Old Bailey Proceedings Online (www.oldbaileyonline.org, version 6.0, 29 November 2014), April 1710 (17100418).

Old Bailey Proceedings, 18th April 1710.

THE PROCEEDINGS ON THE Queen's Commission of the Peace, AND Oyer and Terminer, and Goal-Delivery of Newgate, Held for the CITY of London and COUNTY of Middlesex, at Justice-Hall in the OLD BAYLY.

On Wednesday, Thursday, Friday and Saturday, being the 18th, 19th, 20th, and 21st of April, 1710. In the Ninth Year of Her MAJESTY's Reign.

BEfore the Rt. Hon. Sir SAMUEL GARRARD , Baronet, Lord Mayor of the City of London, the Rt. Hon. the Lord Chief Justice Parker , Lord Chief Baron Ward , Mr. Justice Tracy , Mr. Baron Berry , and Mr. Serjeant Richardson ; with several of Her Majesty's Justices of the Peace for the City of London, and County of Middlesex.

The Jurors were as followeth.

London Jury.

Joseph Grimstead

Thomas Dowell

William Tennet

Icabod Dawkes

John Kelson

Christopher Finchway

Richard Appleford

John Hutt

Robert Grosvenor

Walter Tredway

John Morrice

William Hart

Middlesex Jury.

Robert Bampton , Gent.

William Munden

William Pannet

Thomas Walker

Richard Winkfield

Robert How

Thomas Saunders

Francis Parker

Richard Hale

Henry Duck

Richard Newland

Alex. Harwood

The Proceedings were as followeth:

Mary Barlow was indicted for Feloniously Stealing three silver-hafted Knives, three silver-hasted Forks, and three silver Spoons , the Goods of Anthony Burridge , on the 7th of January last: It appear'd, that the Prisoner came to the Prosecutor's House, and desired to speak with him; but being told by the Servant he was not stirring, she desired to stay, and being left in the Kitchen, she took the Goods, and went away without speaking to the Prosecutor: That she afterwards sold the Goods to a Goldsmith, who gave Information of the same to the Prosecutor; they were produced in Court, and proved to be his: The Evidence being plain, and the Prisoner saying nothing in her Defence, the Jury found her Guilty of Felony .

[Branding. See summary.]

P - M - of St. Mary White-Chapel , was indicted for Feloniously Stealing 20 Yards of Muslin, Value 20 l. the Goods of Edmund Lee , on the 31st of March last; but the Evidence not proving the Fact upon the Prisoner, the Jury acquitted her.

Mary Walter alias Riddal of St. Martins in the Fields , was indicted for Feloniously Stealing four broad pieces of Gold, and two double Guineas , from Edward Davis , on the 25th of August last: It appear'd, that the Prisoner lived with the Prosecutor, and being sent up in the Evening to lay up her Mistresses Clothes, the Money being in the Chest of Drawers, where she laid the Clothes, the Prisoner took it from thence and went privately away the next Morning; she was afterwards apprehended, and confessed the Fact, the Jury found her Guilty of Felony .

Prudence Pollet of St. Bottolphs without Aldgate , was indicted for Feloniously Stealing two Muslin Neckcloths, Value 8 s. the Goods of Edward Bell , on the 16th of March last: It appeared, that the Prisoner was at the Prosecutor's a washing of Clothes, and having some of her own there, she put up those mention'd in the Indictment amongst them, and carry'd them off; but it not appearing that she took them out of any Felonious intent, the Jury acquitted her.

Elizabeth Thomas alias Still , and Catherine Stacy of St. Botolph without Aldgate , was indicted for Privately Stealing 40 Yards of Stuff, Value 40 s. the Goods of Robert Huntly : It appeared, that the Prisoner came to the Prosecutor's Shop to buy Drugget for a Suit of Cloaths; that when the Servant's Back was turn'd to reach some, the Prosecutor serving a Customer at the other end of the Shop saw Elizabeth Thomas take the Goods from the Counter, and put them up her Petticoats. He let her go out of the Shop with them, and then called her back; when she came back she dropt them from her. The Jury found her Guilty to the Value of 10 d. But the Evidence proving nothing against Catherine Stacy , she was acquitted .

[Branding. See summary.]

Elizabeth Williams alias Green of St. Andrew Undershaft , was indicted for privately Stealing 10 Pair of Women's Gloves, Value 10 s. the Goods of John Bradshaw , on the 15th of April last: It appeared, that the Prisoner came to the Prosecutor's Shop and bought a pair of Gloves , that when she was gone the Prosecutor missed 10 Pair, he pursued her and brought her back to his Shop, where she dropt them from her; the Evidence being positive, and the Prisoner saying nothing in her Defence, the Jury found her Guilty of Felony .

[Branding. See summary.]

Catherine Kirk and Sarah Cooper of St. Andrews Holbourn , were both indicted for Feloniously Stealing two silver Salts, and two silver Spoons , the Goods of Hicks Burroughs , on the 11th of December last; but the Evidence not being strong enough to Convict the Prisoners, they were acquitted .

Elizabeth Thomas alias Read of St. Martins in the Fields , was indicted for Feloniously Stealing a Trunk, a silk Hood and Scarf, two Muslin Hoods, a silk Handkerchief, with other Things , from Margaret Brown , on the 24th of February last: It appeared, that the Prisoner with another came to the Prosecutors pretending to direct her to a Lady for a Charity, that they sent her for a Pot of Drink, and while she was gone for it committed the Robbery; the Prisoner being afterwards taken confessed the Fact, the Jury found her Guilty of Felony . She was a 2d time indicted by the Name of Elizabeth Read for privately Stealing from the Person of Mary Howard , 13 s. on the 8th of February last: It appeared, that the prosecutor was met in the Street by the Prisoner and another Woman, who pretended likewise that they would do her aKindness. They took her to an Alehouse and called for a pot of Drink. but before they parted they pick'd her Pocket. The Prisoner saying little for her self, the Jury found her Guilty to the value of 10 d.

[Branding. See summary.]

Mary Martyn , of St. Paul's Covent-Garden , Spinster , was indicted for privately Stealing 18 s. from the Person of John Mercer , on the 23d of March last: It appear'd by the Evidence, that the Prisoner violently, and with the knowledge of the Prosecutor, put her Hand into his Pocket, and took the Mony from him; and the Indictment being laid for privately picking his Pocket without his Knowledge, she was acquitted .

Mary Wright , of St. Martins in the Fields , was indicted for Feloniously Stealing a Feather Bolster, value 5 s. a Feather Pillow 3 s. the Goods of Martha More , on the 1st of March last. But the Evidence not reaching the Prisoner, the Jury acquitted her.

Elizabeth Miles , of St. Botolph without Aldersgate , was indicted for Feloniously Stealing six pieces of Bone-Lace value 20 s. the Goods of Alexander Barnaby , on the 13th of March last: It appear'd that the Prisoner came to the Prosecutors Stand in the Lace Chamber, Aldersgate-street , and was seen to take the Goods from thence; two pieces of which, upon search was seen to drop from her, and the rest was taken from under her Petticoats. The Prisoner saying nothing in her Defence, the Jury found her Guilty .

[Branding. See summary.]

Samson Archer , was indicted for feloniously stealing a Horse, value 4 l. the Goods of William Birch , on the 30th of March last; It appear'd that the Prosecutors Horse was taken out of the Stable, but was afterwards found expos'd to Sale in Smithfield: It further appear'd that it was told several times after it was missing; and the matter being trac'd up to the Prisoner, he was apprehended, and upon his Examination before the Justice he confess'd the Fact. Upon his Defence, he pretended that he found the Horse, but no Proof appearing, the Jury found him Guilty of the Indictment.

Elias Dammasier , of St. Giles's Cripplegate , was indicted for Feloniously Stealing a silver Spoon value 9 s. the Goods of William Cutbert , on the 23d of January last. But there being no positive Proof against him, and he producing substantial Witnesses to his Reputation, the Jury acquitted him.

Ann Gill , of London, Spinster , was indicted for privately Stealing from the Person of Mary Gray 7 s. 6 d. on the 5th Instant. But the Evidence not being positive, she was acquitted .

Richard Wilkins , of London, was indicted for Feloniously Stealing Table Linen value 7 s. the Goods of Peter Henrious : It appear'd that the Prosecutor being sick in his Chamber, heard a noise below Stairs, and sent a Person down to know the Occasion; he was taken with the Goods upon her, and the Jury found her Guilty .

Elizabeth Richardson , of St. Giles's without Cripplegate Widow , was indicted for Feloniously Stealing 3 gold Rings value 20 s. a Crape Gown 2 s. a Crape Petticoat 12 d. with other things, and 12 s. in Mony, the Goods and Mony of Elizabeth Annet : It appear'd that the Prisoner was the Prosecutors Bed-Fellow, and while the Prosecutor was asleep, the Prisoner took the Goods out of a Chest of Drawers, and went off with them; but being afterwards apprehended, the Goods were found upon her, the Jury found her Guilty to the value of 10 d.

B - G - , was indicted for a Trespass, in paying 10 counterfeit Crown Peices to Tho. Wright , instead of the lawful Coin of this Kingdom , on the 20th of March last: It appear'd by the Evidence, that the Prisoner bought a quantity of Handkerchiefs of Tho. Wright , for which he paid him in counterfeit Crown Peices, which were produc'd in Court, and prov'd to be so. The Prisoner in his Defence, pretended that he had them of a Friend to buy Handkerchiefs, but producing no Proof of it; the Jury found him Guilty of the Trespass.

[Fine. See summary.]

[Pillory. See summary.]

Elisabeth Maulden , of Stepney Widow , was indicted for Feloniously Stealing a Flock Bed value 8 s. and a Callico Quilt 4 s. the Goods of Tho. Taylor , on the 4th Instant: It appear'd that the Prosecutor lost her Goods from her Shop Window, which she afterwards found in the Custody of one Mrs Pigion, who depos'd that she bought 'em of the Prisoner; the Prisoner in her Defence, own'd that she sold it to Mrs Pigion, but said that it was brought to her by another Woman to sell for her, but that not appearing, the Jury found her Guilty to the value of 10 d.

Jane Davis , of St. James Westminster , Spinster , was indicted for Feloniously Stealing 2 silver Seals, value 2 s. 2 silver Buckles: 3 s. a Locket 12 d. a Coral set in Silver 7 s. 6 silver Spoons 40 s. 4 gold Rings 20 s. with other things, and 13 l. in Mony , the Goods and Mony of Jane Mitchell , on the 29th of March last: It appear'd that the Prisoner lay with the Prosecutor, and got her Key out of her Pocket, unlocked her Trunk and took the Goods. which were afterwards found in the possession of one Tess Cook , who was likewise indicted with one Rachel Collier and Elizabeth Taylor , for the same Felony. Jane Davis was found Guilty , but no Proof appearing against the rest, they were acquitted .

John Butteridge , of Istleworth , Labourer , was indicted for Feloniously Stealing 100 bundles of Laths value 4 l. 10 s. the Goods of John Bill , on the 10th of March last: It appear'd that the Prosecutor lost his Goods, which were in the possession of a Person that bought them of the Prisoner, and the Prisoner when apprehended confess'd the Fact. The Jury found him Guilty of Felony.

[Branding. See summary.]

Elisabeth Bland , was indicted for Feloniously Stealing a Holland Shirt value 10 s. the Goods of Robert Birt , on the 14th of March last: It appear'd that the Prisoner was seen to take the Prosecutors Goods from a Line, and being apprehended, they were taken upon her; the Jury found her Guilty to the value of 10 d.

Mary Miles , of St. Mary White Chappel , was indicted for privately Stealing 20 yards of Muslen value 4 l. 10 s. the Goods of Edmund Lee on the 31st of March last. But the Evidence not proving the Fact upon the Prisoner, the Jury acquitted her.

Mary Barlow , of St. Paul's Shadwell , was indicted for Feloniously Stealing a silk Scarf value 12 s. four lac'd Holland Caps, a Holland Handkerchiefs, with other things the Goods of William Lester , on the 21st of February last. The Fact not being fully prov'd upon her. she was acquitted .

Susannah Kent , of St. Pancrass , was indicted for Feloniously Stealing a silver Salt-Seller, a Tortois Shell Snuff Box, 9 Ells of Holland, a Holland Sheet, and 5 s. in Mony, the Goods and Mony of Edward Cook , on the 8th of March last. The Evidence not proving the Fact upon the Prisoner, she was acquitted .

Mary White alias Kennet , was indicted for Stealing 4 Broad pieces of Gold, and 2 double Guinea ; the Goods of Edward Davis , on the 26th of August last: It appear'd that the Prisoner was the Prosecutors Servant , and being sent to put her Mistresses Cloths in the Chest of Drawers, she took the Gold from thence, and went off with it, but being afterwards taken she confess'd the Fact; the Jury found her guilty of Felony.

[Branding. See summary.]

Robert Etheridge , was indicted for Feloniously Stealing a Ram value 6 s. the Goods of Francis Ashby , on the 28th of March last: It appear'd that the Prosecutor lost a Sheep, which was taken upon the Prisoner, who giving no account of his Property in the same, the Jury found him Guilty to the value of 10 d.

Ann Bennet , of St. James Clerkenwell , was indicted for Feloniously Stealing a silk Mantua Gown value 40 s. a silk Petticoat 30 s. and a yard of Callico 1 s. the Goods of Richard Jones , on the 18th Instant: It appear'd that the Prosecutor lost his Goods out of his Shop, which were afterwards found upon the Prisoner, who saying nothing in her Defence, the Jury found her Guilty of Felony.

[Branding. See summary.]

William Maw and Peter Unite of St. Giles without Cripplegate , were indicted for receiving and buying of Mary Weatherly 168 Handkerchiefs, value 11 l. they knowing them to be stol'n by Mary Weatherly , a Person formerly convicted for stealing the same , the Goods of William Picket ; the Evidence proving the Fact clearly upon the Prisoners, and they saying little in their Defence, the Jury found them both Guilty of Felony.

[Branding. See summary.]

Elinor Green was indicted for Feloniously stealing a Hood and Scarf, and a Neckcloth, with other things, out of Alice Caudrie 's House, the Goods of several Persons , and the Evidence being very positive against her, the Jury found her Guilty .

Daniel Shales of St. Botolph without Aldgate was indicted for Feloniously stealing 30 Foot of Glass, value 16 s. 4 Casements 4 s. the Goods of John Ledger , on the 9th of December last. It appear'd, that the Goods were stol'n from an empty House, and when the Prisoner was taken, he confess'd the Fact. The Jury found him Guilty of Felony.

[Branding. See summary.]

Elizabeth Hest was indicted for Feloniously stealing Goods to the value of 3 l. from Richard White ; but there being no positive Evidence against the Prisoner, she was acquitted .

W - M - and C - S - of St. Bottolph without Aldgate , were both indicted for privately Stealing seven Yards of Blue and White Linnen Scotch. Cloath , the Goods of John Cardell , on the 6th of April last. But the Evidence not fully proving the Fact upon the Prisoners, and they producing several substantial Witnesses to their Reputation, the Jury acquitted them.

William Barnes of London Labourer , was indicted for feloniously Stealing a Cloth Wastcoat, a pair of Cloth Breeches, with other Things, and 13 l. in Money, the Goods and Money of Emanuel Matthews ; three Shirts and a Hat , the Goods of Benjamin Paxter , on the 19th of August last: It appeared, that the Prisoner was Servant to Mr. Matthews, but went privately away; that when gone the Goods were missing, and being afterwards Apprehended, part of them were taken upon him, and he confessed the whole Fact; the Jury found him Guilty of Felony.

[Branding. See summary.]

William Brian of St. Bottolph Billingsgate , was Indicted for Feloniously Stealing a Brass Sheave, Value 10 s. the Goods of William Clapham , on the 29th of March last; but there being no manner of Evidence against the Prisoner, he was acquitted .

Catherine Johnson of Maribon , was indicted for Feloniously stealing 46 s. the Money of Thomas Harper , on the 26th of March last: It appeared, that about six in the Morning, of the Day abovesaid, the Prisoner was going by the Prosecutor's House, saw the Cellar Door open, went in, and took the Money. The Prisoner saying nothing in her Defence, the Jury found her Guilty of Felony.

[Branding. See summary.]

Ann Barnes alias Frederick , of St. Paul's Shadwell , was indicted for privately stealing 23 Ells of Garlick Holland, the Goods of Henry Darlton , on the 31st of March last: It appeared, that the Prosecutor's Daughter was sent of an Errand, and left the Shop Door open , and morning saw the Prisoner come out of the Shop with the Goods under her Apron, which were taken upon her, the Jury found her Guilty of Felony.

[Branding. See summary.]

Ann Arnold of St. Giles's without Cripplegate , was indicted for Stealing 6 Pair of Worsted-Stockings, value 30 s. and a silver Spoon, the Goods of - Edwards ; a Peruke, the Goods of Edward Holt , and 5 l. 10 Money, with other things , the Goods of Sarah Widdow , on the 3d of February last; but the Evidence not proving the Fact upon the Prisoner, the Jury acquitted her.

Edward Whitby of St. Dunstan's Stepney , was indicted for Feloniously stealing 12 Yards of Cabel-Rope, value 20 s. and 3 double-headed Shot, 3 s. the Goods of Nicholas Andrews , on the 15th Instant: It appear'd that the Prisoner, in the Night-time, went in a Bomb-boat to the Prosecutor's Ship, and took the Goods from thence, when apprehended, confess'd the Fact. The Jury found him Guilty of Felony, and the Court gave Direction for the Prosecution of the Bomb-boat's Woman, as an Accessary after the Fact.

[Branding. See summary.]

James Neal and Margaret Adams of St. Martin's in the Fields , was indicted for privately stealing 13 Fans, value 40 s. the Goods of Samuel Gambell , on the 18th of April last. It appear'd, that the Prisoner came to the Prosecutor's Shop , and while Adams was cheapening a Fan, Neal took the Goods above-mention'd from the Counter, and was going off with them; but being brought back to the Shop, and search'd, they were found upon him. The Jury found him Guilty of Felony: But the Evidence proving nothing against Adams, she was acquitted .

Jane Edwards alias Gordon of the Precinct of St. Catharine , was indicted for Feloniously stealing a Pair of Stuff-Curtains, 3 Blankets, a Gown, with other things , the Goods of Elizabeth Mekanys . It appear'd, that the Prisoner lodg'd with the Prosecutor, that there came two Persons to her, whom she call'd Sisters, one of which took the Prosecutor out to make her drink, and in the mean time the Prisoner and the other Woman committed the Robbery. The Prisoner saying nothing in her Defence, the Jury found her Guilty of Felony.

[Branding. See summary.]

Thomas Palmer of Tottenham High-Cross , was indicted for Feloniously stealing 3 Pigs, value 21 s. the Goods of John Kent , on the 19th of March last; but the Evidence not reaching the Prisoner, he was acquitted .

Mary Sunderland of the Precinct of the old Artillery Ground , was indicted for privately stealing 36 Yards of Worsted-Stuff, value 36 s. the Goods of Edward Barber . It appear'd, that the Prisoner came to the Prosecutor's Warehouse to cheapen Goods; that he shew'd her several Pieces, and amongst the rest that above-mention'd that when she was gone; he miss'd it, but afterwards apprehending her, she confess'd the Fact, and directed him to the Place, where he got his Goods again. The Jury found her Guilty to the value of 10 d.

[Branding. See summary.]

Mary Boreman alias Essex Brown of the Precinct of North and Falgate , was indicted for Feloniously stealing a silk Petticoat value 40 s. and 10 s. in Money , the Goods and Money of Robert Dollison , on the 8th of February last. It appear'd, that the Prosecutor lost his Goods, and apprehended the Prisoner upon Suspicion: Upon her Examination she confess'd the Fact, saying nothing in her Defence the Jury found her guilty of Felony.

[Branding. See summary.]

Susannah Smart of St. Martin's in the Fields was indicted for Feloniously stealing 3 Gold-Rings, value 50 s. 3 Suits of Head-cloaths 4 s. a silk Hood 10 s. a broad Piece of Gold, and 20 s. in Money , the Goods and Money of George Wooton , on the 12th of October last. It appear'd, that the Prisoner being Servant to the Prosecutor, and he leaving her alone in his House, at his Return the Prisoner was gone, and the Goods missing, which were afterwards, found upon her: she saying nothing in her Defence, the Jury found her Guilty of Felony.

[Branding. See summary.]

Edward Barrington of St. Martin's-Vintry , was indicted for Feloniously stealing 18 Bushels of Coals , the Goods of Thomas Smith and William Frusherd , on the 25th of March last. It appear'd, that the Prisoner was seen with a Quantity of Coals in a Wherry, and being suspected to have stol'n them, he was stopp'd, and upon his Examination before the Justice, he confess'd that he stole them from the Prosecutors. The Jury found him Guilty to the value of 10 d.

On Thursday April 19. came on the Tryal of Daniel Damaree , and the Persons, whose Names follow, were Sworn of the Jury.

Sir Edward Gould , Kt.

Richard Brown , Esq;

Peter Lavign , Esq;

Robert Breeden , Esq;

Charles Bateman , Esq;

Peter Laccuse , Esq;

Giles Riddle

Thomas Dod

Charles Williams

Tho. Sutton

Daniel Selman

John Collis .

Daniel Damaree of St. Clements-Danes , Waterman , was indicted for High-Treason, for that he, on the 1st of March last, in the Parish aforesaid, did, with a great multitude of Men, to the number of 500, arm'd with Swords and Clubs, raise and levy publick War against the Queen . After the Councel for the Queen had open'd the Charge, the first Witness, was Mr. Talboy, who depos'd as follows: That going thro' the Temple, he saw some Thousands of People there, that had attended upon Dr. Sacheverell from Westminster-Hall, he heard some of them cry out, That they would pull down Mr. Burges's Meeting-House that Night; others were for pulling it down the ensuing Night, and a third sort not till they had seen the Event of Dr. Sacheverell's Tryal. They all agreed in the Design, tho' they differ'd to the Time of Execution, which however was the next Night, the 1st of March. For the 2d Witness, Capt. Orril depos'd, That about 10 at Night he was at Leonard's Coffee-House, and News was brought there, That the Mob had pull'd down Burges's Meeting-house, he then resolv'd to go about where they were, in order to do what Service he cou'd to the Government, in making Discoveries, &c. That the first Place he went to was Mr. Bradbury's Meeting-house in Fetter-Lane, where he saw the People rifling the same, and was there forc'd to pull off his Hat; And about half an Hour after Ten he went into Lincoln's Inn-Fields, where there was a Bon-fire made with the Materials brought from Mr. Burges's Meeting-house; and he saw at a Distance from him (towards Powis-House) a part of the Mob, headed by a tall Man: That he went up to him, and spoke to him, and found him to be the Prisoner, with the Queen's Coat and Badge on; That he saw him twirl his Hat, and cry, Damn it, I'll lead you on, God Damn ye, we will have all the Meeting-houses down; I'll lead you on. High-Church and Sacheverell, Hazza! He further depos'd, That that part was divided among themselves where to go next, and a Councel of Mob was call'd; some were for going to Wild-street, others objected against that, and said, That was a Hen roost, and propos'd to go into Drury-Lane, for that Meeting was worth ten of that in Wild-street: Upon which they all agreed to go to Drury-Lane, and the Mob not being so quick as their Leaderwould have them, cry'd, Damn you, why do not you come along, High-Church and Sacheverell, Huzza! That then this Witness lost him: This was about half an hour after Ten. The next Evidence was Joseph Collyer : He depos'd, That about 9 a Clock he saw the Prisoner bring the Brass-Sconce out of Mr. Burges's Meeting-house, and carry it to the Fire in Lincolns-Inn Fields, that was made with the Utensils of Mr. Burges's Meeting, and, in a kind of Procession, there go with it 2 or 3 times round the Fire, Huzzaing with the Mob, High-Church and Sacheverell! and then flung it in. He observ'd, the Prisoner had been there about two Hours, was positive to the Man, and said, That he was one of the principal Men in exciting the Mob, and went off with part of them to Drury-Lane just before the Guards came up. Several other Witnesses depos'd to the same Effect, That the Prisoner was very active in assisting, animating and exciting the Mob. The Prisoner in his Defence produc'd Evidence to prove, That he had been drinking from 9 in the Morning till 10 at Night, at which time he was very much in Drink; and one Wood depos'd, That he and the Prisoner drinking at an Ale-house in Water-Lane, about 10 at Night, News was brought thither, That there was a Fire in the Strand. The Prisoner then said, That there was a Lady in the Strand that used to buy Coals of him, and he would go to help her. That they immediately went to Temple-Bar, and stopp'd no where by the way; but at Temple-Bar they were stopp'd, and forc'd by the Crowd thro' Shere-Lane into Lincolns-Inn-Square, and from thence thro' the Wicket into Lincolns-Inn-Fields; That against the Wicket in Duke-street, the Mob seeing the Prisoner in the Queen's Cloth, caught him by the Cravat, and told him, They they would dash his Brains out, if he would not go with them, and as soon as they laid Hands of him, he left him and went Home. The Alehouse-keeper depos'd, that the Prisoner went away much in Drink a little after Ten, and being ask'd whether any News of a Fire was brought to his House? reply'd no. The next Witness for the Prisoner, was Charles Fisher , who depos'd that he was in Company of Wood and the Prisoner at the Alehouse in Water-Lane, and that the News of the Fire in the Strand was brought thither about half an hour after 8, and the Prisoner staid an hour, or an hour and half after, before he went away. The next Witness, was John Light , who depos'd that he brought the News of the Fire in the Strand, to the Alehouse where the Prisoner and his Company were about half an hour after 8. This Evidence further depos'd, That he came in a 2d time about 10, and found the Prisoner there, and it was between 10 and a 11 before he went away. The next Witness was Mr. Ward, who depos'd that he came out of the Alehouse with the Prisoner about half an hour after 10, and left him talking with one Mrs. Giles about 6 Doors from Water-Lane; who depos'd that the Prisoner was with her about a quarter of an hour. The next Witness was one Cummins, who depos'd that he saw the Prisoner at the Bonfire in Lincolns-Inn-Fields about 11 a Clock very Drunk, and the People hauling him, and making Sport, as he thought, with him. The next Witness was Mary Redding , who depos'd that going with another Woman to see for her Brother at the Bonfire in Lincoln-Inn-Fields, did see a Sconce carry'd about the Bonfire 3 times, and the Man that carry'd it, had the Queens Coat and Badge on, but that was a short Man in black Hair; and being ask'd how she could see the Man that carried the Sconce round the Bonfire, so as to distinguish him, there being a great Mob about the Fire? Reply'd, that she could see him through their Legs and Arms: She further depos'd, that going through Great Queen-street, half an hour after the Sconce was thrown into the Fire, she met the Prisoner going towards the Fire, that was almost burnt to Ashes. Sabella Prince , Redding's Companion, gave the same Account, but being asked how she saw him? replied, when the Mob opened the Ring to receive those that brought the Wood, she then saw him; being asked whether she saw the Prisoner that Night? replied, she met him in Great Queen-street coming to the Fire as she was going from it, and that it was about 11 a Clock when she met him. Rowland Walker deposed that he took the Prisoner up at Strand-Bridge, at half an hour after 11, and carried him cross the Water to his own House. Mrs. Hall and Mrs. Harvey deposed, they met the Prisoner in the Strand, going towards the May Pole about 11 a Clock. The last piece of Evidence for the Prisoner, were Witnesses to his Reputation, who gave him a good Character; notwithstanding which Defence, the Evidence for the Queen being very positive, and agreeing in all the Particulars of it; and that of the Prisoners agreeing with that of the Queens in many Points, and some of them on whom the greatest Stress seemed to have been laid, being very uncertain and contradictory, the Jury went out, and returning in a little time, brought the Prisoner in Guilty of High Treason.

[Death. See summary.]

The Persons Sworn upon the Jury for Francis Willis , were as follows.

Thomas Nichols , Esq;

Joseph Spencer

John Parsons

William Hargrave

John Mills

Thomas Phillips

Robert Breakspear

Charles Gardner

Richard Hazzard

Samuel Brown

Francis Higgins

Daniel Browne

Francis Willis of St. Clements Danes , was indicted for High Treason, for that he the first of March last, with a great number of People with Swords and Clubs, did Levy publick War against the Queen . The first Witness was Talboy, who gave in his Deposition as above, to prove the Design of the Mob at the Temple, to pull down Dr. Burges's Meeting House. The next Witness was one John Lunt , who deposed that he stood at his Door when the Bonfire was in Hatten-Garden, on the first of March about eleven a Clock, and heard the Prisoner say, That the Mob had made him Captain that Night and gave him a Window-Curtain of Mr. Bradburies Meeting-House for an Ensign, that he display'd it, and had burnt a Clock. The next Witness was William Grove , who deposed that about ten at Night the first of March last, in Holborn, at the Bonfire that was made with the Utensils taken out of Mr. Bradburie's, he saw a Footman with a Pole and a Curtain upon it, and cried, High Church Standard; That he with the Mob, stepp'd up to Coaches, and got Mony out of them, and cry'd High Church: This Witness being asked whether the Prisoner at the Bar was the Man he saw in Holborn carrying the Colour? Reply'd, he believed he was, but could not be positive, for he was so altered by his Cloaths, that he did not look like the same Man. Being asked what Cloths he had on? replied, either Blue or Green, but was uncertain which: Being asked whether he saw that Man in Newgate, that waved the Curtain at the Bonfire? Replied he did; and one of the Turn-Keys of Newgate being Sworn, was asked by the Court, Whether the Prisoner at the Bar was the Person he shew'd Mr. Grove in Newgate? reply'd, It was the same. Mr. Lunt being ask'd, Whether the Prisoner at the Bar was the same Person that told him, He had been made Captain of the Mob that Night, and carry'd the Colours? reply'd, He was; for he knew him before: Upon which the Council moved, That what he said to Lunt was not to be made use of against himself. Then the Court order'd the Statute of the Seventh of King William to be read, which says expresly, That no Person after that time shall be convicted of High-Treason but upon the Oath of two Witnesses, unless he shall confess the same in open Court. The next Witness was Capt. Orrill, who could not say any thing in particular against the Prisoner, but proved the general Design of pulling down Meeting Houses. The Prisoner made a long Defence, which I shall omit here. The Queen's Evidence not being strong enough to Convict him, he was acquitted .

The Persons Sworn upon the Jury for George Purchase were as follows.

Thomas Sutton , Esq;

John Furness

John Parsons

Joseph Parsons

William Hargrave

John Meard

Edward Boswell

Robert Breakspear

Richard Bearknife

Richard Hazzard

Francis Higgins

Humphrey Newman

George Purchase was Indicted for High-Treason, for that he with a great Multitude of People Armed, did on the 1st of March last levy open War against the Queen . The first Evidence against the Prisoner was Captain Orrill, who deposed, that after he had been several times at Mr. Burges's Meeting-House, and saw that Demolished, and the Fire made in Lincolns-Inn-Fields, with the Utensils thereof, he met a Detachment of the Queen's Guards, and directed them to go to Drury-Lane; that when he with the Guards came thither, he law a Bonfire made with the Pews and other Utensils thereof, and a great Mob about it, which were scattered by the Guards; That there he saw the Prisoner under a Bulk with a drawn Sword in his Hand, who pushed several times at theHorses Breast with his Sword to keep them off; That he was then driven from that Place, and went a small Distance off, to the end of Long-Acre; That then this Witness went up to him, he asked him what he meant, and said, in opposing the Guard, he opposed the Queen, and would have had him put up his Sword and go home; instead of taking his Advice, made this Reply, Damn ye, who are you for, High-Church and Sacheverell or no, I am God Damn them all (meaning the Guards) for I am as good a Man as any of them all, and called to the Mobb, Come on, come on Boys, I'll lead you on, I am for High-Church and Sacheverell, and I'll lose my Life in the Cause; after this he run resolutely with his Sword in his Hand, and made a full Pass at the Officer's Body, but one of the Guards giving a large, Spring, beat his Sword down, or else he would have run him through the left Flank: That he retir'd a little lower, and the Guards had at this time dispersed all the Mob, knocking down about 40 or 50 of them in the Action: As this Witness was going off he heard some of the Mob say, They would be even with the Guards to Morrow Night, for they durst not fire upon them. Richard Russell , one of the Guards depos'd, That he was Commanded by his Serjeant to match into Drury-Lane, and to return their Bionets, and draw their Swords; That when they came to Drury-Lane there was a Bonfire, with a large Mobb about it; That at the Fire, the Horse were all drawn into one Line with their Tails against the Wall; That none of the Mobb might come behind; That Purchase then stood in the middle of the Lane and Huzza'd, and came up and would have thrust himself between two Horses, but was beaten off with the Flats of their Swords; That then the Guards wheeled about the Fire, and the Prisoner came up at the Head of the Mobb, and cried, Damn ye, who are you for? Whether for High-Church or Low-Church, or Dr. Sacheverell? This Evidence deposed, That it was about a quarter of an Hour before the Mobb was dispersed there. One Sutherland, an Officer, that drew the Grenadiers up, deposed, That he saw the Prisoner several times at the Bonfire in Drury-Lane; That he there saw him flourish his drawn Sword; and cried out, He was for Sacheverell: This Evidence went up to him, and said, Sir are you encouraging the Mobb? He replied, He was for Sacheverell: That this Evidence went up to Capt. Horsey to acquaint him how Troublesome the Prisoner had been, and received Orders from the Captain to cut him to pieces, but the Prisoner then made off. The next Witness was George Richardson , he deposed, That he knew the Prisoner, for they had been together in Flanders; That on the 1st of March, about ten at Night, the Guards marched from St. James's, to Lincolns-Inn-Fields, where they quelled the Mobb, and marched from thence into Drury-Lane; That when they came there, they found a Bonfire with a great Mobb about it; That they struck the People with the Flats of their Swords, and dispersed them; This Evidence farther deposed, That he saw the Prisoner there make a Thrust at Captain Hansberg, and said to him, Do you intend to Kill my Officer; then with his Sword he struck down the Prisoner's Point, upon which the Prisoner retired under a Pent-House, and this Evidence rid up to him with a design to cut him down, but was prevented by his Sword breaking, as it was lifted up against the Pent-House. Being asked whether the Prisoner knew Capt. Hansberg, replied, that he did, for he was Abroad with him in Flanders. The Prisoner in his Defence-produced divers Witnesses to prove that he had-been drinking from Nine in the Morning till Ten at Night, at which time he came from the Cross-Keys Tavern, Covent-Garden, with Mr. Broad the Balliff, who deposed he left him very much in Drink, and as he thought going to his own House. There was nothing in the whole Evidence for the Prisoner that contradicted any thing that was Sworn by the Queen's Evidence, so that after my Lord Chief Justice Parker had summed up the Evidence on both sides, the Jury went out, and returned in about four Hours, well satisfied with the Proof of the Fact, but not as to the Points of Law, and therefore brought in their Verdict Special .

Joseph Waller and John Herbert of St. Dunstans in the East , were both Indicted for Feloniously Stealing four Coils of Rope, 12 s. two Iron Crows, and two Chains , the Goods of Thomas Read . It appeared, that the Prosecutor lost his Goods out of his Shop in the Night, which were afterwards found upon the Prisoners, who when Apprehended, confessed the Fact, the Jury found them both Guilty of Felony.

[Branding. See summary.]

The Tryals being over, the Court proceeded to give Judgment as followeth.

Received Sentence of Death 2

Daniel Damaree , Samson Archer,

Burnt in the Hand 21.

Elizabeth Miles , Elizabeth Williams alias Green, Mary Barlow, William Barns, Daniel Shales , Catherine Johnson , Ann Barn, Elizabeth Read , Mary Southerland , Mary Bearmen , alias Essex Brown, Susanna Smart , John Butteridge , Joseph Waler, John Herbert , Elizabeth Thomas , Edward Whieby, Mary Kennes , Ann Bennet , William Maw , Peter Units, John Edwards.

Petty Larcenies 9.

Edward Warrington , Elizabeth Maulden, Jane Davis, Elizabeth Bland, Hellena Green, Richard Wilkins , James, Robert Etheridge , Eliz. Richardson .

B - G - , Fined for his Trespass 20 Nobles, and to stand twice in the Pillory.

ADVERTISEMENTS.

SToughton's great Cordial Elixir: Now famous throughout Europe for the Stomach and Blood, as is defended in the Bais with it, prepar'd only by him, Apothecary at the Un in Southwark, set forth 19 Years: It makes the best Purl in Beer or Ale, Purl Royal in Sack, and the better Draught in a Minute, being the best and most pleasant Bitter in the World; now drank by most Gentlemen in their Wine, instead of any other, much exceeding any Bitter made with, which being so excessive hot and drying, thicken the Blood, dulls the spoils the sight, and is well known to recover and restore a weaken'd Stomach or lost Appetite beyond any thing that ever was taken occasioned by hard Drinking or Sickness, &c. and certainly carries off the effects of bad Wine, which too many die of. It has been so incerted in the Bills with It almost 20 years, and the certainty of its doing this, was one of the first Occasions of its being made publick. Sold at the Author's House, and at many Booksellers and Coffee-houses in and about the City of London; also at some one such place in most Cities and great Towns in Europe at 1 s. a Bottle. Where it is not yet sold, any Person who send first, may have it to sell again with good Allowance, many now selling 50 or 60 Dozen a Year, some more. Ready Mony expected of all. The Seal on each Bottle has Richard Stoughton cut found it, or else 'tis a Counterfeit.

THE Office of the Taylors Friendly Society, for Insurance upon the Lives of Men, Women and Children, is kept at the Sun and Cross Keys in Witch street, 3 days in a Week, viz. Mondays, Tuesdays and Wednesdays, from 9 a Clock to 1, and from 3 to 7, at which Place, every second and last Wednesday in every Month, she Trustees constantly meet about 6 in the Evening. And on Thursday at the crooked Billet in Billeter-Lane, and Friday and Saturday, at the Spotted-Dog in Shoemaker-row in Black Fryar, all at the same Hours. Here a Man by assuring his own Life and his Wifes for the benefit of each other, there will come into the Family, when 1500 have subscrib'd, 20 l. at their Deaths; and if any which Subscribes upon their own Life, shall after having been 3 Years in the Office, and went all such shall be relieved and assisted with all things necessary at the charge of the Society, till their Claims come due. The charge which each Subscriber pays, for Policies, Stamps, Entrance and first being but 5 s. And there being a second Insurance of the same Number, kept also at the same Places, called the Arnicable Society, whereby any Subscriber to the First, whether Male or Female, or any other Person, may if they pleas become Subscribers have also, by paying 5 s. 6 d. 10. Policy Stamps and Entrance, and first Quarter, and 2 s. a Quarter after, and no more, and will 120 l. be divided Quarterly among the Executors, Administrators or Nominees of the Deceas'd, and if overtaken which shall be relieved as in the first Society, besides several other Benefits which are too large here to mention, shall therefore refer you to the of the Settlement which is in Print, and may be had Gratis at all the Office is kept, as is before directed.

THE Charitable Surgeon: Or, the best Remedies for the worst Maladies, reveal'd. Being a new of Curing (without Mercury) the several degrees of the Venereal Pattern per in both Sexes, whereby all Persons, even the meanest Capacities, may for an inconsiderable Charge, without confinement or knowledge of the near of Relation, cure themselves easily, speedily and safely, by the Methods prescrib'd, without the help of any Physician, Surgeon or Apothecary, or being expos'd to the hazardous attempts of Quacks and Pretenders. To which is subjoin'd, a new discovery of the true Scat of Claps in Men and Women, different from the commonly received Opinion of Authors. As also a peculiar Method of curing their Gleets and Weaknesses whether Venereal, Seminal, or otherwise; with some other pertinent Observations relating thereto never before taken notice of. By T. C. Surgeon, Printed for, and sold by Edmund Curl at the Dial and Bible in Fleetstreet, price stitch'd 1 s.

MArten's Treatise (being the Sixth Edition, with large Additions) of all the Degrees and Symptoms of the Venereal Disease, in both sexes; Explicating Naturally and Mechanically its Causes Kinds, various Ways of Infectig; the N or Hereditary Infection; Certainty of knowing whether Infected or not: Infallible Way to prevent infection; Easiness of Cure when Infected; Reasons why so many miss of Cure; how to know when, and when not, in skillful-Hands for Cure; and the Use and Abuse of Mercury in the Cure. Necessary to be Read and Observ'd by all Persons that Now have, Ever had, (many other Diseases being occasion'd by the Venereal Taint and Mercury,) or at any time May have the Misfortune of that Distemper, in order to prevent their being Ruin'd by Ignorant Pretenders, Quacks, Moontebanks, Impostors, &c. whose Notorious Practices are clearly evinc'd To which is added, The Cause and Cure of Old Gleets, and Weaknesses in Men and Women, whether Venereal or Seminal, briefly describing the Use and Abuse of their Genital Parts, and why Gleets (as sometimes they did hinder Procreation, causing Impotency, &c. in Men, and Sterility, &c. in Women. With some Remarkable Cases of that Kind inserted. The whole Interspers'd with peculiar Prescriptions, many Pertinent Observations, Histories and Letters of very Remarkable Cures. The like for general Advantage, never published, by any Author, Ancient or Modern, since the Disease came first to be known in the World. By J. Marten, Chirurgeon, With a Copious Index to the Whole. Sold by N. in the Poultry and Church-yard. A. Collins at the Black boy in Fleetstreet, P renne at Se Head in the Strand, Ch. King in Hall; Booksellers, and at the Authors house, the Garden, on the Left-hand over the Door. Price Bound 4 s.

THE Famous Cholick Water, so often mention'd in the Gazatte, and published base Nine Years, being well known throughout Great Britian and Ireland, for being the only One Medicine giving speedy Relief in Cases of W in the Stomach or Bowels, Cholick, Vapours of both Kinds, sinking of the Spirit, Stiches and Pains of the sides. Gripes, Huxes, Vomiting or Loosness, and all indispositions and Weakness of Stomach and Bowels (immediately digesting any thing that is continued to be said Places only, viz. Old Man's Coffee-house at Charing-Cross Alice's at the Parliament House, Richard's at Temple Bar and at Mr. Clarks Stationer, in Birchin Lane, at 2 s. 6 d. per Bottle.'Tis not putting, but a rich Cordial, pleasant to take at any time, and of excellent Use to carry to Sea, being an immediate Help in Fluxes, Gripes, &c. When once tried, none will be without it. To prevent Counterfeit, every Bottle is sealed with my Seal, the Sun Flower, Mantle and Crest, and sold at those Places only; for since this has been made Publick, hath obtained a very great Reputation, and fully answered the end. I find there are several others that publish and imitate it under other Names and Titles, who live only by thus Pirating upon one and another.

RUptures or broken Bellies Cured with the greatest Success, and Trusses made to so great a nicety, that they exceed all others in lightness, with Springs, Joins Screws or plain, and Totaly the like are not made, Persons living at a distance, by sending an exact measure round the Body, and which side the Rupture is on, may be very well fitted by Wm. Collier , at the Bell and 2 Naked Boys in St. Johns Lane near Hick's Hall. Women may apply themselves to his Wife, you may also be sitted with strait stockings.

The Finest Lucatelius Balsam,

THAT ever was made, prepared with the Choicest ingredients that can be got; to which is now added the true Balm of Gisead, and Three or Four other Rich Balsamicks , and you'll soon discern a Difference from all others by its delicate fragrant cent and Taste: 'Tis a most effectual Medicine (as thus prepar'd) for tickling Coughs, Shortness of Breath, Colds, Hoarsness, Soreness of the Breast, or Lungs, Pleutetick Pains, Spitting of Blood, and all inward Bruises, Strains, &c. It is so great a Healer, that Chapt Nipples, Lips and Hands, are Cured at once or twice using; making them smooth and soft.'Tis sold with Directions, in which is a further Account of it, only at Mr. How's in Talbot-Court, in Grace Church Street; Mrs. Garraway's, at the Royal Exchange Gate, Mr. Smith's the Post Office in Russel Street, Covent Garden, and Mr. Male Glover under Ludgate, at 1 s. 6 d. a Pot, every Pot Sealed with the Sun Flower, Mantle and Crest, or else 'tis a Counterfeit. Nose This Sovereign Balsam you may depend on to answer fully what is said of it.

Robert Whitledge , who formerly lived at the Bible in Creed Lane, is remov'd to the Bible and Ball in Ave-Mary Lane, near Ludgate, where all Booksellers and others may be furnished with Bibles and Common Prayers of all sorts with Cuts or without, Rul'd or Unrull'd, bound in Turkey Leather or plain. Mr. Sturt's Cuts curiously engrav'd, also other fine Cuts, and fitted for all Sizes of Common Prayer. The Duty of Man's Works of all Sizes. The Duty of Man in Latin. Latin and French Common-Prayers, Tate and Brady's New Version of Psalms, with the new Supplement. Dr. Gibson on the Sacrament. The Statutes at large, in 3 Vols. Washington and Wingate's Abridgement of them, The Lord Clarendon's History of the Rebellion, in Folw and Octavo. And the new Transation of Esops Fables. All which Cuts are likewise sold by J. Baker in Mercers Chappel in Cheapside. Also Bp. Beveridges works in 5 Vols. Dean Stanhope on the Epistles and Gospels, in 4 Vol. The Welch Common Prayer.

AT Mr. Skinner's, at the Long White Peruke, in Lamb street in Spittle-Fields, near the Market, Liveth a Gentlewoman, the Daughter of an eminent Physitian, that has a never-failing Ointment that Cures the Gont, altho' the Parties be reduc'd to their Crutches, and that in two or three Days time, having been often found true by Experience; as likewise all Rheumatick Pains, as many in this City can witness. 3 s. the Pot. Also a Powder and Bottle, which Cures the Scurvy in the Gums, Canker in the Mouth, the Tooth-ach; and that so effectually, that the Pain will never return again; not only so, but makes the Teeth as white as Ivory, and fastens those that are Loose to admiration. Bottle and Powder 2 s. 6 d. To be Sold with Printed Directions, at Will's Coffee-House in Cornhill; at Steward's Coffee-House in Bolt-Cours, over-against the Bolt and Tun-Inn in Fleet-street at Ellor's, at the Rain-bow Coffee-House at Westminster-Hall-Gate; Mr. Folks, at the Castle in Little East Cheap, near the Queen's Weigh-House; a Painter's in White-gate Alley in Bishops-Gate-Street; at the Sign of the Peruke, at the Corner of Hastar-Lane in West-Smithfield; and at Mr. Grigg, Bookseller, next Door to Northumberland House, Charing-Cross.

ALL Melancholly, Hysterical and Hypocondriacal Distempers, which variously affect the Mind, with strange Fear and dismal Apprehensions; Faintings, and Sinking of Spirits, great Burries, Restlessness and Disquitement, (little understood, and seldom Cured by any Means) also Pains and Giddiness of the Head, Raisings to the Throat, Sick Fits, Tremblings, Oppressions of the Hearty or any other sucessfully cured (with Gods, Blessing; by a Physician well experienced therein, and of Years in those cases who also Cures

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