Old Bailey Proceedings Online (www.oldbaileyonline.org, version 6.0, 24 July 2014), July 1717 (17170717).

Old Bailey Proceedings, 17th July 1717.

THE PROCEEDINGS ON THE KING's Commission of the Peace, AND

Oyer and Terminer, and Goal Delivery of Newgate, held for the CITY of London, and COUNTY of Middlesex, at Justice-Hall in the Old Bayly,

ON

WEDNESDAY and THURSDAY, being the 17th and 18th of this Instant JULY,1717 In the Third Year of His MAJESTY's Reign.

Before the Right Hon. Sir JAMES BATEMAN , Kt. and Bart. Lord-Mayor of the City of London; the Worshipful Mr. Justice Blencoe, and Mr. Justice Pratt; Sir William Thompson , Kt. Recorder; with several of His Majesty's Justices of the Peace for the City of London, and County of Middlesex.

The Jurors Names were as followeth:

London Jury.

John Cooper

Bezaleel Knight

Richard Ward

Edmund Merryweather

William Marsland

William Mills

John Johnson

Matthew East

Philip Nightingal

James Cossey

Timothy Colson

John Tant .

Middlesex Jury.

William Stroud

William Smart

Richard Saunders

George Langton

Edward Tompkins

Daniel Croker

Thomas Hull

John Kinch

James Harrison

John Bush

Edward Williams

Jacob Pullen .

The Proceedings were as followeth:

Mary Richardson , alias Ann Hammond , of St. Giles's without Cripplegate , was indicted for feloniously stealing 2 Damask Tabie-Cloths, val.20 s. and 5 Damask Napkins, val.7 s. out of the Dwelling-house of the Reverend Dr. Thomas Bennet , the 11th of June last, in the Day-time . Dr. Bennet depos'd, that being in a Closet within his Study at about Eight of the Clock in the Morning, he coming out found the Prisoner there with a Basket in her Hand covered with an old piece of Stuff; and enquiring what she did there, the Prisoner replied she came to beg some Small Beer; whereupon he thinking her a very bold Beggar to come through the House and into his Study on that account, bid her go out of Doors, and following her perceiv'd the Pocket that was before full, on a sudden to be empty, and the Linnen to be thrown down in an Entry between the Study and the Hall, and lying under his Feet as he pass'd along, he secured her. The Doctor's Servant deposed, the said Linnen was before she came, lying in the Doctor's Study. The Prisoner deny'd her having the Linnen, and said she came in there to pick up a few Shavings, there being, as she said, Workmen at work there. But this Pretence did not avail, and she being an old Offender, having been burnt in the Hand for a like Fact but the last Sessions, the Jury found her Guilty to the Value of 10 d.

[Whipping. See summary.]

Walter Foreman , of St. Botolph's without Aldgate , was indicted for privately stealing 22 pair of Leather Shoes, value 4 l. out of the Shop of John Carr , the 5th of this Instant July . The Prosecutor deposed, that the Prisoner was his Journeyman , and used to work in his Shop, and had taken the Shoes away at several times; that at last having several times missed his Shoes, and having some Intimations given him concerning the Prisoner, he charg'd him with stealing them, which with some Difficulty he at the last owned, telling him where he had sold them. Some of them were found according to his Direction. The Prisoner had little to say in his Defence, whereupon the Jury found him Guilty to the Value of 4 s.10 d.

[Branding. See summary.]

Richard Golding , of St. Martin's in the Fields , was indicted for feloniously stealing 1 Cloth Coat, value 15 s.1 Hat, val.3 s. out of the Dwelling-house of Matth.ew Holms , the 4th of December last was 12 Months. But the Fact being but a single Felony and committed before the 6th of May last, which is the Time specified in his Majesty's most gracious Act of Indemnity, he was thereupon Acquitted .

James Mitchel , of St. Katherine's , was indicted for feloniously stealing 60 Yards of Callicoe, value 6 l. and 24 Yards of Holland, value 22 s. the Property of John Bolton , the 1st of May last: But no body appearing against him, he was Acquitted .

Mary Willoughby , of St. Bartholomew's the Great ; was indicted for privately Stealing 19 Yards of Shalloon, value 21 s. out of the Shop of Thomas Shakleton , the 24th of June last. The Prosecutor deposed the Prisoner came to his Shop to buy 4 Yards and a half of Shalloon, bringing him a Pattern to match; and being very difficult in the matching of it, while he was busy in doing it, took an Opportunity to take the Piece of Shalloon and put it under her Petticoats; that she paid him for the Shalloon she bought and went away. The Prosecutor's Servant deposed, that he saw her convey the Piece of Shalloon under her Clothes and suffer'd her to go out of the Shop with it, and telling his Master of it they followed her and seized her, and she being apprehended she let the Shalloon drop from under her Coats in the Street. This was confirmed by another Evidence. The Prisoner deny'd the Fact, and that she Knew how it came to the place where it was taken up, infinuating it was laid there by the Prosecutor's Contrivance, in order to charge her with the Fact, to obtain the Reward: But there appeared so little Probability in this Pretence, and the Fact being plainly proved by Persons of Reputation, the Jury found her Guilty of the Indictment.

[Death. See summary.]

Sarah Chance , alias Smith , of the Parish of St. Sepulchres , was indicted for privately stealing a Camlet Ridinghood, value 15 s. the Property of Thomas Broadhurst ,1 Hat, value 10 s. the property of Joseph Dod , and 1 black Silk Hood, value 10 s. the property of Mary Seager , out of the Dwelling-house of the said Mary Seager , on the 7th of June last. Mary Cole deposed, that the Prisoner coming to the House to drink with another Person took the Opportunity of taking the Goods, going out with the Ridinghood upon her Back and the Hat and Hood in her Apron. The Prisoner denied the Fact, and it appear'd that they were Acquaintance and Fellow-Traders in Iniquity, the Reputation of the Prosecutor as slender as the Prisoner's; whereupon the Jury acquitted her.

William Thompson , of St. Botolph's without Aldgate , was indicted for feloniously stealing 1 Brass Candlestick, value 2 s.1 Pewter Plate, val.6 d. in the Dwelling-house of John Burket , the 2d of this Instant July . The Prosecutor deposed the Prisoner and another Person came to his House to drink, and so took an Opportunity of stealing the Goods; that the Candlestick was found in the Prisoner's Pocket, and the Plate bent lying on the Bench by him. The Prisoner pleaded the Person whom he was drinking with said he had no Money to pay his Reckoning, but had a Candlestick which he had brought from on board a Ship, and desired him to go and sell it for him. The Pretence did him that Service that the Jury acquitted him.

He was likewise a second time indicted for privately stealing a Brass Measure, value 2 s. and Four Pence Halfpenny in Halfpence, out of the Shop of Alexander Phips the same Days . The Prosecutor deposed that the Prisoner coming to his Shop to feil a Brass-Candlestick, he refused to buy it, suspecting it to be stollen; That the Prisoner took the opportunity to take the Goods while his Servant was calling him down Stairs. The Servant deposed he followed the Prisoner, and perceived the Measure to bulge out of his Coat, but that the Prisoner would not permit him to see it, but going into an Alehouse it was set down on a Bench by him, with the Halfpence in it. The Prisoner deny'd the Fact, but however the Jury found him guilty to the value of 10 d.

[Whipping. See summary.]

James Wuller , of London, was indicted for breaking the Dwelling-house of John Colcot in the Night-time, with an Intent to steal , the 11th of July last. The Evidence deposed, that the Cellar-door was broken open, and the Prisoner found upon the Stairs. The Prisoner alledged, that he being out late, found the Door open, and went in to sleep there. There was no Evidence that he broke open the Door, nor any thing stollen, whereupon the Jury acquitted him.

Andrew Minn , of St. Mary le Bow , was indicted for privately stealing a Pair of Worsted-Stockings, value 2 s.9 d. out of the Shop of Samuel and Joseph Marriot , the 6th of July last. The Prosecutor deposed, the Prisoner came in with two others under Pretence of buying Stockings, and stole one Pair and put them into his Bosom, carried them out of the Shop, and they were found upon him. The Prisoner pleaded he was in Drink, and thought he had paid for them; but notwithstanding the Shortness of his Memory, the Jury found him guilty to the value of 10 d.

[Whipping. See summary.]

Peter Hudson , of St. Martin's in the Fields , was indicted for breaking the Dwelling-house of Thomas Haynes in the Night-time, the 21st of February last was 12 Months, and stealing thence 14 Pound of Solder, value 3 s.6 d. The Prosecutor deposed his House was broken open, but he could not say any thing was taken away. Michael Gardiner deposed that he and the Prisoner did the Fact, and sold the Solder to one Orrel: But it depending on the single Evidence of Gardiner, the Jury acquitted him.

He was likewise indicted a second time for breaking the Dwelling-house of Thomas Wetherbone , the 12th of February last was 12 Months, and stealing thence 10 Pewter Dishes, value 3 l.3 Dozen of Plates, value 3 l. and other Goods . The Evidence against the Prisoner was Michael Gardiner, who deposed, that himself, the Prisoner, and one Matthew Barker , having stollen 3 Wiggs, went into the Prosecutor's House to see if they were good, where spying a Door in a private Place, they unbolted it, and coming in the Night, found the Family had not bolted it again, so the Prisoner and Barker went in and stole the Goods, while he stood Gammon (i.e. to watch that no body came to surprize them.) But there being no Evidence but Gardiner's against the Prisoner, the Jury acquitted him of this Indictment likewise.

Robert Edwards , of St. Andrew's Holbourn , was indicted for breaking the Dwelling-house of Mary Townsend in the Night-time, and stealing thence 1 Silver Spoon, value 10 s.1 Cane, value 5 s.1 Hat, value 5 s. the 28 the of July, in the 1st Year of his present Majesty . The Prosecutor deposed, that as she was sitting in the Parlour at Supper, the Things lying in the Windows, the Sashes were put up and the Goods taken out, but she knew not who took them. James Evans deposed, that himself and the Prisoner going by the Prosecutor's House, the Prisoner told him there was Money to be gotten at that House, accordingly he lifted up one Sash, and took the Spoon out of a China Bason, while the Prisoner lifted up the other and took out the Hat and Cane, and that they brush'd off with them, and sold them to Deborah Stent . But there being no Evidence against the Prisoner, but that of James Evans, the Jury acquitted him.

Sarah Jones alias Ann Dunn , was indicted for feloniously stealing 5 Moidores,4 Guineas, and one Half-Guinea, one Broad Piece, and five Shillings in Money, out of the Dwelling-house of Robert Hall , the 2d of this Instant July . The Prosecutor's Wife deposed, that the Prisoner came to live with her as a Servant , having been recommended as an honest Servant by the Name of Ann Dunn; That coming about 9 of the Clock in the Morning, she set her to dusting things in the Chamber; That about 11 she took her Child, saying, she would carry her out and give her a Half-pennyworth of Currants, but that she left the Child at a Chandler's Shop in the Neighbourhood, and went away, and came no more; That the next Morning she going to her Chest of Drawers, found the Lock had been forc'd open, and her Money taken away. Katharine Swan deposed, that she had furnished the Prisoner with the Character of Ann Dunn, as a good and honest Servant, by which Recommendation she went to live with the Prosecutor, with the Intent to commit the Fact. Other Evidences deposed, that when she was apprehended she confessed the Fact; That she said the Money was spent, but she would raise 10 l. by nine of the Clock next Morning to make Satisfaction, and signified she was sorry she had done the Injury to the Prosecutor, he being an honest Man. The Prisoner deny'd the Fact upon her Tryal, and said she could not tell whether she made any such Offer or not; if she did, it was the Effect of her being in a Fright. However, the Jury found her guilty of the Indictment.

[Death. See summary.]

John Hall , of the Parish of St. Clement's Danes , was indicted for privately stealing 3 Perriwigs, value 3 l. out of the Shop of Benjamin Smith , the 17th of June last. The Prosecutor's Servant deposed, the Prisoner came to his Master's Shop in a seeming great Hurry, pretending he wanted his Master to let his Wife Blood, who had received a great Hurt on her Belly near her Navel by a Coach-pole, and that she would permit none to bleed her but his Master; and that he went to call a Neighbour to stay in the Shop, while he went to seek for his Master, in which time the Wigs were stollen. The Person who came to look after the Shop deposed the Prisoner went away while the Servant was gone to look his Master, leaving Word his Name was Clark, and he kept the Star Inn in Fleetstreet, and that as soon as the Master came in he should come thither to bleed his Wife. The Master deposed he went to the Star Inn, but found no such Person there; and finding it was a Trick, upon Examination found the Wiggs were stollen; but his Servant describing the Prisoner, he having some knowledge of him, apprehended him. Upon which he confess'd the Fact, telling him his Life was in his Power, and if he would be favourable to him he should have his Goods again, giving him the Key of his Lodging, where the Wiggs were found. The Prisoner however deny'd the Fact, but the Jury nevertheless found him Guilty to the Value of 4 s.10 d.

[Branding. See summary.]

Mary Howard , of St Martin's in the Fields , was indicted for feloniously stealing a Leaden Flower-pot, value 15 s. from the Dwelling-house of Andrew Carpenter , the 4th of July last. The Prosecutor's Servant deposed, that he coming to his Master's House, saw the Prisoner sitting upon the Flower-Pot, it being in a Basket and cover'd with some Rags, but so that he saw some part of it, upon which he apprehended her. The Prisoner pleaded she bought the Flower-pot for a Shilling of another Woman: But tho' she was so fortunate in buying such good Bargains, she was not so lucky to escape being found guilty to the Value of 10 d.

[Whipping. See summary.]

John Low alias Cobler , of St. Martin's in the Fields , was indicted for breaking the Dwelling-house of James Hampton in September last was two Years, and stealing thence 2 Hats, value 9 s.1 Pair of Leather Gloves, value 1 s.2 Leather Jacks tipped with Silver, value 40 s. The Prosecutor deposed the Goods were lost, but he knew not who stole them. James Evans deposed that himself and the Prisoner did the Fact, by lifting up a Sash and taking the Hats and Gloves from a Window, and that the Jacks were stollen from off the Bar. But there being nothing to corroborate Evans's Evidence, and the Burglary not sufficiently proved, the single Felony being committed before the Commencement of his Majesty's Act of Grace, he was acquitted .

Elizabeth Phillis , of St. James's Clerkenwell , was indicted for feloniously stealing 8 Pewter Plates, value 6 s. the Property of Richard Bennet , the 1st of July last. The Evidence deposed, that going into the Wash-house she found the Prisoner there, and asking what Business she had there, the Prisoner replyed, that she being very sick came in there to vomit, and that immedietely after her going away, missing the Plates, they pursued her and took'em upon her. The Prisoner upon her Tryal deny'd the Fact; yet the Jury, since she was then so sick as not to know her own from other Peoples, thought she would be well enough in a little time to be whipt, and therefore found her guilty to the Value of 10 d.

[Whipping. See summary.]

Edmund Sturmey , of St. Clement's Danes , was indicted for stealing a Silver Watch, value 4 l. a Silver Chain, value 5 s. 10 Muslin Neckcloths, value 40 s.2 Suits of Headcloaths, value 20 s. and other Goods , the Property of John Beachfield ; but no body appearing against him he was acquitted .

Ann Hasle , of St. Giles without Cripplegate , was indicted for the Murther of her Male Bastard-Infant, by drowning it in a Copper, the 11th of this Instant July . The Evidences deposed, that Mr. Burton where the Prisoner lived as a Servant , seeing some suspicious Symptoms of her being deliver'd of a Child, sent for them, being Neighbours; That when they came, they found the Prisoner sitting in a Chair in the Kitchin; That they taxed her with her Delivery, but she would not own it; That they searched all about the House, but could find no Child, though they found some Tokens of such a Matter; whereupon they pressing her more closely to tell them where the Child was, she told them it was in the Copper, whereupon they searched, and found 2 Gown and Petticoat in a Copper wherein was 8 or 10 Pails of Water, and pulling them out, took out 2 or 3 Pails of Water, and afterwards found the Child at the Bottom of the Copper. A Midwife likewise deposed, the Child was at its full Time; That examining her as to the Manner of its Birth, she told them that she was delivered in the Chamber, and that she got out of the Bed early in the Morning, spread a Gown and Petticoat on the Floor, lean'd upon a Chest of Drawers, and the Child came from her upon them; That there was a young Woman in the Room in Bed, with whom she lay, who was asleep ( she being a Quaker would not swear, and so could be no Evidence) and that she being very ill, went again to Bed, lay about 3 Hours, and then getting up, was carrying it down Stairs in the Gown and Petticoat, and was met by the Man. The Evidence deposed likewise that the Child was dead, and that there did not appear any Marks upon the Child of its having been hurt any where, except that there was a sort of a blackishCircle about the Child's Mouth (which a Midwife likewise deposed was usual to such Infants, tho'dying by a natural Death.) They likewise deposed that the Child was opened by a Surgeon, and that there did not appear to be any Water in the Body of the Child. In order to the better Information of the Jury in this Case, the Statute was read in Court, which was made to prevent the clandestine Births and concealing the Death of Bastard-Children, which enacted, That the concealing the Birth and Death of Bastard-Children should make the Mothers deem'd the Murtherers of them. The Prisoner, to put her self out of the Reach of this Act, alledged, that she was a married Woman at the time of her Conception, having been married to one Edward Wingate , who died same time before last Christmas. To prove this she had a Sister in Court, who deposed that she saw her married to the said Edward Wingate at Enfield Church. And others depos'd, they liv'd together for some time at Clerkenwell , and that the said Edward Wingate upon his Death-bed expressed his Concern in leaving her six Weeks gone with Child. Tho'in Contradiction to this, the Deceased's Sister deposed, that she examining the Prisoner since the Commission of this Fact, whether she ever had been married to her Brother, she answered her, she had not. But the other's Evidence prevailing, she was deemed not to be affected by that Statute. The Matter then turning on another Hinge, it being the Prosecutor's Business to prove the Child was born alive and that she murthered it. She said it was Still-born, and that she neither perceived it to stir nor heard it to cry, and produc'd a considerable Quantity of Child-bed Linnen in Court, which was sworn she provided for her Delivery; and her Sister deposed she spoke to her three Months since to be her Nurse; and likewise a Midwife deposed, that two Months since, she spoke to her desiring her to come to her when she sent for her, telling her she look'd the latter End of July or beginning of August. And the chief Stress of the Matter then being whether the Child was murthered by her before putting into the Copper, or alive when she put it in: As to the first , the Evidences generally agreed there were no visible Tokens of any Violence offered to the Infant; and as to the latter, the Judge being of Opinion it was not alive when it was put in, because of what had been before testified, that at its being opened there was no Water found in the Body of it. A Surgeon being call'd to give his Opinion on the Matter, confirm'd his Lordship's Opinion, deposing upon Oath he was of Opinion that no human Body could be drowned without receiving some Quantity of Water into the Body, and consequently the Child could not be alive when put into the Copper. The Matter being thus, that there was no sufficient Proof that she had either murthered the Infant, or that it was born alive, tho' the Action was so unaccountably inhuman, for which she gave but little Satisfaction, the Jury acquitted her of the Indictment.

Mary Johnson , of St. Andrew Undershaft was indicted for privately stealing 9 s.6 d. in Silver, and 2 d. in Halfpence, from the Person of Lewis Lapparelle the 16th of July last. The Prosecutor depos'd, that going along the Street near St. Mary Ax about 12 a Clock at Night, the Prisoner met him and hugg'd him; that he putting her from him, put his Hand in his Pocket and missed his Handkerchief; whereupon he taxed the Prisoner with taking it, upon which she pointed to it lying on the Ground, and while he was stooping to take it up she was making off, whereupon he feeling for his Money missed that too; he therefore pursued her and took her, and a Watchman coming they carried her to the Watch-house, and searching her found the very same Money, and no more, in one of her Pockets. The Watchman confirm'd the same. However the Prisoner deny'd the Fact, and the Jury acquitted her.

Mary Jones , of St. Botolph's Bishopsgate , was indicted for breaking the Dwelling-house of William Kendal in the Day-time, and stealing a Chintz Gown and Petticoat, value 25 l. a Sarsenet-Hood , Muslin Aprons, and other Goods, the Property of Richard Hadley , the 13th of June last. The Evidence deposed, that going into a Room to dress her Head, she perceived something to move the Bedcloaths; so running out of the Room she locked the Door after her and called some to her Assistance, and that as she was going she heard the Door unlock'd. Other Evidence deposed, that searching all the House over, they found the before mention'd Goods, and some others, moved out of their Places in order to carry away, but could find no body, till going into the Garret they found the Prisoner hid in the Chimney behind some Boards, and searching her found a Muslin Apron, a Sarsenet-Hood, and a Ribbon in her Pocket, which were Madam Hadley's. The Prisoner deny'd the Fact, and said she only went in there to hide herself from some Officers she saw who would have arrested her. This indeed appeared but a Pretence; but there being not sufficient Proof how she came into the House, and Madam Hadley being gone to Plimouth, or somewhere by Sea, and not being there to swear to the Goods found upon her, she had the good Fortune to escape at this time, being acquitted by the Jury.

Daniel Tennier , of St. Buttolph's Bishopsgate , was indicted for breaking the dwelling House of Hannah Stamford in the Night-time, and stealing from thence two Silver Spoons, value 15 s. a Silver Fork, value 5 s. two Holland Sheets, value 20 s. one Pound weight of Silk, value 25 s. and 25 s. in Money, the Property of Hannah Stamford, and 2 Holland Shirts, value 30 s. the Property of Thomas Motley , the 22d of June last. Hannah Stamford deposed, that he being provided by his Gang with a Ladder and Rope, got in at her Casement-Window when no body was in the House, and set a Bar against the Door that no body might come in to interrupt him, and having stollen the Goods, got out at the Back-Window by the help of a Rope. Thomas Motley deposed, that he took the Prisoner with one of his Shirts upon his Back. Another Evidence deposed, that the Prisoner had owned the taking of the Shirts, and 10 s.6 d. in Money. The Prisoner in Court owned the Fact in part, that he did go in at the Window as had been testified, and took the Shirts and 10 s.6 d. but pleaded it was no Robbery, in that it was his own House, and he only took what was his own, saying that the Prosecutor was his Wife's Mother, who skreen'd her Daughter to live in an adulterous manner with the said Thomas Motley, who had ruined him, had thrown him into the Marshalsea with a sham Action, kept him there 16 Weeks, and that the Night they knew he would come out of Prison, they got out of the House, and locked it up that he might not get in; That he had brought home 60 l. and his Wife and the said Thomas Motley had made it all away and ruined him; and that when he went away he left 6 good Shirts, and took the 2 he carried away to be his own, and that as for the Money, he took it out of his Wife's Snuff-box. All this was amply confirmed by the Neighbourhood, and much more, who deposed that he did not do this privately, but before Scores of the Neighbours who advised him to it, they adding, that Thomas Motley had, when the Prisoner had come home to his Wife, beaten him in a very barbarous manner, and that Motley had a Wife of his own at Deptford, but used to leave his own Bed to turn the Prisoner out of his, and lie with his Wife. Others gave the Prisoner a very good Character, and added, he had been the most abused that any Man was; whereupon the Jury acquitted him.

William Crew , of St Sepulchres , was indicted for Stealing a Gold Ring, value 15 s. from Sarah Bellamy , the 16th of July . The Prosecutor deposed, the Prisoner had courted her for his Wife, but she having heard he had a Wife, had refused him; That she going into the Country, had intrusted him with a Box of Cloaths to send after her, but that he had detained the Ring. There was not Proof sufficient, so the Jury acquitted him.

John alias Joseph Mathers , of St. Dunstan's in the West , was indicted for assaulting Robert Thompson , a Boy of 9 Years of Age, upon the King's Highway, putting him in danger of his Life, and taking from him 2 Holland Shirts, value 16 s.4 Muslin Neckcloths, value 10 s. and other Linnen, the Property of Thomas Wilkins , the 15th of July last. Robert Thompson deposed, that he having been sent to carry the Linnen to wash, the Prisoner came to him near St. Dunstan's Church, and offered him Twopence to carry a Ring to a certain Tavern hard by (the Name he could not remember) but he not being willing, he told him he would give him Sixpence to carry it, telling him he must deliver the Ring to his young Mistress, telling him he would hold his Linnen while he came back, for fear he should go away with the Ring, but that he not carrying the Ring upon that Condition, went on his Way; That the Prisoner followed him, knocked him down over against St. Dunstan's Church , took his Linnen and ran away. Richard Saunder 's deposed, that he coming along seeing the Boy lying on the Ground, crying out for his Linnen, espied the Prisoner making off, followed him, and seised him with the Linnen under his Arm, then committed him to the Watch. The Evidence being plain against the Prisoner, the Jury found him guilty of the Indictment.

Lucia Wade , of the Parish of St. Pancras , was indicted for stealing some Linnen, value 9 s. from Sarah Gardiner , the 30th of May last: To which Indictment she pleaded Guilty .

Edward Cannon , of St. James's Westminster , was indicted for feloniously stealing 2 Cossoy Chariot-Seats , the Property of Thomas Lord Mansel , the 14th of this Instant July . The Coachman deposed, that driving his Coach, he turned his Head and espied somebody in the Coach, upon which he told the Footman, who jump'd off the Box and pursued the Prisoner. The Footman deposed that he saw the Prisoner come out of the Coach, leaving one Seat in the bottom of the Chariot, running away with the other, he pursued and took him, he throwing down the Seat. The Prisoner pleaded, that hearing a Cry of Stop Thief he was pursuing the Person, and taken instead of him; which unhappy Mistake is like to lead him an ill-favour'd Dance after the Cart's Arse, the Jury having found him guilty to the Value of 10 d.

[Whipping. See summary.]

Richard West , and John Ashbrook , of the Parish of St. Dunstan's Stepney , were indicted for feloniously stealing a Callicoe Gown and Petticoat, value 3 l. the Property of Mary Wilson , from the Dwelling-house of Justice Wilson , the 3d of this Instant July . Elizabeth Jefferson depos'd, that she being in a Chamber saw the Prisoners out at a Window as they were lurking about in a Cow Yard hard by, she suspecting them watched them, and saw them open the Door of the Landry-yard, and take the Gown and Petticoat from the Line, and giving Notice sent a Servant after them. The Servant depos'd, that he apprehended them both, and took up the Gown and Petticoat where they had thrown it under a Hay-stack, finding themselves pursued. The Prisoners deny'd the Fact, saying the one that he went to the Hay-stack to clean his Shoes, and the other that he went to the Pond to wash his Feet. But this did not avail. The Jury found them both Guilty to the Value of 10 d.

[Whipping. See summary.]

James Owen , of St. James's Westminster , was indicted for feloniously stealing 27 Books, value 40 s.40 Yards of Gold Lace, value 10 l.40 Yards of Silver Lace, value 8 l.2 Cloth Coats, val.30 s.36 Shillings in Money, and other Goods to a considerable Value, out of the Dwelling-house of Sir Isaac Rebow , the 1st of June last. Robert Brown the Footboy depos'd, that the Prisoner, who was Footman to Sir Isaac, in his presence broke open a Cabinet, and took out 36 s. and Keys, and opened another Cabinet and took out more Money, he supposed about half of 5 l. and out of another Cabinet and Chest he took about a peck of Gold and Silver Lace, and Silk and Clothes, and many other Things of Value. Sir Isaac depos'd, that being at his House near Colchester , his Daughter sending him word he was robbed he came to London, and suspecting the Prisoner he examin'd him about it, and he told him he believed the Thieves came down the Chimney; but upon examining the Footboy he disclos'd the whole Matter: Whereupon he apprehended the Prisoner, who acknowledg'd it before the Justice; and the Examination was read in Court, many of the Things were had again, procured by the Prisoner's Wife's Direction. The Prisoner could not deny the Fact, but laid it partly on Robert Brown, as being as much concern'd in it as he, which did not excuse him; the Jury therefore found him Guilty of the Indictment.

[Death. See summary.]

John Cook , of St. James's Westminster , was indicted for stealing a Silver Sugar-dish, value 3 l. a Diamond-Ring, value 5 l. a Silver Salver, val 10 l. and other Goods , from Sir Isaac Rebow in January last. The Fact was plainly prov'd upon the Prisoner; but being but a single Felony, and committed before the Commencement of his Majesty's Act of Grace, by it he was discharg'd .

Elizabeth Catlin , of the Parish of Edminton , was indicted for stealing a Guinea and a half from Nathanael Phips , the 27th of June last. The Prosecutor deposed the Prisoner was his Servant , and that she took the Key of the Place where she saw him lay 13 l. out of his Pocket, when he was asleep, and took the Money, which he found upon her, and she owned to be his. The Prisoner pleaded she found the Key in the Chamber, and took the Money with a Design to give to her Mistress. This did not excuse her, but that the Jury found her Guilty to the Value of 10 d.

[Whipping. See summary.]

Richard Aleworth , of Maribone , was indicted for privately stealing 3 s.6 d in Money, from the Person of John Holloway , the 13th of July last. But the Evidence not being sufficient to convict the Prisoner, he was Acquitted .

Sarah Rider , of St. Martin's in the Fields , was indicted for feloniously stealing a Silk Gown and other Goods , the Property of John Mitchel , the 12th of April last; but this coming within the Time of the Act of Grace, she was Acquitted .

Ann Ellis , of St. Giles's in the Fields , was indicted for feloniously stealing a Callicoe Gown, value 20 s. the Property of Herbert Bennet , the 15th of June last. The Prosecutor's Wife deposed she lost the Gown, but knew not who stole it. Another Evidence deposed that she bought it of the Prisoner, saying she knew her to be an honest Woman. The Prisoner pleaded that one that lodged in the House with her desired her to sell it for her; she having a Character given her that made it appear probable, the Jury acquitted her.

Elizabeth Pitts , of St. Dunstan's Stepney , was indicted for feloniously stealing a Brass Pot, val.5 s. a Pewter Bason, val.2 s. and a Kettle, val.2 s. the Property of John Cassels , the 30th of June last. The Goods were taken upon the Prisoner going to sell them; she pleaded a Boy gave her them to sell for his Mother, who was in great Distress, telling her she should have something for her pains. But this was not believed, the Jury therefore found her Guilty to the value of 10 d.

[Whipping. See summary.]

Mary Scyas , of St. Giles's Cripplegate , was indicted for feloniously stealing a Callicoe Gown val.20 s. the Property of Thomas White , the 8th of June last. The Prosecutor deposed he took the Prisoner with the Gown in her Apron. The Prisoner pleaded a Woman bid her stay to buy some Goods, and she went into the House and had it of her. But this Excuse did not suffice, the Jury found her guilty to the Value of 10 d.

[Whipping. See summary.]

Thomas Middle , of St. Ann's Westminster , was indicted for assaulting Thomas Rutherford on the King's High Way, and taking from him three Diaper Table Cloths, value 16 s. Six Napkins, val.6 s. the Property of Peter Labbatosh , the 2d of July last. The Prosecutor deposed he was stopped and robbed by four Persons at the end of Dean-street going into Tybourn Road , that he followed the Prisoner and the Persons who robbed him as fast as he could, crying out to stop them, and that John Santeloe was taken with the Goods upon him. John Santeloe deposed, that himself, the Prisoner, Francis Raven and another Person did the Fact. He being the principal Criminal on whom the Goods were found, the Court not thinking fit to convict the other upon his single Testimony, therefore acquitted him.

John Chandler , of St. Buttolph's Aldgate, was indicted for marrying a second Wife, his first being alive : But the Fact being committed before the Commencement of the Act of Grace, he was not try'd, but acquitted .

William Fuller, commonly known by the Name of Evidence Fuller, or (as he stiles himself) Colonel Fuller , was not try'd this Sessions, as it was expected, for two notorious Cheats committed by him, by reason the Prosecutors did not appear; but however is continued in Newgate till the next Sessions.

Thomas Smith , try'd last Sessions for contriving and abetting Williams and Chessey in robbing the Mail , who was to have been try'd this Sessions for a Forgery, made an Affidavit that several material Evidences for him were in the Country, and he could not procure them, desiring therefore his Tryal might be deferred till the next Sessions, knowing that the Gentleman who prosecuted him for the Forgery, had come twice from Salisbury on purpose, and was now in Town, and had been at a considerable Charge to have his Evidences ready: But the Prosecutor bringing Proof that one of the Persons whom he called his material Evidence was in Town but two Days before, and had been serv'd with a Subpoena from him, the Court would not admit the putting off the Tryal, unless he paid him down the Expenses he had been at in attending two Sessions upon him, and to find satisfactory Bail till the next, which he agreed to do; but instead of that staid till the Tryals were over, and then came and pretended he would take his Tryal. The Court seeing through the Shuffle would not be trick'd by him, but he trick'd himself the next way into Newgate.

Panton the Weaver , who was indicted for a Misdemeanour in uttering a great Number of light Gaineas which had been filed, had his Tryal suspended on account of an Indictment of High Treason found against him for the same Fact, for which he is to be try'd at Kingston, the Fact having been committed in Surrey.

The Tryals being over, the Court proceeded to give Judgement as followeth:

Receiv'd Sentence of Death,4.

John, alias Joseph Mather James Owen . Mary Willoughby Sarah Jones , alias Ann Dunn .

Burnt in the Hand,3.

Walter Foreman John Hall Lucia Wade .

To be Whipt,11.

Mary Richardson Andrew Minn Mary Howard Elizabeth Phillips Edward Canon Richard West John Ashbrook Elizabeth Catlin William Thompson Elizabeth Pitts Mary Scias .

Advertisements.

Some BOOKS printed for and sold by Edmund Parker as the Bible and Crown in Lombard-Street, near Stocks-Market.

Orders, By-Laws, and Ordinances, for the good Government and Regulating of Persons Licensed to keep and drive Hackney-Coaches, and their Renters and Drivers. Made, publish'd and declar'd by the Commissioners, John Way. Tho. Sutton, More Molineux, Cha. Barnard, J. Idle. Allow'd and approv'd by Cowper, C. Parker, P. King. Tho. Bury , Note, These Orders, By-Laws, and Ordinance, came in Force the Four and Twentieth Day of June,1717. Price 3 d.

The London New Method and Art of Teaching Children to Spell and Read; so as they may, without the Help of any other Books, read the Bible in less than twelve Months. Note, This Way of Teaching is approved by most School Masters as the best. Price bound 6 d. with great Allowance to those who sell or give them away.

Arithmetick made easie , according to the New Method now taught and practis'd in London. Wherein the Rules of that necessary Art are briefly explain'd and illustrated with familiar Examples as may suit the meanest Capacity , if they desire to learn it. To which is added a Succinct Treatise of Decimal Fractions, with compleat Tables, Rules, and Examples demonstrating the same. The like not extant in any other Treatise of this Nature. The 4th Edition. By John Copeland , Writing-Master. Price bound 1 s.

The Daily Self-Examinant: Or, An earnest Persuasive to the Duty of Daily Self-Examination ; with Devout Prayers, Meditations , Directions and Ejaculations for an Holy Life and Happy Death. The 6th Edition. Price bound 6 d.

The Devout Christian's Preparative to Death. Written by Erasmus , now render'd into English . To which are added Meditations, Prayers and Directions for Sick and Dying Persons. Recommended as proper to be given at Funerals. The 6th Edition. Price bound 6 d. or two Guines per Hundred to those that give them away. Both by Robert Warren , D.D. Rector of Charlton in Kent .

Maximum in Minimo : Or, Mr. Jeremiah Rich's Pen's Dexterity compleated. Being the plainest and easiest Method of writing Short-Hand. To which are added, the Terms of the Law compleat in Characters at length; being of great Use to all Lawyers and others who take Tryals at lage in Courts. Never done till now. By Samuel Botley . The whole curiously engrav'd on 30 Copper-Plates. Price 1 s.6 d.

The Protestant Union: Or, The main Principles of Religion own'd by the Dissenters , agreeable to the Articles and Homilies of the Church of England, Ec Price 3 d.

The Benefit of Early Piety, recommended to all Young Persons, and particularly to those of the City of London. By W. Smythies , late Morning Lecturer of St. Michael in Cornhil , London. The Third Edition. Price bound 6 d.

Mr. Jordaine's Duodecimal Arithmetick, being the most Concise and Exact Method extant. In Three Books. Containing Notation, Addition, Subtraction, Multiplication, Division, Reduction, Extraction of the Square and Cube Roots, Rule of Proportion Direct and Reverse, Duodecimally performed, and very Practically applied to the measuring of all sorts of Superficies, and Solids, as Board, Glass,&c. Timber, Stone,&c. the Guaging of all sorts of Brewers Tuns and Casks,&c. and that with more Ease and Expedition, than by Vulgar or Decimal Arithmetick. Very Useful for all sorts of Men, as well Gentlemen as others, but especially for Merchants, Writing Masters, and all Measuring Artificers. And all the Rules made Plain, and Easie for the meanest Capacity.8 vo. Price Bound 2 s.6 d.

The Pen's Dexterity: Or the Ingenious and Useful Art of writing Short hand. Containing Twenty Copper Plates (curiously engrav'd in the Author's Life-time for the Use of his Scholars) of all the Letters, Characters and Contractions used therein. With Rules and Directions explaining the same to the meanest Capacity. Whereunto are added Law-terms, with other Discourses as on War, Trade, Binds, Beasts, Fruits, Vermin,&c The Sixth Edition, Price 1 s.

Omega: A Poem on the Last judgement. In 8 vo. Price 4 d.

WE Charles and Mary Pearce , who keep the Derby Alehouse in White-horse-yard in Kingstreet, Westminster, do hereby affirm , that our Child was so very ill with its Teeth, that it lay (as we thought and expected in Sorrow and Tears) ready to expire. We sent for the

ANODINE NECKLACE,

Recommended by Dr. Chamberlen, sold at the Golden Key over against the King's Arms Tavern in Kingstreet, Westminster, and put it about its Neck: It had not wore it above half an Hour, but the Child got up upon his Feet to play, to our great Amazement, and has ever since so visibly recover'd and thriv'd that thro' God's Blessing he is now a brave healthy lusty Boy; of the Truth of which we are ready to satisfy any Person that desires it. July 16,1717.

For the Good of the Publick.

WHereas several Gentlewomen and others of that Sex, in this Kingdom, have contracted an evil Habit of Body, wherein the vicious Humours, at first dispers'd thro' the Whole, comeat length to be lodg'd in one Part or another, and many times, for Causes too long to be here mentioned, are thrown down upon the Womb, occasioning a dangerous Weakness in that Part, which being neglected, at last turns Cancerous, and often proves Fatal. I cure the Diabetes when gives over by all other Persons. This is to acquaint all such as may have occasion, that a speedy Relief is to be had from an Experienc'd Midwife, dwelling at the Sign of the Queen's Arms, a Watch-Makers, near Exeter Exchange in the Strand, who perform'd a Cure upon a Lady at the Bath, after she was given over by the Physicians, and since has Cured several Gentlewomen and others in the City and Suburbs of London. I should not have put my self in Publick Print, but to satisfy the Afflicted where they may have present Ease and Relief.

THE most excellent BALSAMICK WATER, being the greatest Preservative of Health in Nature, that in 50 Years Study of Physick I could find out, needs not much to be said in its Commendation, for it will recommend it self; and I have no other Interest in making of it Publick, but for the Satisfaction of my Friends, and the general Good of Mankind, and that it may not die with me. I don't (like the English Quack) say that it cures all Distempers; but it infallibly keeps the Body in good Health, and defends it from all infections Airs and distempers, by taking 3 Spoonfuls of it in half a Pint of warm Ale, a Glass of White Wine, Tea, or any other Liquid. It may be taken by all Persons, of what Age or Sex soever, at any time of the Day, without Consinement or Hinderance of Business, according to the printed Directions given with it. It prevents Consumptions, and cures them if not too far gone ; it relieves she Tissick and Shortness of Breath; cures Ulcers in the Lungs, or in any part of the Body; it opens all Obstructions, and infallibly destroys all sorts of Worms in Young or Old. It cares the Yellow and Black Jaundice, Leprosy, Itch, and Scald Heads. It certainly eradicates that reigning Distemper the Scurvey; chears the Spirits, strengthens the Stomach, and creates a good Appetite. I recommend it to all Child-bearing Women, it preserving the Infant from those Infirmities that Children are generally afflicted with, purifies the whole Mass of Blood, renders the Skin beautiful and clear, and causes easy Delivery. Likewise I recommend it to Sea-faring Men that Trade to the East or West Indies, or those Countries where Fevers or the Piague are infections. When all other Remedies fail, this excellent Balsamick Water drives out the Small Pox or Measles, and keeps them from the Stomach or Throat, preventing that Soreness which generally accompanies, and often proves fatal in that Distemper ; and also prevents the Small Pox or any other infections Distemper, from spreading in a Family. It's excellent for Gentlemen after hard Drinking, far exceeding any thing; it discharges the Body from the Impurity of bad Wine, and cleanses it from all Scorbutick Spots, Scabs, or Boyls , by bathing outwardly; and cures all Old Sores and Green Wounds, by washing the Place with it; and all sorts of sore Mouths caused by inward Heat or Canker . It is also excellent for all Persons that drink the Waters, causing them to pass and evacuate whatever Humours offend the Body . This excellent Balsamick Water is put up in half Pint Bottles, at 2 s.6 d. each Bottle, with Directions at large for the Taking and use of it, which being close stopp'd, retains its Virtue in all Climates; for the older it grows, the better it is: It generally gives one Stool, and works off by Urine. This excellent Balsamick Water is made by none but my self; and, to prevent Counterfeits, is sold only at Mr. Parker's, Book-seller, at the Bible and Crown in Lambord-Street , near Stocks-Market, sealed with a Liew and Dagger. Perform'd by

HENDRICK VANDOR.