Old Bailey Proceedings, 16th August 1847.
Reference Number: t18470816
Reference Number: f18470816

CENTRAL CRIMINAL COURT.

SESSIONS PAPER.

CARROLL, MAYOR.

TENTH SESSION, HELD AUGUST 16TH, 1847.

MINUTES OF EVIDENCE,

Taken in Short-hand by

HENRY BUCKLER.

LONDON:

GEORGE HEBERT, CHEAPSIDE.

TYLER & REED, PRINTERS, BOLT-COURT, FLEET STREET.

THE

WHOLE PROCEEDINGS

On the Queen's Commission of the Peace,

OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY

FOR

The City Of London,

AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE

COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, AND THE PARTS OF THE COUNTIES OF ESSES, KENT, AND SURREY, WITHIN THE JURISDICTION

OF THE

CENTRAL CRIMINAL COURT,

Held on Monday, August 16th, 1847, and following Days.

Before the Right Hon. SIR GEORGE CARROLL, Knt., LORD MAYOR of the City of London; Sir William Erle, Knt., one of the Justices of Her Majesty's Court of Queen's Bench; Matthias Prime Lucas, Esq.; Charles Farebrother, Esq.; Sir Chapman Marshall, Knt.; Sir John Pirie, Bart; and Michael Gibbs, Esq.; Aldermen of the said City: the Hon. Charles Ewan Law, Recorder of the said City: Thomas Wood, Esq.; Thomas Farncomb, Esq.; Thomas Sidney, Esq.; and Francis Graham Moon, Esq.; Aldermen of the said City: John Mirehouse, Esq., Common Serjeant, of the said City: and Edward Bullock, Esq., Judge of the Sheriffs' Court; Her Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer and Gaol Delivery of New-gate, holden for the said City, and Judges of the Central Criminal Court.

LIST OF JURORS.

First Jury.

William Hammond

Joseph James Addis

William Halford

James Osborn Francis

William Frost

William Fillmer

Robert Hulbert

Charles Jackson

Robert William Herman

George Gamble

Samuel Gale

Thomas Allen

Second Jury.

William Good

James T. G. Vizetelly

Christmas Folkard

George Dawson

Francis Gill

Thomas Green

William Gannell

Frederick Hamilton

Henry Kempstead

Richard Hurst

John Henry Jackson

Charles Henry Ducknell

Third Jury.

David Hughes

John Eycott

John Ashford, jun.

Rees James

Richard Clifford

William Allwin

John Small

Benjamin Brumfield

Richard Brown

William Henry Hammond

James George

James Briant

Fourth Jury.

Thomas Gurdford

John Jones

Joseph Bailey

William R. Hoare

William Henry Dean

Joseph Johnson

William Brockwell

Francis West

John Baker

William Biggs

John Aylworth

John Albert

Fifth Jury.

Francis Jenkinson

William king

Francis Aaron Kerridge

Edward George

John Burns

James Kenney

Charles Gardner

Henry Church

William Hulbert

William Hay

Josiah Lowe

Daniel Church

Sixth Jury.

William Moody

Frederick Mullett Evans

Thomas Glanville

Thomas Midgley

James Hume

George Mills

Thomas Gurney

George Grayson

George David Dewdney

Joseph King

Henry Young

Charles Hart

CENTRAL CRIMINAL COURT.

CARROLL, MAYOR. TENTH SESSION.

A star (*) denotes that prisoners have been previously in custody—Two stars (**) that they have been more than once in custody—An obelisk (†) that they are known to be the associates of bad characters.

LONDON AND MIDDLESEX CASES.

OLD COURT.—Monday, August 16th, 1847.

PRESENT—The Right Hon. the LORD MAYOR; Sir CHAPMAN MARSHALL, Knt., Alderman; Mr. RECORDER; Mr. Alderman FARNCOMB; and Mr. Alderman SIDNEY.

First Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18470816-1713

1713. ALFRED EVANS and JOSEPH PRICE were indicted for stealing 178lbs. weight of tea, value 45l.; 158lbs. of coffee, 8l.; 180lbs of almonds, 5l.; 28lbs. of ginger, 2l. 10s.; 30lbs. of rice, 10s.; 100lbs. of American ash, 1l. 10s.; 20lbs. of sugar, 16s.; 20lbs. of tapioca, 15s.; 100lbs. of currants, 2l.; 9lbs. of oleander, 1l.; 20lbs. of caraway-seeds, 1l.; 10lbs. of mustard, 1l. 9s.; 5lbs. of arrow-root, 5s.; 12lbs. of twine, 1l.; 5lbs. of soap, 10s.; 10lbs. of sugarcandy, 10s.; 5 reams of paper, 4l.; and 12 bags, 12s.; the goods of Peter Taylor.

MR. PAYNE conducted the Prosecution.

PETER TAYLOR. I am a grocer and tea-dealer, in the Bethnal-green-road. The prisoner Evans was in my service as assistant for about nine months, and left six or seven months ago—in March last I was in some pecuniary difficulties, and wished to raise some money on some goods—I consulted Evans on the subject—he said he had a brother or a friend in the trade, who would take these goods of him, and I should have the money to pay a dividend to my creditors there and then—he said it was the only plan I could adopt to raise the money and to pay it down directly; and the party I employed stated it would be much easier and better for him to do it, if I could pay the money there and then, and that was the only way I could do it—in consequence of that, I entrusted the property to Evans—the arrangement between us was, that if I required the money, I should have it, and if not, I should have the property returned, but I did not want the property turned into money, as I was able to borrow 50l. to pay to my creditors—the goods were delivered about the 14th of April—the prisoner Price carried them away in his own cart—Evans took them out of my shop and delivered them into the cart—Price received them into his cart—I believe that was the

same day that I had the conversation with Evans—there was half-a-chest of gunpowder tea, half-a-chest of twankay, some almond, ginger, oleander seed, rice, and sugar—there was no invoice, only a list of the goods in pencil on a piece of paper—I made part of it myself, and Evans made part—the goods were all my property, and about the value of 75l., indeed, I would much rather have the goods than the money, they are more valuable to me than that—Price is brother-in-law to Evans—I did not employ Price—I cannot say whether I saw Evans again the same evening that the goods were taken, but I saw him about two days after—I am not aware that there was anything particular said relating to the goods, the first time I saw him; but in the course of a week, or a fortnight, he refused to tell me where the goods were when I asked him about them—before he took the goods away, he had arranged to take them to his mother-in-law's, and before he took the second load, he said that his mother had refused to take them in, and he had placed them with a friend whom he knew, and that they were perfectly safe—I said, "Now, Evans, you will not lead me astray, you will have these goods quite right"—he said, "Quite right, let me have them all"—I asked him if they were perfectly safe, and he said they were—I afterwards borrowed 50l. from a friend of mine, and I did not then require the goods to be sold—I have never got them back, nor received anything for them—about a fort-night after, I requested Evans to return either all or part of them, and he set me at defiance, and said I might do my best and my worst—I saw him at Knightsbridge, and asked him where the goods were—he said he had placed them with a party of the name of Ratford, a horse-dealer—he did not tell me at that time where Ratford and the goods were—he afterwards brought this Ratford before me—his name turns out to be Purdy—I had seen Evans before that, at a public-house in Fenchurch-street, and he promised to meet me at half-past eight—he then said he had seen Ratford, and Ratford required 5l. before he would deliver up the property—he had got a letter in his hand, and he read it to me, as having been received from Ratford, but I can swear to it as having been in his own handwriting—that letter is not here—Ratford can neither read nor write—I have a letter here which I received from Evans—this is it, it is in Evans's handwriting—(read—"Mr. Peter Taylor, Canton House, Bethnal-green-road, Thursday evening. Dear Sir, I have seen that scamp to-day, and have positively done all I could to bring him to something like reason; but I am sorry to say, nothing seems to move the vagabond from what he proposed, but we will se what to-morrow may bring; perhaps both of us may do something with him. I have promised to meet him to-morrow morning, at eleven o'clock, at the Grapes public-house, three or four doors from kingsland-road, in Old-street. Yours, A. Evans. Mrs. Evans has just told me that the Revd. has called. I would come down this evening, but my brother is without a young man, and wants my services. I shall see you to-morrow, at eleven o'clock")—In consequence of that letter I went to the Grapes public-house, in Old-street-road, the next day at eleven o'clock—it was on a Friday in the early part of April, about three weeks or a month after the goods were moved—Evans met me himself first, and afterwards Ratford came in—I had never seen him before—Evans said, "Now Ratford this is my friend Taylor, I went to see if we cannot come to something like reason about these goods"—after a little while Ratford said, "It is no use stating anything but what is right, I have made away with the goods"—Evans on that rose up, called him a scamp and a vagabond, and wanted to fight him, and said he would die in a ditch—Ratford said, "If I do, you will die in the one next to me"—no blow was

struck—I asked Ratford if he knew the value of the property he had had of mine—he said he did not—I said, "It is 75l., if you have made away with it I am a ruined man for ever"—he said he did not know about that, and seemed quite struck at the value of the property—Evans still continued in the same bustle—he appeared to be quite angry with Ratford, wanted to fight him, and called him any name but a gentleman, but he did not touch him—he told me to come out—we went outside together—he directly went back into the house, continued there about a minute, and then came home with me—a man named Payne was there—I had never seen him before—Payne said in Evans's presence that it was an understanding between Evans and Ratford that the goods were to be made away with immediately, and not to remain in his house—in the middle of May I went with Purdy to Knightabridge, and saw Evans there—I had not been able to get the slightest account from Evans of the goods or the money—I am not exactly aware of what passed between Purdy and Evans—Purdy wished him to do something in the matter of these goods—Evans said, "Purdy knows nothing of the goods, I exonerate him, I take the whole charge on myself; Taylor do your best and worst, I do not value you that" (snapping his fingers.)—"I said, "Well, Evans, if you had told me that before, I should have known how to have acted."—Purdy said, "I have been away from my house for three or four days to vindicate your case for a paltry sovereign, and now I shall stay away no longer; I shall speak the truth, you have trod on my foot, and I shall tread on yours"—Evan's said, "Well if you have been away from home at all you are only a fool, how am I to know that?"—Purdy did not tell me in Evans' presence what had occurred between them—he had stated it to me before—I gave Evans a sovereign towards the expenses incurred in moving the goods, and taking charge of them.

COURT. Q. Are you quite clear that the terms on which you let Evans take away the goods were, that he should either bring the money, or bring back the goods? A. Yes—no price was fixed on the goods.

MR. PAYNE. Q. Did you ever sell the goods to him? A. No; I never sold the goods at all.

Cross-examined by MR. BALLANTINE. Q. Was there anybody present besides Evans, yourself, and Price, at the time you delivered these goods to him? A. Yes; two females and my wife—the two females are here, my wife is not—I believe there was no other person present—nobody was present at the time the arrangement was made—I gave Evans into custody some time in June, I believe—I do not recollect what time it was—the goods were removed on 14th April—I was in difficulties at that time, and was contemplating bankruptcy—I did not tell any of my creditors that I was sending 75l. worth of goods off my premises, but I have mentioned it since then, and in consequence of that the whole has been disposed of—I have given up possession, and I have not a farthing in the world in consequence of this robbery being committed—I have not become a bankrupt yet—I have promised to compromise—I am not aware that I am a bankrupt, nor that any one can make me one now—I have nothing to compromise with, the whole of my property is gone—I promised to pay my creditors 5s. in the pound, and have not been able to do it in consequence of this robbery—75l. would have paid every one 5s. in the pound—I have not given it yet—they are not paid, they must be by some means—they will not be settled with till I have settled this matter, and then I must borrow the money—every one of them has agreed to take 5s. in the pound, and if they will not, they must get it in the best way they can—there were no proceedings against me at the time I parted with goods—none of my creditors were suing me—a party named Mollett, who I had

employed to settle the matter for me, had said, if I could procure the money, and offer 5s. in the pound, he could settle it directly, but I had no money, and this was the only way in which I could procure it—Mollett lives in the Blackfriars-road—I supposed him to be a respectable man—he was not present at the time the arrangement was made, nor when the goods were taken away—he knew nothing of the goods being taken away—I did not consult Mollett about it—he understood that something was to be done with the goods, that I was to make money in some way, he did not ask me how I was going to make it—no action had been commenced against me at the time I got my goods off the premises—I had been round to my creditors—I had received no notice from any lawyer—Evans had left me about three or four months when this occurred—he had not the slightest connexion with my business at this time—I sent for him once—I did not send three or four letters to him before he came—I did not sent two—I will not swear that I did not, or that I did—I did not send to him for the very purpose of taking possession of these goods—I cannot answer what he first came to my place for—I sent for him—I believe it was to ask him how I might arrange this matter, having gone through the same thing himself, how I might dispose of the goods and get the money—I believe that was the object—I had not consulted Mollett before—I wanted to dispose of the goods, if I had not other means of getting the money—I must turn them into money, if I could not turn them into money other-wise—if I could not obtain the money otherwise, I was to have the goods sold, and I was to have the money—if I could not obtain the money to pay what I have already paid, they must be sold, but as I was able to obtain 50l. I did not require the goods to be sold—the goods went off in the early part of the week, and I obtained the 50l. on the Friday or the Saturday—I handed over 40l. to Mollett, and kept 10l. myself—Mollett is not here—the 14th of April was Wednesday or Thursday to the best of my recollection, and on Friday I obtained 50l. from Mr. Phillips, a friend of mine, now residing with me—I intended to divide my property equally among the creditors—I authorized Mollett to go to Messrs. Sewell and Nash, my largest creditors, and say what my property consisted of—I was not aware that Mr. Phillips had the 50l. at first—I did not think of applying for it, before I sent the goods away—Mollett went round, and I offered my creditors 5s. in the pound—the 50l. would pay the first dividend—I have not paid them—I have paid the half-a-crown—I paid some of the largest of the creditors, and some of the smallest ones have had nothing yet—I cannot say how much I have paid to the largest out of the 50l.—I have never been a bankrupt—I handed Mollett about 40l., and he made use of 23l.—the other 17l. is in his hands—he is not here—I cannot say how much I have myself paid to my creditors—these goods were to have been returned to me if they were not sold—in the flurry of the moment, the only way I saw of getting the money was by sending them off the premises—I did not shout out after Evans when he was carrying the goods away, "Mind and get the most you can for them," nothing of the kind—I cannot say that I called out anything to him—I might or might not—I cannot recollect.

JOHN PURDY. I am a horse-jobber, in the Bethnal-green-road. About seven or eight weeks before I was examined before Mr. Broughton, I was at Robinson's horse-repository, in Little Britain—I saw Evans and Price there—I had never seen Evans before, Price brought him to me—Price asked me if I would have a drop of half-and-half—he then said, in Evan's presence, that he could put a sovereign in my way—I asked how—I thought he wanted a horse—he said Evans was his brother-in-law, and he had got a little property

belonging to a person, he did not say of what name, who was calling his creditors together; and he had trusted them with some person or other; that he could not find the party, and he wanted me to say that the things were brought to my place—he said there was about 6l. or 7l. worth of property—I asked what kind of goods they were, and he said they were in the groceryline—I asked if there would any danger come of it, if I should get into any trouble about it—he said no, that he had had two or three advices of two or three solicitors, and everything was quite right—he told me to say, when I saw Mr. Taylor, that I had made away with the things—after he told me about the two or three solicitors, I consented—Evans said he would then go home and write a letter to Mr. Taylor, and would meet Mr. Taylor at the Grapes, at eleven, and would meet me at ten, at the London Apprentice, and tell me what to say—I met him at ten—we had a glass of ale together, and about half-past eleven he left me, to go to the Grapes to meet Mr. Taylor—he did not tell me what to say—John Payne went with us to the Grapes at eleven—when we got into the room, the prisoner said to me, "Good morning, Mr. Bradfield, or Bradford, now we have come about these goods."—that was the first time I had answered to that name—I said, "Well, the goods I have made away with"—I was speaking about 7l. worth of goods, not 75l. worth—I had not made away with any—I had not seen them at all—Mr. Taylor said, "I hope you have not made away with 75l. worth of goods belonging to me?"—I was astonished at that, Evans having told me it was only 6l. or 7l. worth—Evans then called me a d—d rascal for making away with the property—it was not arranged beforehand that he was to call me a rascal—he said, "I have a good mind to knock your d—d head off"—he made a motion to strike me, but Mr. Taylor pulled him away, and he did not—he then said, "Well, Mr. Taylor, it is no use stopping, you had better come away," and he took him out of the room—he came back to me again in about a minute, and told me to meet him at the London Apprentice—I went there in about an hour, and met him—he said, "Oh, you did it very well, now I will pay you"—I said, "You told me that it was only 6l. or 7l. worth of property, and it is 75l. worth"—he said, "Never mind about that, it is all done"—he took me to the corner of Pitfield-street, said he had not got a sovereign about him, and he went and pawned his watch—he then came back, and gave me a sovereign—I saw him again about a week afterwards—he then said he wanted me to go and see Mr. Taylor again—I told him I would have no more to do with it—he said, "There is an empty house close by there, shall I bring Mr. Taylor, and say you live there"—(he meant that I was to be gone away)—I said, no, I would have no more to do with it—I afterwards went with Mr. Taylor to Price's, and Price told Mr. Taylor, in my presence, that I knew nothing about the property, that I had not seen it—we afterwards went to Evans, and Evans told Mr. Taylor that he would exonerate me, that I knew nothing about it, and had not seen it; and he was to go and do his best and his worst—I and Taylor then went away together—I did not see Evans again till he was in custody—Payne went with us to the London Apprentice and to the Grapes.

Cross-examined by MR. BALLANTINE. Q. You were to get a sovereign to own yourself a thief? A. No, I did not mean that I had stolen the goods, by saying that I had made away with them—at the time Evans brought them to my place, I understood every thing was quite right, or else I should not have said what I did—I mean I should not have said the things were brought to my place if I had thought any danger would happen afterwards—I should not have let them come to my place if I had thought anything was wrong—nothing was

brought to my place at all—Price brought nothing to my place, nor Evans—when I said I had made away with the goods, I did not mean I had stolen them—I did not mean anything—it was what he told me to say—I went by what he told me—he told me it was quite right, if I used those words, and I went by his words—I knew it was a lie.

COURT. Q. You were hired to lie, and took a sovereign to do it? A. Yes.

MR. BALLANTINE. Q. Is this the first time you have been here? A. No, I was here three years ago, charged with a conspiracy, and had twelve month's imprisonment.

MR. BALLANTINE to PETER TAYLOR. Q. Have you been offered any money by Evans as the price that was paid for those goods? A. Never, nor from anybody on his behalf since the goods were taken away.

MR. PAYNE. Q. Have you ever been able to find money or goods? A. Not any, not even the road they went.

JOHN PAYNE. I am a horse-dealer, and live in the Whitechapel-road—I know Purdy—I went with him to the Grapes, and saw Taylor and Evans there—Taylor said he had entrusted some property into the hands of Evans—Evans asked Purdy what he had done with the property—Purdy said he had done away with it, it was so small an amount he did not think it worth while keeping it, that the value was 5l. or 6l.—Evans put himself into a passion, threatening to strike Purdy for robbing his friend Mr. Taylor—Taylor went on his knees in the room, and said he was ruined, for the amount of the property was over 70l.—Purdy felt surprised at that—Taylor and Evans left the room—Evans returned, said it was capitally done, and told Purdy to meet him at the London Apprentice—he came back again to have a small glass of brandy to refresh himself—I and Purdy went to the London Apprentice, and waited there a considerable time before Evans came—he went a little farther on with a view of pawning his watch—I cannot say whether he did pawn it or not, but he came back and gave Purdy a sovereign, and me 10s.—he said it was a job most capitally done—he gave me four half-crowns, shook hands with me, and said I was a good helpmate, and that it was capitally done.

Cross-examined by MR. BALLANTINE. Q. Were you a good helpmate? A. Oh yes, most excellent—I joined in the cheat—I did not know I was going to have anything for it—I did not do it for the love of a lie—Purdy called on me in the morning to take a walk with him to meet Evans, in case they might want anything, he being no scholar—he told me he had got to own some property that he had never received, and he took me to help him—I knew it to be all a lie—I knew something was going on, and that Purdy had got to own something that did not belong to him—very likely I might have helped him in the job for which he had twelve months' imprisonment—I did not help him in that—I knew he had had twelve months' imprisonment—I was not a witness for him—I was not in it at all—I have been good friends with him ever since, and do business with him now.

MR. PAYNE. Q. You have never been convicted of a conspiracy? A. No.

CHARLOTTE MANNING. I am the wife of Thomas Manning, a carpenter, in the Commercial-road—I was at Mr. Taylor's on Wednesday, the 14th of April—I saw Evans there—I saw him take something out of the shop in a small barrow—Mr. Taylor was in the shop at the time—that was all I saw him take—I was in the parlour—I did not see anybody outside with a cart.

Cross-examined by MR. BALLANTINE. Q. Did you hear Taylor say anything about the price that was to be got for the goods? A. No, he did not

speak at all—I did not know from him what they were being moved for, it rather surprised me to see them moved.

ANN BRENT. I am Mrs. Taylor's sister—I was on a visit to her in April, and saw some goods moved out of the shop by Evans for Mr. Taylor—they were put in a cart which was there—Price was there assisting in the removal—Mr. Taylor was in the shop at the time.

Cross-examined by MR. BALLANTINE. Q. Mr. Taylor saw them being moved, and was giving directions, was he not? A. He saw them, I believe he was giving directions—I was not in the shop all the time, I was sometimes in the parlour—I heard Taylor say, "Are they perfectly safe?"—Evans said they were—I heard nothing said about the price—he said they were worth 70l. or 90l.—I believe that was when they were in the cart—I did not hear him say he was not to get less for them—I did not hear him say, "Get as much as you can for them," or "Mind you get the best price for them," nothing of the kind—there was no man present but Price—Mollett was not present—I think I should know him—I had not seen him before that day.

Cross-examined by MR. ROBINSON. Q. Did you ever see Price before? A. No, nor since, till now—this was going on for about two hours.

MR. PAYNE. Q. Is he the man? A. Yes—they called him Price.

GEORGE TEAKLE (police-sergeant H 8.) On the 9th of June I took Evans into custody—he was in company with Mr. Taylor—I told him I took him respecting the loss of Mr. Taylor's property, and asked him where the things were—he said he knew nothing about them—I had been spoken to by Mr. Taylor some weeks before about it.

Cross-examined by MR. BALLANTINE. Q. Was Price before the Magistrates? A. No, a bill was preferred against him, and he has surrendered to take his trial—the case was postponed from the last Session.

[Mr. BALLANTINE submitted that the prosecutor had entirely parted with his property, and that a case of larceny was not made out.—The COURT Considered that it was for the Jury to determined whether the prosecutor had absolutely parted with the property, or merely with the possession of the goods; if the latter, it was a larceny.]

(Evans received a good character.)

EVANS— GUILTY. Aged 30.— Confined Eighteen Months.

PRICE— GUILTY. Aged 21.— Confined Six Months.

NEW COURT.—Monday, August 16th, 1847.

PRESENT—Mr. Alderman GIBBS, and EDWARD BULLOCK, Esq.

Fifth Jury, before Edward Bullock, Esq.

Reference Number: t18470816-1714

1714. GEORGE MATTHEWS was indicted for stealing 14 boxes, value 4s. 6d.; the goods of Thomas Frederick Trebeck; to which he pleaded

GUILTY. Aged 17.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18470816-1715

1715. WILLIAM MYERS was indicted for embezzling and stealing 1l. 10s. 6d., which he had received on account of William Samuel Burton, his master; to which he pleaded

GUILTY. Aged 30.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18470816-1716

1716. JOSIAH COLE was indicted for stealing 1 coat, value 2s.; the goods of Michael Joseph; to which he pleaded

GUILTY. Aged 22.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18470816-1717

1717. JOEL STACEY was indicted for stealing 1 waistcoat, value 2s.; 1 handkerchief, 2s. 6d.; 1 cap, 1s.; 1 purse, 2d.; 4 half-crowns, and 2 shillings; the property of John Johnson; to which he pleaded

GUILTY. Aged 19.— Confined Four Months.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

Reference Number: t18470816-1718

1718. ISAAC ROBERTS was indicted for stealing 1 handkerchief, value 4s.; the goods of Webb Willie; 1 pair of boots, value 5s; 1 scarf, 2s.; 1 waistcoat, 1s.; 1 tobacco-pipe, 1s.; and 1 box, 6d.; the goods of William Wollen; to which he pleaded

GUILTY.* Aged 25.— Confined Twelve Months.

Reference Number: t18470816-1719

1719. WILLIAM CONNINGHAM was indicted for embezzling and stealing 1s.; which he had received on account of William Drew, his master; to which he pleaded

GUILTY. Aged 18.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18470816-1720

1720. SARAH PERCEVAL was indicted for stealing 11 cigars, value 1s. 4d.; the property of James Scarlett.

JAMES SCARLETT. I live at Harefield—on Friday, the 19th of July, I went away from home for about two hours, and when I came back I found the prisoner at my place—my brother George handed me over eleven cigars, and said the prisoner had taken them from the box—I asked the prisoner why she did it—she said she did not know why—I took her to the station, and handed the cigars to the officer.

Cross-examined by MR. HORRY. Q. Had you ever missed any cigars before? A. I do not know that I had—I knew the prisoner—I did not know her name—I have no recollection of her coming to my place.

GEORGE SCARLETT. I am the brother of James Scarlett. On Friday morning, the prisoner came to the shop and took some cigars, which were in the window—I saw her do it—she went out of the shop, came in again, and took some more—she went out, came in a third time and took some more—I did not speak to her the two first times—the third time I went out and called her, she came back and gave me the cigars when I asked her for them—she asked for half-penny worth of cotton, and said that was what she came for—I did not serve her—I kept her in the shop till my brother came, told him, and she was given into custody.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you told us all? A. She said she would give me 2s. for the cigars if I would let her go—there was nothing else going on between us—there was no little gallantry on my part—I was behind the counter picking up some pins—she did not see me the first and second time that she came in—I did not take a lot of cigars out of the box myself.

NOT GUILTY.

Reference Number: t18470816-1721

1721. ELIZA HAYNES was indicted for stealing 8 yards of tape-wire, value 8d.; 1 pair of stays, 2s; 2 aprons, 6d.; 1 shift, 6d.; and 1 handkerchief, 1s.; the goods of Richard Mann.

RICHARD MANN. I keep a shop at Hillingdon—the prisoner lodged with me for a fortnight—on the afternoon of the 17th of July I received information, went out, found the prisoner, and brought her back—she had two bundles with her—I asked her what she had got, as I had lost several things—she said only a gown she was going to take to be washed—she untied the bundles, and in them were a pair of stays, eight yards of tape-wire, and the other things named in the indictment—they were all my property, and were in the house before the prisoner left—these are the things.

WILLIAM NEWLAND (policeman T 39.) I took the prisoner and this property—she said she wished she had not done it, and was very sorry, she supposed she should be transported.

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutor abused me very much; I did not know the things had got into my bundle; Mrs. Mann lent me a box to put the clothes in; I did not know these things were there.

GUILTY. Aged 19.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18470816-1722

1722. JOHN KILBURN was indicted for stealing one watch, value 30s.; the goods of Frances Ann Morley; and that he had been before convicted of felony.

FRANCES ANN MORLEY. I am a widow, and live in Bateman's-row, Shoreditch. On the 25th of June, about half-past six o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came to my house to deliver a message for me to come to wash for his mother—I knew the prisoner before—he and his mother had lived neighbours with me two years since—he delivered the message inside the passage, near the parlour door, then went out, and I went out in the street to finish cleaning the door-way—he stood a good bit talking to me, and said, "Have you a light, Mrs. Morley?"—I said, "Yes; what do you want with a light?"—he said, "To light my cigar"—I said, "What, do you smoke, John?"—he said, "O yes, we smoke"—I said, "Go and take a light in the parlour"—he stepped in, took a light, stepped over me again, and went out—in ten minutes I went into the parlour to see what time it was, and my watch was gone—I am sue it was in the parlour before he went in—no person had been there but him.

GEORGE BAINES (policeman N 51). I took the prisoner into custody in Hackney-road—the prosecutrix came up—I told the prisoner I took him for stealing a watch—he said nothing at that time, but on the way to the station he said he did not steal it—it had not been found.

HENRY BARHAM HEATH (policeman N 428.) I produce a certificate of the prisoner's former conviction—(read—Convicted May, 1846; confined one month and whipped)—the prisoner is the person.

GUILTY. Aged 15.— Confined Twelve Months.

Reference Number: t18470816-1723

1723. EDWARD MASON and JOHN ROWE were indicted for stealing 1 handkerchief, value 1s., the property of John Lowe, from his person.

MASON†pleaded GUILTY. Aged 21— Confined Six Months.

JOHN DAVIS (City police-constable, No. 551.) On the 29th of July about four o'clock I was in Guildhall-yard with another officer, and saw the prisoners together, I watched them, and saw Mason put his hand in a gentleman's pocket and draw a handkerchief out—Rowe was alongside of him—we seized the prisoners—Mason dropped the handkerchief on the ground—I took hold of it, and we took them both to the station-house.

JOHN LOWE I am a clerk in the Post-office—on the afternoon of the 29th

of July I was in Guildhall-yard—I lost my handkerchief which I had had in my pocket five minutes before—this is it.

HENRY ROWE (City police-constable, No. 356.) I was with Davies, and saw Mason take this handkerchief out of Mr. Lowe's pocket—Rowe was standing behind him, covering him—I had seen the prisoners together for some time—Mason tried several pockets.

Rowe's Defence. I was coming home from work, and stopped to see the election; I was going away, the officer tapped me on the shoulder, and charged me with stealing the handkerchief; I know nothing about it; I was not with this lad.

ROWE— NOT GUILTY.

Reference Number: t18470816-1724

1724. JOHN JONES and ROBERT LAWRENCE were indicted for stealing 1 handkerchief, value 2s. 6d., the property of a man unknown, from his person.

JOHN DAVIES (City police-constable, No. 551.) On the 25th of July, at half-past nine o'clock at night, I was on duty in King William-street, and saw the prisoners both together, watched them, and saw Lawrence put his hand into several gentlemen's pockets—Jones was behind him—I followed them up to New-gate-street, and they then changed their coats—one had a blouse on—he put on a jacket—I followed them to Ludgate-hill, met another officer, and told him to come with me—I then saw Lawrence attempts a gentleman's pocket on Ludgate-hill, and further on he took a handkerchief out of a gentleman's pocket and put it into his jacket—Jones was with him—we followed the prisoners to Fleet-street and took them both—there were two handkerchiefs found on Lawrence and one on Jones—I do not know who the gentleman was from whom they took the handkerchief—if we had gone after him the prisoners would have made their escape.

Jones. He said at the station-house that one handkerchief was found on Lawrence and two on me, and he asked if there was any mark on it.

Witness. We put the question—I do not know whether there is any mark—I did not look.

HENRY ROWE (City police-constable, No. 356.) I was with the last witness, and saw Lawrence draw this handkerchief from a gentleman's pocket on Ludgate-hill—Jones was directly behind him—directly the pocket was picked the prisoners turned and separated—they went down Fleet-street, and we missed the gentleman—I took this handkerchief from the seat of Jones's trowsers—this white handkerchief came from Lawrence—this third handkerchief I believe they said belonged to themselves.

Lawrence. Q. Did you ask me if there was any mark on it? A. Davies said, "Is there any mark on it?"—you said, "No."

Lawrence's Defence. I had been out of employ three weeks; I was returning from my uncle's, in Cannon-street, and the policeman took me; I asked him what for, and he said, "You have been hard at it to-night;" I said, "What do you mean?" he took this handkerchief out of my pocket, and said, "This is the one;" I said, "what one? I worked hard for the money that brought that;" he said, "Was there any mark on it?" I said, "No;" I am innocent.

JONES— GUILTY. Aged 21.

LAWRENCE— GUILTY. Aged 19.

Confined Four Months.

Reference Number: t18470816-1725

1725. GEORGE HORTON was indicted for uttering a forged request for the delivery of 2 reams of paper, with intent to defraud William Lewis Meinier Leschelles; also, for uttering 1 other forged request for the delivery of 2 reams of paper, with intent to defraud the William Lewis Meinier Leschelles; to both which he pleaded

GUILTY. Aged 38.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18470816-1726

1726. JAMES HESTER was indicted for unlawfully assaulting Thomas Hughes, with intent, &c,

GUILTY. Aged 41.— Confined Eighteen Months.

Reference Number: t18470816-1727

1727. HENRY LANGLAND was indicted for stealing 1 handkerchief, value 1s. 6d., the goods of John Kay, from his person; to which he pleaded GUILTY. Aged 17.— Confined Four Months.

Reference Number: t18470816-1728

1728. JOHN ARGENT was indicted for stealing 1 coat, value 30s., the goods of John Pickford.

JOHN PICKFORD. I am a licensed victualler, and live at the Old Parr's Head, in Aldersgate-street. On the 13th of July, between ten and eleven o'clock in the morning, I missed two coats from one of the bed-rooms—I have traced one of them to Mr. Whittaker's, a pawnbroker—this produced is it—it is mine, and it was in No. 8 bed-room—I had seen it safe about nine o'clock the same morning—I have not found the other.

STEPHEN WHITTAKER. I am a pawnbroker, and live in Long-lane, Smithfield. On the 30th of July the prisoner brought this coat, and pawned it with me, for 5s., in the name of John Watson—he is the person.

THOMAS BRADLEY (City police-constable, No. 269.) I took the prisoner into custody, and told him he was charged with stealing a coat—he said he knew nothing about it—I found 5s. 1d. on him.

GUILTY. Aged 28.— Confined Four Months.

Reference Number: t18470816-1729

1729. WILLIAM BURKE was indicted for stealing 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of a man unknown, from his person.

GEORGE SCOTT (City police-constable, No. 560) On the 13th of July, about twelve o'clock at noon, I was on duty at Custom-house-quay—there was a rowing-match at the time—I saw the prisoner attempt a great many pockets—he at last went behind a gentleman, took this handkerchief from his pocket, put it into his breast, and came away—I took him, but there was such a rush that I could not see the gentleman—a gentleman came up, who had lost a handkerchief at the moment, but that was not the gentleman the prisoner took this from.

Prisoner's Defence. I was on the Custom-house-quay, and this officer came up to me, and pulled the handkerchief out of my breast; he turned to a man, and said, "Is this your handkerchief?" the man said, "No;" he said, "You must come along with me;" I know nothing of it.

GUILTY. Aged 19.— Confined Four Months.

Reference Number: t18470816-1730

1730. JAMES THOMPSON was indicted for stealing 2 brass knobs, value 2d., the goods of John Rose; being fixed to a certain building; to which he pleaded.

GUILTY. Aged 38.— Confined Three Months.

OLD COURT.—Tuesday, August 17th, 1847.

PRESENT—Mr. Alderman GIBBS; Mr. RECORDER; and Mr. Alderman

FARNCOMB

Second Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18470816-1731

1731. WILLIAM GILBERT was indicted for stealing a handkerchief, value 2s.; the goods of Charles Thomas Tebay, from his person; to which he pleaded

GUILTY. Aged 17.— Confined Six Months.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

Reference Number: t18470816-1732

1732. WILLIAM DEAN was indicted for stealing a handkerchief, value 2s.; the goods of John Reynolds Algar, from his person; to which he pleaded

GUILTY.† Aged 17.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18470816-1733

1733. THOMAS OWEN was indicted for stealing a handkerchief, value 2s.; the goods of Horatio Stringer, from his person; and that he had been before convicted of felony; to which he pleaded

GUILTY.* Aged 19.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18470816-1734

1734. GEORGE DICKINS was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of June, at St. Marylebone, 30 sovereigns, 1 5l. bank note, and 3 5l. promissory notes; the monies of Ferdinand Leopold Arundel, in the dwelling-house of Roger Roberts.

MR. O'BRIEN conducted the Prosecution.

FERDINAND LEOPOLD ARUNDEL. I am a laceman, and live at No. 116, Great Titchfield-street. On the 14th of June last, I had a carpet-bag, containing 33 sovereigns, 1 5l. Bank of England note, 2 5l. notes of the Bristol Bank, and 1 5l. Brecon note—I kept my bag at the bottom of my bed, and always locked—I had seen the money in it on the morning of the 14th of June—on Wednesday morning, the 16th, I found my bag broken open—the lock was not broken, but one side of the bag was wrenched open, just sufficient for the parcel containing the money to be drawn out—all the money was gone, but nothing else—the money was the very top parcel in the bag—the prisoner lodged in the next room to mine, but I do not think I ever saw him—the partition between the rooms is very thin—I heard some persons in the prisoner's room on the Monday—two young females occupied my room as well as myself—I occupied two rooms, and the prisoner occupied the third room with the landlord's brother—the females remained after I missed my money—they slept in the room next to the prisoner's—that was the room in which I had previously slept, but I did not sleep in that room that night, I slept in the next room—the women were in the room in which the bag was—they are not here—in consequence of information, I went after the prisoner on Wednesday, the 16th—I went to Mr. Nash, of Marylebone-street, to Mr. Maddox's, to Gravesend, and to Richmond—I traced him to Gravesend, but could not trace the notes—I did not see the prisoner till he was taken into custody on Sunday morning.

Cross-examined by MR. BALLANTINE. Q. How long had you been in town before the loss of this money? A. Not more than a fortnight—I came to town on the 30th of May—I carry on business at Bristol—I received the notes from Mr. Beard—I have never been out of the way—I was not in a

state of insolvency or bankruptcy at the time I received this money—I am not now a bankrupt—I compromised with my creditors about twelve months ago—I came up to town alone on the 30th of May—Miss Hall was with me at my lodging—she had been a shopwoman of mine—she did not come up to town with me—she came first—I had not arranged to meet her in town, nor did I meet her by accident—I knew where she was, and wrote to her to an address she had given me, at Hackney—she came to me—she did not go back to Hackney—she is about twenty-two years of age—I re-engaged her—I did no t take her to my lodging then, she came after she was engaged—she was engaged at a place of business which I had close by, No.310, Regent-street—that is Miss Gould's—I am not aware that Miss Gould has made considerable complaints against me—I have brought an action, and filed a bill in Chancery against her—Miss Hall always slept in the room where the money was—we slept together—I was cohabiting with her—she had been my shopwoman for four years—I cohabited with her some part of that time—she is now living at No. 18, Hackney-road—she left my lodging about a week or fortnight after the robbery—I think she was there a whole week after the robbery, if not a fortnight—she slept there the following night, and I think was there the whole of the following day—I was out with the officer every night until the Sunday, we traced the prisoner to fifty places, and I did not sleep at my lodging until three o'clock on the Sunday morning—the other female came up three or four days previous to the robbery—she lives at Oxford—she has been in my employ—she was at the lodging on the night of the 14th of June—Miss Hall and the other young woman both knew of my having the money in the bag.

MR. O'BRIEN. Q. Was Miss Hall here last Session? A. No—the young lady Oxford only slept in the house two or three nights—she slept with Miss Hall as a companion, and I slept in the next room—she was unwell, and was going away on the morning previous to my discovering my loss, and had she gone before I discovered it I should certainly have suspected her, but in consequence of the robbery I kept her in town for two or three days longer.

JAMES MADDOX. I am a licensed victualler. and live in High-street, Marylebone. On the 15th of June last, about five o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner came to my house—I had seen him a few times before—he asked if I would take charge of thirty-one sovereigns for him for a few days, until he went to Gravesend and back, he might be gone two or three days or a week—he called again on Thursday, the 17th, and asked me to let him have 10l. of it—in consequence of information I had then received, I gave him into custody, and gave up the twenty-one sovereigns to Wyness, the policeman—the prisoner had never left any money with me before.

COURT. Q. How was he dressed when he called previously? A. Always very respectably—there was no change in his appearance.

ANDREW WYNESS (policeman D 43.) On the 17th of June I received twenty-one sovereigns from Maddox.

ROGER ROBERTS. I am landlord of the house, NO. 116, Great Titchfield-street. Mr. Arundel lodged in the front room second floor—the prisoner lodged in the back room adjoining, for eight or nine weeks—he left on the 15th without giving me any notice—he owed me about 10s. or 12s. for rent and his meals—sometimes he paid me in clothes—he is a chemist and druggist, and was with a Mr. Nash when I first knew him—he was doing nothing when he was with me—I have now and then lent him 1s. or 6d.—he was out with me the day previous, at Clerkenwell, and told me he had no money.

Cross-examined. Q. How long have you known Mr. Arundel? A.

About six or seven weeks—I had not known him previous to his coming to lodge with me—my brother used to sleep with the prisoner—I am not quite sure how much the prisoner owed me, as I did not keep the account myself, but I should say it was about 10s.—I am sure it was 5s.—that included provisions—he paid so much per meal—he left some clothes behind—I was told not to give them up—I did not say the Sheriff would have them—on the 14th, when we were out, I proposed going to a public-house to get some dinner, and he said he had no money.

WILLIAM ROBERTS. I am the brother of the last witness. I know the prisoner by being at my brother's for five of six weeks—I occupied the same bed with him—the last night he slept there was on Monday, the 14th of June—I saw him that evening—he left some clothes behind him, but he had been in the habit of leaving before that.

Cross-examined. Q. For three or four days at a time? A. Yes, and leaving his clothes in the same way, without saying he was going—some of the clothes were pretty good, and some not so good—I know nothing about his receiving money from the country.

COURT. Q. Where was the prisoner after he got up in the morning? A. I always got up first, about seven or half-past seven o'clock, and undid my brother's shop shutters, leaving the prisoner in the bed-room—the lodgers in other room used to go out to a shop in Regent-street—they left at various times, sometimes at eight o'clock, and sometimes at nine—the prisoner used to come down when we called him about eight o'clock to breakfast—he sometimes went to the bed-room afterwards—he was at home on the Tuesday afternoon—I cannot say whether the young women were out then or not—the partition to the prosecutor's room is very thin—you can hear persons talking if they speak loud—I cannot say whether their door was locked when they went out—I never tried it—I did not know where the prosecutor kept his bag—I know the place where he said he kept it—I afterwards saw the carpet bag, it appeared to have been wrenched open on one side—the young women were in the house when the prosecutor discovered the loss—my sister is the landlady of the house—she attended to the rooms, but she never went into the prosecutor's room—they always locked it up when they went out—the prosecutor had two rooms—they are not one within the other—there are two separate doors on the staircase—they only locked one door—that was the door of the room the money was in—they could not get into that room by going in at the other door—if they did get in, they would be obliged to open that door—there is no internal communication between the rooms—they used to take the key with them—I never saw them with it—I have seen them locking the door sometimes when they have been going out—the door was not found broken open—the key of the my door will not open the other room—the prosecutor tried it himself—we have not a key in the house that will unlock it—I saw no appearance of the lock having been pushed back.

FERDINAND LEOPOLD ARUNDELL re-examined. I discovered my loss about eight o'clock on Wednesday morning, the 16th, as I wanted the money to pay away in the City—I kept nothing but the money and papers in the bag—I kept it at the foot of the bed, at the bottom of the room—persons sleeping in the bed might fail to notice that it was wrenched open, because it was in an angle of the room, where there is no space for a person to go up, except a small division between the bottom of the bed, and the handle of the door—the bag was not placed so as to show that it had been forced—it would not be seen till it was disturbed—I asked the young persons for the bag, as I was going out; they gave it me through their door while I was dressing, and

directly I saw it, I saw that the money was gone—they did not notice it till I remarked it—if I had been aware of it I would have had Miss Hall here—I did not see the money on the Tuesday, I did on the Monday—the door was invariably locked—I particularly desired it, and always tried it every time I went into the room—it was impossible that the room could have been entered without a key, but the last time the carpet bag was gone to it was wrenched open—I believe they were disturbed—I was only alluding to what I have heard from Miss Hall—Miss Hall had some boxes at my lodging—I did not have them searched—they were not searched at the time of the robbery—I do not think her friend had any boxes.

COURT. Q. Has Miss Hall told you something which you believe would explain the difficulty if she was here? A. Yes; it would explain as regards the lock—I could get her here in half an hour—nobody could have had access to the room without a key, the door was locked on the Tuesday evening.

RICHARD BEARD. I am in the prosecutor's employ, and act for him at Bristol—I was in the habit of remitting him money from time to time in June last—on the 9th of June I remitted him 23l. 9s. 7d., there were three bank notes, and the rest in gold and silver—I had remitted other money in that month, and many times previously.

DANIEL ALLEN. I am acquainted with the prisoner—I saw him about a week or eight days previous to the robbery—he had no money then to my knowledge—I did not see him again until he was in custody—he was out of a situation I believe—I have known him about seven or eight months.

HENRY HOLLAND. I am a tailor, and live in High-street, Marylebone—I am acquainted with the prisoner—on the 15th of June he came to my shop about one o'clock—he did not purchase anything of me then—he bought a few waistcoats about a month back, and then paid me some money—on the 15th of June when he came he said, "I want to speak to you"—I was at dinner—he asked me to come and have a glass of wine or brandy, or anything I liked—I said, "No; I have business to do against time, but in the evening I shall have no objection"—he said, "What time will you be done in the evening?"—I said, "About seven o'clock"—he said, "Here are nine sovereigns, will you take care of these till night, for I do not want Mr. Roberts to know that I have got any money; I have had a remittance of 10l., and I have just come from St. Martin's-le-Grand with a post-office order; I have had to write a letter for it, it took me an hour and more, and to tell the d—dest lies to get this money"—he said it came from his uncle at penrith in Derbyshire—he went away, and said he would call about seven—between four and five he came again—I said, "You have come before your time"—he said, "Yes; I have met with a person or two, and have had a little to drink and something to eat, I am going home to answer some advertisements, I have heard of two or three situations"—about a quarter past seven the same evening he came and said, "Are you ready?"—I said, "Yes"—he said, "I have brought some duplicates with me, I want to get some things out of pledge that are in this neighbourhood"—a friend came in and asked me to go and have some ale—I asked the prisoner to come—he said, "No; it is between seven and eight, the pawnbrokers shut up at eight, I will go and get these things; give me 2l. of the money I gave you, and I will meet you at the public-house,"—I gave it to him, and he went—he afterwards met me at the public-house, and we took a walk up Marylebone-street—he said, "You have got to give me 7l."—I said, "Yes"—I gave it him, and we went into a public-house, had some sherry and water, went to Oxford-market, and had some supper together at an eating-house—he there

said, "Take 5s. for me, and I will ask you for 5s.; I don't want Roberts to know that I have got money, and I will say, 'Holland, lend me 5s.'"—he gave me the 5s.—we went to Roberts, but Roberts was not at home—we saw Mrs. Roberts, and he asked me in her presence for the 5s.—I gave it to him—that was about nine o'clock in the evening—I saw the articles he had redeemed, they were a black wrapper, a neckerchief or two, and a cap and jacket.

WILLIAM BROCK. I live with Mr. Clark, a pawnbroker, in Long-acre. I produce a coat pledged for 8s. on the 2nd of June, in the name of George Dickins—I cannot swear to the prisoner.

WILLIAM TAYLOR. I am in the employment of Mr. Dobree, a pawn-broker, in Oxford-street. I produce four waistcoats pledged for 5s. 6d., on the 10th of June, by a man in the name of John Dixon, of No. 8, Great Chesterfield-street—I do not recollect the prisoner.

ROGER ROBERTS re-examined. I have seen the prisoner wear a coat very much like this, but I could not swear to it—I recollect this waistcoat very well—it has some peculiar buttons.

WILLIAM ROBERTS re-examined. I believe the prisoner had such clothes as these—I have seen some very much like them.

EBENEZER BOWER (police-constable D 143.) I took the prisoner into custody on Sunday morning, the 20th of June—I told him the charge—he said I was a mistaken, that he was not the man—on the way to the station he said he was a stranger there—I was present at the Police-office when his father-in-law was examined—he is here to-day—he stated that he had come from Derby.

JOSEPH HUGHES (police-constable T 114.) In June last, in consequence of instructions from the Magistrate, I accompanied the prosecutor to Derby—I saw a person there, representing herself as the prisoner's mother—I was present at the examination at the Police-office, and heard a person named Foulston examined—he represented himself to be the prisoner's father-in-law—I do not know whether or not his deposition was taken—I heard the prisoner state in his defence to the Magistrate how he got possession of the money—I do not know whether the clerk wrote it down or not—it was at the first examination, on the 21st of June, I think—the clerk took it down in his book—it was not submitted to the Magistrate to authenticate—it was not read over to the prisoner, nor was he asked to sign it.

The depositions returned to the Court contained no statement of the prisoner's. MR. O'BRIEN tendered the evidence of a witness who was present at the time, and took down what the prisoner said. MR. BALLANTINE objected to the reception of this evidence, but the COURT was of opinion that it was admissible, as the best evidence, in the absence of the Magistrate's clerk.

GAVAN RICKARDS. I was at Marlborough-street on the 21st of June—the prisoner was under charge there—he made a statement—I took down in writing what he said, just as he uttered it—I was attending for Mr. Eyre, the attorney for the prosecution—this is the memorandum I made at the time—he said, "Since I have been out of a situation, I have been under the necessity of pawing; Mr. Roberts lent me a watch; about a fortnight ago my father sent me up 35l., they were two tens, and the remainder in fives; I was asked by my father if I should like a government situation; which I said I should; he is not my father, but my father-in-law; his name is Mr. Foulston, No. 1, Eycott-street, Derby."

MR. BALLANTINE called

GEORGE FOULSTON. I am a miller, at Derby. The prisoner is my son-in-law—I

have married his mother—I knew of his coming up to town—he has always borne an honest and respectable character—his mother had been married before I married her—I had no money in my possession on his account—his mother has a yearly annuity, and it was between his mother and himself—I have at times supplied him with money—the last time, I believe, was about eleven weeks ago, according to my recollection—I cannot say to a few days—the last sum of money I sent him, was three £5 notes—I had sent him two £10 notes about a fortnight before that, it was my own money—I knew he was out of a situation—I had not sent him money previously to that—he had written down to me to say that he was out of a situation, and was in expectation of getting one, and wanted money to fit him out for it; and being his father-in-law, I considered it was my duty to supply him with it—I do not know whether his mother supplied him with any money.

MR. O'BRIEN. Q. Did the prisoner write to you? A. Yes—I have not got the letter—I sent him two 10l. and three 5l. Bank of England notes—I sent them by letter from Derby, directed to the prisoner's lodgings—I sent the two 10l. notes first—I did not get a letter from the prisoner acknowledging their receipt—I sent the three fives before I received any other letter—I did not get a letter acknowledging the receipt of the three fives—he sent a letter saying the two 10l. notes were not sufficient, and I then sent him the three fives—I was not aware that unpleasant circumstances would take place, or I could have produced the letters—I was in town six or eight weeks ago, and was examined before Mr. Bingham, he did not put such questions as these to me—I do not know the numbers of the notes—whether I have been in custody has nothing to do with this—I was not charged with stealing, convicted, and sentenced to nine months' imprisonment in Derby jail—I suffered innocently—it may be ten years ago—I was there nine months, I believe—I cannot give an explanation of what I was charged with—I was with other men in a public-house; we had some liquor together, and a person got drunk, and another said he had lost some money or something of that sort in the public-house—I was not able to say whether he had or not, but I was in their company—I believe the other person was charged with stealing money in the public-house—it was through paying for some ale—one party said he had put the money down for the ale, and that another party took it up—I have been married nearly six years—my wife was never known as Devonshire Bess—she never kept a brothel—I was never insolvent, nor a bankrupt—I am a miller by trade—one mill is sufficient for me, that is at Derby—I do not say I am the owner of it, or that I have one at the present time—I do not rent a mill; I superintended one till I came up to London, for Mr. Foreman, who has one at Derby.

MR. BALLANTINE. Q. You married the prisoner's mother after you had been in Southwell jail? A. Yes, that is the way I became acquainted with him—I believe he is near twenty years of age—my wife has an annuity of about 40l. a year—she had no money when I married her, to my knowledge—I know that she supplies the prisoner with money on her own account—I had been living in the neighbourhood of Derby ever since I was in Southwell jail, and in the employ of respectable people—I have not been in trouble or difficulty since, but have been trying to gain an honest livelihood—my wife never kept a brothel at Brentford to my knowledge; far from it, she has been in a respectable business at Derby for twenty years—she is not here.

COURT. Q. In whose employment were you in June and July last? A. Mr. Charles Foreman's, who has a corn-mill at Derby—I received a guinea a

week as wages—I had this money in my possession ever since I gave up business, which is nearly four years ago—I had more money than the 35l. I sent the prisoner—I did not take the numbers or dates of any of the notes—I carried on business at Derby as a grocer, and a bacon, butter, and cheese-factor—I did not fail, I gave it up in consequence of my wife's ill health, and we went home to my friends for three months—I kept all the notes by me for four years—I never made any use of them, or deposited them in any Bank—I kept them in my own chest of drawers—I had 60l. in ready cash when I gave up business, besides what I had in my books—I had 23l. left after remitting the 35l. to the prisoner—I never used this money, as it was in Bank of England notes—I have always had it in my power to receive a guinea or 25s. a week, and my wife has a yearly annuity, and carried on business as a milliner and dressmaker—I have more money in my possession now than I had when I gave up business—I had spent no part of the 60l. until I sent my son-in-law the 35l.

MR. ARUNDEL re-examined. I do not know a person named William Hyde—I never said to any one, that if Miss Hall had left town I should have suspected her of stealing my money—she never did leave town—it was the other young lady that I should have suspected—Miss Hall is not here now—I have been to fetch her, but unfortunately she has gone to Colchester for the day—if I had had the least idea of her attendance being required, I should undoubtedly have had her here—I always locked my door when I left the room, and I believe I was the last person that left the room previous to missing the money.

GUILTY. Aged 20.—Recommended to mercy by the Jury.

Transported for seven Years.

Reference Number: t18470816-1735

1735. GEORGE JACKSON was indicted for stealing 1 purse value 1s., 5 sovereigns, 2 half-sovereigns, 4 half-crowns, and 2s., the property of Girolamo di Mattia.

WALTER FEATHERSTONHAUGH. I live in Chester-le-street, in the country of Durham—on the 12th of July I was on board a steam-boat off the Adelphi-pier, Hungerford—I had got on board at Westminster—the prisoner sat near me—I saw no one in his company then—I did not see him move from the rail, but I saw him standing before me in the act of taking a purse from the pocket of the prosecutor with his right hand—his comrade held the pocket—the prisoner had a great coat hanging on his left arm—he put the purse under the coat—I tapped the prosecutor on the back and told him he had had his pocket picked—I laid hold of the prisoner, and told him the purse was in his possession—I secured him—he stopped down and then threw the purse overboard—it was a kind of shot coloured purse—I did not see the face of the other man—we had left the Hungerford pier about 100 yards—the vessel was in motion—a good many people were on board.

Cross-examined by MR. BALLANTINE. Q. Was it an old man with him? A. I did not see his face.

SAMSON SAMSON. I live at Albion-terrace, Walworth-road—I was on board the steam-boat—I saw the last witness lay hold of the prisoner—he said, "You scoundrel, you have got the gentleman's purse"—I looked round immediately, and saw the prisoner throw something overboard—I touched the prosecutor on the back, he did not understand a word of English—I spoke in French and told him he was robbed—he understood me then.

GIROLAMO DI MATTIA (through an interpreter.) On the 12th of July I was on board a steam-boat—I had a purse of a reddish colour—it contained five sovereigns,

two half-sovereigns, four half-crowns, two or three shillings, and some sixpences—I was spoken to and missed it—I have never seen it since.

Cross-examined. Q. What is your name? A. (Writing it, Girolamo di Mattia.)

ROBERT WARE (City-policeman.) I was at Blackfriars pier, and took charge of the prisoner—I found no purse on him.

GUILTY. Aged 20.— Transported for Seven years.

Reference Number: t18470816-1736

1736. RICHARD CLOSE was indicted for stealing 5 tons of iron rails, value 50l.; and 5 tons of iron, value 50l., the property of Joseph Bailey and others; other COUNTS varying the manner of laying the charge.

MESSRS. CLARKSON and BODKIN Conducted the Prosecution.

PRICE BENBOW. I am in the employ of Messrs. Bailey of the Nanticlough iron works, in Wales—I recollect rails being made for the Great Northeren Railway Company—one end of them was painted red to distinguish them from others—they were sent by canal to Newport, and were shipped for London in January, February, and March last—I was sent for from Wales in consequence of some of them being missed—I was shown some rails in the possession of the police in London—they were part of those made for the Great Northern Railway Company—they answered in point of marks, length, and weight.

JOSEPH JOHNS. I am foreman to Messrs. Bailey—I recollect the rails being shipped for the Great Northern Railway Company—on some of them I put a particular mark of my own, of white paint—since I have been in London I have seen two of the rails, and find the white paint mark, which perfectly satisfies me they were part of the rails so shipped.

JAMES BETTS. I am carman to Mr. Callbreath, who has carts, horses, and timber-carriages—I took 640 iron rails, which had come to the wharf by the schooner, and placed them in the Caledonian-road—it was in the same week as the fast-day(23rd of March).

WILLIAM CHEESEMAN. I occupy a field in the Caledonian-road—I remember some rails being brought there in March last, and placed in the road adjoining my field, by the side of the railway—I saw them from time to time—I remember some of them being taken away—they were not taken in the same sort of carriages as those they were brought in, but in one-horse carts and vans—they were not taken away by the same men who brought them; they were at it nearly a fortnight—I cannot speak to the person of the prisoner—I remember a cart coming two or three times with cement casks—they unloaded the casks, loaded the iron in, and then put the casks on the top—they were empty casks—I did not take notice of the men.

Cross-examined by MR. BALLANTINE. Q. Orrow was in your employment? A. Yes—I keep a ground for beating carpets—there is nearly an acre of it—for the convenience of the public, I beat the carpets as far from the road as possible—Orrow beat carpets and looked after the ground when I was away—he was present when the carts came—he was doing nothing—I was backwards and forwards after the work—he was not beating carpets, he was looking after the people that were working—we beat the carpets quite at the other side of the ground—the iron was no further from the fence than I am from that table—I saw the one-horse cart, with the cement casks, come and take away the rails two or three times—I saw people loading it—there were generally two, three, or four of them—I did not notice their dress at at all—I spoke to them the first time, and asked where they were going to take the irons—they

said they were going to take them "handy to the works" for the Company—there were two carts there then, and I dare say three or four men—I asked why they did not send timber-carriages to take the irons away—there is a turnpike-gate, which they would have to go through, called the King's Head Bar.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. What did they say about the timber-carriages? A. One of them said the Company had got another job in the country, and could not spare the timber-carriages.

THOMAS JAMES ORROW. In the beginning of the year, I was in the employ of Cheeseman, and am now—I remember seeing the iron rails brought on timber wagons, and deposited near the ground where we beat carpets—I remember the "Fast-day"—some time after that, I noticed people coming and taking away the rails—I noticed a cart that had cement casks in it—that was used four of five times to take them away—a man came and helped to load the cart—they took the casks out, put in the iron, laid the casks over them, and drove away—one day I stood about five yards from the man who drove the cart, and noticed his person; the prisoner is the man—I saw him before the Magistrate—there were about four men employed in loading the cart that day besides him—the prisoner stood in the cart, and lifted the irons up.

Cross-examined. Q. Was your master there on that occasion? A. I do not know—the last day they came was about a fortnight after the Fast-day—I was sweeping and folding up a carpet on the spot where I had been beating it—Mr. Mowett was the first person who asked if I knew the person who was with the cart; I was taken to the prisoner by a policeman—he was not pointed out to me—the policeman asked me whether I knew the man—he took me to him, pointed him out, and asked whether he was not the man—he was pointed out to me—there was nobody else but that man—I had not been told that the man was in custody who they supposed had stolen the rails—I was taken to see him—I knew who I was taken to see—when I saw him take the rails he had a corduroy jacket with moleskin sleeves to it, a corduroy waistcoat I believe, and corduroy trowsers—he had only the trowsers and waistcoat on when he was shown to me—I think it happened in the month of April—I told Mr. Mowett in April what I had seen, and told him what sort of carts they were—I gave a description of the carts, but not of the men—I have identified the carts—I was not told that the prisoner was the man—I did not know that they had got the man who was charged, in custody—I did not know who I was going to see, till I saw him—I was not surprised at all—I did not know what I was being taken for, and was not curious enough to inquire—I walked with the policeman, and never asked him what he wanted of me, I did not care to know—I did not think he was going to take me up, I did not care about that—I made no question whatever—this might be three months after I saw the rails taken—I kept the prisoner's face and appearance completely in my mind all that time—I never forgot it.

MR. BODKIN. Q. You saw the cart four or five times? A. I did—on one occasion I was very near the carman—it was between three and four o'clock in the afternoon—I was folding up a carpet at the time, and watched the loading of the carts five or ten minutes—my master was not there then—I said nothing to any of the men—I am quite sure the prisoner is the man who drove the cart, and helped to load it—Brandford the policeman came to me, I do not know where he took me to—I believe I went to one house—I saw the prisoner in the street—Mr. Wood, the attorney was with him—the officer asked me if that was the man, I said, "That is the man that is coming up the street"—my master was there, he went down the street after Mr.

Wood, and came back with him and the prisoner—as they were coming up I told the officer that was the man.

COURT. Q. Did the officer say you, "Is that the man coming?" A. Yes—he asked me if I knew the man—I cannot say who said the words, "That is the man, "whether is was I or the officer—he asked me if I knew the man—I said, "Which one"—there was a man on the right hand side—I said he was not the man—I then said of the man on the left, "That is the man that drove the cement cart"—that was the prisoner—the rails are four or five feet from the fence, which is four feet high—it is an open fence.

ROBERT BRANDFORD (police-sergeant N 12.) On the 8th of July, I took the prisoner in charge in Salisbury-street, Rotherhithe. Orrow, and Cheeseman, and Mr. Wood, the clerk to Messrs. Rixon were with me—I had not told Orrow before I took him to Rotherhithe that I was going to show him the man who drove the cart, I used no such expression—from the description I had of the prisoner's person from Orrow, I went to Rotherhithe, and took Orrow with me, but as I had been to the prisoner's master several times before respecting the iron, sent Mr. Wood down to see whether the prisoner was in the way, in order that there might be no suspicion about my going—the prisoner came back with him, and Orrow pointed him out as one of the men who took the iron—they both came upon the same side—there was man on the other side of the way—I had asked Orrow to look out and see if he saw any body coming up the street—he said, "Yes, that is the man that took the iron"—that was the prisoner—on my oath I had given him no reason to suppose that the man who was coming was the man who stole the iron—I had not pointed him out at all—he wore a sleeve waistcoat, short cord trowsers, and a cap.

Cross-examined. Q. You have been in Court during the whole time Orrow has been examined? A. Yes—Orrow knew he was going to see if he could identify the man—he had not accompanied me the day before to the prisoner's master—he had never done so—I found (Orrow) at the Police Court this day with his master—they went there to identify another man—I went with him to see if he could identify him, and then Wood went to fetch the prisoner—I waited till he came—I might have been there twenty minutes—I am certain Orrow did not know during all that time that Wood was gone to fetch a man he was to identify—it was an arrangement between Wood and me—I told Orrow I wanted him, as I thought I should be able to find the man, and he accompanied me to Rotherhithe—I do not know who the person was on the other side of the way—it was a strange neighbourhood to me—I am not in the habit of doing duty there—there is a turnpike in the neighbourhood of the railway which the carts must have gone through—I took the turnpike-men to see the prisoner—they are not here.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Were they able to speak to him? A. No—they did not take sufficient notice to identify him.

CHARLES RAY WOOD. I assist Messrs. Rixon, the attorneys for the prosecuion. A person who had been concerned in this robbery was described to me by Orrow; and in order to avoid suspicion by an officer going, I made an arrangement that I should go, and on 8th of July I went to Rotherhithe, to the prisoner's master's house, at the corner of Salisbury-street—the prisoner was not within—his mistress had sent him out—it was a sort of green-grocer's shop—I saw a one-horse cart in the street when I first went, such as is used for removing goods—the prisoner came back at last—I asked him to accompany me to the top of the street, where I wished to ask him few questions, and said if he would, I would give him a pint of beer—he accompanied me—when

said they were going to take them "handy to the works" for the Company—there were two carts there then, and I dare say three or four men—I asked why they did not send timber-carriages to take the irons away—there is a turnpike-gate, which they would have to go through, called the King's IIead Bar.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. What did they say about the timber-carriages? A. One of them said the Company had got another job in the country, and could not spare the timber-carriages.

THOMAS JAMES ORROW. In the beginning of the year, I was in the employ of Cheeseman, and am now—I remember seeing the iron rails brought on timber wagons, and deposited near the ground where we beat carpets—I remember the "Fast-day"—some time after that, I noticed people coming and taking away the rails—I noticed a cart that had cement casks in it—that was used four of five times to take them away—a man came and helped to load the cart—they took the casks out, put in the iron, laid the casks over them, and drove away—one day I stood about five yards from the man who drove the cart, and noticed his person; the prisoner is the man—I saw him before the Magistrate—there were about four men employed in loading the cart that day besides him—the prisoner stood in the cart, and lifted the irons up.

Cross-examined. Q. Was your master there on that occasion? A. I do not know—the last day they came was about a fortnight after the Fast-day—I was sweeping and folding up a carpet on the spot where I had been beating it—Mr. Mowett was the first person who asked if I knew the person who was with the cart; I was taken to the prisoner by a policeman—he was not pointed out to me—the policeman asked me whether I knew the man—he took me to him, pointed him out, and asked whether he was not the man—he was pointed out to me—there was nobody else but that man—I had not been told that the man was in custody who they supposed had stolen the rails—I was taken to see him—I knew who I was taken to see—when I saw him take the rails he had a corduroy jacket with moleskin sleeves to it, a corduroy waistcoat I believe, and corduroy trowsers—he had only the trowsers and waistcoat on when he was shown to me—I think it happened in the month of April—I told Mr. Mowett in April what I had seen, and told him what sort of carts they were—I gave a description of the carts, but not of the men—I have identified the carts—I was not told that the prisoner was the man—I did not know that they had got the man who was charged, in custody—I did not know who I was going to see, till I saw him—I was not surprised at all—I did not know what I was being taken for, and was not curious enough to inquire—I walked with the policeman, and never asked him what he wanted of me, I did not care to know—I did not think he was going to take me up, I did not care about that—I made no question whatever—this might be three months after I saw the rails taken—I kept the prisoner's face and appearance completely in my mind all that time—I never forgot it.

MR. BODKIN. Q. You saw the cart four or five times? A. I did—on one occasion I was very near the carman—it was between three and four o'clock in the afternoon—I was folding up a carpet at the time, and watched the loading of the carts five or ten minutes—my master was not there then—I said nothing to any of the men—I am quite sure the prisoner is the man who drove the cart, and helped to load it—Brandford the policeman came to me, I do not know where he took me to—I believe I went to one house—I saw the prisoner in the street—Mr. Wood, the attorney was with him—the officer asked me if that was the man, I said, "That is the man that is coming up the street"—my master was there, he went down the street after Mr.

Wood, and came back with him and the prisoner—as they were coming up I told the officer that was the man.

COURT. Q. Did the officer say you, "Is that the man coming?" A. Yes—he asked me if I knew the man—I cannot say who said the words, "That is the man, "whether is was I or the officer—he asked me if I knew the man—I said, "Which one"—there was a man on the right hand side—I said he was not the man—I then said of the man on the left, "That is the man that drove the cement cart"—that was the prisoner—the rails are four or five feet from the fence, which is four feet high—it is an open fence.

ROBERT BRANDFORD (police-sergeant N 12.) On the 8th of July, I took the prisoner in charge in Salisbury-street, Rotherhithe. Orrow, and Cheeseman, and Mr. Wood, the clerk to Messrs. Rixon were with me—I had not told Orrow before I took him to Rotherhithe that I was going to show him the man who drove the cart, I used no such expression—from the description I had of the prisoner's person from Orrow, I went to Rotherhithe, and took Orrow with me, but as I had been to the prisoner's master several times before respecting the iron, sent Mr. Wood down to see whether the prisoner was in the way, in order that there might be no suspicion about my going—the prisoner came back with him, and Orrow pointed him out as one of the men who took the iron—they both came upon the same side—there was man on the other side of the way—I had asked Orrow to look out and see if he saw any body coming up the street—he said, "Yes, that is the man that took the iron"—that was the prisoner—on my oath I had given him no reason to suppose that the man who was coming was the man who stole the iron—I had not pointed him out at all—he wore a sleeve waistcoat, short cord trowsers, and a cap.

Cross-examined. Q. You have been in Court during the whole time Orrow has been examined? A. Yes—Orrow knew he was going to see if he could identify the man—he had not accompanied me the day before to the prisoner's master—he had never done so—I found (Orrow) at the Police Court this day with his master—they went there to identify another man—I went with him to see if he could identify him, and then Wood went to fetch the prisoner—I waited till he came—I might have been there twenty minutes—I am certain Orrow did not know during all that time that Wood was gone to fetch a man he was to identify—it was an arrangement between Wood and me—I told Orrow I wanted him, as I thought I should be able to find the man, and he accompanied me to Rotherhithe—I do not know who the person was on the other side of the way—it was a strange neighbourhood to me—I am not in the habit of doing duty there—there is a turnpike in the neighbourhood of the railway which the carts must have gone through—I took the turnpike-men to see the prisoner—they are not here.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Were they able to speak to him? A. No—they did not take sufficient notice to identify him.

CHARLES RAY WOOD. I assist Messrs. Rixon, the attorneys for the prosecuion. A person who had been concerned in this robbery was described to me by Orrow; and in order to avoid suspicion by an officer going, I made an arrangement that I should go, and on 8th of July I went to Rotherhithe, to the prisoner's master's house, at the corner of Salisbury-street—the prisoner was not within—his mistress had sent him out—it was a sort of green-grocer's shop—I saw a one-horse cart in the street when I first went, such as is used for removing goods—the prisoner came back at last—I asked him to accompany me to the top of the street, where I wished to ask him few questions, and said if he would, I would give him a pint of beer—he accompanied me—when

we arrived at the top of the street I heard Orrow say, "That is the man"—the prisoner said he knew nothing at all about it—the officer took him into custody—I did not ask him the questions, as he was taken into custody immediately—I directed the officer to give him the pint of beer—the object was to give Orrow the opportunity of identifying him—he was told that he was taken on a charge of stealing some rails in the Caledonian-road—he said he had never been there—he repeated that statement before the Magistrate.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you at any time hear anybody say, if he would tell who employed him, that they would let him off? A. No.

JOHN SPRINGBETT. I am manager of some cement works at Rotherhithe, and live at Islington. The prisoner was in the habit of driving a horse and cart with cement from my house, as the servant of a Mr. Allen—he was employed in many instances in April last in taking cement to customers, some of whom resided in the neighbourhood of Islington—the Caledonian-road runs from Battle-bridge to Holloway—the prisoner generally came back with empty casks—he never had authority from me to carry iron rails.

Cross-examined. Q. You do not know that he ever did? A. No—he has done his duty very much to our satisfaction—I have not bad the iron rails—I never took notice of the name on the cart—we have four or five carts in that neighbourhood sometimes, and sometimes none at all—there are a great number of new buildings going on in the neighbourhood of Islington.

JOHN HENRY BATTERBURY. I am a builder, and live in Albert-street, Camden-town. In April last I was building a sewer in John-street and Rodney-street, Pentonville—I was a customer of Mr. Wood, the cement-maker, and received cement from him in his cart—I cannot say who brought it to me, only by referring to the tickets—there is a ticket delivered to me at the time—whoever delivers the ticket signs it—I did not see the prisoner sign them on this particular day—I have seen him sign them repeatedly—the cement always came in casks, which I returned empty—whoever brought the casks I always made to sign for the number—I do not know the Caledonian Asylum, I know the Pocock Arms—that may be nearly a mile from my place, but it is not a very direct road—I do not recollect seeing any one else with the prisoner when he came—I have got his receipts—(looking at them)—on the 21st there are eighteen empty casks and twenty lime-bags; on the 22nd, three empty casks; and on the 29th, none, I received six, but there is no signature—there were no empty casks.

Cross-examined. Q. How often did you receive cement from Mr. Wood? A. I received it constantly, but not always from Mr. Wood, Allen's cart brought the bigger portion.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Is the prisoner the man that brought it in Allen's cart? A. Yes.

WILLIAM ABSOLOM. I am a builder, and live in St. Mary's-road, Kennington. In April last I had some cement brought to me in Mr. Allen's cart, the prisoner drove it—my place is about a mile from the Caledonian-road—no empty casks were returned on that occasion.

Cross-examined. Q. I believe you sent back sacks? A. Not to my knowledge—I never do—my men might have done so.

JOHN MURRAY. I am a wharfinger at Battle-bridge, and live in Almina-road. The rails which came for the Northern Railway were landed at my wharf—I am in the employ of Mr. Brassey, the contractor, who is the prosecutor—the rails were laid in the Caledonian-road, in the early part of May—189 of them were missed—there were eight of the twelve-feet ones, and 181 of the

fifteen-feet—the eight twelve-feet ones have been recovered by the police, and I think 156 out of the 181 fifteen-feet ones, but do not know exactly—in consequence of information, I went to Mr. Plumley's premises, at Bank-side, on the 6th or 7th of July, and found the stacks of rails which have been recovered—I had seen them while they were lying in the Caledonian-road; and believe them to be the same which were taken from there—they were the same rails which were shown to the man from Wales—they were painted red at the end—after they were deposited in the Caledonian-road there was no order or intention on the part of the contractor to remove them—they were worth between 300l. and 400l.

MR. BALLANTINE called

EMILY ALLEN. My husband is a blacksmith. The prisoner lived with me at the time he was taken, and had done so far nearly two years—he worked for me as carman—he did not live in the house—he is very honest—I have never found any fault with him.

COURT. Q. Was he in your employ? A. Yes—mine is a green-grocery business—my husband does not take any part in it—we keep a horse and cart.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Do you know this gentleman who stands by me? (Mr. Wood.) A. By his coming to my house—I had no conversation with the prisoner about the robbery—I did not tell the prisoner if he had been concerned in the robbery he had better tell me—he did not say at my house, "What is the good of my saying anything it? I shall only get myself further into the mess"—that was after he had his hearings—I wished to defend the prisoner, and said he had better say what he had to do with it—I cannot say that I told the solicitor that he said he should only be getting himself further into the mess—I told the prisoner if he had been concerned in the robbery he had better say—he did not say, what would be the nse of his doing so, it would only be getting himself further into the mess—I did not tell the solicitor so.

COURT. Q. The question asked you this, whether in conversation with the solicitor you did not say that you asked the prisoner whether he had anything to do with it, and that he said it would be of no use saying anything, it would only get him further into the mess? A. As respects his imprisonment, I considered he was in quite mess enough—he had had five weeks' imprisonment, and I considered he would only get himself into more trouble, and told him if he had anything to do with it, he had better own to it—the solicitor came to me on Saturday night—I cannot say what passed—I am not aware that the prisoner said he had better not say anything, as he would only get himself further into the mess—I am not aware that I said so to the solicitor—the prisoner said, "It is no use my saying anything about it, for I shall only get myself into trouble."

MR. BALLANTINE. Q. You visited the prisoner for the purpose of assisting him in his difficulties? A. I visited him several times, I desired to know whether he was really implicated—I asked him the question several times, had he anything to do with it—on all occasions he had nothing to say—the attorney's clerk came to me on Saturday evening, and took me quite by surprise—I cannot say what passed, I did not take particular notice—I have lived in the neighbourhood twenty-four years—I have been married six years—the prisoner lived in the neighbourhood—he knew me to be his friend, and that I asked him the questions for his own benefit.

COURT. Q. Did not you employ the prisoner to go with the cart and horse? A. Yes—he used to cart cement with it for a Mr. Wood—I never

suspected him—he used not to be out an unreasonable time—I allowed my cart to be used to draw cement—I live between five and six miles from the Caledonian-road.

NOT GUILTY.

(There were three other indictments against the prisoner, upon which Mr. Clarkson offered no evidence.)

Reference Number: t18470816-1737

1737. JAMES COCHRANE was indicted for stealing 5 tons weight of iron-rails for railways, value 50l.; and 5 tons weight of iron, 50l.; the goods of Joseph Bailey, and others.—Other COUNTS, varying the manner of laying the property.

MESSRS. CLARKSON and BODKIN conducted the Prosecution.

JOHN MURRAY. I had charge of a wharf at Battle-bridge for Mr. Brassey—in March or April last, a large quantity of iron-rails were brought there from Wales, for the Great Northern Railway—part of them were afterwards removed to the line of the intended railway, in the Caledonian-road—in May last, I missed 181 of the 15ft. and 8 of the 12ft. rails—in consequence of information, I afterwards went to Mr. Plumley's premises at Bankside, and found 182 of the rails, which I claimed, as belonging to Mr. Brassey—I have every reason to believe they were part of the rails that were placed in the Caledonian-road—they have a red mark on each end, and some white paint on some of them—the police took possession of them—they were worth 300l. or 400l.

WILLIAM CHEESEMAN. I have a carpet-ground near the line of the intended railway, in the Caledonian-road—I saw iron-rails carried away from there several times—the last van that came I took particular notice of—it was on the 1st of May, between four and five o'clock in the afternoon—it was a yellow van, with an iron-grey horse—I had never seen that van and horse before, but I was given to understand it had been there in the morning—the prisoner was the person who was driving the van, and had charge of it—I am quite certain of him; there were others with him loading, he assisted to load—he put the rails into the van, and they drove away to the King's Head bar in the Holloway-road.

Prisoner. I never was on the road in my life; I never saw him, and he never saw me. Witness. He was dressed in a sleeve waistcoat and cord trowsers, as he is now—I cannot read, and could not tell what name was on the van—it rained very hard.

MR. BODKIN. Q. How long were they loading the van? A. Half an hour, or three-quarters of an hour—the prisoner was under my observation for that time, and I am certain he is the man.

COURT. Q. Had you reason to think the transaction was an irregular one? A. I thought it was after hours—I went up to the fence inside my ground, close to the road, and looked at the van—I did not speak to the persons—I was close to the van—the prisoner was stooping, loading the iron into the the van, which was close to me, I had a full view of him—the man loading inside the van was a stoutish man, and I took notice of the carman—I had been told that same week, by Mr. Murray, to keep a look out, and see if I could identify any of the persons.

SAMUEL COLLINS. I live in Southwark. In July last I bought a yellow van and N iron-grey horse of Francis Janway—the prisoner had used it previously—I had known him driving it for one or two months previous to his being taken—I have seen him standing in my yard with it—he looked after it, he used to go out with it almost every day—Janway was ill for nearly

twelve months, and could not go out for weeks together, and the prisoner had to do the work.

ROBERT BRANDFORD (policeman) On the evening of the 7th of July I took the prisoner into custody in Tooley-street, from the description given of him that same morning by Cheeseman, and also of the vehicle he was in the habit of driving—I said I took him for stealing some railway iron—he said he knew nothing at all about it; he had never been in the Caledonian-road—I heard a statement made before the Magistrate about his being in prison—I know he was out of prison on the 1st of May.

FRANCIS JANWAY. In May last I had a yellow van and an iron grey horse—I sold them to Collins—the prisoner was then in my service—I did not authorize him to go on my account with the van and horse to take the rails from the Caledonian-road.

COURT. Q. Did you ever let it out without knocking the use to which it was to be put? A. Yes, for the removal of goods or otherwise, but I always sent my servant with it; I was not able to look after it—I allowed anybody to use it on the terms I charged—I do not know of any transaction in which the van was employed on the 1st of May—I never booked anything—I do not know of my van being employed by any person engaged in the removal of iron—if the person hiring it saw my servant before he saw me, my servant would be under his orders—I do not know what use my van was put to on the 1st of May.

Prisoner. Mr. Collins knows me to be a hard-working lad; I have worked for him off and on.

MR. COLLINS re-examined. I have known him some years—he was out with the horse and cart almost every day, with different customers—he worked for me a good while, I had no fault to find with him; he always seemed willing to work.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Do you affect to speak to his character? A. No—I know that he was tried here the session before last—I do not know that he was tried and convicted in 1841—I know that he had six months in 1844.

JOHN HOARE (policeman M 194.) I produce two certificates of the prisoner's former convictions, one from Mr. Clark's, and another from Mr. Straight's office—(these being read were certificates of the conviction of James Conelly in June, 1841,confined six months, and in July, 1844, confined six months)—I was present at both the trials—the prisoner is the person.

GUILTY. Aged 26.— Transported for Seven Years.

NEW COURT.—Tuesday, August 17th, 1847.

PRESENT—Sir CHAPMAN MARSHALL, Knt., Alderman; Mr. Alderman SIDNEY, Mr. Alderman MOON, and Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Sixth Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18470816-1738

1738. GEORGE GOODNY was indicted for stealing 1 cost, value 20s.; the property of William Garratt; to which he pleaded

GUILTY. Aged 23.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18470816-1739

1739. THOMAS SIMMONDS was indicted for stealing 1 handkerchief, value 1s; the goods of Henry Edward Bird from his person; to which he pleaded

GUILTY. Aged 18.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18470816-1740

1740. THOMAS STURME and WILLIAM GARRETT , were indicted for stealing 1 handkerchief, value 5s.; the goods of William Henry Cooper, from his person; to which

STURME pleaded GUILTY. Aged 38.

GARRETT pleaded GUILTY. Aged 28.

Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18470816-1741

1741. THOMAS BLACKWOOD was indicted for indicted for stealing 1 handkerchief, value 2s.; the goods of Robert Ottiwell Chambers, from his person; to which he pleaded

GUILTY.* Aged 17.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18470816-1742

1742. MATTHEW COOK was indicted for stealing 1 coat, value 30s; the goods of Henry Drew May; to which he pleaded

GUILTY.* Aged 15.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18470816-1743

1743. THOMAS BELLAMY was indicted for unlawfully uttering counterfeit coin; to which he pleaded

GUILTY. Aged 21.— Confined Four Months.

Reference Number: t18470816-1744

1744. JOHN ROLFE was indicted for a like offence; to which he pleaded

GUILTY. Aged 22.— Confined Four Months.

Reference Number: t18470816-1745

1745. HONORA JENNINGS was indicted for a like offence.

MESSRS. BODKIN and DAWSON conducted the Prosecution

MARY ANN FREEMAN. My husband is a baker, we live in High-street, Highgate. On the 3d of July, about nine o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came for a penny loaf—I gave her one—she gave me a shilling, I gave her change—I supposed the shilling was bad—I laid it on a shelf, and kept it by itself, till I gave it to the constable on the Wednesday morning following.

MARTHA DORAN. I keep a shop in the Hornsey-road. On the 8th of July, between nine and ten o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came for two half-penny cakes, and gave me in payment a shilling—I gave it to Eliza Day to get change, she returned with the change, and I gave it to the prisoner.

ELIZABETH DAY. On the 8th of July I was at Mrs. Doran's, and saw the prisoner give a shilling in payment—I took it to Mrs. Mussett's to get change, left it with her, and she gave me the change.

ELIZABETH MUSSETT. My husband is a baker in Hornsey-road, about a mile from High-street, Highgate. One Thursday Eliza Day came to me for change for a shilling—I gave her the change, and put the shilling into the till—I did not mix it with any other money—the prisoner came to my shop from a quarter to half-an-hour afterwards, asked for a penny loaf and paid me with a shilling—I put that shilling into the till, where I found the other shilling which I had put in first alone—there was no other shilling there—my husband came in in about a quarter of an hour—I showed him the shilling—I saw the prisoner again in custody on the Saturday evening following—the

shilling were put into a piece of a piece of paper and laid on the mantel-piece, separate from other money—they were afterwards given to the policeman and he marked them in my presence—these produced are them.

Prisoner. I never was in your house. Witness. I saw her on Saturday afternoon at my next door neighbour's—I have not the slightest doubt of her being the person.

ROBERT MUSSETT. My wife showed me these two shillings—they were from that time kept apart from other money, on the mantel-piece—on the following Saturday I saw the prisoner at my neighbour's, next door to me—I followed her till I met a policeman, and gave her into custody—when she was taken I observed a bad shilling fall from her—the policeman took charge of it—I said she was the person who had been ay my house on the Thursday before, and had given us two bad shillings—I had not seen her on the Thursday—it was from description that I said so—the prisoner denied having been there—she did not give any account of herself.

SAMUEL HOCKADAY (police-sergeant S 15.) On the 10th of July I tookthe prisoner into custody—one counterfeit shilling dropped from her hand—three fourpenny pieces and two sixpences in good money were found in her bosom—this is the shilling I received from Mary Ann Freeman, and these other two from Mr. Mussett—this other shilling I found in the road.

CALEB EDWARD POWELL. I am inspector of coin to her Majesty's Mint. These shillings are all counterfeit—two of them appear to have been cast in the same mould.

Prisoner's Defence. I was two days hay-making; a man gave me a shilling; I had it in my hand when the policeman took me; I did not know it was bad.

GUILTY. Aged 17.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18470816-1746

1746. CORNELIUS KELLY was indicted for a like offence.

MESSRS. BODKIN and DAWSON conducted the Prosecution.

THOMAS CHAMBERS. I am an oilman in Houndsditch. On the evening of the 9th of July I saw the prisoner loitering about my shop door—he came in some time afterwards and asked for half-a-pound of soap, I served him; he gave me a counterfeit half-crown—I saw it was bad—I told him I had not got change—I went out at the side door with the intention of getting a policeman, when I returned the prisoner was gone—a policeman came in soon after; I showed him the half-crown, and he marked it.

Cross-examined by MR. HORRY. Q. You looked at it, examined it, and found it was a bad one? A. Yes—the prisoner was standing in the shop—I took the half-crown in my hand when I went to the door—the policeman brought the prisoner to me next day, and I said he was the man—the prisoner did not say anything.

MARY DEFRIES. I am the wife of Henry Defries, a publican in Houndsditch. On Saturday, the 10th of July, the prisoner came between five and six o'clock—he asked for half-a-pint of porter, it came to 1d.—he gave me a shilling in my hand—I said, "This is a bad shilling," he said, "Is it?"—I wanted to give it him back, but Mr. Defries took it out of my hand and sent for a policeman—the prisoner gave me another shilling, and I gave him 11d. change—he did not say who he was.

Cross-examined. Q. Was any one else in the shop? A. Not any one.

HENRY DEFRIES. I saw my wife take the shilling from the prisoner, I took it out of her hand—I called a policeman, marked the shilling, and gave it him.

ANDREW CAMERON (City policeman, No. 657.) On Saturday, the 10th of July, I was called to Mr. Defries, who gave the prisoner into custody for passing a bad shilling—he gave me this shilling, which he had marked—the prisoner did not say anything then, but he afterwards said he made his living by selling fruit, and that he lived in Blue Anchor-alley, White Cross-street, he gave his name as Cornelius Kelly—I took him to Mr. Chambers, having had a description of him the night before—Mr. Chambers said, "That is the man that passed the half-crown to me last night"—I took him to the station—this is the half-crown I got from Mr. Chambers.

CALEB EDWARD POWELL. This half-crown is counterfeit, and so is this shilling.

GUILTY. Aged 19.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18470816-1747

1747. THOMAS WATSON was indicted for stealing 1 handkerchief, value 2s.; the goods of Augustus Frederick Goddard, from his person.

AUGUSTUS FREDERICK GODDARD. I am a member of the Stock Exchange, and live in Albion-villas, Hornsey. On the 15th of July, about twenty minutes past nine at night, I was going over London Bridge, arm-in-arm with a friend—a women touched our arms, and asked if we had been robbed—I put my hand into my pocket, and my handkerchief was gone—I saw the prisoner and another lad crossing the road—I crossed and took the other lad, I did not find my handkerchief on him—I then took the prisoner, and asked him if he had got anything belonging to me—he said, "No"—I said, "I think you have; at all events, I will see"—I took him by the collar, opened his coat, and found my handkerchief tucked under his arm—this produced is it.

Cross-examined by MR. HORRY. Q. Is your friend here? A. No, nor the women, there is no one but myself who knows anything about it—the policeman had not sense to retain the first lad that I took hold of—he was very near me—it was all the work of a moment—I took the first boy in the middle of the road, and the prisoner on the pavement.

GUILTY.* Aged 17.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18470816-1748

1748. THOMAS MOULL was indicted for stealing 7 yards of cloth, value 8s.; the goods of William Henry Smith, his master.

WILLIAM HENRY SMITH. I live at No. 40, Basinghall-street. The prisoner was in my service—in consequence of circumstances I thought it necessary to search his box on the morning of the 4th of August—I had missed about three pieces of fancy plaids, which had been torn off goods—after breaking open his box. I found the ends which precisely matched the pieces they were torn from—this is one of them, it is part of what I lost—the prisoner had no right to have it in his box—his box had no business on my premises—it was there without my knowledge.

Cross-examined by MR. HORRY Q. How long had the prisoner been in your service? A. About two years, at different periods—he did not come with a character—I am not aware whether mine was the first situation he had been in—I do not think it was—I have employed him off and on—I am a packer and dresser, these things are sent to me to pack—there are ends torn off pieces, but not of this description—the persons in my employ vary in number, from sixteen to thirty—I have a large number of goods of this description—these are woolen and cotton—there are no ends torn off pieces of woolen, but of mouselin-de-laine which is a very different thing to this—the ends are not torn off these by me, or by any of my people, I am quite positive of that—when I went to the prisoner's box he was not in the way—there

were men in the shop—before I broke the box open I asked the prisoner to give me the key of his box, and he said he had left it at home with his sister, and he bring it at night—he was out in the City with my cart when I spoke to him—I left him, came back, and broke his box open—there was no policeman present—I have not seen the key of the box—he admitted that the box was his, and his observation about fetching the key was about this box—it was in a cupboard in the workshop in which I am in the habit of keeping papers—the cupboard was open.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY Aged 18.—Recommended to mercy by the Jury and Prosecutor. Confined One month

Reference Number: t18470816-1749

1749. WILLIAM RICHARDSON was indicted for stealing 27 1/2 yards of printed cotton, value£1 4s., the goods of Joseph Bowman and another.

ISAAC TALLENTINE. I am warehouseman, in the service of Joseph Bowman and John Maine, of Wood-street, Cheapside. On the 19th of Aug., about half-past nine o'clock, the prisoner came into our shop, and asked for Brailey—I said he would not be in till ten o'clock—he waited there—our traveller came down, I went to speak to him, and my back was turned for about two minutes—I then saw that the prisoner was stooping—I walked up to meet him, and saw him take a bag off the counter which he had brought in with him—he was drawing the bag up, and I discerned these handkerchiefs in it, they had no business in it; they are the property of john Bowman and another—I took the bag from him, took it into the counting-house, and gave it to the head clerk—I then went down, and brought the prisoner up.

Cross-examined by MR. CHARNOCK. Q. You could see these handkerchiefs very plainly? A. Yes—Mr. Bowman and his partner are not here—Brailey is a warehouseman—the prisoner had not had goods trusted to him before, for samples—he had often asked me for some, but I never would let him have any—I believe Brailey had let him have patterns—I asked the prisoner what he had got—he drew the bag up, and I took it from him—he did not say he had things before—he walked up with me to the counting-house—he had no business to take these as patterns—I should not have given them as patterns—he did not say he had got an order, and wanted to show some patterns—the clerks are not here.

WILLIAM NAYLOR (City policeman, No. 456.) The prisoner said before the Magistrate that the bag was open, and that he did not intend to take the things away—he gave his address—there was nothing found at his house.

NOT GUILTY.

Reference Number: t18470816-1750

1750. WILLIAM SMITH and JOHN MANN were indicted for stealing 1 handkerchief, value 2s.; the goods of Thomas lark, form his person.

SMITH pleaded GUILTY. Aged 17.— Confined Three Months.

THOMAS CLARK. On the 13th of July I was at the Custom-house-quay—the officer tapped me on the shoulder—I found that I had lost my pocket—handkerchief—this is it.

GEORGE SCOTT (City policeman, No. 560.) On the 13th of July, about three o'clock in the afternoon, I was on duty in plain clothes—I saw the prisoners for an hour attempting to pick a great many pockets—I then saw Smith put his hand into Mr. Clark's pocket, and take out this handkerchief—Mann

was standing close to Smith, looking round to see that no one was looking—I went and took Smith, and found this handkerchief in his breast—Mann was standing close by him, and Jenkins took him.

JOHN JENKINS (City policeman, No. 559.) I saw the two prisoners there a little after four o'clock—they tried nearly twenty pockets—Mann tried the most, but Smith took the handkerchief out of Mr. Clark's pocket—Mann was standing close behind him, covering him—Smith put his right hand into the pocket, and put the handkerchief into his breast—he put sometimes one hand into a pocket and sometimes the other—sometimes he had one hand quit by his side while the other tried the pocket, and sometimes he put one hand against the pocket while the other tried the pocket.

Mann. Q. Did you see me attempt to pick pockets? A. Yes; and saw you with Smith.

Mann's Defence. I never knew this prisoner; I never saw him at all; I went to the rowing-match at Brewer's-quay, the officer took me, and said I had been attempting to pick pockets.

MANN— GUILTY. Aged 18.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18470816-1751

1751. JOHN MACARTY was indicted for stealing 1 handkerchief, value 4s.; the goods of Joshua Mayston, form his person; to which he pleaded

GUILTY.* Aged 21.— Confined Nine Months.

Reference Number: t18470816-1752

1752. RICHARD FINIL . was indicted for feloniously receiving 1 watch, value 3l.; the goods of Thomas Pearce, well knowing the same to have been stolen.

JEMIMA PEARCE. I am the wife of Thomas Pearce—we live at Hanwell—my husband had a silver watch, which was in the bottom of a box—we lost it on the 8th of July.

GEORGE GODDARD (a child.) On the 8th of July I took a watch from Mrs. Pearce's and sold it to the prisoner—I unlocked Mrs. Pearce's back door, and found the watch in a box—I took it—and sold it to the prisoner for three pence—I am sure the prisoner is the man I sold it to—I saw him selling bones and rags.

Cross-examined by MR. PARNELL. Q. Who was with you when you went to the house? A. No one—I went there about one o'clock—I sold the watch at a quarter-past five—I was up against the Hope public-house—I did nothing with the watch between one and five o'clock—I was up the Twickenham-road, between the Hope and Mr. Boucher's, when the prisoner came by—the witness Jackson came about a quarter-past five to the place where I was standing—he had only just come when prisoner rode by—he knew nothing about stealing the watch till then—he was not at Pearce's house with me—he was not waiting at the door while I went in—he was dressed in a fustian coat, a black waistcoat, black trowsers, and a black hat—he was driving a donkey and cart—he was coming from Twickenham and going up the Hounslow-road, and then up the nearest way home—he was driving a white donkey—he had a black donkey at one time—he has had the white one for six months—those are the only two donkies I recollect his having—there was nobody with him in the cart—he was coming fast when he asked me to sell him the watch—he gave me three penny pieces in my hand—I did not give Jackson any of the money—I bought two penny wroth of bread, and one penny worth of sweet-stuff—I told Jackson it was Mrs. Pearce's watch—he

did not say I had better sell it—I do not work anywhere—my father and mother are living.

THOMAS JACKSON. I was present when Goddard had a silver watch—I saw him sell it to the prisoner, who gave him threepence for it.

Cross-examined. Q. Where were you when you first saw Goddard? A. Up by Clay's Gravel-pits, with the cows—that was where the prisoner went by—that is about half a mile from the Hope, and about 100 yards from Mr. Boucher's, on the further side from the Hope—it was between five and six o'clock—the prisoner was driving his donkey slowly when he came up, and then he drove off very slowly—he had a black hat on, black trowsers, and a fustian jacket—his donkey was a sandy one—that is the one he always had—I have known him for a good while—I had not seen Goddard on that day before—I was cow-minding, and he came to where I was—I did not go to him—I persuaded him not to sell the watch when he told me it was Mr. Pearce's—I saw the prisoner pay him for it with three penny pieces—I did not have anything to eat out of the money, because I did not get home soon enough—he got two pennyworth of bread, and one pennyworth of sweet stuff, with the money—I was to have had some of the sweet-stuff—I am getting on for nine years of age—I cannot read—I say my prayers—I do not go to church—I go to work on Sundays—Goddard has no work.

COURT. Q. Are you sure the prisoner is the man that bought the watch? A. Yes—I had known him a long time.

MR. PARNELL called

JAMES KEEN. I am a labouring man, and reside at Hounslow. The prisoner has lived lived there all his life—his father lives there now—the prisoner keeps a donkey-cart—he drives about, and buys bones—I have seen him constantly—on 15th of July I bought his black donkey of him—he never kept but one—I have since seen him with a white one—he has been an honest, well-conducted man—he does not wear a fustian jacket—he wears a cap.

WILLIAM GROVER. I am a carman—I did live at Hounslow. I have known the prisoner three years—he drives a donkey-cart—I have never seen him go about in a fustian jacket—he has a green coat, white waistcoat, and corduroy trowsers—his donkey is brown—he had a black donkey three months ago.

NOT GUILTY.

Reference Number: t18470816-1753

1753. LYDIA SUTTON was indicted for stealing 7 pair of stockings, value 1l.; 6 yards of silk, 16s.; 5 scarfs, 10s.; 2 gowns, 1l. 16s.; 2 aprons, 5s.; 6 towels, 3s.; 2 handkerchiefs, 2s.; 4 pair of gloves, 2s.; 1 pair of mittens, 2s.; 5 yards of lace, 12s.; 16 yards of ribbon, 8s.; 1 pair of earrings, 5s.; 1 brooch, 2s.; 4 purses, 10s.; 4 scent-bottles, 4s.; 1 eye-glass, 2s.; 1 pair of spectacles and case, 3s.; 1 fan, 2s.; 3 books, 6s.; 2 combs, 4s.; 1 cream jug, 5s.; 2 feathers, 3s.; and 2 watch pockets, 2s.; the goods of William Brown Sams, her master.

WILLIAM BROWN SAMS. I am a tailor, and live at Barbican. The prisoner was my servant—I have missed the property mentioned in this indictment—I sent for a policeman—the prisoner's box was searched, and this property was found—it is mine—I missed it all—when the policeman opened the box the prisoner fell in a fit, and continued so for some time.

Cross-examined by MR. HORRY. Q. I believe Mrs. Same died in April? A. Yes—I do not know of her giving the prisoner anything.

JOHN MARK BULL (City policeman, No. 151.) I was sent for to Mr. Sam's—I asked the prisoner for the key of her box—she said it was at Vauxhall—I said I should break the box open—she fell in a fit—I found these things produced in the box—the key was afterwards given me by the female searcher.

GUILTY. Aged 20.—Recommended to mercy by the prosecutor Confined Four Months

(There was another indictment against the prisoner)

Reference Number: t18470816-1754

1754. EDWARD KING was indicted for embezzlement.

MR. PARNELL conducted the Prosecution.

ARTHUR MATTHEWS. I am cashier to Mr. William Samuel Burton, of Oxford-street—the prisoner was in his employ as collecting-clerk—he had to account to me for the sums he received—I have the books here—I have looked in them for the sums of 3l.—6s. 6d., and 1l. 14s., they are not there—he has never accounted to me for either or them.

Cross-examined by MR. HUDDLESTON. Q. What was the average amount he collected every day? A. I suppose 10l., sometimes more—in different sums, varying from pounds to shillings—very rarely as much as 100l.—I do not know what the amount of Mr. Gray's debt was—I have the cash-book here in which the prisoner ought to have entered that sum on the day he reecived it—it is from the cash-book that I know what sums I received from the prisoner—if I take money I enter it in the cash-book—each person who takes money makes his own entry in the cash-book—I cannot tell from this book the amount of Mr. Gray's debt—I could tell it by the ledger, which is not here—I think Mr. Gray's debt was more than 1l. 14s.—I cannot tell whether it was more than 3l.—we are not in the habit of making an allowance to persons when their debt amounts to 3l., and it is paid at once—when a sum above 3l. is paid in the bulk, there is sometimes an allowance of discount—I do not know what Mr. Pugh's debt was—the prisoner embezzled 3l. of that money—I know Mr. Pugh owed more than 3l., and I believe Mr. Gray owned more than 1l. 14s.

WILLIAM PUGH. I am a chemist, and live at No. 48, Portland-place. I have a memorandum, which I received from the prisoner when I paid him 3l., on the 22nd of April—(read—"Received of Mr. Pugh, 3l., for W. S. Burton, 22nd April, 1847. E. Kings.")

Cross-examined. Q. Had any arrangement been made between you and the prisoner to take this debt by instalments? A. Yes—the prisoner had called on me on several occasions for it—my debt was 4l. 12s.—I had not been able to pay him when he called—this 3l. was an instalment, the prisoner has asked me on many occasions since for a further instalment, and he had another pound—on the day he was taken, he was at my house asking me for the balance I owed—he did not say he wanted to pay in the whole debt at once—he asked for the balance, as he wanted to go to Brighton.

JOHN QUINTON. I am page to Mr. Clark, of Upper Gower-street. I have a receipt which I got from a man who I paid 6s. 6d. to—I believe the it was the prisoner—(read—"Bill, 6s. 6d. Settled, 9th June, 1847, E. King.") Cross-examined. Q. what time of day was it you paid him? A. Before dinner, in the hall.

ROBERT PENSON. I am clerk to Mr. Gray. of Great St. Helen's. I have a receipt which I got from a man who I paid 1l. 14s. to—I believe the prisoner is the man—I would not take my oath to it.

Cross-examined. Q. What was the amount of the whole debt? A. I

think that was all—I do not Know—it was not 3l. 7s. that I am aware of—there had been 1l. 18s. 6d. previously paid—I never told the prisoner to call again for the remainder in a fortnight—I do not keep Mr. Gray's books—I have not the books here—I paid this amount on the 12th of June—I have not referred to the book to see if there was not more due—I think there was not.

MR. PARNELL. Q. The first item in this bill is 1l. 18s. 6d., and that is scratched out? A. Yes, that had been previously paid—I told him so—I deducted it with his consent, and he took the 1l. 14s.

HENRY FOWLER (police-sergeant E 5.) On the 25th June I took the prisoner—he asked Mr. Matthews not give him into custody, and he would pay him the deficiency, if it were 100l.

COURT to MR. MATTHEWS. Q. You charged the prisoner with receiving these sums, what did he say? A. He was given in charge for another sum—we then found out Mr. Gray's account—he said he had taken it, and offered to make it good, if it were 100l.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY. Aged 40.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18470816-1755

1755. GEORGE SLEAP was indicted for stealing 62lbs. weight of spelter, value 10s., the goods of Joseph Colebatch, his master.

DANIEL JELLIMAN. I am superintendent of the business of Joseph Colebatch, of Lower Thames-street—on the 7th of July the prisoner was employed as a porter to bring up some spelter from the quay to our warehouse—it was Mr. Colebatch's property—I have seen the spelter produced by the officer—I am quite sure by the mark that it is Mr. Colebatch's property.

Cross-examined by MR. PARNELL. Q. You only know it is similar to what Mr. Colebatch had? A. Yes, it is the same article, it is in large cakes—the prisoner was employed by Mr. Colebatch from eight o'clock in the morning till the time this happened, which was about twelve—I do not know whether the prisoner had been employed on the preceding day—we had a barge full of spelter to remove, upwards of fifty tons—we had a gang of men removing it—the prisoner was one of them—it was about twelve o'clock that I heard of this being lost—a man was found with it, as I heard—It was not found on the prisoner—there is a public-house in Beer-lane that the men make use of.

JOHN ROBERTS. I am a lighterman, and live at St. George's-in-the-East—on the 7th of July, a little before twelve o'clock, I saw the prisoner place a plate of spelter behind a gate in Beer-lane, which is about 200 yards from Galley-quay—there were two other men standing at the corner of Beer-lane.

Cross-examined. Q. How many persons were there in Beer-lane? A. Perhaps a dozen—the court where he placed the spelter is right opposite the Ship Afloat public-house—I am in the employ of Mr. John Williams—I had never seen the prisoner before that day—I was right opposite to him, coming down Beer-lane—I saw two men, one of whom had a basket under his arm—I went down to Galley-quay, saw Mr. Moss, and told him.

SAMUEL MOSS. I received information from Roberts, went to Seething-lane, and caught a man with the plate of spelter, he threw it at me—I gave it to an officer, who is not here.

Cross-examined. Q. When you went into Beer-lane did you see the prisoner?

A. Yes, at the bottom of Beer-lane—he had nothing with him then that I saw—I believe he was still at work for Mr. Colebatch—I do not know whether the men had gone to dinner when I saw the prisoner.

JURY to JOHN ROBERTS Q. Are you certain the prisoner is the man? A. I have no doubt of it—I had never seen him before—I have no vindictive feeling against him.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY. Aged 31.—Recommended to mercy by the Prosecutor. Confined Four Months

Reference Number: t18470816-1756

1756. HENRY KING was indicted for stealing 13 yards of flannel, value 15s., and 1 counterpane, 10s., the goods of William Wightwick.

WILLIAM HOLDICH. I am warehouseman to Mr. William Wightwick, of No. 105, Fleet-street. On the evening of the 31st of July I saw the shadow of a man in the shop—I went to the side door, but saw no one—I went out and saw the prisoner walking down Fleet-street with this flannel and counterpane—I went, collared him, and brought him back to the shop—I had seen this property safe in the shop a few minutes before—it is my master's, and is my own marking.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE Q. Which door was it you saw the shadow of a man at? A. The door in Farringdon-street—we have one door there, and one in Fleet-street—when I saw the prisoner he was about six yards from the door—I will swear he had not got fifty yards off—I followed him, caught him by the collar, and he dropped these goods—he had not got them on his shoulder—they were under his arm, and he threw them down—I did not shake him—I told him to pick the goods up—he would not, and I picked them up—I held him by the collar while I picked up the goods—he did not kick me; he wished me to let him go—he said he was carrying the things for another person—our shop is about forty yards long—we have a lobby before you get into the shop—the door was standing open on account of the weather being warm.

GUILTY.** Aged 20.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18470816-1757

1757. THOMAS WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing two boots, value 6s. 6d., the goods of David Alexander Reid.

DAVID ALEXANDER REID, JUN. I am assistant to my father, David Alexander Reid, a boot and shoe-maker in Sun-street, Bishopsgate. On the 29th of July, at half-past six o'clock, I was in the shop, and saw the prisoner step inside the doorway, take two odd blucher-boots, and run away—I followed him—he dropped the boots—I took them up, followed him, and gave him into custody—I am sure he is the person.

CAROLINE CRASSY. I was passing by, saw the prisoner take the boots, and am sure he is the person.

GUILTY. Aged 16.—Recommended to mercy by the Jury. Confined One Month

Reference Number: t18470816-1758

1758. JOHN JONES, MICHAEL NEALE . and JOHN PRICE , were indicted for stealing 1 handkerchief, value 1s., the goods of William Ockenden, from his person; to which

NEALE pleaded GUILTY. Aged 17.— Confined Four Months.

WILLIAM OCKENDEN. I am general dealer. On the 6th of Aug. I was in Smithfield-market—I heard something, and missed my handkerchief—this produced is it

MICHAEL HAYDON (City police-constable, No. 214.) I was in Smithfield on duty, at half-past four o'clock, on the 6th of Aug.—I saw the prisoners together for about a quarter of an hour—they tried to pick my pocket—that induced me to watch them—I then saw Jones take a handkerchief from Ockenden's pocket, and hand it to Neale—Price was covering them—I took Neale, and asked him for the handkerchief—he said he had none—I took it from him.

JOSEPH DALTON (City police-constable, No. 366.) I saw Jones take the kerchief, and give it to Neal.

Jones' Defence. I did not take the handkerchief.

Prices' Defence. I had nothing to do with it.

JONES— GUILTY. Aged 14.

PRICE— GUILTY. Aged 17.

Confined Four Months

Reference Number: t18470816-1759

1759. WILLIAM PALMER and GEORGE LOCKHART were indicted for stealing 1 handkerchief, value 1s. 6d., the goods of Edward Smith, from his person.

EDWARD SMITH. I live at Dock-head, Bermondsey. On the 2nd of Aug., about six o'clock, I was on London-bridge, looking at a rowing-match—I missed my pocket-handkerchief, turned, and saw Palmer with it in his possession—this produced is it—it is mine.

GEORGE SCOTT (City police-constable, No. 560.) I was on London-bridge, and saw the two prisoners together, attempting to pick pockets, for half an hour—I saw Lockhart put his hand into two different pockets—they then went behind Mr. Smith—there was a gentleman between, and I could not see what they were doing, but Smith asked Palmer for his handkerchief, and he gave it him.

MICHEAL HAYDON (City police-constable, No. 274.) I saw the prisoners together for half an hour trying pockets.

Palmer. Q. Did you see me try to pick pockets? A. No, not you—the other one works.

Palmer's Defence. There was a rowing-match; I was standing, with my hands together; I had something put into my hand; the gentleman turned, and said, "You have got my handkerchief;" I took it out of my trowsers pocket, and gave it him.

(Palmer received a good character.)

PALMER— GUILTY. Aged 23.

LOCKHART— GUILTY. Aged 23.

Confined Three Months

Reference Number: t18470816-1760

1760. ABRAHAM ISRAEL was indicted for stealing 67 yards of sheeting, value 1l. 15s.; the goods of Archibald Glover.

ARCHIBALD GLOVER. I live in Queen-street, Cheapside. On Saturday afternoon the 31st of July, about a quarter before one o'clock, I was in the counting-house—I heard a step and heard my man cry, "Stop thief!"—I went to see what it was, and saw this piece of sheeting lying on the top stair—it had no business there—it is mine.

JOHN STANGROOM. I am warehouseman to Mr. Glover. I heard a rustling, looked and saw the prisoner trying to conceal this piece of goods under his coat-tail—it is my master's—it had been removed from where it was to the

top stair—the prisoner ran off—I followed him, and did not lose sight of him till he got into the warehouse again.

FRANCIS HALLIDAY. I was standing at the top of Queen-street—I heard Stangroom cry, "Stop thief!"—he was running after the prisoner—I stopped him because I saw him come out of the house.

HENRY MONTAGUE (City police-constable, No. 481.) I took the prisoner, and have the property.

Prisoner's Defence. I have taught the Hebrew and German languages in respectable situations; on the day this occurred I was in the city looking for a gentleman; I could not find his residence, and went to Mr. Glover, whom I knew by having called there before, to ask him to lend me the Post Office Directory; he was writing at his desk, and I would not disturb him; there was a table there, and about one step from it was a heap of goods; I took one piece just to inspect it, and the young man came up, wanted to lay hands on me, and began to call "Thief:" I threw it on the ground, and ran down stairs; my foot slipped and I nearly fell, and near the door I was stopped

COURT to ARCHIBALD GLOVER. Q. Had you seen the prisoner before? A. Yes, he had called with the person he alludes to, who paid me some money—when he came into the warehouse he might have seen me though I might not have seen him—I have examined his papers—it appears that he has been a respectable person.

NOT GUILTY.

OLD COURT.—Wednesday, August 18th, 1847.

PRESENT—The Right Hon. the LORD MAYOR; Mr. Justice ERLE; Sir CHAPMAN MARSHALL, Knt., Alderman; Sir JOHN PIRIE, Bart., Alderman; Mr. Alderman SIDNEY; Mr. Alderman MOON; and EDWARD BULLOCK, Esq.

Third Jury, before Edward Bullock, Esq.

Reference Number: t18470816-1761

1761. FRANCIS BURTON was indicted for feloniously forging and uttering a warrant and order for the payment of 10l., with intent to defraud Her Majesty's Postmaster-general; to which he pleaded

GUILTY. Aged 19.— Confined Twelve Months.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

Before Mr. Justice Erle.

Reference Number: t18470816-1762

1762. ALEXANDER THOMSON MUNRO was indicted for the willful murder of David Lynar Fawcett. He was also charged on the Coroner's Inquisition with the like murder.

MR. ATTORNEY-GENERAL with MESSRS. WADDINGTON and CLERK conducted the Prosecution.

GEORGE GULLIVER I am a surgeon in the regiment of Horse Guards (Blue), and was so in 1843—I was then well acquainted with Mr. Munro, the prisoner—he was then a lieutenant in the same regiment—I had known him very intimately—in June, 1843, the regiment was quartered at the Regent's-park barracks—on Saturday morning, the 1st of July, between four and five o'clock, I was called up by Mr. Munro—he came onto my bedroom,

awoke me, and said he wanted me to go with him, that he had to settle an affair with Colonel Fawcett—that was while I was still in bed—I objected to go at first, but he pressed me, and said I might be of use to him, and so I went—he had previously spoken to me of some misunderstanding about the sale of a house—that Colonel Fawcett had intrusted him with the sale of a house, and that he had obtained more for it than Colonel Fawcett either demanded or expected, and that Colonel Fawcett, so far from showing any kindness on account of the trouble he had taken in his behalf, had behaved in an unkindly manner, instead of being grateful to him for what he had done—he did not tell me that a quarrel had been the consequence, he merely mentioned it in the way that any person would mention a family disagreement—I was aware that Colonel Fawcett and Mr. Munro had married two sisters—I do not remember whether Mr. Munro remained with me while I was dressing—we went together in his carriage to the Brecknock-arms, near Copenhagen-house, in the north of London—I do not know whether it is Kentish-town or Camden-town—we arrived there about half-past five or six o'clock—I do not think we found any one there when we arrived—some one drove up afterwards, I think it was Colonel Fawcett, but I am not certain—I saw Colonel Fawcett afterwards in a field, near the Brecknock-arms, with Mr. Munro, and two other gentlemen with him—one was Mr. Grant—I knew him—the other one I have been since told was Major Cuddy—I did not know him at the time—Mr. Grant either had been, or was then, in the army—I know he was a lieutenant at one time, whether he was then or not I do not know—Mr. Munro did not tell me what Mr. Grant was there for, he told me nothing about it—when these gentlemen were in the field I went out of the field, and left them there—I was going down the Tottenham-road—the field I left adjoins the road—they went into a field further away from the road, next but one to the road—I saw nothing done there—Mr. Munro called me into the field—I had heard nothing before that—that was before there was any shot—he shouted to me, and asked me to come into the field, and said something to the effect that I might be of use to him—I thought they were going to settle it—I got over the paling into the field to them—they seemed to be standing all together—I cannot say that I saw them all four—I saw three or four—I had no conversation with Mr. Munro on that occasion—I went up to them, and they retired from me, and then I turned my back to them, I thought they were at conference—they did not go out of that field—they went a little farther away in the same field, and in about a minute, as near as I can recollect, I heard a report as of a pistol—I only heard one report—there was immediately a shout for me—it was either "Gulliver," or "Doctor," or some such shout—I turned round, and saw Colonel Fawcett down on the grass—Mr. Munro was standing by him saying something—Mr. Cuddy was there—Mr. Munro said something to the effect that Colonel Fawcett had been levelling at him, I forget the words—Colonel Fawcett said he had not, and he afterwards said it was an accident—I think that was said to the policeman—that was half an hour after at least—after Colonel Fawcett said he had not, he and Mr. Munro shook hands, and Mr. Munro went away—I did not see him drive off in his carriage—I do not know whether any one went with him, of course Mr. Grant went away—I lost sight of him—Mr. Cuddy remained with Colonel Fawcett—I found Colonel Fawcett was likely to die—he was wounded on the right side of the chest, under the arm—I raised him up, he rallied a little after that, and then Mr. Cuddy went to get some assistance, and came with a board for the purpose of taking him away—he

was taken to the Brecknock-arms first—Mr. Cuddy took a note for me directed to Sir Benjamin Brodie, or Mr. Liston—they refused to take him in at the Brecknock-arms, and he was taken to the Camden-arms, and remained there till his death, I believe, but I speak of that from hearsay—I was present when Mr. Liston and Mr. Sands saw him—we saw him together—I think it was the day after, I am not quite certain—I think I saw him both days—Mr. Liston and I helped to move him on the Sunday, to shift his position—I saw him also with Sir Benjamin Brodie.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Are you still surgeon of the Blues? A. Yes—I have been in the regiment more than ten years—Mr. Munro was lieutenant and adjutant in the regiment when I joined it—I was indicted here on this subject—the Attorney-General entered a noli prosequi in my favour, and examined me as a witness—I was called as a witness on the trail of Mr. Cuddy—the Jury pronounced him "NOT GUILTY"—I was also present at the trail of Mr. Grant—the Jury pronounced him also "Not Guilty"—he was Mr. Munro's second—the expression Mr. Munro used was, "You were covering me"—that means deliberately leveling—that was the complaint of Mr. Munro at the moment; that Colonel Fawcett had been deliberately aiming at him—the colonel recovered when he was put into a better position so as to relieve him—he had recovered from the immediate shock, when he told the policeman it was an accident—when Colonel Fawcett and Mr. Munro shook hands, I heard Mr. Munro say, "God bless you, Fawcett, I forgive you;" or words to that effect—I examined the wound that Colonel Fawcett had received—it was in such a position as to show that the arm must have been upraised, or he could not have received it—the skin was withdrawn from its natural position by the uplifting of the arm—the hole in the skin would have been lower down if the arm had not been uplifted—it was very early in the morning when I was aroused by Mr. Munro—the regiment was about to march that morning, in consequence of which he slept where he did, and I slept where I did—that had been arranged long before any quarrel took place—it was not the result of any arrangement between us—when he awoke me, and I refused to go, he implored me to go with him in his extremity, and said he had been very harshly treated, or words to that effect—he was in a state of the greatest possible anxiety and despondency—he did not appear to me like a man who was pursuing an object of his own with vindictiveness, but, on the contrary, he appeared determined to avoid it—when he said I might be of use to him, he did not explain how in particular, but he said that the slightest shadow of an apology would be satisfactory to him; that he had been very grossly insulted in the presence of a servant—I have known him upwards of ten years—a more kind man never existed—that was his character throughout the whole regiment, and everywhere else, by everybody who knew him—he was the last man to injure any person, the last man in the world to seek a quarrel—he was not at all quarrelsome—as far as I could judge from his conversation, as well as from his conduct, he appeared to be a man who would, on almost any terms, have avoided a quarrel—he told me, in express terms, that he hoped it would not come to any mischief at all, and that he wished it settled—his father was an officer in the army, and rose (I merely speak from hearsay,) from the ranks on account of his bravery, I have repeatedly heard that he was with the "forlorn hope" at the storming of Seringapatam—Mr. Munro is not a man of fortune—he rose entirely by his own merits—he has universally the reputation of being a distinguished officer, and a humane, mild, forbearing gentleman, and he certainly is a most humane, kindly, and benevolent person—no

man can be more so, and he is very warm-hearted man—I believe he has six children, and the greater number, if not all, are daughters—his commission in the Blues became forfeited by his absence—I should think that would be worth about 3,000l.—I believe he is reduced to the utmost poverty and indigence.

MR. ATTORNEY-GENERAL. Q. I believe you are aware, from your connexion with the regiment, that he has left this country shortly after this melancholy affair? A. Yes, and has only recently returned—I believe he did actually leave the country—I never saw him afterwards till now.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. You saw nothing of him before he surrendered himself to take his trail? A. Certainly not—I never saw him from that morning, till now

CHARLES LONGMAN. I am private in the Blues, and was so in June, 1843—we were quartered at the Regent's-park Barracks at that time, I acted as coachman to the prisoner. On Saturday morning, the 1st of July, we were to leave the barracks—I saw the prisoner soonish that morning—I drove him in his carriage up to the Brecknock Arms—Mr. Gulliver was with him—there was another carriage there, and a cab—Mr. Munro waited a little at the Brecknock Arms till the others came up, and then they went away, some down the road, and some down the field—I saw them when they were in the field—they went out of my sight—while they were out of my sight, I heard the report of fire-arms—about a quarter of an hour or twenty minutes after that, Mr. Munro came to me, got into the carriage, and I drove him back to the barracks—he did not go into the barracks that I saw—after the regiment left there, we removed to Knightsbridge barracks—I did not see Mr. Munro at Knightsbridge after that.

Cross-examined. Q. How long have you been in the regiment? A. Very nearly twenty-two years—Mr. Munro has been there quite as long—I have always found him to be a mid, kind-hearted, humane gentleman—I never had a better master in my life.

WILLIAM HOLLAND LECKIE DANIEL CUDDY I am now major and captain of the 55th Regiment of Foot—at the time of this duel, I was a lieutenant in that regiment—I have myself been tried as a second—I knew Liuetenant-Colonel Fawcett—he was a brevet Lieutenant-Colonel, and was a major in my regiment—his name was David Lynar Fawcett—I served with him in India and China some years—the regiment returned to this country in Aug., 1844—I and the colonel returned in June, 1843—the duel took place on Saturday, the 1st of July—on the Friday before that, I saw Colonel Fawcett on the subject—in consequence of what he said, I had reason to expect some gentleman to call on me at the club—an individual, who gave his name as Grant, called on me at the United Service Club that day—he said he called from Lieutenant Munro—we had a long conversation—the result was, that he called on me again the same night, when a meeting was arranged to take place between Lieutenant Munro and Colonel Fawcett on the following morning—Colonel Fawcett called on me in a carriage, between four and five o'clock, next morning (Saturday, July 1)—we called at Mr. Grant's lodgings, and then drove to the Brecknock Arms, Colonel Fawcett and myself were in one carriage, and Mr. Grant drove in his own conveyance at the same time—when we got out at the Brecknock Arms, I saw two individuals, who I have been given to understand were Lieutenant Munro and Dr. Gulliver—I cannot take on myself to swear positively that the prisoner is the individual—I have seen him since, in this prison—my belief is, that the person in the dock is Lieutenant Munro, and that he is one of the persons I met—I believe Mr.

Gulliver to be the other gentleman—I went with Colonel Fawcett and the gentleman who represented himself to be Mr. Grant, and the person I believe to be the prisoner, into a field in the neighbourhood of the of the Brecknock Arms.

Q. State what occurred when you were in that field? A. With the permission of the Bench, I decline answering that question, as I conceive, by so doing, I am criminating myself—I am aware that I have been tried and acquitted, as a principal.

THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL here handed to the witness a pardon under the great seal of her Majesty. MR. JUSTICE ERLE having read the document, in formed the witness that it was a full and general pardon, freeing him from all liability to criminal proceedings, in respect of the death of Colonel Fawcett, and that it removed any objection founded upon such supposed liability.

MR. ATTORNEY-GENERAL. Q. Will you now state what occurred in the field? A. The individuals who were pointed out to me as Lieutenant Munro and Dr. Gulliver, entered a field from the road—we went down some distance, I believe, and they followed—to the best of my recollection Dr. Gulliver separated from the rest—I had a case of pistol—to the best of my recollection a pistol was loaded by Mr. Grant, and another by myself—the distance was measured by Mr. Grant—the paces were very long—to the best of my recollection fourteen was the number—Mr. Grant took up Mr. Munro, and placed him at the ground indicated for him to stand—I took up Colonel Fawcett, and placed him—the signal agreed upon, was, "Gentlemen, are you ready, fire?"—Mr. Grant gave that signal, and instantaneously afterwards a shot was fired by Mr. Munro, and almost immediately afterwards Colonel Fawcett fell—Mr. Munro exclaimed, "Did you see him, he covered me as dead as possible; he intended to shoot me"—Colonel Fawcett said to the best of my recollection, "No, I did not, I never intended to fire!"—Mr. Munro then came up and tried to shake hands with Colonel Fawcett, but my impression is that hands were not shaken—Mr. Munro said, "Fawcett, I forgive you," and he immediately afterwards left the ground with Lieutenant Grant—I fetched assistance, and carried Colonel Fawcett to the Brecknock Arms, where we were refused admittance—I left before he was taken to the other house, and went to Mr. Liston with a note I had received—he was from home—I then proceeded to Sir Benjamin Brodie's residence, and found him—I did not see Colonel Fawcett again before his death.

Cross-examined. Q. I understand that you do not speak positively on your oath as to the person of the accused? A. No, I never saw him, if he be the same person, previous to the morning in question; and I have only seen him once since, during the course of four years—my belief is that he is the same person—my belief is founded as much from the recollection of the individual I saw that morning, as from anything that has happened since; it is combined of the two—I cannot, point blank, swear to the man—I have now been fifteen years in the service—I have been tried as a principal in this duel for the offence of willful murder, and was pronounced "Not Guilty" by the Jury.

MR. ATTORNEY-GENERAL. Q. Are you able to say whether the person who fired the shot, from which Colonel Fawcett fell, was the gentleman who came with Dr. Gulliver? A. Yes—after Colonel Fawcett fell, Mr. Gulliver came up—he was called for.

ROB ERT LISTON, ESQ. I am a surgeon, living in Clifford-street, Bond-street. On Saturday, the 1st of July, 1843, I was sent for to attend a

gentleman at the Camden Arms, at Camden-town—I got there about nine o'clock in the morning, or between nine and ten—I was told that the gentleman I then saw was Lieutenant-Colonel Fawcett—I met Mr. Gulliver there in the course of the day—I examined Colonel Fawcett—he was still very faint, from a wound which he had received in his right side, a little below the arm-pit—it seemed to have been inflicted by a gun-shot—I think he died on the Monday morning following, the 3rd—I made a post-mortem examination in the presence of Mr. Sands, and several gentleman—the ball had penetrated one of the ribs, I cannot now tell exactly which, and after passing through the chest and the root of the lungs, had become fixed in one of the bones of the spine.

JOHN HYWARD. I am a clerk to the solicitor of the Treasury. I produce a bullet, which I took charge of on the first trial, relating to this proceeding—it was then produced by Mr. Liston—it was on or about the 27th of Aug., 1843—I produced it at the last trial.

MR. LISTON re-examined. I had kept the ball from the time of the postmortem examination up to that time—this is very like ball—it was one of this kind—it is a pistol-ball—there may have been part of the deceased's clothes found in the wound, I think there was—that wound was certainly the cause of his death.

MR. CLARKSON called

THE MARQUIS OF ANGLESEA. I have known Mr. Munro since I was appointed Colonel of the Royal Horse Guards, about six or seven years—I have had full opportunities of ascertaining the character which he has sustained as an officer in that regiment—it is my duty to inquire into the conduct of all the officers belonging to that regiment—I found this gentleman adjutant of the regiment, having entered it as a private, he obtained all his steps by the excellence of his conduct, until finally he became adjutant—as adjutant, he was respected and esteemed by all the officers of it, and he was beloved and respected, and full confidence was placed in him by all the men under his command—he conducted himself throughout as well as it was possible that a man could do.

(Daniel Ross, Esq., merchant, of Billiter-street; Robert Barclay, Esq., merchant, Abchurch-lane; Dr. Rutherford, of Devonshire-street; the Earl of March; the Earl of Arundel and Surrey; Colonel Bouverie, Colonel of the Blues; Lord George Manners;—Percival, Esq., formerly of the Blues; Edward Hayward, and—Tidd, privates in the Blues, also deposed to the excellent character of the prisoner for humanity, kindness, and forbearance.

GUILTY. Aged 43.—Strongly recommended to mercy by the Jury. DEATH recorded.

First Jury, before Mr. Justice Erle.

Reference Number: t18470816-1763

1763. WILLIAM GATES was indicted for feloniously forging and uttering a receipt for the payment of 137l., with intent to defraud our Lady the Queen; to which he pleaded.

GUILTY. Aged 47.— Transported for Twelve Years.

(There were other indictments against the prisoner, with respect to which the Attorney-General entered a noli prosequi.)

Reference Number: t18470816-1764

1764. SPENCER LAMBERT was indicted for embezzling the sum of 270l., part of the sum of 2,783l. 7s. 9d., which he had received on accountof the Receiver-General of Her Majesty's Customs. Other Counts, varying the manner of stating the charge.

MESSRS. CLARKSON and BODKIN conducted the Prosecution.

DANIEL TINNISWOOD MILLER. I am the principal teller in the office of Sir Francis Hastings Doyle, Bart., the Receiver-General of Customs. At the time this occurred, and some time before, the prisoner was an assistant teller in that department—it was his duty to receive monies from merchants and others who have to pay money into the Receiver-General's office at the Custom House—there is a cash-book in which he should enter all such receipts—he had payments to make as well as to receive—it was his duty to enter on the other side of that account the payments he so made, and the account should be balanced every day—his duty on making up his accounts at the end of the day was, to hand over the notes to me—the cash that he took in the course of the day was generally retained in the cash-box till next morning, and was to be delivered up to me the first thing next morning—he handed to me at the end of the day, a memorandum of the whole of the money he had taken, the amount of notes he had got, the amount of payments he had made, and the amount of the money he had retained in the box, all of which I had to enter in my book at the end of each day—it was a memorandum transcribed from his book—before he gave me that memorandum, it was his duty to balance his cash-book, and then to transcribe this from it—on the 9th of Jan. last, I acquainted the principals of the office that I had suspicion of him, and they desired him to make up his accounts—that was about half-past eleven in the day—he was then in the Treasury, in which office we all transact our business—on that order being given to him, he continued to take money until eleven o'clock, and did not make up his accounts—he then left the office, and I saw or heard nothing more of him till he was taken into custody on this charge. on Saturday, July 31st—he had a desk in the office where he was employed—it had drawers, of which he had the keys—his desk and drawers were left open, I acquainted the principals that he was gone, and they were examined in my presence—his book was taken possession of, and the money that was found in his drawers—I produce the book—I find entered in it, in his writing, thirty-four receipts, as received on that day—they amount to 2,783l. 7s. 9d.—I find on the other side, there payments, amounting to 130l. 3s. 3d., he ought to have had a balance left in his drawer of 2,652l. 14s. 6d.—I found notes and cash in his drawer—they were not examined in my presence—the notes handed to me by Mr. France, the Assistant Receiver-General, amounted to 2,310l. and 72l. 14s. 6d. in cash—the balance was 2,382l. 14s. 6d.—there was 270l. deficient.

Cross-examined by MR. BALLANTINE Q. Do those thirty-four receipts all purport to have been received on the 9th of January? A. Yes; the payments were also made on the same day—I have made no inquiry to ascertain whether other payment were made by him on that day—it required no inquiry—I have the names of the persons from whom these different sums were received—they are different sums of money—it was the prisoner's duty to deliver me an account of all receipts at the end of each day—he left on the 9th of Jan., about one o'clock—that was considerably before the period when it was his duty to account to me—a suspicion had been intimated against him that his accounts were wrong, and after that he absconded—the aggregate was usually summed by him, but not on that day, he left his accounts unsettled, and it was done by Mr. Franc—the entries do not

show at what time the monies were received—but he received the whole between ten and one o'clock in the morning.

GEORGE FRANC. I am Assistant Receiver-General of the Customs in London—the prisoner was an Assistant Teller in the Receiver-General's office—on the 9th of Jan. last, in consequence of information I went into the Treasury-office, where he was employed, and told him to make up his accounts immediately, and bring me his money—he said he would—it was his duty to do so on my giving him those directions—I afterwards received a communication from Mr. Miller that he was absent, in consequence of which I went to the desk which he occupied, and took the money from his drawers, took his book into my room, and made up his accounts myself—this is the book—I handed over to Mr. Miller the money that I took from his desk, and the book from which he made up the accounts—I took all that I found in his desk—I found 2310l. in notes, and 72l. 14s. 6d. in cash amounting together to 2382l. 14s. 6d.—I handed over the whole of the money I found in the desk to Mr. Miller—I examined the book to see what he had received and what he had paid—the deficiency, as appears on his account, was 270l.—I never saw him again, till he appeared at the Mansion-house.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you count the money and notes yourself? A. Yes, and ascertained the amount—he was in the habit, from day to day, of receiving very large sums of money—he has been in the service of the Customs eight years.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Are all these accounts in his own writing? A. Yes; they are accounts of the receipt and payment of public monies.

CHARLES BAWTREE. I am a clerk in the Bank of England—I produce a 200l. and a 50l. Bank note—they were exchanged at the Bank of England for gold on the 9th of January—I do not know by whom—there is "S. or B. Lambert" on them.

MR. PARISH. I am a clerk in the Bank of England—on the 9th of Jan. these notes were presented by the prisoner for gold—he wrote his name on them—I believe this to be his writing, but cannot say I saw him write it—I recollect his person—he had two hundred and fifty sovereigns given him for them.

Cross-examined. Q. What time of day was this? A. From half-past nine to ten o'clock in the morning, I think; but I am not at all sure about the time.

WILLIAM CRAFTER I am one of the constables of the Board of Customs—on the 12th of July, in consequence of information, I went to Croydon in search of the prisoner—I found him there, and took him into custody—I told him he must consider himself my prisoner, for the robbery he had committed at the Customs—he seemed very much agitated, and said he wished he had given himself up at the first, and settled the business, he though it would have been most likely all at an end by this time, he was very sorry for it, it would have saved him a great deal of trouble.

MR. BALLANTINE contended that as there only was proof of a general deficiency of money, and not of any particular sums, the prisoner could not be convicted of embezzlement. The COURT considered that if the Jury were of opinion that he took the 270l. out of the money received that day, intending to appropriate it to his own use, he was guilty of embezzlement,

Thomas Tasker, wine-merchant; William Nash, provision-merchant, of the Minories; James Buckland and James Layton, tea-broker, gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY. Aged 30— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18470816-1765

1765. CHARLOTTE ELIZABETH GAMBLE was indicted for the wilful murder of her infant male child; she was also charged on the Coroner's inquisition with the like murder.

MESSRS. BODKIN and CLERK conducted the prosecution.

The particulars of this case were unfit for publication; but from the evidence of the surgeon it appeared that the death might have been occasioned without any criminal act on the part of the prisoner.

NOT GUILTY.

NEW COURT.—Wednesday, August 18th, 1847.

PRESENT—Mr. Alderman Lucas; Mr. Alderman FAREBROTHER; Sir CHAPMAN MARSHALL, Knt., Alderman; and Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Fifth Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18470816-1766

1766. CHARLES ORME was indicted for stealing 13 handles for umbrellas, value 8s.; the property of John Hargrave and another, his masters; to which he pleaded

GUILTY. Aged 38.— Confined Four Months.

(There was another indictment against the prisoner.)

Reference Number: t18470816-1767

1767. JAMES WALLS was indicted for stealing 1 waistcoat, value 13s.; the property of Edward Farthing and another; and that he had been before convicted of felony; to which he pleaded

GUILTY. Aged 21.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18470816-1768

1768. MICHAEL PHILLIPS was indicted for stealing 1 handkerchief, value 1s.; the property of John Whitworth, from his person; also 1 handkerchief, the property of Edward Butcher, from his person; to which he pleaded

GUILTY. Aged 21.— Confined One Year.

Reference Number: t18470816-1769

1769. JOSEPH CROUCH was indicted for stealing 1 handkerchief, value 4s. 6d.; the property of Charles Coleman, from his person; to which he pleaded

GUILTY. Aged 21.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18470816-1770

1770. MICHAEL MAHONEY was indicted for stealing 1 handkerchief, value 4s.; the property of Thomas Ford, from his person; to which he pleaded

GUILTY.** Aged 15.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18470816-1771

1771. JOHN HESSON was indicted for stealing 5 smelling-bottles, value 5l.; the property of Frederick Octavius Thomson and another; also for obtaining goods and money by false pretences; and that he had been before convicted of felony; to which he pleaded

GUILTY. Aged 23.— Confined Nine Months.

Reference Number: t18470816-1772

1772. JAMES ROBERT DICKIE was indicted for embezzling the sums of 27l. 8s. 3d.; 15l. 10s.; 20l. 3s. 9d.; the monies of John Carter, his master; to which he pleaded

GUILTY. Aged 47.—Recommended to mercy by the prosecutor.— Confined One Year

Reference Number: t18470816-1773

1773. RICHARD WATKINS and MARY ANN JOHNSON were indicted for stealing, on the 9th of June, I set of fire-irons, value 10s., and 1 bolster, value 2s. 6d.; the property of John Marshall.

JOHNSON pleaded GUILTY. Aged 24.— Confined Six Months.

JOHN MARSHALL. I am a boot-maker in Seething-lane—the two prisoners came to me on the 5th of June—Johnson engaged a room at 6s. per week—Watkins came very soon afterwards, and paid a week's rent as deposit—the rent was paid to my wife—Johnson said she was a married woman, and that her husband worked as a cigar-maker—they continued five of sixweeks, and always paid a week in advance, which made me have no suspicion—my wife gave them everything that was necessary for a furnished lodging, with the exception of a frying-pan, which she was to borrow—my wife went up to the room when Johnson was not at home, looked in at the door, and saw that the things were missing—when Watkins came in I asked him what he had done with my goods—he said they were pawned, and he had lost the duplicates, if the duplicates were not lost they would be released on the Saturday following—I said that would not do for me.

Cross-examined by MR. HORRY. Q. Did he not say that the woman had pawned them. A. No—he did not say that he had been inquiring what had become of the things—I did not let him go out of my sight, I gave him into custody—Johnson came in very soon afterwards—she said nothing particular—she gave up the duplicates.

ANN MARSHALL. I lost the bolster, pillow, and other things—those produced are them.

GEORGE JAMES SHUTE. I am a pawnbroker—I produce this bolster and other articles—I cannot recollect who pawned them.

Cross-examined. Q. Are they all pawned in the same name? A. Yes; in the name of Gilman—they were pawned by a female.

SAMUEL HARTWELL (City policeman No. 584.) I took the prisoners—I produce nine duplicates which were given me by the prosecutor—four of them correspond with those produced by the pawnbroker.

WATKINS GUILTY. Aged 24.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18470816-1774

1774. JOHN FREDERICK HUNTER was indicted for stealing 2 coats, value 8l., and 1 pair of trowsers, value 2l; the property of Thomas Lester Shirley, his master.

THOMAS LESTER SHIRLEY. I am a tailor—the prisoner was in my service as a porter—on the 20th of July I delivered him a parcel, containing a coat and a pair of trowsers, to deliver at Messrs. Taddy & Co.'s, in the Minories, for a gentleman named Williams, and from there he was to go to Messrs. Robarts', the bankers—he did not go to the Minories, but went to Messrs. Robarts' and got a coat that wanted some alteration—he did not return, but went and sold the two coats and the trowsers—I went down to Greenwich the next day—I found him, and asked what he had done with the things—he said he had sold them to a Jew.

WILLIAM DOUGLAS. I am clerk to Messrs Robarts & Co., of Lombard-street—the prisoner called there and I gave him a coat that wanted some alteration—he was to have taken it to his master.

GUILTY. Aged 30.—Recommended to mercy by the prosecutor. Confined Three Months

Reference Number: t18470816-1775

1775. JOHN RUTHVEN was indicted for stealing 1 pocket-book, value 1s. 6d.; the property of James Blackman, from his person.

MICHAEL HAYDON (City policeman No. 274.) About five o'clock in the afternoon, on the 29th of July, I was in King-street, Cheapside—I saw the prisoner draw this handkerchief from a gentleman's pocket—I laid hold of him—he threw the handkerchief on the ground and struggled—I took it up, and took him to the station—I asked if he had got anything else—he said "Yes, a pocket-book"—I took it, and found the prosecutor's address in it—this is it.

JAMES BLACKMAN. I am a tallow-chandler, and live in Blackfriars-road—I went to the election, and lost this pocket-book from my coat-pocket—I did not know that I dropped it.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked it up at the door of Guildhall; I took it in my hand; I was sent back by the police; I put the book in my pocket, unopened; I did not see the inside of it.

NOT GUILTY.

Reference Number: t18470816-1776

1776. JOHN RUTHVEN was again indicted for stealing 1 handkerchief, value 6d.; the goods of a man unknown, from his person.

MICHAEL HAYDON (City policeman No. 274.) On the 29th of July I was on duty in plain clothes at Guildhall—I saw the prisoner draw this handkerchief from a gentleman's pocket—I laid hold of him, and he threw it down—he struggled with me, and in the struggle I lost the gentleman, but secured the prisoner—I found on him these two handkerchiefs—they have no mark on them—he said, "Well, I took them; I have been very hard up; my wife and child are at home starving; the pocket-book I found, but the handkerchiefs I took."

Prisoner's Defence. I took one handkerchief, I did not take the other two; when they cheered Mr. Rothschild, the handkerchiefs fell from their hats; I took them up.

GUILTY. Aged 27.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18470816-1777

1777. HENRY HOPKINS was indicted for stealing 24 live lobsters, value 16s.; the property of John Scovell.

JOHN WHITTAL. I am foreman to Mr. John Scovell, a fish-salesman. On the 8th July I went into his warehouse at a quarter past four o'clock to remove lobsters—I turned them out of the hamper, and there were twenty-four gone—the warehouse had been locked all day—it may have been entered by moving some loose boards.

JOHN CHAMBERLAIN. I packed seventy lobsters in a hamper for Mr. Scovell, on the 8th of July, about eleven o'clock—there were twenty-four of them gone out of the hamper.

JOHN MEAHAN (City policeman No. 555.) On the 8th of July I stopped the prisoner with a basket and twenty-four lobsters in it—there was no mark on the basket—it had been used for carrying away things—I asked

him what he had got in it—he said, "Some fish-guts"—I went with him about ten yards, and said, "I should like to see what you have got in the basket, if it is fish-guts"—he said, "Never mind, old fellow, it is the all right—it is shrimps"—I took him by the collar, opened the basket, and found it half full of live lobsters—I took him to the station, and found there were twenty-four—the inspector asked how he came by them—he said they were left in his charge that morning, by a man named Brinn, of East Woolwich; that the man went away and forgot them, and he was going to his mother to get money to take them to Woolwich after him.

Prisoner's Defence. He felt them with me, and I was going to take them down to him; I told the officer I was going to take them to Brinn, at Wool-wich.

GUILTY.* Aged 21.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18470816-1778

1778. JAMES ARTHUR, WILLIAM M'DONALD , and THOMAS EVERITT , were indicted for stealing 1 purse, value 6d.; 1 sovereign, 6 shillings, and 1 groat; the property of Elizabeth Watkins, from her person.

MR. RYLAND conducted the prosecution.

DANIEL MAY (City policeman, No. 357.) On Tuesday, the 20th of July, I was coming with three other officers, in plain clothes, in a steam-boat, to London-bridge—we arrived a little before nine o'clock at night—there were several other boats at the pier—I and the others proceeded to land—I observed the three prisoners coming from the pier, on board a Chelsea boat, in fact, they were on board, crossing from one boat to another—I saw a female going just before the prisoners, close to them—the prisoners were close together—I did not know them before—I saw M'Donald put his hand into the female's pocket, and drop his hand down as if he was passing something to the other prisoners, who were close to him—I went and laid hold of M'Donald's hand, and found nothing there—Wardle came up and took him by the collar—I felt him, and took Everitt—I looked round, and saw Arthur hold his hand out, with a purse in it—he dropped it, and a man employed on the pier picked it up—I did not see it shown to any female—I took Everitt—he did not go quietly—while we were going to Garlic-hill station, M'Donald commenced a scuffle—Everitt then looked round, and he commenced a scuffle—he struck me several blows, and we came to the ground.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. How many policeman were there? A. Four or five—we had been to Lee races—we had had no good luck or bad luck there—nothing particular occurred—I cannot say how many boats were at the pier—there were three—there might be four—there were a great person passing from the Greenwich boat across the others.

GEORGE WARDLE (City police-constable, No. 25.) I was in company with May and Storey, on the steam-boat, on the 20th of July—we arrived at London-bridge, and were about to land—there were other persons coming on board—I saw the prisoners in company together—there was a female in front of them—I saw M'Donald put his hand into her pocket—after he took his hand out again, he put it behind him to the other two prisoners, who were behind him—I took M'Donald into custody—I heard about the purse, and I saw it when Storey had it—I saw the prosecutrix, and told her—I knew she was the person by her dress—I had seen the pocket picked.

Cross-examined by MR. BALLANTINE. Q. Then you had lost sight of the female, had you? A. Yes, the crowd was so great we got separated—I had

not seen the female before, to my knowledge—she came to the station, and described the contents of her purse—the other prisoners were near enough to M'Donald to receive anything from him.

Cross-examined by MR. PARNELL. Q. was the boat coming from Chelsea? A. The boat the female was on going to Chelsea—the boat the prisoners were on was No. 1, Waterman—that was on one side, not going to sail at all—there were more than 100 persons on all the boats—there might be twenty or thirty persons on the boat No. 1, Waterman.

JOHN STOREY (City policeman No. 414). I was with the other officers on the 20th of July—I saw the Chelsea boat—I saw the three prisoners together on No. 1 Waterman—I saw Elizabeth Watkins Close to them. I saw M'Donald with his hand by the side of her dress—she had a light shawl on—he appeared as if his hand was in her pocket, but I cannot positively say it was—in a second afterwards I observed Arthur with a purse in his hand—I laid hold of his arm—he tried to throw the purse away, but he dropped it—the witness Hayes picked it up and gave it to me—I showed the purse to Elizabeth Watkins—she claimed it, and described the contents of it.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. Where was Hayes? A. on the Waterman steamboat—I seized Arthur—he held up his hand and dropped the purse—when I first saw the prisoners I was on the Chelsea boat—there were three boats there—I was in No. 1 Waterman, and I was the first that got out—there was another lady who had lost her purse—she claimed this purse at first, but when she found the contents did not correspond with what she had in her purse, which was 2l. 10s., she said it was not hers—she said hers was a new purse of the same kind as this is.

THOMAS WOODWARD. I am an inspector of the City police—I was with the other officers—I observed the three prisoners together—I saw Arthur's hand up with something in it, but what it was I could not tell—we immediately secured the prisoners, and took them to the station—we had a great struggle with them in Thames-street.

Cross-examined by MR. PARNELL. Q. When you got to London-bridge you had these men pointed out to you. A. Yes, by one of my men—I was not examined before the magistrate.

HENRY HAYES. I am assistant at the City Steam-boat pier at London-bridge—on the evening of the 20th of July I was on duty at the pay-place—I saw the three prisoners there—they took tickets for the steam-boat to Chelsea—when they had taken their tickets, they proceeded towards that boat—there were two or three boats there—I went on board the boat myself after them—I saw some scuffling going on—I saw the three prisoners together—there was some movement of their hands, and I heard a cry, "look after the purse"—I saw a purse in Arthur's hand—I went to lay hold of it, and he dropped it at his feet—I took it up and gave it to Storey—I did not see Miss Watkins till she was brought to the station.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. Then you did not call out to Miss Watkins? A. No—I called out, "Has any lady lost a purse?"—three or four made answer, "I have got a purse"—they did not say they had lost a purse.

ELIZABETH WATKINS. This is my purse, I had it and some money in it in my possession on the evening of the 20th of July—there was a sovereign in one end of it, and six shillings and a fourpenny piece in the other end—I was going by the Chelsea steam-boat that evening—this purse was safe in my pocket when I went on board the boat—there was an alarm of a purse

being found—this purse was handed to me by one of the officers after I had sworn to the contents of it—the contents of it are right now.

(Thomas Richards, a salesman in Farringdon-market, and Frederick Giles, a wire-drawer, gave Arthur a good character.)

ARTHUR— GUILTY. Aged 19.— Transported for Seven Years.

M'DONALD— GUILTY. Aged 30.

EVERITT— GUILTY. Aged 21.

Transported for Ten Years.

Reference Number: t18470816-1779

1779. THOMAS THOMPSON was indicted for stealing I purse, value 2s.; 1 watch, 23l.; 1 watch-chain, 5l.; 1 seal, 30s.; 1 watch-key, 30s.; 5 sovereigns, and 1 half-sovereign; the property of John Smith.

MR. RYLAND conducted the Prosecution.

JOHN SMITH. I am a native of Scotland, and reside about a mile and a half from Glasgow—in June last I was in London—on Monday morning, the 21st of June, I had been to the Dundee wharf—I was returning about half-past ten o'clock—I had a gold watch, with a gold chain and seal, and key attached to it, and a purse containing five sovereigns, and a half sovereign—I came along the Minories on my way back from the wharf, I met with a person, and went with him into a public-house—we got a tankard of malt liquor—in about two minutes the prisoner came in alone, and a fourth man came in in six or seven minutes—I have no doubt that the prisoner is the man who first came in—he said that his father was killed by a kick of a horse, and that an old female servant had said that his brother was a natural child, and he had had a lawsuit with his brother, and got his father's money—he pulled out a great bundle of what looked like notes, and said he would give the other man 5l.—the other man said, "I will give you a purse to put it in," and gave it him, and the prisoner gave him a 5l. note—the other man said, "Put it into my purse carefully," which the prisoner did—the other man said, "Will you give this other gentleman 5l.?"—the prisoner said, "Yes, by all means," and said, "Give me your purse and watch"—I do not know what came to me, but I gave the first man my purse and watch—the prisoner gave him a 5l. note to put into the purse—he put the watch and note into the purse, as I believed, and he put it about me—they then went away, and I found in my pocket instead of the purse and watch a tin box in this bag—I told a friend of the robbery; he gave information, and I gave a description of the prisoner—I saw him the next night, about eleven o'clock—his cheeks were redder, and he had not the same dress on, but in spite of that I knew him.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. How old are you? A. Fifty-one—I have been a factor for houses—I think the tankard we had was a small one—I do not know whether we had ale or porter—I went in there for a rest—I was going to a medical man about my brother—I came to town with my brother—it was the other man who put the watch into the purse as I thought, and not the prisoner—the prisoner came in by himself, after I and the other man had been there—in six or seven minutes afterwards another person came in, but he went out again—I saw the prisoner again about eleven o'clock the next evening at the station—I did not say he was not the man—I said he was the man, only he was differently dressed, and his cheeks were redder—I was not confused at being routed out of my bed—I did not say it was a younger man—I did not say there was no alternation, only he was redder and fuller in the cheeks—I did not say he was fuller—I gave the watch myself; I did not see what was done with it—I was in a weakly state—I had no

notes, I had five sovereigns and a half in my purse—after the prisoner and the other man went to the door, I felt in the bag to see if the five sovereigns were in it—I think there was something in the bag to correspond with the five sovereigns—I said, "You should not show your money in company, it is very dangerous"—I gave the other man good advice—I said I did not want any money, he insisted on my having it—I gave up the watch and sovereigns that they might be put together with the 5l. note into the bag—I thought I had got the 5l. note.

WILLIAM SUTTLE. I am a porter in the Minories. On the morning of the 21st of June, I saw Smith come up the Minories, just on this side the archway, to the Alton ale-room, No. 64—I observed a short man stop him—I was sitting inside the door—Smith pointed with his finger to the archway, and asked what it was—the man said he did not know, he was a stranger—they came in, and went into the back parlour, I followed them in, and asked what they wanted—Mr. Gilbert was out, and I was officiating for him—I saw a third man go in directly after them.

ELIZABETH GILBERT. I am the wife of Thomas Gilbert, who keeps the Alton ale-rooms, at No. 64, Minories. On Monday, the 21st of June, Suttle was helping me—I saw him take a pint of porter in to some persons in the tap-room—I had seen Smith come in with a short man—they were shown into the back parlour, and had some refreshment—I went into the room while they staid—I saw a man there who I have no doubt was the prisoner—he had come in about two minutes after Smith and the short man had come, and he went into the same room—they staid about a quarter of an hour—my little girl went into the room while they were there, with a pint of half-and-half—there were four persons at least in the room—I have no doubt the prisoner was one, and Smith was another.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you see all the three parties go into the parlour? A. I saw them all three—the little man came in first, and went into the parlour—he then went out again and came in with Smith; the prisoner came in afterwards—I went to the Compter, a few days afterwards—the prisoner was placed amongst other persons there, I did not find him; I did not look at the persons, I was too timid—I just looked, and the gaoler spoke very roughly to me, and behaved very rudely—he asked me if I Knew him, and I said really I did not look, I could not say.

Q. Did you not see the prisoner; did he not catch your eye and hang back? A. Yes; I said to the gaoler, "I cannot go down here"—and he said, "Go on; what are you afraid of?"—and he said, "It is no use bringing such people as these here, for they never look"—the man caught my eye—I did not say, "That is the man:" I said I could not tell—I was at the Compter on Saturday, and was before the Magistrate on the Wednesday after-wards; the prisoner was there—I had had no conversation with the police-man—I had not known the prisoner before.

MR. RYLAND. Q. You saw the prisoner, with other persons, before the Lord Mayor, did you recognize him then? A. I said, to the best of my belief, he was the man—I have no doubt about him now.

LOUISA HARRIET JOSEPHINE GILBERT. I am the daughter of Elizabeth Gilbert. On Monday, the 21st of June, I saw the prisoner at our house—he went into the parlour—I went in to take a pint of half-and-half for the three gentleman that were in there—I did not see Smith go in; but he was there, and the prisoner.

MICHAEL HAYDON (City police-constable No. 274.) I saw the description which Smith gave at the station—I had known the prisoner before—I looked

after him, and took him in Fleet-street on the night of Tuesday, the 22nd of June—I had followed him from a house which he came from in the London-road—I said, "I want you, Thompson, for that job in the Minories"—he said, "What job?"—I said, "The money you had from a Scotchman"—he said, "I know nothing at all about it"—I found on him twenty-six shillings, a purse, and a pencil-case—I went to his lodging, searched his box, and found two purses, a Bank of Elegance note for 50l., and some other things.

Cross-examined. Q. How do you know that the box you searched was the prisoner's? A. I was told so by the landlady—she is not here—I did not take the prisoner to the lodging.

GUILTY.* Aged 41.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18470816-1780

1780. JOB BLAKE was indicted for stealing 1 watch, value 30s.; the goods of William Lintill, from his person.

WILLIAM LINTILL. I was drinking with the prisoner on the 11th of Aug., at Stanwell—I got a little fresh, and laid down on the grass—the prisoner accompanied me—I had a watch with me—I went to sleep, when I awoke I found my watch was gone—I gave notice to the Police—this is my watch, and the one I lost.

Prisoner. Q. Were there not persons drinking at the public-house besides me? A. Yes.

ROBERT HENRY RIGARLSFORD (police-constable T 26.) I received information, and went to the prisoner's room at the Windsor Barracks—I asked him if he had been to Stanwell-moor—he denied it—he was ordered to get out of bed to be searched—while I was searching a pair of trowsers, he passed me and went to his bed again—I then heard something rattling in his right hand, and found this watch in his hand—he told me had picked it up in a field—this was on the same night it was lost.

Prisoner. You told the man to swear a robbery against me, or he would not have his property again. Witness. No, never—it is about seven miles from the barracks to where the watch was lost.

Prisoner's Defence. I went to a public-house and met this man; he asked me to drink, and called for a pint of half-and-half; we went to a Tom and Jerry shop and had some more beer; I went out and laid down on the grass; I picked up the watch by the foot-path; I stated to the landlord that I had found it, and I also stated the same in the barracks.

GUILTY.** Aged 27.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18470816-1781

1781. FRANCIS LAYDON was indicted for stealing 1 sovereign; the money of Mary Ann Jane Christian, from her person.

MARY ANN JANE CHRISTIAN. I am a widow, and live in Boswell-square. On the 8th of July, about five o'clock in the morning, I met with a friend—we went to a house in Fetter-lane and also to Farringdon-street—we were then going along the Strand, and the person I was with met the prisoner and another person with him—the three of them stood talking together—it was then proposed that we should go to the Grapes public-house—while we were there, the person who was with me, snatched my glove out of my hand, in the way of a lark—my money was in it, two sovereigns and 4s. 8d.—I said, "That is not right, you are taking my glove, that has got my money"—he took a sovereign out, and in a minute he returned the glove—I turned round, and he and the other person were gone—I looked into my glove and saw my other sovereign—the prisoner snatched the sovereign and put it into his

mouth—I said, "I beg of you to give it me, this other man has robbed me of one; you give it me?—I found no one was there to assist me; the barman was gone after the other two persons—the prisoner went out.

Prisoner. Q. Who gave you this money? A. It was not given to me—I did no gave a shilling to a deaf-and-dumb boy—I did not buy a pair of braces, I did not tell the Alderman that I did.

JOSEPH FREEMAN. I am barman at the Grapes—I remember the prosecutrix and the prisoner being there—I saw the prisoner take a sovereign from her hand, and put it into his mouth.

Prisoner. Q. Were there not more persons there? A. Yes, two or three—you were in the house half-an-hour or three-quarters, drinking in front of the bar.

DANIEL CARTER. I was in the public-house—I saw the prisoner take the sovereign from Mrs. Christian's hand, and put it into his mouth.

GEORGE WINSON. I saw the prisoner put something to his mouth—I cannot say what.

Prisoner's Defence. I get my living by selling braces—I met this female and a cabman, they were both rather fresh—they said would I have anything to drink—I said I did not care—we went and had some rum, and a pot of ale, then came down to Farringdon-street, and there the prosecutrix accused the other man of taking a sovereign—I was then going down Seacoal-lane, and they came and took me for taking a sovereign—I never knew she had one.

GUILTY. Aged 30.— Confined Nine Months.

Reference Number: t18470816-1782

1782. JAMES WRAY was indicted for stealing 6 muffs, value 25l.; the goods of Jacob Davis, his master.

JACOB DAVIS. I am a furrier, and live in Bull's-head-court, Newgate-street—I have lost six fur muffs—they were in our possession in Sept. or Nov., I believe—they were worth 25l.—I have only found this one, I can swear it is one I lost—the prisoner was in my service—this muff has my name on it.

Cross-examined by MR. BALLANTINE. Q. When did the prisoner leave your employ. A. He finally quitted on the 31st of Oct.—I did not miss the muffs till the end of June—I believe the prisoner had gone into partnership, or started for himself as a fur-seller—he bought one parcel of things of me, amounting to 12l.—I have heard that he was in partnership with Mears, a furrier, who purchased things on me three years ago—this is the muff that I speak of—it has "I D and Co." on it—this mark is not on all my property, but my instructions are to mark them all—I do not sell; my warehouseman does—the prisoner was my warehouseman; no one else sells, but if two or three customers come in, we all assist—Bone never sells—Arrowsmith sells very seldom—this is Marten sable fur, it is known by no other name.

CHARLES ARROWSMITH. I keep the books for Mr. Davis—this muff has not been sold.

Cross-examined. Q. How do you know it has not been sold? A. Because when the prisoner was accused he never once attempted to say it had been sold, but said that it had been left in his stock by his late partner, John Mears.

COURT. Have you examined your books? A. Yes—I cannot trace that it has been sold—the books would enable me to trace it pretty accurately.

MR. BALLANTINE Q. Do you mean you could trace it with reasonable certainty? A. Yes—I do not mean to say I can swear to it entirely, it is worth about four guineas.

FREDERICK CUTTEN I sold the prisoner's stock under his insolvency—to the best of my belief this muff was one of the articles.

Cross-examined. Q Where did you get it? A. I was auctioneer at the prisoner's sale—I bought it in myself.

JAMES BRANNAN (police-sergeant G 20.) I took the prisoner—I said I belonged to the Police, and I came to take him for stealing a sable Victorine from his master—he said, "The Victorines and the valuable part of the form✗ were brought into our business by Mr. Mears."

JOHN MEARS. I was in business with the prisoner—this muff formed no part of our stock—we never had this kind of article in the stock.

Cross-examined. Q. When did you go into partnership with him? A. I think about three years back—we dissolved partnership last Jan. twelve months—there was an inventory made of the stock in a similar book to this one, I did not make it—I cannot say whether this is the book or not—the book I had it in, was reckoned up, and this is not; and I do not see sufficient down here for the whole of the stock—I had similar kind of furs to this: some as expensive as this, but of a different description—when the prisoner and I parted we were not friends—I declined paying him 60l., or 70l., which he charges me with owing him, because I do not owe it—I say he is indebted to me.

MARIA WEBB FORD. I was in the employ of the prisoner and Mr. Mears. This muff was not part of their goods, I am positive.

Cross-examined. Q What were you? A. I was shopwoman to Mr. Mears. I am now living at home with my parents—this muff was called to my attention at Guildhall—I had seen it in the prisoner's stock several months after he dissolved partnership with Mr. Mears—I know Mary Ann Hart, I did not tell her this was part of Mr. Mears' stock—I said it was useless to say it was in his stock, I should have to state on my oath that it was not.

NOT GUILTY.

Reference Number: t18470816-1783

1783. JAMES WRAY was again indicted for stealing 10 sable Victorines, value 40l.; and 7 boas, 35l.; the goods of Jacob Davis, his master.

JACOB DAVIS. I lost ten Victorines—I believe these produced to be mine, and those I lost—one of these bears our mark—I swear to it—these others do not bear the mark, but I am quite certain they were in our stock by the style of the manufacture; to the best of my belief, they are mine—we only missed them when we took stock at the end of Feb.—I took stock myself with Mr. Brice, and subsequently on marking our stock off again at the end of June the deficiency was discovered—the prisoner had left at the end of October.

CHARLES ARROWSMITH. These articles were missed, and suspicion fell on the prisoner who had been in Mr. Davis' employ about two years and a half—I have examined the books—to the best of my belief these Victorines have not been sold—we took stock in Feb., but did not refer to the articles—we took it for granted that the stock was correct; but subsequent to that we referred to the stock, found these were deficient, and traced them to have been sold in the prisoner's stock—I am sure these were not sold to the prisoner, nor to Mears—to the best of my belief they were not sold at all.

FREDERICK COTTON. I sold these Victorines for the assignees of the prisoner.

SUSANNAH REIZER. I purchased this marked Victorine at the sale.

JAMES BRANNAN. (police-sergeant G 20.) I took the prisoner—he said the valuable part of the furs were brought in their stock, by Mr. Mears.

JOHN MEARS. These never formed any part of our stock.

MARIA WEARS FORD. I can positively swear that these were not in Mr. Mears' stock.

NOT GUILTY.

Reference Number: t18470816-1784

1784. GEORGE WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing 1 handkerchief, value 4s.; the goods of John Schofield, from his person; and that he had been before convicted of felony; to which he pleaded

GUILTY. Aged 21.— Confined One Year.

Reference Number: t18470816-1785

1785. GEORGE PERKINS was indicted for stealing 3lbs. weight of nutmegs, value 6s.; the goods of the London Dock Company, his master; to which he pleaded

GUILTY. Aged 39.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18470816-1786

1786. THOMAS WOOD, JAMES ALLEN, JAMES BAKER , and JAMES CHERRY , were indicted for stealing half-a-pint of shrimps, value 3d.; the goods of the Eastern Counties Railway company, their masters.

MR. BALLANTINE conducted the Prosecution,

JAMES HUDSON SPARKS. I am gate-keeper of the goods-station of the Eastern Counties Railway, in Brick-lane—the prisoners were porters there. On Sunday, the 4th of July, it was their duty to unload the trucks of the goods and fish that came from the country, and to put them on the platform—about two o'clock that afternoon I received directions, and placed myself where I could have a view of the platform—there were two trucks there, one contained pods of shrimps, and the other beer—about twenty minutes before three o'clock I saw Cherry go to the truck—there were five baskets, he took one off, and then took another—he lifted up the lid of the third one, put his hand in four times, and put some shrimps into his pocket—I then saw Allen go to the same pod—he took two handfuls of shrimps out and put them into his right-hand pocket—I then saw Baker go, take a handful out, and place it in his waistcoat pocket—he then took another handful, which he sat down to eat, on a case containing goods—I saw Wood go and take two handfuls, and place them in his right-hand pocket—they were there when they were taken by the officer.

Cross-examined by MR. WILDE. Q. Are you any relation to Mr. Hudson? A. No—I have been under his superintendence for eighteen months—I was one of the Bow-street night-patrol for five years and a half—I was transferred from that to the F division of the Police—I left it because I did not like it—I was in it for about two years—I had a cab of my own for about two years—I have seen the prisoners employed at the railway—I do not know how long they have been there, I have been good friends with them—I had no words with Baker that morning, I never opened my lips to him—I did not say I would remember him before the day was over—I was twenty or twenty-five yards from the pods—I was looking out of a window—I was not hid—the prisoners could have seen me if they had looked up.

JOHN WARWICK. I am foreman of the goods department. On Sunday morning, the 4th of July, truck arrived with ten pods of shrimps—they are

generally tied with three strings in front of the lid—it is my duty to look after them—these pods were all fastened—I looked at them in the afternoon again, and one string had been cut—it was open enough to admit a man's hand in flat, but there was not room to take a handful of shrimps out—I saw perhaps forty or fifty shrimps were taken from Wood's pockets.

Cross-examined. Q. It is not unusual for the tie of a parcel to be out? I have seen it before frequently—to the best of my belief a hand that was doubled and made larger by a handful of shrimps could not have been got out of the basket.

JOSEPH PRICE (police-sergeant H 15.) Sparks pointed out the prisoner to me—Cherry said, "You are welcome to search me; I have nothing."—I found no shrimps on him—I found a knife—I found nothing on Allen—I went to the trucks, and found one string of one pod had been cut—on the way to the station Cherry said, "If I had brought any shrimps in with me what an awkward predicament I should have been in."

WILLIAM CROOK (policeman H 70.) I searched Wood and found some shrimps on him.

NOT GUILTY.

Reference Number: t18470816-1787

1787. FRANCIS FARRELL was indicted for stealing 7 yards of silk, value 25s., the goods of John Dalton, his master; and WILLIAM PULFORD for feloniously receiving 4 1/2 yards of the same, well knowing it to have been stolen; to which

FARRELL pleaded GUILTY. Aged 40.— Confined Six Months.

JOHN DALTON. I am a silk-draper, in South-place, Finsbury—Farrell was in my employ. I lost seven yards of silk—I accused✗ him of taking it, he said he did not take it—he was what is called a maker-up, and he cut off certain lengths of one or two yards, and gave them to Pulford—these are them.

JOHN JENKINSON (policeman G 53.) I went to South-place and saw Pulford—after some time Farrell came, put his hand in his breast, and gave something to Pulford, who went towards Ropemaker-street—I went and stopped him, I searched his pocket and found nothing—I took off his hat and found these pieces of silk—I took him, and then took Farrell.

Pulford's Defence. Farrell is my brother-in-law; he gave it me, and told me to sell it; I did not know it was stolen.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

PULFORD— GUILTY. Aged 27.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18470816-1788

1788. JOSEPH WEBB was indicted for stealing 1 handkerchief, value 2s. 6d., the goods of William Blunt, clerk, from his person.

REV. WILLIAM BLUNT. I live in Suffolk-lane. On the 17th July, about six o'clock in the evening, I was on Tower-hill, I felt some one touch my pocket, and found it was empty—I turned and saw the prisoner and another boy—I found my handkerchief in the prisoner's hand—I took him to the station—this is my handkerchief, and the one I took him—I had had it just before.

Prisoner's Defence. The handkerchief was given to me.

GUILTY.* Aged 15.—Recommended to mercy by the Prosecutor. Confined Six Months

OLD COURT.—Thursday, August 19th, 1847.

PRESENT—Mr. Justice ERLE; Mr. Alderman FAREBROTHER; Mr. Alderman GIBBS; and EDWARD BULLOCK, Esq.

Fourth Jury, before Edward Bullock, Esq.

Reference Number: t18470816-1789

1789. JOHN DANIEL was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of July, at St. Andrew Undershaft, 22 watches, value 131l.; 63 chains, 222l.; 214 Rings, 350l.; 17 brooches, 62l.; 3l. breast-pins, 62l.; 22 pencil-cases, 22l.; 7 lockets, 13l.; 11 watch-keys, 4l.; 2 necklaces, 1l.; 2 thimbles, 1l.; 5 sets of studs, 9l.; 1 coat link, 1s.; 1 scent-bottle, 3s.; 1 scent-box, 3s.; 2 fruit knives 7s.; 1 brooch mounting, 2s.; 2 gold snaps, 3s.; 2 gold ends, 2s.; part of a gold bracelet, 10s.; 10s.; 1 set of sleeve-buttons, 3l.; 1 snuff-box, 2l.; 3 pairs of ear-rings, 2l.; 3 medals, 5l.; 3 pairs of ear-wires, 5s.; 1 eye-glass, 1l. 10s.; 3 seals, 7s.; 6 spoons, 1l. 10s.; 1 pair of ear-ring tops, 6s.; 4 tooth-picks, 9s.; 1 bracelet, 3l.; 10 half-francs; 1 half-dollar; and one other foreign coin 3d.; the property of John Walker and another, his masters, in the dwelling-house of John Rolfe: to which he pleaded

GUILTY. Aged 63.— Transport for Ten Years.

( Daniel Sweeney, a commercial traveller, of 23, Patience-street, Bethnal-green, gave the prisoner a good character.)

Reference Number: t18470816-1790

1790. HENRY HUMM was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of George Pinchin, and another, on the 20th July, at St. Matthew, Bethnal-green, and stealing therein a musical box, value 8s.; 1 case of mathematical instruments, 1l.; 1 half-sovereign, 4 half-crowns, 14 shillings, 14 sixpences, 60 pence, and 60 half-pence, their property: to which he pleaded

GUILTY. Aged 21.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18470816-1791

1791. JOHN WRIGHT was indicted for unlawfully obtaining a sovereign from William Perrott, by false pretences; also for obtaining three other sums by false pretences: to all of which he pleaded

GUILTY. Aged 34.— Confined Twelve Months.

Reference Number: t18470816-1792

1792. THOMAS MOORE was indicted for stealing a cash-box, value 3s., and 90 sovereigns, the property of John Howell, his master, in his dwelling-house: to which pleaded

GUILTY. Aged 25.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18470816-1793

1793. JOHN SANDDOVER was indicted for feloniously and knowingly uttering a forged request for the delivery of 6 printed books and 3 cases for books, with intent to defraud Edward Gardner and others; to which he pleaded

GUILTY. Aged 28.— Confined Twelve Months.

(There was another indictment against the prisoner for embezzlement.)

Reference Number: t18470816-1794

1794. JOSEPH BROWN was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Mary Ann Pearce, about ten in the night of the 8th of July, at St. Pancras, with intent to steal, and stealing therein 25 yards of silk, value 5l.; the skirt of a gown, 3l.; 5 yards of merino, 20s.; 1 scarf 15s.; 3 yards of ribbon, 3s.; and ¾ of a yard of carpet, 5s.; the goods of the said Mary Ann Pearce; to which he pleaded

GUILTY to the larceny. Aged 26.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18470816-1796

1796. THOMAS GAVELLE was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Robert Smith, about one in the night of the 21st of July, at St. Pancras, with intent to steal; and that he had been before convicted of felony.

ELLEN STILL. I am servant to Mr. Roberts Smith, of Percy-street, Rathbone-place—it is his dwelling-house, and is in the parish of St. Pancras. On the 22nd of July, about a quarter to one o'clock in the morning, I was in bed asleep in the front kitchen—I was awoke by the noise of the window lifting up—I heard it the second time and got out of bed, rung the bell for my master, went up stairs, and gave an alarm—I called two constables, who came to the door—I let them in and found the prisoner in custody—before I went to bed the night before, I had left the house all fastened, except the window that he got in at, that window was quite down, and the shutters were closed—I did not see it lifted up—I saw it open afterwards—there was a light there.

WILLIAM WESTLAKE (policeman E 102.) On the 22nd of July, about half-past one in the morning, I was called to Mr. Smith's house with another constable—I found the prisoner concealed behind the door of the press-bedstead in which the servant was sleeping—I asked what he did there—he said he came in to have a sleep—I asked if he lived there—he said he did not—I took him to the station-house, and found on him a key and some lucifer matches—the key opened the door of the house—I saw the kitchen window about a foot and a half open—I have some things here which have since been found by the servant.

Prisoner's Defence. I had no where to go that night; I had been there two or three nights in the area, and when I got down this night I saw the shutters ajar, and the window a little way open, I lifted it up; I did not know anybody was there; I went in, and in about twenty minutes after the policeman came; the key found on me was the key of my mother's door.

WILLIAM POCOCK (policeman F 14.) I produce a certificate of the prisoner's former conviction—(read—Confined June, 1846, and confined two months)—I was present at the trail—he is the person.

GUILTY. Aged 17.— Transported for Seven Years.

Before Mr. Justice Erle.

Reference Number: t18470816-1797

1797. MARY ANN HUNT was indicted for the wilful murder of Mary Stowell; she was also charged on the coroner's inquisition with the like murder.

MESSRS. BODKIN and CLERK conducted the Prosecution.

CHARLES BATTERSBY (policeman D 124.) On Wednesday morning, the 2nd of June, about a quarter-past four o'clock, I was on duty in Adam-street, Marylebone, and saw the prisoner put her head outside of the door of No. 40—she looked round, looked on each side, till she saw me, and directly with-drew her head, and closed the door—in consequence of this, I watched the house till about a quarter to five—I then saw the prisoner coming out with two large bundles, one under each arm—she merely came outside the door, I suppose not half-a-yard, before she saw the shine of the leather at the top of my bat, as I was watching round the corner on the opposite side of the road, from fifteen to twenty yards from the door—on seeing me, the prisoner

directly threw the bundles behind her into the passage, went in, and closed the door—I waited a few minutes, then went over to the door, tried it, and found it fast—I continued to watch the house till saw the door open about an inch or an inch and a half—that was about a quarter-past five—I put my fingers inside, and tried to open it, but found some one pushing against me—I then put my shoulder to the door, forced it open, and saw the prisoner standing behind it, with the two bundles by her side—I said, "Do those bundles belong to you?"—she said, "Yes, they do"—I said, "Had you been an honest woman you would have taken one of those cabs in the street, and not have watched till the policeman was out of sight"—there was a cab-stand fifteen or twenty yards from the house—she did not make any answer to that—I said, "Did you," or "have you lived in the house?"—she said, "Yes, I have been living with an old lady on the first-floor, up stairs"—I said, "I must trouble you to show me this old lady up stairs"—she said, "You can go, and I will wait here"—I said, "Certainly not, I shall not part with you, nor yet the bundles, until I have seen the old lady"—she went me up about four stairs, then suddenly turned—round, and said, "I suppose it is no use telling you a lie?"—I said, "No, nor a thousand will not satisfy me until I see the old lady"—she said, "The truth is, I have been living with the old lady in the front kitchen, down stairs"—I said, "We will go down stairs and see the old lady"—she was very unwilling to go down—I insisted on her going down with me, and she went down—I went to the door of the front kitchen—on going down she said, "It is of no use for you to knock, for she is as deaf as a stone"—I knocked repeatedly without receiving an answer—I said to the prisoner, "Is there not a window to this kitchen?"—she said, "Yes, in the front area"—I went into the front area—the prisoner went with me, after a good deal of hesitation, I took hold of her by the arm—I looked through the window of the kitchen—there was no shutter to the window—I found the kitchen quite empty, and said to the prisoner, "This is the second falsehood you have told me, when are we coming to the truth?"—she made no answer to that—I then went towards the back yards—the prisoner offered me half-a-crown, and said, "This will do to get you something to drink, or I have a crown; or, I think I have 20s."—I said, "This looks blacker still"—I had hold of her at the time, and said I should not part with her till I had seen the lady in the front shop up stairs—I said that, because I suspected something was wrong, by her offering me the money—she said she wanted to get away without paying her rent—she gave me no other reason for offering me money—I then tried the back kitchen door with my shoulder, and heard the lock make a noise as if the door was coming open—the prisoner directly turned round and said, "You have come to the truth; do not say I did it, for I have not seen her since last night"—I felt in the keyhole of the door, and not finding the key I said, "This looks very suspicious," I directly took the prisoner up stairs to the door of the shop, which is on the ground-floor, knocked, and asked to be admitted—there was a female in the room who declined to admit me, as she was undressed—I asked her if she knew the party I had outside—I asked her whether she knew her by her voice, and I asked the prisoner to speak—I believe the words she said were, "It is me, Miss Smallbone," on that Miss Smallbone said, "It is Mrs. Hunt she is living with, an old lady in the back kitchen down stairs"—I then said to the prisoner, "It has come to the back kitchen, has it? you must go with me"—I went down with her—as she was going down she said, "As I told you before, it is no use for you to knock, for she is as deaf as a stone."—I knocked at the door repeatedly, but received no answer—I inquired for the key—the prisoner said she had not

got it—I said, "This looks very suspicious"—she said, "Do not say I did it, I have not seen her since last night"—I said, "Where is the window to this kitchen?"—she said, "In the back yard"—I took her dress, about six inches in extent—it appeared to have been recently washed, the arm of the grown was wet—I have the gown here—there was a small area in front of the window, about two feet wide and three feet deep—there was no railing round it—I got down into it, to look in at the window—while doing so P✗ heard a noise, and on turning round I saw the prisoner attempting to get upon a wall about seven or eight feet high—she got on a place where the water-butt stood, about six feet high, and attempted to raise herself up by the water-pipe—I pulled her back, and said, "What are you doing?" or "What is this?"—she directly pointed to the water-closet, and said, "I want to go there," and appeared to be very much agitated, and her tongue was protruding from her mouth—I allowed her to go to the water-closet—the door was not closed, I put my hand in to prevent her closing it, fearing she might do some injury to herself while there—she was there I suppose about two minutes at the most—I opened the door directly, and saw her with her clothes up round her neck, and hands behind apparently twisting her clothes, and as I supposed attempting to strangle herself—I said, "What the devil are you doing? come out"—I took her out, and said, "I must give you into the custody of another constable—I took her with me to the street door, and opened it—I directly saw constable Jackson passing on the other side, called him in, and gave her into his custody, and said, "I have found the body of the old lady, take care of this party"—I had seen the legs of the old lady in the kitchen—I said, "This is a very suspicious affair; I suspect I have seen the body of the old lady"—and wished him to take care of her till I came back—she made some remark on that, but I do not recollect it—I then went down to the back kitchen again, got in at the window, and saw the body of the old lady with her head under the fire-place, and her neck bent—her head was, apparently, as if she was looking through the bottom of the grate—there was a cord several times round her neck—I drew the body out about six inches, and remained in that position till the surgeon saw it—there was a quantity of blood under the head—it had run from the head to the right, and formed a small pool near the centre of the room—Dr. Moat came in about a quarter of an hour or twenty minutes—I went to him directly after sending the prisoner to the station—there was a table by the window, and a turn-up bedstead—it was turned up at the time—the door was locked and the key was out—I came out by the window—Jackson was still in the house with the prisoner at that time—I said to her, "I have found the body of the old lady"—she made some remark, but I did not hear it—I directed Jackson to take the prisoner and bundles to the station, and then went for Dr. Moat—after he had seen the body, a constable named Killingback had charge of the room—the premises were constantly watched till to the inquest—after I had put Killingback in charge of the premises, I went to the station, and charged the prisoner with murder—she said, "I did not do it, I have not seen her since last night"—I opened the bundles at the station—there were several petticoats, aprons, night-gowns, and shifts—they were marked "M. S."—they all were afterwards shown to Elizabeth Wills, the deceased's daughter—I afterwards went back to the house in Adam-street with Mr. Hunt—a poker was found by the body—I returned to the station-house, and searched a reticule and other things which the prisoner had with her—she was searched a reticule and other things which the prisoner had with her—she was searched by a female—I found four letters in her reticule, one partly torn up in her hand, a glove, and 1l. 1s. 6d., all in silver—these are the letters—(produced)—the inquest

was held on Saturday, the 5th—I had searched in the dress of the deceased on Thursday, the 3rd, and found two watches, 6 1/2d., and a watch-key in her pocket—there was a chest of drawers in the room; when I first went into the room one drawer was partly open, and the key in it—it was quite empty—I did not see a bag found in either of the drawers—on Wednesday, the day the murder was discovered, I went with Major Wills, the son-in-law of deceased, and showed him the body—he identified it—Mrs. Drenchfield, another daughter of deceased, likewise identified it.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Did you put your hand on the body? A. I Did—it was quite cold.

JAMES JACKSON (policeman D 29.) On the morning of the 2nd of June, about half-past three o'clock, I was on duty in the neighbourhood of Adam-street, and saw the prisoner walking along Upper Seymour-street very quickly—it was perhaps 500 yards from the place where she lived—she was going in a direction towards it—nothing passed between us—she was on the opposite side of the road—she was carrying nothing—about two hours after I was passing by the house she lived in, and was called there by Battersby, who gave the prisoner into my custody—I asked her if she lived there—she said, "Yes"—I asked her how long she had lived there—she said, "About eight weeks"—I asked her where she was going so early—she made no reply—she speared excited very much, and trembled—this conversation took place whilst Battersby was down stairs—he afterwards came up and joined us again, and desired me to take the prisoner to the station—I took her there in a cab, and the bundles—she said nothing going along.

MARY ANN PORTER. I am the wife James Porter, a policeman, and am a searcher at the Harcourt-street station. I recollect the prisoner being brought there on Wednesday morning, the 2d of June—I was called on to search her—I observed some blood on the sleeves, skirt, and bosom of her gown—I said, "Your dress is in a mess"—she said she was taken poorly in the street, and she could not be off making herself in a mess—I examined the state of her clothing, and found she was in that condition—her under clothing had stains on it—I cannot say how much—there was a good deal—I saw blood on the strings of her bonnet, and a good deal of blood on her cloak—she said her nose had been bleeding, I think she said "last night"—there was nothing about her dress by which I could trace the blood from the lower part to the upper part of her clothing—when she was in the cell at the time the policeman was looking at the bundles—she said, "There are some things in the bundle belonging to the old lady which I have given 5s. for."

Cross-examined. Q. I suppose you have got the cloths here? A. Yes—(the witness here produced the cloths, and pointed out the marks to the Jury.)

COURT. Q. On which sleeve of the gown is the blood? A. The right and on the bosom—there are stains at the bottom of the bonnet strings.

JURY. Q. Have they been washed? A. No—there seemed to be a very great deal on the cloak when it first came to the station

SUSANNA NISBET. At the time this matter occurred I lived on the first-floor of the house, No. 40, Adam-street—the deceased, Mrs. Stowell, lived in the back kitchen of that house—the prisoner lodged there with her—the front kitchen was empty at the time this happened—there was no one on the lower floor of the house on the evening this happened but the old lady and the prisoner—the last time I saw the prisoner was on the Tuesday night, about ten minutes to nine o'clock—she was coming along the passage then—I knew Mrs. Stowell—I remember on the Monday night, before this matter occurred, between nine and ten o'clock, hearing her and the prisoner quarrelling—I

heard the prisoner say to the old lady that she would do for her—she repeated that over different times—the last I heard her say was that she would do for her, and that before long—that alarmed me, so that I went and fetched Mr. Hayman, the landlord—he came, and I told him what had passed—they were then in the back kitchen—he went down to them, and I remained on the landing—before I fetched the landlord I heard the prisoner call the old lady an old hypocrite, and I heard the old lady say to the prisoner that she was the first lodger she had ever had, and she should be the last, and she should not remain there that night—I have lodged in the house since the 24th of March last—I rather think I was there before the prisoner came to lodge there, but I am not quite certain—it was nearly at the same time I should think—I have occasionally spoken to her, and seen her—she always appeared to conduct herself quite like other persons in their senses.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. How long had you lived in the house with her? A. From the 24th of March up to be the time she was taken into custody—I used to see her sometimes more frequently than others, but not very frequently—there was no familiarity between us, more than speaking when we met, passing common conversation—I understood that the quarrel was about nine week's lodging that she owed the old lady, but the prisoner said it was about a petticoat hanging in the yard—that was when Mr. Hayman came to enquire about it—that was on the Monday night—I did not see her on the Tuesday morning—I made sure that she had left the house, from the conversation I had heard on the Monday night—I did not see her till the night of Tuesday, at about twenty minutes to nine o'clock—I cannot say where the old lady was then—I had been at home all the Tuesday—I heard no quarrelling on the Tuesday—I saw the old lady at about three or half-past three o'clock—when I saw the prisoner about nine o'clock she was going out of the house—she passed me at the door.

JURY. Q. Was the old lady in any way deaf? A. She was—she could hear the threats the prisoner used—I could not distinctly hear what she said, as I was up stairs at the time, but it was said to the prisoner—I could make Mrs. Stowell hear—she could converse with me at times—she could her if I called loud; if I exerted my voice as I do now, she could hear what I said.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Where were you when you heard the prisoner say, "I will do for you," or words to that effect? A. Up stairs in the first-floor back room—my window was open—the door was shut—it is my belief that the voice I heard was the prisoner's—I could state so positively—I believe it was her voice—I am not certain of it.

MR. BODKIN. Q. You had your window open? A. Yes; it was the room immediately over the back kitchen where the old lady and the prisoner were, and the window of the back kitchen was open—I have not the slightes doubt whatever that it was the prisoner's voice that I heard.

CHARLES HAYMAN. I am an oil colour-man, living at No. 43, Adam-street, I am also landlord of No. 40. I remember Mrs. Nisbet coming to me on Monday the 31st of May—in consequence of what she said to me I went to the back kitchen of the house, No.40, and found the old lady sitting in a chair, at the kitchen-door, in the passage—the prisoner was in the back kitchen—the door was open—the prisoner was near enough to hear what I said to the old lady—I asked her what the matter was, what the row was about—she said that the prisoner had been abusing her, because she had asked her for some money—I then went into the kitchen, and the old lady followed me in—I asked the prisoner what she was making a noise about; she said the old lady had been making a noise about a petticoat that was hanging in

the yard, she said that the lodgers had been making remarks on it; and she wished her to take it in before she went to bed, if it was hers—the prisoner told me she had told the old lady it was not hers, that it belonged to a person in the first floor—the old lady said the prisoner had been abusing her very much, and said that she would do for her—upon that the prisoner said, "You lying old wretch, I did not say any such thing"—Mrs. Nishet was standing on the stairs, and she said, "You did say so; for I heard you say so two or three times"—upon that the prisoner said, "And so I will"—I asked her what she meant by it—she said, "In the estimation of her friends;" for she would either write or go to the house where she was in the habit of going for her broken victuals of a morning, and tell them of her dissatisfaction; for her she was a nasty, covetous old woman, she was not satisfied with what she had—the prisoner shook her fist in her face; and said, "You old wretch, I should like to have my revenge of you"—I said, "Surely, you would not injure an old woman like that?"—she said that the old lady's daughter had been there to borrow sixpence of the old woman, and she had denied her, and said she had nothing; and she said she knew it to be a lie, for she had money in the corner-drawer, for she saw it herself—she pointed a drawer at the time she said it—she acknowledged to owing her nine weeks rent, that she had not got no money then to pay her, but she could get some by writing for it, she was too ill to take a situation at the time, and she would pay her every farthing before she left—she was rather excited, and she cried—I told her she had better get into bed and not have any quarrelling there, for I could not allow it in my house; and unless she did keep quite I should be obliged to put her out—she promised me she would not say another word that evening, and I wished them good night and left—I saw the body of the deceased on the following morning—I was there when the body was removed—I found the key of the door under where the body lay, and gave it to Inspector Hunt—Mrs. Stowell's rent was 2s. a-week; but I allowed her 1s. a-week for doing little odd jobs about the place—I do not know what rent the prisoner was to pay her.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. You do not know whether she was to pay her any? A. I do not—when she cried, I said I hoped she would not injure the old lady, and she said no, she would not—I do not know that she said she would not hurt her, although she had abused her very much and very shamefully—I do not believe she did say so—I do not believe that I have said so before—she said she would not hurt her—this is my name to the deposition—(looking at it)—it was read over to me after I made it, and before I put my name to it—I cannot charge my memory as to whether I stated that—I have no doubt but it was said, as I find here the words, "She said she would not hurt the old woman although she had abused her very much and very shamefully"—the prisoner appeared to be in an excited state—my attention had not been called to her, more then being called in that evening—I suppose that was about ten o'clock—it was on the Monday evening, and it was the next morning that I saw the old woman's body.

Q. Why, the next morning was Tuesday, when the old woman was prefectly well. A. I cannot say exactly to the day—it was on the following morning that I saw the body.

COURT. Q. Do you remember the day of the week when you went and bad this interview? A. On the Monday evening I think, or Tuesday—I cannot remember the day on which I saw the body, I rather think it was on the Wednesday—I cannot charge my memory whether it was two days after interview.

MR. BODKIN. Q. Do you remember whether, in point of fact, this quarrel took place the night immediately before you saw the dead body, or was there a day between? A. I cannot charge my memory—it might have been that this took place on the Monday night, and that I saw the dead body on the Wednesday.

JURY. Q. Was the old lady in arrears of rent with you? A. No, not since her husband's death.

COURT. Q. On the 1st of June did she owe you a week's rent? A. Yes, 1s.—not more than that—her day of payment was Monday—I think she did not always pay exactly on that day, but she kept it up pretty near to the week.

MR. BODKIN to MRS. NISBET. Q. Are your sure it was on Monday that you fetched Mr. Hayman? A. Yes.

ANN SMALLBONE. I live at No. 40, Adam-street, and did so on the 1st of June last—I am shopwoman to Mr. Baylis, who keeps a baker's shop there—the deceased lived in the back kitchen—the prisoner had been lodging there with her for about nine weeks—I last saw the deceased alive between seven and eight o'clock on the Tuesday morning—I had seen the prisoner on the Monday morning, and on Monday night she came to my parlour and knocked at my door—I opened it partly, she said that she and the old lady had been quarrelling, and that the old lady had very much abused her and insulted her—nothing else particular that I recollect passed on that occasion—I saw her again the next morning (Tuesday) between eight and nine, nearer nine than eight—I did not look to see what the time was—she begged my pardon for intruding the night before into my apartment—she said that the old lady had been saying that she had said she would do for her, but she meant that she would do for her in the estimation of a lady of the name of Wyndham, who was charitable to her—I saw the prisoner again about ten o'clock on that Tuesday morning—I had no conversation with her then—she was conversing with another lodger in the wash-house—I saw her again between four and five o'clock on Tuesday afternoon, in the back kitchen—I had received a letter from the postman for the prisoner, and I took it down to her—I had no conversation with her, I knocked at the door, I did not get an answer, I stood at the door for, as near as I can say, a minute or a minute and a half, and I was just going to knock again, when the prisoner distinctly unlocked the back kitchen door and opened it a small space—she stood opposite the space and received the letter out of my hand—I believe it was nearer five o'clock than four—I was not able to see into the room—I next saw the prisoner at twenty minutes to six—she came into my shop with a piece of writing paper—whether it was the letter or not that I had delivered to her I cannot answer, but she said "he" (alluding to a person I suppose that was in the habit of visiting there as a suitor) "wishes me to meet him at half-past five or six o'clock, and what time is it now?" looking at my clock—I said, "I am ten minutes too fast, I am ten minutes to six, therefore it is twenty minutes to six"—she asked me if I would allow her to go through my apartment to go down, as I supposed, to the back kitchen, and I said, "Yes"—she did not say "back kitchen"—she said, "Will you allow me to pass, Mrs. Smallbone?" and I said "Yes"—she did not come out of the house to my apartment, but she was frequently in the habit of coming through the shop and going through my apartment, as other lodgers frequently do, when they have forgotten their key, without opening the street-door—I saw her again that evening, as near nine o'clock as possible, but I cannot tell to a few moments—she stood and conversed with me

at my shop-door—she then came from the street—she again asked to pass through my apartment—she did not say where she was going—she came to me again shortly after, and asked me for a Lucifer-match—I gave her three—she then went beck again towards her own apartment—I did not see her again that night—I was awoke on Wednesday morning, about five o'clock, by Battersby knocking at my door—I was asleep—I recognized the prisoner's voice outside the door—I told Battersby who she was—while the prisoner lived with the deceased in the house, I have been in the habit frequently of seeing and conversing with her, almost daily—I always thought her at all times truly sensible and truly collected, quite like other people—I never detected anything peculiar in her manner or way of talking—on the Monday and Tuesday when I saw her, she spoke in the same way as she had done previously—her manner was as usual, but she looked much paler than on ordinary occasions.

COURT. Q. Was there any other difference in her manner or conversation? A. Not any.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. You never were examined before the Magistrate about this, I believe? A. No, nor before the Coroner—I was first questioned on the morning that the deed was discovered—that was by Superintendent Hughes—I believe he took down from me in writing what I had to say—I summoned to attend before the Magistrate, and was called into the witness-box, but then the old lady's daughter was called, and I was not required to speak—I was examined at the office of the Solicitor of the Treasury, at Whitehall—that was some two or three weeks since.

Q. Did you know that the prisoner had been affected with an irregular discharge, and was ill in consequence at times? A. She once made an observation to me that she had an obstruction of that kind, but she afterwards told me that she had had a renewal—I never saw her in fits in conesquence of that—she told me the time that she had the renewal—I believe it was first of all on the Sunday week before the deed was discovered, and like-wise on the Tuesday morning, the day before it was discovered.

COURT. Q. When was it she told you she had an obstruction in a certain respect? A. I cannot say exactly, but I believe shortly after she came into the house, and then she told me, I believe, on the Sunday week, that she had had a renewal, a return—she told me on the Sunday week that she had had a return of this matter, and on the Tuesday that she had had a return of that illness; that she had become ill; not that she had a return of the obstruction, but a return of the periodical complaint.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. And that was she occasion when you observed her to be so much paler than usual? A. Yes, I observed her to be very pale on the Tuesday, more so than I had ever done before—I am not married—I have not know any instance in my own family where this obstruction has violent results.

COURT. Q. Did you see the prisoner at the time you say the door was unlocked and she took the letter out of your hand? A. I did see he—she was then dressed—she had her bonnet on and her cloak—I did not see the old lady—I had no opportunity to observe anything more about the place—the prisoner appeared at the crevice made by the partial opening of the door, and she had her bonnet and cloak on—she opened the door and stood opposite the opening of the door—she did not throw it wide open, she only opened it a small space.

JURY. Q. Does the fire-place face the door? A. Not exactly—a door-way face the door, I think—the side of the fire-place faces the doorway—I

did not stop to see whether she shut the door again—I turned round, and ran up the staircase—I heard no unusual noise.

SAMUEL WATKINS. I am a waterman at a cab-stand in Adam-street West—I was not examined before the Magistrate—I heard of the death of the old woman on Wednesday evening, the 2nd of June—the night before that, about twenty-five minutes to nine o'clock, the prisoner came to make an agreement with Mapleston, the cab man, who stood first on the stand, to go to the Brighton Railway—she spoke first—I did not hear what she said then—the first thing I heard was her wanting to know what time the last train went from the Brighton Railway—Mapleston asked me if I knew—I said I did not, but if she would wait a minute I would go and inquire—I went across the street and inquired of another cab man, who said the next train went at eight o'clock—that was the mail train—I returned back to her, and found her waiting where I had desired her to wait—I told her that she was too late for the last train, for it went at eight o'clock—I looked at a clock in a public-house, and found it wanted nearly twenty-five minutes to nine—when I told her the train went at eight, she said she thought as much—she asked Mapleston what he would take her to King's Arms-yard, Whitecross-street, for—he told her for three shillings—she said, "You must take me for less than that"—Mapleston said, "I can't take you for less, you have got luggage to carry"—and she said, "No; I have only got two or three bundles"—she had nothing with her at that time—she said she had got a friend at King's Arms-yard, and she could sleep there, and she would be nearer the railway in the morning, in the room of going away from Adam-street—Mapleston asked her when she was going—she said, "Directly"—he asked her where she was going to take up—she said, "Just down below"—she said she would be back again in about ten minutes—she went away and did not return any-more—I saw no more of her—she had a kind of lavender-coloured gown on, and a black mantle you might call it, and a light straw bonnet with a kind of plaid ribbon.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Has the mantle, the dress, the straw bonnet, and the ribbon, been shown to you by anybody? A. No—I have never seen them since that time—I have not seen them in court, nor any-where else, nor been spoken to about them—there was no blood on the ribbon, or the cloak, or on the dress, to my knowledge—I was not examined before the Magistrate or the Coroner about this—I went to the Home-office on the 28th of May, that was all—they found me out through a constable named Lovett, who carried the prisoner from the station-house to High-street office—he is not here.

HENRY MAPLESTON. I was not examined before the Magistrate and the Coroner about this inquiry—the first time I was examined was by Mr. Hayward—I am a cab-driver—I was at the stand in Adam-street on Tuesday night, the 1st of June—I was first cab—I recollect a woman coming up to me that evening and speaking to me—she asked me what time the last train went to Brighton, or the early train in the morning—I told her I did not know about the trains, and referred her to the waterman, Watkins—I am not able to identify that person—being first cab the job did not suit me, and I did not pay any attention to it.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. How far is your cab-stand from the house, No. 40, Adam-street? A. I suppose about as far as from here to the cab-rank in the Old Bailey—I did not look at the clock, finding it was half-past eight I understood that the last train was gone—I referred her to the waterman—it was after he returned that I found out that the train was gone—I heard the waterman say it was half-past eight—I cannot say whether he had looked at the clock—I saw him go into a public-house opposite.

COURT. Q. Was anything said about your taking her to any other place? Yes—she said she wanted to go by the early train in the morning, and if she could get down by the King's Arms-yard in the morning, she should be near for the early train—I said, "I suppose you have some luggage?"—she said, "Some bundles"—I said, "Three shillings"—she said, "I will let you know in ten minutes"—she went away, and I never saw her any more.

MAJOR WILLS. I am porter to Messrs. Bedham, upholsterers—I married a daughter of the deceased Mary Stowell—I identified her dead body—I went down to the place where it was—the policeman was there—it was the dead body of Mary Stowell—I had last seen her alive on the Sunday previous—she dined with me—she was in the habit of so doing every Sunday when it was fine—she then appeared to be in perfectly good health—she was seventy-eight or seventy-nine years old—I know the prisoner by seeing her there lodging with my mother-in-law—I know had seen her four or five times—she paid one shilling a-week, as I understood from my mother—she became acquainted with my mother from being servant to Mrs. Wyndham, and my mother about her leaving the lodging—that was about three weeks previous to her death—it was in consequence of something going forward which she did not approve of in the prisoner—they were both together—I told my mother, in the hearing of the prisoner, that she was to go down and see her brother in the City—in consequence of that, my mother told the prisoner that she must get a lodging—I shook hands with my mother, and bid her good night—the prisoner made no reply to what I said to my mother—nothing transpired after that—I then left—this was on the Sunday three weeks before her death—she dined with me on the next Sunday—I cannot say what time I saw her next in the prisoner's presence—it was one evening part, but I had seen my mother previous to that, I should think nine or ten days before my mother's death—no conversation took place in the prisoner's presence about my mother's living in the kitchen—about four weeks previous to her death, I called in to see her—she asked me to have something to eat—I said, "Yes, and you had better send for a drop of porter with it"—she said she had not got anything to send for it—the prisoner said, "Your mother has got money in that corner drawer, and she won' send for it"—I said, "Never mind, she always was a little old screwish"—I turned it off in that way—she was of a very saving disposition—she would find fault when she had lighted two matches at being so extravagant as to light two instead of one, she was so penurious in her ways.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. You were tolerably well off, were you not? you were not in any difficulties for money? A. No—my house is about three quarters, or a mile from where my mother lived—my mother used to walk there with me of a Sunday, although elderly, she was a fine, hale, strong old lady.

MR. BODKIN. Q. Had you any reason to believe she had not sufficient to maintain herself? A. She had—she was allowed 3s. a-week from St. James's parish, and sometimes something by her brother.

JURY. Q. Was she deaf? A. Very deaf, indeed—she decidedly did not hear the conversation between me and the prisoner respecting where the money was, therefore she had no opportunity of denying what the prisoner said.

ELIZABETH WILLS. I am a daughter of the deceased—I have been shown some articles of wearing-apparel by the policeman, and recognize several of them as having belonged to my mother—here is a new flannel petticoat, a shift, two aprons, a morning gown, and two yards of calico—I was with my mother when she bought the calico, a short time before her death, at Mr. Laking's, in Cross-street—this pocket handkerchief and other things belonged to her, and I fancy this other petticoat did form the width round the waist.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. I suppose these articles are not of great value? A. The flannel petticoat is a bran new one—it is worth 3s. 6d.—the sliver watch has "James Stowell" round it—the other is a pinch-back or metal, and there is also a brooch—I believe some of the things in the bundle bear my mother's name on them.

MR. BODKIN. Q. Had you seen much of the prisoner while she lodged with your mother? A. No—I never saw her—there is a gold brooch with hair in it, marked "Catherine Cooper."

MRS. DRENCHFIELD. I am the wife of Edward George Drenchfield; a tailor. Mary Stowell was my mother—I was acquainted with the prisoner—I recollect her coming to live with my mother—I went to Colonel Wyndham's the night she came there, and helped her with her things to my mother's—I believe it was on the Monday before Easter—I had some conversation with her that night—she said she had been very ill, that she had fainted away once that day—she said she had been in that way once before—I knew her to be very poor while she was living with my mother—I had a conversation with her on the subject—she said she had been out of place a very long time before she went to Colonel Wyndham's, that she had only been there a month, and that she had been very poor before, she had even wanted bread—she did no needle-work for me—I made a gown for her—my mother was a person of very penurious habits—she used to keep her money in the righthand corner drawer—she always kept it locked, and kept the key in her pocket—I never had any conversation with the prisoner about that—I have met her ten or eleven times at my mother's—I have staid at my mother's five or six different days, and the prisoner has been there during the greater part of the day—I have done needlework on those occasions, and was then in the habit of conversing with the prisoner—there was nothing different from other people in her manner of conversation—I observed nothing the least peculiar in her manner—she had no firs while she was living with my mother.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Did you know anything of the family of Mrs. Wyndham at all before the prisoner came away from the family? A. No—I was not examined before the Magistrate or the Coroner—I was first called on to give evidence at the State-office, about a fortnight ago—I never was examined on any occasion when the prisoner or any representative of hers was present.

JURY. Q. Was the old lady in the habit of wearing tow pockets, or of carrying the key on any other part of her person? A. She had a pocket on each side—I cannot exactly say which pocket she carried the key in—my father's name was on one watch—it was "James Stowell," and there were the twelve letters of his name, instead of twelve figures round the face—the hours could be learnt by the letters—I believe there were small figures as well—the name on the brooch was that of a lady where my mother lived.

JOHN IRESON. I am a water-gilder, and live in King's Arms-yard, Whitecross-street—the prisoner lodged at my house—she came first last December,

and continued to lodge there till she went to Mrs. Smythe Wyndham's, which I think was at the latter end of Feb., or the beginning of March, I cannot say exactly—I have seen her twice since she left to go there—she came to my place twice, and I called on her twice, at Mrs. Wyndham's, to see her—to the best of my recollection the last time I saw her was three weeks before this happened, or it might be a day or two longer, I cannot say—that was at my own place—I never saw anything in her manner different from other persons in their senses—I conversed with her when I saw her—while she lived with me she took her meals with me several times—she did so generally, if there was no one in the place at the time—I have a wife and two children—when she did not take her meals with us, she took them in the parlour—that is my room—we take our meals on the first floor—she did not pay when she had her meals with us—I am not the landlord—I am only a lodger in the house—she found her own victuals when she eat and drank at my table—she made that arrangement when she came—she was to pay 3s. 6d. a week for the room, and to find her own food—she did not make that arrangement with me—it was with Elizabeth Andrews, who was lodging in the house, that made that agreement for her—she took the parlour for the prisoner, and then the prisoner came—I saw her pretty well every day—I understood she came from a place at the west-end of the town, of the name of Mrs. Robinson—I do not know whether it was in Harley-street—I did not understand how long she had been there—she said she expected some money from Brighton, and she had got a letter written to some friend at Brighton, but she was disappointed, and did not have any money from Brighton—she told me that, somewhere about the middle of Feb., as near as I can recollect, before she went to Mrs. Wyndham's—she said several times that she should like to get to Brighton by the beginning of June, she said she could do better in Brighton than in town—the last time she called on me I had very little conversation with her myself—my wife had—I was present—she then said she should get to Brighton by the beginning of June, that she expected money from another party, as well as from her friends at Brighton, and that friend's name was Andrew Wyness—it was about the beginning of Feb, that I heard of it last, she then said that he had been going to Paris after some robbery, that he came there one part of the week before he went to Paris, and left her a trifle, and promised he would send her some more money in the course of a week, and no money was forth-coming, neither was there a letter came for a fortnight or three weeks afterwards, and then a letter came to say he had taken the party, that he had gone 300 or 400 miles more than he expected, and he was short of cash, and be could not send her any—this was spoken of at my house when she called—she had nothing to live on, and she was almost starving at the time, till she went to Mrs. Wyndham's place—I think she had been gone about a fortnight or three weeks when this letter arrived from Andrew Wyness—I saw her after that letter had come—she told me that she was disappointed in the money again—she was not in my debt—I think she owed the landlord 19s. 6d., or something to that effect—the 3s. 6d. a week was not payable to me—she did not hire the room of me.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Did she come to stay with you after she left Mrs. Wyndham's? A. No; I visited her at Mrs. Wyndham's—I did not learn that the reason of her leaving Mrs. Wyndham's was that they thought it not safe that she was about to quit—I learnt that she was going to Brighton about the beginning of June and she did not mean to stop at

Mrs. Wyndham's—I do not know of her being subject to violent fits—she never said so to me, but she has said so to my wife, not in my presence—I was not examined before the Magistrate—I was at Whitehall, nowhere else—I have seen this Wyness—I understand he is one of the detective force of Marlborough-street—he used to come after the prisoner and Elizabeth Andrews.

COURT. Q. You say "and Elizabeth Andrews," do you mean that you do not know which of the tow he came after? A. Yes, both of them; one came a week beforehand—he used to come after the prisoner—I used to see him two or three times a week.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Where is he now, do you know? A. I do not know—he is the person that was to have sent her money—he sent a letter, but no money—I never saw her in this house in Adam-street, and cannot say whether the same party was in the habit of visiting her there—the letter was not spoken of as having been received while she was in Adam-street, but while she was at Mrs. Wyndham's—the letter came to out place, about a fortnight or three weeks before she went to Colonel Wyndham's—I never heard her complain to my wife in my presence of the deranged state of her person consequent on certain irregularities, and that her head was very much affected—the only thing that I know of is that when she first came to our place she was poorly for a time, and had the doctor, and I asked her one morning at the door, "How do you do this morning?" and she said she had got the headach very bad, that is all I know—I never saw anything the matter myself—I never saw any alteration in her, further then being in low spirits at having no money coming to her.

MR. IRESON. I am the wife of the last witness. In Dec. last the prisoner came to lodge at the same place as I did—she remained till the beginning of March—I saw her every day—she spent a considerable portion of the day in my company—I never knew her have a fit while she was lodging there—I never saw anything in her manner or way of talking that attracted my attention—she behaved like other persons—she once told me she frequently had hysterical fits—that was shortly before she went to Colonel Wyndham's—she was to fill the situation of cook there—she said she had formerly been kitchen-maid there—at the time she told me about the fits, she said she could not stop on account of the fire, it caused her to have fits, and she could not stand the fire—she gave that as the reason why she came away—she called on me afterwards—at the time she was living at our house she was in a state of poverty, very much so—she had two sister at Brighton, and she wished very much to go back there—she did not go, because she had not the means—she said she wanted to go back by the beginning of June, if it was possible—I asked her why she wished to go back at that time—she said she should get a job place if she went back at that time of year—she said she must get back somehow or other by the beginning of June—she said that several times—I saw her twice after she left Colonel Wyndham's—the last time I saw her she said wished to go back—I heard of the death of the old woman on the Friday as it was done on the Tuesday—I had last seen the prisoner three weeks before that—she was with me I think about two hours on that occasion—she told me she had not been well—I understood her that she had had an hysterical fit since she had left Colonel Wyndham's—she said she expected some money from the country, but she did not have it—she told me she was disappointed of it—I do not recollect that she said anything else—she

was disappointed of money more than once at the time she was lodging with me—I did not see any one bring her to my house; she came there by herself, by the wish of Wyness, the policeman—he was in the habit of coming to see her there.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Was he keeping company with her there? A. I suppose he was—he was backwards and forwards—I understood he was there as a friend.

COURT. Q. Was he keeping company with her, intending to marry her, or as a man keeps company with a mistress? A. He was keeping her there, because she was expecting money from him.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Was he keeping anybody else there at the same time? A. He kept one there before that—he is in the detective force—I did not know anything of the prisoner at Adam-street—I never went to see her at Mrs. Wyndham's—she told me she left there on account of fits, that she was not able to stay, she could not stand the fire—she did not state to me that they were afraid at Mrs. Wyndham's that she would fall into the fire in those fits—I did not learn from her that they considered it unsafe that she should stay there—I do not know that she is now in the family way—it was in the parlour of the house where I lodged that she was kept by Wyness—I cannot say that he slept there—he has come very late at night, and gone away very early in the morning—of course I did not watch him.

WILLIAM SMITH. I am butler to Mr. Robert Gillespie, of York-place, New-road. I have known the prisoner seven or eight years—I knew her while she was living at Brighton with Lady Elizabeth Parsons—I do not know when she left Brighton—I lost sight of her for the last two or three years, until last summer, when as I and my wife were passing along Adam-street, the prisoner called across the road to me by the name of William-during the time she was living at Brighton with Lady Elizabeth Parsons I was in the habit of seeing her very frequently indeed—she used to come in most evenings to our place to see Mrs. Pearce, our housemaid, and sit along with us in the servants' hall—that happened three, four, or five times a week for about five years—during that time I did not observe anything in her mode of talking or in her conduct different from ordinary rational people.

Q. Do you know whether she ever had any fits during that time? A. Yes, two or three dreadful fits—I have seen her in them, and a dreadful palpitation of the heart—I can scarcely tell what kind of fit it was—it took four men to hold her, it was so violent—I was myself one of them—it required strength to hold her down—she used to be rather delirious after these fits—she seemed quite to lose herself—I mean she was quite absent.

Cross-examined by MR. BALLANTINE. Q. For how long after the fits did you observe that state of absence? A. It might be half or three-quarters of an hour—except when my attention was attracted to her by those fits I did not notice her manner particularly—she seemed a very good kind-hearted person indeed—every body that knew her while she lived at Brighton used to speak of her with the greatest praise—I cannot say that I have know her complain very much of her head.

ANN JONES. I am a milliner, and live in Margaret-court, Oxford-market—twelve months ago I lodged at 25, Great Marlborough-street—the prisoner came to lodge there about six weeks afterwards, and staid there about eleven weeks—I saw her frequently during those eleven weeks, and conversed with her a little—I saw her every day—she lodged on the same floor, but in a different

room—I saw her in the winter time since she left, but not within the last few months—I never noticed anything extraordinary in her conversation or manner—she always conducted herself well in my presence—I have never seen her in a fainting fit—the last time I saw her was on the Monday before the old woman's death—she called on me in Margaret-court, in the early part of the afternoon—she merely came to pass an hour or two with me—it was merely a visit—I did not work for her—she appeared to be then just the same as I had always seen her—she staid with me about three hours altogether.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Am I to understand, when you say that she seemed on that Monday to be as you had seen her, that she was a kind-hearted, good, amiable person in whom you detected nothing particular? A. Yes—I get my living by millinery—I never had my attention called to the prisoner more than to anybody else—I do not pretend to form any judgment upon any ailment with which she was afflicted—I never saw her in a fainting fit—I cannot undertake from my own observation to say that she is not a person of unsoundmind.

COURT Q. Have you conversed with her a number of times? A. A great many times—I never noticed anything peculiar about her.

SCSANNA CRESSWELL. I am the wife of Charles Cresswell, who is butler to Sir Alexander Woodford—I first became acquainted with the prisoner about four years ago—she was then living at Brighton—I sometime saw her there for about an hour, an hour and a half, or two hours—I lost sight of her soon after our acquaintance began, until within the last four months—about that time ago, or some time last spring, I went to live at No.42, Adam-Street, two doors from where the prisoner lodged—she recognized me in Adam-street, and we renewed our acquaintance—after that, I saw her sometimes every day, and sometimes two or three times a week—she always came to me—I have sent to her, but it was generally at my house that I saw her—she sometimes staid an hour, sometimes two hours, and sometimes a little more—she has occasionally taken tea with me—during the time she used to visit me I observed nothing peculiar in her manner of speaking or acting—she behaved like other people—the last time I saw her before the old woman's death was on the Tuesday evening before the murder, I think about half-past eight—she did not stay more than five or ten minutes with me at that time—her manner was then rather different to what I had seen before—she appeared wilder—her speech appeared wild, rather incoherent.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. When you have observed her on other occasions, and when you have noticed nothing peculiar about her, have you always observed and found her to be a person of humane and affecttionate disposition? A. Yes, that was the character she bore at Brighton—she was a harmless person, not given to violence of any kind.

COURT. Q. Can you say what she came to you about on the Tuesday about half-past eight? A. I do not think she came about anything particular, merely running in to say, "How do you do?"—she knocked at the door, and said, "It is me, Mrs. Cresswell"—I said, "Walk in, Mary. I am busy"—I do not think I turned my head to look at her, but I heard her voice—she was not sitting, but standing up, and what she said was rather behind me, but I did not see her face at all—I said "Take a seat," or something to that effect—she said she would come in again presently—she did not return—I do not recollect the precise words that passed on the occasion—I do not remember I saw her face at all

WILLIAM CROPTION MOAT. I am a surgeon, and live Upper Berkeley-street.

About five O'clock in the morning of the 2nd of June, I was called to see the body of the deceased—I found the head lying under the grate, partly across the fender, the right shoulder and neck across the fender, the head being under the grate among the cinders—the legs were slightly bent, the hands were stretched out under the grate, a little beyond the head, and just beyond the hands was lying a thimble, under the grate—there was some blood lying under the head and under the shoulder—I noticed a string round the neck—it was passed six times round the neck—I also noticed that the string was quite loose—I did not see the ends then—it was loose enough to admit the hand of person, or two or three hands—no bruise was visible in that position of the body—I did not shift the body on that occasion—I noticed a mark of violence, that had occurred from an injury inflicted since death—the bone was not fractured, nor the skin broken, it was dried or red—it was a dry red, harsh and greasy—it would not result from fire—it would result from the application of a blow shortly after death—a blow before death would produce a very different appearance—it would produce a blackness.

Q. Could you judge whether that was a blow of any violence or not? A. I could not tell whether it was an actual blow, or merely pressure, but there was considerable force—I think the woman had been dead for about eight hours—it was half-past five when I made my notes—I had gone home and dressed before that—I think it was about a quarter-past five when I saw the body—it was fully dressed, with the exception of the head—the cap was off, lying underneath the grate, and the false front of hair with it—there was no fire burning—I did not then trace from what part of her person the blood came that I saw about the head, but it came from the mouth—it might also have come from any wound which I had not then seen, as I did not lift the body up; but it was also flowing from the mouth—on the same day I proceeded to make an examination of the body—for that purpose it was lifted from the floor on to a shutter—a halfpenny and the key of the room door was found underneath the body when it was moved—I then noticed that a very extensive bruise had been given over the socket of the right eye, inflicted during life—there was a slight mark of pressure on the bones at the back of the neck, and a slight mark of pressure on the top of the head—both those marks appeared to have been made after death—I examined those marks immediately, to see whether they were of any importance, and found them to be of none—I then proceeded to make an internal examination of the body—I found the brain perfectly healthy, and the skull very sound—I found the ribs broken on both sides, very extensively, eight on one side, and six on the other—I found that those ribs had been broken during life—I found that the lower rings of the wind-pipe had been pressed from each side towards the middle, so as to break them in the centre—there was no evidence whether that injury had been inflicted during life—I could not tell one way or the other—the right lung having been diseased for many years, was broken up in its diseased false texture, which it had acquired from disease for a number of years, and was lacerated by the projecting piece of one of the ribs, so that the blood flowed from out of its texture into the air-vessels to a considerable extent, and that was the source, and the only source of the blood that was found lying on the floor—the blood having flowed into the air-vessels, escaped by the mouth—that was only the case with the diseased lung, the left lung was slightly diseased—I think that injury to the right lung would not of itself have been mortal—the left lung was much more healthy

than lungs are usually found in persons of her age—it was slightly diseased—it had been inflamed at times, there was no laceration of that—I found everything else extremely healthy—I ascribe the death to the same power that broke the ribs—the same power being continued would inevitably stop the person's power of breathing—the same, or even a less pressure than that which broke the ribs, would stop the power of expansion of the chest, and cause death, but how soon death would ensue would depend on the age; with a young person not very soon, in a woman of her age I suppose a minute and a half.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. You say the injury you found on the ribs of the deceased might have been inflicted in about a minute and a half? A. It might have been done instantaneously—the circumstances I saw about the deceased's body do not warrant me in concluding that the injuries must have been inflicted by more than one person—I think that one person could stop the circulation of the air-vessels of the wounded person by a string, by the fists, or by the knees; and, at the same time, break the ribs on both sides of the body—it could be done by sitting on the body and squeezing the throat—that is quite speculative—you asked me to imagine how it was done, and I have done so—I cannot imagine how it is possible that blows could have produced such a state of circumstances—it is quite impossible.

CHARLES BATTERSBY re-examined. I was present when the poker was found by Inspector Hunt—there was blood and hair on it—it was found lying by the wall, but it possibly might have rolled into the hair and blood—it was lying by the side of the body, with the handle towards the head—I saw a quantity of blood about the top—I could not speak as to the hair till next morning—next morning I saw several hairs sticking to it previous to my putting it in the piece of paper in which it now is—it is in the state in which I left it.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Did you see the poker with blood and hair on it that night, or the following morning? A. I saw it that night with the blood on it, but I will not say that I saw the hair on it, because I did not take that notice.

COURT. Q. Did you keep it in your possession? A. I did—it is an impossibility that hair could have been brought to it between the time I saw it in the night, and my seeing it in the morning—it was on the handle of the poker.

MR. CLARKSON to MR. MOAT. Q. On the presumption that a poker had been used by any person or persons seeking to destroy the life of the deceased, do you now think that you can account for the possibility of the death being caused by one person and one only? A. The breaking of the ribs by blows would not necessarily have done any mortal injury, but that the ribs might have been broken to all that extent by one person, there can be no doubt—if a body were fixed in a position, very difficult to imagine, namely, tied ready for it, and one person was to go about with a poker beating it all over, taking excellent aim at each rib, they might, seriatim, break every rib—in my opinion it is quite impossible that the ribs could have been broken by the poker, but I am taking your hypothetical case—I think it quite impossible that the use of a poker would account for the appearances I found about the body—the blow below the orbit of the eye would not be likely to be occasioned by a poker—I believe the poker was not used at all—the only way in which I can imagine this to have happened, is by the sitting on the body, and by the pressure of both sides the ribs were broken—I believe the woman to have been lying on her back on the ground—I assume

the ribs to have been broken by the bumping of the assailant on the chest of the deceased, and at the same time assailing the throat as I have represented—I am not driven to assume that that was the mode of death, because I am otherwise unable to account for it—the compression of the throat was not necessary to death—I believe the compression of the throat had no effect in extinguishing vitality—I form the same opinion with reference to the rope round the neck—the bumping would be unnecessary after once the ribs were broken—the first bump might break the ribs, and after that the sitting on the chest would be sufficient to prevent the deceased breathing—the mere lying of the weight of a corpse on the chest would have been sufficient—I do not think that one bump would produce the breaking of all the ribs—the power of bumping is merely the rising up of a body and sitting it down again—I cannot describe that as considerable, but previous to the bump she must have received the blow over the eye, that was a blow given whilst the woman was alive—I examined it—I did not lay it open—I am quite certain that that injury had no reference to the death—the bone immediately under the spot where the blow was received was not fractured, or driven in—the bone is very thin there, and it might be driven in to a considerable extent, and yet produce no injury—the blow was immediately over the frontal sinus, the vacant space in connection with the cavity of the nose, that was not broken in—there was no injury about the head inflicted whilst life remained—there was a mark over the forehead of an injury that had occurred after death, at the root of the hair—the head was very bald, but not quite bald—it was much easier to ascertain that the fractured rib driven into the deceased's lung had produced the discharge of blood that escaped from the mouth, than it was to account for the means by which the broken ribs had been fractured—it was occular—I could trace the stream of blood from the spot—I consider that suffocation produced death, and that suffocation was caused by pressure on the chest, and preventing its expansion—I believe the hemorrhage had nothing to do with it—death from hemorrhage would have occurred in three or four hours perhaps—I form my opinion of the woman having been dead about eight hours, from experience, and from the rigidity of the muscles, I am chiefly guided by the rigidity of the muscles, making allowance for the heat of the weather, it was very hot weather at that time—she might have been dead six or twelve hours—I might be as much out as that, but it is not likely.

MR. BODKIN. Q. You have said that the blow on the eye had nothing to do with the death; by that I apprehend you mean that the blow was not in itself mortal? A. Yes, that is what I mean—that might have been a blow of sufficient force to have felled her to the ground, and it might have produced insensibility.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. By what do you suppose that blow to have been inflicted? A. There was a hearth-brush lying in the room, which might possibly have inflicted the blow, but I should say it certainly was not inflicted by a body of less than two inches in diameter—it might possibly have been by a fist.

JURY. Q. Was it possible for the deceased to have fractured her ribs from any fall or accident? A. Quite impossible, I should think—I am firmly of opinion, as a surgeon, that external violence from some other person operated to produce those fractures—the hearth-brush was standing by the side of the fire, in the usual place for the poker or tongs—the room altogether is very small.

GILBERT M'MURDO, ESQ. I am surgeon to the gaol of Newgate. The prisoner has been under my notice from the commencement of her imprisonment, in June last—I have been desired to pay particular attention to her, with

a view to ascertain the state of her mind—I have done so—I have had conversation with her continually—I have not noticed anything which, in my judgment, justifies an inference that she is otherwise than of sound mind—she complains occasionally of headaches—when I speak to her, she generally says she is pretty well; but when I ask her more particularly after her health, she says she has headaches—she has complained to me of symptoms of certain inconveniences, which led me to put further questions as to her condition, and my belief is that she is pregnant.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. You have no doubt had considerable experience with reference to the diseases of women? A. I have had some—I am aware of disorders, more or less mischievous, arising out of irregularity of the menstrual discharges—the interruption or temporary stoppage of those discharges sometimes affects the brain—I have not known of women becoming permanently mad from that state of disorder—I have known of their being so for a considerable time—I have read of permament derangement of intellect arising from that cause in combination with others—the instances of temporary derangement arising from that are frequent.

COURT. Q. Do you follow the question, that temporary insanity is a frequent consequence of irregularity in that matter? A. I must accompany my answer with an explanation; I should not term it insanity, but that the mind was not acting as it had acted before, that it was not sound during that time.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Have you not known frequent instances of what is called unsoundness of mind, by which I mean derangement of intellect, so that a person would temporarily, be incapable of responsibility, arising from this cause? A. No, I have not known frequent instances—I have not read of frequent instances—I have read of some instances of the mind being deranged by the interruption of the secretion—I have known that derangement preceded by hysteria, hysterical fits—I have known them require bleeding, and they have generally terminated as we could wish—I have not known insanity, preceded by hysterical fits or convulsions, continuing for a period of years, and increasing in those years—I should expect that a long continued attack of epileptic fits would affect the mind, but hysterical fits would not produce it so decidedly—I should say when the patient was not affected by that interruption, that she would be in a perfect state of mind, although low and desponding—there might be at times temporary derangement of those functions, and temporary derangement of the brain, and at other times there might be healthful action of those functions, and also healthy action of the brain—of course with continual attacks the brain would become worse—I have not seen such a result—the prisoner is not a woman of slight frame—I should call her a well grown woman, and rather strong—as far as I can ascertain I think she is from three to four months gone in pregnancy—in some cases of stoppage of the periodical discharge there is a slight discharge, and in other cases it is entirely stopped—I have known instances where there has been none, and in those cases the health is generally exceedingly interrupted, bodily as well as mentally—a partial discharge occurring after an interruption, and then not re-occurring, is genarally supposed to proceed from mental excitement, or bodily fatigue or injury—of course it would be the result of an effort of nature; but, generally speaking, a sudden discharge after an arrest of that kind, is the result of mental excitement or bodily fatigue—I do not practice as an accoucheur.

MR. BODKIN. Q. During the time your attention has been directed to

the prisoner, has she been attacked by any hysteria or any fit of any kind? A. She has not, to my knowledge, nor have I observed any tendency to such an attack.

Q. Supposing a person, after some interruption, to have had a resumption of the discharge at a particular time, and a week after that to have another recurrence of that discharge, and at that time to be pursuing their ordinary calling, apparently as usual, down to nine o'clock of the evening of any particular day, according to anything that you have met with in practice, or read of, would you expect that in the course of the night following, at nine o'clock, a paroxysm would come on which would deprive the party of her intellectual faculties? A. I should not.

COURT. Q. Have you had experience in cases of insanity arising from irregularity in respect of that function? A. I do not myself practice as an accoucheur, and am not likely to have these cases brought under my immediate notice—I am speaking partly from experience in cases that I have had under my notice attended to by others, and from books—I have had under my eye, for short intervals, cases of temporary derangement of the faculties of the mind, arising from irregularity in respect of that function—in those cases healthful action of the brain generally returns simultaneously with the healthful action of that function—I consider the one as the consequence of the return of the other.

ANDREW WYNESS (policeman D 43.) I have known the prisoner for about twelve months.

ANN SMALLBONE re-examined. Mrs. Sinclair lives in the same house with me—she is unable to attend, having been confined on Monday morning.

MR. CLARKSON stated that he considered the evidence of this witness material for the prisoner, and requested that her deposition might be read. The COURT was of opinion that this might be done, the Counsel for the prosecution not objecting. MR. BODKIN suggested its being used as the prisoner's evidence, and it was so read, as follows:—"Sarah Sinclair, the wife of Thomas Sinclair, a tailor, living at No. 40, in Adam-street West, on the second floor, being sworn, saith; That she saw the deceased woman at three o'clock on Tuesday afternoon, the 1st of June, 1847, and then in good health; that she was going down stairs, and that the witness did not see her or hear her again, and knows of no person who did, unless it was Mary Ann Hunt, who witness saw at half-past nine o'clock on Tuesday evening, June 1st, 1847, lying on the kitchen stairs, leading to the room of the deceased, with her head on the top stair, without a candle; her bonnet was by her side; she was moaning as if not well; she was not in the habit of speaking to her; she knows of no one that saw her after that night, and that at three o'clock on Tuesday afternoon she spoke to the deceased at the yard-door, when the deceased said, after alluding to quarrelling with Mary Ann Hunt on the Monday night previously, that she was afraid to go to bed, because she said Mary Ann Hunt had said that she would do for her; witness advised the deceased to lock Hunt out; the deceased said she feared personal violence from Hunt, and then the witness left her."

Witness for the Defence.

LUCY GIBSON. I am the wife of Thomas Gibson, the landlord of the Rising Sun, at Twickenham. Eight years ago this July I was housekeeper to Mrs. Garrow, at Brighton—the prisoner was then a servant under me— —she was with me between five and six years, nearly six—I always found

her very kind, and a very well-disposed young person—she was very ill at that time, and suffered a great deal—I do not know that she ever had good health—the cause of her illness was suppressed menstruation—she told meso—I know of her having fits several times—I saw her in one once—I know that she had them several times—I saw how that fit began—she had been out for a walk and came in, and she had a very bad fit then—it was just as she came in—it lasted, I suppose, an hour—she was not violent—she fainted and remained insensible—it was an hysterical fit—she fainted and went into hysterics—she laid quite insensible, like a dead person, till we restored her—I did not see her fall off a dresser, but I know that she did—I saw her after that, in bed, ill—she went to bed directly—the servants in the house told me she had fallen off the dresser—I saw her in bed about an hour after I had seen her in the fit—I have seen her ill many other times—I cannot say how often she had these fits—I perhaps saw her ill in bed two or three days—it is so long ago I cannot recollect, but very frequently I saw her in bed—I should think she must have been about seventeen years old when she came, and she was with us between five and six years.

MR. BODKIN. Q. Where did she come from before she came into Mrs. Garrow's family? A. She had been living in London—I did not inquire about her character—Mrs. Garrow did—she was the kitchen-maid, I acted as house-keeper and cook—she had been there a year or two when this fainting fit occurred—I did not perceive anything the matter with her at first—she had been ill before—she had this fainting fit after coming in from a walk—she had been there about a year and a half before she began to show any symptoms of being unwell—she used to faint frequently after that—the fainting fit which I saw was near the expiration of the time—I should say she must have been in the service five years before that fainting fit occurred—it was in the last years of her service—she had been out for a walk that day—she had not been out very long—she went out perhaps because she felt poorly—I do not recollect that circumstance—she was very poorly—she went alone—it was in the evening, I think it was in the autumn of the year—Mrs. Garrow is still living, but I do not know where she is, I am not living with her now—I have left her these eight years—the prisoner and I left together, the establishment was broken up—Dr. Price, who resides at Brighton, was the medical man who attended the family—this occurred at Brighton—I sometimes attended her when she was in this insensible state—on this occasion I was in the room—I applied hartshorn and vinegar; she revived and went to bed, she was very ill.

MR. BALLANTINE. Q. I understand you had seen her ill in bed previously? A. Yes, many times, from weakness.

ROBERT YOUNG. I live at 35, Temple-street, Brighton. I was fellow-servant with the prisoner, nearly four years, at Lady Elizabeth Person's who lived at Brighton—I left her four years ago, and it was the four years preceding that that I and the prisoner were fellow-servants—she was cook there—she never was in good health during the time she was there—when she had been with us about twelve months, she had a fit—she fainted in the first place—the fit lasted two hours, and she raved very much—I assisted her, and got her into a chair—I was not able easily to keep her there—she recovered in about two hours, and went to bed, and I did not see her for two or three hours after—she was then very weak and low, very low spirited—she was very poorly and low for several days—I had not seen her in the same state of spirits on other occasions—she did her work in the morning, but not before breakfast—she never did anything until she had her breakfast—she bore a

very excellent character—she was a kind humane person as far as I am able to judge, and she bore that character.

MR. BODKIN. Q. She staid in the situation three years after this, as I understand you? A. Yes—it was not a hard place—she had to cook for the family—the heat of the fire did not make her faint sometimes—I never heard it said so—I never saw it.

MR. BALLANTINE. Q. I believe that after she left the service she lodged with you for some time? A. For about three weeks, that was about three years ago, she was in better health then—I did not notice her spirits at all then.

MR. BODKIN. Q. In what part of the house was it where she fainted away? A. In the kitchen—I was the only servant there besides herself at the time—there were two nurses, but they were both out of the house—I got her some cold water—I did not sluice her with it, she drank it—I recovered her in that way, after some time—I did not take her up to bed, she was in the kitchen some time—the cook at the next door came in and took her up to bed—I saw her two or three hours after—that was not in bed, she had come down stairs again, and had her tea—I saw her next morning—she cooked the dinner the next day, and so on, as she had been in the habit of doing—the next day she expressed herself to me as thankful for my attention to her when she was ill.

JANE RICH. I am the sister of the prisoner, and live at Brighton—the prisoner is thirty-three years old—I am younger than her—I have seen her from time to time for the last twelve or fourteen years—I do not know the period when the monthly discharge commenced with her—she has been long in suspense and very faint, with great lowness of spirits, and she would sit down and cry for half an hour at a time—she has done that frequently—when I say she was faint, I mean that she felt very faint and was obliged to go and lie down on the bed—I have not known her to have fits at any times—she has been living out in service form time to time—my mother is not now living—she was very subject to fits—I have a brother also, who has been out of his mind.

MR. BODKIN. Q. When did your mother die? A. About eight or nine years ago—my brother is living and is here, the one that has been out of his mind, but he is recovered—he is nearly forty years old.

MR. BALLANTINE. Q. Was your brother in confinement a any time in any hospital or any place? A. In the infirmary at Brighton for about a month—he is now better, and has been induced to come here to-day.

MARY RICHARDSON. I live at 21, Charles-street, Brighton—I have known the prisoner for seventeen or eighteen years—she was a very nice young woman indeed, a very nice character and a very hard-working girl—at one time she staid in my house for two months—she left my house, and then lived along with Mrs. Garrow—she had a very bad fit indeed while with me, which frightened me very much indeed, for I was alone with my daughter in the house—my husband had died with the same complaint—I did not like to say it was so, because my daughter is very nervous, and I kept it to my-self—I saw her in the fit—she was some time in it—I cannot tell you what time—it might be ten minutes or so—when she came to, she looked very wild in her eyes, and that was what made me so frightened—she scrunched her hands very much—she took hold of my arm when she recovered—but I kept away from her—a few days after that, she went to her place at Mrs. Garrow's—Mrs. Garrow has gone abroad.

MR. BODKIN. Q. What was she in you service? A. She was stopping at my house, not as servant—I respected her—she left me shortly after she had this fit—I did not give her a character to Mrs. Garrow—I knew Mrs. Garrow—I did not recommend her to her—I knew she was going there—this was about eight years ago—I have seen her several times since, while she was living with Lady Parsons.

ELIZABETH RICHARDSON. I am the daughter of the last witness—I recollect the prisoner staying with my mother for a week, thirteen years ago—that was the first time I can remember, and she was with us nearly two months as far as I can remember, about eight years ago—she left us then to go to Lady Elizabeth Parsons, and thirteen years ago she left us to go to Mrs. Garrow—she was never in good health to my recollection—I have seen her very often—she did not appear to he in a very good state of health—she was always in a tremble and in very low spirits, land deadly pale—she had very bad fits—I have seen her in one very bad fit, that is very likely the one my mother has spoken of—I have seen her mother also in very likely fits, I was very young at the time, but I recollect my father, mother, and as many as four or five men holding her.

MR. BODKIN. Q. How old are you now? A. Nearly twenty-eight.

CHARLOTTE JENNINGS. Between thirteen and fourteen years ago I was living at Mrs. Garrow's, in Brunswick-square, Brighton—the prisoner was in her service as kitchen-maid—during that time she was constantly subject to fainting fits—I was accustomed to sleep in the same room with her—on first getting up in the morning she used to begin to dress herself and could not finish—I have frequently got up to get her water to drink to enable her to continue her dressing—I know of nothing more than the fainting fits—she quite fainted away till I got the water and sprinkled her face, and got her some to drink—that was frequently the case in the morning—I knew her altogether between three and four years—I think this state of health did not continue all the time—I cannot exactly say at what period she was better—it was at different times—there were periods when she was better—since then I have known her to be dreadfully low spirited at times—I did not notice that at all at the time she was at Mrs. Garrow's—she has lodged with me since then when she has been out of place, two or three different times—the first time was after she had been with Lady Elizabeth Parsons—she had pretty good health then, I think, but she was dreadfully depressed at times—I have asked her about it at times, but she never would say what was the cause of it—I do not know anything about her monthly discharges—I did not make any inquiry with respect to it—I know of her crying frequently during the whole time that I have known her, particularly the latter part—I have asked her what was the matter with her, and she has not given me any reason for it—she never gave me any particular reason—I have heard her complain of constant pain at the stomach, and frequently of a languid feeling, with a palpitation of the heart at different times; not anything particularly about the head—she bore the character of a most humane creature, a more humane, kind creature I never knew—she has been with me at different times, and when I have been ill she has been a most kind creature.

SARAH ROBINSON. I live at No. 35, Broad-street, Golden-square. The prisoner resided with me from the 1st of July to the 16th of Dec., 1846—during that time she had very bad spirits indeed—she was very low spirited constantly, and had very ill health indeed—I do not know exactly what that arose from—she went to the doctor, and got medicine—she was not at

all regular in her discharges—she was not so when she ought to have been—that was the reason she went to the doctor—I noticed her crying very frequently—I have asked her what was the matter, and she has said she was very unwell indeed, from what cause I cannot I cannot tell—I once knew her to be in a fit—it lasted a quarter of an hour or an hour or twenty minutes—it was an hysterical fit; she struggled very much, and was insensible likewise; my two sons were present, and they were obliged to hold her down—I can hardly tell when that was—it was some time in 1846—she was always particularly kind in her disposition in every way.

MR. BODKIN. Q. Did she go from your house in Dec. to White-cross-street? A. Yes, on 16th Dec.—I did not see her again till the 26th of the same month—a man of the name of Wyness came once to my house—that was a long time ago, while she was stopping with me—that was the only time I saw him—I never heard that he had a lodging in Whitecross-street—I saw the prisoner on the 26th of Dec.—she did not tell me where she was living, I did not know for some time—I knew she went to Whitecross-street from what I was told—I believe she told me—when she went away she did not say what she was going to do—we were rather friendly, I was kind to her and she to me—she was out of place at this time—she left my house without giving me any notion as to where she was going to—I had seen Wyness last in July, when she first came to me—while with me she employed herself in mending her clothes and looking after a situation—she went out for that purpose, I suppose—I do not know that she went out for any other purpose—I had no reason to suppose that she was conducting herself at all improperly—when she came back she gave me a satisfactory account of where she had been—when she was taken ill and went to the doctor, she got some medicine and got better.

MR. BALLANTINE. Q. Was that after or before she had this fit? A. She had it before she went to the doctor—I persuaded her to go to a doctor in Welback-street.

MR. BODKIN. Q. I believe she was very much pressed for money? A. She was very poor indeed, all the time she was with me?

EMMA BAILEY. I am in the service of Mrs. Smythe Wyndham—her town residence is No.14, Connaught-place—I have come up from the country now—I remember coming from abroad and finding the prisoner in the house—that was on the 11th of March in the present year—she had a very violent fit on the 13th of March—I was sent for after I had gone to bed, and found her on the floor in the kitchen, quite insensible—at that time she required one person holding her, and two or three maids with her—after that, she required two or three men to told her, the fit was so violent—I found her in the fit between eleven and twelve, and she was not perfectly sensible until four o'clock in the morning—she had one interval or two—she was sensible for a short time, but replaced—she was very violent, and quite insensible—this was on the third evening—on the evening of the fit she boiled an egg that was not required, she continually expressed her sorrow for having so done, after I had assured her that it was of no consequence, until her repetition of it was quite wearying—I can scarcely express her manner at the time, she was constantly alluding to her stupidity in having done so—she was afraid some fault would be found with it, and repeatedly said, "I am sorry for boiling that egg"—I was then housekeeper, and had the control of those matters—she was kitchen-maid under me—I was the only person to blame her—for two or three days afterwards she was very ill, and kept her bed on the Sunday—she had a very

wild look during the fit—very much so, and there was a wildness in the expression of her eye for two or three days afterwards—she did not do her work fully or regularly for two or three days after that—she remained at Mrs. Wyndham's twenty-eight or twenty-nine days—she complained very much of pain in the chest through to the back—on the day after she left, she came back for some of her clothes—I left her standing in the kitchen, and when I returned, I found her in a fit in the servants' room—it was the same sort of fit which I had previously seen her in, but not so violent—I had restoratives at hand, and gave them to her—they appeared to relieve her—she called on me again some time after—I inquired after her health, and she told me something—there was the sort of wildness in her look which I had observed after the preceding fits—I knew that she was suffering from an irregularity in the menstrual discharges.

MR. BODKIN. Q. Did you know the old person whose death are inquiring about? A. Yes; she used frequently to come to my master's place, and was an object of charity there—she had things given to her—when the prisoner left the service I did not recommend her to go and stay with the old woman till she got another place—I was not aware where she was going to—she did not tell me, till a short time previous to her leaving the house, and then she said she was going there for a night or two—while she was in the service she slept in the top bedroom, with three other maids—I did not sleep in that room—one of the maids slept in the same bed with her, and continued to do so until she went away to the decreased place.

MR. BALLANTINE. Q. I believe you have come up a very great distance at very great inconvenience. A. Yes; the prisoner bore a very good character for humanity and kindness of disposition, and her manner of expressing herself even to the poor woman was kind in the extreme—as far as I had an opportunity of judging, she was a kind, humane person—the second housemaid slept with her—Margaret Fraser slept in the same room, but not in the same bed with her.

JOHN HANCOCK. I was in the service of Mrs. Wyndham at the same time as the prisoner—I was present when she had this fit, and was the first person that went to her—she was standing in the kitchen at her place by the dresser when it took place, it happened quite suddenly—her manner was very strange two or three days after that.

WILLIAM PRIEST. I know the prisoner by living with her at Smythe Wyndham's, Esq., Connaught-place—I was a fellow-servant of Hancock's. I remember the prisoner having two fits—the conducted herself very violently in the first; she tore the skirt of her dress from the body entirely—I and Hancock held her—it was a very difficult task; she attempted to strike us, and was quite violent.

COURT. Q. Do you mean that the convulsive action nearly struck yon; or that she had powers of mind about her, and intentionally struck you? A. She was violent towards the parties round, struggling—in struggling she struck us.

MR. BODKIN. Q. Did she fall to the ground? A. No; she was supported on a chair; I saw she was faint, and came forward and prevented her falling—she was on a chair when I first saw her—the butler was the first person to run to stop her from falling—I think I was the third—there was the nurse-maid there—there were several persons about her—they prevented her falling on the ground, otherwise I think she would have fallen—she was quite in a senseless state—I gave her water first; she did not get better, and I went for Mr. Hardwick, a surgeon—I cannot tell whether he is here—he

wrote down something which I took to the surgery, and brought some medicine back, which was given to her—she did not get better—she was on a mattress which was laid down on the kitchen floor—the surgeon staid till the medicine came, and gave it to her, and remained an hour or more after that—she was on the mattress on the kitchen floor all night—I and the butter staid with her till about two o'clock in the morning, and the maids stopped the rest of the time—she was quieter when I left—about eight o'clock next morning I saw her again; she was then on the bed in the servant's hall—her place of sleeping was up stairs at the top of the house—she was not able to be carried up to bed—we could not attempt to do such a thing in the state she was—she appeared to be very weak and low next day—she did her work as well as she could—I cannot tell whether she cooked the dinner.

MR. BALLANTINE. Q. I believe you are here by the desire of your master and mistress, who are aware of these circumstances? A. Yes; and the other servants likewise.

MARY HOLLETT. I am single, and live with Mrs. Smythe Wyndham—I was there with the prisoner, and live there now—I was there three years ago, when she was first engaged as cook during our stay in Brighton after the family—she was taken into the service again, her conduct was so perfectly satisfactory—on the first occasion she was with us she suffered very much from bilious headache—she frequently took calomel, and acted very imprudently afterwards, she would kneel on the cold stones during her work after taking it—I am not positive whether she took it without advice—as far as I know she did, and she afterwards exposed herself to the cold—that was on more occasions than one—I believe I prevailed on her to take it less frequently—she appeared to suffer in her general health, from the chest, and from lowness of spirits, and palpitations of the heart when she went up stairs—when she came on the second occasion she was much worse—her legs were very much swollen, and she appeared to do her work with great difficulty—her spirits were very low—I was not present when she had the fit—I was three flights of stairs up, and I heard her scream violently—I did not know it was in the house, I thought it was outside—I have not noticed any wildness or anything particular in her appearance—as far as her conduct and disposition go, she is a humane, well-conducted girl, extremely so—she would give away all she had, and borrow to give to the poor woman.

MARGARET FRASER. I am in the service of Mrs. Wyndham, and have been so more than three years—I was there on the second occasion that the prisoner was in the service—I slept in the same room with her—I was present when she had two fits—she was very violent on the first occasion—she screamed once or twice—it continued for more than two hours, I think—I noticed her manner after that fit—she looked very wild in her eyes for some days afterwards—I do not know that she had been suffering from any particular disease incidental to women—I think she was poorly once while with us, but I did not know anything particular about it.

WILLIAM VERRALL. I am surgeon, practicing at Brighton—I attended the prisoner's brother at two different periods—his complaint was delirium on both occasions—it was very slight on the first, but much more severe on the second—I have never attended the prisoner professionally—I am a general practitioner—I have attended many cases of suppressed menstruation—I am senior surgeon at the Lying-in-Institution, that is an infirmary in which all the diseases of women are likewise treated—fits of different character are occasionally the consequence of suppression of the menses—I believe that a

continuation of those fits for a number of years might contribute to a permanent injury to the brain—I have heard the whole of the evidence in this case—I should describe the fits, from which the prisoner is said to have suffered, as hysterical fits—a person would not have a fit without the brain being affected—the proximate cause of the fit would be some operation on the brain—if these fits were repeated over and over again, it might superinduce disease of the brain—I have know persons suffering from these fits, arising from the same cause, who have lost their reasoning powers for short periods while under the influence of the fit, and for a short period afterwards while the brain was recovering itself—I do not believe that a person would be able to distinguish what she was doing, or the circumstances surrounding her, during the fit; she would be gradually coming round after the fit—the continuance of these fits would operate prejudicially to the health in every respect, and I should say it would operate upon the mental powers—that is the case with every disease that has its origin in the brain, or by which the brain is at all affected—where there is disease in one member of a family, it is likely that there would be a predisposition to it in others, in some diseases particularly—if there was such a predisposition in a family, any exciting cause would be likely to produce insanity.

MR. BODKIN. Q. I suppose in the course of your experience, your attention being particularly directed to the diseases of women, you have met with innumerable cases of women suffering more or less inconvenience from an obstruction of this kind? A. I have—it is a complaint to which very many young women are subject—if a person is in a situation that requires them to work or exert themselves for their livelihood while labouring under this obstruction, of course they will have fainting fits—during those fainting fits the patient would be quite insensible, and incapable of any determinate action; during the fainting fits, but not during the struggling—I should describe the fits which the prisoner is said to have had, as fainting fits—I have heard it stated that on one or two occasions she screamed and was violent, with a convulsive action of the muscles—those I attribute to hysteria, but I attribute both to the same cause, the obstruction—I do not recollect ever meeting with a case in the course of my practice in which a woman became permanently insane from fainting fits or hysteria—in a fainting fit the patient would be perfectly quiet and insensible—persons are very violent in some cases of hysteris, but equally incapable of determinate action—I have know the fit last for many hours—with proper applications persons would recover earlier than they would without—it is followed by lassitude and depression of spirits, until nature recovers herself.

Q. Suppose a person to have been subject to occasional obstruction and irregularity of this kind, would any successful effort of nature causing a discharged, have a tendency to relieve the inconvenience that would be felt by the want of it? A. I have noticed that at the time the discharge comes on they are rather more inclined to have fits—if a person suffered from suppression, and had a return, they are nearly sure to have a fit at the period of the return—the return is the consequence of an effort of nature, and is curative as far as it goes—the fit would mark the crisis—if it were followed or accompained by a return of the natural action, it would be curative for a time—there always increased irritation in the female constitution at the time the discharge commences, even where they are in good health, but not such as to cause fits—I am speaking of a case where there has been suppression for a considerable time.

Q. I will put the case of a woman who on one Sunday had a discharge, and on the following Tuesday week had a return, would your observation as to the probability of a fit occurring, at all apply to such a case as that? A. It is plain that the first discharge did not relieve the system, or nature would not have brought it on again so soon—great anxiety or fatigue might bring it on—it might either be an imperfect effort in the first instance, or it might be a renewed secretion—I can give opinion as to whether the attacks of hysteria or faintness would be indicative of greater intensity of the obsruction or the reverse—hysteria is not in all cases accompanied with loud screaming—I have seen many patients that do not scream at all—it is very loud in some cases—I should expect that a person after an attack of that sort, would show want of power, energy, and self-possession for a considerable time afterwards—I have not seen the prisoner's brother here—I was called to attend him for one attack on the 16th of December, 1844, and for the order on the 4th of February, 1845—the first attack was very slight—I do not know his age—he was then between twenty and thirty, I think—I believe he was single, he was living in lodgings at the time—on the first occasion I saw him for about a week—he then got better—I did dot bleed him, I gave him medicine—his habits were rather irregular, he was given to drink, I believe—the delirium was not incidental to any febrile attack—it was a morbid action of the brain—I should say drink was the predisposing cause—I cautioned him, when I attended him for the first attack, against drinking in future, and told him of the conesquence—the second attack was of the same chararacter—I have reason to believe that it was induced by the same means—that did not yield to my treatment—he was so had that I was obliged to have him removed to the Infirmary, not the Infirmary over which I preside—I have seen him since he came out, in the town, but have not attended him professionally since—his complaint was delirium-tremens.

MR. BALLANTINE. Q. Do you mean that the predisposing cause of this delirium was drink, or that the drink, superadded to a tendency to delirium, brought it on? A. I knew nothing of the man until I found him ill—it is not usual for so young a person to suffer from delirium-tremens unless there is a predisposition to insanity—I cannot form the conclusion that there must have been a predisposition to insanity in his constitution, but I seldom see it in one so young, brought on solely by drink.

Q. Supposing the prisoner to have been enduring fits of the kind described, arising from the obstruction of the menses for the last fourteen years, do you believe that that would have a material effect upon her constitution and upon her mind? A. I do—it would weaken the powers both of mind and body, and that without reference to the particular attack.

RICHARD RUGG. I am a surgeon, living at Brighton—I am surgeon to the Infirmary there. The prisoner's brother was brought there on the 9th of Feb., 1845—I agree with Mr. Verrall in opinion that his disease was delirium-tremens—it is more than two years ago since I attended him, but I have a distinct recollection of the case—it arose from taking too much beer, not to any large extent, but still sufficient to produce that disease—that would certainly be more likely to arise to a person disposed to it than not—another person might take ten times—the quantity, and not produce ot—I have a memorandum of his age—it was thirty-four—I do not recollect having attended him before—thirty-four is an early age for that disease, unless a person is much in the habit of drinking, or there is a predisposition to it—if there was

anything like insanity in the family, drink would be more likely to promote those appearance—I have heard the evidence that has been given in this case, with reference to the fits and the obstruction of the menses—there is no doubt that is continuation for a long time might affect the brain, and that affection of the brain might be exhibited, by melancholy, or violent excitement—I mean excitement of such an extent, that I have a person labouring under such an obstruction, and she is obliged to be put under restraint—that continues for a few days—I should say during the period of that excitement, they would not be capable of knowing what they were doing, and would not be answerable for it; and during that violent paroxyam they have a greater hatred to their immediate friends than to other people—I have known females of a naturally kind and humane disposition who have exhibited those symptoms of ferocity under such circumstances—it is a very common symptom.

MR. BODKIN. Q. If I understand you, assuming that the brain has been so far acted upon as to induce mania, those are the consequences? A. Not in all cases, of course—I should think it very likely under excitement—these are consequences that would very possibly follow.

MR. BODKIN being about to examine Dr. Sutherland as to his opinion of the prisoner's state of mind, MR. BALLANTINE contended that the proper time for so doing had passed; and that as the nature of the defence had been anticipated by the prosecution, it was not now competent to them to give fresh evidence in contradiction of the prisoner's case. MR. JUSTICE ERLE was of opinion that the evidence was admissible: the learned Judges (in answer to the questions submitted to them by the House of Lords after the trial of M'Naughten) expressly stating, that after all the witnesses had been examined, and after all the facts had been stated, persons of skill might be called upon to give their opinion whether, assuming the facts deposed to to be true, the accused was sane or insane at the time.

MR. BODKIN called

ALEXANDER JOHN SUTHERLAND, M.D. I have had considerable experience in diseases of the mind—I have lately turned my attention to that exclusively—I came here at half-past ten this morning, when Battersby was being examined—I was desired by the Solicitor of the Treasury to attend—I have attended to the evidence in the case since my arrival here—I have particulary attended to the evidence of the witnesses called on the part of the prisoner—assuming that all the facts spoken to by the witnesses are literally true, they do not, in my judgment, indicate any unsoundness in the prisoner; not in any degree whatever, in my opinion.

MR. BALLANTINE. Q. You mean to infer that the prisoner has all those powers that nature gave her, in a perfect state? A. I mean that she is not in a state either of insanity or unsoundness of mind; that her mind is in as perfect a state as nature gave it to her—I believe it has not been affected in any way by disease—I mean to apply that opinion to her state at the present moment, as far as I can judge from what I have heard—of course it is hardly fair to say so, because I have not examined her person—I can only form an opinion from what I have heard—I could still only give an opinion, if I had examined the party, but it would of course be more satisfactory if I had had an opportunity of examining her—I am generally able to form an accurate opinion in these matters from an examination of the party—I received diretions from the Government at ten o'clock this morning to attend here—I am the son of the gentleman who has the management of a large lunatic asylum—I

have known insanity produced by defective menstruation, and by hysteria consequent upon it—in all cases of insanity, when we can find out the cause, we can generally apply a cure—those patients whose insanity is superinduced by hysteria, are as easily, or probably more easily cured than any other insane patients—the attacks are sometimes very sudden—I have known persons whose disposition has been naturally very mild and humane, to become almost ferocious when under those attacks—they are sometimes incapable of judging between right and wrong; but those sort of case are usually accompanied with delusion—perhaps the delusion may be imagining a person who is really a friend to be the bitterest enemy, but that is not the common delusion that accompanies that species of the disease; it is a delusion that occasionally accompanies it—they sometimes require restraint—the continuation of hysterical fits arising from imperfect menstruation for fourteen or fifteen years is not calculated to affect the brain—epileptic fits are—in epilepsy the patient bites the tongue, foams at he mouth, and goes to sleep immediately after the fit—they do not both arise from pressure on the brain—in hysteria the brain is secondarily affected from the uterus—the brain is not primarily affected in epilepsy either.

MR. BODKIN. Q. You have been asked whether, in order to form an opinion of the present state of mind of the prisoner, it would have been more satisfactory for you to have examined her personally; you say it would? A. Yes—I do not require any personal examination to form a judgment upon the facts which have been deposed to by the witnesses—I say it would have been more satisfactory to me to examine the prisoner, as it would in every case—according to the descriptions given by the witnesses, I believe the fits to which the prisoner has been subject, to have been hysterical fits.

Q. Seeing the periods at which they occurred, her manner and demeanour afterwards, her habits and pursuits of life, and the way in which she has been reported by the evidence to have conducted herself, can you discover any circumstance whatever upon which you can found a belief that her brain is in any degree injured? A. No, I cannot—I have known cases where unsoundness of mind has been produced by obstructed menstruation—I am acquainted with innumerable instances in which it has produced no such effect—it is not at all an uncommon affection—these attacks sometimes come on suddenly.

Q. Have you ever known, or read, or heard of a case among those to which you have alluded, in which a woman, apparently in the possession of her senses at about nine o'clock on one night, and apparently in her senses on the following morning, between four and five o'clock, making preparations for a journey, had in the interval been seized with an attack which had deprived her of her intellectual power, and caused her to commit a violent crime? A. I never knew of such a case, nor have I ever read of a case exactly parallel to it.

COURT. Q. According to your opinion, as a man of skill in this disease, supposing a sudden attack of insanity, from, suppressed menses, to occur, do you suppose that attack would appear between nine o'clock at night and four o'clock the following morning, without leaving some trace? A. No, I do not.

GUILTY. Aged 30.—Strongly recommended to mercy by the Jury, in conesquence of the humane character that she sustained for so many years.

DEATH .

NEW COURT.—Thursday, August 19th. 1847.

PRESENT—Mr. Alderman LUCAS, Mr. Alderman FAREBROTHER; Sir CHAPMAN MARSHALL, Knt.; and Mr. RECORDER.

Sixth Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18470816-1798

1798. HENRY MILLAR was indicted for stealing a 5l. Bank note, the property of Horatio Smith, in his dwelling-house to which he pleaded

GUILTY. Aged 21.— Confined Nine Months.

Reference Number: t18470816-1799

1799. WILLIAM HOWARD was indicted for stealing 2 pairs of boots, value 6s.; the goods of Edward Bull; having been before convicted of felony, to which he pleaded

GUILTY. Aged 15.— Confined Three Months, and twice Whipped

Reference Number: t18470816-1800

1800. CHARLES GRAH was indicted for stealing 1 waistcoat, value 5s.; 1 pair of trowsers, 12s.; 1 pair of braces, 2d.; and 1 watch-key, 2d.; the goods of John Linsey; and 1 half-crown, 1 shilling, 1 penny, and two half-pence, the moneys of Joseph Mills, in a vessel on the navigable river Thames, to which he pleaded

GUILTY. Aged 19.— Confined Nine Months.

Reference Number: t18470816-1801

1801. JAMES BELL was indicted for embezzling 9l. 17s. 6d., which he received on account of his master, John Hutley; having been before convicted of felony, to which he pleaded

GUILTY. Aged 38.— Confined One Year.

Reference Number: t18470816-1802

1802. CHARLES JOHNSON GOODS was indicted for stealing 1 writing desk, value 3l.; 1 card-case, 2s.; 1 pencil-case, 2s.; 1 snuff-box, 2s.; and 3oz. of acidulated drops, 6d.; the goods of John Lawrence, to which he pleaded GUILTY , and received a good character.

Aged 19.—Recommended to mercy by the prosecutor.— Confined Six Months

Reference Number: t18470816-1803

1803. GEORGE EMMERTON was indicted for stealing 1 cake, value 3d.; and 13oz. of bread, value 2d.; the goods of John Frost, his master.

JOHN FROST. I am a baker. The prisoner was in my service for four or five months—he had a large fustian coat with large pockets, and I noticed that they had a bulky appearance every time he left the premises—in conesquence of that, when he passed through the shop on the 15th of July I followed him, and charged him with having bread in his pockets—he said he had not got anything—I said I should be much obliged if he would let me see, as I was sure he had got something that did not belong to him—he then took a piece of bread out of one pocket and a cake out of the other—I said this was a sort of game he had been carrying on for some time, and I would give him in charge to the first policeman I met—I did not meet one, and I went to the station with him—the officers there searched him, and found another piece of bread on him—the cake was made with my materials, but not by my order—I had frequently seen these cakes in the bakehouse, and on one occasion I found one between the bed and the sacking.

Cross-examined by MR. ROBINSON. Q. He had no right to make these cakes at all? A. Yes, if he thought proper, but he ought to have sent all he mad into the shop—these cakes have been made on my premises—I have

seen them—he was employed to make all sorts of goods—he was in the habit of making such cakes as this, but not sending them to the shop—on one occasion I found them, and brought them up to my shop myself—he had 25s. a-week, and a half-quartern loaf every day when he went home—if I were not there to give it him, he asked my wife or shop-woman for it, but he was not to help himself—I found the half-quartern loaf in his hand, about 1/2 lb. of bread in his pocket, and the cake—our stale bread is always saleable—we do not let it get mouldy, or give it away if we can help it

JOHN REED (policeman B 190.) I received charge of the prisoner from Mr. Frost at the station-house—I found some bread on the prisoner, and received some bread and a cake from Mr. Frost—the prisoner had a loaf under his arm.

GUILTY. Aged 36.—Recommended to mercy by the Jury and Prosecutor.—

Confined One Month.

Reference Number: t18470816-1804

1804. WILLIAM WINSELL was indicted for embezzlement.

EDWARD THRESHER. I live in High-street, Kensington, and am a hat and cap-maker—I have a shop at Notting-hill—the prisoner was in my service, and had the care of that shop—it was his duty to account to me daily, except on Saturday nights, for what sums he received there—I have not had 3s. 6d. of him for a cap sold to Lovell on the 5th of June, nor 1s. paid by Foster on the 12th of June—on the 28th of June I went up to the shop, and said to him, "A cap has been sold"—he said he had sold a cap for 3s., and 1s. was paid off it, which shilling he gave me—I said, "Let me look at the cap?"—he said, "It is sold and gone, the person is to pay a shilling a-week, she is a brick-maker's wife, who works in the field opposite"—I found he had received one shilling first, and on the 28th he had received the other two shillings—he did not account for the first shilling till the whole was paid.

Cross-examined by MR. ROBINSON. Q. Did you do a good business in the shop which the prisoner managed? A. No—he had no one with him there—it was his duty to come to me every evening with the money and the book—he sometimes did not account for more than 2l. in the course of a week, sometimes less, sometimes more—I have the book here, it is in his writing—it would have told its own story.

ELIZABETH LOVELL. I am the wife of Joseph Lovell, and live at Notting Dale—I purchased this cap at the prosecutor's shop on the 5th of June, and paid him 3s. 6d. for it

EDWARD THRESHER re-examined. This is not entered in the book on the 5th of June—here is a cap entered for 3s., which is No. 94. a navy cap, but there is no account of this cap, he never told me of this one at all—he charged himself with selling a cap for 3s., but the book was kept so imperfectly, that I cannot swear to any cap as being missed from the stock—there is an entry of a cap for 3s.—that was a different sort of thing entirely—every article is numbered, and it does not correspond with the number of this cap—he might bring me as much as 5l. a week from the shop—I have on one or two occasions sent to that shop for caps, but I have always given him a receipt for them the next day—he may have waited two or three days for a receipt—I will swear that caps have not been sent from there, for which he has had no receipt at all—the reason he did not have it at the times was because he did not come down for two or three days—I have often scolded him for it—he did on one occasion produce 5s. 3d. more than his account would warrant, and I gave him credit for it in this book.

NOT GUILTY

Reference Number: t18470816-1805

1805. JOHN CALLAGAN was indicted for staling 3 wooden doors, value 1s. 6d.; and 10 wooden boards, 1s.; the goods of Michael Wright, his master.

MICHAEL WRIGHT. I live in Great Barlow-street, and am a builder. The prisoner was in my employ for three or four days—I put some old timber into my back yard, in Grotto-passage—on the morning of the 17th of July I went into the yard, found it had been disturbed, and that some was gone—the prisoner had assisted me in putting some timber there the night before—I went to a house which the prisoner rents in Grafton-court, in consequence of information, and in the back-yard there saw some timber which I had missed from my premises—I sent for a constable, and pointed out some old doors and old timber that belonged to me—I have known the prisoner many years—I had not employed him to work on this timber on his own premises.

Cross-examined by MR. PARNELL. Q. Where had this door and planks come from? A. A stable of mine in Burying-ground Passage, which we pulled down, and were to rebuild—this piece of a door had been on the scaffold the night before, and it had brickdust and dirt about it—I do not know, that there is any particular mark about it—the house in which the prisoner lives, No. 5, Grafton-court, was mine a little time ago—I sold it to another party—the prisoner was never a tenant of mine, he had lived there several years—he keeps a lodging-house—there might be twenty or thirty men living there—you go to the yard, which is by the passage from the street door—anybody in Grafton-court could have access to it—I found in that yard not only this wood, but a number of bricks, and other things—I was in the habit of giving my men a cart-load of stuff almost every week, to make use of—the prisoner mentioned to me about building a wash-house—I said he might have some had wood—I would have given him two or three doors—I should be glad to take him again.

NOT GUILTY.

Reference Number: t18470816-1806

1806. JOHN CALLAGAN was again indicted for staling 9 pieces of wood called quartering, value 9s.; and 1 wooden gutter, 1s.; the goods of Edmund Brown: and 2 scaffold-boards, 2s.; the goods of George Brown.

EDMUND BROWN. On the 17th of July, Mr. Wright, sent for me—I went round, and found some quartering and some arris-gutters belonging to me in the prisoner's yard.

Cross-examined by MR. PARNELL. Q. It was in the open yard of this house where twenty Irishmen were? A. I suppose there are as many—these things are worth about 10s.—I had ordered my men to fix the gutter and the quartering—I had missed the gutter from my premises, Nos. 7 and 8, Grafton-court, and No. 1, Conway-court, about ten days previous to my finding it—I had not employed the prisoner—I hardly know whether I had employed any of his lodgers.

JOSEPH BROWN. I live in Bridport-street, Dorset-square—I work for my father, George Brown—I had been working in Conway-court, where the prisoner worked, for Mr. Wright—I missed two scaffolding-boards from No. 6, Conway-court—I inquired of the prisoner, he said he had not seen them—I found them on his premises—they are my father's.

Cross-examined. Q. This yard of the prisoner is open to the whole of the court? A. Not more than the other yards—you go through the passage to it—I do not know how many persons live in the prisoner's house.

NOT GUILTY.

Reference Number: t18470816-1807

1807. GEORGE DEANE was indicted for stealing 1 shirt, value 1s. 6d.; and 1 shirt-front, 1s.; the goods of Charles Bachler; having been before convicted of felony.

MR. RYLAND conducted the Prosecution.

HARRIET BACHLER. I am the wife of Charles Bachler, and live in Princes-court, Shoreditch—on Saturday morning, the 24th of April, the prisoner came to my house about ten o' clock, and asked for a comfortable lodging—I had not seen him before—I said I had a comfortable bed; he asked me what I charged, I said, "3s. for part of a bed"—he said he had just come on shore from the Sarah Belina, which was lying in the docks, and his hammock and chest were in Old Gravel-lane—he asked if I had got a room large enough to take it in—I said, "Yes," and agreed to let him have it—he asked if I had any food in the house—I said at any rate I had some bread and butter—he asked if he could lie down, as he was very tired—he went up and laid down, and told me to call him at a quarter before four o'clock, that he might get up and go to Cornhill to get his papers signed, that he might go to the Jamaica Coffee-house to get his money on Monday morning—he said he had a great deal of money to receive—I called him at a quarter before four o'clock, he got up in a great hurry and went out—he came back in three-quarters of an hour, as I was taking my tea—he then produced this paper to me, and said he could have 10l. on it as well as five farthings, if he were in a boarding-house, but he preferred a private lodging—he said he had been out four years, and he had a great deal of money to receive on Monday morning, at ten o'clock, at the Jamaica Coffee-house, and he told me to be sure to get myself in readiness to go with him—on Monday morning he begged he might go clean to the Jamaica Coffee-house, and I lent him a shirt and front of my husband's, to go and receive the money—he went out about eight o'clock on Monday morning, and absconded—he was perfectly sober and sensible—I got myself ready and waited from ten till twelve o'clock—I did not see him—he gave me a great deal of trouble—I saw no more of my husband's shirt and front, and did not see the prisoner again till he was in custody—he had three shillings and six-pence of me on the Saturday and the Sunday, and his food.

HENRY KNOWLES (City policeman 623.) I took the prisoner—I was present before the Magistrate, and saw what the prisoner said taken down—this is it—it is signed by the Magistrate—(read—"The prisoner says I have nothing at all to say.")

Prisoner's Defence. I had been a long time in drink; I did not know what I had been doing.

CHARLES WILLIAM TAYLOR. I produce a certificate of the prisoner's former conviction, which I got from the office of the Clerk of the Peace for Surrey—(readConvicted 13th of April, 1846; and confined six months)—I was the prosecutor at the trial—the prisoner is the person.

GUILTY

Reference Number: t18470816-1808

1808. GEORGE DEANE was again indicted for stealing I coat, value 7s.; 1 shirt 7s.; and one handkerchief, 3s. the goods of John Morse.

MR. RYLAND conducted the Prosecution.

JOHN MORE. I am a grocer, and live in Toltenham-court-road. On the 16th of April the prisoner came to my shop—he said he had come from one of her Majesty's steam-boats, that he had not long arrived, and he was going on the following day to the Admiralty to receive his wages—he said he wanted lodging and assistance, and knowing me he came to me—I had known

him as working in Tottenham-court-road, but I had lost sight of him for about two years—I gave him his breakfast—he said he had got a pension from Government of 30l. a year, and he was an independent man, and thought he should live comfortably—on the following day he said he was going to the Admiralty to receive his wages, and he wanted a shirt, a coat, and a handkerchief to appear decent in—they were lent to him by my permission, on condition that he was to return in two or three hours—he did not come back, I never saw him till he was in custody—he also obtained money from my wife, unknown to me.

GUILTY.

Reference Number: t18470816-1809

1809. GEORGE DEANE was again indicted for stealing 1 plane, value 7s. 1 oil-stone, 6s.; 1 pair of pincers, 2s.; 1 oil-can, 1s.; 1 hammer, 18d.; 1 pair of compasses, 2s.; 6 gimlets, 2s.; 1 mallet, 1s; 1 spok-shave, 1s.; 1 screw-driver, 6d.; 1 basket, 18d.; 2 samplers, 3s.; and 36 printed books, 3s.; the goods of Charles Holmes.

MR. RYLAND conducted the Prosecution.

MARY HOLMES. I am the wife of Charles Holmes, a carpenter, of No. 15, Fashion-street, Spitalfields. On Thursday, the 10th of June, the prisoner came with Mrs. Cowan, who lives close by me, to look at the lodging, to see if it was comfortable—she said it was for her nephew, who had just come from sea that he was in liquor, but I must excuse she said, as it was the first day he had come from sea—he appeared to be in liquor, and sat down and slept for an hour and a half—it was then getting towards bed-time, and I told my husband to awaken him—he shook him, and said we were going to bed—he awoke, and said he must have something to eat, and he had some supper—he said he had got no money, but should have to receive 300l. or 400l. the next day, and what he had he would pay for—he said he was in habit of having liquor, and he must have some rum—I fetched some rum, which I paid for, and he drank it—he then wanted some more rum—I said I had no more money—he said, "Show me the house and I will get it"—I said we had not gone on credit, but he went and got a quartern and a half, drank it, and went to bed—on the Friday morning he came down at breakfast-time—he had breakfast and new laid eggs—he then went to his friend who had brought him to me—my husband asked him if he should go with him to get his money; but he said, "If I do I must be paid; my family depend on me"—the prisoner said, "I will pay you double"—he went out and did not come for my husband—he came back in the evening, and said only the common men were paid that day—he had his supper and went to bed—the next morning he had his breakfast, and my husband was going to the place with him—he said, "I want a plane and a chisel to do a little job; I shall not be more then tem minutes"—my husband said, "Take the basket of tools"—he took them, and went into the public-house—he did not return—we saw no more of him—my husband was standing still for weeks for want of his tools, and could not do a bit of work—after the prisoner was gone, I went into the room in which he had slept and missed the articles which the officer found on the prisoner—these are my little boy's Missionary books—the prisoner asked my little boy to lend him them, as he knew every part they spoke of, and he put them into his pocket and took them away with him—these samplers were in a box in that room, and they were gone—the tools have not been found—they were about 30s.

CHARLES HOLMES. I have heard what my wife has said—it is all true—I can swear to these books.

HENRY KNOWLES (City policeman, 623.) I took the prisoner on the 12th of June—I found on him these samplers and books—he said he picked them up in the street—one of the coast-guard is here from Woolwich, to identify the prisoner—the prisoner has got his jacket on now.

GUILTY. Aged 33.— Transported for Ten Years.

Reference Number: t18470816-1810

1810. JAMES REEVES and JAMES WAKEFIELD were indicted for stealing 6 shillings and 3 sixpences, the monies of Thomas Butlin; and that WAKEFIELD had been before convicted of felony.

REEVES pleaded GUILTY. Aged 15.— Confined Six Months.

JANE BUTLIN. I live with my father, Thomas Butlin, in the Curtain-road, Shoreditch. On the 6th of July, about tweleve O'clock, I had occasion to go into the adjoining shop—I saw Reeves come out of our shop—he gave Wakefield some money and ran away—I took hold of Wakefield and took him into the shop—I found a sixpence in his hand—I asked how he had got it; he said the other boy gave it him in change for a shilling that the boy had come into the shop for—I called my father, and asked him if he had been to give change—he said, "No"—I looked into the till and missed 7s. 6d.—there had been 8s. in it, and there was 6d. left—it was my father's money—I gave Wakefield to an officer, and described Reeves to him.

WILLIAM MORELL (policeman G 60.) I was called into the shop, and took Wakefield—he said to me said to me, "I did not steal the money; I am sure Reeves stole the money; I was looking through the window"—he said, "You know James Reeves very well; he went in there was nobody in the shop; he reached over, got the money out of the till, gave me six-pence, and then ran away"—I met Reeves in Long-alley the same evening—I said I wanted him for stealing some money from a baker's shop in the Curtain-road that day—he was very saucy, and told me not to handle him—he then said he went for change for a shilling.

Wakefield's Defence. I was going down the Curtain-road; a gentleman bought a pipe of me for 6d.; Reeves went to got change for a shilling; he gave 6d. to the gentlemen and 6d. to me.

ISAAC WAKEFIELD (policeman G 140.) I produce a certificate of Wakefield's conviction—(readConvicted 2nd June, 1846, and confined six months)—he is the person.

WAKEFIELD— GUILTY. Aged 14,— Confined Six Months, and twice whipped.

Reference Number: t18470816-1811

1811. CHARLES HILL was indicted for embezzling 2l. 11s. 2d., the monies of Benjamin Clark, his master; to which he pleaded

GUILTY. Aged 19.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18470816-1812

1812. ROBERT NOAD was indicted for embezzlement.

WILLIAM HUMPHRYES. I keep the Globe-tavern, in Bow-street, Covent-garden. The prisoner formerly lived with me as under-waiter in the Hay-market—he has since applied to me on several occasions to take him again, and I took him on the 4th of July—it was his business to receive money from the customer's to pay in checks to the barmaid, and to account afterwards—on the 10th of July I found that he was gone—I counted the checks which he had paid in the day before, and they amounted to 9s. 9d., which he had not accounted for—on the 12th of July he came to my house—he said he had been to Norwood and spent my money,

and he would pay me—I gave him into custody—he was paid by the customers, and I told him if he were not satisfied I would give money, but my waiters get 2l. or 3l. a week, and are better off than I am myself—he told me when he came there that he had no work, and was in great distress—I said I would employ him if I could—he is clever—he speaks French very well, and is a good cook—I took him, and he asked me to let him have two or three shillings—he came; and went on very well, till he absconded—he has sent me letters, saying he is very sorry for what he has done, and hoping I would be merciful to him.

HARRIET CASSELL. I am barmaid to Mr. Humphryes—on Friday, the 9th of July, the prisoner paid me 9s. 9d. with checks—he did not give me any money.

WILLIAM FARNDEN (police-sergeant F 36.) I took the prisoner—I found several checks on him.

Prisoner's Defence. I returned on the Monday morning, under a firm persuasion of having committed an act of indiscretion and not a crime; my character has always been irreproachable till this charge; since I have been in my master's employ I have not been required to hand over the money to balance my account for several days together.

WILLIAM HUMPHRYES re-examined. I never omitted to bring him to account every morning—he was only four days in this employ—he had no money when he was taken—he went away, left all the places open, and all the silver about.

NOT GUILTY.

Reference Number: t18470816-1813

1813. JANE PERRY was indicted for stealing 1 gown, value 4s.; the goods of James Howell.

WILLIAM LAWRENCE. I am in the employ of Mr. James Howell, of Beech-street, Barbican—on the afternoon of the 21st of July 1 heard a bell ring, which is over the shop-door, and attached to some goods—I looked, and saw the prisoner undo a string which was fastened to this gown and take it away—I followed, brought her back, took the gown from her, and gave her in charge.

Prisoner. I found it at the door, rolled up, as I passed by.

Witness. I saw her take it and roll it up—this is the gown, it has the private mark inside.

SAMUEL SPECK (City policeman 119.) I took the prisoner, and produce the gown which I got from the witness—when I was bringing her to New-gate she met two of her pals (two bad girls), and she said to them, "I told you I should not halloo when I got pinched."

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY. Aged 17.— Confined Three Months.

OLD COURT, Friday, August 20th, 1847.

PRESENT—Mr. Justice ERLE; Mr. Alderman FAREBOTHER; Mr. Alder-man GIBES; and EDWARD BULLOCK, Esq.

Third Jury, before Edward Bullock, Esq.

Reference Number: t18470816-1814

1814. ELLEN HAYES was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Ann Monksfield, and stealing therein 2 sheets, value 8s.; 1 gown, 1s.; 1 shawl, 4s.; 1 petticoat, 2s.; 1 cloak, 5s.; 1 tea-pot, 3s; and 1 candlestick, 2s.; her property.

ANN MONKSFIELD. I am a widow, and live in Long-alley, Shoreditch. I occupy one room; the rest of the house is let out in different tenements—the landlord does not live there. On Tuesday, the 8th of June, I had been out to work—I came home at half-past seven in the evening, and found my room-door open—I had left it locked, and had the key in my pocket all day—when I got in I found my things disturbed—I opened the shutters, and then saw the prisoner standing in the corner of the room—I did not know her before—my tea-pot was moved from my drawers on to the table with the candlestick, which had been on the shelf; a gown had been taken from a nail behind the door, and thrown on to another table, a cloak and bonnet were moved, and two sheets—these are the things—(produced)—they are all mine—I said to the prisoner, "What do you do in my room?"—she said, "Do not be afraid; have you lost anything? two ladies sent me to ask you to go to work"—I said, "What ladies?"—she said she could not say, but they were little ladies—Sarah Robertson was in the passage, and she went and fetched the officer.

MARIA MOSS. I am going on for fifteen years old, and live with my mother near the prosecutrix—about half-past seven o'clock on the evening in question, I went to her with a message—I found her door on the jar—I tried to push it open but could not, somebody kept pushing it back—I did not see anybody—I called out to Mrs. Monksfield twice or three times—I waited five or ten minutes; I then saw Mrs. Monksfield come in—I gave her the message and went away.

SARAH ROBERTSON. I am the wife of James Robertson, and live in the same house with Mrs. Monksfield. On Tuesday evening, the 8th of June, about half-past seven o'clock, I went out for an errand—I saw no one in Mrs. Monksfield's room then—I came back in about ten minutes, and then saw the prisoner in her room—I observed the cloak and bonnet lying on the floor, and a bed-gown, and this tea-pot on the table—Mrs. Monksfield was very much agitated and frightened—she said to me, in the prisoner's presence, "Mrs. Robertson, who has been here to-day for me to go to work?"—I said, "No one"—the prisoner answered, "Yes, there has"—I do not know anything of the prisoner—I asked her if she knew Mrs. Monksfield, she said "No"—I said, "Do you know me?"—she said, "No"—I said, "What do you do here?"—she said, "I do not know"—she looked at Mrs. Monksfield, and said, "Poor woman, have you lost anything?" Mrs. Monksfield answered "I do not know"—I went out and found the policeman standing talking to the landlord, and called him in.

WILLIAM KENCH. (policeman G 89.) The prisoner was given into my charge by the prosecutrix, as she was coming out of the passage of the house—I asked her what she had been doing down there—she told me she had gone to tell the woman of some work—I asked what business she had in the room—she said she had not been into the room—I asked what business she had down there at all—she said she had been to the water-closet—I took her to the station-house—she was searched, and a knife and spoon found on her, they do not belong to the prosecutrix—I examined the room-door, and saw a place cut in the door-post, as if something had been put in to push the lock back—it was fresh chipped.

The prisoner, in a long defence, stated that she was sent by a person on a message to the prosecutrix, but that she did not enter the room.

NOT GUILTY.

Reference Number: t18470816-1815

1815. JOHN JONES was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Henry Hall, about four in the night of the 20th of July, and stealing therein 3 sixpences, 7 pence, 20 halfpence, and 13 farthings; his monies.

MR. BRIARLY conducted the Prosecution.

HENRY HALL. I am a licensed-victualler, and live in Church-street, Bethnal-green. On the 21st of July I and my wife went to bed about two o'clock in the morning—I left the house quite safe, I saw it so myself—I was called up about a quarter-past four o'clock—I came down, went into the bar, and saw the prisoner in front of the bar, being searched by two policemen—the window of the bar-parlour was open—the bar of the shutter had been taken down, and the shutter was down, and he had got through the window—it had been shut the night before—I missed some money from the side drawer—it was a little open—I lost about three sixpences altogether, several halfpence and farthings, I cannot say how many—I am certain there were some.

Cross-examined by MR. HORRY. Q. Have you known the prisoner? A. I had never seen him but once before, and knew nothing at all of him—the bar of the window was outside—my servant fastened the window, he is not here—it screwed inside in the usual way—I think the screw was lost—I cannot say what money was in the till—I make a point of putting two or three sixpences in the bar to give change in the morning—I cannot speak myself about the window being secured—I know that the shutter and window were closed—I cannot say whether the bar was up.

FREDERICK CAMP. I am a butcher—I work for Mr. Lamb, of Bethnal-green, and sleep at Mr. Hall's—I got up about a quarter-past four on the morning of the 21st of July—on coming down stairs I came out at the side-door, and was walking down to the bottom of the street when a man came out at the side-door leading from the bar, turned the corner, and ran down Church-street—I saw him come out—I did not see his face, and could not discern his features—I saw Fowler, the policeman, opposite—I pointed to the man, and Fowler pursued him; I did not see him taken—I afterwards saw the policeman bring the prisoner back—I could not swear to his being the man I had seen, for I was rather late that morning myself and in a flurry—the man was something similar to the prisoner—I am not very sure on that point, I cannot swear to him—I saw nobody besides the person that went out, the one who was brought back, and the constable—I pointed out to the policeman the person I saw come out of the house, and saw the policeman go after that person.

Cross-examined Q. Did you know the prisoner? A. No—I had not seen him before that morning.

ROBERT FOWLER (policeman 115.) On the 21st of July, about a quarter-past four o'clock, the prisoner was pointed out to me by Camp, in Church-street, Bethnal-green, about twenty or thirty yards from Mr. Hall's—there was no other person in the street but him and Camp—I ran after him, he turned up Tyson-street—when he got to the corner, I sprang my rattle, and when I came to the corner there was no person in the street but him—I had lost sight of him, perhaps a second, in turning the corner—I was about twenty or thirty yards from Tyson-street, when I lost sight of him—I had that distance to run before I caught sight of him again, and when I came round, there was no other person in the street but himself—he turned up Shacklewell-street—another constable then came in sight, and he ran into his arms—I have not the least doubt that he is the same person that was originally

pointed out to me—we brought him back to Mr. Hall's, searched him, and found on him three sixpences, seven penny-pieces, twenty halfpence, and thirteen farthings.

Cross-examined. Q. How far is Shacklewell-street from where he was first pointed out to you? A. About fifty yards down Church-street, and fifty yards up Tyson-street—Tyson-street is the first street he turned up—Shacklewell-street leads out of it—I was twenty yards off whe he got to Tyson-street—when I got to the corner of Tyson-street he was going up Tyson-street, and I never lost sight of him again—he was going to turn into Shacklewell-street, and ran into Jessop's arms, just at the corner—I did not notice anybody going up and down the street—I think I can swear there was no one else.

EDWARD JESSOP (policeman.) On the 21st of July, about a quarter-past four in the morning, I was at the corner of Shacklewell-street—I heard a rattle spring, and saw the prisoner coming up—as soon as he got to me, he said, "I am done now, it is no good my running any further," I took him into custody—Fowler came up, and we took him to Mr. Hall's—I looked to see how any one had been getting in—I saw that the bar of the back parlour shutter had been taken down, and that the shutter was taken from the window, and placed back against the wall—a small tub was taken from under the water-butt, and placed below the window, by means of which a person could have got in there, and in the parlour—there was a small flap to put the coals down into the cellar—that was taken up by a poker—it opens into the cellar.

Cross-examined. Q. Was that trap open? A. Yes—a person could get that way into the bar, and also from the bar into the street.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY. of stealing only. Aged 18.—Recommended to mercy by the Prosecutor and Jury.— Confined Twelve Months

Before Mr. Justice Erle.

Reference Number: t18470816-1816

1816. THOMAS SMITH was indicted for stealing 7 warrants for the delivery of 57 bags of coffee, value 90l.; and 7 pieces of paper, 7d.; the goods of Thomas Buckthorpe.

MR. BALLANTINE conducted the Prosecution.

HENRY OLIVER. I am clerk to Mr. Thomas Buckthorpe, a coffee-merchant, of No. 1, Mincing-lane. I have known the prisoner for about twelve months. On the 4th of June last, he was indebted to Mr. Buckthorpe in the sum of about 270l.—previous to that, we had received the warrants for some coffee that had arrived by the Morning Star—these warrants (looking at some produced by Mr. Mullens) are them—the prisoner was aware that we had them—previously to the 4th of June he had had the loan of them for he purpose of sampling and inspecting the coffee at the docks, and he returned them—he was merely a customer of Mr. Buckthorpe's—he bought of him—he is a commission agent for some parties, and does business on his own account as a merchant—on the 4th of June he came to Mr. Buckthorpe's office, and said he had a friend in town from Newcastle whom he thought was a purchaser of that description of coffee, that he was a very particular sort of man in the mode in which he conducted his business, and he wished to inspect the goods himself before he would make a purchase—he said, "Will you let me have the warrants, I and my friend will go down directly, and they shall be returned in about an hour?"—I said that he had previously drawn samples, and I did not see the necessity for his doing so again—Mr. Buckthorpe was in the next

office, and I just mentioned to him that he wanted them—after that I agreed to give him the warrants—I delivered them to him, and he went away with them—I did not see him again till he was in custody—on the following day we received this noted from him—(read, marked "A," signed Thomas Smith, dated June 5, 1847—"Gentlemen, I told you on Thursday I should pay you 150l. to-day. I then felt certain of receiving that amount from the country this morning, but owing to my journey being due in the north next week, the party has written me saying, he will pay me when there. I very much regret that it has occurred so, but if you will call at the Bank of England on Thursday, you will receive the full amount of what I owe you, as I shall pay it on Wednesday to your credit through the branch at Newcastle. The Morning Star's I have sold this morning, and the party will pay me for them on Tuesday, as he leaves town to-night, and has not quite enough with him. The amount I will remit with the other on Wednesday, if you will have the kindness to forward me the invoice, deducting rent, &c., to the Post-office, Newcastle. I presume you will charge me 14s., the transaction being a cash one.")—I received this other letter from him the same evening—I had written an answer to the first letter in the interval, directed to his office in St. Swithin's-lane—(read, from Mr. Smith to Mr. Oliver—"Sir, I feel exceedingly surprised at your note just received, and the conduct you have pursued towards me without any cause. I would have met you this morning, but it is now needless, as you seem determined if you can to ruin me. All I need say is, that although it was my intention to have left for Newcastle to-night, I shall not now do so until Monday; and if you will then call on me, at ten o'clock in the morning, with the invoice of the Morning Star's I will pay you for them; and during the week you shall have the balance of your account, as before stated.")—I received no other letter from him myself, and did not see him till he was taken into custody.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. What day of the week was the 4th of June? A. Friday—I cannot say how many transactions my principal has had with the prisoner—he has had several, both in coffee and tea, principally in coffee—he was agent to a tea-merchant, and also did business on his own account—he was not agent to my employer—the transaction between them were those of purchase and sale—he had not had transactions with us to the amount of 1, 000l. the month before—it is impossible for me to tell how long the transactions with him have been going on—I have not looked to the books—I should think it is about twelve months, but I cannot say exactly—the books are not here—he has purchased coffee of us before, I should think to the amount of about 1, 000l.—he is now indebted to my master 270l.—I understand the sampling of coffee, but it is not my province to sample it—I do not know that there would be no great difficulty in sampling the coffee without the warrants, I believe it is not so—these were inferior coffee—I am not aware that my employer had any communication with him on the subject of these coffees—I had myself offered them to him at 34s. a cwt.—the market price of coffee at that time was from 20s. to 30s.—these were Ceylon coffees, which are of various qualities—these coffees were not damaged, they were returned by the Dock Company, which is the only rule we have to go by, as being sound and in good order, I did not inspect them—I know they were sold as sound at public sale—I saw the samples of them; they appeared to be sound, and not in any degree damaged—my employer had not received money from the prisoner in the course of that week—I have not the books with me, and cannot positively say when the last payment was made on his

account; I think it was about a fortnight previously—I cannot tell the amount he then paid; I think it was very trifling, not 100l.—I do not think he had paid him 70l. in a lump—he had had credit my employer, and there was an unsettled account at the time of 270l.—it was not all for coffees, but principally so—I had not pressed him to take these particular coffees—I had offered them to him, perhaps two or three times—I do not recollect having done so more than that—I offered them to him at a low price—I, on the part of my employer, wanted to get rid of them, because they did not suit our trade,

COURT. Q. I suppose a merchant is always glad to sell? A. Yes.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Did you offer to take a bill for them? A. I once said, that if he met with a customer for them whom we approved of, and drew upon him, and handed us that party's acceptance, that then we would sell him the coffees, and take such a bill in payment—I offered to sell him the coffees, if he met with a customer whose bill we approved of—he had had possession of the warrants three or four weeks before—I think he had them one day, and returned them on the following morning—I shall swear he did not hold them two or three days—we did not make any great effort to get rid of the coffees—I asked 34s. a cwt. for them on the last occasion; we were losing money on them I did not state to him, on the 4th of June, that if he did not take them I should expect the warrants back again in an hour—the usual credit on coffee is one month, and on tea we expect the cash on the Saturday following the delivery—the cash transaction were confined to the teas—he had inquired of me before I give him the warrants, what price I would take for cash for them—I said, to clear them up I would take 34s. for them, cash—I would have sold them to him for 34s. per cwt., if he had brought me the cash—if he had returned with the cash, I should have been content to have made a contract with him under the circumstances—I should have asked for the warrants, to have the account made out—we had an entry of them in the book—we could have made out the account from that entry, but we should not have done so, because it is not the practice in the trade—we should have had nothing to do with his selling them—we had nothing to do with that; we had not sold them, and I would not have sold them, unless he had brought the warrants back, because it would not have been regular—I should have felt myself at liberty, during the time he was gone to the docks, to sample them for this party, to have sold them to any other party—I had not engaged to hold them for his answer—we could have sold them by our samples, and delivered the warrants when applied for—we should have been at liberty to do so, according to the custom of the trade—if he had returned with the 34s. a cwt., we could have made out an invoice from our books and closed the transaction—we had had other transaction with him in credit, but the warrants were not delivered to him at the time he made the purchases on any former occasions that I recollect—I will undertake to swear that they were not principally delivered to him at the time of making the purchase—that is not the ordinary course of business—the ordinary course of business in the market is for a credit to be given of one month prompt, from the date of the sale; it does not follow that the warrants are to be delivered till the prompt ends, unless they are applied for; and then it would be at the option of the party selling, whether he would deliver the warrants with-out the cash or not—I might not hesitate to deliver the warrants, although the prompt had not expired, but I should require the cash for them, and that is the custom in the trade—I am not aware that in our

previous transaction with the prisoner we had demanded the cash—I am not aware that any application was made to the prisoner, or at his office in St. Swithin's-lane, for the warrants, until we received the note from him, which has been put in—St. Swithin's-lane is about half a mile from us—this transaction was at about twelve or one o'clock—we did not send for the warrants at two, because we thought he might have been detained, having a very high opinion of him at that time, we had no idea that he would have done anything wrong—Change is over at half-past four—we did not send to St. Swithin's-lane till next day, after we had received the note marked A, when we ascertained, as he there stated, that they were sold—he had promised to pay 150l., in reduction of our balance, on the Wednesday or Thursday preceding—I had not taken 60l. in cash from him a short time before that, and a bill for 40l.—he did not pay me on that day 10l. to complete the 110l.—I think it must have been a fortnight before since he paid money—I do not know the amount that he then paid—I do not know that he paid monies at all since—I do not know the amount that was received from him a fortnight before, and have not looked to see—I did not think it was of consequences.

THOMAS BUCKTHORPE. I am a dealer in tea and coffee, and live at Nos. 1 and 2, Mincing-lane—I knew of the coffees coming by the Morning Star—on the 4th of June I was in the adjoining counting-house tasting the coffee, and heard a conversation between Mr. Oliver and the prisoner; but I did not enter into it, because it was Mr. Oliver's business to sell—Mr. Oliver came to me and said, "Smith has asked for the warrants, to examine them down at the docks with a friend, is there any objection to his having them?"—I said, "No, but he must return them within one hour"—and I believe I said to the prisoner, "Why, Smith, it is not necessary for you to have the warrants to go down to see these coffees, because they have been sampled, and the coffees are here"—he said he had a friend up from Newcastle, who wanted to purchase that description of coffee, and that he being a particular man would not purchase unless he examined the coffee himself—the prisoner then received the warrants from Oliver—I do not think I said anything to him at the time he received them—I think I felt the counting-house, and went into Fenchurch-street—I saw the prisoner again, I should think ten minutes or a quarter if an hour afterwards—I met him very near the corner of Rood-lane, as I was returning—he was not going towards the docks—we ran against each other—I said, "Smith, you are not going to the docks"—he said, "No, Sir, I am going to Gracechurch-street to meet my friend; I have the warrants here," holding up the warrants in his hand; which I knew were the warrants by the marks on them, by which I could distinguish them—I said, "Now mind, if going with your friend to the docks that you return them as you pass, or send them immediately you return from the docks, as we may want them"—he said, "Sir, rest assured I will do so"—we had further conversation, not connected with the business, it was about his getting married—he could not very well come from the docks without coming past Mincing-lane—Mr. Oliver had power to sell or do anything in my business, as much power as myself, I do not interface with these things—after receiving the second letter from the prisoner, I applied with Mr. Oliver at the Mansion-house—on that Saturday evening, as we could not find Smith the whole of the day, we sent on to his counting-house at ten o'clock—the clerk's answer was, that he was not at home—we sent there two or three times, and then applied at the Mansion-house; after which I received this letter, (produced), on the Monday morning; it was brought by a person

who is in Court, it is the prisoner's writing—(read—"Mr. Buck thorpe, —Sir, —I consider the course you have acted towards me is most shameful and uncalled-for; had I wished to have acted dishonourably towards you, I should hardly have taken up Dixon's bill and offered you a 40l. bill as good as a bank, one only a few days ago; I have paid you a great deal of money, and paid you very punctually too; in the present instance nearly all I owe you has become due at once, but in a very few days you would have been paid, as my prospects are too good for me to throw them away; in regard to the Morning Star, Mr. Oliver had repeatedly pressed me to buy them; I have had the warrants before, as long as I have now had them. On Friday, I thought I had a customer for them for the purpose of sampling; the party could not pay me until I got to Newcastle, and being particularly in want of some money to meet a pressing engagement, I borrowed an amount on them; but this I would not have done if I did not consider them as bought by me, as they really were; as the understanding was, that if I did not sell them I would bring them back again to you; Mr. Oliver even went so far as to say, that if I drew a bill upon the party to whom they were sold, that he was willing to take it—was not this making me the purchaser? I had fully intended to have taken the warrants up again on Monday morning, or paid for them, as I promised in my note of Saturday evening; but finding I am rather short I have left town, as I originally intended, or at least shall do so by the train this evening; and it now only rests for you to say, whether you will have money for the coffees or the warrants returned; at the same time I candidly tell you that, although I shall now leave town, I will not go home until I receive the invoice of the coffees, as rather than I would run the risk of being placed in the position you threaten, I would put a pistol to my head, or leave the country: my cousin, Mr. Robinson, will give you this; and he only knows where I shall be. If you give him the invoice, and show the confidence which you never had cause to lose, you will not find that confidence misplaced. I do not owe 500l. in the world—to you I owe more than half of that; and I ask, is it your policy to ruin me?")

Q. How long was it after receiving that letter that the prisoner was taken into custody? A. I think ten or twelve days—we sent out in every direction to find him—we sent, I think, 1400 miles after him.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you received cash and a bill for 40l., as he states, a few days before? A. I really cannot answer that question—my clerk keeps my books, but I believe it was only the exchange of a bill—Mr. Oliver has authority to buy and sell as much as myself—I authorized him to accompany the officer to Newcastle after this transaction—I sent him to the prisoner's father, from the best of feelings—I did not desire him to tell the father that if he would pay the money for the coffees I should be perfectly content—I desired him to see the father, to state to him what had transpired, and to know what was best to be done, and to see whether the prisoner was there—the letter just read was in answer to one written by Mr. Oliver, by my direction, stating that I intended going to the Mansion-house—I do not think I had received the first letter before I sent to find him—the letters came into Mr. Oliver's hands, and he handed them to me.

CHARLES BUNYARD. I am a grocer and tea-dealer, in Shoreditch—I have know the prisoner about a year and a half. On the 4th of June last I saw him, about three, or a quarter to three o'clock, I cannot say the time exactly—he asked me about some warrants, and showed me some that I had had some time ago—I had bought a portion of them some time ago—they were the same

warrants, I knew them—they did not turn out sound, and I returned them—they were warrants for the coffee by the Morning Star—I did buy them of him on the 4th—I said perhaps I could do something with them, I would see—he asked me to buy them—I cannot now say how much he wanted for them—he said something like 32s.—he said I might have them much lower than he had offered them to me previously—I cannot now call to mind the price he had offered them to me at, previously—it might have been 33s. or 34s.—I bought them before, but this time they were not bought—he did not go with me to Mr. Harrod—he gave them to me, and he was to call on me at my shop in the morning—he said he had a large sum of money to pay away, and asked me if I could buy them—I told him I could not them—I never was at Newcastle—he came on the morning of the 5th, and said that he wanted money very badly indeed—I forget now what I said—we had a good deal of conversation—he asked me if I could lend him some money on them—he did not at the time say exactly how much—he talked about having a customer, and that he could realize more money by them—he said, if I would let him have 50l. on them till the party from Newcastle who was going to buy them had had the samples, then he would take the coffee out of my hands and give me the money, by paying me for the use of them—I gave him 50l. on them, and they were to be forfeited if he did not redeem them in the course of two or three days—I had not the money at the time by me, and I borrowed a portion of it from Mr. Harrod, leaving the warrants as security for the money—I think he lent me 45l. for which I gave him a memorandum, and left the warrants with him—I did not introduce Harrod to Smith—I do not know that Mr. Harrod ever saw Smith—I gave the warrants to Harrod on the evening of the 4th of June, the same day that Smith gave them to me—Harrod lent me 45l. on them—that is a very usual thing with warrants—we went to sample them.

Cross-examined. Q. Then as far as you shared in the transaction it was this, that you advanced him 50l. on the warrants until he had the opportunity in the course of three or four days of seeing a gentleman from Newcastle to purchase them at a higher price? A. Yes, I was to retain them to see whether he succeeded with that person—he promised to write to me from Newcastle—persons do not buy warrants without they sample—I have heard from many in the trade that you can sample coffees without the warrants, by taking an order with you, but I never did it myself.

MR. CLARKSON to BUCKTHORPE. Q. Is there any doubt that you may sample coffees, or any other thing, by order? A. It depends upon whether warrants are specially endorsed, so that you have a power of getting a written order for the sampling—it would then be an authority, but they are generally sampled by the warrants—sometimes merchants have power from the holder of the warrants to give an order, as many circumstances may occur to prevent your getting the warrants for a week or ten days after you have purchased the coffee—it must be an order from the broker, specially endorsed by the merchant who has imported the coffee, because he is in possession—I may buy coffee to-day and not apply for the warrants until my months has expired—I am not in possession of the warrants until the Saturday following; they then present the warrants to me, and I give the money—it is not every day's practice to sample coffee from an order in the name of any person whose name is in the dock-books—it is not constantly or frequently done—it is done sometimes, under peculiar circumstances.

MR. BALLANTINE. Q. If person want to sample by an order, there must be a special indorsement on the warrant? A. Yes, and unless that exists, no order could be given upon which samples could be taken.

MR. CHARKSON. Q. How are the authorities at the Docks to know anything about a special indorsement upon a document which they never see? A. The Dock Company make out the warrants, and issue them, the same as a bank note, and the goods are deposited in their possession.

CHARLRS HARROD. I am a grocer in Cambridge-street, Whitechapel. I advanced 45l. on the warrants—they are now in Court, they are in my possession, or the possession my representatives.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you know that coffee may be sampled by order? A. Yes, it is done every day, as long as they have the warrants numbered—every warrant has a number put on it.

WILLIAM MORTON (policeman.) On the 23rd of June last, in consequence of information, I went to Evans's hotel, Covent-garden—I knocked at the door of a room there, it was opened by the prisoner—I at once seized him—he put his right hand into his coat pocket, and pulled out a pistol—after some time I rescued it from him—he again put his hand into his pocket and pulled out another—I got that away from him—the pistol were loaded with ball and powder, and capped—I said nothing to him about the present charge.

Cross-examined. Q. Let me look at the warrant you had? A. I had no warrant; it was not on this charge that I arrested him—I did not go to New—castle, that was an officer named Bradley.

HENRY OLIVER re-examined. The value of the warrants is 90l., at 34s. a cwt., and about 100l. at public sale.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. You went to Newcastle with the officer? A. I did—I saw the prisoner's father, and was with him about half-an-hour, or perhaps a little more—it was certainly not two hours, and I think not more than one—I did not notice the time—I told the father I had come down with an officer to take the prisoner into custody—I did not tell him that I had come down to see what was best to be done—I consulted with him as to what was best to be done—but that was more with a view of getting possession of the property that he had made away with—that was my object in going there—I said that he owed us a large balance, I did not ask for it—his father was aware that he had done business for some time with our house—he asked if there was any money owing, and I then told him the amount—there was a long conversation, but I cannot recollect the particulars—I have told you all as near as I can recollect—I think in answer to an inquiry, I told the father the value of these coffees, and the amount of the balance on the previous credits—Bradley went with me—I do not know what has become of the warrant, I did not have it—I charged him at the mansion-house with obtaining the warrants—I did not invite the father to pay the money for the coffees—I did not ask him to pay any money whatever—I did not in any manner invite him to pay the amount of the warrants for the coffee—I said nothing to the effect of requesting him to pay the balance of 270l.—I said nothing having for its object or effect to induce him to pay for the value of the warrants, or the amount of the balance—I did not offer to withdraw the officer it he would pay the amount of the balance, nor anything to that effect—I should not be liable for the loss, supposing this was a sale—I should not have sought for the prisoner at Newcastle, but for his giving his direction—we knew that his father lived there—we had no other means of finding out where he was, except by going to his father's

Mr. Justice Erle left it to the Jury to say whether the property had been entirely parted with; or merely for a temporary purpose, if the latter, a case of larceny was established.

GUILTY. Aged 31.— Confined Three Months.

NEW COURT.—Friday, August 20th, 1847.

PRESENT—Mr. Alderman FAREBROTHER; Sir CHAPMAN MARSHALL, Knight, Alderman; and Mr. RECOREDER.

Fifth Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18470816-1817

1817. WILLIAM CASLAKE was indicted for stealing 1 half-crown, the money of James James, his master; to which he pleaded

GUILTY. Aged 14.— Confined One Month, and Whipped.

Reference Number: t18470816-1818

1818. GAETANO RITA was indicted for stealing 1 brass-weighing pillar, value 4s., and 1 scale-pillar, 4s.; the goods of Josiah Wenborn, his master; to which he pleaded

GUILTY , received a good character. Aged 23.— Confined One Month.

Reference Number: t18470816-1819

1819. BERNARD BERL was indicted for stealing 1 breast-pin, value 6l.; the goods of Richard Wilcox Fairlam.

MR. RYLAND conducted the Prosecution.

RICHARD CHARLES FAIRLAM. I am son of, and assistant to, Richard Wilcox Fairlam, a jeweller, of 33, Ludgate-street. On Friday, the 2nd of July, about half-past three o'clock, the prisoner, another man, and a woman came to the shop—the other man asked to see some diamond pins—I took out a tray, and showed it to him—they looked at them—the prisoner took some out—he looked at a large one, and said he wanted something like that—he laid one of the pins down on the counter, and put one into the tray—the other man explained a diamond pin that they wanted, and another article—he acted as an interpreter, and said he wanted a pin with a stone in the centre, and other diamonds round it—the woman took a ring off her finger, and the other man said he wanted a ring like that—my father said he would get the articles by five o'clock that afternoon—they went away, they did not buy anything—after they were gone I missed a diamond pin, worth 6l., which had been in the tray which I had shown them—I saw it again at the station the same evening when the prisoner was in custody—this is it, it is my father's.

Cross-examined by Mr. CHARNOCK. Q. Is your father here? A. No—he has no partner—the prisoner did not speak at all—the other man was engaging my father's attention by talking to him—there was a small ticket on this pin, but there is no mark on it—we had this diamond mounted—I know it perfectly well, by having had the handling of it for about six months—we had four or five of these pins of a jeweler in Clerkenwell—one of them we sold, and I have one in my pocket—the gold part of them was alike, but the diamonds were different—they were not all the same price—some of the diamonds were larger and some smaller than this one—I will swear that this is not the one that was sold—I am not sure that one was sold—I believe we

had five altogether, and I think we have three left—I believe we sold one some months ago—I cannot say whether I or my father sold it—this is a larger diamond than the one we sold—we have about a dozen diamond pins in our shop—the prisoner did not speak at all in English; I believe he spoke in French—I do not know what he said.

MR. RYLAND. Q. Did he seem to conversing with the other man? A. Yes—the pin we sold was a smaller diamond than this—I am confident that that one was not on the tray—I am certain this is one of the pins that they saw.

WILLIAM NEWMAN (City policeman, 67). On the 2nd of July I received information, and watched the prisoner, another man and a female—I first saw them in a hosier's shop in the poultry—they came out together, went to the corner of Charlotte-row, called a cab and got into it—the cab drove a short distance and the other man looked out at the window—he saw me talking to the person who gave me information, and they all three jumped out of the cab on the other side, and ran away—I pursued and took the prisoner—I found this pin stuck in his breast—this diamond and pearl ring were in his waistcoat-pocket, two rings were on his fingers, and he had 4l. 5s. 10d. which has been given up to him; and 3d. in copper, a pencil-case, a gold watch, a chain, and a key, three pieces of silk handkerchiefs; one piece containing seven handkerchiefs, one six, and the other, three—they are new and not made up, and another new silk handkerchief which is made up, and a foreign gold coin.

GUILTY.

Reference Number: t18470816-1820

1820. BERNARD BERL was again indicted for stealing 847 handkerchiefs, value 5l. 17s. 6d.; the goods of Austin Withers, in his dwelling-house.

MR. RYLAND conducted the Prosecution.

AUSTIN WITHERS. I am a hosier. I carry on business, and occupy a house in the parish of St. Mildred the Virgin, in the Poultry. On Friday afternoon, the 2nd of July, between four and five o'clock, the prisoner came into my shop with another man, and a woman—the other man who acted as an interpreter, asked to look at some goods—he desired to have some red and white silk handkerchiefs—I showed him some—the prisoner looked at them, and they talked together—they pointed at another pile of handkerchiefs—I produced them, they looked at them, and each man pulled a piece of handkerchief out of the fold, and spread it all over the counter over the other goods as if to look at it—the other man then said he would take five handkerchiefs; which I cut off, and did up in paper—they were cut from different pieces—the prisoner then offered me a foreign coin, I said I could not change it—the party who was acting as interpreter said they would call again—the prisoner took back the coin, and they went away—they did not take the handkerchiefs—in about ten minutes I missed some handkerchiefs—I then heard that one of the party had been taken—I went to the station, and saw the prisoner there, and some handkerchiefs, but none of them were mine—I could not tell how many I missed, because we have a very large stock, but I thought I missed some—I heard nothing more of my handkerchiefs till the Saturday week following, when they were brought to my shop by a policeman, who stated that they were found in Coleman-street—there were forty-seven—my young man examined them, and saw

they were all mine—they had my mark on them—these are them—I can identify every one of them—I examined my stock between that Friday, the 2nd of July, and the Saturday week following, and ascertained that I had missed some, but I could not tell the number that were gone, or exactly of what sort, we have so many sorts—these are all my handkerchiefs, they have the tickets on them with the mark in my own writing—this is one of the pieces that I showed to the prisoner and the other man—this is one piece from which I cut a handkerchief off for them—there were four handkerchiefs on this piece, I cut off one handkerchief for them, and here are now three remaining—my impression is, that these others are the same that I showed to the party, they all bear my shop-mark.

Cross-examined by MR. CHARNOCK. Q. Your attention was not drawn to this till the following Saturday week? A. No—I knew some handkerchiefs were gone—I have a good many—I cannot tell how many—I could not clearly tell what sort I missed—there is one person in my shop who sells handkerchiefs, besides myself—I am out sometimes, and then my young man sells—we have a book in which we put down the amount of what is sold, but not the particulars—we generally take off the tickets when we sell pieces of silk handkerchiefs—I can tell by the pattern that this is one that I showed that day to the prisoner and the others—we only had one piece of this pattern, and this has the ticket on it—here it is, "Extra Rich Corah"—the writing on it is mine—they are worth about 5l. 17s. 6d.

WILLIAM COURTNAY (City policeman, 79.) I produce these handkerchiefs—on the 9th of July I received information, and went to Messrs. Crowder and Maynard's, the solicitors, 57, Coleman-street—I saw Brittain, their porter, he gave me some information—I went up stairs, and Mr. Crosby produced to me this parcel—it contains these handkerchiefs—I received information and went to the prosecutors.

WILLIAM CROSBY. I am one of the partners at 57, Coleman-street—this parcel was brought to me by the porter, and was delivered to Courtnay by me, or by my direction.

JOHN BRITTAIN. I am porter to Messrs. Crowder and Maynard. I have the care of the house, and lock it up—it is open from nine o'clock in the morning till eight in the evening, during which time any person can go down stairs and deposit anything there—on the morning of the 8th of July we were having coals in—(we had had coals in several days before, these were the last we had)—I found this bundle behind the coal-cellar door, took it up stairs, and delivered it to Mr. Jay—the policeman went up with me afterwards—I found the same bundle that I had left there—the officer took possession of it.

Cross-examined. Q. All you know is that you found a parcel behind the cellar door on the 8th of July? A. Yes—I took it up stairs, put it on the ground, and opened it in Mr. Jay's presence—I counted the pieces, and left it there.

GEORGE HARVEY JAY. Brittain brought up the bundle, and left it with me—I directed one of our clerks to take an account of it and tie it up, and wait till further information could be obtained—he took it into the clerks' office—I think I saw Courtney there when he came about it—I saw the same bundle being examined by him and Brittain—I do not speak to this bundle being the same.

JAMES WETHERHEAD. I am a coal-porter. I went into the cellar at 57, Coleman-street, and found this bundle behind the door—I gave it to Brittain.

WILLIAM NORMAN (City policeman, 67.) On the 2nd of July I saw the prisoner in the prosecutor's shop with a man and a woman—I saw them come out—I apprehended the prisoner, and found a foreign coin on him—I did not find any handkerchiefs—he came out of the shop, got into a cab, then got out and ran down Mansion House-street, and along Lothbury—he did not pass Messrs. Crowder's premises—the other man and woman went up the Poultry westward—if they chose to turn down the Old Jewry they would come to Messrs. Crowder's.

AUSTIN WITHERS re-examined. Q. Can you tell who bought the one handkerchief from the piece which now contains three, and which did contain four? A. The person who spoke English, said he would have them—I do not know who they were for—the prisoner offered to pay for the five that they bought—the remaining part of that piece of handkerchiefs is in the bundle that was found, and among the handkerchiefs I afterwards missed.

Cross-examined. Q. You did not miss them till the Saturday week afterwards? A. I missed some, but I could not tell what.

COURT. Q. Did you ever see the piece which now contains three handkerchiefs, and which did contain four, after the prisoner had offered to pay for that one handkerchief? A. I did not, till they were brought back by the officer.

Prisoner (through an interpreter.) I came from Dover to London two days before; I met those two parties in town, and was very glad to find company, as I could not speak a word of English; I asked them to accompany me and show me over the town; I went into several shops, but did not buy anything; I have been twenty years in Paris; six years ago I had a clothes-mart there, the officer has my licence; I throw myself on the mercy of the Court; I have never been in any trouble.

GUILTY. Aged 27.— Confined One Year.

Reference Number: t18470816-1821

1821. JAMES HART was indicted for feloniously assaulting William Markwick, and cutting and wounding him, with intent to prevent the apprehension of a person unknown.

MR. RYLAND conducted the Prosecution.

WILLIAM MARKWICK (City policeman, 370.) On the night of the 13th of July, I was on duty in Parson's-court, near Bride-lane—I saw two men fighting, and ten or twelve persons standing round—the prisoner was one—I went towards the two men who were fighting—directly they saw me they ran away—I went after them, and laid hold of one of them—I do not know who he was—the prisoner came up and said to me, "Let the man put on his shirt"—I said to the prisoner, "Jemmy, I know you very well; you have nothing at all to do with the row; stand back, you have no business here"—I had then got slight hold of the man's arm, while he was putting on his shirt—I was not hindering him from doing so—the prisoner came up and struck me right and left—he had a brick in his left hand—this is it—he struck me with it on the forehead—blood followed from the blow—he struck me on the right temple with his other hand—the blow stunned me—I seized him at the moment—we had a long struggle together, and both fell on the ground—the prisoner was above me—I managed t hold him till another policeman came—I went to Mr. Child's the next day—I was under his care for a week—I have known the prisoner these five years—he knew me very well—I was in uniform.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. This man is a fruit-seller, in Farringdon-market?

A. No, he sells it about the street—he might have been drinking a little, he was not drunk—I did not prevent the man who had been fighting, from putting on his shirt—none of the other policemen came up till after I had been struck with the brick—this piece of brick was picked up by a female the same morning—I do not know whether that female is here—I was in Bride-lane when the brick was given me, just on the spot—there are bricks there—I do not know what became of the other man who was fighting—I did not catch him at all—I seized one man—he said, "Let me put on my shirt," and then the prisoner said, "Let the man put on his shirt"—I swear I did not refuse to do so—I did not let the other man go, and lay hold of the prisoner before he touched me at all—I swear that I did not let the other man go, and take the prisoner for interrupting me in my duty, before he struck me—that was the cause of my letting the other man go—when the other policemen came up, there were three taking the prisoner to the station—I afterwards struck the prisoner once in the face—I said, "Will you go quietly?"—I did not see what became of the brick—I saw it fall from his hand—it was not some person in the crowd who threw the brick at me—I do not know that the prisoner was once in the employ of Messrs. Deacons, the carries—I do not know of his having fallen from a wagon—some persons came to the station on behalf of the prisoner, and left their address—I did not persuade them not to go before the Magistrate—I did not make any representation to induce them not to go—Mr. Twyford, of Bride-lane, gave his address—he complained of the violence which I and the other policemen had used towards the prisoner—Mr. Saunders, a painter, came and made the same complaint, and left his address—I swear I did not make representations to them to induce them not to appear before the Magistrate—I did not say things which were calculated to prevent them from appearing before the Magistrate, or with the intention of preventing them.

. FRANCIS STANWAY (City-policeman, 311.) On the 13th of July, about three o'clock in the morning, I was on duty in Fleet-street—I went to Bride-lane and saw the prisoner and Markwick struggling—Markwick was without a hat, and was bleeding from the side of his head—he had hold of the prisoner—I took hold of the prisoner—we had a great deal of trouble to get him along—he kicked me several times in going to the station—I knew him before—I believe he is a quiet man when sober.

JOHN BIRCH (City-policeman, 350.) I was on duty—I went to Bride-lane—I saw Markwick bleeding from both his temples—they were trying to take the prisoner to the station—he put his left leg between Markwick's legs and tried to throw him down.

GEORGE BORLACE CHILDS. I am surgeon to the police force of the City—on the evening of the 14th of July Markwick called on me, in consequence of some injuries which he stated he had received in an affray with the prisoner—he had a contused would over the left eye-brow, half an inch long, which reached to the bone—he had received a wound on the right eye—he complained of great headach and soreness—I dressed the wounds and did what was necessary—he was invalided seven days—the wound on the left eye was in immediate proximity with the temporal artery—there was considerable contusion about the left eye—the wound on the right eye was by a man's fist—I think that on the left eye was not from a fist—such a substance as this brick would occasion it.

Cross-examined. Q. If it had been thrown, it would have produced those appearances? A. I should have expected more serious consequences if it had been thrown—if it were struck, a man would draw his head back, and the force of

the blow would be broken—there never was any danger from these wounds—they were not of vital importance—they would have been, if the blow had been a little further—the man complained of violent headach, which showed there had been some slight concussion.

MR. PAYNE called

JOHN SAUNDERS. I am an upholsterer, and live in Brazier's-buildings—I am in the employ of Mr. Cummings, of Hatton-garden—on the 13th of July, about two o'clock in the morning, I was coming home—I heard a noise in Parson's-court, walked down, and saw two men stripped and fighting—I saw the prisoner—he was not interfering in the fight at all—Markwick came up, and took hold of one of the men who were stripped—the other ran away—the one Markwick had hold of, asked as a favour to be allowed to put his shirt on, which he refused—the prisoner then asked Markwick to allow the man to put his shirt on—he took no notice, but was dragging the man to the station-house—the prisoner again asked him to allow the man to put his shirt on—Markwick released his hold of the man, and took hold of the prisoner—the prisoner had done nothing then but spoken to him—the prisoner was struggling to get away from Markwick, and they fell down—I think the prisoner was undermost—I saw the prisoner strike Markwick once—that was after he had let the other man go, and had hold of the prisoner, and had got him very near the Twelve Bells—I observed that on the road when the other policeman had got the prisoner, Markwick struck him two or three times with his firs on the head—I went to the station, and made a complaint of the violence they had used to the prisoner—I left my right address—I did not go before the Magistrate—I was sent a little way out of town by my employer, or I should have gone—I should consider, according to his size, that Markwick hand the best of it when he and the prisoner were struggling—I had no acquaintance with the prisoner—I have known him by selling things about the street.

MR. RYLAND. Q. What were you doing out at that time in the morning? A. I had been with a few friends at the west end of the town—a poor person in the trade had been out of work and he had a raffle—we had not been there until three o'clock—it was about half-past two—the men had not begun to fight—the man asked Markwick quietly to let him put on his shirt, and he refused—I heard him say, "Never mind your shirt"—he might have said more, but I was not able to hear it—the prisoner then came, and merely said, "Let him put his shirt on, master"—I will swear that I never heard him call him any vulgar name—Markwick told him to mind his own business—I did not hear him say. "I know you very well, you have nothing to do with the row"—the prisoner said to him a second time, "D—n it, let him put his shirt on"—I could not swear, in the noise and confusion, whether he said "D—n it"—or, "D—n you"—he was within half a yard of him—I did not see any brick—after the prisoner had said a second time, "Let him put his shirt on," I saw the prosecutor seize him by the collar, and then the prisoner struck him once—I could not see with which had he struck, I only saw him strike him once—there was a lot of people round, I could not see all that took place—I was five or six yards off—I was looking on—I could not swear whether he struck him more than one blow—I saw some blood just over Markwick's left eye—I did not see a bruise on his right eye—the prisoner struck him just over the left eye—I could not swear that he had not a brick in the hand that he hit him with—I did not see anything in his hand—I should say there could not have been anything in his hand without my seeing it—he struck him with his hand clenched—there

could not have been a large piece of brick in it—I saw some blood—I could not say whether it was immediately after the blow, it was within two or three minutes—I had seen the prisoner before—he had not been at the meeting—I had not seen him that night—no one persuaded me not to go to the Magistrate's—no one persuaded me one way or the other—I should have gone but my master sent me out.

WILLIAM TWYFORD. I am an accountant, and live in Bride-lane—I was at my own house on the morning in question—I was roused out of bed, hearing a great noise—I looked out of window, and saw Markwick and the prisoner with his back against the wall as if he were throttling him—shortly after, two other policemen ran down the lane and took the prisoner into custody—they walked up the lane together, during which time Markwick struck the prisoner several times violently in the face and on the head—I put on my clothes and went to the station—I made a complaint of the violence of the police, and left my address—I did not go before the Magistrate as I did not hear anything of it.

COURT. Q. Had you any acquaintance with any of these policeman? A. Not the slightest—they are the policemen of that district—I know them on the beat—the noise I heard was of a person being strangled, of a man crying in distress—that was the prisoner, while Markwick had him up against the wall—I did not see the fighting people—the prisoner was not kicking when I saw him.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY of an aggravated assault. Aged 30.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18470816-1822

1822. CHARLES SMITH was indicted for feloniously assaulting Jane Smith, and cutting and wounding her with intent to do her some grievous bodily harm.

MR. RYLAND conducted the Prosecution.

JANE SMITH. On the 13th of Aug., I and the prisoner, who is my husband, were living at 31, Monkwell-street, near Falcom-square—I remember his coming home between three and four o'clock that afternoon—he was not sober—I told him his dinner was ready—he said he should like to lie down—he did lie down, and told me to rouse him in an hour—I let him lie about an hour and a half—I then awoke him—he came down, and we had tea—we had no quarrel, we were quite comfortable—as I was putting away the tea-things he saw part of his work lying on the table, and said, "Where is the other part?"—I said, "I don't know, you have not left it anywhere, have you?"—he said, "No, I have not," and he then struck me once or twice on my face and back—I got out of the room, and was going down stairs—before I left the room I saw him take a file in his hand, as if to go into the shop to work—he uses a file—when I had got down about three stairs, I found the file in my back—I took it out, and found some blood—I believe I called out, "O Baxter, see here at my back!"—I did not observe where my husband was—I went into Baxter's room, and my back was washed—my husband came into the room while my back was being washed, and struck me again—I went to Mr. Childs, the surgeon—I am not under his care now.

ALEXANDER BAXTER. I live on the ground-floor of this hours—the prisoner and his wife lodge on the second floor—on Friday evening, the 13th of Aug. I heard a quarrel in their room, and then heard Mrs. Smith coming down, making some noise—I went out of my room and met her on

the staircase—she showed me a file, and said, "Baxter, I think he has done it at last"—she thought she had received her death-blow—I took her into my back room—I was coming out to get some cold water, to warm it to bathe her back with, and met the prisoner—I asked him to bring some warm water—he brought it—I was then bathing her back—the prisoner was looking on, and he suddenly came forward and struck her—I was doing what I thought was right, and my wife was in the room—I called in a neighbour first, and then a policeman.

JOHN SKINNER (City policeman, 141.) Last Friday evening I was called into the house, and saw Mrs. Smith lying on a bed—her back was bleeding—her husband came in soon afterwards—I said, "How came you to use such violence to your wife?"—he said he was very sorry, he did not do it for the purpose, that he was in the act of striking her with the file in his hand, and the file went into her back—I asked Mrs. Smith if she wished to make any charge against her husband—she said, no, she did not think he did it intentionally—I sent Mrs. Smith to Mr. Lloyd, the nearest medical man, and Mr. Child saw her afterwards.

WILLIAM WILKINS (City policeman, 166.) I assisted in taking the prisoner—I produce this file—it has a sharp end—I found it in the room up stairs.

ALEXANDER BAXTER re-examined. Mrs. Smith took this file into the back room and laid it down.

GEORGE BORLASE CHILD. I am a surgeon. I was sent for to the house, examined Mrs. Smith's back, and found she had received an oblique punctured wound, close on the left border of the shoulder-blade towards the spine—she had lost a considerable quantity of blood—it was a triangular wound, such an instrument as this file would certainly have caused it—I should say it was done with this—I considered it likely to be dangerous; it was over an important artery, if it had not struck against the shoulder-blade it would most likely have entered the lung—the end of the file is not sharp therefore it must have been struck with great force.

GUILTY. Aged 38.— Confined One Year, and to enter into his own recognisances to be of good behaviour for Five Years.

Reference Number: t18470816-1823

1823. WILLIAM THOMPSON was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Archibald Keightley and others, about four o'clock in the night of the 31st of July, at St. Andrew, Holborn, with intent to steal; and stealing therein 1 hat-brush, value 1s.; the property of William Austin.

MR. PRENDERGAST conducted the Prosecution.

CHARLES CULMER (policeman, F. 117.) On the 1st of Aug., about twenty minutes before five o'clock in the morning, I was on duty in Chancery-lane, and heard something at No. 39; I went to the door, pushed it, and it opened—I went into the passage and found the prisoner close to the staircase, with a coat under his arm, in the pocket of which I found this brush—I found the premises broken open—a person could go from there to No. 43, by going out at the first-floor, and going on the leads which cover the back offices—I found that a person had gone in that direction—we traced the marks of corded trowsers—I found this file in the prisoner's possession—there were marks outside the window of the back office, at No. 43, where he had pushed it to try to break the glass—they were marks which could have been made by this file—it fitted them—the lock had been forced off a cupboard in the same office—the house is in the parish of St. Andrew, Holborn.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. The house, No. 43, is connected by the leads with No. 39, where you found the prisoner? A. Yes, all that has been lost from No. 43 is this hat-brush, supposed to belong to a clerk there—this is my mark on it—I traced the mark of corded trowsers in the dust on the window-lead—the prisoner had corded trowsers on—he said a person had called him in, and asked him to hold the things that were found on him till he came back—he said he was going to call on Mr. Mark, in Union-court, Holborn, to go to bathe in the Serpentine.

WILLIAM REED WHEELER. I am housekeeper at No. 43, Chancery-lane—it belongs to Archibald Keightley and other—on Saturday night, the 31st of July, about half-past nine o'clock, I shut up the house—I shut the back parlour—the window was shut and fastened—in the morning, about the half-past five o'clock, I was awoke by the dog barking—I found the door of the back parlour was not as it ought to be—the lock had been jammed—I forced the door open with my foot, found the window wide open, and the place in confusion—a desk was broken open, and a press and a bookcase—this brush belonged to Mr. William Austin—I have no doubt it was in that room that night—it was taken from the drawer under the window—I do not know whether anything else was taken—the place was ransacked, and everything strewed about the room.

Cross-examined. Q. Is Mr. Austin here? A. No—I am certain this brush is his—he would not part with it on any account—it is a keepsake—there was a square of glass taken out—they had then raised the sash, and got in.

COURT. Q. Was any valuable property removed? A. No, not at all—the two drawers where the property was, escaped.

THOMAS BARTLETT. I live at No. 39, Chancery-lane—the prisoner had no business on my premises.

GUILTY.

Reference Number: t18470816-1824

1824. WILLIAM THOMPSON was again indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Bartlett, at St. Andrew, Holborn, in the night of the 31st of July, and stealing therein 1 diamond ring, value 2l. 10s.; 1 coat, 10s.; 2 candlesticks, 24s.; and 1/2 a yard of woolen cloth, 1s.; his goods.

MR. PRENDERGAST conducted the Prosecution.

CHARLES CULMER (policeman F 117.) On Sunday morning the 1st of August, I was going down Chancery-lane about twenty minutes before five o'clock, and heard a noise at No. 39—I went to the side-door in Cursitor-street, pushed it, and it went open—I got in and saw the prisoner—he had this coat under his arm—these candlesticks were wrapped up in the coat—this ring was in the pocket—this hat was on the prisoner's head—he had exchanged this old one for it, which was left behind; it exactly fits him—I alarmed the house, locked the street door, put the key in my pocket, and said to the prisoner, "I shall search you and see what there is about you"—he pulled out this file, a knife, and a small bag of matches, and said the property was given him by a person to hold till he came back—I said, "If that is the case I shall lock the door and let him knock"—no one knocked—I looked about the premises and found a pane of glass had been broken in a glass door in the lobby—I found the swing window of the water-closet was also broken—the house had been entered by the back kitchen from the area—a person must have dropped from the wall into the

area, forced the bolt off the outer door, and broken the square of glass which adjoins the kitchen, and by that means have entered the house—there were marks of this file indifferent places—I have reason to think the person must have gone to No. 43 first—he could have got on the leads from the adjoining wall.

THOMAS BARTLETT. I am a surgeon, and live at No. 39, Chancery-lane, in the parish of St. Andrew, Holborn—on Saturday night, the 31st of July, I went to bed at a quarter before eleven o'clock—the house was then secure, and the kitchen door was shut—it opens to a small area—I was alarmed about five o'clock in the morning by the ringing of the bell; the front door was open, and the kitchen door which leads out on the area had some panes of glass broken, the bolt had been violently wrenched off; the door was open—these are my candlesticks, they were just inside the front door when I came down; they had been on the table in the drawing-room the night before—this ring is mine; it was in the pocket of this coat, which is mine—it was in a small room on the ground floor—this is my hat—the prisoner had it on his head; I found a hat which did not belong to me, but which fits the prisoner exactly, in a room up stairs—there is a door which opens on the leads, two panes of glass in that door had been broken, the bolts violently wrenched off, and there were impressions where this file had been used—the person had got in as far as where the hat was, and could not get any further on account of a door.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. Is there a room on the ground floor belonging to you? A. Yes—I do not know the prisoner at all—I am not aware of his having any connexion with anybody on my premises—I do not suspect any person—the prisoner would know nothing of my premises.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY. Aged 18.— Confined One Year.

THIRD COURT.—Friday, August 20th, 1847.

PRESENT—Mr. COMMON SERJEANT and EDWARD BULLOCK, Esq.

First Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18470816-1825

1825. DANIEL BROWN was indicted for stealing 4lbs. weight of lead, value 4d.; the goods of the East and West India Dock Company, his masters; to which he pleaded

GUILTY. Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18470816-1826

1826. JOHN WILSON was indicted for stealing 2 coats, value 3l.; the goods of Joseph Charles (since deceased.)

GEORGE CHARLES. I am a tailor, and live at No. 171, Fleet-street. On the 24th of June, after one o'clock in the day, I missed two coats—they were my father's, Joseph Charles', property—they have not been found.

JOHN SPINKS. I live in Fetter-lane. On the 24th of June, about one o'clock, I saw the prisoner go into Mr. Charles' shop, and come out with some coats on his arm—I am sure there was more than one coat.

Prisoner. Q. I was not taken till a month afterwards; what do you swear to me by? A. By your face—I knew you by sight for a couple of months, by passing along Ship-yard.

GUILTY.** † Aged 17.— Transported for Seven Years.

Before Edward Bullock, Esq.

Reference Number: t18470816-1827

1827. WILLIAM WATKINS was indicted for stealing 1 handkerchief, value 1s., from the person of a man whose name is unknown, having been before convicted of felony.

JOSEPH DALTON (City policeman, 366.) On the 15th of July, about a quarter past twelve o'clock, I was in St. Paul's Churchyard, I saw the prisoner followed him into Cheapside, and saw him follow a gentleman by Bow Churchyard—he took the gentleman's right coat pocket up with his right hand, and took the handkerchief out with his left—the gentleman got away, I did not know who he was—the prisoner told me he was in great distress.

Prisoner. I am guilty, and throw myself on the mercy of the Court.

THOMAS BROWN (policeman.) I produce a certificate of the prisoner's former conviction—(read—Convicted March 1847, and confined four months)—I was present at the trial—he is the person.

GUILTY.* Aged 19.— Confined Twelve Months.

Before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18470816-1828

1828. WILLIAM SEYMOUR was indicted for stealing 2 handkerchiefs, value 4s., the goods of George Bean.

WILLIAM MALYON. (City policeman, 456.) On the 6th of Aug., about a quarter to eight o'clock in the evening, I was on duty in Gutter-lane, Cheapside, I saw the prisoner, and asked him where those handkerchiefs were, he made no answer—I pulled his coat open, and saw two handkerchiefs in his breast—I took them out, these are them—they were not found in this paper—the ticket was in his trowsers pocket.

HENRY WALKER. I am shopman to George Bean, hosier, of No. 98, Cheapside. I lost some handkerchiefs; and had seen them safe at seven o'clock, which was half-an-hour before—these are them, they are George Bean's, my master's—this is the ticket which was on them—it could not be blown off—they were inside the shop.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked them up in Cheapside.

GUILTY.** Aged 27.— Transported for Seven Years.

Before Edward Bullock, Esq.

Reference Number: t18470816-1829

1829. JOHN SEALY was indicted for embezzlement.

GEORGE THOMPON. I live in Coal-yard, Drury-lane, and deal in wood—the prisoner was in my service. On the 5th of July I sent him with some wood to Mrs. Lawrence—he was to receive the money, and bring it back to me—he never returned—I gave notice to the police.

LUCY LAWRENCE. On the 5th of July the prisoner came to me with thirteen bundles of wood—I paid him 3s. 6d. for his master.

Prisoner. Q. Am I the only person who brought wood to you from Mr. Thompson? A. You are the only person I paid money to.

Prisoner's Defence. I never received the money at all.

GUILTY. Aged 27.— Confined Three Months.

Before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18470816-1830

1830. MARGARET ENGLISH was indicted for embezzlement.

ELIZABETH JOY. I am wife of Thomas Joy, a milkman of Marylebone-street, St. James's—the prisoner was in my employ—if she received money it was

her duty to pay it to me morning and afternoon—if she received 1s. on the 23rd of May from Mrs. Keeling, or 31/2d. from Mrs. Nash on the 15th of June, or 3d. from Rachel Charlton on the 16th of June, she has not paid me any of those sums.

Prisoner. I told you your place was too hard for me; you used to keep me till ten o'clock at night. Witness. I did not—(referring to her book) you did give me 10 1/2d., but it was on the 16th of May, a long time before this—I never went to Mrs. Keeling's or Mrs. Charlton's in my life.

ANN KEELING. On the 3rd of May I paid the prisoner 1s.

Prisoner. I gave you 1 1/2d. out. A. You did not, the debt was 1s.

RACHAEL CHARLTON. On the 16th of June 1 paid the prisoner 3 1/2d.

SABRINA NASH. On the 15th of June 1 paid the prisoner 3d.

Prisoner. Q. Was not the other servant with me? A. Yes—Mrs. Joy did not tell me you were going to leave—I did not know it.

Prisoner's Defence. I did pay Mrs. Joy, and I summoned her to Castle-street, Leicester-square, for my wages.

MRS. JOY re-examined. She did summon me—I had told the policeman to look for her, on Tuesday the 22nd, which was before that—she summoned me, I think, about a month after—it was for a week's wages—I had paid her 1s. of it, and she was to bring me Mrs. Keeling's address on the Monday or Tuesday, but she never did—I never knew her lodging.

ROBERT CHICKLEY (policeman) Mrs. Joy told me to look for the prisoner about a month before she was apprehended—I did not hear of the charge for wages till after that—Mrs. Joy could not have heard that there was a summons against her.

THOMAS JOY. I heard of a summons for wages against my wife—she appeared, I did not—the money was paid—it was 8s.—the prisoner only got 7s., as she had 1s. in advance.

JURY. Q. What was the reason she was not paid her wages? A. Because we wanted to know Mrs. Keeling's address—she did not come for her wages after she left.

Prisoner (to Mrs. Joy.) Q. Did not I come on Monday? A. No—you were not in my employ nine months, only four or five—I had a false character with you—I never saw you in Marylebone-street—you sent another party about the summons, and I could not take you into custody.

JURY. Q. Has she always paid you money honestly? A. No, there was always a scrupling—she did not ask for her wages before she left—I discharged her, and said, "When you find out where Mrs. Keeling lives I will pay you"—she told me Mrs. Keeling lived in Broad-street, and had afterwards said she had removed into Little Portland-street—I found that was a wrong address, and then told the policeman to look after her—I had no knowledge then that she was going to summon me.

Prisoner. Q. Did not I tell you so, and you said, "Do your best?" A. No—you told me Mrs. Keeling had moved, but did not tell me she had moved again.

JURY. Q. Where did you find Mrs. Keeling? A. At. Mrs. Hall's, who keeps a dairy in Portland-street—I did not misunderstand the prisoner—she told me it was at Mrs. Dowell's—I said, "Dowell's is in Titchfield-street"—I enter the customers' names and addresses in a book, but I had the false address of Mrs. Keeling after she moved—I told them at the County Court that I charged the prisoner with embezzlement, but not till after they had paid her the money.

GUILTY.* Aged 18.— Confined Six Months.

There was a former conviction charged against the prisoner, but Thomas Flower (policeman, E 71) having stated that fact in the hearing of the Jury, the Court did not allow it to be proved.

Before Edward Bullock, Esq.

Reference Number: t18470816-1831

1831. SAREH SNELLING was indicted for stealing 1 silver mouth-piece, value 1s; 1 stone, 1s.; 2 scarfs, 1l.; 1 sheet, 2s,; 1 pair of trowsers, 18s.; 1 shawl, 2s.; 1 petticoat, 4s.; 1 handkerchief 2s.; and 1 apron, 6d.; the goods of George William Umpleby, her master.

FANNY ANN UMPLEBY. I am wife of George William Umpleby, a woollendraper—the prisoner was my servant of all-work—I began to lose things three days after she came—she was there not quite six weeks—on the 9th of June, in consequence of information, I told her she was charged with felony—she said, "Felony, indeed, that is a pretty thing!"—this scarf and petticoat are mine, the other things are mine and my daughter's—some had been in a drawer, and some in the wardrobe.

THEODORE ROSE. I am shopman to Miss Fleming, a pawnbroker, of Farringdon-street—I produce three scarfs and a shawl pawned by a person I believe to be the prisoner, and to whom I gave this duplicate—it corresponds with the other duplicate found.

MARY ANN DOYLE. I am wife of Samuel Doyle, a policeman, and search females at the police-station—I searched the prisoner, and found a piece of silver and a pebble stone on her—she said she had picked them up in the dust in sweeping.

RICHARD WALKER (policeman.) I took the prisoner into custody—she said she had not got a farthging's worth of her mistress's property—I found this key on her, she said it belonged to her box—in consequence of information I went to the house of Mr. Jones, in Drury-lane—the key fitted a box there—I searched it, and found the articles produced and two duplicates.

JANE JONES. I am the wife of David Jones—on the Wednesday in question, Walker came to me with a key—I showed him the prisoner's box, which she had brought to my place and left there.

(The prisoner put in a written defence, stating that she pledged the things, but intended to redeem them.)

GUILTY. Aged 41.—Recommended to mercy by the Jury. Confined Three Months

Before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18470816-1832

1832. WILLIAM GREEN was indicted for stealing 1 pair of trowsers, value 14s., the goods of Robert Clemow.

HENRY TAYLOR. I am in the employ of Robert Clemow, a hosier, of King William-street. On the 14th of Aug., about twenty minutes past nine in the evening, I was standing opposite the door—the prisoner came up, and looked at a pair of trowsers that were buttoned at the side of the door—he unbuttoned them, and ran off—I pursued him up St. Nicholas-lane, and caught hold of him—he dropped the trowsers, and wrestled from me—I pursued him back down St. Nicholas-lane—ha said he would not be taken by me—I laid hold of him—I picked up the trowsers, they are Mr. Robert Clemow's.

Prisoner. The trowsers were lying on the grating, I picked them up, and took them round the corner to look at them; you came up, and I gave them to you. Witness. You threw them down—you had got two doors up Nicholas-lane—the trowsers were tied inside, and the staring is cut—here it is.

GEORGE CROUCH (City policeman 534.) I heard a cry of "Stop thief," and saw the prisoner struggling with Taylor—he said, "I am not going to be taken by you"—I took him into custody, and produce the trowsers.

Prisoner's Defence. It is false to say he saw me take them.

GUILTY. Aged 19.— Confined Four Months.

Before Edward Bullock, Esq.

Reference Number: t18470816-1833

1833. WALTER GARDNER was indicted for stealing 1 handkerchief, value 1s.; of a man unknown, from his person, having been before convicted of felony.

MARTHA WEST. I am single, and live in St. Ann-street, Westminster. On the 25th of July, about half-past ten o'clock in the evening, I was in Tothill-street, and saw the prisoner take a handkerchief out of a gentleman's pocket, and put it in his left breast—there was another man with him—the prisoner said "hush" to him—he got away—I followed the prisoner, lost sight of him for a few minutes, caught sight of him again, and am sure he is the same person—I took particular notice of him—there was a lamp—I swear to him.

Prisoner. Q. If you were close to the gentleman, why did not you tell him? A. When I turned round he had gone into some house—he was a shortish gentleman—I did not know you before—I have not made inquiries about the gentleman.

DENNIS DEVINE (policeman, 61 V.) On the 25th of July, about half-past ten o'clock at night, I took the prisoner, and asked what he had in his pocket—he said, his own handkerchief—I found this handkerchief and nothing else—I found no other handkerchief—he said, "It is blued"—I suppose he meant that it was disposed of—there was one of his companions there.

WILLIAM WADLOW (policeman, 87 V.) I saw the prisoner in Tothill-fields about a quarter-past nine o'clock at night with two or three others—I saw him there till ten, and then saw no more of him.

Prisoner's Defence. I am not the party; I was with my sister; we had been to the Bayswater-road, and were coming up Tothill-street; the policeman took me; my sister can prove it is my handkerchief, but she was confined last week.

WILLIAM MILLERMAN (policeman.) I produce a certificate of the prisoner's former conviction (read—Convicted, October, 1846, and confined six months, having been before convicted of felony)—I was present at both convictions—he is the person.

GUILTY. Aged 19.— Transported For Seven Years.

Before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18470816-1834

1834. GEORGE WHITE was indicted for stealing 2 coats, value 2l.; 1 hat, 10s.; 2 pairs of breeches, 1l. 10s.; I pair of boots, 13s.; 3 shirts, 10s.; handkerchiefs, 7s.; and 2 pair of stockings, 1s.; the goods of Henry William Jones; having been before convicted of felony.

HENRY WILLIAM JONES. I am groom to Lord Wharncliff, and live in Ham-yard, Grosvenor-squre. On the 25th of July I missed the articles stated from the stable—I had seen them safe the night before at twelve o'clock—these are them (produced).

JAMES PONDCT. I am a horse-keeper, and live in Salisbury-street, Portland-market. On the 15th of July, about six in the evening, I was in the

Mitre-tavern, Oxford-street—the prisoner offered me a pair of boots for sale—he afterwards asked me to pledge them, which I did, at Mr. Dobree's.

WILLIAM TAYLOR. I am assistant to Robert John Dobrees. pawnbroker, of Robert-street. I produce a pair of boots which I took in pledge of Pondett on the 15th of July.

GEORGE TOMS. I am a coachman, and live at Melton-place, Dorset-square. On the 15th of July I bought a pair of boots of the prisoner.

JOHN SMITH (policeman.) I took the prisoner into custody, and found this jacket on him (produced).

Prisoner's Defence. I was never near the place.

WILLIAM MILLERMAN (policeman.) I produce a certificate of the prisoner's former conviction—(read—Convicted Nov., 1845, and confined one year, having been before convicted of felony)—the prisoner is the person.

GUILTY. Aged 32.— Transported for Seven Years.

Before Edward Bullock, Esq.

Reference Number: t18470816-1835

1835. GEORGE HAYWOOD was indicted for stealing 2 1/2 yards of kerseymere, value 8s.; the goods of George Thompson.

GEORGE THOMPSON. I am a tailor, and live in Upper Thames-street. On the 14th of Aug., between four and five o'clock in the afternoon, I was in my shop—in consequence of something said to me, I ran out to Cannon-street, and found the prisoner in custody of a man and a policeman, who had this kerseymere cloth—it is mine, and had been hanging in the lobby, pinned up.

THOMAS BURNES (City policeman.) On Saturday evening I was on duty in cannon-street, and saw the prisoner running, and Mr. Thompson's servant running after him—I took him in charge—he had the cloth produced under his left arm, under his jacket.

Prisoner. I am guilty of having it, but not of stealing it; it was by the door, I took it up.

GUILTY.* Aged 23.— Confined Nine Months.

Reference Number: t18470816-1836

1836. CHARLES ABBOTT was indicted for stealing 16 bottles of wine, value 3l.; I handkerchief, 1s.; and I towel, 6d.; the goods of George Stonestreet Griffin Stonestreet, his master; to which he pleaded

GUILTY. Aged 47.—Recommended to mercy by the Prosecutor.— Confined Four Months

Reference Number: t18470816-1837

1837. GEORGE NICHOLSON was indicted for stealing 1 plane, value 2s.; and 1 saw, 3s. 6d.; the goods of William Lucas; having been before convicted of felony; to which he pleaded

GUILTY. Aged 18.— Confined Nine Months.

Before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18470816-1838

1838. GEORGE BRINKWORTH was indicted for stealing 1 whip, value 10s.; 60 yards of whip cord, 6d.; and 1 cap, 2s. 6d.; the goods of Thomas Nowlan: having been before convicted of felony.

THOMAS NOWLAN. I live in Warwick-place, Whitecross-street—the prisoner is m son-in-law's apprentice—I allowed him to sleep at my place. On Monday morning, the 12th of July, I missed a whip, twelve knots of whipcord, and a boy's cap, worth 13s. altogether—the cap did not belong to me—I produce the whipcord and cap—the tassel is cut off the top of the cap—I

found it on the prisoner's head, on Tuesday—my mistress allowed him to sleep in the house for one night, for charity—he got up before we were up, and took the things—the cap cost 4s., five months ago—the prisoner was a Parish apprentice, my son-in-law did not get any money with him—he had been another mans apprentice, and was turned over to my son-in-law, a whip-maker—he has applied for money with him, but the Parish could not grant it him.

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutor kept me at work from four o'clock in the morning till eleven o'clock at night, and I only had one meal on Friday and Saturday; he came home drunk on Sunday night, and threatened to throw the poker at my head, and I ran out of the house, and put another cap on my head, leaving my own at home.

THOMAS NOWLAN re-examined. It is not true—he never did any work in my place—he was only one day with me—I did not till-use him.

DAVID CRIPPS (policeman.) I produce a certificate of the prisoner's former conviction—(read—Convicted Dec., 1845, and confined six months)—he is the person—he has been convicted besides that.

GUILTY.* Aged 18.— Confined One Year.

Before Edward Bullock, Esq.

Reference Number: t18470816-1839

1839. JAMES M'MURDIE was indicted for stealing 1 truck, value 10s.; 1 tumbler, 3d.; 48 bottles, 3s.; and 4 quarts of ginger-beer, 1s.; the goods of Thomas Rogers, his master.

THOMAS ROGERS. I live in Arthur-street, St. Luke's. On Tuesday, the 23rd of July, I sent the prisoner out with a cart and four dozen bottles of ginger-beer, to sell on commission, at 1s. a dozen—I was to allow him 4d. in the dozen for what he sold—I gave him 5d. besides that, but that was not part of the bargain—he never came back with cart, bottles, or money—I spoke to a policeman, who brought him back on the following Friday—I said, "Mack, what have you done with them?"—he said, "Taken the down Petticoat-lane, and sold them"—I said, "What did you get?"—he said, "10s."—I said, "Tell me to whom you sold them?"—he said, "To a man in Petticoat-lane; I do not know who he is—he was taken to the station.

WILLIAM NEWMAN (City policeman, 98.) The prisoner gave himself into my custody, and said he had sold the ginger-beer for a halfpenny a bottle, beer and all, and that the truck was sold in Petticoat-lane—he did not say who it was sold to.

Prisoner's Defence. I left the truck, and when I came back it was gone.

GUILTY.** Aged 25.— Confined Twelve Months.

Before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18470816-1840

1840. HENRY DORMER was indicted for embezzlement.

THOMAS DEDRIDGE. I live in White Lion-yard, Whitecross-street, St. Luke's—the prisoner was my errand-boy—he was authorized to receive money, and if he received it he was to account to me the same day—if he has received 5s. 6d. of Thomas Leech, or 3s. 10 1/2d. of Charlotte Spink, on the 6th of July, he has not paid me—I never asked him for it—he absconded, and was brought back by the officer.

Prisoner. I went away because my master would not give me any money. Witness. I took him in from the streets—I was to feed him—he had been with me four months—I used to allow him pocket-money.

THOMAS LEECH. On the 6th of July, I paid the prisoner 5s. 6d. for his master.

CHARLOTTE SPINK. On the 6th of July, I paid the prisoner 3s. 10 1/2d. for his master.

JOHN HARVEY (policeman.) I took the prisoner—he said he had spent the money.

GUILTY. Aged 16.—Recommended to mercy by the Jury and Prosecutor. confined Six Days and Whipped.

(The prisoner's uncle agreed to take him into his employment.)

Before Edward Bullock, Esq.

Reference Number: t18470816-1841

1841. WILLIAM LINSELL was indicted for embezzling 4l. 1s., the monies of Fredrick Barford, his master; to which he pleaded

GUILTY. Aged 47.—Recommended to mercy by the Prosecutor. Confined Nine Months.

Reference Number: t18470816-1842

1842. THOMAS OLIVER was indicted for stealing 1 umbrella, value 5s.; the goods of Edward Baker; having been before convicted of felony.

EDWARD BAKER. I have chambers at No. 36, Great Ormond-street—I saw my umbrella safe in the lobby, which is in front of my chambers, some time in the morning—I was in the house at the time—I afterwards missed it.

CHARLES JEANS. I am a painter, and live in Upper Overy-street, St. Marylebone—on the 17th of July I was at work at Mr. Baker's chambers, the prisoner came and asked me if a person named Richardson worked there—I said, "No"—he left the room, and went up to the second story—I afterwards went into the kitchen to the housekeeper—as I came up the stairs the prisoner came down the stairs and went into the street—I crossed the street afterwards, and then saw him go into the house again, and saw him come down the stairs with an umbrella under his arm—he was coming out of the house—directly he saw me, he ran up with it again—I shut the door, shut him into the house, and sent for a policeman—I was away for about three minutes, and he had go into the street—it was a silk umbrella with a yellow handle—this produced is it—I had seen it in the stand before, and no other umbrella near it—when I came back it was put back into its place.

EDWARD BAKER re-examined. It was found in the place it had been in before—it is my umbrella, and the one which was missed from the hall.

Prisoner's Defence. I met a person who told me to ask if a person named Richardson worked there; I did so; when I came out of the house the man said I had stolen an umbrella; I know nothing about it.

JAMES DOWSETT (policeman.) I produce a certificate of the prisoner's former conviction—(readConvicted Aug., 1845, and confined one year)—I was present at the trial—he is the person.

Prisoner. Two policemen have identified me as two different persons.

Witness. I am certain of him.

GUILTY. Aged 21.— Transported for seven Years.

Before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18470816-1843

1843. THOMAS MURRAY was indicted for stealing three pair of stockings, value 2s.; the goods of Robert Rawlinson; having been before convicted of felony.

ELIZABETH RAWLINSON. I live with my father and mother in Whitecross-street—my father's name is Robert—on the 30th of July, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I was at the shop, and saw the prisoner take some stockings which were outside the door, but not in the street—I went out of the shop and got a policeman to go in search of him—he brought him back—the

stockings were gone—I lost sight of the prisoner, but I had seen him before two or three mornings in the same week.

WILLIAM ANDERSON (policeman.) I received information from the last witness, ran after the prisoner, and took him.

GEORGE KEMP (policeman.) I produce a certificate of the prisoner's former conviction—(readConvicted, June 1845, and confined two months)—he is the person.

GUILTY. † Aged 14.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18470816-1844

1844. JOHN FIELD was indicted for embezzlement.

SARAH SPIKES. I am shopwoman to Julien Boura, a dyer and cleaner—I have the entire charge of the books in the shop—the prisoner was employed by me as errand-boy—if he received money, it was his duty to pay it as soon as he returned to the shop—if he received 15s. 6d. of Mr. Mumford on the 5th of July, or 4s. of Mary Chidsey on the 10th of July, he has not paid me—I am the only person who ought to have received it.

Cross-examined by MR. CROUCH. Q. Has your master any other shop? A. No; the shop in Rathbone-place is his brother's—they are not in partnership—there is no person in the shop to receive money but me—Miss Lea does not receive money, she attends to customers when I am not there—the prisoner was not allowed to give his account to her—she has received money, but I always had the account—she is not here—the books are not here; I was not ordered to bring them—the monies received are entered in one book, the debts in another—there was no other boy in the employment at the time these monies were received—we have had boys before, they knew the customers, but the prisoner was the boy I sent.

WILLIAM RUSSEL MUMFORD. My master deals with Mr. Boura. On the 7th of July I paid the prisoner 15s. 6d. from Mr. Gitana, for his master, I have his receipt.

MARY CHIDSEY. My mistress deals with Mr. Boura. On the 10th of July I paid the prisoner 4s.

JAMES PIERCE (policeman.) I took the prisoner—I told him he was charged with receiving several sums of money and not accounting for them—I did not mention these two sums in particular—I said he must come to the station—he said, "It is all right; I will come with you."

Cross-examined. Q. Did not he say, "I have not the money?" A. No; he said, "I did not receive it."

MR. CROUCH to SARAH SPINK. Q. Are there a good many sums received in the course of the day? A. Yes; if there are customers in the shop, the boy always waits till they are gone before he pays me.

COURT. Q. Did you speak to him particularly about any of the sums you sent him for? A. Yes; at one time he returned and said the lady was out—I sent him again; he came back, said the lady was in, but he did not think she intended to pay.

EDWARD MARTIN gave the prisoner a good character, and agreed to take him into his service.

GUILTY. Aged 15.—Recommended to mercy by the Jury Confined Three Months.

Before Edward Bullock, Esq.

Reference Number: t18470816-1845

1845. THOMAS PARRACK was indicted for embezzlement.

WILLIAM RADFORD. I am a baker, living in Great College-street, Camden-town.

The prisoner has been in my service about twelve months—it was part of his duty to receive payments of bills from customers, and account to me for them—Mr. Pritchard, of Woburn-place, is a customer of mine—if the prisoner has received 1l. 6s. 8 1/2d. of him, or 4s. 3 1/4d. of Mrs. Radford, he has not paid me.

ANN PILE. I am the wife of William Pile, and am servant to Mrs. Pritchard, of Woburn-place, I paid the prisoner 1l. 6s. 8 1/2d. for Mr. Radford.

MARY ANN RADFORD. I am the wife of William Radford, of Windmill-street, Tottenham-court-road. I remember paying the prisoner 4s. 3 1/2d., for Mr. Radford for bread.

Prisoner. Q. You said at the Police-court that it was 4s. 4 1/2d.? A. I cannot be exact which it was.

MARY ANN MOON. I am the wife of George William Moon, of King-street, Camden-town, and deal with Mr. Radford for bread. On the 15th of July I paid the prisoner 3s. 1 1/4d. for Mr. Radford.

WILLIAM RADFORD re-examined. The prisoner never accounted to me for that.

JOHN SPRATHING (policeman.) I took the prisoner into custody.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY. Aged 18.— Confined One Month.

Before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18470816-1846

1846. SIMON NEWMAN was indicted for feloniously and knowingly uttering a forged request for the delivery of 2 1/4 yards of kerseymere, with intent to defraud John Paunett Bull and others.

JOHN COLLIS. I am assistant to Messrs. Bull and Way, of St. Martin's-lane, woolen-drapers. On Wednesday, the 28th of July, the prisoner presented me with this order for kerseymere (produced,) he said he had got it from Mr. Holman—I took it to Mr. Way.

HENRY SAVORY WAY. I am a woollen-draper, and live at No. 52, St. Martin's-lane—Collis brought me this order—I went to the prisoner and asked if he brought it from Mr. Holman—he said "Yes"—I said, "Did Mr. Holman write it?"—he said, "Yes"—he afterwards said Mrs. Holman gave it him, and afterwards that he found it—I gave him into custody.

SIMON HOLMAN. I am a tailor, and deal with Mr. Way. I sent no order to him by the prisoner—I have known the prisoner fifteen years—he knew I dealt there—this order is not my writing.

Prisoner's Defence. A butcher asked me to take the order to Mr. Bull; I was not aware that I did wrong.

GUILTY. Aged 38.— Confined Six Months.

Before Edward Bullock, Esq.

Reference Number: t18470816-1847

1847. CATHERINE BANIS was indicted for stealing 1 bag, value 1d.; and 11 shillings; the property of Lancelot Baxter, from his person; having been before convicted of felony.

LANCELOT BAXTER. On the 27th of July, about half-past seven in the morning, I went with the prisoner onto the Pit's Head, in Owen-street, to treat her to a glass of gin—I had a leathern purse with 12s. in it, and two keys—I gave her 1s. out of it to pay for the gin, and put the purse into my waistcoat pocket—she then wanted me to give her some money to treat some

of her companions—I refused—she put her hand into my pocket, took the bag and raced away.

Prisoner. Q. Were you not very much in liquor? A. No—I was locked up in the station with you, but unjustly, as I consider.

JOHN MOORE. I am a cabinet-maker, and live in Compton-street, Clerkenwell. I went into the Pit's Head about seven o'clock, and saw the prisoner and Baxter—she asked him to treat her to some gin—he gave her a 1s.—she said something about keeping the change—he put the purse into his pocket again—she laid hold of him and took the purse out—he laid hold of her arm, she wrenched her arm away, and got away altogether with the purse.

Prisoner. Q. How close were you to me? A. Nearer than I am now—I could see that it was a purse, and that there were a number of shillings there—I was sober—I did not look as if I had been up all night—I had just got up to go to work—I had none of the gin.

Prisoner. If I had robbed him, I should hardly have gone back to the same public-house.

THOMAS AMOS (policeman.) In consequence of information I took the prisoner, she denied the charge—I took her back to the public-house with me—she did not go back of herself—the purse was not found—there were other females there—I asked Baxter if he had been robbed—he said he had—I asked him to point out the woman—he tapped the prisoner on the shoulder, and said, "This is the woman that robbed me"—I found the prisoner with a man who was living with her—Baxter was rather the worse for liquor—Moore was perfectly sober.

THOMAS EVANS (policeman.) I produce a certificate of the prisoner's former conviction—(readConvicted Aug. 1846; and confined six months)—I was present at the trial, she is the person.

GUILTY. Aged 24.— Transported for Seven Years.

OLD COURT.—Saturday, August 21st, 1847.

PRESENT—Mr. Justice ERLE; Mr. Alderman FAREBROTHER; Sir CHAPMAN MARSHALL, Knight, Alderman; Mr. Alderman GIBBS; Mr. Alderman WOOD; and EDWARD BULLOCK, Esq.

Second Jury, before Edward Bullock, Esq.

Reference Number: t18470816-1848

1848. THOMAS FRENCH was indicted for feloniously forging and uttering an order for the delivery of goods, value 10l.; with intent to defraud Robert Garrad; to which he pleaded

GUILTY. Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18470816-1849

1849. CHARLES RUSHTON was indicted for stealing 1 half-crown, 2 shillings, 1 sixpence, and 10 pence: also, 2 shillings, and 2 sixpence: also, 4 shillings, and 1 sixpence; the monies of Alfred Josias Rogers, his master; to all of which he pleaded

GUILTY. Aged 17.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18470816-1850

1850. ALFRED DOOREY was indicted for embezzling 42l., which he had received on account of Charles Daley, his master; to which he pleaded

GUILTY. Aged 13.—Recommended to mercy by the Prosecutor. Confined Twelve Months.

Reference Number: t18470816-1851

1851. ELIZABETH SMITH was indicted for stealing 1 shilling, and 1 sixpence; the monies of Oliver Nelson, from his person.

OLIVER NELSON. I am a shoemaker, in Little Windmill-street, Haymarket. On Monday, the 16th of Aug., about a quarter-past twelve o'clock at night, I was coming from the city, and was inquiring my way of a gentleman, the prisoner came up, and told me she would show me the way—I cannot tell the name of the street I met her in—it was near to New Oxford-street—I walked a good distance with her—she brought me up a street, and told me that was my way—I began to shake the rain off my coat—she put her hand into my pocket, and took out 1s. 6d. which was there loose—I had nothing else there—I followed her—she ran into a house—a woman stopped me in the passage—I came out, saw a policeman—I sent him in while I stood at the door—we could not find her—I saw her the next night, and gave her in charge—I am sure she is the person.

Prisoner. You gave me the money to take you home; I took you up into a room, and you gave it me. Witness. I did not.

JAMES STRINGER (policeman C 199.) On the 17th of Aug. the prisoner was given into my charge—Nelson came up and told me she had stolen 1s. 6d. from his person—the prisoner said he had given it to her—as we went to the station she said, "Things are getting very cheap now, only 1s. for the room, and 6d. for me."

Prisoner's Defence. He gave me the money, and I took him home; I asked whether he wanted to stop the night; he said, "No, only a short time."

OLIVER NELSON re-examined. I never stopped with her an instant—I swear I never entered any house with her before I charged her with the robbery, and never gave her any money—I went nowhere before I lost the money—I have been in London seven weeks—I had been in London three months before this.

GUILTY. Confined Four Months.

Before Mr. Justice Erle.

Reference Number: t18470816-1852

1852. JOHN RASEY was indicted for the wilful murder of Henry Williams, on the 3rd of Nov., 1844.

MESSRS. BODKIN and CLERK conducted the Prosecution.

FREDERICK WILLIAM FOGARTY. I am a surgeon, living in Great Percy-street, Clerkenwell. On the 3rd of Nov., 1844, between one and three o'clock in the morning, I was called to a house in Constitution-row, Gray's Inn-road, and found there a person, who I afterwards found to be Henry Williams—he was in an insensible state—one of his eyes were swollen—it had a small wound over it, under the eyebrow, within the orbit of the eye, at the corner—the direction of the wound was upwards and backwards.

COURT. Q. So that if a man was leaning his hand on an umbrella in front of him, and bobbed his head down, and the umbrella went into the socket of his eye, was it in the direction that the umbrella would have penetrated? A. Precisely so.

MR. CLERK. Q. What was the external surface of the wound? A. About the size of the top of the finger, or the point of an umbrella with an ordinary ferrule—I attended the man until his death—there was a post-mortem examination by Dr. Quain, at which I was present—the wound was more than an inch deep, it penetrated the brain very nearly an inch—it was the cause of death—the decreased was a large heavy man—his falling forward on the

point of an umbrella held in the hand, on which he was resting, might have caused the injury.

COURT. Q. It was just such a wound as would be caused by a heavy drunken man falling forward on the point of an umbrella? A. Yes, a man parallel to him, and thrusting it into his eye, would not have made a wound in that direction, unless he thrust upwards.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. The jolting of a carriage, perhaps, if a man was nearly insensibly drunk, might have produced it? A. Yes.

COURT. Q. Was it a wound that wound that would have produced a good deal of blood, flowing pretty quickly? A. It might, or it might not; it does not necessarily follow—it would possibly produce a good deal of hemorrhage after an interval—it might be received at one time, and blood not began to flow until after an interval.

DR. RICHARD QUAIN. I practice as a physician. I was called in by the coroner, to make a post-mortem examination in this case—Mr. Fogarty has given an accurate description of the wound itself—blood would not be so likely to follow immediately from such a wound, as from a wound made by a sharp instrument; it would be more likely in half an hour, than directly—I think the party would have been stunned by such a blow.

COURT. Q. Do you suppose the person would have some derangement almost immediately in his voluntary powers? A. I think so; I think there would be a considerable derangement in respect of voice and motion—I think he would be stunned or knocked down by such a blow, and unable to walk.

MR. BODKI N. Q. Supposing it to be received by violence from somebody else, do you think it probable he would be able to get out of a carriage and in again? A. He might have done so—I do not think it probable.

Cross-examined. Q. if you had known that an had been found reversed in the hackney-coach with the ferrule of it bloody, should you have had any doubt of the high probability that it had happened as has been suggested? A. It certainly might have been produce in that way—I should say it wound be very probable.

ROBERT COPL✗EY. I am a cab driver. On the evening this occurred I was going down the Minories, towards the Tower, driving a hackney-coach with a pair of horses—it was a very wet night—I was hailed near the arch of the railway, and took in two gentlemen, who appeared tipsy—while taking them in a policeman came up—I got off my box to let them in—I do not remember whether there was anything particular about their way of getting in—nothing attracted my attention—I do not remember that once was helpless—they both appeared to be the worse for liquor—I did not notice that anything was the matter with either of them, except that—I am not certain whether, when they got into the carriage, they directed me to Redcross-street, or to Gray's Inn-road, but I remember being in Redcross-street, and pulling up there—neither of them made any complaint of being ill, or anything of the kind—we stopped in Redcross-street—one of the gentlemen spoke, and I heard the door open and the steps let down—they both got out—one of them wanted something to drink—I do not remember which one it was—when we got to Gray's Inn-road, I remember one of them being found with a wound in his face—I cannot say whether it was that one that wanted the drink—they both got out of the carriage—they could not get any more drink—a policeman was spoken to, and he said the houses were all shut up—I asked them if they had done with me—I do not rightly recollect whether they said "Yes, "or "No"—one of them wanted to give me 1s. and I said my fare was 1s. 6d.—I do

not recollect which one it was—one of them inquired for change, and said he had only half-a-sovereign—they then got into the coach—whether I was paid or not I do not recollect—I was ordered to Gray's Inn-road—they were both stout gentlemen—I do not know which of them it was that talked—I do not recollect whether they both spoke—there was nothing particular to attract my attention about either of them—I got off my box in Redcross-street, and saw them get into the coach again—I do not recollect whether each of them got in by himself—there is no impression left on my mind as to anything particular—I was told to stop at a house in Chad's-row—I opened the door myself—I am not sure which got out first—I afterwards looked into the coach and found some blood in it—I said that I ought to be paid more, in conesquence of my cushion being bloody—they both got out—one was assisted out, as well as I can remember—I cannot remember which cushion the blood was on—I do not remember seeing any blood on the straw—I was paid, and went away—I saw only those two persons and the policeman in the Minories—I saw no third person.

Cross-examined. Q. How long did you see them before they got into the coach? A. A few seconds, a very short time—neither of them made any complaint to me that either had received an injury of any kind—I got down to let them in—I do remember their faces—I did not see anything that denoted that either of them had been subjected to any violence—I saw no blood, or anything of the sort.

JOHN GEORGE ROGERS. I was a City policeman in November, 1844—on the night this occurred I was on duty in the Minories, and recollect seeing some person there who afterwards got into a hackney-coach—I cannot say who stopped the coach—I was close to them when it stopped—I cannot say who opened the coach-door—I had my light with me—it was a very dark wet night—both the man were the worse for liquor—I did not assist either of them in—I was standing by the door at the time they were getting in, on the right side—my light was so directed that I could see them both—they got in by the assistance of the coachman—one got in with as great facility as the other—neither of them made any complaint of having received any injury—there was nothing that attracted my attention, more than that they were in liquor—I saw a third person cross the road about two or three minutes before they got into the coach—I had not been walking up the Minories with these two person—I was coming down my beat—there were three person crossing the road as I was going down my beat, and they came up to me by the railway bridge—the coach came up at the time, and it was hailed, by who, I do not know—the two persons got into the coach—I cannot say what became of third person—they had the appearance of being all these together but one was separate—I cannot say how far he was from the two.

Cross-examined. Q. How near were you to the two that got into the coach? A. Within two or three yards, close to the door—I did not take particular notice of their faces—I noticed nothing about the person of either to donate any act of violence.

GEORGE MARRIOTT (policeman G 31.) I was on duty near Constitution-row, Gray's Inn-road, and came up shortly after the coach came up—the person were crossing the payment from the carriage to the house when I came up—one appeared to be very much in liquor—I cannot say positively about the other—I had a light and saw an umbrella in the coach, leaning against the front seat, with the ferrule and upwards—there was blood on the ferrule end, and also on the covering of the umbrella—there was also some at the bottom of the carriage—I did not notice blood on of the cushion

(The Jury, upon this evidence, were of opinion that the cause of death was accidental. Mr. Bodkin stated that the prisoner, while in a state of intoxication, had surrendered himself into custody for the murder, but had afterwards declared that he was in a state of delirium at the time he did so.)

NOT GUILTY

Reference Number: t18470816-1853

1853. WILLIAM RAMSEY was indicted for a rape on Isabella Maru Adams.

GUILTY. Aged 21.— Transported for Twenty Years.

Reference Number: t18470816-1854

1854. JOHN TIERNEY was indicted for feloniously killing and staying Rebecca Gray: he was also charged on the Coroner's inquisition with the like offence.

SAMUEL WISKER. I am in the 2nd battalion of the fusiller-guards. On Saturday afternoon, the 14th of Aug., I was in Bridcage-walk, at a quarter to two o'clock, coming from Storey's-gate towards Buckinggham Palace, I observed a carriage and pair of horses, with a coachman and a woman sitting on the box—no one was inside—when it was coming by the Wellington Barracks chapel I was about twenty or thirty paces on this side of Queen-square gate—I was close to it when the accident happened—I did not see it came through Buckingham-gate—it is a straight line, but I did not notice it—when I got this side of Queen-square gate I saw it coming up at a full gallop—I was about 130 yards from it when I first saw it—I saw the child in the road before the carriage came up to it, she was crossing the road in the park towards Queen-square gate, coming out of the park into the square—at the time the child came out into the road, the horses were about ten yards from the place of crossing—the child came out running—it was knocked down by the horses, and I saw the wheel pass over the side of its head—I called out to the coachman, "Stop, coachman, stop!"—he must have heard me—he did not seem to take any notice, but still went on—if he had had his eye on his horses he must have seen the child knocked down—he was not doing anything with his horses at the time they went over the child—I saw him whipping them before he came up to the chapel—that was about 100 yards off—they were in a gallop then, he seemed to have the reins right, and his whip was across the reins—I went and took the child up—its eyes were closed, and the blood was pouring out of each ear—I took it to a doctor in Queen-square—the coachman did not in my presence make any effort to pull up the horses—I saw the child in front of the horses before it was struck—I did not see the line of the horses altered, or the least effort made by the coachman to stop them—I did not see him stopped, but I afterwards saw him at the station—he then appeared as if he had been drinking, but he appeared to know what he was about.

Prisoner. The child never was before me in the road; I never saw it in the road; I was not going at full gallop; he never saw me whip the horses.

Witness. I am sure the horses were in a gallop when I first saw them, and I saw him whipping them when they were coming by Wellington Barracks—I took the child to the hospital.

CHRISTOPHER MAYES. I was in Bridcage-walk on the 14th of Aug., coming from Store's-gate to Queen-square gate—I saw the carriage and horses galloping up the road—I saw them first just before you come to the Barrack-gate—they were galloping—the prisoner was the driver—I did not notice him doing anything—I saw a child coming out of the interior of the park, and crossing the road towards Queen-square—I should say the child

was about three yards before the horses when she came out into the road—I was about 100 yards in front of the horses—the child came walking out looking over its shoulder, as if looking for some one else—the near horse knocked her down, and the near wheel front caught the head—if the driver had had his eyes on his horses' heads, he must have seen the child, and if he had had his reins in his hand, he could have turned out of the line, so as to have let the child escape—the carriage was nearer the park side than the middle of the road—there was plenty of room to turn out of the road—a very little turn wound have saved it.

JAMES LEGGETT. I am shoe-manufacture, and live in Queen's-row. On Saturday afternoon, at two o'clock, I was in the neighbourhood of Queen's-row, opposite the end of Arabella-row, Pimlico—I saw a carriage and horses driven by the prisoner, in Birdcage-walk—it is perhaps 150 or 200 yards from Buckingham-gate into Birdcage-walk—I was in a shop, serving—the lashing of the whip caused me to run to the door, and I saw the prisoner's carriage strike my cart, which was standing at the door, knock my pony round, strike my boy, who was in the cart, knock my seat and box out of the cart, and the top, which I carry to keep my goods dry—the horses were galloping when they passed my cart—I hallooed to him—he did not stop—the boy of the shop ran after him, and caught hold of the reins of his horses—he did pull up before he got to Buckingham-gate—the boy asked him to come back—he did not come back—I put my seat in my cart and drove after him—I drove full trot till I got into the park, and then I whipped my pony and galloped after him as fast as I could make my pony gallop—I think I gained on the carriage, but could not overtake it—before I got to Storey's-gate the accident occurred—I pulled up the little, but I still drove through Storey's-gate, and as I was going along George-street, he was turning and coming back.

Prisoner. His cart was on the wrong side of the road; I could not pass, I caught the other rein and turned it round; there was a wagon on the side, and the cart on the other, and I could not pass them both; I tried to pull up, and could not. Witness. I swear I heard the sound of his whip—that attracted my attention—I heard three or four lashings of the whip.

COURT. Q. Do you know the difference between a whip being cracked, without striking a horse, and the sound when striking a horse? A. I could not tell that distinctly, but I distinctly heard the lashing of a whip three or four times—just at the time he got to the corner of Arabella-row he was striking his horses—I noticed no wagon—there might have been one, but my eyes were on my pony and on my goods, which were thrown into the street.

HENRY TURNER LANE ROOKE. I am house-surgeon, at Westminster Hospital. On the 14th of Aug. the child was brought to me—she was in a state of insensibility, bleeding from the ears, and had a coutusion on the left side of the head, such as would be likely to be occasioned by the passage of a carriage-wheel over it—re-action never came on, and the child died from concussion—I have not the slightest doubt that it died from the bruise on the head.

GUILTY. Aged 28.— Confined Eighteen Months.

Reference Number: t18470816-1855

1855. WILLIAM LITCHFIELD was indicted for feloniously sending to Henry Robert Lewis, a certain letter, demanding money, with menaces, and without any reasonable or probable cause.

MESSRS. CLARKSON and BALLANTINE conducted the Prosecution.

HENRY ROBERT LEWIS. I live at No. 12, Upper Montague-street, Monta—gue-square—I

know the prisoner—he and his wife were in my service—he left about three years ago—his wife died during the time she was in my service—after the death of his wife, I from time to time let him have small sums of money, and afterwards I let him have a larger sum—I let him have that larger sums willingly, in consequence of a promise made to his wife on her death-bed—I am speaking of the small sums, and the other one like wise—I received this letter (produced)—I know the prisoner's hand writing—this is his writing.

Cross-examined by MR. HORRY. Q. I believe you made a promise, when his wife was dying, that you would attend to his child? A. Yes, and those sums were given in consequence of that promise—I cannot say that he has complained to me that I have not altogether fulfilled that promise—he has never complained to me at all—I never sent him to my solicitor, Mr. Thackston, on the subject—I gave him a large sum before this, to go into business with—he has never spoken to me about neglecting to send remittances on account of that promise—he never sent to me for 6l. on account of my promise, that I recollect—(looking at a letter)—this letter, dated the 17th of Feb. 1847, is my writing—it certainly appears from this that I did send him 6l. he did not send to me for that 6l. on account of my promise to his dying wife—he wrote to me that he was in deep distress—I have not got the letter—I sent him the 6l.

MR. BALLANTINE. Q. Has the letter been destroyed? A. I am not aware that I ever had such a letter.

MR. HORRY. Q. Then you cannot say how it was you came to send him the 6l.? A. I remember, from this paper being put into my hand, and from the date, that he wrote to me that he was in the greatest possible distress, and he expected everything to be seized—he did not name the 6l. to me—I never sent him to Mr. Thackston in my life—I do not know what Mr. Thackston would have paid him—when Mr. Thackston applied to me for money I gave it to him—I cannot say that he ever received 20l.—Mr. Thackston has never given me any account of the sums of money you name—the prisoner never sent to me for money which I never gave him—he never complained before this that I had not executed my promise—I have not seen him for upwards of two years—he has written to me for small sums of money—I refused for some time—I wrote back to him, and he has got my letters, I suppose—the letter on which the indictment is, was not produced before the Magistrate—I had not it in my possession then.

The letter was here read, as follows, directed "H. R. Lewis, Esq., 22nd July, 1847—Sir, if you do not act as a gentleman towards me in this affair of yours, and come to terms with your solicitor, by leaving with him certain monies to supply my wants in future while you are out of town, I swear by heaven and hell that the whole of your damnable affair and beastly conduct shall be held up before the eyes of the Masonic order, and the clubs that you are a member of, whose secretaries I will write unto. Now, sir, if you delay more than the ordinary time in sending me a remittance, and likewise an answer, to acquaint me when to call on your solicitor for the same, it shall not be 500l. that will stop me in denouncing you as you deserve. Recollect, you have broken faith with me, not me with you. I will have you beware, sir, and not play too much on me. Yours, &c., W. LITCHFIELD, 18, Queen-street, New-cut, Lambeth."

GUILTY. Aged 31.— Transported for Life.

(There were two other indictments against the prisoner, for sending other letters to Mr. Lewis.)

Reference Number: t18470816-1856

1856. WILLIAM SHEEN was indicted for feloniously assaulting Mary Ann Sullivan, and stabbing, cutting, and wounding her on the left hand, with intent to kill and murder her:—2nd COUNT, stating his intent to be to main and disable her:—3rd COUNT, to do grievous bodily harm;—Other COUNTS, calling her Mary Ann Sheen.

MESSRS. BODKIN and CLERK conducted the Prosecution.

MARY JACKSON. I am seventeen years old. In July last I lived at the prisoner's house in Keate-street, Spitalfields, and had been living there about four months. I know the prisoner, and also Mary Ann Sullivan, whom he was living with—on Sunday night, the 25th of July, I came back to the house in Keate-street—there was nobody at home—I waited at the door till the prisoner came up—he and Mary Ann Sullivan came up together—Sullivan had been drinking, but not so much as the prisoner—when the door was opened, I went in first, and the prisoner and Sullivan went into the parlour on the ground-floor—I heard the prisoner say something to Sullivan—I could not understand the words—Sullivan said, with an oath, that she would not live with the prisoner any longer—he did not say anything to that, but took up a white-handled knife off the table, and attempted to stab her—he said nothing when he took up the knife—he did not say anything till he had said it down again—he took it up in a passion with the intention of stabbing her—he cut her hand—he was going to put it somewhere about her neck, she put her hand up to save herself, and the knife went across her hand—they were close together—the point of the knife was nearest her throat—he had the handle in his hand—if she had not raised her hand the knife must either have gone to the front or side of her neck—her hand bled very much—the prisoner threw the knife on the table, and said he would do for her—at that time she was standing in the passage at the door of the room—she did not fall down—she cried out, "Help" and "Murder," and told the prisoner that he had cut her hand—he then struck her, and knocked her down in the passage—I called the policeman. White.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. Where were you standing? A. By the table in the ground-floor room, which was Mrs. Sullivan's room—Sheen and Sullivan were standing in the passage—he struck with his fiat after he had put down the knife—he put the knife towards her throat—she put up her hand, and her little finger got cut, and then he laid down the knife on the table—there had been no struggle between them before—the prisoner was very much intoxicated, a great deal more than she was—I removed the knife off the table on to the dresser—I do not know how long she had lived with him—I have known them living together for the four months I was there—I do not know her name, only the name she was called by—sometimes she was called Polly Sheen, and sometimes Mary Ann Sheen—I did not go before the Magistrate—I have not been examined before in Court—Mr. Hayward has asked me questions—that was last week—I get my living sometimes by selling things in the streets—I did not go to the station-house with the prisoner.

MR. BODKIN. Q. What kind of knife was it? A. A small white-handled knife—a table-knife—he thrust the knife at her throat—he had the handle in his hand, but her hand being put up stopped it—the point of the knife was forward.

MR. PAYNE. Q. Was it a knife that would go into the pocked? A. It would go into the pocket, but it was not a shut-up knife, it was a small bread-and-butter knife, not a large dinner knife—it is not here.

MR. BODKIN. Q. What kind of point had it, do your remember? A. It was not a narrow point.

JAMES WHITE (policeman H 210.) I heard cries of "Murder" as I went round my beat on the night in question—I went round a portion of my beat, and met Jackson half-way—she took me to the house—I found Mary Ann Sullivan lying down on her back, or more properly speaking on her side, with her hand up, bleeding profusely—her clothes were saturated with blood, and the floor as well, literally covered—the prisoner was about three feet from her—I asked her in his hearing what was the matter—she said that he had done it, that he had stabbed her—the prisoner said he might have kicked her, or he might have struck her, but he had not stabbed her—he said he did not use a knife—I got some assistance, and gave him into the custody of another officer, got a cap, bound up the wound, and took the woman to the hospital—I took the prisoner next day to Worship-street—as we were going along, he said, well, perhaps it was a good job, for he had no doubt if they were together, that he should be hung for her.

Cross-examined by MR. O'BRIEN. Q. What was a good jab>? A. That he was taken into custody, for if they were together, he might be hung for her—I was examined the next day—I did not state that at the time—I cannot say that I recollected it.

MR. BODKIN. Q. Were you asked any question about it? A. No, not in the least—my attention was not called to it—I only spoke of what had occurred the night before—I made no observation on what he had said to me.

JOSEPH ALLEN (policeman H 205.) On Sunday night, the 25th of July, I was called to the prisoner's house, and saw Sullivan sitting or lying down in the passage, covered with blood—White was there when I came—he went away to get some other assistance, and left me there—the prisoner was then in the room—he came into the passage and stood over Sullivan, held up his first at her, and said, "You b----, I will do for you yet"—I told him to go and sit down—he said, "I shall go to bed now"—White returned with another constable, and the prisoner was taken into custody.

JOSEPH NASH. I was acting as house-surgeon at the London Hospital when Sullivan was brought there—I found an incised wound on the little finger of the left hand—it began on the inside of the finger and went round—it went to the bone—it was a wound that must have been inflicted by some sharp instrument; a small sized knife would have done it—supposing a thrust was made at a person with a weapon of that sort, and the hand was suddenly raised, the injury I have described might have been inflicted.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you mean a thrust, as if by the point of a sword, that the injury would be inflicted in that way? A. If the hand were placed in that position to prevent a sword or knife coming—the would appeared as if made by the edge of the blade, not by the point—it was on the inside of the little finger of the left hand, at the bottom of the finger, close to the hand—it is just likely that such an injury might have been inflicted by the party seizing the knife and making a grasp at it—I do not think it could be caused by grasping the knife, because the would extended farther round—it is just possible it might—if the knife was grasped, and then it was drawn from the hand, it might be drawn round—the wound went from the inside to the outside of the little finger.

MR. BODKIN. Q. Supposing a knife to have been thrust at a party, and that the left hand was raised, and the fingers extended, the cut would have been made precisely by that sort of action? A. Yes, I should say it was most likely to have been done in that way, but it is not impossible that it might be done by a grasp.

MR. O'BRIEN to MARY JACKSON. Q. I think I understand you to say

that the prisoner threw down the knife immediately he saw the blood? A. I do not know whether he saw the blood; but directly he did it, he threw the knife down on the table—they were not eating at the time—the knife was on the table—there was no bread and meat on the table at the time—I had some bread and butter of my own—I took some in with me, and was eating it—the woman did not take any of mine.

GUILTY of an Assault. Aged 49.— Confined Twelve Months.

Reference Number: t18470816-1857

1857. JOHN ROBINSON was indicted for feloniously sending a letter to Andrew Buchanan, threatening to kill and murder him.

MR. BODKIN, for the prosecution, stated that he was unable to trace to the prisoner the writing of the letter, or any knowledge of its contents; and the prisoner receiving an excellent character from a witness, who also deposed that he was unable to write, he was

ACQUITTED.

Reference Number: t18470816-1858

1858. ELIZABETH ALLEN was indicted for feloniously killing and slaying Mary Ann Allen.—She was also charged on the Coroner's inquisition with the like offence.

MR. PRENDERGAST conducted the Prosecution.

MARY ANN PYBUS. I am mistress of the Infant School, in the Marylebone workhouse—on the 22nd of April a child named Mary Ann Allen was brought to the workhouse—I first saw her on the 27th of April, she was in a very destitute state, apparently starved, when given to me—it was very emaciated indeed—it remained under my care till the 30th of May, when it died—it appeared to rally a little, but it was always in a weak and delicate way, and very thin—at first it was unable to play or move about at all, but afterwards it was able to play a little with the other children—while in the workhouse it was allowed wine and arrowroot, and nourishment.

Prisoner. Q. When you saw my little girl on the 27th of April it was in a very weak state, of course? A. Very weak indeed.

CATHERINE BRIDGMAN. I am a nurse for the children in the workhouse—I received the child, Mary Ann Allen, on the 22nd of April—it was in a distressing state; it had only a few rags on, which scarcely covered its person, and was in a very filthy dirty state—it was stripped before me—I saw no marks of bruises about it—it appeared thin, and was scarcely able to stand from weakness—I have not seen children so thin, unless they were children that wanted proper nourishment—I know nothing of the mother of the child.

ROBERT JEFFERIES. I live at No. 26, Wells-street, Oxford-street, the prisoner and her husband occupied the back attic of my house—they had two children, one of them was Mary Ann Allen, the deceased—she was about four years of age—the children were both taken together to the Marylebone workhouse—my attention was drawn to the deceased on the 22nd of April, by a person of the name of Hobson—I went up to the back attic, and when I came to the door the eldest little girl was inside, crying—I requested her to open the door—she said, the mother was gone out, and had locked them in—the door was locked—I went into my shop, got a bunch of old keys, and opened it—I found the eldest child sitting upright on the sacking, and the youngest lying on her side, close by the other—they were in the most dirty beastly state that I ever saw, and the room was equally as bad—there was a large tub

standing by the side of the bed, full of human soil—it had been there, I suppose, for six months, from the stench; I could not go into the room for some time—there was a large baking-dish underneath the bed, also full, and some in another corner of the room, in an old saucepan without a handle—there was nothing in the room but the bedstead, an old table, a chest of drawers, and an old fender—the children were literally naked, they had nothing on them but what appeared to be a bit of calico, as black as my hat, round their shoulders—they were both in that state—I received information from one of them—the prisoner came to lodge there on the 18th of March, 1835, and lodged there until this time—I do not know how the youngest child was treated—I could very often hear the eldest crying—I never heard the youngest cry, as she was so very weak—I do not know of my own knowledge that she did have a proper supply of food, I have every reason to believe that she did not—I have never had any conversation with the prisoner upon the subject—the father was in the hospital for three weeks altogether—I think he went on the 22nd of April, but I did not take particular notice—I know he was in the hospital at this time—the children remained together in the room, till I had the prisoner taken for robbing the apartment—they were taken to the work-house at eleven o'clock that night—I seldom had an opportunity of seeing at what time the prisoner came in and out—she used to go out generally at eight o'clock in the morning, and sometimes came home again about one or two, but not always, and then went out again—she was a charwoman at two houses in Carburton-street—I think the husband was there in the morning as I took the children away at night—I think he went to the hospital on that day, for I knew he was going to the hospital, and that made me go into the room.

Prisoner. Q. He went to the hospital on the 1st of April, and you saw me go with him; the tub which you say was there for six months, I borrowed to wash in, and on the 19th you came and asked for it, and I told you I could not spare it as the clothes were in it? Witness. I am not certain on what day the husband went to the hospital, I think it was on the same day that I went into the room—I had seen him several times in the course of that week—I only received one week's rent during the six months he was out of a situation—I did not go up on the 19th and ask her for the tub—the tub she speaks of was sold long before that—she came down next day and gave me what little money she could, it might have been half-a-crown—I knew she had no money, and never troubled her for it—I did not see her go out to work every morning.

MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. How long had the husband been in the hospital on the day the children were taken to the workhouse? A. I do not think he had been there above a few days, I thought it was the same day, and I think it was, but I am not certain about it.

MARY CLARK. I lodge at No. 26, Wells-street. I remember the child being taken to the workhouse—I cannot say how long before that, the father had been to the hospital—I do not know whether he had been at home on that day—I was called by the last witness to look at the child—I never observed the prisoner beat her; she did not attend to it, or take a mother's care of it; quite the reverse, she neglected it in every possible way, never cleaned or dressed it—it was hardly ever fed, and then only with food of the worst description—it was occasionally brought down to my school and left with me, once a month or so—when I first saw the child two years and a half ago, it was in a very weakly state, and covered with sores; it could not stand.

it was in its mother's arms covered with a piece of green baize; it had a scabbed face—I conceive that the child was slighted and neglected by its mother; though she has repeatedly told me that the children were fed better than I was, every day of my life—she certainly had the means of giving them food, and supporting them with credit, if she had thought proper—I know that her husband was out of work for a few weeks; but she told me that even when he was out of work he used to bring her home 7s. a-week; out of work, or in work, she told me she always had that, and she had coals every Saturday night from some charitable institution—when her husband was not employed at the coach-making, I understood from her that he acted as taproom man, or something at a public-house—when she brought the children to school she used to give the elder girl three halfpence, to buy their dinner with—I was called up by the landlord on the day the child was taken to the work-house—she was lying as perfectly naked as she was born, and the bones were protruding through the skin—the skin was actually broken at the bottom part of its back, and the bone was bare—the prisoner was always very meanly clad herself—I cannot say that I ever saw her perfectly sober—I occasionally saw her during the last week or so before the child was removed, but I never saw her perfectly sober—I have repeatedly spoken to her about the children, and she has told me to mind my own business, that they were better fed than I was.

Prisoner. Q. Have you not often seen me come home with food to my children? A. I have, with broken victuals; and I have seen you carry it out again immediately afterwards; on one occasion you brought a plate of odd victuals into my room, and actually stood and fed my dog with it; I asked you to take it up to your children; you did not, but told me to mind my own business, and that is what enrages me so—I did not tell you that the dog would not leave you till you gave him a bit—they were pieces of bread, skirts of meat, rinds of cheese, and so on—you said the children would not eat it—they were certainly such things as they would eat—the bread was hard, certainly; but if it had been sopped they could have eaten it—that was about a week before they were removed.

COURT. Q. Do you mean to say that she gave that to the dog which would have been of use to the children? A. She certainly did—I have repeatedly seen her bring food home and take the same food out again, scraps of pies, meat, and bits of things—she has shown them to me when she has come in, and said, "This is for my children," and I have afterwards seen her take it out again just in the same state—that has occurred several times during the last six months—her husband, who is in Court, says that he has a witness to prove that she did take the food out again and sell it.

Prisoner. You have seen me take the plates out, to take back to the mistress I worked for—I was always glad to bring things home to my children—you are speaking false. Witness. It is nothing but the truth.

ELIZABETH ALLEN. I lived with my mother in Well's-street—I am nine years old—my sister Mary Ann was younger—I remember Mr. Jefferies coming up to us when we were taken to the workhouse—my father had been in the hospital a fortnight at that time—we did not have our food regularly before my father went to the hospital—my mother did not give us our food regularly—she did not give my sister food—she used to give her dry bread some-times—she had not very often got anything to give her, before my father went to the hospital—she sometimes gave her food, she did not do so oftener because she had no money—she did not give her food very often after my

father went to the hospital—she used to beat my sister sometimes—it was not for doing anything wrong, but because she was crying—my mother was generally tipsy while my father was in the hospital, and she used to treat my sister very badly—she used to cry because she had no victuals—she said so, and my mother said she could not get any, that she had none—while my father was in the hospital my mother used to go out and lock us in, sometimes all day—she used to leave us a bit of dry bread sometimes, but my sister could not eat it—we never had anything but dry bread to eat during the time my father was in the hospital—my sister had no clothes—sometimes she had, and my mother used to take them off sometimes and take and sell them, and then she would come home tipsy—while my father was at home there was food in the house sometimes—my father left money sometimes, but my mother did not get food for my sister that she could eat, she gave her dry bread; she had nothing but dry bread—sometimes my father would give her some bread and butter—my mother sometimes brought home food in a dish or plate—she did not offer it to my sister, she used to eat it herself—it was such food as my sister could have eaten, if it had been given to her—my sister was ill while my father was in the hospital, but she could run about sometimes when she was well—she was ill at the time she was taken to the workhouse—she had been ill for two days—my mother has gone out and left my sister and me together a good many times—when my father was at home he would sometimes give food to my mother to give to us—she did not give it to us—I did not complain of that to my father—she dared me to do so—my father sometimes brought my sister home clothes, and mother used to take them off when he was gone out, and sell them.

Prisoner. Q. Have I not been obliged to take your things and my own to get us victuals when I had not enough money? A. No—you have not always given us food when you had it—you have not given us breakfast, and gone to work without any yourself—you have not brought home victuals to us of an afternoon, or given us tea, bread and butter, or fish and bacon—my father did not mostly have breakfast with us.

JURY. Q. Before your father went to the hospital, was he in the habit of coming home to his regular meals? A. No—he went out about seven of a morning, and came home about twelve o'clock at night—he worked at coachmaking—he stopped at the public-house sometimes.

GRACE MARIA HOBSON. I live in the next room to the prisoner—I was called in and saw the destitute state in which the children were left.

JOHN STEWART ALLEN. I am a surgeon—I saw the deceased child in the workhouse—she appeared very much wasted, as if she had not had a proper quantity of food—if the child had been left without the proper supply of the necessaries of life it might have presented that appearance—I think it would—I examined the child after death—I found mesenteric disease—that might account in some respects for its starved appearance—that disease might either be brought on or increased by a want of proper food—I cannot with any certainty say that I should expect to find mesenteric disease in a child of that age if it was in a state of starvation—I have heard the evidence of the prisoner's daughter—I cannot say that the way in which she describes the child to have been kept, would produce mesenteric disease, it might tend to it—there was extensive disease in the lungs, also effusion of water on the brain—I think the immediate cause of death was the effusion of water on the brain, but it is mere matter of opinion—I should attribute that effusion to glandular disease, the same that pervaded the whole body—I think that glandular disease

is likely to be brought on or increased by the want of proper food—I should say that which occasions general debility has a tendency to produce glandular disease—bad air, bad nourishment, and bad clothing are calculated to produce the morbid affection of which the child died—I cannot positively state whether the death was occasioned by neglect or want of proper care and nourishment, but I think it may have been hastened by that—I think there is no doubt about that—I believe that the death was hastened by the treatment the child's sister has described.

Prisoner. Q. The child's head was affected, was it not? A. Yes—your husband never consulted me about the child.

Prisoner's Defence. The child had been very weakly ever since it was a twelvemonth old, and was attended by Dr. Brown, of King-street Dispensary, for water on the brain; I fed them as well as I could, my husband being out of work for six months and a fortnight; I worked hard for them at whatever I could get; I pledged things out of the room, but it was to help to support them, as what I earned was not sufficient; I was taken up for that, and had three month's imprisonment in the House of Correction; it was while I was there that my child died; I knew nothing about it till last Tuesday fortnight, when the police came to bring me down to Newgate; I am innocent of the charge against me; I worked hard the whole week long, to support my poor children, and if I had not tried to do that, I should never have put myself in the way of being sent to prison, by taking the things out of the room; my daughter has been away from me, and, I am sorry to say, has been tutored to speak falsely.

GUILTY. Aged 31.— Confined Eighteen Months.

Reference Number: t18470816-1859

1859. ELIZABETH CORNWELL was indicted for the willful murder of her infant male child.

FRANCES RICH. I am the wife of Thomas Rich, who keeps the Windsor Castle public-house, in Albany-street. The prisoner was in our service for nearly six months—on the 16th of July, about six o'clock in the evening, as she was at work in the kitchen, she complained of being very ill with the spasms—I gave her a little brandy-and-water, sent for the doctor, and told her to go and lie down on the bed till he came, as she was so ill—she went up stairs—I went up a little while afterwards, and saw her—she said she was better—I did not stop long in the room, I left immediately, and did not notice anything—I went up again in twenty minutes or half-an-hour, with the doctor—she was not undressed, but lying on the bed—I heard a strange noise when I went into the room, and asked her what it was—she said it was merely the water coming in outside the window—I cannot describe what noise it was—she told the doctor she was much better, he left, and sent her some medicine—she got up again that same evening, and did her work—on the following Friday I found what had been the matter, and accused her of having had a child—she said she had—I asked her if it was alive—she said, yes, it was alive, and the noise I had heard when I was in the room, was the child under the bed, and the hand-basin covered over it—I asked what she did with the child—she said she had given a man outside 5s. to take it away and bury it—I told her I would not believe any such improbable story, for there was no man that would take charge of such a thing and bury it for the sake of 5s.—a policeman was sent for on the Saturday, but before he was sent for, I told her it was no use her persisting in that falsehood, for I did not believe it, that the child was either in one of her boxes, or in the water-closet, that we were going to have them both searched, therefore she had better tell me what she

had done with it—she said the child was not in the house—I said if it was not in the house, it was certainly in the waster-closet—she said it was, that she had taken it down in the slop-pail on Saturday morning, and put it into the waster-closet, that she had taken the stick that we keep to close the shutters with, and poked it down as low as she could in the water-closet—I asked her about the baby's clothes, she said she had none provided for it, that she was not aware she was in that way at all.

Prisoner. The water was coming in at the time mistress came up; if the child had been alive, which it was not, it would have been impossible for it to have made a noise like that; I am quite certain that it was not alive, for I never saw it; as it came from me in the chamber utensil, so it remained. Witness. There was water coming in at the window at the time, but that was not the sound I heard—it was not a child's cry, it was as if a person was making a noise in the throat—there were two utensils in the room—when I first went into the room the prisoner was sitting on one, and was being sick into the other—I did not notice them when I went into the room with the doctor—she had put it under the bed and covered it over with the hand-basin, but I did not notice it—it was her duty to empty those things—she was lying on the bed at the time I heard the noise, with the blanket and counter-pane thrown over her.

ELIZABETH FELLOWES. I live in Little Albany-street, and work for Mrs. Rich. On Thursday, the 22nd of July, I saw the prisoner—she told me she was very much distressed in her mind—I said that nothing distressed me but poverty, and I was afraid when my little one was born that I should have nothing to put it in—she said, "I had plenty of things with my baby"—I said, "Have you had a baby, then?"—she said, yes, she had one—I said, "Was it alive?"—she said, "Yes, it was born alive"—I asked what she had done with it—she said she had sent it away—she afterwards told me that when her mistress came into the room with the doctor, it was making a noise, and her mistress asked her what it was, and she said it was the gurgling of the water that was coming into a water-closet close by her bed-room window—I cleaned out the prisoner's bed-room the same day, noticed a large make on the floor close by the bedside—it had been wiped up, and the carpet put over it.

Prisoner. I did not tell her the child was alive: I said it was not, and I said that had I been aware I was in that state I should have had plenty to put the child in, but I was not aware I was in that way. Witness. She did not say that she was not aware she was in that state.

HENRY RICHARDS. I am assistant to Mr. Cooper, who was surgeon to the workhouse at Camden-town. The prisoner was brought there—I asked her if she had had a child—she said she had—I asked her if it was born alive—she said it was—I asked how she had disposed of it—she said she delivered herself in the chamber utensil, then put it under the bed, and covered it with the washhand basin, and next morning carried it down to the water-closet, and deposited it there—I asked whether she had prepared any clothes—she said she had not, that she did not know she was in the family way—I saw the body of the child—it had the umbilical cord and the after-birth attached to it—it was altogether—that would indicate a rapid birth—it might have taken place into the chamber utensil—I made a post mortem examination of the child—I opened the chest, and found the lungs of a florid red colour, and on cutting into them I found that they contained blood and air, from which I infer that the child had breathed—I thought it was born at its full period—there were no marks of injury about it.

RICHARD NEELD (police-sergeant.) I was sent for to Mrs. Rich's, and the prisoner was brought to me—she told me that she had given birth to a child on the 16th, and that on the following morning she took it down in the sloppail, emptied it into the water-closet, and thrust it down among the soil—I found it there—I afterwards told the prisoner I had found it—she said, "Yes, I know I put it there"—I asked if she had any baby-linen—she said, "No"—I asked to search her box—she gave me the keys, and I found in it a bottle, labeled, "Laudanum, poison," and a certificate from St. Thomas' Hospital.

Prisoner's Defence. I have had the laudanum-bottle in my box these six years, but had no laudanum in it; I feel certain the child was not born alive; it did not stir or move that I saw; and had I been aware I was in that way I should certainly have got things, because I was not devoid of the means of doing it.

GUILTY of concealing the birth. Aged 38.— Confined Twelve Months.

THIRD COURT.—Saturday, August 21st, 1847.

PRESENT—Mr. Alderman FAREBROTHER; Mr. Alderman WOOD; and EDWARD BULLOCK, Esq.

Fourth Jury, before Edward Bullock, Esq.

Reference Number: t18470816-1860

1860. FRANCIS MOUNTAIN was indicted for stealing I mare, price 7l.; the property of Charles Thomas.

CHARLES THOMAS. I deal in horse, and live at No.7, South Wharf-road, Paddington—on a Friday, about a month or five weeks before I was at the police-court, I was at Smithfield—I had a grey mare for sale—I did not sell her—I saw James Cooper, and ordered him to take her home.

Cross-examined by MR. O'BRIEN. Q. You got her the same evening, did you not? A. Yes—she was brought home by Cooper—I have no partner—I do not always deal for the knackers—this mare was not for a knacker—it was worth 7l.—I gave 6l. 10s. for her—Cooper never sold for me—I did not tell him the value of the mare—if he had an offer of seven guineas for her as he was coming from market, he was not authorized to take it without seeing me—I was going to put her to work—I took her to Smithfield, for sale—she was there till the market was shut up—when I discovered that I could not buy anything, I made up my mind to take her home—I am in the habit of buying and selling—Cooper asked me whether I would sell her—I said, "No; take her home."

JAMES COOPER. On the 2nd of July I was in Smithfield, and saw Mr. Thomas—he had a mare for sale—it had been there from the morning—in the evening, when the market closed, he told me to take it home—I had seen the prisoner in the market, I had known him for twelve months—I saw him again afterwards, and asked him if he would be so kind as to lead the mare on a little way for me, and I would overtake him—I went towards King's-cross, and saw John Hoare, with two mares—one was Mr. Thomas's, it was the one I had given the prisoner to lead, and the one Mr. Thomas had given me to take home—I asked Hoare for her, he gave her to me.

Cross-examined. Q. Was the prisoner in the habit of dealing in the market?

A. Yes—I have seen him buying and selling horse—the mares were going the direct road to my home—if I was taking them home I should have taken them just in the same direction—I gave the prisoner in charge, half an hour or three quarters of an hour after I had left him.

JOHN HOARE. I live at Reading, and deal in old horses for the knackers—on the 2nd of July I saw the prisoner with a brown mare and a grey one—I had seen him before—he asked a man standing by me if he would buy one of them, and afterwards offered them both for sale to me—he told me he had exchanged one on that day, and one on Thursday—he said he should sell them at some place or other that night, as they were of no use to take down to the country—I gave him 7l. for the two.

Cross-examined. Q. What time was it when you first him with the two mares? A. Seven o'clock in the evening—I gave up the mare to Cooper, at half-past seven or a quarter to eight—it took a quarter of an hour or twenty minutes to make the bargain for the two mares.

COURT. Q. Where was this? A. At King's-cross—the prisoner was not there—I did not give the mare up to Cooper before I got to Paddington—he road one, and I road the other—we began to deal in Smithfield-market; I paid the money in Cow-cross-street—I did not see the prisoner afterwards till the 10th of August, that was at Reading—I asked him "How about the money he had done me out of in selling me two horses?"—he said he was not the man—I gave him into custody.

MR. O'BRIEN. Q. How long was it after the prisoner offered the mares to another man that you bought them? A. Not five minutes—I should have taken them to Reading—I paid the money at the Three Tuns, in Cow-cross-street—I was with the young man who was with the prisoner—I had a pennyworth of gin, he had a pennyworth of peppermint—I paid the prisoner seven sovereigns, there were no notes at all—I did not think I had a particular bargain—I wanted a horse for my own cart—I have been in prison at the Town-hall, Reading, for buying a pair of reins; I bought them in an open tap-room, and had witnesses to prove it—they took me up for stealing them—it was about eleven months ago—I was in prison three days, before the trial, and was bailed—I was afterwards tried before a jury, and acquitted—a young man, who was with the prisoner, was outside the public-house holding the mares—he held the grey one, the other one was tied to it—I took the gray mare to Mr. Deekes, to see if it was his; it was, and I gave it up to him—the prisoner had not told me it was Mr. Deekes'.

JURY. Q. How do you know it was? A. Cooper told me so—he fetched Mr. Deekes, who said it was his property, and I gave it up to him—the prisoner did not go a yard with me after he was at the public-house—I never saw him again—he was not with me when Cooper overtook me.

HENRY HUTTON. I am superintendent of police, at Reading—Hoare gave the prisoner into my custody, for stealing two mares.

JURY to JOHN HOARE. Q. Did you not see Cooper previously to buying the mares? A. No—there were eight or ten people at the bar of the public-house, who saw me pay for the mare—I did not take Cooper back there to prove it, because we made haste up to the railway—I was going to take the mares to my house, at Reading, next day, as I had business to settle at King's-cross—Cooper went with me with the other mare—I rode one and he rode the other—he went and fetched Deekes—I had seen Cooper before this transaction.

NOT GUILTY.

Reference Number: t18470816-1861

1861. FRANCIS MOUNTAIN was again indicted for stealing 1 mare, value 7l.; the goods of Thomas Edward Deekes; on which no evidence was offered.

NOT GUILTY.

Reference Number: t18470816-1862

1862. WILLIAM COBB was indicted for stealing 3 coats, value 10l.; 1 waistcoat, 1l.; 1 pair of trowsers, 30s.; 1 pair of boots, 1l.; and 5 hand-kerchief, 10s.; the goods of William Lane, in the dwelling-house of Henry Nichols; to which he pleaded

GUILTY. Aged 23.— Transported for Seven Years.

(There was another indictment against the prisoner.)

Reference Number: t18470816-1863

1863. ABRAHAM WISE was indicted for stealing 1 bridle, value 2s.; and 1 mare, price 6l.; property of Robert Simmonds; having been before convicted of felony.

MR. BALDWIN conducted the Prosecution.

JOHN NEWMAN. I am a cow-keeper, at Kensington Gravel-pits. On Sunday morning, the 1st of Aug., about seven o'clock, the prisoner brought a mere to me, and asked me to buy it—he asked 5l. for it—I asked whose it was—he said it was his father's—I suspected something, communicated with Mr. Simmonds, sent for a constable, and gave him in charge—I had never seen him before.

JAMES PRIOR. I am servant to Mr. Simmonds, of Northold, near Ealing. On Saturday, the 31st of July, at five o'clock in the evening, I turned a mare out into the field—I did not see her again till the following Tuesday—I missed the bridge out of the stable on the Monday morning; I had seen it safe on Saturday.

ROBERT SIMMONDS. I am a farmer, at Northold—I had a bay mare, and missed her on Sunday morning—I found her at Kensington, in Mr. New-man's possession—the prisoner was at my house at half-past nine o'clock on Saturday night—the field is about forty poles from where I live.

JURY. Q. Had you known the prisoner before? A. Yes, I had seen him many times—I never authorised him to take or to ride the mare.

STEPHEN AYRES (policeman.) I took the prisoner into custody, at Mr. Newman's—on the way to the station, he said the mare belonged to his father, who was very ill, and had authorised him to sell.

Prisoner's Defence. I never stole it; a man gave it me, told me to sell it for 5l., and meet him in Smithfield; he gave me a shilling, and told me to say it was my father's, who lived in Hertfordshire.

JOHN PHILLIPS (policeman.) I produce a certificate of the prisoner's former conviction—(readConvicted April, 1846, and confined one month)—I was present at the trial—he is the person.

GUILTY. Aged 16.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18470816-1864

1864. SAMUEL BARRELL was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Lutman, at St. Mary Abbott's, Kensington, and stealing I shawl, value 5s.; and 1 handkerchief, 3s.; his goods; having been before convicted of felony.

JOHN LUTMAN. I am a gardener, and live at Old Brompton—I occupy two rooms—the landlord does not live in the house—no one lives there but me and my wife—on the 13th of July, about one o'clock in the day, I went home—I received information, and went after the prisoner—there were two

men with him—I saw them before me, coming towards me—they passed me, and I went after them—I did not see the prisoner caught, but went home—I found a pane of glass broken in my window, the latch moved on one side, and the window opened, so that a person could get in—I went in, and missed a handkerchief and, shawl—I do recollect seeing them there that morning—I am quite sure they were there on Sunday—I went to work at two o'clock in the morning, leaving my house locked, my window shut, and my wife in the house—she is not here—she did not sleep in that room.

Prisoner. Q. Did you see me break the window? A. No, but I saw blood on your finger.

GEORGE BETTS. I live at 2, Cromwell-row, Old Brompton. On the 13th of July, about half-past one o'clock, I was in front of our house, and saw the prisoner and two other at Mr. Lutman's window—the prisoner got up to the window, and tapped with his knuckle—I heard something fall, like glass—he got down; one of the other jumped up, got in at the window, and came out with a bundle—they all three ran away together—I called, "Stop, thief!"—I afterwards met Mr. Lutman, and told him what I had seen—I knew the prisoner before by sight, and am quite certain he is the boy.

Prisoner. Q. How high is the window from the ground? A. About two feet—I was about 200 yards from you—I could see you quite plainly.

JURY. Q. How old are you? A. Twelve, last week.

ELIZABETH CHAMBERS FOSTER. I live in Camera-street—I saw the prisoner running with a silk-handkerchief—I saw him throw it over a wall in Camera-square—Mr. Lander picked it up, and gave it to a policeman—I am sure the prisoner is the person—I had never seen him before.

Prisoner. Q. What coloured handkerchief was if? A. Chocolate.

DAVID EAGLE. I am a butcher, and live In Camera-square—I was by the Goat in Boots on this day, met Mr. Lutman running—the prisoner and two others passed me, and looked very hard at me—I knew the prisoner before, and am sure he is one of the three Mr. Lutman followed—in consequence of what Mr. Lutman said, I ran and took the prisoner by Old Church—he said, "I suppose you do not want to do much in it; I will give you a sovereign to square it"—he said he would not have broken in, but it was a market-gardener's. and not a poor man's house.

Prisoner. Q. Did you see any one running a head of me? A. Two boys—they made their escape—I did not see the hand kerchief in your hand—I was too much engaged.

ROBERT MITTELL (policeman.) I took the prisoner, searched him, and found nothing on him—Mr. Lander gave me this handkerchief (produced.)

ELIZABETH CHAMBERS FOSTER re-examined. This is the same coloured handkerchief that I saw the prisoner throw

MR. LUTMAN re-examined. This handkerchief is my property—it was in the house on the Sunday.

Prisoner's Defence. The man took me, and said, "What have you been up to?" I said, "Nothing;" he said, "I know you have, and if you like to give me a trifle, or drop of beer, I will let you go;" I said, "No," and he held me till the policeman came; he says, I offered him a sovereign; the policeman knows I had no such money about me.

JOHN PORTSMOUTH. I produce a certificate of the prisoner's former conviction—(read—Convicted July, 1846, and confined six months)—I was present at the trial—the prisoner is the person.

GUILTY. Aged 19.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18470816-1865

1865. GEORGE KING was indicated for stealing two baskets, value 2s.; and 2 dead fish, 6s.; the goods of William Kenyon Bateman, his mater.

CHARLES SNEEZUM. I am assistant to William Kenyon Bateman, fishsalesman, of Love-lane, Billingsgate—the prisoner was in his service—in conesquence of information I watched—there were baskets there, with salmon in them—I saw the prisoner watching for about an hour—he then came, took two baskets, and took them into the Rose and Crown public-house, close by—I followed, and asked what he had got there—he said, "Nothing"—I took the top of the baskets off, and found two fish—I said, "Where did you get these, George?"—he turned to a man standing by him, and said they belonged to him—that man said nothing—I stood by the door; when the man went out, I said, "You had better stop and take your fish"—he said, in the prisoner's presence, "They do not belong to me"—I referred to the prisoner, and said, "Do they, George?"—he said, "No, they belong to me"—he did not say at the time how come by them, but afterwards said he bought them—I gave him in charge—I did not search him—on returning from the station we searched the place, and found three other fish in a basket—they had no business there, they ought to have been in the salmon-box—he had no authority to take them.

Cross-examined by MR. HORRY. Q. Had he regular wages? A. He was a kind of job workman—I gave him a shilling just as I employed him—he did not say "they belong to the man there, of whom I have bought them"—I do not remember the word "bought" being used till he was before the Lord Mayor—I do not thing I have said he used it, if I have, it was a mistake—this is my signature to these depositions—(read—"The prisoner said he bought them")—I swear nothing of the sort occurred—he did say so before the Lord Mayor—I do not know the fish—the basket has Mr. Bateman's name on it—it is the basket the fish come in: and not one which I send fish out in—the prisoner was not employed to take baskets home—he had no business to remove them.

THOMAS HONEYBALL. I am in the employ of Mr. Bateman. On the morning of the 17th of Aug. I went to the warehouse, and saw the prisoner waiting about—I did not taken know anything about the fish which were said to have been taken—I saw the basket—I know them.

Cross-examined. Q. How many have you? A. Dozens, sometimes—they have the fisherman's name and the name of the vessel on them—a fisherman only sells to one salesman.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY. Aged 20.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18470816-1866

1866. THOMAS SHARP was indicted for stealing 8oz. weight of raw silk, value 4s.; the goods of St. Katherine Dock Company, his masters.

MR. ROBINSON conducted the Prosecution.

ALEXANDER COCKERILL. I am a constable to the St. Katherine Dock Company—I know the prisoner. On the 13th of Aug. he came out of the Docks—I searched him, and found seven hanks of silk underneath a false crown of his hat—I produce the false crown, it is tin—the silk was curled round, and the false crown put close over it, so that you could not see the silk—the had a very shallow appearance—the silk weighs 8oz.—the prisoner

said, "It is not my hat"—I said, "We will come and see"—he had taken it off his head himself—it is usual for them to take their hats off as they go through the Dock-gates to be searched—the hat at first had no appearance of having anything in it.

Cross-examined by MR. HORRY. Q. Did he say, "It is not my hat all, I took it because my hat was taken?" A. No, he said, "It is not my hat"—the silk was curled up—it was very tight—the false top fitted very tight—I have not got the hat, it was given back to him.

JURY. Q. Used the prisoners generally to wear a hot or a cap? A. A hat—I do not recollect his wearing a cap.

EDWARD MARTIN. I am foreman of the F warehouse in the St. Katherine's Docks. The prisoner has been employed there, as an extra labourer—on this day he was in the warehouse, on the ground-floor—there were a number of broken bales placed there—I have examined these hanks of silk, they correspond with those in the warehouse which are damaged—I produce some of the other silk, this is damaged in a similar way—I heard the prisoner say at the Police-court, "It is not my hat; I took it because mine was gone."

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY. Aged 30.—Recommended to mercy by the Jury. Confined Four Months

Reference Number: t18470816-1867

1867. BARTHOLOMEW DONOVAN and WILLIAM WALDEN were indicated for stealing 40lbs. weight of iron chain, value 10s.; the goods of Kezia Sarjant, in a dock, adjacent to a certain navigable river.

JAMES SMITH. I am a lighterman, and superintend the business of Kezia Sarjeant—the barge Fanny belongs to him. On the 10th of July she was in the Regent's Dock Basin, which is part of the River Thames, the tide flows in there—Rogers is my apprentice, between six and seven o'clock in the evening he called out to me, in consequence of which I followed the prisoners—they were both together—I saw them in the dock, about forty or fifty yards from the barge—I stopped Donovan, the other got away—directly I laid hold of Donovan, he said it was not him that took the chain—Walden was not present—the chain is the barge's head-fast; it was lying in the cabin till we could get it fastened to where it was broken from—I had seen it there the day before—it is Kezia Sarjant's property—my apprentice brought the chain ashore, in a basket, from the vessel, and gave it to me, and I gave it to the policeman.

WILLIAM YEOMAN (policeman K 6.) On Saturday evening, a little before seven o'clock, I received Donovan in charge from Smith—I told him he must go back with me, he came back—Smith showed me where the chain was—I said I should take him into custody for stealing it—he said it was not him that took it—I took Walden at his own house, and told him I took him for stealing the chain in company with Donovan—he said it was not him, it was the other boy—the chain was given me by Smith—it was in a basket—Walden said it was Donovan's basket; Donovan was not present.

Donovan's Defence. We went into the cabin and put the chain into the basket—a gentleman gave us the rope's end—I did not like to go ashore without the basket, and so was taken into custody.

Walden's Defence. I went with Donovan into the cabin—he put the chain into the basket—I told him he had nothing to do with it—a man came with a rope and sent us ashore—next morning the policeman took me.

NOT GUILTY

Reference Number: t18470816-1868

1868. THOMAS COSGRAVE and TIMOTHY SULLIVAN were indicted for stealing 12lbs. of cherries, value 4s., and 1 basket, 1s.; the goods of William Hatchman; and that Cosgrave had been before convicted of felony; to which

SULLIVAN pleaded GUILTY. † Aged 14.— Confined Two Months.

GEORGE HUNTINGFORD. I am a carman in the service of William Hatchman, a market-gardener at Hillingdon. On Saturday morning I was driving a cart with some baskets of fruit to market—I was sitting in front of the cart—Susan Hamilton called out to me near the turnpike at Kensington, in consequence of which I examined the tail part of the cart, and missed a small basket and twelve pounds of cherries—I led my horse back to Kensington, and saw a constable, who came and brought the two prisoners and the basket of cherries—I know the basket; it is Mr. Hatchman's property, and contained the same sort of cherries which I had lost.

SUSAN HAMILTON. I live at Jennings'-buildings, Kensington. On the 24th of July I saw a cart going towards London—I saw the prisoners cut a string, and take a basket of cherries from the cart—Sullivan took the cherries, Cosgrave was behind him; they both ran away together—I followed Huntingford—I afterwards went with him to Jennings'-building, and saw the prisoner in a passage with the basket of cherries—the constable took them.

Prisoner, Cosgrave. I was not with Sullivan at all. Witness. I am quite sure of him.

JOHN ALLEN. On the 24th of July, at one o'clock in the day, I saw the prisoner in Kensington—I went with Hamilton to Jennings'-building—I saw the prisoners on the stairs of a house with the basket of cherries produced—I took charge of the prisoners and the basket.

GEORGE HUNTINGFORD re-examined. This is the basket that had the cherries in it—there is a mark on it.

Cosgrave's Defence. I was not with Sullivan at all—I was coming along—he asked me if I would have a few cherries—I said "Yes."

THOMAS BRADSHAW (policeman.) I produce a certificate of Cosgrave's former conviction—(read—Convicted Nov. 1846, and confined three months)—I was present at the trial—he is the person.

COSGRAVE— GUILTY. † Aged 17.— Confined Four Months.

Reference Number: t18470816-1869

1869. ELIZABETH KAY was indicted for stealing 5 shillings, and 2 sixpences; the monies of John Hopkins, her master; to which she pleaded

GUILTY , and received a good character. Aged 16.— Confined Eight Days.

Reference Number: t18470816-1870

1870. CATHERINE AYRES was indicted for stealing 30 pence, and 63 halfpence; the monies of George Blake, her master; to which she pleaded

GUILTY. Aged 19.—Recommended to mercy by the Prosecutor— Confined Eight Days, her uncle agreeing to take her into his employment

Reference Number: t18470816-1871

1871. HARRIETT BURLIN was indicted for stealing 2 sovereigns; the monies of Hyam Barnett, her master.

HYAM BARNETT. I am a general dealer at Chambers'-street, Goodmen's-fields. The prisoner was in my service about ten months—on the 14th of July I went to bed, and put my cloth on a chair in the room—I had two sovereigns, a sixpence, and a fourpenny-piece in my waistcoat pocket—I had

moved them from my trowsers pocket into my waistcoat pocket—the door was shut, but not locked—next morning, Wednesday, at seven o'clock, I was awoke out of my sleep, and found the street door open, and was told the prisoner was gone; I had not sent her out—I dressed myself, and missed two sovereigns, a sixpence, and a fourpenny-piece—the waistcoat was moved from the back of the chair to the seat—I informed the police—the prisoner did not come back—I found her on Saturday, in a street in Brick-lane—I made no promise to her, I asked what she had done with my money—she said she had spent it—I asked what she had spend it for—she said, some portion in clothes, and the rest she went out at right and spent—she said she did not know what possessed her to rob such a good master—I gave her in charge.

JURY. Q. Did you give her any wages? A. Four shilling a week and her board, and two shilling more when she was washing—she is an illegitimate child—her father will not own her—I have not missed anything before.

THOMAS HUGHES (policeman.) On the 17th of July, about half-past one o'clock, I went with Mr. Barnett to No. 23, Saint John-street, Bethnal-green, and found the prisoner there—Mr. Barnett gave her in charge—she pulled her box our from under the bed, and gave me these clothes; they are all new—she said she had bought part of them with the money she had taken from Mr. Barnett.

GUILTY. Aged 19.— Judgment Respited.

Reference Number: t18470816-1872

1872. WILLIAM STAMMERS was indicted for unlawfully laying his hands on a certain bitch, with intent &c.

NOT GUILTY.

NEW COURT.—Saturday, August, 21st, 1847.

PRESENT—Mr. Alderman FAREBROTHER; Sir CHAPMAN MARSHALL, Knt., Alderman; and Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Sixth Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18470816-1873

1873. ELISHA KEMP was indicted for stealing 1 table-cloth, value 6s.; 1 cloth, 10s.; 2 pairs of trowsers, 1l.; 2 waistcoats, 10s.; and 1 pickle-jar and cover, 6s. the goods of Robert, Viscount Jocelyn: also 7 napkins, 12s.; 1 ornaments, 10s.; 1 pin-tray, 3s.; 1 thermometer, 10s.; and 1 tea-cloth, 6s.; the goods of John Pownall Bastard: also 1 blanket, 15s.; the goods of Lady Anna Maria Dawson: also 1 candle-stand and snuffers, 4l.; 1 pair of candlesticks, 10s.; 1 portfolio, 4s.; 3 dishes, 10s.; 4 plates, 6s.; and 1 copper pan, 4s.; the goods of Hester Catherine, Dowager Marchioness of Sligo: also 8 tablecloths, 2l.; 2 pillow-cases, 3s.; 13 napkins, 1l. 10s.; the goods of Hester Catherine, Dowager Marchioness of Sligo: also 1 paper box, 1s.; and 1 frock 3l.; the goods of the Hon. Charles Grantham Scott: to all which he pleaded

GUILTY. Aged 25.— Transported for Seven Years on the 1st indictment, and Seven Years further on the 2nd.

Reference Number: t18470816-1874

1874. HENRY WILLIAM BATES was indicted for stealing 10 pence, and 8 half pence; the monies of Edward Newman Hobbs, his master; to which he pleaded

GUILTY. Aged 17.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18470816-1875

1875. EVEREST BARNES was indicted for embezzling the sum of 10s., which he had received on account of Henry Vincer, his master; to which he pleaded

GUILTY. Aged 12.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18470816-1876

1876. FREDERICK DOBBY was indicted for stealing 1 waistcoat, value 1s. 6d., the goods of James Gibbs; having been before convicted of felony; to which he pleaded

GUILTY. Aged 17.— Confined Nine Months.

Reference Number: t18470816-1877

1877. JAMES LAWRENCE was indicted for stealing 1 sixpence, the money of William Henry White, his master; to which he pleaded

GUILTY. Aged 14.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18470816-1878

1878. GEORGE BROWN was indicted for stealing 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of Henry James Allen, from his person; to which he pleaded

GUILTY. Aged 20.— Confined Three Months

Reference Number: t18470816-1879

1879. PATRICK JOHN CLANCEY was indicted for stealing 10 shillings, the monies of Joshua Gordon, having been before convicted of felony; to which he pleaded

GUILTY. Aged 21.— Confined One Year.

(There was another indictment against the prisoner.)

Reference Number: t18470816-1880

1880. ROBERT LACEY was indicted for stealing 53 combs, value 10l.; 13 sponges, 2l.; 1 spoon, 6d.; 35 brushes, 4l. 2s.; 3 pairs of scissors, 9s.; 9 pieces of hair, 3l.; 20 yards of ribbon, 10s.; 1 hank of silk, 2s. 6d.; 16 sticks of sealing-wax, 1s. 6d.; 14 cakes of soap, 14s.; 31 bottles of perfume, 24l.; 5 bottles of eau de Cologne, 10s.; 3 bottles of hair grease, 1l.; 1 bottle of spirits of wine, 1s. 6d.; 3 bottles of tooth-powder, 6s.; 3 bottles of dye, 7s.; 1 pot of pomatum, 1s.; 3 sponge bags, 6s.; 1 box, 3s.; 1 strop, 2s. 6d.; 1 flower vase, 10s.; 1 toilet bottle, 10s.; and 3 files, 3s.; the goods of Henry Perry, his master: to which he pleaded

GUILTY. Aged 23.—Recommended to mercy by the Prosecutor. Confined Eighteen Months.

(There was another indictment against the prisoner.)

Reference Number: t18470816-1881

1881. JAMES WORLEY, THOMAS COX , and WILLIAM BEASELY were indicted for stealing 840 lbs. weight of flour, value 9l. 12s.; and 3 sacks, 3s.; the goods of Joseph Johnson, the master of Worley; and HENRY HOLLIDAY for receiving 560 lbs. weight of flour, part of the same, well knowing the same to have been stolen.

MR. ROBINSON conducted the Prosecution.

DAVID HUNTER. I was foreman to Mr. Daniels. On the 22nd of July, I saw Cox and Beasely come there—I did not see Worley, but I believe he was in the wagon—they delivered eighteen sacks of flour there, my attention was called to them the day afterwards—I counted the sacks we had in our place—there were fourteen sacks below, there had been emptied, and one was in the shop—I can undertake to say that only eighteen sacks were delivered.

HARRIOT DANIELS. I recollect the sacks being delivered—I supposed there were twenty-one—I only saw Cox and Beasely—I cannot say whether there was any person in the wagon, it was at the private door—I signed the receipt, and gave it to Cox.

JOHN HAGUE. I am a butcher, and live in Crown-street, Soho. On the 22nd of July I was at work in my shop, about twelve o'clock—Cox came in and asked me if I had any money to sport—he said he had some dead once to sell wroth the money—I said, "I do not know what you mean, let us see them"—they had drawn up a wagon to my shop—I noticed on the tarpaulin that it came from Uxbridge—I want to the tail of the wagon, and there I saw the prisoner Beasely—Cox said, "He wants to see them"—Beasely got up and pulled a cloth off one or two sacks, pulled out his knife, cut open a sack, took out a handful of flour, handed it to me, and said it was a find pig, or something of that sort, or find dead one—I was quite surprised, and took it into my neighbour, who is a baker, and asked him what it was worth—Beasely had asked me 2l. for the two sacks—I was in at my neighbour's I dare say five minutes—while I was there the prisoner came and peeped through the window two or three times, and then drove off—Worley was with the horses at the head of the wagon.

Cross-examined by MR. PARNELL. Q. Did you know the prisoners before? A. No.

GEORGE COOPER. I am baker, and live in Little Compton-Street. On the 22nd of July I saw the prisoners Worley, Cox, and Beasely, and I saw the wagon at Holliday's door—he keeps a marine-store shop, about 100 yards from me—I saw two sacks of flour carried into his shop—I could not say which of the prisoners carried them in, or who received them.

Cross-examined by MR. BALLANTINE Q. Do you know whether Holliday is married? A. No.

JOSEPH JOHNSON. I am the master of Worley. One the 21st of July I sent by him thirty sacks of flour—I told him to deliver twenty-one at Mr. Daniels's—I received a receipt for twenty-one sacks from Mrs. Daniels—I have known Cox and Beasely some years—they are employed as porters by my man and by other men.

HENRY MERCER. I am in partnership with Mr. Stevens, near Uxbridge. On the 21st of July I sent twenty-one sacks of flour to London by Mr. Johnson—I have seen two sacks of flour since at the station—I did not examine the flour, but I could swear to the sacks—they are marked "H. Stevens, Uxbridge," and a black mark.

JOSHUA MONKTON (police-sergeant F 13.) I want to Holliday's house on the 22nd of July—I saw him in the shop, and asked him if he was landlord of the house—he said, "Yes"—I said, "You have two sacks of flour here?"—he said, "Yes, a tall man came and asked me to allow him to leave them for two hours"—I said, "Let me see them"—he said, "Yes—I went up stairs to the front room, first floor, and found two sacks of flour there—I told him he must consider himself in my custody for having them in his possession, well knowing them to be stolen—he replied, "Shall I be allowed bail?"—I said I did not know—on the following day I apprehended Worley at Uxbridge—I told him the charge—he denied it, and on the way to the station he said that Beasely and Cox had got him into this trap—he said, "I know there were two sacks of flour in the wagon, and Beasely and Cox took them away."

Cross-examined by MR. BALLANTINE. Q. Have you told us all that

Holliday said? A. Yes—he did not say that if he were allowed bail he should be able to find the person who left them—there was a female there.

MR. ROBINSON. Q. Was the room locked? A. Yes—it was used as a bed-room.

MR. BALLANTINE. Q. Was it not the only sitting-room in the house? A I cannot say—there were tables and chairs in the room—I did not go in other rooms—there was sitting-room down stairs, adjoining the shop—the shop was full of things.

JAMES BROWN (policeman F 142.) On the 23rd of July I apprehended Beasely—I told him what he was charged with—he denied helping to unload Mr. Johnson's wagon that day at all—I apprehended Cox the same evening—he denied it—Beasely said at the station, "I did help to unload Mr. Johnson's wagon."

(Mr. Bandy, a bricklayer, at Knightsbridge, and James Robinson, of Newton-court, gave Beasely a good character; Mr. Johnson, the prosecutor, gave Cox a good character.)

WORLEY GUILTY. Aged 26.—Recommended to mercy by the Prosecutor. Confined Four Months

COX— GUILTY. Aged 56.

BEASELY— GUILTY. Aged 55.

Transported for Seven Years.

HOLLIDAY— NOT GUILTY.

Reference Number: t18470816-1882

1882. WALTER WHEELER was indicated for forging and uttering an order for the payment if 1l; with intent to defraud Edward Majoribanks and others; other COUNTS, to defraud Edward, Baron Skelmersdale.

MESSRS. BODKIN and ROBINSON conducted the Prosecution.

FREDERICK MCKENZIE GAUGE. I am a clerk in Messrs. Courts' bank, Edward Majoribanks is one of the partners, and there are others—Lord Skelmersdale keeps an account at our house—this check for 1l. ( looking at it) was presented by Triphook, and was paid—another check similar to this was presented afterwards by him, and he was detained.

WILLIAM TRIPHOOK. I am in the service of Mr. Findlay, a portrait-painter in the Strand—he has a brother a tailor at Birmingham—on the 8th if July I presented this check for payment, and received 1l. for it, which I gave to my employer—on a Saturday, about a month ago, I went with another check of a similar kind; I was then told they were forgeries and was detained.

JOHN LIPTROTT FINDLEY. I am a tailor and draper, and live in Monmouth-street, Birmingham. In the beginning of July the prisoner came to my shop, and selected a coat and trowsers—he requested the coat should be put by and left a shilling on it—the trowsers he wanted to take away—they came to 6s. 6d.—he tendered in payment this check for 1l., purporting to be drawn by Lord Skelmersdale—he indorsed this one the back of it, "Pay to Mr. Findley, C. Wheeler"—from the smallness of the amount I suspected it was not genuine, and I said it was not regular to take these things in business, but if he would leave it I would remit it to my brother—he agreed to that at once, and he showed me this letter enclosed in an envelope—he called on the Saturday evening afterwards, took the trowsers, and I paid him the balance, 11s. 6d.

Prisoner. Q. Was there any objection on my part when I brought the cheek, to give my address? A. Not the slightest—it was my proposition

that you should indorse it, and you agreed to it—I did not sufficiently examine it to know whether the indorsement and the body of the check are the same writing—I sent it up to my brother to get it cashed—I believe your address was found to be correct—I made no enquiry as to who or what you were—I had a young man in my employ who went by the name of Frederick, he is not here.

LORD SKELMERSDALE. I keep an account at Messrs. Coutts'—I have been in the habit of drawing checks for small sums in case of charity—I never saw this check till the day before yesterday—it is not my writing—I never authorized any one to write it—the prisoner received an annual subscription from me for a society of which he was secretary—this note is my writing—I have no recollection of when I wrote it—I sent 1l. to Mr. Wheeler—this envelope is my writing—it was directed to Mr. Wheeler, and has been altered to Mrs. Wheeler.

Prisoner. Q. Has your lordship known anything detrimental to my character during the seventeen years I have belonged to that society? A. No.

JOHN NULT SAYER. I am a printer—I have known the prisoner seventeen years—I cannot say that I have seen him write—I may have done so—I have corresponded with him, and have acted on communication from him in writing—I believe this check to be his handwriting—there are characters in it which very much resemble his writing, this L, the W, and w and b—I should not able to say it was his writing positively, but for the reason I have given, and the general character of the writing, I believe it to be his.

Prisoner. Q. In what way did you become a witness? A. The inspector came to me and asked if I could recognize your writing—I said, yes, because yours was a very peculiar hand—he showed me some papers, and asked if they were yours—I said, "Yes," I should not swear that these checks were your writing—I do not expect any reward for attending here—I was summoned before the magistrate, and was bound to appear here.

JOSEPH THOMPSON (policemen 62 F.) I took the prisoner at Burmingham on the 7th of July—he said it was not a forgery, he should be able to make it all right.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not ask for a person named Wheeler, and did I not say I was the person? A. Yes, I went down to Birmingham on the Saturday, and I went to you on the Tuesday—the reason of the delay from Saturday till Tuesday was, that Mr. Findley had mislaid your address, and I ascertained it afterwards at the election committee-room—you first requested me to accompany you to Mr. Findley's—you asked me to go before the Mayor and magistrates, and said you should exonerate yourself—I refused to go before the Mayor—you asked me for my warrant—I said I had none—you went to the Windsor Castle Inn, and called a man named "Dan," and said to him, "You saw me receive the parcel?" and he said, "Yes"—you said, "You saw me cut the parcel, and there were some clothes in it"—he said, "Yes"—I said to the man, "Did you see a check in it?"—ha said, "No"—I said, "That don't assist you much, Wheeler; I told you I had no power to take you before the Magistrate."

MR. BODKIN. Q. You were sent down from London to apprehend him? A. Yes—I went down a private dress, and said something about the election—the prisoner was a sergeant in the police force at the commencement of the force.

Prisoner's Defence. I am the victim of a conspiracy which I may call secret; I wrote to Mr. Alderson in London, and said, there was the annual money due from his lordship, and other money that I had the collecting of; and he said if I sent the receipt the money would be forwarded; I sent the recepts and received back in an envelope these two checks for 1l. each; I went to the banker's and asked them to cash them; they said they would not for that small amount, but any tradesman would; I then went to Mr. Findlay's, and left one check for a week; it was honoured, and then I called and presented the other, and that was refused—I deny the forgery but admit uttering the checks; his lordship has known me seventeen years, the person I sent the receipt to, sent me the checks, and the officer has taken no steps to find him; the man has absconded; I am the victim through that man, who I consider perpetrated the forgery.

LORD SKELMERSDALE re-examined. I was not indebted to the prisoner—I cannot how long the society to which he was secretary, ceased.

(Samuel Ware, Esq., gave the prisoner a good character.)

GUILTY of uttering . Transported for seven Years

Reference Number: t18470816-1883

1883. JAMES BARRYMORE was indicted for stealing 2 waistcoats, value 1l.; 8 handkerchiefs, 1l.; 3 yards of serge, 7s.; 1 brush, 1s.; and 1 fur Victorine, 8s. 6d.; also, 4 yards of linen cloth, 6s.; 1 Holland coat, 4s.; 2 waistcoats, 1l.; 1 pair of boots, 10s.; 3 handkerchiefs 7s. 6d.; 1 1/2 yards of serge, 3s. 6d.; also, 1 1/2 yards of serge, 3s.; 1 pair of boots, 10s.; 37 handkerchiefs, 4l. 12s. 6d.; 12 waistcoats, 6l.; 2 coats, 3l.; 4 yards of linen cloth, 6s.; and 1 pair of trowsers, 15s.; also 21 waistcoats, 10l. 10s.; 22 handkerchiefs, 2l. 15s.; and 1 pair of trowsers, 15s.; also, 23 handkerchiefs, 2l. 17s.; and 5 waistcoats, 2l. 10s.; the goods of Isaac Moses his master; to all of which he pleaded

GUILTY.

Reference Number: t18470816-1884

1884. JAMES BARRYMORE was again indicted for stealing 2 handkerchiefs, value 5s., the goods of Isaac Moses, his master; and MARY ANN BARRYMORE for feloniously receiving the same, knowing them to be stolen; to which

JAMES BARRYMORE pleaded GUILTY.

MR. HUDDLESTON conducted the Prosecution.

GEORGE JAMES HILLSTEAD. I am assistant to Mr. Harris, a pawnbroker, in the hackney-road—I produce two handkerchiefs, pawned for 3s. on the 19th of June, by Mary Ann Barrymore, in the name of Wallis—she had pawned articles previously—she pawned a coat fourteen month ago, and two handkerchiefs on the 4th of Jan.—those are the only articles that I recollect as being pawned by her—some other things were pawned, but the person who took them in, is gone away.

LEWIS ADOLPHUS. I manage the business of Mr. Isaac Moses—James Barrymore was in his employ, as night watchman—he has been in the police, and Mr. Moses has employed him since March, 1846—we have missed a number of articles; several young men have been turned away in consequence of it—we had the prisoner James detained, and I felt it necessary to go to his house—Mary Ann Barrymore, who is his sister, came in the evening, about seven or eight hours after—I did hear any one tell her it would be much better for her to tell the truth—she said I might search the house, she had destroyed all

the duplicates, but they all related to her own property, that she had pawned goods for her brother, but all the goods she received from him he told her he had purchased, and she would not pawn them till he said he had bought them—I said, if he had purchased handkerchiefs once, it was cheaper to redeem them than to buy others—she still said she had pawned them, but not with a guilty knowledge—I believe these articles to be the property of Mr. Isaac Moses—James Barrymore would have easy access to them.

Cross-examined by MR. WILDE. Q. You are only one amongst many in Mr. Moses' employ? A. Yes—there are about a hundred employed, nearly all of them sell—I cannot say that on of those persons may not have sold this property—I know that all that James Barrymore has bought, we have got down—I have not the books here—I swear he never purchased silk handkerchiefs—he certainly never bought one of me—he is not allowed to pay for what he purchases—our young men who purchase are obliged to have their purchases entered in a book, for which they receive a bill, so that if any of them have any property they can refer to the books and find it—I have been there eight or nine years—we have discharged many people for improper conduct—we are obliged to discharge for any irregularities—this is a bill (looking at me) for something sold, and signed by one of our young men, but this was not sold to James Barrymore—it has not his name on it—everything that our men have there, would be entered on a bill different to this—this bill would prove that a handkerchief has been sold—we sell thousands of handkerchiefs to different persons—here is a bill for a cravat, and from the appearance of this bill I should say that Barrymore bought this cravat—here is a bill for a coat, which is on such a bill-head as he would have—it is my own signature.

JOHN ALTON. I am a pawnbroker—I produce some articles pawned by Mary Ann Barrymore previous to the 19th of June—here is a blouse pawned on the 18th of June, and a pair of men's boots on the same day—neither of them are new—and here is a new handkerchief pawned on 29th of Sept., 1846—these three I can swear she pawned—I have some other articles pawned by a female and some by a man.

LEWIS ADOLPHUS re-examined. This blouse and these boots are Mr. Moses'—I am not aware of James Barrymore having bought these boots—I identify the whole of this property as Mr. Moses'.

Cross-examined. Q. How are you able to swear to this blouse? A. By the private mark—I will swear it has been Mr. Moses'—we had it from the manufacturer; he works for other persons—I think James Barrymore has bought a blouse of us, and he has bought shoes there.

JOHN ROSE. I am a pawnbroker. I have a waistcoat, pawned on the 28th of April, and another on the 9th of July, and two pieces of serge on the 9th of Aug.—I cannot say who by.

MARY ANN BARRYMORE— NOT GUILTY.

Reference Number: t18470816-1885

1885. JAMES BARRYMORE was again indicted for stealing 1 waistcoat, value 10s,; and 2 handkerchiefs, 5s,; the goods of Isaac Moses, his master; and MARY ANN BARRYMORE , for feloniously receiving the same, knowing them to be stolen; to which

JAMES BARRYMORE pleaded GUILTY.

(MR. HUDDLESTON offered no evidence against Mary Ann Barrymore.)

MARY ANN BARRYMORE— NOT GUILTY.

Reference Number: t18470816-1886

1886. JAMES BARRYMORE was again indicted for stealing 1 coat, value 1l. 1s., the goods of Isaac Moses, his master; and MARY ANN BARRYMORE for receiving the same, well knowing the same to have been stolen; to which

JAMES BARRYMORE pleaded GUILTY. Transported for Seven Years.

(MR. HUDDLESTON offered no evidence against Mary Ann Barrymore.)

NOT GUILTY.

Reference Number: t18470816-1887

1887. EDWARD WILLIAM SHEARCROFT was indicted for stealing 1 bill of exchange for 63l. 10s., the monies of James Thomas Dorrington and others, and his masters; to which he pleaded

GUILTY. Aged 18.— Confined Six Months.

Reference Number: t18470816-1888

1888. JOHN HENRY HOLMES and CHARLES KENWORTHY were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Foster, about two in the night of the 9th of July, at Paddington, with intent to steal, and stealing therein, 3 coats, value 3l.; two pairs of boots, 10s.; 3 pairs of shoes, 6s.; and 1 pair of gaiter, 2s.; his property.

MR. EVANS conducted the Prosecution.

WILLIAM GLENNISTER (policeman D 174.) On the 10th of July, at two o'clock in the morning, I was on duty in Victoria-grove, and saw the prisoners coming from a passage which leads into a field at the back of Mr. Foster's house—Holmes was carrying two bundles—I asked what they had got—they both said they were their own things, and they had come from Kensall new Town—they then said they had found the things in a ditch in the field—I examined the bundles, and found a coat, three pairs of shoes, and two pairs of boots, and at the station I found a pair of gaiters in Holmes's pocket—these other two coats I got from Holmes's person—he said they were with the things which he found in the field—I found a knife, two tobacco-boxes, and some lucifers on him—when I was about to take Kenworthy, he said he would not be taken to the station, and ran away.

WILLIAM SHARGOLD. I am servant to Mr. John Foster, of 55, Westbourngrove, in the parish of Paddington—these boots, shoes, coats, and gaiters are his—on the night of the 9th of July I saw them all safe in the back room, which is Mr. Foster's study, and fastened the window with a little catch—there is no shutter to it—next morning I cam down about seven o'clock, the policeman came, and I missed these three coats and other things—they had been all safe the night before—I found the window shut down, but one pane of glass was broken.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. Are you quite sure you fastened the window? A. Yes, I generally do—I recollect fastening it on that evening about eight o'clock—I knelt on my master's table, and fastened it with a catch—I am quite sure I did so on that night—I did not leave the window up—there is no shutter—they had got a garden-stool on the outside to get to the window—it is a good height from the ground.

JOHN FOSTER. This is my property, and was taken from my dwelling-house.

HOLMES— GUILTY. Aged 17.Recommended to mercy by the Prosecutor. Confined Three Months

*KENWORTHY— GUILTY. Aged 17. Confined Twelve Months.

Reference Number: t18470816-1889

1889. MATTHEW ROACH and WILLIAM WILTSHIRE were indicted for stealing 5 candlesticks, value 64l.; 1 pair of snuffers and stand, 6l.; 11 tops of toilet-glasses, 20l.; 1 watch, 15l.; 1 basin, 5l.; 1 pincushion, 8l.; 6 seals, 12l. 12s.; and one pen, 1l.; the goods of Charles, Earl of Harrington, in his dwelling-house.

MR. ROBINSON conducted the Prosecution.

JOHN PAYNE. I am butler to Lord Harrington—his christian name is Charles—he lives in Whitehall-palace, in the parish of St. Margaret, Westminster—I went into his dressing-room on the 20th of July, at a quarter before eight in the morning—I missed a pair of silver candlesticks, a pair of silver snuffers and tray, a pincushion from her ladyship's writing-room, and a pair of candlesticks and a gold watch from another room—I had seen them safe at one o'clock that morning—there were no chimneys swept that morning, nor any to have been swept.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. Your master is called Lord Harrington? A. He is the Earl of Harrington—I know that by the letters directed to him—is they are directed to Lord Harrington we may take them in—his name is Charles Stanhope, Earl of Harrington.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. Whose duty would it be to attend on sweeps? A. When sweeps are expected they knock at the front door, and are let in by the porter—they then go to a second door, and are let in by a second porter, and get a light.

FRANCIS STURGES. I am porter at the Earl of Harrington's, at Whitehall-gardens. On Tuesday morning, the 20th of July, about half-past three o'clock, I was awoke by a tapping at the window, and a calling out "Sweep!"—there were two men dressed as sweeps—I got up, and let them in—I cannot identify them.

HENRY TATTAM (policeman A 160.) On the morning of the 20th of July, about a quarter before four o'clock, I was on duty in Whitehall-gardens—two sweeps came and spoke to me—I can swear Wiltshire was one—I am not positive that Roach was one—he resembles the man, but I had not the chance to speak to him—Wiltshire was coming along the pavement with a bag on his back, and said to me, "Policeman, is it gone four?"—I said no, it wanted a quarter—they went over to Lord Harrington's, and tapped at the window—they were admitted in about a minute—on the morning of the 25th of July I took Wiltshire in Oxford-street from information—I told him what it was for—he said he was innocent, and could prove his innocence by his having worked on that Tuesday morning, at No. 55, Lower Grosvenor-Street—he also said he was at work at another place, No. 44, Davis-street, that morning.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. Was he sober? A. yes—I had seen him twice between the Tuesday and the time I took him—I saw him on the 22nd of July in a public-house for about a minute or two, and again on Friday, the 23rd of July, for about two or three minutes, and again on Sunday morning, the 25th, when we took him—I did not have any conversation with him, but I was with another constable who had—I was within two or three yards of them when the conversation took place—I now and then heard a word—I did not hear Wiltshire saw to me, "After all I have told you it is very odd you should take me"—I did not hear the policeman ask him where he lived—I did not tell him not to get out of the way, and I would call on him in the course of the day.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. The person who was with Wiltshire you described as being rather taller than the other? A. I described Wiltshire as being about five feet three inches high, and the other five feet three inches and a quarter—I gave the description to the inspector by word of mouth—there was no description given in writing.

SETH THOMAS. I am a private in the Grenadier Guards. I was on duty on the 20th of July—about half-past four o'clock that morning I saw two sweeps—I feel positive that Roach was one—he had a bag—my attention was directed to the Earl of Harrington's, from the closing of the door—the bag which Roach was carrying projected more than a bag does which is carrying soot—I stopped them, and asked the person who resembled Wiltshire if he could oblige me with two or three lucifers—he said he had not got any—he asked Roach if he could give me them—Roach said no, but he could give me two or three fusees—I said, "You have got a very heavy load, old mate"—they made no answer—I feel quite positive Roach is the man who gave me the fusees—Wiltshire carries the description of the other man, but I will not swear to him.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. You are quite sure Roach carried the bag? A. Yes—I saw him again on the following Monday morning, at King-street Police-Station—when I saw him on the Tuesday morning he was dirty, as sweeps usually are, but his face was not so dirty as sweeps usually are, there were come marks of dirt about his face, whether it was soot, or no, I cannot say—I should think, from his size, he does not go up chimneys, but sweeps generally continue rather dirty—I did not see the persons come out of the house—the persons were three or four paces from the door at the time the sound of the door closing reached me—the house is rather in front, it is in Whitehall-gardens—I cannot say whether it is a stone house—there are two gates which lead to it—it is exactly in front of my post.

GEORGE BUTT (policeman, A 135.) On the 25th of July, between eight and nine o'clock in the morning, I was in Oxford-street—Wiltshire came up to me, and said he wanted to give me some information respecting the parties who committed the robbery at the Earl of Harrington's—he said he was standing at the corner of street near Oxford-street, and saw two sweeps, who he thought were the persons who committed the robbery—he described one about his one height and size, and little legs, much like himself, and the other a little taller—he said he had told a sergeant of D division, and he had desired him to follow them, that he did follow to the Great Western Railway station, and lost them, and thought they went off by the train—he offered to go with me to see to find them—Tattam was near me—I had some conversation with him, then returned, and took Wiltshire—I said he was charged with the robbery—he said he was satisfied, he could state where he was at work; that he had two jobs that morning, one at 55, Lower Grosvenor-street, and the other at 44, Davis-street—when the charge was taken, he said, "In order to clear myself, I will speak the truth"—he said there was a man of the name of Matthew Roach, and if I were to go to see him, I should think he was the other man—he said, in fact, he was certain that he was one of the parties that was there at the robbery—in conesquence of that I went to Marylebone Court—Wiltshire asked me if I was going to take the other man—I said I should see—he said, "If you take him, most likely he will turn round against me, but that I can't help"—I asked him why he had made that previous statement—he made no reply—I took Roach—I told him what he was charged with—he said nothing.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. Did you not ask him if he had ever swept the Earl of Harrington's chimneys, and did he not answer, "I have not for years?" A. No, I told him I apprehended him for the robbery at the Earl of Harrington's—he said nothing—I had no conversation with him on the subject of robbery.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. You took Wiltshire into custody, when had you last seen him before that? A. On the Saturday evening, the 24th of July, in Oxford-street—I saw him on the Friday—I saw him almost every day—I was in company with Tattam sometimes, but not always—I saw a person walking with Wiltshire, in the street, on Sunday morning—I took Thomas into one of the public-house—I did not see Wiltshire there—I do not know whether he was there pr not—I did not notice him in the Clarendon.

ELLEN CONDON. I live in the service of Mr. Mead, 55, Lower Grosvenor-street. Our chimneys were not swept on the morning of Tuesday, the 20th of July—they were swept on the next day, on the Wednesday, by a person in Wiltshire's employ—Wiltshire came and had the money for them.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. Are you sure it was not on the Tuesday morning they were done? A. Yes—my master had company the night before they swept them, which was on Tuesday night.

SARAH BURNETT. I am in the employ of Mr. Wicker, 44, Davies-street—there were no chimneys swept there on Tuesday morning, the 20th of July—they were swept on the Thursday morning by morning by Wiltshire.

WILLIAM ANDREWS. I am a chimney-sweeper, and live at No.10, Angel-court. Roach was in my service four or five years—I will not swear whether he was in the habit of sweeping the Earl of Harrington's chimneys—it is most likely he did—there was no reason why he should not go there—I swept the Earl of Harrington's chimneys up to 1843.

Cross-examined by Mr. PRENDERGAST. Q. You have been dismissed since? A. Yes—I kept nine person in my employ, and do now—I cannot say that all the West-end chimney-sweepers have been in my employ—I have some who have been in my service twenty years—it is between ten and eleven years since Roach left my service—I know nothing against him.

ROACH— GUILTY. Aged 23.

WILTSHIRE— GUILTY. Aged 27.

Transported for Seven Years.

Before Edward Bullock, Esq.

Reference Number: t18470816-1890

1890. JAMES WILKINS was indicted for a robbery on Samuel Manning, putting him in fear, and stealing from his person, and against his will, 1 pocket-book, value 1s.; and 32 shillings; his property.

MR. PAYNE conducted the Prosecution

SAMUEL MANNING. I am a superannuated officer of Government. On the night of Tuesday, the 3rd of Aug., I went to the Seabright Arms, Bethnal-green, and had a little porter—I left at a little after nine o'clock—when I was leaving, the landlord recommended me to go down a passage, which is not further from the Seabright Arms than across this Court—when I got a little way down, four men rushed upon me, pinned me against the brick-wall, and began to search me—I stood very quietly, and allowed them to do it—while they were doing it, I noticed their faces—the prisoner was one, I have no doubt of it—there was a light directly opposite—they put their hands into my pockets, and took out about 1l. 15s., a pocket-book, and

some memorandums—I never attempted to prevent their doing it; if I had been a younger man I should—I was not at all afraid—I am seventy-eight years old—when they had got my money and book, they ran off as fast as they could—I took the shortest end of the passage, and sent a hue and cry after them as soon as possible—I said to some one, "If you make haste, you will overtake them before they get to Hackney-road"—I then went back to the Seabright Arms—I was a little alarmed, and I called for a glass of water—in less than ten minutes the prisoner was brought back—he said he hoped I would not prosecute him, he was not the one that robbed me—I had not said anything about robbing.

Cross-examined by MR. HORRY. Q. You had never seen any of these men before? A. I do not know that I had, but I should know them I saw them again—I might have said I thought the prisoner was one of them—I said positively, directly I saw him, "He is one of them"—I might have said, "I think he is one," before I had a full view of him—when I looked at him I was certain he was the man—the policeman called out, "Which is the gentleman that has been robbed?"—I said it was me, and the prisoner said what I have stated—he said that over and over again—it was a fine night—I might have got ten or twelve yards down the passage before this happened—the men appeared to me as if they came from the Seabright Arms—I say, the prisoner is one of the persons—I have said so all along.

ANN SARAH LAMBERT. I am the wife of Robert Lambert, an ironmonger, of Hill-street, Hackney-road—on the 3rd of Aug., at half-past nine o'clock at night, I was near the passage joining to the Seabright Arms, and saw three young men standing at the corner of the passage—one was inside the passage, that was the prisoner—I spoke to him—I thought he was my husband—it was exactly half-past nine o'clock—in five or ten minutes I heard of the robbery.

Cross-examined. Q. Where were you standing at first? A. In Woodley-street, which is directly opposite the passage—I was close by the lamp.

THOMAS DARBY (policeman, K 224.) About half-past nine, or twentyfive minutes to ten o'clock that night, I was on duty near Elisabeth-street, Hackney-road, which is only across the road from the passage—I heard a cry of "Stop thief!" and saw two men running across from the passage—the prisoner was one of them—as soon as they saw me they separated—the other one ran on the other side—I lost him, and gave chase to the prisoner—I was not two yards from him the whole way—I caught hold of him—another policeman came up in the other direction—he said, "Let me alone, I know nothing about it"—I had not at that time said anything to him, for I did not know what had happened—I took him to Hackney-road, and inquired—I heard that a gentleman at the Seabright Arms had lost his money, and said, "You must come there, and we will see"—he made no answer, I think, but while he was going he said it was a shame he should be dragged along the street in that disgraceful manner—when I got near the Seabright Arms, he said, "It is not me, if you lock me up I shall be ruined"—I said, "Hold your tongue; which gentleman has been robbed?"—Manning said, "I have been robbed"—he had not opened his mouth before the prisoner said what he did.

Cross-examined. Q. When you were pursuing the prisoner, were not some persons behind you? A. Not one, they could not come up to us—I said, before I got up the steps at the Seabright Arms, "Which is the gentleman who has been robbed?"—and after that the prisoner said, "I hope you wo'nt think it is me!"

GUILTY. Aged 21.— Transported for Seven Years.

OLD COURT.—Monday, August 23rd, 1847.

PRESENT—Mr. RECORDER; Mr. Alderman WOOD; and Mr. Alderman

SIDNEY.

Third Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18470816-1891

1891. JOHN TAYLOR was indicted for stealing 8 1/2 ounces of tobacco, value 10s., the property of George Rogers; and that he had been before convicted of felony; to which he pleaded

GUILTY. Aged 32.— Confined Two Months.

Reference Number: t18470816-1892

1892. JOSEPH MILNE was indicted for stealing I sovereign, the money of John Henry Pressley, his master; to which he pleaded

GUILTY Confined One Month.

Reference Number: t18470816-1893

1893. JOHN KING was indicted for feloniously and knowingly delivering to Eliza Lynn a certain letter, demanding money from her with menaces, and without any reasonable or probable cause.

MR. CLARKSON conducted the Prosecution.

ELIZA LYNN. I am the daughter of a clergyman, the vicar of Keswick, in Cumberland—I have recently been residing at 35, Montague-place, Russell-square, and have been in the habit of pursuing a course of reading at the British Museum, by permission of the Trustees—there is a gate appropriated for the entrance of the readers to the reading-room—I think I know the gate-keeper, Dingle, by sight—I went there last Wednesday week, the 11th of Aug.—I found the prisoner at the gate—after I had entered the gate, he ran after me with a letter—this now produced is it—the envelope is addressed to me by name, "Miss Lynn, Reading-room, British Museum," and this is the note that was enclosed—I read part of the contents of the letter, and immediately communicated what had happened, to the attendants at the Museum.

JOHN WINTER JONES. I am the senior assistant in the department of Printed Books at the British Museum—the prisoner was a supernumerary attendant—it was his duty to be in the library, and hand the books into the reading-room—I have seen him write frequently, and know his writing, the note produced is his writing, I have no doubt of it whatever.

Cross-examined by MR. BALLANTINE. Q. How often have you seen him write? A. He has been at the place many years—I must have seen him write twenty, thirty, or forty times—he makes entries in a book, connected with the particulars of the works used in the reading-room—I have received letters from him from time to time, and I know that he spells very inaccurately—I have no doubt or question at all about this letter being his writing.

ANTONIO PANIZZI, ESQ. I am the keeper of the Printed Books at the Museum, and know the prisoner very well—a man of the name of Buckler keeps the reading-gate, as it is called—there are two porters, one at the gate, and another at the room inside, called the cloak-room—on Wednesday week Buckler had a holiday, and was away from the gate for three days—his leave of absence expired on the Friday—the prisoner was to fill his situation while he was away—I have known him since he has been in the Museum—I have often seen him write, and have no doubt whatever about this letter being his writing.

COURT. Q. Supposing it was intimated that money was to be left at a box where there was a porter at gate, it would have fallen into his hands that day? A. Yes, up to the evening of Thursday, the porter at the gate would be the prisoner himself—I saw Mr. Jardine, the Magistrate, put his initials to the letter.

ROBERT CAWTON. I am an attendant in the Printed Book department at the Museum—I know the prisoner and his writing—to the best of my belief this letter produced is the prisoner' writing.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you entertain any doubt about it? A. None whatever.

The letter was here read:—"Miss Lynn, Reading-rooms, British Museum.—Miss Lynn, I have wached you for some time with Mr. Barnard. I have seen all your tricks andmaneuvers. I have followed you from the readingroom abont the streets with Mr. Barnard. I have seen where you have gone to with him. I have herd your conversation with him, in fact I have seen more than you are aware of, and know more than you think for, and I must say you ought to be ashamed of yourself to first and go on so with a married man, as Mr. Barnard is, with a family of young children as he has got, and his wife a nice lady that ever lived. It is wrong of you to allow him to act as he does. If it was known to his wife and family, you would suffer for it most sevearly; and your own family what would they say to it all, and more particularly your brother, what would he say to all this going on? He does not in the least suspect you of acting in this way, like a common girl of the town; indeed you in some respects are worse, for they do not often take up with married men if they know it. Now, Miss, I shall write to your brother and explain all to him, and write to your family and explain all to them, unless you do one thing, and that only shall save you. I know of a very poor family who is in the greatest distress, brought on by the bad conduct of the father, who died six months age all through his extravagant ways, by keeping another woman, and suffering his poor wife and family to want. Now if you will enclose a five pound note, or as much near that sum as you can conveniently spair, and leave it at the little box close to the iron gate as you enter to go to the reading-rooms—leave it either with the old man at that box, or with the young man that is there during the day of wednesday the 11th of August, or Thursday the 12th, and direct it to Mr. J. Smith, till called for; and if not left by Thursday evening I shall not wait longer, but communicate the whole of the affair, to your eternal disgrace, to your family, brother, and all concerned in it, and to the reading-rooms.—J. SMITH."

JOHN CRISPIN RAWLEY. I am an inspector of police. I took the prisoner into custody about three o'clock on Wednesday, the 11th of August—I told him that he must consider himself in my custody for knowingly sending the letter to the lady—he admitted that he had given it to her, but said that a man he did not know had given it him—I searched him, and found on him a pocket-book of memorandums, from which I should say that he was not a person who was in want.

MR. BALLANTINE submitted that the letter did not contain such a menace as was contemplated by the statute. The COURT considered that it was for the Jury to put their construction upon the wording of the letter, and that if, in their opinion, it contained a threat to charge a criminal intercourse with the party named, then that it was a menace within the meaning of the Act of Parliament.

Cases referred to:—The King v. Pickford, 4 Car. & Payne, 257; The King v. Sutherton, 2 Russell on Crimes, 706; and the Queen v. Hamilton, 1 car. and Payne.

Edward Turner, Esq., No. 19, Salisbury-street, Agar-town; Robert Richardson, net and tent-maker, No. 21, Cambridge-place, New-road; John Ayre, clerk in chancery; Henry Hetherington, bookseller, No. 51, Judd-street; Thomas Rogins, baker, No. 45, Judd. street; Richard John Madden, victualler, Museum-street; and William Griffin and J. Knight, attendants in the library of the British Museum, gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY. Aged 44.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18470816-1894

1894. THOMAS CONNELLAN was indicted for feloniously cutting and wounding Thomas Connellan on the head, with intent to kill and murder him:—2nd COUNT, stating his intent to be to do him some grievous bodily harm.

MR. PAYNE conducted the Prosecution,

THOMAS CONNELLAN. I am in no trade now; I was a farmer—at the time this matter happened, I resided at No. 3, John-street, Hanway-street, Oxford-street. On Wednesday night, the 2nd of June, about nine o'clock, I was standing at the parlour-door of No. 3, John-street, my sister was standing at the passage-door, and the prisoner's brother outside—I saw the prisoner come to the end of the stairs, which lead from the kitchen, and I was struck immediately afterwards on the head—I did not myself see the person that struck me—I fell; and was bleeding till I was taken to the hospital—I was standing, looking in such a way that I could see either out of the passage-door, or towards the yard—I had not spoken to the prisoner since about six hours previously, nor had anything to do with him.

Cross-examined by MR. PARRY. Q. Do you live in this house? A. Yes—I have been from Ireland since last April twelvemonth—I have done nothing for my living during that time—I have lived on the goodness of my uncle—I used to farm, up to last March twelvemonth—I then came over here—there is only my sister and myself, of my father's family, living with my uncle at present—the prisoner is my cousin; he lived with my uncle at the time this occurred—be was not living with him when I came over—Michael Byrnes and Ellen were—I cannot say how many of us were living upon my uncle—he is between 80 and 90 years of age—I had done nothing that I know of to provoke the prisoner—I was not drunk—I had taken some drink—I had been standing at the parlour—door for two or three minutes—I had not been watching all day for the prisoner—he had not been hiding from me all day in the kitchen—we had had a row at the door in the morning—I know Byrnes and Owen Connellan, the prisoner's brother—I swear Owen and I were not beating Byrnes—I met Byrnes at the door, and asked him a question, and he told me I was a liar—I said he was a liar, and then he struck me—(looking at a torn coat produced by MR. PARRY)—I did not do all that I am sure—I was not holding Byrnes while Owen Connellan was beating him with the tongs—Owen Connellan struck him—I did not see the tongs in his hand—the greater part of that day I was in the parlour—I swear I was not watching for the prisoner coming up stairs from the kitchen, to prevent his coming out—it was not quite dark when the blow was struck—I did not see the prisoner strike me—there was not light in the parlour or passage except the light of the evening—it was about nine o'clock—I never threatened to do for the prisoner—I did not say that day that I would have his life—I had not been having a row with Michael Byrnes and him for two and three days—there had not been a good deal of quarrelling—I forget whether I said that I was the blood relation of my uncle, and I would have the management

of his property—I was not trying to force the prisoner and his sister Ellen out of the house—I did not threaten two or three times in the course of that day that I would have the prisoner's life, and that he should not go out of the house without a broken head—I had not the tongs in my hand, walking about the passage, about twenty minutes before this occurred—I had not the tongs in my hand that day, unless I had them for the purpose of the fire—I was not threatening to break the prisoner's bones—I was never charged with an assault—I know William Bury—I never assaulted him—I have never been locked up in a station-house for an assault, or for a raw of any sort, nor has any summons been taken out against me—I had drunk some beer on that day—I do not recollect that I had any spirits—the prisoner has not been brought up as a surgeon that I know of.

MR. PAYNE. Q. You and your sister lived with your old uncle before the prisoner came there; he was not there when you first went there? A. No—I had not struck or threatened him, just before the poker came on my head.

MARY MORAN. I am the wife of Patrick Moran, and live in the same house as the prosecutor. On Wednesday night, the 2nd of June, between nine and ten o'clock, I was in the parlour—the prisoner's brother called me out—I went to the street door, and stood there talking with him—I left the prosecutor in the parlour—I heard him call me to go in—I did not go in at the time, but said I would be in directly—he then came to the parlour door to call me, and I saw the prisoner come and strike him with the poker—I do not know where he came from, whether from the yard or from the kitchen—he did not come from the street door or the front way—he came behind him with the poker and struck him with it over the head—he then dropped the poker, and ran out behind his brother, who was standing at the door, and ran across the street—there had been no words between the prosecutor and prisoner while I was there—the prosecutor fell into my arms, and afterwards on the floor—he bled a great deal, and was taken to the Middlesex Hospital.

Cross-examined. Q. There had been a good deal of row in this house in the morning, had there not? A. Yes, between the prosecutor, his cousin, Mike Byrnes, Patrick Clark, and myself—I was in the row—the prisoner was not threatened to beaten in the morning—the prosecutor had not been drinking all day—he had not been fighting all day—he was with the others that were fighting, and he was struck—Michael Byrnes was coming in at the street door, and he was coming out of the yard, they both met at the door, and Byrnes never struck at him till he saw the prisoner and his brother coming behind him, and then they struck each other—this row had not been going on for two or three days—we did not want to turn Byrnes out of the house—I and my brother were not plotting together to turn him out—I do not live with my uncle—I have only come on a visit—my husband is at Liverpool—Byrnes is a relation of my uncle's—I did not see the prisoner till I saw him strike the blow—I was standing at the door at the time—it was not very dark—I was standing with my back to the door and speaking to Timothy Connellan, the prisoner's brother—I had not put the candle out in the parlour—I do not know whether my brother had—my brother had not been more than five minutes in the passage—I did not see him with a pair of tongs in his hand that day—I have said that the prisoner should not go out of the city without a broken head—my brother did not say so too—I had not been threatening him for a day or two before this—I had not had a word with him—I did not say I would not leave London till I had him hung.

COURT. Q. What did you mean by telling him he should not go out of the place without broken head? A. It was when they were fighting in the morning, and I was in a passion—the prisoner, my brother, Michael Byrnes, Timothy Connellan, Owen Connellan, Michael Clark, his sister, and myself, were all fighting together—we had a regular row in the morning.

MR. PARRY. Q. Had not Owen the tongs beating the prisoner? A. I did not see that—I did not see him strike him—I did not see Byrnes' coat torn—I did not see the prisoner get behind the bed in the kitchen for fear of my brother, nor hear my brother say he should not go out of the house without a broken head.

MR. PAYNE. Q. When did the row finish? A. In the morning—there was fighting and quarrelling after that—the prisoner came to the door between one and two o'clock, with a knife in his hand, and said he would stab my brother if he came before him—there had not been a word said from that time till he came with the poker.

EDWARD HARRIS. (policeman E 17.) About ten o'clock on Wednesday evening, the 2nd of June, I was sent for to No. 3, John-street—I found this poker in the room, and some blood in the middle of the room—no part of the poker was bloody.

Cross-examined. Q. Where was it found? A. In the front-parlour, where the blood was lying, under the window.

HENRY FOWLER (policeman, E 5.) On Friday, the 4th of June, in consequence of information I had received, I went opposite Aldgate Church—the prisoner came up to me there, and said, "I wish to give myself up to you, as I understand I am wanted for the assault on Thomas Connellan"—I took him to the station-house.

JOSEPH DIXON. I am house-surgeon at the Middlesex Hospital—about half-past ten o'clock in the evening of the 2nd of June, the prosecutor was brought there—he had a would on the right side of the head. which had been bleeding—on putting my finger into it to examine it, I found the bone was depressed, driven in and pressing on the brain: that would require considerable violence—a blow with such an instrument as this poker might cause it—I should say it was inflicted by the head part—it was necessary to remove a portion of the bone, and I have it here (producing it)—the place had healed up in the proper way.

COURT. Q. Was it a dangerous wound? A. It was—he remained in the Hospital ten weeks—it so happened that no dangerous symptoms presented themselves, but from the nature of the would they were likely to occur—if he had been of a bad habit of body, there would have been danger of erysipelas, or inflammation of the brain—it must have been a very violent blow.

MR. PAYNE. Q. Would a person coming behind another, with a poker in his hand, be able to strike such a blow as that? A. I should say he might.

MR. PARRY called

MICHAEL BYRNES. I lived in John-street, Hanway-street, from the 22nd Jan., 1846, up to the night in question—I was there before the prosecutor, and had been sent for by my uncle—the prisoner has lived there with my uncle since April last—he was not there before the prosecutor—I managed the rents for my uncle—about ten o'clock on the morning in question, I was sent out by my uncle, and on my returning, and knocking at the door, the prosecutor opened it, seized me by the collar, and dragged me into the parlour, and he and two others struck me most desperately—there were seven,

eight, or nine of us mixed up in it—there was great violence—the prosecutor was very violent, and the prisoner came to rescue me—the prosecutor and his sister tore my coat—the poker and tongs were used, and Clark had a stick—Owen Connellan, the prisoner's brother, took the poker first—he was one of the prosecutor's party—he struck the prisoner with it, and the prisoner took it from him—I did not see prisoner afterwards in the kitchen—I returned at two o'clock for my coat, to take before the Magistrate, and the prosecutor would not admit me—I understand that the prisoner was then in the kitchen, and could not leave it—I did not hear the prosecutor make use of any threat against the prisoner that day.

TIMOTHY CONNELLAN. I am the prisoner's brother. I saw the prisoner about half-past nine or ten o'clock on the morning in question, in the kitchen—he was doing nothing, but looking after the breakfast, and preparing to go out as usual—I left him there, and went out; and when I returned, between nine and ten in the evening, I found him hiding in the kitchen—that was before the blow was struck—I knocked at the door, and found he had bolted himself in—he let me in when he found who it was—there had been a great deal of quarrelling and disputing that day—I had been told on the previous evening that the prosecutor was concocting this row, and my uncle told me to come in the morning, that I might effect peace—I did so, but while I was in the kitchen the prosecutor went to open the door, and the row took place.

MR. PAYNE. Q. Where were you when the prisoner struck the below? A. Standing outside, on the pavement, before the door—I did not see the below struck—I saw the prosecutor bleeding—the prisoner ran out behind me—I then returned home—when I left the kitchen, I left only my uncle and the prisoner there—I went and tapped at the parlour door, to ask the prosecutor's sister to allow my brother to come out, as he had told me he was in fear of being knocked down by the parlour door—there seemed to be no enmity against me—the parlour door was half open—there was nobody in the passage when I came up, but the prosecutor was in the parlour, and he came out while I was talking to his sister—I might have been talking to her for five minutes.

COURT. Q. Then the effect of your coming, was to bring the prosecutor into the passage, and then the prisoner came up with the poker, and struck the blow? A. Well, it appears so; but in the morning I had asked the prosecutor's sister to allow Byrnes to come out, and she did—she took her brother into the parlour, and Byrnes came out—that made me return in the evening to effect a further conciliation, and ask her to allow my brother to go out, and he would never come in again.

ELLEN CONNELLAN. I am the prisoner's sister. There was a great disturbance on the morning in question—I went to the doctor's about ten o'clock, and did not come back to the house until about eight in the evening—I went down into the kitchen for my box, and my uncle was lying on the bed—he told me to go out with my brother Timothy—I was going out, and I saw the prosecutor standing in the parlour doorway, with the tongs in his hand, and another person with him—that was about half-past nine o'clock, before the blow was struck—he was not saying anything, but he looked after me—I heard him and his sister (headed by the party in the parlour) say that day that they would have the prisoner out that night—the whole family were all quarrelling together—I go my finger broken in the morning row, as the prisoner's brother was going to strike him on the head.

MR. PAYNE. Q. Where you one of the fighting party? A. I was going to rescue Byrne along with my brother.

TEDDY CONNELLAN. I am first cousin to the prisoner's uncle. I was at the beginning of the row, but I did not meddle with it—I saw the prisoner in the evening—he came down to me, without his hat, which was broken—he did not hide himself, he staid there—I saw the prosecutor that morning, with a pair of tongs in his hand, at the parlour door—I did not see him with the tongs in the evening—the prisoner is lame.

COURT. Q. Which leg is he lame of? A. Well, indeed, I cannot tell.

TIMOTHY CONNELLAN re-examined. My brother is lame, but I do not know of which leg.

(The gaoler stated that the prisoner was lame of the left leg.)

GUILTY on the Second count. Aged 21.—Recommended to mercy by the Prosecutor. Transported for Seven Years

Reference Number: t18470816-1895

1895. CHARLES ROLLINS was indicted for feloniously assaulting Myer Levy, being armed with a life-preserver, with intent to rob him.

MR. ROBINSON conducted the Prosecution.

MYER LEVY. I am in the employ of Isaac Jacobson, of No. 112, Oxford-street—on Wednesday morning, the 4th of Aug., the prisoner came to our shop, shortly before eleven o'clock, and asked to took at some gold watches—I showed him some—he asked if I would have any objection to send some to the Boar and Castle, for his father to look at—he selected three—I went with them to the Boar and Castle, and went up stairs with the prisoner into a bed-room—after I had been there some time, from his manner I began to get very uneasy, and asked him if the gentleman who wished to see the watches, had not better step into the shop, as it was only a few doors off, and he would see a great variety to look at—he said he would see—he went out of the room, came and said if I would go with him to his father's room he would look at them and choose them—I walked across the room, and we met near the door—we were walking out together, side by side, through the door-way, and just as we got under the door-way, he struck me two or three blows on the side of the head with a life-preserver, which I produce—he laid hold of my left hand which had the watches in it—by a sudden jerk I pushed my hands away from him, and, turning round at the same time, caught his had falling on my head with the life-preserver again—the watches were partly in his hand and partly in mine—they were never out of my possession—he never got them—I called out. "Murder!" and held him till the waiter came to my assistance, and he was taken into custody—this is the hat I had on at the time—(producing it, very much broken)—this is the effect of the blows—it is not beaten through—there is no hole in it—I had a large bump on my head, and I was constantly bathing it for a fortnight afterwards—I have been under the doctor's care ever since.

Prisoner. Q. Are you sure I am the person that struck you? A. Certainly; you hit me three times—I felt three blows on my head—you might have struck more than that—the watches were in my left hand—I had my hat off in the room, but in going out of the room I put it on—you had your hat on at the time you struck me—as we were going out of the room you stepped behind me, and hit me on the side of the head—you bent my hat in this way—I swear your hand was on the watches and my hand, and I pushed your hand away to prevent your taking them—I turned round, and caught

your hand with my right hand, as you were levelling the fourth blow—you resisted, and we had a most desperate struggle after that, after I put the watches into my pocket.

COURT. Q. Did you find that he had a father, or any person in the house? A. No.

WILLIAM YOUNG. I am a waiter at the Boar and Castle, Oxford-street—about ten o'clock, on the morning in question, the prisoner came to our house, and asked me if his luggage had come from the Birmingham Railway—I asked what name—he said, "In the name of Fitzgerald," or Fitzwilliam—my mistress spoke to him, and sent him to the office to see if it had come—he came back, said it had not come, might he go up stairs and wash his hands, he wanted two rooms, one for himself and one for a friend—he went out, and came in again with the prosecutor, and went up stairs—I heard cries of murder some time after—I went up, and found them struggling together—I caught hold of the prisoner, and took him in charge, and he was taken into custody—no one was there with him, and he had no luggage—the prosecutor's shop is about six doors from the Boar and Castle—the porter was sent for a policeman—the prosecutor gave him the life-preserver.

JAMES NEWMAN (policeman E 9.) I received the prisoner into custody, and received this life-preserver from the porter—he is not here—I met him in Oxford-street, running—he told me a man had been knocked down with a life-preserver at the Boar and Castle.

MYER LEVY re-examined. When I got the life-preserver from the prisoner, I had it in my hand, while keeping him away from me—the porter came up stairs, and I told him to take it out of my hand, he did so—I believe this one to be the same—I told him to fetch a policeman.

Prisoner's Defence. It was not my intention to rob him; I was out of employment, and driven almost to desperation, and I committed the assault, that it might have the appearance of something desperate, and that I should get transported; if I had intended to rob him, I could easily have rendered him senseless; but I did not strike him with all my strength, and before the Magistrate the effects were hardly visible; as to seizing the watches, or attempting to seize them, I did nothing of the sort; I do not believe he had his hat on at the time; I hope you will be merciful to me; I was nearly frantic.

MYER LEVY re-examined. I am quite sure he made a snatch at the watches.

GUILTY. Aged 22.— Transported for Fifteen years.

Reference Number: t18470816-1896

1896. JANE HICKMAN was indicted for feloniously assaulting William Allen, and stabbing, cutting and wounding him on the left arm, with intent to do him some grievous bodily harm.

WILLIAM ALLEN. I live in Queen-street, Seven Dials. I have known the prisoner for two years and a half, and cohabited with her for some time—we have been parted for the last ten months—on Saturday, the 14th of Aug., as I was standing in Newport-market, selling my goods, the prisoner came up to me and gave me a blow on the side of my head with her fist—I went away from my barrow, and left the boy Bradley in charge of it, to avoid any disturbance—I then came back and saw her following the barrow—I saw her speaking to Bradley, and I told him not to give her any money—on that she began to abuse me, and struck me with something that she had in her hand—I cannot say what it was—it must have been a knife, but I thought it was a key—I held up my arm to prevent her striking me, and it went into my

left arm—she ran away, I ran after her, stopped her, and gave her in charge—I found that I was wounded—my holding my arm up caught the blow—I do not know where it would have struck me, if I had not held my arm up—I was almost close to her—she had left off attacking me, before I told Bradley not to give her any money—a knife has been found.

DAVID BRADLEY. I was by when the prisoner struck the prosecutor, I believe with her fist—he went away and left me in charge of his barrow—when he came back the prisoner was asking me for money—I said I had none to give her—with that Allen came running alongside, and said to me, "Bradley, give her no money"—I said I had none to give her—with that she ran over to him, and made several blows at him with her hand—he said, "You have got a key in your hand, have you not?"—she said, "No, I wish I had, for your sake"—he took off his coat, and said "Oh, she has stabbed me; she has cut me"—she ran away and cried out "Murder!"—the blood ran down his arm very much.

HENRY SHEPPARD (policeman C 138.) I took her into custody—I noticed Allen's arm, it was bleeding very much—I found the knife about three yards from where I took her—I could not see any stains on it—it was shut as it is now—the prosecutor went to a surgeon, and I believe the next day he went to the hospital.

WILLIAM ALLEN re-examined. I only went twice to the hospital—the wound was not very deep—it is nearly well now—it does not hurt me much—if I had not lifted up my hand, I thought I should have received the blow on my head—it was not a very broad wound, it was about the same size as this knife—I know nothing of the knife.

DAVID BRADLEY re-examined. I do not know what occasion she had for a knife—I was selling cucumbers—she had not asked for anything out of the barrow—I had never seen her with that knife.

Prisoner's Defence. I was passing through the market, and he gave me a shove; I asked what he did it for, and knocked his cap off; I asked the boy for some halfpence, and he struck me over the head and knocked me down; he gave me two stabs, one over the head, and the other on the knee; I do not know whether the boy was by at the time.

WILLIAM ALLEN re-examined. I did not touch her—I did not see her till she gave me the blow on the head, and knocked my cap off—she had nothing in her hand when she struck me at first—I cannot say what she had got the last time—she did not cut or hit me till I raised my arm.

DAVID BRADLEY re-examined. Allen did not strike the prisoner at all—she struck him two or three times, and all at once she made a sudden dart at him—she only struck him once at the barrow, but she made three or four blows at him.

NOT GUILTY.

Reference Number: t18470816-1897

1897. WILLIAM BRADSGAW was indicted for stealing 60 yards of carpet, value 6l., the goods of Joseph Steffanoni, in his dwelling-house.

JOSEPH STEFFANONI. I am an upholsterer, at Holborn-bars, in the parish of St. Andrew. On the 27th of July, between three or four o'clock, I missed sixty yards of carpet, which I had placed outside the door—this now produced is it

RICHARD WALKER (policeman G 33.) On the 27th of July, a little after halt-past three in the afternoon, I met the prisoner in Little Ball-alley, carrying this carpet on his shoulder, covered with a kind of bag—he was about

350 yards from the prosecutor's—I asked what he had got—he made no answer—I followed him into White Hart-yard—he threw it into a truck—I said, "I am determined to see what you have got, what is it?"—he said, "I do not know"—I said, "Where did you meet with it?"—he said, "A man asked me to carry it for him to Finsbury-square, and he would give me 6d."—the prosecutor was going towards Finsbury-square; there was another man with him, who ran away when I stopped the prisoner—I apprehended him the same night—he was remanded for three days—I had them both at the Police-court together—the Magistrate thought there was not sufficient evidence to send him for trial—the wrapper does not belong to Mr. Steffanoni.

Prisoner's Defence. A man asked me to take it to Finsbury-circus, and said he would give me 6d.; I am a stranger in town.

GUILTY.† Aged 23.— Confined Six Months.

THIRD COURT.—Monday, August 23rd, 1847.

PRESENT—Mr. Alderman FARNCOMB; and EKWARD BULLOCK, Esq.

Before Edward Bullock, Esq.

Reference Number: t18470816-1898

1898. JAMES O'NEILL was indicted for stealing 1 truck, value 30s.; 8lbs. weight of dates, 4s.; and 16 quarts of nuts, 10s.; the goods of Thomas Liney, his master.

THOMAS LINEY. I live in Cambridge-place, Agar Town—on the 22nd of June I employed the prisoner to go out with a cart and sell fruit—it was my cart and fruit, and he left me with them—I never saw him or them again till he was in charge—he never came back with fruit or money—I saw the truck in the possession of Dumon—I have seen it here, it is mine, and the one I had sent the prisoner out with.

ALBERT DUMON. On the 27th of July, Mr. Liney saw me with the truck, and claimed it—I told him I had bought and paid for it—the prisoner was with the man I bought it of—he was the first who asked me to purchase it—he said it belonged to both of them, that they were in partnership, and were going to leave off partnership—it is the same truck which Liney claims.

JOHN WHITING. I live in Red Lion-street, Clerkenwell—I was with Dumon when he bought the truck—a man who was with the prisoner sold it—I did not hear the prisoner say anything.

Prisoner. He did not give me any money for it. Witness. He gave the other man 27s. for it.

THOMAS SEAVOL (policeman.) I took the prisoner—I have the truck here—Liney has seen it.

GUILTY. Aged 16.— Confined Two Months.

Reference Number: t18470816-1899

1899. ALEXANDER HOWETT and MARK KINGSTON were indicted for stealing 7 yards of cotton, value 3s. 6d.; the goods of John Booker and another, and that Kingston had been before convicted of felony.

JOSEPH BOOKER. I am assistant to John Booker, of London-terrace, Hackney-road—he has one partner—these seven yards of printed cotton are their property—on the 2nd of Aug., a little before three in the afternoon,

they were on the rail outside the door—I received information from Mr. Apsall, who lives opposite, about a quarter of an hour after—he brought the prisoner Howett and the cotton to me, and told me, in his presence, that he had found it on him—I asked him how he became possessed of it—he said a young man threw it into his arms—Kingston was brought shortly after—a policeman was sent for, and they were given in charge.

GEORGE APSALL. I live with my father, an upholsterer, at Cambridge-place, Hackney-road, opposite Mr. Booker's—on the 2nd of August, a little before three o'clock in the afternoon, by my father's desire, I watched the prisoners from the front parlour window—they were together—I saw Kingston unpin the piece of cloth at Mr. Booker's shop, and give it to Howett—my father caught Howett, I caught Kingston—I am quite sure he is the man who unpinned it.

WILLIAM FOY (policeman.) I was sent for, and took the prisoners—I told them they must come to the station—they said nothing.

Howett's Defence. The cloth was thrown into my arms.

Kingston's Defence. I know nothing about it.

WILLIAM BEASLEY. I produce a certificate of Kingston's former conviction—(read—Convicted, June, 1846, and confined three months)—I was present at the trial—he is the person.

HOWETT— GUILTY. Aged 19.— Confined Four Months.

KINGSTON— GUILTY. Aged 16.— Confined Twelve Months.

Reference Number: t18470816-1900

1900. RICHARD MARTIN was indicted for embezzlement.

THOMAS HUNT. I am a fishmonger in Fitzroy-market—the prisoner was in my employ for about three months—he ran away at Whitsuntide, the 24th of May, and did not come back—he has received money and brought it to me—I engaged him to deliver fish, and if the bills were paid, he should have brought the money to me—he was not hired as a collector—he has received money before, and paid me—he has not accounted to me for 1l. 2s. 3d., paid by Mary Ann Roon for Mr. Cowling, or for 3s. 6d. from Mr. Hopper.

MARY ANN ROON. I am servant to Mr. Cowling, of Portland-square, Chelsea—I saw my mistress pay the prisoner 1l. 2s. 3d.—she is pregnant, and not able to come here—I saw it paid—I saw silver, a half-sovereign, and some halfpence—I am sure the prisoner is the person—I know that Mr. Cowling dealt with Mr. Hunt for fish.

HARRIET BREWER. I am servant to Thomas Hopper, of Lisson-grove—he deals with Mr. Hunt—between two and three months ago I paid the prisoner 3s. 6d. for Mr. Hunt—he receipted the bill.

COURT. Q. You cannot fix the time exactly? A. No, I am sure it was Whitsuntide—he asked for a pencil—my mistress gave him one, and he wrote his name—here is the bill, it is dated Feb.

MR. HUNT re-examined. I wrote this bill—the dates on it are Feb. 16th, and April 7th.

GUILTY. Aged 17.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18470816-1901

1901. ELIZABETH CHEVELL was indicted for stealing 1 sheet, value 2s., 1 shift, 1s.; and 1 handkerchief, 1s.; the goods of William Holden, her master.

WILLIAM HOLDEN. I am a gardener, and live in Church-street, Chelsea—my wife is a laundress—the prisoner came into my service about twelve

months ago, and staid three or four months—in consequence of something, I discharged her, and then my wife missed something—she is not here—I missed two frilled shirts, and a handkerchief of my wife's—these things produced are our own—we found them at Mr. Grant's, a pawnbroker's—here is our name at full length on them—they are my prop✗rty—I will swear they were in the drawers at the time the prisoner was living with us.

WILLIAM CULLEN. I live in Ebury-street, Pimlic—I received thirty duplicates from Mrs. Arnold, and gave them to the policeman—the prisoner lived in my house—she left just before Whitsuntide.

ELIZABETH ARNOLD.

I am a widow, and live in Spring-garden-palce, Pimlico—the prisoner lodged with me before she went to Mr. Cullen's—she gave me some duplicates to take care of—I gave them to Mr. Cullen.

WILLIAM GOLDING (policeman.) I took the prisoner on another charge—she said she did not care, if there was nothing more than the charge on which I took her.

JOSEPH SMITH (policeman B 40.) I received the duplicated form Mr. Cullen.

SAMUEL HOLLIS. I produce a shirt, a shift, and a handkerchief—I do not know who pledged them—it is upwards of twelve months ago—I gave the person a duplicate—this produced is it.

Prisoner. It is my first offence.

GUILTY. Aged 29.— Confined Three Months.

Reference Number: t18470816-1902

1902. WILLIAM SULLIVAN and JAMES GRIFFITHS, alias HORAN , were indicted for stealing 1 pair of boots, value 14s.; the goods of Thomas Moore; and that they had both been before convicted of felony.

JOHN FRANCIS SHEARGOLD. I am shopman to Thomas Moore, of No.30, Lamb's Conduit-street, boot-maker. On the 11th of Aug., about half-past twelve o'clock in the day, I was in the shop, and saw Sullivan take a pair of boots from inside the door, and hand them to some one outside—I saw Griffiths with them in his hand—Sullivan is lame, he a crutch; I caught hold of him—a person passing laid hold of Griffiths—I saw him drop the boots, I picked them up, and threw them inside the shop—they said they did not touch the boots, and did not know anything about them.

CHARLES WAKE. On the 11th of Aug., in the afternoon, I saw Sullivan in Mr. Sheargold's custody—Griffiths was close to Sullivan, holding these he tried to run away, struck me very violently on the month, and made it bleed.

Griffiths. Q. You tore the buttons from my shirt? A. I took hold of your collar, you rolled yourself into the gutter, and tore your own things—it was your own fault.

EDWARD BAKER (policeman E 124.) I took prisoners into custody, and saw Mr. Wake bleeding from the month—the minute Griffiths saw me he said, "I will go quietly."

Sullivan's Defence. I was looking into the shop, at some slippers; if he had seen me take the boots, he would have taken me immediately, but he touched me on the shoulder, then walked away, and took hold of this lad.

Griffiths' Defence. I was looking into the next shop window; I did not drop the boots; I had nothing to do with them.

JOHN JAMES ALLEN (policeman E 159.) I produce a certificate of Sullivan's former conviction—(read—Convicted Nov., 1846, and confined six months; having been before convicted of felony)—I was present at the trial—he is the person.

ROBERT ROBINSON (policeman N 427.) I produce a certificate of Griffiths former conviction—(readConvicted Feb., 1847, and confined six months.)

SULLIVAN— GUILTY. Aged 18.

GRIFFITHS— GUILTY Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18470816-1903

1903. JOHN MACARTHY was indicted for stealing 1 spoon, value 5s.; the goods of Elizabeth Ryan; having been before convicted of felony.

ELIZABETH RYAN. I am a widow, and live in Lambert-street. Last Tuesday week I lost a spoon—it had been just outside the back window-ledge, in the yard, on the Friday form or Saturday before—I afterwards saw it broken—these broken pieces from my spoon, and the one which was out-side my window—a person could get it by coming over a wall, four or five feet high—which is in a public street.

MARY HALE. I am a widow, and live in Lambert-street—the prisoner used once to board with me. On the 12th of Aug., between eleven and twelve o'clock in the morning, he came to me, and said he had found a spoon in the ruins which are nearly opposite my house—I said, "There is no harm in finding, my lad; go and find the owner, and the reward of that spoon will be better to you than many spoons, for honesty is the best policy"—I laid the spoon in my window, and am sure this is the same—he came to me about two hours afterwards, and said, "Mrs. Hale, I have found an owner for the spoon"—I said, "I am very glad of it"—I let him have it—it was not broken then, only bruised—in about an hour I saw him passing the door, hailed him in, and said, "What have you done with the spoon?"—he said, "Taken it to the owner"—I said, "What may your reward be?"—he said, "4d."

ELIZABETH LARKIN. I am a widow, and live in Lambert-street. I was washing for Mrs. Ryan on Tuesday and Wednesday week last—she told me on the Tuesday that she had missed a spoon, and on 12th of Aug. I heard a talk about a spoon, and I told Mrs. Ryan about it—she told a policeman, and the spoon was found—I had seen the prisoner on Thursday, about eleven o'clock, lurking near the wall, with his cap off, and raking about the dirt in the ruins—it was after the spoon was lost—some houses had been pulled down there—I have seen rubbish thrown there.

DANIEL LYONS (policeman.) On the 13th of Aug., about one o'clock, I went to a room at the back of No. 16, Lambeth-street—I found the prisoner and his brother there—I woke him up, and asked him if he had anything about him—he said, "No"—I searched him, and found the bowl of silver spoon—I asked where the other part was—he said he had not got it, that he picked this part up on the dust-heap in the ruins—he afterwards produced the other part from his trowser's pocket—I asked him where he got it—he said in the dust-heap in the ruins, that he had sold it to Mrs. Hale for 2d., and had got it back again—he afterwards said he had left it there, and got some bread and cheese on it.

Prisoner's Defence. I was raking for a few bones, and saw the spoon on the dust-heap; I laid the spoon a down; she asked me what I wanted for it; I said, "2d.;" she gave it me; a boy afterwards told me the spoon was silver; I went back and got it, thinking it might do me service.

MARY HALE re-examined. I lent him the 2d. to buy something to eat, as he said he was hungry—I knew it was silver—I did not tell him so—he afterwards came, gave me 2d., and took the spoon.

CORNELIUS FOAY (policeman.) I produce a certificate of the prisoner's former conviction—(read—Convicted May, 1845, and confined two months.)

GUILTY. Aged 18.— Confined Twelve Months.

Reference Number: t18470816-1904

1904. ROBERT GRANDY was indicted for stealing 2 Spanish doubloons, value 6l. 8s.; 6 Mexican dollars, 1l. 4s.; 12 Spanish quarter-dollars, 12s.; and 1 five-franc piece, 4s. 2d.; the monies of Matteo Storitza.

(MATTEO STORITZA and ADOLFO MORETE being called did not appear.)

CHARLES SLAKER (policeman K 159.) I was called on board the Monte Video, and saw the prisoner—the mate, whose name I do not know, made an accusation against him—it was a foreign name—he said he should not be able to attend, as the ship was going away—he charged the prisoner with stealing Spanish doubloons—he denied it—I took him into custody, searched him, and found nothing on him—he told the sergeant he had stolen the money, and told me so as well—he said he had stolen the money from the ship—he said it was the mate's and mentioned his name—he went with us—as we passed Mr. Snelley's shop there was some money in the window—he said, "There is some money in that window which looks very much like mine"—we went in—I inquired if Mr. Snelley had bought any foreign money of a sailor—he said he had—I asked if he should know the man again—he said he did not know, but that the prisoner was very much like the man—the prisoner did not say anything—we all left the shop, and went to the station—I afterwards took the prisoner to Arbour-square, where I heard him say, "I have stolen the money from the chest of the ship's mate"—he said he had sold it to Mr. Snelley.

Cross-examined by MR. WILDE. Q. Is this the first time you have thought of this? A. No—I do not know why I did not tell it to the Magistrates' clerk—I might have forgotten it—I have seen sergeant Townson since—I have had no conversation with him about what took place at the station-house.

JOHN LAWSON. I am salesman to Mr. Snelley, a pawnbroker, of High-street, Shadwell. On Monday afternoon I purchased twelve Spanish quarter dollars of a sailor—I cannot positively swear to the prisoner.

EDWARD WANDERER TOWNSON (police-sergeant K.) On the 14th of July, in the afternoon, the prisoner was brought to the station—I sent Slaker to bring a witness—while he was gone the prisoner and prosecutor spoke in a foreign language—the prosecutor said, in broken English, "He says he has taken my money"—I said to the prisoner, "Is that the case?"—he said, "Yes, and I changed twelve quarter dollars round the corner; if you will go with me I will show you where the money is"—he took me to 14, George-street, Commercial-road, where he stated his mother lived, went to a chest, and drew out a purse, which he said contained 17s. and two farthings—I opened it, and said, "Are you aware what you have given me?"—he said, "Yes"—I counted it—it was 6l. 17s. in English money—he said it was Storitza's, the mate's, all but the two farthings—on getting outside the house, he said, "Do you think I shall be transported?"—I said, "I cannot say"—when the charge was taken, the mate said his name was "Matteo Storitza"—he wrote it in my presence, in the charge-room.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he come to you before he went to sea? A. Yes—he said he should make me responsible for the money, and if he came back he should charge the prisoner again—he would have stopped, but would have lost his situation.

MR. WILDE called

FRANCIS PIMOTELLI. I am a licensed victualler, at Wellclose-square—I have known the prisoner since he was a boy—Storitza is a countryman of mine—on the Sunday before this, I saw them on board the ship together, and

had a conversation with them—the prisoner had two Spanish dollars, and two quarter dollars, in a little purse—he had two quarter dollars a month—he asked me how much they were worth in London—I saw that he had money—I afterwards saw him with a Spanish dollar, some Mexican dollars, and two quarter gold doubloons—that was before he went to Mr. Snelley's to change them—I am an Italian—I did not hear any conversation between the prisoner and Storritza about the money—I have known the prisoner from his infancy—he bears a very good character for honesty—Storritza engaged him for the ship at my house.

NOT GUILTY

NEW COURT. Monday, August 23rd, 1847.

PRESENT—Mr. Alderman FARNCOMB; and Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Fifth Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18470816-1905

1905. WILLIAM WELSH was indicated for stealing 1 bed-tick, value 2s. and 2 sheets, 1s. 6d.; the property of John Labouchere and others, his masters; to which he pleaded

GUILTY. Aged 51.— Confined Sir Months.

Reference Number: t18470816-1906

1906. DAVID EDWARDS was indicated for embezzling 7l. 9s. 10d., the monies of Septimus Scott, and others, his masters, to which he pleaded

GUILTY. Aged 39.— Confined Nine Months.

Reference Number: t18470816-1907

1907. HENRY EVANS was indicated for embezzling 2s., the monies of James Newell, his master; to which he pleaded

GUILTY , Aged 15.— Confined Four Months. (There was another indictment against the prisoner.)

Reference Number: t18470816-1908

1908. WILLIAM ALDRIDGE was indicted for embezzling 20s., the money of Frederick Putnam, his master; having been before convicted of felony; to which he pleaded

GUILTY. Aged 16.— Confined Nine Months.

Reference Number: t18470816-1909

1909. CHARLES EVANS was indicted for stealing 15 shirts, value 1l. 2s. 6d.; 2 shifts, 2s. 1 table-cloth, 3s.; 2 pairs of trowsers, 3s.; 2 handkerchiefs, 2s. 1 waistcoat, 1s. 6d.; 2 towels, 1s.; 1 apron, 6d. 1 pillow-case, 6d. and 1 petticoat, 1s.; the property of John Maynard, having been before convicted of felony; to which he pleaded

GUILTY. Aged 18.— Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18470816-1910

1910. SARAH TAYLOR was indicted for staling 1lb. of soap, value 6d.; 1lb. of sugar, 6d.; and 2oz. of tea, 6d.; the property of Francis Virgo Sanderson, her master; to which she pleaded

GUILTY. Aged 18.— Confined Ten Days, it being stated that a person would take her into his employment.

Reference Number: t18470816-1911

1911. GEORGE TINKIN was indicted for embezzlement.

MR. O'BRIEN conducted the Prosecution.

CHARLES WHEATLEY. I knew the prisoner in the service of Mr. Andrew Nicol, a baker—in May, 1846, the prisoner called on me for some money for Mr. Nicol—I paid him 10s. out of a larger sum.

Cross-examined by MR. PARRY. Q. Did you take a receipt for it? A. Yes.

SARAH SALMON. I am the wife of David Salmon—I knew the prisoner by coming as Mr. Nicol's servant—I paid him 1l. 0s. 6d. in May last year on account of Mr. Nicol.

ANDREW NICOL. The prisoner was in my service in May, 1846—he received money for me, and accounted for it—he never accounted in any way for, or paid me these sums—he ought to have paid them on the Sunday following.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you transact business on Sunday morning? A. Yes, if we have not time on Saturday night—he had authority to collect money for me—he was not in the habit of paying himself his wages and handing me the balance—he has done so when I told him—he was given in custody on the 30th of last month—he had asked me on the Saturday before he received this money, to book up his account, but I was very busy, and said he had better go home—his wages were 1l. 0s. 6d. a week.

COURT Q. Did you pay his wages? A. Yes—there was no money due to him on the day he received these sums—they were paid on Monday, and he left me on the Saturday following—he used to account to Mrs. Nicol sometimes—she is not here.

MR. O'BRIEN. Q. How is it you did not give him in charge since June last year? A. I could not find him—he left me without a man.

GUILTY. Aged 35.— Confined Two Months.

Reference Number: t18470816-1912

1912. ELIZABETH PARTRIDGE was indicted for stealing 1 coat, value 17s.; and 1 waistcoat, 3s.; the property of John Adams.

JOHN ADAMS. I lodge in New-court, Marylebone—on the 12th of July I gave the prisoner my coat and wais