Old Bailey Proceedings Online (www.oldbaileyonline.org, version 6.0, 19 December 2014), December 1723 (17231204).

Old Bailey Proceedings, 4th December 1723.

THE PROCEEDINGS ON THE KING'S Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Goal-Delivery FOR THE CITY Of LONDON, and COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX HELD AT JUSTICE HALL, in the OLD BAILEY

During, the MAYOR

Rt. Honble Sir Peter Deline , Knight.

LORD-MAYOR of the CITY of LONDON.

In the 10th Year of His MAJESTY's Reign.

1724.

LONDON:

Printed for J. Humphreys, in Bartholomew Lane, behind the Royal Exchange; and Corner of Pope's Head Alley Cornhill.

THE PROCEEDINGS ON THE KING's Commission of the Peace, AND

Oyer and Terminer, and Goal-Delivery of Newgate, held for the CITY of London and COUNTY of Middlesex, at Justice Hall in the Old Bailey,

On Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, Saturday, and Thursday, being the 4th, 5th, 6th, 7th, and 12th of December, in the Tenth Year of His MAJESTY's Reign,

BEFORE the Right Honourable Sir PETER DELME , Kt. Lord Mayor of the City of London; the Lord chief Justice King, Mr. Baron Page , John Raby , Esq; Deputy Recorder; and several of His Majesty's Justices of the Peace for the City of London and Country of Middlesex.

The JURORS were as followeth.

The London Jury.

Daniel Lock ,

William Withers ,

John Snee ,

William Hatton ,

Roger Street ,

Daniel Hudson ,

Thomas Forfeit ,

Joseph Bailey ,

William King ,

Richard Hicks ,

Joseph Masters ,

Thomas Martin ,

The Middlesex Jury.

Thomas Whiteing ,

William Whitehurst ,

John Brooks ,

Thomas Bates ,

John Walker ,

Charles Fairchild ,

John Becket ,

John Stringer ,

Edward Percival ,

William Ashman ,

Jonathan Katlin ,

Richard Mills .

The Proceedings were as followeth, viz.

Letitia, alias Letice Hopkins , of the Parish of St. Buttolph Bishopsgate , was indicted for feloniously stealing a pair of Bodice, Stomacher, and other Things, value 12 s. and 6 d , the Property of Deborah Waters , the 16th of November last. It appear'd by the Evidence, That the Prisoner was Servant to the Prosecutor when she stole the Goods, and the Prisoner having nothing to say in her own Defence, the Jury found her guilty to the Value of 10 d. Transportation .

Edward Gunnis , of the Parish of St. Dunstan in the West , was indicted for privately stealing a Silk Handkerchief, value 2 s. and 6 d. from the Person of John Philips Esquire , the 26th of November last. The Fact was plainly prov'd, and the Prisoner had meeting no say in his own Defence, but That he took it off from the Ground. Which Pretence not agreeing with the Evidence for the King, the Jury found him guilty to the Value of 10 d. Transportation .

David Bathey , of the Parish of St. James Westminster , was indicted for the Murther of Thomas Ansloe , the 29th of October last. He was also indicted a second Time upon the Coroner's Inquest for the same Murther. Moses Cornelius depos'd, That he and some other Company were, on the 29th of October, drinking at the Peacock Ale-house in Duke-street , near King-street in Westminster. That Thomas Ansloe, the deceased, went out, and he, this Evidence, and another, went out to make Water, and they saw the deceased standing as they supposed, making Water; and saw a Soldier and a Woman, or the Devil like a Woman, and he heard the Deceas'd say to the Soldier, Do not make any Disturbance. Do you know who I am? I am Colonel Scot's Man. That he perceiv'd him to cut at him; the Deceased was thrown on the Ground, and the Soldier upon him. He and another took him off from the Deceased, and he went over the Kennel and drew his Sword. That they help'd up the Deceased, and he went also toward the Prisoner, who cut at him; and, that he endeavouring to take him, he struck him three Times with his Sword, but did not cut him. That the Deceased bidding them secure him, he was mortally wounded, he threatened if any Body went to take his Sword from him, he had Pistols in his Pocket and would shoot them. The Speaker's Coachman coming up, he, this Evidence, and another, struck up his Heels, and so they apprehended him. Finding the Deceased to be wounded, he wash'd his Wound with Brandy, sent for a Surgeon; he sat up with him; he was ever after very restless, could not lie in his Bed, and died about Forty five Hours after. Samuel Friborn depos'd much to the same Purpose. The Constable depos'd That when he was brought to Watch-house he was very drunk and outragious . Two Watchmen deposed, That hearing the Watch called, they went, found the Prisoner apprehended; and as they were carrying him to the Watch-house his Breeches either were by him let down, or broke and fell down; and he desiring them to let go his Hands, that he might put them up, they did; and having his Hands at liberty he knock'd one of them down, but was presently secured. The Surgeon deposed, That he being sent for to dress the Deceased, found the Wound, as he thought, but a slight Wound, and that it was above the Groin; against the Hip-bone, about an Inch and half deep. That he thought it was not the Cause of his Death; but he was much bruised, and that the next Day he found he had been restless all Night and uneasy. And another Surgeon being sent by Colonel Scot , they gave him a Glister, which did not go through him, and he perceived some Tokens of Convulsions upon him; and he died the next Day. The Prisoner called some Witnesses in his behalf, but they saying nothing in Contradiction to the King's Evidence, the Jury, after a full hearing of the Matter, found him guilty of Manslaughter . Burnt in the Hand .

John Wicks , of the Parish of St. James Westminster , was indicted for the Murther of Francis Edwards , by giving him one mortal Wound with a Sword, near the right Pap, of the Breadth of half an Inch, and the Depth of five Inches, the 25th of November last, of which he languished to the 26th, and then died . He was also indicted a second Time upon the Coroners Inquest for the same. William Greenfield deposed, As he was going through the Privy Garden between 12 and 1 a Clock, he was told by a Boy, That there were in such a Place, near the Duke of Richmond'd House, two Men a fighting. That thereupon he made up to them, and seeing them with their Swords drawn, making Passes at one another, and, that the Deceased made two or three Passes at the Prisoner; he called to them, saying, What are you doing? Have you a mind to be hang'd? That upon this the Prisoner dropp'd his Sword, seeming willing to desist. That then he went to the Deceased, and desired him to desist, asking him, If he had a mind to be hang'd? To which he answered, No; and desired that they might be let alone to fight it out. But he getting behind him, endeavouring to secure him from doing Mischief, he let his Sword fall, and it was taken up by the Prisoner, who returned it to the Deceased, and he put it up himself. And as they were carrying them to the Guard, the Deceased desired him, and other Persons that were there, to take Notice, if any Mischief came of it, that he forc'd the Prisoner to it. Mr. Wellbeloved deposed, That as he was Passing through the Privy Garden, being told that there were two Men a fighting, he went, and saw the Deceased stand leaning against a Wall, and bloody, and the Prisoner having the Deceased's Sword in his Hand; and the Deceased said, D - n you, give me my Sword. That he, this Evidence, bid the Prisoner not give him the Sword, lest he should do him some Mischief. That the Prisoner told him he would give him his Sword, if he would let him put it up for him. But the Deceased said, D - n him, he would put it up himself; and he did return him his Sword, but with great Caution, and he put it up. And as they were going away he turned back, and said to the People there, That they had quarrelled, and only went out to Box and that if any Mischief came of it, he forgave the Prisoner, for he forc'd him to it. And, that having gone fifty or sixty Yards he fell down. The Surgeon depos'd, That he going by at the same Time, went home with the Deceas'd, which was not far off, and search'd and dressed his Wound, which he found had penetrated below the left Pap about five Inches, into the Liver, and he believed to the Diaphragma, which he suppos'd was the Cause of his Death. And he died in about 28 Hours. The Prisoner pleaded, They having been drinking together, the Deceased, pack'd a Quarrel with him, and challeng'd him out to Box, and when they came to the Place he drew his Sword, and swore he would stick him if he did not draw. He also called some Persons to his Reputation, who gave him the Character of a quiet, peaceable Person. And the Prisoner likewise pleaded, That the Deceased was a quarrelsome Person, and had before Killed two Men: and for one of the Facts had been tried at the Old Bailey. The Jury, after a full hearing, found him guilty of Manslaughter . Burnt in the Hand .

Mary Thorn , of the Parish of St. Martins in the Fields , was indicted for feloniously stealing a Silver Salt, value 12 s. in the Dwelling House of Mary Ely , the 19th of September last. The Fact not being prov'd to the Satisfaction of the Jury they acquitted her.

Gratian Misson , of the Parish of St. Leonard Shoreditch , was indicted for feloniously stealing a Night-Gown, value 20 s. four Shirts, value 12 s. the Property of George Ransey , the 19th of October last. The Prosecutor depos'd, He saw the Prisoner come into the Garden and take the Clothes off from the Line, and carry them away. That thereupon he pursued him, and he threw down the Clothes, but was taken by two other Men, when he had ran as far as Hoxton Market-House. The two other Evidences confirmed their apprehending the Prisoner upon the Prosecutor's Out-cry. And the Prisoner having nothing Material to say in his Behalf, the Jury found him guilty of the Indictment. Transportation .

Henry Johnson , of the Parish of St. Buttolph Bishopsgate , was indicted for feloniously stealing three Guineas and a half, the Property of Edmund Banner , and some Linnen, &c . the 12th of November last. The Prosecutor deposed, He kept the Prisoner as a Servant to go of Errands, he being a Cheesemonger , and, that he had taken the Money at several Times out of his Till, as he confess'd upon Examination, the Money being found in the Knees of his Breeches in a Green Purse, which he took out of his Breeches himself, and own'd, that he had taken it out with bits of Sticks, Wax, and some such sticking Things, that he had been taking it out about six Weeks. This was confirmed by two other Evidences, and the Prisoner himself not denying the Fact at the Bar, the Jury found him guilty to the value of 39 s. Transportation .

Mary Jarvis , Wife of Moses Jarvis , of the Parish of St. Buttolph Bishopsgate , was indicted for feloniously stealing a Bolster, and other Goods, value 16 s. in the Dwelling House of Thomasin Nichols , the 6th of November last. It appeared by the Evidence. That the Prisoner lodg'd with the Prosecutor, and took the Opportunity to take the Goods out of her Lodging and pawned them. The Prisoner had own'd the Fact before the Justice but pretended at the Bar, That the Prosecutor went with her to pawn them. But this being deny'd by the Prosecutor; and the Fact being sufficiently proved, the Jury found her guilty to the Value of 10 d. Transportation .

Joseph Glade , of the Parish of St. Brides , was indicted for privately stealing a Silk Handkerchief, value 1 s. from the Person of Daniel Vincent , the 7th of November last. The Prosecutor depos'd, That as he was passing along Fleetstreet , the Prisoner and one Dickinson were sculking about, and while he laid his Hands on the other to make his way, he felt his Handkerchief to be taken out of his Pocket, and turning short on the Prisoner, took him with the Handkerchief in his Hand. The Fact being plainly prov'd, the Jury found him guilty to the Value of 10 d. Transportation .

Isabel Nesby , Wife of - Nesby , of the Parish of St. Giles Cripplegate , was indicted for feloniously stealing a gold Chain and Locket, value 6 l. the Property of Elizabeth Scoffin , in the Dwelling House of William Cooper , the 11th October last. The Prosecutor depos'd, That she having before changed Things for Earthen Ware, she call'd her in to change some Things, and when she came in her Chain lay in the Window. That she shut the Door after her when she came in, and went in call to her to bring down the Things she design'd to change, and perceived the Prisoner to make towards the Window where the Chain lay, and saw her thrust something down in her Stocking, but had no Thought of her Chain, till the Prisoner being for going away on a sudden, under Pretence of buying another Bargain, said she would call again in half an Hour, and went away; and in a little Time after she miss'd the Chain, that the Prisoner never came again according to her Word; and that the Chain was in the Window when she let her in, and there had been no Body in the House but her Father, Mother and her self, before the Prisoner came in, nor till after the Chain was missing. Another Evidence confirm'd her being at the Prosecutor's House the Day the Chain was lost, that she saw her go in, that she knew her, and had before dealt with her in changing Things. The Prisoner deny'd the Fact, or having been that day at the Prosecutor's House, and call'd two Evidences to prove it. Mary Waymouth depos'd, That the Prisoner lodg'd in the same House with her, and she had been taken sick on the Monday before, and had kept her Bed, and came to her into her Room on Friday, the Day laid in the Indictment, and was not out that Day. Another Evidence depos'd That she was sick all that Week. The Prosecutor and another Evidence depos'd, That tho' the Prisoner upon her being apprehended, deny'd her ever having been at the Prosecutor's House, afterwards own'd that she had been there once, and chang'd for some Curtains. They also depos'd, That upon this Acknowledgement, the Prisoner's Husband said to her, Huzzy, dont you speak a Word more: And also, that whereas the Prisoner's Evidence had sworn, and the prisoner pleaded that she was not out of Doors from Monday till Friday, yet the Prisoner had acknowledg'd that she was abroad on the Thursday, the Day before the Friday the Fact was Committed. This the prisoner deny'd, that it was that Thursday before the Fact was commited, but the Thursday in the Week before. The Prisoner also call'd some Persons to her Reputation. The Jury acquitted her.

Nicholas Whitehorn , of the Parish of St. Paul Shadwell was indicted for feloniously stealing divers Linnen, value 13 s. the Goods of Thomas Shepherd , the 18th of October last. It appear'd by the Evidence, that the Linnen was hang'd up to dry in the Prosecutor's Yard, and were stolen. The Constable and Watchman depos'd, That about 12 a Clock at Night, the Prisoner with three more, were going along Penitent Street, and the Prisoner having a Bundle of Linnen between wet and dry, which he could give no Account of, they secur'd him, and having cry'd the Clothes, they were own'd by the Prosecutor: That the other three that were with the Prisoner ran away. The Prisoner pleaded, That as he was going, along, he stumbled over the Bundle, and took it up. The Jury found him guilty to the value of 4 s. 10 d. Transportation .

Ann Gadbury and Mary Griffith , of the Parish of St. Margaret Westminster , were indicted for feloniously stealing a silk Mantle, value 20 s. 4 Pair of silk Gloves, value 10 s. 2 Guineas, and 8 s. 6 d. in Money, and other Goods, in the Dwelling House of Richard Guest , on the 16th of October last. The Prosecutor depos'd, That the Prisoner Ann Gadbury had nurs'd his Wife, and having been discharg'd and paid, she came afterwards, and took the Things mentioned in the Indictment. And Part of the Goods were afterwards taken upon the Prisoners, when they were apprehended. Another Evidence depos'd, That at their Apprehension, they had on each a suit of the Prosecutor's Headclothes, and other Goods were found in their Lodgings, which Gadbury own'd were the Prosecutor's. There not being Evidence sufficient to affect Mary Griffith, the Jury acquitted her, but found Ann Gadbury guilty to the value of 4 s. 10 d. Transportation .

Edward Rolph , of the Parish of Hillenden , was indicted together with Henry Man , not yet taken, for assaulting Mary Forster , Spinster , putting her in fear of her Life, and stealing 40 s. in Money, in the Dwelling House of Ambrose Forster , the 10th of November last. Mary Forster depos'd, That the Prisoner and Henry Man came in Mr. Forther's House to drink, and treated an old Man, who was drinking there, very rudely, thrust him out of Doors, roll'd him in the Dirt, and Rolph took a red hot Poker, threatning to burn him in the Cheek, and drove him a Quarter of a Mile from the House, then came back, and after they had drank Hot Pots the Prisoner went away, and left the Reckoning unpaid; that thereupon Man ask'd her several Times to change a Guinea, and telling her, he otherwise could not pay the Reckoning; she delay'd to go up to change it, till Man went out, then taking an Opportunity, went up Stairs, and had told out Silver for a Guinea, when Henry Man, to her great Surprize, came behind her, and threw her upon the Bed, was very rude with her, that she had put the Silver into her Bosom, but had yet the Bag in her Hand, in which there was the rest of the Money, out of which she had taken the Change of the Guinea, in which there was as she thought near 5 l. that he took it from her; she made shift to get off from the Bed, and was going down Stairs, but he stopp'd her, and would have thrown her on the Bed again, but she holding by the Posts kept her self from being thrown down again; so Henry Man went down, and as she follow'd down Stairs, offer'd Rudeness to her, and went away, carried away the Money, and has never appear'd since so as that he could be apprehended. Upon the whole, there being no Proof that the Prisoner Rolph was concern'd in the Commission of the Fact, he was acquitted .

John Hankey , of the Parish of Edmonton , was indicted for feloniously stealing a Saddle value 20 s. the Property of, and in the Stable of Jarvis Moor , the 29th of September last. It appear'd by the Evidence, That the Saddle was stolen out of the Prosecutor's Stable, and that it was bought of the Prisoner, who said, that it had been given him by one Mr. Moor, in Gratification for a Buck that he had killed, and presented to him. The Prisoner pleaded, He took the Saddle off from a Common. The Fact being plainly prov'd, the Jury found him guilty to the value of 4 s. 10 d. Transportation .

William Beck , of the Parish of St. Dunstan Stepney , was indicted for feloniously stealing a Hand-Saw, value 6 s. the Property of Charles Yates , on the 29th of November last. It appear'd by the Evidence, the Saw was stolen out of some Buildings, where the Prosecutor was at Work, and was found where the Prisoner had sold it. The Jury found him guilty of the Indictment. Transportation .

John Coke , of the Precinct of the Savoy , was indicted for feloniously stealing a Cock and 9 Hens, value 10 s. and a Coney, value 6 d. the Property of Sarah and Alice Nut , the 21st of November last. It appear'd by the Evidence, that the Fowls were stolen out of an Out-House, where they roosted, and that the Prisoner was apprehended by a Watchman, with the Fowls all kill'd. The Prisoner pretended he met a Man with these Fowls upon his Shoulder, and he asked 8 s. for them, and he bought them of the Man for 6 s. 6 d. The Jury found him guilty to the value of 4 s. 10 d. Transportation .

Archibald Oliver , of the Parish of St. Margaret Westminster , was indicted for feloniously stealing a Pair of Stays value 10 s. the Property of James Thomson , the 17th of October last. He was also indicted a second Time, for feloniously stealing a brass Pot, value 6 s. and other Goods , of Thomas Swan , the 18th of October last, He was also indicted a third Time, for feloniously stealing a copper Sauce-Pan, and other Goods , the Property of Thomas Mason , the 18th of October last. The Facts were plainly prov'd, and the Prisoner having nothing to say in his own Defence, but that one Kennedy put him upon getting what Things he could, and he would buy them of him, and these Goods he was to get any Way that he could, and that when Kennedy bought them of him he knew that they were stolen. The Jury found him guilty to the value of 10 d. on each Indictment. Transportation .

Elizabeth Saunders , Wife of Charles Saunders , of the Parish of St. Giles in the Fields , was indicted for feloniously stealing Bed Curtains, and other Goods, value 15 s. the Property of Edward Hattam , and Lace value 5 s. the Property of Ann Ball , the 3d of November last. It appear'd by the Evidence, That the Prisoner lodg'd in the Prosecutor's House, and the Things were taken out of the Apartment. There was not sufficient Evidence to prove that the stole the Goods, the Jury acquitted her.

Elizabeth, Wife of Thomas Bushel , of the Parish of St. Giles in the Fields , was indicted for feloniously stealing a Silver Tankard, value 5 l. and some other Goods, and Money, in the Dwelling-House of Timothy Collins , the 17th of November last. The Prosecutor depos'd, That the Prisoner and her Husband lodging in his House, she pretended that her Husband and she had had some Difference, and therefore depos'd him to let her be in his Room, for fear of being murder'd by her Husband; that he did give her leave, and went to Bed, and in the interim, he being asleep, his Servant stopp'd her with the Tankard and Money. The Prosecutor's Servant depos'd, That she being call'd up when her Master was in the Bed, she met the Prisoner coming down Stairs, with the Tankard and Money in a Trunk, and the Keys in her Pocket, and said she would carry it away, for that the Prosecutor had given it her. The Watchman depos'd, that he being call'd, found the Trunk by her which she had brought down, in which was the Tankard, and that she said the Prosecutor had given it her. Another Watchman depos'd, That after she was brought to the Watch-House, she was search'd, tho' she said she had no Money, they found 9 s. and half Pence. &c. about her. The Prisoner pleaded, That the Prosecutor having pretended to lose a Sauce Pan, he made them pay 5 s. for the Sauce Pan, which occasioning some difference between her and her Husband, he bid her go into his Room and sleep in the Great Chair; and that the Prosecutor came in and began to be rude with her, would have her come to Bed, and threw some Money into her Bosom, but as to the Trunk and the Tankard, &c. she knew nothing of them, and she had not meddled with them. The Jury considering the Matter found her guilty to the Value of 39 s. Transportation .

Thomas Reed , of the Parish of Stepney , was indicted for feloniously stealing two hair Coal Sacks, value 6 s. the Property of Will. Irenonger , the 5th of November last. The Prosecutor depos'd, The Prisoner was a Bum-boat-Man , and took the Sacks off from the Wharf, and put them into his Boat, but he look'd upon him as a craz'd Man. Upon Consideration that he was accounted non Compos Mentis, and therefore could not in Law be guilty of Felony, the Jury acquitted him .

John Farquhar , of St. James's Westminster , was indicted for privately stealing a Pair of shoes, value 3 s. a Shirt, value 2 s. and two Guineas in Monday, the Property of Edward Burgess , in the House of Charles Porter , the 27th of November last. It appear'd by the Evidence, That the Prisoner and the Prosecutor lay together in the same Room, and the Prosecutor getting up in the Morning left the Prisoner in Bed, and when he came home at Night the Clothes and Money were gone; and at the Tune of his being apprehended he had the Linnen, and the Purse in which the Money was, wrapp'd up in a Bundle. The finding the Goods upon him was confirm'd by the Constable, but the Prisoner would give no Account how he came by them. The finding the Goods upon the Prisoner was further confirmed by Mr. Porter; and, that the Purse was taken up under his Chair, where he sat; and, that he said afterwards, if the Prosecutor would not hang him, he should have the Clothes he had bought with his Money, and he would pay him weekly to make him Satisfaction as to the Remainder. This was confirm'd by another Evidence. The Prisoner deny'd the Fact, but he having little else to say in his own Defence, the Jury found him guilty to the Value of 39 s. Transportation .

Mary Little-John , of the Parish of St. Giles Cripplegate , was indicted for feloniously stealing a Frock, value 1 s. a stuff Coat, value 20 s. and other Goods , the Property of Ralph Mansel , the 28th of September last. It appeared by the Evidence, That the Prisoner was Servant to the Prosecutor, and the Clothes were seen in the Parlour that Morning, and she went out, and after her coming in the Clothes were missing, and there had no body else been there. That after enquiring where she had liv'd, he had a bad Character of her, as a dishonest Person. But none of the Goods being found upon her, the Jury acquitted her.

Mary Ellar , of the Parish of St. Sepulchres , was indicted for privately stealing a Silver Tankard, value 6 l. in the Dwelling House of Charles Bass , the 16th of November last. The Prosecutor depos'd, That the Prisoner came into his House to sell Oysters ; and some Men being drinking, one of them gave her the Tankard to drink, and she carried it away; and, that he afterwards was told, that she offered it to Sale. Another Evidence depos'd, That she confess'd she took the Tankard, and pawned it for three Pounds. Her Examination was read in Court, wherein she confess'd, That a Man a drinking at the Prosecutor's House gave her the Tankard to pawn, and she pawn'd it for 3 l. and gave the Man 12 s. and he was to come on the Monday to have a further Share of the Money, but she never saw him since. After a full hearing the Jury found her guilty to the Value of 39 s. Transportation .

Margaret Hall , of St. Andrew Holbourn , was indicted for feloniously stealing a Quilt and Blanket, value 10 s. the Property of George Fisher , the 3d of this present December . It appear'd by the Evidence, That the Prisoner lodg'd in the Prosecutor's House, and took the Goods and pawn'd them. She having nothing to say in her Defence, but that the Prosecutor lent her them to pawn, but could not prove it, the Jury found her guilty to the Value of 10 d. Transportation .

Ann Goodwin , of Queen Hithe , was indicted for feloniously stealing four Aprons, value 6 s. the Goods of Walter Partridge , and divers other Goods of other Persons, in the Dwelling House of Walter Partridge , the 7th of October last. It appear'd by the Evidence, That the Prisoner was Servant to the Prosecutor, and stole the Goods and went away. The Fact being plainly prov'd, the Jury found her guilty to the Value of 10 d. Burnt in the Hand .

Jane Martin , alias Turner , of the Parish of St. Giles Cripplegate , was indicted for feloniously stealing a Silver Cup, value 50 s. in the Shop of John Johnson , the 5th of December, 1722 . The Prosecutor's Wife depos'd, That the Prisoner once came and pawn'd a Ring to her, and came and redeemed it. Afterwards came again, and said, Her Husband was in danger of Trouble, and brought two Bundles, which she said were two pieces of Holland, worth 12 l. and borrow'd a Guinea and a half; and at that Time pretended to buy a Cup for an antient Gentlewoman, and she showing her one, the Prisoner told her, that she was a Milliner, kept a Shop in Bow-Lane, and she was to send the Cup there. After the Prisoner was gone she presently missed the Cup, and going to enquire for her, she could not hear of any such Person; and coming home again examined the Bundles, and found they were nothing but Rags made up artificially, with Tickets with Strings like Pieces of Holland. That she could not hear of her till lately, that she heard she was taken up and sent to New Prison for another Fact. The Prisoner pleaded, She had the Cup delivered to her by the Prosecutor with a bill of Parcels, so that it was no more than a Debt. But this was contradicted by the Prosecutor and her Maid; and she calling none to her Reputation, the Jury found her guilty of the Indictment. Death .

She was indicted a second Time for a Misdemeanor, for intending to defraud Robert Vokins of a parcel of Callimanco, containing 35 Yards, value 45 s. by leaving in pawn a parcel of Rags of no Value . The Prosecutor depos'd, That the Prisoner came, and pretended that she was recommended by one of her Customers, and she wanted Crape for to serve a Funeral for a Gentlewoman, that was come out of the Country to a Brother who was dead, and this was to be sent the next Day. At the same Time she had two Bundles, which she said was Holland, and show'd her the Ends of some Cloth in the Bundles, and said she wanted some Callimanco upon her own Account, and fixed upon a Piece of Callimanco, and pretended to carry it to a Coat-Makers to know how much would make the Coats; and after a faint of pulling a Canvass Bag half way out of her Bosom, said she was a bad Walker, and therefore would leave the two Pieces of Holland in pawn for it while she came back. That she went away, and she suspected nothing till she had reason for it, upon Notice given her by one John Gray , a Constable, who stopp'd her upon Suspicion of her being a Shop-lifter, seeing her making away with the Piece of Callimanco in a hurry. This Evidence confirm'd the Manner of her Apprehension, and gave Notice to, the Prosecutor. The Fact being plainly prov'd, the Jury Found her guilty of this Indictment.

John Ward , of Great Stanmore , was indicted for feloniously setting Fire to a Barn of Hezekiah Burr , fill'd with Hay, Corn, &c. the 18th of October last. The Prosecutor depos'd, his Barn was burned, with Hay, Corn, Peas, and Beans, and also five Horses were destroyed. Ann Cockburn deposed, That the Prisoner came into the Kitchin in the Evenings, and took out a Watch Light and a Quarter of an Hour after he came and fetch'd a Match, and went out into the Garden where the Barn stood adjoining; and she having occasion to go into the Yard soon after, saw the Barn all in a blaze, and the Prisoner was near it, saw it, and told no body of it. And, that the People seeing the Fire call'd to him, saying to him, Why do not you open the Gates, the Barn is on Fire? That he reply'd, he knew it, and did not open the Gates, but they were broken open Another Evidence confirm'd his not opening the Gate. tho'he had the Keys in his Pocket, which he should not have had, not used to be in the House; and, that he perceived a Hole new broke in the Barn that Day, and the Prisoner was smoking a Pipe near the Place. Another Evidence deposed. That he was in the Inside when the Barn was burning. and had the Keys of the Gate in his Pocket. And three Evidences deposed, he was there, and seemed unconcerned. And one deposed, That when he asked him if he would not help, he walked away and said nothing. The Maid deposed, That there had been some Words between her Mistress and the Prisoner about his staying on an Errand too long, and about a Shilling, and the Prisoner said, D - n her and her Shilling too. One Evidence deposed, That he afterwards said, he could have sav'd the Horses, if he had a Mind to it. The Prisoner deny'd the Fact, and as to the fetching the Candle. It was to light a Fire in the Copper; and as to the fetchings the Match, he fetch'd that because the Candle went out; and that he never had a Word of Difference with Mr. Bar the Owner of the Barn; that as so the Maid, she and he could never agree; that he was a Stranger in the Town, and they were all against him. The Jury acquitted him.

Susannah Tailor , of the Parish of St. Giles in the Fields , was indicted for feloniously stealing 6 s in the Dwelling House of Susannah Wright , the 27th of September last. There not being sufficient Proof against the Prisoner, she was acquitted .

Katherine Gibson , alias Wright , of the Parish of White Chapple , was indicted for feloniously stealing 19 Guineas and a half, in the Dwelling House of Richard Kendal , the 10th of September last. The Prosecutor depos'd the Prisoner was a Lodger in his House, and was the only Person that knew of the money, and that he did not suspect her, till she and her pretended Husband sell out, and then he turn'd her out, and afterwards looking for the Money, (which was laid up for his Wife's Children) he found the 19 Guineas and a half wanting. The Prisoner deny'd the Fact, and said that the Prosecutor told her, that after the losing the Money, he went to a cunning Man, at the Golden Ball in Ratcliff High Way, and he had told him that a brown Woman had it, and it must be she; and that the Cunning Man told him, that the Money was not yet dispos'd of, and thereupon he told her, if she would own it, and give him the Money, he would take no farther Notice of it. After a full hearing of the Matter the Jury acquitted her.

Elizabeth Barrel , of the Precinct of St. Katherine , was indicted for feloniously stealing 3 Shirts, value 10 s. a Wastcoat value 10 s. the Goods of Peter Drake ; and divers other Goods, value 45 s. the Property of Thomas Wood , the 25th of November last. Mrs. Wood depos'd, That the Prisoner being her Acquaintance, came to see her at her House at Lambeth , and lay there that Night, but she went away unknown to her, the next Morning, and the Goods were missing: and upon her being apprehended, the Goods were found in the Prisoner's Lodgings, she directing the officer where to find them. The Prisoner pretended, the Prosecutor lent her the Things to pawn, she being under some Necessity, to prevent her from coming into Trouble. The Jury found her guilty to the value of 4 s. 10 d. Burnt in the Hand .

Elizabeth Mansfield , of the Precinct of St. Katherine , was indicted for feloniously stealing divers wearing Apparel, value 3 l. the Goods of Mary Humphreys , the 28th of October last. It appear'd by the Evidence, That the Prosecutor being abroad, the Things were stolen, and found upon the Prisoner, who was a Girl that was entertain'd and lodg'd in the House, and had often been charitably reliev'd with Victuals. The Prisoner pleaded, The Goods were lent her by the Prosecutor, but she not making this appear, the Jury found her guilty to the value of 10 d. Transportation .

Thomas Saunders , of St. Giles's Cripplegate , was indicted for feloniously stealing, 14 Board Pieces of Gold, 26 Guineas, and 10 l. in Silver, a Silver Porringer, Spoons, and other Goods , the Goods of Robert Wheeler , the 19th of July last. The Prosecutor depos'd, That the Prisoner was a Lodger in his House, and he being abroad, and his Wi fe and the Prisoner's Wife being gone out, about the Prisoner's Business, they left the Prisoner at House, and in the Interim, the Money, &c. were taken away. The Prosecutor's Wife depos'd, That when they went out, she double lock'd the Door, and as they were going along, she was under Apprehension of some Mischief, and said to his Wife, I wish while we are gone, the Rogue your Husband does not rob me; to which the Prisoner's Wise replied, That tho' the Prisoner had said, he had been as great a Rogue, and deserv'd Hanging as well as any Body had done, and had escap'd it, yet he had several Times said, he would never do such a Thing so near home. That when she came home, she found her Door broken open, and her Box, and all her Things broken and thrown about, and all that they had been working for all their Life, to keep them when they were old, taken away; and that the Prisoners's Daughter said, an Awl and some Things that she found in their Room, were her Father's; and that he absconded ever since. Two Evidences depos'd, That when they apprehended him, which was at an Ale-House, the Fox and Goose in Bunhill Fields, they asked him, what made him come there to be hang'd? And he reply'd, that he could not help it, for he had never been easy in his Mind since he had done it. And asking him what he had done with the Money, he said he had lost it next Day by a Whore, and as for the Prosecutor's Hat, he lost on Board a Ship, it falling over Board. Another Evidence depos'd, That he knew the Prisoner to have the Awl that was found in the Prosecutor's Lodgings, after the Fact was done, on Board of Ship. and also the Sheath of the Knife, they being Ship Mates. He likewise depos'd, That after the Commission of the Fact, he met the Prisoner at Graves End, and ask'd him what he had done about his Landlord's Business, and that the Prisoner answer'd him, he had made it up, having made two Trips to France, and run Brandy, and had paid them 40 l. at two Payments, 20 l. at a Time. The Jury found him guilty of the Indictment. Death .

John Harrington , of the Parish of Stepney , was indicted for Assaulting James Low , near the High Way, and taking from him a Peruke, value 30 s. 10 s. in Money, and other Goods , the 10th of March last. The Prosecutor depos'd That he being at the Grey Hound Ale-House at Mile-End, about 10 or 11 a Clock at Night, and being coming to London, the Prisoner said he was going that Way, and would go along with him, and he going to ease himself, he knock'd him down, and took his Things from him, - Danbury depos'd, That he saw the Prosecutor down, and the Prisoner helping him up, he bid him come away, but he said he would not leave him yet, and a little after the Prosecutor came to the Turn-pike, and had lost his Wig, and said the Prisoner had robb'd him. The Prisoner deny'd the Fact, he call'd several Persons to his Reputation. The Jury found him guilty of the Indictment. Death .

William Cryer , of St. Martins in the Fields , was indicted for stealing a Hundred Faggots, value 13 s. the Goods of John Perkinson , 3d of this Instant December . The Fact being plainly proved, the Jury found him guilty of the Indictment Transportation .

Thomas Edge , of St. John Hackney , was indicted for breaking the House of John Chandler in the Day Time, and stealing 2 Shirts and Shifts, value 10 s. the 15th of November last. The Prosecutor's Daughter depos'd, That she having lock'd the Door while she went on an Errand, when she came back, she saw the Prisoner coming out at the Door. And it appear'd by other Evidences, that he was pursu'd, and the Goods taken upon him. The Prisoner produc'd an Evidence, who depos'd, She saw one stoop and take up a Bundle in the Fields, on the Day mentioned in the Indictment, he also call'd several to his Reputation. The Jury found him guilty to the value of 10 d Transportation .

Rebecca Pearse , of the Parish of Shoreditch , was indicted for feloniously stealing a Pair of Bellows, value 6 d. and a Poker, value 4 d. in the Dwelling-House of Hannah Humphreys , the 29th of November last. The Fact being plainly prov'd, the Jury found her guilty to the value of 10 d. Whipping .

Eleanor Ware alias Thorn , of the Parish of St. Giles in the Fields , was indicted for feloniously stealing a Guinea , the Money of George Willan , the 26th of February last. But no Body appearing against her, she was acquitted .

John Tailor , of the Parish of St. Olave Hart-Street , was indicted for feloniously stealing 2 Half Peck Loaves, value 19 d. the Goods of Joseph Booth , the 20th of November last. It appear'd by the Evidence, That the Baker's Man Set down his Basket in Mark Lane , to carry some Bread into an Alley, and the Loaves were taken out of the Basket, and were found upon the Prisoner. The Prisoner pleaded, That he met a Man with the Loaves, and he gave them him to carry to the Mag-pie Alehouse. The Jury found him guilty to the value of 10 d. Transportation .

Stephen Dyer , of the Parish of St. Ann Black Friers , was indicted for privately stealing 4 Castor Hats. value 48 s. and one Beaver Hat, value 20 s. in the Shop of Thomas Howes , the 23d of November last. It appear'd by the Evidence, That the Hats were lost out of the Prosecutor's Shop, while he was out of his Shop. But there not being sufficient Evidence against the Prisoner, he was acquitted .

Ann Wood , was indicted for defrauding Ann Salt of a Guinea, by Pretence of seeing the Guinea which was in the Hand of one John Hopkins , and having got it into her Hand kept it . John Hopkins depos'd, That being sent out by his Mistress Ann Salt, to change a Guinea, the Prisoner came to him and ask'd him to give her a Pint, and she bid him go into Bell Yard; she ask'd him what he had in his Mouth, he said a Guinea, she bid him let her see it, and promised she would give him it again upon her Life, but did not. The Prisoner pretended the Boy John Hopkins came and pull'd her by the Gown, and fell a hugging and kissing her, and offered her 3 Pence, but she bit him a Dash, and he said he had lost a Guinea. The Proof not being sufficient, the Jury acquitted her.

William Davis , of the Parish of St. Martin in the Fields , was indicted for feloniously stealing a Sattin Gown, and a Pair of Stayes, value, 45 s. in the Dwelling House of Thomas Haynes , the 12th of October last. The Jury found him guilty to the value of 10 d. Transportation .

Martha Wetherly , of the Parish of St. Giles in the Fields , was indicted for feloniously stealing Linnen, value 8 s. the Property of Elizabeth Bulmore , the 2d of November last. The Jury found her guilty to the value of 10 d. To be whip'd .

John Stanley , of London , Gent . was indicted for the Murder of Hannah Maycock , Widow , by giving her one mortal Wound, with a Sword, on the last Part of the Body. near the left Pap, of the Breadth of half an Inch, and the Depth of 9 Inches, of which she instantly dy'd , the 20th of October last. He was likewise indicted a second Time on the Coroner's longest for the same.

Mary Morehen depos'd, That Mrs. Maycock having been at Mrs. Leek's, to visit one Mrs. Edwards, who was sick, when she went away, desired Mrs. Leek, that if her Friend Mrs. Edwards grew worse, she might be sent for; and Mrs. Edwards growing worse, accordingly about 10 a Clock at Night, her Couzin Mrs. Leek desir'd her to go for Mrs. Maycock, and Mr. Hammond went along with her, to Mrs. Maycock's Lodgings, in Burleigh Street, that as they were all three coming back, near the King's Head Tavern, at Chancery Lane, there came to them two Gentlemen, who clasp'd their Arms round Mrs. Maycock and her self, and said they should go a long with them. That upon this Mr. Hammond seeing them stop Mrs. Maycock and her self, desired them to let them go, telling them we belong'd to him. That then the Gentlemen swore that we should go with them, or they would go with us, saying, they would know who we were, and whether we were going. That while Mr. Hammond was disputing with the Gentlemen, and they were desiring them to go about their Business, Mrs. Maycock looking into Mr. Stanley's Face, knew him, and said to him, what, Captain , is it you? and he requiring to know where she was going, was told to Mr. Hammond's House in the Old Bailey. That then the Prisoner said he was glad he had met with her, and he would go with her, for which she thank'd him, but telling him there was no Occasion, since Mr. Hammond was there himself to take Care of them. But he being resolute, would go with them; and being about St. Dunstan's Church, the Prisoner spoke to the other Gentleman who was with him, and bid him go back to such a Place, and he would come to him presently; but he not going back, he said to him, why don't you go, and adding something in a Language unknown to her, which she suppos'd to be French, he at last did go away, seemingly with the utmost Unwillingness. That then the Prisoner bid Mr. Hammond go before, but he would not; and the Prisoner went with Mrs. Maycock, and she follow'd them. That as they were going along, the Prisoner struck a Man he met, and near Fleet-Bridge, a Woman that was crossing the Way: That when they came to the Old Bailey, to Mr. Hammond's House, they thank'd the Prisoner for his Civility in waiting upon them home, desir'd him to go home, but he would not, but would go in, which they endeavoured to disswade him from, saying, Mrs. Maycock was going to stay all Night with a Gentlewoman that was sick, and they had not any Conveniency for his staying; and that the Deceas'd rush'd in, and the Prisoner after her, Mr. Hammond after the Prisoner, and she after Mr. Hammond; that they went into the Kitchin, where she saw them standing, the Prisoner on one side of the Door, and the Deceased on the other: That soon after Mr. Hammond went into the Yard, and she having pull'd off her Cloak, and the Head of it, went into the Shop to fetch some Milk she was going to boil for her Supper, but was no sooner got in, and had taken the Milk into her Hand, which was not above the Space of two or three Minutes, before she heard the Deceased cry out, Mrs. Leek, Mrs. Leek, I am stabb'd, I am murder'd; upon which in a Fright, she threw down her Milk, and ran to the Kitchen Door, asking what was the Matter to which the Prisoner reply'd, nothing: That the Deceased was then standing on one side of the Table, with her Hands cross her Break, looking at the Prisoner with all the Innocence imaginable, and in a little Time fell down on the Ground, and said to her, dear Mrs. Morehen, I am stabb'd, and the Prisoner on the other side of the Table flourishing his Sword, Swearing, that whatever Man or Woman entered the Room he would kill them; upon which she fell down on her Knees in the Door Way, entreating both for her own Life, (he directing the Sword to her Breast) and that he would permit some Help to come, that what Injury had been done might be repair'd, and crying out for a Surgeon, Mr. Hammond came in, out of the Yard, but could not enter the Room, she being on her Knees in the Door Way, but afterwards some other Persons coming, and slipping by into the Room, and attempting to disarm the Prisoner, he suffer'd his Sword to be taken away, and submitted, saying, his Name was John Stanley: That then she ran and fetch'd Mr. Snowd the Surgeon, who coming in, the Prisoner lay'd himself over the Deceased, and said, My dear Hannah, won't you speak to me? That Mr. Snowd said to the Prisoner, what, Captain Stanley, will you never have done with these Tricks? And viewing Mrs. Maycock, said she was dead; that then they got her up Stairs, cut her Lace, Strings of her Cloathes, &c. and got her to Bed; that in a little Time after she came to herself, and said she was stabb'd she was murder'd she was a dead Woman, and calling upon God for Mercy, died in about an Hour and half after the Wound was given. Mr. Hammond depos'd much to the same Purpose with Mrs. Morehen, adding, that the Prisoner did not seem to be drunk, but walk'd very well as they came along. That after they had come in to his House, he having set a Candle in the Kitchin, went into the Yard to the Necessary House, and saw through the Window the Prisoner and Deceased stand leaning near the Window, and talking together friendly, as he thought, but he was no sooner set down on the Vault, but he heard an Outcry of Murder. Whereupon he ran in and saw the Prisoner with his Sword drawn in his Hand, standing upon a Parry, and swearing that if he came into the Room he would kill him, and every one that entered the Room, come as many as wou'd. That Mrs. Morehen being kneeling in the Door Way, he could not get to him without going over her, so he went to the Shop to get a couple of Broom-sticks, designing first to throw in one at the Prisoner, and so put him in Disorder, and then to rush in and knock down his Sword with the other, but some Women getting into the Room, got hold of him, and he quietly let go his Sword, and said he would do no Harm, that he had kill'd the Woman, and he must be hang'd for it. That then they got a Surgeon, and Things afterwards were as Mrs. Morehen had depos'd. Mrs. Hammond depos'd, That hearing an Outcry, of Mrs. Leek, Mrs. Leek, I am stabb'd, and a faint Shriek, she being lame, made what Haste she could down, and slipp'd in between the Door and the Prisoner, and found the Prisoner with his Sword drawn, and the Deceased on the Ground all bloody; that she caught hold of the Prisoner's Arm, as did another Woman, Mrs. Addesey, and took his Sword from him; and the Prisoner looking on the Deceased, said, I have wounded her, if she be not dead, I hope she will. That he afterwards lay down across the Deceas'd, and said to her, Dear Hannah, speak to me; Hannah, for God's sake speak to me. Then getting up, said, You have been a damn'd Bitch. That when the Surgeon came in he spoke to the Prisoner, as had been before depos'd; and, that looking upon Mrs. Maycock, be said to the Prisoner, I will give you my Word you have done her Business. That he reply'd, He had had a Child by her that was three Years and a half old, and if Mrs. Maycock was dead, he must die, and the Child should die, and there would be an end of them all. That they sent for the Watch, and the rest was as before depos'd.

Mrs. Addesey depos'd, That Mrs. Hammond and she coming down upon the Out cry, found the Deceas'd and Prisoner, as had been before depos'd, and slipping in by him, and taking hold of his Arm, he deliver'd his Sword to her. And as for what follow'd after was as the other Evidences had depos'd. Mr. Snowd the Surgeon depos'd to the same purpose, to what the other Evidences had depos'd. As to his saying to the Prisoner, What, Captain, will you never have done with these Tricks? That he answered, No. &c. That he found the Wound mortal, and told them, though she did come to her self after having been put to Bed yet she would not live till Morning, though, for Decency sake, he did dress the Wound. The Constable depos'd, That having apprehended the Prisoner, as he was carrying him to the Watch-house, he swore outragiously, and said, If she was not dead he hop'd she would be. The Prisoner, in his Defence, deny'd nothing as to the committing the Fact, nor the Manner of it, but only in Palliation said, That he had had a Child by the Deceas'd, which was now three Years and a half old, and speaking to her, and upbraiding her with Unnaturalness, in not taking care to make and provide some Clothes for the Child, telling her, his Circumstances were such, that he was now oblig'd to leave the Kingdom, she (he suppos'd) was provok'd, that he should speak of it where nothing of it was known, struck him, gave him ill Language, &c. which rais'd his Passion to give her the Wound, not knowing what he did. He called several Persons, who would have perswaded the Court to look upon him as a Person lunatick. But these Evidences not being satisfactory as to that Point, the Jury found him guilty or both Indictments. Death . After having received Sentence he said, Death was welcome to him, he having been treated so unkindly by his Relations or Friends.

Mary Smith , Ann Scrivel , and Elisabeth Jones , were indicted for feloniously stealing five Hats, value 4 s. the Goods of William Spicer , the 20th of November last. They were indicted a second Time for stealing a Riding Hood, value 18 s. the Goods of William Allen , the same Day. And also, a third Time, for stealing a Camlet Riding Hood, value 20 s. the Goods of William Broadhurst , the same Day. It appeared by the Evidences, That the Goods were lost by them at Ingerstone Fair , and were taken upon the Prisoners at the Sign of the Why not Beat Dragon, near Mile End. The Facts being plainly prov'd against Mary Smith and Ann Scrivel , they found guilty to the Value of 10 d. on each Indictment. Transportation . But Elizabeth Jones was acquitted .

Jane Street , of St. Clement Danes , was indicted for feloniously stealing a pair of flaxen Sheets, value 27 s. the Goods of Elisabeth James , the 4th of November last. But the Evidence not being sufficient to convict the Prisoner, she was acquitted .

Sarah Baker , of Enfield , was indicted for feloniously stealing a Cheese, value 3 s. the Goods of Henry Barnes , the 30th of November last. The Fact being plainly prov'd the Jury found her guilty to the Value of 10 d. Transportation .

Sarah Theodorick , of St. Giles in the Fields , was indicted for feloniously stealing an Apron, value 2 s. the Goods of Jane Robinson , the 10th of November last. But no Body appearing against her, she was acquitted .

James Hussey , William Field , and Jane Towse , of St. Sepulchre , were indicted for feloniously stealing two Milk Pails, a Yoke, Milk Pot and Strainer , the Goods of Thomas Lane , the 23d of October last. There not being sufficient Evidence against James Hussey, and Williams Field, they were acquitted , but Jane Towse was found guilty to the Value of 10 d. Transportation .

Ruth Herringshaw , was indicted for stealing a Pocket, and 7 s. in Money , the Property of Robert Campion , the 22d of November last. But the Evidence not being sufficient to convict the Prisoner, she was acquitted .

Samuel Haydon , was indicted for stealing 10 lb. of Brass, value 6 s. the Goods of Joseph Matthews , the 22d of November last. To which Indictment he pleaded guilty . Burnt in the Hand .

William Munday , was indicted for a Misdemeanor, in solliciting , and suborning , Edward Davis , to make an Affidavit before Mr. Justice Denton, That he had, in the Name of William Munday, made an Offer and Tender of Payment of 52 s. to Mr. Clark, the 30th of June, in the Year 1722 . which he had not done . It appear'd by the Evidence. That upon Occasion of a Law Suit, William Munday was ordered by the Court of Common Pleas to pay to Mr. Clark, by such a Day, the said Sum, upon which Condition he was to forbear proceeding upon the said Munday and his Bail. He not paying the said 50 s. the said Mr. Clark does proceed against she said Munday and his Bail; whereupon he Producing the said Affidavit of Edward Davis's, that he had offered and tender'd the Money to the said Clark, upon the Day ordered, the Judgments obtained by Mr. Clark, against Will: Munday and his Bail, were set aside. But it afterwards appearing to the Court of common Pleas, as it did also at the Old Bailey, by the Evidence of the said Edward Davis, That he had made that Affidavit by the Instigation and Subornation of Munday, and that he had not made any such Offer or Tender of the 52 s. to Clark at that Time, the Jury found him guilty of the Misdemeanor.

He was also indicted a second Time for wilful Perjury, for making an Affidavit before Mr. Justice Tracy, that he never had any Notice from the said Mr. Clark, that he would have accepted the Payment of the 52 s. when it was sworn in Court, by an Evidence, That he had carried and delivered to him two Notes from Mr. Clark, that he would accept of the, Payment of the 52 s. The Jury found him guilty of this Indictment, and he was sentenc'd by the Court to pay a Fine of 20 l. for each Offence , to suffer 3 Months Imprisonment , and to stand twice on the Pillory .

John Lant , Richard Ayres , David Kite and John Ambler , were indicted for a Misdemeanor, for that they, with 500 others, did on the 23d of July at Night, in the Year 1723 . with Force and Arms, unlawfully, riotously, and tumultuously , assemble together, and so continued for the Space of three Hours, to the Disturbance of the King's Peace, and against the Statute in that Case made and provided . The Prosecution was manag'd by Mr. Attorney General, and the Council for the King, who having opened the Cause, supported their Charge by the following Evidences.

John Bates depos'd, That being in his own House on the 23d of July, between six and seven a Clock, he heard a great Noise, and Hollowing near Cripplegate, and saw about 20 Men with great Sticks and Clubs. That they came to the House of a Neighbour of his, Mr. Jones an Apothecary, making a great hissing, and shaking and rattling of their Clubs; and did in the like Manner at the Crown Tavern and Crown Coffee-house, marching backwards and forwards, and in an Hour's Time got a great Number together, and about eight a Clock they made two Bonfires, one on one side of Cripplegate, and the other on the other. That when one of their Fires was pretty well burnt, they came again to the Crown Tavern, and he saw a great Club thrown from among the Mob, which hit a Man and knocked him down. Then they throwed Stones and broke the Lamps at the Crown Tavern Door, and afterwards retreated to the Bonfire. Then some Gentlemen went out of the Tavern, and went as near the Bonfire as they durst to venture, and read the Proclamation, after which they were quiet for some Time; but afterwards they came up again in a great Body, he thinks some Hundreds, many of them with Clubs and Staves; and as he was standing at his own Door, some of them came up to him and struck him. Whereupon he retired to the Inside of the Door, and bolted it, then they broke his Windows. That there were in the Coffee-Room about four or five Persons reading the News, who being frightened at their breaking the Windows, and throwing in Stones, they ran up Stairs, and before he could bolt the Back-door, they came to it, burst it open with great Violence, broke his Sconce which hung in the middle of the Room, heat and bruis'd him very much; and as he held up his Hand to save his Life, was struck on it, so that it broke the Bone, of which he is lame, and like to be so as long as he lives. They having continued there about two Minutes, some Gentlemen that were at the Crown Tavern came down, and they went away. That there was no Provocation given the Mob, that he knew of, and what was done afterwards he could not say, being so battened and bruised, and wounded to the Scull, that he was render'd insensible.

Mr. Adams depos'd, That between nine and ten a Clock, the 23d of July aforesaid, he heard at his Door a very great Noise of hissing and following, but they went away, and about an Hour afterwards came again with a greater Number, hissing and hollowing, and crying our, Down with the House, but went away again. After which he went to some Gentlemen who were drinking in his House, having been upon Exercise with Captain Saunders in the Artillery Ground, whose Company had mustered there that Day; and be himself also being Major of the White Regiment, they being at his House at Supper, he acquainted them with the Danger he apprehended he was in from the Mob, and desired them to assist him in case of need. That afterwards the Mob came again the third Time, broke all his Lamps, his Lanthorns and Windows, almost half way in his Passage; and he having sent up for them to come to his Assistance, being afraid they would have pull'd down his House, according as they had cry'd out, the Gentlemen came down and drove them out.

Joseph Lamb depos'd. That he and others having marched that Day as Voluntiers with Captain Saunders, were, after the Muster, invited by him to Sup at Major Adams's, at the Crown Tavern near Cripplegate . That while they were there, a Person came up, and said, The Mob were pulling down the House of Mr. Jones an Apothecary, a Door or two off, but upon that none of them went down, That after this he heard several Noises, and several Messengers came up, at Times, from between nine and ten a Clock, bringing News of Injuries that had been done, till about eleven, that they went out and took some of them. After that another Messengers came up, and said, they had broken Major Adams's Lamps; and that several People had been knocked down, and Sticks had been flung into the House. That upon this he went down and several follow'd him. That the Mob were driven out, and attempting to come in again, he caught hold of a Firelock, and told them, if any Body came in, and attempted to knock any Body down, he would fire at them. That then he went out with a Constable to read the Proclamation, having his Sword drawn to defend him from the Violence of the Mob, and going to Cripplegate, the Gates were shut against them. That the Constable put through his Staff, to shew his Authority, and commanded the Constable, &c. to open the Gates, but he refusing, they went to the Posterns, but they being shut they were obliged to go round through Moorgate, and coming to Cripplegate they read the Proclamation. That there was among the Mob the Cry of, No King George; no Hannoverian Proclamation. And, that one Person, whom he was told was a Smith, particularly cry'd, No King George, but Williams for over; but he pursuing him with his Sword drawn could not overtake him. That having come back to the other side the Gate, there was Lant with a great Oaken Stick in his Hand, where he and Ambler were taken.

Thomas Carter depos'd, That that Night he was at Supper at Major Adams's House, and the Servant Said to him, William's Mob is out. To which he reply'd, Lot them alone, I hope not a Man here will stir. That having stay'd some Time longer, he went down, in order to go home, and found the Entry full; and, that the Lamps and Windows had been dash'd in pieces. That thereupon he asked, if they had read the Proclamation, and was answered, Yes. That the Mob seeming then to be rallying again, he bid them read it again, and if they did not disperse he would go out and help to take some of them; and, that as the Proclamation was read, they throw'd Firebrands. That the Mob rallying again, Mr. Adams said to him, For God's sake do not go away, I am afraid my House will be pull'd down. That he afterwards went out and laid hold of one of them, and Lant came and jostled him. One said to him, There is Lant, who has been heading them all this Night, and was call'd, the Captain of the Mob. That having said hold of him, Captain Lamb came up, and bid him deliver his Stick, or it should be worse for him, and so as last they wrested it out of his Hand, and carried him to the Crown Tavern. He added, That he heard the Mob cry, Down with them; Down with the House, &c.

Samuel Laurence depos'd, That he going to the Crown Coffee-house, to speak with a Friend, going into the Passage of the Crown Tavern, a Gentleman that had been with the Gentlemen of the Militia, said to him, Mr. Lawrence, You are a Constable, are you not? To which he reply'd, He was. Upon which he desired him not to go away, for that he believ'd the Mob would be very unruly that Night. That he answered him, He had not his long Staff, and he would not go among them with his short one; at which Mr. Adams said he would borrow him a Staff, and he did so. And, that at that Time the Mob began to halloo, and gather about the Door. That there was also another Constable present, who had a short Staff. That the Mob growing more unruly, he desired them to go to their Bonfire and be quiet, saying, no Body shall abuse you, or meddle with you, the Aldermen have done Sir John Williams Justice, and no Body shall obstruct you in your Rejoycing. The other Constable had likewise a Staff brought, and in about a Quarter of an Hour they grew very unruly, and threw Stones, and broke the Lanthorns. That then he spoke to them again, saying, Do you know what you do? That he there saw Lant with a great Stick, flourishing it; and, as he thinks, going to strike him. After this they grew more violent, and threw Sticks into the Passage; upon this some Gentlemen, who were in the Tavern Passage, were for going out, but he disswaded them from it, that they might give no occasion or pretence of their being the Aggressors, and none did go out; and he clapp'd his Staff cross the Door. That some Persons advised the Reading the Proclamation; that they went out to read it, but they were so push'd and shov'd about that they could not read it; and he was forc'd, for fear of being more abus'd, if not murthered, to withdraw; but afterwards it was read, and he had his Head broken going to read it; and the Mob pursed them that had been reading it to the Door, and threw Sticks and Firebrands in very violently, and broke the great Lanthorn to pieces, and pressed so against the Door, which they were attempting to shut, that a great many People could not shut it against them. but they forced their way in, and Mr. Bates was very much wounded. That then being driven out they retired to the Bonfire, and they went to read the Proclamation at the Bonfire that was on the Inside of the Gate, but the Gates were shut, and he put his Staff partly in between them, to show his Authority, but they refus'd to open the Gate, so they went round, as has been before depos'd, and there Kits was taken, who said the Constable was a Fool and a Blockhead, for reading the Proclamation. That the Cry was, High Church and Williams. And, that in the whole, he never did see a more unprovok'd, and barbarous Abuse of People, that gave them no Provocation in Word or Deed in his Life.

Mr. Harris, a Constable depos'd, That he being at the Crown Tavern at Supper, with some Gentlemen, Members of the Artillery Ground, who had been there at their Tuesday's Exercise, there was News brought them, that there was a very great Mob, and that they had broken the Lanthorn, and threatned to pull down the House, and the Master of the House came up and desir'd them to stand by him, and not long after they heard the House was attack'd, and some Gentlemen desir'd that the Proclamation might be read; that he replying he had it not, was told there was a Person there who had it in his Pocket in writing; that they did then go to the Bonfire and read it, and told them the ill Effect of their violent Proceedings, and return'd to the Tavern, and took Notice by their Watches, that it was then about 10 Minutes after 10 a-Clock; that in about a Quarter of an Hour after, there was such a terrible Racket about the Tavern Door, that they getting up in a Hurry, went out of the Room, forgetting to put up their Watches, but one Gentleman went back and secur'd them. When they came to the Door they found the Lamps and Windows broken, and heard several had been wounded, and tho' he spoke to them very civilly, he was forc'd to retire, and in the Passage he receiv'd 4 or 5 very Severe Blows, Stones and Sticks being flung in as thick as Hail; that then there came some Gentlemen down Stairs, and forc'd them to retire; that he saw Lant with them at the Tavern Door, when he was going out to read the Proclamation, which was done without making any Disturbance; and that they had assaulted the House before this Time. Being ask'd by the Council for the Prisoners, whether there had not Men gone out with Swords, Muskets, and Bayonets? He reply'd, there were 2 went with Swords, and 2 with Muskets, to defend the Person that read the Proclamation.

Daniel Frazier depos'd much to the same Effect, adding. That after the Proclamation was read the second Time, the Mob came up in a Body to Major Adam's House, and there was a hot Dispute, they throwing Sticks, Stones, and Fire-brands; and that the Proclamation was read three or four Times. That he saw one of the Prisoners there, which he thinks was Ayres, and Lant was flourishing his Stick without the Gate, and was call'd the Captain of the Mob.

Mr. Jones depos'd, That he having had the Misfortune to be in the Scrutiny for Mr. Feast, upon the Day mentioned in the Indictment the Mob came to his House about 7 a-Clock in the Evening with great Clubs, and in a violent Manner broke his Shutters, and at that Time he saw Ayres among them.

John Pickard depos'd, That he saw a great Mob about the Castle Tavern, who cry'd, down with the Rump. Lockwood and Williams for ever no King George; that at Cripplegate there was the same Cry of Lockwood and Williams for ever, and they made him pull of his Hat, at their Outcry; that they also cry'd out, No King George several times. That there were then about 200, and he saw Ayres there, with a Stick in his Hand. That going to the Crown-Tavern, he saw Lant the Carman there, with a great Mob of 150, or more, and their Cry was at the Door of the Crown-Coffee House, Down with the Rump, Down with the House, and at the Crown Tavern a great Stick was thrown, which miss'd him, and hit some body else; and afterwards they came up with great Violence, and several Persons were knock'd down and beaten in an unmerciful manner.

Daniel Quarles depos'd, That he living at the Crown-Coffee House, went out, and coming Home about a quarter of an Hour before Mr. Jones's Windows were broke, saw a violent Mob, who cry'd out, Down with the Roe-buck Coffee-House, Down with the Roe-buck Tavern; that thus they went their Rounds, and Lant was there flourishing his Stick about over his Head.

Mr. Power depos'd, That being near the Crown-Tavern, about 9 a Clock, he saw a great Mob, and he desir'd them to disperse, and they cry'd, Knock him down, and they did so; that they were near 200; that they cry'd out, No King George, No Hannoverian Proclamation, when the Proclamation was read; that they cry'd, Down with the House; and that he saw Lant there.

Jonathan Woodley depos'd, That he being at the Crown-Tavern, the House was assaulted, and he being desired to assist in saving the House from being pull'd down, receiv'd a desperate Wound on the left side of his Forehead, which laid his Skull bare, so that he was two Months under the Surgeons Hands. The Mark of which he show'd in Court.

Mr. Ambrey depos'd, That he being drinking with Company at the Crown-Tavern, a Person came up and said, Mr. Jones's House had been assaulted. Some time after they had News brought them, that they were breaking the Windows of the Crown-Coffee-House, and afterwards Major Adams came up, and told them, his House was assaulted, and desir'd them to come down; that he saw the Glasses broke: That the Proclamation was read, and they sat down again to drink. That afterwards Major Adams's Porter was brought in wounded, and he dress'd him. Then Mr. Woodley was brought in wounded very dangerously, him Skull being laid bare, and he took a Splinter of Wood out of the Wound; and he was also very much bruised; and that Mr. Merry and others were also brought in wounded, to the Number of six or eight. And that afterwards he heard that Captain Lamb had taken some of the Mob, and Lant was brought in, and he heard him own the Stick, which was taken from him, to be his Stick, and that he was in the Mob.

Mr. Merry depos'd, That being at Supper, Mr. Smith brought Wood, that the Mob were breaking Mr. James's House; that about an Hour, or Hour and half after, the Drawer came and asked him, if he would stay there, and let his Master be knock'd on the Head in his own House; that he went down, and the Major had gather a Mop-stick, and he pull'd off the Head; and asking him if he would see him kill'd in his own House, he reply'd, No; and gave it him. That there coming up a great Number, he oppos'd them, and knock'd down two, but was knock'd down himself, miserably beaten and bruis'd when down; was wounded and bruis'd in the Head, and many other Places, and especially his Arm, the right use of which, he is never like to receive.

The Council for the Prisoners were, Mr. Hungerford and Mr. Kettleby; who during the Course of the Evidence for the King, were not wanting in cross-examining the Evidences for the King; and so also in the Defence of their Clients spar'd no Pains or Rhetorick to clear them of the Charge of a Riot, by laying it upon their Accusers, which they attempted to do by the following Evidences.

Mr. Kelpin depos'd, That he liv'd at the House which is over Cripplegate, and that he look'd out of the Window, and they lighted a Fire on the Inside of the Gate, and there was no Disturbance; and then they lighted another Fire over against the Castle-Tavern, and cry'd out, King George for ever, and Sir John Williams, and they took a Walk round about, without any Disturbance; and at last there was a Company of Captains of the Train'd Bands, who made them run away, and they kick'd the Bonfire abroad, and went into the Tavern again, and then they lighted it again, and cry'd, King George for ever; and then the People came out of the Tavern again, and then the Fray began. That they had Guns and Bayonets, to the Number of 4 or 5, and Swords waving, and they were the Cause of the Riotous Doings. That he saw them come out twice, and fell upon them, and they ran away like Sheep. That he heard no manner of Noise, but at the Crown-Tavern, and he did not see that they went there; but he believ'd they at the Crown-Tavern were the Transgressors.

Joseph Jude depos'd, That about 10 a Clock, having been drinking thereabouts, he saw Men in Scarlet and Buff kicking the Bonfire about, and one of them was Captain Stray; and that another Captain came out, shaking his Sword, who he heard was call'd Capt. Lamb, and he swore they should have no Bonfire; that when they were gone, the People put the Bonfire together again, and he saw the Men in Scarlet drawing up to dislodge them; that he clapp'd his Back against Bates's Window, and they came towards them, and met them, and the Red-Coat Men were forc'd to retire. But in two Minutes time came out with their Bayonets in their Muskets, ten or a dozen of them, but he could not tell whether or no there had been any thing done at the Crown-Tavern before.

- Worsley depos'd, That he saw no Disturbance till it was almost 9 a Clock; that some Persons came out of the Crown-Tavern and cry'd, King George for ever; that one had a drawn Sword, that they kick'd out the Bonfire, they about it running away; but afterwards came and put it together, and ran round it, and cry'd, King George for ever, and Sir John Williams; That he saw Gentlemen in Scarlet, and Granadiers between the Conduit, and they cry'd, Fire, and one did fire, and there was a Fray. He could not tell whether there were 4 or 5 with Fire-Arms, but he could not say that none of the Bonfire-People had been at the Crown Tavern before this.

John Ridgley depos'd, That he was at his Door, about four Yards from the Bonfire, and they were dancing about it; and there came out twelve or fourteen Soldiers out of the Crown Tavern, some with Swords drawn; and Captain Stray pok'd the Fire about with his Sword in the Scabbard, and swore, He could not bear to see the Fire. But when the Men in Buff and Scarlet were gone, and retir'd to the Crown Tavern again, they at the Bonfire pick'd up the Sticks and put it together; and, that they never went near the Crown Tavern, that he saw; and, that the Soldiers were half of them drunk, and he thought they would have kill'd one another, for they had a great Mob of their own Party, and at last they came out and fought; then the Mob at the Fire met them, and then the Soldiers run away, and retired to the Tavern, and shut the Tavern Door; and there was none about the Bonfire but Women and Children.

Samuel Gray depos'd, That the Bonfire was lighted about duskish, and he stay'd at the Castle Tavern, and there were about twenty or thirty that went round the Bonfire very quietly; then a Party of the killing Captains sallied out of the Crown Tavern and came to the Bonfire, and kick'd the Fire about, all that were about the Fire being gone away; and then having vapour'd round it, they went to the Crown Tavern again. And when the People were got round the Fire again, Men in Scarlet and Buff came out again with about seven or eight Guns, and two Swords drawn, and the Bonfire People met them, and the Captains ran away first, and then they came out again and read a Proclamation, about ten or twelve Words, and then it wanted about a Quarter of an Hour of eleven a Clock. And the Gate was shut, and they went round.

John Benson depos'd, He saw two Gentlemen in Scarlet, one with his Sword drawn, and another with his in the Scabbard, and eight or ten with Sticks, they about the Fire being run away, they push'd the Fire about, but he did not know where they came from. They retired thro' Cripplegate, and by and by there came out four or five with Muskets, and the Gates were shut.

Moses Wilson depos'd, That he heard a following, saw a Bonfire, and a great Company of People gathered together about the Crown Tavern Door, and the People were hurrying about in the Crown Coffee-house. That some Gentlemen in Scarlet came out with Swords drawn in their Hands, and walk'd towards the Bonfire. That those at the Bonfire drew up towards them, but seeing their Swords drawn they ran away, and they demolish'd the Bonfire. Then the Gentlemen went in to the Crown Tavern again, and in half a Quarter of an Hour he saw two Mobs a fighting cross the Kennel, near the Tavern Door, and they made up to the Crown Tavern, and he heard Windows break.

Mr. Battin depos'd, That he saw Captain Stray come out at the Head of his Granadiers, and they threw the Bonfire about: and there were some with Constables Staves. That there was one Sword drawn, and one in the Sheath, the Mob ran away, and they kick'd the Bonfire about, and then went into the Crown Tavern again, after which the People return'd, and put the Bonfire together again. That some came out with Bayonets and Muskets, made a halt, and cry'd, Fire, and the Bonfire People ran away, and they came and read the Proclamation; and, that the Soldiers made the Battle. That they went to go through the Gate to read the Proclamation; and this was about Nine a Clock.

Mrs. Brown depos'd, That she saw it from the Beginning to the End. That they made a Bonfire, and rejoyc'd about it, and when it was about half burnt out, two or three came in Red Coats, and one with his Sword drawn, and one said, There should be no Bonfire. One of them was Captain Stray, and they put the Bonfire out, and went into the Tavern again, and stay'd there about half an Hour, and in the mean Time the People put the Bonfire together again. And afterwards the Captains, and Men in Caps, and two or three in red Coats, came to the Bonfire, and said, There should be no Bonfire. And there was hardly any Body at it but Boys and Girls, and they threw it about, and one Stick of Fire lay in the Front of the Passage of the Crown Tavern. That a Man came by, and said, What do you throw the Fire about for? And kicked the Billet, and it broke Adam's Lanthorn. That the Soldiers stood in the Passage of the Tavern, and there was a Fight there, and then they went about to take whom they could; and, that there had been no Assault upon the Crown Tavern, before they had been out twice, and there had been one Gun let off.

Mr. Howard, a Constable, depos'd, The Beadle came about half an Hour after nine a Clock to him, and told him, That the Soldiers came out of the Crown Tavern, and kicked the Bonfire about, and he believed there would be a Quarrel. That he went to Cripplegate, and the Bonfire had been kick'd about, and they were making it up again. That there was a great running through the Gate, and there were Persons in Scarlet Coats, and there was knocking down of People. That he saw one with his Piece levelled to shoot; that he commanded the King's Peace; that he saw Captain Stray there, and that another came with his Sword drawn, and he thereupon commanded the Gates to be shut.

This being the Substance of the Evidence, as to the Fact, the Prisoners call'd Witnesses as to their particular Persons.

As to Kite, some Evidences appear'd, who depos'd, That he had been drinking from about five, and was with them till half an Hour past ten.

As to Ayres, one Witness depos'd, That she saw him about another Bonfire at the three Tuns in Woodstreet till half an Hour past 10 a Clock, and he was taken up by 11.

As to Ambler, That he was much in Liquor at five in the Afternoon. And another Evidence, That she parted with him between nine and ten a Clock in Forestreet.

As to Lant, There were several Evidences who spoke as to him; but none that could prove him not there at the Times of these Attacks; and one insisted, That Lant told him, he was employed by Mr. Willis Constable to aid and assist him in keeping the Peace. Upon this Mr. Willis was call'd, who depos'd, That being at a publick House, he heard of a great Disturbance, about seven or eight a Clock; that Mr. Jones's House was assaulted, that he went, and they said, those that assaulted Mr. Jones's House were gone. That he afterwards saw Lant among the Mob; said he was sorry to see him there, advised him to go home, and gave him half a Quartern of Brandy to do so. and, that he did afterwards charge him to aid and assist him, but he could not keep him in his fight for above two or three Minutes, and afterwards he heard he was taken up. Being ask'd, for what reason he charg'd him to and and assist him? He reply'd, To keep him from running into Mischief.

The Course of the Evidence, on both sides, being finished, and the Council for the Prisoners having made their Remarks upon them, Mr. Attorney General reply'd, That as to the Evidences for the King, they were Persons of Reputation; which had no wise been impeached, or called in Question. That they were to the Number of ten or twelve; who were uniform in their Evidence. That they being generally there upon the Spot at the very beginning of the Riot, and where the Injuries were done; and many of them had suffer'd great Damage, they must of necessity be able to give a more exact Account, than those Persons, who; some came by accidentally, some stood at a Distance, and some saw through Windows, and some saw one part; and others another; and, as it appear'd, not one of them the whole; so that their Evidence must needs be imperfect, and perplex'd as to Time, scarce one of them speaking to any Thing that was done before nine a Clock, when it appear'd by several Evidences for the King, that the Disturbance was begun before eight a Clock. The Judge having summ'd up the Evidence on both sides, the Jury went out, and after a short stay, found John Lant guilty of the Misdemeanor , and acquitted Richard Ayres, David Kite, and John Ambler.

The next Morning the Council: for the Prisoners mov'd the Court in Arrest of Judgement, insisting upon two or three Points of Law, which were disallow'd by the Court; but upon their urgent requesting for a Respite, did adjourn the Court till Thursday, the 12th Instant.

[Fine. See summary.]

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

[Provide sureties for good behaviour. See summary.]

Mary Caldecut , of St. Mary Stratford le Bow , was indicted for stealing a Gold Watch and Chain, and three Silver Spoons . But it appearing she was not Compos Mentis, she was acquitted .

The Trials being over the Court proceeded to give Judgement as followeth, viz.

Receiv'd Sentence of Death, Four.

John Stanley , John Harrington , Thomas Saunders , Jane Martin .

Burnt in the Hand, Six.

David Bathey , John Wicks , Samuel Haydon , Elizabeth Barrel , David Davis , and Susannah Martin , the two last former Convicts.

To be Transported. Twenty Six.

Letitia Hopkins, Edward Gunnis , Gratian Misson, Henry Johnson , Mary Jarvis , Joseph Glade , Nicholas Whitebour , Ann Gadbury , John Hankey , William Beck , John Cook , Archibald Oliver , Elizabeth Bushel , John Farquear , Mary Ellar , Margaret Hall, Ann Goodwin , William Cryer , Thomas Edge , Elizabeth Mansfield , William Davis , Sarah Baker , Mary Smith , Ann Scrivel , Martha Towns , John Tailor .

To be Whipt, Two.

Martha Wetherly , Rebecka Pearse.

John Lant , sentenced to pay a Fine of 30 l. to suffer three Months Imprisonment, and to find Sureties for his good Behaviour for a Year, after the Expiration of his Imprisonment.

William Munday fined 20 l. upon each Indictment, to stand Twice on the Pillory, and be imprisoned three Months.

Jane Martin pleaded her Belly, and a Jury of Matrons being impannelled, found her with quick Child.