stealing divers Goods, in the House of Jane Libra , the 4th of July last. It appeared by the Evidence, that the Prisoner liv'd in the Prosecutor's House, and stole the Goods, as appeared by her Confession before the Justice, which was read in Court. The Fact being plainly prov'd, the Jury found her guilty to the value of 39 s. Transportation .

Elizabeth Candy , of the Parish of St. Giles in the Fields , was indicted for feloniously stealing Goods, in the Dwelling House of Edward Higginson , the 29th of June last. It appear'd by the Evidence, that the Prisoner was Servant to the Prosecutor. She confessed the Fact before the Justice, which Confession was read in Court. The Fact being plainly prov'd, the Jury found her guilty to the value of 10 d. Transportation .

Durance Bun , of the Parish of St. Giles in the Fields , was indicted for feloniously stealing a Hat, from the Person of Isaac Saunders , the 1st of this Instant August . The Prosecutor depos'd, That as he sat on a Bench about 12 a Clock at Night, the Prisoner snatch'd his Hat off from his Head, and gave it to a Man, and he ran away with it, and he immediately laid hold of her. The Prisoner deny'd the Fact, but the Prosecutor was positive that the Prisoner took it. The Jury found her guilty to the value of 10 d. Transportation .

Frances Sands , and Ann Bellas , of the Parish of St. Andrew Holbourn , were indicted for feloniously stealing 35 l. the Money of divers Persons, in the Dwelling House of Richard Barron , the 12th of April last . It appear'd by the Evidence, that Frances Sands was Servant to the Prosecutor, and there was a Club kept at the Prosecutor's House, who had a Box, wherein was 35 l. which Box was broken open, and the Mony was stolen. The Prosecutor's Wife depos'd, That no Body used to go into that Room but her Husband, her self, and Frances Sands, the Key always was kept between them, and the Bottom of the Box was broken, and the Money taken away. James Dun depos'd, That Frances Sands came to him and told him, that he and his Wife must come to her on the Sunday Morning, she had got some Money, and if they did not come, she must be forced to throw it down the House of Office, that they did go to Sir John Oldcastle 's, and staid there while Ann Bellas the Prisoner's Daughter went to her Mother Frances Sands, who was then at the Prosecutor's House, and brought the Money, to him, which was Gold in a Paper, and Silver in a Bag, and that Frances Sands afterwards owned that it came from the Club Box, but he being made drunk did not know what became of the Money. James Crew depos'd, That the Prisoner used to fetch Drink at his House, and he perceiving that they spent their Money more profusely than was usual, and beyond their former Ability, so that at length it became a Talk in the Neighbourhood that the Money came from a Box in such a Place, he went and acquainted Mr. Barron with it, and the Prisoners were apprehended. The Jury found Frances Sands guilty of the Indictment. Death . But acquitted Ann Bellas.

Joseph Ward , of the Parish of Pancrass , was indicted for assaulting Jame Vickery near the High Way, and taking from her a Gold Ring, value 20 s. the 18th of July last. The Prosecutor depos'd, That as she and her Daughter were going near Kentish Town , behind Bondstreet , the Prisoner came to them, and pulling a Club from under his Coat, and swearing in a violent Manner, that if she did not deliver immediately, he would murder them that Minute, she did deliver to him a Ring.

He was indicted a second Time for Assaulting and Robbing Elizabeth Barker , near the Highway, and taking from her a Gold Ring set with Garnets , the 18th of July last. The Prosecutor depos'd, That having Lodgings at Kentish Town, her Mother and she went out to take a Walk, and were met by the Prisoner, and treated as her Mother Jane Vickery had depos'd. The Prisoner confess'd the Facts before the Justice, which Confession was read in Court; nor did he deny them at the Bar. The Facts being plainly prov'd, the Jury found him guilty of both indictments. Death .

Elizabeth Wakelin , of the Parish of St. Martin in the Fields , was indicted for feloniously stealing Goods, in the Dwelling-house of Ebenezer Mitchel , the 5th of July last. The Prosecutor depos'd, The Prisoner was his Servant , and on Sunday, he being out of Town, and no Body at Home but her self, she went away, and carried away the Goods, Part of which were found upon her about a Fortnight after in Shadwell: That she own'd the Commission of the Fact, and said she was sorry for what she had done, and it was the first Fact she had been guilty of. The Jury found her guilty to the Value of 39 s. Transportation .

Francis Wetherel , of the Parish of St. Clement Danes , was indicted for feloniously stealing Tea, and Chocolate , the Property of David Davis , the 23d of July last. The Prosecutor depos'd, He lost his Tea, and James Spooner , his Servant, depos'd, That he met with the Prisoner at the Castle and Falcon, and he claimed Acquaintance with him, telling him he was his Countryman, and he knew his Parents very well, and must needs be his Cousin, and he would come and see him; and he did come several Times, and took away Goods at several Times, sometimes Cloves, and sometimes other Goods, and threatned if he told of it he would murder him, and promised to help him to a good Place; and that Morning he came, and took the Tea out of the Canister with his Hand, and put it into his Pocket. The Prisoner call'd several Persons to his Reputation: The Jury found him guilty to the Value of 10 d. Transportation .

Edward Auden , of St. James Clerkenwell , was indicted for feloniously marrying a Second Wife, while his first Wife was living . To which indictment he pleaded guilty . Burnt in the Hand .

Richard Hoskins , and Hannah Jones , of St. Margaret's Westminster , were indicted for feloniously stealing a Flaxen Sheet , the Property of Nathaniel Pyner , the 16th of June last. There was no Evidence against Richard Hoskins that affected him, whereupon he was acquitted : But Hannah Jones was found guilty to the Value of 10 d. Transportation .

Ann Clay , alias Roberts , of St. Martin's in the Fields , was indicted for feloniously stealing a Gown and Petticoat, the Property of, and in the Dwelling-house of James Nicolas Arbuthnot , the 26th of July last. It appear'd that the Prisoner had been Servant to the Prosecutor, but did not live with him at that Time the Goods were lost, but came there one Sunday when they were abroad, to another Servant that then lived with the Prosecutor. The Prisoner pleaded, That the Cloaths were given her by the Prosecutor's Maid, and she sold them for her, and gave her the Money. The Jury found her guilty to the Value of 10 d. Transportation .

Susannah Russel , of the Parish of Whitechapel , was indicted for feloniously stealing a Gown and Petticoat , the 11th of July last. The Fact being plainly prov'd, the Jury found her guilty to the Value of 10 d. Transportation .

John Fountain , of St. Ann Westminster , was indicted for privately stealing a Guinea and 9 s. from the Person of Elizabeth Phillips , the 8th of this present August . The Prosecutor depos'd, As she was standing, shewing her Child the Trained Bands, a Boy told her, a Boy had pick'd her Pocket. Another Evidence depos'd, That he pursu'd the Prisoner, and took him, and he found a Crown Piece in his Pocket, and he dropp'd 3 s. Another Evidence depos'd, That he laying hold of the Prisoner, he clapp'd his Hands behind him, and in giving another Boy the Money, as he own'd afterwards, he dropp'd 3 s. but the other Boy got away. The Jury found him guilty to the Value of 10 d. Transportation .

Elizabeth Hutton , of the Parish of St. Leonard Shoreditch , was indicted for feloniously stealing a Coat , the Property of Abraham Ledew , the 13th of July . The Prosecutor depos'd, That he went into a Vault that belong'd to the Alms-houses at Hoxton , between nine and ten, and falling asleep, slept 'till about one, and when he awaked he had neither Coat nor Hat. The Constable of Shoreditch depos'd, He apprehended her the 13th of July, with the Prosecutor's Hat and Coat, he having stopp'd the Prosecutor before. The Jury found her guilty to the Value of 10 d. Transportation .

Stephen Fowles , of the Parish of St. Peter's Cornhill , was indicted for stealing 46 Yards of Holland, value 56 s. out of the Shop of Jasper Waters , and Company , the 8th of this present August . Mr. Cookson depos'd, That the Prisoner came into the Shop, and took 2 Pieces of Goods, and run away with them, he pursued him, and took him with the Goods upon him. The Prisoner pleaded, He bought the Goods of a Man in St. Catherines, for 30 s. but not being able to prove it, the Jury found him guilty of the Indictment. Death .

John Vanderhurst , of St. Buttolph's Bishopsgate , was indicted for feloniously stealing Money , the Property of Nathaniel Edwards , the 25th of January last. The Fact being plainly prov'd, the Jury found him guilty to the Value of 10 d. Transportation .

Samuel Hales , of the Parish of St. Faith , was indicted for feloniously stealing a Basket of Cherries , the Goods of John Eels , the 4th of August . It appear'd by the Evidence, That the Cherries stood at a Stall, and the Prisoner took the Cherries, and was carrying them away, but being pursu'd was taken with them upon him. The Fact being plainly prov'd, the Jury found him guilty to the value of 10 d. Transportation .

Edward Doe , of the Parish of St. Mary Hill , was indicted for feloniously stealing the Money of Samuel Breeton , the 9th of August . The Prosecutor depos'd, The Prisoner was his Servant , and he keeping an Eating-house, he had often taken his Money, and defrauded him of it. The Jury found him guilty to the Value of 10 d. Transportation .

Robert Cheeseman , of the Parish of St. John Baptist , was indicted for privately stealing a Pocket, &c. from the Person of Dorothy Horn , the 11th of July last. The Prosecutor depos'd, That going along Dowgate Hill , she had her Pocket pull'd of, she cry'd out, and the Prisoner was pursu'd and taken. The Jury found him guilty to the Value of 10 d. Transportation .

Elizabeth Hardy , of the Parish of Alhallows on the Wall , was indicted for privately stealing a gold Chain, from the Person of Rebecca Jones Spinster , the 20th of June last. Rebecca Jones depos'd, That the Prisoner told her, her Neck was very dirty, and bid her take it off, and she would wash her Neck, she did do so, laid it down on the Table, and afterwards put it into her pocket, and presently she said, Miss, how ugly your Coat sits, and pretending to set it right, she perceived her Hand about her pocket, and presently ran out of Doors; she felt in her pocket and missing her Chain, cry'd, where are you going? she replyed, for a half penny worth of pins, run out of Doors, and she followed, but she was got out of Sight, and she came no more, but at last was apprehended. The Jury found her guilty to the value of 10 d. Transportation .

Philip Zeman , of the Parish of St. Botolph, Aldgate , was indicted for privately stealing Spectacles in the Shop of Elizabeth Mappleston , the 28th of July last. The Prosecutor's Man depos'd, That the Prisoner came to his Mistress's Shop, and bought 6 Pair of Spectacles, and put other Spectacles into his Pocket besides, and went away with them, being pursu'd, he deny'd the having them, but being carried into the Shop, threw them down on the Counter. The Jury found him guilty to the value of 10 d. Transportation .

Joseph Ward , of the Parish of Pancras , was indicted for Assaulting Peter Walter , Esq ; in an open Place near the High Way, and taking from him 6 s. 6 d. the 1st of August last. The Prosecutor and his Wife depos'd, That as they were walking between Kentish Town and Hampstead , going over a Stile, the Prisoner coming out of a Ditch, pulled out a Club from under his Coat, and swore if he put his Hand to his Sword, he would knock out the Prosecutor's Brains presently, that then he demanded his Money, Watch, &c. but he gave him only his Silver. The Prisoner had confess'd the Fact before the Justice, and also to two other Evidences that apprehended him. The Fact being plainly prov'd, the Jury found him guilty of the Indictment. Death .

Mary Hermitage , of the Precinct of the Trinity, Minories , was indicted for stealing the Goods of Edward Crookshall , the 16th of July last. It appear'd by the Evidence, that the Prisoner came to the Prosecutor's House with a Paper, pretending to beg, and took an Opportunity to steal the Goods, and being pursu'd, was apprehended with the Goods in her Lap. The Jury found her guilty to the value of 10 d. Transportation .

Benjamin and Francis Brightwell , of the Parish of Pancras , were indicted for Assaulting John Pargiter , on the High Way, and taking from him 6s. the 20th of July last. The Prosecutor depos'd, That having been at London, going home between Fig Lane and Half-way-house, he got off his House to make Water, and his Horse going on before, he was walking after him, the Prisoner Francis Brightwell met him, and passed him 6 or 8 Yards, and then Benjamin met him, and knock'd him down into a Ditch, and demanded his Money, and Watch, asking him if all the Money he had was in one Pocket, he told him yes, and he took it out; that he afterwards bid him give him his Hand, to lift him out of the Ditch, and gave him his Wig that was fallen off by his being knock'd down, that as for Francis, he did not say any thing to him, but halted, and was standing still a little distance off, while Benjamin was robbing him; that afterwards they went away, and he followed his Horse and went Home; that on the Saturday following, he having been at London, was going home with some Farmers his Neighbours, and coming to the Place, was telling them, that was the Place he had been robb'd at, and describing the Persons, and riding farther, saw the two Prisoners in the Road, telling the Farmers, that those were the Persons that had robbed him, they apprehended them, being in the same Clothes that they had on when they robb'd him, that at that time Francis Brightwell had under his Coat a Cross Bow, which was produced in Court, that taking them to an Ale-house, he charg'd them with having robb'd him, that they were under a great Surprize, and did neither own nor deny it, but Francis pretended he was elsewhere at that time upon Guard, but prevaricated in his Account.

Two other Evidences depos'd, as to the Manner of their apprehending the Prisoners according to the Charge of the Prosecutor, for having robb'd him.

The Prisoners in their Defence, deny'd the Fact, and called several Persons to prove they were the one at home, and the other on guard, at the time when the Robbery was committed.

Ann Miller depos'd, That she saw Benjamin Brightwell the 20th of July last, in the Brew-house Yard, at 3 quarters past 9 a Clock, going home to lye at Mr. Lomax's House, where he lay.

John Barber depos'd, That on the 20th of July, he was at Benjamin's House, from 3 a Clock, till half an Hour past 8 at Night. Mary Gibson depos'd, That on the Tuesday Morning Mr. Pargiter came to her House, and told her he was fuddled when he was robb'd. Ann Miller depos'd, That she lodg'd in Benjamin Brightwell's House, and that he was there at work till half an Hour past 9 a Clock at Night, the 20th of July. Susan Tailor depos'd, she saw Benjamin Brightwell, at her Stable Door, between 9 and 10 a Clock at Night, and talk'd to him there, and he was going to lye at Mr. Lomax's House. Thomas Taylor depos'd, to the same Purpose. John Bever depos'd, That he heard the Prosecutor Pargiter say, that he was much in Liquor, when he was robbed. Several Persons also gave them a very honest Character. William Hughes a Clergyman depos'd, That he had known Francis Brightwell near 20 Years, that he was always reputed a Person of the fairest Character for Sobriety, Justness, and Probity, and also that he was a Person extraordinary well accomplish'd with Latin and Greek Literature, and good Skill in Roman Antiquities, that there was not such another Granadier in the Universe, he carrying a large Share of exquisite Learning under his Granadiers Cap. Several other Persons of Character, as Colonels, Majors, Captains, &c. confirm'd the Character before mentioned, and his Sergeant and several other Soldiers depos'd, that he was on the 20th of July on guard, from about a quarter of an Hour past 9 a Clock, till past eleven a Clock. The Jury upon a full hearing of the matter acquitted them both.

Christian Clark , of the Parish of St. Martins in the Fields , was indicted for feloniously stealing a pair of Shoes, in the Shop of Samuel Davis , the 30th of July last. It appear'd by the Evidence, that the Prisoner took the Shoes off the Spikes, at the Shop Window and ran away, but being pursu'd was apprehended. The Fact being plainly prov'd, the Jury found him guilty to the value of 10d. Transportation .

John Heath , of the Parish of St. Leonard Shoreditch , was indicted for feloniously stealing 50 pair of Shoes , the goods of John Smith , the 1st of July last. It appear'd by the Evidence, That the Prisoner being an Apprentice to the Prosecutor; did use to steal Shoes from his Master, and sell them. The Fact being plainly prov'd, the Jury found him guilty to the value of 39 s. Burnt in the Hand .

Robert Colethorp , of the Parish of St. Giles Cripplegate , was indicted for privately stealing a Wig, value 5 l. the Property of Samuel Salt , from the Person of Joseph Webster , the 11th of July last. It appear'd by the Evidence, That Joseph Webster was going along Chiswell-street , with two Wig-boxes under his Arm, and perceiving some Body to touch the Box, he turn'd about, and saw the Prisoner, and seeing one of his Wigs was gone, he laid hold of the Prisoner, and charg'd him with having the Wig, which he deny'd, but he took the Wig out from between the Prisoner's Coat and Wastcoat. There were several Evidences to prove the Fact, whereupon the Jury found him guilty of the Indictment . Death .

Miles Allison , of the Parish of St. Giles in the Fields , was indicted for feloniously stealing a Trunk, and divers Goods and Money , the Property of Frances Mills , the 2d of February last. The Prisoner lodg'd in the Prosecutor's House, and pretending that he was sent for in Haste into the Country, went away very early in the Morning, and the Trunk was missing after he was gone. The Prisoner having nothing to say in his Defence, the Jury found him guilty of the Indictment. Transportation .

Katherine Farley , of the Parish of St. Martin in the Fields , was indicted for privately taking a Silver Watch, value 5 l. from the Person of Guy Dixon , the 4th of this present August . The Prosecutor depos'd, That going to the House of the Prisoner's Mistress about some Business, she being busy, he was desired to stay in the Kitchen 'till she was at Leisure, and falling asleep, his Watch was taken away, and found where the Prisoner had pawn'd it. The Prisoner pleaded, That the Prosecutor gave her the Watch. The Jury found her not guilty .

John Wright and Benjamin Shaw , of St. Leonard Shoreditch , were indicted for stealing two Pewter pots, and a Copper Pot, Value 1 s. 10 d. the Property of Jonathan Wilcox , the 29th of June last. It appear'd by the Evidence, that two Persons came to the Prosecutor's House to drink, and having had two Pints of Drink, while she was gone into another Room they went away, without paying for their Drink; and the two Pint Pots and a Copper Pot were missing, and the Copper Pot was found where the Prisoner Wright had sold it. The Jury found them not guilty .

Mary Cloak , of the Parish of St. Martins in the Fields , was indicted for feloniously stealing Sheets, Blankets, and other Goods , the Goods of Elizabeth Caperil , the 3d of this present August . The Prisoner was a Lodger in the Prosecutor's House, and the Goods belonged to the Lodging, and were carried away, and the Prisoner owned that she had pawned them. The Jury found her guilty to the Value of 10 d. Transportation .

Norris Hall and William Hall , of the Parish of St. James Clerkenwell , were indicted for feloniously stealing Iron, &c. Value 6 s. the Goods of Henry Billingay , the 14th of July last; the Fact being plainly prov'd, the Jury found them each guilty to the Value of 10 d. Transportation .

William Mould , of the Parish of Stepney , was indicted for feloniously stealing Leather, Value 12 s. in the Shop of Thomas Warren , the 5th of this present August . The Fact being plainly prov'd, the Jury found him guilty to the Value of 10 d. Transportation .

Margaret Mews , alias Fetherstone , of the Parish of St. Giles in the Fields, was indicted for breaking the House of John Best ; in the Night time, with an intent to steal , the 30th of June last. But no body appearing against her, she was acquitted , and the Court being informed that it was a malicious Prosecution, the Jury ordered the Prisoner a Copy of her Indictment, and ordered the Prosecutor's Recognizance to be estreated.

John Armstrong and Mary Armstrong , were indicted for a Misdemeanour, in putting off Pieces of Copper for Six Pences, knowing them to be false . One Evidence depos'd, that the People of the Town of Twickenham complained that they had been much imposed upon by Copper Pieces like Six Pences, he went in quest of the Prisoners; he apprehended them, and several Pieces of the Copper Money, and a parcel of Tools were found upon the Man. Several Persons depos'd they had taken Pieces of Copper wash'd of Mary Armstrong. The Jury found them both guilty , and the Court fin'd them three Marks apiece .

Mary Cyles , of the Parish of St. Giles Cripplegate , was indicted for feloniously stealing a Pair of Spurs , the Property of Daniel Guilt , the 1st of August last. It appeared by the Evidence, that the Spurs were given to the Prisoner to clean, and she gave them to her Brother, who pawned them, and afterwards they were brought into the House again by some unknown Hand. The Jury acquitted her.

John Mackfedre was indicted for a Misdemeanour, for assaulting and wounding Mr. Henry Jacomb , the 9th of June last. It appear'd by the Evidence, that Mr. Jacomb having acted as an Attorney in a Suit the Defendant was concern'd in, he took upon him to come to Thaves Inn , to a Coffee-house, and demand some Writings out of his Hands that he had no Right to; and upon his refusing to deliver them, knock'd him down with his Cane, and wounded him very much. The Fact being plainly prov'd, the Jury found him guilty ; and the Court sentenced him to pay a Fine of 20 Marks , to suffer a Year's Imprisonment , and to find Sureties for his Behaviour for three Years .

Elizabeth Copney , alias Cobley , of St. Anne Aldersgate , was indicted for stealing the Goods of Mary Pollard , the 9th of June last, but the Evidence not being sufficient to convict the Prisoner, she was acquitted .

William Jones , of the Parish of St. Anne Aldersgate , was indicted for privately stealing a Handkerchief, from the Person of Isaac Gaunt , the 8th of August last. The Fact being plainly prov'd, the Jury found him guilty to the Value of 10 d. Transportation .

John Wright , of the Parish of Pancrass , was indicted for Assaulting Martha Mead , upon the Highway, putting her in fear of her Life, and taking from her a Gold Ring, Value 8 s. the 13th of July last. The Prosecutor depos'd, that she being to go to Hampstead, about ten or eleven a Clock in the Forenoon, met with the Prisoner at Black Mary's Hole, and inquiring of him the Way to Pancrass, he told her he was going thither, and would conduct her; that they went together through Pancrass-Church-Yard, and coming to an Alehouse, the Prisoner would needs call for Drink, and was very urgent upon her to drink with him; but she refus'd; till at last he sitting down on an Alehouse Bench, and having call'd for Drink, he over-perswaded her, and she did sit down at the other end of the Bench, and did drink part of a Pint of Drink, he very much pressing her, and telling her there could be no harm in it, and taking her by the Hand, constrained her to sit down; that afterwards they went to Kentish-Town, and the Prisoner call'd at the Black Lion for some Brandy, and urged her to drink a Dram with him, which she did; that then she inquiring the Way to Hampstead, the Prisoner told her he would show her the Way, and she not knowing it, he carry'd her through by-Fields, that went towards Highgate, and in the Fields opening her Hand by Force, took the Ring off from her Finger, and turned into another Field out of the Way, that she followed him and asked him for her Ring, to which he replyed, he would give it her again presently, but did not, but offered Rudeness to her, that he carried her round about for a great while, telling her, she was in her way to Hampstead, till at last she found to the contrary; that she having a Calamanco Gown in her Handkerchief, he took that from her also, and told her now she was obliged to follow him; that he carried her rambling about, calling at several Places, but she was afraid to charge him with her Ring, &c. for fear he should do her some Injury, because they were People of his Acquaintance, till at last they had wandred till they came into Long Alley, and at the Sign of the Dolphin he went in, and gave the Gown to the Maid, and bid her not deliver it to her till the next Morning, but she being resolved not to go without it, the Gown was given to her again, that after that the Prisoner went with her to the House where she lodg'd, and her Landlord being a Constable, she demanded her Ring of the Prisoner, but he deny'd that he had it, but owned it the next Morning. That he did deny having the Ring, on the over Night, was proved by two Evidences. And that he produc'd it the next Morning in the Counter, was depos'd by the Prosecutor's Landlord, the Constable.

The Prisoner in his Defence pleaded, That he having some Business at Kentish Town was going thither, and as he was sitting on a Stile near Pancras, the Prisoner came to him and ask'd him the way to Pancras, that he directed her, and when they came to the Adam and Eve, he sat down on one end of the Bench, and called for a Pint of Drink, and the Prosecutor sat down on the other, and fumbling with her Hand in her Pocket, began to complain that she had the Misfortune to lay her Money down at home, instead of putting it in her Pocket, and so had left it behind her, otherwise she would have had a Pint of Ale and a Cake; that he replyed, she was very welcome to drink with him, that he drank to her, and she drank, edging nearer and nearer to him, from one end of the Bench to the other, that the Landlord brought some Cakes, and she took one; that then they went forward to Kentish Town, and went to the Black Lion, and called for 2 or 3 Pints of Drink, and for 3 half Quarterns of Brandy, which tho' she refused at first, she afterwards drank very freely. That then she enquired the way to Hampstead, that they having staid there 3 or 4 Hours, he then went to speak to some Farmers about putting 2 Horses to Grass, that the Prosecutor went with him, that he went no By-ways, nor did violently take the Ring; but the Prosecutor gave him the King as a Pledge, for her Part of the Expence he had been at, in their long Journey, that she also gave him the Gown to carry for her, which he did, that at length, at Night, arriving in Town, at Long Alley they went in to drink, and had 3 Pots of Drink, and at another Place 2 or 3 half Quarterns of Brandy, and then he went with the Prosecutor to her own Lodgings, it being about 11 a Clock at Night. That this was their Progress, that he did not rob her of her Ring, and he hoped God was above the Devil Still. Another Evidence depos'd, That the Prosecutor and Prisoner came to his House at the Dolphin in Long Alley, about 7 or 8 a-Clock at Night, and staid there till 11, and had three Pints of Drink, that the Prisoner had a Ring on his Finger, and he asked him if it was his own, that he reply'd no, it was the young Women's, that they drank very familiarly together, were very loving; that the Prisoner kissed the Prosecutor, and she again the Prisoner several times, and afterwards he (this Evidence) also kissed the Prosecutor, that after they had drank their Drink with much Pleasaniness, they went away lovingly together, she taking the Prisoner hold by the Arm, and went away like Man and Wife, or like Whore and Rogue, and he took them all the while to be in a sort of Courtship. Another Evidence depos'd, That he was present when the Prisoner and Prosecutor came in, and were very familiar and loving, kissing one another with that Freedom, that tho' he was an old Man, it made him blush, that the Prosecutor said to the Prisoner, my dear, I hope we shall drink together, we have been together all Day, and I am dry, that she said she was a little faint, and Brandy was called for, and they drank together, and afterwards went away very lovingly together. Upon a full bearing of the Matter, the Jury accquitted him.

Alice Crofts , of the Parish of St. Giles Cripplegate , was indicted for feloniously stealing the Goods of Joseph Anderson , the 11th of July last. The Fact being plainly prov'd, the Jury found her guilty to the value of 10 d. Transportation .

Charles Harrison , Esq ; of the Parish of St. Paul Covent-Garden , was indicted for the Murther of Mr. Alexander Agnew , by giving him one mortal Wound with a Sword, of the Length of one Inch, and the Depth of Six Inches, on the right part of his Breast, the 4th of this Instant August , of which Wound he immediately died . He was also indicted a Second Time on the Coroner's Inquest. And also a Third Time, upon the Statute of Stabbing.

John Adams depos'd, That Major Harrison and Captain Agnew came to the Lubeck's Head in Maiden Lane , about 11 a Clock at Night, and called for a Bottle of Burgundy, that he carried it, and filled out a Glass, that they afterwards asked for his Master, and his Master went up, and brought down that Bottle of Burgundy, and carried up a Bottle of French Wine, that he afterwards heard the Bell ring in the Lion, and went up, and the Gentlemen wanted some Snuff, that he sent the Porter for it, and carried it up, that they also called for another Bottle, which was carried up, and they were talking together very friendly, and disputing on some Argument, but he knew not about what, that Capt. Agnew went to the Window, and Major Harrison went to him and laid his Arm over him very friendly, that near one a Clock he heard in that Room, the Noise of stamping of Feet like 2 Men parrying and pushing at one another, that he immediately ran up, and before he got up Stairs, the Bell rung, and when he went to the Room, he met the Major coming towards the Door, with two Swords drawn in his Hand, and taking him by the Collar, he led him to Capt. Agnew, who was sitting in a Chair in the Room, bleeding, that he said to him, Dear Sir, did you not draw your Sword first? And Capt. Agnew answered, he did, and the Major bid him this Evidence take Notice; that one of the Swords was bloody, which he thinks was the Major's, it was a mourning Sword, and the Major's Clothes were light coloured trimm'd with black; that he carried down the Swords, informed his Master, and ran away for the Surgeon, who when he came, dressed his Wound, and afterwards laid him on the Table, and the Surgeon bidding him get a Chair, he fetch'd one, and they carried him down Stairs, and he and another went on each side of the Chair, holding a Napkin before him to keep him from falling or rocking, but before they came to his Lodgings in Hemming's Row, he was dead.

Edward Thorp depos'd, that he being a-sleep behind the Bar, all being in Bed, but one Drawer, the Porter, and himself, about one a Clock in the Morning the Drawer brought down two Swords, telling him, one of the Gentlemen was wounded, and that he immediately ran up Stairs, and saw the Deceased sitting on the Ground stooping, that they listed him up, and sat him on a Chair, and the Drawer ran away for a Surgeon, that he called a Coachman and sent him up; that when the Deceased was taken off the Ground he sighed and groaned very much.

Joseph Thorp depos'd, that the Major and Capt. Agnew came to his House, he being then at the Bar, and desired to have a Bottle of Burgundy, which they had; but afterwards would have Claret, which he carried up to them, that they seemed to be very friendly. That be went to Bed, and was called up, about a Quarter past one a Clock, but did not see the Deceased till Mr. Small the Surgeon came to dress him.

Thomas Stonystreet , an Apothecary's Apprentice depos'd, That he was present while Mr. Small the Surgeon dress'd the Deceased, that when he came in, the Deceased was sitting in a Chair, that Major Harrison ask'd the Captain, if he himself (the Captain) was not the Aggressor, and he answered he was.

Mr. Stone depos'd, that he being Beedle, was all'd, and when he went, the Deceased was laid on the Table, and the Major said to him, Sir, it was your own seeking, and I am sorry for it.

Mr. Carter the Constable said, he also being call'd, went, and the Captain was lying on the Table, and after some time stirred his Hand, and raised himself, and sat up, and the Major said to him, Sir, you have already said it to the Drawer, say before the Constable, did you not draw your 8 word upon me, and Capt. Agnew reply'd, I did draw my Sword first. This was the third time he had owned it, and at that time said, is there no Body to attend me, no Body to help me, and the Apothecary's Man wiped the Spittle from his Mouth, he being too weak and saint to discharge it.

Mr. Small the Surgeon depos'd, he dressed the Deceased, that the Wound was half an Inch broad, and an Inch and a half backwards near the right Pap, and that Major Harrison desired him to take Care of him, and also ask'd the Deceased, if himself had not been the Cause of this, and he answered, ay, ay.

The Major in his Defence pleaded, that this unfortunate Accident had brought upon him a great deal of Grief and Concern, that the Deceased and himself were Brother Officers in the Garrison of Dunkirk, in the Year 1710. and both of them having an Inclination for Books, it had occasioned their contracting an intimate Acquaintance, which had been continued with the strictest Friendship ever since, that the Day the Accident happened, they had been together, and walking in Lincolns Inn, they bespoke a Rabbet, &c. for Supper, and having supped, were together till about 11 a-Clock, and going thro' Covent Garden heard there was a Fire, and not being willing to go home till they were satisfied how and where it was, they went to the Lubeck's Head, as had been before depos'd, that at the latter end of the first Flask, being in Discourse, the Deceased was drawing Parallels between the Roman and English Government, which he thinking carry'd in them Reflections on the latter, it gave him Occasion to oppase him in his Argument. Which put the Deceased out of Temper, but he giving him soft Language, had brought him to Temper again, as he thought, and they were very friendly; but after the bringing in of the second Bottle, the Captain return'd to his ill Temper, and wish'd there was a Case of Pistols in the Room, to which he reply'd, for what, he hoped not for them to use, to which he answered, since there was not, they should decide it another way, by the Sword, and drew it, he begged of him for God's sake to sorbear, but he grew violent, and push'd at him, whereupon he retreated as far as he could for the Wall, and having drawn his Sword, put himself into a Posture of Defence, and the Captain made a very violent push at him, which he happily put by, and believes at the same Time he ran upon his Sword, and received the Wound, for he did not know that he was wounded till he told him that he was, and that having disarm'd him, he immediately called for help, and took what care of him he could, sending for a Surgeon, and assisting him as well as he could.

Colonel Sinclare, and a great many Persons of Character appear'd to his Reputation, who gave him the Character of a peaceable, affable, inoffensive Gentleman; and some others, among which was a certain noble Lord, gave the Deceased the Character of a Person who was so apt to be tenacious of his Argument, when in Discourse, as to be impatient of Contradiction. Upon a full hearing of the Matter, the Jury acquitted him of all three Indictments, bringing in their Verdict, Se Defendendo .

Isaak Dearing , of the Parish of St. Dunstan's Stepney , was indicted for feloniously stealing 1300 Pound Weight of Iron , the Property of John Trueman , and Company , the 29th of April last. To which Indictment he pleaded guilty . Burnt in the Hand .

Joseph Sheppard , of the Parish of St. Martin in the Fields , was indicted for breaking the House of William Philips , and stealing divers Goods , the 14th of February last. But there not being sufficient Evidence against the Prisoner, he was acquitted .

He was also indicted a Second Time, of St. Clement Danes , for breaking the House of Mary Cook , the 9th of February last, and stealing divers Goods : But the Evidence against the Prisoner being deficient as to this Indictment also, he was acquitted .

He was also indicted the Third Time, of St. Mary Savoy , for breaking the House of Williams Kneebone , in the Night-Time, and stealing 118 Yards of Woollen Cloth , the 12th of June last. The Prosecutor depos'd, That the Prisoner had some Time since been his Servant , and when he went to Bed, the Time mention'd in the Indictment, about 11 a-Clock at Night, he saw all the Doors and Windows fast; but was call'd up about 4 in the Morning, and found his House broken open, the Bar of a Cellar-Window having been cut, and the Bolts of the Door that comes up Stairs drawn, and the Padlock wrench'd off, and his Shutter in the Shop broken, and his Goods gone; whereupon suspecting the Prisoner, he having committed ill Actions thereabouts before, he acquainted Jonathan Wild with it, and he procured him to be apprehended. That he went to the Prisoner in new prison, and asking how he could be so ungrateful to rob him, after he had shown him so much Kindness? The Prisoner owned he had been ungrateful in doing so, informing him of several Circumstances as to the Manner of Committing the Fact, but said he had been drawn into it by ill Company. Jonathan Wild depos'd, The Prosecutor came to him, and desir'd him to inquire after his Goods that had been stolen, telling him he suspected the Prisoner to have been concern'd in the Robbery, he having before committed some Robberies in the Neighbourhood. That inquiring after him, and having heard of him before, he was informed that he was an Acquaintance of Joseph Blake, alias Blueskin , and William Field : Whereupon he sent for William Field, who came to him; upon which he told him, If he would make an ingenuous Confession, he believ'd he could prevail with the Court to make him an Evidence. That he did make a Discovery of the Prisoner, upon which he was apprehended, and also of others since convicted, and gave an Account of some Parcels of the Cloth, which were found accordingly. William Field depos'd, That the Prisoner told him, and Joseph Blake, that he knew a Ken where they might get something of Worth: That they went to take a View of the Prosecutor's House, but disapprov'd of the Attempt, as not thinking it easy to be performed: But the Prisoner perswaded them that it might be easily done, he knowing the House, having liv'd with the Prosecutor. That thereupon he cut the Cellar Bar went into the Cellar, got into the Shop, and brought out three Parcels of Cloth, which they carried away. The Prisoner had also confest the Fact when he was apprehended, and before the Justice. The Fact being plainly prov'd, the Jury found him guilty of the Indictment. Death .

William Gouldstone , and John Thornycroft were indicted for a Misdemeanour in conspiring to defraud Sir James Thornhill , of 2001. But the Fact not being prov'd, the Jury acquitted them.

Joseph Oliver , was indicted for a Misdemeanour, in selling to Joseph Pangford , a false Prize York Lottery, Ticket, for 20 Guineas, knowing, it to have been falsified . It appear'd by the Evidence, That the Defendent, Joseph Oliver, was a Ticket Porter , who ply'd at Aldgate , and that he did sell a Ticket to Joseph Pangford for 20 Guineas, as a Prize, which Ticket, when it came to the Office to be checqued, did appear to have been (though a true Ticket) a Blank, the Number of which having originally been 1906, and was a Blank, was altered to 1908, which was a Prize. The Defendant Oliver call'd two of his Brother Porters to prove, That a Person appearing like a Gentleman just come out of the Country, with a lac'd Hat, Boots, and a Whip in his Hand call'd Porter, and they ran, but the Defendant being readiest at Hand, got the Jobb. That they saw him pull some Papers out of his Pocket, and give some to Oliver, and that he afterwards told them what the Jobb was. It also appear'd by a Broker in Court, That the Defendant Oliver brought the Ticket to him from such a Gentleman to sell; and that he not bargaining, it was afterwards told to the Complainant. So that it plainly appear'd, That the Porter was impos'd upon, and knew not any Thing of the falsifying, and that he was only imprudent in endorsing it to the Buyer, and parting with the Money to the Person who sent him, without taking an Account of who he was, and a Receipt. Upon which the Jury acquitted him.

The Trials being over, the Court proceeded to give Judgment as followeth, viz.

Received Sentence of Death, Six.

Stephen Fowles , Anthony Upton , Frances Sands, Joseph Ward , John Sheppard , Robert Colethorp .

Burnt in the Hand, Nine.

Mary Price , Edward Auden , Charles Welling , Edward Quin , Isaak Dearing, William Gay , John Heath , Nathaniel Webster , and Luke Tench . The Two last former Convicts.

To be Transported, Thirty One.

John Claxton , John Grimes , Elizabeth Francis , Mary Clark , John Heath, Mary Rainsberry , Miles Allison , Mary Garret , Elizabeth Candy , Durance Bun, Elizabeth Wakelin , Francis Wethevel , Hannah Jones , Ann Clay , John Fountain , Susanna Russel , Elizabeth Hutton , Christian Clark , Mary Cloak , Norris Hall, William Hall, Williams Mould, John Vanderburst , Samuel Hales , Philip Zeman , Edward Doe , Robert Cheeseman , Elizabeth Hardy , Mary Hermitage , William Jones , Alice Crofts .

John Mackfedre , Fined Twenty Marks, to saffer Twelve Months Imprisonment, and to find Security for his good Behaviour, for Three Years.

John Armstrong , and Mary Armstrong , Fined each Three Marks.

ADVERTISEMENTS.

Just publish'd, the Seventh Edition (with many Additions and Amendments) of

A Rational and Useful Account of the Venereal Disease, With Observations on the Nature, Symptoms, and Cure. and the ill Consequences that attend it by ill Management; with proper Admonitions; recommended as a Friendly Instruction to all Person who do, or may, labour under this misfortune. Also, A short Inquiry into Old Gleets, and other Weaknesses; and the Reason why they are so Seldom cured: With the Auther's Method of Cure. To which are added, Some Hints on the Practical Scheme. The Methods and Medicines therein exported, and the gross Impositions Justly detected: With an Account of Specisicks, the Use and Abuse of the Name, and how it covers Ignorance and a Cheat. By Joseph Cam , M.D. Printed for, and sold by G. Strahan, against the Royal Exchange, W. Means, without Temple-Bar, C.King, in Westmister-Hall, T. Norris on London-Bridge, J. Baker against Hatton-Garden in Holborn; and by the Author, at the Golden Ball and Lamp in Bow-Church-Yard, Chepside. Price 1 s.

A compleat List of all the Minters, who were cleared at Guilford, Kingston, Croydon and Ryegate, Amounting to above 6000 from all Parts of Great Britain and Ireland, with their Names, Trades, Towns and Countries, of their last Abode, Alphabetically done, for the more easy finding out any particular Person. Publish'd for a general Information to all Mankind. Price 1 s. Where may be had also, An Account of the Lives, Intreagues, and Comical Adventures of Rob Roy alias Robert Mac Gregor , Capt. Stanley, Sally Salisbury , alias Sarah Pridden , and near a hunred more, who have either dy'd in Newgate, or been executed for several Villanies and Murders committed by them: Wherein is contained a more full and true Account, than has been publish'd by the Ordinary, or any other. The Whole being not only very Diverting to read, but very Useful to preserve others from being impos'd upon by Sharpers. Price 1 s. Both printed for M. Hotham, at the Black-Boy on London-Bridge.

A Water that perfectly cures the Itch, or any Itching Humour, in a few Days, without Necessity of Purging, or the dangerous Use of Mercury, Price 1 s. 6 d. only is prepared and sold, by A. Downing, Chymist, at the Crown and Ball, in George Court, in St. John's-Lane, by Hicks's-Hall, near West-Smithfield. Where also may be had the best Spirits of Scurvy-Grass, by Wholesale or Retale, at S d. a Bottle. A most effectual Remedy for the violent Pain in the Teeth, Price 1 s. Also a most excellent Remedy for the Teeth, and clearing them from the Scurvy.

Youth's Introduction to Trade and Business: Containing, I. Tables of the most usual Clerk-like Contractions of Words: A Collection of English Words, alike in Sound, but different in Signification; with proper Directions how to address to Persons of elevated Rank, and those in Office. II. Acquittances and Promissory Notes diversify'd, and adapted to such Circumstances as occur in real Business. III. Variety of Bills of Parcels, and Bills on Book Debts, to enter the Learner in the Manner and Methods of Commerce, and to make him ready at Computation. IV. Bills of Exchange, with Directions necessary for the right Understanding and Management of Remittances; several Orders for Goods, Letters of Credit, Invoyces, and other Merchant-like Examples. V. Authentick Forms of such Law-Precedents as are most frequently to be met with, in the Course of Traffick. VI. A Collection of Questions to exemplify the common Rules of Arithmetick, and to reduce them to Practice. For the Use of Schools. Done upon the Plan of the late Col. Ayre 's Essay. By M. Clare, School-Master in Soho-Square, London.

Miscellaneous Essays, viz. 1. Of Company and Conversation 2. Of Solitatiness and Retirement. 3. Of Nobility 4. Of Contentment. 5. Of Women. 6. Of the Knowledge of God, and against Atheison. 7. Of Religion. 8. Of Kings, Princes, and the Education of a Prince. 9. Of Greatness of Mind. 10. Of the Education of Children 11. Of Law. 12. Of Man. 13. Of Old Age. With the Life and Conversion of St. Mary Magdalen, and some Reflections upon the Conversion of the good Thief; also, the Life and Conversion of St. Paul. By Sir Richard Bulstrode , Knt. Envoy at the Court of Brussels, from King Charles II . and King James II . Publish'd, with a Preface, by his Son Whitlock Bulstrode, Esq; The Second Edition. Both Printed for Edward Symon , at the Corner of Pope's Head Alley, in Cornhill.