Old Bailey Proceedings, 12th September 1892.
Reference Number: t18920912
Reference Number: f18920912

CENTRAL CRIMINAL COURT

Sessions Paper.

EVANS, MAYOR.

ELEVENTH SESSION, HELD SEPTEMBER 12TH, 1892.

MINUTES OF EVIDENCE.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND, BY

JAMES DROVER BARNETT

AND

ALEXANDER BUCKLER,

Short-hand Writers to the Court,

ROLLS CHAMBERS, No. 89, CHANCERY LANE.

THE POINTS OF LAW AND PRACTICE

REVISED AND EDITED BY

EDWARD T. E. BESLEY, ESQ.,

OF THE MIDDLE TEMPLE, BARRISTER-AT-LAW.

LONDON:

STEVENS AND SONS, LIMITED, 119, CHANCERY LANE,

Law Booksellers and Publishers.

THE

WHOLE PROCEEDINGS

On the Queen's Commission of

OYER AND TERMINER AND GAOL DELIVERY

FOR

The City of London,

AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE

COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX AND THE PARTS OF THE COUNTIES OF ESSEX, KENT, AND SURREY, WITHIN THE JURISDICTION

OF THE

CENTRAL CRIMINAL COURT,

Held on Monday, September 12th, 1892, and following days.

BEFORE the RIGHT HON. Sir DAVID EVANS, LORD MAYOR of the City of London; the Hon. Sir HENN COLLINS, Knt., one of the Justices of Her Majesty's High Court of Justice; Sir JAMES WHITEHEAD , Bart., M.P., STUART KNILL , Esq., WALTER HENRY WILKIN , Esq.,GEORGE FAUDEL PHILLIPS, Esq., HORATIO DAVID DAVIES , Esq., M.P.,JOHN VOCE MOORE, Esq., FRANK GREEN , Esq., MARCUS SAMUEL , Esq.,WILLIAM PURDIE TRELOAR, Esq., and VAUGHAN MORGAN , Esq., Aldermen of the said City; Sir FORREST FULTON, Knt., Q.C., Common Serjeant of the said City; and ROBERT MALCOLM KERR , Esq., Q.C., LL.D., Judge of the Sheriff's Court; Her Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer and General Gaol Delivery, holden for the said City, and Judges of the Central Criminal Court.

GEORGE ROBERT TYLER , Esq., Alderman.

HARRY SEYMOUR FOSTER , Esq.

Sheriffs.

FREDERICK HILL , Esq.

CLARENCE RICHARD HALSE, Esq.

Under-Sheriffs.

CENTRAL CRIMINAL COURT

EVANS, MAYOR. ELEVENTH SESSION.

A star (*) denotes that prisoners have been previously in custody—two stars (**) that they have been more than once in custody—a dagger (†) that they are known to be the associates of bad characters—the figures after the name in the indictment denote the prisoner's age.

LONDON AND MIDDLESEX CASES.

OLD COURT.—Monday, September 12th, 1892,

Before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18920912-752

752. HENRY LAWRENCE (53) PLEADED GUILTY to unlawfully having in his possession twenty-one counterfeit shillings; also to a previous conviction of having in his possession a mould intended for counterfeit coining— Nine Months' Hard Labour.

Reference Number: t18920912-753

753. MARY WILLIAMS (22) , Unlawfully uttering a counterfeit coin— [Pleaded Guilty: See original trial image.] Four Months' Hard Labour.

Reference Number: t18920912-754

754. JAMES BRAZALL (40) , To feloniously marrying Fanny Elizabeth Johnson, his wife being then alive— [Pleaded Guilty: See original trial image.] Six Months' Hard Labour.

Reference Number: t18920912-755

755. THOMAS MANDRILL PAYNE (26) , To feloniously forging and uttering a postal order for 10s. 6d., with intent to defraud; also to stealing a letter whilst in the employ of the Postmaster-General— [Pleaded Guilty: See original trial image.] Nine Months' Hard Labour.

Reference Number: t18920912-756

756. WILLIAM CHAPPLE (39) , To stealing a post office parcel order (an order for a pair of shoes) whilst employed in the Post Office— [Pleaded Guilty: See original trial image.] Nine Months' Hard Labour.

Reference Number: t18920912-757

757. WILLIAM HENRY NEWMAN (21) , To feloniously forging and uttering a request for the payment of £30, with intent to defraud; also to two other indictments for like offences— [Pleaded Guilty: See original trial image.] Twelve Months' Hard Labour.

Reference Number: t18920912-758

758. STEPHEN FULFORD (19) , To stealing letters containing orders for 1s. 6d. and 4s. whilst employed in the Post Office— [Pleaded Guilty: See original trial image.] Twelve Months' Hard Labour.

Reference Number: t18920912-759

759. ALBERT BATTY (19) , To stealing two letters containing property whilst employed in the Post Office— [Pleaded Guilty: See original trial image.] Discharged on recognisance.

Reference Number: t18920912-760

760. CARLO DE NIOKLO (41) , To feloniously marrying, his wife being then alive— [Pleaded Guilty: See original trial image.] Nine Months' Hard Labour.

Reference Number: t18920912-761

761. GEORGE NAINBY (20) , To stealing a counter pane, the goods of William Smith; also to three indictments for forging and uttering orders for the delivery of umbrellas; also to a conviction of felony at this Court in the name of Alfred Nainby— [Pleaded Guilty: See original trial image.] Nine Months' Hard Labour.

Reference Number: t18920912-762

762. JOHN BRENNAND CHAFFER (44) , To forging a request for the payment of £7, and to obtaining by false pretences from Edmund Simmonds £7, with intent to defraud— [Pleaded Guilty: See original trial image.] Three Months' Hard Labour.

Reference Number: t18920912-763

763. GEORGE JOHNSON (40) , To three indictments for forging and uttering cheques for £80 6s. 8d., £6 5s., and £6 5s.— [Pleaded Guilty: See original trial image.] Three Years' Penal Servitude. And

Reference Number: t18920912-764

764. GEORGE BROWN ,* To burglary in the dwelling-house of James Thomas Palmer, and stealing a purse and other articles and 12s.— [Pleaded Guilty: See original trial image.] Eight Months' Hard Labour.

Reference Number: t18920912-765

765. WILLIAM COAD (24) , Unlawfully committing an act of gross indecency with James Clarke.

MR. GREENFIELD Prosecuted.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18920912-766

766. CHARLES ALLEN (20) , Unlawfully uttering counterfeit coin.

MR. PARTRIDGE Prosecuted.

LOUIS UNDERWOOD . I am a picture-dealer, of 36, Holywell Street, Strand—on Saturday night, 6th August, about five minutes to twelve, as we were closing, the prisoner came in; he took up some small pictures in an envelope and tendered a 5s. piece—I said, "Have you a sixpence?"—he said, "No; what is the matter with that?"—I said, "I shall not give it you back"—he said, "Then I shall make you"—I sent for a policeman and gave him in charge—I said, "Where did you get it from?"—he said, "I had it from a book-maker"—I said, "Give me his address"—he said, "Oh, King's Cross."

Cross-examined by the prisoner. You made no attempt to escape; you remained perfectly quiet.

WILLIAM MONK (E 163). I was called to the shop of the last witness—the prisoner was there—Mr. Underwood stated that he had tendered a bad 5s. piece; the prisoner made no reply—I searched him, and found no money on him, good or bad—he gave his name as Charles Allen, but refused his address—he was charged at the station with uttering this coin—he said he received it from a book-maker at King's Cross.

Cross-examined. I don't remember you saying that you did not want your father disgraced.

WILLIAM JOHN WEBSTER . I am Inspector of Coin to the Joint—this is a counterfeit 5s. piece.

The prisoner in his defence stated that he had been drinking heavily, and did not know what he did.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18920912-767

767. GEORGE ERSSEE (18) , Unlawfully uttering counterfeit coin, and having other counterfeit coin in his possession.

MR. BODKIN Prosecuted.

ANNE BAILEY. I am barmaid at the Welsh Harp, Chandos Street—on 26th July the prisoner came in and asked for lemonade and a dash—he put down a 5s. piece; I picked it up, and thinking it was not good I took it to my master—the prisoner left without waiting for his change—on the 29th July the prisoner came again; he asked for half a quartern of port wine, and produced a bottle; I filled it; he put down a 5s. piece in the same way; I recognised the way in which he rang it as he put it down—I took it up and looked at it; it was bad—while I was looking at it the prisoner went out without his change—I gave the coin to Mr. Gilbert, and we both went out and caught hold of him just outside the hospital, as he was going to make off; a constable was sent for, and he was taken to the station—I saw the coin marked by Mr. Gilbert denting it—this is the one I took on the 29th; the other is not marked, but I believe this is it.

EDWIN HENRY GILBERT . I am landlord of the Welsh Harp—on 26th July Miss Bailey gave me this, 5s. piece—it is bad; I dented it—on 29th July I was in the bar when the prisoner came in—I did not see the 5s. piece put on the counter; Miss Bailey handed it to me—I asked her where the man was; he was just leaving—I followed him out with the barmaid, and caught him in the road opposite the hospital—while he was standing on the pavement he dropped something into an area; I did not see what it was; I could tell it was coin by the ring of it—he was taken to the station and searched in my presence, and another 5s. piece was found on him—I gave the two coins to the constable.

GEORGE COCK (E 130). On 29th July, about nine in the evening, I was called to the Welsh Harp, and found the prisoner detained by Mr. Gilbert, who said he had tendered this 5s. piece—he made no remark—I took him to the station, and found this other 5s. piece in his coat pocket—Mr. Gilbert mentioned the hospital to me, and I sent a constable there, with a man belonging to the public-house, who brought back another 5s. piece—Mr. Gilbert gave the other two coins; these are them.

WILLIAM JOHN WEBSTER . I am Inspector to the Mint—these three coins are counterfeit, two from one mould and one from another.

Prisoner's Defence. I went to the public-house on the 29th August and called for a small soda. There was another lad in the bar, and I saw him put something in his pocket and go out; the barmaid was at the other end of the bar, and as I was going out she said it was me, and I was given into custody. The bar maid said before the Magistrate that the man had on the same clothes on both occasions; I only bought this suit of clothes on the 27th, of a man named O'Hara, a clothier, who promised to be here.

GUILTY .

Recommended to mercy on account of his youth. **— Six Months' Hard Labour.

FOURTH COURT.—Monday, September 12th, 1892.

Before Robert Malcolm Kerr Esq.

Reference Number: t18920912-768

768. FREDERICK PYKE (22) , Unlawfully uttering counterfeit coin.

MR. PARTRIDGE Prosecuted, and MR. K. FRITH Defended. ARTHUR LEWTNS. I am manager to Mr. Copenhagen, a tobacconist, of 2 Poultry—on August 12, about two o'clock, the prisoner came in for an ounce of tobacco, and tendered a 5s. piece—I told him it was bad—he said he would take it where he got it—I gave it him back—later in the day I was taken to Cloak Lane station, and picked the prisoner out from nine or twelve others.

Cross-examined. I identified him as soon as I went in—I went about halfway down the line, he stood about the centre—I glanced at the others—I had not given the police a description of him—I telephoned to the other shop.

JOSEPH COPENHAGEN . I am a tobacconist, of 4, Queen Street, and have another shop at 2, Poultry, of which the last witness is manager—on August 10th I received a communication through the telephone, and about one o'clock the prisoner came in for an ounce of tobacco and tendered

this 5s. piece (produced)—I walked round the counter, and he went away as fast as he could with the tobacco—I ran after him and called "Stop him!"—he was brought back.

Cross-examined. My two shops are about five hundred yards from one another.

JOHN DANE (534 City). On August 10th I heard cries of "Stop him!" and saw people running after the prisoner—I stopped him in Pancras Lane, under one hundred yards from the shop, and took him back, and Mr. Copenhagen charged him—he said at the station, "I wish I had taken it back where I got it from; I took it at the Lewes races; I wish I had gone to Redcar, and taken it back"—I found on him a good half sovereign, a 5s. piece, and 21/4d.—he was placed with other persons, and Mr. Lewins immediately identified him—an ounce of tobacco was found on him.

Cross-examined. Lewins glanced down the line, and went halfway down before he fixed on the prisoner—there were six or seven in the line.

WILLIAM JOHN WEBSTER . I am Inspector of Coin to Her Majesty's Mint—this is a bad crown.

GUILTY Twelve Month' Hard Labour.

Reference Number: t18920912-769

769. GEORGE WILLIAMS (53), CHARLES GRIFFITHS (40), and BRIDGET WHITLOCK (48) , Having in their possession implements for the manufacture of counterfeit coin.

MR. PARTRIDGE Prosecuted.

FREDERICK BARTON (Detective E). Early in August I received information, in consequence of which I kept observation on Griffiths; I saw him daily on the Seven Dials, and in company with Williams—I followed Griffiths home, and I kept observation with Tremlett on 7, Smart's Buildings for a fortnight or more, from the back windows of the top floor back room of a large building at the back of Smart's Buildings; we had full view of the room occupied by Griffiths and the woman, and of the entrance to the house—I only saw Williams go in once, that was on the morning of the 15th, but I had seen Griffiths and the woman in the room every day—on August 13 I saw Williams come down Goldsmith's Buildings, and pass the side door and push it open, and enter the house—shortly afterwards I saw Whitlock hurriedly dress herself and let him in, and I saw him folding a slip of paper—the men had their shirt sleeves rolled up—Tremlett and I entered the house, and went up to the top floor back—I pushed the door open and went in; Williams was standing by a table with this basin of plaster of Paris, and this spoon and a piece of glass—there was a fire recently banked up—there were three pieces of glass on the table—this is the piece of paper I saw him folding up—I was looking through field glasses—I said, "What are you doing?"—Williams made no answer—I told them both that they would be charged with manufacturing counterfeit coin—Williams said he had been put away—Griffiths made no reply—we handed them over to other officers, and then searched the room, and found four iron clamps, a quantity of copper wire, some plaster of Paris, white sand, some rivets, a hammer, screwdriver, two candlesticks, a quantity of soda and dry chemicals, all which were handed to Mr. Webster—in the dusthole we found about half a bushel of plaster of Paris.

SIDNEY TREMLETT (Detective E). Previous to August 13 I saw Williams go into this house about five times—I found in the room a file, a Ledger, a counterfeit sixpence, and the cell of a battery, and on Williams part of a battery—after Williams entered the house I saw Whitlock get up and put her skirts on, and go to the door; she was not in the room at the time we made the raid, and I went to the first floor back and knocked, and said, "Mrs. Griffiths"; she said, "No, she has just gone out"—I went to the landlady, and Whitlock rushed out of the house; I fetched her back, and said to the landlady, "Is this the woman you let the top floor back to?"—she said, "Yes"—Williams was asked his name and address at the station—he said, "George Williams, no home. "

Cross-examined by Griffiths. I saw nothing found in the room—we did not keep constant observation with our glasses.

MARY ANN DRISCOLL . I live at 23, Goldsmith Street, Holborn—I am landlord of Smith's Buildings, Holborn, and let the top floor to the female prisoner—she was there about three weeks—Griffiths came about the end of June and lived with her as his wife up to August—she paid the rent—I have several other lodgers, they all had access to the dusthole.

WILLIAM JOHN WEBSTER . I am Inspector to H. M. Mint—a number of articles have been shown to me—this is a knerling or edging tool—this is a counterfeit sixpence—this glass is for mould-making—this is plaster of Paris, which is used for the composition of the moulds—these are clamps to hold the mould while the metal is poured in—I have seen three bottles of acid, two spoons, copper wire, a ladle containing molten metal, some antimony, and a basin and spoon; all these articles may be used in the manufacture of counterfeit coin and for other purposes—I have examined a number of fragments of moulds, two of them have been used for making coins—these strips of paper are used to wrap the coins in.

Griffiths'defence. The female prisoner and I had been cohabiting together for many years; we had a quarrel, and she went to live with her son. She went to the lodging and gave her name as Mrs. Griffiths. She was there three weeks previous to a reconciliation, and then I went home to her. I was in utter ignorance of what was in the room.

WILLIAMS— GUILTY .

He then PLEADED GUILTY** to a conviction in the name of Benjamin Matlock, on February 27th, 1882, of possessing a mould for coining.— Five Years' Penal Servitude.

GRIFFITHS— GUILTY .— Six Months' Hard Labour.

WHITLOOK— NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18920912-770

770. BRIDGET WHITLOOK was charged on two other indictments with like offences, upon which no evidence was offered.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18920912-771

771. JOHN REARDON (21) PLEADED GUILTY ** to burglary in the dwelling-house of William Thomas Chambers, and stealing four pieces of cloth, after a conviction, at Hammersmith on November 19th 1888.— Twelve Months' Hard Labour ,

OLD COURT.—Tuesday, September 13th, 1892.

Before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18920912-772

772. RICHARD JAMES (23) PLEADED GUILTY to stealing a watch and other articles, and 35s., of Samuel Smith in his dwelling-house; and to a previous conviction of felony on 3rd December, 1889.— Fourteen Months' Hard Labour.

There were three other indictments for obtaining goods by false pretences, upon which no evidence was offered.

Reference Number: t18920912-773

773. JOHN MACKLIN (23) , Stealing a barrel and thirty-six gallons of ale, of Messrs. Bass, Ratcliffe, and Gretton, Limited.

MR. HUTTON Prosecuted.

JAMES CAKEBREAD . I am a drayman, in the employ of Messrs. Bass, Ratcliffe, and Gretton, Limited, brewers—on the evening of 2nd August I was outside the Red Cow public-house, with my dray, delivering beer there, and when I was in the cellar for about an hour I left a thirty-six gallon cask of beer on the pavement, and when I came back it was gone—I spoke to a policeman, and we searched for the barrel, and it was found in Half Moon Passage, about 100 yards off—I saw the prisoner close to where the barrel was found; he was among the crowd—the policeman spoke to two boys, and they pointed out the prisoner, and he was taken into custody.

HENRY HARRY ROBINSON . I did live at 1, Bartholomew Place—I have since moved to 17, Adam Street—on the afternoon of 11th August I was outside the Bed Cow, looking at them putting the barrels down—I then went to St. Bartholomew's School, and when I went back again I saw a barrel in the passage; I sat upon it; while I was sitting upon it Jack Macklin (the prisoner) came up with another man—I knew the prisoner before—the other man said to me, "Get off," as he was going to wheel the barrel to Hurst's—Hurst is the proprietor of the Rose and Crown—I did not know the other man; he was a stranger to me—I got off, and they ran the barrel up Half Moon Passage, and hid it behind a door—I then came away, and they went into Hurst's, the Rose and Crown—a policeman afterwards came up and spoke to me, and I pointed out the prisoner in the crowd—the policeman called out all the men that were in the side bar of the public-house—the prisoner was one of the men.

CLEMENT FRANCIS CHRISTIE . I live at No. 1, Newbury Street—I am twelve years of age—I know the Red Cow in Long Lane—on 2nd August I was there, and saw a man rolling a barrel up Half Moon Passage—I saw two men, but I did not notice the other; the prisoner was one of the men—I had seen him before, and knew him—I did not see what they did with the barrel; I only saw them rolling it up the passage.

FREDERICK COOTE (City Policeman 358). On 2nd August Cakebread spoke to me, and in consequence of what he said I went to Half Moon Passage, and there found a barrel of beer, which he identified—in consequence of what the two boys said I went back to the Rose and Crown, where I saw the prisoner outside—I said to him, "These two boys tell me that you have rolled a barrel of beer into Half Moon Passage," and I asked them if they identified the prisoner as being the man—they said,

"Yes, Jack Macklin"—I then said to the prisoner, "I shall have to take you into custody"—he said, "All right"; he also said, "I know nothing about it"; that was at the station, when the charge was taken—the barrel was found about a dozen yards from where the prisoner lives, and about 100 yards from the Red Cow.

Witnesses for the Defence.

JANE DAVIS . I live at 8, Half Moon Passage—on the Tuesday after Bank Holiday I was with the prisoner and his mother, Mrs. Macklin, from two in the afternoon till eight in the evening—we went to buy a pair of boots in Old Street for the mother, who is a cripple; she was on crutches—she had not enough money to pay for the boots, and we came out and went into Aldersgate Street—that was near seven o'clock—when we got a little further the mother said she could not walk any further, or he would have to get a barrow and take her home; it was before eight when he put her on the barrow and took her along—I walked on with my baby.

Cross-examined. After taking his mother home he went to take the barrow back in White Horse Yard; that was not five minutes' walk—he then came back—he went out again to purchase some things for his mother, and I saw him no more till he was in custody—I live about two minutes' walk from the Bed Cow, and about a few yards from Half Moon Passage.

JAMES CAKEBREAD (Recalled). I went down into the cellar just before seven, and was down there till very nearly a quarter-past eight—I then came up and missed the barrel.

H.H. ROBINSON (Recalled). I don't know what time it was when I was sitting on the barrel; it was about half an hour before I saw the policeman, it was just getting dark.

WILLIAM POTTER . On the Tuesday evening after Bank Holiday, about ten minutes past seven, or from that to a quarter, I was standing at the Rose and Grown—I saw a man with a barrel of ale, he had the appearance of a butcher, he had on a blue smock and a grey coat—what made me take notice of him was his walking up and down, looking first one way and then another, rather suspiciously—directly after that I saw him bring a barrel of beer across Bartholomew Close—I saw him go towards Fentmore's Buildings, and roll a barrel of beer across the Close to Half Moon Passage—Fentmore's Buildings is a court leading into Long Lane—I stopped inside the Bose and Grown till about eight—I saw all this through the open door—I then came outside and saw the prisoner go in and light a cigarette—it was five minutes past eight when I came out and went home to wash, and it was a quarter-past eight when I saw the prisoner go in to light his cigarette—I heard immediately afterwards that he was taken for stealing this barrel, of ale.

Cross-examined. I heard the constable tell him that he was wanted for stealing a barrel of beer—I knew the barrel was wheeled up Half Moon Passage—I did not know at first what he was charged with—the constable said, "You will have to come with me on account of that barrel of ale"—I said "The chap is innocent"—I said that to the people standing round; I did not say it to the constable—I knew he was innocent—the two boys had told the constable that they had seen him take it—I did not hear them say it—I did not go to the station nor to the Police-court—this is the first time I have given evidence—I know the

prisoner and his mother; she is a cripple—the prisoner is not a friend of mine—I know him by working in the same place.

ROBERT POTTER . I live at 53, Bartholomew Place—just before seven on Tuesday after Bank Holiday I went up Half Moon Passage for a can of water, and I saw a man rolling this barrel up the passage—I did not know the man before; he was a stranger—the barrel was rolling from one side to the other—it was coming against my legs, and I put down my hand to stop it—there was only one man; there was a stranger standing there, looking on—I picked up my can and went home.

Cross-examined. I am nephew of the last witness—I do not live with him—I did not see the face of the man that was rolling the barrel—it was about five minutes to seven; it struck seven just as I got into the shop—I did not tell anybody about this; I kept it to myself till my father asked me about it; that was two or three days afterwards—I know the prisoner; he lives opposite—I heard that he was taken into custody the same night in Half Moon Court.

KATE CAPEL . I am thirteen years old—I live at 9, Half Moon Passage—I saw a strange man rolling the barrel up Half Moon Passage—it was six, or half-past six—I looked at the clock; I am quite sure of the time—I saw the barrel afterwards on a dusthole; it was a big cask.

GUILTY .— Eight Months' Hard Labour.

Reference Number: t18920912-774

774. SARAH WILKINSON (23) PLEADED GUILTY to unlawfully endeavouring to conceal the birth of her child.— Discharged on recognisances.

Reference Number: t18920912-775

775. GEORGE WATSON (20) to stealing a portmanteau containing clothing and other articles, the goods of John Miller ; also to stealing a box containing various articles and £13 10s., the goods of George Oscar Pullinger; also to stealing a trunk containing a quantity of clothing and other articles and £3 15s., the goods of John Herbert Fulton; and to a conviction of felony in February, 1892.— [Pleaded Guilty: See original trial image.] Eighteen Months' Hard Labour.

Reference Number: t18920912-776

776. ANN WILLIAMS** (69) to stealing a piece of dress goods the property of Leopold Schwabacher; also to a conviction of felony at Liverpool in November, 1886, in the name of Emma Morgan.— [Pleaded Guilty: See original trial image.] Nine Months' Hard Labour.

Reference Number: t18920912-777

777. WILLIAM JACKSON** (25) to burglary in the dwelling-house of George Day, and stealing a pair of boots; also to a conviction of felony in April, 1888, in the name of Charles Wilson.— [Pleaded Guilty: See original trial image.] Twelve Months' Hard Labour.

Reference Number: t18920912-778

778. JOSEPH FARREN** (36) to stealing from the dwelling-house of Richard Cole a bird and a cage; also to a conviction of felony in December, 1888.— [Pleaded Guilty: See original trial image.] Six Months' Hard Labour. And

Reference Number: t18920912-779

779. HENRY WALLACE CLAY (28) to six indictments for forging and uttering Post Office orders; to two indictments for stealing Post Office orders; to two indictments for forging and uttering requests for the payment of money; and to four indictments for obtaining from the Hearts of Oak Benefit Society Post Office orders, by virtue of a forged instrument.— [Pleaded Guilty: See original trial image.] Three Years' Penal Servitude.

FOURTH COURT.—Tuesday, September 13th, 1892.

Before Robert Malcolm Kerr, Esq.

Reference Number: t18920912-780

780. JOHN WILSON (26) PLEADED GUILTY to stealing two marine glasses, the property of Edward Martin, having been convicted of felony at this Court, in the name of William Hughes.—

Twelve Months' Hard Labour. (See page 1153). And

Reference Number: t18920912-781

781. WILLIAM RAWUNSON (37) to burglary in the dwelling-house of Barnet Levine, and stealing six coats, his property, after a conviction at this Court, on 25th April, 1867.— [Pleaded Guilty: See original trial image.] Twelve Months' Hard Labour.

Reference Number: t18920912-782

782. THOMAS DOUGLAS (29) , Unlawfully uttering counterfeit coin.

MR. PARTRIDGE Prosecuted, and MR. BLACK Defended. FREDERICK CLEVELAND (415 G). On August 4th I was with other officers, and saw the prisoner and a woman leave 4, Denmark Street—we followed them to Chapel Street; the woman went into No. 31, a grocer's shop, and the prisoner waited on the other side Of the road; the woman came out and walked to the end of Chapel Street, and joined the prisoner, and I lost sight of them.

ARTHUR WEST . I am assistant to James Harrison, a grocer, of 31, Chapel Street, Islington—on August 4th Emily Douglas came in for 1/4lb. of tea and 1 lb. of lump sugar and tendered a bad half-crown—I put it in the tester; it bent, and I told her it was bad; she said somebody must have given it to her—I gave it back to her, and she left—I afterwards saw her with four more at Clerkenwell Station, and identified her.

Cross-examined. It is so good an imitation of a good coin that I had to put it in the tester—it was such a coin as a person might take.

JOHN BRADMAN . I am a butcher, of 20, Amwell Street, Clerkenwell—on 13th August the prisoner came in for a neck of lamb, which I had not got, and he had mutton instead, which came to 2s. 7d.—he paid my mother with a half-crown—I broke it after he left, and looked up the street, but he was not there—I afterwards picked him out at Clerkenwell from several others.

Cross-examined. He took the mutton with him.

WILLIAM BLIGHT (Detective Sergeant G). On 13th August I was in Claremont Square, Clerkenwell, with other officers, and saw both prisoners—the male prisoner crossed the road, and went into Mr. Bradman's shop; the woman waited on the other side; he joined her, and they walked to Denmark Road, and went indoors—on the 15th I saw them together again, but nothing transpired—on the 16th I saw them leave their lodging and go to 18, Paternoster Row, to Mr. Kensit's shop—Thomas went in, and the woman stood about twenty yards away—I lost sight of him, and saw him again in King Edward Street, where he stopped and put something down a sewer grating—I told Green, who went into the sewer.

JOHN KENSIT . I am a stationer of 18, Paternoster Row—on 16th August the prisoner came in for two penny pamphlets and tendered a half-crown to the young woman—I heard it go into the till, and said "That is a bad one; you might be locked up for this"—he gave me smaller money and the change back—I followed him to Newgate Street, and at a turning behind the Post Office he saw me following, and dropped something down a gully in King Edward Street—I afterwards identified him at the Police-court in a room full of others.

Cross-examined. It is a very good imitation of a half-crown, and would easily deceive.

GEORGE GREEN . I am in the employ of the Commissioners of Sewers

for the City—I went down a sewer in King Edward Street, and found this half-crown of 1889. I gave it to Sergeant Blight.

Cross-examined. I can swear to it by this little mark on the horse.

WILLIAM BLIGHT (He-examined). I received this coin from Green, and have kept it separate ever since.

ADA SIDDELL . I live with my uncle, who keeps a paper shop at 269, Gray's Inn Road—the prisoner came in about 7.30 and asked for "Homeland," which is a penny book—he tendered a 4s. piece—I took it to my aunt, who put it in her teeth and bent it—I did not go into the shop again—my aunt put the coin on the counter, and the prisoner said, "Oh, I have got a penny," and took the 4s. piece back.

Cross-examined. I did not know it was a 4s. piece—we did not put it in the tester, but my aunt put it between her teeth and it bent.

JOHN ROBINSON (Detective Sergeant G). Early in August I received instructions from Inspector Leaf, and kept observation on the two prisoners—I followed them on August 2nd and 5th, and on the 13th I followed them to a butcher's shop in Am well Street—on the 15th, about seven p.m., I followed them to a stationer's shop, 173, Pentonville Road; the woman handed something to the prisoner, who entered the shop, and she remained outside—he came out, and I followed them to 269, Gray's Inn Road—the prisoner went in, and remained three or four minutes; he hurried out, and I entered and came out, and from what Miss Siddell told me, I followed the prisoner to 16, Melville Terrace, Euston Road—on the 18th I saw them again; he ran round the square; I saw them at the King's Arms, and followed them to King's Cross, and told them we took them for being suspected persons—they were placed with others, and three or four witnesses identified them without hesitation—one shilling and a few halfpence were found on the prisoner, which I returned to him.

WILLIAM JOHN WEBSTER . I am Inspector of Coin to H. M. Mint—these two half-crowns are counterfeit.

GUILTY .

He then PLEADED GUILTY to a conviction of uttering counterfeit coin on February 27th, 1888, in the name of James Dann, upon which the JURY found him Guilty of felony.

Reference Number: t18920912-783

783. THOMAS DOUGLAS was again indicted with EMILY DOUGLAS (22) for Unlawfully uttering counterfeit coin, to which

THOMAS DOUGLAS PLEADED GUILTY **— Five Years' Penal Servitude. MR. PARTRIDGE Prosecuted, and MR. BLACK Defended.

The evidence given in the last case was repeated.

E. DOUGLAS GUILTY .— To enter into recognizances.

Reference Number: t18920912-784

784. CHARLES CAXON (21) , Unlawfully uttering counterfeit coin.

MR. PARTRIDGE Prosecuted.

HENRY SAGEMAN . I am a tobacconist, of 76, Marylebone Lane—on August 11th the prisoner came in for a 3d. cigar, and gave me a five shilling piece—I asked Mrs. Sageman, in his hearing, to go next door and get change—she went out and came back with the crown and a policeman, and I gave the prisoner in charge—we went to the station,

where I said, "Here is another 5s. piece which he passed last Tuesday"—he said, "I never been last Tuesday here"—these are the two crowns; the one brought back by my wife is marked.

CATHERINE ELIZA SAGEMAN . I am the wile of the last witness—on 11th August he gave me this crown; I went to get change at the public-house next door because I had doubts about it—the publican tested it, and it turned black—I went to the station and brought a constable—the prisoner was still there; they asked him if he had any more coin on him, if he had any good coin—I said, "If you had so much small money, why did you pass the 5s. piece?" he said, "Because it came first"—my husband handed the other 5s. piece to the constable, saying that the prisoner was the party who passed it on Tuesday—the prisoner said he was not in the neighbourhood.

MR. LOWSON. I tested this marked coin and found it bad.

GEORGE CLEMENT (470 V). Mrs. Sageman called me to the shop on 11th August, and I saw the prisoner smoking a cigar—I asked him if he had passed this 5s. piece; he said, "Yes"—I asked him if he had got any more, and searched him, but found no bad coin, only 7s. in silver and some copper—Mr. Sageman said, "This is the man who passed this bad 5s. piece on Tuesday last"—the prisoner said nothing.

WILLIAM GEORGE WEBSTER . I am Inspector to H. M. Mint—these are two counterfeit crowns from different moulds.

The Prisoner called

LOUISA CUMMINGS . On Tuesday, August 9th, I was with you all day till 12 p.m.—we went to Greenwich, and went through the park, and went home at nine o'clock.

Cross-examined. On Monday I was at home, and on Wednesday my mother asked what the prisoner was locked up for, but I knew nothing about the Thursday case, I was only with him on Tuesday—I knew nobody at Greenwich, and nobody proves that I was away from home on that day.

Prisoners Defence. I can say nothing about the 9th; on the 11th I received, the coin in payment of a debt, and went into the shop, and bought a cigar, and waited a quarter of an hour for the change, and the woman came back with a constable.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18920912-785

785. JOHN WILSON (26) was again indicted for robbery with violence (with a person unknown) on Robert Ayliff, and stealing 3s. 6d., his money.

MR. SMITH Prosecuted, and MR. SANDS Defended.

ROBERT AYLIFF . I am a fireman, of 71, Pekin street—on July 15th about one a.m., I was going home; I got off a tramcar, and noticed four persons, three abreast and one ahead—I passed them, and got a blow on my left ear and then one on my right ear, and was knocked down on my face, and was held by my throat, and could hardly halloa or speak—the prisoner had hold of me while the others robbed me, and I was rolled over, and could see the prisoner's face; I was three or four yards from a lamp—3s. 6d. was taken from me, and my watch and swivel and tobacco box—I went to the station, and a sergeant was sent with me to walk through the streets—on 17th July I went to the station, and saw ten or fifteen men standing in a row, and recognised the prisoner by his

features and by his coat—I asked him to unbutton it, and saw the silk facings—I am sure he is the man who held me down.

Cross-examined. I had been to a garden-party at the Recreation Grounds, which was over about eleven o'clock; I then went to see a friend—I had had four glasses of ale from the time I left my work—this was in the main road—the other men were all taller than the prisoner—I could distinguish the silk facings on the prisoner's coat quite plainly when I was rolled over—I am sure of his features—he was clean shaved—they all had felt hats—I looked at the man's coat while he held me by the throat—it was a fortnight afterwards that I saw him at the station—most of the men at the station were taller than the prisoner; some had beards, and some were clean shaved.

Re-examined. Some men at the station were taller than the prisoner, and some were his size—I looked at their faces, and then asked that the prisoner's coat might be turned down.

WILLIAM FOLEY (Policeman K). On 27th July, Ayliff was brought to the Police-station—a number of men were placed in the yard, and he identified the prisoner, who shook his head—I told him he would be charged with highway robbery with violence; he shook his head, and said, "What day was that?"

Cross-examined. He had been in custody six days—I did not see him when he was first in custody—he had no beard, only a light moustache—his beard on the 27th was not grown as it has now—he had no beard at all, but when he was identified he had a beard of about a week's growth.

The prisoner's statement before the Magistrate: "I know nothing about this; I am entirely innocent."

NOT GUILTY . (See page 1150.)

Reference Number: t18920912-786

786. THOMAS BULPETT (49) , Indecently assaulting James Brown.

MR. HUTTON Prosecuted, and MR. WARBURTON Defended.

NOT GUILTY .

OLD COURT.—Wednesday, September 14th, 1892.

Before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18920912-787

787. JOHN SIMMS (22) , Feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Lucy Crozton, and stealing a box of cigars.

MR. POYNTER Prosecuted.

GEORGE LINGE (City Policeman 903). On Tuesday morning, 30th August, at two a.m., I was on duty in Bishopsgate Street—I heard a noise like the smashing of glass—I went towards it, and saw the prisoner in front of No. 4 8,(close by the window; he came towards me, and then turned and ran away down Catherine Wheel Alley—I followed, calling "Stop thief!"—he was stopped by Police Constable Jones; he took this cigar-box from under his coat and threw it away—he was taken to the station and charged with breaking and entering No. 48, and stealing this box—he made no reply—there were people in the street, but not near the shop there was nobody running besides the prisoner.

Cross-examined by the prisoner. I did not see anybody with you—I did not see you break the window or take anything.

JAMES JONES (City Policeman 935). On Tuesday morning, 30th August, about two, I was in Catherine Wheel Alley—I saw the prisoner running towards me—I stopped him; he threw away this box, containing a few cigars, and also this small jemmy—I afterwards went to 48, and found a plate-glass broken—I produce a piece of the glass; it was taken out of the inside of the window—a number of cigars were lying on the pavement in front of the window, and this piece of brick—there is an iron railing in front of the shop window to protect it—I don't think this piece of brick could hare broken the window; the jemmy could hare done it.

Cross-examined. When I first saw you you were walking very quietly—you ran as soon as you left the court—I was on duty in uniform.

LUCY CROXTON . I am a tobacconist, and keep a district post-office at 48, Bishopsgate Street—on Monday night, 22nd August, I left the shop at half-past eight, it was then looked up and safely secured—I was aroused on the morning of the 23rd, and went to my shop about half-past two—I found the window smashed, and some cigars and pipes and cigarette holders gone—I missed three boxes of cigars—this (produced) is one of them—the value of the things I missed is about £5.

Cross-examined. At the station you appeared to be intoxicated—I could not say you were—you were doubled up, leaning over the bar as if you were not quite sure what you were doing.

GEORGE LINGE (Recalled). I searched the place where the box and jemmy were found—I found no other articles there, not in the way the prisoner ran—I did not see anyone else near the shop—people are passing and repassing all night in Bishopsgate Street.

Prisoners Defence. I left home about ten minutes to one, and coming along I saw this box and jemmy on the ground; I picked them up and walked up the court; the man came after me, and the police pounced upon me like a lion, and I ran; I was very drunk at the time.

GUILTY .

He also PLEADED GUILTY to a previous conviction of felony in the name of William Taylor, on 5th January, 1891, and several other convictions were proved against him.— Five Years' Penal Servitude.

Reference Number: t18920912-788

788. GUY GORDON, alias BLACKBURN (85) , PLEADED GUILTY to feloniously forging and uttering an endorsement to an order for £10, with intent to defraud.— Discharged on recognisances.

Reference Number: t18920912-789

789. JOHN KELLY (22) and RICHARD MITCHELL (19) , Feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Maria Hailey, with intent to steal.

MR. RAVEN Prosecuted.

ROBERT MOTHERSOLE . I am a cab driver, of 4, Goulston Road—on 20th July, about a quarter to nine in the evening, I was in Rosemount Road, Acton, and saw the prisoners; Kelly had got his head and shoulders through the window, and Mitchell stood at the gate of No. 28—there is a little garden in front, about three yards long—I had passed Detective Wilkinson as I was going along, and I at once turned and drove back to him, and gave him information; he jumped up on the cab beside me,

and we chased the prisoners they ran across the fields—Wilkinson caught Kelly and I caught Mitchell—one or two gentlemen came up and assisted us; I afterwards drove to the station, and fetched another constable to help.

Cross-examined by KELLY. "When I saw you in the window it was about two feet up—I saw you run away—I am positive you are the man.

WILLIAM MALCOLM HAILEY . I live with my mother, Maria Hailey, at 28, Rosemount Road—on 20th July, just before nine, we were at supper in the dining-room—we had left the drawing-room about a quarter of an hour before—the window was then open about two or three inches—when I saw it again it was shut.

KATE VARDIGAN . I am servant to Mrs. Hailey—on 20th July, about a quarter to eight, I went into the drawing-room and closed the window; it was right up.

JAMES WILKINSON (Detective). On the evening of 20th July, about eight o'clock, I saw the two prisoners in Rosemount Road; I kept observation on them for some time till they passed through a piece of waste ground, and then I lost sight of them—I afterwards received information from the cab-driver, and I got on his cab and rode into Rosemount Road—we passed No. 28, and saw the men running away up the road—I got off the cab and chased them across the field about three-quarters of a mile—I then overtook Kelly, and took him into custody—he said, "All right; you have got me, but I never got in"—Mitchell continued to run; the cabman stopped him about fifty yards from where I stopped Kelly—when the charge was read over Mitchell said, "That is quite right"—Kelly said it was a fine thing; they had done nothing—they were quite sober.

MR. HAILEY (Recalled). I could not say exactly the time I left the drawing-room—I think it was between half-past eight and a quarter to nine—when I saw it again it was shut.

The COMMON SERJEANT ruled that the evidence of breaking was not sufficient, and directed a verdict of NOT GUILTY . The prisoners were subsequently charged with unlawfully attempting to steal the goods in the said dwelling-house. (The evidence in the former case was repeated.) The JURY found the prisoners

GUILTY on this indictment.

Reference Number: t18920912-790

790. RICHARD MITCHELL was again indicted for unlawfully assaulting Benjamin Spencer, a police officer, in the execution of his duty, with a view to resist his apprehension.

MR. RAVEN Prosecuted.

BENJAMIN SPENCER (194 X). I was called to Bow Lane, Acton, a little before nine p.m. on 28th July—I saw Wilkinson, the two prisoners, and other people—I was in uniform, Wilkinson was not—I took hold of Mitchell; he went quietly for some distance, then he tried to wrench himself away from me—he tripped me up, and while on the ground kicked me three times on the left leg on the shin, and once on the right leg below the knee, and on the lower part of the stomach, as I was getting up—some gentleman had hold of him behind, and another constable coming up we got him to the station—I felt the kick in the lower part of the stomach for about a fortnight afterwards—I did not go on the sick list, nor did I see the divisional surgeon—I am quite well now.

Cross-examined by Mitchell. I did not handle you very roughly, and try

to choke you; I held you by your handkerchief, and you struggled, and so hurt yourself.

GUILTY .

A number of previous convictions were proved against the prisoners.

KELLY— Twelve Months' Hard Labour.

MITCHELL— Twelve Months' Hard Labour, and Six Months' Hard Labour for the assault upon the officer.

Reference Number: t18920912-791

791. CHARLES STEWART (29) PLEADED GUILTY to stealing a bicycle, the goods of Edward Henry Meers ; also to stealing a bicycle, the goods of Henry George Doughty ; also to stealing a bicycle, the goods of Walter Milledge; and also to stealing shirts, the goods of Ephraim Ayres, and others, his masters. There were other indictments against the prisoner.— Nine Months' Hard Labour. And

Reference Number: t18920912-792

792. MARY GILLINGHAM (20) , to unlawfully endeavouring to conceal the birth of her child by a secret disposition of the dead body.— [Pleaded Guilty: See original trial image.] Discharged on recognisances ,

Reference Number: t18920912-793

793. JOHN FREDERICK CHRISTIE (26), ERNEST BREACH (24), HENRY PERRY (22), ALFRED OLIVE (18), and JAMES JIMSON (40) , Robbery with violence on Percy Shuttleworth, and stealing 9s. 5d. from him.

MR. PARTRIDGE Prosecuted, and MR. GEOGHEGAN Defended Breach, Perry, Olive, and Jimson.

PERCY SHUTTLEWORTH . I live at 9, Montagu Mews, Hammersmith, and keep a coffee-stall outside the Hammersmith Broadway Railway Station at night—at half-past eleven on Sunday night, 14th August, I opened my stall—all five prisoners were waiting outside to be served, apparently—each of the prisoners called for eggs and coffee—they consumed the articles—I asked each one of them for the money, and they all laughed at me—I said to each one of them, "You have had so-and-so, it is so much"; I said to one, "Give me fivepence," to another, "Give me sixpence," and so on—they laughed at each other, and refused to pay me, and swore at me—Christie said, "I will turn your b——stall over"—Perry said, "Come on, let us turn his stall over"—they all said "Yes," and all of them started breaking up my cups and saucers—I shut up the stall and went inside—Christie forced the door open; he got in first and struck me in the chest and knocked me up against the urns, and all five surrounded me, and I felt a hand in my right-hand hip pocket; to the best of my belief it was Christie's hand, but I could hardly say—I had 9s. 5d. in silver and bronze in that pocket—the prisoners went out and got round the stall—I felt in my pocket and missed the money—I know it was 9s. 5d., because it was the amount for my milk bill; I had done no business till the prisoners came—the prisoners then got round my stall outside, and tilted it half-way over—they knocked the stall about, broke the window, and found some old boots, or something, which they threw, and damaged the stall very much—they spilt the milk and ate some cakes—Berry, my assistant, was outside—Jimson made an attempt to enter my stall again—I could not see if he had been in with the others before; I have no doubt he had—when he tried to come in again Berry stopped him, and Jimson struck Berry on the jaw—I cleared up my things, and opened the stall again—Olive went away; the others were still outside at the back, and they came round and I shut up again—they simply jeered and laughed at me when they came back again—when I shut up the second time the prisoners ran away, and a gentleman brought me assistance, and I informed the policemen what had been

going on—the same night I identified Christie and Breach at a common lodging-house in "Waterloo Street, and they were taken into custody—about two days afterwards I identified Perry and Olive from among a number of other strange men at the Police-station without hesitation—afterwards the police came again, and said they had caught Jimson, and I went and picked him out in the same way.

Cross-examined by Christie. You had about sixpenny worth at my stall, and you encouraged young Olive and others to call for it for you—Berry gave Breach one cup of coffee to encourage him to go away; a cup was not given to you—the stall is quite large enough for four men to get into; the door is broken off the hinge now; you burst your way through—I took my coat off in the stall—the stall was not tipped right over; you tilted it, and knocked over about fifty eggs; my milk was not spilt before you came.

Cross-examined by MR. GEOGHEGAN. Olive paid 2d., but he had more than that, and owed about 4d.—if I said before the Magistrate Olive paid for what he had, it was a mistake—the Magistrate gave me £1 to repair my damage—I gave two policemen, Lock and Jones, drinks out of it—I knew the prisoners before; they are well known; they have had stuff before and not paid for it—the stall runs on wheels, and the door is at the side—only one person can get in at the door at a time—Christie came in first; to the best of my belief it was his hand in my pocket—I swore it was his at the Police-court—Jimson came up to the stall after the money was taken, had stuff, and refused to pay, and struck my witness on the jaw—he was at the stall and had stuff with the others—I fancy it is correct to say that he came up to the stall after the money had been taken—I could swear he was there at the same time as the others, and called for things—he was there before the money was taken—it was not the police who made me prosecute; they asked me to come to the court—I should have come if they had not asked me—the amount of damage done to my stall was 30s.—Jimson came up and ordered stuff, declined to pay, and went away, and then when the others had forced their way in Jimson came up again—the constables did not have anything out of the £1, only two glasses of bitter which they asked for.

WALTER BERRY . I live at 9, Montagu Mews, Hammersmith—on this Sunday night I took the stall round and just settled it down, and we were opening it when Jimson came up and struck me on the jaw—I was pulled away by a friend—I went away down the Grove about 40 yards, and did not have a view of the stall—I saw all the prisoners there—later on when I came back I saw all the prisoners round there, and I gave Breach a cup of coffee to entice him away, and then I went away—I saw Perry taking a cake.

Cross-examined by Christie. Only one cup of coffee was paid for.

MONTAGU WOLFF . I live at 13, Angel Road, King Street, Hammersmith, and am a compositor—on this Sunday night I was on my way home, and I saw all the prisoners and several other men surround the coffee-stall—Christie aimed a boot at me, and asked me what I was looking at—they were smashing various articles on the stall; you could hear it quite plainly, but I could not say positively what they were doing, because the crowd was so great, and it was so organised—I went a few yards away for the police, and the prisoners saw me speaking to the police and ran away—I spoke to two plain clothes constables, who I

suspected were constables; I could not see one in uniform—Breach and Christie ran one way and Perry and two others (whom I do not recognise as being among the prisoners) another way—I went to the lodgings with the police.

Cross-examined by MR. GEOGHEGAN. This scene was going on for ten or fifteen minutes—it was within a few yards of the Hammersmith Police-station.

THOMAS JONES (265 T). On this night Wolff spoke to me—I saw Christie and Breach running from the coffee-stall in the Broadway, Hammersmith, and I saw Olive leaving, not the other two prisoners—I went with Lock to the prosecutor, and from what he told me I went to 2, Cove Cottages, as I knew Breach and Christie—I arrested Christie, and said I should take him into custody for being concerned with four other men in assaulting Shuttleworth, and robbing him and breaking his stall and cups and saucers—he said, "I know nothing about it; you have made a mistake"—Lock apprehended Breach—I apprehended Perry on the following midnight—I told him I should take him into custody for being concerned with Christie and Breach, in custody, in assaulting Shuttleworth and robbing him, and committing wilful damage—he said, "Not me, governor; I did not do it"—I arrested Jimson on the 22nd, a week afterwards, at "West Drayton—I told him the charge he said, "Governor, you have made a great mistake"—Shuttleworth identified Perry and Jimson from six others at the station; he went to the lodging-house.

Cross-examined by Christie, You did not say anything about paying for coffee.

EDWARD LOOK (594 T). I arrested Breach on this Sunday night at a quarter to twelve in bed, at a common lodging-house in Waterloo Street, Hammersmith—I told him the charge, and he replied, "I have been in here all night"—he refused to get up, and I was obliged to send for a policeman in uniform—Breach was very violent—I had to force him out of bed—I took him to the station; he made no answer there to the charge—I arrested Olive the same evening; he made no answer to the charge—I was with Jones when Wolff spoke to us—at that time I saw Christie and Breach running away, and I saw Perry in the distance.

Cross-examined by MR. GEOGHEGAN. I was in plain clothes, off duty, when Wolff spoke to me—there is no constable on duty outside Hammersmith Police-station.

Re-examined. This coffee-stall is more than ten yards from the Police-station—I arrested these men on the Monday morning, 15th.

Christie, in his defence, said that he had a cup of coffee, which he did not pay for, but that no money was taken from the prosecutors pockets, and, that no violence was used,

Jimson and Breach received good characters.

JIMSON— NOT GUILTY .

BREACH. PERRY, and OLIVE GUILTY .

Christie and Perry then PLEADED GUILTY to previous convictions of felony, Christie** in December, 1891, in the name of Albert Jennings, and Perry in June, 1891.

Christie also PLEADED GUILTY to assaulting Thomas Wilson and James Lockyer, police-constables, in the execution of their duty.— Three Years' Penal Servitude. PERRY— Twelve Months' Hard Labour. BREACH and OLIVE— Six Months' Hard Labour.

FOURTH COURT.—Wednesday, September 14th, 1892.

Before Robert Malcolm Kerr, Esq.

Reference Number: t18920912-794

794. ARTHUR DAVID BROWN , Marrying Elizabeth Ruth Puckle, his wife being alive.

MR. SYDENHAM JONES Prosecuted, and MR. TRAVERS HUMPHREYS

Defended.

SARAH KEZIA EDNEY . I live at 31, Upsand Road, Chelsea; I am a widow, and mother of Ada Kezia Underwood—I was present at her marriage to Arthur David Brown on the 11th August, 1878; she is still living, and is outside—Underwood was the name of my first husband.

Cross-examined. My husband took the name of Hatch when he came to London—I don't know if the prisoner was seventeen or eighteen when he was married—I had a reason for being anxious that they did get married; they lived together, I think, about fourteen months—he left her, and she came home to me, and lived with me, I keeping her, till ten years ago, when she took up with the man she has been living with for some time—after the prisoner and she parted he went to sea for some years; I lost sight of him—I was living at Norwood—he sent a letter there; I did not answer it; but I opened and returned it with, "Gone away, opened by mistake" on it—he knew where I was, or he would not have sent the letter—I opened it, but the housekeeper read it—I have seen him several times; I have known him all these years since he came home from sea—my daughter gave him in custody.

ELIZABETH RUTH PUCKLE . I live at 49, Banner Street, Hammersmith—I have known the prisoner six years and six months—I went through a form of marriage with him on 27th August, 1883, and have lived with him since—I have two children by him—I did not know he had been previously married till the Monday before his arrest.

Cross-examined. I have nothing to say against him; he has been a good man to me, and a good father to my children.

JOHN RICHARDSON (Police Sergeant B). On the 17th August, about 3.30, I arrested the prisoner and told him the charge—he said, "I can prove that the first marriage was not legal, as she married me in an assumed name, and I was only 17 years of age. It was her mother who forced us to get married, and she afterwards left me, and I went to sea"—at the station he said, "I was at sea for some years, and when I returned I wrote to her mother at Norwood, but the letter was returned, and I never saw anything of her till last January in King's Road, and I spoke to her. "

Cross-examined. The prisoner is a hard-working man when he can get work to do.

GUILTY. Strongly recommended to mercy by the JURY.— One day's imprisonment.

Reference Number: t18920912-795

795. JOHN DOSSETTER (24) and LOUISA DOSSETTER (21) , Unlawfully possessing counterfeit coin.

JOHN DOSSETTER PLEADED GUILTY. MR. WILKINSON, for the prosecution, offered no evidence against.

LOUISA DOSSETTER NOT GUILTY .

JOHN DOSSETTER also PLEADED GUILTY to possessing two galvanic batteries for the purpose of manufacturing counterfeit coin.— Five Years' Penal Servitude.

Reference Number: t18920912-796

796. DAVID BARRIS (30) PLEADED GUILTY to obtaining money from Isaac Pearlman by false pretences, with intent to defraud, after a conviction at this Court in June,1890.— Two Years' Hard Labour.

Reference Number: t18920912-797

797. JOHN McCORMACK (39) , to receiving articles of clothing: stolen from the dwelling-house of George Alfred Rowley.— [Pleaded Guilty: See original trial image.] Twelve Months' Hard Labour.

Reference Number: t18920912-798

798. GEORGE WILSON, alias ANDREW WEST (41) , to conspiring to obtain, and obtaining by false pretences from Martin Sherman Kerry, and from other persons, money, with intent to defraud.— [Pleaded Guilty: See original trial image.] Three Years' Penal Servitude.

Reference Number: t18920912-799

799. HENRY SMITHERS (36) , to burglary in the dwelling-house of Charles Henry Gowers, and stealing knives, forks, and spoons, his property.— [Pleaded Guilty: See original trial image.] Twelve Months' Hard Labour.

Reference Number: t18920912-800

800. JAMES DONOVAN (28) and CHARLES ATKINSON (22) , to burglary in the dwelling-house of Charles Edward Coffin, and stealing a quantity of cigars, DONOVAN having been convicted at Clerkenwell on 23rd April, 1883, and ATKINSON at Worship Street on 8th May, 1888.— [Pleaded Guilty: See original trial image.] Twelve Months' Hard Labour each.

Reference Number: t18920912-801

801. ALBERT WICKS (29) , to being found by night with housebreaking implements in his possession.— [Pleaded Guilty: See original trial image.] Twelve Months' Hard Labour. And

Reference Number: t18920912-802

802. ALBERT OHARLES LOWLES (33) , to stealing a pair of diamond earrings and a diamond brooch of Henry Charles Pearson, and others, his masters; also a diamond brooch; also a diamond bracelet and brooch, and a gold pearl pin; also two diamond brooches, a diamond bangle, and a pair of diamond earrings; also a gold albert chain, three diamond brooches, and a diamond bangle; also two diamond rings; also a diamond bracelet; also a diamond brooch and bracelet, of his said masters.— [Pleaded Guilty: See original trial image.] Judgment respited.

Reference Number: t18920912-803

803. WALTER EDWARDS (18) and EDWARD SULLIVAN (24) , Burglary in the dwelling-house of George Horn, with intent to steal.

MR. WILLS Prosecuted.

CHARLES NELSON (219 A). On 17th July, at 130, I was on duty in St. James's Street, and saw two men near the Wellington Barracks—they saw me watching them, and went away towards Victoria Street—as they passed me I recognised Sullivan—I hid myself in a doorway for ten minutes, and saw one man come back to York Street, and shortly after the other joined him—they went over to Castle Lane and looked down there, and came back to the middle of the road, smoking cigarettes—I went quietly down to the corner, and saw one man on a window-sill and the other standing by—Sullivan said, "Here is the copper," and the other one dropped from the window, and a struggle took place for four or five minutes—I called on a civilian to assist me, but he did not—I took Edwards to the station—Sullivan got away—on August 3rd, at 11 p.m., I went to the Duke of York public-house, Victoria, and saw Sullivan—I took him to the station—he was asked his address; he said he had been living at a lodging-house in Mile End Road, but did not think they would know him there—the Inspector asked him where he had been; he said at Manchester—I never lost sight of Edwards;. he dropped from the sill right into my arms.

ANNIE HORN . My husband is a colour-sergeant in the Coldstream Guards—my bedroom a buts on St. James's Park—I left my window a little way open at the top—I was awakened by a man who was half through the window—at that moment a policeman came up—I went to the window, and saw Edwards leave the window-sill—I saw the struggle

below; he was struggling with a policeman and another man, who got away—I have no doubt about him—I saw him drop from the window.

Edwards' Defence. I was not there at the time.

EDWARDS— GUILTY . Four Months' Hard Labour.

SULLIVAN— NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18920912-804

804. JAMES ROGERS (31) , Feloniously assaulting William James Windhurst, with intent to rob him.

WILLIAM JAMES WINDHURST . I am a shop-fitter, of 175, Essex Road, Islington—on 25th July I was in Norfolk Street with my wife, and the prisoner and two others came across the road—the prisoner came in front of me on the gutter and snatched my chain—I stumbled, and he ran away—I ran after him, and a man struck me—my wife ran after the prisoner, and he was stopped—I am positive he is the man.

Cross-examined by the prisoner. I saw you next in custody, at the corner of Essex Road.

EMMA WINDHURST . I was with my husband, and the prisoner came up at his side and snatched his chain, and he fell—I followed the prisoner, and called "Stop thief!" and never lost sight of him till he was caught by a policeman—he was facing me—there were no lights in the street—I have no doubt the prisoner is the man.

JOHN M'CARTHY (475 N). On 25th July I was on duty in Essex Road, and saw two men running—I pursued the prisoner, caught him, and asked him what was the matter—he said he heard cries of "Stop thief!" and asked me to stop a man—he was in an excited state—I took him back, and met a crowd of people and the prosecutor, who identified him and charged him—another man was running with him, who got away.

Prisoner's Defence. I heard a cry of "Stop thief!" and saw a man running. I ran in the same direction, and when he stopped I stopped too. The constable said, "What is the matter?" and some children said, "That is him."

GUILTY Six Months' Hard Labour.

OLD COURT.—Thursday, September 15th, 1892.

Before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18920912-805

805. ARTHUR WILSON PLEADED GUILTY to three indictments for unlawfully sending through the post certain postcards and letters of an obscene character.— Nine Months' Imprisonment.

Reference Number: t18920912-806

806. JOHN BARRY O'CALLAGHAN and SARAH ANNETTE BOLTON , Unlawfully conspiring by fraud to detain Phyllis Massey Baker, aged eight months, with intent to deprive her mother of the possession of the said child.

After MR. GILL had opened the case for the prosecution, MR. AVORY submitted that the facts alleged in the opening would not support the indictment, which was under the 56th Section of the Act, because, first, that the detaining must be with intent to deprive the person who then had the lawful care and charge of the child, and that here the defendant Bolton, and not the mother, had that

lawful care and charge; secondly, because the force or fraud required by the Section must be practised on the child itself and not upon the guardian. In support of this point he referred to the case of Beg. v. Barrett, a decision by MR. JUSTICE A.L. SMITH in 15 Cox, Crim. Cases, p. 638. The COMMON SERJEANT overruled the first point, and, acting upon the decision of MR. JUSTICE A. L. SMITH, sustained the second objection, and directed a verdict of

NOT GUILTY .

There was another indictment, for feloniously by fraud detuning the said child with the like intent. Upon this no evidence was offered.

NOT GUILTY.

Reference Number: t18920912-807

807. ELLEN COLE , Feloniously marrying James Smith during the lifetime of Henry Cole, her husband.

MR. TURRELL Prosecuted.

ELIZABETH COX I am the prisoner's sister—I live at 96, St. Ann's Road, Burdett Road—I was present at her marriage to Henry Cole on 18th February, 1884—I was a witness—I last saw Henry Cole in 1886 at the Thames Police-court; I have not seen him since to know him—I went into the church when my sister's second marriage was just over, and I was asked to sign, and I put a cross—I met my sister between her first and second marriage—she was in black, and she told me her husband was dead—I saw her two or three times—I saw the policeman in the Rosherville Road, and he pointed out a man, but I cannot swear whether that man was Henry Cole.

MR. TURRELL said that this was the only evidence he had that Henry Cole was alive.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18920912-808

808. GEORGE TITMUS (53) , Unlawfully and indecently assaulting Ellen Teague.

MR. GEOGHEGAN Prosecuted, and MR. PURCELL Defended.

GUILTY .— Four Months' Hard Labour ,

Reference Number: t18920912-809

809. GEORGE HAWKINS (19) PLEADED GUILTY to unlawfully attempting to carnally know Rose Hawkins, a girl under fifteen.— Twelve Months' Hard Labour.

Reference Number: t18920912-810

810. HEROULES GEORGE BARNES (20) to unlawfully and indecently assaulting Rose Footiman.— [Pleaded Guilty: See original trial image.] Four Months' Hard Labour. And

Reference Number: t18920912-811

811. FRANCIS KAY , to stealing a washstand and other articles, the goods of William Edward Hardy. A police sergeant stated that no doubt the prisoner had been the dupe of other men now in custody.— [Pleaded Guilty: See original trial image.] Discharged on recognisances.

FOURTH COURT.—Thursday, September 15th, 1892.

Before Robert Malcolm Kerr, Esq,

Reference Number: t18920912-812

812. GEORGE KNIGHT (28) PLEADED GUILTY to unlawfully obtaining six postal orders for 1s. each by false pretences, with intent to defraud.— Eighteen Months' Hard Labour.

Reference Number: t18920912-813

813. SIDNEY WHITE (28) , to unlawfully obtaining three pairs of boots by false pretences; also to stealing a bicycle, the property of William Thomas Collier.— [Pleaded Guilty: See original trial image.] Eight Months' Hard Labour. And

Reference Number: t18920912-814

814. SAMUEL BUTLER (18) , to attempting to carnally know Ellen Rogers, aged 4 years.— [Pleaded Guilty: See original trial image.] Five Days' Imprisonment.

Reference Number: t18920912-815

815. GEORGE THOMPSON (27) and ARTHUR LEVITT (26) , Breaking and entering the Church of St. Ann, Holloway, and stealing a lectern and four surplices, the property of George Charles Tilley.

MR. WILKINSON Prosecuted, and MR. COLE Defended. SAMUEL THOMPSON. I am verger of St. Ann's, Holloway—on 14th August I locked up the church about ten o'clock, the schoolroom window was partly down at the top, but there was galvanised iron work over the window—about a quarter to nine a.m. I went to the church and found the wire wrenched away from the schoolroom window, and the door of the children's lavatory was open—I missed the brass lectern from the church, five surplices from the vestry, and a clock from the choir vestry; the poor boxes were broken open, and a panel of a cupboard door was knocked off—I know both the prisoners by sight.

Cross-examined. I have lived in the neighbourhood sixteen or seventeen years—Thompson's father keeps a plumbers shop in Durham Road—I have known him ten years—Poole's Park runs northward from the Seven Sisters Road, and there is Poole's Park Tavern—there is a lamp just as you come up to the church on the same side—the size of the waste ground is about seventy feet—there is a gable end to Mrs. Platten's house and a fence, four feet high, and a lamp opposite her door just to the right of the steps.

Re-examined. The lamps are at the usual distance from each other.

SAMUEL GEORGE PLATTEN . I live with my parents at 59, Poole's Park—on the night of August 14th I was with my mother at the door between eleven and twelve o'clock, and saw the two prisoners in the middle of the waste ground—my mother told me to undo my boots and stockings for bed; I heard her call out, and went and saw the little man get over the waste ground and come back with a bundle wrapped in a white cloth—the other men went round the pub, corner together—I went to the Police-station on the 16th and saw the two prisoners there; they were not with other men.

Cross-examined. I have never seen the two men before I saw them in the waste ground—I did not see them go into the public-house with the parcel—my mother took me to the Police-station.

GEORGINA PLATTIN . I am the wife of Samuel Platten, of 59, Poole's Park—on 14th August, about 11.5 p.m., I was at my gate with my little boy, who will be nine years old to-morrow, and a man looked over the fencing of the waste ground of the church—he put his hands on the fence and looked at me—I called "Police! Murder!"—a few minutes afterwards, after I was getting over my fright, two men and a woman came up and stood there a little while; one of them had a very peculiar walk—the short one stood back, and the tall one and the woman said, "Are you coming home?"—he never answered, and they said again, "Ain't you coming home to-night? I don't keep my house open all night for you"—and then the two men came back, leaving the woman standing at the lamp-post—my little boy said, "Mother, that man has picked up your cat—the big one picked up the cat and gave it to the little one, who came and gave it to mc; but I was too frightened to know him again—the little boy was then by my side, without shoes or stockings—the men walked straight down, and the little one went away and came back with a white bundle under his arm—I went to the Police-station

a day or two afterwards, and identified the short man by his walk.

Cross-examined. I said at the station that I identified them by their walk—the lamp is at the top of the street, by Lennox Road, and they stood under it—I never left my doorstep, but I could see up Lennox Road, because the woman showed herself by her white apron.

Re-examined. The nearest lamp is nine doors up—there was only one lamp between my house and the lamp-post where I saw the people standing; they stood under the lamp by the church—there is a lamp on the opposite side of the way, right opposite my door.

WILLIAM CANDY (20 y). On August 14th, about 11.30 p.m., I was on duty in Durham Road, and saw the two prisoners and a woman near a fish-shop, about 350 yards from St. Ann's Church—I knew the prisoners, but not the woman—I afterwards saw Levitt with the same woman about fifty yards from the church—they saw me and went away, but I spoke to them all three the first time I saw them—none of them, had anything then.

Cross-examined. Durham Road runs out of Seven Sisters Road northwards—Telper's fish-shop is close to the bottom—I believe Levitt lives in Durham Road; this was next door but one to where he lives—I cannot swear to that girl (Kate Gill) as the woman he lives with—I have known old Mr. Thompson nearly six years.

Re-examined. I think the woman I saw Levitt with was a little taller than this girl, but it was in the dark.

ALFRED ALLEN . I am a coal porter of 29, Camden Road, Holloway—on August 16th I was near Finsbury Park, and found this piece of brass near the slope of the G. N. Railway, about three feet from the fence, in front of Weirs Terrace, and about ten minutes' walk from St. Ann's Church—it was wrapped in this coarse apron—I handed it to the police.

CHARLES ALLEN . I live at 97, Camden Road, Holloway—on August 18th I was in Well's Terrace and found this piece of brass, in a bag, on the embankment, and this other piece on Clifton Terrace—I also found these works of a clock at the roots of a tree in Well's Terrace, and these other two pieces and this cloth on the railway—I took a police-sergeant to the spot.

Cross-examined. I found them on different days, Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday.

GEORGE CHARLES LILLEY . I live at 66, Victoria Road, Stroud Green, and am churchwarden of St. Ann's Church—these are portions of the lectern, and these are the works of the clock.

WALTER TARGETT (Police Sergeant Y). On 16th August, at nine p.m., I took Thompson in custody, and told him I should arrest him on suspicion of breaking into St. Ann's Church last Sunday night—on the way to the station he said, "You are getting it up for me; I can prove I was at home and in bed at eleven o'clock last Sunday night"—I had not mentioned any hour—he was taken to the station, and the boy came and picked him out immediately—the inspector said, "Do you know anybody else there?" and he picked out Levitt—they were charged, and made no reply—there is a lamp opposite Mr. Platten's door, on the other side of the way, and there are about fifteen yards between the lamps—passing this tavern is the nearest way to Well's Terrace.

Cross-examined. I have been in the neighbourhood ten years, during which time old Mr. Thompson has lived there and carried on business, and young Thompson lived there—Mr. Platten's house is 120 feet from the corner of Lennox Road—I was present when the child identified the prisoners; two inspectors were there, and two or three men—the people put with the prisoners were passers-by.

JAMES THOMAS (Detective Y). On August 16th I met Levitt in Seven Sisters Road, and took him in custody on this charge—he said, "You are getting it up for me; I know nothing about it."

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18920912-816

816. CHARLES MACLELLAN (51) , Forging and uttering an order for £613s. 6d., with intent to defraud.

MR. ABRAHAMS Prosecuted, and MR. GEOGHEGAN Defended. JOHN WARNER. I am a furniture dealer, of 9, Crawford Street—on August 5 the prisoner came in and said he came from Mr. Cornelius, who he owed some money to, and Mr. Cornelius owed me some money, and he came to Day £2 off Mr. Cornelius' account if I would cash a cheque—I said, "No; I have just sent to the bank, and I have no money in the house"—he showed me this cheque. (This was for £6 13s. 6d., and signed "J. Lincoln & Co.," crossed, and endorsed "E. Andrews")—the prisoner gave the name of Andrews—I kept £2 back and gave him £4 13s. 6d.—I paid it into my bank next day, and it was returned marked "No account"—I had never seen him before.

Cross-examined. It was made out to Mr. Andrews, and was already endorsed—I asked him if his name was Andrews—he said "Yes"—I said, "Do you know who drew this cheque?"—he said he is the biggest builder in Westbourne Park.

JOHN WESTON . I arrested the prisoner on 18th August in Tottenham Court Road—he was with Cornelius—I said I should take him for obtain ing from Mr. Warner £4 13s. 6d. with intent to defraud—he said, "Why dont you take this man in custody as well?" alluding to Cornelius; he was in it as well as me, and knows all about it"—he passed a letter and a bill to Cornelius, and we took them from Cornelius. (This letter was signed "G, R, Cornelius")—he also passed this document, C, to Cornelius—after the arrest I was looking at the letter, and the prisoner said, "I am doing his writing for him; I wrote that letter for him, and was going to take it"—I have an opinion that the letter is in a similar hand to the cheque, and that the person who wrote it wrote the cheque.

Cross-examined. I have never given evidence of this sort before—when the prisoner gave these documents to Cornelius, Cornelius struggled with me to detain them; he afterwards called at the station to see the prisoner, but I would not allow him—he was ordered to come as a witness; he did not attend, and he was summoned—I afterwards assisted in arresting him for passing dishonoured cheques.

JOHN EMANUEL SMITH . I am a cashier in the London and County Bank, Westbourne Grove—we have no account in the name of Lincoln Brothers—this cheque was presented for payment; it was marked "No account," and returned to the bank—it came from a book issued to Mr. Henry Milmond, whose account was closed in May, 1881.

ALBERT LINCOLN . I am a builder, of Westbourne Park—I know nothing about this cheque; it is not in the writing of any member of my firm—we have no account at that bank.

Cross-examined. It is not an imitation of my writing.

GEORGE ROBERT CORNELIUS . (In custody). I live at 429, Edgware Road—I am following no occupation at present—now and then I buy a little land, and I am a lodging-house keeper—I know Mr. Warner; I owe him about £20—early in August the prisoner came to me; I was very ill in bed—he came to my bedroom and asked if I could give him the difference of a cheque; I said, "No"—he owed me £2, and asked me to give him the difference, but I refused—he had been with me when I had cashed several cheques at a public-house in the neighbourhood, and he asked me if I could go and get it cashed there—I said "No; I cannot go out to-day, and will not"—he said, "Will Mr. Warner do it?"—I said, "I don't know; you can take it there and try him if you like"—he left, and came back in half an hour and said he had changed the cheque with Mr. Warner, and paid him £2, and gave me a receipt—I have seen this letter before; it was not written by my instructions—I saw the cheque at the Police-court—I do not know the writing, but I know the prisoner as Mr. Andrews, and nothing else—this account, marked C, is, I believe, in Mr. Hunter's writing—about a week before this occurrence I asked the prisoner to write a letter to Mr. Hunter, offering him my interest in some building land which I had in Essex for a small consideration over the amount of this account—I handed him the account, and he never handed it back till he was taken in custody.

Cross-examined. He forced himself upon me—I did not visit at his house; I do not know where he lived—I do not know Mr. Hamilton—I know a man who passes by the name of Eldon—I do not know whether he wrote a cheque for £48—whether that letter exists or not it was not written by my authority—it might have been in my hand in getting the account from the police, the account was what I wanted—I have been in the habit of cashing cheques in the neighbourhood, drawn in my favour—four of them have been dishonoured in the neighbourhood of Edgware Road—they were all endorsed by me—I was the means of arresting the prisoner, but I did not knowingly act as a decoy—there was one dishonoured cheque for £5 at Hammersmith from a friend of twenty years' standing—an inquiry is going on about it at the Police-court, in which I am the chief actor—it was at the request of the police that I went to the station in a cab—it is not true that I wanted to see the prisoner privately; that is a mistake—he did not show me the cheque—I have lived in the Edgware Road since January—I do not know all the large firms in the building trade—I never heard of Lincoln Brothers, large builders.

Re-examined. I was not acting for the police—the dishonoured cheques were given me for some building land, and the man has absconded.

JOHN WESTON (Re-examined). Cornelius represented himself as an agent, and we asked him to make an appointment, and that is the way we got him.

GUILTY of the uttering.— Twelve Months' Hard Labour.

Reference Number: t18920912-817

817. GEORGE CHARLES LACEY , Indecently assaulting Elizabeth Kirby.

MR. GEOGHEGAN, for the prosecution, offered no evidence.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18920912-818

818. JOHN DALY (26) , Robbery with violence on Hugh McAuley, and stealing 4s., his money.

HUGH MCAULEY . I live at 44, Wentworth Street—about 6.30 on Saturday evening the prisoner and another, man came up to me and knocked me down, and robbed me of four or five shillings—I called "Murder," and the police came and took the prisoner.

FREDERICK DICKINSON (254 H). I was on duty in Kings Arm's Yard, and saw the prisoner holding McAuley by his throat—he got him on the ground, and was rifling his pockets—I got hold of him and had a struggle with him—he got my finger in his mouth, and became very violent—I was on the sick list fifteen days.

Cross-examined by the prisoner. You were not eight or nine yards from the prosecutor.

ARDSEN MALE (107 E). I was at the King's Arms, and saw the prisoner and the constable struggling; the prisoner had hold of the constable by the throat, and had one of his fingers between his teeth—he was taken to the station.

The prisoner's statement before the Magistrate. "I happened to push against the old man, but I never took his money. "

Prisoner's Defence. I was the worse for drink, and three or four men behind me pushed me against the prosecutor; he caught hold of me and started strangling me. On the way to the station the police gave me a severe doing, and I have had a pain for a fortnight where the police kicked me. I am innocent.

GUILTY Twelve Months' Hard Labour.

Reference Number: t18920912-819

819. THOMAS BIRD (39) , Indecently assaulting Oliver Charles Yowell Carter; and GEORGE NEWBERRY (47) , Indecently assaulting Godfrey Smith.

MR. GILL Prosecuted, and MR. HUTTON Defended Bird,

GUILTY Twelve Months' Hard Labour each.

Reference Number: t18920912-820

820. JAMES BRENNAN (19) , Robbery on James Webb, and stealing two cucumbers and £3 10s. 9d., his property.

MR. LAWLESS Prosecuted, and MR. ELDRIDGE Defended.

JAMES WEBB . I am a jeweller, of 38, Newington Green—on 2nd August, about 10 a m., I came out of a urinal in Park Street, Islington, and five men seized me, threw me into a doorway, and kicked me and knocked me about—the prisoner seized me by my throat, and I saw his hand go to my trousers pocket; he took my money and my watch from my waistcoat pocket—somebody gave me a blow on the side of my head and knocked me down—I grabbed at the prisoners legs, and he kicked me in my stomach—I had a half sovereign, two half-crowns, and some silver and copper in my pocket, and two cucumbers and a small bunch of flowers in my hand—they made off into No. 1A, Parkfield Street—I went into the kitchen there with two constables—there were fifteen or twenty men in the kitchen, and I picked out the prisoner, who was sharing the money—the constable showed me a cucumber which had been freshly broken: I identified it because it was a peculiar one introduced by Colonel North's gardener.

Cross-examined. I never saw one like it before—there was a door at the end of the passage; it was not locked—the prisoner put his knee on my throat; he was the chief one, the others were doing the holding part—

I had the same chance of seeing them, but I only identified the prisoner.

JOHN ROBINSON (70 G). On the morning of August 2nd Webb came to me and pointed to 1A, Parkfield Street—we went to the kitchen and saw eighteen or twenty men—Webb walked up to the prisoner and said, "That is the man who robbed me"—I saw him pass some silver coins to two men—I caught hold of his right hand and took from it 10s. in silver, a half-sovereign, a florin, a penny, and two market tickets—I said, "Stop that man"—that was the one I saw the prisoner pass money to—the prisoner said, "They are only market tickets"—I found in the room a florin and a sixpence, and a cucumber freshly broken on the table—the prisoner said, "All right, governor, you know I do not get my living at this; I only came here to pay a man's lodging who works for me"—I took him to the station, and found 5d. more.

Cross-examined. The prisoner did not attempt to run away; the door was closed—when I stopped the prisoner he said, "Hand them up, they are only market tickets," but I found 2s. 6d. among them—I saw him handling money when I went in.

The prisoner's statement before the Magistrate: "I went there to pay the lodging of a chap who works for me; that is all I was doing, and the money belonged to me. I borrowed a sovereign of a man named Vincent. I am not one of those who rob men, and I can prove it. "

NOT GUILTY .

OLD COURT.—Friday, September 16th, 1892.

Before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18920912-821

821. LAZARUS SAMUELS and LAZARUS PHILLIPS , Stealing six pieces of cloth and fifteen other pieces of cloth, the property of the London Parcels Delivery Company.

MR. GRAIN Prosecuted; MR. GEOGHEGAN Defended Samuels, and MR. C. F. GILL Defended Phillips.

ERNEST HAWES . I carry on business at 86, Leadenhall Street; that is the chief shop, and there is a branch at 12, High Street, Finchley—on the 8th August I caused a parcel of cloth to be sent to the branch establishment containing six pieces of 5 yards and fifteen pieces of two and a half yards, twenty-one yards altogether, worth £11 11s. 3d.—that was the price charged to the trade, and charged to the branch office—the parcel was signed for in the ordinary way—it did not arrive—I made a claim against the company—I gave the officer Savage a sample on Tuesday evening—I have since seen some of the cloth—I accompanied Savage, and had an interview with the two prisoners—this is the cloth (produced)—it is practically all here; three pieces are missing.

Cross-examined by MR. GILL. There are eighteen pieces, of different patterns—the largest piece is five yards—I buy different lots of cloth in bulk—there would be a slight difference in price buying cloth in that way to buying it in bulk—I bought this cloth from Brown and Sons, Holborn—I have the invoice—the pieces vary in price; the highest price is 3s. 7d. per yard, and the lowest 3s. 1d.—that is the price buying it in the roll—these are not remnants—I have never bought in Pill's Market—if a hawker

brought such goods to the door to sell I should expect the price to be less than if bought in a shop in Holborn—they would be none the worse for being of different patterns—I went with the officer to Phillips' shop in Cutler Street; he was not there—I saw his son, and asked where his father was—he said he was at the synagogue—he was asked about the cloth—I saw him produce the cloth, and all that is here; it was lying on a chair in the corner; the son showed the detective where it was—there was no concealment about it—I did not hear him say it had been sent by his uncle—Mr. Phillips afterwards came in.

HENRY ROBERT LEE . I am a carman in the employ of the London Parcels Delivery Company—on the morning of 8th August I took some goods out—having delivered them, I commenced to collect cloth at 11, Aldersgate Street—I took up this parcel—I had a boy with me—I went to different places, and ultimately I went to the collecting office in Camomile Street—I there left the boy, and went inside the office—I stopped there about a quarter of an hour or twenty minutes—when I came out I went to the Royal Exchange, and then to the head office in Fetter Lane—on unloading the van I missed the parcel.

GEORGE HILES . I was van boy to Lee on 8th August—I recollect this parcel being collected—on getting into Camomile Street I put the nosebag on the horse—I did not miss this parcel till I got to Fetter Lane—I then found it was gone, when the contents of the van were checked with the way-bill.

WILLIAM SAVAGE (City Detective). I received notice of this robbery on the 19th—I got a sample, and circulated information among the pawnbrokers; the result was that I found one piece pawned at Mr. Swinfins, at 32, Kingsland Road—I got a ticket in the name of Bishop—I made inquiries, and a little after five in the evening I was called to Hoxton Station, where Elizabeth Bishop and her father were detained—there was a long conversation with them, and I went to their house, and found there another piece of cloth—I then conveyed them to Bishopsgate Station, and this piece was identified by Mr. Hawes—I had a communication with him, and on Thursday, the 11th, went with him, in company with Shepherd, another officer, to Phillips' shop, 13 and 14, Cutler Street, which leads out of Houndsditch—I there saw the son, and had a communication with him—eventually he showed me all this cloth; he first went to the corner of the shop and brought one piece; I spoke to him again, and he went and fetched another piece; I spoke to him again, and he then pointed to where he had taken the two pieces from—that was on a tin hook in the corner of the shop—I saw the remaining pieces—a pair of trousers was hung up just inside the shop door, among other things, with a measurement ticket on it—I then went to 113 and 114, Houndsditch, at the corner of Cutler Street; that is another shop of Phillips's; I went there with his son—after waiting there a few minutes the prisoner Phillips came up; I saw him outside the shop—I said to him, "Mr. Phillips, come across to 114 with me"—he said, "All right"—we walked together, and when we got into the shop he said, "It is no use my telling you what I am; you know"—I knew him well—I said, "This cloth is stolen" (pointing to the cloth on the bench), "where did you get it from?"—he said, "I bought it of my brother-in-law, Lazarus Samuels, on Tuesday"—I said, "Have you a receipt for it?"—he said, "No"—I said, "Then you will have to go to the station

with me, and the cloth too"—I took him to the station; Shepherd brought the cloth—I asked him how much he paid for it—he said "2s. 6d. a yard"—I said, "How much money did you give him?"—he said, "I could not tell without my book"—he was not charged then—I went out to look for Samuels—Phillips remained in custody at the station—I went to Samuels' house in Ellison Street, leading out of Petticoat Lane—I did not find Samuels there—I returned to the station, and Samuels came there about a quarter of an hour afterwards—I said to him, "You know me, Samuels?"—he said, "Yes, I do"—I said, "Mr. Phillips says he bought this cloth of you "(pointing to the cloth in the station),"I want you to account for it"—he said, "I bought the cloth of a young woman who came to my place on Tuesday"—I said, "What time?"—he replied, "About twelve"—I said, "Do you know her name or address?"—he said, "I don't know her name or where she lives; I only know her by sight"—I said, "What did you pay her for it?"—he said, "I paid her 2s. a yard for it, let me see, sixty-five yards; no, sixty-two and a half, I think"—I said, "How much money did you give her?"—after hesitating, he said, "£7 10s."—I said, "Have you got a receipt for it?"—he said, 11 "No"—I said, "How much money did Mr. Phillips give you for it?"—he said, "£4 10s."—nothing more took place—they were charged—Samuels made no reply to the charge—Phillips said, "Why should I be charged after producing the man I bought it from? it is rather severe. "

Cross-examined by MR. GILL. I have known Phillips well for nearly twenty years as a thoroughly respectable man, since I have been an officer—when I asked if he had a receipt, his answer was, "I have not got one; we don't get one in the market," or words to that effect—I took a note, and produce it, but it is not all there—I forgot to mention it today; it slipped my memory—I gave it in evidence at the Police-court—I know this market; it is "The Clothes Exchange," or "Pill's Exchange"; it is the property of Mr. Hart and Major Isaacs—I have only seen made up clothes sold there; I have never seen pieces of cloth sold there—the goods are strewn about the place—Phillips' son said his father had been at Margate all day, and only came home late that Monday night—I have since ascertained that to be true—I asked the son if he knew Bishop he said, "Yes"—I said, "Did you give Bishop any cloth this week?"—he said "Yes"—I did not produce any patterns of cloth there—I showed it at the other shop when Phillips came in—the son said the cloth had been bought from his uncle.

Cross-examined by MR. GEOGHEGAN. I have known Samuels a considerable time—I don't know that he has a stall in the market—I have seen him going in and out—persons have access to the market on payment of a penny—you can walk in and buy any article you like—I think the dealers pay about one shilling a week for their stall.

EDITH BISHOP . I am the daughter of Henry Bishop—he works as a cutter for Phillips—on 9th August, about twelve o'clock, a postcard was put into my hand—in consequence of that I sent my brother Henry to Phillips' place at Cutler Street—he brought back three pieces of cloth—I was detained—I gave some information to the police, and this pawnticket.

The prisoners' statements before the Magistrate. Phillips: "I bought these goods of my brother-in-law, Mr. Samuels, in the market, in a thoroughly

honest and legitimate way, in the way I have purchased goods many years, buying them of him; I should have no suspicion of anything wrong; I know of no third party in this. I should not ask a man of his character any questions." Samuels: "I sold them to my brother-in-law in the same way ad I bought them; if I had bought them with a guilty knowledge I should not have sold them."

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18920912-822

822. JEREMIAH SULLIVAN (34) , Robbery with violence on Frank McFarlane, and stealing 2s. 4d.

MR. LEVER Prosecuted.

WILLIAM BARRY . I am a warehouse porter, and live at 24, Jubilee "Buildings, Wapping—in the early morning of 30th July I was walking up Leman Street, and saw the prisoner and two others hustling with the prosecutor—two of them had their arms round his neck, and the prisoner was in front of him—I did not see what he was doing with his hands—as soon as they saw me they let him go and ran away in the direction of the Commercial Road—the prosecutor came towards me and told me something—I took him to the station and told the Inspector that I knew the three parties by sight—the Inspector sent a constable with me, and I saw the prisoner in the Commercial Road—I made an effort to catch hold of him; he stooped his head and ran away—I ran after him, calling "Stop thief!"—the policeman blew his whistle, and another constable coming on duty caught him.

WALTER WOOLLATON (72 H). I was coming off duty—I heard a whistle blow, and ran down Church Lane—just as I got to the corner of Colchester Street the prisoner rushed by me—I went after him; he commenced dodging—I told him he might as well turn it up—he said, "You have made a mistake"—Barry came up and said he was wanted for robbing a man, and I took him to the station.

GUILTY .

He then PLEADED GUILTY to a previous conviction on 26th October, 1885. Several other convictions were proved against him. **— Five Years' Penal Servitude.

Reference Number: t18920912-823

823. GEORGE HENRY UPSON , Carnally knowing Delia Woollard, a girl under the age of sixteen.

MR. HUTTON Prosecuted, and MR. GEOGHEGAN Defended.

GUILTY .— Six Weeks' Hard Labour ,

FOURTH COURT—Friday, September 16th, 1892.

Before Robert Malcolm Kerr, Esq.

Reference Number: t18920912-824

824. EDWARD BEACHILL (23) and RICHARD CRAWFORD (20) , stealing a rug and other goods on a barge on the Thames.

MR. GEOGHEGAN Prosecuted.

JAMES SHILLING . I am captain of the barge Charles—on August 9th she was moored at Limehouse, and the barge Past Master was two or three barges off—there were five barges altogether, and mine was the innermost—I saw the prisoners on the Past Master, they entered the cabin just after twelve; and one of them came out with a rug which he placed on the skylight—I called to Johnson, and we two went on board the Past

Master and shut the door to and fastened it, and heard persons speak inside—we sent for the police, and woke the foreman, and gave the prisoners in charge—there was a light in the cabin; we could see through the skylight—the padlock of the cabin door was apparently broken.

SMITH JOHNSON . I was with Shilling—I went to the cabin door and heard some person inside—I said, "Who are you down there, are you any of the crew?"—some one said, "Yes."

JOSEPH SAMUEL BECKETT . I am captain of the Past Master—on Saturday, 9th August, I fastened the cabin door with a padlock and went away—I left the cupboards fastened, one with a lock, the others with buttons—there was a barometer under my bed towards the foot, a pair of marine glasses in a private locker, and a rug—there was property value about £50 in the cabin—on 10th August the police gave me information—I went to the barge on the Monday and found that another padlock had been put on the cabin door—the police had this rug which I had left in my berth—the barometer had been moved about a yard—the cupboard lock had been broken, the things were topsy-turvy, and the marine glasses had been moved about a yard—an awl had been taken from a chest of tools—the lockers fastened by buttons had been opened, and most of the things had been shifted—the prisoners had never belonged to the crew—this wedge belongs to the ship, but it ought not to have been in the cabin.

JOHN FARRELL (129 K). On 10th August I went to the barge and found the two prisoners in the cabin—they said they went there to have a sleep—the lookers were open, and there was a rug on the skylight—I searched Beachill at the station, and found three keys; one was a barge key, and another that of the house where he lives—he said he had been working on a barge, and the keys belonged to him—he lives about three hundred yards from the barge—I went there, the key opened the door—he gave no explanation of why he went to the barge to sleep.

RICHARD MILLS (60 K R). I took Crawford—he said he went there to sleep—I searched him at the station, and found two keys, one of which belongs to Fox & Co., barge builders—he told me it belonged to the barge he had been working on, but did not give me the name of the barge.

WILLIAM DENEAN (Police Inspector K). I was at the station when the prisoners were charged; they made no reply—I went to the barge at 2.45, and found two cupboards unlocked, and an attempt had been made to force the captain's private locker—I found a fire rake and a wedge; the wedge corresponded with the marks on the private locker—I found an awl—the barometer was on the bed—the locker had not been, opened; the door was jammed—whether it had been opened and jammed again I cannot say.

Beachill's Defence. I went on board the barge to have a lay down. One key belonged to a barge, and the other was my street door key; somebody came and asked what we were there for; I said, "To sleep." The cabin was open. We had no light, and went straight down; we never saw the locker. They took us to the station, and went back and turned over all the things in the cabin and blamed us.

GUILTY .

—BEACHILL then PLEADED GUILTY** to a conviction at Clerkenwell on March 9, 1890.— Eighteen Months' Hard Labour. CRAWFORD— Six Months' Hard Labour.

Reference Number: t18920912-825

825. PATRICK O'DONOVAN (29) , Burglary in the dwelling-house of Charles William Dunnage, and stealing a box of cigars and other articles.

MR. ORMSBY Prosecuted.

CHARLES WILLIAM DUNNAGE . I am a tobacconist, of 2, Hyde Street, New Oxford Street—about two a.m. on 23rd July I was awakened by the sound of a crash, and on looking through a side window I saw that a plate-glass window had been broken from the outside—I opened the door, and saw a constable outside, who gave pursuit, and a few minutes afterwards brought up the prisoner—I charged him, and followed him to the station—I missed this box of cigars and dummy packets of tobacco.

RICHARD SMITH (320 E). I was on duty on the morning of 23rd July in New Oxford Street; I saw the prisoner loitering about, and kept observation on him, and saw him go to 2, Hyde Street—he picked up something from the gutter and threw it into the window, put his arm through and took some goods—I gave chase across Oxford Street—the prisoner threw something at me which hit my helmet—I fell, but got up and caught the prisoner in Hart Street—he said, "All right, governor, I will go quiet"—he handed me these cigars and packets of tobacco—after I came back I found this cigar box in the road, with cigars smashed up.

GUILTY .**— Twelve Months' Hard Labour.

Reference Number: t18920912-826

826. JANE BURNHAM (35) and JOHN GIBBS (39) , Unlawfully having intercourse with each other in a public place, and in the sight of other people.

MR. LLOYD Prosecuted.

GUILTY .— Three Weeks' Imprisonment each.

Reference Number: t18920912-827

827. JOHN McDONALD (64) , Feloniously wounding John Tyrrell, with intent to do him grievous bodily harm. Second Count, with intent to resist his lawful apprehension.

MR. LLOYD Prosecuted.

JOHN TYRRELL (307 H). About 11.45 on 6th August I was called to the prisoner's house by his wife, and on entering the room the prisoner, who was behind the door, stepped forward—he had a knife in his hand, and he stabbed me in the left groin, and said, "Get out of this, you sod, or I will do for you too"—Taxey; who had followed me up, assisted in taking the knife from the prisoner—after that I attended to the woman, who was bleeding very much—the prisoner was taken to the station and charged with stabbing me in the left groin; he said nothing—the prisoner did not appear as if he had been drinking; he was excited.

JAMES TAXEY (311 H). I went to the prisoner's house on 6th August, and saw the prisoner make a lunge at Tyrrell with a knife with his right hand—I seized hold of him—he said, "Get out of this, you sod, or I will do for you"—I seized hold of the prisoner and forced him into a chair while Tyrrell wrenched the knife from his hand, and I held him while Tyrrell bound up the woman's arm as well as he was able.

MICHAEL MCKAY (Police Surgeon). Soon after twelve on 7th August I examined the constable, and found on his left groin a slight scratch,

and corresponding with that his tunic, trousers, and under-garments were punctured, as if a lunge had been made.

GUILTY of unlawfully wounding.— Four Months' Hard Labour.

OLD COURT.—Saturday, September 17th, 1892.

Before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18920912-828

828. JOHN OLEGG (32) and JOSEPH SIDNEY TOMKINS (35) PLEADED GUILTY to feloniously forging and uttering a will purporting to be the will of Samuel Webb; also to another like indictment, and to two other indictments for demanding money by forged instruments, and to obtaining money by false pretences.— Judgment respited.

Reference Number: t18920912-829

829. JAMES READING (21) , Unlawfully carnally knowing Elizabeth Stacey, aged fourteen years and one month. Second Count, for an indecent assault.

MESSRS. BODKIN and BIRON Prosecuted, and MR. HUTTON Defended,

GUILTY .— Nine Months' Hard Labour.

Reference Number: t18920912-830

830. RICHABD PAPPIN (24) , Feloniously forging and uttering a bill of exchange for £450, with intent to defraud.

MR. C.F. GILL Prosecuted, and MR. CHARLES MATHEWS Defended. ARTHUR CECIL CURTIS-HAYWARD I am a solicitor, of 27, Chancery Lane—I had the winding-up of an estate called the Ellicombe estate; the testator spelt his name with an i, but the executor with an a—I was in possession of all the papers connected with the estate, and was in communication with the two executors; letters passed between us—I was preparing a deed of release—for that purpose the accounts were got out and the right figures were arrived at—the work in connection with the matter was going on in May and June this year—letters were written and documents forwarded from my office to the executors, also cheques for signature—Mr. Penlington, my managing clerk, had the preparation of the accounts, and for that purpose he would have all the papers connected with the estate—I had temporarily employed the prisoner in my office—he was there at the end of May—he was employed intermittently in the office—the accounts were originally prepared in April—the prisoner was employed continuously from 30th May to 13th June, with the exception of one day at Whitsuntide—he was employed by me in connection with the Peters estate—he afterwards had something to do with the Ellicombe estate (he was a law stationer's clerk)—he copied the accounts, and also ascertained the final balance, the actual amounts for which cheques were to be drawn for the purpose of discharging the indebtedness to the beneficiaries—that would be done from documents in my possession showing the account of the executors—this (produced) is a rough draft of the accounts, with-his figures in pencil on it—this release was prepared by him; it, is written, and copies lithographed—my office consists of three rooms; one is mine, in which I have two clerks—Penlington has an inner room, in which the prisoner had a table—the papers would be in that room—when the cheque-book was not in that room it was kept in a tin box in my

room, not locked—when it was in Penlington's room it would be tied up with a bundle of papers; he would have it on his table during the day—when cheques were to be sent to the executors the body and amount would be filled in before being sent—about the 24th June I received a communication from Messrs. Cocks, Biddulph, and Co.—at that time a cheque for £1,254 had been drawn—in consequence of that I communicated with Cocks and Co., and the matter was placed in the hand's of the police—the cheque had been forwarded to the executors for signature, and the bankers returned it as not sufficient—this' is the cheque book of the Ellicombe estate—on examination I found that two cheques had been abstracted, counterfoils and all—one of those missing was No. 86,805, and the other 86,808; that No. 86,805 was for £450.

Cross-examined. The prisoner was employed by Messrs. Evison and Bridge, law stationers, of 22, Chancery Lane—he worked with me continuously from 30th May till 13th June—I don't think he was on the Peters estate at that time; he had been at some time; he did other work besides that—Penlington was charged with the business connected with the Ellicombe estate—Fleming and Giblett were the two clerks in the. third room; there was also a boy named Johnson in the intermediate room—Haynes was Penlington's predecessor—he left me at Easter—the business connected with these two estates had been going on for many months—the original rough drafts were prepared before Easter, and substantially revised afterwards—the rough draft was prepared by Mr. Haynes—no one has left my office except Haynes—this 86805 cheque has not been filled up by anybody in my office; it was not done by my authority—it is not in the prisoner's handwriting that I know of; of course it may be, but I express no opinion about that—it bears no resemblance to his ordinary handwriting.

By MR. MATHEWS. The prisoner has a very deliberate way of speaking—he left me on the 13th June in order to resume his occupation as a law stationer—I had done with him for the time.

EDWARD TOM PENLINGTON . I am managing clerk to Mr. Hayward, and have been so since 21st April; I had to do with preparing the accounts in the Ellicombe estate, and arriving at what the right figures were—I occupied the inner-room at the office—in the next room there were two clerks—the papers connected with the estate would be on my table—the prisoner worked at a table in that room—I was out during part of the day, and he would then be there alone—on Friday in Whitsuntide I went away about half-past three, and was away all Saturday, Sunday, and Monday; and I returned on Tuesday about half-past four for about an hour—on Friday, 3rd June, I was away from 4 p.m. till 3 p.m. on 7th June—the office would be open on Monday, Bank Holiday—I was assisted by the prisoner in arriving at the amounts that persons would be entitled to under this estate—the pencil figures on this draft are the prisoners—this re-lease was prepared by him, and litno graphed—the two clerks, Fleming and Giblett. are not at all like the prisoner in appearance—I did not know Mr. Haynes—I generally went out about half an hour to lunch, or more—the prisoner generally went out earlier—I saw the two forged cheques at Cocks's; both were for £450.

Cross-examined. It is not the custom at Cocks's to return the cheques after they are cashed—I had to do with the Ellicombe estate in the first

instance—the prisoner had charge of the Peters estate, and after that he assisted me with the Ellicombe estate.

LOUIS PENDARVIS KEKEWICH . I live at Foots Cray; I am one of the executors under the will of George B. Ellicombe, and co-trustee with Rev. Nicholas Ellacombe—Mr. Hayward was solicitor to the estate, and the executors had an account at Cocks, Biddulph and Co.—I had to sign cheques as one of the executors—neither of these cheques were signed by me or by my authority—the imitation of my signature is good, but it would not deceive me—it is not a tracing of my signature to a cheque, but I think it is an imitation of my signature to letters—I sign my name rather differently to cheques—this (produced) is a letter of mine to Mr. Hayward.

REV. HENRY NICHOLSON ELLACOMBE . I am vicar of Bitten, and am one of the executors under the will of the late George Ellicombe—he spelt his name with an i—I spell my name with an a—the signatures to these two cheques are not mine, or written by my authority—the initials are not good imitations of mine; the other is—the name is spelt as I spell it—"order" has been scratched out, and "bearer" substituted, and that alteration is initialed.

WILLIAM AMBROSE HOYER . I am cashier at Cocks, Biddulph and Co., Charing Cross—these two cheques were presented for payment across the counter; one on the 10th, and the other on the 16th June—the one of the 16th I paid with two £100 notes and one £50, No. 02766, dated 16th July, 1891—I cannot swear positively who presented it, but the prisoner is extremely like the man who presented it.

Cross-examined. I paid the first cheque on the 10th; it is dated the 4th—it was presented by a tall fair man with slight moustache; that was the description I gave as far as I could remember—I entered the details of the notes in a book, and I did the same on the second occasion—I have them in the book; I also have a copy in my pocket—I went to Bow Street to pick out the man about ten days afterwards—I was sent for by Inspector Dinney, and I saw him when I got there—some men were put before me, about six, the prisoner included, I believe; I am not sure—I did not pick out one of them as being the man; I pointed to a man that had a resemblance to the first man; that was not the prisoner—I did not identify the prisoner—I was called before the Magistrate; I don't remember the date—it was before Miss Connell was called I was placed among some others for her to see.

CHARLES JOHN WILLIAMS I am a clerk in the accountant's department of the Bank of England—I produce a £50 note, No. 02766, dated 16th July, 1891, paid in on 29th June from the Union Bank.

GEORGE AUGUSTUS FREDERICK GWELLY . I am a cashier in the Union Bank, Princes Street—Mr. W. G. Connell has an account there—this £50 note was paid in to his account on 18th June.

WILLIAM GEORGE CONNELL . I am a watchmaker and jeweller, of 88, Cheapside—on 18th June the prisoner came into my shop and purchased a silver watch and gold chain for £11 8s.—in payment he tendered this £50 note—I gave him the difference by a cheque on my bank for £381. payable to bearer—he gave the name of Tomlinson, which is on the cheque—I have no doubt the prisoner is the man—he was in the shop about a quarter of an hour; I attended to him myself—I spoke to him and he to me—he spoke in a

pleasant, quiet manner—I was not particularly struck with the manner in which he spoke—my daughter was in the shop at the time—she is nearly eighteen—the prisoner was very neatly dressed, in a buttoned-up coat, I think it was a frock coat; I know it was a double breasted coat from his opening it to take out the pocket-book, from which he drew this £50 note—he had on a round felt hat, commonly called a bowler—I was afterwards called upon by Inspector Dinney with reference to this note; I then gave a description of the man who had given me the note, and he took it down in writing—it was after that I went to Chancery Lane and saw the prisoner, and identified him.

Cross-examined. I do not remember the date when I first saw Dinney; I think it was about ten days after the 18th; my visit to Chancery Lane was two days after seeing Dinney; I am not sure, it may have been the next day—Dinney went with me to Chancery Lane, and then he left—we first saw one of the principals, and then I went on a staircase and saw the prisoner pass from the back part of the premises—the prisoner passed from the street across the large doorway in which we stood, and through a private door into the shop—I then went by the front door into the shop, leaving Dinney behind—Mr. Bridger, the principal, gave a further opportunity of identifying the prisoner by calling him down from the back part of the shop, and called him forward—I recognised him as the man I had seen in the doorway, and as the man who had been in my shop—I rejoined Dinney, and then Dinney left me in the street and went into the office—Dinney was with me when I went into the shop on the first occasion—after Dinney left me I remained in the street for half a minute, and then Dinney came out with the prisoner—Dinney said to him, "Did you. go to 83, Cheapside, and purchase a watch, chain and pencil-case and tender a £50 note in, payment thereof, and receive a cheque on the Union Bank for the balance?"—the prisoner said, "I did not; I don't know Mr. Connell, and did not purchase a watch there; I know nothing whatever about it"—I left them then—to my knowledge I had never seen the man who came to my shop on 18th June before that date; he was quite a stranger to me—it was about a quarter to twelve a.m. that the man came to me—I may have said at the Police-court that it was just about twelve o'clock; it was just about twelve as near as I can give it—the man was there for a quarter of an hour; before the Magistrate I said ten minutes or a quarter of an hour—I believe I said before the Magistrate that the man wore a frock coat.

Re-examined. I was not struck particularly by the way the prisoner spoke; having heard him speak, I have no doubt it is the same voice.

HILDA CONNELL . I am the daughter of last witness—on the 18th June I saw the prisoner making a purchase at my father's premises in Cheapside—I had a good opportunity of seeing him—I was afterwards shown about nine men at Bow Street Police-station, and from them I picked out the prisoner—I have no doubt about him.

Cross-examined. I was the last witness called at Bow Street—I don't think I had any doubt about the prisoner being the man—I said then, "I believe the prisoner is the man"—I don't remember seeing Mr. Hoyer among the men from whom I identified the prisoner—I looked along the line; I stood facing them all—I believe the man I touched,

who was the prisoner, was the fourth man from the end—before touching the prisoner I did not go and stand in front of a man two or three down distinct from the prisoner; I did not look fixedly at him and move towards him—Inspector Dinney was there—he placed his hand on my shoulder, and said, "Don't be in a hurry"—that was before I touched the fourth man; he said it immediately I went into the room—he did not say it when I was standing, as it were, irresolute before a man distinct from the prisoner—I recognised the prisoner at once—I remember no one of the group except the prisoner; I cannot say if Mr. Hammersley was one of the persons in the line—I do not remember Mr. Cooper being in the line—I did not stand irresolute opposite Hammersley when Dinney touched me on the shoulder, and said, "Don't be in a hurry"; I stood opposite the prisoner—the man who came to my father's bought a pencil case.

Re-examined. Nothing that Dinney said or did affected me in picking out the prisoner—I had no difficulty in picking him out.

WALTER DINNEY (Inspector Criminal Investigation Department). When these forgeries were discovered the matter was placed in my hands, and I went to the bank and made inquiries, and then I came into communication with Mr. Connell—I then had no knowledge of the prisoner—I traced the note back to Mr. Connell, who gave me a description of the man who gave him the £50 note—I then made inquiries, and in the result took Mr. Connell to Chancery Lane, Evison and Bridge's—after something had taken place I called the prisoner out and told him that Sergeant Brockwell (who was standing outside with Mr. Connell) and I were police officers, and that that was Mr. Connell, of 83, Cheapside—I said, "I am about to ask you a question, but you need not answer unless you like; did you, on 18th June, go to Mr. Connell, 83, Cheapside, and purchase a silver watch, gold chain, and pencil-case, and tender a £50 note in payment thereof, and receive a cheque of the Union Bank for the balance?"—he said, "No, 1 did not; I don't know Mr. Connell. I did not purchase a watch there; I don't know what you are talking about"—I took him to Bow Street Police-station, and charged him with stealing two blank cheques and forging and uttering the two cheques—he said he knew nothing about it—when Miss Connell identified the prisoner at Bow Street I did nothing to assist her, or to suggest or stop or interfere with her in any way—she had no difficulty in identifying the man.

Cross-examined. I arrested the prisoner on 80th June—I went with Mr. Connell to Chancery Lane, and I think we were first standing in the passage when Pappin, or someone like him, passed—I had been in before that to see Mr. Bridge alone, I think—I came out and joined Mr. Connell, and then the prisoner passed—I would not be quite sure if Mr. Connell had been in the premises before the prisoner passed; he might have been; I believe he had—after the prisoner passed we both went back to the premises together, I think—Mr. Connell was sent in to see the prisoner; an arrangement was made with Mr. Bridge—I did not go with him the second time—he rejoined me, and then I went in alone, and Mr. Bridge said to the prisoner, "This gentleman (pointing to me) wants to see you"—I said, "Do you mind coming out for five minutes?"—he said, "No," and came out, and the conversation which I have given occurred—I believe Mr. Hoyer and Mr. Hammersley were among the people placed to be identified by Mr. Connell on 8th July—Mr. Cooper

was there; I didn't know his name—with the prisoner there were eight—Hammersley was next to the one at the end, and the prisoner was near the centre—there would be one or two persons between them—Hammersley was No. 2, and the prisoner about No. 5; he may have been 6 or 7—Miss Connell came in, and stopped nearest Hammersley's end, because it was right opposite the door; the door is at one end of the room, and the row of eight men were facing her—she stopped until she said "Yes," and looked round at me—when she was coming in I said, "Look at these gentlemen carefully, and point out the gentleman who called at your address and made the purchase"—when she said "Yes" she was not opposite to and looking at Mr. Hammersley; she might hare been nearly opposite; she was not looking at him—I did not touch her upon the shoulder then; probably I touched her shoulder as she came in, showing her in; I simply put my hand up, I don't believe I touched her—I may have said at the commencement, "Don't be in a hurry"; at the later point I did not say that, nor did I touch her on the shoulder—after she looked round and said "Yes" I asked her to touch the person she identified; then she moved on about three from Hammersley, or it might be more, about two yards, and touched the prisoner—the prisoner was among a number of people shown to Hoyer at Bow Street for the purpose of identification.

Re-examined. About a couple of minutes after Miss Connell came into the room she said "Yes" and turned to me—she said nothing till she turned to me—I do not think it was two minutes—there is no ground for suggesting that she was apparently going to touch another man, and that I spoke to check her.

THOMAS BROCKWELL (Detective Sergeant). On 30th June, while the prisoner was in the dock at Bow Street, he said to me, "What is all this about? What am I charged with?"—I said, "Inspector Dinney told you in Chancery Lane"—he repeated his question—I said, "You are charged with stealing two blank cheques from Mr. Hayward's office in Chancery Lane, forging the names of the executors to the Ellicombe estate to those cheques, and obtaining £900 from Messrs. Cocks and Biddulph, the bankers"—he said, "I know nothing about it; I had nothing to do with the Ellicombe estate; the only cheque-book I saw was in the Peters estate."

A.C. CURTIS-HAYWARD (Re-examined). The two clerks in my office, the office boy, and the men in my office have no resemblance whatever to the prisoner.

Witnesses for the Defence.

WILLIAM HAMMERSLEY . I am a telescope manufacturer, of 42, Mercers Road, Holloway—I know the prisoner—I was present at Bow Street when Hilda Connell came to make her identification, and I was in the line—I think one gentleman was on my left, the others on my right—I think there was only one between me and the prisoner, but I would not be sure—Miss Connell came into the room, and I should think for three quarters of a minute, or for an appreciable time, she fixed her eye more on me than on the prisoner, and then, to the best of my belief, Mr. Dinney just tapped her on the shoulder and said, "Don't hurry"-we were forming almost a semi-circle, but she was standing nearer to me and the man next me than to anybody else—she was standing barely in the centre—I don't think she was nearer to me than

to anybody else—she looked at me a considerable time when she first entered the compartment, looking at my features more than anywhere else—after Dinney said "Don't hurry," I should think the next quarter of a minute or a little more she went towards the prisoner and touched him.

Cross-examined. This was my first experience of this kind—I went there out of curiosity—I have never been to a Police-court on business before—Dinney pressed me to go in with my friends and others to see if the lady could identify the prisoner; he persuaded me to do so—I had only known the prisoner eight or nine months, and hearing he was in trouble I went to hear what I could about the case—I did not go to assist the prisoner—if I thought there was anything I could do I might have offered to assist him—I hare known Cooper longer, perhaps, than I have known the prisoner; we are both friends of Pappin—I carry on. business at 41, Half Moon Crescent, Islington—I became acquainted with the prisoner from his taking lodgings with friends of mine living at 129, Lady Margaret Road—I have been out with him frequently; he has been to my house and spent many pleasant evenings, and I may have been out with him on four or five occasions—between Christmas and March he may have been at my house once or twice a week in the evening—I have been to his place perhaps once a week during the winter months—he was only an acquaintance of mine—Cooper has not been to my place so often as the prisoner has—I pledge my oath that Dinney touched Miss Connell on the arm at a time she was looking at me; to the best of my belief he did, and said, "Don't hurry"—I don't suggest that Dinney stopped her identifying me; I should not suggest anything of that sort.

Re-examined. I have told what happened and as it happened to the best of my belief—she might have been looking at me for three-quarters or half a minute, and he tapped her on the shoulder and said, "Don't hurry," but I do not insinuate anything.

PERCY COOPER . I am a traveller for George Mason and Co., invalid dietary manufacturers, and live at 417, King's Road, Chelsea—I have known the prisoner for about twelve months—I was one of the line when. Miss Connell came to identify, with Hammersley, Hoyer, the prisoner, and six others—Hammersley was to my left, second in the line; I was next to Hammersley—the prisoner stood on my right, either next to moor next but one; he would be No. 4 or 5—I noticed a great hesitation on Miss Connell's part when she came in, and her attention seemed particularly divided between Hammersley and the prisoner; she looked intently at Hammersley—Dinney said to her, "Take your time; don't hurry"—I did not notice if he touched her—I have no recollection of seeing him.

Cross-examined. I do not remember her turning round and saying "Yes," nor being told to touch the person she identified—she touched the prisoner—I did not go to the Police-station with Hammersley; I went on. my own account, and happened to meet him there.

ELLEN WYLD . I am assistant to Messrs. Wyld, Bourne, and Underwood, florists, of Camden Town—on 18th June, at eleven a.m., or a few minutes after, we had an order from the prisoner to send a box of cut flowers to Mrs. Arden, Bridge Hotel, Chertsey—I can tell by this book; that was the last order we had from him—he had sent flowers to the-same

lady once every fortnight or three weeks, and they used to come to 3s. 1d., 3s. 6d., or 4s.—I know it was eleven o'clock on 18th June that the prisoner came in, because we had a very large funeral order to be got out at eleven, and the young ladies thought he was rather a bother—he was about ten minutes in the shop—he always paid down at the time—I was asked to give evidence I should think just over a week ago.

Re-examined. Orders are always booked when they go by train—the large order is traceable in our books—the funeral order had been given a day or two beforehand; it had to be out at eleven o'clock on this day, and when we were doing it the prisoner came in—he came in a few minutes after eleven, not before, and went out about ten minutes after eleven.

ANN GREEN . I am a servant, employed by Mrs. Stratton, at 17, Lady Margaret Road, Kentish Town, where the prisoner lodged—on Saturday morning, 18th June, he left the house about a quarter-past ten; he was late that morning, he sometimes goes out before—between 12 and 12.15, as near as I can fix, I was at work in the kitchen, and heard the front street door go—I Went up into the parlour to see who it was, and looked through the window and saw the prisoner walking across the road away from the house—I fix the time by the advance I had made in my work in the kitchen—I have never seen the prisoner wear a frock coat.

Cross-examined. I started cleaning the floor at twelve, and had got from the dresser to the table when the door went—every day has its work, and this was the work for Saturday—I do my work in the same order, and it is as good as a clock—the two Saturdays before the prisoner was at business—I could not say if the Saturday before those he was at business—he went out as if he was going to business; I did not go with him—he told me he was going to business—he has had work with him, and he took it out with him in the morning—he took writing home—the reason I knew he was going to business was because he had something with him, and I asked him. if he was going to business, and he said "Yes," and I asked him if he would be home to dinner, and he said "No"; that was on Saturday, 11th—on the. Saturday, 25th, after the 18th, he was out, and I don't know where he went—I could remember the 18th, because he did not eat his breakfast that day—Mr. Hammersley came there; I have seen them together—I first knew it was important where he was on 18th when they came to search his apartments nearly a fortnight afterwards, on the Thursday, 30th June—they told me that he was supposed to have changed a £50 note on 18th June—when Mr. Stratton came home and said he had bought jewellery at twelve o'clock that day, I said he went out of the house a few minutes after twelve that day—Dinney did not ask me if I could remember anything about where he was on the 18th—the prisoner told me when he came home in the evening of the 18th that he had been to the Alexandra Park Races that day—I did not tell Dinney that—the prisoner does not always tell me where he goes—I was in the kitchen, and he came into the kitchen and told me—he has not told me on any other occasions when he has been to the races—I did not open the door to him; no one was present—I was alone—I could not say what time it was—he had ordered his dinner for two o'clock, and did not come home.

Re-examined. I kept the dinner for him—we had a meat pudding for

him that day; the prisoner was rather partial to it, and some was kept for him—in the morning it was said that it was going to be made, and he said he would come home and have some—I only heard from my employer, Mr. Stratton, that it was said the prisoner was at Mr. Counell's about twelve o'clock on 18th June, that was on the day before the prisoner was taken before the Magistrate—I was not at the Police-court—about last Monday week Mr. Freke Palmer's, the solicitor's managing clerk, first intimated it was likely I should be required as a witness—he came and took my evidence, and told me I should have to give evidence at the trial.

ALFRED WHITE . I am a bookmaker—I am a friend of Mr. Tatham, landlord of the Half Moon, who is very ill with quinsey, and cannot come here—he was here all day yesterday—on 18th June I was at the Half Moon—I can fix the date because the Alexandra Park races were on the same day, and Mr. Tatham asked me to go for a drive previous to our driving to the races—the Alexandra Park races are held four times a year—we drove in Mr. Tatham's pony and trap to the City, and got back about twenty-five or twenty minutes past twelve—a gentleman was in the bar to whom Tatham spoke; I asked the manageress when dinner would be ready, because I wanted to get to Alexandra Park at two o'clock—I don't know who the gentleman in the bar was—I do not know if he was the prisoner—I went upstairs about twenty-five minutes to one, leaving the gentleman behind in the bar—we were at dinner about half an hour, and when I came back, about five minutes past one, the gentleman was there—Mrs. Mason was there all the time—I then started, and was at Alexandra Park at twenty minutes to two.

Cross-examined. I drove there with the landlord—we drove to the City to the brewery in John Street Road—I think it took us about twenty-five minutes to get there—I was making a book that day—I sent my clerk on to Alexandra Park in advance to occupy a place for me—I was asked to give evidence about a fortnight ago.

LUCY MASON . I am manageress at the Half Moon, 471, Holloway Road—Mr. Tatham is ill; he was here yesterday—on the Saturday in June, when the Alexandra Park races were on, White came to the Half Moon with Tatham for their dinner at exactly a quarter-past twelve—they remained in the bar till dinner was ready—one or two more strangers were there, and the prisoner came in while Tatham and White were in the bar, and had a Scotch and soda—I remarked to the prisoner that the governor was punctual for once in his life.

Cross-examined. The Half Moon is not far from where the prisoner lives—he usually came in on Sunday evening, and sometimes to dinner on Sunday—I knew him very well as a customer—I don't know when there were races at Alexandra Park before those on 18th June—there have been some recently, I think—if I looked up the date it would help me.

Re-examined. The day I saw the prisoner there was the day White came home to dinner with Mr. Tatham, and they and I went up to dinner together at half-past twelve; it was ordered for a quarter-past twelve—when we came down the prisoner was gone.

GUILTY †— Ten Years' Penal Servitude.

FOURTH COURT.—Saturday, September 17th, 1892.

Before Robert Malcolm Kerr, Esq.

Reference Number: t18920912-831

831. HARRIETT ARDEN (35) and JOHN ARDEN (35) , Feloniously taking from Albert Gottich a warrant of execution issued by the Bloomsbury County-court, and destroying the same.

MR. METCALFE Prosecuted, and MR. CONDY Defended. ALBERT GOTTICH. I am a warrant officer at Whitechapel County-court—on 26th. July I had a warrant to levy an execution on the prisoner's goods, issued by the Bloomsbury County-court—on 26th July, about 10.30 a.m., I went in with a man named Newport—the amount was £6 5s.—I saw the two prisoners there, and read the warrant—John said he did not see how he could pay; I told him he had better get a notice, as he had formerly—he said he should have to go to Leytonstone to get it, and while he was away I went to the court—there was sufficient for the claim and costs and one month's rent—I went to the auctioneer and returned at 12.30, and then made the technical levy, and a claim for one month's rent was given to me—I made an inventory of the goods, and again asked Arden for the money—he said he had not got it, and the sooner the things were cleared out the better—I went away, leaving Newport in possession, and came back at 3.30 with a van to take away the goods—I then again asked him for the money; he said he would not pay it, but later on he showed me some money; I do not know how much—I instructed the carman to take out the goods, and when he came into the room the woman said all the b——lot would be smashed before they were taken out of the house, and began smashing the empty drawers with her feet; they had been cleared out when I was gone—I noticed when I came hack that the prisoners were not so sober as before—I sent Newport for a constable—I got the warrant from Newport, and the notice attached to it, doubled it up, and put it into this pocket—when Newport was gone they both ordered me out of the house—I said, "No"—they said that if I did not go out they would put me out—I told them to remember what they were doing—five or six people hustled me out of the parlour into the passage, and the female prisoner struck me several blows on my head, knocked my hat off, and knocked me down, dragged me to the door, and I got jammed between the door and the door-post, and the female prisoner took the warrant out of my pocket, handed it to her husband, and said, "Here are the b——papers, now we are all right"—he went away—one of the people was a lodger on the top-floor—I knew Arden before; he was a bailiff working under a licence granted by Judge Bacon—the female prisoner still persisted in trying to get me out, and I was ultimately put outside without my hat, and the door closed—a constable came and knocked at the door; it was not opened—we got a smith, who forced it open, and we took the things away—I got my hat again—I asked the woman for the papers in the constable's presence—she said she did not know anything at all about them; she had not seen them—the two prisoners were taken to the station and charged.

Cross-examined. I have been a bailiff two years—the money was not shown to me till the goods were nearly all out of the house—I saw some sovereigns—he did not tell me he had five sovereigns and would get the

other to make six—there was some confusion, but the warrant did not disappear till Mrs. Arden took it from my pocket when I was on the mat, jammed between the door and the door-post—other people were behind the door, but I know she took it, because she had a maroon dress on, and her arm was partly bare—a claim for £4 for rent was pinned to the warrant—I don't know what the goods fetched—I lost sight of the prisoners for about three-quarters of an hour before they were taken to the station—they were searched there, but the papers were not found.

HENRY NEWPORT . I am a bailiff of Whitechapel County-court—on 26th July I was acting under Gottich's orders—he put me in possession of 65, Salmon Lane, from 3.30 to 5.30, when he came back with a van—Mrs. Arden smashed up the goods, and Mr. Gottich sent me out for a constable—I gave him the warrant before I went away, and he had it in his hand—I came back in about ten minutes, and found Gottich outside the door, which was shut; we had to get a smith to burst it open—when we got in Mr. Gottich asked both prisoners for the warrant; they said they had not got it—he said that they had taken it out of his pocket—he did not get it—we got the goods out, but there was some little violence.

Cross-examined. I was away ten minutes or a quarter of an hour.

JOHN WILLETT (43 H. R). On 26th July, about four p.m., Newport came to me, and I went with him to 65, Salmon Lane, and saw Gottich outside without a hat—I called to someone at the window; I stood there some time, but could not get admission—a smith was sent for, and the door burst open—the two prisoners were in the passage—Gottich said that they had taken a warrant from his pocket—they said they had not seen anything of it—his hat was found in a wringing machine in the passage; the female prisoner handed it to me—Mr. Gottich gave directions to the men to take the goods out; the male prisoner said he would not allow them to go, but I advised him, and they were taken.

Cross-examined. I searched for the warrant, but did not find it—some pieces of paper were on the floor; I cannot tell what they were—I heard a number or people upstairs, but did not see them.

JOHN ARDEN received a good character.

GUILTY .— Six Months' Hard labour.

HARRIETT ARDEN— GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18920912-832

832. HARRIETT ARDEN and JOHN ARDEN were again indicted for assaulting Henry Newport and Albert Gottich.

HENRY NEWPORT repeated his former evidence, and added: While the things were being removed John Arden was sitting in a chair—he was asked to get out of it, and he put his arm out and struck me in the chest, and struck Gottich in the chest and face—after I got the chair Mrs. Arden kicked me on the privates, and said, "Take that, you"—the policeman was holding her at the time—it made me feel very queer for a long time, and I feel pain now occasionally.

Cross-examined. I did not go to a doctor, I did not think it serious enough, nor did I leave off work; ours is not laborious work—I did not pull the man, I only took hold of the chair.

ALBERT GOTTICH repeated his former evidence, and added: The male prisoner said he would not get out of the chair; we should not have it—I took hold of the arm on one side and Newport on the other side, and lifted it a little on the tip so that Arden should stand on his feet, and he

struck each of us several blows, and after we got the chair away he struck me violently on my jaw, and the woman kicked Newport very violently on the private parts, saying, "Take that, you b—"—the constable had her by the arm then.

Cross-examined. In the former part of the day everything had gone on smoothly, and I did not expect any violence—I asked him to get out of the chair as we must have it—he said that he would not several times—this was after the goods were removed—I did not see a doctor, but I had pain for three or four days—it did not stop my work.

JOHN WILLET (43 H). When the goods had been removed Arden sat down on a chair, and said that they had moved everything in the house, and he thought it very hard that it should be taken away—they tried to raise him gently, he pushed them back and struck them in the chest, but not violent blows—Mrs. Arden struck Gottich a violent blow on his jaw—I seized her arm and pacified her for a moment—Newton had just released his hold from the chair—I put my left hand on the male prisoner to pacify him, and she jumped forward towards Newton and kicked him, saying, "Take that you b"——I stopped the force of the kick.

HARRIETT ARDEN GUILTY .— Six Months' Hard Labour.

JOHN ARDEN NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18920912-833

833. ROBERT DRURY (20) and WILLIAM HEARN (17) , Burglary in the dwelling-house of William Haws, and stealing four tins of tomatoes, his property.

MR. WARBURTON Prosecuted.

WILLIAM HAWS . I am a grocer, of 98, Grafton Road, Kentish Town—my shop is attached to my dwelling-house—on 12th August, about 3 a.m., I was awoke by the police, went to my shop, and found the plate glass window smashed—I missed five tins of tomatoes and some bottles of sauce and pickles—I had left the shop shut up at eleven o'clock—I identified the tomatoes at the station and found the prisoners there.

Cross-examined by Drury. A man could not get in at the window, but he could get these things out—the glass was one-third of an inch thick.

JOHN COCKRELL (415 Y). On 12th August, about 1.15 a.m., I heard a smash of glass, and found the prosecutor's window broken, and saw the prisoner Drury and his wife, who has been discharged, coming from that direction—they passed me, and Drury had his hands behind his coat; he dropped this tin of tomatoes, which I picked up—they went to 3, Wilton Street—I got assistance and went to the house—Drury was in bed—I told him I should take him in custody for being concerned in breaking into 98, Grafton Road—he refused to come, and a struggle ensued between him and Plummer—on the way to the station I passed the window, and put my hand in and took out this stone—Drury said it was not him, it was Hearn—I saw Hearn running away up Mitchell Street, about a minute previous to seeing Drury.

Cross-examined by Drury. I went after you when you dropped the tin, and kept observation on the house twenty minutes, and then got assistance—nobody but you passed me; you hurried away home and shut the door.

ALFRED PLUMMER (Policeman). Cockrell called me to 3, Wilton Street—I went upstairs and requested Drury to get out of bed—he refused, a struggle ensued, and he struck me—I got him to put his things on—going to the station he said, "It was not me that threw the stone, it was

the other prisoner"—I took Hearn on Saturday night at 11.15; he said he wished it was Monday.

Cross-examined by Drury. There was no light.

RICHARD BULLING (Police-sergeant Y). On the morning of August 12 I examined this window, and found three sides of the square cut away, and the window smashed.

Drury's Defence. The window was broken accidentally.

Hearn's Defence, Me and him had a bit of a row, and broke the window.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18920912-834

834. THOMAS KELLY (48) , Forging and uttering a cheque for £5 10s., with intent to defraud.

MR. HEDDON Prosecuted, and MR. GEOGHEGAN Defended.

GEORGE STEPHENS . I am undergoing a term of imprisonment for uttering this cheque (produced)—on May 5 I met the prisoner in Fleet Street—he asked me how I was getting on—I said I was hard up, and was selling wine on commission—he asked if I could get him some paper—I said, "What do you mean?"—he said, "Cheques"—a day or two afterwards I went to a house in Kensington, and saw a cheque-book—I cut two leaves out, which I gave to Kelly—he met me two hours afterwards, and the cheques were filled up in his writing, to the best of my belief—I have received letters from him—we went to a public-house, and saw Walpole—he asked the landlord to cash the cheque—we went to Piccadilly Circus—Kelly was with us all the time; he went to his sister's place, who keeps a dairy, and brought the money out—Kelly had 30s.—told him where I got the cheques from—he said, "You b——fool; why did not you take the lot?"

Cross-examined. I did not say to Walpole that the cheque had been given to me in the usual course of business, or that my wife had been confined, and there was a doctor and a nurse in the house, and that I was most anxious to get some money—I expected to be defended by a solicitor—Kelly did not promise to send one—my wife did not come to see me at Holloway—I did not say that it was through Kelly, she did not come.

HORACE WALPOLE . I live at Farningham—on 12th or 13th May, at 3.30, I saw the prisoner in the Barley Mow, Salisbury Square, Fleet Street—he introduced me to George Stephens, who he said was the son of a retired victualler, and kept the Mitre, in Mitre Court, and he was in trouble as his wife was in premature confinement, and there was a dead baby at home; and if I could get a cheque changed for him it would be a benefit—he handed a cheque to me—I introduced him to the landlord, who had cashed cheques for me, but was unsuccessful—we then went to Piccadilly, then to Paternoster Square, and then to Herne Hill, where my sister got my mother to cash it—I had had a glass or two, but was none the worse for it.

Cross-examined. I gave Stephens £4 10s., and kept a sovereign till next day, and I had three or four shillings for what I had paid—I did not repay the sovereign—I was arrested on this charge, but was dismissed—Stephens told me the cheque had. been paid to him in the, ordinary course of business—another cheque was given me to cash in Piccadilly—I wont swear, but I believe Stephens gave it to me—Kelly was present—I went to Herne Hill, but did not cash it; it was lost—Kelly did not have it in

his possession, but he was with me—I cannot say whether Stephens had a spite against Kelly; he did not say that he thought Kelly had something to do with not sending his wife to see him at Holloway—when Stephens and I were locked up in prison, Stephens said, "I sent a duffing solicitor to him"—he said his-wife had been. kept from him, and he thought through Kelly's instigation—when I was arrested I don't think I told the detective that I got the cheque from Stephens; I said I was introduced to Stephens by Kelly, and Kelly could clear me—I said before the Magistrate, "I had had a glass or two that day more wisely than well."

By the COURT. I did not lose the cheque and account for it by having taken a little too much—I bought tickets to Loughborough Junction and when I got to my mother's house Mr. French said he had not enough but he would let me have £1 or £2 on the cheque—that was the second cheque.

ANNIE WALPOLE . I am a sister of the last witness, and live at 45 Loughton Road—he came to see me on May 13, just after tea, and brought this cheque—I took it to my landlord; he cashed it, and I gave the amount to my brother.

JOHN FRENCH . I am a dairyman on Herne Hill—on 13th May Annie Walpole brought me this cheque—I cashed it, and gave it to Mr. Venner next day.

RICHARD VENNER . I live at 115, Plough Road, Wandsworth—on 14th May I received this cheque from Mr. French—I paid it into my bank, and it was returned, marked "No account. "

HORACE CHURCHILL . I am a clerk at the Alliance Bank—this cheque was presented in May last-we had no customer named Barnett—the cheque belongs to Mr. Lord.

HENRY MORGAN (Police Inspector T). I made inquiries near Fleet Street to find the prisoner, and met people who knew him there—I could not find him, and he was handed over to us by the Sheffield Police about three weeks ago.

CHARLES RICHARD FORD . I am a sanitary engineer—on 6th March I was living. at 4, Neville Terrace, City Road—this cheque and another were taken from my book—Stephens was lodging in the house.

ROBERT DAY (Police Sergeant T). I took the prisoner on August 16th at Sheffield, and told him he would be charged with George Stephens with forging and uttering a cheque for £5 10s.—he made a statement to me in the train which I took down; he said, "I met Stephens in Fleet Street, outside Mitre Court; he told me the firm he was travelling for in the wine trade, and asked me if I could introduce him to any customers; we went into the Clachan Tavern, Mitre Court, and I met a friend; he asked me if I knew where he could get a small cheque cashed. I said, 'No; people are very dubious about cashing strange cheques'; we walked down Fleet Street and saw Walpole at the Barley Mow public-house. Stephens asked if he could get the landlord to cash the cheque, which he said was for £5 10s. I said, 'I cannot do it. 'I asked him whose cheque it was; he said, 'My cousin's; it is as good as a Bank of England note. 'I said, 'Why not pass it through a clearing bank?' He said, 'I must have the money to-night, as my wife is just in her confinement. 'Walpole said, 'If it is all right I can get it cashed for you. 'Stephens made the same statement

to Walpole which he had already made tome; we tried at two places, but failed. Walpole said he could get it cashed at his sister's at Herne Hill; we went there, and I and Stephens waited outside while Walpole got the cheque cashed, and handed £4 10s. to Stephens, saying he would give him the £1 balance next day. Stephens gave Walpole some money, and me half a sovereign, part of a debt he owed me. He then left; a few days afterwards Stephens came for the £1 balance, and asked Walpole to cash another cheque, which was lost by Walpole on our way to Herne Hill. "

GUILTY of uttering.— Eight Months' Hard Labour.

OLD COURT.—Tuesday, September 20th, 1892.

Before Mr. Justice Collins.

Reference Number: t18920912-835

835. CHARLES BLACKMAN (88) PLEADED GUILTY to the manslaughter of James Bond.— Six Months' Hard Labour.

There was an indictment for the murder of the said James Bond, upon which, no evidence being offered, he was found

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18920912-836

836. MATTHEW DE RYTER (48) and HERMAN SHOENMAKER (40) were indicted for , and charged on the Coroner's Inquisition with, the wilful murder of John Landells.

MESSRS. C.F. GILL and BIBON Prosecuted, and MR. GEOGHEGAN

Defended. RICHARD SIMMONS. I am employed as a watchman on board the steamship Llewellyn—she arrived in the Millwall Dock on the night of Friday, 30th July—I knew the deceased John Landells—he was second mate of the Llewellyn—I also know the two prisoners—I have seen them on board—Shoenmaker was a fireman—on Tuesday morning, 2nd August, at six o'clock, I had orders to call the men to work—Landells went forward and spoke to the men—De Ryter was in the closet, just outside the forecastle—I heard Landells say to the men, "You have had your coffee, and now you must work; you are a set of Dutch impostors"—De Ryter came out of the closet, and was, with the rest of them, quarrelling with the second officer—he spoke in English; all of them did—they said they were not going to work, and there was a general row—the crew was five, all told—I could not say exactly what De Ryter said; he was using, bad language—they were all swearing—I heard someone call out, "You d—d cowards!"—I could not recognise the voice; it was said in English—the row was started on the quay, about 220 yards from the ship, by the P warehouse—the row lasted two or three minutes; it then ceased—shortly afterwards two men came on board; one of them went into the cabin to tell the captain that the second mate was murdered—they went ashore again—about ten minutes afterwards someone else came on board, I could not tell who they were, they were part of the crew—I could not see their features—I had a light on the gangway—one was a tall man and the other a short man—all the others were on board except the two men and the second mate—the crew consisted of the captain, the mate, boatswain, steward, five sailors, and five firemen—the sailors lived in the forecastle by themselves—the two men got on board from some barges; I heard them speaking together in a

foreign language as they came on board—they can speak English very well at other times—as they went towards the forecastle I heard them rattling an iron bucket as if they were washing—after that several policemen came on board—I went ashore, and saw a place on the quay where there were marks of blood, that was in the place where I had heard the row—when the police came on board I showed them to the forecastle, and the prisoners were picked out.

Cross-examined. I was not on board in the daytime—I was there every night from the Friday till Tuesday—there was a Russian vessel called the Queen lying next to the Llewellyn, and foreign steamers lower down—Landells wanted the crew to work; the crew said the work was over when they came into the dock, and there was a quarrel.

GEORGE HOWARD . I am a constable at the Millwall Dock—in the early morning of Wednesday, 3rd August, I was on duty at the wood gate entrance near Glengall Road—I have a box there—shortly after twelve the two prisoners came into the dock and asked for the ss. Llewellyn—they went inside and turned to the right, which would bring them on the quay in front of P warehouse—about a quarter or twenty minutes after Landells came in, and went in the direction of the same quay—about ten minutes to one four sailors from the sailing barge Hope came, and went in the same direction—no one else passed through the gate after that—not a minute after they had passed I heard one of them call out, "Police! there is a man dead"—I went on to the quay and saw a man lying down about a hundred yards from where I was standing—he was lying close to a lever that turns the points of the railway metals—I knelt down and felt his pulse, it had ceased to beat—I looked on the other arm and found no blood running from the wound—I recognised the body as that of the mate, who passed in about twenty minutes past twelve; he then had a paper parcel under his arm, which was afterwards shown to me by Constable Hurst—I left the body in charge of Hurst, and went to fetch Dr. Leslie; he came back with me—there was blood lying beside the body, and a stream of blood about forty yards in front of the warehouse near a stage on the left of P warehouse.

Cross-examined. I believe I had seen the two men the night previous there is an entrance to the dock from West Ferry Road, about three quarters of a mile from my box—it was the sound of "Police" that made me go to the spot—I met the man running towards the gate, saying, "There is a man there lying dead," and I at once went there—I heard no noise or anything before that.

JOHN TRIM (112 L). I am accustomed to making plans—I made this plan of part of the Millwall Dock—it is correct.

THOMAS LEADBEATER . I live at 10, High Street, Milltown, Sittingbourne—I am mate of the barge Hope—on the night of 3rd February, about 12.50, I was in company with three other bargemen going into the Millwall Docks to get on my barge—I passed the gate where Howard was; I went in, and turned to the right on to the quay—I there saw the body of a man lying across the metals—I took hold of him to lift him up, and saw that he was dead—I called for help and went towards the gate; it took me about a minute to get there.

EDWARD CLOVER . I live at 30, Mellish Street, Millwall, and am a night watchman—on Tuesday night, 2nd August, I was on board the ss. Winstead, which was lying on the North Quay of the Millwall Dock, about 400 yards

from the Llewellyn—about twenty minutes past twelve I heard a noise right abreast of me, against the lower crane in front of the P warehouse; both cranes were in front of P warehouse—it was quite a wrangle; I could not understand what they said, but all at once this man sang out, "Police, police!" and went towards the gates, and the other man went the other way past towards No. 5 Dolphin—I went nearer to the Prince Llewellyn, and went straight home—I took the wrangle to be in foreign language—I heard the man call "Police" four or five times, and then stop for a moment, and then sing out again; it was all in the time; I should not think two minutas elapsed between the time the wrangling began and that—I said from three to four men went towards the Dolphin, but I could not say to one—I could see people moving at the quay right abreast of me—I sang out over the water to the police, "There is three or four in it," as near as I could tell—that was when I saw the police—there were three or four in the wrangle, including the man that called "Police."

Cross-examined. The ship went away next day—I forget the boatswain's name; I don't know the steward's name—after I had heard the man cry "Police," my boatswain and steward came aboard at the same time, and I said a man was crying out" Police"—they came aboard directly—I was about 150 feet from where this took place—they did not come past the spot; they were on the opposite side of the dock—they came from the railway station, which is in Glengall Road—they bad to come over the bridge—altogether, three or four persons were wrangling—when they separated, one went towards Glengall Road, and it might have been three went towards the Dolphin; I could not swear there were three; I am sure there were more than one—I would not swear whether there were three or four.

JAMES HOWSE (Millwall Docks Constable). At a quarter to one a.m. on 3rd August I was on duty at the East Quay—Constable Howard spoke to me—I went to the front of P warehouse and there found a body—I was left in charge of it while Howard went to fetch a doctor—I noticed this trail of blood, and at the end of it I found a parcel and a hat—I gave the parcel to Howard—where the blood first originated there were smears on the stones, as if there had been a scuffle there—the parcel was lying about four yards from where the blood first appeared on the stones, near the water's edge, and there the blood had been smeared as if there had been a scuffle, and some one had been pushed or rolled—constables came back with a doctor—afterwards I went on board the Llewellyn with Hardy, and asked if anybody had come on board—the watchman, Simmons, was standing on the bridge—afterwards I saw the two prisoners in the custody of Barrett and Hardy.

GEORGE HARDY (342 M). About one a.m. on 3rd August Howard spoke to me, and I went with Barrett to the Millwall Dock—I there saw the deceased and Dr. Leslie—from what I heard I went with Barrett on board the Llewellyn, leaving Barrett on the quay—I went to the starboard forecastle, where five sailors were in their bunks—I examined each of them, taking hold of each of their hands—the third sailor I came to was De Ryter—I examined his right hand and then took hold of his left, and although it was covered with sweat, on the back there was a smear of blood, strewed like two or three beads of blood—this was soon after one—I said, "How did you come by that?"—he pulled his hand away and

gave like an exclamation of impatience—the blood did not seem to be coming from his own hand, which was quite clean, as if it had been previously washed—after I had examined the other two sailors, who were all right, I heard a noise from the port side—I went across and heard Barrett say, "What is the name?"—some one answered, "De Ryter"—I had left him for a moment, partly closing the starboard door—I had, after seeing blood on his hand and a recent bruise on the right eyebrow, and some blood marks on his clothing, told De Ryter I wanted him—he was lying in his bunk—I noticed marks on his clothes while he was lying in his bunk—I told him I wanted him; he made no answer, but turned over as if he wanted to lie down again—then, in consequence of something I heard from the port side, I said, "De Ryter"—he rose up from his bunk; I said, "Come on, I want you; I am going to take you into custody on suspicion of having caused the death of a man"—I told him he need not say anything, but that if he did I should take it down in writing, and it might be used in evidence against him—he did not seem to understand me; he did not say anything—he got up, took his cap from a nail, put it on, and came along with me—we took him and the other prisoner on shore and to the quay where the dead body was lying—I asked him if he knew the man; he said, "No"—I said, "Look, man"—he said, "No, no me"—I took him to the dock gate, and met Howard, who said, "That is them; that is the two that I let in"—the prisoners were taken into the constable's box, where in the gaslight, we could see the marks of blood they were taken to the station and charged—there was no interpreter there.

Cross-examined. The doctor was present when we came, and saw the dead man lying there—I and the doctor went there first—it might have been about half-past one when we went on board the ship, and then De Ryter had three little beads of blood on the back of his hand—the blood was not dry—the bruise over the eye appeared to have been done quite recently—it seemed red and raw; I should think the skin was broken—so far as I could see it had been bleeding—De Ryter said, when I pointed out the dead man, "No me," not "Me know"—I said before the Coroner that when I first examined De Ryter he was in a dazed condition, covered in sweat—he may have been roused out of sleep and suffering from drink—he seemed to take no notice when I said that anything he said might be used against him—I was in uniform—I said, "Come along" before he got out of his bunk, and when he had got out I took his arm; he took his cap and came peaceably with me.

THOMAS BARRETT (42 K R). On the early morning of 3rd August I searched the port forecastle on the Prince Llewellyn, where I found Shoenmaker in his bunk—I noticed he had a lot of blood on the left side of his neck, spots on his forehead, and blood on the backs of both his hands—I said, "Turn out; put your things on"—he did so; I noticed he had his trousers, shirt, and stockings on—he put his coat on—I said, "There is a man lying dead out on the quay; I notice you have a lot of blood about your face, the left side of your neck and forehead; come with me to the station"—he said, "What want me for?"—I said, "You will be charged on suspicion of killing that man"—he said, "De Ryter and the second mate were fighting; I went between them; I went to part them, lifted up their arms, and that was how I got the blood"—I said, "Yes; De Ryter is here"—I called

across to Hardy, and then took Shoenmaker into custody—we all four went on shore, and when we got to the dead body I said, "There he is; there is the man"—a man standing close by pulled the coat off the dead man's face—when Shoenmaker saw him he looked surprised, and turned to De Ryter, who was standing at his side, and said in English, "Be Ryter and he were fighting; I left them and went to my ship—I said, "You will be taken to the station and charged on suspicion of killing that man"—he said, "Not me"—I took him to Howard's box—before going on board the ship, after the doctor had seen the body and pronounced it dead, I searched it, and found on it a silver watch, albert chain, 4s. 6d. silver, 4d. bronze, a pocket-knife, a key, a tobacco pipe, and some papers.

Cross-examined. I searched Shoenmaker at the station; I found no knife on him—I was present when De Ryter was searched—no knife was found on him—when the dead man's face was uncovered, and Shoenmaker threw up his arms as if surprised, De Ryter shook his head and moved his lips.

WILLIAM CULLEY (Sub-Inspector K). At 2.15 a.m. on 3rd August I went into the Millwall Docks in consequence of what I heard—I saw the prisoners there—I saw splashes of blood on Shoenmaker's left coat sleeve, on the shoulder, and collar, and spots of blood on his neck, face, and forehead—his left ear was daubed with blood and smeared—I said, "Barrett, the man is smothered in blood"—Barrett said, "He has made a statement to me about that when I took him into custody"—Shoenmaker turned half round and pointed to De Ryter, and said, "I push him away when he fought the second mate; I go between them; that is how I got the blood"—De Ryter said nothing—I looked at De Ryter's clothes; the front of his guernsey was covered with blood, splashes all up the front—the sleeves of both arms were wet to the elbows, apparently with water; on the front of his shirt, just above the waist of his trousers, were three or four smears of blood; down the left side of his trousers leg, from the hip to the knee, was a daub of blood as if he had fallen down in a pool of blood—he said nothing—I examined his clothes closely—I searched him; I only found a purse on him—I went to the quay and saw the pool of blood, which appeared to be daubed about the stones as if someone had fallen in it—I afterwards went to the Prince Llewellyn—my attention was attracted to a galvanised pail with water in it of a red colour—I searched among the things belonging to the prisoners—there was this knife in De Ryter's kit—I showed it to the doctor; it did not appear to have been used; it was dirty—I charged the prisoners at the station with feloniously killing and slaying John Landells by stabbing him in the right arm about 12.20 a.m. on 3rd August—both prisoners were in the dock together, and I read the charge over to them—Shoenmaker said, "Not me"—De Ryter said nothing—I searched the quay and about there, but found nothing.

Cross-examined. This sailor's sheath knife I found right at the bottom of De Ryter's kit—there were no marks as if a wet hand had been put down to put the knife at the bottom—it is dirty, and has marks of clay mud or something on it—it was nearly at the bottom of the kit—I searched Shoenmaker's kit—I found no knife in it.

WILLIAM MURRAY LESLIE . I am a divisional surgeon of police—at 1.20 on the early morning of Wednesday, 3rd August, I was called to

Millwall Dock, and found a body lying in front of P warehouse in a slightly dishevelled condition, but chiefly noticeable for being very much smothered in blood—I found a wound under the arm, which had severed an artery—I examined the body more carefully at the mortuary—I found the wound was two inches above the elbow on the inner side of the arm; it was seven eighths of an inch broad, and one and three quarter inches deep—death was caused by syncope, or failure of the heart's action from hæmorrhage, due to the wound having severed the artery—any knife would have caused the wound; probably it was a broad-bladed one, but there were no special marks about the wound—it was a clean-cut wound—the arm must have been in a raised position when the wound was inflicted, from its position—on 5th and 6th August I examined a coat belonging to Shoenmaker, and a guernsey shirt and trousers belonging to De Ryter—I found blood stains on all those clothes; in my opinion the stains were about a couple of days old, but it is very difficult to say—I also examined and analysed some water in a bottle shown to me by Culley—in my opinion the water contained blood, but I could not swear to it.

Cross-examined. Along the water's edge of the quay it is very badly lit; unless a person knew his way he would be liable to go wrong—the wound was just under the biceps, just where the biceps begin—the blood was that of a mammal.

PHILIP CHARLES SYMONS . I am master of this ship—she arrived on 30th July—both prisoners were on her during the voyage; De Ryter as seaman, and Shoenmaker as fireman—the mate, Landells, did not mix with the crew in any way, to my knowledge—both prisoners could speak English.

Cross-examined. According to the articles both prisoners are Dutchmen—I said before the Coroner, "I believe De Ryter had constantly cheeked me, but he has always spoken in Dutch, and I did not answer him"—with the exception of nautical terms they knew English—they always spoke in Dutch; but an instance I can give is that I had to have a Consular Court on De Ryter, and he replied to all the questions—De Ryter was troublesome on board, and I thought he was impertinent to me because he spoke in Dutch; it was not what he said, but the way he said it—another of my crew was taken to the Consular Court and put in irons for using a knife—I begged him off—I could not say whether that man who threatened the officers with a knife was on board the ship when the mate was killed or not—he was one of the crew; he had threatened me and the steward with a knife—when a ship is in port, the officers who go out at night can stay out as long as they like, so long as one officer is on board—I was on board on this night, and Landells could go out for all night, or come back when he liked—the sailors have no fixed time for returning when the vessel is in port; they have to ask permission of the chief officer—they did not ask permission of me; I was not on board at the time—I don't know whether they left to go on shore before or after the mate.

Re-examined. As to the matters against the other seaman and De Ryter they both occurred at Smyrna.

MR. JUSTICE COLLINS said that he did not think there was sufficient evidence to bring home the act of murder to the prisoners, or either of them, and he directed the JURY to find them

NOT GUILTY .

FOURTH COURT.—Monday, September 19th, 1892.

Before Robert Malcolm Kerr, Esq,

Reference Number: t18920912-837

837. GEORGE WALTER PHILLIPS (41) PLEADED GUILTY to stealing £10 4s. 9d. of Albert Egerton L. Slazenger, his master; also to embezzling orders for £17 14s. and £5 16s. of his said master.— Ten Months' Hard Labour ,

For the case of WALTER POWELL, tried this day, see Surrey cases.

FOURTH COURT.—Tuesday, September 20th, 1892.

Before Robert Malcolm Kerr, Esq.

Reference Number: t18920912-838

838. WILLIAM GEORGE FITZGERALD (21) , Fraudulently destroying a paper writing, the property of his employers.

MR. GRAIN Prosecuted, and MR. HUTTON Defended. ELLEN NORMAN. I am managing barmaid of the buffet bar of the Zoological Gardens for Messrs. Spiers and Pond—it is my duty at the end of the day to collect all the money taken in my bar, count it, make it up into pounds, and enter it upon a ticket, as well as the odd shillings and pence—15th August was a very busy day—on that day I made up the moneys to £37 5s. 3d.—I was called away, but entered the amount on my cuff (produced)—they are my figures—the previous Wednesday I had made out this ticket, and left it with Miss Whittier to take to the prisoner—on 15th I copied the ticket and kept the copy—this is my writing—I took the duplicate to the prisoner's office, with the cash made up of £33 in gold, £4 5s. loose silver, and three pence—there is a counter—I placed the money before the prisoner and the ticket—when Noxon had finished the prisoner counted the money—he said, "Correct, miss"—I put my ticket in my cash-box—Miss Noxon was paying in at the time—she came from the bear-pit bar—the next morning I saw the prisoner's rough cash-book (produced) in his office—I found under date of 15th August entered" £33 5s. 3d."—I saw the prisoner coming and said, "You have made a mistake; you have entered £33 5s. 3d., and the money is £37 5s. 3d."—he said, "Yes, I knew you paid them in, but I have taken £4 for sustentation"—I went to Mr. Blanchette, the resident manager—I made a communication to him—the prisoner was sent for—Mr. Blanchette asked him why he had entered £33 5s. 3d., and he denied even saying he had taken £4 for sustentation, or having said anything to me about the £37—I told Mr. Blanchette he had said that I had paid in £37—Mr. Blanchette then said, "We can do nothing in this until we go to the C. 0."—that means the Central Office—the ticket marked B and the figures £33 5s. 3d. are not my writing—neither of these seventeen tickets nor the figures are mine, nor the signatures—on each of the days on those tickets I was at the bar, and made out a ticket in the usual way every night.

Cross-examined. It is not my habit to keep a duplicate ticket—it is not a rule to do so, but I did it on that day—I produced this duplicate first when I discovered the mistake—I got no receipt from the cashier—I have made mistakes, but corrected them at the time—not afterwards—those mistakes were not in the additions, but money put aside in the glass and omitted, and when discovered I have gone back for the ticket—have £5 "float"—that is, cash for change—this is not sometimes added

up in mistake—my writing varies very slightly—the manager sees it daily—there was a great crowd on 15th August—there was extra "float," £10 or £15, but that varies according to the change thay have.

Re-examined. The "float" is paid back before the money is paid in between the "E" and the "N" in "Norman' I make one or two dots as a rule—these other tickets (produced) are all genuine.

By the JURY. The tickets are given out about fifty or twenty at a time, but not counted—I had no particular reason for looking next morning for the money I had paid in on 15th August, nor for retaining the ticket, only that it was not written well enough.

By the COURT. There would be no difficulty in always keeping a duplicate ticket, nor in getting a receipt for the money paid in.

EMMA NOXON . I was engaged at the bear-pit buffet on 15th August—I made up my money and took it with a ticket to the cashier's office—I saw Miss Norman bring her money—I saw the "£37" on it, but did not notice the odd money—I did not see her money counted—I came away first.

ADA PULLING . I am engaged at the buffet bar—August 15th was a very busy day—I saw Norman's cash ticket at the back of the bar—I saw the amount on it, £37 5s. 3d.—I heard of the matter the next day.

Cross-examined. I did not count the money.

MARGARET WHITTIER . I was serving as barmaid on 15th August Norman showed me her cash ticket—we conversed about the day's takings—I saw the total amount on the ticket, £37 5s. 3d.—I noticed the "7" was particularly large—I was spoken to next day about the matter—I had taken Norman's ticket to the cashier the previous Wednesday for her—this is it—the prisoner counted the money—he said there was 5s. deficient—he ordered me to tear up one ticket and make out another—he gave me the form—I made a communication to Norman the next morning, Thursday.

Cross-examined. I believe there are occasional mistakes—I was not present when the money was counted.

WALTER ERNEST BLANCHETTE . I am resident manager to Spiers and Pond, of the refreshment bars at the Zoological Gardens—I supervise the buffets, and hear employee's complaints and other matters—I know Norman's writing—I see it almost daily—she has been with me twelve months—the signature on the ticket B is not hers—I will not swear to the figures £33s. 5s. 3d.—the signatures on the seventeen tickets produced are not hers—Norman complained to me on Tuesday afternoon—I got this rough cash-book—then I sent for the prisoner—Norman was there when he came—I said Norman had stated that she paid in £37, and that he had only entered £33—I asked him what it meant—he said, "If she had paid in £37, £37 would have been entered; but she only paid in £33"—Norman said, "Just now you said you had taken £4 for the 'sus. "'—Norman said he was always making mistakes—the prisoner said, "You don't know what you are talking about"—I said nothing more could be done till we went to the Central Office, and could look at the ticket that was paid in—I went to the Central Office the next morning; the tickets were looked over, and this one produced for £33 5s. 3d.—I showed it to Norman—I sent for the prisoner and Mr. Ellis—he was given into custody on the Wednesday—by rule, a book should have been

kept by the barmaid similar to the prisoner's rough cash-book (produced)—during the winter I keep the books—the prisoner is not there in the winter—the end of March or the beginning of April, when the prisoner came, the books were kept for a few days, and then discontinued—I placed the amount in the barmaid's book—it might not be in her presence—she had the book every morning or afternoon to inspect.

Cross-examined by MR. HUTTON. I picked out the seventeen tickets produced in the secretary's office—I believe Norman was present.

Re-examined. After the interview with the prisoner I had found the ticket with the £33—a search was made in another bundle, and I picked out those which I say are not Norman's writing.

By the JURY. I do not know why the barmaid's book was discontinued—the cashier signed her cash-book.

WILLIAM THOMAS SKINNER . I have been chief cashier at the Central Office of Messrs. Spiers and Pond twenty years—the total collections of takings come in sealed bags—I received the collections of 15th August—the total of the takings of the bars was £132 12s. 9d.—the amount under buffet bar column £33 5s. 3d.—that corresponds with the amount on the ticket.

GEORGE SMITH INGLIS . I am an expert in handwriting—I have compared these twenty-four tickets with the seventeen—they are not written by the same individual—between the "E" and the "N" in "E. Norman" are one or two dots in the genuine signature, in the seventeen no dots—I say the figures are not the same. [Mr. Blanchette identified the seventeen tickets and the figures £33 5s. 3d., and the signature on ticket B as the prisoner's writing]—there are letters on the-seventeen tickets in strong agreement with the admitted writing in this book (the prisoner's cash-book)—the signatures on the seventeen tickets are written off at once, there is no tracing—there is a resemblance, an attempt to imitate.

Cross-examined. The signatures on the twenty-four tickets differ, and so they do on the seventeen—strong suspicion is as far as I can go—the tickets and the book were given me together—I took for granted the twenty-four were Fitzgerald's—I have given evidence in Neil's case—I am under subpoena to attend the trial—Mr. Best was called as I was out of town and could not attend—I said a letter was in the writing of Neil—a person was called to say she wrote it.

JAMES EYRE (465 S). On 17th August, about two o'clock, the prisoner was given into my custody in the Albert Road, Regent's Park, by Mr. Blanchette, who charged him with stealing £4—I took him in a cab to Albany Street Police-station—I was not called at the Police-court—when the charge was read over to him he said, "I emphatically deny the charge"—then he was taken in a cab to Marylebone Police-court—on the way there, before I spoke to him, he said, "Can I speak when I get to the Court?"—I said, "Yes"—he said, "Can I have a solicitor?"—I said, "Yes"—he said, "Shall I plead guilty?"—I said, "Please yourself; take your counsel's advice"—he said, "I went there with a good character; if there is a loophole to get through I'll get through it," and that this would be a stain on his character.

Cross-examined. I first spoke of this conversation to the solicitor when he asked me last Wednesday—I have been in the force three years—I did not consider it important evidence—I was not called—I was present at the Police-court when the prisoner was in the dock, and when he was

committed—I made a note of the conversation at the time—I did not show it to anybody.

GUILTY of altering the £37 into £33.— Six Months' Hard Labour.

Reference Number: t18920912-839

839. HENRY WHITE (37) , Unlawfully carnally knowing Daisy Hill, a girl above thirteen and under sixteen.

MR. HUTTON Prosecuted, and MR. GRAIN Defended.

GUILTY .— Eighteen Months' Hard Labour.

Reference Number: t18920912-840

840. JOHN DELANE (29) , Indecently assaulting Louisa May Wren.

MR. HUTTON Prosecuted.

GUILTY .— Four Months' Hard Labour.

Reference Number: t18920912-841

841. GEORGE SHEPHERD (20) , Unlawfully attempting to carnally know Ada Little.

MR. HUTTON Prosecuted.

GUILTY .— Eight Months' Hard Labour.

FOURTH COURT.—Wednesday, September 21st, 1892.

Before Robert Malcolm Kerr, Esq.

Reference Number: t18920912-842

842. JOSEPH WESTON (30) , Stealing a mare, a dog-cart, and a set of harness, the property of Frank William Streeter; and EDWARD KEIGHLEY (23) , assisting, harbouring, and maintaining the said Joseph Weston.

MR. LAWLESS Prosecuted, and MR. MUIR Defended.

FRANK WILLIAM STREETER . I keep a refreshment-house at 1, Spur Street, Leicester Square—previous to August 11 had a mare, a dog-cart, and a whip at Clark's Mews, value altogether about £16—Weston had been in my employ, but he was not then—on August 1 I saw both the prisoners at my house—later in the day I required the horse and cart, and in consequence of what I heard I communicated with the police-later in the evening Keighley came and said, "Strike me blind, I do not know anything about it"—I said, "About what?"—he said, "Your cob has broken down"—I said, "You had better come to Bow Street"—I put him in a cab, and we passed my horse and cart—he said that it was not my horse, it was a horse he had borrowed; but I examined it, and it was my own—I gave him in custody—on September 2nd Weston sent for me; I went to him; he said it was a very bad job—I said that he had better come with me to Bow Street—I asked him if Keighley was with him; he said yes—I gave him in custody—I have not got all my property back; some of the harness is still missing.

Cross-examined. Two bags, worth six or seven shillings, are missing Weston did not mention where my cart was—I got it back, but the wheels were off.

WILLIAM SUCKLING . I live at 15, Clark's Mews, Broad Street—I know the prisoner; he had come for the dog-cart before—on August 1, shout 2.45, he came and wanted Mr. Streeter's horse and trap; I let him have them—the horse was brought back about 10.10 in a very bad condition, over-driven.

ALFRED RANKING . I am a wheelwright and coach builder, of Russel

Place, Bermondsey—on 1st August Weston came to me and said he had had an accident with a trap, and could I assist him in picking it up—I said my men were all gone, but I would not mind repairing the damage to it—he went away, and came back the same evening with Keighley, and asked if I would advance him a little money to get the trap brought to my place—I lent him 10s., and asked him to give me a signature for it—he signed this bill in the name of Francis Streeter, and said it was his brother's trap, of 1, Spur Street, Leicester Square—they went away and brought the trap—I did not repair it till I got orders.

Cross-examined. The trap is at my place now—the horse never came to me.

FRANCIS WISE (271 C). On August 3rd, about nine o'clock, I was on duty, and saw a man standing outside the Duke's Head public-house—soon afterwards Mr. Streeter appeared—I was called to take the prisoner—he struggled—the detective showed him a handkerchief.

ARTHUR HASLETON (Detective E). I went to Leicester Square and saw the prosecutor and the prisoner struggling—I took this handkerchief off the traces, took it to the cell, and asked Keighley whether it was his; he said, "Has it any blood on it?"—I said, "Yes"—he looked at it and said, "That is mine"—I said, "Where is Sandy?" meaning Weston—he said, "We were together; blind me, I did not think I should get looked up"—on September 2nd I saw Weston at Bow Street-station—he said, "I will tell you where the cart is, it is at Reddall's, a turning out of Riley Street; Keighley was with me when it broke down"—I said, "You had a loan on it"—he said, "Yes, 10s., to get assistance to get it removed."

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18920912-843

843. JOSEPH WESTON was again indicted for forging and uttering a receipt for 10s., with intent to defraud. No evidence was offered.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18920912-844

844. JOHN CAROLAN (23) was charged, on the Coroner's Inquisition only, with feloniously killing and slaying Joseph Webb.

MR. BODKIN, for the prosecution, offered no evidence.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18920912-845

845. THOMAS MURRAY (20) was charged, on the Coroner's Inquisition only, with feloniously killing and slaying the said Joseph Webb.

MR. BODKIN offered no evidence.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18920912-846

846. THOMAS MURRAY was also indicted, with MICHAEL MURRAY (27) , with assaulting the said Joseph Webb, and occasioning him actual bodily harm.

MR. BODKIN Prosecuted. JANE WEBB. I live at 42, Broad Street, Golden Square, and am the widow of Joseph Webb—on the, August Bank Holiday, about 9.45 p.m., some boys and girls were dancing in the street to the sounds of a barrel organ-my husband asked them to go away, which they did, except one little girl, the prisoner's sister—she was very impudent, and asked him what the b——hell was the matter—he said that if she did not go away he would get the police to remove her—she ran across the road in the direction of the Star and Garter—I then saw some people coming up, they all struck my husband, and he never rose again—he fell in the door-way

between 41 and 42—there was a great disturbance for a few minutes I do not recognise either of the prisoners, but Mrs. Murray attacked my husband—I asked her not to do so; she called me bad names and knocked me down—I got a warrant at the Police-court, but she has not been taken in custody—the police picked me up and put my husband in a cab, and took him to Middlesex Hospital—he stayed till Wednesday, and then came home, and died in the Infirmary shortly after his admission.

ANNIE BARNES . I am fifteen years old, and live at 41, Broad Street—on August 1, about ten p.m., I was standing on my doorstep, and noticed some children playing and dancing—Mr. Webb spoke to them, and most of them ran away, but Lizzie Murray cheeked him, and used bad language—he said something about fetching a policeman; she ran across to Poland Street, towards the Star and Garter, and came back with several men and women—Michael Murray was one, but I did not know his name; he struck Mr. Webb and knocked him down—Mr. Webb did not strike at all; when he was on the ground Michael Murray kicked him, and Mrs. Murray kicked Mrs. Webb directly she was knocked down—Mr. Webb was put into a cab and taken away—during the evening I saw the other prisoner on the opposite side of Broad Street at the right hand corner, looking up the street, the nearest corner to my house—about fifteen persons were standing between me and the corner of Poland Street; they were between me and Thomas Murray—I did not see Thomas Murray do anything to Mr. Webb—on 19th August I was taken to Marlborough Mews Police-station, and picked out Michael Murray from a number of men—I was called a second time at the Police-court, and gave evidence against Thomas Murray.

Cross-examined by MICHAEL MURRAY. I know you because I have seen you at the corner standing outside the Newcastle—you had brown cord trousers on—I did not see Mr. Webb strike you; he did not fight, he had not time to strike you back.

HANNAH JANE HOMR . I am the wife of John Home, of 19, Upper Rathbone Place—on the night of August. 1 I was at 13, Broad Street, which is just opposite Nos. 41 and 42; I was at a second floor window, looking out—I saw Mr. and Mrs. Webb standing outside their door—I knew them by sight; I heard a scream, and saw Thomas Murray knock Mr. Webb down and kick him—I knew Thomas Murray by sight—he turned down Leighton Street—I saw Mrs. Murray knock Mrs. Webb down and kick her, and then Mr. Webb was put in a cab and taken away.

Cross-examined by THOMAS MURRAY. There was a large crowd, and I could not see your feet when you kicked him, but I saw your leg—there were more than forty people there.

By the JURY. I know the prisoners by sight—I have seen Michael Murray about once—I should not make a mistake between the two.

ELLEN PROCTOR . I live at 16A, Marlborough Mews—on August 1, about ten p.m., I was standing at the corner of Broad Street, speaking to Popsy Murray, the prisoner's sister, and saw Lizzie Murray cross the road to the Star and Garter—I did not see her come back, but Michael came from that direction, and said to Pop, "Which is the one?"—I do not know what she said—I have known the prisoner Michael a long time—he then went across the road and struck Mr. Webb, who struck

him back—there was a fight, and Mr. Webb fell on the doorway of No. 41, and did not get up again—the prisoners then went away together—that was the first time I had seen Thomas that evening—I did not see Mrs. Murray there; I know her by sight.

FREDERICK BLENKINSOP (Police Inspector C). On August 17 Thomas and Carolan were before the Magistrate, and Annie Barnes gave evidence—I was at Marlborough Mews Police-station next day, and Michae Hurray came and said, "I have heard there is a warrant out for my arrest for causing the death of Joseph Webb, in Broad Street, on August 1st"—I cautioned him that I should take it down in writing—he made a statement, which I took down; this is it: "I, Michael Murray, now residing at 30, Rupert Street, Haymarket, wish to give myself up. I have heard there is a warrant out for my arrest for causing the death of Joseph Webb, between nine and ten on 1st August last. I was in the Scar and Garter public-house when my sister Lizzie came in and said to me that one man was hitting my sister Pops. I went out and spoke to my sister Pops in Broad Street. While speaking to her I received a blow from some man, I don't know who, which knocked me down. I got up and struck the man, and knocked him down on the pavement; he got up again, and we had another round. I knocked him down again, and fell with him. The man did not get up again, but appeared unconscious. I then went back to the Star and Garter"—I took him into custody, and sent for Annie Barnes—he was placed with other men, and she picked him out—he was charged, and made no reply—he was taken before a Magistrate, and remanded to be brought up with his brother.

HERBERT WILLIAM KENDAL . I am house surgeon at Middlesex Hospital—on August 1 Joseph Webb was brought in unconscious, and bleeding from the ear, which is a symptom of fracture of the skull—I found no external marks on him—he left the hospital on August 3rd against my advice.

HENRY TURNER (170 C). On August 2nd, at ten p.m., I took Thomas Murray near Broad Street, and read the warrant to him charging him with an assault on Webb—he said, "I was in the coffee-shop at the time"—when the charge was read he said, "All right."

Cross-examined by THOMAS MURRAY. YOU were standing just opposite, in Gatten Street—you did not say, "Let me get a pennyworth of tobacco"; you said, "All right."

EMILY RIDDEFORD . I live at 15, Broad Street, Golden Square—that is next door but one to No. 13—on the night of Bank Holiday I was looking out at the third floor window, and saw a crowd on the same side of the way, and noticed a little girl; she said, "I will go and tell my father," or "my brother"—she ran into Poland Street, and in a little while a rather short man came into Broad Street, and all of a sudden there was a fight between him and Mr. Webb—they both fell; Mr. Webb got up; the fight went on, and Mr. Webb fell a second time—he seemed to fall over the kerb, and he never got up again—I could not see if anybody kicked him, because the crowd gathered round the doorway—I do not recognise the prisoners: I do not know them at all.

Witnesses for the defence. CATHERINE MURRAY. I am the prisoner's sister—on Bank Holiday I.

saw my sister in the middle of the road—I went to her, and saw Mr. Webb make a kick at her—I said, "You are no man; don't kick a child"—he said, "You go and—," and ran after my sister down Broad Street—I told her to go and see if she could see my brother Michael; he came, and somebody I do not know, who hit him a blow, and they fell, and got up and fought again, and the man fell in the doorway.

Cross-examined. I have not seen Lizzie Murray since August 3rd; she and her mother disappeared together; I came home to dinner, and never saw them afterwards—I agree that in the quarrel Mr. Webb was knocked down by my brother; after the blow from the man I do not know my brother went up to Mr. Webb, but did not fight with him.

By the JURY. I did not know Mr. Webb before—my brother Michael was fighting with Mr. Webb, but not Thomas—I have learnt since that it was Mr. Webb.

HENRY HOPKINS . I was in Mr. Evans' coffee-shop—I saw nothing of the row—I came out with Thomas Murray, and Mr. Webb was lying in the doorway—Thomas Murray had been with me in the coffee-shop some time.

Cross-examined. I have known Thomas Murray about three years—he was washing up plates at the coffee-shop for Mr. Evans, the proprietor the coffee-shop closes at nine o'clock, as a rule—I heard no noise or disturbance in the street—Thomas Murray and I did not go home together; we simply went out because the coffee-shop was closing—I never saw a clock, and cannot swear to the time at all.

POPSY MURRAY . I saw my little sister standing by Mr. Webb, and said, "It will serve you right if the man serves you as he says"—he had said he would put his foot up her behind, and made a run at her—he would have used his foot only she ran away—my elder sister said, "If you have a complaint against her, go to her parents"—he shoved me on my breast, and said if I did not go away he would do the same as he said he would do to my little sister, put his foot up my behind—somebody then knocked my brother down, and he got up and hit him again—that was Webb.

(Cross-examined. I did not go before the Magistrate because I did not know I was required—I do not know how my sister knew that she was required—the inspector did not leave notice at our house that I was to go and give evidence—Lizzie Murray is at home; she has not been away—Mr. Webb lifted his foot as the little girl was running away—I mean to say that he used the words I have said—I did not see Mrs. Webb—Mr. Webb struck my brother and knocked him down without having ever seen him before, and I never went to tell the Magistrate.

Evidence in reply.

JANE WEBB (Re-examined). My husband did not do anything with his foot, or kick Lizzie Murray, or say what he would do with his foot—he never used any such expression—he did not know Michael Murray by sight, to my knowledge—my husband was a tailor, and had worked eight years at one place, and had lived there twelve months—he struck no blow whatever.

MICHAEL MURRAY— GUILTY of assault, with intent to do actual bodily harm.— Eleven Days' Imprisonment.

THOMAS MURRAY— NOT GUILTY .

OLD COURT.—Monday, September 19th, 1892; and

NEW COURT.—Tuesday, September 20th, and five following days.

Before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18920912-847

847. WILLIAM JAMES MORGAN (35), JAMES SIDNEY TOMKINS (47), WILLIAM TOLMIE , CHARLES MONTAGUE CLARKE (42), Sir BART GILBERT EDWARD CAMPBELL (42), and WILLIAM NATHAN STEADMAN (31) were indicted for unlawfully conspiring by false pretences to defraud certain persons of their moneys. Other Counts, for obtaining and attempting to obtain money by false pretences.

MESSRS. CHARLES MATHEWS, C.F. GILL and GUY STEPHENSON Prosecuted; MR. LEVER appeared for Tolmie, MR. BONNER for Campbell, and MR. PAUL TAYLOR for Clarke. Morgan and Tomkins defended themselves.

Before plea, MR. BONNER applied to quash the indictment, or that the prosecution be called upon to elect upon which counts they would proceed, on the ground that the multitude of charges included in the indictment tended to embarrass the prisoners in their defence. The COMMON SERJEANT refused the application.

SAMUEL HAYSMAN . I am a clerk in the office of the Registrar of Joint Stock Companies at Somerset House—I produce the file of proceedings in connection with a company called the Charing Cross Publishing Company, which was registered on 18th July, 1873—to the memorandum of association, among the signatories, is "William James Morgan," described as an editor, of 27, Morton Place; also the name of Joseph Sidney Tomkins, of 5, Friar Street, Broadway—that is given as the registered address of the company, and is afterwards altered to 4, Broad Street Buildings—I find on the file a notice of 2nd February, 1880, filed on the 5th, of a resolution to voluntarily wind up the company on account of its liabilities—it is a notice from Tomkins as the chairman—the Somerset House authorities afterwards sent a notice to the registered address, calling attention to the requirements of the Companies' Act of 1890; that was returned through the Dead Letter Office—I also produce a file of documents in the City of London Publishing Company, Limited; that was registered on 30th March, 1881—among the signatories to the memorandum of association I find W. J. Morgan, publisher, 5, Friar Street; and J. S. Tomkins, 5, Friar Street—that is the registered address of the company; that address is afterwards changed to 46, Leadenhall Street—the last documents with reference to that company are three letters of April, June, and August, 1891, which were sent to that address, and were returned through the Dead Letter Office—there was a memorandum of agreement filed—Morgan and Tomkins are described as proprietors of certain publishing companies—they appear to be vendors of the City of London Publishing Company—on the file is a resolution to wind up; it was passed on 31st December, 1884, and filed on 14th January, 1885—in consequence of the letters being returned through the Dead Letter Office, the company was struck off the register, under the Companies' Act of 1880, on 17th November, 1891—I produce the file of proceedings of a company called "The Beraners Gallery, Limited," registered on 17th August, 1891—among the signatories to the memorandum of association are "Wm. Jas. Morgan, of 64, Berners Street, art dealer," and "J. S. Tomkins, of 5, Friar Street, publisher"—in the memorandum

of agreement Morgan is described as the proprietor and vendor of "The National Artistic Union"—64, Bernard Street is the registered address of the Berners Street Gallery, afterwards removed to the Bloomsbury Mansions—the consideration is set out as £1,200, consisting of 100 fully paid-up shares of £5 each in the capital of the company and £700 in cash—a letter of inquiry was sent from Somerset House with regard to the company in February, 1888, and returned through the Dead Letter Office, and all traces of it being lost, the dissolution was adjudged; another letter was sent in April; and another in June, and the dissolution was gazetted on 14th September, 1888—I also produce the file of proceedings of a company called "The Authors' Alliance Limited," registered on 23rd November, 1887—among the signatories of association I find David Tolmie, journalist, of 20, Eresbys Road, West Hampstead; and Joseph Sidney Tomkins, of 5, Friar Street, described, as a secretary; the signatures are attested by W. J. Morgan, of 5, Friar Street, Broadway, S. E.—there is a list of shareholders, among whom David Tolmie appears to hold 21 shares, and Joseph Sidney Tomkins, 21; Charles M. Clarke, of 27, Amherst Road, literary agent, 20; Gilbert Campbell, of 8, Barnard's Inn, gentleman, 20; William Jas. Morgan, of 29, Chancery Lane, manager, 1,500 shares—there is on the file an agreement in which Morgan is described as the sole proprietor of the City of London Publishing Company, and David Tolmie as trustee of the Authors' Alliance, in consideration of 1,500 fully paid-up shares and £500 in cash—the address of the company is registered on 19th April, 1888, 59 and 60, Chancery Lane; the number of shareholders on this list is 17—no further returns reached our office, and in November, 1891, we sent the usual letter of inquiry, which was returned in the same way, and the company was dissolved on 16th August, 1892.

Cross-examined by Morgan. In the Artists' Alliance, beyond the shares held by the signatories and Mr. Osmaston, there are seven of £1 each held by the outside public; altogether 133 shares were held by others—you are not included as one of the signatories; you are the attesting witness—it is a small concern; 2,000 shares are reserved to you as vendor, 1,500 in fully paid-up shares and £500 in cash—the object of the City of London Publishing Company is stated to make gain and profit by acquiring the business of the City of London Printing Company, the Charing Cross Publishing Company, and the London and Provincial Literary Association—fifty £1 shares are said to be held by Major-General Bates; I do not know that he was one of the directors—100 shares stand in the name of Douglas Onslow, gentleman, and General Scovell 500 shares, yourself 501 shares, and Tomkins 501—altogether there are 1,724 shares—by this return it appears that £1 was called up, and they were fully-paid—the returns of the City of London Publishing Company were made regularly from 1881 to the winding-up—the shareholders in the Charing Cross Publishing Company appear to be 237, holding 2,379 shares; you are down for 70 shares—all the returns down to 1879 are here—it appears that the removal was to the office of the liquidator, Robert Edwards, of 4, Broad Street Buildings, and it may have been the same with the City of London Publishing Company.

Cross-examined by Tomkins. The notice which was returned through the Dead Letter Office was after the date of the winding-up of the company in both cases—in the ordinary course the executive duties of the

directors and officers would have ceased—it would then have become the duty of the liquidator to make returns—the notices were sent to the liquidator. 46, Leadenhall Street; that is the address of the City of London Union—there is a notice that the liquidator attempted to hold a meeting in the case of the City of London Publishing Company, but there was not a quorum—the notice is dated 14th March, 1891.

Cross-examined by MR. TAYLOR. I think Mr. Clarke had nothing to do with the Charing Cross Company; I do not remember his name in connection with it, nor with the City of London Publishing Company—he was not a signatory to the Authors' Alliance—he held twenty shares.

Cross-examined by MR. BONNER. Sir Gilbert Campbell holds twenty shares in the Authors' Alliance—there is nothing to show when they were paid, or when allotted to him.

JAMES SWINDLE . I live at 17, Lyndel Road, Stockport Road, Manchester—I am a warehouseman in employment—I got a taste for literature, and have written a play and some poems and ballads—in Jane, 1885, I received this communication from the City of London Publishing Company, successors to the Charing Cross Publishing Company—I answered it, and received this letter of 4th August, signed "J. Sidney Tomkins, Secretary"—accordingly I sent to me MS., including the play, and I received this acknowledgment, dated 10th September, signed "J. W. Tomkins." (Stating that a favourable report had been received from their reader, and requesting a payment of £40 as his share of the cost and risk of publishing, etc.) some friends in Manchester assisted me by subscribing £40 to enable me to publish my works, and on 9th September I remitted £20, for which I got a receipt signed by Tomkins—on 10th September I sent 10s., on 30th September £10, on the 12th November £5, and on 16th February £2 15s., for all of which I had receipts signed by Tomkins—on 3rd March, 1887, I sent an order for £1 5s.; I got no acknowledgment for that—all this was money found for me; I am receiving weekly wages, my book was never published—I repeatedly wrote about it, and the matter was ultimately taken up for me by my Manchester friends—it was put into the hands of a solicitor, an action was commenced, and tried on the 17th February, 1892, at the Royal Courts, before Mr. Justice Grantham—it was an action against Morgan and Tomkins, the City of London Publishing Company and the Authors' Alliance; I was the plaintiff-none of the defendants appeared; they were not represented by counsel or solicitor—a verdict was returned in my favour for £40, and £200 damages, or the return of the MS. and the costs of the action—I never got any fruits of the judgment, no costs, no MS., nor the £40; somebody paid my own costs for me—the facts of the case got considerable publicity in the London and provincial press.

Cross-examined by Morgan. I paid £39 altogether; the acknowledgments were signed by Tomkins—as far as I know you had not a penny piece of the money—it did not belong to me, but to my subscribers; it was not sent for copies of the book—I cannot tell that the Authors' Alliance put my work into the printer's hands—I received some proofs from the City of London Publishing Company, I believe, to the extent of eighty-two pages, or about a quarter of the entire work.

JAMES JUDD . I am chairman of the firm of Judd and Co., Limited

of agreement Morgan is described as the proprietor and vendor of "The National Artistic Union"—64, Bernard Street is the registered address of the Berners Street Gallery, afterwards removed to the Bloomsbury Mansions—the consideration is set out as £1,200, consisting of 100 fully paid-up shares of £5 each in the capital of the company and £700 in cash—a letter of inquiry was sent from Somerset House with regard to the company in February, 1888, and returned through the Dead Letter Office, and all traces of it being lost, the dissolution was adjudged; another letter was sent in April; and another in June, and the dissolution was gazetted on 14th September, 1888—I also produce the file of proceedings of a company called "The Authors' Alliance Limited," registered on 23rd November, 1887—among the signatories of association I find David Tolmie, journalist, of 20, Eresby Road, West Hampstead; and Joseph Sidney Tomkins, of 5, Friar Street, described, as a secretary; the signatures are attested by W. J. Morgan, of 5, Friar Street, Broadway, S. E.—there is a list of shareholders, among whom David Tolmie appears to hold 21 shares, and Joseph Sidney Tomkins, 21; Charles M. Clarke, of 27, Amherst Road, literary agent, 20; Gilbert Campbell, of 8, Barnard's Inn, gentleman, 20; William Jas. Morgan, of 29, Chancery Lane, manager, 1,500 shares—there is on the file an agreement in which Morgan is described as the sole proprietor of the City of London Publishing Company, and David Tolmie as trustee of the Authors' Alliance, in consideration of 1,500 fully paid-up shares and £500 in cash—the address of the company is registered on 19th April, 1888, 59 and 60, Chancery Lane; the number of shareholders on this list is 17—no further returns reached our office, and in November, 1891, we sent the usual letter of inquiry, which was returned in the same way, and the company was dissolved on 16th August, 1892.

Cross-examined by Morgan. In the Artists' Alliance, beyond the shares held by the signatories and Mr. Osmaston, there are seven of £1 each held by the outside public; altogether 133 shares were held by others—you are not included as one of the signatories; you are the attesting witness—it is a small concern; 2,000 shares are reserved to you as vendor, 1,500 in fully paid-up shares and £500 in cash—the object of the City of London Publishing Company is stated to make gain and profit by acquiring the business of the City of London Printing Company, the Charing Cross Publishing Company, and the London and Provincial Literary Association—fifty £1 shares are said to be held by Major-General Bates; I do not know that he was one of the directors—100 shares stand in the name of Douglas Onslow, gentleman, and General Scovell 500 shares, yourself 501 shares, and Tomkins 501—altogether there are 1,724 shares—by this return it appears that £1 was called up, and they were fully-paid—the returns of the City of London Publishing Company were made regularly from 1881 to the winding-up—the shareholders in the Charing Cross Publishing Company appear to be 237, holding 2,379 shares; you are down for 70 shares—all the returns down to 1879 are here—it appears that the removal was to the office of the liquidator, Robert Edwards, of 4, Broad Street Buildings, and it may have been the same with the City of London Publishing Company.

Cross-examined by Tomkins. The notice which was returned through the Dead Letter Office was after the date of the winding-up of the company in both cases—in the ordinary course the executive duties of the

directors and officers would have ceased—it would then have become the duty of the liquidator to make returns—the notices were sent to the liquidator. 46, Leadenhall Street; that is the address of the City of London Union—there is a notice that the liquidator attempted to hold a meeting in the case of the City of London Publishing Company, but there was not a quorum—the notice is dated 14th March, 1891.

Cross-examined by MR. TAYLOR. I think Mr. Clarke had nothing to do with the Charing Cross Company; I do not remember his name in connection with it, nor with the City of London Publishing Company—he was not a signatory to the Authors' Alliance—he held twenty shares.

Cross-examined by MR. BONNER. Sir Gilbert Campbell holds twenty shares in the Authors' Alliance—there is nothing to show when they were paid, or when allotted to him.

JAMES SWINDLE . I live at 17, Lyndel Road, Stockport Road, Manchester—I am a warehouseman in employment—I got a taste for literature, and have written a play and some poems and ballads—in June, 1885, I received this communication from the City of London Publishing Company, successors to the Charing Cross Publishing Company—I answered it, and received this letter of 4th August, signed "J. Sidney Tomkins, Secretary"—accordingly. sent some MS., including the play, and I received this acknowledgment, dated 10th September, signed "J. W. Tomkins." (Stating that a favourable report had been received from their reader, and requesting a payment of £40 as his share of the cost and risk of publishing, etc.) some friends in Manchester assisted me by subscribing £40 to enable me to publish my works, and on 9th September I remitted £20, for which I got a receipt signed by Tomkins—on 10th September I sent 10s., on 30th September £10, on the 12th November £5, and on 16th February £2 15s., for all of which I had receipts signed by Tomkins—on 3rd March, 1887, I sent an order for £1 5s.; I got no acknowledgment for that—all this was money found for me; I am receiving weekly wages, my book was never published—I repeatedly wrote about it, and the matter was ultimately taken up for me by my Manchester friends—it was put into the hands of a solicitor, an action was commenced, and tried on the 17th February, 1892, at the Royal Courts, before Mr. Justice Grantham—it was an action against Morgan and Tomkins, the pity of London Publishing Company and the Authors' Alliance; I was the plaintiff—none of the defendants appeared; they were not represented by counsel or solicitor—a verdict was returned in my favour for £40, and £200 damages, or the return of the MS. and the costs of the action—I never got any fruits of the judgment, no costs, no MS., nor the £40; somebody paid my own costs for me—the facts of the case got considerable publicity in the London and provincial press.

Cross-examined by Morgan. I paid £39 altogether; the acknowledgments were signed by Tomkins—as far as I know you had not a penny piece of the money—it did not belong to me, but to my subscribers; it was not sent for copies of the book—I cannot tell that the Authors' Alliance put my work into the printer's hands—I received some proofs from the City of London Publishing Company, I believe, to the extent of eighty-two pages, or about a quarter of the entire work.

JAMES JUDD . I am chairman of the firm of Judd and Co., Limited,

of Doctors' Commons—in 1884 I purchased the freehold of 5, Friar Street, Broadway—at that time Tomkins was a tenant there, and another person, who I knew as Lieutenant Morgan—they occupied two rooms on the ground floor, the other room, I think, was let to a third person—they purported to carry on a publishing business under the title of the Charing Cross Publishing Company—during the latter part of the two years they occupied the place I had several communications with regard to them—during the latter period they paid no rent; I think the rent was £40 or £50 a year; it was a yearly tenancy—in 1886, to the best of my belief, they owed £40; that was applied for a good many times, and about the end of 1886, not having received the rent, and having complaints of them, I said, "You had better go, and take your things; you may take all you have and go"—and they went—I think I afterwards received two sums of 5s. each; beyond that I have had nothing.

Cross-examined by Morgan. Tomkins was my tenant—I found you were very actively engaged there; you were not my tenant—I don't think Tomkins was there after 1886—I should say he was not there in 1888; I think the premises were pulled down in 1888—I heard of you as Lieutenant Morgan—there were a large number of books there, arranged on shelves; I could not say how many, certainly nothing like three or four thousand; I should think about two or three hundred—you owe me nothing.

Cross-examined by Tomkins. The rent may have been £70; it is some years ago; I don't think any lease was given you—I have no memory whatever of a lease—I don't think the police ever came to me about this—I had some communications from outside people about money being obtained for publishing books; then I acted on the fact that you owed me rent, and I asked you to leave, without regard to your character.

ROSE ANNA ASHFORD . I now live at 5, Green Dragon Court, in the City—I was engaged by Tomkins at 5, Friar Street, as housekeeper he was there for two years or more—during that time Morgan was continually on the premises—I have seen Tolmie come there from time to time—I was paid 18s. a week—I used to pay for their coals and things—in the course of their stay there a distress was put in; the things were going to be taken, but Mr. Judd compromised—when they left they owed me £3 0s. 8d—I found out they had gone to Chancery Lane; I went there several times—I saw Tomkins, and got 5s. from him, and Morgan afterwards came and paid me 5s.—I got no more; I tried to; but I could not find them after.

Cross-examined by Morgan. I was engaged by Tomkins, not by you—you do not owe me anything.

Cross-examined by Tomkins. You allowed me to occupy rooms there for a considerable time, and afterwards promised to pay me 18s. a week.

Cross-examined by MR. LEVER. I think I saw Tolmie; I had not very much opportunity of seeing him—I let him in just as a chance visitor.

ERNEST FREDERICK ANDERSON . I am a clerk in the Capital and Counties Bank—I produce a certified copy of the account of the City of London Publishing Company, opened at that bank on 21st April, 1885, and operated upon by cheques signed by both W. J. Morgan and James Sidney Tomkins. both of 5, Friar Street, E. C.—down to 9th November, 1885, when a cheque for £3 10s. unpaid was placed to the debit of the

account, the sums paid in and drawn out were £425 7s. 6d.; in many instances the cheques are drawn to "selves," and to numbers as payees, but in instances where names appear I find frequently the names of Morgan and Tomkins.

Cross-examined by Morgan. I do not find a cheque for £500, consideration-money agreed to be paid you as vendor.

GEORGE HENRY WATSON . I am a clerk in the employment of the Royal Exchange Bank—on 12th March, 1886, an account was opened there by the City of London Publishing Company—I produce a certified copy—the operators on the account signing the cheques were Morgan and Tomkins—between March and June, 1886, £551 was paid in and £557 drawn out; the account was slightly overdrawn—at the end of that year £350 had been paid in and £353 drawn out, and the account continued down to 1887—between January and May, 1887, £97 had been paid in—on 7th May 2s. 3d. was paid in to balance the account—in many instances the cheques are drawn to numbers; the names of Morgan and Tomkins occur several times.

Cross-examined by Morgan, It is nothing unusual to draw cheques to the number of the cheque—nearly all the cheques paid to you are small.

Cross-examined by MR. PAUL TAYLOR. I copied these accounts from the bank books—I see no cheques payable to Clarke.

ELIZABETH LECHMERE . I live at Rock House, Thornhope, Hereford, and am single—my attention was attracted to an advertisement of the firm of Bevington and Co., 5, John Street, Adelphi, publishers—I communicated with them with reference to publishing a book for me—I agreed to pay £48, and signed an agreement to that effect—I afterwards received this letter from the City of London Publishing Company, successors to the Charing Cross Publishing Company, 6, Friar Street, Broadway. (This stated that Bevington and Co. having been unable to complete their contracts, the City of London Company had taken over their business and would go on with the publication of her book upon the receipt of £50)—I declined to pay the £50—enclosed in the letter was a copy of this circular. (Calling attention to a new volume of "Poets of the Day" and inviting her to contribute a poem, the only condition being that she should subscribe for a copy of the book)—I sent a poem to be published in the book, believing statements in the circular—I received in reply this letter of 7th July. (Stating that the poem was too long, but that wing regard to its merit it would be put in if she subscribed for six copies)—I then sent three guineas, which was acknowledged by the letter of 9th July—I never got a copy of the "Poets of the Day," and I have never seen a copy—I have never got my manuscript back—about the same time I received a prospectus of the Authors' Alliance. (Affixed to this was a special notice stating that the directors were pleased to announce a minimum dividend of 8 per cent, per annum had been secured by bond)—I saw among the directors the names of Sir G. Campbell, Clarke, Morgan, and Tolmie; the secretary was W. James, and the registered offices at 5, Friar Street, Broadway. (The prospectus stated that the object of the Alliance was to publish on more advantageous terms than usual, and did not start as a new and speculative venture, but had taken over the business of the City of London Publishing Company; no promotion-money having been paid, the promoter having told it for shares in the company)—I believed it was a genuine

bona fide company, and that the statements were true, and that they were taking over a real business, and that the dividend had been guaranteed in the way described—I took two shares, I think—on 22nd December, 1887, I had this letter, informing me that I had been allotted two shares—on 24th February, 1888, I had this letter. (Stating that a call of 5s. had been made on her two share)—I believed a call had been made, and sent a remittance and received an acknowledgment—that was the last I heard either of them or of Bevington and Company—I never got back my manuscript, nor the money I parted with.

Cross-examined by Morgan. I do not remember receiving any letter from you.

Re-examined. I received this letter from the City of London Publishing Company, signed W. J. Morgan, dated 3rd November, 1887.

EDWARD WILLIAMS . I am a coal merchant, of 34, Rifle Crescent, Aston Manor—I published some poems—I received a communication from the City of London Publishing Company, directing my attention to "Poets of the Day"—I believed the circular they sent me, and sent 10s. 6d. for a copy of the work, which I understood would be sent to me for that, I becoming a contributor to the volume, and therefore to receive it at half price—I sent a poem to be put in the volume—on 28th June, 1887, I received this letter from the City of London Publishing Company, successors to the Charing Cross Publishing Company, 5, Friar Street, accepting my poem—I wrote saying I would introduce the book among my friends if I could—after that I received a prospectus of the Authors' Alliance; I read it, and believed the company to be genuine, to the best of my knowledge—this slip in red ink was attached as to the 8 per cent, dividend guaranteed—I believed it—I forwarded £10 in four different sums for allotments and calls on the shares—these are the cheques—I had receipts signed "James Sidney Tomkins, Secretary," except for the last cheque, which would complete the payment for the shares—I wrote several times, but had no answer—the last cheque is dated April 4th, and bears the endorsement, "Authors' Alliance Limited, J. Sidney Tomkins, Secretary," and there is another signature, "A. Reeves" (The endorsement on the cheque relating to the remittance of the 1st March was "Authors' Alliance, W. J. Morgan," and on that of December 20th, "For the Directors of the Authors' Alliance, Limited, W. J. Morgan, Managing Director")—I had no answer to my last letter—I did not get my manuscript nor my money back.

Cross-examined by Morgan. I had printed copies of my poem.

MARCUS SAMUEL RICKARDS . I am the Vicar of Turgworth, Gloucestershire—in December, 1887, my attention was attracted to an advertisement with reference to publishing—I communicated with the address given, and in reply received this pink circular with reference to the "Poets of the Day"—I believed the contents of the circular, and sent a manuscript and an order for 27 copies—I received this letter of 16th December from the Authors' Alliance. (Thanking him for his contributions, for his order for 27 copies, and asking for his remittance)—I sent £10 2s. 6d., and on 19th December received this receipt-about this time I received a prospectus of the Authors' Alliance—I believed the statements contained in it—it had this red notice guaranteeing 8 per cent., and I believed in that—I took £5 worth of shares—I received this letter of 26th March. (Stating that a call of 5s. a share had been made, and signed" J. S.

Tomkins, Secretary)—I sent a cheque, and received an acknowledgment on 28th, enclosing a receipt—I sent a further sum of £4 10s. in respect of further copies of "Poets of the Day," and received a receipt—I think I subscribed about £30 altogether; that was about my total loss—I never got anything—"Poets of the Day" was not produced—I communicated with them, but could get no explanation; I got one or two evasive answers, and at last my communications were entirely unanswered—in the late summer of 1888 I went to the company's office in Chancery Lane and saw Tomkins, and asked him for an explanation; he had written about that time requesting me to undertake the editorship of a magazine; I made inquiries and caused inquiries to be made—a good deal transpired which made me doubt the genuineness of the concern—Tomkins showed me at Chancery Lane books on shelves, and stated they had been published by the company—he told me "Poets of the Day" was in course of progress, and would in due time be published—I could get nothing more definite—I never received any proofs, though he promised to send them—on another occasion when I went to Chancery Lane a distress had been put in for rent, and nothing was left but manuscripts, and I found mine among them—I recovered none of the money I paid for "Poets of the Day," or for shares.

Cross-examined by Morgan. Tomkins showed me a large number of volumes published by the company; he showed me the company's name on the title-page—I don't remember seeing the catalogue—I believe the books were published by the City of London Publishing Company—I think he showed me this book published by the Authors' Alliance—I called to make inquiries especially about the matter; I was wholly dissatisfied with the result of those inquiries—I did not send further money after I saw Tomkins on that point—I think I hid called once previously—I don't remember receiving any letters or communications from you in the matter.

Cross-examined by MR. BONNER. Tomkins was the only person I had personal communication with—I observed his name on the Authors' Alliance prospectus; I allowed him to retain the manuscript I had sent to the City of London Publishing Company.

WILLIAM SIMPSON . I live at the Angel Hotel, Cardiff—I had broken out into poetry at one time, and was attracted by the advertisement of Bevington and Co., John Street, Adelphi—I answered the advertisement, and received this reply, dated 12th September, from the Authors' Alliance, Limited, 59 and 60, Chancery Lane, and 9 and 10, Southampton Buildings. (This letter stated that, having purchased Bevington's business, they would be glad to receive his manuscript, and no doubt could offer him the same terms; it was signed "J. S. T")—then I received this letter of 13th September, with the same printed heading. (This stated that their reader having read his poem, and being very pleased with it, they were willing to publish it on the same terms as those suggested by Bevington—£15 10s. as Simpson's share of the cost and risk; net proceeds of sales to be divided—four-fifths to author, one-fifth to publisher)—I accordingly sent £15 10s.—I believed that the Authors' Alliance was a genuine bona fide company, and that they really had bought Bevington's business, and that the statements contained were correct—I received this receipt on 15th September—I received no proofs—I wrote asking for them—on 11th December I had this letter from them on paper

headed "Dramatic Opinion, 9 and 10, Southampton Buildings." (This dated that the printers promised proofs early in the new year, and asked him if he had a poem he would like inserted in "Poets of the Day")—that letter contained one of these pink circulars, pointing out the advantages of "Poets of the Day"—I did not contribute to it; I waited to see the result of my £15 10s.—I was not able to get any proofs—I never got any money—I wrote on August 23rd, 1889, to 59 and 60, Chancery Lane; my letter was returned through the Dead Letter Office, marked "Gone away"—I gave the matter up as hopeless—my attention was attracted by the trial of the action of Swindler v. Morgan—I communicated with a gentleman in the Temple, and was put into communication with the Treasury.

Cross-examined by Morgan. I received no communication from you.

Cross-examined by MR. BONNER. I received no prospectus of the Authors' Alliance.

EMILY JONES . I live at 69, Hope Street, Liverpool; I lived at Wallasey in 1886—in June, 1886, I saw an advertisement in, I believe, the Daily News—I-wrote, and had this reply. (Stating that they should be glad to receive manuscripts, and that they made no charge for their reader's fee)—in consequence of that I sent a manuscript magazine article for insertion to the City of London Publishing Company, 5, Friar Street, Broadway—I received a letter saying that the cost of publishing my magazine article would be £7 10s.; I sent £7 10s.—I never saw my article in print, nor did I ever receive my manuscript back, or get any value for my money except some proofs—a lengthy correspondence ensued between me and the City of London Publishing Company; I received seventeen letters between June, 1886, and September, 1888; four were signed Morgan, and the rest Tomkins, I think—in September, 1888, I came to London, and went on the 3rd to 59 and 60, Chancery Lane—the doors were closed, and I could not get in—it was before noon, I think—I went again on 4th. September, and found the door open, and went into the office—I saw Tomkins, and asked if Mr. Morgan was in—he told me Morgan was out of town—I asked for Mr. Tomkins; he said he was not in at present—he asked me what I wanted—I said I preferred to tell my business to Mr. Morgan, and would call again—as I went out Tomkins went out after me, through another entrance, and locked the door—I followed him, and saw him go through the building in Chancery Lane, round the square, and enter the building by another entrance in a street I don't know the name of—the next day I returned to the office; Tomkins was writing some letters there, and I recognised his writing as that I had seen in the correspondence signed Joseph Sidney Tomkins—he said, "Mr. Morgan has not returned yet"—I said, "And Mr. Tomkins?"—he said, "Mr. Tomkins is not here"—I said, "Yes, he is; you are Mr. Tomkins"—he said, "No; I am not Tomkins"—he said that several times, I asserting he was—after a little time he said, "Well, I am Tomkins; but I don't care for everybody to know it"—I said that I had come up for my manuscript, and that I should stay there till I got it—he said he had lost it; that he knew nothing about it—a second man appeared in the office; I believe he was Morgan, but I cannot say positively—I waited there for close on two hours, and then the second man said he had business with Tomkins, and that I must turn out—I

said they could turn me oat, and if they did I would give them in charge—the impression I got was that they were going to send for the police—they left me to make arrangements between them—I remained for a further half-hour or so—they did not come back—I glanced at letters on the table, and copied two of the addresses—the porter came to lock up before I left the room.

Cross-examined by Morgan. I believe you were the man I saw; I cannot remember if he had whiskers and a beard; he was tall, with a rough overcoat and hat on; he came from the inner office, and stood there—I could not swear if you are that man.

Cross-examined by Tomkins. My manuscript was put in type, and proofs sent to me; I corrected and returned them I had no special reason for desiring my manuscript returned—I did not come across a pamphlet by Mr. Gordon, entitled "Curious Names and Curious People n—you did not ask me if I was indebted to that pamphlet for a good deal of the information in my article—you did not complain that you had been imposed on by me in that respect, or that I had cribbed the whole of my manuscript from the pamphlet—I was not excited; you were—you did not say that unless I gave an explanation about Gordon's pamphlet you should refuse to publish mine—I did not threaten to commit suicide if I did not have my manuscript back—I did not offer the housekeeper half a sovereign to find the manuscript.

Cross-examined by MR. BONNER. All the communications I received were headed the City of London Publishing Company or the Authors' Alliance, and signed by Tomkins or Morgan—I had no prospectus of the Authors' Alliance, and had nothing to. do with it.

Tuesday, September 20th.

RICHARD BOSS SOUTH . I live at Breach House, Sheerness—about May, 1886, I saw an advertisement in the Daily News, in consequence of which I wrote to 5, Friar Street, E. G., and received a reply written by the manager of the City of London Publishing Company, in consequence of which I sent the MS. of a novel I had written, which was duly acknowledged—on 23rd September, 1886, I received a letter from the company, signed "W. J. Major," saying that a favourable report of my novel, "The Student," had been given by the reader, and offering me terms, viz., that I was to pay £20 towards the publication, and have a certain division of the profits—I refused those terms, and received another letter on 2nd October, offering me different terms; I was to pay £10 down—this order form is similar to one enclosed to me—it is signed "W. J. Morgan, Manager," and dated 2nd October, 1886—there was an alternative proposal that, in lieu of payment, I was to find a cash order for 200 copies—I agreed to that proposal, understanding that two thirds of the profits of sales were to be mine if I found the cash orders for 200 copies—I was supplied at my own expense with printed subscription forms—I sent £9 1s. 9d. towards about 100 copies, and received receipts signed, "J. Sidney Tomkins, Secretary"—at that time subscriptions from my friends began to fall off, and I received an offer from Morgan to publish my novel at the Christmas season of 1887 for £10—I paid that to Morgan, who sent me this receipt, signed by himself my novel was never printed—I wrote from time to time protesting—I received letters in reply—I never received any proofs—on 9th July, 1888, wrote that unless they were prepared to carry out their contract I should

place the matter in my solicitor's hands—I placed the matter in my solicitor's hands, and he sued Morgan, Tomkins, and the company in the County-court, Sheerness, in November, 1888—the action was undefended, but a letter was sent to the judge, saying their solicitor was engaged elsewhere—I recovered judgment for £10—that judgment was unsatisfied—in May, 1888, previous to that action, received a letter, signed "J. Sidney Tomkins, Secretary," and headed "The Authors' Alliance, Limited, Stone Buildings, Chancery Lane, and 9 and 10, Southampton Buildings." (This letter stated that the Authors' Alliance had taken over the other business; that they regretted to have given him the trouble of writing about proofs, and they would see that his work had the first consideration, as they were not less anxious than he to produce it)—a friend gave me a prospectus of the Authors' Alliance about the time I brought my action, November, 1888—I saw in it, among the members of the honorary council, the names of Sir Gilbert Campbell and Mr. Morgan.

Cross-examined by Morgan. I thought my action was against the City of London Publishing Company, with your name and that of Tomkins coupled with it—I think it is not against the Authors' Alliance; it might have been—I have not got the papers.

GEORGE CROSSWAY COOKMAN . I am manager to Mr. Clarke, the owner of 59 and 60, Chancery Lane—in March, 1888, Morgan, who described himself as the manager of the Authors' Alliance, Limited, 5, Friar Street, Broadway, saw me with reference to two rooms we had to let there—I received this letter from him, dated 23rd March. (This, signed "Morgan, Manager" asked if they would accept £40, as he was authorised by the board to offer that)—he gate, as two references, Clarke and Tolmie—I communicated with them, and received these answers. (That signed D. Tolmie was headed Printers' Register Office, 33A, Ludgate Hill, and recommended Morgan as a thoroughly respectable and responsible tenant; and stated that, having had many business transactions with him, he had always been found to fulfil his engagements with promptitude and integrity. The reply, signed Charles M. Clarke, LL. D., was headed 27, Amherst Road, Eackney, stated that the writer believed (he Authors' Alliance, Limited, would prove a trustworthy and desirable tenant; that he had known the manager, Morgan, for twenty years, and had always found him prompt and reliable in discharging his engagement)—the Authors' Alliance were accepted as tenants, and an agreement was executed by W. Morgan on behalf of the Alliance—I said the seal of the company ought to be attached to the agreement, and the signatures of two directors and the secretary—Morgan said he could act and sign for the company, and could pledge the company's credit—there was difficulty in getting the rent, and steps were taken to distrain—we never got the rent after they were turned out—the only rent paid was £7 10s. for the first half-quarter from April to 24th June.

Cross-examined by Morgan. That was paid in the early part of July, 1888, and was a discharge for all rent due up to 24th June—this cheque of 4th June, 1888, for £8 los., bears Mr. Clarke's, my principal's, endorsement—there is a mistake in the date of it—that was paid for rent up to Midsummer, 1888; housekeeper's fees would bring the £7 10s. up to £8 15s.—the cheque is drawn by the Authors' Alliance, Limited, W. J. Morgan, manager.

Cross-examined by MR. LEVER. We did not find out what position Tolmie held at the Printers' Register, we only wrote.

Cross-examined by MR. TAYLOR. This cheque is on the Royal Exchange Bank; it was the only one the landlord received, so far as I know—we made no further inquiries as to Morgan after receiving references; we considered they were satisfactory—Morgan first wrote from 5, Friar Street—we made no inquiries there—I did not hear Tomkins' name in connection with Morgan at that time; I think I first heard that from his being at the office—Tomkins at one time had been a common councilman; I cannot say when—we did not know it in March, 1888.

Cross-examined by MR. BONNER. We let the premises to Morgan, who merely represented that he was the manager of the Authors' Alliance; I knew nothing more of the Alliance than that—I knew none of the directors—I looked to Morgan for the rent.

Re-examined. I never saw any of the directors.

JOSEPH WILLIAM PERRY . I am a clerk, in the employment of Thomas Clarke, of 63 and 64, Chancery Lane—I remember the Authors' Alliance being his tenants—a distress for rent was put in about December, 1888, for £49 11s. 10d., being rent, and 2s. 6d. a week for the housekeeper—the distress realised £8 7s. 6d.; the balance has never been paid.

Cross-examined by Morgan. There was not more than one distress to my knowledge—this distress is for £13 5s., dated 10th December, 1888, for one quarter, and I should think from that that there was more than one distress—there is no return upon it; I know nothing about it; the books do not show it—this is a general catalogue of the auction on January 10th, 1889; I know nothing about the articles—I know nothing about the warrant for £49; I am only going by the books, and all they specify is that the amount due to Midsummer quarter, 1889, was £49—no furniture was brought in after December.

FREDERICK GEORGE MOORE . I was formerly housekeeper at 59 and 60, Chancery Lane—the first man I saw there in connection with the Authors' Alliance was Morgan the day after the office was started and opened he was joined by Tomkins, and a very short time afterwards by Tolmie—Clarke I have seen at the office many times; I thought he was Campbell; I did not know his name at the time—I have seen 8ir Gilbert at the office—I know nothing about Steadman when they were there everything they could get hold of was delivered there, cigars, wines, portmanteaus, and different goods—I ascertained cigars were brought there, so many people came with bills, and told me they were cigars, and asked me if they should leave them without the money—the goods were mostly delivered in the name of Tomkins—I have seen Tomkins, Tolmie, and Morgan in the office together, with another nun when goods were delivered, and I have then heard Tomkins asked for, and Tomkins told them he was not in, but if they would leave the goods Mr. Tomkins would be back in about twenty minutes, or directly, and would give them the money; all sorts of excuses were made—sometimes people left the goods, and when they came back for the money they never got it; perhaps they had gone and taken the goods with them—people very often called—they never found Tomkins and the money there at the same time—I saw scores of ladies and clergymen—Tomkins was very seldom there; he would come and get his letters and

slip off again, unless there was something coming in—that was after the distress—one old lady waited there for months, bringing her knitting and sewing—I have heard Tomkins asked by these people for their manuscripts he has said the reader or publisher had it—I saw one gentleman, dissatisfied with the explanation, give Tomkins a shaking—I saw the place every day for some months—all the business I saw going on was people coming and wanting their papers, and so on—they kept the key for a long time after the distress and sale of the things; the premises were locked up—they had an agreement for three years—they used to come for their letters, but there was no furniture in the place—I kept observation on the rooms—Tolmie came there—I found they had an office at Finsbury Pavement, and I went there and found they had a distress there that morning—Tolmie came there, and when he left I followed—he went all round the back turnings, and five times he took me to the Swan public-house—he looked in there—I left him there—next day I went again before they came for their letters, and I followed another man, and I found Tomkins and another man standing against the swan—I asked Tomkins for the key; he said he had not got it, but that Morgan had—I said, "I am going to stick to you till you see Morgan"—I stuck to him for about two hours, and then he said, "If you give me back the papers which are in the office I will give you the key; it is in my pocket"—I got the key—that was in August, 1889, I believe.

Cross-examined by Morgan. I saw you at the office many times after the distress in December, 1888—I had a summons to serve on you, but I cannot swear whether I served it—I saw you standing in the room when goods came in long after the distress—I cannot say why I did not serve you with the summons, or whether it was served or not; it might have been twelve months after that—I did not see you at Finsbury Pavement—I was told the office there was not taken by you—I resigned my situation as housekeeper and went into business for myself; I did not leave because of Police-court proceedings—I was a defendant at the Police-court in May—a policeman locked me up for being with a woman in Hyde Park, but he got a month because he had made a mistake; he locked me up for assaulting him, but he got £5 or a month for assaulting my wife, and was convicted—I preferred a charge against him—I did not see you at the White Swan.

Cross-examined by Tomkins. I am in my own business at Lewisham now—the man who shook you was from Jersey; I cannot tell his name or why he did it—I was on the landing outside—I was there a good deal—I was caught once with my ear to the office keyhole—I don't know if a complaint was made to Mr. Clarke—I cannot give the name of any person who left goods, so many came—you did not bring the clients out on to the landing to speak to them—I have been at the office during office hours no one was there for months except to pop in and get letters—you did not tell me you should attend regularly every morning after the distraint until you had returned all manuscripts—you did not fix a notice on the door, nor did I remove it.

Cross-examined by MR. LEVER. I do not know the number of Tomkins' office at Finsbury Pavement—I do not know that near there Tolmie had been carrying on a type-writing business—I could not say whether he was engaged at Tomkins' office on business—I had great sympathy

—with the scores of defrauded people—the fees were not my money; I was at no loss—I was paid so much a week by Mr. Clarke.

Cross-examined by MR. BONNER. I made a statement to Richards—I saw Sir Gilbert Campbell's name on the prospectus—Richards asked me two or three weeks ago if I had seen Sir Gilbert Campbell there, and I said yes—I have heard him spoken of, and I have seen him at the office several times—until I came into Court I did not know him—I was not at the Police-court—I have seen Clarke there.

Re-examined. I looked in at Bow Street once, and then I thought I might be wanted, and I left—I recognised the men I saw there as the men I had seen at the office—after that Richards-took a statement from me.

By the COURT. Tomkins pointed out Sir Gilbert Campbell to me at Chancery Lane as Sir Gilbert Campbell, about three years ago—I would not swear whether it was Clarke or Sir Gilbert Campbell whom Tomkins pointed out—he pointed out some man; I could not say whether he wore glasses.

GEORGE EDWIN GARDINER . I live at 30, Fleet Street—in 1888 I lived at 40, Amhurst Boad, Hackney—Clarke then lived at 27, Amhurst Road—I used to cash cheques for him from time to time—on 7th April, 1888, he brought me this cheque, on the Royal Exchange Bank, signed for the Authors' Alliance by W. J. Morgan, manager, for £4 4s., payable to Dr. Clarke, or order, and endorsed Charles M. Clarke, in Clarke's writing—he asked me to cash it; I did so, and paid it into my bankers—a few days afterwards it was returned marked "N. S."—I saw Clarke about it; he said he would make inquiries—he might afterwards have called and spoken about it, but I g. it no definite answer about it—I went to see him occasionally; I saw him at home once or twice; no proper explanation was given—I received this letter, which is written and signed by him. (This stated that he had seen Morgan yesterday, and that Morgan, who was just moving into new offices at 59 and 60, Chancery Lane, had promised to see Mr. Gardiner, and to settle the cheque this week; that if he did not keep his promise, Clarke must pay it himself, but that he should not have funds before Monday)—he never paid me the proceeds of the cheque—I put the matter into my solicitor's hands—he sued Morgan; but he was unable to effect any service of the County-court summons—I went to 5, Friar Street, and Chancery Lane, but was not successful in seeing Morgan—I did not get the money.

Cross-examined by Morgan. I swore an affidavit at Guildhall that the warrant officer could not serve you—I don't know what became of the plaint note; I could not do anything with it. (MR. MATHEWS produced the plaint note, which was against the Authors' Alliance, and not against Morgan)—I do not know that I re-presented the cheque for payment.

Cross-examined by MR. TAYLOR. I had known Clarke three or four years as a customer, and had frequently cashed cheques for him and his wife, and had never had reason to complain of those cheques not being met—none of them were cheques of the Authors' Alliance—I do not recollect at the time he asked me to cash the cheque his saying it was for money he had lent Morgan—I cashed this as I should have cashed any one of his private cheques, without inquiry and without any statement being made by him—he appeared annoyed when I first told him

that the cheque had been dishonoured; I said before the Magistrate he appeared disturbed and annoyed—he said he would make inquiries, and he afterwards came to my shop, and I spoke to him about it, as far as I remember, and asked him about it—I might have asked him twelve or twenty times afterwards about it—he told me he would do everything in his power to get the cheque met—I handed the cheque to the solicitor, for him to use his discretion—I knew Clarke was in the habit of spending a considerable portion of each year in Ireland; he was arrested there—the matter was in my solicitor's hands—I did not see him after he had ceased to appear at my shop; I did not know whether he was in Ireland or not—I might have changed twelve or twenty cheques for Clarke and his wife before this.

By the COURT I did not say to Clarke that he had had the £4 4s., and he might try to pay it himself—soon after my business failed, and the solicitors had the matters in hand—I made a deed of assignment to my creditors, and they became entitled to recover the debt, and I had nothing more to do with it.

Re-examined. The cheques I had cashed before were his wife's, not Clarke's—I do not recollect Clarke telling me why this cheque had been paid» to him—it was the only cheque signed Morgan that I had ever cashed for Clarke.

FRANCIS MORGAN ALLEN . I am a member of the firm of Mallett, Allen, and Co., 42, Wardour Street—in November, 1888, Clarke and Sir Gilbert Campbell came to my premises—I knew Clarke, but not Campbell before—Clarke introduced him as Sir Gilbert Campbell—we had general conversation, and Clarke asked me to cash this post-dated cheque, which one of them produced—it was said it had been paid for directors' fees—it was in favour of Sir Gilbert Campbell for £5 5s., upon the Royal Exchange Bank, dated 21st December, 1888, and signed "W. J. Morgan, for the Authors' Alliance," and endorsed Sir Gilbert Campbell—they said it was post-dated, and I was to hold it over till 21st December—I gave £5 5s. to Clarke, Campbell being present—it was said that it would be an accommodation for Sir Gilbert Campbell if I cashed it—having got the money they went away—I sent the cheque to my bankers; I think it was paid in on 20th December, a day too soon, by mistake; I was away—it was returned, 'Refer to drawer"—I saw Clarke; I think he came to me—he was away at the time, but when he came back to his office I saw him—he said it would be all right—I was to let it be for a little while; I won't say those were the words—I never got the money—I sent my collector after Campbell, but never came into communication with him, and saw nothing more of him—Clarke introduced Campbell as a friend and as a writer who would perhaps put something in our way; we are publishers—I have been a member of the firm about five years.

Cross-examined by MR. TAYLOR. We published Dramatic Opinion, a perfectly bona fide journal, for Clarke—I have known him about four years, and he is of good character—he has been engaged, to my knowledge, in bona fide literary work during that time—I have seen him frequently—I have seen other dishonoured cheques in his possession—he had a settling up with me of his accounts in March last year, and he then took up in a bona fide way a dishonoured cheque of Morgan for £5 5s., which I had cashed for Clarke—I do not suggest there was any fraud on

Clarke's part in cashing this cheque—there were 20,000 copies of Dramatic Opinion—I cashed a cheque for £5 5s. for Clarke a week previous to cashing this for Sir Gilbert Campbell; it was a similar cheque, except as to the name—I knew of the dishonouring of that about 28th December, I think—I was away—when I settled up my accounts with Clarke I said as to Campbell's cheque that I should get my money, and he said, "Give him time and he will pay"—I made no claim on Clarke for payment.

Cross-examined by MR. BONNER. I only saw Campbell that once—I changed another cheque for him about May in the same year—I should say it was about the same time as the other one—it was for £5 5s., and was drawn to Sir Gilbert Campbell by the editor of the Hawk—I cannot say if it was payment for an article—that cheque was honoured—the only occasion I yaw Campbell was not, I think, when I cashed the Hawk cheque; my brother may have seen him—Campbell's cheque came back the second time dishonoured—I never presented it again—I could not say when I sent my collector to see Campbell—I did not see him myself, nor did I take proceedings—I saw Clarke—I think some bankruptcy proceedings were going on which deterred me from taking proceedings—I did not attempt to get this money from Campbell after my settling up with Clarke; I let it go altogether.

Re-examined. At one time I had a dishonoured cheque, dated 21st December, payable to Dr. Clarke, drawn by Morgan—Clarke had brought me that a week before he came with Campbell, I should say—Clarke asked me to hold it for him, and advance him the money—he said he had received it for directors' fees from the Authors' Alliance—I held both that and Campbell's cheque till they went forward for presentation on 21st, December—they were both returned dishonoured—in March, 1891, Clarke came and took up the cheque payable to him—Campbell never took up his cheque—I am sure that this is the cheque Campbell presented to me—Dramatic Opinion, which we printed and published, only lasted for one number,; the twenty thousand copies were all printed at one time, and there was no further issue—it was a bona fide one number—to that extent we were publishers for Dr. Clarke—70, Wardour Street was the office of Dramatic Opinion—I did not know it when it purported to be published at 9 and 10, Southampton Buildings, Chancery Lane—it was "Dramatic Opinion, Limited," when I published it; limited to one issue—the four years I knew Dr. Clarke were from 1888 to 1892—I did not know him as a director of the Authors' Alliance, or as on the honorary council of the Artists' Alliance, or as among the councillors of the International Society of Literature, Science, and Art; or as a friend of Morgan or Tomkins—I did not know Tomkins or Morgan—I knew Tolmie, and I knew him as known to Clarke.

By the JURY. The twenty thousand copies of Dramatic Opinion was bought by Mr. Willard, who took them away—Clarke paid the whole of the expenses of producing: those copies; the money paid by Mr. "Willard went to Clarke.

JOHN WORTHAM . I am an officer of the High Court of Justice in Bankruptcy—I produce three files of proceedings relating to the bankruptcies of Sir Gilbert Campbell: a petition in 1874 which was dismissed; a petition in 1876 upon which he was adjudicated bankrupt, and remained undischarged till June, 1890; and a petition in March, 1891.

FRANCIS PLUMTREE BERESFORD OSMASTON . I am a barrister—I live at Church Bow, Hampstead—I am not in practice—in April, 1888, I replied to the advertisement (produced) for a reader for literary work I asked for particulars; I received this reply: (From the Author' Alliance, Limited, New Stone Buildings, Chancery Lane, and offering a literary partnership without liability, the duties to correct grammatical and other errors in new authors' manuscripts, at £120 for the first year, with an annual increase of £10 to £200, requiring a deposit of £300, which would be in vested in shares yielding 8 per cent, per annum; agreement to be determined at six months' notice, and the £ 100 deposit to be repaid)—I saw a prospectus in which 8 per cent, was guaranteed as a minimum dividend—then I got this letter of 12th May, 1888: (Stating witness's qualifications appeared to be fully adequate, and appointing a meeting at Sir G. Campbell's chambers)—I went to 8, Barnard's Inn—I there saw Morgan and Campbell—I had seen Morgan once before, receiving this second letter, when I said 8 per cent, was a large dividend—that made me suspicious—he said a well-known business had been bought by the company—I believed 8 per cent, had been guaranteed by the vendor—I saw Campbell's name on the prospectus—he was spoken of as a director—he was so introduced to me at that interview—he looked at my testimonials—they were approved of—I was accepted as a suitable reader—I paid the £300 in four instalments of £75—I acted as reader between five and six months—I received £30, three months' salary, in £10 sums—I repeatedly tried to get my salary—for that purpose I went to Chancery Lane, but without success—I was then in practice at my chambers, 7, Stone Buildings, and my papers were to be sent there—by the agreement it was not necessary to discharge them there—I then gave them notice to put an end to the arrangement—I placed the matter in the hands of a solicitor—from what he told me I gave up all hope and my money—I have seen Tomkins at Chancery Liane—Clarke came to my chambers—he introduced himself as a director, but the conversation was entirely personal—I saw him last Sunday morning at my house—he reminded me of a former interview at my chambers, and asked me if I recollected his warning me about the money—I told him I did not remember it; he had not warned me.

Cross-examined by Morgan. You showed me some account-books at the office—I remember a catalogue—I did not come to see the books—I came to discuss my dealings with the company, and the books were brought up. (A catalogue of books published by the City of London Publishing Company was put in)—you showed me the bond named in the prospectus—I read it—I came to satisfy myself of the genuineness of the business taken over by the Authors' Alliance—the bond provided for the payment of the purchase-money to you as vendor, and thereupon you guaranteed 8 per cent.—I also saw the contract for the sale of the business to Mr. Tolmie as trustee of the Authors' Alliance—I cannot speak exactly to each paper I saw—you showed me no books separately—you did not tell me the catalogue was of books published by the City of London Publishing Company—I imagined the company was buying a genuine business, a going concern—I hoped it would be a success; I had a doubt of it—I thought there was a fair likelihood of success—I believed the documents I saw wore genuine—I revised and approved the agreement between myself and the company—I never

applied for my shares to be transferred—I think my solicitor wrote you or the company—he took no proceedings—that was not because he advised me there was no fraud—we concluded it would be difficult to press a charge—"Grantley's Revenge" was sent me, the only book I ever saw published by the Authors' Alliance—I did not tell you I had nothing to complain of except that you took too sanguine a view of the success of the Authors' Alliance—that was not my impression.

Cross-examined by MR. TAYLOR. My last payment to the Authors' Alliance was on August 7th—after that I saw Clarke—our conversation then was chiefly literary—I swear Clarke never suggested to me to be careful in my dealings with Morgan—I never said it was too late to undo what I had done—till last Sunday I never saw Clarke after the payment of my money.

Cross-examined by MR. BONNER. I only saw Sir G. Campbell at Barnard's Inn for the purpose of looking at my testimonials—my conversation with Morgan was at another interview—I had about 100 manuscripts sent me to read during the first three months; those I read and returned—afterwards they began to drop off, and came in twos and threes to read.

Re-examined. Sir G. Campbell said my testimonials were quite satisfactory.

GEORGE HENRY WATSON (Re-examined). I produce banking account of W. J. Morgan with the Royal Exchange Bank, opened on 15th April, 1887, and going to 12th January, 1888—at the end of six months, in June, £355 9s. 6d. had been paid in, and twopence balance was loft—between 1st July, 1887, and 31st December, £183 7s. 11d. was paid in, and all drawn out except £2 5s. 11d., which was drawn out on 12th January, 1888, and the account closed—on 29th December, 1887, another account was opened—this is the requisition so dated. (This request contained a resolution of the board, at which Clarke, Tolmie, and Morgan were present, to open an account, cheques to be signed "Authors' Alliance, Limited, W. J. Morgan, Managing Director; Charles M. Clarke, Chairman")—in accordance with that request an account was opened, and between 6th January, 1888, and 30th June £226 19s. 1d. was paid in—in July the account began with a debit balance of £1 8s. 8d., and to 31st December £201 8s. was paid in, less £2 9s. 6d., the balance against the company when the account closed—taking the other side, many cheques are drawn to numbers—I find the names Tomkins several times, Campbell May 25th, Tolmie June 1st, Campbell June 9th, and Tomkins and Clarke July 5th—then five guineas July 6th, and £8.15s. 10d.—then Tomkins, then numbers, then M. and T. August 11th; also July 23rd and four more—there is only about thirty shillings balance in April, 1888—between 23rd February and 18th May the account is slightly overdrawn—there was no authority to overdraw the accounts—on 31st December there was sixpence on the account—upon 17th May £65 was paid in, 30th May £75, 4th July £75, and 7th August £75.

Cross-examined by Morgan. From first to last there was not sufficient to pay out £500—the total paid in was £429 16s. 1d.—the overdraft was in consequence of the bank's charge for commission at the end of the half-year.

Cross-examined by MR. TAYLOR. I only. see one cheque of five guineas paid to Clarke—after 17th "May there would have been funds to meet the

cheque of 17th April—we did not give notice of there being insufficient to meet cheques—there are no entries in our books between 23rd February and 17th May.

Cross-examined by MR. BONNEB. On 31st December £2 10s. was charged for commission.

Re-examined. On 17th May the £65 was obtained from Mr. Ormaston—upon the same day I find a payment of five guineas to Mr. Tomkins.

MARY DE COSTA . I am a widow—I now carry on a draper's business at 107, Brompton Road—64, Berners Street belonged to my husband—in 1880 the ground floor was let to Morgan—it was one large room—that room was called "The Berners Gallery"—it was let for three years-at first the rent was paid properly, the latter part not—Morgan left without notice, owing £75, shortly before the three years expired—about 1888.

Cross-examined by Morgan. I could not identify you now—I knew of the letting, because it is natural I should know something of my husband's business—I can only say the room was let to a Mr. Morgan—I said in my statement it was 1880; I gave it as near as I could—this is my husband's endorsement (one cheque for £25 on London and County Bank, paid through the London and Westminster Bank, Bloomsbury, dated 4th January, 1881)—it is so many years ago I could not remember you again, but I saw you twice in Berners Street—I suppose this cheque was for the June rent (£27 18s. 6d., payable to Be Costa, and endorsed by him)—I remember asking for you, and a person in the house said you had gone and taken the pictures—I could not swear there was no notice, it is so long ago.

HENRY HERBERT PRICE . I am a solicitor, of 9, John Street, Adelphi—in November, 1889, Morgan applied for the ground floor—he told me he was an artist—his references were Tolmie and some solicitor I do not recollect the name of—I wrote to them, and got satisfactory answers—I accepted Morgan as tenant under this agreement of 4th December, 1889, at £40 a year—shortly afterwards "Artists' Alliance" was painted on the door—I saw there Morgan, Sherwin (a witness), and Tomkins—people came to see them—then they came to see me, and make complaints—then the police came—I went into the room on many occasions—there were two boards, I think, on legs, covered with baize, and one or two chairs—I saw prospectuses and forms inviting subscriptions—I read the prospectus—this is one (produced)—Morgan stayed from December, 1889, to July, 1890—rent was paid in March and in June, almost entirely in cheques of one guinea and two guineas—they were endorsed by Morgan or Tomkins—they were nearly all country cheques—I saw two lead pencils, two tablets of paint, and some pictures labelled with addresses—I saw no books except a small book for petty expenses, chiefly postage stamps—I gave him notice to leave—I saw him afterwards—the notice was partly in consequence of communications made to me and partly on account of rent—when I saw Morgan he asked me if he could stay on after 24th June, as he said he was going to take a large gallery, and I said he might do so, and he stayed three or four days, when I screwed him out—as he did not go at the end of the few days I screwed up the door—then his solicitors, Messrs. Wontner and Sons, sent me a letter—they came afterwards and took the board and chairs away—I have seen Campbell and Tolmie with Morgan once coming out of the room and in the Strand.

Cross-examined by Morgan. I went in the office in the evening after you had gone—the police came after Tomkins—I did not know Tomkins—I saw him outside waiting for you—you paid your rent—there was no difficulty—you objected to it at last—this is my receipt for £3 He.—I did not want you to go out to let in Mr. Thorpe—Wontners did not proceed against me—I did not keep your letters—they did not tell me to give them up. (Tolmie's 8 reference of 26th November, 1889, stating that Morgan mid pay £45 rent, was put in by MR. LEVER.)

Cross-examined by MR. TAYLOR. I never saw Clarke at John Street—his name was not mentioned.

Cross-examined by MR. BONNER. I said at the Police-court I saw Campbell—I recollect seeing him three times in 1890—I saw him come out into the Strand the beginning of 1890—I saw his name on the prospectus—I asked the police who he was; I did not know him.

HANNAH KENTON . I am the wife of Charles Kenyon, and live at 6, Mount Grove Road, Green Lanes—I was housekeeper at 20, York Buildings, for twenty years—I cannot remember the date when Morgan took two rooms on the ground floor—he had "Artists' Alliance" painted on the front door, and "Longman and Co." on the door of the back office—one room led out of another, and there were chairs and tables—I cleaned the offices—there was not much in the second room—Morgan went away about September, 1891—he was there twelve to eighteen months—he came in about February, 1890—I saw Steadman and Campbell there.

Cross-examined by Morgan. I left in October, 1891—the lease expired—I never had to complain of James Longman and Co., nor the Artists' Alliance—the rents and charges were paid by you.

Cross-examined by MR. LEVER. I saw Tolmie there two or three times a week—I saw Campbell; not often; two or three times—I heard his name when we left in October; from that time I did not see him till I saw him at the Police-court—I do not know where I got his name.

By the COURT. I have no doubt Sir G. Campbell is the person I saw at York Buildings two or three times.

EDWARD SHERWIN . I am a schoolmaster, living at Connah's Quay, Flint shire—at the end of 18891 had saved £100—I was not in good health—I advertised for employment, offering £100 as security—amongst the answers I got one from Morgan—I have looked for it, but cannot find it—the printed heading on the paper was "The National Artistic Union," and the address, in ink, was 8, Raeburn Street, Brixton, S. W.—there was also printed "Berners Gallery, Limited," and an address—the letter offered me a secretarial post at £150 a year, to increase annually £10 to £250 per annum—I was to pay £ 100, to be secured by a bond at 8 per cent, interest—in consequence of that letter I came to London, and saw Morgan at 8, Raebum Street—he told me he was an editor, that he wanted a secretary for an art institution, a registrar—he said he had sold the National Artistic Union—I asked him if the union he was going to establish was perfectly bona fide; he said it was—he mentioned the premium and gave me four references—he first offered them as a guarantee of his respectability (Tolmie, a solicitor; S. Benham, I think, of 60, Chancery Lane, and Tomkins)—I forget the fourth—I wrote to Benham and Tomkins—I received satisfactory replies—I cannot find them—I wrote to Morgan accepting the post upon the faith of

those references—I believed them to be honest—in December, 1889 I went to John Street, Adelphi, to an office on the ground floor "Artists' Alliance" was painted on the glass door—I saw a draft of this printed prospectus in Morgan's writing in January, 1890—the paragraph at the bottom is my writing under Morgan's instructions, written in March or April, 1890. (That the list of original members was closed "in April last," but the Honorary Council had much pleasure in reopening the list by the addition of fifty members" and visitors were invited to apply to become members)—I paid my £100, I think, on 2nd December, 1889, in Bank of England notes to Morgan, at 9, John Street—Tolmie came there; not often at the commencement, but more frequently towards the close—I saw Clarke once, and Tomkins three or four times—my work was to address applications to artists, inviting subscriptions, and send out prospectuses through the post, and letters were written; I got the names and addresses from directories—I confined my letters of application to artists; in response, members were enrolled and sent subscriptions—cheques would come of one and two guineas, and sometimes postal orders—I used to address people in the country; I believe they were all artists—I never saw any meeting of the Honorary Council—I never saw Campbell—I do not remember seeing Mr. Viner—I believe the Rev, Mr. Moulton called once to ask when the opening of the gallery would be—Mr. Phillips, M.R.C.S., called to pay a subscription—C.L. Clarke, M.L.D., called once; also the Rev. J.L. Hall, M.A., to know when to exhibit, and inquire about the gallery—his name appears, as he was invited by Morgan to join the Honorary Council; I cannot say if he gave authority for that—the society was at John Street from December, 1889, to July, 1890—letters, in response to applications, continued to come in to the end of December, 1890, from the time of issuing the prospectuses—some were addressed to me, and some to the society—Morgan opened all letters; I saw cheques in his possession—they were frequently drawn to my order—I did not endorse them—I do not know who did—they never passed through my hands at all except for salary and repayment of my £100; I endorsed those—I cannot give the average of receipts—I never saw any book or anything to give an estimate from—I had an art directory—the only books kept by tin Artists' Alliance, at John Street, were the expense book for postage stamps and an alphabetical register of members—I was not altogether satisfied, but this was entirely new to me; I had never been connected with any art society before—that was my first residence in London—I had been a schoolmaster in the country up to that time—I received cheques for the first month's salary—the second month I had to wait till March—then it was regular; I have nothing owing for salary—in July we moved to 20, York Buildings—on one door was painted "Artists Alliance," and on the inner door "James Longman and Co."—the business there was very much the same, with only the books I have spoken of—I saw Steadman there—I became dissatisfied in January, 1890—I gave Morgan notice in writing to repay my £100 and terminate the agreement—I had that right under the fourth clause—I did not get my £100—Aforgan said he could not pay then, he would pay as soon as he was able—then the agreement of 5th February, 1890, was entered into—he then I owed me £15 4s. for services rendered—in that agreement the £100 was to be repaid to me, with 8 per cent, interest, within two months from the 2nd

February, 1890—it was not repaid, but it was reduced by about £20 in varying cheques of one, two, and five guineas; the majority of those cheques came by post to the society from the subscribers—by the time we got to York Buildings the amount owing had been reduced by about £50 in the same way—I still continued to ask for my money—I was in the service from December, 1889, to February, 1891—the amount was then reduced to about £40—then I left—I asked Morgan for the balance before I left—I did not receive £150 salary, but a lesser sum—that was reduced to £80 or £90—I consented to that reduction about the time of the second agreement, about February, 1890; that salary was paid to the time I left, not regularly, fairly regularly—my principal reason for staying on was I wanted money—I wanted my £100, and I was promised I should have it if I stayed on and worked—my solicitor was instructed in January; he wrote Morgan in February, 1891—a portion of my salary is included in the claim for £64 19s. 11d.—he helped me a little—I say a small balance was still owing for my salary—that letter was succeeded by a payment of £30—the account has been reduced to about £30—I was arrested on warrant and charged with the defendants at Bow Street—I made a statement to the police, and was discharged from I the dock and placed in the witness box.

Cross-examined by MR. LEVER. I did not write to or get any reference from Tolmie—I do not remember saying at the Police court that Tolmie never stayed long.

Cross-examined by MR. ONNER. I attended the office from ten to four—I never saw Campbell there—I only saw his name on the prospectus.

Cross-examined by Morgan. (This is (he advertisement—read:"Gentleman, aged 28, well educated, wishes for position where his services and £100 would be acceptable. Duties secretarial. Reference submitted, and must bear the strictest investigation. 42, West Street, Burton-on-Trent,"marked "W.J.M.,5"). I made as good investigation as I could—you showed me the books you produce. (St. James's Magazine, vol. 34, 1878, and another volume; Charing Cross Magazine, several volumes; Church and State, several volumes; London and Brighton Magazine, all conducted by W.J. Morgan)—I was satisfied from them you had some standing, and was correct in describing yourself as an editor—I believe you. told me the society projected was a new one—you asked me to look for grammatical errors in the prospectus, and I did so——I believe you asked me for suggestions; I do not remember that I made any; I do not think I was in a position to do so, because the ground was quite new, and I did not know anything about art—you referred me to the Birkbeck Bank—I cannot be sure about the date the prospectus was sent out—it seems probable I must have written the added par. in the prospectus after April, 1890—I wrote to artists in London—a good many called; some when you were not there, and I saw them; in some cases I took their subscriptions in your absence—there might have been books I did not see.

By the COURT I was registrar, but I had one table; I had nothing to do with any other.

By Morgan. I was dissatisfied early in 1890 because I did not understand it; I thought I would rather go back to my old profession—I do not think I could form an opinion as to its success—"at first," works. were not printed—preliminary business went on inaugurating the

society—I suggested the notice terminating the agreement—I do not remember if it was your writing—I was to withdraw my capital upon terms to be arranged—I did not see anything fraudulent—I think you intended to pay me when you could.

Cross-examined by Tomkins. I do not complain of your reference for Morgan.

Cross-examined by Clarke. You came to John Street with a ticket for a concert for Morgan—that was the only occasion I saw you.

Re-examined. I have always thought Morgan behaved fairly towards me—I left York Buildings 19th February, 1891—upon that day I told him he was a rogue and a swindler—when I used those words I did not mean it; I think I was too severe; I was very heated—that is how I left him—Mr. Eastwood, my solicitor, wrote him—I never noticed the books Morgan has produced, purported to be printed at 5, Friar street, Broadway, E.G., nor the two first volumes of a literary venture, "Church and State"—I never noticed the passage about the Church Defence Association. (Mr. James Gough from the Record Department of the Royal Courts of Justice, produced the Answers to Interrogatories filed in the Action of Swindell v. Morgan and others. MR. MATHEWS read the first answer.)

WALTER FAULKNER . I am a decorator, of The Facade, Brockley—I exhibited a screen at Raphael Tuck and Company's Exhibition in January, 1890, and my name and address were given in a catalogue of that Exhibition—in March, 1890, I received a letter from the Artiste' Alliance, containing a prospectus, which I read—in consequence I went to 9, John Street—I there saw Morgan—I asked him when the prize competition would take place; he said monthly—he said I should be one of the original 500 members—I believed the statements in the prospectus were true—I saw the names of Sir Gilbert Campbell and Clarke on the prospectus—I said to Morgan that the great drawback of these societies was the officers' salaries, I meant that they swallowed up all the profits—Morgan said there was only one paid official in the Artists' Alliance, and that was himself; he said he was manager, at a salary of £30 a year, and that he was only there the latter part of the day—on the faith of the prospectus. and Morgan's statements I paid a subscription of one guinea, and received this receipt. (This was signed W.J. Morgan, manager)—wine time after I received this letter from Morgan, asking me to become one of the Honorary Council—I allowed my name to be put on the Honorary Council—I received the first report of the Artists' Alliance—I also received this announcement that the Artists' Alliance had taken the Marlborough Galleries for the exhibition of members' pictures—I wrote asking my name to be withdrawn after that I received by post this circular, with the name of Dr. Bickersteth on it—I cannot say if there was a second report—in reply to my letter of withdrawal I received a letter asking me to repeat my letter, and then I got another letter of 7th August, 1890, saying my letter surprised them, and they had pleasure in removing my name, denying any failure on their part, and stating that if able legally to do so they should return my subscription.

Cross-examined by Morgan. I cannot say I understood that there were no meetings of the honorary council to attend—I sent no pictures—I had labels to put on my pictures; I lost them, and applied for a second lot, which I never had.

Cross-examined by MR. TAYLOR. I received two prospectuses—on the first prospectus I said before the Magistrate I did not remember seeing Clarke's name, but I said afterwards I found out it was on the prospectus when I looked at it a second time—I never saw Clarke personally—I saw his name on the prospectus.

Cross-examined by MR. BONNER. In consequence of my interview with Morgan and from the prospectus I paid my subscription.

Re-examined. I was affected by the names on the prospectus—I understood Sir G. Campbell was the late Sir George Campbell, M. P.

WILLIAM BROWNGER TAYLOR . I live at Coombe Park, West Berks—in June, 1891, I received a communication, with a. prospectus of the International Society of Literature, Science, and Art, and a members' application form attached. (The letter invited him to become a fellow, as, with a view of making the society thoroughly representative, a resolution had been passed that a number of members of learned societies should be eligible for election on payment of fees; it was signed Steadman)—I believe I the statement that a resolution had been passed—I received this diploma, signed W.J. Morgan, curator; Maunder Hill, secretary; Tolmie and Houston, councillors—I also received a copy of the Pantheon, the official journal of the society, and thereupon I paid a cheque for two guineas, and got this receipt, signed Steadman—on 25th March I received this letter. (Stating that the council had determined he was at liberty to wear the hood and gown, the price of which was £4 4s.)—in May this year I sent another annual subscription of two guineas, and received this receipt, signed Maunder Hill, secretary; I did not apply for the hood" and gown—my knowledge of the society was got entirely from the documents sent me; I was led to accept in consequence of the names I saw on the circular; I thought that such persons would not be likely to lend their names to any institution that was not thoroughly genuine and sound.

Cross-examined by Morgan. The prospectus of the International society bore Steadman's name as secretary—my form of application was filled up by Mr. Faulkner as proposer—I did not notice in the Pantheon an announcement of the general meeting of the members, to be held on 25th May; I did not read it very carefully; it has been only once issued, as far as I am aware—I renewed my subscription in May this year without being asked for it—I was satisfied up to that time and till these proceedings commenced, and then I was enlightened when I saw the case in, the paper—I did not say before, the Magistrate that I was still satisfied with the society: you made the remark to me and I was silent.

Cross-examined by MR. BONNER. 1 did not notice in the Pantheon of March, 1892, that at the close of 1891 Sir Gilbert Campbell's year of office as chairman expired, and that he had since retired from the society—I had a second prospectus after I joined the society, with written on it, "proposed by Mr. Taylor"; on that there is no mention of Sir G. Campbell, but in the first one I received he was described as chairman of the executive council—he does not appear in the Pantheon,

Cross-examined by Steadman. Your name was omitted from the second prospectus I received.

Re-examined I think this third prospectus came with the ree it for the first payment—my name was attached to it, and it asked me to Propose any one else I thought would join.

WILLIAM FORBES GIBBON . I live at Kensington—in October, 1891 I received this prospectus of the International Society of Literature, Science, and Art—I noticed that the subscription might be compounded for life by payment of eight guineas, and I returned the application form asking to be enrolled a life member, and enclosing a cheque for £8 8s.—I received on 17th October this receipt, signed by Maunder Hill—I believed at the time the society to be genuine.

Cross-examined by Morgan. I have not been in Court before—I have said that had I known you and four or five others were connected with it I would not have joined it—I don't know if I was told by the Treasury that there were hundreds of other members—I received the Pantheon, but I looked very little into it—I see on page 3 a general meeting of members and fellows is called for 25th May.

WILLIAM WILBERFORCE THOMPSON . In July, I think, 1891, I received a letter announcing a special resolution of the International Society of Literature, Science, and Art inviting me to become a member—in October I received a repeat letter with this prospectus, and I sent £7 7s. for entrance fee and five years' subscription—this is the receipt—I believed it to be a genuine society.

Cross-examined by Morgan. I know nothing to the contrary now except for these proceedings, and from what I heard through Truth; that shook my confidence very much—I saw only one number of Truth referring to it; I think it referred to the International Society, so far as I remember, and was not of a complimentary character, but made out that it was a bogus affair—my attention was first called to Truth about March, 1892—except what Truth said, I knew nothing to the detriment of the society; I should not say that now—up to these proceedings it was the only thing I knew to the detriment of the society—I never complained or asked for the return of my subscription.

ALBERT YATES . I live at 48, Stern dale Road, "West Kensington—I was the owner of 36, Sperston Road, Hackney, in May, 1890—Tomkins wished to take that house, and gave three references: Morgan, the Adelphi, Strand; David Tolmie, Eresby Road; and Mrs. Wright, Colebrook Row—I wrote to Tolmie, and received this answer of 2nd June. 1890. (Stating that he had known Tomkins for many years, and had no hesitation in saying that he knew him to be respectable, and likely to prove a desirable tenant)—I admitted him as a tenant on a yearly tenancy, I think. £36 a year, from 30th June; he went in after September—I did not get the first quarter's rent, due in September—I tried several times to get it; ultimately I got £1 through a solicitor—I found it difficult to get possession, but ultimately I did so by the key being left in my agent's letterbox in January, 1891—the I was all the rent I got.

Cross-examined by Morgan. I had no reference from you recommending Tomkins.

Cross-examined by Tomkins. I think I got an ejectment order against you; I cannot produce it—some proceedings were taken by Mr. Cable, a solicitor—we applied for an ejectment order, and failed to obtain it.

Cross-examined by MR. LEVER. I do not know that when Tomkins entered on that tenancy he had freehold property of his own, or that he had been a tenant of 5, Friar Street, for fifteen years—I inquired of Mrs. Wright, of whom he had been a tenant in Colebrook Row, Islington,

and found he had been a very desirable tenant, and had paid his rent, and that she was sorry to lose him.

FREDERICK WARREN . I am an estate manager to Messrs. J.W. Hobbs and Co., 1, John Street, Adelphi—in September, 1890, we had this application for the hire of the Marlborough Gallery from Morgan, through Mr. Robert Reed. (This letter was on paper headed "The Artists' Alliance" gave Tomkins, of 36, Sperston Road, and others, at references, and was signed "Morgan")—I wrote to Tomkins, and received a satisfactory reply, and let the gallery to Morgan for three years at £150 a year—if Tomkins had sent an unsatisfactory reply, in all probability we should have asked for another reference—this is the agreement.

Cross-examined by Morgan. You entered into possession at Christmas, 1890, or a little before—you paid the rent regularly every quarter as it became due, up to the date of your arrest, on 4th June, 1892.

Cross-examined by Tomkins. I wrote to the other reference, and found him perfectly satisfactory—I am not aware he is a solicitor of thirteen or fourteen years' standing.

GEORGE MAUNDER HILL . I live at 9, Langham Street—I was at one time a farmer; I am now an agent and collector for—the London, Edinburgh, and Glasgow Life Insurance Company—in December, 1890, I was looking out for employment, and I saw an advertisement in the Echo promising 453 to £5 a week, and mentioning a premium of £50—I replied to the address given, and got this reply, dated 27th December, 1890, signed Morgan, and saying he would be glad to see me to-morrow—I went and saw Morgan, who said he wanted an assistant-secretary—I was to be paid by a commission of one-third of the subscriptions I obtained in reference to the International Union of Art, Literature, and Science, 20, York Buildings, Adelphi—I was to write an average of forty letters per day—Morgan was to give me the letter I was to copy—my premium was to be paid in advance—I had never had a secretary's place before—I told Morgan I had been a farmer—I undertook to pay the premium, and was engaged a few days afterwards, after I saw an agreement—he sent me the agreement, and enclosed a copy of the letter I was to send to intending members—on 30th December, 1890, I saw him, and signed the agreement, and paid my £50 to Morgan by cheque—a fortnight after that, about 15th January, I commenced to carry out my duties by writing an average of forty letters a day, or more—I wrote them from 20, York Buildings, and on the paper of the International union of Art, Literature, and Science—that went on to very near the end of January, and then I turned my attention to the International Society of Literature, Science, and Art—I saw the printed prospectus about that time—I began to write about the same number of letters a day in connection with that society—only a specimen copy of the prospectus of the International Union was printed, and it never got beyond that stage—this form of application for membership in the Union, enclosing 10s. 6d. subscription, is signed by me; I understood that only one copy was printed; but this brings to my mind that money was received by the Union—these are all similar documents, and all signed by me—money was received, of which I got my one-third; I remember it now—I went on writing for the International Society up to the present—subscriptions of one and two guineas and so on came in, of which I got one-third—I read very little of the prospectus of the International Society

before I sent it out; I just glanced at it—I am secretary on one; in another I am assistant-secretary—no one of these six prospectuses of the society is an exact copy of the other, although all are printed; it did not attract my attention—I went on doing this work up to June, 1892, as secretary, having first been assistant-secretary—Steadman was secretary when I was assistant-secretary—I was promoted in July last year; I still had one-third, and still wrote forty letters a day—I did not know of the agreement between Steadman and Morgan till it was produced at the Police-court—Sherwin was there in my day doing much the same for the Artists' Alliance as I was for the International Society, in the same room at York Buildings—I knew him as the Artists' Alliance registrar—Steadman, as long as he remained, was in the same room there, writing these same letters—Mr. Locke and Mr. Du Bois did no writing there—I knew what Sherwin and Steadman did, and they knew what I did all that any one of us did was to send out application forms inviting subscriptions, and get our one-third when they came in; and that was the business—there were books at York Buildings—I had nothing to do with them—I know they were kept by Mr. Steadman from the beginning of the International, in June, 1890—Mr. Morgan kept the postage-book; Steadman kept the register—I saw no other books kept at York Buildings—I saw books kept at Marlborough Gallery at the commencement, when we moved there from York Buildings, Michaelmas. 1891—Tolmie kept them—they were cash-book and ledger—Morgan kept the day-book—there was a minute-book—I cannot say who kept that; I did not; I think Tolmie did—Tolmie kept the register and Morgan the postage-book—a good many prospectuses were issued—I could not say if the bulk of the money was spent in postage—I had no connection with the money—when I first went to York Buildings, "The International Union of Art, Literature and Science," was stuck on the door in large printed paper letters, pasted on—afterwards "The International Society of Literature, Science and Art" was pasted over that—of the subscriptions to the International Union I had one-third and Mr. Morgan had two-thirds—on an inside door at York Buildings was the name of James Longman and Co.—there were two outer doors and this was the innermost—circulars came there addressed to Longman and Co.; I never saw a letter—I could not tell who Longman was—I was in this employment nine months—I saw the name Longman within a few days of the time I was first there—I never inquired who Longman was, and I swear I do not know who he was—there was no one there other than Morgan to represent him, but I could not say that Morgan was James Longman, and I have no reason to believe Longman was Morgan—I have no doubt that Longman was Morgan—I was always paid—I always got my one-third—I sent out on an average forty circulars a day from the middle of January, 1890, to June, 1892—from July, 1891, for twelve months, I had as my one-third share £55 6s.—business was much better after we came to the gallery and opened it, subscribers increased—they were suitable premises for the purpose—I only once got three guineas a week as my one-third—I sent out letters of this kind: that a resolution had been passed tat a limited number of gentlemen interested in Ecclesiology should be elected as members of the society free of entrance fee, on payment of subscription only, and a

similar letter that members of the Iron and Steel Institute were eligible for election—I know Morgan's, Tolmie's, and Steadman's writing well—these documents (produced) are written by them respectively—this agreement between Morgan and Steadman is signed by them—I did not know of that agreement—I do not know Tomkins' Clarke's, or Campbell's writing—this receipt, dated 6th February, 1892, for £61 13s. on account of commission, is in my writing—that was the last commission I had before the arrest—that was from July, for twelve months—it is my salary for July, 1891, to February 6th, 1892—I now say I got £55 from my first commencement in January to July, 1891, and this £61 13s. is from July, 1891, to February 6th, 1892—I occasionally attended meetings of the council at Great Marlborough Street—Sir Gilbert Campbell took the chair—when he did not do so Tolmie was voted to it, as a rule—Campbell' discontinued occupying the chair when he resigned in Christmas, 1891—I saw and read several numbers of Truth from May to October, 1891—my attention was called to this one, headed "Sir Gilbert Campbell, Bart.," of October 2nd, 1891—I don't know if the defendants' attention was drawn to them my attention was drawn to them by the placard—I bought the newspaper, and read it—I did not say anything about it to any of the prisoners—I never discussed the matter with them, or these detailed attacks on my employers—I never mentioned it in the gallery—I read in the paper Morgan's reply to the attack on him—I never mentioned the articles to him—I have mentioned the matter to my own personal friends, but I never mentioned it to Morgan or anyone connected with the office—Morgan, Tolmie, and Steadman mentioned the subject to me—the last article in order of date was the attack on Sir Gilbert Campbell, on 22nd October, 1891—I could not say it was in consequence of that article Campbell resigned—I never asked why he resigned—I read the article upon him, but never connected the two things—a concert was to be given at the Marlborough. Gallery—it was advertised, and tickets were circulated, but it never was given—the place was in the hands of the police—a claim was made in my name, but under the instructions of some of the prisoners, against Mrs. Alcock in the early part of 1892—it was discussed at a meeting how that claim should be brought, and this minute was come to and entered in regard to it, and signed by Tolmie as chairman—it is dated 27th April, 1892, and authorises me to sue on behalf of the company—I was to be plaintiff in the action—the cash-book, ledger, minute-book, register, and day-book were in existence at that time—an appearance was entered on behalf of Mrs. Alcock to that action—I learned, and it was communicated to the prisoners, that Mr. George Lewis had been retained on behalf of Mrs. Alcock; Morgan told me that—Mr. Du Bois, who had been assistant secretary, was to act for me—I knew Mr. George Lewis was Mr. Labouchere's solicitor—the claim was brought in the County-court—there was a discussion as to whether I could be rightly plaintiff—as plaintiff I swore an affidavit of documents in the action, and for the purpose of the affidavit I had to exhibit the books of the society—I had nothing to do with giving the particulars from which the affidavit was drawn Up—I read it over before signing it, but I gave no particulars to make it up from; Morgan supplied the particulars; I signed it—about to time I went to swear the affidavit the hooks of the society were lost

by Morgan, in an omnibus he told me—he was taking them home with him—he used to do so occasionally—he had never lost them before among the books so lost was the society's minute-book—they were advertised for in the papers—they were lost between the date of the swearing the affidavit and the trial; I could not say the date; it was about the date I was called on to swear this affidavit—the affidavit says the books were lost on 6th May, 1892; I did not make out the affidavit, although I swore it—the books disappeared, and nothing was ever heard of them afterwards. (The advertisement was read: "£1 reward.—Lost, last Friday night, between Bond Street and Victoria, black leather bag, containing books and papers. Finder will receive above reward. Marlborough Gallery, 39, Great Marlborough Street, W")—I could not say why no reference is made there to the omnibus—if that was a blind, it was unknown to me—Morgan or Tolmie wrote to the secretary of the omnibus company.

Cross-examined by Morgan. I took your word that they were lost; I saw them before, but not afterwards—there were such books, and they were honestly and properly kept—the minute in this book refers to a minute in the lost minute-book—I did not see you doing business as J. Longman and Co.—I simply saw the name on the door—the projected International Union of Art, Literature,' and Science was abandoned, and the few members who had sent subscriptions were enrolled as members of the International Society of Literature, Science, and Art-Steadman kept the books at York Buildings; I do not recollect seeing Tolmie doing so; he might have done so while I was away on my holidays—300 or 400 pictures belonging to members were exhibited at the Marlborough Gallery—I saw this advertisement as to the lost books in the Daily Telegraph—inquiries were made at Scotland Yard about them—someone came from there and said that if anybody brought them in he ought to be locked up for stealing them, instead of having a reward—this is one of the catalogues of pictures exhibited at the Marlborough Gallery by members of the Artists' Alliance and International Society—the pictures are properly numbered and priced, with the name of the subject and the artist—the catalogue was handed to every visitor who came to the gallery; at first, I think, 6d. was charged for it, and subsequently it was given away this is a supplementary catalogue of the International Society, containing a large number of other pictures—hundreds of free tickets of admission were gent to the public every week, inviting them to call at the gallery; this is one—I know that in consequence of the attack in Truth you offered, in my name as secretary, the Public Prosecutor, in March this year, to submit the books of the International Society to him, or a gentleman deputed by him, for inspection—this reply came from the Public Prosecutor. (This stated that the Public Prosecutor knew nothing of the society except from what appeared in the prospectus and advertisements, and that he was not taking any action against the society)—all subscriptions were paid into the society account at the British Mutual Bank, and on Saturday I received my one-third—I was paid every Saturday for some time, until July; and in July I had a cheque—I used to receive my commission and not give a receipt at the time, and after a time you asked me for a receipt for six months, in order to make the books right—so far as I know, subscriptions as received were paid into the bank to the society's account—I knew nothing about what became of the money received, except from what you

told me, but I know money was paid into the society's account; I have paid it in myself—after Sir Gilbert Campbell's year of office expired these tickets of admission to the gallery were sent out in hundreds weekly (These had Tolmie's name as chairman)—I know there were over one thousand three hundred fellows and members of the society who had paid a guinea or more, and the society was constituted of those members and the council, and not by you and four or five others—none of the one thousand three hundred had paid less than a guinea—at the council meetings an agenda paper was placed before the chairman; the ledger and day-book were on the table, open for the inspection of the council—council meetings were held monthly; at them the progress of the society was reported, and paid engagements procured for members at concerts, and sales of pictures were reported—the Pantheon was sent to every member of the society, to all the. one thousand three hundred—the society's gold medal and money prizes were announced in the Pantheon, as offered for the best essays on subjects suggested by the Daily Telegraph—other gold medals were offered for the best invention, and for the best pictures illustrating certain subjects—the council had given you instructions to have a gold medal struck—the Pantheon stated that the competitions were to close on June 30th, 1892, and the gold medal was to be ready in time for the awards—I saw the announcement in the Pantheon, to fellows and members, that a general meeting would be held on 15th May, 1892; and the announcement that fellows and members requiring occupation could have advertisements inserted free of charge in the society's journal; and that in connection with the employment bureau active fellows and members were invited to have their requirements entered on the register free of charge, and were invited to suit themselves through that agency—on page 4 of the Pantheon there is a balance-sheet of the society for December, 1891. (In this the liabilities were £1b, and the balance, being profit in cash at the bank, £ 140)—the ledger was not lost in the omnibus—particulars are given in the Pantheon of the four departments of Art, Literature, Science, and Music—a list of members available for entertainments and concerts is given; members are invited to send in pictures for competition, and to avail themselves of the advantages offered by the society—I had no reason at any time to complain of you or of your conduct of the society—I make no complaint against you, although you had £50 from me—I was perfectly satisfied with the agreement you made with me—I have always found you honourable and straightforward to me, and you have always treated me well—this is the back page of the programme of the concert arranged for 7th June, three days after the arrest; I find on it the names of a number of members as singers—they are all members except Miss Kingham, who was manager of the musical department—on the inside are the names of the members singing and their songs—there is a notice that those members are available for concerts, etc., and that application must be made at 39, Great Marlborough Street—on 11th December, 1891, a concert was given by the society at the International Hall, Piccadilly Circus—this is the programme, giving the names of the members singing and their songs—on 23rd January a Dramatic and Humorous Recital was given at Steinway Hall, at which members of the society were engaged—on February 2nd, Princes' Hall was engaged for a Grand Charity Concert in aid of the funds of the Poor Children's Dinner Table, East

Dulwich—members of the society were engaged to sing—I understood Mrs. Alcock, being interested in the Poor Children's Dinner Table, was to pay for them—the society, through me as secretary, brought an action against her—the solicitor engaged for us was away, and you were not able to attend, as you were in Holloway—a nonsuit was entered; I was not there, but notice was sent to me—I was the plaintiff by name I went to the County-court on the first occasion—the case was not reached then—I heard the next day fixed; I did not go then—I had no occasion to be there, I really had nothing to do with it; I was plaintiff—I had no one to go with on the second occasion, I don't know why I did not go—I did not understand from the solicitor that I was required to go there—I did not know that application for postponement was made—I saw by the papers that the society was represented by a solicitor it is within my knowledge that members of the society received paid engagements to sing there—on 22nd March this year Princes' Hall was again engaged for Miss Winifred Parker's Concert; members of the society were engaged for it—letters were sent to the members and fellows announcing these concerts, and enclosing them tickets to be purchased at half-price, and asking for their patronage and presence—Rod en Pearce was secretary of the musical department—in June, 1892, circulars were sent out, stating that in consequence of the action of the police the concert Had to be abandoned—the council tried to give fellows and members paid engagements, and to get wealthy fellows and members to come to concerts as part of the audience, and then get paid engagements from the wealthy members who gave "at homes" for the performers—the council wanted to be useful to the members and fellows, and get them paid engagements—a large number of carriages attended at the Marlborough Gallery on the 7th, and a number of members came to sing, and had to go away; it was after the arrest—the public were not allowed into the building; the police were in possession—at the meetings of the council everything that could be suggested as being useful to the members of the society was done—concerts were given; pictures were hung and sold-since May or June, 1891, the gallery has been open daily for the sale of members' pictures and works—there were counters exhibiting art needlework, which at night were carefully covered up with sheets; every care was taken of members' works—I heard of a complaint from Mr. Black, the novelist, of his name being on the prospectus, but his name was not on; it was Black, J. P., of South Shields-that was the only complaint I heard of—no concerts or entertainments were given before October, 1891—the musical department was one of the latest opened by the society—Mr. Pearce was engaged at the time we left York Buildings, which was on the 1st or 2nd October, to work up the musical department, and these concerts were the result of that department's operations—I know nothing about this lodger; it is the first time I have seen the figures—I first saw the books at the gallery on my return from my holidays in August, 1891.

Cross-examined by MR. LEVER. As far as I remember, Tolmie entered into the International Society's employment in January, 1891, and his name was on the prospectus, with me as assistant-secretary—Sherwin left on 12th or 19th February—Tolmie was working in the same room with me end I saw what his work was; we each had a separate desk-his worn: was very similar to mine; writing letters—I don't think he kept

any books at the first—he took no part in the higher management of the society—I don't know what Tolmie's commission was; he told me he was receiving commission—after a short time he left, about April or May, 1891—he told me he was leaving because the commission he received was not sufficient to keep him—I next saw him in the employment of the society the following August—he returned during my absence for a holiday—he did not take up the same duties, but was employed in keeping and entering up books, and work of that kind—I don't know if he was paid a salary—after the books were finished he again wrote circulars and letters, and took salary by way of commission, and he continued doing that work and receiving that commission until his arrest—after Sir Gilbert Campbell resigned, Tolmie occupied the position of chairman pro tem., being elected by the council at their last December meeting, until some more suitable person could be found—I heard it so stated at the council; I do not know if his salary or commission was raised; I know nothing of what he received—I had no suspicions as to the bona fides of the society—I should have regarded Tolmie as one of my superiors during the time he was chairman; before that I should not have done so—Tolmie continued to act as chairman up to the time of the police coming.

Cross-examined by MR. TAYLOR. I never saw Clarke before I saw him in Court—I do not know Fear or Croft—some letters inviting people to join the society were sent out and signed in the name of Clarke from the International Society—I cannot say who signed those; it was through Morgan's instructions—I never saw Clarke there, and so far as I know he had nothing to do with the International Society—I know nothing of the Artists' Alliance, except that it was at the same building—I never saw Clarke at York Buildings, or at the Marlborough Gallery.

Cross-examined by MR. BONNER. I saw Sir Gilbert Campbell a few times at York Buildings and at Marlborough Gallery, and occasionally at council meetings at the gallery, in the chair—I could not say the first time I saw him there; the last council meeting was in November or December, towards the end of the year when ha resigned—I could not say if I last saw him there in October, November or December—I think it was either in October or November, not so late as December—I will not swear I saw him at a council meeting after October—I saw him three or four times at Marlborough Street—I never told him I was receiving one-third commission upon subscriptions—I never heard it mentioned at the council meetings that Morgan and Steadman were dividing profits—I never knew of this agreement till it was produced in Court—I do not think I was dividing the profits with Morgan; I got my part—it was never mentioned at the meetings that Tolmie was getting commission—ordinary business took place at the meetings—I reported nothing; Morgan did it—progress was recorded on the minutes—the minutes of the previous meeting were read at each of these three or four meetings—there was not much need to have a chairman, but there always was one—I was not a councillor; the prospectus said I was one—Stone and Houston were on the board—I saw other councilors besides them and the prisoners—Houston and Stone, attended the meetings there was an agenda for another meeting after March, 1892—there was a meeting in Stay, but the minutes were not written in the book—I cannot tell why that was not done.

Re-examined. I knew nothing of literature, science, or art—I found farming not good enough to go on with—Morgan and Tolmie had the working of the society, and they, as far as I know, possessed knowledge of literature, science, and art—all I did was to ask members of the public to subscribe; there was first the letter and then the repeat letter—money was obtained from 1,300 people by means of these letters——I saw about twenty of them at the gallery, extending over twelve months—I don't know how Morgan got into that position; I never inquired—he signed the cheques—I took the money for the concerts at the doors on two occasions; once I handed it to Morgan, on another occasion to Mr. Pearce, who had nothing to do with the banking account as far as I know—if a picture was sold, Morgan took the money—during the whole time I was connected with the society I only know of one picture being sold; I think more than £1 was given for it; I could not say—I suppose Morgan paid that money into the bank; as far as I know it went into his pocket—I think it was purchased by Mr. Tewson, the auctioneer—you must have something 8 you are getting money from 1,300 people—the catalogue is published by James Longman and Co., and embellished with a picture of Steadman—I cannot say if Morgan was James Longman and Co.—there was no one to represent James Longman except Morgan—I do not know if they were the same person—I don't know who was the author of the Pantheon; I had nothing to do with it—I have no doubt Morgan was the author—it is No. 1 of Vol. 1 it was sent broadcast all over the place—every one of the 1,300 persons had it; on the back is the invitation to subscribe, with information about the letters after one's name, and the hood and gown—I was never present at an examination; I don't know who as examiner—I saw no old medals nor money prizes, nor certificates of merit—I don't know who handled the provision for decayed fellows, nor who was responsible for the literary department—Morgan had the artistic department under his special care—I cannot say who benefited by the society except the prisoners and some of the secretaries; I did not—none of the persons I know of did any work except write these letters and repeat letters—apparently the object was to get in money—I do not know why my' name was used in the action that was brought—I did what Morgan told me, I suppose—Morgan talked at the council meetings—I did not know Morgan was going to write to the Public Prosecutor—I never saw the letter written to him in my name by Morgan—I saw the reply—the attacks on the society were not discussed at the council meetings—during the twelve months or longer I had to do with the society, Morgan, Tolmie, Campbell, Stone (who had been assistant-secretary), and Houston (a councillor) took part at the council meetings—I don't remember any others—Morgan had the books, and the number of members who had joined since last time—I thought Morgan was paid by salary—neither I, Houston, Stone, nor Tolmie was his master.

By the COURT. I know that the council gave directions and authority to draw and sign these cheques—I saw a hood and gown; it was kept in the gallery, in the safe, I think—it was acquired in the early part of this year—I never saw it used; it was kept there to show to people when they came in and asked for it—Morgan took the initiative when a subscriber came in—he would bring the matter of the hood and gown up,

and would say, "This is the hood and gown mentioned in the prospectus"—I do not remember it being discussed at a council meeting whether anybody was worthy to wear them—I never saw anybody in it.

JOSIAH KILNER . I am clerk to Messrs. Lewis and Lewis, solicitors, of Ely Place—I produce the original of the Morgan and Steadman agreement, which Messrs. Lewis and Lewis had possession of, for the purposes of the action.

Cross-examined by Morgan. It is between William James Morgan and William Nathan, herein called W. N. Steadman—it is not stamped—Mr. Lewis handed me the document—I know nothing further about it (This agreement stated that whereas W. J. Morgan was establishing a business under the style of the International Union of Art, Literature, and Science, and desired to engage Steadman as secretary, it was agreed that Steadman should conduct the correspondence, keep the books and register of members, and write or cause to be written letters of invitation to likely members, engaging, if necessary, clerical assistance, to be paid for by him, and that all payments obtained through letters written by Steadman should be divided equally between him and Morgan.)

WILLIAM RUSSELL LOCKE . I live at 221, Cornwall Road, Notting Hill—in April, 1891, I saw an advertisement in the Daily Telegraph for assistant-secretary, address Secretary, Wells Street, Grays Inn Road—I replied by letter, and received this answer; (This stated that a premium of £50 was required; that the work would be partly canvassing by letter, salary £1 a week and commission of 15 per cent.; that the appointment would continue so long as he supplied 300 letters a week, and it was signed "W. N. Steadman")—I went to the address given, 20, York Buildings, and there in a room on the ground floor I saw Morgan and Steadman—Steadman introduced Morgan as the curator of the society—they showed me an agreement ready drawn, and asked me to pay £50—some question was raised about the form of the agreement, but afterwards I executed the agreement, and paid £50 to Steadman—this is his receipt for it—I was supplied with a copy of the kind of letter I was to write. (This was to the effect that the council had resolved that a few members of the learned societies would be eligible for membership on payment of a compounded life membership of three guineas)—I was to turn out 300 a week of such letters, and if I wrote more I was to be paid in proportion—I was supplied with stationery and prospectuses—I took the 300 letters I wrote a week to Steadman at York Buildings—I saw him and Morgan 'there—I was also supplied with the repeat letter—printed lists of the addresses of people I was to write to were supplied to me by Steadman—after a time I complained to Steadman of not getting my salary—I went to his house at Talgarth Road, but did not see him there—afterwards I saw Morgan, and complained to him—I went on one occasion to Talgarth Road with my solicitor, and got a cheque from Steadman for £2 10s—I took proceedings against him in the County-court and got judgment—a cheque for £2 10s. was agreed not to be paid in—another cheque was returned "Refer to drawer," and I saw him and he gave me £3 in money—I continued to write the same kind of letters for Morgan—I saw at York Buildings a register of the persons who had answered the letters and paid subscriptions—all the work I did for the society consisted in writing these letters and the repeat letters—that went on for about twelve

months, to about April, 1892—my attention was attracted to the article in Truth—I think I heard Morgan speak about losing the books, but not very much—I did the copying at home, and was only there for about half an hour on Saturday—I saw first Steadman, afterwards Morgan and Toimie, in connection with the society—I saw a copy of the Pantheon—I saw nothing of gold medals, prizes, or certificates—I was not present at any examination—I saw the hood and gown at the gallery—I was not present when anybody parted with money for the right to wear it—at the end of about twelve months I wrote, asking for my name to be taken off, partly in consequence of something that came to my knowledge.

Cross-examined by Morgan. I have no complaint to make against you, nor against the society—my complaint was against Steadman—as far as I knew, you always honourably carried out your contract with me—I had only a verbal, and no written agreement with you—I was to receive 10 per cent, from you for writing the letters—I got that—the agreement prevailed from the time Steadman failed to fulfil his contract until the time of the arrest—you did not discontinue the contract—you paid me every penny due from you—you told me in August, 1891, that the council had asked Steadman to resign, partly in consequence of his treatment of me and of Mr. Du Bois—you told me he had resigned—I never saw him at the gallery afterwards—I saw several books at York Buildings; I could not pay what they were—I was told I was not entitled to attend at the council meetings—I have not heard of persons' names being wrongfully used, or of complaint—I made inquiries from friends about Truth, and heard it was not considered a truthful paper, and I did not pay much attention to it then—I did not consider it was a paper to be relied on; neither the paper nor its editor seemed to be thought much of, from what I heard—I always thought the objects of the society were being properly carried out—I left partly, if not wholly, on account of bereavement, not from any fault I had to find with you or with the society—I was at the gallery on the Saturday on which you were arrested—I was assisting in making and fixing a platform for the concert which was to take place on the Tuesday.

By the JURY. I received £51 odd altogether as salary and commission—that was all that was due to me, except what Steadman owed me—I did not get my premium back; I am £1 clear of what I paid, and I did a year's work.

Cross-examined by Tolmie. I saw you once or twice, I believe, at York Buildings, before the movement to the gallery—I have frequently seen you since at the gallery—as far as I could judge I saw you occupied in ordinary clerk's work—you had nothing to do with the arrangement I made with Steadman and Morgan.

Cross-examined by MR. TAYLOR. I was only connected with the one society—I never saw Clarke before I went to Bow Street.

Cross-examined by MR. BONNER. I only saw Campbell once, when he came to York Buildings on a visit to Morgan.

Cross-examined by Steadman. Since these proceedings, about three weeks ago, I received a letter from you expressing your desire to repay me.

Re-examined. That was after Steadman had been committed for trial—I considered myself one of the assistant-secretaries to the International Society—I saw Campbell's name on the prospectus as president—I saw

by the new prospectus that Tolmie succeeded him—I did not know how Tolmie was connected with the society—my agreement was with Steadman, and the blame was placed on his shoulders—I worked for a year, and got in the end £1 6s. for my work—I cannot say I was very pleased.

FREDERICK DU BOIS . I live at The Maisonette, East Putney, and am a solicitor—in July, 1891, I saw an advertisement in the Evening Standard for an assistant-secretary in connection with the International Society of Literature, Science, and Art—I replied to it, and received an answer purporting to come from Mr. Steadman—in consequence of that I went to 39, Great Marlborough Street, by appointment—I saw Steadman there, and while talking to him Morgan came in—the advertisement mentioned a premium of £200, payable in advance, as a sort of security—I believe really it was a premium for the appointment, which was to be £150 a year, with annual increments of £20 a year up to £300, for multiplying in duplicate a form of letter given to me—this agreement was sent to me, executed by Steadman, and in hit handwriting, with Morgan as attesting witness—prior to the execution of the agreement I paid my £200 premium by this cheque, dated 1st August, which was not to be presented within a short time—directly after this I went to the Marlborough Gallery, and began there my duties, which consisted of writing these letters soliciting subscribers—I got my first month's salary, but no more—I went there on August 1st, 1890, and was in the building up to the time of the arrest on 4th June, 1892—when salary was owing I spoke about it to Morgan—I don't think T saw Steadman (to whom my £200 was paid, and with whom I entered into the agreement) after the first month's salary was paid; he was no longer at the gallery—Morgan was there constantly after 1st October—I complained to him in October about Steadman's treatment of me, and about the articles in Truth, which I saw some time after they were out—I did not read them all; I don't think I read the one on Sir Gilbert Campbell, in October—I saw one with an answer from Morgan-explained it mostly away; he said, "It is one of Labouchere's tricks," or something of that kind—I remained on on different terms; this agreement shows what they were—I entered into it at the time of mentioning the Truth articles, and afterwards it was reduced into writing—I asked Morgan what I had better do as to proceeding against Steadman, and he said he did not think it was much good to proceed against Steadman, as it would do the society, which I still believed in, such a lot of harm, and there was nothing whatever to be got from Steadman—he said other officials had suffered with respect to Steadman—under the new agreement I was to be permitted to use the office at Great Marlborough Street as a solicitor, and write only one hundred letters a week; there had been no arrangement before as to the number—I was to give free legal advice to any of the councillors or any of the officers on their behalf—I should say on an average about 1,200 letters went out a Week—I believe that each secretary was supposed to open his own answers, but failing that, Mr. Fenwick would do it—the letters contained cheques and money, which Morgan appeared always to take—I never attended a council meeting—I knew of one being held, but I never actually saw one held—, I have seen Campbell and Tolmie there—Steadman was never continuously

there—I only saw him there two or three times after I was engaged—they were ail down at York Buildings when I was at the Marlborough Gallery at first, with the exception of their employes—I saw Morgan and Tolmie at York Buildings, and I think Hill—I was introduced to Campbell there as the president, I think—I did not see Steadman there—I saw him about five times in all at the gallery—I last saw him at the end of September or beginning of October, 1891—he and Morgan went out together then—I saw Campbell once at York Buildings and two or three times at Marlborough Street—I saw him there on days on which I was told a council meeting was going to be held—they did not come to Marlborough Street till October, 1891; and it would be after October, 1891, that I saw Campbell there—I was appointed solicitor to the society in the action brought by the society against Mrs. Alcock—books had been kept by the society up to that time, and they were lying about—I asked Morgan who was to be made the plaintiff in the action—it was determined that Hill should be made the plaintiff—I advised them that at the next council meeting they should appoint Hill plaintiff; it did not seem quite dear from the Act of Parliament who should be appointed—I cannot say I looked into the Mortmain Act very carefully—I was only solicitor to the society—by my advice Hill was made plaintiff—it became necessary to make an affidavit of documents, and about then the books were all lost in an omnibus, so I was told—I saw nothing in the society itself to object to—I got no salary after the first month, except that I got a small commission on the 100 letters a week—I paid £200; I got £12 10s. in cash, and gave the whole of my year's work; but I carried on business there, and I thought I would take it out in rent; I was not very pleased.

Cross-examined by Morgan. It was Steadman owed me money—I saw nothing to object to in the way you carried on business—you told me that in consequence of Steadman's treatment of me he was dismissed by the council—I have seen the minute-book, with a large number of entries of minutes in it—I believe it has been repeatedly left in the inner office, which I used—you showed me the minute of the removal of Steadman—I have been absent when council meetings have been held—I was not a councillor—on many occasions you gave me notice that you would require my room for a council meeting—I never read the Mortmain Act through—I am afraid I took it for granted that I thought I was appointed under this Act—the agreement subsequently made between me and the society was honourably kept by the society and you—I drew it—I was paid every penny from September, when I commenced, up to the arrest—I have seen you making up bank-slips for payment into the bank, and I have seen you stamp cheques to the account of the International Society—I have seen cash-book, day-book, ledger, and other books of the society in the inner office—I have, under the terms of the agreement, on several occasions given free legal advice to members and fellows of the society; it was one of the advantages offered to members—the society hung and exhibited its members' works—I have personal knowledge of five sales of pictures—I believed the society was genuine up to the day of the arrest—I have no cause of complaint against the officers, excepting Mr. Steadman—I was perfectly content with the agreement I made, right up to the time of the arrest—I saw in the first minute-book, which was lost, that the appointment of Mr. Hill to sue in the action was brought

before the council—you told me inquiries had been made at Scotland Yard about the books—I have seen at the Marlborough Gallery two or three of the persons whose names appear on the front page of the prospectus—I can only say that two, so far as I can say, I was personally responsible for; one was the Hon. and Rev. Viscount Moles worth, and the other was, I think, Lady Willoughby d'Eresby—I introduced also the Duchess of Newcastle, the Duchess of Portland, and the Duchess of Sutherland; I mean I wrote letters to and got answers from them—I never imagined I was assisting in a fraud—members' pictures were properly hung at the gallery—I know there were several members who received paid engagements; I have seen their receipts, and the cheques of some—I know great efforts were being made to induce people to come to the concerts—I was present at the concert at Steinway Hall—I know the society expended £49 over it, at any rate—I had all the receipts—the amount was made rather less in order to bring it within the County court; certain claims were not pressed—I never saw you act as James Longman and Co.—no pictures were ever hung in the w. c.; I believe one was found there—it was not used as a w. o.; it was stopped up, and used as a store-room—a bill of the Guardian Insurance office was hung up in my office over a picture, and the picture could not be found—I don't know if I hung up the bill; if I did not a clerk did by my instructions—I was agent for the Guardian, and no one was interested in that office bat me.

Cross-examined by Tolmie. I first saw you at York Buildings three weeks after! joined as secretary—I should say on 1st August—X saw you almost daily at the gallery—you appeared to be keeping books and writing letters and doing ordinary clerk's work, so far as I could see—I believe you had nothing to do with the arrangement between me and Steadman or me and Morgan.

Cross-examined by MR. TAYLOR. Morgan instructed me to write letters in the name of Atwell, who appears to be a member of the honorary council, and I did so—I never saw Atwell there—I do not know that anyone was instructed to write letters in the name of Clarke.

Cross-examined by MR. BONNER. I used to call at York Buildings, and I first saw Campbell there in August—I saw him four or five times at the Marlborough Gallery—I should say that I last saw him the middle of November—I think he resigned in November—the agreement I signed was entered into between me and Morgan, and had nothing to do with any of the others.

Cross-examined by Steadman. Three weeks ago I received from you a communication, which I handed to the police—it expressed a desire to repay the money you had had from me.

Re-examined. I am twenty-five—I did not understand how it was Morgan handled the society's money, or who had appointed him to do so; 1 presume he did so as agent—it was no business of mine to inquire—I don't know now who had appointed him—I saw the original prospectus—people paid to go to the concerts; I did so on one occasion—I don't know what was done with the money; it was no business of mine—one picture was sold for £10, and I think a pair were sold to Mr. Tewson for three guineas; and I recollect two others being sold—I presume Morgan took the money—Campbell and Tolmie were not allowed to handle the money; only Morgan handled it—they never told me how it was the

paragraph appeared that the society was incorporated under this Act of Parliament—I never asked.

Thursday, 22nd September, 1892.

ALICE EMEEY . I am the wife of John Emery, of 13, Wells Street, Gray's Inn Road—in January, 1891, I had a furnished bedroom to let—I advertised it in the Echo—a William Nathan Steadman, of York Buildings, applied for it; the prisoner Steadman is the man—he took the bedroom at 5s. a week—his reference was Morgan, of York Buildings—he went into possession in February—I had difficulty in getting the rent—he advertised from my house; I have seen the advertisements—letters came—he said he had advertised for an assistant-secretary—he showed me some bank notes.

Cross-examined by Morgan. Steadman showed me a letter he said came from you—I did not write to or receive a letter from you. Cross-examined by Steadman. You do not owe me any rent.

WILLIAM GEOEGE PALMER . I am a clerk, in the employment of W. H. Smith and Son—I live at 56, Talgarth Road, West Kensington; I let lodgings there—in August last year I let Steadman some rooms at 25s. a week—he said he had been living at No. 22 in the same road—he paid a sovereign deposit, and the balance and for his keep at the end of the week; he said it was more convenient to him to pay once a month—at the end of the month we presented the bill but could not get the money—he left in September, owing £11 10s.—after he left several persons called—he wrote letters, circulars, and pamphlets; I saw great piles ready for posting of different things—I recollect his taking a great quantity to the post one day in a bagquires of paper with this heading were left behind: "International Society of Literature, Science, and Art," etc., "Chief Secretary's Office, 22, Talgarth Road," etc.—he also left some copies of Truth—I sold these documents (produced) to a person who called at my house about the end of October. (Read agreement of 8th December, 1890, between Morgan, of York Buildings, and Steadman, of Bloomsbury, whereby Steadman was to act as Secretary to the National Union of Art, Literature, and Science, to pay for clerical assistance and postages, Morgan to provide paper, envelopes, and pay rent, printing, and other charges, the receipts to be divided equally)—after Steadman left I went to the Marlborough Gallery—I saw Morgan—I said, "Can you tell me where Mr. Steadman is?"—he said, "No"—I pressed for a better answer than that, and told him how he had served me at the lodgings, and he smiled and said, "You are not the first one he has served like that," and that Steadman had been dismissed from there; he knew nothing about it, and politely showed me the door.

Cross-examined by Morgan, I noticed the agreement was not stamped.

Cross-examined by Steadman. " Paternoster" was the name of the man who bought the papers—he was agent for Truth—he paid £2 for them—I have not disposed of the other goods you left; they are not worth it—I sold two or three old pairs of trousers—you left about 50 books, standard editions of the poets, classical and biographical dictionaries, all in good condition, clean, and neatly bound, and worth about one guinea to me to keep—the edition of the poets was 7s. 6d.—you left a dressing-gown, too small for me, and an old one; three boxes, one large, worth about 5s., and a coloured photograph I have still—it is not worth three guineas

—I am no judge of art—I advertised that you were' to come, or these goods would be sold to defray expenses—you told me you were busy bringing out a book of poems—the servant told me proofs came from the printers—you did not say you were very anxious and much worried about this book—I will not swear I saw you write on the headed paper—my wife said you gave her £1—that was to come off the total—I have given credit for it—I received a letter from you, not saying you were in financial difficulties and would be happy to pay in a few days, but that you were on your way to Brighton, and you addressed it from Charing Gross—it was a postcard—I have not got it—you have never claimed the goods.

CHARLES FREDERICK WATERS . I am a clerk of the British Mutual Banking Company, Ludgate Circus—this is an account opened by William James Morgan—this is the application of 7th March, 1891. (Giving address as 20, York Buildings; occupation, artist; and reference, Ernest Wallace, Esq., 13, Eastcheap, E. C.)—this is the reference. (March 11, '91: "I believe Mr. Morgan will make himself a desirable customer to you")—Morgan drew cheques—the last was 19th February, 1892, when £43 was drawn out, leaving a balance of 18s. 8d.—the amount which passed through the bank is £554 7s., 9d.—I produce form of application on behalf of the "Artists' Alliance" (dated 13th April, 1891)—there is no reference, because Morgan had already an account—he operated upon that account—the last time on 31st December, 1891, when there was a credit balance of £23, including 5s. 6d. interest—£202 lis. 3d. passed through the bank—this is the cheque-book of the Artists' Alliance—these accounts are taken out tinder the Bankers' Act—I also produce application of William Nathan Steadman to open an account, of 5th May, 1891, address, 20, York Buildings, occupation secretary, reference, W. J. Morgan; also certified account—Morgan came to us—that account was operated upon by Steadman from May 5th to September 3rd, 1891, when there was a balance of 19s. 3d.—I see payments on May 5th, £50; 9th, £50; and July 31st, £200—£362 0s. 6d. passed through the account—I also produce application and certified account of James Longman and Co., of 20, York Buildings; reference, W. J. Morgan—the first entry is June 2nd, 1891, and the last 20th August, 1891—Morgan operated on the account—Morgan and Longman I understood to be the same man—I recognize his writing—he drew cheques signed James Longman and Co.—the amount which passed through the bank was £26 13s., and 4s. 6d. interest—I produce application of 12th August, 1891, and an account of the International Society of Literature, Science, and Art, W. J. Morgan, curator; address, 20, York Buildings, no occupation and no reference—that account was opened 12th August, 1891, the last entry is June 13th, 1892, when there was a balance of £25 1s. 1d.—that account was operated upon by Morgan—the amount paid in is £32 7s.—I see entries Glasgow, Greenock, Girlock, Guernsey, Dundalk, Welshpool, Gtalway, Provincial Bank of Ireland, Inverness, and others—those are charges made by those banks for collection on cheques not drawn in England—(Charles Richards, Inspector, produced pass-book found at Morgan's private address, 38, Lynette Avenue)—that is not Morgan's original passbook, but one we issued on his application on 8th April, 1892, on his statement that he had lost his pass-book—on January 11th, 1892,

Morgan has written his name opposite £30—he having the cheques, wrote the names, and we filled in the amounts from the ledger—16th January, D. Tolmie £2 6s. 8d.; 29th February, D. Tolmie £2 16s. 8d.; 19th February, No. 447 £200, and No. 446 £30; March 1st, Sir G. Campbell £2 2s.; 5th, £5 5s.; 24th, D. Tolmie £2 16s. 8d.; the names being Morgan's writing, the figures ours—19th April, Morgan £20, in our writing; 17th May, Tolmie £1 18s.; and 25th May, Tolmie £2 16s. 8d.—the total passed through the bank on the International account was £1,830 1s.—up lo June 13th the balance was £25 1s. ld. that is the last entry here, but there has been a transaction since, and I believe the account is closed now—between 7th March, 1891, and 13th June, 1892, five accounts were opened at our bank, four by Morgan and one by Steadman, with Morgan as a reference, the total amount passing through those banks being £2,613 17s. 5d. on Morgan's four accounts, and £362 0s. 6d. through Steadman's account, making a total of £2,975 17s. 11d.

Cross-examined by Morgan. 7s. 6d. was charged for a new pass-book—the date is 26th May, and not 8th April—it was not entered at the time, but the pass-book was supplied in April—that is the time the entries start from—we had the cheques at the time we made up the new book—you applied for a new pass-book directly after you lost the old one in April—your transactions appeared satisfactory—no cheques were dishonoured; no complaints were made—Du Bois' cheque for £200 was paid in on 31st July, and credited at once—it passed through Steadman's private account—this pass-book stops at August 11th, 1891, with a balance of £23 3s. 7d.; the balance now is 19s. 5d.—I have not been able to trace 7s. 6d. for pass-books on 26th May in any book—the book was supplied on some day between 8th April and 26th May—I have looked, and I cannot see that any cheques have been paid to you for the balance since Steadman's pass-book was made up.

Re-examined. The cheque for £1 13s. paid in on 3rd June is drawn by Steadman in favour of "James Longman and Co.," and is so endorsed in Morgan's writing.

CORNELIUS SEXTON . I am a detective-sergeant of Scotland Yard—I arrested Steadman on 2nd July at Brighton, at the Police-office, where he was detained—I read the warrant to him, charging him with obtaining money by false pretences, with intent to defraud—he replied, "Well, I am perfectly innocent of the charge, and most willingly accompany you; Lord Salisbury is severely to blame that I am mixed up in this unpleasant business at all; now, officer, do your duty, I shall be very pleased to do mine"—I took him to London by train, and conveyed him to Bow Street—he was charged; he made no reply—I searched Steadman's house at 22, Stirling Road, West Brighton—I found three cheque-books of the British Mutual Bank, and one passbook, a number of paid cheques, one which has been produced, payable to James Longman and Co., for £1 13s., endorsed by Morgan, and one to Self, £168, and a number of papers, amongst them a letter to Steadman on International paper, 20, York Buildings, of 11th August, 1891, and addressed 22, Talgarth Road—("Dear Steadman,—You are really too unkind. Come up and see me, even if you go back again Send me cheque, too; I am in an awful hole through your unkindness I do hope you are better. With love, yours ever,—W. J. M.")—that is

Morgan's writing—I know his writing—also this letter, with the game heading, of 14th August, 1891—(commencing, "Pear Steadman," and stating, "Unless you meet me to-morrow, Saturday, 11.30," etc, he would not be answerable for what would happen)—another, of 7th August, 1891, forwarding £60 in notes to Steadman—also memorandums relating to forwarding 5,000 circulars of the society, and in relation to Bridge Street—also letter from Tompson, a solicitor, respecting a witness—I was present when Inspector Richards arrested Morgan on 4th June, 1892—I took him to Bow Street—I searched him—I found on him two rough minutes, one in Morgan's writing, the other in Tolmie's; a cheque-book of the British Mutual, Sir G. Campbell's visiting card (of Junior Conservative Club, W., with "Albemarle Street" in pencil); a receipt from J. J. Davis for £1 for services rendered, and some unpaid vouchers of the International Society.

Cross-examined by Morgan. I do not find any document of any printer belonging to Steadman, with any charges in connection with the International Society. (Memorandums of circulars from Drake, Driver, and Leaver, Limited, printers (produced), addressed to W. Sargent, Esq.)

S EBGEAT HAYTER . I am a detective, of New Scotland Yard—on 7th June I arrested Clarke at the Banbridge Police-station, county Down—I said, "Is your name Charles Montagu Clarke?"—he replied, "Yes"—I said, "I am an officer of the London Metropolitan Police; I hold a warrant for your arrest"—I read the warrant to him—it charged hint with conspiracy and fraud—he said, "Very well, I know the persons you refer to, and I am not 'surprised at two of them getting into trouble, Tolmie and Morgan, but I cannot understand about Sir Gilbert Campbell, and I have read about the case in the paper, but I have had nothing to do with it; in fact, I caused my solicitor to write them a letter about my name being on the prospectus without my sanction"—I conveyed him to London, and charged him at Bow Street—he made no further reply—he said he was of no occupation—an officer at Banbridge offered me a pocket-book which he said, in Clarke's presence, he took from him—it contained letters and memoranda, including four cheques, one payable to Dr. Clarke for five guineas, also a card of Sir Gilbert Campbell, and two envelopes addressed in print of Dr. C. Montagu Clarke (documents produced)—I arrested Sherwin, who was afterwards discharged—I arrested Tolmie on 4th June—I took him to Bow Street, where he was charged—I found on Tolmie, or at his house, paper headed "Association of Accountants and Auditors, Sir G. Campbell, Bart., President;" visiting cards in the name of Ward; letters relating to the International Society, forwarding prospectuses; a letter addressed to Sir G. Campbell, which had passed through the post, threatening proceedings for rent, from 9, Prince of "Wales's Road • a letter to Tolmie that the authorities from Scotland Yard were after them; and several letters requesting return of money sent for Treatise on Double Entry from different persons—on Clarke I found paper headed "Dramatic Union, Wardour Street; Music conducted by Dr. C. M. Clarke, 1d. weekly;" a pawnticket in the name of O. M. Clarke, Amhurst Road, for 15s. for a belt, and dated 24th April, 1891—I had seen Clarke write, and know his writing—the reference stating the Authors' Alliance would be desirable customer, and that Clarke had known the manager, W. J. Morgan, twenty years, and they would

always find him prompt in discharging his liabilities, is Clarke's writing; also the letter explaining the four-guinea cheque, and the endorsement on the cheque marked "N. S."—also the resolution of the Artists' Alliance, of 29th December, 1887, to open account with the Royal Exchange Bank, signed 'Authors' Alliance, Limited, W. J. Morgan, Managing Lirector; Charles M. Clarke, Chairman"—I arrested Tomkins on 5th July, about 8.15 p.m.—I saw him at Hackney Police-station—I charged him; he made no answer, but refused his address and occupation.

Cross-examined by MR. LEVER. I made no inquiries at 7, Prince of Wales' Road—I do not know the house was condemned by the sanitary inspector—I found six visiting cards of the name ot Ward—I did not see or know of books lying ready to be sent to persons complaining of not receiving them.

Cross-examined by MR. TAYLOR. The dates named in the warrant are 1881, 1883, 1886, 1887, 1890 and 1892—no specific company is mentioned—Clarke did not show disinclination to face investigation.

Re-examined. I also found at Tolmie's house, on paper headed "Association of Commercial Accountants and Auditors, President, Sir G. Campbell, Bart.," a letter to Messrs. Isaac Pitman, asking them to insert advertisements in the Phonetic Journal of an examination to be held on various commercial matters and foreign languages, signed by Tolmie.

By MR. LEVER. That letter had no envelope with post-marks upon it—I made no inquiry of Pitmans about it—I have heard Mr. and Mrs. Tolmie were carrying on a school of commerce; I do not know if it was at 38, Finsbury Pavement.

CHARLES RICHARDS . I am an inspector of the Criminal Investigation Department,—about three p.m. on 4th June I saw Tolmie and Morgan at 89, Great Marlborough Street, a picture gallery called the International Society of Literature, Science and Art—I had a conversation with them at the time—at 8.30 p.m. I spoke to Morgan in Piccadilly I called him by his name—I said I had a warrant for his arrest—he asked what it was about—I read it to him—he said, "That is a long way to go back; who is doing this?"—I said, "The Treasury solicitor is prosecuting"—he said, "What is it in connection with?"—I said, "The Literary and Artistic Union in Berners Street, and the society you ran in connection with that in Bloomsbury Mansions"—he said, "I don't know anything about them"—I then said, "There is also a Charing Cross Publishing Company, the City of London Publishing Company, the Authors' Alliance, the Artists' Alliance, and the one you are now carrying on is the International"—he said, "This will do me a lot of harm with the International"—I said, "If that is the society you represent it to be, and you will give me the names of some responsible persons in connection with it, I will see them before removing the documents and pictures to Scotland Yard"—he said, "I do not know whether I am doing right in saying anything without seeing my solicitor"—I said, "Whatever you say may be used in evidence against you"—he answered, "I thought so, and I shan't say any more"—I asked if he would give his address—he said, "Not till I have seen my solicitor"—I said, "I think you live at 38, Lynette Avenue"—he said, "Yes; that is right" and "This is a funny thing for the Public Prosecutor to do, as I have taken Mr. Wontner's advice on this matter, and

he is the Public Prosecutor, is he not?"—I said, "No, he is not; but he often appears for him at the Police-court"—he was taken to Bow Street Police-station by Sergeant Sexton—the same evening, about eleven, I saw Tolmie detained at Bow Street—I read the warrant to him—he answered, "I did not know Morgan in 1881"—I said, "No; I think your case begins with the Authors' Alliance, and goes through the Artists' Alliance and the present society"—he said, "The present society is a genuine one"—I said, "Very well, if you will give me the names of any responsible persons I will see them"—he said, "Oh, we can do that," and gave the name of Madame Dinnay D'Arc, West Square, Kennington—as I was about to write it he said, "Give me the paper, and I will write it for you"—he wrote it on this paper I am refreshing my memory from—I said, "Anyone else?"—he replied, "Yes," and turning to Morgan said, "We can give some more?"—Morgan replied, "No, we can't; not without our books"—Tolmie then returned this paper to me—the same night I went to 8, Barnard's Inn, Holborn—I there arrested Sir G. Campbell upon a warrant—I read the warrant to him—he said, "I suppose Labby has done this?"—I said, "I do not know why you should think so"—he said, "Oh, yes; he has been giving it to us in Truth lately; I do not know where I have benefited by these things"—I said, "You had some cheques from Morgan, and you held some shares in the Authors' Alliance"—he said, "I have had some cheques, but I never held any shares in the Authors' Alliance, and the present society is all right"—I then conveyed him to Bow Street, and he was charged with the other prisoners—they made no reply—on 4th July I saw Steadman at the back of the Police-court at Bow Street, detained—I said, "Steadman, I am Inspector Richards"—he said, "Oh, how do you do? I have seen your name in the papers in connection with this case. Look here, I should like to help you all I can in this matter, and I should like you to say this for me: I acted entirely under Morgan's directions in this matter, and he drew up all the agreements that I have used. And as for Longman and Co., he told me he had bought their business, and he had a banking account in that name at the British Mutual Bank"—I had been making inquiries with regard to the societies mentioned for three or four months prior to last June—on 30th March I went to the Marlborough Gallery; when I got inside the door I saw Tolmie—he said, "Yes sir, what do you require?"—I said, "I came in to look at the pictures"—he said, "Oh, are you a member?"—I said, "No, but I thought it was open to the public"—he replied, "Well, yes, but they are usually introduced by members"—Morgan then joined us, and said, "Are you an artist, sir?"—I said, Not exactly, but I am interested in societies of this kind, and I know of persons exhibiting here"—he then showed me the pictures and a diploma similar to one produced; there were about 500 of them—the diploma was signed by Morgan and Tolmie—I said, "Are you Mr. Morgan?"—he said "Yes"—I said, "Is that Mr. Tolmie?"—he said "Yes"—I then thanked him for showing me round, and he handed me circulars and a prospectus like those produced (one Pantheon)—while I was there a stranger called for a manuscript—Tolmie looked to Morgan, who said, "Oh, yes; it is in the hands of our readers"—amongst the works of art in the gallery was hanging Sir G. Campbell's commission in the 92nd Regiment, of the date of 8th June, 1862—the next time I called was to

arrest Morgan—I searched the gallery after Morgan's arrest, and found and now produce forty-eight letters from different persons complaining of the Artists' Alliance, and asking for the return of their pictures; a letter addressed to C. M. Clarke, Esq., Councillor, 38, Great Marlborough Street; a letter from a gentleman suggesting that he recognised Morgan's writing in connection with the Berners Gallery, Limited, and asking what had become of it, as he was a member; a letter from San Francisco in reference to a picture which had been sent, and which the society had promised to purchase; some letters asking for return of subscriptions, on the ground that the writers had mistaken W. J. Morgan for W. G. Morgan, a Birmingham artist—Morgan's replies are on the backs of those letters—a Birmingham subscriber got his subscription returned after correspondence—I also found prospectuses of the three kinds produced, a number of pictures in the gallery and in the room occupied by Du Bois as solicitor—there they were mixed with empty boxes, and appeared to have been thrown away—the size of the gallery was about forty to forty-five feet by twenty feet, or almost half as long as this Court, but not so high—the pictures in places were three thick on the wall, the smaller ones being behind; you could not see them—I found this minute-book (Exhibit 17) and this list of members (a small book), forms of application torn from the prospectuses—I added them together, I added the amounts, which came to £2,450—I do not know the writing or the 346 names in the list of members—I find, from the application forms, members were mainly proposed by Morgan and Tolmie, and a few by C. M. Clarke, LL. D.—the writing is not Dr. Clarke's, but Cock's, one of the assistant secretaries I found this draft letter to Truth, in Campbell's writing, and a copy written by Tolmie—(Read draft letter, 30th September, 1891,written on paper with the International heading, from 39, Great Marlborough Street, complaining of the personal attack of Truth upon the writer; also the following passage from Truth, of 21st October, 1891, being the concluding portion of the letter: "The names of the ladies and gentlemen who have joined the society, and who have taken no notice whatever of your Grub Street Sewage, are a sufficient guarantee for its position, without even your endorsement, and so Heave you, like some loathsome reptile, to swelter in your self-created garbage.—I am, sir, your obedient servant, G. Campbell—I also found two letters addressed C. M. Clarke, Marlborough Gallery, 16th January, 1892, asking for money to be returned, and from J. Elliot forwarding cheque for two guineas—I afterwards searched 38, Lynette Avenue—I found books and letters of complaint of the Berners Gallery, prospectuses of the Berners Gallery, Limited, in connection with the National Artistic Union; of the Literary and Artistic Union, in connection with the National Artistic Union; of the Junior Literary and Artistic Union, in connection with the National Artistic Union; and of the National Artistic Union, with the words written above it in ink, "The Artists' Alliance, successors to the National Artistic Union;" of the Authors' Alliance, with the name of their secretary, W. James; also letters addressed to W. James and Mrs. W. James, and envelopes (produced), dated in October, 1890; also bankers' pass-book of Authors Alliance with the Royal Exchange Bank; and W. J. Morgan's private account with the same bank, in both of which the names of Campbell, Tolmie, Clarke, and Tomkins appear; the name Bellamy is in the private

account; also agreement under which Morgan took over the business of 5, John Street, Adelphi, which had been carried on in the name of Bellamy, for £20—the business of Berington and Co. was carried on there—the agreement is dated 2nd June, 1887—I found applications addressed to Morgan to fill positions connected with the Authors' Alliance, a list of members of the Artists' Alliance, and of the International Society, published with it, by James Longman and Co., of 20, York Buildings, Adelphi; also note paper with the heading of "International Union of Art, Science, and literature," being an inversion of the similiar heading; and of the Theatrical Times and Musical Gazette, of 20, York Buildings, and of the Dramatic Opinion, 9 and 10, Southampton Buildings, and 59 and 60, Chancery Lane, which is the same building, only another entrance; beyond the paper headed "Association of Commercial Accountants and, Auditors, Metropole, Adelphi, Sir Q-. Campbell, President, "found at Tolmie's, I have not been able to trace the existence of such a society—I found a letter to Morgan from a lady in reference to the post of "Lady Superintendent of the Artists" Alliance," and Morgan's draft reply; also letters addressed to. "Alpha," and "Scribe"; a prospectus of the Traders' Times, proprietary capital £5,000, Mr. Morgan, manager, and a statement that he had been thirteen years manager of the Charing Cross Publishing Company; some note paper headed Literary Union, Bloomsbury Mansions; a printed prospectus of the Junior Conservative Alliance, of which David Tolmie, F. 8. A., was one of the council, instituted on 1st January, 1885, at 88,39, and 40, Temple Chambers; a copy of a printed letter pointing out reasons why shares should be taken in the City of London Publishing Company; a sketch of the Pantheon in Morgan's writing; specimens of letters sent to the public; the pass-book of the International Society with the British Mutual Bank; note paper of the Histrionic Herald, 59 and 60, Chancery Lane; of W. James and Co., of Frater's Magazine, 5, Friar Street; circulars of the Educational Directory, editor, David Tolmie, F. S. S. E; of the Amateur Authors' Association, and of the Society of Printers; an agreement between Morgan and Osmaston; two cheques for £2 2s. and £5 5s. on the account of the International Society, drawn by Morgan in favour of Campbell, dated 29th January, 1892, and 4th March, 1892, and endorsed by Campbell, and cancelled as having passed through the bank; the counterfoil of a cheque for £2 2s. on 26th August, 1891, payable to Campbell; this letter from Campbell to Morgan asking for £4 10s. to redeem a watch and chain; a prospectus of the Chilian Nitrate Property Syndicate, of which Campbell is trustee, and the office at Barnard's Inn; a cheque-book of counterfoils showing cheques paid to Tolmie in 1887; a cheque-book with cheques, signed Longman, in Morgan's writing; a number of letters addressed Thomas James, 8, Raeburn Street; a letter from Steadman to Morgan in an envelope, with the post-mark of 13th October, 1891, suggesting advertising for a person with a premium; a letter from a gentleman complaining that his name had been inserted in the National Artistic Union, and calling attention to Truth; a prospectus of the Literary Guild, of which the secretary and treasurer was Tomkins, 5, Friar Street; a cheque-book containing three cheques, amounting in the aggregate to £350, drawn by Morgan in favour of the National Artistic Union, and endorsed in his writing—I found at Campbell's rooms, Barnard's Inn, a framed

diploma of the International Society, signed by Hill, Morgan, and Tolmie; an envelope addressed Sir Gilbert Campbell, 39, Great Mari borough Street with the post-mark of November 4th, 1891; and a pawn-ticket for a gold watch and chain, pledged, the watch for £15 and the chain for £10.

Cross-examined by Morgan. I made no inquiry as to whether you acted on Steadman's suggestion, and put the advertisement in—I have had conduct of this case—I commenced to make inquiry in 1889

Cross-examined by MR. LREVEK. When I saw Tolmie detained he began to give me the name of a respectable French lady, and then he said to Morgan, "We can give more?" and Morgan said, "No; not without our books"—I only saw one certificate at the gallery; the only signatures on it were Morgan and Tolmie—I found there receipts signed "Tolmie," for commission received by him from the society from time to time—I did not find a book on double entry, or on book keeping, packed up to be sent to a subscriber-in Morgan's private banking account pass-book on October 6th, 1887, there is an entry of £3 3s. as paid to Tolmie, and on October 18th there are two cheques for £5, and £5 paid to Tolmie, and there is a cheque for £2 10s. to him: there are no other items entered as paid to Tolmie—on the opposite page, on October 18th, £2 and £8 making the same sum as the sums paid to Tolmie on that day are credited by cash-in the Authors' Alliance pass-book on June 1st, 1888, there is a cheque for £5 5s.; on September 21st £2-there are no other entries of sums paid to Tolmie—the name of Tolmie is written in full in that case opposite the amounts.

Cross-examined by MR. BONNER. This letter to Truth is not all in Campbells writing;—it is corrected in other writing—Campbell's commission as lieutenant appears to have been signed June 8th, 1862: he was gazetted on 25th August, 1859-1 seized a number of manuscripts I have not been able to ascertain that they belong to any other person than Campbell; they have not been claimed by anyone else-some, but not many, are in his writing; the others are typewritten—I have made inquiries, and satisfied myself he is an author.

By Morgan. I don't think this letter to Truth is in your writing—I commenced to make inquires about the Artists' Alliance in 1889 I cannot say that until May or June, 1892, I saw nothing upon which I could take action against you; I made reports upon it—I made inquiries at 5, Friar Street, but did not trace them back beyond Mr. Judd's buying the premises; I found you had been there before that, since 1873, for fifteen years—I could not say if you had been in continuous occupation all that time—I traced you to other places in the meantime that you had taken in addition-you left Friar Street in 1888-1 understood that the premises Were in the name of Tomkins but that you were with him all the time and that there had been nothing owing up to 1886—every thing was paid there up to 1886, and what was owing when you left in 1888 was Tomkins debt—I found that at Bloomsbury Mansions up to Christmas, 1882, I think, you had paid every farthing—on inquiring of the landlord I found he did not know whether you owed him anything or not—I found at Clapham that the rent had always been paid punctually there—I heard Price say that the rent at John Street had always been paid on the day it was due—I find now that rent was paid satisfactorily

—you paid all the rent at York Street, Adelphi, to which you next went—you had to leave there, like all the other tenants, because the lease had expired—the rent of 39, Great Marlborough Street I ascertained to be £150 a year—all rent had been paid there up to the time of your arrest—if I swore in my information that you were ejected from Berners Street Gallery in June, 1883, for non-payment of £20,1 believed it to be true—I alleged in my information that complaints were made by Miss Graham and Browse—I have not since heard that they had no cause for complaint—I heard it said here that the Charing Cross Publishing Company was constituted of a great many shareholders—I did not find out that that company published a large number of books—I have only seen one book-in connection with that company. (Mr. Keogh, a witness subpœnaed by Morgan, here produced a number of books)—I think we have had several complaints from authors who published through that company; I have no papers here containing them—I have had no notice to produce them—I did not take more than half the papers found at your house—I did not take a bond of the Authors' Alliance—I knew there was a concert to be held on 7th June at the gallery—I was not there—I found a grand piano at the gallery; I don't think it was new—I made no inquiry about it—I found an agreement between you and Bellamy, relative to Bevington and Co. 's business—Bevington was Bellamy.

Friday, September 23rd, 1892.

Morgan called the following witnesses.

EDMUND DAWSON ROGERS . I live at 4, Hendon Lane, Church End, Finchley—I am manager of the National Press Agency, White friars Street—in June, 1888, you sent me manuscripts of authors' work to print for the Authors' Alliance, Limited—you sent me two cheques, each for £15, in June and July, drawn by the Authors' Alliance, Limited, W. J. Morgan, manager—that was part payment for the work I had in hand—you also sent me paper to print the books upon—those were the only transactions we had.

Cross-examined by MR. MATHEWS. I do not know Morgan personally—that was the only time I knew him in business—I knew him as Morgan—I know nothing about W. James—I know nothing about the other prisoners—I know no other name connected with the Authors' Alliance.

Re-examined by Morgan. I don't think I ever saw you—I had the order from the traveller, and did the work, and had the cheque from the company.

WILLIAM RANSOM COOPER . I live at Woodlands, Clapham Park—I am an engineering student, and M. A. of the Royal University of Ireland—I am a member of the Artists' Alliance—I heard no complaints of the Alliance—I joined in April, 1890—I paid a subscription of £1 Is—I subsequently renewed my subscription in May or March this year—no subscriptions were taken last year.

Cross-examined by MR. MATHEWS. I have lived at Woodlands for the last two years, from 1890 to 1892—I never read Truth; I just heard there was something in it in connection with the Artists' Alliance; I had not enough time to read it—I went to the offices in the Adelphi; I don't know whom I saw there—I paid my subscription to Morgan, as far as I remember; I did so by letter, enclosing P. O.—I replied to a circular,

which had, as far as I remember, Morgan's name upon it as proposing me as a member, on one of these forms—I did not know him up to that time; as far as I remember he solicited me to become a member—I cannot say if his name was on the form; I believe it was—I cannot say if the premises were at York Street or John Street; they were in the Adelphi—I don't think I noticed what names were outside the door; I don't remember the name of James Longman and Co.—I heard and understood Sherwin's evidence in this case—I heard him say that one-third of the subscriptions which he solicited went to him, and two-thirds to Morgan—I cannot say I have any reasons for believing it—if that was the arrangement, I don't think I should still believe in the honesty of the Artists Alliance—although I paid no subscription in 1891 I remained a member for that year; the subscription was not asked for—I don't know if that is usual in honest societies; I should not have thought it was usual in dishonest societies; I thought it was an argument in favour of the genuineness of it—I had no intimation that I had ceased to be a member because my subscription was not paid—in 1892 I think I paid my subscription to Morgan, I cannot swear; I paid it then to the International Society; I thought the Artists' Alliance had been absorbed into that society—no one told me that; I suppose I got the idea from the prospectus, sent by Morgan as far as I am aware—I inferred it—Morgan sent the prospectus—he did not propose me—when I enclosed my subscription I said I supposed that would make me a member of the International—I have only seen Morgan the last few days, as far as I know—I have heard the agreement between Morgan and Steadman read, under which they proposed to divide the subscriptions received through Steadman's solicitations; I did not think it sounded very well or the society genuine—I never heard complaints against this society before this trial—I should not have paid my subscriptions to the Artists' Alliance, or to the International Society, if I had known that one was divided into thirds and the other into halves between Steadman and Morgan—I obtained no benefit from the societies—I don't know any of the members.

Re-examined. I exhibited a water-colour at the society—I did not sell it, but I did not attribute that necessarily to the fault of the society. (Morgan called the attention of the COURT to the fact that MR. MATHEWS had been mistaken inputting to the witness the fact that Sherwin had received a commission of one-third. MR. MATHEWS acknowledged that this was an error, and that he should have said Hill, instead of Sherwin)—there is no "proposed" on this form of application for the Artists' Alliance—to my knowledge there was no other form than this appearing on the prospectus—the Steadman agreement refers to the International Union, a different society to either the International Society or the Artists' Alliance—I should not have thought the International Society was not genuine on account of this agreement as to the International Union I think it might have shaken my belief in the society—if it was a wrong agreement, and had been abandoned, I think I should have thought it was an agreement that was not a good agreement—I did not pay my subscription in 1891, because I got a report from the Artists' Alliance stating that subscriptions paid during the year 1890 entitled members to the advantages offered for the whole of 1891—it appeared by the report that this offer was made to members to extend their subscription! because the society was a young one; members who had joined had had

to wait for the advantages offered—I thought it very probable that the Society and Alliance bad been incorporated—so far as I know I sent my subscription to you as officer of the society; I put your name on the postal order—I have never seen the ledger before.

FREDERICK KEOGH . I live at 88, Church Road, Islington, and am a pianoforte salesman, and act for the firm of E. Keogh and Co.—I produce forty books—I have not looked to see by whom they are published—they have been taken as part payment for expenses.

Cross-examined by MR. MATHEWS. Tomkins was my wife's tenant, occupying 96, Church Road, Islington, from 25th March, 1891, till June, 1892, when he owed me £14; £2 of the March quarter and the amount for. the June quarter—in June he was taken into custody, and I seized these books for expenses in getting possession of the house—we had to break open a grating at the back to get in—these books were in the house at the time.

Cross-examined by Tomkins. The quarter's rent had only just accrued at the time of your arrest, and the time had not arrived when, in the ordinary course, I should have applied for it—the previous quarters had been promptly paid, except £2 of the March quarter—that was not returned, by agreement, to meet the Queen's taxes; you said it was so—you had the house at £48 a year—I don't know where you were when I first distrained—there was not a friendly arrangement that I should hold these books for rent; it was for expenses—it was not arranged that on payment of the rent by a stipulated time I would give the books up.

THOMAS KING . I live at 16, North Road, New Cross—I have been a letterpress printer for about forty years—I have printed for you in connection with the Charing Cross Publishing Company and the International Society since 1875—those publishing companies have published a large number of magazines—I have printed some of them, and I have seen others in circulation which I have not printed, and which I believe were published by the company; I believe I printed all these copies of the St. James's Magazine—the printer's name is not on any of them, only the publisher's—the Charing Cross Publishing Company published them—I see here different numbers of the London and St. Leonards Magazine, the London and Brighton Magazine, and the London and Scarborough Magazine, published by the Charing Cross Publishing Company—I did not print them—this is a bundle of numbers of the Charing Gross Magazine, published by the Charing Cross Publishing Company—(Morgan produced a number of different books as published by the Charing Cross Publishing Company)—these purport to be published by that company—I printed some of them—I believe we printed about 2,000 copies of this "Tried and Approved Recipes, by a Lady"—in all cases where we printed books for the Charing Cross Publishing Company it was a real bona fide printing of an edition—the company always paid me very satisfactorily—these are copies of the St. George's Magazine, which purports to be published by the City of London Publishing Company, Unlimited—T have known you seventeen years; your general reputation has always been that of an honest and respectable man.

Cross-examined by MR. MATHEWS. When I first knew Morgan, about 1875, the Charing Cross Publishing Company was in existence at 5, Friar Street—that was wound up about February, 1880, I believe—Tomkins was secretary of the company—I saw him several times when I called at

the office there—I don't know if they lived there, or where they lived—I know nothing of the City of London Publishing Company; I did no business with it—my friendship with Morgan was kept up—the St. James's Magazine, which I printed for Morgan, was in existence before it came to me, and we printed it for about a year, or sixteen months, perhaps—I never heard that Morgan advertised for an editor for it, with a premium of £306—I don't know who the contributors to the magazine were—I know the City of London Publishing Company was one of Morgan's ventures—I believe he was associated with Tomkins in it—I believe it was wound up; I don't know when—I did not know he was putting forward the prospectus of the National Artistic Union—I knew him all the time, but I did not know he was putting forward the Literary and Artistic Union at Berners Street—I only knew he was associated with Tomkins in the Charing Cross and City of London Publishing Companies—I only knew Tomkins as associated with Morgan in those businesses—I did not know they left Berners Street and Friar Street in debt for rent—I did not know Morgan was trading as Bevington and Co. in John Street, Adelphi, in 1887—my acquaintance with him was kept up casually—I should shake hands with him if I met him, and so forth; he was still Morgan to me—I did not know he was promoting the Authors' Alliance at the end of 1887; he came to me in 1887 or 1888 for an estimate for printing for the Authors' Alliance, but my estimate was too high, unfortunately, and I did not get the job—I only knew him as Morgan—I never heard of him as Mr. W. James, the secretary of the Authors' Alliance; I should be surprised to hear it; I don't know that if I had known it it would have induced me to think he was not a honest and respectable man; there are many reasons why he might have a nom de plume—I don't mean that he should put it on the prospectus which he was issuing to the public; I don't think a man would be justified in doing that, nor in figuring as a director on the same prospectus in the name of W. J. Morgan—his appearence in the double capacity would be likely to shake my confidence unless it was explained—I did not know of the Artists' Alliance—I went to York Buildings when he was carrying on business there—I saw the name of James Longman on the outside—I did not know Morgan was James Longman and Co., who I thought was another tenant in the same building, and quite distinct from the Artists' Alliance; that was the impression left on my mind—if I had known Morgan was that company I should very likely have asked him a question about it, as I was going in on business then—I did not know him as connected with the International Union—I knew him next at York Street as connected with the International Society, which I believe was a development of a previous society, whether the Union or not I cannot say—I got an order from him at Marlborough Street to print prospectuses, note headings, letter-headings, cards of admission to the gallery, and concert bills for various concerts—we printed about 20,000 prospectuses a month, I should think—sometimes my attention was called to them to look at printers' errors; I know they were different; as they got new members the front page was changed—I did not notice the Executive Council was constantly changing; I know the members were—I knew Morgan throughout the whole of the time between 1880 and 1890; we were not on visiting terms, but when we met we shook hands—I did not know him as advertising for secretaries in connection with the Authors' Alliance

and International Society with premiums, or for a registrar with premium for the Authors' Alliance—I think I saw an advertisement for artists to appear at an International Society concert—I have only known Tolmie since I met him at the Marlborough Gallery in association with Morgan—Tomkins was not there, to my knowledge—I did not see Clarke or Campbell—I saw Steadman at York Buildings; a portrait of him there drew my attention to him—I know nothing about them being in Chancery Lane—I was present at Bow Street occasionally when this case was on; I have not been in this court—my opinion of Morgan remains unchanged—I have read one or two accounts in the papers of the proceedings here, but they have been very meagre, and I could form no opinion from them.

Re-examined. I know that the St. James's Magazine was very well written, but I could not say from memory who the authors were—my impression is that Friar Street was only used as an office—I understood the St. James's Magazine had been printed for some time before I had the printing of it; we took it over from another printer—I know no one who new you as Bevington and Co.—I cannot call to mind any alteration in the International Society's prospectus' except as to some of the names; I believe there was no other change; when I took to printing it the smaller size was changed to the larger—I did not print the first lot; we always printed them the same size—I printed the Pantheon, nearly 20,000 copies I believe—I called frequently at the Marlborough Gallery, sometimes daily; I never saw Steadman there—I met him once in the street outside—all my transactions with the society were perfectly satisfactory—I mean by that that I was always paid, except as to the last accounts, which were stopped in consequence of this prosecution.

ERNEST WALLIS . I am a solicitor, of 13, King Street, City, and live at Croyland House, Shedderton Road, Hornsey Rise—I have known you since 1874—at that time I was managing clerk to Messrs. Farmer and Robins, solicitors, of Pancras Lane—Mr. Farmer is now dead, and Mr. Robins is in Australia—they acted professionally for the Charing Cross Publishing Company in several actions—I was admitted as a solicitor in 1881, and I have acted personally for the City of London Publishing Company, Limited—I remained with Mr. Robins after he dissolved partnership with Mr. Farmer—both those companies published a large number of different magazines; I have seen different magazines in the office—all these books are published by the City of London Publishing Company, Limited; they are separate copies of different works—lean only speak as to the time you were in the City (after you left Friar Street I saw very little of you); but your general reputation among all those who knew you was that of an honest and respectable man.

Cross-examined by MR. MATHEWS. At one time I was a solicitor at 11 and 12, Southampton Buildings, Chancery Lane; I bought the late Mr. Plater'8 practice there, and was alone—I am not in practice with Mr. Avory at 13 and 14, King Street, City—at Southampton Buildings I was next door to 59 and 60, Chancery Lane, where the Authors' Alliance was carried on—I never heard anything against Morgan—I do not know how he came to leave 59 and 60, Chancery Lane; I do not know of a distress being put in, except from what I have heard in Court during the last few days—J have not heard the whole case; I have been in about two

hours a day—I heard about the distress and the sale of furniture in January, 1889, and about £46 being due in relation to the premises, but I did not, and I do not know now, that it was in connection with Morgan; I thought it was the Authors' Alliance—I never went to the premises—I have known Morgan personally since 1874—Tomkins I knew before that—Tolmie and Clarke I have only known in Morgan's company—I did not know Campbell or Steadman—I have not seen Tolmie and Clerke with Morgan at Chancery Lane, but in the public streets, Holborn, for instance—I know nothing about the Authors' Alliance—I gave Morgan a reference in connection, I think, with premises in John Street or York Buildings—this is the reference I gave on 28th November, 1889. (This was on paper with a heading "Solicitor and Commissioner, 11, Pancras Lane" crossed out, and "11 and 12, Southampton Buildings" written in; it stated that he had known Morgan for a considerable number of years, and believed he was well able to pay the rent mentioned, and would be a respectable tenant; it was addressed to Messrs. Gardiner and Son)—I am still a Commissioner—I did not know Morgan owed rent when he left Chancery Lane—I made no inquiry—I did not assume it was Morgan's office there; I did not know he had any office there—I did not know he was going to start the Artists' Alliance—he never told me anything about it—I never heard of the distress; I lived next door; it is a very large building—I did not know that Morgan under this reference got possession of 9, John Street—I never went there to see him—I might have seen him once a year after that date—I never knew he had made default in payment of rent—I do not know that in June, 1890, his landlord turned him out, owing to complaints he received, and screwed up the door—I knew Morgan when he was at York Buildings—I met him in the Strand one evening, and he took me into his office there—I did not see the name of Longman there; Morgan went in first and opened the door—he did not mention why he had left the address for which I had given him the reference, and I made no remark about it—our acquaintance continued in the same way during 1890 and 1891; I meeting him about once a year—on 11th March, 1891, I was applied to as a reference for opening a banking account with the British Mutual Bank; I gave it. (This was read; it stated that he believed Morgan could make himself a desirable customer)—I gave that without inquiry as to the leaving of John Street—I have no recollection of being applied to by Mr. Warren to become a reference as to the International Society—I was never, to the best of my belief, applied to by anyone who was going into Morgans service to know if he was a respectable person, as they were going to pay him a premium—I will swear I was never personally applied to, and to the best of my belief I never gave a written reference of that sort—I should not have given it without inquiry that he was a safe man to pay a premium to, for the reason that I had not seen him lately.

Re-examined. I have had no reason for altering my good opinion of you, but not having seen you recently I would not have done that without proper inquiry—I heard in Court the other day that the Authors Alliance, Limited, was the tenant of Southampton Buildings and Chancery Lane—that name and not yours I saw painted up in the doorway I did not hear in Court that the rent of the premises for which I was reference was duly paid by you—I heard part of the evidence of the

clerk from the Mutual Bank—I did not hear him state that the bank was perfectly satisfied with the accounts which you had opened.

By the COURT. I saw Morgan about once a year when he was connected with the International Society—I was never consulted when the prospectus was drawn up—I cannot explain how the mention of the society being instituted under an Act of Parliament came about—I did not advise it—I have never seen a prospectus.

WILLIAM HENRY CRANEY . I live at 58, Fairholt Road, Stoke Newington, and am a surveyor—I produce on subpoena seventeen different books published by the City of London Publishing Company, Limited—in 1880 I was in partnership with Mr. Robert Edwards, an accountant, at 4, Broad Street Buildings, and at that time the business was introduced to ns of voluntarily winding up that business—Mr. Edwards was appointed one of the liquidators by a resolution passed by the Company—to the best of my knowledge that Company did a large legitimate business—I know it published a large number of magazines, and I should think a great many novels, in one, two, and three volumes, and other kinds of books—that Company was subsequently succeeded by the City of London Publishing Company, Unlimited; here are some of the books—I made your acquaintance in connection with the liquidation, and have known you intimately since—I don't know if the limited company was voluntarily wound up in 1884; these books were all published by the City of London Publishing Company, without the limited—your general reputation among your friends and neighbours has always been that of an honest and respectable man—I know nothing about the balance-sheet and report of the Charing Cross Publishing Company—I remember from having seen the account books of that company that such names as Simpkins and Marshall, Mudie, W. H. Smith and 8on, Willing and Co., Hamilton and Kent, appeared in the Company's books as customers buying books from you.

Cross-examined. For about the last twelve years I have known Morgan intimately—I have not been in Court, but I have read the evidence in this case in the newspaper. Q. Did he deserve the reputation of a respectable man at the end of 1889 in your opinion? A. I don't see any difference—I have not read all of Sherwin's evidence—I have read Hill's—I have read of the division of subscriptions paid to the society between Hill and Morgan—that has in no way affected my opinion as to Morgan's reputation; I cannot say about other persons—I have heard of advertisements asking for people with premiums, and promising them large salaries—very likely that is all right—I do not say that anybody who paid a premium would be all right—Morgan was doing the very best he possibly could under the circumstances, and there is not the slightest doubt that his intentions were perfectly honest—the knowledge of these facts does not affect my opinion as to his being an honest and respectable man; I think he was doing the best he could for those he employed—I don't know how he was benefiting subscribers by dividing subscriptions between himself and Hill—I do not know that he left Berners Street, Friar Street, and Chancery Lane debt; I have had nothing to do with these various offices; to know a man it does not follow that you know his place of business—I have no knowledge of any of these transactions; I know of Friar Street, because these books were published there—I did not know Morgan in connection

with the Authors' Alliance or the Artists' Alliance, or the International Society—I became acquainted with him when he was the Charing Cross Publishing Company—only one or two of the business boob of the Company were brought to my office—my partner, who was a liquidator, lives at Highgate—he was conversant with the business of the society—I don't know if he is here—I had nothing to do with the liquidation except that I was a partner with Edwards—our partnership is now dissolved—I do not know why I, and not my partner who knew about these matters, was called here.

Re-examined. Mr. Edwards's address is 105, Chetwynd Road, Highgate, I think—as a business man I should think from the evidence of Hill that the one-third he received was as commission for the work he did—I read that Hill said he had paid £50 for the appointment, and that he was satisfied with you and the society—having heard all these people say they were satisfied, I did not regard your obtaining premiums for appointments as damaging to your character—I did not read Mr. Judd's evidence, that you did not owe him one penny when you left Friar Street, or that it was Tomkins who had that house.

MOWBRAY ERNEST CATTELL . I live at 53, Harrington Street, Hampstead Road—I am now a canvassing agent for the London, Edinburgh, and Glasgow Insurance Company—I have a large experience in hanging pictures—I was the hanger engaged by the International Society of Literature, Science and Art, to unpack and hang the pictures of members of the Artists' Alliance and International Society, at the Marlborough Gallery—I received this letter signed "Morgan, Curator," engaging me on behalf of the society—I went for a week, and then was told I suited the society, and was engaged as hanger and remained on as a permanent servant—since that time I have hung pictures of members of the Alliance and the society—part of my duties was to pack carefully and return the unsold pictures when required by members and fellows—I have had such orders direct from the members, or Morgan has given me orders to return pictures—I had to enter those cases in the society's parcels book—when members or fellows desired their pictures returned they always were returned—I know pictures were properly hung in the exhibition; there were between 400 and 500 of them—endeavours were made week by week to sell pictures by distributing hundreds of free tickets of admission to the gallery—the tickets were sent to people living in fashionable neighbourhoods, to the aristocracy—sales were made, and the pictures so sold were sent to the buyers—I took them in some instances—the money for them was remitted to the authors—it was part of my duty to send the cheques off; I directed the envelopes, and put the inclosures in; I have seen the cheques—the gallery was properly adapted for the exhibition and sale of pictures, and had a good skylight; I should say the gallery, except as to height, would cover nearly three parts of this Court; it was about sixty feet long by twenty-five feet wide—these two boards were hung conspicuously outside the door, one on each side, on the railings every morning, with the names of the Artists' Alliance and of the International Society of Literature, Science, and Art, and the "Marlborough Gallery" on the top in gold—the gallery was on the ground floor—so far as I could see, the business of the society was conducted in a straightforward and business-like manner—you and the other officers of the society, Mr. Tolmie,

Miss Kingham, and (until he left) Mr. Roden Pearce were in daily attendance—Mr. Hill called there almost daily—Mr. Du Bois was there; he had an office there—members of the council used to meet at the gallery at the council meetings once a month, or sometimes oftener—I hare daily seen the minute-book, membership and fellowship roll, day-book, ledger, cash-book, and postage-book—I saw the original minute-book of the society up to the beginning of May, until it was lost in the omnibus—I have heard members who called say they were pleased at the work done by the society; several expressed their pleasure at seeing the gallery—fifteen or twenty members were calling every week, apart from the general public—I knew they were members by bringing cards of admission—if they had not got a card I should have had asked for it if I had been there—concerts were given at high-class West-end concert halls by the society, and members and fellows of the society engaged to sing and play at them—it was the object of the officers to get the honorary members and fellows to attend those concerts, and circulars were sent inviting them to attend at half-price—once a month the pictures were rearranged and rehung, some pictures having been sold and taken away, and fresh works having come in—to my knowledge the pictures were not hung two or three deep, one over the other—Richards said it was so; it is not true—the only foundation for the statement is that a few days or perhaps a fortnight before the arrest, a large picture "Alexander in the Tents of Darius" was sent by Mr. Massey from Newcastle, and there was no room for it except at the end of the gallery, and it was put on the floor there and covered others—Mr. Massey said he thought it was an old master, and sent it for us to obtain an expert's opinion upon it—it was only placed there temporarily till the opinion was obtained—apart from that every picture in the gallery could be seen—they were all properly catalogued in this catalogue, which I made myself—one old painting was placed in a small closet, a disused w. c, used as a storeroom, leading out of Mr. Du Bois' room; it had come by rail and was damaged, and I put it there until it had been repaired—to my knowledge no pictures were out of the way except that one—I should have known it—downstairs in the lower gallery, in the basement, the musical department, there were twenty to twenty-five pictures—that basement was properly boarded, and had a glass ceiling, and the light was almost as good downstairs as upstairs—the pictures there were some set out and some waiting packed up to go back—none were thrown away downstairs—I had often seen you put the account books of the society in your black bag in the evening when leaving—you said you were going to work upon them at home, as you had had no time during the day; and you said you did as much work at home with the books as at the gallery—you were interrupted at the gallery by callers—up to the beginning of May I saw the books there every day—I remember advertisements being inserted in the papers about the lost books—I believe one officer called while I was out one day—copies of the Pantheon containing an invitation to a meeting of fellows and members, on 25th May, were sent to members—as forms of applications came in they were numbered and placed on a table with others—I have read some of the application forms so signed and filed, and found they corresponded with the names on the prospectus—when I was there first there

was a needlework department for art needlework, which was carefully shaken and dusted and covered up at night when the gallery was closed; in short, every care was taken of the members and fellows' work sent in for exhibition and sale—members of the Alliance and of the Society were treated with equal consideration at the exhibitions, no difference was made between them—I never heard of your representing yourself as James Longman and Co.—I saw no business done by that firm—I did not know anything of you at York Buildings—I had a card with the name "W. James" on it left one day to give to you as you were out; I gave it to you, and you asked me what sort of a person he was to the best of my recollection—Sir Gilbert Campbell's commission was hung in the musical department on a place for a gas bracket; it was not in the gallery.

Cross-examined by MR. MATHEWS. I gave Mr. James's card to Morgan; I never saw it again—I am positive the gentleman who called with it was distinct from Morgan—I know Morgan's writing, and have seen his figures from time to time in different books—I should say each of these four letters, addressed to Mr. James, 8, Raeburn Street, Brixton, is endorsed with the date of their receipt in his writing—Morgan's private address, where he used to take the books home, was 38, Lynnett Avenue, Brixton—this letter is addressed, James, 38, Lynnett Avenue—I still say that another person left the card—Morgan took home all the books but the ledger and cash-book; he left two at the gallery—I have seen him take those two home, but they were the two most frequently left—I cannot say I have seen him take all at the same time; I never looked particularly—all the books were not missing from the gallery—this minute-book was bought after the old one was finished and lost; I know nothing of when this minute was made in it—Hill was secretary of the International Society—Locke and Houston called there; Tolmie was there every day—Stone came there—they were officers of the Society—I was never at a council meeting, but I was in the gallery when it was held—it was held once a month, or sometimes once in three weeks—Morgan, Tolmie, Stone, and Houston attended the meetings; they were all I can call to mind—I saw Campbell there once, some time at the beginning of March this year, I should say; he called to see Morgan, but Morgan was not there—I only had one complaint about the pictures, and that was my fault because I did not forward one—I heard one gentleman ask for a manuscript to be returned; but I heard no complaint; I was downstairs principally—there were two parcel-books, an old and new one, in which everything sent out was entered; they would show the pictures I returned—I have enclosed cheques to various people—I only saw three pictures sold there from 3rd February to 4th June—I sent one cheque to Mr. Mortimer, I believe about the middle of May, I should say—the cheque was given me to enclose in an envelope with a communication—cheques were sent to a number of other people, not to artists—all the works that came under my notice were in admirable condition—this (produced) was downstairs in the lower gallery behind a portfolio—that and these were not exhibited, and I know nothing of them, they were simply put on one side in a port folio in the lower gallery—there was an accident to this terra-cotta exhibit—I believe it was in the place where the packing-cases were—to the best of my belief there were no pictures there as if they had been

thrown away among the packing-cases, they were all in portfolios—I have since heard of a picture, in the disused w. c, which was alleged to have been covered up by a Guardian Fire notice, but I never saw it till I saw it here—I saw by the prospectus that there was an educational department, and that examinations were held—no examinations to my knowledge were held during the time I was there—I don't know who the examiners were—I cannot say whether a register of professors, governesses, and private tutors was kept—no operation in connection with the purchase, sale, or transfer of scholastic business came under my knowledge; I was the hanger in the artistic department—we had many pictures sent to us to forward to other London and provincial galleries; I have taken pictures to the Dudley and to the Institute of Lady Water Colour Painters, and pictures went to the Institute of Water Colours—Miss Kingham was in charge of the musical department after Mr. Roden Pearce left—no concert was given at Marlborough Gallery during my time; there were some given at other places—Mrs. Alcock's concert was before I went there—Mr. Du Bois conducted his solicitor's business in the room running out from the gallery, and distinct from it, and leading out of his room was the disused w. c.—there were two entrances into his room, one from the gallery and one from the passage; but one was fixed by the bookcase in front of it—in Mr. Du Bois' room the council meetings were held after he had left for the day—sometimes he left at twelve o'clock, but usually it was three or half past three—I have seen a council meeting at two, and later; it depended on whether Mr. Du Bois' room was disengaged; he always had previous notice of a meeting—I cannot say where the educational or literary department was carried on—I read in the prospectus that they were branches—I did not take the liberty of asking—I could not say if anything was done in connection with those branches—I did not know Morgan was trading as Longman, at York Buildings, at this time; I never went there—I understand there had been offices there, but I did not know that he still had offices there——if I was there it would be my duty to ask visitors to the gallery, for their cards of membership; the gallery was open to a limited number of the public; it Was said to be open to the public—I asked for cards of membership because I had to make a list of all callers and give it to Morgan—I did not take names and addresses—Morgan engaged me, and I received my salary from him—I don't know if he was the International Society; I did not go into the working of it; it was enough for me to get my money.

Re-examined. I took it you paid me as the officer of the society in the same way as you paid others—I have posted letters you have written, and proofs you have sent to authors—I have taken to General Abbot, at the Bath Hotel, Piccadilly, proofs of a book being published by the literary department, I believe—I did not know that Tolmie was manager of the educational department—I have seen examination papers lying on the table at times—I can say, from seeing papers, that work was done in those departments—I have no more knowledge as to those matters than by taking proofs and seeing papers—I did not see the amount of the cheque sent to Mr. Alexander Mortimer; I. should think it was before May—here is an entry in the pass-book on March 1st, Alexander Mortimer, £5 18s. 6d.; I do not know what commission you charged—I

was always under the impression that these dusty pictures did not belong to any member or fellow of the society; the pictures belonging to them were properly numbered and catalogued—I heard Mr. Du Bois say yesterday that he had covered up this picture—I am certain Mr. James called and left his card and asked for it to be given to you.

FRNCIS WILLIAM SLADE . I live at 26, Enmore Road—I am a Director of the Isle of Wight Railway Company, and of two other rail way companies—I am a member of the International Society-in December, 1891, I attended one of the concerts of the International Hall—I was pleased with it, considering that it was carried on by members of the society—I understood that all the artists were members of the society; I knew no one connected with the society but yourself; and that was the only occasion I availed myself of my membership—in June, 1891, before I became a member, I purchased two members' pictures—on 6th June, 1891, I received a letter from Steadman, the secretary, inviting me to become a fellow, and a prospectus, and I called at the gallery to see what the company was represented by—up to that time I had not heard of the society—I called; and considered the society respectable—I saw you and bought two pictures—you said a good deal in favour of the society, and made yourself very pleasant, and I said I would consider whether I should become a fellow or member; I said I had a son, a student at King's College in the art class; and you recommended that he should become a junior member at half-a-guinea—I said I would consider that, and on 17th June I became a member and sent this cheque for £11 1s. 6d. to your order in your capacity as curator, for myself and my son—I joined because I thought it might be useful to my son to exhibit a picture there—I think that this cheque has been passed through * the British Mutual Bank—I afterwards received another letter from Steadman, asking me to become a fellow; I took no notice of it—I knew nothing of the society beyond the prospectus.

Cross-examined. I sent Morgan, as curator, a cheque for seven guineas for the two pictures I bought on 9th August, 1891; one picture was £5 5s., and the other £2 2s.—I had nothing to do with the society after I joined, till I went to the concert in December, 1891; I received a letter enclosing two tickets, and afterwards I was applied to for the money.

Re-examined. I have no doubt that this is the programme of the conceit—I congratulated you after the concert, and said that, considering the artists wore members of the society, I thought it was a very good concert.

CATHERINE ELLIS I am single, and live at 4, Conehurst Road, Crouch End—I am a member of the Artists' Alliance—I exhibited at the gallery—in August, 1891, they sold a picture for me; the catalogue price was two guineas; the society was entitled to charge a commission of five per cent, on sales, and I received a cheque for £1 19s. 11d., which I acknowledged—another of my pictures was sold for 25s., I think; I received the money for it—I have no reason to complain of the society or its officers.

Cross-examined. The second picture was sold at the beginning of this year, I think—I know nothing of Morgan beyond what I have heard of him as being curator.

FREDERICK THOMAS TIPPER . I live at Mornington Road, Leytonstone

—I am a member of the International Society—I paid my subscription in January this year, I think—since then I have appeared at two concerts for the society, and two for Mr. Pearce, an officer of the society—I have always received my agreed fee for singing and playing—I have nothing to complain of.

Cross-examined. I had a guinea for one concert and half-a-guinea for another; those were the only two occasions; they were a week apart.

ISABEL WATER . I live at Defoe Road, Tooting—I am a singer, and a member of the International Society—at various times I have called at the gallery about musical matters, about concerts to be held, and so on—I have always been satisfied with your conduct of the society; you were always polite and willing to do anything I wished—I was to have sung at a concert on the 7th June.

MABEL MOYLE . I live at Church Street, Kensington, and am a professional singer and a member of the International Society—I sang for the society at a recital at the Steinway Hall on 27th January—I was paid my fees—I know nothing about your management of the society; I did not know you were manager.

Cross-examined. I paid my subscription; I got fifteen shillings for singing.

Re-examined. I was, comparatively speaking, a recent member of the society; I hoped for further engagements.

DELIA ALGURO . I live at 20, Freegrove Road, West Holloway—I am a professional singer—I paid a guinea, to become a member of the International Society; I am perfectly satisfied with your conduct of the society; you treated me very kindly—I sang at one of the concerts; I did not expect to be paid—nothing was due from the society to me.

SIDNEY BLAKISTONE . I live at 14, Beacon Hill, Camden Road—I am a professional musician—I am a member of the International Society—I played at the society's concert at the Prince's Hall on February 2, 1892—I received my fee of one guinea—I was to have played without a fee at a concert to be given at the society's gallery on June 7th with a view of introducing active to wealthy honorary members, I was told.

ALEXANDER MORTIMER . I live at Blenheim Cottage, and am an artist—I was a member of the Artists' Alliance—I exhibited at the gallery—a picture was sold, and I received a cheque for £5 18s. 6d.—the society was entitled to charge five per cent, commission.

KATHERINA ALBRECHT . I live, at 35, Mornington Crescent, Regent's Park—I am a professor of music—my daughter was a member of the International Society—I have always accompanied my daughter to the gallery; we called there many times; you treated us with politeness, and attended to what we wanted—I was so satisfied that, being desirous of giving a matinee musicale on June 18th, at which my daughter was to perform; I entrusted the whole of the musical arrangements to you—it had to be abandoned in consequence of this prosecution—the council of the society offered me the free use of the gallery for the purpose, including gas and attendance—with your assistance this programme was prepared.

LILY ALBRECHT . I live at 35, Mornington Crescent, Regent's Park—I am a well-known professional pianist, I think—I am a member of the International Society—I have several times visited the gallery—you

showed every attention and kindness—I was engaged to play on 11th December at an evening concert at the International Hall, Piccadilly—I played, and it was most successful—I gave my services in hopes of getting introduced into members' houses.

HERBERT CHARLES STONE . I live at 17, Ashchurch Road, Shepherd's Bush—I am an English timber valuer—I was a member of the council of the International Society from September, 1891, till the arrest—council meetings were held every month; business was conducted regularly at them—an agenda paper was prepared, which you handed to the chairman—the members of the council made suggestions and discussed matters, and the suggestions were put and adopted or rejected—Campbell was chairman up to December, and after that Tolmie was elected chairman for 1892—the minutes of the previous meeting were always read and confirmed and signed by the chairman—I, as a member of the council, had confidence in you, and so far as I know the councillors as a body had confidence in you—I recognised you as manager of the society in everything, all the time I was there—the council knew you received the moneys—I don't doubt you did so on their authority—no authority was given when I was there; it may have been given before—your signature was on all cheques for work done as a member of the council, and for canvassing letters—I wrote letters—I received no payment as member of the council, there were no directors' fees, but I received payment for writing letters soliciting subscriptions—I was paid £1 for 300 letters, and 15 per cent, commission by you—I believe whenever I received payment by cheque it was always signed with the stamp of the society, W. J. Morgan, curator sometimes I was paid by cash—between September, 1891, and the arrest I made an average of about £2 per week—I was a member of the society before September, 1891; not of the council; I was first connected with the society about the beginning of April, 1891, as assistant secretary—I got then £1 for 300 letters, and 15 per cent, commission—I was promoted from assistant-secretary to member of the council without any additional remuneration—I only heard of the International Union from papers sent; I knew nothing of its existence.

Cross-examined. Morgan, Hill, Houston, and Tolmie attended the council meetings; Steadman and Locke did not—Campbell attended down to Christmas, 1891, as chairman—I have given the names of all who attended the council; more names were on the prospectus—from April, 1891, I only know who were on by the prospectus; but from September, 1891, I attended sometimes—I was engaged as assistant secretary by Morgan, after I answered an advertisement some time in March, 1891—I paid £20 premium to Morgan, £10 before engagement and the other £ 10 within a short time—I had nothing to do with the books, and know nothing about them; I do not remember the existence of them or the loss of them—I was at first described on the prospectus as assistant secretary, and afterwards as upon the executive council—I had no agreement with Morgan about writing 300 letters a day, only a letter explaining the duty—I cannot find that letter—all the money received in answer to my letters would go to Morgan—when Morgan paid me by cheque it would be a cheque from the society sometimes, and sometimes his own—I dont remember his paying me occasionally by the cheques for £1 1s. and £2 2s., received through the post—I suppose the

cheques it had would appear in the society's' accounts—some of the cheques were with the stamp of the International Society for April, 1891—I do not know that the society's banking account was opened only in August, 1891—I believe I had cheques from Morgan in his own name—I understood he was authorised by the society to receive every penny that came, and he paid everything that had to be paid, so far as I know—I cannot suggest any way in which the council controlled him.

Re-examined. I was not paid by the cheques of members paying subscriptions—I was not present at all the council meetings, and other members might have attended meetings when I was not there—I have seen some books on the table, but I did not take notice of them.

Monday, 26th September.

H.C. STONE (Re-examined by Morgan). I do not think I have regretted paying you the £20 premium—you always fulfilled your engagements with me honestly and faithfully, and always acted honourably to me.

MARY JANE HARRIET FAULKNER . I live at 24, Oppidan Road, Primrose Hill—I am single—I am a professional singer, and tolerably well known—I am a member of the International Society—I think the concert was successful, with an appreciative audience—I was to have sung at a concert to be held on the 7th June last—I have always received attention when I have called at the gallery with a view to getting engagements.

Cross-examined. I can't remember exactly when the concert that was held took place—I was not paid for my services—I was not supposed to be—I did not expect a fee on that occasion—I paid to become a member of the society.

By the COURT. I undertook to give my services gratuitously as a member—public appearance at good concerts is an advantage for. singers; it is an advertisement.

HENRY HILL HODGSON . I carry on business at 115, Chancery Lane as a book auctioneer—I am the senior partner—I live at 208, Anerleys Road, Norwood—we receive for sale a great many remains or surplus copies of books published by the large London publishers—I have several times received considerable consignments on account of the Charing Cross Publishing Company and the City of London Publishing Company for sale; I may say sixty or seventy lots—this catalogue, containing lots 865 to 981, is one of the consignments sent by the Charing Cross Publishing Company—it is nearly twelve years ago—the name of Morgan or Tomkins is on the top in your handwriting—I cannot charge my memory whether they realised over £100—this (produced) is an account of the transactions for the year 1878 with the Charing Cross Publishing Company—it is £18 14s. 9d. to Christmas, 1878—it includes two accounts, amounting together to £37.

Cross-examined. These are copies of the accounts supplied by us, Morgan's name appears on both, and to him the amount realised was paid.

Re-examined. They are extracts from my books—I put your name as manager of the company—I understood you were secretary or manager, I am not sure which.

MAJOR-GENERAL JOHN BATES . I am of the Indian Army, retired from the Staff Corps, and reside at 17, Hill Grove, Finchley Road—I was a

director of the City of London Publishing Company—I qualified for that position by applying for and paying for fifty £1 shares in the capital of the company—Major-General Scobell and Mr. Douglas Onslow, J. P., were also directors; I was chairman—General Scobell, I believe, held 600 shares, and Mr. Onslow 100—the board meetings were regularly held—at the end of 1884 the company resolved to wind up voluntarily—the company published a number of books, and, I think, a magazine periodically—I believe proper books of accounts were kept and submitted to the board—a catalogue of several hundred books was published.

Cross-examined. I do not remember the year in which I becames director; it was about a year or two before it was wound up—I became a director and chairman at the same time—I rather think Major-General Bates and Mr. Onslow were directors before me—I believe we three constituted the board—Morgan was manager and Tomkins secretary at first the meetings were held in Hart Street, Bloomsbury—I do not remember when we moved to 5, Friar Street; some few months afterwards the company was wound up, when we left Friar Street; we did not move to a new address; we did not move to New Bridge Street—I am not quite sure where the actual meeting took place for the winding up—I know we had meetings elsewhere—there was a meeting with a view of winding up, calling for a general meeting; it was necessary to invite all the shareholders to attend—I cannot remember how many did attend; it was not largely attended it would be entered in the register—I have no recollection of a memorandum of agreement under which Morgan and Tomkins sold the two properties to the City of London Publishing Company—I do not know the name of Robert Andrews; as far as I know this is the first time I have heard that name in connection with this company—I do not know that £1,000 was to be paid to Morgan and Tomkins, or that they were to be manager and secretary for five years, at a salary of £300 a year each—I am not a director of any other company at present I have been a director of many companies that have ceased; none of the companies have done well—I was never a director of more than two or three—I was not chairman of any but this.

Re-examined. The registered offices of the company were never moved, to my knowledge—I don't know what the office was in Hart Street; we used to meet there, and subsequently in Friar Street—when the liquidation was resolved upon, as far as I am aware, the whole thing was taken to the liquidator's office; that was the usual course, and the directors ceased to have anything to do with the company—as chairman I should undoubtedly see the memorandum of agreement at the time, but I hare no recollection of it.

By MR. MATHEWS. We got fees two or three times, I think, that was all; a guinea each attendance, something of that kind.

By the COURT. The City of London Publishing Company was hopelessly insolvent in 1884, when it was voluntarily wound up; there were no funds—after it was wound up I did not take the slightest interest in it—I knew nothing of the sale to the Authors' Alliance; this is the first I have heard of it.

EMILY JONES . I am single—I live at 5, John Street, Adelphi; I am housekeeper there, and was so in 1886—I was subpœnaed in this case by the Treasury, but never called—in 1886 a Mr. Bellamy took two

rooms there as offices, and carried on business as Bevington and Co., publishers—he left in June, 1887—I never saw you there during the whole of that time or afterwards.

Cross-examined. Bellamy was distrained upon—I think one quarter was left—he went away suddenly—I have remained there since—I never saw Morgan before I saw him here.

WILLIAM ROWLAND PEARCE . I live at 27, Alexandra Road, South Hampstead—I am a concert manager and musical agent—I was subpœnaed by the prosecution in this case—I gave them papers and a copy of my agreement with the society—in 1891 I was engaged by the council of the International Society, to manage the musical agency department of that society—the engagement was made in September, and the agreement was signed in October, and I commenced my duties, I think, on the 19th of that month—my salary was £1 1s. per week and a commission of one-third on the profits made by that department—my instructions from the council were to do my utmost in securing paid engagements and public appearances of active musical members—those appearances were to be given where I could get engagements for them; naturally they would not take a very bad hall—I secured paid engagements for the major portion of the members, who joined with the idea of getting engagements—some of them were engaged as many as four times—an appearance at Princes' Hall or Steinway Hall is a good advertisement, and a very great advantage to members of the society, apart from any fee; in fact, many would pay to appear there—you were never offered or received any fee from any of the members for the privilege of singing at these concerts, although that is very frequently done in the profession—the council held their meetings about monthly—a proper minute-book was kept—so far as I know, you always did your utmost to promote the welfare of the members—a gold medal of the society was to be struck and awarded to the members in a competition at the end of June to the best setting of a four-part song—I was consulted about the best medium of bestowing the medal—it was given to Morgan to carry out the instructions—concerts were given under my management at the International Hall, Piccadilly Circus, on December 11, 1891, at Steinway Hall on January 7, and at Princes Hall on February 2 and March 22—I left the society at the end of March, 1892, because 1 thought I could earn more money by myself—Miss Kingham was my assistant while I was there; I do not know if she was appointed my successor—everything was carried on for the advantage and benefit of the members.

Cross-examined. The agreement was made on the 8th October, and I commenced my duties on 19th; by it I was to develop the musical department, and, subject to Morgan's direction, do such other things as should tend to the advancement and benefit of the society, and as remuneration Morgan was to pay me 21s. a week and 33 J per cent. commission upon all profits of the musical department—if the agreement says I was to have 33 £ per cent, of all moneys paid to the department, I did not have it—I wrote to a few professional members, because there were none when I joined, and I had to have some to work with—I received the £3 6s. 11d. shown by this account in January—I charged in that commission on several sums of £1 1s. coining from professional

members—that arrangement was come to after the agreement was signed—within a few weeks of signing the agreement I was to get professional members by means of applications—I wrote very few letters—Mr. Candlish wrote a few letters for mo, and I paid him, and charged Morgan with it; this is my account for 117 letters, on 9th January—those 117 were written in one week—on 16th January there it an account for stamps and gum and petty cash—I received altogether £2 14s. 6d. on 23rd January; £1 5s. 3d. was commission, and 8s. 34 I paid out for petty cash for 1,500 envelopes and 50 letters—on 3rd January I had £3 0s. 1d., £1 2s. 1d. being commission on 116 letters, and then there was the money for 500 envelopes and stamps for two week!—Morgan paid those sums—Morgan had the subscriptions, what he did with them I do not know—some, I know, were paid into the bank—I paid all moneys to Morgan, and accounted for them.

Re-examined. I have seen you making up paying-in slips for the bank for cash and cheques that have come in—it was necessary, in order to constitute and develop the musical department, that new members should be obtained—there would have been no musical department if musical members had not been canvassed, and I canvassed—I do not think it at all extraordinary that I should receive a commission for that work.

Robert Edwards was called on subpoena, but did not answer. The following witness was called to the character of Clarke.

RICHARD BAXTER DOAKE . I live at 24, Stanley Gardens, Notting Hill—I am Clarke's brother-in-law—I am a retired Indian planter—I hare known Clarke twenty years—his general reputation as a honest, respectable man is of the best—I am his bail in £200.

Cross-examined. He is an author and writer, and his wife is an authoress—he helped to publish her books—I have been out in India, and backwards and forwards, and saw very little of him, only as I came backwards and forwards—I retired from India in 1886—out of twenty years at least fifteen or sixteen were spent in India; while there I heard nothing against Clarke; I heard from home and heard of him—I have seen him from time to time since 1886, much oftener than once a year I believe his degrees of M. A. and LL. D. were given to him in America together—I don't know what he paid for them—he told me he was a director of the Authors' Alliance—I took no shares in it—I saw the prospectus with 8 per cent, guaranteed—we discussed it—I did not know Morgan was his friend of twenty years' standing—I did not know Morgan at all, I never heard his name mentioned—he told me before he was charged lately that he had got a cheque for his fees which had been dishonoured, and that he had retired from the Authors' Alliance—he told me that about 1st January this year—I do not know whether he had a banking account, or about his monetary position—before these proceedings were heard of directed his attention to something I had seen in the papers, and then ho made the statement to me

Morgan and Tomkins, in their defence, reviewed the evidence at length, and contended that the various societies had been started honestly, and had been worked with an endeavour to benefit the members, and that they had used no false pretences, and had not conspired to defraud.

Tolmie, Clarke, and Campbell, by permission of the COURT, made statements, in which they asserted that they had believed the societies were genuine and useful, and denied having conspired or having made false pretences.

MESSRS. LEVER, PAUL TAYLOR, and BONNER also addressed the COURT on behalf of their clients.

Steadman desired that certain letters he had written should be read by the JURY.

MORGAN, TOMKINS, and STEADMAN GUILTY on all counts, except the second;

TOLMIE, CAMPBELL, and CLARKE, GUILTY of conspiracy, except as to the second count. TOLMIE and CLARKE were recommended to mercy by the JURY. MORGAN.— Eight Years' Penal Servitude. TOMKINS.— Five Years' Penal Servitude. STEADMAN.— Fifteen Months' Hard Labour. CAMPBELL.— Eighteen Months' Hard Labour. TOLMIE.— Six Months' Hard Labour. And CLARKE.—. Four Months' Hard Labour.

The GRAND JURY and the COURT highly commended Inspector Richards for the skill and ability he had displayed in connection with this case,

OLD COURT.—Wednesday, September 1st, 1892,

Before Mr. Justice Collins.

Reference Number: t18920912-848

848. ELIZABETH LOCKETT (28) was indicted for, and charged on the Coroner's Inquisition with, the manslaughter of Richard Arthur Lockett.

MR. LAWLESS Prosecuted, and MR. GEOGHEGAN Defended, at the request of the COURT.

ERNEST HUNT (Police Sergeant G R 5). I was present at an inquest held at the Holborn Town Hall on 11th August—after the verdict I took the prisoner into custody—I charged her with the manslaughter of this child—she made no reply to the charge.

Cross-examined. She had already heard that the Coroner's Jury had returned a verdict of manslaughter—the prisoner's husband is a very respectable man—at the inquest the prisoner accused one of the witnesses of having induced her to drink; that she had had a very happy home till then.

WILLIAM ROBERT GOULD . I am a registered medical practitioner—on Monday, 8th August, I was called in to examine the body of the deceased child—it appeared to be about two and a half years old; it weighed twelve pounds four ounces——the proper weight of a child of that age is about twenty-five to twenty-six pounds—it was very thin, wasted; the eyes were sunken; its arms and legs were nothing but bones covered with skin; there was an absence of all fat; the body was in a very dirty state, with vermin both on the body and head—I saw the prisoner there at the time—she was intoxicated—I asked her if she was aware that the child had been ill very long—she said she had not noticed anything the matter with it—I subsequently made a post-mortem examination—the organs were all more or less healthy, with the exception of the lungs; they had a little old congestion, but not sufficient to account for death, there was very little blood in the veins, and it was very pale—I think

the child died from an insufficient quantity of food, and not of proper quality—a child may die from food which it cannot digest—if it received improper food it would be thin, but not so thin as this was—there wag about an ounce of milk and water fluid in the stomach—the intestines were empty.

Cross-examined. There were no marks of injury or violence—the child could be reduced to a wasted condition by giving it food which it cannot assimilate, but not so emaciated; starvation or improper food would present similar appearances—I would not say definitely which was the cause of death in this case.

GEORGINA COLERIDGE . I live at New North Street, Holborn—I am married—I lived in the same house as the prisoner; she and her husband lived there for about six months; they occupied the first floor front they had three other children besides the deceased—the husband was a picture frame maker—he used to go to work daily, generally about half past seven, and returned about seven or eight in the evening—on the morning of 8th August I went up to the prisoner's room, and saw the child; I had never seen it before—it was alive, and lying on the bed, breathing very hard—while there I saw the prisoner coming up and down for water—she washed downstairs in the wash-house—I have very often seen her the worse for drink—I have seen the husband bring home a bundle of groceries and other goods, and I have often seen him send out for bread and different things—sometimes the prisoner used to go out for them, sometimes he went himself, and sometimes the eldest boy—I have seen them bring in bread and other things—the child did not die while I was in the room—it died about twenty minutes afterwards; I saw that it was dying.

SARAH BOSTON . I live at 4, New North Street, in the next room to the prisoner—I have been in the habit of going in and out of her room for the last few months—I have seen the child—at times it was kept clean, in the first instance—I have seen it cleaned and washed and fed—I did not notice any change until the Friday before it died on the Monday morning; I thought it looked very ill on the Friday—the prisoner said she had given it a powder—I did not notice whether it was clean then; it was lying on the mother's bed—I have seen her feed it—I saw her on the Monday morning, and she then said she had been for a doctor—on the Sunday night, while the prisoner went out to look for her husband, I gave the child some beef-tea which she had made—it took it in its hands and drank it rather ravenously; it held the cup pretty fairly—on the Monday morning, about half-past eight, as I was going down stairs, I saw the prisoner, and asked her how the baby was; she said she had been for a doctor, and she asked me to go and look at it—I did so; it was then decidedly dying—the prisoner drank at times—I have got her a little beer sometimes, when she was ill; she asked me to get a little brandy—I did not get it; I did not consider her an habitual drinker.

Cross-examined. The other children were well nourished and properly looked after—the room in which they lived was a large room; it was kept very nice and clean—I thought the child wanted to be taken out more; the house is in a court—the child had what the prisoner and her husband had—I never saw spirits in her room.

Re-examined. The two eldest children were kept very nicely, and went out in the street.

The prisoner's statement before the Magistrate: "I have neglected the baby only through mixing up with bad company. "

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18920912-849

849. ELIZABETH LOCKETT was again indicted for unlawfully neglecting the said child in a manner likely to cause injury to its health.

WILLIAM ROBERT GOULD repeated his former evidence.

The prisoner stating in the hearing of the JURY that she desired to

PLEAD GUILTY to this charge, the JURY found her

GUILTY .— One Month Hard Labour.

Reference Number: t18920912-850

850. CORNELIUS SMITH was indicted for, and charged on the Coroner's Inquisition with, the manslaughter of William Smith.

MR. GUY STEPHENSON Prosecuted, and MR. GEOGHEGAN Defended at the request of the COURT. SARAH THATCHER. I am single, and live at 20, Ealing Road, Brentford—on the evening of the 18th August I was in Ealing Road at twelve at night, and I heard a row in the house opposite—I stood outside the door and listened a moment, but I could not see what was going on between the two brothers, the prisoner and deceased—I saw them come out of the house—the prisoner persuaded his brother to go home; he would not go—he told him several times to go home to his wife—he said he would go when he liked—the prisoner said, "If you do not go home I shall hit you"—he said he would not go; he would fight his brother that night—the prisoner then went up and hit him in the face; William then threw a can of beer over him, then the prisoner hit him and they both fell—the last I saw of them, William was lying on the ground on his back in the road, and the prisoner on the top—I then went indoors.

Cross-examined. The deceased appeared very quarrelsome—I did not see him square up to his brother before he struck him, he was standing with the beer in his hand; the can struck the prisoner on the forehead—they pulled their coats off—I only saw the prisoner give one blow, which knocked the deceased down—the deceased was on the kerb when he was struck, and the prisoner was on the path—they both appeared to have been drinking.

BRIDGET SHOOTER . I am the wife of John Shooter, No. 2, The Barracks Brentford—I was in my house about twelve o'clock on the night of 18th August—Mrs. McElwayne was with me—I heard a noise and went into the Ealing Road—I saw the prisoner telling the deceased to go home; he would not go—the prisoner again told him to go home, and said, "If you don't go I will hit you"—the deceased said, "I won't go home till I like"—the prisoner then struck him in the face—the deceased then threw a can of beer over him and pulled off his coat and waistcoat—I could not say whether the can hit the prisoner—they fought for two or three minutes, and then they fell, the deceased underneath and the prisoner a-top—Mrs. McElwayne and the prisoner picked him up and set him on the kerb; he was sick—the prisoner went away.

Cross-examined. The deceased lived in Albany Road, I believe; that

is about a mile from the prisoner's—when I saw them they were near the prisoner's house—I do not know whether the prisoner struck him with his hand or his fist—they had both been drinking—I did not see the prisoner's nose bleeding—I saw that his shirt was torn behind.

JOHN SMITH . I live at 15, Ealing Road, Brentford, with the prisoner, who is my brother—on the 18th August I went to bed at eleven—when in bed I heard William come in at twenty minutes past twelve—the prisoner was in at eleven—I heard William quarrelling about something, I could not tell what; this was in the house—about ten minutes to twelve, when William was going outside, the prisoner told him to go along home; he would not—the prisoner was going to shut the door, and William put his foot in the door—the prisoner said if he did not go home he would hit him, and he struck him in the face, not hard; it did not knock him down—when the prisoner was rubbing the beer out of his eyes William got hold of him and pulled him on the ground a-top of him—there was no struggle—the prisoner got up and went indoors away from him, saying he would see him in the morning—there was no other blow before they caught hold of each other—I and Mrs. McElwayne helped the deceased up and set him on the path—I did not see them squaring up at each other or taking their coats off—the prisoner had his coat off when he came indoors at eleven, before William came there.

WILFRED JAMES RICHARDSON , M. D. I was called in on the morning of 19th August to see William Smith—I found him in bed, lying on his back, suffering great pain in the abdomen—he could not pass water—I operated twice—there were bruises on his face, on the left eye, and the back of his head—the scalp wound was recent, also the cut on the forehead—he died on Monday, the 22nd—I made a postmortem—I found all the organs healthy, with the exception of what I have mentioned—there was a large rupture of the bladder, large enough to admit the hand, and the urine had escaped into the abdominal cavity, causing peritonitis, causing death—violence of some kind would cause the rupture—a man falling on him with his knees would cause it—the bladder was distended at the time.

JAMES LINNETT (Police Sergeant T 5). On 22nd, in consequence of information, I made inquiry, and arrested the prisoner at eleven p.m., for causing the death of his brother—he said, "Oh"—I read the charge to him—he replied, "That is right, governor. "

GUILTY Strongly recommended to mercy.— . Nine Days' Imprisonment.

Reference Number: t18920912-851

851. THOMAS GOOCH , Manslaughter of Anthony Young.

MR. ARTHUR GILL Prosecuted, and MR. HUTTON Defended.

At the commencement of the case the prisoner, on the advice of his Counsel,

PLEADED GUILTY; the JURY returned a verdict of

GUILTY .

He received a good character.

One Month Hard Labour.

Reference Number: t18920912-852

852. JAMES SLATER (32) , Feloniously wounding Jane Slater, with intent to murder. Second Count, with intent to do her grievous bodily harm.

MR. HUTTON Prosecuted, and MR. GEOGHEGAN Defended at the request of the COURT.

JANE SLATER . I live at 14, Osborne Cottages, Acton—the prisoner is

my husband—lie had been away to South America fourteen months—on Monday, 22nd August, I was awakened by my hand being out with a knife—I was undressed, and in bed—the prisoner was standing by the bedside over me, with the knife in his hand—I said, "Good God, Jim, what have you done?"—I was so frightened—he turned round to the table and out his throat—I called the landlady, who opened the door, bat was so frightened she ran downstairs, and I ran after heir—I went in next door, where the policeman came.

Cross-examined. The prisoner walked over to the table—he has been a soldier—he went through the Zulu war—I did not go to South America; I did not know where he had gone—I have one child three years old next month—the prisoner had had some drink that night—I never gave him any provocation—I did not hear him say anything about Deeming.

GEORGE HEATH (477 X). On 22nd August, about ten o'clock, I was called to Osborne Cottages, Acton—I went into No. 13 first, and saw the last witness—she had a large cut between the thumb and first finger, which bled very much—after I had washed her hand and stopped the bleeding, in consequence of what she told me, I went into No. 14—I saw the prisoner held on the bed by three or four men, who said he had tried to cut his throat—that was downstairs—I sent for Dr. Jolly—I searched the room, and found this knife at the bottom of the bed—I showed him this knife, and said, "I shall take you to the station and charge you with stabbing your wife"—he said, "Very well"—at the station he made this statement; I made a note at the time he was charged: "My wife was in bed; I said to her, 'I am going to have a game at Deeming to-night'; I took the knife from the table and went towards her, and said, 'Jennie, are you prepared, like Deeming's offspring?' I then pointed the handle of the knife to her throat. She threw her hands up, and then said, 'Oh, Jim, see what you have done. 'I then caught hold of her wrist and saw it was bleeding, and said, 'Mate, it is an awful cut. 'I then turned round and cut my own throat with the same knife. "

SAMUEL LAIRD JOLLY . I am a medical practitioner, of 19, Gold' smiths' Gardens, Acton—between ten and eleven on 22nd August I was called to 14, Osborne Cottages—I saw the prisoner—he had two small incised wounds in his throat two-thirds of an inch in length, slight wounds, only through the skin—I saw his wife in No. Id—she had an incised wound on the back of the hand, the dorsal surface between the finger and thumb extending into the superficial faciæ and into the muscular tissue; it was bleeding much—that could have been caused by a knife similar to this produced—it would require great force to inflict the wound, which was two-thirds of, or nearly, an inch in depth—I have attended her since—she has recovered.

Cross-examined. The wound was deeper in the centre—he asked me to attend to his wife first; he was in drink—I said to him he was a foolish fellow to drink so much—the woman throwing her hand up, and its coming in contact with the knife, would not cause the wound; the force would not have been sufficient.

The prisoners statement before the Magistrate: "It was an accident, that is all; it was no intention on my part. "

Guilty of unlawfully wounding.— Six Weeks, Hard Labour.

NEW COURT.—Wednesday, September 21st, 1892.

Before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18920912-853

853. ALBEET HONOURg , Embezzlin £1, £1 8s. 6d., and 12s., received by him on account of his master. On this and two other indictments, for embezzling £3 10s., 12s. 6d., and £1; and 14s. 6d., 3s. 3d., and 3s. 3d.,

MR. PURCELL, for the Prosecution, offered no evidence.

NOT GUILTY .

OLD COURT.—Thursday, September 22nd, 1892.

Before Mr. Justice Collins.

Reference Number: t18920912-854

854. CHARLES GLBSON (30) , Rape on Rebecca Carter.

MR. SLADE BUTLER Prosecuted.

GUILTY .

He also PLEADED GUILTY to a conviction of felony on 3rd January, 1890, and other convictions were proved against him.— Seven Years' Penal Servitude.

Reference Number: t18920912-855

855. WILLIAM EDWARD OFFORD , Carnally knowing Margaret Maud Griffiths.

MR. SLADE BUTLER Prosecuted, and MR. GEOGHEGAN Defended.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18920912-856

856. GIUSEPPE ZOLLER (19), MECHULE GUATIEEE (23), SALMONE DE FLOEIA (26), JOSEPH POESELLI (22), and GEORGE GILLETT , Feloniously wounding Edward Day, with intent to murder. Second Count, to do grievous bodily harm.

MESSRS. BIRON and BODKIN Prosecuted; MESSRS. WARBURTON and SIDNEY KNOX appeared for Zoller; MESSRS. PAUL TAYLOR and HALL for Guatiere and J. Porselli; and MR. GEOGHEGAN for Be Floria and Gillett. GEORGE DAY . I am a carman, of 54, Leader Street—on the night of 13th June, about a quarter past ten, I, my brother Edward, and Hagan were in Cahill Street—I bought some fish there and went along eating it—I was walking in front, and my brother and Hagan were behind—I noticed some persons with an accordion—they were walking in the road near the gutter, in the opposite direction to me—one of them knocked against me, and knocked the fish out of my hand—I had not said or done anything to them before that—I could not tell who those men were, it was dark and a dark place—I asked what they did it for, and I got knocked down against the wall, I do not know who by—I called out to my brother, and he came to me—I do not know what he did—when I got up from the ground I heard my brother call out, "I am stabbed"—he was then going towards home—the men did nothing more to me; they left me alone, and I got up—I did not see any person do anything to my brother after I got up—there were persons round him—there were some women at the corner of Leader Street—he dropped down—I went to see if I could find the persons who had done it—when I came back the police were there—my brother was wearing a black hard felt hat—when I afterwards saw him he had no hat—when I came back I saw the five prisoners in custody of the police at the top of Cahill Street, and afterwards at the station.

EDWARD DAY . I am a labourer, and live at 54, Leader Street—on the evening of 30th June, about a quarter-past ten, I was passing along Cahill Street with Hagan—my brother George was behind—we passed four or five people; one was playing an accordion—I heard my brother call me—I went back, and found him partly on the ground with these men round him—I cannot identify any of them—I pulled one on one side to rescue my brother, and in the struggle I was stabbed and knocked down—I got up—I have no idea who stabbed me; I felt the blood running down my trousers—I ran home, and was taken by a constable to the hospital.

MICHAEL HAGAN . I live at 3, Oakley Street, Chelsea—about 10.15 p.m. on 13th June I was with George and Edward Day in Cahill Street—I was walking first with Edward—I saw Porselli, De Floria, Guatiere, and Zoller pass—then I heard a disturbance behind me—I saw those men attacking George Day, who was on the ground—Edward tried to rescue him—he rose up from the ground, and said, "I am stabbed"—I saw Gillett come across the road with a female that was before Edward called out—he followed the other prisoners.

WILLIAM KNIGHT . (This witness being deaf and dumb was examined through the interpretation of DR. STAINER.) I live at 4, Wellesley Grove, Chelsea—I remember coming home on a Monday night in June at ten o'clock—I saw a man playing an accordion—I saw Gillett with a black hat with a division in the top—Porselli and De Floria commenced playing the accordion—Porselli was striking the two Days with a belt—I saw Gillett stab Edward Day in two places—I have not seen this knife before.

Cross-examined by MR. GEOGHEGAN. I have seen Gillett before, one week, near a church. (DR. STAINER explained that the witness did not understand the deaf and dumb alphabet, and MR. JUSTICE COLLINS held that, owing to the questions being necessarily hading, the evidence was not wholly reliable.) FREDERICK ROBERTS. I live at 18, Marlborough Square, Chelsea—on 13th June I was in Cahill Street, a little after ten p.m.—I saw a man down, and Zoller, Guatiere, De Floria, and Porselli on the top of him—I helped to pull three of the men off him—the man on the ground got up, and said, "I am stabbed," and ran away—I fetched a constable and pointed out the five prisoners—I had seen Gillett fighting with two young men about twenty yards off the man on the ground—about two a.m. I found what I took to be a soft felt brown hat, bent in at the top; it happened to be black—I gave it to the inspector.

FREDERICK LOCKYER I live at 85, Keppel Street, Chelsea—I was in Leader Street on 13th June, about 10.15 p.m.—I am between fourteen and fifteen years old—I saw Zoller, Guatiere, and Porselli—some boys, were making a noise—two of the prisoners used knives—I could not say which-Porselli ran after me.

Cross-examined by MR. HALL. I could not say whether the knives were shut or open—I could see it was a knife.

FREDERICK OLIVER . I am eleven years old—I live at 28, Godfrey Street—I remember being in Cahill Street about ten p.m. on 13th June—I saw Zoller, Guatiere, and Porselli paying a man on the ground—Porselli hit him with a belt—Guatiere was paying him with a stick—Zoller was hitting him in the side with something—I picked up a handkerchief opposite the post-office—it was full of blood—Guatiere dropped

it—Porselli and Guatiere ran away—Guatiere took the handkerchief away from me; I tried to drop it in a garden.

HENEY SIDNEY WILD . I am house-surgeon at St. George's Hospital—Edward Day was brought in on 13th June suffering from a wound in the lower part of his left chest, on the margin of the ribs, and about half an inch from the middle line, about two inches in length, taking the direction of the ribs; also a small wound about two inches below the left armpit—that was only a superficial wound—the first wound I did not think dangerous till I examined it more carefully the next morning, when I found it communicated with the stomach, which had been opened by the stab—it was a very dangerous wound—he was under treatment at the hospital from 13th June to 26th July, after which he was for two weeks in a convalescent home.

HENRY KERMISON (495 B). I was called on 13th June to Cahill Street—I saw Gillett in the crowd in his shirt sleeves, no coat or hat on, standing in the roadway—some of the crowd got hold of him by the arms—I told him I should arrest him for stabbing a man, or being concerned—lie said, "I know nothing about it, and I refuse to go with you"—I caught hold of his arm—he threw his arms about in different directions—another constable took him to the station.

JOHN DUNSTAN (Inspector B). On 13th June I was on duty in the King's Road Police-station when the prisoners were brought in—they were charged with being concerned in cutting and wounding Edward Day, in Cahill Street, with intent to do him grievous bodily harm—on the charge being read to them Gillett said, "At the time the affair happened I was standing some little distance away from the others, wishing my sister, who lives in that neighbourhood, good night, and looking up I found something was wrong with my companions, and went toward them, and got taken"—Porselli said, "Do you think if I had done anything I would have come here?"—I said, "But you appear to have been brought here"—Zoller said, "I do not understand much English"—the next morning, about 3.30, a dark felt hat was brought to the station, indented at the top—I brought Gillett out of his cell, and he said, "That is my hat," he put it on, and it seemed to fit him well.

Cross-examined by MR. GEOGHEGAN. Gillett's sister lives near the spot—he signed for the hat in the name of Gillett.

WILLIAM RYDE (234 B). On 13th June I went after Gillett—I asked him to go back with me to see what had been done—he said, "I have a right to protect my sister"—a large crowd had assembled—I afterwards arrested him, and took him to the station—he was walking from the crowd when I asked him to return—his coat and hat were off.

Cross-examined by MR. GEOGHEGAN. I saw several women—I cannot say if one was with Gillett, nor that his reason for not returning was because he would not leave his sister—I was in uniform, but off duty.

NOT GUILTY .

OLD COURT.—Friday, September 23rd, 1892.

Before Mr. Justiee Collins.

Reference Number: t18920912-857

857. JAMES BROWN (47) , Unlawfully committing an act of gross indecency with a male person not known.

MR. SANDS Prosecuted, and MR. WARBURTON Defended, at the request of the COURT.

GUILTY .— Six Months' Hard Labour.

Reference Number: t18920912-858

858. KATE WOOD (27) , Feloniously attempting to murder Flossie Martin. Second Count, to do grievous bodily harm.

MESSRS. C. F. GILL and BODKIN Prosecuted and MR. WARBURTON Defended. CAROLINE POULTER. I live at 53, Cholmondeley Street, Beading—I have known the prisoner fourteen months—I first met her at Finchhampstead, in Berkshire, as Kate Martin—since then she married a man named Wood—I know Flossie Martin; I took care of her thirteen months ago, on account of the prisoner being married, and she wanted to shift her—my daughter-in-law took her from Miss Wood and brought her to me at Beading—I had no conversation with the prisoner about it—I was to have 5s. a week with it—the prisoner came and saw me after I had received the child—the child addressed her as her mother—I had the child up to 17th July this year—I received the 5s. a week up to the 3rd November last year—the prisoner would pay me very well, sometimes a fortnight in advance; the last time a month in advance, by postal orders—I was not paid from 3rd November to 17th July—during that time I heard that the prisoner was living at 9, Tadmor Street—I occasionally wrote to her; when she wrote to me about the child I answered her letters—I have here the last letter she wrote to me, it was on the 6th—on the 17th July I took the child to Tadmor Street—I saw the prisoner, and asked her if her husband knew I was going to bring the child, and was quite willing to take to it—she said, "Yes"—I did not say anything to her about the money that was owing—I did not see her husband—I left the child there, and never saw it again till this matter happened.

Cross-examined. She did not come to my house to see it since I left Beading; she did before that, only once or twice—she always seemed very kind to it, and fond of it.

Re-examined. It was six years old on the 2nd of last February—I do not know whether it is an illegitimate child; I was always given to understand so.

SARAH BIRD . I live at 9, Tadmor Street, Shepherd's Bush—the prisoner came to live there with her husband on the 2nd April last; she came from a Mrs. Austin—the husband took the room, the first floor front; he is a waiter—she had a baby with her when she came—on 17th July Mrs. Poulter brought Flossie Martin—the prisoner said it was coming for three weeks' holiday—my husband said he objected to another child being in the room; it was too many for one room—I told her that, and she said it was only going to stop three or four weeks for a holiday—on Friday, the 5th August, she went out with the child—she said she was going to take it to Paddington, to meet Mrs. Poulter, to take the child back again—while she was away a letter came for her, it was delivered to her husband; I don't know whether he opened it—she returned with the child on the Friday night—I said to her next day, "I hear Flossie has come back"—she said, "Yes; if the letter had come before I went I should not have gone"—she said her husband was very upset with her for bringing the child back—on the Monday she said she was going to Mrs. Austin's, her former landlady, to borrow the

money to take Flossie either to her grandmother or her aunt, I cannot be sure which—she went out with the baby; I can't remember the time, it was while we were having dinner—I did not see her again that afternoon, but I heard her come in, just as we had finished our dinner—Mrs. Austin lives about twenty minutes' walk off; between three and four she went out again with the two children—she did not say where she was going—she said Flossie was her cousin's child—I did not see her again that day—I heard her come in about a quarter to eleven at night, or a quarter-past eleven, I am not sure, I was in the kitchen at the time—I knew nothing about this matter till the police came to the house.

Cross-examined. While lodging with me she was a well-conducted person as far as I know—I have seen her every day; as far as I could see she was kind and affectionate to the child; I was never in her room—I have seen her with it on the staircase—she has complained in the ordinary way, of headache and toothache, not very much, once or twice in a week—the baby was about seven months old.

ARTHUR JAMES COOPER . I am house-physician at the Hospital for Women at Soho—I have a patient under my charge named Annie Austin—I have been in constant attendance upon her—she underwent an operation some time ago, and she is not fit to travel or to be here to-day.

AMOS ATKINSON (Detective X). I was at the "Oxbridge Petty Sessions when the prisoner was charged with this offence—Anne Austin was examined there as a witness in the prisoner's presence, and she had an opportunity of cross-examining her—I saw her at half-past nine this morning at the hospital in bed.

(The deposition of Anne Austin was read as follows): I know the prisoner, she lodged with me six or seven months till about April this year—she had no children when she came—she went away to be confined, and came back with a baby after three weeks—I understood from her that it was her first child—about a month ago she brought Flossie Martin to see me—four or five days after I went to see the prisoner at Mrs. Bird's in Tadmor Street—I asked her if Flossie Martin was her child, she said, "You are a witch"—I said, "Does your husband know it?" and she said, "Yes"—she came to me about the 8th August, about two o'clock, and asked me to lend her 5s., which I did—she said she wanted it to take the child away; she did not say where or to whom.

WILLIAM HENRY MORRIS . On 8th August I was acting as booking clerk at Shepherd's Bush Railway Station, that is seven or eight minutes' walk from Tadmor Street—I saw the prisoner there, she had a baby in her arms—she took a ticket, I am not sure where for—passengers to Slough would have to change at Westbourne Park or Bishop's Road—there are trains every ten minutes to Westbourne Park—we book through to Slough, but not to Southampton West—I identify the prisoner by a casual remark she made to the child, which called my attention to her—I had not seen her before to my knowledge.

JOHN PLUMRIDGE . I am a porter at the Slough station of the Great Western Railway—about nine in the evening of 8th August I was on duty there, and saw the prisoner with a baby in her arms and a small girl walking by her side—she asked me for the next up train for London—she was on the wrong platform—I directed her, and told her the next up train was 9.13—I saw her go over the bridge on to the right platform

—I did not see her get into the train, the train was a bit late—that train does not stop at Hayes, it stops at West Drayton—I afterwards saw several women at the Uxbridge Police-court, and picked the prisoner out.

CHARLES OSWOOD (Police Sergeant). I made this plan of the Hayes Station.

WILLIAM SKELTON . I am a butcher, at High Street, South Norwood—on the night of 8th August, about a quarter to eleven, I was on the up relief platform at Hayes, and on a seat I saw a little girl lying on her face—I spoke to her—she did not appear able to answer—a handkerchief was tied tightly round her neck, knotted under the right ear—Frederick Groves was with me—I ran to fetch some of the railway officials, and found a booking clerk—the child's face was smothered in blood, and its clothes and hands—the face looked as if it was being strangled—I held her head up while Groves tried to cut the handkerchief with a knife, but he could not, it was so tightly tied, he kept snipping it—it was a very difficult thing—(the child was called in)—that is the little girl—I took her to the Railway Arms, and asked the landlord to let us have some water to wash the child, or give it some drink—he refused—we asked him to allow us to have a cab to fetch a doctor he refused, and told us to take it back where we found it—the house is almost adjoining the Hayes Station—he refused us any assistance—I believe his name is Holmes—we took the child to a cottage opposite—the landlady there gave us water, and I carried the child until we met a police-constable—we then took it to a doctor's, and then to the Cottage Hospital—I asked the child her name—she gave her name and address, and also told us she had been to Reading—this (produced) is the handkerchief—it was cut away a bit at a time—I asked her how she got to the seat—she said she crawled there.

Cross-examined. The seat is some distance from the metals.

FREDERICK GROVES . I live at 73, Ledbury Road, Bayswater—on the night of 8th August, about a quarter to eleven, I was on the platform at Hayes Station, in company with Skelton—I noticed the child lying on the seat—I endeavoured to cut the handkerchief round her throat; it was tied very tightly—I had some difficulty in cutting it—I could not cut it from the front, I cut it from the back—I assisted in taking her to the Cottage Hospital.

JAMES BLAKE . I am a signalman at Hayes Station—on the night of the 8th August the 9.13 train from Slough was late—it passed through the station at 10.1—it would pass on the up relief line, next to No. 3 platform—at 10.45 I was called by Mr. Skelton—I saw Groves trying to cut the handkerchief—it had to be cut from the outside—there was great difficulty in cutting it.

FRANK CHAPMAN (236 X). On the night of 8th August I was called to Dr. Parrott's surgery at Hayes—the little girl's wounds were dressed there, and she was taken to the Cottage Hospital—I received this handkerchief from Dr. Parrott.

ALFRED GREGORY ALLAN . I am assistant to Dr. Parrott, of Hayes—on the night of 8th August, between eleven and twelve, the little girl was brought to the surgery—I examined her—she had a large contused wound on the right temple, such as might be caused by falling or sliding on gravel or some hard substance; she had two bruises on the left temple,

the right eyelids were completely closed, the left eyelids were closed next morning—the marks on the temple and leg were such as might be caused by a fall, and then by turning over from the shock of the fall she bled from the nose and head—there was a considerable amount of blood on the left side—it was an open wound—one tooth was missing from the upper jaw, and two were loose, the upper pænum uniting the jaw was broken, and the jaw was a good deal swollen on the right side I saw the blue mark on the neck—it was about half an inch wide, extending from the ear on both sides to almost the centre of the neck—it was such a mark as might be caused by some constricting band—it most have been very tight—I have seen the handkerchief—that tied tightly and knotted would produce such a mark—there was a bruise on the right forearm and elbow; also on the thigh and knee on the right side—the contents of the bowels and bladder had passed, the result of the shock, and she was sick after being in the surgery—she made some statement to me; I asked her some questions, and she answered them—her condition was very serious—she got better, and I think she will not be permanently injured.

CLARA MAID BIRD . I live with my mother in Tadmor Street—I knot the prisoner—on Monday night, 8th August, about a quarter to eleven, I saw her come home with the baby, not with Flossie Martin.

ROBERT ALLISON (Policeman 102 X). I received information, and about a quarter-past four on Tuesday morning, 9th August, I went to 9, Tadmor Street—I went upstairs, and saw the prisoner in bed with her husband—I told her I should have to take her to Notting Dale on perhaps a very serious charge—she muttered something about Southampton West—I cautioned her that anything she said I should take down, and it might be used against her on her trial—she then made a statement—I told her that a child had been found on Hayes platform, and from information I had received I should take her where she would be detained—she then made the following statement: "I travelled by train about four p.m. yesterday, to see my aunt at Southampton West, from Waterloo, and left the child on the platform, whilst I tried to find my aunt, who had removed; on my return I missed the child, and thought someone had picked it up and taken it to my aunt's; that WM the last I saw of my child; I then travelled back to Addison Road, via Clapham Junction"—I then took her away, and she was handed over to a constable from Hayes.

WALTER WELLBR (Inspector X). On 9th August I was on duty at Uxbridge Police-station—the prisoner was brought there—I read the charge to her; it was for attempting to murder nor child by placing a handkerchief round its neck; also throwing it out of the railway train she said, "I did not throw the child out of the carriage window."

AMOS ATKINSON (Recalled). This matter was placed in my hands, and on the afternoon of the 9th August I took the prisoner to the Cottage Hospital—I said to her, "I am a police officer; there is a little girl in there very seriously injured; she was found last night on the platform at Hayes Railway Station. You are supposed to be the mother, and to have caused the injuries; my object in taking you in there is to see in the child recognises you as her mother, and that you may have an opportunity of hearing what she says. You are not obliged to say anything; what you do say I have to report"—she said nothing; we then went

into the hospital ward, where the child was lying in bed—the prisoner at that time had a baby in her arms—she sat in a chair at the foot of the bed—the child looked towards her and smiled—the handkerchief was produced, and I said to the child, "Is that yours?"—she replied, "It is not mine, but auntie's"—I said, "What auntie?"—she said, "That auntie," and she motioned with her head towards the prisoner—I said, "Are you sure?" and she said, "Yes; I felt someone pulling the handkerchief so tight"—I said to the prisoner, "You hear what the child has said?"—she said, "Yes; early in the evening she asked me to put it round her neck; she felt cold"—at the Police-court, after one of the witnesses had spoken about Slough, the prisoner said, "I passed through Slough Station, up and down"—at the hospital, after the conversation with the child, the prisoner was very much overcome, and we had to assist her from the ward.

The prisoner's statement before the Magistrate: "I had no intention of throwing the child out of the window, or tightening the handkerchief round her neck, or hurting her in any way.

Witness for the Defence. SARAH WILLIAMS. I have known the prisoner seven years—I took charge of the child from between the age of six and seven weeks and four and a half yean—I had it at the end of March, 1886—the prisoner continued to see the child in my possession, and every week I had a letter—she was always a good mother to the child; very fond and always anxious for its welfare—she has borne the character of a humane and kind-hearted woman.

Cross-examined. The child came to me when the mother was well enough to come out of the Union—the child left me because the mother thought she could earn more money in London, and she said the child would be company.

GUILTY. Strongly recommended to mercy by the JURY.— Nine Months' Hard Labour.

FOURTH COURT—Thursday, September 22nd, Friday, 23rd, Saturday, 24th, Monday, 26th, and Tuesday, 27th, 1892.

Before Robert Malcolm Kerr, Esq.

Reference Number: t18920912-859

859. MARGARET JOSEPHINE SMITH (30), JOHN PAUL (60), WILLIAM MICKLETHWAITE (45), SARAH INGRAM (60), and THOMAS ALLISTONE (37) , Feloniously forging and uttering a deed, purporting to be signed by John Cornelius Park, with intent to defraud.

MESSRS. CHARLES MATHEWS and HORACE AVORY Prosecuted; MR. SYLVESTER appeared for Smith, MR. ELDRIDGE for Paul, Allistone, and Ingram; and MESSES. TATLOCK and GREENFIELD for Micklethwaite. JOSEPH TRAVERS SMITH. I am a solicitor—in the years 1884, 1885, and 1886 I acted as solicitor for the late Cornelius John Park in some incidental matters—about January 24th, 1887,1 received by post, at my residence at Teddington, these documents in an envelope—one of them could not be a will, because there are no witnesses to it—at that time I had never heard of Margaret Josephine Smith, and knew nothing of any will under which I was appointed executor—I sent the documents to the

solicitor acting for Mr. Park—there was this copy and an anonymous letter and an envelope—I do not know the writing of any of the documents, and have no idea whence they came, and never have had.

Cross-examined by MR. SYLVESTER. I knew old Mr. Park's writing; it is many years since I saw it, but I think I should recognise it again—I do not recognise the signature to this letter (produced) as Mr. Park's; signatures vary a good deal, but his varied less than most people's; it was a very peculiar cramped writing—this deed is a little more like his writing, but it it larger than he generally wrote, and I don't think it is his—this cheque of March 23rd, 1886, is the same date as the deed, that looks more lib Mr. Park's writing, but my impression is that it is not; there are a gnat many differences. (Several other signatures were shown to the witness which he did not recognise as Mr. Park's)

Cross-examined by MR. ELDRIDGE. Old Mr. Park frequently came to see me on matters of business—the first time I was asked to act for him was from a message from Mrs. Park.

Cross-examined by MR. TATLOCK. Mr. Park's age was 75 or 80—I last saw him about two years before his death—no doubt I have got letters from him; I have not brought them—my impression is that this signature to the letter of instructions of October, 1885, is not Mr. Party but it is far more like his writing than one or two of the others—I an not an expert, but it does not remind me of his signature as the others instantly do—this cheque has his signature—one signature immediately reminds me of his writing, and the other does not; when you know it signature you recognise it the instant you see it—the signature of I man of that age may vary from weakness, but I have known some old people where there is no difference—there is a material difference between the signature of 18th October and that of the deed of March 21st, though there is only a difference of a few months in point of time; the hand trembles more; the "J" and the "C" are not united, and the "P" is not written in the same way; the general pressure of the pea appears to be the same—I should not expect such a change in three or four months, in a person whose health had not materially varied—lie was a wonderfully hale hearty old gentleman.

Re-examined. This letter (produced) differs very much from the signature of Mr. Park; the "k" is of a totally different character to the "k" in the deed—my impression is that it is not Mr. Park's signature—I have given my opinion simply from my acquaintance with his writing as a matter of business.

GEORGE MURRAY . I am a barrister, and one of the examiners of the High Court—I took the depositions on the examination of John Paul in the suit against Park—Paul was examined first on August 8th, 1887, and cross-examined on December 5th, 1887—during his cross-examination exhibits J. P. 1 to J. P. 5 were all produced, and marked with my initials—Paul was re-examined on May 1st, 1890, and the exhibits J. P. 6 and J. P. 7 were produced—on 13th February, 1888, William Micklethwaite was cross-examined before me, and the exhibits W. KJ and W. M. 4 were produced, and marked by me—he was re-examined on May 1st, 1890, and the exhibits W. M. 6, 7, and 8 were all produced, and marked by me—Micklethwaite and Paul both signed their cross examination and re-examination—the prisoner M. J. Smith was cross-examined before me on 1st July, 1889, and I produce the original depositions

which she signed—she was re-examined on April 30th, 1890, and 1s. 2 and the letter of October, 1885, were produced on her cross-examination, and marked by me; also M. J. S. 1, which purports to be a copy of the will.

Cross-examined by MR. SYLVESTER. I also took Mrs. Park's deposition—I have not got it here.

Cross-examined by MR. TATLOCK. This deposition (produced) has not been marked by me; if it was produced as an exhibit I should have marked it—it appears to have been used; this is the mark of the Registrar of the Court of Chancery—these are Miss Smith's, Micklethwaite's, and Paul's depositions (produced).

WILLIAM ARTHUR WOLLERBY . I am a solicitor, of 4, Lancaster Place, and a commissioner for oaths—this affidavit of Margaret Josephine Smith was sworn before me on August 3rd, 1887 this is my signature—this affidavit of William Mickiethwaite was sworn before me on August 3rd, and this one of John Paul on August 5th, 1887, and the same deed exhibited with it—Messrs. Cross and Sons, who were acting as solicitors, brought me the affidavits.

BENJAMIN STARLING . I am a solicitor and commissioner for oaths, of 9, Gray's Inn Square—this affidavit of Thomas Allistone was sworn before me on August 3rd, 1889.

ARTHUR WESTBROOK . I am a solicitor and commissioner for oaths, of 45, Duke Street, Mayfair—this affidavit of Sarah Ingram was sworn before me on August 4th, 1889—I went down to Baynes Park for the purpose—there were some exhibits, articles of jewellery, marked S. J. 1, to S. J. 10. (The affidavits were here read; also the deed; also another affidavit of Margaret Josephine Smith, sworn on June 29th, 1889; also her cross-examination nine months afterwards in the Court of Chancery.)

GEORGE MURRAY (Re-examined), I took the cross-examination of Mrs. Park—this is the original; it is signed by her, at least it has her mark.

Cross-examined by MR. SYLVESTER. These two photographs, C.P. 1, and C.P. 2, were shown to Mrs. Park; they do not bear any marks, but I recollect the fact perfectly. (The re-examination of M. J. Smith on April 30th, 1890, was here read,)

ARTHUR WILSON CROFT . I am one of the firm of Croft and Son, solicitors, of Lancaster Place, Strand—I acted as solicitor for Margaret J. Smith at the commencement of the. claim she made against Mr. Park—I received from her this deed marked A, and this letter of instructions, and other documents, which were filed in Court—towards the end of January, 1887, Mrs. Emily Wright brought me a document purporting to be the will of Mr. J. 0. Park, and about three weeks afterwards Smith called at my office; I showed it to her; she read it and asked me what I thought of it—I said I thought it a very dangerous document, and before she propounded it as a will she ought to consult some other solicitor—she tore it up and threw it into the fire, and said, "That is the best place for that"—I did not notice that she kept the signature—it said, "I give all I possess to Miss Smith, of Teddington,' and the signature was across a penny stamp—this (produced) purports to be a copy, but it is written the other way of the paper—the witnesses' names are Ingram and Allistone-we filed her claim under the deed, and acted for her up to the time she went to prison, after which we handed over some documents'

solicitor acting for Mr. Park—there was this copy and an anonymous letter and an envelope—I do not know the writing of any of the documents, and have no idea whence they came, and never have had.

Cross-examined by MR. SYLVESTER. I knew old Mr. Park's writing; it is many years since I saw it, but I think I should recognise it again—I do not recognise the signature to this letter (produced) as Mr. Park's; signatures vary a good deal, but his varied less than most people's; it was a very peculiar cramped writing—this deed is a little more like his writing, but it is larger than he generally wrote, and I don't think it is his—this cheque of March 23rd, 1886, is the same date as the deed, that looks more like Mr. Park's writing, but my impression is that it is not; there are a great many differences. (Several other signatures were shown to the witness, which he did not recognise as Mr. Park's)

Cross-examined by MR. ELDRIDGE. Old Mr. Park frequently came to see me on matters of business—the first time I was asked to act for him was from a message from Mrs. Park.

Cross-examined by MR. TATLOCK. Mr. Park's age was 75 or 80—I last saw him about two years before his death—no doubt I have got letters from him; I have not brought them—my impression is that this signature to the letter of instructions of October, 1885, is not Mr. Park's, but it is far more like his writing than one or two of the others—I am not an expert, but it does not remind me of his signature as the others instantly do—this cheque has his signature—one signature immediately reminds me of his writing, and the other does not; when you know a signature you recognise it the instant you see it—the signature of a man of that age may vary from weakness, but I have known some old people where there is no difference—there is a material difference between the signature of 18th October and that of the deed of March 21st, though there is only a difference of a few months in. point of time; the hand trembles more; the "J" and the "C" are not united, and the "P" is not written in the same way; the general pressure of the pen appears to be the same—I should not expect such a change in three or four months, in a person whose health had not materially varied—he was a wonderfully hale hearty old gentleman.

Re-examined. This letter (produced) differs very much from the signature of Mr. Park; the "k" is of a totally different character to the "k" in the deed—my impression is that it is not Mr. Park's signature—I have given my opinion simply from my acquaintance with his writing as a matter of business.

GEORGE MURRAY . I am a barrister, and one of the examiners of the High Court—I took the depositions on the examination of John Pad in the suit against Park—Paul was examined first on August 8th, 1887, and cross-examined on December 5th, 1887—during his cross-examination exhibits J. P. 1 to J. P. 5 were all produced, and marked with my initials—Paul was re-examined on May 1st, 1890, and the exhibits J. P. 6 and J. P. 7 were produced—on 13th February, 1888, William Micklethwaite was cross-examined before me, and the exhibits W. M. 1 and W. M. 4 were produced, and marked by me—he was re-examined on May 1st, 1890, and the exhibits W. M. 6, 7, and 8 were all produced, and marked by me—Micklethwaite and Paul both signed their cross-examination and re-examination—the prisoner M. J. Smith was cross-examined before me on 1st July, 1889, and I produce the original depositions

which she signed—she was re-examined on April 30th, 1890, and M.J.S. 2 and the letter of October, 1885, were produced on her cross-examination, and marked by me; also M.J.S. 1, which purports to I be a copy of the will.

Cross-examined by MR. SYLVESTER. I also took Mrs. Park's deposition—I have not got it here.

Cross-examined by MR. TATLOCK. This deposition (produced) has not been marked by me; if it was produced as an exhibit I should have I marked it—it appears to have been used; this is the mark of the I Registrar of the Court of Chancery—these are Miss Smith's, Micklethwaite's, and Paul's depositions (produced).

WILLIAM ARTHUR WOLLERBY . I am a solicitor, of 4, Lancaster Place, and a commissioner for oaths—this affidavit of Margaret Josephine Smith was sworn before me on August 3rd, 1887—this is my signature—this affidavit of William Micklethwaite was sworn before me on August 3rd, and this one of John Paul on August 5th, 1887, and the same deed exhibited with it—Messrs. Cross and Sons, who were acting as solicitors, brought me the affidavits.

BENJAMIN STARLING . I am a solicitor and commissioner for oaths, of 9, Gray's Inn Square—this affidavit of Thomas Allistone was sworn before me on August 3rd, 1889.

ARTHUR WESTBROOK I am a solicitor and commissioner for oaths, of 45, Duke Street, Mayfair—this affidavit of Sarah Ingram was sworn before me on August 4th, 1889—I went down to Raynes Park for the purpose—there were some exhibits, articles of jewellery, marked S. J. 1, to S. J. 10. (The affidavits were here read; also the deed; also another affidavit of Margaret Josephine Smith, sworn on June 29tó, 1889; also her cross-examination nine months afterwards in the Court of Chancery.) GEORGE MURRAY (Re-examined). I took the cross-examination of Mrs. Park—this is the original; it is signed by her, at least it has her mark.

Cross-examined by MR. SYLVESTER. These two photographs, C. P. 1, and C. P. 2, were shown to Mrs. Park; they do not bear any marks, but I recollect the fact perfectly. (The re-examination of M. J. Smith on April 30M, 1890, was here read.)

ARTHUR WILSON CROFT . I am one of the firm of Croft and Son, solicitors, of Lancaster Place, Strand—I acted as solicitor for Margaret J. Smith at the commencement of the. claim she made against Mr. Park—I received from her this deed marked A, and this letter of instructions, and other documents, which were filed in Court—towards the end of January, 1887, Mrs. Emily Wright brought me a document purporting to be the will of Mr. J. C. Park, and about three weeks afterwards Smith called at my office; I showed it to her; she read it and asked me what I thought of it—I said I thought it a very dangerous document, and before she propounded it as a will she ought to consult some other solicitor—she tore it up and threw it into the fire, and said, "That is the best place for that"—I did not notice that she kept the signature—it said, "I give all I possess to Miss Smith, of Teddington," and the signature was across a penny stamp—this (produced) purports to be a copy, but it is written the other way of the paper—the witnesses' names are Ingram and Allistone we filed her claim under the deed, and acted for her up to the time she went to prison, after which we handed over some documents'

—the deed was not stamped when it was brought to me; she asked me to get it stamped, and I said if she brought me the money I would do so; she never brought it—it was stamped on September 2nd, 1889 and the penalty paid—I entered a caveat against Mr. Park's will, not by her instructions, but with her concurrence.

Cross-examined by MR. SYLVESTER. I cannot say on what day she gave me this deed—I am not prepared to say that it was not on January 7th 1887—I think it was the beginning of January, on a Sunday night; I believe the letter of instructions came from Miss Smith with this deed, and not I from Mr. Lomax's office—I never saw Micklethwaite till I saw him at Bow Street—I did not take Miss Smith's instructions to make a claim; I that was done by my partner—he is not here—the claim was to be made I on the deed alone—I had no instructions from her to make any claim on any will—she did not mention any will before I showed her the document from Mrs. Wright, and never suggested that there was such a will—she brought Mrs. Wright to my office in the Vibart Hughes case—she came to my office earlier than three weeks after I had that document, but I was away in Italy—there are attendances down when she discussed these matters with some of my clerks before she saw me—she never suggested propounding that will to me—she threw it in the fire, and I believe it was burnt—my firm actually filed a claim on this deed, and deposited the deed in Court and the letter of instructions—Miss Smith had not got either of them in her hands after early in 1887—they went straight from my hands into Court—there is not the slightest doubt that the deed was in existence early in 1887; it was brought to me on January 19th, 1887—there was Chancery delay between January and August.

THOMAS WILLIAM ROSSITER . I am a solicitor, of 7, Ely Place I conducted the prosecution when Margaret J. Smith was charged in 1887—I am the person she mentions in her examination—I went with a police-officer to identify her, at 41, Talbot Road, when she was arrested—she and her sister and Paul were arrested together, and I charged with conspiring to defraud—Paul was not there at first; he came in afterwards, and was arrested—there is no truth in her allegation that I took possession of a tin box containing documents, or of any letters from Mr. Park to Mr. Park, jun—when Paul was arrested he was carrying a black bag, which was taken from him, and I found in it two documents marked J. P. 2 and J. P. 3; they purport to be copies—also J. P. 1, a penny memorandum-book, and the memorandum J.P. 5 that was in October, 1887—on November 9th, 1887, I took a statement from the prisoner Ingram, with a view of calling her as a witness for the prosecution, and she was called—she signed every page of her statement as it now appears—this is it—she says: "I know nothing whatever about Mr. Park's affairs, or if he left a will. I will swear I never signed a document with Allistone as another witness."

Cross-examined by MR. SYLVESTER. I knew nothing about Miss Smith's claim till after her arrest, in October, 1887—I then knew that she had I made a claim against Mr. Park's estate for £20,000—when I applied for the warrant I did not know that such a claim existed; it is very probable I knew it when I went to identify her—I was acting for Mr. William Frederick King, of the Admiralty, whose house the prisoner Smith had taken—I found nothing else of any importance in

Paul's bag—I only took out those four documents, and whatever else there was I left there—I read them—they were cards and bills and indecent photographs—I had nothing else in my possession bearing on Miss Smith's claim—Ingram's statement was taken at 3, Western Road—she was cook with a lady there—she did not write it, I took it down at her dictation; no doubt she referred to the will; I do not think I put to her the question of this deed—I said, "I understand there was a will signed by Mr. Park, and attested by you?"—she said, "No, I never attested it, and further than that, I never attested any other document"—I took a statement from Emily Wright; if the Treasury have not got it I have—Ingram was to be a witness against Miss Smith if she could give evidence—she gave evidence, and said that the Treasury had a copy of her proofs—she was not acting against Miss Smith; she was acting in her own defence, because it was suggested that Ingram was a party?—she explained to me in that statement how she brought an action against Mr. Park for slander.

Cross-examined by MR. ELDRIDGE. There are two statements in Paul's writing.

Cross-examined by MR. TATLOCK. I was making a charge of false pretences—I knew of the existence of the claim against the Park estate—I was instructed to prosecute long before October, 1887—I applied for a warrant about the end of August—I had nothing to do with the prosecution about the alleged forged will—the information I got from Sarah Ingram related to her claim on the Park Estate—I am not aware that she had made any claim; it was a general statement for the prosecution, incorporating the facts necessary to be proved—no doubt I mentioned the alleged forged deeds; otherwise it would not have appeared in the statement.

Re-examined, In Ingram's statement she says: "On 22nd October, 1885, I left Mr. Park's service; that was only a month or two before the time I was introduced to Miss M. J. Smith. After leaving Auckland House I went to Mrs. Edwards and stayed ten days; I then went to Mrs. Smith at Gordon Villa; she offered me a room, for which I paid nothing. I remained with her till I left with Margaret J. Smith for London. Afterwards I heard that Mr. Park and his son had been making slanderous statements against me. Miss Smith suggested that I should bring the action"—at the end of it she says, "Allistone was only with Mr. Park six weeks or two months. "

SEYMOUR MORRIS . I am clerk to Mr. George Sherard, solicitor, of 26, Lincoln's Inn Fields—Mr. Sherard acted as agent for the trustees of Park's will in Smith's claim, which was tried before Mr. Justice Romer on 6th May, 1891, and ten subsequent days—judgment was given on 5th June, 1891, dismissing the claim—Smith gave notice of appeal, which was dismissed with costs, she not complying with the conditions—Allistone, Micklethwaite, and Ingram were examined as witnesses at the trial—Paul was also called, but I was not present.

Cross-examined by MR. STLVESTER. Smith was ordered to find £100 security for costs upon motion made 23rd July—an application made to the Court of Appeal to extend the time was granted—the security was not found, and on that ground on 9th December the appeal was struck out of the paper—the appeal was never heard—I saw Lomax, O'Leary, and Sears in Court.

Cross-examined by MR. ELDRIDGE. I was junior clerk under supervision—Williams attended to the matter till his death, shortly before the trial—the trustees were Mr. Cole and Mr. Chester—the action of Cole v. Park was commenced by an administration summons—Mr. Chester acted for John Park, the son.

Cross-examined by MR. TATLOCK. Mr. Lomax gave evidence at the trial. Re-examined. Mr. Davis was a witness.

(The statement of Emily Wright, the re-examination of Paul and Mickle thwaite on 1st May, 1890, and an affidavit of Smith, made 5th July, 1890, were here read.)

CORNELIUS JOHN PARK . I reside at South Hayling Island—I am the son of John Cornelius Park, who died on the 4th January, 1887, in his eighty-second year, leaving property amounting to about £100,000—he was four feet eight inches in height, and stout—these are two photographs of him, one full-length, the other only the head—I am fifty-eight years of age—I was married in 1875; up to then I resided with my father—when I married I went to live at South Hayling Island, in which he had large property, which I managed for him—my wife died in 1878—I have since remained a widower—I was on terms of the closest intimacy with my father till his death, and acquainted with all his business on the island and in other places, but only partially after I left him—I was constantly in the habit of visiting him at Teddington, and was on affectionate terms up to the time of his death—he had very great business habits, was very saving, and careful of his investments—Mr. Travers Smith and Mr. Chester acted as his solicitors—he had a large quantity of house property—he was accustomed to sign deeds and other legal documents—till after my father's death I never heard one word of a suggestion that I was to marry Smith—I never had any conversation with her leading to such a subject—I had seen her only twice before my father died, once, in 1885, at Auckland House, when she came about some repairs—I knew she was the tenant of Gordon Lodge—nothing then passed between us except a discussion of that business—I next saw her about two months later, in 1885, at Auckland House, when she brought a catalogue of a sale of furniture about to take place, and asked my father to go and buy some of it for her—on those occasions there was no conversation on the subject of my marrying her—I never gave her an engagement ring, nor tried to put one on her finger—I never gave her a present—I never had this brooch and other articles—I never wrote a letter to her, nor she to me—after my father's death I saw her at Holloway Gaol, when I attended with the Examiner for the purpose of taking her cross-examination—as I was going out of the room she said she would thank me to return a ring she had never given me a ring—when I denied it she said nothing—never till this case came on did I hear of Sir Charles Manley Brown—I never saw him, nor knew of his existence—I was at Auckland House, and, thinking my father would last a day or two, I went home to get clean things—when I returned my father had died at eleven the previous night—his funeral was the following Friday—Smith was not present after the funeral I went to South Hayling—about 4th February of that year I received by post this packet in an envelope—it contained a photograph of Smith, with some pink paper attached, with some writing

which no one could make out—it also contained a form of bond and one of my visiting cards, with some writing about being found in a certain part of his dress, but it was never there—I know nothing of these documents—I had no idea whose writing was on the envelope—the postmark was Richmond—I knew nobody at Richmond—I had never had the photograph, nor heard of any such bond—Mr. Churchill was present when I received the packet; he saw me open it—I showed him the contents—I afterwards sent it on to Mr. Edward Cole, the executor, in the same state in which I received it—I know nothing of Micklethwaite or Paul—I never saw or heard of them in connection with my father's place of business, nor of one of them being a gardener—Ingram was a cook part of the time at South Hay ling; she went back in 1885 to Auckland House—I heard of an action against my father—in 1885 my father was in very good business health; in 1886 he was very ill; up to November, 1886, he was in good health, but failing in memory—I wrote his business letters sometimes—he invariably signed his own cheques—I know his signature well; the signature to the deed marked "A" is not his; this "J. C. Park" and "I agree to the above" I believe are his writing, the other I am doubtful of; I do not believe it is his; the "k" is rather unlike his, but I should pass this as his writing—this cheque of January 12th, 1886, on plain paper, I know nothing of; he never signed cheques on plain paper, to my knowledge—these other cheques are signed by him—Mrs. Park was my stepmother; she had a paralytic stroke 1886—from my diary I fix the date, and that I left Auckland House on 8th September—Mrs. Park was then perfectly well—on Saturday, 11th September, 1886, I received a telegram, in consequence of which I drove to Havant from South Hayling, and went by the 3.18 Southwestern train to get the 6.20 for Teddington—I then found my stepmother suffering from a seizure.

Cross-examined by MR. SYLVESTER. My father did not like writing letters—he generally got them written for him, and signed them—that was not always his habit—his signature is sometimes more tremulant than at others—this is my father's signature and mine. (A distress warrant.)—I do not see any variation in his "P'S" and "k's"—he had worked his way up; he started not as a bricklayer, but as a builder in a small way—his education was neglected—I have no doubt that in March and November, 1886, he was able to do business,' but in a very unsatisfactory way—he did not know sometimes whether he was doing it—I see he signed a cheque on 23rd March, 1886, the same date as the deed—I also find one on November 9th, 1886—there is a cheque of 12th January, 1886, and another of 3rd May, 1886, on blank paper—he transacted business in October, 1885, the date of the document when he wrote "I agree to the above"—he did take an interest in my marriage; as to the person I should marry in the first instance, so much so that he made a proviso in his will that things would not be quite the same if I married without mother's consent—after my wife died I had no difficulty with my father about that—I know you are going to ask about a certain lady—in 1885 and 1886 my father wished me to marry; I was an only child—he expressed no wish that my deceased wife's sister should leave, because it was at his suggestion she came—he was not very anxious, but he suggested I should marry again—he named two persons—I hoard

what Mr. Chester had to say after my engagement was broken off—I went to Auckland House in 1885 four times in four months, the latter part—I can show you by my diaries; I went twice in one week then missed for a month before I went again—I was there frequently between 1883 and his death, while Miss Smith was tenant of my father—my father confided his business to mother, generally speaking—she knew nearly all his business, or quite—Miss Ingram was with me three years—when she went I corresponded with her two or three times to ask her questions—this is one reply (produced): "I do pity father now that he has got to the age when he ought to be petted," etc., "such a trouble as he has"—I suppose that referred to my stepmother—she might have been unfit for business at times, when father could not consult her—she was a very violent-tempered woman at times—I do not think there were things he tried to hide from her, especially connected with his money—the photographs produced are getting on for twenty two years old.

Cross-examined by MR. ELDRIDGE. When I went to Auckland House I slept there—I slept at the Clarence four times—the rule was I was to sleep at Auckland House, but I slept out very seldom; I used to go there and back in the day—I do not suppose I slept out four nights in a year—the letter of 21st July, 1890, giving a character to Mrs. Ingram after she left, is my writing.

Cross-examined by MR. TATLOCK. Auckland House is semi-detached, with ten or twelve rooms—there is a little side garden gate—people could get in there, or could cross the fields, and get in by the back door—I first sat the document containing "I agree to the above" at Holloway in 1887 or 1888—I had no opportunity of examining it—I took no proceedings upon it—I first saw it in the possession of Mr. Rossiter—I first heard of the deed of 23rd March, 1886, on 4th February—I heard of the deed set up in Chancery through the solicitor; I cannot say when.

Re-examined. I never heard of the deed nor the bond till after Smith claimed against my father's estate—the photographs of my father are good so far as his figure is concerned—he was always on confidential terms with me up to his death, although a little angry because speculations did not turn out as he expected—he never suggested I should marry Smith—I was engaged to another lady in 1885 or 1886—it lasted three months, I think—my father knew of it—he objected to it at; last.

EDWARD CHESTER . I am one of the firm of H. F. and E. Chester, solicitors, of Newington Butts—my firm were solicitors to J. C. Park upwards of fifty years, prior to his death, and continuously up to 1883—between 1883 and 1886 we had no fresh business of his—he sent for me in July, and I attended him in August, 1886, to take instructions for a new will—he gave me instructions, and a new will was drawn, but never executed—I went to Teddington several times between July and his death—Smith or her mother was a tenant—except that, I never heard of her—the deceased talked to me about the marriage of Cornelius John Park—there were negotiations on the subject in 1882,1 think; not in 1885 or 1886—I acted for Park in the action against him by Sarah Ingram for slander—letters were handed to me, received from Ingram—they were destroyed by me, under an order of the Court, as being scandalous and offensive—they contained no reference to Smith, or any

intended marriage between her and Cornelius John Park—that was not mentioned, to the best of my recollection—I read the two letters before they were destroyed, to find out whether they did refer to Smith; I was requested to do so—I knew J.C. Park's signature—the signature to the deed is not his—as to the letter of ratification, the writing is similar, but I am sure it is not his signature—he never joined the upper part of his "a," which is joined here—I have never seen the upper part of his "a" joined at any time—I have carefully looked at the letter of instruction—this is wonderfully like his; I believe that to be his—I acted in proceedings to get Smith's mother and sister out of Gordon Lodge in the latter part of 1886, on Mr. Park's instructions—I could not find out who was tenant; Miss Smith came and gave me reasons why she could not get out, and arranged to go out afterwards—the time did not expire before Park died—the house was found empty some time after he died.

Cross-examined by MR. SYLVESTER. After the death, Smith claimed that the house had been bought, but when she saw me she never asserted such a claim—proceedings were taken on an alleged agreement, the signature to which was denied—between 1883 and 1886 fresh matters went to other solicitors; I had to take some up afterwards—he employed several solicitors—a draft settlement came into my hands in 1882—the lady's name was Miss Kemp—that settlement, on behalf of the son, fell "through in 1882 or 1883—Park wished his son to marry again before 1882, and in 1886, and names were mentioned.

Cross-examined by MR. ELDRIDGE. In Ingram's action an order was made that I was to deliver up all documents in my possession to the executors—among them were three letters and part of another one—this claim on the deed was under consideration, but I cannot speak to dates—I read through the letters a second time by special request—I applied for the Order on 18th July, 1888, that they should be destroyed—I did not keep them, because I was afraid of their getting into other hands than the executors, and I thought they ought not be parted with under any circumstances.

Cross-examined by MR. TATLOCK. I saw some of these cheques before the hearing—the "J" and "C" are not united on the deed, although it was not usual for him to make them separate—I have searched and found one or two cases where his signature is not always so—the "J. C. S" are all joined in these letters—that was his custom—in many years there are one or two exceptions—some signatures on these cheques are firm and some weaker on account of his age.

Re-examined. I have looked, I fancy before the trial, to find a signature where the J and C were not joined—I never found one with the "a" not open on the top-in the letter and in the deed of November, 1886, the "a" is joined at the top—he never made his "k" like the "k" in the deed, he made them like "h" with a curve, and the little dot on the "P" is from his always having made an involuntary stop with his pen as he was making it—I have been through the claim made by smith, or some of her family, that Gordon Lodge had been purchased by them—she never suggested it when I tried to get her out of possession—I believe her sister put forward an agreement for the sale of the house to her by Park—that was resisted—they did not go on with toe proceedings—there was merely a writ or summons—I was not the

Solicitor—his father never mentioned Smith as a suitable wife for him, but spoke of her in quite a different way.

JOHN CHURCHILL . I am an accountant of Evesham, in Worcestershire—Mr. Edward Cole is my father-in-law—I went with him on 7th January, 1887, to Auckland House, Teddington—to assist him, I went through all the papers left by Mr. Park, Auckland House—I found nothing relating to Smith during my stay in the house for a weak—this letter (produced) with Christmas or New Year's card in it, was shown to me by Mrs. Park two or three days after I went—on Sunday evening, 9th January, when I was in the dining-room, I heard a noise which led me to go upstairs—I saw Smith on the landing at the top of the staircase—two servants were trying to prevent her getting into a room—I went into the room where Mrs. Park was lying down on the floor holding Mr. Cole by the hand; I went to her, she laid hold of my hand—Smith was outside—she should have heard what was said—I did not know her—I told her she was forcing her way where she was not wanted—she said she did not believe Park was dead, and would I let her see him—I said, "No," and asked her to go downstairs—she ultimately went down; when we got to the hall, she told me she was engaged to be married to Cornelius Park, and Mr. Park had left her £30,000 by his will—I said I could not say anything about it; she must put forward her claim at the proper time—she went upstairs—I followed her and got her out of the house—she did not want to go—I was present at Mr. Park's funeral on 27th January—Smith was not present to my knowledge—two hours after the funeral she came to Auckland House—she said she had come to attend Park's funeral—I said it had already taken place, and asked her to leave the house—she did leave ultimately—I was with Cornelius John Park in Hay ling Island on 4th February, 1887, when he received the postal packet (produced)—I saw him open it—I saw the contents: a photograph, a bond, and a visiting-card—those were sent on to Mr. Cole.

Cross-examined by MR. SYLVESTER. I married a niece of Mrs. Park she is not interested under the will—her father is the brother of Mrs. Park—the letter of 2nd January was shown to me by Mrs. Park some days after its receipt—Mrs. Park did not hand me the envelope—I cannot say it was not received 2nd January.

Cross-examined by MR. ELDRIDGE. I had charge of the papers, and went through them—I saw some receipt-books; I think with counterfoils.

MARY LAMBOURNE . I am the wife of George Lambourne, a bargebuilder—I am a niece of Mr. Park, who died on 4th January, 1887—I was in the habit of visiting Auckland House and staying a week at a time for several years before Mr. park's death—I also visited them at Hayling Island—during my visits I became acquainted with the fact that the prisoner Smith was a tenant at Gordon Lodge—I never heard of her except as a tenant, not personally—I never saw her in the house till after Park's death—on the August Bank Holiday, 1886, when I was staying at the house, she came into the garden at the side gate—I was walking with my husband and Park in the garden—I left her sitting on a garden seat, speaking to Mr. Park—almost immediately afterwards Mr. Park beckoned to me—when I got up to them, Mr. Park begged me to come and sit between him and Smith—Smith went on

talking a little while, and then got up and went away, wishing Mr. Park good-afternoon—she was not on friendly or affectionate terms with him—he did not treat her nor she him as his future daughter-in-law—there was no appearance of it—when she went away Mr. Park said something about her—he had very often spoken about her before—I was on confidential terms with Mr. Park—I remember Allistone and Ingram leaving within a week of each other—when Mr. Park died I was staying at his house—I remember a letter arriving on 6th January from Smith, with a New Year's card—I opened it for Mrs. Park—it was handed to Mr. Churchill afterwards—it purports to be a reply to one from Mr. Park, who for three weeks or a month before his death did not receive or write letters; he was too ill—I was at the house on Sunday evening, 9th January, when Smith came—I was in the hall as she went out—she said to us all that she was Mr. Park's future daughter-in-law, and that Mr. Park, the son, had refused to marry her, but Mr. Park had left £20,000 to her—that was the very first I heard of her story.

Cross-examined by MR. SYLVESTER. She said she was to have £30,000 if the son did marry her, and £20,000 if he did not—she did not say under what document—Churchill was there; he heard it—she said nothing about the will—I am the niece of Mrs. Park—I was not living in the house in December, 1886, but I was frequently there—I was in the house within a day or two of the whole of the last three weeks of the deceaseed's life, day and night—I might have stayed just a day from him, and returned again—no relations visited Park for many years—he was an isolated man—Smith got in the habit of coming in by the garden gate for the last twelve months—I cannot say often in 1886—possibly four or five times during the year—the letter came about ten o'clock from Notting Hill or Bayswater—I believe the envelope was given to Mr. Churchill with the letter;—my attention was called to the date when I saw the matter in the Courts—I do not know whether the envelope was destroyed or what became of it.

Cross-examined by MR. ELDRIDGE. I now live at Auckland House—in 18861 was living at St. John's, Lewiaham, and in 1885—I was not at Auckland House when Allistone left, but I was there directly afterwards, and Mr. Park told me the circumstances—Ada Lambourne is my husband's daughter—she was at the house part of 1885; she was not there when Allistone left, to the best of my recollection—I knew the rules of the house—the servants were not allowed to bring in intoxicants; there was no occasion.

Cross-examined by MR. TAYLOR. Gordon Lodge is eight to ten minutes' walk from Auckland House—Smith would have to come through a field to come through the garden gate; it was a wicket gate from the field into the garden; at another time she would come through the stable-yard—she came as if she was in the habit of coming—I was very much surprised at the letter—not at the date, but at the words—6th January was a Thursday.

Re-examined, She did not come in as if she was on friendly terms; she forced her way in—I never saw her come in through the front door—she tad been forbidden the house quite a fortnight before Mr. Park's death—I knew of those orders.

ADA LAMBOURNE . I am living at Auckland House, Teddington—for seven years before Mr. Park's death I was in his service as parlourmaid

—I was in the house at the time he died—after 1883 I occasionally sat the prisoner Smith in the house—I used to Jet her in sometimes, and sometimes Annie Scott did—sometimes she said she wanted to see Mr. Park on business—she had no meals in the house, she only called as a tenant—I knew she was a tenant—I saw her there twice when the son was there—I think it was in 1885—I let her in, and showed her into the drawing-room, and told Mr. Park that she was there—she was in the house from twenty minutes to half an hour—she came again the same year when young Mr. Park was there, and told me she came about a stove or some repairs in her house—I left her in the hall, and told Mr. Park she was there, and afterwards showed her into the dining-room—those are the only two occasions I saw her in the company of young Mr. Park—I never saw or heard anything to lead me to the conclusion that they were engaged to be married—I was away from the house for a few months in 1885, and with that exception I was continually there from 1889 to 1887—I remember Allistone and Ingram being discharged within about a fortnight of each other—at the beginning of 1886 Mr. Park gave me instructions about Miss Smith, in consequence of which I never let her into the house again—she tried to get in after that, and I told her Mr. Park was engaged, and would not let her in—I remember Mr. Park dying in January, 1887—he had not been very well in November and December, and at the end of December he was very bad—I never saw Micklethwaite or Paul till I saw them at the Chancery Court—I never saw Allistone at the house after he left in October, 1885—on the Sunday after Mr. Park died the prisoner Smith came—I went to the door—she said, could it be true that Mr. Park was dead—I said yes—she said, "Will you let me see him?"—I said that she could not—she tried to get up the stairs; I tried to stop her; she tried three times, and I pulled her down, but she got up at last—I am one of the persons who held her; she was on the landing, and I tried to take the candle away—she wanted to get into the room where Mr. Park was lying.

Cross-examined by MR. SYLVESTER. I am no relation of Mr. or Mrs. Park—Mrs. Lambourne is my stepmother, and she is a niece of Mrs. Park—I am living with her at Mr. Park's house, Auckland House; it belongs to his executors now—I knew Miss Smith very well at Teddington, from 1883 to 1886, but cannot say how many times she called—she called there often in those three years, but not in 1886—she always called on business, as far as I know, or about the repairs of the house—it was Mrs. Park who first objected to her coming to the house—when she came I told Mrs. Park, and she came into the room, so that they should not be alone together—Smith was in the garden in 1886; she came to the garden once and sat on a seat with Mr. Park, and Mrs. Park told Mary Lambourne to go and sit there—Mr. Park was in good health in 1885, and in fair good health in March, 1886; he was not confined to his room till December, 1886—I took a present of game from Auckland House to Miss Smith at Gordon House from Mrs. Park—I think it was at the end of 1885; I do not know whether young Mr. Park had sent that game up from Hayling Island—he used to send game up, but the game came from different parts—he may have sent some in 1885, and I will not swear he did not send this.

Cross-examined by MR. ELDRIDGE. I do not remember being at Cromer Lodge at the end of 1885, or bringing some oilcloth from there—there was no oilcloth in the bedroom at Auckland House, nor in the hall—I remember a sale at Cromer House, next door to Auckland House—there is not a house called Cromer Lodge—I think Mr. Park bought two fenders and some Indian matting there; I do not think I helped to bring it in; I do not remember when they came to the house, but I know it was after the sale—I do not remember the facts; I might have helped Allistone to take it up, but I don't remember—I never took any messages from Mr. Travers Smith—if I remember right, Mr. Park gave Allistone notice to leave; I was not there when be left—I did not take any apples from the house to sell; I might take a few to friends—I never heard orders that nobody was to bring any alcohol into the house, or any intoxicant.

Cross-examined by MR. TATLOCK. Annie Scott was the only other servant—I generally let visitors in—we were never out of the house at the same time—Mrs. Park went to the door sometimes—I never saw either of these persons come to the house—I first saw Micklethwaite at Bow Street—I was a general servant—it is a large house—when Miss Smith only came into the garden I should see her—I made an affidavit in 1889; that was the first time I was asked about Micklethwaite—I do not remember any gentlemen visitors to the house in March, 1886, or in December, 1886—I cannot give you the name of a single visitor from. 1885 till I left.

Re-examined. There were very few visitors; Mr. Park was not able to receive many—he had several other tenants at Teddington; they sometimes called on him on business matters, and Smith called just the same as the other tenants—there was no appearance of her being an intimate friend or a probable daughter-in-law of Mr. Park—it was Mr. Park who gave me instructions at the end of 1885 not to let her in—he said he could not be bothered with her any more.

ANNIE SCOTT . I was in service at Auckland House for two years before Mr. Park died, and assisted Ada Lambourne in the work of the house—if she was not in the way I opened the door—during the two years the prisoner Smith came three or four times, not as Mr. Park's future daughter-in-law, but simply as a tenant—she never took any meals in the house—she was there once when Cornelius Park was there—I cannot say when it was—she was shown into the drawing-room; I went and told Mr. Park, and he came in to see her—except on that occasion I never saw Smith and Cornelius Park together—I never saw any sign of their being engaged to each other—I never saw Micklethwaite or Paul at the house—I never saw Allistone at the house after he left in November, 1885—I do not know Emily Wright; I saw her once after Mr. Park's death—I received a letter from her, and she called at the house and saw me—up to that time she was quite a stranger; she wanted me to do something, which I declined, and I did not see her again.

Cross-examined by MR. SYLVESTER. During the two years I saw Miss Smith many times at Auckland House, she used to come to see Mr. Park; she asked for Mr. Park—Mrs. Park objected to her being with Mr. Park, and used to come into the room when they were together—on one occasion she came when young Mr. Park was staying there; I think that was about September, 1885—Mr. Park and young Mr. Park were in the

garden together; I went and told Mr. Park that Miss Smith was there, and he went in and asked young Mr. Park to go in with him, which he did, but he did not go straight in—the interview lasted about half an hour—I remember Charles Sears repairing some boots for Mrs. Park once, and I believe he brought them home—I went with Ada Lambourne to take some game to Miss Smith as a present; I do not know whether it came from Hayling Island.

Cross-examined by MR. ELDRIDGE. I have heard Mr. Park speak to Ingram; he usually called her Wigram.

Cross-examined by MR. TATLOCK. When Miss Smith did not get in at the front door she came in by the side gate—gentlemen called on Mr. Park, but I cannot give you the names of any of them; Mr. Park did not speak to me about his affairs—he always saw Miss Smith alone.

Re-examined. She used to come in by the garden gate in 1886—I knew that there were orders not to admit her to the house.

RICHARD WEALTHY FORGE I am an auctioneer, of Twickenham—on June 12th, 1885, I received instructions from Mr. Park, senior, of Auckland House, Teddington, in consequence of which I distrained on the 13th at Gordon House, where the prisoner was living, for three quarters' rent—the distress warrant was made out against her—on the Monday after the man was put in possession, Smith produced a receipt for rent, and I withdrew the man on my responsibility, after making inquiries.

Cross-examined by MR. SYLVESTER. I informed old Mr. Park that I had done so, and he approved of what I had done.

EMMA GREEN . I live at 5, Hayden Terrace, West Maldon—my maiden name was Mansell—in the summer of 1886, I was lodging with Mrs. Emily Wright, of Hampton Wick, and the prisoner Smith visited her frequently; they were on intimate terms—I occasionally went to Auckland House with Emily Wright; she told me she went there to take needlework—this is my signature to this affidavit—during the whole time I was at Auckland House I never saw Smith and Cornelius John Park in company—I never heard anything of an engagement between M. J. Smith and Cornelius John Park—in December, 1889, I was staying at New Maldon, and Smith came to see me there twice—she asked me if I would make an affidavit of what I knew about Emily Wright—(I do not know whether Emily Wright was dead at that time), she asked me if I remembered Wright at Teddington—I said yes, and she asked me to go to London one day to See her, and then told me Emily Wright was dead, and that Mr. Park had left money to her, Miss Smith, by will, and if I made a statement she would give me something for my trouble; I believe it was £20—she gave me something that night, I cannot say how much—she came and saw me a few weeks afterwards, and in consequence of a letter I had I went to see her at Talbot Road, Bayswater—I took down a statement on another occasion, and she read it, and asked me to copy another paper which she had written out before I got there—when I had done it she asked me if I knew what an affidavit was; I said, "No"—she said, "Well, this is my affidavit and yours together"—I put it in an envelope and addressed it to Mr. Kimber, the solicitor—she said she would post it—she gave me something on that occasion—on one occasion I saw Mrs. Ingram with her—about the end of June, 1890, I went with her to Mr. Kimber's

office in Walbrook; she said that I was going before a commissioner of oaths to swear an affidavit—when we got into Mr. Kimber's office I saw the document, and signed it—I did not read it first, and did not know what was in it—I did not know that it was my statement—I signed it because I thought Miss Smith was going to sign it as well—this is it—the one I originally wrote I left with Miss Smith, and never saw it again—I then went across to a commissioner of oaths, and was sworn to it—I did not write this; it was written by the solicitor's clerk—no card of Cornelius John Park was ever given to me—this visiting card of Mr. C. J. Park has my writing on it—Miss Smith gave it to me, and I wrote these words at her request—she did not dictate them; she gave me a book to copy them—the spelling is the same—after I wrote it she robbed it with her fingers to make it dirty, and said, "I have had it a long time in my box"—she took it to Mr. Kimber, and I heard her tell him that I had found it in my box—when I had sworn the affidavit she gave me 10s.—I said, "I do not know half what they have been reading"—she said, "I will get you an office copy, and you can. learn that"—she afterwards asked me to go to Auckland House to see Mrs. Park, so that if I was asked on the trial what Mrs. Park was like I could say what sort of person she was—some time afterwards she brought me an office copy of an affidavit, and told me to learn it—my address in it was 58, Chippendale Road, Harrow; I had never lived there—she said I was to go there and stay a few days before the trial, that they should not bother me, and I was to learn it like a book, because I might be cross-examined—on the day before the trial came on in Chancery she sent my expenses for the trial and a new bonnet—I saw her at the Court in the afternoon some days before I was called into the witness-box, and went with her to Warwick Road—she said she wanted to see me alone about the affidavit which was sworn, whether I knew it; she said, "Suppose I am the solicitor and you are the witness," and she cross-examined me on it—I could not answer—she said I might be all right when I came to the Court, and gave me 10s—I was called at the Court the next day and cross-examined about my affidavit, and described how it came about—I spoke the truth—I never saw Smith afterwards—Mr. Kimber spoke to me after the case—I once saw a piece of paper in Smith's hand with a penny stamp on it, and "J. C. Park" written over the stamp, and there was writing above it—she showed it to me that I might mention on the trial how the paper was wrote—this is what I copied: "In the years 1885-1886 I saw the said J. M. Smith at Auckland House, where she seemed to be on very intimate terms with the said Cornelius John Park and Mrs. Charlotte Park, and I have seen the said Miss Smith and the son Cornelius John Park walking together in the garden of Auckland House, and it was the common talk all over Teddington at that time that Miss Smith was going to be married to the said Cornelius John Park."

Cross-examined by MR. SYLVESTER. I married Mr. Green at the end of last October—I was living in apartments at the time of the trial; Mrs. Seeley was the landlady—I believe it was at the beginning of May, the year before the trial, that Miss Smith asked me to make an affidavit—I believe the trial was at the beginning of 1890—I think I swore the affidavit in July, 1889, but I have not kept an account—the first conversation as to the affidavit took place at 4, Haydon Terrace, New Maldon,

garden together; I went and told Mr. Park that Miss Smith was there, and he went in and asked young Mr. Park to go in with him, which he did, but he did not go straight in—the interview lasted about half an hour—I remember Charles Sears repairing some boots for Mrs. Park once, and I believe he brought them home—I went with Ada Lambourne to take some game to Miss Smith as a present; I do not know whether it came from Hayling Island.

Cross-examined by MR. ELDRIDGE. I have heard Mr. Park speak to Ingram; he usually called her Wigram.

Cross-examined by MR. TATLOCK. When Miss Smith did not get in at the front door she came in by the side gate—gentlemen called on Mr. Park, but I cannot give you the names of any of them; Mr. Park did not speak to me about his affairs—he always saw Miss Smith alone.

Re-examined. She used to come in by the garden gate in 1886—I knew that there were orders not to admit her to the house.

RICHARD WEALTHY FORGE I am an auctioneer, of Twickenham—on June 12th, 1885, I received instructions from Mr. Park, senior, of Auckland House, Teddington, in consequence of which I distrained on the 13th at Gordon House, where the prisoner was living, for three quarters' rent—the distress warrant was made out against her—on the Monday after the man was put in possession, Smith produced a receipt for rent, and I withdrew the man on my responsibility, after making inquiries.

Cross-examined by MR. SYLVESTER. I informed old Mr. Park that I had done so, and he approved of what I had done.

EMMA GREEN . I live at 5, Hayden Terrace, West Maldon—my maiden name was Mansell—in the summer of 1886, I was lodging with Mrs. Emily Wright, of Hampton Wick, and the prisoner Smith visited her frequently; they were on intimate terms—I occasionally went to Auckland House with Emily Wright; she told me she went there to take needlework—this is my signature to this affidavit—during the whole time I was at Auckland House I never saw Smith and Cornelius John Park in company—I never heard anything of an engagement between M. J. Smith and Cornelius John Park—in December, 1889, I was staying at New Maldon, and Smith came to see me there twice—she asked me if I would make an affidavit of what I knew about Emily Wright—(I do not know whether Emily Wright was dead at that time), she asked me if I remembered Wright at Teddington—I said yes, and she asked me to go to London one day to See her, and then told me Emily Wright was dead, and that Mr. Park had left money to her, Miss Smith, by will, and if I made a statement she would give me something for my trouble; I believe it was £20—she gave me something that night, I cannot say how much—she came and saw me a few weeks afterwards, and in consequence of a letter I had I went to see her at Talbot Road, Bayswater—I took down a statement on another occasion, and she read it, and asked me to copy another paper which she had written out before I got there—when I had done it she asked me if I knew what an affidavit was; I said, "No"—she said, "Well, this is my affidavit and yours together"—I put it in an envelope and addressed it to Mr. Kimber, the solicitor—she said she would post it—she gave me something on that occasion—on one occasion I saw Mrs. Ingram with her—about the end of June, 1890, I went with her to Mr. Kimber's

office in Walbrook; she said that I was going before a commissioner of oaths to swear an affidavit—when we got into Mr. Kimber's office I saw the document, and signed it—I did not read it first, and did not know what was in it—I did not know that it was my statement—I signed it because I thought Miss Smith was going to sign it as well—this is it—the one I originally wrote I left with Miss Smith, and never saw it again—I then went across to a commissioner of oaths, and was sworn to it—I did not write this; it was written by the solicitor's clerk—no card of Cornelius John Park was ever given to me—this visiting card of Mr. C. J. Park has my writing on it—Miss Smith gave it to me, and I wrote these words at her request—she did not dictate them; she gave me a book to copy them—the spelling is the same—after I wrote it she rubbed it with her fingers to make it dirty, and said, "I have had it a long time in my box"—she took it to Mr. Kimber, and I heard her tell him that I had found it in my box—when I had sworn the affidavit she gave me 10s.—I said, "I do not know half what they have been reading"—she said, "I will get you an office copy, and you can learn that"—she afterwards asked me to go to Auckland House to see Mrs. Park, so that if I was asked on the trial what Mrs. Park was like I could say what sort of person she was—some time afterwards she brought me an office copy of an affidavit, and told me to learn it—my address in it was 58, Chippendale Road, Harrow; I had never lived there—she said I was to go there and stay a few days before the trial, that they should not bother me, and I was to learn it like a book, because I might be cross-examined—on the day before the trial came on in Chancery she sent my expenses for the trial and a new bonnet—I saw her at the Court in the afternoon some days before I was called into the witness-box, and went with her to Warwick Road—she said she wanted to see me alone about the affidavit which was sworn, whether I knew it; she said, "Suppose I am the solicitor and you are the witness," and she cross-examined me on it—I could not answer—she said I might be all right when I came to the Court, and gave me 10s—I was called at the Court the next day and cross-examined about my affidavit, and described how it came about—I spoke the truth—I never saw Smith afterwards—Mr. Kimber spoke to me after the case—I once saw a piece of paper in Smith's hand with a penny stamp on it, and "J. C. Park" written over the stamp, and there was writing above it—she showed it to me that I might mention on the trial how the paper was wrote—this is what I copied: "In the years 1885-1886 I saw the said J. M. Smith at Auckland House, where she seemed to be on very intimate terms with the said Cornelius John Park and Mrs. Charlotte Park, and I have seen the said Miss Smith and the son Cornelius John Park walking together in the garden of Auckland House, and it was the common talk all over Teddington at that time that Miss Smith was going to be married to the said Cornelius John Park.

Cross-examined by MR. SYLVESTER I married Mr. Green at the end of last October—I was living in apartments at the time of the trial; Mrs. Seeley was the landlady—I believe it was at the beginning of May, the year before the trial, that Miss Smith asked me to make an affidavit—I believe the trial was at the beginning of 1890—I think I swore—the affidavit in July, 1889, but I have not kept an account—the first conversation as to the affidavit took place at 4, Haydon Terrace, New Maldon,

and I live at No. 5 now—Miss Smith did not suggest that I should make a false affidavit—a few months elapsed between her asking me to make a statement and my making it—she told me to write down what I knew, and I did so; this is it (produced)—I left it with her and saw it again at Mr. Kimber's office—I wrote this (produced) at Mr. Kimber's office—Miss Smith asked me to write it—the clerk was not there; she took good care that there was only she and I there—I believe I entered two rooms, in one of which I saw Mr. Kimber and in the other his clerk; Mr. Kimber was not at home when we went, and we saw the clerk—that is him—I did not tell him what we came for; Miss Smith did all the talking—she went into the room first, and I followed her; she might have been talking to the clerk a minute before I went in—we were presently shown into Mr. Kimber's room, and saw him; he had my written statement in his hand or on the desk in front of him—he did not draw my attention to the facts in that statement; I don't think he spoke to me at all; he spoke to Miss Smith—he must have asked me whether that was my statement, and whether it was true—he did not dictate this affidavit to his clerk in my presence, but the clerk, I believe, read it over to me—I signed my name to it in the clerk's presence without saying that it was untrue, because I thought it was Miss Smith's and mine together, but I did not say so to them—I did not give this address—I cannot say whether Miss Smith gave it; I could not give it, because I never lived there—I never saw Mr. Kimber or his clerk from that day till the trial, and did not suggest that it was untrue—I did not live at Auckland House, and I was not very often there in 1885 or 1886; I should not know whether Miss Smith visited there or not—Mrs. Wright used to do needlework for Mrs. Park, and I used to go to the gate to take it home—it was before the affidavit was sworn that Miss Smith told Mr. Kimber that I found this card in my box—I did not say that it was a lie, but I told her about it coming home—I wrote this on the card at Miss Smith's place in Talbot Road before I went to make the affidavit—I wrote it from a copy; I do not know whether I wrote the word "copy" on the card; I wrote it in the room—I was first shown into a kind of waiting-room where clerks were sitting, and not in the room where it was read—Jenkins did not stay in the room—I wrote it while we were waiting for Mr. Kimber—I don't know whether I gave it to Mr. Kimber, or whether Miss Smith did—he asked me whether it was true, but I thought it was the paper I wrote first—Miss Smith tore that up, but it was to be added to my affidavit. (The statement teat here read.)

Re-examined. Very little of that statement is true—Miss Smith gave it to me to copy and I left it with her in an envelope—I wrote down that on one occasion I had seen M. J. Smith and young Mr. Park walking in the garden of the house, and that it was common talk about Teddington that they were going to be married; I copied that—Emily Wright told me on one occasion Rossiter had taken some jewellery and keys, and I told Miss Smith that—I last saw Emily Wright in 1888, I believe—there is no truth in the paragraph about having seen Mr. Park cut off the signature with a pair of scissors—I never was at Auckland House.

GEORGE BRIGGS HOWARD . I am a solicitor, of Gray's Inn Square, and a commissioner of oaths—on November 4th, 1890, in the afternoon, Smith came to my office to have an affidavit sworn, and said that Sir Charles

Manley Brown would call about 3 or 3.30—this is the affidavit—it was already signed, but this jurat was not there—I said this won't do, I must alter the jurat—it purported to be sworn at Wimbledon Hill, in the county of Surrey, before me—that was in November, and I said, "We are not at Wimbledon, we are in Gray's Inn Square"—I took my pen and was going to strike it out, but she said, "Pray don't do that"—I read the Act to her. but she would not permit me to strike it out; she said she would get it done elsewhere, she took it away, and the gentleman went too—she called at my office afterwards on other business, and said that she got it done elsewhere—on the trial of this case before Justice Romer I saw a man named Davis who was very like the man said to be Sir Charles Manley Brown—Davis was also a witness at the County-court—at the time it left my hands the jurat was not crossed out, it is crossed out now, and it purports to be sworn before a commissioner named Lebrow—here is an entry in my call-book of Wednesday, November 7th, 1890: "Miss Smith called at 3.30, and Mr. Brown at 3.55."

Cross-examined by MR. SYLVESTER. Miss Smith was first introduced to me on November 4th—I have an entry, "November 4th; Miss Smith, 1.50"—when she brought this affidavit on the 7th she brought somebody's card whom I knew—I had not done any business for Sir Charles Manley Brown against a Mr. Spencer, a stockbroker—I never saw him on any business—Octavius Davis was a witness for Miss Smith at the trial, and after I was called I heard him emphatically deny being at my office—I was engaged for Miss Smith at the County-court; she was the defendant—so far from keeping away from me, Davis actually came to my office to have his proof taken by my clerk—the first time I saw him was November 7th, and I did not see him again till I was at the County-court—I do not recollect Miss Smith asking me questions about an advertisement Sir C. M. Brown wanted inserted, but I remember her saying so at the Chancery Court—I do not remember being spoken to about an advertisement, or about any slanderous statements by Brown, and there is no entry before November 14th, 1890, that Miss Smith or Brown ever called on me, but there was a general conversation before Mr. Brown came—I do not remember seeing this advertisement (produced), but Edmunds and Edmunds, my next-door neighbours, are mentioned in it—I never had any conversation with them about it.

LEONARD PLANT PENNER . I am clerk to Mr. Howard—I was with him in 1890—I remember Miss Smith calling on November 7th—she was shown into Mr. Howard's room, and after she had been there some time a man called, who gave the name of Mr. Brown, and I entered him in the call-book—I took him into Mr. Howard's room, and the prisoner Smith introduced him as Sir Charles—the same man called subsequently several times and gave his name Mr. Davis—I saw him before Justice Bowen, and he gave his name Octavius Davis—when he called in November I entered him as "Mr. Davis, Bart."—I did not know him before November 7th—no letter had been written to him to call at the office before the 7th.

Cross-examined by MR. SYLVESTER. I saw him on November 7th, and had so good a look at him that I knew him again—he was a peculiar looking gentleman—he came several times afterwards in a different

name—he had no reason for keeping away; he wanted some money I never said, "You are the man who came here as Sir Charles Manley Brown," or hinted to anybody that he was the same man till I got into Court in the Chancery case—I did not take his proof as a witness; I believe Mr. Howard did—I put Bart, to distinguish him from other Davises who called—I heard him deny before Justice Bowen that he was the man who came with Miss Smith.

Cross-examined by MR. TATLOCK. He was a witness at the County, court—I don't think I described him as Davis, Bart., then; I daresay Mr. Howard did—two other gentlemen were in the office; one of them has gone, and the other is dead—I was for the defendant at the County-court.

VALENTINE LABROW . I am a solicitor, but not in practice—I am still a commisioner for oaths—to the best of my belief this affidavit, purporting to be sworn before V.H. Labrow, was not sworn before me; it is very much like my writing, but to the best of my belief it is not—to the best of my belief I was never at 11, Great Western Road—I did not take many other affidavits, and that may have impressed itself on my mind, especially as it was taken at his private residence—I find in my diary an entry that I was at Acton that day, but none of my being at 11, Great Western Road—I went to the house before I was called as a witness, but failed to recall that I had ever been there—I knew Micklethwaite before August, 1890, but I did not know his name; when I saw him at the Law Courts I recognised him as the managing clerk to Mr. Ward—he has not brought affidavits to me, but he has sent for me on many occasions to Mr. Ward's to take affidavits.

Cross-examined by MR. SYLVESTER. Mr. Wale is managing Chancery clerk to Mr. Ward, and I have taken affidavits there—I have often gone with Micklethwaite to take affidavits—I cannot swear positively that this is my signature, but I may have written in a style I fail to recognise—when I recognised Micklethwaite at the trial before Mr. Justice Romer I asked to be re-examined, and explained it to Mr. Park's solicitor, and I waited, but he did not call me again—I offered to make an affidavit to that effect in the Court of Appeal—I do not think the Great Western Road is on the road to Acton; it is close to Paddington Station, and you go to Acton by the North London line from Broad Street, or by the District Railway—it is not Acton on the Great Western line—there are two stations, one on the North Western line, and the other on the Great Western—my diary does not say that I went by the North London line; it merely says "Acton"—I have not got the diary here.

Cross-examined by MR. TATLOCK. I handed the diary to Mr. Sherrard, the solicitor—I do not make an entry every day of the affidavits I take; I sometimes take notes and memoranda—I make notes of affidavits very irregularly; there are very few entries in my diary.

Re-examined. I see that the jurat was originally at the bottom of the page, and it is now crossed out with the pen—I often swear affidavits, and the jurats are very often crossed out.

Re-examined. I have no recollection of taking this affidavit—11, Great Western Road is a very small place; a very poor place.

MARTIN MAXTEAD . I am an army pensioner, of 11, Great Western Road, Paddington—a person named Sir Charles Manley Brown lived at my house in 1890, and died there on September 5th, 1890—this

(produced) is the certificate of his death; he was eighty-eight—he was laid up for three weeks before he died, and for about a fortnight he was seriously ill—the prisoner Smith was a constant visitor at the house.

Cross-examined by MR. SYLVESTER. He came to me from 8, Talbot Road—he was at Artesian Road before that—Miss Smith used to come and nurse him during the day, and there was a nurse at night; she came to see him every day, and took him out for a walk—I attested his will, under which she took a benefit—up to three weeks before he died he was well enough to do business; he signed cheques and wrote letters—I do not know his signature very well, but he used to sign my book every week—I have not kept his signature; I destroyed everything; it is two years ago—I should say that this affidavit is not his; I do not believe it is his signature, but I cannot swear it is not—he always signed his name Major Brown—he did not put "Bart." after it—he signed his will Charles Manley, I think—I cannot say whether he put "Bart." after it—I believe this letter (produced) is his writing; this signature has got "Bart." at the end of it.

Re-examined. I do not know whether "Bart." is the same writing or the same ink.

Cross-examined by MR. TATLOCK. I believe the whole of that letter to be his writing.

By the COURT. Nobody came to take an affidavit of Sir C. M. Brown—I was not away in the daytime, I was away on night duty—the servant would open the door—I have not go) the same servant now.

JOHN SMITH INGLIS . I am an expert in handwriting, which for many years I have made a study—I have carefully examined the signature on this deed, J. C. Park, with his genuine signatures on the cheques, and in my opinion it is not genuine—I can give reasons—I have also examined this signature on the letter of 29th November, 1886, I do not think it is genuine—the signature to the letter of instructions with "I agree to the above" is more like Park's genuine signature, but I cannot give a decided opinion one way or the other with regard to it—the last line of the body of that document Is much closer to the previous line than any other lines in that page, and I also find that there are more letters in that line than in any other line, showing that it is compressed from top to bottom, and from side to side—it appears as if the words "I agree to the above" had been written in to fit the writing of the body.

Cross-examined by MR. SYLVESTER. It is possible that writing may be fitted so as to leave room for a signature as much as that a signature may be fitted to suit the writing—I cannot give an opinion whether the "I agree to the above" is in Mr. Park's writing; I heard his son swear it was—I had thirty cheques to compare the signature with—I have seen and compared the cheque on blank paper. (The Witness was cross-examined as to similarities and dissimilarities between the formation of various letters and style of writing.)—you cannot expect a good signature from a man of eighty; you would expect a tremulous signature—I have no doubt in my mind about the signature to the deed not being genuine, it is larger than he wrote at that time.

Cross-examined by MR. ELDRIDGE. I have often given evidence—juries have not always agreed with me—I don't expect twelve men to find out in two or three minutes what it has taken me two or three days to work out—the first few lines of the first page of the letter of instructions are

written closely together, and on the second page they get much wider in the middle, and I do not see why the last line should be crowded if there was a blank space underneath.

Cross-examined by MR. TATLOCK. I think if the "I agree to the above" had been on the paper, and the last line had been written in the ordinary space, they would have clashed—a "J" pen writes differently to a scratchy pen. (The witness was further cross-examined as to characteristics of the writing of various documents.)

Re-examined. My opinion is that in signing this the ink failed in the pen, and that the writer continued with the pen exhausted, and made some scratchy marks, and then it was gone over again and made more distinct; the failure of iuk occurred when the "J" was made, and before the "C" was made—I have a cheque of the same date as the deed—I was not called upon the trial before Mr. Justice Romer—I had been consulted by Miss Smith about this signature; I went down to the Probate Court with her, and examined the deed; I was not called as a witness.

By MR. SYLVESTER. I said that without more signatures of Mr. Park it was impossible to tell.

By the COURT. None of these variations could have been constituted by going over the signature with an empty pen, because I consider the faint indications of letters are underneath the ink—there was a faint signature before this was made, and if there had been this signature over it would be explained by a failure of ink—I should think the "J. C. Park" and the "Margaret" were written at the same time, because there is a peculiarity; the "ar" is faint also, and it has been gone over, and I think Allistone's name is written at a different time; it appears to be different ink—I think "Park" and "Margaret Josephine Smith" were written with the same pen and ink, and the "Thomas Allistone" with different ink, but whether at a different time I could not say—I am inclined to think that the signatures Micklethwaite, Park, and Paul in this letter of instructions were in three different inks—the words "I agree to the above" are in a different ink to the "Thomas Allistone" and the body of the letter—the signature is more similar to the genuine writings than otherwise—I believe the signature "J. C. Park" has been patched up.

G.B. HOWARD (Re-examined). I find on 16th June, 1889, Miss Smith changed her solicitor to Mr. Bridger, and papers were handed over to him, and are in his possession, on an undertaking to hand them over to me if I want them—no proof was ever taken from Davis—I find from letters from Miss Smith this letter, in which he prepared his own proof; it was used by me as his proof—no letter was written to Octavius Davis in 1890 to come; I have searched the letter-book—I may have asked Miss Smith to bring Davis, but this letter of 7th November, 1890, to her explains why he did not come—I think there is no letter asking her to bring Davis—Miss Smith called next day, and said she had not said anything of the kind.

THOMAS DOVE . I am a pensioned Police-Sergeant—in October, 1887, I went with Mr. Rossiter to arrest Smith and her sister and Paul, at Talbot Road—I then took no tin box from her lodgings or anything else belonging to her—I took no letters from her belonging to Mr. Park—I saw no tin box.

Cross-examined by MR. SYLVESTER I took no property belonging to the

females; they had no property—I was responsible—no property was brought from the house.

FRANK FROEST (Detective Inspector New Scotland Yard). On 18th June I arrested Smith—I met her in Whitehall—I said, "Is your name Margaret Josephine Smith?"—she said, "Yes"—I said, "l am an Inspector of Police; I am going to arrest you on a warrant charging you with forging and uttering a deed purporting to be signed by John Cornelius Park"—she said, "Let me go to my house first"—when we got to Scotland Yard she said, "On my solemn oath the signatures on the documents in Court are Mr. Park's"—I took her to Bow Street, where she was charged; she said in answer, "The signatures on the three documents in the Court are Mr. Park's"—two days afterwards, on 20th June, I arrested Paul, at Havant, Hay ling Island, where he was detained by the police on my instructions—I said, "Is your name John Paul?" he said, "Yes"—I said I was an Inspector of Police, and told him the charge; he made no reply—I brought him to London, and charged him at Bow Street; he said in answer, "I have nothing to say"—I was in Rowan's company part of the time when Micklethwaite was arrested her at the Wimbledon Police-station; she made a statement, which I took down at the time: "I entered an action for £500 against Mr. Park, and Miss Margaret Smith said she would double it if I withdrew the case. I am sorry I had anything to do with her. She induced me to say what I did at the trial. It was all false; now I intend to tell the truth; I did not witness Park's signature to the paper"—a little while after, when going back into the cell, she said, "She did not offer to double the £500 to make me say what I did"—at 5 o'clock the same evening I arrested Allistone—I read the warrant charging him with forging the deed—he said, "It is a bad job; I will make up my mind what to say when I go before the Magistrate"—on 22nd June I arrested Micklethwaite—I told him I was a police officer, and was going to take him into custody for forging and uttering a deed, purporting to be signed by J. O. Park, on 23rd March, 1886—he said, "How could I have forged? they know very well it was old Park's signature"—I was present at the Police-court when these prisoners were all brought up, on the first occasion they were charged, when evidence of their arrest was given—I gave evidence, in the presence of Ingram, Allistone, and Smith, of the statement made by Ingram—Ingram said to the Magistrate, when asked if she had anything to say, "It is quite true"—on the second hearing, at the Police-court, when all prisoners were present, she denied the truth of it.

Cross-examined by MR. ELDRIDGE. I arrested Allistone at his house; his wife was there—I don't think he pointed to her when he said, "It is a bad job"; she was in a very delicate condition at the time.

Evidence for Smith's Defence.

CHARLES FIGGIS . I am managing clerk to Mr. Kimber, the solicitor who acted for Miss Smith in the proceedings in Chancery—I was with him when Emma Green swore an affidavit; I knew her then as Emma

Mansell—on July 1st Mr. Kimber received a statement in Mansell's writing, and it was arranged that an affidavit should be made on July 3rd—I believe Mr. Kimber was in the office when she came, but engaged, and I saw her first—I do not know whether she came with anybody—she afterwards continued her statement in Mr. Kimber's room, writing at his table, and then he called me in and dictated an affidavit, and before it was written I believe Miss Smith called; it was about 6 p.m., and I suggested that while I was transcribing my notes they might go and get a cup of tea—Mansell did not raise any objection to any statement Mr. Kimber dictated to me; on the contrary, she suggested more—Mr. Kimber got the things which are not in the statement, from her—they talked over the affidavit while it was being dictated—this (produced) is the statement sent to the office, and this is what was sent by post—I read the affidavit over when they came in; it was put to her as her own affidavit; it was never suggested by anyone that the statement was Miss Smith's—the affidavit of Sir C. M. Brown ultimately came into Mr. Kimber's possession, I do not know how.

Cross-examined by MR. AVORY. Mr. Kimber had not acted for M. J. Smith before to my knowledge, and I do not think he has since—he is not acting for her now—she was not present when this affidavit was dictated—I have said, "The affidavit of E. Mansell was dictated to me in the presence of Emma Mansell and Miss Smith. "

WILLIAM LOVELL . I was coachman to Mr. Park, senior, for twenty four years—I cannot say whether I was there between 1881 and 1885—I cannot remember the dates—I do not know who succeeded me as coachman—Allistone came after I left—during the time I was coachman I saw the prisoner Smith sometimes at Mr. Park's, and sometimes in the road—I have seen her in the dining-room talking to old Mr. Park, but not very often—I never drove them—young Mr. Park was not there when I have seen Miss Smith there—I have seen Mr. Park and Miss Smith talking at the gate together.

CHARLES SEARS . I am a bootmaker at Teddington—I have known old Mr. Park about twenty years, and worked for him during that time—my shop was near Auckland House—I have seen the prisoner Smith there once or twice, but never saw her with young Mr. Park—I have left Teddington seven years—I do not remember being present in one of the rooms of Auckland House when Miss Smith and old Mr. Park and young Mr. Park were there—I once carried a letter from Mr. Park to Miss Smith, and I have taken two or three from her to Mr. Park—I took one from Mr. Park to Miss Smith, at 81, Lawrence Road, Notting Hill.

Cross-examined. I made an affidavit to oblige Miss Smith, and was examined as a witness—I do not remember Mr. Justice Romer saying that he did not believe me—I have never seen Miss Smith with Cornelius John Park—I have sworn, "I have seen the said M. J. Smith on several occasions walking arm in arm with the said Cornelius J. Park," that was the old gentleman—I did not read my affidavit before I swore it—Mr. Edwards, the solicitor, prepared it—I swore it about August 18th, 1889—I was living then where I am now at, Hampden Gurney Street, near Hyde Park—I am described as of St. Peter's Park; I work there; they are both correct—I said before Mr. Justice Romer that it was not correct, and that it was the address of a relative—I don't know now what was in the affidavit.

DR. HEAD. I am in practice at 20, Oxford Terrace, Hyde Park—I attended a man at Great Western Road, who was introduced to me as Major Brown, from August 5th to September, when he died; during the greater part of that time he was capable of conducting business.

EDWARD KIMBER . I acted as solicitor for Miss Smith in her claim in the Chancery Division in the latter part of the time—I prepared an affidavit for Emma Mansell—I received a statement in writing, and when this woman called on me I asked her whether it was her statement she said "Yes"—I asked her whether she sent it to me—she said "Yes"—I asked her whether it was true—she said "Yes"—I said that it appeared there was something which was irrelevant, and told hereto sit down, and I called in my shorthand writer, and I dictated! to him, paragraph by paragraph, each statement, and asked her whether it was true, and she said "Yes"—there was no suggestion of it being a joint affidavit of her and Miss Smith—I explained to her what she was doing—the things which are in the affidavit and not in the statement I got in discussion with her—I received the affidavit of Sir C. M. Brown through the post in August or September sworn, too late for the trial—I had it in my possession in November, 1890—it had a signature then, the same as it has now—it purported to be sworn before a commissioner, and the other jurat was across it—it was too late to file—it was filed; these were all affidavits filed and printed, and they must have printed some affidavits afterwards, because I know the first batch printed were filed within the time; these are supplementary affidavits, which were afterwards sworn and filed; the first one is as far back as 1884—this affidavit is exactly in the same state now as when it was sent to me.

Cross-examined. I received it by post—I suppose it was from Brown himself, as I was having some proceedings with him at the time—I do not think there was any letter with it—I afterwards told Miss Smith it was no use, because he was dead, and could not be cross-examined upon it, and I declined to file it; she asked for it, and I gave it to her—I was surprised to find afterwards that she had actually filed it.

DONALD MILLER DUNBAR . I am a laundry proprietor and dyer, of 103, The Grove, Hammersmith—in 1885 I was an estate agent at 214, Fulham Road, and Miss Smith called upon me alone; she came a second time with a gentleman, and said his name was Park—they forced me to put two houses on my books which belonged to Mr. Park; and about a week afterwards she came with him, and my daughter Annie was present—the houses were given to me at £40 a year the first week, and when he came again he said I might take less to get rid of them—he said Miss Smith was about to get married to his son, and it was important that they should be let finally, as two houses would be too much for her mother to look after—I subsequently got instructions to let Cromer Lodge—I went to Teddington, looked at the houses, and called at Auckland House.

Cross-examined. I was managing the estate agent's business for the prisoner Paul during the time he was in the country, as he lodged at my house—he is a house agent—I had to attend to my own business as well—I was a landed proprietor too; I have a house or two—I gave Paul a job when he returned from prison, doing machine work in the laundry—I knew he had been in prison; I saw it in the papers—I considered he was as respectable a man as we are; of course a conviction looks bad,

but when I knew him he was a highly respectable man, and had a livery stable in St. James's; he had then, I suppose, £2,000—I did no business, but I turned 5 per cent, during the months I was there, and I introduced some customers, big firms, furnishing companies, and all that—I have met Paul and Miss Smith together, passing through Brompton Cemetery, once or twice—at the time Paul was arrested, in 1887, we were not still doing business for each other, but he was lodging at my place; he owed me some money, and therefore we did not speak after that; I passed him and took no notice—I believe he lodged with me in 1885; I do not know about 1886—when he came out of prison he came to me; he was down, and I did not want to keep him down—I saw him two or three times walking about with Miss Smith—I was first asked to make an affidavit, I think, in 1889—Mr. Edwards' clerk asked me.

Re-examined. I never went with Miss Smith to St. James's Street.

ANNIE DUNBAR . I remember the time when my father was managing the estate office in Fulham Road—I went there every day for a fortnight to take his dinner—one day when I was there, Miss Smith and a short stout gentleman, Mr. Park, came together—he spoke about houses to let at Teddington or Richmond, and then about Hayling Island—I said I had been there; he asked how I liked it; I said, "Very much," and that I had seen the lifeboat launched on stormy days—he said Miss Smith was going to marry his son and live on Hayling Island—she was wearing a locket with a portrait in it—he said it was his son—I could not see the likeness because I am near-sighted.

Cross-examined. I took my father's dinner into the back parlour, but the folding doors were thrown wide open; I then walked into the office, and stood speaking to my father when the lady came in, which prevented my asking him if I should fetch his beer—I had never seen the lady or gentleman before, but I have seen Miss Smith several times since; I saw her walking with a gentleman in Fulham Road; I cannot say whether that was Paul, because I am near sighted—I saw Ingram once in The Grove, Hammersmith—I made an affidavit; Miss Smith asked me to state what I knew—she did not remind me of this interview in 1885—she said she was having an action and wanted me as a witness, and asked me if I remembered what was said on that occasion—Mr. Edwards' clerk wrote out the affidavit as I told him; I did not find it ready written—these people were conversing there nearly two hours, but not with me; my father's dinner was hot when I took it.

By the JURY. The gentleman had a broad face and short legs, and walked peculiarly, and had a little hair on his chin, but I cannot recognise the two photographs—he was very old—I am very bad at recognising, unless I am close to a person.

CHRISTOPHER JOSEPH O'LEARY . I have carried on business for some years as a dentist in Harrow Road—for the last seven or eight weeks I have been in the hospital with phthisis—I knew Sir Charles Manley Brown very well in 1885 and 1886; he came to my place and introduced a gentleman as Mr. Park, who came to me afterwards professionally—I went down to Auckland House, Teddington more than once, to attend him professionally, and I did something to his teeth there—on the first occasion I was there professionally about half an hour, but I stopped two hours—while I was there I saw Miss Smith; I had known her previously—I saw her at Auckland House on that occasion—I did not stay

any time in her company—he was surprised that I knew her—I do not think she was in the room more than once while I was there—when she was going out Mr. Park said she was a very lucky girl, but what that meant I do not know—Sir C. M. Brown mentioned her engagement on a subsequent visit, or else Mr. Park mentioned it; I think it was the elder Mr. Park, but Sir C. M. Brown was present.

Cross-examined. I gave evidence before Mr. Justice Romer, and was cross-examined—I heard after that Mr. Justice Romer said he believed Mr. Park in preference to me—I have no book to show the year or month of the date of my visit to Mr. Park, nor have any of my patients except their names—it was about 1885 or early in 1886; I think it was in 1885—I distinctly remember visiting him twice—I have no idea how Sir C. M. Brown came there; I understood he was a friend of Mr. Park that was about 1885; I do not know where he lived—I used to meet him in Bayswater—he never lodged at the house kept by M. J. Smith in Talbot Road—I have known her since 1884, and I must have known her when she was living there; I understood making affidavits—I gave my address 18, Westbourne Villas, Bayswater—but the name was changed some months, before to 18, Harrow Road; it was Westbourne Villa; when I was asked how it was to be found, I replied, "I daresay they would find it in an old directory, or making use of their tongue"—I said it would sound better if I called my house Westbourne Villa—Sir C. M. Brown was tall and stout, and had a long beard.

Re-examined. 18, Westbourne Villas was the right description of my house when I went to live there, but a few months before this the Board of Works had altered it; that was well known to the postmen; letters so directed would reach me now—I do not keep books, only a rough scribble—it is a ready-money business.

MR. PENNINGTON. I am an auctioneer, of Richmond—in June, 1885, I had written instructions from Mrs. Smith, the prisoner's mother, to levy a distress at Gordon Lodge, Teddington, on the goods of Mrs. Vibart Hughes—Mrs. and Miss Smith were living in the adjoining house—this is the distress warrant.

GWINNETT SMITH . I am no relation of the prisoner Smith—I knew Sir C. M. Brown when he lived in Great Western Road, Paddington—I nursed him during the last months of his life—I was there every day—in August, about a month before he died, Mr. Micklethwaite and another gentleman came to see him, and he made an affidavit—I saw him sign his name to it—this is it—I think he put it away himself, but I am not sure—Dr. Head, of 20, Oxford Terrace, was attending him—he knew what he was doing when he made this affidavit—I went to Teddington in 1885, and looked at some houses—Mr. Park was the landlord—I called at Auckland House and saw Mrs. Park and Miss Smith, who was playing on the piano—Mr. Park introduced her—I had never seen her before—he said that she was his future daughter-in-law—Mrs. Park joined in the conversation—later on in the same year I saw young Mr. Park at Gordon Lodge; he came there to see Miss Smith—I did not hear anything; they were in the garden—I think they went away together—I am not quite positive whether I saw Miss Smith again at Auckland House, but I went there once or twice—Mr. Park spoke to me about Miss Smith more than once in a very friendly way.

Cross-examined. My real name is Jane Gwinnett Smith—I got that by marriage—I first married John Gwinnett; he died, and I married a Mr. Smith—my name is Jane Smith—on 5th July, 1890, I was living at Porten Road, "West Kensington—I swore before Mr. Justice Romer that I lived at 120, Shirland Road, in July, 1890—that was true—I described myself in July, 1890, as of 66, Belsize Park, Hampstead, in an affidavit I made—I had no permanent address—I told Mr. Justice Romer that I was living at 120, Shirland Road, because I was staying there at the time I had known Sir C. M. Brown some time—I am not a professional nurse—I have known Miss Smith about ten years—I gave evidence for her at the County-court once or twice—I registered Sir C. M. Brown's death—I was present when he died at 42, Chippenham Road—when I registered his death I described myself as J. Gwinnett—I was Jane Smith, but I conducted my business in that name as a dressmaker and outfitter twenty years ago, and I am more known by that name than the other—I had no residence at this time; I was staying with my sister for a year and a half—I was living in Warwick Road, I think, in April, 1890—I was one of the attesting witnesses to Sir C. M. Brown's will—I did not describe myself as Jane Gwinnett, of 50, Portland Road, Kensington, but Porten Road—I cannot tell how many addresses I gave at that time; I was visiting Miss Smith was not living with me when she was arrested, I was living in Porten Road then—I was not in the house when she was arrested—I was living with her when she was arrested on this charge—she had been living with me for a short time previous to the trial of her action—I am the person who went down to bring Emma Mansell up, and took her a new bonnet—I had not got a copy of my affidavit, as we came up in the train; I did not come up with her—I lived in the name of Gwinnett Smith, at 63, Belsize Road—a Mrs. Reynolds lived there—that was not me, she was not like me; she was only a quarter my age—I do not know where she can be found now—I lived there about 9th December, 1890—I have never heard that the landlord and tradesmen have been looking for me—I know Sir C. M. Brown's writing, and quite believe the signature to this letter to be his.

Re-examined. I was not in debt to the tradesmen—one of my sisters lives in Shirland Road, and the other in another road—I had not got a house of my own—Sir C. M. Brown knew me as Gwinnett Smith—I carried on business in my first husband's name, even after I married Smith—I had no reason for concealing my name—people knew me as Mrs. Gwinnett. (MR. TATLOCK tendered the affidavit of Sir C. M. Brown. MR. AVORY Contended that I was not put in.)

HENBY BLAND . I am a greengrocer—I removed some furniture and effects by Miss Wright's orders in 1887 and 1891—I do not know whether Miss Smith had been living there, or where she was at that time—there were six or seven different kinds of boxes; two were big yellow tin ones.

Evidence in reply,

JAMES FORBES . I am a clerk in Somerset House—I produce the will of Sir C. M. Brown, Bart., who died in September, 1890—he signs his name, Charles Manley Brown, in full.

WILLIAM HOWARD HUNT . I am a pensioner of police—before March, 1891, I knew the prisoner Smith at Teddington, where I have lived since 1863—in February, 1891, she came to see me, and pulled out a sheet of

note-paper, and said, "Have you ever seen me and Mr. Park together?"—I said, "I think I have, once;" she said, "Do you know the date?"—I said, "No; but I remember his meeting you in Queen's Road"—She wrote it down and said, "Would you mind signing it?"—I said "No," and signed it—a fortnight afterwards she brought a sheet of paper folded in four, and said, "Just sign this; this is precisely the same as you signed before in pencil"—I said, "I always make a rule of reading a thing before I sign it"—I looked at it, and it said, "I have seen her hand on Mr. Park's arm several times, and also on old Mr. Park's arm, and Mr. Park introduced me as Mr. John's future wife, and said he would give me £30,000 if I married him, and failing that, £20,000;" she said, "If you will sign that I will give you £500"—I said, "How can I sign what I have never seen and never heard?"—she said, "You won't do it?"—I said, "No"—she said, "Then I won't press you"—she summoned me as a witness.

Cross-examined by MR. SYLVESTER. I have positively seen Miss Smith walking with young Mr. Park in Queen's Road—that is Cornelius John Park, who has been called as a witness—I have every reason to believe it was Miss Smith; this was not far from the father's house, but I never saw them arm-in-arm—I saw them walking together once, and only once. By the JURY. I am not quite sure it was Miss Smith; they were six feet apart, and it was dark—Mr. Park said, "Here is our old policeman Hunt"—that was addressed to her—I had known her by sight for three years, and knew her pretty well; I should imagine it was her; she was going towards her house, Gordon House—they were both side by side, six feet apart, but abreast of each other.

GEORGE INGLIS (Re-examined). I have examined the signature of the alleged affidavit of C. M. Brown with the signature to the will, and do not think they were done by the same hand—this letter appears to be written by the person who signed the will.

Cross-examined by MR. SYLVESTER. My opinion is that there are very strong variations.

Cross-examined by MR. GREENFIELD. The signature to the will I accept as genuine—I had no other.

By the JURY. I have only had it a short time; the "le" is imperfectly formed, but it joins the "t," and the "r" has got-a shoulder to it—he writes "Charles" in full in these two.

EMILY ELIZABETH NORMAN . I live at 15, Artesian Road, and let lodgings—in August, 1889, Sir C. M. Brown came to lodge with me in Torrington Square—this is his photograph—he left, I believe, in November, and went to lodge at Bayswater—I went to see him at his new lodgings, 11, Great Western Road, once or twice (I inquired at Talbot Road, but he had left)—a fair man, rather dissipated-looking, opened the door—I have not seen him since—I saw Sir C. M. Brown—this document, which he said was an affidavit, was on the table—I have seen him write cheques and letters—I should say decidedly that this letter is his writing—it is very like it, and I believe it is—this (another) is also his, and this affidavit is his writing, to the best of my belief—I have seen him write, and have received letters from him frequently—he lodged with me a little over three months.

Cross-examined. I have not been called as a witness in this case before—I have given evidence in ordinary police cases—he usually signed his

name "C. M. Brown" or "C. Manley Brown"—he wrote numbers of cheques.

GUILTY .

SMITH— Five Years' Penal Servitude. PAUL— Seven Years' Penal Servitude. MICKLETHWAITE and INGRAM— Six Months' Hard Labour each.

ALLISTON— Twelve Months' Hard Labour.

OLD COURT.—Saturday, September 24th, 1892.

Before Mr. Justice Collins.

Reference Number: t18920912-860

860. ALBERT RICHAED JONES (18) , Feloniously carnally knowing Annie Jones, aged nine.

MR. HUTTON Prosecuted, and MR. BIRON Defended at the request of the COURT.

GUILTY Twelve Months' Hard Labour.

Reference Number: t18920912-861

861. THOMAS RILEY (27) and JAMES THOMPSON (soldiers) , for a rape on Agnes West.

MR. SANDS Prosecuted;

MR. BIRON appeared for Riley, and MR. HUTTON for Thompson (at the request of the Court).

GUILTY Seven Years' Penal Servitude each.

FOURTH COURT.—Tuesday, September 27th, 1892; and

OLD COURT.—Wednesday, September 28th, 1892.

Before Robert Malcolm Kerr, Esq.

Reference Number: t18920912-862

862. CHARLES ANTHONY BEYTS (59) and GEORGE GRANT CRAIG (34) , Conspiring, with Henry Stafford Beyts. to defraud the Chartered Mercantile Bank of India, London, and China of large sums of money.

MESSRS. C.F. and A. GILL Prosecuted, MR. BESLEY, who appeared for Beyts, and MR. PYKE, Q. C., for Craig, advised their clients not to plead.

WILLIAM JACKSON . I am chief manager of the Chartered Bank of India, London, and China, 65, Old Broad Street—there is a branch at Bombay—the defendants were customers of the bank for a considerable time—they carried on business at 35, Great St. Helens, as steamship owners and merchants—part of our business at Bombay is purchasing bills of exchange, with shipping documents attached—they are forwarded to me in London, and would be presented for acceptance here—the firm did a good deal of business with Beyts, Craig, and Co. for many years—I retained the bills sent over here till they were paid, and then handed over the shipping documents to the firm—I produce four bills of exchange; the first is for £1,000, with a bill of lading for 1,600 bags shipped by the ss. Stanton by Beyts, Craig and Co., which is signed H. S. Beyts—there is an invoice attached to the bill; the total is £1,155 14s.—the signature is Bombay, Beyts, Craig and Co.—the next bill is for £907 2s. 10d., with a bill of lading showing 1,334 bags of brown nuts, shipped for Antwerp; the invoice is made out in a similar way—the next is for £892 17s. 11d. for 34 bags of linseed, shipped at Antwerp—the last is for £933 2s. 4d., represented by a bill of lading for 1,334 bags of rape seed, shipped at Antwerp; the bills represent £3,370 3s. 1d.—those bills were accepted

on 23rd May by Beyts, Craig and Co.—the signature in each case is Mr. Beyts'—those bills all matured on Saturday, 25th June—I received these letters (produced) on 24th June, and again communicated with Antwerp; and on 28th June received an answer, in consequence of which I went, between five and six p.m., with Mr. Barnard, the assistant manager, to the office of Beyts, Craig and Co., and saw the two prisoners—previous to that he had promised to make a deposit, first on the Saturday and then on the Monday; on Tuesday nothing came, and I went round and said to Mr. Beyts, "How is it these bills are not paid?"—I did not get any definite reply, but he was desirous that I should wait till the following day—I pressed him, but I could get nothing satisfactory from him—I said, "Are the deposits all right?"—he did not give any distinct answer, and I said, "Do the deposits exist?"—he said, "No—I asked how it was he had accepted bills knowing that the deposits had never been shipped—he said, "Yes"—I asked him why he had not stopped—he said he wired to his son at Bombay to stop it, but he persisted—I said to Craig, "You have been to Bombay, how is it?"—he said, "When I was in Bombay there was nothing of the kind"—I said, "Why did not you stop it, then?"—he said, "My old partner's son and I did not like to"—Mr. Beyts said he was dazed, and said he would all tomorrow—I said, No, they must know the amount the bank would lose—Craig said about £30,000—I guessed then further, and he produced an account showing that the Bombay firm was credited to them in a large amount of money—I pressed Craig again,. and he turned to Beyts and said, "You had better tell Mr. Jackson everything"—they said they would come next day—I said, "You mean to tell me you have been accepting bills when you knew the produce had not been shipped?" he said "Yes"—the directors were told next day, and on the 29th two of them came to the bank, and Beyts gave me this memorandum, the total of which is £46,349 2s. 6d., for which there is no produce—even that does not exhaust the amount.

Cross-examined by MR. BESLEY. I have known this firm in London eight or ten years—I have been manager of the bank ten years, and I was assistant manager before—I have not the ledger here to show the vast transactions of the firm with the bank—the firm shipped coal to India, and they may have shipped sugar—the bills always came with the documents—when the acceptances sent by the branch at Bombay were sent to the head office, the clerk used to leave the bill and call for it accepted the following day—till last year the amount of drafts accepted by this firm was very small, but last year it was larger—up to the failure of the New Oriental Bank there were some few bills which I had to hold over for a week or two—I think I heard of the stoppage on June 9th—the ss. Stanton had arrived at that time; she arrived about the end of May—these were accepted on May 23rd—I knew of the ship arriving at Antwerp—I suppose notice of fire insurance was given in the usual way—we did not on this occasion give notice to the people at Antwerp that the goods were to be held on our account; we had a lot of bills purporting to be drawn against goods by the Stanton, but some of them were paid—there was a certain amount by the Stanton, some of which were paid long before they fell due; there might be £1,700 due on June 18th paid on June 4th, and £953 due on June 18th, and they went on

paying themselves—there were large payments before the rumour of the fall of the bank, but not very large amounts afterwards—they had three or four banks in Bombay—up to the time of this conversation the business had gone on satisfactorily, and I had implicit confidence in the integrity of the firm—there were other failures.

Cross-examined by MR. PYKE. Mr. Craig gave me April, 1891 as the date of his leaving India, and he told me he got back to Bombay in October—he came back again in March this year—every one of these bills was signed by young Mr. Beyts; not one by Mr. Craig—young Mr. Beyts would send them, when signed, to our branch in Bombay, with the bills of lading, and they would put the money to the credit of the account in Bombay—if Mr. Beyts or Mr. Craig had not accepted a bill we should have sent it back to Bombay—the acceptance of a bill does not take any money out of our pockets on this side—I think all the bills I have referred to, which came to £46,000, were drawn or signed in Bombay, about May, 1892, by young Beyts, when Mr. Craig was over here—the payment of those bills was in many cases in anticipation of the date of maturity, and we should allow discount for that—as to their solvency, I was not perfectly certain, but I knew nothing to the contrary—we had not got security for the amount; we relied on the security of these documents—I knew the ship had arrived about the end of May with the goods, as I supposed—I did not stop the goods; I wrote to inquire about them on June 24th or 25th—I did not stop them, because some of the bills were paid shortly afterwards, and Mr. Beyts said these goods were all sold, and if I sent a bill of lading to Antwerp it would interfere with his credit there, and he asked me not to do it; there had been previous instances where he had asked me to do the same—that was a week or a fortnight before the bills matured; but a lot of them had been paid—we have stopped goods—Mr. Beyts always came to me—I never saw Mr. Craig with reference to this matter—I said to Mr. Craig, "You have been in Bombay, and must have known this was going on"—he did not say that it never went on when he was in Bombay—he said that when he left Bombay in 1889 nothing of the kind was going on, but when he returned in 1891 he found it going on—I said, "Why did not you stop it?"—he said, "Oh, it was my old partner's son"—my memory is very clear—I consulted Mr. Barnard, and Mr. Craig said it was £30,000; I made a mistake at the Police-court—they volunteered to come and make a proposition next day about the way they were going to meet their liabilities.

By MR. BESLEY. After the £46,000, bills for £15,000 were sent for acceptance with the stamp of the firm on them, but they were not signed—he was not in custody then, but it was no use asking him to sign them then—the £30,000 forms part of the £46,000.

Re-examined. I never saw Mr. Craig that I know of till a fortnight before he was arrested; I wanted to know what was the position of the firm, and he came round and told me the capital of the firm was £20,000, and they had available capital in Bombay to that extent—I asked him what he meant—he said two lacs of rupees were at their disposal—I said, "What do you mean? that is not capital"—he said, "That is what I meant."

GEORGE EDWARD BARNARD . I am manager of the Chartered Mercantile

Bank—on 8th June I was in the office of Beyts, Craig and Co., and heard £30,000 mentioned; we were pressing the two prisoners, and Mr. Craig said that roundly the amount was £30,000—I have heard Mr. Jackson's evidence, and corroborate it.

JAMES CHRISTIE BENGALOW . I have been manager of the Bank of Bombay for some years—in February, 1889,1 went out and took charge of the bank, and remained there till this year—I know Mr. Craig as the resident partner; I also know Mr. Henry Stafford Beyts, the son of the elder partner—he signed by procuration—we purchased these four bills; they bear the signature of Mr. Stafford Beyts, and the firm of Beyts, Craig and Co. had credit for them—I believed they were genuine documents.

Cross-examined by MR. BESLEY. I was satisfied that Mr. Beyts's son had authority to sign per procuration—I have been managing since 1879—I first saw young Mr. Beyts there about 1890—he has been there, I believe, ever since—he has not left Bombay—he was not in custody before I came over to give evidence—I know that he is committed for trial in Bombay; he is not tried yet—I did not see him in custody; he sat at the table with the solicitors, and I rushed away to the steamer, and just caught it in time—young Beyts signs the bills per pro. in Bombay, and we credit the proceeds to the firm's Bombay account; we try to make a profit out of it—I was in Bombay when the New Oriental Bank started—they do not sometimes bring in the bills of lading a day or two after we have credited the bills in our account; they came in together—when acceptances are sent out to Bombay, we get the documents of title with them—we send the draft to the acceptor, keeping the documents in the bank, but some people insist on seeing the documents; I do not—this firm were managing owners of the company; they own, I believe, four, five, or six ships—I believe they were the owners of the Minnie Craig and the Fanny—I know of coal and other produce being imported into Bombay by this firm to a small extent—I know they make £75,000 on freight, independent of coal charges.

Cross-examined by MR. PYKE. Mr. Craig was absent from Bombay, I think, from April to October, 1891, and I believe he was in Bombay from November, 891, to March, 1892; he has not been there since, to my knowledge—when Mr. Craig as there, I believe he or young Mr. Beyts would sign the drafts—all these four drafts are signed by young Mr. Beyts, and also the bills of exchange and bills of lading, and all the invoices—Craig told me a lot of lies—I said, in cross-examination by Mr. Grain, "As far as I have had occasion to see Craig on several occasions, I always found him open, straightforward, and ready to give information"—that is right.

FREDERICK ARTHUR HULTON . I am a mate in the merchant service—I was in Bombay when the ss. Stanton was being loaded this year—I was chief officer—I saw all the cargo put on board—Beyts, Craig and Co. were the charterers; they shipped one parcel—I proceeded with the vessel to Antwerp, and arrived in May; discharged all the cargo, and proceeded in ballast.

Cross-examined by MR. BESLEY. I very often sign mates' receipts—the owners may give bills of lading without my knowing anything about it—I do not know what the one parcel was. PETERS. I am chief clerk in the sailing department of Kennedy,

Hunter and Co., ship brokers at Antwerp; they are agents for the SS. Stanton—I had to overlook the unloading of that vessel—on her arrival we could not get a manifest or freight list—I telegraphed to Mr. Hubbard, the managing owner, after which I received the freight list (produced)—the discharge was then proceeded with, and completed on 4th June she left on 8th June, but she had to wait a few days for orders—looking at the freight list I found 49 parcels, and bills of lading were presented for all of them—these are the whole of them as I sent them back to Mr. Hubbard, and after the 29 parcels had been discharged the ship was perfectly empty.

WILLIAM DICKSON . I am a chartered clerk to a firm who acted for Beyts, Craig and Co.; I produce the charter-party—the ship was to proceed to Bombay, and come to Antwerp, where Kennedy Brothers and Co. are the owners' agents—on the arrival of the Stanton I communicated with Beyts, Craig and Co., and got the list and forwarded it to Antwerp.

Cross-examined by MR. BESLEY. Coal was taken out to Bombay.

Cross-examined by MR. PYKE. The charter party was signed by Mr. Beyts; they charter a good many vessels with us outwards; this was the only one home.

RICHARD HOLTON. I was clerk to Beyts,. Craig and Co. from 1889 till the filing of the petition—Mr. Beyts was usually in London, and Mr. Craig in Bombay—one of the partners opened the letters from Bombay; there was usually a private letter enclosed in them to Beyts or Craig, or to Beyts and Craig—I did not use the letter-book after Mr. Cooper took possession of the premises—a stock-book was kept, and on folio 57 of it a parcel of goods by the Stanton is entered 1,404 packets of linseed—the freight list would be the same—it is shown in the produce-book how that parcel was dealt with.

Cross-examined by MR. BESLEY. I went in 1889, and remained there till the Official Receiver took possession he was there about a week before Mr. Cooper came—in the interval I saw nothing of any letter-book—I do not think the letter-book locked this was three or four months ago—I think Beyts went out in the spring of 1891; he drew £50 a month at first, and £70 or £75 last year—there was no private banking account to my knowledge; he drew from the firm—I have always heard that he bore an excellent character.

Cross-examined by MR. PYKE. Mr. Craig came back in the spring of 1891, and was sometimes in the office—Mr. Beyts was the resident partner—I think Mr. Smyth was sent out in the autumn of 1891, and sailed in the Mary Beyts—Mr. Craig came back in 1891, and went out again in October—while he was away Mr. Martin was placed in the firm to look after his interests—when Mr. Craig returned in April, 1892, there were not strained relations between the partners directly—I have heard that Mr. Craig gave notice to Mr. Beyts to dissolve the partnership—I do not know the date; it was before June 25th—when Mr. Craig came back in April he went away for some time, and came back about the time of the crash of the Oriental Bank—I then heard high words between the partners—Mr. Craig asked to see the books generally, but they were not written up, and he complained bitterly about it—if they had been made up they would have shown these bills; they are here—the bill-book is written up to February 10th, 1891—there was great pressure of business in 1891, and that was given as the reason that the

books were not made up—the firm owned a large number of shares in ships; they were transferred to Beyts, and Mr. Craig complained that Beyts had transferred to other names shares which belonged to him—on 7th May, 1892, Mr. Craig gave notice to dissolve—he complained about the books as soon as he came home.

Re-examined. I was on fairly intimate terms with Mr. Craig; I was not told that the partnership was ever dissolved—this (produced) is my writing—I think Mr. Craig gave me most of the figures—the Indian letters came in an envelope like this (produced), but I never saw one this size—there was a list of the contents, and usually a private letter; these were opened by Mr. Craig—the stock-book was written up, as far as I know—I believe there were letters from Mr. Smyth to old Mr. Beyts in 1891 and 1892—this letter (produced) is to Mr. Beyts, sen.

HENRY TAYLOR (Detective Inspector). On 19th June I went with another officer, Coates, to the Chartered Bank of India and China, Old Broad Street, and saw the prisoners in the manager's room—I said, "I am a police officer; you will be charged with forging bills of lading Craig said, "I have conspired with no one"—on the way to the station Beyts said, "I have been made the dupe of my son in Bombay; I wired him not to do it, but he would not take my advice; neither he nor myself will save one penny piece out of it; I never thought it would come to this"—I found on him this letter written in pencil. (This stated that he had been made a victim of, and that there were no goods to represent the drafts that his son had been squandering the money in Bombay, and he lacked the moral courage to refuse to honour the drafts.)—I knew Mr. Arthur Cooper, the accountant this (produced) is a certificate of his death—I heard him give his evidence before the Magistrate—the prisoners were present; they were represented by counsel, and he was cross-examined. (The deposition of Arthur Cooper was here put in.)

MR. BESLEY submitted that there was no jurisdiction to try Mr. Beyts for conspiracy; it had been decided in Dr. Bernard's case that a person in England joining in a conspiracy with a person in France, was not punishable in this country: there was no proof that Mr. Beyts had conspired or said anything to or acted with his son, who did certain acts in Bombay.

MR. GILL contended that, as the money was paid by the bank to Beyts, Craig and Co., who both carried on business within the jurisdiction of the Court, there was evidence of conspiracy in this country. The COURT overruled the objection.

GUILTY .— Two Years' Hard Labour each.

ESSEX CASES.

Before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18920912-863

863. ARTHUR ERNEST WALLIS (17) , Stealing 18s. from Annie Page.

MR. GEOGHEGAN Prosecuted.

ANNIE PAGE . I am the wife of William Page, of 84, St. Stephen's Road—on Saturday, 23rd July, about one o'clock, I left my shop—just before I left I went to the till and saw about 18s. in silver in it; I left a small boy in the shop, I was not away a minute; when I came back I

saw the prisoner and another small boy in the doorway; the prisoner was in the shop, I was close to him; the small boy was in the doorway, and when he saw me he ran away; the prisoner walked outside the door—the till was wide open and the money was gone—when I got outside the door the prisoner was two doors off, and he turned round and said, "I have not got the money, Mrs. Page, the other boy has got it;" he had his hands closed, and I distinctly heard him drop the money into his pocket, and he flew away as fast as he could—I had seen him before, and on Sunday morning, the 24th, I picked him out from a number of others.

LOUISA AYLETT . I am the wife of Arthur Aylett, of 15, St. Stephen's Road—on 23rd June I was at my street door, close to Page's shop—I saw the prisoner and another boy walking down the street on the other side of the way—I watched them to the corner of the street—the prisoner and a lot of boys stopped at the corner; the smallest boys walked on—I looked again, and the prisoner stood there, and the smaller boy came from Page's shop and gave something into the prisoner's hand at the corner of the street, and the prisoner put it in his pocket—I picked Bush out at the Police-court as the small boy, but I would not swear.

HENRY WILLIAM BUSH . I am fifteen years old—I know the prisoner—on Saturday, 23rd July, the prisoner asked me to go with him to get a bit of something to eat; I went to his home—we passed Page's shop—I did not go to it—the prisoner did; he went in—he said, "I am going to get a penny worth of locusts to eat"—it is a kind of bean—Page's is a cornchandler's—I stood against the shop next door—when he came out he showed me a handful of silver—he had it in his hand—he did not say anything—I did not ask him how he had got it—I walked away to the other side of the road; I did not run—I don't know what became of the prisoner; he stood there—I left him because I was frightened—I did not know where he got the money from—I saw him again the same evening at Stratford, and I said to him, "Mrs. Page has got your name and address, and she has told all the people that you have got 18s. out of her till"—he said, "I only had 11S. 3d. out of it"—there was no other boy there besides me.

Prisoner. He was in the shop with me—he went in first and gave the money to me Witness. No.

FREDERICK PORTH (Detective Sergeant). About half-past nine on 23rd July I arrested the prisoner—I said, "I shall arrest you for stealing a till and contents"—he said, "Where from?"—I said, "St. Stephen's Road"—he said, "I know nothing about it"—he was afterwards detained and charged—I found on him 6d. in silver and 8 1l. 2d. in bronze—the boy Bush was seen by the witnesses, but they failed to identify him as the boy that ran away.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not do it.

GUILTY Judgment Respited. .

He then PLEADED GUILTY to a previous conviction at West Ham on 19th December, 1891. Polite-constable Thomas Searle stated that there were three previous convictions against the prisoner; that his parents were respectable, but he would do no work. The prisoner's mother undertook that he should be sent to America, where he had a brother doing well.—

Reference Number: t18920912-864

864. WILLIAM CHAMBERS and ELLEN KNELL , Stealing three watches and other goods, the property of Frederick Lovell Chambers. Second Count, receiving.

CHAMBERS PLEADED GUILTY .

MR. TURRELL Prosecuted, and MR. LYNCH Defended Knell. FREDERICK LOYELL CHAMBERS. I am the father of Chambers—I am a jeweller and watchmaker, in the Leytonstone Road, Stratford—on 24th August I missed from my shop these articles of jewellery, value about £8 or £9—I gave information to the police—I afterwards went with a constable to Knell's place—this silver, watch is worth about £1, but it is only valuable because it is old—I had not known Knell before this.

WILLIAM EUSTACE (Police Constable). I arrested Chambers; I found three duplicate pawn-tickets on him—in consequence of what he said I went, on 31st August, to Knell's house—I said to her, "A man by the name of Chambers is in custody at West Ham for stealing jewellery, and he says you have pawned two gold chains with gold seals, and one gold watch"—she said, "I don't know anything about him; I don't know the man, and I know nothing of the jewellery"—she then said, "Is he locked up?"—I said, "Yes"—she said, "Then I will tell you all about it. He came over here; I have only seen him once. He gave me two gold chains and one gold watch, those I pawned"—I said, "Do you wear a keeper ring?"—she said, "Yes, I have a keeper ring. I saw it on his finger; I asked him for it, and he gave it to me"—she produced the ring—I conveyed her to the Police-station—she made no answer to the charge there.

Cross-examined. I said at the Police-court that when she was charged she said, "I pawned the watch for 13s. at Butterfield's"—she told me it was pawned in the name of Knell—she gave me the name of each pawnbroker again—she said the gold chain and seal were pawned for 22s., at Attenborough's—she told me she gave the ticket to Chambers—I first told her that a man of the name of Chambers was in custody for felony—she was very much frightened and upset; I don't think she understood it; she said, "I know nothing about it"—I then said, "He is in custody for having stolen," enumerating the articles—and she said, "I will tell you all about it"—everything she told me I elicited to be the truth—I made inquiries, and found she is a respectable woman, so far as I know; she has been a married woman, living at 219, Scovell Road, Borough, for eighteen months, and has borne a good character during that time; I cannot trace her back more than that—Chambers told me that another man had pawned another portion of the jewellery.

THOMAS LEWIS . I am assistant to James Butterfield, pawnbroker—this lady's gold watch was pawned at our shop, by the prisoner Knell, for 13s., in the name of Jane Knell—this is the duplicate—it was about a safe price to advance; I believe she asked more.

WILLIAM BISHOP . I am assistant to Henry Telling, pawnbroker—I produce this gold Albert and seal, pawned with us for £1, in the name of Mrs. Chambers—to the best of my knowledge it was the prisoner, but I could not swear to her.

NOT GUILTY .

CHAMBEES— Discharged on recognisances.

Reference Number: t18920912-865

865. JAMES GEORGE HARVEY , Stealing ten bags of flour and ten bags, the goods of William Johnson and Co., Limited.

MR. HUTTON, Prosecuted, and MR. BURNIE Defended.

GEORGE THOMPSON . I live at 29, Haile Road, Tidal Basin, and am a labourer in the employment of Mr. McCabe, a stevedore for Johnson and Co., who have a wharf—on Thursday, 11th August, I was with Sicking in the docks; the prisoner, who is deputy wharfinger employed there, came and told us to fetch two trucks down to the bottom of the shed at D jetty—when we got there with the trucks he helped us to load ten bags of flour from the bulk of sacks which were there—they were mixed brands, Crown of Ruby, Superlative, and King of Kansas—when loaded, by the prisoner's instructions, I and Sicking took them on the trucks to the top of the jetty on the left hand side, and put them into a cart—the prisoner assisted us—we then went back to where we were working.

JOHN SICKING . I am a labourer—I assisted Thompson in loading up these ten sacks of flour, and in consequence of it I gave information to my employer, Mr. McCabe.

WILLIAM CONSIDINE (207 Dock Police). On 11th August I was on duty at the Victoria Dock entrance, about 1.30 p.m.—a van drove up to the gates, and the driver gave me this pass ("A"), which I signed at the back. (This pass was for ten hags of flour out of the Victoria Bock, and had the initials "R. D." at the top)—I examined the van, and found ten bags of flour in it.

ROBERT CLEARY . I am a wharfinger to the Johnson Line, Victoria Docks, living at Osborne Road, Forest Gate—it is my duty to sign passes, with the amount of the goods going out, and enter it on the counterfoil; the contractor's man fills them up—when I am absent during the day I sign so many passes in the book, and leave them blank, so that the contractor's man can fill them up—I am not responsible for the number of sacks—on 11th August I was absent from the docks; before going I signed passes Nos. 92 to 95, both inclusive, and left them blank—I did not see the prisoner in the office when I left—he would be entitled in sending goods out to fill up the pass—he is employed by McCabe, the contractor, as principal ship's clerk—it would be the duty of anybody sending out goods to enter the amount of the goods in the stock-book—the prisoner would be entitled to get one of these passes and send goods out—he would be at the office when the lighterman or carman applied for a pass; he would refer to the tally card, and fill up the pass from that—this pass is filled up in the prisoner's writing—across the counterfoil 95 is written, "see 94," in the prisoner's writing—94 says, "Nineteen bags of flour, marked Hastings," and is signed by a man named Donovan, as having been taken by him; he is the lighterman—that pass has not been taken out, but is still attached to the counterfoil—these ten bags of flour on 11th August have not been entered in the stock-book, which I have here, as they should have been if they went out—we call this stock-book the manifest for the ship.

Cross-examined. I do not keep this book, which belongs to Mr. McCabe; I am not in his employment; I have never made any entries in it—I had to go through the book and check over the ships' accounts, but I should see whether entries had been made; the prisoner did not have to make entries in the book under my direction—McCabe sends out a

great number of bags of flour—the prisoner has been some months in Mr. McCabe's employment.

JONES. I live at South Tottenham, and am marine superintendent to Wm. Johnson and Co., Limited—on August 26th, from something that came to my knowledge, I sent for the prisoner to the office; Mr. Perry (the general manager to Wm. Johnson and Co.), Cleary, John B. McCabe, Banks, and myself were there—the prosecutor, who held this pass "A" in his hand, said to the prisoner, as nearly as I remember, "Do you know anything about this pass? Can you give me any explanation about it?"—the prisoner, without taking the pass into his hand, said, "Yes, I know all about it; it relates to ten bags of flour that I intended to take, and after it was loaded up on the van, and had been taken away, I heard a whispered conversation between two men on the dock, to the effect that the job looked very crooked; I went after the van; it was standing at a public-house outside the dock gates, and I had the bags brought back again, and I unloaded them myself from the van, and they are at the bottom of the jetty now"—Mr. Perry asked what "R. D." meant on the pass—the prisoner said, "That refers to the ten bags of flour"—Mr. Perry told Cleary to go to the bottom of the jetty and see whether the ten bags of "R.D." were still there—Cleary went, and on his return said the ten bags of "R.D." were there—that is all the conversation I remember—the prisoner was told to leave the office by perry—I went and looked at the ten bags, and I should say they had laid there six months undisturbed—if "R.D." flour was sent out, "R. D." would be put on the pass, and if it were Superlative or Crown and Ruby, that would be put on it—everything was done in order; the actual description with the number should be put on—"R. D." is a particular brand.

Cross-examined. The solicitor conducting the prosecution before the Magistrate examined me; before that he had taken a statement from me—I thought the prisoner's statement that Mr. Perry about his having taken the bags out and brought them back was important; I said nothing about it before the Magistrate—the prisoner called a witness before the Magistrate, and I heard his evidence.

Re-examined. I made a full statement to my solicitor—he asked me before the Magistrate no questions about detailing this conversation.

REECE EDWARD PERRY . I live at 73, Disraeli Road, Putney—I am manager to William Johnson and Co.—on 26th August I was present when the prisoner was called into the office; Jones, John McCabe, Banks, Sergeant Reed, and the prisoner were there, and Cleary was there part of the time—I said, "Can you explain the matter, Harvey? I suppose you know all about it"—he said, "Yes, sir, I have done a wrong thing"—I said, "What do you mean? Do you mean you stole the flour?"—he said, "Yes, sir, I did"—I asked him what he had done with it—he said, "I got frightened; someone on the wharf said, 'This is a crooked job,' so I stopped the cart at a public-house outside the gates and brought it back again, and I unloaded the flour myself on the end of the wharf"—I sent the wharfinger to see if the bags were there—the prisoner was not given into custody till some time afterwards.

Cross-examined. I did not go before the Magistrate I was not asked to do so—I had made a statement to my solicitor, and left the matter in his hands—I think John McCabe was present nearly all the time.

FREDERICK KITCHING (Sergeant Dock Police). On 1st September I went to the sdock entrance, West India Dock, and saw the prisoner I told him I was a police-officer; I should arrest him for stealing ten bags of flour from the Victoria Docks on 11th August, and that anything he said in answer to the charge I should use in evidence against him he made no reply to the charge—I took him to the station.

JOHN B. MCCABE . I am London manager with my father, a stevedore for Johnson and Co.—the prisoner was in my father's employment—this stock-book is supposed to be kept by us under Cleary; it is our duty to keep it, and Cleary is supposed to look over it to see it is correct, and whether the entries in it correspond with the counterfoils of the other books—it is the duty of the prisoner and Banks to make entries in the stock-book of any goods taken out of stock—in the prisoner's absence it would be Banks's duty to do it—Cleary's duty is to check it by the counterfoils from the other book, which is called the counting off book—it would be the prisoner's duty in passing off goods to enter it in the pass-book, or give instructions for it to be done—the prisoner is Banks's superior—on August 11th there is no entry by the prisoner of ten sacks of flour being passed out—it would be the duty of the prisoner or Banks to enter that flour going out—he would have to put "R. D." there.

Cross-examined. I was present when the prisoner was sent for to the office—I was not called as a witness before the Magistrate—Mr. Banks is not here—I discharged the prisoner on 26th on account of the flour, and paid him to the end of the week.

Re-examined, Between 26th August and 1st September inquiries were made—he was given into custody about 1st September, I think—I gave information to the police before 26th—the book shows when flour is on hand, and if any is delivered it would be entered underneath, with the date—the whole of this entry refers to the "R. D." in stock, and the prisoner's duty was to enter the "R. D." that went out—as there is no such entry here, we should assume that the whole quantity was still in stock—we had no other "R. D." in stock besides that lot that I know of. By MR. BURNIE. The prisoner had been about three months with us, and during that time I should think he has delivered about 100,000 sacks under Mr. Cleary—the prisoner's duties took him away from the office on to the jetty a good deal, about two-thirds of the day, and in his absence Banks, a man of experience, aged forty-three, would have charge of the office—he was a man of experience brought up from Liverpool to look after this book when the prisoner was not there.

GUILTY Six Months' Hard Labour.

Reference Number: t18920912-866

866. JANE GERDES (28) PLEADED GUILTY to marrying William Mackling during the lifetime of her husband.— Discharged on Recognisances.

Reference Number: t18920912-867

867. ALBERT SPURIN (22) and FREDERICK MAY (23) , to burglary in the dwelling-house or Leonard Potts, and stealing three solitaires and a silver brooch. [Pleaded Guilty: See original trial image.]

SPURIN also PLEADED GUILTY to a conviction of felony in February, 1884— Fifteen Months' Hard Labour.

MAY— Four Months' Hard labour. And

Reference Number: t18920912-117

(868) ALFRED CHARLES COLLEY (28) and GEORGE BARTON (21) , to breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Inman, and stealing 60 cigars and other articles, and 8s. 6d. [Pleaded Guilty: See original trial image.]

COLLEY also PLEADED GUILTY to a conviction in

May, 1888, at this Court in the name of Alfred Coley— Fifteen Months' Hard Labour. BARTON— Four Months' Hard Labour ,

Reference Number: t18920912-869

869. REUBEN GAY (25) , Unlawfully and indecently assaulting Elizabeth Wells.

MR. BLACKWELL Prosecuted, and MR. CONDY Defended.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18920912-870

870. HARRY WATERS (16) PLEADED GUILTY to embezzling 18s. 11d. received by him for and on account of Henry Schmidt, his master.— Three Months' Hard Labour.

Reference Number: t18920912-871

871. WILLIAM SAYERS (40) , Unlawfully obtaining meat by false pretences from Alexander Miller, with intent to defraud.

MESSRS. CONDY and COLLINS Prosecuted, and MR. HUTTON Defended. THOMAS HOLWAY. I am an accountant, and have the use of the office at 7, Grove Terrace, Woodford—last June I went into the accounts of Thomas Miller, Woodford, and found that the prisoner owed him, £153 3s. 6d., the balance of weekly accounts—I was requested by Mr. Miller, the sole surviving partner, to draw the prisoner's attention to the fact of his owing so much, and that he would not be allowed to have more meat—I asked the prisoner to come and see Mr. Miller—he did so—I was present at the interview in the shop, and then we adjourned into the parlour—the prisoner said he was about commuting his pension; that he should know in a few days as to what he should have to receive, and he would let Mr. Miller know—about a fortnight afterwards he called and said he had been up to town to sign his papers, that he should know in a few days the amount he should receive—he called subsequently, and told us it would be about £157—he said, "If you will allow my account to continue As usual, I will pay the whole of this over to you, Mr. Miller"—he did not say what that was to be paid in respect of.

Cross-examined. He has paid nothing since June in respect of the subject of this charge—I don't know how much he has paid.

JOHN ALEXANDER MILLER . I am a butcher carrying on business at Woodford—the prisoner is a butcher; I have dealt with him in business for two or three years off and on—he is in debt to me £53 on the present charge, and £151 or £153 on the old account—about the end of May he came to my shop, and said, in the presence of the last witness, that he was able to commute his pension, and he would then hand me over the bulk of the money if I allowed him to have meat—he said he was going to the War Office to sign the papers—in consequence of that I went on selling him more meat—we had told him we could not let him have more meat unless he paid some money, and he said he would commute his pension and pay—he had some meat within a few days—the same week, or three or four weeks later, I saw the prisoner, and he said he had been to the War Office to commute his pension and had signed the papers, and in the course of a few days he would hand me the money—I went on supplying him with meat for some weeks after that, through June and July, until he moved his furniture and ran away.

Cross-examined. I have had dealings with him for the last five or six years, he buying meat to the extent of about £20 a week—he owed me

about £153 when he ran away—he said he had been to the "War Office—I charged him with taking £53 worth of meat by fraud—I began supplying him with that from the end of June to the end of July—he has, since 18th July, paid me money off other accounts, not off that £53—he has paid me some few pounds a week, in all about £90; but I did not apply any of that to the £53—after I gave him credit for the £53 he was indebted to me about £225, out of which he paid me about £90—I daresay he has paid me over £90 since I gave him credit for that sum—when he decamped with his furniture I determined to charge him.

Re-examined. The money I received was not in payment of this. £53—I supplied him with meat for three weeks on the faith of his representation, and if he had not made it I should not have so supplied him.

CLAUD ERNEST BENSON . I am clerk in the first division of the War Office—the prisoner enlisted in the army in 1871, at the age of eighteen; he is entitled to a pension of eightpence a day, being discharged invalided—he cannot commute that pension till he is fifty years old—I don't think he had any notification of that fact when he received the pension—he has never applied at the War Office for a commutation; he has not signed any papers.

Cross-examined. A person might raise money on a pension without going to the "War Office, but it could not continue for more than one quarter—I said before, I know people in difficulties raise money on their pensions outside the War Office.

THOMAS JOHNSON (Detective Sergeant Y). I arrested the prisoner on the 12th August at Brighton—I read the warrant to him—he said, "I don't see where the fraud comes in; it is a debt"—I conveyed him to Woodford—when charged he made no reply.

Cross-examined. I have made inquiries about him—he left the army with a good character, and has carried on the business of a butcher for many years—I should say he has always been respectable.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18920912-872

872. GEORGE JOHNSON (37) , Stealing a pair of boots, the property of Mary Sullivan; Second Count, receiving the same.

MR. TURRELL Prosecuted.

MARY SULLIVAN . I live at Balance Street, Plaistow, and am a boot and shoe dealer—these boots are mine—I made this mark, No. 11, inside them.

Cross-examined. I always mark my boots myself—there is no initial on it.

WILLIAM HONSON . On 29th July I was in Mrs. Sullivan's shop—the prisoner was sitting down there; he told me to go out and come in presently, the woman might be at home then—I went out—when I came back the prisoner was gone—I afterwards saw him down the street with the policeman.

Cross-examined. I am positive you are the man I saw in the shop there was a lad in the next room, who seemed as if he was asleep.

EDWARD TILLEY (211 K). I arrested the prisoner, who was being detained at a shop—on the way to the station he said he had some property on him—I said, "We will see what it is at the station"—he then produced this pair of boots from his coat pocket—I asked him where he

got them—he said, "I bought them off a Jew in Whitechapel"—I said, "What did you give for them?"—he said, "1s. 8d."—I said, "What were you going to do with them?"—he said, "Pawn them"—I said, "You have passed a great many pawnshops between Whitechapel and here; you could have pawned them before now"—he said, "I thought I could make more of them in the country. "

The prisoner said, in his defence, that he had bought the boots of a Jew, named Isaacs, for 1s. 8d.

GUILTY .

He then PLEADED GUILTY>** to a conviction of felony in January, 1887, in the name of Thomas Lea. (There was another indictment against the prisoner.)— Twelve Months' Hard Labour.

Reference Number: t18920912-873

873. SAMUEL BENNETT (25) and WILLIAM EVANS (19) , PLEADED GUILTY to stealing a purse and £1 5s. 6d. from the person of Emma Bauckhan , Bennett having been convicted at Westminster on 4th July. 1891, and Evans at Bow Street on 4th February, 1892— Eighteen Months' Hard Labour each.

Reference Number: t18920912-874

874. JOHN WALTERS (47) and GEORGE STUBBINS (44) , Unlawfully attempting to steal goods and money from a woman unknown.

MR. GRAIN Prosecuted. GEORGE SMITH BERRY (Detective Sergeant 8 R) I am generally stationed at Liverpool Street Statien—I received instructions, and. on August 13th, about 4.20, I was at Stratford main line Station, and saw the two prisoners on the platform with two men not in custody—Walters had an overcoat on his left arm—on the arrival of the train he opened a door partly, and placed his arm behind the coat and put his hand into a lady's pocket—he then went to another lady and did the same, and then to a lady in a third class compartment, but I could not see whether he put his hand in—Walters was standing behind him each time—I took Stubbins—he said, "I will have a go for it," and kicked me in a private part and bit me—he was very violent—I did not know them by sight—Campbell was with me.

Cross-examined by Walters. A ticket was found on each of you; you changed at Stratford, but you had no business on that platform—I spoke to one lady, but she had her purse in her pocket; Campbell spoke to the other—I had to get out of the compartment to follow you, and had no time to speak to the third lady.

CHARLES ROBERT CAMPBELL (Police Sergeant). I was with Berry—I have heard what he has stated—Stubbins refused to give his address; Walters said that he lived at Bruce Grove, which is not an address, it is a district.

ALBERT SHAYLER (60 K). I received the two prisoners in custody.

The prisoners' statements before the Magistrates:—Walter says: "I have done ten days' imprisonment; I think it is quite sufficient for what I did."Stubbins says:" I have no wish to go for trial."

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18920912-875

875. JOHN WILLIAMSON (22) and FREDERICK BOLTON (18) , Unlawfully attempting to steal from the person of a woman unknown.

MR. GRAIN Prosecuted

GEORGE SMITH BERRY (Detective). On August 19th I was on the down platform of Coborn Road Station with Swain, a Post-office officer, and saw the two prisoners get out of a third-class carriage of a Romford train—they sat down on a seat, and then went up to two ladies—Bolton put his hand in a lady's pocket, Williamson standing behind they then went to another lady—Bolton put his hand in her pocket, Williamson standing behind—I got into a carriage, and got out at the next station, and saw Bolton put his hand into a lady's pocket, and pull out her handkerchief—I said I was a detective-officer, and should charge him—he said, "Where did you pick us up first?"—I said, "At Coborn Road"—they were taken to the station and charged—Williamson said his name was Williamson, but afterwards he said "Jack Sharp"—Bolton would not give any name; they both gave addresses.

ALFRED HORACE SWAIN . I am a second class sorter in the Post Office—on August 19th, about 5.30, I was at Coborn Road Station, and saw the prisoners—a lady got into a third class compartment, and Bolton put his hand into her pocket—Williamson covered him—the train went on.

CHRISTOPHER JOHN BISOOE . I am a porter at Coborn Road—on 19th August I saw the prisoners sitting on the platform, and afterwards saw them leave by the 6.3 train to Romford.

EDWARD WARRINGTON (420 K). On August 19th the two prisoners were charged before me; the charge was read over to them; they made no reply—I found these two tickets on them.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18920912-876

876. JOHN WOODLEY (22) , Attempting to break and enter the dwelling-house of Charles Carlish, with intent to steal.

MR. ROOTH Prosecuted.

The COMMON SERJEANT considered the evidence insufficient.

NOT GUILTY .

KENT CASES.

Before Mr. Justice Collins.

Reference Number: t18920912-877

877. FREDERICK WILLIAM DEAN , Unlawfully assaulting Thomas Lansdale.

MR. ELDRIDGE Prosecuted, and MR. GEOGHEGAN Defended. After MR. ELDRTDGE had opened the case, the prisoner stated his desire to

PLEAD GUILTY to a common assault, and the JURY thereupon found him Guilty of Common Assault.

There was another indictment against him for shooting at Thomas Lansdale with a loaded pistol, with intent to murder him. No evidence was offered by the prosecution.

NOT GUILTY .— Discharged on recognisances.

Before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18920912-878

878. WILLIAM SNOW and WILLIAM KNEVETT , Unlawfully and indecently assaulting Minnie Elizabeth Hill, aged three years.

MR. SYDENHAM JONES Prosecuted

SNOW.— NOT GUILTY .

KNEVETT.— GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18920912-879

879. PATRICK CONNOR (46) , Feloniously wounding William Cleaver, with intent to do grievous bodily harm.

MR. ST. AUBYN Prosecuted, and MR. GEOGHEOAN Defended.

WILLIAM CLEAVER . I am a labourer in the Arsenal at Woolwich—I married a daughter of the prisoner, and we lived in the same house as the prisoner and his wife—on the night of 24th August, about a quarter past eleven, I and my wife came home together from the theatre; she knocked at the door, the prisoner opened it—I stopped at the gate talking to a friend—as soon as the prisoner opened the door, he rushed at me past my wife with an axe in both his hands, and aimed a blow at my head with it; I put up my hand, and received the blow in the palm of my hand, which was cut open about two inches long—I immediately closed with him, threw him to the ground, and held him till a constable came, and he was given into custody—my hand was dressed by the doctor at the station.

Cross-examined. My wife took away the axe from his hand—I saw that he had a wound on his nose next day; I suppose that was caused in the struggle—I did not bite him, he said that I did, but it is not true—I saw him that evening about eight, before I went out, and he bade me goodnight; and I said, "Good-night, father," he spoke in a perfectly friendly manner—I have seen his discharge from the Army, where he had been twenty years, it stated that his conduct was good; he has an African medal, and a good conduct pension of 4s. a day.

ALFRED AYRES (251 R). On 24th August, shortly after eleven, I was called outside the prisoner's house, and found the prosecutor had him on the ground, holding him; the prosecutor was bleeding from the hand—I asked the prisoner why he did it—he made no reply—I believe he was quite sober—on the way to the station he said, "I will do for him," and at the station he said the same—I produce the hatchet; the prosecutor's wife gave it me.

Cross-examined. At the station the prisoner said he believed he had been bitten through the nose by the prosecutor—the doctor examined his nose—I saw marks of blood about it—he was rather excited—when I went there he was lying flat on the ground on his back, in the front garden; he was not struggling, he was lying quite still, and the prosecutor holding him—he looked very wild—the hatchet had been taken from him by that time—I believe the prisoner had been thirteen years with his regiment in India.

SIDNEY WORTHINGTON . I am a divisional surgeon—I saw the prosecutor at the station about midnight on the 24th—he had an incised wound an inch and a half long, running down the centre of the right hand to the bone—this hatchet could have done it; it is not very sharp—there must have been considerable violence used—the prisoner had a wound at the side of his nose, which I dressed; it was a lacerated wound, like a tear.

GUILTY of unlawfully wounding.— Nine Months' Hard Labour, and find one surety in £100 to keep the peace for twelve months.

Before Robert Malcolm Kerr, Esq.

Reference Number: t18920912-880

880. JAMES WISE (39), CHARLES WALKER (28), and THOMAS JARVIS (21) , Unlawfully taking Louisa Elizabeth Newland, a girl under sixteen, out of the authority of Stephen Diddens, her lawful guardian, with intent, etc Other Counts, charging each person with carnally knowing her.

MR. HUTTON Prosecuted.

The JURY considered that the prisoners might reasonably suppose the girl was eighteen.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18920912-881

881. WILLIAM WEBBEE (35) , Unlawfully attempting to carnally know Charlotte Hall, a girl under thirteen.

GUILTY Eight Months' Hard Labour.

Reference Number: t18920912-882

882. ALFEED THOMAS CEOCKWELL (58) and ANNIE CEOCKWELL (36) , Unlawfully procuring Alice Shead to become a common prostitute.— MR. MUIR Prosecuted.

GUILTY Eighteen Month each.

SURREY CASES.

Before Mr. Justice Collins.

Reference Number: t18920912-883

883. JAMES BANBUEY (22) was indicted for, and charged on the coroner's inquisition with, the wilful murder of Emma Oakley.

MESSRS. C. F. GILL AND BODKIN Prosecuted, and MESSRS WARBURTON and SIDNEY KNOX Defendod.

The JURY, after retiring for nearly two hours to consider, returned and delivered a verdict of Guilty, with a recommendation to mercy on account of the prisoner's age, but before the verdict was entered the Foreman desired to remark that two of the jury were so deaf that they had not been able accurately to hear the evidence. The two jurors referred to having assured the Court that such was the fact, MR. JUSTICE COLLLNS stated that under such a state of things he could not receive a verdict. The jury were therefore discharged, and the cm was reheard before another jury, when the following evidence was given.

HENRY RICHARD BRIGGS . I live at 18, Well Street, Camberwell, and am a cab-driver—I have known the prisoner twelve months—he is my daughter-in-law's brother—on Wednesday, 29th June, about two in the afternoon, I was with my cab outside the underground railway at the foot of Westminster Bridge—I saw the prisoner—he hired my cab, a hansom—I drove him first to the Southampton Restaurant, Southampton Buildings, Chancery Lane, where we had a drink together; he had a four of gin—we remained inside there about ten minutes, and outside about twelve minutes afterwards—he then got into the cab again, and I drove to Grosvenor Park, Camberwell—we stopped at the Grosvenor Arms, and went in; he had half a quartern of gin, which came to 3d.—the prisoner paid me my fare there—I said, "Jim, I am going to change horses, as I have a new horse"—he said, "Don't change your horse, because I shall want you again to drive me to Victoria"—I said, "Well, I will go and change horses; I am close to the stables, and will come and fetch you"—he said. "No, I shall not be about two minutes"—I said, "If you are longer than five minutes you will find me gone; I am not going to keep this horse out any longer"—he then left me, and went round the comer

towards the church in the direction of Grosvenor Park; that was somewhere about four—he returned in about seven or eight minutes, got into the cab, and said, "Go on to Victoria"—I first went to the stable and changed my horse—in Trafalgar Street he said, "Don't go to Victoria, go to Charing Cross instead"—I drove into the yard of the South-Eastern Station—he got out there and said, "You can leave your cab here, because we will go and have a drink, as I am going to leave you," and he said, "I have shot a girl"—I said, "You shoot a girl; you never had the pluck to shoot a revolver, I think; in fact, you could not shoot for nuts"—he said, "You are laughing"—I said, "I can't help it"—he said, "But you will find it a very serious matter"—we then went to a public-house in Villiers street, called the Griffin, and the prisoner had another quartern of gin there—I said, "Is it right you have shot a girl?"—he said, "Yes; I loved her, and I swore nobody else should have her"—I laughed again, and said, "What have you been reading, some horrible novel? What is the matter with you? Are you mad?"—he said, "You keep on laughing; you will find it a serious matter"—I said, "Oh, bosh; I am going back to my cab"—we then left the public-house, and went towards my cab—on the way he put his hand in his left side pocket and pulled out a revolver, and said, "I should like to see the man that would arrest me now"—upon that I put my knee on his hip, caught hold of his wrist, took the revolver out of his hand, and put it in my pocket—it was fully loaded in six chambers—he said, "Give it me back; I will give you all the money I have for it"—I said, "No, you could not have it for £50"—he said, "I don't owe you any animosity, Briggs; shake hands"—which I did—we returned into the yard to the cab—on the way I asked him if he had any more cartridges; he put his hand in his pocket and gave me eighteen cartridges—I was going on towards my cab, when he came behind me and struck me on the left ear—I said, "You whelp! what do you mean by that?"—he said, "I can hold my own with you"—I then struck him; he put himself in an attitude, and we fought a fair round—he said I might as well hit mahogany as him—a porter came and caught him under the legs, and carried him outside into the Strand—I drove out of the yard, and a little way in the Strand I got a fare, and drove off to the Criterion; the prisoner ran and jumped up behind, and got on to the cab; in Waterloo Place I told him to go away—her said he would not—I said, "You had better go from me, I have had enough; if I lose my temper I may perhaps do you an injury"—he then went away, and I did not see him again till he was at Lambeth Police-court—I withdrew the charges from the revolver, and kept it in my pocket, and the next day I gave it to Inspector Dunlevy, with the cartridges—I saw something in the newspaper, and went to the police—this (produced) is the revolver.

Cross-examined. When he told me he had shot a girl I thought it was ridiculous; I thought it was imagination—he has generally borne the character of a peaceable man—when he hailed me, and got me to drive about, he seemed rather muddled from the effects of drink—we had drink twice at the restaurant, once at the Grosvenor Arms, and once in Villiers Street—at the Grosvenor he seemed rather worse—he seemed dazed, and rather thick in his speech—I believe an aunt of his died in an asylum; it is a well-known fact in the family—he has two cousins in a private asylum—he told me that

afternoon when we were in Chancery Lane that he had had a very good time, that he had won £30 at the Alexandra Park races—he said he had been horribly screwed the night before—I knew he was sodden with drink, he had been on the drink for months—some time back he came into £200, or something like it, under his father's will, and it had all gone in drink—I don't know why he should be described as a betting man; he has laid his money out in betting and drinking; he never kept a book.

Re-examined. I have only known him twelve months—he has been abroad; I did not know him before he went abroad—he was drinking heavily when he came home—he had money sent him to bring him home—his father died about eleven years ago, before he went away—when he came home from Australia, the first time I saw him, I thought there was something strange about him, he would seem so quiet, and when talking to him about one subject he would go into something else quite different—I have known that occur at various times—he would begin talking about his life in Australia, and then go on talking about his father and mother—he would sometimes sit very quiet, and perhaps not speak for half an hour, without taking the slightest notice when you spoke to him—I was not in the habit of driving him about—when he first came home I took him about a little, three or four times only, and then I did not drive him till this particular day—about three weeks previously, I think, I drove him to the Canterbury; that was the last occasion before this—I used to see him sometimes two or three times a week—I have seen him in other cabs, not to speak to him, very often—I did not know that he was racing; I knew he would bet his money, he told me so—I knew he lived in Brewer Street, I did not know the number—he never told me where he lived—he told me he had a wife in Australia—he said nothing about being married here—he did not show me a photograph of himself and wife; he sent one in a letter to his sister, Clara Briggs, my son's wife—I believe he went to Australia alone, and came back alone—I knew his two cousins personally, William and John Devenish—I saw John about three months back, he came to my house—I know he was mad enough then by the way he carried on; I don't think he drank to excess; I don't think he had the money to drink—soon after I saw him he was taken away to a madhouse, I believe to Dr. Stacker's, in Peckham Bye—I know he had been confined before, and so had his brother William—I saw William about nine months ago, in the street, walking about—he was not a man that drank a good deal, to my knowledge—I have seen the aunt, she was not a drinking woman at all—she is living—her name is Devenish; she lives at 48, Lorrimore Road, Walworth; she is an independent lady, and is the mother of William and John; neither of those three people were in the habit of drinking, as far as I know—I don't know who the father was, I did not know him at all—Mrs. Devenish was either the prisoner's father's sister, or something.

EMMA FOSTER . I live at 81, Grosvenor Park, Camberwell—I knew Emma Oakley; she had been a lodger of mine for about fifteen months—she came with me to Grosvenor Park, about Christmas, from a previous address—she had the front room ground floor, furnished as a sittingroom, and the back as a bedroom—I know the prisoner by sight; I have seen him as visiting at the house for about seven weeks before the 29th

June—I can't say that I have seen him every day, but I have seen him frequently; he used to come to see Emma Oakley—on Wednesday afternoon, about a quarter to four, I was in the washhouse at the back of the house; I heard a knock at the door, and I heard the deceased let somebody in—I heard the door shut again—I heard someone speaking in the passage—I heard them go into the parlour and heard the door shut—I next heard the sound of a revolver, four or five times, I should think, reports very quick one after the other—I should say it was about five minutes from the time I heard the knock at the front door that I heard the banging of the firearms—I then ran upstairs, and saw the prisoner leave the door of the sitting-room and run out of the street door; he was putting his hand behind him as though putting something into his pocket—the parlour door was closed—as he was just going across the road I said, "I see you"—he was just running across the road between a walk and a run—I then went into the parlour; there was a great deal of smoke in the room, and a strong smell of powder—the deceased was lying on her back on the ground, between the door and the window, bleeding very much—she had on a cloth ulster; I saw afterwards that she was not dressed—I put a pillow under her head, and at once sent for a doctor; he came, and the police.

Cross-examined. She had on a cloth ulster, buttoned from the top to the bottom—he was her only visitor except her sister; she used to come—at first I thought they were married; she was very quiet and well conducted, there was no quarrelling between them, they always appeared to be on very affectionate terms—she was a tall young woman, dark and muscular, a good deal bigger than the prisoner—this is a photograph of them taken together—I never knew spirits to be brought in to them, only beer; I probably should not have known; it was not my business—I think he had been in the room about five minutes before I heard the shots—there was no noise or tumbling about, I did not hear anything.

Re-examined. I had seen this photograph about a fortnight before this—the girl was a very quiet girl.

GEORGE BARKWALL . I live at 246, Westminster Bridge Road, and am a tailor's manager—I have known the prisoner about ten months—on 29th June there were some monetary transactions between us—I owed him a matter of £10—I paid him half a sovereign that morning, about half-past eleven, as near as lean remember—I heard that he was keeping company with the deceased girl, I have seen them together—when he left me that morning he said he was going to Southwark, that he tad promised to be there at three, but he was going earlier, to Grosvenor Park, to see his girl—I did not see him again till about a quarter to six in the evening—I was at the door, he came up and said, "George, the money you owe me I give you, I have shot my girl"—I said, "Don't talk nonsense, you must be joking"—he said that he had been down and saw her coming out of a public-house with two men, merely clad in her dressing-gown, that it was in a fit of jealousy, and he must have been mad; that he came away, and went and bought the revolver; he did not speak to her, he could see she was playing him double, that he bought the revolver, and went back and shot her—I would not be quite sure about buying the revolver; I concluded that he must have had the revolver—I had never seen him with

one before, and I naturally concluded that lie had gone and bought it; I would not be sure upon the point; all I know is that he said he had shot her—I won't be certain that he said he had bought it—he said he had shot her, he had just done it—he said he had spent £40 on her in a fortnight—he said he was going to marry her the next week—he said, "Come and have a drink, as I expect to be arrested every moment"—I went and had a drink with him—when I parted with him he was crying—he asked my advice what he should do—I did not think he had done it—I said, "I can't advise you"—he seemed in such a dazed condition, I thought he was joking—I bade him good-night at the Rodney publichouse, and shook hands with him—he did not say where he was going; he said he did not know where to go—during the time I have known him I have seen him four or five times a week—I have not been about with him, no more than across the road to have a drink on different occasions when he has purchased clothes—I did not know of his having a revolver in his possession—I never saw one or ever mentioned one.

Cross-examined. I don't think he did say anything about having bought the revolver—I did not say so before the Magistrate—more or less, I should think he had been on the drink at least seven months—he was really not right in the morning—I came to the conclusion that he was going wrong altogether, that he was reckless, that he was doing things that must, of course, come to an end one way or the other—I looked on him as not quite right in his intellect, a weak, foolish man, besotted with drink that was the opinion I had of him, that he was spending his money recklessly, getting so besotted with drink that one day it must come to a final, to be a dipsomaniac, in an asylum for the mad—my opinion was that when he came to me he was suffering from delirium tremens, he was all of a shake in the morning when he first came—it was the second time that I had the drink with him—he paid for the drink—he was apparently right off his head, I thought he did not know what he was talking of—I knew him as a quiet, peaceable, kind-hearted man—he is no relation of mine, an absolute stranger—I did not believe a word of his story; if I had done so I should have had him arrested—he said he had pawned his watch and chain to find money for this young woman, and had spent £40 on her in a fortnight.

Re-examined. He came to me four or five times a week, merely as an acquaintance, to say "How do you do?" in passing—he told me that the money he had left him he was laying out in horse racing, backing horses; he said that was how he got his living—I considered he was weak-minded through the effects of drink—his hand was shaking, and likewise the whole of his system.

JOSEPH CARRITT . I am a surgeon, of 82, Camberwell Road—on 29th June, about twenty minutes past four in the afternoon, I was called to 81, Grosvenor Park—I saw the deceased lying on her back in a pool of blood—she did not speak, but gasped and died—I made a post-mortem of the body—I found four bullet wounds in the face and neck, one the hand, as though she had put up her hand—the cause of death was hemorrhage from those wounds—I extracted one bullet—I saw a bullet that was found in the picture frame; it was the same kind of bullet as was in the revolver.

WILLIAM LEONARD (Detective Sergeant L). On 29th June, shortly before five, I went to 81, Grosvenor Park, and saw the body of the deceased

on the floor in the front parlour; she had on an ulster, chemise, and stockings—I searched the place, and found a photograph like this and some letters—in consequence of inquiries I made I went to 6, Brewer Street, Pimlico—I waited there till the prisoner came, about five minutes to eleven; I heard him go upstairs and go into his room—I went up with assistance, 'and knocked at the door; it was locked—the landlord spoke to him through the door, and said someone wished to speak to him—as the door was not opened at once I commenced to force it, but before I could do so the prisoner opened it, and I and my brother officer rushed at him—I seized him and held him while the officer searched him—I said, "We are police officers, and you will be charged with the murder of a woman at 81, Grosvenor Park"—after a few seconds he said, "I know nothing about it"—I cautioned him—he said, "I am not such a fool as to incriminate myself; I am educated; you have got your business to do, and I must put up with it; I thought you had come here to murder me"—on the way to the Carter Street station in a four-wheeler he said, "Dont hold me so tight"—I said, "You will be dealt fairly with; we shall treat you with the utmost kindness if you behave yourself"—he said, "I will; I am in an awful position"—at the station he was charged with the murder of Emma Oakley—he made no reply—he appeared to be apparently recovering from the effects of drink, but was perfectly steady—I did not observe any mark upon him; Brogden did.

Cross-examined. I did not examine him—when I went to arrest him I went up to him perfectly quietly, nothing like threatening violence; we only rushed at him, thinking he might have the revolver.

Re-examined. We both rushed at him, and had tried to force the door—I held him while Brogden searched him.

WILLIAM BROGDEN . I was with Leonard at the time of the prisoner's arrest—I have heard his evidence—on coming into the room the prisoner pointed to a washstand, and said, "You will find a razor in that drawer, which I did, evidently a new one—in the cab he said, "You did not give me a ghost of a chance, and it was just as well you did not"—I noticed a scratch on his cheek; I said, "You have a scratch on your nose"—he said, "That's my business"—he thoroughly understood what we were saying to him—in his room I found these photographs.

Cross-examined. At Carter Street station he put up his leg and showed a slight bruise there; I should say it was recent—I did not notice any bruise on his arm then; next morning, at the Police-court, he had a bruise on his arm.

GEORGE DUNLEVY (Inspector L). On 30th June Briggs came to the station and gave me this revolver; it is a central-fire, with six chambers—it was unloaded; he also handed me twenty-four cartridges—it is a self-acting revolver; each chamber was foul, and the barrel was foul—each chamber had been fired—it appeared a new revolver—the distance between the Grosvenor Arms and Grosvenor Park is nearly two hundred yards.

Cross-examined. I did not notice any marks of rust on the barrel; It is a mark of powder—I have had it in my possession ever since the 30th June.

ALFRED CAREY (226 L). I assisted in searching the front parlour at 81, Grosvenor Park—I found a bullet in a picture frame between four

and five feet from the ground—the picture was behind the door as you went into the room—the body lay close against the wall.

THOMAS TEASDALE (Examined by MR. WARBURTON). I live at 30, Grove Lane, Camberwell—I know the prisoner and his family—his two cousins, through Mrs. Devenish, their aunt, are confined in an asylum in London—Mrs. Devenish is the prisoner's father's sister—I knew the prisoner's grandfather, old Mr. Banbury—he was a little insane, too, since 1868, and the grandfather's sister, Mrs. Knowles; I and the executors had to trace the family—we found that Mr. and Mrs. Knowles had gone to Australia, and he had come back and left his wife there; she was aunt to the prisoner, and we found, by communicating with the solicitor, that she died in a lunatic asylum in Australia—the grandfather was kept in the basement at Lorrimore Street for a time, and he ran after me once with a saw in his hand—he was a person of weak intellect.

Cross-examined. I did not know that the aunt drank heavily; they said she was in a lunatic asylum—they did not say it was through drink; I never heard that—all I know is from making inquiries from the family, and what I have been told—I know Clara Briggs—I don't remember the boys drinking heavily; I know William did not.

By the JURY. Old Mr. Banbury was not in an asylum; he was kept at home and looked after by his wife and the aunt—they kept him in the cellar, and took him up to bed at night; he was just upon eighty when he died, but he was there for years in the basement—I am no relation to the family.

PHILIP FRANCIS GILBERT (Examined by MR. MATHEWS). I am medical officer to Her Majesty's Prison at Holloway—I have had the prisoner under my observation there since the 30th June—in my opinion he is a person of sound mind.

Cross-examined. Supposing there be insanity in a family, a person having that tendency might be more easily affected by drink—excessive drinking might seriously impair his intelligence; I don't see why it should; it might impair his reason to some extent; with any man it might impair his intellect.

GUILTY .— DEATH .

Reference Number: t18920912-884

884. HENRY HANCOCK (50) , Feloniously carnally knowing Olive Hancock, a girl under the age of thirteen.

MR. HUTTON Prosecuted, and MR. WARBURTON Defended at the request of the COURT.

GUILTY .— Seven Years' Penal Servitude.

Before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18920912-885

885. THOMAS JENNER (28) , Robbery with violence on Albert Wild, and stealing a watch and chain.

MR. TURRELL Prosecuted.

ALBEBT WILD . I am a brush manufacturer at Brixton—on Saturday, 13th August, about nine, I was in Kennington Park Road walking along, when the prisoner jumped in front of me and gave me a violent blow with his fist, and at the same moment snatched my watch and chain, and ran away—I pursued him for about thirty-five or forty yards; I did not lose sight of him; I was within a yard or two behind him—several witnesses

came up, and a constable happened to come up at the same time—the prisoner was stopped by a crowd in the street—I was halloaing, "Stop thief!" after him—I gave him into custody he said he had nothing on him—I lost my watch; it was a presentation one, worth about £40—next morning I found a mark on my lace; I did not feel it at the time; I had a black eye, and have been deaf ever since—I have seen a doctor, and have not been well.

Cross-examined by the prisoner. I did not see you get off a bus, or fall down.

SIDNEY JOHNSON . I live at 104, Lancaster Street, Newington Cause* way—on 13th August, about nine, I was in Kennington Park Road; I heard cries of "Stop, thief!" and saw the prisoner running towards me, followed by the prosecutor—the prisoner went across the road, fell down, got up again, and ran across—I ran after him—I came up to him—he said, "I will give myself up to the police"—about a minute afterwards a constable came up, and he was given into custody—before that I think he said he was going to get on a tram, or something like that.

Cross-examined. I did not see you get off a 'bu; you fell in crossing the road—the prosecutor was about six yards behind you—you said, "Search me"

CHARLES DORMER (323 L). I was in Kennington Park Road on 13th August—I saw a crowd—the prisoner was given into my custody—he said, "I am wanted to go to the station"—I took him there; he was charged—he made no reply—I searched him, but found nothing on him.

Cross-examined. You did not say, "This gentleman charges me with stealing his watch and chain;" Mr. Wild charged you—you said, "I am willing to go to the station. "

Prisoner's Defence. I got on an omnibus at five minutes to nine, and rode to Kennington Gate; I got off as it was going on and I fell; I got up and ran across the road I heard a cry of "Stop thief!" I turned round and this gentleman came and accused me of stealing his watch and chain. I never saw him till he accused Me I am innocent; nothing was found on Me I work hard for my living at the docks. I have a witness named Gray, who can speak to me getting on the 'bus at Brixton, and getting off at Kennington Gate; he wrote to me while I was in Holloway, and promised to be here. (Mr. Gray was called, but did not answer.) He lived at 15, Mason Street, Westminster Bridge Road.

CHARLES DORMER (Re-examined). I have been to that address; they said he had gone out that morning, and did not know when he would return; he is a baker by trade, and lodges there—I asked the prisoner for his own name and address—he gave it as Thomas Jennings, 84, Walworth Road; that was a false address.

Prisoner. The reason was I did not like my people to know.

GUILTY.— Judgment respited.

Reference Number: t18920912-886

886. GEORGE FREDERICK SKINNER was indicted for wilful and corrupt perjury, in an action in which he was plaintiff, at Southwark County-court.

MESSRS. HORACE AVORY and BIRON Prosecuted, and MESSRS. COCK, Q. O., and FILLAN Defended.

FREDERICK WILLIAM FARMER . I am chief clerk at Southwark County-court—I produce a correct copy of the official minutes of the proceedings

at that court on 6th May, in an action of Skinner v. the South Western Railway Company, for damage sustained by the plaintiff in consequence of the negligence of the company, to his horse and cab—the claim was for £33—the summons shows the particulars: injury to horse £20, damage to cab £13—the case was heard before the Judge and a Jury; verdict and judgment for the defendants—I was in Court when the action was tried—I heard the prisoner give evidence—he was sworn in the usual way—he produced this document, a bill and invoice, and receipt for £13; it was impounded by order of the Judge.

Cross-examined by MR. COOK. The case was what is generally called a running-down case evilence was called on both sides.

GODFREY KNIGHT . I am a solicitor in the office of the solicitors of the South Western Railway Company—I was present on the 6th May at Southwark County-court when this action was tried—I heard the prisoner sworn and give evidence—I took a note of it; this is a copy of it—in his examination-in-chief he said, "The two front wheels of the cab were broken; the shafts broken; Alexander has done a lot of work for me; this is the bill I paid; Alexander is not here"—he produced this account for £13, with Alexander's name at the top—he said, "I paid £13 for repairing the cab," and he said something more about the horse—in cross-examination he said, "I paid £11 10s. in ready money; I swear Alexander did not give me a bill for £3 10s.; I owe him £70; it may be less"—in re-examination he produced a counterfoil cheque, dated 2nd April, for £2 10s.—his attention was again called to the £18 account, and he said, "I swear that is a true account"—that is the end of my note—Alexander was sent for, and was afterwards called as a witness for the company.

Cross-examined. There was no doubt a collision between the two vehicles—two or three days after the collision notice was given to the company—before the cab was repaired an opportunity was given to the company to see what was the matter with the cab, and what amount of damage was done to it—Mr. Hope was sent to see it; he is here—he was not called before the Magistrate—he reported to the company—on the 15th May, the day before the trial, we first heard that the claim was an improper one—that was by letter; it is here—it was from Mr. Alexander—it was addressed to the manager of the Accident Department, and stated, "If you will call on me you will learn something to your advantage concerning the claim put in for damage done to Mr. Skinner's cab and horse.—Mr. Alexander, coachmaker"—I heard at the Court that that letter is in the handwriting of Leftwich, who was then in Skinner's employment, he afterwards left.

Re-examined. On the receipt of that letter someone, on behalf of the company, had an interview with the prisoner before the trial came on.

JOHN WILLIS ALEXANDER. I am a wheelwright, of Dorset Mews, Clapham Road—prior to 1892 I had been in the habit of doing work for the prisoner in repairing cabs and so on—at the end of January, 1892, a hansom cab of his was sent to me to repair—I used to put a distinctive number on the cabs I had from him; this was numbered ten; I repaired that cab at my premises—I made an entry in my book of the work to this cab, done by my son—I produce the book; the entry is mine (reading the entry)—I entered the work and the prices at the time; it amounted to £3 10s.—the repairs were finished on 8th February—some

little time after the cab was sent home I saw the prisoner—the cab was sent to his cornchandler's shop in clapham Road—I save him the account for £3 10s.—he said, "I want a bill made out for 213"—I said, "There is not enough work there to make out a bill for £13"—he said I should have to go back and make one out somehow—I asked him what I should put on the bill—he said, "Put two new shafts down and resetting the irons"—I went back to the shop and did it, and returned to him in about half an hour or an hour, taking with me the bill for £13; this is it—Mr. Leftwich and the prisoner were in the shop—he asked me if I had got a stamp; I said no—he said, "Give the boy a penny and he will go and get one; get two"—the boy brought back two, and he put one on the £3 10s. bill, and asked me to sign it; I did so—he then put the cheque in his pocket—I had seen a cheque at least I had seen a paper; I did not know what the amount was—after I had signed the bill he put it in his pocket—when he asked me to sign the £13 bill I said it did not want receipting—I referred to Leftwich, and asked him if it wanted receipting, and he said "No"—the prisoner said, "Then you don't get no money out of me unless you do receipt it"—I then receipted the bill as it now appears, and he gave me a cheque for £2 10s.; he took it out of his pocket; it was apparently the same cheque he had in his hand—I did not notice at the time that it was for £2 10s.; I did when I got home, and I directly went back to his shop, but he had gone—I went after him, and asked him if he knew what he had made the cheque for—he said, "Yes"—I said, "What?"—he said, "£2 10s.; did not you have £1 of me during the week?"—that was so—at that time he owed me about £50 for repairs—I left both the receipts with him—some time after I heard that he was bringing an action against the company; I don't remember the date; I fancy it was about the latter end of March; it was the same day that I left the two receipts with him—I told him if he went to Court with the company I should tell the company about the bill—he said I could do as I liked, or as I chose—before the trial I ascertained who the prisoner's solicitors were, and I went there on business; and before the action was caused I took a letter to be sent to the company—I did not see the letter written; I don't know whose writing it is; I believe it is Leftwich's it was written by arrangement between me and Leftwich—on 6th May I attended at the Court and gave evidence.

Cross-examined. I have been doing work for the prisoner for some tune; he is a cab proprietor and cornchandler—it was somewhere about the end of January that this cab came to me—I knew that it had been injured in an accident—he did not tell me he was going to make a claim against the company—he said I was not to begin on the repairs of the cab till somebody came from the company to look at it—they always do send somebody—he did not tell me he was going to make a claim against the company, and pay me something on account of the job—I think the cab remained on my premises about three weeks, till 8th February, when it went out—he paid me £5 on the 6th February, and another £5 on the 13th—that was for work done previous to this—I gave him a receipt for it in a book, not showing who the work was done for—he gave me another pound in March, before the £2 10s.—I made out the £13 bill to get my money—he would not pay me unless I did it; I had to do it; I believed it was going to be shown to the

company—I did not know it was to show that he had paid me £13—I did not know what it was to be used for—I did not know that he had taken action against the company—of course, I suppose it was to show to the company—I did not communicate to the company until I found they were going to inquire into the damage—before that I had seen a man named Myers—I see him every day—I believe Myers and the prisoner had been on bad terms for along time—Myers keeps a furniture shop next door to Skinner in Clapham Road—I did not discuss with Myers what I should do with regard to this; I did not talk it over with him or mention it to him; I never had any conversation with him about it, not till after the company came and saw me. (The witness's deposition, being referred to, stated: "I had four or five conversations about the £18 bill with Myers")—I don't think I spoke about it till after I had been to the company—I don't recollect saying that—I believe Leftwich was in Skinner's employ—I don't know that he was; I saw him there—he was in his employment when he kept the baker's shop; whether he was in the corn shop I don't know—I saw him in the shop when I was paid this bill; I did not ask him if he had left, I did not say anything at the Police-court about the boy and the two stamps; I don't know who the boy was—I could not speak about it before the Magistrate, they would not let me; I have seen Leftwich every day since these proceedings have been pending—I have not talked to him about the boy.

Re-examined, Whenever the prisoner paid me money I signed my book for it—he kept the book, and I signed for all the money he paid me (book produced)—this is the book—part of it is my writing, the other part is Leftwich's—the latter part shows small sums paid week by week, every Saturday (Entries were read of £5 on account on 13th February, and £3 on 20th February)—he never during this year paid me £11 10s. in cash; I never received more than £4 in cash of him in my life; if he paid me more than £4 it was by cheque—these sums of £5 were by cheque—there is no receipt in this book for the £2 10s. cheque or the £1, because that was to be left, and scratched out of my book; that was the only bill he had since 1890—I had not delivered to him any separate account for any particular work, since September, 1890—all the payments in this book were made to me on account of the general balance that was owing—Myers had nothing to do with the writing of the latter; I said so at the Police-court.

By the COURT. The entry of the £2 10s. and £1 was struck out of the book; this is it; it was brought forward on every page up to the time I worked for him; I mean it was to be left out, so that it should not be in his bill—I refer to that in a bracket.

JAMES LEFTWICH . I live at 16, Clarence Road, Hackney—at the beginning of this year I was in the prisoner's service as manager, at his shop at 128, Clapham Road—I heard there had been an accident to a cabin January—I remember on a Saturday, towards the end of March or beginning of April, Alexander coming to the prisoner's shop in the Clapham Road, and Alexander and Skinner had an altercation about a bill, and Alexander went away and came back, and soon afterwards Skinner told me to pass the pen and ink to Alexander; I did so, and Alexander came to the counter and signed two bills, one of which is in front of me, and was for £3 10s.; the other was a little way at the side, and I cannot

say whether it was for £13, or £13 10s.—the £3 10s. bill was signed first—all that took place between the signing of the first and second bill was the payment of a penny for a stamp—Alexander paid for one stamp and the prisoner for the other, and a boy was sent for them—when the bills were signed they were receipted—I saw a cheque given by the prisoner to Alexander after the bills were signed—I saw no cash pass from the prisoner to Alexander—I heard of the action against the railway company being tried at the County-court—before that I was asked by Alexander to ask the prisoner what he had done with the £3 10s. bill—I did so, and the prisoner said he had thrown it on the b———fire—I saw the prisoner after his return from the trial of the action, on the same day—he told me that he had got over the case, but they had impounded the bill, and Mr. Alexander, or Alexander, had got a witness—I said I was the witness—the prisoner said he should sue Alexander for £1,000 for slander, and should be sure to win—when I said I was the witness, he said I need not say anything about the bills; that Mr. Alexander was in the habit of coming and signing a number of bills in the shop; I said I should not commit perjury—this letter is in my writing—I wrote it in consequence of an arrangement with Alexander.

Cross-examined. I had been about two years, I should think, in the prisoner's employment; during that time Alexander, I believe, had been doing work for the prisoner—I had seen him a number of times—I left the prisoner's employment about two months now I should think—J am in employment now—I was not in the prisoner's employment when I was examined at the Police-court, I might have left him about a fortnight before, so that I should have left him some time in July—we had had no differences and were not on unfriendly terms up to the time of the letter, we were the best of friends—I thought this was a very dishonest transaction, and I wrote the letter for Mr. Alexander—I continued in the prisoner's employment after having written the letter, and after the action had been heard, until I found another house to go to.

Re-examined. I did not write this letter in consequence of any quarrel with the prisoner.

JOHN ALEXANDER, JUN . I am Alexander's son, and assist him in his wheelwright's business—I remember the prisoner's cab, No. 10, being brought for repairs about the end of January—I and my fellow servants worked on it—we put no new shafts to the cab—the entry in my father's book correctly represents the work that was actually done—the fair cost of those repairs would be about £3 10s.

CHARLES HEAD . I am a coachbuilder, of 3, Gloucester Road, Kensington—on the 5th May this year I and Hope inspected a hansom cab on behalf of the South-Western Railway Company, to see what repairs had been done—the prisoner was there—I called the prisoner's attention to a shaft which had been broken and spliced up afterwards—he said the shafts had met with an accident since new ones were put—I examined the shafts, and I can say that neither of them had been new within the preceding four months—I put the cost of such repairs as I saw at about £5 at the outside—that is what I should charge.

GUILTY .

A witness deposed to the prisoner's good character.—Four Months' Hard Labour.

Reference Number: t18920912-887

887. HARRY HAYWOOD (34) , Unlawfully assaulting Florence Lacey, and occasioning her actual bodily harm.

MR. HORACE AVORY Prosecuted, and MR. HUTTON Defended.

After MR. AVORY had opened the case, the prisoner stated, in the hearing of the JURY, that he was guilty, and the JURY thereupon found him

GUILTY Judgment respited. .

There was another indictment against the prisoner for feloniously casting lime at Florence Lacey with intent to do her grievous bodily harm. No evidence was offered by the prosecution.

NOT GUILTY

Reference Number: t18920912-888

888. WILLIAM TAYLOR (20) and CHARLES JONES (18) PLEADED GUILTY to burglary in the dwelling-house of Ernest Hopkins Ham, and stealing a basket of plate and other articles.

TAYLOE also PLEADED GUILTY** to a conviction of felony in May, 1888, in the name of John Dale; and JONES** to one in July, 1891.— Eighteen Months' Hard Labour each.

Reference Number: t18920912-889

889. ALEXANDER JOHN MILTON (33) , Unlawfully and carnally knowing Emily Furnival, aged fourteen years.

MR. HUTTON Prosecuted.

NOT GUILTY .

Before Robert Malcolm Kerr, Esq.

Reference Number: t18920912-890

890. GEORGE PRICE (28) and JAMES SAUNDERS (29) , Unlawfully attempting to commit burglary in the dwelling-house of Robert Hawker Poynder.

SAUNDERS PLEADED GUILTY .

MR. ABINGER Prosecuted.

ROBERT HAWKER POYNDER . I am a clerk, living at Lockwood, Anerley—a few minutes after one a.m. on August 8th I heard a window opened—I looked out and saw a man standing on the doorsteps—I asked him what he was doing there—he made no reply—I shouted and blew a whistle, and he ran away to a garden nearly opposite diagonally—I then saw another man emerge from the shade of a bay window and run in the same direction and then hide himself under the wall—in a few minutes a constable came to whom I made a statement—he and I examined the window and found it was half open—I gave a description of one man—I could not swear from his features if Price was the man, but from his apparel I could—he had on a light-coloured pair of corduroy or fustian trousers, a dark coat and a soft cloth cap with a peak—there is a lamp not quite in front of my house, but a little diagonally—I could not identify the other man—I only saw one shoulder and hw hat—I identified Price directly I saw him after his arrest by his dress.

ELIZABETH HALL . I am the prosecutor's housekeeper—on this night I saw that this window was closed and I fastened it.

THOMAS COLLYER (Police Constable). On the morning of 8th August I heard a whistle—the prosecutor made a communication to me—after searching for about a quarter of an hour I found in a field about a 100 yards from the prosecutor's house the two prisoners in a shed, pretending to be asleep—the prosecutor had given a description—I blew my whistle, and another constable came—Price said he knew

nothing; he went into the shed to have a night's sleep—I took them to the station, and then went for the prosecutor, who came and identified Price as the man he saw standing at the top of his area steps—Price said, "You are wrong this time, old man."

Price in his defence said he know nothing of the affair; that he went into the shed to sleep and was arrested,

GUILTY Twelve Months' Hard Labour each (Set page 1349).

Reference Number: t18920912-891

891. EDWIN JOHNS (32) and HINES (20) , Robbery with violence on John Frater, and stealing a watch from his person. Second Count, receiving the same.

HINES PLEADED GUILTY to the larceny.

MR. COLLINS Prosecuted, and MR. PURCELL Defended Johns.

JOHN FRATER . I live at 44, Stangate Street—on Saturday, 16th July, I was coming out of my house about half-past eleven—the two prisoners, whom I had never seen before, were outside the Duke's Arms public-house, just across the road—they rushed at me with their hands across me, and took my watch from my pocket, off the chain—I did not see them take it, but I missed it as I was going into the Duke's Arms—I went back and asked the prisoners to give me my watch back, and Hines knocked me down and kicked me—I cannot say if Johns did anything—they let go of me; I got up and ran after Hines, who ran round into the public-house and then out of the corner I had Just passed—I saw no more of them till the next Thursday night at the Police station, when I identified Hines—I was unable to identify Johns.

Cross-examined. My watch was stolen as I had my foot on the kerb by two men tumbling against me, as if larking I did not discover my loss till I got into the public-house—the robbery was done very quickly—I came out and went after the two men, who were just across the road, and I was knocked down—I went to the station, and afterwards went to the Duke's Arms with the constable, but it was closed—when I said in the public-house that I had lost my watch some of the customers, it might have been six, came to the door, and saw me go after the two thieves—next day, Sunday, I went to the Duke's Arms, I identified no one there then—I did not point out Tug Wilson and say I believed he was one of the thieves—I did not point out anyone and find out afterwards it was a mistake—I was taken to the station to identify on 19th July—I am certain the prisoners are the thieves—I said before the Magistrate, in answer to Johns, "I did not recognise you exactly; I am not perfectly certain about you now"—I could not recognise him—I am certain he is the man, because a party saw him while I was on the ground; I say he is the man, not from my own recollection, but from what other people have told me.

WILLIAM DONOHUE . I am potman at the Duke's Arms, 27, Upper Marsh, Lambeth—on Saturday night, 16th July, after Johns left our house, I heard a cry of "Stop thief!"—I came out immediately, followed by the landlord, and saw the prosecutor in the road, with Johns in the act of kicking him—I am positive it was Johns, because I had had to put him out previously; I could see him quite plainly; it was eleven o'clock when they came in, and half-past eleven when the cry of "Stop thief!" was raised—there are two big lamps outside and a lamp-post opposite, and other two lamps about 150 yards down the street where

they ran—the prisoner was between the two lights and the lamp-post in the middle of the road—after Johns kicked the prosecutor, a man said something to Johns, and they made off, one down one street, and one down another; I followed, but lost them—I afterwards went with the prosecutor to Kennington Road Police-station to report the loss to the Inspector—on the following Tuesday night I was called to the station, and immediately identified Hines from among twelve or thirteen others—afterwards I went again to the station, and identified at once Johns out of twelve or thirteen men—I am positive about him.

Cross-examined. I have been at the Duke's Arms about three months; I have given evidence a number of times; I have frequently done so against thieves in cases where Record was the officer—I have never been charged—I have been a material witness in about twenty-five cases—I have been behind the bar now for about six years—I only know Tug Wilson by name; he may have been at the Duke's Arms on the Sunday after this robbery; I could not swear—I do not know that anybody suggested one of the thieves was in the bar on the Sunday afternoon—on the Saturday evening after the prosecutor went out after the thieves, half a dozen customers came to the door—Johns had followed Hines into the house, and they made a snatch at a lady's locket, and we had to put him out—the lady would not charge him—I don't know if Johns had been in the house since nine o'clock—I don't know if he lives a few doors off; he has so many names and addresses—I knew him by sight—I did not see him actually kick the prosecutor; his foot was raised, and the prosecutor was on the ground—when I came back to the house after closing, the prisoner Johns was not in the public-house—he did not wish me goodnight—I went from the public-house to the station, and was there at closing-time—I did not see Johns next day at our public-house, but I am not always in the bar.

Re-examined. I have been taking situations as potman for about four years, and bad characters make it a habit to come into public-houses—on the 2nd of August about fourteen of the prisoners' friends came and blacked my eyes, and stabbed me.

SAMUEL MASON . I keep the Duke's Arms public-house—on Saturday night, 16th July, I was standing at the door and saw a scuffle—I only saw Hines run at the prosecutor, who fell over—I did not see Johns over the prosecutor—I cannot say what took place—afterwards, at closing-time, I saw Johns.

Cross-examined. I saw Johns in the house shortly before closing-time; he wished me good-night—Donohue had gone to the station then several customers went to the door when the prosecutor complained of losing his watch, and went out—I had known Johns as a customer for about a fortnight previous—I had seen him in my house earlier that evening—I am not aware that he was treating some women—I did not see Mrs. Smith there—I was at the further end of my long bar—they might have been there without my seeing them—I did not see Johns at my house; he might have been there—Tug Wilson was there on Saturday and Sunday—I cannot say if the prosecutor was also there on Sunday.

ALICE BATCHELOR . I am the wife of William Batchelor, a miller; we live at 44, Stangate Street—on this night, between a quarter and half-past eleven, I saw the prisoners coming from the Distillers public-house—

Johns passed something to Hines—the prosecutor came up and said to Johns, "You have got my watch"—he said, "I have not got it; he has got it," meaning Hines—the prosecutor said to Hines, "You have got my watch"—Hines said he had not—the prosecutor said. "Come to the top and see if I can see a policeman"—he went two or three yards, and then Hines hit him, twisted his leg, and threw him—the prosecutor is my landlord—I helped to pick him up—the men ran away.

Cross-examined. I saw the prisoners at the Police-court—this all took a very short time—I was about the length of this Court away—I had seen Johns before—I was not taken to the station to identify him—when I gave my evidence at the Police-court Johns at once suggested that I had made a mistake.

Re-examined. There was a good light, and I could see the men distinctly—I am sure the prisoners were the men.

FRANCES SMITH . I am the wife of Henry Smith, a painter, of 16, Griffin Street—on this night, at 11.30,1 saw the prisoners come out of the Distillers public-house, and Johns passed something to Hines—the prosecutor came up and said to Johns, "You have got my watch"—he laid, "I have not; go to the other man"—the prosecutor said to Hines, "You have got my watch"—he said, "I have not"—the prosecutor said, "Will you come to the top to the policeman, and be searched, and then Hines threw the prosecutor and kicked him, and he ran away, and I and Mrs. Batchelor took up the cry of "Stop thief!"—I had known Johns before by his wife doing our washing; I had not seen him very often—I could see him distinctly, and am sure of him.

Cross-examined. Before the robbery on this night Johns treated me to some drink in Mr. Mason's public-house, the Distillers, about a quarter past eleven—I was not in the house at closing-time—I had only spoken to Johns three or four times—I had been in the house before—I never said to Johns' wife that Johns had too much to say, and I would have my own back some day; nothing of the kind—I have always been on most friendly and kindly terms with the prisoner, and have no illwill towards him whatever.

JOHN WARD (Police Sergeant)—I arrested Johns; I told him the charge—he said "All right, I will go with you"—at the station he was placed with others, and picked out, after some hesitation, by the prosecutor, and without any hesitation by Mason and Donohue—in reply to the charge, he said "All right"—I got this watch from a man named Woodford, who bought it from Hines.

JOHNS received a good character.

GUILTY. Strongly recommended to mercy by the JURY.— Discharged on recognisances. HINES— Twelve Months* Hard Labour.

Reference Number: t18920912-892

892. ARTHUR JOHN HEWLETT, JOHN MILLS (19), GEORGE MILLS (17), and BETSY ANN COOLIDGE (40) , Breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Jolliffe, and stealing a pair of trousers and other articles, his property.

MR. MUIR Prosecuted, and MR. GILL Defended Hewlett.

ELIZABETH JOLLIFFE . I live with my husband at Amwell Hill, Wandsworth—on June 27th I left the house about 11.45, leaving no one in it—I shut the front door and the side door—I returned at 3.40 and opened the door with a latch-key, and found the chain up; I had not

left it so—I fetched a policeman, went to the side door, and found it broken open, and everything turned over—the door leading into the hall had been broken open—I missed things value £30 or £35; these trousers are my husband's; this silk handkerchief was taken from a coat pocket; this is a gold keyless watch and a gold pin—they are all my property—a gold brooch has not been found.

JOSEPH GOUGH (Policeman V). On the evening of 8th July I saw George Mills in Eldon Street, Wandsworth, outside his house—I told him I was a police officer, and should take him in custody for being concerned with his brother in breaking into several houses in Wandsworth—he said, "I don't know anything about housebreaking; I have been with my brother several times for a drive"—I found this handkerchief on him.

JOHN WINDSOR (Police Sergeant V). On July 8th I saw John Mills in Falcon Road, outside the Falcon public-house—I told him I should take him and charge him, with several others, with housebreaking—he said nothing—I went to his lodgings, 64, Eldingham Street, Wandsworth, and made inquiries—I searched an upstairs front room, and behind a picture hanging over the mantelpiece I found this silver chain, which Mrs. Jolliffe identifies—I also found this pawn-ticket and counterpane on the bed—Coolidge is the mother of the two Mills; they live in the same house.

JOHN THORLEY (Detective V). On 8th July I went with other officers to 64, Elkington Street, and assisted in searching the house—I was standing at the foot of the stairs with a large bundle of clothing, when George Mills came in and said, "Halloa, what is up?"—I said, "Who are you?"—he said, "I am George Mills"—I said, "Where do you sleep?"—he said, "In the front room upstairs. "

FREDERICK RUMBRIDGE (Police Sergeant). I was with the other officers—the prisoner George told me the female prisoner's room; I went there, and found 45 or 46 pawn-tickets in a box on the sideboard, one of which, marked £, is attached to the depositions; it relates to a pair of trousers pledged for 4s.—I arrested Coolidge that night, and told her the charge—she said she knew nothing about it.

Cross-examined by Coolidge. You did not tell me the things had been given to you to pledge.

PERCY PETERS . I am assistant to Mr. Chase, a pawnbroker, of 170, York Road, Battersea—I know Coolidge as a customer; I cannot say whether she pawned these trousers, but they were pawned for 4s. in the name of Ann Coolidge, and this ticket was given to the person.

WILLIAM PUGSLEY (Police Inspector V). On 12th July I had a warrant to search 48, College Street, Chelsea, a working jeweller's shop, and found Hewlett there; I asked him if he was the proprietor of the shop&