Old Bailey Proceedings Online (www.oldbaileyonline.org, version 6.0, 24 July 2014), January 1692 (16920115).

Old Bailey Proceedings, 15th January 1692.

THE PROCEEDINGS ON THE King and Queens Commissions OF THE Peace, and Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol-Delivery of Newgate, held for the CITY of London, and COUNTY of Middlesex at Justice-Hall in the OLD-BAYLY.

On Friday, Saturday, and Tuesday, being the 15th, 16th, and 19th. Days of January, 1691. And in the Third Year of their MAJESTIES Reign.

THE Sessions of Peace, Oyer and Terminer, Goal Delivery of Newgate, held at Justice-Hall in the Old-Bayly, On Friday, Saturday, and Tuesday being the 15th, 16th. and 19th. days of January, before the Right Honourable Sir Thomas Stamp , Kt. Lord Mayor of the City of London, and Mr. Deputy Recorder, with several others of Their Majesties Justices for the City of London, and County of Middlesex.

The Jurors were as follows.

London Jury.

Nath. Carpenter .

David King .

William Dodd .

Jeremy Marloe .

Michael Warting .

Thomas White .

Thomas Bickley .

John Grosvenour .

Robert Peck .

Dorman Newman .

Thomas Bowyer .

Hugh Granger .

Middlesex Jury.

Thomas Reynolds .

William Webb .

Thomas Pattle .

John Bignall .

Thomas Williams .

John Holding .

Richard Bowler .

William Moor .

William Stroud .

Charles Newman .

John Browne .

George Pollfrey .

The Proceedings were these:

C - W - , was Indicted for High Treason, in Clipping the Current Coin of this Kingdom , on the 11th day of November last; it was evidenced against him, that he came in company with a Woman, to a Tavern; where after they had paid the Reckoning and were gone away, immediately afterwards the Prisoner came back, and asked for a Handkerchief that was left behind; which Handkerchief was (after they were gone) found by the Drawers, in the Room, where the Prisoner and the Woman were, in which was tyed up about Fifty Ounces of Clippings; upon which he being stopt by the Master of the House, and afterwards carried before a Magistrate, he was committed to Newgate: The Prisoner charged the matter upon the Woman; who seeing the Prisoner seized, run away; he said that she had formerly been his fellow Servant, and meeting her; went into Drink with her; he called several of his Neighbours; who spoke very favourably of him; so he was acquitted .

Edward Blewet , a Boy , was Tried for Stealing 4 l. in Mony , from Robert Falconer of St. Michaels Cornhill , on the 22th. of December , The Boy was Mr. Falconer's Apprentice , whom he took upon liking out of meer Charity, the Boy coming as a Begger to the door; but after he had been there about Six Weeks, he took the Key out of his Master s Breeches, and unlockt the Drawer where the Mony lay, and went away with it; and within two or three hours after, the Boy was met uponLondon Bridge with the Mony about him, all which the Boy had confest before his Tryal; and had nothing to say for himself, so he was found Guilty .

[Transportation. See summary.]

George Segar , was Tryed for Stealing 3000 pound Weight of Tobacco, Value 100 l. from one Mr. William Mooreland , on the 10th. of December last; the Evidence was, that the Ware-house was broke open, and the Tobacco, being in Bundles, was conveyed away: The Prisoner was seen to carry away one of the bundles, about Eight or Nine a Clock at Night, and that one George Green , and one Hoskins were concerned with the Prisoner, who are not yet taken; There were others also supposed to be concerned in the Robbery with him, besides, who are not yet discovered; the Prisoner pleaded, that he was Innocent, and there being but one Evidence as to his taking the bundle aforesaid, and being in the Night time; he might be mistaken; he was acquitted .

Abraham Stacey was Tryed upon an Indictment for Felony and Burglary, in breaking the House of Jane Browne , on the 23d. of December , together with one Morris Moor , since fled ; The Prosecutor said that she was abroad, and returning home in the Evening, she found the Parlor Window open, and the Goods gone; and he confest the Robbery before Mr. Justice James; how that he and Morris Moor, and one Griffeth actually committed the Robbery; as Griffeth declared in Court, being admitted an Evidence against the Prisoner; and further deposed that the Goods taken away, were one Stuff Gown, value 10 s. one Womans hood Dress, value 15 s. another Scarf value 40 s. a Feather Tippet, value 5 s. &c. Some of which were produced in Court; the Prisoner said, that Griffeth gave him the Scarf, that was in his custody, and that he had never been guilty of any ill thing; which was contradicted by Griffeth; for he declared that he had confest to him; that he had Robbed several people, on Sundays, when they were at Church, which he did by the Dubb, as they term it, (that is) by opening the Door with false Keys: The Prisoner call'd some Persons with whom he had Liv'd as a Servant; (being a Cook by Trade) who gave a favourable Account of his Reputation in the General, yet he was found guilty of the Felony, but not of the Burglary , the Prosecutor not being positive the Window was shut.

[Transportation. See summary.]

Elinor Willyer , was Indicted for Stealing Eight Yards of Back Silk Fringe, value 4 s. out of the shop of Rob. Baden in Cheapside on the 12th. of Jan. Instant, she came to the shop and cheapned some Fringes, Pretending to buy some, bet she did not like them at first, but afterwards the pitcht upon the Fringe abovementioned; and said she would come another time for it; but Mr. Baden's Son being busie with other Customers; she slipt away the Fringe, which he immediately missing, went after her, and found it upon her: So she was found Guilty to the value of 10 d.

[Whipping. See summary.]

Susan Rothery and Anne Knight , were both Indicted for picking the Pocket of one Frances Rogers , Wife of Daniel Rogers , on the 24th of December last, taking out a Silver Thimble, value 12 d. and 25 s. in Mony : The Prisoners met Mrs. Rogers in Bishopgate street , about Noon-Tide and Rothery jostled her, and Knight put her hand in her Pocket, and took the Bag with the Mony, and gave it to a Third Person, who run away with it: The Prisoners denied the Fact; and were very confident in their behaviour, and gave no good Account of themselves; they said they lived in White Chappel, but had no Evidence on their side to prove any thing; so at length Rothery was Accquitted , but Knight was found Guilty .

[Transportation. See summary.]

Judith Bayly , Wife of Edward Bayly not taken, was Indicted for the Murther of one Richard Tate a Boy , on the 11th. of December last, in manner following; the said Tate was a poor Parish Boy, who was set Apprentice to the Prisoners Husband, he being a Broad Weaver in Bishopsgate Parish : It was sworn by the Kings Witness, that he the said Edward Baily took a Coach Whip value 6 d. and gave the said Tate several Stripes upon the Shoulder Loyns and Buttocks and after that, his prodigious Malice and Wicked Tyranny not being qualified, he took an Iron Spindle heated in the Fire, and with the same he did burn the Deceased Tate, in several places, in and about his Body; of which blows with the Whip aforesaid, and Malitiously burning, he died on the 13th. Instant; It was particularly made appear, That the Master of the boy was wont to beat him in a most inhumane manner with the Whip and sometimes with a Stick; pretending that he did not follow his Work, so close as he expected: And he had another way whereby he was wont to punish the boy, which hath scarce ever been heard of before; he had a Stone that he used about his Work, which weighed Seven Stone and two pound, and that he would frequently tye it about his Neck, and make him carry it about, Lashing him forwards, with the Coach Whip aforesaid, telling the boy, that if he was able to carry that Stone, he was able enough to work, &c. And when the Prisoner saw it (instead of endeavouring to allay his Passion) she added Fuel to the Fire by crying out, give him more: Another way he had to Exercise his unparalell'd Cruelty, was by burning him with a hot Iron; upon the Back and Thighs: Also several times he would prick the boy with an Iron Spindle, &c. in several places of his Body. All this Cruel usage was performed upon the poor Boy, for a considerable time, before he died, by Reason of which, he was brought so Low and Weak, that he was not able to subsist any longer; but being burnt by his Mrs. on the Saturday in the Afternoon, he went to bed, and there continued till Sunday Night, Speechless, and then died: The Chief Evidence against the Prisoner was, That she was seen to burn him with the hot Iron, and to urge her Husband to be more Cruel to him; all which was Resented by the Court, as very Unreasonable, Illegal, Inhumane, and most brutish Correction. It was also sworn, That the Master was wont to hang a Curtain before the boys Face, that he might not see him when he came to correct him; and lest the aforesaid Stone should not be ponderous enough; He would add another little one to it; &c. The Prisoner made great Protestations, that she never did any harm to the boy, and called some Witnesses, who declared in the General, that the boy never wanted any necessary Provisions, and that the boy was a sickly distempered boy, troubled with Ulcers, and Runing Sores in his Legs, and elsewhere, about his Body; so the Gent. of the Jury being directed seriously to weigh the Matter; they gave in their Verdict, that she was not guilty .

James Philips and Abraham Stacey , were both Arraigned upon an Indictment of Felony; for that they together with one Morris Moor , not yet taken, did Rob one William Kent of St. Andrews Holborn , on the 26th of December last, of two Silver Tankards value 14 l. 10 s: a Silver Beaker value 3 l. Four Spoons value 40 s. another Cup value 3 l. a Salt 10 s. a Gold Chain value 7 l. 13 Gold Rings value 6 l. 10 s. two Silk Petticoats Lac'd with Gold Lace value 34 l. a Cloak 5 l. a Cloath Coat 50 s. and divers other Goods of good value, besides 10 l. in Mony , onto which Indictment they pleaded Guilty , &c.

[Transportation. See summary.]

K - J - was Tryed for stealing a Silver Tankard Value 7 l. from Rob. Stockdane , of the Parish of St. Andrews Holborn , on the 16th. of August last; Mr. Stockdane swore that the Glass was taken out of the Window over the door, at his House in Grays-Inn Lane , and the Cup-board was broke open, and the Tankard took away; The Prisoner was at the Prosecutors House, together with one Peter Mellincapp since fled, and there called for Drink, about Twelve a Clock at Night, the same Night that the Tankard was lost, but the Evidence could not fully charge it upon him; and he denied it all, so he was Acquitted .

Hannah Gascoigne and Sarah Branch , were both Indicted for stealing on the 7th of this instant January , from Robert Elliot of St. Martin in the Fields , Three pair of Holland Sleeves value 20 l. two pair of Lac'd Sleeves value 30 l. a Muslin Night Rayle, and other wearing Apparel, besides two Silver Spoons value 16 s. and Threescore and twelve Yards of Lace value 6 l. 5 s. The Evidence was, that she being a servant to Mr. Elliott, she took the Goods away, and gave them to Branch, who pawn'd them at divers places; Gascoigne confest the Fact very freely when taken; and did not deny it upon her Tryal, and Branch did not deny, but that she Pawned them; so in the End, Gascoigne was found Guilty, to the value of 10 d. but the other was Acquitted .

[Whipping. See summary.]

Sarah Witherman , was tryed for breaking the House of John Mackfadian , about two a Clock in the day time, on the 29th. of October last; and taking away an Alamood. hood value 7 s. a Scarf value 13 s. a Yard and a half of Lace value 6 s. The Evidence said, that the Goods were taken out of a Trunck, in the Prosecutors Chamber; but the Trunk was not Lock't; and the Prisoner was seen to come out of the Chamber, a little before the Goods were missing; but the Evidence could not charge it positively upon her; so she was Acquitted .

Thomas Riches of Stepney , was indicted for the Murther of one Thomas Todd on the 8th. instant, giving him one mortal Wound with a Sword, value 2 s. 6 d. upon the left part of the Belly, near the Hip, of the breadth of one inch, and of the depth of three inches, of which he instantly died . The Evidence for the King and Queen deposed, That the Prisoner and the Deceased being at an Alehouse in Stepney , with some others, a quarrel arose betwixt them, for that the Prisoner demanded of the Deceased, What he had done with his Wife? or to that effect; he having some jealousie that the said Todd and his Wife were more familiar than it became them. And it was further deposed. That the Deceased (Todd) had sent away the Prisoner's Wife into the Country; and kept her from him, and had sold and made away all the Prisoner's Estate whilst he was at Sea: all which very much vexed and irritared the Prisoner against him, insomuch that he took a Sword that lay in the Room (which was the Deceased's) and gave him the Wound abovesaid. The Deceased was heard to give very provoking language to Rich before the Wound was given. The Prisoner declared for himself, That he had no malice against the Deceased: so, upon the whole, he was found guilty of Manslaughter .

[Branding. See summary.]

Thomas Kibey was Tried for stealing a Gelding, price 10 l. from William Goodyer Esq ; on the 20th of December last. The Prisoner was found leading the Horse along the street in the Haymarket; and Mr. Goodyer's servant declared in Court, That the Prisoner was a Servant to his Master for a year in Oxfordshire; and when he came first to live with him, he brought a Horse of his own, which he kept still his year was expired, and then he took away his Master's House instead of his own, that being something better. But the Prisoner alledged, That his Horse that he left behind him, was better than Mr. Goodyer's, and that he ordered him to sell the Geldings, but could not prove it: Yet this could not be accounted Felony in the Prisoner, so he was acquitted .

Samuel Hurley , John Butcher, alias Shorter , and John Nunn all three young Youth s, were tryed for Felony and Burglary, in breaking the House of Thomas Burgan in Ratcliff-High-way , on the 12th of December last; Mr. Burgan swore that his House was broke open about One a Clock in the Morning; and the Goods took away, were One Silver Tankard, value 8 l. 40 Yards of brown Cloth 40 s. 1 s. Yards of Muzlin 26 s. Two Holland skull Caps, value 18 d. a Muzlin Comode 7 s. 2 silk Hoods, a Walking-Cane, 2 Pair of Buckles, 2 Ells of Holland; and several other Household Goods of good value . There was a Boy one Scofeld, who was committed with the abovesaid Prisoners; but Recanting, he was called as a Witness against them; but being young, and a suspicious Boy, his Evidence was not allowed of in Court; but the Prosecutor was ordered, immediately to prefer an Indictment against him; And the Evidence being weak against the Prisoners, they were all acquitted ; but not without good Grounds of Suspicion to the contrary.

William Lodge was indicted for stealing One Ewe Sheep, coloured white, Price 5 s. from John Hall of Edmonton in the County of Middlesex. The Witness swore that the Prisoner found the Ewe, entangled in the Bryers in a Ditch and he took it home and kill'd it, as he was heard to confess when taken, which he did not deny at his Tryal, adding that his Family was ready to starve; and seeing it lie in a Ditch, tied in the Bryers as aforesaid, he took it and killed it, being in such great Necessity of Food for his Family, so he was found guilty, to the value of 10 d.

[Whipping. See summary.]

John Magennis a Soldier was tryed, only for breaking the Shop of one Mr. Keating , near the Savoy , on the 14th of December last, taking away a Hair Trunk, value 5 s. a Silver Watch, value 40 s. a Spoon, value 10 s. a Pair of Silk Gloves, 10 s. 3 Flanders Lac't Crevates, value 20 s. with other Goods ; the Evidence could prove nothing as to the Fact, but that a Note was found by the Prisoner in an Ale house, in a Drinking Box; and that he immediately carried it to the Prosecutor, and told him of it, and the Prosecutor owned it to be his Note, which was in the Trunk; but nothing else was found upon him, and the Evidence was not positive that he broke the Shop, so he was acquitted .

Elizabeth Bird and Rebeccah Dalton , were both Indicted for Robbing one William Milledge of St. Giles Cripplegate , on the 27th of December last, of One Alamode Hood, value 2 s. another old Hood, value 6 d. a Dowlace Smock, value 4 s. The Evidence was, that Bird came to the House, under a pretence of seeing a Child of Mrs. Milledge that lay dead, and whilst her back was turn'd; she directed Dalton to take the Goods, which she afterwards pawn'd at a Brokers in White-Cross-street; but none could swear particularly against Dalton, so she was acquitted ; but Bird was found guilty to the value of 10 d.

[Whipping. See summary.]

Daniel Conduit of St. Martins in the Fields , was Indicted for Felony, in marrying two Wives; The first, named Katharine Conway , who he married at Knights Bridge-Chappel, on the 1st of April 1689. The Second Wife; named Elizabeth Springfield , who he married the 20th of September following : The Clark of the Chappel produced a Copy of the Register which gave account, that one Daniel Conduit had been married there; but withal said, that itwas usual for people to come there and personate others, and to make sham Marriages; It was also declared that the Prisoner was in the Company of Conway divers times; and that he owned her to be his Wife, and that Conway was a very vertuous Woman; and carried her self like a loving Wife to him, insomuch such that she sold her Hair off her Head to administer to his Necessities. The occassion of his denying of the Marriage was, because he expected a considerable Fortune with the aforesaid Springfield, &c. The Prisoner in his Defence denyed that ever he was married to the former Wife, and called some Witnesses, who said that they had heard him declare, that he had held some private Correspondency with Conway, but never was really married to her; nay, one of his Witness affirmed, that the Prisoner was sick at the time, when he was said to marry Conway, yea so ill, that he was not able to stir without help; which was corroborated by one Mrs. Weeks, a Midwife where he then Lodged at Islington; Moreover the Prisoner averted that Conway hearing of the Fortune he was like to have (she out of Malice) accompanied with an eager Expectation of Reaping some Gain, by Receiving part of the Portion) had now indicted him fasly; and put him to unnecessary Trouble which seemed to be coherent enough: So that he was (after a long hearing) found not guilty .

Edward Pollard of the Precincts of the Tower of London , was tryed for stealing (on the 20th of July , in the Second Year of the Reign of King William and Queen Mary) from William Baker Six Pound of Dyer's stuff, call'd Archill, value 3 s. and 3 Bushel of Sea-coal, value 3 s. The Prisoner was a Workman to Mr. Baker's Dye-house, and was seen to take the Goods, but whether he used them about his Masters Business, or his own, was not prov'd, and no positive Proof being found, he was acquitted .

Rob. Scofield , the Boy that was called as an Evidence against Hurley, Butcher and Nun, was indicted for the like offence, (viz.) for breaking Mr. Burgan 's House in Ratcliff Highway , and taking away a Silver Tankard, value 8 l. and divers Goods, all to the value of about 25 l. mentioned at large in the former Tryal of Hurley, Butcher and Nun: The latter of which he said went by the Name of Card Matches; The Examination of the Boy was read in Court, in which he confest, that he and the other three Boys, broke the House, and took away the Goods, and afterwards sold them to a Woman in Kent-street in Southwark, and the Prisoner had 5 s. to his share: The Boy said that he confest it out of fear; but could make no other defence, and was known to several of his Neighbours, to have been an idle pilfering young Youth, so he was found guilty of Felony and Burglary.

[Transportation. See summary.]

Christopher Eastwick was Arraigned for marrying two Wives, the first, one Joan Richards , the latter one Sarah Lucas ; but no Evidence appearing against him, he was immediately acquitted .

William Bynworth was Arraigned for that he, together with Richard Sarn , not taken, did steal a Silver Tankard , from one Joseph Howel , on the 5th. instant, to which he pleaded guilty , &c.

[Branding. See summary.]

Sarah Taylor was tryed, for privily stealing from one John Randale , a Lac'd Crevate, value 5 s. on the Third of November last, she met him in St. Paul's Church-Yard , about Eight a Clock at Night, and suddenly snatch't his Crevate from his Neck, and run away with it, crying ont murther; The Prisoner declared that the Prosecutor solicited her to go into a House with him, but she refusing, he seemed to force her, upon which, she cryed out; She called the Justice of Peace's Clerk, who said, that the Prosecutor gave but a very indifferent account of himself before his Master, and owned to one of the Family that he did usually divert himself by picking up Women in the Streets: The Prisoner furthermore, called some others who said, that she was a Sempster , and wrought hard for her Livelihood, and that she was never Reputed to be a Person of such a Character; so she was acquitted .

Anne Brodnix was tryed for being accessary to James Philips and Abraham Stacy in the Felony and Robbery they lately committed in the House of William Kent a Brewer , in Liquor-Pond-Street, in the Parish of St. Andrews Holbourn , on the 26th of December , which they confest upon their Arraignment. The chief Evidence was Griffith, who is before mentioned in the single Tryal of Stacy, who was with them at the Robbery which was done by himself: Philips, Stacy and Morris Moore , after they had compleated their Work, they went to the Robin Hood in Shoe-lane and then Griffith went and sold the Plate to Mrs. Brodnix the Prisoner for 34 l. 13 s. 9 d. part of which Money was paid him by the Prisoner's Order, and the Remainder was to be paid him when the Plate was melted down, which he afterwards received, and he said further, that he used to sell stolen Plate to the Prisoner, very frequently: The Prisoner denied the Charge against her, and said, she knew nothing of it; and would have called several Witnesses to prove her Reputation, which was not allowed of, because it was unnecessary in respect to the Law; for Philips and Stacy having confest their Indictment, she could not lie under any penalty, neither be found guilty upon that Indictment, so she was acquitted .

James Hull was tryed for privily stealing from one William Matthews , 10 l. in current Money , on the 11th instant, in the Parish of St. Dunstans in the East ; but the said Matthews not appearing (though often called) he was acquitted .

Margaret Hyde was indicted for uttering and counterfeiting false Half-pence ; The Evidence against her was that she came to the Shop of Mr. Philips in East-Cheap , and offered 12. of them, desiring him to give her 6 d. in Exchange; and there being seized, a great quantity more were taken out of her Bosom in a Bag: The Prisoner denied that she made the Half-pence, alledging that she took them for 2 Pair of Stockins she sold to a Man in the Street; for being a poor Woman, she knit Stockins for a Livelihood, which was considered of by the Gentlemen of the Jury, so far that she was discharged .

Mr. Harrison , who was committed upon Suspicion of being concern'd in the barbarous Murther of the late famous Dr. Clench , who was strangled and found dead in a Coach in Leaden-Hall-street, &c. was ordered to remain in Prison till next Sessions, to be tried for the same, there being very good grounds of Suspicion against him.

Also one Roe a Solicitor, who was admitted to Bail, for that he was likewise suspected to be one of them, who so Butcher-like, assassinated the Dr. was ordered to stand to his Recognizance to answer the same.

One Thomas Shaw , who was taken upon suspicion of having a hand in Robbing the King's Waggon, near Uxbridge, was ordered to remain.

William Griffeth was ordered to find Bail for his appearance next Sessions.

Judith Baily , nothwithstanding she was acquitted for the Murther of Richard Tate her Apprentice, yet she was ordered to find good Sureties for her peaceable and quiet behaviour, for the future .

A Bill being preferred against William Canning (who was accused the last Sessions) for Publishing several Scandalousand Seditious Libels against the Government; the same was found by the Grand Jury. The Witnesses were, Mr. Poyke and Mr. Morrice; and the said Canning travers'd his Indictment till next Session.

Then the Court Adjourn'd till Tuesday Four a Clock in the Afternoon: And then being met, the Proceedings were as followeth; that is to say, These following persons being called over by their Names; and being asked, Why Execution should not be awarded against them, for that they had been found Guilty of Death? they all, upon their respective Knees, pleaded Their Majesties King William and Queen Maries most Gracious Pardon , amounting to the number of Thirty Five.

The Names of those that were Freely Pardoned, are these:

Elizabeth Fairbank

William Reynolds ,

Mary Ingle ,

W - D .

Mary Stretch ,

Catherine Seymour ,

William Jones ,

Thomas Banks ,

Robert Trumball ,

Robert Adderton ,

Elizabeth Clarke ,

Matthias Browne ,

John Ray, alias Rea ,

Mary Hemingway .

Those to be Transported, are these,

Margaret Beard ,

Jane Williams ,

K. - J.

Mary Horspoole ,

Thomas Exhall ,

Robert Beneson ,

Matthew Thomas ,

Daniel Willcox ,

William Gray ,

John Strutton ,

Matthew Earsall ,

Elizabeth Jones ,

Elizabeth Hancock ,

Francis Bluck ,

Charles Trivert ,

John Friend ,

Robert Chatfield ,

Daniel Bransbury ,

Thomas Mercy ,

Richard Jackson , and Martha Walters alias Wilson.

Then the Court was pleased to give them a most seasonable Exhortation, pertinent to the occasion, to this effect; telling them, That they were now in a good posture of submission, being bowed upon their Knees; hoping that they were also relenting in their Hearts, for that they had all been great Offenders, not only against the Laws of Man, but of an All-seeing God, who would call every one of them to a strict and particular Account for all their Actions, and therefore it behoved them to beg Pardon of both; and as they had obtained Mercy from the Goodness and Clemency of so Gracious a King and Queen, so they would endeavour to demonstrate their thankfulness for so great a Deliverance, by living in holy, humble, and honest life for the time to come, that being the least part of their Duty for such extraordinary Pity; putting them in mind how many notorious Offenders (in nature like to themselves) were gone before to the fatal tree yet They were spared: therefore it was now hoped, that such particular Indulgence to them would work such a thorow change upon their Hearts and Lives, that their whole Life should be dedicated to the Service of God, and that no temptation whatsoever should be able to draw them aside; remembring withal, That the shedding of a few Tears here, will not satisfie offended Justice, except they universally repent, and turn to God with all their Hearts and Souls, &c.

After this the Court was pleased to particularize some of their Offences to them, not any ways to upbraid their former dissolute Lives, but calmly to caution them, to take heed how they steer'd their Course for the future; that they might not split upon the same Rock, some of them being but young in Years, yet old Offenders; therefore it was hoped they would take heed of falling into the like Danger; for if they did, they must not expect to receive such Pardon, as now happly they had met withal: And furthermore, if they who were to be Transported should return into England, before Seven Years were expired, it would certainly prove a great detriment to them, even to the Loss of their Lives, if overtaken in such a desperate Adventure, &c.

Another amongst them was more particularly remarked, viz. John Ray, alias Red, who was condemned formerly for Clipping and Coyning the current Money of England: He receiving such Mercy as to be freely Pardoned, and not Transported (as he deserved) was told, That it was required of him (being more sensible than some others) to lay out his whole Interest for the Service of King William and Queen Mary: but if he thought to undermine the true Interest and Government of the Crown and Church of England (as it was to be feared his Religion might teach him) then he would certainly find himself to be mistaken; for upon this Rock have I built my Church, faith a much better than the best, &c.

The Conclusion was in the general to all of them, That notwithstanding their Crimes could not be particulary recounted, yet the Court hoped they would be all forwarned by this particular Grace, and distinguishing Favour, as never to offend any more in the like nature, but that they may have Grace to serve God for the time to come.

The Tryals being over, the Court proceeded to give Sentence, as followeth.

Received Sentence of Death, none.

Burnt in the Hand, 3.

William Franklin, Thomas Riche, and William Bunworth.

Ordered to be Transported, 5.

Edward Bluet, Abraham Stacy, James Philips, Anne Knight, and Robert Scofield.

Ordered to be Whipt. 4.

Elizabeth Willyer, from New-gate to Aldgate, Hannah Gascoigne, Elizabeth Bird, and William Lodge, from Newgate to Holbourn Bars.

Then the Court Adjourn'd till Tuesday Four a Clock in the Afternoon: And then being met, the Proceedings were as followeth; that is to say, These following persons being called over by their Names; and being asked, Why Execution should not be awarded against them, for that they had been found Guilty of Death? they all, upon their respective Knees, pleaded Their Majesties King William and Queen Maries most Gracious Pardon , amounting to the number of Thirty Five.

The Names of those that were Freely Pardoned, are these:

Elizabeth Fairbank

William Reynolds ,

Mary Ingle ,

W - D .

Mary Stretch ,

Catherine Seymour ,

William Jones ,

Thomas Banks ,

Robert Trumball ,

Robert Adderton ,

Elizabeth Clarke ,

Matthias Browne ,

John Ray, alias Rea ,

Mary Hemingway .

Those to be Transported, are these,

Margaret Beard ,

Jane Williams ,

K. - J.

Mary Horspoole ,

Thomas Exhall ,

Robert Beneson ,

Matthew Thomas ,

Daniel Willcox ,

William Gray ,

John Strutton ,

Matthew Earsall ,

Elizabeth Jones ,

Elizabeth Hancock ,

Francis Bluck ,

Charles Trivert ,

John Friend ,

Robert Chatfield ,

Daniel Bransbury ,

Thomas Mercy ,

Richard Jackson , and Martha Walters alias Wilson.

Then the Court was pleased to give them a most seasonable Exhortation, pertinent to the occasion, to this effect; telling them, That they were now in a good posture of submission, being bowed upon their Knees; hoping that they were also relenting in their Hearts, for that they had all been great Offenders, not only against the Laws of Man, but of an All-seeing God, who would call every one of them to a strict and particular Account for all their Actions, and therefore it behoved them to beg Pardon of both; and as they had obtained Mercy from the Goodness and Clemency of so Gracious a King and Queen, so they would endeavour to demonstrate their thankfulness for so great a Deliverance, by living in holy, humble, and honest life for the time to come, that being the least part of their Duty for such extraordinary Pity; putting them in mind how many notorious Offenders (in nature like to themselves) were gone before to the fatal tree yet They were spared: therefore it was now hoped, that such particular Indulgence to them would work such a thorow change upon their Hearts and Lives, that their whole Life should be dedicated to the Service of God, and that no temptation whatsoever should be able to draw them aside; remembring withal, That the shedding of a few Tears here, will not satisfie offended Justice, except they universally repent, and turn to God with all their Hearts and Souls, &c.

After this the Court was pleased to particularize some of their Offences to them, not any ways to upbraid their former dissolute Lives, but calmly to caution them, to take heed how they steer'd their Course for the future; that they might not split upon the same Rock, some of them being but young in Years, yet old Offenders; therefore it was hoped they would take heed of falling into the like Danger; for if they did, they must not expect to receive such Pardon, as now happly they had met withal: And furthermore, if they who were to be Transported should return into England, before Seven Years were expired, it would certainly prove a great detriment to them, even to the Loss of their Lives, if overtaken in such a desperate Adventure, &c.

Another amongst them was more particularly remarked, viz. John Ray, alias Red, who was condemned formerly for Clipping and Coyning the current Money of England: He receiving such Mercy as to be freely Pardoned, and not Transported (as he deserved) was told, That it was required of him (being more sensible than some others) to lay out his whole Interest for the Service of King William and Queen Mary: but if he thought to undermine the true Interest and Government of the Crown and Church of England (as it was to be feared his Religion might teach him) then he would certainly find himself to be mistaken; for upon this Rock have I built my Church, faith a much better than the best, &c.

The Conclusion was in the general to all of them, That notwithstanding their Crimes could not be particulary recounted, yet the Court hoped they would be all forwarned by this particular Grace, and distinguishing Favour, as never to offend any more in the like nature, but that they may have Grace to serve God for the time to come.

ADVERTISEMENTS.

*** The Notorious Imposter: Or, The History of the Life of William Norell, alias Bowyer, some time of Banbury, Chyrurgeon, who lately personated Humphrey Wickham of Swackley in the County of Oxford, Esq; at a Baker's House in the Strand, where he died the 3d of January 1691. Together with an Authentick Copy of his Will, taken out of the Prerogative-Court, and the manner of his Funeral in St. Clements Church yard.

There is also in the Press, A second Part thereof, compleating the History of his Life, Cheats, &c. with some further passages relating to his Sickness and Death (not mentioned in the former Part.) Dedicated to his Executors. Both printed for Abel Roper at the Mitre near Templebar.

*** The Experienc'd Farrier: Or, A compleat Treaties of Horsemanship: in Two Books, Physical and Chyrurgical. Fitted to the use, not only of Gentlemen, but of all Farriers, Grooms, Jockeys, and Breeders of Horses; with Directions for the choice of all Stallions and Mires, their Shapes and Colours; as also Instructions for Paring and Shooing all manner of Hoofs, shewing where in that Curiosity doth consist; with the Virtue of both Simple and Compound, appertaining to Farrying, and where you may buy them; with a large Alphabethical lable of most Simples, for the Cure of all inward and outward Diseases. The second Edition much enlarged, with many new Receipts of excellent Use and Value, never published before in any Author. By. R. Gent. Printed for Whirwood at the Angel and Bible in Little-britain; At which place you may have Ready Money for any Parcel or Library of Books.

*** Dr. Salmon's and FAMILY PILLS and FAMILY POWDER; Those so Famously known throughout England for the Curable Diseases, as Scurvey, Gout, Dropsey, Worms, &c. Made and Prepared by the Author himself, at his House at the Blew Ball by the Ditch-side near Holbourn-Bridge, London. The Family Pills and Family Powder, are both fitted for the Care of the same Diseases; but the Pills work more gently, the Powder more strongly, yet both very safely, and may be given to old or young whether Man, Woman, or Child, given in a fit Dose. They that cannot swallow the pills, may take the powder, or they who like not the Powder, may take the Pills, they both being Universal Purgers. These Famous Family Pills and Family Powder, are eminent for the Cure, not only of the aforenamed diseases, but also of Agues, Green Sickness, Catarrsh, Head-act, Lethargy, Rheuming Eyes, Stinking-Breath, Want of Appetite, Illness of stomach, Stuffing at Stomach, Vomiting, Fluxes, Foulness of Stomach, Hard-drinking, Sea-Sickness, Urine stopt, Barrenness, Soiatica, Numbness, French-Pox, Gonerrbei, Swellings, Lameness, Prin in any part, Pushes, Wheals, Botches, Scahs, lich, Tetarrs, Ring-worms, Morphew, Leprosie, Marge, Salt-humours, All breaking-out, Running-Sores, Old Ulcers, Fistulas, Jaundice, Kings-evil, Worms, &c.

Price of the Pills, 9 d. a Box; of the Powder 6 d. a Paper.

*** These are to give Notice to all Persons for the Benefit of the Publick. That W. Elmy Professor of Physick, and Operator of known Integrity, and above 24 Years Practice; Liveth at the Blew-Ball in Whale-Bone-Court, at the lower End of Bartholomew-Lane, by the Royal-Exchange.

WHo most safely and expeditiously cures Deafness and Newse in the Ears, in any of what Age soever (if Curable) and at first light by inspection resolves the Patient, if so or not as must Eminent Person of Quality in this City can Testifie.

He hath likewise a Sovereign Pill, which Insallibly Cures all Pains in the Head, whether old or newly Contracted; Speedily taking away all Swimmings and Giddiness, preventing the dangerous Consequence of Apoplectical Fits; Preserves the Sight, and takes away all Accidents offending the Eyes, strengthens the Memory, and disburdens the Brain of all offensive Humors, thereby rendering the Understanding more clear and vigorous.

He bath likewise an expeditions way in Curing all Pains in the Teeth without drawing.

He bath likewise a most Excellent Gargarism or Month-Water which will make black or yellow Teeth as white as Ivory in few times using; and it will certainly Cure the Scurvey, and all other Diseases incident to the Mouth, Teeth and Gums with Directions.