Old Bailey Proceedings Online (www.oldbaileyonline.org, version 6.0, 28 November 2014), October 1693 (16931012).

Old Bailey Proceedings, 12th October 1693.

The Proceedings of the KING and QUEEN'S Commissions of the Peace, and Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol-Delivery of Newgate, held for the City of London, and County of Middlesex, at Justice-Hall in the Old-Bayly.

On Thursday, Friday, Saturday, Monday and Tuesday, being the 12th, 13th, 14th, 16th, and 17th, Days of October, 1693. And in the Fifth Year of Their MAJESTIES Reign.

The Sessions of Peace, and Oyer and Terminer, Goal Delivery of Newgate, held at Justice-Hall In the Old-Bayly, on Thursday, Friday, Saturday, Monday and Tuesday, being the 12th, 13th, 14th, 16th, and 17th of October 1693. before the Right Honourable Sir John Fleet , Kt. Lord Mayor of the City of London, and Sir Salathiel Lovell , Kt. Recorder of the said City, with several others of Their Majesties Justices for the City of London, and County of Middlesex.

The Jurors were as follow,

London Jury

Daniel Taylor .

Isaac Dighton .

James Stancliff .

Henry Emmett .

William Turvill .

John Clark .

William Rogers .

John Lapworth .

Edward Harrison .

Allen Hackshaw .

Charles Russell .

Joseph Haycock .

Middlesex Jury.

William Dynn .

Henry Russell .

Gilbert Herring .

Nicholas Clark .

John Green .

John Groves .

John Hall .

Thomas Dunk

John Biscoe .

Robert Hopkins .

William Jennings .

William Gunstone .

The Proceedings were these,

Walter Batson , Jeremy Bedford and William Dando , were all three tried for breaking the House of Robert Jacob in Falcon-Court in Shooe-Lane , about the hour of Three in the morning, on the 21st day of September last . The Prisoners came to the House of Jacob, and told him they were come to search his House upon suspicion of High Treason, upon which he arose out of his Bed, and let them in; as soon as they were entered, instead of searching for Clippings, &c. they fell to rifling the House, and took away one Silver Tankard, value 6l. one Caudle-cup, 50s. one Salt, 5l. one Silver Porringer, val. 30s. Six Forks, val. 3l. Nine Knives, val. 40s. and other Plate; when they had done this, they carried Mr. Jacob, his Wife and Maid away to the King's Messenger's House in Piccadilly, pretending they had a Warrant from the Secretary of State to do so; viz. no search for Clippers; but they carried none of the Plate with them to the Messengers. They produced the Secretary's Warrant in Court, which was read on their behalf; but were told by the Court that their Warrant was to impower them to seize the persons, not the goods; and the Warrant was directed to a Messenger, and not to them; and what had they to do to meddle with the Goods? Batson said, That, what he did, was through ignorance, having been not long deputed to search for Clippers: Then the Constable, who was with them in the search of Jacob's House, swore that the Prisoners came to him at his Watch-house, and caused him by force to go along with them; and one in the Company held a Pistol to his Breast, but he could not tell which of them: They produced a Copy of their Deputation in Court, but they were told that did not avail, because they had acted more than they ought; they said they would produce the Plate: Upon the whole, the Court told the Jury, That such practices as these were of dangerous consequence, and therefore the more to be consider'd by them. They were all acquitted .

Richard Hewet was tried for stealing (on the 6th of September last) from John Williams a Bag, va 2d. one Guinea, and 17l. 5s. and 3d. in Money ; Williams said that he was a poor Country-man, and came to London to sell Teazles, and lay at Mr. Robert's Inn, where the Prisoner was Chamberlaine , and his Money being in his Pocket, behind his Breeches under the Pillow, under his Head; but in the morning when he awoke, his Breeches lay upon the Floor at the Beds-feet, and the money all gone; he produced several persons that paid him the money. And there was one Dendy, a Country Gentleman, that lodged in the same Room, who lost his money out of his Breeches in the same manner. The Prisoner and his Master (Mr. Roberts) alledged that they took all the care they could to fasten their Doors, and that they knew nothing of the matter. In fine, The Inn-Keeper was ordered to make the said Williams satisfaction, and the Prisoner was acquitted .

James Summers was arraigned for stealing a Silver Tankard, val. 6l. 10s. from Daniel Cook , to which he pleaded guilty .

[Branding. See summary.]

James Bell was arraigned for stealing 30 yards of Gold Lace, val 33l. Fourteen Gross of Brass Buttons, gilded, value 3l. 9s. the Goods of Alexander Marshall ; to which he also pleaded guilty .

[Branding. See summary.]

Mary Foreman , Widow , was arraigned for stealing 55 Ells of Hempen Cloth, val. 4l. 3s. 6d. 100 Ells of Offenbrig Cloth, val. 3l. 15s. the Goods of John Goslin ; To which Indictment she pleaded guilty .

[Branding. See summary.]

Martha Ward was indicted for stealing two Gold Rings, val. 28s. from Agnes Hilliard on the 2d. Instant. To which, upon her Arraignment she pleaded guilty .

[Branding. See summary.]

Ann Smith was tried for robbing Ralph Tells and Sarah Tells of two Silver Spoons, val. 22s. one pair of Stays, val. 25s. and other Goods, &c. which she had made away; she was a Servant to Mr. Tells, and took away the Goods; she went away on a Sunday night, without any notice given to her Master; she could prove nothing for her self, nor why she went away so clandestinely; she was found guilty .

Thomas Cook, alias Brown , and Peter Wallis , were both tried for making an assault upon Sarah Arnold , a Fish-woman , in the King's High-way; as also upon Margaret Atkinson her Maid , upon London Bridge , putting them in fear of their lives; taking from Atkinson 21l. 7s. and 6d. in money, and a Guinea from Sarah Arnold ; Atkinson swore, That on the 21st of September last, as she was going over London Bridge about 5 a Clock in the Evening four men then met her, whereof the Prisoners were two, and seized her, and carried her to a Tavern upon Fish-street Hill, and afterwards they went and brought Mrs. Arnold to the Tavern to her; and afterwards pretending to carry them before a Justice of Peace, they left them in the open Street, and went away. The Prisoners alledged that they charged the said Atkinson with Treason, for Clipping money; but then comes Mrs. Arnold, and declares, That they used her in a very uncivil manner, and gave abundance of ill names, and searcht her House, but found nothing; and being with her in the Street, pretending to go before a Justice, the Prisoners and one Ireland gave them the slip; and afterwards they had a Treat, and drank the two Fish-womens health, saying they had had a good Booty on the over-night; afterwards Mr. Cook was found out in Fetter-Lane, and part of the money was about him, which he did not deny to be Arnold's money; Mr. Cook called several Witnesses who were with him when he searcht the House, who declared that he fairly searcht her House, but found nothing suspicious there; he pleaded his Deputation, (and what he did was by virtue of the power derived from it) which he had from the Warden of the Mint; that was true, but then he must take heed how he executes that power, it must be upon persons of those suspected, and not upon their Goods; for this was of such bad Example, that all honest persons might be seized in the Street. Mr. Cook had persons of good quality as to his Birth and Reputation, and that he was a Gentlemen of a Good Family and had been entrusted by several worthy persons of great note, of things of value; so had Mr. Wallis. The Jury considered of the matter, and brought them in Not guilty ; for which Verdict they were checkt by the Court.

Jeremiah Bedford was singly tried on Middlesex side for Felony, in stealing on the 20th of September last two Pistols, value 40 s. the Goods of John Hicks ; upon Evidence is appeared that the Prisoner went to Chelsey and searcht Mr. Hick's House for Clippings, and Mr. Hicks swore that he lost his Pistols, and some Plate, at the same time; and the Evidence was positive that the Prisoner took the Pistols; the Prisoner pleaded his Warrant, but was told he was no Messenger, and had nothing to do to go about such matters; he denied that he took the Pistols; and said, that one Mr. Killigrew's man had them, and that he went with them but as an Assistant to the Messenger; the Court directed the Jury, that if they did believe he did it with a felonious Intent, then they must find him guilty; but if not, then they must acquit him. He was acquitted .

Ann Jones , Alice Stebbing , and Elizabeth Dymblebee , were tried upon two Indictments of High Treason; the first for Clipping the Currant Money of England , the second for Coining the same : The King's Witnesses declared, That in Jones's House in Sutton-street, at Westminster , were found a File, Tools for Coining, and three pair of Shears were found in the Stable under the Manger, and about a thousand Crucibles were found in the Garret, and some false Half-Crowns; and a Silver Plate was found with the Coat of Arms razed out, which was with all the above-mentioned Utensils produced in Court, and shewed to the Jury; as also a Bag of Clippings, Rubbing-stones, &c. Mrs. Jones alledged that she knew nothing how such things came there, and her Husband was gone out of Town the day before; and that she had a Lodger, a Frenchman, one Dumferling, that might possibly be concerned; she called several of her Neighbours, who she dealt with, who gave a favourable account of her life, and of her Husband's, Mr. Jones; the other two were Sisters; Stebbing being Maid-servant to Mrs. Jones; she said that Dymblebee (her Sister) came the Sunday before to see her, and staying there, was taken with her and her Mistress; they had some Witnesses also who said they were honest Women, and of a fair Reputation; the Evidence was not full enough to satisfy the Gentlemen of the Jury; so they were all acquitted of both Indictments, but not without great suspicion of being concerned.

John Bayly was tried, for that he, together with one Elizabeth Grimes , not taken, did break the House of Thomas Gill on the 15th of July last, about Eleven a Clock in the day-time, and took away one Iron Pot, val. 3 s. a Skillet, a Plate, a Bowl, &c. and 25 s. in money ; the money was in a Cupboard in a Little Drawer, and the Cellar-door was lockt, and no body at home; and when Gill came home, there was a Padlock put upon the Door, and the money was gone; The Prisoner said that he let the Cellar to Gill, in Long-Acre, and gave him warning to be gone, which he refused, so was advised to put a Padlock upon the Door: And a Witness for the Prisoner declared, that he took an Inventory of the Goods in the Cellar, and there was but five penny-worth of Farthings, and Half a Crown in Silver: So he was acquitted .

Abraham Anderson , a Black , was tried, for that he, together with one Benjamin Davis , not taken, did kill and murther one Benj. Price , on the 14th of April last, giving him a mortal wound upon the Belly of the depth of six Inches, of which he died : The matter of fact was thus; The deceased Price, and another person one Blacker, being walking along Castle-street in Long-Acre last Good-Friday at night, they overtook the Prisoner and the said Davis, who had each of them a drawn Sword in their hands; and when they came near them, the Black cried out, Damn you, who do you call Jack-a-napes; and immediately pickt a quarrel with them, and would fight with them; so Blaker got the Black's Sword from him, and then Davis gave Price the wound in his Belly; and the Black's Fingers were cut by Blaker's drawing the Sword out of his hand; the Black fled for it as well as Davis, and went into Flanders, as he alledged; and thinking all was forgot, he returned to England, and was taken at Westminster in a House of bad Repute.

The Black said that the other abused him, and called them Sons of Whores, and that he would not have fought, but what he did was in his own defence; he denied any thing that most affected him, and pleaded hard for to extenuate the Crime; He was found guilty of Manslaughter .

[Death. See summary.]

John Lord was tried for High Treason, for Clipping Money ; he was found at Dinner with Mrs. Wilkinson at Westminster, when she and her Daughters were taken, who were all tried for the same Fact last Sessions; and Mrs. Wilkinson was found guilty (and was reprieved, being pregnant) but on Evidence could affect him: So he was Acquitted .

John Crittenden and Edward Deer , were both tried for High Treason in Clipping the Currant Coin of England : On the 4th Instant the Prisoners were found in their Lodgings in Salisbury-Court , where was found a Forge, Clippings, Clipt-money, half-finished, and Melting-pots, Files, Rubbing-stones, four pair of Shears, and all other necessary Implements fit for Clipping. The Prisoners were much surprized when the Officers came to search, they stood as it were men struck dumb, so they did upon their Trial; they called several Witnesses, who spake well of them in the general, but the Evidence was so plain, they were both found guilty of the Indictment.

[Death. See summary.]

Thomas Tupham was likewise tried for the like Offence of High Treason, in Clipping the Lawful Money of England : Upon the Evidence it appeared that he was seen upon the Monument steps telling Clipt-money; and being examined, his Colour changed, and there was a small parcel of Clipt-money found about him, and a parcel of Clippings dropt from him out of his Breeches; The Prisoner said that he found the Clippings and Money upon London-Bridge, about 40 s. on't: He was found Not-guilty .

James Gardner was tried also for Clipping the Currant Money of England : The Evidence was, That the Prisoner offered 27 s. of False Money for 20 s. of Good Money, and that he would help the same person to some Clippings; in order to which they agreed to meet at an Ale-house in St. Anns-Lane, where being met, he was seized, and a Bag of Clippings was found pinn'd to the Skirt of his Coat, and some Tools for the Trade was found in his Lodging: The Prisoner denied that he knew any thing how the Clippings came to be pinn'd to his Skirt, and that it was a Trick put upon him; for truly he said he was wholly innocent; but yet he had no Witness to evade the Charge; He was found guilty of High Treason.

[Death. See summary.]

Mary Nace, alias White , was tried for stealing from Rachel Nace , Widow , on the 27th of September last, in St. James Dukes-place , four Ells of Cloth, val. 12 s. and 19 l. in money ; Rachel Nace was Mother-in-law to the Prisoner, and kept her in her House, and whilst she was abroad, she run away with the money, and afterwards was found at Westminster with part of the money about her; there was a parcel of Silk, Crapes, with Scarves and Fringes, &c. which were bought by her to make her fine; there was a Letter also produced in Court, written to her by one White from Northampton, wherein he desired her to buy him a Sword, and that he long'd to see her in her new Rigging, and that he would have her come to Northampton, but withal in as great pomp as possibly she could &c.

In her defence she said that she had been a Servant to her Mother Rachel Nace, and that her Mother had used her money often times before, so she thought now she might make bold with hers: She was found guilty of Felony.

[Branding. See summary.]

Dorcas Needham was tried for stealing a Watch, val. 6 l. from her Master one Peter Dubelly , whom she had served about three quarters of a year; Mr. Dubelly said that she took the Watch, and got out of the Window with it, and run away; she being taxed with the Felony, denied it; but after much pressure, she confessed the taking of the Watch; she was taken at her Mother's House in Russel-street in Covent-Garden, but she had made away the Watch; though she promised, that if her Mistress would give her but a days time, she would produce the Watch, or the value, but did not; instead of that she got out at the Window, as abovesaid, and made her escape; she denied it, but yet she was found guilty .

[Branding. See summary.]

Cornelius Trough was indicted for feloniously taking out of the Shop of Thomas Burgess near Aldgate, twelve pair of Leather Gloves, val. 24 s. the Prisoner and another man came to Mrs. Burgess's Shop to cheapen some Neckcloths and Crevats, and she saw him put the Gloves under his Coat; the other person run away, but the Prisoner was taken in the Act; he was found guilty to the val. of 10 d.

[Whipping. See summary.]

George Windor was tried for stealing a Brass Kettle, val, 25 s. and a Jack, val. 15 s. from Henry Mitchell of St. Botolph's Aldgate , on the 9th of September last; the Goods were found upon him in the night-time in the Street; he was found guilty of Felony.

[Transportation. See summary.]

Gertrude Smith, alias Davis , was tried for robbing William Wells of a Trunk, with several Laces and other Linen contained in it, besides 40 s. in money ; she lodged at Mr. Wells's in Cripplegate Parish and took away the Trunk, which was found in her possession; she said that she had the Trunk of a strange Woman, but that did not avail; she was found guilty of Felony.

[Branding. See summary.]

Samuel Godson was tried, for that he the 8th day of March did marry one Elizabeth Deacon ; and on the 12th of Jury following he did take to Wife one Ann Mealand , the first Wifebeing alive ; The Evidence to prove the first Marriage, said, that he was married to Deacon in the Fleet Prison, according to the Church Ceremonies; there was none could charge the second Marriage upon him; So he was acquitted .

Walter Batson , Jeremy Bedford and William Dando , were all again tried for making an assault upon one John Hicks , and taking 40 Guineas from him against the will of the said Hicks . They came to Chelsey , where Mr. Hicks was, and they seized Mr. Hicks, and took the money out of his Pocket, telling him that his House was at the same time searching, upon suspicion of being a Clipper; they went away, taking Hicks with them, and delivered him to the King's Messenger; This was lookt upon to be no legal way of dealing; tho they had a Warrant from the Warden of the Mint to search for Treasonable Persons, yet they ought to meddle with nothing but the persons themselves, and not their money and Goods. Bedford was not there at the same time, so he was acquitted in course; and the other two pleading that what they did was through ignorance, the Jury were pleased to acquit them both.

James Seward , John Rowland and Margaret Sumner , were all tried for a Misdemeanor, in unlawfully defrauding and seducing one William Puplet , a young man, aged about 21 years, who was a Servant to one Mr. Isaac Bernard , a Merchant in the City of London : They were charged in the Indictment to have seduced him the said Puplet, and got out of his hands (he being Cash keeper to Mr Bernard) the Sum of One thousand and seventy pounds in money, and of Goods to the value of 150 l. The Matter of Fact was thus; Mr. Bernard being on the 15th of July last at Bristol Fair, and leaving the said Puplet at home, to look to his Affairs here at London, and a younger Apprentice, in the interim of which time Margaret Summer was Mr. Bernard's Servant , and he was brought to be acquainted with Seward and Rowland, through, and by the means of one A - who was a man as bad as they; they all went to the Tavern, and caused the said Puplet to drink himself into a good humour, and then Seward borrowed 5 l. of him upon a Horse he pretended he had in Town, but really he had none; then after this they all went with him to Richmond to the Wells, and at that time he lent them more money; after this, they finding him yielding to their Designs, they told him that they would hire a Calash, and that he should ride in it with two Gentlemens Wives, whose Husbands were out of Town, to Epsom Wells, and they would ride by to attend him; to effect this, they told him that they should want money to pay for the Calash, and to buy them fine Cloaths, and Perriwigs, which he lent them, and passed his word for some Perriwigs to a Barber near Temple-Bar, where he left 30 l. in a Bag which he left behind him; which said money Mr. Rowland took away, and the Epsom Journey was put by; this money they borrowed of him, and they encouraged him so to do, by telling him that Mr. Seaward was a Gentleman of a good Estate in Reversion, in Wiltshire, which was false, and that he would honestly pay him; and as for Mr. Rowland, he was a Gentleman that had Threescore pounds per annum, and receiv'd it by 15 l. a quarter, and then he would pay him whatever he lent him; and that Seaward would ride to Salisbury in Wilts, and there sell his Reversion to repay Mr. Puplett what he had borrowed, but this was not performed: Then they come to the last shift, which was to perswade Mr. Puplet to get all the money he could of his Master's, and with that to go into Flanders, and there he might get into preforment, and buy a Commission. Mr. Puplett being so tricked out of so much money, and not knowing what to do to get it, and make up the Cash against his Master's return from Bristol, was persuaded to comply; upon which he raised several Sums, some of which were in Guineas, the rest in Silver, to the value of about 1000 l. in all, and with that he was shipt off from Harwich; this was the sum of the Evidence against the Prisoners. They by their Counsel pleaded, that they never allured nor inticed Mr. Puplet, neither did they know the money was his Master's; and that he was as forward as they in the whole matter, which was declared upon oath by several Witnesses on their side; that did them no kindness, for the Jury were pleased to consider the bad Consequences of such base Practices as these, so after a long hearing, the said Steward and Rowland were found guilty of a Misdemeanour, but the Maid, viz. Sumner was acquitted .

[Fine. See summary.]

[Pillory. See summary.]

Dorothy Robinson was arraigned for stealing a Box, value 10 s. two Quilts 2 s. two Blankets 12 d. three Sheets, value 18 d. and two pair of Breeches, the Goods of John Pedly , To which Indictment she pleaded guilty .

John Gold and Elizabeth Gold his Wife , were both tried for Clipping money ; the Evidence was, that there was a couple of Files, and a clipt Sixpence found in Gold's Chamber; but none could charge them to be Offenders in that case; So they were both acquitted .

J - P - was tried for a Misdemeanour, for that he being a Person of an evil behaviour and disaffected to the Government; and being at a Church at St. Mary-le-Bon on the 30th of April last, was heard to wish evil to the King and Queen, the occasion was thus; The Minister having read a Brief, and pronouncing the words, God save King William and Queen Mary, at the conclusion thereof the said P. was heard to say, The Devil take them both ; but there was but one Evidence that sworn he spoke the words, and there were others in the same Pew with the Witness and they heard no such words spoken; and there were several Persons sate with Mr. P. in his Pew also, and they heard nothing like it; several of whom were produced in Court on Mr. P's behalf, who declared upon oath, That the Minister pronounced the words, God save the King and Queen, and not King William and Queen Mary, as the King's Witness said; there was several that gave a credible account of his Reputation, and that he had taken the Oaths to Their present Majesties, and was well affected to them, and Their Government; particularly Dr Puller, and others of his Neighbours, &c. So he was in the end acquitted .

Joseph Stephens was arraigned for stealing a Shift, and some other Linen , the Goods of a Person unknown, which he confest upon the Arraignment.

[Death. See summary.]

Sarah Burrows was arraigned for stealing 8 yards of Lace from Sarah Lewkin ; To which she pleaded guilty .

[Branding. See summary.]

Edward Lampkin was tried for stealing a Sable Tippet from off the neck of one Mrs. Elizabeth Montford on the 10th of October in the Evening about Six a Clock; she was going along Bishop's-gate-street , and suddenly her Tippet was snatcht from her neck; and the Prisoner was found running away in the same place, but no Tippet was found about him, neither could Mrs. Montford say he was the Person that did the Fact; and the Prisoner had good Witness to his Credit; and the reason he run was because he was in debt; He was acquitted .

Jacob Duchfeild a Dutchman, was indicted for a Misdemeanor for speaking these words; says he, I take a Crown a week of King James's Pay, and I have a little Pocket-glass, and on the one side of it there is King James's head, and on the other there is a Cross, and that's to shew that I am listed under King James, and I can take any man to be listed under the same man that I am : These words were declared positively to be spoken by him, by a Woman: All he had to say for his defence was, that the Woman swore against him out of malice, because he would not yield to her unlawful desires; but that was disproved by her Husband that stood by her in Court, who said that he had been married to her several years, and that she was no such person: He was found guilty

[Fine. See summary.]

Mary Baker , Servant to Edward Groome in Drury-Lane , was tried for the wilful murther of her Male-infant Bastard-child, which she did on the 2d Instant ; upon Evidence it appeared, That in the Garret, where she lay, there were some symptoms of a Child being born, and that she used to tell her Mistress that she had the Dropsy, but last Monday was Sevennight, she was found in the Kitchen with the Child lying upon the ground dead by her, wrapt up in an old shift; there was no sign of any hurt done to the Child: The Prisoner said for her self, that the Child was dead born, and that she made provision of Clouts, &c. but she could prove nothing; then the Statute of the 21st of King James the First was read to her, viz. Except such Mother can prove that the Child was born dead by one Witness as least, then she shall be accounted guilty, which she could not prove; so she was found guilty of the Murther.

[Death. See summary.]

Jane Lark, alias Lyon , tried for stealing eleven Pieces of Coined Gold, val. 11 l. another 10 s. Piece, 9 Guinea's, and 25 s. in Silver ; the Prisoner was a Lodger in the House of the Prosecutor one Mr. Thomas Cummins ; and Mrs. Cummins having a Child sick of the Small Pox, she desired her to look to it whilst she went abroad, and in the mean time she robbed her; and about a fortnight after she let her Goods out at the Window with a Cord, and run away, and afterwards she was found it St. James's Market but the Gold was spent. And she then said, that if Mrs. Cummins had not made so much ado, she might have had her Money again; and if she would not be contented, she would go to Law with her with their own money, and ruin them therewith; for she could but be burnt in the band for it. The Prisoner denied the Charge, and had nothing material to offer. She was found guilty of Felony.

[Branding. See summary.]

Elizabeth Ellory was tried, for that she, together with Edith Ellory , not taken, did steal three Gold Rings from Thomas Medbury , value 40 l. Upon the Evidence it did appear, that thePrisoner was a Washer of Linnen to the Lodgers in Medbury's House, and one of the Rings was found upon the Prisoner's Daughter's Finger; that was nothing to her; So she was acquitted .

Mary Salter and Sarah Welsted were both arraigned upon on Indictment of Felony, for stealing from Mary Minnim on the 21st of September last 7 yards of Calico, val. 10 s. Welsted pleaded guilty , and Salter was tried for it: The Evidence declared the Prisoner came into the Shop with Welsted to cheapen Goods, and stole the Goods, and the Goods were taken upon the Prisoner, which was plain: So she was found guilty .

[Salter: Death. See summary.]

[Welsted: Branding. See summary.]

James Grimstone of Stepney was tried for breaking the House of Thomas Jackson in the day-time, and taking away on the 10th of September last one Silver Tankard, val. 4 l. a Silver Salver, val. 3 l. a Cup, val. 20 s. a Spoon, val. 8 s. five yards of Silk, val. 5 l. a Surgeon's Box of Instruments, and other Goods ; Mr. Jackson declared, That he being at Church, and his Family, the Lock of his Door was pickt open, and the Goods and Plate taken out of the House; and a little time after the Prisoner was taken in Swan-Fields, and Mr. Jackson's Plate was dropt in the Field, and a Salver was found in a Room upon the Bed in the House of one Utherwell in Brick Lane in Spittle fields, where the Prisoner was taken; and some Silks were found in the Cellar; all which Corroborating Circumstances gave such satisfaction to the Court, that he was found guilty of Felony.

[Death. See summary.]

Thomas Percivall , of the Parish of St. Martins in the Fields ; (that lately belonged to the Play-House) was indicted, for that he being a person not having God before his Eyes, nor weighing his Duty and Allegiance to our Sovereign Lord and Lady the King and Queen; but endeavouring and intending to deceive the King and People, he did falsly and traiterously clip, cut, file and diminish the Currant Coin of England : The Evidence for the King deposed, that when they came to search his Lodgings on the 10th of September last, he run away, but was soon stopt, and in his Pocket was found a small Paper of Clippings; and over his Bed's-head was found another little Bag of Clippings, which were showed to the Jury; and a pair of Shears, which were seen to drop from the Prisoner in the Street as he run away; which he did not deny; adding, that he found the Shears and the Clippings in a Closet where he lodged, and was going to carry them to Mr. Justice Bridgmans when Mr. Dunn came upon him; but he was askt why he run away when he saw Mr. Dunn; he said, because he was afraid of falling into their [Text unreadable in original.], which was easily believed; He was found guilty of High Treason.

[Death. See summary.]

Elizabeth Williams was arraigned for stealing a Silver Tankard From William Hutchins , val. 5 l. 10 s. on the 2d of September last; To which she pleaded guilty .

[Branding. See summary.]

John Aldgood and John Bonner of Westminster , were both tried, for that they, together with Stephen Duncks (not yet taken) did feloniously take out of the House of Thomas Kyrbey of Westminster 180 l. in money . The matter of Fact was, That Aldgood and Duncks went to Mr. Kyrbey's House in German-street to search for one Unit a Clipper, and they went up stairs about the House, and came down again; and then the Constable and Mr. Bonner came, (who had been waiting at an Alehouse near the House) till the other two had been in the House, the Constable and Mr. Bonner were in the House afterwards but found nothing that was suspicious; so they went all to the Tavern, and afterwards Mrs. Kyrbey went home, and mist her money, but she could not tell who had it; Mr. Bonner had good Evidence for his Reputation, how that he was a man of a fair demeanour amongst his Neighbours, and all others that he dealt with; So he was acquitted , but Aldgood was found guilty of Felony.

[Death. See summary.]

William Kemp was tried for privily stealing from John Brown 15 l. 5 s. in money : Mr. Brown swore that he was at the Tavern with the Prisoner from 10 a Clock on the Friday morning, till 10 the next day, playing at Cards; and he being much in drink he fell asleep; and in the mean time he catch't the Prisoner's Hand in his Pocket, but they were much in drink: He was acquitted .

William Noble , a Soldier , was tried for killing one Edward Randale , giving him a mortal Wound near to his Right Pap, of the depth of 12 Inches ; they quarrelled about a Whore on the last Fast-day, and fought for her at the George in Newtner's Lane , and the Prisoner had the misfortune to kill Randale; He was found guilty of Manslaughter

[Death. See summary.]

Walter Batson , William Dando and Jeremiah Bedford , were all three again indicted for breaking the House of William Marriott , and taking away a golden Locket, val. 16 s. two Silver Lockets, val. 20 s. a Pair of Forceps, val. 4 s. and other Surgeons Instruments, besides 42 l. 14 s. in money, &c. the Goods of Mr. Matthew Coppinger ; They came to the House about 3 a Clock in the morning, in a rude manner, and caused Mr. Marriott to open the Door; and when they were enter'd the House, they held a Pistol to Mrs. Marriott's, and Mrs. Coppinger's Breast, and swore great Oaths at them, and put them in great fear, and said, If you won't tell where your Husband is, I will send your Soul to Hell; this was said to Mrs. Coppinger; then they rifled the House, searching all the Drawers and took all the money away; Batson and Dando would not suffer Mrs. Coppinger to put on her Clothes a pretty while, till Mr. Bedford (being more civil than they) desired them to give her leave; the Constable spake to them to be civil; but yet Mr. Batson took out the money out of the Drawer, and sealed it up, and put some odd money into his Pocket, which he said was to bear charges; and Mr. Killigrew's Man stood at the Door, and threatned to fire the House if they would not bring Candles, &c. They pleaded that they were mistaken, and went further than they had power, but withal had no Felonious Intent. So they were all acquitted . And Mr. Coppinger had his money again.

Alexander Rollstone was tried for making an Assault upon Richard Settle in the High-way in Beaufort's Buildings on the 18th of September last, and taking from him four pair of Stays, val. 5 l. a Gown, val. 12 s. a Hat, val. 9 s. Mr. Settle said, that four or five men met him, and one of them struck him, and another run away with the Hat, and Perriwig, which was found upon the Prisoner in the Street at the same place; the Prisoner denied the Fact, and his Left Arm was perfectly lame, being maimed in the Wars last Summer; the Evidence waver'd; he was acquitted .

Hannah Woolley, alias Barry , was singly indicted for stealing one Woollen Blanket, val. 5 s. a pair of Sheets, val. 12 s. from Richard Nicholls ; she was a Lodger in Nicholls's House, and she took the Goods away, and confess'd that she had pawn'd them: she was found guilty of Felony.

[Branding. See summary.]

Edward Taylor , Deborah Taylor his Wife , George Purfrey and Jane Webb , were tried for stealing two Cart-load of Wood, val. 11 s. Iron Pot, val 2 s. 6 d. the Wood of William Johnson of Westminster , on the 24th day of June last; but it appeared to be a malicious Prosecution; So they were all acquitted .

John Skudamore , David Douglas and John Gowen , were indicted for a Misdemeanor, in erecting and setting up a private Printing-press, and printing therewith, or causing to be printed several Scandalous and Seditious Pamphlets against the Peace of the King and Queen, and Government, and for privately and secretly dispersing the said Scandalous Pamphlets . The King's Messenger swore that the Press was found in Douglas's House at Westminster , and there was printed thereupon several Seditious Papers and Pamphlets; one, entituled, The Jacobites Principles vindicated; and Great Britain's Just Complaint; Another Book of Paradoxes; and that Mr. Douglas came into the Printing-room whilst the men were printing of them, and bid them make more haste, for, says he, I was used to make more haste when I made Gloves for my Mistress the Queen; and Further, it was proved that Mr. Douglas had several of the Pamphlets from the Printer, and that he sold them, and brought the money for them to him; and in Mr. Gowen's House was found in a Drawer the Scotch Whim; and in his House of Office was found the Jacobite Principles vindicated: The Prisoners had several Friends appeared for their Reputation, who declared in general that they were men that followed of their private Trades; and no ways disaffected as they ever apprehended, &c. Mr. Skudamore did not appear, though often called; so the Jury were discharged of him; and having considered of their Verdict, they were both found guilty of a Misdemeanor.

[Fine. See summary.]

Walter Batson , Jeremy Bedford and William Dando , were again indicted for making a Riot in the House of Robert Jacob in Shooe-Lane ; to which they all pleaded guilty .

[Fine. See summary.]

Mary King, alias Godman , was tried for robbing the House of one Joseph Bayly of St. Gile's-Cripplegate on the 30th of September last, and carrying away one Alkereene Petticoat,val. 7 s. three yards of Hair-fringe, a Hood, and three yards of White Flanders Lace, val. 43 s. the Door was double lockt; and when Mrs. Bayly came home, she found it open, and the Goods gone; she confest the Fact before Mr. Justice Wythers; but none could say she broke the Door open; So she was found guilty of Felony only .

[Branding. See summary.]

John Chetwood of Harrow on the Hill , was tried for two Burglaries; one for breaking the House of John Canon , and stealing 9 Pullets, val 9 s. and some other things, from Matthew Malner ; a second for breaking the House of Robert Twiford at the same place, and stealing 5 Geese, val. 15 s. there were two other Persons with the Prisoner viz. one Thomas Purchase , and one Daniel Hoskins , who were bailed; Mr. Twiford's Goose-house was broke open on the 8th Instant, and 5 Geese stole away; and the Prisoner confest to the Headborrow of Marrybone, that he broke the Goose-house, and took 4 of the Geese away; he was found guilty of breaking of Twiford's House; but the Evidence was short as to the other: So he was acquitted of that.

[Death. See summary.]

John Vandore , Mary Vandore his Wife , Hannah Woolley, alias Barry , and James Bennet , were all four indicted, for that James Bennet, together with James Barnet , and John Turner , not yet taken, did break the House of Richard Nicholls of St. Margaret's Westminster , and took away one Silver Tankard, val 5 l. 10 s another Tankard, val. 6 l. a Caudle Cup, a Spoon, a Watch, val. 40 s. a Wastcoat, a Silk Scarf, 5 Gold Rings, val. 40 s. and 50 l. in Money . Upon Evidence it appeared, that James Bennet was a Lodger in Mr. Nichol's House, and he came to his Lodging about 10 a Clock at night, and the Maid opening the Door to let him into the House, he with two more rushed in, and went into Nichols's Chamber, and swore that money they wanted, and money they must have; and told him that he had 500 l. in his House; there was none could swear that Vandore, his Wife, and Woolley, was at the Robbery; so they were indicted but as Accessaries, and were acquitted ; but James Bennet was found guilty .

[Death. See summary.]

Margaret Sherwood and Thomas Marsh were both tried for counterfeiting the Currant Money of England ; Mrs. Sherwood's House being searcht at Cock-hill, in the Parish of Shadwell upon suspicion, there was found in the Garret abundance of Plates of Half-Crowns newly stampt; as also a great many Bars of Copper, Tin, and other mixt Metals; with the Flasks and Melting-pots, and all other Tools for the work; and in the Chamber where the Woman lay, Marsh was found standing by the Window; and in the Closet there was found 94 new fresh-coined Half-Crowns, which were essay'd and valued by the Goldsmith to be worth but Half a Crown an Ounce: Sherwood said she knew nothing of it, and had Lodgers that Lay in the Room. Marsh declared that he had not been in the House not above a quarter of an hour before the Constable came: The Evidence could not reach him, so he was acquitted ; but Sherwood was found guilty of High Treason.

[Death. See summary.]

Cornelius Slayman , Arthur Denzy , Philip Mackdonel , and Nicholas Henderson , were all four Indicted for Robbing the House of one William Hudbolt of Hackney : Three of the four came to Hudbols's House, it being an Ale-house, about 6 a Clock at Night, and ask'd for Lodging; telling the Man of the House, That they wanted two Fellows that were run from their Colours: After they had sat a while eating and drinking civilly, in comes four more, and immediately they made a Mutiny in the House, pretending to Quarrel amongst themselves, one holding a Sword to the Woman's Breast, and put all the Family into disorder and fear, penning them in a Room; then they rifled the House, and took away a Mantua-Gown, val. 4 s. a Looking-glass, val. 18 d. a Silk Scarf, a White Hood, &c. Then one of them shot a Pistol off, and Mackdonel fell down and feigned himself dead; and they swore great Oaths at the said Hudbolt, and told him that he had kill'd the Man, and they would kill him; and that if he would give them 40 s. they would carry him off; Mrs. Hudbolt told them she was poor, and had no Money; they forced her to go and borrow of her Neighbours, which was 3 s. and 5 s. They broke open a Chamber-door and a Lock, and took several Parcels of Linnens, and let the Drink out of the Barrels, and away they run. The Evidence swore positively that they were all concerned in the matter of Fact, so they were all found guilty of Felony.

[Death. See summary.]

Walter Batson was again singly tried for stealing a Musquetoone, value 30 s. and 15 l. 10 s. in Money , from Mr. John Hicks of Chelsey : He came to the House, and told them that he had an Order to search the House by Virtue of a Warrant from the Deputy of the Mint; and he took an Inventory of the Goods in the House, Mr. Hicks and his Wife being then in the Massenger's House at London, he took away the Money above said, and the Musquetoone; but said withal, That if Mr. Hicks were Convicted, then he must give him the Money again. He found nothing suspicious in the House, and said that Mr. Hicks's Wine was very good, but his Ale was naught. It was not believed that he did it with any felonious Intent: So he was acquitted .

Francis West was indicted and tried for scattering, selling, and exposing the Picture of the Prince of Wales ; and this he did by taking Notes under the Peoples hands to pay him for them when King James came to England again: The King Messenger swore, That they found Copper-plates with the Prince of Wales's Effigies engraven upon it: And there were several Notes which he had taken to be paid, one of which was thus, I promise to pay to Mr. Francis West, the Sum 10 s. 9 d. the same day that our Sovereign Lord King James shall come to White-hall. Witness my hand Elinor Graham . There were several other Notes to the same purport.

Francis West was a second time indicted for Publishing a Scandalous Libel, Entitled, An Errata of the Protestant Bible, or the Truth of the English Translation Examined . In which were many most base, false, and scandalous Expressions, tending to the disparagement of the Holy Bible, and the undervaluing of the Protestant Religion; There was another Book produced in Court, which the Prisoner owned to be his, and in the same it did appear, that he had sold several of the Books to one Matthew Turner , near Turn stite, a Bookseller: He was found guilty of a Misdeameanor upon both Indictments.

[Fine. See summary.]

William Batson , William Dando , and Jeremiah Bedford , were again arraigned for making a Riot in the House of William Marriott : To which they all pleaded guilty .

[Fine. See summary.]

Robert Walker was tried for stealing a Silver Tankard value 5 l. a Lid of a Tankard value 15 s. and other Goods , from Francis Edmonds , the Evidence could not charge the Plate upon him; but he confest That he had stole 14 Glass Bottles from Mr. Edmonds: So he was found guilty to the value of 10 d.

[Whipping. See summary.]

Robert Smith and William Laborne , were both tried for stealing a Canvass-bags value 1 d. and 100 l. in money , from Francis Flower : They were Plaisterer s working in the House, and at that time the Money was missing; but none could be positive against them, and they had very credible Witnesses on their sides; They were both acquitted .

Elizabeth Clover was indicted for stealing five pair of Sheets, value 6 l. 10 s. two other pair, value 1 l. the Goods of Moses Kneves . The King's Evidence was, That the Prisoner took the Cloaths away from a Washer-woman, as she was sitting in the Street, and being pursued, she dropt them. She had been branded before; She denied the Fact; She was found guilty of Fellony.

[Branding. See summary.]

Ann Clemens , Wife of William Clemens , and Elizabeth Tomlins of Stepney , were both Indicted for High Treason, in Cutting, Clipping, and Diminishing the Currant Money of this Kingdom of England, &c. Upon Evidence it appeared, That there was found in the Prisoner's house at Poplar Sixty Ounces of Clippings; and Six pair of Shears, and other Instruments fit for the Trade; which was fully proved, and they could not contradict it; They were both found guilty of High Treason.

[Death. See summary.]

Thomas Loveday was tried for stealing 150 pound weight of Lead, value 9 s the Goods of Robert Aldershaw , the substance of the Lead was in old Pipes, which a Witness, a Woman, told the Court she bought of the Prisoner, and gave him 9 s 6 d. for it; she askt him where he had it, and he said, that his Father sent him to sell it, which was false, as his Father testified in Court; he said he found it in the Common-shore, which might be so; He was acquitted .

Elizabeth Vaughan was tried for making of Tyn Halfpence, and Tin Farthings, and uttering them in payment against the Law, &c. The Landlady where she lodged, swore that she pretended to her to be a Mantua maker; but she hearing a knocking in her Room, and asking her what she was doing; She replied, nothing, but beating of Pepper to boil in Milk But afterwards searching her Room they found her at work and she had a Bottle of Water that would turn the Farthings into Copper colour presently. The Mold was brought, as also several of the new made Halfpence into Court, She denied the fact, but it was so plain against her, that she was found guilty .

[Fine. See summary.]

Jeremiah Bedford was singly tried for changing Broad money for Narrow Clipt money, and uttering it in payment ; but no Evidence appearing against him, he was discharged .

Margaret Heretage , Wife of John Heretage , was tried for stealing a Violin from Capt. Charles Berkley , Esq. as the 17th day of September last, she was met coming out at the Doorwith the Fiddle in her Custody: She denied the fact, tho so plainly proved: She was found guilty to the value of 10 d.

[Whipping. See summary.]

Rebekah Child was tried for that she did on the 4th day of May last, steal a Stuff Gown, val. 15 s. a Petticoat 6 s. a flaxen Smock 3 s. &c. from Sarah Barlow , who swore, That the Prisoner and she coming out of the Countrey together, she robbed her as they lay together one Night in a Barn upon the Road: She was found guilty to the value of 10 d.

[Whipping. See summary.]

Elizabeth Gray was indicted for robbing Edw. Bright of St. Martins in the Fields of a Trunk val. 10 d containing in it a Silver Spoon, val. 6 s. Two Poringers, val. 40 s. Two Candlesticks, val. 4 l. Mr. Bright declared, That his Trunk being at a Friend's house, one Thomas Smith not yet taken, went by a false Token, and got away the Trunk, which afterwards was found in the Prisoner's Lodgings: But nothing affected the Prisoner; so she was acquitted .

Dorothy Robinson was tried for stealing a Silk Quilt, and a Dressing box, from Mr. Pedley 's, and two Statute books, val. 2 s. which she confest when taken: She said that she did it through Poverty: She was found guilty to the value of 10 d.

[Whipping. See summary.]

Shadrack Cook , formerly Curate of Islington , was tried for Forging and Counterfeiting the Lord Nottingham's Hand and Seal, and making a false Passport, to convey one Thomas Davison and his Family into France . The Evidence for Their Majesties deposed, That Mr Cook being at Mrs. Merryweathers House, he was seen to melt Wax with a Candle, and to pull a Broad Seal out of his Pocket, which he said was the Lord Nottingham's, and press'd it upon the Wax; and when he had so done, he said to Mrs. Merryweather, Madam, look you, it is fairly done. And the Witness looking upon it, said, Madam, this is poor King James's Seal, is it not? No, says Mrs. Merryweather, you Fool, it is the Lord Nottingham's. Says the Witness again, If I could make such Seals, I would do it for all the Jacobites in Town. Furthermore, the Blank in the Passport was filled up with the name of Thomas Davis. This was positively sworn, as also, that my Lord Nottingham's hand was fairly written under the Warrant. Mr. Cook said, that what he did, was out of a Principle of Conscience. He was found guilty of a Misdemeanor.

[Fine. See summary.]

[Provide sureties for good behaviour. See summary.]

Sarah Duncomb was tried for making a Felonious Assault upon Thomas Spragg , an Infant , in the High-way, and taking a Stuff Coat off his Back, value 6 s. Mrs. Spragg swore that the Prisoner confest the matter, but the Indictment was laid wrong, the Coat being the Child's in Law, they were laid to be the Father's. So she was acquitted of this Indictment .

Katherine Arnold was indicted for stealing divers goods, as Scarves, Gowns, &c. and 10 s. in money , but no Evidence appearing against her, she was immediately acquitted .

The Trial of Elizabeth Cook , a Young Dutchwoman, for Picking the Pocket of one John Powel , a Parson , near Ipswich.

ON Friday in the Evening, the 2 d. day of this Session, the Prisoner was brought to the Bar, and the Jury being sworn, the Indictment was read against her, as followeth; Elizabeth Cook, Hold up thy Hand: [Which she did.] Thou standest indicted by the Name of Elizabeth Cook, of the Parish of St. Margarets Westminster , in the County of Middlesex, Spinster , for that thou not having God before thine eyes, but being instigated and seduced by the Devil, a Leather Purse, val. 1 d. and 11 l. 10 s. in moneys numbred, thou didst privily and secretly steal, take, and bear away from the Person of the said John Powel, without his knowledge, and against his will. What sayest thou, Elizabeth Cook, art thou guilty of this Felony or not guilty? Eliz. Cook, Not guilty, Culprit, How wilt then be tried? Cook. By God and my Countrey. Clark, God send you a good Deliverance, &c.

The first Evidence against her, was Mr. Powel the Parson, who being sworn, declared, That he came to London upon some particular affairs, and happened to go into the house to dinner, where the Prisoner was a servant , (it being a Dutch-Ordinary), where she pickt his Pocket of the abovesaid money, which he could never get again. The next Witness was the Old Woman that kept the Ordinary; who deposed, That the Parson after he had dined (observing the Features of the Dutchwoman, and indeed she was handsome) was so much smitten with her Beauty, that he was not able to contain himself, but immediately he fell a Courting of her, declaring that there was no Creature in the world that he esteemed more; and truly he followed his business so close, that the match was suddenly made up, and they were married in the House by a Dutchman, who read out of a Dutch Book, after the Dutch fashion. After which the Parson grew inflamed, in Love with his New Bride, saying, My Dear now we are married, we must, to Bed, which they did, and lay two nights together; after which, the Parson, being willing to accommodate his new Wife, and to behave himself like a Gentleman, gave her money to buy her some fine Cloaths, adding these words, My dear, I will never leave you; God Almighty leave me, if ever I leave you. And that when she had bought her Cloaths, he would take her to his Living in the Country, which in reality he never intended. For as soon as he had delighted himself, and took his fill of Love, he began to grow weary of her, and examining his Pockets, his Stock grew low, not of Confidence, but of the Coriander, which put him into a sudden and strange Consternation; but awaking from that drowsy fit, he began to ask for his Money, which was all bestowed before on his dear Mistress: Being in this sorrowful plight, he knew not what to take to; but the next thing the Devil put is his head, was to Indict his Mistress for a Robbery; which he did, to the disgrace of his Person and Character; For the Court told him that his Diocesan should be made acquainted what a fine Clerk he had in his Diocess. In the conclusion, the young Dutchwoman was acquitted of the Indictment; and the poor Parson was laught at for his pains.

The Trials being over, the Court proceeded to give Sentence as followeth, Burnt in the Hand, 10.

Margaret Foster, Sarah Burrows, Mary Nace, Doncas Needham, Gertrude Smith, John Summers, James Bell, Mary Foreman, Martha Ward, Jane Lark, alias Lyon, Mary King, Hamnah Woolly, Mary Cloves, Ann Davis, Elizabeth Williams, Sarah Welsted.

Received Sentence of Death, 21.

William Noble, Mary Salter, Joseph Stephens, Abraham Anderson, John Aldgood, James Robbins, John Crittenders, Edward Deer, James Gardner, Mary Compton, Mary Baker, James Grymstone, Thomas Percival, Cornelius Slayman, Arthur Denzy, Philip Mackdonnell, Nicholas Henderson, Mary Sherwood, John Chetwood, James Bennet, Ann Clemens, Elizabeth Tomlin.

Ordered to be Whipt. 5.

Cornelius Trough, Rebekah Walker, Margaret Heretage, Dorothy Robinson, Rebekah Child.

To be Transported,

George Windor.

Mary Compton, Mary Sherwood, and Ann Clemens, pleaded their Bellies, a Jury of Matrons were impannelled, whose Verdict was, that neither of them were with Child.

Fined.

James Seaward 400 l. John Rowland 200 l. And 10 stand in the Pillory.

Jacob Dutchfeild 40 Mark.

Walter Batson 20 Mark. William Dando 10 l. Jeremiah Bedford 10 l. for the first Riot.

Fined for the second Riot.

Dando 10 l. Bedford 10 l. Batson 20 Mark.

David Douglas 200 Marks. William Gowen 100 l.

Francis West for the first Offence 100 Mark. For the second 100 Mark.

Elizabeth Vaughan 10 l.

Shadrack Cook 200 l. and to find Sureties for a Twelve Month; The Pillory remitted for his Function-sake.

Ann Smith was set by till further Order.

After the Sentence was passed, these four Persons were called down upon their former judgment; viz.

Ralph Matthews , for Clipping.

Elizabeth Ridgway ,

Catherine Davis ,

Mary Wilder ,

for Felony and Burglary.

John Dyer being often called, and not appearing to try has Traverse, his Recognizance was estreated, and a Warrant was issued out against him to take him up wherever he can be found, for Writing and Publishing false and scandalous News, to the Disparagement of the Government, and against the Peace of the Kingdom, &c.

John Skudamore, mentioned in the Tryal of Douglas and Gowan, appeared after their Tryal was over, and gave fresh Bail to appear next Sessions.

Thomas Kyrbey was indicted for the murther of one Steno Brent ; on the 19th of September last Brent was hanging on the side of the Prisoner's Lighter at Shadwell , endeavouring to get into it, and Kybrey struck him off with a Pole down into the water, giving him a blow on the fore-part of the Head, of which he immediately sunk, and was never seen since; the Prisoner alledged, that the said Brent struck him down in his Lighter several times as fast as he could rise, and stunn'd him, into much that he knew not what he did, at last the Prisoner was bailed to appear whenever he should be called, till the man be sought for it being uncertain whether he was drowned, yes or no.

ADVERTISEMENT.

The Tryal of the Midwife will be published at large in a day or two.